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Full text of "History of Douglas and Grant counties, Minnesota : their people, industries, and institutions"

Gc 

977.601 

D74^ 

V.2 

1192546 



GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



1833 01077 1175 



HISTORY 

Douglas and Grant Co unt i es 

Minnesota 

THEIR PEOPLE, INDUSTRIES AND INSTITUTIONS 



CONSTANT LARSON 

Editor-in-Chief 



With Biographical Sketches of Representative Citizens and 
Genealogical Records of Many of the Old Families 





.VOLUME II 


97-7. ^o( 


ILLUSTRATED 

1916 

B. F. BOWEN & COMPANY, Inc. 

Indianapolis, Indiana 



CONTENTS 



> VOLUME I 

DOUGLAS COUNTY 1192546 

(O CHAPTER I— RELATED STATE HISTORY 33 

\j A portion of Minnesota Originally Included in Louisiana Purchase — Indian 

Cessions and Treaties — Territorial Government Establislied — Boundaries — 
Governor Alexander Ramsey — First Territorial Legislature — The Historic 
Council with the Indians at Traverse des Sioux — The Treaty — Indian 
Hunters Cause Trouble — Townsite Speculation — Constitutional Convention — 
First State Legislature — Admission of Minnesota as a State — Aid to Rail- 
roads — Financial Stringency — LTnrest Among the Indians — Massacre of 
1862 — Punishment of the Indians — Subsequent Treaties — A Period of Rapid 
Development — Trouble Because of the State Issue of Railroad Bonds — Settle- 
ment of the Question and Activity in Railroad Building — Diversified Farm- 
ing Interests — Population Statistics — Military Record — Xame — Geography — 
Area — Rivers — Lalvcs — Elevations — Climate — Chronological Flistory of the 
State. 

CHAPTER II— GEOLOGY OF DOUGLAS COUNTY 59 

Location of the County — Area — Svirface Features — Natural Drainage — 
Lakes — Topograph}' — Moraines — Drift and Glacial Deposits — Altitudes — 
Soil — Timber — Geological Structure — Mean Elevation Due to L'nderlying 
Formations — Building Stone — Lime — Aboriginal Earthworks. 

CHAPTER III— THE KEXSIXGTOX RUXE STOXE; AN ANCIENT 

TRAGEDY 72 

White Men in Minnesota Prior to the Discovery by Columbus — The Record 
— Conflicting Views as to the Authenticity of the Rune Stone Found in 
Douglas County — The Discovery — Topography of Surroundings — Examina- 
tion of Stone by Experts — Details of the Inscription — References to the 
Topograph}' of the Region — Where was Vinland? — Characteristics of the 
Stone — Discussion of Its Authenticity — Rune Books — Review of the Find- 
ing of the Stone and Notes on the Record Given by the Inscription — Lin- 
guistic Objections — Collateral Evidence — Resolutions Adopted by the 
Museum Committee of the Minnesota State Historical Society — Investiga- 
tions of Prof. George T. Flom — Bibliography. 

CHAPTER IV— EARLY SETTLEMENT 123 

Great Natural Beauty of the Park Region of Minnesota — Lack of x\bsolute 
Proof of Some Early Historical Statements — The Old Red River Trail — The 



CONTENTS. 

Kinkaid Brothers and Their Settlement at Alexandria — Gradual Growth of 
the Xew Settlement — Other Early Settlements — The First County Govern- 
ment — Development of the Count}' — Effect of News of the Indian Uprising 
on the Early Settlement — Echoes of Pioneer Days — Henry Gager's Stage 
Station — Mosquitoes in Pioneer Times — Brandon Township's First Home- 
stead — First School Houses — Pioneer Reminiscences — Primitive Ways of 
Agriculture — Ivarly Days of the Kailroad— Conditions in the Pioneer Schools 
— Quick anil i:tT<ctive Kemedy for Frostbites. 

C11.\PT1:R \— THE SlUCX outbreak and the old stockade 140 

Causes lor the Sioux Outbreak of 1862 — Story of the Trouble — Every 
Frontier Dwelling a Charnel House — Siege of Ft. Ridgely — Suppression of 
The Sioux — Battles of Birch Coulie and Wood Lake — Pitiful Scenes at Camp 
Release — Punishment of the Guilty — Effect in Douglas County of the 
Uprising — Tragic Death of .Andrew .Austin — The Old Stockade at .Alex- 
andria. 

CHAPTER VI— ORGANIZATION OF DOUGLAS COUNTY 152 

First Civil and Judicial Relations — Legislative Act Creating the County — 
Boundaries — First Meeting of the County Board — County Buildings — Court 
House History — Jails — Population of Douglas County — Naturalization Rec- 
ords — County I'inancial Statement. 

CHAPTER VII— OFFICIALS OF DOUGLAS COUNTY 162 

First Officers — Roster of County Commissioners — Auditors — Treasurers — 
Registers of Deeds — Sheriffs — County Attorneys — Judges of Probate — Sur- 
veyors — Coroners — Clerks of the Court — Court Commissioners — Superin- 
tendents of Schools — Douglas County in the Legislature — Legislative 
.\pportionments, with Roster of Senators and Representatives. 

CHAPTER VIII— TOWNSHIP ORGANIZATION AND EARLY SETTLERS 172 
Civil and Congressional Townships — Osakis Township — Creation — Settle- 
ment — Officials — .Mexandria Township — Creation — First Officials — Settle- 
ment — Present Officials — Holmes City Township — Created — First Election 
— Settlement and Land Entries — Pioneer Life, a Reminiscence — Early Events 
— Present Officials — Brandon Township — Created — Settlement — Officials — • 
— Moe Township — Creation of — Settlers — Officials — Lake Mary Township — 
Establishment — Name — Settlement — Officials — Leaf Valley Township — Crea- 
tion — Settlement — Officials — Millerville Township — Created — Settlement — 
Officials — Evansville Township — Established — First Homesteads — Officials — 
Orange Township — Established — Land Entries — Officials — Ida Township — 
Established — Early Homesteaders — Officials — Carlos Township — Created — 
Settlement— Officials — L'rness Township — F^irst Settlers — Officials — Fludson 
Township — Established — Early Settlers — Present Officers — Belle River 
Township — Establishment and Nanie — Land Entries — First Settlers — Early 
Conditions — Indian History and Tradition— Present Officers of the Town- 
ship — Solcm Township — Creation and Name — Settlers — Present Officers — 
Miltona Township — Creation — Settlement — Officials — LaGrand Township — 
Establishment— Settlement— Present Officers— Spruce Hill Township— 
Establisbnipnt and First Election — Present Officers. 



CHAPTER IX— DEVELOPMENT OF AGRICULTURE 194 

Early Conditions Favorable to the Development of Farms — Timber and 
Water Supply — Location of Douglas County — Surface Features — Land and 
Water Area — Timber — Soil — Climate — Farms and Principal Crops — Corn 
Prizes — Potato Culture — Fruits — Live Stock — Dairying — Rural Mail Deliv- 
ery — Telephones — Good Roads — Douglas County Agricultural Association — 
— Douglas County as a Summer Resort — Registered Farm Names. 

CHAPTER X— TRAVEL AND TRANSPORTATION 211 

^^'onderful Transformation in Transportation System — Blazing of the First 
Roads — Military Trails — Government Road Surveys — The First Railroads and 
Later Lines Which Have Entered the County — County Roads. 

CHAPTER XI— EDUCATIONAL INTERESTS 216 

The Little Log School Houses of Pioneer Days — High Value Placed on 
Education by Early Settlers — Minnesota's Splendid Educational System — 
The County's School System Epitomized — Alexandria City Schools and 
Some of the Early Teachers — Clerks of the School Districts — Teachers of 
Douglas County. 

CHAPTER XII— CHURCHES OF DOUGLAS COUNTY 224 

First Religious Services in the Homes of the Early Settlers — -The Itinerant 
Preacher — First Church Organizations — A List of the Seventy-three 
Churches Incorporated in Douglas County — Methodist Episcopal Churches — 
Congregational Churches — Norwegian Lutheran Churches — Swedish Luthe- 
ran Churches — Swedish Evangelical Lutheran Churches — Swedish Baptist 
Church — German Evangelical Lutheran Church — Catholic Churches — Episco- 
pal Church — Church of Christ, Scientist — Seventh-day .\dventist Church — 
Presbyterian Church. 

CHAPTER XIII— NEWSPAPERS 265 

An Account of the Various Papers, Past and Present, Which Have Been 
Influential in the Advancement of Douglas County. 

CHAPTER XIV— THE BENCH AND BAR 272 

First Attorneys in Douglas County — Later Attorneys — Douglas County 
Judiciary. 

CHAPTER XV— THE MEDICAL PROFESSION 275 

Self-reliance of Early Settlers in Times of Sickness— The First Physicians 
in Douglas Count)- — .\lexandria Physicians — Osakis Physicians and Those 
Elsewhere in the County — Doctors of Dental Surgery. 

CHAPTER XVI— BANKS AND BANKING 280 

High Interest Rate in Early Days— A Record of the Banks at Alexandria, 
Osakis, Evansville, Brandon, Carlos, Garfield, Nelson, Kensington, Forada, 
Melba and Millerville. 

CHAPTER XVII— MILITARY ANNALS 286 

Soldiers Monument— Douglas County's Loyalty in the Civil War— Grand 
Army of the Republic— The Spanish-American War. 

CHAPTER XVIII— FRATERNAL AND BENEVOLENT SOCIETIES 291 

The Spirit of Fraternity .\mong the Pioneers— The First Lodges in the 



COXTl-NTS. 

County — Independent Order of Odd Fellows — Ancient Order of United 
Workmen — Kniphts of Pythias — Modern Woodmen of America — Scandi- 
navian Mutual Aid Association Siloah — Independent Order of Good Temp- 
lars — Woman's Christian Temperance Union — Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons — Brotherhood of American Yeonu n — Modern lirothcrhood of Amer- 
ica — Douglas County Humane Society. 

CHAPTFR XIX— ALEXANDRIA, THE COUNTY SEAT 300 

Beautiful for Location — Modern Improvements — In the Days of the Begin- 
ning — Subsequent Development — The City Government — Elections and Offi- 
cials of the City — The Postoffice — Commercial and Industrial Concerns — 
The Commercial Club — Free Public Library. 

CHAPTER XX— INCORPORATED TOWNS AND VILLAGES 314 

Epitomized History of Osakis, Touching Its Location, Early Record, First 
Events, Business Interests, Public Utilities, Manufacturing Industries, Church 
and Fraternal Societies, Commercial Club. Postoffice, Educational Advan- 
tages and Homes — Evansville, Brandon, Holmes City, Nelson, Garfield, 
Melby, Forada, Miltona, Millcrsville, Carlos and Kensington. 

CHAPTER- XXI— SIDELIGHTS ON COUNTY HISTORY 331 

Home-coming Week at Alexandria — Memories of Other Days, a Cluster of 
Reminiscences — William Everett Hicks, the Man Who Started .Alexandria 
Going — Senator Knute Nelson, .Alexandria's "Grand Old Man" — .Alexandria's 
First Village President^First Commercial Association Incorporated — The 
Celebrated Paulson Case — Reminiscences by a First Settler — .An Early Trav- 
eler's Impressions — .An Impressionist's View of Alexandria — Something 
-About Mules and Mule Drivers — Glimpses of Claim-stakes and Claim- 
shanties — The .\pproach to .Alexandria — Hospitality of the Wilderness — The 
Sims Brother.s— Old People's Home— Early Days Near Nelson. 



GRANT COUNTY 

CHAI'TER I— GEOLOGY AND TOPOGR.Al'HY 361 

Location — .Area — Surface Features — Drainage — Lakes — Elevations — Soil — 
Timber — Geological Structure — Lake Agassiz — Building Stone — Lime — Bricks 
— .Aboriginal Earthworks. 

CHAPTER II— THE INDIAN OL'TBREAK .\ND THE STOCKADE 370 

Settlement Deferred Because of the Indian Unrest in the Early Sixties — 
Causes of the Outbreak — First Bloodshed — .Ambuscade at Redwood Ferry — 
.Attack on New Ulm — Battle of Birch Coulie and at Wood Lake — Events in 
Grant County During the Outbreak — The Old Stockade — Expeditions 
Throu.ijh Grant County. 

CI1.\I'TI:R III— E.\RLY settlement 376 

ICdward Grithn, the F'irst White Resident of Grant County — Some of the 
First Settlers — Pioneer Conditions — Settlement, by Townships, and Interest- 
ing Incidents in Connection Therewith. 



CHAPTER IV— ORGAXIZATIOX OF GRAXT COUXTY iS7 

Legislative Act Establishing the County — Locating the County Seat — Xame 
of the County — First Commissioners and Some of Their Early Acts — Com- 
missioner Districts Established — The Second Board — First County Court 
House — County-seat Contest — The Present Court' House — Population Statis- 
tics — Xaturalization Statistics — County Finances. 

CHAPTER V— OFFICL\LS OF GRAXT COUXTY 399 

County Commissioners — Auditors — Treasurers — Registers of Deeds — Sher- 
iffs — County Attorneys — ^Judges of Probate — Surveyors — Coroners — Clerks 
of the Court — Court Commissioners — Superintendents of Schools — Grant 
County in the Legislature — Senators and Representatives — Apportionments. 

CHAPTER VI— TOWXSHIP ORGAXIZATIOX 409 

An Account of the Organization, First Elections, First and Present Officers, 
and Other Interesting Facts in the Townships of Lien, Logan. Elk Lake, 
Pelican Lake, Elbow Lake, Ponime de Terre, Erdahl. Stony Crook, Land, 
Roseville, Macsville, Gorton, Delaware, Lawrence, Sanford and Xorth 
Ottawa. 

CHAPTER VII— DEVELOPMEXT OF AGRICULTURE 419 

Pioneers Favored by Wonderful Xatural Resources — Getting Started on the 
Pioneer Farm — Some Early Difficulties — Evolution of Farm Machinery — 
Tree Planting — Diversified Farming — Statistics of Production — Modern 
Farm Conditions — County Agricultural Agent — Farmers' Clubs — Recorded 
Farm Xames — Grant County Agricultural Association. 

CHAPTER \'III— TRAVEL AXD TRAXSPORTATIOX 427 

Trails, the First Routes of Travel — The First Roads — Old Stage Routes — 
Trend of Early Settlement — Laying Out the Early \\'agon Roa'ds — State 
Highway Commission — Railroads in Grant County. 

CHAPTER IX— SCHOOLS OF GRAXT COUXTY 432 

High Ideals of the Pioneers — First School Houses — School Districts Estab- 
lished — Sketch of the Early Schools by a Pioneer — Some of the Early School 
Houses — Pioneer School Conditions — Teachers of 1896 — Development of 
School System — Aims of the Modern School — Teachers for 1916 — School 
District Officers — Financial Statement. 

CHAPTER X— CHURCHES OF GRAXT COUXTY 442 

Synod Lutheran Churches— Rev. Gullik M. Erdahl— Swedish Evangelical 
Lutheran Churches — Xorwegian L'nited Lutheran Church — Presbyterian 
Church — Rev. James Godward — Methodist Churches — Catholic Churclies — 
Seventh-Day Adventist Church — Other Church Incorporations. 

CHAPTER XI— XEWSPAPERS OF GRAXT COUXTY 455 

Story of Journalistic Efforts Which Have Appeared in Grant County and of 
the Papers Xow in Existence Here. 

CHAPTER XII— THE BEXCH AXD BAR 458 

Early Judicial Jurisdiction of Grant County — Judges — Attorneys— Story of 
the First Court Session. 



CONTENTS. 

CIIAI'TKR XIII-TIIIC MHDICAL PROFESSION 461 

Sliurp Contrast Between Early Conditions and Those of Today— First Physi- 
cians in the County— Physicians Who Have Practiced at Herman, Elbow 
Lake, Ashby, Wendell. Barrett and Hoffman— Grant County Dentists- 
Veterinary Surgeons. 

CIIAPTl'R .\I\-I1AXKS OF GRANT COUNTY 466 

Iliurh Interi'Sl Kates in Early Days— A Brief History of Each of the Finan- 
cial Institutions in Herman, Elbow Lake, Hoffman, Ashby, Wendell, Nor- 
crnss. Barrett and Erdahl. 

ciiArri-:K x\'— military AXNALS 472 

(irand Army of the Repulilic — Many Veterans Among the Early Settlers. 

CHAPTER XVI— FR.KTlCkXAl. AXD BENEVOLENT SOCIETIES 474 

.Ancient Free and .Accepted Masons— Order of the Eastern Star— Knights 
of Pythias— Independent Order of Odd Fellows — Modern Woodmen of 
America — Brotherhood of American Yeomen — Degree of Honor. 

CHAPTER XVII— ELBOW LAKE, THE COUNTY SEAT 481 

Platted — Location — Selection as County Seat — First Election — Municipal 
Officers — Slow Early Growth — Postoflfice — Schools — Business Directory — 
Creamery Interests — Telephones — Concert Band. 

CHAPTER XVIII— VILLAGES OF GRANT COUNTY 488 

Herman — Settlement — Platting — First Officers — Present Officers — Schools — 
Community Social Club — Band — Business Interests — Hoffman — Beginning 
of — First Business Men — First and Present Officers — Education — Religious 
Organizations — Ladies' Band — Present Business Interests — Wendell — Begin- 
ning of and Early Events — Postoffice — Incorporation — First and Present 
Officer^ — Schools — Public Improvements — Business Directory — Ashby — 
Early Records Destroyed — Officers — Schools — Postoffice— First Merchants 
— Present Business Interests — Barrett — Original Plat — Incorporation — First 
and Present Officers — Manufacturing Industries — Postoffice — Business Inter- 
ests — Norcross — Hereford — Erdahl — Pommc dc Terre — Cancstorp. 

CHAPTER XIX— SIDELIGHTS ON COUNTY HISTORY 500 

County-seat Contest — "A Crow Feast" — "An Eventful Day" — "News from 
Grant County" — -"Kncient Stone Carving — Indian Scare of 1876 — Grant County 
Old Settlers' Association — A Pioneer of Pioneers — Thomas C. Hodgson. 



HISTORICAL INDEX 



VOLUME I 
DOUGLAS COUNTY 



Aboriginal Earthworks 

Acreage of Farms 

Agricultural Association 

Agriculture. Development of 

Agriculture. Primitive 

Alexandria — 

Attractiveness of 

Banks 

Beginning of 

Business Interests 

Churches^-224, 227, 229, 230, 231, 
233, 235, 246, 247. 251. 253. 254, 

City Buildings 

City Government 

Elections 

First Merchants 

Growth of 126, 

High School 

Home-coming \\'eek 

Impressionist's View of 

Improvements 

Incorporation as \"illage 

Indian Scare 

Kinkaid, Alexander 

Lawyers 

Library 

Lodges 287, 291. 292. 294. 

Lot Sales 

Mail Routes. Early 

Mayors 

Merchants 

Newspapers, 

Officials, Roster of 

Old People's Home 

Physicians 

Population 158 



312 
296 
126 
126 
307 
309 
265 
304 
357 
275 
300 



Alexandria — Con. 

Postoffice History 126, 308 

President, First \'illage 343 

Reminiscences 333, 346 

Roster of Officials 304 

Schools 218 

Settlement 124. 127, 132 

Stockade 134. 150 

Townsite Company 126 

Village Council 303 

Alexandria Township — 

Altitude 66 

Churches --' 

Officers, First 153. 173 

Officers, Present 174 

Organization 1:^3. 173 

Population 158 

Settlement 173 

Topography 6o 

Altitudes in County 6:1 

Altitudes in the State 49 

Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 295 
Ancient Order of L'nited Workmen 292 

Animals. Farm 201 

Apportionments. Legislative 169 

Area of County 59 

Area of the State 47 

Attorneys 272 

Auditors. County 153, 164 

Austin, Andrew, Death of 149 

B 

Banks and Banking 280 

Baptist Church 111, 228, 229, 230 

Belle River Township- 
Altitude 65 

Churches 234, 259 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



ItiHr River Tcwiiship— Con. 

Indians 1S9 

Mills. Early li^*^' 

Officers IW 

Organization If"'*^ 

Population 1-"''^ 

Settlement l^^'"^ 

Bench and Bar ^"i- 

Bencvolent Societies 287. 291 

Bcthcsda Society -'i- 

Boundarics of County 1."'2 

Brandon — 

Banks 2« 

Business Interests 324 

Churches 230, 234, 323 

Incorporation 324 

Indian Scare 149 

Lawyers 273 

Lodges 292 

Xew.spapers 269, 271 

Officials 324 

Physicians 278 

Population LS9 

Schools 324 

Settlement 130, Zn 

Stage Station, Early 323 

Brandon Township — 

Birth, First 133 

Gager, Henry 133 

Homestead, First 135 

Officers 179 

( )rganization 178 

Population 158 

Settlement 133, 179 

Building Stone 71 



c 

arlos — 

Banks — - 283 

Business Interests 329 

Churches 234, 252, 259 

Plat 329 

Population 159, 329 

arlos Township — 

Altitude 66 

Churches 232, 233 

Officers 185 

Organization 185 



Carlos Township — Con. 

Settlement 18.5 

Topography 65 

Catholic Church 232, 233, 234, 2.54 

Cereal Crops 198 

Chippewa (see Brandon) —130, 134. 149 

Chippewa Township 66 

Chiropractor , 279 

Chronological History of Minnesota 50 

Church of Christ, Scientist 263 

Churches 224 

Claim-stakes and Claim-shanties — 351 

Clerks of the Court 153, 167 

Clerks of School Districts 221 

Climate of Minnesota 49 

Commissioners, County 161 

Commissioners, County, First 129 

Commissioners, Court 167 

Congregational Church_.224, 227, 231, 238 

Constitution of State .?9 

Corn as a Crop 199 

Coroners 153, 167 

County .\ttorncys 153. 166 

County .\uditors 153, 164 

County Boundaries 152 

County Pniildings 153 

County Commissioners, First 129 

Count}' Commissioners, Roster of 161 

County h'inanees 161 

County Government, First 129 

County Offices. First 1.54 

County Officials, Roster of 161 

County Organized 152 

County Roads 214 

County School Superintendents — 1 168 

County School System 217 

County Surveyors 153, 166 

County Treasurers 153, 164 

Coureurs des Bois, the 211 

Court, Clerks of the 153, 167 

Court Commissioners 167 

Court House History 154 

Creameries 200 

Crops. I'arm 198 

D 

Daughters of Rebekah 297 

Dentists 278 

Diversified harming Interests 46 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



Doctors 275 

Douglas County Agricultural Ass'n. 201 
Douglas County Humane Society.- 299 
Drainage 195 

E 

Early Days near Xelson 357 

Early Families 127 

Early Settlement of County 123 

Earthworks 71 

Education 216 

Election, First in County 129 

Episcopal Church 262 

Evangelical Association 229. 231 

Evangelical Lutheran Church 

217. 229, 230, lii. 234, 253 

Evansville— 

Banks 282 

Business Interests 323 

Churches 226, 229. 

231. 2ii. 234. 246. 247. 248. 264. ill 

Improvements i22 

Incorporation 322 

Indian Scare 149 

Lawyers l^i 

Location 321 

Lodges 295. i22 

Xcwspapcrs 271 

Officials i2i 

Paulson Case 345 

Physicians 278 

Population 159 

Settlement 130 

Stage Station, Early i22 

Evansville Township — 

Altitude 66 

Churches 248, 250 

Officers 184 

Organization 183 

Population 159 

Settlement 184 

F 

Fair Association 201 

Families, Early 127 

Farm Acreage 197 

Farm Animals 201 

Farm Xames. Registered 204 



Farmers Clubs 

Farming Interests, Diversified 

Farms, Xumber of 

Financial Statement, County .____. 

First County Government 

Forada 159, 264. 284, 

Fraternal Orders 2^7. 

Freemasonry _.. 

Free Methodist Church 230, 

Frostbites, Pioneer Cure for 



Garfield — 

Banks 

Business Interests 
Churches 



_-234, 



X^ 



Officials 

Population 

Postoffice 

Geography of the State 

Geology of Douglas County 59, 

German Evangelical Luth. Church__ 

Grains 

Grand Army of the Republic 

Gregory. P. L. 129, 

Growing Season 

Growth of the State 



H 

Hicks, William E. 340 

Holmes City — 

Business Interests 325 

Churches— 230, 234. 248, 251, 252, 325 

Indian Scare 149 

Location 325 

Lodges 293 

Settlement 132 

Holmes City Township — 

Altitude 66 

Churches 247, 248 

Officers 178 

Organization ; 153, 174 

Pioneer Life 175 

Population L 159 

Recollections of 178 

Settlement 124, 174 

Topography ._ 65 

Home-coming, A 331 



A I. IXDKX. 



lirllc KivtT Townshii.— I on. 

Indiiins ^^'' 

Mills, Karly 1^^" 

Officers 1"" 

Organization l*"'"^ 

I'opulation I-"'''"' 

Settlement •■'^'"^ 

Bench and Bar -'- 

Benevolent Societies 287. 291 

Rctliesda Society 232 

r.oundnrics of C"ounty 1?2 

Business Interests 324 

Churches 230, 234, .Wr' 

Incorporation -^24 

Indian Scare 149 

Lawyers 2/3 

Lodges 292 

Newspapers 269, 271 

Officials 324 

Physicians 278 

I'opulation l-"i9 

Schools 324 

Settlement 130, 323 

Stage Station, Early 323 

Brandon Township — 

Birth, First 133 

Gager, Henry ^^-^ 

Homestead, First 135 

Officers 179 

Organization 178 

Population 158 

Settlement 133, 179 

lluildiuR Stone 71 

c 

Carlos— 

Banks 283 

Business Interests 329 

Churches 234, 252, 259 

Plat 329 

I'opulation 159, 329 

Carlos Township — 

Altitude 66 

Churches 232, 233 

Officers 185 

Organization 185 



Setlleiiunl 1K5 

Topography 65 

1 ulholic Church 232, 233, 234, 254 

Crr.al Crops 198 

Chipifewa (ser r.randon ) _-130. 134, 149 

Chipprua Township 66 

Chiropractor 279 

t hronological History of Minnesota 50 

Cluirch of Ciirist, Scientist 263 

Churches 224 

llaim-stakes and Claim-shanties — 351 

Clerks of the Court 153, 167 

Clerks of School Districts 221 

Climate of Minnesota 49 

Commissioners, County 161 

Commissioners, County, First 129 

Commissioners, Court 167 

congregational Church-224, 227, 231, 238 

(."onstitution of State 39 

Corn as a Crop 199 

Coroners 153, 167 

County .Attorneys 153, 166 

County Auditors 153, 164 

County Boundaries 152 

I'ounty Buildings 153 

County Commissioners, First 129 

County Commissioners, Roster of — 161 

County 1-inances 161 

County (Jovornment, First 129 

County Offices. First 154 

County Officials, Roster of 161 

County Organized 152 

County Roads 214 

County School Superintendents --_! 16S 

County School System 217 

County Surveyors 153, 166 

County Treasurers 153, 164 

Courcurs des Bois, the 211 

Court, Clerks of the 153, 167 

Court Commissioners 167 

Court House History 154 

Creameries 200 

Crops. I'arm 198 

D 

Dau.yhters of Rebekah 297 

Dentists 278 

Diversilied I'arming Interests 46 



IIISTOP.ICAL INDEX. 



Doctors -7? 

Douglas County Agricultural Ass'n. 201 

Douglas County Humane Society.- 299 

Drainage 19? 

E 

Early Days near Xclson 357 

Early Families 127 

Early Settlement of County 123 

Earthworks 71 

Education 216 

Election, First in County 129 

Episcopal Church 262 

Evangelical Association 229. 231 

Evangelical Lutheran Church 

m. 229. 230, 2.M. 234, 253 

Evansville— 

Banks 282 

Business Interests 323 

Churches 226, 229. 

231, 233, 234, 246, 247, 248, 264, 322 

Improvements 322 

Incorporation 322 

Indian Scare 149 

Lawyers -73 

Location 321 

Lodges 295, 322 

Newspapers 271 

Officials 323 

Paulson Case 34.t 

Physicians 278 

Population 159 

Settlement 130 

Stage Station, Early 322 

Evansville Township- 
Altitude 66 

Churches 248, 250 

Officers 184 

Organization 183 

Population 159 

Settlement 184 

F 

Fair Association 201 

F'amilies, Early 127 

Farm Acreage 197 

Farm Animals 201 

Farm Xames, Registered 204 



l''arnu-rs Clubs 201 

Farming Interests. Diversified 46 

Farms, Nimiber of 197 

Financial Statement, County 161 

[•"irst County Government 129 

Forada 159, 264, 284, 328 

Fraternal Orders 287. 291 

F'reemasonry 295 

Free Methodist Church 230, 231 

Frostbites, Pioneer Cure for 139 

G 
Gartield— 

Banks 283 

Business Interests 327 

Churches 234, 327 

Xame 327 

Officials 327 

Population 159 

Postoffice 327 

Geograph}- of the State 47 

Geology of Douglas County 59, 66 

German Evangelical Luth. Church — 252 

Grains 198 

Grand Army of the Republic 287 

Gregory, P. L. 129, 152 

Growing Season 197 

Growtli of the State : 44 

H 

Hicks, William E. 340 

Holmes City — 

Business Interests 325 

Churches- 230. 234. 248. 251, 252, 325 

Indian Scare 149 

Location 325 

Lodges 293 

Settlement 132 

Holmes City Township — 

Altitude 66 

Churches 247, 248 

Officers 178 

Organization ; 153, 174 

Pioneer Life 175 

Population :: 159 

Recollections of 178 

Settlement 124, 174 

Topography 65 

Home-coming, A 331 



TIISTORICAL INDELX. 



Hospitality, Early 355 

Hudson Township — 

Altitude 66 

Officers 187 

Orjjanization 1S7 

Population 159 

Settlement 130, 187 

Topography • 65 

Humane Society 299 

I 
Ida Township — 

Altitude 66 

Churches 227, 228, 231, 248 

Moraines 64 

Officers 185 

Organization 185 

Population 159 

Settlem,ent 128, 185 

Incorporated Churches 224 

Incorporated Towns 314 

Independent Order of Good Temp- 
lars 293 

Independent Order of Odd Fellows 

291, 292, 296 

Indian Hunters. Trouble with 37 

Indian Outbreak 140 

Indian Treaties 33 

Indian Unrest 40 

J 

Jail History 156 

Judges 2/3 

Judges of Probate 130, 152, 153, 166 

Judiciary of Douglas County 273 

K 
Kensington — 

Banks 284 

Business Interests 329 

Churches 233 

Location 329 

Plat 329 

Population 159 

Kensington Rune Stone Tl 

Kinkaid Brothers 124, 125 

Knights of Pythias 292 



L 

LaCirand Township — 

Altitude 66 

Churches 230 

Officers 192 

Organization 192 

Population 159 

Settlement 192 

Topography 65 

Lake Mary Township — 

Altitude 66 

Officers 181 

Organization 181 

Population 159 

Settlement 181 

Topography 65 

Lakes of Minnesota 48 

Lakes of the County 59 

Land Area 195 

Lawyers 211 

Leaf Valley Township — 

Altitude (^ 

Churches 226, 230 

Officers 181 

Organization 181 

Population 159 

Settlement 181 

Legal Profession 272 

Legislative Apportionments 169 

, Legislators 168 

Lime 71 

Live Stock 201 

Location of County 59 

Location of Douglas County 194 

Lodges 287, 291 

Lund Township — 

Altitude — • 66 

Churches 228, 232, 248, 249 

Officers 191 

Moraines 63 

Organization 191 

Population 159 

Settlement 191 

M 

Masonic Order 295 

Massacre of 1862 42 

Medical Profession 275 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



Melby 284, 328 

Methodist Episcopal Church 224,226, 235 

Military Annals 286 

Military Record of State 46 

Military Trails 212 

Millerville — 

Banks 284 

Business Interests 329 

Churches 233, 257 

First Things 329 

Plat 329 

Population 159 

Millerville Township- 
Altitude 65 

Moraines 63 

Officers 183 

Organization 182 

Population 159 

Settlement 135, 182 

Miltona 328 

Miltona Township- 
Altitude 66 

Officers - 191 

Organization 190 

Population 159 

Settlement 191 

Modern Brotherhood of America 298 

Modern Woodmen of America 293 

Moe Township — 

Altitude 66 

Churches 227, 228, 230, 233, 246 

Moraines 63 

Officers 180 

Organization 179 

Population 159 

Settlement 180 

Moraines 63 

Mosquitoes 133, 134 

N 

Name of the State 47 

Nationality of Citizens 197 

Naturalization Records 159 

Nelson — 

Banks 284 

Business Interests 326 

Early Days 357 

First Things 325 

Incorporation 325 



Nelson— Con. 

Plat 325 

Postoffice 325 

Population 159 

School 326 

W. C. T. U 326 

Nelson, Senator Knute 342 

Newspapers 265 

Norwegian-Danish Evan. Luth. Ch.- 228 

Norwegian Evangelical Church 226 

Norwegian Evan. Luth. CInirch 

227, 229, 230 

Norwegian Lutheran Church 246 

O 

Officers, First County 129 

Officials of County 162 

Ohman, Olaf 72, 76, 86, 88 

Old People's Home 357 

Old Red River Trail 124 

Orange Township — 

Altitude 66 

Commercial Association 344 

Officers 184 

Organization 184 

Population 159 

Settlement 184 

Topography 65 

Organization of County 152 

Organization of Townships 172 

Osakis — 

Band 344 

Banks 281 

Business Interests 315 

Churches 

224, 227, 229, 231, 232, 255, 264, 319 

Commercial Club 319 

Creamery 318 

F'armcrs Co-operative Assn 344 

First Events 315 

Fires 315 

High School _• 217 

Homes, A City of 321 

Improvements 317 

Incorporation 315 

Lawyers 273 

Location 314 

Lodges 289, 295, 319 

Mail Service 320 



HISTOIUCAI. INDEX. 



Osakis— 

Manufacturin« Iiuhislrics 31S 

Name --- .?14 

Newspapers -~l 

Officials 315 

Physicians -276 

Plat 314 

Population 159, 31" 

Postofficc 320 

Professional Interests 315 

Public rtilitics 318 

Schools 320 

Settl.iiient 130. 314 

Osakis Township — 

Altitude (>(' 

Churches 228. 248 

Name 172 

Officers. First 153. 172 

Officers. Present 173 

Organization 153, 172 

Population 159 

Settlement 172 

Toposraphy f>5 

Ostiopathy 279 

P 

Patriarchs Militant 296 

Paulson Case, the Celebrated 345 

Physicians 275 

Pioneer Days, Echoes of 132. 136 

Pioneer Schools, Conditions in 138 

Population of County 158. 197 

Population of the State 46 

Potatoes 199 

Precipitation 197 

Presbyterian Church 231, 234, 264 

Press, the 265 

Probate Judges 130, 152, 153, 166 

Products. Farm 198 

R 

k.iilroad lionds 39 

Railroad, the First 213 

Railroads. Early Days on 138 

Rainfall 197 

Red Kivcr Trail 124 

Reuisterod I'arm Xames 204 



R.wi.sters ,,l Deeds 129. 152. 1.5.i, 165 

Related Stale History 33 

Religious Societies 224 

Reminiscences 132. 136. 333, 346 

Representatives 168 

Rivers 4S 

Roads. County 214 

Roster of County Officials I6l 

Rune Stone, Kensington 72 

Rural Free Deliverv 201 



Scandinavian Christian I'ree Church 233 
Scandinavian I^van. Luth. Church 

228, 232 

Scandinavian l'"rec Church of God-. 233 

Scandinavian Mut. Aid Assn 293 

School Districts, Clerks of 221 

.School Houses, First 136 

School Superintendents, County 168 

Schools 216 

.Schools. Pioneer, Conditions in 138 

Senators, State 168 

Settlement of County 123 

Seventh-Day Advcntist Church _-231. 263 

Sheriffs ...-129, 152. 153, 165 

Sheriff's Residence 1 1.58 

Sidelights 331 

Sims Brothers 356 

-Sioux Indians, Murders by 43 

Sioux Outbreak 140 

Soil 66, 196 

Soldiers Monument 286 

.Solem Township — 

Altitude 66 

Churches 227, 229, 248 

Moraines 63 

Officers 190 

Organization 190 

Population 159 

Rune Stone 72 

Settlement 190 

Spanish-American War 289 

Spruce Hill .Township — 

.\Ititudc 65 

Churches 228, 231, 234, 248, 249 

Moraines 63, 67 

Officers 193 

Organization 192 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



Spruce Mill Tcwnship— 

Population 159 

Settlement 192 

Stage Routes. Early 212 

State Constitution 39 

State Senators 168 

Stockade. Old 140 

Summer Resorts 203 

Superintendents of School 168 

Surface" Features 59 

Surveyors. County 153. 166 

Swedish Baptist Church— 229, 230. 

234, 251 

Swedish Evangelical Church 

225, 228. 229. 232 

Swedish Evan. Luth. Church 

229, 230. 231. 2i3. 234. 250 

Swedish Lutheran Church 247 

T 

Teachers of Douglas County 22i 

Temperature 196 

Terminal Moraines 67 

Territorial Government 34 

Timber 66, 195 

Topography of tlie County 63 

Towns 314 

Township Organization 172 

Townsite Speculation 38 

Trading Posts 211 



Trails. Early 124 

Trails, the First 211 

Transportation 211 

Treasurers, County 153, 164 

Treaties with Indians 33 

l"nion Church Society 232 

L'nion Religious Society 229 

L'rness Township — 

-\ltitudc 66 

Churches 230, 24S. 250 

Lodges 295 

Officers 187 

Organization 186 

Population 159 

Settlement 186 

V 

\'alue of Farm Land 197 

^'egetable Products 199 

\"illages 314 

W 

Water Area 195 

Weather Records. 196 

\\"oman's Christian Temperance 
Union 294 



GRANT COUNTY 



■.\ Crow Feast" 

\astad ., 

\boriginal Earthworks 

Agricultural Agent. County 

Agricultural Association 

Agriculture. Development of 

Altitudes 

An Eventful Day 

Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. 

Ancient Stone Carving 

Apportionments, Legislative 

Area of County 

Assessment Districts, First 



-\ttorncys 458 

502 Auditors, County 389, 401 

442 Ashby— 

369 Altitude 362 

423 Banks 468, 470 

425 Business Interests 495 

419 Churches 447 

362 Farmers' Club 424 

500 Location 494 

474 Lodges 472. 479 

506 Lawyers 459 

406 Newspapers l 456 

361 Officials 494 

389 Physicians 463 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



Ashliy— Con. 

I'opulation 396 

Postoflice 495 

School District Officers 438 

Schools 494 

Teachers 437 



Hanks an.l Uankinj; 466 

liaptist Church 454 

Barrett- 
Banks 470. 471 

Business Interests 497 

Churches 454 

Farmers' Club 424 

Incorporation 496 

Location 496 

Lodges 477, 479 

Manufacturing Industries 496 

Officials 4% 

Physicians 464 

Platted 496 

Population 396 

Postoffice 497 

School District Officers 439 

Teachers 437 

Beaches 365 , 

Bench and Bar 458 

Benevolent Societies 474 

Brick-making 369 

Bridges, Early -- 428 

Brotherhood of American Yeomen. 479 

Brown. Henry 508 

T.uilding Stone 367 



Canestorp 499 

Catholic Church 452 

Cereal Crops 422 

Christian Reform Church 454 

Church of God 454 

Churches of Grant County 442 

Clerks of the Court 4(M 

Commissioner Districts 390, 400 

Commissioners, County, First 387 

Commissioners, County, List of 

387, 389, 391, .W9 

Coroners 404 



County Auriculuiral A.i^ent 423 

County .\ttorneys 389, 403 

County .Auditors 389, 401 

County Commissioners, First 387 

County Commissioners, List of 

387, 389, 391, 399 

County Finances 397 

County Officers, First 389 

County-seat Contest 392, 500 

County Seat Located 387, 389 

County Surveyors 404 

County Treasurers 389, 401 

Court Commissioners 405 

Court. First Sessions of 460 

Court House, First 391 

Court House, Present 394 

Crop Statistics 422 

Crops, Early 420 



Degree of Honor 480 

Delaware Township- 
Altitude 362 

Geology 367 

Xame 416 

Officers 416 

Organization 416 

Population 396 

Roads, Early 385 

School District Officers 438 

Schools 432 

Settlement 385 

Dentists 464 

Development of School System 435 

District Court 460 

Diversified Farming 421 

Doctors 461 

Drainage of County 361 



Early Difficulties 420 

Early Settlement, Routes of 428 

Earthworks, Aboriginal 369 

Eastern Star, Order of the 475 

Education 432 

Elbow Lake — 

Ancient Stone 506 

Band 487 

Banks 467 



HISTORKAT. INDEX. 



Elbow Lake— Con. 




48 i 




—44 


4,445,447, 
392 


4=;^ 


Court Houses . 




, 394 

486 








464 


Early Growth 
Election, First 
Farmers' Clubs 
Growth 






. 482 

. 481 

. 424 

481 


Improvements - 






. 482 

4sq 








■181 


Lodges 


._474. 476, 


478, 479 


, 480 
486 








48' 








46' 


Platted 




• 


4S1 








W6 




TTorl,. 




X/?- 


Postoffice History 

Public Utilities 

School District Officers- 
Schools 




482 
482 
437 
48^ 






— 437, 


484 








486 


Elbow Lake Tow 
Altitude 


nship — 




^6' 


Churches 

Farmers' Clubs 
Election, First - 
First Death 




442, 


, 443 
424 
412 
381 


First Religious 


Service- 




, 381 
367 


Officials 






41^ 


Organization _. 
Population 






. 411 
306 


School District Officcrs.. 
School. First 




. 438 
. 381 


Settlement 




ill 


. 380 
^6' 


Elk Lake Townsh 
\ltitudc 


ip— 




362 


Churches 






44^ 








^6t 


Mill, Early 






^81 


Officers 






4in 








410 


Population 






. 396 



Elk Lake Townsbij) — Con. 

School District Officers 437 

Schools 432, 4.33 

Settlement 376, 377, 381 

Roads, Early 381, 42') 

Erdahl— 

Banks 471 

Business Interests 498 

Churches 454 

Farmers' Club 424 

Location _• 498 

Plat - 498 

School District Officers 440 

Erdahl, Rev. Gullik M 444 

Erdahl Township — 

-Altitude K^2 

Lime 367 

Moraines 364 

Xanic 412 

Officials 412 

Organization 412 

School District Officers 437 

Schools 432 

Settlement 384 

Population 396 

Evan.gelioal Lutheran Church 446 

F 

Fairs, -Annual 426 

Farm Conditions, Modern 422 

Farm Machinery, Evolution of 421 

Farm Xames 424 

Farm Production 422 

Farmers' Clubs 423 

Farming Interests 419 

Finances of County 397 

First County Commissioners 387 

First House in County 376 

First Session of Court 460 

l-Vatcrnal Orders 474 

Freemasons 474 

G 

Geological Structure 364 

German Evan. Luth. Church 454 

German Reformed Church 454 

Glacial Drift 364 

Godward, Rev. James 448 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



(iorton Townsliip— 

Churches -^-^-^ 

Early Conditions •5''^'' 

Geology ^^' 

Officials -H5 

Organization ■♦'-■' 

Population •39'' 

School District Officers 438 

Schools •*3.' 

Settlement -5^'' 

Government Road* 373 

Grains _•- 422 

Grand Army of the Republic 472 

Oant Gountv Agricultural Associa- 
tion 425 

II 

Hereford— 

Business Interests 49.S 

Churches 451. 454 

Location 49.S 

Name 498 

Platted 49.-; 

Herman — 

.-Mtitude 362 

Band 41-9 

Banks 466, 468 

Bi'siness Interests 489 

Churches 442, 445, 451, 452, 453, 454 

Community Social Club 489 

County-seat Contest 393 

Dentists 464 

Farmers' Club 424 

Incorporation 488 

Laid Out .''S2, 488 

Lawyers 458 

Lodges 473, 474, 47ri, 477, 479 

.Newspapers 455 

Officials 488 

Physicians 461 

Population 396 

Roads, Early 429 

School District Officers 437 

Schools 489 

Teachers 436 

Highway Commission, State 43(1 

Hodgson, Thomas C, 508 

Hoffman — 

Ranks 468, 471) 



llolTman— Con. 

Business Interests 491 

(. hurchcs 445, 453 

l'"armers' Club 424 

Incorporation 49t) 

Ladies' Band 491 

Location 490 

Merchants, First 490 

.Newspapers 457 

Officials 491 

Physicians 464 

Platted 49() 

Population 396 

School District Officers 439 

Schools 491 

Teachers 437 

1 

Independent (Jrder of Odd Fellows-^ 476 

Indian Scare of 1876 507 

Indian Trails 427 

Indian Troubles 370 

J 

Judges 458 

Judges of Probate 389. 403 

Judicial Districts 458 

K 
Kniyhts ..I I'ytbias 47i) 

L 

Lake Agassiz 1 365 

Lakes 361 

Land Township — 

.Mtitude 362 

Iburches 442 

i:iection. First 414 

Xame 414 

Officials 414 

( )rganization 413 

Population 396 

Roads, Early 429 

School District Officers 437 

Schools 432, 434 

Settlement 384 

Trail, An Harlv 384 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



Lawrence Township— 

Altitude 362 

Churches 450 

Early Conditions 385 

Geology 36" 

Name 385, 416 

Officials 416 

Organization 416 

Population 396 

School District Officers 438 

Schools 432 

Settlement 385 

Lawyers 458 

cgal Profession 458 

egislative Act Creating County 387 

egislators 405 

icense Fees, Early 389 

ien Township — 

Altitude 362 

Churches 442, 443, 444, 454 

Election, First 409 

Mounds 369 

Name 381 

Officials 409 

Organization 381, 409 

Population 396 

Postmaster, An Early ^ 382 

School District Officers 437 

Schools 432, 434 

Settlement 377, 381 

Lime 369 

Location of County 361 

Lodges 474 

Logan Township — 

Altitude 362 

Officers 410 

Organization 410 

Population 396 

School District Officers 439 

Schools 432, 434 

Settlement 377, 382 

Lutheran Churches 442, 453 



M 

Macsvillc Township — 

Altitude 362 

Election, First 415 

Officials 415 

Organization 415 



Macsville Township— Con. 

Population 396 

School District Officers 4.38 

Schools 432 

Settlement 384 

Masonic Order 474 

.Medical Profession 461 

.Methodist Episcopal Church 451 

Military .\nnals 472 

Military Roads 373 

Modern School. -\ims of the 436 

Modern Woodmen of America 477 

Mounds 369 



N 



Name of County 387 

X'ationality of Citizens 396 

Naturalization Statistics 396 

Newspapers 455 

Xorcross — 

Banks 469 

Business Interests 498 

Churches 443, 446, 451, 4.52, 454 

Farmers' Club 424 

Geology 368 

Incorporation 497 

Location 497 

Plat 497 

Population 396 

School District Officers 439 

.\orth Ottawa Township — 

Altitude 362 

Geology 367 

Name 417 

- Officials 417 

Organization 417 

Population 1 396 

School District Officers 438 

Schools 432 

Settlement 386 

Norwegian Evan. Luth. Church 443 

Norwegian United Luth. Church 445 

O 

Odd Fellows Order 476 

Officers, County, First 389 

Officials of Grant County 

387, 389, 391, 399 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



Old Sittlcrs' Association 5<)K 

Old Stockade 374 

Or<kr of the Kastcrn Star 47.^ 

( )rKaiiiz;itiim of County 3cS7 

P 
Puiican l.akc Townsliip— 

Altitude 36-' 

Klection. I'irst 411 

Government Road 373 

Lime 369 

Moraines 364 

Officials 411 

Organization 411 

Population 396 

Roads, Early 427 

School District Officers 43H 

Schools 432, 433 

Settlement 377, 380 

Stockade 374 

Physicians 461 

Pioneer Conditions 377 

Pioneer Farms 419 

Pioneer School Conditions 435 

T'omme de Terre — 

Churches 443 

Early Stores 38(1 

Laid Out 379 

Mill 380 

I'lat 499 

I'liniiiK- (if Terre Township — 

Altitude 362 

Election, I'irst 412 

Moraines 364 

Officials 412 

Organization 412 

Population 396 

Roads. Early 427 

School District Officers 438 

Schools 432 

Settlement 377, 379 

Population Statistics 395 

Prairie Fires 420 

Presbyterian Church 447 

Press, the 455 

R 
Railroads 431 

Recorded I'arni Names 424 



Kcgisters of Deeds 389. 402 

Religious Societies 442 

Representatives 406 

Road Districts. First .389 

Roads, Government 373 

Roseville Townshi]) — 

Altitude il,2 

Churches 454 

Election, First 414 

Name .383 

Officers 414 

Organization 414 

Population 396 

School District f)fficers 438 

Schools 383 

Settlement 383 

Routes of Early Settlement 428 

Royal Neighbors of America 477 

S 

Sanford, Henry F. 37r>. 378 

-Sanford Township — 

Altitude 362 

I'irst House in Count)' 376 

Name 417 

Officials 417 

Organization 417 

Population 396 

School District Officers 438 

Schools 432. 4.?4 

Settlement 376, 377. 378 

School District Officers 437 

School Districts, Early 389. 390, 432 

.School J'Mnancial Statement 44<) 

School Houses, Early 434 

School Superintendents, County 405 

Schools 432 

Schools. Early, Sketch of 433 

Secret Orders 474 

Senators, State 406 

Settlement. Early 376 

Seventh-Day Advcntist Church 453 

Sheriffs 389. 3"I. 4<12 

Sioux Indian Outbreak 370 

Sketch of Early Schools 433 

Soil 362 

State Highway Commission 430 

State Roads 430 

State Senators 406 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



Stock Raising 422 

Stockade, the Old 374 

Stone, Building- 368 

Stone Carving, Ancient 506 

Stony Brook Township — 

Altitude 362 

Election, First 413 

First Religious Service 383 

House, First 383 

Officials 413 

Organization 413 

Population 396 

Roads. Early 427 

School District Officers 438 

Schools 432 

Settlement 376, 11', 382 

Streams 361 

Surface Features 361 

Superintendents of Schools 405 

Surveyors, Count3- 404 

Swedish Evan. Luth. Church 444 

Synod Lutheran Churches 442 

T 

Teachers in 1896 435 

Teachers in 1916 436 

Timber 364 

Township Organization 409 

Trails, Early 427 



Transportation 427 

Treasurers, County 389, 401 

Tree Planting, Early 421 

V 
N'cterinary Surgeons 465 

W 

Wendell- 
Banks 469, 471 

Business Interests 493 

Churches 443. 449 

Creamery 492 

Farmers' Club 424 

Incorporation 492 

Location 492 

Lodges 478 

Merchants, Early 492 

Newspapers 456 

Officials 493 

Physicians 464 

Platted 492 

Population 396 

Postoffice 492 

Public Utilities 493 

School District Officers 439 

Schools 493 

Teachers 437 

Wheat, a Leading Crop 421 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX 

VOLUME II 



A 

Aancnson, Keiiiert 317 

Aanerud, M. C 485 

Adams, Melvin I 196 

Adensam, Henry 688 

Adensani, Wcnzl 669 

Adrianson, Claus P 670 

Amundsen, Ole A. 169 

Amundson, Hon. Ole 43 

Amundson, Oscar 166 

Anderson, .\. Emil 600 

Anderson, A. M 167 

Anderson, Aaron 458 

Anderson, Andrew H 667 

Anderson, Carl D 295 

Anderson, Charles 251 

Anderson, Charley J 623 

Anderson, F. O - 578 

Anderson, Gustaf 244 

Anderson, Louis 174 

Anderson, Magnus 345 

Anderson, Nels D 496 

Anderson, Xcls M 232 

Anderson, O. H. 534 

Anderson, Swan M 325 

Angen, Jens J 263 

Angen, Olaus 378 

Aslcson, Ole 195 

Augdahl, Carl O 682 

B 

Backclin, John 432 

Bah, Andrew O 203 

Bah, Olaus O 246 

Baker, John — _544 

Baker, Lewis 544 

Baker, William R 676 



Bardahl, Hans .. 517 

Barker, Melvin A 591 

Bartness, Paul S 611 

BarU, Rev. Albert F, W 575 

Bates, John C 236 

Behrends, William F 94 

Benson, John S 406 

Benson, Louis 680 

Berg, John O 677 

Bergan, Erick N 1^'8 

Bergan, Ole N 676 

Bcrgh, Emil E 275 

Berglund, J. Alfred 430 

Bergstrom, John 383 

Betland, Christopher P 551 

Betland. John C 526 

Betterman. William F 351 

Birkhofer, Hans 336 

Bjerke, Even E 620 

Boerner, Elmer 558 

Bolin, John 639 

Bordsen, Theodore 90 

Borgen, Adolph 571 

Borrill, James R 536 

Boulting, Walter H 274 

Bowman, Edwin 337 

Brakken, Gilbert J. 691 

Brandt, Emil J 339 

Brckkc, Nels B 686 

Brevig, Xels N 212 

Brevig, Peter N 675 

Brewster, Loren L 84 

Bronson, Clement H 504 

Bronson. Willie X 87 

Brough, Robert K 71 

Brown, Charles T 612 

Brown, Eli W 564 

Brown, George C 261 

Brown, John X 384 



ICAL INDEX. 



I'.rouii. XiclK.Ias 3S4 

Krowii. 1'. C 38.S 

lirowii. William 062 

Hrucske, ICniil 476 

llrueske. I-'rcdcrick 439 

15rusc, KvcTt 186 

Hundy. Scott 424 

lUirkec. Axel 20,s 

Burros. O. J 363 

liiirlncss. Tidcnian H 68 

IJusclier. l'"rank 307 

liyr, Xels 479 

C 

ramplKll. Harlan S 61 

CanlK-ld. riiarks ]■ 89 

C'arl<|uist, Adam 374 

Carlson, C A 334 

Carlson. Carl J i73 

Carlson. Magnus 464 

Carlson, Samuel M 464 

Cassell. I'cter 278 

Cater. Charles 88 

Christensen, Martin 411 

Christcnson. .\rthur C 249 

Christcnson. Christen A 106 

Christenson, Henry 306 

Christenson, Ncls C 250 . 

Christianson. Chris 311 

Christophcrson. Charles J 460 

Clark, John 11 644 

Colbjornsen, Colljjorn \V 40 

Cooley. John II 466 

Cordal, Tosten T 122 

Cowing, William T 35 

Crabb. William J 451 

Craig, Hon. George P 96 

Curtis. Jesse M 1.58 

Curtis. O. 11 291 

D 

Dabl. Alfred J 98 

Dahl. l-.rick 1-: 390 

Da.hl, I'eter E 340 

Dahlber.g. Martin 445 

Uahlgrcn, Olaf J 661 

Dahlstrom, Carl J 2,V) 

Danek. Charles 311 



Davidson, David J 409 

Derby. 1.. J 658 

Dieken, James !• 376 

Diment, Henry 368 

Diment. Louis 368 

Dobmeyer. Ferdinand G 472 

Drussell. Edward J 220 

Dybdal. Knute 283 

Dybdal. Tosten E 583 

Dyrud, .Si\er 663 

E 

EklHT,L;, l-"rank .\ 585 

Elgin, Frank 497 

Ellingson, Ellen 652 

Ellingson. Ellend X 116 

I'^llingson, Xils 63 

Ellis. Ray F 465 

luigcnion, Ole 253 

Englund, Peter M 455 

Engstrom, Peter 353 

Erickson. -August W . 223 

Erickson, Edward P. 584 

Erickson, Erick G 618 

l'>ickson, Hcndrick 417 

i:rickson, Peter 189 

Evenson, Xels M 51 

Evju, Halbcrt H 680 

F 

b'agerber.g. Lewis T 615 

1-ahlin, Xels J. 265 

I'ida. Leopold 341 

I'ida. Lucas 382 

I'isher, John M. 175 

I'joslicn. Knut O 505 

I'loden, Peter 640 

I'oslien. .\lfred 303 

Eoslien, Theodore 399 

I'oss, Hon. Louis O 562 

I'rigaard, Jens 281 

G 

Gerjord, Ole T. 521 

Gilbertson. George 176 

("lilbertson. Gilbert 113 

(~,ilkinson, .\ndrew J.. M. D l.'C 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



Gillies, John E.- ^ 492 

Ginther, Louis 138 

Goetzinger, Hon. William H._^ 477 

Goodell, Charles S 159 

Gregersen, Anton H. 56 

Grinder. Christian C 193 

Gronwold, Herman 185 

Groven. Knute 267 

Gruetzmacher, Robert 82 

Guenther, Gustavus 576 

Gulbrandsen, Ole 554 

Gulbranson, Ole 653 

Gulson, H. A 356 

Gunderson. John L 179 

Gustafson, Gustaf H 579 

H 

Haatvedt, Carl A. 288 

Haatvedt, Ole A 288 

Halgrimson, J. E 184 

Halvorson, Albert O 491 

Halvorson, John T 343 

Halvorson, Osten 228 

Hammer, John 362 

Hand, William R., M. D 569 

Handschug. William A 588 

Hansen, Anton 410 

Hansen, Louis 614 

Hanson, Albert 240 

Hanson, Christopher B 426 

Hanson, Erick 347 

Hanson, Gilbert 674 

Hanson, George H 3?2 

Hanson, Hans O 240 

Hanson, Hans P 352 

Hanson, Henry 452 

Hanson, Ole 508 

Hanson, Peter 461 

Harris. Frederick G 689 

Harrison, Ole W 148 

Harstad, Carl A 226 

Harstad, Christian L , 270 

Hauge, Lars J. 132 

Haugen, Andrew I 500 

Haugen, Knute 149 

Hauglie, Anton 367 

Hawkins, Oliver P 298 

Hawkinson, Andrew 665 

Haywood, George H 142 



Heald. Frank H 629 

Helleckson, H. E 77 

Hendrickson. Henry 518 

Hengstler, William' H., M. D 76 

Herbert. Frans O 318 

Hermanson, Carl 231 

Hermanson, L. G 350 

Hermanson, William 398 

Hessel, Henry 516 

Hetherington. Charles C 322 

Hicks, William E 53 

Hillmond, Hon. Herman 72 

Hintzen, John A 342 

Hintzen. Leonard 437 

Hintzen. Nicholas 344 

Hjelm, Peter M 404 

Hobart, H. B 440 

Hogstrom, John X 670 

Holing, Anton 453 

Holing, John ! 657 

Holm, Peter J 462 

Holt, Engebret O 539 

Holte, Christ L 475 

Hoplin, Peter 75 

Hove, James B 139 

Hove, Oluf T 433 

Howe, Byron E 365 

Hubred, Hans 560 

Hubred. Olaf M 546 

I 

Isackson, Isack 386 

Isakson, Andrew 538 

Island, Gunerinus L. 230 

Iverson. Ole B 93 

J 

Jeffrey, George 355 

Jensen, Peder 660 

Jensen. Theodore A 333 

Jenstad, Ole G 541 

Johnson. Hon. .\nders G 483 

Johnson. Cliarles 414 

Johnson. Chris 91 

Johnson. Erick 395 

Johnson, Erick G 408 

Johnson, Gustav .A 182 

Johnson, John C 488 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



Johnson. Martin 

Johnson, Martin I'.. 
Johnson. Mrs. Peter 
Johnson. Theodore . 
Johnson, X'ictor N._. 



237 

634 

332 

271 

412 

Juhg, Charles I 252 



Kaasa. llalvor I 194 

KelloHK. I-eandcr 489 

Kent, Lewis S 144 

Kcrsten, H. C 654 

Kietzman, .-\dolph G 606 

Kietznian, .Amil R 312 

Kictzniann, .Mbert P 598 

Kinney, James A 272 

Kloehn, Charles 387 

Kloos, Charles B 596 

Kloos, John W 656 

Klug, Frederick 447 

Knutson, Torgjcls 168 

Kraenier, Michael 309 

Kreidler, George D 617 

Kube, Adolph G 287 

Kuchenl)cckcr. Otto 199 

Kiillandcr, Andrew 685 



decne, William E 567 

dt, S. S 532 

Larson. A. D., M. D 605 

-arson, ."Mgot F 214 

Larson, C. H 457 

arson. Constant 160 

arson, Mrs. EIna 561 

arson, Emil 636 

arson, Erick 324 

arson, Julius 444 

arson, Simon 478 

arson, Victor 346 

each, Hugh E 83 

ec, Jens P 603 

ce, Lars E._-^ 423 

ec, Ole _302 

ekander, Jens 648 

eraas, Andrew L 599 

craas, Ole J .590 

(•Roy, Henry A .592 



Lewis, Hon. Henry I 446 

Lien, Edward 535 

Lietz. Henry T 635 

Lillemoen, Henry G 118 

Lindeni, John T 137 

Lindsey, Harvey E 248 

Lindstrom, Charles J 217 

Lindstrom, Olaf J 494 

Linnard. Carl O 401 

Long, Charles M., M. D 364 

Lorsung, .-Xnton J 117 

Lund. Alfred O .' 78 

Lund. Christian A 357 

Lust}', John A 331 

Lynne. John M 689 

Lynne, Lars 587 

Mc 

McClellan, James R 335 

McCord, Andrew L 436 

McCrca, Ezra E 566 

McFarlanc, John 470 

M 

Magnuson. .V. .Alfred 459 

Mahlke, Fred 637 

Malmquist, Henry .A 338 

Martinson, Henry M 205 

Mathison, Math 428 

Mattson, Swen 515 

Maxfield, George S 81 

Meckstroth, Charles W., M. D 163 

Meissner, Ernest 358 

Meissner, William F 155 

Mcister, Conrad 314 

Melhy, H. O 3a) 

Melby. K. X. O 480 

Melin, Axel 389 

Melin. Charles 360 

Miller, Carl G 224 

Miller. Henry W 543 

Miller, Soren J 435 

Mobraaten, Torger 279 

Mollman, August 552 

Moses, William J. B 59 

Moxness, Peder 391 

Mybr, Henry O 369 

Myhr, I'etcr O 405 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



N 

Nash, Timothy V" 284 

Xehls. Frank J. E. G 103 

Nelson, Alfred 664 

Xelson. Algort T 438 

Xelson, Carl 241 

Xelson, Edward 233 

Xelson. Gustaf 286 

Xelson. John P 219 

Xelson, John W 628 

Xelson. Hon. Xcls E 418 

Xelson, Xelson G 349 

Xelson, Otto 482 

Xelson, Otto W 442 

.Xelson, Peter T 473 

Xess, Christ C 215 

Xewhouse, Carl J 555 

Xewman, E. J 499 

Xewman. Gust 277 

Xieniackl. William \V 502 

Xilson. Xils 512 

Xorgrcn, John A 429 

Xorman. Rev. Glaus 41 

o 

Oachs. Frank 601 

Oberg, Knut 427 

Olbekson, Hans L 266 

Olson. Charles G 431 

Olson. Julius C 641 

Olson, Ole G 520 

Olson. Olof 211 

Olson. Thomas 157 

Omland. Peter T 400 

Oslund. Erick O 238 

Osterberg. Arthur L 115 

Ostroni, Aaron J 140 

Oiterson, Xcls M 524 

P 

Pennie, Peter 315 

Pennock, Joseph 668 

Peterson, Carl O 280 

Peterson. Charles S 626 

Peterson. Claus 456 

Peterson. Emil 359 



Peterson. Frank A 545 

Peterson, Xels 136 

Peterson. P. M 254 

Peterson. Peter 550 

Peterson, Peter .A. 326 

Peterson, Peter A 326 

Peterson. Peter G 105 

Peterson, Peter J 683 

Peterson, Rev. Peter T 143 

Pikop. Knut A. 207 

Pikop. L. H 519 

Pikop. Olaus A 127 

Pikop. Hon. Olc A 3i 

Pletan. Gilbert J 263 

Pletan. Jens 198 

Pletan. Ole J 187 

Powers. Fletcher W.. M. D 527 

Prcstrud. C. A. 70 

O 

Quast. F. F 666 

ijuinn. Thomas 642 

R 

Raines, John E 671 

Raiter, Fred C 45 

Randall, Auvigne M.. M. D 154 

Rarer. Robert F 100 

Reif. Victor M 290 

Ringdahl. Theo. 449 

Risbrudt, Edward T 366 

Ritzschke. Albert I 180 

Ritzschke, Carl 646 

Ritzschke. Charles F 548 

Ritzschke. Theodore A. H 580 

Ronhovde, Mons 572 

Rooney. A. A 206 

Rose, Lars 321 

Roth, Andrew 297 

Ruggles, E. R 125 

Russell, Marvin D 421 

Rustad, Carl O 594 

Rustand, Andrew C 487 

Rustand. Mads C 153 

Rustand. Ole C 191 

Rustand. Ole K 109 

Ruud, Magnus B.. M. D 92 



.693 
-23') 
.495 
.631 
.420 



Sand. Kittil () 

Sand, Ole () 

Sandbcrp, John 

Sanford, Jasper X 

Sanfcstead, Andrew 

Sannes. Ole O 523 

Sanstcad, John V. 371 

Saterlee. Henry I. 403 

Sattcrlund, Ole 687 

Sattre, Rev. Torbjorn A 4S 

Schaffcr, Albertus 260 

Schelin, Charles F 471 

Schlechter. Joseph 294 

Schmidt, William 67.S 

Schmidt, William 1! 245 

Schoonovcr, Sylvan 102 

Schnlz, .-Xugust 643 

Sellsoth. Ole 38 

Selran. Hogan G 282 

Sheldon, W. W 134 

Shervey. Sivert 542 

Shogrcn, Carl A 209 

Shogren, Herman A 216 

Simonson, Hans 568 

Skinnemocn. John S 124 

Skinncmoen, Nils .S 133 

.Skinnemocn, Ole S 173 

Skinnemoen. Stiner S., Jr 52 

.'^koglund, Ma.crnus . 681 

Skramstad, Haaken 227 

Skrove, Martin 463 

Sletten, K. E 607 

Sletto. Ole E 415 

Sh.tsve, Hans H. 557 

Smith, John . 402 

Smith. Roy G 269 

Sobcrg, Halvor O 613 

StalTanson, Erick G 372 

Stariha. Mathrw ...229 

Stark. Gustav A 162 

Sttdjc. Clarence 692 

Steidl, Nicholas A 130 

Steinach. Rev. Eniil J 9<i 

Steinhorst, Ed 690 

Stene, C. J 171 

Stevens. George T 151 

Strand, Jens O .S30 

Strandbcrg. John I 361 



Strang, Cassius C., D. D. S (>4 

Strecd, IVter 242 

Strom. Anton H 381 

Stromlund, George 192 

Suckow. Herman 392 

Sund, Engcbret E 213 

.Swcnson, Carl H. 079 

Swenson. Ferdinand 121 

Swcnson, Sven X. 25(i 

Swenson, Rev. Sven W 80 

Swenson. Swen 467 

Swenson, Theo E 256 

Swore. Knute 165 

Symonds. Fred H. 624 

.^yverson. Lauritz 450 

Syvriid, Thomas .V. 156 

T 

Teigen. liottol T. 108 

Thayer. Thomas M.. M. D. 111 

Tines. Xick 5m 

Thompson, .Alfred J. 468 

Thompson, .August ZS-: 

Thompson, Gilbert J 649 

Thompson, John 638 

Thompson. Ole A. 304 

Thompson. Thco. 595 

Thorson. Lars 441 

Thorson, Thor J 422 

Thorstenson, Calmer E. 164 

Thronson. Otto C. 201 

Thronson. Thron C. 528 

Titus, John F. 268 

Toliiason, T. L. 222 

Tollefson, I'ernt 310 

Tollefson. Jens 235 

Torgerson. Mikkel 289 

Torstenson, William 650 

Treat, George L. 128 

Triese. Jacob 513 

Tripp. George 293 

Trisko. Sylvester 264 

I' 

risager, Martin X 221 

Cnumb. Peter O. 112 

Crness. John A. 582 



EtOGRAPHICAL IXDEX. 

V Wcstlund, P. M. 622 

Wettleson. Joseph H. 58 

\ on baumbach. Major l-rcdenck ..ill Wick. Martin L. 507 

Winkjer, G. T. 379 

W Wold. Hon. Carl A. 608 

Wagcnius. Samuel O. 329 ^^'"'f' ^^"^ ^' ■ ^^^ 

Wagner, Herbert O. 54 

Walstad. Andrew M. 320 Y 



Wallen, Oscar J. 119 Yates \\" \ 181 

\\'angsness, Syvert S. 258 



Z 



Waugh, Knute 522 

Weaver. Howard 299 

Weigand, Fred 621 Zellcr. Andrew 684 

Wells. A. Waters 145 Zicbarth. W. T. 150 

Wesen, Constant A. 396 Ziemer. Fred 574 

Western. John O. 172 Zininicl. Andrew 416 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



HOX. OLE A, PIKOP. 

Hon. Ole A. Pikop. re])resentati\-e in the ^Minnesota state Legislature 
from tlie fifty-se\enth district and one of Grant count}-'s best-known and 
most progressive farmers, a director of the First Xational Bank at Elbow- 
Lake, former chairman of the board of super\isors of Elbow Lake township 
and for years acti\"ely interested in the general civic and industrial affairs 
of this section of the state, is a native of the kingdom of Xonvay. but has 
been a resident of ^linnesota since he was three years of age and of Grant 
county since the year 1872, having consequently been a witness to and a 
participant in the wonderful development of this region since pioneer days 
hereabout. He was born at Sigdal, in Xorwa}-, July 16, 1866, son of 
Anders O. and Gunhild (Ramstad) Pikop, natives of that same district, 
who came to ]\Iinnesota in 1869 and after a brief residence in Houston 
county came over to this part of the state, among the pioneers of Grant 
county, and settled on a homestead farm in Elbow Lake township, where 
Anders O. Pikop died in the summer of 1901 and where his widow is still 
living. 

Anders O. Pikop was born in Sigdal on Julv i, 1835, son of Ole and 
Gunhild Pikop. the former a native of X'umdal and the latter of Sigdal, 
who made their home in Sigdal, where Ole Pikop died, his widow later com- 
ing to ^Minnesota with her son, Anders, spending her last days in Houston 
county, where she is buried. Anders O. Pikop grew to manhood on a farm 
in Sigdal and there married Gunhild Ramstad, who was born on September 
12, 1844, daughter of Haakon and Ingeborg Ramstad, natives of Sigdal, 
who moved to X^'umdal and there lived until 1873, in which year thev came 
to America with their son, Helge, coming directly to ^linnesota and settling 
in Grant county, making their home with their son, Helge, until the latter's 
death in 1886, after which they Ijecame members of the household of their 
daughter, Mrs. Pikop, where their last days were spent and both are buried 
in the cemetery in San ford township. After their marriage Anders O. 



34 Dorm.AS and c.ka.vt c(jl-\ties, Minnesota. 

I'ik(p|) ami \u> wife cinitinued to make their home on a farm in their native 
land until iN'.<>, in which year they came to the United States, proceeding on 
out to .Minnesota and settling on a farm in Houston county, where they 
remained until 1872, when tliey mo\ ed (i\er into Grant county hy ox-team 
and settled in i-'lhow Lake township, Mr. I'ikop homesteading a quarter of 
a section in section _'_> of that township, where they established their home. 
V\)ou locating in I'lhow Lake township, ]\Ir. Pikop erected a log cabin on 
his iioniestead tract, the same occupying the site of the i)resent comfortable 
I'ikop home, and proceeded to break and develop his land. l'"rom the very 
beginning he was successful in his ojjerations and presently became the 
owner of eighteen hundred acres of choice land, practically all of which was 
in one body, a good portion of which was fine pasture and hay land, on 
which he rai.sed large herds of cattle. He made a specialty of small grain 
anil often cultixated as much as one thousand acres of such crops, early 
becoming recognized as one of the most substantial farmers in this part of 
the state. .Mr. Pikop was a Repuljlican and gave his earnest attention to 
local cixic alTairs. but was not a seeker after public office. He was prom- 
inently identified with all nio\ements having to do with the advancement of 
the material interests of his home community and was one of the leading 
stockholder- in the Larmers b'.levator Company at b^bow Lake. In the good 
works of the community he also took a warm interest and was one of the 
organizers of the United Lutheran church at Elbow Lake, of which he and 
his wife were active members, and in the affairs of which he took an active 
part until bis death on June 4, iQoi. His widfjw is still living, being now 
past se\entv-two years of age. To them ten children were born, of whom 
the lion. Olf .\. Piko]) is the eldest, the others being as follow: Ingeborg, 
who married 1'. 'f. Peterson and lives on a farm one-half mile north of the 
I'ikop homestead: Haakon .\., who li\es about two miles southwest of the 
olil home: Knute .\., who lives two miles southwest: Ciunhild, wlio died at 
the age of eighteen years: .\ndrew, who is still living on the old home place; 
Olaus, who lives about one and one-half miles southeast; Gena, who died at 
the age of eighteen months; Gena, who married Arthm- Berglund and lives 



at h'ergus Vi 


dls. 


tbi^ 


. St; 


ite. an 


d Hattie, 


wlx 


1 married l\ei 


■ 01, .on 


and 


lives in 


i'lbow Lake 


to\ 


vn-b 


i].. 
















Ole A. 


1 'ik 


op. 


as 1 


noted ; 


above, wa 


s only about six 


\ears 


Id w 


hen his 


jiarents settl< 


■d i 


u < ] 


r;in' 


1 couni 


ly and be 


gre 


w to manhooi 


d on tb( 


e hoi 


iiiestead 


farm, receiv 


ing 


his 


sell 


looling 


in the lo 


ical 


schools. !■>. 


nn the 


days 


of his 


youth he wa 


s a 


\alued 


assist; 


uit in the 


wo 


rk of develoi: 


ling the 


hon- 


le ijlace 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 35 

and has ever remained there, since their father's death he and his brother, 
Andrew, managing tlie place, operating now about six hundred acres, engag- 
ing quite profitably in general farming and stock raising. In addition to his 
activities as a farmer, Mr. Pikop has long given close attention to local 
business affairs and is a director of the First National Bank at Elbow Lake 
and of the Farmers ]{le\'ator Company at the same place. He is a mem- 
ber of the United Lutheran church and gives proper attention to the general 
good works of his home community. 

Representative Pikop is a Republican and for years has taken an active 
interest in local ci\'ic affairs. For some time he served as chairman of the 
board of supervisors for Elbow Lake township and in 1914 was elected 
representative from the fifty-seventh legislative district to the Minnesota 
General Assembly and in the campaign of 1916 was the nominee of his party 
for re-election. During his service in the Legislature, Representative Pikop 
served on the following important committees : Public accounts and expend- 
itures, state hospitals, villages, agriculture and horticulture, public domain 
and the state school at Owatona. gixing his most thoughtful and intelligent 
attention to the public ser\'ice in that connection. He is recognized as one 
of the most forceful and influential factors in the common life of this sec- 
tion of the state and is held in high regard throughout the entire district. 



\\'n.LL\^I THOMAS COWING. 

William Thomas Cowing, secretary and treasurer of the old established 
hardware firm of the Cowing-Hobards Company at Alexandria, former 
president of the Minnesota State Hardware Dealers Association and for 
years recognized as one of the leading merchants of his home town, is a 
native son of that city and has lived there all his life, having witnessed its 
growth and development from the days when it was but little more than a 
frontier stockade center. He was Ijorn in the old stockade at Alexandria, 
March 5, 1868, son of John B. and Mary Ann ( Beeston) Cowing, the fornier 
a native of England and the latter of the state of Illinois, pioneers of this 
section of Minnesota and for many years leaders in the communitv life of 
-\lexandria and Douglas count)-, where their last davs were spent. 

John B. Cowing was born in 1842 and was but six years old when he 
came to this country from England in 1848 with his parents, Thomas and 
Jane (Heads) Cowing, and settled in Dane county, Wisconsin, where thev 



^6 DOUGLAS AND CRANT COL'NTIES, MINNESOTA. 

remained until i860, wiien they came over into Minnesota and came out to 
this part of the state, settling in i\Ioe township, Douglas county, home- 
steading a place there, on which they remained until the Indian outbreak 
drove them to Sauk * enter for safety. Upon their return to Douglas 
count\- they lived for a time in the stockade which the government meanwhile 
li.ul erected at Alexandria and where Thomas Cowing presently started a 
la\crn, later opening a general store which he conducted until his retirement 
from business; his store, the "Old Regulator," having been far-famed 
throughout this entire region in the early days. He continued making his 
home at Alexandria after his retirement and both he and his wife spent their 
last days there, honored and respected pioneer residents. They were the 
jiarents of nine children, namely: George F., who served as a soldier of the 
Union during the Civil War, a member of the Twenty-eighth Regiment, 
Wisconsin \"olunteer Infantry, later locating in Douglas county, this state, 
where he for years conducteil a store at old Chippewa, and later went to 
Otter Tail count\", where he served as county superintendent; Thomas F., 
who also served as a soldier of the Union during the Civil War, a member 
of the Second Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry (the famous old 
'Tron Brigade" ), and upon the completion of his military service also located 
in Douglas countv, where he made his home until his removal to Portland, 
Oregon, where he died on August 3, 1916; John B.. father of the subject 
of this sketch, further reference to .whom will follow; William H., who 
came to this section with his parents in pioneer days, married Katie Piatt, 
who taught school in the old stockade at Alexandria, the first school teacher 
in Douglas county, later became a merchant at St. Olaf, w-hence lie moved 
to Fergus Falls, where he engaged in business and where he spent the 
remainder of his life; Flizabeth, who married Wilbur D. Hurlburt and 
spent her last days in the West; A. A., who for some time was engaged 
in the implement business at Fergus Falls, later moving to Oregon, where 
he spent his last days; Joseph, who left his home at Alexandria in 1866, 
when sixteen years of age, and never was heard from by his family again; 
Marv, who married George H. Reynolds and later moved to St. Cloud, 
where her last davs were spent, and A. C, whf) for some time was engaged 
in l)usiness at Alexandria, later moving to Crookston and thence West, 
where his last days were spent. 

John B. Cowing was but a child when he came to America with his 
parents in 1848 and he grew to manhood on the homestead farm in Dane 
county, Wisconsin, receiving a limited education in the pioneer schools of 
that time and district. On September 15, 1861, he then being nineteen years 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 3/ 

of age, John B. Cowing enlisted for service during the Civil War as a 
member of Company H. Eleventh Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, 
and served with that command until he received his honorable discharge in 
November, 1864, shortlv after which he joined his parents, who some years 
before had come out here and established themselves on the outpost of 
civilization hereabout at Alexandria. In 1867, in the neighboring county 
of Stearns, he married Mar_\- Ann Beeston, who was born in Cook county, 
Illinois, in the near vicinity of the city of Chicago, daughter of William 
and Anna Beeston, natives of England, who had come to this country and 
settled near Chicago, where William Beeston died, after which his widow 
and her family came to Minnesota, her last days being spent at Alexandria. 
Not long after locating at Alexandria, John B. Cowing opened a meat market 
near the old stockade and was thus engaged in business for about two years, 
at the end of which time he formed a partnership, under the firm name of 
Cowing & Swenson, and (jpened a general store. He presently sold his 
interest in that store and on April i, 1872, in partnership with O. J. Rob- 
ards, engaged in the hardware business, buying the stock of Jacob Holla- 
baugh established in 1867, and continuing the store at the old stand, the site 
of the present extensive establishment of the Cowing-Robards Company, 
where the business e\-er since has been conducted, one of the oldest mercan- 
tile establishments in continuous existence in this part of the state. The new 
firm started in business under the firm name of Cowing & Robards and in 
1874 bought the building and lot and later, in 1880, erected the substantial 
business block in which the business is still carried on. Later the firm was 
incorporated as the Cowing-Robards Company, which firm name has ever 
since been maintained, and John B. Cowing continued actively connected 
with the business until bis death in January, 1912. Not only was he active 
in the mercantile business, but he took a leading part in the general com- 
mercial and civic life of his community from the very beginning of his 
residence here. He was one of the organizers of the First National Bank 
of Alexandria and was a director of that institution from the date of its 
organization to the time of his death. He had held practically all the civic 
offices in the t(nvn at one time and another and served for two terms as 
representative from this district in the lower House of the Minnesota General 
Assembly. He was an active member of the local Masonic lodge and he 
and his wife were among the leaders in the Episcopal church, in the faith 
of which their children were reared. There were five of these children, 
of whom the subject of this sketch was the first-born, the others being as 
follow: Charles F., a railway mail clerk, with headquarters at Minneapolis; 



3^^ DorCLAS AND GRAXT COCXTIES, MIX^ESOTA. 

John K., who is connected with the Cowing-Robards Company at Alexan- 
dria: Kate C, wife of Dr. J. !■". Beck, of Minneapohs, and Joseph B., who 
is with tile W'ilhams Hardware Company at Minneapolis. 

William T. Cowing was reared at Alexandria, the city of his birth, 
receixing his schooling in the schools of that city, and early took his place 
in the hardware store of his father and has ever since l)een connected with 
that estai)lishment, having risen from the position of a clerk to his present 
])Ositiiin as secretary-treasurer (if the Cowing-Robards Company, long hav- 
ing l)een recognized as one of the leatling merchants of this part of the 
stale. Mr. C(jwing has a fine reputation in the hardware trade throughout 
the state and has served as president of the ^Minnesota State Retail Hard- 
ware Merchants .\ssociation, of which organization he is now a member of 
the executive board, for \ears having taken an active interest in the affairs 
of that organization. 

In 1898 \\'illiam T. Cowing was united in marriage to Charlotte M. 
Campbell, of Alexandria, and to this union has been born one child, a son. 
William G. Cowing, who is at home. The Cowings are members of the 
Congregational church, in the various beneficences of which they take a 
proper interest, as well as in all local good works, being helpful factors in 
the work of promoting all measures designed to advance the general wel- 
fare hereabout. Mr. Cowing is a Knight Templar ]\Iason and a member 
of the Knights of Pythias and takes a warm interest in the affairs of these 
organizations. 



OLE SELLS RTH. 



Ule Sellseth. one of Grant county's l)est-known and most substantial 
business men. member of the firm <.f Lund & Sellseth, general merchants 
at Xorcro-ss, vice-president of the State Bank of Xorcross, one of the organ- 
izers of the mercantile firm of Sellseth & Company at Glenwood, former 
[jresident of the village of Xorcross and for years actively and prominentlv 
identified with the general business and civic affairs of that part of the 
county, is a native of the kingdom of Xorway, but has been a resident 
of this section of Minnesota since he was twenty years of age. He was 
liorn on a farm in Horningdal, Xorfjord, October 23, 1865, son of Iver 
and I-^lizabeth (Larson) Sellseth. both natives of that same district in 
Xorway, the fnrnier a farmer and landowner, both of whom spent all their 
lixes in their nati\e Iand_. Iver Sellseth dying in 1867 and his widow surviving 



DOUGLAS AXU GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 39 

until 191 1. They were members of the Lutheran church and their chil- 
dren were reared in that faith. There were eight of these children, of whom 
the subject of this sketch was the se\enth in order of birth, the others being 
as follow : Lars, who continues to reside at the old h(ime in Xorwa\- ; Annie, 
who married Rasmus Kirkon and died at Rutland, Xorth Dakota: Lena, 
unmarried, who lives at Glenwood, this state ; Bertha, who married Ole 
Iverson and remains in her native land : ]\Ialine, who married Andrew Lund 
and lives at Glenwood: L S., who is manager and stockholder in a store 
at Glenwood, and Iver, who also came to this countr}^ and is a homesteader 
in northern ^Minnesota, where he also is clerking in a store. 

Ole Sellseth was but two years of age when his father died. His mother 
and his eldest brother continued to maintain the old home farm and there 
he grew to manhiiod, recei\'ing his schoiiling in the neighliurhodd schools, 
and remained at home until he was twent}' years of age. when, in 1885. 
he came to the L'nited States and proceeded directly out to this part of 
Minnesota, locating at Xorcross. For the first vear after his arrival in 
Grant county 'Sir. Sellseth worked on the railroad at \\'endell and the ne.xt 
)ear was engaged working on a farm in that vicinity. He then was given 
employment as a clerk in the store of Andrew Lund at Xorcross and 
remained thus engaged until 1891. the year of his marriage, when he was 
admitted by Air. Lund into partnership in the business, which e\er since 
has been conducted under the firm name of Lund & Sellseth, one of the 
best-established business firms in the \illage. \Mien Mr. Sellseth became 
connected with the firm it was carrying a general stock of the value of about 
two thousand dollars. This has been gradually increased, with the passing 
\'ears, until now the firm carries a sti5ck of the value of ten thousand or 
twelve thousand dollars and is doing an excellent business. The firm also 
has made some investments in farm lands and owns a tract of two hundred 
and forty acres in Gorton township and another piece of eighty acres. Mr. 
Sellseth, in addition to his general mercantile interests, also has given con- 
siderable attention to the general business affairs of the community in which 
he lives and since 1910 has been vice-president of the State Bank of X^or- 
cross. He also was one of the organizers of the mercantile firm of Sellseth 
& Company at Glenwood, a partnership concern. Li his political affiliations 
Mr. Sellseth is a Repul>lican and for more than ten years ser\'ed as treasurer 
(jf the school district and for two years served as president of the village of 
Xorcross. 

It was in 1891 that Ole Sellseth was united in marriage to Thea Larson, 
who also was born in Xorway. a native of the Sigdal district, daughter of 



40 IJOLGLAS AXIJ GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

I.ar> KmilMiii ami wife, earlv settlers of Grant cunnty, the former of whom 
(lied at his Imme in (Jdrtoii township in 1914, and to this union nine chil- 
dren have heen hern. Iner, who died at the age of three years; Ida, Inga, 
Idvina. Stella, Alhin, Theodore, Olga and Xina. Mr. and Mrs. Sellseth are 
memhers of the Lutheran church, ]\Ir. Sellseth heing a member of the board 
of trustees of the same, and both take a warm interest in the general good 
works of the community in which they live, helpful factors in the promo- 
tion of all movements having to do with the advancement of the common 
welfare thereabout. 



CdLlIJORX W. COLBJORXSEX. 

t'olbjorn W. Colbjornsen. head of the firm of Colbjornsen & Wegener, 
clothiers and mercliant tailors at Alexandria, and for years recognized as 
one of tile leading merchants of Douglas county, is a native of the kingdom 
of Xorwa\-, but has been a resident of Minnesota since he was seventeen 
vears of age. He was born on October 3, 1863, son of Wilhelm and 
Johannae I Jacobsen ) C olbjijrnsen, both natives of Xorway. who are still liv- 
ing there, where the former for manv years has been engaged in the hard- 
ware business. 

Colbiorn W. I'olbjomsen was one of eight children born to his parents 
and when he was seventeen years old, in 1885, he came to the United States, 
proceeding directly to .Minnesota and locating at Battle Lake, where he 
remained about a vear. He then went to Henning and there was employed 
ill the general store of .\. S. I'aulsen for three years and si.x months, at the 
end of which time he went to Parkers Lrairie, where he was employed in the 
general store of John Murray for a year, at the end of which time he went 
to .Mexaiidria, where he ever since has made his home. Upon going to 
.Alexandria, Mr. Lo!bj(;rnsen became employed in the general store of Kortsch, 
Hardy & Hoeble, where he remained eighteen months, going thence into the 
clothing store of C. F. Canlield & Son, where he remained for more than 
seven years, at the end of which time he engaged in business for himself, 
at Alexandria, opening a merchant-tailoring establishment, which he con- 
ducted for a time alone, later forming a partnership with Jacobsen, Follet & 
.\ndrew, clothiers, which arrangement c(jntinued for three years, at the end 
of which time .Mr. ( olliionisen resumed his former business as a merchant 
tailor and after twi years of that form of business formed his present part- 
nerslii]) with J. !'",. Wegener, under the firm name of Colbjornsen Sz Wegener, 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUXTIES, MINNESOTA. 4I 

clothiers and merchant tailors, and has been doing very well, dexoting his 
whole time to the business. 

On July 15, 1899, Colbjorn W. Colbjornsen was united in marriage to 
Etta L. Thompson, of Alexandria, and to this union three children have 
been born, Harold, Helen and Carl. ^Nlr. and ^Nlrs. Colbjornsen are mem- 
bers of the Norwegian Lutheran chtirch and take a proper interest in the 
various beneficences of the same, as well as in all neighborhood good works, 
being Iielpful factors in the promotion of all agencies designed to advance 
the general welfare hereabout. 



RE\". OL.VUS XORMAX. 

Rev. Olaus Xorman, -one of the well-known and successful ministers 
of Grant county, was horn near Jefferson Prairie, Wisconsin, on Januan- 
25, 18-I.5, the son of Alexander and Anna (Olson) Xorman. the latter of 
whom was a daughter of Ole Olson, a native of X'orwav. who came to the 
United States in 1848. Upon his arrival in this country. Ole Olson pro- 
ceeded at once to \\lsconsin, and there located on a farm in Dane countv. 
where he engaged in general farming and in the carpenter trade. During 
the war in 1814, between Sweden and Xorway, Ole Olson was a soldier in 
the army of his count)-, and performed good service. His father, Ole Berk- 
hus, li\ed his life in X'orwav, where he was a farmer. 

Alexander X'orman was born in X'orway on September 5, 18 19. He 
received his education in the public schools of his native countrv and at the 
normal school. After completing his schooling he engaged in the teaching 
profession. He was engaged to be married while living in X'orwav, but the 
wedding took place in Jeft'erson Prairie. Wiscrmsin. He and his bride-to-be 
both came to America in 1843 and both located near Jefferson Prairie, where, 
after a year, they were married by the first X'orwegian minister in America. 
the Reverend Diethrickson. After their marriage they located on a rented 
farm and for some years Alexander X'orman worked for others as a farm 
hand. They then moved to Dane county, Wisconsin, where thex- purchased 
a farm of one hundred and sixty acres and there ^Ir. X'omian engaged in 
farming for himself for twenty-three years, at the end of which time he 
went to Otter Tail county, and located in St. Olaf township, where he Ixuight 
a homestead right, and there li\ed, engaged in general farming, until his 
retirement from the actix'ities of life on the farm, and removed to Ellxiw 



42 DOll.l.AS AND CkAXT COLNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

Lake, where he (hed on March iw, iN'iJ. His widow, wh(. was Ixjrn on 
jmie I. iN_'j. (lied on Deceniljer J'). lyoO. Tliey were tlic parents of ten 
children, Olaus, hisepli. Anna, Ole, Margaret, Ingehorg, Josephine, Tosten, 
Sarah and Halvar. the latter of whom died in infancy. 

Alexander Xnrnian was always very active in churcii work and for a 
time after connng to the United States taught in one of the church schools. 
He mastered the English language after coming to this country and hecame 
lluent in its use. He mingled niucli in politics in Dane county and especially 
after the beginning of the ( ivil War. He was a strong advocate of the 
principles of the great Lincoln, and esi'oused the same with an eloquent 
tongue and with much ability. 

( Ijaus .\ornian received his early educational training in the public 
schools of Dane county and was later sent to the Norwegian Lutheran 
school for further study. He attended high school at Madi.son and later 
was graduated from the Norwegian Lutheran College at Decorah, L)\va. 
.\fter his graduation from Concordia Seminary at St. Louis, Missouri, in 
]86g, he was stationed at a little church at St. Paul and had thirty stations 
throughout the state of Minnesota. During his work at that time he assisted 
in the organization of m;ui\- new churches, among these being the one where 
he i- now stationed al .\shby. He was unmarried at the time and in addi- 
tion to hioking after his thirty charges he studied medicine, under Doctor 
\\ iegniann of St. 1 'aid and under Doctor Baily of Sioux City. Lie l)egan 
the practice of medicine in 1870, and continued the same in connection with 
his ministerial duties, his labors as a physician all Ijeing ])erformed in the 
name of charit}- and without compensation. 

In 1870, the l\c\'. Dlaus Norman was united in marriage to Britha 
Holum, and to that union fi^•e children were born, .\ugustus, Theodore. 
Hahor, .\nna and Caia. The Rev. Theodore Norman is a minister of the 
.Norwegian Lutheran church, as i< the Rev. Halvor Norman. .Vfter the 
death of his I'lrst wife, the Rev. Olaiis Norman married I-llisa Wilson, and to 
that union three cliildren were born, Susie. Marie and Bertinus. L^pon the 
death of the nioth.er of these children, Mr. Norman married Mrs. Koefod. 
widow of Magnus Koefod. Mr. Ncjrman was for eight years, pastor of 
one of the churches at St. Paul and mo\ed to Ashby for a rest. .\t the 
request of the people there he [iresently as.sumed charge of the pastoral work 
atid now has three charges. Mr. Norman has always taken active exercise 
antl was the hr>t man to ride a bic\cle in this section of the state and was 
the first minister to drive an autonKjbile, a vast contrast to his traveling on 



DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUXTIES, MINNESOTA. 43 

snow shoes during his pastorate in the northwestern part of Minnesota. 
where he was termed "the path-breaker," when the winter time came on 
and the travel was difficnk. 



HOX. OLE A^IUXDSOX. 

The Hon. Ole Annmdson. well-known and well-to-do retired real-estate 
man and dealer in farm machincr}-. of Evansx'ille, former member of the 
Minnesota state Legislature, former commissioner of Douglas county, former 
sheriff of that same county and since pioneer days actively identified with 
the work of developing the resources of this section of the state, is a native 
of the kingdom of Norway, but has been a resident of this country since 
he was eighteen years of age. He was born on August 31, 1844, son of 
.Vmund and Anna Olsen, also natives of Norway and farming people in 
their native land, who came to the L'nited States in 1862 with the six younger 
members of their family of twelve children and after four or five years of 
residence in Wisconsin came to Minnesota, settling in Douglas county, where 
they spent the remainder of their lives. 

Upon coming to this country in 1862 -\mund Olsen settled in Rock 
county, \Msconsin, where he remained until 1867, in which year he came 
out to this section of Minnesota with his family, settling on a homestead 
tract of one hundred and sixty acres in L'niess township, Douglas county, 
one of the very earliest settlers in that section. He built a log house on 
his homestead tract and there established his home, presently becoming well 
settled, an influential and substantial pioneer farmer. In 1871 he built a 
new house and there spent the rest of his life, his death occurring in 1892, 
he then being eighty-two years of age. His wife had preceded him to the 
grave many years, her death having occurred in 1869, at the age of fifty- 
five years. They were the parents of twelve children, of whom six came to 
this country, namely : Bertha, who married Kittle Koltveit and both she 
and her husband are now deceased: Agnes, who married Swen Winger and 
now lives in \\'isconsin : Ole, the subject of this biographical sketch; Pauline, 
who married L. Ingarbretson and died at Janesville, Wisconsin ; Simon, who 
is farming the old homestead place in Urness township, and Anna, who mar- 
ried Ole Eakke, of Otter Tail county, and is now deceased. 

Ole Amundson was about eighteen years old when he came with his 
parents to this country and had attained his majority before they moved over 



44 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

intu Minnesota. I'pon settling in Douglas county he became a valuable aid 
u> iiis father in the work of developing the homestead farm in Urness town- 
siiip and also took an active part in the civic affairs of the pioneer com- 
munity, being one of the early clerks of that township. He then was 
appointed as a member of the board of appraisers of school lands in Douglas 
county and after ser\ing one term in that office was elected, in the fall of 
1872, sheriff of his home county, taking office on January i, 1873, serving 
one term uf two years, at the end of which period of service he decided to 
advance his studies and witli that end in view entered the La Crosse Com- 
mercial College at La Crosse, Wisconsin, one of his teachers there having 
been I'rnfessor Cashale, now senator from Xorth Dakota. On his return 
from college ^Ir. Amundson stopped at St. Paul and made a contract with 
the Wal try- Wood Machine Company to handle that company's harvesting 
machines in Douglas, Stevens, Grant and Big Stone counties and established 
his headquarters at Morris, with branch houses at Herman and Evansville. 
The first harvesting machines ever seen at Herman were delivered there by 
him and tb.e first self-binder ever seen in Douglas county and the first trac- 
tion engine in Evansville also were shipped in by him. In 1876 Mr. Amund- 
son was made the nominee of the Republican convention in this legislative 
district for representative and was elected in the ensuing election, serving one 
term as a member uf the lower Ifouse of the General Assembly. Meanwhile 
he continued right ahjng with his farm-machine agency and held his original 
territory for seven years, at the end of which time, the country rapidly 
becoming more settled, he was relieved of Big Stone and Stevens counties, 
but continued covering the other two counties for many years. .\t the same 
time Mr. Amundson was doing quite a business in the real-estate way and at 
one time was the owner of more than tweh-e hundred acres of land, six hun- 
dred and --e\ent\-two acres of which he still owns and which is being profit- 
ably farmed for him. Tn December, 1<)I4, after many years of continuous 
service in the farm-machinery line, I\Ir. Amundson retired from active busi- 
ness and has si.nce then been taking things somewhat easier. In addition 
to his public service above mentioned, Mr. Amundson served Douglas countv 
as a member of the board of county commissioners during the period of 
1883-86 and was also president of the Evansville \-illage council for two 
terms. He is a meinber of the Nor\vegian Lutheran church and for \-ears 
has taken a warm interest in the affairs of the same. 

On November 15, 1875, Ole Amundson was united in marriage to Carrie 
Hoveren. of near liattle Lake, Otter Tail county, who died in 1884, and to 



AXD GRAXT COUNTIES, MINXESOTA. 



45 



that union five chiklren were born. Anna \'iola, Joseph Syhester, Clara 
AdeHa and two wlio died in infancy. Anna \'iola Anmndson, now general 
secretary for the Young Women's Christian Association in the state of 
\\'ashington, with headquarters at Xorth Yakima, was former!}^ financial 
secretary for the local branch of the Young \\'omen's Christian Association 
at Seattle and just l^efore the great war broke out in Europe in 1914 had 
visited the countries of Germany, France, Holland, Denmark, Sweden, Nor- 
way and Scotland in behalf of the general association and upon her retiun 
to Xew York in September, 1913. took a further course in Yoimg \\'omen's 
Christian Association work which qualified her for the advanced position 
which she now occupies in that association. At the age of nineteen years 
Joseph S. Amundson went to Arizona with a view to bettering his state of 
health by a change of climate and for a }-ear studied law with an attomev 
at Flagstaff. He then took the civil-service examination and was appointed 
to the forestry service, with headquarters at Flagstaff, where he remained 
thus connected for a year, at the end of which time he was engaged as 
private secretary to David Bobbitt. a millionaire at that place, later becoming 
credit man in a large department store operated at Flagstaflf by the Bobbitt 
interests. A few years later that concern started a large store at ^^'illiams, 
fifty miles west of Flagstaff and J. S. Amundson was made manager of 
the same, a position he occupied until the spring of 1916, when the Bobbitts 
made large investments at Kingman. Arozina. and transferred him to the 
latter place, as manager of their interests there. He married Lillias Mar- 
shall and to that union two children have been born. Elliot Marshall and 
Joseph .Sylvester, Clara Amundson married ^^'alford Forsgreen, of Doug- 
las county, now a grocer at Dillon. ■Montana, and has three children. Frances. 
\\'allace Osborn and Eleanor. 



FRED C. RAITER. 



Fred C. Raiter. well-known and substantial dealer in meats at Alexan- 
dria, successor to the business which his father, Christopher H. Raiter, now 
retired, built up in this section during pioneer days, and who also has large 
farming interests, besides interests in banking and other forms of business 
hereabout, is a native son of Minnesota and has lived here all his life, a 
continuous resident of Alexandria since the days of his infancy. He was 
born in Rochester, this state. July 13, 1869. son of Christopher H. and 



46 IKUT.LAS AND CUANT COUNTIES, MIXNKSOTA. 

Anna (Reierj Raiter, both natives of Germany, who had come to America 
with their respective parents, married in Minnesota and later located at 
Alexandria, hecnmin,^ influential factors in the development of that place 
clurin.t^- tlie carlv (la\s and wlm are still livinp^ there, very comfortablx' situ- 
ated. 

( iiristiipher 11. Raiter was born in Prussia on July 9, 1842, s(in of Got- 
liel) and (hisina ( SheflerJ Raiter, who came to the United States with their 
family in 1864 and settled in Olmsted county, this state, Gotlieb Raiter 
takinjr a homestead there on which he established his home and where he 
spent the rest of his life. His widow, who survived him some years, went 
til the state of Washington after his death and there .she spent her last days. 
'riK'\- were members of the T-utheran church and their children were reared 
in that faith. There were ii\e nf these cliildren, of whom Christopher H., 
the (inl\- present survixnr, was the third in urder of l)irth. the others being 
August. I'eter, Gertrude and Gustine. Ghristcipher H. Raiter preceded his 
l)arents t" this cuuntr}-, he ha\ing come here in 1862. when twenty years 
of age. landing at the port of Xew York penniless, or, as he himself puts 
it, with t\\ent\-iive cents less than nothing at all. He presently secured a 
place working in a market garden near the city for his board and seven 
dollars a month and saved money on the job. .After awhile his wages were 
raised to ten dollars a month and that, he says, spoiled him, for he was 
emboldened ])rcsently to ask for more, was refused and (|uit his job, having 
a difficult lime tinding another: \\hich circumstance, he says, was a good 
le-,->on in letting well enough alone. In the fall of 18^)3 Mr. Raiter made 
his way out to Minnesota and located at Rochester, where he began working 
with a threshing crew and when the threshing season was ended went to 
work in a butcher shop at Rochester, he having had some experience in the 
butcher trade in his native land. Tn 1868 he married and in Ma\-, 1869, 
started in the butcher business on his own account at Oata, where in a few- 
months he built u]) a flourishing business. He then was adxised In- a friend, 
Mr. i 'helps, to transfer his business to the then new town of Alexandria 
.•ind. following that athice. started i>nt with his wife and their first-born 
child, the subject of this sketch, for the latter place. .\t that time there was 
a meat market in the town, locateil on the [iresent site of Raiter Brothers' 
(M,n> of Christoijher H. Kaiter ) shoe store. Christopher H. Raiter Iwught 
that meat market, pa\ing for the same the sum of one thousand dollars, 
put an adilition to the building the market occujiied antl in that addition 
boiisc-d his f.-iniih . That was the beginning of Christoi)her H. Raiter's sue- 



DOUGLAS AXn GKAXT COUXTIES, MINNESOTA. 4J 

cesstul I)usiness career in .-Vlexandria. He remained in tlie meat lousiness 
nntil a few years ago. when he sold his place to his son, Fred C, who is 
now conducting the same along the same successful lines, the business still 
being carried on in the brick liuilding erected by the elder Raiter, the first 
brick business l^uilding erected in Alexandria. Christopher H. Raiter also 
erected the first brick residence in Alexandria, where he and his wife are 
still living and where tiiey are \ery plea.'iantly situated. In addition to the 
extensive Inisiness interests retained I)y Mr. Raiter in .Alexandria, he is the 
owner of a fine farm of three hundred and sixty acres near town, is the 
vice-president of the First National Bank and continues to deal in real estate. 
a business in which he has been largely interested. He organized the first 
bank in Alexandria, now the First Xational Bank, and has helped organize 
and is an officer in seven other banks in towns throughout this section of 
Minnesota and in Xorth Dakota. One of his latest enterprises is the erec- 
tion, in connection with Clans J. Gunderson, of a fine new brick business 
bl' ck in .Alexandria. Christopher H. Raiter and his wife are active mem- 
bers of the Congregational church and were among the leaders in the work 
of erecting that congregation's Ijeautiful edifice in 1892. Mr. Raiter has 
ever been an active leader in the cause of temperance hereabout and his 
strong personal influence has ever Ijeen directed in behalf of good citizen- 
ship. 

It was in 1868, at Rochester, that Christopher H. Raiter was united 
in marriage to Anna Reier, who also was born in Germany, and who had 
come to this country with her parents, Christopher Reier and wife, the 
family first settling in Illinois and later coming to Alinnesota. To that union 
seven children were born, of whom the subject of this sketch was the first- 
born, the others being Emma, Tina, Lytta. Christie, George and Frank. 

Fred C. Raiter was but an infant when his parents moved from Roches- 
ter to Alexandria and he grew to manhood in the latter city, receiving his 
schooling in the public schools there and early taking a part in the manage- 
ment of his father's extensive meat business. \\'hen twenty-eight years of 
age he bought the meat market from his father and has since been very 
successfully conducting the same. He also operates his father's farm of a 
half section near town, devoting the same chiefly to the feeding of cattle 
for his own market. In addition to this he has other business interests and 
is a member of the board of directors of the First Xational Bank of Alex- 
andria and a stockholder in the .Alexandria .Manufacturing Company. Air. 
Raiter is a thirty-second degree Alason. a Knight Templar and a noble of 



48 Dorr.LAs axd gkaxt counties, Minnesota. 

the Ancient Araljie (Jrder of Xubles of the Mystic Shrine, past master of 
tile blue lodge at Alexandria; a memljer of the chapter, Royal Arch Ala- 
suns, at Sauk Center: a member (jf the commandery, Knights Templar, at 
Morris, and a memljer of the consistory, Scottish Rite Masons, and of the 
Shrine at Minneapolis. He also is past noble grand of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows at Alexandria and in the affairs of all these fra- 
ternal organizations takes a warm interest. 

Fred C. Raiter was married to Lily ^^■atters. who was born in Hud- 
sun township, Douglas county, daughter of James W'atters, a veteran of 
the C'ix'il War and a pioneer of Hudson township, now living retired at 
Alexandria, and to this union two children have been bom, Gertrude and 
Frederick. Mr. and Mrs. Raiter are members of the Congregational church 
and take an earnest interest in the various beneficences of the same, as well 
as in all communit}- good works, heljaful in promoting all proper causes 
hereabout. 



RF\'. TORBJORX A. SATTRE. 

The Rev. Torljjorn .\. Sattre, of Evansville, is a native son of Minne- 
sota. He was born on a pioneer farm in Salem township, Olmsted county, 
April 13, 1857, son of Ole S. and Ingeborg (Gjesme) Sattre, natives of 
the kingdom of Xorwa}-, who came to the United States' with their respec- 
time parents in 1844, were married near Cambridge, Wisconsin, in 1854 
and in 1856 came to Minnesota, settling in Olmsted county, where they 
spent the remainder of their lives, honored and useful residents of that 
communit\'. 

Upon moving to Olmsted county Ole S. Sattre bought three hundred 
and twent}' acres of "Congress land," paying for the same one dollar and 
twenty-five cents an acre. During the first summer of their residence there 
he and his wife lived in their covered wagon and in the fall Mr. Sattre built 
a log house, in which he established his home and in which he lived until 
he was able to replace the same by a fine two-story frame house in 1865, 
hauling the lunxber that entered into the construction of the same from 
^\'inona. He develojjed his farm in fine shape and became recognizetl as 
one of the nio^t substantial fanners thereabout. Besides farming he also 
took part in politics antl served one term in the state Legislature as rep- 
resentative from hi> district. On that pioneer farm he and his wife spent 
the remainder (.f their lives, his death occurring on January 2~ . 191.2. and 




l:i;\. T. A. SATTUK. KAUI. I ). SATTUK. 

lUtS. (iritlNE SATTUE. 

[.X(;emax .s. sa ttke. mai;(;ai;et c. satti; 



DOUGLAS AX1> GRAXT COUXTIF.S, MINNESOTA. 49 

hers, February 7. 191^. They were the parents of eight children, of whom 
the subject of tliis sketcli was the second in order of birth and all of whom 
are still living save Sjur, the tirst-born, the others being as follow: Ole, a 
retired farmer, living at Rochester, this state: Andrew, of Minneapolis, a 
collectttr for the Minneapolis Threshing- ^Machine Company: Lewis, who 
is farming the old home farm in Olmsted count}": Adolph, a farmer in 
Dodge county, this state : Mattie, whti li\es with her brother, Lewis, on the 
old home farm, and Inger. wife of David Rivenes, a hardware and clothing 
merchant at Glendive, ^lontana. 

Torbjorn A. Sattre was reared on the paternal farm in Olmsted county, 
receiving his elementary education in the district school in the neighbor- 
hood of the same, and in 1874, when seventeen years of age, entered the 
classical department of Luther College at Decorah, Iowa, from which he 
was graduated in 1880. with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. In the fall 
of that same year he entered the Minnesota State University and after 
one term there, in the spring of 1881, began teaching in a Minneapolis paro- 
chial school and was thus engaged for a rear, at the end of which time, 
in the fall of 1882, he entered Luther Theological Seminary at Madison, 
where he pursued his theological studies for two years. In the fall of 18S4 
he entered the theological department of Capitol L'niversit>- at Columbus, 
Ohio, and was graduated from that institution in 1885. On October 25 
of that same year he was ordained to the ministry and was straightway 
assigned to the Xorwegian Lutheran parish centering at Evansville in his 
native state and has ever since been in charge there, a period of more than 
thirty years. 

The Re\". T. A. Sattre arrived at K\-ansville to begin his pastoral duties 
on November 3. 1885, and on the following Sunday, Xovember 8, at Alex- 
andria, preached his first sermon as pastor of the parish .over which he was 
destined to exert so great an influence in the years to come. That parish 
at that time comprised the charges at Evansville, Alexandria. Xelson and 
Salem, in Douglas county, and Parkers Prairie, Folden and Leaf Lake, in 
Otter Tail count}-, and these seven, charges were ser\ed In- Mr. Sattre for 
seven years, at the end of which time he was relieved of the charges in 
Cotter Tail county and for eight }ear5 thereafter he serxed the other congrega- 
tions, the charges at St. Peter and Lrdahl being added to the same. At 
the end of that period the congregations at Alexandria and Xelson called 
another pastor and since that time Mr. Sattre has continued to ser\e the 
congregations at lAansville, St. Peter and Solem, in Douglas county, and 
('4a) 



50 DOl/GLAS A\M GKAXT COTNTIES, MIXXESOTA. 

I'.ethel cluirch at l-'.nlalil. in drant county. Reverend Sattre has Ijeen a 
member »if tlie United .\(ir\ve<,nan I.utlicran church since its formation in 
1890. lie has >er\ed 1 >n some of it- ni<i-t important committees, has served 
as ])resident of the Ferj:jus halls district of the same, and is now its finan- 
cial secretary, h'or more than twenty years he has been a member of the 
lK)ard of directors of Concordia College at Moorhead. and has helped that 
institution rise from it- one-time humble state to its present excellent stantl- 
ing as a school with m<ire than four hundred students. 

()n April 15, i8qi, the Rev. T. A. Sattre was united in marriage to 
(jurine llellekson. who was Lorn in Olmsted county, this state. May 17. 
1865, daughter of Christen and Saave ( Skogsmark ) Hellekson, natives of 
Norway, who were married in Olmsted county and who spent the remainder 
of their li\es there, honored and useful farming people. Christen Hellekson 
was the owner of a tine farm of two hundred and forty acres and farmed 
the same until his retirement in his old age. His wife died in 1901 and he 
thereafter made his home with his children until his death in April. 1905. 
They were the parents of ten children of whom seven are li\ing. Mrs. Sattre 
the third. Those li\ ing are as follow: Henrik. a farmer in Brookings 
county. South Dakota: Inline, parochial school teacher at Ruso. Xorth Dakota; 
Elias, a farmer in Hettinger count}-, Xorth Dakota: Albert, a farmer in 
McLean count}-. Xorth Dakota; Oscar, pastor at X'orth Yakima, \\'ashing- 
ton.. and Anna, wife of O. P. Frogner. a merchant at Hayfield, Minne- 
sota. 

Reverend antl Mrs. Sattre ha-\-e three children: Karl Orlane, b(jrn on 
July 24. 1892, who was graduated from St. Olaf College at Xorthtield in 
June. 1915, and is now assistant cashier in the Kenmare Xational Bank at 
Kenmare. Xorth Dakota: Ingeman Sanford. a student in the junior class 
.'it Concordia College at ^loorhead. and Margaret Constance, liorn on .\[)ril 
17. 1903. a child at home. 

.\].ril 15. 1916. was the twent}--lifth anniversar}- of the marriage of 
Rev. ami Mrs. .Sattre, and on that day the four congregations consisting of 
Evansville. St. Peter, Solem and Bethel gathered in the Evansville church 
to celebrate the day with the pastor and family, whom they all hold in the 
highest esteem. Re\erend Skyberg. oi .-\astad. addre.-sed the audience, con- 
sisting of n-iore than three hundred people, using as his text Psalm 119. 
63: "Thou h,-ist done well with 'i"h}- ser\-ant. Lord, according to Thy word." 
He spoke at some length almut the well-doing of the Lord through the entire 
life: in our s<irro\\s as well as our pleasures. He em])liasized the thought 
that the Lord cares c-])ecially fur his servants, and concluded his address 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. Z,l 

by presenting Reverend and Mrs. Satire with some beautiful and costly gifts 
and a bag containing two hundred and thirty silver dollars from the con- 
gregations he has so faithfully served. 

For more than thirty years Re\-erend Sattre has served these congre- 
gations, always using his best efforts and striving to uplift the spiritual and 
moral life as well of the members as non-members of his congregations. He 
has had onl}- that one aim in his work, the salvation of the poor and heav\- 
laden, so that the}- ma}" enjci}- (iod's richest I)lessings in this earthly life 
and when death calls them they may live an eternal life in the glorious 
kingdom of God. And the best of good-will towards their pastor and his 
cheerful and pleasant wife has always been thoroughlv manifest. 



XELS M E\'EXSOX. 



Xels Yl. Evenson. president of the I'irst Xational Bank of Osakis, was 
born in Pope county, ^Minnesota, Februar}- 22, 1873, son of Johannes and 
Ane (Langvandet ) Evenson, the former of whom was born in Trondhjem, 
X'orway, and the latter at Snaasen, X'orway. 

Johannes Evenson came to America in 1867 and located first in Fill- 
more county, this state, where he remained for one year. In 1868 he went 
to Pope county, where he entered a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres 
of government land. He made all the improvements on that land, building 
a house for a residence and putting up the necessary farm ]:)uildings. He 
added other acres to his original homestead until be was the owner of a farm 
of two hundred acres. He was the father oi four children: Evinda, who 
married Ole 'SI. Ramstad : Xels AL, Amar J. and Albert J. Air. Evenson 
was a member of the Xorwegian Lutheran church. 

X'els yi. Everson received his elementary education in the public schools 
of Pope count}- and afterward attended a business college at ^Minneapolis, 
where he completed a commercial course. He then taught school for two 
years in the public schools of Pope county and then was for about two years 
with A. G. Englund, of Starbuck. He was afterward emplo}-ed as traveling 
salesman for Deering and AilcComiick harvesting machinery, following that 
business for about two }-ears. In i8qS he entered the employ of Tolliff 
Tacobson & Co., of Alexandria, and in i8qg took a position in Jacobson's 
bank, at Lowry. and after a short time there he was transferred to Jacob- 
son's bank at Lindstrum, where he remained until April, 1902. In October, 



52 DOUGLAS AXn GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

iyo2, he went to Osakis and took a position as cashier of the Securit)- Bank, 
of that place. .V year later that hank was re-organized and became the First 
National Bank of Osakis. Air. I-Acnsnn l)eing continued as cashier of the 
reorganized instituticm. In lyoC) Mr. k'-xenson bought Mr. Jacobson's inter- 
est in the brink, becune iiresidcnl (if tlie same, and is still serving in that 
capacity. 

In 1908 Xels M. Exenson was united in marriage to Ehira R. Ruby, 
daughter of James .\. Ruby, of Seward, Nebraska, and to this union two 
children ha\e been born^ Katherine Ann and Charlotte Louise. The Even- 
sons are members of the Norwegian Lutheran church. Mr. Evenson is a 
Repuljlican. and was formerly a member of the \illage council. He also 
ser\ed as president nf the ("ommercial Club of that city. He is a member 
of the Mas(jnic ortler anil has attained to the Shrine. He also is a member 
of the Knights uf I'ytbias and takes a warm interest in the afYairs of both 
of these organizations. 



STLXER S. SKINNEMOEN, JR. 

Stiner S. Skinnemoen, Jr., a well-known merchant at Wendell, was 
born in Clayton county, Iowa, June 21. 1870, a son of Stiner S. and Criste 
( Olson ) Skinnemoen, lioth natives of Norway, who came to America in 
i86c) and located in Clayton, Iowa, where they remained for two years, at 
the end of which time they came to Minnesota and Mr. Skinnemoen took a 
homestead of one hundred and sixty acres of land in Grant county, on 
whicli he built a house and other Imildings, improved the land and made a 
good farm. He still lives in the old homestead on that farm. To him and 
his wife were born five children, Stiner, Ole, Nels, John and Henry. The 
Skinnemoens are members of the Norwegian Lutheran church, and the 
elder Stiner Skinnemoen has serxed as trustee of the congregation. 

The junior Stiner S. Skinnemoen received his elementary education in 
the public schools of Grant county and afterward attended the Park Region 
Lutheran College at Eergus Falls for two years. After leaving college he 
worked with his father on the farm until 1902. He is the owner of three 
hundred and twenty acres of land in Grant county and is also interested in 
the farmers' elevator in \\>ndell, and is a stockholder in the local bank. In 
1902 he remo\ed to Wendell and engaged in the general merchandising busi- 
ness, in partnershi]) with I''.. .\. Dybdal and L. H. Pikop. In the spring of 
1915 he bouglit Mr. Dyl/d.al's interest in the store and. with Mr. Pikop, has 



DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 53 

since continued the business. They carry a large stock of general merchan- 
dise and do a thriving business, with a substantial trade in the town and sur- 
rounding coimtry. 

In Juh', 1904, Stiner S. Skinnemoen, Jr.. was married to Emma Soleah. 
daughter of .\ndrew E. and Bertha ( Haugen ) Soleah, of Otter Tail county, 
Mr. and Mrs. Skinnemoen are members of the Norwegian Lutheran church 
and he is a Republican in politics. 



WILI.IAAI E\'ERETT HICKS. 

William Everett Hicks, deceased, was one of the most prominent and 
influential citizens of Douglas county. He was born at Sand Point, Long 
Island, son of Xathan ^^'oodhull Hicks, a prominent resident of that com- 
munity, and there spent the early years of his life, ^^■hen but a lad he 
removed with his parents to Brookhn, Xew York, and there received his 
education in the puljlic schools of that city. .\.fter completing his schooling 
at the age of eighteen years, he engaged in newspaper work, as a reporter 
on the Xczt.' York Tvihiinc. Vox four years he followed his chosen work 
on the Tribune and then, in 1857, became financial editor of the Xczi' York 
Evcninci Post, which position he held for lixe years, at the end of which 
time his health l^egan to fail, and he resigned his position. He and his 
familv then spent the year 1863 traveling in Europe. Having regained his 
health. ^Ir. Hicks returned to the L^nited States, locating again in Xew York 
City, where he engaged in business in Wall street. Although successful in 
his business ventures, he decided, in i8fi6, to locate in the A\'est. In the 
summer of that vear he and his family came to ^linnesota and located in 
St. Paul. In the fall of i8h6, he came out to this part of the state on a 
hunting expedition and was so charmed with the country and its scenery 
and beautiful lakes, that be decided to locate here. He purchased from the 
townsite company the land on which the city of Alexandria now stands and 
also became largely interested in timljcr lands. In 1867 he built in the 
village of Alexandria a log building, which he stocked with merchandise and 
thus engaged there in the mercantile business. 

Ylr. Hicks had much faith in the future of the new townsite. and in 
1868 he built the \Voodhull House and the building which served as the 
first court house for Douglas c< mnty. The court house building was also the 
home of the Alexandria Post, which Mr. flicks established in 1868. In 



54 DOLT.LAS AND GKAXT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

that same year he ilc mated the gmund for the court hoiM.- square as well as 
for the site of tlic C nngregatiunal church. He erected a saw-mill and soon 
did an t-xteiisi\c Iju^inc^s, In 1808 he was elected Iw his district as repre- 
sentati\e in the Legislature, and in that capacity he performed a most valu- 
able service for his home people as well as the state in general. As a mem- 
ber of the Legislature he was recognized as one of the leaders in all pro- 
gressive and sul)Stantial movements. He was an untiring worker and a 
man of broad views and much ability. 

In 1855 \\illiam E. Hicks was united in marriage to Theresa T. Aliller, 
of Brooklyn, ami to that union five children were born, Marie, Ida E., AMll- 
iam F... Xorman W". and Cleveland H. Marie Hicks married W. F. Can- 
field; Ida and Xorman Hicks are deceased and Cleveland H. Hicks is the 
private secretary of United States Senator Knute Nelson. ]\Ir. Hicks was a 
devout member of the Congregational church and he and his wife took much 
interest in church work, being active in the social and religious life of the 
community. They took much interest in ail local affairs and were held in 
the highest esteem by all who knew them. Mr. Hicks died in Alexandria 
on Julv 17, 1874, mourned througliout this entire region, for which he had 
done so much. 



HERBERT O. WAGNER. 

Herbert O. \\'agner, a well-known and successful banker of Erdahl. was 
born at Becker, Sherburne county, Minnesota, on April 2, 1875, the son of 
John A. and Kate (Foster) Wagner. 

John A. Wagner was an early settler in Sherburne county, where, in 
1852, he took a claim of one hundred and sixty acres, which cost him one 
dollar and twenty-five cents an acre, and also bought one hundred and sixty 
acres at two dollars and fifty cents an acre. After having secured his claim, 
he left his mother to look after his interests and then went to Colorado, 
where he worked in the mines for some years. \\'hile there he enlisted in 
the Second Regiment, Colorado Volunteer Cavalry, and was engaged help- 
ing put down the guerilla warfare in Missouri, Tennessee, Kansas and Colo- 
rado. At the close of the war, he returned to Becker and there he developed 
and improved his farm and engaged in general farming and stock raising 
until the time of his death, in IQ14, at the age of seventy-eight years. His 
widow died in IQ15, at the age of sixty-eight years. They were the par- 
ents of seven children, John C, Katie. Ruby, I. S., Herbert O., Ernest J. 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, ^MINNESOTA. 55 

and Frank, all of whom are living save Ruby. }ilr. and ]\[rs. Wagner were 
prominent in the social and religious lite of the community, and Mr. Wagner 
was active in local affairs, ha^•ing much to do with the early development 
of his township and county. 

Herbert O. ^^'agner received his education in the common schools of 
Sherburne county and in the high school of Monticello, after which he 
attended business college at V'alparaiso, Indiana, where he was graduated with 
the class of 1893. During the time he was in school he assisted his father 
with the work on the farm and after ha\ing completed his schooling, he 
worked on a farm near Dex'il's Lake, North Dakota, during the summers 
and taught school in southern Minnesota in the winter, and continued thus 
engaged until his marriage, in 1897, to Minnie Jones, of ]^Ionticello, after 
which he engaged in farming in Sherburne county, for the next ten years. 
There he was engaged in general farming and stock raising, in which he was 
quite successful. He then entered the State Bank at Maple Plain, as assistant 
cashier, and remained with that institution for six months, at the end of 
which time he moved to Hawkins, Wisconsin, where he organized the 
Hawkins State Bank, and became cashier of the same, which position he 
held until August, 1914, when he sold his interests and returned to Monti- 
cello and there engaged in farming for a year. In the fall of 1915 he moved 
to Erdahl and there, organized the First State Bank and was later elected 
cashier of the same, with his wife as assistant cashier, which positions they 
now hold. The officers of the bank are as follow : President, Charles 
Bradford; vice-president, Ole A. Thompson: cashier, Herbert O. Wagner, 
and assistant cashier, Minnie Wagner. The directors of the institution are 
Charles Bradford, Ole A. Thompson, Herbert O. Wagner, A. G. Westboe 
and C. E. \\'hite. The capital of the bank is twelve thousand dollars, with 
a surplus of two thousand four hundred dollars. 

The First State Bank of Erdahl started business in small cjuarters, but 
through the efforts of the stockholders and the officers the institution has 
grown to large proportions and is today recognized as one of the strong 
and growing banks of tliis part of the state. The officers of the institution 
have the confidence and the respect of the business men of the connnunit}- 
and are held in the highest regard and esteem. Owing to the growth of the 
institution, the bank left its old quarters in the fall of 1916 and moved into 
its new brick building, modern in. every respect. The bank is equipped with 
a Diebold safe, one of the latest and most modern patterns, and is burglar 
proof. The residents of the community, as well as the owners of the bank, 
take much pride in the institution and are liberal supporters of the same. 



:;6 nOUHLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIKS, MINNESOTA. 

Herbert O. anci Minnie \\ a,i;ner are the parents of two children. Stewart 
A. and C"or H.. tiie former nf whom is now a student of tlie medical school 
at Hamlin Uni\ersitv, after having completed the high-school course at 
Monticelld. and the latter is now a student in the high school, ^h. and 
Mrs. Warner are active members of the Methodist Episcopal church and are 
[tn eminent in the social and the religious life of the community, where they 
are held in the highest regard and esteem by all who know them. 

In atldition to his many other duties, Mr. Wagner, with his brother. 
I. S. Wagner, has established the Wagner Lumber Company at I'.rdahl, the 
firm carrying a full line of building material. Having the confidence and 
the respect of the entire community, they hope to conduct the business in such 
a manner as to merit the support of those who contemplate building or are 
in neeil of an\thing in their line of business. Herbert O. \\'agner has always 
taken an acti\'e interest in the ci\ic life (if the c<ininiunit}- and has ever exerted 
his inlluence in behalf of the liest interests <if the township and the county, a 
strong supporter of all public imi)rovements that tend to the betterment and 
the growth of his home district. He is a lirm belie\er in good roads and 
good schools, belie\ing that in these rests to a great e.xtent the future suc- 
cess oi the district, as v.ell as the state. Being a man of broad views and 
much experience, he is often consulted on matters relating to proposed public 
improvements and to him is due much of the progressi\'e spirit manifested 
in the town as wel' as in the surrounding territory. He is broad-minded 
and Icioks to the interests of the community in general. His life has been 
an acti\e one and he lias acciini[)lished nuich that is worthy of emulation. 
Few men in the community are held in higher regard and respect. l-A-er 
readv to assist a friend and neighl)or. he has won for himself a host of 
friends in the business and social world. 



.VXTOX H. GREGERSEX. 

.\nton H. Gregersen. head of the well-known firm of .\. H. Ciregersen 
& Comjiany at .Alexandria, dry goods and general furnishings; first president 
of tl'.e Commercial Club of that city, first president of the local board of 
works, \ice-president of the b'irst Xational Bank, secretary-treasurer of the 
.\lexandria Heating Comi)any and actively identified with other commercial 
;md industrial enterprises in that city, is a native of the kingdom of Den- 
mark, liut has been a resident of Minnesota since he was se\-enteen years of 



DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUXTIES, MINNESOTA. 57 

age. He \\as born in the city of Copenhagen on September 13. 1865, .son 
of Hans and Christina Gregersen, who spent all their lives in their native 
land, and received a commercial training in connection with his general 
schooling in the days of his youth. 

In 1882, he then being eighteen years of age, Anton H. Gregersen came 
to the United States and proceeded directly to Alinnesota, locating for a 
time at Alden, in Freeborn county; presently going thence to Minneapolis, 
where he began working for the wholesale house of Regan Brothers. From 
there he went to Litchfield and was there engaged as a clerk and bookkeeper 
in a general store until 1887, i" which year he went to St. Paul and was there 
connected with the wholesale house of C. Gotzian & Company and later with 
the clothing store of H. C. Burbank & Company, bookkeeper and credit man 
for the latter concern until 1899, when he engaged in business for himself 
at Alexandria, buying the interest of W. T. Hendren in the dry-goods store 
with which he ever since has been connected, entering business there as a 
member of the firm of Gilbert & Ciregersen. Three }'ears later Mr. (ireger- 
sen bought INIr. Gill)ert's interest in the establishment and has since continued 
as general manager and actixe head of the concern, which is conducted under 
the firm name of A. H. Gregersen & Company and which has built up a 
large trade in and about Alexandria. A\'hen Mr. Gregersen engaged in 
business in Alexandria his store employed but three clerks. He now employs 
sixteen clerks and the business has more than trebled in \olume. In addi- 
tion to managing his own extensive establishment ^Ir. Gregersen has taken 
an active interest in the general business affairs of Alexandria e\er since 
locating there and has Ijeen one of the prime factors in the de\elopment of 
the commercial and industrial interests of the town.. Upon the organization 
of the Alexandria Commercial Club he was elected president of that organ- 
ization and has ever since given his most thoughtful attention to the affairs 
of the same. He also was the first president of the board of works after 
Alexandria began to do business as a corporation and was for four years 
the head of that important public body. He is secretary-treasurer of the 
Alexandria Heating Company, which operates the new heating plant in 
that citv and he also has an interest in a garage there. 

In 1884, a little more than two years after coming to Minnesota, Anton 
H. Gregersen was united in marriage to E. J. Gottschamer. of St. Paul. 
Mr. and Mrs. Gergersen ha\ e a \ery pleasant home in Alexandria and take 
an earnest interest in the general social activities of their home town ami in 
all proper movements having to do with the general welfare of the onn- 
munitv in which thev li\e. 



jRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 



JOSEPH H. \\T.TTLESOX. 



Joseph II. Wettlesuii, secretary and treasurer of tlie Herberger-Wettle- 
son Company. incoqjDrated. dealers in dry goods at .\le.\andria. and who for 
years before becoming connected with that firm was a well-known commer- 
cial traveler, traveling out of Alexandria, is a native of Wisconsin, born in 
Stoughton, that stale. June 19, 1867. son of Jacob and Mary (Johnson) 
\\'ettleson, nati\es of the kingdom of Norway, the former of whom is now 
living retired in the city of Los Angeles, California, where tlie latter spent 
her last days, her death occurring in 19 10. 

Jacob Wettleson was about ten \ears old when his parents. \\'ettie and 
Susan Wettleson, came to the L'nited States from Norway in 1841 and set- 
tled on a homestead farm in Dane county. Wisconsin, where thev spent the 
remainder of their lives. He grew up on that homestead farm, receiving his 
education in the public schools, and later became a grain buyer in Stoughton, 
afterward becoming engaged in the mercantile business and was for years 
one of the leading business men of that town. He also took an active part 
in the civic affairs of his home town and was the first mayor of the city of 
Stoughton, where he remaineil until his retirement from business and removal 
to Los Angeles, where he is now living and where he is very comfortably 
situated. He and his wife were the parents of six children, Susan, Josephine, 
William, Joseph, Emma and Theresa. The mother of these children, who, 
as noted above, died at Los Angeles in 1910, was a young woman when she 
came to this country from Norwav with her parents, John Johnson and wife, 
in 1 85 1. John Johnson was a goldsmith and both he and his wife spent 
their last days in Wisconsin, where they had settled upon coming to this 
country. P.oth the Wettlesons and the Johnsons were active workers in the 
Lutheran church. 

Jo.seph H. Wettleson A\as reared at Stoughton, receiving his schooling 
in the public schools of that town and early entered upon his mercantile 
career, beginning as a clerk in a store in his home town. He later became 
engaged as a commercial traveler and made his headquarters at Alexandria, 
where he ever since his made his home. Mr. Wettleson continued his 
service as a tra\elmg salesman for fifteen years and then, on Jtily 22, 1914, 
formed his present connection, as a partnership, with the Herberger-^Vettle- 
son Company, incorporated, dealers in dry goods at .Mexandria. ^Mr. Wet- 
tleson is the secretary and treasurer of the company, which has a large and 
well-equipped store and which has built up a fine business in and alx)ut 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT <;OUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 59 

Alexandria, being one of the best-known dry-goods firms in this part of the 
state. I\Ir. W'ettleson is the present president of the Alexandria Commercial 
Club. 

In 1887 Joseph H. \A'ettleson was united in marriage to Anna Eells, of 
Crawford county, Pennsyh-ania, and to this union four children ha\'e been 
born, Paul. Joseph, Philip and Robert. J\Ir. and Mrs. Wettleson are mem- 
bers of the Congregational church and take a proper interest in all measures 
having to do with the advancement of the common welfare of their home 
communitv. Mr. Wettleson is a Mason and takes a warm interest in the 
affairs of that order. 



WILLIAM JOHX BARR MOSES. 

William John Barr Moses, editor and publisher of The Foniiii at 
Brandon and one of the best-known and most popular of Minnesota's con- 
siderable circle of literary men, author of "Dreaming River" and numer- 
'ous short stories, sketches and magazine and newspaper articles without 
number, proprietor of "Oakdene Park," a delightful lakeside place and an 
equally delightful home at Lake Latoka, near .\lexandria, besides a pleas- 
ant home at Brandon, where he latel}' has made his residence, is a native 
of Minnesota and has lived in this state all his life, with the exception of 
the period spent in extensive travels through Europe and in this country. 
He was born at the village of Terrace, in Pope county, this state, June 
27, 1874, son of \\'illiam and ^lary ( Morrison! Moses, whose last days 
were spent in Alexandria. 

William Moses was born at Knowlton, in the province of Quebec, 
Canada, April i6, 1842, and completed his schooling in the ^^'aterloo Acad- 
emv, after which he taught school for some years, farming during the sum- 
mers. He married Alartha Ralston and in 1868 came \\\th his wife to 
Minnesota, settling at Owatonna, where for a few years he operated a wind 
grist-mill. He then mcn-ed to Pope o^unty and started a store and water- 
power mill, the only mill within a radius of seventy-five miles. Arotmd 
that mill and country store a village presently sprang up which became 
known as Terrace, and there Mr. Moses continued to make his home for 
ten years. While living there his wife died without issue, and in 1873 
he married Mary ^Morrison, who was born on March 23, 1842. In 1882 
\Mlliam Moses left Terrace and moved up into Douglas county, locating at 
.Mexandria, where, in partnership with J. 



6o nOUCLAS AM) (.RANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

in tlie general mercantile business and where he made his headquarters the 
rest iif iiis life. Mr. Mose.s was a \ery active business man and his com- 
mercial and banking connections gradually extended to distant towns. He 
was president of the Douglas County Bank at Alexandria and was con- 
nected with the l-'irst National Bank of Elbow Lake, with the Bank of 
Carrington at larrington, North Dakota, and with the Citizens' Bank at 
Draxton, same state, lie also held commercial connections in other towns 
in North Dakota and was long accovmted one of the most influential and 
progressixe business men hereabout. William Moses died on June 25, 
1914, and his widow survived less than a year, her death occurring in 
March, 191 5. They were the parents of two sons, the subject of this sketch 
ha\ing a younger brother, C. M. Moses, born on December 5, 1876, now 
general agent for the Great Western Assurance Company of Winnipeg at 
Mini it, Ncirth Dakcjta, wlm married Rubina Halcrow and has four children, 
Charles William, Domthy h'.lizaljeth. John Halcrow and George Harold. 

William J. B. Moses was about eighi: \ears <ild when his ijarents moveil 
from Terrace to Alexandria and he grew to nmnhood in the latter citv. He 
was graduated from the .Alexandria high school in t8q.^ and then entered 
Hamline University -at St. Paul and was graduated from that institution in 
if)oo. with the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy. IMr. Moses also took a 
]iarl of his undergraduate work in the L'niversity of Minnesota, after which 
he to(]k a post-graduate course in the English department of the University 
of Chicago. Inuring 1896 Mr. Moses traveled extensively in Europe and 
upon his return home entered ui;on his life work as an author, since then 
having devoted practicall\- his whole time to the writing of novels, short 
stories, poems, magazine articles and humorous sketches. Mr. Moses has 
had one no\ el ]>ublished, "Dreaming River" (Stokes, New York, 1909), and 
has written for a great many popular publications, including the Peoples 
M(n/a.::iih-. .til-Story. Red Book. St. Xicholas. Puck. Jiuh/e. Life. Smart 
Set. U'niiuni's limit,' Ciniiponion. The Housekeeper and the like and has 
also written for many of the leading newspapers of the country, including 
the Spyiiujfield ( Massachusetts) Republican, the AVk' York Times, the Xezv 
York Sun. the -V.-7i' )'ork Herald, the Boston Globe, the Chicago Xczes. the 
Chieaiio Trilnnie. the Chic(!(/t> h'ecord-Herald and others too numerous to 
menti<in. Mr. Moses was librarian at .Mexandria for two years. On Octo- 
ber 15, KJ15, he purcliasecl 'The Torum. published at Brandon, and has since 
been the editor and luiblisher of the same, a six-column (|uarto paper of 
wide circulation and large intluence throughout this section. Since then Mr. 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 6l 

Moses has been making his home in Brandon, where he owns a very pleas- 
ant residence property. For some years previously he had been living in 
his delightful country home, "Oakdene Park," near Alexandria, a tract of 
twenty-six acres at Lake Latoka, and his father's old home place in Alex- 
andria. The elder INIoses was a prominent member of the Methodist church 
at Alexandria and was one of the leading factors in the substantial estab- 
lishment of that congregation there, but his son is a member of the Epis- 
copal church, a vestryman, and for some years served as lay reader in the 
church. 

On June i, 1910, W. J. B. Moses was united in marriage to Annette 
M. Peacock, of Alexandria, daughter of Robert and Ruth (Wilson) Pea- 
cock, old residents of Pope county, who moved to Alexandria about 1904, 
and to this union one child has been lx)rn, a son, William Roliert. born on 
December 24, 1911. 



HARLAN S. CAAIPBELL. 

Harlan S. Campbell, manager of the St. Anthony & Dakota elevator 
at . Alexandria, member of the common council of that cit}-, and one of the 
best-known grain men in this part of the state, is a native of Minnesota and 
has lived in this state all his life. He was born in the city of Minneapolis, 
June 5, 1874, son of Arthur R. and Sarah H. (Smith) Campbell, natives of 
the state of iMaine, whose last days spent at Little Falls, this state. 

Arthur R. Campbell was reared in Alaine and earl}- learned the trade 
(_)f shipwright, working in shipyards in the East until his marriage in 1865 
to Sarah H. Smith, immediatel\- after which he came West and settled at 
St. Anthony (now Minneapolis), where he worked on the erection of several 
of the large mills then being erected at that place. He later engaged in the 
grain business and presently was made manager of the Old Pillsbury elevator 
in southeastern Minneapolis, remaining thus engaged until in August, 1884, 
when he was transferred to . Alexandria as the manager of the Pillsbury & 
Hulburt elevator at that place. There Mr. Campbell remained until 1904, 
in which vear he was luade inspector for the Northwestern Milling Com- 
pany, with headquarters at Little Falls, and moved to the latter place, where 
he spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring in June, 1913, he 
then being sixty-nine years and six months of age. His widow survived him 
but a few months, her death occurring in September of that same \ear, she 
being sixty-five years of age at the time of her death. They were the par- 



02 lMJL<;i.AS .\\n GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

ents uf fdur children, those besides the subject of this sketch being Georgia, 
who died in September, 1914; Dennison, instructor in manual training in 
the schools at Jordan, this state, who married Bessie Burrell and has one 
cliild. a daugiiter. Janet, and Ralph, who died rm March 7, 1916. 

Harlan S. Campbell was ten \ears old when his parents moved from 
Minneapolis to Alexandria and his schooling, begun in the schools at Minne- 
apolis, was continued in the schools of Alexandria. He w as graduated from 
the high school in the latter city in 1893 and then attended the academic 
department of the State University for a year, at the end of which time, in 
the fail of 1895, following his marriage, he was made manager of an ele- 
vator at Garfield. From the days of his boyhood Mr. Campbell had been 
acquiring a thorough acquaintance with the grain business under his father's 
careful direction, and after two years as manager of the Garfield elevator he 
was transferretl to I^'hard. in the neighboring county of Otter Tail, where he 
served as manager of the elevator at that place for four years. In the fall 
of 1 90 1 Mr. Campbell was called back to Alexandria to take the position 
of manager of the St. Anthony & Dakota elevator at that place and has 
ever since continued in that responsible position, long having been recog- 
nized as one of the leading grain men in this part of the state. Mr. Campbell 
is a member of the .\lexandria Commercial Club and has for years taken 
an acti\e part in the general business afifairs of his home town. He also 
takes a proper interest in the community's civic afifairs, has been a member 
of the fire department since 1902, was the first president of the Fireman's 
Relief Associatimi and for the past seven or eight years has lieen a member 
of the Alexandria CDninK.n council, being elected on the n()n-i)artisan ticket. 

It was on October ] t,. 1895, that Harlan S. Campbell was united in 
marriage at Alexandria to Florence E. De I'rate. of that citv. daughter 
of Sheriff .\. \\'. De b>ate and who was graduated with the same class 
and had taught school for a couple of years before her marriage to Mr. 
Campbell. To that union two children have been Ix^rn. Arthur Ross, brirn 
on July 18, 1897. and Francis Colin, Januarv 25. 1904. Mr. and Mrs. 
Campbell are members o{ the Congregational church and take a proper 
interest in the \arious lieneficences of the same, as well as in all local 
good works. Air. Campbell is a past master of Constellation Lodge Xo. 
81, Ancient b>ee and Accepted Masons, of which lodge he served as master 
for three terms, and is past worthy patron of the local chapter of the Order 
of the Eastern Star. Mrs. Campbell is past worthy matron of the same 
and is also a deaconess in the Congregational church and superintendent of 
the primary department of the Sunday school of the same. 



DC J Uf, I. AS AXO (IKANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 63 

NILS ELLIXGSON. 

Xils lillingson, a \\ell-kn(n\ii pioneer fanner of Stony Brook township, 
Grant connty, is a native of the kingdom of Norway, but has been a resi- 
dent of [Minnesota since 1868 and of Grant county since 1878. He was born 
on a farm in the Sigdal district of Norway on June 11, 1852, son of EUing 
Nilson and Annie Ellenson, both natives of that same district, the former 
born in May, 1825, and the latter, March 23, 1823, who grew up in the 
same neighborhood and were married there, remaining in their native land 
until 1868 when they came with their family to the United States and pro- 
ceeded on out to Alinnesota, settling in Houston county. Elling Nilson 
had been reared to the life of the farm in the old country and had there 
been a farmer, hence upon coming to Minnesota he rented a farm in Houston 
count}- and there established his home, remaining there until 1877, in which 
year, by wagon and ox-team, he made his way to Grant county and home- 
steaded one hundred and sixty acres in section t,2 of Ston}- Brook township. 
He erected a small frame house, twelve by fourteen feet and eight feet high, 
and settled down to the difficult task of breaking the farm and bringing it 
under cultixation. He prospered in his farming operations and later bought 
an "eighty" adjoining his homestead and still later an additional quarter 
section, but before his death had disposed of most of his land holdings. On 
that homestead farm Elling Nilson and his wife spent their last davs, his 
death occurring in 1903, he then being past seventy-eight vears of age, and 
hers in the the following _\ear, 1904, she then being eight\--two vears of age. 
They \vere the parents of se\'en children, namelv : Annie, who married 
Peter Erickson, a biographical sketch <if \\'h(ini appears elsewhere in this 
volume ; Gunhild, who married Kittel Olson and died at her home in Stony 
Brook town.ship in 1895; ^'^i^*- the immediate subject of this biographical 
sketch : Hans, who is now living retired at \\'endell ; Martha, who married 
A. E. Dybdal and also lives at Wendell; Christine, who married C. C. 
Grinder and li\es on a farm one and one-half miles east of Wendell ; and 
Ellen, a farmer, who lives about one-half mile south of ^Vendell. 

Nils Ellingson was about sixteen years of age when he came to America 
with his parents in 1868 and he grew to manhood on the home farm in 
Houston county, this state, reiuaining there until he was twentv-one years of 
age, when he began working on his own account and was thus engaged until 
1878, when, with his wife (he having been married in the spring of 1877) 
and their infant child, he came over to this part of the state and settled in 



64 nOT.-C.LAS AM) GRANT COL'NTIES, MINNESOTA. 

Grant cuuiitw buying a tract of eighty acres in section 29 of Stony Brook 
township. J-'ur his immediate occupancy at that time he erected a small log 
house on the adjoining farm of his brother, but later built on his own farm 
a small frame house, which is now used as the kitchen of his present dwell- 
ing. He gradually broke his farm and brought the same under cultivation 
and as he prospered in his operations added to his holdings until he is now 
the (iwner of a fine farm of two hundred acres. 

It was on March 26, 1877, that Nils Ellingson was united in marriage 
to Sigri Dybdal, who was born in Norway, a daughter of Ellen Dybdal and 
wife, who liecame early settlers in Iowa, where they spent their last days. 
To this union nine children have been born, namely: Elling, a grain buyer 
at Barrett; l-'.llen, who died in infancy; Annie, who married Ole Christenson 
and lives at \\'endell; I'^Uend X., a biographical sketch of whom is presented 
elsewhere in this \()lume; Bernard, who is engaged in the retail meat busi- 
ness at \\'en(lell ; Sam, at home, and Bertha, Edward and Albert, also at 
home. 



CASSIUS CLINTON STRANG, D. D. S. 

Dr. Cassius Clinton Strang, a w-ell-known dentist and the mayor of 
Alexandria, was Ixirn in Hudson township, Douglas county, Minnesota, on 
-May 24, j87<), son 01 George Jesse and Sarah Jane (Burgan) Strang. 

George Jesse Strang was Ijorn in Prince Edward Island on February 
22. 1845, the son of Joseph and Elizal^eth (Murray) Strang. Joseph Strang 
was born in Rhode Island and Elizabeth Murray Strang was born on Prince 
h^dward Island. Joseph Strang received his education in the public schools 
of Rhode Island, and there grew to manhood. As a young man he engaged 
as a coast sailor, and during his cruises along the coast he met and married 
Elizabeth Murray, at her home in Prince Edward Island. Soon after their 
marriage, the voung couple mo\ed to Kane county, Illinois, and pre-empted 
one hundred and sixty acres of land, six miles from Elgin. Joseph Strang 
developed and improved tliat farm and there engaged in general farming 
until 1850, when he nio\ ed to Iowa and located in Fayette county, and there 
engaged in farming for (i\e years, at the end of which time, in 1855, he 
came to ]\iinne-(ita ;ind pre-empted one hundred and sixty acres of land in 
Rice count V, all of which was wild prairie. He built a log house and 
developed the farm, and there he resided until 1867, when he moved to 
Douglas count}- and took a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres in 



DOUCLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 65 

Hudson township. There he buih a substantial frame house and with a 
team of oxen developed the farm. In time he became one of the substan- 
tial farmers of the township and there he resided for thirty-eight years, at 
the end of which time he retired from the activities of the farm life and 
moved to Alexandria, where he lived for twenty years before his death in 
December. 1905, he then being eight}--nine years of age. His \Aife had died 
nearly twenty years previous to that time. They were the parents of nine 
children. ]\lary. David ^1., Sarah Ann, George Jesse. Eliza. Penelope, 
Charles D., Lucinda and Louis D., the latter of whom died at the age of 
five years. 

George Jesse Strang receixed his education in Iowa and in Rice county. 
this state, and grew to manhood on the home farm, where as a lad and 
young man he assisted with the farm work. He remained at home until, at 
the age of eighteen years, in 1863, he enlisted in Company A. Fifth Regi- 
ment, ^linnesota \'olunteer Infantr_\, and was at once sent to Memphis, 
Tennessee. He was later in the two-days i)attle of Xashville, after which 
he was with the command that followed Hood to the east part of Tennessee, 
where they engaged in the decisive battles of Pulaski and Franklin, the latter 
battle being one of the most decisive battles of the war, and perhaps the 
only one in which an entire Confederate army was annihilated. He was 
then sent to Mobile, Alabama, after one month in Eastport, Tennessee. 
There he assisted in the capture of Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely. 
After that he was sent to Xew Orleans, and then on a month's campaign 
along the Gulf of ^Mexico ; thence to Montgomery, Alabama, and then to 
Salem, that state, where he was discharged, after two years of most active 
senice. After being mustered out of the service. 'Sir. Strang returned to 
Minnesota and the first winter thereafter he spent with the home folks in 
Rice county. Then in 1S66. he. with his brother. David AI. Strang, came 
to Douglas county, where each took a squatter's claim to one hundred and 
sixty acres of land, Da\id Strang- taking his claim in section 21 and George 
J. Strang, in section 16 of Hudson township. George Jesse Strang later 
learned that his land in section 16 had been set aside for school purposes, 
so he pre-empted the tract and paid one dollar and twenty-five cents an 
acre for the place. The brothers had driven through with oxen, and after 
having selected their land, returned and brought their parents to this county, 
and with them they brought horses, with which to assist them in their work. 
George Jesse Strang at once built a log house on his farm and began the 
task of clearing the place and planting his crops. The first year he had 



66 DOUGLAS AND GRAXT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

hi'ty bushels of oats and twenty-five bushels of wheat, wihch he had to 
market at St. Cloud, eighty miles distant. Those were trying times for 
the pioneers, \et they were determined, and in time became prosperous 
farmers. A substantial frame house presently was erected, which now 
stands on the farm, and other substantial and valuable improvements were 
made. More land was Ix)ught. and in time George J. Strang became the 
owner of some six hundred acres of valuable land, all of which was under 
high cultivation and well improved. Mr. Strang engaged in general farming- 
and stock raising and became one of the prominent men of the countv. In 
1904 he was appointed In- Governor \'an Sant. as a member of. the board 
of grain appeals. For two \ears a son operated the farm, after which he 
rented the place until lyio, when he sold the farm. He continued to ser\e 
on the board of appeals until 1908, when lie entered tlie emp]o\- at the 
Atwood I^rson Company, grain commission merchants at Duluth, in which 
capacity he served as a grain buyer in carload lots, his territorv covering 
the northwest part of ^linnesota, he continuing, however, to reside in Alex- 
andria, where he has a beautiful home. 

In 1868 George Jesse Strang was united in marriage to Sarah Jane 
Burgan, who was l:orn on I'-ebruary 3. 1849. <''t Jamestown. Indiana, and 
who came with her parents to Minnesota in an early day. To this union 
seven children have been born. Charles B.. George J., Lulu Elizabeth, D. M., 
Kl\a. Cassiu-^ Clinton, and C!i\-e Joseph. George J. Strang. Jr.. died at the 
age of five vears. Dr. Charles B. Strang is a well-known pliysician at 
Leninion. South Dakota: Lulu ICIizabeth Strang married A. P. Xelson. a 
Ijanker of Grant.'iburg. Wisconsin : Dr. D. M. Strang is a phv.sician at 
Sprague. Washington, and is the father of two children. Pauline and Robert. 
\-A\-A Strang married \\ E. Hawley. a successful hardware merchant of 
Grantsburg, Wisconsin, and has one child, Grace. Clive Joseph Strang is 
a lawyer and at present county attorney of Burnett county, Wisconsin. 

Cieorge Jesse Strang and wife ha\e long lieen prominent in the social 
life of the coninninity. where they are hekl'in the highest regard'and esteem 
l)y all who know them. Politically. Mr. Strang has always taken an active 
interest in local affairs, and was one of the organizers of the township of 
Hudson. He served as chairman of the township board of supervisors for 
a number of years and as ju-tice <>i the ])eace. as well as constable. He 
was a patriotic citizen and was e\er willing to assist in the civic growth 
of the township and the county. In 1S03 he was elected to the .state Legis- 
lature, and there renilered valuable service to his district as well as to the 



DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 67 

State. He won imich prominence in the House and was recognized as one 
of tlie strong and iniluential men of the assembly. Fraternally, 'Sir. Strang 
is a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted ]\Iasons and of the Inde- 
pendent Order ot Odd Fellows, and has always taken much interest in the 
work of these orders. Airs. Strang is a prominent member of the Order 
of the Eastern Star. Both 'Sir. and Airs. Strang have devoted much time 
to the interest of the community in which they have lived for so many 
years, and have had much to du \\ith the substantial progress of this district. 
'J'hey are kind and indulgent parents and have ever devoted their lives to 
their family and to their friends. They have taken much interest in the 
development of the educational system of the county, and are strong advo- 
cates of the maintenance of the best of schools, and have given their children 
every possible adxantage in the way of acquiring a good education. 

Cassius Clinton Strang received his education in the rural schools of 
Hudson township and at the high school at Alexandria and grew to manhood 
on the home farm, where he assisted his father during the time he was not 
attending school. Even while later attending the University he spent his 
summers on the farm, assisting in the work of the same. During the time 
he was in the high school he taught two terms in the rural districts, and thus 
gained an experience that has been of much value to him during his active 
life. In the fall of 1902 he entered the dental department of the Alinnesota 
State Uni\-ersity, and was graduated with the class of 1905. Upon com- 
pleting his work in the university, Doctor Strang secured his state license to 
practice the dental profession and located at Alexandria, where he has since 
continued in practice with marked success. 

Doctor Strang's hrst office was a small one over the People's Store, 
where he remained for three _\ears. at the end of which time he moved to 
the rooms over the Hanson furniture store, where he remained for seven 
years. In Xovember, 191 5, he moved to his present magnificent offices 
where he has an excellent practice. The Doctor is free to admit that for 
more than a year after he began his practice at Alexandria he was not self- 
supporting, but now his practice demands his entire attention. His office is 
supplied with every modern appliance, and his instruments are of the most 
up-to-date character. His workship is so arranged as to handle all work 
quickly, accuratel}' and in a sanitary manner, ever\thing in his line haxing 
been installed for the comfort and benefit of his patrons. Bv expert work- 
manship and courteous treatment. Doctor Strang has won the confidence and 
the esteem of the people of the conmiunity, among whom he is held in the 
highest regard. 



68 DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

On June 3, 1897, Dr. C. C. Strang was united in marriage to Marian 
Lillian Costello, of Stillwater, Minnesota, and to this union two children have 
been born, A'irgie .\dair, born on July 7, 1908, and Mary Elizabeth, Febru- 
ary 28, 1912. Doctor and Airs. Strang are active members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church and take much interest in church work, and are also earnest 
participants in the social activities of the community. Fraternally, Doctor 
Strang is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and of the Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, and in the latter order has attained to the Temple 
degree of the York Rite, and is a thirty-second degree member of 
the consistory of the Scottish Rite, and a noble of the Ancient Arabic Order 
of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is senior deacon in the Masonic lodge 
at Alexandria and takes nnich interest in the affairs of that order. Mrs. 
Strang is a member of the Order of the Eastern Star and is associate matron 
of the local chapter at Alexandria. Doctor Strang is also a member of the 
latter order and is now serving as sentinel of the local chapter. 

Doctor .Strang has always taken an active interest in the civic life of 
the commimity and has long been prominent in the governmental afifairs of 
Alexandria. He is progressive in his views and has long advocated improve- 
ments and policies that would tend to the advancement of the best interests 
of the residents of the city. In March, 1916, he was elected mayor of the 
city and is now devoting his best efforts to the duties of that office. 



TIDEMAX H. BURTXESS. 

Tideman H. Burtness, one of Grant county's best-known and most 
substantial jMoneer farmers and an honored veteran of the Civil War, 
is a nati\e of the kingdom of Norway, but has been a resident of this 
country since he was thirteen years of age and of Grant county since the 
vear 1871, thus being classed among the very earliest settlers of the county. 
He was born on the farm "Burtness," in the beautiful valley of Hallingdal, 
about eighty miles northwest of the city of Christiania, July 7, 1847, son 
of Helge and Leva (Maiermon) Burtness, natives of that same district, 
well-to-do farming people and owners of the farm "Burtness." Airs. Burt- 
ness died in 1856 and in i860 Helge Burtness disposed of his interests in 
Norwav and, following the example of some of his older children who had 
come to this country and had settled in ^^'isconsin, came with his other 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 69 

children to the United States and joined the older children in Rock county. 
Wisconsin, settling there on a farm. After spending some years in that 
county he moved over into Minnesota and his last years were spent with 
those of his sons who previously had located in Houston county, his death 
occurring there in 1867. Helge Burtness had been twice married, six chil- 
dren having been born to his first wife, namely: Peter, who remained on 
the old homestead in Xorwa}' and who died there at the great age of ninety- 
five years; John, who died in Rock county, ^^'isconsin; Ole, who died in 
\\'aseca county, this state; Tideman, who also spent his last days in Rock 
county, Wisconsin; Osten, who died in Houston county, this state, and 
Peder, who joined an expedition seeking gold in California and after 
spending some time there never was heard from again. To Helge Burtness's 
second marriage seven children were born, of whom the subject of this 
biographical sketch was the sixth in order of birth, the others being as 
follow : Thora, who married Ole Olsgaard and is now living at Spring 
Grove, in Houston count}-, this state, past eighty-three years of age: Elling. 
who died in Houston county ; Sven, who died in Emmet county, Towa : 
Christien, who lives in Fillm< ire county, this state : Halvor. who lives in 
Clav countv. this state, anil Bergit. who lives in Fillmore county, widow 
of Knut ^^'old. 

Reared on the ancestral farm in the valley of Hallingdal, Tiedeman 
H. Burtness received his schooling in the local schools there and was about 
thirteen vears of age when he came with his father to this country. He 
spent his vouth on a farm in Rock county, Wisconsin, and in 1864. when 
seventeen vears of age. enlisted for service in Company D. Forty-third Regi- 
ment, \\'isconsin \'olunteer Infantry, with which command he served until 
the close of the Civil \\'ar. ])articipating in the battle of Xashville and 
after that being -tationed along the line of the Xashville & Chattanooga 
railway, doing guard duty. During his term of service Mr. Burtness was 
confined to the hospital for six weeks. Upon the completion of his mili- 
tary service he returned to Wisconsin, but shortly afterward joined his 
father in Houston county, this state, and there worked with his brother 
on a farm until his marriage in the fall of 1870, following which, in 
1871. he and his wife drove over to this part of the state and located in 
Grant crmnty. homesteading a tract of one hundred and sixty acres in 
section 14 of Elbow Lake township, which ever since has been their home. 
Upon entering upon his homestead Mr. Burtness hauled logs from the 
banks of Pomme de Terre Lake and built a log house, which provided a 
home until he later was able to erect a more commocKous and comfortable 



^0 DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

dwelling. He passed thmugli all the trials and privations of the pioneer 
period, but after awhile began to prosper in his farming operations and 
)ears ago became recognized as one of the nmst substantial farmers of that 
community, adding to his holdings until he now is the owner of four hun- 
dred and eighty acres in one body, surrounding Iiis old homestead, l>esides 
a farm ui one hundred acres in Sanfurd township. Air. Burtness is a 
Kepublican and has served the pulilic in the capacity of school director and 
as.sessor in his home township. 

It was in September, 1870, in Rock county, \\'isconsin that Tiedeman 
11. Burtness was united in marriage to Barbara Solem, who was born in 
that county, a tlaughter of Knut Solem and wife, who were among the 
earliest settler^^ of tliat county, and to this union eleven children have been 
born, namely: Leva, who died in infancy; Helge. who lives on a farm east 
of l^lbow Lake; Leva, who married Sivert Xort and lives on a farm nearbv 
the Burtness homestead ; Hans, who lives in Canada ; Theodore, who also 
lives in Canada: Tilla, who married Henry Hanson and lives near the old 
homestead: Peander, who, with his brother Pidolph, is now' operating the 
home place for his father; Christine, who marled Andrew Vum and died 
in Elbow Lake township; b)hn, who lives in Enderlin, North Dakota, where 
he is the owner of a garage; Torgen, at home, and Adolph, also at home, 
who is assisting his brother Peander in the management of the home farm. 
The Burtnesses are members of the United Lutheran church at Elbow Lake, 
lor many years among the most active supporters of the .same, and Mr.. 
ISurtness was formerly a member of the board of trustees of the congre- 
gation, ever taking a pro])er interest in communitv good works. 



C. A. PRESTRUD. 



C. A. Prestrud, cashier of the First Xational Bank of Wendell, was 
born in Norway, June 17. 1878, a son of H. C. and Charlotte L. (Mason) 
Prestrud, natives of Norway, who came to America in 1886, locating at St. 
Paul, where the father worked at his trade as cabinet-maker, and made this 
home for the rest of his life. He died on May 3, 1902, and his widow sur- 
vived until 1916. The subject of this sketch is the youngest of two children 
liorn to these jiarents and the onl}- one now living, his sister, Lvdia, now be- 
ing deceased. The Norwegian Lutheran is the family church. 

C. A. Prestrud was but eight }"ears of age when he came to this countrv 



DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. Jl 

and he was educated in the public schools of St. Paul. As a young man, 
at the age of eighteen, he was employed as messenger for the Scandinavian 
and American bank, of St. Paul, and that was the beginning of his career 
in connection with bankiflg. a business that he has since continued. In 1902 
he came to ^\'endell to take a position as cashier of the Farmers and Mer- 
chants State Bank, of Wendell, a position he now holds, the bank now be- 
ing known as the First National Bank of A\"endell. 

In 1901 C. A. Prestrud was married to Xanna J. Hott. daughter of 
Hans Hoff. of Christiania. Norway, and to this union seven children have 
been burn. Xorman A.. Mildred C. Raymond A.. Ethel K.. Earl \\'.. Eve- 
lyn L. and Doratha H. 

Mr. Prestrud is a member of the Synod Lutheran church, and general 
trustee for the congregation. In politics he affiliates with the Republican 
partv and was formerly a member of the village council. 



ROBERT K. BROUGH. 



Robert K. Brough. postmaster at .Mexandria, enjoys the usual dis- 
tinction of nearly thirty years continuous service in the postoffice in that 
city, having been engaged there ever since the fall of 1888. when he entered 
the postoffice as a clerk. Two years later he was promoted to the position 
of deputv postmaster and served in that capacity under successive post- 
masters until his appointment as postmaster in 1908, a position he ever 
since has held, being one of five postmasters out of fifteen hundred appli- 
cants for reappointment that were retained in office under the ^^'ilson admin- 
istration. 

Mr. Brough is a native of England. lx)rn in the city of Hull in 1866. 
son c.f Robert Brough. a sea captain, who was lost at sea. In 187J. he 
then b,eing but six years of age. he accompanied his widowed mother to 
the United States, the family locating at Alexandria, where Mrs. Brough 
spent her last davs. There Robert K. Brough grew to manhood. He 
received his education in the Alexandria high school and worked at \arious 
occupations until the fall oi 1888, when he became employed as a clerk 
in the local postoffice. He at once demonstrated his fitness for the work in 
hand and two years later, in 1890. was appointed to the position of deputy 
postmaster. In that capacitv he was retained by successive postmasters, 
serving under Godfrev \'i\ian one term: untler J. H. A'anDyke. one term: 



72 DOUGLAS AXI) GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

under l-'anny \'anD\ke, widow of J. H. X'anDyke, three terms: under 
Charles S. Mitchell, one term, and under H. K. White one term, or until 
the death of the latter in Decemher, 1908. when, on recommendation of 
Senator Xelson, he was appointed to succeed Mr. White and has ever since 
held his commission as postmaster at Alexandria, l^eing one of the very 
few "presidential" postmasters holding office under the Taft administra- 
tion to he reappointed u.nder the \Vilson administration, an evidence of 
fitness for the jilace to which Postmaster Brought friends point with pride. 
In 1894 Robert K. Hrough Avas married to Elizabeth Aldrich. a daugh- 
ter of J. D. Aldrich and wife, pioneer residents of Douglas county, and has 
a son. luigene Brough. thirteen years of age. Mr. Brough is a member 
of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias and of the Order of Yeomen 
and in the affairs of both of these organizations takes a warm interest. 



HOX. HKRMAX HILL.MOXD. 

Hon. Herman Hillniond, one of the largest landowners in Grant county, 
former representative from this d'lstrict to the Minnesota state Legislature, 
independent candidate for the Legislature in 1916, proprietor of a line 
farm of se\-en hundred and si.xt}- acres in Pomme de Terre township, for 
the past fifteen years a tlirector of the First National Bank of Elbow Lake 
and for many years one of the most active factors in the civic and indus- 
trial life (if his home communit}-, is a native of German\-, but has been 
a resident of jMinnesota since he was thirteen years of age and has con- 
sequentl}- been a witness to and a participant in the development of this 
part of the state for many )ears. He was born in Saxony on January 
18, i860, son and only child of lulward and Dorothy (Marx) Hillmond, 
both natives of Saxony, the latter born on May 29, 1836, and the former 
some years earlier, lulward Hillmond was a farmer and landowner, who 
died in his natiAC land in Octol)er, i860, when his son, the subject of this 
sketch, was but an infant. Plis widow later married Jacob Treise and in 
1868 or 1869 came with her husband to the LTnited States, leaving her 
young son in charge of her fadier, Jacob Marx. Jacob Treise and his 
wife came to Minnescjta upon their arrival in this coimtry and settled in 
Birchdale township, To(l<l county, where Mr. Treise homesteaded a quarter 
of a section of hind and established his home, remaining there until the 
fall of 1873. when he moved over into Raymond township, in Stearns 



DOUGLAS AND GRAXT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. /T, 

county, and settled on a farm a1)out nine miles south of Sauk Center, in 
the meantime, in 1873, having been joined by his stepson, the subject of this 
sketch, and the latter"s grandfather, Jacob Alarx. The year following the 
removal of the family to Stearns county the whole country hereabout was 
devastated by the ravages of the grasshoppers and the fanuing operations 
of the Treises, as well as those of all other settlers, were seriously inter- 
rupted, young Hillmond thus being compelled, even as a l.ioy, to take such 
employment as he could find in the neighborhood, to help out during tlie time 
of distress, and was thus employed, working, for others, until 1879, when 
he resumed his place in the home and there remained until 1882, in which 
year, he then being twenty-two years of age, he came over into Grant 
county and bought a cjuarter of a section of wild land in Pomme de Terre 
township and began farming on his own account. Two years later the 
Treises also moved over into Grant county and bought a farm adjoining 
that of Mr. Hillmond, where the\' lived until 1899, in which year they 
retired from the farm and mu\'ed tii Elbow Lake, where Ijiith 'Sir. and 
Alrf. Treise are still living. To them three children were born, Emil, who 
died when a child; Lottie, who married Jacob W'oessner and lives in Pomme 
de Terre township, and \\'innie, who married Frank Schaeffer and li\es 
in that same township. 

.\s noted above, Herman Hillmond remained in his native land until 
he was thirteen vears of age, receiving his elementary schooling in the 
schools of his home town, and in 1873 came to this county with his grand- 
father and joined his mother and his stepfather in Todd coimty, later mov- 
ing to Stearns count}-, where he remained until taking up his residence in 
Grant county in i88j. There he liought a farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres of wild prairie land anil ])roceeded to develop the same. Lie drove 
over with two teams of oxen and the first year he occupied his homestead 
he broke sixty-four acres, making his domicile in his wagon-box. In the 
fall of that year he returned to Sauk Center and there worked during the 
winter, using the money thus earned to apply on the payment of his land 
and for the purchase of seed for the spring farming, returning to his farm 
in the spring and planting to wheat and oats the sixty-four acres he had 
previously broken. That }ear he broke seven acres additional and then 
sold the place to Robert Staley, appl}-ing the money thus secured to the 
purchase of the northeast quarter of section 29 in the same township, on 
which he erected a seat of buildings which still stand and are in use. 
In 1 89 1 Mr. Hillmond married and established his home on his quarter 



74 DOrOI.AS AXI) GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

section, cnntinuin^- Ui tx-sidc tliere until 1903, wlien he and his wife moved 
to l'".lli(.>\v Lake in (irder tn secure better scIkxjI advantages for their chil- 
(h-cn. renting the farm in the meantime, and remained at the county seat 
until iijiJ, when, the children then being through the high school. the\- 
moved to Miriam Park. .St. I'aul, in order that the children might enter 
the University uf Alinnescjta, and two years later returned ti> the old home 
f;irm and shortly afterward erected there the ])resent tine farm residence, 
in which the family is very comfortably and very pleasantlv situated. Mr. 
Hillmond's farming operations have prospered from the very beginning 
and he is now the owner of seven hundred and sixty acres, all in one liodv. 
one of the l)est-improve(l farms in that part of the countv. Xot only has 
.\lr. Hillmond dune well in his farming operations, l)Ut he has for years 
given much attention to \arious other enterprises and for fifteen vears has 
been a member of the board of directors of the iMrst National Bank of 
b'.lbow Lake. l-"rom the lieginning of his residence in Grant countv Mr. 
Jlillmond has given close and thoughtful attention to local political affairs 
and in igoo was elected, as the nominee of the Populist party, in a Scandi- 
navian Republican district, representative to the Legislature, defeating Sena- 
tor Knute Nelson's son by a majority of sixty-eight. In the campaign of 
19 1 6 Mr. Hillmond again became a candidate for the Legislature, stand- 
ing on a strictly non-partisan platform, long having maintained a stricth- 
independent attitude in his political views. In local civic affairs he also has 
been an active and inlluential factor and has held all township ofiices in 
his home township at one time and another, having e\er been an earnest 
promoter of all movements having to do with the advancement of the best 
interests of his home community. Mr. Hillmond was reared as a Liitheran 
and in his fraternal relations is affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of 
America and with the order of Yeomen, in the aft'airs of both of which 
organizations he takes a warm interest. 

In 1891 Herman Hillmond was united in marriage to Pauline Schwantz, 
at that time a resident of the village of Evansville, but who was born in 
Sibley county, this state, daughter of William Schwantz and wife, wiio 
later became substantial residents of Effington town.ship. Otter Tail countv, 
and to this union three children have been Ixirn, .\rthur, who is at home; 
I'deanor, who married William B. Schneider, of Minneapolis, and has one 
child, a daughter, Ruth, and .\ll>ert, at home. 



DOUGLAS AND GRAXT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 75 

PETER HOPLIX. 

Peter Hoplin. a well-known and progressive merchant of Brandon, 
(iwner of the hardware store that formerly belonged to the Larsen estate 
in that village, a member of the board of county commissioners of Doug- 
las county, former assessor of his home township and for six or seven years 
justice of the peace there, a director of the Farmers State Bank of Brandon 
and the owner of a considerable tract of land in Montana, is a native of 
the kingdom of Xorway, but has been a resident nf ]\linnesota since he 
was four years of age. He was liorn on September 23, 1876, son of Xels 
and Hannah Hoplin. who came to the United States in the spring of 1880, 
settling for a time in ^^'i^consin, whence, in the summer of that same year, 
they came out to this part of Minnesota and settled on a farm of forty 
acres in the Brandon neighliorhood in Douglas count}-, where the)- are still 
li\-ing. 

Xels Hoplin was a laborer in his native land, but upon ac(|uiring a 
bit of land out here in Minnesota proved himself a good farmer and as he 
prospered in his farming operations added to his holdings until lie is now 
the owner of a fine fann of twn hundred and forty acres, on which he 
engages in general farming and dairying and on which he has done very 
well. Pie and his wife have five children living, those besides the subject 
of this sketch being Lena, wife of Hans Xelson, a farmer of Hennepin 
countv, this state ; Bessie, who is at home with her parents, anti Xettie and 
Ole (twins), the former of whom also is at home and the latter of whom 
is a well-known hardware dealer at Lowr\-. 

Peter Hoplin was but a child when he can-ie to this countr\ with his 
parents in 1880 and he grew to manhood on the home farm in the \icinit\- 
of Brandon, receiving his schooling in the schools of that village and in 
the high school at Alexandria. Upon completing his schooling he remained 
on the home farm for a few }-ears and then engaged in the grain-bu>-ing 
Inisiness at Brandon, continuing thus engaged for a year, at the end of 
which time he began clerking in the store of B. F. Tiegen, in that same 
village, and was thus engaged for six years. He then was appointed to 
take charge of the h. P. Larsen estate and had since then been managing the 
Larsen hardware store at Brandon, which he recently bought, long having 
been recognized as one of the leading business men of Brandon. In addi- 
tion to his general hardware Inisiness Mr. Hoplin is the local agent for 
one of the best-known automobiles in the country and is doing very well. 
He is a stockholder and a director in the Farmers State Bank of Brandon 



76 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

;m<l is tile nwner (if a tarni n\ one hundred and sixty acres in Montana. 
Air. Hdplin is a Republican and since 191 1 has been serving as a meniljer 
of the board of county commissioners for Douglas county, now serving 
on his second term, and for two years was chairman of the Ixjard. For 
six years he was clerk of the Brandon school district No. 76; then for four 
years served as township assessor and for six or seven years then was justice 
of the peace in and for his home township. He is an active member of 
the Xorwegian h>ee church and since 1910 has Ijeen superintendent of 
the L'nion Sundav school at Brandon. 



\\'ILLI.\A[ II. HENGSTLER, AI. D. 

Dr. William H. Ilengstler, well-known physician at Osakis, is a native 
Alinnesotan, born at Winona on ]\Ja}- 8, 1887, a son of ^\'illiam and Anna 
( McBride) Hengstler, the former of whom was born in Ereedom, Wiscon- 
sin, May 26, 1856, and the latter, at Austin, Minnesota, Alarch 11, 1859. 
William Hengstler is a railroad train dispatcher and lives at Wilmar. He 
is the father of two children, the subject of this sketch having a brother, 
Herliert. The elder William Hengstler is a Republican and a member of 
the Woodmen's lodge. 

Doctor Hengstler was well equipped by preliminary study for the prac- 
tice of his profession, his early schooling ha\'ing been obtained in the pub- 
lic schools and in the Alodel Normal School at Winona. He took the lirst 
year course in the high school at Trac}- and the last three years in the 
high school at Alankato, from which he was graduated in 1904. In the 
fall of that year he entered tiie medical department of the University of 
Minnesota and after two years of study in that institution went to the 
Pacific coast, where he remained from June, 1906, to the fall of 1907. He 
then returned to Alinnesota and resumed his studies in the univer.sity, com- 
|;leling lii> medical studies and receiving his degree in 191 1. h'or about two 
months after graduation Doctor Hengstler served as interne in a hospital 
at Alinneapolis and then took up the general practice, locating at Rockford, 
Minnesota, where he remained until the summer of 1913. In July af that 
year he remo\ed to Osakis and has been engaged in the practice of his 
profession there since that time. In August, 1915, Doctor Hengstler formed 
a partnership witli Doctor ( iilkinson. and the two are at present thus asso- 
ciated in practice. 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. ']'] 

On October 5, 1912, Dr. \V. H. Hengstler was united in marriage 
to Edna E. Baird, who was l^orn at Graceville, 3iIinnesota, April 7. 1889. 
a daughter of Edward C. Baird, and to this union has been born one child, 
a daughter, ]\Iarniion Gertrude, born on ]\Iarch 21, 191 5. Doctor and Mrs. 
Hengstler are members of the Presbyterian church. In politics the Doctor 
affiliates with the Republican party. He is a meml>er of the ^^lasonic urder 
and also of the Order of the Eastern Star and of the ^\■orkmen's lodge. 
He holds a membership in the Minnesota State ^Medical Association, in the 
American Medical Association, and in the Park Region ^Medical Society. 
Doctor Hengstler is at present the surgeon for the Great Xorthern Railway. 



H. E. HELLECKSOX. 



H. E. Plelleckson, chairman of the board of supervisors of Pomme de 
Terre township, Grant county, and a well-known and substantial farmer of 
that township, is a native son of Minnesota and has lived in this state all his 
life. He was born on a farm in Brown county, January 9, 1869, son of 
F.lle\' and Sigri (J^^ngrebretson) Helleckson, both natives of Eggedal, Nor- 
way, who came to the United States in the same year, about 1865 or 1866, 
and settled with their rcspecti\e parents in Brown county, this state, where 
thev were later married. Elle\- Helleckson homesteaded a farm in Brown 
countv and there made his home until 1876, in which year he sold his place 
and mo\-ed up to Ottertail county, pre-empting there a quarter section in 
Tunmli township on which he established his home and there spent the rest 
of his life, his death occurring in 1S98. he then being about sixt3'^-four years 
of age. His widow survived him about fifteen years, her death occurring in 
November, 191 3, she then being about sixty-eight years of age. They were 
members of the SAmod Lutheran church, now the United Lutheran church, 
and their children were reared in the faith of the same. There were seven 
of these children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the eldest and two 
of whom died in infancy, the others being as follow: Edward, now deceased, 
who was for }-ears a well-known Grant county farmer; Teoline, who mar- 
ried Louis Larson and lives in Ottertail county; Martin, who lives on the 
old home farm in Ottertail county, and Marie, who married Andrew Holte 
and died in Ottertail county. 

H. E. Helleckson was about seven years old when his parents mo\ed 
from Brown countv to Ottertail countv and in the latter countv he grew to 



78 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

nianliood, receiving his scliooliiig- in the schools of his home neighborhood, 
such as they were at that time, for there was no organized school district 
in that commimity until he was se\enteen or eighteen vears of age. As a 
young man lie began farming nn his ciwn accimnt. managing the home farm 
for his father, during wliirli time, tor ten nr t'ie\en seasons, he was also 
engaged as an engineer wilh a threshing crew. In the meantime, in i8qj. 
he bought a farm n{ (uic hundred and sixty acres in (irant county, the north- 
east quarter of section 18 in i'omme de Terre townsiiip, Init not until his 
marriage in 1904 did lie make his home on the ^^ame. He had, howe\er, 
erected some small buildings on the place and had done considerable toward 
improving the same, and upon taking up his residence there in 1904 erected 
a modern barn and the next year erected his present comfortable farm resi- 
dence. He also has on the farm an attractive grove and a well-cared- for 
>)rcliard. .Mr. Helleckson is a firm believer in tlie modern methods of farm- 
ing and has brought his farm up to a high state of cultivation. He is a 
ivep.uljlican in his political persuasion and has for }'ears gi\en his close atten- 
tion to local civic affairs, long having served as a member of the board of 
township super\-isors and for the past four years as chairman of the same. 
On July 6, 1904. H. K. Helleckson was united in marriage to Seriana 
Xelson, who was born in Ottertail county, daughter of Joseph Nelson and 
wife, early settlers of that county. No children have been born to this unit^n, 
but Air. and Mrs. Helleckson have adopted a daughter, Amanda Holte, a 
niece of Mr. Helleckson. Both Mr. and Mrs. Helleckson are members of 
the Hjardel United Lutheran church and Air. Helleckson is secretary of the 
congregation, to the affair- of which he for years has given his earnest atten- 
tion, both he and lii-^ \\ife l-.eing warml\- interested in all local good works. 



.\lfrp:d o. luxd. 



.\lfred O. J.und. one of the younger and successful business men of 
Norcross. was Ijorn in the building in which is now located the State Bank 
of Norcross, on Jime _w 181X4, the son of Andrew and Alaline ( Selleseth ) 
Lund, natives nf Nor\\;u-. 

.\s a yi'ung man \ndrew Lum.l came to .\merica. in 1880. proceeding 
on out to Alinnexita and liomesteading one hundred and sixty acres of land 
in ( irant county, one mile south of Norcross. He then returned to his native 
land and was there married, in his native town, Norfjord. to Maline Selle- 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 79 

seth. Accompanitci bv his bride he then returned to tiie homestead in Cirant 
county and there erected a frame house, in which he and liis family h\ed 
for some years, lie de^■eloped his land and engaged in general farming 
until the building of the Great Northern railroad, when he engaged in the 
general mercantile business at Norcross, in partnership with JMons ^^'eum. 
under the firm name of Lund & Weum. This partnership lasted some si.x 
vears. after which Mr. Lund conducted the business alone for a time, and 
then Ole Selleseth associated himself with the business and the firm was 
known as Lund & Selleseth. This firm continued until 1900, in which year 
.Mr. Lund retired and removed to Superior, A\'isci)nsin. where he associated 
himself with the Fiinon ^.lercantile Company as a stockholder. After two 
or three years he retired from the business and moved to Glenwood, his 
present home. 

During his many years of active life _\ndrew Lund has bought and 
sold many farms in this community, and is today the owner of five hun- 
dred and sixty acres, as well as the owner of a one-half interest in three hun- 
dred and twenty acres. In the fall of 1905 he engaged in the private bank- 
ing business and established the Norcross Bank. In 1908 the bank was made 
a state bank, with Andrew Lund as jiresident, which position he still hoUls; 
the other officers being Ole Selleseth, vice-president, and Alfred O. Lund, 
cashier. The bank has been a successful one and the people of the com- 
munit\- have the utmost confidence and respect for the officers of the insti- 
tution. The deposits today are nearing the one-hundred-thousand-dollar 
mark, with a steady and substantial growth. 

.\ndrew and Maline Lund are the parents of the following children : 
.Vnna, who is the wife of Clarence Wollan. of North Dakota; Alfred O., 
the suljject of this sketch; I\er. wlio li\es in Superior, Wisconsin, where he 
is a salesman for the T\vohy-Einion Mercantile Company; Ellen, the wife 
of Olaf Gandrud. of Fergus Falls; Ina, the wife of Hugh Stenson, of Glen- 
wood and Mabel anrl Nora, at home. The famil)- are members of the Nor- 
wegian Lutheran church and are prominent in the social and religious life 
of the community. -Vndrew Lund's life has been an active and successful 
one. He is a man of rare judgment and exceptional ability and is held in 
th.e highest esteem and regard by all who know him. 

Alfred O. Lund recei^'ed his education in the public schools of Nor- 
cross and at Superior, after which he took a course in a business college at 
Minneapolis, from which he was graduated in the spring of 1905. Soon 
after completing hi-; -chooling he was elected cashier of the Norcross State 



80 DOrGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

I5ank. which ])ii>itiiin he now holds. In liis chosen \v(irk ^Ir. Lund has been 
quite successful and has the confidence and respect uf the Ijusiness and social 
world in which he ]i\es. In addition to iiis duties in the bank, Mr. Lund 
has always taken a keen interest in the civic life of the town and has served 
as a member of the town jjoard. his efforts e\'er havings been exerted in behalf 
of all mo\'ements designed to adxance the growth and prosperitv of the 
home communit}'. 

In the fall of loi.^ Alfred •: ). I.unil was united in marriage to Mabel 
W'estljerg. who was liurn in iilinciis. daughter of Swan Westljerg. who located 
in (irant county in 11)04, 'Tio to this union one child has been born. Marquis, 
whose birth occurred on !'"el;ruary 13. 1915. Mr. and Mrs. Lund are prom- 
inent in the .-social and religious life of their hcmie town and take much inter- 
est in all that tends to promote the l?eauty and the betterment of the place. 



RE\'. S\'EX \MLLIAM SWEXSOX. 

The Rev. .S\en \\'illiam Swenson, pastor of tiie Swedish Lutheran 
church at Evans\ ille and president of the Red River valley conference of 
the Augustana synod, is a native of the kingdom of Sweden, but has been 
a resident of this country since he A\as twenty-one years of age. He was 
born at L^ndensos, ^^'estergotland, Sweden. April 6, 1870, son of A. G. 
aiul l/harlotte Swenson, natives of that same countr}-, who spent all their 
lives in their nati\"e land. 

Reared on a farm, Mr. Swenson received his elementary schooling in 
the schools of his nati\e land and in 1891, he then being twenty-one years 
of age, came to th.e United States and located at Manchester, X^^ew Hamp- 
shire, where for a time he worked in a textile factory. He then, in August, 
1892, in pursuance of a long-cherished desire to acquire a more liberal edu- 
cation with a view to entering the ministry, entered Augustana College at 
Rock Island, Illinois, and upon completing the academic course there entered 
the classical department and was graduated from the same in 1900. In the 
fall of that same year he entered the Lutheran Theological Seminary at 
Rock Island, from which he was graduated in the spring of 1903, with the 
degree of Bachelor of Divinity. On June 14, 1903. at the meeting of 
Augustana synod at Paxton, Illinois, he was ordained to the ministry of 
the Lutheran churcli and was straightway assigned to the pastorate of the 
Swedish Luthenui church at Elbow Lake, Grant county, this state, where 



DOUGLAS AXn GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 8l 

he remained until IQO". in which year he accepted a call to the Eagle church. 
Axel postoffice, in the neighlK-iring county of Otter Tail, where he continued 
as pastor for about six years. 

It was on X^o\-eml)er i. 1912, that the Rev. S. \\". Swenson accepted 
the call to his present pastorate of the Swedish Lutheran church at Evans- 
ville and during his incumbency of that pulpit he has done an excellent 
work, admirable progress being reported along all lines in the work of the 
congregation, the church having advanced both ntmierically and financially 
during that period. For years JNIr. Swenson has been recognized as one of 
the leading ministers of liis communion in the Northwest. In 1908, as 
associate editor, he helped to prepare the "History of the ^^linnesota Confer- 
ence of the Swedish Lutheran Church," and in that same year was elected 
president of the Alexandria district of the ^Minnesota conference. In the 
spring of 191.; a new conference of that church was created, known as the 
Red Ri\er \'allev conference, embracing the northwestern section of Minne- 
sota and a part of Xorth Dakota, and at the first meeting of that new con- 
ference in Alay of that year Mr. Swenson was elected president of the con- 
ference and has since occupied that honorable and responsible position, a 
position of great influence throughout the church in this section. 

On June 15, 1904, at Cadillac, ^lichigan. the Rev. S. W. Swenson was 
united in marriage to Ida Ovedia Pedersen, daughter of Hans and Martha 
(^loe) Pedersen, at that time residents of Elbow I^ake. but now residents 
of Cadillac, Michigan, and to this union two children have been born, Justin 
^^'illmore. born on ]\Iarch 17. 1909, and Dorice Caroline Charlotte, Octo- 
ber 6, 19 1 2. 



GEORGE S. MAXEIELD. 

George S. Maxfield, ixistmaster of the ^■illage of Kensington, in Doug- 
las county, an honijred veteran of the Civil ^^'ar and for years active in the 
business life of his home town, is a native of the state of Xew Hampshire, 
but has been a resident of Minn.esota since he was twehe years of age. He 
was born on .August 3, 1843, 'i''''' \vhen a boy came with his parents to Minne- 
sota, the family locating at Shakopee. in Scott county, where he grew to 
manhood and where, on September 9, 1861, he then lieing but little more 
than a month past eighteen a ears of age, he enlisted for serxice during the 
Ci\il A\'ar in Company A, Third Regiment, Minnesota A'olunteer Infantrw 
with which command he served until the close of the war. 
. r6a) 



02 DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

Upon the completion of his miHtary service, Mr. Alaxfield returned to 
Scott county and was tliere engaged in farming for two years, at the end 
of which time, in 1S67, he married and moved to JNIille Lacs countv, where 
he entered a homestead, later mo\ing to a farm in the near vicinity of \\'il- 
mar, in Kandiyohi county, where he remained for two years, after which 
he mo\ed to Benson, Avliere he remained until moving to Kensington in. 
T8gi. I'pon locating at Kensington Air. Ma.xfield engaged in the business 
of buying grain and was thus engaged for two years, or until his appointment 
in 1893 to the position of postmaster of the village, which position he ever 
since has held. Mr. Alaxfield is a Mason and a member of the Grand Armv 
of the Republic ami takes a warm interest in the affairs of those organizations. 

As noted above, it was in 1867 that George .S. [Nfaxfield was united in 
marriage to Sarah E. Cole and to this union three children have been born, 
daughters all, Elizabeth. .Anna and Georgia. Mr. and Mrs. Maz-cfield are 
members of the Episcopal church and have ever taken a warm interest in 
church affairs, as well as in all neighborhood good works, and are helpful in 
promotir.g all good causes in the community in which the\- live. 



ROBERT GRUETZMACH VAi. 

Robert Gruetzniacher, local manager of the plant of the Standard Lum- 
ber Company, is a native-born Minnesotean, born in Stearns county on Janu- 
ary II, 1873, son of William and \\"ilhelmina (Larson) Gruetzniacher, 
natives of Germany, who came to America in the early part of 1861 and 
located at Green liaw Wiscijnsin, where they remained for about four 
years. Li 1865 they removed to Stearns county, Minnesota, and made 
that their permanent home. There were eleven children in this family, Anna. 
Bertha, Herman, Robert, Ida, Tunma, Emil, William, Martha, Albert and 
Gusta\'. The lather and mother were members of the German Lutheran 
church and their cliil(h-en were reared in that faith. 

Robert Gruetzniacher received his elementary etlucalion in the public 
schools of Stearns count \- and later attended the Sauk Center academy and 
business college, from w hicli he was graduated. As a young man he began 
working on the farm and w<5rked for ten years for Clark and IMcClure, 
large farmers, and by economy and the saving of wages received for his 
work was enabled to pay the expense of his college education. After com- 
pleting his business course he was employed for nearly two years as clerk 



DOUGLAS AXD GRAXT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. . 83 

in a store at St. Cloud and then went to Breckinridge, where for five )-ears 
he was employed as a clerk in the store of ]\Iiksche & A'ertin. He then 
taught school for one winter in ^^'ilkin county and during the following 
winter he was engaged in teaching school in Lac qui Parle county and 
in the spring he again took up his work in the lumber yard, taking the posi- 
tion of manager of a lumber company at Louisburg. in that county, and 
remained with that concern for two years. On August i, 1907, he took 
the position of manager for the local plant of the Standard Lumber Com- 
pany at Herman and has ever since been thus engaged. In addition to a 
general line of lumber and building material, this firm handles coal. 

On Mav 18, 19 10. Robert Gruetzmacher was married to Emma Rhode, 
daughter of John Rhode, and has one child, a son, Robert John. In politics 
Mr. Gruetzmacher is independent. He has served four years as a member 
of the village council, and has been president of the council for three years. 
He is a member of Prescott Lodge Xo. 162. Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons; of the Order of the Eastern Star and of the Woodmen of America. 



[lUGH ELLIS LEACH. 



Hugh Ellis Leach, a ;)rciminent and successful attorney of Alexandria, 
was born on a farm in Bloomfield township, Fillmore county, ^ilinnesota. on 
l\lav 30, 1880, the son of Dunbar AI. and Sarah Ann (Roberts) Leach, the 
former of \\hom was born in Vermont on February 11, 1837, and the latter 
of whom was a native of Wisconsin, born in 1845. Dunbar AI. Leach 
received his education in the public schools of his native state and there grew 
to manhood. In 1865, at the age of twenty-eight years, he decided to locate 
in the West and in that year he landed in Wisconsin, where he remained 
for a short time, after which he came to Alinnesota, locating in Alower 
countv. He then, after three years, removed to Fillmore count}-, where he 
purchased a farm and where lie engaged in general farming and stock rais- 
ing until 1896, in which \'ear he retired from the activities of farm life and 
moved to Spring A'alley, where he died on December 22, 1910. Fie and his 
wife were the parents of six children, Harlan E., Helen, who married Herb- 
ert Hale; Harris E., Hugh Ellis, Helon E. and Grace. The family were 
prominent in the social life of their home community in Fillmore count}-, 
where the father was a well-known and successful man. 

Hugh Ellis Leach received his elementan,- -education in the public 



84 DOUGLAS A^'^) grant counties, MINNESOTA. 

schools of Fillmore county and was graduated from the high school at Spring 
Valley with the class of 1900. He then attended the State University, from 
which he was graduated with tlie class of 1904. In 1906 he received his 
degree from the law school of that institution and after having been admitted 
to the bar located in Owatnnna, where he remained but four months, at the 
end of wliich time he located in Alexandria, entering the law office of Mr. 
(junderson. where for six months-lie was engaged as a clerk, and then, on 
July I, 1907. a partnershii) was formed with Mr. Gunderson, which mutually 
agreeable arrangement still exists. 

On June t8, 1907, Hugh Ellis Leach was united in marriage to Clara 
E. JMolstad, who was born at Spring A'alley, daughter of M. E. Molstad, 
and to this union three children have been born, Robert Franklin, Margaret 
Ann and Catherine. Mr. and Mrs. Leach are active members of the Congre- 
gational church, of which Mr. Leach is a deacon and at present chairman of 
the board of trustees. 

Politically, Hugh I'~l]is Leach is identiiied with the Repuljlican party, 
in the affairs of which he has taken an active interest. In 1913 he was 
elected county attorney and was re-elected in 1915. During the year 1912 
he ser\ed as city attorney for Alexandria. He is chairman of the Alexandria 
school board and has served on that body for four years. Mr. Leach is pro- 
gressive and takes a warm interest in all movements that tend to advance 
the moral, social and financial development of the county. He and his wife 
are prominent in the social and religious activities of the community and are 
hekl in high esteem liv all. 



LOREK L. BREWSTER. 

Loren L. Brewster, one of Grant count\'"s best-known and most sub- 
stantial pioneer farmers, now living practically retired on his fine farm in 
Elbow Lake township, is a native of the state of Maine, but has lived in 
the West since he was thirteen years of age and in Minnesota since he was 
sixteen. He was born on a farm in Franklin county, Maine, September 25, 
1844, son of Stephen John and Mary T. ( Blanchard ) Brewster, both natives 
(if that same countw who came to Minnesota many years ago and whose 
last da}s were spent in this state. 

Stephen J. Brewster was born on May i']. 1818, one of the three children 
born to his parents, members of old New England families, who had set- 
tled in Franklin county, Maine, about the year 1795, going there from 



DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 8c; 

X'ermont or Alassachusetts. He grew up on a farm there and married ^lary 
T. Blanchard, who was torn in that same county,. October 4, 1822, a daugh- 
ter of Noah and Polly ( Knapp ) Blanchard, both of English parentage, who 
in 1 86 1 came to Minnesota and settled in Winona county, where Noah 
Blanchard bought a farm and where his wife died, after which he returned 
to Alaine and spent his last days with his eldest son in the city of Port- 
land. After his marriage Stephen T. Brewster bought a farm and remained 
in his home comit}' in JNIaine until 1856, in which year he moved with his 
family to X\'isconsin, settling on a farm in the township of Alto, in Fonil 
du Lac county, where he lived for three years, or until the fall of i860. 
when he came with his family )))■ "prairie schooner" over into ^Minnesota 
and bought a raw prairie farm in XMnona county, where he estalilished 
his home. In 1897 he sold his farm there and came over into this part 
of the state, locating in the village of Brown \'allev. in the neighboring 
county of TraA'erse, where he lived retired the rest nf his life, his death 
occurring on .\pril 13. 1913, he then being nearlv ninet^■-four vears of age. 
His wife's last tla\'s were spent, as an invalid, in the home df a daughter 
at Wine ma, where her death occiuM-ed in May, 1905. The}- were members 
of the -Methiidist Episcopal church and their children were reared in that 
faith. There were eleven of these children, of whom the subject <if this 
sketch was the first-born, the others being as follow : Xancy, who died at 
the age of seventy years; Maria, who lives at Brown \'alley, this state, 
widow of John Elliott: James, who also lives in Brown \'alley, a farmer; 
Miirris, whose present whereabouts are unknown; Stephen, who tlied in 
infancy; Melissa, who dieil in Maine, in infancy; Marv, who also died 
in infancy; Myrtle, who is li\-ing. unmarried, at \\'inona ; Eugenia, also 
inmiarried, li\'ing at Brown N'alley, and Lila, who died at the age of nine- 
teen years. 

Loren I.. Brewster was about thirteen years of age when his parents 
moved from Maine to Wisconsin and was about si.xteen when they came over 
into Minnesota, consequently his schooling was obtained in three state>. 
He grew to manhood on the home farm in \Mnona county and after his 
marriage in 1865 established his home in that comity and remained there, 
farming, until 1878, in which year he disposetl of his interests there antl 
with his faniih- drove through to (u'ant c<iunt}-, a distance of three hnndretl 
miles, and h(.)mesteaded a tract oi one hundred and sixty acres in section 
8 of Elbow Lake township, where he ever since has made his home. \Mien 
the Brewsters settled on their homestead the neighbors thereabout were 
very few and far between, there being at that time but one house between there 



86 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. ' 

and tlie village (if Herman, which at that time consisted of but fifteen 
houses. Ujjon taking jxissession of his homestead Mr. Brewster built a 
small frame house, jjlanted a grove and began to break the virgin soil. 
He completed the task of breaking the farm during the second year and 
it was not long until he was able to make other improvements, bringing 
the place up to a high standard of development. In 1887 James J. Hill 
gave him a purebred Shorthorn bull and he began to give proper attention 
to the raising of high-grade cattle, sticking to Shorthorns ever since, gen- 
erally having a herd of from sixty to one hundred head, and has done much 
to raise the standard of the live stock in that communit}-. As he pros- 
pered in his undertakings, Air. Brewster added to his land holdings until 
he now is the owner of seven hundred and twenty acres of fine land in 
one body, the whole being well improved. About 1912 he practically retired 
from the active labors of the farm and since then the farm management 
has been carried on by his sons. Mr. Brewster has for years given close 
attention to local affairs, has served as supervisor of his home township 
and with the exception of two years has been treasurer of his local school 
district since the year 1883. 

It was on July 4, 1865, in Winona county, this state, that Loren L. 
Brewster was united in marriage to Mary Ellen Cram, who w^as born in 
New Hampshire, July 4, 1850, daughter of Joseph Cram and wife, and 
to this union thirteen children have been born, namely: Byron, a well- 
know-n Grant county farmer; Horace, who died in infancy; LaForest, super- 
intendent of the Old Peoples Home, of St. Paul Park; Rollin, who died in 
infancy; Ellion, who is assisting in the management of the old home place; 
Horace, a farmer, of Sawyer, North Dakota; Herbert, who died in infancy; 
Mabel, who married Thomas H. Heath and lives at Lemmon, South Dakota ; 
Herbert, who is assisting in the management of the home farm; Efiie, who 
died in infancv; Effic, second, who married Richard Amundson, a well- 
known Grant county farmer; Eugenia, who married Isaac Law and lives 
at Bordulac, North Dakota, and Eva, who married Arthur Jasmer and 
lives at Nimrod, in \\'adena county, this state. Mr. and Mrs. Brewster 
celebrated their golden wedding anniversary on July 4, 191 5, and the occa- 
sion was made one of much congratulation on the part of their many 
friends hereabout. Airs. Brew.ster died on October 6, 1916, after a married 
life of fifty-one years, three months and two days. Mr. Brewster is a 
member of the Church of God at Hereford and has ever taken a warm 
interest in all movements designed to advance the common welfare of the 
community of which he has been a part since pioneer days. 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 87 

WILLIE XICHOLSOX BROXSOX. 

Willie Xicholsr)n Bronson. one of the well-known and prominent men 
of Douglas county, and the editor and the publisher of the Evaiisz'illc Enter- 
prise, was born in Jones county, Iowa, in the town of ^^'yoming, the son of 
the Rev. Samuel Merwin and Anna Amelia ( Xi'cholson) Bronson, nati\es 
of Danlniry, Connecticut, and Salem, Pennsylvania, respectively, the former 
born on Xovember 6, 1818, and the latter, Octol;er 4, 1836, whose last days 
were spent at Evansville. the death of the former occurring on Januar\- 2j. 
1888, and that of the latter on ]\Larch 13. 1907. 

As a yoimg man, Samuel INIerwin Bronson decided to enter the gospel 
ministry and soon engaged in that labor. During his early married life the 
Rev. Samuel ]\L Bronson preached in Iowa, where he had some large charges, 
including Charles City, Fayette and Floyd. .\s a minister he was success- 
ful and accomplished much good in his various charges in Iowa. Wishing 
to extend his influence for good, in 1879 he came to ^Minnesota and for some 
years preached for the Methodist Episcopal and Congregational churches at 
Alexandria. He then located at Evans\ille, where he preached for the 
L'nion church until the time of his death. He and his wife were prominent 
in the social and tlie religious life of the communities in which they li\ed 
and were held in the highest regard and esteem by all. Their influence for 
good was most marked, and they had much to do with the moral develop- 
ment of this district. They devoted their lives to their family and to the 
people of the community, and their lives were exemplifications of the highest 
ideals. They saw the real beauty in life and used their best eflforts to have 
others to live the true Christian life. They were the parents of six children, 
Willie Xicholson, Xellie (who died in 191 1), Stella, Gertrude, Clement H. 
and Rollin. Clement H. Bronson is the editor of the Osakis Rcziezc and 
Rollin Bronson is a resident of Xew England. Xorth Dakota. 

^^"illie Xicholson Bronson completed his schooling in the academy at 
Fa}ette. Iowa, and afterward engaged in teaching, being thus engaged for a 
number of years in northern Iowa and in Minnesota, completing his work 
as a teacher at Osakis, where he was principal of the high school. In 1905 
he bought the EvausviUe Enterprise, a six-column quarto newspaper and one 
of the clean, live papers of this part of the state. The circulation at the 
start was small and ihe office poorly equipped, but today the circulation has 
increased to a substantial list and the ofifice is nicely equipped with modern 
machinery. In addition to publishing the Enterprise, Mr. Bronson operates 



So DOL-GLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

an extensive iLilj-printing plant and turns out a consideralile quantity df !ii,<^h- 
:liss jol) work, which compares favdral)!}- with tlie work ilone in tlie larger 
.■ity offices Air. I'.ronson is unmarried and his sisters. Stella and (iertrnde 
h'\e with hin.i. 



CHAlvU.ES CATJ- 



Charles Cater, a successful real-estate dealer of Herman, was horn in 
Methuen, Alassachusetts. cm Octoher 29, 1858, the son of Andrew J. and 
Clara ( Grant ) Cater, the former of whom was horn at Bangor, New Hamp- 
shire, and the latter at Lowell. Massachusetts. Soon after their marriage 
they located at ]\Iethuen. In 1866 Andrew Carter came to Mimiesota and in 
the next year located al i'rinceton, where his family joined him. There he 
followed his tiade, that of a carpenter, and engaged in the lumber business, 
remaining there uniil 1877, when he moved to Grant countv, where he 
entered a homestead and a tree claim in Delaware township. The two claims 
ga\e him a tract of three hundred and twent}- acres, the greater part of 
which he developed and improved. There he made his hcjme for about 
fifteen year'^, at the end of which time he went to the state of Washington, 
where he became interested in mining. Some years later he returned to 
Minnesota, but died shortly after he reached Minneapolis, lie and his wife 
were the parents of seven children, J. P., Abbie S.. Charles, Mary I-".. Ij.ttie 
(deceased), E\-eline and Maude. 

Charles Cater was reared at Princeton, this state, where he received his 
early education in the iml.lic scliools. His school davs ended at the age of 
fourteen years, at which time he began to work for himself. For six or 
seven years he worked at variuus places and at difterent kinds of work and 
on May 17, 1878, located at Herman and in the following year filed a claim 
f(.n- one hundred and sixty acres in Clifton township. Traverse county. He 
took u]) Ills resuhiice there and li\ed lj\- himself for live years, after which 
time he returned V> Herman, where he has since resided. For the next ten 
or twehe years he was in the im]ilement business and after owning an inter- 
est in an ele\alor business for two years engaged in the drug business until 
the sale of real-estate became acti\e in Minnesota, when he engaged in the 
real-estate business, at which, he has continued. 

In 1885 Charles (/atcr was united in marriage to Grace K. Holman of 
Lake Traverse and to this union six children ha\e been born, Lottie ( decea.sed), 
Dessie, Cajiitola, ( harles F., (irace \\ and I'.hmche. The familv are active 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 89 

members of the ]\Iethodist Episcopal clmrch at Herman. Fraternally, Mr. 
Cater is a member of the Knights cjf Pythias, of the Ancient h'ree and 
Accepted Alasons, of the Benevolent and Protectixe Order of Elks, of the 
Modern Woodmen of America and of the Court of Honor. Mr. Cater has 
always taken an active interest in local affairs and has done much for the 
growth and prosperit}- of Ilerman and the surrounding territory. 



CH.\RLES F. CAXFIEI.D. 

Charles !•'. Cautield, one of the real pioneers of Douglas county, now 
li\ing retired at Alexandria, was born in Ridgefield, Connecticut, December 
25, 1826, a son of Rufus and Polh- ( Xorthrut) Canfield, both natives of 
Connecticut, who lived all their lives in that state and wlio were the parents 
of eight children, Mar\-. ('harles, John, Gould. Sylvester. Henry, lunily and 
Frank. 

Charles F. Canheld was educated in the schools oi Connecticut and in 
1855, two years after his marriage in. the East, he and his wife mo\-ed to 
^Milwaukee, Wiscon'^in, where for four years he was engaged in the clothing 
Imsiness. Then, attracted liy the glowing reports sent out by settlers in this 
]iart of Minnesota, they can^.e to this state and for a short time were located 
at Dalton, in Ottertail county, [.roceeding hence down into Douglas county, 
where Mr. Canfield entered a claim to a tract of land on the shores of Lake 
Ida and there established his home, among the xery first settlers of the region 
now comprised within the bounds of Douglas county. .\t that time Alex- 
andria was Init a stopping place for the stage line and there were no build- 
ings there save a small \og ta\ern on the bank of the lake. 

Mr. Canfield had just fairly settled on his claim and had his first crops 
under cultivation when tiie Indian uprising of 1862 occurred. Abandoning 
evervthing, he sought safety for himself and family by flight to St. L'loud, 
where he remained about two years, at the end of which time he returned to 
his homestead in Holmes City township and there remained, farming, until 
his removal, in 1875, to .Alexandria, where he engaged in the clothing busi- 
ness and w'as thus engaged until his retirement from active business in IQ04. 
He also was connected with a clothing store at Cando, North Dakota. Mr. 
and Mrs. Canfield are auKing the oldest survivors of the original pioneers 
of Douglas county and both are hale and hearty. They have a pleasant 
home in .\lexandria and are verv comfortablv situated. P.efore the Indian 



90 DOUGLAS AXO 



GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 



outbreak many Indians \isite(l tlie (^"anfields at their home on the shores of 
Lake Ida and Mr. Lanficld relates how the okl Indian chief, "Hole-in-the- 
Day." had vi.sited their home many nights, rolling up in his blanket and sleep- 
ing on the floor of tiieir cabin. 

In 1853 Charles V. Lanheld was united in marriage to Sarah A. Shot- 
well, of Xewark, Xew Jersey, a daughter of Daniel and Margaret (Force) 
Shutwell, who also were among the early settlers of Douglas county, coming 
here in 1858, and taking among" the first claims of government land. Daniel 
Shotwell and wife Avere the parents of six children, Anna, Sarah, Mary, 
James, \\^alter and ]\Iarcus. To Mr. and ]\Irs. Canfield were born six chil- 
dren, Wilbur F.. Horace B.. Theodore L.. Arthur A., Charles F. and 
Orville E. 



THEODORE BORDSEN. 



Theodore Bordsen, treasurer of Douglas county, was born in Port 
Washington, W'isconsin. ]<>bruarv 11, 1850, of Norwegian ancestry. His 
father was Beruld B(jrdsen, born in Norway, on April 14, 1808, and his 
mother was Ranghild ((irinevold) Bordsen, also born in Norway, June 17, 
1819. 

Beruld Bordsen came to America in 1844, and located on a twenty-acre 
farm near Port Washington, Wisconsin, where he engaged in farming, 
together with work at his trade as a blacksmith. In 1868 he removed with 
his family to Douglas county, Minnesota, and located on a farm of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres near E\ansville, entering this land under the homestead 
laws. He built a h.ome and other necessary farm buildings there and made 
that place his home for the rest of his life. He and his wife were the par- 
ents of six children, namely: B. W., Anna, who married P. O. Froland; 
Theodore, the subject of this sketch; Sina (deceased), who was the wife 
of William Thompson; Christen and Reinert. His church membership was 
with the Norwegian Lutheran denomination. 

Theodore Bordsen was practically self-educated. What little schooling 
he received was in the public schools of Port \\'ashington. ^Visconsin. As 
a young man he came with the family to Douglas county and found employ- 
ment in working on the farm in the summer time. That his education was 
not neglected, and that he had made the best of his opportunity for self- 
education, is evidenced liy the fact tliat he was ciualified to teach school, and 
engaged in that occupation during the winter months. In 1873 he taught 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 9 1 

his last scliool and then took a position as clerk in the United States land 
office, holding that position for two years. After that he was for a short 
time engaged as clerk in a store. Since 1877 ^'^ ^^^s been continuously con- 
nected with some office in the court house in Alexandria. From 1877 to 
1879 he was register of deeds. He was county auditor for nine years, and 
has l:.een county treasurer since 1890. 

In 1 88 1 Theodore Bordsen was united in marriage to ]\Iarie Aaker, a 
daughter of L. K. Aaker, of Alexandria, and to this union three children 
have been born. Dr. Theo Laurence Bordsen, who is a physician and surgical 
specialist, of Portland, Oregon; Camilla, who married Albert O. Hayes, 
who is connected with the geological survey in Canada, and Carl W". Bord- 
sen, who is stenographer for United States Senator Knute Xelson in ^^■ash- 
ington. i\Ir. and Mrs. Bordsen are members of the United church, of which 
he has ser\'ed as trustee and also as clerk. 



CHRIS TOHXSOX. 



Chris Johnsoii, a prominent and successful retired farmer and business 
man and president of the Grant County State Bank at Herman, was born 
in Sweden on October 26, 1851, being the son of John Johnson and wife. 
The parents were natives of Sweden and there lived their lives, they having 
died some years ago. 

Chris Johnson recei\ed his education in Sweden and there grew to man- 
hood. He made his native country his home until he was twenty-five years 
of age. Being anxious to advance in financial affairs, he decided to come 
to .America. Having the push and the determination he knew that he would 
succeed. In 1876 he left his home and came to Minnesota, locating at Her- 
man, where he engaged in railroading for a number of years, after which, 
in 1880, he homesteade<l one hundred and and sixty acres of land in Max- 
well township. Grant county. He at once began the task of developing and 
improving his tract of land and there he engaged in general farming and 
stock raising until i8c)2, in which year he entered the general mercantile 
business at Herman, in partnership with Frank Falstrom, under the firm name 
of Falstrom & Johnson, which partnership continued until the .store was sold 
in 1910. 

Upon disposing of the mercantile business, iNIr. Johnson assisted in the 
reorganization of the \\'ells banlc, the new banking institution being known 



92 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

as the Grant County State Bank. At the inception of the new bank, Mr. 
Johnson was electetl a ihrector and on Jnly 3, 1914. was made president of 
the institution. Other than his connection with tlie bank he has been retired 
from business since 191 1. 

In 1885 Ciiri-^ I'llmson was united in marriage to Tilda Anderson, also 
a native of Sweden, who came to this country alone the same year that she 
was married. To this union have l>een born fi\'e children, Hilda, Hugo, 
Roy, Herbert and linoch. The family are members of the ]\Iethodist Epis- 
copal church and take an acti\'e interest in church work. 

Chris Johnson's life has been a valuable and useful one in the com- 
munity in which he has lived so long. He has always taken an active part 
in local affairs and liis effijrts ha\-e exer jjeen for ]irogress and advancement. 
He is recognized as a man nf sterling worth, with high ideals and noble 
purposes. 



-AIAGXUS B. RUUD, AI. D. 

Dr. Magnus B. Ruud, of Alexandria, coroner of Douglas count}' and 
one of tiie best-known }-oung physicians in this part of the state, is a native 
son of Minnesota and has lived in this state all his life. He was born at 
Fosston, in Polk county, March 4, 1887, son of Edward Ruud, a well-known 
druggist of that place. Upon completing the course in the public schools he 
became an aid to his father in the drug store and later entered the Uni- 
\ersity of North Dakota, from which he was graduated, with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts, in 1907, after which he entered the medical department of 
the Uni\ersity of Minnesota and was graduated from that institution, with 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine, in 191 1. b'or about a year thereafter 
Doctor ]\iuk1 was engaged as an interne in the University hospital and then 
took the practice of a physician at Lowry for three months. In April, 1912, 
the month in which he was married. Doctor Ruud moved to Alexandria, 
where he began the practice of his profession and where he has ever since 
been located, ha\ing built up a fine practice in and about Alexandria. Doc- 
tor Ruud has taken an acti\e interest in local civic afifairs since locating at 
Alexandria and is now serving as coroner of Douglas county. He also is 
the local surgeon for the Soo Line Railway Company. Doctor Ruud is an 
active member of the Alexandria Commercial Club, an earnest factor in 
the work of promoting the best interests of his home town, and is also a 
member of the Douglas Countv ^.ledical Societv, of the Minnesota State 



DOUGLAS AXD GRAXT COUXTIES, MIXXESOTA. 93 

Medical Association and of the American ]\Iedical Association, in the affairs 
of all of which organizations he takes a warm interest. 

It was on April 4, 1912, that Dr. ^l. B. Ruud was united in marriage to 
Ella May Oie, of Cooperstown. Xorth Dakota, and to this union two sons 
have l.een born, Jolm Fdward and Roljert Henr\-. Doctor and Mrs. Ruud 
attend the Xorv.'egian Lutheran church and take an earnest interest in the 
various beneficences of tlie same, as well as in all local good A\orks. ever 
helpful in the work of promoting sucli agencies as are designed to advance 
the common welfare hereabout. 



OLE B. R'ERSOX. 



Ole B. Iverson, one of the well-known business men of Xorcross, was 
born in \'ernon county, \\'isconsin, on October 3, 1861, the son of Baard 
and Susan Iverson, natives of X'orway, who were married in Dane county. 
\\'isconsin. where thev lived for some years, at the end of which time thev 
moved to \*ernon county, same state, where the father engaged in general 
farming, and Ijecanie the nwner of twn farms. They remained residents of 
\*ernon county until 1879. wlien they came to Minnesota, and located in 
Gorton township, Tirant county, wliere Mr. Ixerson homesteaded one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of land. He de\eioped and improved that farm and 
there he and his wife made their home until 1891, when they returned to the 
land nf their nati\it\". wliere they died some years ago. They were the par- 
ents of four children. Christina. Agrim, Ole B. and Hannah, of whom the 
subject of this sketch is now the only survivor. 

Ole B. Iverson received his education in the pulilic schools of \'ernon 
county, \\'isconsin, and there grew to manhood. As a lad he assisted his 
father with the work on the home farm and when the family moved to Grant 
county he continued farming and is now the owner of the old homestead in 
Gorton to\vnship. There lie did much in the way of development and 
improvement, and engaged in general farming and stock raising until 1901, 
in whicli year he retired from the farm and moved to Elbow Lake, where 
he engaged in the viood business for some two years. He then mo\ed to 
Xorcross, where he conducted a saloon and bowling alley for six }ears. and 
since that time has operated a pool room. He continues, however, to look 
after the interests of his farm and has been quite successful. 

In 1891 Ole B. Iverson was united in marriage to Marv Hanson, of 



94 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

Grant county, and to tliis union one child was bom, who died in infancy. 
Mary Iverson died in iHuj and in 1893 ]\Ir. Iverson was married to Bertha 
Hawkinson, who was born in 1875 in Wisconsin, the daugliter of Knute and 
Carrie Hawkinson, who mo\-ed from their home in ^Visconsin to Grant county 
in 1878 and bought a homestead right in Gorton township, where the father 
died and where the widow, with her son, Louis Hawkinson, still lives. To 
Ole B. and Bertha Iverson have been born six children, Marv, Sophia, Olivia, 
Benne, Arthur and All)crt, all of whom are living save Olivia. Mr. and 
Mrs. Iverson are active members of the United Lutheran church and take a 
proper interest in church Avork. They have long liecn prominent in the 
social life of the community in which' they live. 

Politically, Ole B. h-erson is identified with the Republican partv and 
has always taken an active interest in local affairs. He does not aspire to 
office, yet he has ever used his influence to further the interests of his home 
community. 



WILLIAM F. BEHREXD.S. 

\Villiam F. Behrends, one of the well-known and successful business 
men of Alexandria, was born at Appleton, Minnesota, (in March 31, 1893, 
the son of Frederick and Augusta ( Henkle ) Behrends, natives of Germany 
and Minnesota, respectively. 

Frederick Behrends resided in the Fatherland until be was sixteen years 
of age and there learned the butcher's trade, at which he worked for some 
years in the land of iiis nativity. At the age of sixteen he came to America 
and on his arrival in the United States came directly to Minnestoa and 
located at Lamberton, where he worked at his trade for some time. While 
a resident there he was married to Augusta Henkle and later he and his 
wife moved to .Appleton, where Mr. Behrends operated a meat market and 
invested in land. He continued in the meat business for many years, but 
for the past few years he has devoted his time to the buying and fattening 
of cattle. lie is now tlie owner of three hundred and twenty acres of good 
land, the most of whicli he uses for pasture. In addition to his large farm, 
he is the owner of much other land which he rents. 

Frederick and Augusta Behrends are the parents of five children, Har- 
riet, Mabel, \Villiam !•'., Elizabeth (deceased), and one who died in infancy. 
Harriet is the wife of C. L. Stuart, a tailor of Havre, Montana, and ]\Iabel 
married J. M. Keene, a train dispatcher, of Havre, Montana. Mr. and 



DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 95 

^Irs. Behrends are prominent in the social and religious life of the com- 
munity and Mr. Behrends has always taken an active interest in the local affairs 
of the township, where he is recognized as one of the substantial and promi- 
nent citizens. 

\\'illiam F. Behrends completed his schooling in the high schools at 
Appleton, and was graduated from the same with the class of 19 u. Dur- 
ing the last three years of his high-school work he was employed in a drug 
store and for fourteen months thereafter worked in a drug store at Havre, 
Montana, and then returned to Alinnesota, where he entered the State Uni- 
versity and completed the course in pharmacy there in 1915. He took the 
state examination and received his certificate three months before his gradu- 
ation. After he had completed his work at the universit}- 'Sir. Behrends 
was employed h\ a drug firm at Crookston for six months, at the end of 
which time, on Xoveml^er 8, 1915. he went to Alexandria, where he pur- 
chased the drug stock of C. A. W'aldren. Since assuming possession of 
the store he has added to the stock and made many changes in the store. 
In addition to his complete line of drugs he handles wall paper, maga- 
zines, books, candies and photographic supplies and has an up-to-date soda 
fountain, which is of the latest sanitary type. He caters to the best trade 
of the community aiid his motto, "Courteous Treatment," is strictly adhered 
to by all connected with the store. During his short business career in 
Alexandria Mr. Behrends has won the confidence and the respect of the 
people of the community by his courtemis and business-like principles. He 
l;elieves in keeping the best of all articles and especially does he look after 
his supply of pure drugs, believing, as he does, that the pulilic is entitled to 
the best that can be obtained. His stcu'k is ever fresh, and he buys in 
quantities that make it ])(>ssible for him to give the people the latest supplies 
on the market. 

On June 25, 1915. William 1'. Behrends was unitetl in marriage to 
Axis B. Sloss, and to this union one child, Jean, has been born,. ^Ir. and 
Mrs. Behrends are active memliers of the Congregational church, take much 
interest in church work and are prominent in the social and religious life 
of the community, where the\' arc held in the highest regard and esteem bv 
all who know them. They take nuich interest in the betterment of the social 
and the moral conditions of their home town and have devoted much time 
and attention to this line of work. 

\\'hile in school, William 1". Behrends was active in the student life 
of the university and was a member of the Phi Delta Chi fraternity, in 
the aft'airs of which he took a prominent part. Since becoming a resident 



96 DOUGLAS AXn GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

(if Alexandria he has taken an active interest in local affairs and is a sup- 
pi irter of all enterprises that have a tendency tu i)roniote the growth and 
dex-elnpment of the coniiminitw 



HOX. GEORGE P. CRAIG. 

The Hon. George P. Craig, judge of probate for the county of Douglas 
and one of the best-known and most influential residents of the city of 
Alexandria, is a nati\e of the Old Bay state, but has been a resident of this 
section of ^linnesota since he was twelve years of age and has consequently 
been a witness to and a participant in the wonderful development that has 
marked this region during the pa.st half century. Judge Craig was born in 
the old city of Salem, Massachusetts. July 14. 1S55, son of George B. and 
Sophia W. ( Wilson ) Craig, the former a native of the state of Massa- 
chusetts and the latter of Xew Hampshire, who later Ijecame pioneers of 
this section of IMinnesota and spent their last days in Douglas county, for 
many years honored and influential residents of the Osakis neighborhood. 

George B. Craig had quite an adventurous career before coming to 
Minnesota to take up his final residence on a homestead farm in Douglas 
county. He was born in the city of Salem, Massachusetts, March i, 1831, 
son of Samuel and Clarissa 1 Perkins ) Craig, the former of whom, a native 
of Maine and of Scottish descent, was for many years a provision merchant 
in that citv. Cpon completing his schooling in the schools of his native 
cit\-. George B. Craig became a sailor and for ten \ears followed the sea, 
visiting nearlv all the imjiortant ports of the world. In the days before the 
discovery of gold in California he spent several years in that territory and 
then returned to his boyhood home, where he married and for ten years 
diereafter was in partnership in business with his father. In 1864 he again 
responded to the call of the sea. and became a sailor on a vessel that after 
a tempestuous ^-oyage around Cape Plorn presently put into port at San 
Francisco. Until the spring of 1866 Mr. Craig remained on the Pacific 
coast and then started out into the wilds of British Columbia with a small 
partv on what proved to l)e a fruitless quest for gold, afterward returning 
down the Columbia ri\er to Colville, proceeding thence over into Montana, 
where during the summer of 1866 he delved in the mines. In the fall of 
that year he and thirteen others equipped a small boat and floated down 
the Missouri ri\-er to Sioux City, Iowa, from which place he returned home 



m ^ ^Sm 




HON. (;K()i;(;k p. cuai 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 97 

to Salem. During his arduous trip across the countrj^ through the West 
Mr. Craig determined to become a settler out here in the new country and 
in the spring of 1867 he came to Minnesota with his family, arriving at 
Osakis on April 21 of that year. After a bit of prospecting he selected a 
homestead site at a point nine miles north of that village, in Douglas county, 
and there established his home, being thus among the very earliest settlers 
of that part of the county. The country thereabout at that time was all still 
in its wilderness state and he was compelled to cut a road for the last two 
miles on his way to his homestead site. Mr. Craig became one of the most 
substantial farmers in that section and for some time served as clerk of the 
township, in other ways also contributing of his time and his energies to 
the public service of the pioneer community. There he remained the rest of 
his life, his death occurring in February, 1900. His widow remained on 
the homestead place until the fall of 19 14, after which she made her home 
with her son, Frank W. Craig, at Osakis, where she died in August, 1915, 
being then ninety years of age. She was born on a farm in New Hamp- 
shire, August 17, 1825, daughter of Nathaniel and Sarah (George) Wil- 
son, natives of that same state, but whose last days were spent in Massa- 
chusetts. To George B. and Sophia W. (Wilson) Craig five children had 
been bom, of whom the subject of this sketch was the first-born, the others 
being Frank W., Clara W. (deceased), Walter J. (deceased), and Clara S. 
George P. Craig was not quite twelve years old when he came to Minne- 
sota and he grew to manhood on the homestead farm north of Osakis, com- 
pleting his schooling in the district school that early had been organized in 
that neighborhood. From the days of his boyhood he was an able assistant 
to his father in the labors of developing and improving the homestead fann 
and continued farming until he entered upon his official duties in the court 
house at Alexandria in 1897. He had early begun to take an interested 
part in the civic affairs of his home community and of the county at large 
and became widely known in political circles throughout the county. Pre- 
vious to 1897 he had held minor public offices and on January i of that 
year became deputy register of deeds. So satisfactorily did he perform 
the important duties of that position that he was retained in the register's 
office for sixteen years, or until entering upon the duties of judge of probate 
for Douglas county, to which important office he was elected in 19 12. In 
the succeeding election of 1914 Judge Craig was re-elected and is now serv- 
ing his second term as judge of probate. He is a member of tlie United 
(7a) 



98 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

Modern Brotherhood of America and of the Ancient Order of United Work- 
men, in the art'airs of which organizations he takes an active interest, and he 
and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, in the various 
beneficences of wliich they take a warm interest, as well as in all community 
good works, helpful factors in the promotion of all agencies for the better- 
ment of conditions hereabout. 

It was on March 14, 1891. that Judge Craig was united in marriage to 
Ada M. Richards, who was born in Wisconsin, a daughter of Henry Rich- 
ards and wife, the former a native of New York state and the latter of Ver- 
mont, who had located in Wisconsin and who had later come to this sec- 
tion of Minnesota, settling in Douglas county among the pioneers of 1868. 
To this imion two children have been born, ^lary R., who is a clerk in the 
office of the treasurer of Douglas county, and Guy G. B., now a student 
in the Alexandria high school. 



ALFRED J. DAHL. 



Alfred J. Dahl, merchant and postmaster at Ashby, was born at Eagle 
Lake, Ottertail county, this state, August 1, 1882, of Norwegian ancestry, 
his parents, John A. and Aha B. (Johnson) Dahl, both being natives of the 
kingdom of Norway. 

John A. Dahl came to America when a young man. He first located 
in Wisconsin and later came to Minnesota and located at Ashby; later 
going to Eagle Lake, Ottertail county, where he remained for some years. 
He then returned to Ashby where he has since continued to live. He is a 
carpenter by trade. Mr. Dahl has been twice married. His children by 
his first marriage are Alfred J., Isabella and Edgar. His second wife was 
Josephine Bothum and the children by this marriage are Maljel, Pearl and 
\\'alter. Politically, Mr. Dahl is independent. 

Alfred I. Dahl received his early schooling in the pulilic schools of 
Ashbv. He afterwards attended the business college at Hutchinson. :\lin- 
nesota, and completed his business course in the business college at ;\Iin- 
neapolis. After leaving college he was employed for a time as a clerk in 
a general store at Ashby. In 1908 he engaged in the meat business with 
Frank Bemis as a partner, thi's partnership continuing for about a year, 
when Mr. Bemis bought his partner's interest and conducted the busi- 
ness alone. In 1908 Mr. Dahl was appointed postmaster of Ashby, and at 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 99 

that time he bought the office of the Asliby Post and became proprietor 
of that paper, cor.tinuing to own it for about three years. In 191 3 he sold 
the paper and a year after bought one of the two meat markets in the town 
and formed a partnership with the owner of the other meat market. A 
year later that partnership was dissolved and Mr. Dahl still continues in 
business in connection with his duties as postmaster. He recently formed a 
partnership with Theodore Peterson in the mercantile business and has a 
very complete store called the "Quality Store." 

In 1906 Alfred J. Dahl and Alessa V. Johnson were united in mar- 
riage. To this union two children have been born, Harold and Ethel. ]\Ir. 
Dahl is independent in politics. He has ser\'ed for some time as village 
clerk. His lodge membership is with the Woodmen. 



RE\\ EMIL JOSEPH STEINACH. 

The Rev. Emil Joseph Steinach, pastor of St. Nicholas Catholic church 
at Belle River, to which also belong the Catholics of Carlos, was born at 
Uzumach, Switzerland, February 14, 1868, son of Emil Joseph and Gene- 
vieve (Fritschi) Steinach, both of whom spent their lives in their native 
land. The father was a tanner and saddler by trade. 

The subject of this review spent his boyhood in his native land where 
he attended the common schools and an academy. When sixteen years old 
he came to America, a member of a large party of immigrants, and entered 
a convent in Mercer county, Ohio. After finishing his studies there he 
entered the Indian school at Rensselaer, Indiana, as a teacher, and remained 
there until in December, 1890. He was then ordained to the holy priest- 
hood by Archbishop Elder at Cincinnati, Ohio, December 22. 1890, after 
which he entered the seminary at Carthagena, Ohio, as teacher of Latin and 
Greek, and also did hospital work at Dayton and Cincinnati. From there 
he went to the Bunning Indian School in California, where he taught among 
the Pueblo Indians for three years, at the end of which time he returned 
to Burkettsville, Ohio, where he built a parochial school and had charge of 
the parish at Burkettsville for over one year. While there his parents died 
in Switzerland. At his own request, Father Steinach became secularized 
and entered the diocese of St. Cloud, Minnesota, as a secular priest. About 
that period he sent for his two sisters in Switzerland and they made their 
home with him. His first charge was at Holdingford, Minnesota, where 



lOO DOUGLAS AND GR\NT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

he spent eighteen months; then spent three years at Sauk Center, building 
a new parochial school while there. He then went to Fergus Falls and 
had charge of the parish there, also of the parishes of EHzabeth, Pelican 
Rapids and Maine, all in Ottertail county. After spending, about one year 
there he took charge of the parish at Breckenridge, and there built a com- 
■ fortable priest's house. Father Steinach then went to Wheaton, Travefse 
county, and had charge of the work there, also at Dumont and Cillis at 
the same time. Six months later he was transferred to Rice, Benton county, 
w'here he spent about eight years, during which time he built a new parochial 
school and also taught school. He then was transferred to the parish of 
St. Nicholas, in Belle River township, Douglas county, where he has since 
remained. During his work there covering eight years, Father Steinach 
has greatly increased the congregation and in 191 6 completed a new church 
edifice. 

Father Steinach is a member of the Knights of Columlaus at Long 
Prairie. He founded lodges of Foresters at Sauk Center and at Brecken- 
ridge (one each for men and women), and one at Rice. He is not now a 
member of the Foresters. 



ROBERT F. RARER. 



Robert F. Rarer, a well-known and substantial farmer of Grant county, 
v*vvner of a fine farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Gorton township, 
Desides other lands in the county and a quarter of a section in California, 
is a native of the old "Buckeye" state, but has been a resident of Minnesota 
since 1876 and of Grant county since 1880, in which year he took up a 
tree claim in Delaware township. He was born on a farm in the near vicin- 
ity of Enosville, Ohio, September 30, 1859, son of George and Rosa (Vance) 
Rarer, natives of Pennsylvania, who grew up in that state and were married 
there, after which they made their home on a farm alxjut a mile from Enos- 
ville, Ohio, where they lived until 1865, when the family moved to the vicinity 
of Tower Hill, in Shelby county, Illinois, where George Rarer bought a 
farm and made his home for many years, later leaving the farm and moving 
into Tuwer Hill, where he engaged at the wagon-making trade; later mov- 
ing to Irving, in Montgomery county, that same state, ^yhere he was engaged 
at the same trade until his retirement from business, when he returned to 
Tower Hill, where he spent his last days, his death occurring at the age of 
seventv-seven vears. His widow, who was his fourth wife, survived him 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. Id 

several years, her death occurring at the age of eighty-one. They were 
members of the ]\Iethodist Episcopal church and their children were reared 
in that faitli. To the last marriage of George Rarer four children were 
born, of whom the subject of this sketch was the. second in order of birth, 
the others being Betty, who married Charles Newberry and died in Okla- 
homa; Jennie, who married Isa J. Aloses and lives in the village of Herman, 
and Vance, who lives at ^linneapolis. 

Robert F. Rarer was not yet six years old when his parents moved 
from Ohio to Illinois and he grew up on the home farm in the vicinity of 
Tower Hill, receiving his schooling in the schools of that village. When 
seventeen years of age, in 1876, he came up into the Northwest and located 
at ^Minneapolis, where he became employed as the driver of Elias Moses's 
carriage team and also drove trotting horses for D. C. Nichols on the race 
track. During the visit of President Hayes to Minneapolis ^Ir. Rarer drove 
the six-horse team which drew the President's carriage through the streets 
of the city on the way to the state fair. Afterward Mr. Rarer found employ- 
ment in the lumber woods of \^^isconsin and for seventeen years there- 
after spent his winters there. In the meantime, in 1880. he had come over 
to this part of the state and had bought a tree-claim to one hundred and 
forty-two acres of land in Delaware township, Grant county, on which 
he planted ten acres of trees and began to develop the farm, putting on the 
place the buildings that are there today. After his marriage in 1886 Mr. 
Rarer established his home on that place, in 1895. and lived there until 
the death of his wife in 1899, when he sold the place and moved to Herman, 
where for four or five years he was engaged in the restaurant and pool- 
room business. In the meantime, Mr. Rarer had bought a quarter of a 
section of land in Gorton township, the place on which he now lives, and 
about that same time went to California, where he took a stone and timber 
claim to a quarter of a section of land, which he proved up and which he 
still owns. In igoi he returned to Grant county and married a second 
time, establishing his home on a rented farm in Delaware township, where 
he lived for about ten years, at the end of which time he erected a good 
set of buildings on his Gorton township quarter section and has ever since 
made his home there, moving into the new home in 191 1. In addition 
to his general farming Mr. Rarer has given considerable attention to dairy- 
ing and has done very well. He is a member of the board of directors of 
the Herman Market Company and has for years taken an active interest 
in the general business afifairs of the community in which he lives. In his 
political affiliations he is a Democrat and while living in Delaware town- 



I02 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

ship served as chairman of the board of supervisors and in Gorton town- 
ship as director of his local school district. He is a member of the Modern 
Woodmen of America and takes a warm interest in the affairs of that 
organization. 

As noted above, Ro1)ert F. Rarer has been twice married. It was in 
1886, at Tower Hill, Illinois, that he was united' in marriage to Laura 
Middlesworth, who was born in that village, daughter of Ner Middles- 
worth and wife, old settlers there, and to this union was born one child, 
a daughter, Tarsa. who married Brinton Houston and now lives at Staples, 
this state. Mrs. Laura Rarer died in 1899 and in 1901 Mr. Rarer married 
Clara Rhode, who was born at Oshkosh, Wisconsin, daughter of John 
Rhode and wife, who later became residents of Stevens countv, this state, 
and to this union eight children have been born, four of whom died in 
infancy, the survivors being Donald, Noma, George and May. 



SYLVAN SCHOONOVER. 

The late Sylvan Schoonover, who was a substantial farmer in Grant 
county, was born in Wisconsin on June .7, 1854, the son of Richard and 
Amelia Schoonover, who lived in that state for many years. It was there 
that the mother died in 1871, after which the father came to Minnesota 
and located in Byron, where he died in 1887. 

Sylvan Schoonover received his education in the public schools of 
Wisconsin and there grew to manhood on the home farm. After his mar- 
riage he moved to South Dakota, where he engaged in farming for nine 
and one-half years, after which he came to Minnesota and located in Dodge 
county, where he remained until 1900, when he moved to Grant county 
and purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land in Gorton township, where 
he lived until his death the following year. 

In 1882 Sylvan Schoonover was united in marriage to Gertie De Young, 
who was born in Illinois on November 30, i860, daughter of Gilbert and 
Minnie DeYoung, natives of Holland, who were married in Illinois in 1854. 
They located on a farm in Cook county, that state, but later came to 
Minnesota and here they located on a farm in Dodge county, where the 
mother died on April 5, 1885, at the age of forty-eight years. The father 
also died in Dodge county on February i, 191 3, at the age of eighty years. 
To Mr. and Mrs. DeYoung were born twelve children, Clara, Henry, 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. I03 

Gertie, Jennie, James, John, Ax}-, Nellie, Mary, Minnie, Gilbert and Jacob, 
of whom Henry, John, Gilbert and Jacob are now deceased. 

To Sylvan and Gertie Schoonover were born ten children, Jessie, Min- 
nie, Ada, Eugene, Guy, Chester, Elsie, Blanche, John and Grace. Elsie 
died in 191 5 at the age of twenty-four years. Since the death of Sylvan 
Schoonover, the widow and her sons have looked after the interests of the 
farm. Mrs. Schoonover has demonstrated her ability as a manager and has 
looked after the management of the farm with the same careful care and 
exact attention that her husband gave it. In all she has been quite success- 
ful, and has added much to the beauty as v.-ell as to the value of the place, 
having erected a fine new barn and made many other valuable improvements. 
To Mrs. Schoono^■er is due much praise for her good management and 
excellent success. At the time of the death of ]\Ir. Schoonover the place 
was not paid' for and they were in debt for some of the stock. Today she 
is recognized as one of the substantial property owners of the township. 
Her farm is one of the best in the township, her buildings are of the best 
and her home is well furnished. At the tirne of the death of her husband, 
her eldest son was but fourteen years of age and her youngest daughter but 
fourteen months. The family have been kept together and all are indus- 
trious and work to a common interest. The sons are now doing the work 
on the farm. The family is held in the highest regard and esteem by all 
who know them. 



FRANK JULIUS EDWARD GOTTFRIED NEHLS. 

Frank Julius Edward Gottfried Nehls, one of Grant county's best- 
known and most substantial farmers and the proprietor of a fine farm of 
three hundred and twenty acres in Gorton township, did not settle down to 
the cjuiet and secure life of a farmer until he had si>ent many years in the 
adventurous calling of the seas and had traveled the wide world over. Dur- 
ing his years of seafaring he served for three years in the German navy 
and as a sailor saw pretty much every important port in the world, later 
becoming a fresh-water sailor and seeing ext-ensive service on the Great 
Lakes of America, until an incident of travel led to his accjuaintance with 
farming life in Iowa and caused him to cease his wanderings and "settle 
down."' Mr. Nehls is a native of Germany, born in Brandenburg on Decem- 
ber 17, i860, son of Gottfried and Wilhelmina Nehls, both natives of that 
same country, the former of whom was a stone mason. The mother died 



I04 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

about 1867, leaving two sons, of whom the subject of this sketch was the 
younger, the other being Carl, who, at the age of fourteen, left home to 
go to sea and was last heard from in New York City in 1879. The father 
married again and to this second union two daughters were born, Amelia 
and Anna, both of whom remained in Germany. Gottfried Nehls, the 
father, spent all his life in his native land. 

Following the example of his elder brother, Frank Xehls also began 
life of a seafarer at the age of fourteen years and he followed the sea 
until the age of twenty-nine, seeing service in all parts of the world, during 
three years of which time he served in the German navy, and sailed in 
both German and American vessels, seeing considerable service also as a 
sailor on the Great Lakes. While serving in the latter capacity, one dav 
in 1885 he and John Wortman, another sailor, also a German, started out 
from Chicago with the ambitious design to walk around the world, but 
when they arrived at Denison. Iowa, they abandoned their trip. There they 
met some Germans who were acquainted with Mr. Nehl's father in the 
old country and they were persuaded to stop there, for some time making 
their home with these friends and working on farms in the vicinity of 
Denison. Wortman presently returned to Philadelphia and thence to the 
sea, but afterward gave up the life of a sailor and is now farming in South 
Dakota. Within the year Mr. Nehls also left Denison and returned to Chi- 
cago, later going East and taking service on a coast-wise vessel, but after 
awhile returned to Chicago and was there engaged for some time working 
on the docks, after which he again made his way out to Iowa, locating 
in Hardin county, where, in 1888. he married and settled down to the life 
of the farm, some years later moving to Winnebago' county, where he 
bought a farm and there made his home until 1902, in which year he 
disposed of his interests there and came up into Minnesota, locating in 
Grant county, where he ever since has made his home and where he and 
his family are now very pleasantly and very comfortably situated. 
Previous to his definite location here, Mr. Nehls had bought a half section 
of land in section 26 of Gorton township and it was on that place that he 
established his home. Though the farm had been broken when he came 
into possession of it, no buildings had been erected and the improvements 
on the place, as well as the planting of a fine grove, are the works of the 
present owner, who, in addition to his general fanning has engaged some- 
what extensively in stock raising and has done very well, long having Ijeen 
recognized as one of the most progressive farmers in that neighborhood. 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. I05 

In his political affiliations Mr. Nehls is a Republican, but has not been a 
seeker after public office. 

It was in iS88 that Frank Nehls was united in marriage, in Hardin 
county, Iowa, to Doretta Smith, who was born in that county, daughter of 
Henry and JMeta (Glade) Smith, early settlers there, and to this union 
three children have been born, Minnie, who married John Gebhardt and 
lives in North Dakota; Emma, who married John Harder and lives in that 
same state, and Harr3% who is at home. 



PETER G. PETERSON. 



Peter G. Peterson, manager of the elevator of the Atlantic Elevator 
Company at Kensington, dealer in wood, oils and machinery at that place, 
secretary and treasurer of the Kensington Telephone Company, former 
recorder of the village and in other ways active in the civic and business 
life of his home town, is a native of the kingdom of Sweden, but has 
been a resident of [Minnesota since he was three years old. He was born 
on April 28, 1867, son of Gustav and Gunillia (Anderson) Peterson, both 
natives of Sweden, who came to the United States in 1870 and proceeded to 
[Minnesota, settling in Todd county. There Gustav Peterson homesteaded 
a quarter of a section of land about eight miles north of Sauk Center, on 
which he established his home and where he lived seven years, at the end 
of which time he disposed of his homestead and moved to Pope county, 
where he bought two hundred acres of railroad land about two miles south 
of Kensington, which he proceeded to improve and develop and where he 
still lives, long having been regarded as one of the most substantial resi- 
dents of that community. His wife died in 1892. They were the parents 
of four children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the second in order 
of birth, the others being Marie, Lena and John. 

Peter G. Peterson was but a child when he came to this countrv with 
his parents in 1870 and he received his schooling in the district schools of 
Todd and Pope counties, growing to manhood on the home farm in the lat- 
ter county, remaining there until the fall of 1893, when he was made man- 
ager of the farmers' ■ elevator at • Kensington, a position he held for six 
years, at the end of which time he rented the elevator and for a year 
conducted the same on his own account. His services then were secured 
by the Kensington Milling Company and for two years he acted as manager 



I06 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

of that company's mill at Kensington, after which he transferred his services 
to the Atlantic Elevator Company and has since been in active charge of that 
concern's elevator at Kensington, long having been recognized as one of 
the most competent grain men in that section. On his own account, in 
addition to his service in behalf of the elevator company, Mr. Peterson does 
quite a business in the way of selling wood, oil and farm machinerv and 
has done very well. For three years or more he has been secretary and 
treasurer of the Kensington Telephone Company and as such the practical 
manager of that concern's interests. He also has for years given his thought- 
ful attention to local civic affairs and for two years served as village 
recorder and has also served on the village council, his efforts ever having 
been directed toward the betterment of conditions in his home town. 

In 1904 Peter G. Peterson was united in marriage to Emma Ander- 
son, who was born in Pope county, this state, daughter of Swen R. Ander- 
son and wife, natives of Sweden and early settlers in Pope county. Mr. 
and Mrs. Peterson are members of the Mission Lutheran church and take 
a warm interest in the affairs of the congregation, as well as in all neigh- 
borhood good works, helpful factors in the promotion of all proper causes 
thereabout. 



CHRISTEN A. CHRISTENSON. 

Christen A. Christenson, a well-known and progressive farmer and 
stockman of Stony Brook township, Grant county, is a native son of Alinne- 
sota and has lived in this state nearly all his life. He was born on a 
farm in Freeborn county on December 9. 1874, son of Andrew and Gun- 
hild (Kaasa) Christenson, both natives of the kingdom of Norway, the 
former born in Egdahl and the latter in Telemarken. Both Andrew Chris- 
tenson and Gunhild Kaasa came to America in the days of their youth 
and settled with their respective parents in Freeborn county, Minnesota, 
where they were married and where they began to make a home for them- 
selves on a rented farm. There they resided until the year 1876, in which 
year "Sir. Christenson homesteaded a quarter of a section of land in Elbow 
Lake township, Grant county, on which he and his wife established their 
home and where they are still living, for many years having been regarded 
as among the most substantial residents of that community. Upon taking 
his homestead Andrew Christenson erected a small log house and bravelv 
set about the task of breaking the virgin prairie soil, which presently began 



DOUGLAS AXD GR.\XT COUNTIES, MIXXESOTA. lOJ 

to bring him a proper reward for his labors and it was not long until he 
had a well-improved and profitably cultivated farm, on which he later erected 
comfortable farm house and put up a substantial set of farm buildings. 
As he prospered in his farming operations he added to his holdings until 
now he is the possessor of a fine farm of four hundred acres, on which 
he and his wife and those of their children who still remain on the old 
homestead are very pleasantly and comfortably situated. Andrew Chris- 
tenson and wife are members of the United Lutheran church at Elbow 
Lake and their children were reared in the faith of that communion. There 
are eleven of the children, all of whom are still living and of whom the sub- 
ject of this biographical sketch was the first born, the others being as fol- 
low : Ole, a farmer, living at Wendell : Betsy, who married Carl Helgeson 
and lives in Walsh county. North Dakota: Lars, a farmer of Berthold. 
Xorth Dakota : Caroline, who married H. Bergan and lives at \\"endell ; 
Knute, a farmer, of Benedict, Xorth Dakota; Sela, who married Ben Elling- 
son and lives at Wendell: Henry, who lives at Hereford; Annie, who mar- 
ried Ole Anderson, a farmer of the Wendell neighborhood: Alma, who is 
at home with her parents, and Theodore, who also is at home. 

Christen A. Christenson was not two years old when his parents moved 
to Grant county from Freeborn county and he grew to manhood on the 
homestead farm in Elbow Lake township, receiving his schooling in the 
local schools of that neighborhood. Cpon attaining his majority he went 
to Walsh county, Xorth Dakota, where he homesteaded a quarter of a 
section of land and there remained for two years, at the end of which time 
he sold his claims to advantage and returned to Grant county, almost 
immediately thereafter starting a hotel at \A"endell, which he conducted 
for a year. He then traded the hotel for a tract of eighty acres of land 
in Stony Brook township and began active farm operations on the same. 
There Mr. Christenson has made his home ever since, with the exception 
of two years, 1907-09, during which period he was engaged in conducting 
a butcher shop at Elbow Lake. Upon taking over his farm in Stony Brook, 
^Ir. Christenson rented an adjoining quarter section and began to operate 
the same in conjunction with his own farm. In 19 13 he bought the quarter 
section and is now the owner of a fine farm of two hundred and forty 
acres, on which he has erected excellent buildings and has one of the best 
farm plants in that part of the county. In addition to his old land, Mr. 
Christenson rents an adjoining quarter section, and is thus profitably culti- 
vating in all four hundred acres. Besides his general farming he has 
engaged somewhat extensively in the raising of live stock and has done very 



I08 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

well. In his political affiliations, Mr. Christenson is a Democrat and takes 
a good citizen's interest in the general civic life of the community, though 
not an office-seeker. 

On January 28, 1903, Christen A. Christenson was united in marriage 
to Emma Oson, who was born in Wisconsin, daughter of Hans Oson and 
wife, substantial residents of that state, and to this union three children 
ha\'e been Ijorn, Gladys, Evelyn and Arthur. Mr. and Mrs. Christenson 
are members of the United Lutheran church and take a proper part in all 
community good work. 



BOTTOL T. TEIGEN. 



Bottol T. Teigen, a well-known and progressive merchant of Brandon, 
dealer in general merchandise, director in the Farmers State Bank of that 
village and head of the real-estate firm known as the Teigen, Berg Land 
Company of Brandon, dealers in farm lands throughout the famous park 
region of Minnesota, is a native son of Minnesota and has lived in this state 
all his life. He was born on a farm in Goodhue county, June 12, 1866, son 
of Thomas and Johanna Teigen, natives of the kingdom of Norway, who 
came to the United States in 1850, settling at Madison, Wisconsin, whence, 
in 1855, they came to Minnesota and settled in Goodhue county, where 
Mrs. Teigen died many years ago and where Thomas Teigen, a well-to-do 
retired farmer and the owner of two hundred and eight acres of land, died 
recently. His youngest son now operates the home place. Thomas Teigen 
and wife were the parents of six children, all of whom are still living and 
of whom the subject of this sketch was t-he third in order of birth, the 
others being as follow: Mary, wife of T. Hummedal, a farmer of Good- 
hue county; Martha, wife of Albert Anderson, manager of a lumber yard 
at INIayville, North Dakota; Nels, a real-estate dealer and farmer at Minne- 
waka. North Dakota ; Ole, who is operating the old home farm in Goodhue 
county, and Lena, wife of the Reverend Adesvick, of Bryant, South Dakota. 

Bottol T. Teigen was reared on the paternal farm in Goodhue county, 
receiving his schooling in the schools of that county, and remained at home 
until he was past twenty years of age, when he came over to this part 
of the state, about 1889. and located at Brandon, where, in partnership 
with John Barsness, he built a creamery at Brandon, the first creamery 
established in Douglas county, and for seven years was engaged as man- 
ager of the same. He then moved to Audubon, this state, where he was 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. IO9 

engaged as buttermaker in the creamery of the Audubon Creamery Com- 
pany for five years, at the end of which time he returned to Brandon, about 
1898, and there engaged in the general merchandise business, which ever 
since has occupied the chief part of his time. Mr. Teigen started in business 
in a small way, but has gradually enlarged his stock as the demands of the 
trade warranted, until now he has a large and complete stock of merchan- 
dise. He owns the building in which his store is situated and his business 
is conducted along strictly up-to-date lines. In addition to his mercantile 
interests, Mr. Teigen is vice-president and one of the directors of the Farmers 
State Bank at Brandon, owns two hundred acres of land in North Dakota; 
one hundred and sixty acres, in partnership with Peter Hoplin, in Montana 
and is head of the Teigen, Berg Land Company of Brandon, doing a large 
business in farm lands throughout the ^Minnesota park region, justly known 
as the corn and clover belt. 

On June 4, 1896, Bottol T. Teigen was united in marriage to Bertina 
Holing, daughter of Haakon Holing, an early settler in Douglas county, 
and to this union two children have been born, Agnes, who is now a student 
in the high school at Alexandria, and Hazel. Mr. and ]\Irs. Teigen ha\e a 
very pleasant home at Brandon and take a proper interest in the general 
social activities of their home town. Mr. Brandon is a Republican. Fra- 
ternally, he is affiliated with the local lodge of the Woodmen and takes a 
warm interest in the affairs of the same. 



OLE K. RUSTAND. 



Ole K. Rustand, one of Grant county's best-known and most sub- 
stantial farmers, clerk of North Ottawa township and the proprietor of 
a fine farm of four hundred and eighty acres in that township, is a native 
of the kingdom of Norway, but has been a resident of Grant county since 
he was nine years of age. He was born in Sigdal on August 17, 1871, son of 
Christian O. and Anna O. (Tofsrud) Rustand, both natives of that same 
district in Norway, the former born on February 22, 1839, and the latter, 
March 5, 1844, who later came to Minnesota and became pioneers in Grant 
county, where Christian O. Rustand died in the summer of 1908 and where 
his widow is still living. 

Christian O. Rustand was a farmer and small landowner in his native 
land and in 1880, attracted bv the stories of the fine success which had 



no DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

attended the efforts of some of his old neighbors who had come to Minne- 
sota and had located in Grant county, emigrated to this country with his 
family and settled in North Ottawa township, Grant county, homesteading 
a tract of one hundred and sixty acres in section 14, where he established 
his home and where he spent the rest of his life. Upon taking possession 
of his homestead Mr. Rustand put up a small frame house, on the site where 
the present comfortable farm house now stands, and began to break and 
improve his land. He prospered in his operations and gradually added to his 
land holdings until, with the aid of his sons, he became the owner of eight 
hundred acres, all in one piece with the exception of one quarter section. 
Christian O. Rustand was a Republican and gave his earnest attention to 
local civic affairs, serving his community in several public capacities, hav- 
ing been a member of the board of township supervisors, township assessor 
and a member of the local school board. He and his wife were earnest 
members of the Lutheran church and were among the organizers of the 
local church of that communion in the neighborhood in which they lived. 
Christian O. Rustand died on July i. 1908, and his widow is still living 
on the old homestead place. To them nine children were born, of whom 
the subject of this sketch was the third in order of birth, the others being 
as follow: Ole C, a farmer, .living near Wendell; Bertha, who married 
H. H. Ramstad and upon his death married, secondly, A. I. Haugen and 
is now living on a farm in Elbow Lake township; Gunhild, "who married 
Charles Larson and lives in North Ottawa township; Martha, who mar- 
ried Carl Torgerson and lives in North Dakota ; Andrew, who lives in North 
Ottawa township; Mads, who lives in the same township; Christian, who 
died in infancy, and Albert, who also died in infancy. 

As noted above, Ole K. Rustand was about nine years old when his 
parents settled in Grant county and he grew to manhood on the home farm 
in North Ottawa township, receiving his schooling in the local schools. From 
the days of his early youth he was a valued assistant to his father in the 
work of developing the home place and remained at home until his mar- 
riage in 1896, when he established his own home on a quarter of a section 
of his father's farm that had been given over to him. From the very 
beginning of his operations there he has been successful and has added to 
his holdings until nciw he is the owner of a splendid farm of four hundred 
and eighty acres, (in Avliicli he has erected a fine house and a good set of 
farm buildings, supplanting the buildings he put up there when he first entered 
upon possession of the place. In addition to his general farming, he has 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. Ill 

given much attention to the raising of a good grade of Hve stock and has 
fine herds of Shorthorn cattle and Poland China hogs. Mr. Rustand was 
one of the organizers of the farmers' co-operative creamery and is treasurer 
of the company operating the same. He also is a stockholder in the new 
\\'endell State Bank and in other ways has displayed his interest in the gen- 
eral business activities of his home community. In his political views, Mr. 
Rustand is an ardent Prohibitionist. He has served as treasurer of his home 
township, for many years has been clerk of his school district and is now 
serving as township clerk. 

In 1896 Ole K. Rustand was united in marriage to Hulda Lardon, who 
was born in the kingdom of Sweden, a daughter of Otto and Anna (Carl- 
son) Larson, old settlers of North Ottawa township, where the former 
died on July 18, 1916, and where his widow is still hving, and to this union 
three children have been born, Arthur, Ethel and Florence. ]\Ir. and Mrs. 
Rustand are members of the Church of God and Mr. Rustand is a member 
of the board of trustees of the same, both taking a warm interest in the 
affairs of the church, as well as in all local good works, helpful in promoting 
all movements having to do with the advancement of the welfare of the 
communitv in which thev live. 



THOMAS M. THAYER, AI. D. 

Dr. Thomas M. Thayer, a successful physician of Herman, was born at 
Gou\erneur, St. Lawrence county. New York, in 1876, the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. O. G. Thayer. He grew to manhood at Gouverneur and received his 
early education in the schools of that place. After completing the high- 
school course he entered St. Lawrence L^niversity, where he remained one 
}-ear, at the end of which time he entered the Homeopathic College at New 
York City, from which he was graduated in 1900. For a year thereafter 
he was engaged in general practice at Montreal and he then spent a year as 
a member of the staff of the state hospital at Middletown, New York. Doc- 
tor Thayer then came to Minnesota and for six years was attached to the 
staff of the state hospital at Fergus Falls, his extensive hospital work thus 
having been of inestimable value in his general practice. L^pon leaving the 
hospital at Fergus Falls, Doctor Thayer located at Herman, where he has 
since been engaged in general practice. 



112 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

In 1908 Dr. Thomas M. Thayer was united in marriage to Mae Pardee. 
of IMinneapoHs, and to this union has been born one child, a daughter. In 
his political persuasion, Doctor Thayer is affiliated with the Democratic 
party. 



PETER O. UNUAIB. 



Peter O. Unumb, cashier of the First National Bank of Alexandria, 
member of the common council of that city, president of the Farmers State 
Bank of Brandon, president of the Farmers State Bank of Hofifman and 
also actively identified with the real-estate interests of this section of the 
state, is a native of the kingdom of Norway, but has been a resident of 
this country since he was three years of age and of Minnesota since he 
was nine. He was born in the year 1863, son of Peter and Olivia (Han- 
gaard) Unumb, both natives of Norway, who came to the United States 
in 1866 and located in Madison, Wisconsin, where they remained until 
1869, in which year they came to Minnesota with their family and settled on 
a homestead farm in Moe township, Douglas county. Peter Unumb was 
a good farmer and made an excellent farm out of his raw timber land, 
becoming one of the most substantial farmers in that part of the country. 
There he spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring in 1913. His 
widow survived him about two years, her death occurring in 191 5. They 
were the parents of six children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the 
second in order of birth, the others being E. O., C. B., Oscar, Bertha and 
Ingeborg. 

Peter O. Unumb received his schooling in the public schools of Alex- 
andria, finishing the course offered at that time, before the days of the 
commissioned high school, and in 1880, when seventeen years old, became 
a bookkeeper in the Bank of Alexandria, now the First National Bank, 
and has ever since been connected with that sound old financial institution. 
His work with the bank received the approval of the directing heads of 
the same from the very start and he was presently advanced to the posi- 
tion of assistant cashier and in 1900 promoted to the position of cashier, 
which position he ever since has held, long having been one of the best- 
known figures in the financial circles of this part of the state. Mr. Unumb 
has extended his banking interests in other directions, having been the 
organizer of the Farmers State Bank of Brandon and of the Farmers State 
Bank of Hoffman, of both of which institutions he is president. He also 




riOTEU O. rXTTMF., 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. II3 

has for some years been an extensive dealer in real estate throughout this 
section, both in Dakota and Minnesota, and in town properties in Alexan- 
dria and has done very well in that line. Mr. Unumb also has given close 
attention to the civic interests of his home town and of the county at large 
and is now serving as a member of the common council of the city of 
Alexandria. He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and takes a warm interest in the affairs of that organization. 

In 1889 Peter O. Unumb was united in marriage to Margaret Hovde, 
who was born in Douglas county. Her parents came to this country from 
N^orway and settled in Douglas county in 1865. To Peter O. and Mar- 
garet (Hovde) Unumb the following children have l>een born, \'era, 
Archie and Percy, who are now attending Carlton College, and iSIerlin and 
Paul, who are still in school at Alexandria. Mr. Unumb is a member of 
the Norwegian Lutheran church and takes an earnest interest in the various 
beneficences of the same, as well as in all neighborhood good works, while 
Mrs. Unumb is affiliated with the Christian Scientists, both useful and 
influential factors in the promotion of movements designed to increase the 
general welfare hereabout. 



GILBERT GILBERTSON. 

Gilbert Gilbertson, one of the well-known and prominent retired farmers 
of Erdahl, was born in Norway on December 5, 1843, the son of Gilbert and 
Anna (Olson) Olson, also natives of Norway, who there received their edu- 
cation in the public schools and there grew to manhood and womanhood and 
were married, and there their children were born. Gilbert Olson was a 
farmer in his native land, and he and his wife were prominent in the social 
and the religious life of the community in which they lived. They con- 
tinued to reside in the land of their birth until 1861, when they came to the 
United States and spent the remaining days of their lives with their son Ole, 
in Wisconsin. They were the parents of eight children, Ole (deceased), 
Thoren, Ole (deceased), Thora (deceased), Olia, Mary, Gilbert and Anna. 

Gilbert Gilbertson received his education in the public schools of his 

native land and there grew to manhood. He remaiHed a resident of the 

land of his birth until 1861, when he decided that he would come to America. 

On his arrival in the United States he located in Wisconsin, where he worked 

(8a) 



114 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

as a farm hand for one year. On August 15, 1862, he enHsted in Company 
H, Twenty-seventh Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, at Madison. 
He was first sent to CoUimbus, Kentucky, and then to Vicksburg, where he 
ser\ed under General Grant in the memorable siege of that city. After the 
siege of \'icksburg he was with the command of General Steele, in the cap- 
ture of Little Rock, Arkansas, where he remained for nearly two years. 
After the fierce battle at Jenkins Ferry, where they captured the commands 
of (Jenerals Price and Marmaduke, under General Canby, Mr. Gilbertson 
was sent to Mobile, Ala])ama, where they captured the old Spanish fort and 
Fort Blakely, after which they started in the campaign up the Alabama 
river, and were on this latter expedition when the war came to a close. 
Although the war was over, Mr. Gilbertson was transferred to Mobile, and 
later to Texas to reco\er some guns that had been sold to the Mexicans in 
an unlawful manner. He received his discharge at Browns\ille, Texas, on 
September 25, 1865, and returned to ^^^isconsin, wliere he remained for some 
five years, engaged as a farm hand. In 1870 he came to Minnesota and 
took a soldier's claim to one hundred and sixty acres in Swift county. There 
he built a log shanty, obtained a good team of oxen and engaged in farming 
until 1875, when he sold the place and moved up to Grant county, where he 
purchased eight}- acres of land in section 5 of Erdahl township, having 
driven up from Swift county. This was all wild land, covered with scrub 
timber and brush. He built a good log house and started to clear the place 
and plant his grain. The most of the first crop was taken by the grass- 
hoppers. With much perseverance and hard work he succeeded in clearing 
and improving the farm and erected good and substantial buildings. There 
he continued his general farming and stock raising until 1903, when he sold 
the place and moved to Erdahl village, and there purchased fifteen acres of 
land, on which he is now living, having retired from the greater responsi- 
bilities of farm life. He built a fine new residence and made many other 
valuable improvements, adding much to the value and the beauty of the place. 
In 1 87 1 Gilbert Gilbertson was united in marriage to Mary Lee and 
to this union twelve children have been born, Ellen, Gustav, Mina, Oscar, 
Sena, Otto, George, Clara, Arthur, Martin, Martin Arnold and Mabel, the last 
three of whom are now deceased. Ellen is the wife of John Comstock and 
resides at Fergus Falls ; Gustav is a resident of Canada ; Mina married Austin 
Thompson and lives at Hankinson, North Dakota; Oscar is in the grain 
business at Rugby, North Dakota; Sena is the wife of \\'illiam Mooe, a 
wheat buyer at Judd, North Dakota; Otto, Clara and Arthur are at home 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 1 15 

with their parents, and George resides in Erdahl. Air. and Mrs. Gilbertson 
are active members of the Norwegian Lutheran church and have long been 
prominent in the social and the religious life of the community, where they 
are held in the highest regard and esteem. 'Sir. Gilbertson, has alwavs taken 
a keen interest in local affairs and has had much to do with the civic life of 
the township and the county. He assisted in the organization of the town- 
ship and was the first clerk of the same. He also served as clerk of the 
school district, which he helped organize. For four vears he was county 
commissioner, in which capacity he rendered excellent ser.ice. retiring with 
the confidence and the respect of the entire county. 



ARTHUR L. OSTERBERG. 

Arthur L. Osterberg, manager of the Kensington Alercantile Company 
at Kensington, Douglas county, and for some years 'one of the most active 
factors in the business life of that village, is a native son of ^Minnesota and 
has lived in this state all his life. He was born on a homestead farm in 
Xora township, in the neighboring county of Pope, December 17, 1882, 
son of August and Christina (Johnson) Osterberg, natives of Sweden, born 
in Westergotland. who came to America in 1869, immediately following 
their marriage, and proceeded directly to Minnesota, settling in Pope county. 

Upon settling in this state August Osterberg homesteaded a tract of 
land in the immediate vicinity of Glenwood, in Xora township. Pope county, 
where he and his wife established their home and where they reared their 
children, remaining there until alx)Ut the year 1900, when they retired from 
the farm and moved to Kensington, where their last days were spent, Mr. 
Osterberg dying in 1905 and his widow surviving a little more than a year, 
her death occurring in December, 1906. August Osterberg for years took 
an active part in community affairs in Pope county and became one of the 
most substantial farmers in his neighborhood. He and his wife were mem- 
bers of the Swedish Mission church and their children were reared in the 
faith of the same. There were ten of these children, of whom the subject 
of this sketch was the seventh in order of birth and all of whom were bom 
on the old homestead farm in Xora township, the others being ]\Iamie, 
Cecelia, Frank, Robert, Esther, Huldah, Harry, Edith and Ebba. 

Arthur L. Osterberg was reared on the homestead farm near Kin- 
sington and finished his common-school schooling in the high school in 



Il6 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

that city, supplementing the same by a course in the Glenwood Academy, 
after which he began clerking in a store at Kensington and with the excep- 
tion of one year spent at Elbow Lake has ever since lived in that village. 
After clerking for some time he began to buy grain at Kensington and when 
not thus engaged resumed his work as a clerk and was thus engaged until 
1912, when, upon the organization of the Kensington Mercantile Company, 
he became a partner in the same and was made general manager, a position 
he ever since has held, and in the performance of the duties of which he 
has come to be recognized as one of the most enterprising and energetic 
business men thereabout. Mr. Osterberg also has been called on at one time 
and another to act as administrator of various estates in" probate in that 
section of the county. 

In 1905 Arthur L. Osterberg was united in marriage to Christine Head- 
strom, who was born in Salem township, Douglas county, and to this union 
five children have been lx)rn, the first-born of whom, Weldon, died in infancy, 
the others being Walter, Irene, Ethel and Ruby. Mr. and Mrs. Oster- 
berg are members of the Swedish Lutheran church at Kensington and take 
a warm interest in the affairs of the same, as well as in all neighborhood 
good works, being earnestly concerned in all movements having to do with 
the betterment of conditions in the communitv in which thev live. 



ELLEND N. ELLINGSON. 

Ellend N. Ellingson, a well-known and progressive young farmer of 
Grant county, one of the most active and infiuential residents of Stony Brook 
township, is a native son of that county and has lived there all his life. He 
was born on a pioneer farm in Stony Brook township, January 19, 1883, son 
of Nils and Sigri (Dybdal) Ellingson, natives of Norway and early set- 
tlers in Grant county, who came out to this part of the state from Houston 
county, Minnesota, in 1878 and settled in Stony Brook township, where they 
are still living. A biographical sketch of Nils Ellingson, presented else- 
where in this volume, gives details of the history of the Ellingson family 
back through the days of Grandfather Ellingson, who came with his family 
from Norway in 1868, settling in Houston county, this state, later locating 
in Grant county, where he and his wife spent the rest of their lives. 

Upon completing his schooling in the common schools of his home town- 
ship, Ellend N. Ellingson entered the Park Region Lutheran College at Eer- 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. II7 

gus Falls and after a comprehensive course there returned to the home farm 
and has ever since, with the exception of a year spent as a clerk in a hard- 
ware store at \Vendell, been engaged in farm work on his father's place and 
on adjoining land which he rents on his own account, and has been quite 
successful in his farming operations. In his political affiliations ]\Ir. Elling- 
son is a Republican and by religious persuasion is a member of the synod 
branch of the Norwegian Lutheran church, taking an earnest interest in the 
civic affairs of his home community and in all movements having to do with 
the advancement of the common welfare hereabout. 



AXTOX T. LORSUXG. 



The pleasant village of Millerville has been a good enough place for 
Anton J. Lorsung to spend his life in. and there he is now well established 
as a merchant. He was born there on August 6, 1877, a son of Peter and 
Katherine (Miller) Lorsung. John A. Miller, his uncle, was probably the 
earliest settler in Millerville township, the village now being built on land 
that was formerly his farm. He and Peter Lorsung each gave twenty acres 
to the Catholic church of ^Millerville and helped organize the church there. 
Mrs. Katherine ^filler, mother of John A. IMiller, also took up a homestead 
in that vicinity and the village was named after the Miller family, the town- 
ship later being given the same name. Peter Lorsung, the paternal grand- 
father, was a native of France. He married Johannah Raymark. They 
came to America, settling on a farm near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, although 
he was a wagon-maker by trade, and there his death occurred, after which 
his widow came to Minnesota and spent the rest of her life with her son, 
John Lorsung, ,who had previously taken up a homestead near Millerville. 
Peter Lorsung, father of the subject of this sketch, was bom in Germany 
on December 10, 1830. He was twelve years of age when he crossed the 
Atlantic with his parents and he lived at Pittsburgh until the spring of 1859, 
when he came to Minnesota, arriving in Douglas county on May i. He took 
up a homestead in what is now ]vlilierville township, and there he underwent 
the privations and hardships incident to pioneer life, developed a good farm 
and there spent the rest of his days, dying on Januarj^ 9. 1908. at an 
advanced age. He survived his wife twenty-eight years, her death hav- 
ing occurred on June 2. 1880, at the age of forty-two vears. To these 
parents six children were born, Johannah, Joseph. Peter P.. Marv- F., John 



Il8 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

P., and Anton J. Tlie father of these children was active in local affairs 
and helped organize the Catholic church at Alillerville. In early life he 
learned the carpenter's trade and continued to work at it at intervals. He 
built the first church of his denomination at Millerville and also a number 
of other buildings still standing in that locality. He also made several 
wagons for his neighbors. 

Anton J. Lorsung grew up on the home farm, and was educated in 
the common schools of his district, later taking a short business course at 
Sauk Center. He remained on the farm until he was sixteen years old. 
In 1898 he started a general store at Millerville, in partnership with his 
brother, J. P. Lorsung, and five years later he bought his brother's interest 
and has been operating the store alone ever since. He carries a well-selected 
stock of general merchandise and has always enjoyed a good trade with the 
people of the town and surrounding country. He carries about a seven- 
thousand-dollar stock. His brother, John P. Lorsung, is also a merchant 
at Millerville. He was born on June 25, 1872, and in 1900 he married 
Katherine Kojlin. 

On Xdvember 11, 1906, Anton J. Lorsung was married to Anna Kots- 
chaver, and to their union six children have been born : Alyojies, Mathias, 
Hilta and Mircilla (twins), Attlebirt, and Jerome. 

Mr. Lorsung is a member of the Catholic church, and of the Catholic 
Order of Foresters. Politically, he is independent. He has served as vil- 
lage recorder since the place was incorporated. On September 14, 1903, 
he called a meeting of the leading citizens of the village, who met in his 
store for the purpose of incorporating the village, which was accordingly 
done, he being elected recorder, which position he has held ever since. 



HENRY G. LILLEMOEN. 

The long years of strenuous effort as a general fanner put forth by 
Henry G. Lillemoen, of Wendell, has been rewarded by a large measure of 
material success and he is now able to spend his declining years in retire- 
ment. He was born in Norway, Novemlier 23, 1848, and was five years of 
age when, in 1853, his parents came to the United States and settled at 
Decorah, Iowa, where he grew up and attended school. In the fall of 1864, 
he then being but sixteen years of age, Henry G. Lillemoen enlisted in Com- 
pany I, Sixteenth Regiment, Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and sensed with that 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. II9 

command imtil the close of the Civil War. After his honorable discharge 
he returned to Iowa and for some time followed boating on the Mississippi 
river, also worked one year in the lumber woods and in rafting logs and on 
steamboats plying Iietween Iowa cities and St. Louis, Missouri. He came to 
Minnesota in 187T, taking up a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres 
in section 6 of Stony Brook township. Grant county, and also secured a tree 
claim of one hundred and twenty acres. He worked hard, cleared and 
developed his land into an excellent farm ; set out a grove and erected good 
buildings, and engaged successfully in general farming and stock raising 
until the fall of IQIS- when he retired from active life, removing to the 
village of Wendell, where he bought property and now resides, renting out 
his farm. 

In 1869, in Winneshiek county, Iowa, Henry G. Lillemoen was married 
to Ingeborg Sneserud, who was born in Norway, February 2, 1849, a daugh- 
ter of Stiner Sneserud, a pioneer of Wisconsin, who settled there about 
1853 and in i860 removed with his family to Iowa, locating in Winnesliiek 
county, where he spent the rest of his life. To Mr. and Mrs. Lillemoen the 
following children have l)een born : Stiner, Ole, Henry, Ida, who is now 
the wife of Nils Skinnemoen; Emma, who married Charles Setra and li\-es 
at Minot, North Dakota ; Christopher, a harness maker in \\''endell, and 
Helma, who married Lawrence Anderson. 

Politically, Mr. Lillemoen is an independent voter, and he has long been 
active in local public affairs. He ser\ed very ably as county superintendent 
of schools about the, year 1874 or 1875. He has also served on the local 
school board, and as supervisor of Stony Brook township, of which he was 
the first township clerk. He belongs to the S^mod Lutheran church, which 
he helped build and since moving to Wendell attends the church there, which 
he also helped to build. 



OSCAR J. WALLEN. 



Among the younger business men of Douglas county who is rapidly 
ascending the ladder of success through his own endeavors is Oscar J. Wallen, 
banker of EA-ansville. Ele was born in Lyon county, Minnesota, June 14, 
1879, and is a son of Jacob and Anna Wallen. The father who devoted his 
active life to contracting and building was a resident of Lyon county until 
1884, when he moved to Glenwood, this state, later locating in Tacoma, 
Washington, where his death occurred some time ago. His widow still 



I20 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

resides in that city. To these parents five children were born, the subject 
of this review being the second in order of birth. 

Oscar J. Wallen completed his schooling in the high school at Glenwood 
and on April i, 1900, entered th^ einploy of the Benton County State Bank 
at Sauk Rapids, where he remained until July i, 1902, when he went to 
E\'ansville and helped organize the Evansville State Bank, of which he became 
assistant cashier. That position he held until 1905, when he was made 
cashier, the duties of which position he continues to discharge in an able 
manner, highly satisfactory to the stockholders and patrons of the bank. 

On July 14, 1 9 10, Oscar J. Wallen was married to Amanda Anderson, 
a daughter of John Anderson and wife of Evansville, and to this union one 
child has been born, a daughter, iJorothy. Politically, Mr. Wallen is a 
Republican. He has been active in the affairs of the village of Evansville 
and has filled the offices of treasurer and clerk of the same with general 
satisfaction. 



ANDREW JACKSON GILKINSON, M. D. 

Dr. Andrew Jackson Gilkinson, of Osakis, is a native of West Vir- 
ginia, born in Wayne county, that state, March 23, 1863, a son of A. W. 
and Matilda Jane (Caylor) Gilkinson, both of whom were born in that same 
county. 

.-\. W. Gilkinson is still li\ing in the county in which he was born, and 
has been all his life engaged in farming. He is the owner of a farm of 
two hundred and fifty acres of land in that county. His wife died in 1876. 
They were the parents of five children, Andrew J., Armilda, Nevada, Laura 
and Martha. The father is a member of the Methodist church, and is a 
member of the Masonic order. In t86i he enlisted in the Confederate army 
and served under Col. John B. McCoslin. in "Stonewall" Jackson's brigade, 
in the eastern \'irginia division. He served until the close of the war and 
was with his regiment in all the battles and campaigns in which it partici- 
pated, except during the year 1863, when he was absent from his command 
for about one year on account of sickness. 

Doctor Gilkinson received his early education in the common schools 
of Wayne county, West Virginia. On October 8, 1882, he came to Minne- 
sota and found employment on a farm near Kingston, Meeker county, work- 
ing on the farm in the summer time and attending school in winter. In 
1884 he entered the Normal School at St. Cloud and was graduated from 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 121 

that institution in 1888. During the years 1888 and 1889 he served as 
superintendent of schools at Long Prairie and in the fall of 1889 he entered 
the medical department of the ITniversity of Minnesota. He completed the 
course and was. graduated from, that institution in 1893 'ind in that same year 
located at Osakis for the practice of his profession and has been continuously 
engaged in practice there since that time. In the fall of 191 5 Doctor Gilkin- 
son and Doctor Hengstler established the Park Region Hospital, at Osakis. 
On January 30, 1894, Dr. A. J. Gilkinson was married to Grace I. 
Bliler, daughter of John li. Bliler, of Franklin, Minnesota, and to this union 
five children have been born, Ross E., Bryan A., Howard N., Cecil and 
Lucile. Doctor Gilkinson is a Democrat. He has served as mayor of the 
city of Osakis and also has served as president of the school board. His 
lodge membership is with the Masonic order. He is a member of the Park 
Region Medical Society and also a member of the Minnesota State Medical 
x-Yssociation and of the American Medical Association. 



FERDIXAXD SWEXSON. 

Ferdinand Swenson, of Brandon, one of the best-known and most 
progressive bankers in this part of the state, director and cashier of the 
First National Bank at Brandon, cashier of the Garfield State Bank at Gar- 
field and vice-president and director of the German- American State Bank 
at Millerville, is a native son of ]\Iinnesota and has lived in this state all his 
life. He was born at South Stillwater, April 30, 1876, son of Charles and 
Eva Swenson, the former of whom spent his last days on his farm in Chi- 
sago county, where his widow is still living. 

Ferdinand Swenson was reared on a farm in Chisago countv and re- 
ceived his schooling in the schools in the neighborhood. He remained at 
home until he was twenty-one years of age and then, having been one of 
the organizers of the Nessel Farmers Mutual Fire Insurance Companv of 
Chisago county, was made president and manager of the same and con- 
tinued thus engaged for three years, at the end of which time he was ap- 
pointed assistant cashier of the First National Bank at Braham, in Isanti 
county, and remained there six months, or until December i, 1905, when he 
came over into this part of the state and opened a bank at Garfield, under 
the name of the Garfield State Bank, of which he has ever since been the 
cashie'r. He presently helped to organize the German-American State Bank 



122 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

at Millerville and has ever since been a director and the vice-president of 
that institution. On September i, 191 5, Mr. Swenson located at Brandon, 
as direct(.r and cashier of the First National Bank, and has since then 
made his home in that pleasant village, dividing his time between the three 
banks in wliich he has a directing interest. 

On June 3, 1908, Ferdinand Swenson was united in marriage to Selma 
Hokenson, of Urness township, Douglas county. Mr. and Airs. Swenson 
have a very pleasant home at Brandon and take a proper interest in the 
various social activities of their home town, as well as in all neighlx)rhood 
good works. Mr. Swenson is "independent" in his political views and 
gives a good citizen's attention to local political affairs, while living at Gar- 
field having served for several years as president of the village council. 



TOSTEN T. CORDAL. 



Tosten T. Cordal, one of the most substantial and progressive farmers 
of Stony Brook township. Grant county, director of the Farmers Cream- 
ery Association at Wendell, former president and organizer of the Stony 
Brook Telephone Company, for many years school director in his district 
and in other ways an active and influential factor in the development of the 
community in which he lives, is a native of the kingdom of Norway, but has 
been a resident of Minnesota since he was twenty-one years of age and of 
Grant county since the middle eighties, when he settled on a farm of his 
own in Stony Brook township and has ever since made his home there. It 
was on a farm in the stiff of Bergen, in his native Norway, that Tosten T. 
Cordal was born, February 21, 1859, son of Tosten Ellefson and Ingeborg 
Tostensdatter, both natives of that same section of the country, the former 
born in 1824 and the latter in 1826, who grew up in the same neighborhood 
and were married there, establishing themselves on a farm, where Tosten 
Ellefson died in 1872. His widow survived him about twelve years, her 
death occurring in 1884, she then being nearly si.xty years of age. Thev 
were members of the Lutheran church and their children were reared in 
that faith. There were six of these children, of whom the subject of this 
biographical sketch was the first-born, the others being as follow: Ellef, 
who came to this country and lives in Roberts countv, South Dakota : Peter, 
who died at the age of fifteen years; Ole, who died at the age of one year; 
Ole, who came to this country and is now a well-to-do farmer in the neigh- 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 1 23 

boring count}' of Ottertail, and Soneva, who also came to this country and 
spent her last days, unmarried, at the home of her brother, Tosten. 

Tosten T. Cordal grew to manhood on the home farm in Xorwa}-, re- 
ceiving his schooling in the schools of his home neighborhood and was but 
thirteen years of age when his father died. As the eldest son, the larger 
part of the responsibility of maintaining the home farm fell upon his young 
shoulders and he assumed that responsibility, managing the place until he 
attained his majority, when, in 1881, he came to America and proceeded di- 
rectly to [Minnesota, settling in Goodhue county, where he remained for two 
years and six months, working on farms and acquiring an acciuaintance 
with the speech of his adopted country and with the methods of the land 
which he had selected as his permanent place of abode. At the end of that 
time he came over to this part of the state and for three years thereafter 
made his home with his uncle, Ole Thunselle, in Ottertail county, a well- 
established farmer of that county. During the first year of his residence 
there he bought a tract of eighty acres in Grant county, his present place of 
residence, as an investment and later began to develop the same. After 
working for his uncle about three years he began working for others and 
was thus engaged for an additional period of two years, at the end of which 
time, in 1S87, about three years after his marriage, he moved onto his o\\ti 
farm in Stony Brook township and there established his home. He erected 
a comfortable farm house, good farm buildings, planted a grove and other- 
wise improved the place, later buying additional land adjoining the same 
until he now is the owner of a fine farm of two hundred and fifteen and 
three-fourths acres and has long been recognized as one of the most sub- 
stantial farmers in that neighborhood. In addition to his general farming, 
Mr. Cordal has given considerable attention to the raising of a high grade 
of live stock, Percheron horses, Durham cattle and Poland China hogs, and 
has done very well. From the very beginning of his residence in Stony 
Brook Mr. Cordal has given his thoughtful attention to local affairs and 
has been one of the most active factors in the development of the best in- 
terests of that community. He was the organizing spirit in the Stony Brook 
Telephone Company and for some time served as president of the same. 
For fourteen or fifteen years he served as director of the school in his dis- 
trict and is a director of the Farmers Creamery Company at \\'endell. 

In 1884 Tosten T. Cordal was united in marriage to ]\Iartha Onstad, 
who also was born in Norway and who came to this country with her par- 
ents, Mons Onstad and wife, in 1873, the family settling in Goodhue county, 
this state. Mons Onstad later moved to Cass county. North Dakota, where 



1-^4 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

his last days were spent. To Mr. and Mrs. Cordal four children have been 
born, namely, Tosten, who died at the age of six moths; Ida, who married 
Andrew Rustand and lives in Grant ; Thea, a teacher in the parochial schools, 
who lives at home with her parents, and Adolph, also at home. The Cordals 
are members of the Lutheran church and Mr. Cordal has Ijeen a trustee 
of the local congregation for the past eighteen years or more, he and his 
family taking an active and influential interest in all neighborhood good 
works. 



JOHN S. SKINNExMOEX. 

John S. Skinnemoen, cashier of the Wendell State Bank at Wendell, 
proprietor of a fine farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Stonv Brook 
township and formerly and for years one of the best-known school teach- 
ers in Grant county, is a native son of that county and is regarded as one of 
the most active and influential citizens of the northern part of the county, 
where he has lived all his life, with the exception of a few years spent in 
homesteading and in teaching school in North Dakota. He was born on 
the old Skinnemoen homestead farm in Stony Brook township, April ii, 
1877, son of Stener S. Skinnemoen and wife, pioneer residents of that town- 
ship, who settled there in 1871 and who are still living on the old home 
place. Stener S. Skinnemoen and his wife are natives of the kingdom of 
Norway and in a biographical sketch of the former, presented elsewhere in 
this volume, there are set out details of their pioneer experiences upon com- 
ing out here from Iowa in the early days of the settlement of Grant county. 

Upon completing the course in the public schools of his home township, 
John S. Skinnemoen entered Park Region College at Fergus Falls and was 
graduated from that institution in 1896, after which he entered Luther Col- 
lege at Decorah, Iowa, receiving from that institution the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts in 1901. He then, in 1901-02, took a special course in English, 
Latin and History in the University of Minnesota and thus admirably 
equip]jeil for the teaching profession taught school for five or six years, one 
year of wliich he taught in Grant county and five years in North Dakota. 
During this service in the latter state Mr. Skinnemoen was selected as sup- 
erintendent of the high school at Starkweather, in Ramsey county. In 
1908 he homesteaded a quarter of a section of land in Dunn county, North 
Dakota, fifty miles from a railroad, and there maintained his residence for 
two years, at the end of which time he resumed his calling as a teacher, 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. I25 

teaching school until 1914 in different parts of North Dakota. He then 
returned to Grant county and bought his present fine farm of one hundred 
and sixty acres in section 4 of Stony Brook township. In December of 
that same year he married and in the spring of 191 5 moved onto the farm. 
where he and his wife are now very pleasantly situated. Air. Skinnemoen 
is a Republican and has ever given a good citizen's attention to local civic 
affairs, but the only public office he has held was that of township assessor 
in the years 1906-07. He was one of the organizers of the Wendell State 
Bank and is cashier of the same, being recognized as one of the most active 
business men in that part of the county. Mr. Skinnemoen takes much in- 
terest in the history of his home county and of this section generallv and 
has made an extensive collection of Indian relics, arrow-heads, stone ham- 
mers and the like and has in his collection one stone ax of rare design. On 
his farm stands the first house erected in Stony Brook township, a log house, 
which has been covered over, years ago, with siding, giving it now the 
appearance of a frame house. In pursuance of his design in the wav of 
historic collections, Mr. Skinnemoen is making a collection of photographs 
of every house in Stony Brook township, a collection which undoubtedly 
will have great historic value in the generations yet to come. 

It was on December 7, 191 5, that John S. Skinnemoen was united in 
"marriage to Emma Asleson, who also was born in Grant county, a daughter 
of Asle Asleson and wife, who located in that county in the late seventies. 
Mr. and Mrs. Skinnemoen are members of the United Lutheran church and 
take a proper interest in all neighborhood good works, being helpful factors 
in the promotion of all measures and movements having to do with the 
advancement of the common cause hereabout. 



E. R. RUGGLES. 



E. R. Ruggles, one of the well-known and prominent men of Douglas 
county and proprietor of the "Idle Wild" lake resort at Osakis, was born 
in Ogle county, Illinois, on February 16, 1856, the son of Liberty and Cath- 
erine (Ripley) Ruggles, natives of Mansfield, Ohio, and of the state of 
Connecticut, respectively, Mrs. Ruggles being a descendant of Governor 
Bradley of Connecticut. Spooner Ruggles, the 'grandfather, was a native 
of Massachusetts and a descendant of General Timothy Ruggles, the Ruggles 
family having settled in Hardwick, Massachusetts, in 1630. Spooner Rug- 



126 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

gles located in Ogle county, Illinois, in 1837 and there became a man of much 
prominence. He was elected to the state Legislature and later to the office 
of probate judge of the county. He, with Ebenezer-Peck and Abraham 
Lincoln, formed the committee that drafted the fir.st Illinois state Republican 
platform in 1856, the first draft having been made by Mr. Ruggles. While 
a member of the Legislature he was the father of the drainage laws of Illi- 
nois. He and his wife reared a family of thirteen children, one of whom 
was Gen. James Ruggles, of Civil War fame. 

Liberty Ruggles received his education in the public schools of Ohio 
and Illinois and in the latter state grew to manhood. In 1858 he came to 
Minnesota, locating in Chanhassen tow-nship. Carver county, and was living 
there during the time of the Indian outbreak, when, in 1862, he removed 
to Faribault, where he lived until 1892, in which year he went to live with a 
son in Virginia. He and his wife were the parents of four children, Walter 
P.. Edwin R., Willis R. and Arthur H., all of whom are living. 

Edwin R. Ruggles received his education in the public schools of Fari- 
bault, Minnesota, and after completing his schooling he removed to Gary, 
Deuel county. South Dakota, where he opened a law office and was at the 
same time a partner with his brother in a drug store. After a year and a 
half the drug store was removed to what later was known as Webster, in 
Day county. While there Mr. Ruggles helped organize the county and was 
the postmaster at Webster from 1881 to 1887. He was the first agent for 
the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul railroad at that point and was the first 
grain buyer in the town. In 1889 he was appointed custodian of the Ft. 
Sisseton ^Military Reserve, comprising the buildings and eighty-two thousand 
acres of land, and was in cliarge of the same for four and one-half years. 
In 1894 he returned to Minnesota and located on a farm at the head of 
Lake Osakis, in Todd county. In i8g8 he opened a law office in the town 
of Osakis and continued in the practice there until 1902, in which year he 
purchased the "Idle Wild" lake resort, and has since then given that popular 
resort the greater part of his attention. In 1889 Mr. Ruggles was assistant 
chief clerk in the House of Representatives of the Legislature of South 
Dakota. In 1906 he was appointed secretary to Congressman Buckman at 
Washington and was with him for two winters. In 191 1 and 1912 he spent 
the winter with Senator Clapp. In 1883 he was a delegate to the highway 
convention at Huron and in 1884 was a delegate to the constitutional con- 
vention of South Dakota, at Sioux Falls. Mr. Ruggles is at present con- 
ducting one of the delightful lake resorts of Minnesota. He has a beautiful 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. \2J 

place on the lake, where the beauties of nature are at their best. "Idle 
Wild" resort is one of the well-estal>lished recreation places in the state and 
is becoming more widely known each year. There may be found every 
convenience, with excellent facilities for bathing, fishing and boating. Mr. 
Ruggles knows well how to care for his guests and sees to it that they get 
every comfort. 

On March 6, 1879, E. R. Ruggles was united in marriage to 
Amy Passon and to this union five children have been born, John 
Archibald, Sidney, Arthur Mellette, Jessie Mae and Frank L. Mr. 
and Mrs. Ruggles are held in the highest esteem by all who know them and 
they and their family have long been active in the social life of the com- 
munity. Fraternally, Mr. Ruggles is a member of the Ancient Free and 
Accepted INIasons and of the Modern Woodmen of America. 



OLAUS A. PIKOP. 

Olaus A. Pikop, a well-known and successful farmer of Elbow Lake 
township. Grant county, was born in that township, on the old home farm, 
on January 26, 1882, the son of Anders Pikop. a more extended biograph- 
ical sketch of whom may be seen elsewhere in this volume. 

Olaus A. Pikop received his education in the public schools of Elbow 
Lake township, at Norman College, Minneapolis, and at Park Region Col- 
lege at Fergus Falls. Upon completing his schooling he returned to the 
farm and has since devoted his time to general farming and stock raising, 
being now the owner of two hundred and forty acres of excellent land in 
section 26 of Elbow Lake township. He has planted a large grove, one 
of the finest in that community; has erected good and substantial buildings 
and has one of the ideal country homes of the township. Mr. Pikop is a 
believer in intensive farming and in the most thorough cultivation of the 
soil, and his stock is of the best. 

Politically, Mr. Pikop is identified with the Republican party and has 
always taken much interest in local affairs. He has served as a member 
of the school board and is now a member of the board of supervisors, giv- 
ing the same careful and thoughtful attention to the public .business that he 
does to his own. He is progressive in his views and is a strong advocate 
of such public improvements as tend to the betterment and growth of both 
the township and the county. 



120 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

On March 28, 1903, Olaus A. Pikop was united in marriage to Nick- 
olene Brevig, who was born in Stony Brook township, Grant county, in 
March, 188 1, the daughter of Nils N. Brevig. a biographical sketch of 
whom is presented on another page of this work. To this union have been 
born seven children, Gladys, Norlin, Idella, Orville. Walter, ]\Iildred and 
Laurna, all of whom are living save Walter. Mr. and Mrs. Pikop are active 
members of the Lutheran church and take much interest in church work. 
They are prominent in the social and religious life of the communitv and 
are held in the highest esteem by all who know them. 



GEORGE L. TREAT. 



One of the prominent and progressive attorneys of Alexandria is George 
L. Treat, who was born in Janesville, Wisconsin, November 14, 1859. 
He is a son of Hiram F. Treat, who was a native of Cayuga county. New 
York, born in November, 18 16. 

Hiram F. Treat learned the trade of a tailor when a young man, and 
later engaged in the clothing business in Boonville, New York. Pie was 
twice married, his first wife being Emeline O. Tuell, who died in 1855. To 
that union five children were born : Clarissa, who dipd in infancy ; Clarissa 
Lucy, born in 1845, who died on October 26, 1878; Amasa H., Charles A., 
and Flora Adda, all deceased. Mr. Treat's second wife was Pamelia Sims, 
a daughter of George and Hannah (Cross) Sims, of Jefferson county. New 
York, where Mrs. Treat was born. To that union were born two children, 
George Lyman, the subject of this sketch, and Hannah Stella. 

In 1857 Hiram F. Treat left his home in New York state and moved 
to Janesville, Wisconsin, and was the first tailor in that place who cut clothes 
to measure. About i860 he removed to what was then St. Anthony, Min- 
nesota, now the city of Minneapolis. In 1863 the family moved to Afton, 
Wisconsin, where they lived for many years. Mr. Treat died at Madison, 
Wisconsin, November 2, 1876, and his widow passed away at Afton, Wis- 
consin, April 23, 1912. 

The paternal grandfather of George L. Treat was Lyman Treat, who 
was born in Port Byron, New York, December 18, 1786. He was twice 
married and Hiram F. Treat was a son by his first marriage. His children 
by his second marriage were, Henry, Egbert and Clarissa. The paternal 
great-grandfather of George L. Treat was Ashbel Treat, who was born 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 1 29 

in Lenox, Alassachusetts, May 13, 1764. He married Sarah Bell, and they 
reared a family of eleven children, of whom Lyman Treat was the eldest. 
Ashbel Treat died on April 14, 1842, his wife having passed away a few 
weeks prior to that date, on ]^Iarch 29, 1842. The fomiders of the Treat 
family in America were three brothers of that name who came from Eng- 
land in 1643, 'i"'i settled in the vicinity of the Plymouth colony, in ;\Iassa- 
chusetts. Richard Treat was one of these brothers, and George L. Treat 
belongs to the ninth generation that has descended from that early pioneer. 

The maternal grandfather of George L. Treat was George Sims, who 
was born in Connecticut, November 23, 1804, and who died on March 13, 
1901. Mr. Sims spent his early manhood in Jefferson county. New York. 
He was a fanner, carpenter and a local preacher. In 1861 he came to Minne- 
sota and settled at St. Anthony Falls, which is now the east side of the city 
of Minneapolis. In 1863 he mo\-ed to Afton, \Msconsin, where he spent 
the remainder of his life. He married Hannah Cross, a daughter of Theo- 
dore and Susannah (Jackman) Cross, who was born on January 15, 1806, 
and was the youngest in a family of ten children. Her death occurred in 
Afton, Wisconsin, in 1891. George and Hannah Sims were the parents of 
the following children: Pamelia, born on April 8, 1828, who died on April 
23, 1912; William, January 6, 1830, who died on October 4, 1866; Charles 
F., October 10, 1831, who died on May 8, 19 10; George C, May 12, 1834, 
who died on October 22, 1898 (a twin sister of George C. died in infancy) ; 
Erwin W., September 30, 1836, now living in Oklahoma, and Lorenzo G., 
November 11, 1838, who also is still living. The maternal great-grand- 
father of George L. Treat was Robert Sims, born in September, 1770, who 
died in September, 1822. The maternal great-grandmother was Lydia 
(Hanks) Sims, who was born on April 6, 1768, and who died in ?^Iarch, 
i860. 

George L. Treat recei\-ed his elementary education in the public schools 
of Afton, Wisconsin, after which he attended the Janesville classical acad- 
emy, and later was a student in Beloit College, at Beloit, Wisconsin. After 
leaving college he came to Minnesota, in 1880, locating at Alexandria, but 
only remained there a few months at that time, going thence to Fargo. 
North Dakota, where he remained for one year, at the end of which time he 
returned to .-Vlexandria and has e\-er since been a resident of that city. \\'ith 
a ^•iew to preparing himself for the practice of law, ]\Ir. Treat entered the 
law offices of George H. Reynolds as a student in 1881. Later he was a 
student in the law office of L'nited States Senator Knute Nelson, who at 
(9a) ■ 



130 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

that time was associated in practice with Mr. Reynolds. 'Sir. Treat then 
entered the law school of the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, Mich- 
igan, and after completing part of the course in that institution, returned to 
Alexandria; was admitted to the bar in Douglas county in 1883, and became 
associated as a partner in the law firm of Nelson & Reynolds, the style of 
the new firm being Nelson, Reynolds & Treat. In 1886 the firm was 
changed to Nelson, Treat & Gunderson, that partnership continuing until 
January, 1887, from whicli time, until 1890, Mr. Treat practiced alone. 
In 1890 the firm again liecame Nelson & Treat, which partnership continued 
until Mr. Nelson was elected governor of ^Minnesota in 1892, when the firm 
became Jenkins & Treat, and thus continued until 1897, since which time 
Mr. Treat has continued alone in the practice. For the last fifteen years 
he has also been largely interested in the real-estate and loan business. 

On January i, 1884, George L. Treat was married to Carrie E. Nellis, 
a daughter of Alexander and Cecelia Nellis, of Janesville, Wisconsin, and 
to that union three children were born: Alice Esther, born on January i, 
1888; Francis Alexander, February 5, 1890, who died in infancy, and Kath- 
erine Beaucre, October 5, 1892, who died on April 19, 1895. The mother 
of these children died on November it, 1909. 

Mr. Treat is a meml)er of the Congregational church at Alexandria 
and is at present serving the same as deacon and as clerk. He is also a 
director of the Congregational conference of Minnesota. Politically, Mr. 
Treat is a Republican, and has always taken a more or less active part in 
local political affairs. He served as probate judge, by appointment, in 1912. 
He is secretary of the Commercial Club, of Alexandria; secretary of the 
Douglas County Humane Society and for years was secretary of the Doug- 
las County Agricultural Association. 



NICHOLAS ANDREW STEIDL. 

Nicholas Andrew Steidl, manager of the Atlantic elevator at Carlos, 
manager of the local branch of the Central Telephone Company at that 
place, village clerk, former president of the village council, former re- 
corder of the village and for years actively identified with the growing 
interests of that thriving community, is a native son of Douglas county and 
has lived there all his life. He was born on a pioneer farm in Belle River 
township, Douglas county, September 18, 1871, son of Simon and \''eronica 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. I3I 

(Deirr) Steidl, natives of Germany and pioneers of this section of IMinne- 
sota, the latter of whom is still living on the old homestead place in Belle 
River township. 

Simon Steidl was born in Bavaria on October 28. 1825, and grew to 
manhood in his native land, early entering the mines and becoming an 
experienced miner. After serving the customary period in the army he 
came to the United States, about 1855, and for four years was employed 
on government works at Galveston, Texas. He then returned to Bavaria 
and there married \'eronica Deiri-, returning straightway with his bride to 
the United States and was employed at St. Louis. Missouri, until about 
the time the Civil War broke out. when he went to upper Michigan and 
was there employed in the copper mines until 1870, in which year he and 
his wife and their six children came to Alinnesota, following the tide of 
emigration that then was setting in strongly toward this part of the State. 
Simon Steidl bought the right to a homestead tract of one hundred and 
sixty acres of land in Belle River township. Douglas county, and there 
established his home in a small claim shanty that had been set up on the 
place. He began his farming with a yoke of oxen, his first crop being a few 
potatoes and a small garden. He presently built a log house which served 
as a domicile until he later was able to erect a more commodious and com- 
fortable frame dwelling. As he prospered in his farming operations he 
bought an adjoining "eighty" and became accounted one of the substantial 
farmers of that neighborhood, remaining actively engaged in farming until 
late in life, the last few years of his life having been spent in practical re- 
tirement, the farm being managed by his sons. Simon Steidl died on his 
old home place on October 25, 191 5, at the great age of ninety years, and 
his widow is still living there, she now being eighty-one years of age. 
They were the parents of ten children, of whom the subject of this sketch 
was the eighth in order of birth, the others being as follow : Simon, who 
married Elizabeth Walters and is now a farmer in Spruce Hill township, 
Douglas county : Joseph, who married Clara J. \\'right and is now a farmer 
and lumber man at Bemidji, this state: Anna, who is at home with her 
mother; John, who married Julia Tweet and is a lumber man at Bend, 
Oregon; Sophia, who died at the age of twenty-two years: Michael, who 
married ]^Iary Jerome and is now farming the old homestead place : Kather- 
ine. who died in the da.ys of her youth; Josephine, wife of Peter Lithgow. 
who is engaged in the laundry business at Fargo, and Suzanne, wife of 
George H. Pennison, who is engaged in the railroad service. 

Nicholas A. Steidl was reared on the homestead farm in Belle River 



132 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

township, receiving his schooling- in the district scliool in that neighborhood 
and proving a vahiable aid to his father in tlie work uf developing the 
home place. Alx)ut 1896 he and his brother, ^Michael, took charge of the 
farm and he continued active!}' engaged in farming, also interested in a 
threshing outfit and a saw-mill, for about nine years thereafter, at the end 
of which time, on July i, 1905, he was made the manager of the Atlantic 
elevator at Carlos and has since then occupied that position, making his 
home at Carlos. In 1909 Mr. Steidl was made the local manager for the 
plant of the Central Telephone Compan)- at Carlos and has since occupied 
that position. He also is the owner of one hundred and fifty-five acres of 
fine land, which he rents to his brother, Michael; is a stockholder in the 
Belle River creamery and owns a fine residence property at Carlos. Mr. 
Steidl is a Republican and for a year served as president of the village 
council at Carlos, then served for seven years as village recorder and as a 
member of the school board and is now treasurer of the school board. 

On January 15, 1901, Nicholas A. Steidl was united in marriage to 
Eliza Malinda Jerome, of Miltona township, Douglas county, and to this 
union five children have been born, Agnes, Miles, Susan, Florence and 
Marie. The Steidls have a pleasant home at Carlos and take a proper 
interest in the various social activities of their home town and of the com- 
munity at large. 



LARS T. HAUGE. 



One of the successful and enterprising citizens of Ashby is Lars J. 
Hauge, cashier of the First State Bank of Ashby and former clerk of 
court of Grant county. He is a native of Norway, where he was born 
on July 20, 1859, the son of Jens Hauge and wife, the former of whoir. 
died in Norway and the latter of whom is still living there. The parents 
resided on a farm that belonged to the family for centuries. 

Lars J. Hauge grew to manhood in his native country and there re- 
ceived his education. Having attended the public schools and later a school 
that is similar to our normal schools, he prepared himself for the teaching 
profession and followed that profession for some years in Norway. While 
his work there was pleasing to him, he realized that the opportunities were 
greater in America, and in 188 1 he left his home and came to the United 
States, locating in Minnesota, where he taught school and worked as a 
farm hand for some years. He was a man of education and good address 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 1 33 

and made many friends. His ability was soon recognized among the peo- 
ple of Grant county and he had been a resident of the county but a short 
time until he was recognized as a leader and a man of progressive ideas. 
His intiuence was noticeable in all local functions and enterprises. He 
was always interested in social, church and civic affairs, his ambition being 
for the betterment of all local conditions. 

In 1887 Lars J. Hauge was elected clerk of courts for Grant county 
and assumed the duties of the office in 1889. He served the people of the 
county for nine years in that position, and completed his work with the 
respect and esteem of all. .\fter his retirement as clerk, Mr. Hauge served 
as postmaster at Elbow Lake for some time and in 1910 he was elected 
cashier of the First State Bank at Ashby. which position he still holds. 

In 1893 Lars J. Hauge was united in marriage to Annie Rygh, of 
Grant countv, and to this union five children have been born, Vernon, 
Lawrence. Clifford, jNIargaret and Benjamin. The famih- are active mem- 
bers of the Lutheran church. 



NILS S. SKINiXEMOEN. 

Nils S. Skinnemoen, one of the best-known and most progressive 
farmers of Grant county, proprietor of a fine farm of two hundred and 
forty acres in Stony Brook township, vice-president of the Farmers Ele- 
vator and Supply Company of Wendell, a stockholder in the Wendell State 
Bank and otherwise interested in the general business affairs of his home 
community, is a native son of Grant county and has lived there all his life 
He was born on the old Skinnemoen homestead farm in Stony Brook 
township. April 30, 1875, son of Stener S. Skinnemoen and wife, early 
settlers of that part of the county, who are still living on the place on 
which they settled back in pic^neer days and a biographical sketch of whom, 
presented elsewhere in this volume, gives further details of their exper- 
iences upon coming here- in the early days of the settlement of this part of 
the state. 

Reared on the old home farm. Nils S. Skinnemoen received his ele- 
mentary schooling in the schools of his home township and supplemented 
the same by a course in the Park Region Lutheran College at Fergus Falls, 
after which he returned to the home farm and remained there, a valued 
assistant to his father in the labors of developing the old homestead place, 



134 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

until 1902. wlien he started out farming on his own account, in the mean- 
time having become the owner of a farm of two hundred and forty acres 
one-half mile north of the home place. In the summer of the next year, 
1903, he married and established his home on his place, putting on modern 
buildings and gradually developing a fine farm plant that is recognized as 
one of the most complete in that part of the county. Mr. Skinnemoen is 
developing a herd of Shorthorn cattle and is making a specialty of the cul- 
tivation of alfalfa and also of red-clover seed, the latter of which he sends- 
to e.xperiment stations and seed houses. In addition to his general farm- 
ing and stock raising, Mr. Skinnemoen gives considerable attention to local 
business afifairs of one sort and another and is a director and vice-president 
of the Farmers Elevator and Supply Company of Wendell and a stock- 
holder in the Wendell State Bank. In his political affiliation he is a Re- 
publican and for five years served as township sui>ervisor and for thirteen 
years as treasurer of his school district. In 1910 Mr. Skinnemoen erected a 
line new, modern dwelling on his farm and he and his family are very 
comfortably and very pleasantly situated. 

On July I, 1903, Nils S. Skinnemoen was united in marriage to Ida 
C. Lillemoen, daughter of H. G. Lillemoen and wife, early settlers of Grant 
countv, and to this union three children have been born, Selmer, born on 
Mav 3, 1904; Kenneth, July 22, 1908, and Irene, Octol>er 24, 1912. Mr. 
and Mrs. Skinnemoen are members of the United Lutheran church in the 
various beneficences of which they take a warm interest, and Mr. Skinne- 
moen served as a member of the board of trustees of the same for six vears. 



W. \\'. SHELDON. 



\\'. W. Sheldon, one of the best-known and most substantial land- 
owners in Douglas county, for years one of the leading merchants of Alex- 
andria, former proprietor of the Sheldon Clothing House, now conducted 
by his sons; a member of the Alexandria city council and otherwise actively 
identified with the civic and commercial interests of his home town, is a 
native of the old Buckeye state, but has been a resident of Minnesota since 
he was twenty-one years of age. He was lx)rn in ^\■arren county, Ohio, 
August 22, 1848, son of W. J. and Martha Sheldon, who moved to Guil- 
ford, New York, when he was but a lad and he received his schooling there. 

In 1869, he then Ijeing twenty-one years of age, W. W. Sheldon left 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 1 35 

New York and came to Minnesota, joining his elder brother, Benjamin 
Sheldon, on a homestead farm in Hudson township, Douglas county, Ben- 
jamin Sheldon having homesteaded a quarter section in that township two 
years before. For years thereafter the brothers were engaged in develop- 
ing the extensive farming interests they gradually acquired in Hudson town- 
ship, and in 1886 \\'. W. Sheldon retired from the farm and moved to Alex- 
andria, where, in the spring of 1887, he bought an interest with John Sun- 
blad as a partner in a clothing store and engaged in business there, starting 
where the store of Gregerson & Company is now located. After several 
moves the firm erected the substantial two-story structure now occupied 
by the Sheldon Clothing House and the store has ever since been located 
there. Having acquired ^Ir. Sunblad's interest in the store some time be- 
fore, ]\Ir. Sheldon, in 19 10. turned the clothing business over to his sons. 
William J. and Clare, who have since been ver\- successfully conducting 
the establishment, a modern, up-to-date and well-appointed clothing store, 
operating under the name of the Sheldon Clothing House, one of the best- 
known mercantile establishments in this part of the state. 

During all the years he was connected with the clothing business Air. 
Sheldon continued his connection with his brother, Benjamin Sheldon, in 
the general agricultural business and was also heavily interested in the 
cattle trade, being one of the heaviest buyers of live stock hereabout, and 
continues to operate about five hundred acres of land in Douglas county, 
a part of which is rented. ]Mr. Sheldon is a Republican and has for years 
given his close attention to local political afifairs, being now a member of 
the city council at Alexandria. His brother, Benjamin Sheldon, who was 
born on July 5, 1846, also is a Republican and has Ijeen one of the active 
members of that party since he came out here in pioneer days and took up 
his residence as one of the earliest settlers in Hudson township. He home- 
steaded a tract of one hundred and sixty acres in that township, erected a 
small claim cabin on the same and started in to develop his land. That was 
in 1867 and two vears later he was joined by his younger brother, W. \\'. 
Sheldon, since which time the two brothers have been very closely con- 
nected in their farming and land operations. Benjamin Sheldon is un- 
married. 

It was in 1876 that ^\'. \A'. Sheldon was united in marriage to Caddie 
Hawley, and to this union five children have been born, namely: Harry 
O.. who is engaged in the jewelry business at Bottineau, North Dakota; 
Elsie, wife of Henrv Schafer, who is connected with the Farmers National 
Bank of Alexandria; William J. and Clare, who are now operating the 



136 DOUGLAS AND GRAXT COCXTIES, MINNESOTA. 

Sheldon Clothing House at Alexandria, and Marion, who is in school at 
Minneapolis. The Sheldons have a very pleasant home at Alexandria and 
take a proper interest in the general social activities of the city and of the 
coniniunity at large, heljjful in advancing all agencies having to do with 
the ])rom(ition of the common welfare thereabout. Mr. Sheldon is a mem- 
ber lit the l(jcal lodge of ]\Iasons and takes a warm interest in the affairs 
of tiie same. 



XELS PETERSON, 



Among the early settlers of Douglas county, that stalwart breed of 
Ijioneers who came out here on the outposts of civilization in the latter 
sixties and laid the foundations for the wonderful development that has 
marked this region witliin the past generation, few names are held in better 
memory hereabout than that of the late Xels I^eterson, who was one of 
the first settlers in LaGrand township and who built up a fine piece of 
farming property in that neighborhood, becoming one of the most sul> 
stantial and useful residents of that community and spending the rest of 
his life on the farm he had reclaimed from the wilderness, his death oc- 
curring in 1904. His widow, ever a competent and valuable helpmate to 
him in the arduous task of de\-eloping the home farm, is still lix'ing, mak- 
ing her home in cf)mfortal)le retirement in the city rif Alexandria, where 
her sons, the Peterson Brothers, are activel\- and successfully engaged in 
the automobile garage business, Ijeing among the best-known and most 
energetic business men of that city. 

Xels Peterson was a native of the kingdom of Sweden, born in 1843, 
and lived there until he was about twenty-three years old, when, in 1866, 
he came to the United States, proceeding directly to Minnesota and settling 
in Meeker county, where he remained a year or two, at the end of which 
time he came to this part of the state and homesteaded a quarter section of 
wild land in LaGrand township, Douglas county, thus being among the 
\'erv earliest settlers of that part of the county. Tn addition to his home- 
stead he bought a nearby "ff)rty" and proceeded to improve and develop 
the same. In 1870 he married and later sold the homestead tract, buying 
an "eighty" adjoining the "forty" above mentioned and on this latter tract 
establi.shed his home, gradually developing a well-improved and profitably 
cultivated farm of one hundred and twenty acres, on which he spent the 
remainder of his life, his death occurring, as noted above, in 1904. His 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINN5:S0TA. IT,/ 

widow is now living at Alexandria. She was born, Anna Juhnscm, in the 
kingdom of Sweden and came to this countr}- with her parents, the family 
settling in the early days in Douglas county on a homestead farm, where 
she was living at the time of her marriage to ^Ir, Peterson in 1870. To 
that union nine children were born, namely : Emma, whu died in her 
\outh: Andrew, a member of the firm of Peterson Brothers at Alexandria; 
Ole, a member of that same firm; Alfred, who died in his youth; Emma, 
who married Olaf Olson and now lives at \''alley, Nebraska; Delia, who 
is at home with her mother in Alexandria; Amanda, who is now living in 
St. Paul ; Ellen, who married Reuben Dunnere and lives in Alexandria, and 
Alfred, who is now the managing member of the firm of Peterson Broth- 
ers at Alexandria. 

It was in 191 1 that Andrew, Ole and Alfred Peterson started an 
automobile garage at Alexandria, operating the same under the firm name 
of Peterson Brothers, and have done very well. They have a well-equip- 
ped place of business and in addition to their general garage business deal 
extensively in automobile accessories, the firm having a wide reputation for 
service among automobile owners in and about Alexandria. 



TOHX THEO LIXDEM. 



John Theo Lindem, former sheritT of Grant county, now engaged in 
the real-estate and insurance business at Herman, was born in Norway, 
August 17, 1853, son of A. H. and Marem (Wham) Lindem, both natives 
of Norway. 

A. H. Lindem came to America in 1867 and located in Bui¥alo county, 
Wisconsin, where he engaged in farming. He lived there about six years 
and then removed to Polk county, Minnesota, where he lived for the rest 
of his life. He and his wife were the parents of five children, Hans (de- 
ceased), John Theo, Anton, Martin (deceased) and Jennie. The father 
and mother were members of the Norwegian Lutheran church. 

John Theo Lindem received what little schooling he obtained in his 
early years while Hving in Norway, where he attended the public schools. 
He had little opportunity to attend school after coming to this country and 
as a voung man he found opportunity for employment in the northern pine- 
ries, on the river and on the farm. In 1876 he removed to Grant county, 
and entered a homestead of eighty acres of government land in Roseville 



138 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

township. He added U> liis original acreage, from time to time, until he be- 
came the owner of fnur hundred and twenty acres. He has done ver\- little 
active farming since 1907. From 1880 to 1890 Mr. Lindem served as 
sheriff of (Irant countw Since 1907 he has lived in Herman and has given 
most of his attention to the real-estate and insurance business. He has 
been secretary and treasurer of Delaware Farmers' Mutual Fire Insurance 
Company since 1907. 

Mr. Lindem married Julia Hanson, daughter of Ole Hanson, and to 
this union five children have been born, Anton, INIartin, Zelma, Clara and 
Alpheus. Mr. Linden is a member of the Lutheran church. In politics he 
affiliates with the Republican party. He has ser\-etl as a member of the 
village council. He was one of the first settlers in the township of Rose- 
ville, was one of the organizers of the township, and was the first town- 
ship clerk. He has always manifested an interest in the affairs of the 
township and in the town of which he is a citizen and is a thoroughly rep- 
resentative citizen. He is a Freemason, a member of Prescott Lodge No. 
162. 



LOUIS GINTHER. 



Hon. Louis Ginther, former mayor of the city of Alexandria and for 
vears the well-known and popular proprietor of the Letson House in that 
city, is a native of Iowa, born on a farm in Dallas county, that state, Aug- 
ust 9, 1866, son of John A. Ginther and wife, substantial and useful resi- 
dents of that community. 

Receiving his schooling in the schools of his home neightiorhood, Louis 
Ginther remained on the home farm in Dallas county until he was twenty 
>'ears of age, when he became employed in the engineering department of 
the Soo Line Railway and was thus employed for something more than six- 
teen years, at the end of which time he engaged in the general mercantile 
business at Drake, North Dakota, where he remained for six years. In 
the meantime, in 1896, he had married Gertrude Harrell and in 1908 he 
disposed of his business interests at Drake and moved to Alexandria, where 
he bought the Letson House and has ever since remained there, proprietor 
of that popular hostelry, one of the best-known hotels in this part of the 
state. 

For years Mr. Ginther has taken a warm interest in political aft'airs 
and upon locating at Alexandria manifested his active concern in civic 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 1 39 

affairs thereabout. In 1913 he was elected mayor of the city and gave 
such excellent service in that capacity that the public showed its appreciation 
by re-electing him twice as the chief executive of Douglas county's flour- 
ishing county seat, his third term in that important office terminating in 
the spring of 1916. During his incumbency in the mayor's office ]\Ir. 
Ginther was a consistent and steadfast advocate of puljlic improvements 
and much substantial advancement was made along that line during the 
time he held the reins of local government in his home town. He is now a 
member of the board of public works. Mr. Ginther has taken an active 
interest in local fraternal affairs and is a member of the Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and of the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, in the local doings of which or- 
ganizations he takes a warm interest, being one of the best-known and most 
influential figures in fraternal circles hereabout, even as he is in the civic 
and business circles of the communitv. 



JAMES BERNARD HOVE. 

James Bernard Hove, president of the First State Bank of Carlos and 
one of the best-known and most progressive bankers in Douglas county, 
is a native of the adjoining state of South Dakota, but has been a resident 
of ^Minnesota the most of his life and has been connected with banking 
interests since the days of his young manhood. He was born at Elk Point, 
South Dakota, January 20, 1873, son of John S. and ^Nlarie (^lonson) 
Hove, natives of Norway, the former born at Throndhjem and the latter 
at Bergen, who became early settlers at Elk Point. John S. Hove died in 
1877 and his widow sur\-ived him but three years, her death occurring in 
1880. The only one of their children now living is the subject of this 
sketch. 

Bereft of his father when he was four years of age and of his mother 
when he was seven, James B. Hove was reared by kinsfolk at ^Minneapolis, 
receiving his elementary education in the citj^ schools there, and later spent 
some time in the native land of his parents, completing his schooling in 
the schools of Bergen, his mother's native city. Upon his return to Minne- 
apolis he became engaged in commercial pursuits and in 1899 left there for 
Hampton, this state, where he remained until 1904. when he located at 
Carlos, since which time he has been engaged in the banking business in 



I40 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

that thriving village, president of the First State Bank of Carlos and wide- 
ly known in banking and commercial circles hereabout. In addition to his 
banking interests, ]\lr. Hove is the owner of two hundred and fifteen acres 
of land and is regarded as one of the substantial citizens of Douglas county. 
He is a Republican in his political affiliations and has given close atten- 
tion to local civic affairs, having served as village treasurer and as school 
treasurer at Carlos for }ears, up to the year 191 2. Mr. Hove is a Mason, 
a member of Social Lodge Xo. 48, at Xorthfield, and takes a warm interest 
in Masonic affairs. 

James B. Hove was united in the holy bonds of matrimony to Ida T. 
Thompson, who was born at Miltona, in Douglas county, February 10, 
1876, daughter of Tollef and Inger Thompson, pioneers of that neighbor- 
hood and the parents of six children, of whom Mrs. Hove was the last- 
born, the others being Gilbert T., Herman, Lillian O., Helen E. and Mrs. 
Torina Lanager. To Mr. and Mrs. Hove two children have been born, 
sons both, Bertram and James. The Hoves have a very pleasant home in 
Carlos and take a proper part in the general social activities of their home 
town. They are memlier? of the Lutheran church and take an earnest in- 
terest in the various beneficences of the same, as well as in all neighborhood 
good works, helpful factors in the promotion of all agencies designed to ad- 
vance the general welfare hereabout. 



AARON J. OSTROM. 

Aaron J. Ostrom, well-known and progressive merchant of Evansville, 
dealer in hardware and lumber; vice-president of the Evansville State Bank, 
former city councilman and for years actively identified with the general 
business interests of that village and of Douglas county, is a native son of 
Minnesota and has been a resident of this state all his life. He was born 
on a pioneer farm in the immediate vicinity of Afton, in Washington county, 
this state. May 20, 1868, son of Nels and Mary A. Ostrom, who later moved 
to Nicollet county, where they are now living. 

Nels Ostrom was born in the city of Christianstad, Sweden, in 1834, 
and in 1857, he then being twenty-three years of age, came to the Cnited 
States and proceeded directly to Minnesota, settling in Washington county, 
where he bought a tract of eighty acres of land and remained there, farm- 
ing the same, until 1868, when he moved to Nicollet county, bought a farm 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 14I 

in New Sweden township and is still living there, hale and hearty, at a ripe 
old age. Though deprived of the advantages of a liberal education in his 
youth, Nels Ostrom has been a great reader and a close student and has 
a remarkably well-stored mind, being regarded as a local authority in his 
neighborhood on Biblical literature, ancient and modern history and general 
current events, his mind remaining very active, despite his advanced vears. 
To him and his wife twelve children were born, of whom the subject of 
this sketch was the hrst-born, the others being as follow : Mrs. Tilda Peter- 
son; Theodore, a farmer in Nicollet county; Charles G., of Seattle, Wash- 
ington; the Rev. O. W. Ostrom, of Fresno, California; Walter, of Brahani, 
this state; Mrs. PauHne Jones, of Evansville; Mrs. V. T. Carlson, of New 
England, North Dakota; Mrs. A. J. Quist, of Nicollet county; Mrs. Peter 
Johnson, who died in 1907 at White Rock, South Dakota; Helen, who died 
in her youth, and Clara, who died in infancy. 

Aaron J. Ostrom was but an infant when his parents moved from 
Washington county to Nicollet county and he grew to manhood on the pa- 
ternal farm in New Sweden township, that county, receiving his elementary 
schooling in the old pioneer school in that neighborhood, supplementing the 
same by a course in the schools at St. Peter. He remained at home until he 
was twenty-one years of age, when he came to this part of the state and 
became engaged in the grain business at Evansville, buying grain for O. N, 
Ostrom, afterward the Inter-state Grain Company, and was thus engaged 
until 1895, when he formed a partnership with C. A. Smith and C. J. John- 
son in the lumber business at Evansville. In 1901 ;\Ir. Ostrom bought the 
hardware store of Olaf Dahlheim and incorporated as the Evansville Lumber 
and Hardware Company, which firm style continues. His first hardware 
store was conducted in a room twenty-five by sixty feet in dimensions, be- 
sides warehouses, and in the spring of 191 5 he erected his present commod- 
ious business building, thirty-six by one hundred, with a basement thirty-six 
by sixty, heated by furnace, equipped with a modern light plant and other- 
wise well appointed in up-to-date fashion, and carries a complete stock of 
general hardware. In the spring of 191 5 Mr. Ostrom bought the stock of 
Luistrom & Peterson and merged the same with his stock, now having prac- 
tically all the hardware business in Evansville. In addition to his mercan- 
tile interests at Evansville Mr. Ostrom has given considerable attention to the 
general business enterprises of his home town and upon the organization of 
the Evansville State Bank was elected vice-president of that concern, a po- 
sition he ever since has held. He is a Republican and has served the public 
in the capacity of councilman and as a member of the school board. 



142 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

On June 29, 1889, just before moving to Evansville, Aaron J. Ostrom 
was united in marriage to Mary A. Anderson, daughter of Peter and 
Martha Anderson, early settlers in Nicollet county, and to this union four 
children have been born, namely: Archibald L., who was graduated from 
the [Minnesota State University and is now assistant cashier of the Security 
State Bank of Golva, North Dakota; Waldemar, who was graduated from 
Gustavus Adolphus College and is now employed as assistant cashier of the 
\'alley (Tounty Bank of Hinsdale, Montana; Alice May, who is attending 
Gustavus Adolphus College at St. Peter, and Carl Vernon, who is in high 
school at Evansville. The Ostroms have a very pleasant home in Evans- 
ville and take a proper part in the general social activities of the town. 
They are members of the Swedish Lutheran church, of which Mr. Ostrom 
is a trustee and of which he has been treasurer for more than twenty years, 
and take an earnest interest in the various beneficences of the same, as well 
as in all neighborhood good works, helpful in the promotion of all causes 
ha\ing to do with the betterment of conditions in the community in which 
thev live. 



GEORGE H. HAYWOOD. 

George H. Haywood, well-known druggist at Osakis, was born in 
Wayland, Michigan, January 2, 1869, son of Henry and Hannah Haywood, 
both of whom were born in England. 

Henr}- Haywood was born on July 14, 1845, '"^^d was a mere lad of 
twelve years when he came to America with his parents. His home was in 
New York until he was about eighteen years old. He then went to Mich- 
igan and was engaged there as a farmer and a contractor until 1887, when 
he removed to South Dakota and bought a farm near Aberdeen, where he 
made his home for the remainder of his active life, his later years being 
spent at Ortonville, Minnesota, where he died in February, 191 1. His wife 
died in 1909. 

George Haywood received his early schooling in the public schools of 
Wayland, Michigan. He afterwards attended the university at Mitchell, 
South Dakota, and was graduated from that institution. Upon leaving 
college he went to farming and was engaged for about six years in farming 
and stock raising. In 1897 he bought a drug store at Clinton, Minnesota, 
and was engaged in the drug business at that place for a year and a half; 
then removed to Campbell, Minnesota, where he was engaged in the same 



DOUCLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. I43 

line of business. In addition to this he bought a newspaper outfit and 
established the U'ilhiiis Coidity Xcws and was editor and publisher of that 
paper for some time. In 1903 he moved to Osakis and has since been en- 
gaged in the drug business there. Mr. Haywood also deals some in real 
estate, and is himself a large landowner. He has a farm of three hundred 
and twenty acres in Orange township. Douglas county, and several other 
farms in Minnesota ; also has several hundred acres in North and South 
Dakota, and has also been the proprietor of several branch stores, which 
he has sold. 

On November 8, 1890, George H. Haywood was united in marriage 
to Effie Parker, a daughter of E. Parker, of Brookins, South Dakota, and to 
this union four children have been born. Hazel, Harold, Leo, and Hildreth. 
Mr. and Mrs. Haywood are members of the Christian church. 'Sh. Hay- 
wood's lodge membership is with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and with the ^^'oodmen. Politically, he affiliates with the Republican party. 



RE\'. PETER T. PETERSON. 

Rev. Peter T. Peterson, one of the well-known and prominent min- 
isters of the gospel and farmers, of Elbow Lake township. Grant county, 
was born in Norway, on October 2^, 1853, the son of Peter and Gertrude 
Sorondson, also natives of Norway. It was in the land of his nativity, that 
Peter Sorondson died in 1876. In 1878 his widow and two sons, Peter T. 
and Soren T. Peterson, came to the United States. On their arrival in 
this country, the)- proceeded to Cass county. Iowa, where they joined an- 
other son and brother, Halvor Peterson, who had previously come to thi 
country and was a young farmer of that county. 

Peter and Gertrude Sorondson were the parents of seven children, 
Halvor, Rachel, Johanna, Soren, T'eter T., and two who died — Soren the 
eldest and Bertha, the youngest. The father and mother were active mem- 
bers of the Lutheran church and always took much interest in church 
work. In their home community, in their native land, they were promin- 
ent in the social and religious life of the same and were held in the highest 
regard by all who knew them, for their many deeds of kindness. 

Peter T. Peterson received his education in the schools of Norway and 
there grew to manhood. In 1878 he, with his mother and Isrother, came 
to the United States and settled in Cass countv, Iowa, where iMr. Peter- 



144 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

son remained until 1880, when he entered the Augsburg Seminary at Alin- 
neaiJolis, from which institution he was graduated in 1886. Upon com- 
pleting his schooling and being ordained to the ministry he served in the 
pastoral relation at Elljow Lake and vicinity until 1899, '" which year he 
went to the states of Washington and Oregon, where he served as a mis- 
sionary for one year, at the end of which time, in 1900, he returned to El- 
bow Lake and located on a farm in section 22 of Elbow Lake township, 
where he began the development and improvement of his two-hundred-acre 
farm. He later became pastor of the church at North Ottawa, and now 
rents his farm, but continues to take much interest in the management of 
the same. Politically, Mr. Peterson has been a Prohibitionist for many 
years and has taken an active part in the affairs of that party. 

In t886 the Rev. Peter T. Peterson was united in marriage to Inge- 
borg Pikop, the daughter of Anders Pikop, who is mentioned elsewhere in 
this work. Mr. and Mrs. Peterson adopted the two orjihan children of 
Daniel and Anna Kamstad. These children were Ida, who died at the age 
of eighteen, and Alfred, who was graduated from the school at Fergus 
Falls and is now a nurse in the state hospital at that place. Mr. Peterson's 
life has been an active one and he has accomplished much good during his 
long vears in the ministr}-. He has always had the confidence and respect 
of the community and the l()^•e of the people to whom he has acted as spir- 
itual advisor. 



LEWTS S. KENT. 



Lewis S. Kent, sheriff of Douglas county and owner of the transfer line 
at Alexandria, is a native son of Minnesota and has lived in this state all 
his life. He was born in Melrose, Stearns county, July 16, 1872, a son of 
Frank Kent, born in Maine, and Elvira ( Fadden ) Kent, a native of New 
York state. 

In 1 85 1 I'rank Kent came to Minnesota and located for a short time at 
Stillwater. He then went to St. Anthony Falls, now a part of Minneapolis, 
and after a short time there went to St. Cloud, where he resided for several 
A-ears. While there he was em]jlo}ed as a freighter from St. Cloud to Ft. 
Abercrombie, Georgetown and Ft. Gary. Afterward he removed to Melrose 
and engaged in the freighting Inisiness from that place to Alexandria, before 
the latter place had a railroad. In 1878, after the railroad reached Alexan- 
dria, he moved to the latter village and started a transfer line which he 
operated until about IQ05, and continued to reside there until his death. 



DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. I45 

which occured on C)ctober 13. 1908. He was the father of six children: 
Charles F., Le Rona, George H., Eugene F., Lewis S. and Harry B. He was 
a member of the Congregational church and his lodge affiliation was with the 
^lasonic order. 

Lewis S. Kent was educated in the public schools of Alexandria, graduat- 
ing from the high school of that city. During his early years he worked 
with his father in the transfer business, and, in 1895, bought a half interest 
in the business. In 1905 he bought his father's interest and became the 
sole owner'of the transfer line. In 1910 he was elected sheriff of Douglas 
county and has continued to sen-e in that official position since. His present 
term will expire in 1919. 

On February 2"], 1895. Lewis S. Kent was united in marriage to Mattie 
Aldrich, a daughter of John \\'. Aldrich. of Brandon township, Douglas 
county, and to this union haye been bom three children, Frank, Ronald and 
Kathr>Ti. The Kents are members of the Congregational church. Sheriff 
Kent is a Republican and an actiye worker in that party. He seryed for 
twelye years as deputy sheriff before he was elected to the office of sheriff'. 



A. WATERS ^^■ELLS. 



A. A\'aters Wells, cashier of the Grant County State Bank at Herman, 
was born in Jordan, Scott county, Alinnesota, July 4. 1873, son of IMajor 
Rufus P. Wells, who was born in Canada, April 7, 1834, and Mary E. 
(Casswell) Wells, who was born near Troy, New York, January 5, 1847. 

As a young man Rufus P. Wells came to Alinnesota, about 1855, and 
found employment working in the pineries for some time. Later he re- 
moyed to Bellplainfe, Minnesota, and after remaining there for a short time 
went to Jordan, ^linnesota, where he was engaged in operating a merchant 
grist-mill. That was about 1858, and he remained there, with the exception 
of the time spent as a soldier during the Ciyil War, until 1883, when he 
sold out and moyed to Herman, Grant county, where he organized the 
Grant County Bank and was elected president of that organization. He 
was also a member of the firm of Wells Brothers, general merchants, at 
that place, and was identified with extensiye farming interests in Grant 
county. On January 9, 191 1, he was elected chairman of the board of di- 
rectors of the bank with which he was connected, and held that position 
until his death, in September, 19 14. Major W^ells was married on March 
doa) 



146 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

4, 1869, and was the father of seven children, namely: A. ^V., the subject 
of this sketch; J. Raymond, born on July 12, 1877: Azelia \'. ; James P., 
born on December 12, 1880; Betsy L. ; Geo. L., now deceased, and Marian 
E., who married T. E. Archer, of St. Paul, Minn. The widowed mother 
is still living, making her home in Herman. 

Major Rufus P. Wells, was an adherent of the Methodist Episcopal 
church and was affiliated with the Republican party. He had served as 
president of the village council, and also as president of the school board. 
He was affiliated with the Grand Army of the Republic and was a Royal 
Arch Mason, Knight Templar and a member of the Knights of Pythias. 

When the Civil War came on Rufus P. Wells was among those from 
Minnesota who early responded to the call of President Lincoln for volun- 
teers to aid in the suppression of the rebellion. On October 21, 1861, he 
enlisted in Company A, Fourth Regiment, Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, 
and was mustered into the United States service with that regiment at Ft. 
Snelling. On June 11, 1863, he was promoted to first lieutenant of his 
company and on February 17, 1864. was commissioned captain of the 
compan}-. Later he was commissioned brevet-major of the regiment. Major 
Wells was with his regiments in all the campaigns and battles in which it 
engaged. The Fourth Minnesota was a part of Sherman's Army in the 
Atlanta campaign, was with Sherman in his march to the sea, then up 
through the Carolinas, and was in the final engagements of the war in 
North Carolina. The regiment then moved on through Richmond to Wash- 
ington, and Major Wells was with his regiment in the Grand Review of 
the armies of Grant and Sherman in Washington at the close of the war. 
The Fourth Minnesota then moved with the other troops in that command 
to Louisville, where it was mustered out on July 19, 1865. 

The maternal grandfather of A. W. Wells was George W. Caswell, 
who was born in New Lebanon, New York, and who died on November 14, 
1 89 1. He followed the occupation of a farmer in New York. His wife's 
maiden name was Charlotte Clark. She was born at Hoag's Corner, New 
York, July 15, 1820, and died on July 8, 1906. Their children were Charles 
M., born in 1843, and Mary E., mother of the subject of this sketch. The 
paternal grandfather was Abel Waters Wells, who was born in New England 
in 1808, and who died in March, 1877. The maiden name of his wife was 
Hannah Cass. She was born in 1808 and died on February 24, 1901. 
Grandfather Wells was a farmer in Canada and has in later years made his 
home with his son, Major Rufus P. Wells, in Jordan, Minnesota. He was 
the father of eight children, Polly, Ann, Rufus P., Abel Waters, Joseph, 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 147 

who was a soldier in the Civil War and was killed in the battle of Gettys- 
burg, Azelia. Alpheus and Harrv. 

A. Waters Wells received his elementary schooling in the public schools 
of Herman and later attended Carlton College at Xorthfield for two years. 
In 1893 he attended the ^Minnesota Business College at Minneapolis, com- 
pleting the course in that institution and graduating therefrom in that year. 
Upon leaving college he engaged in the mercantile business at Litchfield for 
about a year. In 1894 he was in the employ of Griggs. Cooper & Company, 
wholesale grocers at St. Paul, as profit clerk. After about a year at that 
place he took a position as city bookkeeper with the wholesale grocery- firm 
of J. H. Allen & Company, of St. Paul. In 1895 he went to Herman and 
took a position as bookkeeper in the Grant County Bank. In 1896 he went 
to ^lorris as bookkeeper in the Stevens County Bank, remaining there until 
the fall of 1897, when he returned to the Grant County Bank at Herman, to 
take the position of cashier of that institution. The following vear he was 
elected vice-president of the bank, and held that position until the re-organ- 
ization of the same, in February, 1906, as the Grant County State Bank. 
On the re-organization of the bank Air. ^^'ells was elected cashier and has 
since held that position. Mr. Wells is also president of the Wells, Helgeson 
Company, dealers in general merchandise, at Herman ; is a stockholder in 
the Stevens County State Bank; a director in the Twin City Fire Insurance 
Company, of Minneapolis, and is also largely interested in the farming bus- 
iness. 

On October 2, 1901. A. \\'. \\'ells was married to Xena S. Olson, who 
was born on F"ebruary 5, 1S78, the daughter of Paul Olson Eriksrud, and to 
this union has been born one child, Alary Elaine, born on April 6, 1905. 
Air. Wells is an adherent of the Alethodist Episcopal church, and affiliates 
with the Republican party in politics. He has served as president of the 
village couiKil and as secretary of the school board. He is a thirtv-second 
degree Mason and a Knight Templar, affiliated with the Alinnesota Consis- 
tory, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, at St. Paul; with Bethel Commandery, 
Knights Templar, at Morris; w-ith the Alt. Lebanon Chapter, Royal Arch 
Alasons ; with Prescott Lodge Xo. 162, Ancient Free and Accepted Alasons, 
in which lodge he has filled all the chairs, and is a noble of Osman Temple, 
Ancient Arabic Order of X'obles of the Alystic Shrine, at St. Paul. He also 
holds membership in Lodge X'o. 1093, Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, at Fergus Falls, and is likewise a member of the Alodern Woodmen of 
America, a member of the Brotherhood of .American A'eomen and a non- 
resident member of the Alinneapolis Athletic Club, in the affairs of all of 
which organizations he takes a warm interest. 



148 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

OLE W. HARRISOX. 

Ole W. Harrison, cashier of the State Bank of Kensington and one of 
the best-known young bankers in this part of the state, having located at 
Kensington in 191 1 after a varied and vahiable experience in banks through- 
out this section of the state and in North Dakota, is a native of the kingdom 
of Norway, but has been a resident of Minnesota since the days of his child- 
hood and is therefore as much a Minnesotan as one "native and to the 
manner l)nrn." He was born on Febrviary 29, 1888, and was but a child 
when his parents, Hans and Otelia Harrison, came to Minnesota and settled 
on a farm in the immediate vicinity of the city of Breckenridge, in Wilkin 
county, where they are still living. 

Reared on the home farm near Breckenridge, Ole W. Harrison re- 
ceived his elementary schooling in the public schools of that city and supple- 
mented the same by a course in the Park Region College at Fergus Falls, 
from which he was graduated in 1909. Before completing his college course 
Mr. Harrison had had some experience in banking, as a clerk in the bank 
at Doran, and upon leaving college entered the bank at Drake, North Dakota, 
as stenographer and secretary to Harold Thorson, who is now vice-president 
of the bank with which he is connected at Kensington. From the bank at 
Drake Mr. Harrison was sent to the bank at Enderlin, North Dakota, where 
he served as assistant cashier for some time, afterward being sent, as assist- 
ant cashier, to the State Bank of Kensington, but after three weeks of ser- 
vice there was transferred back to the bank at Enderlin, where he resumed 
his former position as assistant cashier, but was presently sent back to Drake 
and after a brief ser^'ice as assistant cashier of the bank at that place, re- 
sumed his former position as assistant cashier of the bank at Enderlin, but 
after six weeks of that service was again sent back to Kensington, where 
he acted as assistant cashier of the State Bank there for six weeks, at the 
end of which time he was made the assistant cashier of the Citizens State 
Bank of Morris, later being transferred to the First State Bank at Buttzville, 
North Dakota, where he served as cashier until he was transferred to the 
First National Bank at Roseau, this state, where he served as assistant cashier 
until the spring of 191 1, when he was sent back to Kensington and has since 
then been serving as cashier of the State Bank of that place, l^eing widely 
recognized as one of the most experienced and energetic young bankers in 
this part of the state. In 1912 Mr. Harrison helped to organize the First 
State Bank of Silva, North Dakota, and has since 1>een a member of the 
board of directors of the same. 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. I49 

The present officiary of the State Bank of Kensington is as follow: 
President, C. H. Raiter, of Alexandria; vice-president, Harold Thorson, 
of St. Paul, and cashier, Ole W. Harrison, of Kensington, the latter being 
the practical manager of the bank. Mr. Harrison is a member of the 
United Lutheran church and takes a warm interest in all local good works, 
as well as in the general social activities of his home town, helpful in pro- 
moting all measures designed to advance the general welfare hereabout, and 
is looked upon as one of the "live wires" in the commercial life of this sec- 
tion of the state. 



KXUTE HAUGEN. 



Knute Haugen, on of the successful and well known farmers of Gor- 
ton township, Grant county, was born in Norway on ^larch 24, 1874, the 
son of Thore and Ingeborg Haugen, natives of Norway, who are still 
living in the land of their nativity, he at the age of seventy-nine years and 
she, at the age of seventy-eight years. They are the parents of seven chil- 
dren, Inger, Rasmus, Eli, Louisa, Knute, Ole and Severena, all of whom are 
living. 

Knute Haugen received his education in the public schools of his 
native country and there grew to manhood. He continued to reside in 
the land of his liirth until 1893, ^vhen he decided that he would come to 
America. After his arrival in the United States he came directh- to Min- 
nesota and engaged as a farm hand in Grant county, presently renting land 
there and was thus engaged as a tenant farmer for twenty-two years, at 
the end of which time he purchased a farm of one himdred and sixty acres 
in section 24 of Gorton township, on which farm he has since made his 
home. He set out most of the beautiful grove that now adds so much to 
the attractiveness of the farm and has developed the land and made most 
of the present improvements on the place. He is engaged in general farm- 
ing and stock raising, in which he has been quite successful, and is today 
recognized as one of the successful and substantial farmers and stockmen 
of the township. He is a firm believer in intensive farming and in the 
thorough cultivation of the soil, as well as in the keeping of the best of 
stock. 

Politicallv, Mr. Haugen is identified with the Republican party and 
has always taken an active interest in local affairs. He believes in sub- 
stantial public improvements and is an advocate of all developments that 



150 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

tend to add to the betterment and to the growth of the township and the 
county. He has for six years been a member of the school board and is 
now, and has been for the past thirteen years, a meml>er of the board of 
township supervisors. His ability as a public official is recognized in the 
community and his services and his work have been greatlv appreciated by 
the residents of his township. 

On July 5, 1897, Knute Haugen was united in marriage to Jennie 
Larson, who was born on October 21, 1877, in Goodhue county, this state, 
daughter of Lars Knutson, whose family history is given on another page 
of this work. To this union eight children have been born, Theodore. 
Iver, Ina, Emil, Carl, Josephius, Edwin and Abner, all of whom are living 
save Ina. Mr. and Mrs. Haugen are active members of the United Lu- 
theran church and have always been interested in church work. They are 
prominent in the social and religious life of the community and are held 
in the highest regard and esteem by all who know thein. Thev are a hos- 
pitable people and take much pleasure in the entertainment of their neigh- 
bors and friends. 



W. T. ZIEBARTH. 



\\\ T. Ziebarth, former member of the board of commissioners of 
Grant county and who now is engaged in the real-estate and insurance busi- 
ness at Herman, was l>orn at Delano, Wright county, Minnesota, April 30, 
1866, a son of William and Sophia (Boerner) Ziebarth, both natives of 
Germany. His father came to America in 1854 and located on the home- 
stead where he now lives. He is one of the oldest settlers in Wright county, 
and has continued to live on the homestead, which he first settled in 1856. 
and has been engaged in general farming all these years. He is the father 
of six children; of whom the subject of this sketch is the eldest, the others 
being A. W'., Sarah, who married Joe Rummuell; Elwine, who married 
William Riep; Emil and Fred. 

W. T. Ziebarth received his early schooling in the public schools of 
Wright county and afterwards attended the School of Agriculture of the 
University of Minnesota from which he was graduated in 1892. Li 1893, 
the year of his marriage, he moved to Grant county and located on a farm 
near Herman. He l^ecame the owner of a farm of four hundred acres and 
was there engaged in farming until 1902, when he removed to Herman and 
engaged in the real-estate and insurance business, in partnership with J. T. 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. I5I 

Lindem, and is still thus engaged, though continuing his interest in farming, 
in connection with his real-estate business. 

In 1893 ^^'- T. Ziebarth was married to Sadie A. Lutz. daughter of 
Conrad Lutz, and to this union eleven children have been born, Fritz, Ade- 
line, Dessie R., Jane, Sadie, Richard, Gertrude, Alexander, Robert, Thomas 
Woodrow and Elizabeth, all of whom are still living. 'Sir. and Airs. Zie- 
barth are members of the German Evangelical church. He is independent 
in politics and has served as village treasurer since he removed to town. 
He served nine years as a memlier of the board of county commissioners, 
and was president of the board when the Grant county court house was 
built. As a citizen and a public official, Air. Ziebarth enjoys the confidence 
of the people of the town and county, is a man of wide influence and is re- 
garded as being eminently trustworthy in any duty to which he has been 
called. 

Air. Ziebarth holds membership in the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, in the Knights of Pythias, in the Alodern Woodmen of America and 
in the Brotherhood of American Yeomen. 



GEORGE T. STE\'EXS. 



George T. Stevens, well-known real-estate dealer at Osakis, was born 
near Osakis, in Orange township, Douglas county, April 3, 1869, a son of 
W. H. and Alary L. ( Alarsh) Stevens, the former of whom was born in 
Wayne county. Xew York, Alay 28, 1840, and the latter, also in Xew York 
state, October 14, 1842, and who were married on October 27, 1865. 

W. H. Stevens is a son of Daniel L. and Aliranda Stevens, the former 
of whom was born in \'ermont and died in 1850. Daniel L. Stevens moved 
to A\'isconsin in 1849 and died at his home in Dodge county the following 
year. His children were Sarah Ann, Lysander, Louisa, Alary C., John A., 
W. H., and Harriet, of whom \\'. H. Stevens is the only survivor. W. H. 
Stevens was partly educated in York state and was nine years of age when 
his parents settled in Dodge county, \\'isconsin, in the public schools of 
which county he completed his schooling. As a young man he worked on 
the farm and when the Civil A\'ar broke out he responded to the call of 
President Lincoln for volunteers to aid in the suppression of the rebellion 
and enlisted in Company C. Sixteenth Regiment. \\'isconsin \"olunteer In- 
fantrv, with which command he served three vears, nine months and fnur- 



152 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

teen days, receiving his discharge at Mobile, Alabama, September 2, 1865. 
The regiment to which W. H. Stevens belonged was a part of the army 
under General Grant at the battle of Shiloh. It was attached to Peabody's 
Brigade, in General Prentiss's Division, and was in the front at the begin- 
ning of the battle and in the hottest of the first day's fighting. Mr. Stevens 
was severely wounded in the battle of the first day, and was sent home to 
recover from his wounds. Returning to his regiment he participated in the 
battles of Ft. Gibson, Jackson, Mississippi; Champion Hills, Black River 
Bridge, Vicksburg, second battle of Jackson, Spanish Fort, Blakely, Ala- 
bama, and numerous other battles and skirmishes in which his regiment was 
engaged. 

After the war Mr. Stevens returned to his home in Wisconsin and in 
May, 1866, came to Minnesota and took up a homestead of one hundred 
and sixty acres in Orange township, Douglas county. He put up the neces- 
sary buildings and improved the land, and continued ti) live there until 1875, 
when he removed to Osakis, where he since has made his home. He had one 
hundred and twenty acres of land inside the corporate limits of this town 
and he retired from active farming about 1907. The children in his family 
are W. E., G. T. and Mabel J. W. H. Stevens is a Republican. He was 
the first treasurer of Orange township, served on the board of supervisors in 
Osakis for several years and has been a member of the village council for 
several years. He is an active, loyal member of the Grand Army of the 
Republic. On October 27, 191 5, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Stevens celebrated 
their golden-wedding anniversary. 

George T. Stevens was educated in the public schools of Osakis, and 
was employed during early years in work on the farm. When he grew to 
manhood he began farming for himself on a farm in Osakis township. In 
the spring of 1889 he opened up a meat market in Osakis and carried on 
that business in addition to his farm work, having his residence in Osakis. 
About i^gf^ he changed his home back to the farm and lived there for 
three years. In 1903 he rented his farm and again took up his residence in 
town and gave his entire attention to his meat market. In 1907 he sold out 
his business and went on the road as a traveling representative for Van 
Duzen & Herrington, in the stock luisiness, and was thus engaged for two 
years, at the end of which time he engaged in buying and selling live stock 
for himself and was thus engaged until 1913, since which time he has been 
engaged in the real-estate business in Osakis. He and his brother, W. E. 
Stevens, are the owners of four hundred and eighty acres of land in Todd 
county. 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 1^3 

On August 14, 1893. George T. Stevens and ]\I. Gertrude Satterlee, 
daughter of Rev. R. B. Satterlee, were united in marriage and to this union 
five children have been born, Lois G., Eunice. Zephyr Z., Richard H., and 
Edward B. ^Iv. Stevens is a Republican and is a member of the \AVirk- 
men fraternitv. 



MADS C. RUSTAXD. 



^lads C. Rustand. a well-known and substantial farmer of Grant county, 
a former merchant at Wendell and now the proprietor of a fine farm of 
three hundred and sixtv acres in Xorth Ottawa township, where, in addi- 
tion to his general farming, he is extensively engaged in stock raising, is a 
native son of Grant countv and has lived in the countv all his life save for 
the time spent in going to college at Fergus Falls. He was born on the 
old Rustand homestead farm in Xorth Ottawa township on February 22, 
1883, son of Christian O. and Anna O. (Tofsrud) Rustand, natives of the 
kingdom of X'orway and pioneers of Grant county, the former of whom 
died on Ji-ily i, 1908, and the latter of whom is still living on the old home- 
stead. In a biographical sketch relating to Ole K. Rustand, clerk of X'orth 
Ottawa township, and an elder brother of the subject of this biographical 
sketch, there is set out in detail the history of the Rustand family in Grant 
county and to that sketch the reader is respectfully referred for additional 
information in this connection. 

Reared on the parental farm in Xorth Ottawa township, INIads C. 
Rustand received his elementary education in the district schools of that 
neighborhood and supplemented the same by a course in the Park Region 
Lutheran College at Fergus Falls, upon the completion of which course he 
returned to the home farm and there resumed his place as a valued assistant 
in the labors of developing and cultivating the 'same, being thus engaged 
until 1908, in which year he engaged in the farm implement business at 
Wendell. For about three years Mr. Rustand continued in business at 
Wendell and he then sold his store and resumed farming, being at that time 
the owner of a well-improved farm of three hundred and sixty acres in 
X^'orth Ottawa township, the place he still owns and which he has brought 
up to a high state of cultivation and improvement, his place being looked 
upon as one of the best farm plants in that part of the county. Two years 
later, in 191 2, Mr. Rustand married and has ever since made his home on 
the farm, he and his family being very comfortably and very pleasantly situ- 



154 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

ated. In addition to his general farming Mr. Rustand has given consid- 
erable attention to the raising of live stock, keeping purebred sires, and 
has about thirty head of Shorthorn cattle and about fifty head of Poland 
China hogs. Mr. Rustand is a Republican and has served his township 
as supervisor and as assessor, and in other ways has demonstrated his 
interest in the public service. 

It was on April ii, 1912, that Mads C. Rustand was united in mar- 
riage to (Ittina Dybdal, a daughter of Asle E. Dybdal and wife, early set- 
tlers in the Wendell neighborhood, and to this union one child has been 
born, a daughter, Glenice, born on September 26, 1915. ^Ir. and Mrs. 
Rustand are members of the Synod Lutheran church and take a warm 
interest in the various beneficences of the same, as well as in all good works 
in the communit\- in which thev live. 



AUVIGNE MASON RAXDALL, M. D. 

Dr. Auvigne Mason Randall, a prominent and successful physician of 
Ashby, was born in Sechler\ille, Wisconsin, on December 8, 1880, the 
son of David Henry and Emma EInora (Kennedy) Randall, the former 
born in \'ermont and the latter in Wisconsin and who were residents of the 
latter state for many years. Emma Randall's parents were early farmers 
in the section of the state in which she was born. David H. Randall, as 
a young man, was a school teacher, but later learned to be a butter-maker, 
which vocation he followed for many years. In 1886 he and his family 
came to Minnesota where they have since resided. In 191 5 he removed to 
Ashby, where he lives a retired life. To him and his wife two children 
were born, Cora and Avivigne Mason. 

Auvigne Mason Randall received his early education in the public 
schools of Minneapolis and in the academy in that city. He later attended 
Hamlin College, from which institution he was graduated in 1903, with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine. Upon receiving his degree Doctor Randall 
located at Eagle Bend, but remained there but seven weeks, at the end of 
which time he located at Underwood, where he practiced until 1909, in 
which year he located at Ashby, where he ever since has been engaged in 
practice. 

On July 22, 1905, Doctor Randall was united in marriage to Anna 
Mortinson, of Underwood, daughter of H. P. Mortinson, a prominent 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 1 55 

farmer of that locality, and to this union one child has been born, a son. 
Carter Gordon. 

Fraternally, Doctor Randall is a member of the ^Modern Woodmen of 
America. He is also a member of the local, state and national medical socie- 
ties. He takes an active interest in the Park Region Medical Society, the 
local organization, and is secretan- of the same. He is the present deputy 
coroner of Grant county. Doctor Randall has always taken an active interest 
in all local affairs and his efforts have ever been directed toward 
the advancement of the best interests of the community. His judgment and 
ability are recognized by the residents of his home town and he is at pres- 
ent the village president, as well as president of the local school board. 
He is also secretary and manager of the Ashby Telephone Company. 



\mllia:\i f. -aieissxer. 

^^'illiam F. Meissner, one of the prominent and well-known business 
men of Brandon, was born in Millerville township, Douglas county, on 
July 10, 1871. the son of Gotlieb Meissner. 

Gotlieb Meissner was born in Germany and there recei\ed his educa- 
tion in the public schools. He remained a resident of the Fatherland until 
1869, when he came to the United States. On landing in this country he 
came directly to Minnesota and located on a farm in Douglas county. He 
died in 1890 and his widow in 1916. They were the parents of eight chil- 
dren, Ernest, Frederick, Fredericka, Herman, Amelia, William, Henry and 
^lary. all of whom are living save Frederick. Mr. Meissner was a suc- 
cessful farmer and stock raiser on his two-hundred-acre farm in I\Iiller- 
ville township. He and his wife were active members of the German 
Lutheran church. 

A\'illiam F. Meissner received his education in the public schools of 
Millerville township and grew to manhood on the home farm, where as a 
lad he assisted his father with the farm work. In May, 1893, he was 
united in marriage to Julia ^^'oida and to this union nine children have 
been born, Fred, Mary, Robert, Lilly, Clara, Raymond, Clarence, ^*irginia 
and Dorothy. Fred Meissner married Hattie Willis. 

On leaving the farm some years ago, Mr. Meissner located in Brandon 
and was there employed in the flour mills for six years. For the past 
four vears he has been engaged in the buying of grain for the Brandon 



156 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

Grain Company. In addition to his other duties he has for the past twelve 
years been the owner and the proprietor of the Brandon House, a well- 
known hotel of that villaj^e. Until four years ago he conducted a livery 
business in connection with the hotel. 



THOMAS A. SYVRUD. 



Thomas A. Syvrud, head of the firm of Syvrud & Meyers, proprietors 
of an extensive garage at Alexandria and dealers in automobile accessories, 
is a native of the Badger state and has been a resident of x\lexandri for 
the past thirteen or fourteen years. He was lx>rn in Dane county, Wiscon- 
sin, December 18, 1864, son of Thor and Carrie (Leinj Syvrud, both 
natives of the kingdom of Norway, who came to the United States about 
1858 and located on a farm in Dane county, Wisconsin, where Thor Syvrud 
spent the rest of his life and where his widow is still living. They were 
members of the Norwegian Lutheran church and their three sons, Knute, 
Thomas and Theodore, were reared in that faith. 

Thomas A. Syvrud was reared on the family homestead in Dane county, 
Wisconsin, receiving his schooling in the district school in the neighborhood 
of his home and supplementing the same by a course in the Lutheran Col- 
lege at Decorah, Iowa. About 1890 he engaged in the hardware business 
in Wisconsin and in 1891 was married. He continued in business in Wis- 
consin until 1902 and about a year later came to Minnesota, locating at 
Alexandria, where he engaged in the real estate business, in which he con- 
tinued for aljout five years. In 1912 he engaged in the automobile garage 
business at Alexandria, under the firm name of Setter & Syvrud, which 
firm, in 19 13, became Syvrud & Meyers, which continues actively in busi- 
ness at Alexandria and to which flourishing concern Mr. Syvrud devotes his 
whole attention, the firm having Iniilt up a fine liusiness among automobile 
owners in and about Alexandria. 

It was in i8qi. in Dane countv, Wisconsin, that Thomas A. Syvrud 
was united in marriage to Carrie Berge, of that county, and to this union 
three children have been born, Clifford, Mary and Ji^seph. Mr. and Mrs. 
Syvrud are members of the Norwegian Lutheran church and take an earnest 
interest in the affairs of the same, helpful factors in the work of pro- 
moting the various lieneficences of their church, as well as all community 
good works. 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 1 57 

THOAIAS OLSOX. 

Thomas Olson, a well-known and substantial Grant county farmer, pro- 
prietor of a well-improved farm of eighty acres on the very edge of the 
village of Xorcross, is a native of the kingdom of X'orway, but has been 
a resident of the United States since he was eight years of age and of 
Grant count}- since he was twenty-one. He was born in Christiansand on 
April 14, 1858, son of Ole O. and Severina (Torgerson) Berkland, both 
natives of that same city, whose last days were spent in ^Minnesota. 

Ole O. Berkland was born on April 14, 1816, and grew to manhood in 
his native land, marrying Severina Torgerson, who was born on July 19. 
1835, and in 1866 came to the United States with his family, the sailing 
vessel on which they crossed being seven weeks in making the passage. 
Upon landing in this country, the Berklands came ^^'est and settled in the 
neighborhood of Bangor, \\'isconsin, not far from LaCrosse. where Mr. 
Berkland homesteaded a tract of forty acres of land and there established 
his home, remaining there for thirteen years,, at the end of which time he 
came over to this part of Minnesota, locating in Grant county. He home- 
steaded forty acres in section 2 of Gorton township, raw prairie land, erected 
there a set of buildings, broke the land and established a home, later moving 
to Verndale. in Wadena county, where he spent his last days, his death 
occurring on August 19, 1904, he then being eighty-eight years of age. 
Following ]\Ir. Berkland's death his widow made her home with the sub- 
ject of this sketch, where she died on June 5. 1913. They were members 
of the Synod Lutheran church and their children were reared in that faith. 
There were nine of these children, of whom the subject of this sketch was 
the second in order of birth, the others being as follow : Tobias, who 
became a homesteader in Grant county, but later returned to Norway, where 
he died; Julia, who married John Ireland and died at Glidden, Wisconsin; 
Tilda, who married Peter Lystad and lives at Sauk Center, this state: Mary, 
who married Hector [McGinnis, and is now deceased: Otto, a farmer, who 
died in Grant county: Andrew, who lives at Duluth; Oscar, a farmer, liv- 
ing in Gorton township, and Selma, who married Knute Larson and died 
at her home near Xorcross. 

As noted above, Thomas Olson was but about eight years of age when 
his parents came to this country and he grew to manhood on the farm his 
father had homesteaded near Bangor, Wisconsin, receiving his schooling 
in the schools of that neighborhood, remaining there until 1S79. when he 



158 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES^ MINNESOTA. 

came over to this part of Minnesota, settling in Grant county, where he 
ever since has made his home. Upon coming out here Mr. Olson home- 
steaded a quarter of a section of prairie land in section 2 of Gorton town- 
ship and proceeded to develop the same, one of the notable improvements 
he made upon the place being the planting of a grove which grew to be 
a very attractive feature of the landscape. He later put up a good set of 
buildings and there made his home until 1900, in which year he sold the farm 
and bought another place, right in the village of Norcross, put up a good 
set of buildings there and has ever since made his home there. On this 
farm of eighty acres, Mr. Olson carries on general farming and has done 
very well in his operations. He is a Republican and has served his com- 
munity in an official way as a member of the board of township super- 
visors and as a school director. 

In 1888 Thomas Olson was united in marriage to Caroline Peter- 
son, who was born in Wisconsin on April 29, 1862, daughter of Arne and 
Annie (Olson) Peterson, natives of Norway, and old settlers in Wisconsin, 
the former of whom was a veteran of the Civil War, and to this union 
the following children have been born: Oswald, who is at home; Alice 
and Adolph, twins, the latter of whom died in infancy and the former of 
whom died at the age of twenty-five years; Mabel, at home; Agnes, also 
at home; David, who died at the age of three years, and Arthur and Clara, 
at home. The Olsons are members of the Synod Lutheran church and 
have ever taken a warm interest in the affairs of the same, as well as in 
all neighl^orhood good works. 



JESSE M. CURTIS. 

Success has come to Jesse M. Curtis, hardware merchant at Osakis, 
because he has been willing to pay the price necessary to obtain it — the 
price of unremitting and honest effort. He was born in Osakis, December 
2, 1874, and is a son of Alanthus and Martha (Tannehill) Curtis, the father 
a native of Shelbvville, Indiana, and the mother of Lewistown, Ohio. The 
father came to Minnesota when a young man and took up a homestead of 
one hundred and sixty acres, in Osakis township, Douglas county, but a 
few years later moved to St. Cloud, where he spent the rest of his life, dying 
a number of years ago. He served three years as a soldier in the Civil 
War, a member of an Indiana regiment. 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 1 59 

Jesse AI. Curtis, the only child of his parents, received his education 
in the public schools of Osakis and at St. Cloud. He began life for him- 
self by teaching, which vocation he followed for alx)ut three years; then 
conducted a restaurant three years in Osakis, after which he was employed 
in the First National Bank of Osakis for three years ; then spent three years 
in the Bank of \'illard, after which he transferred his services to the State 
Bank at Osakis, remaining there five years. In all these positions Mr. Curtis 
gave eminent satisfaction, being alert, progressive in his ideas and cour- 
teous and reliable. In 191 3 he became interested in the Osakis Hardware 
Company, of which he is at present secretary and treasurer. He has con- 
tributed to the general success of the firm in no uncertain manner, and a 
large and growing business has been built up. the company carrying a 
complete stock of general hardware. 

In 1893 Jesse M. Curtis was married to Anna Patrick and to their 
union five children have been born, namely: Dorothy X., ]\Iarvin A., Alice 
;\I., Howard J., and Robert. Politically, ]\Ir. Curtis is a Republican and 
he has served on the village council for three or four years. Fraternally, 
he is a member of the Masonic Order and of the ^Modern Woodmen. 



CHARLFS S. GOODFLL. 

Charles S. Goodell, a well-known merchant at Herman, was born in 
Brandon, Vermont, May 16, 1863. His father, Charles F. Goodell, was 
born in Brandon, Vermont, in 1840; his mother, Jennie M. (Spooner) 
Goodell, was born in Sudberry, Vermont, in 1839. 

Charles F. Goodell was engaged in the marble business for over forty 
years. He first started in the business at Brandon, \'ermont. In 1876 he 
removed to Northfield, Minnesota, where he continued the same business, 
and also had some farming interests while living at that place. He died 
on March 25, 191 1, and his widow is now living at Seattle, Washington. 
Their children are: Elizabeth M., who married John F. Hunter and lives 
in Seattle, Washington; Charles S., the subject of this sketch; Mable L., 
who married B. H. Phinney and lives at Fergus Falls; Flora M., who mar- 
ried F. S. Hixson and lives in Zurich, Montana, and Paul S., who lives at 
Herman. Charles F. Goodell, affiliated with the Democratic party and his 
fraternal affiliation was with the Masonic order. 

Charles S. Goodell was educated in the public schools of Northfield, 



l6o DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

Minnesota. As a young man he worked for eight years with his father in 
the marble business. In 1888 he moved to Stevens county, and for thirteen 
years was there engaged in farming. In 1902 he moved to Herman and 
opened a store, handling a line of groceries, confectioneries and fruits. 
During the summer seasons he handles the marble and granite business. 

In 1885 Charles S. Goodell and ]\Ieribah E. Spencer, who was born 
in St. Lawrence county, Xew York, a daughter of Joseph Spencer, 
were united in marriage. Jean L. is their only child. She married Leslie 
G. Boerner and is the mother of two children, Ruth E. and Mae E. 

}ilr. Goodell affiliates with the Democratic party and is at present a 
member of the village council. His lodge affiliations are with the Masonic 
order, with the Order of the Eastern Star and with the Woodmen. 



CONSTANT LARSON. 



Constant Larson, atturney-at-law, of Alexandria, city attorney and 
chairman of the charter committee of that city and for years actively identi- 
fied with all movements having to do with the advancement of the best 
interests of Douglas county -and this part of the state in general, is a native 
son of Douglas county and has lived there all his life. He was born on a 
homestead farm in Alexandria township on February 7, 1870, son of Gustav 
P. and Carolina (Larson) Larson, natives of the kingdom of Sweden, who 
came to Minnesota at an early day in the settlement of this region and here 
spent the remainder of their lives, honored and influential pioneer citizens 
of Douglas county. 

Gustav P. Larson was reared on a farm in his native land and there 
became a skilled cabinet-maker. He married Carolina Larson, a daughter 
of Johan and Christina Larson, and in 1868, with his wife and the latter's 
father and mother, came to the United States, the family proceeding directly 
to Minnesota and settling in Douglas county, both Gustav P. Larson and 
Johan Larson entering claims to homestead tracts in Alexandria township 
and there establishing their homes. Gustav P. Larson's homestead entry 
was in section 14 and he was just beginning to see his way clear to the suc- 
cessful development of the same when his earnest pioneer labors were stopped 
by death in 1874, his widow thus being left with four small children to con- 
tinue the maintenance of the home. Of these children the subject of this 
sketch was the third in order of birth, the others being as follow : Charles 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. l6r 

H., who is now living on the old homestead farm in Alexandria township; 
Amanda, who married George Lee and is now living on a farm in the 
immediate vicinity of Hampshire, Wyoming, and Augustus T., a lawyer, 
who is practicing his profession at Minneapolis. ]\Irs. Carolina Larson later 
married Charles Anderson and to that union two sons were born, A. Emil 
Anderson, a farmer, of Douglas county, and Adolph J- Anderson, a farmer, 
living in the vicinity of Wadena, this state. 

Constant Larson was reared on the home farm in Alexandria town- 
ship, a valuable assistant, in the days of his youth, in the development and 
improvement of the same, and received his elementary schooling in the 
primitive district school of that neighborhood, the first school he attended 
having been in a little log school house in district No. 22. He later entered 
the high school at Alexandria and was graduated from that school with the 
class of 1889, later entering the University of Minnesota, from which insti- 
tution he was graduated in 1893, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Thus 
equipped by preliminary study, Mr. Larson entered the law department of 
the L^niversity and was graduated from the same in 1894, in which year he 
was admitted to the bar and opened an office for the practice of his pro- 
fession at Alexandria, where he ever since has been thus engaged. For ten 
years Mr. Larson served as county attorney for Douglas county and he is 
now city attorney for the city of Alexandria. At the time of the creation 
of the city of Alexandria he was secretary of the charter committee and is 
now chairman of that committee. i\Ir. Larson is a Republican and for }-ears 
has given his earnest attention to the civic affairs of his home city and 
county and of the state in general, his efforts in that connection e^•er having 
been directed in behalf of the cause of good local government. He is a 
member of the ^Minnesota State Bar Association and of the Commercial Law 
League of America and takes a warm interest in the affairs of both of these 
organizations. 

On July 15, 1895, at MinneapoHs, Constant Larson was united in mar- 
riage to Maud E. Merrifield, who was bom in that city, daughter of James 
S. and Maria (Merrifield') Merrifield, natives of the state of Maine, who 
moved to Minneapolis many years ago, Mr. Merrifield there engaging in the 
lumber business, and to this union one child has been bom, a daughter, 
Lorayne, who is now a student at the Emerson College of Oratory and 
Dramatic Art at Boston, Massachusetts. Mr. and Mrs. Larson are mem- 
bers of the Congregational church at Alexandria and take an active interest 
(iia) 



■l62 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

in the various beneficences of the same, as well as in the general social 
activities of the community. For years ^Ir. Larson has been deeply inter- 
ested in all matters relating to the early settlement of this section of Minne- 
sota and for that reason he was made editor of the historical section of this 

work. 



GUSTAV ABEL STARK. 

Gustav Abel Stark, secretary-treasurer and general manager of the 
Kensington Hardware and Lumber Company, incorporated, at Kensington 
and actively identified with other business interests there and at Elbow 
Lake, is a native son of Minnesota and has lived in this state all his life. 
He was born on a farm in McLeod county, June 30, 1873, son of Franz 
Ludwig and Anna Charlotte ( Moberg ) Stark, natives of the kingdom of 
Sweden, who came to America in 1867, proceeding directly to Minnesota 
and settling on a homestead farm in McLeod county, where they remained 
until 1886, when they moved to Stevens county, where Mr. Stark's last 
days were .spent and where his widow still lives. They were the parents 
of ten children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the fourth in order 
of birth, the others being Andrew, Amos, Amanda, John, Axel, Anna, 
Otto, Joseph and Mary. 

Gustav A. Stark was reared on the homestead farm in McLeod county 
and received his schooling in the schools of that neighborhood, remaining 
on the farm, a valued assistant to his father in the work of developing and 
improving the same. He was married in 1896, the year in which his parents 
moved to Stevens county, and in that county he established his home, farm- 
ing there until 1909, when he bought a third interest in the Kensington 
Hardware and Lumber Company at Kensington, of which company he was 
made the vice-president, and moved to that village, where he since has 
made his home. In 1911 he became the secretary and treasurer of the 
company and has since been the general manager of the' extensive estab- 
lishment maintained Ijy that company at Kensington. I\Ir. Stark also is 
interested in the Elljow Lake Hardware and Lumber Company and in the 
Lowry Hardware and Furnishing Company, of which latter concern he is 
the president, and also is actively identified with the Kensington Mercan- 
tile Company, being recognized as one of the most energetic and enter- 
prising business men in his community. He is a member of the local lodge 
of the Modern Woodmen of America and takes a warm interest in the 
affairs of that organization. 



DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 163 

On February 2. 1896, Gustav A. Stark was united in marriage to 
Sophia Stetten, who was born in the neighboring county of Pope, daughter 
of Erik Stetten and wife, natives of Norway and pioneers in Pope county, 
and a sister of K. E. Stetten, manager of the Elbow Lake Hardware and 
Lumber Company, and to this union nine children have been born. Frances, 
Alvin, Edna, Stanley, Edith. Pearl, Edith, Roy and Ralph. Mr. and Mrs. 
Stark are members of the Lutheran church and take an earnest interest in 
the general beneficences of the same, as well as in all local good works, 
being among the leaders in the work of promoting the best interests of their 
home town and of the communitv at large. 



CHARLES W. MECKSTROTH. M. D. 

Dr. Charles A\'. INIeckstroth, well-knoAvn physician and surgeon at 
Brandon, is a native son of ^Minnesota and has lived in this state all his 
life. He was born in the city of LeSueur on September 7, 1872, son of 
August and Caroline Meckstroth, the former of whom, a druggist, died in 
that city twenty-five years ago and the latter of whom is still living, now a 
resident of Blue Earth, tliis state. August Meckstroth and wife were the 
parents of four children, all of whom are living, those besides the subject 
of this sketch, who is the eldest, being Adaline. Arthur and Minnie. 

Following his graduation from the high school at LeSueur in 1890 
Charles W. ^leckstroth spent a year as a student in the academic depart- 
ment of Hamline University and then entered the medical department of the 
University of ^linnesota, from which he was graduated in the spring of 
1895. In that same spring he passed the state board's examination and for 
a year thereafter was engaged as an interne at St. Joseph's hospital at St. 
Paul. Thus admirably equipped for the practice of his profession. Doctor 
Meckstroth opened an office at Evansville, in 1896, remaining there about 
five years, at the end of which time he moved to Brandon, where he ever 
since has been located and where he has built up an extensive practice, long 
having been recognized as one of the leading physicians in that part of 
the county. Doctor Meckstroth is secretary of the Brandon Grain Com- 
pany, a director in the same, and takes an active interest in the general busi- 
ness activities of his home community, ever a willing promoter of move- 
ments designed to advance the common welfare thereabout. He is a Repub- 
lican and at different times has been an active worker in local campaigns. 



164 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

He is a Mason, past master of Evansville Lodge Xo. 214. and is a member 
of the local lodge of the Woodmen, in the affairs of Ijoth nf which organi- 
zations he takes a warm interest. 

In 1899 D(jctor Meckstroth was united in marriage to Lottie Johnson 
and to this union two cliildren have Ijeen born, Eunice and Orrin. Doctor 
and ^Irs. Aleckstroth have a very pleasant home at Brandon and take a 
proper part in the social activities of their home town and of the commun- 
ity at large. 



CALMER E. THORSTENSON. 

Calmer E. Thorstenson, manager of the Northwestern elevator at 
Ashby, was born in Clitheral township, Ottertail county, Minnesota, June 18, 
1887, son of Carl O. and Mina ( Loken ) Thorstenson, both natives of 
Norway. 

Carl O. Thorstenson was a young man when he came to America and 
was among the early settlers of Ottertail county, Minnesota. He took a 
homestead of one himdred and sixty acres of government land in Clitheral 
township of that county. That was wild, unimproved land at that time, but 
with the energy and industry characteristic of the people who came from 
Norway to this country, Mr. Thorstenson soon had the land in a good state 
of cultivation. He put up buildings for a residence and for farm purposes 
and established a comfortable home in which he has lived ever since, and in 
which he has reared a family of ten children, Thorsten, Eliza, Josephine, 
Hans, Clara, Sarah, Calmer E.. Lawrence, Ole and May. The Norwegian 
Lutheran is the family church. 

Calmer E. Thorstenson received his early education in the public schools 
of Clitheral township and later attended Park Region Lutheran College at 
Fergus Falls. In 1907 he went to Valley City, North Dakota, where he was 
engaged in buying grain for the Powers elevator people. Afterward he 
removed to Bowesmont, Pembina county. North Dakota. In August of 
1910, he moved to Ashby and took the position of manager of the North- 
western Elevator Company, at that place, and has ever since been thus 
engaged. 

In IQ14 Calmer E. Thorstenson and Agnes Krogh were united in mar- 
riao-e Tliev have one child, Frederick Woodard. They are members of 
the Norwegian Lutheran church. 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 165 

KXUTE SWORE, 

The subject of this sketch is of Xorwegian birth and ancestry. He waS 
born in Xordfjord, Nonvay, Augxist i, 1868. His parents were Rasmus K. 
and Kari (Flore) Swore, both natives of Xorway. They were a part of 
the great colony of hardy, enterprising and industrious N^orwegians who 
came into Minnesota in the early history of the state, and who have con- 
tributed so largely to the de\elopment of the lands and the industrial inter- 
ests of the state. 

The father of our subject came with his family to ^Minnesota in the 
spring of 1881, and located at Benson, Swift county. His first employment 
after locating there was working on the Great Northern railroad, in which 
work he continued for about two years. Afterward he settled on a farm 
of one hundred and sixty acres in Chippewa county, which he bought some 
time later, -\fter a few years he laid a claim on an adjoining tract of one 
hundred and sixty acres, upon which there was a disputed title. He moved 
on to that claim and had his home there for about twenty years, most of 
which time he was in litigation for the right of homestead on the land, living 
in uncertainty as to whether his glaim would be established in court. He 
finally won his case by a decision of the superior court, and the place has 
since continued to be the family homestead. The wife and mother died on 
the old homestead in Benson. The family consists of nine children : Knute, 
John A., Olaf, Emma, Einar, Sigtird, Ragna, ^larie and Eivind. The Xor- 
wegian Lutheran is the family church, 

The subject of this sketch had very little public school training in his 
early years. His father, who was a well educated man, taught his own chil- 
dren, and to him our subject is indebted for what he received in the way of 
educational attainment in his youthful years. At the age of twelve he began 
work. About a year later he returned to Osakis and took a store position for 
an occupation in which he was engaged for about two years. In 1884 he 
went to Osakis and was employed there in his uncle's store as a clerk, in 
which he continued for about three years. At that time his uncle sold his 
store and our subject returned to Chippewa county and again took up farm 
work. About a year later he returned to Osakis and took a store position for 
another of his uncles, working with him for about two years. In the mean- 
time the uncle with whom he was first employed had gone into business again 
and our subject returned to his employ. In 1893, ^^^- Swore, with ^^^ P. 
Long, bought out that store and took over the business in partnership. This 



l66 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

partnership continued for about five years, at tlie end of which time Mr. 
Swore bought his partner's interest and took into the tirni as partners his 
brother and E. H. Erickson, the business Ijeing continued under the firm 
name of Swore Brothers & Erickson. After two years the brother with- 
drew from the firm, and two years later Mr. Swore bought Erickson's inter- 
est and conducted the business alone for about three years. As the business 
was not proving to be sufficiently remunerative to justify its continuance 
Air. Swore closed out the stock and discontinued business at that time. 
During the following three years he clerked for George Herberger, and in 
the spring of 1911 he again engaged in business for himself, associated with 
Ijernard Olson and Peter Stenoien as partners. Nine months later Stenoien 
retired from the firm and William R. Baker was taken into the firm. In 
1913 the firni was again changed by Mr. Swore buying the interest of his 
two partners and taking the entire management of the business himself, 
which he has since continued. He does a general merchandise business, his 
line including clothing, furnishing goods and groceries. 

Mr. Swore married Mary Lysing, daughter of Jens K. and Emma 
Lysing, and to this union four children have been born, Ida Clara (deceased ), 
Rudolph L., Edna M., and Kermit. Rudolph Swore was graduated from 
the local high school and attended St. Olaf College for two years, and is 
still a student. Edna M. and Ivermit are attending the local schools. Mr. 
and ]\lrs. Swore are members of the Norwegian Eutheran church. He is 
independent in politics. He served as village recorder in 1914; is at present 
a member of the school board, and has been clerk of that board for nine 
years. His lodge affiliations are with the Masons and the Woodmen. 



OSCAR AMUNDSON. 



Oscar Aniundson, one of Grant county's best-known and most sub- 
stantial young farmers, proprietor of a fine place of one hundred and sixty 
acres in North Ottawa township and former constal^le of that township, 
is a native son of Grant county and has lived in the Qounty all his life. 
He was born on the old Amundson homestead in North Ottawa township, 
near his present place of residence, March 8, 1884, son of Ole A. and 
Sarah ( Reierson ) /Vmundson, natives of the kingdom of Norway, who came 
to this country following their marriage in 1881 and in the spring of 1882 
homesteaded a quarter of a section in North Ottawa township. Grant county, 



DOUGLAS AND GRAXT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 167 

establishing there a home in which they are still li\-ing, honored and respected 
pioneer residents of that part of the county. In a biographical sketch relat- 
ing to Ole A. Amundson, presented elsewhere in this volume, there is set 
out in detail a history of the family in Grant county, to which the atten- 
tion of the reader is respectfully invited in this connection. 

Reared on the homestead farm on which he was born, Oscar Amund- 
son received his schooling in the local schools of that neighborhood and 
remained at home, a \alued assistant in the work of developing the home 
place, until his marriage in 1910. when he established his home on the quarter 
section on which he is now li\"ing, a part of the extensive land holdings 
acquired thereabout b}- his father, and has ever since been managing the 
place and has done \ery well. Mr. Anumdson is a Republican and has taken 
an active part in local civic affairs, having served as constable of his town- 
ship and as clerk of his local school district. 

It was on June 15, 1910, that Oscar Amundson was united in marriage 
to Maud Wilcox, who was born in the state of Nebraska, daughter of 
Robert and Ida (Lee) \Mlcox. who later moved to Eagle Grove, Iowa, 
and thence to 3iJinnesota, locating in Grant county, where they have since 
made their home, and to this union four children have been born, a babv 
boy, who died unnamed: Robert, Thelma and Amber. I\Ir. and Mrs. 
Amundson are members of the Norwegian Lutheran church and take a warm 
interest in the general beneficences of the same, as well as in all local good 
works, helpful factors in the promotion of all movements having to do with 
the advancement of the welfare of the communitv in which thev live. 



A. M. ANDERSON. 



.\. yi. Anderson, one of the prominent and successful farmers, of 
LaGrand township, Douglas county, was born in Sweden, on Eebruary 3, 
1869, being the son of Andrew and Lisa (Johnson) Mattson, who w-ere bom 
in Sweden, and there received their education in the public schools, grew to 
manhood and womanhood and were there married. As a young man Andrew 
Mattson engaged in farming and he and his wife remained residents of their 
native country until 1882, in which year they and their family came to Minne- 
sota and located near Brophy Lake. They then moved to the farm, where 
the son, A. M. Anderson, now lives and there they remained for two years, 
after which time they bought a piece of land by Lobster Lake, where they 



lG8 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

Stayed for twenty years. Now they live near Holmes Citv. To Andrew 
and Lisa Mattson have been born the following children: Andrew M., Inga 
Marie, John, Peter, Martha, Alma, Carolina, Anna and Fred, all of whom 
are living save Inga Marie, Peter and Anna. 

A. M. Anderson received the greater part of his education in the schools 
of his native land, having attended school but two or three months in Minne- 
sota. He was but thirteen years of age when he came to the United States 
with his mother, one \ear after the father had come here. As a lad he 
assisted on the fami in his nati\'e land and has always followed that work. 
He has been on his present farm of one hundred and si.xty acres, in PaGrand 
township for the past thirteen years. He erected the barn and repaired and 
remodeled the house, as well as making many other \'alual)le improvements 
on the place. He is engaged in general farming and stock raising and has 
been quite successful. 

In 1902 A. M. Anderson was united in marriage to Ellen Hnlmberg, 
who also was born in Sweden, daughter of Carl Holmberg, who died at his 
home in Douglas county some years ago, and to this union have been born 
the following children : Elmer, Edna Conrancy, Myrtle Olivia, Hazel 
Mildred, Harold William ami Clifford Marvin. 



TORGJKLS KNUTSON. 

An enterprising merchant and farmer of the village of Garfield, is Torg- 
jels Knutson, who was born in Norway, Deceml>er 5, 1864. He is a son of 
Knut Torgjelson and Gertrude Jenson, natives of Norway where they grew 
up and were married. The father engaged in commercial fishing, owning 
a number of small boats, at the town of Akrehaven. 

The subject of this sketch grew up in Norway and attended school there. 
He came to America in 1883, single, landing in Boston, Massachusetts, but 
he came on west to Minnesota and has since made his home at Garfield, 
where he has been engaged in mercantile pursuits for a period of thirty-two 
years, handling all kinds of hardware and farming implements and of recent 
years the Ford and 0\-erland automobiles. He is the only merchant in that 
locality who has survived the vicissitudes or hard times, panics and crop 
failures for three decades. This fact indicates that he has managed well, 
been courageous and has dealt honestly with his customers. He has pur- 
chased his stock of hardware for thirtv vears from the same wholesale finn 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 1 69 

in St. Paul. He came near giving up his business just after the grasshopper 
' plague here, ha\-ing lost his capital ; but the St. Paul firm induced him to 
stock up again for the coming year and they would take the risk, and in a 
few years he became one of the most substantial men financially in that part 
of Douglas county. He is a stockholder in the Bank of Garfield and is one 
of its directors; also owns stock in the Garfield elevator and in the creamery 
there, and sen-ed on the board of directors of the latter for twelve vears. 
He also owns a butcher shop in Garfield, \vhich he rents. He is owner of 
about six hundred acres of valuable land in Ida, ]\Ioe and LaGrand town- 
ships. 

^Ir. Knutson was married on October 28. 1888, to Johannah [Marie 
Oleson, who was born on April 25, 1870. Her father, Johannes Oleson, 
was the first man married in Douglas county, whose license was recorded. 
He took up a homestead in section 11, Moe township. To Mr. and ^Irs. 
Knutson seven children ha\e been born, Alfred, Ivnut, Rosie, Helge, Law- 
rence, Henry and JMay. Knut Knutson married Ida Bergsten and lives near 
Garfield. The rest of the children are at liome. 

Air. Knutson is now taking life easier than formerlv, having turned the 
management of his business over, very largely, to his sons. He liuilt a mod- 
ern, commodious and well-appointed residence in 1916, just at the edge of 
the village. It has electric lights, hot and cold water and bath and is ele- 
gantly furnished. Politically, Mr. Knutson is a Republican. He and his 
wife belong to the Norwegian Lutheran church. He was president of the 
township board for several years. 



OLE. ANDREW AMUNDSEN. 

Ole Andrew Amundsen, a well-known and substantial pioneer farmer of 
Grant county and proprietor of a fi.ne farm of one hundred and sixty acres 
in North Ottawa township, is a native of the kingdom of Norwav, but lias 
been a resident of Minnesota since 1882, in which year he became a home- 
steader in Grant county and has ever since been a resident of the county. 
He was born in Christiansand on November 2, 1852, son of Amund and Inga 
Mary (Torgersdatter ) Sorenson, both of whom spent all their lives in their 
native land and who were the parents of four children, of whom the subject 
of this biographical sketch was the second in order of birth, the others being 
as follow: Silas, a farmer and fisherman, who still lives in Norway; 



170 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

Edward Tobias, a well-to-do farmer living in New Zealand, and Ole, who 
died in his native land in the days of his youth. 

Reared on a farm, Ole A. Amundson received his schooling in local 
schools and continued farming in his nati\e land until his marriage at the 
age of twenty-nine, when, in 1881, he and his bride set sail for the United 
States, proceeding directly upon their arrixal at port to Wisconsin, where 
they had friends living and where for three months, or until he had got his 
bearings, ]\Ir. .\mundson worked at farm labor. He then came with his 
wife over into this part of Minnesota, settling in Grant county, and in the 
spring of 1882 homesteaded a quarter of a section in section 26 of North 
Ottawa township and there established his home. The country thereabout 
at that time was all wild prairie land and the neighbors were few and far 
between. Upon taking up his residence on liis homestead JMr. Amundson 
erected a small frame shanty that served as a shelter for him and his wife 
for a couple of years, at the end of which time he built a new and much 
more commodious dwelling, a part of which is still in use, a part of his 
present comfortable farm house, which was erected years later. The barn 
and other improvements on the farm are in keeping and Air. Amundson has 
a very well-equipped farm plant. As he prospered in his farming operations 
he bought an additional quarter section for his eldest son, Oscar, who is now 
living on and operating the same. In addition to his general farming Mr. 
Amundson has given considerable attention to stock raising and has done 
verv well. He is a Republican and for many years served as school director 
in his local district. 

It was in the spring of 1881 that Ole A. Amundson was married, in 
Christiansand, to Sarah Reierson, who also was born in Norway, a daughter 
of Reier Larson and wife, the former of whom is still living in Norway and 
the latter r>f whom died some years ago, and to this union nine children ha\e 
been born, namely: Marv, who married Simon Larson and lives at Nor- 
cross; Oscar, a substantial young farmer, who lives on the quarter section 
adjoining that of his father's old homestead and a biographical sketch of 
whom appears elsewhere in this volume; Richard, who is married and lives 
on a nearbv farm; Inga, who is at home, and Tilla, Ole, Annie, Mattie and 
Nina, also at home. Besides these, Mr. and Mrs. Amundson have adopted 
two children, Selmer (Larson) Amundson and Lester Carlson. Richard J- 
Amundson, the second son, was born on the homestead farm on March 25, 
1886, and grew to manhood there, becoming a carpenter and later a sales- 
man. In 1914 he bought, in partnership with E. L. Brewster, a quarter of 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. I7I 

a section of land in North Ottawa township and has since made his home 
there. He was married in December, 191 1, to Effie Ellen Brewster, a daugh- 
ter of L. L. Brewster, a biographical sketch of whom is presented elsewhere 
in this volimie, and to this union two children ha\e been born, Lloyd Lewis 
and Forest Brewster. Ole A. Amundson and wife are members of the 
United Lutheran church and their children were reared in that faith, the 
family ever taking an active interest in church affairs and all local good 
works. In 1914 Mr. Amundson made a trip back to his native land and 
spent six weeks pleasantly reviewing the scenes of his childhood and early 
manhood, but was well content to return to the adopted land which has treated 
him so well in the way of rewarding his industry and enterprise by affording 
him a competence against the time of his declining years. 



C. J. STENE. 

C. J. Stene, one of the well known and successful merchants, of Ashby, 
was born in Norway on February 24, 1865, being the son of John and ]\Iary 
Stene. 

John and 3,lary Stene were born in Norway and received their edu- 
cation in the public schools, grew to manhood and womanhood and were mar- 
ried in 1862. John Stene came to America in 1867 and after his arrival 
in this country, came direct to ATinnesota. where he worked as a farm hand 
for some time and then homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres of land 
in section 9 of Pelican Lake township, Grant county. His wife and family 
joined him in 1870, they having remained in their native land for three years 
after the husband and father came to this country. That farm he developed 
and improved and there he engaged in general farming until the time of his 
death, which occurred in 1884, at the age of fifty-four years. His widow 
died in 1887, at the age of fifty- four years. To Mr. and Mrs. Stene were 
born three sons, John M., C. J. and Edward. John M. Stene is a farmer 
of -Grant county and Edward Stene is professor of agriculture in the col- 
lege at Kingston. 

John Stene was a man of much business ability, an excellent farmer, 
and was successful during his residence in this state. At the time of his 
death he was the owner of three hundred and sixty acres of land, on which 
he had made man}- substantial improvements. He took much interest in 
local affairs, and did much for the growth and development of the district. 



172 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

He ser\ed as a meinljer of the 1x)ard of supervisors for many years, and 
assisted in the organization of the Norwegian Lutheran church in his home 
tiiwnship. He and his wife took much interest in tlie social and reHgious 
life of the cominunitv and were lield in the highest esteem by all who knew 
them. 

C. J. Stene was educated in the common schools of Pelican Lake town- 
ship and grew to manliood on the home farm, where as a lad he assisted his 
father with the work. In June, 1894, he was united in marriage to Olianna 
Rohn, and located on his father's homestead farm, where he now resides, in 
the house that his father built. Though living in tlie country, he conducts 
his extensi\'e business in the town of Ashb_\', where he is engaged in the 
hardware business, in which he has been engaged since 19 13. He carries a 
stock of goods to tlie amount of five thousand dollars, is doing a fine busi- 
ness, and has the confidence and the respect of the community. In addi- 
tion to his farm interests, he is the owner of stock in the bank at Ashby, as 
well as in the Farmers Elevator Company and in the Ashby creamery. 

To C. J- and Olianna Stene have been born the following children : 
Manfred, Oscar, Alma, Clara, Edwin, Bernice, Dagmar, Helen and Ella. 
Mr. and Mrs. Stene are active members of the Norwegian Lutheran church 
and take much interest in church work. Mr. Stene has long been identified 
with tnwn.ship affairs, and has served on the board of supervisors for the 
past twenty vears and has served on the school board for twenty-five years. 



JOHN O. WESTERN. 

John O. Western, a well-known and successful business man of Ashby, 
was born in Fillmore county, Minnesota, on December 25, 1870, the son of 
Ole and Carrie Western, natives of Norway, who with their family, in 
1862, came to the United States and located in Fillmore county, Minnesota. 
After locating in this state, Ole Western followed his trade as a carpenter 
for a number of years. In 1878 he removed to four miles south of Ashby, 
where he engaged in farming. In 18S1 he moved to Ashby, where he worked 
as a carpenter unti! his death in 1914. Mrs. Western died when John O. 
was but a child. They were the parents of four children, .\nna, Ida, Caroline 
and John O. 

lohn O. Western grew to manhood in Grant county and received his 
education in the public schools. After completing his education, he began 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 1 73 

life as a clerk in the stores of Asliliy, where he was at \'arious times employed 
b\- a number of the merchants. George T. Hoff, a brother-in-law, and Mr. 
Western were associated in tlie general mercantile business fijr three years. 
On his retirement from the firm, Mr. Western was employed by A. O. Stoo 
in the lumber Inisiness. He remained here three years, at the end of wliich 
time the business was sold to the Ashby Lumber Company and [Mr. Western 
was made manager, which position he still holds. 

In 1894 John O. Western was united in marriage to Clara Johnson, of 
Ottertail county and the daughter of Andres Johnson and wife. To this 
union have been born the following children : Alvin, Clarence, Ina, Chester, 
Eva, Leonard, Howard and Kenneth. The family are active meml^ers of 
the Norwegian Lutheran church. 

'Sir. Western has always taken an active interest in local affairs, and his 
activity in all lines of social, church and ci\'ic work has done much for the 
development of the community. As an e\idence of the regard in which he 
is held, he has been elected to many of the official positions of tlie \-ilIage. 



OLE S. SKIXNEMOEN. 



Ole S. Skinnemoen, one of the most substantial and progressive farm- 
ers in Grant county, owner of a fine farm of four hundred acres in Stony 
Brook township, a director of the Wendell State Bank at Wendell, one of 
the leading stockholders of the Farmers Elevator Company at that place 
and for years an active factor in the development of his home community, 
is a native son of Grant county and has lived there all his life. He was bom 
on the old Skinnemoen homestead farm in Stony Brook township, July 15, 
1S73, son of Stiner S. Skinnemoen and wife, who were among the earliest 
settlers of that part of Grant county and who are still li\-ing on the place 
they homesteaded in 1871, honored and respected pioneer residents of that 
> community- 
Reared on the old homestead place, Ole S. Skinnemoen received his 
schooling in the Stony Brook schools and from boyhood was an able assistant 
to his father in the labors of developing the home place, remaining at home 
until 1914, when he entered upon the occupancy of the fine farm of four 
hundred acres, of which he had in the meantime become the owner, about 
one-half mile south of the old home place. He erected a fine house on the 
place, put up a roomy and modern barn and otherwise added to the improve- 



174 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

ments until he has one of the best improved farms in the neighborhood. He 
is one uf the pioneer alfalfa raisers of Grant county and now has alx)ut seventy- 
acres planted to that grass. Mr. Skinnemoen, in addition to his general 
farming, has given considerable attention to the raising of pure-bred live 
stock and lias a fine lot of Shorthorn cattle and Percheron horses. He also 
has given his close attention to the general business affairs of the community 
and is regarded as among the most active and influential citizens of that part 
of the county. In his political affiliations he is a Republican, but he has 
never been included in the office-seeking class. He has a fine place, over- 
looking Lightning Lake from the north, and is very pleasantly and com- 
fortablv situated. Mr. Skinnemoen is a member of the L'uited Lutheran 
church at '.\astad and takes a good citizen's interest in all mo\-ements having 
to do with the advancement of the common cause hereabout. 



LOUIS ANDERSON. 



Louis Anderson, a successful farmer of Alexandria township, Douglas 
county, Minnesota, was born in Sweden, on December 15, 1855, being the 
son of Andrews and Breta (Olson) Anderson. Andrews and Breta Ander- 
son were born in Sweden and there received their education in the public 
schools. They grew to manhood and womanhood on near-by farms and 
were later married. They lived their lives in the land of their birth and 
there Air. Anderson was engaged in farming. They were the parents of 
the fnllnwing children: Olaf, ^Nlaria, Christina, Andrew, John and Louis. 

I.nuis Anderst)n received his education in the common schools of his 
native land and remained a resident of that countr}' until he was twenty- 
five years of age. In 1880 he decided that he would come to America and, 
after landing in the United States, came direct to Illinois, locating in Ver- 
milion county, where he lived for two years. He then removed to Wapello 
countv, Iowa, where he lived for four years, after which time he came to 
Minnesota and lucated in Nobles county. He remained a resident of that 
countv until iSprj. when he came to Douglas county. Here he purchased 
one hundred and Mxty acres of land in Alexandria township, and has since 
made the farm his home. The tract at that time was a wild prairie, without 
improxements of any kind. With much energy and patience, the prairie sod 
was broken, crops planted, buildings erected and many other valuable improve- 
ments were made on the place. In later years the buildings have been 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 1 75 

improved and today Mr. Anderson has a most pleasing and attractive country 
home. Here he is engaged in general farming and stock raising and has 
been most successful. He is a public-spirited citizen and takes much interest 
in all local affairs. He is independent in politics and has ser^'ed as a mem- 
ber of the township board for a number of years. His services have been 
of much value to the township a*^ well as the community in which he lives. 
Louis Anderson was united in marriage on ]\larch 29, 18S4. to Tilda 
Maria Larson, and to this union the following children have been bom: 
Oscar E., Albert C. and Edwin ^lorris. I\lr. and ]ilrs. Anderson are active 
members of the Swedish Lutheran church and take much interest in all 
social and religious activities of the township. Mr. Anderson has served as 
a trustee of the local society of the church for many years. He and his wife 
are held in high regard by all. for their many noble qualities of manhood 
and womanhood. 



JOHX M. FISFIER. 



A well known and highly esteemed citizen and farmer of Hudson town- 
ship, Douglas county, is John 1\L Fisher, who is a Hoosier by birth, having 
been born in Shelby county, Indiana, on March 9, 1869. He is a son of 
Tames H. and Hannah (Derickson) Fisher, both of whom were also natives 
of Shelby county, Indiana. James H. Fisher and his family came to Minne- 
sota in ^larch, 1883, settling in Douglas county^ and here he and his wife 
lived the remainder of their li\es. He was a farmer all his life and was the 
owner of one hundred and fifty-four acres of land in Orange township, this 
county. He was actively interested in the affairs of his township and com- 
munity and served as clerk and treasurer of the school board. He and his 
wife had been members of the Baptist church in Indiana, but upon remov- 
ing to ^Minnesota, they became attendants of the Methodist Episcopal cliurch. 
They were the parents of six children, Norman E., John M., William R., 
Emma X.. .\nna E. and Aha E., the last named being deceased. James H. 
Fi-her serAed for four years in the Union army during the Civil \\"ar, being 
a member of the Fifty-second Regiment, Indiana A'olunteer Infantry. He 
participated in many of the hard-fought battles of that great struggle, being 
severely wounded at one time. 

John ]kt. Fisher recei\-ed his elementary education in the schools of 
Shelby county, Indiana, finishing his schooling in the township schools of 



176 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

Minnesota after coming here witli liis father and family in 1883. He grew 
up on his father's farm and early in life decided to become a farmer. He 
first purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land in section 13, Huds(>n 
township, \\here lie lived for eight years, after which he moved to the farm 
where he is now li\ing. This farm consists of two hundred and forty acres 
of fine land and in the summer of 19 15 he erected a nice new modern home, 
where he and his family l;\e, surrounded by all the comforts and conveniences 
of the modern fami home. 

In December, 1899, John ^1. Fisher was married to ]\Iinnie George, 
daughter of Henry and Eliza (Hostettler) George, of Monroe county, Indi- 
ana. Henry George and wife lived in Illinois for three years after leaving 
Indiana and then settled in Douglas county, Minnesota, in 1880. They are 
now liith deceased. Tlieir children were Frank, ^Margaret, John. William, 
JNlinnie, Eva., and two others who died young. To the subject and wife have 
been born three children, Harold, Melvin and Florence. 

]\[r. Fisher is independent in politics, and has served his township as 
road o\erseer; he has also served on the school board for twelve consecutive 
\ears, and was recently elected for another term of three years. 



GEORGE GILBERTSON. 

George Gilbertson, a well known and successful merchant of Erdahl, 
was born in Erdahl township. Grant county, on July 5, 1887, the son of 
Gilbert and "Mary (Lee) Gilbertson. 

Gilbert and Anna Olson, the grandparents of George Gilbertson. were 
natives of Norway and there received their education in the i>ulilic schools 
and there grew to manhood and womanhood and were married. It \Vas 
there that their children were born, and there Mr. Olson engaged in gen- 
eral farming. They were prominent in the social and the religious life of 
the ccjmmunity in which they lived. They spent their lives in the land of 
their birth and young manhood and womanhood, until 1861, when they came 
to America, their remaining days being spent with their son, Ole, in \\'is- 
consin. They were the parents of seven children, Ole, Thoren, Thora, Olia, 
Mary, Gilbert and Anna, of whom Ole, Thoron and Olia are now deceased. 

Gilbert Gilliertson, the father of George Gilbertson, received his edu- 
cation in the public schools of Norway, where he was born, and there grew 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUXTIES, MINNESOTA. 1 77 

to manhood and remained a resident of that country until 1861, when he 
came to America. Upon his arri\al in the United States he proceeded 
chrectly to Wisconsin, where he worked as a farm hand for one year. On 
j\ugust 15, 1862, he enhsted in the Twenty-seventh Regiment, \\"isconsin 
Volunteer Infantry, at IMadison. During his service as a soldier of the 
United States army, Mr. Gilbertson saw much active service, at Columbus, 
Kentucky; at the siege of \^icksburg, under General Grant; at Little Rock, 
Arkansas and in Texas, under General Steele, and was in the battle of 
Jenkins' Ferry, Arkansas, where the commands of Generals Price and 
Marmaduke were captured. \Miile serving under General Canby he was 
at Mobile, Alabama, and there participated in the capture of Spanish Fort 
and Fort Blakely. He was then in the campaign up the Alabama river, 
during the progress of which the war came to a close. He was then trans- 
ferred to Mobile, .Vlabama, and later to Texas, where the command was 
sent to recover some guns that had unlawfully been sold to the Mexicans. 
After having recei\"ed his discharge at Brownville, Texas, on September 25, 
1865, Mr. Gilbertson returned to Wisconsin, where he remained for five 
years, engaged there as a farm hand. In 1870 he came to Minnesota and 
took a soldier's claim of one hundred and sixty acres in Swift county. There 
he built a log slianty, obtained a good team of oxen and engaged in general 
farming until 1875, when he sold the place and moved to Grant county, 
where he purchased eighty acres of land, in section 5 of Erdahl township, 
at that time all wild land, covered with timber and brush. There he built a 
good log house and in time cleared and improved his farm. His first crop 
was, for the most part, taken by the grasshoppers, but he continued in the 
work of development and in time had one of the desirable farms of that 
»township. He continued to live on the place until 1903, when he sold and 
moved to the \-illage of Erdahl, where he purchased fifteen acres of land, 
which he is now farming and on which he has erected excellent buildings 
and made many other valuable improvements. 

In 1 87 1 Gilbert Gilbertson was united in marriage to Mar\- Lee. and 
to this union twelve children were born, Ellen, Gustav, Mina, Oscar, Sena, 
Otto, George, Clara, Arthur, 3ilartin, I\Iartin Arnold and Mabel, the last 
three being deceased. Ellen Gilbertson married John Comstock, of Fergus 
Falls. Gustav Gillaertson is a resident of Canada. Mina Gilbertson mar- 
ried Austin Thompson and lives at Hankinson, North Dakota. Oscar Gil- 
bertson is a grain buyer at Rugby. Xorth Dakota. Sena Gilbertson married 
(12a) 



1^8 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

William Moe, a wheat buyer of Judd, North Dakota. Otto, Clara and 
Arthur Gilbertson are at home and George Gilbertson is a resident of Erdahl. 
Mr. and ]\Irs. Gilbertson are active members of the Norwegian Lutheran 
church, and are prominent in the social and the religious life of the com- 
munity. jNlr. Gilbertson has always taken an active interest in local affairs. 
He assisted in the organization of the township, was the first township clerk 
and served as clerk of the school district that he helped organize. He was 
also prominent in the affairs of the county, and served for four years as 
county commissioner, in which capacity he rendered excellent ser\ace. 

George Gilbertson received his education in the public schools of Erdahl 
township and at the Park Region Lutheran College at Fergus Falls, and 
was reared on the home farm, where as a lad he assisted his father with 
the farm work. At the age of fourteen he went into the woods of northern 
Minnesota, where he was employed as a cook in the lumber camp for eight 
years. Fie then went to .western Canada, where he took a homestead of 
one hundred and sixty acres at Swift Current, Saskatchewan, all of which 
was wild prairie. There he built a small claim shanty and during the sum- 
mer months worked on his claim and in the winter worked for others in the 
neighborhood. He made many improvements, broke about one hundred 
and twenty-five acres of his claim, of which twenty was under fence. He 
remained there five years, at the end of which time, in 1914, he rented his 
place and returned to Grant county. In the spring of 191 5 he engaged in 
business at Erdahl, where he has since handled groceries, meats, confec- 
tionery and fruits, and has been quite successful. He is deputy postmaster, 
under his brother, Arthur Gilbertson, who has the office in the store. In the 
spring of 1916, Mr. Gilbertson moved into his present quarters, and now 
conducts a hotel and restaurant in connection with his soda, confectionery 
and meat business. 

On November 18, 191 3, George Gilbertson was united in marriage to 
Ella Alberts of Erdahl township. Mr. and Mrs. Gilbertson are active mem- 
bers of the Norwegian Lutheran church, and take much interest in church 
work. They are prominent in the social and religious life of the community 
and have had much to do with the social development of the village. Mr. 
Gilbertson is a progressive young man and puts much energy into his busi- 
ness, which is one of the substantial institutions of the town. He takes a 
keen interest in the civic life of the place and devotes his best efforts to the 
growth and development of his home town. 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. I79 

JOHN L. GUNDERSON. 

A well known and well-to-do farmer of Solem township, Donglas connty, 
who is proprietor of a fine farm of two hundred acres in the vicinity of 
Kensington, and who is actively identified with the rapidly developing inter- 
ests of that part of the county is John L. Gunderson, who was born in Nor- 
way, October 3, 1846. He is a son of Lars and Johanna (Seiverson) Gun- 
derson, both of whom were also natives of the same covintry. 

After the death of his wife in Norway, Lars Gunderson came to 
America in 1870, locating first in LaCrosse, Wisconsin, where he remained 
for three years, being employed by farmers in that vicinity. Fie then went 
to Barron county, Wisconsin, where he homesteaded eighty acres of land, 
and there he made his home during the remainder of his life, his death 
occurring in 1909. Jie and his wife were the parents of six children, Gunder, 
Carrie, John L., Seivert, Lars and Mary, all of whom are living except 
Gunder, who died in Wisconsin, Februarv^ i, 1912, and Lars, who died in 
Alaska in 1904. 

John L. Gunderson received a limited education in the schools of his 
native land, and in 1871 joined his father in the United States, going directly 
to LaCrosse, Wisconsin, and from there went to Barron county, Wisconsin, 
where he homesteaded land in Cumberland township, and there he made his 
home for twenty- four years. In 1898 he moved to his present fami in 
Douglas coutny, consisting of two hundred acres. He has made many and 
various improvements on his farm since acquiring the same, having ^erected 
all of the buildings on the place except the house. He is engaged in general 
farming and stock raising, and is well equipped for making a success of his 
farming operations. 

In 1877 John L. Gunderson was married to Eliza Iverson, who is a 
native of Norway, the daughter of Christopher Iverson, and to this union 
eleven children have been bom, Eddie, Josephine, Oliver, Julius, George, 
Melvin, Ella, Rudolph and Walter (twins), Julia and Clarence, all of whom 
are living except Josephine. Mrs. Gunderson's parents were Christopher and 
Ella (Harsdatter) Iverson, the former of whom died in Norway, while the 
mother came to America in later years and made her home with Mr. Gunder- 
son the last four years of her life. Mrs. Gunderson came to the LTnited 
States with her brother, when she was fourteen years of age, and lived in 
Iowa for some time. 

Mr. Gunderson has always taken a prominent and active part in the 



l8o DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

civic life of his community, and while living in Wisconsin, served five years 
as super\'isor of his township, and as postmaster for eight years. He took 
a warm interest in the welfare of the schools, both here and in Wisconsin, 
ser\'ing six years as director on the school board while in Barron county, 
Wisconsin, and seven years on the school board here. The family are all 
members of the Lutheran church. 



ALBERT L. RITZSCHKE. 

Albert L. Ritzschke, a well-known and successful farmer of Macsville 
township, Grant county, was born in that township on October 14, 1877, the 
son of Carl and Louisa (Hensel) Ritzschke, natives of the kingdom of Sax- 
ony, Germany, where they received their education in the public schools and 
were married. Henry Ritzschke and wife, the parents of Carl Ritzschke, 
were also natives of that country. They came to America and located in 
Wisconsin, where the wife and mother later died. After the death of his 
wife, Henry Ritzschke came to Minnesota and located in Grant county, where 
he died some years ago. Tlie maternal grandparents of Albert L. Ritzschke 
spent all their lives in the Fatherland. 

As a voung man Carl Ritzschke learned the mason's and plasterer's trade, 
at which he worked for a number of years. After his marriage he and his 
wife continued to live in Germany until 1868, when they came to the United 
States. The sailing vessel on which they crossed was six weeks in making the 
passage, and during that time they lost the son that had been born to them in 
their native land. On their arrival in this country they located at Oshkosh, 
Wisconsin, where the father worked at his trade for some eight years. In 
1877 they came to Minnesota and homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres 
of land in section 24 of Macsville township, Grant county. A sod house was 
constructed in which the family lived for some time. The farm was later 
developed, substantial buildings erected and more land purchased, until Mr. 
Ritzschke became the owner of three hundred and twenty acres, and there 
he successfully engaged in general farming and stock raising for many years. 
He still lives on the farm, but has retired from the activities of farm life. He 
always took much interest in local affairs and was for many years treasurer 
of the school board. He became a member of the Knights of Pj^thias and 
was prominent in the order. His wife died on February 22, 191 1. 

Carl and Louisa Ritzschke were the parents of nine children, of whom 



DOUGLAS AXn GRAXT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. l8l 

the subject of this sketch is the fourth in order of birth, the others being 
Charles F., a biographical sketch of whom is presented elsewhere in this 
volume; Theodore, who is a well-known and successful farmer and stockman 
of Grant j20unty ; Martha, who is the wife of Harry Enwiller, of Russell, 
South Dakota; Clara, the \\ife of Henry Ristow; Arthur, who is living on 
the home place : Walter, who lives with his brother Charles ; Albert, who 
lives in Iowa, and Edward, who died at the age of twelve years. 

Albert L. Ritzschke received his education in the public schools of Alacs- 
ville township and was reared on the home farm. He later rented land and 
engaged in farming for himself. In 1909 he purchased one hundred and sixty 
acres in section 26 of Alacsville township, on which was a house and a gran- 
ary. In 1 9 14 he erected a fine barn, thirty by forty-eight feet, with concrete 
foundation and hip roof. In addition to this he has made many other im- 
provements and has done much in the way of developing his farm. He is 
engaged in general farming and stock raising, and has been quite successful. 
being recognized as one of the successful and progressive farmers of the 
township. 

Albert L. Ritzschke is independent in politics, has always taken an active 
interest in the affairs of the community, is a firm believer in substantial public 
improvements, and an advocate of good roads and good schools. He is a 
member of the order of Knights of Pythias and of the ^lodern Woodmen of 
America, in the affairs of both of which organizations he is much interested. 



\\'. A. YATES. 



^^■. A. Yates was born in Juneau, \Msconsin, April 14. 1855, and is 
a son of \Mlliam and Bettie (Taylor) Yates, of whom both were born in 
Xew York state. The father was a farmer in his native state and in early 
life he came to ^^'isconsin. For a few years he was employed as a farmer 
in Waukesha county, that state, but about 1849 he removed to Dodge count v, 
Wisconsin, being one of the early settlers in that countv. He made that 
county his home during the remainder of his life, which ended in 1S6:;. 
The children in this family were, Alary, \\\ A., Albert. Ira T. and Tames B. 

The subject of this sketch was educated in the public schools of Juneau, 
\\'isconsin, and found employment during his school vears in working on 
the farm. In the meantime he studied telegraphy and became so familiar 



l82 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

with the business that he was, in 1879, able to hold the position of tele- 
graph operator at Waupun, Fond du Lac county, Wisconsin. He held this 
position for about one year and in the spring of 1880 he came to Minnesota 
and for a few }ears was in the employ of the Great Northern Railway as 
station agent at various places on their line. In 1885 he was checked in 
as agent at Osakis and remained here for about twelve years. In 1897 
he resigned his railroad position and, in association with F. B. Canada, 
bought the St. Cloud Lumber Company and engaged in that line of. busi- 
ness. In 1906 Mr. Yates bought his partner's interest and has since con- 
ducted the business alone. The business of this establishment has doubled 
since Yates and Canada first took hold of it. Mr. Yates now handles wood 
and coal in addition to a general line of lumber and building material and 
building supplies. He also has a stock farm in Osakis township, consist- 
ing of one hundred and sixty acres, and is interested in the breeding of 
Holstein cattle. He also has another one-hundred-and-sixty-acre farm north 
of Osakis. 

\V. A. Yates and Catherine Gallagher, daughter of Edward Gallagher, 
were united in marriage on February 24, 1884. They have two children: 
Eva May, who is the wife of Walter A. Flint, and Chester P., who is 
still at home. Mr. Yates is a Mason, holding membership with Lodge No. 
30, at Osakis; the chapter of Royal Arch Masons at Sauk Center; the com- 
mandery of Knights Templar at Morris; the sovereign consistory of the 
Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite at Minneapolis, and is a noble of Zuhrah 
Temple, Mystic Shrine, at Minneapolis. He is also a member of the Wood- 
men and the Maccabees. Politically, he afifiliates with the Republican party. 
He ser\'ed as mavor of Osakis for fourteen years and as a member of the 
school board for twentv-five years continually. 



GUSTAA^ A. JOHNSON. 

Gustav A. Johnson, a well-known and substantial farmer of Grant 
county, proprietor of a fine farm of two hundred and eighty acres lying 
partly in North Ottawa township and partly in Elbow Lake township, on 
which he maintains an excellent herd of dairy cattle, is a native of the king- 
dom of Sweden, but has been a resident of Minnesota since he was sixteen 
years of age and of Grant county since the year 1892, when he settled in 



DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 183 

North Ottawa township, where he ever since has made his home. He 
was born in West Jutland, Sweden, April 7, 1850, a son of Johannes and 
]\Iaiastina Swenson, natives of that same province, landowners there, who 
spent all their lives in their native land. They were the parents of seven 
children, of whom the subject of this biographical sketch was the last-born, 
the others being as follow : Inga Stina, who married Johannes Swanson 
and died at [Minneapolis, this state : Anna Kaisa, who married Swante 
Bro.x and died in Sweden; Charlotte, who married and also died in her 
native land; Carl, who lives at Grasston, this state; Annie Maria, who 
married a Mr. Sorenson and died in ^Minnesota, and John, a farmer in his 
native land. 

Gustav A. Johnson was reared on the home farm in \\'est Jutland, 
receiving his schooling in the pul^b'c schools and was confirmed there. At 
the age of sixteen, in company with his brother, Carl, he came to the United 
States and the next }ear, in 1867, located at ^tlinneapolis, where he secured 
employment in the coal yards. Later he became a teamster and was thus 
engaged until 1892, when he decided to become a farmer and, in pursuit 
of this decision, moved to. Grant county and bought a quarter of a sec- 
tion of partly improved land in Xorth Ottawa township and began to 
develop the same. When he took possession of the place it had a few poor 
buildings on it and he remodeled the house, built a new barn and other- 
wise brought the place up to proper standard. As he prospered in his 
farming operations, ]\Ir. Johnson gradually added to his holdings until he 
now owns two hundred and eighty acres, a part of which lies in Elbow 
Lake township. In addition to his general farming, ^Ir. Johnson gives 
considerable attention to the raising of Shorthorn cattle for dairy pur- 
poses and now has a herd of forty-five or fifty head of fine cattle. In 
his political affiliations he is a Republican, but has not been a seeker after 
public office. 

In 1877, at ^linneapolis, Gustav A. Johnson was united in marriage to 
Annie Abrahamson, who also was born in Sweden, a daughter of Gustav 
and Katrina Abrahamson, and to this union five children have been born, 
namely: Anna Caroline, who married Charles Swenson and lives at Lind- 
strom, this state; Charles, unmarried, who is at home; Frank, who is engaged 
in a bank at Artesian, South Dakota; Alexis, who married Alfred Dahl 
and lives at Ashby, and Abbie Eleanora, who died at the age of eighteen 
years. The Johnsons have a pleasant home and take a proper part in all 
movements designed to advance the common welfare of the community in 
which thev live. 



184 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

J. E. HALGRIMSON. 

J. E. Halgrimson, a native of Goodhue county and one of the well- 
known and successful farmers of Brandon township, Douglas county, 
^linnesota, was born on November 30, 1865, being the son of Elling and 
Mallie (Solem) Halgrimson. 

Elling Halgrimson was born in Norway, where he received his educa- 
tion in the public schools and grew to manhood. At the age of twenty 
years, he decided to come to America and after his arrival in this countrj- 
and a short stay in Wisconsin he came direct to JMinnesota. He located in 
Goodhue county, where lie later purchased eighty acres of land and engaged 
in farming. Here he was married to Mallie Solem and to this union the 
following children were born: Henry, John E., Gurina, Ellen M. and Emily. 
Ellen M. is now deceased. After a residence of a few years in Goodhue 
county, the family came to Douglas county, where the father purchased one 
hundred and sixty acres of land in sections 20 and 29, Brandon township. 
This land was developed and improved and here Elling Halgrimson engaged 
in general farming and stock raising and was successful. He and his wife 
made this farm their home until the time of their deaths, he dying in 1900 
and she in 1904. The family were prominent in the social circles of the 
township and Mr. Halgrimson took much interest in local afifairs, being one 
of the active and prominent men of the community. They were hekl in 
the highest regard by all who knew them. 

J. E. Halgrimson received his education in the public schools of 
Brandon township and here grew to manhood. As a lad and young man. 
he assisted his father with the work on the farm and in early life decided 
that he would be a farmer. On July 9, 1904, he was united in marriage to 
Magdalena Olson, the daughter of J. A. Olson, a well-known farmer and 
early settler of the county. To this union one child, Josie Hellen, was born 
on May 30, 19 12. 

At the time he became of age. J. E. Halgrimson purchased the home 
farm of his father, where he has since lived and is engaged in general 
farming and stock raising. He is interested in the raising of Shorthorn 
cattle and a mi.xed grade of hogs. He believes in intensive farming and 
the keeping of good stock. He is now the owner of three hundred and 
ten acres of land in sections 20 and 29 and is regarded as one of the sub- 
stantial and successful farmers of the township. He has always taken much 
interest in local affairs and is ever ready to assist in any worthy cause 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 185 

that has a tendency to advance the social and financial condition of the 
county. He owns stock in the Brandon Creamery and has served on its 
board of directors. He is also a stockholder in the Farmers Elevator Com- 
pany at Brandon. He has served on the school board of his district and 
has always been interested in the success of the schools. He and his family 
have long been identified with the social and religious life of the commun- 
ity, and are held in the highest, regard by all who know them. Politicall}', 
he is a Prohil:)itionist, while the Lutheran Free church claims his religious 
affiliation. 



HERMAN GROXWOLD. 

Herman Gronwold, a well-kno\Mi and substantial farmer of Grant 
county, the proprietor of a fine farm of one hundred and sixty acres in 
.Vorth Ottawa township, is a native of Germany, but has been a resident of 
the United States since 1890 and of Grant county since 1904. He was 
born on a farm in East Germany on August 14, 1868, son of Herman and 
Annie ( Ivlausen ) Gronwold, natives of that same district, the former a 
well-to-do nurseryman, whu spent all tlieir lives in their native land, the 
father dying in 1876 and the mother in 1894. They were the parents of five 
children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the fourth in tirder of 
birth, the others being as follow: Ranski, who died in infancy; John, who 
came to the United States in 1889 and has been for years a well-knuwn 
resident of Gorton township, Grant ciiunty ; Dick, who died in infancv, and 
Joran, who also died in infancy. 

Reared on the home farm in his native land, Herman Gronwold 
received his schooling in the schools of that neighborhood aixl rcr.iained at 
home, assisting in the work of the nursery, which was maintained for some 
time after his father's death, until he was twenty-two \'ears of age. In 
1890 he came to the E'uited States, following his elder brotlier, John, who 
had come over the year before, and settled in Butler county, Iowa, where 
he began as a farm laborer. Later he rented farms and operated them on 
his own account until 1904, when he came to Minnesota and settled in Grant 
county, where he ever since has made his home. L^pon coming out here 
Mr. Gronwold bought a cjuarter of a section of improved land in North 
Ottawa township and there established his home. When he took possession 
of the place the original homestead buildings were still standing on the farm, 
These he tore down and erected modern buildings in their place, planted a 



l86 DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

grove, now an attractive feature of the farm, and he and his family are 
very pleasantly and comfortably situated. In addition to his general farm- 
ing, ]\Ir. Gronwold has ever gi\en proper attention to the development of 
the general interests of the community in which he lives and is a stockholder 
in the elevator companies at Norcross and at Herman. He is a Republican 
and gives a good citizen's attention to local ci\ic affairs, but has never been 
a seeker after ofifice. 

On October 4, 1895, while living in Iowa, Herman Gronwold was 
united in marriage to Elsie Sanders, who also was born in Germany and 
who came to this country with her parents, William Sanders and wife, the 
family settling in Butler county, Iowa, and to this union four children have 
been born, Herman, Sadie, ^^'illiam and Harm, all of whom are at home. 
i\Ir. and Mrs. Gronwold are members of the Evangelical church and take 
a warm interest in the general welfare of the community in which they live. 



E\'ERT BRUSE. 



One of the well-known and successful farmers and stock men of Gor- 
ton township. Grant county, Minnesota, is Evert Bruse, who was born in 
Germany on November 17, 1852, being the son of John and Lena Bruse. 
John and Lena Bruse were also natives of Germany and there received 
their education in the public schools, grew to manhood and womanhood 
and were married. There the father died and sometime afterward the 
widow left the home of her birth and young womanhood and came to the 
United States. She located in Butler county, Iowa, in 1883, where she 
remained many years, and died in North Dakota in 1912, at the age of 
ninety-three years. To John and Lena Bruse were born the following chil- 
dren : Adolph, Tina, Ferdinand, Evert, Ella and John. Adolph and Ella 
are now deceased. 

Evert Bruse received his education in the public schools of Germany 
and there grew to manhood. He remained a resident of the land of his 
birth until he was twenty-five years of age, when, in 1877, he decided to 
come to America. On his arrival in the United States he came direct to 
Iowa and located in Butler county, where he engaged in farming. Later 
he purchased one hundred and si.xty acres of land in Kossuth county, Iowa, 
which he sold in 1903 and came to Minnesota. He purchased four hun- 
dred and eighty acres of land in North Ottawa township. Grant county. 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. l8j 

and is now the owner of six hundred and forty acres of land in Xcjrth 
Ottawa and Gorton township, and one hundred and sixt}- acres in Xurth 
Dakota. He has made many vakiable improvements on his farm, which, 
for the most part are under a high state of cultivation. He is engaged in 
general farming and stock raising, in which he has been most successful. 
He is a firm believer in intensive farming and the most thorough cultiva- 
tion, keeps the best of stock and his farm and buildings are in a high state 
of repair. 

Evert Bruse is identified with the Republican party and has ahvavs 
taken an active interest in local affairs, although he does not aspire to office. 
He believes in high-class public improvements and the maintenance of good 
roads and the best of schools. Having been educated in the German schools, 
he fully realizes their need and importance. 

Evert Bruse was united in marriage, in 1874, to Flora \'iland. who 
Avas born in Germany in 1859 and there became the wife of the subject. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Bruse have been born the following children: Ubbe B., 
John, Lena, Alice. Ferdinand, Ida, Henry, Evert, Adolph and Flora. Adolph 
is now deceased. Mr. and ]Mrs. Bruse are active members of the Reformed 
church and take much interest in all church work. They and their familv 
have long been prominent in the social and religious life of the community, 
where they are held in the highest regard and esteem by all who know 
them. They devote much time to their home life, yet they ha\e the time 
for their friends, whom thev entertain in the most kindh- wav. 



OLE J. PLETAN. 



One of the young farmers of Stony Brook township who is con- 
tented with his native locality is Ole J. Pletan. who was born on the old 
homestead in this township, June 14, 1879. He is a son of Jens Pletan 
and wife, who are mentioned in a separate sketch in this volume. 

Ole J. Pletan grew up on the home farm, where he worked during 
the crop season when he became of proper age, attending the local district 
schools in the winter time. After leaving his father's roof-tree, he started 
farming for himself and now owns a well-kept place of one hundred acres 
in section 28. Stony Brook township, on which he is making a good start 
as a general farmer. 

Politicallv, he is a Republican and served his township as constable at 



l88 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

one time, performing his duties faithfully. He belongs to the United 
Lutheran church. 

Mr. Pletan was married, in 1907, to Sophia Asleson, who was born 
on the farm where she still lives, the place being now owned by her husband. 
Here she grew up and was educated in- the local public schools. She 
is a daughter of Narve and Ambjor Asleson, both natives of Norway 
and early settlers of Stony Brook township, the father taking up a home- 
stead here of one hi^mdred and sixty acres, to which he later added eighty 
acres. He improx'ed a good farm and here spent the rest of his life, dying 
about 1899. His widow, who survived until 1902, was married a second 
time, her last husband being Knute K. Folken, of Stony Brook township. 
She was the mother of two children, Laura and Sophia, by her iirst mar- 
riage and one child, Alvin, by her second marriage. To Mr. and Mrs. Pletan 
three children ha\e been born, James Norlin, Hershel Antone (died when 
two vears old I, and Stanlev ]\Ierton. 



ERICK X. BERGAN. 



Erick X. Bergan, a well-known and substantial farmer of Stony Brook 
township. Grant county, is a native of the kingdom of Norway, born on a 
farm near Xewmadahl on August 20, 1868. He is a son of Nils O. and 
Leve Bergan, both natives of that same country, the former torn in 1821 
and the latter in 1823. Nils O. Bergan was a farmer and landowner, who 
died in his native land in November, 1899. His wife had preceded him to 
the grave about two years. They were the parents of seven children, of 
whom the subject of this sketch was the last born, the others being as fol- 
low : Sigrid, who married Ole Skoglund and Hves in Roseau county, this 
state; Barbara, who married Hans Fagri and lives near Wadena, this state; 
Ole, a farmer of Grant county; Knute, a miller, living at Elbow Lake; 
Nels, who lives on the old home place in Xorway, the only one of the chil- 
dren who did not come to America, and Aml)ear, who married Xarve 
Asleson and lives in Stonv Brook township. 

E. X. Bergan was reared on the home farm in Norway and recei^-ed 
his schooling in the neighborhood schools, continuing to live at home, assist- 
ing in the labors of the farm and working at the carpenter's trade until he 
was twenty-two years of age. In 1891, he came to the United States, pro- 
ceeding to Wisconsin, where, in Rock county, he remained about four 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 189 

months, in the fall of that same year coming to Alinnesota and locating in 
Grant count}-. For eight years after coming here Air. Bergan found employ- 
ment on the Soo railroad and then spent a year in a tlour-mill in Clay county. 
He then returned to his native land and there married Ivari Brevig. daugh- 
ter of Ole Brevig, who died there a few years ago. \\"hile working on the 
railroad in Grant county Mr. Bergan had bought a farm of one hundred 
and sixty acres in section 21 of Stony Brook township and, upon return- 
ing to this country with his wife, established his home on the same. The 
place was partly improved, but since he entered upon possession he has 
added largely to the improvement and now has a very well-equipped farm 
plant and is recognized as one of the progressive farmers of the neigh- 
borhood. He gives considerable attention to the general business affairs 
of the community and is a member of the board of directors of the Stony 
Brook Telephone Company. In his political attiliation Mr. Bergan is a 
Republican, but has never been a seeker after public office. He and his 
wife are members of the Norwegian Lutheran church and take a proper 
interest in the general good works of the community. They have four chil- 
dren, Leonard, Paulina, Orville and Arnold. 



PETER ERICKSOX. 



Peter Erickson, a well known and prosperous citizen of Stony Brook 
township, Grant county. ]\Iinnesota, was born in Dahlany, Sweden, on Janu- 
ary I, 1843, being the son of Lars and Annie Christine (Olson) Erickson. 

Lars and Annie Cdiristine Erickson were born in Sweden and there 
recei\'ed their education in the public schools, grew to manhood and woman- 
hood and were married. They li\ed their lives in the native countr}- and 
there died some years ago. The father was a tailor by trade, at which he 
worked, in connection with the management of the farm that he owned. 
He was considered a successful tiller of the soil as well as a prosperous tailor. 
He and his wife were the parents of the following children: Erick, Annie, 
Peter, Brita and one that died in infancy. Erick and Annie remained resi- 
dents of Sweden and Brita died when Init a small girl. The family were 
prominent in their native land and took much interest in the social and 
religious life of the commimity in which they lived. They were highly 
respected by all and honored for their many good deeds of kindness and 
charitv. 



190 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

Peter Erickson received his education in the schools of his native country 
and there grew to manhood, being reared on the home farm. As a lad he 
assisted his father with tlie work on the home place and early in life decided 
that he would some time come to America, where he could obtain a home 
for himself. ?iluch he had heard of the new land and the opportunities that 
awaited the ambitious and wortliy young man. In 1865, at the age of 
twenty-two years, he left the home of his birth and the scenes of his child- 
hood and came to /'vmerica. On arriving in the United States he located 
at Lockport, near Chicago, where he worked in a stone quarry for three 
months. He then went to St. Paul. Minnesota, where he engaged with a 
railroad and worked for some months near Duluth, Superior and Fond du 
Lac. He later engaged as a farm hand, near Shakopee, Minnesota, where 
he remained until the winter, \vhen he went into the pineries. In the spring 
he located in ]\Tinneapolis, where he ;vorked in a saw-mill for a time and 
then removed to Spring Gro\e, Minnesota, where he worked at grubbing 
and clearing land for the pioneers of that section. It was while a resident 
of this section that he was married. In 1879 he came to Grant county, 
Minnesota, and here homesteaded eighty acres in section 30, Stony Brook 
township. The tract at that time was a wild prairie, without improvements 
of anv kind. There was no town of Wendell and the neighbors were far 
apart. After locating on the land, Mr. Erickson constructed a cellar, on top 
of which he built a low log hut, with sod roof. It was in this that he and 
his family lived for some time. He at once began the task of breaking and 
improving the land. He later purchased forty acres more land, which he 
developed and improved, and here he has engaged in general farming and 
stock raising and has become one of the successful fanners of the com- 
munity. 

As a young man Peter Erickson was united in marriage to Annie Elling- 
son, a native of Norway and the daughter of Erick Ellingson, a well-known 
pioneer of the ounty. To this union the following children were born : Ed, 
Annie, Alice, Peter and Albert. Ed is the manager of the elevator at Berit, 
Minnesota : Annie is the wife of Ole Lilleby and resides in Red Lake, Minne- 
sota; Alice, became the wife of Ole Hagen and Hves near Bismark, North 
Dakota ; Peter is a wheat buyer at Wild Rose, South Dakota, and Albert is 
on the liome farm. 

Peter Erickson and wife are active members of the Lutheran church 
and take much interest in all social and religious work of the community. 
Thev are prominent in all local affairs and are held in the highest regard 



DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNE*3TA. I9I 

by all who know them. Politically, ]Mr. Erickson is a Republican and has 
always taken much interest in the civic life of the township, casting influence 
in the township and the county for all things that were for the best interests 
of the people. Being a man of broad experiences and most excellent judg- 
ment, his advice has often Ijeen sought in matters of public moment. 



OLE C. RUSTAXD. 



One would be compelled to search a good while to find a more pains- 
taking general farmer than Ole C. Rustand, of Stony Brook township. Grant 
county. He was born in Norway, August 3, 1868, and is a son of Chris- 
tian O. and Annie Rustand, both natives of Norway, from which country 
they came to America in 1879, locating at Herman, Grant county, taking 
up a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres in North Ottawa township. 
Christian O. Rustand was a man of energy and good judgment and he 
prospered, adding to his original homestead until he owned six hundred and 
forty acres of valuable land, on which he spent the rest of his life, engaged 
in general farming on an extensive scale. He died on the homestead here 
in 1909 at the age of sixty-nine years; his widow survives at the age of 
seventy-three years. To these parents the following children were born : 
Bertha is the wife of I. A. Haugen, a farmer of Elbow Lake townhsip ; 
Ole C, of this sketch; Ole K. was next in order of birth; Julia is the wife 
of Charley Larson, a farmer of North Ottawa township; Martha is the 
widow of Charles Torgeson and lives in North Dakota; Andrew and IMads 
live at home. 

Ole C. Rustand was reared on the home farm in Grant county, being 
but eleven years old when his parents brought him to ^Minnesota. He 
received a common school education and also attended Oxberg Seminary at 
^Minneapolis. He has devoted his life to farming and in 1889, purchased 
the homestead, which he later sold and bought two hundred and forty 
acres, and now owns more than four hundred acres of excellent farming 
land, on which he has put all the improvements, including an excellent 
group of buildings. He carries on general farming and stock raising on 
an extensive scale and is one of the leading farmers of his township. 

Politically, Mr. Rustand is a Republican and has served as assessor 
four years in North Ottawa township and as clerk six years. He has also 
been a member of the school board in Stony Brook township and has been 



TOLA 



S AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 



cliairman of the township board for about seven years, which position he 
still hdlds. He is active and influential in local public affairs. 

^[r. Rustand was married, in 1894, to Inga Anderson, who was born 
in Xurwav in 1872. She is a daughter of Iver and Karn .\nderson. who 
came to Grant county, Minnesota, in 1893. the father Ijuying eighty acres 
of railroad land, which he later sold and took up a homestead in North 
Dakota. That he also sold, then bought a farm in Stony Brook township. 
Grant county, but later sold it to his son Ole, and is now living retired in 
the village of Wendell. His wife also survives. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Rustand the following children have been born: 
Annie, Mabel, Hildora, Josephine, Clarence, Walter, David, Leonard, 
Stanford, Tenny and Ervin, all of whom are living. Hildora and Josephine 
attended high school at Wendell and the rest of the children were educated 
in the county schools. 



gp:orge stromlund. 

George Stromlund, a successful business man and banker of Nelson, 
was born in Sweden on ]\Iarch 29, 1876, the son of Sven and }>Iaria (Jaren- 
son) Stromlund, both of whom were natives of Sweden. 

Svm and Maria Stromlund were educated in their native land and 
there grew to manhood and womanhood and were married. They made 
that country their home until 1891 when they came to the United States, 
proceeding directly to Minnesota and locating at Garfield village, in Douglas 
county. They remained there but a few years, at the end of which time they 
returned to Sweden, where Sven Stromlund died. They were the parents 
of seven children, only one of whom, the subject of this sketch, is living in 
Douglas county. 

George Stromlund completed the work in the common schools in his 
native country and was fifteen years of age when he came to Douglas county 
with his parents. For a time he worked as a farm hand and then entered 
a store at Garfield where he was employed for one year as a clerk. He 
then clerked in a store at Alexandria for a time and then entered the employ- 
ment of C. H. Larson, general merchant, at Nelson, and was thus engaged 
for eight years, during which lime he became a director in the Nelson State 
Bank, at its organization in 1907, and in 1909 was elected to his present 
position as cashier of the bank. In connection with his duties in the bank, 
Mr. Stromlund is interested in farming, owning sixty acres that adjoins the 




iTKO.AlI.rXI) 




XEI-SOX STATE KANK. 



DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. T93 

grounds of the bank. He is interested in general farming and stock raising, 
has an ideal farm and believes in intensive farming. 

In 1905 George Stromlund was united in marriage to Hannah M. Erick- 
son, who was horn at Nelson, the daughter of Olaf Erickson and wife, earh- 
pioneers of Douglas county. 

^Ir. Stromlund has always taken an active part in the affairs of the 
community. His judgment and ability being recognized, he is held in high 
regard by all. For a number of years he was a councilman in Nelson and 
for a time was president of the village. He is treasurer of the Nelson 
Creamer}- Association, as well as treasurer of the school board of consoli- 
dated school district No. 103. He and his wife are active members of the 
Swedish Lutheran church. 



CHRISTIAN C. GRINDER. 

- Christian C. Grinder, a progressive farmer of Stony Brook township, 
who was born under an alien flag, but who has been loval to the Stars 
and Stripes since coming here, was Ixirn in Norway on January 10, 1858. 
He is a son of Christian and Ulricka Grinder, both natives of Nonvav, where 
they spent their earlier years and were married. They immigrated to 
America in 1868, locating in Rice county, Minnesota, but moved to Grant 
county in 1871, taking up a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres in 
Elbow Lake township. This they improved, erecting buildings and set- 
ting out a grove, and here they spent the rest of their lives, the father 
dying on November 6, 1896, and the mother in October, 1894, the former 
at the age of seventy-two and the latter at the age of sixtv-three. Their 
children were named as follow: Tosten, Ole, Herman, Giristian C, Olaf, 
Olive, Axel (who died while the family was en route to America and was 
buried in the .\tlantic ocean ) , L^lrich and ^lary, twins. 

Christian C. Grinder grew up in Norway, where he was educated in 
the public schools, and also attended school three years after coming to Rice 
county, ^Minnesota. He has devoted his life to farming. When twenty-one 
3^ears old, in 1879, he took up a homestead in section 34, Stony Brook town- 
ship. He went to work \\ith a will, developed it into a farm, and he 
has added to it until he now owns three hundred and twenty acres, on 
which may be seen a suljstantial group of buildings and a large grove. He 
is carrying on general farming and stock raising successfully. 



194 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

Politically, Air. Grinder is a Republican. He has been clerk of the 
local school Ijoard during the past thirty years, also a member of the board 
of supervisors for many years, acting as chairman of the same most of the 
time. He belongs to the .Synod Lutheran church of Wendell. 

Mr. Grinder was married on March 14, 1880, to Christina Nelson, who 
was born in Norway in 1862. She is a daughter of Elling and Annie Nel- 
son, l)oth natives of Norway, from which country they came to Minnesota 
in 1868, settling at Spring Grove, moving on to Grant county in 1877. Here 
the father took up a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres in Stuny 
Brook township, to which he added land from time to time until he owned 
four hundred acres, and here he and his wife died. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Grinder nine children were bom, namely: Charles, Ulda (deceased), 
Adolph, Olive (deceased), Elma, Oscar, Clara, Elmer and Arthur. 



HALVOR LARSON KAASA. 

One of the older agriculturists of Stony Brook township. Grant county, 
is Halvor Larson Kaasa, who was torn in Norway, August 18, 1842. He 
is a son of Lars and Karn (Olsen) Kaasa, who spent their earlier lives 
in Norway, coming to Winneshiek county, Iowa, in 1867. The}- moved from 
there to Albert Lea, Freeborn county, Alinnesota, in 1870, and to Grant 
county in 1874, bu3dng eighty acres in Elbow Lake township, and on this 
farm the father died in 1881, at the age of sixty-six years; his widow 
survived until 1891, dying at the age of seventy-eight years. Five children 
were born to them, namely: Annie, deceased; Halvor Larson, of this 
sketch; Rena, Gunel and Ole. 

Halvor L. Kaasa spent his boyhood in Norway, where he attended 
school and where he ser\-ed for some time in the regular army. There he 
was married, in 1865, to Gunel Haustad. They immigrated to America in 
1868, locating in Winneshiek county, Iowa, where they remained until 1875, 
when they came to Freeborn county, Minnesota. In 1878 they came to 
Grant county and took up a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres in 
Elbow Lake township, which Mr. Kaasa later sold, after which he removed 
to Stony Brook township, in 1899, buying one hundred and sixty acres, 
to which he later added one hundred and twenty acres. He now owns one 
of the best farms in the township, consisting of two hundred and se\enty 
acres. He has made many important improvements, including the erection 



DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. I95 

of good buildings and the setting out of a large grove. He is a general 
farmer. 

Politicallv, Mr. Kaasa is a Republican and has served on the school 
board in Elbow Lake township and as road overseer in Stony Brook town- 
ship. He is a member of the Synod Lutheran church. He has belonged 
to four different churches since leaving Norway. 

^Ir. Kaasa has been twice married. His first wife, who died in 1884, 
bore him the following children : Halvor and Hans, twins, the latter of 
whom died while the family were crossing the Atlantic ocean to -\merica; 
Kam: Hans, second; Ole, Lars, Andus, John and Gena; there were also 
three others, Lars, Genna and Theodore, who are deceased. In 1885 the 
father of the above-named children married for his second wife, Sarah 
Strand, who was born in Norway, August 10, 1862, and to this union the 
following children have been bom: Kena (deceased), Carl, Nettie, Ole. 
Henry, Theodore, Selmer, Laura, Selma (deceased), Gilbert. Alfred and 
Palmer. 



OLE ASLESON. 



Ole Asleson, a farmer of Stony Brook township. Grant county, was 
born in Swift county, ^linnesota, June 10, 1876. He is the son of Asle and 
Mar}' (Bjornrud) Asleson, both natives of Norway, where they spent 
their earlier years, immigrating to Minnesota in 1871 and locating in Kandi- 
yohi count}-. They moved on to Swift county in 1875 and in 1878 came 
to Grant county, ^Ir. Asleson buying one hundred and sixty acres of rail- 
road land in Stony Brook township, also forty acres of school land in an 
adjoining section, thus making a farm of two hundred acres, which he 
improved and operated along general lines until his death, which occurred 
on ^larch 11. 1913, at the age of seventy-six years. He became one of the 
leading farmers of his township and was well and favorably known. His 
wife preceded him to the grave in 1906, at the age of sixty-two \ears. 
To them the following children were born: Even, Asle, Jr., and Kjerstie 
are all deceased; Rena, I\Iar}-. Belle, Ole are living; Edward is deceased; 
Emma is living and Laura is deceased. 

Ole Asleson was reared on the homestead here and received a. common 
school education. He has always engaged in general farming and stock 
raising on the home place, which he now owns and to which he has added 
another forty, making in all a fine farm of two hundred and fortv acres, 



196 DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

which is under excellent improvements. His father erected good build- 
ings and set out a large grove on the same, but the son also erected a modern 
home. He is a breeder of thoroughbred Holstein cattle, his fine herd being 
admired by all who are interested in good stock. 

Politically, Mr. Asleson is a Republican. He has been a member of the 
local school board for a period of fifteen years and is now one of the 
supervisors of his township, which position he has held for four years. 
He belongs to the Spiod Lutheran church to which his parents also belonged. 

Mr. Asleson was married. in 1903 to Clara Stave, who was born in 
Ottertail county. Minnesota, August 17, 1878. She is a daughter of Chris- 
tian P. Stave, mention of whom is made in a separate sketch in this 
work. To Mr. and Mrs. Asleson the following children have been born, 
all living; Ernest Arthur, Muriel Constance, Lulu Idella, Clifford Orion, 
Borghild Gurina, and Waldemar Lester. 



MELVIX LEROY ADAMS. 

One of the best known and most progressive and public-spirited citizens 
of Grant county is ^Melvin L. .\dams, of Wendell. He was born at Angola, 
Lidiana, August 22, 1854, and is a son of George H. and Julia (Furry) 
Adams. His maternal grandparents, Jacob and Lucy Furry, were pioneers 
of Steuben county, Indiana, but later in life removed to Hillsdale county, 
Michigan, where her death occurred. The parents of the subject of this 
sketch were nati\es of the state of Xew York, the fathers birth having 
occurred on September 24, 181 7, and the mother's on December 28, 1831. 
They were brought to Indiana when young by their parents and were married 
there on December 18, 1852. The father was a wagon-maker, carpenter and 
general mechanic. He remained in Angola, Indiana, until 1858, when he 
moved to Alger county, Michigan, where he remained until about 1881, 
when he came to Grant county, Minnesota, to join his son, M. L. Here he 
entered one hundred and sixty acres of whole prairie land, which he developed 
into a farm, on which he spent the rest of his life, dying on August 24, 1907; 
his wife preceded him to the grave on December 12, 1888. They were mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian church. They were parents of four children, namely: 
Almira married L. H. Fowler and they live in Alger county, Michigan; 
Melvin L. of this sketch; Clarence died in Butte, Montana; Sylvester died 
in Illinois. 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 197 

Melvin L. Adams received his edncation in the pubHc schools of Mich- 
igan and was reared on the farm. He came to Minnesota in 1878 and set- 
tled in Grant county, homesteading one hundred and sixty acres of prairie 
land in Lawrence township. He built a shanty and by hard work developed 
a good farm, later purchasing one hundred and sixty acres additional in the 
same township. He remained on liis farm until retiring from active life, 
in November, 19 13. when he moved to the village of ^^"endell, buying his 
present home. He was very successful as a general farmer. 

Air. Adams was married on January 19, 1887, to Lula Stickney, who 
was born on October i, 1868, and died on Augitst 2, 1890. To their union 
two children were born, Roy, born November 16, 1887. and Frances, bom 
November 18, 1888; both died on the same day in 1895, of diphtheria. JMr. 
Adams was again married December 3, 1892, to Kari Asleson," a native of 
Norway, whose father, Asle Asleson, was an early settler of Grant county. 
He was bom in Sigdal, Norway, where he grew up and married Sigri Gun- 
derson. In 1S71 they came to America and settled in ^^'innishiek county, 
Iowa, where they lived on a farm five years. In 1876 tliey came to Grant 
county, ^Minnesota, and entered a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres, 
in what is no\v Stony Brook township, where the town of \\'endell now 
stands. He erected a small shanty and began improving his land. His wife 
died during the first winter (1877). After proving up, he sold out and 
returned to Norway, where he spent three years, then returned to Minnesota, 
where he spent the rest of his life, dying when past sixty years of age. His 
family consisted of seven children, namely: Jens lives in Crookston; Nor- 
way, who was a homesteader in Grant county, died here; Julia married Nels 
N. Brevig and they live in Stony Brook township; Ole lives in Winnishiek 
county, Iowa; Christ is farming in North Dakota; Gilbert died in infancy in 
Norwav: Kari. wife of Air. Adams. 

To Mr. Adams and his second wife five children have been born, namely: 
Stella is a graduate of Elbow Lake high school and has taught two years; 
Albert, who was educated in Elbow Lake high school, is a carpenter; Julia is 
now attending the Elbow Lake high school ; Clara and Alice are at home. 

Politically, Mr. Adams is a Republican. He has served as supervisor, 
being chairman of the board ; as township clerk and school clerk for twenty- 
four years in succession, and as county commissioner for two and one-half 
terms. He is a member of the Masonic order and the Modern Woodmen 
of America. His wife belongs to the Lutheran church. 

Lucv Furry, maternal grandmother of Mr. Adams, was bom in \'er- 



IQX DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

mont, July 2j, 1708, and was married near Catskill. Her husband died 
when li\ing near Toledo, Ohio, and, with her cliildren, she moved to Indi- 
ana, locating near Pleasant Lake. Steuben county, buying a farm, which she 
paid for with money she earned by weaving. She was a woman of much 
courage and ability and reared her family in comfort. Her death occurred 
in 1877, at the age of eighty years. She had eleven children, named as fol- 
low : Freeman, Pernina, ]Maria, Lydia, George, Eliza, Richard, Lucinda, 
Julia, Francis and Elmer. 



JENS PLETAN. 



One of the best-known citizens of Stony Brook township, Grant county, 
is Jens Pletan, who was born in Norway, March 6, 1842. His parents 
lived and died in that country, and there he grew to manhood and attended 
school, and married. In 1869 he came to America, locating in Winnishiek 
county, Iowa, but the following year came on to Grant county, Minnesota, 
and took up a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres in Stony Brook 
township, to which he added until he had three hundred and twenty acres. 
He has added all improvements on the same, including an excellent group 
of buildings, and has been very successful as a general farmer. Politically, 
he is a Republican, and he belongs to the United Lutheran church. He 
was married in Norway, in April, 1869, to Sigred Nelson, who was born 
in Norway, December 8, 1839, and who died in her native land. Eight chil- 
dren were born to Mr. and Mrs. Pletan, namely: (i) Julia, born in 1869, 
is the wife of Gunder Ashland, of Iowa, and they have these children, 
Christ, Isabel, John, Tilda, Edward, Ole, Christina, Carl and one that 
died in infancy. (2) Nils, who was born March 14, 1871, in Ottertail 
county, grew up on the home farm in Grant county and attended the dis- 
trict schools. He is now the owner of a good farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres in Grant county and two hundred and forty acres in Ottertail 
county, but rents his land out. Politically, he is a Republican and served 
as supervisor in Stony Brook township. He was marrieil, in 1909, to Net- 
tie Thoreson and to them one child was born, Andrew, who was drowned 
in 1913, when nearly four years old: the wife and mother died on August 
16, 191 5. (3) Edward was born in Grant county in 1873, grew up on 
the home farm, attended the public schools and is now farming in North 
Dakota. He married Julia StaA-e and they have the following children: 
Rudolph, Constance, Hulda, Joseph, Paul, Clifford, Elvina, Christopher, 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. I99 

Clara, Xorman. (4) Gilbert was born in 1874, was reared on the home 
farm and attended the public schools, and is now engaged in farming in 
Stony Brook township, Grant county. He married Ida Stave and they 
have four children, Signe, Cora, Kenneth and Margaret (5) Bertha was 
born on December 2, 1876, grew up on the homestead and attended the 
local rural schools. She married Ole Lillemoen, of Stony Brook township, 
and they have four children, Stella, Edna, Howard and Juliet. (6) Ole 
was born on June 14, 1S79, grew up on the homestead and attended the 
public schools. He is farming in Stony Brook township. He married 
Sophia Asleson and they have the following children: Norlin, x\ntonie 
(who was drowned) and Stanley. {7) Ingeborg was born on March 2, 
1 88 1, grew up on the home farm and attended the district schools. He 
married Nicole Lilebo, of Saskatchewan, Canada, and they have five chil- 
dren, George, Serena, Leonard, Enoch and Otto. (8) Grimder was born 
on I\Iarch 29, 1883, grew up on the home farm, attended the rural schools 
and is now farming on his place of one hundred and twenty acres in 
Stony Brook township, but lives at home. He was married, in 19 10, to 
Selma Anderson, who was horn in Stony Brook township in 1893, ^ daugh- 
ter of Sven and Julia Anderson, of Stony Brook township. Gunder Pletan 
and wife have the following children : Burnett, Gladys, \'erna and 
Judith. 



OTTO KUCHEXBECKER. 

Otto Kuchenbecker, a well-known farmer and stock man of Erdahl 
township. Grant county, ]\Iinnesota, was born in Germany on October 18, 
1874, being the son of John and ]\Iatilda Kuchenbecker. John and Matilda 
Kuchenbecker were born in Germany, where they received their education in 
-the public schools and there grew to manhood and womanhood and were 
married. As a young man, I\lr. Kuchenbecker learned the shoemaker's trade, 
at which he worked for many years. During the war with France in 1870 
and 1 87 1, he served in the German army and saw much active service. He 
and his family continued to reside in the fatherland until 1881, when they 
came to America. On their arrival in the United States, the}^ located in 
Plymouth county, Iowa, and there the father worked as a farm hand for 
some time. He later homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres of land, all 
of which was wild prairie. Here he built a small frame shanty, in which 
thev lived for some vears. In time, he became a successful farmer and stock 



200 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

raiser and built a splendid frame hnuse and other buildings. Here he lived 
until 1888, -when he sold the farm and moved to South Dakota, purchasing 
one hundred and sixty acres of land near Madison. He at once started to 
develop and improve the place, but died the next year. The widow is still 
li\-ing on the farm in South Dakota. The\- were the parents of eleven chil- 
dren, of whom -Otto is the eldest. 

Otto Kuchenbecker received his education in the public schools of Iowa 
and South Dakota and grew to manhood on the home farm. He was but 
fifteen years of age at the time of the death of his father, yet, being the eldest 
of the family, he took charge of the place for his mother and operated it for 
four years. At that time he gave over the operation of the place to the 
other members of the family and began farming for himself. He rented a 
farm near Madison, South Dakota, where he remained until he was twenty- 
five years of age, when he removed to Davidson county. South Dakota, and 
purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land. The tract at that time was 
all wild land and without improvements of any kind. He later bought the 
adjoining farm of one hundred and sixty acres, which had been improved 
with buildings. Here he engaged in fanning for twelve years and then, in 
1912, sold the farm and came to JMinnesota. Here he purchased three hun- 
dred and sixty acres in Erdahl township, Grant count}-, and has developed 
and improved the farm with splendid buildings. He built a new barn, fifty- 
two by eighty feet, which is especially arranged for the handling and the 
feeding of much stock. His granary is one of the best in the community, 
and he has a fine garage, in which to store his seven-passenger Studebaker 
automobile. He has planted over eighteen thousand trees and has a splendid 
young grove. 

Otto Kuchenbecker devotes the greater part of his time to the breeding 
and raising of fine stock, owning a herd of high grade stock and always keep- 
ing a pure-blooded sire. He now has in his herd over eighty fine cattle and 
many hogs, the latter being pure-blood Duroc-Jerseys and a registered sire. 
His stock is recognized as among the best in the county, his special effort 
being to breed to the highest standard of perfection. 

In Xovember, 1899, Otto Kuchenbecker was united in marriage to Min- 
nie Franklin, a native of .South Dakota, and to this union the following chil- 
dren have been bom : Altha, Emma, ^Nlay. Tillie, Earle, Lora, Hildred, Clar- 
ence and Ethel. Mr. and Mrs. Kuchenbecker are prominent in the social 
life of the community and are held in the highest regard and esteem by all 
who know them. They are most hospitable and enjoy entertaining their 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. JO I 

neighbors and friends. Their home is often the scene of happy gatherings 
and the yoiuig people of the family receive every care and attention. ]\Ir. 
and Mrs. Kuchentecker are most kind and indulgent parents and wish to 
give their children every possible advantage. 

Politically. Otto I-Zuchenbecker is identified with the Repuljlican party 
and has taken much interest in the ci\-ic life of the township and the countv. 
He has served as a meml>er of the township board of supervisors and as a 
member of the school board in district Xo. 22. He is a stockholder in the 
Farmers Elevator Company at Erdahl and has for some years served as a 
member of the board of directors. He takes much interest in the success 
of company and has had much to do with its success. 



(DTTO C. THROXSOX. 

Otto C. Thronson, one of the well-known and successful farmers of 
Erdahl township, Grant county, Minnesota, was born in that township on 
INIay 28, 1874, being the son of Carl F. and Anna Thronson. Carl F. Thron- 
son was born in Ringerike, Xorway, on June 17, 1842. There he and his 
wife grew to manhood and womanhood, were educated in the public schools, 
and were there married on JNIa}- 8, 1867. One year after their marriage the 
yoimg couple decided to come to America and on their arri\-al in the United 
States they came to Minnesota, locating in Grant county. Mr. Thronson 
homesteaded in Erdahl township, where he and his family endured the early 
life in true pioneer style. Many were their hardships at that time, yet they 
were brave, and in time Mr. Thronson became one of the prominent and suc- 
cessful farmers and stock men of the county. He was most firm in his 
advocacy of civic progress, religion and' temperance reform, yet he granted 
the same liberty of thought to all who dilTered from him on the important 
questions. His life was a most upright one and he had the confidence and 
the respect of all who knew him. His life was an active one; the greater 
part of it being devoted to agriculture. A few years before his death, in 
1 916, he retired from the activities of the farm life and resided in Evansville. 
He and his wife, who still survives him. were the parents of twelve chil- 
dren, eleven of whom are living, namely: T. C, who is a well-known farmer 
of Douglas county; Ingvald, of Evansville; Christian, who is a commercial 
traveler; Otto C, who lives on the home farm in Erdahl township; Emil, in 
the implement business at Kramer, X'orth Dakota; Mrs. David Davidson, of 



202 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

Battle Mew, North Dakota; Airs. S. A. Satterlee, of Evansville; Hans, of 
White Earth, North Dakota, where he is engaged in the grain business; Anna 
and Carrie, of E\ans\'ille; Hjahner, cashier of the bank at Kanmer, North 
Dakota; OH\e, who died at the age of one year. 

Otto C. Thronson received his education in the pubhc schools of Erdahl 
township, but was unable to attend school to any great extent, owing to ill 
health. He grew to manhood on the home farm and engaged in farming 
with his father until 1900, when he purchased the farm, of two hundred and 
forty acres, and here he has engaged in general farming and stock raising, 
in which he lias been most successful. 

On July 3, 1 90 1, Otto C. Thronson was united in marriage to Alice 
Sorknes, the daughter of Peter and Bertha (Wold) Sorknes. Her parents 
were born in Norway and there recei\'ed their education, and there they 
grew to manhood and womanhood and were married. They later decided 
to come to America and after their arrival in the United States they came 
direct to Minnesota, locating in Pelican I^ke township, Grant county, where 
they lived for many years. The}' were among the early pioneers of the town- 
ship and had much to do with the social and religious development of the 
community. They later retired from the activities of farm life and now 
live at San Jacinto, California. Mr. Sorknes was a man of much prominence 
in the countv, and took much interest in the growth and the development of 
the district, where he and his wife were held in the highest regard and esteem. 

The years 1901 and 1902 were most unfortunate for Otto C. Thronson, 
owing to the failure of the crops, and he became discouraged and insisted 
that his father take the farm back. With the encouragement that he received 
from his father, he kept the place, but went to North Dakota, where he home- 
steaded one hundred and sixty acres of land near White Earth, all of which 
was wild prairie. Here he built a small house and then left his wife to care 
for the place, while he returned to his farm in Grant county. He planted 
his crops and in due time reaped his harvest, which was a record breaker. 
In the fall of 1903 he rented his home fami and rejoined his family on his 
homestead in North Dakota, where he remained for one year and proved up 
on the place, when he returned to Grant county. He rented the farm in 
North Dakota for two years and then sold the place at ten dollars per acre. 
This, with the profits on his crops, enabled him to complete the payments on 
the home farm and make some valuable improvements. He remodeled the 
house and purchased one hundred and twenty acres more land. He now 
has three hundred and sixty acres of the best of land, all of which is under 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. .^03 

high cultivation ajid well improved. Here he is engaged in general farm- 
ing and stock raising, in which he has been very successful. He has a fine 
herd of sixty Shorthorn cattle, whicli are among the best in the township. 
For many years Mr. Thronson devoted his energies to grain farming, but for 
the past few years he has been devoting more time to the development of his 
herd of stock. He has completed a magnificent dairy barn, thirty-four by 
sixty feet in size, with full basement and a hay loft with capacity for one 
hundred tons of hay. The basement is of concrete walls, fioors and feed 
troughs. He has stancliion room for twenty-four head of cows and two 
calf pens are also furnished with stanchions. The barn is built with a view 
to the best sanitary conditions and shows that much care and attention has 
been given to its construction. 

To Otto C. and Ahce ( Sorknes) Thronson have been born five children, 
Carmen, Bernice, Willard, Lillian and Marjorie. ^Ir. and I\lrs. Thronson 
are active members of the Norwegian Lutheran church and take much inter- 
est in all church work. They have long been prominent in the social and 
religious life of the community and ]Mr. Thronson has always taken a keen 
interest in the civic Hfe of the township and the county. He served for a 
number of years as a member of the school board and as township super- 
visor, having resigned these positions when he was elected county commis- 
sioner, which position he held for two tenns. As a public official, Air. Thron- 
son has given the best of satisfaction and is held in the highest regard bv all. 
Tn addition to his other interests, he is a stockholder in tlie Erdahl Farmers 
Elevator. 



ANDREW O. BAH. 



Andrew O. Bah, a native of Norway and a well-known and successful 
farmer of Erdahl township. Grant county, Alinnesota, was born on June 2-. 
1861, Ijeing the son of Ole A. and Bertha Bah. Ole A. and Bertha Bah were 
also born in Norway and there received their education in the public schools, 
grew to manhood and womanhood and were married. They continued to 
li\e in the land of their nativity until 1870. wlien they decided to come to 
America, wliere they might make a home for themselves and their family. 
On their arrival in the United States they came direct to ^Minnesota, remain- 
ing for a few weeks at Preston, Fillmore county, visiting old friends and 
making preparations for their location. Here Mr. Bah purchased a team 
of oxen and wagon and, with this outfit, made the jouniey to Grant county. 



204 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

Here he homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres "^f land in section 2, 
Erdahl township, the tract at that time being all wild prairie, with no improve- 
ments. A dugout, with sod roof, was soon constructed and in this the 
family lived the lirst year and a half. A log house, fourteen by sixteen feet, 
was then constructed and roofed with sod from the plains. In this they 
lived for a number of years, until better and more substantial buildings could 
be erected. The first year Mr. Bah raised no crop, but devoted his time to- 
to the breaking of the soil, preparatory to planting a crop the next year, 
when he succeeded in harvesting some three acres of good wheat. He con- 
tinued ti) de\x-l(ip and improxe the place and engaged in general farming until 
the time of his death in 1891, at the age of sixty-four years. The widow 
died the next year at the age of sixty-one years. They were the parents of 
the following children: H. P., M. G., Sophia, Olaous, Minnie and Andrew, 
all of whom are now deceased with the exception of Olaous, who is a well 
known farmer of Erdahl township, and Andrew. Mr. and Mrs. Bah were 
well known in the social and the religious life of the community, and Mr. 
Bah took much interest in all local afifairs, and had much to' do with the 
growth and development of the township. He belonged to the Lutheran 
church. 

Andrev.' O. Bah received his education in the public schools of Erdahl 
township and grew to manhood on the home farm. He remained with his 
father until the latter's death, when he purchased the farm of the heirs and 
here he has continued to reside. He has done much in the way of develop- 
ment and impro\'ement, ha\'ing erected all of the splendid buildings now on 
the farm. His house is a fine modern building and the bam is thirty-six 
by sixty-two feet, with a full basement. He has a beautiful grove and a 
fine apple orchard, the most of which he has planted and cared for. Here 
he is engaged in general farming and stock raising and has been most suc- 
cessful. During the past few years he has been devoting much of his time 
to his stock and has a fine herd of cattle and many good hogs. 

In 1885 Andrew O. Bah was united in marriage to Isabelle Johnson, 
who was born in Iowa, where her parents had located on their arrival from 
Norwav. To this union the following children have been born : George, 
Anna, Ida and Nellie. George, a successful farmer of the township, mar- 
ried Ella Peterson and they are the parents of two children, Murrel and 
Vivian; Ida is the wife of Olaf Peterson, a well known farmer of North 
Dakota, and they are the parents of two children, Verna and Orvil ; Nellie 
is the wife of Elmer Peterson, a well-to-do fanner of Douglas county and 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 205 

they are the parents of two children, Roy and Inez. 3,Ir. and Mrs. Bah are 
active members of the Norwegian Lutheran church and take much interest 
in all church work, being prominent in the social and the religious life of the 
community, where they are held in the highest regard and esteem by all 
who know them. 

Politically, Andrew O. Bah is identified with the Republican party and 
has long been interested in the civic life of the township. For nine }-ears he 
was a member of the township board of supervisors and for fifteen years a 
member of the school board. He has aiwa^-s given the same careful atten- 
tion to his official duties that he did to his private aitairs. He took much 
interest in the development of the schools of the township and has ever been 
a strong advocate of substantial public improvements. He has used his 
influence in the promotion of all worthy causes that would advance the best 
interests of the township and the county. He is a stockholder in the Farm- 
ers Elevator Company at Erdahl and has had much to do with its success. 



HEXRY yi MARTIXSOX. 

One of the promising young farmers of Sanford township. Grant county, 
is Henrv ]\I. ^Martinson, who was born in Pomme de Terre township, this 
countv, Julv T,o, 1886. He is a son of Peter and Xellie ]^Iartinson, both 
natives of Sweden, the father born on jNIarch 31, 1858, and the mother in 
i860. They came to America while still single, locating in Litchfield, Minne- 
sota, in 1881, and were married in 1882, after which they went to Douglas 
Falls, this state, where i\Ir. Martinson worked one year on the Great X'orth- 
ern railroad. Li 1883 he moved to Grant county and established the home 
of the family, buying one hundred and sixty acres. Prospering l^y close 
application and good management, he added to his original holdings until 
he accumulated six hundred acres of valuable land in Elbow Lake township, 
wliere he carried on general farming and stock raising on an extensi\e scale 
manv ^■ears, but is now living retired. He has a modern home, with up-to- 
date improvements and a large gro\-e. Politically, he is a Republican. He 
has long been a member of the local school board and of the township board. 
He and his wife belong to the Swedish Lutheran church at Elbow Lake. 
Their family consists of nine children, all living, namely: Anne, Amanda, 
Henrv, Olivia, Ida, Arthur, Oscar, Esther and Lillie. 

Henrv AI. Martinson grew up on the home farm and received his edu- 



206 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

cation in the local public schools. He has always farmed and now owns 
one hundred and sixty acres of good land in Sanford township, where he 
engages in general fanning and stock raising. He moved on this place in 
1910. 

Politically, he is a Republican and has been a member of the local 
school board for six years. He is a member of the Swedish Lutlieran 
church. 

Mr. Martinson was married, in 1910, to Melve Flatness, a nati\e of 
Grant county, where she grew up and attended school. The date of her 
birth was Xovember 15, 1S87, and she is a daughter of John and Atlanta 
Flatness. The father was born in Norway and the mother on the Atlantic 
ocean, while her parents were en route to America. They came on to Minne- 
sota and are still living on a farm in EllxJw Lake. To Mr. and Mrs. Martin- 
son three children ha\e been born, Warren, Webster and Norman. 



A. A. ROONEY. 



A. A. Rooney, one of the well-knuwn and successful farmers of Osakis 
township, Douglas county, was born in Dodge county, Wisconsin, on Sep- 
tember 17, 1870, the son of John and Elizal>eth (Kelly) Rooney. who 
were born in Ireland and there received their education in the common 
schools, grew to manhood and womanhood and were married. In 1848 
they decided that they would leave the land of their birth and seek a home 
in America, where so many of their countrymen had come. After land- 
ing in New York they decided to locate there, and for the next seven years 
that was their home. In the fall of 1854 they removed to Dodge county, 
Wisconsin, where they lived until 1887, when they became residents of 
]\Iinneapolis, wheer they resided for the next two years. In 1889 they 
located in Austin, Minnesota, and lived there three years, after which they 
removed to Farmington, where they remained until 1901. They then removed 
to Osakis township, Douglas county, and there Mr. Rooney died in 1907. 
They were the parents of the following children; Patrick, Thomas, Isa- 
belle, Lizzie, Anna, Frank, Stejihen, ]\Iargaret, Isabelle, Jennie, and A. A. 
The first-born Isabelle is now deceased. The family are devout members of 
the Catholic church. 

A. A. Rooney received his education in the public schools of Dodge 
county, Wisconsin. As a young man he started farming for himself, at 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUXTIES, MINNESOTA. JOJ 

.Austin, Minnesota. In 1901 he moved to Osakis township, Douglas countv, 
where he is now tlie owner of one hundred and sixty acres of land, which 
is well developed and improved with good and substantial buildings, Mr. 
Rooney having built the barn and granary and made manv other \aluable 
and substantial improvements. ^ 

A. A. Rooney was united in marriage to Laura Xelson, a native of 
Norway, and to this union the following children have been born ; Lucile, 
Bernard, Irene, \"incent, Stella, Sylvester, Stephen, Ambrose, Lawrence, 
Irene and Lestie, Irene is now deceased. The family are devout mem- 
bers of the Catholic church. Mr. Rooney has always taken an active inter- 
est in local affairs and has been clerk of Osakis township since 191 1. 



KXUT A. PIKOP. 



Knut A. Pikop, one of Grant county's farmers, proprietor of a farm 
in Elbow Lake township, is a native son of Grant county and has lived 
there all his life. He was born on the old Pikop homestead farm in Elbow 
Lake township, in the immediate neighborhood of his present home, June 
30, 1874, son of Anders and Gunhild (Ramstad) Pikop, natives of the 
kingdom of Norway and pioneers of Grant count}-, the former of whom 
died in the summer of 1902 and the latter of whom is still living on the old 
homestead place, now well past seventy-two years of age. In a biographical 
sketch relating to the Hon. Ole A. Pikop, representative in the Legisla- 
ture and elder brother of the subject of this sketch, presented elsewhere 
in this voliune. there is set out in detail particulars of the genealogy and the 
history of the Pikop family in this state, to which the attention of the 
reader is respectfully invited in this connection. 

Reared on the homestead farm on which he was born, Knut A. Pikop 
received his schooling in the local district school and from the days of his 
youth was an able assistant to his father in the labors of developing the 
home farm, Anders Pikop becoming the owner of eighteen hundred acres 
of land and long recognized as one of the most substantial and influen- 
tial farmers in Grant county. Knut A. Pikop, in 19 15, erected a fine, 
new, modern house on his place and he and his family are now verv com- 
fortably and very pleasantly situated. It was in 1899 that Knut A. Pikop 
was united in marriage to Andrea Torgerson. who was born in Norwav, 
daughter of one of the early settlers in Grant county, and to this union 



208 DOUGLAS AND GRAXT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

five children have Ijeen born, Lilv, Arthur, Lester, Gihiia and Iner. ]Mr. 
and ?*Irs. Pikup are members of the United Lutheran church at Elbow 
Lake and take a warm interest in the various beneficences of that organi- 
zation as well as in all community good works, helpful in advancing the 
cause (if better citizenship along all lines hereabout. 



AXEL BURKEE. 



Axel Burkee, cashier of the Farmers State Bank at Brandon and one 
of the best-known young bankers in Douglas county, is a native son of that 
county and has always lived there. He was born on a farm in Urness town- 
ship, July 9, j888, son of Andrew and Carrie (Aloe) Burkee, natives of the 
kingdom of Norway and early settlers in Douglas county, the latter of whom 
is still living on the old home place in Urness township. 

Andrew Burkee was born on February ii, 1837, and in 1861, when 
twenty-four years of age, came to the United States, which just then was 
in the throes of the great Civil \Var. Proceeding almost directly from 
his port of entry to Madison, Wisconsin, Andrew Burkee there enlisted for 
service during the Civil War as a member of the Fifteenth Regiment, Wis- 
consin A'olunteer Infantry, with which command he served until the close 
of the war. Upon the completion of his militar}' service Mr. Burkee came 
out to this section of Minnesota, which then was beginning to attract settlers 
in considerable numbers, and in 1866 homesteaded a quarter of a section of 
land in Urness township, Douglas county, and proceeded to develop the same. 
He built a log house on his claim and following his marriage in the fall of 
t868 established his home there. He later built a more commodious log 
house and still later a very comfortal'le frame house, which still serves as 
the familv hume. Mr. Burkee was an excellent farmer and made many sub- 
stantial impro\ements on his place, at the same time enlarging his land hold- 
ings until he became the owner of a fine farm of two hundred and forty 
acres. He died on the home fami on December 8, 191 5, and his widow 
survives him. She also was born in Norway, Carrie ]\Ioe, daughter of Ole 
Moe, one of the pioneers of this section of the state, and was living on the 
old Moe homestead in Douglas county at the time of her marriage to ]\Ir. 
Burkee on November 7, i8(i8. To that union tweh-e children were born, of 
>vhom the subject of this sketch was the eleventh in order of birth, the others 
being as follow : Sophia, widow of Skak Quam, now living on a farm 




AXEL RUUKEE. 










AKMEUS STA-IK I'.AXK. ItKAMx IX. 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 20g 

near the old Biirkee homestead ; George, who is Hving on the old homestead ; 
John, a prominent resident of Roseau and register of deeds of Roseau 
county: Alfred, cashier of the Peoples State Bank at Greenbush, this state; 
Clara, a teacher in the public schools at Little Falls, this state; Olena, a 
private nurse; Gena, who died at the age of twenty-eight; Ole, who is on 
the old homestead farm; William, a resident of Ritzville, Washington; 
]\Iartha, a teacher in the public schools at Little Falls, and Nels, who died 
in infancy. 

Axel Burkee was reared on the old home farm in Urness township, 
receiving his elementary education in the district school in that neighbor- 
hood, supplementing the same by a course in the Park Region Lutheran Col- 
lege at Fergus Falls, from which he was graduated in 1908. Following his 
return from college he remained on the farm for some time and then, in 
February, 191 1, was made assistant cashier of the Farmers State Bank at 
Brandon. He presently was promoted to the position of cashier of that 
bank and has e\er since occupied that position. Mr. Burkee is an "inde- 
pendent" Republican and has given close attention to local political affairs, 
now serving as justice of the peace in and for his home township and as 
treasurer of the village of Brandon. 

On June 6, 19 14, Axel Burkee was united in marriage to Alice Werner, 
of Brandon. iNIr. and Mrs. Burkee have a very pleasant home in Brandon 
and take a proper interest in the various social activities of their home town. 
They are members of the Norwegian Lutheran church and take an earnest 
interest in the beneficences of the same, Mr. Burkee being one of the trustees 
of the church and active in all good works in the community in which he 
lives. 



CARL A. SHOGREN. 



Carl A. Shogren, one of the well-known and successful young farmers 
of Belle River township, Douglas county, was born in that township on 
March 30, 1885, the son of Charles E. and Matilda (Johnson) Shogren, 
who were born in Sweden and there received their education in the public 
schools. They came to the United States in their youth and were married 
in this country. Charles E. Shogren came to Minnesota with his parents 
and located in Douglas county, where he homesteaded one hundred and 
twenty acres of land. The parents, Andrew and Christina (Xystrom) 
Shogren, also settled in that countv. The tract of land taken bv Charles 
(14a) 



2IO DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

E. Shogren was a wild tract of timber land, and required much work to put 
under cultivation. There he built a small log and frame house and pro- 
ceeded to clear his farm. After having quite a tract of it developed, he 
sold the place and purchased eighty acres in Belle River township, to which 
he later added forty acres. There he made his home until 1899, when he 
moved to a farm of one hundred and twenty acres in section 23, which he 
had purchased some time before. This farm had some few improvements, 
but Mr. Shogren at once entered into the task of making his farm one of 
the ideal ones of the township. He built a fine new house, a good barn 
and other buildings, and there he made his home until 1912, when he 
retired from the active duties of the farm and moved to California. 

Charles E. and Matilda Shogren were the parents of the following 
children: Selma, Carl A., Ellen, Amil, Emma, Herman, Victor, Olga, 
Albert and Joseph. Selma is the wife of Carl Hanson, a farmer of Belle 
River township; Ellen is the wife of Gust Matson, a farmer living south of 
Carlos village; Amil was united in marriage to Otava Davis, a teamster 
of Alexandria; Emma is the wife of Ole Fransen, of Spokane, Washing- 
ton; Herman married Bertha Swanson and lives on the old home place; 
Olga is the wife of .Arthur Palmer and lives in California: Victor, Albert 
and Joseph are with their parents in California. 

Carl A. Shogren received his education in the public schools of Belle 
River township, and grew to manhood on the home farm, where as a lad 
and young man he assisted his father v/ith the work on the farm until he 
was married on April 24, 191 1, to Anna Westlund, a native of Superior. 
Wisconsin, who had come to Douglas county with her parents at the age 
of ten years. August and Hannah (Christenson) Westlund were natives 
of Sweden and Denmark, respectively. Mr. Westlund is a carpenter and 
now lives at Dows, Iowa. 

After his marriage, Carl A. Shogren and wife lived with his parents 
on the home place for one and one-half years. They then rented two hun- 
dred acres in Spruce Hill township, where they lived for three years. 
During that time they purchased eighty acres, which they later sold and 
are now the owners of one hundred and twenty acres of the old home farm 
and there Mr. Shogren is engaged in general farming and stock raising, in 
which he has been successful. He has no buildings on his farm, but is pre- 
paring to build a modern house as well as other substantial farm structures. 
He and his wife now make their home with his brother Herman. Mr. and 
Mrs. Shogren are active members of the Swedish Lutheran church and are 
prominent in the social and religious life of the community. 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 211 

OLOF OLSON. 

Olof Olson, deceased, was born in Sweden on February 4, 1846. He 
received liis education in the public schools of his native country and there 
grew to manhood and was married. He continued to reside in the land of 
his birth until he was thirty-seven years of age, when, in 1883, he decided 
to come to America. On his arrival in this country, he came direct to Minne- 
sota, where he purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land in section 25, 
Sanford township. Grant county, to which he later added one hundred and 
twenty acres. This farm he developed and improved and engaged in gen- 
eral farming and stock raising, in which he was successful. He erected 
excellent buildings, set out a beautiful grove and made many other valuable 
and substantial improvements, which added much to the value and beautv of 
the place. This he made his home until the time of his death, on May 24, 
1899. 

Olof Olson was united in marriage, on August 5, 1883. to Ingred M. 
Olson, who was born in Sweden on May 30, 1859; her parents died there 
some years ago. To this imion the following children have been born : 
Olof L., Amanda, Oscar, Xels and F.thel. Olof L. Olson was born on the 
old homestead in Sanford township, on September 17, 1884. He received 
his education in the public schools and grew to manhood on the home farm, 
where, as a lad, he assisted his father with the work. As a young man he 
decided to be a farmer and for some time before his father's death he farmed 
the place. Since the death of the father, he and his mother have improved 
the farm with more modern buildings and have in many ways added to the 
value of the place. He is now operating the farm and is engaged in gen- 
eral farming and stock raising, in which he has been most successful. Politic- 
ally, Olof L. Olson is independent, but has always taken an active interest in 
local affairs. He was married in 1915 to Effie Johnson, of Montana. 
Amanda Olson was born on IMarch 31, 1886, and is now the wife of Peter 
Jenson, a well-to-do farmer of Lien to\vnship. Oscar Olson was born in 
1888 and died in 18S9. Nels E. Olson was lx)rn on May 28, 1891, and is a 
student in the Gustavus Adolphus College, and Ethel is also a student in that 
college. 

Olof Olson always took much interest in the civic life of the township 
and was recognized as one of the substantial and prominent men of the com- 
munity. He took much interest in the growth and success of the schools 
and served for a number of years as a member of the school board. He and 



212 DOUGLAS AND GRAXT COUNTIES, illNNESOTA. 

his family were members of the Swedish Lutheran church and were prominent 
in the social and religious life of the community. Olof L., the oldest mem- 
ber of the family, has become one of the successful and well-known residents 
of the county. He is progressive and is a firm advocate of modern methods 
and ways of farming. The old home place, under his careful management 
has become one of the best in the township and the family have one of the 
finest farm homes in the communitv. 



NELS X. BREVIG. 



Another Norwegian who has made good at general farming in Grant 
county is Nels N. Brevig, of Stony Brook township. He was born in Nor- 
way, December 29, 1850, a son of Nels N. and Margaret P. (Eadail) Brevig. 
both natives of Norway, the former born in 1825 and the latter in 1816. 
There they grew up and were married, maintaining their home there until 
1865, when they came to America, locating at Decorah, Iowa. After five 
years there, they came, in 1870, to Grant county, Minnesota, the father tak- 
ing up a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres in Stony Brook township, 
which he developed and there spent the rest of his life, dying in 1905. His 
wife died on November 9, 1902. They were members of the United Luth- 
eran church and, politically, he was a Republican. To these parents the fol- 
lowing children were born: Carrie, Nels N., Julia, Peter, and Andrew, 



Nels N. Brevig spent his boyhood in Norway, where he attended school, 
being fifteen years old when he came to America with the rest of the family. 
Lie worked on his father's farm during their five years' residence in Iowa 
and came with the family to Grant county, where he has since made his 
home, being thus one of the pioneers here. During his residence of a period 
of some forty-six years in these parts he has noted many great changes 
"come over the face of the land." In 1871 he took up a homestead — one 
hundred and sixty acres — in section 18, Stony Brook township, which he 
improved and, managing well, he later added to his original holdings until 
he accumulated three hundred and twenty acres of valuable land, on which he 
has carried on general farming and stock raising successfully. His place is 
well improved, including an attractive set of buildings. 

Mr. Brevig has been twice married, first, to Cheslina Kittelson, by whom 
one child was born, Anne Maria. His second wife was before her marriage, 



DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 2I3 

Julia Asleson, a native of Grant county, where slie grew up and attended 
school. She is a daughter of Jens Asleson, now deceased, for many years 
a farmer of this county. To Air. Brevig and his second wife the following 
cliildren were born : Soffe, Amalia, Kjersti, Nicolena, Nora, Albert, Nels 
and two infants who are deceased. Politically, Mr. Brevig is a Republican 
and has ser\ed on the local school board. 



EXGEBRET E. SUND. 



Engebret E. Sund, a well-known Grant county fanner, residing in 
Stony Brook township, is a native of the kingdom of Norway, but has been 
a resident of Minnesota since he was twenty-three years of age and of 
Grant county since the year 1881. He was born on a farm in the Sigdal 
district of Norway, April 5, 1857, son of Engebret H. and i\Iary ( Hanson) 
Sund, both natives of that same district, substantial farming people, now 
deceased, who spent all their lives there. They were the parents of nine 
children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the seventh in order of 
birth, the others being Helge, Hans, Berit (deceased), Ole, Nels (de- 
ceased), Gertrude, Christen and Hans, all of whom, save three, remained 
in their native land, Helge, the first-born, having for some years been a 
resident of Grant county, but later returned to his native land, where he 
is now living, and Hans, the last-born, who also for some time lived in 
Grant county, now living at Leeds, North Dakota. 

Reared on the home farm in Norway, Engebret E. Sund received his 
schooling in the schools of his home neighborhood and remained at home 
until he was twenty-three years of age, when, in 1880, he came to the United 
States and proceeded on out to Alinnesota, settling in Olmsted county, where 
he remained a year, at the end of which' time he came over to this part of the 
state and located in Grant county, where his brothers, Helge and Hans, had 
preceded him and where they had bought a quarter of a section of railroad 
land in Stonv Brook township. Not long afterward E. E. Sund bought 
that tract of land from his brothers, who had built a small house on the 
same and had broken the most of it. That farm was in section 7 and upon 
taking possession of the same Air. Sund proceeded further to improve it 
and it was not long until he had a profitably cultivated farm. In 1887 he 
married and established his home there and has ever since been very com- 
fortably situated. As his affairs prospered he bought an adjoining "forty" 



214 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

and later Ijought another cjuarter section lower down in the township and 
is now the owner of three hundred and forty-live acres of land and is 
regarded as one of the substantial farmers of that section of the county. 
Mr. Sund is a Republican, but has never been a seeker after public oiifice. 

It was in 1887 that Engebret E. Sund was united in marriage to Gunhild 
Bye, who also was born in the kingdom of Norway, a daughter of Peter 
Bye and wife, both now deceased, whose lives were spent in their native 
land, and to this union six children have been born, namely, Mary, who 
married Nels Bergan and lives on section 20, Stony Brook township; 
Edward, now at home, who spent four years in Saskatchewan, where he 
is the owner of a quarter of a section of land which he homesteaded there; 
Helmer, who lives at Spring Brook, North Dakota, where he is the owner 
of a farm, and Clara, Henry and Ragna, who are at home . The Sunds are 
members of the Synod Lutheran church and take a proper interest in all 
neighborhood good works. 



ALGOT F. LARSON. 



Among the sturdy Swedes who have made a success of farming in 
Douglas county is Algot F. Larson, of Carlos township, who was born in 
Sweden on March 26, 1876, the son of Gustaf and Gustava Larson, both 
natives also of Sweden. Gustaf Larson came with his family to Minne- 
sota in 1883, settling first in Alexandria, where they lived for four years, 
after which he purchased eighty acres of wild timber land in Carlos town- 
ship, built a frame house and proceeded to cultivate and improve his land, 
gradually adding to his holdings until he is now the owner of one hun- 
dred and twenty acres of good farming land. He is now retired from active 
farm life and one of his sons manages the farm. He and his wife were 
the parents of three children, Victor, Algot F. and Hjalmar, who is living 
on the home farm. 

Algot F. Larson received his education in the public schools of Alex- 
andria, and was also a student in the schools of Belle River township. He 
assisted his father with the work of the farm until his marriage, when he 
rented forty acres of land in section 36 of Carlos township, where he lived 
for five years, after which he bought eighty acres of wild land in section 
25, of the same township, and has since been engaged in cultivating and 
improving his land. Besides his eighty acres, Mr. Larson rents forty acres 
in Belle River township, and is engaged in general farming and stock rais- 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 21 5 

ing, his crops consisting of barley, oats and potatoes. He also has consider- 
able live stock of the Holstein variety of cattle. He also owns a threshing 
outfit, engine and separator, which he operates during the season. 

In 1903 INIr. Larson was married to Hulda Johnson, who is also a 
native of Sweden, and to this union have been born three children, Harry, 
Gordon and Helen. Air. Larson is a Republican and takes an active interest 
in all public matters of local importance. 



CHRIST C. XESS. 



Christ C. Xess, a pioneer of Grant county and for years recognized 
as one of the most substantial farmers of the Xorcross neighborhood, the 
owner of a fine farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Gorton township, 
is a native of the kingdom of Norway, but has lived in this country since 
he was seventeen years old, when he came to America with his father and 
settled in ^^'isconsin, where he resided until he became a Grant county 
homesteader in 1879. He was born on a farm in the stift of Hamar, fifty 
miles or more north of Christiania, November 19, 1855, son of Christ Olson 
and Barbara (Olson) Ness, the latter of whom died about 1865. She 
was the mother of four children who grew to maturity, of whom the sub- 
ject of this sketch was the eldest, the others being Ole C. who lives on 
the farm his father developed in \\'isconsin; Knut C. who became a resi- 
dent of Grant county and was engaged as a clerk in a store at Herman, 
where he died, and Rande, who died in \Msconsin at the age of eighteen 
years. 

After the death of his wife, Christ Olson Ness did not remarry, but 
in 1872 came to the L'nited States with his children and settled at LaCrosse, 
AMsconsin. In the vicinity of that city he worked on farms for a couple 
of years and then moved to Baldwin, in St. Croix county, that same state, 
buying a farm of one hundred and twenty acres near \\'oodville, in that 
same county, and there he spent the rest of his life, his death occurring in 
1902. 

As noted above, Christ C. Ness was about seventeen years of age when 
he came with his father to this coimtry and he remained with his father, 
assisting the latter in the development of his farm, until the spring of 1879. 
when he came over to this part of Minnesota, arriving in Grant countv on 
March 19th of that year. He homesteaded the northwest quarter of section 



2l6 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

24 in Gorton township, but was so poor in this world's goods at that time 
that he was compelled to work on other farms for money with which to 
make his payments and thus the breaking of his own land was deferred 
until such time as he could eventually get to it. He presently succeeded in 
getting a start, however, and in due time set out a grove, erected a set of 
buildings on his place and brought the farm up to a high standard of culti- 
vation, long having been recognized as one of the most substantial farmers 
in that neighborhood. Mr. Ness has ever given close attention to local 
civic affairs and has served the public as township treasurer and for some 
years as a member of the board of supervisors. He formerly was a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Pythias. 



HERMAN ALBIN SHOGREN. 

Herman Albin Shogren, a well-known young farmer of Belle River 
township, Douglas county, was born in that township on ^March 3, 1893, 
the son of Charles E. and Matilda (Johnson) Shogren, who came to the 
United States single and were married in this country. 

Charles E. Shogren came to the United States with his parents, An- 
drew and Christine (Nystrom) Shogren. They came direct to Minnesota, 
and here Charles R. homesteaded one hundred and twenty acres of land in 
Douglas county. The tract at that time was covered with timber and re- 
quired much labor to bring it under cultivation. There he built a small log 
and frame house, and proceeded to make a clearing. After having done 
considerable work he sold the place and purchased eighty acres in Belle 
River township, to which he later added forty acres. There he made his 
home and engaged in general farming until 1899, when he moved to section 
2:^1, where he had purchased another farm of one hundred and twenty acres. 
That farm had some improvements, but Mr. Shogren at (ince erected a fine 
house, a good barn and made other valuable improvements that added much 
to the beauty and value of the place. On that farm he made his home until 
1912, when he retired from the active duties of farm life and moved to 
California. 

Charles E. and Matilda Shogren are the parents of the following chil- 
dren : Selma, Carl A., Ellen, Amil, Emma, Herman, Victor, Olga, Albert 
and Joseph. Selma is the wife of Carl Hanson. Ellen is the wife of Gust 
JMatson. Amil is the wife of Otava Davis. Emma is the wife of Ole Fran- 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 21 J 

sen. Olga is the wife of Arthur Pahner. Carl A. married .Anna W'esthuitl 
and Herman married Bertha Swanson. A'ictor, All^ert and Joseph are with 
their parents in CaHfornia. 

Herman Albin Shogren received his education in the pul)hc schools of 
Belle River township and grew to manhood on the home farm. When a 
lad of seventeen he worked on a farm away from home and for a time in 
Canada, where he worked on a farm. He then went to North Dakota, where 
he was engaged in farm work, after which he sp.ent one year in California 
with his parents ; while there working with a house-wrecking crew and as a 
laborer. 

On June 17, 191 5, Herman Albin Shogren was united in marriage to 
Bertha E. Swanson, who was born in Illinois, and who came to Douglas 
county with her parents nine years ago. She is the daughter of Andrew F. 
and Emma Swanson, well-known residents of Douglas county. In Novem- 
ber. 1915, Mr. Shogren purchased one hundred and twenty acres of his 
father and is now engaged in general farming and stock raising. Mr. and 
Mrs. Shogren have one child, Emmet. They are members of the Swedish 
Lutheran church and are prominent in the social and religious life of the 
community. 



CHARLES J. LINDSTRO^I. 

Douglas county has among her noble and progressive residents many 
who are natives of Sweden and who came to the United States with the 
determination of making a home for themselves and their families. They 
have brought with them to their new homes the characteristics of their coun- 
try — honesty, industry and economy. With these as their principles, to 
guide their lives, they have had much to do with the reclaiming of the tim- 
bered lands and the wild prairies of the great state of Minnesota. 

Charles J. Lindstrom, a well-known and successful farmer of Carlos 
township, was born in Sweden, on March 24, 1870, the son of Andrew 
and Anna Lindstrom, both of whom were born in far-away Sweden. 

Andrew and Anna Lindstrom received their education in the land 
of their nativity and there grew to manhood and womanhood and were 
married. They continued to live in their native land until 1870, when they 
decided to locate in America. On landing in the United States they came 
direct to ^Minnesota, and here the father took a homestead of one hundred 
and sixtv acres, in section 3, Alexandria township, Douglas county. He at 



216 DOUGLAS .AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

once built a log house and obtained a team of oxen and began the task of 
clearing his farm and the planting of his crops. He later engaged in gen- 
eral farming and stock raising and was successful. He bought more land 
and at the time of his retirement, in 1914. was the owner of two hundred 
and eighteen acres of good land, one hundred and twenty-hve of which 
was cleared and under cultivation. He had erected substantial buildings 
and in other ways added much to the beauty and value of the tract. Upon 
his retirement from the active duties of the farm life he removed to Alex- 
andria, where he now lives. The wife and mother died in 19 13 at the age 
of seventy-one years. Andrew and Anna Lindstrom were the parents of 
the following children: Hannah, Ida, Charles J., Ellen, Augusta, Gustave, 
Anna and one who died in infancy. Hannah is the wife of William Hege- 
dorn, of the state of Washington; Ida married August Grandlund and lives 
in Belle River township; Ellen is the wife of Alfred Hedsen, of St. Paul; 
Augusta married Leonard Hedeen, a successful farmer of Carlos town- 
ship; Gustave married Clara Hanson and resides in St. Paul, and Anna is 
the wife of Anton Rundberg, also of St. Paul. 

Charles J. Lindstrom received his education in the public schools of 
Alexandria township and attended school in the old log school house. He 
grew to manhood on the home farm, where he lived until his marriage in 
1892 to Caroline Sward, a native of Osakis township. Her parents were 
early settlers there, where the)- had located on their arrival from Sweden. 
Charles J. Lindstrom had purchased eighty acres of land in Carlos town- 
ship before his marriage. There he erected a frame house and to this he 
brought his bride. The tract was for the most part heavy timber, which 
he later cleared and developed. He added to his original farm until he is 
now the owTier of two hundred and thirty-three acres, of which one hundred 
and fiftv are now under cultivation, and the rest is in valuable meadow land. 
His first crop was wheat, l;)ut he now raises wheat, corn, oats, barley and 
potatoes. He raises many cattle and keeps high-grade Shorthorns. His 
hogs are among the best in the township. In addition to his hogs and cattle 
he devotes much time and attention to his Rhode Island Red chickens and 
his large flock of turkeys. Since coming to the farm he has added to his 
house, and today has one of the best improved and most attractixe farms 
in the community. 

^Ir. and ]\Irs. Lindstrom are the parents of three children, Minnie, 
Richard and Evenell, all of whom are at home. Mr. and Mrs. Lindstrom 
are popular in their home community and take an active interest in the social 
Ufe of the township. Mr. Lindstrom has always been interested in the 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 2I9 

civic life of the township and has had much to do with local affairs. For 
twehe years he was chairman of the township board of supervisors, assessor 
for two vears. county commissioner for four years and is now a meml^er 
of the school board of district No. -j-j. which position he has held for 
eighteen years. 



lOHX P. XELSOX. 



John P. Xelson, one of the well-known and successful farmers of Peli- 
can township, Grant county, was born in Sweden on April 22. 1850. the son 
of Xels and Marie (Bearson) Johnson. 

X'els and Marie Johnson were natives of Sweden and there received 
their education in the public schools, grew to manhood and womanhood and 
were married. They continued to live in the land of their nativit)- until 
1S74, when thev decided to come to the United States. They had become 
aged, and their children were in this country, hence their decision to come 
to a new land at that time. Here they made their home with their son 
Johnas. in Pelican Lake township, where Xels died in 1880. at the age of 
sixtv-eight vears. His widow died in Januar}-. 1896, at the age of eighty- 
five years. 

John P. X'elson was educated in the public schools of Sweden and there 
grew to manhood. He continued to live in his native land, until 1869. when 
he decided to come to the United States, he being the first of the family to 
locate in this country. He landed at Quebec, after which he proceeded to 
Chicago, and, a short time later, he located in Rock count}-. \\"isconsin, 
where he worked as a laborer. In 1870 he came to Grant county, thus being 
one of the earliest settlers in the country. Here he took a homestead of one 
hundred and sixty acres of land in section 17, of Pelican Lake township. To 
his original farm he later added forty acres in section 16. That farm he 
made his home and there he was engaged in general farming until 1909, 
when he removed to section ^2 of Pelican Lake township, where he pur- 
chased one hundred acres of Hah-or Larson, his father-in-law. 

On ^lay 12, 1879, John P. X'elson was united in marriage to Gurel 
Larson, who was born in Xorway. on Xovember 25. 1859, and who came 
with her parents to Grant county in 1869, her father then homesteading in 
section 2,2 of Pelican Lake township. To this union have been born three 
children, Helmer, Alfred and Amelia. The two sons are now married. 
John P. Xelson and his wife are active members of the Xorwegian Lutheran 



220 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

church at Ashbv and take much interest in church work. They have long 
been prominent in the social and rehgious Hfe of the community in which 
they Hve. Mr. Nelson takes much interest in local affairs and has ever been 
ready to give his support to any worthy cause that has a tendency to advance 
the better interests of the township. He is a stockholder in the Creamery 
Company at Ashby and is a worthy representative of the successful farmers 
of his township. 

Since purchasing his present farm Mr. Xelson has made many valuable 
improvements, having erected all the buildings, as well as adding much to 
the development of the place. He is engaged in general farming and stock 
raising and is recognized as being quite successful. His farm home is nicely 
located, a small lake being just back of the barn ; and Lake Pomme de Terre 
just west of his farm, all of which makes the location an ideal one for a 
home. 



EDWARD JOHN DRUSSELL. 

Among the well-known younger farmers of Ida township, Douglas 
county, is Edward John Drussell, who was liorn in Winona, Minnesota, 
August 5, 1881. He is a son of John and Ellen (Pfifer) Drussell, both 
natives of the United Staies, but of German parentage. John Drussell and 
Ellen F'hfer were married at Winona, Minnesota, and lived on a farm there 
for some years. In the spring of 1885 they came to Douglas county, where 
they purchased ninety-three acres of land in section 24 of Ida township. 
This place was almost entirely unimproved when they bought it, having only 
a small log cabin and a barn on it. A few acres had been chopped over in 
the way of clearing, but the place was full of stumps and almost a wilder- 
ness. However, the family went to work with a will, living in the old log 
cabin house in pioneer st)'le for a time, and now have a nice modern frame 
residence on the farm, as well as many other modern improvements. John 
Drussell's first vear's crop was a little wheat planted between the stumps, 
but he kept on clearing the land, as well as adding to his acreage, until he 
now has one hundred and seventy-three acres of fine farming land all in one 
body, and about thirty acres of which is in timber. The family lived on this 
farm until the spring of 1914, when they moved to Alexandria. John Drus- 
sell and wife are the parents of seven children, Edward J., Will, Albert, 
Anna, Meta, Harry and Frank, all of whom are still at home, with the ex- 
ception of Edward J. and Albert, the latter of whom married Marie Forton, 
and is engaged in the implement business in Hamel, Minnesota. 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 221 

Edward J. Drussell recei\ed his education in the old log school house 
which stood on his father's farm, and assisted with the work on the home 
farm as a lad. After reaching manhood he learned the carpenter's trade 
under Herman Suckow and Will Paulers, and followed that occupation for 
some years, after which he moved to Grundy county, Iowa, where he was 
engaged in the building and contracting business, remaining in that state 
for some seven or eight years, making a total of sixteen years spent in car- 
penter work. In the spring of 1914 he moved back to Douglas countv and 
rented his father's farm, where he has since lived. He is engaged in general 
farming and stock raising and is making a very commendable success in his 
agricultural operations. His farm is well improved and operated under the 
most modern S3'stem, while his home is beautifully located on the east side 
of Lake Ida, from which the township takes its name. 

In October, 1904, Edward J. Drussell was married to Josephine Froem- 
ming and to this union have been born two children, Earle and Aliles. The 
family attend the German Lutheran church and are actively interested in all 
movements which have for their object the general welfare of their com- 
munitv. 



MARTIN N. ULSAGER. 

Farming has always been a pleasure to Alartin N. Ulsager, and indeed 
it should be to everyone. It is all in the way one "looks" at it. There is no 
life so independent or healthful. Mr. Ulsager was born in Brandon town- 
ship, Douglas county, August 8, 1888, and there he still resides. He is a son 
of Nels and Julia (Knutson) Nelson, natives of Norway. The father came 
to the United States in i860, locating in Wisconsin; but not long thereafter 
moved to Goodhue county, Minnesota, where he bought forty acres. While 
there he married Julia Knutson and they continued to live there until 1867, 
when they drove over to Douglas county, where he took up a homestead of 
one hundred and si.xty acres in section 31 of Brandon township — wild prairie 
land. There he built a small shanty, later a log house, and began preparing 
his land for crops. He prospered in due course of time and bought more land, 
at one time owning three hundred and fifty-six acres, a part of which he 
later sold. He spent the last twenty years of his life in retirement, renting 
out his land. Nels Nelson was born on January 27, 1836, and died on De- 
cember 3, 1915. Julia (Knutson) Nelson died in the fall of 1915. 
at the age of seventv-four years. Nineteen children were born to them, ten 



222 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

of whom grew to maturity, namely: Nels, Jr., Julia, Anna, Marv, Betsy, 
Nettie, Knut, Halvor, 'Andrea and Martin N. 

^lartin N. Ulsager was reared on the home farm and there he worked 
when a boy, and he received his education in the district schools. He helped 
his father on the farm until his marriage on February 4, 1914, to Elna An- 
derson. They have one child, Elsie Irene. 

^Ir. Ulsager has been farming for himself twelve years. His father 
gave him eighty acres in section 30 of Brandon township, which was but 
little improved. He also has eighty acres adjoining, owning now one hun- 
dred and fifty-six acres in all, and has a good group of buildings. In 1905 
he built a new barn. One of the county ditches runs through his place. He 
has laid fourteen hundred and fifty feet of six-inch tile. He carries on 
general farming. Politically, he is a Repuljlican, and he belongs to St. Peter's 
Lutheran church. 



T. L. TOBIASON. 



T. L. Tobiason, a prominent and well-known farmer of Pelican Lake 
township. Grant county, was born in that township on November 12, 1869, 
the son of L. L. and Gure (Hove) Tobiason, who were born in Norway. 

L. L. Tobiason was born on October 10, 1836, and Hved in the land of 
his nati\itv until he was nineteen years of age, when he came to the United 
States. After landing at the port of New York he came West and located 
at Decorah, Iowa, where he worked until 1868, when he moved to Pelican 
Rapids, Ottertail county, this state, where he purchased one hundred and 
sixtv acres of land, all of which was heavy timber. He sold that place the 
next year and moved down to Grant county, where he 1x)ught homestead 
rights to eighty acres in section 29 and eighty acres in section ^^2, Pelican 
Lake township. There he built a house and developed the farm and en- 
gaged in general farming. His wife was the daughter of Ole Hove, a 
farmer of Norway, where he lived and died. To L. L. and Gure Tobiason 
were born the following children : T. L., Ole, Jennie, Lewis, Ghea and 
Gust. Mr. and Mrs. Tobiason were active members of the Norwegian 
Lutheran church at Ashby and took 'much interest in religious work. They 
were prominent in the early social life of the community and Mr. Tobiason 
took much interest in the civic afifairs of the township. His parents, Lars 
and Tennie Brakken, were natives of Norway, who came to the United 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 223 

States in 1S65, locating in Iowa, where they hved, for the most part, a re- 
tired Hfe. They were ahvays acti\-e in the work of the Norwegian Lntheran 
church, of which they were members. 

T. L. Tobiason received his education in the pubhc schools of Pehcan 
Lake township, where he grew to manhood and where, as a lad and a young 
man, he assisted with the work on the farm. On October 29, 1894, he was 
united in marriage to Minnie Erickson, who was born in Freeborn county, 
^Minnesota, in 1870, the daughter of Jens C. Erickson, a blacksmith, who 
later mo\-ed to Erdahl. Mr. Erickson answered his country's call in 1861 and 
served throughout the Civil ^^'ar. He saw much active service and was in 
many of the important engagements. To ^Ir. and ^Nlrs. Tobiason have been 
born four children, Leonard, who died at the age of three years; Melvin, 
who died as an infant, and Mabel and Matilda. 

T. L. Tobiason is engaged in general farming and stock raising and is 
the owner of one hundred and ninety -two acres of land in sections 30, 31 
and 32, Pehcan Lake township. He lives in section 29, caring for his aged 
mother and operating her farm of eighty acres. T. L. Tobiason and wife 
are active members of the Norwegian Lutheran church at Ashby and are 
prominent in church work, ^Nlr. Tobiason having been secretary of the local 
society for the past eleven years. He has always been active in local affairs 
and has served as a member of the township board and on the school board. 
He owns stock in the elevator company and, fraternally, he is a member of 
the Modern Woodmen of America. 



AUGUST W. ERICKSON. 

August W. Erickson, a farmer of Carlos township, Douglas county, was 
born in that township and has hved there all his life. His parents, Erick 
and Gustava (Berg) Erickson, came to Minnesota from Sweden in 1882 
and settled in Douglas county, where they established their home and where 
Erick Erickson died in 1902, at the age of forty-nine years. He and his 
wife were the parents of three children, August ^^^, Anna and Emil, the 
first-named of whom is now operating the home farm in Carlos township. 
August W. Erickson served for three years as a member of the township 
board and also has served as clerk of his local school board. The family are 
connected with the Swedish Lutheran church. 



224 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

CARL G. MILLER. 

Li a great grain country like Douglas and Grant counties a number of 
People are engaged in the elevator and milling business. One of this num- 
ber is Carl G. Miller, who operates an elevator at Miltona, Douglas county. 
Mr. Miller vi^as born in Leaf Valley township, that county, August 17, 1888, 
and is a son of Charles and Augusta (Lemke) Miller. Here he grew to 
manhood and received a common-school education. On January 28, 19 14, 
he married Elsie Wilke and they have two children, Mabel and Melvin. 
Mr. Miller started out in life for himself as a farmer in Leaf Valley town- 
ship, later moving to Miltona township where he owns a small place in sec- 
tion 25, l.nit he gives his principal attention to his elevator at the town of 
Miltona, which he purchased in 1914. He has since handled all kinds of 
grain products, and is building up a good trade. 

Charles Miller, father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Ger- 
many, September 13, 1849, a- son of Frederick and E. (Bransteter) Miller, 
natives of Germany, where they farmed on a small scale, owning a little land 
there, until immigrating with their family to America in 1856, coming 
directly to Minnesota, arriving at Winona, August 13th, where the father 
worked out awhile, then bought one hundred and sixty acres of wild land, 
hea\-ily timljered, which he cleared and impro\'ed, built the necessary farm 
buildings and tliere he and his wife spent the rest of their lives. To them 
the following children were born : Lewis, a retired farmer at Arcadia, 
Wisconsin; Charles, father of the subject of this sketch; Julius, deceased; 
Herman, a retired farmer living at Alexandria; John, who is farming in 
Carlos township, Douglas county; Albertina, wife of Henry Bittner, of 
Cinga, Wisconsin, and Fred, who is engaged in farming in Hudson town- 
ship, Douglas county. 

Charles Miller was about seven years old when his parents brought him 
from Germany. He attended school in Winona county, Minnesota, and 
remained on the farm with his parents until 1872, when, on May 2 of that 
vear, he took up a homestead of eighty acres, and later another of the same 
acreage, all in Leaf Valley township, Douglas county. It was timbered 
land, which he cleared, erected a small log house, began farming with an 
ox-team and after many hardships and discouragements finally succeeded. 
He was once compelled to go back to Winona to work out to earn a living. 
He remained in his log house about five years, at the end of which time he 
built a better log house. He remained on that farm until about 1881, when 






.MK. AND >[i;s. CAIII. (;. -MILI.Ki; 



DOUGLAS AXD GRAXT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 225 

he sold out and bought one hundred and sixty acres in another section of 
Leaf \'alley township. It was partly improved, seventy acres being under 
cultivation, but there was no dwelling, so he erected a log house. His present 
home was built a number of years afterwards. He has continued to reside 
there, making improvements from time to time, and adding to his land 
until he owned an additional one hundred and sixty acres, which his son 
is now operating. 

In 1872 Charles ^Miller was married to Augusta W. Lemke, who was 
bom in German}", and to that union the following children were born : 
jNIatilda, who married Carl Patzwald, who is engaged in farming on land 
adjoining the farm of Mr. ^Miller; \M11, who died when seven years of age; 
Alvina, who married George W'itte, who has a photograph gallery at Center- 
ville, South Dakota, and has two children, Mary and Carl; Edward, who 
married Augusta Blank, is farming in ]\Iiltona township, Douglas count}^ 
and has three children, Edna, Ella and Edward, Jr. ; Sophia, who married 
Tollef Dahl, of Carlos township, Douglas county, and had two children, 
Alfred (deceased) and Helen: ]\Iary, who married Segard Dahl, of Carlos 
township; Carl G.. the immediate subject of this sketch: Albert, who mar- 
ried Emma Smith, and is farming near the homestead and Gustav and 
Ernest, both at home. 

Charles ]\Iiller is an independent voter. He served as supervisor of 
Carlos township for some time, and was also chairman of the board of super- 
visors in Leaf Valley township for some time. He is now clerk of school 
district Xo. 59, which position he has held for twenty years. Carl G. Miller 
is independent in politics. His elevator at Milton is gradually securing the 
business of that vicinity and he is recognized as one of Douglas county's 
most progressive grain men. 



PETER AUGUST PETERSOX. 

One of the well-known citizens of Lawrence township. Grant county, 
is Peter August Peterson, who was born in northern Sweden on February 
9, 1840. He is a son of Peter Larson and wife. His mother died when he 
was a child, and his father never remarried. He was one of three children, 
a brother and a sister both remaining in Sweden. 

Peter A. Peterson was reared on the farm and was educated in the 
(15a) 



226 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

public schools. He came to America in 1866 with his wife and daughter. 
They located in Hastings, Minnesota, where he found work in a lumber 
yard and in the neighborhood of which place he "also worked out as a farm 
hand, remaining there about six years, at the end of which time he started 
to farm at Prairie Island, three neighbors buying one-fourth of a section 
together. After living there several years, he sold out to his partners and 
rented land until 1900, when he moved to Grant county and bought one hun- 
dred and sixty acres in Lawrence township, and there he has since resided 
and has since added another forty acres. The land was wild prairie, but he 
broke it and put it in cultivation and erected a good group of buildings 
thereon, set out a grove and made general improvements and now has a 
valuable and productive farm, which is operated by his sons, he having been 
retired for some time. 

Mr. Peterson was married a,bout 1865, to Louisa Hendrickson, a native 
of Sweden and a daughter of John Hendrickson and wife. The death of 
Mrs. Peterson occurred about 1891. Seven children were born to that 
union, namelv : Augusta, who died in girlhood ; Carl, who operates the 
homestead ; Emily, who married Carl Oscar Bergerson, of Fergus Falls, 
and has four children, Dora, Edward, Elmer and Ethel; Charles, who is at 
home; Augusta, at home; Elias, also at home, assisting with the work on 
the farm, and Annie, who was drowned when fourteen years of age. 

^Ir. Peterson is a Republican, but he has never been active in public 
affairs. 



CARL A. HARSTAD. 



A promising young tiller of the soil in Grant county is Carl A. Harstad, 
of Stony Brook township. He was born on the old homestead in Stony 
Brook township on August 19, 1896, a son of Lauritz K. and Eliza Harstad, 
both natives of Norway. The father came to ^Minnesota in the spring of 
1880 and worked for his uncle. Martinis Larson, in Grant county, later buy- 
ing eighty acres in Stony Brook township, to which he added more land 
until he owned three hundred and sixty acres ; also owned about forty acres 
elsewhere. He became a well-to-do farmer. He set out a large grove and 
made various improvements, including the erection of good buildings. Politi- 
cally, he was an independent voter. He belonged to the United Lutheran 
church. On December 12, 1880, he was married in Grant county to Eliza 
Johannson, who came to this country from Norway in 1878, locating in 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 22/ 

Grant county. To these parents four children were born, of whom Christian 
is the eldest. Joseph, the second born, was born on the old homestead on 
March 23, 1892, and there grew up and was educated in the public schools, 
and in partnership with the subject of this sketch owns eighty acres in Stony 
Brook township. He was married on December 8, 191 5, to Clara Elvira 
Foss, a daughter of Louis O. Foss, who is mentioned on another page of 
this work. Eddy, third child of Lauritz K. Harstad, died in infancy. Carl 
A., the subject of this sketch, is the last born. The father of these children 
died in 191 1 at the age of fifty-two years, and the mother died in 1912 at 
the age of fifty-six years. 

Carl A. Harstad was reared on the home farm, where he worked when 
a boy, and he received his education in the district schools. He owns, with 
his brother, eighty acres of the home place, that portion on which the build- 
ings stand, and he also owns another eighty acres in Stony Brook township. 
He is carrying on general farming and stock raising. He was married on 
December 20, 191 5, to Stella Johnson, who was born in Pomme de Terre 
township, where she grew up and was educated. She is a step-daughter of 
Martin Johnson, who is mentioned elsewhere in this volume. One child has 
been born to Air. and Airs. Harstad, a son, Louis T., whose birth occurred 
on March 2, 19.16. 



HAAKEX SKRAAISTAD. 

One of the prosperous and progressive farmers of Solem township, 
Douglas county, is Haaken Skramstad, who was born in Xorwav, Januarv 
2-j, 1858. He is a son of Dorthness Halvorson and Gertrude (Goodman- 
son) Skramstad, both of whom were natives of Norwav. 

Dorthness Halvorson Skramstad was a farmer in his native land, and 
came to Minnesota in 1886, five years after his son, Haaken, had come here. 
He located with his son in Elk Lake township. Grant county, where he spent 
the remainder of his life. The children of Dorthness H. Skramstad and 
wife were as follow : Gunder, Dorothy, Haaken, Peter, Enoch and Tolaf . 

Haaken Skramstad received his education in the schools of his native 
land, and there he grew to manhood on his father's farm. In 1881 he came 
to Alinnesota, locating first in Elk Lake township. Grant county. There 
he owned a good farm of one hundred and sixty acres, which he improved 
and cultivated. In 1896 he disposed of his holdings in Grant county and 
moved to Douglas county, where he purchased one hundred and seventy 



228 DOUGLAS ^Nr) GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

acres of land in section 24 of Solem township, and has made that his home 
since. He is engaged in general farming and stock raising, in which he has 
met with a very commendable degree of success. 

Haaken Skramstad married Annie Olson, daughter of Erick Olson, and 
to this union six children have been born, Amanda, Edward, Helga, Gus- 
tava, Arthur and Mabel. The family are earnest members of the Nor- 
wegian Lutheran church and are actively interested in church work. ■Mr. 
Skramstad is a Republican and has served his township as a member of the 
school board. 



OSTEN HAL\'ORSOX. 



The late Osten Halvorson, for years a well-known farmer of Elbow 
Lake township, Grant county, was born in Norway on September 29, 1865, 
the son of Halvor and Ella Estenson, also natives of Norway, who continued 
to reside in the land of their birth until 1878, when they came to the United 
States. On their arrival in this country the}- caiue direct to Minnesota and 
located in Fillmore county, where they remained for eight years. In 1878 
the}- moved to Grant county and took a homestead of one hundred and sixty 
acres in section 20, Elbow Lake township. That farm Mr. Estenson devel- 
oped and improved and there he lived until the time of his death, in 1905. 
His first wife had died in 1881. They were the parents of two children, 
Osten and Ole H. 

Ole H. Estenson was born in Norway on February 19, 1868, and came 
with his parents to Minnesota when ten years of age. He received his edu- 
cation in the public schools of Fillmore and Grant counties. After complet- 
ing his schooling he engaged in general farming and stock raising and today 
owns a good farm in the county. He is unmarried. 

After the death of his wife, in 1888, Halvor Estenson married Aasa 
A\'augh, who died soon after. He then married Ranhild Olson and to that 
union two children were born, Gilbert and Elma. After the death of Ran- 
hild Estenson, Mr. Estenson was united in marriage to Ella Hove, and to 
that union three children were born, xA.mbrose, Rudolph and Helmer. 

Osten Halverson received his education in Fillmore and Grant counties 
and grew to manhood on the farm. As a young man he engaged in farming 
for himself and later purchased two hundred acres of his father, in sections 
35 and 36, of Elbow Lake township. There he set out a fine grove and 
erected good buildings, and there he made his home until the time of his 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 229 

death in 1908. His widow is now living on the farm, at the age of fifty-one 
years. In 1885 Osten Halverson was united in marriage to Tilda Thomp- 
son, who was born in Fillmore county, this state, on Octolier 25, 1865, daugh- 
ter of John and Karen Thompson, nati\'es of Norway. The father came to 
the United States in 1851 and the mother in 1856. They were married in 
Fillmore county, where they now reside. Air. and Mrs. Thompson are the 
parents of the following children : Thomas, Henr\-, Tilda, .Vugusta, Anna. 
Ole, Theodore, Henry, Anna, Hilda and Teoline. 

To Osten and Tilda Halverson were born the following children : Hen- 
ry, John, Albert, Clarence, Clara, Oscar, Gena, Thomas, Mabel and Tena. 
John is a farmer in North Dakota. Clara is the wife of JNIorris Wallace. 
Mabel and Tena are now deceased. Mr. Halverson was a devout member 
of the .Synod Lutheran church, of which his widow is a member, and was 
an active worker in all branches of church work. The familv have long been 
prominent in the social and religious life of the community. 



AIATHE\\^ STARIHA. 



Mathew Stariha, one of the well-known and prominent business men 
of Millerville, Douglas county, where he is the proprietor of the hotel, was 
born in Ottertail county, Minnesota, on April 4, 1872, the son of Joe and 
Mary Stariha, who were born in Austria. As a young man Joe Stariha 
decided to come to America. After his arrival in this countrv he came 
direct to Minnesota and for a time lived in Stearns county, later removing 
to Ottertail county, where he operated a saloon for some years. He then 
moved to Douglas county and located at Millerville, where he li\'ed a retired 
life for some twenty years before his death, which occurred about 1896. A 
few years before his death he owned a farm, in which he took much interest. 

Mary Stariha, the mother of Mathew Stariha, died when the boy was 
but six years of age, he being one of three children, the other two being Kate 
and Anna. Kate is now deceased and Anna is the wife of Fred Abel, a car- 
penter of Millerville. After the death of his first wife, Joe Stariha was 
united in marriage to Barbara Aleverin, who is now living in Douglas county. 
To that union one son was born, August, who is now engaged in farming 
one mile east of Millerville. 

Mathew Stariha received his education in the public schools of Miller- 
ville, where he grew to manhood. He remained at home until he was twentv- 



230 DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

four years of age, when he went to North Dakota, where he worked on a 
farm for a year, after which he returned to Douglas county and presently 
rented a farm in Polk county. There he was engaged in the operation of a 
farm of one hundred and sixty acres and was quite successful. After six 
years of farm life he returned to Millerville, where he purchased his father's 
old saloon, which he conducted, in connection with the hotel, until the coun- 
try went "dry," in December, 191 5. He now conducts an establishment for 
the sale of soft drinks in connection with the hotel, and is doing a nice busi- 
ness. 

In 1899 Mathew Stariha was united in marriage to Lena Dobmeyer and 
to this union four children have been born, Juletta, Clara, Elmer and Adel- 
hide. The family are devout members of the Catholic church and have al- 
wavs taken much interest in church work. In addition to his interests in the 
hotel and soft-drinks business, Mr. Stariha is the owner of some fifteen 
acres of land near the village of Millerville, to which he devotes a portion 
of his time. Mr. Stariha is a man of industrious habits, a good neighbor, 
and a kind and affectionate husband and father. Fraternally, he is a mem- 
ber of the Foresters, and is cashier of St. Otto Court Xo. 671 of that order. 
Mr. Stariha has always taken an active interest in local affairs and is a 
patriotic citizen and a hustler for his home community. 



GUXERINUS L. ISLAXD. 

Gunerinus L. Island, another enterprising farmer and stock raiser of 
Pomme de Terre township, Grant county, was born in Xorway, April 15, 
i860. He is a son of Lars G. and Elizabeth Island, both born in X'^orway, 
the father in 1827 and the mother in 1836, both of whom are still living 
there. The father has devoted his active life to farming. These parents 
have had the following children : Gurina, Guerinus L., Mads, Patrina (de- 
ceased), .\nna (deceased), Burgetta (deceased), Ole, who Hves in Canada; 
Sigrid and Lars, both of whom live in Xorway. and Elizabeth, who makes 
her home in Canada. 

The subject of this sketch grew up in his native land and there attended 
the public schools. He came to Minnesota from his native land in 1881, 
locating at Redwing, working on a farm near there, later renting land. He 
came to Grant county in 1886 and bought eighty acres in Pomme de Terre 
township, but did not move here until 1887. He has been very successful 



DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 23 1 

as a general farmer and stock raiser on an extensive scale, having been in- 
dustrious and a good manager, and he has added to his original purchase 
until he became owner of six hundred and forty acres of land; but having 
given his son one hundred and twenty acres, he now has five hundred and 
twenty acres, on which mav be seen numerous modern buildings and a fine 
grove of fifteen acres which he set out when he first came here. He is re- 
garded as one of the leading farmers of his township. He is a Republican 
and has served as township treasurer and as a member of tlie local school 
board. 

]Mr. Island was married on October 31, 1884, to Getta Bordson, who 
was born in Goodhue county, ^Minnesota, October 9, 1867. She is a daugh- 
ter of Rollof Bordson, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work. 
To Mr. and ]\Irs. Island six children have been born, all living, namely : 
Louis, who married Alma Christopherson and has two children, Clifford and 
Lloyd ; Bergitta, who married George Jorgeus and has two children, Arnold 
and Gladys; Laura; Rose, who married Orin Ginder, of Pomme de Terre 
township, and Albert and Leonard. 



CARL HER^IAXSOX. 



Among the well-known and substantial farmers of Brandon township, 
Douglas county, is Carl Hermanson. who was born in Sweden, in 1865. He 
is the son of Herman and 'Sla.ry (Olson) Larson, both natives of Sweden, 
who are mentioned elsewhere in this work. 

Carl Hermanson received his education in the schools of his native land 
and came to the United States in 1887. He settled first in Pennsylvania, 
where he worked for about six months in the coal mines. In the spring of 
1888 he came west to Minneapolis, where he worked for a time in a saw-mill, 
afterward Ijecoming engaged in teaming, and, saving his earnings, finally 
had a team of his own. He remained in Minneapolis about fifteen years, 
after which he went to North Dakota, locating near Minot, where he home- 
steaded one hundred and sixty acres of wild prairie land. There he built a 
good frame house and lived for about a year and a half. Disposing of that 
tract at a good profit, he returned to Minnesota and purchased eighty acres 
of land in section 27 of Brandon to\\-nship, Douglas county. The place 
had almost no improvements on it but a small house, and Mr. Hermanson 
had to clear ofif part of the land before he had any crops. He has made 



232 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

many and various improvements on the farm since acquiring it, remodeling 
and adding to the house ; and his was the first round barn buih in the county, 
being erected in 19 13. This barn is large and commodious with a silo in the 
center, twelve by thirty-four feet. Mr. Hermanson is engaged in general 
farming and stock raising, devoting most of his attention to the breeding 
of thoroughbred Shorthorn cattle, of which he has a fine herd. In igi6 he 
built a large granary and machine shed, with garage, having concrete foun- 
dation and floor, and keeps his automobile and machinery in the basement 
of this building. He has one of the best-improved and most up-to-date 
farms in the county, and has met with very commendable success in his 
farming operations. He is also a stockholder in the Brandon creamery. 

In 1892 Carl Hermanson was married to Eda Dalin and to that union 
four children were born, Reuben, Edith, Ruth and Harvey, all of whom are 
still living at home with the exception of Edith, who married Ira \\'illiams, 
a farmer of Benton county, Minnesota, and they have one daughter, Xaomi. 
Ruth is a teacher in the public schools of her home township. The mother 
of these children died about nine years ago and Mr. Hermanson married 
Sophia Anderson, who was born in Sweden and who came to this country 
in 1892. The Hermansons are members of the Swedish Mission church. 



NETS M. ANDERSON. 



One of the public-spirited citizens and sul)stantial farmers of Solem 
township, Douglas county, is Nels M. Anderson, who was born in Sweden, 
July 9, i860. He is a son of Anders Monson and Hannah (Nelson) Ander- 
son, both of whom were natives also of Sweden! Anders Monson was a 
farmer in his nati\'e land of Sweden, and came to America some }'ears 
after his son, Nels M., had arrived here. Together they purchased a farm 
in Washington county, Minnesota, which they later sold at a very handsome 
profit, since which time Anders Monson has retired from active farm life. 
He and his wife are active members of the Swedish Lutheran church and are 
the parents of four children, Nels M., Anna, Swan M. and Mary, the latter 
of whom is the wife of Charles Soderholm. 

Nels M. Anderson received his education in the public schools of his 
native land and grew to maturity there. In 1878, at the age of eighteen, he 
came to ^^linnesota, locating first in \\'ashington county, where he started 
working at seven dollars a month. However, even with this small )>egin- 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 2^Ti 

ning, he was able to sa\e some money and in 1884, after his father had 
come from Sweden, he and his father purchased one hundred and sixty 
acres of land in \\'ashington county, and after cultivating and developing 
that tract for about seven years, they disposed of it profitably, and Xels M. 
mo\'ed to Douglas county, where he moved on one hundred and sixtv acres 
in section 6 of Solem township, which was a present from his father-in- 
law. He also owns eighty acres in section 7 of the same township. He has 
placed all of the improvements and buildings on his place, planting a line 
grove, as well as putting out fruit trees, and in many ways adding to the 
general attractiveness and value of his farm. He raises all the crops com- 
mon to this locality and also devotes considerable attention to the breeding 
and selling of live stock. 

On ^larch 14, r888, Mr. Anderson was married to Carrie Oslund, the 
daughter of Erick Oslund and wife, natives of Sweden, and to this union 
'five children have been born, Amanda (wife of John Strom), Edwin AL. 
Edna J-. Adolph \'. and W'ilhelm F. The family are members of the Swed- 
ish Lutheran church, of which ^Ir. Anderson has been a deacon for tv.entv 
years. 

Mr. Anderson is independent in politics and takes an active interest in 
everything that has for its object the betterment and upbuilding of his town- 
ship and community. He has served as clerk of the school board for some 
years and is ranked among the progressi\"e citizens of his community. 



EDWARD XELSOX. 



Edward Xelson, a farmer of Ea Grand township, Douglas county, is 
a nati\'e of La Crosse county, \Msconsin, where he was born on September 
II, 1867. the son of Embert and Inger ( Ingerbrightson ) X'elson, who were 
born in X'orway, he on October 21, 1833. and she about the same time. 
They received their education in the land of their birth and there grew to 
manhood and womanhood and were married. They continued to reside in 
Xorway until 1867, in which year they came to .America. On their arri\al 
in the .L^nited States they proceeded directly to Wisconsin, where the}- re- 
sided for a year, in La Crosse county, where Mr. X'^elson engaged in farm- 
ing. In 1868 the family came to J^Iinnesota and Mr. X^elson homesteaded 
one hundred and sixty acres in La Grand township. Douglas coimty, where 
he now lives. The tract at that time was all timber and brush, which re- 
quired much time and hard labor to clear, ready for the planting of the crops 



234 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

that were to supply himself and family with food. In time the farm was de- 
veloped and improved and became one of the ideal farms of the township. 
Mr. Nelson was a good farmer, a firm believer in intensive farming and 
thorough cultivation, and was quite successful with his general farming and 
Stock raising. His quarter section was reduced by ten acres at the time the 
railroad was constructed through this section. 

To Embert and Inger Nelson were born the following children : Chris- 
tian, John, Christ, Anna, Edward. Tilda, Alfred, Carrie and Ida. Christian, 
John, Christ and Anna were born in Norway and the first two died in that 
country, while Christ died at Osakis, Minnesota. Edward was born, as stat- 
ed, in Wisconsin, and the other children were born on the homestead in 
Douglas countv. The family are acti\ e members of the East Moe Lutheran 
church and are acti\e in church work. Mr. Nelson always took a keen in- 
terest in the affairs of the township and has had much to do with the civic 
life of the community, having served his township as a member of the 
school board, as sui^ervisor and as road boss, ^\'hile filling the latter posi- 
tion he did much for the improvement of the roads of his district and has 
ever been recognized as an exceptional road builder. As a member of the 
school board he accomplished much for the schools of the township, as he 
was a strong advocate for the best of schools. 

Edward Nelson, received his education in the schools of Douglas 
county, having attended school in the old log school house of early days. 
He grew to manhood on the old homestead and there he has continued to 
live. His mother died in 1901 and his father lives with him. He is engaged 
in general farming and stock raising, in which he has been quite successful. 

In 1906 Edward Nelson was united in marriage to Mary Lee, who was 
born in Urness township, Douglas county, the daughter of Thore and Amb- 
jor (Arneson ) Lee. Mr. and :\Irs. Lee were natives of Norway and located 
in Urness township in an early day and there bought four hundred and 
eighty acres of land and became prominent and successful residents of the 
township. Thev took much interest in the social and religious activities of 
the community in which they lived and were held in high esteem by all. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Lee were born the following children: Halvor, Andrew, 
Arne, Mary, Sophia, Arne, Halvor, Nettie and Mar\'. 

To Edward and Mary Nelson has been lx)rn, one child, a daughter. 
Elsie. Mr. and Mrs. Nelson are memljers of the Moe Lutheran church and 
are among the prominent and active workers of the society. ' They take 
much interest in the social and religious activities of the community and 
are helpful in promoting all good works in that neighborhood. 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 235 

JEXS TOLLEFSOX. 

Jens Tollefson, a succesful farmer and a well-known resident of Pelican 
Lake township, Grant county, was born in Norway, on Alay 2. 1841, being 
the son of Tolef and Bertha ( Gruthong) Egstad. 

Lars Egstad. the paternal grandfather of Jens Tollefson, was a farmer 
in Xorway. He lived his life in the land of his birth and was a soldier in 
the war with Sweden, giving his countr)- some years of good service. Thomas 
Egstad, the great-grandfather, was a farmer, and was perhaps one of the first 
to hold the farm estate that has been in the family for many }ears. Lars 
Egstad was born and lived on that estate and there his family of children 
were born. He died there in 1873 ^^i^ several years after his death his 
widow came to the United States to join her children, who had already set- 
tled in this country. She was the mother of the following children : Lars, 
Ole, Jens, Anna, Tonetta, Lauritz, Andrew and Bernt. The family were 
prominent in their home community in Norway and have here established 
themselves in the social, religious and business life of their respective town- 
ships. 

Jens Tollefson received his education in the public schools of Norway. 
There he engaged in farming and learned well the principles of the success- 
ful agriculturist. In 1873 he decided to come to America and after his 
arrival in this country he came direct to ^Minnesota and purchased one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of land in section 8, Pelican Lake township. Grant 
county. That land he developed and improved and there he engaged in 
general farming and stock raising, in which he was successful. He is a firm 
believer in the principles of intensive farming and in the most thorough cul- 
tivation of the soil. The farm at the time Air. Tollefson settled here was. 
for the most part, undeveloped and unimproved, and it has been by the 
closest application and the severest kind of work that the place has been 
made one of the ideal farms of the community. In his early days here he 
endured many of the hardships of the early pioneer life, yet he was deter- 
mined to succeed, and today he is recognized as one of the prominent and 
successful farmers of the township. 

On September 20, 1886, Jens Tollefson was united in marriage to Anna 
I\Ioe, who was born on May 30, 1849, and to this union the following chil- 
dren have been Ixirn : AI. M., Oscar, Lewis, Theolena, Carrie. Josie and 
Tulia. ]\Ir. and Mrs. Tollefson are active members of the Norwegian Luth- 
eran church and have always taken much interest in church work. They 
have long been prominent in the social and religious life of the community. 



236 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES^ MINNESOTA. 

where they are held in the highest esteem by all who know them. Mr. Tol- 
lefson has always lieen interested in the local affairs of the township and 
has served as a member of the school board, giving careful attention to the 
progress and development of the schools of his district, as he has always 
advocated the best possible educational advantages for the children. 



JOHN C. BATES. 



John C. Bates, a well-known and successful farmer of North Ottawa 
township, Grant county, was born in German}- on February 2, 1864, and 
lived there until he was seven years of age. His parents died in the Father- 
land, when the young son was but a child. He attended school for one year 
in his native land, then he came to the United States with an aunt, Sophia 
Deetz, in 1871. The aunt located in Lee county, Illinois, and there John C. 
Bates recei\'ed his education in the public schools. He remembers being in 
Chicago at the time of the great fire, although he was but a child at that 
time. As a young man he engaged in farming in TaSalle county, Illinois, 
as a renter. He later removed to Sac City, Iowa, and later rented land in 
the county, and remained there for five years. 

In 1902 John C. Bates left his home in Iowa and came to ^linnesota 
and here he purchased three hundred and twenty acres of land in North 
Ottawa township. Grant county, where he is in partnership with his brother- 
in-law, Fred W'. Kutter, in general farming and stock raising, Mr. Bates 
owning much the greater part of the lami and stock. Much has been done 
in the way of development and improvement and the place is one of the 
valuable ones in the township. 

John C. Bates is a Republican and has always taken much interest in 
local affairs and the growth and the development of the township, although 
he does not aspire to office. The family attend the Evangelical church of the 
township, but Mr. Bates was reared a German Lutheran. He is liberal in 
his \'iews and he and his family are prominent in the social and the religious 
life of the comnuuiity and are held in high esteem by all who know them. 

John C. Bates was united in marriage in 1893 to Rosa M. Kutter, who 
was born in Illinois on February 17. 1874, the daughter of Gottlieb and Rosa 
Kutter, who came from Germany in an early day and settled in La Salle 
county, Illinois, where the father died in 1906, at the age of seventy-eight 
years. The mother died in 1903, at the age of fifty-six years. To John C. 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 237 

and Rosa Bates have been born the following children : Mary, Sophia, 
Edith, Frank, Lillie, Jennie, George and Beulah, all of whom are living. 

John C. Bates has lived an active life and has accomplished much that 
is of value, not to himself and family alone, but to the township and the 
county in which he lives. Coming to a strange land and among strange people, 
an orphan at the age of seven years, he had his own way to make in the world, 
and as soon as he was old enough he begin the task of looking after himself. 
Beginning life as a farmer, on rented land, he has today one of the best farm 
in North Ottawa township, all of which is under high cultivation, well im- 
pro\-ed and well stocked. His farm home is one of the best-kept places in 
the township and there he and his family live a contented and happy life, 
as well as a most independent one. 



MARTIN JOHNSON. 



Martin Johnson, one of the leading farmers of Pomme de Terre town- 
ship. Grant county, was born in Norway, November 8, 1863. He is a son 
of John and Ingeborg Johnson, both natives of Norway, from which coun- 
try they came to the United States, settling in. Rock county, Wisconsin, in 
1868, and there the death of John Johnson occurred in 1870. flis widow is 
now living at Waterford. Wisconsin at an advanced age. They were par- 
ents of four children : Gunder. who lives in South Dakota ; Amund, who 
li\'es in Ottertail county, Minnesota; Martin, the subject of this sketch, and 
Gunder, second, who lives in Milwaukee. After the death of John Johnson, 
the father of the above named children, his widow married Olc Larson, who 
is now deceased. To that second union one child was born, Louisa, who 
lives with her mother in Waterford, Wisconsin. 

Martin Johnson was reared on the farm in Wisconsin, and he recei\'ed 
his education in the public schools, his text-book training, ho\ve\er, being 
very limited, for he had to start to work when only ten years of age. After 
the death of his father he was compelled to assist his mother make a living. 
He came to Minnesota in i88t and worked out on a farm in Douglas county 
and, saving his earnings, in the fall of 1887 he bought one hundred and 
sixty acres in Pomme de Terre township. Grant county, adding eighty acres 
later, and now owns a valuable and well-kept farm of two hundred and 
forty acres, on which may be seen a splendid grove and convenient build- 
ings. Mr. Johnson carries on general farming and stock raising success- 



238 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

fully. He formerly had another farm of one hundred and sixty acres in an- 
other part of Pomme de Terre township. He lived awhile in the village of 
Elbow Lake, but is now back on his farm. After li\ing a short period on 
his quarter section he sold it. Mr. Jolinson is a Republican. He and his 
family belong to the United Lutheran church at Rock Prairie, in Stony 
Brook township. 

Mr. Johnson was married in 1896 to Helga Foslen, who was born in 
1863 in Norway, where her parents lived and died. To Mr. and jNIrs. John- 
son two children have been Ijorn, Ida Josephine and Helmer Melvin. Mrs. 
Johnson had been previously married, her first husband having been Tean- 
der Torgeson, by whom two children were born, Stella, who is living, and 
Oscar, who died on December 29, 191 5 at the age of twenty-two years. Mr. 
Johnson is deserving of a great deal of credit for what he has accomplished, 
for he started without capital : began farming raw land with oxen and lived 
in a log house until 1899. 



ERICK O. OSLUND. 



One of the pioneer farmers of Douglas county is Erick O. Oslund, who 
came to the county when it was almost an unbroken tract of wilderness and 
he literally hewed out of the wilderness a beautiful home for himself and 
family by perseverance and indefatigable effort. He was born in Sweden 
on January i, 1842, and is a son of Olaf Swenson and Karen Oslund, botli 
of whom were nati\-es of Sweden. Olaf Swenson came to America in 1873, 
some years after the arrival of his son, Erick O., and here he lived the re- 
mainder of his life. He was the father of three children, SAven, Mary and 
Erick O., the immediate subject of this review. 

P>ick O. Oslund received a limited education in the schools of his na- 
tive land and in 1870 came to America. He located in Douglas county, 
Minnesota, in Solem township where he bought three hundred and forty 
acres of land on Red Rock lake. There were no roads in those days and 
his nearest market was at Morris, two and three days being required to 
make the trip with a team. His first home was a small log cabin, tweh'e 
by twelve in dimensions, in which he li\'ed for about two years, when he 
built a better one. He has made many and various impro\-ements on his 
farm and has gradually added to his land holdings until at one time he was 
the owner of much land in Douglas and Grant counties. His home is beau- 
tifully located on the shores of Red Rock lake, and his is one of the most 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 2T,C) 

attractive farms in the township. He has always kept abreast of the times 
on all agricultural matters and has his farm well equipped with all the mod- 
ern machinery for farming. He once walked to Benson to buy a binder for 
his wheat crop. 

In 1870 Erick O. Oslund was married to Annie Simonson and to this 
union ha\-e been born four children, Carrie, Annie, Ole E. and Selma. The 
family are earnest and de\"oted members of the Swedish Lutheran church 
and take an active interest in the affairs of that denomination. ]\lr. Oslund 
was one of the organizers of the Swedish Lutheran church in his commun- 
ity and has served as trustee of the local church. 

Mr. Oslund is indeed one of the sturdy pioneers of this north country, 
and to such as he are we indebted for the beautiful homes and well-tillecl 
acres which go to make Douglas county one of the beautv spots of the state. 



OLE O. SAXD. 



Ole O. Sand, one of the best-known farmers of Elbow Lake townsliip, 
Grant county, was Ijorn in Xorway, September 18, 1863. He is a son of 
Ole H. and Annie Sand, natives of X^orway where they grew up and mar- 
ried, immigrating with their family to Clinton, Illinois, in June, 1 871, and 
in 1872 the}- came on to Freeborn count}-, Minnesota, and the following 
year to Grant county where the father took up a hon-iestead of one hundred 
and sixty acres in Elbow Lake township, to which he later added until he 
had four hundred and eighty acres, which he improved and on which he 
carried on general farming extensively until his death, June 27, 1913, at the 
age of seventy-six years. His w-idow survives, being now seventy-six. The 
father was independent in politics, he belonged to the United Lutheran 
church, to which the mother also belongs. They assisted in organizing the 
church at Elbow Lake. To these parents the following children were b(orn : 
Ole O. of this sketch; Henry O. was ne.xt in order: Annie is a teacher in 
the Minneapolis schools, she attended Columbia L'ni\-ersity, X'ew York, dar- 
ing the summer of 1916; Kittle O., was next in order; Sarah is the wife of 
K. Christopherson of EJbow Lake; Lars O. lives in the village of \\'endell ; 
INIary is the wife of E. A. Uybdal of Elbow Lake. These children are all 
living at this writing (1916). 

Ole O. Sand was reared on the homestead, and he received a public 
school education. He has always engaged in farming and is now owner of 



240 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

one of the choice farnis of Lawrence township, consisting of four hundred 
and twenty acres, inchiding the old homestead, which he has kept well im- 
proved and under a fine state of cultivation, and is carr\nng on general 
farming and stock raising on a large scale. He is also a stockholder in the 
Farmers and Merchants Bank at Wendell, in which institution he is a di- 
rector, his father having also been a stockholder and director. Politicailv, 
he is an independent \oter. He lias served both as assessor and as a mem- 
ber of the school board. He belongs to the United Lutheran church. He 
has remained unmarried. 



HAXS O. HAXSOX. 

Hans O. Hanson, member of the firm of Hanson Brothers, merchants, 
of Holmes City, is one' of the enterprising men of Douglas county and is 
entitled to mention in a work of this nature. He was born in Sweden, a 
son of P. and Mary ( Waginus ) Hanson, both natives of Jemtland, Sweden, 
where they grew up and were married. They continued to reside there 
until 1 89 1, when they emigrated with their family to America, coming direct 
to ^linnesota and settling in the Holmes City neighborhood. The father 
learned the tailor's trade in his nati\e land, which he followed there, but 
after settling in Douglas county devoted his attention to farming, becoming 
owner of a small farm. His family consisted of the following children: 
Hans O., the subject of this sketch; Albert, who is a member of the mer- 
cantile firm of Hanson Brothers, of Holmes City, and Paul \\'., who makes 
his home at Superior. \A'isconsin, where he follows his profession of 
optometrist. 

Hans O. Hanson spent his boyhood in Sweden and there received a 
common-school education. After coming to Minnesota he engaged in vari- 
ous occupations until 191 1 when, on November 10 of that year he and his 
brother, Albert, purchased the stock of goods of S. O. A\^aginus at Holmes 
CLty, and have since conducted the store under the firm name of Hanson 
Brothers. Thev carry a general line of merchandise and enjoy a large and 
growing trade with the town and surrounding country. In the fall of 191^ 
thev erected a substantial and attracti\e new building. 

The subject of this sketch devotes his attention to. the management of 
the store, while his brother operates the well-impro\ed and \aluable farm 
which tlie firm owns near Holmes Citv. ThcA' have been verv successful 




HANS O. AND ALP.EUT HANSON. 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 24I 

in a business way owing to their industry and fair dealings. They were 
reared in the faith of the Baptist church, to which their parents belonged 
from early life. Politically they are independent. 

Albert Hanson married Hilda Oberg and lives near Holmes City on 
the farm. Hans O. Hanson has had a somewhat \-aried career. At one 
time he homesteaded a tract in Roseau county. He proved up the same 
and still owns it. While there he organized the town of Huss and served 
for some time as postmaster there. 



CARL NELSON. 



Among the many successful farmers of Pelican Lake township, Grant 
county, is Carl Nelson, who was born in Sweden on October 4, 1854, the son 
of Nels and Marie ( Pearson ) Johnson, also natives of that country, who 
were there educated in the public schools, grew to manhood and womanhood 
and were married, and lived the greater part of their lives in the land of 
their birth. When well advanced in years, they came to the United States in 
1874, to join their children, who had located in this country some years be- 
fore. Llere they made their home with the son, Johnas, who lived in Peli- 
can Lake township, where Nels Johnson died in 1880, at the age of sixty- 
eight years. His widow died in 1896 at the age of eighty-five years. They 
were devout members of the Lutheran church, and during younger days 
took much interest in church work. They were e>:cellent people and held in 
the highest regard by all who knew them. They were the parents of six 
children, those besides the subject of this sketch being John, Johnas, Gustaf, 
Lizzie and Mina, all of whom are living save the latter. 

Carl Nelson received his education in the public schools of his native 
country and there grew to manhood. He decided that he would come to 
America and after landing in this country, proceeded to Rock county, Wis- 
consin, where he lived for some years. He was married on October 18, 
1884, to Christina Newhouse, who was torn in Rock county, Wisconsin, the 
daughter of Christopher and Ture ( Halvorson) Newhouse, natives of Nor- 
way. Soon after their marriage, Carl Nelson and wife came to Minnesota, 
and here l\Ir. Nelson purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land in sec- 
tion 8 of Pelican Lake township. Grant county, to which he later added an- 
other quarter section. Mr. Nelson purcha.sed his first land in the township 
(i6a) 



242 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

in 1879, some five years before he was married. The farm lie has developed 
and improved and today has one of the ideal farms of the township, where 
he is engaged in general farming and stock raising, in which he has been 
quite successful. 

Carl and Christina Nelson are the parents of four children, Clarence, 
Charles, William and Henry. Clarence Nelson married Agnes Elberling, and 
to this union five children have been born. He lives on one of his father's 
farms, where he engages in general farming and stock raising. Carl Nelson 
and wife are active members of the Nor\\'egian Lutheran church, and are 
prominent residents of the community, where they are held in the highest 
esteem. In addition to his farm interests, Mr. Nelson is a stockholder in the 
creamery company at Ashby. 

Christopher Newhouse was born on July 13, 1812, and came to the 
United States in 1839, landing at New York on September 27 of that year 
with but ten dollars. He located in ^^'isconsin, and later owned one hun- 
dred and sixtv acres of land. He married Ture Halvorson, the daughter of 
Halvor Halvorson, and to that union five children were bom, Oliver and 
Christopher (both deceased). Christopher. Torgan, and Christina. Mrs. 
Ture Newhouse is now deceased. She and Mr. Newhouse were active mem- 
bers of the Norwegian Lutheran church, and highly respected people. 



PETER STREED. 



Peter Streed, a native of Swedeii and one of the successful and well- 
known farmers of Carlos township, Douglas county, was born on August 
2, 1870, the son of August and Anna Streed, both of whom were natives of 
Sweden. The parents have spent their lives in their native countrv', where 
the father is engaged in farming. They are the parents of five children, 
Herman, Ida, Alfred, Anna and Peter. Herman came to the United States 
and engaged in mining in Colorado, where he died some years ago. The 
rest of the family, besides the subject of this sketch, are still residents of 
the land of their births. 

Peter Streed received his early schooling in his native land and attended 
night school after coming to the United States. He was eighteen years of 
age when he decided to locate in America. On landing in this country, he 
came directly to Minnesota, locating in Chisago county, where he was en- 
gaged as a farm hand for a year. He then went to Idaho, with an micle. 



DOUGLAS AXD GRAXT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 243 

and worked there as a miner for some years. During his experience as a 
miner he worked in. Idaho, Colorado and Utah and mined copper, gold and 
silver. In 1908 he returned to Minnesota and "this time located in Douglas 
county, where he bought a fami of one hundred and sixty acres in section 
14 of Carlos township. He has made many improvements on the place, hav- 
ing remodeled and repaired the house, built a fine barn, thirty by fiftv-two 
feet, and a silo, fourteen by thirty-three feet, the silo being one of the first to 
be built in the county. It is of tile blocks and was constructed in 1912. Mr. 
Streed now has some fifty-five acres under cultivation, the balance being in 
meadow and pasture, with some little timber. He is engaged in general 
fanning and stock raising, and has been quite successful, being progressive 
and believing in intensive farming and thorough cultivation. 

On August 22, 1908, Peter Streed was united in marriage to !\Irs. Anna 
Dahlstrom, widow of Fred Dahlstrom. Before her marriage to Air. DaJil- 
strom she was Anna Johnson, a native of Sweden, who came to the United 
States early in life. To ^Ir. and Mrs. Streed one child has been bom, 
Edith Henrietta, whose birth occurred on July 10. 1909. By her first mar- 
riage Mrs. Streed was the mother of fi\e children, Agnes. Freda, ]\Iinnie. 
Lillian and Edna, all of whom are at home. Agnes and Freda Dahlstrom 
are teachers, the former teaching at district Xo. 62 and the later in the con- 
solidated school at ^liltona. 

The farm now owned by Peter Streed was formerly the farm home of 
Fred Dahlstrom, and was purchased from the heirs by ]Mr. Streed. Long 
Prairie River runs through the farm and tlie house and barn are nicely sit- 
uated on the banks of the stream, giving a most pleasing effect. With the 
beautiful buildings, which are well kept, overlooking the l^eautiful stream of 
water. Mr. and Mrs. Streed have one of the pleasantest homes in the county. 
They take much pleasure in the upkeep of the place, and one has but to 
visit the home to know the pleasures of that family circle. ]\Ir. and ^Irs. 
Streed are active members of the Lutheran church and take much interest 
in church work. 

Mr. Streed is alive not only to his own interests, but those of the town- 
ship and the county as well. Because of his wide experiences, and excellent 
judgment, together with his progressive spirit and honest dealings, Mr. 
Streed is a man of large influence in the commimity. In manv respects he 
has demonstrated the fact that to be a successful farmer and stockman as 
well as a home builder, a man must be alive to the conditions with which he 
has to contend. Spending many years of his life in the mines and a\\ay 



244 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

from the finer influences of civilization, he has engaged in one of the most 
important occupations of man, and at a time when farming processes have 
been undergoing such wonderful changes; yet he has kept abreast o( the 
most successful agriculturists and is meeting with success. He is an exten- 
sive breeder of fine Holstein cattle and is a member of the executive com- 
mittee of the Douglas County Breeders' Association. He is a stockholder 
in the Carlos Co-operative Creamery Company and has served as secretary 
and manager of the organization since 191 1. He also has served and is now 
serving as clerk of the school board. 



GUSTAF ANDERSON. 



One of the pioneers of Douglas county who has had a varied and inter- 
esting career is Gustaf Anderson, a farmer of Belle River town.ship. He 
was born in Sv.'eden, May 23, 1846, and is a son of Andres Jonasson and 
Britta Larson, natives of Sweden in which country they farmed on a small 
scale and there reared their family. There the father died, after which the 
mother came to the United States, in 1878, to join her children, whu were 
named as follow: John, who emigrated to America in 1854; Christine, Anna, 
Gustaf, August, Charlotta, Sarah and Clara. 

Gustaf Anderson grew up in Sweden and attended school there. He 
came to Minnesota in 1863 to join his brother, John, who serv'ed in the Civil 
War, in the Third Regiment, Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, as a corporal. 
During the war Gustaf Anderson was employed by the government to un- 
load steamships of war supplies, and while thus employed took sick and was 
confined for a protracted period. Upon his recovery he came to Douglas 
county and took up a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres in Belle 
River township where he has since engaged in general farming. He now 
owns one hundred and twenty acres there, most of which he cleared and on 
which he put all the impro\-ements. He has been one of our most industrious 
farmers for a period of forty-six years, having come here in 1870, and is 
thus among the early settlers. He also owns stock in the Belle River 
creamery. 

Mr. Anderson was married on October 2^,, 1875, to Ida Nordquist, 
and to their union the following children were born : Charles, who served 
for some time in the Forty-fifth Regiment, United States Infantry, fought 
in the Philippines and is now farming in Canada; Samuel, who lives at In- 



DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 245 

ternational Falls, Minnesota; George, who lives in North Dakota; Julius. 
next in order of birth, and Jennie and Harry, both at home. Mr. Anderson 
is a Republican and served thtee years on the township board and was clerk 
of his township for fifteen years. 



AAILLIAM B. SCHMIDT. 

\A'illiam B. Schmidt, a successful business man of Herman, was Ixjm 
on January 24, 1868, at New Ulm, Minnesota, the son of Carl and Dorothy 
(Fenn) Schmidt, natives of Germany, who in 1855 came tu the United 
States and for a time located in Chicago, where they were married. They 
later came to Minnesota where they homesteaded one htmdred and sixty 
acres of land in Brown county, four miles from New Ulm. That was in 
1S5C) and they were soon to take part in the Indian trouble in that section. 
They were required to leave their home during the Indian uprising in 1862. 
and go to New Ulm and were nearly overtaken by the Indians on the way. 
After the massacre and the Indians had lieen subdued thev returned to their 
home. They remained on the farm until the year of the last devastation by 
the grasshoppers when they left the farm and removed to St. Paul, where 
^Ir. Schmidt engaged in blacksmithing for three years. The family then 
became residents of Menominee, Wisconsin, where 'Sir. Schmidt continued 
his work as a blacksmith until 1909. In that year his wife died and he re- 
turned to St. Paul, where he lives a retired life. 

Carl and Dorothy Schmidt were the parents of the following c'lildren : 
Anna, Charles, Henry, Bertha, [Minnie, \\'illiam B., Lizzje, Clara and two 
who died in infancy. The older children of the family experienced many 
of the hardships of pioneer life. At the time of the massacre, Carl Schmidt 
took an active part in the battle at New Ulm and later enlisted as a soldier 
in the Ci\-il War. 

William B. Schmidt was educated in the schools of \Msconsin and at 
St. Paul. After completing his education he learned the blacksmith trade 
under the direction of his father and for a time worked with the latter. He 
later went to Chicago and then back to his father's shop at Menominee, Wis- 
consin, where he remained for a time. After some years he removed to St. 
Paul where be worked at his trade until 1890 when he came o\-er to this 
part of the state and located at Herman, where he opened the .shop which he 



246 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

has since conducted. In 191 3 he enlarged his business opportunities by the 
erection of a building fifty by one hundred feet, which he uses as a garage. 
In connection with his work in the shop he is selling the Mitchell and Ford 
automobiles; has been quite successful and has an extensive business. 

In 18S9 W. B. Schmidt was united in marriage to Julia Kochendorfer, 
who was born at Menominee, Wisconsin, and to this union the following 
children have been born, Wilbur R., Helen, Walter, Myrtle, Ruth, Marjorie, 
Stanley, Carl and Anna. The sons, Wilbur and Walter Schmidt, are engaged 
in business with their father, under the firm name of W. B. Schmidt & Sons. 
Fraternally, Mr. Schmidt is a member of the Modern Woodmen of Ameri- 
ca and of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He has always taken an 
interest in local affairs and has done much to advance the growth and busi- 
ness interests of his home town. 



OLAUS O. BAH. 



Olaus O. Bah, one of the well-known and successful farmers of Erdahl 
township, Grant county, was born in Norway on February 12, 1855, the son 
of Ola A. and Bertha Bah, natives of Norway, who continued to live in their 
native land until 1870, when they came to America. On their arrival in the 
United States they came directly to Minnesota and for a short time remained 
at Preston, Fillmore county, where they purchased an ox team and a wagon, 
with which to make the journey to Grant county, where Mr. Bah home- 
steaded one hundred and sixty acres of land in section 2 of Erdahl township. 
A small dug-out with a sod roof was constructed, and that was their resi- 
dence for the first vear, after which a log house with a sod roof was erected. 
In time the farm was developed and better buildings erected. The first year 
there was no crop raised on the farm, but the second year some three acres 
of wheat was harvested. In time the place became one of the desirable farms 
of the township, and there Ola A. Bah engaged in general farming and stock 
raising until the time of his death in 1891. he then being sixty-nine years of 
age. His widow died the next year, at the age of sixty-eight years. They 
w-ere the parents of six children, H. I'., M. G., Sophia, Olaus, Minnie and 
Andrew, all of whom are now deceased, with the exceptions of Olaus and 
Andrew. Mr. and Mrs. Bah were active members of the Norwegian Lu- 
theran church, took much interest in church work and were prominent in 
the social and religious life of the community, where they were held in the 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 247 

higliest regard and esteem by all who kne\v them. Mr. Bah ahvaj's took a 
keen interest in local affairs and had nuich to do with the de\'elopment and 
the growth of the township. He was a man of much ability and because of 
his wide experience and excellent judgment was often consulted in matters 
relating to the ci\-ic at^'airs of the township and the county. 

Olaus O. Bah was fifteen years of age when the family came to this 
country. He received his education in the public schools of Norway and 
attended school for four months in Erdahl township. He grew tO' manhood 
on the home farm, assisting his father with the farm work, and remained at 
home until 1881, in which year he was united in marriage to Mary Thomp- 
son, the daughter of Tosten Olson and Magdalena Aaskjer (Aaskjer being 
the Norwegian family name), who came to the United States in 1876 and 
made their home with their son, Ole A. Thompson, for some eight or nine 
years, at the end of which time they removed to Evansville township, where 
they homesteaded forty acres, which they developed and improved, and there 
made their home for some years. They later returned to Erdahl township, 
where they lived until the time of their deaths. They were the parents of 
the following children, Andrew, Ole A., Anna, Mary and Tosten. Anna is 
the widow of G. M. Bah, who was a successful farmer of the township; Ole 
A. Thompson is a prominent resident of Grant county; Andrew is deceased 
and Tosten is engaged in farming in North Dakota. 

Soon after his marriage Olaus O. Bah homesteaded forty acres in sec- 
tion 12 of Erdahl township, and there he erected a frame house, fourteen by 
fourteen feet, which was the family residence for some years. The farm 
was soon developed and with much hard work Mr. Bah became one of the 
successful farmers of the township. He enlarged his farm to one hundred 
and seven acres and built a good and substantial house and barn. He plant- 
ed a splendid grove of three acres and made other valuable and substantial 
improvements. For many years he devoted his time to grain farming, but is 
now devoting much of his time to stock raising and has a fine herd of Short- 
horn cattle and many fine hogs. He is progressive in his methods and is a 
strong advocate of intensi^•e farming and the thorough cultivation of the 
soil and the keeping of the best of stock. 

To Olaus O. and Mary Bah have been born the following children : 
Ole, Martin, Anna, Clara, Leonard, Laura. Bessie and Laura, the last two 
of whom are now deceased. Ole is married to Tillie Johnson and is engaged 
in general farming and stock raising in Pelican Lake township ; Anna is the 
wife of John Olson, a well-known farmer of Evansville township, Douglas 



248 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

county. Tliev are the parents of three children, Myrtle, Orlan and Joseph. 
The other children are at home with their parents. Mr. and Mrs. Bah are 
active memhers of the Norwegian Lutheran church, take much interest in 
church work and are prominent in the social and religious life of the com- 
munitv. Thev are devoted to the interests of their family and are held in 
the highest regard hy all. They are hospitable and take much pleasure in 
the entertainment of the friends and neighbors, their home often being the 
scene of happy gatherings. Mr. Bah has always taken an active interest in 
the affairs of the township and has had much to do with its civic life. He 
has been particularly interested in the development of the schools and has 
had much to do with the splendid system of education now established in 
the district. For the past twenty-one years he has been clerk of his home 
district, to which he has given care and attention. He is a supporter of all 
worthv causes that have a tendency to promote the best interests of the 
township and the county. He is a stockholder in the farmers elevator at 
Erdahl, in the affairs of which he has taken much interest. 



HARVEY E. LINDSEY, 



Harvey E. Lindsev, one of the well-known and successful farmers of 
North Ottawa township, Grant county, was born in Whiteside county, Illi- 
nois, on April 24, 1857, the son of Edwin and Lois (Hewett) Lindsey, 
who were born in Maine and in the state of New York, respectively, he hav- 
ing been born in 1816. Mr. and I\Irs. Lindsey were pioneer settlers in 
Illinois, where thev li\ed until 1866, when they removed to Tamo county, 
Iowa, where the mother died in 1867. The father died in Clinton county, 
Iowa, in 1884, while on a visit. Some years after the death of his wife, 
Edward Lindsey homesteaded in Osceola county, Iowa, and there made his 
home until the time of his death. Mr. and ]\Irs. Lindsey were the parents 
of the following children: Rose, Harvey E., Ophelia, Henry and Man- 
ville. Ro.se died in California in 1915; Ophelia is now a resident of Cali- 
fornia; Llenry and Manville are deceased, the former dying in 1895 ^"d 
the latter in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Lindsey were active members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church and took much interest in church work. 

Harvey E. Lindsey received his education in the public schools of Illi- 
nois and Iowa, and grew to manhood on the farm, where as a lad he as- 
sisted his father with the farm work. As a young man he engaged in 



DOL'GLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 249 

farming and operated his lather's farm of one hmidred and sixty acres, 
until the father's death. He later rented land and in 1908 came to Minne- 
sota, and here he and his sister Ophelia bought four hundred acres of land 
in North Ottawa township. Grant county, which they yet own. 'Sir. Lind- 
sey has placed many valuable improvements on the place, and is engaged in 
general farming and stock raising, in which he has been quite successful. 
yir. Lindsey is identified with the Republican party and has always taken 
an active interest in local affairs. A\'hile residing in Iowa he was for a 
number of years a township trustee, and is now a member of the board of 
supervisors of North Ottawa township. He and wife are active members 
of the Evangelical church of North Ottawa township, ]\Ir. Lindsev being 
one of the trustees of the same. 

Tn 1884 Harvey E. Lindsey was united in marriage to Jessie R. Long, 
who was bom in England on July 25, 1864, the daughter of George and 
Rebecca Long, the former of whom is now dead and the latter of whom 
still lives in that country. To this union the following children have been 
born: AMlliam, Lela, Florence, George, Ethel, Isabelle and Percv (twins), 
Charles and Gladys, all of whom are living. Florence married James 
Phillips of A\'endell, and has one child, a son, Ronald. 

In addition to his extensive interests on his own farm, Harvev E. 
Lindsey is the manager of twenty-five hundred acres of land in Grant and 
Traverse counties, the owners of which are for the most part Iowa people. 
As a general farmer and business man, ^fr. I-indsey is recognized as a man 
of much ability and of the highest integrity. 



ARTHUR C. CHRISTENSON. 

Evans\ille township, Douglas county, has been a good enough place for 
Arthur C. Christenson. who is spending his life in his native localitv, farm- 
ing for a li^•elihood. He was horn on the old homestead there. ^March 2j. 
1874, and is a son of Nels C. and Henricka ( Kosen) Christenson, a sketch 
of whom, appears elsewhere in this work. 

Arthur C. Christenson was reared on the home farm, and he recei\ed 
a public school education. When young he hired out three years to E. A. 
Morgan, a farmer in Erdahl township. Then, after spending some time at 
home, went to Colorado, where he worked about two years in a smelter. 
But before going West he purchased eighty acres in Evansville township, 



250 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

and while in Colorado bought another forty joining it. Upon his return to 
Douglas county he began farming on his own land, which he has since oper- 
ated and improved. In 1903 he built a comfortable dwelling, which he re- 
modeled in 19 1 5 into a modern two-story frame house, equipped with bath, 
h(jt and cold water, furnace lieat and acetylene lights. In 1903 he also 
built a good barn. He has planted a grove of about three thousand trees. 
Mr. Christenson was married on November 11, 1903, to I^ena Thom.p- 
son of Grant county, and to their union five children have been born, 
namelv : Walter, the eldest ; Franklin, deceased ; Earle, who died in in- 
fancv. and Gladys Mildred and Arley William, who are with their parents. 
The Christensons belong to the Norwegian Lutheran church. 



NELS C. CFIRISTENSON. 

Nels C. Christenson, a retired farmer of Evansville township, Douglas 
county, was born in Denmark, December i, 1845, ^ son of Nels and Anna 
Katherina (Nelson) Christenson, also natives of Denmark, where they 
grew up and were married and li\-ed on a farm until emigrating to Amer- 
ica in 1885. They lived with their son Martin, in Douglas county, where 
they died. 

Nels C. Christenson grew to manhood in Denmark where he attended 
school. He came to America in 1868, settling at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
and in the following year came on to Minnesota, and in May of that year 
took up a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres in Evansville town- 
ship, Douglas county, which he improved to some extent, using an ox-team 
for some time. His first house was a dug-out. After two years he sold 
his right, and hired to Hendrick Kosen, later marrying one of the latter's 
daughters, and Mr. Kosen made his home with them in his old age until 
his death, at which time his farm became the property of Mr. Christenson. 
It consisted of one hundred and sixty acres. Mr. Christenson made all the 
the improvements and ran the place himself after taking up his residence 
there, owing to the ill health of the owner, who added to the place until at 
the time of his death it consisted of three hundred and eighty acres. 

Mr. Christenson has been very successful as a general farmer. He 
also owns valuable property in the village of Evansville. He has been liv- 
ing in retirement since [910. He was married in 1871 to Henricka P. 
Kosen, and to their union nine children have been bom, namely: Henry, 



DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 25 1 

wlio is a merchant at Brandon; Arthur C, who is farming in E\-ansville 
towship; Emil, deceased: DagTiiar, the wife of D. J. Davidson; Louisa, the 
wife of Albert Halmgren, who is in partnership with Henry Christenson in 
Brandon; Stella, the wife of AI. A. Cole, of Sauk Center; Ida, the wife of 
J. C. Swift, who operates his father-in-law's farm; Herbert, who is in part- 
nership with Mr. Swift in farming the homestead, and Elma, who married 
J. B. Johnson, a restaurant keeper at Wendell. Mr. Christenson served as 
township super\-isor for twelve years and also served as director and school 
treasurer in District No. 52. He is a member of the Norwegian Lutheran 
church, of which he was at one time trustee. 



CHARLES ANDERSON. 



One of the best-remembered farmers of Lawrence township. Grant 
countv, was the late Charles Anderson, an industrious and public-spirited 
citizen, who in everv way merited the high esteem in which he was held by 
his neighbors and friends. He was born in Sweden, April 17. 1853. He 
was a son of Andrew and Johanna (Ormsen) Anderson, both natives of 
Sweden, where they spent their lives. Of their eleven children, four came 
to America, namely: Andrew, who lives in Pelican Rapids, ]\Iinnesota; 
August, deceased; A'ictor, also deceased, and Charles, the subject of this 
memorial sketch. 

Charles Anderson grew up in his native land and there attended school. 
He emigrated to the United States in 1871. locating in Michigan, where he 
worked in the iron mines for many years. Aliout 1880 he came to ]\linne- 
sota, settling in Grant countv, working out on a farm by the month during 
the summer time and in the lumber woods during the winters. In 1888 he 
bought eightv acres and later another eighty in Lawrence township. He 
improved his land and became a successful farmer and stock raiser. He set 
out a large grove. Ae spent the rest of his life on the farm, dying in 1908. 
He was a member of the Swedish Lutheran church. After his death his 
widow and children put up a modern dwelling on the place. 

Mr. Anderson was married in 1886 to Jennie Peterson, who was born 
in Norway, November 7, 1867, a daughter of Peter and Helen (Anderson) 
Johnson, the former of whom died in 1878 and the latter in 1877, who were 
the parents of four children, Sophia, Jennie, John and Annie, all of whom 
are living. To Mr. and :\Irs. Anderson the following children were born: 



252 DOl'GLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

W'illiam, the eldest : Herman, who is operating the home farm ; NelHe, next 
in order of birth; Ahna, who died on January 26, 1910, at the age of fifteen 
years and six months; Allen, next in order of birth; Vernon, who died in 
1915, at the age of fifteen years and six months, and Carl, the youngest. 



CHARLES LOUIS JULIG. 

One of the preeminent German farmers of Leaf \''allev township, Doug- 
las county, is Charles L. Julig, who was born in Carver county, ^Nlinneosta, 
on November 26, 1863. He is a son of John and Gertrude Julig, both of 
whom were natives of Germany. 

John Julig was a brewer by trade in his native country, also followed 
the occupation of an engineer. He was married in Germany and in 1848 
came to the United States, settling first in Chicago, Illinois, where he worked 
as an engineer in a roundhouse until 1856, when he removed to Carver 
county, ]\Iinnesota. There he bought one hundred and sixty acres of land, 
eleven miles west of Chaska, and lived on that place until 18S0, when he 
moved to Douglas county to live with his son, remaining there for several 
years, at the end of which time he came to live with his son, Charles L., with 
whom he remained until his death in 1895. His widow survived him about 
seven years, her death occurring in 1902. While living in this county, John 
Julig homesteaded forty acres of land in section 10 of Leaf Valley township. 
He and his wife were the parents of nine children, Joseph, Andrew, Mary, 
Henry, John, Charles L., Sophia, Gertrude, and one who died while young. 
Joseph was a soldier in the Lhiion army during the Civil War and was 
wounded at the battle of Nashville. He spent most of his life in Carver 
countv, ^Minnesota, where he died a few years ago. It is believed that An- 
drew is also deceased, as the family have not heard from him for many 
years. ]\Iarv is the widow of John Kitter and lives in Minneapolis. Henry 
is a farmer living in Leaf Valley township, near where the subject of this 
sketch is living. John is a resident of St. Cloud, where he is employed in 
the car shops. Sophia lives in California. Gertrude is the wife of Andrew 
Schmidt, a resident of Ottertail county, Minnesota. 

Charles L. Julig was educated in the public schools of Carver county, 
Minnesota, and as a Aoung man worked out among the farmers of that 
count}'. In the spring of 1881 he came to Douglas county, and in the fall 
of that same year bought eighty acres of land in section 16 of Leaf \'alley 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 2^i, 

township, which, at the time he purchased it, was wild prairie land. He 
went to worl< at once to develop and improve his land and in 1895 bought 
his father's forty acres, and a little later the forty acres adjoining it. In 
1882 he purchased forty acres more in section 16, and in 1897 he purchased 
eighty additional acres in the same section, so that at present he is the owner 
of two hundred and eighty acres of fine farming land. He has made all the 
improvements on his land, and has about one hundred and seventy-five acres 
of it under plow, while the remainder is meadow and pasture land, with a 
little timber. In 1908 he built a new barn, which is thirtj'-two by fifty-two 
feet in dimensions, and all his farm buildings are modern and up-to-date. 
He is engaged in general farming and stock raising and has a fine herd of 
Red Polled cattle. 

In 1892 Charles L. Julig was married to Sophie Schmid, who was born 
in Ottertail county, jMinnesota, the daughter of George Schmid, and to this 
union ten children have been born: Mary, the wife of Max Wagner, a car- 
penter living in Alexandria ; George, who is a blacksmith and has a shop on 
his father's farm: Margaret, who is a graduate of the high school at Alex- 
andria, and also a normal student, is a teacher in Belle River township, and 
Carl, John, Frank, Leona, Eddie, Anna and Helen, who are at home with 
their parents. The family are earnest and devout Catholics and Mr. Julig is 
a trustee of the church at Millerville. 

Mr. Julig is a Republican and has served his township as supervisor for 
twenty-one years. He has also served as school director in district No. 53 
for about twenty years. Besides his farming interests, Mr. Julig is a stock- 
holder in the Valley Creamery Association. 



OLE ENGEMON. 



A successful farmer and worthy citizen of Solem township, Douglas 
coimty, is Ole Engemon, who was born in Norway, August 6, 1848, the 
son of Engemon Olson and Margaret (Sibjorson) Engemon, both natives 
of Norway. Engemon Olson came to America in i860, locating first in 
Lafayette county, Wisconsin, and in 1867 came to Douglas countv, where 
he homesteaded one hundred and twent}- acres of land in section 24 of 
Solem township, and on this farm he lived the remainder of his life, his 
death occurring in 1872. He and his wife were the parents of eight chil- 
dren, Emma, Julia, William, Ole, Christina, Margaret, Betsey and Carrie. 



254 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

Of these children all are living with the exception of three, Emma, Julia and 
Margaret. 

Ole Engemon had little opportunity for educational training but at- 
tended the schools of his native land to some extent. .\.s a young man he 
worked with his father, who was a farmer in Norway, and came with the 
family to America. Here he assisted his father to clear and develop his 
farm in Douglas count}-, and about 1876 he started farming for himself. He 
is now the owner of one hundred and twenty acres in Solem township, on 
which he carries on general farming and stock raising, and has been quite 
successful in his chosen calHng. 

Ole Engemon married Anna N. Valle, the daughter of John Gura, and 
there are no children. He and his wife are earnest and devout members of 
the Norwegian Lutheran church, in the affairs of which they are deeply 
interested. Mr. Engemon is a Republican in politics. 



P. M. PETERSON. 



P. M. Peterson, a well-known and successful farmer of Pelican Lake 
township. Grant county, was born in that township on December 15, 1875, 
the son of Anton and Mary (Larson) Peterson. Michael Larson, the ma- 
ternal grandfather of P. M. Peterson, was a native of Norway, who came 
to the United States and located in Eillmore county, Minnesota, one of the 
early pioneers, and there he spent the rest of his life. Peter Tuhran, the 
paternal grandfather, was a native of Norway, who died in his native land. 
His widow, Mary (Nergeson) Thuran, came to the United States in 1880 
to join her children, who had located here. She died in 1897 at the age of 
seventy-nine years. Peter Thuran died in 1867, at the age of fifty-eight 
vears. To them were born the following children : Alga, Anton, Theodore, 
John, Ole, Lewis and Martin, all of whom, with the exception of Alga, came 
to the United States. Alga is now deceased, as is Anton and Ole. 

Anton Peterson was born in Norway and there received his education 
in the public schools and there grew to manhood. At the age of twenty-one 
he decided to come to America, and after landing in the United States, in 
1867, he obtained work in New York, where he remained for two years, 
working as a farm hand. He then went to Wisconsin, where he worked in 
the woods for one winter, after which he came to Minnesota, and here he 
located in Fillmore county, where he worked as a farm hand for his father- 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 2^5 

in-law, ^Ir. Larson, for three years. After his marriage, in January, 1875, 
he drove a team of horses to Grant county, where he purchased a farm in 
PeHcan Lake township. He obtained one hundreil and sixty acres in section 
29 and there he lived until the time of his death. The farm he developed 
and improved and engaged in general farming and stock raising, in which 
he was quite successful, becoming the owner of four hundred and eighty 
acres of excellent land, all in Pelican Lake township. He was a man of 
much ability and always took an active interest in local affairs, being recog- 
nized as one of the prominent and influential men of the township. His death 
occurred on July 16, 191 1. During his many years of active life. Anton 
Peterson was held in the highest regard by all who knew him. He and his 
wife were active members of the Xorwegian Lutheran church and took much 
interest in church work. 

Anton Peterson had one of the best-improved farms in the township. 
His barn, sixty by sixty-four feet, was at that time the largest barn in the 
community. He rebuilt his house and made it one of the substantial ones in 
the county. In addition to his other interests he was a stockholder in the 
Farmers' Elevator Company and in the creamery at Ashby. He and Airs. 
Peterson were the parents of the following children: Peter, Sander, Caro- 
line, Michael, Josephine and Alma. Airs. Peterson is still living on the home 
farm and with her are her children, Caroline, Sander, Josephine and Alma. 
The family have long been prominent in the social and the religious life of 
the township, w^here they are highly regarded by their neighbors and friends. 

P. j\I. Peterson received his education in the public schools of Pelican 
Lake township. He grew to manhood on the home farm, where as a lad 
and young man he assisted his father with the work. On October i-j, 1909, 
he was united in marriage to Caroline Thorp. Four years before that time 
he had gone to North Dakota, where he had taken a homestead of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres, which he proved up, and then returned to Grant county, 
and later sold his Dakota homestead. He now owns his father's old home- 
stead, having purchased it from the other heirs. In 19 14 he erected a large 
barn, thirty by fifty-six feet, and during the same year he built a new house. 
In addition to his large interests on the farm, Mr. Peterson is the owner of 
stock in the Farmers' Elevator Company at Ashby. He has always taken 
much interest in local affairs and has ever been ready to assist in any worthy 
cause that would tend to the betterment and the improvement of the township 
and the county. He is a firm believer in intensive farming and in the best 
possible cultivation. As a general farmer and stock raiser he has been sue- 



256 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

cessfiil and is regarded as among the successful men in that hne in the town- 
ship. 

P. M. Peterson and wife are the parents of four children, Arthur 'SI., 
Clifford P., Adeline SI. and Laurence. The family are prominent in the 
social life of the community and are interested in the betterment of social 
conditions. 



SVEN NICHOLAS SWEXSON. 

The late Sven Nicholas Swenson, who for years was one of the best 
knowni and most substantial farmers of the Holmes City neighborhood, was 
born in Sweden on July 4, 1S35, and died on October 16, iQii. He received 
his education in his native land, where he li\ed until he was twenty-nine 
years of age. Li 1864 he decided to come to America, and after landing 
in this country, he located in Illinois, where he remained for two years, after 
which he removed to Red Wing, Minnesota, where he lived for eight months. 
In 1867 he moved to Douglas county and homesteaded one hundred and sixty 
acres, in section 33, Holmes City township, just across the line from Pope 
county. That farm he developed and improved and there made his home 
for many vears. after which he purchased the farm where his sons, Theo and 
Frank Swenson now reside, also in Holmes City township. He did not sell 
the old homestead, but in time became the owner of four hundred and eighty 
acres of good land. One year before his death he sold all his land to his 
sons, Albert L., Frank R. and Theo E. Alljert Swenson later entered the 
engineering department of a large factory at St. Paul and sold his interest 
in the farms to the other two brothers. 

On March 2;^, 1867. at Red Wing, Minnesota, Sven Nicholas Swenson 
was united in marriage to Anna .Sophia Jacobson, also a native of Sweden, 
who came to the United States with her brother at the same time Mr. Swen- 
son came. She was born on June 20, 1840, and died on March 25, 1915. 
During her lifetime she was a devoted wife and mother, contributing largely 
to her husband's success and in ever\' way performing her wifely and 
motherlv duties in a splendid manner. Her many fine qualities endeared her 
to all and her death was deplored by her many friends. She and her hus- 
band were regarded during their lifetime as among that sturdy type of 
pioneers who laid the foundations for the magnificent social structure so 
evident in this communitv today. To their family they bequeathed the 




^VEX .NICHOLAS SWKXSOX AND ^V 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 2;/ 

heritage of a good name and to them imparted the knowledge of the vahie 
of honest labor and good lives, and no family in the communit}- stands in 
higher esteem for general worth. To Sven X. and Anna Sophia (Jacob- 
son ) Swenson were born five children, Xannie, Albert L., Frank R., Ellen, 
and Theo E. Air. and Airs. Swenson were active members of the dscar 
Lake Lutheran church, in which denomination all the children were con- 
firmed and became influential members. Air. Swenson also took much inter- 
est in local affairs and was held in the highest regard by all who knew him. 

Theo E. Swenson recei^-ed his education in the common schools of 
Douglas county and remained with his father on the home farms, until he 
purchased one hundred and sixty acres from his father one year before the 
latter's death. To this original farm of one hundred and sixty acres, Theo 
E. Swenson has added eighty acres that he purchased from his brother 
Albert. It is on this well-developed and nicely-improved farm that Air. 
Swenson is engaged in general farming and stock raising, in which he has 
been quite successful. 

On July 2, 191J, Theo E. Swenson was united in marriage to Anna 
Christina Alickelson, who was born in Holmes City township, daughter of 
AI. J. Alalm, who came to America in 1892 and is now a resident of Holmes 
City township, and to this union two children have been born. Ravmond 
Xicolas and Arleigh Alichael, the latter of whom was born in September, 
1916. Air. and Airs. Swenson are active members of the Lutheran church 
and are prominent in the social life of the community. Air. Swenson has 
always taken much interest in local civic affairs and is now a member of the 
board of township super\isors. 

Frank R. Swenson, who is living on another part of his late father's 
farm in Hohnes City township, the owner of a well-developed tract of two 
hundred and thirty acres, where he and his familv are very pleasantly situ- 
ated, gives considerable attention, besides his farming interests, to his work 
as a monument dresser and marble carver. He is an expert in that line, 
having thoroughly learned the trade of monument-cutter, and demoted con- 
siderable time to the business, having a large patronage in that line. Frank 
Swenson was married at \\'heaton on Januar}- 18, 1912, to Anna Xels(in, 
who was born in Sweden. He and his wife take a proper part in the various 
social activities of their home community. They have one child, a dauehter, 
Edith, born on January 20, 1914. 

X'annie Swensor married Frank Palen and lives on a farm three miles 
(17a) 



25» DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

south of Kensington, where Mr. Dalen devotes his time to his fine farm of 
one hundred and sixty acres. To Mr. and Mrs. Dalen have been torn five 
children, Harry, Maljel, Elmer, Raymond and Kermit. 

Ellen Swenson married Ole J- Holm and lives on a farm of two hun- 
dred and twenty-five acres in Holmes City township, where Air. Holmes 
devotes his attention to general farming. 



SYVERT S. WAXGSNESS. 

There are a comparatively large number of farmers in Grant and Doug- 
las counties who came from Winneshiek county, Iowa. Among these the 
name of Syvert S. Wangsness, of Stony Brook township, should be men- 
tioned. He was born in Winneshiek county, Iowa, September 29, i860, and 
is a son of Sjur Hermundson \Vangsness and Torbjor (Larson) Wangs- 
ness, both natives of Norway, from which country they came in an early 
day to Wisconsin, later moving to ^^'inneshiek county, Iowa. To ]\Ir. 
Wangsness and wife were born the following-named children: A son, Her- 
mund, who died at the age of ten years; Ingeborg; Eli (deceased); Ger- 
trude (deceased), and Syvert, the subject of this review, the youngest. Sjur 
Wangsness died in Winneshiek county and his widow subsequently married 
Tores Hanson, a widower, .who had three children by his first marriage, 
Anna, Gurina and Hans, and by his second wife, the mother of the subject 
of this sketch, he had one child, Louise, no\\- the wife of Gabriel N. Thyse. 
In 1870 Tores Hanson with his family came to Grant county, [Minnesota, 
where he took a homestead consisting of one hundred and forty-se^•en acres 
in Stony Brook township, adding to the same eighty acres more. On this 
homestead he and his wife si>ent the rest of their lives, his death occurring 
in 1901. She died in 1891. The daughter, Louise, and son-in-law, Gabriel 
N. Thyse, are now living on the old homestead. 

The subject of this sketch was ten years old when his parents settled in 
Grant covmtv. When a boy he worked hard on the farm, having little chance 
to obtain an education, but he has studied at home and is fairly well informed 
in a general way. He worked out as a farm hand for some time. Saving 
his earnings, he bought one hundred and twenty-three acres of railroad land 
and later forty acres in Stony Brook township. He has worked hard and 
now has a well-tilled farm, on which stand good buildings and a fine grove. 

Politically, Mr. Wangsness is a Republican and is active in local af- 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 250 

fairs. He has been a member of tiie school board for nine years. He was 
also for some time supervisor, chairman of the board a part of the time. 
A\'hen only twenty-one years old he was road overseer. He has also always 
been active in church work, being a member of the United Lutheran church. 
Mr. Wangsness was married in 1885 to Karen Hole, who was born in 
Norway in 1867. She is a daughter of Torger and Tonete Hole, natives of 
Norway, from which country they came to ^Minnesota in an early day. estal> 
lishing their home at Aastad, Ottertail county, where they spent the rest of 
their lives. To Air. and Mrs. Wangsness the following children have been 
born : Sander, Thonette, Thoralf, Harry, Thora, Joseph, Gertrude, Alice, 
Enoch and \\'alter, all of whom are living. 



CARL J. DAHLSTROM. 

Of the many Swedes who have come to the United States and located 
in the great farming districts of our Western states, where they have, by 
their industry and perseverance, developed the land into w-ell-cultivated fields, 
dotted here and there with modern and substantial buildings, few deserve 
greater credit for this magnificent work than does Carl J- Dahlstrom, one 
of Douglas county's well-known pioneer farmers. He was born on March 8, 
185 1, the son of John and Bertha Dahlstrom, who later came to the L'nited 
States. 

Carl J. Dahlstrom received his education in the land of his nativity and 
there grew to manhood. As a lad he assisted his father, who was a farmer 
and a small landowner. Carl J. Dahlstrom married Charlotta Anderson and 
some time after their marriage they came' to America. They landed at Phil- 
adelphia, coming thence directly to Minnesota. From St. Paul they- pro- 
ceeded to Alexandria, where they remained for four years, after which they 
homesteaded in sections i and 2, Carlos township, the land at that time being 
for the most part wild and unimproved. Mr. Dahlstrom's first farm con- 
sisted of forty acres, which he has now increased to one hundred and twentv 
acres, the most of which is under a high state of cultivation and well im- 
proved. The early years on the farm were hard ones to the familv. Com- 
ing, as they did, into a strange land and amid strange conditions, thev have, 
after long and tiresome years of labor, succeeded, today Mr. Dahlstrom 
being the owner of one of the best farms in the township. 

To Carl ]. and Charlotta Dahlstrom have been born the following- chil- 



26o DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

dren : Carl, Ellen, Mary, Bertha, Selma, Esther, Hattie, Arthur, Albin and 
Jerda. Carl resides in North Dakota and is a traveling salesman for the 
Watkins Medical Compan_v; Ellen is the wife of A. E. Sherlin; Selma is 
the wife of Edward Smith and Esther is the wife of E. \Y. W'alstrom. 

Carl J. Dahlstrom is engaged in general farming and stock raising and 
is particularly interested in the raising of Holstein cattle and Duroc-Jersey 
hogs. He raises much wheat and potatoes, the latter being one of the prin- 
cipal crops in that section of the county, many thousands of bushels being 
raised every year. In addition to his many duties on the farm, Mr. Dahl- 
strom has always taken much interest in the civic affairs of his township. 
For four years he has been a di'-ector of the Belle River Creamery Company. 
He has served as treasurer of the school board for twelve years and was for 
four years a member of the township board of supervisors, in all of this 
service gi\'ing excellent sati>; faction. 



ALBERTUS SCHAFFER. 

Albertus Schaffer, a successful farmer of Pelican Lake township, Grant 
county, was born in Marquette county, Wisconsin, on Jul}- 4, 1862, the son 
of Abraham and Marie (Losack) Schaffer, who were born in Saxony, Ger- 
many, and who continued to live in the land of their nativity until 1840, when 
they decided that they would come to America. On their arrival in this 
countrv, they proceeded to Wisconsin, where they spent the rest of their 
lives, the father having died thirty-nine years ago, he then being past sixty 
years of age. The wife and mother died when the son Albertus was but a 
small bo)'. In his new home Abraham Schaffer was successful as a farmer 
and stock raiser and at the time of his death was the owner of three hun- 
dred acres of good land. He and his wife were members of the German 
Lutheran church and always took much interest in church work. They 
were highlv respected people and were held in the highest regard by all who 
knew them. Mr. Schaffer was a man of much ability and possessed of much 
business acumen, which placed him among the successful m'en of his com- 
munity. Mr. and Mrs. Schaffer were the parents of the following children: 
Henry, Carl, Emma, Amelia, John, Lucy, Hattie, Albertus, Lena, Ida, Tillie 
and Augusta, all of whom are living save John. 

Albertus Schaffer received his education in the local schools of Wiscon- 
sin. At the age of eighteen he left that state and came to iMinnesota, locat- 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 201 

ing in Grant county, where he later purchased land, three miles from Elbow 
Lake. There he obtained one hundred and sixty acres of land and there he 
made his home until 1902, when he moved to his present home farm in sec- 
tion 5 of Pelican Lake township, where he has two hundred and forty acres 
of excellent land. He has done much in the way of development and has 
built a large barn and hog house and remodeled the house. In addition to 
his farm in Pelican Lake township, I\Ir. Schaffer is the owner of twenty-five 
acres of land in St. Olaf township, in the neighboring county of Ottertail. 
He is engaged in general farming and stock raising and has some fine Short- 
horn cattle, Hampshire hogs and some fine sheep, his stock being recognized 
as among the best in the county. He had a sheep that took first prize at the 
stock show at St. Paul and others that took first at he show at Fargo. His 
farm is known as "Garden Farm," the name being indicative of the care 
and attention that it receives. 

At the age of twenty-four years ^Nlr. Schaft'er was united in marriage 
to Louisa Caesar and to this union two children have been born, Edwin and 
^^'iIford. }ilr. Schaffer is known as "Sam" Schaft'er, a little girl having given 
him the name, and he feels verv proud of it. 



GEORGE C. BROWX. 



The late George C. Brown, for years a substantial farmer of North 
Ottawa township. Grant county, was bom in Trondhjem, Norway, on July 
28. 1842, the son of Andrew H. and Serena G. Brown. The mother died in 
Norwa}- in 1865, after which the father came to America and in 1869 located 
in Milwaukee, where he lived for some years. He then came to Minnesota 
and located on a farm in Grant county, the farm on which the son. George 
C. Brown, later made his home. It was there that Anilrew H. Brown died, 
in 1903, at the age of eighty-three years. To Andrew and Serena Brown 
three children were born, George C., Adolph and Annie, the latter of whom 
is the only survivor. Adolph died in 1909. 

George C. Brown received his education in the public schools of Nor- 
wav and there grew to manhood, remaining a resident of the land of his 
nativitA" until 1 861. At that time he went to Canada, where he remained 
for a vear, and then, in 1862. located in [Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He had, 
up to that time, lived, for the most part, the life of a sailor, but he soon left 
Milwaukee and settled on a farm in Boone countv, Illinois, where he re- 



26.3 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

mained until 1S90, when he came to Minnesota and bought one hundred and 
sixty acres of land in North Ottawa township, Grant county. There he set 
out a beautiful grove and erected modern and substantial buildings and en- 
gaged in general farming and stock raising until the time of his death, on 
January 16, 19 16. 

George C. Brown was identified with the Republican party and always 
took an active interest in local affairs. He was an ardent advocate of the 
public schools of the state, and was the one who started the petition for the 
building of the school house in his district. He was for many years a mem- 
ber of the board of supervisors and accomplished much good for the town- 
ship during his years of service. He and his family were active members 
of the United Lutheran church, took much interest in church work and 
were prominent in the social and the religious life of the community. 

On December 10, 1S70, George C. Brown was united in marriage to 
Annetta M. Hansen, who was born in Norway on September 3, 185 1, the 
daughter of Andrew and Margaret (Jertsen) Hansen, also natives of Nor- 
way, born on the same day, October 8, 1822. He died in 1878 and she sur- 
vived until October 7, 191 2, being then ninety years of age. They were the 
parents of the following children : Hannah, George, Annetta M., Law- 
rence A. and Mary. Mary became the wife of Herbert Nelson and died in 
Milwaukee in 1899. Andrew and Margaret Hansen came to the United 
States and located in Milwaukee, where they spent the rest of their lives. 
During his active life Mr. Hansen was a sailor, but on locating at Milwaukee 
he lived a retired life. 

To George C. and .Vnnetta M. (Hansen) Brown were born the follow- 
ing children : Serena Margaret, Alena, George C., Annie, Matilda, Leonora, 
Frank, Frances A., Nellie Josephine, Adolph F., Roy Leland and Adolph 
Theodore. Serena Margaret is the wife of Peter Larsen and they are parents 
of two children, Leonora and Harvey. Alena is deceased. George C. is 
living on the old homestead. Annie L., now deceased, was the wife of Louis 
Derby. They were the parents of five children, Ruby, Frank, Mabel L, Ray- 
mond C. and George. Ruby is now the wife of William Hedlund and to 
them one child has been born. Ruth Elaine. Matilda A. is the wife of 
Charles McCalip and they are the parents of two children, Randolph and 
Beatrice A. Leonora is living on the old home place. Frank Norman died 
in 1885, at the age of two years. Frances is the wife of Melvin Evenson 
and is the mother of two children, Leland Leroy and Adaline Marie. Nellie 
Josephine is a teacher and lives at home. Adolph F. died in 1894, at the age 
of four years; Roy Leland and Adolph Theodore are operating the old home- 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 21.13 

Stead farm. The famih- have long been prominent in the social and church 
life of the community, as well as in the civic life of the township and the 
countv. Thev are a most hospitable people and are held in the highest re- 
gard and esteem bv all who know them. 



GILBERT T. PLETAX. 



The biographer is glad to note that a number of native-born men of 
Grant county have remained here, for it shows that they have found condi- 
tions good enough right at home, it not being necessary for them to seek 
their fortunes elsewhere. One of this number is Gilbert J. Pletan, of Stony 
Brook township. He was born in that township on September 15, 1874, 
and is a son of Jens Pletan. mentioned elsewhere in this work. He grew up 
on the home farm, where he worked when a boy, and he received his edu- 
cation in the district schools. He has always followed agricultural pursuits 
and in now the owner of one hundred and twenty-seven acres in section 9 of 
Stony Brook township, which farm he purchased in 1907. He has made 
many important improvements on the same and is successfully carrying on 
general farming and stock raising. :Mr. Pletan is a Republican and has 
served as supervisor of his township. 

In 1903 Gilbert J. Pletan married Ida C. Stave, who was born in Otter- 
tail county, [Minnesota, July 31, 1881, a daughter of Christian P. and Carrie 
Stave, who came to Minnesota from Norway in an early day. Mr. Stave is 
now engaged in mercantile pursuits in Aastad, this state. 

Four children have been bom to Mr. and ^Irs. Pletan, namely : Signe, 
Cora Violet. James Kenneth and [Margaret Alvhilde. 



TEXS T. AXGEX, 



W^ell known as a farmer and citizen, Jens J. Angen, of Brandon town- 
ship. Douglas county, is to be classed with die successful Scandinavians 
who have cast their lot in this locality. He was born in Norway, [May 10, 
1848, and is a son of John and ^lary Johnson. His father and mother 
were natives of Xorway also, the former coming to the United States in 
1869 and the latter in 1872. They located near Garfield, in LaGrand town- 
ship. Douglas county, where the father homesteaded one hundred and sixty 



264 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

acres, which he developed and on which he spent the rest of his hfe. He 
was a member of the Norwegian Lutheran church. His family consisted 
of five children .Jens J., Carrie, Olaus, Carl and Ole. 

Jens J. Angen, who dropped the family name upon coming to America, 
grew up in Norway, where he was educated in the common schools. He 
immigrated to America in 1870 when twenty-two years old, joining his 
father, who had preceded him to Douglas count}', ^Minnesota. The son pur- 
chased one hundred and twenty acres of school land in section 36 of Bran- 
don township, which he improved and on which he still lives, successfully 
carrying on general farming and stock raising. 

;\lr. Angen married Caroline Severson, a daughter of Sever Olson and 
Martha Johnson, natives of X'orway, where they spent their earlier years, 
coming to America in 1859, locating in ^^lsconsin, where they spent four 
years on a farm; then came to ^linnesota, and after farming in Olmsted 
countv four years moved to Douglas county and established their permanent 
home. Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Angen, namely: Joel, 
who married Emma Peterson ; ]\Iartin, deceased ; Carl, who married Mary 
Arnston; Minnie, who married Peter Peterson; Xettie, who married Xels 
Tarson, and Sophia, deceased. 



SYL^'ESTER TRISKO. 



One of the vounger farmers of Belle River township. Douglas county, 
who has made an auspicious start in his chosen life work is Sylvester Trisko, 
who has found his home community a good place in which to spend his life. 
He was born in the above-named township and county, December 31, 1888, 
and is a son of Ignatz and Kate ( Dattler ) Trisko, both natives of Germany. 
The father was a small boy when he came to America with his parents, John 
and Anna ( Loretz ) Trisko, Ijoth natives of Austria. They married in the old 
countrv and lived on a farm there until coming to America in 1882, coming 
direct to ^Minnesota, where Mr. Trisko took up a homestead of one hundred 
and sixty acres in Belle River township, Douglas county, on which he spent 
the rest of his life. He received military training in the old country. He 
and his wife belonged to the Catholic church in Belle River township. They 
had the following children : Joseph, Ignatz and Carl. 

Ignatz Trisko, mentioned above, spent his boyhood in Germany and 
there attended the public schools. He and his wife are living on the old 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 265 

home place, which they own. and which his father entered upon coming 
to Douglas county. The place consists of one hundred and sixty acres. 'Sh. 
Trisko also is a stockholder in the local creamery. His family consists of 
the following children: Sylvester, the subject of this .sketch: John, who 
married a Miss Stewart in Croy, Xorth Dakota, and Richard, Anna, ^^■illie, 
Lei^, Frank and Arthur. 

Sylvester Trisko grew up on the home farm and he received a common- 
school education in district No. 92. He continued to assist his father on the 
farm until his marriage, on January- 10, 191 1, to Bernice Craig, a daughter 
of Frank and Clara Craig, who came to Douglas county in an early day and 
took up a homestead on which they established the future home of the family. 
Two children have been born to ~\Ir. and ]\Irs. Trisko, namely: Clifford, 
who was killed b}- a kick from a horse when two years of age, and ]\Iabel. 

yir. Trisko owns one hundred and sixty acres in Belle River township, 
which he purchased in the fall of 19 16. He is also renting a farm of two 
hundred and eighty acres on which he now lives. He carries on mixed farm- 
ing, raising hogs and cattle, and paying considerable attention to dairying. 
Politically, he is a Democrat. He belongs to the Catholic church. 



XELS T. FAHLIX. 



Xels J- Fahlin, one of the best-known and most substantial farmers of 
Solem township, Douglas county, is a native-born son of IMinnesota, his 
birth haying occurred in Solem township, January 14, 1870. He is a son 
of Jens and Anna Fahlin, both of whom were natives of Sweden. 

Jens Fahlin and his family came to the United States in 1869, and in 
the fall of the same year he homesteaded the farm where he is still living in 
Solem township. He improved and cultivated the place, planted a grove and 
put up many of the older buildings on the place, most of which, however, 
have been replaced by newer and more modern ones. For over twenty years 
he has been retired from the active management of the farm. His wife died 
when Xels J. was but an infant of sixteen months. They were the parents 
of four children. John J., referred to later in this sketch: ]\Iary, deceased; 
Ole, living in Xorth Dakota, and Xels J., the immediate subject of this 
review. 

Xels J. Fahlin received a limited education in the schools of his home 
community, receiving only two weeks of training in the English school. He 



266 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

was reared to the life of a farmer, has always lived on the home place, and 
during the last few years has bought one hundred and forty acres of it. 
There he is engaged in general farming and stock raising and has met with a 
very commendable degree of success in his chosen vocation. 

In 1900 Nels J. Fahlin was married to Emma Westberg, a native of 
Sweden, who is a daughter of J. P. Westberg, of Solem township, and to 
this union have been born eight children, Mabel, Anna, Hattie, Edna, Emilie, 
Ruth, Lloyd and Florence Esther, all of whom are living at home with their 
parents. The family are all earnest and devout members of the Swedish 
Lutheran church, in the general work of which they take an active interest. 

John J. Fahlin, the eldest brother of Nels J. Fahlin, was born in Swe- 
den, September 19, 1861, and came to America with his parents in 1869, and 
was reared on the homestead farm in Solem township, which he helped to 
improve and develop. He bought one hundred and twenty acres of railroad 
land juet across the road from the home farm, which was all raw prairie at 
the time he acquired it, but he set to work with a will to improve and de- 
velop it, and he now has good buildings, a nice grove, and in various ways 
has added to its value and attractiveness. In 1889 he married Mary Peter- 
son, also a native of Sweden, who died about a year after her marriage, 
leaving one son, Arthur. 



HANS L. OLBEKSON. 



]\Iiltona township, Douglas county has no more painstaking farmer 
than Hans L. Olbekson, who was born in Norway, August 11, 1864. He 
is a son of Andrew and Louise (Olson) Olbekson, both natives of Norway, 
from which country they came to America in 1869, landing in New York 
City where they spent a short time and where they buried an infant son. 
Then they came on to Minnesota and after two years spent in Freeborn 
countv, came to Douglas county, the father taking up a homestead of one 
hundred and sixty acres in Miltona township, which he developed into a 
good farm Ijv patient, hard work; and where he and his wife spent the 
rest of their lives, his death occurring on June 3, 1900, at the age of se\'- 
enty, his birth having occurred on May 28. 1830. His widow survived 
until j\Ia\- 20, 1913, dying at the age of eighty-four years. To them the 
following children were born : Anton, who lives in Alexandria ; Michael, 
who is a mason and Hves in Gaston, Oregon; Carrie, deceased; Hans L., 
the subiect of this sketch, and Anna and Louise. The father of these chil- 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 1^67 

dren was active in local affairs, in both township and church matters, being 
a member of the bciard of the Lutheran church and active in church work. 

Hans L. Olbekson was reared on the fann and was educated in the 
common schools. On December 20. 1889, he married Jennie Peck, whose 
death occurred on Jtme 13. 1914. at the age of forty-eight years. She was 
the mother of four children, Josephine. Edith. Edwin and Cleveland. Jos- 
ephine married James Sterrker and they li\-e on a fami in ?vIiltona town- 
ship. The rest of the children are at home with their father. 

Mr. Olbekson has been very successful as a general farmer and stock 
raiser. He has a productive place of one hundred and twenty acres, a part 
of the old homestead, in section 10. Miltona township, and has kept it well 
improved. He built a new barn in 1912 and a modern home in 19 16. He 
is one of the stockholders of the Farmers Society of Equity, of Parkers 
Prairie, and is also a stockholder in the creamery at that place. Politically, 
he is a Republican. He belongs to the [Methodist Episcopal church at Park- 
ers Prairie. He was a member of the local school board eight years and a 
member of the township board four years. 



KXUTE GROVEX. 



Xorwav has give many of her sons and daughters to the United 
States, many of those have engaged in farming and others in business pur- 
suits and in the professions. Among those who engaged in agricultural 
pursuits with success, was numbered the late Knute Groven. who was a 
well-known resident of Pelican Lake township. Grant county. He was born 
on July 6, 1849, ^"^1 received his education in Xorway, where he grew to 
manhood and was married in 1873 to Signe Jore. who was born on March 
10, 1851. They lived in the land of their nativity for a number of years 
after their marriage, and then decided, in 1883. to come to America. They 
landed at the port of Xew York and came directly to ^linnesota, locating at 
Ashbv. where they joined E. K. Teisberg. a cousin of Knute Groven. who 
lived near that place. 

Lpon arriving at his destination, Knute Groven purchased one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of land in section 35 of Pelican Lake township. Grant 
countv, where he lived until the time of his death, which occurred on April 
15, 191 1. At the time Mr. Groven made the purchase, the place needed 
much in the way of development and improvements, there being only wild 



2bO DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

prairie at the time he built a house. In 1897 he built a large barn and made 
other valuable and substantial improvements, the farm soon being trans- 
formed into one of the finest in the township. There he engaged in gen- 
eral farming and stock raising, in which he was quite successful. His life 
was an active one and he accomplished much that was worthy of his great 
efforts. He was a man of much ability and force of character and was 
possessed of a business acumen that made his life a financial success. Con- 
ing to the country, amid new conditions and amid strange people, he soon 
adapted himself to the new order of things and demonstrated the fact that 
he could and would meet the difficulties with success. He took much in- 
terest in local aft'airs and was ever ready to assist in any worthy cause that 
had to with the betterment of the township, or the county. 

KniUe and Signe Groxen were the parents of three children: Isabel, 
^larv and Osmond. Isabel became the wife of Jepps Kronlierg and Mary 
married Christ Clauson. Osmond is unmarried, his mother living witli 
him on the old home place. He was born in Norway on August 8, i88r, 
and was but two years old when he came with his parents to the United 
States. Soon after the death of his father, he purchased the home farm, 
which he has since operated. Osmond Groven received his early training 
in farming under the master hand of his father, and has thus been able 
successfullv to carrv on the work that his father began. 



JOHN F. TITUS. 



Among the prominent farmers and substantial citizens of Hudson 
township, Douglas county, is John V. Titus, who was born on December 4. 
i8()4, in Johnson county, Iowa. He is the youngest child of Joseph and 
Mary Jane (Rogers) Titus, bodi of whom were natives of Ohio. 

In the early fifties Josph Titus and his family came West and settled 
in Jones countv, Iowa, later moving into Johnson county, that state, from 
which place, in 1867, the family moved to Butler county, Iowa, where they 
lived until the death of Joseph Titus, which occurred in 1894. His widow 
is still li\-ing. To this worthy couple eight children were born, W. N., Lida 
A., Susanna, Sarah A., R. H., H. M., C. R., and John F., the immediate 
subject of this brief review, 

John F. Titus received his education in the public schools of Butler 
countv, Iowa. He grew up on the farm, assisting his father with the farm 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. -jOg 

work, and in the fall of IQ02 moved to Douglas county, >.Iinnesota, where 
he is the owner of a tine farm of one hundred and sixty acres. He is en- 
gaged in general farming and stock raising, and has met with a very com- 
mendable degree of success in his chosen work. Besides his farming in- 
terests, Air. Titus is a director and stockholder in the warehouse at Forada. 

•In 1902 John F. Titus was married to Jane iMcNellis, the daughter of 
Closes and Hannah ( Oshorne ) INIcXellis, and to this union four children 
haye been born, Durward H., Fielden G., Leander B. and Clara E. The 
family are earnest members of the Presbyterian church and take an active 
interest in the affairs of the local congregation, Mr. Titus being a trustee 
in the church. 

Politically, Air. Titus is an independent voter, preferring to cast his 
ballot for men and principles rather than for party. He has ser\-ed his town- 
ship as school director since 19 14, and for several years served as school 
clerk of the school district. 



ROY G. SMITH. 



Roy G. Smith one of the succesful young farmers of Gorton township, 
Grant county, was born in Chicago, Illinois, on July 2, 18S9. His father 
died when he was but a small child and he and his mother were left alone, 
for he was the only child in the family. Some years after the death of her 
husband, Mrs. Smith became the wife of Alathias Schnell, who, with the 
mother, now li^-es in Chicago. 

Roy G. Smith received his education in the public schools of Chicago 
and at Davenport, Iowa, having spent a part of his early life with his 
grandfather, \\'illiam Smith, who still lives in Davenport. As a young man 
Mr. Smith worked in a machine shop, while living with his grandparents, 
William and Clara Smith, at Davenport. In 191 1 he came to Alinnesota 
and purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land in section 16, Gorton 
township, Grant county, where he has done much in the wav of develop- 
ment and improvement. He is engaged in general farming and stock rais- 
ing and is meeting with success. He is particularly interested in the breed- 
ing of Shorthorn cattle and has many of these fine animals. He is inde- 
pendent in politics, yet he takes an active interest in all local affairs. He 
and his wife are actix-e members of the Evangelical church of Gorton 
township and are prominent in th social and religious life of the com- 
munity. 



2/0 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

On June 15, 1912, Roy G Smith was united in marriage to Josephine 
Augusta Reckner, who was born in Howard county, Iowa, November 28, 
1890, the daughter of Christian and Carohne (Tienken) Reckner, who lo- 
cated in Tra\erse county, Minnesota, in 1901, where they now reside. To 
this union three children have been born, Mathias, Beulah and William 
^Martin. 

^Mathias Schnell, the stepfather of Roy G. Smith, was born in Ger- 
many and came to the United States when twenty-one years of age, arriving 
at Hoboken, New Jersey, without a dollar. He later went to Rock Island, 
Illinois, and later to Chicago. He became a contractor and builder and 
erected many public buildings, his field of operations covering all parts of 
the United States, among his contracts having been the construction of the 
foimdation for the capital building of Texas. For the past fifteen years he 
has been living a retired life. 

Christian Reckner, Mrs. Smith's father, was born in Howard county, 
Iowa, on January 6, 1858; and his wife, Caroline Reckner, was born in 
New York City on March 31. 1869. They w^ere married in Howard 
county, Iowa, and came to ^linnesota in 1901. settling in Grant county, and 
later remo\ed to Traverse county. They were the parents of the following 
children ; Hukla, Josephine Augusta, Earl, Annie, George, Henry, Clara 
and Ruth, all of whom are living. Mr. and Mrs. Reckner are highly re- 
spected people and have long been prominent in the social and civic life of 
the community in which they live. Mr. Reckner is engaged in general 
farmino- and stock raisine, in which he has been successful. 



CHRISTIAN L. HARSTAD. 

Among the young farmers of Stony Brook township. Grant county, 
who are making a good start, is Christian L. Harstad, who has been fortu- 
nate enough to remain in his native locality, which he has been contented 
to do. He was born on the old homestead in .Stony Brook township on 
Julv 9, 1889, and there he grew to manhood, working in the summer months, 
when he was a boy. He recei\-ed his early education in the district schools, 
later attending Park Region Lutheran College and was graduated from the 
commercial department of that institution. After leaving school he returned 
to the farm and has made general farming his life work. When starting 
out for himself he purchased one hundred and twenty acres in Stony Brook 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 2Jl 

township, which he lias improved considerably, inchiding the erection of a 
new residence in 19 15. In connection with general farming he raises \ari- 
oiis kinds of live stock. He is a careful worker, liaving had excellent train- 
ing under his father, Lowritz K. Harstad, a sketch of whom appears else- 
where in this volume. 

]Mr. Harstad was married in 19TI, to Gunhild Xelson, who was born 
in Xorway in 1888. She is a daughter of Xels and Sonove Aasberg, 
natives of Xorway, where they grew up, married and established their 
home. They came to America in 1905, but later went back to their native 
land where they now reside. To Mr. and Mrs. Harstad three children have 
been born, Thora Lovine, Signe Evelyn and Gerda Corrine. 

Politically. Air. Hardstad is an independent voter. He belongs to the 
United Lutheran church. 



THEODORE JOHXSOX. 

Among the many worthy farmers of Swedish parentage in Solem 
township, Douglas county, is Theodore Johnson, who was born in Kandi- 
yohi count}', Alinnesota, on February 27, 1870. He is a son of Lewis and 
Anna Breta (Xelson) Johnson, both of whom were natives of Sweden. 

Lewis Johnson and his family came to the United States in 1866, 
locating first in Wisconsin, but later homesteaded one hvmdred and twent\- 
acres of land in Kandiyohi county, ^^linnesota, to which eighty acres more 
were added later, making a total of two hundred acres. After coming to 
Alinnesota. he served as assistant pastor of the Lutheran church preparing 
for the ministry himself, and in 1879 he was ordained. His first call was 
to the Oscar Lake church, after which he served the churches in X'orongo 
and A'enei*sborg, in Holmes City township, until 1887. In that vear he 
moved to Solem township and served as pastor of the \'enersborg church 
until 1 89 1, when he accepted a call to the church at Parkers Prairie, where 
he remained four years. From there he went to Fergus Falls, where he 
was pastor for twelve years, at the expiration of which time he retired from 
the active ministry and moved to Kensington, where he lived the remainder 
of his life, his death occurring on March 12, 1916. While living in Solem 
township, he accumulated a section of land. To him and his wife were 
born eleven children, of whom six grew to maturity,- Alatilda, Lvdia, Esther. 
Theodore, Mary and Alathias, only three of whom are now living. ?klarv. 
Mathias and Theodore. 



272 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

Theodore Johnson received his education in the puHic schools of his 
home county, and also attended the Lutheran Seminary at Willmar. Early 
in life he decided to make farming his life work, and has made a very com- 
mendable success of his chosen calling. He has a good farm of two hun- 
dred and forty acres in Solem township, where he is engaged in general 
farming and stock raising. 

In 1S94 Theodore Johnson was married to Caroline J. Holm, who 
was born in Goodhue county, Minnesota, a daughter of Peter and Carrie 
( wStefferson ) Holm, the father a native of Sweden who came to Iowa, 
where he met and married his wife, also a nati\'e of Sweden. Later the 
family moved from Iowa to Goodhue county, Minnesota, and in 1883 came 
to Douglas county, and in 1893, went to Roberts county. South Dakota, 
where Mr. Holm homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres of land, and 
where he is still li\-ing. His wife died in 1902'. To Peter Llolm and wife 
were born fourteen children, seven of whom are living, Ole, Caroline. Hans, 
John, Karlin, Anna and Mabel. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson are the parents of 
the following children : Mabel Cordelia, Clarence T., Clifford Emanuel, 
Anna Caroline. Elmer Lewis, Ernest Edwin, Alvin Richard, Hildig Got- 
frey, Reuben Eerdinand and Esther Viola, all of whom are living. The 
family are all earnest members of the Lutheran church, which the father 
served so well as pastor for so many years, and all are much interested in 
church work. The grandfather, Lewis Johnson, built the church at Veners- 
borg. 

Politically, Mr. Johnson is a Republican, and ever since the organ- 
ization of school district No. 25 he has served as clerk of the district, a 
period of about twenty-five years, which, in itself, speaks well for his able 
discharge of the duties pertaining to that office. 



JAMES A. KINNEY. 

James A. Kinney, editor of the Alexandria Citizen, was born in West 
Ilnion, Iowa, June 9. 1869. He is a son of Andrew D. Kinney, who was 
born in Pennsylvania, February 12, 1843, ^"<i ^'^^ on September 21, 1905. 
His mother's maiden name was Sarah E. Washburn, born in Waukeegan, 
Illinois. 

Andrew D. Kinney was educated in the public schools of New Jersey. 
He removed to West Union, Iowa, when a young man, and there learned 




JAMES A, KIXXET. 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 273 

the blacksmitli trade. He worked at his trade at that place for several 
years, at the end of which time he renio\-ed to Eldorado, Iowa, and there 
engaged in the hotel business, at the same time opening a blacksmith shop, 
which he conducted at that place for about fifteen years. He then moved 
to Dakota, which was a territory at the time, and took up a homestead of 
government land in what is now South Dakota, near Highmore. He only 
remained there for about one year, returning presently to Iowa and locating 
at Elgin, that state, where he spent the rest of his life, his death occurring 
on the date abo\e stated. Andrew Kinney and wife were the parents of 
eight children: James A., the subject of this sketch; Ella, who married 
J. A. Jones: C. K., of MinneapoHs; G. ^^'., of Beach, North Dakota; Rev. 
R. D. Kinney, of Fredericksburg, Iowa; Grace, who married E. E. Walden, 
of Minneapolis; Earl, of A'anada, Montana, and Arthur, of Minneapolis. 
Andrew D. Kinney was a member of the Masonic order and of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. Politically, he aftiliated with the Repub- 
lican party. 

James A. Kinney was educated in the schools of Elgin, Iowa, complet- 
ing the course and graduating from the high school at that place. After- 
ward he attended the business college at Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and was gradu- 
ated from that institution in 1889. He then entered a printing office at 
West Union, Iowa, and worked at the printing business for about three years. 
In 1892 he went south and spent the winter in Fort ^\'orth, and in Temple, 
Texas, working on daily papers. Returning to ^^'est Union, Iowa, the fol- 
lowing year he took the position of manager of the Fayette Coiintv Union, 
of which Congressman \\'alt H. Butler was at that time the owner, and con- 
tinued in that position for about eighteen months, at the end of which time 
he went to Aurora, Iowa, and engaged in the newspaper business on his own 
account. He bought material for a newspaper plant and founded the Aurora 
Obserzrr, which he continued to publish for eleven years. While residing 
in Aurora he served for two years as postmaster of the town. In 1905 he 
disposed of his interest in the Observer, resigned the postmastership and 
came to Minnesota, buying a half-interest in the Alexandria Citizen from 
Hennings Brothers and entering into partnership with O. W. Hennings, in 
the publication of that paper. That partnership continued until 1910, when 
Mr. Kinney bought his partner's interest and has since been conducting the 
Citizen as the sole proprietor. 

On July 20, 1893, at ^^'est l^^nion, Iowa, James A. Kinnev and Ethel 
( i8a) 



274 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

Hennings were united in marriage. To this union four children have been 
born: James Paul, a senior at Carleton College; Philip R., a midshipman 
at the United States Na^•al Academy at Annapolis ; Elizabeth and Helen. 
Mrs. Kinney is a daughter of Thomas Plennings, of West Union, Iowa. 
Air. and Airs. Kinney are members of the Congregational church and Mr. 
Kinney is treasurer of the local congregation. His political affiliation is 
with the Democratic party and he is at present the deputy oil inspector for 
Douglas and Grant counties. Mr. Kinney's lodge affiliations are with the 
Masonic order, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Modern Wood- 
men of America, and the Yeomen, and he is secretary of the local lodge of 
Masons. 



WALTER H. BOULTING. 

\\'alter H. Boulting, a well-known retired farmer of Xorcross, was 
born in Dubuque county, Iowa, on January 21, 1859. the son of ^^'illiam 
and Matilda (Jackson) Boulting, the former of whom -\vas born in Eng- 
land and the latter in the state of New York. 

William Boulting emigrated to Canada in 1849 and located near 
Toronto, where he remained for some time. He later removed to Dubuque 
count V, Iowa, where he engaged in farming, and where he made his home 
until his death some years ago. His widow died several years ago. They 
were the parents of five children, Walter H., A^iola. Elsie S., Emma and 
William. Emma and William are deceased and Elsie is a resident of Alex- 
andria. William Boulting was the father of one child, a son, Sidney, by a 
former marriage, the mother having died in England. Sidney Boulting was 
a soldier in the Civil War and was present at many of the important battles. 

Anthony and .A.nn (Greene) Boulting, the paternal grandparents of 
Walter H. Boulting, natives of England, emigrated to Canada and were 
located for a time near Toronto. The family had decided to remove to 
Iowa and had proceeded as far as Detroit, when Anthony Boulting died. 
After the death of his father. William Boulting, with his son Sidney, his 
mother and his brothers and sisters proceeded on their way to Iowa. They 
located in Dubuque county where they were among the early settlers of that 
section. Anthony and Ann Boulting were the parents of four children, 
William, Joseph, Annie and Ruth, all of whom came to America. The 
maternal grandparents of Walter H. Boulting were nati\-es of England. 



DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 275 

They were married in the state of New York, but later removed to Oliio, 
where the grandfather died. The mother and children removed to Dnlxique 
county, Iowa, having made the journey with horses and wagon. They 
later removed to southwestern Iowa. 

Walter H. Boulting received his education in Dubuque county, Iowa, 
and there grew to manhood. After completing his schooling he engaged 
in fanning in that county, where he remained until 1902. On his retire- 
ment as a farmer in Dubuque county, Mr. Boulting came to Minnesota 
county and located at Korcross, where he managed the elevator for the 
Hennepin Elevator Company for a number of years, since which time he 
has lived a retired life. 

Fraternally, Air. Boulting is a member of the United \\"orkmen and 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He has always taken an active 
interest in local affairs and served his township as chairman of the board 
before the village was incorporated. After the incorporation he served 
several times as president of the village. Being progressive, he has alwavs 
taken much interest in assisting in the advancement of the town and was 
a strong factor in the successful effort to incorporate. 



EMIL E. BERGH. 



Emil E. Bergh, a well-kn(iwn farmer of Brandon township, Douglas 
county, was lx)rn in that township on April 8, 1882, the son of Ellef and 
Petrine (Melhus) Bergh. 

Peter Bergh, the paternal grandfather of Emil E. Bergh, was a suc- 
cessful farmer of Xorway, where he died many years ago. The family 
was active in the work of the Norwegian Lutheran church. The maternal 
grandfather, Jens Melhus, was also a farmer in Norway and was an active 
member of the Lutheran church. Ellef Bergh, the father of Emil E. 
Bergh, was born in Norway and there received his education in the public 
schools and grew to manhood. In 1872 he came to the L^nited States and 
located in Goodhue county, Alinnesota. He remained there but a short time 
and then became a resident of Pope county, where he engaged in farming 
for three years. He then came to Douglas county in 1875, ^.nd here bought 
a farm in section 20, Brandon township. It was here that he lived the 
remainder of his life, his death occurring on Aixgust 19, 1906, at the age 
of fifty-seven years. His widow still lives on the home place with one of 



276 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

her sons, who purchased the farm. Mr. Bergh was very active in the work 
of the Norwegian Lutheran church at Brandon, wlnich he helped to organize. 
He and Mrs. Bergh were the parents of tlie following children : Peter, 
Minda, Jennie, Emil E,, John and Ole. 

Emil E. Bergh recei\'ed his education in the schools of Brandon town- 
ship and grew to manhood on the home farm, where as a lad he assisted 
with the farm work. After completing his school work in the township, 
he was in attendance at the Augsburg Seminary at Minneapolis for one 
year. On January 26, 1905, he was united in marriage to Minnie Strom, 
who was born in Brandon township, on June 9, 1883, the daughter of Anton 
H. and Anna (Haaven) Strom. 

Anton H. Strom was born in Norway, on October 21,, 1855, and when 
but five years of age sailed with his father and mother for America. On 
the voyage the mother died and was buried at sea. The father and his two 
children, Annetta and .Anton, landed at Quebec, Canada, and came direct 
to Minnesota, locating first in Goodhue county, where they remained for 
eight -^'ears, after which they came to Douglas county. Yomig Anton, after 
the arrival in Alinnesota, \\as taken by one of their neighbors, and with 
that family he remained until he was twenty-three years of age, when he 
came to Douglas county to join his father. He was married on June 28, 
1878, to Anna Haaven, and they were the parents of two children, Henry 
and ^Minnie. After coming to Douglas county, Mr. Strom engaged in active 
farming until 1910, when he retired from active farm life and moved to 
Brandon. 

Emil E. and Minnie Bergh are the parents of four children, Henry, 
Phillip, Miriam and Lloyd. Since their marriage, Mr. and Airs. Bergh 
ha\-e been living on the farm belonging to Mrs. Bergh's father in section 
19, Brandon township. There Mr. Bergh is engaged in general farming and 
stock raising, and is interested in Shorthorn cattle and Poland China hogs. 
Besides his farming interests, Mr. Bergh owns stock in the Brandon 
Co-operative Creamer^' Association, of which he has served as secretary 
and manager for the last six years. He also owns stock in the Farmers 
and Merchants Union Elevator Company at Brandon. He has always 
taken much interest in local civic attairs and has served as clerk of his 
township for the past five years, and as chairman of the school board for 
the past two years. He and Mrs. Bergh are active in the social and religious 
life of the community and are held in high esteem by all who know them. 
Mr. Bergh is progressive and is a strong lieliever in the best of schools and 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 



^77 



good roads. Being broadminded and a man of ability, lie knows the 

importance of the schools to the chiKlren of the community, and that the 

future of the state depends mijch upon the educational training of the 
young. 



GUST NEWMAN. 



One of the many substantial farmers and enterprising citizens of Alex- 
andria township. Douglas county, who are of Swedish birth, is Gust New- 
man, who was born in Sweden on December 7. i860, the son of Carl New- 
man and wife, both nati\'es of th.at same country. Carl Newman came 
with his family to Minnesota in 188 1, locating at once in Alexandria town- 
ship, Douglas county, where he purchased forty acres of land in section 12, 
and on this farm he continued to live until his retirement from active farm 
life, at which time he moved to the city of Alexandria, where his death 
occurred on February 18, 1894. Carl Newman and wife were the parents 
of five children. Gust, Ludwig, Henry, Matilda and Walfred. the latter of 
whom died while }-oung. The family were adherents of the Swedish Luth- 
eran church. The widow Newman, who was born on December 24, 1836, 
makes her home with her son. Gust. 

Gust Newman received his education in the public schools of his native 
land. In 1S80 he came to Minnesota, locating in Alexandria township, 
Douglas county. His first employment after coming here was on the rail- 
road, afterwards on farms in this neighborhood. In 1888 he purchased the 
farm of eighty acres on which he now lives, and started farming for him- 
self. This tract was all wild land at the time he acquired it, and Mr. New- 
man has placed all the improvements on the farm himself, his place now 
being one of the best in the township. He carries on a general system of 
farming and also engages in dairying to some extent, which branch of farm- 
ing he has carried on since 1910. He is also a breeder of blooded live 
stock, specializing in Guernsey cattle, in which business he has met with a 
very commendable success. 

In 1890 Gust Newman was married to Mary Grandlnnd and to this 
union five children have been born, Minnie, Sadie, Ruth, Roy and Mildred, 
all of whom are living with the exception of Minnie, who died at the age 
of thirteen years. The family are all loyal members of the Swedish Luth- 
eran church. Mr. Newman is a Republican, and is interested in all public 



278 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

matters pertaining to the general welfare of his community. He has served 
as a member of tlie township school board. His wife is a daughter of 
Daniel and C'hristena Elizalseth ( Pearson) Grandlund, both natives of 
Sweden and early settlers in Douglas county, who settled in Belle River 
township, where Daniel Grandlund took a homestead, on which he spent 
tlie rest of his life, his death occurring in 1910, and where his widow still 
lives. 



PETER CASSELL. 



Among the substantial farmers of Hudson township, Douglas county is 
Peter Cassell, who was born of sturdy Scotch parentage in Richland county, 
Wisconsin, January 5, 1863. He is a son of George and Jeanette (Pennie) 
Cassell, both of whom were natives of Scotland, the former born in Eifesliire 
in 1 83 1, and the latter born in Lockleaven. George Cassell came to America 
in 1850 and located in Whiteside county, Illinois, where he remained for 
ten years. In i860 he moved to Richland county, Wisconsin, being among 
the pioneers of that county, operating a farm there until 1865. In the latter 
year he came to Minnesota, locating in section 36, of Hudson township, 
Douglas county, the first white man to settle in that township; and during 
all the first winter he was there, there were no other white men in the town- 
ship, his only neighbors being the Indians. The family followed him in 
September and lived in the wagon in which they had come overland from 
Wisconsin until their house was finished. Their nearest market was at St. 
Cloud, with flour selling as high as twenty-two dollars a barrel. In true 
pioneer style they lived in their home in the wilderness, improving and cul- 
tivating the land, and in 1877 Mr. Cassell sold the farm in section 36 and 
bought the farm where Peter Cassell now lives, in section 34. George Cas- 
sell was a successful farmer and at the time of his death was a substantial 
landowner. To him and his wife were born ten children, James, Thomas, 
Peter, John, William, George, Edward, Mary, Daniel and Jessie. The family 
were earnest and devout members of the Presbyterian church. The father 
died in 1903, while the mother survived until 19 14. 

Peter Cassell received his education in the public schools of Hudson 
township and as a young man assisted his father with the work on the home 
farm. In 1891 he and his brother, John, bought two hundred and forty 
acres of the home place. Four years later he purchased his brother's inter- 
est in that farm and has since added to his holdings until he now owns 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 279 

four hundred acres of fine farming land in Hudson township. He has one 
of the most thoroughly cultivated and best-improved farms in the township, 
and is engaged in general farming and stock raising. Besides his farming 
operations, for the past thirty-three years Mr. Cassell has operated a thresh- 
ing-machine outfit in his home neighborhood. 

In 1898 Peter Cassell was married to Maggie Taylor, the daughter of 
Joseph and Margaret (Maxwell) Taylor, both natives of Scotland. Joseph 
Taylor and wife came to America in 1907 and are now living in their own 
little home near Mr. Cassell's home. Peter Cassell and wife are the parents 
of three children : Allyn T., Mina Lovone and Una Janet. The family are 
adherents of the Presbyterian church, and Mr. Cassell is a member of the 
board of trustees of the local congregations. Joseph Taylor and wife, the 
parents of Mrs. Cassell, had eight children: Barbara and David, who li\e 
in Scotland, and Mrs. Minna Pennie, Mrs. Josephine McClelland, Mrs. Jessie 
Waters, Miss Lizzie Taylor and John, in Douglas county. 

Mr. Cassell is a Republican, and takes a warm interest in local political 
matters. He has held several township offices, having filled the positions of 
assessor and clerk, besides being a member of the school board for a period 
of ten years. 



TORGER ]\[OBRAATEN. 

Farming is both pleasant and profitable when carried on in a manner 
like that employed by Torger Mobraaten, of Elbow Lake tov/nship. Grant 
county. He was born in Norway, June 14, 1862, and is a son of Chris- 
topher and Annie Mobraaten, natives of Norway, who came to this countr\- 
in 1867, settling in Houston county, Minnesota, and on to Grant county in 
1871. Here the father took up a homestead of one hundred and sixtv 
acres in Elbow Lake township, to which he later added eighty acres. He 
planted a grove, erected buildings and developed his land into a good farm, 
on which he spent the rest of his life, dying in 1883, at the age of forty-six 
years. His widow survived him twenty-three years, dying in 1906, at the 
advanced age of eighty. They had but two children, Torger, the subject 
of this revicAV, and Edward, who is engaged in business in Wendell. 

Torger Mobraaten was five years old when his parents came to America. 
He grew up on the home farm and attended the public schools. He has 
always followed general farming and stock raising, and has been quite suc- 
cessful, now owning four hundred and forty acres, including the old home- 



28o DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

stead, all his land being under excellent improvements. He has a fine grove 
which he set out himself, and all his buildings are modern. 

Mr. Mobraaten was married on Xo\ember 2^, 1890, to Annie Furge- 
son, who was born in Iowa, a daughter of Halvor and Tone Furgeson, who 
came from Iowa to Albert Lea. ^Minnesota, and then to Grant county, many 
years ago, and who now live in Elbow Lake township. Two children have 
been boni to Mr. Mobraaten and wife, namely: Clarence, who married 
Esther Hultonder and lives on the home farm, which he helps operate, and 
Blanche, who is also at home. 

Like his father, the subject of this sketch is a Reimblican, but he has 
never been active in public affairs or sought office. He and his family 
belong to the Lutheran church. 



CARL O. PETERSON. 



The late Carl O. Peterson, a well-known and well-to-do farmer of 
Solem township, Douglas county, was a native of Sweden, his birth having 
occurred in La\ekulla, Jerda Socken, Ivalmarlaen, on March 3, 1845. 

Air. Peterson received his education in the schools of his native coun- 
try, and as a young man came to America, locating first in Minneapolis, 
where he worked for a time. In 1866 he bought out the rights of a home- 
steader for fiftv dollars. The homestead consisted of one hundred and 
sixt^• acres of land in Solem township, Douglas county, where the family 
is still living, and which is now called "Plainview Farm." Mr. Peterson 
erected the first set of buildings on that farm, planted a grove, and in 
many ways improved and cultivated the place. In the early days he used 
to work (luring the summer seasons in the cities, and go out to the farm 
to trap and hunt during the winter, but later devoted his entire attention 
to farming, in time adding forty more acres to the tract. Since his death, 
which occurred on February 17, 1895. his sons have put up new and modern 
buildings on the farm and it is now one of the best in the township. His 
widow still lives on the farm. 

In 1875, Carl O. Peterson was married to Augusta Dahlin, a native 
of Sweden, who came to the United States at the age of nine with her 
parents Lars Johan and Christina ( Anderstotter) Dahlen. The famih- 
located first at DeKalb, Illinois, Init later came to Afinnesota. where they 
homesteaded land near Farwell. 



DOUGLAS AND GRAXT COUNTIES, MI.VXESOTA. 281 

Carl O. Peterson and wife were the parents oi six children, five sons 
and one daughter, the last-named lieing the wife of Frank E. Oslerberg. 
who is a brother of A. L. Osterberg. who is mentioned elsewhere in this 
work. The five sons are F. Robert, Theodore L., Carl A., H. Fred. Joseph 
M. These five brothers are operating the farm together, and. with their 
mother, have five hundred and twenty-five acres under cultivation. Thev 
are engaged in general farming and stock raising, and have lieen ver\- suc- 
cessful in their chosen lines. They also operate a threshing outfit during 
tlie season, which business they have conducted for fifteen vears. 

The family is a well-established and prominent one in their commun- 
ity, and all are earnest members of the Lutheran church. 



JEXS FRIGAARD. 



One of the well-known and substantial farmers of Pomnie de Terre 
township. Grant county, is Jens Frigaard. who was born at Stordal, in 
Trondhjem. Xorway, Februar\- i6, 1849. He is a son of Jens and Gertie 
(Boraas) Frigaard, both of whom were also natives of Xorway. the former 
born in 1824, and the latter in 1825. The father died in Xorway in i865, 
and the mother remained in X'orway until 1877, when she came to America 
to join her son, Jens, who had come to the United States some time before. 
Here she was married to John Froirum, and she spent her last days in Good- 
hue county, ]\Iinnesota. her death occurring in the earlv eighties. Tens Fri- 
gaard and wife were the parents of seven children : Jens, the immediate sub- 
ject of this review: Sarah, who died at the age of eighteen: Ole. a farmer 
living in Goodhue county, this state: Louis, a retired farmer of Goodhue 
county; Gunder, who died in Goodhue county; John, a farmer of Goodhue. 
and Jetina, who died in Xorway at the age of sixteen weeks. 

Jens Frigaard received his education in the public schools of Xorwav 
and was reared on a farm there. He assisted with the farm work in his 
native land until 1871, when he came to America. He settled first in Good- 
hue county, Minnesota, finding emplovment on the farms there, and later 
bought a farm and lived there until 1890. In that year he sold his farm in 
Goodhue count}- and moved to Grant county, where he purchased a farm of 
eighty acres in Pomme de Terre township. This farm was raw prairie when 
he acquired it and he at once began the work of de\-eloping and cultivating 
it. He has placed many and various improvements on the place, including 



282 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

good buildings, as well as an orchard and grove. He has added to his hold- 
ings until he now owns two other eighty-acre tracts in Stony Brook town- 
ship, making a total of two hundred and forty acres, besides a quarter sec- 
tion in Elbow Lake township. He is engaged in general farming and stock 
raising and has made a decided success of his life work. Besides his farm- 
ing interests, Mr. Frigaard has other interests, being a stockholder in the 
Farmers Elevator Company at West Elbow. 

In 1875 Jens Frigaard was married to Annie Setran, a sister of H. G. 
Setran, who is mentioned elsewhere in this work, and to this union have 
been born twelve children : Julia, who became the wife of Charles Nelson, 
a farmer of South Dakota; Gustav, who died at the age of thirty; Ole, who 
is operating his father's farm in Elbow Lake township; Regina, who became 
the wife of Ole Johnson, a farmer of North Dakota; Richard, living at home; 
Julius, still at home; Annie, at home; Bernhard, at home: Selina, at home; 
Henry, at home ; Alma, at home, and one other who died. The family are all 
memlsers of the Lutheran church, in which they take an active interest. ^Ir. 
Frigaard is still hale and hearty, and takes an active part in the farm work. 
He is a Prohibitionist in politics, and served his township as school director 
for three vears. 



HOGAN G. SETRAN. 



Hogan G. Setran, a successful farmer and stock raiser of Pomme de 
Terre township. Grant county, was born in Norway, March 7, 1859. He 
is a son of Gunder and Berit (Setran), both natives of Norway, from 
Avhich country they came to Minnesota in 1866, locating in Goodhue county, 
the death of the father occurring not long after settling there. His widow 
sur\-ived for some years. They were parents of three children, Anne. 
Hogan G. and Runda (deceased.) The mother of these children married 
again, lier last husband being Ralph Burgsen, and to that union five chil- 
dren were born, Geta. Gurina, Carl (deceased), Bessie, and Ludvig. 

Hogan G. Setran had no opportunity to obtain an education, and he 
never attended school. He was seven years old when his parents brought 
him to America. He has devoted his life to farming and has succeeded 
as a result of his close application. He came to Grant county in 1887 and 
purchased eightv acres in Pomme de Terre township, to which he later 
added one hundred and twenty acres, thus making his present farm two hun- 
dred acres. ?Ie set out a large grove upon coming here which is now of 



DOUGLAS AND GRAXT COUXTIES, MEXXESOTA. 2S3 

good size, and he has added other vahiable improvements from time to time, 
putting up modem buildings and is well tixed in every way. He is a Repub- 
lican and a member of the United Lutheran church. 

Mr. Setran was married in 1880 to Alarrit Borseth. who was born in 
Xorway in 1854. She is a daughter of Gunder and Sigret Borseth, both 
natives of Xorway, in which countr}- the father died and where the mother 
is still living, being now eighty-six years of age. 

To Air, and Mrs. .Setran ten children have been born, Gunder, Gusta\-, 
Sebert, Bernard, Martin, Hannah (deceased), Albert (deceased), Richard, 
Annie and Bertha. Gunder Setran married Pauline \"iger and to that union 
four children have been bom, Sebert, Henry (deceased), Bernard and 
'Willie. Hannah Setran, now deceased, married Beril Ostrom and was the 
mother of two children, Bennie and Alilda. 



KXUTE DYBDAL. 



There was no better farmer or more highly respected citizen of Stonv 
Brook township, Grant county, during the generation that is past than the 
late Knute Dj^bdal, who was born in Xorway on June 13, 1865. He was 
a son of Ellend Dybdal and wife, mention of whom is made in another part 
of this work. 

Knute Dybdal was two years old when his parents brought him 
to the state of Iowa, from his native land, and there he spent his lx)yhood 
and attended the public schools, and worked on the farm in the summer 
time. He was about sixteen years old -when he removed with the family 
to Grant county, Alinnesota. When starting out in life for himself he 
bought eighty acres in Stony Brook township, which he later sold and 
in 1890 bought one hundred and sixty acres in the same township. To 
that he added forty acres, on which he set out a grove, put up modern 
buildings and made various other improvements, and there he spent the 
rest of his life successfully engaged in general farming and stock raising. 

Air. Dybdal was married in Grant county, December 9, 1891, to Rena 
Alohagen, who was born in Goodhue county, Minnesota, Alarch 13, 1870. 
She is a daughter of Lars and Ingeborg Mohagen, both natives of Xorway, 
from which country they came to America in 1867, locating in Goodhue 
county, and from there to Grant county in 1871. taking up a homestead 
of one hundred and sixty acres in Elbow Lake township, later buying 



284 DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

another one hundred and sixty acres in the same township, on which Mr. 
Mohagen set out a gro\e and put on modern improvements, including a 
good set of buildings. There he spent the rest of his life, dying in 1912, 
at the age of seventy-two years. His widow is still living on the old 
homestead, at the age of seventy-six years. To these parents seven chil- 
dren were born, Edward, Rena, Mary (deceased), Ragna (deceased), Ole, 
Ida and Lizzie. Mr. and Mrs. Mohagen were members of the Synod Lutheran 
church at Elbow Lake. To Mr. and Mrs. Dybdal six children were born, 
Elmer, Isaac, Lilly, Melvin, Blanche and Kenneth, all of whom are living. 
The death of Mr. Dybdal occurred on the home farm in Stony Brook town- 
ship, January 6, 1908. 



TIMOTHY VERXON NASH. 

One of the substantial and well-to-do farmers of Hudson township, 
Douglas count}', is Timothy V. Nash, who was born in Essex county, -New 
York, September 12, 1854, and is a son of Timothy S. and Julia Ann (Bur- 
dick) Nash, the former of whom was born in Docksbur\- county, \'ermont, 
and the latter of whom was a native of New York. 

Timothy S. Nash was a direct descendant^ seventh generation, of Thomas 
Nash, who came to New England from the old country in 1640. He came 
west to Wisconisn with his son, the subject of this review, in 1868, and from 
there to St. Paul in 1871, where he followed his trade as a building con- 
tractor. In 1892 he removed to South Dakota, where he farmed for a time, 
but later returned to ^linnesota, where his death occurred at the home of 
his son, Timothy V. His wife had died many years before, previous to his 
leaving New York state. They were the jiarents of four children, Florella 
Imogene, Newton E., Timothy \'. and Sanford ^^'aldo, of whom only two 
are still living. Newton E. died at the age of twenty years, and Sanford 
Waldo died in infancy. 

Timothy V. Nash received his early education in the schools of his native 
state, later finishing his schooling in Wisconsin. He accompanied his father 
to St. Paul, and at the age of twenty-two years, went to Flandreau, South 
Dakota, and in 1877, homesteaded a tract of one hundred and sixty acres of 
land in that state, and there he continued to live until 1897, when he came to 
Douglas county, Minnesota, and purchased land in Osakis township, and 
about a vear later bought land in Hudson township, but continued to live on 
the farm in Osakis township for five years, after which he removed to Hudson 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 285 

township. He has added to his holdings here until he now owns two hundred 
and forty acres of fine fanning land. He is engaged in general farming, 
dairying and stock raising, making a specialty of breeding thoroughbred 
Shorthorn cattle, of which he has a fine herd. 

On December 5, 1S94. Timothy \'. Xash was married to Alattie E. 
French, who is also a native of Xew York state, the daughter of Andrew 
French, and to this union have been born two children, Xewton E. and 
Beulah L., both of whom are still at home with their parents. The familv 
are members of the Presbyterian church, and are much interested in the 
affairs of the local church of that denomination. 

]\Ir. Xash is independent in his political views and is active in ail public 
matters of local importance. He has been a member of the ^Masonic fra- 
ternity for many years, having joined the organization on July 3, 1876. His 
present membership is with the lodge at Alexandria, ^Minnesota, though he 
is a charter member of Flandreau Lodge X'o. 11, South Dakota. 



AUGUST THOMPSOX. 



One of the enterprising younger farmers of Orange township, Douglas 
county, is August Thompson, who was born in Olmsted county, Alinnesota, 
August 14, 1880. He is a son of Chris and Berat (Erickson) Thompson, 
both of whom were natives of Xorway. 

Chris Thompson came to America when a young man, locating in Olm- 
sted county, Minnesota, where he was a farmer for many years, but is now 
living retired in Rochester, Minnesota, enjoying the comforts and conven- 
iences of modern life, after a life of arduous labor on the farm. At one 
time he was the owner of four hundred and forty acres of fine land. His wife, 
who was also a native of Xorway, came to this country when a small child 
with her parents, and she was reared and educated in ^Minnesota, and was 
here married to Chris Thompson. They are the parents of five children, Julia, 
August, Minnie, Theodore and Clara, all of whom are living. 

August Thompson received his education in the schools of Olmsted 
countv, and earlv in life decided to make farming his chosen occupation. He 
farmed for one vear in Olmsted county and in 1902 went to McLean county. 
X'orth Dakota, where he homesteaded a quarter section of land and where 
he lived for eight years. He then returned to ^Minnesota, locating in Orange 
township, Douglas county, where he has one hundred and sixty-seven acres 



286 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

of land and is engaged in general farming and stock raising with a very 
commendable degree of success. 

In 1906 August Thompson was married to Clara Christiansen, who 
was born in the state of Washington, but who came as a small child with 
her parents, Ole and ]\Ialina (Nelson) Christiansen, to Minnesota, the family 
settling in Olmsted county. To this union have been born four children, 
Berdina, Clarissa, Alford and Jarnes. The family are earnest members of 
the Lutheran church. 



GUSTAF NELSON. 



Gustaf Nelson, one of the successful farmers and an early settler of 
Pelican Lake township. Grant county, was born in Sweden on June 24, 
1843, the son of Nels and Marie (Pearson) Johnson. 

Nels and Marie Johnson were natives of Sweden, where they were edu- 
cated in the public schools, grew to manhood and womanhood and were 
married. It was there that their children were born and educated and there 
they lived the greater part of their lives. After having reached three score 
years of life they came to the United States to join their children, who had 
located in this country some years before. It was in 1874 that Nels and 
Marie Johnson came to Minnesota to make their home with their son Johnas 
Nelson, who lived in Pelican Lake township. Grant county, and it was there 
that Nels Johnson died in 1880 at the age of sixty-eight years. His widow 
died in 1896 at the age of eighty-five years. They were the parents of si.x 
children, Johnas, John, Gustaf, Lizzie, Mina (deceased) and Carl. Mr. and 
Mrs. Johnson were devout members of the Lutheran church and were highly 
regarded by all who knew them. 

Gustaf Nelson received his education in the public schools of his native 
country and there grew to manhood. After coming to the United States 
he attended some school in this country. On March 21, 1876, he was united 
in marriage to Forgan Newhouse, the daughter of Christopher and Ture 
( Halvorson ) Newhouse, natives of Norway, where Mr. Newhouse was born 
on July 13, 1812. He decided as a young man to come to America and 
landed in New York on September 2-j, 1839, with but ten dollars in cash. He 
came direct to Wisconsin, where he located and engaged in farming. He 
later became the owner of one hundred and sixty acres of good land, and 
was recognized as a successful farmer and stock raiser. He married Ture 
Halvorson, the daughter of Halvor Halvorson, and to that union five chil- 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. jS/ 

dren were born, Oliver and Christopher, both of whom are deceased, Chris- 
topher, Torgan and Christina. Mrs. Ture Xewhouse died some years ago. 
yir. and Mrs. Xewhouse were members of the Norwegian Lutheran church 
and were highly respected people. 

In 1879, Gustaf Nelson purchased his first farm in section 8, Pelican 
Lake township. He has since added to the original tract and is now the owner 
of one hundred and fifty-two acres, of excellent land, all under good cul- 
tivation and improved with substantial buildings. The tract was wild prairie 
at the time of purchase and Mr. Nelson has erected all the buildings, and 
made the other improvements. 

To Gustaf and Torgan ( Newhouse ) Nelson five children have been 
born, namely: Albert, who died at the age of fifteen }ears : George, who 
died in infancy; Clara, who married Julius Dalgaard, of Ashbv: Mina, who 
married Abraham Sumstad, now deceased, and who also lives at Ashbv. 
and Ella, who married Anton Sumstad and is living on the home place. 
The Nelsons are members of the Norwegian Lutheran church and take a 
warm interest in church work. They also take an earnest part in the gen- 
eral social activities of the community in which they live and are held in the 
highest esteem by all who know them. 



ADOLPH G. KUBE. 



There have come from the Badger state a number of the best farmers 
of Grant and Douglas counties during the past few decades, who have found 
good homes in our midst. Among these the name of Adolph G. Kube, 
of Lawrence township should be mentioned. He was torn in Dodge county, 
^\'isconsin, ^lay 26, 1871, and is a son of Charles L. and Ida (Doerning) 
Kube, both natives of Germany. The father came to this country in 1853, 
locating in \\'isconsin, and was joined there by the mother in 1854. They 
established their home on a farm, living in Dodge and Jefiferson counties, 
finally at \A'atertown, in which place they remained until 1885 when thev 
came to [Minnesota, Mr. Kube taking up a homestead of one hundred and 
sixty acres in Lawrence township. Grant county, which land he improved into 
a good farm. There he spent the rest of his life, dying on November 18, 
1898, at the advanced age of eighty-two years, his birth having occurred 
on November 25, 1816. His wife, who was born on September i, 1826, 
died on May 3, 1893, ^t the age of sixty-seven years. They were parents of 



2Sb DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

six children, Clara (deceased), Liulwig (deceased), Leonora, Alfred, Ida 
and Adolph G. 

The subject of this sketch grew up on the farm and attended school in 
Wisconsin, in Dodge and Jefferson counties. He was fourteen years of 
age when his parents settled in Grant county in 1885. In 1893 he bought 
one hundred and sixty acres in Lawrence township and in 1908 purchased 
another quarter section there, on which he has since resided. He has made 
all improvements, including the erection of a good group of buildings, and 
has been successful as a general farmer and stock raiser. 

Mr. Kube was married, on February i, 1898, to Estella R. Ash, a 
daughter of James Ash, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this volume. 
To this union five children have been born, James, Eunice, Esther, Ruth, 
and Aldis. Mr. Kube is a Republican and is now a member of the local 
school board. He is an elder in the Presbyterian church at Lawrence and is 
a member of the board of trustees of the same. 



OLE ANUXDSOX HAAT\'EDT. 

One of the pioneer farmers of Douglas county, who became a well- 
known and highl)^ respected citizen there, was the late Ole Anundson Haat- 
\'edt, who was born in Norway in 1822, in which country he grew up and 
li\ed until in 1842, when he emigrated to America, locating first in Wiscon- 
sin, working there for some time, finally settling on Jefferson Prairie, that 
state, on which he resided until 1868. The year previous he had come to 
Minnesota and had tought the rights to a homestead — the place where his 
widow still resides, in Holmes City township, Douglas county, to which he 
returned the following year, and from that time on until his death devoted 
his attention to its development, carrying on general farming and stock rais- 
ing successfully. The land was partly timbered. He farmed with oxen 
for some time and hauled the timbers for his buildings from St. Cloud. 
He became one of the substantial and influential men of his township. His 
death occurred on his farm there in 1901, when well ad\-anced in years. 
He owned in all about three hundred and seventy acres on the home place 
and land in other localities. 

Ole A. Haatvedt was married twice, his second wife being Betsey 
Tangen, a native of Norway, from which country her parents emigrated 
to this country, settling in Wisconsin, on the Illinois line, when she was 
seven vears old. The family located on Jeft'erson Prairie and, later moved 




OLi: A. HAAT\'EI)'r 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 2S0 

to Boone county, Illinois. Her mother spent her last years at the home 
of the subject of this sketch, where she died when about ninety-three years 
of age. Mr. Haatvedt had six children by his last wife, three who are li\-- 
mg and three who died, namely: Anna, who is the wife of Andrew Amund- 
son; Carl A. and Edward B.. who have remained with their mother and 
operate the home farm. Of those now deceased. Ole was the only one who 
attained his majority, he having been thirty-three years of age at the time 
of his death. 

Mr. Haat^■edt belonged to the Moe Lutheran church and was a man of 
upright character. Politically, he was independent. He served as county 
commissioner for a number of terms, having been a faithful and useful 
member of the board. He took a prominent part in the early development 
of the county and was regarded as one of its most substantial citizens. He 
had a wide circle of warm friends hereabout and his death on April 27, 
1 901, was widely mourned. 



^IIKKEL TORGERSON. 



From that rugged and far-away country, Norway, many splendid farm- 
ers and citizens have come to Grant and Douglas counties and have estab= 
lished good homes. Among these is ^Mikkel Torgerson, a farmer of Stony 
Brook township, Grant county. He was born in Norway, November 6, 1842. 
His parents lived and died in Norway. He grew to manhood in his native 
land and attended the common schools. He immigrated to the United States 
in 1883, locating in Ottertail county. Alinnesota : but in 1885 moved to 
Stony Brook township. Grant county, buying eighty acres of school land. 
He worked hard, developed a good farm, managed well and prospered, and 
finally owned two hundred and eighty acres on which he erected good build- 
ings, set out a grove and made other important improvements. Politically, 
he is a Republican. He belongs to the United Lutheran church at Elbow 
Lake. 

Mr. Torgerson was married in 1870 to Hage Johnson, who was born 
in Norway in 1848. Her parents lived and died in Norway. To Air. and 
Mrs. Torgerson the following children were born: Torger (deceased), Inge- 
borg, Sara, Jens, John (deceased), Asa, Carl, Annie, Oscar (deceased) 
Oscar ( the second), Henry and Andrew. The mother of these children passed 
away on December 19, 1899. 
(19a) 



290 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

VICTOR M. REIF. 

\^ictor ]\I. Reif, one of the best-known and most progressive merchants 
of EvansA-ille, proprietor of an extensive general store at that place, justice 
of the peace in and for his home township, former postmaster of Evans- 
ville and for years actively identified with the general civic and commercial 
interests of the commimity in which he lives, is a native of the kingdom of 
Sweden, Ixit has been a resident of this country since he was twenty-three 
years of age. He was born in the city of Stockholm on January 3, i860, 
son of Johann and Maria Reif, natives of that same country, who spent all 
their lives in their native land. 

Following his schooling in the high school of his native city, Victor 
M. Reif attended an agricultural college there and was for some years there- 
after engaged in farming, continuing thus engaged until the spring of 1883, 
when he came to the United States and settled near ^Mammoth Cave in 
Kentucky. He bought a tract of ninety-six acres of unimproved land there 
and proceeded to develop the same, making his home in a neighl)oring church 
meanM'hile. In November of that same year he married and in the follow- 
ing month, December, 1883, came to ^Minnesota with his bride, locating at 
Evansville, where he entered into partnership ^\•ith Olaf Dalheim in the 
hardware business, an arrangement which continued for three years, at the 
dnd of which time Mr. Reif embarked in business on his own account. 
While engaged in the hardware business he had acquired a knowledge of the 
jewelry and watch-making business from a business associate and this deter- 
mined him to open a jewelry store in Evansville. Shortly afterward he 
was appointed postmaster of Evansville and served for four years, during 
the Cleveland administration, conducting the postofifice in his jewelry store. 
Later he moved his store to another location, taking a larger room, and his 
wife started a millinery store in a part of the room, the two establishments 
being carried along verv nicely together. Gradually other lines were added 
to the stock until the double establishment outgrew its quarters and was 
compelled to move to a larger room, additional lines being added from time 
to time until now the Reif store carries a complete line of groceries, dry 
goods, queensware, notions, jewelry, tinware, graniteware and the like and 
is doing a large and growing business. Mr. Reif is a Democrat and in 
addition to his service as postmaster of Evansville has served as village 
recorder, a position he held for man)- years; was a member of the school 
])oard for eleven years and for some years past has been serving as justice 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 29 1 

of the peace. He is a member of the local lodge of the Modern Woodmen 
of America and takes a warm interest in the affairs of that organization. 
It was on November i6, 1883, in Kentucky, that \^ictor M.'Reif was 
united in marriage to Adaline Gustafson. also a native of the kingdom of 
Sweden. Xo children have been born to this union, but Mr. and Mrs. 
Reif have reared three children, two of whom they adopted and one, Charles 
Gustafson, a younger brother of Mrs. Reif, a printer by trade, who is now 
located at Trent, .South Dakota, the others being Nannie, now deceased, and 
George, who is still in school. Mr. and Mrs. Reif are members of the 
Presbyterian church and take an earnest interest in the various beneficences 
of the same, Mr. Reif being an elder in the church. In 1912 he was elected 
a commissioner from the Red River Valley Presbytery to the General 
Assembly of the Presbyterian church, held that year in the city of Louis- 
\-ille, Kentucky. The Reifs have a very pleasant home in Evansville and 
take a proper part in the general social activities of their home town, ever 
helpful factors in the work of promoting the best interests of the com- 
munitv in which the^• live. 



O. H. CURTIS. 



O. H. Curtis, one of the well-known and prominent retired farmers of 
Osakis, was born in Porter county, Indiana, on September 30, 1852, the son 
of Seth and Emehne (Fullen) Curtis, who were born in the state of New 
York and in Crawfordsville, Indiana, respectively. Seth Curtis moved from 
the state of New York to Indiana and was there married. In 1866 he 
and his wife decided to locate in JNIinnesota and here he homesteaded one 
hundred and sixty acres of land in Gordon township, Todd county. It was 
there that the family lived for many years. Mr. Curtis developed and 
improved his homestead and was successfully engaged in general farming 
and stock raising. In 1887 he sold his farm in Todd county and moved over 
to Douglas county, where he purchased one hundred and sixtv acres in sec- 
tion 2j of Osakis township. This farm he developed and improved and 
again engaged in general farming and stock raising, in which he was quite 
successful. It was there that he lived until the time of his death on lune i. 
1892. 

To Seth and Emeline Curtis were born the following children : ^^"ill- 
iam. Alanthus, Mary Ann, Samuel, O. H., and Hezekiah. ^Ir. and Mrs. 
Curtis were active members of the Methodist Episcopal church and took much 



292 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

interest in all church work. They were for many years active in the social 
and religious life of the community. Mr. Curtis was a man of much public 
spirit and took much interest in the growth and the development of the 
township and the county in which he lived. His life was an active one and 
he accomplished much that was good, not only to his immediate family, but 
to the community in general. Pieing a man of intelligence and experience, 
his advice and judgment were often sought on matters that pertained to 
the public welfare. 

O. H. Curtis received his education in the puljlic schools of Gordon and 
Osakis townships, and grew to manhood on his father's farms, where as a 
lad he assisted his father with the work of the farm. As a young man he 
decided that he would be a farmer, and soon engaged in the work for him- 
self, in section 22 of Osakis township. There he purchased a farm of one 
hundred and ten acres, where he engaged in general farming and stock rais- 
ing until 190^, in which year he bought the old homestead of his father, 
in Todd count}-, and was thus engaged in farming and stock raising until 
the fall of 1915, when he retired from the activities of farm life and moved 
to Osakis. He has been successful in his work and is now the owner of 
some four hundred acres in Gordon township, Todd county. He erected a 
beautiful modern house on Lake street in Osakis, where he now makes his 
home. 

In 1878 O. H. Curtis was united in marriage to ^Nlaria Bowman, the 
daughter of Jacob and Belinda Bowman. The parents of Mrs. Curtis were 
born in Canada and there received their education in the public schools, and 
there grew to manhood and womanhood. It was in 1858 that Jacob Bow- 
man came to the United States and located in Rice county, Minnesota, where 
he remained until 1867, when he came to Douglas county and here home- 
steaded one hundred and sixty acres in Osakis township. The family made 
the journey to their new home with a horse team and a covered wagon. 
The journey was a hard one and many Indians were passed on the way. 
Mr. Bowman became a prominent farmer,and stockman in Douglas county, 
and in connection with his farm interest he did much work in the real estate 
line and bought and sold many farms. 

To O. H. and Maria (Bowman) Curtis have been born eight children, 
namely: Claude, who married Cara Lane and lives in Montana; John, a 
farmer of Gordon township, Todd county, who married May Dunn and has 
one child, a daughter, Dorothy; Laura, who married Jesse Gray and lives 
in Alberta, Canada : Fred, who married Anna McBride and lives in Montana ; 
Herbert, who married Blanche Gray and lives on the old home place in 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 293 

Gordon township, Todd county, and James, Fillmore and Mildred. The 
family are prominent in the social and the religious life of the community, 
and are held in the highest regard by all. ]\Ir. Curtis is a I-iepublican and 
has always taken a keen interest in the civic life of the township. He is 
progressive in his views and has always advocated the most complete develop- 
ment of the roads and the schools of the community, believing that these 
are of paramount value in the development of the township, as well as of the 
county. Fraternall}-, he is a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted 
]\fasons and of the Independent Order of~Odd Fellows. Few men are held 
in higher regard than is Mr. Curtis, and his life has demonstrated that he 
has lived not for himself alone, but for the good and betterment of his fellow 
men. Aluch that is good has been accomplished by him and his life has been 
a worthy one. 



GEORGE TRIPP. 



George Tripp, one of the successful and well-known farmers of Pelican 
Lake township. Grant county, was born in \\'inona county, Minnesota, on 
July 6, i860, the son of John and Euphemia ( Nisbit ) Tripp. David Nis- 
bit, the maternal grandfather of George Tripp, was born at Scotland, New 
York, where he grew' to manhood. He later came to Minnesota and was 
one of the pioneers of Winona county. Daniel Tripp, the paternal grand- 
father, was also a native of the state of New York, and was' a pioneer of 
Winona county, Minnesota. 

John Tripp was born in the state of Xew York and there received his 
education in the public schools. After coming to Minnesota he home- 
steaded in Winona county, where he remained until 1881, when he sold 
the tract and moved to Grant county, where he engaged in general farming 
and stock raising and was quite successful, at the time of his death having 
been the owner of all of section 35 of Pelican Lake township. His death 
occurred on February 15, 1895, ^^ the age of sixty-four years. The widow 
died on August 28, 1914, at the age of eighty-one years. They were the 
parents of six children, Rebecca, George, Elma, Charles, Ida and Edwin. 
Rebecca lives at Park Rapids, ]\Linnesota, and Elma died in 1896. John 
Tripp was a man of much ability and was possessed of much business acu- 
men, his influence and advice having been widely sought in matters of 
importance in the community. 

George Tripp received his education in the public schools of Winona 



294 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

county and there he grew to manhood. On March 17, 1891, he was united 
in marriage to Lavina Alclvinstry, who was l>orn in Winona county, wher.e 
she was living at tlie time of lier marriage. To this vinion five children 
have been born, Rert, Bessie, Koy, Nellie and Vernon. The family have 
long been prominent in the social and religious life of the township and are 
held in the highest esteem by all who know them. They are most hospitable 
and have won many friends for their many acts of kindness. 

George Tripp is now the owner of eighty acres in section 34 of Pelican 
Lake township, Grant county, and eighty acres in St. Olaf township, Otter- 
tail county, just across the road from where he lives. He has developed 
and improved his farm until today he has one of the desirable farms of the 
township. There he is engaged in general farming and stock raising, in 
which he has been quite successful. He is a firm believer in intensive farm- 
ing and thorough cultivation and is recognized as one of the successful 
farmers of the county. He keeps good stock, l>ut devotes most of his time 
to the cultivation of his farm. 

George Tripp has always taken much interest in local affairs and was 
for many years a member of the township board of supervisors and of the 
school board of Ottawa township, where he lived before he became a resi- 
dent of Pelican Lake township. 



JOSEPH SCHLFXHTER. 

Joseph Schlecter, a well-known and prominent farmer of Alexandria 
township, Douglas county, was born in Minneapolis on June 24, 1857, the 
son of John and Margaret (Kliers) Schlechter, natives of Belgium and 
Germany, respectively. They received their education in the schools of their 
native countries. Some years after their marriage they decided to locate in 
America, where they might have a better chance to obtain a home for them- 
selves and their family. They landed in the United States in 1857 and came 
direct to Minnesota, locating in Hennepin county, where the wife died in 
Septemter, 1859. In 1864 Joseph Schlechter, enlisted in Company K. Fifth 
Regiment, Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, and served until the close of the 
Civil War. He saw much active service and was wounded at the battle of 
Nashville. At the close of the war he returned to his farm in Carver county, 
Minnesota, where he died in 1883. His health had become impaired, due 
to the exposure during his service in the army, and he never regained his 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 



'95 



former strength. He and his wife were the parents of four children, Marv, 
Catherine. Joseph and Theresa. The family were devout members of the 
Catholic church and took much interest in religious work. Politically, ]\Ir. 
Schlechter was identified with the Republican party. 

Joseph Schlechter received his education in the public schools of Carver 
county, Minnesota. His educational advantages were very limited and he 
taught himself to read and write write English and German. The schools 
of the county at that time were poorly taught and far distant from the 
homes of those earl\- settlers. As a lad and young man he assisted his 
father with the work on the farm. After the death of the father, he moved 
to Waconia, where he lived for a number of years. He later moved to 
Isanta county. ^Minnesota, where he remained three years. In 1904 he came 
to Douglas county, and here purchased eight acres of land in Alexandria 
township, just north of the town of Alexandria. Here he remained and 
engaged in general farming until 1913, at which time he sold the place and 
purchased his present farm of sixty acres, in this township, where he is 
engaged in general farming and stock raising. 

In 1878 Joseph Schlechter was united in marriage to Annie Cleasgens 
and to this union one child was born. Mary. She became the wife of Albert 
Pofahl and they were the parents of two children, Joseph and Albert, the 
latter of whom is now deceased. Albert Pofahl, the husband and father, 
died some years ago. After the death of her husband, Mrs. Pofahl was 
united in marriage to Fred Radde. Joseph Schlechter has adopted his grand- 
child, Joseph Augxist Pofahl. Mr. and iMrs. Schlechter are active 
members of the church at St. Joseph and are interested in all religious work. 
They are among the best people in the township and are "held in high regard 
bv all who know them. 



CARL D. AXDERSOX. 



Carl D. Anderson, one of the well-known and successful farmers of 
Pelican Lake township. Grant county, ^linnesota, was born in St. Paul, 
Minnesota, on June i, 1870, being the son of Daniel and Borret Anderson. 
Daniel and Borret Anderson were born in Sweden, where they received their 
education in the public schools, and there they grew to manhood and woman- 
hood and were married. They continued to live in the land of their nativ- 
ity until 1870, when they came to the L'nited States. On their arrival in 
this country, they came direct to ^Minnesota and Mr. Anderson entered one 



296 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

hundred and sixty acres of wild land in section 15, Lund township, Douglas 
county. ■ Mr. Anderson filed on his claim on June 3, 1870, and on July 5, 
of the same year, his family, who had remained in St. Paul, joined him. 
The family came as far as St. Cloud by rail and from there the journey was 
made with an ox team, Mr. Anderson having rented the team for the trip. 
There was much timber on the homestead and the first house in which the 
family lived was made of logs, having no floor but the beaten soil, and the 
roof was of hay and sod. In this the family lived for some years. The 
first year the father managed to raise some potatoes and the next year he 
had four or five acres of wheat. He bought his first oxen in 1871, but 
had no wagon and hauled his first crops on a rude sled. The roads at that 
time were but trails over the prairie and through the forests and the nearest 
market was at Perham, forty-five miles away. Those were hard times for 
the pioneer family, but they were determined to succeed and in time the land 
was cleared and under cultivation and nearer markets were established. In 
1876 a new log house was erected and other valuable improvements were 
made from time to time. It was on this farm that Daniel Anderson con- 
tinued to live until the time of his death, which occurred in the fall of 1896, 
at the age of sixty-six years. His widow, who was born in 1838, died 
on Julv 3, 1900. They were the parents of the following children: Nels 
D., Stena, INIaria, Andrew, Carl, Daniel, Matilda, Alfred, Oscar and Willie. 
Of these children, Stena, Andrew, Daniel, Matilda and Alfred are Hving in 
Canada. Marie is living in California; Oscar on the homestead in Lund 
township and Willie on rented land in Lund township. 

Carl D. Anderson received his education in the public schools of Lund 
township and there grew to manhood. On September 5, twenty-two years 
ago, he was married to Matilda EUefson the daughter of Bengt and Katrina 
Ellefson, natives of the county of Vermland. Sweden, where they lived and 
died. They had the following children : Amanda, Matilda, Anna, Oscar, 
Willie and Signa. Of these, Amanda, Matilda, Oscar and Willie came to this 
country, all excepting Amanda settling in Minnesota, she settling in North 
Dakota. Mr. and Mrs. Bengt Ellefson are still living in Sweden. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Anderson the following children have been born : Ruth A., born 
on July 5, 1895: Rubin Franklin, January 26, 1897, and Rudolph Benjamin. 
February 18, 1900. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church and are prominent in social and church work. 

Carl D. Anderson purchased his first farm of eighty acres in section 6, 
Pelican township, and later increased it to one hundred and sixty acres. This 
he has developed and improved, until today he has one of the best improved 



DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 297 

farms in the community. He l)uilt the barn in 1907 and the house in 1916. 
Here he is engaged in general farming and stock raising, in which he is 
successful. 



AXDRE\\' ROTH. 



Andrew Roth, a prominent citizen and successful farmer of Lake Mary 
township, Douglas county, ^linnesota, was born in Germany, on December 
27, 1849, being the son of Jacob and Christina ( Dieterle ) Roth, both of 
whom were natives of that county, where they lived and died. Andrew 
Roth is the first-born of a family of seven children. Of the others. ^lary, 
Christine, Jacob and John came to America, where Christine has since died. 
Dora and Barbara have always remained in the fatherland. 

Andrew Roth received his education in the schools of his native land 
and there grew to manhood, remaining a resident of the land of his birth 
until he was thirty years of age. Having been educated in the country of 
good schools and trained amid the best farmers and business men of the 
world, Mr. Roth came to America with a thorough preparation for the activi- 
ties of life. Among no class of people do we find better farmers, more 
astute business men, greater lovers of the home and the beauties of nature 
than the Germans. By instinct and training they are progressive, scientific, 
careful, prudent and industrious. The German in America has been a big 
factor in the development of our natural and wonderful resources, much of 
the development of our ^Middle and Western states being due to their energy, 
push and economy. 

In 1879 Andrew Roth decided to make a home for himself in America, 
the land he had heard so much about and to which so many of his country- 
men had come. On his arrival here, he came direct to ^Minnesota and for 
two years worked as a farm hand in Douglas county. He then purchased 
one hundred and twenty acres in Lake ]\Iary township, the farm where he 
now lives. The tract at the time he made the purchase was undeveloped and 
unimproved, but has since been transformed into one of the beautiful and 
valuable fa'rms of the township. He has improved the place with modern 
and substantial buildings, all of which are kept in an excellent state of repair. 
He has always been a believer in intensive farming and a high state of culti- 
vation. Being progressive, he believes in modern methods of doing things 
and has been successful both as a general farmer and stock raiser. He 
added to his original farm of one hundred and twenty acres, ten times, and 



298 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

became the owner of twelve hundred acres. He later sold some of the land 
to his sons. 

In 1 88 1 Andrew Roth was united in marriage to Christine Rapp, a native 
of Germany, and to this union the following children have been born; Rein- 
hald, Eugene, Edward, William, Arthur and Walter. Eugene is now deceased. 
Mr. and Mrs. Roth are active members of the Lutheran church, in which 
the}- take a prominent part in all church work. Mr. Roth has, in connection 
with his farm and church work, alwavs taken a keen interest in the civic 
life of the township. Because of his earlv training and broad views and 
experience, he has been a most valuable member of the community. He is 
now a member of the board of supervisors, a position he has held since 1893. 
To him is due much of the i>rosperitv of the township, relative to schools, 
roads and finances. 



OLIVER P. HAWKINS. 



Oliver P. Hawkins, now deceased, was one of the most prominent and 
well-known men of Grant county, Minnesota. He was born in New Hamp- 
shire on July 21, 1836, and there received his education in the public schools 
and grew to manhood. In 1856, at the age of twenty years, he came to the 
state of Minnesota, and for several years lived at Stillwater. In 1865 he 
went to St. Paul, where he was engaged in the mercantile business, and 
did much traveling throughout the state, being one of the very tirst traveling 
salesmen out of St. Paul. He remained a resident of that city until 1882, 
when he came to Ashbv and engaged in the general mercantile business. 
He also established the Asliby Avalanclic. of which he was the editor and 
proprietor. He took much interest in all local affairs and was recognized as 
a man of unusual ability, being a fluent speaker and ready writer and pos- 
sessed of much wit. He had much to do with the location of the court 
house at Elbow Lake and the success and growth of Ashby was largely due 
to his untiring efforts, it being due to him that the Hotel Rittson was opened. 
At his death, on March 29, 1886, a flag was draped and placed at half 
mast in honor of his public service. His death was mourned by the entire 
community, for they knew that a great and good man had gone to his 
reward. Fraternally, Mr. Hawkins was a member of the Knights Templar, 
belonging to the commandery at St. Paul. 

Oliver P. Hawkins, Sr., the father of Oliver P. Hawkins, Jr.. was a 
native of New Hampshire and lived at Troy the greater part of his life. 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 2qg 

He was married to Miss Foster, also a native of Xew Hampshire. He 
came to ^Minnesota, late in life, and here lived, retired, until his death. 

Oliver P. Hawkins, Jr.. was united in marriage on Decemher 22. i860, 
to Helen T. Hinman, and to this union two children were born, Fanny C. 
and Francis Oliver. Fannie C. was born on October 20, 1861, and Francis, 
on October 19, 1863, and died on October 22. 1888. Judson Hinman, the 
father of Helen Hawkins, was a native of New York and married Elizabeth 
Stickney, who was born in \'ermont on February 25, 1787. To this union 
the following children were born : Joanna, Louisa, Hannah, Elijhalet, Eliza- 
beth. Joanna, Renslaer and Helen T. 

Alfred Colony, Jr., is a native of Harrisville, Xew Hampshire, and 
there received his education. He was born on December 15. 1859, being 
the son of Alfred and Fannie (Hawkins) Colony, the father being in the 
woolen manufacturing business. When Alfred Colony was twenty-six vears 
of age, he came to Ashby and here married Fannie C. Hawkins, the daugh- 
ter of Oliver P. and Helen T. Hawkins. For some five years Alfred Colony 
was engaged in the real estate and loan business in Ashby, after which he 
moved to Fergus Falls, where he remained for se\-en years, and then returned 
to Ashby some ten years ago, and here he and his wife ha\-e since li\ed. 



HOWARD WEA\'ER. 



Iowa is such an excellent farming state that it is nrit often one of her 
native-born sons leaves it and comes to ]\IinnesLita for the purpose of agri- 
cultural pursuits, but Grant and Douglas counties have lured away a goodly 
number, among whom should be mentioned Howard Weaker, of Lawrence 
township. He was born in Mills county, Iowa, August 6, 1871, and is a 
son of William and Nancy J. Weaver, both natives of New Jersey, where 
they spent their early years. They removed to Mills county, Iowa, in 1857, 
where the father bought one hundred and sixty acres of land, to which he 
later added until he owned five hundred acres, on which he spent the rest 
of his life, successfully engaged in general farming. His death occurred in 
1906, at the age of seventy-six years, his widow surviving until 191 1, reach- 
ing the advanced age of eighty-three years. They were members of the 
Methodist church and he was a Republican. Their children were named as 
follows: Joseph, deceased; James E. ; John F., deceased; Charles W. and 
Howard. 



300 DOUGLAS ANP GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

Howard Weaver grew up on the homestead in Iowa, where he worked 
when a boy, and he received a common school education. He has always 
followed general farming. He went to Nebraska in 1891, where he bought 
land, which he later sold, coming to Grant county, Minnesota in 1900 and 
buying a farm. This he subsequently sold, after which he returned to ]\lills 
county, Iowa, and in 1905 came back to Grant county, Minnesota, purchasing 
two hundred acres in Lawrence township, where he has since resided and on 
which he has put on most of the improvements now to be seen. He makes a 
specialty of raising Shorthorn cattle and Percheron horses. 

Politically, Mr. Weaver is a Republican. He is a member and treasurer 
of the local school board, having held the position several years. He has 
also served as supervisor and assessor of Lawrence township. 

Mr. Weaver was married on December 26, 1891, to Eva M. Hamaker, 
who was born in Mills county, Iowa, in 1875, where she grew up and attended 
school. She is a daughter of John and Sarah Hamaker, early settlers in 
Iowa, both having come from the state of New Jersey. Six children have 
been JDorn to Mr. and Mrs. Weaver, namely : John, Roy, Cora, Eva, Orvetta 
( deceased ) and Walter. 



H. O. MELBY. 



H. O. Alelby, a successful and well-known farmer of Pelican Lake 
township. Grant county, Minnesota, was born in Wellsworth county, W^is- 
consin, on October 4, 1866, being the son of K. N. O. and Sarah Melby. 
K. N. O. Melby was born in Norway and there received his education in 
the public schools and grew to manhood. He came to the United States 
as a young man, locating in Wisconsin, where he remained for six months, 
when he enlisted in the Twenty-second Regiment of Wisconsin Volunteer 
Infantrv and served for four years in the Civil War in the defense of his 
adopted country. He saw much active service and was captured by the 
Confederates and imprisoned at Libby Prison, where he remained for sev- 
eral months, when he was exchanged. He was later with Sherman on the 
march t(> the sea and remained with the army until the close of the war, 
when he returned to Wisconsin, where he engaged in farming. In 1868 
he was united in marriage to Sarah Peterson, who was born at Sharon, 
Wisconsin, on June 24, 1847, being the daughter of Ole and Helga Peter- 
son. Mr. Peterson was a native of Norway, where he was educated in the 
public schools, and there grew to manhood. He later came to the United 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. ^OI 

States and located in \\'isconsin, where he engaged in general farming and 
stock raising, in which he was successful. Mrs. Peterson was a nati\e of 
Wisconsin, where her marriage to Mr. Peterson occurred, ilr. and Mrs. 
Peterson were active members of the Lutheran church and were held in 
high regard by the people of the community. 

K. X. O. ]Melby and wife, soon after their marriage, came to Grant 
county, where Mr. Melby had homesteaded one hundred and sixtv acres 
of land making the journey with a team of horses and a wagon. A log 
cabin was erected on the claim, in section 15, Pelican Lake township, in 
which they lived for several years. The farm was cleared and improved 
and ]\Ir. Melby engaged in general farming and stock raising, in which he 
was successful. He later retired from the farm and made his home in 
Ashby, where he died on February 7, 1913. He always took much interest 
in local affairs, and served as a member of the board of township super- 
visors and of the school board and was president of the village board for 
two terms. He assisted in the incorporation of the town of Ashb}- and was 
the postmaster there for a number of years. He was also interested in the 
mercantile business there for ten years, under the firm name of :\Ielb}-, 
]\Iadland Company. He and his wife were active members of the Nor- 
wegian Lutheran church. They were the parents of the following chil- 
dren: H. O., Hannah, Servina, A. K., John, Lewis, Emma, Bessie, Andrew, 
Sarah, Lena, Xellie, Minnie and Christian. Mrs. ilelby is now li\-ing at 
Ashby, with her two daughters, Emma and Hannah. 

H. O. Melb}- received his education in the local schools and grew to 
manhood on the home farm, where, as a lad and 3'oung man, he assisted 
his father with the work on the farm. On November 26. 1892, he was 
united in marriage to Amanda Anderson, daughter of A. ]. and Alarie 
Lena (Peterson) Magnuson. These parents are natives of Sweden, where 
they are still living. The subject's wife came to America at the age of 
fourteen years, stopping in New York for five years, then came to Chi- 
cago. Six years later she came to Minnesota and was married here. To 
her union with Mr. Melby two children have been born, W^alter ].. now a 
student at Minnesota Uni\-ersity, and IMabel. who is attending the St. Cloud 
Normal College. }>Ir. and Mrs. Melby are active members of the Nor- 
wegian Lutheran church and are prominent in the social and relio-ious life 
of the community. 

H. O. Melby has always lived on the home farm, on which the early 
improvements were erected by his father, after he had homesteaded the 



302 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

place, many vears ago. ?^lr. ]\Ielby now owns the old home farm and, in 
addition, has added to the place until he is now the owner of some four 
hundred acres in Pelican Lake township, as well as four hundred and eighty 
acres in northern Minnesota. In 1914 he erected the barn, thirty-four by 
scA-entv-six feet, with a large silo, on the home place, which is situated on 
the banks of I'elican Lake. Here he is engaged in general farming and 
stock raising, being interested in the breeding of Shortliorn and Durham 
cattle, as well as Duroc-Jersey hogs. His stock is recognized as among the 
best in the township and he takes much pride in their records. 

H. O. Melby has always taken a keen interest in the local affairs of the 
township and county and has served for a numljer of years as a member of 
the school board. He is a stockholder in the creamery at Ashby and a mem- 
Ijer of its board of directors. He is also a stockholder in the First State 
Bank at Ashbv, where he is recognized as one of the prominent and influ- 
ential men of the community. 



OLE LEE. 



Among the enterprising farmers and substantial citizens of Ida town- 
ship, Douglas county, is Ole Lee, who is a native-born son of Minnesota, 
his birth having occurred in Ida township, November 2, 1879. He is a 
son of Evan S. and Maria (Larson) Lee, lx)th of whom were natives of 
Norway. 

Evan S. Lee was a carpenter by trade and followed that occupation 
in his native land until 1870, when he came to the United States, his wife 
coming two years later. Evan S. Lee came first to Fillmore county, Min- 
nesota, where he worked on a farm for a short time, after which he con- 
tinued to work at his trade of carpenter. He also worked a short time on 
railroad construction work, but later came to Alexandria, where he helped 
to build manv of the early buildings of that city, ^^■hile he was working 
in the latter city, he had his wife join him from the old country and at that 
time he homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres of land in Ida township 
in sections 10 and 11, near Lake Ida, which was all timber land. There he 
built a log house with a birch-bark roof. He cleared about three acres 
around the house at first, and while living in that cabin the roof was torn 
off bv a cyclone, but he later rebuilt it. His sons did most of the clearing 
and cultivating of the land, while he followed his trade as a carpenter. 



DOUGLAS AND GRAXT COUXTIES, MIXXESOTA. 303 

The lirst team tlie family had was oxen, bought as calves, which the sons 
raised and broke to the plow. In 1880 the family built a larger log house, 
which they lived in until 1902, when the new frame house was erected 
which now stands on the place. When he reached the age of fifty, E\an 
S. Lee retired from the carpentering and building business and devoted his 
attention wholly to farming. He purchased eighty acres more land adjoin- 
ing his original farm on the west, and lived on his farm the remainder of 
his life. For the last few years of his life, he was retired from active 
farming. In 191 3 he sold the farm to ^Irs. Colstrom, but stayed on the 
place until his death on March 30, 19 15. at the age of eighty years. His 
wife died on July 4, 19 13, aged seventy-six years. Evan S. Lee and his 
wife were the parents of eight children: Clara Alaria, who was born in 
Xorway, is the wife of Andrew M. Lantz, a brick mason, contractor and 
builder of ;\Iinot. Xorth Dakota: Olaus, who died before the family left 
Xorwav : August, who has a fruit ranch near Ephratta, Washington, was 
also born in Xorway; Lars, who married ^Martha Monson. is a farmer in 
Ida township and is mentioned elsewhere in this work: Emily, born in X'or- 
way. is a trained nurse in .San Francisco; Minnie, born in the L'nited States, 
is a resident of St. Paul, ^linnesota: Hilda, also bom in this country, is the 
wife of Leonard P. Thunstad, a grocer of Seattle, \\'ashington, and Ole, 
the immediate subject of this review. 

Ole Lee received his education in the country schools of his home 
neighborhood, and lived with his parents until two }-ears after his mar- 
riage, during which time he assisted his father with the farm work, and 
managed the farm for the last two years for his father. He then home- 
steaded ore hundred and sixty acres of timber land in Black Duck town- 
ship, Beltrami county, ^linnesota, and lived on that place for about a vear, 
at the end of which time he sold his claim to advantage and returned to 
Douglas county, where he rented his father's place for one year. After that, 
for two years, he was in Roseau county. Minnesota, where he purchased 
one hundred and sixty acres of wild land. Two }-ears later he sold that 
land and moved to Glenwood, ^linnesota. where he bought a dray line and 
operated it in partnership with Ernest Johnson for a year and a half, when 
he disposed of his interest in that business and returned to Douglas cc:)untv. 
and is now living on the old Larson homestead of one hundred and fiftv- 
five acres, where he is engaged in general farming and stock rasing. 

On November 11. 1901, Ole Lee was married to Hulda Larson, the 
daughter of the late Erick Larson, who is mentioned elsewhere in this 



304 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIKS, MINNESOTA. 

work. To this union ha\e been born six cliildren, Rudolph, Clarence,- 
jNIelvin, Clifford, Doris and Verna, all of whom are living at home with 
their parents. The family are members of the Swedish Lutheran church. 
JMr. Lee is a Republican in politics. 



OLE A. THOMPSON. 



Ole A. Thompson, whose family name in Norway was Aaskjer, was 
born in that country on March 9, 1854, the son of Tosten Olson and Magda- 
lena Aaskjer, also natives of Norway, where they received their education in 
the public schools, where they grew to manhood and womanhood and where 
the}' were married. They continued to li\-e in the land of their birth until 
1876, when they decided that they would come to America. Upon their 
arrival in the United States they came directly to Minnesota and here made 
their home, with the son, Ole A. Thompson, in Erdahl, township, Grant 
cuuntv, for eight or nine years, at the end of which time they removed to 
Evansville township, over the line in Douglas county, where they took a 
homestead of forty acres. That farm they improved and developed and 
there they li\-ed for a number of years, at the end of which time they sold 
the place and returned to Erdahl township, where they lix-ed with a son 
until the time of their deaths, the mother dying two years before the father. 
They were the parents of five children, Andrew (deceased), Ole A., Anna, 
Mary and Tosten. Anna is the widow of G. M. Bah, who was a well-known 
farmer of Erdahl townsip; Mary married Olaus Bah, a farmer of Erdahl 
township, and Tosten is a fanner of North Dakota. 

Ole A. Thompson received his education in the public schools of Nor- 
way and there grew to manhood, and there he continued to reside until he 
was twenty vears of age, when he decided that he would come to America. 
Upon his arrival in the United States, in 1874, he came directly to Minne- 
sota and located at Grand Meadow, where he worked for J. H. J. Weeks, 
during which time he attended a term of school. Tn the fall of 1875 he 
settled in Erdahl township, and for six months was engaged on a farm in 
Douglas county. In the spring of 1877 he purchased forty acres of land 
in Erdahl township, paying ior the same five dollars and fifty cents an acre, 
to which he later added another forty acres, at the same price, all of which 
was wild prairie. There he built a log house and began farming with oxen, 
thus beginning the development of his farm. He lost the greater part of 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 305 

his first crop by grasshoppers, but the wheat that he saved was of fine quahty. 
As he developed his farm and became more prosperous he added to his hold- 
ings until he became the owner of two hundred and forty acres, the greater 
part of which he bought at from fi\e to ten dollars an acre. He devoted 
his best efforts and ability in the dexelopment of the place and in time had 
one of the model farms of the township, engaging there in general farming 
and stock raising, in which he was quite successful. In 1903 Mr. Thomp- 
son went to Saskatchewan, Canada, where he homesteaded one hundred and 
sixty acres and purchased two hundred and forty acres, all of which was wild 
prairie and brush land. The fii;st season he built a two-story log house, 
sixteen by sixteen feet, to which he added the next year an addition, sixteen 
by fourteen feet. He also erected on the place a barn, granars' and other 
buildings. He engaged, to a large extent, in the stock business and had 
some seventy-five head of fine cattle. He cleared some forty-five acres of 
his tract and used the rest for pasture. He remained there for four years, 
at the end of which time he rented the place, which he still owns, and 
returned to his farm in Grant county, which had been operated by his son 
the first two years of his absence in Canada and by his son-in-law the last 
two years. Upon his return to his farm in Grant county, in 1908, Mr. 
Thompson engaged in general farming and stock raising until March 4, 
191 5. when he retired from the active life of a farmer and stockman, sold 
his farm at eighty-seven dollars and fifty cents an acre and moved to Erdahl, 
where he now resides, after many years of an active and successful life on 
the farm. 

In 1884 Ole A. Thompson was united in marriage to Mrs. Anna Solem. 
the widow of Knut Solem, who died in Norway. Mrs. Thompson was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Xorway and there grew to womanhood and 
was married. After the death of her husband, Knut Solem, she came to 
Minnesota in 1883, joining her relatives in Elbow Lake township, Grant 
county, where she worked for one season, at the end of which time she 
became housekeeper for Mr. Thompson and was thus engaged a few months 
before their marriage. By her first husband she was the mother of four 
children, ]\Iary, Austin, Knut and C~)le, all of whom she reared to manhood 
and womanhood. B}- her union with Mr. Thompson she is the mother of 
three children, Matilda, Clara and Thonvald. Mary is the wife of Ole N. 
Lee, a well-known farmer of Erdahl township. Austin is in North Dakota. 
Knut is section foreman for the Great Northern railway at Erdahl. Ole is 
(20a) 



306 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

at home. AJatilda married Albert Tostad and resides at Wendall. Clara 
is the wife of W. M. Kedloazyk, a prosperous farmer of Canada, and Thor- 
wald is now deceased. In addition to their own children, Mr. and Mrs 
Thompson took Andrew Thorp, at the age of one year, and have cared 
for him until he is now nineteen years of age. He is known as Andrew 
Thompson and is engaged as a farm hand in the vicinity of the Thompson 
home. I\Ir. and Mrs. Thompson are active members of the Norwegian 
Lutheran church and take much interest in church work, ]Mr. Thompson 
being a tnistee and treasurer of the local society. They have long l^een 
prominent in the social and the religious life of the community, where they 
are held in the highest regard and esteem by all who know them. They 
are a most hospitable people and take much pleasure in the entertainment 
of their neighbors and friends. 

Ole A. Thompson is an independent voter, has taken an active interest 
in local affairs for many years and has had much to do with the excellent 
system of education in the township, where he has been treasurer of the 
school board for the past sixteen years. He is a progressive citizen and 
uses his influence to further the best interests of the township and the county. 
He is a director of the Farmers Elevator Company at Erdahl and vice- 
president of the First National Bank at that place. 



HENRY CHRISTENSON. 

Henry Christenson, one of the prominent and successful merchants of 
Brandon, Douglas county, Minnesota, was born in Evansville township, on 
July 6, 1872. He is the son of Nels Christenson, a native of Denmark, 
for complete .sketch of whom, see another page of this work. 

Henry Christenson received his education in the public schools of 
Evansville township and at the town of Evansville. He grew to manhood 
on the home farm, where he assisted his father with the work until he was 
twenty-five years of age. Although successful in the work on the farm, 
Mr. Christenson felt that he was better adapted for another line of work. 
In 1897 he left the home farm and went to Colorado, where he remained 
for five years. During much of the time he was in that state he was 
engaged in smelting and during a part of the time he worked in a quartz 
mine. During his residence in Colorado he saw much of the beauty of that 
state and also gained experience in his work that has been of much value 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 307 

to him as a business man. After his return to Douglas county, he pur- 
chased one hundred and twenty acres, of land in sections 19 and 20. 
Evansville township, about thirty acres of the tract being then improved. 
After assuming possession, he proceeded to do much in the way of develop- 
ment, making many improvements that added to the beauty and value of 
the place. During the time he was de\oting his energies to his farm, he 
remained at the home of his parents. After putting the place in good con- 
dition, he devoted his time and energies to general farming, until he came 
to Brandon, to engage in business. He now rents the farm, but takes much 
interest in its management and devotes a part of his time to looking after 
his interests there. 

On March 7. IQ12. Henry Christenson and Albert Holmgren pur- 
chased a stock of merchandise of F. W. Ruppelius and engaged in business 
in the town of Brandon. They carry a general line of merchandise, con- 
sisting of dry goods, groceries, boots and shoes, as well as a large stock 
of men's work clothes. The firm is doing a nice business and has the con- 
fidence and respect of the entire communitv. 

On August 4, 1 91 4, Henry Christenson was united in marriage to 
Louisa Anderson, a native of Moe township. To this union one child, Elda, 
has been born. 'Sir. and ]\lrs. Christenson are members of the Norwegian 
Lutheran church and are held in the highest esteem by all who know them. 
'Sir. Christenson has alwa}-s been interested in the local affairs of the town- 
ship and has ever been ready to assist in any worthv cause. 



FRAXK BUSCHER. 



The percentage of native-born citizens of Douglas county, especially 
farmers, is very small for reasons too obvious to mention here. One of this 
number is Frank Buscher, banker and influential citizen of the village of 
Millerville, whose birth occurred in .Millerville township, Januarv 26. 1875. 
He is a son of John and Mary (Schlener) Buscher, the former born on 
May 9, 1840, and the latter on August 26, 1850. Henrv Buscher, the 
paternal grandfather, was born in \\'estphalen, Germany, from which coun- 
try he immigrated to America, locating on a farm near Martinsburg, Mis- 
souri, where he spent the rest of his life. He had six children. George 
Schlener, the maternal grandfather, was a native of Austria. LTpon coming 
to the United States he settled in \Msconsin, where he worked out, but not 



308 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

long thereafter he went to St. Martin, iMinnesota, spending the rest of his 
Hfe on a farm near there. John Buscher, the father, was nine years old 
when his parents brought him to America, and he spent his boyhood on the 
farm in Missouri. When a young man he left home and came to Stearns 
county, Minnesota, and while there enlisted for service in the Civil \Yar, 
in Company G, Ninth Minnesota \"olunteer Infantry, in which he served 
from 1862 to 1865, taking part in a number of important campaigns and 
engagements. After the war he returned to Stearns county and was pro- 
prietor of a hotel at Richmond for about two years, then came to Douglas 
county, taking up one hundred and sixty acres of land in Millerville town- 
ship and buying forty acres adjoining. Here, by hard work and persever- 
ance, he developed an excellent farm, succeeding as a general farmer, and 
he died here on April 2/, 1902, at the age of sixty-two years. His widow 
survived until December 2, 1913, dying at the age of sixty-three. They 
were parents of the following children: George; Mary, deceased; Frank, 
of this sketch; John, deceased; Anna; Joseph, deceased; Jacob, Henry, Ber- 
nard and Ferdinand. The father of these children became fairly active in 
local public affairs, serving as school director for sixteen years and was 
also supervisor of his township for several years. He was one of the 
organizers of the local Catholic church. 

Frank Buscher grew up on the home farm and he received his educa- 
tion in the common schools. While still on the farm, when about twenty- 
four years old, he took a course in bookkeeping by mail. He then bought 
a o-eneral store at West Union, Minnesota, but later came to Alexandria to 
work for C. W. ColJjertson Company, who conducted a clothing store, now 
known as the Eagle Clothing Company, remaining with this store six years, 
four years of which he was manager. In the spring of 191 1 he went to 
Hofifman, Minnesota, as cashier of the Farmers State Bank, where he 
remained three years, being a stockholder in the same. In June, 1914, he, 
with others, organized the bank at ]\Iillerville, of which he Ijecame a stock- 
holder and has since been cashier. This has proved to be a successful ven- 
ture and the bank is enjoying a steady growth. He also owns stock in the 
Bankers Trust Company and the Savings Bank of Minneapolis. He writes 
considerable fire insurance, representing the Aetna Fire Insurance Company, 
the St. Paul Fire and INIarine Company and the Minneapolis Fire Insur- 
ance Company. 

Mr. Buscher was married, on June 30. 1898, to Justine Dobmeyer, a 
native of Douglas countv, where she grew up and was educated. To this 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 309 

union four children have been born, George, Ferdinand, Alfred and Alark, 
who are all at home. 

Politically, Mr. Buscher is a Republican, and is village treasurer and 
clerk of school district Xo. 34. He is a meml>er of the Cathohc Order of 
Foresters and the Catholic church. 



MICHAEL KRAE.MER. 



Michael Kraemer, one of the prominent and successful business men of 
Alexandria, Minnesota, was born in Germany, on January 9, 1855, being 
the son of Nicholas and Mary (Thielen) Kraemer. Nicholas and Mary 
Kraemer were also natives of Germany and there lived their lives, he having 
died in 1902 and she in 1915. They received their education in the public 
schools. After completing his education, Mr. Kraemer engaged in farming, 
at which work he devoted his life and was very successful. He and his 
wife were the parents of four children, Peter, IMichael, Catherine and Mar- 
garet. The famil}- were highly respected in the communit_\- in which they 
lived. 

]\Iichael Kraemer received his education in the public schools of his 
native land and there grew to manhood. After coming to America, he 
attended night school at Minneapolis, Minnesota, during the winter of 1881 
and 1882. On his arrival in the United States in 1881, he came direct to 
Minnesota, locating in ^Minneapolis, where he remained for three years. 
In the fall of 1884 he removed to Sauk Center, where he engaged in the 
soda water business in partnership with M. Robishon. He sold his interest 
to his partner in 1886 and purchased a soda water factory at Alexandria, 
and here he has since remained. In 1888 he rebuilt the factory and is now- 
operating the Alexandria Soda Water and Bottling Works, in which he has 
been very successful. Here he manufactures all kinds of carbonated drinks 
and ciders, furnishing the local trade and shipping to all points within a 
radius of one hundred miles. Flis products are the best that can be made 
and are recognized as of the highest standard. 

In October, 1883, Michael Kraemer was united in marriage to Julia 
Beining, who died on November 6, 1891. To this union three children were 
born, Mary, Carl and Theresa. On April 26. 1892, Mr. Kraemer was mar- 
ried to Gertrude Hendericks and to this union three children ha\'e been 
born, Lucv, Otto and Alichael. The familv are devout members of the 



3IO DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

Catholic church and are active in the social and religious work of the town- 
ship. Mr. Kraemer has always taken much interest in local civic affairs 
and has served for nine years as councilman of Alexandria and was mayor 
for fourteen months. He is a man of excellent judgment and his service, 
both in the council and as mayor, was productive of much good to the 
community. He is a believer in public improvements and has done much 
for the growth and prosperity of the town and county in which he lives. 



BERNT TOLLEFSON. 



Bernt Tollefson, a native of Norway and a well-known farmer of Peli- 
can Lake township. Grant county, Minnesota, was born on May i8, 1857, 
being the son of Tollef and Bertha (Gruthong) Egstad. Lars Egstad, the 
paternal grandfather of Bernt Tollefson, was a well-known farmer of Nor- 
way, where he lived on the farm that had been in the family for many years. 
He never came to America, but lived and died in his native country. He 
was a soldier in the war with Sweden. Thomas Egstad, the great-grand- 
father, was a farmer in Norway and was, perhaps one of the first to hold 
the family estate. Tollef Egstad lived on the family estate and there grew 
to manhood. He died in Norway in 1873 '^"d several years after his death 
United States. The children of the family were, Lars, Ole, Jens, Anna, Ton- 
etta, Lauritz, Andreas, and Bernt. The family were prominent in their home 
community in Norway, where, the father, being a landowner, was of much 
consequence. The meml>ers of the family who came to the United States 
have here established themselves in the social, religious and business life of 
the community in which they live. 

Bernt Tollefson received his education in Norway and there grew to 
manhood on the family estate. At the age of nineteen, he decided that he 
would come to the United States. On his arrival here he came direct to 
Minnesota, locating in Grant county, and was here at the time of the terrible 
plague of grasshoppers, when practically all the vegetation was destroyed. 
He and his brother, Lauritz, later purchased one hundred and sixty acres 
of land in section 4, Pelican Lake township. This they developed and here 
farmed together until 1888, when Bernt bought the share of his brother 
and is now the owner of the entire tract. He has erected all the present 
substantial buildings and has in other ways added much to the beauty and 
value of the farm. Today he has one of the best farms in the township 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 3II 

and is successfully engaged in general farming and stock raising. The 
tract at the time the brothers made the purchase was all wild prairie land, 
but has been transformed into well cultivated fields, dotted here and there 
with herds of fine cattle and droves of hogs. 

Bemt ToUefson has always taken a keen interest in the local affairs of 
his township, and has served as assessor for two years. In addition to his 
other interests, he is the owner of stock in the Fanners Elevator Company 
at Ashbv. He is a man of considerable prestige in the community, his 
ad\'ice being often sought on matters of public interest. 



CHARLES DANEK. 



Charles Danek, a well known and successful farmer of Lake Mary 
township, Douglas county, was born in Bohemia on October 25, 1852, the 
son of Thomas and Annie (Hlavacek) Danek, natives of Bohemia and 
farming people. There the father died, the mother later coming to America 
to join her children. She took a homestead in Millerville township, 
Douglas county, where she lived for many years. Thomas and Annie 
Danek were the parents of two children, Catherine and Charles. 

Charles Danek received his education in the public schools of Bohemia 
and lived there until he was htteen years of age, when he came to America 
with his sister. They located in Dakota county, Minnesota, where Mr. 
Danek worked as a farm hand. After two years the mother came to 
America and took her homestead of one hundred and si.xty-three acres, in 
Millerville township. Charles then went to live with her, and there he 
remained until 1877, in which year his mother sold the place. Mr. Danek 
then purchased his present farm of one hundred and sixty acres, in section 
32 of Lake Mary township. 

At the time Charles Danek purchased the farm it v;as all wild land, 
undeveloped and unimproved. With much hard work he has succeeded in 
making it one of the productive and well-improved farms in the community. 
He has erected all the substantial buildings and is engaged in general farm- 
ing, in which he has been most successful. He is a firm believer in intensive 
farming, thorough cultivation and the keeping of the best of stock. Having 
come, as a lad, to a strange land, among strange people and amid new con- 
ditions, he has accomplished much that is praiseworthy, and today is recog- 
nized as one of the substantial and influential men of the township. He has 



312 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

always taken much interest in local affairs; is possessed of an intense public 
spirit and has done much toward the development and improvement of the 
township, as well as of the immediate community in which he lives. He is 
a firm believer in all public improvements that have a tendency to add to 
the betterment and the growth of the state. Being broad-minded, he realizes 
the value to any community of good roads and the best of schools. He has 
served three years as township supervisor; five years as assessor; as clerk 
of Lake Mary township for the past fifteen years, and as school district 
clerk since 1887, a period of twenty-nine years. 

In 1 88 1 Charles Danek was united in marriage to Louisa Kuklis and 
to this union the following children have been born : Antonia, Mary, Joseph 
v., Charles A., Frank R. and Thomas H. The family have long been 
prominent in the social and religious life of the community, ^Ir. Danek 
having served as secretary of the local church organization. Mr. and Mrs. 
Danek are held in high regard by their neighbors and friends for their 
manv no1)le qualities of manhood and womanhood. Their lives have been 
busv ones with their family and their work, yet they have ever found time 
to assist in sickness and trouble. 



AMIL R. KTETZMAN. 



Amil R. Kietzman, one of the successful and well-known fanners and 
stockmen of INIacsville township, Grant county, was born at Herman on 
November i, 1S74, the son of Henry Carl and Wilhelmina (Schimmel- 
pfennig) Kietzman, natives of Berlin, Germany. The father was born on 
January 26, 1841. and grew to manhood in the Fatherland. The mother 
was born on August 8, 1850, and came to the United States, with her par- 
ents, as a girl in her teens. Henry Carl Kietzman remained in his native 
land until he was twenty-si.x years of age, when he came to the L^nited 
States and located in Wisconsin, where he met and married \\'ilhelmina 
Schimmelpfenning, the daughter of August and Augusta Schimmelpfenning, 
who had located at W'eyanwega. After their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. 
Kietzman moved to (Jshkosh, where Mr. Kietzman worked at the carpenter 
trade for a number of years. In 1872, after the birth of their first daugh- 
ter, thev came to ]\Iinnesota and ]\Ir. Kietzman homesteaded eighty acres 
of land in the northwest part of Herman township. Grant county. At that 
time the Great Northern railroad had been built through this section and 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. ^^13 

at Herman there was a depot, a section house and a small shack that 
answered as a store room and postoftice. The greater part of the territory 
at that time was wild prairie, and after locating" on his claim ]\Ir. Kietzman 
constructed a sod house in which the family lived for some time. He at 
once began the task of developing his farm and soon secured one hundred 
and sixty acres more land, by pre-emption and tree claim, all of which was 
wild land. The family suffered many of the hardships of the early settler 
and endured the privations of early life on the plains. After having broken 
the sod and planted his crops. Mr. Kietzman suft"ered the loss of the greater 
part of his harvest by the grasshoppers, and would have left the coimty if 
he could have done so. During three years of those hard times, he worked 
on the Great Northern railroad and thus secured money to stock his farm. 
He purchased a cow and a yoke of oxen, and again began life as a farmer. 
He later purchased another yoke of oxen and completed the breaking of his 
land and erected more substantial luiildings, which in later years were 
replaced by more modern buildings. .\s he began to prosper he broke the 
soil comprising the tree claim, and purchased three hundred and twentv 
acres in section 25, ]\Iacs\ille township. He continued to li\e on the old 
homestead until the time of his death, June Ji. 1912. The wife had died 
but a month before, on Alay 20. Mr. and ^Irs. Kietzman were active mem- 
bers of the German Evangelical church, and were among the early members 
of the local society. They were the parents of eleven children : Bertha, 
Amil. A'iva. Adolph. Laura. Albert. Alice, Ella, Henry, Herman and Alinnie. 

Henry Carl Kietzman was a man of much ability and possessed of rare 
business acumen and excellent judgment. By hard work and good manage- 
ment he became the owner of some nine hundred acres of good land, all of 
which is still owned b}- the family. He started life as a poor man and 
became one of the substantial and prominent men of the township. He 
took much interest in local affairs and had much to do with the early ci\ic 
life of the township. He believed in the highest standard of public improve- 
ments, and advocated the support of the best schools possible. 

Amil R. Kietzman received his education in the common schools of his 
township, and was graduated from the high school at Herman. He was 
reared on the home farm and after completing his schooling he returned to 
the home farm and engaged in farming. In 1901 he left the home farm and 
moved to a three-hundred-and-twenty-acre farm in ^Macsville township, one 
hundred and sixty acres nf which his father had given him. and. he pur- 



314 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

chased the other part of the tract. The farm at that time was unimproved 
and the first year he erected a substantial house and the next year a barn. 
He planted the grove and Iniilt the fences, in addition to making many other 
valuable improvements. There he is engaged in general farming and stock 
raising, and is successful. He is a stockholder in the elevator and the bank 
at Herman. He is independent in politics and has taken an active interest 
in the afifairs of the township, having served on the board of supervisors, 
and has been treasurer of the school board. 



COXRAD ^lEISTER. 



Conrad Meister, a well-known and successful farmer of Carlos town- 
ship, Douglas county, was born in Switzerland, on April 17, 1858, the son 
of Jacob and Maria Elizabeth (Schweizen) Meister, natives of Switzerland, 
who were there educated in the public school and who there grew to man- 
hood and womanhood. Jacob Meister learned the mason trade, and as a 
young man came to the United States, but soon returned to his native coun- 
try, where he died in 1864. The widow who was born in 1823, died in 1885. 
Both the parents of Conrad Meister had been previously married. By her 
former marriage Mrs. Meister was the mother of one child, Eritz Ever, who 
is still a resident of Switzerland. By his former marriage Mr. Meister had 
one daughter, Margaret, who has remained in her native land. Jacob and 
Maria Meister were the parents of two children : Conrad antl John, the later 
of whom died in Switzerland some years ago. 

Conrad Meister received his education in his native land and there grew 
to manhood. As a young man he learned the trade of a locksmith. He 
later served in the army of his country. At the age of twenty-two he 
decided to cnme to America. .After landing in this country he came west 
and began working in a machine shop at Baraboo, Wisconsin. He was there 
but a short time, and then went to St. Louis, where he was engaged in the 
rolling mills for two years. He then came to Minnesota and worked in 
a brick }-ard at Collegeville for one month, at the end of which time he 
went to North Dakota, where he worked in the harvest fields the rest of 
that season. He then came to Douglas county and worked for R. Zimmer- 
man for nearly two years. He was then married to Theresa Pichler, a 
native of Austria, who had come to the United States with her parents. 
After his marriage he worked for one year for Braun, in Belle River town- 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 3I5 

ship, after which he settled on eighty acres of land in section i, Carlos 
township. The tract at that time was undeveloped and was covered with 
stumps, brush and some timber. There was no road to the place and it 
was necessary for Mr. ^leister to build one so that he might get to his farm. 
There he buih a small shack, ten by twelve feet, and in this the family lived 
for several years. At the time he came here he had no team with which to 
assist in his clearing and the planting of his crops. Yet in some way he 
succeeded and in time became prosperous. He purchased another tract of 
land, consisting of forty acres. Today about sixty acres of his farm is under 
cultivation, the balance being in meadow and pasture. He has built a sub- 
stantial house, which is nicely located and well kept. In 1911 he built a 
large barn and in 1913 a silo, fourteen by thirty feet. He is engaged in 
general farming and stock raising and has met with success. He has a 
fine herd of Holstein cattle and feeds all his grain, disposing of his stock 
when ready for the market. For six years :\Ir. IMeister was assessor of his 
township and has also served as a member of the school board. 
:\Ir. and }ilrs. :\Ieister have one child, a daughter, Amelia. 



PETER PEXXIE. 



Peter Pennie, one of the well-known and successful farmers of Hudson 
township, Douglas county, was born in Kinross, Scotland, March 13, 1839, 
the son of Thomas and :\Iary (Drummund) Pennie, both natives of Scot- 
land, who continued to live in the land of their birth until 1853, when they 
decided to locate in America. On their arrival in this country they came 
to Illinois and later to IMinnesota, and here located in Pope county, where 
they died some vears ago. It was there that Mr. Pennie homesteaded a 
tract of land inLeven township, which he developed and improved. He 
became well known in the community, and was recognized as one of the 
successful men of the township. Mr. and Mrs. Pennie were the parents of 
six children, three sons and three daughters. They were members of the 
Presbvterian church and were devout Christians, highly respected by all. 

Peter Pennie received his education in the public schools of Stotland, 
where he lived until he was fourteen years of age, when he came to America 
with his parents, with whom he remained until 1862. in which year he 
enlisted in Companv B, Twenty-Fifth Regiment, ^^•isconsin \'olunteer 
Infantry, and saw much active service in the Civil War. In October, 1862, 



3l6 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

soon after his enlistment, he was sent with his company to the new settle- 
ment at Alexandria, Minnesota, where the company erected a stockade as a 
means of defense for the few settlers who had remained in that region after 
the Indian uprising. In the summer of 1863 he was sent with his command 
to Vicksburg and was later in many battles, and was with Sherman in the 
march to the sea. During his stay in Savannah, Georgia, Mr. Pennie filed a 
soldier's claim for homestead in Minnesota. His brother Dan located the 
tract of one hundred and thirty-nine acres for him, in Leven township. 
Pope county, just across the road from where he now lives in Douglas county. 
At the close of the war Mr. Pennie located on the claim and made that his 
home until 1900. The homestead was a wild tract, and without improve- 
ments. There he erected buildings, broke the land and engaged in general 
farming and stock raising. Since that time he has erected a fine brick- 
veneered house and made other substantial improvements. In 1900 he moved 
across the road to his present home, and there, despite his advance age, 
continues active in farm work. Today he owns three hundred and eighty 
acres of excellent land and is engaged in general farming. Mr. Pennie is 
a Presbyterian. He is a Republican and served as a member of the board 
of township supervisors while living in Pope county. 

In July, 1865, Peter Pennie was united in marriage to Eliza Bevier 
and to that union eight children were born, Thomas, Duncan, Mary, Jean- 
nette. Robert, Eliza, Daniel and Hattie. The mother of these children died 
in 1899 and in the year following Mr. Pennie was united in marriage to Mrs. 
Melissa ( ludkins ) Judkins, who was born at Lexington, Maine, and who 
came to Wisconsin, with her first husband. Alanson J. Judkins, from central 
Pennsylvania. They made the trip with horse and wagon and were five 
weeks on the road. To add to the hardships of the trip, they had the care 
of their four-months-old baby. They had among their other household 
goods, a stove with an elevated oven, which she used for forty-two years. 
They remained in Wisconsin until 1865, when they came to Minnesota, mak- 
ing the journe\- with an ox-team. The next year they homesteaded in Pope 
"county, and there Mr. Judkins died on September 8, 1897. Alanson J. 
and Melissa Judkins were the parents of four children, Mark E., Mary 
Annette, Benjamin G. and Wilmer. The latter is now in the Canadian army, 
expecting soon to go to the front in Europe. He is one of twenty-four 
men that were selected, out of seventeen hundred, to operate a rapid-firing 
gun. 

In an earl\- day, Peter Pennie hauled wheat to St. Clouil, the nearest 
market at that time. He assisted in the location of the corners of Hudson 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. :; I J 

township, Douglas county. He is an active member of the local post of the 
Grand Army of the Republic at Willard. The post once had eighty mem- 
bers, but is now reduced to five: yet the members hold together and march 
to the cemetery each Memorial Dav. 



REIXERT AAXENSON. 



Rejnert Aanenson. a native of Norway and a retired farmer of Evans- 
ville township, Douglas county, was born on October 7, 1827, the son of 
Aanen Jestsen, who died in Norway. He is the second in order of birth 
of the twelve children born to his parents and was educated in the schools 
of his native land, and there grew to manhood. He remained a resident 
of his native country until he was thirty-two years of age, when, in 1S55, 
he decided that he would come to America. After a seven-weeks vo}-age 
he landed at Quebec, and from that port proceeded directly to \Msconsin, 
where he located at Manitowac. He purchased one hundred and sixty acres 
of wild timber land in that vicinity, erected a log house and at once pro- 
ceeded to clear some of his land. He remained there but two vears, at 
the end of which time he sold the place and went to Kansas, where he 
engaged in the real-estate business. After two years he went from there 
to Pikes Peak and from there on to California. He remained in California 
and Idaho for eight years, engaged in the gold mining business, and met 
with fair success. After his experience in the mining world, he returned 
to his native land, where he purchased a farm and remained some years. 
The desire to return to the United States caused him, in 1869. to leave 
Norway for the second time. He sold his farm and returned to the land of 
his adoption. He remained in Chicago for a short time and then went to 
Iowa. He later came to Minnesota, where for twelve hundred dollars he 
purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land, in section 3 of Evans\ille 
township, Douglas county, the tract for the most part being covered with 
heavy timber. There were two small log houses on the place, the only im- 
provements. Mr. Aanenson purchased a team of oxen, a cow and a feu- 
farming implements and started the task of clearing and developing his new 
farm. He soon had a tract cleared and plowed, and there he planted his 
first seed, which was winter rye. In time the farm was cleared and under 
cultivation, the greater part of the task being done by Mr. Aanenson himself. 
He was a careful and prudent farmer and manager and became successful. 



3l8 DOI.-GLAS AND GRAXT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

engaging in general farming and stock raising, and developing the farm 
into one of the best in the township. He improved the farm with splendid 
buildings, having a beautiful house and a fine barn. Though now retired 
from the active work on the farm, yet he continues to manage the place, his 
sons doing the greater part of the work. 

Reinert Aanenson was united in marriage in 1869 to Amanda Tolefson, 
who died that same year. In 1871 he married Synneve Saterlee and to this 
union four children have been born, Amanda, Otto, Theodore (deceased) 
and Fridthjof. Amanda Aanenson married Halvor Hanson, manager of 
the elevator at Clair City, South Dakota: Otto Aanenson is workkig in a 
packing house at St. Paul and Fridthjof Aanenson, known as "Fritz," is 
farming the home place. Air. and Airs. Aanenson are members of the 
Lutheran church. Air. Aanenson is a Democrat and has served as super- 
\isor and as a memljer of the school board. 



FRAXS OSCAR HERBERT. 

Frans Oscar Herbert, one of the prominent and successful merchants 
of Alexandria, was born in Sweden on July 26, 1865, the son of John P. 
and Caroline Herbert, natives of Sweden, who there received their educa- 
tion in the public schools, grew to manhood and womanhood and were 
there married. As a young man, John P. Herbert engaged as a sailor, and 
in time became the owner of a freight vessel on the Baltic sea, and operated 
between Sweden and Germany, making England as well as the ports in the 
Gulf of Bothnia.' He continued thus engaged until 1867, when he decided 
to come to America. He sold his vessel and he and his family sailed for 
the United States. On their arrival in this country they came direct to 
Alinnesota, where Mr. Herbert took a homestead of one hundred and sixty 
acres in Douglas county. The tract at that time was all wild country and 
without improvements. There Air. Herbert erected a log house and at once 
began the task of clearing and breaking his land, with a team of oxen, with 
which he farmed for many years. He continued to farm there in Holmes 
City township for some eighteen years, during which time he did much 
in the way of development and -made many valuable improvements, develop- 
ing one of the attractive farms of the township and meeting with consid- 
erable success as a general farmer and stockman. He later sold that place 
and purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land in Evansville township. 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 3I9 

near the village of E\'ansville, and it was there that he and his wife spent 
the rest of their lives. They were the parents of eight children, Hilda 
(deceased), Gustav. Augusta, John A., Hjalmar (deceased), Frans Oscar, 
Ida and Jennie. Air. and Mrs. Herbert were prominent in the early social 
life of the community and were held in the highest regard and esteem by all 
who knew them. Mr. Herbert took an active interest in the civic life of the 
township and was often consulted in matters relating to the policies of the 
district. He was a patriotic citizen and did much to further the interests of 
both the township and the county in which he lived. 

Frans Oscar Herbert received his education in the puljlic schools of 
Holmes City township and there grew to manhood on the home farm, where 
as a lad and young man he assisted his father with the work on the place. 
His educational advantages were very limited, owing to the conditions of 
the rural schools during his childhood days. He was but two years of age 
at the time his parents came to the county, which was at that time on the 
frontier of civilization in this section of the state. The schools were of 
the most primitive kind and were far from the homes of many of those 
early settlers. Yet, with all the disadvantages of his early environment, he 
has kept abreast of the times and is today one of the well-informed men 
of the county. Having remained at home with his father until he was 
seventeen years of age, he began life for himself and for some time worked 
for others. He later owned a soda-water factory at Alexandria, which is 
now owned by M. Kramer. After disposing of that concern he engaged in 
other business for some years and then, June 14, 1912, he established him- 
self in the grocery business at Alexandria, where he is still located. By 
his own efforts and close application to business he has been ciuite success- 
ful in his grocery trade and carries a complete line of staple and fancy 
groceries, his store being one of the most modern and up-to-date places 
of business in this section. By his systematic and business-like methods 
Mr. Herbert has won the confidence of the public, and uses every possible 
legitimate means to please his customers. 

As a young man Mr. Herbert was united in marriage to Beda ]\I. 
Benson, a native of Sweden, who came to the United States in her youth 
with her parents, and to this union eight children have been born, .\urora, 
Cvril, Ruth (deceased), Carl, Oscar, Delia (deceased), Philip and Axel. 
Aurora Herbert married Prof. Ernest Melby, principal of the city schools 
of Brewster, Minnesota. The family have long been prominent in the 
social life of the communitv. While Mr. Herbert is not a member of the 



320 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUN'JIES, MINNESOTA. 

church, he is a Hlseral contributor to the rehgious work of the citv and to 

ah worthy agencies designed to advance the common welfare of the com- 
munity. 



ANDREW ^I. WALSTAD. 

Andrew M. Walstad, a well-known and successful farmer of Moe town- 
ship, Douglas county, was born on the farm in that township on January 5, 
1879, the son of Mathias and Bertha Walstad. 

Mathias Walstad was born in Norway and there received his educa- 
tion and grew to manhood. In 1856 he decided to come to America and after 
landing in this country, proceeded to Wisconsin, where he remained for a 
few )ears. In 1866 he came to Minnesota and located in Moe township, 
Douglas county, and moved to the farm where the son Andrew M. now 
lives, the next year. The tract at that time was all wild land, and without 
improvements of any kind. The first trip he made to that farm, he walked 
from St. Cloud. The following year he drove through with an ox-team 
and a covered wagon. It was there that he lived the rest of his life, his 
death occurring on the home farm some years ago. 

Mathias and Bertha Walstad were the parents of seven children, Adolph, 
Gunder, Bertina, Helga, Martin, John and Andrew M. Mr. and Mrs. 
Walstad were active members of the Norwegian Lutheran church and took 
much interest in church work. They were highly respected in the commun- 
ity in which they lived and were held in the highest esteem. Mr. Walstad 
took an active interest in local civic affairs and served for a number of -years 
as a member of the township board of supervisors. 

Andrew M. Walstad received his education in the public schools of Moe 
township and grew to manhood on the home farm, where as a lad he assisted 
his father with the farm work. As a young man he soon decided that he 
would be a farmer and engaged in the work with his father. In 1896 he 
began farming the home place and has since that time been engaged in that 
work, he having bought the farm in 1906. He has since added to his hold- 
ings and is now the owner of two hundred and twenty-six acres. He is 
engaged in general farming and stock raising and has met with much success. 

Andrew M. Walstad was united in marriage to Inga Peterson, the 
daughter of Martin and Anna Peterson, and to this union three children 
have been born, Mathias, Marvin and Alfred. Mr. and Mrs. Walstad are 
active in the work of the Norwegian Lutheran church, of which they are 




\.XI)UK\V M. WALSTAD. 



DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 32 1 

members. They are prominent in the social and rehgious hfe of the com- 
munity and are held in high regard by all. Air. \\'alstad has served for a 
number of years as a justice of the peace of the township, and is at present 
a member of the school board and takes a keen interest in the success and 
growth of the schools of his district. ]\Irs. \\'alstad"s parents, ^Martin and 
Anna Peterson, were born in Xorway and were married there. The}' came 
to Minnesota about 1883 and settled in Aloe township, Douglas county, later 
moving to Grant county, where J\Irs. Peterson is still living, Mr. Peterson 
ha\ing died. To them were born eight children, Inga, Sarah, Randina, 
Annetta, Clara, Louise, Jennie and Selmer, all of whom are still living. 



LARS ROSE. 



Lars Rose, a farmer in Solem township, Douglas county, was born in 
Sweden, August 2^. 1849. He is a son of Jens Rose and Karin( Larsdat- 
ter) Rose, both natives of Sweden. The father was born on January 3, 
1816, and died in 1907, at the age of ninety-one. The mother was born on 
December 22, 1816, and died on January 3, 1899. They lived in their native 
land until 1866, when they came to America, arriving in Chicago on June 
23 of that year; but they went on to Dekalb county, Illinois, where the 
father began working out by the day. Three months later they went to 
McGregor, Iowa, where they remained until the spring of 1867. Not long 
thereafter the father went alone to Douglas county, Alinnesota, and there 
entered a homestead of one hundred and sixt)--four acres in Solem town- 
ship, and in the fall of 1867 he moved his family here, but his son, Lars 
Rose, remained at McGregor, Iowa, until 1868, when he joined his parents 
on the homestead in Solem township. Previously, in the last of June, 1866, 
he had gone from Chicago to Redwing, and worked on a farm near there 
until the fall, when he joined the rest of the family in Iowa. His father 
lived on the homestead in Solem township the rest of his life. He and his 
wife were the parents of the following children: John L., who died in 
Nelson county. North Dakota; Christie, who is the wife of Peter Edmand: 
Emma, who is the wife of John Hedstrom; Lars, the subject of this sketch: 
Karin, who died when sixteen years old, and Xels, who lives in Solem town- 
ship. 

Lars Rose spent his boyhood in Sweden, where he attended school. 
(2ia) 



322 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

He came to America with his parents. He has Uved on his present farm in 
Solem townsliip since 1868. buying the same of his father at the time of 
his marriage. He has put on ah the buildings, fencing and other improve- 
ments, incKiding setting out a grove, and has been engaged in general farm- 
ing and. stock raising there for a period of forty-seven years, during which 
time he has seen the general development of the county. He is a stock- 
holder in the farmers co-operative store at Hoffman, which he helped or- 
ganize. 

Mr. Rose was married in 1874 to Anna Johnson, who was born in 
Sweden, and to this union the following children have been born : Edward, 
Oscar, Julia, and Alfred, all deceased, and Tilda, Selma, Ida, Amanda, 
Sophia, Helnia and Edward. The mother of these children died on April 
17, 1895. ■^^'"- Rose is a member of the Lutheran church. Politically, he 
is a Republican. He served as township chairman for about eleven years ; 
also served as township assessor and as director in the school board. 



CHARLES C. HETHERINGTON. 

Charles C. Hetherington, one of Grant county's best-known pioneer 
farmers and an honored veteran of the Civil War, owner of a homestead 
farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Delaware township and former 
supervisor of that township, is a native of the Dominion of Canada, but has 
been a resident of Minnesota since the days of his youth. He was born in 
the township of Finch, in upper Canada, September 26, 1844, son of Henry 
and Adaline ( Lake ) Hetherington, the former of whom was a native of 
Ireland and the latter of Canada, whose last days were spent at Hastings, 
this state. 

Henry Hetherington was born in the Emerald Isle, of Scotch parentage. 
In youth he was bereaved by death of his father and later crossed the 
water with his mother, settling in Canada, where he grew to manhood and 
where he married Adaline Lake, who was born in that Dominion, of Dutch 
parents. Before 1850 the family came to Minnesota and located for a 
time at Point Douglas, later settling at Hastings, where Henry Hethering- 
ton became an active figure in the public life of that community, serving 
there as sheriff' of Dakota county and as justice of the peace. When the 
Civil War broke out he enlisted for service in the Fifth Regiment, Min- 
nesota Volunteer Infantry and served with that command until incapacitated 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 323 

by illness. Returning North he later re-enlisted for service in the cam- 
paign against the Indians. Henry Hetherington made his permanent home 
at Hastings and both he and his wife spent their last days there and are 
buried in the cemetery at that place. They were members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church and their children were reared in that faith. There were 
nine of these children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the third 
in order of birth, the others being as follow : George, who was a soldier 
in the Union army during the Civil War, died at Hastings, where he was 
engaged in the retail meat business: Eliza, who died in the days of her 
young womanhood; Emma, who married P. D. Hinemarsh and lives at 
Hastings: Ruby, who lives at ^Minneapolis, widow of Robert Duff; Anna, 
who died in childhood: Henry who lives in northern Minnesota: Theresa, 
w^ho married Ora Walker and died at Duluth, and Gordon, a traveling sales- 
man, living at Minneapolis. 

Charles C. Hetherington was but a child when his parents came to 
this state from Canada and he grew to manhood on the home farm in 
the immediate vicinity of Hastings, where he was living when, on February 
13, 1865, at the age of twenty years, he enlisted for service in Company 
I, First Minnesota Heavy Artillery, in which command he served until 
the close of the war, the command being in charge of the forts at Chatta- 
nooga, Tennessee. Upon the completion of his military service Mr. Hether- 
ington returned home and followed the butcher's trade at Hastings until 
1879, in which year he came over to this part of the state, locating in 
Grant county, where he homesteaded a tract of one hundred and sixty 
acres in section 8 of Delaware township, established his home there and 
has ever since made that his place of residence. When Mr. Hetherington 
settled in Delaware township there was not a house nor a tree within site 
of his homestead and he thus has ever been classed as one of the pioneers 
of that part of the county. He built a frame house on his place, planted 
a grove and entered upon the serious task of bringing the virgin soil under 
cultivation. That early homestead house, remodeled and enlarged, is still 
being occupied as the family residence. Mr. Hetherington is a Republican 
and has served the public in the capacity of supervisor and as school director. 
He formerly was a member of the Presbyterian church and also formerly 
was affiliated with the ]\Iasonic fraternity. 

On September 25, 1875, at Hastings, Charles C. Hetherington was 
united in marriage to Esther McCarriel, who was born in the state of New 
York, daughter of George and Laurenza ' Whitney) McCarriel, both also 
natives of that state and members of old New York families. George 



324 ■ DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

RIcCarriel died in New York, after wliich his widow returned to the home 
of her father and with the latter came to Minnesota, settUng at Hastings 
aljout the year 1861 and there she spent the rest of her hfe. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Hetherington six children have been born, namely : Mildred, who mar- 
ried Edward Bergstrom and lives at ^Minneapolis; Charles Algernon, who 
was educated at Highland Park College in Iowa and at the Moorhead 
(Minnesota) Normal and is now an electrical engineer at DesMoines, Iowa; 
Chester, who died at the age of twelve years; Chetwyn, at home; one who 
died in infancy and Esther Lora, at home. The Hetheringtons have a 
very pleasant home and have ever taken a proper part in the various social 
activities of the community of which they have been a part since pioneer 
days, helpful in promoting all movements having to do with the advance- 
ment of the common welfare thereabout. 



E-RICK LARSOX. 



The late Erick Larson who was one of the pioneer farmers of Ida 
township, Douglas county, was born in Sweden, in 1840, and died at his 
home in Ida township on July 28, 1908. 

Before leaving his native land Erick Larson was a surveyor around 
mines, and also owned a small farm in Sweden. He married in the old 
country and two children were born in Sweden one of whom died there. 
In 1868 he came with his wife and daughter Sarah, to Minnesota, settling 
in Douglas county, where he homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres 
of land in sections 21 and 22 of Ida township. This land was all timber 
land at the time he acquired it, and the first home of the family was a small 
hut made of branches, with a bark roof. Within a short time, however, 
they had erected a log house. His first team was one of oxen and the family 
worked diligently to clear and improve their land. Their first log house 
is still standing, but has been boarded up nicely, and many improvements 
added to it until it could hardly be recognized as the old log house of the 
wilderness. The first barn was made of logs with birch-bark roof. On 
that pioneer farm Mr. Larson lived the remainder of his life, although 
during the last few years he had given over the active management of 
his farm to younger hands. He was also a stonemason by trade, and did 
much work of that kind in the early days, such as building brick founda- 
tions and chimneys for houses, as well as plastering the inside walls and 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 325 

ceilings of the early houses. For the last fifteen years of his life he was 
in poor health, and occupied his time in making brushes, wash-boards, and 
the like. 

Air. Larson was alwa^-s an active member of the Swedish Lutheran 
church and held the office of deacon in the church for many years. He 
helped to build both the old and the new churches, and was always greatly 
interested in the welfare of his church. He was a good singer and music 
teacher in his younger days, having given organ lessons, and he was a 
leader in the church singing for years. He also served on the school board 
for many }-ears. 

Air. Larson and his wife were the parents of nine children as foL 
low: John, deceased; Sarah, the wife of Carl Thunberg a farmer of Ida 
township; John Lambert, who is a boilermaker in Superior Citv, \\'isconsin ; 
Peter August, who married Hulda Sporr and is the owner of a garage at 
Brandon ; Matilda, deceased ; Erick Albert, a homesteader in Xorth Dakota : 
Amanda, the wife of William Edks a teamster of Mora, Minnesota: Hulda, 
the wife of Ole S. Lee, who is mentioned elsewhere in this work, and Axel, 
who died at the age of twentv-one. 



SWAX A[. ANDERSON. 

Another of the prosperous Swedish farmers of Solem township is 
Swan Al. Anderson, who was born in Sweden on December 12, 1865. He 
is a son of Anders Monson and Hannah (Nelson) Anderson, both of whom 
were also natives of Sweden. Anders Alonson was a farmer of his native 
land and came with his family to America in 1881, some vears after his 
eldest son, Nels AL, had come here, and together they purchased a farm 
in Washington county, Alinnesota, which they later sold, and since that 
time, he has been retired from active farm life. He and his wife were the 
parents of four children, Anna, Nels AL (who is mentioned elsewhere in 
this work). Swan M., and Mary. 

Swan M. Anderson was reared on his father's farm in Sweden, and 
had little chance for schooling in his native land, having started herding 
geese at the age of seven. In 1881 he came to America with his father's 
family, locating in Washington county, Minnesota, where his first employ- 
ment was herding cattle. In 1889 he came to Douglas county and started 
to farm by renting land, but later he purchased one hundred and twenty- 



3-26 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

three acres, and has gradually added to his land holdings until he is now 
the owner of two hundred acres of fine land in section 7 of Solem township, 
besides one hundred and sixty acres in section 9 of the same township. He 
has placed practically all the improvements on his farm, which is a well- 
kept and attractive place. He is engaged in general farming and stock 
raising. 

In 1890 Swan M. Anderson was married to Anna E. Oslund, the daugh- 
ter of Erick Oslund, and to this union seven children have been born, Victor 
E.. Henry A., Hattie A., Alma W., Edith M., Herman L. and Alice Viola. 
The family are adherents of the Swedish Lutheran church, to which thev 
are liberal contributors and on the services of which they are regular attend- 
ants. Mr. Anderson is a trustee of the local church at Hoffman and is 
treasurer of the school board of district No. 71. 



PETER A. PETERSON. 



Another painstaking Swedish farmer of Ida township, Douglas county, 
is P. A. Peterson, who was born in Sweden on May 6, 1853, a son of 
Peter and Clara (Johnson) Peterson, natives of Sweden, who established 
their home on a farm. Their children were as follow: Peter A., the sub- 
ject of this sketch ; Albertina, who lives in Sweden ; John, who came to 
Minnesota and died in Alexandria, and Hilma. 

Peter A. Peterson spent his boyhood in Sweden and attended school 
there. He came to America in 1879, landing in Quebec, and from there 
came directly to Minnesota, and has since lived in Douglas county, with 
the exception of some time spent in North Dakota, he having taken up a 
homestead of one hundred and sixty acres in Eddy county, that state. 
Later he located in Ida township, Douglas county, pre-empting land, which 
he lived on and farmed until seven years ago, when he purchased the farm 
he now owns in Ida township, which place consists of two hundred acres, 
on which he is successfully carrying on general farming, making a specialty 
of raising Shorthorn cattle and Poland China hogs. He owns stock in the 
farmers elevator in Garfield, also in the creamery and the potato warehouse 
there. 

In April, 1884, Peter A. Peterson was married to Clara Lusty, a native 
of Sweden, from which country she came with her parents, John A. Lusty 
and wife, to Minnesota, the family locating on a farm in Spruce Hill town- 



DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 327 

ship, Douglas county. Tii Mr. and Mrs. Peterson four children have been 
born, Paul, Elmer, .Arthur, and Alice. Mr. Peterson is a Republican and 
served as a member of the township board for a period of fourteen years 
continuously, being chairman of the same for four years of that period. 
He is a member of the Swedish Lutheran church. 



^lAJOR FREDERICK von BAUMBACH. 

Major Frederick von Baumbach, one of the most prominent and suc- 
cessful men of Douglas county, was born in Prussia on August 30, 1838, 
the son of Louis and Mina (von Schenk) von Baumbach. 

Louis von Baumbach was a man of much prominence and influence in 
Prussia. He was an officer of high rank in the Prussian armv and fought 
with his country against the first Napoleon, his success as an officer and a 
leader of men giving him a commanding position in the German govern- 
ment. He was elevated to the position of president of the diet of Hesse- 
Cassel and was electetl a member of the German parliament in 1848. Air. 
von Baumbach was a member of the progressive element, in that, the most 
important parliament in the history of the Empire, in fact, it was epochal 
in the crisis that followed. Mr. von Baumbach, having championed the 
cause of the people, was compelled to leave the country with the failure of 
the cause and the upheaval that followed, and he, with other distinguished 
men, came to the United States in 1849. 

Upon coming to the United States, Louis von Baumbach located for a 
time on a farm in Ohio, near Elyria. He and his large family later removed 
to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where Air. von Baumbach became the German 
consul, a position he retained imtil 1883. Alina (von Schenk) von Baum- 
bach, the wife and mother, was of a family of distingiushed people of 
Hesse-Cassel, her family ha\'ing had many representatives who won high 
rank as soldiers and statesmen. Airs, von Baumbach died in 1869. 

The old Baumbach estate, Kirchleim, in Hesse-Cassel founded in 1300 
is stillin possession of the family. It was on this estate that Frederick 
von Baumbach was born and lived until he was ten years of age. His 
early education was obtained while living there under the direction of a 
private tutor, who always resided with the family. At the time the family 
came to the United States Frederick was one of the younger members of the 
family. After locating in Ohio he attended school at Elyria and later at 



328 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

^lihvaukee, when the family removed to that city. After completing a 
course in a business college he worked in a bank at Milwaukee until i860. 
Upon resigning his position in the bank, Frederick von Baumbach 
removed to San Antonio, Texas, and was there at the tune of the outbreak 
of the Civil War, a time of the most intense excitement. His sympathies 
being with the North, he had some exciting adventures in getting out of the 
South. Upon reaching Milwaukee he enlisted, June i, 1861, as a private 
in Company C, Fifth Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. He later 
served as corporal, sergeant and sergeant-major, and on June 13, 1862, 
was commissioned a second lieutenant and later a first lieutenant. On 
December 11, 1863, he was appointed captain of Company B, Thirty-fifth 
Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and on October 24, 1865, was 
promoted to major, which was his rank when he was mustered out of the 
service at Brownsville, Texas, March 15, [866, after having served nearly 
five years. Major von Baumbach saw service in many of the battles of the 
war, among some of the more important having been Yorktown, Williams- 
burg, the seven-days fight before Richmond, second battle of Bull Run, 
Antietam, Fredericksburg, Mobile and Spanish Fort. In all his long service 
he received nothing but the highest praise from his superior officers. He 
had given some of the best years of his life, as well as his best efiforts, to 
the cause of his adopted country, and he returned to private life with a 
record worthy of any man. 

In 1863 rVederick von Baumbach was united in marriage to Sarah J. 
Decker, of Milwaukee. Shortly after the close of the war he decided to 
locate further west and with that intention he visited Douglas county, 
Minnesota. He was much pleased with the country and the prospects, yet 
he returned to Wisconsin and there engaged in the drug business at Fond 
du Lac. After a year his store burned and he returned to Douglas county, 
and established a home on the shore of Lake Agnes, just north of Alexandria, 
where he now has a beautiful place and it is there that he and his family 
now reside. Mr. and Mrs. von Baumbach, having no children of their own, 
adopted a boy and a girl, Jacob and Julia. The family are active members 
of the Congregational church. Major von Baumbach's first wife died on 
August 2, 1913, and in August, 1914, he married Mrs. Carrie Hammond, of 
St. Paul. 

Major von Baumbach has always been an active Republican and for 
years a leader in the party ranks: it being but natural, therefore, that in 
time he has been elected to office. In 1872 he was elected auditor of Doug- 
las county and served in that position until 1879. He then was elected sec- 



DOUGLAS AXD GRAXT COUNTIES, MIXXESOTA. 



3 -'9 



retary of state for the state of Minnesota and was twice re-elected, holding 
the otilice from 1880 to 1887. He then returned to Douglas county and 
was again elected county auditor. During the time of the building of the 
new court house he was placed in charge of the construction of the same 
and his services were satisfactory to all. In 1898, at the time of the. Spanish- 
American A\"ar. and after the passage of the new internal revenue law, which 
was passed to raise funds for the prosecution of hostilities, [Major von 
Baumbach was appointed by President ^IcKinlev. as internal revenue col- 
lector, with headquarters at St. Paul. He retained that position until 1914. 
since which time he has lived a retired life on his estate on Lake Agnes. 

Major von Baumback has always taken an active interest in the affairs 
of the Grand Army of the Republic and of the Loval Legion, the latter 
an organization composed only of commissioned officers of the Civil \\'ar. 
Fraternally, he is a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted ^Masons and 
of the Lidependent Order of Odd Fellows. Both in public and private life, 
^lajor von Baumbach has always been honored and respected bv the com- 
munity, county and state. His life has been an active and an honorable 
one and he has accomplished much that is good and noble. 



SAMUEL O. WAGEXIUS. 

Samuel O. \\ agenius, one of the well-known and prominent citizens 
of Holmes City and postmaster of that village, was born in the northern part 
of Sweden on January 16. 1849, the son of Ole and Carrie \\'agenius. both 
of w^hom were natives of that country, where they lived and died. Ole 
^^"agenius was a successful farmer and the famih- were highlv respected 
in the community in which they lived. 

Samuel O. A\'agenius was one of a family of live children and received 
his education in the public schools and at the seminary at Delsbo. Sweden. 
He graduated from the later institution, having taken the normal course, 
and successfully engaged in teaching for a number of years. He remained 
in his native land until he was twenty-two years of age. when he decided 
that he would locate in America. He landed at Quebec and came direct 
to Iowa, locating at AIcGregor. that state, where he remained for seven 
years: during which time he continued his studies and engaged in teaching 
and other work. In 1878 he came to Minnesota, and here he located in 
Goodhue county, where he was engaged as a clerk in a mercantile estab- 



330 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COVNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

lishment at \\'hite Rock. After three years in that place he came to Hohnes 
City, Douglas county, and here he became a clerk for M. F. ^lunson, who 
conducted a flour-mill and a general store. In 1884 Mr. W'agenius and 
Ole 01s<m. purchased the store of Air. Munson and conducted the same 
until 1897, in which year Mr. W'agenius purchased the interest of Mr. 
Olson and thereafter operated the business alone for a number of years. 
He later sold to Hanson Brothers and retired from the business. During 
the time when W'agenius & Olson conducted the store an incident occurred 
that cast a pall over the entire community. The building in which they 
conducted their business was destroyed by fire, and a son of Mr. Olson lost 
his life in the flames, the body being found in the ruins. The lx)y had 
slept in the building and it is surmised that he had been murdered by rol> 
bers and the store fired. 

In addition to his other business interests. Mr. Wagenius is the owner 
of thirty-nine acres of valuable land, the most of which is within the cor- 
porate limits of the village of Holmes City. Years ago he was appointed 
postmaster of Holmes City and continues to occupy that position. As a 
public official he has been true to the trust imposed in him and has the 
confidence and respect of the entire community. 

On June 29, 1881, Samuel O. Wagenius was united in marriage, at Can- 
non Falls, Goodhue county, this state, to Betsy Hogman, the daughter of 
Imbrick and Brita Hogman, prominent people of that county, where Mr. 
Hogman was engaged in general farming and stock raising. To this union 
five children were born, Carl, Mary Caroline, Hattie \^ictoria, Ruth A. and 
Reuben Samuel Eugene. Carl was born on August 27, 1882; Mary, October 
3, 1884; Hattie, June 2, 1889; Ruth, March 14, 1897, and Reuben Samuel 
E., August I, 1899. The family are active members of the Swedish Luthe- 
ran church, of which ]\Ir. A\'agenius was for many years a deacon, Sunday 
school superintendent and secretary. He has always taken much interest 
in religious work and has devoted much time to the work in his home com- 
munity. 

]\Ir. Wagenius is a stanch Republican and has always taken a keen 
interest in local affairs. In 1887 he was elected clerk of Holmes City town- 
ship, and has ever since held that position. He has for many years been 
the secretary of the Holmes City Fire Insurance Company and has done 
effective work in that position. His life has been an active one and the work 
that he has dune has been well done and has received the approval of the 
communitv. 



DOUGLAS AND GRAXT COUXTIES, MIXNESOTA. 33 1 

TOHX A. LUSTY. 

John A. Lusty, a successful and well-known farmer of Spruce Hill 
township, Douglas county, was bom in Sweden on Xovember 24, 1866, the 
son of Andrew and Margaret (Larson) Lusty, who were also born in 
Sweden, where they received their education in the public schools and grew 
to manhood and womanhood and were married. There Andrew Lusty en- 
gaged in farming and took militar\- training. They remained in their native 
land until 1870. when they decided to locate in America. On their arrival at 
Xew York they remained in that city for some time. Mr. Lusty being there 
engaged as a laborer. He later worked on the railroad for a time and in 
1872 the family came to Minnesota, where Mr. Lusty homesteaded one 
hundred and sixt\- acres of land in section 34. of Spruce Hill township. 
Douglas count}-. The tract at that time was all in heavy timber and with- 
out improvements of any kind. A small log house was built, in which the 
family lived for some years. Mr. Lusty had no team with which to assist 
in the clearing of his land and as he had but ver%- little money with which 
to hire the work done, it was necessary for him to work for others until 
his financial condition was improved. The first team that he had some 
time later was a team of oxen he raised from calves. \\"ith that team he 
did much of his clearing and cultivated his farm for years. In 1873 
the mother, brothers and sisters of Andrew Lust}-, came to the L'nited 
States to join their son and brother, and they drove into Douglas county 
from ^Melrose, at that time the nearest railroad point. 

Andrew Lust\- succeeded in developing and improving his farm until 
he had one of the model farms of the communit}-. There he engaged in 
general farming and stock raising for many years and was successful. He 
always took much interest in local affairs and had much to do with the 
social and civic improvement of the township. In 1895 he retired from 
the activities of the life on the farm and died on ilarch 22, 1905, at the 
age of eighty-four years. The widow sur^-ived but a short time, she dying 
on April 4 of that year. They were the parents of nine children, Mary, 
Anna, Johnas (deceased), Johanna, Peter, Clara. John. Augusta ( deceased 1 
and Anton (deceased). John and Augusta were twins. 

John A. Lusty received his education in the schools of Spruce Hill 
township and as a lad and young man assisted with the work of clearing 
and improving the homestead. He grew to manhood amid the pioneer 
surroundings and suffered many of the early privations of the pioneers. 



33^ DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

From 1886 to 1892 he was in Xorth Dakota and some of the Western 
states. He homesteaded eighty acres in Xorth Dakota, but later returned 
to Douglas county, where he purchased eighty acres in section 23, Spruce 
Hill township. He owned that farm for three years and during that time 
purchased one hundred and sixty acres of his father, after which the 
parents lived with John A. Lusty. After he assumed possession of the 
farm he made many improvements and has done much clearing. He is 
engaged in general farming and stock raising and feeds most of the grain 
that he raises. 

In 1905 John A. Lusty was united in marriage to Anna Davis, and to 
this union five children have been born, Oliver, Wilhelm, Leslie, Maria and 
Clara. ^Ir. and Airs. Lusty are active members of the Lutheran church 
and ha\e ahva}-s taken much interest in church work. They are prominent in 
the social and religious life of the community and are held in high regard 
bv all. Mr. Lustv is a Republican, has been active in local afifairs and his 
influence has ever been used in the promotion of all enterprises that would 
tend to the advancement and the betterment of the township and the com- 
munitv. 



AIRS. PETER TOHXSOX. 

Mrs. Peter Johnson, who lives on her excellent farm in Belle River 
township, Douglas county, was born on July 28, 1863, in Sweden. Her 
maiden name was Ulricka Hanson, and she is a daughter of Peter and 
Maria (Larson) Hanson, natives of Sweden, where they grew up, mar- 
ried and established their home; but emigrated to America with their family 
in 1869, coming directly to Minnesota, the father securing a good farm in 
Osakis township, Douglas county, on which he spent the rest of his life, 
dving in 1908, at the age of seventy-five years. His widow is still living 
on the homestead of one hundred and sixty acres. Their daughter Ulricka 
was six years old when the\- brought her to the United States and she 
grew to womanhood on the home farm in Osakis township, receiving her 
schooling in the district schools. There she met and married Peter John- 
son, who was born on July 18, 1862, in Sweden, a son of John Johnson 
and wife, who brought their family from Sweden to America in 1870, 
coming directlv to Minnesota, the father taking up a homestead in Osakis 
township. Douglas county. Peter Johnson was eight years old when the 
familv came to this country and here he grew to manhood, helping his 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 333 

father develop the farm and attending- the rural schnols in his neighhor- 
hcod. When starting out in life for himself he hought one hundred and 
sixty acres in section 32 of Belle River township, all wild land; hut he 
worked hard and soon had it under cultivation and in time well impro\ed, 
having cleared the major portion of it himself. There he spent the rest of 
his life engaged in general farming, his death occurring on Septemher 11, 
1S94. 

Peter Johnson and Ulricka Hanson were married in 1888, and to their 
union the following children were born : Anna, who married Henrv Sibell ; 
Alfred, born on September 18, 1891, who married Hulda Stahl and lives 
on eighty acres, a part of the home place, which he has purchased, and he 
has two children, A'ernon and Lucile; Adolph, and Albin who are with their 
mother on the homestead, a part of which she retains and is operating with 
the help of her children. 



THEODORE ALFRED JEXSEX. 

Theodore Alfred Jensen, a successful business man of Xelson, was born 
in Denmark, in 1867, the son of Hans and Xettie C. (X'elson) Jensen, 
natives of Denmark, where they were educated, grew to manhood and 
womanhood and were married. Mr. Jensen was a'ship builder and devoted 
the greater part of his life to that work. During 1863 and 1864 he served 
his country as a soldier in the war with Germany. In 1892 Hans and X'et- 
tie Jensen came to America and located in Minnesota, where their children 
were living. Mrs. Jensen died some years later and Mr. Jensen is living 
in X'elson, where he has lived a retired life since coming to the United 
States. 

Theodore Alfred Jensen was unable to devote nuich time to his early 
education, owing to the fact that at the age of seven )-ears he became deaf, 
the result of a severe attack of scarlet fever. This condition continued 
until he was nineteen years of age, when, by constant attention and medical 
treatment, his hearing was entirely restored. Yet he has acquired a broad 
view of life through reading and association with others. In 1891 he came 
to the United States, landing at Boston on January it,, of that year. He 
came at once to Minnesota and remained for one year on his brother's 
farm in Douglas county. The farm belonged to C. H. Jensen, the present 
county recorder of Douglas county. At the end of the year Theodore Alfred 
Jensen returned to his trade, that of a carpenter, and followed that trade 



334 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

until 1907, when he homesteaded one hundred and sixtv acres of land near 
Pierre, South Dakota, where he and his family resided until 191 1, in which 
year they returned to Minnesota and located for a time at ^Minneapolis, 
where ]\Ir. Jensen worked at the carpenter trade. They later returned to 
Xelson. where he has since oi^erated a restaurant and has been successful. In 
19 1 5 Mr. Jensen engaged in the auto livery business in connection with his 
restaurant. 

In 1902 Theodore Alfred Jensen was united in marriage to Xicolenia 
Iversen and to this union have been born two children, Wallace and Flor- 
ence. The family are members of the Danish Lutheran church and INIr. 
Jensen is a member of the Danish Brotherhood of America. 



C. A. CARLSON. 



C. A. Carlson, a well-known and successful farmer of Brandon town- 
ship, Douglas county, was born in Sweden on October 9, 1861, the son of 
Carl J. and Anna (Johnson) Peterson, also natives of Sweden, where they 
received their education in the public schools and grew to manhood and 
womanhood. As a young man, Mr. Peterson learned the tailor trade, at 
which he worked for many years. He is now past eighty-four years of 
age, and still a resident of the land of his nativity. Mrs. Peterson died in 
1900, at the age of si.xty-eight years. They were the parents of seven chil- 
dren, Allin. C. August, Gust, Hilma, Hulda, Anna and Oscar. The latter 
son went to Alaska many years ago and has never since been heard from 
by the home folks. 

C. .\. Carlson received his education in the public common schools of 
Sweden and there grew to manhood. He remained a resident of his native 
countrv until 1891, when, at the age of thirty, he decided to come to 
America, .\fter landing at Halifax, he came directly to Minnesota and 
followed his trade, that of a carpenter, in Grant county, for one year, 
after which he engaged in farming. He remained in Grant county until 
1897. when he came to Douglas county and purchased one hundred and 
sixt^- acres of land in section 6 of Brandon township. This farm he has 
developed and improved and today has one of the well-cultivated and well- 
managed farms of the township. In 191 5 he erected a large stock barn, fifty 
bv sixt\- feet. He is engaged in general farming and stock raising and has 
been successful. 



DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 3:55 

In 1886 C. A. Carlson was united in marriage to Sophia Anderson, 
also a native of Sweden, who died on July i8, 191 1, at the age of forty-five 
years. 'Sir. and Mrs. Carlson were the parents of eight children, Axel, Oscar, 
Emily, Fred, Matilda, David (deceased), Ethel and Etlwin. Axel and 
Oscar Carlson are carpenters and built the new barn on the home place. 
Mr. Carlson is an active member of the Swedish Lutheran church, as was his 
wife, and takes a proper interest in church work. ]\Irs. Carlson was a woman 
who was universally beloved and her death was mourned by all. ]\Ir. 
Carlson is deeply interested in the educational system of his township and 
for five years served as a member of the school board. He is a man of 
wide experience and possessed of excellent judgment, his advice often being 
sought on matters of importance in the township and county. 



JAMES R. AIcCLELLAX. 

James R. McClellan, a well-known farmer of Hudson township, Douglas 
county, was born on the old homestead farm in that township on January 
8, 1867, the son of James ]\IcClellan and wife, the former of whom was 
born in eastern Canada on ]\Iarch 13, 1841. 

James R. McClellan received his education in the public schools of 
Hudson township and there grew to manhood on the home farm. As 
a young man he started farming on his father's farm and in 1898 he bought 
his present farm of one hundred and sixty acres and has since made this 
his home. He is engaged in general farming and stock raising, in which 
he has been quite successful, being particularly interested in the raising of 
Shorthorn cattle. 

On Octolier 21, 1893. James R. AlcClellan was united in marriage to 
Addie Stone and to this union four children have been born, Frank, Inez, 
Clara and Lola. The family are active members of the United Brethren 
church. ]\Ir. McClellan is independent in his political views. 

James IMcClellan, the father of James R. AlcClellan, was born in Can- 
ada, a son of John and Ellen ( Filmen ) McClellan, the former born in Scot- 
land and the latter in the north of Ireland. John ^^IcClellan emigrated to 
Canada with his parents when but a boy, and made that countrv his home. 
He and wife were the parents of ten children, Ellen, John, Robert, Tames, 
^klatthew, \\'illiam, Jean, Margaret, Grace and Agnes. The parents were 
active members of the Presl))-terian church and took much interest in church 
work. 



336 DOL^GLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

James McClellan received his education in die public schools of Canada 
and there grew to manhood. In 1866 he came to Minnesota and located 
in what later became organized as Hudson township, Douglas count}-, being 
thus among tlie \'ery earliest settlers in that township. There he home- 
steaded one hundred and sixty acres in section 34. He later added forty 
acres to his original farm. He built a log house, in which he lived for 
twenty years. He at once entered into the task of breaking his land and 
preparing it for the planting of his crops. During the year the grass- 
hoppers were so bad, he devoted his time to the cutting of wood at wage 
of fifty cents a day. In 1868 and 1870 he paid as high as twenty-four per 
cent interest on borrowed money. It was a hard struggle during those 
trying days, yet in time he became a prosperous and successful farmer. 

James McClellan was united in marriage to Agnes Bailey and to this 
union ten children were born, James, Janet, Charles, John, George, Henry, 
Hannah, Frank, Alfred and Ed. Mr. and Mrs. McClellan are members 
of the Congregational church and have always been active in church work, 
for years prominent in the social and religious activities of the community. 
Mr. McClellan has always taken much interest on local civic affairs and 
had much to do with the early life and government of the township. He 
has served as a member of the township board of supervisors and has 
always been held in the highest esteem. 



HANS BIRKHOFER. 



Hans Birkhofer, one of the successful business men of Alexandria, was 
born on Xo\ember i, i860, in Germany, the son of Conrad and Barbara 
(Miller) Birkhofer. The parents were also natives of Germany and there 
lived their lives, they having died some years ago. The father was an officer 
of the postal department of the Fatherland and was a man of much influence 
and was highly respected by his neighbors. 

Hans Birkhofer was of a family of seven children and received his edu- 
cation in the public schools of his native land, where he lived until he was 
thirty years of age. In 1890 he decided to locate in America, and upon 
landing in the United States came directly to Minnesota, locating in Minne- 
apolis, where he was for ten years connected with the Birkhofer Brewing 
Company. In August 1901 he purchased the brewing establishment of R. 
Wegner at Alexandria, since which time he has been the president and the 



DOUGLAS AXn GKAXT COVXTTES. MIXNKSOTA. ^?j;7 

manager of the business. The brewery Ikis been greatly improved and 
developed sinve its purchase by Mr. Birkhofer and is today one of the suc- 
fessful breweries of the state. 

In 1 880 Hans Birkhofer was united in tnarriage to Anna Strcx4>el. who 
was lxirn and eilucated in C«emian}-. To this union four children have l^een 
lxirn. Freda. Antonia. Marg-aret and Connid, the tirst-nained of whom is 
the wife of Sherman Castello. a well-known resident of the county. 

Hans Birkhofer has had a most active life and since young manhood 
has made his owii way in the world. He is a man of pleasing address and 
has made many friends in the community in which he now lives. Jle has 
taken much interest in the de\elopment of the towtt in which he resides, and 
has done much toward the general development of the county. He and his 
family are active meml>ers of the Catholic church and have always taken 
much interest in church work. 



F.nWlX BOWM.W. 



Edwin Bowman, one of the well-known and successful farmers of 
Osakis township. Dmiglas comity, was liorn in Rice county, this state, on 
May I. 1865. the son of Jacob and Belinda ( I'ergaismi ") Bowman, who 
were Ix^m in Ontario. Canada. While a resident of his native country. 
Jacob Bowman was eng-iged in fanning and remained a resident of the 
land of his birth until 1858. ii\ which year he decided to conie to Minne- 
sota. He located in Rice county, where he lived until i8t>-. when he came 
to Douglas county, and here he homesteaded a farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres in section jy of O.^akis township. The family made their jour- 
ne\- from Rice county to their new home by ox-team in a covered wagon. 
Tliere were still many Indians in the coimtry at that linie .md on the way 
they saw a large band of redmen, mardung single tile, the line of march 
being a mile long. 

.\fter having prepared a home ior the family. Mr. Bowman Ivgan the 
task of clearing and breakii\g his land, preixiratory to the plantit\g of his 
crops, .\fter his crops were gathered and ready for the market it was 
necessary to take them to St, I'lond, wlucli \\.l^ the nearest ni.irkot at tli.it 
time. During his active lite Mr. Ihuvukiu did nuich work in real est.ite 
and bought and sold much land. He was recogi>i/ed as a successful fanner 



338 DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

and stockman, and a man of much influence in the community. To such 
men the township and the county owe much, for it is such as these that 
have converted the wild prairie and forests into fertile fields, improved 
with the finest of modern and substantial buildings and dotted with herds 
of fine cattle. 

To Jacob and Belinda Bowman were born five children, Maria, Edwin, 
May, Idella and George, the latter of whom died at the age of ten years. 
During the latter part of his active life Jacob Bowman lived on a farm in 
the corporate limits of the town of Osakis. There he served on the village 
council, did good service and had the confidence and respect of all. 

Edwin Bowman received his education in the public schools of Osakis 
township and grew to manhood on the home farm, where as a lad he 
assisted his father with the work. After completing his education he decided 
that he would be a farmer and remained with his father until the latter's 
death in 1907. In 1910 I\Ir. Bowman built a fine residence in the town of 
Osakis, and there he has since made his home. He is an extensive land- 
owner and has some nine hundred and sixty acres in Douglas and Todd 
counties. He is at present street commissioner of Osakis and was for six 
years a member of the council. He manages his large farms, does much 
general farming and raises many cattle and hogs. His farms are highly 
developed and well improved. 

In 1894 Edwin Bowman was united in marriage to Ida Masteller and 
to this union five children have been born, Lidia. William :\IcKinley, George, 
Edwin and Russell. The family are prominent in the social life of the 
community and are held in the highest esteem by all who know them. Mr. 
Bowman has ever taken an active interest in local affairs and has always 
shown his readiness to assist in any worthy cause that would tend toward 
the betterment of local conditions. 



HEXRY A. MALMOUIST. 

A A-enerable and respected citizen of LaGrand township, Douglas county, 
is Henrv A. Alalmquist, who has devoted his long life to business and agri- 
cultural pursuits, in which he has been successful, for he has not only worked 
hard but managed well. He was born in Sweden on March 11, 1838, and is 
a son of Andres Abramson, who lived and died in Sweden, having spent his 
life at general farming. 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. _:5 39 

Henry A. Alalmquist (who adopted his present name upon coming to 
America) spent his boyhood in his native land, assisting his father with the 
work about the home place, and in the winter time he attended the common 
schools. He remained in Sweden until he was thirty years old, emigrating 
to the United States in the year 1868. After spending a short time in St. 
Paul, at that time little more than a village, he worked in manv different 
places about the state of Minnesota. In the fall of 1881 he entered business 
in the village of Alexandria, where he remained until 1892, when he pur- 
chased his present farm in LaGrand township, but later moved back to Alex- 
andria and lived retired from active labor. In 1910 he built a fine modern 
home where he now lives in LaGrand township, and oj^erates his well- 
improved eighty-acre farm. He has been quite successful in a business way 
and is very comfortably fixed. ]\Ir. Malmquist has never married. He is a 
Republican and he attends the Swedish Lutheran church. 



EMIL J. BRAXDT. " 

Emil J. Brandt, former auditor of Douglas county and now engaged 
in the insurance business at Alexandria, was born in Sweden on July 14, 
1873, a son of H. M. and Johanna (Ogren) Brandt, both natives of that 
country. The elder Brandt came to America in 1882 and followed others 
of his countrymen to Minnesota, where he found a location in Douglas 
county. He bought forty acres of land in Spruce Hill township and estab- 
lished a home. The following year he brought the rest of his family to 
this new home, and still lives on the homestead. He is the father of five 
children: Emil J., the subject of this sketch; Oscar B., ;\Iarv O., who 
married Ed Hanson; Charles M., who died in September, 1908, and Hannah 
E., who married August Anderson. 

Emil J. Brandt received his early education in the public schools of 
Sweden. He was ten years of age when he came to this country and he 
attended school for a time in Douglas county. As a young man he worked 
on the farm most of the time and his attendance at school was only at 
such times as his service on the farm was not needed. During the winter of 
1898 he took a business course in a commercial school at Minneapolis and in 
the fall of 1908 he was elected auditor of Douglas county and served three 
terms in that office, retiring in 1915, since which time he has devoted his 
attention to the insurance business. 



340 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

Mr. Brandt has been three times married. His first wife was Marie 
Hanson, to whom he was married in 1895. She died on December 2, 
1896, without issue. His second wife was Christine Nelson, by whom 
three children were born, Lloyd A. L., Alfhild J. and Lillian C. The mother 
of these children died in February, 1903, and in igio Mr. Brandt married 
Katherine L. Bundy, to which union one child has been born, a daughter, 
Lucia E. 

Mr. Brandt is a member of the Indianapolis Order of Odd Fellows and 
is an active worker in the order. He has long given his close attention to 
local political affairs and before his election to the office of county auditor 
served for two terms as assessor of Spruce Hill township. In 1905 he took 
an active part in the organization of the Rose Co-operative Creamery Com- 
pany in Spruce Hill township and in 1900 helped to organize the Farmers' 
Elevator Company at Eagle Bend, in the neighboring county of Todd. 



PETER E. DAHL. 



The late Peter E. Dahl, for years a well-known farmer of Solem town- 
ship, Douglas county, was born in Sweden in 1852, the son of Peter and 
Margaret Dahl, also natives of that cf)untry, where they continued to live 
until 1868, when they decided that they would locate in America. Upon 
their arrival in the United States they came directly to Minnesota, and home- 
steaded one hundred and sixty acres of land in Solem township, Douglas 
county, the farm being the one where the widow of Peter E. Dahl now lives. 
The farm at the time Peter and Margaret Dahl located here was, for the 
most part, wild land and without improvements. The place was later devel- 
oped and improved and there Peter Dahl engaged in general farming and 
stock raising and became successful. He soon entered into the civic and 
religious life of the township and he and his wife were among the organizers 
of the local Lutheran church, in which they were among the prominent and 
active workers. They were the parents of two children, Peter E. and Betsy, 
the latter of whom married Andrew Anderson. 

Peter E. Dahl received his education in the public schools of Sweden, 
where he lived until he was sixteen years of age. At that time he came to 
the United States, his parents arriving one year later, and he remained with 
them for some years, assisting in the clearing and the developing of the old 
homestead. In 1882 he homesteaded one hundred and sixtv acres of land 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 34I 

in Land township. Grant count)-. This he later sold and purcliased tlie old 
home place, where he lived until the time of his death. He engaged in gen- 
eral farming and stock raising and became successful, adding eighty acres to 
his farm, having purchased the tract that adjoined his one hundred and sixty 
acres over the line in Grant county. He erected all the present substantial 
buildings and made many other valuable improvements, which added much 
to the beauty and value of the place, and there he was living at the time of 
his death in 1913. 

In 1884 Peter E. Dahl was united in marriage to Karen Anderson, who 
was born in Sweden and came to the United States with her mother, in 1882, 
and were joined by the father in 1892. Mr. Anderson owned land in Becker 
county, but now makes his home with the widow of Peter E. Dahl. To Peter 
E. Dahl and wife were born seven children, Andrew L., Peter E., Olaf T., 
Gustav E., Carl A., John E. and Melvina. Peter E. Dahl is in Montana and 
the others are at home. Mr. Dahl was an active member of the Lutheran 
church, as is his widow, and always took much interest in church work and 
was prominent in the social life of the community in which he lived. He took 
much interest in local affairs and was recognized as a man of sterling worth, 
who exerted his best efforts to the growth and development of the township 
and the county. As a farmer and stockman, he was progressive, a believer 
in intensive farming and the keeping of the best of stock. 



LEOPOLD FIDA. 



The number of Austrians in Douglas and Grant counties is comparative- 
Iv small, but those who are here have proven to be enterprising and law- 
abiding and are among our best farmers. One of this number is Leopold 
Fida, of Miltona township, Douglas county, who was torn in Austria, on 
October 28, 1857, a son of Mathias and Barbara (Austria) Fida, and a 
grandson of Ignas Fida, who spent his life on a farm in the old country. 
Mathias Fida grew up in his native land and married there, emigrating to 
America with his family in 1882, landing in Baltimore, Maryland. He came 
on West to IMinnesota and bought a farm in Carlos township, Douglas 
county, on which he spent the rest of his life, dying in May, 1913, at an 
advanced age. His wife died in early life, back in May, 1887. To these 
parents six children were liorn, Mary (deceased), A'ictoria, Leopold, Lige- 
bert (whereabouts unknown), Matthew and Julia. 



342 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

Leopold Fida spent his boyhood in Austria, where he attended school. 
He accompanied the family to Minnesota thirty-four years ago, and was 
married in Douglas county, about 1888, to Mary Dottier, whose death 
occurred in January, 1898. To their union the following children were 
born: ]\lary, who is the wife of Frank Olson, of Fargo, North Dakota; 
John, Amelia and Emma. Following the death of the mother of these 
children, Mr. Fida in ]\Iay, 1902, married Mrs. Anna Ahrentz, widow of 
Ignas Ahrentz, to which union one child has been born, a son, Peter. By 
her first marriage Mrs. Fida was the mother of five children, Rosie, Theresa, 
William, Joseph and Clara (deceased). 

Mr. Fida bought his present farm of one hundred and sixty acres in 
section 36 of Miltona township thirty-three years ago, since which time he 
has made a comfortable living as a general farmer. He cleared most of the 
land and has put on all the improvements. He also owns stock in the Belle 
River creamery. He and his family are memljers of the Catholic church at 
Belle River. 



JOHN A. HINTZEN. 



The Hollanders have always been known as skillful farmers and en- 
terprising merchants; or, in fact, in most any line of endeavor, and they have 
been able to make comfortable livings from soil on which other peoples 
would have failed. They have developed many communities in the New 
World, and America has always extended them a hearty welcome. One of 
this number in Douglas county is John A. Hintzen, a merchant of Miltona, 
in Belle River township. He was born in Holland on January 17, 1877, a 
son of Leonard Hintzen, pioneer settler of Douglas county, who settled in 
Belle River township in an early day and bought a good farm, which he 
developed and on which he established the future home of the family. Fuller 
mention is made of him in the sketch of Nicholas Hintzen, presented else- 
where in this volume. His wife died on July 14, 1916. 

John A. Hintzen was young in years when his parents brought him to 
Minnesota from Holland, and he grew to manhood on the homestead in Belle 
River township, where he worked during the summer months, attending the 
district schools in the winter time. He remained with his father on the farm 
until his marriage on November 23, 1903, to Mary Holsworth. To this union 
five children have been born, Lester, Eugene, Harry, George and Leonard, 
the latter of whom was named for his grandfather. John A. Hintzen bought 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. ^t:^^ 

a general store at Miltona in 1910 and is still conducting the same, having 
built up a good trade with the town and surrounding country. He carries a 
ten-thousand-dollar stock of clothing, hardware, shoes and general merchan- 
dise, and is prompt, fair and courteous in dealing with his many customers. 
He also owns a good farm of twenty acres in JNIiltona township and a farm 
of one hundred and sixty acres in Clearwater county, Minnesota. Mr. 
Hintzen served as postmaster at :\Iiltona for five years, and while living at 
Bejou, Minnesota, was postmaster there for five years. While living in that 
place he was also engaged in mercantile pursuits. He was also for a period 
of five years engaged as station agent for the Soo line railroad at IMiltona, 
and is now secretary and treasurer of the Farmers" Shipping Association at 
that place. ISIr. Hintzen is a Republican and is serving as treasurer of the 
school board in district Xo. 55. 



TOHX T. HAL\'ORSON. 



John T. Halvorson, a well-known and successful farmer of Elk Lake 
township. Grant county, was born in Boone county. Illinois, on July 2, 1858, 
the son of Tosten and Gunhild (Olson) Halvorson, natives of Norway, who 
continued to live in the land of their nativity until 1854. when they decided 
to come to America. On their arrival in the United States, they located in 
Boone county, Illinois, where they continued to reside until 1867, when they 
came to Minnesota, locating in Urness township, Douglas county, where they 
homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres of land. That farm Mr. Halvor- 
son developed and improved and there he engaged in general farming and 
stock raising until the time of his death. At the time the family settled here 
the farm was for the most part a wild tract and required much work to bring 
it under cultivation. The nearest market was at St. Cloud and the neigh- 
bors were few and far away. In time the family became prosperous and 
were prominent in the social and the religious life of the township. ^Ir. and 
Mrs. Halvorson were the parents of eight children, Albert, Ole, Esther, 
Tilda, John T., Annie. Fred and Lena. The father and mother were active 
members in the Norwegian Lutheran church, took much interest in church 
work and were held in the highest regard and esteem by all who knew them. 
The father took much interest in the civic life of the community and was 
recognized as one of the influential men of the township. 

John T. Halvorson received his education in the public schools of Urness 



344 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES^ MINNESOTA. 

township and at Alexandria, and grew to manhood on the home farm, where 
as a lad and young man he assisted with the farm work. Early in life he 
decided that he would be a farmer and in 1890 he bought his present farm 
of two hundred acres in sections 12 and 13 of Elk Lake township. Grant 
county. He has erected all the buildings and made all the developments on 
the place and is now engaged in general farming and stock raising, in which 
he has been quite successful. 

In 1896 John T. Halvorson was united in marriage to Carolina Elling- 
ing, daughter of Syver Ellinging and wife, well-known residents of the 
county, and to this union two children have been born. Hazel C. and Esther 
J. Mr. and Mrs. Halvorson are active members of the Norwegian Lutheran 
church, and have long been prominent in the social and religious life of the 
community, where they are held in the highest regard and esteem of all who 
know them. Mr. Halvorson has always taken a keen interest in the civic 
life of the township and has had much to do with the growth and the devel- 
opment of the district. He is at present a member of the school board and 
has served his township as assessor. He is a progressive citizen and is an 
advocate of substantial public improvements and nf the maintenance of the 
highest grade of schools. 



NICHOLAS HINTZEN. 



One of the young farmers of Belle River township, Douglas county, is 
Nicholas Hintzen, who has been contented to remain in his own locality. 
His birth occurred there on March 15, 1879. He is a son of Leonard and 
Mary E. (Fox) Hintzen, pioneer citizens of Douglas county, a separate 
sketch of whom will be found on another page of this volume. 

Nicholas Hintzen was reared on the homestead in Belle River town- 
ship, where he worked during the crop seasons, attending the neighboring 
schools in the winter time. He was married on September 9, 1902, to 
Hermina Hainzl, who was born on April 26, 1871, in Germany, from 
which country she came to Minnesota with her parents when young, the 
familv settling in Douglas county. To :\Ir. and Mrs. Hintzen two children 
have Ijeen born, Frank M. and Clifford P. 

Mr. Hintzen began life for himself as a farmer and he is now owner of 
eighty acres in section 17 of Belle River township and twenty acres in 
section 5 of that same township. It is all in one body and is a part of his 
father's old home place. He has kept this land under good improvement and 



DOL-GLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 



345 



cultivation and is making a comfortable living as a general farmer. }Ie is 
also a stockholder in the Belle River Creamery dimpany and is [jresident of 
the same, his able management of its affairs ha\-ing resulted in the pro- 
nounced success of the enterprise. Air. Hintzen is a Republican and has 
served as treasurer of his township and as chairman of the school board of 
district X'o. 62. The family are members of the Catholic church in Belle 
River township. 



AIAGXUS AXDERSOX. 



-Magnus Anderson, a prominent and successful farmer of LaGrand 
township, Douglas count}-, was born in Sweden on June 24, 1853, the son 
of Andrew and Alary ( Olson | Anderson, also natives of that countrv, who 
spent all their lives there. The father was a shoemaker by trade, but also 
worked at cabinet-making and blacksmithing. He was a man of prominence 
in his communit\- and was held in high regard bv all. He and his familv 
were active members of the Lutheran church and were prominent in the 
social and religious activities of their community. Andrew .\nderson and 
wife were the parents of seven children, Alagnus, AIar\-, Stena, Andrew, 
Daniel, August and one who died in infancy. 

Alagnus Anderson received his education in the public schools of his 
native country and there grew to manhood. He was married in 1878 to 
Christina Olson, and to this union two children were born in the old countrv, 
-Anna O. and Alagnus AI. The following children were born on the home 
farm in Douglas county : Tilda, A'ictor, Ellen, lunil, ^^■illiam, Oscar and 
Christian, the latter of whom died at the age of one vear. The eldest son, 
Alagnus AI. Anderson, died in Canada on Alarch 5, 1916. 

In 1882 Alagnus Anderson decided to seek a home in America, and 
after bidding his wife and children good-bye, he set out for the much-talked- 
of American country. Upon his arri\'al in the United States he came direct 
to Alinnesota. arriving at Alexandria on Alay 22. 1882. For the next two 
years he worked as a farm hand in the county, during which time he saved 
enough from his meager earnings to send for his wife and two children, who 
joined the happy father on June 24, 1884, at Alexandria. That same vear 
Air. Anderson purchased eighty acres in LaGrand township, which is a part 
of his present farm. The tract at that time was heav\- timber, with the 
exception of four acres that had been cleared. He bought the farm of a 
homesteader, and the little shant\- that was supposed to be on the farm was 



346 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

not there at all, so indefinite were the lines separating the tracts. Since that 
time yiv. Anderson has cleared and developed the farm and improved the 
place with modern buildings, until today he has one of the pleasantest coun- 
trv homes in the township. Since locating there he has added ninety-seven 
acres to his original tract, making him a farm of one hundred and seventy- 
seven acres, less one acre that he donated for school No. 99. There he is 
engaged in general farming and stock raising and has been quite successful. 
He is a believer in intensive farming and thorough cultivation and is recog- 
nized as one of the careful and prudent farmer? and business men of the 
county. 

Air. Anderson and family are devout members of the Lutheran church 
and take an active interest in church work. Mr. Anderson has been a valu- 
able man in the community and has done much for the success and growth 
of the township. He has always been a factor in the development of the 
schools of his district and the building of good roads in the township. He 
is now a member of the school board, was for ten years a member of the 
board of township supervisors, and for seventeen years road overseer, having 
refused the latter position some three or four years ago. Much credit for the 
excellent condition of the roads of his district is due to his excellent judg- 
ment and constant care. 



VICTOR LARSON. 



A voung Swedish farmer of Carlos township, Douglas county, who is 
making good at his chosen life vocation is Victor Larson, who was born in 
Sweden on December 20, 1875, a son of Gustaf and Anna Larson, who were 
born and reared in Sweden, from which country they came to America in 
1883, locating in Alexandria, Minnesota, where they spent four years; then 
moved to a farm in Carlos township, where the}- established the family home. 
While living in Alexandria the father engaged in ditching and grubbing, 
part of the time on the farm of Senator Knute Nelson, which lies in that 
vicinity. The elder Larson finally bought eighty acres in section 36 of Carlos 
township, to which place he removed about 19 14, and now he owns, in all, 
one hundred and sixty acres in Douglas county. He is a member of the 
Swedish Lutheran church at Crooked Lake. He has three sons, Victor, 
Albert and Elmer. The father and sons are Republicans. 

\"ictor Larson was reared on the home farm, where he worked when a 
bov. He received a common-school education, attending school in .\lex- 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 



H7 



andria for four years, also at Belle River for some time. When starting out 
as a farmer for himself he bought forty acres in Carlos township, which he 
operated until 1913, when he sold it and purchased a forty-eight-acre farm 
of Erick Young in section 26, where he has since lived. 

On July 18, igo2, X'ictor Larson was married to Albertine Alstedt. a 
daughter of C. M. Alstedt, a native of Sweden, from which countrv he 
came to Minnesota man\' years ago, and was an early settler of Osakis town- 
ship, Douglas county. To ]\Ir. and Mrs. Larson the following children have 
been born: Ellen, Rosie, Lillie, Theodore, Russell, Marshall, Gustaf and 
Lloyd. 



ERICK HANSON. 



Erick Hanson, one of the well-to-do farmers of Alexandria township, 
Douglas count}', was born in the laen of Orebro, Sweden, March 10, 1861, 
a son of Peter E. and Maria E. (Larson) Hanson, who were born in Sweden 
and who remained residents of the land of their birth until 1869, when they 
decided to coiue to America. L'pon landing in this country thev came 
directly to Minnesota and Peter E. Hanson purchased a homestead right 
of one hundred and si.\ty acres in the northwest part of Osakis township, 
Douglas county, where he spent the rest of his life, his death occurring in 
1908. His widow still resides on the old homestead. At the time Mr. 
Hanson bought his farm there was but one-half acre cleared and there 
stood the only improvement, a small shanty. In time the farm was developed 
and improved with substantial buildings and the farm came to be recognized 
as one of the best in the township. 

Peter E. Llanson was an acti\e member of the .Swedish Lutheran church, 
as is his widow, and was one of the organizers of the local church. The 
facilities for entertaining company in those days were very limited. There 
was little but the bare necessities in the homes, and the visitors had to be 
satisfied with conditions as they found them. Yet Mr. and ]\Irs. Hanson 
made one exception to this rule, for in 1870, at a time when a student, ^A-ho 
was a teacher and preacher, was to be a guest at their humble home, they 
thought it prudent to buy a chair for the use of their guest during his stav 
with them. That was the first chair in that community and placed the Han- 
son family a little in advance of the other members of the little settlement. 
Erick Hanson still retains the chair and prizes it highly. In addition to 
his church activities, Peter E. Hanson also took much interest in local civic 



348 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

affairs and had iniicli to do with the govemment of the township. He was 
for a number of years a member of the board of supervisors and also served 
on the school board. He always took great interest in the development of 
the schools, knowing their full meaning to the children of the township. 
Before his deatii he was the owner of six hundred and forty acres of good 
land in Douglas county. He and his wife were the parents of eight children, 
Erick, Ulricka, John, August, Ed, Mary, Joel and Emanuel. The latter is 
now on the old homestead and August and Mary are deceased. In 1883 
Peter and Maria Hanson made a visit to their old home in Sweden. 

Erick Hanson was about eight years of age when his parents came to 
America and he completed his education in the pioneer schools of Douglas 
countv. Since leaving school he has by reading and close association with 
people kept well abreast of the times and is well informed on all matters of 
public interest. As a lad and young man he assisted his father on the farm 
and soon became interested in the life of a farmer. After his marriage in 
1883, he took possession of his present farm of one hundred and sixty acres 
in Alexandria township and has clearly developed and improved the same, 
his excellent farm plant including modern buildings. He is engaged in 
general farming and stock raising and has been quite successful. 

In 1883 Erick Hanson was united in marriage to Wilhelmina Lund, 
who also was born in Sweden, a daughter of Olaf and Carrie ( Hedin ) 
Lund, who located in Osakis township, Douglas county, in 1879, but in 1881 
remo\-ed to Alexandria township, where they died some years ago. Mr. 
and Mrs. Lund were the parents of nine children. Bertha, Wilhelmina, Otto, 
Louis. Carrie, Hannah, John. Martin and Qiarles. Mrs. Hanson and her 
sister Bertha did not accompany tlieir parents to America, but came in 1881. 
Louis and Charles were soldiers in the Spanish-American War. Louis was 
discharged on account of sickness, after the war, but Charles served for 
two years longer in the Philippines. Olaf Lund was a soldier in the service 
of the Swedish government before coming to the Lhiited States. 

To Erick Hanson and wife have been born eight children, Anna, Ida 
Marie, Edward Wilhelm, Beda, Mable (deceased). Paul O., Carl Fred and 
Hilding E. Paul O. Hanson is a graduate of the Gustavus Adolphus Col- 
lege at St. Peter and Edward Wilhelm Hanson is a graduate of the ITnited 
States Xa\al Acadeni}- at Annapolis and is now a lieutenant in the United 
States navv, serving on the battleship "Brooklyn". He was in the fight at 
\'era Cruz, and had a narrow escape from death at that time. 

]\Ir. and Airs. Hanson are active members of the Swedish Lutheran 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 



349 



church at Alexandria, have always taken an active interest in church work 
and are among the prominent residents of the community. Mr. Hanson 
has, in addition to his many other duties, taken a keen interest in the civic 
affairs of the township. He has served as a memijer of the Ijoard of super- 
visors, was formerly township clerk and was for twelve years the school 
clerk. He has always been particularly interested in the de\-elopment of 
the schools, knowing their full value to the state and the nation. Having 
been limited in his own schooling, he has the desire to see every child have 
the best possible training for the activities of life, and much of the success 
of the schools of his township is due to his untiring effort to place them on 
the highest possible plane. The family are highly regarded in the com- 
munity. 



NELSOX GUSTA\' NELSOX. 

N^elson Gustav X'elson, a well-known farmer of Holmes City township, 
Douglas county, was born in Sweden on February i, 1863, a son of Pehr and 
Anna (Hendrickson) X'elson, both natives of Sweden, who came with their 
family to Minnesota in 1879, locating in Holmes City township, Douglas 
county, the father buying an eighty-acre farm, two miles west of the village 
of Holmes City. He cleared most of his present farm of eighty-five acres, 
about one mile west of the village. He and his wife are the parents of 
five children, all born in Sweden, namely : Stena, X'elson G., John ( deceased ), 
Anna and Philip (deceased). Pehr Xelson, the father, was for a time 
engaged in the mercantile business at Donnelly, in the neighboring county 
of Stevens. He and his family are members of the Swedish Lutheran 
church at Holmes City, which they helped organize. 

Pehr X'elson is now past eighty-seven years old. Ijut notwithstanding 
his advanced age he is active and fairly well preserved. His wife is eighty- 
one. They are highly respected by all who know them. 

X^elson G. X^elson was sixteen years old when he accompanied the famil}- 
to America and he has l:)een engaged in farming ever since in Holmes City 
township. He owns a well-improved and productive farm of one hundred 
and sixty-three acres, lying immediately northwest of Holmes City, the 
village having been built on that farm. He bought the farm in 19 14 and is 
engaged in general farming. The place was formerly owned by John Smith, 
a pioneer. 

In 1889 Xelson G. Xelson was married to Bertha Unumb, a sister of 



350 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

P. O. Ununib, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work. Five 
chikiren have been lx)rn to Mr. and Airs. Nelson, namely: Carl, Philip, 
William. Olga, and Edna. Mr. Nelson is a Republican and has been town- 
ship chairman since 1913. He also served three years on the school board. 
He is a member of the Swedish Lutheran church at Holmes City. 



L. G. HERM.\NSON. 



L. G. Hermanson, a well-known and successful farmer of Brandon 
township, Douglas county, was born in Sweden in 1862, the son of Herman 
and Alary (Olson) Larson, further mention of whom is made in a biograph- 
ical sketch of William Hermanson on another page of this volume. 

L. G. Hermanson received his education in the public schools of Sweden 
and there grew to manhood. He continued to reside in the land of his 
nativity until he was twenty years of age, when, in 1882, he decided to 
come to America. LTpon his arrival in this country he came at once to 
Alinnesota, where he worked in various parts of the state for the first few 
months. He then went to Montana, where he worked on a steamboat on 
the Yellowstone ri\er. After some time spent in the work on the river he 
was engaged with the Northern Pacific railroad construction gang for some 
months. He then returned to Minnesota and located at Minneapolis, where 
he was engaged as a teamster for the next six or seven years, being engaged 
in work with his own team. He then decided to engage in farming, and in 
1873 came to Douglas county, where he purchased one hundred and seven 
acres, in section 12 of Brandon township, the tract at that time being wild 
land. He built a substantial frame house, the expense of which, together 
with the purchase, left him little if any cash. He had no team with which 
to assist him in the clearing and to do his farm work. These conditions 
made it necessary for him to work in the neighborhood for such farmers 
then there as were in a position to hire additional help, in order that he 
might accumulate enough money with which to purchase a team and the 
necessary farming implements. For three or four years he did considerable 
work away from home, and during that time, when not otherwise engaged, 
used his best efiforts to get his farm in shape for cultivation. During those 
three or four years he raised no crops, but devoted his time to clearing and 
in the additional work for the neighbors, in the immediate vicinity. After 
obtaining the team and the necessary farming outfit he devoted his life to 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 35 1 

general farming and stock raising on the original farm. He later sold a 
part of the place and is now the owner of some fifty acres, all imder culti- 
vation and nicely improved. He has a beautiful grove that he planted, and 
the place is kept in admirable condition. 

In 1886 L. G. Hennanson was united in marriage to Tilda Bergstrom, 
of Minneapolis, who also was born in Sweden. He and his wife are active 
members of the Swedish Mission church, Mr. Hermanson being a teacher 
in the Sunday school. He has taken much interest in local affairs and has 
served as assessor and as justice of the peace. In 1898 Mr. Hermanson 
went to Dawson, Alaska, in search of gold, but he was not successful in his 
venture and returned to his farm. He is now treasurer of the Farmers 
Local Telephone Company. 



WILLIAM F. BETTER^IAN. 

The gentleman whose name initiates this biographical review was 1>orn 
in \\'estphalia, Germany, November 18, 1880, but he prefers farming in 
Miltona township, Douglas count}-, to life in his native empire. 

^^'illiam F. Betterman is a son of William and Bertha (Krinka) Bet- 
terman, natives of Germany, where they grew up and married, and who 
emigrated to America in 18S1, locating in Peru, Illinois, where the father 
engaged in coal mining until 1906, when he came to Minnesota and bought 
eighty acres in Miltona township, Douglas county, where he has since engaged 
in farming. His wife died on April 4, 1911. To these parents the fol- 
lowing children were bom: Gustav, William F., Fred, Bertha, Charles, 
Anna, Clara, and Mattie, all of whom are still living. 

A\'illiam F. Betterman was a small child when his parents came to this 
country' and grew up and attended the high school at Peru, Illinois. He 
was married on June 17, 1914, to Helen Thurke, who was born in ^linne- 
sota, a daughter of August Thurke, who now lives in Alexandria, 'Sir. 
Thurke having come to Douglas county twenty-three years ago and bought 
land. Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Betterman, namelv : 
Henrv, Josephine, Walter, Lucy and Clarence. 

Mr. Betterman has always followed general farming. He first owned 
eighty acres in section 9 of Miltona township, which he later sold, about 
1913, and moved to one hundred and sixty acres, which his father-in-law 
owns, and, there he has since resided. He raises all kinds of grain crops 



352 DOUGLAS AKD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

adapted to this latitude and good grade stock, specializing in Poland China 
hogs. He is president of the Farmers Warehouse and Produce Companx 
(the Farmers Society of Equity), having been elected to that position on 
July 7, 1916. and he is discharging the duties of the same in an able and 
satisfacton,- manner to all concerned. He is a Republican and served for 
some time as a member of the township board, part of the time as chairman. 
He \\as township assessor in 1909. He is a member of the German Luth- 
eran church. He takes an active interest in the afifairs of his community, 
and has always been a leading force in the good roads movement in this 
section. 



HANS P. HANSON. 



The late Hans P. Hanson, one of the pioneers of this section of [Minne- 
sota, was born in Norway and died at his home in Douglas county on [May 
31, 1890. He received his education in the public schools of his native coun- 
try and there grew to manhood and married Gunhild Julseth. Some years 
after their marriage he and his wife decided to come to America. After 
landing in the United States, about fifty years ago, they came direct to 
jMinnesota and located in Goodhue county, where they remained for two 
years, at the end of which time they came over to this part of the state and 
took a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres in section 27, Brandon 
township, Douglas county. The tract at that time was for the most part 
a wild and unbroken piece of land. There were no improvements and the 
family suffered the many hardships of early pioneer life. A log cabin was 
erected, in which the family lived for a number of years. Oxen were used 
in the farm work, and in the clearing and development of the place. In 
time the rude log hut was replaced by a more modern and substantial build- 
ing, and the farm was improved with other good buildings. There 'Sir. 
Hanson engaged in general farming and stock raising until the time of his 
death. 

To Hans P. Hanson and wife thirteen children were torn, Thorson, 
Ludwig, Betsy, Martha, Halvor, Hannah, John, Marie, Ida, Peter, George 
H., Louise and Johannah, of whom Ida, Peter and Thorson are now deceased. 
The family have ever taken an active interest in the services, of the Nor- 
wegian Lutheran church of which they are members. The father had 
assisted in the organization of the local church in Brandon township and 
did much work on the building, as he was a carpenter by trade. In addition 



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DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 353 

to his Other work, Hans P. Hanson did much carpenter work in the com- 
munity and built many houses and other buildings. 

Hans P. Hanson always took much interest in local affairs, and was 
recognized as a man of much force and possessed of a high, patriotic spirit. 
He was ever ready to assist in any worthy cause that had for its purpose 
the betterment and the improvement of the township and the county. He 
served as a member of the township board for many years and was a member 
at the time of his death. He was recognized as a good business man and a 
thorough farmer, and owned at the time of his death two hundred and fifty- 
three acres, all of which was in Brandon township. 

After the death of the father the widow and children operated and 
managed the farm. A new house was erected in 1906, which adds much 
to the beaut}' and value of the place. In time the children have all married 
and gone to homes of their own, with the exception of George H. and 
Johannah, who live at home with their mother, who is now seventy-three 
years of age, her birthday being January 15. George H. Hanson, who is 
now thirty-five years of age, rents the farm, and, being possessed of much 
of his father's ability, is meeting with success in general farming and stock 
raising. He believes in thorough and systematic farming and the keeping 
of the best of stock. 



PETER EXGSTROM. 



Peter Engstrom, one of the successful and well-known farmers of Ida 
township, Douglas county, was born in Sweden on October 29, 1865, the 
son of Hendrick and Ingabor (Johnson) Johnson, natives of Sweden. 
Hendrick Johnson was a farmer and contractor and a man of prominence 
in the community in which he lived. He died in 1871 and his widow twelve 
years later was united in marriage to Oluf Lind, now deceased. Mrs. Lind 
is now living in Sweden with her daughter. She and Mr. Johnson were the 
parents of three children, Anna Sophia, John and Peter, all of whom live in 
the native land, with the exception of Peter. 

As a lad and young man Peter Engstrom did farm work and later 
worked in a factory. In 18S7 he decided that he would come to America 
and upon arriving in the United States came directly to Minnesota, where 
he worked as a farm hand for one year in Grant county. During the next 
three years he rented three hundred and twenty acres of land, and then pur- 
(23a) 



354 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

chased a liomestead right to wild land, without any improvements what- 
ever. He built a shanty, twelve by twelve feet, and devoted his time for 
the next five years to the task of clearing, improving and cultivating his 
farm. He then s^ld the place and purchased for nine dollars an acre two 
hundred and eighty acres near \Mieaton, which farm was also all wild land. 
He later built a large house and barn and continued to farm the place for 
the next four years, at the end of which time he sold it for thirty dollars 
an acre. He then, in 1903, moved to Douglas count}' and purchased one 
hundred and sixty acres in section 8 of Ida township. The farm had fair 
buildings at that time, but Mr. Engstrom has done much in the way of 
improvement. He now has a splendid two-story frame-house that is sur- 
rounded by a beautiful grove. The barn is fifty-eight by sixty-four feet, 
with a staA-e silo, fourteen by thirty feet, with a five-foot concrete pit. The 
house is supplied with acetylene lights and a good furnace, and has about 
every modern convenience. Some years after coming to Douglas countv 
Mr. Engstrom added another eighty acres to his farm and is now the 
owner of two hundred and forty acres. 

In 1893 Peter Engstrom was united in marriage to Gerda Anderson, 
also a native of Sweden, who came to the United States as a young woman. 
To this union nine children have been born, Fredolph, Edgar, Elvin, Gerda, 
Oliver, Edwin, Clifford, Leslie and Gladys. Fredolph Engstrom took the 
course in agriculture at the Uni-\'ersity of Minnesota. Edgar Engstrom is 
a teacher in the schools of Douglas county. The family are members of 
the Swedish Mission church, of which Mr. Engstrom is a deacon and the 
church treasurer. 

Peter Engstrom has had an acti\-e and useful life and has accomplished 
much. He has always been progressixe in his methods and believes in con- 
ducting his farm along advanced lines. He believes in intensive farming 
and in the most thorough cultivation of the soil, and he is today recognized 
as one of the well-informed and successful farmers of the township. He is 
public spirited, has ever taken an active interest in local affairs and is a 
strong advocate of the best schools possible. In the schools, as well as in 
public improvements, he sees the success of the farming community of the 
state. While a resident of Traverse county he was assessor of Clifton 
township for a number of 3'ears. .Since locating in Douglas county he has 
been a member of the school board of his township and it is needless to say 
that the schools ha^•e received the very best service that he could give them. 
His own early education having been neglected, he feels that the children of 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 355 

Ida township are entitled to better ad\antages than he had. He has seen 
to it that the children of his own family receive the best education possible. 
He is interested in the Creamery Association at Garfield and has ever given 
of his time and ability to the growth and development of the township and 
the countv. He and his family are held in the highest regard by all. 



GEORGE JEFFREY. 



George Jeffrey, a well-known and successful farmer of Osakis town- 
ship, Douglas county, was born at Rockford, Iowa, in 1875, the son of John 
and Rose rColligan) Jeffrey, natives of the Isle of Man and of the state 
of Wisconsin, respectively. At the age of thirteen John Jeffrey came to 
the United States with his parents. They located in Wisconsin and there 
he grew to manhood and assisted with the work on the fami. x\t the out- 
break of the Civil AA'ar. he enlisted in a company of one of the regiments of 
Wisconsin volunteer infantry, and served until the close of the war. After his 
discharge he located at Rockford, Iowa, where he later became a farmer, in 
which vocation he engaged until a few years ago. when he retired to Rock- 
ford, where he now lives. When the son George was but a child his mother 
died and Mr. Jeffrey later married Erilla Lorenze, who is still living. 

As a farmer and stockman, John Jeffrey -was successful and was recog- 
nized as one of the progressive men of the community. He and his family 
are members of the Congregational church and are active in churcli work. 
Mr. Jeffrey takes much interest in the Grand Army of the Republic, of which 
he is an active member. 

Coming to the United States as a mere lad and a stranger to the social 
and business conditions of the country, John Jeffrey had a hard struggle 
during his early residence here. The territor\' where his parents had settled 
was new and thev had to endure the inany hardships of the pioneer. Yet he 
grew to be a voung man of sterling worth and true to his adopted country, 
and gave several years of his young life to the preservation of the Union. 

George Jeffrey received his education in the public schools of Rock- 
ford and after having completed his school work he engaged in farming on 
his father's fatm, where he remained tintil the spring of 1906, when he pur- 
chased his present farm of one hundred and twenty-four acres in Osakis 
township, Douglas county. Under the careful training of his father, George 
Jeffrey learned the secrets of successfuL farming, and when he came to his 



3Sf> DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

own farm he was prepared to meet the many difficulties that had to be 
encountered. Here he is engaged in general farming and dairying and is 
meeting with success. He belie\'es in intensive farming and in the keeping 
of the best of cattle. 

In 1896 George Jeffrey was united in marriage to Jennie Beaver, of 
his home township, and to this union was born one child, Verl. After the 
death of Mrs. Jennie Jeffrey. Mr. Jefifrey was united in marriage in Novem- 
ber, 19 1 3, to Carrie Swartz. 



H. A. GULSON. 



Among the many well-known and successful natives of Norway who 
are engaged in farming in Afoe township, Douglas county, few are better 
known than is H. A. Gulson, who was born on January 26, 1852, the son of 
Amund and Georn (Halvorson) Gulson, who were also born in Norway. 
The father was reared on a farm and as a young man engaged in farming 
in his native country. He and his family continued to live there until 1864, 
when they decided to come to America. Upon their arrival in this country 
they proceeded to Iowa, where they located in Winneshiek county, and 
where they lived for six years, after which they came to Minnesota and lo- 
cated in Moe township, Douglas county. Here Mr. Gulson homesteaded 
one hundred and sixty acres of land in sections 13 and 24, the place where 
H. A. Gulson now lives, and which was at that time all heavy timber land. 
It required the hardest kind of work and the utmost planning on the part of 
Mr. and Mrs. Gulson to clear their farm and feed and clothe the little fam- 
ily. There were still some Indians in the county at that time, but these were 
for the most part friendly. In time the place was cleared and substantial 
improvements erected and there Mr. Gulson engaged in farming and stock 
raising, until the time of his death. He and his wife were devout members 
of the Norwegian Lutheran church and were active in church work. They 
were the parents of two children, Rande, who is the wife of Halvor Skean, 
and H. A. Gulson. the subject of this sketch. 

H. A. Gulson received his earliest educational training in the public 
schools of his native land and completed his education in the schools of 
Iowa and Douglas county. He grew to manhood on the home farm, where 
as a lad and voung man he assisted his father with the farm work. As a 
lad he devoted much of his spare time to trapping and while on one of these 



DOUGLAS A\n GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. ^:;7 

expeditions he was followed by six canoes full of Indians, who did their 
best to catcli him. With much haste and skill he landed his boat on the 
bank of the lake and made good his escape. 

During his early days of farming, H. A. Gulson was associated with 
his father, but in 1S74 he took a homestead in Trail county, North Dakota, 
where he remained for two years, after which he sold the tract and returned 
to the home in Moe township, where he has since resided. He now owns 
one hundred and sixty-three acres of land. He has placed all the present 
substantial buildings on the place and has done much in the way of develop- 
ment. In addition to his work as a farmer and stock raiser, JMr. Gulson has 
for the past forty years done much carpenter work in the neighborhood. 

In 1876 H. A. Gulson was united in marriage to Gonder Walstad, and 
to this union six children have been born, Albert R.. JMarlin G., Gena, 
Adolph, Helmer and Agnes. The Gulsons are members of the Lutheran 
church, of which 'Sir. Gulson has ser\-ed as trustee. 



CHRISTIAX A. LUND. 



Christian A. Lund, a successful business man of Nelson, was born in 
Denmark, on July i, 1872, the son of M. E. and Eliza (Wetzman) Lund, 
natives of Denmark, where they haAC always made their home. Mr. Lund 
was for many years a farmer, but is now employed as a timekeeper for a 
factory at Aarhus, Denmark. As a young man he served as a soldier in 
the Danish infantry. He and his wife are the parents of nine children 
Christian A., Bergina, Thora, Ida, Andres, Sophie, Carl W^ilhelm and Otto 
W. The family are members of the Lutheran church. 

Christian A. Lund received his education in Denmark, other than what 
he received in one term of school in the United States. In Denmark he 
learned buttermaking at which he worked for four years in his native 
country. In 1892 he came to America and located at Osakis, where he 
worked for two years as a farm hand. He then took a course for experi- 
enced buttermakers at the state experiment station. He then returned to 
farm work and was thus engaged until September, 1894, when he took 
charge of the Nelson creamery and operated it until December 3, 1904, when 
he returned to Denmark, where he remained during that winter. On his 
return to Nelson he devoted three years to the breeding of draft horses, giv- 
ing his entire attention to that business. In 1909 he purchased the feed 



358 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

store at Nelson, which he conducted in connection with his horse stable. In 
1914 he sold his horses and de\'oted his undivided attention to the feed store 
and grinding. 

Mr. Lund has always taken an active interest in local affairs and has 
served on the council of his home town. He is a member of the Knights 
of the Maccabees and of the Danish Brotherhood of America. He attends 
the Danish Lutheran church at Nelson. 



ERNEST MEISSNER. 



Ernest Meissner, a well-known and* successful farmer of Millerville 
township, Douglas county, was born in Germany on November 13, 1857, 
the son of Gottlieb and Fredericka (Haberland) Meissner, also natives of 
Germany. 

As a young man, Gottlieb Meissner engaged in farming in the Father- 
land, where he and his family lived until 1869, when they decided to seek a 
home in America. Upon landing in this country they came directly to 
Minnesota, and here located in Millerville township, Douglas county, where 
Mr. Meissner purchased the homestead right in one himdred and sixty acres 
of land. This farm he developed and improved and there he successfully 
engaged in general farming. There he and his wife spent the rest of their 
lives, he dying in May, 1890. at the age of sixty years, and his widow, Janu- 
ary II, 1916, at the age of eighty-two years, she having been born on May 
-3' 1833. They were the parents of eight children, Ernest, Fred, Fredricka, 
Herman, William, Amelia, Henr\^ and Mary. Mr. Meissner was recog- 
nized as a systematic and thorough farmer and he and his wife were held in 
high esteem by all. 

?>nest Meissner received his education in the public schools of Ger- 
man v, and there spent his boyhood life. As a lad he came to the United 
States with his parents and assisted his father with the work on the farm 
and remained with his father on the home farm, assisting in the manage- 
ment of the place until his father's death. In 1881 he purchased one hun- 
dred and eighty acres of his father in Millerville township, and is now tlie 
owner of four hundred acres, all of which is well under cultivation and nicely 
improved. The old home place was for the most part wild land at the time 
he made the. purchase, and he has improved the farm with new buildings 
and made manv other valuable and attractive improvements. The house 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 359 

was built in 18S9 and the barn about eighteen years ago. Mr. Meissner 
is engaged in general farming and stock raising. During the summer he 
keeps many head of cattle and is interested in Shorthorns. 

On June 21, 1881, Ernest Meissner was united in marriage to Caroline 
Buse and to this union eight children have been born: Ernest, William, 
Amanda, Rudolph, Mary, Minnie, Lesetta and Bertha. The family have 
long been prominent in the social and religious life of the community and 
are highlv respected. Mr. Meissner takes much interest in local affairs 
and is a strong advocate of good roads and the best of schools. Having 
been educated in a country which puts much stress on both, he has a high 
appreciation of their great value in the development and the substantial life 
of the communit^■. His son, Rudolph Meissner, is the only son now at 
home and helps in the management of the place. 



E^IIL PETERSON. 



There is no better farmer in Ida township, Douglas county, than Emil 
Peterson, who was born in Sweden, July 2^. 1849. He is a son of Peter 
and Brita (Nelson) Anderson. (He dropped the family name upon com- 
ing to America.) His parents grew up in their native land and married 
there. They brought their family to this country in 1869, landing at Quebec, 
and coming on directly to Minnesota, the father taking up a homestead in 
Ida township, Douglas county, developing one hundred and . sixty acres, 
which, however, he sold a few years later, and spent the rest of his life 
among his children. He belonged to the Swedish Lutheran church of Ida 
township. His death occurred in October, 1893, when well advanced in 
years, his birth having occurred in 1821. He and his wife had six children, 
Emil, Anna, Gustave, Xels (deceased), Carl and Man,-. 

Emil Peterson grew up in Sweden where he attended the public schools. 
He was married on December 31, 1875, to Elricka Noren, who came to 
Minnesota, about 1870, her father, Erick Noren, taking up a homestead in 
Ida township, Douglas county. Of his large family of twelve children, 
only two are now living, Ulricka and Hilma. To Mr. and Mrs. Peterson 
the following children have been born: Ellen, Carl, Selma, Julius, Elmer 
and Ida, who are married, and Signe, William, Edna and Ebba, single and 
at home. 

Emil Peterson was a young man, single, when he came to America, 



360 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

and since coming here he has devoted his attention to general farming. In 
rS/o he took up a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres in section 18 
of Ida township, where he is still living. He cleared the place, which was 
mostly in timber, and put all the improvements on the same. He has 
worked hard and has succeeded as a general farmer, and also raises a fine 
grade of Duroc-Jersey hogs. He has a good residence and numerous con- 
venient outbuildings. He is a stockholder in the creamery and in the ele- 
vator at Garfield. 

Politically, Mr. Peterson is independent and has been a member of the 
township board for a number of years. He has long taken an active inter- 
est in public affairs, and during his residence here of some forty-six years, 
has been influential in the movements having to do with the general welfare 
and growth of his township and county.' Pie is one of the worthy pioneers 
of this section and is highly respected. 



CHARLES MELIN. 

Charles Melin, one of the well-known and successful residents of Ida 
township, Douglas county, was born in INlichigan, the son of Andrew and 
Albertina (Engstrom) Melin, who were born in Sweden and there received 
their education in the common public scliools, grew to manhood and woman- 
hood and were married. They later came to the United States and after 
their arival in this country located in Michigan, where Andrew Melin was 
engaged in the copper mines for some years. He then came to Minnesota 
and homesteaded eighty acres of land in Carlos township, which he sold 
some years later and then moved to Leaf Valley township, where he pur- 
chaser one hundred and sixty acres of land in section 35, which he developed 
and improved and_ there he made his home until his death in 1908, at the 
age of seventy-four years. His widow died in 1910, at the age of sixty-six 
years. They were the parents of six children, Charles, Albert, Victor, 
Hannah. Axel and Sophia. Mr. and Mrs. Melin were active members of 
the Swedish Lutheran church, took much interest in church work and were 
prominent in the social life of the community. 

Charles Melin received his education in the public schools of Douglas 
county and grew to manhood on the home farm. As a lad and young man 
he assisted his father with the development and improvement of the old 
homestead. He was united in marriage to Hilma Noren, daughter of Eric 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 361 

and Sarah Xoren, of Douglas county, natives of Sweden, and to tliis union 
the following- children ha\'e been born: Arthur, Walter, Axel, Oscar, 
Reuben. Arvid, Inez, Herbert and Kermit. 

Charles Melin is todav the owner of eighty acres of excellent land in 
section 5 of Ida township, which he has developed and improved until he 
has one of the best farms in the township. In addition to his farm work, 
Mr. Melin is the carrier on a rural route out of Garfield and has held 
the position for a number of years, having given splendid service, satisfac- 
torv both to the government and to the patrons of the route. 



JOHN L. STRANDBERG. 

One of the substantial farmers of foreign birth who has developed a 
fine farm in Alexandria township, Douglas county, is J. L. Strandberg, who 
was born in Sweden on November 25, 1866. He is a son of Carl and Lena 
(Johnson) Strandberg, both of whom were nati\-es of Sweden. Carl 
Strandberg came to Minnesota with his family in 1888 and located in Carlos 
township, Douglas county, where he has lived ever since. He and his family 
are earnest members of the Swedish Lutheran church. Carl Strandberg 
was married twice. By the first marriage he had three children, C. A., 
INIatilda and Edward, and Amanda and John L. by the second marriage. 

John L. Strandberg received his education in the public schools of 
Sweden and as a young man worked at farm labor. In 1888 he came with 
his father to Minnesota and was located for a short time in Carlos town- 
ship. Douglas county. In 1891 he moved to Alexandria township, where 
he and his wife own one hundred and twenty acres of fine farming land. In 
igi3 he put up new buildings on the place, which he has improved in vari- 
ous ways. There he carries on a general system of farming and stock rais- 
ing and is also interested in dairying. He devotes a good deal of attention 
to the breeding of thoroughbred Guernsey cattle, in which line he has met 
with considerable success. 

In 1903 John L. Strandberg was married to Emma Erickson. a daugh- 
ter of Andrew P. Erickson, and to this union seven children have 
been lx)rn, Rose, Harold, Vera, Earl, Alvin, Winfred and Duris. 
Andrew P. Erickson was born in Sweden, February 12, 1844, and 
died at his home in Alexandria township, Douglas county, on December 31, 
1900. His wife was Emma F'. Larson, who was born in Sweden in 1844. 



S<i2 DOUGLAS AXn GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

To that union were born six children, those besides Airs. Strandberg being 
Charles A., Theodore A., Hilda A., lillen J. and Rosella C, all of whom are 
living except Charles A. and Rosella C. Andrew Erickson came with his 
family to America in 1868 and coming directly to Minnesota, homesteaded 
one hundred and sixty acres of land in Alexandria township, Douglas 
count}-, where he spent the remainder of his life. 

Air. Strandberg and his family are adherents of the Swedish Lutheran 
church, and take an acti\-e interest in the affairs of that congregation. Poli- 
tically, Mr. Strandberg is a Republican. 



JOHX HAMMER. 



John Hammer, a well-known farmer and stockman of Moe township, 
Douglas county, was born on the farm in that township on which he is still 
living, October 9, 1880, the son of Ole and Baroline (.Vie) Hammer, natives 
of Norway. Ole Hammer came to Minnesota as a young man and home- 
steaded one hundred and sixty acres of land in section 17 of Moe township, 
Douglas .county. On his arrival here he had but little money and it became 
necessary for him to walk to St. Cloud to obtain work. He did some work 
in the way of developing the farm that he had homesteaded, and after seven 
}ears of residence in this country he returned to his native land and was 
there married. Soon after his marriage he returned to the land of his adop- 
tion with his bride and here took up his residence on his homestead. He 
developed and improved the tract and was successfully engaged in general 
farming and stock raising. He later added to his original tract until he 
became the owner of about three hundred and twenty acres of excellent land 
in the township, where he spent his last da)'S. 

Ole Hammer and wife were the parents of three children, Mette, who 
died at the age of twentv-two years; John and Johannes, the latter of whom 
died in infancw Mr. Hammer was an active member of the Lutheran 
church at \^'est Aloe, as is his widow, and took an active part in church 
work. He was always active in local civic affairs and was for many years a 
member of the township board of supervisors. His widow is still living at 
the old home. 

John Hammer received his education in the public schools of Aloe town- 
ship and later attended school at Fergus Falls. He grew to manhood on the 



DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 36^ 

home farm, a valued assistant to his father and since the latter"s death has 
continued to farm the home place, engaged in general farming and stuck 
raising, in which he has been ([uite successful, being recognized as one of the 
progressive young farmers of that neighborhood. 



O. T. BURROS. 



O. J. Burros, a successful farmer of Brandon township, Douglas 
county, was born in Norway on April iS, 1870, son and only child of 
Christian and Margaret ( ^lickelstadther ) Solberg, nati\es of Norway, 
where the father died man}^ years ago. Christian Solberg was engaged in 
farming and was well known in the community in which he lived. After 
his death his widow- with her son came to the United States in 1872. They 
located in Goodhue county, this state, where they remained for three years, 
at the end of which time they came to Douglas county. Here the mother 
married J. T. Burros, and since that time the subject of this sketch has 
borne the name of urros. J. T. Burros was the owner of eighty acres of 
land in section 18 of Brandon tovrnship. and it was on that farm that his 
wife died in January, 1901. 

O. J. Burros received his education in the public schools of Brandon 
township and there grew to manhood, where as a lad and young man he 
assisted with the work on the farm. He was married in May, 1898, to 
Mary Dahl, the daughter of Andrew Dahl, a pioneer of the county, and to 
this union the following children have been born : Irene, Clara, Ethel, Bert, 
George. JNfartin, Lawrence and Ernest. ]\Ir. and Mrs. Burros are active 
members of the Norwegian Lutheran church, prominent in church work, 
and are held in high regard by all who know them. 

As a young man Mr. Burros engaged in farming and later purchased a 
farm in section 18 of Brandon township, where he is engaged in general 
farming and stock raising. He has a well-developed farm and the same is 
well improved, the later improvements having been erected by him. In 
addition to his many duties on the farm, Mr. Burros has always taken an 
active interest in the local affairs of the township and has done much for the 
de\elopment of the community. He is a stockholder in Brandon creamerv. 
to which he has given his most earnest support, and also belongs to the 
Farmers Society of Equity. 



364 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

CHARLES M. LONG, M. D. 

The medical profession in Douglas county has no abler exponent than 
Dr. C AI. Long, of Osakis, universally liked by all who come in contact 
with him. He possesses excellent judgment of men and things, well bal- 
anced hx knowledge and experience; has studied hard, and has worked dili- 
gently for the large success which has come to him through the many years 
of his practice in this section of the state. 

C. ]\[. Long was born in Richland county. Wisconsin, near Madison, 
the capital city of that state. He is a son of Samuel and Frances Herndon 
( Ballon ) Long, the father a nati^■e of Washington county, Indiana, and 
the mother of Louisville, Kentucky. Samuel Long was one of the early 
pioneers of Richland county, Wisconsin, where he secured a valley farm, 
which he improved; later moving to the village of Gotham, which he laid 
out, having purchased the site. He sold many lots in the new town and 
continued to reside there the remainder of his life, passing away at the 
advanced age of ninety j^ears. His family consisted of eight children, namely: 
Mary Catherine, the eldest; John M., who was a soldier in the Union army 
during the Civil War, and who died at \'icksburg, Mississippi, in 1864, and 
was buried in the national cemetery; Charles M., the subject of this review; 
Melissa Caroline, now deceased; Albert H., who is practicing law at Prairie 
du Chien, Wisconsin, and Alice A., residing at the old home in Wisconsin. 

Dr. Charles M. Long received his early education in the common 
schools of Richland county, Wisconsin, after which he began life for him- 
self hv teaching, when only seventeen years of age. In 1870 he entered 
Platteville College, at Platteville, Wisconsin, from which institution he was 
graduated in 1873. He then resumed teaching and served as principal of 
the school at Tempealeau, Wisconsin, for one year; then held a similar 
position at Prescott, Wisconsin, for two years, after which he took charge 
of the union schools at LeSueur, Minnesota, which he graded and improved 
in manv ways. Resigning that position in 1876, he decided to enter the 
medical profession, and with that end in view entered Rush Medical Col- 
lege at ("hicago, from which he was graduated in 1878. Immediately after 
his graduation Doctor Long located for the practice of his profession in 
Osakis, which locality was but little improved and sparsely settled, the vil- 
lage itself containing but one hundred inhabitants, and here, in this frontier 
community, he experienced all the vicissitudes of the pioneer doctor. Here 
he has remained until the present time, his name having become a household 



DOUGLAS AXD GRAXT COUNTIES, MIXXESOTA. 365 

word throughout Douglas count}-, and he has enjoyed a large practice all 
the while, \bout 1880 Doctor Long was appointed on the surgical staff of 
James J- Hill, on which he served for over twenty years. He is the oldest 
practitioner within a radius of twenty miles of Osakis, and is the only phy- 
sician left of those formerly practicing in this locaHty, which includes the 
cities of Alexandria. Glenwood. Parkers Prairie. Long Prairie and Sauk 
Center. 

Doctor Long was married in 1894 to Edna Earl Brock, who was born and 
reared in the Shenandoah ^'alley, A'irginia, near the town of Stanton. Poli- 
tically, the Doctor is a Republican, and was chairman of the Republican 
convention which met at Alexandria in 1888, where he was tmanimouslv 
nominated as the party's candidate for representative to the Legislature. 
The practice of the pioneer physicians was fraught with many disad\-ant- 
ages and difificulties. The roads were so poor that often only a part of the 
distance could be driven, the remainder having to be walked through the 
woods or through mud and water; and if winter, waded through snow 
drifts. Li those days doctors were taught to do faithful service and render 
honest practice without money and without price. 'Slany times after an all 
night's perplexing job, the only pay coming was the remark : "1 have no 
money, Doctor, but there will be a mansion laid up for you." 

Doctor Long's long experience as a medical practitioner in this section 
has given him a wide range of information concerning conditions surround- 
ing the practice hereabout and in an advisor}- capacity he has rendered valu- 
able assistance in the compilation of the chapter relating to the medical pro- 
fession in the historical section of this work : a service highly appreciated and 
gratefully acknowledged by the compilers of the same. 



BYROX E. HO\\'E. 



Among the influential and substantial farmers of Osakis township. 
Douglas county, is B. E. Howe, who is a native of the great Empire state, 
his birth having occurred on September 4, 1856, at \\'atertown. Xew York. 
He is a son of Xorman and Dorothy (Richardson) Howe, both of whom 
were natives of Jefferson county, Xew York. The father was a farmer. 

Byron E. Howe received his education in the public schools of Lewis 
county, X'ew York, and as a young man taught in the schools of that county. 
In 1892 he moved to X'ebraska and engaged in farming in Adams county, 



366 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

that State, for seventeen years. While living in Nebraska he taught school 
one term. In 1909 he came to Minnesota and purchased one hundred and 
sixty acres of land in Osakis township, Douglas county, and lived on that 
farm for three years. In 19 12 he bought a farm consisting of one hundred 
and sixty acres in section z-j of Osakis township, where he is now living. 
He has made many and substantial improvements on this place, having 
erected practically all of the buildings which are now on the place. There 
he is engaged in general farming and stock raising, and that he has met with 
success is attested by the fact that his is one of the test improved and most 
highly cultivated farms in the township. He makes a specialty of breeding 
thoroughbred live stock, such as Shorthorn cattle and Poland China hogs. 

In 1 88 1 Byron E. Howe was married to Mary Newsham, a daughter 
of Charles and Sarah (Barton) Xewsham. Mr. Howe is a Republican and 
takes an active interest in all public matters pertaining to the general welfare 
of his communitv. He is a member of the Alodern Woodmen of America. 



EDW.\RD T. RISBRUDT. 

Edward T. Risbrudt, one of the best-known and most progressive mer- 
chants of .\shby, Grant county, former recorder of that village and also 
actiA-ely interested in agriculture and in real-estate, is a native son of Minne- 
sota and has lived in this state all his life. He was born on a pioneer farm 
in St. Olaf township, in the neighboring county of Otter Tail, July 26, 1875. 
son of Torkel E. Risbrudt, one of the early settlers of that section of the 
state, a very interesting narrative of whose long and useful connection with 
that section is contained in John ^^'. Mason's recently published "History of 
Otter Tail County," a \-aluab1e companion iniblication to this volume. 

Upon the completion of the course in the jjublic schools in the neigh- 
borhood of his boyhood home, Edward T. Risbrudt attended Park Region 
College at Fergus Falls and then continued his labors on the home farm until 
the fall of 1898, when he went to Ashby, where, in association with J. O. D. 
Madland, he built a store building and on March 19, 1899, opened a general 
store there, under the firm name of ]\Iadland & Risbrudt, which arrangement 
continued until September 25, 1903. when he bought his partner's interest in 
the concern and conducted it akine for a couple of months, at the end of 
which time he sold a half interest, in December, 1903, to O. T. Foss, the 
tirm continuing under the firm name of Risbrudt & Foss until on October 



DOUCLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 367 

3. 1908. since which time Mr. Rishrudt has operated the store alone and has 
heen very successful. In 1910 .Mr. Risbrudt lost his .store and all its c<:)ntents 
by lire, but with characteristic energ}- he lost no time in replacing the loss 
and was out of business but nineteen days. In addition to his general mer- 
cantile business he also is giving considerable attention to agriculture and to 
the local real-estate business. He for years has given a good citizen's atten- 
tion to local civic affairs and served as recorder of the village until the pres- 
sure of his personal business compelled him to decline further public service. 
On August 28, 1906, Edward T. Risbrudt was united in marriage to 
Sophia Larson and to this union three children have been born, Ruth Lorine, 
born on February 20, 1909; Ella Marie, August 20, 1912, and Cora Georgene, 
November 26, 19 15. The Risbrudts have a pleasant home in the village of 
Ashby and take a proper part in the various social activities of their home 
town, as well as in all movements designed to advance the welfare of their 
communitv. Mr. Rislirudt is a member of the local lodge of the Modern 
Woodmen of America. 



AXTOX HAUGLIE. 



Anton Hauglie, one of the well-known and prominent farmers of ^loe 
township, Douglas county, was born in Norway on October 21,, 1870, the 
son of Johannes and Bertha (Olson) Hauglie, also natives of Norway, who 
continued to live in the land of their nativity until 1891. ilr. Hauglie was 
a shoemaker and rendered long years of service in that line. Upon landing 
in the United States in 1891, he and his wife came directly to Minnesota 
and located at Evansville, Douglas county, where they both died the follow- 
ing vear. Thev were the parents of the following children : Karen, Sissel, 
Lars, Ole, Christian, Johan, Anton and Clara. Mr. and Mrs. Hauglie were 
active members of the Norwegian Lutheran church and took much interest 
in church work. 

-\nton Hauglie received his education in the common schools of Nor- 
wav and there grew to manhood. As a young man he learned the shoe- 
maker's trade, at which he worked with his father for some years. In 1888 
he decided that he would come to America, and after landing in the United 
States came directly to Minnesota and located in Moe township, Douglas 
countv. After remaining there for a year he went to North Dakota, where 
he worked as a farm hand and did threshing in Richland county. In 1899 
he started farming for himself in 'Sloe township, Douglas county, and is now 



368 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

the owner of two hundred acres of excellent land. The farm is improved 
Avith substantial buildings, a part of them having been placed there bv Mr. 
Hauglie, and there he is engaged in general farming and stock raising, in 
Avhich he has been quite successful. He is a firm believer in intensive farm- 
ing and in the thorough cultivation of the soil. He keeps high-grade stock, 
Avhich receives his careful attention. 

.\nton Hauglie was united in marriage to ^latilda Sophia Olson, daugh- 
ter of Sven Olson, a well-known and successful resident of the countv. To 
this union the following children have been born: James S., Henry B., 
Mildred A., Rudolph C, Esther V., Minnie J., Sidney William, Florence E. 
and Arnold J. ]\lr. and Mrs. Hauglie are active members of the Lutheran 
church and have always taken much interest in church work. They have 
long been prominent in the social and religious life of the community in 
which they li\e and are held in the highest regard by all who know them. 
For man}- }'ears Air. Hauglie served as a member of the board of trustees 
of the local church. 

Anton Hauglie has always taken a keen interest in the civic life of the 
community and has ever given his assistance to all projects that had a ten- 
dency to make better and more prosperous the home community. He is 
independent in politics and served for six years as a member of the town- 
ship board of supervisors, in which office he rendered admirable service. 



HENRY DIMENT. 



From the Badger state came Henry Diment, for many years, a farmer 
and well-known citizen of Brandon township, Douglas county, who is now 
"sleeping the sleep of the just," after a long and upright life, fraught with 
no little good to his neighbors and friends. He was born in Wisconsin, and 
his death occurred in Douglas county, Minnesota. He grew up on his 
farm and when voung came to Douglas county, where he married Clara 
Holte, whose death occurred about 191 o. To these parents the following 
children were born : Louis, who is the eldest ; Emma, second in order of 
birth: ^Minnie, who married Carl Bye: Edwin, who married Minnie Winkjer, 
and Carl. 

Henry Diment owned a good farm of two hundred and seventy acres 
in Brandon township, on which he carried on general farming and stock 
raising successfully, having cleared a large portion of the land. He was one 




ym. AND MRS. IIKNUY DIMEX 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 360 

of the early settlers there and one of the most successful farmers of his 
township. He was of Scandinavian descent and a memljer of the Swedish 
Lutlieran church of 'Sloe township. He put ail the improvements on the 
farm as it now stands. The place is well located three and one-half miles 
northeast of Brandon. Since his death his son, Louis Diment, the eldest 
child, has had charge of the place and is looking after the family's welfare 
in general. He has kept the land in good tilth and has been successful as a 
general farmer and stock raiser. He has purchased the interest of part of 
the heirs, owning that portion of the homestead that includes the buildings. 
He owns sixty acres. He was born on the old home place on Julv i8, 1887. 
He is unmarried and his sister Emma keeps house for him. Louis Diment 
is regarded as one of the most enterprising of Douglas countv's young 
farmers. Politically, he is independent. He attends the Xorwegian Lutheran 
church. • 



HEXRY O. AIYHR. 



Henry O. Alyhr, a well-known and successful farmer of Holmes Citv 
township, Douglas county, was born in Douglas county on April 25, 1880, 
the son of Peter O. and Hannah H. ( Stranvold) Myhr. 

■ Peter O. INIyhr was born in Xorway on Jime II, 1854, the son of Ole 
P. and Julia ( Ingebrightson ) Alyhr. both natives of that countrv. The 
family were farmers in their nati\-e country and well known in the com- 
munity in which they lixed. In i8fi6 Ole P. Alyhr and family came to 
America and located in ^^'innebago county, Illinois, where the^- remained 
until 1872, when they came to ]\Iinnesota, the father purchasing land near 
Brandon, which he developed and improved and where he engaged in gen- 
eral farming and stock raising for many years. He later retired to Evans- 
ville, where he died some years later. The widow after the death of her 
husband, made her home with her son, Peter O. Alyhr, until her death some 
years ago. Ole P. Myhr and wife were the parents of three children. Peter 
O., Caroline and Alary. Caroline Alyhr married Ole Kron and Alary Alyhr 
married the Rev. Christian Sogstad. 

Peter O. Alyhr received his education in the schools of Illinois and 
Douglas county. Soon after completing his schooling he engaged in farm- 
ing near Brandon. At first he lived on rented land -and later was the owner 
of several farms. In 1891 he located on his present farm of one hundred 
(24a) 



370 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

and seventy acres in Holmes City township. He was married in 1870 to 
Hannah H. Stranvokl a native of Norway who came to the United States 
with her parents and to this union the following children have been born: 
Ragna, Henry O., Albert, Helga (deceased), Helga Percilla and Martin. 

Henry O. Myhr received his education in the public schools of Douglas 
countv and at Farwe.ll. As a lad he lived at home and assisted his father 
with the work on the farm, and at the age of seventeen, he went to live with 
his grandfather Stranvold, since which time he has continued to live on the 
farm. The grandfather died some years ago, while the grandmother makes 
her home on the old homestead. Henry O. ]\Iyhr has purchased one-half 
the farm, but operates the entire place, where he is engaged in general farm- 
ing and stock raising, in which he has been quite successful. He is espe- 
cially interested in the breeding of Shorthorn cattle and has many fine 
specimens of that breed. 

On May 30, 1902, Henrv O. Myhr was united in marriage to Tillie 
Oletta Femrite, who was born in Holmes City township, on April 28. 1882, 
the daughter of S. O. Femrite, a pioneer of that township. To this union 
the following children have been born : Sarah Pauline, Hilda Geline, Ruben 
Bennett, Martha Janette, Harold Thorpin and Mary Selvine. The family 
and members of the Norwegian Lutheran church and take much interest in 
church work, being prominent in the social and religious life of the town- 
ship. Mr. Myhr has always taken much interest in the civic life of the 
community and has ser\'ed six years as a member of the school board. He 
is interested in the Holmes City creamery as well as the local Mutual Fire 
Insurance Company^ 

Carl Albert Myhr was born on his Grandfather Stranvold's farm in 
Holmes City township on June 9, 1887. He received his schooling in the 
public schools of the township and remained at home until the time of his 
marriage. He then purchased eighty acres of land near Oscar Lake church, 
where he remained for two years, at the end of which time he sold the place 
and removed to St. Louis county, Minnesota, where he remained for one 
year, after which he returned to Holmes City township and there rented z 
farm for two years. He then obtained forty acres of his father and on this 
latter farm he has made many improvements to the buildings, as well a 
having done much in the way of general development. 

Carl Albert Mvhr was united in marriage on November 24, 1909, to 
Anna S. Simonson, of Holmes City township, who was born in Ben Wade 
township, Pope county, this state, a daughter of Ingebright Simonson, a 



DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 37I 

pioneer of Holmes City township. ^Ir. Myhr and wife are active in the 
work of the Norwegian Lutheran church and are prominent in the social 
activities of the community. Mr. ]\Iyhr is interested in the Hohnes City 
Fire Insurance Company and takes a keen interest in the civic affairs of tlie 
township. 



lOHX E. SAXSTEAD. 



Xo more progressive and painstaking agriculturaUst can be found in 
Ida township, Douglas county, than John E. Sanstead, who was born in 
Sweden on April 17, 1864. He is a son of Gustav and Carrie Sanstead. both 
natives of Sweden, where they grew up and were married. There the father 
learned the blacksmith's trade under his father, which he followed there until 
emigrating to America in 1869. He worked for his brother. Andrew, who 
owned a blacksmith shop at Garfield, ^Minnesota, remaining with him for 
some time. In 1870 he took up a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres 
in Ida township, nearly all timbered land, on which he built a small log house. 
In 1 87 1 he sent for his family, who had remained in the old country. They 
came to Benson, this state, the western terminus of the railroad, and after 
some difficulty found their way on to Douglas county by stage. After man)- 
hardships the father developed a good farm and established a comfortable 
home here. His wife died in 1873 ^^ the age of fifty-two years. About 
1875 he married Hannah Johnson. He remained on his farm until 1889 
when he retired from active life, selling the place to his stepson, F. O. John- 
son. A while after he lived in Garfield, where his death occurred in 1905. 
at the age of sevent\-five years. He had three children, namely : Mary, 
who married Joseph Hogman and lives in Canada: John E., the subject of 
this sketch, and August, who owns an elevator at Garfield and is engaged in 
buying grain. 

John E. Sanstead received part of his education in Sweden and part in 
the district schools of Ida township, Douglas county. He assisted his father 
with the work on the farm until 1887, then bought a team and with C. G. 
Olson went to Elbow Lake and worked on the construction of the Great 
Northern railroad. He later went to Crookston. this state, then to X'orth 
Dakota, doing farm work. Selling his team, he returned to Garfield and 
worked on the farm for his L^ncle Andrew for two years. In the fall of 
1889 he rented two hundred and eighty acres of his Uncle Andrew, which 
he operated two vears; then, in partnership with F. R. Johnson, he bought 



ZT2 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

one hundred and twenty acres in Ida township. About f(5rty acres of that 
land was cleared and there was an old log house on it. They cleared and 
put the land under cultivation. In 1896 Mr. Sanstead purchased his part- 
ner's interest and a little later he bought forty acres more, and has since been 
operating the place alone, now owning two hundred acres. In 1907 he built 
a modern two-story frame residence. He also has a good barn and outbuild- 
ings. In connection with general farming, he makes a specialty of the dairy 
business, keeping an average of thirty-three head of excellent dairy cows. 
Everything about his place denotes good management and taste. 

Mr. Sanstead was married in 1889 to Hilda Johnson, a native of Sweden, 
who came to America in 1883. To this union eight children have been born, 
namely: Hilma, who was graduated in music from 'Northwestern College 
at Fergus Falls and taught music successfully for several years; Gust, who 
is a student in Gustavus Adolphus College at St. Peter; Ellen, who was grad- 
uated from the Alexandria high school and is now teaching; Olga, Edwin, 
Teckla and George, all at home, and Arvid, deceased. 

Mr. Sanstead is a Republican and was township clerk for several years. 
He is now a member of the local school board, of which he has been treas- 
urer since 1904. He is a member of the Swedish Lutheran church, in which 
he is a deacon. He is superintendent of the Sunday school and has been 
for a number of years a teacher in the Sunday school. He is a stockholder 
in the Garfield creamery, in the farmers' elevator and in the potato ware- 
house. 



ERICK G. STAFFANSON. 

One of the native-born sons of Douglas county who has been contented 
to devote his energies to tilling the soil in his own locality is Erick G. Staf- 
fanson, who lives in Solem township. His birth occurred on the farm on 
which he still resides, August 29, 1870. He is a son of Mons and Mary 
( Erickson ) Staffanson, both natives of Sweden, in which country they 
spent their earlier years, immigrating to the United States in 1869. After 
spending one summer in Goodhue county, ^linnesota, then qame on to 
Douglas countv, and in T870 the father homesteaded one hundred and sixty 
acres in Solem township, where he has since resided. He broke the sod, 
planted a gro\e and put up all the buildings. He has prospered by close 
application to his general farming operations and by good management, and 
is now owner of an excellent farm of four hundred and forty acres. He is 



DOUGLAS AXn GRAXT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 7,^2, 

assisted in the management of the same by his sons, Erick G. and Leonard 
Staffanson. The former is unmarried, btit Leonard Staft'anson married 
Anna Johnson and has one child, !Manda. The wife of Mons Staffanson is 
deceased. To these parents six children were born, namel)-: j\[agdalena. 
Erick G., Steven (deceased), Selma, Leonard, and Ole. The Staffansons 
are members of the Swedish Lutheran church at Varmsburg, which Mons 
Staffanson helped organize. 



CARL T. CARLSON. 



. Carl J. Carlson, a native of Sweden and one of the well-known and 
successful farmers of Miller\ille township, Douglas county, was born on 
March 31, 1866, the son of Johannas and CaroHna (Anderson) Carlson. 

Andrew Carlson, the paternal grandfather, was a farmer in his native 
land and was highly respected. Johannas and Carolina Carlson were edu- 
cated in the public schools of their native country and there Johannas Carl- 
son engaged in farming. They were the parents of the following children: 
Christine, Mathilda. Peter J., August, Eva. Gustaf and Mary, the latter of 
whom was the only one of the children who did not come to the L'nited 
States, but remained in the home land with her father and mother. 

Carl J. Carlson received his education in the common schools of Sweden 
and there grew to manhood. In 1888, at the age of twenty-two years, he 
decided that he would come to America where so many of his countr\-men 
and neighbors had located and where they had made homes for themselves 
and their families. On his arrival in Xew York he came directly to [Minne- 
sota and located in E\ansville, where he clerked in a store for five years, at 
the end of which time he moved to Millersville township. On January 28. 
1893, he was married to Alice Anderson, the daughter of Carl J. and Liga 
C. (Swenson) Anderson, natives of Sweden, who located in Millerville 
township, in 1869. There Mr. Anderson had one hundred and forty acres 
of land, where Mr. and Mrs. Carlson now live Carl and Liga Anderson were 
natives of Sweden and there received their education in the public schools 
of that country, and there grew to manhood and womanhood and were mar- 
ried. They later came to [Minnesota, locating on a farm in Miller\-ille town- 
ship, which they developed and improved, and there engaged in general 
farming and stock raising for many years, spending the rest of their li\es 



374 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

on the home farm. Carl Anderson died on October 2, 1893, at the age of 
sixty-eight years, and his widow died on January 30, 1902, at the age of 
sixty-eight years. 

To Carl J. and Alice Carlson have been born three children : Carl G. 
I'"., Edgar, K. A. and Ebba. The family are highly respected and are prom- 
inent in the social life of the community. Mr. Carlson has always taken 
an actixe interest in the civic affairs of the township and has served as a 
member of the school board, treasurer of that body for the past twelve 
years. He is a strong advocate of good roads and of the best of schools. 

Mr. Carlson purchased his farm of one hundred and forty acres in 
1 89 1 and since that time he has made many valuable and substantial improve- 
ments on the same. The family li\e in the old homestead house of Carl J. 
Anderson, which is now some forty-fi\e years old, one of the substantial and 
well-built houses of the community in an early day. Since assuming pos- 
session of the farm, Mr. Carlson has planted more than three hundred dol- 
lars worth of trees and built, a large barn in 1916. His farm nearly sur- 
rounds Lake Anderson, a beautiful little body of water that lends much 
beauty to the place. 



ADAM CARLOUIST. 



Adam Carlquist, one of the substantial and well-known farmers of 
Osakis township, Douglas county, is a native of Sweden, where he was 
born on December 3, 1871, the son of C. J. and Sophia (Lungren) Carl- 
quist, also natives of Sweden, where they lived until 1882, when they de- 
cided to seek a home in America. On their arrival in the United States 
they came directly to Minnesota and located in Alexandria, later purchas- 
ing a farm of one hundred and twenty acres three miles south of that city. 
As a farmer and stock raiser C. J. Carkiuist was quite successful and be- 
came one of the well-known and prominent men of the township. After a 
time he removed to Alexandria, where he was the proprietor of a popular 
hotel for many years and where he is now living retired. 

Adam Carlquist received the greater part of his education in the iiublic 
schools of Alexandria and later attended the schools of Lake Mary town- 
ship. As a lad and young man he assisted his father on the home farm and 
soon engaged in farming for himself on eighty acres that he owned, one 
and one-half miles from Garfield. After remaining there for two >ears 
he removed to Alexandria, where he engaged in the meat trade until he 



DOUGLAS AXD GKAXT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 375 

removed to Xorthport, W'asliington, where he remained for two years, at 
the end of which time he returned to Douglas county, where he remained 
for one year. He then removed to Canada, where he engaged in farming 
for five years, at the end of which time he returned to Douglas county and 
purchased his present farm of two hundred acres in Osakis township. He 
has erected all the present buildings on that farm, with the exception of the 
house and granary, and it is there that he is successfully engaged in general 
farming and stock raising. Mr. Carkjuist is particularly interested in the 
breeding and the raising of Guernsey cattle, of which he has many tine 
specimens. 

On July 8, 1896, Adam Carlquist was united in marriage to Augusta 
Lungren, daughter of P. A. Lungren. a well-known citizen of the -county, 
and to this union the following children have been born : ^lariam, Chris- 
tine, Ella, Elmer, Albin, Fred and Eleanor Evelyn. Politicallv. Mr. Carl- 
quist is independent, yet he has taken much interest in local afifairs and has 
had much to do with the general development of the township and the 
county. He and his family are among the most prominent residents of the 
township and are held in the highest regard by all who know them. 

P. A. Lungren. father of Mrs. Carlquist, was bom in Sweden on 
October 14, 1833, and there grew to manhood and married Johanne Eagle- 
strom. yir. Lungren and wife later came to America in 1852. On their 
arrival in the United States they located in Xew York state, where ^Ir. 
Lungren was emplo3-ed as a farm hand for four years. In 1856 the family 
removed to Kansas and there engaged in general farming. At the outbreak 
of the Ci\il \\ ar. F'. A. Lungren. being true to his adopted country-, en- 
listed in Company A, First Regiment, Kansas A'olunteer Infantr\-, and saw 
much active service until the close of the war. He received a severe wound 
while serving under General Lyon, and after recovering from his wound 
he re-enlisted in the Sixth r^Iinnesota Regiment, A'olunteer Infantry, and 
was discharged a^ sergeant. He later served in the trouble with the Li- 
dians, and was recognized as one of the most faithful and deserving of 
soldiers. At the close of the war he came to Minnesota, where he located 
on the farm now owned by Adam Carlquist, in Osakis township, Douglas 
county. There he owned one hundred and sixty acres of land, which he 
developed and improved, and where he was successfully engaged in general 
farming and stock raising. This farm he made his home until 1908. when 
he retired from the activities of farm life and moved to Xelson. where he 
died two vears later, having lived a useful and honorable life, being highly 



376 DOUGLAS AND GKAXT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

respected by all who knew him. Mr. Lungren was an active member of 
the Grand Army of the Republic and took much interest in the work of that 
order. He always took much interest in local affairs, served a term as 
sherifif of Douglas county, and was for many years clerk of the school 
board of his township and w-as ever active and interested in the advance- 
ment of the schools. He was a firm believer in public improvements and 
was a strong advocate of the good roads system, as well as the most perfect 
school system possible. Being a man of broad views and being well in- 
formed, his influence and advice were of much value in the community in 
which he li\ed. Mr. and ^Irs. Lungren were the jiarents of three children. 
Mrs. Carlquist having had a brother, Bennett, and a sister. Matilda, both 
now deceased. 



TAMES F. DICKEX. 



One of the venerable retired farmers and honored pioneer citizens of 
Douglas county who is deserving of special mention in this work is James 
F. Dicken, of Ida townshi]). He was !)orn in Bedford county, Pennsyl- 
vania, October 12, 1835, and is a son of Jesse and Mary (Donahue) Dicken. 
The grandparents, Jonathan and Xancy ( Bradket ) Dicken, were of Eng- 
lish ancestry. He was a near relation of Charles Dickens, the great English 
novelist. ( They dropped the "s" from their name when they came to 
America. ) The maternal grandfather, James Donahue, was a native of 
Ireland, and his wife, Jane Cassidy, was of Irish descent. The parents of 
the subject of this re\iew were natives of Pennsylvania, where they spent 
their li\es on a farm. Ten children were born to them, namely : Jane, 
Jonathan, James P., Stephen, Anthony, Isaac. Jerome. Sylvester, Catherine 
and Mary. The last named is the wife of John Sweeney, a farmer of Ida 
township. Jerome Dicken is living in Alexandra. Sylvester Dicken, who 
also lived in Douglas county, died some time ago. 

James F. Dicken grew up in Bedford county, Penns\I\ania. where he 
attended school, later attending a seminary at Cumberland, Maryland. He 
worked on his father's farm until the fall of 1856, when he came to Min- 
nesota, partlv to see the Indians, btill wild here, and partly as a result of 
the glowing accounts a friend had given him in writing from here. He 
left the train at Dunleath, Illinois, opposite Dubuque, Iowa, and took a 
steamboat up the Mississippi river to Hastings. Minnesota, where he worked 
a week on the levee, then hired to the firm of Foster & Ramsey, the last- 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUXTIES, MIXXESOTA. 377 

named memljer of which firm was later governor of Minnesota. Mr. 
Dicken drove a team between Hastings and St. Paul for that firm, hauling 
material for a big mill near Hastings. The following spring he went to 
Meeker county and took up a claim in Acton township, proving up on the 
same in the fall of 1858. having built a shanty and cleared about ten acres. 
In the spring of 1859 he left there and hired out to the Hudson Bay Com- 
pany, driving a yoke of oxen hauling goods between St. Cloud and George- 
town, ilinnesota, but made only one trip, then helped put up one thousand 
tons of hay for use at Ft. A.bercroinbie. He then came to .Alexandria, then 
a settlement of but two or three houses, and trapped and hunted in the 
winter, helping the settlers in the summer months until the spring of 1862, 
when he enlisted in the Minnesota Mounted Rangers, or Companv D, First 
Cavalr\-, and saw considerable ser\ice against the Indians in Xorth and 
South Dakota, taking part in Sibley's famous expedition, ser\-ing thirteen 
months in all. After he was honorably discharged he decided to seek a 
warmer climate and went to Missouri, but after a stay of six months he 
returned to Alexandria, not liking the South. He then took up a home- 
stead of one hundred and twenty acres in Ida township, Douglas county, 
and forty acres in LaGrand township, but all in one body. It was wild 
land, part prairie and part timber. He had no capital, but forged ahead 
and succeeded despite hardships and privations, developed his land and put 
it in cultivation, using oxen as a team for some time. His first house was 
of logs, in which he lived until about 1885. Mr. Dicken was the first man 
to farm with horses in his part of the county. He has remained on his 
place, which is now one of the choice farms of the township, modern in all 
its improvements, including a large, comfortable residence and convenient 
outbuildings. He has been successful as a general farmer and stock raiser 
and is deser^-ing of a great deal of credit for what he has accomplished in 
the face of obstacles and imaided. He farmed actively until two years ago, 
despite his advanced ?ge. but he has always been a man of unusual strength. 
His son is now operating the place. He purchased more land from time 
to time until he now owns three hundred and sixty-seven acres. 

On December i, 1863, James F. Dicken was married to Sarah Antoi- 
nette Darling, a daughter of Andreas and Antoinette Darling, who were 
among the earliest settlers in Douglas county, but who went to Missouri, 
^vliere Andreas Darling was killed by bushwhackers. His widow then 
returned to Minnesota and died years afterwards at Long Prairie. The death 
of Mrs. Dicken occurred on July 6. 1901. To Mr. and Mrs. Dicken eight 
children were bom, namely: Mary, born on December 25. 1864. who mar- 



,3/8 DOUGLAS AXI:> GRANT COUNTIKS, MINNESOTA. 

ried \\'illiam Greenwood, who is farming at Deep Creek, Washington; Ida, 
February 20, 1867, who married John Busey, a concrete mason at Havana, 
North Dakota; Edward, December 21, 1868, who married Annie Mace and~ 
lives at Elk, Washington; Alice, June 7, 1871, who married the Rev. Will- 
iam Hume, an evangelist, of Alexandria; Ethel, February 22, 1874, who 
married George IMcQuilan, of Wadena, this state, May 23, 1876, who 
married Sarah Glenn and is farming at Deep Creek, Washington; Leroy, June 
30, 1879, who married Gerda Beckman and farms the old homestead, living 
with his father, and Arthur. September 2, 1881. 

'Mr. Dicken is independent in his political \iews and has always taken 
an interest in public affairs. He was one of the three commissioners 
appointed by Governor Ramsey to organize Douglas county, serving on 
the board for about three years, and a part of his work was laying out 
roads in the county. He was chairman of the board of supervisors before 
Ida and LaGrand townships were divided, and was later chairman of the 
board of supervisors of LaGrand township for two terms. He was clerk 
of school district No. 9 for over forty years. He is the oldest resident liv- 
ing on a pioneer homestead in Douglas county. He has seen the country- 
develop from a wilderness and has always taken a deep interest in that 
development. During the "home-coming week," celebrated at Alexandria 
in June, 1916, Air. Dicken delivered an address before a large and apprecia- 
tive audience, narrating incidents and experiences of pioneer days, which 
was generally declared to have been one of the most interesting and informa- 
tive features of the excellent program arranged for that occasion. 



OLAUS ANGEN. 



An enterprising farmer of Brandon township, Douglas county, is Olaus 
Angen, who was born in Norway, Januar)- 30, 1854. He is a son of John 
Johnson and wife, who are mentioned in the sketch of Jens J. Angen, appear- 
ing on another page of this volume. 

Olaus .\ngen grew to manhood in Norway where he was educated in the 
public schools. He came to America with his father in 1869, landing in 
Quebec. Canada, but he came on west to St. Cloud, Minnesota, and from 
there came b}- team to Douglas county, where he worked out for eighteen 
months, then bought a tract of school land — his present place — in section 36 
of Brandon township. He has worked hard and now has a good farm of 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 379 

one hundred and twenty acres. He has made all improvements now seen 
on the place. He carries on general farming and stock raising. He is also 
a stockholder in the elevator at Garfield and has an interest in the potato 
warehouse there. 

Mr. Angen was married in 1883 to Olene Seiverson and to this union 
eight children have been born, namely: John (deceased), Marv, Severt, 
Mariah, Joel, Carrie (deceased), Rudolph and Carrol. The Angens are 
members of the Norwegian Lutheran church. 



G. T. WINKJER. 



G. T. Winkjer, one of the most influential pioneers of Moe. township. 
Douglas county, is a native of Norway, born on Felaruarv 2y. 1840, the son 
of Thomas and Mariett Winkjer. The father was a farmer in Norway 
and after retiring from the activities of life, came to the United States to 
live with his children. He and his wife were the parents of five children, 
Lars, G. T., Serianna, Gurianne, and Ole. 

G. T. Winkjer received his education in the public schools of Norway 
and there grew to manhood on his father's farm, \\here as a lad he assisted 
wdth the work about the farm. He remained a resident of his nati\'e coun- 
try until he was twenty years of age, when he left for Australia with a 
company of gold seekers. He remained in that country for three years, 
after which he went to New Zealand, where he remained for a }ear. In 
Australia and New Zealand he was successful as a miner, but later returned 
to Norway where he remained for a )-ear amid the scenes of his childhood 
and with relatives and friends. In 1864 he decided that he would come to 
America, and after landing in Quebec he came directly to Minnesota and 
located in Goodhue county and was there four years, at the end of which 
time, in 1886, he came to Douglas county and homesteaded his present 
farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Moe township. He later added to 
the farm, making it two hundred and ten acres, and has been the owner 
of three hundred and twenty acres in the community of Garfield. He remained 
on the old homestead for forty-eight years, during which time he has devoted 
himself to the development and improvement of the tract and engaging 
in general farming and stock raising. For fourteen years, he was engaged 
in the lumber business at Garfield, in connection with his work on the farm. 



380 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

His large farm is one and one-quarter miles from Garfield, and is recog- 
nized as one of the best in that community. 

G. T. Winkjer was united in marriage to Karen Anna Helle and to this 
union the following children have been born : Johan Taulo, Peter Joel, 
Jonetta. Jonetta, Anne Maria, Gideon, Lena, Jonathan, Josias, Theodore 
G. and Kraft. The two Jonettas, Lena, and Josias are now deceased. The 
family are active members of the local Norwegian Lutheran church, of 
which \h. Winkjer was one of the organizers and for many years a trus- 
tee. He also has taken much interest in local civic affairs and was one 
of the organizers of the township of Moe. He was one of the organizers 
of the Moe and Urness Fire Insurance Company and was connected with 
the movements that led to the organization of the Farmers Elevator Com- 
pany, the Co-operative Creamery Company and the Farmers Telephone Com- 
pany at Garfield and has held ofifices at various times in these companies. Mr. 
Winkjer was one of the delegates from Douglas county to the farmers 
convention held at St. Paul for the purpose of urging the state Legislature 
to introduce the manufacture of twine at the state prison, which proiX)sition, 
after a vigorous fight, was adopted, the Legislature appropriating a fund 
sufficient to get the matter started. Mr. Winkjer has ever been a man of 
large infiuence in the community and is held in the highest regard by all who 
know him. His life has been a busy one and he has accomplished much that 
is good. Though now in his seventy-seventh year, he is still active and in 
good health and retains the liveliest interest in current affairs. 

Lheoilore G. Winkjer received his education in the public schools in 
the village of Garfield and later attended the School of Agriculture at the 
University of Minnesota, being graduated from the latter institution with 
the class of 1915. After completing his schooling, he returned to the home 
farm, where he and his brother Kraft, are operating the place. Li 1914 
thev built the large barn, thirty-si.x Ijy seventy feet, and the next year they 
erected a silo, fourteen by forty feet. In the spring of 1916 a modern 
building was erected on the site of the old liarn, making use of the base- 
ment for an ideal hog house, with a machine shed and repair shop above; 
the building being twenty by forty feet with an excellent location. At the 
present time Theodore G. W'inkjer has the entire responsibility of the place, 
as his brother Kraft is in California on account of his health, but will 
soon return tn assume his share of operation of the farm. Having com- 
pleted a course in the automobile school at the Los Angeles Young Men's 
Christian Association, Kraft Winkjer is at present working as a mechanic 



DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 38 1 

and will be thus engaged until his return home. Theodore G. W'inkjer is 
a young man of pleasing personality, and possessed of excellent judgment. 
Having decided that he would be a farmer, he prepared himself in a practical 
manner for his life's work. The course at the Agricultural School has 
placed him in a position to carr\- out the hig-hest ideals in nindern and scien- 
tific farming and stock breeding. He belie\-es in the system of intensixe 
farming and in the keeping of the best of stock. His abilit)- as a careful 
and prudent farmer has been demonstrated, as his work has been quite 
successful. In November, 1916, Theodore G. W'inkjer was united in mar- 
riage to Ellen Peterson, daughter of Frank Peterson and wife, of Brandon 
township. 



AXTOX H. STROM. 



Anton H. Strom, one of the well-knc)wn retired farmers of Brandon, 
was born in Norway on October 23, 1855, the son of Hans A. and Randie 
Strom, also natives of Norway, who, for some years after their marriage, 
continued to reside in their native land, and in i860 decided to come to 
America. Mrs. Strom never realized her hopes of having a home in the 
United States for herself and little family, for she died during the vovage 
and was buried at sea. The father, after his arrival in Quebec, with his 
two children, Anton H. and Annetta, came directly to Minnesota and set- 
tled in Goodhue county and for eight years was a resident (^f that cmmtv, 
after which he came to Douglas county. At that time Mr. Strom was 
united in marriage to ]\Iargarete Larson, and- to this union four children 
were born, Lars, and three who died in infancy. On locating in Douglas 
county Mr. Strom purchased land and was the owner of three hundred and 
twenty acres, which he developed and improved. He and his family were 
members of the Norwegian Lutheran church. ]Mr. Strom died in 1898 at 
the age of seventy-nine years. 

Anton H. Strom was educated in the public schools of Goodhue countv 
and there grew to manhood. Soon after his arri\'al in the count}- with his 
father he was taken by a neighbor, who raised him. At the age of twent}-- 
three vears he came to Douglas county to join his father, who had settled 
here some years before. On June 28, 1878, Mr. Strom was united in mar- 
riage to Anna Haaven and to this union two children have been born, Henry, 
who died at the age of twenty-five years, and Alinnie, who is the wife of 
Emil E. Bergh, a well-known farmer of Brandon township. 



382 DOUGLAS AND GRAXT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

On his arrival in Douglas county Anton H. Strom engaged in farming 
and purchased a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in section 19. Brandon 
township, and there he engaged in general farming and stock raising until 
19 1 2, when he retired and became a resident of Brandon. He was a suc- 
cessful farmer and business man. He is the owner of stock in the potato 
warehouse in Brandon and also in the Farmers and Merchants' Union Ele- 
vator Company and was vice-president of the Brandon First National Bank 
for three }-ears. While on the farm he took much interest in the social and 
civic life of the township and served as clerk for a period of twenty-five 
years, and was also a member of the Ijoard of supervisors for a number of 
years. He has served for three }ears as assessor of the village of Brandon. 
For some years he has been secretary of the Moe and Urness Farmers" In- 
surance Company of Douglas county. 

Mr. Strom is a man who has lived an active and useful life. Beginning 
life under such adverse circumstances, early suffering the loss of his mother 
and reared bv strangers, he has succeeded in becoming a successful farmer 
and l)usiness man, who is held in the highest esteem by all who know him. 



LUCAS FIDA. 



Another -Austrian who has made good as a farmer in Douglas county 
is Lucas Fida, of Belle River township. He was born in Austria on October 
17. 1867, and is a son of Frank and Elizabeth (Brenner) Fida, natives of 
Austria, where they resided until 1880. when they brought their family 
to Douglas county, Alinnesota, settling on a farm in Belle River township, 
where they spent the rest of their lives, both dying some time ago. They 
had devoted their lives to farming, having owned land in the old country as 
well as here. The father served as a soldier in the war of 1866, losing a 
finger on his left hand, a bullet striking him during a battle. He became 
owner of one hundred and ninety acres in Douglas county and was a success- 
ful farmer. He and his wife l:>elonged to the Catholic church at Belle River. 
Four children were born to them, Charles, Frances (deceased), Lucas and 
Rosie, the latter of whom married Joe Trisko. 

I-ucas Fida spent his boyhood in Austria, being thirteen years old when 
he accompanied the family to Douglas county. He attended the public 
schools. He assisted his father with the general work on the farm until 
his marriage to Regetta Schlosser, a native of Austria. She was three years 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 383 

old when her parents, Andrew Schlosser and wife, brought her to Minnesota. 
the family being among the pioneers in Douglas county. The following 
children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Fida : Anna, Elizabeth, Peter, 
^lary, Clara. Bernard and Albert. 

Mr. Fida has always farmed. He located on his present farm of one 
hundred and sixty acres in section i8 of Belle River township in 1910. He 
also owns twenty acres in another section. He has put on a number of 
important improvements, including a substantial residence. In connection 
with general farming he raises considerable live stock, handling a mixed 
grade of cattle and hogs. He is a Catholic. 



JOHX BERGSTROM. 



John Bergstrom, a successful farmer of Holmes Citv township, Doug- 
las county, was born in Norway, on June 27, 1863, the son of Halvor and 
^Martha (Anders) Bergstrom, natives of Norway, who were there educated 
in the public schools, grew to manhood and womanhood and were married. 
As a young man in his native land. Halvor Bergstrom engaged in farming, 
and wishing to continue his farm work and feeling that the opportunities 
in America were better than in his own country, he and his wife decided, 
in 1866, to come to the United States. On their arrival in this country, 
they came at once to Minnesota and settled near Red Wing. There they 
remained one year, after which they moved to Douglas county, locating 
in Holmes City town.sbip. Soon after their arrival in the county, Halvor 
Bergstrom filed on one hundred and sixty acres of land in section 2 of that 
township, but owing to sickness the first winter he was unable to erect his 
buildings, and so sold his right. The following year he homesteaded the 
farm of one hundred and twenty acres in section 2 of Holmes Citv town- 
ship, on which his son, John, now resides, and there he made his home until 
his death in 1884. 

At the time Halvor Bergstrom located on his land he was sick and 
in debt and it was with much difficulty that he was able to live and hold 
the claim. He built the first blacksmith shop in Holmes City, and there 
for one year he worked at his trade and was thus enabled to live. His near- 
est market was at Sauk Center and the first wheat crop that he raised 
he ground in a coffee mill. During those early and trying times, there were 
but few days that Indians were not seen passing the home. To Halvor 



384 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

and Martha Bergstrom were born three children, John and Jennie (twins) 
and Andrew, the latter of whom died when but a child. Mr. and ]\Irs. 
Bergstrom were active members of the Swedish Lutheran church, and were 
among the most prominent and influential members of the local society, Mr. 
Bergstrom being one of the organizers of the Oscar Lake church. 

John Bergstrom received his education in the public schools of Holmes 
City township, and there grew to manhood, as a lad assisting his father with 
the farm work. As a young man he began farming for himself on the 
home place where he has since resided. He now owns one hundred and 
sixty acres of land, on which he has made all the present substantial improve- 
ments. He was married in 1890 to Rachel K. Swenson, the daughter of 
Ole K. Swenson, and to this union the following children have been born; 
Halvor, who died at the age of twenty-two years; Ole, Martha, Minnie, 
the latter of whom died at the age of three years, and one who died in 
infancy. Mrs. Bergstrom died in July, 1904. 

Mr. Bergstrom and family are active members of the Lutheran church, 
of which he has been a trustee for the past thirty-two years. He has always 
taken nnich interest in local affairs, and has been a member of the school 
board for twenty years and was for a number of years a member of the 
township board of supervisors. 



JOHN NICHOLAS BROWN. 

John Nicholas Brown, one of the best-known and most prominent farm- 
ers of Belle River township, Douglas county, the owner of "Brown's Dale 
Stock Farm," was born at Belleplaine, Scott county, Minnesota, on June 
24, 1867, the son of Nicholas and Susanna (Renter) Brown, both of whom 
were born in Luxemberg, Germany, where they were educated. For a num- 
ber of years Nicholas Brown was employed on a vessel that plied in German 
waters and in 1857, at the age of twenty-one years, he decided to locate in 
America. Upon landing in this country he proceeded to Milwaukee, where 
he remained for a short time, after which he located at Belleplaine, this 
state, and for the next two years was employed as an engineer on a river 
boat that plied between Memphis and New Orleans. On Noxember 7, 1865, 
he was united in marriage to Susanna Reuter, daughter of Nicholas and 
losephine (Mozel) Reuter, natives of Germany, who came to this state in 
an early day. 




MR. AND .M 



XUIKII.AS I'.KOWX. 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 381^ 

In 1869 Nicholas and Susanna Brown moved over to Douglas county, 
where they homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres of land in section i8, 
Belle River township. The tract at that time was covered with heavy tim- 
ber and brush, without any improvements. The family for the first year 
lived in a tent, after which a log house was constructed, in which tlie 
family resided for a number of years. For years Mr. Brown had only oxen 
with which to do his farming and .assist him in the clearing of his land. In 
time the farm was cleared and good and substantial buildings took the place 
of the log structures that had housed the family, as well as the stock, during 
those pioneer days. There Mr. Brown engaged in general farming and 
stock raising and was successful. In time he purchased more land until he 
became the owner of fi\e hundred and twenty acres. In 1908 he retired 
from the activities of the farm life and moved to Shakopee, where Mrs. 
Brown died on August 5, 1913. They were the parents of the following 
children: John Nicholas, the subject of this sketch; Josephine, who was 
drowned in a well at the age of six years; one who died in infancy, and 
Susanna, who married Thomas Nickoley, superintendent of the Scott county 
schools, to which union five children have been born, Cecelia (deceased), 
Clement, Genevive, Georgina and Virginia. 

John Nicliolas Brown received his education in the public schools of 
Douglas county and in St. John's University, at St. John's, Minnesota. As a 
lad and during his summer vacations, while attending school, he assisted 
his^- father with the work on the farm, and remained at home until his 
marriage on October 5, 1897, to Sophia Hintzen, who was born in Douglas 
county, daughter of Leonard and Elizabeth (Fuchs) Hintzen. At that time 
John Nicholas Brown had one hundred and sixty acres in section 18, a 
part of the old homestead, and there he and his wife lived until 1908, when 
they took up their residence at the old home of the father of Mr. Brown, 
in section 7, where he is operating three hundred aqd twenty acres of land 
and is engaged in general farming and stock raising. ^ He has some excellent 
registered cattle and hogs and is recognized as one of the most successful 
breeders in the county, his cattle and hogs finding ready sale. Of his cattle 
that deserve special mention are two cows, "Alexandria .\altje Dekol, sev- 
enth. No. 135444 H. F. H. B.," and "Lady Gerti Aaltje Dekol, No. 243785 
FI. F. H. B." He also has a registered sire that has attracted considerable 
attention. His cattle are all of. the Holstein-Fresian breed and are the best 
that can be produced. His hogs are Duroc- Jerseys, among which is a boar, 
"Jim No. 161401" and a sow, "Brown Betty No. 498852," that are most 
(25a) 



386 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

excellent specimens of the breed. ]Mr. Brown keeps one of the finest dairy 
herds in the county. 

John Nicholas and Sophia (Hitzen) Brown are the parents of four 
children, Josephine, Marion, Elizabeth and Nicholas. Josephine Brown is 
taking a course in nursing at the Illinois Post-Graduate Hospital, Chicago. 
Marion Brown is a graduate of St. Benedict's Academy, at St. Joseph, 
Minnesota, and Elizabeth and Nicholas Brown are attending public school. 
The family are devout members of the St. Nicholas Catholic church and 
are among the highly respected people of the township and county, active 
in the social and religious affairs of the community in which they live. 
Mr. Brown has always taken an active interest in local affairs and has done 
much for the general advancement of the district. He has served as a mem- 
ber of the board of supervisors and as a member of the school board. 



ISACK ISACKSON. 



Isack Isackson, a native of Wisconsin, and one of the well-known and 
successful farmers of Holmes City township, Douglas county, Minnesota, 
was born on August 31, 1857, the son of Lars and Anna ( Ballestad) Isack- 
son. 

Lars and Anna Isackson were natives of Norwa}* and there grew to 
manhood and womanhood. Lars Isackson came to the United States in 
1843 and Anna Ballestad came in 1849. I" 1865 they were married and 
settled in Manitowoc, Wisconsin, where they resided until 1868. Lars 
Isackson was a soldier in Company D, Forty-seventh Regiment, Wisconsin 
Volunteer Infantry, in 1865. In 1868 he and his wife came to Minnesota. 
Here Lars Isackson purchased one hundred and eighty-five acres of timber- 
land of a homesteader, the farm being the one Isack Isackson now owns in 
Holmes City township. Here the father erected buildings, cleared some of 
the land and engaged in general farming. Here he and his wife made their 
home until the time of their deaths some years ago. They were the parents 
of three children, Isack, Carrie and .\ntnn. Carrie and Anton are both 
deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Isackson were prominent and active members of 
the Trysil Lutheran church and took much interest in church work. 

Isack Isackson received his education in the public .schools of Douglas 
countv and continued to live on the old farm since first he came there with 
his parents from Wisconsin. He has devoted his life to general farming 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 387 

and stock raising and has Ijeen quite successful. He has added to the original 
farm until he is now the owner of three hundred and lifty-one acres, all of 
which is well under cultivation and nicely improved, with substantial build- 
ings, which have been erected by Mr. Isackson. He is a firm believer in 
intensive farming and the keeping of good stock. 

In 1901 Isack Isackson was united in marriage to Dordie ]\Iauseth. a 
daughter of John Mauseth, a native of Xorwa}-. To this union the follow- 
ing children have been born : Ragna, Lannie, Alary and Gerhard. Air. and 
Airs. Isackson are members of the Trysil Lutheran church and are well 
known in the social and religious life of the community. Air. Isackson is 
interested in the Holmes City Fire Insurance Company and in the Holmes 
Citv creamerv. 



CHARLES KLOEHN. 



Charles Kloehn, a retired farmer and a well-known resident of Ida 
township, Douglas county, was born in Dodge county, Wisconsin, on Janu- 
ary 8, 1852, the son of \\'illiam and Henrietta ( Shultz ) Kloehn, who were 
born in Germany, and there received their education in the public schools 
and grew to manhood and womanhood and were married. In 1847 they 
decided to locate in the United States and after their arrival in this coun- 
try they proceeded directly to \\'isconsin and located in Dodge county, that 
state. There they purchased a farm, which they developed and improved 
and on which they spent the rest of their lives. Air. Kloehn dying on October 
8, 1908, and his widow, September 13. 191J, at the age of eighty-four years. 
^^'illiam Kloehn was eighty years of age at the time of his death. He and 
his wife were the parents of five children, August, Charles, Fred, Amelia 
and Henry. The family were prominent in the community in which thev 
lived and were highly respected. 

Charles Kloehn received his education in the local schools of Dodge 
county, Wisconsin, in an old log school house. He grew to manhood there 
and engaged in farming. He \^■as there married on Xo\"cmber 13, 1872, to 
Albertine Bruske. who was born on October 21, 1851. To this union six 
children were born. \\'illiam (deceased), Charles. Gustave, Dena, Anna 
and Amelia. Dena Kloehn married Carl King, who owns the old home 
farm. Air. and Mrs. Kloehn living with them. 

Before his retirement, Charles Kloehn was the owner of one hundred 
and sixt}- acres of land in section 17 of Ida township, which he purchased 



388 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

in 1884 and which he developed and improved and there engaged in gen- 
eral farming and stock raising, in which he was quite successful. After 
having assisted his children to start in life, he sold the farm and retired 
from the activities of farm life. In addition to his farm interests, ^Ir. 
Kloehn was interested in the Garfield creamery, which interests he still 
holds. He is also the owner of stock in the farmers elevator and in the 
bank at Garfield. 

Charles Kloehn has always taken an active interest in local affairs 
and has exerted his influence in the promotion of all enterprises that had 
a tendency toward the growth and the betterment of the township and 
the county. He served as township treasurer as well as township assessor 
for a number of years. He and his wife are active members of the Ger- 
man Lutheran church and are prominent in the work of the local society. ]\lr. 
Kloehn has had an active and useful life and has accomplished much that is 
good, not alone for himself and family, but for the community as well. 
He and his family are held in the highest regard and have long been active 
in the social and religious life of the township. 



P. C. BROWN. 



P. C. Brown, who is engaged in the insurance and loan business at 
Elbow Lake, was born near Colfax, Illinois, August 31, 1879, a son of 
J. M. Brown, l:)orn in \'irginia, and ]\Iartha ( Ray ) Brown, born in Wood- 
ford, Illinois. 

J. M. Brown served for four j'ears as a soldier in the Confederate 
army, during the Civil War, participating in the battle of Gettysburg and 
man}' other engagements. Returning to his home in Virginia after the close 
of the war, he remained a short time and then removed to Illinois, and 
afterwards to Iowa. He now lives at Madelia, Minnesota. He is the father 
of nine children: Lillian, Charles, Viola, Maytie, P. C, Bessie, James 
(deceased), Edna and Erma. 

P. C. Brown was educated in the public schools and the high school, 
at Blairsburg, Iowa. After his school years he turned his attention to 
farming and for six years farmed near Blairsburg and then for one year 
at Buffalo Center, Iowa. In 1910 he associated himself with his brother, 
C. E. Brown, in the real-estate business at Madelia, Minnesota. In the 
fall of that year he opened an office at New Richland, Waseca county, 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 389 

Minnesota, and took the management of that office. In the summer of 
1912 he was travehng for the Ulland Land Company, of Fergus Falls, 
Minnesota. In the fall of that year they opened up a real estate office in 
Elbow Lake, known as the Brown & Ulland Land Company, with Mr. 
Brown as manager. Mr. Brown is also president of the North Minnesota 
Land Company at New f olden and is associated with real estate offices at 
Kensington, Fergus Falls and Ada, this state, and Cogsville, North Dakota. 
In addition to the general real estate business these offices also handle loans 
and insurance. 

In 191 1 P. C. Brown was married to Charlotte Rice, daughter of 
Joseph Rice, of ^ladelia, and to this union three children have been born, 
Charles George, Clifton James and Harry Bernard. Mr. and Mrs. Brown 
are members of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Brown is at present secre- 
tary and treasurer of the Farmers and Merchants Club of Elbow Lake. 
He is a keen young business man, and a general all-around "booster" for 
the town. 



ANEL MELIN. 



Axel Melin. one of the well-known young farmers of Douglas county, 
was born in Leaf A'alley township, that county, on June 24, 1884, the son 
of Andrew and .Albertina ( Engstrom ) Alelin, natives of Sweden, who came 
to the United States, proceeding directly to Michigan, where Andrew Melin 
worked in the copper mines for a few years. He then came to Alinnesota 
and purchased eight}- acres of land in Douglas county at one dollar and 
twenty-five cents an acre. He remained on that farm for a few years and 
then removed to Leaf A'alley township, where he purchased a farm in sec- 
tion 35, which he developed and improved and there he made his home until 
the time of his death in 1908, at the age of seventy-four years. His widow 
died in 1910 at the age of sixty-six years. They were the parents of six 
children, Charles, Albert, Victor, Hannah, Axel and Sophia. Mr. and Mrs. 
]\Ielin were members of the Swedish Lutheran church and active in the 
social life of the communit}-, where they were held in the highest esteem by 
all who knew them. 

Axel Melin received his education in the common schools of Douglas 
county and grew to manhood on the home farm, where as a lad he assisted 
his father with the work on the farm. He is now the owner of eighty 
acres of land in Ida township, which he purchased some years ago and 



390 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

where he is engaged in general farming and stock raising. He has im- 
proved the farm with a large barn, thirty-two by fifty feet, that he built 
in 1914, and a sub.stantial and modern house in 1915. He is a shareholder 
in the grain elevator and potato warehouse and local telephone company 
at Garfield. Mr. Melin is a man of excellent judgment and a thorough and 
systematic farmer. He is a firm believer in intensive farming and in the 
most thorough cultivation of the soil. Though still a young man, he is 
recognized as one of the progressive and successful farfners of the town- 
ship. He has always taken a keen interest in local affairs and is ever ready 
to assist in any worthy undertaking that tends to the betterment of the 
township and the county. 



ERICK E. DAHL. 



Erick E. Dahl, one of the well-known and prominent farmers of Moe 
township, Douglas county, Minnesota, was born in Norway on January 13, 
i865, son of Erick S. and Ragnhild Dalen, natives of Norway, who spent 
their lives in that country, their deaths occurring many years ago. Erick 
S. Dalen was twice married. By his first wife, Kresti, he had six children, 
Sigurd, John, Lars, Hans, Erick and Kjersti. By his second wife, Ragn- 
hild, he had seven children, Knut, Ole, Hans. Erick E., Christina. Gurinne 
and Mary 

After the death of his father, Erick E. Dahl took his mother and left 
the home of his nativity and came to America in 1890. He had received 
his education in the public schools of Norway and was there engaged as a 
farmer. On his arrival in the United States he preceded directly to North 
Dakota and there located in Cavalier county, where he remained^ for nine 
years, at the end of which time, in 1899, he returned to Norway, where he 
remained until 1900. He then returned to the United States, and again 
located in North Dakota, where he obtained a homestead in McLean 
county, which he developed and improved and remained a resident of that 
county for five vears. In 1910 he came to Minnesota, where he located on 
his present farm, in section 14 of Moe township, Douglas county, where 
he has done much in the way of substantial improvement, having built his 
barn, thirty-four by sixty feet in 1916, as well as having placed many other 
improvements. 

Erick E. Dahl was united in marriage to Anna Gustava Baglo, the 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 39 1 

daughter of Andrew Baglo, and to tliis union four children have l)een born, 
Gladys, Emma, Edwin and Julia. Jilr. and Mrs. Dahl are devout mem- 
bers of the Lutheran church, and take much interest in church work. They 
are held in high esteem by all who know them. 

Andrew Baglo, father of Mrs. Dahl, was born in Norway on Xovem- 
ijer 4, 1848. the son of Andrew and Johanna (Raldatter) Borson, who 
spent their li\es in Xorway and reared a family of twelve children. 
Andrew Baglo recei\ed his education in the public schools of his native 
countn,' and there grew to manhood. As a young man he learned the black- 
smith trade, at which he worked for many years. In 1880 he came to ]\Iin- 
nesota and located in Alexandria. He later purchased a farm of ninetv 
acres in Brandon township, where he lived for two years. He then bought 
one hundred and two acres in section 14 of Moe township, where he has 
lived since 1884. 

On January 29, 1874, Andrew Baglo was united in marriage to Gurn 
Anna Andersdatter Kvam, and to this union two children were born, Mrs. 
Dahl having had a brother, John Albert, now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. 
Baglo are active members of the East Moe Lutheran church and take a 
keen interest in church work. Mr. Baglo is a trustee of the local society 
and has served as leader of the church choir for many years. The familv 
have been prominent in the social and religious activities of the township 
for manv vears. 



PEDER MOXXESS. 



Peder Mo.xness, one of the young farmers of Douglas county, was born 
in X'^orway on September 13, 1879, a son of Ole C. and Betsy ( Gunder- 
son) Moxness, natives of Xorway. where they grew up and were married. 
They brought their family to America about 1880, coming on direct from 
Xew York City to Alexandria, Minnesota. The father learned the car- 
penter's trade when a }-oung man and followed that trade in the old country, 
but upon coming here he bought eighty acres of land in Brandon township 
where he spent the rest of his life engaged in farming, dying there at 
the age of sixty years on June 7, 1902. His widow still survives, having 
celebrated her seventy-seventh birthday on June 20, 1916. They were 
the parents of seven children, John, Gunder, Laura, Ole, Hannah, Peder 
and Julia. The father of these children developed a farm here from the 



39- DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

wild prairie, making all the improvements. He was an active member of 
the Norwegian Lutheran church. 

Peder Moxness grew upon the farm in Brandon township, having 
been but a small child when his parents brought him from his native land. 
He received his education in the district schools here and has remained on 
the homestead, which he purchased eight years ago. It consists of eighty 
acres, as before stated, and he has kejit the same well improved and well 
cultivated, but most of the present improvements were made by his father. 
He has remained unmarried and makes his home with his mother. Politi- 
cally, he is independent. 



HERMAN SUCKOW. 



Herman Suckow, a well-known resident of Ida township, Douglas 
county, was born in Germany on August 26, 1866, the son of Fred and 
Carolina Suckow, who were born in Germany and there were educated in 
the public schools, and there grew to manhood and womanhood and were 
married. Fred Suckow engaged in farming in his native country and was 
considered one of the successful farmers of the community in which he 
lived. He served two terms in the German army and became proficient in 
the manual of arms. In 1884 he and his wife decided to locate in America, 
and after landing in this country they proceeded directly to Wisconsin, 
where Mr. Suckow purchased a farm in Wakesha county, and there he 
engaged in farming for ten years, at the end of which time he and his 
family came to Minnesota. He purchased a comfortable house in Alexan- 
dria and now lives a retired life. Fred Suckow and wife are the parents 
of seven children, Anna, Theodore, Herman, Rudolph, Frank, Freda and 
Stena. Mr. Suckow always took an active part in local affairs and he and 
his family were prominent in the social and religious activities of the com- 
munity. 

Herman Suckow received his education in the public schools of his 
native land and in Wisconsin, where he attended some school after coming 
to this country with his parents, at the age of eighteen years. After com- 
pleting his education, and on reaching manhood, he came to 3iIinnesota and 
purchased ninet)-five acres in section 25 of Ida township, Douglas county. 
The land at that time was for the most part in a wild state. This he 
developed and in time added to the original tract, until he is now the owner 
of two hundred and fifteen acres of land, one hundred and eighty acres of 




HERMAN SrCKOW AXD FAMILY, AND RESIDENCE. 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 



393 



which is subject to culti\-ation ; sevent}--five of which is now cleared, the 
balance in meadow, timber and pasture. The waters of Lake Carlos lap 
the border of the farm, adding much to the beauty of the place. During 
his early life on the farm, Mr. Suckow devoted much of his time to his 
trade, that of a carpenter, and in this way was enabled to add to his 
stock of cash while getting his farm in shape for cultivation. In 191 5 he 
retired from his carpenter work and is now devoting his entire attention 
to his farm interests. He is engaged in general farming and stock raising 
and has met with much success. He has some fine Shorthorn and Durham 
cattle, most of which are dairy cattle. He keeps a few hogs which he feeds 
for the market. In addition to his hogs and cattle he keeps about seventy- 
five hives of bees, and sells much honey- 
In 1894 Herman Suckow was married to Emma Ouast, a native of 
Wisconsin, and to this union has been born one child, Eddie, who works in a 
garage at Alexandria. 'Sir. and :\Irs. Suckow attend the Lutheran church 
and take much interest in church work, liberal subscribers to the support 
of the local church. Mr. Suckow has always taken much interest in local 
affairs, particularly in the success and development of the schools of the 
township, and for a number of years has served as treasurer of the school 
board. 



ALFRED FOSLIEN. 



Alfred Foslien, a successful and well-known farmer of IMoe township, 
Douglas county, was born in Rock county, Wisconsin, September 19, 1875, 
the son of F. K. and Anna Mary (Gilbertson) Foslien. 

Knut and .\nna ( Kittleson ) Foslien, the parents of F. K. Foslien, were 
nati\-es of Xorway and were there educated in the public schools and there 
grew to manhood and womanhood. Knut Foslien came to America in 
1848 and located in Rock county, Wisconsin, where he engaged in fann- 
ing and stock raising, and lived until the time of his death, nianv years ago. 
After the death of the husband and father, the widow came to Minnesota 
with her children and located in Brandon township, Douglas county, where 
she is still living. To Knut and Anna Foslien were bom the following 
children, F. K., Rachel, Mary, Anna, Julia, Carrie, Charley and Ole. 

F. K. I'oslien was born in Rock county, Wisconsin, on September 3, 
1850, and received his education in the public schools and at Clinton June- 



394 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

tion. As a young man he worked on a farm and later conducted a photo- 
graph gallery at Clinton Junction. In 1876 he came to Minnesota and pur- 
chased a farm of one hundred and ninety acres in Moe township. The 
tract at that time was a wild larairic, a part of which was covered with 
thick hrush. The place was later cleared and improved with good and sub- 
stantial l)uildings, and there Mr. Foslien has engaged in general farming 
and stock raising, and has since made that farm his home, although he is 
now retired from the active duties of farm life. 

In 1874 F. K. h^oslien was united in marriage to Mary Gilbertson, and 
to this union three children have been born, -Alfred, Julia, and Clarence. 
Mr. and Mrs. Foslien have long been meml^ers of the Lutheran church and 
have taken much interest in church work, Mr. Foslien having served as 
deacon for many years. In addition to his many other duties, he has always 
taken much interest in local affairs and was for years the clerk of the school 
board. 

.Alfred I-'oslien recei\-ed his education in the public schools of Moe town- 
ship and later attended school at Brandon. He grew to manhood on the 
home farm and as a young man farmed with his father. In 1896 he started 
farming the place for himself, where he is now active and successful in gen- 
eral farming and stock raising. He has been, for the past twelve years 
interested in the breeding of Shorthorn cattle, and today has a fine herd of 
thirty head. He also has a fine bunch of Yorkshire hogs. In connection 
with his other work, Mr. Foslien has for the past two years been the man- 
ager of the Farmers Shipping Association at Garfield. 

In 1S95 Alfred Foslien was united in marriage to Emma Larson, who 
died on March 24, 1905. To that union, six children were born, Freddie, 
Arthur, Clarence, Fvelyn, Cora and Fnima. In April. 1907, Mr. Foslien 
married lohanna Nessgaard, who died on March 11, 1914. To this union 
i\\e children were born, Mildred, Florence, Henry, Arnold and Xeoma. On 
October 12, 1915, Mr. Foslien was united in marriage to Lena Thompson, 
the daughter of J. Thompson, a prominent resident of the county. The 
children of Mr. Foslien are all living. 

Alfred Foslien and family are active members of the Lutheran church, 
and are active in the social and religious life of the community. Mr. Fos- 
lien has always taken a keen interest in local afifairs, and has served as a 
member of the township board of supervisors, of which he was chairman. 
He has lieen an insurance agent for the past eight years and is now the agent 
for the Moe and Urness Fire Insurance Company; also vice-president of the 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 395 

Farmers Ele\-ator Company at Garfield. Mr. Foslien is widely known locall\- 
as a musician and has successfully taught music. In 1910 he organized the 
Scandia Concert Band of Aloe and has also acted as instructor for the 
Brandon band, the Garfield band and the Moe and Urness band, rendering 
\aluable ser\ice in that connection. 



ERICK lOHXSOX. 



Erick Johnson, .a well-known and successful farmer, of Ida township, 
Douglas county, was born in Sweden on March 7, 1858, son of John and 
Christina (Erickson) Johnson, also natives of Sweden, who remained resi- 
dents of their native country, engaged in farming, until 1879, when they 
came to Minnesota, John Johnson homesteading forty acres of land in Ida 
township, Douglas countv. He also bought eighty acres of railroad land in 
that same township. The tract at that time was all undeveloped and unim- 
proved, being covered with some heavy timber and much brush. He built 
a small log house in which the family lived for some }ears. The land was 
later developed and improved, good and substantial buildings were erected 
and there John Johnson engaged in general farming and stock raising until 
the time of his death in 1908, at the age of seventy-five years. 

To John and Christina Johnson were born four sons, Erick, John 
(deceased), Charles and Axel. Charles Johnson is a well-known farmer of 
Ida township, his farm being located near that of his brother Erick, and 
Axel Johnson lives in Cass county, Minnesota, where he is successfully engaged 
in the saw-mill business. After the death of Christian Erickson Johnson, 
John Johnson was united in marriage to Hannah Louise Anderson. He 
and his familv were prominent in the S(icial and religious life of the 
township and were highl}^ respected by all who knew them. Air. Johnson's 
life was an active one and he was regarded as a man of much ability and 
force of character. He took an active interest in all local affairs and did 
much toward the development and improvement of the community in which 
he and his family lived. 

Erick Johnson received his education in the public schools of his native 
ccamtrv and remained a resident of the land of his birth until he was 
twenty-one years of age. On his arrival in the United States he located 
in South Dakota, where he remained for two years, engaged as a farm 
hand. He then came to Minnesota, where he lived with his parents, who 



396 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

had located in Douglas county. He remained at home for some years and 
was employed in grading on the railroad for about ten years. He then 
engaged in farming in section 18 of Ida township, where he had tought 
eighty acres of land, which at that time was covered with timber and brush. 
There he built a small frame house and proceeded to clear and develop the 
tract. He remained there some years and then removed to Marshall county, 
this state where he homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres and pur- 
chased eight}- acres more. He remained there eight years, at the end of 
which time he sold the land and returned to Douglas county, again taking 
up his residence on his farm in Ida township, where he made valuable 
improvements, erected excellent buildings and there he has continued to 
reside, engaged in general farming and stock raising, in which he has been 
successful. His farm is under a high state of cultivation and his residence 
is one of the best in the community. 

Twenty-five years ago Erick Johnson was united in marriage to Hilma 
Mod and to this union the following children were bom : Emily, Oscar, 
Edward, Carl and Alma, and Paul and Annie, deceased. Mrs. Hilma John- 
son died a number of years ago and Mr. Johnson later was united in mar- 
riage to Mrs. Ida ]\Iaria Anderson, a widow and the mother of four chil- 
dren, .Mex, Fritz, Harold and Olga, by her first marriage. 

Mr. Johnson is a Republican and has always taken an active interest 
in local affairs, ever ready to use his influence in the promotion of any 
project that would tend to the advancement of the township. He is a 
stockholder in the Garfield creamery and has done much toward its success. 
He and his wife are prominent members of the Mission church and take 
much interest in church work. 



CONSTANT A. WESEN. 

Constant A. \\"esen, farmer of Flolmes City township, Douglas county, 
was bom in Pope county, Minnesota, December 23, 1872, a son of Claus and 
Anna (Oberg) W'esen, both natives of Sweden. The father was born in 
1843, '^"'^' wheri ut twenty-one years old, in 1864, he came to America, 
locating for a short tmie in Illinois, where he engaged in railroad construc- 
tion work. He helped survey for the Northern Pacific's main line through 
Minnesota. He was married after coming to America and he and his wiff~ 
both cooked for the railroad workers. His first permanent location was 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 397 

when he homesteaded forty acres in Hohnes Cit}' township, Douglas county, 
later buying one hundred and twenty acres adjoining, which he finally sold. 
He now lives in North Dakota, having been retired for ten or twelve years. 
He took up a homestead there of one hundred and twenty acres. His family 
consisted of fourteen children. Minnie, Jennie, Charles, Constant, Theo, 
Adolph, Oscar, Edgar, Elmer, Emma, Anna, Victor, Louis and Albin, all of 
whom are living but the last named. 

Constant A. Wesen grew up in Douglas county where he attended the 
common schools. He began fanning for himself by renting land one year, 
then in 1901 he went to North Dakota, locating in what is now Renville 
county, taking up a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres, on which he 
spent six and one-half years. He added to his original holdings until he 
owned two hundred and forty acres. He returned to Douglas county in 
1907, soon thereafter buying his present farm of seventy-five acres in Holmes 
City township, to which he later added twenty acres, and here he has since 
resided, carrying on general farming and stock raising. 

Mr. Wesen was married in 1900 to Adina Mattson, who was born in 
Holmes City township, Douglas county, a daughter of John and Stena 
(Hawkinson) Mattson, both natives of Sweden, and to this union six chil- 
dren have been born, Alfred, Mabel, Delphen, Fern, Marvin and Hazel. 
Mr. Wesen has always taken an active part in public afl:'airs and has been a 
member of the local township boanl and of the school board. While in 
North Dakota he helped organize his township and was a memlser of the 
township board until he mo\'ed away. He was also a member of the school 
board there. 

John Mattson, father of Mrs. Wesen, grew up and married in Sweden, 
from which country he removed with his family to America, first locating 
in Illinois, thence moving to Redwing, Minnesota. He drove an ox team 
from St. Paul to Douglas county, in 1866, being among the early pioneers 
here. He took up a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres in Holmes 
City township, where he resided until his death in 1914, his wife having pre- 
ceded him to the grave in 1894. He did well as a general farmer and became 
owner of a valuable farm of two hundred and fifty-three acres. He bought 
and sold considerable land at difl'erent times. He ser\-ed as school treasurer 
for many years, having been first elected a member of the board about 1870. 
His family consisted of the following children : Christine, Matilda 
(deceased), Carl (deceased), Theodore, Adolph, Elida and Adina. Mr. 
Mattson helped organize the Oscar Lake Lutheran church and his name was 
the first to go on the church books. He always bore an excellent reputation. 



398 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

WILLIAM HERMANSON. 

Among tlie siil)stantial farmers of Ida township, Douglas county, is 
\Mlliam Hermanson, who was born in Sweden on February 19, 1858, the 
son of Herman and Mary (Olson) Larson, both of whom were natives of 
Sweden. 

Herman Larson followed the occupation of a farmer in his nati\-e land 
and was also engaged in the fishing industry there. He came to America 
eight years after his son, William, had arrived here, and lived on a farm of 
one hundred and twenty acres which his sons had purchased in Minnesota. 
Later he moved to a farm near Chippewa Lake, where he remained several 
years, Imt is now li\ing with his son, Carl, near Brandon, at the advanced 
age of ninety years. His wife is eighty-one years of age. They were the 
parents of ten children, Emil, William, Emma, Louis, Carl, Anna, Mary, 
Alina, .\ugusta and Herman, air of whom are living in the United States, 
with the exception of Emma, who is deceased. 

\\'illiam Hermanson received his education in the schools of his native 
land, and served one year in the Swedish army. At the age of twenty-two 
he came to the United States. His first employment was in the coal mines 
of Pennsylvania, where he worked for six months. From there he went to 
Howard Lake, Wright county, Minnesota, where an uncle lived, and there 
he s])ent some months in school. He then went to Minneapolis, where he 
worked for the h""lour City Transfer Company for twelve years. While 
working in Minneapolis, he together with his l>rothers. Emil and Carl, pur- 
chased one hundred and twenty acres of land in Douglas county for his 
father and family to live on, who had come over from Sweden. After leav- 
ing Minneapolis, Mr. Hermanson came to his farm in Douglas county, and 
at once began to improve the place in various ways. The first house built 
on this farm was a small frame house, which the family lived in until 1908, 
in which year a new house was erected. The old house still stands on the 
place, being used as a granary. Later Carl sold to William his part and the 
latter now has eighty acres of well improved land, where he is engaged in 
general farming and stock raising. 

^^'iIliam Hermanson has been twice married, his first wife, to whom he 
was married in 1886, having been Sophia Jacobson. After her death ]\Ir. 
Hermanson was married in 1S94 to ]\Irs. Anna (Anderson) Nelson, a widow 
with one son, Da\'id. Mr. Hermanson has two children by his first marriage, 
Esther and Oscar, and by his second marriage, one son, Bennie, who is now 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 399 

living at home wilh his parents. Esther is the wife of Simon W'itham, and 
is living in Canada, wliere her husband conducts a general store and the 
postoffice. Oscar also lives in Canada. 

Air. Hermanson is a Republican and has ser\-ed his township as school 
clerk of district Xo. 17. He is a stockholder in the Garfield creamerv, and 
takes an active interest in all matters pertaining to the civic welfare of his 
community and township. He is a member of the Swedish Mission church. 



TlfEODORE FOSLIEN. 

Among the well-known and successful farmers of Aloe township, Doug- 
las county, is Theodore F'oslien, a native of that township, born on the old 
Foslien homestead on June 8, 1880, the son of Haaken and Sarah Anna 
(A\'inkjer) Foslien, natives of Rock county, Wisconsin, and Norway, 
respectively, the former having been born on March 4, 1S49, and the latter, 
July 7, 1850. The father received his education in the public schools of 
W'isconsin and there grew to manhood on the home farm. In 1868 he came 
to Minnesota and purchased a farm in Moe township, Douglas county. He 
developed and improved his farm of two hundred acres, and engaged in gen- 
eral fanning and stock raising. Ijeing among the successful men of the town- 
ship. He and his wife were the parents of six children, Emma, Alinda. 
Theodore, Lewis, Henry and Lizzie. 

The paternal grandparents of Theodore Foslien were Even and Ranga 
(Paulson) Foslien, natives of Norway, who came to the LTnited States in 
18.13 '"''■fl located in Rock county, Wisconsin, where they remained until 1868, 
when they came to Alinnesota, locating in Moe township, Douglas coimty. 
There the grandfather became a successful farmer and before his death 
became the owner of four hundred and eighty acres of land. He and his 
wife were the parents of seven children, Fingenr F... Paul, Haaken, Even, 
Alary, Guri and Ole, the latter of whom died at the age of six years. 

Theodore I'oslien received his education in the public schools of Aloe 
township, and at the State Agricultural College, from which institution he 
was graduated in IC)07. As a lad and young man he decided that he would 
be a farmer and was firm in the belief that a course in the agricultural school 
would better prepare him for his life work. L^pon completing his schooling 
he b.egan farming on the home farm, where he remained until 191 1, when he 
came to his present farm, where he has done much in the wav of improve- 



400 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

ment, having placed all the buildings, with the exception of the house and the 
granary. In addition to the buildings he has done much in the way of 
development and today has one of the best farms in the community. He is 
engaged in general farming and stock raising, in which he has been quite 
successful. He has always taken a keen interest in local affairs and has 
ser\'ed as a member of the board of township super\'isors, of which he was 
chairman. 

In 191 1 Theodore Foslien was united in marriage to Gunda Arneson, 
a daughter of Knut Arneson, a well-known farmer of the county, and to this 
union two children have been born, Lydia and Harold. Mr. and Mrs. Fos- 
lien are acti\e members of the Norwegian Lutheran church and take much 
interest in church work. They are prominent in the social and religious life 
of the community and are held in the highest regard by all who know them 
They are most hospitable and their home is often the scene of happy com- 
panies. They take much interest in all movements that have a tendency to 
raise the standard of living in the community in which they live. 



PETER T. OAILAND. 



One of the successful farmers of Holmes City township, Douglas 
county, is Peter T. Omland, a Norwegian by birth, who was born in Nor- 
wav, A]3ril 30, 1869, a son of Thomas and Inger (Peterson) Omland, both 
of whom were natives of the same country and who are still living in Nor- 
way, where the father follows the occupation of a farmer. Thomas Omland 
and wife were the parents of two children, Peter T. and Sophia. 

Peter T. Omland received his educational training in the schools of his 
native land and in 1888 came to America, proceeding at once to Minnesota 
and locating in Holmes City township, Douglas county. He is the 
owner of a good farm of eighty acres, on which he has placed all of the 
buildings and the various improvements which go to make it one of the 
best in the township. He is engaged in general farming and stock raising 
and has met with success in his chosen calling. 

Mr. Omland has been twice married, his first wife having been Olea 
Elefifson, to which union was born one son, Oliver P. In 1901 Mr. Omland 
was married to Regina Christiansen, who was born on March 8, 1869, the 
daughter of Simon and Ingebard (Larson) Christiansen. Simon Chris- 
tiansen and his family came to this country from Norway in 1866, locating 



''lit 






1 



DCJCCLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 40I 

at once in Douglas county, where he homesteaded one hundred and sixty 
acres of land in section 4 of Hohnes City township, and on that farm he 
spent the remainder of his hfe, his death occurring in 1901. He and his 
wife were the parents of two children, Christ Simonson, and Regina, the 
wife of J\lr. Omland. 

Politically, Mr. Omland is a Republican. He and his wife are earnest 
members of the Lutheran church and ]\Ir. Omland is now serving as trustee 
of the local church of that denomination. 



CARL O. LIXXARD. 



Carl O. Linnard, one of the younger farmers and highly respected 
citizens of Brandon township, Douglas county, was born in that township, 
on November 27, 1891, the son of John A. and Caroline (Nelson) Linnard. 

Andrew Sevenson, his paternal grandfather, was a native of Sweden, 
who spent all his life there engaged in farming. The father, John A. 
Linnard, was born and reared in Sweden and there grew to manhood, as a 
lad and voung man working on the farm. A number of his young friends 
and neighbors had left the land of their nativity and had come to America. 
Their glowing accounts of the advantages to the young man in the United 
States, caused John A. Linnard to decide to join them in the new land. On 
his arrival in this country he came directly to Minnesota, arriving at Alex- 
andria on yiay 16, 1870. There he worked in a blacksmith shop until 1S74, 
when he purchased one hundred and sixty acres of school land in section 16 
of Brandon township, which he later developed and improved, and there he 
engaged in general farming and stock raising. 

In 1S75 John .\. Linnard was united in marriage to Caroline Nelson 
and to that union the following children were born : ]\Iina, Ida, Emil, 
Amanda, Hilma, Julia, Hannah, Carl O., Jennie and Ella. Caroline Linnard 
died a number of vears ago. After a successful life as a farmer, Mr. Linnard 
retired four years ago and moved to Brandon, where he now lives. During 
his active life Mr. Linnard accumulated some five himdred acres of good 
land, the most of which he developed and improved. He is the owner of 
stock in the First National Bank at Brandon and is one of the directors of 
the same, as well as vice-president of the bank at Garfield. He is also the 
owner of stock in the Farmers Elevator Company and in the creamery at 
(26a) 



402 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

Brandon. In addition to his man_v other duties, Mr. Linnard always has 
taken much interest in the civic Hfe of the community and was for twenty- 
five years a member of the board of supervisors of Brandon township. On 
his retirement, he sold his land and assisted his children to establish homes. 
Carl O. Linnard received his education in the common and high schools 
of Douglas county. Upon completing his schooling he engaged in farming 
and now owns one hundred and twenty acres of the old homestead, where 
he is engaged in general farming and stock raising, in which he has been 
Cjuite successful. He raises Shorthorn cattle and Poland China hogs and is 
to some extent engaged in the dairy business. He built a large silo in 1915. 
He is the owner of stock in the Brandon creamery, has an automobile, and 
has a telephone and enjoys the benefits of rural free mail delivery. He is 
unmarried and lives at his home in Brandon township. He has always 
taken much interest in local affairs and is recognized as one of the progressive 
young men of the community. 



JOHN SMITH. 

John Smith, now living in honorable retirement in his pleasant home 
in Holmes City, is one of those coming from a foreign strand who have 
made good in Douglas county, his own efforts having brought to him well- 
deser\ed success. Mr. Smith, whose name was Olson by birth, was lx)m in 
Sweden on March ~^, 1842, a son of Olaf and Christine (Larson) Olson, 
both natives of Sweden. His maternal grandfather, Jacob Larson, was born 
in Germanv. The parents of Mr. Smith lived and died in Sweden, devoting 
their active lives to farming on a place of their own. Their family con- 
sisted of four sons, Olaf. Jacob, John and Peter, of whom the subject of 
this sketch is now the only survivor. 

John Smith grew to manhood in Sweden, where he received a common- 
school education. He came directly from that country to Minnesota in 1868, 
remaining ten j^ears in Goodhue county, where he owned a farm of eighty 
acres; and for a time one hundred acres, twenty miles from Redwing. In 
the winter of 1877 he came to Douglas county, visiting the present site of 
the village of Holmes Cit}-. In 1878 he purchased one hundred and seventy 
acres there, a part of which land is now within the village limits. He gave 
one acre to the village and one-half acre to the Swedish Lutheran church, 
of which he and his wife are members. When he first came here there were 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 403 

but three residences and a school house in the vicinity. Only fourteen acres 
of his tract of land here had been cleared when he took possession. Ninety 
acres were cleared and under cultivation when he sold it in 1914. He erected 
good buildings thereon and made other extensive improvements. In 1914 
he erected another modern dwelling which he still occupies. Since selling 
his fami he has lived retired from active pursuits. 

yiv. Smith was married in 1863 to Anna Johanson, also a native of 
Sweden, and to their union two children have been born, Christine and John 
Olaf. ^Ir. Smith is a Republican and has been active in local public affairs. 
He served as a memlx-r of the village school board and as road boss in the 
village and also was a trustee of the Swedish Lutheran church for a period 
of seventeen years. 



HEXRY L. SATERLEE. 



One of the farmers of Evansville township, Douglas county, who has 
been contented to remain in his home locality is Henry E. Saterlee. He 
was born on the old homestead in section 20 of that township on September 
29, 1886, a son of John and Carrie (Barlough) Saterlee, both natives of 
Norway, where they grew up and were married. John Saterlee was for 
some time a drill officer in the Norwegian army. In private life he farmed 
on his father's land. He came to America in 1867, first locating in Rice 
county, ^linnesota, but in 1869 came to Douglas county, and took up a home- 
stead of one hundred and sixty acres in Evansville township, having made 
the trip here driving a team of oxen. He improved his land and erected 
buildings, living first in a dug-out for four years, then built a log house. 
He had no crop the first year, and only three acres of wheat the second. 
The nearest market was Morris, nearly forty miles away. He persevered and 
became very comfortabl)' situated, built a good home, set out a nice grove 
and made various improvements, including numerous outbuildings, and there 
he and his wife are still living, the place now being operated by their son, 
the subject of this sketch. Mr. and ]\Irs. Saterlee are among the best known 
and most highly respected pioneers of Douglas county. Twelve children 
were born to them, namely : Sivert ^I., who lives at Rugby, North Dakota, 
where he has large farming interests; Nels O., who is farming at Bynum, 
Montana; John, who is also farming at Bynum, Montana; Andrew, who is 
a homesteader at Rugby, North Dakota ; Tilda, the widow of Ole Howey, 



404 DOUGLAS AND. GRANT rOUNTIT.S, MINNESOTA. 

who died in March, 1916, after homesteading land at Norwich, North 
Dakota; Lena, unmarried, who had a homestead at Bynum, Montana, but 
is now Viving at Great Falls, North Dakota; Clara, who married Will Nott, 
a grain buyer at Hingham, Montana, where he also has a homestead; Henry 
L.. the subject of this sketch; Amanda, the youngest living child, who mar- 
ried Herman Hanson and lives in Dooley, Montana; Julia (deceased), who 
married Lars Anderson, of Rugby, North Dakota, where her death occurred ; 
Sjur, who died while crossing the Atlantic and was buried at sea, and Ole, 
who also is- deceased. 

Henry Saterlee grew to manhood on the home farm and received his 
early education in the public schools of Evansville township, later attending 
the National Business College at Minneapolis, also Elster Business College 
at Alexandria. He remained at home a number of years after reaching 
manhood, assisting with the work on the farm. In 1912 he went to Dooley, 
Montana, where he engaged in the hotel business for two years, then sold 
out and came home to take care of his parents the rest of their lives. Thev 
gave him the homestead, which he has kept well cultivated and is carrying 
on general farming and stock raising. The father was township trustee for 
over thirty-five years and also held school offices. He is a trustee in the 
Norwegian Lutheran church, to which the family belongs. 



PETER M. HJELM. 



Douglas county ranks high as a wheat-producing section, and therefore 
a number of good flouring mills have been established within her borders, 
one of which is operated by Peter M. Hjelm, of Holmes City. Mr. Hjelm 
was born in Sweden in 1873. He is a son of Martin and Christine (Ander- 
son) Hjelm, both natives of Sweden from which country the father removed 
with the family to America in 1893, locating soon thereafter in LaGrand 
township, Douglas county, Minnesota, where he purchased eighty acres. He 
now li\es on a ten-acre place in the southwestern corner of that township. 
His wife died just before he left Sweden, and he remarried in America. He 
is the father of nine children by his first wife, of whom five are living, 
Andrew, Peter M., Erick, Caroline and Anna. The father belongs to the 
Swedish Mission church. 

Peter M. Hjelm grew up in Sweden and there received his education in 
the public schools. There he learned the carpenter's trade, which he fol- 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 405 

lowed for a time after coming to Minnesota. In 1901 he built the Holmes 
City flour mill. It was first owned by Hjelm Brothers in partnership with 
John Bergstrom, the latter selling out to Andrew and Peter M. Hjelm in 
IQ03. The brothers also own a valuable and well-improved farm of one 
hundred and fifty acres, which is operated by Andrew Hjelm, while the sul> 
ject of this sketch looks after the mill. Peter M. Hjelm also assisted in 
organizing the Holmes City Telephone Company in tlie year 1911 and has 
since been president of the same. 

Mr. Hjelm was married in 1900 to Anna Oberg, a native of Sweden, 
from which country she came to America when three years of age with her 
parents, Halver Oberg and wife, who are now living on a farm in Moe 
township. Douglas county. The following children have been born to 'Sir. 
and ^Irs. Hjelm : Hildur, Roy, Harvie, Helen. Anna, ^lildred. Pear, \\'ood- 
row, Marvin (deceased), and Xorman. ]\Ir. Hielm is a Democrat. 



PETER O. MYHR. 



Peter O. ^lyhr, one of the prominent and successful men of Holmes 
City township, Douglas county, was born in Norway, on June 11, 1854. the 
son of Ole P. and Julia ( Tngebrigtson ) I\Iyhr, also nati\"es of Norway, where 
they were married. Ole P. ]\Iyhr was a farmer in his native land. In iS65 
he and his wife decided that they would lea\e the home of their nativity and 
seek a home in America. Upon landing in the United States, they proceeded 
to Illinois and there located on a farm in \Mnnebago county, where they 
remained until 187^, in which year they came to ]\Iinnesota and purchased 
a farm near Brandon, in Douglas county. The farm was developed and 
there ]\Ir. and ]\Irs. Myhr lived until they retired from the activities of farm 
life and removed to Evansville, where IMr. Alyhr died some years later. The 
widow, after the death of her husband, resided with her son, Peter O. ^Ivhr. 
in Holmes City townshi[). where she died. Ole O. ]\Iyhr devoted his life to 
farming and was successful. He and his wife were the parents of three 
children: l^eter O., Caroline and ^lary. Caroline is the wife of Ole Kron 
and Mary is the wife of the Rev. Christian Sogstad, a well-known minister 
of the Lutheran church. 

Peter O. Myhr received his education in the public schools of Illinois 
and Douglas count}'. ^linnesota. He grew to manhood on the home farm, 
where as a lad he assisted his father with the farm work. As a voung man. 



406 DOUGLAS \Xn GRANT COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

he began farming for himself on a rented farm near Brandon. He later 
owned various farms in Holmes City township and in 1891 located on his 
present home place. There he now has one hundred and seventy acres, he 
having sold forty acres of a farm of two hundred and ten acres to his son. 
He has developed about fifty acres of the tract and has erected all the present 
substantial buildings. 

In 1879 Peter O. M}hr was united in marriage to Hannah H. Stran- 
\-old, who was born in Xorway and who came to the United States in 1868 
with her parents, who located on the farm that adjoins her present home. 
It is there that the parents, Hans and Ragnel (Olson) Stranvold, have since 
resided. The)- were the parents of three children, Hannah H., Helga and 
Mary. Helga died at the age of twenty-eight years. 

Peter O. and Hannah H. Myhr are the parents of the following chil- 
dren : Regna, Henry O., Helga (deceased), Helga, Percilla and Martin. 
The family are active members of the Norwegian Lutheran church and are 
prominent in the social and religious life of the community. Mr. Myhr is 
interested in the Holmes City creamery and in the White Bear Mutual Fire 
Insurance Company. He takes much interest in local affairs, and being a 
man of wide experience and excellent judgment, his advice is often sought 
on matters of public interest and moment. He is a believer in public improve- 
ments and in the highest standard of li\ing. 



TOHX S. BEXSOX. 



John S. Benson, one of the successful farn.iers of Solem township, 
Douglas county, was born on the Atlantic ocean, during the voyage of his 
parents to the United States, on May 19, 1870, the son of Peter and Segre 
( Benson ) Benson, natives of Xorway, who decided to seek for them- 
selves a home in America. Upon their arrival in the United States they 
came directly to IMinnesota and located in Solem township, Douglas county, 
where the father worked as a farm hand for three years, after which he 
homesteaded in the township. His one hundred and sixty acres at that time 
was for the most part a wild tract, which he later developed and improved, 
the same liecoming recognized as one of the best farms in the community. 
There he engaged in general farming and stock raising for thirty years and 
was quite successful. Pie continued to live on the homestead until his 
retirement some years ago, and now makes his home with his son, John S. 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 407 

Benson. His wife died in 1901 after a useful life. In 1885 Peter Benson 
added forty acres to his original farm, all of which was put under a high 
state of cultivation and was well improved. He took an active interest in 
local affairs and was one of the organizers of the Solem Lutheran church 
and had much to do with the success of that society. He and Mrs. Benson 
were the parents of six children, Bert, Joe, Ole, Emma, John S. and Simon. 
Bert and Simon are now deceased and Emma is the wife of Oliver Lybeck, 
a successful resident of the county. 

John S. Benson received his education in the public schools of Douglas 
county and at the academy at Willmar. He grew to manhood on the home 
farm, where he assisted his father with the farm work. He has always lived 
in Solem township and at an early age decided to devote his life to farming. 
He is now the owner of one hundred and twenty acres of land, where he has 
li\'ed since 1901. and where he is successfully engaged in general fanning 
and stock raising. 

On Alarch 15, 1893, John S. Benson was united in marriage to Lena 
Nelson, who was born in Pope county, this state, a daughter of Ole Nelson, 
a successful farmer of that section, and to this union the following children 
have been born: Pama, who was born in 1894; Dora, 1895; Sherman, 1898; 
Myrtle, 1903; Blanche, 1905; Arnold, 1908; Kenneth, 191 1, and Eveline, 
1913. The family are active members of the Solem Lutheran church and 
take much interest in all church work. 

John S. Ben.son has always been active in local affairs and has served 
his township as assessor for eight years and was a member of the school 
board and of the township board for eight years. He was one of the organ- 
izers of the Kensington Live Stock Shipping Association, of which he has 
been the manager since the organization. He was also one of the organizers 
of the Kensington Creamery and is treasurer of that organization. He is 
also a director of the Farmers Elevator Company and in 1916 was the 
nominee of his party as a candidate for county commissioner. He is held 
in the highest esteem by all who know him and is recognized as one of the 
leaders and prominent and successful men of the county. He has devoted 
his best efforts to the prosperity of the community and has had much to do 
with the successful administration of the affairs of the township. He is a 
man of excellent judgment and his \vide experience and successful life well 
fit him for public affairs. He belie\-es that a public office is a public trust 
and always devotes the same careful attention to his official duties that he 
does to his own. 



408 DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

ERICK G. JOHNSON. 

Erick G. Johnson, a native of Sweden and a well-known and successful 
farmer of Holmes City township, Douglas county, was born on May i8, 
1867, the son of John and Christina (Peterson) Johnson, also natives of 
Sweden, where they grew to manhood and womanhood and were married. 
There Mrs. Johnson died in 1875. John Johnson continued to live in the 
land of his nativity until 1904, when he came to America. Upon his arrival 
in the United States he came direct to Minnesota and for a year lived in 
Douglas county, after which he removed to North Dakota, where he home- 
steaded one hundred and sixty acres of land, which he has developed and 
improved, and there makes his home. 

To John and Christina Johnson were born six children, Peter, Mary, 
Erick G., Lena, Christina and Matilda, all of whom are living save Mary. 
Some years after the death of his first wife, John Johnson was united in 
marriage to Margaret Peterson and to this union five children were born, 
Oscar, Clara, Victor, Hilma and Segma. of whom Clara and Hilma are 
deceased. John Johnson has had an acti\e and useful life and has long 
been prominent in the social life of the communities in which he has lived. 

Erick G. Johnson received his education in the pul3lic schools of his 
native land, where he lived until he was twenty years of age. He then 
decided to leave the land of his birth and came to America. On his arrival 
in the United States he came direct to Minnesota and located in LaGrand 
township, Douglas county, where, for the next eight years he worked for 
Nels E. Nelson on the farm. In 1897 he returned to Sweden, where he 
purchased a small farm and engaged in farming on his own account. In 
1900 he was united in marriage to Amelia Erickson and soon thereafter 
he and his wife came to the United States. This time Mr. Johnson located 
in North Dakota and there purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land 
in Nelson county. After four years he sold the farm and moved to what 
was then William county, where he homesteaded one hundred and sixty 
acres of land, and purchased three hundred and twenty acres. Some years 
later he sold one hundred and sixty acres of his land, but is still the owner 
of three hundred and twenty acres in that state. In 1913 he returned' to 
Douglas county, where he now lives on his farm in Holmes City township, 
and where lie is engaged in general farming and stock raising, in which he 
has been quite successful. Mr. Johnson has always taken much interest in 
local affairs and is one of the substantial and successful farmers of this 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 409 

section. He has e\er been held in tlie highest regard by liis neiglibors and 
friends, and is recognized as a man ot much force of character. 

Erick G. Johnson has been twice married. By the first wife, who died 
some \ears ago, one child was born, Albert. He later married Ella Xelson, 
the widow of Edward Xelson. who had two children by her first marriage, 
Carrie and Elsie. 



DA\'ID T. DAVIDSON. 



An advocate of twentieth-century methods of tilling the soil is Da\'id J. 
Davidson, a general farmer of Evansville township, Douglas county. He 
was born on the old Davidson homestead in section 30, in the above named 
township, April 26, 1873, a son of John and Andrina (Eagre) Davidson, 
natives of Xorway, where they spent their earlier years and where the father 
operated a store, also owned land there. He came to America in 1866, 
locating first in Quebec, Wisconsin, where he remained until the fall of 186", 
when he came to Douglas county, Minnesota, aiKi took up a homestead of 
one hundred and sixty acres in Evansville township. In the spring of 1868 
he brought bis family to his farm here. ^lost of the land was heavily tim- 
bered. He farmed for some time with oxen, cleared and improved his land 
and lived in a log house for some time. He continued to live on this place 
until the fall of i8q8. when he retired from active life, spending the rest of 
his days in the village of Evans\ille, where he died in 1908, at the advanced 
age of eighty-si.x \ears. His widow is still living there. John Davidsoit 
was twice married, his first wife having died in X^'orway. By her five chil- 
dren were born, namely : Dan, deceased : Christopher, who has not been 
heard of for a number of years; .Amelia, ^lary and one who died when 
young. To John and .\.ndrina Davidson nine children were born, namely : 
Lottie, deceased; Oscar, next in order of birth: ]\Iinnie, deceased; Julius, 
deceased; Da\"id J., the subject of this sketch; Lora, Adolph, Hilda and one 
who died young. 

Da\'id J. Dax'idson grew up on the farm and received his early schooling 
in the public schools in Evans^•ille township. He also attended high school 
at Herman three years, during vacations working on the home farm. In 
1S90. together with his brothers Oscar and Julius, he purchased the home- 
stead and the three farmed together for some time, Oscar finally selling his 
interest to the other two; then Tnhns sold to the subject of this sketch, who 



4IO DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 

has since operated the place alone, successfully carrying on general farming 
and stock raising and keeping the land well improved. In 1910 he built an 
excellent barn. He also purchased one hundred and sixty acres adjoining, 
in Grant county. 

Mr. Da\-idson was married in 1898 to Dagma Christenson, a member 
of one of the well-known families of Douglas county, and to this union six 
children have been born, Edith, Agnes, Charlotte, Rhuben, ^^'aldemar and 
Korman. 

]\Ir. Davidson is a Republican. He was county chairman of the first 
district for fixe and one-half years and was township supervisor about fi\e 
years, during part of which period he was chairman of the board. He is 
now township treasurer, also treasurer of school district No. 26, which office 
he has held for the past fifteen years. He takes an abiding interest in local 
affairs and is an excellent public official. He attends the Norwegian Luth- 
eran church. 



ANTON HANSEN. 



Anton Hansen, farmer and stock raiser of Holmes City township, 
Douglas county, has made a success of his chosen life work because he has 
been preserving and energetic. He was born at Faaberg, Norway, Febru- 
ary 21, 1858, and is a son of Hans Arnesen Rotrud and Seneve Olsdatter 
Bergsven, both natives of Faaberg, Norway, where they were married and 
spent their lives, d_\-ing there a number of }ears ago. They were parents 
of eight children, Agnes, Anton, CMaf, Rudolph, ]\Iartinus, Agnes (the second ). 
Randina and Martinus (second), all of whom are deceased save the sub- 
ject of this sketch and Randina and the second Martinus. 

Anton Hansen grew up in Norway where he was educated and there 
he learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed until coming to America 
in 1883. He located in Douglas county, Minnesota, where he continued 
his trade, his services being in great demand from the very start, especially 
as a barn builder. He has built one hundred barns in his locality and still 
works at his trade at intervals, though he has always lived on a farm, owning 
dift'erent places. His present farm in Holmes City township consists of one 
hundred acres, on which he has lived for about seven years. He formerly 
had two hundred acres. He has improved his land, including a splendid 
group of buildings. His place is known as "Church Hill Farm." 

In 1893 Anton Hansen was married to Olina Peterson, a daughter of 



DOUGLAS AND GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 4II 

Ole Peterson (Bergsven). Mr. and Mrs. Hansen have no children of their 
own, but have an adopted daughter, Zelma Amanda. Mr. Hansen is a 
member of the 'JVyssal Lutheran church, and poHtically, he is a Repubhcan. 
Ole Peterson (Bergsven) and his wife Martha Evenson, parents of Mrs. 
Hansen, were both born in Norway, the father on July 15, 1829, and they 
grew up and married in their nati\'e land. He came to Minnesota in 1866, 
locating in Douglas county. li\iug about a year near Oscar Lake; then located 
on a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres, which he had selected the 
pre\-ious autunm, and there he has since made his home, being (.me of the 
earliest pioneers in that part of the county. He cleared and improved the 
place and has prospered as a general farmer and stock raiser. He added 
to his original holdings until he owned about six hundred acres in Lake 
IMary and Holmes City township, but he has sold ofif a large portion of his 
land. He is one of the most substantial and most highly respected of our 
venerable early settlers. He is now eighty-seven years old, but is fairly 
active and well preserved. Only two years ago he walked five miles to 
visit his daughter. His wife died in 1910. He assisted in organizing the 
Tr)-ssal Lutheran church, of which he is a member. His family consisted 
of ten children, two of whom died in infancy, the others being named. 
Olina, Peter (deceased), Andrew, AJartba, .Vgnies, Edward, Othelda and 
]\Iaria Augusta. 



MARTIN CHRISTENSEN. 

One of the enterprising farmers of Evansville township, Douglas county, 
is Martin Christensen, who was born in the little kingdom of Denmark, on 
October 4, 1855, the son of Nels and Katherina Christensen, both of whom 
were natives of Denmark. Nels Christensen and wife came to the United 
States about five years after their son, Martin, had come to this country, 
and lived with him the remainder of their lives. They were the parents of 
five children, two of whom, Katie and Christ, died in Denmark; Peter died 
in Dakota, and the others are Nels and Martin. 

ALirtin Christensen received his education in the schools of Denmark 
and in August, 1S80, came to the LInited States. He worked for two years 
for his brother, Nels, who had previously come to America. He then pur- 
chased eighty acres of land in section 18, Evansville township, and began 
farming for himself. His land was wholly unimproved when he acquired 
it, and he has since improved and cultivated it until he now owns one of the 



412 DOUGLAS .4ND GRANT COUNTIES. MINNESOTA. 

best farms in the townsliip. He has added forty acres more to his tract, 
making one hundred and twenty acres which he owns, all of which he farms 
himself, besides renting other land. He is engaged in general farming and 
stock raising, having a nice herd of Shorthorn cattle and markets annually a 
large number of hogs. He has been very successful in his farming opera- 
tions and ranks among the substantial farmers of the township. 

In 1887 Martin Christensen was married to Christina Elveriun, a native 
of Norwa}', and to this union six children have been born : Annetta, who 
married E. M. Sederberg, a motion picture manager of Evansville, and has 
three children, Stanton, Milan and Doris; Elmer, a buttermaker at Stewarts- 
ville, Minnesota, who married Maude Brooks ; Emil, who is working in the 
hardware trade at Austin. Minnesota, and Nora, Conrad and Onward, who 
are still living at home with their parents. 

Mr. Christensen is a Republican and takes an active interest in all public 
matters which have for tlieir object the betterment of his township and com- 
munitv. He has ser\-ed as treasurer of school district No. 2 and is much 
interested in school matters. The family are members of the Norwegian 
Lutheran church and Mr. Christensen is trustee of the local congregation 
of that denomination at bA'ansville. 



VICTOR X. lOHXSOX. 



Ida township, Douglas county, has no more enthusiastic tiller of the 
soil than \'ictor X". Johnson, who was born in the locality where he still 
resides, on December 18, 1889. He is a son of Claus V. and Lucinda 
(Osborne) Johnson, the father a native of Sweden and the mother of 
Ida township, Douglas county, I)orn on the old Osborne homestead, which 
is n(jw owned bv the su1>ject of tiiis review. Claus V. Johnson came to 
America when sixteen years old. After living awhile in St. Paul, ]\Iinnesota, 
when that place consisted of only twelve houses, he moved to Keota, where 
he made railroad ties for about a year and later worked on the construc- 
tion of the railroad between there and St. Cloud. He came to Douglas 
county after that and took up one hundred and sixty acres of wild land, 
timbered, on which he built a log house and barn and cleared it, farming 
there for some time with oxen. He lived there alwut six years, during 
which period he married. He then 1x)ught one hundred and sixty acres, 
the farm on which his son Victor N. Johnson now lives, which was then 



DOUGLAS AXD GRANT COUNTIES, MINNESOTA. 413 

only partly improved. On this he built a good farm in 1904. He sold 
his original homestead and now owns one hundred and sixty acres of well- 
improved land, all cleared but about thirty acres. He is now living on a 
homestead in Montana where he owns an entire section, having been there 
about four years. His son \"ictor X. has had charge of his homq place 
here since he went to Montana. Clans \'. Johnson, has four children, all 
in ^Montana but the subject of this sketch, namely: Maynard R., Edwin, 
Ernest, and Victor X. 

Mrs. Lucinda (Osborne) Johnson, mother of the subject of this sketch, 
is a daughter of O. and Fredrica ( Landeen ) Osborne. O. Osborne was 
a nati\"e of Kentucky and an early playmate of Abraham Lincoln. He 
served as a lieutenant in an Illinois regiment during the Civil ^^'ar and was 
wounded in battle four different times. After the war he came to Minne- 
sota and settled on a homestead in Ida township, Douglas county, and 
while improving it was married to Fredrica Landeen, who owned the 
homestead which is now the farm operated by the subject of this sketch. 
'Mr. Osborne later went to Los Angeles, California, where he spent the rest 
of his life in the Soldiers' Home. 

A'ictor X. Johnson grew up on the homestead