(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "History of Education Woodbridge Township 1664 - 1964"







HISTORY of EDUCATION 

Woodbria^e Township 

1664-1964 



k 



A HISTORY OF EDUCATION 
WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP 
1664 - 1964 



Fourth Edition -June 1964 
Fi f th Edition - June 1965 




9 

o o 

HAf, 



Htlt,HT b 



WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP 
SCHOOLS I9G3-64 



o 
□ 

A 



t_ lementary 
Junior High 
Oemor Hioh 



11 



FOREWORD 



When Miss Martha J. Morrow, Head of the Social Science Department 
of Woodbridge Senior High School, and I got together early in 1963 to think 
up some appropriate projects for our students to work on in celebration of 
the New Jersey Tercentenary, we soon realized that 1964 was the Wood- 
bridge Township tercentenial year also. It was tentatively decided then 
that perhaps we would discover an area of research in which we could con- 
tribute not only to the State celebration but also to that of the Township. 

After considerable preliminary exploration, it was noted that little had 
been written on education in Woodbridge in over a three hundred year 
period. In fact, it seemed that no one had assembled anything of a scientif- 
ic nature along these lines during the past quarter of a century. With these 
facts to go on, Miss Morrow contacted a group of pupils to see if they 
would like to undertake a somewhat intensive study of recent education in 
Woodbridge. The response was instant and convincing. With the aid of Mr. 
Robert Sandor, a teacher in her department, Miss Morrow got the group 
under way. This booklet is the culmination of a year's hard work of re- 
search, planning and writing. 

To these devoted teachers and students go the sincere thanks of the 
faculty and pupils of Woodbridge Senior High School for a double tercen- 
tenary project that brings great credit to Woodbridge Senior High School 
and proudly salutes the Township of Woodbridge and the State of New Jer- 
sey for their historic roles in the development of education in the United 
States. 



John P. Lozo 

Principal 

Woodbridge Senior High School 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

OF WOODBRIDGE 

MAIN LIBRARY 

GEORGE FREDERICK PLAZA 

iii WOODBRIDGE, W. J. 07095 



A HISTORY OF EDUCATION 

WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP 

1664 - 1964 

Original edition prepared by the Class of 1949 
Dolores Lott 
Rosemary McElroy 
Clara Milko 
Dorothy Mushinski 

Second edition prepared by the Class of 1953 
Students of Modern Living I 
George Donavan 
Lee Frankel 
Marjory Lockie 
Ethel Muller 
Mureen Newberger 
Rosemary Nork 
Carol Werlock 

Third edition prepared by the Class of 1962 
Karen Carl sen 
Susan Jacobs 

Fourth edition prepared by the Class of 1964 
Co-editors 

Ruth Anne Baumgartner 
Jane Goodstein 

Staff 

Elaine Bohrer 
Carol Cohen 
Jack Fishman 
John Giatropoulos 
Marjorie Mazurek - '65 
Rita Serotkin 

Illustrations 

Stanley Dorn - special photos 

John Giatropoulos - maps 

Susan Horvath - cover design 

Donald Mac Argel - "65 graph 
Typists 

Carol Hawkes 

Casimere Majlowski 

Mary McCullough 

Barbara Pease 

Camille Yockavitch 

Judy York 

Kathleen Shine - '66 
iv 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

1. Administrative Offices of the Woodbridge Board of Education 

2. Artifacts — 

Mrs. John Dowling 
Mrs. Howard Kuhlman 
Mrs. Harry Howell 

3. Interviews — 

Miss Anna Frazer, Instructor of Music, Woodbridge Township Schools, 
1916-1959. 

Mr. Nathan Duff, former Township Attorney, represented the munici- 
pality during the Free School Land Case. 

Mr. Henry St. Lavin, Trustee of Free School Land. 

Mr. Edward Kilmer, Picture of No. 1 School Tower. 

4. Woodbridge Senior High School 

Records from Administrative Offices 

Records from Guidance Office 

Records of artifacts and memorabilia of Social Science Department 

Office 
Records of Library 

5. Technical Assistants 

Mrs. Annabelle Barney — mimeograph 
Mr. Frank Gubernat — photo — repro-technician 
Mr. William Mazurek — photostat advisor 
Mr. Alfred R. Tanzi - art 

Special thanks to our two advisors, Miss Martha J. Morrow, Head of 
the Social Science Department of Woodbridge Senior High School, and Mr. 
Robert Sandor, member of the Social Science faculty, without whose pati- 
ence, guidance, steadfast and earnest devotion this task would never have 
been accomplished. The staff members owe you the deepest gratitude for 
all of the time you have spent mentoring this contribution to the New Jer- 
sey Tercentenary. 



The faculty and students of Woodbridge Senior High 
School greatly appreciate the assistance rendered by 
the Woodbridge Township Jaycees in the reproduction of 
this text. 



LINDEN 




13<o0 



Land Included V/thm 
Original Boundar 



y 



(w°) Date of Withdrawal tvom 



Original boundary 

Kahway Was Incorporated as 

c\ city m I3b3 
In _» 860 \t Was Withdrawn 

l" f pn t.he Or^in.J.l Boundary 

of Vv/oodbriage by an Act ot the 
Legislature which tooK the part of Railway 
in Middlesex ixnd added it to Union. 



VI 



PROLOGUE 

The Story of the History of Education Of Woodbridge Township 

This history of our school system of 1664-1964 has been written by 
pupils in accord with the pupil-centered philosophy of our school under 
the aegis of the Social Science Department of Woodbridge Senior High 
School. Undertaken originally in the school year 1946-47 to meet a pupil 
need, it is being revised at this time in recognition of the Tercentenary of 
both the township of Woodbridge and the State of New Jersey. 

Our schools have undergone many changes since the time the first 
teacher was appointed in 1689. Down through the centuries when the town- 
ship was less populated and less complex, and when a majority of the 
people had been lifetime residents of this vicinity, oldsters could tell 
youngsters what had happened when, who had dom; what, and how or why 
things had come to be. However, with the population influx which followed 
World War II there arose a need for materials with which to inform the pu- 
pils who had moved newly into the township and who had no knowledge of 
yesteryear, its history, and its traditions, nor local kin from whom to leam 
this. 

Thus, in answer to this need, the story of the Woodbridge Township 
School system was written as a history project by several members of the 
class of '49 and presented in playlet form as part of an Orientation Week 
Program for freshmen in September, 1948. 1 

The cast was composed of members of the senior class who assumed 
this responsibility as a service to their school. The playlet was in three 
acts. Act 1-ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS was presented on the first day of 
Orientation Week, Act 11-THE HIGH SCHOOL, on the second day, Act 111- 
PUPIL ACTIVITIES, The third day. The programs for the next two days 
were put on by the band and the cheerleaders purporting to imbue the in- 
coming freshmen with school spirit. 

It soon became evident that this was a very ambitious project to have 
ready by the first week of school in the fall, in that rehearsals were all but 
impossible while pupils were beyond contact during summer vacation. 



q.v. - Social Science Department, Collection of Artifacts and 
Memorabilia. 



vn 



Also among the developments and changes in education inWoodbridge High 
School during the late '40's was the introduction of a core curriculum call- 
ed Modern Living 1, 11, 111, and IV, planned predominantly for pupils who 
would terminate their formal education upon graduation from high school 
but required at the 9th grade level of all entrants. It was decided, there- 
fore, to include "Orientation to High School" as part of the course of 
study for Modern Living I. 

To provide materials for this study, members of the class of '53 dur- 
ing their freshmen year revised the original orientation playlet into a 
three-chapter booklet, thus virtually writing their own text book. This re- 
mained in use until September, 1959, when the core curriculum called 
Modern Living was abandoned because the 9th grade curriculum was re- 
vised to accord with the 6-3-3 type of school organization. 

The opening of the new high school in the fall of '56 presented the 
need for further revision of the story of our schools. This updating was 
undertaken by members of the classes of '62 and '64 and has been ex- 
panded into this present documented form as part of our Tercentenary 
Celebration. 



Vlll 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Foreword - John P. Lozo, Principal of Woodbridge Senior High School iii 

Contributors iv 

Acknowledgements v 

Maps 

Woodbridge Township vi 

Woodbridge Township Schools - 1963-1964 ii 

Free School Lands 24 

Prologue vii 

Table of Contents ix 

I Developments of Woodbridge Schools 1 

Elementary 1 

High School 19 

II Free School Lands 23 

III State Department of Education . State Board of Education 29 

» 

IV Local Board of Education 32 

V Special Education 35 

Vocational Schools 35 

Classes for the Handicapped; Introduction of School 36 

Psychiatrist 

Summer Schools 37 

VI Student Activities and Organizations of Woodbridge 38 
Senior High School 

Epilogue 48 

Appendices 50 

Alma Mater 5.1 

Athletic Championships 52 



ix 



Table of Contents (continued) 

Statistics of Classes 53 
Chart I - Statistics of Woodbridge Township School System 59 

as of 1964 

Chart IT - Junior and Senior High Schools 60 

Chart III - Schools To Be Opened September 1964 61 
Chart IV - State Aid For Education in Woodbridge Township 62 

Chart V - State Aid for Education 63 

Graph - Graduation Classes 1883-1964 64 

Bibliography 65 
Illustrations 

1. Woodbridge-old School No. 1 and "new" School No. 1 9-10 

2. Grave of the first child born in Woodbridge 6 

3. Desks used in Woodbridge Academy 3 

4. Bell atop the tower in old School No. 1 21 

5. Fords-old School No. 7 and ' 'new" School No. 25 11-12 

6. Chemistry class of 1913 15 

7. Woodbridge— old and new Woodbridge Senior High Schools 18 

8. Substandard school buildings— Hagaman Heights and 57-58 
Avenel (portables #4and #5)-1964 

9. Scrap drive World War II 42 



CHAPTER 1 
DEVELOPMENT OF WOODBRIDGE SCHOOLS 

Woodbridge Township, as you now see it, was not always so heavily 
populated as it is today. As the population grows, so does a school sys- 
tem. Let us turn back a few pages of history to learn some facts about the 
origins of our schools of today. 

Woodbridge Township was created by an agreement among Daniel 
Pierce of Newbury, Massachusetts, Captain Phillip Carteret, governor of 
the Province New Jersey, and John Ogden and Luke Watson, both of 
Elizabethtown, on December 11, 1666- 1 Included in the agreement was a 
charter which provided for land six miles square to accomodate more than 
sixty families. This new township was named for Reverend John Wood- 
bridge of Newbury, Massachusetts. 2 

As you would expect, the early settlers had little time for schooling 
because of their hard frontier life. Even though one hundred acres were 
allotted for schools, early education was mainly in the hands of religious 
sects. 3 As the need for education became more apparent, Woodbridge ob- 
tained its first schoolmaster in 1689, James Fullerton. The second school 
master in Woodbridge, John Bleacher, was appointed in 1691. He was hir- 
ed on a trial basis for six months at £ 13. 4 The first night school in New 
Jersey was started by this same Beecher. John Brown of Perth Amboy be- 
came the third schoolmaster in Woodbridge, after being offered a salary of 
124 for one year, starting in 1694. As of June 12, 1695, Brown's salary 
was to be paid from taxes, but this system proved not too satisfactory due 
to negligence in the collection of taxes. 5 An actual law providing for each 
town to appoint a schoolmaster and to locate schools was passed in 1695. 
In 1701, a town meeting was called to consider building a school instead 
of holding classes in the Meeting House. As a result, the Strawberry Hill 
was built in 1702. That same year, provision were made for primary edu- 

i Reverend Joseph W. Dally, Woodbridge and Vicinity, p.7. 

2 Ibid, p. 6 This charter went into effect immediately after it was granted 
in June, 1669. The English proprieters Joseph Berkely and George Car- 
teret did not confim it until Dec. 1672. 

3 These one hundred acres later became known as the Free School Lands 
and at one time the site of the ' 'Poor House Farm". 

4 Dally, op. cit. p. 177 

5 Ibid, p. 177 



cation in Rahway. 6 Because of British salutary neglect, probably due to 
the French and Indian Wars, education lost emphasis from 1702 to 1776. 
The next schoolmaster in Woodbridge was George Eubanks, who was ap- 
pointed in 1711, for as long as financial support and health allowed him 
to work. He was granted land because of his position. With the coming of 
1776, a re-emphasis on education brought about the creation by 1807 of 
six separate school districts. At this time, because of an increased num- 
ber of poor people, education was becoming a public problem. At the turn 
of the eighteenth century, Woodbridge could boast of only two schools. 
The one at Strawberry Hill and the other at the corner of Bunns Lane and 
Amboy Road. The teaching at this time was similar to that of New Eng- 
land with the use- of the Horn Book. This book contained the alphabet, and 
was decorated with woodcuts. It also had rhymes relating to Biblical sub- 
jects such as: 



. < 



1. Job feels the rod, 
Yet blesses God. 

2. Young Obadias 
David, Josias 
All were pious. 

3. A dog will bite 

A thief at night. " 7 

This, a "Latin Grammar School", was the main type of colonial school. 
Practical courses such as surveying and navigation were added. In 1769 
the first board of education, called the "Trustees of Free Schools"of 
Woodbridge, was appointed to supervise the schools. The year 1894 herald- 
ed the use of the current term "Board of Education" with 9 members. 7A 

If we may, for interest's sake, let us examine the Woodbridge Acad- 
emy. This academy, built in 1793-94 was located on the west side of 
Rahway Avenue approximately opposite 574 Rahway Ave., the present 
office of Dr. C. H. Rothfus. School was held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily 
and on Saturday mornings. The student enrollment was divided into three 
groups, according to precosity. The third was the lowest grade and had 
the smallest tuition. In 1826, Eliza Fitzrandolph paid $125 to attend the 
Woodbridge Academy. 8 A typical schoolday was described in her diary: 

6 Dally, op. cit. p. 177 

7 John Henry Love, An Educational History of the School District of Wood- 
bridge, Township, Middlesex County, New Jersey, 1666-1933, p. 27 

7A Adapted from materials of Leon McElroy, p. 16. 

8 Eliza FitzRandolph, in a letter to Mrs. Marguerite FitzRandolph, quoted 
by Ruth Wolk, History of Woodbridge, p. 21. 





Home-Made Triple Desk Used In Woodbridge Acadamy 1793 



' 'After going through the usual exercises of the morning, I took 
my books and went to the schoolhouse in the yard and studied 
till the bell rang for my prayers. After breakfast I dressed for the 
examination, went down to the room to study my ancient geo- 
graphy with Margaret Edgar. Mrs. Ricord heard our French and 
ancient geography before we went; at nine we went to Mr. Stry- 
ker's Seminary, the boys were examined in the morning on Latin, 
Greek, reading, geography. After dinner Mrs. Ricord heard the 
Bible class. I attended the afternoon school, they were examined 
on philosophy, electricity, and after they went through their 
lessons there were several premiums distributed. Mr. Stryker ad- 
dressed the children in a very feeling manner. The school was 
closed with prayer. I studied very little this evening, my whole 
thought is on tomorrow, thinking it might be the last examination 
for me, and if I should not pass a good one, I should feel very 
bad. Some of the young ladies wrote very handsome specimens of 
poetry this evening. Being very fatigued, also it is very late, I 
have not time to write any more today". 9 

The Woodbridge Academy became increasingly dilapidated, and was 
replaced by the Downtown School in 1851. 

A discussion of these early schools would not be complete without 
mentioning the Elm Tree Institute, later known as the Morris Academy. 
Erected at 531 Rahway Avenue, it was opened in the 1820' s as a high 
school under the direction of James Stryker. It was equipped with its own 
library, collection of rocks and minerals, and a large campus. It was im- 
plied to be a good school because of its variety of courses. One could pur- 
sue a classical, scientific, or business curriculum, taking preparatory 
subjects such as Latin, Greek, Hebrew, English, French, Spanish, and all 
kinds of mathematics, sciences and history. Students were encouraged to 
attend through advertisements in ' 'The New Jersey Advocate and Middle- 
sex and Essex Advertiser." An example could be found in the March 28, 
1826 issue: 

"Woodbridge is one of the most pleasant and healthy villages in 
the Union. It is situated midway between New Brunswick and 
Elizabethtown, and presents a variety of easy and agreeable con- 
nections with the cities of New York and Philadelphia" .^° 



9 Eliza FitzRandolph, op. cit., p.21. 
io John Henry Love, op. cit., p. 48. 



In 1865 the Jefferson and Academy school districts merged. This 
brought about the first graded school, School Number 1, in 1876. The 
school term was fixed at ten months. Classroom size averaged in the 
the seventies. Outside pupils were attracted by tne high standing of the 
Woodbridge Graded Schools. The school was divided into the following 
sections: 

1. Grade Senior 4. Grammar Department 

2. Grade A 5. Intermediate Department 

3. Grade B 6. Primary Department 

Discipline was based on a demerit system. 1 1 

The township was pleasantly surprised when a statement was issued 
in 1870 declaring that all Woodbridge Township schools are tuition free. 

' ' In 1870 when Raritan Township was organized out of Woodbridge 
and Piscataway Township, 12 Fairfield Union School District (Fords), 
Lafayette Union District, and Uniontown District (Iselin) were divided by 
the new township lines, leaving Fairfield Union School and Uniontown 
Schools in Woodbridge, and Lafayette Union Schoolhouse in Raritan." 13 

Through the reorganization of townships and school districts, in 1869, 
Woodbridge had thirteen free public schools and two private ones. 

1. Rahway Neck (Between Carteret and Rahway) 

2. Blazing Star (Carteret) 

3. Academy (Banks of Woodbridge Creek near the Woodbridge 

Lumber Company on Rahway Avenue) 

4. Jefferson (Woodbridge) 

5. Fairfield Union (South side of King George's Post Road) 

6. Bonhamtown 

7. Franklin (Metuchen) 

8. Uniontown (Near Menlo Park) 

9. New Dover 

10. Mt. Pleasant 

11. Oak Tree 

12. Washington (Avenel) 

13- Locust Grove (Far edge of township beyond Colonia) 

1 1 Fifteen demerits — meeting with the principal; twenty demerits - notice 
to parents; twenty-five demerits - suspension for a week. (Love, op. 
cit. p. 80). 

12 In 1954 Raritan Township's name was changed to the Township of 
Edison (Manual of Legislature of N.J., ed. by J.J. Gribbins, p.271). 

13 Love, op. cit., pp. 136, 137. 




- 







"*M:lI.Vr 






Grave Of First Child Bom In Woodbridge; 
Trinity Episcopal Church Yard, Woodbridge 



Two private schools were Mrs. Record's Boarding School for Young Ladies 
in Woodbridge and the Adrian Institute, located halfway between Wood- 
bridge and Iselin on New Bloomfield Avenue. 

The growth and quality of textbooks paralleled the development of 
schools. Few textbooks were used before the American Revolution other 
than the Horn Book and a few primers. Only in 1783 did Noah Webster's 
spelling book become available. Eight years later, a major step was taken 
by Jedediah Morse when he wrote the first American geography book. The 
teaching of English grammar was left to the Horn Book. 14 A favorite 
arithmetic book was one by Rose of Perth Amboy. The answers were 
printed in letters instead of figures. The key, given only to teachers, was 



"1234567 8 90" 15 
pert hamboy 

Reading books by Sanders, graded for grades I to IV, were introduced in 
1840. 

If you consider the textbooks to be primitive, the colonial school- 
house was even more so. A typical building was sixteen feet square and 
made of logs. A fireplace provided the only heat, and the windows were 
holes covered with oiled paper. The desks were used by the older pupils 
only, and benches were provided for the others. Corporal punishment was 
the accepted means of discipline. The rod was never spared. 

In order to maintain the chronology that is so important in understand- 
ing this early history of our schools, mention should be made of the follow- 
ing dates in an organized manner. 

1776— No provision for education in the New Jersey State Constitution. 

1816— First effort to provide funds from the State to establish free 
schools. 

1820— Tax by township used only for the education of poor children. 

1829— State law that teachers had to be licensed by the township 
school committee. 

1845— Township law provided for a separate school for Negroes in 
Rahway District number I. 

14 Old timers might be interested to know that there were no textbooks on 
penmanship in the eighteenth century. (Love, op. cit. Ch 6). 

15 Ibid., p. 54. 



1846— A State School Act provided that school districts were to be in- 
corporated by taking a name and seal and stating their boundar- 
ies. After being incorporated, the schools, by a two-thirds vote, 
could raise any money needed for maintenance, land, or build- 
ing to elaborate further: 

' 'The first district to take advantage of this law was School 
District #1, which was incorporated April 19, 1852, under the 
name of 'The Colombian School. The section of the township 
now known as Colonia caused its School District #3 to be 
incorporated April 22, 1854 as 'Washington School'. The 
school district at Fords, covering the territory from Fords to 
Bonhamtown and from Fords to the Perth Amboy line, was 
incorporated March 15, 1858, as the 'Fairfield Union School'. 
On January 5, 1859, School Districts 11 and 12 in the north- 
west section of the township were incorporated as the ' Oak 
Tree School'. The uptown school district of Woodbridge, how- 
ever, was not incorporated until May 24, 1860, when it was 
designated 'Jefferson School District'. The Iselinor 'Union- 
town School District' was incorporated April 6, 1861. The 
'Washington School District' No. 13, formerly #3 was re- 
incorporated April 4, 1864. ' Star School District' #2, for the 
Carteret, Port Reading and Sewaren district, was incorpor- 
ated in 1865." 16 

1848— State law provided for the first town school superintendent to 
take the place of the township school committee. 

1866— 1867— The position of school superintendent was abolished be- 
cause of ineffectiveness and great turnover in number of super- 
intendents. 17 

1866— The beginning of the State Board of Education. 

May 14, 1867— Jefferson School closed because of insufficient funds. 
This school was located on the south side of Main Street on 
what is now Columbus Avenue. Later it moved to a location 
opposite the Memorial building. 

1867— State legislation recasting the school system and providing for 
county superintendents. 

16 McElroy, op. cit., p. 15. 

17 In 1867 there were two hundred fifty such superintendents in New Jer- 
sey (Love, op. cit., p. 57.) 

8 









^^^K B^ 










mi 








*» '. *j& 


vsm Bt 








k* wj* 


Mill 






. . — _, \ 






< ; /•>•-. 


' fl 




-TsUHiflP^fll 


I 1 




[fu 


^^ 4 1 


i 


1 H MS hD 

/ ;■§ US &8fl 

i 1 


M 


«*|, — . .„ k l 






wWP^ ' '"' | 


/ rWt 








..Vj^H 






fev. ' 


11 «* -* 1 * 3QI 




■•■lis 


ftfi 




" • a 


H 


js^ *'-'"* 


D 








[I ' v*V ' i la ■ 








1 1 -•• Attl 








* * » Ml\l 








■P 








m m fu\w 



=tfc 

"o 
o 

J3 

o 



O 

b 

bo 

s 

O 
O 

5: 



o 

o 

a" 
>-« 

9 
z 

re 

O 

=r 
o 
o 




10 




11 



I 
I 

a> 

fD 
<-i 

CC 
O 

cr 
o 
o 

% 
to 




12 



1871— State Law providing for the schools of New Jersey to be free. 

November 8, 1876— a clock to be placed in the tower of #1 school was 
bought for $600 from E. Howard and Company, a New York 
factory. The striking apparatus of the clock was operated 
through a hammer which struck from the outside of a bell. This 
bell weighs 1,500 lbs. and cost $25,000. The inscription on it 
is: "School District #24, A.D. 1876. C.W.Boynton, President: 
Howard Valentine, D.C., William H. Berry and Charles Campbell, 
Trustees. Wisdom is better than gold."* 

1884— State Compulsory Education Law. 

1894— Uniting of the many small schools into the township under one 
administration. 

1894— At the time School #1 was built, there were seven other schools 
which were thereafter known by numbers as follows: 

1876-#l-Woodbridge Built 1876 18 

1922-#2-Blazing Star (not to be confused with present #2 
at Colonia) 
#3— Rahway Neck (Not to be confused with present 

Strawberry Hill) 
#4— Washington (located at Six Roads the intersection 

of highways 27 and 35, Rahway.) 19 
#5— Locust Grove (not to be confused with present #5 
in Avenel) 

1916-#6-Iselin 

1916-#7-Fairfield (Fords) 

This school was destroyed by fire in 1861, and re- 
built in 1862. To make room for the new school in 
1916(#7) it was removed to a site across King 
George's Road. 

1906-#8-Keasbey 

1897— The high school course was increased from three to four years. 
1900— Port Reading School #9 was opened. 

1900— John Love was appointed the first superintendent of all Wood- 
bridge Schools. 

18 #7 is no longer used as a school. In 1961 it became the Woodbridge 
Township Administration Building. 

19 The Washington School was sold for $75. when the Avenel School was 
built. Later it was torn down. 

* See page 21. 

13 



1902— The New Dover School was closed. 

1904-Carteret School #10 replaced School #2. 

1906— Carteret left Woodbridge and formed the Borough of Roosevelt. 

This included School #10. 
1909— Schools were overcrowded. Classes were held in the Hungarian 

Parish House and the firehouse. 
1909— Introduction of manual training in schools. 
1910— Plans were approved for a new high school on Barron Avenue. 

John Pierson & Son of Perth Amboy were the architects. Ira 

Crouse was the general contractor, and John Reed of New 

Brunswick was the heating contractor. 
April 17, 1911 - The Locust Grove (#5 School) was closed. 

Sept. 11, 1911 — Official opening of Woodbridge High School. The 
original faculty was John H. Love, Supervising Principal; Miss 
Edith Whitney, Vice Principal; Isaac Gilhuly, Edith Brandon, 
Viola Dunham, Ruth Braley, Helen Homes, Anna Shoemaker, 
Leona Van Ripper, Frank C. Ryder, Nellie Hamil, Anna Keegan, 
Edith Scott, and Edith Hinsdale. (See chap. I p. 11 for the history 
of the high school). 

1912-The Avenel School became School #4. 

1913-The Hopelawn School became School #10. 

1915— Night Vocational School was started. Three dollars a night was 
charged for mechanical drawing, cooking, and sewing. (Vo- 
cational education is discussed at length in Chapter V). 

1916— The impact of World War I was felt in Woodbridge, and military 
training was introduced in the high school. 

Feb. 4, 1916 — Iselin School #6 on Green Street was destroyed by 
fire caused by an overheated furnace while the pupils were out- 
doors for recess. 

March 21, 1916 — A new Iselin school building was approved, costing 
$18,000. Also, on this day, a four-room addition for the Port 
Reading School was authorized costing $16,000. 

1917— Physical education was made compulsory. 

1919— Number 11 School was constructed. 
1919— The first school nurse was appointed. 



14 




CO 

T-H 

05 



CO 
CO 
CO 



s 

0) 



15 



1919— Manual training, domestic arts, and music were introduced into 
Woodbridge schools. 

1921— Construction was begun for a Sewaren school on the corner of 
Sewaren Avenue and Sherman Street. 

1922— Construction of the Colonia School began. 

1925— An addition to the high school was opened containing an 
auditorium, chemistry lab, physical training room, gym, and 
cafeteria. Arthur C. Ferry was named principal. 

1926— A portable school building was erected to relieve School #9 in 
the Hagaman Heights section of Port Reading. 

1926— Summer schools were organized in the high school and in 
School #11. 

1926— The elementary schools in Keasbey, Hopelawn, and Fords were 
grouped into the South Side schools of the township. The re- 
maining schools became known as the North Side. 

1930— Superintendent John H. Love suggested a junior high on the 
site of an old building on School Street for grades seven to 
nine, leaving Barron Avenue for grades ten to twelve. This pro- 
posal, and another for an addition to School 11 for grades one 
to six, were both impossible, because of the depression. 

1931— Strawberry Hill School (#3) replaced the Rahway Neck School. 

1933— School #15 was erected in Iselin. 

Sept. 1933 — Double session in the high school was begun as a "tem- 
porary measure." 

June 30, 1933 — John Henry Love resigned after thirty-five years of 
service. 

Sept. 22, 1933 — Victor C. Nicholas assumed the duties of superin- 
tendent of Woodbridge schools. 

1937— The Town Committee charged the Board of Education with ' ' be- 
trayal" and wanted to abolish it as a money-spending agency. 

October, 1938 - The first Boys' Day, now known as Youth Week, was 
sponsored by the Woodbridge Lions' Club. 



16 



January 26, 1941— The Locust Grove School, located near the Clark 
Township School, was destroyed by fire. It had not been used 
as a school since 1911, but served as a landmark because it 
was one of the oldest buildings in the country. 

1943— An influenza epidemic caused the closing of schools for a time. 

1944— Dr. John P. Lozo was appointed principal of Woodbridge High 
School. 

April 29, 1949— The Board of Education had an informal conference 
with Assistant Commissioner of Education Anderson to discuss 
the possibility of constructing a new high school. 

1956— School 18 in Iselin was opened. Construction was started on the 
Hoffman Boulevard School in Colonia and the Menlo Park Ter- 
race School #19. 

September 1956— Woodbridge High School on Kelly Street was opened 
at a cost of $3, 125,000. However, due to unprecendented school 
population growth, it proved to be inadequate and the double 
session was continued until September 1964. 

December, 1956— Mr. Victor C. Nicklas, Superintendent of Woodbridge 
Schools, died. He was succeeded by Patrick A. Boylan. 

1959-1960— Three new junior high schools were constructed to ac- 
commodate, with the Barron Avenue School, the number of pu- 
pils in attendance on a full-day basis. 

1964— Summer school re-instituted for elementary and secondary 
education; a summer music school instituted with lessons and 
experience on Band and Orchestra instruments as well as 
piano; jointly sponsored by Board of Education and Township 
Recreation Dept. 

September, 1964— The second senior high school in the township— John 
F. Kennedy Memorial High — opened; Miss Mary P. Connoly, 
principal. 

September, 1964— Avenel Junior High to be opened. 

The organization of secondary education in Woodbridge Township 
underwent still another revision with the adoption of a 6-3-3 plan in 1959. 
However, a three-year high school was not a true innovation, since it had 
been in operation until 1897. At that time the addition of so many new 
courses to the curriculum in order to raise the academic standards made 

17 




Original Woodbridge High School- 1911 




Woodbridge Senior High School- 1956 



18 



it necessary for pupils to remain in high school the fourth year to com- 
plete the requirements. 

To accommodate the 6-3-3 plan, the Barron Avenue School in Wood- 
bridge was converted into Woodbridge Junior High School and three new 
junior highs in Colonia, Fords, and Iselin were built and ready for use in 
1959-1960. 

As the township population has continued to grow, so the school 
population has increased correspondingly, making necessary a second 
senior high school, the John Fitzgerald Kennedy Memorial High School, in 
the Iselin area, a junior high in Avenel, and a new elementary school, #26 
on Benjamin Avenue, Iselin. These were ready for use in 1964. Additions 
to schools #19, 21, and 22 were built during the same year. 

Old school #9 in Port Reading was turned over to the Town Council 
to be sold on bid to whoever will maintain it as a school. 21 It was sold. 

WOODBRIDGE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

Before 1911, high school classes had been held in School #1. With the 
introduction of the four-year high school in 1897, enrollment became so 
large that a separate building was needed. The governor of New Jersey, 
Mr. J. Franklin Fort, laid the cornerstone of the school on Barren Avenue 
on October 6, 1910. It was opened in 1911 and was to be the high school 
for Woodbridge Township until 1956. 

As the enrollment increased, additional rooms were built from time to 
time. In 1925, an auditorium, gymnasium, six class rooms, a physics lec- 
ture room, the supervising principal's office, and the chemistry laboratory 
were added to Woodbridge High School. Previously, the chemistry labora- 
tory consisted of a table lowered from the ceiling of a classroom. In 1932, 
an annex, housing five classrroms, was built in back of the Barron Avenue 
School to accommodate the rise in high school enrollment caused by the 
return to school of those who could not find employment due to the de- 
pression. 

1956 marked the opening of a new $3,125,000 schoolbuilding, Wood- 
bridge Senior High School, where St. George Avenue and Freeman Street 
converge. 

As originally constructed the academic wing accommodated forty- 
three classrooms, including well-equipped chemistry and physics labora- 
tories. The library, located on the second floor, accommodates more than 

21 The Independent Leader, March 12, 1964, Sec. 1, p. 1. 

19 



ten thousand books and reference materials. One of the most prized items 
of reference in the library is the New York Times on microfilm, a gift of 
the Class of '60. This microfilm library has been added to generously by 
gifts from classes more recently graduated. 

The administrative wing was intended to provide a space for a cen- 
tral office, administrative offices, offices of the department heads, guid- 
ance center, and a publications room. 22 

A third wing houses workshops, a home economics suite, art rooms, 
an auditorium seating over twelve hundred, and triple gymnasiums equipp- 
ed with three basketball courts, showers, and locker rooms. 23 

The school year 1964-65 will see another great change in our school 
system. At that time, and for the first time in the history of this township, 
we will have a second senior high school with the opening of the John F. 
Kennedy Memorial School in the Iselin area. And, too, for the first time 
since the school year 1932-33, every public school in the township will be 
on a full-day session. 

That there is "nothing so constant as change" is indeed well illu- 
strated in this history of our school system in its growth and development 
to meet the needs of Our People, Our Purpose, Our Progress.* 

Reflection upon the changes which have taken place within our school 
system within the last eight years (since WSHS was opened) gives proof 
to this observation. 

1956- 8th grade was housed in the high school 

1957- 8th grade was transferred to Barron Avenue. 

1959- 9th grade was transferred to Junior High School Buildings. 
1964-lOth grade through I2th was divided into two high schools. 



22 With the new addition in 1963, the department heads' offices and 
publication room were transferred to other parts of the school. The 
guidance center was enlarged, and conference rooms were provided. 



23 This area underwent some revision in 1963 when a ' { D" section was 
added to the building to provide much-needed space for science and 
language labs and business education classrooms. 

* See Appendix - Charts 1, 11, and 111, Woodbridge Township School 
System pages 59, 60, 61. 

20 




Bell Atop The Tower In Old School- # 1 



21 



# of teachers in H.S. 

# of teachers in township 

# of pupils in H.S. 

# of pupils in township 

# of elementary schools in township 17 

# of junior high schools 



1956-57 


1963-64 


( 8 full time & 




8 partime) 




84 approx. 


159 


350 approx. 


800 approx. 


2161 


3765 


8000 approx. 


20,000 approx 


17 


27 





4 



And thus the history of education in our township has been recorded. 
The time, interest, money, and care which have been expended to this end 
bespeak the belief in the motto carved into the lintel above the auditor- 
ium door of the Barron Avenue School building, "Liberty is the Fruit of 
Knowledge." An earlier motto, not nearly so evident but equally sagacious, 
is molded into the bell atop the tower of the old School #1 on School 
Street; "Wisdom is better than gold". 



22 



CHAPTER II 
The Free School Lands 

" ... All persons as well as the freeholders, 1 as others the free- 
men and inhabitants admitted in the said corporation or township , 
shall contribute according to their estates... one hundred acres... 
for the maintenance of a free school, which said land shall not be 
allionated, but shall remain from one Incombatant to another for- 
ever. Which said land.. .shall be exempted from paying of the 
Lord's Rent or a half penny per acre, or any other rate of taxes 
forever." 2 

With the above words and the institution of Woodbridge Township on 
June 1, 1669, provisions were made for the education which the settlers 
of the new town held as indispensable; the land set aside would be con- 
tributed by all and would be forever tax free. 

It is interesting to note, at this point, the connection between this 
early provision for a public school and the famous Northwest Ordinance of 
1785, which also established free education. As we have seen above, in 
1669, the people of Woodbridge Township, having come from New England 
and being used to the custom of free public aducation there, were guaran- 
teeing their children an education through the same formula. The North- 
west Ordinance also was based on the New England model of townships, 
providing that one section in each should be sold for the benefits of 
common schools. Thus we can see the strong influence of the Puritan love 
of education, in one small New Jersey township in 1669, and in the North- 
west Territory in 1785. 

Because general location had been agreed upon, but not properly sur- 
veyed, the Township soon had quite a problem to contend with— certain 
people were living on the Free School Lands with the intention of eventu- 
ally claiming it. In September, 1682, an aroused public met for a Town 
Meeting at which they resolved to prosecute all persons refusing to leave 
these lands; in addition, Captain Pike, John Bishop, Sr., Thomas Bloom- 
field, and Samuel Morse were appointed to enforce this resolution as well 
as to declare illegal all patents held on the property. On October 10, 1682, 
the committee, acting as instructed, began a surveying struggle that was 
to continue through the next thirty-three years-they attempted to define 
the Free School Lands as consisting of twelve acres of marshland and 

1 As used here, the word "freeholder" is the Old English term meaning c 
landowner. 

2 "Section Four", Woodbridge Charter of June 1, 1669. 

23 



*5 



& 



I6ELIN 



aS J£22i5& 



L*cu, 



\WOODBRIDCE 



FREE SCHOOL 
LANDS 1 



24 



eighty-eight acres of upland. By 1701, the people of Woodbridge Township 
had realized the necessity of having the school land surveyed properly be- 
fore any of the common land could be divided; and they appointed a com- 
mittee to "lay out the same in such place or places as they in their dis- 
gression shall judge best, most convenient and beneficial for the town in 
general." 3 Slightly contrary to the plans of the previous committee, this 
group then set aside one hundred acres 4 of upland with no marshland. By 
the landmarks of today, this area is bounded by the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road, the Garden State Parkway, the Reading Railroad, and in part by the 
Woodbridge-Edison Township line in the area of Iselin. ' 'All is within the 
confines of the Township of Woodbridge, except for a small sliver extend- 
ing into Edison.'* 5 (See the map of the Free School Lands p. 24.) 

For several years after this initial controversy on the subject of the 
Free School Lands, little was done beyond declaring that they were to 
"remain unmolested, laid in 'common fields' and planted with corn." 6 

On January 28, 1714, a committee of four was appointed unanimously 
to take "special care of the school land, in that manner as shall seem 
most advantageous for the end it was laid out for, and also to agree with 
those that have now got timber cut upon it." 7 

In July of 1715, it was determined that a committee of five men, head- 
ed by Thomas Pike, would re-survey the Free School Lands in addition to 
other duties of caring for the said land. The freeholders also resolved to 
sell the "one hundred" acres, but they found that only by an order from 
the General Assembly could such a sale be made valid. On March 28, 
1716, the township of Woodbridge voted to set out two acres of the proper- 
ty for the new town of Rahway. Then, again, on January 3, 1717, the town- 
people met and resolved that it would be more convenient and advantage- 
ous to sell the land. John Kinsey and Moses Rolph were appointed to 
petition the General Assembly to pass an act permitting such a sale; 
however, this action was not carried out, and the land was not sold. 



3 J.W. Dally, Woodbridge and Vicinity, p. 144. 

4 It was later discovered that the area which the committee described 
actually contained about 163 acres. 

5 ' 'Graham vs. Edison Township", Reports of Cases Argued and Deter- 
mined By the Supreme Court of New Jersey, vol 35. p. 546. 

6 Dally, op. cit. p. 148. 

7 Ibid, p. 181. 



25 



At this point in its history, the school land was given, from year to 
year, into the hands of appointed committees and leased for terms not ex- 
ceeding ten years. (This was determined by a ruling in 1735.) The follow- 
ing table 8 illustrates how the school fund collected from the rent of this 
property increased from 1764 until 1776 (the principal in 1764, was4 361. 
10s. 9d., and the interest accruing amounted to-L 72. 17s., making a total 
ofL 434. 7s. 9d.): 

Year L (Pounds .s (Shillings) d(Pence) 

1764 434 7 9 

1765 465 5 3 

1766 533 8 2 
1767-69 

1770 740 

1771 794 

1772 850 

1773 900 

1774 985 4 10 

1775 1,063 14 11 

1776 1,162 12 6 

( During the days of the Revolutionary War, although no account of the 
expenditures has yet been found, the amount of money put into the fund 
was decreased; and it is assumed that the balance was absorbed for mili- 
tary operations.) On March 11, 1766, the motion to apply the interest of 
the Free School Lands fund for the "schooling of poor people's children" 
was raised, but defeated, at the Town Meeting. Ironically, by 1789, the in- 
habitants were using not only this interest, but also that from the tax on 
dogs, for educating these children. The situation remained very nearly the 
same — with short-term leases allowed on the land, committees of free- 
holders supervising it, and fund being used to educate underprivileged 
children— until 1805. In that year, however, the township itself rented the 
property for use as a poor farm until other land was obtained for this pur- 
pose from the Port Reading trustees in 1919. In 1920, the inhabitants of 
the poor farm were transferred to their new home, and the Free School 
Lands were vacated once again. 

In 1769, the freeholders of the town had appealed to the head of the 
colony for a charter which would organize a committee specifically en- 
trusted with the care of the Free School Lands, and which would define 
that committee's duties and powers; the people of Woodbridge Township 
had discovered that a small group with clear instructions could care most 
efficiently for the property. As the document which grants these requests 
so clearly states of its purpose: 

8 Dally, op. cit., p. 183 

26 



"...the said Freeholders find themselves unable and without 
authority properly to settle the accounts with such persons as 
have from time to time been appointed to receive the rents and 
issues of the said one hundred acres of Land or to prosecute 
such persons as from time to time have committed waste and 
trespass on the same or to build a school house or to make pro- 
vision for the maintenance of proper masters and teachers and 
to make and obtain proper laws and instructions for the good 
governing of the said schools and have therefore prayed our 
letters patent under our Great Seal of our said province of New 
Jersey to incorporate the said Freeholders of the town with such 
Powers, immunities, privileges, and jurisdictions as may be 
thought requisite and necessary for the more effectual promoting 
and the better order and governing the said school and /or schools 
in the said town of Woodbridge..." 9 

The first ' 'Trustees" of the Free School Lands of Woodbridge Township, 
as the new committee was called— John Moores, Nathaniel Heard, Moses 
Bloomfield, Benjamin Thornall, Ebenezer Foster, Joseph Shotwell, and 
Robert Clarison— and their successors henceforth were to be "one body 
politic and corporate" and were to have ' 'perpetual succession in deed 
and fact and name."^ The charter of the school land gave to the com- 
mittee full power to "acquire, hold, and sell or otherwise dispose of real 
and personal property with the right to sue and be sued and the specific 
authority to demand and collect moneys arising out of the school lands re- 
ceived by persons previously appointed."^ 1 Plenary power was also 
granted for the engagement of teachers and for the maintenance of the 
schools themselves. The trustees were to be elected, and still are, once 
every three years, on the first Tuesday in March, at the Town Meeting. In 
the event of a vacancy, a freeholder was to be nominated, elected, and 
chosen by the freeholders of the Township as a replacement/The charter 
and its legal contents were declared to be forever valid. 

In 1949, the Trustees of the Free School Lands conveyed about thirty 
acres of the now vacated property (only the few deserted buildings of the 
old poor farm remained on the land) to the state for use as part of the 
Garden State Parkway; and the decreased acreage sank into public oblivion 
for about six years. In December, 1955, however, the Trustees entered in- 
to a contract to sell the Free School Lands, or the greater portion of them, 

9 The Charter of the Free School Land in Woodbridge of June, 1769. 

10 Ibid. 

11 "Graham vs. Edison Township", Reports of Cases Argued and De- 
termined by the Supreme Court of New Jersey, vol. 35, p. 548. 

27 



to a manufacturing company for $275,000. At this point, Arnold S. Graham, 
a Woodbridge taxpayer and resident, instituted the action of attacking the 
proposed sale as illegal and beyond the powers of the Trustees; he also 
claimed that the price was grossly inadequate. Joined as defendants were 
the Townships of Edison and Woodbridge, the Borough of Metuchen, the 
Trustees of the Free School Lands, the Boards of Education from Edison, 
Metuchen, and Woodbridge, and the various other municipal and state cor- 
porations. Although several months later the agreement of sale was can- 
celled because the "vendee" was unable to obtain title insurance, the 
proceedings continued in an effort to define the Trustees' power, the 
quantity of the land itself, and its rightful ownership. In 1961, the Su- 
preme Court of New Jersey decided that the benefits of the property were 
to go for public education purposes in the present confines of Woodbridge 
Township; no other municipality (neither Edison nor Metuchen) had any 
interest in the land. 12 As to the question of actual ownership, the Wood- 
bridge Board of Education, the Trustees, and the Township of Woodbridge 
agreed to collaborate in any action since they all were concerned with the 
land's most advantageous use. 

In the Woodbridge Independent Leader of August 17, 1961, an an- 
nouncement appeared, stating that Mayor Frederick M. Adams and the 
Town Committee favored the sale of the Free School Lands as an in- 
dustrial park: the proceeds of the sale would go toward the Board of 
Education's school construction program, thus easing the tax burden of 
the landowners of the township. It was also suggested that such a sale 
would bring much needed ratables into the Township. In Mr. Adam's 1963 
mayorial campaigns, he again stressed the need to subdivide the school 
land into individual ten to fifteen acre sites, to provide a diversified in- 
dustrial park for clean industries. His opponent and the present Mayor of 
Woodbridge Township, Walter Zirpolo, however, did not include this plan 
in his program; and the preoccupation of the Township with the action con- 
cerning the often-disputed land greatly decreased until the time of this 
writing when rumors of its potential sale are again appearing in the press. 



12 Graham us. Edison Township op. cit., p.550 

28 



CHAPTER in 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

The State Board of Education, created and established by an Act of 
Legislation October 19, 1911, has the responsibility for the general super- 
vision and control of public education. 1 There has been a State Superin- 
tendent of Public Education since 1846. 2 The New Jersey school system 
is considered a "home rule," with the local board strong, operating under 
a minimum of state control. 

The State Board of Education, established in 1866, consists of ten 
members; the 1911 Act set up standards for membership: at least two mem- 
bers must be women, no political party may be in majority, no two mem- 
bers may come from the same county, and candidates must be citizens re- 
siding in the state for at least five years. 3 

The members are appointed by the governor with the advice and con- 
sent of the senate for a term of eight years. They receive no salary, but 
their expenses are paid by the state treasurer upon the warrant of the state 
comptroller. The State Board of Education has certain rights and duties: 

1. To frame and modify the by-laws for its own government and to 
elect its president and officers. 

2. To prescribe and enforce rules and regulations necessary to carry 
out State school laws. 

3. To prescribe rules and regulations for teachers' institutes. 

4. To decide appeals from the decisions of the commissioner. 

5. To make and enforce rules and regulations for the examination of 
teachers and the granting of $5 certificates or licenses to teach. 

6. To prescribe a uniform and simple system of bookkeeping for use 
in all school districts and to compel all to use the same system. 

7. To appoint, upon application, a supervising principal over schools 
in two or more districts when advisable and to apportion the ex- 
pense among the districts. 

i New Jersey Statutes Annotated, Title 18:2—1. 

2 Manual of the Legislature of New Jersey - 1963, p. 219. 

3 Statutes Annotated, 18:2—2. 

29 



8. To withhold or withdraw approval of a secondary school when its 
academic work, location, or enrollment and per capita cost of main- 
tenance do not warrant its establishment or continuance. 

3. To fix rates for non-resident students when districts cannot agree. 

10. To compel production of records and attendance of witnesses at 
hearings. 

11. To issue subpoenas for the above purpose. 

12. To conduct building operations when necessary and to select 
architects. 

13. To condemn lands needed for school purposes. 

14. To administer oaths and examine witnesses. 

15. To permit the use of school lands for recreational purposes. 4 

The State Department of Education has the same general purpose as 
the State Board: the general supervision of public instruction throughout 
the State. 5 This department consists of twelve appointed members with a 
six-year term. It determines policies and makes recommendations regard- 
ing the unified, continuous, and efficient development of public education. 
It approves the acts of the Commissioner, confirms appointments of de- 
partmental offices and county superintendents, decides appeals from de- 
cisions in controversies and disputes, and prescribes the rules for the 
granting of teachers' licenses and the executing of the State school laws. 6 

The Commissioner of Education is appointed by the Governor for a 
five-year term. The Chief executive and administrative officer of the De- 
partment, he is also secretary of the State Board and its official agent. 
He supervises all schools receiving State appropriations, apportions 
State School aid, 7 establishes rules for the management of vocational 
schools and State teachers' colleges, and issues qualifying academic 
certificates. His other duties include the licensing of nonsectarian pri- 
vate boarding schools, trade schools, and child care centers and the 
deciding of controversies arising under the school laws. 8 

4 Statutes Annotated 18:2-4 through 18:2-7 

5 Bureau of government Research of Rutgers University, Handbook of 
New Jersey State Government, p. 39 

6 Ibid, p. 39 

7 See Appendix Chart IV & V, p. 62 and 63. 

8 Bureau of Government Research, op. cit., p. 40. 

30 



In each of the twenty-one counties there is a superintendent of 
schools, appointed by the State Commissioner of Education to supervise 
public education in his own county. His job includes advising the local 
boards of education, supervising pupil transportation, and rendering pre- 
scribed reports to the State Board. 9 His authority extends to all public 
schools within his county, save those in cities, which are under the su- 
pervision of the State Commissioner. 

The State Department of Education also includes fourteen branches 
for Divisional Education. These are Division of Controversies and Dis- 
putes, which acts as the legal advisor for the department; the Division for 
Elementary Education, which supervises the grade schools and licenses 
child care centers and nursery schools; the Division for Secondary Edu- 
cation, which overseas all secondary schools subject to State approval; 
the Division for Higher Education, in charge of all colleges and pro- 
fessional schools accredited by the State Board of Education; the Division 
for Vocational Education, which administers the Department's vocational 
programs; and the Division of Business, primarily responsible for the ap- 
portionment and distribution of State Funds. Other divisions are the Di- 
vision Against Discrimination, which includes a commission on civil 
rights; the Division for Health, Safety, and Physical Education, assisting 
schools in meeting the requirements for health instruction; the Division of 
Adult Education, which facilitates the development of adult educational 
services; the Division of Teacher Certification, which grants certificates 
for service in public schools through the State Board of Examiners; the 
Division of Academic Credentials, which issues high school equivalency 
diplomas and certain preprofessional qualifying certificates; and the di- 
visions of State Library, Archives, and History, State Museum, and Ad- 
ministration, which are self-explanatory. 10 

This system of check and balances prevents any one group from gain- 
ing complete authority, while at the same time keeping education in the 
State running smoothly and efficiently and making progress. 



9 Leonard B. Irwin and Herbert Lee Ellis, New Jersey-the Garden State, 
p. 182. 

10 Bureau of Government Research, op. cit., p. 44. 

31 



CHAPTER IV 

LOCAL BOARD OF EDUCATION 

The Woodbridge Township Board of Education, comparatively young 
in its present form, had its beginnings long ago as an emergency committee 
appointed to safeguard the land set aside for school purposes as provided 
for by the original charter in 1669 and referred to locally as the Free 
School Lands. 1 This group, selected at a special meeting of the Free- 
holders in 1714, proved to be effective; thus the management of school 
land was given from year to year into the hands of committees appointed 
at the annual Town Meeting. 2 

Since there was still no authority "to settle school accounts proper- 
ly, or to prosecute persons committing waste and trepassing on school 
lands, or to build a school house, or to make provision for the mainten- 
ance of proper teachers," 3 a charter was applied for and obtained regu- 
lating the affairs of the trustees. This charter, signed by William Franklin, 
Governor of the Province of New Jersey, at Burlington on June 24, 1769, 
names John Moores, Nathaniel Heard, Moses Bloomfield, Benjamin Thorn- 
all, Ebenezer Foster, Joseph Shotwell, and Robert Clarkson the first 
trustees under the charter as a body politic called "The Trustees of the 
Free Schools of the Town of Woodbridge."* 

In 1789 the Town Meeting authorized the use of the interest of the 
school fund for the schooling of poor children. This embryo of a budget 
was augmented from then to 1824 by the dog tax levied at that time. 5 

The State Legislature passed a law providing for the creation of a 
fund for the support of free schools in 1817. Three years later townships 
were authorized for the first time to raise money for school purposes by 
vote of the town meeting. 

April 17, 1846, marked the passage of an act to establish public 
schools; in this act provision was made for the appointment of a State 
Superintendent of schools and for the election at town meetings of a town 
superintendent who was, on or before the second Monday in May, 1846, to 
"set off and divide the township into convenient school districts" with 
power to alter as circumstances required. The local superintendent, paid 
one dollar a day, was to select, with the assistance of trustees of each 
school district, the text books for the schools. The first superintendent 

1 See Chapter 11, P. 23 7Q 

2 Leon E.McElroy, notes for History of Woodbridge Township, p. IS. 

3 Ibid, p. 13. 

4 Ibid, p. 14. 

5 Ibid, p. 14 

32 



in Woodbridge was Jacob B. Clarke. 6 The School Act of 1846 allowed 
school districts to incorporate by adopting a name and a seal and record- 
ing the boundaries in the office of the county clerk. Incorporated districts 
could raise by a two-thirds vote any district taxes for maintaining the 
school, buying land, or building school houses. By 1854 Woodbridge Town- 
ship had seventeen school districts attended by 1,173 children between 
the ages of 5 and 18 out of a total of 1,748 eligible in that age range. 
Nineteen teachers were employed: 12 men at a salary of $375 per annum 
and 7 women at a salary of $180. 7 

The use of the term Board of Education for those entrusted with the 
management of school affairs in Woodbridge did not take place till near 
the close of the 19th century. In the July, 1894-March, 1897 Minutes Book 
they were still being referred to as "Trustees of the Free Schools", 
where it is recorded that school elections were announced March 5 to be 
held March 16, 1897 to elect three trustees. The minutes of the latter date 
state that the purpose of the elections was to elect a ' 'Board of Edu- 
cation," the first time this title was used. 8 The victors, however, were 
still called trustees. It was not until the following year that the minutes 
began to read consistently ' 'the board of education." The date of election 
is now established under New Jersey State Law, Title 18, as the second 
Tuesday in February. At the same election the voters pass upon the school 
budget. If it is rejected in whole or part, a special school election on the 
budget as is or revised downward is held fifteen days later. If the budget 
is rejected a second time, it goes to the governing body of the Township, 
who then determines what the school budget shall be. Should the governing 
body not take action within ten days, the problem of the school budget is 
then sent to the State Department of Education for resolution. 9 

According to State law, as long as Woodbridge is governed as a town- 
ship, the local board of education is completely autonomous and in no way 
responsible to the governing body of the township. It is a separate entity 
with a separate budget, supposedly divorced from all political pressures. 10 

The Board of Education at the time of this writing has nine members- 
three are elected at large each year for a three-year term without salary. 



6 Leon E. McElroy, op. cit., p. 15. 

7 Ibid, p. 15. 

8 Woodbridge Board of Education, Minutes Book II: March 16, 1897- 
March 18, 1902. 

9 League of Women Voters, New Jersey Citizen's Facts and Date Book, 
p. 10. 

10 New Jersey State Law, 18:6-21 and 18:7-59. 

33 



The candidates, nominated by petition filed forty days before elections, 
must have three qualifications 1 1 : 

1. They must be able to read and write. 

2- They must be a township resident for at least three years. 

3. They must not have any contract with or against the board. 

Their petitions, filed with the Secretary of the Board, must be signed 
by ten registered voters of Woodbridge Township. 

The staff of the Board of Education includes a full-time secretary and 
a part-time engineer, attorney, and auditing firm. The superintendents is 
chief executive of the school system, administers policies of the Board, 
helps plan curricula, and makes recommendations concerning policies, ob- 
jectives, and personnel appointments. 

Board of Education meetings are public, held at 8:00 p.m. on the third 
Wednesday of each month. Special meetings may be called at the request 
of the president or three board members. Interim reports are made to the 
board by the Superintendent of Schools. 

The Board of Education functions with eight committees: Finance, 
Buildings, and Grounds, Supplies, Public Relations, Personnel, Athletics, 
Transportation, and Program and Policy. 12 

Thus, the Woodbridge Township Board of Education has grown from a 
small, basic one to an efficient body of nine; and it will continue to grow, 
according to the needs of the community. 



1 1 The League of Women Voters of Woodbridge - "This is Woodbridge" 
p. 43-1959. 

12 Woodbridge Township Board of Education Committee Assignments, 
1964-1965. 

34 



CHAPTER V 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 
Vocational Schools 

Vocational education in New Jersey had a later start than did the 
public school system. In 1913 the New Jersey State Legislature provided 
a clause in the Public Law, Chapter 294, establishing county vocational 
schools. 1 This plan was acted upon and in early 1914 the State Board 
of Education and the Board of Chosen Freeholders approved a plan for the 
establishment of vocational schools in Middlesex County. On October 26 
of the same year Judge Peter F. Daly of the Court of Common Pleas issued 
an order establishing a Board of Education for Vocational Schools in 
Middlesex County and appointed five members, including a County Super- 
intendent of Schools. Thus ours became the first county vocational school 
system in the United States. 2 

After an organization meeting November 2, 1914, the County Board of 
Education carried on an evening school program for two months in the win- 
ter of 1915; New Brunswick, Perth Amboy, and Jamesburg offered courses 
in mechanical drawing, carpentry, printing, cooking, dressmaking, and 
agriculture. 3 The fee was three dollars a night. 

Middlesex County Vocational School #1 was opened in a rented build- 
ing in New Brunswick on September 20, 1915. This was the first all-day 
full-time vocational school, teaching fifty-one boys. Admission require- 
ments stated that boys must be at least fourteen years old and must have 
completed the fifth grade. 4 

Middlesex County Vocational School #2 was opened October 1, 1916, 
with an enrollment of forty-five. Classes were held in a one-story building 
built the previous year; besides trade courses, mathematics, science, 
English, and civics were offered. 5 

When the boys moved out of the Guilden Street, New Brunswick, 
building to one on Easton Avenue on October 20, 1919, the old building 
was used for home economics training for girls— the first such all-day pro- 
gram for girls in the county. Lack of enrollment caused the girls' school 
to close in 1925. 6 

1 B.D. Coe Release: "A Brief History of Our Schools" Sect. 1, Oct. 11,63. 

2 Ibid. 

3 Ibid. 

4 Ibid. 

5 Ibid. 

6 Ibid. 

35 



A coeducational continuation school, opened in South River in 1921, 
was converted, after the repeal of the Continuation School Law in 1934, 
into a Middlesex County Girls' Vocational School offering classes in cook- 
ing, home nursing, domestic sewing, and machine sewing full-time. 7 

September 12, 1927 marked the moving of the Vocational School #2 to 
a different location in Perth Amboy; and addition was built in 1958- In 
1930 an addition was built to the New Brunswick school. 

Ground was broken in 1938 for the Middlesex County Girls' Vocation- 
al High School in Woodbridge; the land was donated by Mr. and Mrs. Hamp- 
ton Cutter. President Roosevelt also approved our application for a grant 
of $120,000 of Federal funds toward the estimated $267,400 cost of the 
school. The architect was Alexander Merchant. The school opened Sep- 
tember 18, 1939, with an enrollment of 194. 8 At this time the school in 
South River was discontinued. 9 

On April 1, 1949, the State Board of Education approved the three 
county schools as Middlesex County Vocational and Technical High 
Schools; thus a new era began in curriculum, status, and service. 10 

The Middlesex County Adult Technical School was approved on 
November 21, 1956, for the purpose of providing "full-time pre-employment 
training for adults in skilled trades and technical operation."^ 1 

So the vocational school system has grown with the county, expand- 
ing to meet its needs, providing the opportunity for a education for 
those not interested in a strictly academic course, and thus doing its 
share to combat unemployment. 

As this goes to press, it might be interesting to note that Mr. Albert 
E. Jochen, a young man born and educated in Woodbridge Township, heads 
vocational education in the state of New Jersey. 

Education for the Handicapped 

Education for two types of handicapped students, the educable and 
the trainable, was instituted as part of the Woodbridge Township school 
program in September, 1955. At that time, eight classes were held in 
Keasbey, consisting of five for young and middle educable students and 
three for trainable students. Provision for the deaf and retarded, who are 

7 Ibid. 

8 Ruth Wolk, History of Woodbridge, p. 68. 

9 Coe, op. cit., paragraph 13. 

10 Ibid, paragraph 14. 

1 1 Ibid, paragraph 15. 

36 



trainable, was set up in School #11. In Colonia Junior High School, there 
were two classes of those educable students who were mature socially, 
but not academically. 

In 1956, provisions were made that one classroom for the handicapped 
would be available for each 900 pupils of the total enrollment. 12 

A school psychologist was employed during 1959-60 by the require- 
ments of the Beadleston Act which made it mandatory that Boards of 
Education set up special classes for the handicapped and stated that the 
Board would decide which children needed special attention. At first the 
psychologists were employed part-time and later full-time; however, more 
services of this type are needed lest the time, interest, and attention of 
the school psychologists be absorbed in problems of the retarded without 
time for direction to normal student problems. 

The Beadleston Act not only provided for the education of the handi- 
capped, but also for those confined to their homes, completely unable to 
attend school. While this law went into effect in New Jersey 1954-55, it is 
interesting to note that Woodbridge Township had been providing for such 
pupils since 1938. 

Summer Sessions 

In 1964, summer sessions were reinstituted in Woodbridge Township. 
This was not totally new since there had been summer school in 1926 in 
the Barron Avenue Building under the auspices of the principal, Mr. Arthur 
C. Ferry. 

Retraining Program 

An innovation, however, is being considered for the summer of 1964. 
It is a special retraining program which proports to raise the economic 
level of high school dropouts and welfare recipients. Federal funds dis- 
pensed through the New Jersey Department of Labor under the Manpower 
Development Training Act provides help to defray the costs of such a 
program. 



12 Victor C. Nicklas, A Report of Additional School Housing Facilities 
Needed for the Township of Woodbridge, p. 6. 

37 



CHAPTER VI 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND ORGANIZATIONS 

OF 

WOODBRIDGE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

Over the many years there have been numerous student organizations 
in our high school. The core of a student group is a Student Council, its 
governing body. The Student Council we know today is sixteen years old, 
but, in 1924, there was a student organization known as the General Or- 
ganization. Its constitution was drawn up on December 16, 1924. This 
General Organization was dissolved in the year 1925-26. Another attempt 
was made to organize in 1927-28. The attempt was patterned after local 
township government with a mayor and a committee, or cabinet; however, 
it, too, was short-lived, having come to an inglorious end in the spring of 
1928. 1 

Not until 1944-1945 was a further attempt made to re-establish a 
Student Council. At that time a convention was held of delegates from 
each homeroom to draw up a Student Council Constitution, which was 
ratified by the student body voting in homerooms serving as voting dis- 
tricts. It was thus that our present Student Council came into existence in 
the school year of 1945-1946. 

Among the services established under the aegis of the Student Coun- 
cil in 1946-47 were the Lost and Found and the Information Center Lost 
and Found was not a new idea, however, for in 1925-1926, the Chatterbox, 
a school publication, had a column called "Lost and Found." The pur- 
pose of the Information Center was to greet all visitors to the school and 
to take them to their destination quickly and courteously. With the transfer 
of the high school from the Barron Avenue building in 1956, the function 
of the Information Center was abandoned by Student Council and assumed 
by voluntary receptionists. 

By 1962 the Student Council had instituted numerous projects, in- 
cluding the sale of cookies, 2 school supplies, and paperback books, the 
operation of a concession stand at football games, the sponsoring of social 
functions, and a foreign exchange program, sponsored by the American 
Field Service. 

1 While there are no records to substantiate this information, there is 
rumor around the school that the Student Council judge was the first 
person in need of sentencing; therefore, he resigned, since it was a bit 
awkward to sentence himself. 

2 There was no cafeteria because of the double session. 

38 



The Woodbridge Senior High School Chapter of the American Field 
Service has had a rather brief but extremely fruitful history. The idea for 
the Chapter was orignated at the end of 1962 school year when the Stud- 
ent Council was under the leadership of Frank Dito. At that time the 
Middlesex County Association of High School Student Councils, of which 
Woodbridge was a member, aided our school in starting a foreign exchange 
plan. Meetings were held with Highland Park High School, which already 
had a similar program. Ardavazt Honanyan and Warren Luhrs, of the Class 
Of 1963, worked diligently on plans and, in January-February of 1963, 
final arrangements were made for the stay of our foreign student. Elizabeth 
Sales from England arrived in America in August, 1963, and became our 
first foreign pupil under the American Field Service program. Plans are 
underway to send Michael Van Dzura, a Woodbridge High School junior, to 
Peru during the summer of 1964. 3 

The music organizations form an important part in our school activi- 
ties. Around 1916, a plectrum orchestra, consisting of guitars, banjos, and 
mandolins, was organized. An accordion ensemble, composed of seven or 
eight students who played classics, was also introduced. 4 The present 
band is far larger than the first Woodbridge High School Band of 1926. 
When it was organized, it consisted of a few instruments, and Mr. Nick 
Morrissey of Perth Amboy gave instructions one evening a week. By the 
next year interest has grown to such an extent that Mr. McKenzie from the 
Connecticut Instrument Company was engaged to help Miss Frazer with 
this phase of the instrumental program. By the spring of 1927, the band 
consisted of eighteen members. They played at the township Field Day, 
football games, high school plays, and gave an annual high school band 
concert. The first concert took place in the spring of 1929. During that 
school year additional instruments were purchased, and the following 
year the band purchased their first uniforms. 

Another instrumental group, the high school orchestra, was organized 
in 1917. Mr. Love, who was supervising principal, often joined the orches- 
tra members with his flute. At that time the orchestra played for the high 
school assemblies daily, all school dances, and commencement exer- 
cises. From the original twelve members, the orchestra's enrollment in- 
creased to over thirty-six. Orchestra at W.H.S. disbanded in 1962 due to a 
shortage of string instruments. 



3 Peter Manzo, interviewed by Elaine Bohrer (Woodbridge Sr. High School 
Woodbridge, N.J.) Feb. 1964. 

4 Miss Ann Frazer, interviewed by Carol Cohen (Woodbridge Senior High 
School, Woodbridge, N.J.), January, 1964. 

39 



The vocal section of the music department consists of a Glee Club 
which was established in 1916. At that time, however, the state did not 
grant academic credit for vocal work; participation was on a purely volunt- 
ary basis. The Glee Club began with a double quartet, which was very 
active participating in commencement exercises and school assemblies. 
Since 1960 the high school chorus of mixed voices has been composed of 
students selected from vocal music classes which carry academic credit. 

In all the musical activities, participation is, of course, voluntary; 
the various members have always used their own time to develop their 
musical talents, as practice and rehearsal have been held after school 
hours. Woodbridge pupils are frequently selected to participate in All- 
State Band, Orchestra and Chorus. 

Debating in Woodbridge Senior High School has long been an extra- 
curricular activity. In the early 20' s inter-scholastic debates were as im- 
portant and exciting as football games. The debates were held at night, 
and cheerleaders encouraged the debaters with cheers and songs. Inter- 
class debates between juniors and seniors too played an important part 
in school life; in fact, at one time debating was mentioned in the Alma 
Mater. 5 

The Woodbridge High School Chapter of the Future Teachers of 
America received its charter in 1955. The purpose of this organization is 
to acquaint interested pupils with the different aspects of the teaching 
profession. The club visits various teachers' colleges during the course 
of the year to become familiar with the educational opportunities avail- 
able to them. As a service to themselves and the community, they observe 
and act as teacher-aids in the schools of the township. 

The Woodbridge Senior High School Chapter of the Future Business 
Leaders of America was chartered in May, 1956 6 for the benefit of those 
students interested in advancing in the business world after graduation. 
During the course of the school year the members visit various lccal in- 
dustries in order to see how business concerns operated. Many programs 
are planned within the organization to help the students in applying for 
jobs and in learning the etiquette of the business world. 

The Junior Red Cross was started in 1942 to answer the need of the 
war effort. During the war years, the members packed gift boxes for ser- 
vicement and for children in war-torn countries. The contents were in ac- 
cordance with specifications prescribed by the National Red Cross head- 
quarters. Afghans, used as knee robes for servicement confined to wheel- 

5 ' 'In football and in baseball" was originally written "in glee club and 
debating". 

6 Miss Susan Pesce, interviewed by Elaine Bohrer (W.S.H.S, Woodbridge, 
N.J.) March 1964. 

40 



chairs in hospitals, were knitted in blocks or woven on little hand looms. 
The Domestic Science Department helped sew the blocks together and 
decorate them with featherstitching. Used playing cards were collected 
and donated to servicement who were in hospitals. 

Outside the aegis of the National Red Cross, but still within the 
management of the members of the Woodbridge High School Junior Red 
Cross organizations, there took place a very active and constructive as- 
sist to the war effort. The pupils cooperated with the Civilian Defense 
Department to direct and conduct the collection of all kinds of scrap 
materials vital to the winning of the war. Pupil-organized scrap drives 
began immediately after Pearl Harbor. In the early months of the war, old 
newspapers and magazines were collected; but as the war wore on, rubber, 
old silk stockings, tin cans, victrola records, and all kinds of discarded 
iron and other metal materials were collected also. Firms in the township 
loaned trucks for these drives which were conducted after church on Sun- 
days. Adults volunteered services as drivers, and high school boys sup- 
plied the labor to load onto the trucks the materials left at the curb by 
householders. (The township was divided into sections for collection pur- 
poses, and dates announcing the scrap drives were carried in local papers. 
Since tin was in scarce supply and collected as scrap, students paid ad- 
mission to school dances with empty tin cans, wire coat hangers, etc.) 

With the adoption of a constitution in 1962 the Junior Red Cross as- 
sumed new responsibilities. A Roosevelt Hospital Committee was es- 
tablished that same year. Members of this club and students from the school 
present programs to the patients and contribute their time to helping the 
nurses. 

The Current Civics Club was established in 1956 for those pupils 
interested in bettering themselves as citizens of the present and for the 
future and in developing an appreciation of our democratic way of life and 
our country's heritage. The group's program includes films, guest speakers, 
and field trips to aid the understanding of the variores government levels 
and the rights and duties of intelligent participating citizenship. In 1964 
as a part of the New Jersey Tercentenary Program, the Woodbridge Senior 
High School Jerseymen Chapter played host to the Jerseymen, a state high 
school organization of junior historians organized under the aegis of the 
N.J. Historical Society. At that time, our club's history fair projects were 
exhibited; many of these projects were entered in state competition, 
where one received the second highest award. 

The Woodbridge Chapter of the National Honor Society was founded 
on April 19, 1951. As a service to fellow students, the society instituted 
a tutoring project in 1957. In 1958, as a service to the community, the 

41 




Barrels For Scrap, For Admission To A Dance 
In Woodbridge High School Gym. 




Woodbridge High School Students Assist At Newspaper Scrap Drive 
World War II 
42 



Independent Leader Christmas Project was introduced; under this pro- 
gram members wrap gifts purchased for the needy with contributions to the 
Independent Leader Christmas Fund. The Society's educational programs 
began in 1960. Speakers from various colleges, universities, and other 
interesting areas, and films concerning a wide variety of topics have made 
the meetings of great value to the members. From the treasury, books 
recommended by department heads are purchased for the library. 7 

The A.V.T. (audio visual technicians) is another purely voluntary 
group organized under the supervision of the school Audio Visual Director. 
With the introduction of Audio Visual education into the school program, 
in 1947, the need for a squad of technicians became evident. Pupils with 
an interest in photography and electronics volunteered their services to 
deliver the materials to and from the classrooms, set up and run pro- 
jectors and equipment, and lend a hand wherever and whenever needed. 
Thus there came into being another avenue for pupil citizenship and 
school service. 

The first organized high school sport was baseball, which had its 
start in 1899. The early teams did not have adequate equipment; the 
players had to supply their own uniforms. Woodbridge baseball teams have 
won many championships over the years. 8 

The most popular high school sport, football, began in 1913, but it 
was banned the following year because of a serious injury to a player. 
The sport was resumed in 1924, using the Parish House field (behind the 
Presbyterian Manse on Rahway Avenue) since no other field was avail- 
able. The present stadium was built on the site of the old race track and 
dedicated in 1948. 

The Student Council in 1958—1959 presented a scoreboard for the 
stadium to the High School. Throughout years there have been many 
championship football teams at Woodbridge High School. 9 

Basketball, organized in 1914, is another one of the major sports. 
Originally, home games were played in the "cigar-box"-- the present-day 
air shaft in the center of the Barron Avenue School. It was so small that 
there was no out-of-bounds territory. Until the adoption of the double 
session in 1933, with resultant limitations upon time and place for prac- 



7 James Brown, interviewed by Carol Cohen (Woodbridge Sr. High School 
Woodbridge, N.J.) March 1964. 

8 See Appendix, page 50. 

9 See Appendix, page 50. 



43 



tice, there had been many successful basketball teams. 10 In 1963, Student 
Council dedicated a new scoreboard in the high school gym. 

In 1913 and 1915, Woodbridge High had dual track meets with Perth 
Amboy in Keasbey. In 1931, because of the depression, track was dis- 
continued. Reorganized in 1948, the track squad has since competed with 
many teams throughout the state. 

Cross country track, organized in 1961 provides good training for our 
young men; however, indoor track is the favorite sport. Since its beginning 
the squad has won many outstanding championships. 1 1 

Also organized in 1961, wrestling and soccer are comparatively new 
sports in W.H.S., although there were Varsity-Faculty soccer games in 
1924-1925- In 1964, the wrestling team became champions in Middlesex 
County. 

Girls' sports today are somewhat limited, but in 1914-1927, there 
were excellent inter scholastic girls' basketball teams. Basketball for 
girls was disbanded in 1928 because of the state regulations; however, 
girls soon had archery, which was introduced in 1931. When this sport was 
resumed after World War II, the teams won many contests. 12 

Bowling for girls was started in 1942. The girls used the bowling 
alleys at the Craftsmen's Club in Woodbridge proper because it was within 
walking distance of the school. 

Another activity for girls is cheerleading. In former years, the cheer- 
leaders accompanied the debating teams to spur them on to victory. Until 
1939, many boys took part in cheerleading, but girls took over in 1943. 
Cheerleaders today travel to football and basketball games and lead the 
school during pep rallies. Twirling and color guard squads work in con- 
junction with the cheerleaders to cheer the teams to victory, and to pre- 
sent interesting half-time programs with the marching band. 

Tennis for girls was instituted during the school year 1963-1964 and 
is progressing successfully. 

The first school newspaper, a paperbound edition called The Dial, 
was published by the students of 1906- The name was changed in 1920 



10 See Appendix, page 50 

1 1 See Appendix, page 50 

1 2 See Appendix, page 50 



44 



to L'Envoi, which means "messenger". It was issued six times a year at 
a subscription price of $.75. The title was again changed in 1924 to the 
Chatterbox. During the school years of 1924-1927, the Chatterbox appear- 
ed on a page in the regular weekly issue of the Woodbridge Independent, 
the township newspaper. 

The All-Hi News, the present school paper, was' started in 1930-1931 
as a senior English project. In 1935, various English classes helped to 
publish it. As time went by, the All-Hi News developed from one page into 
eight. Having thus become a sizeable paper, the All-Hi News has won 
several prizes from the Columbia Scholastic Press Association. 

The literary publication, the El Dorado, was organized under the out- 
of the English Department. A collection of the most original and outstand- 
ing student writings during the year, El Dorado comes out in early June. 
It, too, has received awards of merit from the Columbia Scholastic Press 
Association. 

The first high school yearbook, The Annual, was published in 1927. 
It was composed of two topics — Senior Class activities and the history 
of the high school days of the Class of 1927. The Wickshaf,^ 3 taking its 
name from the first letters of the eight parts of the township, made its 
appearance in 1929. However, due to the scarcity of money during the de- 
pression years, there were no more yearbooks, and classes issued gradu- 
ation booklets in place of an annual. These were mimeographed, bound 
with construction paper, and contained no pictures. The Senureka of the 
Class of 1931 is a typical example of this type of graduation booklet. 

In 1938, the name Baronet was adopted for the senior annual. It has 
always included administration, faculty, senior pictures, underclassmen, 
and student activities. 

In 1938, "Youth Week" was instituted in the high school as a project 
of the local Lions Club. This has developed into one of the most im- 
portant events of the school year. During this time, students elect their 
own officers for the following year. Approximately one month before Youth 
Week activities, students circulate petitions for aspiring officers of their 
respective classes, Student Council, and the Junior Red Cross. In a prim- 
ary election held in classrooms, the students select the two opposing 
candidates for each office. When Youth Week officially begins, the cam- 
paigns start. The candidates form two parties, the Red and Black and the 
Barrons. The presidential candidates make speeches at a special assembly 
modeled after a political rally. 

13 W-Woodbridge, I-Iselin, C-Colonia, K-Keasbey, S-Sewaren, H-Hopelawn, 
A-Avenel, F-Fords. 

45 



At the completion of the Youth Week campaign, the students vote, 
using authentic voting machines. This gives them practical experience in 
this phase of the democratic system. Successful candidates are feted at a 
banquet by the Lions' Club; they are also given honary positions in the 
town government for a day, the new Student Council president serving as 
mayor. The program is carried on with the hope that what is learned about 
elections on a small scale will be profitably employed on a grand scale 
when the students become old enough to participate in practical politics. 

In the life of every high school student, commencement is an im- 
portant event. Commencement programs have varied greatly during the 
years. 

The first formal commencement was held in 1887 in the old Masonic 
Temple (now the Independent -Leader building). The graduating class 
numbered seven. Each student read an original essay as part of the pro- 
gram. 

The class of 1894 held its exercises in the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. In 1912 there was no formal commencement because of a severe 
epidemic. Since there was no adequate auditorium, the commencement in 
1913 took place in the First Presbyterian Church. The program was quite 
novel. The students who had studied typing sat on the pulpit and typed to 
demonstrate their ability, and the chemistry classes performed several 
experiments. 

In 1925, the auditorium at Barron Avenue School was completed, 
making it possible to hold commencement in our own high school. The 
wearing of academic gowns by the graduates and the faculty, and march- 
ing in the academic procession were instituted in June, 1929. Former 
presidents of senior classes served as ushers, but this, like many other 
customs, was stopped during World War II. 

By 1939, the auditorium was no longer able to accommodate graduation 
exercises, so that year they were held in the local motion picture theater, 
the State, on Main Street. 

The first outdoor commencement was held on Legion Field, Berry 
Street, in 1939. Continuing this custom a colorful Latin American pageant 
was presented there by the Class of 1942. 

Because of the construction of a highway where Legion Field was lo- 
cated, the Class of 1947 held its commencement in the Albert G. Waters 
Stadium, Perth Amboy. The Class of 1948 was the first to graduate from 



46 



our own football stadium. The size of the graduating class had increased 
from seven in 1887 to over one thousand in 1964. 14 

With the errection of the present stadium in 1948, the graduation 
exercises have permitted some 5000 to 6000 people to attend this pro- 
gram; however, the custom of the direct presentation of diplomas to each 
graduate was discontinued in 1962, again due to the class size. Since 
then the president of the Senior Class has received a token diploma. 

In the early '20's, the practice of taking a senior trip was instituted. 
Until 1932 and the depression, classes spent three days in Washington, 
D.C. The trip then became a one-day outing to such places as Asbury 
Park, Point Pleasant, Rye Beach, Palisades Park, and Lake Hopatcong. 
Graduates of 1943-45, because of gas rationing, were deprived of their 
class trips. In 1946, however, these trips were resumed. As enrollment 
continued to skyrocket, arrangements for class trips grew increasingly 
difficult. The Class of 1962 went to a local swim club and the Cinema 
Theater in Menlo Park. The classes of 1963 and 1964 had no trip. 

Woodbridge High School has had a long and fruitful history. Through- 
out the years its administration and faculty have endeavored to provide 
the best opportunities for the educational enrichment of its pupils. Extra- 
curricular organizations and sports have added to the students' learning 
experience and enjoyment and have, at the same time, prepared them to 
take their places in our ever-changing, ever-growing world. 



14 See Appendix - p. 56 



41 



Epilogue 

This has been the joint project of many pupils over many years 
involving research, reading, writing, collating, tabulating, and refining. 
It has provided an avenue for the practice and exercise of the historical 
method and companion social science skills in a useful and bona fide 
historical project. It is hoped that future classes will continue to revise 
and add to this record from time to time so as to keep current the "Story 
of the History of Education in Woodbridge Township". 



48 



APPENDIX 



49 



APPENDIX 

W.H.S. has been a member of the National Forensic League at two 
different periods. The first was from 1944 through 1949 and the second 
since 1960. During this time 131 students had obtained NFL member- 
ship, 60 reached the Degree of Honor, 32 the Degree of Excellence and 
13 the Degree of Distinction. 

In 1962 and 1963 a Woodbridge debater served as Senator in the 
National Student Congress and was accorded a superior rating in the 
1963 session. In 1963 first place in the North Jersey NFL tournament in 
extemporaneous speaking was won by our representative who also went 
on to participate in the National Tournament. 6 



Major Honors-W. Sr. H. S.-Forensics 
1961-62— N F L District Tournament Debate-2nd place 

N. Y. U. Hall of Fame Tournament - Semi-Finals 

Temple University Speech Festival-East Coast Championship 

National Student Congress-Position of Senator 

2 Degrees of Distinction -NFL 

1962-63— Temple University Speech Festival-3 outstanding awards 
Seton Hall Debate Tournament-team placed second 
Central N.J. Debate COChampions 
New Jersey State Debate Championship 
Central New Jersey Extemp Champion 
NFL District Tournament-extemp-lst and 3rd place 
NFL District Congress-Senator and President 

Delegate and Speaker of the House 
Middlesex County American Legion Oratorical Contest 
1st and 2nd place 

1963-64— N F L Student Congress-District Congress Speaker of the House 
Outstanding Congressman-National Congress-Delegate to 

House of Representatives 
Central New Jersey Debate Champion 
Finalists-State Debate Finals 
New Jersey Extemp Championship 
Seton Hall Debate tournament -1st place 



50 



ALMA MATERS 

In 1905, Asher FitzRandolph wrote the following song to the 
tune of the Rutgers University Alma Mater. 

On the Banks of the Woodbridge Creek 

(1) 
My father lived in good old Woodbridge 
And resolved that in the bye and bye 
I should come to great renown 
In that old historic town, 
So I went to the Woodbridge High. 

(2) 
As a freshman I began my studies, 
But I feared that in the bye and bye, 
I should have to fight my way 
From the dawn till close of day 
On the grounds of the Woodbridge High. 

(3) 
I soon had passed through many battles, 
But as a soph I soon began to sigh, 
For I had such lots of work 
Which I did not dare to shirk 
In the school called the Woodbridge Hi. 

Chorus; 

On the banks of the Woodbridge Creek, my boys, 

There forever it will stick 

For that old Woodbridge High 

It will never never die 

On the banks of the Woodbridge Creek. 

Alma Mater as of 1964 

Oh, Woodbridge Alma Mater 

Thy praises let us sing; 

Through the three long years of high school 

May we honor to thee bring. 

In football and in baseball, 

In basketball and track, 

May we always prove most loyal 

To our dear old Red and Black. 

And when our course is over, 

And we leave our school for aye, 

May our mem'ries often lead us 

Back to Woodbridge High School days; 

Where we spent such happy hours 

In work and pleasure gay, 

May we always turn to help her, 

Where'er and when we may. 

51 



Athletic Championships 
Archery 
1938 - N.J. A. A. Interscholastic Winter Archery Team Shoot 

1962 - National Interscholastic Class B 

1963 - High School Archery Team Championship 
Baseball 

1925 - Middlesex County Championship 
1935 - N.J. S.I. A. A. Central Jersey Championship 
1938 - Group IV Central Championship 

1957 - Tri-County High School Invitation Baseball Tournaments 
Basketball 

1962 ) Middlesex County Holiday Festival Championship 
1963) 

Bowling 

1969 - Jaycee Central Jersey Tournaments 
Football 

1930 - N.J. S.I. A. A. Central Jersey Football Championships 

1938 - Central Jersey Championship 

1939 - Central Jersey Group III 

1960 - Central Jersey Group IV ( tied with Union High ) 

1963 - Woodbridge Kiwanis Award 
Track 

1954 - Middlesex County Relays 

1955 - Middlesex County Relays 

1961 - Central Jersey Championship Group IV 

1961 - Middlesex County Track and Field Association Championship 

1962 - Middlesex County Relays 

1962 - Middlesex County Track and Field Association Championship 

1962 - Queens - Iona Relays - High School Class Mile Relay 

1963 - Seton Hall Relays 

1963 - Middlesex County Indoor Championship 



52 



STATISTICS OF CLASSES * 



Year 
1883 
1884 
1885 

1886 

1887 
1888 



ft of 
Grad. 

2 

14 

No 
class 

No 
class 

7 

7 



# of 
Teachers 



Motto 



' 'Let Know- 
ledge grow 
from more to 
more" 

"Nothing 
great is lightly 



Type of 
Grad. 



Oration 

Recitation, 

Essay 



# and Name 
of courses 



Class 
Colors 



1891 


22 


1892 


15 


1893 


4 



1894 


10 




' ' Truth 
conquers 
all things." 


Essay 






1895 


8 


6 


' 'Perserverence 
conquers all." 








1896 
1897 


23- 
1 


9 

7 


"Row but never 
drift." 




1-English 




1898 


3 


7 


' ' Truth, our 
Light, Con- 
science, our 
Guide." 


Recitation 
Essay 


2-English 

Latin- 
Scientific 


Green & 
White 


1899 


7 






Essay 


2-as above 




1900 


3 






Essay 


2-as above 




1901 


12 






Essay 






1902 
1903 


9 
6 






Essay 


4-English 
Latin- 
Scientific 
Business 
College 




1904 


13 




"Be what you 
seem to be." 


Essay 


4-as before 


White & 
Gold 


1905 


14 




"Finished 
labors are 
pleasant." 




2-Business 

Latin- 
Scientific 


Blue & 
Gold 


1906 


10 






Essay 


2-as above 


Green & 
Gold 


1907 


7 




"Step by 
Step." 


Essay 


2-as above 


Blue & 
Gold 


1908 


6 








1-Latin 
Scientific 




1909 


10 




"In Amine" 






Laven- 
der & 
Gold 


1910 


6 




•'The end 
crowns the 






Black & 
Gold 



work." 
* Blank spaces indicate no records are available. 



53 



Year 


# of 
Grad. 


Teachers 


1911 


5 




1912 


6 




1913 


12 




1914 


15 





1915 



1916 



1922 

1923 

1924 
1925 

1926 



1928 



20 



26 



1917 


22 


1918 


11 


1919 


21 


1920 


16 


1921 


19 



19 

27 

38 
46 

50 



1927 61 



54 



64 



13 

15 

16 
18 

25 



1930 


54 


29 


1931 


75 


31 


1932 


105 


34 


1933 


102 


37 


1934 


135 


42 


1935 


171 


41 


1936 


185 


49 



Motto 



'Forward' 



' 'Esse quern 
videre." 

' 'Success 

reflects 

effort." 

' 'Not really 
to exist but 
to amount to 
something is 
life." 



' 'Voleno et 
Potens." 



' 'Non potma 
sine lahare.' 

' 'Service" 



' 'Deeds, not 
Dreams." 



'Wil 
Desperandum" 



' 'Tactanon 
Verba." 



' ' Labor omnia 
vine it" 



Type of 
Grad. 



ft and Name 
of Courses 



Class 
Colors 



' 'Climb though 
the rocks be 
rugged." 

» Blank spaces indicate no records are available 



Red & 
Gold 



Green & 
Gold 

Orange Sc 
Black 



Laven- 
der & 
Gold 







Laven- 
der & 
White 






Maroon 
& White 


Oration 

Recitation 

Awards 




Blue & 
Gold 


Awards 
Musical 
Recitation 


3-classical 

General 
Commercial 


Orange 
& Black 


same as 
before 


3-same as 
one before 


Blue & 
Gold 


Essay, 

Musical 

Recitation 


3- as above 


Orange 
& Black 


Chorus 

Oration, 

Awards 


3- as above 

4-Classical 
Scientific 
Academic 
Commercial 

3-Academic 
Commercial 
Classical 


Laven- 
der & 
White 


Musical, 
Awards, 
Oration 


4-Classical 
Academic 
Commercial 
Scientific 




Regular 


4 as above 
4 as above 




Pageant 


4 as above 




Regular 


4 as above 




Regular 


4 as above 




Regular 


4 as above 




Regular 


4 as above 


Scarlet 
& Silver 



54 



Year 



1937 



1939 



1940 



1954 



# of 
Grad. 



190 



212 



221 



190 



218 



172 



236 



1953 267 



n of 

Teachers 



53 



53 



51 



51 



51 



Motto 


Type of 
Grad. 


# and Name 
of Courses 


Class 
Colors 


' 'Instruction 
ends in the 
classroom, but 
education ends 
only with life." 


Regular 


4 as above 


Brown & 

Powder 

Blue 


' 'Act well your 
part, there all 
honor lies." 


Scientific 
projects 


5-General 
Added 


Dubonnet 
& White 


"Knowledge 
comes, but wisdom 
lingers." 


Regular 


5 as above 


Blue & 
Gold 


' 'Whoever tries 
for great objects 
must suffer some- 
thing." 


Regular 


5 as above 


Scarlet 
<fc silver 


"Whatever is 
worth doing 
at all, is 
worth doing 
well." 


Regular 


5 as before 


Blue & 
White 



' 'To strive, to 
seek, to find, 
and not to yield. 

' 'But above 
all things, 
Truth beareth 
away alt 
victory." 

"By a step at 
a time one goes 
a long way." 

' 'High regions 
are never with 
out storm." 



Latin 

American 

Program 



5-as above 



5 as above 



Symposium 5 as above 



1946 


239 


47 


"Courage, Con- 
duct, and Perser- 
verance conquer 
all before them." 


Pageant 


1947 


311 


51 


' 'Knowledge 
is power." 


Regular 


1948 


261 


50 


' 'Success is 
judged by 
happiness, 
not by dollars." 


Regular 


1949 


280 


52 


"Ever onward; 
never backward." 


"Our 
America" 


1950 


255 


51 


"Education is 
earned, it is not 
bought." 


' 'Youth and 

the World 

of Tomorrow". 


1951 


221 


52 


"Strive these 
years for 
better years." 


Regular 



54 "Attempt the 
end and never 
stand to doubt, 
nothing is so 
hard, but search 
will find it out." 

55 "If you wish 
to reach the 
highest begin 
at the lowest." 

59 "We build the Music 

ladder by which 
we rise." 
spaces indicate no records are available. 



Musical America 



Music 



Blue & 
Gold 



Burgan- 
dy & 
White 



Navy 
Blue & 
Gold 

Hunter 
Green & 
Gold 

Blue & 
Silver 



Maroon 
& Gray 

Dark & 

Light 

Green 



Green & 
White 



Maroon 
& Gray 



Blue 
Gray 



Powder 

Blue 

Black 



Scarlet 
& Gray 



Navy 
Blue & 
White 



55 



Year 



1955 



# of 
Grad. 


# of 
Teachers 


Motto 


Type of 
Grad. 


# and Name Class 
of Courses Colors 


282 


60 


"Act well your 
part, there all 
the honor lies." 


Music 




Ivory & 
Coral 


317 


63 


"It is hard to 
fall, but it is 
worse never to 


Regular 




Mint 

Green, 

Black 



1957 


365 


84 


1958 


390 


130 


1959 


470 


139 


1960 


665 


142 


1961 


771 


115 


1962 


664 


127 


1963 


735 


135 


1964 


1024 


156 



have tried to 
succeed. 



Regular 
Regular 
Regular 
Regular 

Regular 
Regular 

Regular 
Regular 



Green 
White 



Blue & 
White 

Blue & 
HTiife 
Blue & 
White 



* Blank spaces indicate no records are available. 



56 



^\N^ 







2 

33 



57 



"0 
o 

3- 

(0 



> 
< 

CD 

3 

4^ 







58 



STATISTICS OF WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP SCHOOL SYSTEM AS OF 1964 

CHART 1 
Grade Schools K-6 



School 


Maximum 
Capacity 


Recommer 
Capac, 


\ded 
ity 


Date 
Built 


Date of 
Additions 


Sub- 
Stand- 
ard 
Rooms 


Present 
Enroll- 
ment 


Woodbridge #1 


580 


520 




1876*1962 








554 


Colonia 2 


120 


114 




1922 








130 


Woodbridge 3 


240 


221 




1931 






1 


203 


Avenel 4 


390 


370 




1912 


1927-4 


rm 


£ 5 


402 


Avenel 5 


400 


348 




1948 








329 


Iselin 6 


210 


192 




**1916 


1924-2 


rm 


£ 2 


273 


Fords 7 


515 


481 




1909 






2 


538 


Keasbey 8 


210-110 sp 


.198-94sp*** 


1907 








218:94 


Port Reading 9 


700 


633 




(1900** 
(1963 








622 sp 


H. Hts.; P.R. 


90 


80 




1926 






2 


33 


Hopelawn 10 


420 


392 




1914 








387 


Woodbridge 11 


950-18sp 


872-18 sp 


*** 


1920 






5 


102 7;16sp 


Sewaren 12 


300 


278 




1920 








263 


Fords 14 


390 


363 




1924 








361 


Iselin 15 


420 


392 




1926 


1929-4 


rm 


£ 4 


412 


Colonia 16 


490 


433 




1948 


1963-6 


rm 




451 


Colonia 17 


470 


430 




1953 








591 


Iselin 18 


530 


487 




1955 








718 


Mnl. Pk. Ter.19 


530 


487 




1958 








625 


Colonia 20 


620 


573 




1958 








751 


Colonia 21 


440 


401 




1959 








582 


Colonia 22 


700 


633 




1959 








752 


Avenel 23 


440 


402 




1960 








497 


Iselin 24 


440 


402 




1960 








499 


Fords 25 


700 


633 




1960 








669 



* Indicates dates built and dates replaced 
** Indicates abandoned and at date of this writing not replaced 
***First figure demotes standard pupils; second, retarded or deaf pupils 
£ Denotes that additions were below standard when built. 



I. Maximum capacity per room 
30 pupils, grades 1-6 

80 kindergarten pupils in large kindergarten room 
6 kinder garden pupils in small kindergarten room 

II. Rec ommended capacity 
28.5 in grades 1-6 

60 in large kindergarten room 
5 in small kindergarten room 



59 



CHART II 



Junior and Senior High Schools 



SCHOOL 


Maximum 


Recommended 


Date 


Present 


Jr. High School 


Capacity 


Capacity 


Built 


Enrollment 


Barron Ave. 


750 


700 


1910 


784 


Woodbridge 










Colonia Jr. High 


1000 


900 


1960 


1142 


Fords Jr. High 


1000 


900 


1960 


1193 


Iselin Jr. High 


1000 


900 


1960 


1170 



Sr. High School 

Woodbridge 

Senior High School 1400 



1200 



1956 



3695" 



* Addition built in 1963 with maximum capacity of 800; recommended 
capacity of 700. 



60 



SCHOOLS TO BE OPENED SEPTEMBER 1964 





CHART in 


Maximum 




SEPTEMBER 1964 


Location 


Capacity 


Grade Levels 


SCHOOLS 








# 26 Benjamin Ave. 


Iselin 


660 


K-6 


#27 Pennsylvania Ave. 


Colonia 


660 


K-6 


Avenel Jr. H.S. 


Avenel 


1500 


7-9 


J.F. Kennedy Sr. High School 


Iselin 


1500 


10-12 



ADDITIONS 

4 rooms to #19 Menlo Pk. Terr. 

4 rooms to #23 Avenel 

5 rooms to #21 Colonia 
7 rooms to #22 Colonia 



120 


K-6 


120 


K-6 


180 


K-6 


240 


K-6 



61 



STATE AID FOR EDUCATION IN WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP* 





( 


:hart IV 






SCHOOL YEAR 


BUILDING AND DEBT AID 




TOTAL AID 


1958-59 




$215,550 




$1,231,434 


1959-60 




$229,632 




$1,272,728 


1960-61 




$229,031 




$1,336,419 


1961-62 




$241,985 




$1,385,673 


1962-63 




$279,854 




$1,473,836 


1963-64 


est 


. $303,735 


est, 


, $1,575,045 


1964-65 


est. 


$317,934 


est 


. $1,658,196 



* The State government pays approximately 16% of the total cost of 
education in Woodbridge. 



62 



CHART V 
STATE AID FOR EDUCATION 

METHOD OF COMPUTING STATE SCHOOL FORMULA 
AND TOTAL AID (Current Expense) 



Step 1: Average daily enrollment (for previous year) 

Step 2: Foundation program (Item 1 x $200) 

Step 3: Equalized valuation of taxable property 

Step 4: Item 3x5 mills ($.005) 

Step 5: 25 per cent of shared taxes (franchise and gross receipts, 

financial business, domestic life and casualty insurance, and 

bank stock taxes). 
Step 6: Add items 4 and 5 to get the Local Fair Share 
Step 7: Subtract item 6 from item 2 to get Equalization Aid 
Step 8: Minimum Aid (Item 1, ADE, x $50) 
Step 9: State School Formula Aid is the higher of item 7 or item 8. 

OTHER AID PROGRAMS 

Step 1: Transportation aid— 75 per cent of approved cost 
Step 2: One-half cost of home instruction 
Step 3: Special class aid— number of classes x $200 
Step 4°. A typical pupil aid for sending districts - 1/2 the cost of 
tuition in excess of $200 (the blind, etc.) 

Total Current Expense Aid, or Formula Aid is obtained by adding item 9 
and ' 'Other Aid Programs." 

METHOD OF COMPUTING STATE BUILDING AID 

Step 1: Average daily enrollment (2 years previous) 
Step 2: Item 1 x $30 — Foundation Program Maximum 
Step 3: Equalized valuation 
Step 4: Item 3 x 1/2 mill (.0005) 

Item 4 is the Local Fair Share 
Step 5: Maximum building aid payable is item 2 minus item 4 

This amount is payable so long as budget appropriations for capital out- 
lay and debt service are in excess of item 2. 



63 



MAW UBBA R V 
GEORGE «*°*U.07 



' : |N s |||||||ll|j|j|llllll llll HI 11 11 

« — — 

Hi L 

*s \ 

ii \ 


jlllHI iiiillllllllllllilllHHlj- 


ffiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiilllllllllll 



' i i W -llll 

rTTT' M 

G 

— B— 

to— =fc-l 

T e 

zzzz ::z:zzz:z:-z:|:z3:z::=:==_ 
: z : 5z z zz z 

U EZ 

Zt« 

=6 

&= tfl 

_ 1 

— I 


.a \ 

£ L 

4 \ 

•2 ^ 

± ^^; 

11111 

A ^, 

<a 4 

di — *r 

a ^»-^- 

« 

II f M 


zt: -3- 

= 3 

„ 

«■ 

O 
* 

1 «- 

_)_ S. 

= = : = = _ = = = — ► 

* "* *_15Z fc. fc_ C ± *- 2- ll i- ^- — 1 



64 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Adams, Frederick M., Ratables and Decreased Taxes, Plan to Subdivide 
the Free School Lands, Platform 1963, Mayorial Campaign, Wood- 
bridge, New Jersey. 

Boylan, Patrick A., Superintendent of Woodbridge Township School, inter- 
viewed by Jane Goodste in, Board of Education Administration Offices, 
Woodbridge, New Jersey, October 1963. 

Brown, James, Social Science Teacher, National Honor Society advisor, 
interviewed by Carol Cohen, Woodbridge Senior High School, Wood- 
bridge, New Jersey, March, 1964. 

The Bureau of Government Research of Rutgers University, The Handbook 
of New Jersey State Government, New Brunswick, New Jersey, Rut- 
gers University Press, 1952, pp. 39-44- 

Charter of the Free School Land of Woodbridge, 1789. 

Coe, B.D., Director of Middlesex County Vocational and Technical High 
Schools, Release: A Brief History of Our Schools, Section I. New 
Brunswick, New Jersey, Vocational Schools Press. 

Dally, Reverend Joseph W., Woodbridge and Vicinity, New Brunswick, 
New Jersey, A. E. Gordon, 1873- 

Educational Staff of the Woodbridge Township Public Schools, Report of 
the Survey of the Building Facilities and Requirements of the Public 
Schools of the Township of Woodbridge, New Jersey, Woodbridge, 
New Jersey, 1951. 

Engelhardt, Engelhardt, Leggett, and Cornell, Immediate and Long Range 
School Building Needs, Woodbridge, Middlesex County, New Jersey, 
New York 19, New York, June, 1957. 

Faulkner, Harold Underwood, American Economic History, New York Har- 
per and Brothers, 1935, p. 526. 

Frazer, Ann, Instructor and director of music in Woodbridge Township, 
1919-1959, interviewed by Carol Cohen, Woodbridge Senior High 
School, Woodbridge, New Jersey, January, 1964. 

' 'Graham vs. Edison Township," Reports of Cases Argued and Determined 
By the Supreme Court of New Jersey, Newark, New Jersey, Soney and 
Sage Co., 1962, pp. 537-550. 

Irwin, Leonard B., and Ellis, Herbert Lee, New Jersey the Garden State, 
New York, Oxford Book Company, 1962, pp. 178-182. 

The League of Women Voters of New Jersey, New Jersey Citizen' s Facts 
and Date Book, 1964, p. 10. 



65 



Love, John H., An Educational History of the School District of Wood- 
bridge Township, Middlesex County, New Jersey-1666-1933, thesis 
submitted at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, N.J., 1933- 

Manual of the Legislature of New Jersey, ed. by J.J. Gribbins, Trenton, 
N.J. MacCrellish and Quigley Co., 1963, pp. 219. 

Manzo, Peter, president of Student Council 1963-1964, interviewed by 
Elaine Bohrer, Woodbridge Senior High School, Woodbridge, New 
Jersey, February, 1964- 

New Jersey Statutes Annotated - Title 18 - Education, Newark, New Jer- 
sey, Soney and Sage Company, 1940, pp. 112, 187-188. 

Nicklas, Victor C, Superintendent of Woodbridge Township Schools, 
1933-1956 - A Report of Additional School Housing Facilities Needed 
for the Township of Woodbridge, Middlesex County, New Jersey, 
March 28, 1955. 

Orientation Book Materials, Woodbridge High School Play, 1948. 

Pesce, Susan, teacher of Business Education, F.B.L.A. advisor, inter- 
viewed by Elaine Bohrer, Woodbridge Senior High School, Woodbridge, 
New Jersey, March, 1964. 

Records, Administrative, Woodbridge Senior High School, Woodbridge, New 
Jersey. 

' 'B. of E. Assigns Schools," The Independent Leader, Woodbridge, New 
Jersey, Thursday, March 12, 1964, Sec. 1, p. 4. 

Sechrist, Harry J., Analyst and Administrative Assistant, Board of Edu- 
cation, Administrative Offices, interviewed by Jane Goodstein Wood- 
bridge, New Jersey, October 1963. 

Board of Education Administration Offices, interviewed by Jack Fishman, 
Woodbridge, New Jersey, April 1964- 

' 'Section Four," The Woodbridge Charter, June 1, 1669. 

"Town Pushing Sale of Land for Schools", The Independent Leader, Wood- 
bridge, New Jersey, Thursday, August 17, 1961, Sec. 1, p. 1. 

Wolk, Ruth, History of Woodbridge, Woodbridge, New Jersey, 1959. 

Woodbridge Township Board of Education, Minutes Book II: March 16, 
1897-March 18, 1902. 

Minutes Book XIX, March 11, 1964 

Woodbridge Township History of, Adapted from Leon McElroy's Materials 
by the Social Science Department, Woodbridge Senior High School, 
Woodbridge, New Jersey, 1955, pp. 13-18. 



66 












ST. GEORGE PRESS, AVENEL, N.J.