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Full text of "History of the Eighth Illinois United States Volunteers"

356.1109773 
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HISTORY OF 



The Eighth Illinois 



U. S. V. 









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HISTORY ** 



OF THE 




irilinoisTHmte6 States Dolunteers 



BY 

HARRY ST ANTON McCARD, B. S., 

HOSPITAL STEWARD, EIGHTH ILLINOIS U. S. VOLUNTEERS, 

AND 

HENRY TURNLEY, 
HOSPITAL STEWARD, EIGHTH ILLINOIS U. S. VOLUNTEERS. 



1809. 



ff. F HARMAH d CO., PUBLISHERS, CHICAGO. 






a* 






V 

I 




GOVERNOR-JOHN R. TANNER 



3 jxCellenC, John R. Tanner, the able and 
fearless executive of the great State of Illinois, who believes and 
who has the courage of his convictions, that it is the heart, the 
brain, the soul, not the skin, that go to determine manhood; 
who, acting upon this belief and upon the fundamental principle 
of this government that "taxation without representation is 
tyranny," had the manhood to appoint colored officers to com- 
mand a Colored Regiment, this book is affectionally dedicated 

BY THE AUTHORS. 







COLONEL JOHN R. MARSHALL 



COL. JOHN R. MARSHALL 

JOHN R. MARSHALL was born at Alexandria, Va., March 15, 1859. He was edir 
GJ cated in the public schools of Alexandria, Va., and Washington, D. C. At the age of 
16 he was apprenticed to the bricklayers trade, serving four years, until 1879, when he came to Chicago 
In 189^ he was appointed a deputy clerk in the County Clerk's office and held that position until he 
received his call to the front. 

Col. Marshall took an active part in the organization of the Ninth Battalion in 1891, be : ng elected 
Second Lieutenant, Company A in May, and First Lieutenant in July of the same year. In 1893 he was 
chosen Captain of his Company by an unanimous vote, and held that rank until he received his Colonel's 
commission in June, 1898. 

In Cuba he made an enviable record. He early gained the confidence and respect of his General 
and soon proved that this confidence was not misplaced. 

Lenient and just he has always been. Always a Colonel, but never too busy nor too dignified to 
listen to complanits of his soldiers. Affectation and arrogance are entirely foreign to him, but pride for 
his race and respect for himself and his position gave him a gentlemanly, soldierly bearing that always 
found favor with all officers of rank with whom he came in contact. He never knew personal fear and 
when Governor Tanner submitted the proposition to him to send his regiment to relieve the First Illinois 
he quickly gave his consent. 

As a Commander he was a pronounced success, clearly demonstrating the wisdom of Gov. Tanner 
m appointing him to the Colonelcy, justifying the contention of the black troops that they should be led 
by black officers. By his soldierly conduct he has met all of the expectations of his friends and silenced 
the tongues of his calumniators. He has performed all of his duties with credit to himself and honor to 
to his race. 



7 



LIBRARY 6. OF I WtBANA-CHAHP/Ufo 




^** 'tiferj-ESANT COLONEL JAMES H. JOHNSON 



LIEUT. COL. JAMES H. JOHNSON 

JAMES H. JOHNSON was born iu Washington, D. C., where he received a good literary 
dJ education. In 1880, he enlisted for five years in the Ninth U. S. Cavalry, and during his 
service made a brilliant record. He gained a sharpshooter's medal, and here laid the founda- 
tion for his future success as a commander. For several years succeeding his army experience 
he was engaged in the railroad business, and in 1888 he located in Chicago, where he has 
since resided. In 1891, he joined the Ninth Battalion as a private. Soon after he became First 
Sergeant of Company A, and in 1892, upon the recommendation of his commander, he was 
appointed Adjutant of the Battalion. If in years to come, should he be commissioned a 
General and do gallant service, he would still be called Adjutant Johnson, so brilliant was 
his record while holding that position. Small of stature; quiet and unassuming in appearance; 
always methodical and energetic, he contributed more to the growth of the Battalion than 
even his best friends imagine. 

When the Eighth Regiment was mustered into the service he received the commission 
of Lieutenant Colonel, a place conceded to him by all factions, and by all people. If the 
question be asked, what is Colonel Johnson's distinguishing characteristics, the answer 
would invariably be, "he is a soldier, and a man." "Method " is his watchword, and perse- 
vering he has always been. As a tactician he has few equals, even in the regular army. 
He knows the regulations not to inflict punishment, but to be right and to be just. 




MAJOR ROBERT R. JACKSON 



MAJOR ROBERT R. JACKSON. 

P)OBERT R. JACKSON was born Sept. i, 1869, in Malta, 111. When but a year old lie 
IY was brought to Chicago by his parents, and when twelve years of age he was a graduate 
of the grammar school. As a boy he held various positions with large mercantile and pro- 
fessional firms, proving himself competent in every position he held. In December, 1888, he 
entered the Postal Service as a stamper, and by competitive examinations he received successive 
promotions until he became foreman of Station M, during Colonel Sexton's administration. 

Various secret and fraternal societies claim him as a member, and in 1896 he was elected 
Adjutant-General on the Major-Geneial's staff of the Knights of Pythias. In 1895, the name 
of Private Robert R. Jackson appeared on the rolls of Company D of the Ninth Battalion, but 
it was soon changed to Captain Robert R.Jackson. Upon entering the United States service, 
he was commissioned Major of the Second Battalion, and into that position he threw that zeal 
and magnetism which gave success to. him so early in life. 

Soon after landing in Cuba he was ordered on detached service to Palma Soriano in 
command of Companies E and F. At this post he became Major of the city, protector of the 
Spanish residents and mediator of all disputes that arose amongst the inhabitants. 

Stationed as he was, immediately after the war, in a city containing many Spanish in- 
habitants and connected with the Regiment neither by railroad nor telegraph, Major Jackson's 
position was indeed a trying one. But his diplomacy won the day, and when the order came 
recalling him to his Regiment, it was with genuine regret that the men of his command and 
the citizens saw him go. After rejoining the Regiment at San Luis he did splendid work, 
and returned to his home with nothing but bright marks on his record. 

11 




MAJOR FRANKLIN A. DENISON 



MAJOR FRANKLIN A. DENISON. 

AUGUSTUS DENISON was born at San Antonio, Texas, in 1862. He 
1 obtained his preliminary education in the public schools of that city, preparing himself 
to enter Lincoln University. He entered Lincoln University in 1883, graduating from that 
institution as honor man in 1888. His commencement oration was considered a gem of ora- 
tory. In 1888 he entered the Union College of Law in Chicago, graduating in 1890 as vale 
dictorian. Mayor Hempstead Washburn appointed him Assistant Prosecuting Attoyiey in 
1891, and was reappointed by Carter H. Harrison, Sr., John P. Hopkins and Geo. B^Swift. 
He is one of the most successful colored lawyers practicing at the Chicago bar. . > ' ' 

During the major portion of his time in the service in Cuba he was one of the Jutfge^ of * J 
the Court of Claims sitting at Santiago. General Lawton appointed Major Denison President ,jf t ''<' 
of a General Court-Martial, being the only colored man ever appointed to such a positio^.- 1 & 
He performed his duties in such a dignified, competent manner that he gained the praise of 
every one with whom he was associated. His work undoubtedly did a great deal to tfreatfe 
among the officers of the other regiments, a favorable opinion of the colored officers pf tljb 
Eighth. Of noble figure and commanding voice, Franklin A. Denison wore well the stg&ps 
of a Major. */ 7 

ft / :/j 

13 *-' / 





MAJOR ALLEN A. WESLEY, SURGEON 



MAJOR ALLEN A. WESLEY 

SURGEON 

Q LLEN ALEXANDER WESLEY son of Edward Edrington and Elizabeth Ann (Davis) 
/ V Wesley, was born September 25, 1856, at Dublin, Ind. He was educated in the com- 
mon schools of Cincinnati ; at Bryant & Stratton's Business College. Chicago; and was graduated 
A. B. from Fisk University, Nashville, Tenn., in 1884. He commenced the study of medicine in 1870, 
with Dr. William Mussey of Cincinnati, and later took a three years' course of study at the Northwestern 
University Medical School and received the degree of M. D. from the same in 1887. 

Dr. Wesley has been a practitioner in Chicago since the year of his graduation. He was clinical 
assistant of the late Walter Hay, M. D., LL. D., in the department of mental and nervous diseases, 
Chicago Medical College, 1885-89; clinical assistant to Prof. R. N. Isham, in the department of surgery 
of the same college, i886-'88; lectured on "Surgical Emergencies" in Provident Training School; district 
county physician for Cook county in Chicago. 

Dr. Wesley was gynecologist to the Provident Hospital, of which he was one of the founders, and 
was appointed surgeon-in-charge in 1894, and secretary to the medical staff. 

In May, he entered the Illinois National Guard, when it was certain that the United States would 
have war with Spain, and went to Springfield with the Eighth Regiment. There he examined all who 
applied for enlistment in the Eighth and Ninth Regiments. The commission of Major and Surgeon was 
given him July 2, 1898, and soon after his arrival in Cuba he was placed in charge of the hospital at San 
Luis by General E. P. Ewers as Acting Brigade Surgeon. Later he was chosen as one of a board of three 
to examine all medical officers who should be called before it, he being the first colored man who ever held 
such a position. While at San Luis he had medical charge of the Eighth Illinois, Twenty-third Kansas 
and several pack trains and signal corps. 

The general health and physical condition of the Eighth Regiment speak volumes in praise of Dr. 

Wesley as a surgeon. 

15 




LIEUTENANT HARVEY A. THOMPSON, ADJUTANT 



ADJUTANT HARVEY A. THOMPSON 

THE BEST Adjutant in the volunteer service was born in Columbus, Ohio, July 24, 1863 
His literary education was obtained in the public schools, Fisk University, and La 
Moyne College. His name is Harvey A. Thompson. In 1883, he enlisted in the Ninth U. 
S. Cavalry an-d served honorably for five years. Upon his discharge he went to Nashville, 
Tenn., and matriculated at the Meharry Medical College,- where he studied two years. Chi- 
cago became his home at the end of this period, and he at once became prominent in political 
and business circles. 

Two years ago, he was appointed clerk at the Desplaines Street Police Station, and 
was making an excellent record when he went to Springfield with the Eighth. Only one 
name was ever suggested for the position of Adjutant, that of Harvey Thompson. A thor- 
ough soldier, a splendid bookkeeper and pensman, affable and energetic, the Adjutant of the 
Eighth Illinois was a pronounced success. 



17 





LIEUTENANT EDWARD S. MILLER, ASSISTANT SURCEON. 



LIEUT. EDWARD S. MILLER 

EDWARD SMITH MILLER, First Lieutenant and Assistant Surgeon, was born on a 
farm in Garrard County, Kentucky, August 31, 1858. He received his early education 



in the Danville public schools, beginning his college course in the same city. In 1880, he 
moved to Meadville, Pa., to complete his college course, taking a two years' literary course, 
supporting himself at this time by his own labor. He began his study of medicine in a 
doctor's office, matriculating in the Chicago Homeopathy Medical College in 1880, graduating 
with high honors in 1893. C 



After graduation, Dr. Miller located in Chicago, and at the time of entering the service 
was enjoying a large and lucrative practice. To broaden his knowledge of the medical science -% N 
and more fully fit himself for the many responsibilities of his profession^ he'toE a post- 
graduate course in the Harvey Medical College in 1897. During the service in Cuba, Dr. 
Miller had the care of the greater part of the regiment. How well he succeeded is attested 
by the high esteem in which he is held by both officers and men, and by the wonderful health 
of the regiment. 

Dr. Miller is a Mason, Knight Templar and Knight of Pythias. He was romantically 
and happily married on the eve of his departure for Cuba to Miss Mamie Evans of Winchester, 
Ky. His career is a shining example of what a young man can do with ambition, energy 
and perseverence. 



23 








I.IF-VTENANT JAMES W. CURTIS. ASSISTANT SURGEON 



LIEUT. J W. CURTIS 

JW. CURTIS was born in the town of Marion, Ala., July 29, 1856. He is the fourth 
. son of A. H. and Princess Cnrtis. His father was one of the most prominent men in the 
State and for six years was State Senator. Dr. Curtis was educated at Lincoln University and 
State Normal School, Monon, Ala. As a boy he took high rank as a student; taught school 
in different parts of the State for six years, and in 1879 held a professorship in *his Alma 
Mater. In 1882 he was appointed to a clerkship in the pension office at Washington, B. C. u 
In one year was promoted to a first-class clerkship and in 1889-90-91 was special age{ft for the 
pension office in Northwestern Illinois and Nebraska. During his stay in Washington" from 
1882 to 1891, he studied medicine and graduated from Howard University in 1888. While 
acting as special agent for the pension office in Nebraska in 1891, he resigned for the purpose 
of entering upon the practice of his profession. In October, 1891, he came to Chicago ^.fld 
commenced practice, and soon had a large clientel. He was a member of the staff of Provi- 
dent Hospital, and under the Swift administration was offered, but declined, a position uncjer 
the city health department. 

Under the President's call for volunteers, he offered his services; was appointed by 
Gov. Tanner an Assistant Surgeon in the Eighth Illinois Infantry. He went to Cuba and 
was the medical officer in charge of a detachment of his regiment stationed at Palma Soriana, 
Cuba. He enjoys the distinction of having lost but one man during the whole service. 

. * 

t 

21 





LIEUTENANT EDWARD S. MILLER, ASSISTANT SURGEON. 



LIEUT. EDWARD S. MILLER 

EDWARD SMITH MILLER, First Lieutenant and Assistant Surgeon, was born on a 
_j farm in Garrard County, Kentucky, August 31, 1858. He received his early education 



in the Danville public schools, beginning his college course in the same city. In 1880, he 
moved to Meadville, Pa., to complete his college course, taking a two years' literary course, 
supporting himself at this time by his own labor. He began his study of medicine in a 
doctor's office, matriculating in the Chicago Homeopathy Medical College in 1880, graduating 

* * '*" 



with high honors in 1893. C 

After graduation, Dr. Miller located in Chicago, and at the time of entering the service 
was enjoying a large and lucrative practice. To broaden his knowledge of the medical science 
and more fully fit himself for the many responsibilities of his profession? he'toerc a post- 
graduate course iu the Harvey Medical College in 1897. During the service in 'Cuba, Dr. 
Miller had the care of the greater part of the regiment. How well he succeeded is attested 
by the high esteem in which he is held by both officers and men, and by the wonderful health 
of the regiment. 

Dr. Miller is a Mason, Knight Templar and Knight of Pythias. He was romantically 
and happily married on the eve of his departure for Cuba to Miss Mamie Evans of Winchester, 
Ky. His career is a shining example of what a young man can do with ambition, energy 
and perseverence. 



23 




CAPTAIN JORDAN CHAVIS, CIIATI.AIN 



CHAPLAIN CHAVIS 

CHAPLAIN CHAVIS was born in Massac County, Illinois, February 16, 1856. He 
\^> attended the common school in Metropolis, Illinois. In 1870, he moved with his parents to 
Mississippi, entered Alcona University in 1872, and graduated from a normal course in 1876. He was 
ordained a minister in the Baptist denomination the same year. He taught school and pastored in the 
South until 1880, then coming north, marrying Miss Hattie Marshall at Metropolis, 111. He was pastor at 
the Pisgah Baptist Church, Bloomington, two years, and was pastor of Bethesda Church in Chicago, three 
years. From Chicago he was called to Quincy, where he pastored Eighth Street Church for nearly ten 
years. When the Hispano-American war broke out, the Reverend watched the proceedings closely, and 
was one of the first outside of Chicago, to assist in raising a company for the Eighth Regiment. After 
assisting in -raising Company I, Quincy, he made application for Chaplain of the regiment and was 
appointed and commissioned by Gov. Tanner, Aug. I, 1898. He went to Cuba with the regiment, where 
he did volunteer service for several months, effecting a church organization in the regiment of over one 
hundred members, and kept in existence a live Christian Endeavor and Sunday School the entire time' 
He built a church and baptized twelve soldiers in Cuban waters, which was the first Protestant baptism 
in that province. 

He was of inestimable value in caring for the sick and burying the dead, nothing escaping his 
attention that was to the interest of the regiment. He also learned to be a soldier, often drilling with 
the regiment as a private and could be frequently seen on the firing line at target practice, becoming an 
exceptionally good shot. He returned with the regiment and remained at his post until mustered out. 

Following is a letter received from Brig. Gen. Ewers commanding at San Luis de Cuba. : 

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF M AVAR I, 

SAN Luis, CUBA. March 9, 1899. 

CHAPLAIN JORDON CHAVIS. Eighth Illinois Volunteers, 

DKAR SIR I take pleasure in stating that while you have been under my command since August 26, 1898 you have performed 
your duties in a faithful manner and with credit to your profession. I recommend you as an energetic and zealous Christian and one 
worthy in every way of the position you hold in your regiment. Very respectfully, E. P. EWERS, Brigadier General, Commanding. 

25 




CURTIS P. SOMF.RVII.I.E 
Hospital Steward 





, 



WILLIAM J. BARNETT 
Chief Musician 




HKNRV TURNLKY 

Hospital Steward 




LINCOLN VALLE 
Quartermaster Sergeant 



COL. MARSHALL'S 
NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF 



HARRY STAXTON MC-CARD 
Hospital Steward 




MORRO CASTI.E 




PALACE, SANTIAGO 



EIGHTH ILLINOIS VOLUNTEER BAND, 



BASSES 

G. W. COOPER 
WM. ROBINSON 

ALTOS 

ROSCOE HOLT 
JNO. CRAWFORD 
W. BUCHANAN 
SYLVESTER JOHNSON 



(1EO. P. BROWN- 
DAVID MILLEN 
GUY WILSON 
JOHN COLSTON 
LEE WILLIAMS 
WATT SAUNDERS 



WILLIAM J. BARNETT, Chief Musician. 
WILLIAM COOPER, Principal Musician. 



SLIDE TROMBONES 
ADDISON ROBINSON 
WM. REECE 
EARL FRANKLIN 
WALTER PATTERSON 

BARITONES 
PRICE WOODS 
MORRIS COP-BS 



CORNETS 

\VM. COOPER 
HENRY REN 
WALTER THOMAS 
JNO. HUNTER 

CLARINETS 
OLIE MACK 
CLARENCE BOWMAN 
CHAS. WILLIAMS 



JESSE CASH, Drum Major. 



BUGLERS. 



BENJ. WOR7.ER 
JAS. MO3BY 
WM. DIAMOND 
SAM'L CHASE 



CHARLES W. HUNT, Chief Bugler. 

WILL TURNER 
BUD WATSON 
J. A. FOX 
WM. SCOTT 



FRED MAKERS 
FRED PARKER 



WM. HOLLIDAY 
JAS. LOGAN 



BATTERIES 

CURTIS RAYMOND 
WM. JOHNSON 
SAM ROBERTS 
FRANK ROBERTS 

PICCOLO 

NOAH T. WILLIAMS 



ABRAHAM EZICAH 

LOGAN WHITE 

JOHN WHITE 

IRA KING 

HORACE ALEXANDER 

JOHN JACKSON 




POST HOSPITAL, SAN Luis 




HOSPITAL CORPS 



ELMER HARRISON 
JAMES H. LEE 
WM. WEAVER 
WM. HAYES 
NOAH WILLIAMS 
HARRY TAYLOR 
CHAS. TAYLOR 
CLEMMIE PAYNE 
H. BLYTHE 
WM. YORK 
JESSIE DREXLER 
JOSFPH EDWARDS 
JACK WARD 
EU. THOMAS 
WM. EVERETT 
ROBERT GILLS TRAP 
ISAIAH LINDSAY 



MEMHKRS OF THE HOSPITAL CORJ'S 

CHAS. TAYLOR NOAH T. WILLIAMS CHARLES WILLIAMS 

WILLIAM HAYES 












LIEUTENANT JOHN W. ALLISON 



CAPTAIN THEODORE VAN PELT 



LIEUTENANT STEWART BETTS 



CAPT. THEODORE R. VAN PELT. 

"THEODORE R. VAN PELT was born at Glens Falls, Warren County, N. Y., Sept. 29, 1857. He 
received his early training and education in the Empire State, removing to the State of Illinois twenty- 
five years ago. Capt. Van Pelt was one of the first to be enrolled upon the roster of the Ninth Battalion 
at the very beginning of that organization. Enlisting as a Private in Company A June i, 1890, he was 
appointed Sergeant Oct. I, 1891 . His enthusiastic work and strict attention to duty won for him the 
election to the Second Lieutenancy Dec. -7, 1892. He was elected First Lieutenant July 1 , 1894, continuously 
holding that rank until he succeeded Colonel Marshall as Captain of Company A upon the latter gentle- 
man's promotion. Capt. Van Pelt is a barber by trade, having owned the most popular shop in the city 
of Chicago. He also stands high in the civic organizations, being a past officer in the famous St. George 
Commandery. Capt. Van Pelt was not only a soldier in the time of peace but a soldier in the time of 
war. When the President sounded the war tocsin, Capt. Van Pelt was one of the first to offer his sword 
in the service of the country. At the front he made a record that would gladden the heart of any man . 

LIEUT. JOHN W. ALLISON 

IN the days of the old battalion, Sergt. Allison was reputed to be about the best drill instructor in the 
companies. He is a native of Collierville, Tenn., and is 34 years of age. When he came to 
Chicago in 1892, one of his first acts was to join the Ninth Battalion. Since his commission with the 
Eighth, he has made a splendid reputation, a great deal of the time having charge of Company A, while 
Capt. Van Pelt was in charge of the Second Battalion. 

LIEUT. STEWART A. BETTS 

<TTEWARD A. BETTS was born in the " Buckeye State" in 1873. At an early age he came to 
' ' Chicago. In 1896, he joined the Ninth Battalion, and when the Governor called out the Eighth 
he was a First Sergeant. By merit, he won the position of Lieutenant. 

33 




CAMP MARSHALL, NEAR SAN Luis 



Company A, Eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. 

CAPTAIN, THEODORE R. VAN PELT. FIRST LIEUTENANT, JOHN W. ALLISON. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT, STEWART A. BETTS. 



SERGEANTS 

WILLIAM H. PAYNE, ist. Sergeant 
ABRAHAM L. BALDON 
JAMES D. DUPORTE 
ALFRED BALDWIN 
WILLIAM H. THOMPSON 
ISAAC HAYDEN 



CORPORALS 

JAMES T. BREWINGTON, 
LESLIE CALDWELL 
EUGENE COMPSON 
WALTER JUDD 
PERRY 11. KOPPERL 
HUGH MOSBY 
JOSEPH NORRIS 
WILLIAM H. RHODEN 
WILLIAM WH1TTAKER 
JOHN MASON 
ARCHIE FARMER 
WALTER J. NEWMAN 

OSCAR GREAR, Artifice* 
ROLAND L. FERGUSON, Wagoner 
HENRY K. HURLEY, Musician 
SAMUEL CHASE, Musician 
FRANK BURKS, Cook 



PRIVATES 

ALLEN, FRANK W 
BATEMAN, JOHN 
HELL, JUDGE II 
BREWINGTON, LAWRENCE 
BURKS, FRANK 
BURNS, SMITH 
CASH, JESSE M 
CLAY. JOSEPH D 
COLEMAN, JAMES 
CUDGEL, GEORGE 
DAI'.NKY. THOMAS 
DEVONSHIRE, JOHN 
DORSEY, WARREN 
DRAIN, VINCENT S 
DURGAINS, GEORGE 
DURST, ALONZO C 
DYER, STRATFORD 
CADDY, DANIEL 
GRANT, JOHN 
GRIFFIN, HENRY T 
HAGANS, JOHN 
HANCOCK, WILLIAM 
HARPER, WADE 
HARRIS, ABE 
HOLMES, GEORGE A 
HOLMES. OSSIE W 
HUBBARD, JOHN B 
ISABEL, GEORGE 
JACKSON, FRANK A 
JACKSON, TOHN 
JACKSON, TOHN R 
JACKSON, THEODORE B 
JARVIS, ROBERT M 
JOHNSON, ALFONZO 
JOHNSON, ISAAC 
JOHNSON. JAMES W 
JONES, WILLIAM E 
LONG, WALLACE 



KING, TOHN H 

MALICHL GEORGE 

MAY, JOSEPH 

MOODY. THOMAS 

MITCHELL, JOHN R 

MITCHELL, PETER 

MITCHELL, WILLIAM R 

MURRAY WILLIAM 

McFADDEN, GEORGE 

McPHERSON, CLARK 

OLIVER. WILLIAM 

PETTIPORD, NORWOOD 

REED, GEORGE 

REYNOLDS, MOSE 

RICE, JOHN 

ROBINSON, ABE 

SANDERS, WILLIAM 

SANDFORD, RICHARD 

SHAVER, LEE 

SHAW, EDWARD 

SMITH, EDWARD P 

SMITH, ELBERT J 

SMITH, TOHN 

STANLEY, REUBEN 

SYKES, OTIS 

TAYLOR, ALBERT 

TAYLOR, JAMES B 

TAYLOR, OLIVER 

TIDWELL, EDWARD A 

TUCKER, TAYLOR 

TWITTY, ROBERT 

WARD, THOMAS 

WHITEHEAD, FREDERICK 

WHITEHEAD, JOSEPH 

WHITEHEAD, WILLIAM 

WOODFOLK, ANDERSON 

WOOLFOLK, BENJAMIN 

WILKERSON, TOBE 

HENRY C. WILSON from A. to G. 

ISAAC JOHNSON, from L. to A. 



35 





LIEUTENANT GEORGE T. BAKKR 



CAPTAIN ADOI.PHUS THOMAS 



LIEUTENANT G. A. NEVEI.S 



CAPT. ADOLPHUS THOMAS 

CAPTAIN ADOLPHUS THOMAS was born thirty-seven years ago in Hancock County, Georgia. 
^^ In 1872, he was attending the public schools at Atlanta, and in 1882 he joined the National Guard 

of Georgia as a Sergeant in his Company. In 1885, Sergeant Thomas, at the national competitive drill, 
received the high honor of being the best drilled man on the field, and that fall he was elected First 
Lieutenant of his company. His military experience in the West began as a Sergeant in Company B 
of the Ninth Battalion. In 1892, he was elected First Lieutenant and became Captain in 1893. Captain 
Thomas is naturally a commander of men. Many times in Cuba, during the absence of a Major, he 
has had command of a battalion, and well did he handle it. 

GEO. T. BAKER 

EO . T. BAKER, First Lieutenant of Company B, was born in New Orleans, La., Dec. 15, 1863. 
He spent the early years of his life in New Orleans, La., and Natchez, Miss., learning the trade of 
cracker baker. His military career began at the early age of eighteen, when he became a member of 
the Lynch Guards of Natchez, Miss., holding the commission of First Lieutenant. Upon reaching his 
majority, he joined the Knights of Pythias and was elected First Lieutenant in G. F. Bowies' Division, 
No. 1 8, K. of P. He came to Chicago in 1888 and joined the Ninth Battalion in 1891 He was made 
a Corporal in 1892, a First Sergeant in 1893, and on Nov. 5, 1895, he was elected to the office of First 
Lieutenant of Company B. 

LIEUT. G. A. NEVELS 

IEUT. NEVELS was born in Washington, Mo., in 1867. From boyhood he was characterized by a 
steadfastness of purpose that knew no defeat. Seeking a wide field for himself he came to Chicago, 
in 1887, soon taking a leading position among his fellow-citizens. He joined the Ninth Battalion as 
Hospital Steward Nov. 4, 1895, and held that position until he was commissioned a Lieutenant by Gov. 
Tanner, July 21, 1898. He was on detached service a great portion of the time while at the front at 
one time filling the position of Adjutant General on Brig. Gen. Ewers' staff. At another time he was 
Acting Brigade Quartermaster. 

87 




COMPANY li. 



Company B, Eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. 



CAPTAIN, ADOLPH THOMAS. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT, GEO. T. BAKER. 



SECOND LIEUTENANT, GUSTAVUS NEVELS. 



SERGEANTS 

DURRAND B. DAVIS, ist. Sergeant. 
FRANK HARTSF1ELD 
STUART ALEXANDER 
ROBERT \V. GULLY 

THOMAS F. TYLER 
CHAS. E. L. HENDERSON 



CORPORALS 

JOHN BRADLEY 

WM. L. SETTLES 

ROBERT P. KURD 

WM. TONES 

ROBERT CARTER 

TAMES L. HUNTER 

LOUIS C. TORBERT 

OLONZO V. CURRY 

WM. J. ELLISON 

CLARENCE LOVE 

WM. M. WEBSTER 

JAMES LOVE 

FREDERICK MAKENS, Musician 

HENRY HOLLIDAY, Musician 

WM. D. PORTER, Artificer 

BRAD. HUMPHRIES, Wagoner 

HENRY J. MOORE, Cook 



PRIVATES 

ANDERSON, THOMAS 
BRINN, LUCIUS 
BROWN. ARTHUR 
BUTLER, ANTHONY F 
CARTER, WM 
CRAWFORD, WM 



DAVIS, TIMOTHY 
DAVIS, JACOB 
DUNSON. JACOB 
DILLYHAY, JAMES 
DOWNS, ROBERT 
DREWERY, WILLBON 
EDWARDS, CHAS H 
FRYE, JESSE 
GREEN, WM H 
GRIFFIN, WM H 
GWIN, WALTER 
HALL, JOHN H 
HILL, TOHNNIE 
HASKINS, FRANK 
HOWARD WM 
JEFFERSON, HARRY 
JACKSON, ROBERT 
JOINER, JOHN 
KELLY, THOMAS 
LAWSON, ROY 
LINDSAY, ISAIAH 
LEE, ISAAC 
MAZE, TAMES 
McDOU'GAL, ADDOUN 
McFERRIN, JESSE L 

MOORE, WM M 
NORRIS, EDWARD 
OWSLEY, JESSE 
PARKS, FRANK 
PARKS, JOHN 
PAYNE, ALBERT 
PAYNE, HENRY L 
PETERSON, WM H 
PHILLIPS, JOSEPH A 
ROSS, THEOPHII.US 
SHANNON, JOHN W 
SMITH, AUGUSTUS R 
SMITH, HENRY 
STALLCUP, CHAS. H 
TALBERT, FRANK J 



TERRY, JOHN M 
THOMAS, GEO. S 

THOMAS, WALTER 
TRACEY, ROBERT B 
TRAVEIS, WM H 
TRIBUE, JOHN E 
TRIBUNE, JOHN E 
TURNER, OWSLEY 
UPCHURCH, GEO 
VAN, WM 
WALKER, SAMUEL 
WALKER, LEMUEL 
WASHINGTON, JOSEPH S 
WHITE, WM 
WILSON, WM 
WILLIAMS, MARTIN 
WILLIAMS, WM H 
WYATT, WM 
YOUNG, GEO 
YOUNG, JOHN C 



DISCHARGED 
Corp. JACOB D. TURNER 

PROMOTED 

Corp. GEO. D. WHITE, to S. M. 

DECEASED 

Private WALLACE JOHNSON 
Private PAUL SMITH 
Private SAMUEL NICKENS 
Private SYLVESTER JOHNSON 
Private SIMON B. PETERS 
Private GEO. FARRIS 




CAPTAIN CHARLES L. HUNT 




LIEUTENANT JOHN W. SHREEVES 



CAPT. C. L. HUNT 

/""HARLES L. HUNT was born June 29, 1862, in Chicago. He received his early education in 
^^ what is now the heart of Chicago. He learned his A B C's in the Jones School and completed his 
education in the Dearborn School which stood at the time opposite to the present site of McVicker's 
Theater. His early ambition was to be a soldier. Asa mere boy he joined the Hannibal Zouaves, 
remaining with them when they became Company A, Sixteenth Battalion, I. N. G. He joined Com 
pany B of the Ninth Battalion, June 17, 1891, and on May 3, 1892, was elected Second Lieutenant, 
holding this office until Sept. 28, 1895, when he was elected First Lieutenant. He was first put in 
command of Company C, being finally elected and commissioned Captain of Company C Nov. 4, 1895. 
Hunt's Coyote's were one of the most famous companies in the regiment and had the opportnnity pre- 
sented itself they would undoubtedly have proven themselves great fighters. 

LIEUT. JOHN W. SHREEVES 

JOHN W. SHREEVES was born in New Bedford, Mass., in 1866, receiving a fine education in the 
public schools, he prepared himself for the government service. He occupied a position for three 
and a half years in the Bureau of Engraving and Printing at Washington, D. C. In 1890, he moved 
West to Chicago to grow up with the country. He joined the Ninth Battalion as a private in 1894 and 
by successive promotions he reached the rank of First Lieutenant in 1898. While on duty at the front, 
he was Provost Marshal in San Luis. 

LIEUT. FREDERICK D. SEARLES 

I IEUT. SEARLES is a native of Chicago, and received his education in the public schools. 
He is one of the most versatile young men in the city of Chicago, and has held many 
positions requiring trust and skill. He is now an electrical mechanic one of the very few to be found 
among our race. At one time he was storekeeper at the Dunning Institute; at another a deputy in the 
County Agent's office. He was one of the organizers of the Ninth Battalion, holding a Lieutenant's 
commission in 1892. While at the front he was Inspector of Rifle Practice, with the rank of Captain, 
He is an Odd Fellow, also a Knight of Pythias. 

41 




COMPANY C. 



Company C, Eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. 

CAPTAIN, CHAS. L. HUNT. FIRST LIEUTENANT, JOHN W. SHREEVES. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT, FRED D. SEARLES.. 



SERGEANTS 

CAPP HADLEY, ist Sergeant 
SAMUEL P. MOTTLEY 
JESSE BUTLER 
JAMES D. SHREEVES 
GEO. W. H. SAWYER 
ALBERT JOHNSON 

CORPORALS 

WM. I.. HROW.N. 
CLARENCE E. HOWARD 
A. I). JACKSON 
FRANK C. JONES 
CHAS. KINNER 
JOHN H. LUCKEY 
WM. H. LUCKEY 
FREDERICK T. NICKELS 
ALBERT TAYLOR 
JOHN THOMAS 
CHAS. W. F. B. WHITE 
RANSOM W. WESTBERRY 

ALLEN O. PATTEN, Cook 
WM. N. FUSNER, Musician 
KORFLAT WATSON, Musician 
JOSEPH S. SHREEVES, Artificer 
NATHAN M. WATSON, Wagoner 



PRIVATES 

AKERS, FRANK 
ANDERSON, WM. H 
BENJAMIN, LEWIS 
BERRY, WM E 
BROOKS, GUS M 
BROWN, HASTINGS 
BROWN, SAMUEL H 
CARTER, JUSTIN E 
CAVE, TAMES T 
CHAPPLE, JERRY 
CLAXTON, SAMUEL D 
COLLIER, LEVI 
CRAIG, WILLIAM T 
CRIM, JACOB L 
DAVIDSON, JOHN W 
DULE, FREDERICK 
DYER, CLIFFORD 
FLOWERS, MONROE 
FORD HERSCHEL 
FORKNER, HENRY 
FREEMAN, HOMER A 
FREEMAN, FRANK W 
GARDNER WM M 
GAINES, JOHN A 
HARDAWAY, HARRY B 
HARDISON, AARON 
HART, WINGFIELD S 
HARRIS, WM R 
HENRY. EARL 
HIGHTOWER, FELIX 
HOBSON, MORGAN 
HOGAN, EDWARD 

IACKSON, LAWRENCE 
ACKSON, GEORGE W 
OHNSON, JERRY 
OHNSON, LEMUEL 
OHNSTON, LOUIS H 



LEWIS, DAVID P 
MARSHALL, GEORGE A 
MAY, CHARLES A 
MAY, ERNEST R 
McGOWAN, SAMUEL H 
McNARY, THOMAS 
MITCHELL, WALTER B 
MORGAN, GEORGE L. O 
MUMPHUS, MOSES S 
NOLAND, GARLAND 
NORTON, PERCY 
PEAKE, 6US 
PIERCE, ALBERT 
POLK, OLIVER M 
POLK, WALTER H 
PRYOR, CLARENCE P 
REED, LIONEL 
REEVES, ALEXANDER 
RICHARDSON, WILLIAM K 
ROBINSON, GUS 
ROBINSON, LEWIS 
ROSS, HARRISON B 
SCALES, FRANK 
SHARP, WILLIAM 
SLEET, JAMES W 
SMITH. BOLAN P 
STREADRICK, JOSEPH J 
TAYLOR CHARLES H 
TAYLOR, GEORGE II 
TERRELL, ROBERT 
THOMAS, HENRY 
THOMAS, WALTER 
THOMASSON, RALPH E 
UPCHURCH, BAILEY 
WILLIAMS, JAMES 
WILSON, JACOB 
WISE. RUFUS 
WHITE, GRANT 



43 




LlKUTENANT HOWARD LOVE 




LlKUTENANT TllADDEUS STKI'I' 



CAPT. W. T. JEFFERSON 

W. T. JEFFERSON was born in Washington, D. C., Aug. 4, '864, living there but a few 
years, when his parents moved to Derby, Conn. He obtained his early education in the public 
schools of that place; at the age of 18 he began an apprenticeship in a local dental parlor and continued 
in this work eight years. In 1889, he decided to make dentistry his life's profession, and in the fall of 1889 
ho entered the Dental School of Howard University of Washington, D. C. He took but one year at 
Howard; coming to Chicago in March, 1890, he entered the American College of Dental Surgery and 
graduated March 24, 1891. He immediately entered upon the practice of his profession and continued 
his successful practice until his country called him to arms. He early joined the Knights of Pythias 
and rapidly rose in favor in the most- respected order. He joined Company D of the Ninth Battalion, 
April I, 1895, and was elected Second Lieutenant May I, 1895, when the Battalion became a part of the 
State Militia. In November, 1895, he was unanimously elected First Lieutenant of the company he now 
commands. As an officer, he is the peer of any Captain in the volunteer service. 

LEUT. HOWARD LOVE 

J IKUT. HOWARD LOVE is 34 years old. His birthplace was Urbana, Ohio, where he lived for 
fifteen years. He came to Chicago in 1885, and joined the Ninth Battalion at its inception in 1891. 
He soon was appointed a Sergeant, and was elected Second Lieutenant in 1897. When the regiment 
was mustered in at Springfield, he received a First Lieutenant's commissson, and soon afterwards was 
detailed as Regiment Ordnance Officer, which position he most acceptably filled until he was mustered 
out. Quiet and unassuming, Howard Love has made friends and has done his duty. 

THADDEUS W. STEPP 

A GOOD record in the Ninth Battalion, coupled with a good ability, placed a Second Lieutenant's 
commission in the hands of Sergt. Thaddeus Stepp at Springfield. He has resided in Chicago 
since 1887, and joined the Ninth Battalion at its chartering, when 26 years of age. For several years 
he has been head janitor of Plymouth Congregational Church. Aside from his regular duties in Cuba 
Lieut. Stepp did some splendid work in photography, and brought home with him views of many inter 
esting Cuban scenes. 

45 




GROUP OK OFFICERS AT TATTER SALL'S 



Company D, Eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. 

CAPTAIN, WILLIAM T. JEFFERSON. FIRST LIEUTENANT, HOWARD LO.VE 

SECOND LIEUTENANT, THADDEUS STEPP. 



SERGEANTS 

CHARLES J. FIELDING, ist. Scrgcani 

MOSES HOPKINS 
ROBERT P. KING 
GEORGE H. SMITH 
EUGENE WASHINGTON 
BENJAMIN PINKNEY 

CORPORALS 

JAMES BREWER 
IOSEPH FIELDEN 
FLOYD LEWIS 
THOMAS DUNCAN 
THOMAS PETTIS 
THOMAS TURPIN 
ROBERT S. TROUTMAX 
RICHARD A. BOONE ' 
WILLIAM SPARKS 
LESTER HENDERSON 
CARL GRANGER 
TIMOTHY TYLER 

ANDREW McGEE, Cook 
ROBERT TINGSLEY, Artificer 
CHARLES WHITE, Wagoner 
DAVID A. MILLEN, Musician 
EDWARD ROBINSON, Musician 



PRIVATES 

ACRES, FRED 
BANKS, TAMES 
BLAKNEY. JOHN 
BROOKS, WALTER 
BROWN, ALBERT L 
BROWN, WILLIAM 
BLAND, FRANK 
BYRD, WILLIAM 
CHEERS, ARTHUR 
CLAY. WALTER 
COLWELL, EUGENE 
CONSTANT, GEORGE 1 
CONWAY, JOHN F 
CONWAY, WILLIAM 
DOUGLAS, WILLIAM 
DOZIER, ISRAEL 
FRAZIER, JOSEPH 
FARMER. OSBORNE P 
GARLAND, EUGENE 
GARNETT, WILLIAM W 
GIBSON, ARTHUR 
GRAYTON, WILLIAM 
HALL, WILLIAM 
HART, JOHN W 
HAMPTON, JOHN 
HAMILTON. CHARLES E 
HARPER, IRA 
HARRIS, ARTHUR 
HAYES, FRANCIS E 
HIGHTOWER, JOHN 
HUNTER, PEARLE 
JACKSON, HARTIE 
JACKSON, THOMAS 
JOHNSON, CHARLES W 



c, 

cOUINEY, JAMES L 

ARSHALL, ALEXANDER 



JOHNSON, JOSEPH H 
JOHNSON, WILLIAM 
JONES, JOHN W 
JORDON, JOHN H 
LYNTHECON, OWEN 
McGEE, WILLIAM 
McO 
MA, 

MOHR, WILLIAM H 
MILLER, DANIEL B 
PAGE, CHARLES 
PATTERSON, GEORGE 
PAYNE, ALEXANDER 
PEARMAN. HENRY 
PRUDEN, WILLIAM H 
REED, ARTHUR E 
RICHARDSON, WILLIAM I 
RILEY, JOHN 
ROBINSON, JAMES 
ROBINSON WILLIAM K 
ROSS, CHARLES J 
ROWLAND, ROBERT E 
SEALS ROBERT W 
STANFORD, JOHN G 
STEWART, CLARENCE 
THATCHER, WILLIAM 
TOWNSEND, JAMES 
TURNER, CHARLES 
WILLIAMS, NOAH T 
WEBSTER, JAMES L 
WILLIAMS, EDWARD 
WILLIAMS, GEORGE W 
WILSON, JOHN 
WILLIAMS, CHARLES 
YOUNG, HARVEY T 



47 




CAPTAIN RICHARD I>. ROOTS 




LlEUTKNANT ARTHUR WILLIAMS 



CAPT. RICHARD P. ROOTS 

\ . /HEN Major Jackson was relieved as post commander at Palma Soriano, he was succeeded by Capt. 
*' Roots, who brought to the position an experience gained in the regular army with the Twenty- 

fifth Infantry. Richard Roots was b.rn in Tuscaloosa, Ala., in 1860, and attended school in Tennessee. 
He came to Chicago in 1884, and has held important positions in the Post Office of that city. Gentle- 
ness, marked by decision, is Capt. Roots' predominating characteristic, and he has always been a 
commander who could completely control his men and retain their love and respect. At Palma, he was 
a most painstaking commandante. To his lot fell the investigation of numerous crimes committed by 
Cubans and Spaniards, and to his credit he invariably reached correct conclusions. Capt. Roots points 
with pride to the record made by his company in Cuba not a man was lost by death, or by marriage 
with a Cuban senorita. 

LIEUT. ARTHUR WILLIAMS 

A RTHUR WILLIAMS was born in Athens, Ga., in 1870, and attended the public schools in that 

city until he reached the age of 15. He then moved to Atlanta. He enlisted in the Ninth U. S. 

Cavalry, being stationed at Jefferson Barracks. He reached the rank of Sergeant, acting as drill 

master for eight years. He then came to Chicago, and when war was declared assisted in enlisting 

Company E. 

LIEUT. JAMES M. RAULS 

JAMES M. RAULS is a natural soldier. He served five years in the regular army and was discharged 
as a First Sergeant. While in Cuba, Lieut. Rauls was on detached service at Palma Soriano, 
serving most acceptably as Post Adjutant. 

49 




COMPANY E. 



Company E, Eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. 

CAPTAIN, RICHARD P. ROOTS. FIRST LIEUTENANT, ARTHUR WILLIAMS. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT, JAMES M. RAULS. 



SERGEANTS 

OLIVER M. DAVIS, ist. Sergeant 
JULIUS H. JOHNSON 
ARTHUR H. BROWN 
FRANK L. ARMSTRONG 
CHARLES A. HARPER 



CORPORALS 

GUILFORD E. CAMPBELL, 
JOSEPH B. JOHNSON, 
DAVID LOCKETT 
WILLIAM RADFORD 
EGBERT R. WILLIAMS 
AMOS JORDAN 
FRANK VERNON 
BURTON WHITE 
BERT COLEMAN 
EDWARD D. BARBER 
GEORGE EDWARDS 
JOHN COLES 
MINCER O. SMITH 

SAMUEL C. SMITH, COOK 
JOHN B. COLSTON, Musician 
WATT A. SANDERS, Musician 
FRANK SMITH, Artificer 
HENRY BROWN, Wagoner 



PRIVATES 

ABBOTT, CLIFFORD 
ADAMS. GEORGE E 
ALEXANDER, WICKIE 
ARNOLD, THOMAS B 
BERRY, EDDIE W 
BLACK, HENRY 
BOSLEY, EDWARD 
BRANSOME, JUNIOR 
BROWN, ALEXANDER 
BROWN, GEORGE P 
BROWN, LAWSON 
BROWN, THADDEUS 
COOK, ISAIAH 
CARPENTER, JEFFERSON 
CARROLL, ALEXANDER 
CHAPPLE, CHARLES 
CHAVIS, BERT 
COLLINS, BUD 
DAVENPORT, HARRY 
DORSEY, EMORY 
DREXTER, JESSE M 
EDWARDS, MATTHEW 
EMBRY, JORDAN A 

EVANS, FRANK T 
FERRILL, LOUIS 
FIELDS, ALFRED 

GARNETT, JOHN 
GASH, WARNIR 
GREEN, ERNEST 
GRAY. TOM 
HANNAH, THOMAS 
HARDY, EDWARDS F 
HERRING, GEORGE W 
HUBBARD, GEORGE 
HUNDLEY, GEORGE 
JACKSON, DAVID B 
JACKSON, JESSE 
JARVIS, JESSE 



JASPER, GRANDSON 
JOHNSON, AARON E 
JOHNSON, WILLIAM 
JONES, JOHN 
LANKINS, JAMES A 
LEVENS, PETE 
LUNKE, HOWARD 
LEE, JOHN G 
McCONNELL, GEORGE 
McGILL, ROY 
McHENRY, JOE 
McKINNEY, JULIAN 
McNEIL, CHARLES 
MOBLEY, JULIUS 
MOSBY. CHARLES 
MATSON, GEORGE 
MATTHEWS, CHARLES 
MORRIS, GEORGE W 
NICKENS, IRVIN 
PETTIT, WILLIAMS 

PITNER, HERBERT w 

PORTER, EDWARD T 

gUARLES, WILLIAM 
ANSOME, MADISON 
ROBSON, JULIUS B 
ROYAL, CHARLES 
SCOTT, JOHN 
SMITH. BERT 
STROTHER, CHARLES 
SUTPHEN, CHARLES 
TAYLOR, HARRY C 
WATSON, JASPER 
WILKES, THOMAS 
WILDER, FRANK 
WILIAMS, GEORGE 
WILLIAMS, GUS 
WILLIAMS, LEE 
WONZER, P.ENJAMIN 
YOUNG, FRED 



51 



UBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF 1LLWCK 



COMPANY F. 





CAPT. WM. B. AKERS 

WM. B. AKERS was born in Columbia, Mo. in 1871. To secure the advantage of the free public 
school system of Chicago, he moved to that city in 1886. He entered the public schools and grad- 
uated from the North Division High School in 1891. In the public school, he showed such marked abil- 
ity that everyone interested in him advised him to study law. He entered the Law School of Lake 
Forest University in 1892, graduating in 1894. He immediately entered practice in Chicago 
and rapidly rose in his profession. He has occupied many positions of tTust and has filled them all 
with great credit. For nineteen months he was discount clerk in the Water Office of the City of Chicago, 
and served as U. S. Custom Inspector of the World s Fair Grounds from Feb. 1893, until March 1894. 
Capt. Akers has a peculiar fitness for politics and is the leading colored poJiticion on the North Side. 
When the call to arms was made, Capt. Akers had a lucrative law practice which he left to take up the 
practice of arms. He organized and captained Company F during the whole time the company was in 
service. 

LIEUT. CLINTON L. HILL 

' I 'HERE is no more popular man in Chicago than Clinton L. Hill. He was born in Joliet in 1867; 
at the age of five years he moved to Galesburg, and then in a few years to Bloomington. He 
attended the Normal University at Bloomington for a number of years and then removed to Chicago in 
1882. Lieutenant Hill is a Knight of Pythias of very high standing, at the present time holding the 
position of Adjutant-General of that order. He assisted in the enlistment of Company F and was elected 
First Lieutenant of that company. He was Post Quartermaster at tht Palma Soriano, Cuba, filling the 
position to the satisfaction of all. "Clint" is the most popular dancing master in the city of Chicago. 

LIEUT. JOHN MCDONALD 

JOHN MCDONALD gained his military experience by ten years' service in the regular army. He 

^ has made a very efficient officer. 

53 




SPANISH TROOPS 



Company F, Eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. 



CAPTAIN, WM. B. AKERS. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT, CLINTON L. HILL. 



SECOND LIEUTENANT, JOHN MCDONALD. 



SERGEANTS 

AUGUSTUS RANTUS, ist. Sergeant 
THEODORE HAWKINS 
VARIES A. DAVIS 
HERMAN HECTOR 
CHAS. A. BROWN 
RICHARD B. BONZELL 

CORPORALS 

WM. TURNER, 
HOWARD GARDNER 
GEO. W. WOOD 
GEO. H. GRIFFIN 
MARCELLUS W. McCALL 
JARIOT McLEMORE 
EDWARD BURNETT 
JAMES A KURT 
CHAS. LINDSAY 
I.'H'JS PEARMAN 
EMORY SNOWDON 
GEO. STROTHER, Cook 
JAMES A. FOX, Musician 
WM. L. SCOTT, Musician 
ALEX. ALFORD, Artificei 
JOSEPH W. BROWN, Wagoner 

PRIVATES 

ANDERSON, ADOLPH F 
ANDERSON, BERT 
BEAN, GEO. W 



BERRY, JOHN H 
BERRY, JOHN T 
BLAKES, FRED 
BISHOP. CHAS 
BOWDEN, JOHN F 
BOYD, SAM 
BRENT. BERTRAND 
DROWN, JOSEPH J 
BROWN, JOHN R 
BRYANT, GEO. H 
COBB, GEO 
COREY, WM. H 
CORRUTHERS, OSCAR O 
DOUGLASS, WM 
FIELDS, MOSES 
FOX, JAMES D 
FOSTER, WESLEY S 
FRAZIER, JAMES H 
GRAY, GEO W 
GOODE, WM. T 
HADLEY, JOHN 
HALL, GEO 
HAYES, WM. F 
HAYWOOD, GEO W 
HOLLOWAY, FRANK 
HUMPHREY, JAMES G 
HYDE, JOHN 
HAWKINS, GUS 
JACKSON, JOHN 
JACKSON, JOHN A 
TACKSON, MALCOLM 
JENKINS, FRANK 
JOHNSON. THOMAS W 
JONES, ALONZO J 
LANE, TAMES 
LANE, SILAS 
LEEK, EDWARD 
LEWIS, CLAYBORNE G 



LIVERMAN, GEO 
MCDONALD, WALTER 

McGOWAN, JACOB 

MITCHELL, JOE 

MORGAN, TAMES A 

MORRIS, SAMUEL 

MOSBY. FRANK C 

NUNN, MOSES T C 

PHILLIPS, SCHUYLER 

PRATHER, FRED 

RANDOLPH, PAYTON W 

RUDD, JAMES H 

SCOTT, ALBERT 

STARKS, CLYDE W 

STEWART, JOHN P 

STEWARr WM E 

STODDARD, CHAS W 

STONE, THOMAS E 

SYKES, GEO 

TABORNE, LAFAYETTE 

THOMPSON, ARTHUR 

TURNER, ROBERT 

WARFIELD. HAYDEN 

WEAVER, WM 

WHITTAKER, WESLEY 

WHITE, THADDEUS M 

WILLIAMS, CHAS H 

WILLIAMS, SAMUEL 

WILLIAMS, WM W 

WILKINS, PEYTON B 

WOODALL, PRINCE E 

WOLLRIDGE. WM H 

AMBROSE, CHARLES, discharged Jan. 27, 

i?09. 
PARKS, ALONZO, deceased at Palma So- 

rtana, Feb. 4, 1899. 




CAPTAIN JULIUS C. WITHERSI-OON 




UIEUTENA-NT CHARLES M. REECE 



CAPT. JULIUS WITHERSPOON 

F~) ROB ABLY no man in the regiment has had a more varied career than Captain Julius Witherspoon. 
He was born at Archidelphia, Ark., 1859, receiving his education and early business training in 
that town. After spending twenty-four years in his native home, he decided to go out into the world 
and seek his fortune. He came to Bloomington in 1884 and began his new career as a farmer, working 
for O. Barnard, the largest agriculturist of that section of the State. He left the employ of Mr. Barnard 
to enter that of the great stock dealer, I. H. Light. He enjoyed the entire confidence of both of these 
gentlemen and soon rose to the position of confidential man in both places. When war was declared, 
he was a policeman in the City of Bloomington. 

LIEUT. H. W. JAMESON 

j-jENRYW. JAMESON left the ministry to join the Eighth Illinois. Lieut. Jameson obtained his 
' ' literary education at Knox College, and then bent his energies towards the study of theology. For 
the past few years, he has made a distinct success in the newspaper and publishing lines, and was early 
selected for a commission when the regiment was being formed. In Cuba, as Judge Advocate, his work 
met the commendation of his superior officers. 

'ti$j^gj^$ 
LIEUT. CHARLES M. REECE 

/'"HAS. M. REECE was born at Bowling Green, Mo., in 1858, receiving his early education and learn- 
ing the trade of barber in his old home. He left Bowling Green in 1888, coming to Jacksonville, 
111. He is a tonsorial artist of wide repute in his community, but the confinement of the occupation was 
injurious to his health. When he enlisted in the volunteer service he was employed as messenger at the 
Railway and Warehouse Commission at Springfield. 

57 




COMPANY G, 



Company Q, Eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. 

CAPTAIN, JULIUS C. WITHERSPOON. FIRST LIEUTENANT, HENRY W. JAMESON. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT, CHARLES M. REECE. 



SERGEANTS 

AUGUSTUS G. SMITH, 1st. Sergeant 

JAMES M. COURTNEY 

WICKLIFFE SMITH 

DAIVD H. MOORE 

IRA O. GUY 

JESSE H. WAGGENER 

CORPORALS 

WILLIAM T. JORDAN 

DELMAR E. LEE 

CASH G. TOLIVER 
LEWIS LIVINGSTON 
WILLIAM K. CLARK 
JAMES H. SIMONS 
NOBLE D. LAMB 
JKREMIAH PROSER 
HARRY D. RODGERS 
EUGENE THOMAS 
JOHN H. H. HAWKINS 
HENRY C. WILSON 

CHARLES HARDIN, Cook 
JOSEPH G. WILSON, Musician 
SAMUEL HARDIMAN, Artificer 
EKED MURPHY, Wagoner 



PRIVATES 

ANDERSON, CHARLES S 
BELL, SHIRLEY D 
BELL, WILLIAM 

BLAKE. F1NUS 
BROWN, BLAND 
BROWN, EMMANUEL W S 
BROWNER, JAMES 

BURNETT, HAYES 
BURNS, MERRILL 
BRYANT. WILLIAM 

BOYD. WILLIAM 
CROUSE, WILLIAM P 
DAVIS, FRANK L 
DAVIS, TOSEPH 
DUNN, JOHN 
EARLY, DANIEL 
FEARS, A. M 
GIBBS. DAVID 
GAINES, TOSEPH B 
GLASSCO, CHARLES H 
GRAYER, FRANK 
GRISLE, GRANDVILLB 
HARDIN, JAMES 
HARDIN, WILLIAM 
HENRY, ED 
HOBBS, DAVIE G 
HOLLY. JOHN 
HUBBARD, ALBERT 
JACOBS. CASSIDY 
JACKSON, LEBERT 
JOHNSON, WILLIAM D 
JONES, CHARLIE 
TONES, WILLIAM M 
KEMP, CHARLIE 



KNIGHT, NOBLE 
LANE, TOHN 
LEE, JAMES H 
LEWIS, NATHANIEL 
LEWIS, PHILIP 
MADISON, SIDNEY 
MARTIN, CHARLES E 
MCDONALD, VIRGIL 
M1LOM, HART 
MYERS, CHARLES 
NICKENS, WARDNER 
1'ATTON, JAMES N 
1'ENNIX, JOHN 
ROLLINS, WILLIAM P 
RILEY. HARDIN 
ROBERTS, HAYES L 
ROBERTSON, WILLIAM 
SMITH, ARTHUR 
SMITH, WILLIAM 
STIPES, JOSEPH 
SUBLETT, SAMUEL 
SAMUELS, GEO. W 
SAMUELS, JAMES A 
THOMAS, EVERETT 
TICKNOR, JED 
TURNER, MIKE 
WALKER, NELSON 
WATSON, WILLIAM A 
WHITE, SAMUEL F 
WILEY, WILLIE 
WILLIAMS, WATHER 
WILLIAMS, SPENCER 
VVRIGHT, CHESTER 
YANCEY, WILLIAM 
YARBERY, FRANK 
YOUNG, CHARLES H 



59 




L f 



I 





LIEUTENANT RICHARD C. Ross CAPTAIN WILLIAM L). HODGE LIEUTENANT WALTER J. JACKSON 



CAPT. WILLIAM D. HODGE 

APT A IN WILLIAM DARRELL HODGE has the distinction of being the youngest Captain in 
the Eighth Regiment. He first saw the lipht of day in Quincy, 111., 1875. In 1879, his parents 
moved to Springfield, III., which place has been his home ever since. His father was a veteran of the 
Civil War and much of the mattial spirit of the father was inherited by the son. He was the organizer 
of the Sons of Veterans Corps of Springfield, joining as a private in 1891; by steadfastness of purpose 
and devotion to duty, he rose to the rank of Captain in 1894. Captain Hodge by diligent work, aided 
by able assistants, succeeded in making Company H one of the "crack" companies of the regiment. 

LIEUT. RICHARD C. ROSS 

A LTON, ILL., is the birthplace of .Richard C. Ross. Born in 1870, he lived in his native city until 

he reached the age of 17, then removing to Springfield. At the time of his enlistment, he 

was the second cook at the Leland Hotel of that city. He is such a trustworthy man that in times of 

emergency he has been given full charge of the house. He is also First Lieutenant in the Sons of 

Veterans' Corps of Springfield. 

LIEUT. WALTER J. JACKSON 

r? ALTIMORE, MD., is the birthplace of Walter Jackson. He is twenty-nine years old. In 1895 he 
L^ joined the Ninth Battalion as a private, and when the regiment was called to Springfield he wore the 
stripes of a Sergeant. He was mustered in as Second Lieutenant, and has done faithful and consistent 
service. 

fit 




COMPANY H. 



Company H, Eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. 

CAPTAIN, WILLIAM D. HODGE. FIRST LIEUTENANT, RICHARD C. Ross. 

SECOND- LIEUTENANT, WALTER J. JACKSON. 



SERGEANTS 

ROBERT BLAKEMAN, ist. Sergeant 

HENRY WILLIAMS 
OLIVER CURTIS 
HENRY A. BROADY 
FRANK L. LEWIS 
JOSEPH RICHARDSON 



CORPORALS 

IOSEPH MORGAN, 
HARRY ROSS 
WILLIAM FARMER 
ELIAS KIRBY 
JAMES HATCHER 
DAVID EDWARDS 
CHARLES ROSE 
LUTHER KING 
GEORGE BEARD 
FRANK BURNS 
ABRAHAM L. MORGAN 
EVERTT WATTS 



GEORGE HARRIS, Cook 
FREDERICK PARKER, Musician 
IRA KING, Musician 
CHARLES HOLMAN, Artificer 
JOSEPH WELLS, Wagoner 



PRIVATES 

ADAMS, ROBERT 
ALEXANDRA, GEORGE 
BLACKFORD, WILLIAM 
BLAND, AUBRY 



BRABOY, KIT 
BISHOP, CHARLES 
BROWN, ALLEN 
BROWN, HELTON 
BROWN, DANIEL 
BURKS, WALTER 
BURTON, MILUS 
BURTON, GEORGE 
BENNETT, ROBERT 
CALHOUN, RALPH 
CARTER, GILES 
DICKENS, HARRY 
DIXON, JAMES 
DONNEGAN, WILLIAM 
EDWARDS, JOSEPH 
ENSAW. CHARLES 
FARMER, JOHN JR 
FORD. FRANK 
GIOYI-.K. LOUIS 

C.RfilCXLEAF, EJ.HAH 
GII..KS. DAVID 
HAT I., T>V,]-;UT 
HARDIN, ANDREW 
HATCHER, ELLIS 
HICKS, \\ I'.,LIAM 
HI 1,1.. HENRY 
HOLMAN, RALPH 
11C-GAN, CHARLES 
HUBBARD. TAMES 
JOHNSON, ALBERT 
TONES, JOHN 
JOHNSON, ARTHUR D 
KIRBY, PAUL 
LACEY, GEORGE 
LOOMIS, GEORGE 
LOOMIS, WILLIAM 
LUCAS, TAMES 
MAHR, DAVID 
MARSHALL, GEORGE 



MEREDITH, AMOS 
MILLER, HENRY 
MINNARD, HARDY 
MOORE, CHARLES 
MARSHALL, WESLEY 
MAHR, MAJOR 
MARSHALL, LENARD 
ORENDORF, ELIJAH 
POLLARD, WILLIAM 
PETTIT, WILLIAM 
PEYTON, WILLIAM 
PARKER, LORENZA 
QUARELLS, GEORGE 
RAGLAND, WILLIAM 
RAY, GRANVILLE 
REDEN. NEUMAN 
RICKETT, BENJAMIN 
ROBINSON. JAMES 
ROSS, CHARLES 
RUCKER, ELECK 
SMITH, WILLIAM 
SETTLERS, SAMUEL 
SANDERS, JOSEPH 
THOMPSON, ALBERT 
TABORN, JOHN 
VERNON, FRANK 
WILLIAMS, JOHN 
WILLIAMS, LOUIS 
WILLIAMS, NOAH 
WILLIAMS, REUBEN 
WRIGHT, ROBERT 
WASHINGTON, ALEXANDRA 
WASHINGTON, ROBERT 
WASHINGTON, FREDERICK 
WATKINS, CHARLES 
WEBB, TAMES 
WORML'EY, EDWARD 
YORK, WILLIAM 
WALTON, JAMES C 



63 







LIEUTENANT WILLIAM H. DALLAS CAPTAIN FREDERICK J. BALL, JK. LIEUTENANT ROBERT F. RADCLIFFE 



CAPT. FREDERICK BALL, JR. 

FREDERICK BALL, JR., was born in Ouincy, 111., Dec. 5111,1865. In 1883, he was graduated from 
the city high school, and soon afterwards commenced the study of law. After a complete course 
in the Chaddock Law College he was admitted to the bar in November, 1895. He built up a splendid 
practice, and soon became the leading colored citizen in that section. When Col. Marshall was casting 
about for a suitable man to recruit a company in Quincy, his choice naturally fell upon Frederick Ball. 
In securing recruits, he was particularly fortunate, and Capt. Ball's company soon became a company of 
soldiers. 



LIEUT. WILLIAM H. DALLAS 

ILLIAM DALLAS was born in Ouincy, 111., in 1877. He attended the public schools of that 
city, afterwards learning the butcher's trade. He was working at his trade when the call for 
troops was made. Entering the service as a Sergeant, Lieutenant Dallas received more promotions 
than any man in the regiment two commissions coming to him in less than two months. 



w 



LIEUT. ROBERT RATCLIFFE 

' I "HE Second Lieutenant of Company I won his commission in the service. He enlisted as Sergeant 
Major, performed his duties most acceptably, and was rewarded with a promotion. In Chicago, 
Lieutenant Ratcliffe held an important position in the Postoffice, which has been held open for him during 
his absence. During the temporary absences of Adjutant Thompson, Lieut. Ratcliffe performed exceed- 
ingly well the duties of that important office. 

05 




APPROACH TO MORRO CASTLE 



Company I, Eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. 

CAPTAIN, FREDERICK BALL, JR. FIRST LIEUTENANT, WILLIAM H. DALLAS. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT, ROBERT F. RATCLIFFE. 



SERGEANTS 

CHARLES S. S. MORRISON, ist. Sergeant 

CHARLES O. ROBINSON 

CHARLES H. PETERSOii 

SAMUEL DUNCAN 

WILLIAM W. PERKINS 

JOSEPH W. JORDAN 

CORPORALS 



JAMES DENNING 
SOLOMON L. LESTER 
THOMAS W. ROBINSON 
TAMES W. CROPP 
HERBERT WILLIAMS 
BAILEY BUTLER 
JCHN W. BALL 
JOHN W. GRIFFIN 
WILLIAM GRIFFY 
EDWARD H. JOHNSON- 
JOHN GLOVER 
WILLIAM WARD 

WILLIAM E. WOODS. Cook 
JAMES A. MOSBY, Musician 
WILLIAM DIAMOND, Musician 
TAYLOR WHEELER, Artificer 
ROBERT CROCKETT, Wagoner 



PRIVATES 

ARTIS, SILAS 
BARNES, BERTIE 
BERNARD, LOUIS H 
BELL, WILLIAM F 
BLUE. WILLIAM 
BLACKBURN, JOHN W 
BRU1NGTON, BAANA 
BRUINGTON, LEMUEL 
BROWN, WILLIAM A 
BUCKNER, BEN 
IH'RRKLL, HENRY M 
HUTLF.R, SMITH 
BUSH, EDWARD 
BALL, WILLIAM W 
CLARK, JOSEPH J 
COMBS, JOHN A 
COBY, WILLIAM 
DAVIS, MORTON 
DEAN, HONOR 
DOUGLAS, THOMAS 
DOTSON, WILLIAM 
HORSEY, JOHN H 
ELLIS. ARTHUR 
FOSTER, ERNEST L 
FlNLEY, WALTER R 
GASKIN, SIMON 
GASKIN, CHARLES D 
GILSTRAP, ROBERT 
GIBSON, ROBERT 
GREEN, SAMUEL 
HARRISON, JOHN H 
HARRISON, ELMER 
HARRISON, HENRY 
HARRIS, ROBERT 
HARVEY, ANTHONY J 
HICKS. ALBERT L 
HENRY, HERMAN D 



JACKSON. LORENZY 
JEFFERSON, ARNOLD 
JEFFERSON, JESSE 
JOWLS, CHARLES A 
TOHNSON, WILLIAM 
JOHNSON, GEORGE W 
LONGMEYER, JOHN 
MAXWELL, CHARLIE 
MARSHALL, JOHN E 
McCRAY, JOHN 
McWILLIAMS. GEORGK 
MARTIN, EDWARD 
MORRIS, WILLIAM 
MOORE, FRANK 
MITCHELL, HARRY H 
MERRITT, DAVID 
MILLER, EDWARD 
NEWBOLT, HENRY 
PARRISH, SIMON P 
PERKINS, JOHN H. JR 
PHIPPS, EDGAR 
PHOENIX, WILLIAM 
PENIX, ROBERT L 
PLUMMER, CHARLEY 
PRIDE, JOHN A 
RELEFORD, WILLIAM A 
RICHARDSON, PHILIP 
ROLAND, JOHN 
SHAW, MILLARD A 
SANSBURRY, WILLIAM 
SMITH, AARON D 
SMITH, TYSON H 
SPENCER, MARION 
SIMINGTON, CHARLES 
THOMPSON, ANDY 
THOMPSON, WILLIAM W 
WARD, FRED 
WASHINGTON. WILLTAM 
WALKER, JOHN M 




LIEUTENANT WILLIAM CARTER 



CAPTAIN LEON \V. DENISON 



LIEUTENANT JAMES WASHINGTON 



CAPT. LEON W. DENISON 

I EON W. DENISON, brother of Major Frank Denison, was born in San Antonio, Tex. He 
* ' prepared for the University of Michigan in the public schools of his home. Captain Denison spent 
two years in the University of Michigan, taking a special course in history, logic and rhetoric preparatory 
to the study of law. He entered the Chicago College of Law in 1896, and at the time of his enlistment 
was a senior in that institution. He enlisted as a private in the Eighth Regiment and was unexpectedly 
appointed Captain of Company K by the Governor. He took a green company, and by skill and per- 
sistence formed it into one of the best companies of the regiment. Leon Denison is one of the most 
able and popular young men in the city of Chicago. He lays no claims to being a politician, but stands 
high in the councils of both city and county politicians. 

LIEUT. WILLIAM CARTER 

LIEUT. WILLIAM CARTER, the smallest and best-natured officer in the regiment, was born forty- 
eight years ago in the Old Dominion. In 1863, he moved to Litchfield, 111., entered the field of 
business, and made a pronounced success. During the formation of the Eighth Regiment, no man was 
more active, or more successful, in securing recruits than Lieut. Carter. A capable officer, genial, courte- 
ous, and at all times a credit to his uniform is the record of Lieut. Carter. 

LIEUT. JAMES W. WASHINGTON 

JAMKS W. WASHINGTON, the fighting parson, was born at La Grange, Mo., in 1863. He 
Gl received his early education in his native city. At that time, it was his highest aim to be a minister 
of the gospel and a leader of his people. He was ordained a Baptist minister at Davenport, Iowa, Oct. 
15, 1886. Lieut. Washington was Chief City Oil Inspector for two and a half years at Monmouth, 111.; 
leaving that position, he became editor and publisher of the Douglas Optic, the first colored paper 
ever published in Knox County, Illinois. This field becoming too narrow for a man of his abilities, 
he moved in 1896 to Rock Island, 111. He took an active part in the enlistment of his company, and 
afterwards as a Lieutenant met all the requirements of a soldier. While located at San Luis, he filled 
the position of Provost Marshal with great distinction. 

69 




COMPANY K 



Company K, Eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. 



CAPTAIN. LEON DENISON. FIRST LIEUTENANT, WILLIAM CARTER. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT, J. W. WASHINGTON. 



SERGEANTS 

GEO. D. CARTER, ist. Sergeant 

WILLIAMS, WILLIAM 
WELLINGTON CROCKETT 
DANIEL LUCAS 
SMITH HALL 
SOLOMON WILLIAMS 



CORPORALS 

PHILLIP DAVIS 
JOSEPH YEAGER 
RUFUS YEAGER 
GRANT WARD 
JOHN SPEARMAN 
WILLIAM JONES 
GEORGE HAYES 
WILLIAM REDMOND 
FRED HOLMES 
JOSEPH WILSON 
EDWARD LEE 
ALEXANDER BUSH 



HENRY BOWENS, Cook 

HARRISON PORTER, Artificer 
SYLVESTER McALLISTER, Wagoner 
JOHN JACKSON, Musician 
HORACE ALEXANDER .Musician 



PRIVATES 

ALBRITTON, TOLBERT 
ALLEN, CHRISTOPHER 
ANDERSON, HARRY 
BAKER, GEORGE 

BAKER, JAMES 
BELL, JOHN 
BELL, WILLIAM 
BIRCH, WILLIAM 

BAILEY. LAFAYETTE 
BRANCH, FREDERICK 
BRAMM, JAMES 
BROWN, CORNELIUS 
BROWN, FREMONT 
O'BRYANT, HENRY 
BUTLER, GEORGE 
CARPER, MARTIN 
COLLINS, ROSS 
COOPER, CHESTER 

CURTIS, BENJAMIN 
CURTIS, JOEL 
EAVES, GEORGE 
EDENS, TAMES 
EDWARDS, BENJAMIN 
EVANS, WALTER 
FERGUSSON, JOHN 
GORDON, CHAYLON 
GRANT, JAMES 
HARRIS, JAMES 
HAYES, ROBERT 
HUNTER, GEORGE 
HYATT, RICHARD 
JACKSON, ANDREW 
JACKSON, JAMES 
TOHNSON, A \V 
JOHNSON, TOHN 
JOHNSON. 'WILLIAM 
TOHN. TILTON 
TONES, FRANK 

71 



JAMES, JOSEPH L 
KEELING, JOHN 
KNOX, JOSEPH 
KNIGHT, LUCIUS 
LEE, ERNEST 
LEE, EDWARD 
LETCHER, EDDIE 
LEWIS, WILLIAM 
LOGAN, FRANK 
MAYS, JOHN 
McKANE, NEUT 
MITCHEL, FREDRICK 
MOORE, FRANK 
OWENS, C. W. 
PEAIR, TONIE 
RAYMOND, HUGH 
REDMOND, EVERETTE 
ROSS, W. A. 
RUSH, GRANT 
SCOTT, WILLIAM 
SUMMERS, EARL 
SMITH, WILLIAM 
SMITH, T. T. 
STANLEY, LEONARD 
TAGGART, HENRY 
TERRELL, EDWARD 
TERRY. HENRY 
TITSW6RTH, DAVID 
VANDERMUS. ANDRE\V 
WADDLE, AARON 
WALKER, WILLIS 
WHITE. JOSEPH 
WILSON, WASHINGTON 
WALLACE, JAMES 
VALENTINE, IRA 
PENDLETON, ELMER 
THOMAS, JOHN R 
CLAYPOOL, AUSTIN 
COEFIELD, EDWARD 
NORTH. JOHN 




LIEUTENANT JOHN W. W. LADETN 




LIEUTENANT HORACE G. BURKE 



CAPT. GEORGE V. LANE 

EORGE V. LANE is reputed to be the handsomest officer in the fegiment. When Capt. Lane left 
his home to lead his company to the front, he was serving his third term as County Commissioner. 
By profession the captain is a lawyer. 

LIEUT. JOHN W. W. LADEN 

JOHN W. W. LADEN was born in Mound City, 111., in 1873. He received his early education in the 
^ schools of his native city, afterwards attending the high school at Metropolis. He left the Metropo- 
lis High School to complete his course at the Evanston High School preparatory to a collegiate course 
in Northwestern University. When war was declared he was working on a farm to 'replenish his funds 
in order that he might complete his university course. 



LIEUT. H. G. BURKE 

[HORACE G. BURKE was born July 4, 1872, at Houston, .Tex. He passed the early years of his 
life in his native State, moving to Metropolis, III., in January, 1883. He enlisted in Company L 
at the first organization of that company, leaving a thriving and remunerative live stock business for 
the defense of his country. He enlisted as a First Sergeant and was promoted on the field in Cuba to 
Second Lieutenant. He proved himself to be an efficient officer in every respect, discharging his duties 
in such a gentlemanly manner that he won the esteem of the entire regiment. He has always been a 
prominent figure in the southern part of the State, and bids fair to become one of the leaders of his race, 

73 




COMPANY 



Company L, Eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry 



CAPTAIN, GEO. V LANE. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT, JOHN W. W. LADEN. 



SECOND LIEUTENANT, HORACE G. BURKE. 



SERGEANTS 

JOEL T. LLOYD, ist. Sergeant 
HARLAND A. HOARD 
ROBERT T. SIMS 
WM. T. STEPHENS 
CLARENCE E. THOMPSON 
BEN J. HOLLINS 

CORPORALS 

ROB GLOVER 
J. W. PARKS 
GEO. W. HUGHES 
WM. MOORE 
WALTER I. LIPSCOME 
ARTHUR CARR 
FLEMIN FISHER 
JAMES MEALS 
JOHN W. PASCIIEL 
FELIX DAILY 
GEO. G. ANDERSON 
.-fLEX. JOHNSON 

EDWARD P.IDDLE, Cook 
THOMAS" HARMON, Artificer 
HILMON DAVIS, Wagoner 
JOHN WHITNER, Musician 
WM. G. LLOYD, Musician 



PRIVATES 

ADAMS, Ed H. 
ADAMS. JOSEPH 

ALLEN; JOHN D 
ALLEN, 'WALTER 
BLITHE. JAMES H 
BRADLEY. ANTHONY 
BROWN, WM. D 

BROWN, Geo 

BURROWS, GEO 
COUSINS. WM. E. 
CROCKET, REUBEN 
DALTON CHAS. R 
DUNNING, THOMAS 
EDWARDS, ROI! A 
EDWARDS, TOHN 

EVANS. HY' 

FLAKES, FATE 
GIBSON, SAMUEL 
GORDAN, ELIJAH A 
GRAHAM, WM. G 
HAYES, GEO H 
HAGLER, WILEY A 
HENRY, FELIX H 
HENDERSON, OTRESS II 
HYNES, EMERSON E 
HOFFMAN, SAMUEL 
HUGHES. ALFRED 
JOHNSON. THOMAS 
TONES, JESSE 
KING, EMERSON 

KIRBY, HY 
KIMBALL, TOHN 
LISHMAN, "BENJAMIN 
LONG, HY 
LANE, JR., GEO V 
McCRACKIN, WALLACE L 



McCURRY, SONEY 
McCURRY, GEO 
McKAY, SAMUEL 
MANN, TOE 
MILES, "WM 

MORGAN, JAMES G 
MOORE, PORTER 
MILLER. WILSON 
MILLER, FRANK 
NOBLE, WJI 
NEWSON, JESSE 
ORINGTON, CLARENCE 
PAYNE, CLEMNIK E 
POLLARD, TUDGE 
REEDE, RO'LLAND 
REEDE, WM 
ROBINSON, JOE 
ROBINSON, JAMES M 
ROLLINS, TOHN 
SMITH, TOHN W 
SMITH, GUS 
SMITH, ARTHUR G 
SMOOT. JOHN F 
STEWARD, ULYSSES 
TURNER, JEFF 
TAYLOR, ELIAS 
THOMPSON, GEO 
THOMPSON, HARRY K 
THOMAS, CHAS 
TILLER, WM 

UZZELL, McRae 
WATERS, LEWIS 
WEBSTER, HORACE 
WHITE, JOHN 
WHITNER, ELIJAH 
WILSON, LEVY 
WILSON, PETER 
WILLIAMS, EDDIE T 



75 





LIEUTENANT WILLIAM A. DONALDSON CAPTAIN JOSEPH W. McAuoo 



LlKl'TENANT NATHAN DAVIS 



CAPT. JOSEPH W. McADOO 

JOSEPH W. McADOO was born in Gibson County, Kentucky, in 1869. For the last fifteen years 
^' Cairo has 'been his home, and he by reason of his natural strength of character and energy, was early 
selected to be one of the officers in Company M. In the field, Captain McAdoo was a good tactician and 
a thorough gentleman. His company is noted for lack of friction, and the comradeship so general amongst 
his men. 

LIEUT. WM. DONALDSON 

E of the quietest, most willing officers of the line is Lieut. Donaldson. He served his 
military apprenticeship in the 24th U. S. Infantry, and was well fitted for the more important 
duties with the Eighth. One of his superior officers said of him: "Whenever everyone else was worn 
out and ready to rest, Lieut. Donaldson was always ready to carry out orders." 

LIEUT. NATHAN DAVIS 

M-ATHAN DAVIS was born in Pittsylvania County, Va., in 1865. He moved to Cairo, 111., in 1887, 
' and immediately took a leading place among the men of his race. Lieut. Davis is a self-made 
man in the fullest sense of the word. By the hardest knocks, he was enabled to reach the enviable 
position he now holds. He has always been a lover of his race, and any measure that would advance 
the interests of the race, he advocated with all his great soul. He has always been true to himself and 
to his friends that is the secret of his success. He took an active part in recruiting Company M and 
the improvement of that company, and thereby the regiment has been his greatest delight. His gentle- 
manly and soldierly ways have endeared him to both officers and men. 

77 




COMPANY M 



Company M, Eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. 

CAPTAIN, JOSEPH W. McAooo. FIRST LIEUTENANT, WILLIAM H. DONALDSON. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT, NATHAN DAVIS 



SERGEANTS 

WILLIAM M. WATSON, ist. Sergeant 

HENRY D. DOUGLAS 

CHARLEY TRUELOCK 

WILLIAM BUCKNER 

JAMES W. MOSS 

GEORGE H. LANE 



CORPORALS 

SAMUEL PHILLIPS 
JUDGE J. PHINNESSEE 
GEORGE CLEMONS 
JOSEPH J. WINBISH 
JAMES A. WILSON 
BENJAMIN H. SHANKLIN 
ALFRED THOMAS 
MAJOR WILLIFORD 
DEMPSY SUMNER 
EDWARD PATTERSON 
ISAIAH C. D1LLARD 
1EFFERSON SMITH 
FRANK NEAL 



LOGAN WHITE, Musician 
ABRAHAM EZICAH, Musician 
EDWARD WRIGHT, Artificer 
JOSEPH DAVIS, Wagoner 



PRIVATES 

ALLEN, ELMORE 
AMOS, RICHARD 
BAKER, WILLIAM 
liRADSHAW, CHARLEY 
BIRDSONG, DENNA 
BRIDGES, CLIFTON 
BROWN, JOHN M 
BAKER, LAWSON 
BURNETT, RICHARD 
BRACY. RICHARD 
BUCKHANON, WILLIAM 
COMBS, DELACY 
COOK, H EZICAH 
CLARK, JOHN 
COLE, RUFUS W 
CARTER, WILLIS 
DUDLY, FRANK 
DOUGLAS, TAMES D 
DUEPREE, WILLIAM 
ELLIOTT, SIMON 
EVERETT. WILLIAM 
EWING. IRA 
DENNIS, FARROW 
DIJNN'VS, PAGAN 
FIELDS, JOHN 
FREEMAN, PETER 
FOULTZ, WILLEY 
GREER, SAMUEL 
GASKIN, STEPHEN 
GATEN, DAVID 
HERRON, ALBERT 
HILL, TOHN 
HAYNES, ROBERT 
HOLLY. PLESS 
JACKSON, ANDREW 
TOYNER, THOMAS 
TOHNSON, ALBERT 
JOHNSON, WALTER 



JONES, WALTON F 
KNOVVLES, HARDY L 
KNOWLtb JOHN B 
LAMBERT, EDWARD 
LEACH, WILLIAM 
McKISIC. THOMAS 

MITCHELL, WILLIAM 
MITCHELL, EDWARD 
MOSBY, GEORGE B. 
MOPPINS, JOHN 
MORRIS, MITCHELL 
MORRIS, NEPP 
MARTIN, WALTER 
MARTIN, JOHN H 
MATHES, SIMON 
MOSS, ALEX. 
NOONAN, ALLIE 
NEWTON, ALEX 
NEWSOME, FRANK 
OWENS, CHARLEY 
PILLAR, ALLEN 
PEARSON, HENRY 
RIST, JAMES 
ROSS. JAMES 
RILES. JOHN R 
SMITH, EDWARD 
SMITH, JOHN T 
SPAGGS, JAMES 
SILVERS. NATHANIEL 
STEVERSON. WILLIAM 
THOMAS, EDWARD 
TUCKER, SIDNEY 
THOMPSON. JOSEPH 
TANCIL. CHARLEY 
WATKINS. EDWARD 
WADE. GEORGE 
WASHINGTON, TAMES W 
WARD. TACK 
WHITE." JOSEPH 
WILLIAMS, REECY 



79 




COMPANY II BREAKI.NC CAMP AT SAN I.ris 
CUBAN BOYS IN THE FOREGROUND 



HISTORY. 



A history of the Eighth Illinois Volunteers is an 
epoch in the history of the negro in America. 

Ever since Crispus Attucks, the world has 
known that the black man has undaunted courage ; 
that he is obedient to command ; and that he pos- 
sesses, thanks to his unfortunate ancestors, a 
hearty constitution, and the faculty of being satis- 
fied with an humble diet. In a word he is the ideal 
private soldier. 

Sherman and Sheridarr have testified to this fact ; 
after Appomattox, I.ee averred that without the aid 
of the negro soldiers, the North could never have 
conquered him ; and Gen. McClellan said, "Give me 
an army of black men, and I will defy the world.'' 

Negroes as officers would be an experiment. 
Theirs, heretofore.was toobey,nottocommand. They 



were always to be led, never to lead. Though his shoul- 
.ders were broad, they were too narrow to bear the 
gilded shoulder straps. Though his hands were 
strong, they were too brawny to wield the comman- 
der's glittering sword. 

They possessed that enthusiasm which led to 
noble deeds, but they had not yet learned to com- 
mand, or to be commanded by members of their own 
race. 

Prejudice, rank and insurmountable had con- 
tinually barred, to the colored youth, the doors of 
the nation's great military academy. Laws, enacted 
in the post bellum days, absolutely forbade, in the 
negro regiments in the regular army, the promo- 
tion which merit or valor might deserve. 

Only one avenue leading to the upper grades re- 
mained to him, the state militia. In various states, 



81 



companies and battalions were organized, and in 
1891 the afterwards celebrated Ninth Battalion of 

* 

Chicago was formed. Up this single avenue it 
inarched, storming citadels of opposition, leaping 
trenches of spiteful intrigue, repelling newspaper 
and legislative attacks, but always on the way 
upward. 

For seven years the Ninth Battalion was the 
negroes' West Point. Nothing marked their Fresh- 
man, Sophomore and Junior years save many nights 
of hard drill, several brilliant parades, and now and 
then a solemn march when a comrade was borne to 
his final resting place. But political events were 
shaping themselves to give these soldier students a 
memorable senior year, a senior year that was to 
end with a commencement that was indeed a begin- 
ning of greater things. 

In the spring of 1898, the world was expecting 
Congress to declare war with Spain. Diplomacy 
had utterly failed to gain for the tottering Cubans 
a single tangible concession of liberty, or the right 
to live. 



The press was clamoring for war ; the pulpit 
prayed for intervention ; and the people regarded 
every strong voiced jingo as a defender of the down- 
trodden, and an exponent of liberty. War was ine- 
vitable and the citizen soldiery was preparing for it. 

On April 23rd, Congress declared that "a state 
of war existed between the United States and 
Spain," and the students in the West Point of the 
Negroes thought that their day of graduation was 
at hand. They knew that they belonged to the state 
militia and that it was upon the state militia that the 
government relied for its first soldiers. At last, the 
experiment was to be made, negro troops, with ne- 
gro officers were to be called into the service. At 
last, the American negro was to be given a chance to 
fight for his less fortunate kinsmen in Cuba. 

April 24th, the President's proclamation calling 
for 175,000 troops was issued, and under the allot- 
ment to States, Illinois was to furnish seven regi- 
ments of infantry and one regiment of cavalry, no 
battalion was mentioned. The state's seven regi- 
ments departed for Springfield, and every militiaman 



iii the state who was willing to fight for his coun- 
try, except those of the Ninth Battalion, was to be 
given a musket. Was it misfortune, or was it preju- 
dice? Popular opinion chose the latter, but devel- 
opments showed that it was the former. 

The day following the issuance of the call, a com- 
mittee composed of John R. Marshall, Robert R. 
Jackson, Franklin Denison, E. H. Wright, Rev. R. 
C. Ransom, Rev. J. W. Thomas and S. B. Turner 
proceeded to Springfield to ascertain from Governor 
Tanner why the Battalion had not been included 
in the call. The Governor explained the situation. 
Seven regiments had been called, and there were 
seven complete regiments in the state service.lsavhig 
no place for an unattached battalion. "However," 
he said, "if a second call be issued, I will give you 
the opportunity to recruit the battalion to a regi- 
ment, and will call that regiment first into the serv- 
ice. Furthermore I will promise you that every offi- 
cer in that regiment will be a colored man." How 
fully and well he kept this promise the world knows. 

Then came the trying days. Two new companies 



were being formed in Chicago, one in Quincy, one 
each in Springfield, Cairo, Mound City, Litchfield 
and Bloomington, and men for these companies 
were coming in from all the surrounding towns and 
villages. In some companies, election of officers 
were held and drilling was commenced ; in other en- 
thusiasm was the predominating feature. Recruits 
were easily obtained, but were just as easily lost after 
they had grown weary of weeks of waiting. New 
men to take their places were found by the tireless 
recruiting officers, despite the ever increasing cry 
that "the Eighth will never be called." Men who 
had given up their positions preparatory to going to 
the front, got them back again, or began to grumble 
at the long delay. Pessimists, and that class of men 
who discourage every enterprise, now loudly pro- 
claimed that the government had no use for the ne- 
gro soldier, and on the surface their cry appeared to 
be a sorrowful truth. Splendid specimens of man- 
hood applied at the recruiting stations of the regu- 
lar army only to be told that they could not be en- 
listed except for service in the kitchen, or as order- 



lies. Applicants at the naval recruiting stations re- 
ceived similar replies, but the new Eighth Regi- 
ment bided its time. 

It was at this time that Capt. John R. Mar- 
shall of Company A of the Battalion showed his 
splendid ability as an organizer. Aided and coun- 
selled at every turn by Capt. James H. Johnson, 
Adjutant of the battalion, and reinforced and assisted 
by Capt. Robert Jackson of Company D., his every 
movement tended to lend strength and centraliza- 
tion to the widely scattred groups of men who were 
fast becoming discouraged waiting for a chance to 
defend their flag, and to fight for their people. In 
Chicago beds and food were supplied at the Armory 
for those who had come to the city with but little 
money, and who had expended it during the long 
wait. Frequent messages of encouragement were 
sent out through the state to the various recruiting 
officers, and meanwhile the war progressed. 

The 25th day of May, President McKinley issued 
his second proclamation calling for 75,000 men, and 
twenty days later, Governor Tanner issued the order. 



commanding the Eighth and Ninth Regiments to 
proceed to Camp Tanner to prepare for service at 
the front. 

The day and night of June 3Oth, 1899 will long 
be remembered in Chicago. Everywhere during 
the day, could be seen soldiers loaded with luggage 
centering to the Armory at Michigan Ave. and 
Thirteenth St. That nighi, authenticated rumor 
said as it had often said before the "boys" would 
surely leave for Springfield, and this time rumor 
was right. 

The night of June 3Oth saw the entire regiment 
on the road to Springfield. From Chicago went 
seven hundred, from Cairo one hundred and twenty- 
five ; from Quincy a full company ; and from Mound 
City, Metropolis and Litchfield came smaller num- 
bers, while nearly a full company from Springfield 
was already at the State Fair Grounds, now called 
Camp Tanner. 

The Adjutant's report for July 2nd showed about 
one thousand men in camp, and also showed that 



84 



active recruiting was necessary. Franklin A. Deni- 
son, Maj. Robert R. Jackson and Liuet. John 
Hawkins were dispatched to various cities as re- 
cruiting officers, and within a few days the required 
number were obtained. 

Then came the days of organization, equaliza- 
tion and preparation. The United States Mustering 
Officer, Lieut. Ballou, was on the ground ready 
and anxious to transform the citizens into soldiers, 
and the surgeons of the Eighth and Ninth were con- 
ducting the physical examinations with all possible 
speed. On July i8th Company A. was sworn in amid 
the cheers of the entire body of volunteers. Daily, 
thereafter, one, or more companies took the oath 
and at eleven o'clock of the morning of July 23rd, 
John R. Marshall swore to perform faithfully the 
duties as Colonel, and the long-looked-for, and the 
long-hoped-for, experiment was under way. The 
muster roll showed 1,195 men an d ?6 officers, every 
man of them of African descent with but a single 
exception, a private in one of the Chicago com- 
panies. 



Tented on the same camp grounds was the Ninth 
Illinois under Col. Campbell, the junior of the 
Eighth in theory, but in fact its senior since it was 
ordered to Springfield first. Early in August, the 
Ninth received orders to prepare to move to a south- 
ern camp en route for Cuba. Great was the rejoic- 
ing in that camp, and great was the sorrow in the 
camp of the Eighth at being left behind. The Ninth 
left, and again was heard that same old pessimistic 
cry that had been so prominent in Chicago, that 
the government did not want colored soldiers. 

At this stage Gov. Tanner visited the camp 
and in a speech said, "even from the very doors of 
the White House have I received letters asking and 
advising me not to officer this regiment with col- 
ored men, but I promised to do so, and I have done 
it. I shall never rest until I see this regiment, my 
regiment, on the soil of Cuba, battling for the 
right, and for its kinsmen." 

The echoes of his voice had hardly died away 
before the misfortunes, in Cuba, of one of the fav- 



85 



orite regiments of Illinois gave these colored sol- 
diers a chance to prove again to the world that when 
the needs of their country called them, their per- 
sonal safety was not to be considered for a moment. 

The First Illinois, the "Dandy First" of Chicago, 
was melting away before the onslaughts of the ter- 
rible Cuban fevers in the trenches around Santiago. 
Drenching daily tropical rains had transformed their 
camp streets into rushing streams. Constant ex- 
posure, with insufficient food supply, had changed 
almost every tent into a sick room, and the dead 
march was more often heard than the mess call. 
Death was staring every man in the face and every 
man in the regiment realized it. 

Col. Henry L. Turner implored Gov. Tanner 
ner "to use all influence possible at Washington to 
secure the immediate recall of the First Illinois:' 
H-e said that a much longer stay would result in 
nothing short of a calamity. Tried, they had like 
brave men to do their duty without complaining, 
but to die as though swept by a pestilence, without 



making effort for self-preservation ; to attempt to 
stand without a cry what their material bodies could 
not stand, was not to be expected, and they asked 
that something be done at once to relieve them. 

But what could be done? The rain would fall 
equally as hard upon, and the fever would burn just 
as savagely in any one who might be sent to suc- 
ceed them. At this juncture, Gov. Tanner con- 
sulted Col. Marshall and requested him to ascer- 
tain the sentiment of his officers and men in regard 
to being sent to relieve the First. Unanimously 
they said, "let's go" and the following message was 
sent to Washington : 

Springfield, Aug. 4. 
H. C. Corbin, Adjutant General : 

"I called the officers of the Eighth 
Illinois, colored, in conference and they 
are unanimously and enthusiastically 
in favor of being sent to relieve the 
First Illinois at Santiago.'' 



This message was sent in a full realization of its 
import, the Eighth was volunteering to be sent to 
the exact spot where their old companions in arms 
were dying like sheep in a plague, and not a man 
objected to the dispatch of that message. 

The next day, the Adjutant General sent this 
answer : 

"The Secretary of War appreciates 
very much the offer of the Eighth Illi- 
nois Volunteer Infantry for duty in 
Santiago, and has directed that the 
regiment be sent there by steamer 
Yale, leaving New York next Tues- 
day. The main trouble with our 
troops now in Cuba is that they are suf- 
fering from exhaustion and exposure 
incident to one of the most trying cam- 
paigns to which soldiers have ever 
been subjected." H. C. CORBIN. 

Adjutant General. 



On Saturday, the cjth of August the order to 
break camp and to proceed to New York was re- 
ceived, and joy reigned again in Camp Tanner. 

The regiment departed from Springfield in four 
sections, each composed of Pullman and Wagner 
palace sleeping cars, and attended by porters. 
Travel rations had been provided, but few of them 
were ever used so frequently were lunches supplied 
by patriotic people along the line. 

The citizens of Ohio were particularly generous 
and demonstrative. Not a man in the regiment will 
ever forgot the people of Greenfield, Chillicothe and 
Athens. At those cities hot coffee, sandwiches, cake 
and fruit were supplied without limit by the citi- 
zens, and so warm was their reception that it only 
served to make more prominent the half-hearted 
welcome and Godspeed of the people in Dixie's 
Land the next two days. 

Arriving in Jersey City, the regiment was 
marched to the ferry and thence directly to the Yale 



which was lying at dock in New York City. Before 
embarking the following sick and injured were sent 
to the New York Emergency Hospital : Drum 
Major James Rudd, Private George Baker, Com- 
pany D., who soon died there, and Privates George 
Walls and Charles Ambrose of Company F., both 
of whom had sustained severe injuries byfalling from 
the train while it was in motion. 

Early in the afternoon of August i ith, the Yale 
cast off and proceeded down the bay amidst a per- 
fect beldam of cheers from the passengers, and 
shrieks from the whistles of the many steamboats 
on the bay. When off Sandy Hook, a signal from 
the government station situated there stopped the 
boat to wait for a tug to bring out a large number 
of soldiers and officers who, wandering too far from 
the dock, had been left in New York. 

The first real taste of the privations of a soldier 
was experienced on this voyage. For the first two 
days, it was almost impossible for the soldiers to 
obtain any kind of food, and cool water was entirely 



out of the question. The men slept on the open 
decks, a pleasant place at that season of the year. 

On the morning of August I4th, Cuba was first 
sighted looming up in the distance, rugged and bar- 
ren. For hours, the Yale steamed along the coast 
without passing a city or a hamlet until the beautiful 
bay of Guatanamo. filled with American war ships, 
came into view. The next day Morro Castle was 
the center of all attention, and immediately off from 
this historic point the Yale anchored for the night. 

The next morning lighters came out from San- 
tiago and carried the regiment to the docks a dis- 
tance of four miles, every inch of which teems with 
interest to an American. The half sunken Reina 
Mercedes, the staff of the Merrimac. and the masked 
batteries of Socapa were all in sight. About five 
o'clock in the evening, the companies were landed, 
and began a march to their first Cuban camping 
ground. The roads were in terrible condition, no 
means of transporting rations or baggage were at 
hand, and the site selected for a camp was covered 



88 



with a foot of water. The government guide, seeing 
the condition of this spot, marched on until he 
passed through what seemed to he the gates of a park, 
high and dry on a hill. Shelter tents were pitched 
and a comfortable night was passed, but uneasiness 
\vas common the next morning when it was discov- 
ered that the camp was in the yard of the Spanish 
yellow fever hospital. 

Bright and early on the morning of August ijth, 
the First Battalion under Lieut. Colonel Johnson 
took train for San Luis to take charge of a large 
number of Spanish prisoners of war. Emaciated 
and hungry were these Castilians, living on the 
bounty of Uncle Sam. The famous Mauser rifles 
were all taken away and sent to Santiago, and in a 
few days the prisoners themselves followed. 

As soon as Colonel Marshall arrived with the 
other battalions, he was appointed Governor of the 
province of San Luis, and commander of the post. 

While encamped on u hill near San Luis the regi- 
ment had a ludicrous, yet sad, experience. The Cu- 



bans had shown some signs of discontent, and the 
regiment was sleeping on its arms prepared for any 
emergency. About eleven o'clock a shot awakened 
the whole camp, and in an instant, almost, every 
company was in battle front. The sentry's cry of 
'"halt" was not heeded by the approaching objects 
and several shots followed. Soon the firing became 
general, but was quickly stopped by vigorous work on 
the part of some of the officers. It was then discov- 
ered that the approach of a Cuban in an ox cart had 
been the innocent cause of all the excitement. The 
next morning the body of poor Paul Smith, a pop- 
ular member of Company B. was found, cold and 
stiff, lying just outside of his quarters. A stray bul- 
let, and a promising existence was cut short. 

The policy of the government was to station 
American troops in every Cuban city of any im- 
portance, to protect the weak, be they Spanish or 
Cuban, and to assist and instruct in the formation 
,of a municipal government. Colonel Marshall was 
ordered to send a detachment to Palma Soriano, 
seventeen miles away, for this purpose, and to com- 



mand this post he made the happy selection of Maj. 
Robert R. Jackson, Company E., Capt. Richard P. 
Roots and Company F.. Capt. William H. Akers, 
with Lieut. Curtis as medical officer, formed his 
command. 

1'alma. owing to its great number of Spanish 
inhabitants, was known as "Little Spain," and a 
master-hand was needed to keep the two old enemies 
from clashing. Major Jackson succeeded in doing 
this very well, so well, in fact, that Cubans and 
Spaniards alike expressed regret when the "Com- 
mandante" was ordered to return to the regiment 
at San Luis. 

Captain Roots succeeded him as commander of 
the post and how well he performed his duties is 
attested by a petition signed by all the leading citi- 
zens sent to the General, asking that Capt. Roots 
be retained at that post when it had been rumored 
that he and his command were to be ordered to the 
hills outside the city. 



At Palma, this command passed a quiet, rather 
uneventful period, marked by no serious disturb- 
ances, saddened only twice by death, and gladdened 
several times by marriages, with soldier grooms and 
Cuban girls as brides. 

The sad death of Sergt. George Patterson of 
Company F. early in December, cast a gloom over 
the entire detachment. Resentment and revenge 
were the first sentiments that stirred his comrades 
when his dead body was found, for it was at first 
thought that he had been shot by a Cuban or a 
Spaniard. Investigation showed, however, that he 
had accidentally killed himself while hunting alliga- 
tors. 

During this time history was fast making 
with the regiment at San Luis. Colonel Marshall 
possessed the full confidence of the general com- 
manding and great power was given into his hand. 
For months, the regiment was camped, about a 
mile from San Luis, on a hill called by the boys, 
"Bull Run." This name dated from the night when 



the Cuban in his ox cart created so much excite- 
ment and shooting, during- which one of the oxen 
was shot to pieces. 

For the sake of better quarters, after it 
became known that a long stay was in store 
for the Eighth. Col. Marshall moved the regiment 
into the old Spanish barracks and arsenal within 
the limits of the city. Then, he proceeded to give 
the natives a lesson in the American idea of munici- 
pal government. He caused the streets, the yards, 
in fact, the entire city, to be cleaned. He allowed 
the Cubans to enter the lines to trade and sell, and, 
in a short time, they became veritable Jews as trad- 
ers. 

Pay days came regularly and often, and large 
amounts were spent amongst the merchants, so that 
in a short time, listlessness and stagnation gave 
way to activity and life. 

The store keepers commenced to put on their 
shelves delicacies and foods that would tickle only 
an American's palate. American beer was soon to 



be had on every hand. When one visited Santiago, 
he was approached every moment either by a boot- 
black who would say, "you, shine," or by a news- 
boy with papers two weeks old. 

Shortly after the Eighth became settled in bar- 
racks, the Ninth United States Volunteers, a negro 
regiment with white officers, camped on the out- 
skirts of the city. They soon became involved in a 
difficulty which unfortunately was reported to have 
been participated in by the Eighth.. It was soon 
learned that a most base plot was on foot amongst 
those close to headquarters at Santiago, to discredit 
if possible the Eighth Illinois or rather, the colored 
officers of the Eighth Illinois. Officers high in 
authority saw that the experiment was about to be 
a success, and tried through unprincipled tools to 
so distort facts, and to so conceal the truth that 
another century would pass before a negro Colonel 
should again head a regiment. 

A member of the Ninth Immunes became in- 
volved in a quarrel with a member of the Cuban 



91 



police and was shot dead. A general fight resulted 
with the Cubans on one side and the Ninth Regi- 
ment on the other. The Eighth, meanwhile was a 
mile distant. But the Colonel of the Eighth, with 
his accustomed energy, and with matchless courage, 
as soon as he heard the firing, rode to that point, 
recognized at a glance the state of affairs, spurred 
directly up to the house from which the Cubans 
were firing, and put an end to the shooting. Gen. 
Ewers, as soon as he was informed of the affair, 
placed Colonel Marshall in charge of the Ninth, and 
that night the "news" was flashed to America that 
the Ninth Immunes and the Eighth Illinois had 
killed five Cubans. 

As a result of the unfortunate affair, however, 
it became the policy at headquarters to remove the 
troops from the city, and Camp Marshall, three 
miles from San Luis, became the home of the regi- 
ment. Tragic and historical events were few at this 
point, but here was developed one of the finest vol- 
unteer regiments that was ever in a field. For mili- 
tary precision and cleanliness, Gen. Ewers said that 



the camp of the Eighth was the first on the island. 
The planning of the camp, and the execution of its 
details was the handiwork of Lieut. Colonel John- 
son. 

Battalion and company drills in the morning 
were followed in the evening by regimental parade. 
Guard duty came to each soldier about once every 
ten days, and in the intervals between these duties, 
the men were free to follow their own inclinations. 
By some, this time was employed visiting the Cuban 
girls ; by others in playing base ball, foot ball or 
cards ; others devoted their time to the study of tac- 
tics and individual drill. 

The post hospital at San Luis, for the reception 
of patients from the 23rd Kansas and the Eighth 
Illinois consisting of several large buildings erected 
by the Spaniards, was directly under the charge of 
Maj. Allen A. Wesley. A corps of more than 
forty well trained men looked out for the wants of 
the patients, and administered the medicines pre- 
scribed by the surgeons. At the camp, the field hos- 



pital was in charge of Lieut. E. S. Miller, and 
at times more than three hundred men were treated 
every morning. 

If the Eighth were given a chance to testify, it 
would say that Uncle Sam takes splendid care of his 
soldiers. 

They never, for any length of time, needed any- 
thing allowed to a soldier by regulations. Clothing, 
of good quality, was almost always on hand. After 
the first two months, the most fastidious could not 
consistently complain of the rations issued. Fresh 
American beef was received daily from Santiago, 
and fresh bread was baked every day in the regi- 
mental bakery. Beans, peas, tomatoes, rice, hominy, 
bacon, dried apples, salmon, Irish potatoes, and 
sweet potatoes were supplied in sufficient quantities. 

Of course, after a time, the diet became monoto- 
nous, but it was nevertheless entirely wholesome 
and all that could be expected, except in the case of 
the sick in the hospital. At first the government 
did not supply any delicacies, or articles of diet, suit- 



able for an invalid. These facts were known in Chicago 
and the following committee represented the Auxil- 
iary in the raising and disbursing of funds ; Mrs. 
Emma Phelphs, Mrs. John R. Marshall, Mrs. Rob- 
ert Jackson and Mrs. Harvey Thompson. Mr James 
Gilbert, of the Garden City National Bank, acted as 
treasurer and contributed aid to the enterprise. 

By steady and consistent efforts, the auxiliary 
raised over $600.00 and expended it in the purchase 
of hospital supplies, such as oatmeal, condensed 
milk, canned fruits, canned soups, castile soap, co- 
coa, beef extract and nightshirts. 

Thanksgiving morning, William T. Taylor, the 
druggist, departed for San Luis in charge of the 
supplies. 

No one, not connected with the hospital, can 
ever imagine the incalculable amount of good that 
these supplies did. Before their arrival, the fever 
stricken boys were compelled to eat the regular 
army rations which were hardy for even a well man. 
Clam broths and chicken soups took the ols^e of 



93 



beans and hard tack, and the cool, clean nightshirts 
supplanted the hot, regulation blue. 

Many a blessing was called down by the pa- 
tients upon the Auxiliary, and all who contributed 
to the funds, and the efforts of the surgeons were 
materially aided by the use of the foods. 

After Christmas, the regiment settled down to 
speculation upon the return home. Reveille blew 
every morning and taps every night for months and 
months, every day of which was just like the other. 

Pay days came and passed ; inspections were or- 
dered and carried out ; drills followed drills and the 
regiment improved day by day. Cubans were be- 
coming every day more friendly. Several marriages 

resulted from this increased friendship, and the lit- 
tle god played some of his most peculiar pranks. 
Men married girls to whom they couldn't say a 
dozen words : the interpreter was an absolute neces- 



sity at every marriage, and households were set up 
that were destined soon to be torn down. 

On the first day of February the camp was in 
an uproar. Drills were broken up, guards left their 
posts, meals were forgotten, and the cheering could 
be heard a mile. News had just come that the 
tiansport Chester would be in Santiago on the twen- 
tieth to carry the regiment home. Officers and men 
alike joined in a general thanksgiving, for they were 
all going back to America. The days dragged slowly 
by ; the twentieth came and passed, but no orders to 
move came with it. Early the next Sunday morn- 
ing the order was given out to prepare for general 
inspection. 

At last the great day had arrived, the success of 
the experiment which meant so much to the officers, 
the regiment and the colored people in general, was 
about to be tested. Had the Eighth done all that 
the government expected it to? Were the men well 
drilled, and was the camp both military and sani- 
tary ? \Youkl the officers prove equal to their task. 



and would the men to-day, on this day of all days, 
prove to the United States government that negro 
soldiers can become as military under negro offi- 
cers as they ever became under white officers ? 

These questions were uppermost in the minds 
of all, and when the sun went down that night it 
shed its rays on a regiment that was, as Gen. 
Breckinridge, the inspecting officer, said, "as fine 
a volunteer regiment as was ever mustered into the 
service." 

General Breckenridge complimented Col. Mar- 
shall very highly upon the splendid showing that 
the Eighth had made, and stated that it was "a shame 
to muster out of service such an excellent regi- 
ment." Capt. R. S. Woodson, Medical Director, in- 
spected the hospital and in his report said, "the two 
wards were in excellent sanitary condition ; * * * 
the medicines were dispensed from carefully written 
prescriptions." 

This day marked the death of the old stalking 
horse that negroes were unable to command their 



own race. Gen. Breckenridge and Capt. Woodson 
told the world that the broad shoulders of the ne- 
groes were not too narrow for the shoulder straps. 
That beautiful Sunday in tar off Cuba, placed the 
negro as an officer on the same high plane that he 
had heretofore occupied as a private. 

Now the Eighth was ready to go home, the mis- 
sion was accomplished. Many a man had left his 
home and his family with this one thought urging 
him on, if this regiment is a success, the last bar- 
rier that stands between my race and complete free- 
dom will be swept away. 

The day of repatriation was again set, and on the 
morning of March loth, the regiment marched gaily 
into San Luis, its colors flying and the band playing, 
"There'll Be a Hot Time," and "Honey, Let Me 
Bring My Clothes Back Home." The journey by 
rail to Santiago was a short one, and by evening the 
entire command was aboard the Sedgwick waiting 
for the morrow. 

The passage on the Sedgwick was much better 
in every respect than had been the one on the Yale, 



and Thursday morning, March i6th, the boat 
dropped anchor off shore from Newport News, Va. 
A tragic and sorrowful incident of the trip was the 
death of the baby daughter of Major and Mrs. 
Robert Jackson. Of feeble health in Cuba, the 
change of climate as the boat steamed north- 
ward, hastened the death that had been pending for 
some time. The little one was buried at Newport 
News. 

Through Virginia and Kentucky the train sped. 
Indiana was crossed with but few stops, and Satur- 
day afternon, March i8th, the Eighth Illinois is in 
Chicago. Home at last, and a true Chicago wel- 
come it received. A magnificent ovation all along the 
line of parade ; a glorious banquet ; a mammoth re- 
ception, and the tedious work of mustering out was 
begun. 

But twenty noble souls had already been mus- 
tered out. Twenty young lives had been given up 
far from home and friends that the cause of justice 
and freedom might live forever. The Great Muster- 



ing Officer had already received their records and 
said, "well done, thou good and faithful servants.'' 
Glorious death in battle was not theirs, but no less 
glorious was their death, for they died for their 
Hag and for their country. 



Maj. George Pickett paid the last private in 
Company M. late on the third of April, Eighteen 
Hundred and Ninety-nine, and the Eighth Illinois 
United States Volunteers ceased to exist. 

Tattersall's, in Chicago, which had been the bar- 
lacks of the regiment since its arrival in Chicago, 
was the scene of this historic event. 

President McKinley said when the Eighth 
volunteered to relieve the fever-stricken First, "that 
it was the proudest moment of his life." Now that 
the Eighth has served, and has been mustered out 
with a most excellent record, his pride is shared by 
all who know of the regiment, and what was once 
an exoeriment is now an assured success. 




DINNER AT TATTERS ALL'S 




SPANISH BLOCK HOUSE 



OBITUARY. 

THE HEROES OF THE EIGHTH. 



WALLACE JOHNSON, 

Company B. Died, Springfield, 111., August 
I, 1898. 

JAMES BAKER, 

Company D. Died, New York City, August 
15, 1898. 

PAUL SMITH, 

Company B. Killed on Rousseau's Hill, San 

Luis, August 19, 1898. 
LAWRENCE MICHEAUX. 

Company C. Died, San Luis, September 14, 

1898. 
WILLIS GARRETT, 

Company K. Died, San Luis, September 16, 

1898. 
BYRON L. LAKEMAN, 

Company I. Died, San Luis, October 3, 1898. 

SAMUEL NICKENS, 

Company B. Died, San Luis, October 7, 1898. 

SYLVESTER JOHNSON, 

Band. Died, San Luis, October 22, 1898. 
BURT WITHWORTH, 

Company G. Died, San Luis, October 31, 1898. 

WILLIAM THOMAS, 

Company K. Died, San Luis, November 27, 1898. 



GEORGE PATTERSON, 

Company F. Accidentally kiUedhimself, Palnia, 
December i, 1898. 

FRANK RICHARDS, 

Company G. Died, San Luis, December 26, 
1898. 

SIMON B. PETERS, 

Company B. Died, San Luis, January 20, 1899. 

GEORGE FARRIS, 

Company B. Died, San Luis, January 21, 1899. 

ALONZO PARKS, 

Company F. Died, Palnia Soriano, February 
4, 1899. 

CHARLES EARLY, 

Company G. Killed by Cuban, Santiago, Feb- 
ruary 17, 1899. 

WILLIAM JONES, 

Company A. Died San Luis, February 17, 1899. 

WILLIAM SPARKS, 

Company A. Died, San Luis, March 2, 1899. 

BENJAMIN HOLLINS, 

Company L. Died, San Luis, March 2, 1899. 

JOHN COMBS, 

Company I. Died San Luis, March n, 1899 




GENERAL HOSPITAL, SANTIAGO 




XoN-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS 1 Cl.UB, 1'ALMA 



ROSTER OF STAFF 



COLONEL, JOHN R. MARSHALL. 

LIEUTENANT COLONEL, JAMES H. JOHNSON. 



MAJOR, ROBERT R. JACKSON. 
MAJOR, FRANKLIN A. DENISON. 
MAJOR, ALLEN A. WESLEY. 
ADJUTANT, HARVEY A. THOMPSON. 



QUARTERMASTER, JAMES S. NELSON. 
ASSISTANT SURGEON, JAMES WEBB CURTIS. 
ASSISTANT SURGEON, EDWARD S. MILLER. 
CHAPLAIN, JORDAN CHAVIS. 



NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF 



SERGEANT MAJOR, GEORGE L. WHITE. 
QUARTERMASTER SERGEANT, LINCOLN VALLEY. 
CHIEF MUSICIAN, WILLIAM BARNETT. 
CHIEF TRUMPETER, CHARLES HUNT. 



PRINCIPAL MUSICIAN, WILLIAM COOPER. 
HOSPITAL STEWARD, CURTIS SOMEKVILLE, 
HOSPITAL STEWARD, HARRY S. McCARD. 
HOSPITAL STEWARD, HENRY TURNLEY. 



80 




Northeast Corner State St. and Jackson Blvd. 
THE STORE WITH THE 4'LEAF CLOVER ABOVE THE ENTRANCE. 



THE PEOPLE'S STORE. 



iireater valves for less money 

We keep in repair FREE FOR ONE "YEAR all clothing 

SPECIAL ITEMS: 



This greatest value- giving store, devoted exclu- 
sively to Men's and Boys' Clothing, Hats and 
Furnishings, is in its second year. It proved a great 
success from the start, from the very fact that it gives 

than any clothing store in the city of Chicago. We cater to people's wishes in every detail. 

bought here. COME AND INVESTIGATE. We quote a few 



7.50 



Special Hat Value. We give the best values in hats for the 
money. This Special Value is in both Derby and Fedora 
Styles, the very latest correct styles and 
all shades this is positively a $3.00 hat, 
Our Special Price 



$1.90 



Men's Nobby Suits, in new and stylish fabrics of all-wool, 
smooth-finished cassimeres, blue and black unfinished 
worsteds, beautifully tailored throughout, perfect fit guar- 
anteed, sizes to suit everybody they cannot be found else- 
where for less than jti2 Our special 
price $7.5O. 

Men's Very Stylish Top Coats, all this 
setson's productions, in new and 
nobby double-twist and smooth-fin- 
ished covert cloths, plain or strapped 

seams, perfect fit guaranteed this really a $12 garment, the 
price else where- -Our special price $7.5O. 

Our Finest Top Coats and Suits were selected with the utmost care. The Suits in single and double breasted sacks, 3-button 
cutaways and stylish Prince Alberts. The Top Coats in the swell box and regular styles 
many exclusive designs, according to our own specifications. We positively guarantee 
you a saving of at least 25 per cent, at our prices 



Special Shirt Value. We carry the best line of Men's Furnish- 
ings in Chicago. Special Colored Dress Shirts not to be found 
elsewhere 24 new patterns to select from 2 standing 
collars to match and one pair cuffs 
positively sold for $1.75 and $2 oo but 
here for 



$1.25 

na double breasted sacks, 3-button 

$15 TO $35 



E. A. Armstrong Mfg. Co. 

3OO-3O4 Wabash Avenue 
Next to Auditorium ^ CHICAGO J*J* 



Military Outfitters 

Armstrong's Celebrated 
Uniforms and Uquip- 
ments g * <g 



SOCIETY UNIFORMS * REGALIA j* JEWELS J* 
COSTUMES j*j* ETC. 



J. B. WILSON 



The Leading 
Photographer 



389 State Street 



CHICAGO 



Old and New Pictures Copied and 
Enlarged J*J* Open Sundays ^* 




Military 
Tailors 





174 EAST MADISON STREET 
CHICAGO 



G. F. FOSTER, SON & CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



All Military Equipments, Flags 
Banners and Badges 



* -* 



MAKERS OF 



Uniforms for All Purposes 
Secret So.iety Goods, Etc. 



i. j. .+. j.i 



C. T. Mackay & V. M. Mackay 

419 36th Street, Chicago. 

Tailors and Drapers 

CLEANING, DYEING and PRESSING 
A SPECIALTY 

Ladies' Garments Altered J*J*J* Latest Style J* 
Work Called for and Delivered 



NOW, when we get chicken we don't get bone, 
r They are all glad to see us bring our clothes back home. 

We always get what we like best, 
That is why we get our Shoes at 



'Phone, South 1003 



Trunks To and From 
All Depots J* j* jt 



J. H. COLEMAN'S 

Laundry and Express 
Company 

Moving, Packing and Shipping 



STORAGE 



2540 STATE STREET 
CHICAGO 



Hold 




en's 



In BLACK and TAN 



at $2.98 



225-227-229- 
231 State st. 

Chicago. 



The Elite Buffet 






I. Garner W. H. Weller 

3030 State Street 

Fine Wines, Liquors CHICAGO 

and Cigars 

.................................... 3 



'tl 



i*/ 
if/ 
if/ 



E. F. HARMAN & CO., 



Experts in 

Typography* 



WE DO 

A GENERAL LINE OF CATALOG Jiy 
AND COMMERCIAL PRINTING. 



ilf 



A 4 ^ 
^T > I 



DEARBORN 
STREET^^t 
CHICAGO. 





UNIVERSITY OF ILUNOI9-URBANA 





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