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Full text of "The history of Esarhaddon (son of Sennacherib) king of Assyria, B. C. 681-688; tr. from the cuneiform inscriptions upon cylinders and tablets in the British museum collection, together with original texts; a grammatical analysis of ech word, explanations of the ideographs by extracts from the bi-lingual syllabaries, and list of eponyms, etc."

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^^M^^;;«immx-^^f;^vm«<^^^«»ffl,^«^ ^ 



T RiJBNER'S 

ORIENTAL SERIES 



iAI.LANTYNE AND HANSON, EDINBURGH 
CHAN DOS STREET, LONDON 



THE 



HISTORY OF ESARHADDON 

{SOJV OF SENNACHERIB) 

KING OF ASSYRIA, B.C. 681-668 

2Eranslatet( fr0m tje CutiEiform Ensctiptions upon ffi^glintjergi anti 
STabUts in t|&£ 23ritfs{j JHuseum Ccllection 

TOGETHEK WITH 

©rtginal SEexts 

A GRAMMATICAL ANALYSIS OF EACH WORD, EXPLANATIONS OF 

THE IDEOGRAPHS BY EXTRACTS FROM THE BI-LINGUAL 

SYLLABARIES, AND LIST OF EPONYMS, ETC 

BY 

ERNEST A. BUDGE, M.R.A.S. 

MEMBEK OP THE SOCIETY OF BIBLICAL ARCHEOLOGY 



LONDON 
TRUBNER & CO., LUDGATE HILL 

1880 

{AU rights reserved) 






STfjts Book is ©etJtcateti 

TO 

ZT/^- TRUSTY FRIEND AND TEACHER, 

THE REV. A. H. SAYCE, M.A. 

Deputy Professor of Comparative Philology, Oxford, Sfc $fc. ^c. 
BY THE AUTHOR, 

IN GRATEFUL REMEMBRANCE OF MANY YEARS' VALUABLE TUITION. 



260769 



PREFACE. 



The histories of Sennacherib and Assur-bani-pal, kings of 
Assyria, have already been written by the late Mr. Georg-e 
Smith. Sennacherib ruled over Assyria from B.C. 705 to 
B.C. 681 ; Assur-bani-pal from B.C. 668 to B.C. 626. But from 
B.C. 681 to B.C. 668 a king called Esarhaddon reigned, and 
the annals of this king have been translated to form the present 
history. Esarhaddon vi^as the son of Sennacherib, and father 
of Assur-bani-pal. Thus we have the history of father, son, 
and grandson j consequently, a fair knowledge of the warlike 
expeditions which were undertaken, and what countries were 
subdued by the Assyrians, between the years b.c. 705 and 
B.C. 626. Sennacherib, Esarhaddon and Assur-bani-pal were 
certainly three of the gTeatest kings that ever ruled over 
Assyria. Their reigns, taken together, cover nearly eighty 
years j but an exact idea of the influence that this family had 
upon Assyria can only be made out clearly from the records 
and documents which they themselves caused to be written. 
Sennacherib was the true type of the Oriental conqueror — 
delighting in war for its own sake, proud, cruel, and fond of 
power. The Bible preserves for us a speech of the Rabshakeh ^ 

> This is the Accadian ^N^X ^T^— ^TTct~ , D.P., rab-sak, 
borrowed by the Hebrews under the form njJK^i'l • i-ab is the Semitic equi- 
valent of the Accadian ^T^-^, GAL, "great." 



viii PREFACE. 

of Sennacherib, so well known on account of the boastfulness 
and pride so vividly portrayed in every word. The commence- 
ment, Thus saith "the great kin^, the King of Assyria," ^ is 
the oft-repeated formula beginning* all the inscriptions of this 
monarch. We can quite understand such a king asking, 
" Where are the gods of Hamath and of Arpad ? who are 
they among all the gods of the countries, that the Lord should 
deliver Jerusalem out of mine hand V for he frequently 
boasts, '' the gods of his country I carried off, I spoiled." 

The sway of Esarhaddon was, however, milder, and although 
he warred as much as '^ the king his father, who went before," 
yet he exhibits many signs of gentleness, and it is evident 
that he tried to pacify all those subjects that successful warfare 
had allowed him to conquer. It must be clear to all how 
valuable are the cuneiform inscriptions that give us the history 
of this monarch. The Bible mentions him but three times by 
name -^ he is alluded to once.^ 

Esarhaddon's son, Assur-bani-pal, was the literary king* imr 
excellence^ and he records of himself that " Nebo and Tasmit 
gave him broad ears, and his seeing eyes regarded the 
engraved characters of the tablets, the secrets of Nebo, the 
literature of the library, as much as is suitable, on tablets 
I wrote, I engraved, I explained, and for the inspection of my 
subjects in the midst of my palace I placed " {W.A.L^ iv. pi. 55). 

The following is his full and interesting account of his sub- 
jection of Tirhakah, King of Egypt and Cush, translated from 
the large decagon cylinder containing the " Annals of Assur- 

" 2 Kings xix. 37 ; Isaiah xxxvii. 38 ; Ezra iv. 2. 
' 2 Chron. xxxiii. 11. 



PREFACE. ix 

banipal/' recently brought from the East, and bearing the 
number R^ i in the British Museum collection : — 

1 In my first expedition to the land of Magan and Melukh- 
kha, then I went. 

2 Tirhakah, King of Egypt and Gush, 

3 of whom Esarhaddon, King of Assyria, the father, my 
begetter, 

4 his overthrow had accomplished, and had ruled over his land, 
then he, Tirhakah, 

5 the power of Assur (and) Istar, the great gods, my lords, 
despised, and 

6 he trusted to his own might. Against the kings, 

7 prefects, which within Egypt, the father, my begetter, had 
appointed 

8 to slay, plunder, and capture Egypt, he came 

9 against them, he entered and dwelt within Memphis, 

lo the city which the father, my begetter, had captured, and 

to the border of Assyria had added it. 
Ill was walking within Nineveh, (when) one came and 

1 2 repeated to me concerning these deeds. 

13 My heart groaned and was smitten down my liver. 

14 I lifted up my two hands j I besought Assur and Istar, the 
holy one. 

15 (Then) I assembled my powerful forces, (with) which 
Assur and Istar 

16 had filled my two hands. Against the lands of Egypt and 
Gush 

17 I set straight the expedition 

27 Tirhakah, King of Egypt and Gush, within Memphis, 

28 of the march of my expedition heard, and to make battle ; 
(his) weapons 

29 and army {St?] ^® ^® assembled, (with) his soldiers. 

23 In the service of Assur, Bel, the great gods, my lords, 

24 the marchers before me in a great field battle, I accom- 
plished the overthrow of his army. 



X PREFACE. 

25 Tirhakah, within Memphis, heard of the defeat of his army. 

26 the terror of Assur and Istar overwhelmed him, and he 
went backward, 

27 the fear (approach) of my lordship covered him. 

28 The city Memphis he turned from, and for the saving of 
his life 

29 he fled to the midst of Thebes. 

30 That city I captured, my army I caused to enter and to 
dwell within it. 

Col. 2. 

20 Tirhakah fled from his locality, (but) the fire of the weapon 
of Assur, my lord, 

2 1 overwhelmed him, and he went to his dark destiny. 

His grandest work was the institution of the great library 
of clay tablets at Koyunjik. 

And now as regards the texts, translations and notes that are 
contained in this book. I have used all the principal historical 
texts, and every line of these has been carefiilly compared 
with the original clay tablets and cylinders in the British 
Museum. But it cannot be expected that every notice con- 
cerning Esarhaddon which may be found upon contract or 
other tablets will be given in so small a book. 

In the first place, it would necessitate a strict and careful 
examination of every tablet and tablet-fragment in the 
British Museum collection, which alone would require many 
many months to be devoted entirely to the purpose — no small 
task either, as any will see who knows the nature of the writing 
on the tablets. 

Secondly, when done, the chances are that it would place 
the book entirely out of the reach of commercial enterprise. 



PREFACE. xi 

These two reasons, taken together, will account for the 
omission of the text and translation of a tablet containing 
" Addresses to Esarhaddon/' ^ and also of another containing* 
an account of Esarhaddon's buildings, and numbered k 3053. 

The translations are as literal as possible, and all added 
words are enclosed in brackets. Parts of the texts relating 
the history of Esarhaddon have been translated before by my 
friend Dr. Julius Oppert, Professor of Arabic in the University 
of France,'' the profound scholar and earliest pioneer of 
Assyrian in France. 

The grammatical analysis has been thrown into a vocabulary 
arranged according to the order of the English alphabet. The 
object has been to make the words easily accessible and use- 
ful. Wherever I have known a Semitic equivalent for the 
Assyrian word it has been given, but words properly Syriac 
have been turned into Hebrew letters. The sense of some 
of the words is only known from the context, and of course 
there are some the meaning of which I do not know at all. 

Here I take the opportunity of expressing my great obliga- 
tions to the Rev. A. H. Sayce, M.A., for several years past 
my kind friend and teacher. It is to him that I am indebted 
for anything I may know of Assyrian. The whole of the 
MS. for this book was read by him before it went to press, 
and it owes much to his scholarly and accurately critical eye. 

My thanks are also due to Mr. Pinches for copies of texts 
and verifications of existing copies. 



^ The text is printed in W.A.I., iv. 68, and translated in the Records of 
the Past, vol. xi. 

^ See Expedition Scientifique en Mesopotamie executes par ordre du 
Gouvernement de 1851 d, 1854. Par MM. F. Fresnel, F. Thomas et J. Oppert. 
Paris, 1857-64. 



xii PREFACE. 

New advances are made in Assyrian with every new tablet 
that is found. Old readings are corrected, new words are 
found, and what is almost unintelligible to-day becomes 
quite clear to-morrow. With such progress going on, no book 
can be perfect ; and as for this, I feel that 

hn'^ pnj^sj'o p^jn ^nt^ ^r\ i<:2n^ ^ibv:^ tyijx l^x >d ^n^jjj'n djdj?^ 

*' Truly I have committed errors, for there is no man who 
does not err ; so that my error cleaves to me. I pray, there- 
fore, that whoever understands and knows them, may correct 
my errors according to his wisdom." 

E. A. Budge. 

Christ's College, Cambridge, 
October J 1880. 



1 I quote from Levita, Massoreth Sa-massoreth, p. 268, by Dr. Ginsburg. 
Longmans. 1867. 



CONTENTS. 



THE GENEALOGY AND ACCESSION OP ESARH ADDON, AND PRIN- 
CIPAL EVENTS OP HIS REIGN 1-8 

LIST OF TEXTS USED OR CONSULTED FOR THIS BOOK ... 9 

SYSTEM OF TRANSLITERATION OF ASSYRIAN SIGNS .... lO 

LIST OF EPONYMS I2-I3 

WILL OF SENNACHERIB I4-I5 

TITLES OF ESARHADDON l6-20 

ESARHADDON's BATTLE AT KHANIRABBAT 20-2$ 

THE WAR AGAINST NABU-ZIR-NAPISTI-ESIR 2O-3I 

EXPEDITION AGAINST ABDI-MILCUTTI, KING OF TSIDON . . 32-4 1 

EXPEDITION AGAINST CILICIA 41-5 1 

ARABIAN WAR OF ESARHADDON 52-65 

THE MEDIAN WAR 66-/3 

THE BUILDINGS OF ESAHHADDON 74-77 

THE BUILDING OF THE PALACE 77-99 

THE NAMES OF THE EIGHT KINGS IOO-IO3 

THE NAMES OF THE TWENTY-TWO KINGS OF " THE COUNTRY 

OF THE HITTITES AND THE SEA-COAST" IO3-I08 

ESARHADDON's EGYPTIAN CAMPAIGN IO9-I23 

NAMES OF THE KINGS APPOINTED OVER EGYPT BY ESARHADDON 1 24- 1 29 

VOCABULARY I3O-160 

INDEX 161-163 



ERRATA 



Page 3, line i, instead of ideograph 



7. 



22, 

22, 



13. 

„ 24, „ 19, 

» 32» " 9' 

„ 36, » 25, 

„ 36, » 36, 

„ 38, „ 41, 

» 55. "56, 
„ 68, „ 56, 
„ 78, „ 10, 
„ 80, „ 19, 
„ 85, ,,47, 
» 92' " 36' 
„ 93, note,\. 8, 
,,104, „ 17, 
,,104, „ 18, 



Saulmugina 

AEBA 

ina-khats-zu-va 

^i-gar-si-ui 
Tirpanituv 



read ideographs. 
„ SamuUu-suma-ucin ; 
and wherever it occurs. 

„ '^ 

„ lEBA 

„ im-khats-zu-va 

„ ^i-gar-si-in 
„ Tsarpanituv 



TlgfM-^ - TEls^m-Hh 



M^ 



^! 



109. Concerning the history of Tirhakah, see a paper by Dr. Birch 
which will appear in the Trans. Soc. Bib. Arch., vol. vii. 
part 2. 



ADDENDA. 

I. While The History of Esarhaddon was passing through the 
press Dr. Schrader's new work, Zur Kritik der Inschriften Tiglath- 
Pilesers II. des Asarhaddon und des Asurhanipal, appeared. On 
pages 34 and 35 he identifies some of the towns and countries men- 
tioned by Esarbaddon, and printed on pages 103—107 of this book. 
Thus, concerning " 'Samsirauruna" he says, " Eine Stadt des Namens 
Samsimurun ist bis jetzt in Palastina-Phonicien iiberhaupt nicht 
nachzuweisen." He points out (as I have also done on page 107 of 
The History of JEsarhaddon) that the hitherto accepted reading of 
" Amtikhadatsti " is wrong, and should be " Karti-khadatsti," 
" Newstadt," DK'in mp (Assyrisch regelrecht riDin "p), " bedeutet 
und einfach ein cyprisches Kapxrj^atv = Karthago ist." Dr. Schrader 
likewise points out that in Esarhaddon's List of Kings the King 
of Arvad is called, " Matanbaal (?y3:|lJiip), but in Assurbanipal's list 
" Yacinla" (75<3D*); also the name of the King of Beth-Ammon in the 
former list is " Puduilu (''^r'*!?), but in the latter Amminadbi, Heb. 
I'l'^^tpV,; and thinks "dass wir es bei dieser zweiten Liste nichts 
weniger als mit einer gedankenlosen oder gar frivol-leichtsinnigen 
Eeproducirung der friiheren des Asarhaddon zu thun haben." Also, 
see " Zusatze," page 36 of Dr. Schrader's book, for the opinion of 
Professor K. A. Lepsius, of Jena, concerning the town of Lidir, 
situated in Cyprus. 

II. In the " Vocabulary" all parts of the verb " suzubu" have 
been compared with the Hebrew J 3ty. But I believe its correct 
equivalent to be found in the Chaldee ^T^ or "^TPy " to save," " to 
deliver ;" Syriac y\W. Compare Targum on Isaiah xx. 6, II'^^S?^ 
^yxp 5<7 , " themselves they deliver (save) not ;" nTlflK^OT Xy^LJ^") |D1, 
"and who is the wicked man that shall be saved" (Ephraem, 
" Carraina," 0pp. iii. p. 67,^ ; Eodiger, Chrestomathy, p. 79) ; x;33tK 
XD^y^ nTIEJ'Kl, " that I shall save the world" (John xii, 47). In the 
expression, " ana suzub napsate su," " for the saving of his life," I 
would compare the word " suzub " with Chaldee ^?J\^, or Rabbinic 
^T^r??^, " deliverance, escape." 

III. Ittagil, from J " dagalu." With this compare Chaldee /"^Jjl, 
" fidere, confidere, fiduciam ponere vel coUocare;" and see Psalm ix. 11, 
where '''^12^^.1 is translated by one MS. 1-1/'|0?), "and they trusted." 



T -^A ^ ^} ^T « V -TA <M • • • • 
Tf V -'^^ < -+ t-t] «=TIT -+ I— 
^T< -T<T^ -^TI t!^ I ^T ^m ^--T ^T 

Rm I, col. I, lines 8, 9. 
y ^^ ^ ^ ^tl IgU <;^ t:]} ^ t^ ->f 

j[^^y ^yyy. (TF.^.i.,iv. 68, 52-530 



(Isai. xxxvii. 37, 38.) 



i-in3D nn«W mn^D ^k^ 133 . iik'k i^d |nn -id« 

(Eashi on Ezra iv. 2.) 



vnnn i3n |nn -idk i^oi vjn ^"y ntDin 'pKitr* nx n^^K* ainao ^d 

(in miV» on Ezra iv. 2.) 



THE GENEALOGY AND ACCESSION OF 

ESARHADDON, AND PRINCIPAL 

EVENTS OF HIS REIGN. 



EsARH ADDON was the son of Sennacherib, king of Assyria, 
B.C. 705-681. The Sin-akhi-irib of the cuneiform inscrip- 
tions is the— 

inn^p of the Bible; 

LXX. ^(vvaxrjplfJi., or "Sevvax^jpetfi J 
JosephuS, 2€vvaxr]pi^os ; 
Herodotus, l.avaxapi^os. 

The sons of Sennacherib were — 

1 Sharesar, Biblical "IV^I^ (Nerg-al-sarra-yutsur) ; 

2 Adrammelech, „ v^ll^; 

3 Esarhaddon, „ n"in"ipx, 

written 'Ao-opSai/ and 2axep8oi/ds, Berosus and LXX. ; 
„ "Ao-apibavos, Ptolemy ; 

,, 'Aaapddav, Ezra ; 

„ Sa^epStt)!/, Codex Alex. 

,, 'Axeipdavos, Compl. 

The account of the death of Sennacherib is told us by the 
Bible, and very briefly, for we read (2 Kings xix. 37) : *^ And 
it came to pass as he (Sennacherib) was worshipping in the 
house of Nisroch his god, that Adrammelech and Shareser his 

B 



2 GENEALOGY AND ACCESSION 

sons smote him with the sword ; and they escaped into the 
land of Armenia. And Esarhaddon his son reig-ned in his 
stead." ^ 

Josephus says {Ant.^ x. i, sec. 5) that Sennacherib was 
buried " in his own temple called Araske " ('ei' rw I'Siw j/a&> 

' Apdo-KT] XeyojjLevio). 

It has been generally thought that Esarhaddon was Sen- 
nacherib's eldest son, and this seems to have been the idea of 
Polyhistor, who made Sennacherib place a son, Asordanes, on 
the throne of Babylon during his own lifetime (Ap. Euseb., 
Chrm.y Can. i. 5).'' The testimony of a small tablet {W.A.I. ^ 
iii., 16) supports this view. 

It has been aptly called the ^^ Will of Sennacherib."^ It 
reads — 

"I, Sennacherib, king of multitudes, king of Assyria, 
have given chains of gold, etc., to 
Esarhaddon, my son, who was afterwards named 
Assur-ebil-mucin-pal, 

according to my wish." 
The name of Esarhaddon is written in the following ways — 

D.P. Assur - akha-iDiN -na. — i. 49? i- 

D.P. Assur-akha-idinna. — i. 48, 2, i. 

D.P. Assur-akha-idinna. — i. 48, 5, i. 
It means ^^ Assur gave a brother." 

* These events are mentioned, with additions, by Berosus (Berosus and 
Abydenus ap. Eusebius, Chron. Armen , ed. Aucher, vol. i. pp. 42, 43) ; 
Gesenius, Theosaurus, p. 962. 

* Smith's Diet, of Bible, large edition. 
' liec&rda of the Pant, vol. i. p. 136. 



OF ESARHADDON. 3 

The syllabaries explain the ideogTaph employed in the 
name thus : — 

►^►?- = ^E t^=^ i-luv. Heb. ^'t?, ii. 31, 27. 

^ ^ Assuru. Heb. "i-IC^K^ Sayce, Syl.^ 414. 

E^i^ = y} »^yi a-khu. Heb. n«, ii. 2, 276. 

^^"^I zzz ^"^T ^TT >J- na-da-nu, Heb. 1^^, iii. 70, 77. 

A^ ■=. TI ►-TT a-khu. Sayce, Syl., 13. 

►^ = ^""^I t^TT V~ ^a-d^"!!"- Sayce, ^S/yZ. i. 

The character ►— is a variant form for ►-►^ , Assur. It 
is found on an altar slab of Assur-natsir-pal {Trans. Soc. Bib. 
Arch.j vol. vii.). 

Esarhaddon began to reign b.c. 681, and he reigned until 
B.C. 668. His brothers Adrammelech and Shareser attempted 
to obtain the throne, but Esarhaddon drew up his army, and, 
marching against them, gained a complete victory at Khani- 
rabbat, a district on the Upper Euphrates. According to some, 
Adrammelech was killed in battle; according to others, he 
escaped with his brother and took refuge in Armenia. Accord- 
ing to local tradition, the king of Armenia received the van- 
quished with great kindness, and gave them land to dwell in.^ 

A tablet, containing* ^' addresses " to Esarhaddon, was 
probably drawn up at the time when Esarhaddon was prepar- 
ing to fight against his brothers. Column II. speaks thus 
{W.A.I. iv. 68):— 

14 Fear not, Oh Esarhaddon, 

15 I (am) Bel, thy strength. 

16 & 17 I will ease the supports of thy heart. 

18 Respect, as for thy mother, 

19 Thou hast caused to be shown to me. 

20 (Each) of the sixty great gods, my strong ones, 

21 Will guide thee with his life 

25 Upon mankind trust not, (but) 

' Maspero, Hlstoire. Ancienne, p. 422. Moses of Khorene, History of 
Armenia, I., i. p. 22. 

B 2 



GENEALOGY AND ACCESSION 



¥' 



<^iS^ 



26 Bend thine eyes \y'^ >^ ' 

27 Upon me — trust to me ! (for) ■ ' '- " 

28 I am Istar of Arbela. 

After tlie battle (b.c. 680), Esarhaddon marched into 
Nineveh. But about this time Nabu-zir^napisti-eser, son of 
Merodach-Baladan, an old enemy of Assyria, raised an army 
and went to attack the city of Ur, whose eponym's name was 
Nin-gal-iddina (?). He was successful in his siege, and cap- 
tured the city. Esarhaddon sent out his officers, and Nabu- 
zir-napisti-esir, knowing this, fled to Elam, asking protection 
from Umman-aldas, king of that country. But this was 
refused ; and in col. 2, lines 2tZ ^^^ 34, we read that " he had 
trusted to the king of Elam, who had not caused his life to be 
spared." Nahid-Marduk, another son of Merodach-Baladan, 
hearing of the death of his brother, came to Nineveh and 
sought alliance with Esarhaddon, who received him graciously, 
and gave him the sea- coast to rule over. 

Another revolt in Syria now claimed the attention of the 
Assyrian king. Abdi-milcutti, king of the city of Zidon, had 
made alliance with 'Sanduarri, king of Cundi and 'Sizu. 
Esarhaddon marched against Zidon, besieged and captured it. 
He cut oif the heads of Abdi-milcutti and 'Sanduarri, and, 
hanging them upon the necks of their great men, exhibited 
them in the wide spaces (Rehoboth) in Nineveh. 

All Palestine and the neighbouring regions now submitted 
to Esarhaddon — viz., twelve districts in Palestine, and ten in 
Cyprus. Each king sent presents. 

At this time, also, he captured the city of Arzani, perhaps 
a city of Egypt. 

Esarhaddon's next expedition was against the Gimirrai, or 
Kimmerians, whose king was called Teuspa. He conquered 
them, and, at the same time, the inhabitants of Cilicia and 
Duha submitted. 

Soon after this, Esarhaddon attacked the Mannai, but in 
this attempt he appears not to have been quite as successful. 
However, five Median chiefs came to Nineveh and submitted 
to Esarhaddon. 



OF ESARHADDON. 5 

Esarhaddon now attempted the conquest of Arabia. Many 
of the Assyrian king's before Esarhaddon had made some con- 
quests in the land of Edom. But he went farther, and reached 
two cities, called Bazu and Khazu (the Biblical Huz and 
Buz), and conquered eig-ht king-s and queens. The journey, 
however, was very difficult, and little more is said about it. 

A king-, called Lailie, asked that the g'ods which Esarhaddon 
had captured from him mig*ht be restored. His request was 
granted, and Esarhaddon says — " I spoke to him of brother- 
hood, and entrusted to him the sovereignty of the districts of 
Bazu." 

Esarhaddon being- master of Arabia, Syria, Media, and the 
other countries which had rebelled against him, was now troubled 
by Egypt. Before the reign of Esarhaddon, an Ethiopian, 
called Sabaka, had conquered Egypt. He died, and Sabatok, 
his successor, made good his cause, and was recognised as 
king.^ But now Tirhakah fought Sabatok, who was vanquished, 
taken prisoner, and put to death. ^ 

Tirhakah had been a stubborn and rebellious enemy against 
Sennacherib, the father of Esarhaddon. It was his army that 
had opposed Sennacherib at the time of the overthrow of the 
Assyrian army. Tirhakah, having reigned about twenty years, 
considered himself well established on the Egyptian throne, so 
he made an alliance with Bahlu, king of Tyre, and as it is said — 
'' The yoke of Assur, my lord, they despised \ they were 
insolent and rebellious." 

" Esarhaddon had entered into a convention with Bahal, 
by which, in return for services rendered by the Tyrians, the 
Assyrian monarch ceded to the king of Tyre a considerable 
portion of the coast of Palestine, including Accho, Dor, and all 
the northern coast of the Philistines, with the cities and Gebal, 
and Lebanon, and the cities in the mountains behind Tyre." * 

This very serious rebellion aroused Esarhaddon and brought 
him and his army against the rebels. He started from the 

• Oppert, Ileinoirc sur Its liajqwrts dc VE(jyj)tc et de VAssyric, p. 14. 
^ JIanctho, edited Unger, p. 251. ^ Smith's Assyria, p. 34. 



6 GENE A LOG Y AND A CCESSION 

city Apliek, and marched as far as Rapikhi (?), a journey of 
30 caslnij or 210 miles. 

The Assyrian army was short of water, and was obliged to 
drink whatever water could be found, for he says — 

" Marsh waters from buckets I caused my army to drink." 
He then marched into Egypt, and Tirhakah was beaten. 

Esarhaddon next divided Egypt into twenty provinces ; all, 
except two, being governed by Egyptian generals. 
The exceptions are : — 

Sar-ludari,king of the city of Tsiahnu (Zoan, or Tanis),and 
Bucur-Ninip, king of the city of Pakhnuti. 

Esarhaddon caused to be carved upon the rocks of the 
Nahr-el-Kelb a long inscription, in which he called himself 
"King of Egypt, Thebes, and Ethiopia.'" b.c. 672. 

Esarhaddon now began his buildings. He first built " ten 
fortresses " in Assyria and Accad. He then repaired and 
enlarged the palace at Nineveh, which had been made for 
the " custody of the camp-baggage." The twenty-two kings 
of Syria (for their names see text) brought him materials for 
his works. He began a palace at Calah, but it was never 
finished; and he built one for his son, Assur-bani-pal, at 
Tarbitsi (modern Sheref Khan). 

While Esarhaddon was yet king, he set his son Assur-bani- 
pal upon the throne to reign with him. This is evident from 
W.A.I., iii. I, 7, 9, where it is said: — 

9 Esarhaddon, king of Assyria, the father, my begetter. 

10 The will of Assur and Beltis the gods, his ministers, he 

exalted. 

1 1 Which (gods) commanded him to establish my kingship. 
The inscription then goes on to say that, on the 12 th day 

of May, Esarhaddon gathered together the principal men of 
the kingdom, and it was decreed that Assur-bani-pal should 
be made king. This event must have taken place between 
B.C. 671 and B.C. 668. 

' Oppert, M4moire8 ear les Eapports tie VEyyptc et de VAssyrie, pp. 38, 43, 
80, et seq. 



OF ESARHADDON. 7 

When Esarhaddon returned to Assyria, Tirhakah raised a 
larg'e army and went to besieg'e Memphis. The city fell into 
his hands after a " murderous sieg*e."^ The account of his- 
defeat is g-iven by the annals of Assur-bani-pal. Esarhaddon 
died in the year B.C. 668. 

He left one son, Assur-bani-pal, king- of Assyria, and 
another called g-enerally Saulmug-ina, kin^ of Babylon. 
Their names are thus written : — 

Assur-bani-pal, J ^>qp4i^ ^I Jy 

Saulmug-ina, J ^>^ t^J ^^^ ►¥" *^TT-^ ^'^T' 

Esarhaddon was truly " the great king-," and he adopted 
the policy of holding court at Nineveh and Babylon. Baby- 
lon was the scene of many great battles, and during- its exist- 
ence was fought for oftener than, perhaps, any other city in the 
Babylonian and Assyrian empires. It was said to have been 
built in very early times, became capital under Khammuragas, 
and held this position for 1200 years {Babylonia^ p. 75). 
Khammuragas (about B.C. 1700) calls himself ^* king of 
Babylon." He built there a temple to Merodach. 

It was conquered by Tuculti-Ninip B.C. 1271 ; by Tiglath- 
Pileser I. b.c. mo; by Tiglath-Pileser II. B.C. 7315 by 
Merodach-Baladan b.c. 722; by Sargon b.c. 721; it was 
sacked and burnt by Sennacherib b.c. 692, but restored by 
Esarhaddon b.c. 6755 captured by Assur-bani-pal b.c. 648, 
also by Nabu-pal-yutsur b.c. 626, and finally taken by the 
Medes and Persians B.C. 539.^^ 

In his capacity of ruler he was comparatively merciful and 
kind, for the phrase '^riemu arsi-su " (I showed mercy to 
him) occurs frequently in the inscriptions j also his restoration 

' Oppert, Les i:iar go nicies, p. 57. 

^ For the measurement of its walls, etc. — See Diodorus Siculus, vol. i. 
pp. 118, 120. Amstelodami, 1746. 



8 GENEALOGY, ETC., OF ESARHADDON. 

to his enemies of the gods which he had captured is probably 
without equal among the deeds of the might j kings of Assyria 
" who went before." Another proof of his generosity to his 
enemies is shown by the fact of his releasing Manasseh, king 
of Judah, and restoring- to him his kingdom after he had 
been carried captive to Babylon (2 Chron. xxxiii. 11). He 
extended the Assyrian empire by the conquests of Arabia and 
Egypt, and does not appear to have taken delight in warlike 
expeditions for their own sake, but only undertook them when 
necessity required for the submission of his enemies. 



LIST OF TEXTS USED OR CONSULTED 
FOR THIS BOOK. 



The brick legends lithographed in W.A.L, i. 48. 

48 
No. 10 — 31 „ „ W.A.L, i. 45, 47. 

2 

48 
Broken Cylinder, No. 11 — 4, lithographed in W.A.I. ^ iii. 15, 16. 

315 

Black Stone „ W.A.I., i. 49. 

Broken Cylinder (unnumbered). 

K 3082, K 3086 \ Containing the account of the expedition 

s 2027 J to Eg}^t. 

K 1679. Containing the equivalent parts of lines for W.A.L, 

i., xlv. 41, 48. 
K 2671. War against Elam. 
^ 305 3 • Titles and genealogy of Esarhaddon. 
K 4473. War against Sidon. 
K 4444. War against Balu, king of Tyre. 
K 2663. Bears the name of Esarhaddon, dated 27th day of 

lyyar. 
R M. 3. Belongs to a Cylinder of Assur-bani-pal, and contains 

a list of names of tributary kings and cities, 

by which the spelling of many names in W.A.L, 

iii. 13, has been corrected. 
W.A.L, iii., xvi. No. 3. The Will of Sennacherib. 



10 



The system of transliteration adopted in the following pages 
is the same as that used in Professor Sayce's Assyrian Graminary 
and is as follows : — 



a - a 


ha 


= N 


b 




= 3 


g 




= J 


d 




= n 


h 




= n 


U, V 




= 1 


z 




^ \ 


kh 




= n 


dh 




= ID 


i 




= » 


c 




= D 


1 




= b 


m, also 


V 


= » 


n 




= 3 


's 




= D 


e 




= y 


P 




= B 


ts 




= V 


k 




= p 


r 




= "1 


s 




= ^ 


t 




= n 



CUNEIFORM INSCRIPTIONS RELATING TO 
THE HISTORY OF ESARHADDON. 



LIST OF EPONYMS, 

B.C. 681-668. 



T -^ «^Tr « ^ 

I «=^T If 1} 

1 <ls^ ^ -II -EI ^ 1- 

l-^^imx^l}l}t: 

1 tih -EI a 



^I I- ^^11 <}} ^I t^M- 



13 



LIST OF EPONYMS 

For each year during the reign of Esarhaddon. 



The Assyrian word lim-imi is translated " eponym " by the 
g-eneral consent of scholars. A Ummuy or eponym, was ap- 
pointed every year, held office for a year, and g-ave his name 
to the year. About thirty of the king's ministers had the 
right of being* eponyms/ 

REFERENCE 
NAME OP EPONYM. TO TABLETS. 

B.C. 68 1, D.P., Nabu-akhi-ures k 288. 

D.P., Assur-akha-iddina ina D.P.^ 

cussu ittusib (Canon). 

Esarhaddon upon the throne sat. 

„ 680, D.P., Da-na-a-nu (Canon).^ 

„ 679, D.P., Istu-Rammanu-aninu . . . K 341 

678, D.P., Nergal-sar-utsur k 1617 

677, D.P., Abu-ra-mu (Canon). 

676, D.P., .Bam-ba-a k 350 

675, D.P., Nabu-Akhi-iddina . . . . k 1575 

674, D.P., Sar-nuri k 285 

673, D.P., A-khaz-el k 376 

672, D.P., Nabu-bel-utsur k 284 

671, D.P., Dhebet-ai k 399 

670, D.P., Sallim-bella-assib k 327 

669, D.P., Samas-casad-aibi k 363 

668, D.P., Mar-la- rim k 321 



1 Eponym Canon, p, 24. 

^ Mr. Smith refers to tablet k 3789 for the name of this Eponym Danann, 
but the tablet is not dated, and the line of which he makes Daniinu reads 
inaynme cas'pu iddinu, "on the day when money they gave." (For text, 
see opposite page.) 



H 



H^.^./., iii. 1 6. No. 3. 
OBVERSE. 

^ ^^ ^^ ^lA 4i.^ r— <|{ -yy^i, ^y c: 
3.^11^ <lf -yy^i. tyyy^ y^ ^yy^ <}} ^yy^ 

Afe y-- <m V yf -<y< 

4 -t^yty^II-^^^y'gyy^y<^.^iy^ 



REVERSE. 



7 yf -^y y --T ^ - 1£ t^yi 'gyy :^jg^f 

8 y -^ tfff]; ^y<y^ t;<y t:g;-<y ^ :^ 

9 -^y ^- tyyy- <^ -e ^Jiy A-y yf 

- yf 2< ^.^ ^y f^yyyy y yi -^ 

' ' ^^1^1 -T<y^ --ly -tH -7^ iH yf :??: -^ d:: 



THE WILL OF SENNACHERIB. 

OBVERSE. 

1 D.P., D.P., Sin-akhi-irba sar cis'sati. 
(I) Sennacherib, King* of multitudes, 

2 Sar mat Assur esiri khuratsi tulat karni 

King- of Assyria, bracelets of gold, heaps of ivory, 

3 khuratsi gagi khuratsi esiri itti sa-a-ti (?) 

a cup (?) of gold, crowns of gold, (and) chains with them, 

4 ina du-ma-ki an-nu-te sa tu-lat-s'u-nu 

these benefits (goods) of which there are heaps 

5 D.R, ibba D.P., likh-khal D.P., zadhu 
crystal stone, stone, bird stone. 

REVERSE. 

6 I bar ma-na 2 +^ cibi ci sakal-su-nu 

One and a-half manch, two and a half shekels, according: 
to their weight 

7 a-na D.P., Assur-akha-iddina abil-ya sa arcatu 
to Esarhaddon my son who afterwards 

8 D.P. Assur-ebil-mucin-pal sum-su 
Assur-ebil-mucin-pal his name 

9 na-bu-u ci-i ru-ah-a 

was named according to my wish. 

10 a-din cisat-tu Bit D.P., A-muk 

I gave the treasure of the temple of Amuk 

11 erik-irba ca-nu-ur-a-ni D.P. Nabu 

irik irba the harpists (?) of the god Nebo. 



i6 



W.AJ., i. 48. No. 2. 
W.A./., i. 48. No. 4. 



PK^./., i. 48. No. 5. 



5 \- i^ <<<<EI ►f •PIT ^^ M •^IT 



17 



TITLES OF ESARHADDON. 

No. 2. W.A.L, i. 48. 

E-GAL D.P., Assur-akha-iddina 

The palace of Esarhaddon 

sarru dan-nu sar cisVati sar mat Assur 

the powerful king;, king- of multitudes, king of the country 

of Assyria, 
abil D.P., Sin-akhi-irba sar mat Assur 
son of Sennacherib, king- of the country of Assyria, 
abil D.P., Sar-gin sar mat Assur 
son of Sarg'on, king" of Assyria. 

No. 4. H/.^./., i. 48. 
mat D.P., Assur-akha-iddina sar cissati sar mat Assur 
the country of Esarhaddon, king* of multitudes, king- of 

Assyria, 
mat Khat-ti mat Mu-tsur mat Cusi 

(king of) the land of the Hittites, of Eg-ypt, (and) Cush, 
(Ethiopia.) 

No. 5. W.AJ., i. 48. 
a-na-cu D.P., Assur-akha-iddina-sarru rabu 
I am Esarhaddon, the g-reat king-, 
sarru dan-nu sar cis's'ati sar mat Assur sakkanak 
the strong king, king of multitudes, king- of Assyria, 

priest 
ca-dimir-(ra) D.A., sar mat Sumir-D.A. 
of Babylon, king of Sumir 
u Accad D.A., sar sarri mat Mu-tsur 
and Accad, king- of the kings of Egypt 

mat Khat-tu mat Cu-s'i 

of the country of the Hittites, Egypt (?) of Cush. 

c 



i8 TITLES OF ESARHADDON. 

8 ^^ « ^y V ^TTIT :^T «^III^ -<\< 

.0 tit i^ t:TIIt ^M tr<^< 

fF.^./., i. 48. No. 7. 



M^.^./., i. 50, 1-6. 



--^^<IEy 



3 <^tt! t^l -^ EtlT <Ig[ 



f <IEI 



TITLES OF ESARHADDON. 19 

6 mat sa ci-rib D.P., Tar-bi-tsi. 

(Upon) the land which is within Tarbitsi (a palace) 

7 a-na mu-sab D.P., Assur-bani-pal (abla) 
for the seat of Assurbanipal, 

8 abil-sari rabi sa Bit-rid-u-ti 

the son of the g-reat king" of the harems, 

9 abil tsi-it lib-bi-ya 

the son, the offspring of mj^ body, 
10 artsip u-sac-lil. 

I built, I caused to be completed. 

No. 7. W.A.L/\,\Z, 

sar mat Kar-D.P. Duni-ya-as 
king" of the country of Kar-duniyas. 

W.A.L, i. 50, 1-6. 

1 D.P., Assur-akha-iddina sar 
Esarhaddon king 

2 cissati sar mat Assur D.A., 

of multitudes, king of Assyria, 

3 sakkanak ca-dimir-ra, D.A. 
priest of Babylon 

4 sar mat Sumir D.A., va Accad. D.A. 
king- of the country of Sumir and Accad, 

5 rubu na-a-du, pa-likh 

the exalted prince, the worshipper of 

6 D.P., Nabu va D.P., Marduk 

Nebo, and Marduk. 

c 2 



20 



W.AJ., iii. 15; col. I. 



. ^t] !^T :^ I^TT -+ ^T •^ITH EI «-! |]^ 

^T- ^ «iin -<!< ::El]f 
4 !^ ^! -Hf- -^ -+ <« -^ ^T -►f -II 

6 H "y^ ^T< ^ <T- EI ^-IT H ^Jn <Iei 

8 -yy t^ ^. tin <::^y Ey y^ ih -t] -tti 
-Ey fcS^yyy 



21 



BATTLE OF ESARHADDON AGAINST HIS 
BROTHER, AT KHANIRABBAT, B.C. 680. 



W.A.L, iii. 15 ; col. i. 

I u-sar-rid-va u-sa-ats-bat 

I caused to descend and I caused to take 



2 la-ab-bi-is an-na-dir-va its-tsa-ri-ikh ca-bat-ti 

In heart I was discouraged, and was stricken down my 
liver. 

3 as-su e-pis sarru-ti BiT-ABi-ya ni-pi-sa rit-ti-ya 

As regards the making of the royalty of the house of my 
father, the extension of my dominion, 

4 a-na D.P., assur D.P., sin D.P., samas D.P., bel D.P., 

NABU U D.P., NERQAL 

to the gods Assur, Sin, Samas, Bel, Nebo, and Nergal, 

5 D.P., ISTAR Sa NINUA D.A., D.P., ISTAR sa D.P., ARBA-il 

the goddess Istar of Nineveh, (and) the goddess Istar of 
Arbela, 

6 Ka-a-ti as-si-va im-gu-ru ci-bi-ti 

. my hands I lifted up and they were kind to my prayers. 

7 ina an-ni-su-nu ci-nuv seru ta-gil-tu 

By their grace established, a trusting heart (body) 

8 is-tap-pa-ru-niv-va (h) a-lic la-ca-la-ta 

they sent, and (said) march ! do not restrain thyself 



22 



BATTLE OF ESARHADDON 



S^ -^I Tl e:TI eIK -IK! Tl -tH 

- T -II ^T I- II ^i I- <t^ ^:sK<m^ 

-HP ^Al} «-Ell <t45 ^El <t^I 

" <i-ii<i -«=H II <t^ II A^ ^i- tin ^i< 
j^i^ ^.- e:ii I— t^ii - -^i< I EiH 

.. <^t:^ tnit ^ ^i ^mm «=eii <t^ ii 
ji^ 

13 tElI <IE^ ^I E|I< -IKI «^^II <t^ ^ 

.4 1- H i^ ^-Ki !-^ -::^i ^ «=iii -^i 
t=Ei -II ^i -^i <^45 II .m ^ 



■5 <ii Ei -Ki "^11 "^11 ^^ ^ >^ tit 
^ <i-ii<i <i- 

.6 II ^i c^ ^]ii IK ^^iii tE -IKI »=EII 

«*I t^III II 8.E ^I II II 

>7 ^fe e:ii -+ f^iiiiKigf ^ ^ ]gii i^n 

IH ^jn ^-III ;::^II <I-II<I <I^ EI 

■8 Mil -EI -^ ^^ II - <m -K ^.^ IK s^ 
EV - -ii4». EinEj t^ e:ii <i:^ i «-iii 



AGAINST HIS BROTHER. 23 

9 i-da-a-ca- ni-it-tal-lac-va ni-na-a-ra g-ir-ri-a-ca 

(with) thy hands, we march ; and we abhor thy enemies. 

10 EST-en YU-me sanna YU-me ul uc-ci pa-an UMMANi-ya 

ul-at-g-ul 
On the first day (and) second day I foug-ht not, the front 
of my army I set not in array, 

11 ar-ca-a ul-a-cin pi-kit- ti susi tsi-mit-ti niri 

the hinder part I formed not, the overseers of the horses 
trained to (bear) the yoke, 

12 ul u-nu-nt TAKHATSi-ya ul a-su-sur 

without the furniture of my battle, I did not set in line (?) 

13 tsi-di-it gir-ri-ya ul-as-pu-uc 
provisions for my journey I issued not. 

14 sal-g*u cu-uts-tsu ARAKH SEBATTU dau-ua-at en-te-na 
Snow, storming (in) the month Sebat (came the) mighty 

darkness, 
ul-a-dur 
I feared not, 

15 ci-ma iTSTSURi si-si-in-ni mu-up-pa-ar-si 
like a smnni bird flying 

16 a-na D.P., Gab-kha-akh i-ri-tsi ap-ta-a i-da-ai 

against the officer Gab-khakh, of the land (0 1 opened 
(out) my forces 5 

17 Khar-ra-an ninua D.A., pa-as-ki-is ur-ru-ukh-is ar-di-va 
the road (to) Nineveh, with difficulty quickly I descended, 

and 
t8 el-la-mu-uh-a ina iRTSi-tiv mat Kha-ni-rab-bat gi-mir ku- 
ra-di-su-im 
beyond me, in the region of the country of Khanirabbat, 
the whole of their warriors. 



24 BA TTLE OF ESARHADDON 

•9 s^ElI ^JII ^I< ^ -^ ^TT< -m ^^V^ '} 

ao •i^^ tyyy< ^y< -4- \**^ ej- \>*^ >-\\ 

T^ c:ETI A -Ml I ^ ^}< t] 
- ^T< fcU -m^ tt]] ^III s^ s-T^ ^ ^jm 

.. ^y :z^yy ^ -^ c: ^<M-} -IS^ e:tt 

A-y ^t ^<- -gyy -►f h -^t< ^tV( 

n ^E ^y y^ y^ ^^yyy -yy^ ^y Ey ^\ <^ 

-^yy^ IH A^^ 
^4 t^yyy ]?{< ?^ i.,^ E:yy -i^ -^yy ^ nw 

iH^y 
^5 - H=y>f y \^ -y<y^ ^- < t:yn Ey -^ 

^y s^yyy ^yy s.^ izj ^jn tyyyt ^ K. 



A GA INS T HIS BRO THER. 2 5 

19 tsi-ru-ti pa-an o-ir-ri-ya tsab-tu-va ii-rac-sa D.P., CAcci- 

su-un 
powerful in front of my army placed themselves and girded 
on their weapons. 

20 pu-lukh-ti iLi RABi BELi-ya is-khup-su-nu-ti-va 

The fear of the great gods, my lords, overwhelmed them, 
and 

21 ti-ib TAKHATSi-ya dan-ni e-mu-v-ru-va e-mu-u makh-khu-ur 
the onset of my powerful attack they saw, and collected 

in front. 

22 D.P., Is-tar bi-lat kabali takhatsi ra-ah-i-mat sa-an- 

gu-ti-ya 
The goddess Istar, the lady of war (and) battle, the lover 
of my obedience, 

23 i-da-ai ta-zi-iz-va D.P., MiTPANi-su-nu tas-bir 
my forces she fixed, their bows she broke. 



24 ta-kha-tsa-su-nu ra-ac-su tap-dhu-ur-va 
their assembled fighting men she struck and 

25 ina PUKHRU-su-nu nam-bu-u um-ma-an-nu yu-sar-a-ni 

in their assembly disturbed, the army turns away from me. 



26 ina ci-bi-ti-sa tsir-ti id-ai it-ta sa ats-bi-ru u-se-mid 

By her supreme command, my hands the standard which 
I had raised, I caused to carry. 



26 



Broken Cylinder. W.A.I., iii. 15 ; col. 2. 

EI ri ^T y^ \-t] t]>- ^m 

3 f^ T -.- E^Si^ E<2<il <IE! <MT<I ^] 

^ ]} I! I 
5 <t43 -EEy ^^ ^^ .^ ^y ^y ^^ < .>f 

7 - ^i H ^^ «=ET ^t]} ^yy E^K i=yyy»= ^ 

<y^ ^- Sf: Ey 

8 ^ :.yf^ -,- «=yyyt= ^- ^yy^ lEU ^ s^ t^yf 
^y .=yyyt <t]t idi «=yyy< 



27 



THE WAR AGAINST NABU-ZIR-NAPISTI- 
ESIR, SON OF MERODACH-BALADAN, 

ABOUT B.C. 680. 



Broken Cylinder. W.A.I., ill. 15 ; col. 2. 

in-da-li-ikh-khu 

he had been troublesome . . . 



2 . . . . CARAsi-su id-ci-e-va a-na D.P. nin-gal 

His camp he assembled and against Nin-gal (idinna) 

3 D.P. sa-nat ur-D.A. ar-du da-gil pa-ni-ya 

the governor of the cityUr, a servant, a dependant upon me, 

4 ni-i-tu il-ve-su-va its-ba-tu mu-tsa-a-su 

battle he brought against him, and had captured his (place) 
of exit. 

5 ul-tu D.P., AS-SUR D.P., SAMAS D.P,, BEL U D.P., NABO 

D.P., ISTAR Sa NINUA, D.A. 

From (the time when) Assur, Samas, Bel and Nebo, 
Istar of JN ineveh, 

6 D.P., ISTAR sa D.P., ARBA-il ya-a-ti D.P., assur-akha- 

IDINNA 

Istar of Arbela, myself (namely) Esarhaddon 

7 ina D.P., gu-za ab i-ya dha-bis u-se-si-bu-ni-va 

upon the throne of my father well caused me to be seated, 
and 

8 be-lut MAT I u-sat-gi-lu pa-ni-ya su-u ul ip-lukh 

the government of the country they caused to be entrusted 
to me, he himself did not reverence 



II 



28 THE WAR AGAINST 

9 -^T <r^ tj^ If A <^^ Ss <T- ET <Mi<y 
<r^ i^^ (=iyyt ►f ^<^ 

<t^ t^II ^- t<^ ET <|tf}f f ^ Ei:?s 

I< !=EII <^^ ;^IT ti<j 
x^ tU ^ ^T s=!l J! <T- t?^ A} ^T< - <M 

M e:?5 -ki^ t— V ^ ti m^ ^.^ I «-ii^ 
EI 41-1 ^ >-Ei ^jn :ii5i I 

xs <I-^ JKi ^+ ^ ^^ -H^ HP ->^T 

e:ii ^ < ^i -^v ^m ttiii -^ 

•6 n ^jn ^141 Tl 1:^11 T- EI II ^I X^ <;::^I El 

m ^ -EI EiK ^ss »*i t-mi 



• 7 g^ I El ^ -^ I— El- I— til ^I 
1^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ <« ^^ ^y 

.8 -^ -II < -HP -& ->f ^ -II -eEI til i^ 

!^y JT EI 



I 



NABU-ZIR-NAPISTI-ESIR. 29 

9 na-di-e a-khi ul-ir-si-va ar-di ul yu-mas-sir 

the gifts of a brother he presented not, and (to do) homag-e 
he approached not, 

10 va D.P., rac-bu-su a-di makh-ri-ya 

and his ambassador to my presence 

11 ul is-pu-rav-va sul-mu SARRU-ti-ya ul is-al 

he sent not, and (concerning-) the peace of my king-dom he 
asked not, 

12 ip-se-te-e-su lim-ni-e-ti ina ci-rib ninua. D.P., as-me-e-va 
his evil deeds within Nineveh I heard, and 

13 lib-bi i-gug-va its-tsa-ri-ikh ca-bat-ti D.P., su-par SAKi-ya 
my heart groaned and was stricken down my liver. My 

officers, 

14 D.P., PiKHATi sa pa-a-di mati-su u-ma-ah-ir tsi-ru-us-su 
the prefects of the borders of his country I hastened against 

him, 

15 va-su-u D.P., NABU-ZIR-NAPISTI-ESIR ba-ra-uu u 
and he (namely) Nabu-zir-napisti-esir, gross (?) and 
na-pal-cat-ta-nu 

a rebel, 

16 a-lac UMMANi-ya is-me-va a-na mat Ela-ma, D.A., se-la- 

pis 
of the march of my army heard, and to the country of Elam, 

like a fox 
in-na-bit. 
he fled away. 

17 as-su ma-mit ili rabi e-par-ku, D.P., as-sur, D.P., sin, 

D.P., samas 
Since the covenant of the great gods he had broken, 
Assur, Sin, Samas, 

18 D.P., BEL u D.P., NABu au-uu en-tu e-me-du-su-va 
Bel and Nebo, sin (and) guilt placed upon him, 



30 THE WAR AGAINST 

.0 y ^ .►f tyy^ tyf^ e:^^ jy tJT m v 

- '^TI If ^I E^^ ^I ^t m -^ M t:]} 

aa <:^ ^EEy -- 1:]} «^yy ^y< ^^s ^^} ^I 
ET If ^y t:]} EIK -fc^y «=IIIt ^I< ^1} 

^3 yf -^y V -^ <[Ey ^ri^yy ih :=:^ eI 
s^yyyt >^ ^t] yf - M -<I< 

^4 -.- ^I -K II ^I •^II ^H --I< V -IKI 
. s;<y^yE^^ityyyt^^n^^^y ][ 

as V ^y< tyyyt ^y ^b] ^y ^y -^H II ^I 
^i< fc^yyy »=yy- ^y< i -^h «-iiii ^i 

a6 y^ ^y t=3i<I <m tE IH J^ EI tint 
^y ^ V -I <^ll W 



NABU-ZIR-NAPISTI-ESIR. 31 

19 ci-rib MAT Ela-ma D.A., i-na-ru-su ina cacc(i) 

within the land of Elam they overwhelmed him with 
weapons. 

20 D.P., NAHiD D.P., Mar-duk akh-su ip-sit mat E-lam-ti 
Nahid-Merodach his brother, of the matter (in) the countn^ 

of Elam, 

21 sa a-na AKH-SU i-tib-bu-su e-mu-ur-va 
which to his brother had happened, saw and 

22 ul-tu MAT E-lam-ti in-nab-tu-va a-na e-pis ARD-u-ti-ya 
from the country of Elam had fled and to make submis- 
sion to me, (lit. ^^ my homag^e.") 

23 a-na mat assur D.A., il-lic-av-va yu-tsal-la-a bi-lu-ti 

to the country of Assyria came and he besoug-ht (prayed) 
my lordship. 

24 MAT tam-tiv a-na si-khir-ti-sa ri-du-ut akhi-su u-sat-gil 
The sea coast, to its whole extent, the dominion of his 

brother, I 
pa-nu-us-su 
entrusted to him. 

25 sat-ti sam-ma la-na-par-ca-a it-ti ta-mar-ti-su ca-bit-te 
Yearly a sum unvarying with his numerous presents 

26 a-na ninua D.A., i-lic-av-va yu-na-as-sa-ka SEPA-ya 
to Nineveh he came and he kissed my two feet. 



32 



EXPEDITION AGAINST ABDI-MILCUTTI 

KING OF SIDON, AND SANDUARRI, 

KING OF CUNDI AND STZU. 



W.A.L, I 45 ; col. i. 



4 MS«« -*f -^ -HP <« -+ ^T 

6 --f <V? '^T «-:^ -+ <M -H^ I— EI- 

7 <t^ ^] S.EIT ^T -HP ^T <V !^ <Tt^ 

«=I^ s^m -4- ^T <T- 

8 ^i] -M m m^ EI EI 4». e:II -EI 

:=E»EI< 

9 -tH m --II «^EII S5<I «=I|{ S?: V - 
E<32:]? ^I -1-7^ 



33 



EXPEDITION AGAINST ABDI-MILCUTTI, 

KING OF SIDON, AND SANDUARRI, 

KING OF CUNDI AND STZU. 



W.AJ., I 45 ; col. i. 
48 
British Museum, Nnrriber 10 — 31 

2 

I D.A., u Accad D.A. 

(Sumir) and Accad 

2 U MAT ASSUR, D.A. 

and the country of Assyria 

3 sar mat Assur, D.A. 

kinj^ of the country of Assyria, 

4 D.P. ASSUR P.P., SIN D.P. SAMAS, 

the ^'ods Assur, Sin, Samas, 

5 D.P. NABU D.P., MARDUK D.P., ISTAR sa NINUA, D.A. 

Nebo, Marduk, the goddess Istar of Nineveh, 

6 D.P., ISTAR sa ARBA-il D.A. ILI RABI BELI-SU 

the goddess Istar of Arbela, the great gods his lords, 

7 ul-tu tsi-it D.P., Sam-si a-di e-rib D.P., Sam-si 

(who) from the rising of the sun to the setting of the sun 

8 it-tal-lac-u-va ma-khi-ra la-i-su-u 

he hath marched, and an opponent has not had. 

9 Ca-sid D.P., Tsi-du-un-ni sa ina gabal tam-tiv 

The conqueror of Tsidon, which (is) upon the border of 
the sea, 



34 EXPEDITION AGAINST 

o ^ ^y^ ^ -yy^ EHrgy ^yy ^^yyy y^ i 

jy^y 

^ <IEy tyyf ^y -i^^ ^^y <y^ tt Ey 

3 y^ ^H ^ ^^ ^ I "-yyy^ - ih 

4 y tty <y^ n^yy i^ ^y -y< ^^s jy 

sw-Ey^-+«-ymy-- -^y^ 

7 <iEy ^y ^ ^w ^ <^^ ^y <i^ A\} ^y 

8 y} ^ jy Ey -^ <^ .^ t^ ^y ^>^yy 

9 ^t® ►^ V -yyy^ i <f^ -yy^ <ii ^y :^^? 

y^ yi ^^ ^y 

- n^yy t:^ "^yy -^h j^ -^yy «=y -yy^ -y i^ 

- igy lai M -^y< "^y^y < ^t-^y -«^^y 

.. ^ ^-yyy< ^y< 8=yyyy ey- I 

a3 y} -^y ►^ ^»-\ <\^ A} ^ M -Ey 

. Compare <iEy ^y iK ^y^ ^y^^ .^y ^ yH 



ABDI-MILCUTTI AND SANDUARRI. 35 

10 sa-pi-nu gi-mir da-ad-me-su 
sweeping away all its inhabitants, ^ 

1 1 DUR-su va su-bat-su as-sur-su-va 

its fortress, and its site I captured and 

12 ci-rib tam-tiv ad-di-i-va 

into the midst of the sea I cast and 

13 a-sar mas-gan-i-su u-khal-lik 

the region of its habitation I desolated. 

14 D.P., Ab-di-mil-cu-ut-ti sar-su 
Abdi-milcutti its king 

15 sa la-pa-an D.P., CACci-ya 
who from before my weapons 

16 ina KABAL tam-tiv in-nab-tu 
into the midst of the sea had fled ^ 

17 ci-ma nu-u-ni ul-tu ci-rib-tam-tiv 
like a fish, from the midst of the sea 

18 a-mas-su-va ac-ci sa kak-ka-su 

I drew him out and cut off his head. 

19 nac-mu namcur-su khuratsu caspu abni a-kar-tav 
Spoiling his goods, gold, silver, precious stones, 

20 MASAC RIMI KARAN RIMI D.P., DAN D.P., SUBTU 

skin of the wild bull, horn of the wild bull, strong wood, 
chair wood, 

21 D.P., lu-bul-ti BIRMI U CITU NIN-SUM-SU 

clothing, variegated and linen, whatever its name 

22 ni-tsir-ti e-gal-su 

the treasures of his palace, 

23 a-na mu-ah-di-e as-lu-la 

to a great (number) I carried off 

1 p ™„„_p ci-ma NUNi its-bat su-pul mik ru-ku-ti 

like the fishes he took (went into) the depth of distant waters. 

D 2 



36 EXPEDITION A GAINST 

.6 T^ ^^ .tH i^ ^i <igT »=m V -^ 

.9- t^ ->f (tETI) V C^I EI -^11 ^III^ 

^ EH< EI 
3o-8=yy (T ->f -^) ^:?^^ ^\ -^T t^y 

t^iyy - ^ tiiiT ^^11 

31 ty^^f I— -i<i ^- ^i A <^ ^^} SF 

3^ <I-M ^I -1^ tElI ^I -►f ^I <I- 

33 - ^ni :=: «=iii«= ^ <i- tu 

34 E^ ^i ^i ^=^11^ t=En E^ -I<I^ <-tH 

35 4ym 1 4ff -►f J5<i <i-ii<i -ii<i 

36 ^^ -tii -•f A-iii <it^ -tiT -^n ->^ii 

«-iii^ 



ABDI-MILCUTTI AND SANDUARRI. yj 

24 Nisi-su UMMi sa ni-ba la i-sa-a 

His men (and) women which number had not 



25 ALPi va tsi-e-ni imiri 
oxen and sheep, asses 

26 a-bu-ca a-na ci-rib mat assur D.A., 

I turned (drove) to the midst of the country of Assyria. 

27 u-pa-khir-va sarrani mat khat-ti 

I assembled also the kings of the land of the Hittites, 

28 va a-khi tam-tiv ca-li-su-nu 

and the sea coast the whole of them 

29 ina pa-an-(ya) sa nuv-va alu u-se-pis-va 

into my presence. Another city I caused to make and 

30 AL (D.P., D.P., assur) AKHA-iDDiN-na at-ta-bi ni-bit-su 
the city of Esarhaddon, I called its name 



31 NISI khu-bu-ut D.P., MiTPANi-ya sa SAD-i 

the men, the spoil of my bow from the mountains. 

32 va tam-tiv tsi-id D.P., Sam-si 
and the sea of the rising sun 

2y'^ ina lib-bi u-se-si-ib 

in the midst of (it) I caused to dwell 
34 D.P., su-par-sAK ya D.P., pikhatu eli-su-nu as-cun 

my general as prefect over them I established. 



35 va D.P., sa-an-du-ar-ri 
and S'anduarri 

36 sar ali Cun>di D.P., S'i-zu-u 

king of the city Cundi, (and) the city S'izu, 



38 



EXPEDITION AGAINST 



38 ^T ->f T— ^1!^:= ^ ^H «=IIT»- EI 

39 If -^I ^- tE tii- 1^^ ^i< ^i f^yyy 

40 < I ^} ^^ ^}\ i^i ^i ^y< ^:?5 .til 
4' \} ^I -M t-^ ^I< I :r5ll ->f A-III EI 

,, ^ ^y y.^ ^y^ y.^ y^ ^y y^ ^^^ y.^ 

ty -.- tyyyt eI 

43 n ^I tn ^ I^II ^I AW ^I :^^ 

44 n ^I M I]^ ^I -^ -II i^Ell tEl 

t^III n EI 

45 <iEi EI ty t^^ -yy<y <;:^ ^y m m 

46 n ^ »Ey EI -]& <m ^ ^ -I -^n 

47 ^ I ^ ^I -^ -H^ -^ -II tEl]f 

48 tllf I^^ ^^ ^tj: <tt A-II El 

49 '^ll^ c^i I— I ^ ->f ::-I < <y^yy<y 
-II<I 



ABDI-MILCUTTI AND SANDUARRI. 39 

37 D.P., NACiRU ak-tsu la pa-lakh be-lii-ti-ya 

an enemy, destroying-, not a reverer of my lordship, 



-^^ sa iLi yu-mas-sar-u-va 

whom the gods had deserted, and 

39 a-na SAD-i mar-tsu-ti it-ta-g'il 
to the rug'g-ed mountains trusted 

40 u D.P., Ab-di-mil-cu-ut-ti sar al Tsi-du-ni 
also Abdi-milcutti, king- of the city Tsidon 

41 a-na ri-tsu-ti-su is-cun-va 

to his help established (g'ot) and 

42 SUM ILI RABi a-na a-kha-i iz-cur-u-va* 

the name of the great g-ods to each other they remembered, 
and 

43 a-na e-mu-ki-su-un it-tag"-lu 
to their forces they trusted. 



44 a-na-cu a-na assur BiL-ya at-ta-gil-va 
But I, to Assur my lord trusted, and 

45 ci-ma its-tsu-ri ul-tu ci-rib SAD-i 
like a liird from within the mountain, 

46 a-mas-su-va ac-ci-sa kak-ka-su 

I drew him out and I cut oif his head. 

47 as-su da-na-an D.P., assur BiL-ya 
Besides, by the mig-ht of Assur, my lord, 

48 NISI cul-luv mi-iin-ma 

the men all of them, whoever (they were,) 

49 KAKKADi D.P., S'a-an-du-u-ar-ri 
the heads of S'anduarri 

1 Compare •'ll^ST.n-Ni' Dn\1-5S DE^^-1 Joshua xxii. 7, "Neither make 
mention (remember) the name of their gods." 



40 EXPEDITION AGAINST THE 

5, ^y K.y< E-^ ^y- \>^ iA^%< 1- 
wy< ^y<T^ 



EXPEDITION AGAINST THE CIMMERI AND 
CILICIA. 



W.A.I., i. 45 ; col. 2. 

, yi ^y V -^ <i^T ^m- ^:tt ti 

4 ^T -I< If *A^ IH M -^Hlf? 

> Compare ^ tt^| tEjI ^I ■-►f ^^ <T- E<3<lf 

-tyy tiiHj <iEy tyyyt. ^ -+ ^-IIT< I ti 



CIMMERI AND CILICIA. 41 

50 va, D.P., Ab-di-mi-il-cu-ut-ti 
and Abdi-milcutti 

51 ina ci-sa-di nis(i) RABi-su-nu a-lul-va 

upon the necks of their great men I hung and 

52 it-ti, D.P., NINGUTI, U . . . . ZICARI U SINNISTI .... 

together with the musicians, both male and female .... 

53 ina ri-bit ninua, D.A., e-te-it-ti-ik 

through the wide spaces of Nineveh, I made pass through. 

54 sa-lil AL Ar-za-ni 
spoiler of the city Arzain, 

55 na MAT Mu-uts-ri 

of the country of Egypt. 



EXPEDITION AGAINST THE CIMMERI AND 
CILICIA. 



W.AJ., i. 45; col. 2. 

1 . . . id-ci-e-su 

he gathered it 

2 a-na mat as-sur, D.A., u-ra-a 

to the country of Assyria I brought. 

3 ina di-khi abulli gabal AL-sa ninua, D.A. * 

In front of the great gate at the border of the city Nineveh, 

4 it-ti A-SI CALBI DABI 

with wild bulls, (?) dog(s and) bear(s). 

1 Compare ina bab tsi-it, D.P., Sam-si gabal, D. P., ninua, DA., u-sa-an-tsir- 
su, D.P., si-ga-ru. In the gate of the rising sun, at the border of Nineveh, 
I caused him to be guarded iu wooden bonds. — W.A.I.^ iii. 25, 93. 



42 EXPEDITION AGAINST THE 

E:Tr II II 

7 ^1 « ^11 V II ^H I ^jn »^iiit ;^x^ 

8 - m -w "^^ -II y- ^^ ^^ 
9 II <i:^ -M Enn ^lAii I tiii«= e:ii 

t^ •^yy ^y - ty ^ 

- < -tH 1^ :^ir^ m I <is^ f^iii I— 

" :i- ::;!y ;gy^ yi y^ <y- ^^ ^y ^^ T ^ 

- V <It^ ^ V fc^lii --i^" 

'3 V <-:^H V I— I ^' ^I t^ m EI 

u <:::ii ^y ^y y- ^ s?: -ei -i<i^' ^ i ii 
^y ^ tE -yy<y 

'5 « y -tyy i-- 1 ^ tin -t^ -<i< 

'5ff S=EII ^I ('*--'./."!.. 15,1). 

' ,^J^ •^^ ¥'>^I (W'-J/. iii, 15, 3). 

" A,^ t^III "^"^I "^El (W-l-^.iii.,15,5). 

' tyy^ >j- ►-<y< (in»erledherebyK:^,/. m., 15, 6). 

' tyyy = -y<y^ (r..i./.m.,i5,6). 



CIMMERI AND CILICIA. 43 

5 u-se-sib-su-nu-ti ca-me-is 

I caused them to dwell in a heap, 

6 va, D.P., Te-us-pa-a mat Gi-mir-ra-ai 

and Teuspa (king*) of the country of the Gimirrai, 

7 TSAB man-da sa a-sar-su ru-u-ku 

a barbarous (?) soldier, whose country (is) remote (namely) 

8 ina iRTSi-tiv mat Khu-pu-us-na 

in the territory of the country of Khupfisna, 

9 a-di gi-mir ummani-su u-ra-as-si-ba ina cacci 
together with the whole of his army, I ran through with 

the sword ; 

10 u-ca-bi-is ci-su-di nisi mat khi-lac-ci 

(and) I trampled (upon) the necks of the men of the 
country of Cilicia, 

1 1 MAT Du-uh-a a-si-bu-ut khar-sa-ni 

(and) the country of Duha, the inhabitants of the forests 
{or hills) 

12 sa di-khi mat Ta-bal 

which (are) opposite the country of Tabal {or Ta-ba-la), 

13 sa eli SADi-su-nu (dan-nu-ti) it-tag-lu-va 

who upon (the strength) of their mountains (strong) had 
trusted, aijd 

14 ul-tu YU-me pa-ni la ic-nu-su a-na ni-i-ri 
from the days of old did not submit to my yoke, 

15 XX + I ALANi-su-nu dan-nu-ti 
twenty-one of their strong cities, 



44 
i6 

17 
18 

19 

20 



22 

23 

24 

25 

26 
27 

28 



, EXPEDITION AGAINST THE 

^} <Tt^ ^tll T-- x^ T-- T -£^ T- 
t^\ ^. -S >tll - -^ ty >f -^ ►^ 

-Til -^I s^ tw -- M -<!< -Ell til -- 
^^IT ^ -^T< 

Tl <T- ^- ^T V <^| II ^ -!!<! 
'^IT ::^ ^l ^v tE s=y|| T— 

-tU T- ^-m e:!T ^?^ -^IT ^V t^IIT 

t^ -T<T1^ ^- ^m^ -11^ ElK I «-TII 
►^ ^H ^T- A-TI!" till I-- V « 

^I II II 
'i:XX -^I E=IIIt -El ^ -»f :r$:: 

' ^- ^t:^ (>r.yi./.iii., 15, 10). 

' tEl tl^^II (H'.^./. Hi., 15, 13). 

'tlllt ^^IdDf ^I'^ ^"^m (f''-^'fi"-.15,16). 



I 



CIMMERI AND CILICIA. 45 

i6 a-di ALANi TSAKHRi sa li-ve-ti-su-nu 

tog-ether with the small cities which bordered them 



17 al-ve ac-sud as-lu-la sal-lat-sun 

I besieg"ed, I captured, I spoiled (them) of their spoil ; 

18 ab-bul ag'-gur ina isati ac-vu 

I threw down, I dug- up, with fire I burned. 

19 si tu-te-su-nu sa khi-idh-dhu 

The remainder of them, who rebellion 

20 va kul-lul-tav la i-su-u 

and curses had not (uttered), 

21 cab-tu ni-ir be-lu-ti-ya e-mid-su-nu-ti 

the heavy yoke of my lordship I placed (stood) upon them. 

22 Da-is {var. ad-is) mat Par-na-ci nac-ru ak-tsu 

The trampler (I trampled upon) the country of Parnaci, 
an enemy, destroying 

23 a-si-bu-ut MAT TUL-a-sur-ri 

the inhabitants of the country of Tel-Assur, 

24 sa i-na pi-i nisi 

which in the language of the men (natives) 

25 AL me-ekh-ra-nu D.P., Pi-ta-a-nu 

of the city Mekhranu, the city Pitanu 

26 i-nam-bu-u zi-cir-su-un 
they call their name. 

27 mu-sap-pi-ikh {yar. u-sap-pi-ikh) nisi mat Man-na-ai 
The scatterer of (I scattered) the men of the country of 

Van, 

28 Ku-tu-u la sa-an-ku 
Gutium disobedient, 



46 EXPEDITION AGAINST THE 

30 V ^ H }} \} }\ ^ITT ^jn -El ^ ^ 
31 1^ -^y ^jn' - ty ^T 

in -HP I IT - 
33 T y^ -^y « ^^ A} «^yy -<y< ^y 

34 -^y tyyyt ^ -yy^ ^^ ^} ^^ -^yy 

35 y -^y AM ^y --f ^yy- ^v^t ^^t: 

%^yy 

36 ^ I ty^ E^K -tty tyyys^ ^y< s^yf 

37 ^^ ^y <M «-yyif v A} <<a\ ^y< ^ss 
s=t^ ^y ^^ 

38 y^ -^y t^Ej <lEy ^yy - igyy ^y< ^\\ 

39 ^.^yy iH t^ Ey «=yyi^ ^y ^ <y- 

40 V ^y -t^ y^ ^y ^^yy a s?? -<y< v 

' y][ *^^T ^T'^TI<I ("-4./.iii, 15,18). 



CIMMERI AND CILICIA. 47 

29 sa um-ma-na-a-ti {var. ummanu) D.P., Is-pa-ca-ai 
who the armies of Ispacai (king of) 

30 MAT As-gu-za-ai ma-ru la mu-se-zi-bi-su 

the country of the Asguzai, a rebel force, not saving him, 



31 i-na-ru (mr. a-na-ar) ina cacci 

had overwhelmed (I overwhelmed) with weapons. 

32 Dha-rid, D.P., D.P., nabu-zir-napisti-esir abil, D.P., 

D.P. marduk-abla-idinna 
The repeller of Nabu-zir-napisti-esir, son of Merodach- 
Baladan, 
2,z sa a-na sar mat E-lam-ti it-tag-lu-va 

who to the king of the country of Elam had trusted and 

34 la u-se-zi-bu nap-sat-su 

had not caused his life to be saved. 

35 D.P. Na-ah-id DP., Mar-duk akh-su 
Nahid-Merodach, his brother, 

36 As-su e-pis ARD-u-ti-ya 

in order to make my submission (^.«., submission to me), 

37 ul-tu ci-rib mat E-lam-ti in-nab-tu-va 

from within the country of Elam had fled, and 

38 a-na nin ua d.a. al be-lu-ti-ya 

to Nineveh, the city of my lordship 

39 il-lic-av-va yu-na-as-si-ik SEPA-ya 
came and kissed my feet, 

40 MAT tam-tiv a-na si-khi-ir-ti-sa 

The country of the sea {i.e., sea-coast) to its whole extent, 



48 EXPEDITION AGAINST THE 

44 -tH ^ <' T -^ ^T tH ^ ^^w ^T 

t<3<i -ii<! -II -ir 

48 ^ I II -^I m ^- s=T!T< -<!< -+ -II 

' db EV (TT.^./. iii. 15, 19). 
, ^^ ►^ (TF:A7.m.l5,20). 
» >^^ >^^ >-^ (F;A7. iii. 15, 21). 

* ji^yy = >-yy<y »-y<y^ (^r.^/. in., 15,23). 

. ^yyys. ^s.^^^^ ^jn E:yy eT »7^ :s^T ^-'>- 

ra-ma-nu-wt, "they turned themselves away," is inserted after I'fl by 
W.A.I. HI, 15,23. 



CIMMERI AND CILICIA. 49 

41 ri-du-ut AKH-su u-sat-^1 pa-nu-us-su 

the dominion of his brother I caused to be entrusted to 
him. 

42 Na-bi-ah {var. as-lul) mat bit, D.P., Dak-kur-ri 

The disturber of (I spoiled) the country of Beth-Dakkurri, 

43 sa ci-rib mat Kal-di ai-ab ca-dimir(ra) D.A. 

which (is) within the land of Chaldea, an enemy of Babylon, 



44 ca-mu-u {yar, ac-vu), D.P., D.P., SAMAS-ib-ni sar-su 
the burner of (I burned) Samas-ibni its king- 

45 is-khap-pu khab-bi-lu la pa-li-khu zic-ri beli 

a ravager wicked, not revering- the memory of the lords, 

46 sa EKILI ABLf CA DIMIR-RA, D.A,, 

who the lands of the sons of Babylon (Babylonians) 



47 u Bar-sap, D.A., ina pa-ri-ik-te it-ba-lu-va 

and Borsippa, by violence had carried away. And 



48 as-su a-na-cu pu-lukh-ti, D.P., bel u, D.P., nabu i-du-u 
as for myself, the fear of the g-ods Bel and Nebo I knew. 



so EXPEDITION AGAINST THE 

5. y ^^ ^ t- <T- II I -^I -tl -^n 

53-tIHIIIs=III-^I-^I 
54 tE W ^I ttl V II S3f= • 

* XIT >^T< ►-ry (TT.A/.iii. 15, 25). 



CIMMERI AND CILICIA. 51 



49 ECiLi si-na-a-ti {yar. sa-ti-na) u-tir-va 
Those lands I restored, and 



50 pa-an abli ca dimir-ra^ D.A., u Bar-sap, D.A., 
to the sons (inhabitants) of Babylon and Borsippa 

51 u-sat-^il 

I caused to be entrusted. 

52 D.P., D.P., NABu-sal-lim abil, D.P., Ba-la-su 
Nebo-sallim, son of Balasu, 

53 ina, D.P., gu-za-su u-se-sib-va 

upon his throne I caused to be seated, and 

54 i-sa-dha ap-sa-a-ni 

he repented of his transgressions (or, he performed acts of 
homage). 



E 2 



52 



THE ARABIAN WAR OF ESARHADDON. 



In lines 55 and 56, printed below, it is stated that Sen- 
nacherib had conquered the city of Edom, in Arabia. A 
notice of this event is found on a tablet (K 3405), very much 
defaced, a copy of which is printed in Smith's Sennacherib, 
p. 138. The invasion by Sennacherib took place about 
B.C. 691. At the time of Esarhaddon, Khazail was king* 
of Arabia, and when he died Esarhaddon bestowed the throne 
upon Yautah or Yahlua, the son of Khazail. This occurred 
during the reign of Esarhaddon, and Yautah paid his ap- 
pointed tribute, as Khazail had done before him, until some 
time after the death of Esarhaddon. Assur-bani-pal, was king 
of Assyria, and Saulmugina, his brother, had revolted. It was 
then that Yautah joined in the revolt and raised two armies ; 
one he sent to Palestine, and the other to the help of the 
Babylonians. He had refused to pay his tribute, and his con- 
duct is thus tersely described by Assur-bani-pal (W.A.I., iii. 
23, 105): — "For when Elam was speaking sedition wnith 
Accad, he heard, and then he disregarded fealty to me, (even) 
myself Assur-bani-pal, the King, the noble hero, the powerliil 
chief, the work of the hands of the god Assur. He forsook 
me, and to Abiyateh and Aimu, sons of Teahri, his forces with 
them, for the assistance of Saulmugina, my rebellious brother, 
he sent, and established his face. The people of Arabia he 
caused to revolt with him, and carried off the plunder of the 



ARABIAN WAR OF ESARHADDON. 53 

people whom Assur, Istar, and the great gods had given me." 
His was, however, totally defeated, for another notice says — 
" The Arabians who escaped from before my warriors the god 
Ninip destroyed. In want and famine their life was passed, 

and for food they eat the flesh of their children 

To Yautah misfortune happened, and he fled away alone to 
Nabaiti." Assur-bani-pal placed Abiyateh upon the throne of 
Yautah." The account of these events, given in W.A.I., iii. 25, 
81, goes on to state that Assur-bani-pal brought Yautah out 
from Nabatea, and kept him chained in the Gate of the Rising 
Sun, in Nineveh. 



54 



THE ARABIAN WAR OF ESARHADDON. 
IV.AJ., i. 45 ; col. 2, 55-58. 

55 -tTT Hf ^T ►^ < -ty t:jj} ^ ^y ^- y| 

56 V y -Hh <« ^ y— -^yy « v --^ 

57 (t^y) -.^y ^ < yf -y<y^ jy n^y ^y 
58»a jy z V s=yyy^ z -+ y— i 

fF.^./., i. 46 ; col. 3. 

' (i^yy m -t\) w ^y v -^ <iEy 
^ ss^^^ss ^yyy^ ^y yi 

3 (y ]?{< ^n yif -+ 'gyy ^<Mi -yy<y :^ 

4 ^y ^y< :^yyy ^yy- ^y< z -^H «=yTiy ^.^y 

5 yf ^y «=3i<y <iEy ^ty i^ m -<y< ^^yif 



55 



THE ARABIAN WAR OF ESARHADDON. 
W.AJ.,i.4S; col. 2, 55-58. 

55 D.P., A-du-mu-u al dan-nu-te mat A-ri-bi 

(To) the city of Edom, a fortified city of the country of 
Arabia 

56 sa, D.P., D.P., SIN-AKHI-ARBA SAR MAT ASSUR, D.A., 

which Sennacherib, king of the land of Assyria, 

57 (abu) ba-nu-u-a ic-su-du-va 

the father, my begotter, had conquered, and 

58 (bus)-SU-SU NAMCUR-SU ILI-SU 

its wealth, its riches, its gods. 



W.AJ.,i.46; col. 3. 

I (is-lu-la) a-na mat assur, D.A., 
had carried away to the country of Assyria. 

2 u-ra-a 

I brought 

3 D.P., Kha-za-a-il sa mat A-ri-bi 
Khazail (king) of the land of Arabia, 

4 it-ti ta-mar-ti-su ca-bit-te 
with his numerous presents, 

5 a-na ninua, D.A., al be-lu-ti-ya 

to Nineveh, the city of my lordship. 



56 THE ARABIAN WAR OF ESARHADDON. 

7 ^ I ^I ^^} ^>f K- I m- :?^ -EI 
n Sf: EI 

« -ii<i «=n ^ <Mi<i <i- ^i EI 

9 -H^ I— V -^I ^ ->f -I<I -^11 

-7^ ^I I ET 
- ^I ^I ->f ->f -^ -II tEl^ 

" < <I- ^IIII ►^ f-EH <-tH I «3^ f-III^ 

V ^ '^im EI 
- tint ^xm EI t^i <!< I 

'3 1- t^III ^- < I^ -- tJiTi tiTll EV 

«=EII 

H I? -^I ^3S tyryt ^T< <^tH I ^ ^ 

-lA-III EI 
's ^il -<I< -^ K^ V I^ -^I V T 

«=III^ -tAW} <I- 

:6 ^^^ W -I^ \ tff=I K-- <'-tH EI ^T 

:^EI ^I 



I 



THE ARABIAN WAR OF ESARHADDON. 57 

6 il-lic-av-va yu-na-as-si-ik SEPA-ya 
he came and he kissed my two feet, 



7 as-su na-dan ili-su yu-tsal-la-a-ni-va 

when the gift of {i.e., giving hack) he supplicated of me. 
Then^ 

8 ri-e-mu ar-si-su-va 
compassion I showed (to) him, and 

9 iLi sa-tu-nu au-khu-su-nu ud-dis-va 

of these gods their injuries I repaired, and 

10 da-na-an, D.P., assur BiL-ya 

the mighty (deeds) of the god Assur, my lord, 

11 u si-dhir suM-ya eli-su-nu u-sa-as-dhir-va 

and the writing of my name upon them I caused to be 
written and, 

12 u-tir-va ad-din-su 

I restored and I gave (them) to him. 

13 D.P., Ta-bu-u-a tar-bit E.GAL-ya 

The woman Tabua, one reared (in) my palace, 

14 a-na SARR-u-ti eli-su-nu as-cun-va 

to the sovereignty over them I established, and. 



15 it-ti iLi-sa a-na MAT-sa u-tir-si 

together with her gods, to her land I restored her. 

16 Lxv, D.P., Gam-mali eli ma-da-at-te 
Sixty-live camels more than the tribute 

^ A similar story is told of Yautah, son of Khazail, in Smith's Assur-bani- 
pal, page 283. 



58 THE ARABIAN WAR OF ESARHADDON. 

•8 ^IIT^ ]gu ^EIT ^jn :^ JI 

- - tl H H I «=IIT^ ^ T- E! 

- < EI ^I <!l -H^ I <I- s^^^ I— 

^^JII-^T< 

^^<\\ ^i^ ^ s^i I— i,<i- -i^-iii 
-11^ ^n^ii ^} 

M <-tH EI ^I ^I ^^^ I «=IIIt -II- <I^ 
A} - I 

.5 V -.^I II -^11 -^I H < V n ^H 
^6 <tt tjn ^i ^i ^E^ii ^ ^ ^i^ 

II EiH t-fe EI I- 
.7 1 1- ^« #^ ^- ^ ^ -^l II tElI 



THE ARABIAN WAR OF ESARHADDON. 59 

1 7 ABi-ya makh-ri-te u-rad-di-va 

(paid to) my father in former times I added, and 



18 u-cin tsi-ru-us-su 

I placed upon him (her). 

19 ar-ca, D.P., Kha-za-il sim-tu yu-bil-su-va 
Afterwards Khazail, a plague carried him off, and 

20 D.P., Ya-ah-lu-u abil-su 
Yahlu, his son, 

21 ina, D.A., gu-za (cussu) su u-se-sib-va 
upon his throne I caused to be seated ; and 

22 X. ma-na khuratsu, i x iooo abni bi-ru-ti 
ten manehs of gold, one thousand carved stones, 

23 L., D.P., gam-mali, i + 1000 gun-zi-rik mahduti 
fifty camels, one thousand dromedarieSj 



24 eli ma-da-te abi-su u-rad-di e-mid-su 

more than the tribute of his father I added, I appointed 
him 

25 MAT Ba-a-zu na-gu-u sa a-sar-su ru-u-ku 

the country of Bazu, a district of which its situation (is) 
remote, 

26 mi-lac na-ba-li kak-kar muni a-sar tsu-ma-me 

a journey of desert-land, a land of loathsomeness, a place 
of thirst, 

27 I. + 100 X 40 cas-bu kak-kar ba-a-tsi 

one hundred and forty casbu of ground, dusty 



6o THE ARABIAN WAR OF ESARHADDON, 

>Jf- tffZ (Vf.XX iii., IS, 12.) 

.9 « ^ ^- ^ ^ ^-m< < —IT! ^ 

36 - E^K c: I i- ^T « tE! -IN ^jn 

37 m ^^ T— V <M AW ^^ -TT^ 

«=n I TMT 

1 y^ ^^ TF.^./., iii. 15, 13. 

^ >-/"T t>-^ ^TTT^ EJ T]^ '^T '^^^^ ***"'"' " ^^^^^ district," 

is inserted after e-ti-ik, by PF.^./. iii. 15, 16. 



THE ARABIAN WAR OF ESARHADDON. 6i 

28 pu-kut-tu u ABiVi ca-za-bi-ti {var. ca-bar-ni) 

broken (?), and stones deceitful (o^reat (?). Heb. nn^). 

29 XX. CAS-BU kak-kar tsir u akrabi 

twenty kasbu of g-round (where) snakes and scorpions 

30 sa ci-ma zir-ba-bi ma-lu-u u-ga-ru {yar. a-gar) 
which, like grasshoppers, they filled the ground. 

31 XX. CAS-BU MAT Kha-zu-u SAD-di, D.P., sag-gil-mut 
Twenty Itasbu of the land of Khazu, a mountain of sagil- 

MUT stone, 

32 a-na ARCi-ya u-vas-sir-va e-ti-ik {yar. na-gu-u su-a-tu) 
behind me I left, and I passed through that district, 

33 sa ul-tu YU-me ul-lu-ti 

(into) which, from ancient times (days), 

34 la il-li-cu SARRU pa-ni makh-ri-ya 

had not marched (any) king preceding me. 

35 Ina ci-bit, D.P., assur, BiL-ya, 
By the command of Assur, my lord, 

36 ina cir-bi-su sal-dha-nis at-tal-lac 
within it royally I marched. 

37 SAMNA sarrant sa ci-rib na-gi-e su-a-tu 
Eight kings, which (were) within that district, 



62 THE ARABIAN WAR OF ESARHADDON. 

38 If tjf^ ^HF- K-- I ^ V ^T I >7^ T 

4^ t- -ET t^I -*f T-— Z :=^II T- tif ET 

44 1^ <i^ ^^ZZ -II<! ^^W ::i^II IH !=^ ET 

45 ^TII^ ^I ^ <T- ^I<I^ <^TT :^ET^ 

46 ^iy<y :=i| -^ <My<y <y^ ^y ^y ^^ .^yyy 

J^ Z T? -!<! ::^I^ 

47 .^ y^_ ][ x^ ^ Igj .^y ^y ^y 

-+ -^ -ZZ ^Vi 

48 <-::H Z -7^ ^ >f^^ Ey tyyy:= ^t=^^^| 

^^ ^^^ m Z 



THE ARABIAN WAR OF ESARHADDON. 63 

l"^ a-duc iLi-su-nu Busu-su-nu namcur-su-hu 
I slew ; their gods, their wealth, their riches 



39 u Nlsi-su-nu as-lu-la a-na ci-rib mat assur, D.A., 

and their men I spoiled. To the interior of the land of 
Assyria, 

40 D.P., La-ai-li-e sar, D.P., Ya-di-ah 
Lailie, king" of the city of Yadiah, 

41 sa ul-tu la-pa-an, D.P., CACCi-ya ip-par-si-du 
which from before my weapons had fled, 



42 sal-la-at ili-su is-me-e-va 

of the spoiling of his gods he heard, and 

43 a-na ninua., D.A., al be-lu-ti-ya 
to Nineveh, the city of my lordship, 

44 a-di makh-ri-ya il-lic-av-va 
to my presence he came, and 

45 yu-na-as-si-ik SEPA-ya 
he kissed m.y two feet. 

46 ri-e-mu ar-si-su-va ak-ta-bi-su a-khu-tuv 

Compassion I showed him, and I spoke to him of brother- 
hood 5 

47 ILI-SU sa as-lu-la da-na-an, D.P., Assur BiL-ya 

(on) his gods which I had carried off (spoiled) the mighty 
(deeds) of Assur my lord 

48 eli-su-nu as-dhur-va u-tir-va ad-din-su 

upon them I wrote, and I restored (them) and I gave 
(them) to him. 



64 THE ARABIAN WAR OF ESARHADDON. 

51 .^Am « ^ ttl ^T - M -<!< ^^W 
5^ tyiit ^11 t^yy ^jn :^y jy 

53 y -II ^y T yn ^- ^y ^ ti:^ \ 

^- -Ey yf w 

54 V - <yy ^ ^- ^ ^ - yn-- < 

^yy^ M \***^ 
ss <igy El ^ tyyjt s?: ^jn i^ "7^ ^jn ^y 

56 ^ <igf tyyyy ^^ ^n jr^y]? ^ ^^gy ^^yy 

-- ->^yy ^y 

57 m ^ :=^ty A-yy E:yy ^y x^ i 

58 !r^t^y ^y < « ^y ^^\ ^y 

59 <ty^ -^11 A <v ^yt i^yyy^ ^y 






THE ARABIAN WAR OF ESARHADDON. 65 

49 na-^i-e, D.P., Ba-a-zi su-a-tu 
The districts of this land of Bazu 

50 u-sat-gil pa-nu-us-su 

I caused to be entrusted to him, 

51 BiLAT (tig-un) man-da-at-tu bi-lu-ti-ya 
offering (and) tribute to my lordship 

52 u-cin tsi-ru-us-su 
I fixed upon him, 

53 D.P., BEL^ba-sa abil, D.P., Bu-na-ni sar Gam-bu-la-ai 
Bel-basa, son of Bunani, king of the Gambulai 

54 sa ina xii kas-bu kak-kar ina mie u kani tsutsi 

who over twelve Uaslu of ground among the waters and 
reedy marshes 

55 ci-ma nu-u-ni sit-cu-nu sub-tav 

like a fish (fishes) they were establishing their dwelling- 
place (seat). 

56 Ina ci-bit AssuR BiL-ya khat-tu ina-khats-zu-va 

By the command of Assur, my lord, terror shook him and 



57 ci-i dhe-im ra-ma-ni-su 
according to his own decree 

58 BiLTU (tig-un) u man-da-at-tu 
offering and tribute 

59 ALPU makh-khi suk-lul sam-na 
great ox(en) complete ? eight ? 

60 



66 



THE WAR AGAINST SIDIR-PARNA AND 
EPARNA, KINGS OF MEDIA. 
W.A.I., i. 46; col. iv. 

X tlll^ I- «^TI EI tITI«- ^T ^ <I- -T<^ 
. ^II<T ^]} >^ <MI<I <l- JT ^111'= E^H 

3 H=TI V ^I- ^t -►f -II -tj! tn^ ^ 

^T<I 

4 tTIf ^T ^ ^^U «=m^ »=m t-ET ET 

5 T TH Tf <It^ E^ ^]^ T-- :^T <£! I 

6 tyn^ ^ .^ly ji EI 

7 <^!T ti -T<i^ ^i< -.- ^.y^ «^yy ^y< tyi 

<Ts^ ^TI I 

8 - ^ ^^y :^ <yMT<T e:tt ^T H < 

V tE -is^I tTI ^Jn -T<T T--- 



67 



THE WAR AGAINST SIDIR-PARNA AND 

EPARNA, KINGS OF MEDIA. 

W.AJ., i. 46; col. iv. 

1 u-bi-lav-va yu-na-as-si-ik SEPA-ya 
he brought and he kissed my feet, 

2 ri-e-mu ar-si-su-va u-sar-khi-its sur-ru-te 

compassion I showed him, and I caused to be washed 
away his rebellion. 

3 D.P., Sa-pi-i, D.P., bel al dan-nu-ti-su 

The city of Sapi-Bel, the city of his strength (i.e. strong'- 
hold), 

4 dan-na-as-su u-dan-nin-va 

its strength (fortification) I strengthened and 

5 sa-a-su a-di, D.P., tsabi, D.P., mitpani-su ina lib-bi 

he himself, together with his bowmen {lit. bow-soldiers) 
within (it), 

6 u-se-li-su-va 

I made him go up and 

7 ciMA, D.P., DAL-ti MAT E-lam-ti e-dhi-il-su 
like a door, the land of Elam I shut it up. 

8 MAT Pa-tu-us-ar-ra na-gu-u sa i-te-e-ru itstsuri 

The land of Patusarra a district from which the birds re- 
turn, 

9 sa ci-rib mat Ma-da-ai ru-ku-ti 

which (is) within the land of the Medes afar off (and) 

F 2 



68 THE WAR AGAINST SIDIR-PARNA 

» V - ^^ I"^ =^^T T-^ e=t!^ HI -ET 
,3 y <y^ >^|yy^ ^ <T-|T<T ^T I ^T^ ^ 

17 tl^ I— tElT til s? :^I^ T-^ -T^ 
x8t- ^- «n -*-H «=Tm ^T ^ ISI -El If 

,9 y ttt= ^y- t=y e^ -II --n T -*=ll ^ 
<y^yy<y t^ -tH 

.0 y ^^ ^y ^ ^y E^ -II -tyy ^yy -tyy 

^ <y-yy<y lli ^tu 
- y E:yy Ey ^i ^Eif e:?s -ii -tyy w -«=n 

< E:yy -^h }} + ^i 



AND EPARNA, KINGS OF MEDIA. 69 

10 sa pa-a-di mat Bi-ic-ni SAD-di, D.P., ucni 

which (is on) the borders of the land of Bicni, the 
mountains of marble (crystal) 

11 sa ina sarrani ABi-ya mimma la ic-bu-su 

which (land) among the kings, my fathers, none had trod 



12 iRTSi-tiv MAT su-un 

the territory of their country 

13 D.P., Si-dir-pa-ar-na, D.P., E-pa-ar-na 
Sidir-parna (and) Eparna 

14 D.P., BELT ALANi dau-nu-ti 
the lords of the powerful cities 

15 sa la-cit-nu-su a-na ni-i-ri 

who had not submitted to my yoke 

16 sa-a-su-nu a-di Nisi-su-nu, D.P., susi ru-cu-bi-su-nu 
they themselves together with their men, (their) horses, 

their chariots, 

17 ALPi tsi-e-ni imiri, D.P., u-du-ri 
oxen, sheep, asses, flocks, 

18 sal-lat-sun ca-bit-tu as-lu-la a-na mat assur, D.A., 
their great spoil I carried off (spoiled) to the land of 

Assyria. 

19 D.P., Uppits, D.P., BiL ali sa, D.P., Pa-ar-tac-ca 
Uppits, lord of the city of Partacca 

20 D.P., Za-na-sa-na, D.P., bil ali sa, D.P., Pa-ar-duc-ca 
Zanasana, lord of the city of Partacca, 

21 D.P., Ra-ma-te-ya, D.P., bil ali sa U-ra-ca-za-bar-na 
Ramateya lord of the city of Uracazabarna 



70 THE WAR AGAINST SIDTR-PARNA 



:^T^ m -w ^^ -^ m 

^5 ^ tTTK ^T e:it W -< -^ -II tEH 
t! -II^II JT -^ ^T< EI 

^6 ::^T^ A^ S?: «=! <IEI ET- T— S^^^ 
}f ^.^ 4ifcII V I 

^7 Tf ^r c::s<j <igi -tiT -^ lai -<t< tEij 

^8 ::^IT Jl <:::^I El ^111^ -^I ^ <V i:^ 
^9 ^ I ESS -II -tiT T-- T -T !^ ^T 
3° -< M AW -A< AW ^ M El 

3^ e:^ JI ^T -^TTt^ T--- tEH e:?5 -I<T^ 

33 w f^ I? <is^ ^.^ I «=m 



AND EPARNA, KINGS OF MEDIA. 71 

22 MAT Ma-da-ai sa a-sar-su-nu ru-u-ku 

(chiefs) of the country of the Medes. whose territory (is) 
afar off. 

23 sa ina tar-tsi sarrani ABi-ya iRTSi-tiv mat assur, D.A. 
(Those chiefs) who in the time of the kings, my fathers, 

(to) the country of Assyria 

24 la ip-pal-ci-tu-niv-va la-ic-bu-su kak-kar-sa 

had not crossed over, neither had they trodden its soil. 

25 pu-lukh-tu ra-ru-bat assur siL-ya is-khup-su-nu-ti-va 
The fear (and) terror of the god Assur my lord over- 
whelmed them and 

26 D.P., mur-ni-is-ci rabi, D.P., ucni dhi-ib mat-su 
great war horses, (and) choice marble of his land 

27 a-na ninua, D.A., al be-lu-ti-ya 
to Nineveh, the city of my lordship 

28 is-su-niv-va yu-na-as-si-ku SEPl-ya 

they had brought, and they kissed my two feet. 

29 as-su, D.P., BiLi alani sa ka-a-tav id-cu-su-nu-ti 

As regards the lords of cities who (my) hands had struck 
them, 

30 be-lu-u-ti yu-tsal-lu-va 

my lordship they implored and 

31 e-ri-su-in-ni cit-ru 

they asked of me a treaty. 

32 D.P., su-PAR-SAKi-ya, D.P., pikhati 
My officers, the prefects 

33 sa pa-a-di mat su-un 

of the borders of their country 



72 THE WAR AGAINST SIDIR-PARNA 

34 ^y -<!< \ -^ tjyyt ^y ^^y ^ ^ 

35 ty^f y— w <y- ^- ^y -tyy y— t 

36.T<y^ ^^ ^^yy El tyyyt -^yy^ « i 

37 .m^y^^ « ^y ^y -- igu ^y< ^^yi ^.^ 
-<T< ^yyy^ Ey »=yyy^ igii «=^yy ^jn x ty^^ 

38<td^ ^y ^^ ^^ ^>f ^y ^HF- -II < 
39 -Hh <W '^ly !^H<J <IEy -HF- <\V '^T 

40 <H.H ^T <i^i -M t^y? - -^yy 

tE -<y< 

41 tyyyt ^ -ly^ ^yy St= :=^ 1-^ < Ey 

-Ey ^yyy tx x^w 

4^ - <iEy »3n -<y< ^y o^y -yy<y v m 

43 V "^ "-^y "-^^ '^y< >-HF~ y*^**" Ey*- y^**- 

-II y— tt^} 

44 -y<y^ jy ^yy ^y j^yyy \} Vi 



AND EPARNA, KINGS OF MEDIA. 73 

34 it-ti-su-nu u-ma-ali-ir-va 
with them I urged on and 

35 NISI a-si-bu-ut alani sa-tu-nu 

the men, inhabitants of those cities, 



36 ic-bu-su-va yu-sac-nis-su SEPl-us-su-un 

they trampled (upon) and they made to submit to their 
feet 

37 BiLAT (tig-un) man-da-tu be-lu-ti-ya sat-ti sam-ma iv- 

cin tsi-ru-su-un 
offering (and) tribute to my lordship, yearly the sum, I 
fixed upon them. 

38 Ul-tU, D.P., ASSUR, D.P., SAMAS, D.P., BELU U, D.P., 

NABU 

From (the time when) the gods Assur, Samas, Bel, and 
Nebo 

39 D.P., ISTAR Sa NINUA, D.A., D.P., ISTAR Sa ARBA-il, D.A. 

The goddess Istar of Nineveh, the goddess Istar of Arbela 

40 eli na-ci-ri-ya ina li-i-ti 

over my enemies by the law (which) 

41 yu-sa-zl-zu-ni am-tsu-u ma-la lib-bi-ya 

they had caused to fix for me, I found the fulness (of the 
desire) of my heart. 

42 ina ci-sit-ti na-ci-ri sat(?) lu-u-ti 
By the acquisitions from enemies (?) 

43 sa ina tu-gul-ti ili rabi BELi-ya 

which in the service of the great gods my lords 

44 ik-su-da ka-ta-ai 

my two hands have captured. 



74 



THE BUILDINGS OF ESARHADDON. 

46 < -.- J^ <IE| ^lyyt 1^ ^}K ET 

47 <l^ ^T <?l -!IA -TII»= }} ^^ ET 

48 tiTi^ .y<y^ y. e:TI <IEy eT ^I T- 

49-^yy- jyETf-TniET-ET^H^T 
50 ^yy <iEy ^yy^f .^yy :^ ^y y? 

sx ^ ^:?ii y— yf IH -^11 -M t^T 
53:3^ ^y <y:^ ::^y^ ^^ Sf: ^y <m 



54ty ay y^^ ^ -^yy ^yyy^ ^^ ^^i 
55 < i- -EI «=ET ^T <I^ -M -TT^ BUm 



75 



THE BUILDINGS OF ESARHADDON. 

45 es-rit ma-kha-zi sa mat assuu, D.A. 
Ten strongholds of the land of Assyria 

46 u MAT ACCAD, D.A., u-se-pis-va 

and the land of Accad I caused to be made, and 

47 CASPU KHURATSU u-za-in-va 

(with) silver (and) g-old I decorated, and 

48 u-nam-me-ra ci-ma YU-me 

I made brilliant as the day (light). 

49 Ina Yu-me-su-va e-gal ma-khir-te 
At that time also the principal palace 

50 sa ci-rib, D.P., Ni-na-a 

which (is) within the city Nineveh 

51 sa SARRANi a-lic makh-ri ABi-ya 
which the preceding kings, my fathers, 

52 yu-se-pi-su a-na su-te-sur carasi 

they caused to be made for the custody of the camp* 
baggage 

53 pa-ka-di, D.P., mur-ni-is-ci, D.P., parrati 
(and) the oversight of the war horses, cows (mules), 



54 D.P., RucuBi bat-li u-nu-te takhatsi 
chariots, arms, the furniture of battle. 



55 u sal-la-at na-ci-ri gi-mir nin-sum-su 

and the spoil of enemies, all (of it) whatever its name. 



76 THE BUILDING OF THE PALACE. 

56 ^ -HL -^ ^^ ^^ y^^ 

57 n ^r <« <]^ ^^ -<!< tEii i::^!! ^jn 

58 {\} -^T f^Ofi) A^ :i^i^ ^- ^:tt y. 



59 «y- ^y ^\) AMI! «=! B K-- (Ey 



THE BUILDING OF THE PALACE. 
W,A.I., i. 47 ; col. 5. 

^ Ey «^i<j M <yyy \\ m m^ T ^ <t- 
JT ^ --T< Ey 

3 jri^yy - ^ t^M^^ ^yf 

4 tyyyy ^y- 1^ E:yy jy y^ -E^y 

5 y^ -^y "^yy a s^ ^l< V -& ^TT eT 



THE BUILDING OF THE PALACE. 77 

56 Sa, D.P., ASSUR SAR ILI 

Which the god Assur, the King* of gods 

57 a-na es-ci SARRU-ti-ya is-ru-ca 

to the hand? of my kingship hath granted 



58 (a-na sit)-cin, D.P., susi 

for the establishment of horses, 

59 (si-par-du)-ukh, D.P., rucubi (va nisi matati)^ 

(?) of chariots and the men of the countries 



THE BUILDING OF THE PALACE. 

W.A.L, i. 47 ; col. 5. 

1 (sa ak-ta)-sad se-ci-bu ina, D.P., MiTPANi-ya 
which I captured ravishing with my bow 

2 ma-al-lu mus-sic-cu u-sa-as-si-su-nu-ti-va 
fiill tax(es) I caused them to bear and 

3 il-bi-nu LABINI "^ MAHDI 

they made many bricks. 

4 E-GAL TSAKH-ra su-a-tu 
That small palace 

5 a-na ^i-khi-ir-ti-sa ag-gur-va 

to its whole extent I dug up and 

^ The text of the transliteration in brackets, in lines 58 and 59, is restored 
from W.A.L, iii. 16, 6. 

2 Compare W'l^^r] \:h^ ^ Exodus v. 7. 



78 THE BUILDING OF THE PALACE. 

7 <t:^ ^T ^IIT tx Vi ^TTT T-- t^T III t\ 
>-yy<y ^t^ jF.^./.iii, i6,ii). 

10 ^y ^^y y} s^^T Ey ti<y ^^yy 

" tEy <iEy ty^ ^y « yy ^^ y— -.- 

13 ::yyyt ^y .^-^y Sw JT ^ -<i< ^y 

14 ty ^ s=w^y y^-M^ ^y-- y*-**^ ty -^li^ y^ 

-KIT' 



IS ty y]f :^ y- !:y i^xiE-yyy ty ^ « 

16 <t:^ ^y <iiy tyy^ -,- -yy E:yy ^< tyyi 
^y^y 



THE BUILDING OF THE PALACE. 79 

6 kak-ka-ru ma-ah-du cima a-sil tim-ma 
much earth like the line of a rope 

7 ul-tu lib-bi ECiLi ab-duk-va 

from the interior of the lands I du^ and 

8 e-li-sa u-rad-di {var. u-ri-di) 
upon it, I added ; (and) 



9 ina D.P., pi-i-li abnu SAD-i dan-ni 

with alabaster a stone from the great mountain 

10 tu-la-a us-ma-al-li 
the mound I filled up 

11 ad-ci-e-va 20 + 2 sarrani mat khat-ti 

I gathered, and twentj-two king-s of the land of the 

Hittites 

12 sa a-khi tam-tiv u gabal tam-tiv ca-li-su-nu 

of the sea-coast and the middle of the sea, the whole of 
them 

13 u-ma-ah-ir-su-nu-ti-va 

I hastened them on and 

14 D.P., GUSURi RABi, D.P., tim-me rabi 
great beams (for) a great floor (of) 

15 D.P., A-bi-me, D.P., erinu, D.P., sur-man 
Abime wood, cedar wood, sherbin wood 

16 ul-tu ci-rib mat S'i-ra-ra mat Lib-na-na 

from the interior of the land of S'irara (and) the land of 
Lebanon, 

1 7 SAL LAMAssi sal-lat tsa-tsa-a-te 

sphinxes (female colossi) and a height of statuary work 



8o THE BUILDING OF THE PALACE. 

x8 ^^^ S=E M T— II \ -IN 

X9 ^ ^t tl -<^ El- ^1 -^ ^- 

-s?:^ in <:: -^i ^^ ^ <:r ^i 

ai s^i ^xi ^11^ ^:^H}ii ^% II r ^i 

.3 ^^1 -iiA ^i 4i. -^11 -^i <^^ ^i 
<iEi ^iii ^^-^^ 

n II ^H tt| S^ ^I< I ^ 

^4 II -^I A -ITHIII -<I< tllll EI^ tEll 

.5 tii^ tEii ^11 ^ ^ mi :^II 

a6ii ^i t^El <m «^III»=!- <I^ -I < ^ 

^7 - rjri -^ 6=111^ ^i ^ ^ ^III^ -II<I 

.8 til -^11 ^I -S^n !:II ^iii ^i 

.9 tiiii tv I— ^^ ->^i II -<i< 
30 II -^i ^ ^irn ^ m ^v -Ell 
3. tfc:i t^ni !^ -Eii ^jn ^i ^i 



THE BUILDING OF THE PALACE. 

1 8 D.R, AZKUPPATi a-g'ur-ri 
door posts of burnt brick, 

19 Sa, D.P., SAMULLU, D.P 

of Samulla stone (alabaster) stone, 



20 D.P., CU-MI-NA, D.P., CU-MI-NA TUR-DA 

Cumina stone, strong- Cumina stone 

21 D.P D.P., A-LAL-DU 

stone stone 

22 D.P., Gi-NA-KHi-GUB-BA iil-tu cl-rib khar-sa-ni 
stone from the interior of the forests, 

23 a-sar nab-ni-ti-su-nu 

the place of their production, 

24 a-na khi-sakh-ti E-GAL-ja 

for the requirements of my palace, 

25 mar-tsi-is pa-as-ki-is 
laboriously (and) with difficulty 

26 a-na ninua, D.A., yu-sal-di-du-u-ni 

to Nineveh they had caused to be brought. 

27 Ina ARKHU SEGA MAGARU Yu-mu mit-gari 
In a fortunate month (on) a favourable day, 

28 e-li tu-li-e su-a-tu 
upon that mound, * 

29 HECALi rab-ba-a-ti 
great palaces 

30 a-na mu-sab be-lu-ti-ya 

for the^welling- of my lordship 

31 ab-ta-ni tsi-ru-us-su 
I built upon it. 



82 



THE BUILDING OF THE PALACE, 



-R ^- ^T 

33 <« T + s-m^ ET- -1^ ^ ■ 

35 i-ET -EI A} ^ \'ss^^m tif -^^ ^T 

36 tT ::ii!!i I— ti MiE-Tii tEii ^jn -<!< 

37 tTITt 1^- -M ^^ A\ -^TT V 

38 -I .T<I^ y^ tl ^ « -glT tij -II<T 

•PIT -^T A^m^ 

4o tlTTt -TT- t^ITI T^ ^"^^ I— T 

4. -glKIEI tE ^T- tE II S^ I -^^ 



43 Sff ^T< <!- fff= tTTTe= "^ 1^ 



THE BUILDING OF THE PALACE. 83 

32 BiTU dan-ni sa sussu + silasa -f khamsa bar-u rab-tiv 
sadadii 
A strong- temple of ninety-five great laru in length, 

^T, SILASA + I bar-u rab-tiv rapastu 
Thirty-one great baru in width, 

34 sa ina sarrani a-lic makh-ri ABi-ya 

which among the preceding kings, my fathers, 



35 MiMMA la-e-pu-su a-na-cu e-pu-us 

any one (of them) had not made, I made. 

-i^d D.P., GusuRi, D.P., ERiNu tsi-ru-tu, 
Beams of cedar, great 

37 u-sat-ri-tsa e-li-sa 

I caused to be placed upon it. 

38 D.P., DALTi, D.P., sur-man sa e-ri-si-na dhabu 

Doors of Sherbin wood, of which their foundation (is) good. 



39 me-sir caspu u siparru u-rac-cis-va 

a band of silver and copper I bound (on them), and 



40 u-rat-ta-a BABi-sa 
I hung in its gates 

41 SEDI U LAMASSI 

bulls and colossi, 

42 sa ci-i pi-i sic-ni-su-nu 

who, according to their fixed command, 

43 ir-ti lim-ni yu-tar-ru 

against the wicked they turn (themselves) j 
G 2 



84 THE BUILDING OF THE PALACE. 

44 -^T m] ^jn t^} •^TI -^ t- -^!T ►^ 



47 



:IT V <T- ^SS 



49 tEl (?) ^T ^ ^T ^T< 

so ]} ^j ^}^^ ttyyy (=TiTt ^t< - jgij 

5, t^ ^>f tu^ I— t^ ^ V II ^I 

S3 V Tl A -II ^T Tl ^ ^T <T-M 
<T-IT<! -«=H 



THE BUILDING OF THE PALACE. 85 

44 na-tsi-ru cip-si mu-sal-li-mu 

they protect the footsteps, making peace 

45 tal-lac-ti SAR ba-ni-su-nu 

(to be upon) the path of the King, their creator (who 
made them). 

46 iMNU u suMELU u-sa-ats-bi-ta 

(Positions) to the right hand and left I caused to take 
(occupy) 

47 si-gar-si-ui 

the avenue of them. 

48 E-GAL, D.P., pi-i-li U, D.P., ERIN I 

A palace of alabaster and of cedar wood 



49 at (?) te mu-du-ti 

(?) • 



50 a-na mul-ta-u-ti be-lu-ti-ya 
for the renown of my lordship 



5 1 nac-lis u-se-pis 

completely I caused to be made. 

52 sal LAMASSi ERi mas-sa-a-te 
Female colossi of painted (.'') bronze, 

53 sa a-khi-en-na-a pa-na va (ar-ca) 

which (were) on this side, in front and behind, (I raised). 



54 



^ The cylinder containing this inscription is broken here, but another line 
is evidently wanted to complete the sentence. 



86 THE BUILDING OF THE PALACE. 

W.A.L, i. 47 ; col. 6. 



3 -^yy ^H -<!< '-III! El- V !? -^i 



4 



:??: 1^ -y<y ^ ^ 1^^ V s?:^? -^h 



s^^l ff V 



5«=yyyt ^ EfK ^y ^^iii^ t- ^^ \} m 
I 



6'=:yy Myy m ^.^- -TT^ H ^' .^ 



7 tyyy;: v ^^ ^ E:yy -yy^ tm ^^} 



►ff- 



8 II .^iii ^} ^y fcu :=! < ^y -t^j + 

■ var. -yy ^vyy ts^ << 

* Mr. Noma inserts {Did., p. 1057) the two signs ► w "^^IIII 
after cima^ but I have been unable to fiud the tablet which gave this reading. 



THE BUILDING OF THE PALACE. 87 



W.A.L, i. 47 ; col. 6. 



1 D.P., DALTI, D.P., ERINLT RABI, 

The doors of great (planks) of cedar wood, 

2 (D.P.) A-bi-me cu-lul BABi-si-in e-mid 

of Abime wood, the completion of the gates I placed (made). 



3 si-khar-ti e-gal sa-a-tu 

The whole extent of that palace, 

4 ni-bi-khu pa-as-ku sa, D.P., ca, D.P., ucni 

a battlement (?) broken of eye- stone (and) marble (crystal) 



5 u-se-pis-va u-sal-ma-a risatuv-su 

I caused to be made, and I completed its summit, 



6 si-el-lu-lat gi-gu cima 
stairs of the roof like . 



7 u-sa-a^-khi-ra gi-mir babani 

I caused to surround all the doors 

8 sic-cat CASPU ib-bu u siparru nam-ri 
coverings of white silver and shining copper (and), 



58 THE BUILDING OF THE PALACE. 

9 ^W -IT- fc^IIT Vi m m 
o ^T -^T ->f -Hh -^ -II t^y^ 

X T - ^.^ ^.- -tnn e:it ^} ^^ 



3 SS ^T E^Si A^ e:it i^i ^t A} 

7 <iEy t- -Ey V Ey ^y- «=yyys= ^:?: :^ v 
8-yy<y ^jn ttyyy v ^y 4i.-y y tyyy^^g^ 

9 y? -^y + tyyy ^z^y^ v E:n i--- m 
tyyiT 



THE BUILDING OF THE PALACE. 89 

9 u-rat-ta-a ci-rib 

I hung (them) within (it). 

10 da-na-an, D.P., assur BiL-ya 

The mightiness of the god Assur my lord 

1 1 sa ina matati nac-ra-a-te 
(with) which in hostile lands 

12 i-lu-bu-su 

he had clothed himself, 

13 .... na, D.P., khar-ra-cu-te e-si-ka ci-rib-sa 
priests (?) I established (?) within it. 

14 D.P., ciRU RABU tam-sil mat kha-ma niv* 

A great plantation like (that) of the land of Amanus, 

15 sa ca-la sim mahdu u ets(i) mahdu 
which (contained) all spices and tree(s), 

16 khar-ru-su i-ta-a-sa e-mid 

its ditch, its walls, I made to stand ; 

1 7 ci-sal-la-sa ma-rab u-rab-bi-va 
its altar in size I made large, and 

18 tal-lac-ta-sa ma-ah-dis u-rab-bis 
its paths greatly I enlarged 



19 a-na mas-cit, D.P., susi ci-rib-sa 
for the reception of horses within it. 



1 A similar act is recorded of Tiglath-Pileser I., b.c. 1130, in W.A.I., i. 
15, 16-27, where it is said, "The cedar, the liccarma tree and the almug> 
from the countries I have conquered, these trees which none of the kings, my 
fathers, that were before me, had planted, 1 took, and in the plantations of 
my land 1 planted, and by the name of plantation I called them ; whatsoever 
there was not in my land I took (and) the plantations of Assyria I 
established." 



90 



THE BUILDING OF THE PALACE. 



20 <xf ^^y tyyi:: ^ ^ t<^ay et 



21 



22 



tint r^nitim i^ ->^t n t^ e][k 

«=M EV ^T T^ ^T <^^ -^T -^T T 



^4 <T-IT<T ^ tint •^lls^ E<r< ET M -^U 

.5 tM EV ^jn tf: ^ n 
►^ t?SL igf e:it ^ ^mi ^ 

T-^ V -^ <IEI 

30 ^\ ^^ JT tm -& m ET 

3: fTiis= '-IT!'- ^ E:n -III e:ii i? n 



THE BUILDING OF THE PALACE. 91 

20 pat-tu ii-se-se-rav-va 

An opening" I caused to make straight, and 

2 1 u-sakh-bi-ba-a dhab-bis 

I caused to beautifully 

22 E-GAL su-a-tu ul-tu ussT-sa 
that palace from its foundation 

23 a-di takh-lu-bi-sa 
to its roof. 

24 ar-tsip u-sac-lil-va lu-li-e u-ma-al-li 

I built, I caused to be finished, and with fulness I filled 

(it); 

25 ES-GAL EPUS-a 

(also) the great gate I made. 

26 E-GAL pa-ki-da-at ca-la-mu az-cu-ra ni-bit-sa 

The palace of the oversight of the world, I recorded (called) 
its name. 

27 D.P., ASSUR, D.P., ISTAR Sa NINUA, D.A., ILI MAT ASSUR, 

D.A. 

The g'od Assur, the g-oddess Istar of Nineveh, the g'ods of 
the land of Assyria, 

28 cALi-su-nu ina kir-bi-sa ak-ri-va , 
the whole of them within it I summoned, and 

29 D.P., NiKi ur-ri-ikh-te ib-bu-ti 
victims plentiful, (speedy) pure. 



30 ma-khar-su-un ac-ci-va 
before them I sacrificed, and 

3 1 u-sam-khi-ra cat-ra-ai 

I caused to present my peace off'erings. 



92 THE BUILDING OF THE PALACE. 

3^ --^ T— T -^T ^ ^ m -Iff ^TTT 

33 -T<T^ ^ e:tt ^^ ^^ < -<T< 

34 E5S ^V T-— < A}} T-— ^^ !^EI? -tH 

35 - t^yyy ^^ ^y < <jEy .yy<y ^y^ ^y< 

36 ^ ty .tytEy j^yyy <y^ ^^y y^ ^y< 

37 m m V «=iiTt ^ T- ^^ 

38 tyyy^ y .^yy |^ ^ ^ <y^yy<y ^ ^y^^ 

39 :i^ y— M ^jm s^yij; ^ - <iEy E:yy 

40 s?= »^TTt^ s^ H -^^ \} <-tH IK I ^ 

4. - <m tmi -^ « --T I— < Hf 



THE BUILDING OF THE PALACE. 93 

32 I LI sa-tu-nu ina ci-rib lib-bi-su-nu 

Those gods in the interior of their hearts 



2,z ik-tar-ra-bu sARR-u-ti 
approached mj kingdom. 

34 D.P., RABi u NISI MAT-ya ca-li-su-nu 

The chiefs and men of my land, the whole of them, 

35 ina ta-gul-te u ci-ri-e-ti 
in service and homage 

-^^ ina is-sik-ta si-la-a-ti 
with submission, peaceful 

37 ci-rib-sa u-se-sib-va 

within it I caused to be seated, and 

38 u-sa-li-za nu-par su-un 

I caused to be glad their soul. 

39 c ARAN I cu-ru-un-nu bi-ci-ra tsur-ra-su-un 
Grape wine ^ ? ? 

40 ni-sak-ni gu-la-a mukh-kha-su-nu u-sa-cin 
(as tribute ?) upon them I established. 



41 Ina ci-bit assur sar ili u ili mat assur, D.A. 

By the command of Assur, King of the gods, and the 
gods of the land of Assyria 

1 The names of five sorts of wines are given by a bi-lingual list in W.A.I., 
ii. 44, 9-13. In W.AJ., i. 65, 22, we read, — caranuv mat Izdllav mat 
Tuahimmu mat Tsimmini mat KMbuniv mat Aranabaniv mat ' Sutsav mat 
Bit-Cuhativ mat Bitdtiv cima me ndri la nabiv ina, D.P.,passaru, I). P., 
Marduk va, P.P., Tsirpanituv heli-a lu uddssiv. *' AVines from the countries 
of Izallav, Tuahimmu, Tsiminni, Khibuniv, Aranabaniv, Sutsav, Beth- 
Cubativ, Bitativ, like river waters (in quantity) without number in the bowl 
of Marduk and Tirpanituv, my lords, then I poured out." 



94 THE BUILDING OF THE PALACE. 

4^ -tH ^^U I ^' - im tit t;4^ 
43 -7^ :::TyT 4i^ -tH -- -^I< ^ l:^ tj^ 

44<lEy tm V ^ -^Tlt^ M IH V EI 
45 M ^ ->^T T^ -ET -EI II T 

46 - EB -^ <M (^:i|) -pII^ -<i< tE 
-K^ -^^ .51^ :?^ ti <iEi 

47 :r:i^ Ie=^M I^^ J=!l^ {^^) I^^ 

Ci^I^^^II— 

48 ^ .^yy tint ^ ^I t^yyy ^ .yy^. 

(vflr. ►•^gl^^ (TF.^.Z iii., i6, 8.) 

49 -M Eim ^}^} t- V' ^i <i^i ^ii<i 

so <- ^y< tyyyt t\ ^t\ ^y ^i ^tH If 
5. M tit i^ii ^ <iEi tm V 

5^ - m «=m «-iiii EI- V II -eei 

' t^ ][ 1^ ( IF.^ J., iii. 16, 3). 
' Far. ^El tEl. 



THE BUILDING OF THE PALACE. 95 

42 ca-li-su-nu {var. cALi-su-nu) ina dhu-ub seri khu-ut lib-bi 
all of them in health of limbs, joy of heart, 



43 nu-um-mur ca-bat-ti se-bi-e lit-tu-ti 
lightness of liver, abundance of offspring, 

44 ci-rib-sa da-ris lu-tas-sib-va 

within it, eternally, mayest thou dwell, and 

45 lu-us-ba-a la-la-a-sa 

may its fulness be abundant. 

46 ina suMELi muk-ki arkhu ris-ti-i cul-lat mur-ni-is-ci 
At the left hand of the building (in), the first month, all 

the war horses, 

47 D.P., PARRATi iMiRi ^ D.P., gam-mali 
cows (mules), asses, camels, 

48 bat-li u-nu-ut ta-kha-zi 
arms, the furniture for war, 



49 gi-mir ummani sal-lat {yar. la-at) na-ci-ri 
the whole army (and), the spoil of enemies, 

50 sat-ti sam-ma la na-par-ka-a 
yearly, a sum unbroken, 

5 1 lu-up-ki da ci-rib-sa 

then I appointed (to be) within it. 

52 Ina ci-rib E-OAL-sa-a-tu 

In the interior of that palace 



1 Omitted by the text in W.A.I., iii. 16, 8. 



96 THE BUILDING OF THE PALACE. 

55 >^ f^< ::^T < -:^H -- --!< t^II 

Concluding Passage from W.A.I., iii. i6. 

British Museum, No. ii 4-4. 
315 

56 ^ •^TT:^ ^ := ^jn ^W 

SI n !^ tU ^I M t|T|t tE ^ Tl V 






THE BUILDING OF THE PALACE, 97 

53 SEDU DAMKu la-mas-si damku 

a propitious bull, a propitious colossus 

54 na-tsir cip-si SARRU-ti-ya 

the protector(s) of the footsteps of my king-ship 

55 mu-kha-du-u ca-bat-ti-ya* 
rejoicing* nay liver. 

Concluding Passage from W.A.I.y iii. i6. 

British Museum, No. 11-^4. 
315 

56 da-ris lis-tap-ru-u 
eternally may they send (me) 

57 ai ip-par-ku-u i-da-a-sa 

may its walls not be broken (down). 

58 a-na arcat Yu-me ina sarrani ASLi-ya 

For a future day (for which ever king) among the kings 
my sons 

59 sa, D.P., AssuR u, D.P., istar a-na be-lut mat u nisi 
whom the god Assur, and the goddess Istar to the govern- 
ment of the land and people 

60 i-nam-bu-u zi-cir-su 
shall proclaim his name 

61 e-nu-va e-gal sa-a-tu 
when this palace 

62 i-lab-bi-ru-va i-na-khu 

shall grow old and shall decay. 



1 The cylinder from which the previous text has been taken ends here, 
and the following lines are added from the broken cylinder, but they are 
lithographed in W.A.I., i. 47, as if they were a part of the other text. 

H 



98 THE BUILDING OF THE PALACE. 

64 m tE '^n Vi ^i M ^ V ^jm tint 

67 ►^ ^H «=IITt <T- -^TITTf ^ -Ell II 

68)^^^^ ^I ^ IgII<^ -^T^ <IgJ 

69 ^T -^T< ►^ ^H til <I- "^ini ^ -»=H 

JI-IA-III 

70 -Hh -^ <I-M -Hh -TI -- 

71 -l<l^ -ll<I jzj ^H tE ^zsi^ll ^ tnit 

Date from W.AJ., i. 47. 

- :::ri t^s^i ^i <iiii t^ i 



Date from W,AJ., iii. 16-24. 

-^1 r^M(?) <I- M II -- -H^ E^ 
-II -I<Ii!^ -^11 -EI ^ -M- 



THE BUILDING OF THE PALACE. 99 

63 an-khu-us-sa lu-(ud)-dis 

Its ruins may he renew (repair) 

64 ci-i sa a-na-cu mu-sa-ru-u si-dhir 
even as I the straight line of writing of 

65 SUM SARI ABU ba-ni-ja it-ti mu-sar-e si-dhir suM-ya 

the name of the king, my father, my begetter, with the 
straight lines of the writing of my name, 

(i(i as-cun-u-va at-ta ci-ma ya-a-ti-va 

have established, (so do) thou like myself also 

67 mu-sar-u si-dhir suM-ya a-mur-va 

the written writing of my name see and 

68 cis'allu bu-su-us, D.P., niku na-cI 
the altar cleanse, a victim sacrifice 

69 it-ti mu-sar-e si-dhir suM-ca su-cun 
with the written writing thy name place 

70 D.P., AssuR va, D.P., Is-tar 

the god Assur, and the goddess Istar 

7 1 ik-ri-bi-ca i-sim-mu-u 

thy prayers (then) shall hear. 

Date from W.A.I., i. 47. 

Ina ARAKH AB YUMU xviiith 

(Dated) in the month ab (July) i8th day 



Date from W.AJ., iii. 16-24. 

Ina ARAKH AB (?) lim-me, D.P., a-khaz-el, D.P., bilu 

PiKHATU, D.P., La-khi-ri 
(Dated) in the month ab, eponym Ahazel, the lord prefect 

of the city Lakhiri. 

H 2 



lOO 



THE NAMES OF THE EIGHT KINGS 

(and their cities), to which reference is made in 

Col. iii. 37. 



W.A.L, iii. 15 ; Col. 4, 19-24. 

.0 y ^y ^Hh ^ I^ ^Kff t] th ]} ^ 

h ^t]} ^ 4i-y ^w -n- -«=Ti <T^ 

A-T s^TH y^ fi^ 

AM 

y ^K -^T -T<T^ im m^ -tn ^- ^y 
AM 



lOI 



THE NAMES OF THE EIGHT KINGS , 

(and their cities), to which reference is made in 
Col. iii. 37. 



W.A.I.y iii. 15 ; Col. 4, 19-24. 

19 D.P., Ci-i-su SAR, D.P., Khal-di-li 
Cis'u, king of Khaldili ; 

D.P., Ak-ba-ru sar, D.P., Du-pi-a-te 
Akbar, king* of Dupiate ; 

20 D.P., Ma-an-sa-cu sar, D.P., Ma-gal-a-ni 
Mansacu, king of Magalani ; 

D.P., Ya-pa-ah s^r-rat, D.P., Di-ah-ta-a-ni 
Yapah, queen of Diahtani ; 



21 D.P., Kha-bi-su sar, D.P., Ka-da-^i-ah 
Khabisu, king- of Kadasiah ; 



D.P., Ni-kha-ru sar, D.P., Ga-ah-pa-ni 
Nikharu, king of Gahpani j 



22 D.P., Ba-i-lu sar-rat, D.P., I-khi-lu 
Bailu, queen of Ikhilu 5 

D.P., Kha-ba-nam-ru sar, D.P., Bu-da-ah 
Khabanamru, king of Budah ; 



I02 THE NAMES OF THE KINGS 

n m ^^ T— T <I^T tITI -^T -T!^ 
^4 m ^1 (ID ^- -i^- ^ t^ITT <If^ ^ 



THE NAMES OF THE TWENTY-TWO KINGS 
(and their cities), to which reference is made in 

Col. V. 12. 



The following text is from W.AJ., iii. i6; Col. 5, 12. 

^:?^ ^TT ^]} 6=m«= <I^ 
14T -T ^ ^ -TT<T ^35 -«=!T tTTTs^ ^i^T T- 



AND THEIR CITIES. 103 

23 SAMNA SARRANi sa ci-rib na-gi-e su-a-tu a-duc 

eight kings which (were) within those districts I slew : 



24 ci-ma (a)-bu-bu as-ta-di pa-gar ku-ra-di-su-un 

like a storm I destroyed. The dead bodies of their warriors, 
etc. 



THE NAMES OF THE TWENTY-TWO KINGS 

(AND THEIR CITIES), TO WHICH REFERENCE IS MADE IN 
Col. V. J 2. 

The following text is from W.A.I., iii. 16, 21. The script 
of the writing on the cylinder, from which the copy in W.A.I.j 
iii. 16-21 is made, is very much rubbed, and the differences 
in the names of the cities given below are caused by the 
comparison of them with an identical list found on a fragment 
of a broken cylinder of Assur-bani-pal. — ^R.M., 3. 

12 ad-ci-e-va sarrani mat khat-ti u e-bir a-ab-ba 

I assembled, and the kings of the Hittites and along 
(beyond) the sea (viz.) — 

13 D.P., Ba-ah-lu sar, D.P., Tsur-ri 
Baal, king of Tyre ; 

D.P., Me-na-si-e (var. Mi-in-si-e) sar, D.P., Ya-u-di 
Menasseh, king of the city of Judah ; 

14 D.P., Ka-us-gab-ri sar, D.P., U-du-me 
Kausgabri, king of Edom ; 

D.P., Mu-tsur-i sar, D.P., Ma-ah-ba 
Mutsuri, king of Moab -, 



I04 777^ NAMES OF THE KINGS 

'5 T -ni -ZI (r«r. ty <tt -II) ^^ -tjy 

T T- -A< ^ ^y ^^ -tiT ty ^y 

>6 y tE ^^ tyyyt ^^yy « ^s=yy ^r;^ ^ 
^jn -^y 

T ;:^T! <M T^ ^ ^ « -tyy H '^l'^ 



■7 y l^y igy -4- ^y ^.^y ti<j « -tyy 

t;^) "^yy ►^ ^jii -^y 
18 y ^^ -y .^ « H.yy tyyyy ^ eT ^l 

T ^ ^v. m « -tyy ^^ ^ <y^ 

X9 <yy ^;?s y— V >^ ^I -K 

T tyi <Igf -yy -Ei! e:TI ^:?5 -:^TI «=TI 

- y ^y- ^^^ h e:tt TI « -tyy <iEy ^y 
^jn^^yy 



AND THEIR CITIES. io5 



15 D.P., 'Sili-Bel sar, D.P., Kha-zi-ti 
Tsili-Bel, king of Gaza ; 



D.P., Me-ti-in-ti sar, D.P., Is-ka-lu-na 
Metinti, king* of Askelon j 

16 D.P., I-ca-u-su SAR, D.P., Am-gar-ru-na 
Icausu, king of Ekron ; 



D.P., Mil-ci-a-sa-pa sar, D.P., Gu-ub-li 
Milciasapa, king of Gubli ; 

7 D.P., Cu-lu, D.P., Ba-ah-al sar, D.R, A-ru-a-di 
Culu-Baal, king of Arvad ; 



D.P., A-bi-Ba-al sar, D.P., Sam {yar. sa-am) si-mu-ru-na 
Abibaal, king of 'Samsimuruna j 



18 D.P., Bu-du-il SAR, D.P., Bit-am-ma-na 
Buduil, king of Beth-Ammon \ 

D.P., AKHi-mil-ci SAR, D.P., Ats-du-di 
Akhimelec, king of Ashdod ; 

19 XII SARRANi sa ciSAD tam-tiv 

twelve kings of the neighbourhood of the sea. 

D.P., E-ci-is-tu-ra sar, D.P., E-di-ha-al 
Ecistura, king of Ediahal ; 



20 D.P., Pi-la-gu-ru-a sar, D.P., Ci-id-ru-si 
Pylagoras, king of Cidrus'i ; 



io6 THE NAMES OF THE KINGS 

- T tE -^T m^ -+ ^ <MI<T « -tji 

" T ^ El -^IT « -^TT n -IM tE 

T --ITT T- ^TT « -^TT t^TTT T- «=ETT 

^3 T 0[T ^ ^\\V ^TT « -^TT ^ --T< ^< 
HfT ^L '-<T< 

.4 T tlTTt -^T 4s H -^TT « -^^TT -^^T 
<T^^ 

T ^- t-^ ->^TT « -tTT ^ -TT<T :^T^ 
(w. t^t -TT<T I V ) 

^5 < ^?^ T— V "<^ tETf tET ^T ^T 
E<3S| ^T 4^ 



AND THEIR CITIES. 107 



D.P., Ci-i-su SAR, D.P., 'Si-il-lu-ah-me 
Kissos, king of Salamis ; 



21 D.P., I-tu-u-an-da-ar sar, D.P., Pa-ap-pa 
Ithuander, king of Paphos ; 

D.P., E-ri-e-su sar, D.P., 'Si-il-lu 
Eriesu, king of Soloi \ 



22 D.P., Da-ma-su sar, D.P., Cu-ri-i 
Damasu, king of Curi (Kurium) ; 

D.P., Adh-me-zu sar, D.P., Ta-me-tsi 

Adhmezu (Admetus), king of Tametsi (Tamassus) \ 

23 D.P., Da-mu-u-si sar, D.P., Gar^-ti-kha-da-ats-ti 

Damtisi, king of Gartikhadatsti ; 



24 D.P., U-na-sa-gu-su, sar, D.P., Li-di-ir 
Unasagusu, king of Lidir j 

D.P., Bu-tsu-zu' SAR, D.P., Nu-ri-e 
Butsuzu, king of Nurie ; 



25 X SARRANi sa MAT Ya-at-na-na kabal tam-tiv 

ten kings of the land of Cyprus in the middle of the sea. 



1 The first sign of the name given in Smith's " Assurbanipal," page 32, is 
^^j^ , am, which " was compared to the Greek Ammochosta, and the 

modem Famagosta (see " Records of the Past," iii. 108). 

2 This king is called king of Up-ri-tis-sa ( W.A.I. , iii. 27, 133), which has 
been compared to Aphrodisium. 



io8 THE NAMES OF THE KINGS, 

^6 m III «IT ^^ T-- ^.^ ^ -<T< I^ A 



THE EGYPTIAN CAMPAIGN. 109 

26 IN suMMA XXII SARRANi MAT khat-ti a-khi tam-tiv 
GABAL tam-tiv CALi-su-nu 
Altogether twenty-two kings of the country of the Hittites, 
the sea coast (and) the border of the sea, all of them. 



THE EGYPTIAN CAMPAIGN OF 
ESARHADDON. 

No notice or account of Esarhaddon's Egyptian campaign 
occurs on the large and nearly complete cylinder, a copy of 
which is printed in the preceding pages. Our knowledge of 
it is obtained from tablet fragments in the British Museum 
Collection and short notices in the "Annals of Assur-bani-pal." 
The two following are the principal annal notices ( W.A.I., iii. 
17, 51-62):— 

" In my first expedition to Makan and Meroe, then I went. 
Tirhakah, king of Egypt and Ethiopia, whose overthrow 
Esarhaddon, king of Assyria, the father, my begetter, had 
accomplished and had taken possession of his country; then he, 
Tirhakah, the might of the god Assur, the goddess Istar, and 
the great gods, my lords despised, and trusted to his own might 

; (59) and to capture Egypt he came against them, he 

entered and sat in Memphis, the city which the father, my 
begetter, had taken, and to the boundaries of Assyria had 
added." 

^F.^./., iii. 28, 6-8. 
" Tirhakah against the men of Assyria, who within Egypt 
(were) tributaries dependent on me whom Esarhaddon, king 
of Assyria, the father, my begetter, to kingdoms had appointed, 
in the midst of it came." 

Egypt and Ethiopia were under the rule of Tirhakah during 
the first part of Esarhaddon's reign, but the latter drove 
him out of Egypt. In the latter part of Esarhaddon's reigu 
Tirhakah again conquered Egypt, and this was probably the 
cause of Assur-bani-pal's expedition to that country. 



no 



NOTICE OF THE EGYPTIAN CAMPAIGN 

OF ESARHADDON BY HIS SON 

ASSUR-BANI-PAL. 



Cylinder E, W.A.I., iii. 29. 

6 y ^^ t";^ ^1 ^T ^^ ^- ^^ <IEy 

«<!- <M ^ l:^ < ^:?^ ^- M tint 
>pIT t^V^ m ^ t] 

9 ^W ^I -II<T ^JH MTI V -^IT 



10 



II 



-.< -^ <:^ -.< m ^w -»^IT -i<!^ M 

- ^ET <e::: ^ ^yy m -t] t- -Ey ^:sl 

" ^- ^y If ^y - ►^yy ^h -t< v ^e ^ 
MIT Ey 



Ill 



NOTICE OF ESARHADDON'S EGYPTIAN 

CAMPAIGN BY HIS SON 

ASSUR-BANI-PAL. 



Cylinder E, W.A.I., iii, 29. 

6 D.P., AssuR-AKHA-iDiN-na SAR MAT AssuR, D.A., ba-nu- 

u-a 
Esarhaddon, king of the land of Assyria, the father, my 
begetter, 

7 ir-du-va il-li-cu ci-rib-sa 

had descended and had marched into the midst of it. 

8 ABiCTA, D.P., Tar-ku-u sar mat Cu-u-si is-cu-nu-va 
The defeat of Tirhakah, king of the land of Ethiopia, he 

had established and 

9 yu-par-ri-ru el-lat-su 
scattered his forces. 

10 MAT mu-tsur MAT Cu-u-si ik-su-da-va 

The country of Egypt (and) the country of Ethiopia he had 
captured, and 

1 1 ina la-mi-ni is-lu-la sal-la-as-su 

to a countless (extent) spoiled (carried off) its spoil j 

1 2 MAT su-a-tu ina si-khar-ti-sa i-bi-el-va 

that country, through its whole extent, he ruled (over) and 



112 NOTICE OF THE EGYPTIAN 

13 Tf -^T <tt ^-IIT< V -^ <^T J^ITT- 

^y< tyyyt ^^ eH< El 
^5 Vi ^\ <« ^T tyyyt ^T ^TT m ^T 

16 e:?^ ^y y.^ ][ y^ ^y ^-^ ^y< ^j- 

-T<!^ tyyyt ^y< 

18^^ tT]f][ « ^y tEi ^T - I^ -<y I 
.9 V -<T< tyyy^ ^yyyt eT tyyyt WX «=eTT 



CAMPAIGN OF ESARHADDON. 113 

13 a-na mi-sir mat assur, D.A., yu-tir 

for a border of the country of Assyria turned (it) 



14 SUMI ALA-ni makh-ru-u-ti yu-nac-cir-va 

the former names of the cities he made strang-e (abolished) 
and 

15 a-na es-su-u-te is-cu-na ni-bi-is-su-un 
afresh he established their names. 



16 D.P., ARDi-su a-na SARRu-ti, D.P., PiKH-u-ti 
His men-servants for king-ships, prefects 



17 va, D.P., sa-nu-u-te yu-pa-ki-da ina lib-bi 
and governors he appointed within (it). 



t8 bilat man-da-at-tu be-lu-ti-su 
Offering (and) tribute to his lordship 

19 sat-ti sam sam-ma yu-cin tsi-ru-us-su-un 
yearly, a fixed sum he placed upon them. 



114 NOTICE OF THE EGYPTIAN 



K 3082. S 2027. K 3086. 



OBVERSE. 



' SS» I n ^T T^ <I^ III iniH ) 



3 T -II - t-t ^^ -tIT ^t -^IT A-TI 

4 y^ ^y <^ ^-yyy< v -^ <lgl tyyy:: 

5 « ^yy t^yy -<y< -11 -i< :^ei{ ^ss 

7 tyyyt v ^^^ :^ t^yyy ^ ^ < yn? 



CAMPAIGN OF ESARHADDON. 115 

K 3082. S 2027. K 3086. 
OBVERSE. 

The tablet fragments (copies of which are printed below) 
were assig-ned by Mr. Smith to the rei^n of Esarhaddon, but 
there is nothing in them which proves it, and the style of 
writing appears to be more that of Assur-bani-pal than 
Esarhaddon. 

Copies have been printed {Trans. Soc. Bib. Arch., vol. iv. 
part I, 1875), but the text there given is both incomplete and 
inaccurate j hence they are reprinted, and the text found on 
the tablet fragments is given. 



I su-a-tu a-di sana essute a(lic) . . 

(To) that (district) for the second time I went 



2 u-se-sib, D.P., Bi-ah-lu . . . . 

I caused to sit Biahlu (son of) 



3 D.P., BEL-iDiNNA i-ua AL Kul-li-im-me-ri 

Bel-idinna in the city of KuUimiri 

4 a-na mi-sir mat assur, D.A., u-tir 

to the border of the land of Assyria I brought back . 

5 man-da-at-ti BiL-ti-ya 

tribute to my lordship 

6 Ina ESRiT-e KHARRAN-ya 

In my tenth expedition 

7 u-sa-ats-bi-ta pa-nu-u-a a-na mat 

I caused my face to take (the road) to the country of 

I 2 



Ii6 NOTICE OF THE EGYPTIAN 

.o tB -^} *^T!^ -tt] < <t^ ^! -til 
.m ^3i < I^]& If -TI- ^I! A^^ 

" V r^ til- !-^ --ii^ -<j< -ii<i EI « 

^ ^I <IE^ ^-III 

- - I- -I< -I<I^ ^ II =-El{ <-::H I -^I 

^-I m « V <;^ -ii<i V 1} ^I I 
>^tx:^<« X- mi < "^11 fcU -II<I 

I ^ t^ lEH EI 

>3 6=1 s^niH -^^ -II s^Eiif s=i M < ^11 

t: t^ M I- -II<I A-III -^I SS 

.4 -tl — t-^ I— <-tH I tiiit i^ <2g: 

EI I^ -EtI -EI <I-IEII ►^ tlll:r -til V 

-n^ I m -& -Ei 
,5 <^:: ^i V ►^ <:^ <m ^]]^} -EI <m 
^]} ]} -^i -.- V tiiK i^ ^i ^i ^ e:ii 
A^ e:ii ^ 



CAMPAIGN OF ESARHADDON. 117 

8 sa ina pi-i nisi mat Cu-u-si va mat Mu-tsur 

which (is called) in the languag-e of the men of the land of 

Ethiopia and Eg-ypt 

9 ad-ci-e ummani, D.P., assur g-ab-sa-a-ti sa ci-rib 

I assembled the armies of Assur, mighty which (were) 

within 

10 NiSAN ARKHu ris-tu-u ul-tu AL-ya ASSUR at-tu-sir nahr 

IDIKLAT U NAHR PUR-RAT (e-bir) 

In the (month) Nisan, the first month, from my city Assur 
I departed, the river Tig-ris and the river Euphrates 
I crossed, 

11 SADi mar-tsu-u-ti ri-ma-nis as-tam-di-ikh 
mountains rug'ged, like a wild bull I passed through. 

12 Ina me-ti-ik KHARRAN-ya eli, D.P., Ba-ah-lu sar mat 

Tsur-ri sa a-na, D.R, Tar-ku-u sar mat Cu-u-si ip-ri- 
su it-tag-lu-va 
In the crossing- of my expedition against Bahlu, king- of 
Tyre, who to Tirhakali, king of the land of Ethiopia, his 
friend had trusted and 

13 D.P., NiR, D.P., ASSUR BiL-ya is-lu-u e-tap-pa-lu me-ri- 

ikh-tu 

the yoke of the god Assur, my lord, they despised, they 
were insolent . . . ? ... 

14 D.P., khal-tsu(ti) eli-su u-rac-cis va a-ca-lu va mu-u ba- 

ladh NAPis-tiv-su-un ac-la 

Fortresses against him I raised and food and water (for) 
the preservation of their lives I kept (from them). 

15 ul-tu MAT Mu-tsur, D.P., carasu ad-ci-e a-na mat Me- 

lukh-a us-te-es-ra khar-ra-nu 
From the country of Egypt the camp I withdrew and to 
the land of Melukha I set straight the road (expedition). 



ii8 NOTICE OF THE EGYPTIAN 

T{ <i^ -^j] e:it ^t- a 

x7 If -^y t^ ^y tyf -^y -- -^^ ►^ <:zj y^ 

^H If © -Ey «-E ^y < - H -yy<y 
4k^ A^ -yy<y ^yyi ^yyi ^y 

'« in-- m - <yt^ M tyyyt -<y< ^}a]} 

REVERSE. 

^ <IEy tE <igy tyyyy ^^ ^ ^n ^tl} - 

^Vtt T>>>» VTT /V tT s8SSMS8S§s^ssJS .^.-VT 

>-> .-<y< 
. j^y^ > js:y ^^ly v ^:w ^<^ 1} -yy<y 

- .tH -^yy z «=yif ^s -,^11 

3 <« ^- ^^ ^ ^ Ey gn <w ^y y- - 
<y-yy<y a^^ <My<y <yt^ »« 



CAMPAIGN OF ESARHADDON. 1 19 

16 siLASA KAS-BU kak-kar ul-tu alu Ap-ku sa pa-di mat 

'Sam-me-na a-di, D.P., Ra-pi-khi 

Thirty kasbu of gTound from the city Aphek, which borders 
the country of 'Samena to the city of Rapikhi, 



17 a-na i-te-e na-khai mat Mu-tsur a-sar nahr la i-su-u 

ina ip-ri khar-khar-ri dan-dan-tu 
to the frontiers of the valley of the country of Egypt, a 
region (which) a river had not, through dusty sunburnt 
places very great 

1 8 MiE TSUTSi ina di-lu-u-ti UMMA-(ya) u-sa-as-ki 
marsh waters from buckets, I caused my army to drink. 



REVERSE. 

I ci-i ci-bit, D.P., assur BiL-ya ina uzna ip-si-va 

ca-bat-ti 
When the command of the g'od Assur my lord, in my ears 
was also (then) my liver. 



2 D.P., Gam-mal-li sa sar mat A-ri-bi ca-li-su-un 

su-nu-ti 
Camels belonging- to the king- of Arabia, the whole of 
them them. 



3 SILASA KASBU kak-kar ma-lac khamisserit Yu-me ina 

ar-di 

Thirty kasbu of ground, a journey of fifteen days in . . . 
... I marched 



20 NOTICE OF THE EGYPTIAN 



IT "^11^ I-- »«S V -^ ^I EI 
6 ^EI ^11 ;:^II El :^I^ -^I -I<I^ V #^ ^- 

^ ^^ Ei^jns«« I— -^li— 

7 T i-^ ^\^ ^ ^- 1} -m ^i- V #^ 

^- :?: ^ EI ^jii II ^i I- «^i 
EI -^11 >-i< 

8 <m #^ ^^ ^ ^^ EI ^jn m ^i I- 

M <MI<I <I^ 



9 ^^ <J^^I -II EI- «=III^ -II<I !-^ -I< 

:^II IH S^l 
.o (-lyy-) .^T^ <:^ .yy^ ^t^ ^l^y} -Eyf 



.. <:^:! ^y -tyy Ey -]& ^«« ^ «s 



CAMPAIGN OF ESARHADDON. 
4 IV KAS-BU kak-kar ina, D.P., al-lic 



Four kasbu of ground among- stones I went 



5 IV KASBU kak-kar ma-lac sana yu-me tsir sana kak- 

KADi sa mu-ut-va 

Four kasbu of g-round a journey of two days^ snakes (with) 
two heads .... of death and 

6 ad-da-is-va e-te-ik iv kas-bu kak-kar ma-lac bani 

I trampled upon and I passed throug-h four kasbu of 

ground a journey gazelles 

7 sa tsu-ub-bu-bu a-cap-pi iv kas-bu kak-kar ma-lac sana 

YU-me ma-li-ti 

of lizards winged (?). Four kasbu of g-round a journey of 
two days filled 

8 KHAMissERiT KAS-BU kak-kar ma-lac samna vu-me . . . 

. . . ar-di 

Fifteen kasbu of g-round, a journey of eight days 

I marched. 

9 D.P., MARDUK BiL RAB-u ri-tsu-ti il-lic 

The god Merodach, the great lord (to my) help came 



10 yu-pal-ladh NAPis-tiv UMMAN-ya esra YU-me vii 

he saved the life of my army. Twenty days, seven kasbu 

11 sa me-sir mat Ma-gan-nu bil-ti-ya 

of the border of the land of Mag-annu (Sinai) 

my lordship 

12 ul-tu, D.P., Ma-ak pa ..... . 

from the city Maggan (?) 



122 NOTICE OF THE EGYPTIAN 

<WI<I <T^ i 



n m ^^ ^ -II<! -T -- t^III ^ 
.6 ^11 -^ < ^H M MI! I 

.7 1^ ^ -15 m w <i£^ 

.8 \} ^y .^11 ^y ^y<y ^y ^^^ 



CAMPAIGN OF ESARHADDON. 123 

13 me-si-ikh-ti irba kasbu kak-kar ar-di 

a measurement o^ forty kasbu of g-round, I marched 



14 kak-ka-ru su-a-tu ci-ma, D.P. . . . 
this g-round like a stone 



15 ci-ma tsip-ri, D.P., tar-ta-khi 
like a heap of tartakhi .... 



16 da-mu-u sar-cu el . . . 
(people of) blood white 



17 D.P., NACiR ak-tsi a-di 
a rebellious enemy to . 



18 a-na, D.P., Is-khu-ut 
To the city of Iskhiit 



124 



LIST OF NAMES OF THE KINGS APPOINTED 

BY ESARHADDON TO RULE OVER 

DISTRICTS IN EGYPT. 

(From the " Annals of Assur-bani-pal.") 



W.A.L, iii. J 7, 112. 



-3 W <M m \^ ^ <:^ i^IT^ ^ <I^T 
^y »=^y ^^y ^ < y^ 

W.A.L, iii. 17, 92-112. 

9. y :?^ Igy ^.yyy^ ^:^ ^yy y^ ^^yy ^y^ 
< ^tyy m Vi Vi 



93 



}«m^ -II<I E^:Si -«-IT J^ETT ^-^ ^ 



94 y ^y^ V -Hh -T<T ^jn ^^ -^yy ^t 



25 



LIST OF NAMES OF THE KINGS APPOINTED 

BY ESARHADDON TO RULE OVER 

DISTRICTS IN EGYPT. 

(From the " Annals of Assur-bani-pal.") 



IV. A. I., iii. 17, 11: 



112 SARHANi an-nu-ti, D.P., pikhati, D.P., ci-pa-a-ni 
These king-s, prefects, (and) g-overnors, 



113 sa ci-rih mat Mu-tsur u-pa-ki-du abu hu-nu-u-a 

which within the land of Ej^ypt the father my begetter 
had appointed. 



IV. A. L, iii. 17, 92-112. 

92 D.P., Ni-cu-u SAR, D.P., Me-im-pi u, D.P., S'a-ai 
Necho King of Memphis and Sais 

93 D.P., Sar-lu-da-ri sar, D.P., Tsi-ah-nu 
Sarludari, King of Tsihnii (Zoan ?) 

94 D.P., Pi-sa-an-khu-ru sar, D.P., Na-ad-khu-u 
Pisan-Hor, King of Natho. 



J 26 



LIST OF KINGS 

95 1 :^ -i^ ^jn ^j[n ^^^ -tiT (^i^) 

96 r ^^ fc^if i^y -^y ^^L j^ ^^1 ^y^ 

98 r ^- mr tm ^y< ^^^ .-yy ^ ^^y ^ 

99 y tyyyt -^y ►^ ^^ e^:^ -tyy -^y t^y 

-o y ^^ ►^yy -^yi ty| ^ ^-- ^^yy ^ ^ 
:o. y ^. ^yyy^ ]} ^ t] m^ -t:\] t^ ^^ 






^'i^ -tyy t^- 



.03 T ^ ^T A--TTy -<T< El:?ff -tyy y- 

104 y ^- ^SK igf ^y -4- St= ^^^ ^y- 
^:^ ^tyy 44.-yyy ^ 



APPOINTED BY ESARHADDON. 127 

95 D.P., Pa-ak-ru-ru sar, D.P., (Pi) sab-tu 
Pakruru, King of Pi-supt. 



96 D.P., Pu-uc-cu-na-an-ah-pi sar, D.P., Kha-at-khi-ri-bi 
Puccunanahpi, King of Khatkhiribi. 



97 D.P., Na-akh-ci-e sar, D.P., Khi-ni-in-si 
Nakhce, King of Khintnsi (D3n). 

98 D.P., Pu-dhu-bis-ti sar, D.P., Tsa-ah-nu 
Pudhubisti (Petubastes), King of Tanis (|x;v). 

99 D.P., U-na-mu-nu sar, D.P., Na-ad-khu-u 
Unamunu, King of Nadkhu. 



100 D.P., Khar-si-ya-e-su sar, D.P., Tsab-nu-u-ti 
Kharsiyaesu, King of Tsabnuti (Sebennytus). 



101 D.P., Bu-u-ai-va bar, D.P., Bi-in-di-di 
Buaiva, King of Bmdidi. 

102 D.P., S'u-si-in-ku sar, D.P., Bii-si-ni 
Sheshonk, King of Busiris. 



103 D.P., Tab-na-akh-ti sar, D.P., Bu-nu-bu 
Tabnakhti, King of Bunubu. 



104 D.P., Bu-uc-cu-na-an-ni-ab-pi sar, D.P., Akh-ni 
Buccunanniabpi, King of Akbni. 



'28 LIST OF KINGS 

^y- }} tEy --y< -y<y ^jn ^v,} ^y m 

,06 y ^y 4».-yyi -^I< -I<T ^jn -^ -^yy :^ 
^^ ^tyy ^y- ^tn <y^ ^ ^y< 

I07 y ^^ -^^ ^ Sf: tU £^ -tyy ^ ^^yyy 

.08 y ttyy {{< y^ ^^ -tyy <y- tEyi y} < ^y 
109 y -Ey y- e^s?? ^t ^^w -tyy a ►^ s^ 
.,oy ^yy ^y- ^^ y{ py ei^^ .^y t^yyy 

THIS?: 

... y Ey -^ -<y< y- -►f 4*. A} ^^ -tyy 



APPOINTED BY ESARHADDON. 129 

105 D.P., Ip-ti-khar-di-e-su sar, D.P., Pi-za-at-ti-khu-ru- 
un pi-cu 

Iptikhardiesu, Kin^ of Pizattikhurunpicu. 

106 D.P., Na-akh-ti-khu-ru-an-si-ni sar, D.P., Pi-sab-di- 
nu-ti 

Nakhtikhuruansini, King- of Pisabdinuti. 

107 D.P., Bu-cur ni-ni-ip sar, D.P., Pa-akh-nii-ti 
Bucur-ninip, King of Pakhnuti. 

108 D.P., Tsi-kha-a sar, D.P., Si-j^a-a-u-ut 
Tsikha, King" of Siyaut. 

109 D.P., La-me-in-tu sar, D.P., Khi-mu-ni 
Lamentu, King of Khimuni. 

no D.P., Is-pi-ma-a-dhu sar, D.P., Ta-ai-ni 
Ispimadhu, King of Taini ( Abydos). 

Ill D.P., Ma-an-ti-me-an-khi-e sar, D.P., Ni-ali 
Mantimeankhie, King of Thebes (j^j). 



VOCABULARY. 



A 

AB, fifth month of the Assyrian year. Explained by a syllabary 
II '^►^ . Heb. 3K . Its Accadian name is f^^^^T 
t:^^y ^^] , "fire that makes fire." (See Trans. Soc. 
Bib. Arch. iii. p. 163.) 

A-AB-BA. The equivalent of the Semetic word " tamute^ 
(Layard's Inscriptions, plate 12, line 9.) 

dbhul^ I St sinf^. aor. Kal, for anbul. Heb. ^^\ . 

dbuhi, subs. sing-, masc, '^ storm/' ^^ whirlwind." 

abulli, subs. sing*, masc. gen. Chald. N/''13i< , or t<>")2"'{< • this 
ideog-raph is explained a-hil-luv, k 4191, and a-M-ul-lu, s 20. 

AMi-milcutti, i.e., "the servant of the kingdom/' or of 
Melkarth(?) 

abduky ist sing. aor. Kal. Heb. P?"^ , "to cleave." 

dbilj subs. sing. masc. cons. Comp. Heb. /'^D (?). 

abni, plu. masc. of abnu, ^yy~5 | = ^^T *7^ ^^^- ^^t 39)- 
Heb. i3K. 

abtanij ist pers. sing. aor. Iphteal. Heb. ^32. 

almcaj ist pers. sing. aor. Kal. Heb. 'jl5^5 . 

acalu, subs. fem. sing. Heb. i^??^ . 

acappi, perhaps for acanpL Comp. Heb. ^l^S . 

Accad. This is the Accad ("^?^) of Genesis x. 10. LXX. 'hpxab. 
^c« is "high/' acada, " highlander /' acada-ci, "country 
of highlanders /' the Accadai descended from a mountainous 
country, but no part of Babylonia was mountainous. 

N.B. — In the "Notes" references are made to the JSecond Edition of Prof. 
Sayce's Grammar. In such references as ii. 2, 393, the first number refers 
to one of the volumes of the Cuneiform Inscriptions of Western Asia, the 
second to the plate, and the third the line. 



VOCABULARY. 131 

Among" the Semetic Assyrians it bore the names of tilla and 
saki. Tilla = " highland " (ii. 48, 13). Heh. ^?^ . saki 
=^ summits from Accad. sak, "a head." SAK = risu (ii. 7, 36) 
Heb. ^J'XI . The inhabitants spoke an ag-g-lutinative dialect. 
Considerable discussion has existed between scholars as to 
whether the lang-uage should be called Sumerian or 
Accadian, and also where Accad was situated. On s 463 it 

is written »-lC^ ►+- ^^ , Ac-cad-i 2indi Ac-ca-di-iv (i. 65, 9). 
The sign ^TET is the D.A. for ^' country." (See Dr. Oppert, 

Sumerien ou AccadiaUj Paris, 18765 Prof. Sayce, Assyrian 
Lectures J p. 17 ; Dr. Delitzch, Chalddische Genesis^ p. 291 
et seq.) 

acbis, ist sing. aor. Kal. Heb. ^^^ . 

aciny ist sing. aor. Kal. Heb. 1-13. 

acciy ist sing. aor. Kal, for and. Heb. Hpp . 

aecis'a for ancisa, ist sing. masc. aor. Kal. Aram. DD: , '' mac- 
tavit." 

acta, ist sing. obj. aor. Kal. Heb. ^7? • 

acvuj ist sing. aor. Kal. Heb. ni3 . 

adi, prep. Heb. ^i? . 

addi, ist sing. aor. Kal. Heb. niJ , 

addiuj ist sing. aor. Kal. Heb. jH^ . 

adue, ist sing*, aor. Kal. Heb. HD"! . 

Adumu; Old Test. Cih^^ 'Edc^fij New Test. 'iSov/xai. The 
country lay along the east side of the great valley of 
Arabah, and embraced only the narrow mountainous tract 
(about 100 miles long by 20 broad) extending along the 
eastern side of the Arabah, from the northern end of the 
gulf of Elath to near the southern end of the Dead Sea. 
Its ancient capital was Bozrah (Smith, Bible Diet.). 

aggur^ ist sing. aor. Kal for angur. Heb. ^\>^ . 

agguriy subs. sing. masc. gen. 

aial)j subs. sing. masc. cons. Heb. '^))'^ . 

ai-ipparku, ai, negative particle. Comp. Heb. ''^ , in Job 
xxii. 30, and i Sam. iv. 21 ; ipjmrku, Niph. aor., Heb. P^IB. 

K 2 



132 VOCABULARY. 

akartavy adj. plu. fem. Heb. "li^J; comp. Collect nn|T |5X^ 

I King's X. 2. 
alihij subs. masc. sing-, gen. Heb. nx . 
akhi-ennay iov alih-anna ; akh = ^'Q. side," an?ia = demons, pron. 

sing. masc. 
Ahhi-milci. Comp. Heb. name '^^5^^^? . 
akhai, ^' others," plu. Heb. nt? . 
akkntav, abstract fern. Heb. ^^? . 

akrabi, subs. plu. masc. Heb. D^^li^y. ^See gir-tab.) 
akrij I St sing. aor. Kal. Heb, ^^"^i?. 
ahtdbi, ist sing. aor. Iphteal. Chald. V^p . 
aktasad, ist sing. aor. Iphteal. Arab, hashada. 
aktsu, adj. Heb. nVj^^ <^ to destroy." 
AL, subs. sing. cons, of alu, •* a city j" plu. alani. ►^^TT = Ty t^t^ 

(ii. 2, 393). Heb. ^g-j^. 
fi/?;^, subs. plu. masc of alpu. Heb. ^.^. 
alul, ist sing. aor. Kal. Heb. 7^?. 

flZ«;£?, ist sing. aor. Kal. A verb doubly defective. Heb. HI?. 
anuiSy ist sing. aor. pres. Heb. "^^P. 
Aingurruna ; Biblical PP^ j LXX. 'AicKapav. 
amur, imperative, 2nd sing. Kal. 
ana, prep., objective case of old noun anu (Sayce, Grammar^ 

Triibner, page 142). 
anacuy ist pers. pron., sometimes written T TET. Heb. ^?i^ . 
ankhus'unu, for ankhut-sunu, subs. plu. masc. ^jy . 
anaru, i st sing. perf. Kal. Heb. "l^? . 
annadir, ist sing. masc. aor. Niph. Comp. Heb. "ID^ , "to 

tremble." 
anni. Comp. Heb. I^n . 

annuj subs. sing. A synonym of khidhitu. Heb. pjf . 
Aphu. The city Aphek. Comp. Heb. name pS^f . 
apsdniy subs. plu. masc. Sir H. Rawlinson thinks from basii, 

"to exist" (Jour. B.A.S.y xii. 190). 
apiaj ist sing. aor. Kal. Heb. nns . 
orJflt, or irUttu, " four." Heb. y?"ii< . 
area, subs. sing. masc. Heb. nsi^ . 



VOCABULARY. 133 

area, prep. Heb. Xl^ . 

ardi, subs. sing. masc. gen. Heb. "Trn ^ ^<- to rule over;" hence 

^^one ruled over." 
ardi, ist sing. masc. aor. Kal. Heb. T!!) . 
ardUj see «r^^ above, 

Ann-uti, subs. fern. abs. sing. Heb, nnT . 
-4n7»i, 'Apa^ia. The country known in the Old Test, under two 
designations — 

(i) Ci^i"^ r>Ni , "the east country" (Gen. xxv. 6). 
(2) n-ij^, Arabia. 
It was divided by the Greeks into — 

(i) Arabia Felix {rj ivbatixcov 'Apa/3ia). 

(2) J, Deserta (17 eprj^os 'Apa/Sm). 

(3) „ Petraea (rj nerpala 'Apa/3ta). 

(Smith's Bible Diet.) 
arsisuva, ist sing. aor. Kal. Syr. ^K^"i , with pers. pron. and 

enclitic conjunction. 
artsij), Tst sing. aor. Kal. Heb. ^V^, '^ to arrange stones." 
Aruadi; Biblical ^1"1&? . 

asavy subs. sing. masc. cons, of asaru. Heb. "'D^f . 
asewi^ ist sing. aor. Kal. Heb. |?^ . 
a5^Z>w^, subs. masc. plu. cons. Heb. ^K'i^ . 
asluluy ist sing. aor. Kal. Heb. 7^^. (And see Sajce, Assi/rian 

Lectures, p. 86-88.) 
flwme, ist sing. aor. Kal. Heb. V^^ . 
aspuG, ist sing. aor. Kal. Heb. ^2^ . 

AST, TI = "^JU ^"^^^ , a synonym of aricu, " length," Heb. 
V^', and »^yy = ^^ >^ , kar-nu, '' a horn/' Heb. \1^, 
(ii. I J 176). Dr. Delitzch {Ass. Stud., p. 35) thinks asi to 
be identical with t^A *^TT ? "wild bull," and says it 
appears to be an animal with long horns. 

asil, subs. sing. cons. Chald. ^/f ^ . The word used in the 
Targum on Job xviii. 10 to express the Heb. ^^n . 

asusur, ist sing. aor. Shaph. Heb. "W^ and 'W\ . 

assi, 1st sing. masc. aor. Kal. Heb. ^^^ . 



134 VOCABULARY. 

assu, prep, of Accadian origin (Sayce, Grammar ^ Triibner, p. 143). 

as's'ur, ist sing. masc. aor. Niph. Heb. "IP^, *^to make 
captive." 

Assur. The great and supreme god of the Assyrians, from 
which the country took its name. He is called the "god of 
judges" (iii. 66, 23), and the month Ve-adar was dedicated 
to "the god Assur, the father of the gods" (iv. 33, 48). 
Among the earlier kings, in their invocations he is simply 
mentioned as one among a number of gods, but in the time 
of Assurbanipal he is often mentioned alone and with 
attributes of power. 

Assurj Biblical "^^^^ . Assur is itself a Turanian compound 
from Ty, "water," and >^ {sur), "bank or field," and 
has therefore attached to it the Accadian suffix ^TET? 
"land" (Sayce, Trans. Soc. Bib. Arch., vol. i. 299). The 
earliest form found is ►^►?- TI T^ ^ET>^T , a-usar (i. 6 ; 
No. I, 3), y^ ^y[ ■= se-it-tu, " field" (ii. i, 145). 

astadij ist sing. masc. aor. Iph. Heb. ^^^ j '^to lay waste." 

atgul, ist sing. masc. aor. Kal, from J dagalu, "to trust" 

atur, ist sing. masc. aor. Kal. 

atsbiruj ist sing. perf. Kal. Heb. "1?^. 

atta, 2nd pers. pron. Heb. HflN . 

attdbiy ist sing. aor. Iph. Heb. ^^} . 

azcura, ist sing. obj. aor. Kal. Heb. ">?J . 

Azdudi, Biblical ^Hf K , 'A^coro's. 

azkuppati, subs. plu. fem. Heb. ^\>\ . 

B 

baJfani, subs. plu. Heb. ^33 . 

baladh, subs. fem. cons. Comp. Heb. nD73 . 

bani. See Assyrian Syllubarijj No. 313. 

banu-a^ or banu-ya, nom. agentis, masc. sing. Heb. n33 . 

baranu^ comp. Heb. ^"^S . 

baruy a measure of length. 



VOCABULARY. 135 

hatlij subs. plu. masc. 

BdzUj probably the ^-13 of Jerem. xxv. 23 ; Gen. xxii. 21. 

ieli, subs. plu. masc. of ielu. Heb. 7I?|l . 

^?7«iJ, subs. fern. cons. Heb. npjjll . 

Z'zVtt^, subs. fern. Heb. ^^\, ''to bring-;" ►f!^ ^y|| = 
Z'iZ-^w (ii. 2,2), 14). 

^^^7w^^, abstract fern. Heb. ^V"^ , " to rule over." 

birvii, adj. plu. masc. Heb. D*p*n| (Ezek. xxvii. 24), '' varie- 
gated garments." 

Uruti, adj. fem. Heb. ^"^3, "to carve." 

Bit-ammana. Mr. Smith compared the Biblical P^y . 

UtUj subs. sing. nom. ^TTTT = ii-i-tu (ii. 2, 364). Heb. n^3 . 

^AS5?<, subs, masc, " spoil." 

^2^25, imperative Kal, from basasu. 



cabattiy subs. fem. sing. Comp. Heb. "I^S . 

caMttij subs. fem. sing. gen. (Same root.) 

cabtu, adj. nom. (Same root.) 

cacci, subs. plu. masc. 

CA-DiMiRRA, the Biblical ^33. Its Accadian name was ca- 

DiMiRRA, D.A., meaning '' the gate to god," of which the 

Semetic bab-el is an accurate translation. ^^Iy = ^^►^T 

]} ^>-; ''gate" (ii. 2, 365). Heb. nn3. 

Its name is written in the following ways : — 

-►^i :^ tE lai <M (i- 5^' No. 6, 7). 

-^t :=; -Hf- <M (i- 57, 28). 
t:^{ -►f <;^y (i. .s, no. 5). 

It bore the names of ^K '^^WII ^]^T' din-tir-ci 
(ii. 50, 2), properly the town on the western bank, and 



136 VOCABULARY. 

^EJ >^>T- ^"^y ^]^y(i. 41, 16), su-AN-NA-ci, properly 

the valley on the eastern bank. For the words " sons of 

Babylon " compare the Bihlical usage " sons of Heth," 

"daughter of Zion." 
calamuj " all the world/' *' of all kinds." 
calata, permansive Kal, 2nd sing. masc. (with ta for atta). 

Heb. «b . 
cali-sunu, adj., with 3rd plu. pers. pron. masc. Heb. 73 . 
camis, adv., from caviu. 

caranij subs. plu. Comp. ^5^?}i? , " sweet wine." 
carasi, subs. masc. gen., perhaps akin to Heb. ^-I^l . 
CASBu, CAS-BU = " doublc hour " in Accadian. Another form 

is ^^ 'i^^" ^^"^ y kas-hi-mi. The Assyrian equivalent is 

g^ >^^y, as-li. Chald. ^if^, "a cord." The cashi 

was about 14 miles. 
casid, subs. sing. cons, of nomen agentis. Arab, kashada. 
cas'iM. The syllabaries render ^W -^y by ►^ttzJ ^^L 

•^►^ . Heb. ^p3 . (I have mislaid the reference.) 
catrdi, subs. plu. masc. (See Norris, Dict.j p. 538.) 
cavu, nom. agentis, masc. sing. cons. Heb. ^13 . 
cazabiti. Comp. Heb. ^fS . 
ciy prep. Heb. *? . 

cibit, subs. fem. cons, with softened guttural. Heb. V^p, . 
cibitti, " abundance." Heb. 133 . 
CTLi = ri-sa-a-tuv, k 4357. Heb. K^fi^T. 

cima, prep. Heb. io? . ^K»^yy = ^T^y ^y (iv. 30, 5). 

cinuv^ adj. with mimmation. Heb. |-13 . 

cipdni, subs. plu. masc, "rulers." Comp. Heb. "^^3 , "to 

subdue ;" hence " subduers," " rulers." 
ci-pi. Comp. Heb. ^B3 . i Chron. xii. 23. 
cips'iy subs. plu. masc. of cips'u. Heb. D33 . 
cireti, abs. fem. plu. Heb. Vy^ , " to bend the knee." 
ciribj prep. Heb. y)J> . 



Heb. 113 . 



VOCABULARY. 137 

t=y ^EJ^ = ^«-^^" (iv. 18; iii. 36). 



cm^i, subs. masc. plu. See Syllabary, No. 161. M. Lenormant 

{Trans. Soc. Bib. Arch., vi. p. 188) compares the Ghez 

chesdde. 
cis'alla, subs. masc. sing*. Of Accad. origin. 
cis's'ati, subs. plu. fern. Comp. Chald. NK^^^| or i<P}f^^ . 
Cis'u, Kissos, King of Salamis. 
citmisu, 3rd plu. masc, perman. Iphteal, from {}^33 . 
dtu, adj. Comp. Chald. ^>1i^2- Gr. xtT®^- 
cu, a sort of wood. 
culul. Comp. Heb. ^'/S . 
Gulluv, adj. with mimmation. Heb. 3 . 
cusVu, subs, sing. masc. Heb. ^E"? ; Sjr. {<''D"TiD • The 

ideogTaph is explained by cu-us'-s'u (ii. 46, 52). 
Cus'i. Biblical K^-IS , or Ethiopia. 
cutstsu, partic. Kal. A cognate form exists in Arabic (see 

Freytag, Lex., vol. i. p. 40). 



D 

dabu, subs. masc. Heb. 3n . 

dddnie-su, reduplicated derived form (peculiar to verbs N "S5 
and 1 "S). Heb. ^^^ ; su = pers. pron. Heb. ^-"Jn . 

dais, sing. masc. cons. nom. agentis. Heb. ^•1'^ . 

•DKUi, subs. fern. sing. Heb. TQ'l , The ideograph is explained 
by da-al-tu (ii. 15, 2). ^T = "wood," and ^[<T-^ = pi-tu-u, 
'^ to open" (iv. 69, 46). Heb. nna • hence the whole means 
" the opening piece of wood." 

daviku, adj. See Syllabary, No. 333. The ideograph is ex- 
plained by da-mi-ik-tuv (ii. 46, 53). 

damu, subs. sing. masc. Heb. ^"^ . 

DAN, a kind of wood. It is called gis kibir, or " coffin wood." 
Syl. No. 7 s, and is there explained by nappatsu, perhaps a 
Niphal deriv. ^vom. pitsu, "white." Heb. r*"^ • 

danan, subs. sing. masc. cons. Of Accad. origin. 



138 VOCABULARY, 

dmdantu, reduplicated form. The form dandanti occurs on 

K 2802. 
danas'su for dannat-su, subs. fern. sing. 
darisj adv. from daru. Heb. 'T^'H , ^^ an age." 
dhdbu, ideograph explained bj dha-a-lm (iv. 7, 6). Heb. 21D . 
dharid, sing', masc. cons., nom. agentis. Heb. T]9 , ^' to 

thrust." 
dhem, subs. masc. sing. cons. Chald. D3^tD (Dan. iii. 10). 
dhih. Comp. Heb. 3it3 . 

dikhi. Compared by Dr. Delitzsch with Heb. ^im . 
diluti, subs. plu. masc. Heb. v'H . 
dur, subs. masc. sing. Heb. ">*n ^ ^^ a habitation." 



E 

eUvj ist sing. aor. Kal. Heb. *^?V . 

edhil, ist sing. aor. Kal. Heb. y>^ , ^'10, 

E-GAL, In Accad. = " great house." Heb. ^5^n . The ideo- 
graph is equated with e-gal (iv. 5, 31). 

ekiliy subs. plu. masc, and see ii. 70, 9, where TI '^TTT - 
Phoen. {<7pn . Chald. ^i^ri . It is written e-ki-il (see Jour. 
R.A.S., 1864, p. 209). 

ellamiihay for ellamu-ya. Comp. Heb. n?]; , " to go up ;" hence 
" to be above/' or ^^ beyond." 

ellat-s'uj subs. plu. masc. Heb. ^'''0 , with s'u for su. 

elamti. Biblical Q/^V. ; 'EXa/* ; Aelam. The inhabitants were 
originally a Seraetic people (Gen. x. 22) who appear to have 
been invaded and conquered at a very early time by a 
Hamatic or Cushite race from Babylon, called by the 
Greeks KiWtot (Cissians). Its ancient capital was Susa. 
See Smith's Babylonia for its early history. 

eli, prep. ''V . 

emidj ist sing. aor. Kal. Heb. "lo;;. 

emu, 3rd plu. masc. aor. Kal. Comp. Heb. OPV • 

emukij subs. sing. masc. gen. Heb. P^IJ . 



VOCABULARY. 139 

eniiUj subs. sing. nom. A synonym of khidhita, '^sin" {CJial- 

ddische Genesis, p. 306). 
entemia, Iphteal deriv. Perhaps akin to I^^ . According" to Dr. 

Delitzsch it - Ass. kutstsu, '^ earthquake." Prof. Sayce 

thinks it an Accadian word. 
enuva, adv. compounded of enVy and the pronoun rna, " that " 

(Sayce, Grammar , ip. 115). 
eparkuj 3rd sing. masc. perf. Kal. Heb. p^3 . 
m, subs. masc. gen. Perhaps from Accad. urudu. 
erib, subs. cons. Comp. Heb. ^"J^ , " evening/' from 3*11^ , " to 

set like the sun." 
erinu, subs. sing. masc. Heb. \i]^ . Written also e-ri-ni and 

ir-ni. 
eris'ina = erid-sina. Comp. Heb. "TIT. 
erisu, 3rd plu. masc. aor. Kal. 
esci, subs. sing. masc. (But text very doubtful.) 
esra. Comp. Heb. D^lfJ^. 
csritj ord. number. Heb. "Tj'^l? . 
esruj fern. card, number. Heb. "i|^lf . 
essutCy for edsute. Comp. Heb. ^in ^ " to be new." 
ESTEN, an Accadian word compounded of ►— , as, ^' one/' and 

t^ITT T]f »■ ► ! , ta-a-an (ii. 10, 21), "a measure/' lit. 

" one measure." It is the word from which the Heb. 

*'^PV in the number " eleven " is derived. See Dr. Oppert, 

Grammaire Assyr., pp. 32—38, second edition. 
etappaUiy 3rd plu. masc. aor. Pael. Heb. 73?. Comp. 

•1^^2V*1, '^they acted insolently" (Num. xiv. 44). 
etck, I St sing. aor. Kal. Heb. priJJ. 
eteittiky ist sing. masc. aor. Ittaphal. Heb. ?^V . 



G 



galal, subs. sing. masc. cons. Heb. n?*3| . 

gahsati^ "strong/' adj. fem. 

GAL = rabuj " great." Heb. nnn . 



I40 VOCABULARY. 

gammaliy subs. plu. masc. Heb. ^'^\ , 

GiDDA = a-riGj " length " (ii. 46, 7). Heb. V!^ . 

giguj subs. sing. masc. Heb. ^ . 

gimivj cons, of gimiru. Heb. "IP^ ^ " to be complete." 

Gimirrai. The "1P5 of Gen. x. 2 ; probably the CiMMfiRli (Kt/x- 

fiepioi), remarkable for their incursions into Asia Minor in 

the 6th century B.C. (Herod, i. 6, 15, 103; iv. i, ii, 12). 

They took Sardis B.C. 635 (Smith's Class. Diet., art. " Cim.") 
girri, subs. plu. masc. Heb. nn| ^ " to make war." 
GiR-TAB, see under akraU. Concerning" winged snakes or 

scorpions, see Rawlinson's Herod, ii. p. 499. 
Guhli, Biblical ^^ . 
gtisuri, subs. plu. masc. The ideograph is explained hy gu-su-ra 

(ii. 15, 12). 

H 

haliCj 2nd sing. masc. imperative, Kal. Heb. "^^H . 



ibbUj adj. Heb. n^J . 

ibel, 3rd sing. masc. aor. Kal. Heb. 7V3 . 

icbus'uj 3rd plu. masc. aor. Kal. Heb. D33 . 

icnusuj 3rd plu. masc. aor. Kal, J ^^3 . 

icsuduj 3rd sing. masc. perf. 

idd-ca, subs. dual. Heb. ^* ; ca = '^ . 

idciCj 3rd sing. masc. aor. Kal. 

idu, I St sing. aor. Kal. Heb. V^J . 

idiclat. The river Tigris. In line 35 of the Behistun inscrip- 
tion it is written di-ik-lat, which Mr. Norris compared to the 
Hiddikel ( ''P.'jjn ) of Genesis ii. 14. Called by the Arameans 
^Z^*^. . Syr. TVpl . idiclat is the Semetic equivalent of 
A-sus-MAS-TiG-GAR. It is somctimes written ►>- ►>- . 



VOCABULARY. 141 

igug^ 3rd sing", masc. aor. Kal. M. Guyard (in Journal Asiatique, 
Jan. 1880) makes this come from J nagagu^ '^ to cry," " to 
groan;" M. Halevy from J agaguj *'to be angry;" and see 
iv. 2, 37. 

ilirihi, subs. plu. masc. Heb. 1"])^ , ^' to approach." 

ihsuda, 3rd sing. masc. obj. aor. Kal. 

iksudu, 3rd sing. masc. perf. Kal. 

ikfarrabu, 3rd plu. masc. aor. Iph. Heb. ^Ii? . 

ilabhiru, 3rd sing. masc. fut. Kal, from J labarUj ^^ to be old." 

ilUnu, 3rd plu. masc. aor. Kal. Heb. P< , denom. n^np . 

Hi and Hani ; plu. of ilu, " god." Heb. ^^ . The plural is 
once written t^ ^T^^ (Heb. D^^7^^ ), i-/i?« (preserving 

the mimmation) in the name of Assur-ris-ilim, — i.e., " Assur, 

chief of the gods" (i. 6, No. 5, 2). 
illicavva, 3rd sing. obj. aor. Kal. Heb. '^2^? , with mimmation 

and enclitic va. 
ilubusuy 3rd sing. masc. perf Kal. Heb. ^?5 . 
live, 3rd sing. masc. aor. Kal. Heb. nip , 
imguru, 3rd plu. masc. aor. Kal. 
imiri, subs. plu. masc. Heb. "il^n . The initial n being lost, 

as in the word ekil, " land " (which see). 
imkhatzu, 3rd sing*, masc. perf. Kal. Heb. l^HD . 

imnu. Heb. TPJ . This sign ( ^>^ ) happens to mean ^' left 

hand," as well as y<y<y . 

ina, prep., obj. case of the old noun inu, being identical with 

Heb. IP! (Sayce, Gram., Trubner, p. 142). 
inakhu, 3rd sing. masc. fut. Kal. J Hjy . 
ina7nbu, 3rd plu. masc. pres. Kal. Heb. ^^3 . 
inaru, 3rd plu. masc. Comp. Heb. 1^? . 
indalikhkhu, 3rd sing. masc. perf Niph. Heb. ^7'^ , " to 

trouble." 
innaUu, 3rd sing. masc. perf. Niph. 
in-summa, '^ in all," " altogether." 
ipri, subs. sing. masc. Heb. 1?n . 



142 VOCABULARY. 

iprij adj. masc. Heb. "JSj; . 

ipsij 3rd sing", masc. aor. Kal, from J hasu, " to be." 

ipsit, fern, abstract sing.^ from J episu. 

ippalcitunivva, 3rd sing. masc. perf. Niph., with enclitic va. 

ipparsiduj 3rd sing. masc. perf. Niph. Heb. ^^"j5 , " to spread 
out." 

irM. Comp. Heb. D'VJ'JN . 

irduy 3rd sing. masc. perf. Kal. Heb. Ti^ . 

iritsij subs. sing. gen. 

irsi, 3rd sing. masc. aor. Kal. J ^K^T . 

irtij "against," of doubtful origin. 

irtsitiv, subs. fem. sing. Heb. IT^^. ^TET = ir-tsi-tiv 
(ii. I, 182). 

isadha^ 3rd sing, telic. obj. aor. Kal. J ^'\^ . 

isalj 3rd sing. masc. pres. Kal. Heb. ^^'f . 

isati, subs. fem. sing. Heb. ^K; Eth. esdt ; Chald. Nf K . 
The word is once found written phonetically ^^ ^ ►<!< 
(3 Mich. i. 34). It is remarkable that it only wants the 
sign TTTH[ to complete the name of the solar hero Gisdhu- 

iscunay 3rd sing. masc. obj. aor. Kal. Heb. 15^ . 

iseunuj 3rd sing. masc. perf. Kal. (Same root.) 

isimmuj 3rd plu. masc. fiit. Kal. Heb. l^P^ . 

Iskalmm. Biblical p'^pf ^ j 'Ao-KaXwi/. 

is'khajypuj subs. masc. sing. Heb. ^Dp . 

t/Zw, 3rd plu. perf. Kal. Heb. n^p . 

islula, 3rd sing. masc. obj. aor. Kal. Heb. ^d^ . 

isme, 3rd sing. masc. aor. Kal. Heb. V'Q'^ . 

ispurawttj 3rd sing. masc. obj. aor. Kal, and enclitic va. Arab. 

sapara. 
isrucaj 3rd sing. masc. obj. Kal. Heb. X^^ . 
istapparunivva, 3rd sing. masc. perf. Iph. with enclitic va. 
Istar. The Biblical T\iF\fV ; Greek 'Aaraprrj. A goddess, " the 



VOCABULARY. 143 

lady of war and battle," who pla^^ed a ^eat part in the 
religious system of the Assyrians. Istar was the daughter of 
the Moon-god, her spouse was Tammuz (the t^sri of Ezekiel 
viii. 14), and the Adonis of the Greeks, whom she went to 
seek in the *^ land of no return," or Hades. Many are the 
hymns which are dedicated to Istar, and very fine are the 
epithets applied to her. As her name is written here, she is 
the g-oddess of the half-month, or fifteen days ( ^UJ ) . She 
is called "the wife of Bel" (iii. 24, 78). As regards the 
title " Istar of Nineveh," it is said (iii. 24, 65) : Istar sa 
Ninua il-sarrat Kitmure, " Istar of Nineveh, the divine queen 
of Kitmure ;" and in line 78 Nineveh is said to he naram 
Istar y '^ the delight of Istar." The month Elul was dedicated 
to her. There were also Istar of Arbela, and Istar of Erech. 
(See the remarks and authors quoted in Gesenius, Thesaurus j 
p. 1082.) 

issikta, for insikta. Comp. Heb. P^^ . 

is's'uniy 3rd plu. masc. perf. Kal. Heb. ^^\ ; as in i Kings x. 12. 

izGuru, 3rd plu. masc. aor. Kal. Heb. "l?^ . 

ita, subs. fern. sing. 

itbalu, 3rd sing. masc. perf. Iphteal. Heb. ??J . 

iteru, 3rd plu. masc. aor. Kal. Heb. "^-1^ . 

iteti, subs. plu. fem., " frontiers." 

itstsarVih, 3rd sing. masc. aor. Niph. = iJmbM (iv. 11, 30). 
Chald. Vlip . 

itstsuri, subs. masc. sing'. Heb. "liSV . 

itibbUy 3rd sing. masc. perf Iphteal. Heb. ^<)| . 

itta, " a military ensign." Heb. nix (see Numb. ii. 2). 

ittagil, 3rd sing. masc. pres. Niph., from J dagalu. A verb 
peculiar to Assyrian. 

ittallacu, 3rd pers. sing. masc. perf Iphteal. Heb. "^^^ y with 
va enclitic like Latin " que." 

ittiy prep. Heb. Hi^ . 



144 VOCABULARY. 



K 



hahal, subs. sing", cons. Comp. Heb. ^?i5 . 

kaMadij subs. plu. masc. Heb. "^PliJ. 

kakkar, subs. masc. sin^. cons. Heb. "133 , " a tract of country " 
(Neh. xii. 28). 

kali has' u, for kakkad-su, for kad-kad-su (see kakhadi). 

kaldi. The land of Caldu or Kaldu is first mentioned by 
Assur-natsir-pal (i. 24, i), B.C. 878^ and in the year b.c- 
850, his son Shalmaneser speaks of the district as lying below 
Babylonia, on the Persian Gulf. The word cnsdim is best 
explained by the Assyrian root casadu, " to conquer," ^^ to 
possess " (Sayce, Lectures, pp. 49 and 61). 

Jean. Comp. Heb. "^^p^, ►^JT^ = >^T ►^►T- (ii- 24, 6). 

karan, subs. masc. sing. cons. Heb. j^i^ . 

TcasbUy see cashu. 

katai, subs, dual masc. with pron. suff. Comp. Targum ^^P. , 
" a handle." 

katav, subs. plu. (Same root.) 

khdbUlu, VqlqXj 0.6.]. Heb. ''^n, " to destroy." 

khaltmti, subs. plu. Comp. Heb. pH (No. 2). 

khamisserit. Comp. Heb. "I'^V nB^Pn . 

hhamsa, fern. card, number. Heb. njj'pri . 

kharkharri, subs. plu. masc. Comp. Heb. D*")in , " sunburnt 

places" (Jerem. xvii. 6). 
kharrariy subs. sing. cons. Of Accadian origin. Its synonyms 
are daragu, Chald. ^|")1 ; and metiku, from J etiTiu, Heb. 
pnj; (see ii. 52, 3). 
liTiarrUj subs. masc. sing. Heb. I'Jn . 
hharsani, subs. masc. plu. of hharm. Heb. ^'ip . 
khatti. The Biblical nn (Gen. xxiii. 3). 
khattUj subs. fem. sing. 
khaziti. Biblical njj; ; vdCa. 
hhidhdhu, subs, fem., of Pael formation. Heb. ^"On . 



VOCABULARY. 145 

Jihilacci. The classical cIlIcIa in S.E. of Asia Minor. 

khisakhti, subs. plu. fern. Chald. nK^Q . 

khubut, subs. fern. cons, plu., " booty/' J t^^n . 

MiZ^, subs. cons. Heb. nin ^ " to be glad." 

khuratsu. The ideograph is explained by khu-ra-tsu (ii. i, iii). 

Heb. r-nn. 

kullultavy subs. plu. fern. Heb. nppj? . 

kuradi, subs. plu. masc. 

kutu = Gutium (Kurdistan), the ^'^)^ of Gen. xiv. 



IdbUsj adv. from Idbbu. Heb. ^I? . 

Idbini, subs. plu. masc. Heb. D^^^i*. 

Z«-^5a. Comp. Syr. n"*?. 

la-isii, 3rd pers. sing. masc. perf. Kal. Heb. H^J ^ with negative 

Z«. Heb. N> . 
ZaZa, from Accad. lal^ " to fill." 
lapdn, prep. Heb. ^P.S? . 

la-s'dngu, a synonym of la-ma-gi-ru (ii. 27, 41)^ " disobedient." 
/i55i, subs. masc. sing. gen. Heb. 3? . 
Libnana. The Biblical P^^. 
Liccu = ^TT? i^^ cal-hu (ii. 6, 13). Heb. 37| . 
limneti, subs. plu. fem., perhaps Heb. Onj ^ " to fight." 
limniy subs. plu. masc. (Same root.) 
listaprUj 3rd plu. masc. prec. Iphteal. 
litij subs. plu. fem. 

liveti. Comp. Heb. HI? , " to be around." 
hihulti, for luhisti, s changing into I before a dental, subs. fem. 

sing. Heb. K^-in^ . 
luddis, 3rd sing. masc. prec. Aphel. Comp. Heb. ^1^ , in 

Piel to repair buildings (i Sam. xi. 14). 

L 



146 VOCABULARY. 

lulie. From Accadian. 

lusbdj 3rd. sing", prec. Kal. Heb. V3K^ . 

lutassib, 2nd sing. masc. prec. Pael. Heb. 3^* 



M 

MadaL Inhabitants of the Biblical ''19 • They occupied the 
country, called after their name, which lies to the N.W. of 
Persia proper. They were descendants of Japhet. 

Tnaddtte, for maudante, subs, fern., lit. ^'something given." 
Comp. I^iiip , Dan. ii. 6. 

Mcujannu. '^The ship region." And see Lenormant, Les N<ms 
de VAirain, etc. {Trans. Soc. Bib. Arch., vi. p. 350). 

31dhba. Biblical 3KiD . 

mdhdis, adv. from mahdu. Heb. "l^P . 

mdkhazi, for vialihatsiy subs. plu. masc. Heb. KH? . 

makMihiy adj. from Accad. makh. 

Tnakhiray subs. sing. masc. accus. case of malihar, J "IHO . 

makhritij prep. fem. form. 

malilirute. " Previous, former." 

ToalUj 3rd. plu. masc. perf Kal. ^^ . 

mdlluj partic. Kal. (Same root.) 

mamit, subs. fem. sing. Heb. i^J^^. . 

mana, subs. masc. plu. Heb. n3D , Gr. iiva. The standard 
maneh appears to have been fixed at Carchemish. There 
seem to have been manehs of different weight and value ; 
thus : — 

5 manehs of silver = 2 manehs of gold. 

{Records of the Past, i. p. 166.) 
Mannai. The Biblical ''IP, of Jer. li. 27. Proper name of a 
province which is joined with ^T\^^ according to Bochart; 
Mivvaff, " a tract of Armenia" (Gesenius), placed by Rawlin- 
son (Herod i. 464) about Lake Urumiyeh, and with the 
Minuas who appears in the list of ancient kings in the 
inscriptions at Vau (Layard, Nineveh and Babylon, p. 401). 



VOCABULARY. 147 

marab. Deriv. from ruhu. Comp. Heb. 3*1P. 

Marduk. The Biblical T^V of Jer. 1. 2. The name is 
Accadian, and means " the splendour (or light) of the sun." 
^JlJ ■=• ^>- ^yrr ^u-m. Heb. "inn (ii. i^ 156), and tsuru. 
Heb. "inV^ -^T = sam-su (ii. 3, 431), ^' the sun." He was 
called Silik-mulu-khi, "the protector of the city who benefits 
mankind/' and was the son of Hea (►■ ^- T ^TTTT T^) iv- 
7, 25 (Sayce). The month Marchesvan was dedicated to 
" the Lord, the prince of the gods, Merodach" (iv. ^2>y 43)* 
The name Marduk has been found written ►^>?- ^T ^TT 
^TI^, D.P., Ma-ru-duk {Zettschrift fur Aeg Sprache, July, 
1869, p. 95), and ►^►^ j^y y]r (see Norris, Diet., p. 940). 

Marduk-dbla-idinna, '' Marduk gave a son." Heb. n^f?"^'^^"'9- 
His name is written >->y- ^JJJ J^ g^| >-^T(Botta, 151). 

martsis, adv. from martsu. Arab, maritsa^ '^to be wearied out 

with toil." 
martsuti, adj. fern. 

masaCy subs. sing. masc. cons, of masacu. Syr. jotj^D • 
mascity subs. fem. sing. Heb. W^, "to hold." 
mascani, subs. sing. masc. gen. Heb. |3^P. 
massate, adj. fem. Perhaps from ^ riK^D , as compared by Mr. 

Norris. 
mat. This sign is explained by via-a-tu (ii. 39, 4). The 

Accadian name for land was mada, and this word is perhaps 

the original of the Aram. t^riD . The following extract from 

Syl. 116, is interesting :— 









L 2 



148 VOCABULARY. 

MeluTiha. A word often used instead of Cush. 

Menas'ie. The r\fyo of the Bible. 

7fi£sikhti, subs. fern. Heb. n^D . 

mesiry subs. masc. sing. cons. Heb. ip^ . 

meiikj synonym of Jiharran, which see. 

mie, subs. plu. masc. Heb. D?^. 

milaCy sub. masc. sing. cons. Comp. Heb. vP^ • 

mimmaj pron. Comp. Heb. HO-li^D . 

mis'ir, see mesir. 

mitpanij subs. sing. masc. A synonym of Ka-as-tav (ii. 19, 7, 8). 

Heb. r\f2 , V IS" . 
mifffari, adj., Iphteal deriv. ^ magaru, "to be happy." 
971M. Comp. Heb. ^P , Chald. ^iD . 
mtiahdiej adj. Heh. ^^^ . 
mukhadu, partic. Comp. Heb. Hin . 
mukhliha. Assyrianized form of Accad. mukh, " upon." 
mukM. Of Accad. origin. (See ii. i, 161.) 
multauti, fem. abs. Comp. Heb. ^^5K^ , <' to make a noise." 
mwm, subs. fem. sing. J \^^ . . 
muppdrsi, Niph. partic. Heb. ^^^ . 
mumisci, subs. plu. masc. This word is by general consent 

translated war-horses. 
mvsdb, sub. sing. cons. Heb. 3^i» . 
musallimuj Pael partic. nom. Heb. a2f . 
musapplkh, Pael partic. masc. sing cons. 
musare, subs, plu., like nadie, " gifts." 
musaru, subs. sing. masc. Heb. '^^l , " to be straight." 
museziU, partic. Shaph. Heb. ^IX} . 
mussiccu, subs. sing. masc. nom. Heb. '^I^.J . 
muty subs. sing. cons. Chald. T\\D . 
mutsa, subs. sing. masc. Heb. i^'p^ . 
Mutsn. TheBiblicaniVD. 



VOCABULARY. 149 



N. 



nabali, subs. masc. sing". g*en. case, Niph. form. Comp. Heb. 

nabiahj subs. sing", masc. cons. 

nabniti, subs. fem. Niph deriv. Heb. nj2 . 

Nabu, ^^ the prophet." Heb. ^5^?J . The god who was sup- 
posed to preside over literature. As befitted the god 
whose name meant a prophet, his consort's name was ►■ ►■ T 
][Vy y>- J::^jg,D.P., Xas-me-tur, "the hearer" (iv. 55, 

26). He is the Biblical "np . The 4th, 9th and 17th days 
of the month were days upon which the King sacrificed to 
Nebo (iv. 32, 17; 42, 31). 

Nabu-sallim, " Nebo completes." 

Nabu-zir-napisti-esir. '' Nebo the seed of life (guides) straight." 

^TT ^^fc = (isaru and isaru. Heb. "IK^J . 

Nacij 2nd sing. imp. Kal. Heb. np3 ^ " to kill," as in Gen. 

iv. 15. 
naciru, subs. masc. sing. Heb. "i?^. . 
naclis, adv. from naclu. Heb. ^72 . 
nacmuj partic. Heb. '\^3 . Niph. deriv. 
nadarij subs. masc. sing. Heb. 1^3 . Talmud fc^^^HJ . 
nadie, subs. plu. masc. Heb. nn^ . 
naduj adj. 
naguj subs. masc. sing., of Accad. origin ^^T ►^^ ^TII'^ 

= ^T H < ("• '' '47)- 

Nahid-Merodach, ^' the majesty of Merodach." Nahid, a Niph. 

deriv. 
nahrj subs. sing. masc. cons. Heb. "in? . The ideograph 

TI T^ means " flowing water." It is thought to have been 

pronounced hid in Accadian. 
nakhalj subs. sing. masc. cons. Heb. ^HJ . 



ISO VOCABULARY. 

namcurj subs, masc, Niph. deriv. of macaru. Comp. Heb. 

namri. adj. J "103 ^ bright, clear. 

napalcattanuy subs. masc. sing. Niph. collective in anu. 

naparka. Niph. deriv. partic. Heb. P!!^ • 

napsat-s'Uj for napsat^su, subs. fern. sing. Heb. ^^\, with 

enclitic pron. 
natsiru, 3rd plu. masc. permans. Kal. Heb. "IV^ . 
niba^ Pael partic. Heb. ^23 ^ ^' to speak." 
niUkhu. Comp. niWihUy '' the zenith." (See nipikhu.) 
nibiss'un, for nibit-^un^ for nibit-sun, subs. plur. (See niba.) 
nibit-s'u, for nibit-su, subs. fem. sing. 
nindra, ist plu. masc. pres. Kal. Heb. "1^53. 
ningtitij subs. plu. fem. Comp. Heb. f^^^^^J . 
NiN-suM-su. See Chalddische Genesis, p. 296. 
Ninua. Biblical "^.l?^?. Nivevi, Luke xi. 32. Literally it 

means the "fish city," for J^^ = ^ ^ (ii. 7, 25) ; Heb. 

l''J3 , " a fish." A city situated upon the banks of the Tigris, 

and the capital of Assyria. Its ancient name was ^yy" ^^ 

^^k TJ ^]^T, Ni-NA-A-ci (k 4629), and means "the 

resting-place of the god" (Delitzsch). Ninua was the 
daughter of Hea (iv. i). 

nipis'a, subs. sing. Heb. DB3 . 

nipikhu. This word occurs in Layard's Inscriptions y pi. xxxix. 
line 33. It is equated with saruru and sahibu (ii. 35, 8). 

niri, subs. sing. masc. Heb. ^'^y^ . The ideograph is ex- 
plained by ni-i-ru (ii. 4, 658). 

Nisan. The first month of the Assyrian year. Assyr. 

^^^.-Hf-"?^ (Heb. m); Accad. ^^ ^^ 

^ , " the month of righteous (sacrifices)." It was 

dedicated to Anu and Bel. (See Trans. Soc. Bib. Arch., iii. 
p. 162). 
nisij subs. plu. masc. Corap. Syr. V^^^ . 



VOCABULARY. 151 

nitsirti, snhs. fem. sing. Lit. "the guarded things." Comp. 

ni-i^ix^ "treasures" (2 Chron. xi. 11). 
nittcdlac, ist plu. masc. pres. Kal. Heb. "^pn . 
nitu. (Root uncertain.) 
nummur^ subs. cons. ^ "l^J . 
nunl^ subs. sing. masc. Heb. I-I^ . 
nupar-surij subs. sing, with 3rd pers. pron. affix. 



padij subs. plu. masc. Comp. Heb. n«3 . Chald. fc^Hi^D for pati, 

like tamdiy for ^«??i^z. 
^«^«r, subs. sing. cons. Heb. l^l . The sense here requires 

the plural. 
■pakadiy subs. masc. gen. case. ^i?2) . 
pakidatj subs. fem. sing. cons. (Same root.) 
palakh, subs. masc. sing cons. Ch. HpB ^ ^^ to worship." 
pan, lit. " face," subs. masc. sing*. Heb. ^^^ . 
panu-a, or panu-ya, subs. sing, masc, with pron. suffix. 
pani, lit. " before." 

Pdppa, PAP H us. Town on west coast of Cyprus. 
parrati, subs. plu. fem. Heb. HIQ . 
parikte, subs. fem. abs. Heb. P'!]S . 
pdskls, adv. from pasaUu. 

pasku, " difficult, broken." J pK^Q . Chald. PP? . 
2)attu, subs. sing. masc. Heb. nns . 
i?i, lit. " mouth." Heb. nsi . 
pikhatUj subs. masc. Comp. Heb. nns . 
pikhutiy subs. plu. o^pikhatu. 
pikittiy for piJiidtij subs. sing. fem. Heb. "ipp . 
j92;/i, subs. masc. sing. 

pukhru, subs. sing. masc. )i^^T>?-T = pu-ukh-ru (ii. 2, 398). 

Purrat. The river Euphrates. Heb. H")? . 
pukuttu. Comp. Heb. Vi??. 



152 VOCABULARY. 



H 



rahi, adj. plur. masc. Heb. 3"]. 

racbu, subs. sing. masc. Heb. 231 ^ " to ride." 

rdhimatj subs. fem. sing. Heb. DHT . 

rama?iiy reflex pron. " Excellently explained by Dr. Oppert. 

He first pointed out its true meaning and its derivation " 

(Sayce). Heb. Dm . 
raruhat, "terror." It is thus translated generally. Prof. 

Sayce thinks the word is rasubhat (^2J^"i), "the fire." 
remu, subs. sing. masc. Comp. Heb. D^Pni (Isa. xlvii. 6). 
ribity subs. plu. cons. Comp. Heb. nUfTji . (For the Accad. 

equivalent see iv. 22, 20, and iv. 16, 52.) 
riduty subs. fem. abs. Heb. nnn ^ " to rule over." 
rimanisy adv. from rimu, " wild bull." Heb. D^?1 . 
rimij lit. "the horned bull." It is also phonetically spelt 

-TT<T ^ ^- 

ristty fem., from risu. Heb. IT'K'K'l . 
rittiy subs. fem. gen. case. Heb. fTiT . 
ritsuti, subs. fem. sing. Heb. nv^ . 
rucubi, subs. plu. masc. Heb. ^Dn . 

7'ukuy adj. An interesting example of the loss of the n . 
Heb. pm. 



say rel. pron. Identical with the later Heb. f in Canticles, 

Judges and Ecclesiastes. 
sadadUy " length," as opposed to rapastUy " width." 
sadiy subs. plu. masc. of saduy "^-^ = XIX f^T / (iii. 70, 117). 

Arab, saddun, " mons." 
saldhaniSy adv. from sildhanu. Heb. ^?}l^ . 



VOCABULARY. 153 

salgu, subs. sing*, masc. nom. case. Heb. *^^ . 

salily subs. masc. sing*, cons. Heb. 7?^ . 

scd-lama^s'i, subs. plu. masc. The ideograph is explained by 
la-mas'-s'u (ii. i, 174). Prof. Sayce g-ives the rabbinic Doi?, 
as connected; the word is of Accadian origin {Lectures, 
p. 157). They are evidently of the same class of collossi 
that are to be seen in the British Museum. 

sallaty subs. fem. sing-. Heb. ^d^, " to elevate." 

Samsu. The Sun-god. Heb. ^p^ . The sun has been deified 
b}^ Eastern nations generally, and his power was looked 
upon as being' considerable. He was supposed to be able 
to heal maladies (iv. 17). His title is generally "the 
judge of heaven and earth" (i. 9, 7), and " the Sun, the lady 
of the world" (iv. 32, 8). The month Tisri was dedicated 
to the " Sun-god, the warrior of the world." Its gender 
was feminine, but exceptions occur where the Sun is re- 
garded as masculine, as in the Bible (Psalm civ. 19). 

Samas'ibni. " The Sun-god created (me)." 

sammay subs. masc. sing, accus. Heb. U'\V} . 

samna. Card, number. Heb. t^^O^ . samna is made fem. 
here, according to the custom of the Semetic languages, 
which is to use a fem. numeral before the masc. gender. 
Compare ^^?)'P ^V?!^ , " four kings" (Gen. xiv. 9), and see 
the remarks on p. 221, of Roediger's Orammar, 21st edit. 

Sams' imuruna. Biblical jiip^^. 

sanaty with prefix, " man of the year." Heb. n^K^ . 

s'dngutiy sing. fem. abs., sangu — magiru. (ii. 27, 41). Assyrian 
7 "1:10 , " to be obedient." 

sanna. Heb. HJ^ . 

sanuvva, adj. with mimmation. Heb. n:K^. 

s'apinUy partic. Kal. Heb. nSD . 

sar, cons, form of sar-u. Heb. "l^ . 

sarcu, adj. agreeing with damu, " white race," as opposed to 
adamatUy " black or red race." 

sarruti, subs. fem. sing. Heb. H^K^ . 

sdsu, demons, pron. 



154 VOCABULARY. 

sasunu, demons, pron. plu. masc. 

satti, for santi. Heb. HJK^ . 

Sebatti. The month equivalent to our January. Heb. 132^ . 
The ideograph for this month is tit . 

sebie, subs. plu. Heb. ^?'^ . 

seciJm, partic. Kal. Heb» 3?^^ . 

sedi^ subs. plu. masc. Explained by se-e-du{i\. i, 174). Heb. 
T??'; and see Deut. xxxii. 17. 

SE-GA, "■ happy." ^ = ma-ga-ru (ii. 7, 28). ^TTT-^ forms 
adjectives in Accadian. 

selapis^ adv. from selapu^ "a fox;" and see the remarks under 
^yiK^ in Gesenius' Diet. 

sellulat. Comp. Heb. D?p , 

sepd, subs. masc. dual., like end, "eyes," uznay "ears." 

seri, subs. plu. Heb. ">5<P' . 

sibittu. Comp. Heb. n^3K^ . 

/icca^, subs. plu. fem. cons. Heb. "^^p . 

sicni. Comp. Heb. 1?^^ . 

sidhiVj subs. sing", masc. cons. Heb. "i^K^ . 

siellulat. See under selullat. 

s'igar, subs. fem. cons. Comp. Heb. "IJD . 

sikhirti, " extent." 

5iZfl5a. Comp. Heb. t^'^hf . 

silate, subs. fem. Comp. Heb. *?f , ^* tranquillity." 

aS^ZZw, /SoZm, A^i^Zi or SoWe. A seaport on the west part of 
north coast of Cyprus. 

iSlluahme, Salamis, 2akafiis. A city at the east end of the 
island of Cyprus, not far from modern Famagosta. 

SIM, subs. plur. Perhaps to be connected with U)^, '^ a plant 
giving forth powerful odours." 

simtu, subs. fem. sing". Heb. ^Pp . 

SIN. "The Moon-god." His Accad. names were TI TET 
A-cu (ii. 48, 48), and >^][J ^^^^yj ? en-zu, which is com- 
pounded in the name of Sennacherib (Bellino Cylinder, i.). 



VOCABULARY. 155 

Contrary to the iisag-e of the Western nations, the g-ender of 
the Moon-g'od was masculine, which is shown by the 
following* line from iv. 2>Zy 3^ • — ^^ The month Sivan 
(dedicated) to the Moon-g-od, eldest son of Bel." The cult 
of the Moon-god was principally carried out in the city Ur. 
The wife of the Moon-g-od was called Nana {La Magie^ 115)- 
The daughter of the Moon-god was called Istar (iv. 31, 2). 

Sin-akhi-irba, i.e., '^ Sin increases brothers." 

s'iparru, subs. sing. masc. This ideograph is explained by 
s'i-jMr-ru (i. i, 112, and see ii. 40, 48). 

sitcirij subs. sing, masc, Iphteal deriv. Heb. p^ . 

sit-cu-nu, 3rd plu. permans, Iphteal. Heb. |?^ . 

situte, subs. fem. plu. 

subat-s'u, for suhaUm, subs. fem. sing. Heb. '^P'l , " to dwell.'' 

suUti^ subs, fem sing. (Same root.) 

sucun^ imper. 2nd sing, masc, imper. Kal. 

suklul. Shaphel deriv. Heb. /"PS . 

sulmu, subs. sing. masc. Heb. ^w^ . 

sum, subs. sing, masc cons. Heb. ^^ . 

sumelu, adj. Heb. ^i<b'^ . 

supar-saki. Conjectural reading, supar, means "over;" sak, 
Accad. deriv. = chief; hence, "man over my officers." 

supul, subs. sing. cons. Comp. Heb. "^7??^ • 

surman, subs. sing. masc. Comp. Syr. Ki^21^K^, pinus, "pine 
tree." " Hoc shar-hin Arabicus prophetarum interpres ponit 
. pro KVTTdpiao-osj Isai. xxxvii. 24 (Castell, Lex, p. 937). 

surrute, subs. fem. plur. Heb. "TlK^ ^ ^'to fight." 

s'us'i, lit. " the animal from the east." Heb. DID . 

smsu. Comp. Heb. W^W^ . 

sutesur, lit. " setting straight." Istaphal deriv. Heb. "W) , 
" to be straight." 



IS6 VOCABULARY. 



T 



taMatsi, for tamkhatsi. Tiphel deriv. from makhatsu. Heb. 

taJihlupij Tiphel deriv., subs. sing;, masc. ^^ , " to cover." 
tallacti, subs. plur. fern. Tiphel deriv. Comp. Heb. "^^n . 
tamartij subs. plur. J '^J^^? . 
Tametsi. The TS-massus of classical authors; in the middle 

of Cyprus, 29 miles S.E. of Soloe (Smith, Class. Diet.), 
tamsil. Tiphel deriv. Heb. ^^9 > " similitude." 
tamtivj subs. sing. fem. gen. case, with mimmation. Heb. 

ninri . 

tapdhur, 3rd sing. fem. aor. Kal. Heb. *tps . 

tarUty fem. abs. sing. Tiphel deriv. Heb. nn*! . 

Tarlm, Tirhakah. Biblical nj^rjn.ri . TedpKav of Strabo, TapKo?, 

or TapaKos of Manetho. 
tartsi, subs. masc. sing. 
tasUr, 3rd sing. fem. aor. Kal. Heb. "'?p' . 
tazlZj 3rd sing. fem. aor. Kal. J nt . 
Tel'Assuri. Occurs in the form of Telassar (Isai. xxxvii. 1 2). 

Thus— "i'^«^j;i . 
tib. Tiphel deriv. cons. Heb. ^^J3 . 
TiMMA, " rope, cable." See Syl. No. 93. 
timme, subs. masc. sing. 
tsaMy subs. plu. masc. Heb. ^^^^ . 
tsdbi-mitpani, i.e., ^' bowmen." 
tsakhra, adj. sing. Heb. *l^VV . 

tsakhrij adj. masc. (Same root.) t^'gh = tsa-ahh-ru (ii. 48, 20). 
tsatsdtc, subs. masc. sing., " image or statuary work." Cotnp. 

Heb. ^'V^y.y (2 Chron. iii. 10.) 
tsidit, subs. plu. fem. Heb. n*]^)? (Gen. xlii. 25). 
Tsidunni. The Phoenician " fishing" city. Heb. i^l^V . 
tsmi, subs. plu. masc. Heb. |t*^ . 
tsimitti. Comp. Heb. ^l^^. 



VOCABULARY. 157 

tsiprij subs. masc. sing*, g-en. case. Heb. ^?^, " to heap up." 

TsiR, from Accad. 

tsirussu, for tsiru-su, prep, "svith enclitic pron. 

tsit, fern. abs. Heb. 5<Vt , '' to g-o forth." 

tsuhhubuy subs. plu. Heb. 2)f (Levit. xi. 29). 

tsumavii, subs. masc. g-en. case. Heb. ^9^ ? " thirst ;" used of 

thirsty {i.e., desert) land, Isai. xliv. 3. Similar forms are 

samami, "heavens," 7nami, "waters." 
Tsurri. Biblical "Tl^ ; Aram. ^"J^ ; Greek Tvpoy. 
tsutsij subs. masc. plu. of tsutsu. Heb. }*^V , " a flower." 
tugulti, fem. abs. sing. 
tula, subs. sing-, masc. accus. case. Heb. ^^. 



U 



u. Heb. -l , " and." Note the frequent use in this inscription 

of ^instead of ^y>-JgQ[. 
ucci, I St sing", masc. aor. Kal, for unci. Heb. nD3 . 
ucin, ist sing. aor. Aphel. Heb. |-13 . 
Mcni, subs. masc. sing*, gen. case. It is called tJOf "4^^. 

Heb. n^^ J which proves it to have been a white stone of 

some sort {Trans. Soc. Bib. Arch., vol. vi. : Les noms de 

VAirain, etc.). 
udannin, ist pers. sing. aor. Pael, from J dananu, "to be 

strong." 
uddisj ist sing. aor. Pael of khadasu, "to be new." Heb. ^1^ . 
Udume. Biblical D'"l« . New Test. 'EScoV. 
uduri, subs. plu. masc. Heb. "•'JV. • 
uffaru {agar), subs. masc. sing. A syllabary makes v^aru ~ agar. 

Its numbers are k 4403, k 4319, k 4604, ® 279. 
uhhallih, ist pers. sing. aor. Pael. Heb. P/H , "to despoil" 

(2 Chron. xxviii. 21). 
ulluti, prep. A curious compound of this word with anacu 

occurs in i. 59, 55, ul-la-nu-cu, "I am from ancient times." 



158 VOCABULARY. 

ultUj prep. Prof. Sayce compares Ethiopic " westa " {Lectures, 

P- I05)- 
ummanu, subs. plu. masc. Heb. pon ^ lit. ^^ many soldiers." 

^} = }} ^^ (ii. 2, 293); Heb. t<?y. ^y]f = ^y ^^y i^y 

(i. 21, 64); Heb. n«P. 

ummij lit. " mothers/' plu. fem. of ummu, Heb. D^ . 

unammcra, ist pers. sing. obj. aor. Pael. 

unute, subs. fem. plu. Heb. pn . 

upahhir, ist pers. sing. aor. Pael. ^ "inn . 

urdj ist sing. obj. aor. Kal. Heb. ni^. 

urabbi, ist pers. sing. masc. aor. Pael. Heb. HIT . 

uraccis', ist pers. sing. aor. Pael. Heb. D?n . 

uraddiy ist sing. aor. Pael. 

urds's'iba, ist pers. sing. obj. aor. Pael. Arab, rashaba, 

usdski, ist sing. aor. Shaphel. Heb. nj5^. 

W5«55i sunuti, ist sing. aor. Shaphel. ^^^ , with plu. masc. pron. 

urattdj ist pers. aor. Pael. J nm . 

U7'ikhte. The word literally means " quick." 

Uru. The Biblical >1« of Gen. xi. 28. Now Mugheir. XaUal<ov 
TToXis (Gesenius). 

nrrukhiSy adv. " quickly." 

usaclil, ist sing. aor. Shaphel. Heb. ?I?3 . 

usadffil, ist sing. aor. Shaphel. J ?n . 

usakhbiba, ist pers. sing. aor. Shaphel. 

usaldiduni, 3rd plu. perf. Shaphel. J nB' . 

usalizUj ist sing. aor. Shaphel. Heb. tby . 

usalmdj ist sing. masc. obj. aor. Kal. Chald. D^p ^ " to com- 
plete." 

usarkhits, ist sing. masc. aor. Shaphel. X^l- 

usarrid, ist sing. masc. aor. Shaphel. Heb. TTJ. 

usdsdhir, ist sing. aor. Shaphel. Heb. "ip^. 

usds'khira, ist sing. masc. aor. Shaphel. Heb. "'HD . 

usatritsa, ist sing. aor. Shaphel. ;^ j'ln . 

usatsbat, ist sing. masc. pres. Shaphel. Arab, tsabata* 

usatsbita, ist sing. masc. pres. Shaphel. 



VOCABULARY. 159 

useli-suva, ist pers. sing. aor. Shaphel. Heb. n?y, with pers. 

pron. su and enclitic va. 
usemid, ist sing*, aor. Shaphel. Heb. ^py. 
usqnsj ist sing. masc. aor. Shaphel. J K^^y, episu = banu, 

"to make" (ii. 60, 41). 
useserav-va, ist sing. aor. Shaphel. Heb. "1^^ , and enclitic va. 
usesib, ist sing. aor. Shaphel. Heb. ^Pl . 
usmalli, ist sing. aor. Shaphel. Heb. ^/^ . 
ussi, subs. fern. sing. Heb. ^^'^^ . 
utir, I st sing', aor. Aphel. Heb. '^•IPi . 
uzairij ist sing. aor. Kal. Comp. Aram. TT . 
uzna, subs. dual. Heb. Q^^t^ . 



va^ conjunction. Heb. \ 



Ydtnana. Cyprus. The usual name for the island of Cyprus 
in the cuneiform inscriptions. It was situated^ according to 
W.A.I, (iii. II, 29), malac vii. yumi ina Itabal tamti erib Samsi, 
" a journey of seven days in the middle of the sea of the 
setting sun" {i.e., Mediterranean). 

yaudi. Biblical T\y[7\\ . 

yubil, 3rd sing. aor. Aphel. Heb. np|l . Used of a man who 
through sickness wastes away. 

yuciUj 3rd sing. masc. aor. Aph. I^S . 

yuvms's'aru, 3rd plu. masc. aor. Pael. Heb. "ip^ . 

yumas's'ir, 3rd sing. masc. aor. Pael. 

yum% subs. plu. of yumu. Heb. Q^'' . 

yunaccir, 3rd sing. masc. aor. Pael. 

yunassik, 3rd sing. masc. aor. Pael. Heb. P^} . 

yupalladhy 3rd sing. masc. aor. Pael. tD73 in Hiphil, " to 
deliver from danger." 



i6o VOCABULARY. 

yuracsaj 3rd sin^. masc. obj. aor. Kal. Heb. Dp"!. 

yusezibUy 3rd sing*, masc. aor. Kal. J 3Ty . 

yusesibuni, 3rd plu. masc. perf. Heb. "^P) . 

yutarruy 3rd plu. masc. aor. Pael. Heb. "lirj . 

yutir, 3rd sing. masc. aor. Aph. ; and see Sayce, Grammar 

(Bagster), p. 6^. 
yutsallani, 3rd sing", masc. obj. aor. Pael, with poss. pron. suffix 

ni. Chald. kW. 



zicari. Comp. Heb. "^PJ . 

zicir^ subs. sing. masc. Heb. ">5.!.» For the use of this word 

for " name," see Exod. iii. 1 5. 
zirlaU, subs. plu. masc. 



INDEX. 



Abi-baal, 105 

Aburamu, 13 

Adhmezu, 107 

Adrammelech, i 

Akbaru, 10 1 

Akhazel, 13 

Akhimelec, 105 

Akhni, 127 

Amanus, 89 

Amgarruna, i.e. Ekron, 105 

Amuk, Temple of, 15 

Aphek, 119 

Araske, 2 

Armenia, 2 

Aruadi, i.e. Arvad, 10$ 

Arzani, 4 

Asordanes, 2 

Assur-bani-pal, 6 

Assur-ebil-mucin-pal, 2 

Atsdiidi, i.e. Ashdod, 105 

Babylon : its History, 7 

Bahlu, 103 

Bailu, 1 01 

Bamba, 13 

Bazu, 59 

Bel-basa, 65 

Bei-idinna, 115 

Betb-Ammon, 105 

Beth-Dakkuri, 49 

Bicni, 69 

Bindidi, 127 

Borsippa, 51 

Buaiva, 127 



Buccunanniahpi, 127 

Bucur-Ninip, 129 

Budah, 10 1 

Budil, 105 

Bunubu, 127 

Busiru, 127 

Butsuzu, 107 

Cidrus'i, 105 

Cilicia, 41 

Cimmeri, 41, 43 

Cis'u, loi 

Colossi, 83 

Culu-Baal, 105 

Cundi — Sanduarri, its King, 33, 37 

Cus'i, i.e. Ethiopia, in 

Damas'u, 107 

Dananu, 13 

Dhebet-ai, 13 

Diahtani, 101 

Duba, 43 

Dumus'i, 107 

Dupiate, loi 

Eulstura, 105 

Ediabal, 105 

Edom, 55 

Eparna, 66 

Eponyms, List of, 13 

Eriesu, 107 

Esarhaddon, King of Assyria, b.c. 
681-668 : Victory at Khanir- 
abbat, 3, 2 r ; Addresses to, 3 ; 
Division of Egypt into twenty 
provinces, 6 ; His buildings, 6 ; 



l62 



INDEX, 



Death, 7 ; Restoration of Manas- 
seh, 8 ; Titles of, 17, 19 ; Arabian 
War, 52, 53 ; Egyptian Campaign, 
109 

Gahpani, loi 

Gambulai, 65 

Gartikhadatsti, 107 

Gubli, 105 

Gutium, 45 

Icaus'u, 105 

Ikhilu, loi 

Iptikhardiesu, 129 

Iskaluna, i.e. Ascalon, 105 

Is'khut, 123 

Ispacai, 47 

Ispimadhu, 129 

Istu-Rammanu-aninu, 13 

Ithuander, 107 

Kadas'iah, loi 

Kausgabri, 103 

Khabanamru, loi 

Khabis'u, 10 1 

Khaldidi, 10 1 

Khars'iyaesu, 127 

Khatkhiribi, 127 

Khazail — his son Yautah, 52 

Khaziti, i.e. Gaza, 105 

Kbazu, 61 

Khimuni, 129 

Khininsi, 127 

Kissos, 107 

Eulliiniri, 1 15 

Kurium, 107 

Lailie, 63 

Lakhiri, 99 

Lameintu, 129 

Lebanon, 79 

Lidir, 107 

Lizards (winged), 121 

Madai, 67 

Magalani, loi 

Magannu (Sinai), 121 

Mahba, i.e. Moab, 103 

Manasseh, 8 

Mannai, 45 
Mans'acu, 101 



Mantimeankhe, 129 
Marlarim, 13 
Mekhranu, 45 
Melukha, 117 
Memphis, 125 
Metinti, 105 
Milciasapa, 105 
Mutsuri, 103 
Nabu-akha-iddina, 13 
Nabu-akhi-ui-es, 13 
Nabu-bel-utsur, 13 
Nabu-sallim, 51 
Nabu-zir-napisti-esir, 4 
Nadkhu, 127 
Nahid-Marduk, 4 
Nakhtikhuruansini, 129 
Nakhce, 127 
Natho, 125 

Nebuchadnezzar : List of wines of- 
fered to Marduk, 93 
Necho, 125 
Nergal-sar-utsur, 13 
Niah, i.e. Thebes, 129 
Nikharu, loi 
Nin-gal-iddina, 4 
Nineveh, 41 
Nisroch, i 
Nurie, 107 
Pakhnuti, 129 
Pakruru, 127 
Paphos, 107 
Parnaci, 45 
Partacca, 69 
Patusarra, 67 
Pisabdinuti, 129 
Pisan-Hor, 125 
Pi-supt, 127 
Pitanu, 45 

Pizatti k h u runpicu, 129 
Pudhubisti, 127 
Pylagorus, 105 
Ramateya, 69 
Rapikhi, 119 
Sabaka, 5 
Sabatok, 5 
Sais, 125 



INDEX. 



163 



Salamis, 107 
Sallim-bella-assib, 13 
Samas-casid-aibi, 13 
S'ams'imuruna, 105 
Sapi-Bel, 67 
Sarludari, 125 
Sar-nuri, 13 
Saulmugina, 7 
Sennacherib : Deatli, i 
Property, 2 

Sharesar, i 

Sidir-Eparna, 67 

S'irara, 79 

Siyautu, 129 

S'izu, 33 

Soloi, 107 

S'us'inku, 127 

Tabal, 43 

Tabuakhti, 127 

Tabua, 57 

Taini, 129 

Tamassus, 107 

Tanis, 127 



Bequest of 



Teahri — his Sons, 52 

Tel-Assur, 45 

Tiglath-Pileser I.— his Plantations, 

89 
Tirhakah : Battle against Sabatok, 5 ; 

Alliance with Bahlu, 5 ; Siege of 

Memphis, 7 
Tsabnuti, 127 
Tsidon (see Zidon) 
Tsihnu, 125 
Tsikha, 129 
Tsili-Bel, 105 
Tsurri, 103 
Umman-Aldas, 4 
Unamunu, 127 
Unas'agus'u, 107 
Uppits, 69 
Yapah, 10 1 

Yatnana, i.e. Cyprus, 107 
Yaudi, i.e. Judah, 103 
Zanas'ana, 69 
Zidon, 33 



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