(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "History of the Fifteenth Regiment, Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry, from October, 1861, to August, 1865, when disbanded at the end of the war"

REYNOLD^ M'CTORICAL 
iGENEALOGY COLLECTION 





ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01757 0554 



April Sixth and Seventh, 1862 November Twenty-Second, 1906 

ADDRESS 

OF 

Mai. H. C. McArthur 

(FIFTEENTH IOWA VOLUNTEERS) 
AT THE 

DEDICATION OF THE 

Fifteenth Iowa Regimental Monument 

ON THE 

BATTLEFIELD OF SHILOH, TENN. 

NOVEMBER TWENTY-SECOND 
NINETEEN HUNDRED SIX 



Governor Cummins, Members of the Iowa Commission, Comrades 
of the Old Army, Ladies and Gentlemen: 

"Truth is mighty,. and will prevail." The principle of truth, 
justice, and right did prevail on this battlefield in 1862, and, we are 
happy to say, again in this year 1906, else survivors of the 15th and 
16th Iowa Volunteers would not be present on this occasion 
with survivors of other Iowa regiments to recognize heroic 
action, pay homage for noble deed and valuable service rendered 
in preserving the best Government on earth. With you, Gov- 
ernor Cummins, and the noble people of our beloved State, we 
rejoice at the completion of this monument with the exact truth 
inscribed thereon. It is a good omen when patriots are honored 
and patriotism exalted. It did not, however, require this monument 
to convince the survivors of the 15th Iowa Volunteers, of the will- 
ingness and desire of our people to honor her sons who, in this, the 

8851—1 



first great field fight of the war, and up to that time the greatest 
battle of modern times, bore the Stars and Stripes in victorious con- 
flict. Our citizens, tho crowded with the busy cares of life, remember 
well, how forty-four years ago the 6th and 7th of last April, armies 
were contending here over a principle vital to the very existence of 
our Government; and that Iowa had eleven regiments engaged 
upon this battlefield who did nobly in defense of the flag. 
This ground is made sacred and historic by deeds of valor 
and sacrifice in the noblest cause — human liberty. We cele- 
brate the achievements of patriot heroes. The nation's life 
had been assailed, defenders sprang to the call, ready to die that 
the nation might live. Altho one of them from 1861 to 
1865, and proud of the distinguished honor, I claim nothing unduly 
when I say the members of the 15th Iowa Infantry Volunteers 
deserve the approbation so freely bestowed. What your soldiers 
bore of danger here, no one can adequately describe. The command 
arrived at Pittsburg Landing from St. Louis, Mo., about daylight on 
Sunday morning, April 6, 1862; soon artillery was heard in the dis- 
tance, the command, in light marching order, was hurriedly disem- 
barked, forming line on top of the hill. About 8 o'clock a. m.. 
General Grant arrived, and while conversing with Colonel Reid of 
the 15th Iowa, a staff officer approached in/great haste, reporting 
General McClernand's right sorely pressed and desiring re-enforce- 
ments. Colonel Reid with the 15th and Colonel Chambers with the 
16th Iowa, were directed thither. Between 8 and 9 o'clock a. m., 
both regiments were put in rapid motion toward the point designated. 
The recollection of that march to this point of attack, is as vivid to 
my mind as if made but yesterday. We hear again the command of 
the officers, the roar of distant artillery and musketry; we see 
dashing orderlies, the rapid advance, the forming line, the charging 
column, the wounded, the dying, the dead; oh, how plainly we see, in 
panoramic view, the scenes of that morning. 

How well do we remember the discpuraging remarks made by the 
wounded and stragglers — a very trying experience for new troops on 
the eve of battle. A terrible volley of musketry in advance satisfied 
us the fighting line was not far away. 

"Hotter and fiercer grows the din, 
Deeper the panting troops press in." 

While m,arching thru yonder field the band struck up "The Girl 
I Left Behind Me." This familiar tune seemed to nerve the men to 
step with firmer tread, determined to do their duty when the battle's 
front was reached. We were marching in column of fours, therefore 
unprepared to resist attack, neither thinking that — 
"In these woods there waiting lay 
Hidden lines of dingy gray. 
Thru which we must cleave our way." 



The front of the column had passed two-thirds across that field. 

"Hark! on the right a rifle rings, 
A rolling volley back it brings. 
Crash, crash, along the line there runs 
The music of a thousand guns. 
Spurring the panting, steaming steed, 
Dash orderlies at top of speed." 

The discharge of artillery into our very faces was the nature of 
our reception. We formed line of battle from the flank, the 16th 
Iowa promply taking position on our right, and for two hours, 
from 10 to 12 o'clock, forenoon, these two Iowa regiments had 
their engagement, unsupported on the right or left by any other 
troops. They had been ambushed some distance back of the front 
general line of battle by a Confederate force which had passed 
thru a gap in our line, which we now know existed to a damaging 
extent, between the left of Sherman and McClernand's right, altho 
so unexpectedly assaulted, officers and men behaved with great gal- 
lantry. Another hath said: " Seldom, if ever, had older troops with- 
stood the shock of battle with greater fortitude or more heroic 
courage than did these new Iowa regiments. The men were unused 
to war. This was their first experience in skirmish or battle. The 
command had received their arms but a few days before. No oppor- 
tunity of learning their use until brought face to face in mortal com- 
bat with a very active foe. The blast of artillery and volley of 
musketry, coming so unexpectedly as it did, together with the forma- 
tion in which we were moving, the wonder of it all is, the command, 
had not. been driven in utter confusion from the field. Not so, how- 
ever. Under a raking cross-fire the regiment was changed from flank 
to line of battle; moved forward like veterans, forced the enemy from 
their concealments, and held this position for two hours, until, to 
escape capture, it was ordered to retire. The casualties of our regi- 
ment, 206, as per the revised records of Iowa, disck)ses the character 
of our engagement. The time the enemy was held in check evidences 
the staying quality of these Iowa boys — worthy followers of the older 
Iowa troops. This proved a bloody baptism for the regiment, but 
glorious in patriotic achievement. Officers and men counted no effort 
too great nor dangerous, nor sacrifice too dear while defending the 
"old flag." 

"How they'cheered and how they rallied, 
How they charged mid shot and shell, 
How they bore aloft the banner. 
How they conquered, how they fell." 

Nowhere on this field, nor any other field of battle for the Union, 
was the honor of Iowa put in jeopardy by the action of her soldiery, 
and upon no field of conflict did she achieve greater honor for stal- 



wart bravery and patriotic devotion than on this historic ground. 
They were battling for the unity of the nation, for the very life of 
the republic. 

War, dread war; here on that eventful day it was indeed a reality; 
it seems like a dream, yet terrible. Intervening time has to a great 
extent healed the wounds caused by cruel war. We thank God it is 
so. We hope and believe no future act will mar the beauty of the 
dear old flag, stain its purity or degrade its authority. It is a guar- 
antee of protection to ourselves and children within the confines of 
every civilized nation on earth. Isn't such a flag, with such complete 
and happy protection, a precious boon? Its authority was upheld on 
this hotly contested ground by the Unio« army, and Iowa troops 
contributed their full share toward the grand result. 

The commonwealth of Iowa believing her soldiers performed their 
duty here faithfully and well, have, in a spirit of magnanimity and 
patriotism, caused these monuments to be erected — aglorious.consum- 
mation of generous desire and noble intention. This expression of 
their gratitude and confidence is greatly appreciated by the sur- 
vivors of the 15th Iowa Veteran Volunteers. It is a very great 
satisfaction in being fully assured, as we are, that the memory 
of our fallen comrades who gave their last and best measure of 
devotion, their lives, that the Union might be preserved, and 
that the deeds and sacrifices of all are enshrined in the hearts 
of a greatful people. We are happy in the belief that this block, of 
granite must defy the corroding touch of time if it fully represents 
the lasting gratitude the people of Iowa" have for what her 
patriotic sons did here on April 6, 1862. And now, here upon this 
spot made memorable and sacred by loyal sacrifice in a noble 
cause, to you Governor Cummins, the members of the Iowa Shiloh Com- 
mission, and thru you to the citizens of patriotic Iowa, in behalf of 
the survivors of the 15th Iowa Volunteers, and. for those whose 
white tents are pitched on "fames eternal camping ground," I thank 
all most heartily and sincerely for this magnificent monument, a tes- 
timonial of our good conduct, devotion to duty, flag and couptry 
in time of national peril. 




\\'illi:iiii ( ". StidKiT. in liis uniform as a soldier in tlie Fifteenth 
li'\\;i Inrantrv, iilionl 1S63, ;j member of tlie Rose Expedition. 



,^-^. IK '^^/o 








Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center 



http://www.archive.org/details/historyoffifteenOOinbelk 




H.T.Reid 

COUSr^lOWA VOLS. 
BRIG.GEN'L YOIS. 



msTOK."^ 



OF THE 

J 



FIFTEENTH REGIMENT, 



Iowa Veteran 



VOLUNTEER INFANTxHY, 



FROM 



OCTOBER, 1861, TO AUGUST. 1865, 



WHEN DISBANDED AT EHD OF THE WAR. 



Vota ^ita Mea. 



' KEQtCUK: 
R/.B. PGDE"!>< son, PR 
1887. 



R. B. OGDEN & SON, PRINT, 

KEOKUK. 



1695770 

PREFACE. 



This History of the Fifteenth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, claims 
for itself, no literary merit. — It is defective in many points, 
but the compiler and reviser, and the officers of the Regimental 
Association are free from blame. Circulars have been sent to all 
of the members, and if any of the Company Histories are deficient 
in matter and reminiscence, the criticism, if any, must fall where it 
belongs. 

Upon the death of the beloved General Hedrick, whose heart 
was in the history, the undersigned was requested by Major Higley 
the Vice President, and Major McArthur the Secretary of the 
Association, to revise the work. 

Having been the Colonel of the Regiment, and its Brigade 
Commander for so long a time, this labor has been a most delicate 
one, for reasons obvious to all . 

Others have kindh' written wliat has been said personal to him- 
self, and what he has written as to others, has been done, he be- 
lieves impartially and truthfully. He has personally written 
the history of the Field and Staff", not including that portion 
referring to himself. 

The labor of the work has been done by Mr. Loren S. Tyler, 
formerly of Company H, who was selected as compiler, and all 
will admit that it has been w^ell done. The rolls and lists of casu- 
alties, and all the records involving great and anxious care, have 
been examined, and the History prepared by General Pomutz, re- 
examined, corrected and copied by Mr. Tyler. 

He deserves and will have the thanks of the Regiment. 

He and I are aware of its defects, but send it to the Regiment 
as a record of their camps, marches and battles, in which the ser- 
vices of officers and men will do them honor forever. 

WM. W. BELKNAP. 



PARADE REST! ATTENTION TO ORDERS. 



Headquarters Fifteenth Iowa Veteran Infantry Association, 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa., iSSj. 

Comrades: During the third Reunion of Crockei-'s Iowa Bri- 
gade, held at Iowa City, September 23 and 24, 1885, over one- 
hundred of the survivors of our regiment met in the City Hall, at 
2 o'clock, p. m., September 24, General Wm. W. Belknap in the 
chair, A. M, Brobst, G. Co., Secretary. A motion was unani- 
mously adopted, that we organize the 15th Iowa Veteran Infantry 
Association; a committee appointed to nominate Officers for the 
ensuing term, reported General John M. Hedrick, of Ottumwa, 
President; Major Mortimer A. Higley, of Cedar Rapids, Vice- 
President; and Major Henry C. McArthur, Memj^his, Mo., 
Secretary and Treasurer, and they were unanimously elected. It 
was then resolved to have compiled and published as soon as pos- 
sible, a History of our Regiment, which is one that every man 
who served in it will be pleased to peruse, and future generations 
will read with pride. We are moving rapidly beyond the Picket 
line, not to return, and as "We are the men who made the history, 
it is our duty to ourselves to have it correct in our day". 

The following comrades were elected Regimental and Com- 
pany historians : 

For Field and Staff. — General Wm. W. Belknap, Washington, 
D. C. 

For Medical Department. — Colonel Wm. H. Gibbon, Chariton, 
Iowa. 



6 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

For Co. A. — Maiinus Rhynsburger, Orange City, Sioux county, 
Iowa. 

For Co. B. — Wilson Lumpkin, Fort Dodge, Iowa. 

For Co. C. — ^Joshua B. \"ancleave, Louisville, Cass County, 
Nebraska. 

For Co. D. — Col. J. S. Porter, Ewing, Holt County, Nebraska. 

For Co. E. — Ben Johnston, Keosauqua, Iowa. 

For Co. F. — Maj, Throckmorton, Sidney, Iowa. 

For Co. G. — Albert M. Brobst, Knoxville, Iowa. 

For Co. H. — L. S. Tyler, Keokuk, Iowa. 

For Co. I. — Col. J. M. Reid, Keokuk, Iowa. 

For Co. K. — John S. Bos worth, Washington, D. C. 

Their reports are herewith presented with Rosters giving the name 
of every man, who from '61 to '65 served in the Regiment. The 
first showing the Original members, and additional enlistments; the 
second, the Veterans; third, the Drafted men, which show 1,900 
men were mustered into the Regiment; fourth, members and 
present residence as far as known. The Roll of Casualties will 
convince all that the Regiment was at the front; and the Official 
History, compiled by General George Pomutz, from the Regi- 
mental books and returns, in the fall of 1865, with full reports of 
the Battles, Sieges and Expeditions, in which the Regiment parti- 
cipated, with many interesting reminiscences included in connection 
with their proper dates, form a true story of 3'our services in the 
army which your historians trust, the "Grim and Grizzled Survivors 
of the Fight," their families and friends, will find worthy of perusal. 

Officiai,. 
H. C. McARTHUR, M. A. HIGLEY, 

Secretary and Treasurer. Vice President, 

15 Iowa Veteran Infantrv Association. 



T=> A "FP.n-" T 



ERRATA, 

Page 12, first paragraph, reads "Tlie Regiment was iniisteied in 

on March 14. 1882," should be March 14, 1802. 
Page Ifi, 3d paragraph, 2d Hne, should be Vincennes, Indiana, 

instead Vincennes, Iowa. 
Page 58, last paragraph, 4th line, should be Sunday instead of 

Saturday. 
Page 54, first paragraph, 4th line, (June 1, 1800,) should be June 3. 
Page 58, Gth line from bottom, should read August, 18G3, instead 

of August 18, '63. 
Page 116, 6th line in 2d paragraph, should read morale instead 

morals. 
Page 170, head line, leads Roster of G Company, should read 

Roster of K Cumpanv. 



S Hi story of the Fifteenth Regiment 

For Co. A. — Marinus Rhynsburger, Orange City, Sioux county, 
Io\va. 

For Co. B. — Wilson Lumpkin, Fort Dodge, Iowa. 

For Co. C. — ^Joshua B. Vancleave, Louisville, Cass County, 
Nebraska. 

For Co. D. — Col. J. S. Porter, Ewing, Holt County, Nebraska. 

F-^'- f^n. E. — Ben Johnston, Keosauqua, Iowa. 

I 

I 



of 
fii 
se 
nr 

P 
c 
I 
1 
I 



with their proper dates, form a true story or yuui o.-...^^. 

army which your historians trust, the "Grim and Grizzled Survivors 
of the Figlit," tlieir families and friends, will find worthy of perusal. 

Okmciai,. 

H. C. McARTHUR, M. A. HIGLEY, 

Secretary and Treasurer. Vice President, 

15 Iowa Veteran Infantrv Association, 



I=^J^K.T I. 



ONE THOUSAND MEN WANTED. 

RENDEZVOUS AT KEOKUK. ORGANIZATION. 

MUSTERED INTO THE UNITED STATES SERVIOE 

HISTORY OF THE FIELD AND STAFF. 

OUR SURGEONS. THE OOMPANIES. 



mUNTECRS 

FOR THE WAEl 

m mmm abie-bodid m 

Between tke ages of 18 & 45 fears, wanted 




To serve as Infantry, for Three years, unless sooner discharged. 



This Regiment k now being raised under authority of Gen. Fremont, and the 
authorit;^ of the Gorernor of Iowa, and will rendezTons at Keokuk, and as soon 
as organized, will be at once clothed and equiped for actire service. 

Subsistence will be furnished at the expense of the United States at place of 
Rendezvous, to Volunteers drilling whilst Companies are being raised, in accord* 
ance with instruction to recruiting officers. 

STATE OF IOWA, ADjrUTANT BEflEMAM^ OFFICE,! 

^ ^^^ „ ^ . ^ , DaTenport, Octofccr 10, 1861. J 

At a meettns of the Commnnder-ln-C!hief and the of ttcers of Ma staff, held In the office of the 
Adjnt^nt General, on the 10th day of October A.D. 1§61, the followlnr order was ananlmonsly 
adopted t 

GENERAL ORDER No. 37. 
No.II. That no citizen, inhabitant or resident of this State, snWect to do mllitarr duty 
either in the Volunteer or Reserve Militia, shall hereafter enllstor enaase to enter the milita- 
ry seryice of any other State. AndaU persons liable to military ddty within this State, are 
hereby prohibited from eollstlne, or a«reelnv to enlist, or assembllnir with a view, or for the 
vnrposeof entering the serrice of any other State. NorshaUany person within this State, 
liable to do military dnty.enter into the service of the United States* except under the express 
authority of this State; PROVIDED, That this order is not Intended to prevent the Govern- 
ment of the United States from recruiting for the Rcfrnlar Army, pultrsuant to the Acts of Con- 
Sress, and proTlded further that this Order, and the next fitacceedlnsr one, does not apply to 
lie Comminy now belnr raised at Dubuque for the « Lyon Regrlment.'' 
No. III. That all persons, whether residents of this State or otherwise, and all officers ex- 
cept regularly authorized officers of the United States, recruiting for the United States RendiQr 
-^!!!^^' '^If' hereby prolilblted from enlisting, or in any manner raislnar men within this State 
IS? .T ". »J?^."r *"'■ **** purpose of enterlna Into the military service of any other State or of 
* w'^*^?^•l wJ**:^*?***^* *" pursuance of the lawsand authority of the State of Iowa. 

Ho. 1 V . 1 Imt the Adjutant Geiiirar c.f tms State be charged with the duty of aeeing that neither of the above Orders (Nos. II and III) 
w nolKted. 

And the iiai.l AdjuUnt General, when salisfied that either or any of the above Orders (Nos. II and III) has been or i« being violated, shaU 
order all officers or persons violating Kueh ordora under military arrest, unless the Commander-iu-Uhiof o^erwise directs, to be attached to^ enter 
and serve as privates in any eompany or regiment being raised within this State, under authority thereof. 
By Older of tho Commander-inChie^ 

N. B. BAB3BR, Ai^. (Sen. of State of Iowa. 



GENERAL ORDER No. S3. 

AOJT GBNERAL'S OFFIOB of the STATE of IOWA, ) 
V-* •■ t. V ■ J ..v • , Datenport, Oct. 3 1, I86I. C 

inronnatioD has Boon received at this olBco that ponons claiming to be recruiting officers from other States, are, at various ooints in this 
State, endeavoring to enlist citii^ns of this Stile for military service in other Stattg. These persons are holding out inducomonts'of hiiher pay 



Gtovatnor of the State. 



and higher Iwuntics than those provided by law, and other induiMineuts as of clothing, arma, 4o., ,ill of which are false and unfoanitod. By 
means of these pretcnioa citiwms of our State arc led to abandon the service pf their State, thus depriTrina thenwelves of the support of the State, 
and the 8t«to of their services. Tho citizens of Iowa, subject to military duty, are warned not to onlnt under any such persons, and all sooh 
perauns are hereby strictly forbidden to continue such cr'istnionts, at their peril. Tho otBoer at Dubuqe, enlisting one company for the 'LyOn 
.Regiment, is not embraced in this order. By order of the Comma ndey-in-Chief, If.^ BAKER, Adj. Gen. Of lowa. 

I hereby certify ^t I am insbrat^ted by the Oommanaei^rln-dhiet; of the State of Iowa, to see that the above 
orders are rlKlaly enloroed, and ttarther notify all peraonft that Maj. Gen. Fremont has expressly retused to grant 
•™i^|^*o?fJSl!S.*" '"^y' men to reeraitiii the State of Iowa, except it ia done with and by the consent <3 the 

D. B. HILLIS, Aid de Camp. 



Keokuk, Oct, 14, 1861. 



Col. 15th Reg. Iowa Volunteers. 



VOLUNTEERS FOR THE WAR' 



ONE THOUSAND ABLE-BODIED MEN 

Between the Ages of 18 and 45 Years, Wanted, 
FOR the 

FIFTEENTH REGIMENT OF IOWA VOLUNTEERS! 

To Serve as Infantry, for Three years, unless sooner 
discharo-ed . 



This Regiment is now lieing raised under authority of Gen. 
Fremont, and the authority of the Governor of Iowa, and will 
rendezvous at Keokuk, and as soon as organized, will he at once 
clothed and equipped for active service. Subsistence will be fur- 
nished at the expense of the United States at place of rendezvous, 
to Volunteers drilling while companies are being raised, in accord- 
ance with instruction to recruitino- officers. 



State of Iowa, Adjutant General's Office, ( 
Davenport^ October lo^ 1861. \ 

At a meeting of the Commander-in-Chief and the officers of his 
staff, held in the office of the Adjutant General, on the 10th day of 
October, A. D., 18G1, the following order was unanimously 
adopted : 



20 History of the Fifteenth Regijnent. 

GENERAL ORDER No. 37. 

No. II. That no citizen, inhabitant or resident of this State, sub- 
ject to do military dut}^, either in the Volunteer or Reserve Militia^ 
shall hereafter enlist or engage to enter the military service of any 
other State. And all persons liable to military duty within this State, 
are hereby prohibited from enlisting, or agreeing to enlist, or assem- 
bling with a view, or for the purpose of entering the service of any 
other State. Nor shall any person within this State, liable to do 
military duty, enter into the service of the United States, except 
under the express authority of this State; Provided, That this 
order is not intended to prevent the Government of the United 
States from recruiting for the Regular Army, pursuant to the Acts 
of Congress, and provided further, that this Order, and the next 
succeeding one, does not apply to the Company now being raised 
at Dubuque for the "Lyon Regiment." 

No. III. That all persons, whether residents of this State, or 
otherwise, and all officers except regularlv authorized officers of the 
United .States, recruiting for the United .States Regular Army, are 
herebv prohibited from enlisting, or in an^^ manner raising men 
within this State with a view or for the purpose of entering into the 
militar}' service of any other State or of the United States, except 
in j)ursuance of the laws and authority of the State of Iowa. 

No. IV. That the Adjutant General of this State be charged 
with the duty of seeing that neither of the above Orders (Nos. II 
and III) is violated. 

And the said Adjutant General, when satisfied that either or any 
of the above orders (Nos. II and III) has been or is being violated, 
shall order all officers or persons violating such oiders under mili- 
tary arrest, unless the Commander-in-Chief otherw^ise directs, to be 
attached to, enter and serve as privates in any company or regiment 
being raised within this State, under authority thereof. 

By Order of the Commander-in-Chief. 

N. B. BAKER, Adj. Gen. of State of Iowa. 



Iowa V^eteran Volunteer Infantry, Jl 

GENERAL ORDER No. 38. 

Adjutant General's Office of the State of Iowa, I 
Davenport^ October jd^ i86i. \ 

Information has been received at this office that persons claiming 
to be recruiting officers from other States, are, at various points in 
this State, endeavoring to enlist citizens of this state for military 
service in other States. These persons are holding out induce- 
ments of higher pay and higher bounties than those provided by 
law, and other inducements as of clothing, nrms, &c., a41 of which 
are false and unfounded. By means of these pretences citizens of 
our State are led to abandon the service of their State, thus de- 
priving themselves of the support of the State, and the State of 
their services. The citizens of Iowa, subject to military duty, are 
warned not to enlist under any such persons, and all such persons are 
hereby strictl}^ forbidden to continue such enlistments, at their peril. 
The officer at Dubuque, enlisting one company for the "Lyon Regi- 
ment," is not embraced in this order. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief. 

N. B. BAKER, 

Adjutant Gen. of Iowa. 



I hereby certify that I am instructed by the Commander-in-Chief, 
of the State of Iowa, to see that the above orders are rigidly en- 
forced, and further notify all persons that Maj. Gen. Fremont 
has expressly refused to grant authority to any man or body of 
men to recruit in the State of Iowa, except it is done with and by 
the consent of the Governor of the State. 

D. B. HILLIS, 

Aid-de-Camp. 
HUGH T. REID, 

Col. 15 Regiment Iowa Volunteers. 
Keokuk^ Oct. j4t/i, 1861. 



12 History of the FiftccntJi Rcgi))iciit 

ORGANIZATION. 

The Fifteenth Regiment Iowa Infantry, originally raised under 
authority of General John C. Fremont, and of the Governor of 
Iowa, (Novemher, 1861,) was formed by Capt. J. W. Kittle's Co. 
A, from Linn and Clinton counties; Capt. W. T. Smith's Co. B, 
from Des Moines, Polk county; Capt. J. A. Seever's Co. C, 
from Oskaloosa, Mahaska county ; Capt. G. A. Madison's Co. D, 
from Ottumwa, Wapello county; Capt. R. W. Hotchcraft's Co. 
E, from Lee and Van Buren counties; Capt. E. C. Blackmar's 
Co. F, from Mills and Fremont counties; Capt. W. T. Cunning- 
ham's Co. G, from Marion and Warren counties ; Capt. D. B. 
Clark's Co. H., from Pottawattamie and Harrison counties; Capt. 
L. D. Simpson's Co, I, from Lee and Clarke counties, and Capt. 
J. M. Hedrick's Co. K, from Waipello, Marion and Van Buren 
counties; they rendezvoused at Keokuk, and the Regiment was or- 
ganized on February 22, 18(52. Col. Hugh T. Reid was commis- 
sioned November 1, 1861, ^vhen it proved to be a hard task to raise 
a regiment during the rigid winter, owing more especially to the 
warlike spirit of the population not having been at that time 
aroused. Only the well-known untiring energ\' of the colonel 
could bring success to the recruiting business, although, imfortun- 
ately for his patriotic undertaking, the measles happened to break 
out to an alarming extent, among the very first companies that ar- 
rived at the rendezvous. The regiment was mustered in on March 
14,18^2, at Keokuk, by first Lieut. Chas. J. Ball, 13th U. S. 
Infantry, mustering officer, with an aggregate strength of 1088 
officers and men . 

'•There were just a thousand bayonets. 

And the swords were thirty-seven, 

As we took the oath of service, 

With our right hands raised to heaven." 

Private Miles (TReiley. 

The other field and staff officers were Lieut. Col. William 
Dewey, of Sidney, Fremont county; Major William W. Belknap, 
of Keokuk; Surgeon Samuel B. Davis, of Atchison, Kansas; 
Ass't Surgeon William H. Gibbon, of Chariton, Lucas county; 
Chaplain William W. b^stabrook, of Clinton, Adjutant George 
Ponuitz, of New Buda, Decatur county, and Quartermaster 
Mortimer A. Higley, of Cedar Rapids. 



Iowa Veteran Vohcnteer Iiifaiitry. ij 

HISTORY OF THE FIELD AND STAFF 

OF THE 

FIFTEENTH IOWA VOLUNTEERS, 



William W. Belknap, lirigadier General of Volunteers, 
Sect)nd Colonel of the Rec^inient. 

^'■FALL INr 



FIELD AND STAFF 



Colonels . 
Hugh T. Reid. William W. Belknap. John M. Hedrick. 



Lieutenant Colonels . 
William Dewey. William W. Belknap. 

JohnM. Hedrick. Geo. Fomutz . 

Alajors. 
William W. Belknap. William T. Cunningham. 

John M. Hedrick. George Pomutz. 

James S. Porter. 



Surgeons. 
Samuel B. Davis. William H. Gibbon 



Assistant Siirg-eons. 
William H. Gibbon. Hezekiah Fisk. William W. Nelson 



Adjutants. 
George Pomutz. Ensign H. Kinof. William C. Stidoer. 




i^ Historv of the F'ifteentk Regiment 

Quartermasters. 
Mortimer A. Higley. Elisha W. Elliott. 



Acting Quartermaster 
Henry C. McArthur. 



Chaplains. 
William W. Estabrooke. Ensign H. King. 



NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF. 
Sergeattt Majors. 
Jesse B. Penniman. Alexander Brown. 

Amos D. Thatcher. William C. Stidger. 

James W. Henry. 



Quartermaster^ s Sergeants. 
Rufus H. Eldredge. Andrew Mitchell . James H. Flynt 



Commissary Sergeant. 
Robert W. Cross. Elisha W. Elliott. 

James G. Shipley. William R.Cowley 



Hospital Stewards. 
Henry T. Felgar. Lucius Boudinot. 

Cornelius Inglefield. Alexander McGilvery 

Drum Majors. 
Nathan A. Leonard. Henry Metz. 

Fife Majors. 
Tilcrhman H. Cunningham. John S. Strain. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry, j^ 

HUGH T. REID. 

Hugh T. Reid, of Keokuk, was the first Colonel of the 15th 
Iowa Volunteers. On October 14, 1861, he published a notice by 
hand-bill and otherwise, calling for Volunteers and stating thai the 
Regiment was then being raised by authority of General Fremont, 
and Governor Kirk wood, of Iowa, and that it would rendezvous 
at Keokuk. 

He was a man of energy, determination, strong will and indom- 
itable pluck, and a lawyer of great ability. The Regiment was 
raised and fought its first battle at Shiloh, under his command, 
where he was severely wounded on April 6, 1862. His appoint- 
ment as Colonel was dated November 1, 1861, and he was mus- 
tered in on February 22, 1862 . 

Brave, determined, of strong will, and great physical and moral 
courage, he was in the midst of action without fear. Thoroughly 
devoted to the interests of his men, he was tireless in promoting 
their welfare, and his successful efforts in procuring for them the 
best clothing, arms and rations was remarkable. 

Stern and exacting at times, beneath all was an affection for his 
Regiment which showed itself whenever criticism came from 
others . 

He was among the first to favor the enlistment of colored troops, 
and when some of his Regiment objected, in vigorous words he 
spoke to them and reminded them in language which went to the 
mark : " Remember that every colored soldier who stops a rebel 
bullet saves a white man's life." 

Dangerously wounded at Shiloh in the presence of the writer of 
this, and stunned by the blow, he was apparently dead and was 
carried from the field, but recovering consciousness he remounted 
his horse, and with blood streaming from the wound rejoined the 
line. With great endurance he refused a sick leave and remained 
with the Regiment. But he never recovered from the effects of 
this wound, which finally was the cause of his death . 



i6 History of tJie Pifteeiith Regiment 

While Colonel he fiequently commanded the Brigade of which 
the Regiment was a part, and was appointed Brigadier-General of 
Volunteers on March 13, 1863. He resigned this commission on 
April 4, 1864, and devoted himself to the interests of the Des 
Moines Valley Railroad Company, which owed its completion 
mainly to his efforts, the cars of that road being the first to enter 
Des Moines, the Capitol of Iowa. 

But the wound received at Shiloh never ceased to trouble him 
and he died on August 21, 1874, at Keokuk, Iowa, leaving to his 
fi'iends and comrades the memory of a gallant soldier and an able, 
upright man. 

General Reid left a widow, formerly Miss Alexine LeRoy, 
of Vincennes, Icjwa yand three children — fame> Henry, who died 
in Nashville, Tennessee; Alan L., who is a banker in Newton? 
Kansas, and Hugh T., who is at Harvard University. 

The Daily Gate Cit\\ of Keokuk, of Aug. 22d, 1874, contained 
this obituary notice: 

Death of Gex. Hugh T. Reid. 

Gen. Hugh T. Reid dietl at his residence, in this city, at 7:15 A. 
M. Friday, August 21st, 1874, of Brights Disease of the Kidneys, 
in the ()3d year of his age.^ 

General Reid was born in Union county, Indiana, on the l8th of 
October, iNl 1 ;\vas of Scotch-Irish descent, his parents being natives 
of South Carolitui. He giaduated with liigh honors at Blooming- 
ton, (Indiana) College. Soon after studied law in the otlice of 
Judge Perry, and was admitted to practice by Judge Bigger, after- 
wards Governor. In the spring of 1839 came to Lee county, Iowa, 
and settled at Fort Madison, and in the spring of 1S40 formeil a 
co-partnership with Judge Edward Johnstone, which lasted near 
ten years, when he remo\ed to Keokuk, retiring from law business, 
except in cases in which he was personally interested. 

He had been a citi/en of Lee countv over thirtv-tive years at his 
deatii. He was Prosecuting Attorney for tlie counties of Lee. Des 
Moines, Henry, Jeflerson and Van Buren in 1840-2, then the most 
populous counties in the State, and was a terror to criminals, rarely 
failing to convict. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer litfantry. ly 

As a land lawyer he stooJ in the front rank of his profession, as 
one of the ablest lawyers in the West from adjoining States then 
coming here to practice in our Courts in suits growing out of the 
disputed title to the Half Breed Tract. 

He was engaged as one of the builders of the Des Moines Valley 
Railroad to Fort Dodge, 250 miles, of which he was President four 
years. He was also President of our magnificent Railroad and 
Passenger Bridge over the Mississippi river, giving his services 
gratuitously until it was completed. 

He entered the service as Colonel of the 15th Iowa Infantry in 
the war of 1861; had command of the Regiment in the battle of 
Shiloh, his Regiment losing nearly two hundred men in that battle 
in two hours and twenty minutes. Here he was severely wounded 
— shot through the neck and fell from his horse paralyzed, but in a 
few minutes recovered and remounted; continued in command, 
riding up and down the lines, covered with blood, exhorting the men 
to stand firm; being the last mounted field officer who remained on 
horseback to the close of the battle. He was engaged in many 
other important actions, and was made Brigadier-General in the 
spring of 1803, and commanded at the then important posts of 
Lake Providence, and Cairo, 111., until he resigned near the close of 
the war in 1864. 

Pie was twice married, his first wife dying in 1842, leaving no 
children. By his second wife, Mary Alexine LeRoy, he has three 
children, all boys. Untiring and energetic, he was always in active 
business, and with an iron will and persistency of purpose, he pros- 
ecuted every enterprise in which he was engaged with sleepless 
vigilance, traveling much on railroad at night, till disease prostrated 
his physical energies and death closed his careei' forever. 

He had little time for social intercourse and made few confidents, 
and amongst the few in whom he did confide the most was Judge 
2 



j8 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

Edward Johnstone, his old law partner, in whose integrity and 
devoted friendship he placed the most deserved and implicit con- 
fidence. 

For nearly two 3'ears before his death he was a member of St. 
John's Episcopal Church of this city, in which he was confirmed 
by Bishop Lee. 

When his name was sent for confirmation to the Senate by Pres- 
ident Lincoln as Brigadier-General, such was his high character for 
integrity and patriotism that he was at once unanimously confirmed 
without the usual reference to a Committee. 

He was ever kind and generous without pretension. Those who 
understood him and knew him best, loved him most for his many 
sterling qualities of head and heart. 

Ever indulgent toward his family, to them he was ever kind and 
affectionate; his goodness of heart being proverbial, for his heart 
was as tender and sympathetic as that of a child. In him they have 
lost their dearest friend and protector, and he has left them a name 
unsullied by the breath of scandal, and untarnished by the words of 
reproach. He knew that his recovery was beyond medical skill 
and he must die, and died in the full faith and hope of the Chris- 
tian's immortality, of which he was a firm believer, and the Crown 
of Glory is laid up for him in Heaven. 



WILLIAM W. BELKNAP. 

William W. Belknap, of Keokuk, was the second Col- 
onel. Heredity asserts itself in the transmission of the chivalric 
spirit of the father to the son as well as in the perpetuity of those 
other traits, mental and moral, which the psychologist and the 
social philosopher love to trace with such minute care. The sol- 
dier is the sire of soldiers! Some men take up the sword as nat- 
urally as others do the pen or plow. It only requi*res the oppor- 
tunity to develop the penchant. In every lonely, wind-swept 





BVT.-MAJOU GENL. U.S. VOL'S. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. ig 

country grave-yard there are the ashes of unknown Miltons. The 
epics that remained unsung upon their Hps would have fired men 
to nobler accomplishments and purer purposes, — but the circum- 
stances that shaped their destinies cast in different moulds those 
who would have sung them; the philosophers and scientists who 
have never been developed are unnumbered ; the teachers worthy 
to lead men and the statesmen who might have guided the ship of 
state in any storm and who yet died unknown, is beyond count. 
But that spirit, which animates the soldier — that martial valor — 
rises to the surface under different circumstances, more untoward 
conditions. When the shock of war breaks upon a nation, when 
a crisis in civil affairs arises which must needs be arbitrated by 
arms, then there comes the stern sense of duty, coupled with the 
grim pagentry and high glory of war which fans into flame the 
latent embers of chivalry that have slumbered in the breasts of 
men. Here heredity and intellect assert themselves. The men 
born to command, command; those born to obey fall into the ranks 
and fill a noble part not less glorious for being less conspicuous. 

Admitting the truth of the premises we have established it is not 
surprising that William W. Belknap was one of the earliest to enter 
the service in the war for the Union. It is not surprising that he 
achieved distinction and left the service with a brilliant recoi'd as a 
soldier and a leader. He came of a line of soldiers. His father, 
William G. Belknap, was for years a distinguished officer of the 
regular army, entering the service in 1818, when but a boy. He 
was appointed a third Lieutenant by President Madison and served 
with marked gallantry in that last struggle with Great Britain. 
Later he sei'ved in the Florida and Mexican wars, participating in 
all the battles fought by General Taylor — serving for a time on 
the staff of that officer and being brevetted Brigadier-General for 
gallantry in the battle of Buena Vista. While still in the service 
in Texas in 1851 he died. 



20 History of the Fifteenth Regi^tient 

In the town of Newburgh, New York, in 1829, the subject of 
this sketch was born, and there lie spent his boyhood. When 
nineteen years of age (1848) he graduated from Princeton Col- 
lege; and at once entering upon the study of the law with Hugh 
Caperton, of Georgetown, D. C, he was admitted to the bar of the 
District by Judge Cranch in 1851. The young attorney, with a 
shrewdness of intuition which stood him in good stead later in life, 
saw the possibilities which yet lay before the Great West. Already 
the avenues to success at the East were blocked by the number of 
worthy applicants. The West, with its untried possibilities and its 
wider scope for the development of talent he preferred to the East, 
and in July of the same year in which he was admitted to the bar 
we find our young attorney hanging out his shingle in Keokuk. 
The professional ability of young Belknap commanded the respect 
of the older practitioners at the bar, and shortly after his location 
he formed a partnership with Hon. R. P. Lowe, who became after- 
wards Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the State and later 
Governor. It was not long before the talent of the young lawyer 
began to assert itself in the new community. While there was a 
vigorous energy about the frontier communities which the later 
generations may have missed, still there was not the competition 
of talent which comes with older civilization and broader means of 
general culture. A strong, talented man must of necessity forge 
to the front and take precedence; so after his marriage in ISo-t to 
Miss Cora Le Roy, of Vincennes, Indiana, fa sister-in-law of 
General Hugh T. Reid, who died in 180)?), General Belknap began 
taking the local political leadership. As a result he was elected to 
the Legislature from Lee County at the first session held in Des 
Moines, in 1857-8. Then Belknap was an enthusiastic Douglas 
Democrat. It was the argument of war which changed his politics 
and made him a Republican. 

The first real evidence of military spirit which the young lawyer 
showed was when he entered the " City Riilcs," a crack military 



Iowa Veteran }'ohtnteer Infantry. 21 

company which he afterwards commanded, and which furnished 
many officers of ability and high rank to the Volunteer forces. In 
its ranks, or as its Captain, he attained a proficiency in aims which 
profited him in the most trying- times. There was little to indicate 
that the service seen in the streets and parks of Keokuk was ever 
to be useful in more earnest fravs; but in fact it was the basis of 
that broader military education finished in the field and which 
eventually made of the Captain of militia one of the most brilliant 
commanders of his day. The "City Rifles" were famous for 
their proficiency in drill and their perfect discipline, so that when 
Governor Samuel J. Kirkwood commissioned Wm. W. Belknap 
as Major of the loth Iowa Infantry in November, 1861, he placed 
over the raw recruits a man, who, though coming from the ranks 
of professional civilian life, was in jDoint of ability and courage 
competent to lead his men forth to battle. He became Lieutenant 
Colonel on the resignation of Lieutenant-Colonel Dewey, August 
1, 1862. On the promotion of Col. Reid to a brigadier generalcy,he 
became Colonel on April 22, 1868, vacating the latter position when 
promoted by President Lincoln July 80, 1864. 

Tlie first battle in which the 15th engaged was Shiloh. It was 
a bloody baptism for the new Iowa Regiment and yet it was a 
glorious one. It was at that fight, too, that Major Belknap was 
wounded and had his horse shot under him. He also on that field 
came under the personal observation of the great leader — General 
Grant, and from that time dates the intimacy which was afterwards 
to so closely associate these two men. At Shiloh the discipline and 
drill of the men came into full phiy and that of none in the whole 
vast army were better. Major Belknap had himself di'illed the 
officers in a hall in Keokuk previous to taking the field and as a 
result there was a degree of perfection which would have been 
highly creditable to regular soldiers. The intrepidity of the com- 
mander also inspired his men. 



22 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

In the report made by Colonel Hugh T. Reid of the part taken 
by the Regin:ient in the battle of Shiloh, he writes as follows: 

" Major Belknap was always in the right place at the right time 
directing and encouraging officers and men as coolly as a veteran; 
he was wounded, but not disabled, and had his horse shot under 
him, but remained on the field performing his duty on foot." 

Colonel M. M. Crocker, commanding the 3d Brigade, Sixth 

\ Division, in the battle of Corinth on October 3, 1862, says: 
\ 

"This engagement lasted three-quarters of an hour; the firing 

was incessant, and the Regiments, especially the 15th, suffered 
severely. I deem it my especial duty to particularly mention 
Lieutenant-Colonel Belknap who commanded the 15th Iowa. 
This Regiment was under the hottest fire, and Colonel Belknap 
was everywhere along the line, mounted, with sword in hand, en- 
couraging, by voice and gesture, his men to stand their ground.'' 

Colonel William Hall, commanding the 3d brigade, Fourth 
Division Seventeenth Corps, in the battle of Atlanta, July 22, 1864, 
in which engagement General McPherson, the able and beloved 
commander of the Army of the Tennessee, was killed, speaks as 
follows: 

" Where all officers and men did their duty I can make special 
mention of but few . * * * * Colonel Belknap, commanding 
the 15th Iowa, displayed at all times the highest qualities of the 
soldier, cheering his men by his voice, and encouraging them by his 
personal disregard of danger." 

General Giles A. Smith, commanding the Fourth Division, Sev- 
enteenth Corps in the same action, sa^'s: 

" Many indi\idual acts of heroism have occurred. * * * 
Colonel Belknap, of the 15th Iowa Volunteers, took prisoner Col- 
onel Lamplcy, of the 45th Alabama, by pulling him over the v\H)rks 
by his coat-collar, being several times fired at by men at his side. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 2J 

Colonel W. W. Belknap, 15th Iowa, displayed all the qualities of 
an accomplished soldier." 

On July 29, 1864, General Morgan L. Smith, commanding the 
Second Division of the Fifteenth Arm}' Corps, addressed General 
Giles A. Smith, commander of the Foin-th Division, Seventeenth 
Corps, as follows: 

" The General commanding thanks you for the assistance ren- 
dered him yesterday by sending to his support the 15th Iowa and 
32d Ohio Regiments under the command of Colonel William W. 
Belknap. The General also thanks Colonel Belknap and his brave 
men for the etHcient manner in which they performed their dutv." 
This was the battle of Ezra Church, near Atlanta. 

He not only had a minute and personal knowledge of all the 
details of company organization, but he knew every man by name 
and was more familiar with their needs than many of the company 
officers. As a result his men were devoted to him. A fact which 
strengthened the regard in which he was held, and which gave his 
men the utmost confidence in him, was the utter absence of per- 
sonal fear on his part, and his willingness to share whatever dangers 
or hardships befel those he commanded. This characteristic was 
illustrated by a little incident which occurred while the Regiment 
was lying at Benton Barracks in St. Louis. A gentleman came 
in one day who was selling steel vests — delicately wrought shirts 
of mail which were bullet-proof. Major Belknap examined them 
approvingly, but firmly said, " I think they are good things but I 
could not buy one because I would not ask my men to go into a 
fight under any less advantageous conditions than I would. If 
the Government will furnish them to the soldiers I will gladly buy 
one." 

General Belknap served in the Army of the Tennessee to the 
end. At the battle of Corinth he commanded his Regiment and 
was commended for his skill and gallantry by General Crocker in 
his report as Brigadier-Commander. Then for a time he was on 



24 History of the Fifteertth Regitnent 

the staff of General McPherson, Corps Commander. He was 
conspicuous in the siege of Vicksburg and Atlanta, and in the latter 
campaign won his principal renown, being always at the front and 
enjoying full opportunities for all his tactical knowledge and nat- 
ural bravery. 

At the battle of Pittsburg Landing, Major Belknap was shot in 
the shoulder. In company with an officer of the Regiment he 
went to the landing and he found it crowded with disorganized 
men. Turning lo his companion lie said, " Don't let us go down 
there," and reversing iiis steps he ralhed over a hundred men 
land went into the fight again. After the battle. General Grant 
placed him in command of the 18th Wisconsin Regiment which 
had lost all its field and many of its line officei's. 

He commanded his own Regiment in the liattles of Atlanta on 
July 21,22 and 2(S, 180-1, and in the bitterly contested battle of 
July 22 distinguished himself anew by the intrepidity of a single 
act. The fight had become a hand-to-hand one on the breast- 
works, the loss on both sides vv;is terrible and every man fought as 
though the result depended upon his individual efforts. It was 
then that Colonel Belknap, catciiing the Confederate Colonel 
Lampley, of the 15th Alabama, dragged him over the lireast-works 
and made him prisoner. Eight days after. Colonel Belkn;ip was 
made Brigadier-General of Volunteers and placed in command of 
"Crocker's lovva Brigade," composed of the 11th, 18th, lath and 
l()lh l()\v;i Regiments. General John M. lledrick, of Ottumwa, 
lately deceased, succeeded to the colonelcN' of the Regiment. 

The march "to the sea" of that famous l)rigade under the com- 
mand of (Jencral Belknap was a jjart of one of the most glorious 
epochs in the military history of this country. Then came the 
siege of Savannah and the final battle of Bentonville, Noith Caro- 
lina, which preceded the surrender of General Joimstoirs army . 
That Grand Review in which CJeneral Belknaj) participated in 



loiva Veteran Vohinteer Infantry. 2^ 

Washington, was a fitting climax to his brilliant militaiy career, 
and there is but little to recall after that. He was assigned to the 
command of the Fourth Division, Seventeenth Corps, was the last 
commander of that famous Corps at the time of its muster out, and 
w^as brevetted Major-General early in 1865. 

We said the war made General Belknap a Republican. It was 
at the election held in the field in 186-I- that he cast his first vote 
with that party. That vote was for Abraham Lincoln. 

At the close of the war General Belknap was offered a field 
officer's position in the regular army, but he declined it, preferring 
to remain in ci^■il life, and in 1806 he was appointed Collector of 
Internal Revenue for the First District of Iowa. The collections 
for that District aggregated millions, its work was exacting and 
complicated, but when, three years later, lie relinquished that office 
and the immense accounts were settled, it was found that there was 
a deficiency of just four cents, and not even an enemy had the 
hardihood to say he had embezzled that amount. It was regarded 
as remarkable that the difference should be so insigniHcant after 
years of duty and when the accounts were at once so large and so 
complicated. 

The first really important public event — or at least the one which 
again brought him into conspicuous public notice — in the life of 
General Belknap after the close of the war, occurred in 1867 at the 
great reunion in Chicago. General Belknap delivered the address 
for the Army of the Tennessee in the evening and it was such a 
marvelous piece of fervid oratory, so beautiful in its rhetoric and 
lofty in its tone of patriotism and love, that the great audience, 
which embraced the most di'^tinguished men of the Nation, was 
fairly carried away by it. 

General Belknap was ofTered several high positions in the Rev- 
enue Service, by President Grant, which he declined, and was 
appointed Secretary of War by him in 1869, and served in that 
cajjacity until March, 1876, when he resigned. The records of 



26 History of the Fifteenth Regitnent 

his administration and the verdict of subsequent events show how 
well the duties of his otfice were performed. It was duiing the 
early years of liis tenure of office that the measures for the recon- 
struction of the South were in process of formation and operation, 
and the number of delicate and vital questions arising were dealt 
with so skillfully that few of them ever needed readjustment. On 
the charge that he had used his office for personal profit he was 
impeached by the House of Representatives during a time of great 
excitement and the bitterest political enmities. The Senate tried 
the case and acquitted General Belknap. His friends of to-day are 
the ones who have known him best in his private and public life 
and neither the clamor of envious politicians nor the inuendoes of 
secret enemies have ever shaken their faith in his truth, his honesty 
or his patriotism. 

General Belknap succeeded Governor Buren R. Sherman, of 
Iowa, as the President of Crocker's Brigade, a societv of the old 
members being formed almost six years ago. It is a flourishing 
body composed of the men — now no longer lusty with the strength 
of young manhood, but veterans beginning to feel the weight of 
years — whom the General commanded. 

The General resides the greater part of the time in Washington 
City where he has a large law practice in addition to being Iowa's 
Representative in the settlement of war claims. However, he still 
retains a beautiful home on the bluff at Keokuk, overlooking the 
great river. 

He married in 1869 Miss Tomlinson, daughter of Dr. John Tom- 
linson, of Kentucky, who died in 1870, while he was Secretary of 
War. His present wife was her sister, and is a huh' of much cul- 
ture and grace. He has two children, a son by his first wife, Hugh 
Reid, who occupies a position of trust in the service of the Balti- 
more and Ohio road, and a daughter, Alice, by his present wife. 

It is a grateful task to those who knew and honored him, to 
sketch the life of a man who, in spite of his soldierly bravery, is 



loiva Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 27 

too modest to do it himself. General Belknap seems to have been 
one of those men less moulded by circumstances than he was 
adapted to the condition which created those circumstances. He 
was never in any position which he did not fill well. In civil and 
military life he was true to himself and his principles — the peer of 
any man — the sycophant at no door. His command was not so 
often "go" as it was "come." And in the future he will stand 
out as one of the boldest and grandest figures, that strong manli- 
ness, great intelligence, and a Nation's peril combined to produce. 

MORTIMER A. HIGLEY, 

1st Lieut, and Quarter- Master 15th Iowa Vols. 

Brevet Major and Ass't Commissary of Subsistence. 
Cedar Rapids^ lowa^ May, iSSj . 



The story of the Great Rebellion will be the fruitful theme of 
poet and philosopher down to the latest beat of recorded time. 
From the pen of the historian will fall great volumes of political 
philosophy, showing the play and clash of ideas, the friction of 
political opinions which resulted in the most stupendous civil war 
of the century. The military critic will write of tactics, of grand 
and minor strategy, and show how battles were foughl and won . 
But there is a human side to this great military upheaval, and this 
is the side that lies nearest the hearts of the people. The flesh that 
was pierced and the blood that was spilled bring their harvest of 
sorrow. In some manner or form each family has its skeleton, 
whose grim and ghastly visage will not down at their bidding. 

The sudden transition from peace to war will never be under- 
stood by this generation. To-day the people are prosperous and 
happy in civil pursuits, the country basks in the smiles of the pro- 
foundest peace. To-morrow the land is filled with armed soldiers 
who seem to have sprung from the ground in a night. Swords 
and bayonets flash back the light of the noonday sun; the air re- 



2 8 History of the Fiftee7ith Regiment 

sounds with martial music and the voice of command. The very 
earth shakes with the tread of armed men. Companies and Reg- 
iments are organized and sent rapidly to the front. How these 
men bore themselves in the field is a storv that should be told by 
every Company and Regiment. 

But the interest and history of a Regiment centers largely round 
its Commander. Upon his intelligence depend their comfort, their 
lives, their good name. In William VV. Belknap the 15th Iowa 
had a Commander endowed by nature with the rarest gifts for high 
command. By education, Belknap was a trained scholar; by in- 
stinct, he was a soldier. • At Wagram he could easily have led the 
charge of Macdonald, a charge that routed a magnificent ai-my and 
shattered an empire. /Vt Waterloo he could have led the Old 
Guard with the same desperate valor of Cambronne. In his blood 
were mixed strange currents which seldom flow together. 

He had in him the gentleness of a woman and the sturdy courage 
of the warrior. The hand that could indite the tenderest lines to 
the loved ones at home, could wield the sword like an Ajax. He 
had the voice of Stentor and the arm of Hercules. No word of 
bravado ever escaped him. Men who knew this polished gentle- 
man in peace were slow to believe him what he was in war. In 
camp he is seen in the hospital, or in the tents with the soldiers, 
writing letters for those who are stricken with disease, or disabled 
by wounds. In discipline he was exacting to severity; delinquent 
officers were shown no cpiarter. Under his magic touch his Reg- 
iment stootl hke a wall of adamant at Corinth, Vickslnirg and 
Atlanta. He knew every soldier by name, and every soldier knew 
him for a personal friend, and held for him an affection surpassing 
the love of woman. And yet this man, when the fight was on, 
seemed to have been created expresslv bv the Almighty to ride the 
whirlwind, and direct the storm of battle. 

See lum on tiie 22d of July at Atlanta. His camp- is in the 
thick woods. He and three comrades are quietly eating their dinner. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry . 2g 

The pickets are driven in with a rush. The forest is in a moment 
filled with the smoke and blaze and roar of musketry. A great 
battle has begun, one that may decide the fate of Sherman's army. 
But there is no demoralization. That wonderful voice of magic 
power cleaves the air like the blast of a bugle and men are lifted 
by it to the highest plane of daring and duty. This brigade is on 
the extreme left, "in the air," unsupported, and this Regiment on 
the left of the Brigade. They are attacked in front, on the flank 
and rear. But they hesitate not a moment; they knew they were 
in the hand of a Master. They knew that a retreat mf^ant the 
wholesale slaughter of their comrades and the possible rout of 
Sherman's army, and they determined to hold their position to the 
last man. 

Here Belknap was in his glory. His alert military intelligence 
took in the situation at a glance. He seemed to be everywhere at 
the same moment, directing and encouraging the men, pausing only 
an instant to lift a Confederate Colonel over the breast-works 
with the ease with which he would land a trout from a rivulet of 
the Adirondacks. 

For hours the battle raged, but the victory was ours. Here in 
this valley of death this Iowa Regiment, under the leadership of 
this magnificent soldier, added to the fame of the Iowa Brigade a 
name for dauntless heroism which the people of Iowa will never 
let die. The man who could produce such veterans, and inspire 
them with his own sublime and majestic courage, was a man of no 
ordinary mold. Since Thermop3'lae the world has seen no braver 
day. 

This was Belknap in war. In civil life he has given the world 
a spectacle of moral grandeur no less deserving the admiration of 
mankind. 

His impeachment was born in base conspiracy. Throughout the 
severe ordeal of a Senatorial trial, he bore himself with silent 



JO History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

bravery. His conduct there and his manly demeanor since, cap- 
tured his enemies, and fastened his friends more firmly. 

A great orator has said, " the time will come when the world 
will pronounce Belknap a moral hero." With those who know the 
man and the facts, that time has already come. By his comrades, 
officers and men, he was loved and adored as no man was ever 
loved before, and they girt him about with his own bright baldric 
of honorable renown, crown him with the garland of laurel he has 
so fairly won, and commend him to those historic and immortal 
pages where stands the shining record of his country's glory. 

The fame of Iowa in the war was surpassed by no State in the 
Union. Her valorous sons have filled her borders with a great 
wealth of widowhood and orphanage, but they have given her 
shield a resplendent lustre, a lustre upon which the coming gener- 
ations of Iowa youth will gaze in admiration forever. 

VVM. H. GIBBON, 

Surgeon 15th Iowa Volunteers. 

Brevet Lt. Colonel. 

Chariton^ Iowa, AJay, iSSy. 



JOHN M. HEDRICK. 

John M. Hedrick, of Ottumwa, was the third and last Colonel 
of the Regiment. He entered as 1st Lieutenant of Company D, 
became Captain of Company K, and while in command of his 
Company in the battle of Shiloh on April G, 1 802, was wounded 
antl captured. After being in captivity for several months he was 
exchanged and returned to the Regiment on January 7, 1SG3. He 
became Major on January 17, 1868, on the resignation of Major 




J.IVI. Hfdrick. 

COUSW IOWA VOLS. 
BRiVET. BRIG. CENL U.S VOLS. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. J7 

Cunningham; Lieutenant-Colonel, on April 22, 1863, on the pro- 
motion of Colonel Belknap; and Colonel in 1864, on the appoint- 
ment of the latter as Brigadier, and remained its Colonel until the 
close of the war, when he was brevetted as Brigadier-General of 
Volunteers, a rank which he had won by active service. He was 
a most brave, zealous, energetic, competent and extremely popular 
officer. His manner and demeanor attracted his men, and he vs^as 
beyond question one of the most gallant and brilliant officers in the 
Service. 

While at the front, in the battle of Atlanta, on July 22, 1864, he 
was fearfully wounded twice. His conduct was witnessed by the 
Colonel of the Regiment (Belknap) who writes these lines, and he 
makes this lasting record of General Hedrick's service and fearless 
courage in that terrible action. He was too severely wounded to 
remain with the regiment, but was detailed on Court Martial duty 
at Washington and was retained in service for several months after 
the muster out of his Regiment. 

He resides at Ottumwa, and is a reliable and public-spirited bus- 
iness man, prominent in public and private affairs. But his wound 
still gives him trouble, and reminds him constantly of his service in 
the field. 

Since the above was written, General Hedrick was on September 
29, 1886, stricken with paralysis, caused undoubtedly by the wound 
received in the battle of Atlanta, and died on October 3. 

It is believed that no more fitting tribute can be paid him here 
than the following account of his funeral services from the Ottum- 
wa Courier, of October 5, 1886, written by his devoted friend. 
Major A. H. Hamilton. 

Resolutions passed at a meeting of the Regiment are also ap- 
pended. 



J2 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

THE LAST SAD RITES 
TO THE LAMENTED GENERAL HEDRICK. 

From the Ottumiva Courier, October j, 1886. 

Tuesday at the appointed hour for the funeral services, 9:30 a. 
M., West Second street, on which the family residence of the 
lamented dead is situated, was thronged with people and carriages. 
Great numbers had arrived by teams from all parts of the country, 
and hundreds came by trains. It being also the opening day of 
the reunion of the gallant 2d Iowa Infantry, there had arrived 
during the night and the early morning, soldiers of various Regi- 
ments from all parts of this and other states to attend the funeral 
and to participate in the reunion. General W, W. Belknap, of 
Washington, D. C; Dr. W. H. Gibbon, of Chariton, Major H. 
C. McArthur, antl Capt. R. H. Whitenack, of Lincoln, Neb., all 
old comrades in arms of the deceased, arrived also during the night. 
Others of General Hedrick's old Regiment were here from abroad, 
but their names we have not been able at this hour to obtain. To 
the four mentioned deceasetl was knit with a brotherly affection. 
How strong and enduring this affection was will be found ex- 
pressed in the short address of General Belknap, which follows 
further on . 

Gen. Belknap brought with him the okl silk flag of the loth 
lowii, carried in the battle of Corinth, which was laid upon the 
cortin of tiie dead hero and enshrouded his remains as they were 
borne to their final resting place. 

There were floral tributes of great beauty and abundance. There 
was a beautiful wreath anil four pillows of flowers, containing the 
following; designs and mottoes in flowers: "Our Father," "Cour- 
age,'' "J. M. 11.," and a sworti and pen crossed in evergreen, sur- 
mounted by the flgure "3U" in pink flowers — "80" is the printer's 
finis. 



lovja Veteran Volunteer Infantry. jj 

The face of the dead was wonderfully placid and natural. The 
living brothers and sisters, besides the General's own family, were 
all present, and also some more distant relatives from abroad. The 
family residence, though large, could accommodate but a few of 
the great crowd which assembled in respect for the dead and in 
sympathy with the bereaved family. The services were opened 
by a hymn rendered by the choir of the First Methodist Church 
of this city. The Rev. W. F. Cowles then addressed the Throne 
of Grace in fervent prayer, after which the Rev. J. B. Blakeney read 
a lesson from the scriptures and spoke briefly of the deceased and his 
many virtues, closing with words of comfort to the bereaved . The 
remains were then viewed by the vast concourse of people, the sad 
parting leave taken by the family, and the immense procession took 
up its journey to the grave in our city cemetery. The head of the 
procession was taken by Co. G. I. N. G , of this city, preceded by 
Prof. Carl Schwabkey's band. Next came the army veterans, 
Cloutman Post No. 69, G. A. R., and soldiei's of other Posts, and 
they were followed by the chaplain, hearse, family and relatives in 
carriages. The friends followed in carriages and on foot. The 
number of carriages in line was one hundred and sixty. 

The business houses of the city were closed and there was an 
outpouring of the people enmasse to attest their respect and love 
for the deceased soldier, citizen and friend, and their sympathy with 
the sorely bereaved family . 

Arriving at the cemetery the casket was borne to the open grave 
and deposited preparatory to being lowered to the final resting 
place of all that is mortal of the honored dead, when, in the pres- 
ence of two thousand people. General Belknap in a clear, strong, 
but tremulous voice, as though his sad heart was struggling for 
the mastery, delivered the following beautiful and feeling address : 
Friends of our Friend and Comrades of the Army: 

When one who has been called away is bound to some by the 
bonds of kindred, and to all by the ties of affection, there is a 
3 



J4- History of the Fifteetith Regime)it 

mournful pleasure in the act of love which honors the memory of 
the dead . It is not for me to intrude upon the sanctity of the sor- 
row, which falls like a burden upon the broken hearts of those who 
were of his own household. The bitterness of this bereavement 
comes, in a measure, to us all. But, knowing him as I did, I will- 
ingly recall some memories of the past, and in this solemn hour 
give the tribute of my best affection to this most noble gentleman . 
I recall him when in the full flush of beautiful manhood, he joined 
the 15th Iowa in 1861, and received his commission as captain. 
Bright as day, quick in movement, and sincere in friendship, he 
tied himself to the men of his command, and at once captured our 
regard. On the fearful field of Shiloh, where the crash of the 
conflict came so suddenly, he bore himself bravely and as a true 
soldier should. Captured there, he was a prisoner for months, and 
returned to the Regiment to become its Major, its Lieutenant- 
Colonel and its Colonel . That General Hedrick filled all these 
positions with great judgment and military skill, all of his comrades 
know, and none better than myself. I recall him in that severe 
siege of Vicksburg, when the fire of the Southern batteries shook 
the stoutest heart, and well remember that smile of joyful happiness 
which showed how he welcomed victory, with a cool confidence 
that could not be disturbed. I recall him, and so do you, my com- 
rades of the Iowa Brigade, when he moved on that bright morning 
in July, 1864, with the entire 15th Regiment deployed as skirmish- 
ers in the advance of the 4th Division upon the opposing works. 
His figure and form were the perfect development of young man- 
hood, as he moved his men to the charge. I seem to hear now his 
voice, which, like a clarion, called to the men to be steatly, and 
nerved them for their work, and we remember again that group of 
Generals — McPherson, Blair and Gresham, who looked with ad- 
mitted atlmiration upon his skillful leadership, and united their 
cheers with his and tliose of his victorious comrades as tlicy swept 
up the parapet and captured the work. We recall him again in 



Iowa Veterafi Volunteer hifantry. jj" 

that bloody assault on July 21st, when the Regiment marched 
like men up to the blazing mouths of the batteries, and in that bat- 
tle of giants on the next day — ^July 22, 1864 — when, in the midst 
of action, in the extreme front, and with his sword on high, waving 
in encouragement among his men, he received that fearful wound, 
which for twenty -two years has been sapping the foundation of 

his life. 16S5770 

Well do I recall his heroic demeanor on that eventful day. See- 
ing him come from the line, with the blood streaming from arm 
and side, I said " Where are you wounded?" " I am shot all over. 
Col.," he said, but there was no complaint, though with the con- 
sciousness that it might prove fatal soon . That battle at great cost 
ended in victory. I knelt down by the stretchers on which he and 
his brother lay side -by side, during a lull in the fight, and spoke to 
him of his heroic conduct and cheered him as best I could amid the 
havoc of action. But he needed no words from me to aid his cour- 
age. With a smiling face and a strong heart, he was carried to 
the hospital, and the President bi'evetted him Brigadier-General for 
his great gallantry. 

The men of his command had no truer friend than he, and they 
trusted him with the firm reliance of devoted faith. The words of 
discipline which came from him as an officer, came so firmly and 
yet so gently that it was happiness to obey. His tender words and 
cheei'ing voice in the hospital smoothed the rough pillow of the 
dying soldier, and brought to him the blessings of the sick. His 
career since the war is known to you all. As a man of affairs he 
was earnest, courageous and true. This gathering of old men and 
matrons and young men and maidens is a sure tribute to his worth 
as a citizen, while his comrades of the army bind upon his brow 
the laurel wreath which he has won, as he leaves them to march 
without fear and with calm faith, into the presence of the God of 
Mercy and of the God of battles. 



j6 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

General Hedrick was my fond and faithful friend. I loved him 
as I did no other man on earth. For years associated with him in 
camp and fight, in field and march, there never was the shadow of 
a shade to come between us. The tender memories of his manly 
love all come to me now, and I bless Heaven that I have known 
him so long and well. 

Two weeks have not passed since I met him in Burlington by 
appointment, and we journeyed together to Chicago and spent a 
day there together. We were both interested in the history of our 
Regiment of which he had the charge, and his last act, in my pres- 
ence, was to arrange for the publication of the likenesses of all the 
men of the Regiment in that work. Devoted to his men his last 
act there was for them and theirs. 

Original in his ideas, brilliant in conversation, the life of every 
circle, and the loved of his friends, my comrades "we shall not look 
upon his like again." Our hearts go out in sympathetic affection to 
those who bear his name. No words of ours can be their solace. 
The blessed memory of his beloved companionship and kindest care 
is theirs to keep forever. This will be a joy to them in their dark- 
est days, and though some plans in life may fail and hopes be 
broken, they cannot lose the recollections of this manly, noble life. 

Comrades — Trouble may be with us in the passing" years, and 
the vicissitudes of life va^y bring disaster, but those who have been 
side by side in the fire of battle are bound to each other by a con- 
fiding devotion which no blow can break . 

The hour has come. The fiag of his Regiment lies upon his 
bier. The march which he has made will soon he ours. He has 
crossed the unknown river, and is with that great army whose spot- 
less tents arc pitched near the celestial city. 

Rev. J. B. Blakcney pronounced the benediction, and the large 
conccnirse silently wended their way to their homes. 



Iowa Vetera7t V^olunteer Infantry. jy 

Resolutions of Res feet and Condolence Adopted by Alembers of 
the i^th Iowa on the day of General HedricFs Funeral. 

At a meeting of members of the 15th Iowa Volunteers, at the 
Ballingall House, Ottumwa, Iowa, on October 5th, 1886, Col. Wm. 
H. Gibbon, of Chariton, was called to the chair and Major H. C. 
McArthur, of Lincoln, Nebraska, was appointed secretary. 

On motion of Ben. Johnston, of Keosauqua, the following reso- 
lutions were adopted: 

Resolved., That, with all the members of the 15th Iowa, we 
mourn the death of our brave comrade and commander, Brigadier- 
General John M. Hedrick. Gifted in a marked degree with ability, 
both as an officer and a citizen, he fastened himself to us by his 
generous character, his considerate kindness and thoughtful regard. 
As a comrade he was our personal friend; as a soldier, he was 
heroic in every act; as a Commander, he led instead of followed; 
and as a man he kept the esteem which his kindly ways had won. 
We shall cherish to the end the memory of his noble life. 

Resolved, That we give to his loving widow and children the 

sincere assurance of the unfeigned sympathy of the Regiment, in 

this, their most sad hour. 

H. C. McARTHUR, 

Secretary. 

WILLIAM DEWEY. 

William Dewey, of Fremont county, Iowa, was the first Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel of the Regiment. He was with the Regiment at 
the battle of Shiloh, and having been appointed Colonel of the 28d 
Iowa, resigned to accept the new commission. He died in Missouri 
during the war. 

William W. Belknap was the second and John M. Hedrick the 
third Lieutenant Colonels. Their history is given above. 



j8 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

GEORGE POMUTZ. 

George Pomutz was the Fourth Lieutenant Colonel, and was 
appointed November 23, 1864. He was an exiled Hungarian who 
came to America in 1848 and settled in New Buda, Decatur 
county, Iowa. 

He had a military education in the old country and was appoint- 
ed Adjutant of the Regiment on its formation. As an Office Ad- 
jutant he had no superior. Methodical beyond example in his 
Regimental papers, he kept a descriptive book of the Regiment, 
giving the service of every officer and man, which is historically 
accurate and which is surpassed by no Regimental record in the 
War Department. While Adjutant he was wounded in the thigh 
at Shiloh where he behaved with gallantry. He afterwards be- 
came the Major of the Regiment on the promotion of Colonel 
Hedrick and the Lieutenant-Colonel on the promotion of the same 
officer. While Major, he was Provost Marshal on the staff of Major 
General Blair, commanding the 17th Army Corps. He was mustered 
out with his Regiment in 1865, and was appointed Consul General 
at St. Petersburg and Cronstadt, which position he filled with 
honor and efficiency. Governor Curtin, of Pennsylvania, formerly 
United States Minister to Russia, bears cheerful \vitness to his 
great usefulness in that position. But political changes removed 
him from this place, and financial troubles coming upon him he 
died in great poverty at St. Petersburgh, on October 12, 1882. A 
stone was erected to his memory through the exertions and contri- 
butions of Governor Curtin, the officers of the 15th Iowa, and other 
friends, and the Regiment now makes a yearly contribution towards 
the care of his grave. His records of this Regiment form his best 
memorial. And as long as any man of the 15th Iowa lives, the 
Adjutant will be remembered, and the words will be recalled which 
he spoke, when expecting death when thrown from his mare, whom 
the surrounding soldiei's denounced, he defended his favorite animal 
and said: "If I dies, I forgives Mary." 




James S. Porter. 

MAJOR 15^" IOWA VOLS 
BV'T.LICOL. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry, JQ 

William W. Belknap was first Major, John M. Hedrick the third, 
and George Pomutz the fourth. Their history is given above. 



WILLIAM T. CUNNINGHAM. 

William T. Cunningham was the second Major. He was 
Captain of Company G, and was appointed Major on the promo- 
tion of Major Belknap to the lieutenant-colonelc}' on August 1, 
1862. He was wounded in the left arm in the battle of Corinth on 
October 3, 1862, where he behaved with gallantry. He resigned 
on January 16, 1868, and died on May 28, 1884, at Pittsburgh, 

Kansas. 

JAMES S. PORTER. 

James S. Porter, of Ottumwa, Iowa, was the fifth Major, ami 
was appointed on March 23, 1865, being promoted from Captain 
of Company D, to which position he had arisen from that of Private 
in that Company . He was a conscientious, faithful and brave 
officer, and a thoroughly loveable man. As a company commander 
he was what is represented by the words "level headed." He 
shirked no duty and always did it well. And his commanding 
officer never left his society without feeling that he had learned 
something in patience, good manners and solid sense. He was a 
man who knew what his duty was, and did it without questioning. 
And though no words ever passed his lips which could be called 
profane, he seemed to rise to the occasion when there was work to 
do, and other men did the swearing. He was a true soldier and 
was always ready. He lives at Ewing, Nebraska, and now, as 
when in service, is beloved by all who know him. 

George Pomutz was the first Adjutant. His historv is given 
above. 

ENSIGN H. KING. 
Ensign H. King was the second Adjutant. He enlisted as a 
private at Osceola, Clarke county, Iowa, in 1861, and was First 



40 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

Sergeant of Company I, was in the battle of Shiloh, and his Com- 
pany officers being all killed or wounded, he commanded the Com- 
pany on Monday, April 7, 1862. He, with Sergeant McArthur of 
Company K, joined about ninety men under the command of 
Major Belknap, and fought on the left of Gross's Brigade of Nel- 
son's Division on the evening of Sundav, April 6. They v^^ere 
placed there by order of General Grant to Major Belknap per- 
sonally. Major Belknap having reported to General Grant and 
seeing him then for the first time. He became a Second Lieuten- 
ant on July 4, 1862, vice Hamilton killed at Shiloh, and became 
First Lieutenant on December 10, 1862, and on April 22, 1863, he 
was made First Lieutenant and Adjutant. He was in all the cam- 
paigns in which the Regiment took part. He especially distin- 
guished himself during the battles near Atlanta in 1864. In the 
charge of July 21, on the right of the Third Division, which enabled 
that Division of the 17th Corps to capture and hold " Bald Hill," 
which could not have been captured had not the Iowa Brigade 
made this charge, the 15th Iowa, after its work was done, fell 
back into the earth works. It was soon discovered that Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel Hedrick, with three Companies of the Regiment, had 
not fallen back and were still under a heavy fire, and within close 
proximity to the enemy's works. Colonel Belknap ordered Adju- 
tant King to return and notify them. It was a hazardous and dan- 
gerous duty, but he did not flinch. Up he went through severe 
firing. He says himself : '' It was about the severest trial I had 
during the war." But he did it well. On the next day when 
Lampley, the Colonel of the 45th Alabama, was captured, King 
brought in the youngster, Lee, who had so bravely stood by his 
Commander. Lampley died soon after. 

Lee now li\ cs at Cla\'ton, Alabama, ihoroughlv reconstructed. 

On October 27, 1864, Adjutant King was appointed Chaplain 
and he was as faithful and devoted in that branch of the ser- 
vice as in the other. As Adjutant he was prompt, accurate and 




IVIajorIVI.A.Higley. 



co.A is'^iomvois. 



loti'a Veteran Volunteer Infantry, 4.1 

reliable; he continued the work, most intelligently of Adjutant 
Pomutz on the Regimental Record, and the service he did will live 
to do him honor always. He was, as all truly religious men are, 
thoroughly brave and unostentatious, but still aware of his own rights 
and prompt to maintain them. Both as soldier of the country and 
soldier of the cross, he came up to the mark, and the men of the 
15th Iowa will always have a pleasant word for King. He now is 
a Minister of the Gospel, connected with the Methodist Church 
and resides at Napa City, California. 



WILLIAM C. STIDGER 
William C. Stidger was the Third Adjutant. He was a 
private in Company E, and rose rapidly through the various non- 
commissioned grades until finally, on December 10, 1864, he became 
Adjutant. He was a first-class soldier — ready to render obedience 
and promipt to demand it. In fact, the writer of this was early 
impressed by his manner and martial bearing and conduct. He 
behaved with bravery in action and did his duty faithfully. He 
died at Red Oak, Iowa, on July 21, 1880. ~~ 



MORTIMER A. HIGLEY. 

Mortimer A. Higley, of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, was the first 
Quarter-Master. He entered the Regiment, as did nearly all the 
others, as a private, and became Second Lieutenant of Company A, 
which was composed of a body of men equal to any company in 
the command. He was a very efficient officer — up by dajdight or 
before, and watchful of the interests and necessities of the men. 
His ability as such was so promptly recognized that he was recom- 
mended for promotion as Captain and Assistant Commissary of 
Subsistence, to which position President Lincoln appointed him 
on November 28, 1862. He was as a soldier a real hero. In the 
battle of Shiloh, though his position did not call for it, he was 



^2 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

found in the midst of danger, rallying, the scattered men and re- 
gardless of peril, doing his work well. The writer of this recalls 
him especially on the afternoon of April 6, 1862, at Shiloh, when 
Lieutenant Higley pointed out General Grant, with whom my first 
acquaintance was then made. He resides now at Cedar Rapids, 
Iowa, with a lovely family. Prosperous in the world's ways, and 
prominent as a citizen, he is President of a National Bank and a 
leading business man of the city. Everybod^' honors, and not only 
likes, but loves him. 



ELISHA W. ELLIOTT. 
Elisha W. Elliott was the Second and last Quarter-Master. 
He was born in Ohio, and entered the Regiment from Knoxvillc, 
Iowa, celebrating his twenty-eighth birth-day by enlisting in Com- 
pany G at Keokuk, the rendezvous; he was assigned to dutv in the 
office of Lieutenant Ball, U. S. A., Post Q. M., and was appointed 
Commissary Sergeant on September 8, 1862, in the field, and on 
February 3, 1868, he was appointed First Lieutenant and Quarter- 
Master by Governor Kirk wood . 

He was on duty by order of January 31, 1864, with Colonel J. 
D. Bingham, Chief Quarter- Master Department of the Tennessee, 
and was there during the Meridian Expedition. He returned with 
the Regiment and served with it until mustered out. Faithfulness to 
duty was his characteristic, as it was of his associate officers, and he 
gained a solid and sure reputation. He now resides in White Lake, 
Dakota, and is a farmer. 



HENRY C. McARTHUR. 

FiHST LiEUTKNANT Henry C. McAkthuk, of Company II. 

was made Acting Quarter-Master on February 1, 1864, near Vicks- 

burg, Mississippi. While in that position he did his duty well and 

with the energy which characterized him in military or civil life. 







Wivi. H. Gibbon. 

3URGtUN I5^>! IOWA VOLS. 
BREVET LT.COLU.S.VOLS. 



loiva Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 4.^ 

He was an efficient and brave young officer, and was severely 
wounded on July 21, 1864, near Atlanta. But he returned to the 
command soon afterward, and was on the staff of the Brigade 
Commander until the end. He resides and is a prominent merchant 
in Lincoln, Nebraska. 



SAMUEL B. DAVIS. 
Samuel B. Davis was the First Surgeon. He took high posi- 
tion and his ability was promptly recognized by his professional 
associates. He was early detached as Medical Director of the 
Brigade and Division, and was appointed Surgeon of Volunteers 
on February 19, 1863, and was honorably mustered out on October 
17, 1865. . 

He resigned from the Regiment on March 1, 1863. He after- 
ward resided in New Mexico and died there. 



The history of the Medical Staff, prepared by an abler hand 
than this, is given elsewhere, but mention must be made here of 
WILLIAM H. GIBBON. 

William H. Gibbon, who was the First Assistant Surgeon, 
and became Surgeon on the resignation of Doctor Davis. Sur- 
geon Gibbon was a man of accomplished education, delightful 
manners, and courteous demeanor, faithful to duty and energetic on 
all occasions . 

His success as a Surgeon and Physician showed that he was 
thoroughly " up " in the acquirements of his profession. Early 
and late, in field and fight, in camp or hospital, his genial manners 
made the sick feel better, and his complete knowledge of his work 
gave confidence and hope to the wovmded and desponding soldier. 
He was mustered out on December 22, 1864, and no man e\er left 
the Regiment more beloved and more regfretted . The brevet 



44 History of the Fifteeiith Regiment 

which he received from the President as Lieutenant-Colonel of 
Volunteers, on March 18, 1865, was but a slight recognition of his 
services. But no title which could be given him could equal the 
reward which he had won . 

His name is a cherished one in every home where lives a soldier 
of the 15th Iowa. He resides in Chariton, Iowa, where he prac- 
tices his profession in honor and prosperity. 



WILLIAM W. ESTABROOK. 

William W. Estabrook was the First Chaplain of the Reg- 
iment. He was an Episcopal Clergyman of character and educa- 
tion, who had left the profession of Medicine to become " a soldier 
in the Army of the Lord." 

As the Regiment's first experience was at Shiloh, the services of 
the Chaplain were not more needed than were those of the medical 
officers who could be found. Doctor Estabrook was equal to the 
occasion. He prayed with the dying, he administered to the care 
of the wounded, and his medical knowledge made him most useful 
in those trying hours. In the active life of Regimental duty there 
were not opportunities for the performance of Chaplain's duties 
with the regularity of Sunday service at home. But the Chaplain 
was a man of sense; he devoted his time to the sick and suffering, 
and ministered to their physical as well as spiritual cares, and tied 
to him forever the men of the Regiment. They remember him as 
a benefactor and friend. On April 2, 186H, he resigned, antl was 
on May 25, 1804, appointed Surgeon of the 45th Iowa Infantr}'. 
He now resides in Chicago, and as a phvsician has an increasing 
practice there. 

Ensign H. King was the Second and last Chaplain. His his- 
tory is given above. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 45 

JESSE B. PENNIMAN. 

Jesse B. Penniman was the First Sergeant Major of the Reg- 
unent. He will be remembered as a blonde youth, tall, active, and 
a ready soldier. He was made Second-Lieutenant of Company A, 
and was killed in action at Shiloh on April 6, 1862. He was not 
mustered into the grade in which he served. But he was the first 
officer to fall in action, in this Regiment, and he fell in its first fight 

in the front. 

ALEXANDER BROWN. 

Alexander Brown was the Second Sergeant Major. He was 
a private of Company E; was wounded at Shiloh at the front; 
wounded at Corinth at the front; always behaved with great gal- 
lantry, and was discharged on February 5, 1868. He has filled 
positions of trust and honor since the war, and has behaved in civil 
life with the same true heroism which characterized him in action. 
He now resides at Keosauqua, Iowa. 



AMOS D. THATCHER. 

Amos D. Thatcher was the Third Sergeant Major. In the 
battle of Corinth he acted, in the presence of the writer of this, 
with real bravery. Colonel Crocker, Brigade Commander, was 
near him, when a private of the Regiment took to his heels, and 
Thatcher went after him and brought him back. He may not 
remember this, but others do, and it will not be forgotten. He 
was promoted First Lieutenant, 8th Louisiana Volunteers, (colored ) 
Jun^ 5, 1868, and now lives in Kansas, at Topeka. 

William C. Stidger was the Fourth Sergeant Major, and was 
promoted to Second Lieutenant of Company E. His history will 
be found above, among the Adjutants. 




JAMES W. HENRY. 
James W. Henry was the Fifth and last Sergeant Major. He 
was a thoroughly brave, active, and to some extent, reckless young 



46 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

man: that is, reckless in disregard of danger. He was captured at 
Atlanta July 22, 1864. No information has been received about 
his later life beyond the fact that he is dead. He was a singularly 
attractive young man in many ways; when there was work to be 
done he did it if he could, and there were no bullets coming to the 
front which he avoided. This tribute is gladly given to his 
memory. 



RUFUS H. ELDREDGE. 

Rup'us H. Eldkedge, the First Quarter- Master Sergeant of 
the Regiment, was afterward the First Lieutenant of Company K. 
He fell in action in the advance of his Company, at Corinth, in the 
presence of the writer of this. In all work he was prompt and 
faithful, and his bearing in battle could not be surpassed. 



ANDREW MITCHELL. 

Andrew Mitchell, of Company A, was the Second Quarter- 
Master Sergeant. For some misconduct, it is forgotten what, he 
was reduced to the ranks. But it could not have been a fault of 
high degree, because on May 11, 1865, he was made Captain of 
his Company. No one doubts his loyalty, bravery and merit. He 
resides at Norway, Iowa. 

JAMES H. FLYNT. 
James H. FLYNT,of Company B, was the Third Quarter- Master 
Sergeant. He did his duty faithfully. He died at 



ROBERT VV. CROSS. 

Rohekt W. Cross was the First Commissary Sergeant, and he 
was promoted First Lieutenant 23d Iowa August II, 1862, and 
Quarter- Master of the same Regiment. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantiy. 4y 

Elisha W. Elliott was vSecotid Commissar}' Sergeant. His 
history is given above. 

JAMES G. SHIPLEY. 
James G. Shipley was the Third Commissary Sergeant. He 
was enHsted by the writer of this in 1862 at Keokuk, Iowa, and 
was promoted from private in Company K . He afterwards was 
promoted First Lieutenant in the same Company. He was a man of 
education and a good deal of abiHty, and in the performance of his 
ckities, especially in the transportation of the 4th Division 17th 
Corps from Washington to Louisville via Baltimore & Ohio Rail- 
road, he showed singular and marked ability. His residence is not 
known. 



WILLIAM W. COWLEY. 

William W. Cowley was the Fourth Commissary Sergeant 
and was promoted from Sergeant of Company C. The writer of 
this did not serve with the Regiment then, and cannot state further 
concerning Sergeant Cowley's history. 

Henry T. Felgar, Lucius Boudinot, Cornelius Ingle- 
field and Alexander McGilvery were Hospital Stewards. 

They must have been good ones, or Surgeon Gibbon would not 
have tolerated them for a moment. It is regretted that nothing of 
their histor}' can be given beyond the fact that Felgar was from E 
Company, and died in Service. Boudinot was from Company B, 
and was discharged for disability. Inglefield was from Company 
K, and was mustered out March 27, 1865, and McGilvery was 
from Company G, and stayed until the end. 



NATHAN A. LEONARD. 
Nathan A. Leonard was the First Drum Major. He was 
from Company B, and was discharged at Corinth on July 11. 1862. 



48 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

His daughter now resides at Council Bluffs, Iowa. He had the 
early instruction of the Musicians of the Regiment and did very 
well, considering the insubordinate characters of the young devils 
over whom he had control. He died several years since. One of the 
"youngsters" above named, John S. Bosworth, is now in the 
office of the Adjutant General at Washington, and another, Major 
L. S. Tyler, prominent in the Grand Army of the Republic, and 
formerly in Company H, is the compiler of this history of the 
Reeiment. 



HENRY METZ. 

Henry Metz, of Company G, was appointed Drum Major on 
March 15, 1862. He was a full-faced, bright-eyed, handsome boy, 
with ability for the position, had he the determination to control his 
band. Instead of running the band, the band ran him. He was 
brave and active, and ready to do his work, but his fault was that 
he did not try to run his machine. But he was so willing to be an 
obedient soldier that his failui-es to command his men were forgot- 
ten. He lives now in Winlock, Lewis County, Washington Ter- 
ritory. 

TILGHMAN H. CUNNINGHAM. 

TiLGiiMAN H. Cunningham, of Company K, was First Fife 
Major. And he was a good one. The boys called him the "boss 
whistler," and he was. He could rattle the music out with more 
noise and less effort than any Fifcr in the Brigade, and he knew 
his business anil did it. He was mustered out on December 17, 1864. 

Although not in the ranks with a musket, he was faithful in his 
duties and thoroughly subordinate to those above him, and the 
writer of this has no hesitation in saying that he was the very man 
for the place. 



lorva Vetei'an Volunteer Infantry. 4Q 

JOHN S. STRAIN. 

John S. Strain, of Company B, was his successor. He was in 
this position in the later days of the Regiment, and he was always 
ready when wanted, and capable. 

I have thus given hurriedly, amid the pressing cares of business, 
my recollections of the Field and Staff of the Regiment. Omis- 
sions must have been made, I know, but the fault must be attributed 
to the failure of memory in passing years. It is difficult to signal- 
ize any one where all did their duty so well. But the members of 
the Field and Staff, as well as every oflicer and soldier of the Reg- 
iment, have mv lasting regard. They bore so many hardships 
without murmur that, as I have often said, " the meanest man 
among them was a hero." 

And they have no more fond and faithful friend and lover than 
their old Commander. 

WILLIAM W. BELKNAP, 

Second Colonel of the Regiment, 
Brigadier-General of Volunteers, 
Brevet Major-General. 

1420 A^exv York Avenue^ Washington^ D. C, May 26, 1886. 




JO History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



iE^^I^T II. 



HISTORY OF 

"A" COMPANY, "B" COMPANY, 

"C" COMPANY, "D" COMPANY, 

"E" COMPANY, "F" COMPANY, ' 

"G" COMPANY, 

"H" COMPANY, "I" COMPANY, 

"K" COMPANY. 



loiva Veteran Volunteer Infantry. ^i 

A. COMPANY. 

It was early in the fall of 1861 . The war had already assumed 
large proportions, and President Lincoln's call for more troops to 
quell the Rebellion was everywhere being responded to, either by 
enlisting or by recruiting companies. Some soldiers that had 
served under the three months' call were at home, and still others 
on furlough, many of whom were active and anxious to do their 
part in the great work, and at the same time secure, if possible, 
positions as commissioned officers in the new Regiments that were 
to be sent to the field . 

Thus it happened that during the first days of September, in the 
year mentioned, that Mr. John W. Raymond, a conductor on the 
C. & N. W. R. R., proposed to Mr. M. A. Higley, of Cedar 
Rapids, Iowa, to see Adjutant-General N. B. Baker, with whom 
they happened to be well acquainted, and see if they could get com- 
missions to raise a company . The proposition was accepted, but 
on account of family circumstances, however, Raymond had to give 
up the plan, and Mr. M. A. Higley continued his way, determined 
to enter the Army . Meeting General Baker on board of a steamer, 
going to Davenport, he was told by the General that J. W. Kittle, 
Sergeant Major of the 2d Iowa, then on furlough, and W. M. 
Swanson were on board also, for the purpose of getting permission 
to raise a Company for the 11th Iowa Infantry, and were advised 
by the General to consult them, and if possible unite with them . 
The General's plan was agreed upon by the three, and they received 
commissions from General Baker to raise said Company, where- 
upon Mr. Higley returned to Cedar Rapids where he recruited 
about thirty men. The first two, we think it proper to state here, 
that were enlisted for the Company, were Robert H . Whitenack, 
who a year later succeeded Captain Kittle in the command of th'e 
Company, and Patrick H. Kennedy, who was the first one called 
upon to lay down his life for the preservation of our glorious 
Union, on the memorable battle-field of Shiloh. The remainder 



$2 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

(excepting a few that came to the company after the organization) 
were enhsted at Lyons, Iowa, by J. W. Kittle and W. M. Swan- 
son . 

A sufficient number having been recruited the Company was 
soon organized by the election of J. W. Kittle as Captain, M . A, 
Higley as 1st Lieutenant, and W. M. Swanson as 2d Lieutenant. 
After being organized, the Company on September 17, 1861, went 
to Camp McClellan, at Davenport. On arrival they were assigned 
as Company B to the 11th Iowa, and immediately commenced 
building barracks for the Company under the direction of Hiram 
Price, Quartermaster-General of Iowa. 

Soon after the barracks were finished Col. Hare came to Camp 
McClellan and assumed command of the Regiment. He brought 
with him Capt. Beach's Company, and asked the Adjutant-General 
to assign that company to the 11th Regiment in place of Capt. 
Kittle's . General Baker informed Colonel Hare that he could not 
do so, as Captain Kittle's Company was recruited for the 11th 
Regiment and had been properly assigned. Colonel Hare then 
made his request of Governor Kirkwood, who granted the same, 
and telegraphed General Baker to assign Captain Beach's Company 
to the 11th Regiment. General Baker replied to the Governor the 
same as he had to Col. Hare, and further informed him that if 
Captain Kittle's Company was to be removed he, the Governor, 
must come down and make the change himself. In a day or two 
orders came for Captains Kittle and Beach to present themselves at 
the Burtis House, as the Governor wished to see them. Captain 
Kittle being absent on business at Lyons, Lieutenant Higley went 
with Captain Beach to see the Governor, who informed them that 
Colonel Hare was very desirous that Captain Beach's Company 
should be assigned to his Regiment, and he had not yet determined 
which company he would assign to Colonel Hare's Regiment, but 
the company he did not assign to the 11th Regiment he would give 
the position of Company A, (A, or the first Company, is regarded 



&l^^- 



^&^ 



<^^s 




John! Guinning. 

C0AI5lflOWfl. 
COLOR BEARER. 




C.S.Stewart. 

CO. A l51»iaWAY0lS. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. ^j 

as the most desirable position in a Regiment), in either the 18th or 
14th Regiments. Lieutenant Higley soon saw or inferred from 
the tone of the remarks that his Company was the one that would 
have to go, and politely said to the Governor that he would not 
consent to be assigned to either the 13th or 14th Regiments, as they 
were being recruited for garrison service, and his Company had 
enlisted for the field. The Governor then said: "I will assign 
you Company A, of the I2th Regiment, which is now being re- 
cruited at Dubuqu^." Lieutenant Higley at once accepted this 
proposition, and telegraphed Captain Kittle that the Company 
would go up on the first boat to Dubuque. 

Soon after sending the dispatch to Captain Kittle, a committee of 
gentlemen from Keokuk, v^^ho were at Davenport to secure a Com- 
pany for a Regiment that Colonel Hugh T. Reid had authority to 
recruit, met Lieutenant Higley and urged him strongly to take his 
Company to Keokuk. General Baker also advised him to go there, 
saying: "If you take your Company to Dubuque, of course you 
will be assigned as Company A, as the Governor has promised, 
but the Company will be the last one to join the 12th Regiment, 
and then to have the first position there would naturally be con- 
siderable feeling among the other companies, and in the other case 
your company would be the first one at Keokuk, and consequently 
entitled to the first position." 

Lieutenant Higley saw at once that the General's advice was 
sound, and again sent a telegram to Captain Kittle that he would 
leave for Keokuk that evening with the Company to ioin the 15th 
Iowa Infantry, where he arrived with the Company on ^tturday 
morning, and at once marched to the Stannus Block, where they 
went into winter quarters, and were mustered into the United States 
service on November 16, 1861, by Captain Chas. C. Smith, 18th 
United States Infantry mustering officer. 

MARINUS RHYNSBURGER, 

Historian A Company . 



^^ History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

TWO NARROW ESCAPES. 
The Kansas City fournal oi May, 1883, says: The escape of 
Captain J. W. Kittle, agent of the Louisville and Nashville Rail- 
vv^ay, from the recent Cyclone, was remarkable. Tw^enty-three 
years ago, (June 3? I860), Captain Kittle, then a Deputy United 
States Marshal, was in Comanche, Iowa, taking the census. While 
there a cyclone approached the town, and the Captain jumping 
upon a swift horse, made his escape from the falling buildings to 
the edge of the town, where he was lifted from his saddle and 
flung across a wide field, turning up without serious injury. From 
the ruins of the town of Comanche Captain Kittle assisted in re- 
moving sixty-five bodies. Last Sunday he saw the deadly funnel 
drop and come. When the pillar of cloud by day crossed Grand 
Avenue he actually threw his wife and f amilv into the cellar, and 
as he reached the bottom stair the house went to wreck over his 
head, while a timber came plunging through the cellar window and 
splintered against the wall within a foot of him. The family 
escaped without a bruise. 

Captain Roger B. Kellogg was born in Burlington, \'t., and 
there learned the tinners' trade; then went South and remained 
several years; thence to Illinois, Missouri, and Fort Madison, Iowa. 
On the organization of the loth Iowa, at Keokuk, he enlisted in 
Company A; was promoted Second Sergeant, First Sergeant and 
Second Lieutenant September 14, '62; First Lieutenant November 
28, '62, and Captain December 22, '64. 

In reference to his death my best recollection is that he was serv- 
ing on the staff of General Giles A. Smith, as Picket Officer, and 
on the advance on Pocotaligo, S. C, Leggett's Division being in 
the advance developed the enemy pretty strongly, and formed line 
of battle on the edge of the salt marsh that covered the enemy's 
works at Pocotaligo. Leggett's line Iieing rather long, and fear- 
ing that his left would be uncoverctl, asked (iencral Smith to send 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. ^^ 

a Company to cover his (Leggett's) left. On Kellogg receiving 
the order from Smith, he selected his own Company " A," of which 
I was in command at the time, and deployed on left of Leggett's 
line, and joining an Ohio Regiment commanded, I think, by a 
Colonel Wilde. Kellogg and myself then went over to where 
Colonel Wilde was standing to get a view of the enemy's line and 
works. Colonel Wilde was behind a clump of bushes, and warned 
Kellogg and myself not to step out from the cover as a Sharp- 
shooter had fired at him several times at that point. Kellogg de- 
siring to get a better view, partially stepped from under cover and 
raised his field glass to his eyes, when the ball struck him a little 
to the right and under the navel . On being struck he made a right 
half wheel and grasped me by the shoulder, saying, " Bill, that's my 
muster out." He was sent to the hospital at Beaufort, and on the 
day following I was sent back to Beaufort, by order of General 
Belknap, and remained with him until his death, the next day. He 
was buried in the soldiers' cemetery at Beaufort, and I put up a 
wooden head-board with his name, rank. Company and Regiment. 
He was a very close and intimate friend of mine prior to the war 
and all through our service together, and a better or braver man 
God never made, and I think all of his Company will join in say- 
ing so. 

After being mustei-ed out at Davenport I retui'ned home to Fort 
Madison, Iowa. Was appointed Postmaster there by President 
Johnson, and promptly sat down on by the Senate, threw off the 
robes of oflice, and went to St. Joe, Mo., and engaged in the furni- 
ture business for a short time, then out on the Union Pacific R. R. 
as Clerk in Construction Department; was on the road until its 
completion ; then through the Territories on a wild goose chase for 
"Gold Galore," and in fall of '69 to the Osage Country in Kansas; 
tried cattle and busted; then to Chetopa, Kansas, and was appointed 
Superintendent of United States National Cemetery at Fort Brown, 
Texas; then Superintendent of National Cemetery at Fort Barran- 



S6 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

cas, Florida; then Superintendent of National Cemetery at Fort 
Scott, Kansas, from which I resigned May 5th, 1881, and located 
at Independence, Kansas, and was appointed Chief Clerk United 
States Land Office at this place, from which I resigned January 1st, 
1886, and am now engaged in the real estate business. 

God bless all the Old Boys! Our hair is getting thin between us 
and Heaven, and in a few years the last of us will have to answer 
at the final Roll Call, and we certainly should leave some record of 
our suffering and services for the rising generations to pattern bv, 
so far as Loyalty is concerned at least. 

WM. C. HERSHBERGER. 



B COMPANY. 

Wilson T. Smith commenced recruiting a Company on the 2C)th 
day of August, 1861, at Des Moines, Polk county, which was or- 
dered into quarters by Samuel J. Kirkwood, Governor of the State, 
on September 5th, 1861, and mustered into the service of the 
United States by Captain Chas. C. Smith, 18th United States In- 
fantry mustering officer, at Keokuk, on November 9, 1861, under 
proclamation of the President of the United States, bearing date 
July 28, 1861. The company was enrolled in the City of Des 
Moines, designated B Company. Wilson T. Smith was commis- 
sioned Captain, Adolphus G. Studer First Lieutenant, and Christian 
E. Lanstrum Second Lieutenant. 

The most remarkable capture during the Regiment's service was 
that made by Private Reuben Meek, of B Company, during the 
battle of Atlanta, July 22d, 1864. lie, with a few men pressed by 
him into service, captured and brought in seventy-one rebels, and 
turned them ovei" to the Division Provost Marsnal. 

VV. LUMPKIN, 

Historian B Company. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. ^'^ 

On his tour around the world, General Grant stopped at Sing-a- 
pore, India, with Captain A. G. Studer, United States Consul. 
The General and wife were " awfully glad to find a real live 
American girl," (especially an Iowa one), in that far away place, 
and they became so fond of the Captain's daughter, who is his 
house-keeper, and can entertain a French or a Russian Count, talk 
to them in their own language, get dinner, or see to her father's old 
clothes, which is a daughter worth having, and still she is quite 
young, that they took her with them on their tiip to Siam, which 
came near behig their last trip. Their steamer had to anchor in a 
storm at the entrance to Bankok. After a long and vexatious de- 
lay, the King's yacht came down to their rescue, but could not come 
very near, and so the whole party had to be transported from one 
vessel to the other. The sea was running high, and the small boat 
was swamped under the guard of the yacht, and it was with ex- 
treme difficultv that Gen. Grant, wife and Miss Studer were saved. 

T. 

C COMPANY. 

This Company was recruited by James A. Seevers at Oskaloosa, 
Mahaska county, under and by the authority of a recruiting com- 
mission from General N . B, Baker, Adjutant-General of Iowa, 
issued on October 3d, 1861. 

He commenced at once canvassing the county for recruits. The 
first roll was called on the 13th of October, and on the 17th James 
A. Seevers was elected Captain, John D. Shannon First Lieuten- 
ant, and Ebenezer E. Herbert Second Lieutenant, and on that clay 
went into c^uarters at Oskaloosa with forty men. 

On the 28th the Company started for Davenport, but at Eddy- 
ville Captain Seevers received a telegram to proceed to Keokuk 
and join the 15th Iowa Infantry, under Colonel H. T. Reid, ex- 
pected to be mustered into the United States service at once, but 



^8 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

was delayed for several days on account of measles in quarters. 
This is well known by all members of the Regiment. Captain 
James A. Seevers resigned on November 27, 1862, on account of 
injuries. 

Captain Sylvester Rynearson, son of Abram and Rachel R3'near- 
son, was born in Mason, Warren county, Ohio, December 5, 1835. 
In November, 1836, they settled on a farm near Ithaca, Darke 
county, Ohio. The country being new, and an almost unknown 
wilderness, he knows something of the hardships incident to a life 
in the green woods. The country being thinly settled, and the 
facilities for getting an education very poor, he only received a ver\ 
common country school education; always stood at the head of his 
class in the few studies taught at that time. Having a strong desire 
to see the West, he in March, 1861, adjourned to work for Cousin 
John Voorhees, of Mahaska county, Iowa, and worked for him 
until November 1st, when, with three others of Laredo, Black Oak 
township, Mahaska county, Iowa, enlisted in Company C, 15th 
Iowa Infantrv. The first word spoken to Recruiting Officer 
James A. Seevers was, " Captain, I, Sylvester Rynearson, came to 
enlist in your company,'' With other new recruits was at once 
put to drill, and in a very short time it was discovered that there 
was military service accomplished. In less than four weeks he was 
detailed to drill new recruits, which were daily coming to the com- 
pany; was in every skirmish and battle the company and Regiment 
was in from the battle of Shiloh to the close of the war. Always 
right where duty called, had comrades to fall on right and left, was 
never wounded or in hospital. Was also on everv March the Reg- 
iment made, with the exception of the one in August I'S, ""i^], from 
Vicksburg across the country, while he was home on sick leave. 
Cajitain Rynearson was well respected by one and all. As General 
Relknap says, when Captain Rvnearson was on the picket line all 
was well, anil no fear but what all orders would be quickly and 
promptly obeyed. 




S. Ryre/\rson. 

CAPTAIN CD. C I5T':' tOIVA VOLS. 



ioiva Veteran Vohinteer Infantry. ^g 

He was appointed Corporal January 1, '62; Sergeant, March 1, 
'62; First Sergeant, April 23, '62; promoted Second Lieutenant, 
October 4, '62; First Lieutenant, December 10, '62; and Captain 
June 24, '65. Before accepting any position in the Company he 
first received the unanimous consent of his Company, of which 
every one was ready and willing to grant at all times. 

Captain Rynearson was as brave and true as any man could be 
when it looked like death would be the result, he would draw his 
sword and say, "Come on, my bo3's, follow me." No fear ever 
stopped him from doing his duty. In every respect he fulfilled 
the promise that he made at the beginning to the last letter. It is 
the wish of all his old comrades that he may prosper in life, always 
live in peace, and when the last Bugle and the last Tattoo has been 
heard, may he be ready to meet his Great Commander, and all of 
his old comrades in peace and happiness, for we are all willing to 
pitch his Tent with ours. 

Captain Sylvester Rynearson was married to Mary Jane Clark, 
daughter of John D. and Sarah E. Clark, of Arcanum, Darke 
county, Ohio, on September 13, 1866. They settled on a farm near 
Farmland, Randolph county, Indiana, in March, 1870. He pur- 
chased a farm near Gettysburg, Darke county, Ohio, where he now 
resides, 1886. They have had only one child, a son, Eddy, who 
was born June 23, 1867. 

This history is written by a request of mine, as it was the wish 

of all the old comrades to have his whole history written as near as 

we could get it. I hope to see this all published in the History of 

our Regiment. 

J. B. VANCLEAVE, 

Company C Historian. 

D COMPANY. 

Early in September, 1861, Captain Ed. Lewis, of Ottumwa, 
commenced to raise a company for a Regiment then making up at 



6o History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

St. Louis, Mo., known as Birge's Sharp-shooters. About the 
same time Captains J. M. Hedrick and G. A. Madison, of the same 
phice, each undertook to raise a Company for the Infantry service. 
Recruits came in slowly, and it was finally agreed between the 
three to unite in one company all their recruits, numbering 70 men 
or more, and allow the men by an election to choose their officers. 
Madison and Hedrick were each willing to take their chances, but 
Lewis was unwilling to take anything below the Captaincy — (he, 
perhaps, having recruited more men than either of the others). 
The election was held late in October, and G. A. Madison was 
elected Captain; J. AI. Hedrick First Lieutenant, and C. M. Reyn- 
olds Second Lieutenant, and H. W. Brant Orderly Sergeant. A 
majority of Lewis' men were from Mahaska county, and a very tine 
body of men, too, but owing to the way they were treated in the 
election quite a number of them withdrew from the company. 

Captain (afterwards General) E. F. Winslow, and now Presi- 
dent of the St. Louis and San Francisco Railway Company, was 
in Ottumwa looking up recruits for the 4th Iowa Cavalry, and in 
less than an hour after our election of officers Captain Winslow 
had a majority of the Lewis men sworn in for his companv. Those 
men would have been satisfied to remain if one of their number had 
been elected Second Lieutenant, or even Orderly' Sergeant. They 
were not dissatisfied with the election of Madison and Hedrick. 
Three of the Oskaloosa boys remained with us and brought one 
more recruit, while one of the Wapello county bovs went with 
Winslow and three or four others backed out. 

It was the expectation that the company would form a part of 
the Regiment then being recruited by Colonel Hugh T. Reid, at 
Keokuk, and having received orders the companv started and 
arrived at the rendezvous in that city on the last dav of October, 
and on November 1st were mustered into the United States service 
and designated D Company. 




Arthur A. Irvin. 

CD D 15™ lOm VDIS. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 6i 

About that time the 3d Iowa Cavah-y left Camp Rankin, and 
the first duty assigned the company was to take possession of and 
guard Camp Rankin until all the companies then at rendezvous 
could move up there. Lieutenant Hedrick appointed me Sergeant, 
and with fifteen men detailed us for that purpose; we marched 
boldlv up and took possession. I divided the squad into reliefs, 
appointed one Sergeant to have oversight, and a Corporal for each 
relief. This, I believe, was the first Camp Guard of the 15th Iowa. 
Getting everything into good working order, and directing the 
Sergeant what to do in case of an attack, and giving a countersign, 
I rolled myself up in my blankets and slept like a Major-General. 

Here the first blood of Company I was shed. Early in the morn- 
ing a shot was fired in camp. One of the men had concluded that 
soldiering was pretty tough business, and thought by shooting the 
fore-finger from his right hand he could get out. The end of the 
finger was shot off, and Dr. Seaton, of Keokuk, dressed the wound, 
and the man soon recovered. 

Captain Madison resigned on account of wounds January 18, '63, 
and since the war has represented Wapello county in both branches 
of the State Legislature, and served several terms as Mayor of the 
City of Ottumwa. J. S. PORTER, 

Historian D Company. 

Captain Madison is now one of the Board of Commissioners of 
the Iowa Soldiers' Home, for which the last General Assembly 
appropriated $100,000, and which has been located at Marshall- 
town. Since the war Colonel James S. Porter has most ably filled 
the ofiice of County Judge of Wapello county, and also served very 
acceptably for two terms as Mayor of the City of Ottumwa. 

T. 

E COMPANY. 
In October, 1861, John P. Craig, a popular and influential bus- 
iness man of Keosauqua, received a commission to recruit a com- 
pany under the first call for 300,000 men for three years. Twenty- 



62 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

five men enrolled at once. There being in the town several hun- 
dred old Harper's ferry muskets, furnished the people by the state 
for protection on the border, one of the number, Hugh G. Brown, 
began at once to instruct the recruits in the drill, using Scott's 
tactics. Meantime, with a martial band, the detachment visited 
different parts of the county — (Van Buren) — for additional enlist- 
ments. They were cordially received and entertained by the citi- 
zens of the towns visited, and doubled their number. 

Being mostly young men who had grown into manhood in the 
county, when the time came for their departure to Keokuk, their 
place of rendezvous, many were the tears and earnest benedictions 
of the friends they left behind. November 6th John P. Craig 
reported to Colonel H. T. Reid, at Keokuk, with the detachment. 

C. W. Woodrow and Newton J. Rogers, having been members 
of the First Iowa Infantry — a three months' Regiment — gallant 
men, who received honorable mention for service at the battle of 
Wilson's Creek, determined to raise a company under the three 
years' call. They decided to join R. VV. Hutchcraft, who had re- 
ceived a commission from General John C. Fremont to raise a 
company for the '■'Fremont Light Guards," which was intended to 
be the crack Regiment of the Western Army. 

Upwards of fifty men had been enlisted in the vicinity of Des 
Moines and the northern part of Lee county, and were about to 
embark for St. Louis when Governor Kirkwood issued a procla- 
mation prohibithig men who had enlisted within the state from 
leaving and joining other organizations. For this reason they also 
reported to Colonel H. T. Reid, at Keokuk, where the ISth Iowa 
organized. 

At this time the quota of 800,001) men called foi" was about com- 
pleted, and the general public believing that no more troops would 
he needed, it wa.s deemed best to consolidate the detachments. 
Among others, the following order was issued: 



Iowa Veteran Voluntee}' Infantry , 6j 

GENERAL ORDER NO. 10. 

Headquarters 15th Iowa Infantry, ) 
Catiif Halleck, Dec . 6th,i86i. \ 

The detachment of men in camp under command of R. W, 

Hutchcraft, and a detachment under John P. Craig, are hereby 

consolidated in one company; the men under Hutclicraft to have 

the Captaincy of the company, and the men under Craig to have 

the Lieutenancy. The non-commissioned officers to be equally 

divided between the detachments. By order of 

HUGH T. REID, 

15th Iowa Infantry, Commanding. 

GEO. POMUTZ, Adjutant. 

In accordance with said order the detachments became Company 
" E," of the 15th Iowa, and as such were mustered into the U. S. 
service on December 6th, 186], by Captain Chas. C. Smith, U. S. 
A., at Keokuk, and were assigned to the left center of the Regi- 
ment, which position they retained during the war. 

They were quartered for the winter in the third story of a brick 
building on Fifth street, near Main, in Keokuk, where, amid the 
songs, dances, jokes and games, the long winter evenings passed . 
The usual restlessness, however, to be sent to the front was mani- 
fested, and many a fear expressed that the war would close ere they 
were given a chance to exercise their patriotic valor. During the 
winter the company was drilled and instructed in the duties of the 
soldier by the first captain, R. W. Hutchcraft, who was a man of 
fine military bearing, and proved himself a ready and efficient offi- 
cer at the battle of Shiloh . 

In the summer of 1862 he resigned on account of illness, and the 
vacancy was filled by the promotion of First Lieutenant John P. 
Craig. Captain Craig led his company valiantly at the battle of 
Corinth; and for his innate kindness of heart and high moral char- 
acter he proved a general favorite with all . He was compelled to 



y 



64 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

leave the service in December, 1862, on account of disease con- 
tracted by exposure. His resignation being reluctantly accepted, 
he returned to liis pleas.mt home and loving friends. This vacancy 
was tilled by the promotion of Newton J. Rogers, who became the 
third and last Captain, and was mustered out with the Company at 
the close of the war. He was a genial, whole-souled man, a jolly 
companion, as brave as the bravest, and generous to a fault. 

Hugh G. Brown was elected Second Lieutenant at the organiza- 
tion of the company, and was promoted to First Lieutenant to fill 
the vacancy caused by the promotion of Craig to Captain. Lieu- 
tenant Brown was a thorough scholar, and distinguished himself 
for gallantry at Shiloh. He acted at times as Adjutant of the Reg- 
iment, and made an efficient olficer; was detailed as Provost Mar- 
shall at Corinth, Miss. He was chosen by Gen. E. O. C. Ord as 
a member of his staff, and was promoted to Captain and A. D. C. 
U. S. Volunteers August 28th, 1863; brevet Major, December 
29th, 1864; brevet Lieutenant-Colonel, March 81st, 1865; appointed 
.Second Lieutenant United States Infantry, May 2d, 1866; promoteil 
First Lieutenant 86th United States Infantry November 28th, 
1866; promoted Captain Company " C," 12th United States In- 
fantry, March 2()th, 1879. 

The third, and last, First Lieutenant VV . P. Muir was promoted 
to First Sergeant from the ranks March 1st, 1862; was again pi^o- 
moted to Second Lieutenant February 2d, 1868; and to First Lieu- 
tenant November 9th, 1868; brevet Captain March 18th, 1865, and 
brevet Major March 18th, (same day) 18()5. 

Lieutenant Muir was an able otlicer and a man of sterling worth, 
higli purpose and Inm ik-tLMininaticMi . These qualities rendered 
liim every inch a soKlier. He believed that all who entered the 
army were actuated by tlie same high principle as himself; that 
their duty was to obe\' orders. 

Those who had liie honor to serve under him can testif}' that 
they usually did so. Wni. C, Stidger v/as elected Fourth Sergeant 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 6^ 

at the organization of the company . Was promoted to Sergeant- 
Major; also to Second Lieutenant, and from that to Adjutant of 
the Regiment. He was a brave and efficient officer. 

Second Lieutenant Don C. Hicks was elected Corporal at the 
organization of the company; promoted to Sergeant; then to Sec- 
ond Lieutenant. He was as true as steel, and always found at his 
post ready for duty . . He was loved by his comrades, trusted by 
his superiors, and obeyed by those under his command. 

From the foregoing it will be seen that Company E had but 
seven commissioned officers; yet from those originally forming the 
company, there were commissioned nineteen officers of different 
grades. 

During the service of the 15th Iowa, Company E furnished four 
Sergeant-Majors, to- wit: Alexander Brown, who was wounded 
at Shiloh, and again at Corinth so severely that he was unable 
longer to remain in the service; Amos D. Thatclier, who was pro- 
moted to Lieutenant in United States colored Infantry; Wm. C. \/ 
Stidger, and Jas. W. Henry, who was mustered out as such at the 
close of the war. 

Of the Regimental Color vSergeants, Company E furnished not 
a few. Newton J. Rogers, afterwards Captain, carried them gal- 
lantly at the battle of Shiloh; Eldredge G. Black, at the battle of 
Corinth, laid down his young life while holding the colors aloft, 
amid the most terific rain of musketry, and Wm . H. Sellers bore 
them bravely through the fighting from Kenesaw Mt., to the sea. 

The Regimental Ambulance was driven for nearly three years 
by a member of Company ' E,' L. B. Muzzy, and a true friend to 
the boys did '* Father Muzzy" prove. He was watchful and at- 
tentive; an opportunity of rendering aid to the weary or suffering 
soldier was never allowed to pass unheeded. Being an earnest and 
conscientious Christian, many were the prayers that went up from 
his great honest heart for the sick and wounded under his care. 
5 



66 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

At the organization of the company, McDavis was appointed 
Drummer, and a faithful one he was. For nearly three years he 
promptly (too promptly) awoke the boys with his reveille and 
retired them with his taps. At his own request, on the morning 
of the charge on Nick-a-Jack Creek, he changed his drum for a 
musket, and in his first engagement lost a leg. 

Many acts of heroism were performed by members of Company 
'E .' In the excitement of battle to stand up and fight, while com- 
rades are falling on every side, requires bravery; but what shall we 
say of those who volunteered to go and care for brother soldiers 
who were stricken down with small-pox, or of those who entered 
the enemy's line to find and bring wounded comrades, as did a Ser- 
geant and three other members on July 21st, 1864, while Sergeant 
Roberts lay wounded. Augustus Smith, a private, who waited to 
help them over the works at the time, was killed. 

Among the captures made by individuals Private Ben. Johnson, 
on the Meridian march, captured two prisoners. The Regiment 
had bivouaced for the night, when Johnson started off alone. Hav- 
ing gone somewhere near a mile, he espied two rebels lying behind 
a log watching other soldiers, unconscious of their own danger. 
He ordered them to surrender, which they (reluctantly) did, when 
he, a self-appointed guard, marched them off to headquarters. 
Private T. I. Muir, while doing picket duty, was surprised by a 
party of the enemy, who ordered him to surrender, but by dint of 
strategy and ready wit, he entirely out-gencraled them . Making 
a bold dash forward he called to the boys to "• come ahead," and 
ordered the rebs to throw down their arms. Believing his comrades 
to be near they obeyed. Thus the would-be captors became the 
captives. 

When the time arrived for the l)ovs to subsist off the surround- 
ing country, Company 'E' came to the front and was soon noted 
for careful, systematic foraging. The midnight "crow" of the in- 




Wm.h.Shepardson 

MUSICIAN 
CO.FI5^"IOIVAyOLS. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 67 

nocent rooster never failed to catch the attentive ear, and as for the 
squeal of a pig it was music which was soon followed by the wel- 
come odor of " fresh pork " arising from the old camp kettle. 
Numerous and various were the captures, and with characteristic 
liberality were they ever divided. It is needless to assert that in 
the distributions the field and staff were generally remembered. 

When the last reveille sounded on the morning of August 3d, 
1865, many and conflicting were the thoughts of each man. Eager 
expectations of home were somewhat clouded by the parting of 
comrades who had mingled in associations which only soldiers have. 
It was the parting of a band of brothers — both officers and men — 
and many were the regrets for those comrades left in unknown and 
unmarked graves. 

The commands of Rogers would never inspire them to bravery 
again; the cheery voice of Wilson to fall in, Company 'E' need 
never more be obeyed; the songs of Cockayne cheer them in our 
home sickness, or the jokes of Grove and Buck, and drollery of 
Bowen and Holcomb, make long days and nights pass swiftly 
away . The bravery of Stewart, Carver, Wilson, Watson, and 
many others, are among the thoughts in the minds of each man as 
they laid aside their arms to take up the peaceful duties of life . 

The general history of the Regiment is the history of Company 
'E.' It never fell to their lot to have any special detail that would 
lighten the burden of work or danger. The list of casualties will 
show that they did not shrink from duty, for no company that was 
mustered out had more cause to be proud of their officers and of 
each other than had Company 'E,' of the I5th Iowa. 

J. J. WILSON, 
BEN. JOHNSTON. 



F. COMPANY. 

A company was raised by Captain E. C. Blackmar, of Mills 
county, and First Lieutenant Jas. G. Day, of Tremont county, dur- 



68 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

ing September and October, 1861, and went into camp at Glen- 
wood, October 10th. By order of the Governor, started to Keokuk, 
the place of rendezvous, November 9th; arrived there on the 16th, 
and was mustered into the United States service, by Captain C. C. 
Smith, November 18th, 1861, as Company F, 15th Regiment Iowa 
Volunteers, for three years. 

JOB. THROCKMORTON, 

Company Historian, 



G. COMPANY. 

On the 20th day of October, A. D. 1861, Wm. T. Cunningham 
and Frederick Christofel, of Knoxville, Iowa, began, under orders 
of the Governor of Iowa, to recruit for Company G, 15th Iowa 
Infantry Volunteers . On the 24th of said month they had enrolled 
77 men . On the 15th day of November, 1861, about thirty men 
were enrolled at Indianola, Iowa, by Dr. Hezekiah Fisk and Cyrus 
G. Boyd, arrived at Knoxville, and on the next day the company 
met in the court house in Knoxville and completed its organization 
by the election of officers. 

Mr. Fred. Christofel, who was a very competent drill master, 
was, by a combination of circumstances, denied the position of Lieu- 
tenant which had been promised him . A large number of those 
who enlisted in Company G were afterwards transferred to Com- 
pany K, and in this company Mr. Christofel received the commis- 
sion he had so well earned and deserved . 

On the 19th of November, 1861, Company G started in wagons 
for Eddyville about 30 miles distant, then the nearest railroad sta- 
tion. We reached Eddyville about 5 o'clock p. m. of same day, 
and the. loyal and hospitable citizens of that place entertained us in 
their homes until next morning at 5 o'clock, when we took train 
for Keokuk, our ]:)lacc of rendezvous. Arriving at Keokuk at 
10:40 o'clock a. m., November 20th, 1861, we were immediately 




DANL.EMBRfE 
2"? LIEUT CO. G I5T» Wm VOLS. 




S.C.SlVIITH. 
CO.GJSTflOW/IYOLS. 



loxva Veteran Vohtnteer Infantry. 6g 

marched to the camp of the Regiment on the bluffs over-looking 
the "Father of Waters" north of the city. On the 25th of same 
month Company G was mustered into service by Captain C. C. 
Smith, U. S. A., under proclamation of the President of the United 
States, dated July 23d, 1861. 

On the following New Years day Company G was greatly 
cheered by being made the happy recipients of a most excellent 
dinner from the hands of the loyal people of Keokuk. It is need- 
less to say that the boys did ample justice to the delicious viands. 

On January 8, 1862, Wm. Bidgood, of Company G, died of 
congestion of the brain. This was the first death in the company, 
and caused many sober reflections. 

ALBERT M. BROBST, 

Company Historian . 



H. COMPANY. 

November 12, 1861, Mr. Daniel B. Clark, of Council Bluffs, 
commenced recruiting a company in that city on the 30th. He 
started with eight wagons, carrying 42 men; arrived at Eddyville 
December 7th, and via Keokuk and Des Moines railroad at the 
rendezvous at Keokuk on the 8th, coming 210 miles in wagons 
over frozen roads, and 90 miles in cars. Mr. Clark soon returned 
to the Bluffs; on January 5, 1862, one-half of the compan}' v\^ere 
reported sick, engaged with the measles. 

During the month a second squad of 20 men arrived, and Febru- 
ary 13th Mr. Clark left for Keokuk with 28 more recruits, in 
stages on runners, as it was good sleighing. At noon it commenced 
snowing furiously, and continued all night. Before dark it was 
necessary to detail two men to walk in advance as guides, and they 
could only keep the road by walking on the old sleigh ruts. The 
night was dark, very cold and windy; to-day we would call it a 
Montana blizzard. It was the most violent storm that winter. 



JO History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

The drivers and guides could see but a few yards ahead, and had to 
be relieved often . The men suffered greatly, and w^ere compelled 
to get out and walk to prevent being frozen. In this way the de- 
tachment came across the prairies all night and next day until a trail 
was found the drivers could follow, and they arrived at the ren- 
dezvous February 21st. 

This company was raised in Pottawattamie and Harrison coun- 
ties; nine brethren joined at Keokuk. It was designated "H 
Company," and with 95 men was mustered into the United States 
service on December 13, '61, and February 22, '62, with Daniel 
B. Clark commissioned Captain from December 18, '61. He 
took a serious cold from exposure on his last trip across the state, 
losing his voice for weeks, and at St. Louis was taken sick and left 
there in hospital, and has never fully recovered. He rejoined com- 
pany on May 22d, but feeling that he was disabled for active ser- 
vice, resigned June 7, '62, at Corinth, Miss. He is now Secretary 
of the Pottawattamie County Farmers' Mutual Fire Insurance 
Company, and resides at Council Bluffs, Iowa. 

John A. Danielson, of Calhoun, Harrison county, was our 
second Captain, vice Clark resigned. He signed the roll Novem- 
ber 12, '61, being the first man to enlist in the company, and soon 
after its arrival at Keokuk, was appointed the first Orderly Ser- 
geant, and made out the first morning reports, first pay rolls, de- 
tailed its first guards, drew its first camp equippage; hence, he was 
" First in war, first to draw Company rations, and first in the hearts 
of his Companymen." At the election of officers he was unani- 
mously elected Second Lieutenant, and was appointed a member of 
the Board of Survey that held an inquest on those Shoddy Black 
Overcoats, (that you could easily see through three or four thick- 
nesses), and condemned the price charged, of steen dollars or more 
down to three dollars. 

He watched closely the interests and welfare of his men, and at 
the battle of Shiloh, First Lieutenant King being wounded, he took 



Iowa V^eteran V^ot7inteer infantry. yi 

command. About 2 o'clock p. m. he was severely wounded in 
right hip. Private J. E. Rice carried him a quarter of a mile back 
to a ravine. Stopping to rest, a wounded man of the lf5th rode up 
on a wounded horse. On being asked to let the Lieutenant ride 
behind him, he replied, "Yes, if you can get on." Rice assisted 
him to mount and he was taken to the " Minnehaha," where Ser- 
geant Gibbon di'essed his wounds, and he was sent to Savannah antl 
then to Keokuk. Returning he was promoted Captain June 8, '62. 
The march from Corinth to re-enforce Bolivar, Tenn., convinced 
him that he could not endure hard marching. 

He was kind, sociable, a friend to all the men, a good officer, and 
was beloved by the whole company, who sincerely regretted his 
wounds disabled him and compelled him to resign on September 
13, '62. He is now engaged in farming and raising fine stock, and 
resides at Missouri Valley, Harrison county, Iowa. 

William M. Swanson, of Lyons, was third Captain, vice 
Danielson, resigned; promoted from First Lieutenant A Company, 
he took command on November 14, '62. He was tall, active and 
a dashing looking officer, and had the reputation of being the best 
one in the Regiment on skirmish drill. In this he took especial 
pride. It was soon evident that H Company was not his affinity, 
for in a way that was " child-like and bland " they would decline to 
assist him in an emergency, like being mired, or when it was dull 
in camp arrange a military diversion as part of their school of the 
soldier, (in which he did not instruct them ), and shell his head- 
quarters at Lake Providence, (and later the Guard House, which 
had been named Fort Murphy by its then sole occupant). This 
he did not seem to enjoy so fully as expected, and on March 80, 
'63, he resigned. Nothing has been heard of him since. 

Nelson VV. Edwards, of Council Bluffs, was the fourth and 
last Captain, vice Swanson, resigned. He enlisted as private No- 
vember 14, '61 ; was elected Second Sergeant in December, at Keo- 



y2 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

kuk; Capt. Clark was left sick at St. Louis, both Lieutenants and 
First Sergeant Piatt being severely wounded at Shiloh. He was 
in command of the company until relieved by Lieutenant C. M. 
Reynolds, of D Company ; then served as First Sergeant until pro- 
moted Second Lieutenant June 8, '62; First Lieutenant February 
13, '68, and Captain March 81, '63. He was a pleasant and efficient 
officer, thoroughly posted in the regulations and tactics, and ever 
ready to render any courtesy in his power, and was well liked by 
the whole company. He was slightly wounded at Shiloh and at 
Kenesaw Mountain. With two exceptions, he was in continuous 
command from his promotion to Captain until the company was 
disbanded August 4, '65. Then he was a railroad contractor for 
several years; married in 1870, and soon after located in Moulton, 
Iowa, and became connected with the Moulton Record. Was 
editor, postmaster and mayor in 1875, and was admitted to the bar 
in '79, and secured a large practice in that and adjoining counties. 
He was a good friend and neighbor, a kind husband and father, but 
after a brief illness he died from a complication of diseases in his 
43d year, on March 3, 1882. 

Stephen W. King, of Council Bluffs, was, on the organization 
of the companv, December 13, '61, at Keokuk, vmanimously elected 
First Lieutenant. Had the company been entitled to a General, 
like F Company, they would have elected him to that position with 
the same unanimity, for on the trip across the state he looked closely 
after their comfort, and proved to them it was not his first cam- 
paign. It was generall}' understood that his knowledge of com- 
pany and battallion drill, and all tilings militar\', lie acquired l\v 
personal observation of the Army on the Plains. He was tall, well 
built, had the "set up" of one who had experienced the drill, and 
was the handsomest man in II Company. From date commis- 
sioned, he was most of the time in command of tlie company until 
seriously wounded in left leg in battle of Shiloh, April 6, '62, and 
sent North. His left foot amputated, and disabled for life, he was 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. yj 

mustered out on August 31, '62. He had by his manly, soldierly 
qualities so Avon the hearts of his men, who respected and loved 
him, that it was a sad day for them when informed he would not 
return. He is repoited to reside at Wheelock, Texas. 

Nelson W. Edwards was the second First Lieutenant, vice 
King, mustered out. See fourth Captain. 

Henry Clay McArthur was the thnd and last First Lieu- 
tenant, and no one is more entitled to credit for the efficiency of 
our company, and none more loved by the boys, than Mac. 

He was born in Circleville, Ohio, August 27, lJi89; moved to 
Keosauqua, Iowa, in April, 1856, and was engaged in business there 
at the outbreak of the war. Full of patriotism when the flag of 
our country was assailed, he enlisted in the three months service, 
but the company not being accepted, he joined E Company of our 
Regiment in August, '61. Our beloved and lamented General 
John M. Hedrick, was recruiting K Company and observing Mac's 
soldierly qualities, had him transferred to that company, and pro- 
moted Second and Orderly Sergeants. 

At the battle of Shiloh, that baptism of blood for the ]5th Iowa, 
Mac w^as foremost in the fight and was wounded in the left hip 
slightly. In the slow advance on Corinth Mac was seized with a 
complication of diseases and sent North, not, however, until he fell 
in the ranks on battallion drill, and was carried unconscious to 
camp. This severe sickness caused his absence for several months. 
During the summer he was detailed on recruiting service at Keo- 
kuk with Major Belknap, where he did good work; rejoined Reg- 
iment that fall and was promoted to First Lieutenant H Company 
April 16, '68; was in command of company August 10 to Septem- 
ber 10, '68; then detailed as Acting Adjutant to October 1, and 
from October 2 to November 9, '63, in command of B Company, 
and was Acting Quartermaster February 1 to March 6, '64, during 
the Meridian Raid. 



^4 History of the fifteenth Regiment 

He was always eagerly watching the interests of his men, en- 
forcing discipHne, prompt on duty, yet a comrade in every particu- 
hir when off duty. He soon won the respect and love of every 
soldier in the company, and when or where " Little Mac" led, H 
Company followed, and he always went where dutj' called. On 
July 21, '64, while leading our company in that bloody charge be- 
fore Atlanta, he was shot down, struck by a large piece of shell in 
left hip, but would not allow himself to be carried from the field 
until he was assured the assault had ended. That night word came 
from field hospital that Mac would not recover, and several officers 
and men went over to see him, Mac noticed his comrades felt he 
would not live, and said, " Look here, boys, I am not going to die; 
I am better than two dead men yet;" and no doubt his good nature 
and strong determination to live carried him through the trying 
scenes of the next few days and saved his life. Colonel Hedrick 
said the next thing he knew of him was, that on the very next day 
Mac was stealing a grave. See account of same after the battle of 
July 22, 'H4. His wound disabled him for duty until January, '65, 
when he rejoined Regiment at Savannah, Ga. 

His Shiloh wound in left hip, and same hip being terribly man- 
gled at Atlanta, prevented him from marching, and he was detached 
January 4, '65, as Aide-de-Camp to General Wm. W. Belknap, 
commanding Brigade. The night after we bivouacked in sight of 
Columbia, S. C, Mac unearthed two old dug-outs, and assisted bv 
Lieutenant VV. H. Goodrell, F Company, and by working all 
night, they were accepted as ser\iceable next morning bv that part of 
the United States Go\ernment on the spot without the usual trial 
trip. But the Lieutenants soon made it, with other daring spirits, 
crossing the river in them, and planted the first L^nited States flag 
over the Rebel Capitol. See this exploit forward on February 17, 
'65, and H Company claims her share of the honor in the promi- 
nent part our I'^irst Lieutenant McArthur took in the affair. 



JoTi'a Veteran Volunteer Infantry . 7j 

When brevet Major General W. W. Belknap was assigned to 
command the Fourth Division, and later the 17th Corps, Mac 
accompanied him, and was always a prompt, courteous and efficient 
officer, and was mustered out with Regiment. For gallant and 
meritorious conduct he was brevetted Captain and Major United 
States Volunteers. Returning to private life he moved to Memphis, 
Mo., and engaged in the drug business. On February 5, 1870, he 
was appointed United States Revenue Assessor for Third Col. 
District of Missouri, and relieved May 20, '78, by act of Congress 
abolishing the office. Then the press of his district, regardless of 
party, paid him the tribute of being one of the most efficient, ener- 
getic, competent and faithful Internal Revenue officers in the ser- 
vice. 

Mac continues the same enei-gy in his daily life that he displayed 
in the service, and has accumulated considerable property. He has 
a charming wife, two sons and a daughter. In August, 1886, he 
removed to Lincoln, Nebraska. Mac has a warm side and hearty 
greeting for all old soldiers, especially for the 15th boys, and in 
return is given a warm welcome at all reunions, and he generally 
contributes his share in making the occasion interesting. 

"Court Fours." John A. Danielson was Second Lieuten- 
ant on formation of company, and promoted Second Captain, 
which see . 

The second was Nelson W. Edwards, promoted First Lieu- 
tenant and Fourth Captain, which see. 

The third Second Lieutenant was Logan Crawford, of Cal- 
houn. He enlisted November 27, '61, and was an honest, kindly 
man, always ready for duty, or with pleasant words to cheer or 
willing hands to aid any one. At the battle of Corinth he was 
severely wounded in the head, and appointed First Sergeant De- 
cember 28, '62, vice Gammond, discharged, and promoted Second 
Lieutenant February 13, '63. He was the engineer who surveyed 
and superintended the digging of the Iowa and Mississippi canal, 



y6 Hisfojy of the Fifteenth Reghtient 

from A Company to left of E Company, in the camp below Vicks- 
burg, which insured the boys from being washed away in later 
overflows while encamped there. He was again severely wounded, 
shot through left lung, and captured in battle of Atlanta July 22, 
'04, and taken to Macon, Ga., thence to Charleston, S. C, and was 
exchanged in the harbor there December 13, '64, but disabled for 
other campaigns by wounds and prison life. He was mustered out 
on February 19, '65. He lives at Missouri Valley, Iowa, and for 
some years has been Surveyor of his county. 

The fourth Second Lieutenant was James M. Hoffnagle, 
commissioned February 29, '65, formerlv First Sergeant. He was 
called Doc for short, not because he was short as you may suppose. 
He enlisted as private December 24, '61, on the left of the company, 
and ascended the military scale and won a Corporal's and a Ser- 
geant's chevrons, but for some unknown cause, he was like several 
of our Sergeants, retired on less pay and became a reform-ed pri- 
vate, but immediately set out to win new honors, and by an act of 
Providence, (La.,) he interviewed Tom Wilson and gained valua- 
ble information which defeated a proposed plan to bankrupt the 
guard house, and prevented the squad from skipping North. Doc's 
star was rising, and on September 28, '63, he was appointed First 
Sergeant, vice Rice, deceased. Doc was a quiet man, a good fel- 
low, generally liked by the boys, and was in command of the com- 
pany from June 29 to July 14, '65, and became a disbanded volun- 
teer with comjiany August 4, '65. His address is not known. 

In addition to the aboxe officers tlie coin))any was also commanded 
by Lieutenants Reynolds, D Company; Swanson, A Company; 
Shannon, C Compan\-; Throckmorton, F Company; and Craig, E 
Company; 167 men joined H Company, and tluring its first three 
months' serxice in tlie field it had ten Commanders. Its Roll of 
Honor sliows 140 casualties. 

Barnes Post, No. 103, G. A. R., of Mondamin, and Bedsaul 
Post, No. 202, of Magnolia, Iowa, are named to perpetuate the 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. jj 

memory of two of our comrades. At midnight, August 8d, 1865, 
the company started on its last march (to the pay-master) and about 
2 A. M. of the 4th it was disbanded in a soaking rain as usual. 

Whether they were fighting or building works in a half dozen 
States (digging canals in Louisiana, wading rivers and swamps in 
Georgia and Carolina, corduroying roads or twisting railroads in 
many places, corraling fast stock at Vicksburg, or " Hold on, Sloke, 
we bet twenty on the ace," they were always ready for any duty, 
and although hard service once reduced them until there were not 
enough men present to make one stack of arms, they rallied and 
were jolly soldiers, A 1 foragers, and as bully boys as any that 
wore the Blue. 

L. S. TYLER, 

Historian H Company. 



I COMPANY. 

The military history of Company I covers a long period of active 
service in the field. Its first battle was Shiloh, April, 1862; its last 
battle Bentonville, N. C., February, 1865. It was the first com- 
pany to re-enlist as Veteran Volunteers in the Seventeenth Army 
Corps at Vicksburg, Mississippi, in 1868. This part of its history 
is mentioned hereafter. 

Company I lost more men in casualties, caused by death from 
disease, and being killed, wounded and captured in battle, according 
to its numerical strength, compared with other companies, than any 
other company in the Regiment during its long term of active ser- 
vice in the field. 

Always at the front, conspicuous in every action, ready and will- 
ing for duty in every emergency, the surviving members of this 
little band may well be proud of the part they took in the war 
which saved the Union and gives us to-day a united and prosper, 
ous country, 



y8 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

To look back now to the days when, filled with enthusiasm and 
the hot young blood of youth, enlisted men of Company I, came to 
Keokuk as new recruits to do their first duty as soldiers in the win- 
ter of 1861-2, reminds me that in this brief sketch, so long a period 
has elapsed, many things must be omitted. 

It is twenty-five years, a quarter of a century, which has glided 
by like a shadow, with its days and months and years, with the 
rush of events of every day life, with their sunshine and storm, 
during which we have thought more about making money to buy 
bread and butter than about our military services in the field. 

General Hedrick, our gallant comrade in arms, who has crossed 
the great river of death from paralysis, caused by his wounds before 
Atlanta July 22, 1864, was an inimitable and amusing story teller. 
When interrupted in the midst of telling one of his many stories, 
which were legion, he always stopped and said to the party correct- 
ing and interrupting him: "Very well; if you know the story 
better than 1 do, go on and tell it yourself." 

If any one else knows the story of Company I better than I do, 
let him tell it himself, and he will have my thanks. 

In this rapid review of its history, if any member of Company I 
does not get his deserts it is not my fault. I am ready and willing 
to do full justice to every gallant soldier of the company, so long 
under my command. But the half cannot now be told, as Queen 
Shebe said after seeing the glory and magnificence of Solomon. 

1 had the first appointment October 18, 1861, as recruiting officer 
for a compan\ in Colonel Reid's Regiment, and was transferred 
from Comj^any A, Second Regiment Iowa Infantry, November, 
1861. Lloyd D. Simpson, of Keokuk, also had a recruiting com- 
mission for the same purpose. Having 40 men between us they 
were consolidated and made Company I. I was elected and mus- 
tered in as First Lieutenant December 1, 1861, from which date I 
liati command until January 24, 1862, when Lloyd D. Simpson 







Ged.W. Kirkpatrick, 

J?T LIEUT. C0.U5W IOWA VOLS. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. jg 

was elected Captain and Robert W. Hamilton as Second Lieuten- 
ant, the company being full. Captain Simpson resigned before we 
left Keokuk, and after his resignation I was elected Captain; but 
soon after our arrival at St. Louis it was found two days after the 
resignation of Captain Simpson, James G.Day, First Lieutenant of 
Company F, who had not been elected, which was then required, 
was appointed Captain of the company January 26, 1862, and took 
command, which he held until the 6th of April, 1862, when he was 
wounded and disabled in the battle of Shiloh, where Second Lieu- 
tenant Robert W. Hamilton, who was a gallant and efficient and 
popular officer, was killed. Captain Day, after being wounded, 
turned over the command of the company to myself, and rode off 
the field on the horse of Colonel Alexander Chambers, who was 
also wounded . 

Getting leave of absence, wounded he went North; returned on 
the 8d of July, 1862, to Corinth, Miss., and at my request was 
transferred to be Captain of Company F, whose Captain and First 
Lieutenant had resigned, and I was promoted Captain of Company 
I July 4, 1862. 

We return now to the early days or recruiting period and our 
winter quarters at Keokuk, in Barracks, in 1861, '62. The counties 
of Marion, Clark, Lee and Van Buren furnished nearly all the re- 
cruits; a few came from other counties from Illinois and Missouri. 

That winter was very severe, and the men suffered much from 
measles, which was epidemic, and in some cases proved fatal. As 
a sequel of measles many have also since suffered from diseases of 
lungs, eyes, and deafness. 

That winter while I had command as First Lieutenant I let every 
man have a pass to go out at night who asked for it. Some went 
to see their friends, others to see their girls, and to Dutch dances in 
Holland town, but I impressed it upon them to get recruits. 



8o History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

On Sabbath day, all who desired, went to some church — 
marched there in a body. Captain Simpson was an Episcopalian, 
and read the service in the absence of the Rector of St. John's 
Church. 

He held going to dances was very immoral. On one occasion 
he was drilling the company on Main street. In his fine, shrill 
voice he gave the order as they were drawn up in column, "touch 
elbows to the left, gentlemen! gently! g-e-n-t-/^(7! gentlemen! 

Then he made them a speech about the propriety of starting a 
Sunday-school class in quarters, and concluded his address with the 
words, " Gentlemen ! / Tvant to make Cotnpany I the best drilled 
Company^ as well as the most moral Co?)ipanv, i/i the Regiment V 
His eloquent words took deep root. All but about five of his 
friends, who held to his views, petitioned him to resign, and he sent 
in his resignation, and Companv I continued to be the most moral 
company in the Regiment. 

Cornelius Van Hout, of Eddyville, who was a Catholic and at- 
tended that church, was told by some mischief-loving waggish 
young rooster of the company, one Sunday morning, when after 
inspection, the men fell into line to march that day to the Metho- 
dist chuixh, that he too had to go to the Methodist church. He was 
horrified, and protested against going to any other church except 
his own, and wringing his hands in his agony, blubbered out in a 
voice full of tears and broken with sobs, "TU go and see the Priest 
and see what She says about it." When I told the story to Father 
De Cailley, our merry and fun-loving Priest, he was very much 
amused. 

Cornelius went to his own church, however, without having to 
go tirst to see the Priest. 

The new recruits had a good time at Keokuk, and after our 
arrival at Benton Barracks, and on the way up the Tennessee River 
to Pittsburg Landing, playing pranks on the many odd and sus. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 8i 

ceptible characters who took everything said to them by way of a 
joke, as said in good earnest, and believed it to be true. John 
Stigman, a Holland Dutchman, and George Walters, a German, 
were much worried . 

From all parts of the quarters you could hear them cry out: 
You! John Stig-ga-man! Then he would rave. 

Isaac N. Hewitt, now dead, who was a soldier in the Mexican 
war, made Walters believe he had to carry a ham of meat, besides 
his knapsack, on the march. Stigman deserted in disgust, joined 
the 21st Missouri Infantry, and was killed at Shiloh April 6, 1862; 
Walters deserted at Corinth, and died in the State Insane Asylum 
at Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, in March, 1865. 

The wags sought new victims. 

Furnished with arms and equipments at St. Louis, without hav- 
ing loaded or fired a musket, we marched out of Benton Barracks 
leading the column of four full Regiments with their new blue uni- 
forms through the streets of St. Louis. With the music of all the 
bands, and flags and banners flying to take transport steamers from 
the landing via Cairo and Faducah, Ky., up the Tennessee River 
to Pittsburg Landing (Shiloh), presented a grand spectacle. The 
streets were crowded with people who witnessed it with evident 
admiration. Thev all reached Shiloh in time to participate in the 
first day of that great battle, commencing early on the Sunday 
morning of April 6, 1862. What is a remarkable fact, every Col- 
onel of these four Regiments on that day was under fire and shot. 
Colonel Jacob T. Tindall, 23d Missouri, had his head shot away by 
a cannon ball. Colonel Jas. S. Alban, of the 18th Wisconsin, was 
mortally wounded and died next day. Colonel Alex. Chambers, 
of the 16th Iowa, was severely wounded in the arm and shoulder, 
and Colonel Hugh T. Reid, of the 15th Iowa, was shot through 
the neck and fell from his horse, paralyzed for the time, but recov- 
ered consciousness, remounted his horse, and continued in command 
of Regiment, and died from the results of his wound August 21, 



82 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

1874, from paralysis bringing on Brights disease of the kidneys. 

The story of the battle of Shiloh has been so often told I shall 
refer to it as far as Company I is concerned very briefly . 

Being our first battle, it tested the courage of our men who 
fought with great gallantry and suffered severely . 

I counted the men in ranks before we left the landing for the 
field, and found we had 66 oflicers and enlisted men, and out of 
this number our casualties were 23, or one more than one-third of 
the whole, every one of the commissioned officers being shot. 
Lieutenant Hamilton being killed early in the action . Later, Cap- 
tain Day was shot through the thigh, which made him a great man 
at home, District Judge and Judge of the Supreme Court of Iowa. 
The Johnny Reb who did him the favor to shoot him was never 
afterwards heard of. I took command of the company; was 
wounded myself, being shot by a minne ball, which tore through 
my coat, vest and two undershirts, and as the surgeon of an Illinois 
Regiment said to me, cut a beef-steak out of the left side of my 
neck, which bled profusely, but I continued in command of my own 
company and of Company F, whose Captain claimed he was dis- 
abled from the concussion of a passing shell, and the First Lieuten- 
ant was disabled by a shot in one of his fingers, " Old Throggy,'' 
Second Lieutenant, who was a brave man, having been left on de- 
tail in charge of our baggage and stores at the steamer Minnehaha. 

James Doyle, of Company I, as we advanced by the movement 
"On the right by file into line," to a front facing the enemy shel- 
tered in the timber, was the first man of the Regiment kille<l. He 
was a large, broad-chested, finely-formed Irishman, and fell dead 
shot through the heart. Marshall H. Wilson was shot dead. 
James Murphy died on the field. Daniel Buckley died in the hos- 
pital at Mound City, 111.; Corporal Geo. H. Kuhn died at Keokuk 
U. S. general hospital, all from wounds receixcd in that day's 
battle . 

Garrett W. Colenbrander, who was wounded, was the only man 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 8j 

captured. The total list of casualties, as I have heretofore stated, 
from wounds and death of commissioned officers and enlisted men, 
was twenty-three in my company, and as commanding officer of 
Company F on that day. Company I is, I claim, entitled to the 
additional credit of its casualties. First Lieutenant Goode was dis- 
abled in the finger, and Captain Blackmar had concussion of the 
spine from a shell or solid shot passing in dangerous proximity to 
his back. 

Colonel Francis Markoe Cummins, then Lieutenant-Colonel of 
the 6th Regiment of Iowa Infantry Volunteers, then under arrest 
and afterwards Colonel of the 124th New York Infantry, who 
died the 26th of March, 1884, at Goshen, New York, fought that 
day as a private soldier under my command. He came up to me 
armed with a musket, his fiery red face begrimmed with powder, 
and knowing him well, I asked what he was doing there. His 
answer was, "I am under arrest and hunting a place to fight." 

Here's the place! Glad to have you, Colonel! He loaded and 
fired, and stayed with us until the last, for which he, if living, 
would be entitled to the credit. Now that he is dead I mention 
the fact in honor to his memory. 

Birds are never seen where there is artillery firing, as the con- 
cussion kills them, and speaking of birds reminds me of how wildly 
some of the excited new recruits shot into the tree tops instead of 
aiming at the enemy in their front. I called their attention to this, 
and inquired if they were shooting at birds, and directed them to 
lower their muskets. 

Some very amusing incidents took place on the march to the 
field. Daniel Boone, a relative of the distinguished Kentucky 
pioneer hunter, and an ex-soldier of the Mexican war, being old 
and stiff was not able to keep up and fell in the rear. William 
Ward, a simple-minded, gawky country boy, nick-named General 
Ward, could not keep in ranks and was slower than a funeral. 
They were both taunted by their comrades, who believed they were 



84 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

both trying to shirk. I knew better; they both got to the company 
in line of battle and did good service. Ward was shot through the 
hand, his musket at the time being only half loaded, and on account 
of the shot in the hand he was not able to ram down the cartridge, 
and came to me and asked what he should do. I completed load- 
ing his musket and told him to give one more shot and leave the 
field, which he did . Ward spent all his money for pies with the 
Suttler, and could eat a dozen before stopping. The poor fellow 
died in the United States hospital at Keokuk after he came home 
on veteran furlough in March, 1864. We had him buried with 
militai-y honors, and Colonel Belknap and myself and Lieutenant 
Henry Schevers, all the commissioned officers of the Regiment 
present, marched out with all the enlisted men we could collect, 
with the escort furnished by the hospital to the cemetery . Here 
it is proper to state the detail of hospital soldiers, better known as 
"hospital pimps," were not able to properly go through the manual 
of arms . 

No soldiers who died in hospital were buried with military hon- 
ors then, but an undertaker furnished a cheap pine coffin, hauled 
the dead to the cemetery where they were dumped into the hole in 
the ground dug for them as if they were animals. Many loud- 
mouthed hangers-on and furnishers of supplies made it their bus- 
iness to rob them and the government when thev were living, and 
found no further use for them when dead. Many of these thieves 
I could name, made their thousands and lost them as easily, and are 
long ago dead and almost forgotten. 

Henry Morgan, an Irishman from Keokuk, had been in jail for 
fighting. He enlisted and I got the charge against him dismissed, 
and he never forgot it. 

In the midst of the battle, when tiie men were ordered to lie 
down, Joe Richards, a little Frenchman who was badly frightened, 
wiggling about gt)t inulcr Morgan, who was a large, stout, square- 
built, red-faced and broad-chested, square-shouldered man, when 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry, 8$ 

Morgan cried out, "get out from under me, I am high enough 
now!" Soon after this he came back to me behind the Hue of bat- 
tle, where I was standing, while the rebel bullets were coming 
thick and fast, and said to me, " Lieutenant, if I am killed, don't 
bury me with a Republican." 1 told him to go back and attend to 
his fighting. 

Later in the day, when we were driven off the field, and lie was 
at the landing, he heard I was killed or badly wounded, and went 
to our Suttler, got a fresh musket and cartridge box, and asked for 
a drink of whisky, which he got, saving, " I'm going out to look 
for the Lieutenant; he took me out of jail !" He went out to look for 
me on the field and got a shot through the arm. After we were 
some time at Corinth, Mrs. Morgan came down to see him, and 
though there was stiict orders at the time against bringing lic^uor 
through the lines, she smuggled through a five-gallon keg of 
whisky, but finding that Henry had deserted, she sold out her 
whisky at an enormous profit and went home . 

After the battle of Shiloh, on account of the change of climate, 
and using surface water which could be found everywhere by dig- 
ging down about two feet to the clay, where it had settled after the 
heavy rain storms during the first night after the battle and after- 
wards, our whole command had the bloody flux or diarrhcea. Ad- 
jutant Pomutz and his comrade, old- Major Compody, a Hungarian 
exile of the revolution of Kossuth in 1848, slept together under the 
same blanket at night, smoked out of their long pipes, and grunted, 
slept and awoke one another in the night and smoked again. If 
Pomutz awoke first he punched his partner and said: Compody! 
He answered with a gutteral "Nach! Pomutz!" Then they got 
their big Hungarian pipes and commenced to smoke. If Compody 
awoke first it was the same programme; he punched Pomutz, who 
replied, " Compody ! Nach !" As a remedy for flux Pomutz brewed 
what he called Garibaldi Tea. It was in short hot tea, brown 
sugar, and commissai'y whisky . 



86 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

Compody was seven years a close prisoner of state and in chains 
in an Austrian dungeon, and walked with a lock step, acquired by 
being so long in chains. He could speak but little English, could 
not ride on the cars for the reason he was in a dropsical condition, 
and came from the Hungarian settlement in New Buda, (named by 
the exiles in memory of Buda — Pesth) Decatur county, Iowa, as a 
companion of Pomutz. He was a first-class military engineer and 
swordsman, but too old for active service. He had a romantic his- 
tory . At Boliver, Tenn., in August, 1862, General Ross employed 
him to survey and lay out fortifications, and while doing so he was 
captured by the enemy; his assistants escaped. He was taken for 
a spy, as he wore citizen's clothes, and as he could not talk enough 
to explain what he was doing, they whipped him severely with 
switches and turned him loose several miles from our Regiment in 
the enemies country. 

He started out on his long, slow and painful march on foot back 
to Decatur county, Iowa, living on green corn and whatever he 
could pick up from negroes, sometimes attacked by blood hounds, 
which, with his huge walking stick he killed, as he was very pow- 
erful in his arms, and handled his stick with the skill of a profes- 
sional swordsman. 

He had reached Salt River bottom in Missouri, not far from the 
Iowa line, more dead than alive, when, exhausted from hunger and 
fatigue, he sank by the roadside to die. Mr. Bechtold, a merchant 
of Decatur county then, now a German editor in Omaha, fortun- 
ately was driving that way, and saw by the roadside a huge heap 
of what looked like a bundle of old, many colored rags, got out of 
his buggy to examine it, and found it was a man, but did not at first 
recognize his friend. Major Compody. With chafing and stimu- 
lants he revived him, spoke to him in German, and with great dif- 
ficulty got his huge, heavy and helpless body in his buggy and 
carried him home. He became so he could get about as usual, and 
as he was a gentleman of education ;nul understood metalurgy, he 



lo'wa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 8y 

was engaged and given a partnership with a wealthy mining com- 
pany operating in Colorado, and went thither, and made very val- 
uable discoveries, and ended his career by death from falling over 
a precipice — supposed to have been pitched over by his partners. 

Corinth was evacuated May 80, 1862, and the march from Shiloh 
in April, 1862, nearly two months digging ditches and building 
works in the advance on Corinth, was called the siege of Corinth, 
General Halleck commanding the army. As there was only one 
line of breast-works, by advancing at once Corinth could have been 
taken in a week with a General like Grant, who was then under a 
cloud and virtually had no command. At Corinth in June and 
July we were on picket duty and provost guard; after this at Boli- 
var, Tenn., until the 13th of September, when we made a forced 
march back to Corinth, and then to luka, where General Price was 
defeated on the 19th of September, and came back to Corinth, 
where Company I participated in the battles of October 3 and 4, 
and on the 5th in the battle of Hatchie. Bolivar contains the old 
Polk homestead, and in its cemetery " Zeke " Polk, uncle of the 
President, and others of his relatives lie buried. 

Bolivar was the stamping ground of the notorious John A. Mur- 
rell and his land pirates, and he was confined in jail at Jackson 
near by. 

While at Corinth and vicinity many men were on the sick list 
from malarial fevers. 

When we first got in quarters there. Sergeant Schevers got hold 
of an iron camp bedstead and mosquito bar, abandoned bv the 
enemy, fixed up a bed on it, and was taking a good sleep one warm 
afternoon when Sergeant Bennett lifted up the mosquito bar and 
put a handfull of brown sugar near his head and let in a big lot of 
flies, which swarmed about and lit on his face and the sugar. The 
Sergeant snored and fought the flies while a crowd of idlers gath- 
ered outside and laughed so loud he awoke mad as a hornet, and 
swearing in his best Dutch. Schevers was a gallant soldier; was 



88 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

seven times wounded; was promoted from First Sergeant to Sec- 
ond Lieutenant; resigned in October, 1864, and died at Keokuk the 
12th of August, 1872. 

Many promotions to commissioned officers were made from Com- 
pany I: Sergeant William F. Bennett, who went home on re- 
cruiting service, became a Captain of the 89th Iowa Infantry ; 
Sergeant William Christy, discharged at Grand Junction, Tenn., in 
1862, became Captain in 8th Iowa Cavalry, and afterwards Treas- 
urer of State. Edgar T. Miller, made Second Lieutenant to suc- 
ceed Hamilton, became First Lieutenant and Captain of Company 
C, Provost Marshall on General Frank P . Blair's staff, and was 
bi'eveted Major. 

Ensign H. King was made Second Lieutenant. First Lieutenant 
and Adjutant; was elected Chaplain; went home and got ordained as 
a Methodist Minister; came back, and as the representative of the 
morality of Company I, served faithfully as Chaplain to the end of 
the war. He was a very gallant and efficient officer, and captured 
the Adjutant of the 45th Regiment Alabama Volunteers on the 
22d of July, 1864, before Atlanta. When the boys won money at 
"Chuck-a-luck " on the " March to the Sea," they always deposited 
with him for safe keeping. He is now a Minister at Napa City, 
California. 

William C. Wells and Oliver P. Fleming were promoted First 
Lieutenants, and both became Captains in Colored Regiments. 

Sergeant James C. Bonar, one of the coolest and bravest men in 
action, after serving with honor through the war — being in every 
siege, skirmish and battle — rc-enlisted as a veteran; was wounded 
in the hand, and after discharge was elected SherifFof Clark county, 
and died holding that office at Osceola October, 29, 1886. Always 
jolly and full of humor, he amused the company in quarters by 
playing auctioneer, and before Atlanta he often got up on the breast- 
works, and exposed to the fire of the enemy, would shoot among 
them deliberately, taunting them by calling out to them, which 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 8g 

would provoke a shower of bullets in reply, no shot ever touching 
him on such occasions. 

In October, 1862, I left Corinth on sick leave of absence and re- 
turned to the Regiment at Abbeville, Miss., November, 1862, 
passing through Holly Springs two days before it was raided, and 
our stores destroyed by General Van Dorn, which caused the return 
of Grant's army from Yokena Station, Miss., to Memphis, and 
thence, January, 1863, down the river to commence operations from 
the Louisiana shore against Vicksburg . 

In passing through Holly Springs I called on Colonel Murphy 
commanding the Posts, to ascertain the whereabouts of our com- 
mand, and as there was no hotel in the place, I called at the large 
brick building occupied as the Post Hospital, and saw the surgeon 
in charge, and requested permission to stay there over night, which 
he insolently refused . 

Later, when we were coming home on furlough in 1864, from 
Memphis, Tenn., to St. Louis, I met this same surgeon, then pro- 
moted as United States Surgeon of Volunteers, on our boat. I 
was assigned to the state room with him, and going to it he was not 
in, but I found the sword and green sash, and all his dress parade 
uniform, and a brace of revolvers h'ing on his bed. He came in 
while I was there and wanted to know who I was and what I was 
doing there. I told him I was assigned to that state room and 
said, " Who are you, and where are you from, and were you not in 
charge of hospital at Holly Springs?" He answered he was a 
Surg of U. S. Volunteers, had been at Holly Spi'ings, and gave me 
to understand I must get out, handling his revolvers menacingly. 
I looked him over first, as I did not want to attack an armed man 
with only a sword, sheathed, and no room to draw it. The back 
state room door facing on the river was open. Taking up my 
sword as if to leave the state room, I suddenly punched him in the 
stomach with it, when he cried out as he thought he was run 
through the body. I seized his revolvers and threw them in the 



go Histury of the I^''iftecnt/i Regiment 

river, and as I slapped his face told him, " I think I met you once 
at Holl}' Springs; you would not let me stay over night in your 
Hospital." As he gathered up his traps I gave him a parting 
salute. Colonel Hall put me under arrest, but no charges were 
preferred and was soon released, and of one thing I am certain, I 
settled the hash of this fancy surgeon and broke the puppy from 
sucking eggs. 

Going down the river from Memphis, Tenn., I was oificer of the 
day. The 15th and 16th Iowa were aboard our boat, and nearly 
every German officer had one or two dogs, and they made night 
hideous with their howling. When night came I promised a nig- 
ger a canteen of whisky if he would pitch them all overboard in 
the river. 

Next morning at davlight we landed on the Louisiana shore, and 
the stage plank was put out, and as I looked I saw a dog, a tall 
grey hound. I called up the nigger and asked him what he had 
been doing — look at that dog! '' Massa," said the darkey, "I put 
dem all over, but de long dog he comed back up de plank." The 
long dog was Captain John Henry Smith's grey hound, and if he 
had known it he would have raised cain. 

We were at the siege and surrender of Vicksburg July 4, 1803, 
and during the winter and spring of 1868, before we crossed over 
to Mississippi, were stationed at General Sparrow's plantation at 
Lake Providence, La., where we had an epidemic of small-pox, 
and the small-pox hospital was full of patients. 

We landed at Grand Gulf May 13, south of Vicksburg; thence 
embarked for Young's Point, crossed it, again embarked on steamer 
and arrived at Haines' Bluffs, northeast of \'icksburg, Mav 20, and 
were moved to Warrentown, eight miles below Vicksburg, on the 
2 1st; thence in the rear of Vicksburg to General McPherson's 
headquarters, the center of the besieging federal forces. 

Under the command of General Blair from May 27 to 2U, we 
were on an exjiedition to Mechanicsvilk-, in the direction of Vazoo 



lawa Veteran Voltinteer Infantry. gi 

City, on which expedition James Martin, of General Belknap's 
staff, was mounted upon the noted stallion " Epamimondas," and 
distinguished himself by charging on the fleeing rebels. We again 
returned to the rear of Vicksburg in the center of General McPher- 
son's line, in the midst of a cane brake filled with jiggers, a yellow 
thread-like insect or worm, which creeps or works itself into the 
flesh, creating sores, for which the sovereign remedy was a piece of 
bacon rind or salt pork, salt killing all the lowest forms of animal- 
culae. While here on a high ridge we had nightly a grand spec- 
tacle or pyrotechnical display of bursting shells, with their fiery 
fragments falling in showers over the devoted city . 

Here Governor Kirkwood and Hon. James F. Wilson made 
speeches to us. And from the frantic way in which the Governor 
scratched with one hand, while he gyrated with the other, grey 
backs and jiggers must have " snuffed the battle from afar," and 
taken him to their embrace as a long-lost and savory-scented 
brother . 

We were moved again to Black River to look after General Joe 
Johnston, who, it was expected, would attack us in the rear, but 
came to the rescue of Pemberton too late, as his supplies of mule 
beef were exhausted. 

We had a grand celebration of the 4th of July, 1863, memorable 
now for the surrender of Vicksburg, and General John McArthur 
commanding our Division, swung his Scotch cap jubilantly in the 
air and ordered a barrel of Commissary whisky in lieu of milk to 
be distributed to every Regiment. The big oak tree under which 
Pemberton signed the articles of capitulation to General Grant, 
like Joseph's coat of many .colors, was cut to pieces and dug up 
by the roots and carried away as souvenirs. 

After tne surrender of Vicksburg we were camped in the sub- 
urbs of the city, and in August, 1863, while most of the officers of 
the Regiment were North on leave of absence, Company I, with 
Lieutenant Schevers in command, made an expedition to Monroe, 



Q2 History of the Fiftee^zth Regimeiit 

La., Lieutenant Colonel Hedrick commanding Regiment, while I 
was acting as a Held officer, Major Pomutz being on detail as Divi- 
sion Picket Officer.- Monroe is part of the Attackapas grant to 
Baron Bastrop, (which Aaron Burr contemplated purchasing when 
he was charged with treason) on the 27th and 28th of August. We 
had a skirmish with the enemy, and on the 29th a spirited engage- 
ment at Monroe, which thev abandoned with all their military 
stores, which fell into the hands of General Stephenson, command- 
ing our expedition, and beat a hasty retreat. 

Company I was on the expedition to Redbone, 12 miles from 
Vicksburg, on the 24th and 25th of December, 1868; the brigade, 
11th and 15th Iowa, being commanded by Colonel Belknap, Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel Hedrick commanding Regiment. 

While at Redbone I was Brigade Officer of the day, my head- 
quarters being at a large white house on the hill occupied by four 
widows and a young lady of sixteen. When I entered the house I 
found it occupied by a lot of guards of the 2d Wisconsin Cavalry, 
and with their swords at a shoulder arms. I demanded of them by 
what authority they were there, and found every one of them had 
a paper showing he was detailed there on guard, and decided at 
once that the officers of the 2d Wisconsin were sweet on the widows. 
1 called one of mv Sergeants with a detail and said to them, "•all 
right, I will relieve you;" made them get out and substituted my 
detail in their stead. I devoted my attentions to a young and 
buxom cross-eyed widow, and when badgei'ed about why I selected 
the cross-eved widow, gave as my reason to General McArthur, 
she could look two ways for Christmas — it was Christmas eve — 
keep one eve on me and the other on the key-hole. 

When vvc marched away next day every one of the widows and 
the clipper voung lady, gathered together on the hiilsiilc, and with 
their handkerchiefs waived us a parting adieu! W^e were on an 
expedition to Jackson in October. Before December, 18()':5, we 
were busv re-enlisting as veteran volunteers, and Company I had 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. gj 

the honor of being the first full company to re-enlist as veterans in 
the 17th Army Corps. 

On February 3, 1864, we went on the expedition under General 
Sherman to Meridian, Miss., and returned to Vicksburg on the 4th 
of March. On the return march Company I, on detail vmder my 
command, was the first company to cross the Pontoon bridge over 
Pearl River, at Ratcliffe Ferry, and captured A. H. Branch and 
some other citizens mounted on blooded horses, one of them a val- 
uable black Morgan stallion. We raided the plantation of one 
Terry, a wealthy planter and relative of Judge Terry, of Califor- 
nia, who is noted as having killed Senator Broderick in a duel, and 
seized a bountiful supply of much-needed rations of cured meats, 
honey, molasses, corn meal and flour. 

On our return to Vicksburg nothing of much interest occurred 
until we left for the North on veteran furlough in March, 1864, 
and on our arrival at St. Louis, Mo., were entertained bv Mayor 
Thomas, and again by the citizens of Keokuk. On our arrival 
home with depleted ranks and our flag and banner torn by bullets 
in battle, the sun-burnt veterans presented a widely different ap- 
pearance to what they did in 1862, when, with full ranks, they 
gaily marched through Main street with new banners, new uni- 
forms, headed bv the band with their new flag and banners flying 
to embark for the seat of war. 

The veterans return, and we are off" again for the front via St. 
Louis, Cairo, Paducah, and thence up the Tennessee River to 
Clifton, where we halted for a brief period, then marched to Pu- 
laski, Tenn., thence to Huntsville, Ala., when we met the non- 
veterans, and halting for a few days were again on the march via 
Decatur, striking the line of Sherman's army at Rome, going thence 
onward to Ack worth. Big Shanty, to the front of Kenesaw Mount- 
ain, where we met the enemy in force and followed him in his 
masterly reti'eat in June, 1864; fought the battle of Nickajack, 
memorable in history as the battle-field with the Indians. John- 



g^ Histoiy of the Fifteenth Regiment 

son's army still fought and retreated, and we met them in battle 
on the 20th, 2 1st and 22d of July, the last day when General Mc- 
Pherson was killed and Company I reduced to 81 men; lost 16 
captured in battle, besides killed and wounded. For 87 days we 
were under constant fire, every day equal to a battle, and again 
fought at Ezra Church July 28, our Regiment alone re-enforcing 
Leightburn's brigade of Morgan L. Smith's Division, and fought 
the last battle about Atlanta. Were at Jonesboro on September 2, 
1864, defeating Hood's Army, which evacuated Atlanta on the 8d, 
and took up its line of march on retreat. 

We moved to East Point on the 9th of September, and by the 
armistice of the 10th between Sherman and Hood, had an exchange 
of prisoners captured. Most of the sixteen captured men of Com- 
pany I returned half starved, sick, ragged and dirty, on the 22d, 
Henry Kirby dying October 1, and the same day we left on an ex- 
pedition to find out the whereabouts of Hood; returned to camp on 
the 3d, and on the 4th again were on the march along the Northern 
Railroad, and crossed the Chattahootchie at Vining's Station on 
pontoons, and on the 7th were on another expedition, and returned 
to Merrietta at the foot of Kenesaw Mountain, where we had camped 
in June. On the march and by railroad we passed Kingston and 
arrived at Resacca, and on the 15th fought the retreating enemy at 
Snake Creek Gap. On the 18th passed through Lafayette, and 
through Summerville, and Alpine, and arrived at Galesville, Ala., 
and went into camp on the 20th. On this march I was detailed 
as field ofiicer; and Major Pomutz, after this being in command of 
the Brigade. I now commanded the Regiment, and on Grand 
Review by General Mower, and on the march back to Merrietta 
from the pursuit of Hood, where we again camped November 5, 
having marched 81 1 miles. Sergeant Williams commanding Com- 
pany \\ Lieutenant Schevers ha\ing resigned in October, Lieuten- 
ant Kirkpatrick captured at Canton, Miss., February 29, 1864, 
being still absent as prisoner of war, 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. g^ 

On the 15th of November, 1864, we commenced the memorable 
March to the Sea, I acting as Field Officer until we reached Savan- 
nah, Ga. At Atlanta we received an additional number of drafted 
men and substitutes. The March to the Sea was a picnic. On this 
march Sergeant Isaac " Marsh" Christy, whose fighting weight is 
now 860 pounds, marched barefoot until we could get him a pair of 
No. 13 brogans; twice wounded, once at Corinth and again before 
Atlanta, he distinguished himself for gallantry in every action. 

We had sharp fighting before Savannah, and on the route to the 
Sea, as we lived on the country, the " bummers" of Company I 
had no end to their funny adventures, coming in every night loaded 
down to the guards with hams, chickens, corn meal, and everything 
eatable, mounted on horses and mules, some of them wearing cit- 
izens' plug hats. 

Leaving Savannah on the 6th of January, 1865, for Beaufort, 
Port Royal Island, once the residence of John C. Calhoun, whose 
house was still standing, on the 10th we commenced the march 
through the Carolinas. 

We had a good time getting fresh oysters in the marshy ground 
overflowed by the ocean tide water on Port Royal Island, and re- 
suming our march fought and defeated the enemy at Garden Cor- 
ners, Pocotaligo, and in February waded Salkehatchie Swamp, a 
mile and a quarter wide, and in some places the water rising up to 
our arm pits, and dislodged the enemy, holding Broxton's and 
Rivers' bridges, this battle being called Rivers Bridge. 

We marched on and took Orangeburg, once the headquarters of 
Lord Rawdon in the Revolutionary War, crossed the Great Pedee 
River at Cheraw, the head of navigation, on a pontoon bridge near 
which place General Marion hid his two cannons in the swamp, 
entered North Carolina, fought the enemy, who Hed, and fought 
the last battle of the war on Sherman's line of march at Benton- 
ville, N, C., on February 21, 18Q5, defeating the enemy, and 



g6 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

marched thence to Goldsboro, where, on the 9th of April, 1865, the 
clay of the surrender of Lee's Army at Appomattox. 

I went on sick leave of absence North, being in Baltimore, Md., 
the night of the 14th of April, when President Lincoln was assi- 
nated, and on the 16th saw the remains lying in state at Washing- 
ton, D. C, and was present at his funeral. 

I called on President Andrew Johnson, to whom I was intro- 
duced by Colonel Kilbourne Knox, commanding his body guard at 
the Kirk wood House. 

It is here proper to state Lieutenant William W. Williams, now 
Captain in the State Guards, and Sheriff of Clark county, who 
always deported himself as a gallant and efficient officer, commanded 
Company I part of the time through the Carolinas, while I was on 
the sick list, and continued in command, and was present at Raleigh, 
N. C, April 18, at the surrender of General Johnson's Army, and 
on the subsequent March to Washington at our Grand Review. 
I returned to Washington before the Grand Review and took com- 
mand of the company after it was over, and continued with it until 
our muster out at Louisville, Ky., July 24, 1865, and then left Lieu- 
tenant Williams in command, and was sent by special order in ad- 
vance of the Regiment via Chicago to Davenport, Iowa, where we 
were finally paid off and disbanded, I being the last officer of the 
Regiment paid, August 8, 1865. 

In conclusion, no company ever did better service in the field. 
The veterans of Company I from the first stood by their colors in 
action without faltering, and always met the enemy without flinch- 
ing, and fouglil and bled ;uid died like brave men. 

I am proud of tliem and their record, and while I commanded 
them looked after their health and comfort, and impressed it upon 
them to look out for themselves, and they always did it, and if there 
was anything good to eat they always got it; in short, they never 
went hungry. When hams were only to be had by officers at 
Black River, on the leturn from Meridian, "Old Throggy" went 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. P7 

to the Commissary for ham. There was only one left, and he said 
Sergeant Verrips, of Compan}' I, drew that. Luther B. Thomas, 
Verrips and Billy Williams, afterwards Lieutenant, stayed over 
until next day and brought in half a car load of hams for the com- 
pany to Vicksburg, which they drew from the United States Com- 
missary . 

JAMES M. REID, 
Captain Company I, 
Brevet Lieutenant Colonel Volunteers. 



K COMPANY. 

This was the last company of the Regiment to organize, and was 
formed by a nucleus of thirty or forty men, who were recruited in 
Marion and adjoining counties, and brought to Keokuk by Edwin 
Davis. The surplus men of the other companies were then trans- 
ferred and formed Company " K," with John Marrow Hedrick, 
at this time Regimental Quartermaster, as the first Captain. The 
companies mostly represented in this transfer were " D," "E," and 
" G," with a few from other companies. 

It is not necessary for me to say anything about Captain John M. 
Hedrick, as every man in the Regiment knows of his gallant conduct 
on every battle-field upon which he served, as he became the Col- 
onel of the Regiment through the grades of Major and Lieutenant- 
Colonel. He was wounded at Shiloh, and captured while in com- 
mand of the company, and was kept for some months as a prisoner-, 
and vei'y shortly after joining the Regiment in the spring of 1868, 
was promoted to the Majority to succeed Major Cunningham, who 
had resigned. From this time his history became Regimental, and 
is so much better given in the history of the Field and Staff of this 
work that my poor efforts should, and will cease. 

The second Captain of the company was Thos. H. Hedrick, a 
brother of Colonel Hedrick . He enlisted as a private soldier in 
Company " D," in October, 1861, at Ottumwa, but was soon after- 
7 



g8 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

wards appointed a Sergeant of that company, and was transferred 
to Company K when the company was formed. He was promoted 
Second Lieutenant June 1, 1862, upon the resignation of Lieuten- 
ant Davis, First Lieutenant upon the death of Lieutenant Eldredge 
October 3, 1862, and Captain upon the promotion of his brother to 
the Majority in the spring of 1863. He held this position until 
February 8, 1865, when he was discharged on account of wounds 
received in the action of July 22, '64. He was one of the best offi- 
cers which the citizen soldiery of this country ever produced, and 
was brevetted as Major for gallant and distinguished services. He 
was brave and gallant, and one of the best disciplinarians and exec- 
utive officers in the Regiment. He was almost constantly in com- 
mand of the company from the date he took command until July 
22, '64, when he was fearfully wounded in the right arm, and from 
that time until his discharge w^as never again with us. 

He became a merchant in Kansas City, Mo., after the war; then 
moved to Iowa and engaged in the dry goods business until 1876, 
when he accepted a position as Special Agent of the War Depart- 
ment to adjust claims of the Quartermaster-General's office, which 
position he held until 1880, when he resigned and went to Bedford, 
Iowa, and commenced the practice of law, and was beginning to 
make his mark when stricken with disease, superinduced by his old 
wound, and died. 

He was a gallant soldier, an honest Government official, a genial 
companion, a good husband and father, and died lamented by all. 

Wm. B. McDowell was the third and last Captain of the com- 
pany. He enlisted as a private in Company " D" in October, 1861, 
and was transferred to Company " K" as a private. He went 
through the grades of Corporal and vSergeant, and was promoted to 
the First Lieutenanc}^ of the company on July 22, 1864, for gal- 
lantry in that action, succeeding Frederick Christofel, who was 
discharged a short time previous to that date. He was promoted to 
the Captaincy of the company upon the discharge of Captain Hed- 




John F. St. John 

CD KIS'^IOIV/l VOLS. 



lotva Veteran Volunteer Infantry. gg 

rick February 8, 1865, and continued in command of the company 
until its muster out, July 24, 1865. He lived only a few months 
after the close of the war, dying in the winter of 1865 in Iowa. 
He was a brave man and a good officer, and was universally liked 
by his comrades. 

RuFUS H. Eldredge was the first Lieutenant on the organiza- 
tion of the company, being promoted to that position from that of 
Regimental Quartermaster Sergeant February 1, 1862, and he 
served faithfully with the company (which he commanded from 
April 6, 1862,) until he was killed at Corinth, Miss., October 3, 
1862, while gallantly leading the company in that action. He was 
a splendid officer and a perfect gentleman, and his loss was a heavy 
one to the company and Regiment. 

Frederick Christofel was the next first Lieutenant, succeed- 
mg Thos. H. Hedrick January 17, 1863. He served with the 
company until sickness compelled him to leave for the hospital, 
from which he was discharged for disability July 16, 1864. He 
was a good officer, and won his way to the position through the 
grades of First Sergeant and Second Lieutenant. 

James G. Shipley was the next First Lieutenant, succeeding 
Captain McDowell in December, 1864. He joined the company as 
a recruit August 31, '62; was promoted Regimental Commissary 
Sergeant, and from that position was promoted to the First Lieu- 
tenancy. He was a good soldier, but did not serve long with the 
company, being promoted to the Quartermaster Sergeancy shortly 
after joining the company. He made a good officer, however, and 
was liked by the men of the company. 

Edwin Davis was the Second Lieutenant at the organization of 
the company, he bringing with him the men who formed the com- 
pany before alluded to in this history. He was too old to endure 
the hardships of active campaigning, and was compelled to resign 
May 30, 1862, on account of ill health. He was a brave officer 
and a gentleman in every respect. 



lOO History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

David Myers was the next Second Lieutenant of the company, 
and was promoted to that position from that of First Sergeant. 
He was commissioned January 17, 1868, and resigned the position 
March 30, 1864. He was wounded at the battle of Corinth, ^liss., 
October 3, 1862, and was a gallant soldier and a good officer. 

Cyrus J. Momyer was the next and last Second Lieutenant, 
reaching that rank through the grades of Corporal and Sergeant. 
He was wounded several times, and was captured by the enemy at 
the battle of Atlanta, Ga., July 22, 1864, was confined at Ander- 
sonville, Ga., for four months, and exchanged just before starting 
on Sherman's march through Georgia. He was a good soldier, 
and was liked by all the men of the company. 

The roll of honor of Company " K" is a good-sized one, em- 
bracing John D. Holmes, John W. Winkler, Joseph Chrismore, 
Jacob Ketchum and Humphrey B. Wyatt, killed at Shiloh, Tenn., 
April 6, 1862, Rufus H. Eldredge, Wm, C. Dixon and Thomas 
H. Davenport, killed at Corinth, Miss., October 3, 1862; Wm . S. 
Clearwaters, who was struck by a 32-pound shell on the legs July 
4, 1864, at Nickajack Creek, Georgia, severing both legs and dying 
within two hours; Stephen H. Gillespie, Joshua P. Davis, and Ben- 
jamin F. Momyer, killed at Atlanta, Georgia, in that terrible action, 
besides about twenty others who died from wounds received in 
action, or who died lingering deaths in hospitals of disease contracted 
while in the faithful performance of their duties. They died in the 
defense of their country, and should be honored by the whole world. 

The history of Company " K" is identical with that of the Reg- 
iment from the date of its muster into the United States service 
until its muster out, July 24, 1865, at Louisville, Ky. We shared 
in all the battles, marches, sieges and hardships with the other com- 
panies of the Regiment, and always did our part. The company 
was always ready for duty, whether it was lifting wagons from the 
mud, tligging and erecting breast-works, fighting, skirmishing or 
marchiuH^. 



loiva Veteran Volunteer Infantry. loi 

The men of the company were above the average for hitelli- 
gence, and w^henever Company " K" was on picket or the sku-mish 
line, the rest of the Regiment knew that the enemy would have a 
difficult task either to surprise us or drive them back upon the main 
line. There were few of the cowardly kind in our ranks, but when 
the order was given to move upon the enemy, it was executed at 
once and with a will. A better company was never recruited in 
Iowa than this same gallant old Company " K." 

JOHN S. BOSWORTH, 
Late Drummer Company "K," 

Company Historian . 



OUR SURGEONS. 

The 15th Regiment of Iowa Infantry began its formation in 
Keokuk in the early autumn of 1861. The state was shaken by a 
great convulsion of patriotism, and throughout its borders presented 
the appearance of a vast military uprising. 

Military organizations for Iowa arm of the service were being 
formed in almost every town in the state. Imbued with the pre- 
vailing military spirit, and deeply impressed with a desire to ser\e 
my country in the best way I could, I determined to offer myself 
to the Governor for a position on the medical staff of some one of 
the Regiments then in process of organization. 

I had graduated at the Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia 
in the spring of 1857, and during my whole course of study had 
paid especial attention to surgery, for me it had an attraction beyond 
all other studies and inspired me with an energy and devotion I 
never felt for any other pursuit. 

In September, 1861, I went to Des Moines and offered my ser- 
vices to Governor Kirkwood for a position on the medical staff of 
some Iowa Regiment. He rather curtly informed me that if I got 
a position of that kind I would have to first convince him I \vas one 
of the best qualified young men in the state for such position. 



I02 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

There was a great pressure upon the Governor at the time for 
places on the medical staff, and he seemed to manifest some annoy- 
ance at the multitude of applications. 

I told him I would be glad to go before any board he might 
appoint to be examined as to my fitness for the place I desired. 
He replied he had already appointed a medical board and it would 
be in session in Davenport in a few days. x'Vbout the 20th of Oc- 
tober, 1861, I went to Davenport and reported myself to the med- 
ical board for examination. It was composed of Dr. Hughes, of 
Keokuk, then Surgeon-General of Iowa; Dr. Barrow, of Daven- 
port, and Dr. Harvey, of Dubuque. The examination occupied 
one afternoon and evening, and was, as I thought, pretty rigid; but 
in the evening I was complimented rather highly by one of the 
board, Dr, Barrow, who had himself been a surgeon in the regular 
army, and I felt as if my examination had at least not been a total 
failure. Having recently come into the state I was almost entirely 
without political acquaintance or influence, and had little hope of 
getting the position I so much desired. While in Davenport I met 
the Hon. J. B. Leake, at that time a member of the legislature, 
and afterwards Brigadier-General Leake, who so greatly distin- 
guished himself as one of the best military commanders from Iowa. 
Immediately after my examination I came home and soon convinced 
myself that, under the circumstances, I could not reasonably expect 
an appointment. In about two weeks, however, I got a big en- 
velope out of the postoflice addressed to "Assistant Surgeon W. H. 
Gibbon." On opening it I found I had been appointed Assistant 
Surgeon of the 15th Iowa Infantry, and was ordered to report at 
once for duty to Colonel H. T. Reid at Keokuk. 1 learned tliat 
Dr. Barrow and Mr. Leake had been untiring in their efforts for 
mv appointment, which was a very pleasant surprise to me, as I 
had not known or seen either of the gentlemen before I met them 
in Davenport on tiie day of my examination. 

Of course 1 felt very big with my appointment, and seriously 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. lOj 

debated the question whether or not I had better be hooped to 
avoid bursting and doing tremendous damage to my surrounding 
fellow citizens. 

About November 10 I reported to Colonel Reid, at Keokuk, and 
at once took charge of the college hospital, in which there were 
already some sick recruits of the 15th Regiment and also a few of 
the sick of the ;3d Iowa Cavalry Regiment that had recently left 
for St. Louis. 

Recruits for the Regiment were constantlv arriving, and their 
examination, together with the organization of the hospital, kept 
me very busy. The medical and hospital supplies on hand were 
totally inadequate for a Regiment, and I was ordered to St. Louis 
by Colonel Reid to draw the medical stores necessary for the Reg- 
iment. An elaborate and extensive requisition was made out, ac- 
cording to the revised army regulations, and when I presented it to 
the medical purveyor at St. Louis, he remorselessly di-ew his pen 
through so many items that I thought it would be impossible to go 
into the field with so meagre an outfit. But the purveyor had seen 
service in the regular army, and his wisdom was manifest at a later 
day, when our limited transportation showed the necessity for the 
utmost economy of space and the highest wisdom in the selection 
of articles for service in the field. The hospital was soon placed 
on good footing. The sick were well supplied with beds and 
other accommodations, and a well-organized cooking department 
furnished them with abundance of healthy food. Early in January 
the measles broke out in the Regiment and soon the hospital was 
filled with those taken with this disease, and before its course was 
finished three hundred and thirtv-five men were prostrated, and 
about twenty died from it. 

The middle of February, 1862, arrived, and still the Regiment 
had no surgeon. Distrusting my ability as an operator, I was ex- 
tremeh^ solicitous that a surgeon of practical experience should fill 
the place. As yet, no man whom I thought superior to myself had 



I04 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

offered for the position, and knowing the high importance of an 
experience in practical surgery to the officers and men, I should 
have declined to enter the service with a surgeon not well up in 
this particular, and I so informed the Colonel . The position was 
offered to Dr. S. B. Davis, of Atchison, Kansas, who was mustered 
in as surgeon of the Regiment February 22, 1862. 

Dr. Davis was much of a scholar, and a gentleman in the best 
sense of the word. He had an eye like Mars and seemed born to 
"threaten and command," and yet he had a nature as gentle as a 
woman's, and I have, more than once seen his eyes dimmed with 
tears for the sufferings of soldiers whose distress our art was pow- 
erless to palliate. He was born in Ohio, had graduated at the 
Louisville Medical College, and for a short time had practiced in 
his native state. He afterwards moved to Atchison, Kansas, where 
he soon rose to distinction as a phvsician, and achieved an enviable 
reputation as an operator in surgery. 

He had done about all of what are called "capital operations," 
such as amputations — operations for stone, &c. His appointment 
pleased me very much, and I never regretted it, although he re- 
mained with the Regiment less than three months, being detailed 
to division headquarters as Division Surgeon. With the exception 
of this period of less tlian tliree months, I was in medical charge of 
the Regiment during my whole term of service of over three ^-ears. 

By the middle of March the Regiment was full, and complete in 
its organization . The winter had been spent most pleasantly by 
officers and men. Colonel Rcid and Major Belknap resided in 
Keokuk, and had done their utmost to make our stay pleasant and 
had succeeded. The citizens of Keokuk seemed to \ie with each 
other in their social attentions to the 15th Iowa, and the winter 
flew rapidly by, leaving its blessed memories of happy social gath- 
erings and cemented friendships which the loth will never let die. 
Here several of the soldiers and officers formed still stronger at- 



loiva Veteran Volunteer Infantry. lo^ 

tachments, which resulted in pai'tnerships for Hfe after the " cruel 
war was over.'' 

On the 19th of March the Regiment embarked for St. Louis. 
The sick was left behind in hospital and the Regiment, nearly one 
thousand strong, marched gaily to the boat, with banners flying and 
a lively band and stirring martial music. It was a moment that 
forever impressed itself upon the minds of the soldiers. The streets 
were crowded with men, women and children, who had come down 
to say a last adieu. Handkerchiefs were waving, and vet some 
were pressed to eyes that knew a great agony of grief. The men 
were quickly embarked, and soon the boat rounded into the stream. 
The men tried to give a wild hurrah, but it seemed to be choked 
with sadness, and in a few moments we were out of sight of the 
city and the people we loved so well. The river was high and 
swift and the next morning we landed at St. Louis and went into 
quarters at Benton Barracks, About ten days were spent here in 
completing the arming of the Regiment, the time being also im- 
proved to replenish medical supplies and to select those soldiers 
unfit for active duty and place them in general hospital in St. Louis. 
On April 1, 1862, we left St. Louis on the steamer Minnehaha for 
Pittsburg Landing, and arrived there on the morning of April 6th, 
On our way up the Tennessee River we occasionally met boats 
coming down, and from some of them w^e heard that a great battle 
had been fought and that our troops had been victoiuous, and some 
of the officers and men were bitter in their denunciation of those 
who were responsible for the delay by which we had been deprived 
of our share of glory. They soon learned the battle had not been 
fought, and there was still ample time for them to fill themselves 
full of renown, an opportunity some of them failed to improve 
when the time arrived for its complete gratification. 

At early dawn men and officers were stirring. Already could be 
heard distant musketry firing and an occasional boom of cannon, 
but it was supposed to be merely heavy skirmishing. In an hour 



io6 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

the line of firing had greatly extended, and had become very heavy. 
The excitement grew about the landing. Men w^ere hurrying to 
and fro; ammunition and supplies were rushed up the bluff; field 
officers, staff officers, orderlies, men dashing to and from the land- 
ing with an earnest and serious mien that betokened the imminence 
of a great occasion. The tide of the slightly wounded had already 
reached the landing. A great battle was on . 

Dr. Davis showed great skill and energy in the organization of 
the hospital corps for field duty, and in a short time the medical 
and surgical supplies necessarj- for a primarv depot in the field were 
packed and ready, and a suflicient hospital squad detailed as assist- 
ants. I requested permission from Dr. Davis to accompany this 
detail to the front. He told me to ask the Colonel, and said he 
would remain on the boat and attend to the men seriously wounded 
as they came in. The two Regiments, the 1 5th and 16th Iowa, 
were now drawn up on the bluff awaiting orders. 

About 8 a. m. General Grant arrived from Savannah, a landing 
twelve miles below Pittsburg. In a few moments he and several 
of his staff came up the bluff and engaged Colonel Reid in conver- 
sation, General Grant asking manv Cjuestions about the Regiment, 
where it was from, its officers, arms, &c. They had been talking, 
perhaps, ten minutes, when one of General Grant's staff ofiicers. 
Colonel Pride, I think it was, came in from the front and said, as I 
understood him, that General McClernand was hard pressed and 
wanted re-enforcements. General Grant waved his hand in our 
direction '.wxtX said, " take these two Regiments out to him.''' I 
ste])j)ed up to Colonel I^eid anil asked if I could go with our Reg- 
iment. He did not seem to liave a clear idea of what my duty was 
and turning to General Grant, who was still near, said, '' My As- 
sistant Surgeon Gibbon wants to know if he can go along?'" Gen- 
eral Grant glanced at me and replied, " lie can go if he wants to." 
I was very much elated with this kindness of General Grant, but 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. loy 

about two hours afterwards I doubt whether I appreciated it so 
highly. 

The Regiments took arms and marched off with great spirit. It 
was pleasant to see the elastic step and enthusiastic manner of offi- 
cers and men. We had not gone far before we met quite a column 
of wounded and stragglers drifting in toward the landing. Many 
of them told us their Regiments were "cut to pieces." 

To some of the wounded I gave stimulants and temporary dress- 
ings and passed them on to the landing. One man I saw leaning 
against a tree some thirty yards from the road, his hat off, and his 
gun beside him. His countenance was ashen, and beseemed in 
great distress. I went up and spoke to him, but he did not answer; 
he was quite dead. He had got that far back and sat down to rest, 
and his life had oozed away from a gaping wound in his side. 

After marching about two miles we entered an open field of 
about eighty acres. It was surrounded with high timber in which 
was a growth of underbrush as high as a man's head, which afforded 
excellent cover for an army. Our two Regiments were marching 
by the flank across this field, when about the middle of it we were 
greeted with a tremendous infantry and artillery fire from front 
and flank. Our guide had blundered, and by some strange mishap 
we had been led between the divisions of our army and were thrown 
against the solid line of the enemy. Colonel Reid was soon dan- 
gerously wounded and borne from the field bleeding freely from a 
wound which at the moment was thought to be mortal . Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel Dewey, though in the battle, was in fact on the sick 
list, and unequal to the occasion. But Major Belknap, though 
severely wounded, was equal to the demands of this supreme mo- 
ment of peril. He had inherited the military genius and high 
courage of his father, and nature had given him a fine figure and a 
magnificent voice for command. He rallied the Regiment with 
great ability and showed those military qualities which afterwards 



io8 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

won him great distinction as a soldier and commanded the admira- 
tion and affection of officers and men. 

My duties as a surgeon were now^ to begin in earnest. The 
ground seemed covered with dead and wounded. I had noticed a 
deep ravine to the rear and left of the Regiment, and directed the 
wounded to be carried there. It was probably fifty yards from 
the level of the field to the bottom of the ravine, which was 
grown up with heavy timber and underbrush as before described. 

I found many wounded soldiers here who had drifted back into the 
shelter from the earlier fights of the morning. Some belonged to 
Ohio Regiments and others were from Indiana and Illinois. There 
was no surgeon there but myself, and I went to work to do the 
best I could. There were men wounded in almost every con- 
ceivable way. Some with a leg or an arm shot away, others 
shot through the lungs and dying slowly from shock and inter- 
nal hemorrhage. Several were dreadfully torn and mangled by 
pieces of shells and had assumed that deadly ashen hue that im- 
mediately precedes dissolution. The pain and anguish depicted 
upon the countenance of these can never.be erased from the mem- 
ory of one who has ever seen them. As quickly as possible I or- 
ganized my nurses and all others who were not hurt into a hospital 
squad and set them to giving temporary dressing to the slightly 
wounded, and administering stimulants and making them as com- 
fortable as possible, while I attended to the more serious cases. Of 
course amputations were out of the question under the circum- 
stances, but I cut out many bullets and gave morphine to many 
who were suffering greatlv. Some drifted into the ravine from mv 
own Regiment, who were so badly injured that thev lived but a 
few moments. Adjutant Pomutz was assisted into the ravine dan- 
gerously wounded. The tremendous roar of the battle grew louder 
and nearer. Shot and shell went hissing and screaming over the 
ravine and occasionalh' falling into it. At last I could hear the 
commands of Regimental and Companv Commanders with dis- 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry . log 

tinctness, but supposed them to be our troops, who had fallen back 
to the edge of the timber to form a new line and make a stand. 
The underbrush was so dense the troops could not be readily seen, 
and I was so intent upon assisting the wounded and organizing my 
field hospital that I failed to note that the Confederate line of bat- 
tle was forming less than a hundred yards from us. I heard a sol- 
dier say, ''that is the rebel line of battle." Almost the next instant 
the ravine was swept with a cyclone of musketry, shot and shells, 
which cut the limbs of the trees; they fell in great profusion and 
did some injury to the men. One man, who was suffering from a 
gun-shot wound of the leg, had his bowels torn out by a piece of 
shell. It seemed strange that it did not kill him instantly, but he 
was perfectly conscious for fifteen minutes after, when, as I left 
him, I gave him a large dose of morphine, which I hope softened 
the pains of his dying moments. 

The first volley had scarcely spent itself, when I was aroused to 
the seriousness of the situation by an irreverent remark of Adju- 
tant Pomutz. His wound had been dressed, and I had directed 
him to lie down and be quiet, as I feared excessive hemorrhage . 
When the volley had passed over the ravine the Adjutant raised 
himself upon his arm, and, taking in the situation at a glance, re- 
marked " this is a h — 1 of a place for a hospital." I directed sev- 
eral men to assist the Adjutant out of the fire and to the boats if 
possible — where a few hours after I found him — but hov^^ he got 
there without getting more bullets through him I could never com- 
prehend, as he must have made his escape through a veritable 
leaden hail. Many more of the wounded inanaged in some way 
to crawl through the brush and get to the rear through the north- 
ern end of the ravine, which was near the road and much better 
covered with brush and timber than the other end. This, how- 
ever, was soon occupied by the Confederates, which made escape 
by that route impossible . It now began to look serious for the 
few of us who remained, for it was evident the enemy was nearly 



I JO History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

ready to charge down the ravine. To go up the hill directly op- 
posite the enemy was not feasible, as there happened to be little 
covering of brush on the side toward the landing, and would have 
resulted in our being complimented with an undue share of the 
enemy's ammunition . Our ravine ran somewhat circuitously toward 
the east, and in about a quarter of a mile broadened out into a ten 
acre field which was grown up with oats. Near the mouth of 
this ravine was a tree covered with a dense matting of grapevine, 
which we succeeded in reaching without discovery, and into which 
we climbed and were perfectly concealed from the enemy, though 
we could see them plainly. But to remain there was to be cap- 
tured in a few minutes. I proposed to the men that we should 
quietly get down to the lower limbs of the tree, and at a given 
signal from me we should all jump at once and run to the north- 
east across the open field, in full view of the Rebel line of battle, 
striking for a high point on the other side which was well covered 
with timber and brush, and which would afford concealment and 
protection. This little campaign was admirably executed, and 
while we were greeted with a heavy volley from the Rebel brigade 
which faced the field, we all got over without a scratch. When I 
was a boy I was considered a good runner, but I have never felt 
as satisfied with my speed as on this occasion. On this point of 
land we found four pieces of artillery that had just been abandoned 
and near them a few soldiers and an othcer wearing a green sash, 
and as this denoted my branch of the service, I was curious to 
make his acquaintance, and soon recognized him as an old friend, 
Dr. Cornyne of St. Louis. He proposed that we should collect 
some of the men and work the battery. I told him I knew noth- 
ing about working the big guns, but he said he had been a member 
of an amateur artillery company at home, and he thought that with 
my help and that of the soldiers we could pick up, we might do 
some good work. We soon gathered together about twenty men 
and worked the battery for near half an hour, during which time 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. iii 

two of the guns were disabled and one of the caissons exploded by 
the concentrated and splendid gunnery of the enemy. Dr. 
Cornyne was as brave a man as ever lived, and for his gallantry on 
this occasion, was made Colonel of the 10th Missouri Cavalry, and 
was complimented in general orders by Gen. Grant. His military 
career was brief, for soon after the organization of his regiment 
he was killed by one of his officers whom he had accused of cow- 
ardice. 

The enemy charged upon our position and our little squad fell 
back in good order to the landing, where I took up the amputating 
knife, and in a few days did more surgery than falls to the lot of 
the average practitioner in a life-time. The boats were now rap- 
idly filling with wounded and dying soldiers. Col. Moore, of the 
21st Missouri, Volunteers, was, I believe, the first commanding 
officer whose leg was amputated at Shiloh . He had been out on 
the picket line early in the morning and had been shot through one of 
his legs below the knee, badly crushing the bone and requiring 
amputation. Dr. Davis had him on the table ready for the opera- 
tion, and I assisted him in taking off his leg. The Colonel swore 
roundly until he got under the influence of chloroform, and if I am 
not mistaken, his first words after he came from under its influence 
were of a very sulphurous character against those who had rebel- 
led against the " best government on earth," The steamer Minne- 
haha was under the charge of Dr. Davis and myself, and all day 
and far into the night we were busily engaged in performing al- 
most every operation known to military surgery. About midnight 
we were completelv exhausted, and many of the sorely wounded 
men had fallen asleep. Many of the surgeons were sickened by 
their bloody work, and were unable to do more and had gone to 
sleep, haunted bv gory dreams and dreadful thoughts of the mor- 
row. Our boat was passing backward and forward across the river 
carrying the advance of Buell's cdmmand. The roar of the bat- 
tle had grown nearer and nearer, Qur little army had fought for 



112 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

every inch of ground, but when night drew her sable curtain over 
the bloody scene our army was gathered in a short, but compact 
line near the landing. The men lay down on their arms in a 
drenching rain, and sought sleep and rest, but the surroundings 
were favorable to neither. 

At daylight, April 7th, 1862, the ball opened furiously on both 
sides, and many shot and shell came whistling over the boats, re- 
minding the surgeons that they were a little too near the line of 
battle to perform surgical operations with the steady nerves re- 
quired in such delicate work. About 10 o'clock we heard a yell 
which seemed to shake the ground. It was a genuine " Yankee 
yell," and immediately after the firing grew more distant, and we 
knew the day was ours. The battle was won and now came the 
herculean task of the surgeons to take care of the wounded. We 
had the Confederate wounded to look after also, which gave us a 
total of about ten thousand. The worst cases of sick and woun- 
ded were rapidly sent North to the general hospitals, and the army 
was soon ready for more heavy work, but were a long time in get- 
ting it. 

Now came the reign of Halleck — the reign of a book soldier — 
the reign of picks and spades, the reign of tedious camp life and 
camp diarrhea — the latter the worst scourge and deadliest enemv 
of the soldier. To the tortures of Tantalus it had an added phys- 
ical suffering and wasting which nothing at our command seemed 
capable of staying. More fatal than bullets, its poisonous effects 
upon the blood continued with many long after the smoke of bat- 
tle had cleared away, producing other diseases which made life a 
burden. 

By the 1st of June Corinth was taken and our army encamped 
about it, and the first great campaign in which our Regiment was 
engaged was finished. Soon after the ca})ture of Corinth Dr. 
Davis accepted an appointment as Assistant Surgeon Volunteers 
and left the Regiment. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry, iij 

He was a surgeon of rare skill and well up in the literature of 
the profession, and deservedly popular with officers and men, but 
he had not the nerve for long and continuous heavy operating; he 
said it made him "blood sick." My association with him I regard 
as one of the most pleasant episodes of my army life, and I dearly 
cherish his memory. He afterwards became a medical director of 
a division where his duties were more clerical and more to his taste. 
After the war Dr. Davis was appointed to a position in the Reve- 
nue Department, and was assigned to New Mexico, where he died, 
to the best of my recollection, about 1870. I took his place as 
Surgeon of the Regiment and held it until my term of service ex- 
pired, and was mustered out December 22, 1864. 

My place as Assistant Surgeon was filled by Dr. W. W . Nel- 
son, who was born in Wayne county, Ohio, November 30, 1834. 
He came with his parents to Van Buren county, Iowa, in the fall 
of 1845, where he was employed on his father's farm until of age, 
then attended Washington College. He attended his first course 
of medical lectures at the Iowa State University Medical Depart- 
ment at Keokuk, Iowa, the winter of '58 and '59, and a second 
course at the Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pa., where 
he graduated in the spring of 1860. 

He practiced medicine for two years in Van Buren county, when 
he was commissioned by Governor Kirkwood as Assistant Surgeon 
of the 15th Iowa Infantry August 19, ''62; was mustered into the 
United States service by Lieutenant Charles J. Ball, 13th Infantry 
United States Mustering Officer, September 14, '62, at Keokuk, 
Iowa; joined his Regiment at luka, Miss, ; remained with it until 
November, when he was taken sick with malarial fever and lay in 
the general hospital at Coi^inth, Miss., for two or three weeks, suf- 
fering severely, and recovering, joined his Regiment at Grand 
Junction, Tenn. 

In the spring of 1863 he was ordered to take charge of the small- 
pox hospital at Lake Providence, La., by order of General Mc- 



114 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

Pherson. After one month was relieved and placed in charge of 
the 6th Division Pioneer Corps, commanded by Captain Davis, of 
the 82d Illinois; returned to his Regiment in August, 1863, and had 
charge of the sick of the Brigade when the Regiments made their 
march to Monroe, La. 

Being again ill in camp near Vicksburg, he was treated by Dr. 
McClellan, of the I6th Iowa; then, by order of General Grant, was 
given leave to proceed North for twenty days, at the expiration of 
which time he rejoined his Regiment, taking charge of two com- 
panies detached on duty at the Ai'senal near Vicksburg, and also 
had charge of Pioneer Corps and Engineer Regiment, commanded 
by Captain John Wilson. He remained with the above commands 
until the spring of 1864, when he was relieved and placed in charge 
of the non-veterans and recruits of the Iowa Brigade. 

He was in charge of this detachment until their respective com- 
mands joined them (from veteran furlough) near Huntsville, Ala. 
Assistant Surgeon Nelson was here placed in charge of the 3d. 
Iowa Veteran Infantry, commanded by Colonel Aaron Brown, and 
remained with this Regiment until it was consolidated with the 2d 
Iowa Veteran Infantry, which occurred near Jones' plantation, 
Ga., on Sherman's March to the Sea, on or about Dec. 1,1864. 

Dr. Nelson again joined his Regiment, and from December 22d, 
the date of Surgeon Wm. H. Gibbon's muster out (by reason of 
expiration of term of service,) he was in charge of the Regiment, 
and for the last seven months of the service was the only medical 
officer with the command. He was mustered out with his Regi- 
ment at the close of the war at Louisville, Ky., July 24, 1865. 

In the fall of 1865 he located in Birmingham, Van Buren county, 
Iowa, where he superintends a farm as well as practices his profes- 
sion . He spent one year visiting California with his family; has 
performed several capital operations with success, and is classed 
with the best in his profession in southern Iowa. 

Dr. Hezekiah Fisk, of Indianola, Iowa, First Lieutenant of Com- 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. ii^ 

pany G, captured in battle at Shiloh, rejoined the Regiment at 
Lafayette, Tenn., January 6, 1863, and was appointed Second As- 
sistant Surgeon March 7, 1863. He was a man of high moral 
sentiments, a fervid Christian and consistent member of the Meth- 
odist Church, and a physician of rare skill and devotion to his pro- 
fession . The whole Regiment mourned his untimely death, and 
each officer and private soldier felt a deep personal grief. During 
the siege of Atlanta Dr. Fisk was in ill health nearly all the time. 
On the ]7th of August, 1864, he sent a note to me while I was 
detailed as one of the operators at the Division Hospital, with a 
request that I would come and see him, as he wanted to consult 
with me concerning his health, and about getting a leave of absence. 
I went to him at once, and found him in an arbor of green boughs, 
put up just in the rear of our breast- works. He was lying on a 
little bunk made of poles and covered with cotton he had gathered 
in the neighborhood. He told me of his poor health, and wanted 
me to assist about the leave of absence. I persuaded him to wait 
for a few days, as such an application was regarded with great dis- 
favor except in extreme cases. While sitting in his chair by his 
bedside, I noticed bullets from the rebel lines were dropping very 
close to me, one passing just over my head, another about two feet 
to my right and striking the ground about ten feet in advance of 
me, then another to the left. At the time I thought but little of it, 
supposing them to be random bullets. After we had talked possi- 
bly fifteen minutes. Dr. Fisk being in a much more cheerful mood, 
I got on my horse and rode back to the hospital, a distance of half 
a mile. I had just arrived and dismounted when an orderly came 
in great haste, saying Dr. Fisk had been shot directly after I left 
him. I returned to him immediately, and found he had been shot 
in the back near the left shoulder blade, the ball ranging down- 
ward. He was much shocked and already considerably weakened 
by internal hemorrhage. I took him to the hospital and gave him 
every care and attention, and the next day took him to the general 



Ii6 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

hospital at Marietta. He seemed to bear the ride well, and 1 began 
to hope his wound might not be fatal . But still he had that pecul- 
iar numbness of the feet which indicated a serious spinal lesion. 
About 9 o'clock I left him for a few minutes, hoping he might go 
to sleep. When I went back he was still awake. I gave him a 
small dose of morphine, adjusted his pillow, and asked him if he 
thought he could take a nap. He replied in his humorous way 
that he thought he could "make an average crop of it." The next 
instant he was dead, and the world had lost one of its best and 
truest men . 

The campaigns of Shiloh and Vicksburg told severely upon the 
health of the men. The radical change of life, the exposure, the 
drinking of creek water, together with the casualties of battle, had 
reduced the Regiment about one-fourth, so that when we entered 
upon the Atlanta campaign, the Regiment in its phvsique and 
aaoialo was undoubtedly one of the most effective in the service. 
This result was largely due to the exceptionally good quality of 
the men themselves, and to the soldierly traits of Colonel Belknap, 
whose genius for command was the inspiration of all. When off 
d\ity he was frequently seen in company quarters in familiar chat 
with line officers and men, and in this way gained an individual and 
biographical knowledge of each one, which was invaluable to him 
in the matter of promotions, and made him seem the personal friend 
of every man in the Regiment. And yet he was a skillful tactician 
and a thorough disciplinarian. In battle his stentorian \ oice could 
be heard above the roar of musketry, while his tremendous energy 
was an example to officers and men, which gave the Regiment great 
prestige for daring and endurance. 

In looking back over my army life I find much food for pleasant 
reflection. I was acquainted with almost every man in the Regi- 
ment, and some of the warmest friendships I e\er formed were 
with the private soldiers. A surgeon's efficiency depends largely 
upon his individual acquaintance with the men. Bad management 



loiva Vete7'a7t Volunteer Infantry. iiy 

on the part of the surgeon can greatly impair the usefulness of a 
Regiment. Want of discrimination in making up the "off duty" 
list will rapidly demoralize a Regiment. Respect for the surgeon 
is soon lost by putting men on duty who should be off, and leaving 
off duty those who should be on. A thorough personal knowledge 
of the men is the only remedy. 

As I have already occupied more space than that allotted to me, 
I must now say farewell to my old Regimental friends, officers and 
men. How shall I ever forget my genial friend and companion at 
the rear of the Regiment, Lieutenant-Colonel J. M. Hedrick? I 
owe him a great debt of gratitude for his cheery words and inimit- 
able humor. His dreadful wound is slowly wasting his strength, 
but the heart of every man in the Regiment goes out in sympathy 
for him in his suffering. 

Looking back through the vista of twenty years and recalling our 
army life, its grand and stirring incidents are still vivid and fresh in 
our memory, undimmed by the lapse of time and the cares of the 
rolling years. As the Cavalry horse takes his place in the line at 
the call of the bugle, so a soldier when he hears the old, familiar 
martial airs, in imagination takes his place in the ranks, hears the 
rattle of the musketry, and the boom of the cannon, sees the ground 
strewn with the dead and dying, and feels his pulse leap with that 
inspiring thrill which none but a soldier in action can ever know. 

But we have made our last march, and fought our last battle; we 
have buried our beloved comrades by every stream, from bloody 
Shiloh to the Sea, and shall soon cross the river, whence there is no 
return, and camping on the other side we will sing the old songs 
and joyously greet each other in the last Grand Review . 

W. H. GIBBON, 
Surgeon loth Iowa Volunteers. 

Charito77., loxva^ May^ iSSy. 



ii8 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



:fjli^t III. 



OUR FIRST ROSTER.— THE 1000 MEN WANTED.— "FALL IN" 

1113 STRONG. 



ORIGINAL ROSTER FIFTEENTH IOWA INFANTRY. 



FIELD AND STAFF. 

"A" COMPANY, "B" COMPANY, 

"C" COMPANY, "D" COMPANY, 

"E" COMPANY, "F" COMPANY, 

"G" COMPANY, 

"H" COMPANY, "I" COMPANY, 

"K" COMPANY, 

COMPANIES UNKNOWN. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 



iig 






f^ 






S 



I 



^ « "r! 

lu ^ E 
f^ o is 



5 o 






^ c ■" -S 

o is "* 

a'-' ^ ^ S 

- TJii ii XL 

•T- CM — — ^ . 

cop ^ «o 

o o i2 u « 
J^ Z S O o 



Q 
cs c — ' 

-" D >' 

■a -^ • 

E sS 



<=' :^ "^- 

w j:: '^ 

_■ 4-. O 



^ . 
o 



U 



>^ 



O O !- O S-. 

'^ '^ tu U Ci< 



O O "O 



6 S S 6 

C CU O U 2- 



.2: J 

u 

a. 



CO ^ 

r- . T e« 






c — • ■" =« • 

. 2 E . E dIq- 



? 9 
£ 6L 






_ D- 
- o . 
~ If ^ 
Qu Cb [x. 



'r^ SI ^ 

o 

• TO 

CO .> 

£ E 






b. El. 



SEE 
- o o 

!- !-. I, 

UL' b [Jh 






1 o O O O O ' 



Q 3 



E^ 



C? O T-i c- ,_! CO C: d O 1* CI !ffl ^H IC O Ci o; 10 1—1 O CO — i^ ^ 
■?? CI O"! f?? CC 1-H C""! T-. C"! -^ C? 1-^ CO C> '^'l 

[(Li03aj3a;]:^ojra)CK:ooc "oojOaluoo 



O .,— '-'■ 



2 '-3 
be 



Z Z O O O Q c?5 a. Z 75 






u o u o u 



SOOc/)OZOZO 



c 



00 



Z.>; 



oj o o 

O 4J ^' 

J J 

1 t" sJ 

l^sz 



nJ e« 73 



8 '^ ■'' . 



5. 5 ;'^ " 



be bl bt be if-" -e^ 

u. u t- !- I, g g 

t: 75 X y y: 75 x 



Is: 



z 



t« be o -= 2 -= 

> E U O S O Z 



S:l 



■SSS E E ^^i 
! V • 7 o o o o 

; .2 - >^ 
'-= 8 

OxZ 



• .2 .2 ^ 



Z>i 



C[JU 



'Qi O 






_^ 1; ^ J- >< 



° -n - 



II C U D *J 

^UJZU< 



c _2f .5 >r_i; 1^ u 1) 
'c ~ /T -"ti ~ o — — 



ai.ycCcO-^t«u:C5^:^C^OO 



•3§VI 



10 10 CO CO ! 



CI 



- - e 






^ ^ bn be 

ca c 3 -^ c« 

> 3 ?•<'"" 
"^ U i£ t- a:' 



■^ 3 
fa P 



5 5 rt "^ 
— 'jz 'j: v 



Z^^. 



be— 
: tS 15 ^^ ±0 a a; ^ 
. E - ^ t^' M 






T3 '—' 



rt 



Ix^^^^O^c^^^^^, 



X' a> cy: T^ c5 >-l -3 

3 ^ OJ <u jr >- •— 

^ T3 r; ^ c/3 C u 

3 C 3 - — 



— X t. u 
_:.iJU-0~U3 



3 

;c 3 

c s: 



:u 



_ . u „ OJ . 

WEiJoZHH 



o ^ 



I20 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 






^ 



fii 






^ 



I 



O 1) 

o c ■- 



-7) 



jap pjco J5g ^p 

1^ S - l^'ci '-^'^^ ^^$ . -§■ 

5 ^ucj feiu^2^?P =-of .:3-|2 g|-^'^ = 

W) S ii n, a. J .« g b* !M-^ b/j bi bB^ £ bt o 3 bi ':^ E^ ^^. a o >; « ^^ 
,Si 13 rt -■ -^ "■; - • i* ,i< 5 53 5 i; '' i^ u ci-'J i ^ c^ ^ rt o E. E.-^ j= -^ 

C«^3JJJ^2C-73^^75/:C0 0;,7D>^7:>-^^|U_>>^-| 
■S'SCf-a~"3— i'tc'S*^T;-3"C'^ C-a'Cnx'C— ~_-:3'CT*j_ jr 

'-" -^ - 01 C-7 C^J -^ /J — .— ^ C"> 71 ?t -H ShCO CI.-* ,_. C-* -* ^ TO C:- C— 2^ — ' 

— <—!—'— '—O— '1-1--' C>"(' ^/^f^ — ^H — C-J — — — 1-^— .^^,-. — ,— — — 

ppopppppppppppjrppppppppppp--pppp 
o o'go ;o »""* oi»;oTj7ocD-*'o:oc5o'-^^^oooo';D~oo^cop 
>> 4J >>' -c >>>' -fi >> -C >">>■> ^' >■>>>>>>>> > >' >' 

OOuOO'^OOO^COUCOOO'-'OOOCOOCOOwOO 

ZZOZZSZZ/?;S2ZSZZzZSZ2Z2ZZZ:gZZZZ 

-H — -J^— <01 — — .— ..^J-H — CI — — — '— 'C-1 — — — — — —'— •^■^ — — — 




c c . . . 
,*, ^"1 S « tS "S 

sj ^ ^H — ( ^^ 



'bX)'"bc''bc'b/)''y)''siD*!5jo'!y)'bc'bc'bc'bc''be'bX)"bc JO bo bc bij bc 

— — ■-< — ■— — '- — ^ '— — 1- s- r r; ., r, 11 r, i^ 



j_'^j-i-iJl''Ul',^l>3.''l;liD'L>l'UU 



u 1; 11 u _i> 1; 



c jzjz s:. r ^ 



z > 



>^ c 



ZO'J-3> = s5>5o>t5SOO>OOZw-rZ 



u bcV; — 



. o 

So 



03 es 

9 -a -a 



Ch c 






C C rt ^ 

c o -a o 



:ja; 



23 " £"-1 

000 t30'auOO"o"a 
1^ -' _] JL. :^ bd O ai 1-1 -3 O O 

'^OSOQO^CO-^iNCO — Cliff-* 
03 •— 01 <M W CQ !M 07 C? ^^ 0< O? 



D.C 



-a -o 
E-'E. 



,,ai Di! Qi od 



I- C cs rt 
-C ^, 0^ 1) 

O-J'JU 



OU 



•3§V 



C? Ci iC o ■ 
OJ --(MO 



- •- ^ :>^ t> 

S^2bo^^ 

S rt bO M ^ ^^^ 

'E > 5 — ." 




11 O -S be ni ^ o 
en u O O X O — ■ 

^,0 Oi D^ -J 3C < , 



r" O 

" ^ C 

u "» 5 "o 

, C C 0; rt 



Iowa eteran Volunteer Infantry. i2t 






jr 



c -S o >^ 



cJr^ofPg 



in 

o x" 

a c 






\A 



T-i _ 1-. 3J 



(Z) ^ cifir 












o o~o o t^T-r-To -^o '"' :o co^o^yTo 1-H !o".-ro'"<:o':o50 coco ;o •■o:S^ '-c i:'"- -* » CC' 'ti -* 

X X! x: j3 X 

u u u o u 

OOOOOC«Ot«o«500000i'30rtOCOOOOOCOOCOO''5000™ 

z;^;z 2zs:^szSzzz:^2SzS2z?.zz:z:gZ2;zz2zSzzzS 

— •;^ -J _ _. _ £ -5 ■£ ■£ -5 -5 •£ X X X £ X £ 3 3 -j; ■- •- -r -^ ~ T "C 'C Z 'C 'C "n "C "j: 
.."3 =5 r^n^- -"^ • aj .'O'a " ^~ • ^^ , "^ H - - ■ - ^' 





CflUJ CCCflCO C/;C^ X C/JC/iC/JC/)^t/3 


t; t3 


-0 TJ-'Ts-oTS "-a'o -a ■o-o'D'o ~ "o 






- a. CL - 


0,^0.0 0.0.0, 00 CL-- oooo «> -^ 


ns, 
rlotte 
arRa 
ar Ra 
rlotte 


«ctf^c«'^5KC<S«Ck5Cc3rtSErt':r;£rac3c«cs5<StCt5jCi.iC 


nj -^ -^ cc 


>~.X Jj (U X 


DW-a;^>~><u'UD--ii_.-'. aj9j>-.>. oi'-'-^^Diuajiu^-ij-idjiu -^x cs 


J^^CJUUPHCJttiUti-JCJUUJk-uJUUJJUiiDiJCJUUU-J&HCi-UJUCi- 


CiJO»0 — MCC'?3CiMO'*-H005--i0005COCCQC500CCOWJOOiOOOi05C50lQOOQO 


(M -M (?* C»C« 


i-HOi— i'r3i?*o?<MOi'^w— ii-icocj©jT-<^c«^c»cij«socQi?4-*^(Meo'NT-i 



5> „ be 
_ be _ oj !- ^ 












, o; c , 



-a rt aj '^ CO e i! " «3 cs „.,..„.„, ,. - .„ - „ , _ 

=«i:5-5«';xurr^cesg-^xx«fc^octf«cs.i:£i:333-ooo=? 



122 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



^ 



R 



^ 



^ 

fs 






^ JS ° 

o -^ ^ 



IgcJP 



a, 

IS 



3 -as O 



s ^, 



0/ CS 11 
C P = 



^ S 



U 



tH ^ 

s_ cs o «=! 
t^ Cl. ^^ (/; 



J2S 



- OJ 



c« 



c« 



O) 



u 



cC QQQ 



CO lO 

p d -n . -, 






~ « -;: ^ ■" 
•5 -^ ^ c c 

.— .— TJ ^ 

■U 13 bJO be ?^ 

o; >- i" 
"O -C —. u i> 

O . 3 • ■ 

to "O o o o 

5^ ^ ici 



- I c» ^ <^^ _ ^ o> ^ ^ ^ _ ^ 






CO T-H ir ^' -^ :C' o — o ;s 
o^oo^ooccc 



o o « 



r- 07 C^ — — -— ^ CJ -^ — 

ceo OCOO'COCCCOCOO 

CO ^ 'rlTyr O CO CO ■^' o' CD~ 

o« rtoooouoo 



COCO COCOCOCCCOCOCOCO CO 



>^.2 c/3 c/D a< O c^ 



0-53 



of "O lo'sf 2" cf o' ^' C5 in" o o'oT r-" 
fa 0>£,-^Z>5l.2 0Z07) coa^&^ 



^ 






^ 






a> D oj ij oj 



> > > > > 



U D 1 <U 1) (U t) 

rt c^ ci rt c3 rt 



>>>>>>>>>> 



CuCl^DMD-ie-iDLiDH2Hi^CU0uCL,QkCuQ-iCL,DHCLi0-iCl.Q^DHQHa.DHCLCl.,CL,CLiCLi 



z;> 


■a "S u ^ c ^ J iS >.■£ £ 'S 2 *-S <u ^' i3 - g _• ^ 2 . 15 S .M- ■? c« 1 "SS 

-Soo3wo;:^o^o&.oSoiJ:iZQ-;:^o2;oo>-S>°s 







ICl 3iXOOCX)aOOOOO(MQOOSO— iTt< 



o pU 
cs u 5 "p 



!<: c 



o •- 



— ^ z: c« • ■£ u "-^ ^, c » *^ * 



^ eS _r; 



O-^ 












' 1) "T cJ c/5 >-, 



i> a. oj 



o c IJ 












•-i^^ ?».;; o o o lu u .;:.-:;= --3 c« cs ojaj--- 



^ , — 1-, cfi Ch 



= i3^>.5"oooara3 



-aC^: 



K^ 3 Da HH c _ 

flj y: ca ;^ "^ N — 

d3J=CL,1Jl'^cS 

u h .5 '^ bc r-' ■- '^ * 
be— a-;; =: 3 E 5 E 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. I2J 



OS eS J?^\ 









c 



5j « rt 



^o - 



-■ CS 



ti_ --03-13 -^.•Qhn'^ 0-7;«s 



.5 -C ^ -a^S 0-35^=^3 

o ' J -a o -a «> 3 T) o p^ o -a s o 



•E "^cj ^ 



•~ >" .•- 3 ^5 c o S ^ -n -"^ 2 o H r"! :; -^ w ._ 

o -.u .73 3-T313 .a^.Tj-u.^^-a-a 

K 'otjo' oo; o<uto O— o«iiiOT3'no_i^_iu 

< ^^5 &:q ^co ci: t2a:co£ ^ ^£ q 5 

>>i.>>i>-u>>>>>>ui.u>u:^uuu>>>>>> >>■->>>>> 
CO«000^000000«*n!0'S"!t<cSrtOOOOOOOO<SOOOOO 

07?&.0:^:z::L,00c^00Zfa&H^c^ >fl,>l,>:l>5,Ji,7} :gOOOcoZO>^7;x7)00 

aT sT cT oT oT nT oT iT a5" oT iT d" iT iT iT uT oj' oT tT oT iT iT u' iT 1; oT d' iT iT a> ^jj ^ ^ 5 ^ i^ 

_> _>• > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > .> .> .t .t .t .t .i. .^ ■- .^ ■- -i. •- ■- -^ •- •- •- 
'C 'n "C 'C 'u 'C 'C 'C 'C '■- 'C "C X 'Z 'Z Z 'Z 'Z 'Z X 'Z 'Z 'Z 'Z 'Z 'Z 'Z 'Z 'Z 'Z 'Z 'Z > s- ^ ^ 

r/) t/j C/J «; ^ t/3 I/) CO H !Ll 

-OJ ? -Oi . .' - -7i .' E CKi Oi Hi .'-^ -^ B -^ "2 c^ -^ Cd 2:i ^ '-^ .-^ ^ -S ..'- 



0.n>-0-aO=OOOcsO-S.§7;00007]0'^-00-o-§niOo^==0.--c«0 
s^ a> '5 >■■ u >~'V >^^. >-.-C >-.- ^l<uaJ>-.l^l^■-aJ^^)4J(^JnJJ::>-.aJa;al>l3C^>, 

i-!uiJHi-iu^OH>-3i-3>-3Ui-3odoo^iJ^^ogL^ti.u^cjuUw::^eL,CL,^Oc:Uh-i 

OOlOt--<*ICJOOC50'^OOOiOOOOOOCOCCOOCOO>01CO — 00-*05C«Ot-C0000005Ci»Ol?J 

:^o«q^TOcOi-HO>o?Mg?gj-^T-HW-^(yjeQ-r-i-^TH-.-Hec?7^e<?i--i(y?cQg>-^"T-iT-ir^c}co 

to 

'> "H ^ H .2 ^ K ^ " o c 

■a «r fe S ^ -i: -s 5 5 5 1 J^ g .0 ,0 c ^' Mf -5^ o p ^ ^ ^' P S ^-^- c c ^' ^ ^ = = 
s >.?!>— u u u*t;5csfiHji-i^2-i*;- o ^ t ? S: u 3-f: r_*j c 0.0;.- -'. s^xtt 3 3 

j-:iS^2SSSSSSSSSSSSSZZZc2o!£a:&:oioioic^Dipic«7^^S^ 



124 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



'^ 



U 



8' 
IN 















^^5 



^'W ^ = t^ 



C/3 ci ° .f rt 

_ 1) — :_ 1^ 

c o i « o 

^ d ^ ^ Q 



■^ 3 
^^ 

So 

« r- 

^ o 
o .-;; 

o2 

U 3 

. O 



^^ 



o.-£^:^~ 



2 "^ 

C 3 
cs o 



be JJ u 

u C V 

C/5 I— ,'-1 
CQ OJ 3 S-' 

V- t; t^ "" 

^ O jn 

o £ o 

73 3 •- 

J > ■-. ni 

• U O .« 

_ _ J ^ -n I 



2?« 



• o 



"j^ 


Ou 


C3 


o 


(U 2 


V,CJ 


ai)i- 


W)4^ 


!- U. 




cso 


C8 


-c 7, 


o-n 


t3 <" 




{/) ^^ 



^x 



CO ^ 

d 



Q 3 . 

£D 



CQ CI C7 »-• i-H o> CO _ . 



^ -^ -t< o o ~f ^ tr'co'^'"-^-;^^'*"^' -# c:' :3 ?o <£ co' 
Kcsoo«e«ooO«roeao«00000 

ss§zzssz:zzss§zszzzz^ 



1*« 


s * 





.£ J3 








cS 


.£ § 


« 


^o* 



2^S^'~~*^'^"''-^— ' — c:(c"jeo — c> — — — -^ — 

^2^2" ^S ^ '^' 2 rf == '^ '•''''^' =5' o' <o ic 00 ci 31 
jocj'^-^eoc? 10 CI so i-i-^i-ic^ 1-^ 

c r-j3-" a.^j2"S. a. c.^ 3 -Q D.X1 ^'-' o. ^ ^ 
i-^^^ O n ^U. 7)c/;y;fc.Sfac/?^gO:^ZZ 






Z"> 






3 S- 

CuZ^ 






SOP 



00 ZO 



ry: > ±; j: 



:2 o 

Q_ CO 



"S-^-^ ..'Qi, 



rt _^ _ 

■^ o o 



o -a 



^ _-a -u 
"o-'S-'d. 

'^^^ 

5 « (jj 
-a -a -3 

DDK 

uuu 



Qi Cd -=^ 

•a T3 o 
1) i> D 



Aee 



CO C? CO ( 

-* o c> • 



IS o 

3 c 15 ^ 
o o -n 



12 "3 

S ^' ^ ^ 
5 S « =< 

-l-JUO 



M S 



£ «j s 






1) > 



£ ^ J5 6 ^ S' c 



O 1) 3 u 

(U tUO CO CO c 

^ (U ►T "-^ 3 — 



.£ e 



:5 „' ^"-§ g S S P s £ a s -3 :^ II "g "§' 
■5=SiS^^!=2°33Cli«^oo 



SCO 

S,-; ■«■ 

ill 

V-, - o 

00 N 

<y 00 « 



5-=S 
K) .ir-3 



«£ o 






0^ S s 

'& • 
go JJ 



i 1^ 

■^ "S — 



3 ^ " 



oj 



c o „ 



3 (U > 
St3 O 





!_ I- U I, T3 








(U V V <U ^ 




^- ^ ^ ^cS 

1) i; 0) OJ ^^ 






U 0) 1) 11 <_ 




1- - I, t- rt 


^J 


^ ^ x: j=-a 


^ 


V . u u 


^ 


,0 ,0 ,0 .0 ^ 


» 


-"■*-'—*- rt 


^ 


■3 -0 T3 t: -0 


^ 


Q^ (L* a> CL* u 










,^ 






N 


3 3 3 C C 


W W W H Ct) 


4 


p p p p CO 



5: cs ctf," cs « 

5: '^ CO Tt< ic rr 

>v CO ;o CO CO CO 

u y ' ' ' 

S 3 OJ -^ 1) (U 



^ 1) D (U HJ <U 
5^ c^ OS c^ rt c^ 

-K^ Dh cC £i Ph cC 



^ 



£ ^ p £ 

3 j; i ;- u 
£^^ ,^ 

^ j:; T3 c/i 
O 3 N > ^ 

J; t. o ™ "^ 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 



125 





Enlisted at Cedar Rapids. 
Enlisted at Cedar Rapids. 

Pro 8th Corpl Oct 1, '64. 






'+-*Tt<Tf<^-^TH^^^^'*;2<;2^5[<^^7ti^^ 


— ' ci" ci" in \a •^' IC lO" C;' 16 oT ci" 0' t-' £-" C-' E-' t-' t-' t-' 


T-' ^' LC :£ 3D IC 30' OO" 30' of OD' 3D cT '^ Tp' — ' —' — cf 
^ (?? 51 «>? ^ 03 W C5 CQ (N 01 « CO 01 X 0> 

- -J -C a > u -J cj _ _ ^ y :j 


> > 
"C 'Z. 

DhO- 




"css'csrartrtKcirtisreTOK'SSrecsn 










Rapids Tp. 

Cedar Rapids 

Cedar Rapids 
Cedar Rapids 
Cedar Ra|)ids 
Cedar Rapids 
Cedar Rai>ids 
Cedar Rapids 
Cedar Rapids 




■ 1 


a)IOOCO'3Di»0"}C030 3030— lOSO ai3iff*0| 
■— ■* ?0 ^ <?5 <N 53 3Q -i-^ -^ -^ 5} *} (?•■} -^ -^ O"? 93 1 


r 
X 

« 

1. 


c 

C 

■J 

1 
- > 


< 

c 
^ c 


Ferguson, Cyrus E 
Ferguson, Rufus C 
F'ox, Robert R 
Fuller, Orando V 
Gebhard, Perry 
Hodge, John 
Kindred, Napoleon B 
Klum[)h, John W 
Largent, Daniel W 
Largent, John N 
McCavley, Patsey 
Moore, VVilliam W 
Mui-phy, Michael 
Smith, Elihu 
Smith Ellis 


z 
- ij 


J 

s 



■^ 



s 



^ 



I 









^ ^ 




OJ ,* 




^ ^- S^ 




too « 




!>i r:: u '— ' 




^ ^ P iip 
^ ^ '* ^i '- 0" 


en 




< 


c , c ^ u -, . 

c T' -" 5 ^ — 1 — ^•- 




<5 
W 


_o •— <5 3 (U 1) 




I^J^-G.Sicti- 3 




« c c 1 x: tr 






s-.-Ci.iJuj'-i'Oa'C 




a &H .=« W .i; ^ g C/D 5 


of 

into 

erv. 


'-HO'J-.-^CQ-rHOlTH^ — 


»»»o«oo««oo 




\j u'J^ 


3s ^'c5 ^'c; ^' c; — T-. 




C^ <M OJ 


^ ^^ 


> ;;-, > >, > »-, > > > 




0<SO«CcSOOO 


BO 


zSzS^g;z;^z 





— J — T— --J-^-— T-^- — 


o.£ £ 


:r^^^^^i^s=>'^ 


crT L-' i-c" ■^'' -r^' — ^' t- so' 


0? OJ CI ^- — 


bX 


5 £"£"5555 S"&" 

< CO C/} 7D 73 






c 


C C . . . . u" :-■ :J 


S *J J J Jh^lcococo 


c2 




ao33s?333s 




- ^ 


o\^,^^,•33 7=.2 ^-=n: 


^ > 


CO ^v: CO' t: w U Z 








i.ia;ajD0J3juiJ 


! 

! c 


-EECCCCC^J" 


OOCOOCOOx 


r2 


SSSSSSSSo 




'Xo3C/)a)«.c^t^c/;C 


^ 




Age 


000^-^c-oooi^ 


roTOcowotcr'So^o* 




S £ 




:.•_ = = 7: 




<u 5J i i c 




_ TD "O « tc -r 


1 ^^ 


:5 3 3 e c T3 ^ 


w 

< 






£i.5--s -s - b : £2 




— 't, T "S c ~ 3 


1 


^ < < u ei n: A> 



126 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



O 



Is 






f^ 






^ 

^ 



SsU 



w j^ qj 



f^ in 



U ■?■? 4-. » ^ 


;^; C/2 -o cc ' 


J ^ _• ' , - Tj, ►^ 


. 3d 
o. Is 
pora 
V. 35 
pro. 
ilyl 

oral. 




I- a o ^i M— . S: r- 


u I- ■- T3 75 u •- CJ 


n75.h tijc£7:'j£ 


-5^ -^ £ u £ ^--5^ £ 


. o ' £ c . o 


fcijfcOfeliifcfc 






:0 



■-^ 



> 
o 

'^ — 

00 ~ 



00 ~ T-< 



'-'^ 75 , » c/5 X ^' bC' U 

O i— . O a , -1 r- 3 



00 1: 

"^ UO c "^ "C -"^ — T3 «M 'C 

-a ,-, c . c} 15 . ^; . c. 
U . o c . . o . o . 



o c 33 

i > ^^ 

ED 



.'75 

1:5 X 

•s:75 ^-r 2 
^^ .> 0- c 

o o . o •?, 

1- s- u u <U 
CQ — C<! W 1— I 

;s JO := 5= 5= 



^ be 



D.4J 

75 ^ 

. O 

i IJ 1 «' 

pa 



^ p 



i; B bo 



c _ 
o o c c 

u. L. u u u. ^ u 

(xk II, (i^ b Oh pL, Ch 



S E« 

o o 



t^-rH-r-CJ — Oi'^l-'rCiwJSTi:^— ^OOCOCI' 



C5 00 C5 CD ■ 



, > bfl ^ > u. bjo >■ ^• 



1^ > > > > > >"£.^i:> 



'■*- "^ -/. 






:o o o o » o o 



C- X> X) O t- ^ L-O iO i-O C\f O 03 O* Oj O » CO OT -rH r-H 3; T-T O »C~C} lO JO lO CQ 



O 75 75 75 3 75 "-,75 75000000 7:750c/50i 



cj u o jr cj u 
.O O Z 75 O O 



;_ ;- ^ u I. L. k. 



(Ui.iji.(DlJliiuuua)OCOCOOOOOO,XArXrXrXr9r^rSr9 
X'75757575757575X'7575!JOUOOUUOUCJ^^'-''-'^^^^'-* 

o-i c>» cQ ?5 10 -^ ^ '^ ic L- ic — — •— CO c; cf CO rti '^ th Tt o ic w o o ^- c- xi 



o' E . £ . E ° o ° . £ . ^ °" cT c 6" d" o">< o' >- d o' d" t = 
^ 5 2 « "2 3 S '.S -S "o 5 "2 "^ £ "^".S .S J£ 5 ^ -S '^ .15 . ^ '5 2 "^ S 
OuS'j^uo o O-:;aH-:;SoSODi:;eH O OOZOZOOO-::^ 



Z > 



c c c 1.' 



SS' 



c 

u - - O'O 



-o^ii^ 



be be . 
-3 -a ^ 



rr 


r/) 


rn" 


„' 


(/) 


f/r 


m 


in 


,f- 


<n 


V 


u 


<u 


lU 


a> 


V 


U 


Hj 


<u 


aj 


c 


c 


c 


E 


C 


c 


c 


C 


c 


c 



o o o o o c c 



t«y:C. — j'j tfi tf^ 'j: ^ OoOxa)tfi"«t/:c/;cr' 



c o 

ti in </; 
U U OJ 



o o 

Q y rjj X 1^ 



°3 

C2 <l1 



D T3 

^ rv <*J 



|t-OOCSOOCO'XO-*COCO-*Cti»D~C5iCOOiOt-: 
' CO >>> — < -^ gj Ct ^^7 Cj C<> O Ol C^> — ' C-1 y-i -yi 01 Oi Pt CO ' 



■3§Y 



1- c 



C3 i; 



•o w 



^ 1) !« 

S5^ 



3 C w 

£ J o 



--3.C-L. i-'v'ky'^^^'T''-' 

; CQ ^ ^ ^- ^- L- -^ r •> W 



1^^ 






, 75 U' c 5 75 



E ^ = 
« be cs 






"* r^ r^ 



u3 C — ir -— 






O --• — 



o o 



be ■£ 



z; fc. o iJ ir-T i- •> c 

,^ O ^ ^ ►£, ^ ° ^.^^►S,^ w oi ^ ^ u < ►2,>£,Q O J ►= 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. i2y 



Z • ^ '-P 






^ 


, 


I' 


(W 


^ 




«) 


X 


••=> 


•• 




?< 


C-LO 


D 


n 




-0 


= 


3 
1— > 






o 


a. 


bf) 


^ 


'5 


^< 


c 


-* 


o 






■■J 


c 




aj 


OJ 


c 


Ui 


jj 


hn 


o 


J 


T 


r 


ai 










« 




1_ 




I'r 


> 














> 


•7-) 


C 






(1) 












bx 


T! 


1; 


t; 





m 


c5 


_c 


S^ 



chES.:: .3T3-UO • 

o o o ^ o o o o .1; _ij _!£ P ._ ._ — ._ ._ ._ , ._ ._ 

'^ '■^ r■^ '■■T r*" '••^ p^ '^ 5 S 5 oi! 5 '^ ^ ? Ci 5 5 i 5 ■$ 5 



^ 


' 


. s.= 


^ 


^H 


CI tuc^ 


-^ 71 


•J 




o c? 




OS UlJ 


u 






^ ^ 


be 


c"^ b 


j^< 




►^.-5^ 
















c5 




-C u 




o _ -a 



OO ouC-OOOOOOOOOOO «BcBO<^«CO OrtcOO^OOO 

zz oo-<zzzzzzzzzzz ^SSZSSZZ ZSZZZ^ZZZ 



rv t- u ^" ^ *-■ ^" ^- X iJ ^' *." > t.- jJ ^ <_• 6 Xi ■ _6 > '- ■ A > 6 _" • -^ A r-' o" > ^' > 

coZQOOOcoc^xOOOZOCZOn^£..^Zg>il..j;ZQO>^.0:^:^&HZOZ 
j: .5 .2 2 .5 J" aJ 4^ iT aT 4j d oj oj xi o^ u oj u ii iT cT iT o" iT iT iT iT iT iT oT cJ sJ oJ o oT 

~ fc— kd kJj .^ -^^ "i- '- '- i- i- i- ^ i- "i- i- i- "^ '^ '^ '^ s- '^ '^ i- i- ^^ '^ '" '^ '^ i^ '^ "C Z 'C 

x>^^SS>i^o-c-^ 2- a. Ch 2h i- 0. 2- 3h ;i^_^^£. CL, 2^ a-i c- 2-, Q, a- c a, Sh cu cu 2- 2- ::- 



o' s: c ^ ' c . . « >i c >-i , ' d" o" o' ciT d" - o . :s' . t3 . 

0t^&^Z>^a;00^::;ZCZ^0.50^Q£c;:;^S^£0-U~S-0J::0 

— csCrtgc^' 4j--?OscOOco03cc3^'=c = Os._.rccc ' 
^ o 73 o g o "c ^ 2^ 7} c o o 'o o o o ^ c 'o o o 'c ^ •- '5 o 5 "5 ^ ■^ •? "o '5 ^' 

■;::crtci::_'-t;ccc ccQc -t: =Cu2- -^ 

= X 'T le ^ O ■J^ C I' ^ '7 O C '■« t« O O '■'^ C -s, f. -i- ir. - i. tn m O '-f- '^- '^- "J^ ^ 

>Q2iiSOcQ;2;><>C!i2:c3CiC;:2a2Cli422CC^2 ^^ C;C^C;cc22H2-dC;C^U; 




128 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



L) 



1^ 









I 



■75 

< 

w 




Promoted Musician. 
Died at St. Louis Dec. 8, '63. 
Pro. 8th Corporal Nov. 36, '62. 
Discharged June 18, '63. 

Deserted at Corinth, Miss., July 17, '63. 

Pro. 4th Corporal Aug. 4, '63. 
Pro. 4th Corporal Mar. 37, '63. 
Discharged June 16, '63. 
Died at Keokuk June 11, '63. 

Died of measles at Keokuk Jan 9, '63. 


Tranff'd to C Co. 15th Infantry Dec.l, '61. 
Died at Keokuk Mar. 8, '62. 

Discharged March 1, '63. 

Deserted Coiinth July 38, '63. 
Transf'd to H Co. 15th Inf Mar. 1, '63. 
Pro. 6th Corporal Nov. 1, '63. 
Served in D Co. 1st Iowa Inf 3 months. 


Date of 
mustering 
U. S. Serv. 




T-^ T-H OJ — T— ,— 1 T-H « r-H — C> 

:sppcpcppcpcopcop 


Oi'oi ci ei c; 31 ■* rs si -#0 '*'*'* ci'o oj os'cTTiH'cj c; » cT -^crcT^ 

> ^ > > > > t- > >' I, > i- ■_ Sh :-' > > > > > >■ J-' > > > > u > >' ul 

000C00<^00<S0"W«0C00000*0000'«00=8 


o 
B toe 

c« C 

Qo 
be 


es 

3 

a 


jP5Ppppppppisjppcppppppp«pc35P3pcp;sjsjDpocp 


■^ <m'o CO »0 — 30 T- CQ ■<* CS jOcf LO iff 
.(N<N .C3— ^ (7Jt-iS>> -^OQIOCOCJ 

1 ;^' 1 £" s-| £ s-5' 0' y -s' i i "' u ts^t^ % 

ZOZ7D73Z^c/3 0fcO&H ►^,►^.,0 3 C/D 


— — Ncj-i<?i'*coa5!?t) 

CO CO ,— 1 OJ ,—1 

> *J ■ ^ *J > 4J o- > > J2 
0<j3cjo0u'^00i; 






ea«rtcs«c«'5rt(«rt'5rtcs'c8es'S«'c«n! 


>>>>>>>>>>> 


£i;(i;iici;cIcIcl£cC££a^cC£dIicIiDliii 


ciiciiialaiaiiicCDiiaicC 


12 


> 


c cs c 0" 0" 6" d" 0" 3 cT cs' cT c'^H cT 

S i S 2 IS ■£ s ".s S ".s § j£' '.H s . s ^' .i' t 

CUOa,OOOOO0-OO=:OOZO = = O 


Iowa, 
Eng. 
Ind. 
Ind. 

Va. 

•Ills. 

Iowa, 

Ohio, 

Switz. 

Cana. 


*5 

c 


ID t£ <£ tc" uT uT US* mT to oT «r uT « <«" uT uT uT ^^ /T »r 

.£ .E .£""""' .5 .£ .E .S ^ c _3 c c 3 c c c . .^r c -5 g c _c 
'0 '0 '0 « il '5 "0 "o '0 "0 '0 "0 '5 "o 'c '5 '0 '5 rS M "0 Ph S 5 ./'o 

«)X«)33tC(/;t/5t/3U;CU5t»CCcC«:001«I««>— CcCI'SccKOm 


•aSvl 


iC'CC>iffC?000000Q0iO»OC0a000Ot-05O>^-iT-' 
JO '>> -* C>J ^ *3 — ' •-- M r^ « ^ --J CQ « -- <N IM Cv? 


00^- — CCC0O£-Q0X)C005 
— 05 O? C*} r- -H -J? ^H ^- CO — 


< 

z 




Fisher, John S,, 
Fisher, John, 
Fleming, Samuel, 
Folwell, James D., 
Folwell, John M., 
Foster, Joel, 
Foster, Samuel, 
Fox, Columbus P., 
Fredrcgill, Christian, 
Ganus, John, 
Gardiner, James, 
Glenn, PVanklin, 
Goodrell, Mancil C, 
Goodrell, William H., 
Green, Luther T., 
Guthrie, John W., 
Hamilton, Joseph H., 
Hamilton, William S., 
Hanan, John, 


Hardin, James, 
Hazen, Edward, 
Houston,- Lafayette, 
Hubbard, Isaac S., 
Hudson, Charles H., 
Hughes, George T., 
Hurst, John H., 
Johnson, Jonathan, 
King, David, 
Klay, John, 
Lenehan, Thomas, 



loxva Veteran Volunteer Infantry. i2Q 



cog <n^ S -d S ci^„ n: ^.'^^ P- .o 



^" "•' ■- _i t-'T ;d r- - c! :— 



c -^ 



3.7^^00— :S 2, ^3 '73 •' bti-O T3h Woj 

-- ^_-■^^L. = C -aoS t: -Coo -ri-O 



o> 


,„■ 





p 


03 


z 


"* 


f^ 


>i 


y-~* 


^ 




5 


c 




s;§ 








^ 


rt 


,0 


n 








■-J 





t^ 




an 




(< 


5 




£ 


r; 


T3 


u 


CJ 


a; 












Q 


a 


Q 



3.t;-o■^^t!-C -aoS u "000 -rj-O •" 

^p:gad:^s&:H qq^ s qqq ^b 

rH — 01 — — o? — c? •-- c-"j I— ■?"( c>"> — T^ ■?? — I — — — CI — C'"? ■?> 01 — ^ ^ -^ ^ '-I '^2 ?2 :ri i:i 

7—1 .^-.— ,— l_r— t— Ir-I. — r-l _,— _,^,_|,_| ■^■^.. 

>■ >■ !_■ >■ > Ih' > !-■ >' v.' >■ t; !^ !-■ > U.' i: > >■ >■ >■ i.' >■ C ■-■ t.' >■ >■ > ^ > > !-. i-; > > 

00''^00™0"^0t*0'^cJc«0'^K;0000rt0=*"''^000000<3"00 

,— I — ^7 1— I — < Cf 'H Ci ^^ d "-H 07 d O -^ <?■? >— I — ' — ' -^ -H d — ' C"! Cl O -^H -^J ^J -^H -^^ -^H C* O 1— I -^H 

ocD ;0':0':0J0 ^ x^o -jd ^ ''S> :o<:bi:o xiOXicoxj^dco :ocd "^^p^p 0000 pp_ppo 

M — - T— I _ — -^ O ,-H CO CI i-H ^ C? — ^- CI — C7 — — I Ci ^H .— I 1— I _ CO 00 C7 _ -r^ -^ ^H -r-l 
4-J *-> Ci ■*-' ^ O *-' * J-* -^' -'-' — h; • ^' o U -i-J 4-J r-" 4-» * cL._0 i—* _Q Q- ^ ■*-'■*-' '*-^ ^ .^ Xi "*~^* ■*"' 

OjoJ o_zJ o^^AqA^-^^ Q op xp^A-^.t^ A^ :o_^ppp>^K&hP_o_ 



m 


(U 


«j 


V 


D 


i> 


(U 


■ii 


Oj 


1; 





HJ 





'U 





<i> 


U 


u 





u 


CU 





OJ 





c; 


ZJ 


CJ 


K 


aj 


<u 


<U 


<u 


aj 


D 


OJ 


<Li 


(7! 


rt 


C3 


oi 


r^ 


rt 


a 


ni 


en 


rt 


rt 


rt 


fr^ 


c« 


rt 


rs 


rt 


rt 


rt 


rt 


crt 


n! 


rt 


CS 


rt 


rt 


rt 


rt 


cs 


CS 


a 


n 


13i 


rt 


rt 


ri 




> 


> 


> 




> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


























































































i-> 
























































CIhCU 


/^ 






&H 


2h 


D-, 


p_l 


2h 


OiO-, 


3i_i 


O-il 


2h; 


a. 


!:1h I 


Ih I 


^ 


^ 1 


2h1 


2h Ph (In (3-1 ; 


2^ ' 




iiP-il 


in 1 


2^: 


^ 1 


i(0-i ecu 



= >^S^2^^0^>S^0 2 00.0 2 00 MOO ^O 

c/T c/T vT w^ yT c/T c/T '/> oT tc' U5 eft co en r/) u> t/> «j c/"j 'X ^y; t/i ■*-* c/s t/j c/d 

CCCCCCCCCCCC CC .C^CjJ^CC^-CCCC-gCCCOiUajgO 

■5 '3 "o '0 'o '0 'o "o '3 "o 'o 'o s'o '0 .r.o "o 'o ?^ "o '5 2^ "3 "o "o 'S o^ 'o o o o ^^ o 5 

uD.n«>c/)'J3^c/)c/3c/:cc</)t/30^c/)0^c/)«3Cc/Jc/:Cc/:7:o:fy3'U[or/)y3Q OO 

ajuuoj(Ui»!uuuiuuyDDU4jO'u<u;Lr'i'u;Lrcjuuu>a)<UD3jj^-oo 

aaQQ;::iQ3QQQaCi:^SC)^':oQa^Q;::;^QQQQy3QaQc3fca.cQca 



Ci, 



^x 






1) -co 



fe > ^ rt S g c ='— >-D c^J=< c c EC 2 = j: cfl^f^ > cl3^ o ,H 5 ou~ 
S -5 5 & ^ 2 5 -^ >; S <: ^ .'-§ ^ 2 ^ p tg g Q c c S 4i F ^ ^ c ^.:2 iT^ S > 



_2J ^ i04-r c c X -a r1 -^ sxit: ^ n s ■" .j-- ^TV, S = £ S,"- ^ _r 3 = c H ^j- " ^ 2 
(u ^ o 3 ;^ >,J« >i3uH>JHLSJfrt>5^oo5=tf«o^ K.5 i caw i>xxx ort^=*>> 



I30 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



^j 



U 






U 

^ 
^ 



ft^ 


















260 



_ -I -^ ^ ^ C,-} 

C I- o ^ --r :r ;:;' w o 



<*-. 


r- I. 





.S (U 


V 


..'^J 






a 


■SCO 


-1 


3 . 




E^ 



Oi O 05 O 05 Gi '^ 



> > > 
000 



> > > U 
O O O rt 







T— 1 T-H T-H -I-H 1— J -^H ^"l 


<«-. 


y. «, 


0000000 





c ^ 


_ „ ^ , 






CQ 00 OT Gt' tC Ci 


cS 


5«J5 


rH . -?■? i-H OJ 


Q 


.S 3 


000 ^0 U C 



0) 1) lU <u 4; OJ O) 
CS Cd ^ C^ c^ 03 Cd 

iii (li (i CLJ c£i (£i Ph 



;zjV Ic'^ •'S'g S:S 









■3 o. o 

3 Q 8 
g '^r a 

gap 

"^ c5 <*^ 
« '/3 ■' 



E 'S c^ 

3 o 3 
3 2^ 



tf7 a c3 
2 '-a 5 

C3 O r- 

£ 2 '3 

•5;:° 



05 



tc c/} tfJ C/5 
U OJ lU (U 

^•^ c _c c c 
^ 'o 'o "5 "o 

I- 5- 5 tH 5< 

lU OJ C C« O! U5 to 
T3 T3 ~ <U *J 5J (U 



Age( 



c .E 

1 ,,y Oh !_ 

•S £ § ?^ 

cs c« cs lU 



£q 

c - «r 

C c i- 
<A o <a 



in 



O 



t-« ^ 1— ' 

o o ■*-' 

P, -t-^ tM 

tT =5 o 

a* § 

« 5 ? 

fX SfH S 

-B O s 

"= O S 

t r « 2 

IXi o o 

■r O V, 



•d £ M 



a ',1^ > iJ 

o S '-' •" 

o §3 ^ a 

13 «>.: o 

t; a 00 

O M I-H 



^ 



3 

< 



o 



W'S 


•- 


T-H 


<»p 


a, 






< 

<u 




t« 3 


T3 


"a 


"cS 


ts 



?2 
Jo 



?3 

1^ 












bfi 3 



^S 



O 



"c/2 



,S§ 



<« ^cTo'cT 

CJ Ol OJ T-H oo 

b u ,-• -£ ^ 

CC u C CL C3 



(J t- t- (J 

C OJ c5 rt (U 






CO o? 

_ ^ ^ 
id rt rt 



cj (U C c« « 



" i: b " 

a> TO TO gj 






1) a; (U <u 



>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 



PH(liaiCUiCUCLiCL(Q-iCL(PuiO-iCliP-iCLiCLiCuOH 


Cana. 

Ind. 

Ind. 


Mo. 
Iowa, 
Ohio, 
N. H. 
N. Y. 


w 


00 
'2. 'S. 
00 


• .2" 

=;0 



O 3 ' 



1) *i O 



CqQoQQ 



OJ 4) 

3 ..S 1>" 

■5 f< a"o ;= 

<, 3'^ ^ 

«i 5ii <c o 

oj .t: — i> 3 



3feH . 
„ 3-x CO M . 



.I' 3 = 



i'— >p t: p 



!^ 3 



^'fcA^ 



^ EM o' 



3 <u c iS ■« 



' O cS 



7^ M 3'^f^ ^ 

-a (u lu to .5 ^ - I. 

^ ??£^ t E 1^ 

m pq pq fiH E ^►H, J hJ J S Ph 



o 2 



. o 



■ J OS 



*-■ ^ "-• -3 .3 „ < 






'A -H h b. 



0) o 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 



131 



^ <AA 



> ?P 



O "50 O 

■o 7""! 

•-T '^ aj 






ti ' — ' 



CO . 
ID O 



-C •;:; 



?0^ 



■ ■" 4J 07 Q _^ - «> 

?, ?* "C 0> C« !_■ O 






n.D,iio 



^ -o '^^ '".,"'« 



^ 2 £ £ 2 2 -0. ^- ^- S 






-J-"- ^-r rt 



^ „ t- C« r- 

<! .^ '7 "O '^ .^ &H-a Oh o 
•- C 'aJ 2 •- ■ • P ° ° 'aJ 

Qfai^^ Q £ £ £ £ Cci 



U 



fc^ 



3 

a-rrj O^-" Oh 

o p o .« p 





. 


,^ 


■^ ^ 





C (U 




T iZ) 


u 




CS 


^W 


Q 


SS 



! "-^ 0-? — OT i— ( <?J C? 1— ( C"* 1— I .^T 1—1 u-t ■■— ' i^^( 1—1 (.V 



CO 'J - e» (M OT) 



1 1-1 T-HO ^ 

CO C-? CO 



>~,u>o'M>u>>u>o 



CXo0J™O<U""O<U'— iu0ll30<U'*iU0<u 



> o > o > 
O O) O II o 

2Q^;cz 



u^ 










c 










<U 


hn 


Si 


c3 
Q 


c 
■5 

SB 


3 

a 



000 CO 

V- :; ^ cOrHsss ,-i' 

O U CJ o 

000 o 



00 



•g^'J Ji_!JWCA3COC/3C/)73£/2COCOC/3C/3^^^UUOU(JUUOOUO 

r^toT3T3T3"(io"S'S'aT3T!'a-a-o'f':S5:S£toto'0'0-riT3-a:S'£:£5 
*-^ i-H o^ CQ g-i 1-1 i-H .-ic?i?je < ?o3coco^^ioioioT-<i-i(y;c^eo co co -^ -^ o 10 





Va. 
Ohio. 
Iowa, 
Ohio. 

Iowa, 
Ohio, 

Ills. 
Ohio. 

Ind. 
Ohio. 
Md. 
Ohio. 

Va. 

Sctl'd 

Ills. 

Mich, 

Ohio, 

Ky, 


1) 


c 

'00 


OO;5OMOfqOOmOOOOOS0-,S(2.OMOOOOCL,pqO&.O 


Age. 


C5-^-^OiOOlO0?'Ml0C3OO'*lOC0t-C0iOW-^J>C.JC0 1OC0iO00 00O 
CI 03 CO Ol C? M 01 « CO CJ 0? CO <?? 0? CO W CJ C'? 07 OJ CI G^ CO C« O-J 1-1 (J.-! T-t C* 0? 




132 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



"TS 









iT 



r" CO c* 3? 



ti) 

3 

CO -^ 

' ,^ o 



-^s^ 



C C ?i 



O O O CI. 

73 T3 TJ S 
'i; '(U 'gJ P 



o - 5 



o ■ 

6 33 



-^ 
" ?2 o 

— cu 
o" -tij 

3 u oj 
<^ ^ '^ 

m u c ■ 

« C/3 OJ 






be 5 



O 

r-" <U 



*j CO cc 

cS . <u 

. !- >'^ 

u S! rt 

. > «= lU 

, ^JJ -a g 

; o Jo 

I t: in -a 



^ p:$aOQQ^QC^O 



— o -a 
IS "^ f 

— . C rt 

-a .- j: 



— ^^ 

IE « 
c o 




c 


l-H 


CI ^ 


— 


— OJ OJ -H 


« 


.^ 










CO 


50 






















.3 n 


^ 


*- - 


•N '- 


- r- .. »- 


^ 


„ 


ni . C/3 






-* ^ '^tl 


'-' 00 rti 1— t 








CO :: 


2 r-H CO - or - :; 




CO OJ -^o - ^ 




-ro :: :: 


^ « 75 




>~.o 


A ^ A 


" r-' r-' " 




u 


Q 3 . 




ca n> 




(U C C ti 


c 


1) 


Sl:^ 


a 


ISQ 


^ C3 

I—,,-! 1—, 


Q»S,^Q 


1 — . 


Q 



c 5 



^a 



CI £^ t- oi o i- — ti t- ■* -^ L-- T-1 "* GO Qo o r- 
o y o 



^T^ t~ ,-ic- 



ZO 



OZZZZO, 






>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 

j: J= ^ ^ 3 3 « -r; •- ■- •.- -r -r -r -n -r; -r; -r; •.- -r -j; ■- -^ "n T -n -r "S 'C "C! 

ot^oo^SS^ &.a.CLia^aiCLa,e-iC-,P-iCucus^ti.a.o-,ci,aHP-iPH&HP-iFu 






o « o o . .00 



o . 







•aSv 






.5' 

'C 



OJ 


CS* 


.5" 




.2" 













1) 


OJ 


1; 








o«ca 








H-l 


►i( 


3D 


^^ 


OCKt- 30 


CJC8^C4CJCOCOCl 



cj p rt cS I^ cj ^^^ 

' CO — , UD IX O c/; — ■ 

I o qj O O — ' O 1J 

: ,0 , ?: ° O I'r O is c« 

I z: ^ — £--:^ -^ c ^ g^ o 



^ ..£ - ^ ^ 

cj Ctf ^ CQ c^ c^ 

yj CO ^ t/3 c/: t/j 

O O c O O O 

ca~ cf « O O £ O O _0 



-:^ ^ .^ ^ O 



'CLOPh 






if tT ^ 



u ^ 



— ^ — >^3J 



C/5 






'<-. 



c ■ 

01; 
a! 



U S ^ ii C a; . •: .- 
K -u ^' -^ ^' - - ' 






> 






^:2 oT 



:j 



= r. . ' o 



u ^ ■- ^ ;::; 



p e^ A J , 



2 t« o 



1) 






"-1 


- n 










•^ 






n 


^- 


p 


3 rt 


ci 


> 


u 


UUQQ 




ii^ 



o ^ ^-■^ 

•^ 3 > (/3 

GQQa 



iovja Veteran Volunteer Infantry. ijj 



"O • • " ci .S - 

§ • . „-g >, SO of ^^O >• 

■2-" . ° °^ ^^ § ^ E^ >-^-^ 

' c" ^ >" O o ,"% 3 P ^' ;5 P • T rn ^ ^ '-^ C _2-:p 



' Q c c ti t; 



S i; 6 



^^^ o^ S -^ S^-^*S — o SSo. ;£-- c'^-c 

oS"-" SS ° - OiU")PO aig; OOq^O rty oo» 






,—1 ,_, ,—11—1 _T— I 1— ItHt— I-i-It-i-1— iC-!,— (r-l-^0>i— IT-H i— it— I,— (CO(?"Jr- OCCI,— I 



iT 


oT 


aJ" 


iT 


oT 


n" 


•u 


flf 


a^ 


oT 


(U 


iT 


iT 


«r 


oJ" 


0)" 


iiT 


cT 


aT 


iT 


aT 


lU 


HJ 


a" 


aj" 






oT 


aT 


iT 


V 


ar 


cr 


1? 


<u 












































































rt 


rt 


B3 


CS 


nS 


rt 


cs 


c« 


cj 


C3 


CS 




c« 


rt 


cS 


rt 


05 


rt 


rt 


c< 


c« 


cj 


« 


ri 


rt 


(t; 


m 


ctf 


ci 


rt 


d 


c« 




a 


Bi 


n 


> 


.„ 


> 


> 


.£: 


_> 


> 


> 


.- 


> 


> 


_> 


_> 


> 


.t 




> 


> 


.S 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 




> 


.> 


> 


> 


> 


.iC 


.^ 


_> 


> 


> 


> 









d"o"..o ocf o'cToo 



>;s "^ ci c s ^ s s "^ ;H 2 s -a -^ 2 -g 2 s "^ -a :s s :s :c 2 '-S "-S s u ;=^.i ".s g s 



c c c c c 



"' ,OiU00000 1''"<lj"o-S 1'' f" 5?!''"'^'^ 



3 bjobcbj]W)iX)> > be c cs_2,2>rtc«c«^c23>>^25=*.2rt — 

^;^Oz:5?OOyoOOOOrtrtO— 000rtO00-^0hr^rt«000-^0-^ 

OC-,^mQ ti: :O-/)OOC;OOC)OOMPHCLi0H::;cuCLCLO CL, xiO OOcua.C H O0HO 
■■-I ^^ o;i o^ -N ^^ CO ?T> th T-H 07 CO •TO w 03 o^ 01 (>> oj e<j oj -T-i c-^ -rH ^H ;o ^^t; 07 ■—I -^ ^ Q-j c>i CQ CO 1-H 



Sp:<i 



.w 



J .<: 



cOi c J r-' . 



c W c^r ="^ S ■" ^ "iS 'iS ii ^ 13 . ,ii lip -- - ^- 5 o o o .^ J^ g 5 ./T « --r >. c 

:^>:5^'M--^^--^cciJiic'^«t!^£^-^'^'^S^'^^~o^?:.i:o'Ci 
^ r^rS T:cscs«csrtrtaJuajrrr::.coo3C3oaux;ct.j;;-j;^(yjj--_o„cs 



134 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



>t 






Cl^ 



s 

^ 

^ 



^ 



^ 



^ o CO <?* 00 oi 

- •- ^ 6 •.'^ '^ 

•c >^ « ^ ^"^ ° • ^ 

•3:5^::;^ o^-r^c«t<^ ^---tu) o 

T3 -a — T3 r ) * r ) ■" u "u ■" c "o -a cj .13 

& & "s ^^ -3^ -s^a -s T- ^s,^ ^ 

I I -? 1^ 0^ -Ji^ - 5 ^Jl -g 

otjSui; CJU300 3 —ooC 3 

Q Q ^ pa ii:5 ^^^ ^ ^ QQ o: ^ 

^H^-'i-HC^-'— lO^-rtOi— l--.C>^^Hi— I^HT-HT-H-rHCICIW-^-^i— IC'?'— It— l-H-—!,-!,— I 
CO CO CO CO CO coco CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO 

ouo_o^u„ou_,oooouu___oou_uuoooo 

Q Q Q >1,Q >£,P >!l,P G >£ ,Q Q a Q Q Q >S,A>^Q Qn>ii,QQQQQQ 

t-^oO -^c-'o' t-'^t-'c-^^ ,-<'£> t-'f- c-^c-Ti-rT-rTHt^ocTt- -^1-^00 c-^t-^t-^c-^ 



O C IJ 

£ i ■ 

(3S to C/3 

p 3 . 



Ctf E '^ 



12; > 



>>>>>_>_>_►>>_>•>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 

u 'H 'u 'c 'u ih u, I, 'c 'c "c n 'c 'n 'c "c 'n c 'c 'u 'c "i^ 'c "n n n 'n 'i^ "C 'n 

&^^a^|3-l&^|l^P^ll|C^&^P^P^|l^(l^|I^P^pHP^^PHC^P-lPHp-(C^^&^&^iXfi^ 

. o' o' o" o" c „ . - _ £ d o" o' • . . . o c. 6 . . ^ 

■a ^5 2 S '.c g -a s^'S '^'■n i; "^ X S o o -^^ -o o o j£ IS 5 iS '^' •^' § >^ >^ 



^ 



iuo 



c c 



c c 
o o 



.2 > ?; > S -2 .5" bc.S' '^ 



_ c« u - "r 03 ca 
o :r; o o o — s 



a)^^j-<J5c/)^4>(u^i>a)i^i^aj4>D(U(uvQjt^ 



fl \ tk\ n\ 1— ■*"' r/i L^ rx 



^ V <U O 



p-,OOocaoaHOPHOOCL,e)O0HaH&.CL,cL,CL,CL,;^SooOOcueL,&^ 



Age. 



^l 



\A 






.= JTU rS S !r'"^ r- «.G 



(U >- •- .5 -n ^ -^ •£ K «J -^ C 

||.^2sjia-g-5Ui^g 






E o 



.73 



rx: .ti 
i o c 






c c c c c 



13 ? C 

K ^ 1* 



if .2^ 

j« zn >; » N 



.^ F 






>>>>; 



> > > . ^ . . . 



bi 
I. c _ _ 

■e Is .ti .t; 

.S ^ jzj: 



o o 



loiva Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 



135 



te O 

ij T3 -a OS 



o 

rt c/I . 

.- .22 ^ 



o «* 



r: c c 
O 3 3 
O O 



Q b b ^ ^ 



■^ 01 c? ^ -- — 




^ 


CO 000 


0= 2 


a 












T! 


TH'* X ^ ^tM 






00 10 Toeo 


a £ 










"__,""" 




P 1 


0) C E 1) (U 1) 


•' a 




Q 4i,AQ Q ^ 


43 


1-H 0^ 07 -^ T-H -^ 






CO «5 


(u a 







a « 


C 


t- -^ 00 t- t- -r-l 








T— 1 1 — 1 r-1 




[ 1 


- H c - 


^i 


C3 

s 


^AO ^ 


<^'$£ 


"3 




E-. 


1) 0" aj~ iT «r oT 


II 










cS cS cS OS (3j n! 




•-^ 


>>>>>> 












■U :- u. -^ u u 






CL, Dh Dh &H Oh Oh 




as 














•0 . • . • 




_i 


T3 to "O -a 


c: 


M 


^:z:= =^s 


&s 






es ? ^ c« 

U3 _ O O ic 

o .^ v< "Jl o 

CQ CQ r-b !_ Lfl Ctf 
U3 jj 1) CJ <U « 
OOntidOOO 



•t; a, o) S 

I" hC - ^ ^ o 

I o:^ g 2 ^ 
•- ii o c - 3 

f- o o i^ s^ o 



id a 

a o 

2 « 22 



■5 •= ^ 

S «> aj 



a '^ to 



fe 5 'S 



■5 i- >-, 



o g O 
in o -< 



* Si =^ S 
5 °'.- 3 

o o U o 

o .5 a o 

2 2 § c 

nil 

.2 ° J o 

a ■s d " 

O C3 C3 <t. 

Ml 
o w ft 



^ 
4 



>, >. < 



U 






J2 <3 












<< 



00 23 



o. a. 



a, 
£ 



O 






2 c 



QcJ^ 



of 

into 

erv. 


^ ^ "^ cc ^ 


xH 


: ■* 


-rfi-'i'-^TtioQ-^-"*!'* 


» -.O 10 


- 


. 


cooocooocoo 




■ 


• ^ 


., ^ - 


to u-Ji 


CO to CO of 


. M 


^1"^ 


» CO ^ 05 C^■^ 




07 CQ W « C3 




; <?? 


07 CT (M OJ C<1 fM 


a='^ 


U U. i- jj i- 

c5 a. Dh CL, 


• « 


• C3 


D. a t« cu oj D. a. cih 


SD 


'^«o< 


:§ 


•^ 


<<^<<fe-<-<'^ 


c 


^^^ vi-^ m 


■ ^ 


• ■^ 


^^.^.^.^-^^^ 


"*- ti te 


CO CO 5D CO « 


• CO 


: 


cocococococooco 


c " 


'"'"'" ^ *" •" 






•"-•-•"'-'-•^•^ 












1) ^ - 


;r; S^oT =s^ 


1-H 


: 


COOOCSOOCOCOODCS 


-i bfi i. 






. c* 


C>! C( Oi C>7 T- 01 CQ r<l 


^ cr 
ho 


5 5 « tj =< f 


- • 0! 


• u 

• C3 


■- '-^ r, ■-•^■-' •" ^ 


^ ^gO^c/: 


:S 


:% 


gSiiS^^gS 



.:«: 


c 


iT 


iT 


oT 


iT 


iT 


nT 


a;' 


aT 


aj" 


or 


aj" 




iT 


<u 


«r 


aj" 


oJ 


«r 














































c« 


c« 


efl 


« 


rt 


cS 


rt 


Ci 


a 


C3 


rt 


C3 


rt 


Ri 


cS 


CT! 


« 


C3 


0:^ 


^ 






> 


> 




> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 




> 


> 




















































u 


1.1 


^ 


^ 


Ih 


u 


^ 






Lh 




U 








u. 




^ 


!^ 


Oh Oh Oh 


Oh 


CL,OHDHCUOHeUCL,0L,CL,a,CL,OHCL< 









■aSy ' 



;z;aH^So ►ISO 



^ • u 
o -ii 





D.c«' 




H 





.5" 


L4 


C3 


n 


C ^ 




00 



u 






ni •r' -C // U <_ 



^^ -^ = := ":^ ^ ^ s ^ ^ ^ 

O U O fe fc^ E K ^ t4 hJ 



" , p CS 






t- E ni c 



s^-^^Sk" 



5 ts 



OJ 1) 

OnOi 






Oi!co 



c S 



^^ 



136 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



1^ 



s 



t 

<; 



^ 



I 



"o ^'' o^ 



" „ o ci 

OS — . • P 

OJ J= 01 g ^ 

>^73 p - CO 



'C/3 



^' V :^ 



t^c. 



r-T J' 



-w r,M 

U^?'". 



-* bn 



' k> -w" be oi; 
r 5 b b£ 

1 c3 be « !/) 

; CI, 5 .ti ■" 

« V3 CL, ^ 

; .?.? a 












g u — :^ "3 
c/5 X £- o bi) bb.i 

ii ^ '^ > C/5 c/? ^ 



o ■ . . ■ -a -3 — 



5 _■ S "^ _• ^ -* — ■ I^ — -: 



o c 



S cs 



r S be 5J CQ 



— — « 



« 5 v; o P- P- ?^^ 



=S i^r^ -' 



bci^ 



u ^ t-, 1- V. u i. 

^ n b 1^4 b [jh Q^ 



^ be <u b be '^ O 
(J y rt U i tTU 

EC .CcrTW .C .EC .CG .un 

ooOoc* . . 000000000 -j^o 

■— u '-^ u I- ■— u u '^ u i~ :- •— u u •— ■— i- 








> 




c 







0) 


V 


L. 


/; 


3! 




'/i 


::) 








H^ 



■ "* O T-^ Tj< :c Tt< • 






L OJ« O Oc^ ci-re-^^O-g-;; 0-?C-S-?C-^0 ii.— O -^ — O « — 

z z in z s c 2: s < s ^ z ci. ^z ^.:z fc; ^z ►xz < x,:z [l. Z.Z s ►:! 





. 

















^^« 


^^ 



i— ' l.f — I '-' 10 Iff IC ^J ■ 

O fcO 






(U ^ !U O (U u 

liLiOfc.OfaO 



fc.O 



> 



^•-•■t.i:ii.„UDo5Ji'i'i-'^<i'3ju(U(ua;<u030C0C000 



z-> 



^ . ^ . - . o ^ . o" o c o" . o* ? 

F, "^ ?, "^ 'Pi "^ ■? (tf T3 ■" ■? C •- T3 — 



C to C o' o' 



£ -g g -^ •£ ^ S rt ^' •£ s g :s "H X ^ ^ ^ -a'-c g ^ S "^ "^ ^' _■ ^ =«• s 



^ W U3 -' tS t/) ^ 

'-C ? o >. 5: o ^ 
p; q cs P p n ;: 

caoo<;ooo 



to C(3 

-2 p i 

ra p 

t« ^ 

00 



_0 tj 
C2 O 



esO 



Age 




-52 S § 
bey€^'& ^'rS £ 

a 1; Ji 7^ -p t! "H S 
o o beu ? o^t; — 



MS 






j= ^ x: u 3 






Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. ijy 

'-' •- "S o e5 Sc u^^ ^ u S -- ^ o P >. « >.p >, 



f,^^ "^U.> ^ S,.^ 2i.>.^ ii ^ S)^ 2fc^ -o^ ?^ l-o V c ?i 

S .^ ^ c GO -S D..> 5 o-,^ a. CL^ bj3 ^ £ .jj - ^ ^ ^ 5 o ^ o 'ii 

_ 0. = _ E . £ Co ScEEC-tl- C. ■"• CyScTSC 

y-Oi^COO-aJOrtCOcsP '^O rtO nO ej SocSUW 

i ^&H&Hl^faCufafaQfahbfa h^^ QDh ho- ScL, E-QfLihSh 

— '' oi — T-i'-T^"^ ^ ^^ ^" o .^'^ r-T^ ^ rH,-H,-rrH,-rT-r,-rrt,-rr4 ^,_rr-r,-7 rH ,— ' ^r-r ,-r 

O-q- ooo— - ooo D-— ooooooooooooouoocoooooo 

■T— ii-Ho^^j/T^^'CTf'— ii— (,— (^Hio^Hioioio-T-H io~io T— I lo'ic i^'C wTt— I — cTio'ic »o"i— I'lo'ic'io 

oOo---- jjo-------- Ou--^-'^^v: 'uoir'u'"-^-- 

OZO feO ZO QO:rtO 



^J^_^^^ww^^w^^w^w-'^ >.>.>.^ ^.> > c ■* "* ^ ^ S: ^ "* ■* ^ ^ ^ ■* '^ ^ ■* 
-C — ■£ :5 £ '5 ■£ "S 5 ■£ 5 ~ 5 ''- "^ '^ '^ '^ '^ '- '^ "'- '^ '^ "^ *'- '- '^ '- '- '- '- '" ''- '=-• '"- 

c cT o" c - o <=' = . S £ . d" . d^ c £ ;>i -s" d" E = c 

O „- d , ^" rt ri - <'' 

^£« = 5.f £. ^ ^ = £. . .2 

(U3>qX1J-3 :_o3 i_ 






« o 


« 


_ rt 




^ ^ 


^ 


^ ^ 


S ^ 


p - X p - 


- «r p - - - 


- . . 3 p , 












3 •: 3 


I- 3 


O 3 


^2 
















5 i-o 


fc.O 


t^O 


DO 



= d= ^ 5^= P £ E b^§ E « "^£ ir^-H ! ^r| > p-£^i.^ £■§:§ £^"5 



^3^ 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



o 



« 

f^ 






c^ 














§ CO I^^ > 






« 






5:r • »? c^ .0 
















CI, - 






■» - -° -A 1— 1^-; <» HH 




CO 

< 


i M 

6 6 >^k 
U U-5 c 


p 

. 
.0 

OJ 

> 

d 




ed to K Co. Feb. 1, '62. 
Corporal April 10, '62. 
fever, Pittsburg Ldg. Ma 

nee at Shiloh. 

•ed to K Company Feb. 1, 
ed for disability Aug. 5, '6 

ed at Corinth July 11, '62. 
g brain at Wapello, la, F 
ed to K Company March 
llOih 111 Inf; re'd to Rtg 
fever, Keokuk, Jan. 25, '( 
1 at Shiloh; died April 27. 
ec 16, '62; re-en. Co I 8th 


-c3 


^ 


'.S 

^ 


i4 i^'^'Z'-^ 
2 S Sg2 

1) ,2" c <u 


2^ 




v-' 


!- n — — u 




^ ^ 







'-H iP c S <i! 


• c 




S-a 


5 cl^.^ = 


Trans 
Pro. 8 
Died 

W'di 

Trans 
Disch 

Disch 

Died 

Trans 

Enl'd 

Died 

Mort. 

Disch 




<u 


cS rt ^-' -- cs 


rt 




iip 


C-. ^ :? H ui 




te of 
t'r into 
. berv 


? p 


p p p p op p_ 


p-pp yD;p p-^pppp'-ppppppp 


p po 


r-l -H 




^ '^> T-( r-i '"' 


^^^ 


PS^^ 


> > 


> > > > > > 


>t>>>>>>>>0>>y>>>>^ 


> > > 





JJ 


OOCOOOOOOa/00<UO:2000 


000 


= :=) 


ZZZZZZZQZZZZZZZZZZGZZQ^^I^ZZZZIZZ 


■_■"«) 


»coo:scoo:ooooooooo:oo»ocoocooo?C'';ooooo 


o.S fe 


" " 


" "" ., ' ' *" 


-.,,..„„_„„„„,.„_, -, „ 


" " " 


o — 


T-ilOiOlCiO'-ilOT-H^ 


_1 T-l 10^10 CO iO 10 lOlC in T^ OlO'O r-^ r- r-i 


T— 1 ,-i ,— < 


C3 r^ re 


'— * 


r- 1 T-< f-H i-H 


^ „_ ,_, ,_ ^ 0* ^ ,-1 ,-1 »-H 






> - y - 

- - - aj cj 

ZOGO 


. - - ^ - >-"-^ "*^,- 0^>.u, ^ 


.- - - 


P Of 





ZO QO POZO 




-^ 




U D 


K CJ <U (U !> li 


ua;<uajDDiJiiD<uiiiiv<uoajxi4j 


U 1) 












rt 




a ct 7i a u a la 


«cacSrtrtc«c«c<i:jcScScScic«cS«rtc« 


^ ra cs 


Pi 


> > 


>>>>>>> 


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 


> > > 


u s- 


Lh '.., t. 1-, V- 1_ l, 


•^U-l-i^S-. UI—UI-LhCuI- *■""*— ^u 


'— '— u 




cua.cuQ.CL,ixa,a,ci^a.Q-cuc.^a.CL,(i,ji,a,a,ii<CL,CL,D-,3.a,£i,Q-,a,D-t^ 


i' ^ 


c 


nfO d" 


6 .6 ■ . . 6 . . 


r^ 


z > 




^ZO ^ = 


Ind 
Ky 
111. 
Ohi 

Ind 
Ind 
Ohi 

Ind 
Ohi 
Ind 
Ind 
111. 
Ind 
Ohi 
Ind 
Ind 








aT n 


oT 






-f 


cc rt 5 cs c/. « 
g ^ fe s ^ 


iT re rt n « 

^-= ^ & 2 ^ 


cS 


^ 


^ 


■3 

(U 


= S 






' «5 s 


C(i 




•tj ^ a. ..J -^ _, 









00 <:cSo 


t^^t^O fcOwO 


PO 



Age 



ran. o 



> 



^'<5 



- 0) o) ' ty:' „ H— , i: 

luOOOSrirfai 



5j § £ cA! ' 
,- cs cs > ' c g c .5 



c u 



""Cii £ 



C o C 



!S^SS:SSSSSSSSzzoa:e^c^ 



Iowa Veterafi V ohtnteer Infantry. 



139 



o« . '^^ 3P 

©j . <^^ oi P c^i ci 5^ ^ Ir 

10 c f^^ ■" ,1^ r'" IJH J; -^ C ,1^ cT 5! ^ 

^^ -^ -a 5 222 52-^222 2^ 

.H _' S tT O -a xj -a > '^ 2 -u -rs -o .S -S 

c ^ ° i '^ « * * — — ° 12 « i;S c c 

^Q O Q Q HHH ^^ Q- HH ^ ^ 

cooooocooococoooooocoo<ocoooooooco 

-r-r^T-rT-ri-ri— I i-Tt-h i-Tt-t th thth i-Tt-i o ^h o o'l-^'i— i 1— Ti— > t-Ti-* o' 

O O >' > > > > > > >' >' > > >>>>>>>' o >' > > >' > 
(bUOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOliCOOOO 

r-T -th' lo" 1 n 10' io~ ii^ i4~ -^ -*" io .-h" cff T-T -7f' o' ^ cT is" -i^" -rt' -th 1-^ ^ 

Cv( C? IN W CQ 01 0} CQ r^l 7-1 r^l■r-^ Oi C> W t-h 

d u ■>-'■ ^' _; :> ^- > > ^ 6 ^ > 

rt^cSc5c«rtr;cSciK!(!Sc3i3jcSaJrtrtrtrtrtcSrtc«'53ra<'i 

"jH 'c "c "c "u "u ■C 'C "C "c "C 'iH 'C '•« "n 'C 'n 'z, 'z. "z "c, "c "c "c "c 'u 

P^CL|CL^|lH&^pL|PHP^CL,P^PL|Du|D-|CS-Q.Cl^C-,Q.a^D-,CHQ^DHO-P-lPt^ 



C C 



'X tn "O "O jj "O _£; •- 



— C C u C 



c -a rt j£ ;= 



C o 



0;^eL,PH§i>c:;Cu0^t:^>^bii::ODHO 



<j. c «3 c: 
o ii 5 tJ 

E ocihO 





•7: hX) 


6 2 

Si. 

t. 3 " 




« :ti 


tS. 


uo 


CUtHM 



60 









w 



0) ^ 



K^' 



^ h-5 



be «i 



75 (LI 






5 E^\-.5 ^- 



^ % ^ .' 



o 3 S J:5 E 

Di Di CO 73 73 C/5 



HHH 



«:^ ^ O 7 0) y 



c 


'-ZT 


r; 


c! 



1— 1 


% 


c 


c 


rt 


ci 


f: 


C 














ii 


aj 


^ 


> 



= > 



£ S 



> o-t:> 



^^2 o .2:3 c2 E 






^^ 



il^i 



*- CJ o 

a . tS 

g O ft 

^ c S 

<u '« g 

t^ ^ — " 

.2 O a3 

CO 

S "^ M 

O OJ « 

• ^ CO 1-5 

S -a ^ 

S S s 

_2 ^ a 

E 'S 5 

^ § 2 

5 ? ■? 

ca 5 * 



i» o ^ 



2 'O 



QJ O 



S a (i 

o " 2 

M ^- ^ 

$_ --o %. 

o lo o 

§^ I 

•5 o i: 

■£ OJ O 

S £ a: 

i (U ^ 



3 a S 



! o !5 . 

' ^ o c 

' 2 a; o 

O s N 



£ 



o o t« c 

S ^ *-) *^ 

.1i o >-> c. 

- o' " a 

g = CO « 

"^ 5 5' c 

O M '^ 




^' -P J3^ 






.^ CuPhCl, 



^ 



o . 
,^ "^ 1^ c 






3 Q. 3 



Oc^O 



cs O 

5^3 



i^H 



^ 2 ^ 



i4o 



History of the Fifteenth Kegi7neni 



^ 



^ 



8' 













dJ 


iT 


oT 


oT 


oT 


oT 


iT 


"0 


oT 


iT 


cT 


iT 


<u 


0; 


iT 


oT 


oT 


iT 


iT 


oT 


iT 


oT 


iT 


oT 


oT 


iT 


iT 


«r 


iT 


Oj" 


rt 


s 


rt 


(« 


rt 


rt 


t« 


« 


rt 


rt 


-•« 


c< 


rt 


- 


■« 


rt 


C3 


c« 


CS 


nf 


rt 


rt 


C3 


c« 


rt 


rt 


rt 


Clj 


n) 


rt 


> 


> 


> 


> 


_> 


> 


.i 


_> 


> 


.i; 


> 


.i 


.:; 


> 


.^ 


> 


> 


> 


> 






> 




> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 





CAJO 




Ky. 
Ind. 
Ohio, 


B 
C 

Ph 


N. Y. 

Ind. 

Ind. 

Ind. 

Va. 

Penn 

Va. 


Md. 

Ind. 

Ohio. 

Penn 

Penn 

Penn 

Ind 




0) 

u 

0) 


Oltumvva, 

Drakeville, 

Ottumwa, 


- - — 


i -. 




Centre Tp. 
Ottumwa, 

Green Tp. 


Adams Tp. 
Green Tp. 

Centre Tp. 



•3§V 



CiS 



<j 



C/2 C 



3 3 

pa 03 






o 



-a 



(u « ^ : 



4^; 

oj C t;;; cS 



2 ' a; p S .^ ^' ^' ■/' y J; X i5 jO 5 D ^ . - f > > 



u S « 
0) cs hi 

o — O 

Ph •'- — 

:% rH 



1) := 



'-'-' — — -" - ^-c -35 = 6. '■'?'^ 'C 

^ i, ^ 2 2 ^ J g g - » ^^1 - ^" g- 2 - 8 

paMOUOUuoouQww&H&HpHOOOP: 



O 3 

l-H |Jh l-H »..M l-U 



(U J^ ■_ 
_'< O 

J2.E .- 



E^i: 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. i4i 



sS P » S ^S 



CO D«tO 



CO ^ 


to 










'^ico 










o ^ 








'^^t^ 


" „ . 


<:o~ 




JZ 


Co. la., 

ns Ben 

Dec. 2 




c» 






1-1 CS 






" 




1 — > 




■J) 


pello 
Milki 
bility, 


- O 

^ r 
•7^ <= 


o 






Wa 

ver, 
disa 




c 

3 


O 

a. 
•- 
o 




nt. fe 
rged, 


II 




U 

-a 
1) 


-3 rt 


o"^ « 


C«i^ 







c: "^ 


7^ -^ 


£ - 


n 




.'^ — 


-o o u 


u -a 


rt 


^ 


O 3 


.Si-a.:£ 






o 


«, O 


QQQ 


ao 


Qd^Qj^ 






o") 



OS 



I? OJ 









c3 o!^ p1:o^<^? I-" "^ 



. t; D ^ c X' -^ 



1) -i: S "^ 



J2 .- 



^' 






cT 10' i-H o' i-<^ "5 30 th !»" o to'i-Ti-To'T-r o T-T-^' ,_7,-Hi-r— 'cj'^'~'^0'^oooiiow.,— lo^-r-T-^ 



-Qc 5?^c bj3_y-.a>r- ^-Of-^5^-^.C-P=-? 



bD 



^ o-i '» ft f>i "^ '>i o^ •* -^ '» c~i w w OT CO o"» ^ — 'i^ 'Ti 07 ■* -r^ o> 03 -f ■« o"! 't" •-»< 01 c*"! o"! r>i 01 

aD'-^'i-^o'-^'"* oo -rH'co'— CO -rH — o — o -H~^o""'-<'-r^'cc ^ co ^^ :o th ao rT-r-Tco'rM'of th ^^iJ 

.^ T-( OJ r-1 .— 1 CO i-H fft OT -rH d O"? -^ C< tH '^■* Of iOJ 1— CI C>"( Of OJ 

^^SS'S = = = 5-«5S>5'S'S^=-SvCCc3-gc-S3-5crt=-g^-£^3' 



dp 


iT 


V 


iT 


(iF 


aj" 


ir 


oT 


iT 


oT 


oT 


iT 


V 


oT 


iT 


«" 


or 


<v 


oT 


a? 


n" 


<v 


iT 


oT 


iT 


c' 


aj" 


cj" 


iT 


„ 


V 


iT 


iT 


iT 


aj" 












































































rt 


rt 


zi 


rt 


cs 


rt 


e« 


cs 


rt 


« 


rt 


es 


?i 


rt 


c« 


rt 


rt 


ni 


rt 


cs 


cs 


cs 


CS 


cs 


cS 


cj 


cs 


cS 




cS 


cs 


cs 




cs 


-3 


cS 




> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 




> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 




t- 




> 


> 


> 


" 


> 


> 




> 


> 




> 


'■' 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


;_ 


^ 


.„ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


t_, 


«^ 


^ 


. 


;_, 


i^ 


.__ 


^ 


'— 


Ih 


I. 


._ 


Ln 


^_ 


t„ 


L. 


J_ 


!-i 


u. 


u 


t., 


L» 


1. 


_ 


S-, 


_ 


•„ 


u. 


'_ 


'^ 


fl, Ph Ph Ph Ph &H 2u 


Cm 


PHPH^PHdHPHP^PHPHPHPHPHP-PHPHPHPHP^^PHPHPHPH^PHOHPH 


r^ 



0.c~ rtc3~ .CcS.O cSCo 

;= t". •? i T3 ^ -T3 5 i T3 -^ -q C ' 



J£ j: V J= i "^ 



•- >: 



o ' c c c « o .= ?; o c -^ ;=; - c ?:; o ;=: o 



H„ Q,„ '"'-d.iT -> d,- di_' cL_ri-_- 

c^^o u o aoua xo uo ^o ^'^^ mo 

CSiC-TH'MOa)C03000aOQO-*CO'*^05010— 1-* ^o^ooigooc^ojooosiaco O; 






^ If -S .^ -.3 ^ -5- 5 -'T^H -^-?£-3 = FFi=«^-:Sc.5j£^i-3£3^?i^:5° 
^^.UJ Liih-UjS2OP.0iPiPi;2iPic^PiPi;p:ixxxxxc^y3X.HHH>?^?^?^;^ 



142 



History of the Fifteenth Regijnent 



1^ 






^ 
^ 
« 



^ 



< 




W'd arm sev. Shi ; resg'd Corinth July 8. '62 
Fr 1st Lt repg'd Holly Springs Dec. 35, '62 
Promoted Captain July 8, '62. 
P'rom 2d Lieutenant. 
Promoitd 1st Lt. July 9, '62. 
Frcim 3d Sergeant. 

Transferred to 17th Iowa March 1, '62. 
Fr priv. w'd sev head, arm & leg, Corinth. 
Pro Serg't Maj r Ma.ch 1, '63. 
Pro 2d L't Juh 9, '62. 

Fr 4th Serg't w'd sev. thigh Cor. Oct 3, '63. 
Wd sd Shi Ap. a, '62; pro 3d Ser. July 9, '63 
Died of ilisease at Corinth July 20, '62. 
Fiom 2d Corporal. 
Pro. 4th Serg'l July 9, '62. 
From private. 

Disciiarged for disability Oct. 30, '62. 
Pro. 4th' Ser. July 27, '62. 
Fr. priv. w'd sev. hand and hip at Corinth. 
Discharged for disability May 29, '62. 
From 4th Corporal. 
Captured at Shiloh April 6, '62. 
Fr. priv. w'd aim Shiloh April 6, '62. 
Fioin private. 

l'ran^ferred to Hih Iowa March 1, '62. 
Fr. priv. dis. Oct. 3, '62, for w'dsrec. at Shi- 
Froin private. [loh. 
Pro 1st Cor. rnh Ser. 4'.h Ser. 3d Sir. 
Transferred to 17th Iowa March 1, '62. 
From private. 


o 
o .£ 

3 3 

£ 

o •= 
B be 

c< C 

Qo 

bo 


> 
u 

/) 

D 


Dec 1, '61 

Nov 1, '61 
July 9, '62 
Nov 1,'61 
July 9, '62 
Nov 1, '61 
Dec 1,'61 

Dec 2, '61 
Dec 1, '61 


5 


o ooooo--o»pp»oppcocppocDjopocpjo«op 

^ 4-. .-_ -^ Ojj'J>4-.^04J>4J 

O O QOQZO QOZp 


c 

CS 


■_:3C— ti .. u u C u i^ u '^ ^ i^ 

^ ^ aj (u ? -^ u C >- ^ i' --^ ■-•- ^ ~ ~ ■-•'-•-' --^ o o : OOOOO 

^ J ^ _i -^■( o> _ _ o! TO cc -t< -H -H ic lo r-H -r? -r? 00 -TO -f< 'ti -+ 'C lo "O CO o o 


c5 

;z 




C o'">h' C c" rt . cf C o" C o'^^ ^.-Sh' Co" rt ^^ 


43 

o 

c 

a: 


Clay Grove, 
Keosauqua, 

Danville, 

Mt. Pleasant, 

Vernon, 

Keosauqua, 

Danville, 

Keosauqua, 

Denmark, 

Pilot Giove, 

Denmark, 

Danville, 

Keosauqua, 

Pilot Grove, 

Keosauqua, 

Keokuk, 
D )ver. 
Keokuk, 
Bus. Cor. 
Keosauqua, 
Clay Grove, 
Vernon, 
Danville, 
Keosauqua, 
Pilot Grove, 


■a§V 




75 

w 

< 
z 




Richard W. Hutchcrait 
John P. Craig 
John P. Craig, 
Hugh G. Brown, 
Hugh G. Brown, 
Newton J. Rogers, 
Charles W. Woodrow, 
William P. L. Muir, 
Amos D. Thatcher, 
Newton ]. Rogers, 
William C. Stidger, 
William C. Stidger, 
Perry A. Enslow, 
Carlos Hicks, 
Perry A. Enslow, 
Charles Cadv, 
William M." McCiary, 
Carlos Hicks, 
James W. Henry, 
William W. Glanville, 
John J. Wilson, 
William Clark, 
John J . Wilson, 
George Harbaugh, 
Morris A. Lane, 
Melvin Sweet, 
George DcHart, 
James N. Roberts, 
George W. Toole, 
Solomon Holcomb, 



\^ 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 



^43 



■r^^ 



o 


c 




■s, 


^ 


r 


yi 






c 






:3 


o 


— u 


U 







O -?„' 



i2 oi 


h-1 


'"' o 




_f:^ , 


-r 










■-^xj- 


trl 


>>tu 




.ti Ph 


CO 




CO 






^ o 


^ 


SO 


O 



5 -^ 5 It -a u: 

f= S k £ "^ 
5 o 2"g^ 

tL, fc, [i( tn > 



"o - 



- 1-1 a- 



U . 

p p 



o q 



. "?:/^ 2 j= 

' ^ « 7, :^' 

' £ I .^ '^ 
• O C "to K 



h'X U 'H 



(U 


a; 


7) 


c 






'-; 


c 








<. 






C 


■fi 



o s -c 
.- i— .o 






. jj _ ^ 6 '-/3 5 
) pco ^ oo t; T^ 
• c ti .- f< k> , o 

; :_ — J " O "3 . 
; Q .Sf' 5^ t - -B ? 

5 " £ - ^ -i 2 a 

- oj ^- c — •- X '., 
: I i 5 o V. ,£ r ' 

: £ ^ ^ O H ^ H 



i p o 



w 



•J -T3 






ciiG; 






I T-H i-H — I CO -^ -rH ■ 






u u tj o u 'J u _, o 'J -J u o i- o o u _Q •_) u -J cj o -J u u ;; -J u u -J u u o u o 



' -^"^ ■-■ -I*' o' CO '^ cf 



C~> ^ C( ■ " CI « I 



l-^-^C<JO'^r^f-0)->-i,-(X>G0'-l 
OJ W 0( CQ OJ CJ O:* O^ ^ C( 

/5QC kX^OJ^; O &H S O fc.QZO zo a O GO z o 



U 'J U O -J ^ 5 « « « I « 



oj aj !< Oj 9j 1- 

"^ c: w rt cSjifS 
> > > > >^ 






c-cLc.2.2.aHci,(iHD-,CHeueL^i 



^O 



'>aJl>ol> 






-c o' 



o'cSniS' 



= cj rt o >H cs 
- ^ ^ t:. ^ i. 

a.°UO Z^ 



rf «' 


ceville, 

t Grove, 

sauqiia, 

ville, 

sauqua, 

ville, 

do 
er, 
Vladison , 

Grove, 
sauqua, 

do 
kuk, 

Madison, 
sauqua, 
ville, 
-le^ton, 
kuk, 
ville, 

do 
on, 
ion, 
ville, 

do 
ceville, 
ion, 
ville, 

do 
«auqua , 
tiose, 
kuk. 


3 ]j 3 „ 


. rr I/) cr 1-' 


303=0 

a 'r, rt T "^ 


■/■j t; i/j I' 


5 c 






UiS^C 


Q-Pni^GLiiC C-U.rj'-j!, i^&:,t:dQOt^2 0>C! aH>C! t^S^ 


1— to OO CJ t~ 


COCOQO— ^^C»lOa)^Q0-t<-HO30C"JQ00000'C0O^<r"JX C30""* — CO eO C5 O) 


OT CO — — CJ 


— ' CQ -" OQ OJ 0-1 — 1 Oi — C.^ i-H 0? O^ -*l ^ CO CQ T-H T-H C* (?J « « — ^ <M 01 Of-*'-" 



^ 



a 

:.^ US,.; 



ShJ' 



. -. ^ 



d a3 






tllll^i 



iiUO 



iJ c 



■n 5 5 



£ ■= ir ;- -? .:^ W 



•" — -as 






^ 2 5 - t 2: 






— 3 C ' E . 

O 2 o f' >^ 

£=^i?3-^ 

<: m ca CQ CQ aq X d CJ u u U U U 6 - G 






2 'i^ ii c O 



— •_ tS 



-5 LI C O O 3 _3 

qc:C;QGGm 



144 



History oj the Fifteenth Regiment 



o 









> - — I o 

o -^ _c ^ r:: 

rt kr- O O C3 

-j ^ -" -a .5 
1/ 
- t. u 

..ECS 
p p c: cfl O 






O 1) 



o.S ^ 



O O IJ 



I- 



^ otT 
.. oi 

S :^ 

Iff 

^o ~- so >■ 

' ^ .^ ' o 

. *j ^ 



>■ O 



O 






'/J 5^ 



•S?irt o 
~" . CI,-" - 

-— rt o ? .-. 






CO 

d o "* o 

Si 



73 



Ch^; 



o -a 

u v 

-2 ^ -o -a -t: '~ u2; 

t^ i« _c ^ l- ^ i< 

. c o 'J . "a . 

O rt u; _x O _!> O 



O) CO 



C/:>^ rt 
- o^ 



7= fe-^ 

■^ to TS 

C C ii 

rt rt — 

hh5 



£D 



■^^o;OwwiC^o^oo»ooooo' 






rH^T-f^^t- — i-(Oi-h050— ■ 






— •/: ! :^ r^ " 






>- 4J CJ i- > > 



_lirtooCtjr:; o-j 



> 

^ 



s 



^ 

^ 



u 


Ij' 


iT 


iT 


iT 


iT 


iT 


0/' 




3? 


iT 


ar 


iT 


(■r 


iT 


iT 


t' 


nj" 


iT 


iT 


<u 


af 


iT 


<u 


V 


V 


V 


V 


, 


a' 






























































t 


rt 


? 


> 


rt 


rt 


> 


> 


rt 


? 


rt 
> 


? 


> 


rt 


rt 


rt 


> 


rt 


rt 


> 


rt 


« 


rt 


n 


rt 
> 


« 

> 


rt 
> 


rt 
> 


« 

> 


rt 
> 


u 


;_ 


_ 


•_ 


u 


<„ 


1- 


^ 


^ 


•_ 


u. 


•_ 


L. 


u 


^ 


u 


:_ 


i_ 


L. 


'_ 


\- 


•_ 


•_ 


•„ 


^ 


L- 


u 


.„ 


u 


u 


p 


Cj 


2h 


^ 


^ 


^ 


Ch 


^ 


Ch 


r^ 


Jh 


^ 


C-l 


^ 


Ch 


CL, 


c 


%^ 


^ 


Z^ 


Z^ 


'^ 


%t 


Ch 


Ch 


^ 


^ 


^ 


?-l 


P-i 



^.t 



C rt aj S C 



u u u ^ 



id". . ^ o 
. ^ o' -d '^'r ^ 






'■^- ^ o - 

rt r- E ' 1 « 

3 .= O -^ = 

cr o ^ OJ t^ o- 



"o I— ' .rt -I rt i; — 



^ rt^ >> ^ ' I '-^ -^ 



:^Lii 



0.3 rt o-^J-^ rt j;^^gg-> I 

oOOO^COEOo'o^Oi.i.CO 
i.D-ri>i>rtl;rtlii.j_a^UDrti^ 



Age. 



c^ ro 7( -^< — I 



•7) 

< 
;z 


1* • - ./;►-. 




.^fso.^ p 

f^ c^ '6 





tjc^rt 
^ 


•=iJ< i-r' E.- p_ 




0^ 




■ — 


r-" C 


> 


^e 


^ U .' 5 "^ = c ^ >- 






ca -2 c rt 



r .2 -^ -^ < •■ J 



c c 
o c 



^ E 

rtn:> j= 

3 - O 

^ iT ^ I— . 
X = 3 - 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. i^f.^ 



So5 






•5 <^'» 



<J H 'ffl iJ -w 








c 


C5 


3 





1 — 1 


^ , 


-a 


rt 


(U 


o> 




CO 


c« 




JS 



i-i=^^ 




-n -a 






■a 






3 ™ C [^J (J -O ^ ° 

1^ %% % °-^2-o^^ u o ^-^ it^^.£^^g -15 lis 

>" tool o OUj-— 0^0 O <U was O^'aPoOnO oS~ (B^ 

■^07-^T-l-.-l-^— •01i-lrHi-H^--l-^T-l-^C»:jT-H^C<J(M^-l^-^i-lT-HTHi-l -rt"^ .^ T-H ^ i-H CJ't-H 






! T-i d i-H CM i-H <-' ^" ■ —-■--, . — -^ 

> „ ^ t>^ > ^ > ^ ^ ^ 

" " ooooo 



z 


^ 


,0 




:^o 




cs 


,^0^00 


- 


r 


" 


►fi,^^ S Ao z 


- 


' 


- 


- 


QO 


' 


- 


Q 


- 


fcO 


> 




> 


> 


> 


oT 


if 




> 


iT 


oT 

> 






if 
> 


> 


> 


> > 


ij" iT iT (iT cj" u 

rt rt « rt n! cs 
> > > _> _> _> 


> 


> 




6 
> 


> 








oT 


47 

> 




> 



t« C O ro . 5 O of . C 6" ts rt" o' . rf n • kj 

= ^ - 3 § ^ § § i i - 5' >~ cT «r « 2" of 
SSl^^SSS S^g S8^£SSg8§8S^g|g lilgg £ 



11 



146 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 





So = 




















= s , 






to 




1 ^ " 






^ 




— p- ft 






u- 1 ^ 




^ ^=§ 






>. ^ 




_ •' 






■3 >> 




5|5 




c/5 


•—1 = 

5 t 




Z ^ t 




oi 


c p 








<J 


« 


•^J 


1 'S =' 




S 


< ^ 


;5; 


3 'e «) 




w 


w '^ 


■»^ 




c 


oi 


[1, 




5 ■" a 








Ql 








>> 


C 1 


2 "S'g 


^J 




"S 7, 


N-^ 


(MOO 






u V 


1 


— ^ 


^ 




5 r- 


1 


'^ V ^ 


^ 




> 






V 




(U •— 




^ _2 

■O J3 «! 

a ■" -a 
53 « 


E? 




to I« 


J^ 


> 


•^■rt*-^ -jfl (N-*-^-* 


^ 

u 


111 


*, 


■|l=^ 


jpoco ococoo 




C5 P 


«-. 


<S c: —^ t-' GO '-'"o" 


^ 
^ 


•5 5 5 


^i 




CJ 07 CI -rt ^ 01 '^ « 
S- > !- _ 


^^1 


5 
^ 


Is:^ 


S = 5 '^ oc«5 




^ 


. 


'M ■* (M tC C>> 't* 0> 7* O) -^ 07 <?"! 07 i-H C7 -^ OQ -^ ^ Ol 


« 


c: C rt 


Qi 


>*-■ ti «> 


ppcpcpojrpptcoopptpoooisopp 




6 ^ p 


U 




=f -* ci — T ^' cT Ci" QO t-^cs cs" 00 ^' 0" 00' ai ■y£ ^iri^ 


V; 


*t, rJZi ^ 




S biDt^ 


71 ro c7 ;t ^ -r C7 ^ c>? oj ci i-H c7 If « 


1 


r; 00 •*< 


^ 


ri c n 

Qo = 




*i "S 




mO 


1 


^ 


DQj^(ua^aj5jajoajoj4;(uajaJib<3J<unriri>ar 




.^ c3 ■ 




c 






S 


cj 


.■3ci.-acSc«rtrtrtcScSc«rtnici3rtrtrtrtt«rtrt 




■;;; +j ^ 


Pi 


c b .- .- .- .- .- .- .- - .- c .t - .":; .- ~ i ^ .- .C 


.?j 


3 92 — 






^ 










S 2 P 

:c' = 

S =s 
2 = 






2^C-(eHDHCl-|l.CL,2-,CHC-CHC-,CHCuCH&HC-,Q-,C-CuDH 


S 




. o'i! oT cT 0' >^ c « c 0" 


^ 






»s>* 


S|| 


52 


?^ 


CCS rtcniCC nS 


*^ 


^ 


2^ 


2S, ^°^52 r-SS- 


■*si 


"ll 


-t^ 




■So g" ^ ? "Sc^ 3"^ "Sd-^ "So , -^ •= "5d = 3 


i 


1 ^^ 


S2 




•~t:^ 


m „ 


"^j 


P5 


3(U HI JJ 3<uaj(U3l'33o^£3IU<U 


^ 




N 




pq|^ t^^ Cq ^ t^ !:<: CQ fc«i CQ 73 i^ t, 03 > tii 




Age 


30QOorocx)a5QO^cioo-*oio-*^oaoot-9oao 




CO 0- c S 




T-^T-iMC*— '^■^C3'-'--^OC<JC0CQO7 — — CvWOTt-^ 










£2<S§ 






1— > 




g •= <tj <.- 

» -3 lS 
° C- ° 

g CO '2 
•S - ■=' 2 

5 (5 M ^ 

> 3 £ 






|=-?*-illlii-illfli^|-l^-l 




-a a = 






■^Sai.-033J=^j=J5o--=t«<iJiu •- ~ 




§^ 2 






<McafflB3M£oycj(jyuuKC>ffia:3:3a:a: 



iotva Veteraji Volunteer Infantfy. 



147 



^ S^ 



u CO 

Oh?* 



~y^ 



^-a 



w 



'-^ ^ — 




UJ_ 2 


u 




_, CS 




11 f; CI, 




tu. 


rr 




•aoO 


H 


^O-o 


hr 


ox-H 




-oS° 


W 



500 ^ 



^ Ttl -^ -^ (» -* 

O CO CO "^ CD O 






^ J5 X) b b b 

plH-fan [x. 2 <^ ^ 



Oi 1-1 



O^ O" ■^'' W GO 
^ CT '"< »— ' 



TO C C C3 « -Tj 



3ocoo3PppcDcoco»oppcoppocppcDpcocococooo 



jOcooc~oc>?ooooOGOor — 

C cs <A •X^ 3C3S. cScSrt 



'7-1 -n OT ^-( 1— O ■— O? 5Q CO T-i 



CS 


sst:< 


1— , 


^ 


rt J 


' ss^ 


< 


sS 


%% 


< 


Jh 


s<s 


<^ 


Q 


1—1 


s 


UH aj 


oT 
> 


vate, 
vate, 
vate, 
IV ate, 


> 


> 




<u" iT oT iT 

c^ cd cj cs 
> > > > 


> 


if 

OS 


> > 


> 


Is 
> 


aT aT oT 
rt rt u 
^ > > 




> 


if 

> 


> 


> > 





.2 ?* 

ol 



(i.-=^0 



* — 5 5 ° ^ 



^I^-;5J = 



o 3 



D3tid 



' S^- - 



o "C o 

aj t« oj 



O 3 O 3 DO 

S-On! 33<S^^^^i;C 

!- tob'o'Co =1: 

3 ajaj^ajao; ^3 




;ASS^ss6ooE^ 







si 












4J 












7—1 






CO 






c 






.c^ 






CO' 












'~'CO 




CA) 


i- T-H 




^ 


^^• 




X 


-* 57 




< 


OJ 7) *-■■ 




s 


^-oS 






^?i 3 

aj . a; 


^ 




r; , , -*^ 


:*• 




'V3 ^ ^ 


« 




^ D.'^ 


^ 




rt CC G 


1C> 








k/ 


— i-H — - 






> > > 


^ 


QpD 


3 


"ii 


IZZ'^ 










• 5 cr' 


3 


^ 


o.b 53 


o'o 


1 


n .S 3 

pa 






u u 

000 














1^ 


J»! 


cT c~ c" 






S 


OS 


cti cd c4 




Pi 






Q-DhQ. 


<?i 




cS tS k! 


?^ 




UOO 


^ 




-^ OJ 


■»^ 




CJOP- 








•o 






>W 


a; 






c 
aj 


-a 

, 


•s 


TJ 


fe ^ 








0) 


0'^ 




•3§V 


CO 05 !>■> 
C^'J 0? ■* 






. 






nf c 






p 




c/3 


^ ^ t- 




w 


>~,o 




s 

< 


t« cS C 






z 


fJSH 

1 s^ 



14S 



History of the fifteenth Regiment 



^ 



U 



fe 
■^ 



o 

^ 
^ 



J ? a £ J= '-S 

U ^, 2 <u '^ ^ 

■" ^ - J= J S 



o -a 



•^ ^ 
•_ I. u, L. 

t, |JH £1, t- 



p. re T3 
:S J o 
5 d^^ 

u :_ u 

fa Ph b-i 



O -" « 

o -2 ^ 



'_ -a 

»o . •' 

. CJ — »o 



£■-. E 

O «i o 

I. ■ - I- 

faOtlH 



■a »o o 



.:^ 



CI' 3" 

p< 

-.' o d 
S — O 

c _ c c . 
O ?> cs o o 
- t> ^ ^ ^ 

tL, ?- H &H CU 



u- 00" O. 



bio ^ 



' o 



'c ^- =« ■;:: '-^ 'Z ^xi-n ^ - 

P "O) - '^ ° ° .^" P ° .li 



e of 
r into 
Seiv 


pjoppp^popppp'pppopojspoocpppttooooep 


00 x'"x"'*^x'x'x"x'oo<» CO 00 x"x'x'adx'x"!30~x''QO ^xToo go 00 x x'x x"x' 


Da 

must 
U. S. 


ooojroooooooooooooooooooooooooo 



o.S - 

c4 c 2 



O O O jjh' o o o' o o o' o' o' o o" o' o o" o' o" o' o" o" o' o" o" (^ o' o' cT o 

o Ao 



^ 

^ 



^ 



I 



S-. L. I, U 

i-OOOOOOOO 



■ ■ • ^ j: £ ^ -e „ ^_ ^ j3 ^ j: j3 ji: -c ji: 









c "5 



o o <u o o 



C E C J£ ' 

■o ^ -a 1 .1 .1 _;: „, ,„ _ ,^ 



S = 

re ^ 

HO 



o o 

y % V ^ V ID ^ 
-g « -o JJ -a -a -g 
H O 7) O CO c« H 



Age. 



00<MXC?0C5'*l— t-OiCOXCST-iOO'-'CiCO^^-t-lCOOQ-^Xl'-i 



JCQCJ-^-rH^tiOST^-^gOOJC'l'cO ■ 



aT P -5 .r q 






QOj5^-OjS2 



c ^ — . 



c/> C 



<u o t JS - _ 
^ •- « 












005 . eq coi^ 



:a3 



U 



s- 



3.^ g 0^1.0.^11111^ °>°.^ 



re > 






5i>' ^>'-' '"•- 5^ 



M 






3: g ^Q ^ O W 1^ ►2,C 



toiva Veteran Volunteer Injantry, iJfQ 



ta 
to e» 



ej«2, 



^S ^ ? . • C> ^-J 'SD - " T, 

^S g^. o - -g ^o p^- _^^ g£^ 

u -^- o^ ^ ^ -■-: ^^ o>. H.s': 

COS §^ o^^:2 :^ -^ ^ >, 15 ;S "^ "o £ ^' 

2f^ ::^.^ ^1^^ 1 ^1 ti si ^^" 

:^.s II l^-'n -^ «| as c| i|2 

^3= grt ckotu I. Q-a ^-o -.^ ^'^■n 

.>^ r-^ >^x- ^ yS ^-2 >S? 2t>cfe 

^•n '^l SS^.S i ^^ 1^- ^^ o_c- 

• Dtc >'00>' i« ttfc^ Ot« -O!* (Ut/irt 

&h!jh QQ ^OhCu^ Q HQ CbQ ^Q a^H 



f^ 


' _ 


-C 








;io 


. a 




T3 


o . 


% 


ih 


o 


o 


:^ 


£o 


U 


Cl. 


c _ 


W 


> 


S2 


o 


,s^ 




QJ 


H 


c"^ 





1-1 (?} I-H 

pop 




O"? C? -- i-H C^ — 1 Ci — -^ -nH 0"i C-7 Ol Cv» >-l W O^ e* CO — ' 1-1 

O'»oo»0':oco5o:o'»ooopo;0spppo 


GD'aTao"^ 


^ ^ ^ ^ ooo . 


^ cTc^^TD GO sToocT a5'c»a3'o~o cfcT o) 00 c^cf'?* 0^00" 


o-g o 


dj o 


-S-go^ -g o-g o^ - c-g= ^ §. -g. 3. S 


i-H M — 1 

p p ?p 




0? -H (M ^ OJ ,-H (MOT OT 01 T^ O? !M OT -H 

p 3p op«p ppopp p pop 


o'x^o" 


ocT 




tj 'S t) 


■So 


Feb 

Oct 

Jan 
Oct 
Feb 
Oct 

[an 
Jan 
Feb 
Jan. 
Oct 

Jan. 

Feb 
Feb 
Oct 






a^oaji>aj<Ltajajaj!L)^<ua;a^i»oa>(U'uaj(u<u<U(ij(L»aji>(ui*'i^i>ijaj 



r* r* ^3 .*H .^ .^ .^ ._ .^ .^ .^ .^ ,^ .^ .^ ...^ .^ .^ ._ ._ .» ,^ .^ ,w .— .-H .-. .^ .^ .^ .— .w .^ .— .^ .M 

•2"iS !« '^ t>' '^' ^ ^ "P <^ o jTs-I o" . . «" o" c _ _ o" _ .0 

15 <u t« g - ^ j£ ?, '.S o ■«' o ^ !S =^ :: i "a j£ ;H '^' ■'^ 6 "? 5^' ;S g -o -o ;S 1; ' S s 



u 



5^= 



cs-.-it-— itoosio^-rHSiGoooo— i'*QO^-^ioO'X)30coO'*t--*ao-»'X)^THOoaj ^ 



P3 



-ai ^ c/2 -< g ^^ Ph ^ c- ;c ° ^ ^ c' S " -c .^ c/5 S > .. -= .0 1:^ « £ 5 :2 £" ^'^ 









^JO 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



>t 



I 



1 






-3P so 









:^ 'i^ 



cccc 
^ E ^ >' " 

;q'-' o^ 



. cT 
C/3 






bJobb 



J3 XI 



rt -a o 



cs o "^"^ 






5 > 



o 



bo C "^ ?c c 

cS 4J to — 



r;j3 = 'ii' 



•CI, too tuo 

0^ Q C^ C3 






[olS o 

•"^ ^ n: 
-= S-c 

C/5 •- 7} 

^ -o ^ 

c3 !_ rt 

c =« c 

._ JS — 

p "33 



« =^ 

\J3 a, 
^^< 

"'5 



4.; *^ 

-5 .2 



O^ 



8^ .S 



<2-S >■ 





. 





C 1; 




— V) 


5J 




W 


'^GO 


Q 


l^ 



CO o 



1:1 

o 



C>"!C3000C5X)C>7C>>O^30a)GOaDO5C5X' Q'^'* o o®^ O O o o o o o^ 

T-^T-lT-l'— I T-lT-ll-l-,— II— II— 11— (^Cfl— I-J-qtM,— l^^,^^^^^l-l 

« o o "S o ,« .q ,f^ o o o o i3 "^ o .t« o 



^z^^zssgzzz^z&nfcZ s:^ 



fc^ 





. 





c ■- 




.- uj 






Q 


.5 3 

OQf 






o ^o 



QO 






> > > > > 



>>>>>> 



>>>>&> 



>>>>>>>> 



).5j;'j OH o z ►S ^ o s fi. ^ o > S q^i^^^A?^: 



r>'^,-#^ft. J:^, S i-i O 



•T3 -a ^ '0-0 

o o iP 00 

dI^v. iuu?-s"^cU(L,Da)iuiuc- a)_-- 
«c: r-r-c CccccccC cf 

"'aT3'0'0'0'3_ TJ^ 

^ eo Ci 00 ■ 



- , >. . 






t^ c^cm5_^Jm^O 



3-0 V lo^ oj CO T-i ^ 0< ^ CO CQ CJ 0"> ev> -^ CO C< -Th CT CT 01 i-i 



p ^ K 



o 



£ £ i 

f' c c '-^ 

„ oj E -a 

face* 

_£-•-•- <L> 

73 bjo bUTJ 
.-000 

i;p::;x!i::i:x3:^s:: 



.^H 



— ' y s ^ 

„ O c - 

X; I. U (C 

cs rt c< 11 



>W 









^■^" 






1^^' 



s, 



= 5:Er^< 



o o 



C K 



^ — ^ — ■ w *- 



u . . c c :£:£<«» «fO n ii" bJD b]o~ o 



0:^ 



OXJ3 ? i- £■ SX C C C rtS^.= .= ra ^ 



o 



loiva Veteran Volunteer Infantry. i^i 












^ § <© ^ P >^^- « ace . CO ^ CO -^ « ^^ CO 



Ol — C"? SQ -^ Oi 1-1 CI -^ CI ^ C? — CI '^ r-i Ol y-* Ol-^ 

o»ooo =D copppopopooo S^3? 

o'oo' o ^acToo q q O O"' o o*^o2 0'^'"o'^''o od of qo'oi q co"-^ "go' o O o o '^^ 2 O 

•So-goo "S o-So-So-So-go/«o ««o 



C"> — ' 



-- -- — CJ T-^ '-' --J -H — I -^ C3 C7 CI '-I — CJ C7 -H i-H ,-1 C? ^-i C> — CT« C^ -^ Cl ---I 

»NCOiso:c»oO':ooopppp»pjsco;0':c:o«ccccppp 

OOi— I*"* T-4.— ,-..^,-iT-HC*r-lC"»^^-— " -^-^^H -^ t-H T-li— li— (^^_j_jC?i— 1^ 

9p_ 1^ ' ^ ' ' - ^h. A 3 ^ U.U.Q-' Ou . OiL. CU^ - O >^0 faO 

1- 'n 'H "H "c "C 'h 'u 'n "n n u 'u, 'H 'z. "H "c n "C 'u "u t. 'c "sn 'n 'C 'n 'n n "c n ^ c n u v 

aH0-(CHgiiCu0H&<0-iC-ia<C-iCLia<o-i0-iguoM0-ia4gLia i0-iai ajajeu2^cuCLiS^o-,3^a,awa-.e-i 

6 rt>^ . o" d >-(' . c c c !«■ d" d" . . 

O ^z:::;::SuSooJ::2:^ >i; t^L^a > S e^ &h Ph >5 1:^^ >5:g 0>S g 0>S>^ 

JJ-OT3 -a T3 .^T34-> "O 

- o o . . _ . 



oo 'O^ o. -=^.0. y^ 









152 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



.8 
8 

I 






i^ 



':? 7X >- <?i >, " 

Cf — i 2 5^ I— , £ 

• ^ _^ iz -*■■ 

U .? ^ '-^ c 1 

.*_» u ';r .— ^< A^ 
'^- Q O w , c/; 

iZ ~ •? C 5 C 



O cS o 



c 

O E 



o «j 1) o <u o 



o -i'l— ' -- « o> ---I « >— 



SP 



Xi 00 (M « 00 Ci 00* 
> •= > ^ > 



-- — d d ^- 07 -^ 



o .c 3 



O 






(L* Hy <D Gj il> O-" 
rt r: "5 cp c; « I 





D-, cu cu £ d, a- cu 


rt ^ • "^ 2" >"' .2" 
iz -r "^ • IS <u . '.E - 



5^ go ^ S 
O X O tsi o o 



u, 



c/: 



•i +a CO 
3 ft ■^ 

©OS 

7.=* 



3 ■< "p <5 6 . 

E c -3 ? E b 3^ 

g S J i^ £ .5 -5 



QJ 



cT cT rr' "^"^ cT oo o" 



•^ IE != 

2 ^ 3 

o O t- 
;;{=>« 

3 4) ■^ 

9 5-- 

CO q_, o 

«' I ^ 

S '£ -s 

5 !^ 'c 

C3 O — 

Pi ;= ^ 

S ^ ° 

3 2° 
5c ^ 2 

O S a: 

.^ — o 

« « p:; 

a a 2 

> 05 *-■ 

£ S ® 



o o S 



° — 2 

'5 ° •£ 

S 3 '"' 

= >S a 

., £ o to 

af ;- *j CO 

*^ c3 c! -- 

§ 5. >>? 



en 


o 








o 


CC 


O 










o 


o 


t) 


c 


E 


^' 


J= 


5 




« 


.^ 


t; 






Q 










S 


o 


J= 


u 


'7 


lx< 


"Z 


<^ 


t/. 




u 




"c 





7J 


o 










t 




D 


31 




^ 




^ 


ij 


s 


« 


E 




o 


o 


2 



N 



s 



is 






f^ 



-^ 



u 



bubUbDu 

3 3 3 Cu 


u U :^ 





O O i~ o'w"— o o lo'o'o" 
rr rr o} ^t :c " T- r-' c>> ■re "-I 



be i- 

3 c« 



^ : -S. ^ 



J2 JS^j 



iT 


jT 


nS 


iT 


iT 


iT 


<u 


V 


jT 


iT 


cT 


aT 


























c; 


ct 


rS 


7i 


a 


« 


« 


c: 


:^ 


« 


rt 


rt 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 




























u 




t- 








u 




^ 




L. 


OiCl, 


&H 


ctia^CL,CHa<iijCLiCL(Cu 


6" 




>* 


?* 


d 






r 




o" 






_r: 


OJ 




o 


^ 






<u 


1> 








O 


»::; 


'^ 


O^ 


" 




>^ 


O 


















. 






^ 


d 




y" 




O 

n 






^ 


H 




^ 




H 








> 


>1 




3 








>-, 


rC' 






< 




V 


" 


..li! 


c: 


^ 


^ 




c 










!S 




O 


o 




O 


u 


n 




0) 






-o 




4J 






lU 








i^ 




o 


-J) 




t^J 




bii 


t: 


J 




00 00 XI 30 


^^ 


XX 


X X ■* c- 






—^ 


■■-1 


■'-< 






■^ 


'^ 


— ' 






, 



hQ 



rt 3 



o 



n > 3 t/; 

►^ ->=: 3 C/3 > j: <u 



U 0/ I 



> 1) ' 



;^ o K ^ 



cis-^ot;3x-G=? 

i.t-cSS.cortOOliC 



X 


^ 


.:^ 


^ 


K 




V 


c< 


^ 


U 



Iowa Veteran Vohinteer Infantry 



153 






3 - 
< CO 



. D be rt O -r; 

< '^ r- = j: .;.^ 






05 o 



IX ., -SM I* - 



c *- o 



C -o 

O a; 
o) — ■ 



. O 

1- u I- u. u ■- 

Q- tt< CU fcn Ph ^ 



I 3 O ;- 

^ ^ "5 

o d o o o 

^ L- L. u :m 

fc. CU (X, CL, f!H 



" iP 



be 



bid = 

O u 



c/5 y. 



/»;j CO 

O 4> 



§ 2" 

^^ -T-l JLj . 



' O -^ a ^ 

O , !^ ^5 - 



■ X. .- 



^ t. 



<A-r-, 'f. 



-feU 






b^ 



iCO d.S •'■ 






c c 

rt O 
:-! u 

HC-, 






•~ ^ -y - 

- <U TO !- 

CU-r; .> a 

S 3 a £ 
o o 



■^ 5 2 



rt rt c^ I 

^ .^ -O 
^ ^ rt 

CI. a, u ' 

£ s: 



rt O K O O 



„ " > 



c D 



' CD O O ' 



, to CO o 



10 '"' O ^-T 10 r-T rjT lO LO^ T-- Ttl 10 i-~ L'j' lO ■^ 10 O -acT L-5 ■ 
OJ C-} W (N O^ OJ c-'j OJ C>! o^ ^ — ' *>! 

330303 0- 3uO--- uo£3jO-^OJ2 O^ O ^ O 



Zt, 




ocDpo:opop«5oppcpo:oj:!pjDCDjDp»pi:>'psocDcoo 


P 


CQ 01 0? i-l 


CI 




~^"2^"^"2^"^'~s's;rf^"^fSc^"c^'^"cf;^'j5^'^'^2 


Cl 




U :: - - 


- 


- 


. r ^ ^ ^ . . . ^ -g S ^ ^ . ^ - ^ ^ ^ ^ .= . 


c: 


i 









fcio 







c c: 3 3 '^ 3 

■3 -^S .H .i 1; a; 5 h h '- h 



. >j S "^ 5 5 



0) OJ u aj«o O O 



U U i- '— ^ 

00000 





u:j^ 


^;i 


01 O"? -^ OJ OJ 0« CO '^ IC 


10 LO T— ^ — O"! OJ CO CO CO -t< -* ^ 10 » 


Na- 
tivity. 






Ohio. 

Ind. 
Ohio, 
Ills. 
Ohio, 

Ills. 


Ohio, 

Penn 

Ind. 

Ohio 

Penn. 

Ills. 

Ohio 

Va. 

Ohio 

Penn. 

Ind. 

Ills. 

Iowa 


u 

(U 

pi 




t5 


"o 

C3 "^ 


Knoxville 

Indianola 
Knoxville 

Indianola 
Knoxville 


Indianola 
Knoxville 

Indianola, 
Knoxville, 

Indianola 
Knoxville 


•3§V 


1 S ?o ?b CO CO " <r? iTJ T-H OJ CQ 00 OJ OJ 0? CO <?* CO c>i 0? CO ?J 01 co o? 00 ^ 'i^i oj o? 



Z 



■33 ^r^ . ^^-^ .; 

-3 3 rt rt _^'-' S_-3-^. 



__ Cl ■- o 



•5 -S ^. 5 



I cs O O u U ■ 



C3 



^ rt ^ o ■ 



Q^ 



bc'- 



.-i M - -a 



"c -^ -^ - ■ 

^ r:, c ^ ^ 



UPq 



-^ 4-. 









■•ri A^ ^-. 



S i= 








.^ 


r. 






c/: 




aj 


•r: 


C 






■a 


/3 



rt 


T3 


^ 


r 


r^ 




<5 


CB 






2 


iT 


tT 


-D 





Z 


5^ 


r3 




y 


t« 


.73 

OJ 


>.o 


c« 


>. 


CS 


■s 



b/) u 
ra .J 

75 rc ^'g .7^ M 3 d: K M E w ^ 



. »r-l 


c 


pq •* 


^ « 




V3 D 


J2 ^ 






— i^U 


A< 


^■^' 


OJ ?J <u 


;i-^ 


-^3:^ 



12 



154 



History of the I'ifteenth Regiment 



"^ 



U 



^ 

§ 
■^ 



O 

^ 
^ 









c^iO, 



^^ 



SS= o^ 



x 


', o ^ 


^ 


30 u X 


Pi 


4;i:^ 


< 


C 5S <u 


x«^ 


w 


>-,-o'~^ 




k; 



"5^ 



M O 



. w o s^ 



oi 



o 

£^ 

o 






> . c 



^ u u ?- . w 

•^ ^ <U O C <>^ 3 

Ci .-i 



1. 



1; 

> - 









u •-; ►*• ^ I/. ^ Ai U-, »- '^ 

o £"0 



'p ^ 



fct'S £ .o £ o .5 



p ci 



bti 








3 




y3 




o. r< 




cp 




«±; c 




.^^'^ 




'. c c 




;:; . 




eb 1 
Cori 
-Te 














rj bco 


g 


1^ -C 


O 


^■? V 


i-^ 


15 *j 


'J 










S^^.i 




■^ca 


rt 


■^' ^ ^ 


^1; 


,0 .3 


C 


t 5H 


— 


T3 "O 





O o 



O O CS -O 5J 






f>^- 



SfaPifa -^Cu H^GCSQ r 



o >' « $5 ' 



'O C V o O U 1- 

u rt u3 _cA _x p t/. p rt 

g a Q £ a oi H : 



c o -c ^ h c 



rt T3 4J t« V- — "O 



accu; 



,5 "^ _Q ?i > 

3 3 . l-S E o 



o' o O ic L"^ L~' lit' Lo' Iff o lo It :c i~ ic It ic It lo 

"•? CI CJ C^ CI CJ C7 CJ CI Ci C^ C? C> CI CJ C^ C7 CI 



Lt It lO It' It lO lO -^ 
C< C? CJ M C^ C» CJ 



Son 



>>>>>>>>tj 



,z<:2zzzzzzzz^zzzzzzz2zzzzza 




o 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry /j-j- 



S COr-, 

-< So ,, *-* 



■ — ■ •,-' {^ OJ 

i- Za ^^ OcUtSCO _ 

o o n:^ ^- ^ o .- > > " • E 



o ^"' -■ r;^; ^ a b o > -^ c -^ 2 '3 " <" -' - S -5 5 ^ =^ ^ s z>' - 






o~ppo^otC'0':ocpjpo?oocooooibocD535oco55oo55oS'Oco 

io'l'j 10 i-f ic i": rf 1!^ ic 10 lo io icS ~^ 10 ir^ ifFyStntri )c^ ir^ tfT in <:o f^ "^ 10 ir^ ir^ "'^ i'^ iri^ ~^ '^ l^ 
<M oj 07 <?? c^ c? CI 01 d c-^ cj d ot CJ 07 ^H d a c^ c^ d in ot a 01 01 c5 w a d c-j 01 c? c^? 

OOOOOOuOOOOOOuOOOUOOrOOOCoOOOOOOO'UOO 

:g;z;;?;:^;^;z:Q :z;2^;z;:z; ^a:?:z:z;Qz:z;;z : ^^2^zzz:z:z:2:z2:Q2z 

<M CI CJ Of C"! C"* O? ^- CI d CI ^H T-H C? C! T-^ CI CJ C") T-H CI '— I ^H r-H ,-1 -^ -nH T-H Ci T-H C? T-l I— I C? 
*J4-.4_>->->J_l4J Ujj4_.J_.4_, >j_, -J >4_)4_. U4_)J_>4J-l->*j4.i _4->iJJ_)*JJ-Ji->4_lJ-l OjJ^ 

•J 'J CJUCJO ''J OUO 'J OMtiCuuiuoooouoCuooouuooiJuo 

ooooooqoooo;z;oq:z;ocqoooooo 5>o oooooooqoo 



iT 


oT 


oT 


'<u 


iT 


4J' 


oT 


oT 


iT 


oT 


d" 


oT 


oT 


■y 


oT 


oT 


oT 


iT 


tT 


V 


V 


oT 


iT 


iT 


iT 


iJ 


aT 


iT 


<V 


V 


iT 


"u 


V 


v 


oT 


iT 


rt 


rt 


■fl 


rS 


t« 


rt 


cj 


rt 


rt 


t« 


C3 


rt 


ri 


rt 


rt 


CS 


rt 


cj 


a 


ai 


rS 


rt 


cS 


rt 


nj 


rt 


rt 


n! 


n 


r- 


« 


c« 


rt 


rt 


rt 


rt 


t. 


> 




> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 




> 


> 




> 


> 


> 


> 


t» 


> 


> 


> 


L> 




i 




> 


> 


















































































































































CUQhCl, 


Cl, 


Oj 0-1 ij a< CL( 


2m 


a.cu a-Dn Oh 


Ch 


OfpininiPi^iPi^iPiniPi^' 


^ 


C^Ou, 


2-1 


CL,emx,OH 



. o' . • o" o' o" -^ 6 B 



.0..-000 rt oc C .-J-<->0.0..>-.l-l-.C .>- 

-d "^ 'p: tj '"■? ■;:; ■;^ t-; ^ •/;■;: ^r 6 ^ t« "^ r, ■- !S !H "^ "^ "^ "^ F. "^ ?, r> "o '?= -• » tj r, 



oT 


rt*if 


rtii" 


rt' if rt' iT rt' iT rt"~if n" 


iT s^if aji 














•-' 




n •- — •- ■- 


• - •- •r- 


> ^ - 


- c > - 


- c > - 


-CJ>C> C>C>Ci- 


^ , > c > - c > 


X ' - 


" a ^- ' 


- rt >< ' 


' rt^rt^^"'" ri >^ ^ '-^^ a 


' - >i rt X " ay. 





— 


— 


._ •- ^ — — 


0—0 u: 


c 


"2 c 


■a c 


'^2'^C Tjr- "Of^T^ 


c ^ c ^ c 


^ 


s^ 


^u>; 


5^^U ^i^^iji^ 


t^rt^ ^bd 


-^ If? X c"? d X' 


•»~G0O-^C0O0005O^-H01C0O130iOG0O7C">-.-J-'+ 


'CI rt --J C GO rt to W 


<M CO — 1 


C7 -* C"( — 


CI 1-1 CJ CI 


i-H -# rt i-H CO ^ -^ CJ CO T-H C) 1-- Cf Cf CI 0* C7 CI Cf CO -^ C"? C? CO 




IJCd"^' 



•^ CQ 



kk: 



yj > 
rt ^ 



t«p-o-SPu-=or:rt„ 



> ^■ 


g 


" ^ 




^■0 




U OJ (D 


aj 


~i; S")^ 


n 


rt — t '^ 


•^ c 




IL-i^ 



-S^ij" - F - «' = ^ -'^ .-' -' ""> o 53 >^ S c/- «r '>r 9 c « H 1: 5J i ** a L^ 3 

■> •> I c P -u o o ^ J^ S 'fc c ^ ^' 5 S >; = sr.^ 2 0. oj a; - ;5 C C -g f f -- ^ ^O 

>>g§^^|r2g5«-rt_c|^^iiSrt;5SoSSe^-Hi^.^rt^^ iSi 



IS6 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



'>t 



U 















o> 



CO 




-O - CD 

^' O ^ I- ' . . t- 

'^ >;•:: .iTr^ ■ ^'.t if ■-. ^ >; >;'"- -"^ >. -s ^ n >^ >^ t 

o .t; « -^ x: £ .n .^.t; .t: ?J .•?.- f;. 3 .ti =* -^ ^ •- ^ t 

'■;:-:z^ S'T' ^^ 3.— — i-r^niy o— ,; -^^ '^ ^-rz ■= <u 

— '/)«) 'j ™ O ''■■ S- '^ «" U3 »3 X jj «) o c 5 — "■' to ° 

^ T3 Cu'; •- £ -a >.,"3 t: a; -a T3 1« ,aj tj - cs .In ._ .5 -o t3 ,cu 

5 !=B o >^ Jj .- w)'^ bx) ac . ' be M) • .• tx^ ?. li ?, -c be ec 

-:«.--^_«05!«f-H"=*C-' prtl^^^^i-rt re f-i 

^-'f/}c3QO„'^'V^. c/jo^^'txiiu ajt^'~^ooo^^ ^ ^ 

^5 H s ^ £.p 5 £55 5_5_ 5 _ 5^ c^ ^p_ ^uo 5 q 

>— ' ^ CI "-l --H ^J -^ T-H 01 T-l ,— I 0> T-- — ' — I 0» — ■ — C"> '-< — ■^h"-,— ,— IC^J-^T— I — -Jl— I 

lo'io'oD ir^-i^Tf .c o fs'-rt lo rrj -|5^.rtH'-^t--'io lO ^ if:r--t<'-^ io~iO •:£ ir^ >o iO i^ lO 

C7 CI c^ CI Ct CI <>? CI CI CI OJ CI C3 CJ CI C( CI C* CQ C* Ct CJ CI C> CJ CI c< 

OOaJOa;HjOO"HlliO't,'.i'Ui'SOO'~0"-jajCC'7jCOOOO 

-^'— IC>?1— l-J-r-l-rH---0>iT-li— lC?T-<-'— l'-<^-,-rHi— 1^, ■^— I— H— I,— II— l-rti— Ir-li— I 

-* ~f I'Pc^'Xi To'cTo' cT'* cs' —<'-*''* co" ' -# -TiJ" ^ -^ '*'~^' -tr,^ ' ^" /p ^ ^ 05 

C> C> CJ T.^ ^ ■^ T-H T-H 01 ^Cl -^ CI C» 5Q CJ C:» O"! q5 Cf ffS C^ CJ '"' 

oo&HOQQoo>^aofaQaaAooAOQQ^oAooooQ 







>>>>>>> 



(i&^ilH&HlXl^llH&HllHpHpHD-aHa^&HilHO-iaHCl^f^CUll^C^P-lPHfcOHPHaHCL, 



• >> 


o re' o" c o" 

^ 1 -.5 -■ S re -^ :5 . ^ 


Ii-elnd 

Penn. 

Ohio, 

Va. 

Ohio, 

Iowa, 

Dele, 

Ohio, 

Ills. 


re" 

o a 


6 
O 


a, - 




^ 


o 
"to 


Knoxville, 

Knoxville, 

Belletbntaine 

Indianola, 

Knoxville, 

Knoxville, 

Indianola, 

Glenwood 

Indianola, 


Knoxville, 
Indianola, 

Knoxville, 
Indianola, 


iT re' 
~ o 




> 

y. - 
o 

c 


- - 


o 

c 
.2 
•5 



•3§V 



in 
W 


, Ale 
Ifred 
cob 


<Ji 


C<^ 


Z 


•u .. 








.~ u re 




0?. > 






93: 



2 i 



.= Sf 



-'ifO 



~i-' 

c _- 



re — 



- i ° ■§ ■- ^ -■? 
« ^ .. h C/3 £ -.2:^ xT |S aJ 

2 c i3 go^' "ii-g-S 5 fe i p^-^ 

h i; -iJ aj ci-'n tst: ^^.o-axi •„ u c 



U? ,7) 



a. >^.2 re '/) >-. 

QJ i. — ■- V lU 



OUOOJD.-OOOCD 



o o 



(u .i; .s .^ 



loiva Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 



157 






o o 

'> 2 



(UU 



o 


u 







^ 


^J 


7) 




4_, 


rt 


n 






-T! 




rt 








£. 






Qp ^cii 



o o 



r'" ,=" U ' 

— -:=^ 

O OlD, 

o o 

uo 

S ^ ~ 

00. 

e E S 

O O ri. 

L. L. i- 

ChPhH 



C O 

''^ "jj « 






(/J O c^ 



-o o :o o :c' o o iS o ts • 



CI C> r<i CI CQ « '-I "* Ci <^ "^' CQ CI '-^' 



Q Z ' ^,Q Z ' 



-t"'* -^'CO'-^'-*" '-"O '^ C5 -^ ■<* CO ^ 
CQ CI CJ — Ct C^ C^ tH C? C^ 



o ao 






i.QO' 






>>>>>> 



>>>>>>> 



Q^^OiOLiCLOlCLiQliQ-iQlCLd^CLCL^lH 



00 



d~c 



.2 ° ■ 

■— ■— T! « 'r ^ 









o ::: o ~ 

C > c > i 



►^^►S^ 



Ot0OC5C0C0l0Q0OClT-it-O-* 







O > ^ "^ ^ -i^ -i^ ^ 



l(/)C/5C/3 












•=^ '^ •::: 



p- J <« 



.' o ~ 

00 , fc- 

"3 c 2 

fc. o s 

o > - 

a o j« 

50 g 

o o "3 

m ■^ tij 



£ r ^ ^ 
^ I "3' i 

'3 0,/'^ 



■S|^ 2 

C > CO " 

S ^ " a 

II 2 



N 
^ 






U 



^ 



t3 Z* 



^C^ 


oC* 


IC <D 


"^ , • 


c^ c 


t- 03 


2 




^^ 


^ 1^ 


3 




1— , 


0.0 




< • 


c 


,'^ 




>-. „ 


S 


.ti 0) 



<x> 



■o 



-; -C 4-1 

r- -~- mo 

5 > !^cO 

o o .22 :p 

in 2 1-^ -^ 

:o !0 :c p » 50 JD jc ~ p 

-h" o •^''^''to cfcf cTcicf 

— ^ ^ C7 C« CI CI c» 

rt c.-?' rt ■? c ^ c d d 

^ < fa "g [j-( I — ,< ? ; I— ,1 — !< — , 

1:0 -co »3P3ppp3DpCDjDCO 

-*" co' 30* -* of ^' -(T o~ L-f c> i-' ■rc~ CO 

^ CJ Ci ^ ^ '<t 

-£ ^ J^ 5^ ^ -g -S c c ^ c c" c 
fa C O Q ^ fa fa A>^S >^>^A 

iTiTiiririiroiriririJ oToj oj 

CLiO-lOHCU&HCH&^pHDHO-cCLPHfa 



^0 


Iowa, 

Iowa, 

Ind. 

Ohio, 

N. Y. 

N. C. 

Iowa, 

Ohio, 

Ind. 

Ohio, 


> 




Des Moines, 
Knoxviile, 

Pleasantville 
Bloomfieldtp 
Keokuk, 
Knoxviile, 


-H ic- t- t- -rt t- ^ '^ X) if^ ct c? 
TCCICJO — CI — -^Tt^i— ICO-^(N 



C ^^^ .y. (-L_,Di-rH D 

c E -^ .r i X c ,' >^ -,5 T' 
•<<muu'jGQwfaOOS 



^5^ 



History of the Fifteenth Regitnent 



U 



S 
« 
^ 

^ 












< 



O 



■^ o 



t < 



;> c/2 



Q id 



o 


> 


•^ -^ O'"* ^ ^ 


-* 


~~ 


-?> t -* 


^^ '^ 


TO'* CC 


-*-* 


*-' 


^ 


«3 ?C CC 


^ 


O 


<;:; 


» 




« 


o 


o o 


«5 


-o o o 


o o 




































u 


X 


Y)' 


irT 


, 


-t , 


^ 


cc" 


_r 


_r 


"^s 


^ 


of 


'^ 


o'cf LO" 


, 


~i* 




73 


t— « 


C^f 




r-^ - 


r-t 


c^ •^^ 


CC 


1-^ 




,— < 


MO«C>? 


'w- 


^^ 


' 3 


C 


j; 




~ 


I) 


(11 


•B 








C5 


^ 


^ rtZ, 


ra 


j: 




IJ 


1—1 


< 


(* 


«> 


/^ 


SSS 


«!t 


^ 




r< 


< 



o.E 5 



Q-S 



oa 



7*'3C?iZt!Tl!~~?^?^^'*^7tTJTi:^Ti^i■^~**■^f 



li— >^ 






iT 


oT 


<v 


iT 


V 


lU 


ar 


a) 


dJ 


ar 


iT 


nT 


nT 


iT 


oT 


0)" 


oT 




i' 


?' 


V 












































,-« 


rt 


33 


c; 


sS 


rt 


rt 


ri 


rt 


rt 


rt 


rt 


rt 


rt 


r^ 


rt 


r; 


rt 


rt 


rt 


rt 


.i: 


.:^ 


> 


.'i. 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 




.:; 


_> 


.b 


^ 


> 


> 






> 





:z:> 



O " 



o o o _o cs _ o 

■- . • ^ "_c 15 ^ =* i^ _c 



- Ioh= °^^oc:o>ooOv2 = ^o^^o^ 






— i2 
^ o 



- -o 

:5^ 



c 

bcz: a,— 



^ o "5 o .2 o 



U Ni 



* - u - 



— OJ -tJ . — 
O o «5 o _ 



Affe 









(•/) 




u 


■JT 


s 


^■^ 


< 


11 c 








O ■" 




^ c 












XX 



. <r! ?JD ' 



53 ^ p ' 



.tnS 



!U 



- ^^ "" ?, "o <;^ "S 



_ !^ c > c o 

• — X r- rti C T^ 



5 x: oj c 2^ 



5 3J 









be— « 







oi 






p^i 






^•~D 






tr- ' 






1) n 






C — ' 






3 • 












'-^D, 






r- 0) 




en 


^73 




Ui 


C 




CC 


^y 




< 


u ^ 






'J6 




ei 


J3 <c 4J 






« '-1-1 








« 




■a " ■S 


ts 




bc;a £ 


i:^ 




S^^ o 






aj t, u 


V ) 




Di&Hfc, 






— C! C^ 


^ 




p CO p 


^ 




V ^ > 




«£D 


I- 2 o 




:::.^*^. 


-1-- 


— 


1—1*—'-^ 


^, 


,«_. ^* 


',o :s o 




5.2 t 
ibot; 


'^'>it^ 


t. 


-1 cor 


o 57 


S 






^ 


^ 


c' c c" 


<; 


5 


:J cs rt 




Cii 


Q. a, ^ 






n CS CS 




OOU 


^ 




>^:n' . 




;?;> 




-s.. 




t'^ 


so 




<G 




D 






c 
75. 






<U 


3 — O 




Oi 


O ^ >> 




OUJ 




•3§V 








S" 






-^s 




c/5 


ca c.S 




w 


x = 




s 


^ii> 




,<= 






z 


Q 5 § 

b C "=5 



Iowa Veteran Vohintcer Infantry. i^g 






^ to 









■5 2 ^.^ g" - c.c-;5^t;d 5~t^&^ ss ^T: ^5 s^^ci 






G"' 



M ^J n 'ri -r _ - ' -r r- 'Vj r- 'r T^ j: T ^ CO r- x. x. ■S - ' 

._.— - — d.- •£.c._c-::;r..o^cj .Cuy.^s 

,-'-^O-.^OOO?C<UOu0!'''Oot« 'O 



.- :?S .'„Sj.2 .-5U.O- --00 .>^^^,.fx gU .^.^ .^feii* 
75 ■'^ 'k(. rt ^ r* ^- ? £* o p- _■ ^ t, .2 o> .2 Q a..i .-u£-5Q£'oi-F7:g FO ^ ^ Q 

o7-*j.— -5r — -rip — 'Cl^io 

-- - -^ - _ - „ . - - - .„ - - - _ O O O O ^ O .^ '^ O ,-^ '"'i, p 
-^ 0> — ' Ol 01 — I 01 O? 1-H 01 CO 03 C-t — 0( Oi Of Ol ^H 5>^ ^^ ^H 0( 0> -H 0( 01 Of Of Of Of Of T^ Of 

p jDpp»poppp;s»opppjOop is»oooo:ccco»opppp 
CO o 30 ?o'o xTto M"oo"o'D"arc'5"o''xrctroror-*''xrr5 o o oo"?o o DO cc'oar of o'odof oro'cT 

T-H -5 —I OJ Of '-I Of O* -r-i Of i-H 0( Of 1-1 Of Of -rt Of T-H ^ Of Of — of 0( 1-1 Of Of OJ of Of of Of T^ Of 

(u iroj— u'u-a;oiia^---ijD3'T,oUD o<i^'!-''o-i5JuaJ'T)UiUiiOiJO 

Q ^ax,aQ^aQQQjlQa<ifcOGQ OQQDQQCQc£:oat^OQO 






■r'U'o to ^ tor3'0'0"a't3.-i-j-j-"~"Sto'to'0'nt;'t5"a"aTj~— >~— .^-."n: _t3*j 
T^ Of o> »— th ^~ O f o< Of C O 00 '^ -# ^ 'C irr — ' -^ — ' o> Of Of Of y; cc TO '^ -T -^ I-*? I? i-o o o t- t- 

>H :u -^ 5 S ~ ^ ° ^ ° 5 . o ^^ o''^! >H c d" ^ . . 6 . 

■ -5.:^ 5 ^' o •- 8 ^ . '^ J 5 *^ "? 15 ^ ■£ ^- S ^. ^- 6 . ^ = •= o i ^ 5 * ^- ^ -^ jS 

Z7DguSuS7;OZO>o>^o>o>og>S:g>fiHoS^>&Hz;>-o;=: 

j::=j::^,, '3 = = 2 o = o =.^ = o= =3o £ = = ~~ 

£ -r > £ -^ MJ= W bi)£ be J= t3 -= £c£ '"' -= bo QC-C tx*^ be *^ 

_:(S_-ajcuaj_-^'=_- «cs=5 rt"?— '"S^Ss — '"^JS — l2sl2 — Ji J— ■ 
U'JOP - U U ^ U CJ S uS 0>il,CJuSu UUS U S O^US 7 ;U 
-*tcoii-iofciofoft--rfic-^c50»C£~'^f^rjofocii'oooc-i--L'f o/ci c- o* o of of of 

Of to Of O f Of CO Of -^ Of 00 Of Of CO TO Of Of Ct> Of Of O? go Of Of TO 00 00 Of Of Of Of TO Of yj Of Of Of 



: T3 i; -u •_3 . - _- <u c c = <u 



^ ^ --^ ^ I ^ -^ .-/ ■- .w-;?-- K r'l'* "■ ^ .'"' rS = ri .3'"' • 
c ; K oj ^ " = ^ K -- ^ o c <" 5 W E - 5. ^ ^ £ '^ ^ r^ = -^ 

1 1 _C ^*^ ic_ r- .. • (1, "" ""^ — ni ^ ^ K^N — .. — ""^ w#^ .*. « -- _- ._ _. '^ ._ 



i6o 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



U 









h 



^ 

<; 



<: 
















p 


















<rt 




-f 








CO 










p 




ea' 








L-T 










o 








of 









07 




^ 










c/ 


■J 




^ 


w 




o o 


w 




p 














< 


.J 


o 


<^ J= 




-o 


.— 


^^ k^ 


'J 



,Se 
ckso 
owa 
Tun 
luta 
pril 
Jun 
Shi 
iloh 
disa 


'fiTi 




C O 

1) _ 


c5 




-5 


15 


rt _, >, 


^ 


o 




3 ,j 


1) 




u 

n 




]o 




■^i^l 




o 




sch'd, disab 
[batile a 
ansfd to 17 
sch'd disabi 
'd left arm, 
id Iv abscnc 
sch'd disabi 
d in thigh s 
'd in face at 
o. musc'n ; 


O — 


-a 
d 


ed of fever 
'd in thigh 
o. 5th Cor. 


ri 

5 
p 


55 



73 
rt 


'd sev. left 
0. 1st Ser J 
scharged di 
ike." 




aH 


5 hS^kS^^o: 


a-L^o. 


C;^ 


d] 


% 


G 


'^^ZO.^ 



o > 

O C i/ 






:O0Oi;OSoOO0 



'oooooc32SiOoE2lS?oo 
T3-a"a'OT3"a"'a'u^''U'a 







^Jr->-.^-..i3 



QZ 



fc-Ztn 



' OJ O U C OJ 

Q Z G nip 




lU 


■c 


oT 


oT 





oT 


iT 


0" 


-r 


iT 


iT 


nT 


iT 


iT 


iT 


i7 


€ 


iT 


(D 





<u 


oT 


iT 


oT 


a 





iT 


0' 


.-a 


« 


n 


CS 


C3 


^ 


CS 


:; 


C5 


ca 


CS 


rt 


ca 


a 


C3 


CS 


CS 


CS 


CS 


-a 


<n 


.-« 


CS 


CS 


CS 


ca 


CS 


CS 



> > 



2-I-liH;lj;XiH2H2:H2-lJuiC-llHCl,Cl.iaHCHCH 




•2e .bi>.2^,-S 

— oj *- c — • _; oj 

02h>wOZ::;2h 



S< 



X CS 



^_i;M'a:;_OcB 
■"■ o r "3 ^ "a -a 



_• u _. i- " ■ 



■a -a 
-u O 



'_-t 


0;; 


.z: c3 






o/:j3 


<u _• CS <u 

JuSz 



-'^ o9^ 



^ •- u: > :r 



.C -xz bf-5 J5 



c- <u _; tj c t^ 



ir c i: c o'i 

<U CS C CS "O 



o c 

C CS 

ac~ 

CS es 






Age. 



L-: o — 1 -o o) c- - 

I T^j ^ -M — — I « ' 



) i-f C~ 30 O ■— " Cl 30 

■ gj -■; --H '^ gj y; — ' — I 



C/) 

<: 
z 



55 C % U 
"^ -? = -a -^ 



,0 ^ 



— - — -' 1/ i; *-' ^ 



o 






-: o 



o o 



- t; J c r 



0) O — CS CS 



- "LI 



-TS CS 

.■.5 < ■ 



CQ 22 



o - 



• cScacSKCScsrZpp'p 



■^- • r- . ^ ^ "3 - Q 

!UtL] S.^ C 3 ^CS'"' 

-I — cs"^ .'S-_ rt— cS 

2t a— ci' S <^ ^ rz^ ~ -^ 

«" £ N s -r u 

s £^= E-2-^ 
» o 5 CS I' ^ 

J fe. i^ o o o 









Iowa Veteran V olunteer Infantry. 



i6i 



6 -$■ 



c ^• 






99 



;; «0 "c X 
« 1—,^ SO 

-n^ 1= C =* 

aj I, _, r _c 



(1) ra 

J -a ■§ .5 .S 
!^ ^ § 33 ? 

■r^ O? -^ 0>? t 



u 

^ CD «P 
I— I o «c> 
tS bo" 






abse 
d fo 
d fo 


£ 


-a 


(U u 




oj tuo bo 


too 


> t. i- 




ctf rt c« 


(S 


0) J= -G 


j: 


— u o 


» 


— tyj c/> 


>A 




OQQ 


Q 



_bC 



be 
3 

< 



^ Q 



— CS 

<u .5 



^W. bo- 

bo^.- >: 
'c5 H^ 



C/3 (u -^ 1—1 
iS C ^ £ = 

i-^ D "O -o -5 
or, " ^ '" 



?0 sO «o o 






Qt, 



U o O rj O 

■w "^ dj 13 aj 



aj u ij (u ij 



03 ;: 



04 tH c<8 OJ CO o^ ^ OJ T-- --J ii ^ CQ tH C3 - 

g Cl. P Q ^ >^Q £., ^_ fa ;§ c^ fagg:z g 



■s ° s ° s 



so --I 00 C7 T** 00 p 



Tj C a; O 



.Qfe. 



Daja<ajajajitia;ajajUDajDajuaji;<Dajaj4Jaj'uajajajajajajtiDa^ajajaj 

i- '^ *t- L4 'C 'l- 'n "C^ 't- 'C 'u 'u *u 'C 'H 'u *n "u *C ^ u- ';-( '1- U Sh 1-1 t-< in t- ^ I- ^ - Lh u i-i 



• . '^ ■ • ■ 



aj 



c. ^ o 



.2 r"; "''.2 c bo 

% ^.2-§ C.2^i O C3 ^ 
bp— &I— .bc^ G..* £ 3C rt 



^-03 



ic 



~ " i Q aj 



o 
■o 5 .-s 






u 



- O cS O s 

ho-a T3 -a I — 1 
TO o -o o • 



!«! 



— .2 — o 



.CQC/3.pa ry^bajM.-^ 



O «i 



1) 



= — 
jj ? 3 ij 

-= a) O ■ - 



" aj O ni c 

~ -^ -a 3 

.t;~ o o 



^ 




1 62 



History of the Fifteenth Regitnent 






I 



s 



^ 
^ 







-a 












• 11 












-?' r^1« 












o> 2 
























- t« c 












?.«•? 




^• 








- J« - ^ 




O 








<-> ^ «,' o 












U. _ S>7 Ji 




. X 




a; 




2 coj=i/5 




2^c^ 




Pi 
< 

w 

2^ 




les, Keokuk, 
[Jan 4, '64, i 
>ability Aug 1 
ttle at Corint 
g severely at 


Ol CD 
tj W 

O u 

s. 
O t. 


o « 


O 

,o 






I --55- 


U £ 
-c t 


~ tub 
o lu 


>. 










> 






^ i-5 S 


sc 




aj 


















U Ol «> "^ 


p p 


0^5 


■a 






S QS^ 


CUCL, 


o:^ 


^ 


o 




(-5 ^ <M ^ OJ 


^oi 


-..^ 


C7 — 






O O o O CO «o ?c> 


o 


■^. o 


o = 


ij 


- - - ' ^ 


' ^ 


" 




OJ I, 


T 


(?} Tt! ^ T? '"^ "J^ 


TO i^^ 


. -0 


'M CO 




(M rH - ->>'-< ffl 


-^ 'M "; - 


-• 1— 1 -. 




3 


73 


X! U JO O J3 
0) CJ (L) 'IJ 4) 




u 


13 iJ 


£ 


D 


i-C fc^Q tn, 


Jfc- 


Q 


it,Q 



©a 



CoOlJOojiLIWl. 






(U o 






Z"> 



. * ^- . ^- ^ 5 J2 ^ ^ JS . . 

• -SI 



QZ 



Di 



3 302303,'^ 3 "^3 

U ►ii.O U U S t^ ii,UUU U 









E P 



C/5C/3 






£ oO « 






£ o 



c/^y: 



8< 






u t oj te o — . 

- ."^ ^^ p o ^ :n 

1- ^ « J t- C 

<U <U l> _" jj ^ 

?^~ > = - = = 

i 3 o 3 t^ ca ca 
y3c/^hHH>> 






>> 






CD >,«} 

•-" Sfflj 

Qi - 

3^ o 
o o a 

-§r 

I'Es 

, o o 

^"" p 

0313 ^ 
5 — «o 

5 ej 



MS) b'O 

ssrs 

£0,£ £ 
1^ o a p 

• '■" .^ 
CO t^Xi o 



.,0 C3<S 

^^-^^ 
1- H s * 



v 



55 Ml 



(c c5 ^ e 



c^ 



O O « « 

Qh is,-* 

o(5& 



^ 



_^.^ cs >^ 



'^ 


. -*^ 




^ cow 


^ 




m 


^ ^ 3 


"* >^ 


« y "— > 


CO — 
' 3 

-rf'— ' 


3 -a p 




'— ><U ni 




'*- X t: 

(U — ^^ 


3 5 


'-'M 


be 4^ 




1- cs 


nS r- 






J= u 




o be 


n: ^ 




.>2 


P n! 
J. 



be 



.p > i; ^ 



5^ 



S ^ 



pp 


CO CO CD 






II 


Ap'l 

Mar 
Mar 


® oco 


TtH CO 10 •<*■>* 

CO «> ® CO p 


;?! eoc7 


_ Oco'c5"»5rf 
S CO — < (J-J <?^f 


" P J2 






i i ii 


oj Q^ a; !> _jj ^ 

c3 c3 rt rt c^ rt 



> ^ > > i» > 



rT .^ P O 

■p tA. ^ -a r - S — 



o 



u 






a: ' o 



, lO -* '^ (M CO t- C5 tH 
' CO C-"! "N CO Ot '-I •^ C^'. 




r ) Cd — p 0) D > 
^ p ^j: -o -n "^ 
. ' ^ w "5 .- .:i , .( 

> p >— »i— . - p p p 

2 iJ X X !> = = ^ 
t« O O O ~ 3 3 " 

D5CJOOWfc-&-Oi 



Iowa Veteran V^otunteer tnjantry. 



163 



» <u 
J= O 

i. o 

> c 



"- o 



tii 



t-i s- :^ > 

C^ C^ CC Q 



TO — I ^ O. O 
1-- TC 01 ^ 

o s- >- 1^ 4-, 



D oj o 4; a> 

cd C3 c^ ci c^ 



2^CLCL1X&- 



i "S i* -53 



= o = .H 

O C t. 3 le 
U n! 3 o ** 

QO ^ 00 O » 
'-I C-^ ■^ O? CO 



Si 'A W*" 

es j= jr, P = 
"G „ D ' — — 

w = ;- ^'^ 

5J * — U tc 









Qi 






'^ 



^ 



^f-H 



=^^ 6 : 



u o 

rt — 

•O 

; 1) -o 

its •' 

,-0 o 
i I'CJ 

1 1^ 






C72 C ■■ 



cs a, 



«S 0) ^ 






o5 
:0' 



be 



.75 



•^G^ 



== u = 

to > "O 

,-H D 0"! 

r^ C» ^ 

P? P 

(Jh r' ^ 



~ — '^ '- o ~ 
. , . o .- ^' - -^ 

^ "t X) •- 7^ y, 75 U .2 -»- i'^ D 






3 "O CO 



- 2 ° 






I— >00 
SJCC 






o ■- -2 O 



I ^ C> CO ^ ^H T3 



i3 i- 



-C 1-1 r; 

= 6co5ppp.5pprt 



?*£ «f 



OOrtf 000?00 
■ 'JT '- - '- ti. !- ^ 



-^ >; 1- 



ED 



r ?> o> d CJ c* c» c-i c? o> <N ?» w 



> ^ ^ ^"j O"? ^^ ^ t^^ C^"* ^"^ "^^ o ci "■ — 






"^ pa 



— w ^ 07 — 

;c :c :c CO <:c 



;s k~ , ^ ^-i:,-,-t--t 






: o o c £ — 






>-, 1- > i- > 

S<Z<Z 



TO -* — "?■? CO -^ — < -^ CO -* 01 CO CO ao 

uooouOTJi3u00053tj 

OZZZOZCifc-OZZOfeO 



^ *^" % ^ ,5 .5 -5 _^ 



oj 1) 1) 7^ 7; c/2 7} 7] 7D 7D '73 

I'Ai r/1 "Ai 



*: ♦^^ J ^ -^ "1 ■^ r/1 -/I -r »J "-J "^ <" '^ S'r.'Xl 73 7] 73 73 '73 

,^^'-Ji-^hJi-1i-1^-'^-2c/)C/2C^C0 73 ' j r-r-r- 

r'^r't (C 'y:X!"T3"a t« ir. cc'CT3'0'ax!'-'*->'X^*->4-i~.-''S 

U U 1-1 •— I QTi o y ? — — I— iirjiy?cococo-i'-^-^ tj< -» i f; i^ ic 



I3i ■" 

Z'> 



■•2„- £ .^ 

TJ x: -; ? G 1* D ■ 



C 03 O 



D:a.oosocd^3:o x^x 






i2 -^ — 

o 3 p 



J^ 73 UJ O tii O 



1) 7; i; -y. <U tc — ^ U X 



o C ~ 



^ 






aSy 



) i^l <?■■» t- O C- CO CO CO O CO -^ O O (M 00. O (M X o 
! CO CO %? OJjoi CQ e>> c^ ^ c*» C2_C5 :^ ?7 co ot ^ ^ ^ 



•i ^-^ -^ = K S ^ 5 '^ 



> .--r;-=- 



T3 «D X 05 i- — '— Hr Cr ^ 
^ J 0) 1) tt lU eS .i'.B^ — 
O 3 C 3 !3J3-2 iC «> X — 

J ^.^At^ ci w w w ^ 





V 


CO 


2 






•11 
> 


CO 


aj 




.i: 


ClH 






73 


P 


>,CS 




"Z 




— 


X 


^ 



■::' r, .5 



^5^ 



1 £^^°f^ 

- 1-^ •- i. • :- (U 



.S CO- 



'0 






s- 


4: 


^ 


■> 


o 


CO 




.; 




i; 




1— 










M 


11 

> 




OS 


^« 




P 


Zf 



*-H TO t 



X^X,^X 



P — 



c o c 



164 



History of the I^ifteenth Regiment 



" o 



ro -4-1 CO ^^ "^ 



•5 ^-s 



= :;? ^.^ = 






c4 CQ 



jv«i ;z; 



>^0 . I— J . 

t, 1) o o n 



00000 

Ih U U L. ^ 

CL, (X fJ^ Ph Cl, 



ii ^ T3 ■£ £ X 
.IJ 7} LO ^ 



• c* o 



cS ffj c 



C0"0 Ph 

- w 

S -S, 
000 

U. b !k I 



^ £: M P-i P-( 



^ 



O rt ca 
P > > 



y Ph 



P'S 2'S £ P P 

£ &: u. c^ t, t^ 'Z 




1— > rr3» X"^ I—, 
-= t ^2^^ « 

o ^ > r^o -F 

T! O O — U C 

T! Z ;s K. -5 

-u ^- C/; ni CJ O 

•= d: ^ J "1^ ^ 

"o _ • o c -a 

1; P O cc rt _«J 

c ^H oi a H o 



o 






CC IC 



■F ^ 5 



^ Q 






00 — 

UU £- 
-a -c S 

t. u. x; 

X £ » 
u u • 

C/J c« O 

QQph 



^ ■* "* ^cT «# cs"' 

" ^ (?} O^ C^ CV( 



— ^^ C^ '^ rv-i ' 



a?-*''* ■*' 



,00000000! 
"o-o'O'O'a'O'O'a 



c-r o c S-c 
— ji — ,A I — )C/) ►— > 



5 o 



c « c — c c c 



.Z>il.S 



O '^f cf^'of 



W^ Q- 






O "I 






Z O fa Q Z ^O p^ O AZ >ff,Z 



C O C O 2 II t; 




^g^c^-j^Cu:555Boooooooiiiiii£iiiii!ii*ii^ii 

■" -w -u X j:; X j:: jr ^ -C X X ,C X "C ■" T T T T" T T' T T T 



_ O *«) . o 

'P 3 u: *^ -. c/:" 




ii ^p o' . o" . 

•B b O >^ O >^ 






. o . c . 



C3 w . J- 
■^'^.-^ Soi£ ^"Clci "H-- <U ^ 



u 



c/:0 



0-0 



u 



-co 

rp to "O c<" jg' cs"^ pT 

«rt0^t/j . — ijO^jjto^— uoOtfi 

OfcUfc^O < Ph K (J &H O O <! O liid O 



?! ^ "5 iS 
" o 



O == F > 

3 o ^a, 

u) <U H O 



Age. 



1 tJh CQ ^ 






c c «> «> 
5^^ 



S^ <5 



^^ 



% "5 -a 3 « i^'o"^ I'll 

^ • - "^ • O C ' ' IS 



'£^« 



S S 



<L> .i: ^ 



O ° 



7^ iJ •— 
o ^ s D.I; •- 



> c 



._^ ^S ^ :;: - ^ c ! 



''.^^>:,^^ 



U' 






^ -^ 5 X g C'[-H 



^ . 

Pi . 



'O 



o S S 



„ „ . ^Ph bc'r 



H^ 



•« c 

■^c>'5csrtrtSSiSo 

' cqpq 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 



'65 



O 

"5 _ ^ 
^^ ^ O 
^ ■ ^C 



■a u 



0,0 



'72 , 



-c .S « -^ 

:= o- P 
X U cx5" 

rt c« C ^ U 
■ be 3 •- c 

> X( 1— ,,-C 3 

D ^ . c/: _ 



o 



'oC/3 



— — 10 3 x; 



§ 








X 


P§ 















0* 




« 







-^S 
.<=' « 




• 







( ; 


!-, ._• 


ja 
















S'S 


x 


c 

4J 


^5 ^' 


Shiloh. 

Shiloh. 
19, '6t2 . 
t Keokuk 




°'^ 


_o 



t3 


.ii ^ 0> .3 . 


~ C7 


5 ^ 

'^ x: 


7; 
X 


X 


oPx 1— »x 

. ^ !> . .^ 

x:^!^-j=^= ^--^ 

- rt c Ji x = 7: 


rt rt OJ *= 

4J ~ (U 






X 


"5 


X ,yj .i; 3 ^ ^- ^ 
7^ x/ ■;:; 1 — > cs '/) ™ 


S *i '—,'3 


t* . 


3 *.. 




X 


^ j5 g I.- X -5 ^ 




C i; 


c .^ 




t: 


1. ^ ajc-a 5 


8c^ 


s?.. 


T3 


-0 
c 


ii - c ^ - bcx 


^'-o 2 


0?. 


0-? 


c 


<A 


CO ? j^.c « _c 


Qj oj u x; 

z^ « (ft ij 


-t3 
iU 


•a 3 

(U 


3 



-a 


J! "S "g d P ?^ ? 


t4WQQ 


q£ 


Q^ 


^ 


^ 


^QQoi^Q^ 


oi o^ m 01 


0^ CI (W CO 


OJ OT 


CO 00 


0000 


«o 



u -5^ =-^ 



M)ii? s 

rt C "^ TJ 

X ■- ^ aj 

SP 

3!f o o o c o o «5"qo~^' 000000 SR Sf o «f :?f o o S ;S 2 ;?;' 000 »2 ;^" 0000 



1— ( T-l T-l « ,-1 Of '-' tH d 03 0"» ^ CI 1-1 -Q W --I . I-H .-• .^ -H 

SOa;g<yOOiJ^ CLO, y<uC4jC<uo'5000CuCcja; ^-^CCC C 

J*,^^ Q 75 O ^ ;5 fc ' Q ^ ' O Cl ^Q ^Q O '^ Z O i5 AQ ►^C Q - fc ►lA-^ A 






D i) U OJ 0; ii 
c^ c^ Cg :^ c^ rt 






3 O" 

HO 



c 
•- c 



■ —' ■"] .2 .2 K^ .2 

: X X . X IJ X OS X 



« OJ £ S — ' 'H "O -^ ^ -2 . X IJ X OS X 

>i:OCL.£;z;>i;3:^OOy O h^0 >0 



. o 

"O X 

^O 



• ••=■> .2 - ^ - - 



05'.^ 

> 3 o 



.5 S -^ 
X 2 o 



5 - „ „ o ^ 

<i (u 1) u .22 D 

c« ^ .^'— o!'.^':3 ^7Z "S S ^"^ «' 

Q.3 ^3>-23>3>^>3-2 „ 






3 "^ 
°-? o 



rz ^'-B 



3 3 o > o 



ni 



e< oc?^-^o*cii-i-^'^-^-^go c^^^^T-^cjyjC<cl(^^cQ — To c oci 



3 o i! ^ t; 



— _. Iff es I- ci CO GC 
c f w c? ^ cf c? »-< ^ 



a3> 



4-. <u > E 




i66 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



o 



1^ 

s 



I 



(Ml 



?^ 



^ 








C4 


«; 


A 


^ 


c 








o 


C 




T 






*-- 


f^ 




C ►— ^OJ 


l^i 






O 


o 


3 


p 




dJ 


3 


U 


5 


55 

(J 


05 


3 
1—1 


< 


u 

c 



u 


'J 


/^ 


C5 


5 


Si 
a 


rt 


3 


5 




5 




5 


O 


u 


ou 


1) 1^ 

be 015 





? '1:; 



tun 




3 




< 




^ 


^ 






-^ 


o 






O 

dJ 


^ J= 


C/3 ti 




■*- '•-' 




rt ^ 


(« 


O 


(A 








lA 


XI rt 


P 


= -S 




• t/D 






o 


1/ c 



rt ?e ^ ^ 



u 



«« 



^ c — 






:= ^ ^ 

J= 3 .- 



o 2 c «5 ^ 



QOciltiiQQ^ 



S Q ^^ HQ 



:. •- c 



^•^ 
c a> 

-.0 

It, <u 



o o? 

.~ o 

C/5cf 

n ^ 

x-o 
.• W) 

-a "^ 




o» — 07 " 









■^uj ccppjsppppppjsppcpppppppppppo poop 



Ti x' tr; x' cT <~ C-' ■^'" ^' i •^i-'" ur"-* x' x' r-' cT i.-:;' cT t-^oo' o' o "* cT ■?«' 






•J~ 


iT 


iT 


iT 


oT 


iT 


ir 




1* 


1/ 


5)' 


tT 


af 


iT 


iT 


iT 


V 


v 


iT 


iT 


v 


iT 


or 


V 


«r 


fl' 


aJ 


v 


iT 


ar 






























































CS 


C3 


CS 




CS 


rt 


rt 


rt 


c« 


c« 


c« 


Cj 


nf 


c« 


rt 


c< 


Tf> 


rt 


s 


rt 


ct 


rt 


rt 


ct 


rt 


rt 


rt 


a 


rt 


etf 




> 


> 




> 


> 


.^ 






> 


_> 


> 


> 


> 




> 


> 




> 


.:; 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 




t 


> 


> 








O O = • _■ = cs rt 

Lh -o X 5 o S ^ ^ "J 



= •-_■ = •- 



_■ O .0 



^ -aSy 



1) 


c 


^' 


jj 


c< 




cs'^" 




C 

"So 
.5 


^ 


-a 


c 

, 







Madison, 

kuk, 

do 


c 


bil 

c 




K* 


_;i 


_4r 


^ 


'J, 


> 


L! 


^ 


?^ 


^ 


030 


u 


OJ 3 


1) 


= ^ c 


n 3 


> 




M 


u 


1- 


es 


« 


£-^ 


■U JC T3 


t^ 


~ ^ 




3 <£ 


•- i-a 


-* 


■a ^ 


>-, 


0) 







"■ 


n 


'J 


n 





£ 


rt 


c 


e< 







^c 







T3 


Di 






r- 




■ti <u 








j= i^ 


•- (U 




jj D 




P u 


,(_i 




•n 


^K 


'S) 


•<0^ 


<!j 


fc 


bd 


<UbdOt^U&-U! 


fc,D.73U 





KfJCd 




C Kt 



E p, 






<i^ i u 



be c^ F > £ c i •= « ^ bc= 
03^j2-j5j3Jj.y^g.-34, 

SS;z;oopHciHP-,Di;cdDiy5coc/3E-i 



• o '^ •>» 

st5 



^ ^ =: 



tm 



E S _- 



QE 






g 3 c 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 



i6y 



?b 'P 
c .3 



-a o 
be _ 



'70 



_ S 



« 



Sii 



ti -a: 



p ^ 

£5 



^ 



S:?; o o o o o 

" ' ^ ■ -r^ -^^ -»^ -r". -n 



■a -a -a -c "O 



fe.O 



^1^^ 



QOi 



u II n 'J 1) 0/ a> D u 



> > > > > 



(U D a; 



= - § . .2 . 



« o _• 



o 

u 

o 



O 3 

— o c 



C D O O - ,o > 

p o JO = u -a 

<a-0 W 



a ji 



cs 



'O X) Ift fO O O CD O r-i 00 to 00 
'n — ' T^ O T? — ' — ' e-j go T- < CQ T-4 



r> "^ — 



^■Q 



ai L 



•5 : , E c - ^' ^- 

-■" "' ■!' 5 o ^ c -■ 



s-i! i-ja-- * o !* ~ 



5§5 
\3^ 



S ^ 



o ■ .S 
o o. S3 

Z is 

o -^ X 

1st 

o >-' ^ 
S o *^ 



sT a -o 



5 o 

2-3 fl 

^ i- -^ 

g s ■= 

_ "^ o 

§ o 

S P 

"^ - fc- 

ft. CO "^ 



rt sJ = 

CJ > a> 

o ^ _ 

5 ■« «^ 

S 2 '-c 

CO u 

-- -^ -^ 

S o a 

o •_ a 

Q. o '^ 

o S <^ 






c' *^" 2 



E a ••: 






w a 






C3 -n 
C.S 
— O 



< 



^ VJ !_, -t-> 

.2 r^ V 



^5 °. 


5 S 


^°. U 


cop JDJD jT 


^ ■* ■* '^ 

« «0 CD p 


CO CO cp CO p 



I iC OD 



S 1^ 



2 fc. < 



— ^ r- '■^ ^ b .C 

< fc ^< 2 < &H - 



S5> 



C3 -r- « 






^ 



^s 



V 


v 


oT 


ij 


aJ" 


o' 


aj 


oT 


Ij 


iT 


iT 


6 


i7 


oJ 


aj 


oT 


aJ" 


rt 


aj 


cs 


-< 


rf, 


.-< 


« 


rt 


- 


n 


rt 


cs 


K! 


CS 


rt 


c« 


cs 


> 




> 


> 


> 




> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 






> 






































s- 




























1- 




a<&^&HCucL,cL(t-CL, 


^ 


0^ 9h Qh P-i Qi 


?!. 


0.0. 



>i 



o =; = 



O. G, 



i?- 



T3 O >■ 



C u T! a; . 


O tZ VI 'U 


o^£ 


00 r> «s- 05 o 00 

— H i-H " ^ ^1 ^* 


ic -H ri o t- 

M •» IN M ^ 


JS^SSSS 



c 

.'p 

O 5 



'te K 



'Cr-'^ o'e^ -^."5-^ i; 
^ - --^.^ -;^ '^ ■- z SI ■- ^-. 





Morrow 
Nelson, 
Rowel 1, 
Howell, 



i68 



History of the I'ifteenth Regiment 



O 



N 



^ 



51 
5h 



s 



^ 








-* 




^'^ 








■*(??' 




50 01 - 






1 


<N^»» 


1 


<M 3 >, 


c/: 1 


>.^3 


^ 1 


SS'-' 


Di 


►— iC CS 


< 


csiS c 


% 


tlant 
n At 
Atla 


U 


^ 


<.2 V 








<U « M 




2 c-^ 




r^s 




« =-n 








P ;2 o- 




^iu 


o > 


'^ TtH ^ Tj* 


ti •- 


O :S «5 OS 


X c V 


•" ' ' " 


ri^ 




CC CO T-l Iff 


^2^ 


Feb 2 

Apl2 
Feb 

" 2 




^^^-* 


o.S S 




rt '^"^ 


^ u "^ 


«-5a 

QJO 








^ 


ID 1> V U 








OS s c« n 


ai 


> > > > 










a^D-c-o* 


. >^ 


^ .'« 


z;e 


1 aa 












f .. 


u 


*■ ■ 


c 


^ ^ 


i> 


^ cf .r 






r 






:iiO u. 


Aae 


(X- X' XX 


T— ^- — - F— 




j: 




c. CJ 




o — 


(/} 


■a ^ V 


td 


D — 3 


s 


C^'' = -S 


<; 


«r'^^ i 


z 


4) C x'"" 




5 2 Hif 
















cJjc^H?^ 






o 



==; 











(N -rf JM 




® *i - 3P 




^ . :» y _ 




O*® '- O ^9J 




~ jj ^ . *J o 




^ " u - o " -i 




■J) 


g-.S §'^ -^ -" c^ £ ^ 

T3c3 go « ;^ fe,«>,o 


Pi 


5-a >^° ^ ^ L' 2:5 ^ 


< 




k; 










O ^' 


^ -^ CI (M O? 1-7 ■?» W -M C-7 M CQ (M <N OJ CQ d C7 


,^ -^ 


^O^O^^CD^OO^OOCO^'^COO 


o c S 


*►'" ' '^"-^ ' '-' ' ' "~,'_'-' ','^ ' 


aj^i. ^ 


— io -^'cc— ' •<* M"-<d<"iOT^:o tJ<'« '-^ t-^t- -^^ 




(M-r-l ^^^^^r-I^TH'-' 


I'k^. 






3- Ud~"J33u^UiliO(ijS'— UjJ 


"" Et> 


o 


--^-'--^^»^(J>^1t-H — •--■--T-^f-^O'?-^^'— '^--^-^ 




«oo':co;;ioococDOOOoo;co 


• S ;-, 


".'," ' ," - - - - ^- *,'_" - - ^ 


" •" <u 


O' T)h' -r-* SQ w' — '' — T -"Sf^" r-^ T^ ■>*' L-f •^'" '*" X* W -^ •<*■ 


i Pat( 
going 
Quar 








^ 


c ?. ?, 3 3 3 , ■ , ■ . . .. C 'J, C C C C 


c 


■Z .}i .^ '^ '^ '^ 7\ T, '—'-'''' >~ V V <D D V i> 




,^,^rc^T3-a1^1^-3-a-o-a£5££££ 






O ■-- 1— CI ->> 01 — T-H CT OJ TC TC -rf* ^ -^ -^ ■* IC 


CS . - 


. o" . >i . E £ o' . ^ , , ... . 




^ 


li 


«"»-*". rt" , rt' - 


<-> 


5 — S .- ? .- ^ 3 -r i 3 -r 3 5 = T 


12 


£^£:^fS.. |s^§=^^!^is>^ 


OJ 

Cd 


3b30 = C 500 = OOo3oO 


•3§V 




- * " b/ i_' oj' , - u "2 I''" 




..is ^ .1) <u is 3 ■£. 3 5 s'S. c2 







'T' ';^ *o 



> 

5E 






U5 r- 
3 3 

;c2h 



•X . 



ii o — r; 



:< 



^ 5 
■a ^ 



u ■ ^ 

2 £ ^:s ^ c 

> = > 2- c 

Q H E Q OJ I ^^ 



0<;, 

ES; 



(U 



.i: ,c .- £v 






rt-^ 



loxva Veteran Volunteer Infantry i6g 






t. June 
June 1 
Aug. 6 
Oct 4, 


c 

3 


bj) ^- j3 ^ 


_^ 


SS«c£" 


W) 


C/} 1) .- D 




^c/2 Sc« 


t-^c/^ 


^^ux 




■.-55 tS^ 


=^0 


P ri- ^^ o 


u ■ 









C/5 r-l 



?> ^ c/5 p £ »« U 






.< 



-if'^o = S^'0 



- P'-"' "ri .iS P-tS ^ ^^' "^ •' o.^a'E. 



5 5 '5 5 U a3 "S r^ - TO O a3 « c3 ^C5 U 



?^^5 £-5 ^-^ ^'^o^.RR ^R^.ot.P. o^S^ ^^^ 



ci 




cfSP 


:o 




T— < ^ 






>^CO 


^"» ^ 










-^ 


20 




o'~" 


Ih — • OJ 




03 .t; 


CL ao 




5 D< 


^ r°^ W' 










^i 


aj o 






•- i. •■" 

:; I' 2 




C..2 




IJ o 


O ->-' >- 




^ b 


%t2. 


<A 


> 






T' 


.- 1) 



UU ^rj^c/5.^^ '^xr^.xx^'-r -'Sir ^.> -^ c}^ .> - -■ 

fa fa fe^ &:h Cfa £ ^_;i^_P:i^^_^:,_bi; fa g^fafafa ifaifa^fafafafafaCifaQifafab 

o> 'Ji o 6i m nt CQ c>> 'it CJ c> <?> oV ci c^ o 

o p 03 w p o p o p j5 o o o o :o o 



t- C- -^ ?r 00 •<* ?T> -^ CO L~ -^ TO t- ^ TO ^ aO to O Ti< CO 43 L-? CO » •* CO ^ "—CO 

1— <T-( 1—1 1— I 1—11— I I— iT-< -:. T^ ^^OJ 1— (*■>>— i-H T— i-i:; ,- 

►^o fa < o fa o fa ^o fa ^o fao<fa<:ofa<Zfa<: Ofa Zfa 



-uouo = uiu = o^i'i'u<uoi,ajiu<L> <u57oi»3ajOUmu = uCu-TJ 

AooooAoP>:^oc;Qaoaofaaaa fa:ooQ<:fao o fa o ^o Ao fa 




ii3c43dii3i! BiiiTO ii rt iirt^ii nf 1; 3 _- U k 3 :« 3 

1?^ O -^ CO — ' g:? C-^ g? 1?^ C<j -^ 107 iQl ^ O:? -^ (M OT O^ 07 C-"? 07 ^ CO ty? CQ ^ e^ — (M 1-1 <W (?} -.-J -^ ^H 



; o cr o c ,. ^ 5 



•3 rt _cs _5 5-3 2 § O O G. « ^ _g 

14 



: 3 p 3 '^^ 3 ^ .3 . i: d. OS 3 P^ 3 '"" ^ >->°^ 0=^ § 3 -,0 Z • '. • • h -^- 0. > 
5rt55x5§O0-H.«^Ji-a5§5c/,^^§7^57^-^^^^«-pfe_-^' 
: X X ~ 3.-.;: 3cs3pW'2,?^ — ■r:^3!"?^-r u/— 3^-333cSx^.i^ 
'C^cr" <«L~ ai-3x i;"':;: <uh::"~ rt~ r ~ ~ rt r ,•-' t- 3 ~— X X :_ jo -t^ .^ ':; x 

'■^^^B^ ^^A=c ^-< i^ < ^ g °,u •< < S &: ^ u uiAA^^^H < < < M w 
14 



lyo 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 






1^ 






1- cs 



ft; 






^ 



I 



— c - 





^ OS-. 






■< 






"x. 










■f= -O- 




O 




VI f-. ^ 






a 


Q fe.S S 




x 




•rS >.-^ 




"3 




D = S: 4J 


U 






.-^ 1; tUD 








^5 55 


O 


='0 




r- •/: ^ 


j: 


'^ p 




o d3= ^ 





i^ o 




fc:c:^i5 


fc 


S tu, 





» 














Moi 


















u. 5o 






















T-H 














73 - 




_^» 


o( 


oi 




« 

o 














- 










lO u 




>— 1 


Y 


«- 


1^ 


..*- 






c 








' 






w 




O 3 


CO 




< 




J2 


o 




is 

o 


^II2 




















t< 


CT 


rt 


^ 




to 




b'r 





'J 





o 


n 


.- 


.r 


X 


-^ 


'^ 


^ 


^ 


UJ 


U 


.ti 






' 


c 


x) I- 




^-' 


^ 




0/ 




; ; 




T-H 


•y: 


-« 


'-. 




— 


c. 

5 
U 


_5 


d 







1) 


-5 


d o 


— 


«s 


O 


Ul 





-o 


r 


C^O 


o 


c 


p 


5 


-a 
1* 




u 




p 




















C-, 


U^ Ijh 




Q^Q^ 


t 






-o J= 


r. 


- 






o 




o - 


^ 


^ ^ 


c 


C/5 1^ 


_o 


Tjd IJ 


> 




Q 






^-^ o 


o 


^^ 


Q 



2 = 



1) o aj 





o . 


o 


c - 








or? 




at 



:: T^ T^ CJ 3 



O U -■ ^ O O 



fcO C 



ZO: 



^ 


u 


o 


OJ 


u 


o 


u 


ii 


4J 


OJ 


1) 


1; 


<U 


aj 


ii 


1> 


1) 


0) 


J. 


« 


u 


(U 


l« 


u 


l; 


!U 


OJ 


u 


Zj 


o 


Ij 


rt 
^ 


r; 


c« 


rt 


rt 


t- 


ri 


U 


CS 


« 


CS 


B5 


rt 


tS 


c« 


rt 


cS 


rt 


« 


cS 


— 


« 


rt 


r: 


ri 


C3 


c- 


CS 


rt 


CS 


CS 


> 


> 






> 




> 




> 






> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 




> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 






























































































































O^C^Ch 


2h 


ChCCCh 


H, 


^H 


^ 


0-, 


— 


C_X 


2- 


0,0. a. 


C-, 


CO, 


Oh 


Ch 


2- 


0, 


^ 


— 


OiOh 



zv 



p-dT3T3 is ^T3t3'^'a 

cccoocccc 



.2"!^ .2' 



K„ • c o . P 

^■5 :s -^s ^ S 



losiolooo^^s^^^a^^iio-ow^oo^cu^o:- 



^ C c^^ 



c « = 



ai 



JS CS — 



= >— cr-; 



cS « 
3 <U , 



^ cS 



cS 



O 3 O 

c ti c 



U'i^ 



09^2 

D C " C 



3 ^ 3ii CS cS 

o O O O 3 Q ^ 
1) C OJ C ii D ^ 

y lai ^ iij O :^ O 






73 
5 c 



u E^ aJ 



1^ O ^ - 

•_ 1 - JO 

2 2? =« o 

O O s- :- 

P3«MCQ 



&H.2 



U3 Ol 

0£ 



r Ji o 



MO 



cS .E 
OU 



> ■"? ,^ ? 2 p 

' C: :«' '<r O S i^ p P 

S . , p . 

;-eSc3£i=i:c> 

« i; if o o 3 ;:- 



-5 5 



p 




U 




^ 


5 


rt 


p 




73 


^ 


x- 


p 




























"c- 


c 


2 


C- 





^ 


"? 


.5 




_CS 


H 




c 


> 






■^ 





c 


x' 






u: 


> 

a' 




P 


SJD 


s 


_0 


_o 








3 


P 


3 






> 




J5 


"x 

CS 


s 


QQQ 


G 


r\ 


in 


woooo 


1-1 


KE 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 



171 







>^ 



1) 



^ -^ S jd o 
^ ^" o ^ -a 

0) :5 '^ <u "v 

C 3 



13 JfJ 






^ <^^ 

<u 5 u 

> „ 

i- ^ — 

(U .»-i ■•- 

-a -2 -2 

3 CO tB 

5 bJOOO 

c 






OOt^Oo O 11 "i 



C CQ 1) 

•-p c 

. O _ 3 
?" 7^ <?« j^ 

o :s „■ s 

o .5 o -o 



be 



. 3 . u 
O O O «> 



g-a 



QQ 



a, 



.* o 



Q 



CO CQ C^ C>J 

CO o o o 



^ CO ■* CO 






f^ Cn 









:^ 4,;z; fe, ^ ^fc O fc. fc O ^' O fe Q S,Q >^fa A" E^ fcn vfl.fc O fe A- fafafa,"' - 



iT 


iT 


oT 


(U 


cT 


oT 


ij 


aj" 


a J" 


<u 


jj' 


aJ" 


iT 


oT 


iT 


^7 


iT 


oj" 


(lT 


«r 


a J" 


<u 


iT 


oT 


a' 


aT 


oJ" 


«7 


aJ" 


aj" 


aj' 


of 


ar 


a;' 


li 


a;" 












































































cj 


« 


(S 


w 


rt 


rS 


CS 


CJ 


si 


rt 


rt 


rt 


(« 


rt 


cs 


R 


« 


(« 


as 


c<S 


03 


n1 


C3 


cs 


« 


73 


cj 


e« 


rt 


rt 


cj 


c« 


cs 


ei 


ca 




■- 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 




> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 






> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


u 


t. 


L. 


;-. 


^ 


^ 


t^ 


'_ 


i~ 


«_ 


^ 


u 


■_^ 


^ 


u 


u 










•^ 


r_^ 


._ 




u 


^ 


^ 


t_^ 


•^ 


u 


u 


^ 


S-. 


u 


u 


u. 


c-OHQ-xa,cL,CLfiHeL,eHO-,fL,o-ieL,eLip-i&HeueL,?L,0-,p- 


:^ 


a.cL,a.cuD^cuo^cuo^o~cucuP^ 



CJ .2 .2 > 2~ • 

X x: J£ _ :S -a 



> 



^■6 






zooSz^JSo = = ^b^oa:^5°^H^55o^ShD:oo^^HO^ 



> 


JU 


cs 


3 


_aj 


_aj 




_aj 




_aj 


? 


_aj 




^ 


a" 


_a; 


cs" 


_aj 


s 


y. 


g 


X - 


> 


e^ 


> - 


£ 


> ^ 


3 




E ; 


> 


M 




= s 


> ^ 







5 




1) 




c 


T3 


3 





- 




c 


3 



c 


-:i 




c 







c 


i 




c 


Ot^Otid^ 


MO 


Ul 


0:^ 


OW 





^^ 


^t^ 


Ot^ii 


00 


COCIOOSOOOOIOOOCOO'* 


^ 00 00 Ot' 07 05 Ci Xi QO ■ 


■-I L-5 -^ 00 10 ! 


'TL 




zrL 




?0 -rH 


"— ' 


ri ^ 


C? Cl -* Cl ^ 


— ' 


— c-t 


■^ -^ 


l— ' 


1— 1 


^1 CQ W -^ 


— (M 1 



=; cr — 



O Nd ^ 



pa 



M 



-.tt] 



3 iX>' 



S r- 



5jL°e. 



^" =:'^ P 



1J ?^ ■" — 
3 "y aj .— 



es ^ ^ ^ cs 

; ^ ■ :^ c _u p |£ 

5— 3y >^u.5> 

o 



5 c- 









3 v ^-3" -a'. 5 o cs 
o ^ '-^ 5^ ^ W ^t^ 



: x: X ^ 3 p' M Si5 ' J^ iT u E -a ^ c =-■■ "^ u' J^' M. <" 1^- 
o5o3bc-3 2^-=§§gt515t;5ooc-5Js?2-S-^rt"'°-o'oS:o:^22 



172 



History of the Fifteenth Regi7ne7it 



U 



ft 



Ct^ 



§. 
^ 



^ 



I 



■J) 




t^ 


^ 


< 


J= 


% 




u 


o 


Di 


U 



a, 
< 






0._ "J ■t' 

T3 T3 = E 

£ £ u o "o 

o o .;£ «) <u 



IH -5 <u.£ 



7) S 
« O 



:: c 



25-3" 



•".- ■£ 



o.£ fc 
Q 3 . 



■ret; 

j:; .— T3 
^? = 
P^5 



o -a " 



I- 



O .£ h I - - 



O Ci' GO CO ^ < 






i.'o 



U tj oj - (u O - 
&H O &H .ilCl- O 



O U - - 



; a; 
















































HI 


Oi 


1) 


n 


M 


0^ 


1< 


n 


u 


11 


Ij 


a; 


JJ 


1) 


V 




<u 


\l 


OJ 












































w 


rt 


rt 


cS 


OS 


cs 


rt 


c« 


05 


OS 


c« 


cs 


















> 




> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


^ 


^ 


^ 


> 


















































































ICuD-iPhCIi&hD-cCuDhCUCuCLiCh 


-H 


Qm 3-f Oh CU Dh Cu Ci^ 



^-> 



■ > ■ -t . .9 . • .2 c -; c • -2 



"o S ■- 



^?2 



cS ^ 

o ' 



&= is 



O^O 



?^ 



^O 



DOC 



■->S-cT (O OO OO O O Ci O O — 05 O 00 CQ 1/^ CO O -^ ^ C5 CO 





^7, 


s 
^ 


^1 

o -a 


z 


— 'W 




















^ £ 




!/3 73 



K^' 



^ . ■% ■ 

« N> r/ M M 
• 03 ** * ,^ c 

<-r. -^ r- ■$■ 'A ^ 

: j= k^ o o -T3 a; T3 j= ►^ .'K 
jog (u'-^s Ji cU>^ 



fcJO 






^"5- 



N ^ 



= 5: 

8.2^ -a o c 

- us -— C 2 " 3 

:c^csu .oo'''*cBcscsaj._.-Oi^o 



1- - - 'jT -?' -j:: - - S C " 
".■S.t: 03^ «>— ,c c 3_ — — 

'iri 'r\ rr\ 'r\ re\ rr\ rr\ rr\ 'r\^-^'^ ^ ^ \ 



O S „ 

£ g| 

I 3 I 

C3 CO O 

— s <« 

ra c3 O 

'^ a 

§ M a 

1 - 1 

>- O Oh 



O p 5 

S o 'S ■ 

bB i: „ * 

cs -»-' j^ j-l 

2 "E To 

o C . o 

£ O =» x" 

S .2 t= I 

i' T3 = g 

"3 "p 



at c, 



o O 



"" H ^ 5 



a c3 .^ i-i 

■^ tlH 

SB'S >> o 

a) 03 , o 
cc >^ o 

._ a •;£ cs 

m .2 ^ a 

g S M 2 
S o" ■- fe 

^ nT ' 

«^ ►? -S 00 
a fe ^ S 

•2 t «= c-' 

ill! 

o 73 -3 



^ 
^ 



1^ 



!<] o: 



lozoa Veteran Volunteer htfantry. 



173 



O c 



tii 



u 



be ■__ u 
3 c a. « 






looo'^o" OS— ^ coo 

(?? Ol 01 :; OJ CO 






iT 


oT 


jj 


a" 


(1)' 


0' 


oT 


iT 


qT 


ir 


aJ 
























-5 


c« 


« 


rt 


rt 


R! 


rt 


rt 


in 


rt 


n 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


•„ 


u 


«„ 


<^ 


;_, 


•_ 


u 


Sh 


<_ 


•^ 




cuo.pH&.eu 


HH 


ChPhPhO^O, 




















•n 






m 











• 








n 







"D 


53 


J= 




u 


!« 


c 


"i! 








fcO 




x>Cu 


►::; 






fed 



c; 


u 


, . 


— - 


a 


> 


;/) 


'/, 


CJ 


f^ 




c 


Ont^i 






CO » 00 £- — < JO ci > 
_j--ir-< _ ^ CO o:) CQ I 






"^ o o V 

?r-= Oh S C =" M "^ 



b/j 



=^- 



V K u ^ -S o 



;:; c 



•f, ^ a.C 



Co; 



1^4 History of the fifteenth Regiment 



IPj^I^T iv. 



INTRODUCTORY LETTER OF LT. COL GEO. POMUTZ TO 

ADJT. GEN, N. B. BAKER. 
THE FIFTEENTH IOWA INFANTRY ARRIVE AT PITTSBURG 

LANDING. 

GENERAL ORDER No. 39-COL. H. T. REID. 

SHILOH— COL. H. T. REID'S REPORT. 

LIST OF CASUALTIES. 

RECOLLECTIONS OF SHILOH. 

THE THIRD BRIGADE— 6th DIVISION FORMED. 



loxva Veteran ] o/z/nfcrr Infantry. lyc 

FIFTEENTH IOWA VETERAN INFANTRY, 



HISTORY OF THE REGIMENT. 

{^Introductory Letter.^ 

Keokuk, Nov. 30, 1865. 

Brig. General N. B. Baker, Adjutant-General of Iowa: 

General: — In obedience to the resolution adopted by the Gen- 
eral Assembly of the State of Iowa, approved February 28, 1864, 
and agreeably to circular No. 10, series 1864, from Adjutant-Gen- 
eral's office of the state, I have the honor to forward to you, for the 
information and use of your department, a copy of a history of the 
15th Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry, showing, in a connected 
form, the part taken by that Regiment in the military operations 
(luring the war, and supplying the deficiencies of the reports of 
former years. The items thereof agree with the official records 
and books of the command, and each campaign being under a sep- 
arate heading, the official reports and lists of casualties, diagrams of 
positions, etc., belonging to it, are annexed to the same. 

The completion of this detailed report has been unavoidably de- 
layed by reason of the constant, active service in which the Regi- 
ment has been engaged during the last two years, and on account 
of the greatly increased labor caused by tlie large number of new 
recruits received in the midst of the last great campaign of the war. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfulh'. 

Your Obedient Servant, GEO. POMUTZ, 
Late Lieutenant-Colonel 15th Iowa Veteran Infantry, 

Commanding Reg-iment, 



iy6 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

The 15th Iowa Infantry — Armed and Equipped at St. 
Louis — Arrived at Pittsburg Landing April 6, 1862 — 
Battle of Shiloh— Colonel H. T. Reid's Report — The 
Casualties over One-fourth of those Engaged — Tel- 
egrams — Recollections — The 11th, 13th, 15th and 16th 
Iowa form the Iowa, or 3d Brigade, 6th Division, Army 
of the Tennessee — A New Flag. 

The 15th Iowa Infantry was organized at Keokuk, and destined 
to enter the field on the Tennessee. It joined General U . S. 
Grant's army at Pittsburg Landing, where it went through its 
" bloody baptism" on April 6th and 7th, with a loss of over one- 
fourth of its number engaged in the two days fights. 

It formed part of Grant's Army of the Tennessee, especially 
under the loved and lamented Major-General James B. McPher- 
son, until General Sherman succeeded General Grant in command, 
in the fall of 1863, from which time, as part of the old 17th Army 
Corps, it shared the hardships, the memorable battles, sieges, and 
hundreds of skirmishes, as well as the glory, of Sherman's army 
moving upon and capturing Atlanta, Savannah, the Carolinas, 
Goldsboro, and Raleigh, N. C, where Johnston's rebel army de- 
feated in a hundred battles during the preceding year, was finally 
brought to surrender April 26, 1865. 

The Regiment left for St. Louis on March 19th, 1862. 

The Keokuk Gate City, of Thursday, March 20th, said: The 
15th Regiment gone. Yesterday was a disagreeable, stormy, 
gloomy day, the rain, at intervals, coming down freely. It was a 
bad day for the departure of the 15th, but at 3 p. m. they marched 
down to the boat, escorted by the 17th, and a large number of 
friends and citizens. 

At 4 o'clock, all hands being on board the Jeannie Deans, she 
slowly swung around and departed amid the hearty cheers of the 
spectators. Many sad hearts were left behind, but every one felt 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. f/y 

that, if ever the 15th has the opportunity, it will give a good ac- 
count of itself, and inscribe its name high on the roll of fame. 

At Benton Barracks the Regiment received its arms, accoutre- 
ments and equipments. 

GENERAL ORDERS NO. 39. 

Headquarters 15th Iowa Volunteers, ) 
Benton Barracks^ March 2g, 1862 . \ 

The 15th Regiment will move at 7 o'clock Tuesday morning 
next, to join General Grant on the Tennessee river. Four days' 
rations will be issued to-morrow morning, which will be cooked by 
the respective companies, to be used only while on the way to Ten- 
nessee. The commanders of the several companies will see that 
their men are ready to move at the time stated, and that their cooked 
rations are properly prepared. 

H. T. REID, 
Colonel Commanding Regiment. 

The Regiment embarked on the steamer Minnehaha April 1st 
for Savannah, where it was assigned by General Grant to General 
Prentiss's Division, then near Pittsburg Landing, the Regiment 
arriving at the latter place on the morning of April 6th. 

Shiloh — Colonel H. T. Reid's Report. 

Headquarters 15th Iowa Volunteers, 
Near Pittsburgh Tenn.^ April p, 1862, 

To the Assistant Adjutant-General, 1st Division, Army of the 
Tennessee : 
I have the honor to report that the 15th Regiment Iowa Volun- 
teer Infantry, from Benton Barracks, arrived at Pittsburg on Sun- 
day morning with orders from General Grant's headquarters to 
report to General Prentiss. Finding that his headquarters were 
some four miles from the landing, I proceeded at once to report to 



ijS History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

him in person, and found a heavy fire of artillery and musketry 
already commenced along his lines. Ordei's were received from 
his aid to bring up my command as soon as possible, and I returned 
to the river for that purpose. The Regiment was rapidly disem- 
barked, ammunition distributed, and the men for the first time loaded 
their guns. We then marched to the heights in rear of the land- 
ing, and formed in line of battle preparatory to an advance, our 
right resting on the road leading from the landing to the field. At 
this time an order was received from a member of General Grant's 
staff directing me to hold the position upon which we had formed, 
and to post such other troops as could be found about the landing 
on the right of the road extending to the bluff of the creek, empty- 
ing into the river below the landing, in order to prevent the enemy 
from flanking it through the valley of this creek, and also to pre- 
vent all stragglers from returning from the battle-field to the land- 
ing, and to hold ourselves as a reserve. The Regiment was then 
advanced across the road to the right so as to stop the progress of 
the multitudes returning from the battle-field, which could only be 
done by threatening to shoot them down. Some of them were in- 
duced by threats and persuasions to fall into line, but most of them 
had the Bull Run stor^^ that their Regiments were all cut to pieces 
and that they were the only survivors, and nothing could be done 
with them but to stop their progress. Captain Benton placed his 
battery on our right, commanding the road leading from the battle- 
field to the river, and also commanding the ravines to our right and 
left. 

Colonel Chambers, of the 16th Iowa, formed his Regiment on 
the right of Benton's Battery, resting the right of his Regiment on 
the bluflf of the creek above mentioned. In this position we re- 
mained for about an hour, when an order was received from the 
Engineer on General McClernand's staff, by order, as he said, of 
General Grant, for the 15th and 16th Iowa to advance some two 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. lyg 

miles, to the support of General McClernand's 1st Division on the 
• extreme right of our lines. 

The advance was made, the 15th leading, supported by the 16th. 
We were led by the staff officer of General McClernand, first to 
the right, across a. deep ravine, and through thick underbrush in a 
direction directly from the firing. Then one of General Grant's 
staff came up and said a wrong order must have been given us, in 
which opinion the undersigned fully concurred ; and after consulta- 
tion of the two staff officers, the head of our column was turned to 
the left and we marched in search of General McClernand's Divi- 
sion, his staff officer showing us the way . 

The road as we marched was filled with retreating artillery, fly- 
ing cavalry, straggling infantry, and the wounded returning from 
the field. We reached an open field in front of the enemy, who 
were concealed in a dense wood and among tents, from which other 
Regiments had been driven earlier in the day. Through this field 
the two Regiments marched, under a heavy fire from the enemy's 
artillery, and took position by direction of General McClernand, 
near the tents. A Regiment said to be from Ohio was on the field 
when we arrived, or came on soon after, and took position on the 
extreme right of the 16th. The 15th, which occupied the left, 
advanced upon the enemv and drove a part of them from their con- 
cealments among the tents and planted our colors in their midst, 
while the whole left wing of the Regiment advanced under a mur- 
derous fire of shot and shell from the enemy's artillery and an in- 
cessant fire from the musketry. 

Our flag-staff was shot through, and our colors riddled with bul- 
lets. For two hours, from 10 to 12 o'clock, we maintained our 
position, our men fighting like veterans. The undersigned was 
severely wounded by a musket ball through the neck, which knocked 
him from his horse, paralyzed for the time, but recovering in a 
short time remounted and continued In command throughout the 
fieht. 



t8o Mlstoty of the fifteenth Regiment 

Fifteen of the thirty-two commissioned officers who went on the 
field had heen killed, wounded or taken prisoners. Twenty-two offi- 
cers and men had been killed, one hundred and fifty-seven wounded. 
The Ohio regiment had left the field. The enemy were attempt- 
ing to outflank us on the right and left. We were unsupported by 
artillery or any other regiment except the gallant 16th, which had 
also sufTered severely. It became necessary for the two regiments 
to retreat or run the risk of being captured, and by order of Gen- 
eral McClernand, the retreat was made. Portions of the regi- 
ments rallied and fought with other divisions later in the day and 
on Monday. Where nearly all fought with bravery, it might 
seem invidious to particularize, but I hope to do no one injustice by 
specially pointing out those whose personal valor, during the action, 
came under my notice. Lieutenant Colonel Dewey had his horse 
shot under him. Major Belknap was always in the right place, 
at the right time, directing and encouraging officers and men as 
coolly as a veteran. He was wounded, but not disabled, and had 
his horse shot under him, but remained on the field performing his 
duty on foot. Adjutant Pomutz distinguished himself during the 
action for his coolness and courage. He too was wounded. Cap- 
tain Kittle, of Company " A," Smith, of Company " B," Seevers, 
of Company " C," Madison, of Company " D," Hutchcraft, of 
Company " E," Cunningham, of Company " G," Day, of Com- 
pan}- " I,'' Hedrick, of Company "• K," who was captured in a 
charge upon the enemy, all distinguished themselves for their gal- 
lantry and courage in leading forward and encouraging their men. 
Captain Blackmar, of Company " F," was wounded in the action 
and disabled. First Lieutenant Goode, of same company, also 
wounded. Captain Clark, of Company " H," was not in the en- 
gagement, having been left sick in hospital at St. Louis. Cap- 
tains Hutchcraft and Day were both severely wounded. Second 
Lieutenant Penniman, of Company " A," and Hamilton, of Com- 
pany "I," were killed whilst bravely performing their duty . First 



loiva Veteran Volunteer Infantry. i8i 

Lieutenant King and vSecond Lieutenant Danielson, of Company 
"H," were botli severely wounded while acting well their part, 
thus leaving the company without a commissioned officer. First 
Lieutenants Studer, of Company " B," Porter, of Company " D," 
Craig, of Company " E," Hanks, of Company " G," J. Monroe 
Reid, of Company " I," who, though wounded himself, continued 
in command of the company after the Captain was disabled, and 
the Second Lieutenant killed, and Eldredge, of Company "K," all 
deserve special praise for the manner in which they conducted them- 
selves on the field. Second Lieutenant Lanstrum, of Company 
" B," Brown, of Company " E," Herbert, of Company " C," and 
Sergeant Major Brown, who was severely wounded, conducted 
themselves well on the field. The non-commissioned officers gen- 
erally were at their posts and performed their duty. The Color 
Sergeant, Newton J. Rogers, who fought in the 1st Iowa at 
Springfield, gallantly bore our standard forward and planted it 
among the enemy, where it was bravely maintained and defended 
by portions of Company " C," Company'' E," Company " I," and 
Company " K." 

It must be remembered that this regiment had just received its 
arms, and that the men had never had an opportunity of learning 
the use of them until they came on the battlefield; that they had 
just landed and were attached to no brigade, and fought the enemy 
without the support of artillery in a position from which more 
experienced troops had been compelled to retire . The enemy, too, 
against whom we fought, the 22d Tennessee, and two Louisiana 
regiments are understood to be among their best troops. 

We have no means of learning the loss of the enemy in this en- 
gagement, except from what they told some of our wounded men 
who were taken prisoners by them and left behind the next day, 
when the enemy made their final retreat, but from this source we 
learned that they had forty men killed in the immediate vicinity of 
colors and a large number wounded. While we mourn our com- 



i82 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

rades in ai-ms, the gallant dead, whose lives were sacrificed on the 
altar of their country, we are solaced with the belief that a grate- 
ful people will, in after times, pay a proper tribute to their mem- 
ory. 

To Quartermaster Higley, great credit is due for the masterly 
manner in which he performed the arduous duties of his office, on 
the field and elsewhere during the fight and after it was over in 
providing for the comforts of the wounded and protecting the 
property of the regiment. 

To our Surgeon, Dr. Davis, we are under great obligations for 
his energy and skill in the performance of the numerous opera- 
tions rendered necessary. Assistant Surgeon Gibbon also per- 
formed valuable service in the midst of great danger on the battle 
field in attending the wounded there and having them carried to • 
our temporary hospital on board of the Steamer Minnehaha. 

The Chaplain, the Rev. W. W. Estabrook, too, for the time, 
laid aside his sacred office and resumed the use of the surgeon's 
scalpel with great success, and the wounded of numerous regi- 
ments besides our own, shared in the skill of our medical staff. 

Attached hereto will be found a list of killed, wounded and mis- 
sing, making a total loss of one hundred and eighty-six. 

H. T. REID, 
Colonel, commanding 15th Iowa Volunteers. 



List of Killed, Wounded and Missing at the Battle 
OF Shiloh April 6th and 7th 1862. 
Killed: ''A.'' Companv. Second Lieutenant, Jesse B. Penni- 
man. Privates, P. H. Kennedy, A. D. Palmer, Wm. Wood;"B" 
Company: Private, C. Wenzel;"C" Company: Private, C. VV. 
Bardrick; •' D '' Company: First Sergeant, E. C. Fo\vler; Privates, 
J. Ryan,G. S. Trick; "E" Company: Corporals, Wm . Clark 
and J. W. Pouts; Privates, J. McCord, G. Peyton; "F" Com- 
pany : Privates, B. F. Russell, M. W. Thayer, \. N. Troth; "G" 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Injantry. i8j 

Company: Private, G. Feagins;" H " Company : Private, A. Crill ; 
" I " Company : Second Lieutent Robert W. Hamilton; Privates, 
Wm. Day, J. Doyle, M. H. Wilson; "K" Company: Privates, J. 

D. Holmes, J. W, Winkler. 

Wounded: Field and Staff ; Colonel H . T. Reid, in neck se- 
verely; Major W. W. Belknap, in shoulder severely; Adjutant 
Geo. Pomutz, left thigh severely. 

Non-Commissioned Staff; Sergeant Major Alexander Brown, 
hip severely . 

" A " Company: Sergeant W. McLanahan, mortally; Corporals, 
J. A. Kimbrough, arm severely; Wm. Elsroad, hip; W. C. Hersh- 
berger, hand and arm severely ; M. Rhynsburger, hand; Privates, 
L.J. Bales, leg severely; J. Brown, breast severely; H. Bunn, 
shoulder; N. Dawson, breast; D. Helmick, mortally ;E. Hopkins, 
leg; A. Hurlburt, F. Lambard, hip; J. D. Moon, shoulder; D. 
Rhynsburger, head; J. Sells, wrist severely ; J. B. Sims, hip; J. 
Smith, C. S. Stewart, shoulder; W. Watson, C. M. Wheelock, 
leg. 

'••■ B " Company : First Lieutenant, A . G. Studer; First Sergeant, 
H. Moreland, head severely; Privates, M. V. B. Barnes, mortally ; 
H. Edmundson, right arm severely; J. N. Newland, mortally; J. 
Payne, shoulder severely; D. J. Skinner, side; B. F. Sterling, 
mortally; B. F. Stoughton, head mortally; W. H. Torr, J. H. 
Warrmgton, mortally. 

"C " Company: Privates, S. P. Autry, leg severely ; H. Borrell, 
hand severely; W. H. Brown, hand severely; D. Devore, side; 
L Dove, leg; D. Hoff, shoulder severely ; E. R. Hunt, side severely ; 
C. Johnson, arm severely; C. L. Kirk, mortally; ^. Llovd, leg; 
J. T. Timbrel, thigh severely, \. S. Warner, breast and side severe- 
ly ; E. B. Whitlock, abdomen, J. Youngblood, thigh severely. 

"D" Company: First Lieutenant, J. S. Porter, arm; Corporals, 

E. M. Gebhardt, J. G. Hallaway, thigh; Privates, J. Angel, leg 
severely; L. F. Bird, head severely; S. Buchanan, head; A. Clark, 



J 



184 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

shoulder severely ; H. Elmer, mortally; W. Gray, mortally; W. 
Maserva, knee; J. H. Nosier, mortally; M. Rayburn, arm severely; 
A.J. Roach, head; C H. Shreeves, side;J. W. Wellman, leg se- 
verely; M.Wellman, mortally ;W. B. Winters, foot severely; G. 
W. Zimmerman, breast . 

"E" Company: R. W. Hotchcraft, arm sevei'ely; First Ser- 
geant, W. P. L. Muir; right leg; Sergeant W. C. Stidger, side; 
Corporals, V. Porter, left shoulder severely; M . Sweet right 
shoulder severely ; Privates, W. D. Carver, hand; A. Clingman, 
side and spine; VV . Clingman, mortally ; B. Davis, head, mortally; 
G. Dehart, thigh severely; C. Dufar, shoulder; S. W. Grove, elbow- 
severely; W. H. Harry man, elbow severely; R. Herdman, head 
mortally; J. Miller, head severely; J. R. Porter, breast; D. S. 
Taylor, hip; I. B. Thatcher, arm; J. J. Wilson, arm; N. Zacham, 
leg and shoulder. 

" F" Company: Captain E. C. Blackmar; First Lieutenant, P. 
H. Goode, hand; Second Lieutenant, J . Throckmorton; Sergeant, J. 
AI. Parsons, ankle; Corporals, J. Y . Stone, breast; F. A. Black- 
mar, leg; Privates, W. Blair, side; P. R. Buckham, left foot; W, 
Cooper, ankle severely; F. M. Harmon, mortally; W. H. Irwin, 
breast severely; L. E. Kelly, breast; L. King, ankle; W. T. Mc- 
Coon, mortally; A. M. McKee, neck severely; G. B. Murray, 
hand severely ; J . L. Ryerson, knee; D. W. Scott, mortally; W. 
Siefford, head; J. A. C. \yhitney, side. 

" G " Company: Corporals, N. S. Hayes, head; C. D. Mathews, 
hip; Privates, J. Amon, thigh severely; D. Fisher, three ribs bro- 
ken ; O. E. Ford, mortally ; H . H. Horton, face; W . W.James, 
breast; M. W. Judkins, arm amputated; J. McVay, W. Metcalf, 
breast-bone broken, hand; H. Morris, arm; T. Stone, head; J. 
Tovera, face; J. White, hand. 

" H " Company: First Lieutenant, S. W. King, left leg amputa- 
ted; Second Lieutenant, J. A. Danielson, right hip severely; First 
Sergeant, Z. M. Piatt, mortally, left leg amputated; Sergeant N. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. i8^ 

W. Edwards, thigh; J. S. Cole, left thigh severely; Corporal, N. 
G. Boynton. right hip severely; Privates, J. Clark, thigh severely; 
S. Clark, face; S. Dicus, thigh severely; J. W. Ellis, mortally; 
H. Frantz, left thigh severely; R. Jewell, right foot; J. Johnson, 
head two, left arm two and leg five wounds; D. Knause, shoulder; 
A. Mosier, thigh severely; L. J. Streeter, left leg severely; H. G. 
Vincent, right leg amputated; J. Whaley, foot severely. 

" I " Company: Captain J. G. Day, hip severely; First Lieuten- 
ant J. M. Reid, neck severely ; Sergeant H. Scheevers, shoulder 
severely; Corporals, B. F. Keck, chest severely; G. H. Kuhn, 
mortally; Privates, R. Brisbin, leg severely; D. Buckley, mortally; 
E. Chandler, leg severely; G. W. Colenbrander, W. J. Gracy, 
thigh; G. W. Hall, thigh; G. Haner, hand ; A. Homewood, leg; 
I. W.Johnson, mortally; J. B. Jones, mortally; H. Morgan, 
wrist severely; J, Murphy, mortally; M. R. Palmer, back severely ; 
A. A. Rogers, hip; H. V. VanderWall, mortally; W. Ward, 
both hands. 

"K" Company: Captain J. M. Hedrick, severely; Sergeant, H. 
C. McArthur, left hip; Corporals, A. R. Wilcox, leg; H. B. 
Wyatt, mortally; Privates, W. W. Bixler, arm; J. Chrismore, 
mortally; W. R. Edmonds, head; W. S. Grove, mortally; T. W. 
Hammond, thigh; G. L. Hunt, thigh; J. Johnson, hand severely; 
J. Ketcham, mortally ; J. M. Long, shoulder severely; L. M. Ran- 
dolph, head mortally; J. Smith, G. W. Wallace, foot severely; M. 
M. Young, leg. 

Missing: " B " Company : Private, M. V. B. Barnes. "D" 
Company: Corporal, E. M. Gebhart; "E " Company: Private, N. 
Zachan; "G " Company: Second Lieutenant, H. Fisk; Private, A. 
N. Crosby ; " H " Company : Private, R . Jewell ; " I " Company : 
Private, G. W. Colenbrander; "K" Company: Captain J. M. 
Hedrick; Privates, T. W. Hammond, J. Johnson, M. M. Young. 

15 



i86 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



RECAPITULATION. 





>^'? 


-a 








aj 


-^1 


-a 






^- 


!- 3 


2 


\^ 


o 


o 



u 



Field and staff 

No i-Commissioned Staff". 

" A " Company 

" B " Company ..... . . 

" C " Company 

" D " Company 

" E '' Company 

" F " Company 

" G " Company 

" H " Company 

" I " Company 

" K" Company 



Totsl. 



.24 ..32 .146 



.19 



..3 
..1 
.21 

.11 
.14 
.18 
.20 
.20 
.14 
.18 
.21 
.17 



..0 
..0 
..0 

..1 

..0 

.1 
.1 

. .0 
. .2 

..1 
,..1 
...4 



.178 



..3 
. 1 
.25 
.13 
.15 
.22 
!25 
.23 

,.17 
.20 
.26 

, .^3 



11 .213 



Note: Without original lists of casualties, it is impossible to make a list 
that will agree with the number stated in the reports of battles, and, after the 
reports have been for-warded to headquarters, other casualties are always found. 

Adjutant Pomutz states, about noon the divisions of Generals 
Prentiss and Shernaan on the left and front of McClernand's were 
pushed back to their second and third lines, and before a brigade 
sent by the latter to reinforce Sherman could occupy the position 
assigned to it, that division was again compelled to fall back, prin- 
cipally by reason of an Ohio brigade having given way precipi- 
tately, by which McClernand's left became suddenly exposed (see 
McClernand's report to General Grant, April 24, '62), in addition 
to his right already being so. 

The Regiment suffered severely, the total loss being 188, which 
of the number engaged, 760 makes over one-fourth of its effective 
force. The enem)' were outflanking the 15th and 16th on the 
right and left, there was no artillery to support their line. Finally, 
after more than two hours resistance, it became necessary for the 
two regiments to fall back, when to the fire in front those from the 
two flanks were added, or to run the evident risk of both being 
captured by overwhelming numbers. The 15th was still advan- 
cing on the enemy, when the order to fall back, as given by Gen- 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Irifantry. j8y 

eral McClernand, was communicated to the line officers on the right 
of the 16th Iowa (which was on the immediate right of the 15th,) and 
was passed along the lines to the line officers of the 15th, when first 
the 16th, then the 15th, commenced falling back in some disorder. 
This disorder could and undoubtedly would have been prevented 
had the order been communicated to the Colonels commanding 
these Regiments, but as Lieutenant Freeman and another staff 
officer of General McClernand had already been wounded in car- 
rying orders in this part of the fight, and as the firing was very 
heavy at the pointg where Colonels Reid and Chambers were 
posted, it is to be presumed that the officer who carried the order 
thought he had sufficiently performed his duty by delivering it at 
the point of least danger — on the right of the line. Generals Mc- 
Clernand and Sherman were both present during the fight, and 
immediately after these Regiments fell back across a ravine, some 
400 yai'ds to-the rear, commenced I'eforming their lines nearer the 
landing preparatory to the great conflict which took place later in 
the day, and which turned victory in favor of our arms. 

Meanwhile General Hurlbut's Division, then in the rear and re- 
serve, received and checked the advance of the enemy. 

Great credit is due to the officers and men of the Regiment for 
having thus proved themselves, on a terrible field, to be of a good 
mettle under the most discouraging ciixumstances, resulting from 
the attack by the enemy on Prentiss's and Sherman's Divisions in 
the early morning and from the enemy's following up his advan- 
tages, thus gained by rapid advancing and bringing up his superior 
overwhelming numbers along the whole line. To the fire, by bat- 
tallionand by company of the enemy, the Regiment answered with 
fire by file, which was the only possible firing by men who never 
had a chance to learn the other modes before they were placed on 
one of the most terrific battle-fields, and which proved to be most 
destructive to the enemy. 



1 88 Histoiy of the Fifteenth Regiment 

By the statement of First Lieutenant J. B. Clark, of the First 
Rebel Tennessee Battery, which was opposite the position of the 
15th and iHth Iowa, and lost heavily, within its first hour of the 
tight its Captain and Second Lieutenant being killed, besides the 
First Lieutenant shot through his right jaw, and 31 others killed 
and wounded, and 19 horses disabled, it had to be relieved before 
their next advance was tried. 

Among the officers of the Regiment most conspicuous for their 
gallant conduct Colonel Reid stands foremost. He displayed an 
iron energy equal to the emergency of the situation, inciting the 
men to stand their ground and imparting his contempt of danger to 
the entire command. He received a severe wound in the back of 
the neck, the ball passing through close to the jugular vein, and 
although paralyzed by it, he fell from his horse, he soon was seen 
remounted and continued in command through the remainder of 
the fight. 

Major Belknap and Adjutant Pomutz, both also mounted, were 
on hand wherever their presence was requiied along the line, keep- 
ing the men deployed whenever there was a tendency on their part 
to collect into groups, and exhorting the same that instead of firing 
too rapidly they deliver their fire with steady and deliberate aim . 
Both were wounded — the Major in the back of his shoulder and 
his horse shot under him, the Adjutant receiving towards the end 
of the fight a severe wound in the left thigh; continued on horse- 
back until weakened by loss of blood he was thrown by his horse. 

Assistant Surgeon VV. H. Gibbon established his primary at a 
distance of 250 yards in rear of the Regiment, there attending to 
the wounded brought in fiom the line, amongst occasional showers 
of bullets crossing his temporary hospital. No other surgeon at 
that time nor ever since was known to have ever selected a place 
for his primarv so close to the fighting line. The Regiment not 
having been brigaded in any of the Divisions, it was attached to 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. i8g 

Hurlbut's Fourth Division during- the afternoon of tlie 6th and 7th, 
when the enemy was driven some seven miles towards Corinth. 



A REMINISCENCE OF SHILOH. 

Sunday morning, April 6th, 1862, the 15th Iowa arrived at Pitts- 
burg Landing, after the Regiment had marched off the boat and j 
were engaged in making coffee. I was detailed as one from Com- 
pany B, being 4th Corporal, to go after ammunition and assist in 
issuing it to the men of the company, while engaged in that duty 
Colonel H. T. Reid standing near me was approached by a man 
who asked him what Regiment that was. Colonel Reid answered 
the 15th Iowa. The man then said: After the men have had their 
coffee and received their ammunition, to move to the top of the 
bluff and stop all stragglers and await further orders. Colonel 
Reid looked at him, when the man said, I am General Grant. 

After being in position on the bluff for some time we were or- 
dered to advance. Captain W. T. Smith, on looking at his watch, 
said, remember it is 20 minutes past 8. The history of the more 
than 3 hours fight we had is familiar to all . After the Regiment 
was flanked on the left and right we fell back through an open 
field in which were the camps of the 11th and 13th Iowa. In 
going back I came across Major Belknap, he being severely wounded 
but able to take care of himself. He asked me what company I 
belonged to, and on telling him he said he had a small bottle in his 
side pocket, and if I would get it out its contents might do us good. 
It was done. The Major said we must stop in the edge of the 
timber and reform as many of the Regiment as possible, which was 
done, and some 200 men of the 15th, some of the 16th, and a few 
men from an Illinois Regiment. While standing in line General 
Grant, with some of his staff, rode along in front, and out in the 
open field. Seeing us he rode to where Major Belknap was stand- 
ing, and asked him what troops they were and what they were 
doing. Major Belknap informed him, and General Grant said, 



igo History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

can you depend on the men . The Major replied : yes, or I could 
not have halted them here. Then General Grant told him to go 
with one of his staff officers, calling him by name, to a certain por- 
tion of the field to support a part of the line there. General Grant 
then asked Major Belknap his name. When told, General Grant 
said, ''z\ny relation of Colonel Belknap of the Old Army?" The 
Major replied; "He was my father!" General Grant then held 
out his hand to him and said: " I knew your father well, and was 
with him in Mexico!" 

If you will take the time, the distance to the field where we 
fought, the time we held the line, and allow some time for collect- 
ing the men where we halted, you will find that it was about the 
time that General Buell says he met General Grant on a steamboat. 
And then recalling the time when General Grant first spoke to 
Colonel Reid, it is an easy matter to decide as to the hour of Gen- 
eral Grant's arrival on the field. 

W. H. GOODRELL, 
Late of Company B 15th Iowa. 



A TELEGRAM. 

Pittsburgh Tcnn.^ April p, 1862. 
To Mrs. H. T. Reid: 

A great fight. It lasted two days. Keokuk all right. 

H. T. REID. 



"FIFTY ROUNDS TO BEGIN WITH." 
Considerable has been said of late in regard to the battle of 
Shiloh, whether our army was surprised or not on that memorable 
Sunday morning, April 6, '62. I was a non-commissioned officer 
in Coinpany E, 15th Iowa Infantry. Our Regiment left St. 
Louis by steamer April 1st, for Pittsburg Landing. On Saturday, 
the 5th, a few miles above Fort Henry, we met a steamer coming 



loxva Veteran Vohinteer Infant)-y. igi 

down the river and were informed that a battle was then in prog- 
ress at the front, (meaning Pittsburg Landing). We were all 
spoiling for a fight, and there was no little amount of grumbling 
done by members of the Regiment on account of the fear that we 
would not be there in time to take part in the battle. 

About 4 o'clock p. M. we landed at a wood-yard some 75 miles 
below Savannah, Tenn., and soon another steamer coming down 
the river landed alongside, and we learned from some military 
officers on board that up to the time of their departure, early that 
morning, nothing but brisk skirmishing had taken place, but that a 
general engagement was likely to commence at any hour. We 
arrived at the landing at 4 o'clock A. m. April 6th, and before leav- 
ing the boat were visited by members of different Regiments who 
had been camped near the landing for some days — among the num- 
ber several from the 2d Iowa Infantry. These soldiers informed 
us that a battle might take place at any time. Sure enough, in less 
than two hours from the time we landed we were greeted by occa- 
sional booms of artillery in the distance. 

We were soon ordered to disembark, and " fif t}' rounds of am- 
munition" was distributed to each man. In a few minutes more 
we were marching toward the front. By this time volleys of mus- 
ketry, as well as artillery, could be distinctly heard. As we marched 
on we met demoralized oflicers and men by the hundreds, making 
their way toward the river. Some of them informed us we would 
smell H — 11 before we got much further. 

About half past 10 o'clock we struck the enemy, or rather he 
struck us, for as we were marching by the right flank across an 
open field, the 13th Louisiana Rebel Infantry, wearing our uniform 
which they had stolen from the Baton Rouge Arsenal, rose from 
their concealment behind a winrow of leaves, where the day pre- 
vious one of our Regiments had cleared off a camping ground, and 
poured a volley into us, killing two and wounding several of our 



zg2 History of the Fifteenth Regime7it 

men. We changed front, and were hotly engaged for the next two 
hours, and finally driven back. 

Now as to the battle being a surprise I must say that, notwith- 
standing it was the first time I had been under fire, I was not sur- 
prised after the various rumors we had heard all the way up the 
river, and from older soldiers that had been camped at the front for 
some days prior to the engagement. If there were some soldiei^s 
there who expected the Rebel General, A . S. Johnston, to politely 
inform General Grant by letter or otherwise, that he expected to 
attack him at a certain time and in a certain manner, they must have 
indeed been surprised at Johnston's seeming lack of courtesy. 

I agree with General Tuttle when he says an officer would have 
been laughed out of camp had he proposed to build works for the 
defense of our army at that time. We wanted a square, stand-up, 
open fight. We got all we wanted of it, and I venture to say that 
no soldier that took part in the two days' engagement at Shiloh has 
ever spoiled for a fight since. I think General Tuttle hits the nail 
square on the head when he says the enemy got the bulge on us 
at the beginning of the battle and held it most all of the first day. 

W. P. L. MUIR. 



A SCENE FROM THE DECK OF A STEAMER. 

The bank of the Tennessee river was covered with fugitives 
who fled from the brave Regiments that were fighting like giants 
in the front. The writer, who was lying on the deck of the 
"Tigress," wounded, here witnessed a scene he will never forget. 
A gallant young Major of the 15th Iowa who, with his Regiment 
had just landed, went amongst them and implored and begged them 
to return and assist their brave comrades who were being butchered 
at the front. He told them they were unworthy of the name of 
men and of the mothers that bore them, but they remained sullen 



J 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. igj 

and deaf to every appeal. This young officer, by his gallantry, 
became a Major-General and Secretary of War — Belknap. 

DAVID MOORE, 
Colonel 21st Missouri Infantry. 

James Martin, of Keokuk, then a boy, and now a prosperous 
merchant of that city, was employed by Major Belknap to accom- 
pany him in the service. While the battle of Shiloh was being 
fought on April 6th, "Jim," excited by the sounds of the battle, 
seized a musket, rushed to the field, joined the ranks, and did good 
service until the close of the day. 

AN INCIDENT AT SHILOH. 
Monday evening, April 7th, at the close of the day's battle, Ser- *>y 
geant H. C. McArthur, K Company, was selected by Major Bel- 
knap and sent in command of a detail to bury the dead comrades of 
our Regiment. While marching to the front occasion presented 
itself to prove his ability to command . While enroute a panic 
occurred in advance. Mac and the detail of about 75 men were 
moving along a low piece of ground, and heard great confusion 
beyond the hill, followed instantly by Infantry men and Cavalry 
men rushing pell mell down the hill towards them. Instead of 
breaking to the rear with the mass of fleeing soldiers, he ordered 
his men to " Fix Bayonets,'' and moved on the double quick up to 
the brow of the hill to find, as Mac said, " much to his delight only 
a stampede of a lot of stragglers in his front." 

ONE OF THAT DETAIL. 

The News at Home — [Extract], Gate City — Keokuk, 

Tuesday, April 15, 1862 — By Telegraph — Afternoon 

Report — Later from the Great Battle. 

Colonel Reid wounded; Lieutenant-Colonel Dewey wounded; 

Major Belknap wounded; Captain Hedrick killed; only 407 of the 

15th Resriment answer to Roll Call. 



ig4 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



Special to Chicago Trib74ne^ ) 
Cairo, April ij — 10 p. m. [ 



Colonel H. T. Reid, 15th Iowa, from Keokuk, was paralyzed by 
a ball in the back of his head, Lieutenant-Colonel Dewey was 
badly wounded. Major Belknap was severely wounded in the 
shoulder; Captain Hedrick killed. This noble Regiment had just 
arrived Sunday with 1,045 men. Only 407 answered to their names 
after the battle. They had received their guns at St. Louis, and 
left Keokuk only two weeks ago and were in Prentiss's Division. 
Letters received last night state: "Colonel Reid received an order 
from General Grant to join Sherman's Division. Marching there 
he found only one Regiment (an Ohio one) fighting bravely. The 
15th stood by them and fought until nearly surrounded by superior 
numbers, and were ordered to fall back. Colonel Reid and Major 
Belknap were wounded, and they and Lieutenant-Colonel Dewey 
all had their horses killed under them ; 17 officers were killed or 
wounded. Colonel Reid speaks highly of his men, who stood up 
without flinching, though many of them had never before loaded a 
musket. Major Belknap covered himself with glory by his gal- 
lantry and determined perseverance in rallying his own men and 
those of another Regiment, in moments of confusion, and bringing 
them into line of battle and fighting like a veteran. Three cheers 
for the Major. 

Was Shiloh a surprise or was it not? 

Hath given rise 

To many a battle fought with ink. 

Where printers love the beer they drink; 

But whether it was or was not so 

We won't stop here to say. 

But we know who held the Real Estate 

At the close of the second day . 

The work of reorganizing the troops began at once. 




rh, Ar , i^^f (UCl^ 



BRIG-. GEN. MARCELLUS M. CROGKEB . 



. loiva Veteran Volunteer Infantry. IQ^ 

GENERAL ORDER NO. 2, 

Headquarters 6th Division, Army of West Tennessee., ) 

In the Field April 13, 1862 . \ 

I. The troops of this Division are temporaril}^ hrig-aded as fol- 
low^s, viz: 

The 12th Michigan, the 25th Missouri, the IGth Wisconsin and 
the 21st Missouri to constitute the 1st Brigade, to be under the 
command of Colonel Quinn, of 12th Michigan, the senior officer. 

The 18th Missouri, 61st Illinois, and loth Michigan, constitute 
the 2d Brigade, under command of Colonel Fry, of the 61st Illinois, 
senior officer. 

The 18th Wisconsin, the 15th and 16th Iowa, to constitute the 8d 
Brigade, under command of Colonel Reid, of the 15th Iowa, 
Senior officer. 

II. All reports, returns and communications from Regiment for 
headquarters, must be made through their respective Brigade com- 
mander. By order of General McKean. 

Wm. T. CLARK, 
Assistant Adjutant General. 

Colonel H. T. Reid assumed command of the 3d Brigade, 
though suffering from the severe wound through his neck received 
on April 6th. Adjutant Pomutz, also wounded on same date, 
being detached as Assistant Adjutant General. 



SPECIAL ORDER NO. 9. 

Headquarters 6th Division, Army West Tennessee. 
In the Field, April 18, 1862. 

The following changes are made in the disposition of the troops 
of this command: * * * * The 11th and 13th Iowa are as- 
signed to the 3d Brigade, and Colonel M. M. Crocker, Senior 
officer will take command. By order of General McKean. Offi- 
cial. W. T. CLARK, Assistant Adjutant General. 
GEO. POMUTZ, A. A. A. General. 



ig6 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

And this Brigade organization continued through its whole time 
of service to the day of its muster-out, July 24, 1865. It was 
therefore the oldest Bi'igade organization in the Army of the Ten- 
nessee, commonly known as the Old Iowa Brigade of the 17th 
Army Coips. 

In the absence of Colonel Crocker, the brigade was commanded 
by Colonel A. M. Hare, of the 11th Iowa, and by Brigadier-Gen- 
eral J. M. Tuttle, from July 4 to July 28, '62, then by Colonel 
Reid on several occasions, and for longer periods; and on Colonel 
Crocker being promoted to the rank of Brigadier-General, April 
18, 1863, Colonel Hall, of 11th Iowa, took command till May 30, 
1863, when Colonel Chambers, of the 16th Iowa, and Senior in the 
brigade, returned from the north and took command of the bri- 
gade in the rear of Vicksburg, and continued in command till 
April, 1864, when by reason of his nomination as Brigadier-Gen- 
eral not being confirmed by the Senate, he returned to the 18th 
Regular Infantry. Colonel Hall then commanded (except on 
July 21st '64, when he was in command of the 4tli Division, and 
Colonel John Shane, of the 13th Iowa, in command of the brigade) 
until July 31st, 1864, when General W. W. Belknap was assigned 
to the same. While General Belknap had temporary command 
of the Division, during the pursuit of Hood in the fall of 1864, 
Lieutenant Colonel J. C. Abercrombie, of the 11th Iowa, and later 
Major Geo. Pomutz, of the 15th Iowa, took temporary command 
ot the brigade. General Belknap being assigned to command the 
4th Division, at Washington, D. C, May 31st, 1865, Lieutenant 
Colonel Ben Beach, of the Ilth Iowa, took command of brigade 
until Brevet Brigadier-General A. Hickenlooper was assigned to 
the command by orders from Corps headquarters, June 16th, 1865. 



A Letter From the Front. 

Camp of the 15th Iowa Volunteers, 3d Brigade, 6th Division. ) 
April 2g, ^62, near Pittsburgh 7'e?in. j 

Editors Constitution: — Yesterday the welcome, genial and 

cozy countenance of our townsman, Samuel G. Bridges. Esq., 




A.IYI.Hare. 

COLin^iaWAlNFTY. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. igy 

loomed up in our camp, and a more welcome visitor never came . 
Bridges is a brick, and he proved himself so to-day. The Regi- 
ment was drawn up in line, and the letters below were read by Ac- 
ting Adjutant H. G. Brown, to the Regiment. The colors were 
unfurled, and a more beautiful banner never floated. It is the 
" Stars and Stripes," made of the most costly silk, with the name 
of the Regiment emblazoned in gold on the blue field, the staff 
adorned with tassels of white and blue silk, and surmounted by a 
beautiful gilded eagle. Col. Reid responded to the letter in an 
eloquent speech. Three cheers were given for Bridges, three for 
the flag, and three others for the old flag, (that, having been well 
riddled by eleven balls through its silken folds, and four balls cut- 
ting its staff nearly in two), which has been sent to the Governor, 
and three cheers and a tiger by Bridges. Mr. Bridge's letter 
of presentation is as follows: 

Camp near Pittsburg, Tenn., April 29. \ 
Col. II. I. Hcid, Conimanding l^th Reg . Iowa I ol . [ 

Dear Sir: — I have the honor, and take pleasure in presenting 
to the 15th Regiment, Iowa Volunteers, a set of National Colors 
to be carried by the Regiment in the great cause in which they are 
engaged. The intention of making this presentation, was formed 
while the 15th was at Camp Halleck, Keokuk, and the gallantry 
exhibited, and the hard fighting done by the Regiment on the 
bloody field of Pittsburg, have endeared them more to my heart 
and to the hearts of all their fellow-citizens of Iowa, and have 
rendered the performance of this pleasant duty doubly grateful. 
Men of the 15th, accept this gift from one of the humble citizens 
of the State, which we all love — from one who trusts that under 
its bright folds you will march forward to honor, and to victory, 
and that soon by the blessing of God, the battle of the Union 
be won and the rebellion overcome. 

The following is the letter of Colonel Reid to Gov. Kirkwood, 
transmitting the flag carried by the 15th in the battle of April 6th. 



ig8 History of the J^ifteenth Regiment 

Battle Field near Pittsburg, Tenn., April 29. ) 

To S. y . Kirkzi'ood^ Governor of lowa^ [ 

Dear Sir: Herewith I send you the flag of the 15th Iowa, 
which was carried in the battle of Pittsburg on Sunday, the 6th of 
April. It was planted in the midst of the enemy, and supported 
and defended there for two hours, and triumphantly brought away. 
The shots through the flag-staff and the eleven ball holes through 
the flag sufliciently attest the fact that it has been among the enemy. 
I also send with the flag, a copy of my official report of the battle 
as far as the 15th was engaged, both of which, I hope you will pre- 
sent to the Historical Society, as evidence that the 15th has done 
its share in sustaining the honor of our State, and the glory of our 
arms on the field of battle. 

H. T. REiD, 
Com. loth Iowa, Vol. Inf. Iowa. 



SIEGE OF CORINTH.— BATTLE OF CORINTH. 

Siege of Corinth. Summer and Fall Campaign of 1862. 
Bolivar. Iuka. Battle of Corinth, Oct. 3d and 4th. 
Report of Lieut. Col. Wm. W. Belknap. The Casual- 
ties ARE again over ONK-FOURTH OF THOSE ENGAGED. 

Pursuit of Rebel Army to Ripley. Return to 
Corinth. Reports of Col. Crocker; Gen. McKean, 
Gen. Rosencrans. Gen. U. S. Grant Congratulates 
THE Army. 

The several divisions of the Army of the Tennessee, under 
Gen. Grant, and those of the Arm}' of the Ohio, under Gen. 
Buell, under the chief command of Gen. Halleck — the 15th Iowa 
with its 3d brigade, 6th division, was assigned to the right wing of 
the army commanded by Gen. Geo. H. Thomas; and it was 
placed generally on the extreme left of 'that wing, while advanc- 
ing upon the enemy forming its camps in line of battle. 



lotva Veteran Volunteer Infantry. igg 

It took part in the advances upon and the siege of Corinth, 
April 28th to May 30th, the last fortified position of the division 
being within half a mile from the main rebel works in its front. 
While the order for a final advance and assault upon these works 
was already out on the morning of May 30th, 1862, the enemy 
was discovered to have evacuated Corinth during the preceding 
night. The same was taken possession of by troops of Grant's 
arni}^, while the Army of the Ohio, under Gen. Pope, undertook 
the pursuit of the enemy then retreating south in the direction of 
Topelo. 

In June, the Regiment, in common with the rest of the brigade, 
was doing important picket and grand guard duties west of Corinth 
and south of the Memphis and Charleston railroad, towards Che- 
walla, where new detached forts were in process of erection. 
June 27th, found the Regiment detailed as a pro^'ost guard in 
Corinth, Major Belknap being provost marshal under Gen. E. O. 
C. Ord, commanding post. 



- THE FIRST INSPECTION. 

Corinth^ J//ss., Jidy i, 1862. 
Colonel: — I have the honor to submit the following, as the 
result of my inspection of the 6th division of the Army of the 
Mississippi, commanded by Brig. Gen. J. B. S. Todd.* I in- 
spected the 3d brigade, commanded by Col. Reid, 15th Iowa. * 
* * * * 15th Iowa, armed with the Springfield rifle. The 
arms and accoutrements of this Regiment I found in excellent 
order. Co. E of this Regiment was on provost duty in town. 
The condition and appearance of the men will warrant the efti- 
ciency of this Regiment very good. The health is good and the 
hospital and accommodations very good. * * * * The four 

* Appointed from Dakota Territory, Sept. 10, '61; commission expired July 17, '62. 



200 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

Iowa Regiments composing this brigade are said to be well drilled 
and disciplined. The contrast is apparent. 
Respectfully submitted, 

A. J. Smith, Brig. Gen. 

Acting Inspector Gen. 
To J . C. Kelton, a. a. Genl. Dept. Miss. 
Othcial copy, J. B. Sample, A. A. A. Gen. 



G. O. No. 118. 
Headquarters Corint/i^ J/iss., July 27, 1862. 
Colonel: — Gen Tuttle is ordered with two brigades to Bolivar 
to reinforce Gen. Ross. Your Regiment included in Gen. Tuttle's 
brigade. We start as soon as possible this p. m., take five days 
rations and as little baggage as possible, leaving that to be sent by 
railroad. The 17th Wisconsin will be in this p. m. to relieve your 
Regiment, and in the meantime get everything ready for the 
march. Lieut. Hedrick will be relieved of the provost marshal's 
dutv, bnt Lieut. Higlej^ having much money responsibility can- 
not be relieved till your return, which is supposed will be in ten 

days or thereabouts. 

E. O. C. Ord, Maj. Gen. Comdg. 
H. T. Reid, Col. 15th Iowa. 

The Regiment, with brigade and other troo^DS, imder Gen. James 
M. Tuttle, was marched to reinforce Genl. L. F. Ross, at Bolivar, 
Tenn., on the Jackson and Grand Junction railroad, then threatened 
bv the enemy from the direction of Ripley. Gen. Tuttle says: — 
"One Sunday morning Gen. Grant sent for me to come to his 
headquarters and said he desired me to take two brigades over to the 
relief of Gen. Ross at Bolivar. I told him I would of course 
willingly go, and asked him for instructions. He told me that 
Gen. Ross was threatened and that he needed reinforcements. I 
asked him about the probabilities as to the strength of the rebels. 
He said he thought their strength was over-estimated and that 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 201 

with two brigades I could whip them . There are two roads to 
Bolivar, one direct, and the other bears down south. If you take 
that road you will be likely to meet the rebels and have a fight on 
your own account. I replied, that is the road I shall take. We 
went down 'there and met no rebels, and had no fight, but I was 
favorably impressed with the troops of the Iowa brigade." * 
Soon Gen. Tuttle being ordered to Cairo, the command of the 
division devolved upon Col. Crocker, and under him the Regiment 
took part in several movements, and reconnoitering around that 
post, it reinforced Col. Leggett's brigade and repulsed the enemy 
attacking that brigade. Col. Reid having taken command of the 
brigade (temporarily called the 5th brigade, 2d division. District of 
Jackson, )he retained that of the Regiment also on account of no 
other field officer being present with the Regiment (Lieut. Col. 
Dewey having been promoted Colonel of the 23d Iowa, while on 
sick leave to Iowa, Major Belknap also being in Iowa on re- 
cruiting service.) Moreover, as, by the constant demonstrations of 
the enemy around Bolivar, an early attack could be expected, the 
several detached forts north of the place were to be connected, and 
those near the Big Hatchie river to be strengthened . Col. Reid, 
while in command of the brigade, in absence of any brigade staff, 
undertook and completed the work with only the help of Adjutant 

PIE KEARLY KILLED HIM. 

At. Shiloh, Hiram G. Vincent of H Compaay, was wounded and iiis right leg amputated, 
and sent north. On arriving at Keokuk he was taken to the Estes house hospital, and was 
apparently gaining every day, when one of the kind ladies of that city, anxious to do all in 
her power to aid the Boys in Blue and maintain the acknowledged hospitality of Keokuk, 
named over a long list of toothsome articles at his service, among them was Lemon Pie. 
Hiram had not indulged in pie for, lo, these many days: it had not been on the daily bill of fare 
at the Hotel de Barracks, Fifih stieet, where he was a guest the past winter, and down below 
Uncle Sam's menu was never known to mention pie Hi thought Lemon pie would fit hira, 
and the lady's next visit brought one of her premium pies, and Hiram eat and then had a 
relapse. Capt. Danielson says, " I saw him when you could not discover that he breathed. "' 
He was carried to the dead room, another lady learning what had happened followed and 
prjing open his mouth administered a few drops of stiniulanr. She persevered and soon 
Hiram showing signs of life, was carried back and most carefully nursed. The Captain says, 
"Hi told me all about it afterwards, the Lemon pie came nearer killing him than the rebel 
bullet." Hi now lives at Arborville, Nebraska, has a 400 acre larm, a good stock of cattle, a 
wife and half a dozen children, more or less, and has thoroughly recovered from too 
much pie . 

16 



202 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

Pomutz, acting as Assistant Adjutant General and also as engineer, 
the 15th was assigned to garrison Fort Engleman, September 2d 
to i2th. The attack did not come however; the enemy, after 
having threatened the place for three weeks from different direc- 
tions, and causing the troops to stand to arms every morning for 
the same time, suddenly disappeared, and was known to turn up east, 
southeast of Corinth in the direction of luka. While the Regi- 
ment and brigade marched to Corinth, (Sept. 13th) luka was 
taken by Price's rebel forces.* The regiment then, with brigade 
and division took part in the expedition under Gen. Ord to luka, 
where it co-operated with Rosencrans' Ohio army (Sept. 21st,) in 
retaking that place and driving Price's army south towards 
Topelo. 

When Major Belknap was recruiting for the Regiment, in the 
summer of 1862, he enlisted a boy in Keokuk named Darby Graley, 
who entered Company F ; afterwards became his orderly, and with 
Private, Clements, of the 11th Iowa, as another orderly, followed 
his fortunes and clung to him faithfully to the end of the war. 
They wei^e both daring boys, full of adventure, splendid foragers 
and thoroughly fearless. When "Darby," as he was always 
known, was marching in the street at Keokuk to the boat which 
was to carry him south, his mother, a respectable old Irish lady, 
rushed from the sidewalk, seized him, objected to his going, said 
that he was not eighteen years of age, and that he could not and 
should not go. Major Belknap remonstrated; told her that Darby 
had sworn that he was eighteen, and that the oath he had taken 
was, under the law, conclusive as to his age. But she was inexor- 
able, and demanded her boy. 

Major Belknap, rather than take Darby by force, told her of the 
honorable character of a soldier's service, of the applause that 
would greet her son when he returned from the war, and of her 

♦Headquarters 3d Div. Army West Tenn., Corinth Miss., Sept. 17, 1S62 — S. O. 239: The 
troops of this army will move with live days ratioQs, three cooked in haversacks * * * 
and 100 rounds of "ammunition per man, and without baggage. By order of Gen. W. S. Rosen- 
crans. H. G. Kennett, Lt. Col. Chief of Staff. 



lozva Veteran V olunteer Infantry. 20 J 

patriotic duty in the matter, and said that he would personally see 
that her son was cared for. This last promise caused her to relent. 
Raising her hands and blessing both the major and the boy, she 
said : "God bless you Darby and good bye . Stay by the major 
Darby! Stay by the major, and you will never get hurted.' " 

Darby did stay by the major. He braved countless dangers and 
lived through the war, but lost his life in Colorado — killed by the 
Indians. 

While Lt. Col. Belknap, he having been promoted from major, 

was on the recruiting service in 1862 at Keokuk, he became weary 

of that duty and was anxious to return to the field, where an 

engagement was imminent. He telegraphed to the superintendent 

of the recruiting service at Davenport, to the adjutant general at 

Washington, to General Schofield at St. Louis, but they declined 

to act. In despair he telegraphed to General Rawlins, the adjutant 

general of General Grant at Corinth, and begged to be ordered to 

the field. In reply he received the following telegram from Gen. 

Grant himself. 

Near Corinth.^ September 16^,1862. 

By telegraph from Gen. Grant's Headquarters: 

"You will immediately return to your Regiment at this place, 

bringing with you all recruits." 

U.S. Grant, Major General, 

He gladly obeyed at once and reached the Regiment in time to 
command it in the battle of Corinth, on October 8, 1862. 

The game of the enemy to reappear suddenly in the direction of 
west, north-west of Corinth, by rapid marches from Topelo by 
way of Ripley, to Chewalla, on the Memphis railroad, having 
been discovered by Gen. Grant, most of the troops stationed at and 
around luka were rapidly marched back to Corinth. The 15th 
Iowa with its brigade (now under Crocker) arrived late on the 
evening of the 2d of October, and took position two miles west of 
Corinth and south of the Chewalla road, when, October 8d, the 
combined attack under Van Dorn, Price and Villipigue was made. 



204 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

Headquarters Army of the Mississippi, [ 
Corinth^ Miss,^ Oct . j, 1862. \ 

Brigadier General McKean:-The General commanding directs 

me to say in reply to your dispatch; * * should the enemy 

appear at the bridge (Smith's), the road ought to be obstructed. 

Nearly everything depends upon the movements on your front. 

C. GoDDARD, Acting Asst. Adjt. Gen. 



THE BATTLE OF CORINTH. 

Lieutenant Colonel William W. Belknap's Report. 

Headquarters 15th Iowa Volunteer Infantry, | 
Camp 7iear Corinth^ Miss., Oct. ijth, 1862. \ 

Lieutenant James Wilson, A. A. General 3d Brigade, 6th Divi- 
sion: 

Sir: — I have the honor to submit the following report as to the 
part taken by the 15th Regiment Iowa Volunteer Infantry in the 
battle near Corinth, on Friday, October 3d, 18(32. The Regiment, 
under the command of Col. H. T. Reid, arrived with the 3d Brig- 
ade from luka in the afternoon of the 2d, and went into camp near 
the fort, designated as Battery F . 

At daylight, on the morning of the 3d, we were ordered to fall 
into line and the Regiment, under the command of the undersigned, 
Col. Reid being sick, and unable to assume command, marched to 
a position nearer the battery above named. On halting, the 11th 
and 13th Iowa were formed in line of battle fronting west, the 11th 
on the right, and the 15th and 16th Iowa, formed in close column 
by division, the first in rear of the 11th and the last in rear of the 
13th Iowa. 

Shortly after this disposition the firing in front, in which the 2d 
Brigade was engaged became general, and as they fell back, the 
front of the 3d Brigade ( Crocker's) was changed, the loth and 
16th Iowa forming into line of battle at right angles to the previ- 
ous line facing north, and the 11th and 13th formed in close column 
by division in their rear. While here two companies of the 13th 



Iowa Veteran V olunteer Infantiy. 205 

Iowa were sent as skirmishers to the front, and an order was given 
to change front with the left of the division resting on Battery E, 
and the right on the left of the 2d Division (Davies') , This order 
was being executed by the 11th and 13th Iowa, and by the artillery 
posted near Battery F, and was about to be executed by the 15th 
and 16th when the skirmishers fell back before the enemy, and the 
two Regiments remained in line of battle to protect the formation 
of the new line above named. In a few moments, it being about 
3 o'clock, the enemy came regularly on in line of battle, their left 
appearing through the thick underbrush to be nearly opposite the 
right of the 15th and the left of the 16th. 

• The Regiment was ordered by me not to fire until the enemy 
came near enough to be easily distinguished. This order was 
obeyed. Both fired at the same instant, and both in full volleys — 
ours being promptly given and that of the enemy with less regu- 
larity. Our men fell back a few steps for an instant, reloaded, and 
from the first fought like veterans. For three-quarters of an hour 
they contended with an immensely superior force, and when the 
order was given by Colonel M. M. Ciocker, brigade commander, 
(who was on the field, in the immediate vicinity of the 15th through- 
out the action), to fall back to effect a union with the new line, it 
had to be frequently repeated before it was obeyed, and the tenacity 
and unflinching courage with which the men of my Regiment 
clung to their position to the last, deserves especial mention. The 
new line was formed promptly and in perfect order, and the first 
day's fight was over. 

I cannot too highly commend the bravery and courage of the 
otlicers and men of the Regiment, and am convinced that had the 
whole Brigade been together in the fight the repulse of the enemy 
would have been complete on that part of the field. The loss of 
the Regiment was heavy. Out of about three hundred and fifty 
men engaged our loss was eleven killed, among them three officers, 



2o6 History of the J'ifteenth Regiment 

sixty-five wounded, and eight missing. The friends of the gallant 
and lamented dead have the proud satisfaction of knowing that 
their lives were patriotically given to their country, and that their 
comrades, who loved them while living, will cherish their memory 
now that they are gone. 

The three officers killed: First Lieutenant Eldridge, of Company 
K, and Second Lieutenants Kinsman, of Company C, and Cath- 
cart, of Company G, were among the hest in the service. Though 
young, dauntless in fight, and devoted to duty, their loss can hardly 
be overcome. Personally witnessing their conduct on the field I 
can truly say they did their duty well — none could have done it 
better. We mourn their loss as that of those who lived the lives 
and died the deaths of true soldiers. 

The officers whose gallant conduct came under my especial ob- 
servation, were Major Cunningham, Adjutant Pomutz, Captain 
Kittle, and Lieutenant Whitenack, of Company A, Lieutenant Wil- 
kins, of Company B; Captain Seevers, of Company C; Captain 
Madison and Lieutenant Porter, of Company D; Lieutenant Rog- 
ers, of Company E; Lieutenant Throckmorton, of Company F; 
Captain Hanks, of Company G, and Lieutenants Miller and King, 
of Company L Others doubtless did as well, but those referred to 
were noticed by myself. Major Cunningham throughout the con- 
test rallied the men and cheered on the Regiment, and though quite 
severely wounded, remained with the Regiment to the close. Of 
the staff officers Assistant Surgeon Gibbon and Quartermaster Hig- 
ley, and of the non-commissioned staff Sergeant Major Brown, who 
was wounded, and Commissary Sergeant Elliott, have my thanks 
for services promptly rendered in then- departments. 

Color Corporal Black, of Company E, had charge of the colors 
and commanded applause by his great gallantry. Clinging to the 
standard he only gave it up when severely wounded, at which time 
Color Corporal Wells, of Company I, took the flag as it was fall- 
ing and bore it bravely through the remainder of the fight. During 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 20"^ 

the action of the 4th the Regiment, under the command of Colonel 
Reid, was placed in position to support the fort, from which the 
artillerj' of Captain Phillips was served with such terrible effect, 
and while there had two men wounded . 

The 15th Regiment Iowa Volunteers has thus again given the 
blood of many of its best and bravest to the cause of the Union, and 
while for their gallant conduct on the field of Corinth the officers 
and men of the Regiment have my thanks; they have meiited and 
will receive the grateful appi-obation of the people of Iowa and of 
the Nation . 

A list of killed, wounded and missing is enclosed herewith. 
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WILLIAM W. BELKNAP, 
Lieutenant Colonel Commanding 15th Regiment Iowa Volunteer 

Infantry. 

List of the Killed, Wounded and Missing at the Battle 
OF Corinth, October 8d and 4th, 1862. 

Killed: A company, Private John Trump; C company, 2d Lieu- 
tenant John D. Kinsman, Corporal Walter A. Tanner, Privates 
Samuel Lloyd, Oliver Smith, Greenbury N. Wymore;F company, 
Privates Wesle}^ Irwin, Francis M. Tarpenning; G company, 2d 
Lieutenant William AI. Cathcart, Corporal James B. Heatly ; K 
company, 1st Lieutenant Rufus H. Eldridge, Privates Thomas H. 
Davenport, William C. Dixon. 

Wounded: Field and Staff, Lieutenant Colonel W. W. Bel- 
knap, left arm severely . Major W. T. Cunningham, left arm 
severely. 

Non-commissioned Staff, Sergeant Major Alex. Brown, left arm 
broken. 

A Company: Corporals J. A. Kimbrough, head ; J. F. Gun- 
ning, head and leg severely. Privates: S. Bailie, head; J. Ma- 
laney, leg; J. Mara, head; S. P. Reed, leg. 



2o8 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

B Company: Corporals J . L. Kelsey, severely ; A. D.Morgan, 
mortally; Drummer R. Lyon, right arm severely. Piivates: A. 

F. Burger, hand; J. P. Polser, mortally; D. K. Winters, mortally. 
C Company: Sergeants: D. H off, leg: I. S . Warner, mor- 
tally; Corporal N. H. Griffis, leg. Privates: J. A. Hiler, arm; 
J. R. Holley. hand; W.Jackson, arm; J. C. Rea, head; J. B. Van- 
cleave, hand. 

D Company: Captain J. A. Madison, breast; Corporal S. P. 

Reid, mouth and shoulder severely. Privates: J. Angle, ; F. 

Bird, head severely; L. F. Bird, head severel}'; A. Clark, temple. 
S. Kuhns, hip severely; S. Wilkins, hand. 

E Company: First Sergeant W. P. L. Muir, head and arm 
severely; Sergeant W. C. Stidger, thigh and leg severely; Color 
Corporal E. G. Black, mortally; Corporals J. W. Henry, head; 
J. y. Wilson, left arm. Privates: J. W. Pierce, right hand se- 
verely; I. B. Thatcher, right hand;}. S. Vantreese, neck severely, 

F Company: Sergeant W. Boyer, neck severely; Corporal J. 
W. Sipple, through both lungs, mortally. Piivates: P. Benner. 

jaw severely; W. Clark, ; W. Fitzgerald, jaw severely; L. 

Hessemer, jaw severely; A. Moriat, mortally ; J. C. Reed, shoulder 
severely ; H . S. Woodmansy. shoulder severely. 

G Company: Captain R. L. Hanks, knee; Corporal C. W. 
Kitchell, neck. Privates: W. C. Clark, hand and leg severely; 

G. B. Cummings, hand; D. Elliott, right thigh severely; A. Essex, 

back severely; H. Essex, back severely; H. H. Horton, ; B. 

Middleworth, abdomen, mortally; E. M. Reed, both legs severely; 

H. M. Reid, ; T. Riddlen, left arm; C. B. Vinton, head 

seveiely. 

H Companv: Sergeant L. Crawford, head severely; Corporal 
J. E. Rice, left side severely. Private R. G. Boyd, left arm am- 
putated. 

I Companv: Private P. Bain, neck and shoulder, severely; W, 
Buss, neck severely; I. M. Christy, both legs severely; J. Daven- 



loiva Veteran Volunteer Infantry, 



20Q 



port, head; W. J. Gracy, thigh; G. Haner, abdomen; J. A. Magee, 
jaw and neck severely; A. Z. Parker, side. 

K Company : Sergeant D. Myers, left arm ; Corporal C . I . 
Momyer, right shoulder. Privates: J. Brady, side severely ; B. 
F. Momyer, left thigh; L. Warren, arm ; W. H. H. Williams, 
groin severely . 

Missing, B Company: Corporal J. L. Kelsey; C Company, 
Privates H. Lewis, J. Martin, A. B. McMurray, J. D. Myers, C. 
Quaintance, U. A. Smith, S. Walker, A. Whitlock, E. B. Whit- 
lock. 

D Company: 1st Sergeant B. F. Stevens. 

E Company: Color Corporal E. G. Black; Private B. Cvith- 
iDirth. 

F Company: Privates C. Dillon; G Company, H. H. Horton, 
S. L. Roberts; H Company, J. S. Gordon, A. L. Stone. 
RECAPITULATION. 





i^-?, 


T3 


(LI 


5l 


T3 






• — ' 


U 3 


3 


Ui 




O 



u 



Field and staff" 

Non-Commissioned Staff". 

" A " Company 

" B " Company 

" C " Company 

' D " Company 

"E" Company 

" F " Company 

" G " Company 

" H " Company 

" I " Company 

" K" Company 



Tot^l. 



.13 ...8 



..7 
.12 
..■.3 



.70 



...8 
...8 
...9 
..13 
...3 



..78 



.18 



1 



...7 
. .22 
...9 
..10 
..12 
..17 
...5 



...9 
7109 



Adjutant Pomutz writes: In expectation of the attack from the 
west, the line of the division was formed early on the 8d of Octo- 
ber from a point north of the railroad to Battery F, south and facing 
west. The Iowa Brigade being on the extreme left, the 11th and 
I3th Iowa deployed, forming the first line, the 15th and 16th in rear 



2IO History of the Fifteenth Regitnefit 

and in close column by division, the 15th being commanded on the 
3d by Lieutenant Colonel Belknap. 

Soon after the partial attack was made by the enemy on our left 
it was evident that the far greater part of the same moved around 
the right of the line, making an impetuous assault on its front, at 
the same time gaining the rear of the line, by which a change of 
front became necessary so as to face north toward the line of rail- 
road. The 15th and 16th Iowa took position on a ridge running 
parallel with the railroad, being deployed in line of battle, the 11th 
and 18th retaining their former positions until 3 p. m., when the 
skirmish line along the railroad was gradually being driven in, and 
the sound of volleys of musketry further on the right evidenced the 
fact that the enemy had gained the ground north of the railroad, 
and was nearly reaching the town, two and a half miles on our 
right, and slightly to the rear. 

The guns of the battery, heretofore doing excellent execution in 
Fort F., on our left, were at once removed to our right, and an 
oblique change of front to the rear on first battalion (lOth Iowa) 
was ordered by Colonel Crocker, which would have formed the 
line of the 15th and 16th to face towards the said fort. In the ex- 
ecution of this movement, however, the 16th Iowa had to contend 
with an almost unmanageable thick underbrush in the rear of its 
former line, causing a delay in the full execution of the order just 
at a time when the slow but determined falling back of the whole 
skirmish line from the low ground, towards the ridge the 15th and 
16th Iowa were occupying, indicated that the enemy had crossed 
the railroad and was advancing upon the line formed by those two 
regiments, and a charge could be expected as soon as they would 
emerge from the dense underbrush in front of the same. The 
order to change front was therefore countermanded, the line of the 
two regiments was reformed, as it was before. 

Adjutant Pomutz, of the 15th Iowa, having been sent at the 
same time by Colonel Crocker to bring up the 11th and 13th Iowa 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 211 

to their former position, (to wit: at right angles with the left of the 
15th Iowa and facing west), which it was found thej had left to 
form in the rear of the first line by order of General McKean . It 
was too late to execute this order then. General McKean having 
already taken them away, and having established the same three 
hundred yards in the rear of the 15th and 16th Iowa, and the enemy 
having already engaged the first line, sending a perfect hail of balls 
into the front line. The 15th and 16th Iowa, being left alone 
on the ridge without protection on their left flank, fought the 
enemy, and by their vigorous fire checked his intended charge over 
half an hour, the men clinging to their ground with the stubborn 
and obstinate tenacity of veterans, and no doubt if the other regi- 
ments of the Brigade had been on the left of this line, the enemy 
had been entirely driven away from that part of the field. 

The enemy, however, with thorough knowledge of the ground, 
brought his new forces gradually to the left of the line, under cover 
of the high ground on which the now evacuated Fort F. was afford- 
ing to them the advantage of breast-works, and from which direc- 
tion thev commenced a murderous fire upon the unprotected left 
and rear of the loth Iowa, which, in addition to the fire from the 
front, necessitated the yielding of the ground to the enemy's over- 
whelming numbers. Even then, however, the order to fall back 
(upon the line formed by the llth and 13th Iowa) had to be re- 
peated several times before these two regiments would leave their 
ground . 

The new line having been rapidly established on the right of the 
llth Iowa, it became a. matter of surprise that the enemy hesitated 
to follow. When by an order received from higher headquarters, 
the brigade was marched slowly and in good order toward Corinth, 
where it took position near Battery Phillips, the 15th and 16th on 
the right and left flanks of the battery, the llth and 18th in rear, 
forming a reserve. During the entire night the movements of 
troops and of artillery within the inner line of fortifications, indi- 



212 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

cated the extent of preparations for the reception of the enemy's 
attack the next morning. 

At 5 o'clock, October 4th, the enemy's artillery commenced shell- 
ing the town from the north. Shortly after the Federal batteries 
answered, and after a spirited artillery duel, lasting an hour, the 
enemy's pieces were silenced. Meanwhile the sun rose and the 
skirmishers of the enemy, in front of the 8d Brigade, showed prep- 
arations for their intended advance upon Battery Phillips. They 
were advancing to the edge of the abatis, filling the low ground in 
front three diffei'ent times during the morning, but as often they 
were met with a murderous repulse by our skirmishers, who were 
most efficiently supported by the Regular Battery of Captain Phil- 
lips; also by the First Minnesota and the Fifth Ohio Batteries, 
taking position on the left of the fort. Shortly after the right 
wing of the Federal line was forced back from north of the town 
towards the Fishomingo Hotel, but the enemy, after an obstinate 
engagement of one hour's duration, was repulsed in disorder and 
panic. 

While the enemy once more engaged the left wing opposite 
Fort Phillips, heavy lines were seen to emerge from the timber 
opposite Battery Robinette, on the right of Fort Phillips, steadily 
moving upon that fort. They were, however, twice nobly re- 
pulsed, though the second time part of the charging rebel forces 
gained the interior of said fort; and the third time they rallied for a 
new charge and moved on with undaunted determination against 
the fort, when two forts on the right and Battery Phillips on the 
left, having concentrated a most terrific cross-fire upon the charging 
column of the enemy, they soon began to waver, and in another 
moment they broke into a disorderly flight, throwing away their 
guns and accoutrements, and trying to gain the timber across the 
extensive abatis composed of heavy logs, limbs, branches, which 
checked their precipitate flight in a great measure. Here, while in 
the act of running, most of the charging column was pursued with 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 21 j 

a deadly hail of grape, canister and shell, until the remaining small 
portion got safely out of sight . A slight skirmishing was yet 
maintained for nearly two hours, behind which, as evidences plainly 
showed, the enemy began his retreat that same evening. 

The battle in which the 3d Brigade alojie was engaged, on the 
afternoon of October 8d, however bravely fought, had no need to 
take place at all . 

The line of the 8d Brigade on the left of the battery in Fort F 
changed after noon. The 15th and 16th Iowa were formed into a 
new line facing north toward the railroad, hardly over three hun- 
dred yards distant. The first brigade was already gone; it fell 
back to the right and rear of the 3d brigade, far away out of sight 
and out of connection. Soon the battery evacuated the fort on the 
left flank of the new line; it also went to the right an hour before 
towards the inner circle of the fortifications, two miles distant. 
Mcreover the 11th and 18th Iowa were taken away by General 
McKean from the position they held during the day (facing west) 
at the very moment and from the very place where they ought to 
have been left flank of the front line. He intended to give battle 
to an overwhelming force, when the brigade was isolated on its 
right and left for over a mile, and all troops were withdrawn to the 
inner fortifications three-quarters of an hour before. The four 
regiments might have been easily cut off from town had the enemy 
known the position . 

Additional cartridges were then distributed amongst the troops, 
and early on the 5tli of October the pursuing Federal forces started 
out . 

In this movement the 15th Iowa, with its brigade, participated. 
At 10 o'clock a. m. heavy cannonading in front brought Gen. Mc- 
Kean to form his division in line of battle, supported by three bat- 
teries of light artillery. After two hours delay in that position it 
was ascertained that the forces under Generals Ord and Hurlbut, 
arriving from Bolivar, had met the retreating enemy at the Hatchie 



214 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

river, and now General McKean * hurried his division to inter- 
cept the bridge on the Hatchie river, the only line of escape of the 
enemy. When the division arrived at the point, however, the 
enemv had already escaped and destroyed the bridge behind him. 

The pursuit of the enemy was then continued beyond Ripley (50 
miles) without overtaking them . The troops therefore returned to 
Corinth, the 15th and 11th Iowa bringing up the rear (October 
13th). 

General John McArthur succeeded to the command of the 6th 
Division October 6th, vice General McKean transf eri'ed . 

The Brigade went into camp in front of Battery Phillips. 



Report OF Col. M. M. Crocker, Commanding 3d Brigade. 

Headquarters 3d Brigade, 6th Division, \ 
Camp 7iear Corinth^ Miss., October Jjth., 1862. [ 

Captain W. T. Clark, A. A. General — 

Sir: I have the honor to report the part taken by the 3d Brig- 
ade in the battle of Corinth, and its subsequent movements in pur- 
suit of the retreating enemy. 

About 5 o'clock of the morning of 3d inst., the brigade formed. 
Two regiments, the 11th and 13th Iowa Volunteers, in line of bat- 
tle facing to the west; the 15th and 16th Iowa Volunteers, in close 
column by division in rear of the line. The regiments remained 
in that position with skirmishers deployed in front, receiving an 
occasional cannon shot, until about 3 o'clock, when the division on 
the riglit having fallen back, a change of front was ordered. The 
15th and 16th were then formed in line of battle perpendicular to 
the first line, and the 11th and 13th in close column by division in 
the rear. In this position the brigade remained until about 4 

Headquarters Army of Mississippi, ( 
OoKiNiH, Oct. 5, 'b-J- ) 
Brigadier-Oeneral McKean: Halt your tr:iin, lutn it out, and park it. I am told it is a 
mile long. Take nothing with you but ammunition and ration wagons. You have left our 
advance guard without a support by your lardy movements. * • * 

By order of 

Majok General K08ENCRAJI6. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 21^ 

o'clock p. m., when orders were again received to again change 
front so as to connect the right of the brigade with the left of Gen- 
eral Davies' division, its left to rest in direction of Battery " E." 
After the execution of this order had been commenced, notice was 
received from General McKean that the division was to move back 
inside the inner fortifications, and an order received that the 11th 
and 13th Regiments form in line of battle, a quarter of a onile in 
the rear of the line formed by the 15th and 16th in front of and 
parallel to the road over which the artillery of the division must 
pass, the brigade to protect the movements of the division and the 
artillery . 

The execution of the order to move back had just commenced 
when the enemy, in greatly superior force, attacked the front line 
(the 15th and 16th). The officers and men of these regiments, 
acting with signal determination and bravery, not only held the 
enemy in check, but drove him back and held their position until 
notice was received that the artillery had passed safely to the rear, 
when they were ordered to fall back and form in line of battle on 
the right of the second line, which they did in good order, the en- 
emy declining to follow . This engagement lasted three-quarters 
of an hour; the firing was incessant and the regiments, especially 
the 15th, suffered severely. 

T deem it my especial duty to particularly mention Lieutenant- 
Colonel Belknap, who commanded the 15th Regiment. This reg- 
iment was under the hottest fire, and Colonel Belknap was every- 
where along the line, mounted, with sword in hand, encouraging, 
by voice and gesture, his men to stand their ground. 

Lieutenant Colonel Add. Sanders, who commanded the 16th, is 
entitled to great praise. He rode along the line of his regiment, 
encouraging his brave boys who had so lately suffered at luka, to 
remember their duty, and althoiigh severely wounded, remained 
with his regiment until it marched off the field. 



2i6 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

Majors Cunningham, of the 15th, and Purcell of the 16th, did 
their whole duty and conducted themselves with great bravery. 
Two companies of the 13th Iowa — Company A, in command of 
Captain Kennedy, and Company G, in command of Captain Walk- 
er — had, before the engagement commenced, been deployed as 
skirmishers. The advance of the enemy drove them in. They 
were ordered to form on the left of the 15th Iowa. They formed 
in good order, fighting like veterans, retiring under the brave com- 
manders without confusion, when ordered to do so. 

The artillery of the division having passed, the brigade followed 
in good order. On arriving inside the fortifications v\^e took posi- 
tion, the 15th Iowa in line of battle in rear of and to the right of 
the battery commanded by Captain Phillips, 1st Infantry; the 16th 
in rear of and supporting the 5th Ohio Battery, which was in posi- 
tion on the left of Captain Phillips' Battery; five companies of the 
llth Regiment, in command of Major Abercrombie, in line of bat- 
tle supporting the 1st Minnesota Battery, in position still on the 
left of the 5th Ohio Battery; the 18th Iowa and five companies of 
the llth, in rear of the 15th and i6th, in close column by division 
as a reserve . 

At night five companies of the 18th Iowa in command of Maj . 
VanHosen, were sent into the woods in front of our position as a 
grand guard. 

Thus we remained during the night and until the battle had 
commenced on the morning of the 4th, when the five companies 
of the llth Iowa, also the five companies of the 13th Iowa were 
relieved and these regiments formed in line of battle, the llth in 
the rear of the 15th and the 13th in the rear of the 16th. In this 
position the brigade remained during the da}', receiving occasional 
shots from cannon and the enemy's sharpshooters stationed in the 
woods in front. Capt. Smith of Co. A, 16th Iowa, having built 
temporary breastworks to the right of the 5th Ohio battery, behind 



Joiva Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 2iy 

which he placed his company, kept up a spirited skirmish with the 
enemy's sharpshooters and did effective service. 

During the day the enemy made two efforts to approach our 
position by coming up a ravine which sheltered them from the 
heavy guns of Capt, PhilHp's fort, but were driven back by the 
5th Ohio battery under command of Lieut, Marsh, a very brave 
and competent officer. At daylight of the 5th, the brigade started 
in pursuit of the retreating enemy and continued the pursuit until 
the evening of the 8th inst., when, after resting one day, orders 
were received to return to Corinth with two regiments, and to 
leave two regiments to come back with Brig. Gen. McPherson. 
At daylight on the morning of the 10th, I started to Corinth with 
the 18th and 16th, leaving the 11th and 15th under the command 
of Col. Hall of the 11th to return with Gen. McPheison. We 
marched back to Corinth in less than two days without any un- 
usual occurrence. The 11th and 15th arrived one day later. Dur- 
ing the movements, the 11th Iowa was under command of Lieut. 
Col. Hall, the 18th under Lieut. Col. John Shane, the 15th after 
the first day, and during the pursuit under command of 
Col. Reid, and the 16th, after the first day, under Maj. 
Purcell. The brigade, during the protracted movements 
of the battle and pursuit, encountering every hardship 
and privation incident to such campaigning, behaved with 
great fortitude — meeting every danger and hardship cheerfully; 
and I acknowledge my obligation to all the field officers for their 
cheerful, hearty and intelligent co-operation. 

Col. H. T. Reid, of the 15th Iowa, though prostrated by illness 
and unable to be in the field during the first days engagement, on 
the second left the sick bed, joined his command, and though un. 
able to ride his horse, remained with his regiment, traveling in an 
ambulance until the pursuit was abandoned. I must not fail to 
mention the renewed obligations under which I rest to my adju- 
tant. Tames Wilson, who during the whole time of the battle and 
17 



2l8 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

pursuit was tireless in the discharge of every duty, always at his 
post, always brave, always reliable. 

Lieut, Lanstrum of the 15th Iowa, who acted as aid, deported 
himself as a good and faithful soldier. The loss of the brigade 
occurred principally in the engagement on the 3d, the 15th suffer- 
ing most. The killed, wounded and missing are as follow^s, viz: 
14 killed, 110 wounded and 22 missing; total 145: a list of which, 
together with the reports of the regimental commanders, is here- 
with submitted. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

M. M. Crocker, Col. Comd'g. 3d Brigade. 



REPORT OF BRIG. GEN. McKEAN, COMMANDING 
SIXTH DIVISION. 

fackson^ Tenn^ Oct. jo, 1862. 
Maj. J. A. Rawlins, Asst. Adjt. Genl. Dept. of the Tenn.: 

I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken 
by the 6th division in the battle of the 3d and 4th inst., at Corinth, 
Miss. On the 1st inst. the division was composed of the following 
named troops: First brigade, commanded by Col. Benj . Allen, 
I6th Wisconsin Volunteers, composed of the 16th Wisconsin 
Volunteers, commanded by Maj. Thomas Reynolds; 17th Wis- 
consin Volunteers, commanded by Col. J. L. Doran, and the 21st 
Missouri Volunteers, commanded by Col. David Moore; the last 
named regiment being detached at Kossuth, ten miles from 
Corinth. Total number of enlisted men present in the brigade, 
1415. Bi'ig. Gen. J. McArthur having rejoined, was assigned to 
the command of this brigade on the 3d. Second brigade, com- 
manded by Col. J. M. Oliver, 15th Illinois Volunteers, composed 
of the 14th Wisconsin Volunteers, commanded by Col. John 
Hancock; 18th Wisconsin Volunteers, commanded by G. Bouck; 
18th Missouri Volunteers,.commanded by Capt. J. R. Ault, and 
|;he 15th Michigan Volunteers, commanded by Liei;t, Col. John 



loira Veteran Vohinteer Infantry. 2ig 

McDermott; the last named regiment being detached at Che'waHa, 
twelve miles west of Corinth, and six companies of the 18th Mis- 
souri being also detached, guarding the railroad towards Bethel. 
Number of enlisted men present in the brigade 1875. Third bri- 
gade, commanded by Col. M. M. Crocker: 13th Iowa Volun- 
teers, composed of the 11th Iowa Volunteers, commanded bv 
Lieut. Col. Wm. Hall; 13th Iowa Volunteers, commanded by 
Lieut. Col. John Shane; 15th Iowa Volunteers, commanded by 
Col. Hugh T. Reid; 16th Iowa Volunteers, commanded by 
Lieut. Col. Add. H. Sanders; the brigade being stationed at luka. 
Total number of enlisted men present in the brigade, 2189. The 
artillery attached to the division, under command of Captain 
Andrew Hickenlooper, 5th Ohio battery, acting chief of artillery, 
consisted of the 1st Minnesota battery, 4 guns, commanded by 
Lieut. F. Cook; 8d Ohio battery, 6 guns, commanded by Captain 
W. S. Williams, (the captain and two sections being absent at 
Bolivar); the 5th Ohio battery, 4 guns, commanded by Lieut. B. 
Matson: the 10th Ohio battery, 4 guns, commanded by Capt. H. 
B. White; and Battery " F,'' 2d Illinois artillery, 4 guns, com- 
manded by Lieut. J. W. Mitchell, (one section of this battery also 
being detached at Bolivar) ; leaving sixteen guns, with 307 enlisted 
men present with the artillery of the division. The cavalry, under 
command of Col. Robert G. IngersoU, 11th Illinois cavalry, had 
orders to report to the chief of cavalry for consolidation. * * 
* * * Xhe 8d brigade, under command of Col. Crocker, 
returned from luka by forced march, and went into camp. Orders 
having been received from the Commanding General designating 
the positions to be occupied by the several divisions, in anticipation 
of an advance of the enemy — (Davies, the nort west angle between 
the railroads;) McKean's Division on the left of Davies with the 
right resting on the railroad, near Battery "F"; Hamilton's the 
northeast angle between the railroads, and Stanley's in reserve. 
The necessary dispositions were made, and at daylight the several 



220 History of the Fiftee7tth Regiment 

regiments of this division were in the exact positions assigned 
them . The first Hne formed in hne of battle perpendicular to 
the railroad with the right resting near Battery •' F." The second 
line formed in close column, by division. * * * About 
7:30 o'clock in the morning the enemy appeared in front of Col. 
Oliver's advanced position, driving in his pickets, and advanced to 
attack him, but was repulsed with great energy. The Colonel 
being at length satisfied that the enemy were in force, slowly 
retired according to his instructions, contesting the ground and 
destroying the bridges, until the brigade took a favorable position, 
north of the railroad and a little in advance of the old Confederate 
entrenchments, where another stand was made. * * * * 
The enemy after an unsuccessful attempt to approach by the 
railroad track (bringing forward a battery at one time to play up- 
on the main line of the division, which was driven back by our 
artillery) ultimately succeeded in passing to the right of our line, 
and McArthur's command again fell back, taking position parallel 
with, and north of the railroad; the left some distance from Bat- 
tery " F." This compelled a corresponding change of front in 
the main line. The 2d brigade being considerably exhausted by 
severe duty and hard fighting, was at this time withdrawn and 
formed as a second line in the rear of the third brigade. The 
enemy at length appeared in front of the new line formed by the 
1st brigade, and a charge was made, driving him some distance. 
This charge was participated in by the 16th and 17th Wisconsin, 
and 21st Missouri, as well as by a portion of Col. Baldwin's Bri- 
gade of the 2d division. * * * * After this charge, 
these regiments, having already performed heavy work, were 
all ordered to form in rear of the main line, of the division, south 
of the railroad, which was done in good order at 3 o'clock in the 
afternoon, and as I had received notice from the General com- 
rhanding that a flank movement was in contemplation, by Hamil- 
ton's division, on the enemy's left, I considered it best to retain rriy 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 221 

present position for the purpose of engaging the attention of the 
enemy until such movement could be effected. [Although I re- 
ceived orders to change front and retire to a position corresponding 
with the main body of the division on my right, which had retired 
towards Corinth some time previously. This movement had 
already commenced, when further orders were received to fall 
back to the interior line of batteries. The movement was accord- 
ingly altered so as to throw the artillery into a road in the rear of 
the line, and leading into Corinth, when the enemv again appeared, 
driving in our skirmishers and advancing to attack; and the 3d 
brigade, hitherto but slightly engaged, now found an opportunity 
to participate in the work. Col. Crocker, with a portion of this 
brigade was directed to drive back the enemy while the movement 
was completed. The Colonel executed this order in fine style, 
succeeding after a severe action in forcing back the enemy with 
considerable loss. 

In this action the loth Iowa, under command of Lieut. Col. 
Belknap. (Col. Reid being sick) and the 16th Iowa, under Lieut. 
Col. Sanders, being most hotly engaged, conducted themselves 
with conspicuous gallantry, and the whole brigade, while covering 
the movements of the division, mancEuvered with all the coolness 
and precision of an oixlinary drill. The movement of the division 
being completed, this portion of the brigade reformed in good 
order on the right of the first line, [and the whole division, with 
the 7th, 50th and 57th Illinois Regiments, moved in perfect order, 
arriving at sundown, and taking the positions designated within 
the line of batteries.] The 8d brigade and three field batteries 
occupying College Hill, [and the two small brigades, with the 
10th Ohio battery, taking positions in the town, under directions 
from the commanding General. J 

Our troops lay on their arms in the ranks during the night, ready 
to support the batteries should an assault (as anticipated) be made 
early in the morning. About '4 o'clock on the morning of the 



222 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

4th, cannonading by the enemy commenced, and after dayHght, in 
addition to the assaults on Battery Robinett and other points of the 
field, heavy skirmishing took place in front of College Hill. Dur- 
ing the morning the 1st and 2d brigades were also withdrawn to 
College Hill, and twice the enemy attempted to assault Battery 
Phillips, — his columns, supported with artillery, approaching 
behind a ridge running nearly parallel to our line. Each time the 
head of his column was suffered to approach within short musket 
range, when Battery Phillips and the light pieces of this division 
opened upon him so hotly that he hastily retired. Information 
subsequently received indicated beyond doubt that these movements 
were not intended as mere feints. The enemy's last effort was on 
this part of the field after having been repulsed at all other points. 
During the day Genl. McArthur, with a portion of his brigade, 
was sent in advance to reconnoiter, and finding the enemy retiring, 
he took a position at night near Alexanders; the l)alance of his 
brigade, the 2d brigade and the 10th Ohio battery, by direction of 
the General commanding, started at 2 o'clock on the morning of 
the 5th to reinforce him, and the balance of the division started at 
daylight in pursuit of the enemy which was continued this day as 
far as the Tuscumbia ri\er. * * * * i^ order to give 
a more distinct idea of the part performed bv this division, in these 
important operations, the following brief account is added by wa}^ 
of recapitulation: 

Oct 2d, heavy skirmishing by 2d brigade, under Col. Oliver, who 
had advanced to reinforce one of his regiments previously stationed 
at Chewalla, the Colonel taking up a position at night near Alex- 
ander's Cross Roads. Oct. 8d, in the morning, the enem3''s ad- 
vance attackei.1 Col. Oliver, but was repulsetl; after which the 
Colonel, ascertaining that the enemv is in force, falls back slowly 
according to his instructions, contesting the ground by severe fight- 
ing and destroying bridges, until he makes a stand on fa\'orable 
ground a little in ad\ance of the old Confederate intrenchments, 



loiva Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 22J 

where he is reinforced by the 1st brigade, under Genl. McArthur, 
who takes command at that point for the purpose of reheving the 
2d brigade, considerably exhausted by severe duty. The road 
leading in from Chewalla runs through the line occupied by the 
2d division, commanded by Genl, Davies, and one of his brigades 
(Baldwin's) now co-operates in holding the advance position. 
After several unsuccessful attemps to turn the left, the enemy pass 
to the right and throw their entire force upon the 2d division, 
which is forced back, and Mc Arthur's command being turned, is 
obliged to retire again to a new position which is taken near the 
main line, north of tlie railroad, facing north, the main line of this 
division changing front to correspond and the 2d being now 
relieved, the enemy at length appearing again, the 1st brigade, 
together with the 2d division, charge, driving him some distance, 
when this brigade is called in and formed as a second line. 

The division still holds its position, menacing the enemy's right 
flank to give time for a flank movement on his left by Hamilton's 
division, and to delay his advance until the reser\e can be posted to 
support the batteries in his front. These movements accomplished, 
the 6th division at length being ordered to fall back within the 
interior line of batteries, the enemy again appeared and commenced 
a furious attack after the division has commenced moving; but is 
repulsed, after a severe action by Col. Crocker, commanding the 
3d brigade; and the division moves in good order and takes posi- 
tion, at sundown, within the line of defenses, without the loss of a 
gun; having during the day received \.\\& Jirst attack of the enemy 
eight miles west of Corinth, and having disputed and delayed his 
advance until after the division on the right was forced by over- 
whelming numbers to give way, and holding its position on the 
enemy's flank, assisted in retarding his advance on the batteries 
until it was too late for him to make an assault on the evening of 
this day; and, finally, when ordered to fall back to the inner bat- 
teries, and the enemy again attacks the division while on the 



^24 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

mafch, it halts to beat him back, and marches into position within 
the defenses in good order. 

Oct. 4, in addition to sevfcre skirmishing in front the division co- 
operates with the siege batteries, repulsed the enemy in two 
attempts to force the works on College Hill, and after the battle 
the division participated in the pursuit of the enemy as far as 
Ripley, and on leaving that place to return to Corinth, the rear- 
guard was furnished by this division. 

As far as my personal observation extended, the conduct of the 
troops (both officers and soldiers) was worthy of the highest com- 
mendations. All appeared to do their duty prompth^ and coolly; 
advancing with alacrity when necessary, retiring only when 
ordered, and then in good order, and promptly halting at the word 
to face about and beat back the enemy. 

The men of Ohio, Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota, 
Iowa and Missouri, together standing and bravely fighting side by 
side. * * * 5te ^j] |-|-,g commanders of brigades were 
active in the discharge of their duties; * * * * iZoX . 
M. M. Crocker, commanding the 3d brigade, is entitled to the 
highest credit for the skill and bravery with which he executed 
the various orders of his fine brigade, and especially for his gallant 
conduct in the engagement near Battery " F." This brigade was 
previously well disciplined under his command and the care of the 
meritorious held officers of the several regiments. Capt. A. 
Hickenlooper, oth Ohio Battery, acting chief of artillery for the 
division, on this as on former occasions, showed himself a brave 
and skillful officer. Of the Field officers, -* * * * 
Col. A, T. Reid, loth Iowa Vols., who was sick when the battle 
commenced, but was with his regiment at daylight on the -Ith, 
and remained in command until the regiment returned from the 
pursuit. Lieut. Col. VV. VV. Belknap, who commanded the same 
regiment on the first day of the battle, and displayed great 
coolness and bravery in the conflict near Battery " F." Maj. W . 



loxva Veteran Volunteer Irifantry. 225 

T. Cunningham of the same regiment, who was severely 
wounded, * * * * are entitled to credit, not only for 
good conduct in the field, but for their previous industry in per- 
fecting the discipline of their respective regiments. Capt. VV . T. 
Clark, Assistant Adjutant General, serving on my staff, who has 
long served with fidelity and great intelligence, on this occasion 
displayed great bravery and energy. Lieutenant M. A. Higley, 
Quartermaster and Commissary 15th Iowa Volunteers, Acting 
Division Quartermaster, performed his arduous duties in a very 
intelligent manner, and has always shown himself reliable, and was 
fearless and indefatigable. 

I respectfully refer to the reports already furnished for an ex- 
hibit of the killed, wounded, etc., of the division. 
Ver}^ respectfully, your obedient servant, 

THOS. J. McKEAN, 
Brigadier General, U. S. Volunteers. 



GENERAL ORDERS NO. 151. 

Headquarters Army of Mississippi, ] 

Third Division, District of West Tennessee, V 

Corinth^ JMississippi, Oct. 25, 1862. ) 

To the Army of the Third Division of the District of West Ten- 
nessee : 
The preliminary announcement of the results of the great battle 
of Corinth was given to you on the battle-field by myself in per- 
son . I then proclaimed to you that " they were badly beaten at 
all points, and had fled, leaving their dead and wounded on the 
field." When I told you to replenish your cartridge boxes and 
haversacks, snatch a sleep after yrfur two days' fighting and two 
nights of watching and movements, and be ready by the morning's 
dawn to follow the retreating foe, my heart beat high with pride 
and pleasure to the round and joyful response from your toil-worn 
and battle-stained ranks. Such a response \vas worthy such sol- 
diers, and of the country and cause for which they fought. 



226 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

I have now received the reports of the various commanders. I 
have now to tell you that the magnitude of the stake, the battle and 
the results, become more than ever apparent. Upon the issue of 
this fight depended the possession of West Tennessee, and perhaps 
even the fate of operations in Kentucky. The entire available 
force of the rebels in Mississippi, save a few garrisons and a small 
reserve, attacked you. They were commanded by Van Dorn, 
Price, Villipigue, Rust, Armstrong, Maury and others, in person. 
They numbered, according to their own authorities, nearlv 40,000 
men — ahiiost double your own numbers. You fought them into 
the position we desired on the 8d, punishing them terribly, and on 
the 4th, in three hours after the Infantry entered into action, they 
were completely beaten. You killed and buried 1,428 officers and 
men; some of their most distinguished officers falling, among whom 
was the gallant Colonel Rogers, of the 2d Texas, who bore their 
colors at the head of his storming columns, to the edge of the ditch 
of " Battery Robinett," where he fell. Their wounded, at the 
usual rate, must exceed 5,000. You took 2,263 prisoners, among 
whom are 137 field officers, captains, and subalterns, representing 
53 regiments of Infantry, 16 regiments of Cavalry, 13 batteries of 
Artillery, 7 Battalions; making 69 Regiments, 13 Batteries, 7 Bat- 
talions, besides several companies. You captured 3,300 stands of 
small arms, 14 stands of colors, 2 pieces of artillery, and a large 
quantity of equipments. You pursued his retreating columns 40 
miles in force with infantrv, and 60 miles with cavalry, and were 
ready to follow him to Mobile, if necessary, had you received or- 
ders. I congratulate you on these decisive results; in the name of 
the Government and the people I thank you. I beg you to unite 
with me in giving humble thanks to the Great Master of all for 
our victory. 

It would be to me a great pleasure to signalize in this General 
Order those whose gallant deeds are recorded in the various reports, 
but their number forbids. I will only say that to Generals Ham- 



loxva Veteran Vohinteer Infantiy. 22y 

ilton, Stanley, McArthur and Davies, to General Oglesby and Col- 
onel Mizener, and the brigade and regimental commanders under 
them, I offer my thanks for the gallant and able manner in which 
the}' have performed their several duties. To the regimental com- 
manders and chiefs of batteries and cavalrv, and especially to Col- 
onels Lee and Hatch, I present my thanks for their gallantry on the 
battle-field and in the pursuit. I desire especially to offer my 
thanks to General Davies and his division, whose magnificent fight- 
ing on the yd more than atones for all that was lacking on the 4th. 
To all the officers and soldiers of this army who bravely fought, 
I offer my heartfelt thanks for their noble behavior, and pray that 
God and their country may add to the rewards which flow from 
the consciousness of duty performed, and that the time may speedily 
come when under the flag of a nation, one and indivisible, benign 
peace may again smile on us amid the endearments of home and 
family. But our victory has cost us the lives of 315 brave ofllcers 
and soldiers, besides the wounded . Words of praise cannot reach 
those who died for their country in this battle, but they console and 
encourage the living. The memory of the brave Hackelman, the 
chivalrous Kirby Smith, the true and noble Colonels Thruah, 
Baker and Mills, and Captain Guy C. Ward, with many others, 
lives with us in the memory of a free people, while history will 
inscribe their names among its heroes. 

W. S. ROSENCRANS, 
Major- General Commanding. 



GENERAL ORDERS, NO. 88. 

Headquarters Department of West Tennessee, 

yackson^ Teiin..^ Oct. 7, 1862. 

It is with heartfelt gratitude the general commanding congratu- 
lates the armies of the West for another great victory won by them 
on the 3d, 4th and 5th instant, over the combined armies of Van 
Dorn, Price and Lovell. 



228 History of the Fifteenth Regimetti 

The enemy chose his own time and place of attack, and knowing 
the troops of the West as he does, and with great faciHties for 
knowing their numbers, never would have made the attempt except 
with a superior force numerically. But for the undaunted bravery 
of officers and soldiers, who have yet to learn defeat, the efforts of 
the enemy must have proven successful. 

Whilst one division of the army, under Major-General Rosen- 
crans,was resisting and repelling the onslaught of the rebel hosts 
at Corinth, another from Bolivar, under Major-General Hurlbut, 
was marching upon the enemy's rear, driving in their pickets and 
cavalry, and attracting the attention of a large force of infantry and 
artillery. On the following day, under Major-General Ord, these 
forces advanced with unsurpassed gallantry, driving the enemy 
back across the Hatchie, over ground where it is almost incredible 
that a superior force should be driven by an inferior, capturing two 
of the batteries (eight guns), many hundred small arms, and several 
hundred prisoners. 

To those two divisions of the army all praise is due, and will be 
awarded by a grateful country. 

Between them there should be, and I trust arc, the warmest 
bonds of brotherhood. Each was risking life in the same cause, 
and on this occasion, risking it also to save and assist the other. No 
troops could do more than these separate armies. Each did all pos- 
sible for it to do in the places assigned it. 

As in all great battles, so in this, it becomes our fate to mourn 
the loss of many brave and faithful officers and soldiers, who have 
given up their lives as a sacrifice for a great principle. The nation 
mourns for them. By command of 

Major-General U.S. Grant. 
John A. Rawlins, A. A. G. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 22Q 

A RECOLLECTION OF CORINTH. 

Well do I remember when we stood in line of battle out in the 
woods beyond Corinth October 3d, 1862, waiting for the enemy to 
advance closer to us. Three or four times I raised my gun to fire, 
when a voice we were accustomed to obey said: "Hold on, Hip- 
pert; hold on." Turning my head and looking back I saw right 
by the colors that good old gi'ay horse, with Colonel Belknap in 
the saddle, as cool as a cucumber, while the rebel bullets were fly- 
ing like hail. Many of the boys would say whizzing and zipping 
like h — 11 all around us. 

After a while we again heard that ever welcome and beloved 
voice command: Attention! Battallion! Fix Bavonets! and then 
say: " Now, boys, there's some work to be done here, and I don't 
want a man to leave if we are all wiped off from the face of God's 
earth." I believe they are the very words spoken by the gentle- 
man who rode that gray horse, and it always makes me feel like 
throwing my hat high in the air, and shouting: "Bully for Bel- 
knap." PHILLIP P. HIPPERT, 

H Company. 



2JO History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



^^I^T "VI. 



Winter Campaign — November-December, 1862 — Grand 
[unction — Holly Springs — Oxford — Abbeville — Yoc- 
kena Station — Forced March to Holly Springs — 
LaFayette — Memphis — Operations in Front of Vicks- 
BURG — Milliken's Bend — Pkovidence--Digg 1 NG Canal 
TO connect the Mississippi River with the Lake and 
Bayous Tensas and Macon---Report of Lieutenant 
Colonel Wm. E. Strong, Lnspector General 17th 
Army Corps—January to April, 1863. 

The loth Iowa with 8d brigade and 6th division, after its return 
from Ripley, remained encamped in front of Battery Philhps for 
two weeks, the troops being employed in constructing shorter in- 
terior lines, and strengthening the forts of the nearest circle, around 
Corinth. 

October 20th, Col. Reid took command of the brigade in place 
of Crocker, on leave of absence. October 22d and 31st, the 
division was reviewed by General McArthur, these being the first 
reviews the regiment participated in since entering the service. 

October 25th, winter set in with piercing north wLiid and snow. 
On next and subsequent days it became as cold as November 
usually is in Iowa, The troops were providing themselves with 
brick from deserted houses in Corinth to put up their old fashioned 
fire-places, as if they intended to stay in winter quarters. vSoon, 
however, the extensive preparations in every branch of the service — 
the issuing of arms and accoutrements in place of those damaged, 
and of a full amount of cartridges — showed plainlv that no winter 
quarters were thought of, 



loiva Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 2ji 

BRIGADIER GENERAL J. McARTHUR'S REPORT 
OF DIVISION REVIEW. 

Headquarters 6th Division, Army of the Tenn. ) 
Corinth^ Afiss., Oct. 2j, 1862. \ 

Colonel H. T. Reid, Commanding Third Brigade: 

Colonel:— -The General commanding the division congratu- 
lates the 3d brigade on the general appearance and soldierly bear- 
ing of the entire command, in the review of yesterday, and in 
connection therewith submits the following remarks: 

11th Iowa Volunteers. ---This Regiment marched well, the 
fourth company from the right, especially. The marching salute 
was correctly given. One mistake was made in presenting arms 
a second time. The martial music, played correctly, ought to be 
increased in numbers. Staff officers mostly absent. 

13th Iowa Volunteers.-— This Regiment appeared to good 
advantage, very steady in line. No marching salute was given by 
the line officers. This is in accordance with regulations, but not 
in practice, generally ; the salute will be given unless otherwise 
oi-dei'ed. The music should have turned out and played until the 
regiment passed as did the first, and then fallen in rear of the 
column. This band ought also to be increased. Staff officers 
mostly absent. Distance in marching not well preserved. 

15th Iowa Volunteers.-— This Regiment shows care on the 
part of the officers. Marching good; distance well preserved 
throughout. Band also omitted to turn out; a few officers did not 
salute. On the whole, very creditable. 

16th Iowa Volunteers. ---This Regiment preserved the 
cadence of the step well; distance well kept in wheeling into line. 
The officers, with few exceptions, gave the marchmg salute well, 
and at the proper time. Band also omitted to turn out; it also 
requires attention. 

Note — The colors of nearly all omitted the salute, as did the 
bands to begt the ruffle. The commanding officers of regiments 



2J2 History of the Fijteenth Regiuient 

also omitted to turn out, while their commands passed in review. 
These remarks are not made in the spirit of fault-tinding, but for 
mutual benefit. The Commanding General will be invited to 
review the division as soon as practicable. 

By order of BRIG. GENL. J. Mc ARTHUR, 

Commanding- Sixth Division. 



October 28th, General Rosencrans, heretofore in command of 

the troops at Corinth, was succeeded by General Hamilton, the 

former being transferred to the command of the Ohio Army, vice 

Buell, relieved . 

yacksoji, Nov. 7, 1862. 

General Hamilton, Corinth, Miss.: 

There are indications that Bolivar will be attacked within forty- 
eight hours. Have three divisions of your command ready to 
move to-morrow morning with three days rations in haversacks 
and three days in wagons. U. S. GRANT, Major General. 



SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 7. 

Headquarters Dist. of Corinth, 3d Div., Dept. of Tenn., ) 

Corinth^ Nov. 7, 1862. \ 

The divisions of Generals Stanley, Quinby and McArthur will 

be held in readiness for movement early to-morrow morning with 

three days rations in haversacks and three in wagons, and 100 

rounds of ammunition per man. Not more than one tent per 

company will be taken; no other baggage. 

By command of Brig. Genl. C. S. Hamilton, 

R. M. Sawyer, A. A. General. 



yackson., Tenn . , Nov. 7, 1862 . 
Major General McPherson, Bolivar, Tenn., 

The moment you hear from the front inform me. If the enemy 
are moving on you I want to put the troops in motion. 

U. S. GRANT, Major General. 







John MPArthur. 

brigben'l.u.s.yols. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 2JJ 

On November 2d, the troops of Hamilton's command were 
started for Grand Junction, on the Memphis and Charleston rail- 
road; the regiment with its brigade and division arriving at that 
place on the night of the 5th. Next day the enemy retreated 
towards Cold Water, eight miles south. On the 12th, Colonel 
Crocker having returned, assumed command of the brigade . 

From the 20th to the 28th, division drill of the three brigades 
and battalion drill, alternately, were the order of the day. General 
McArthur commanding the drill of the division personally. This 
was the first instance of the division being practically instructed in 
the different movements incident to brigade in line of battle by di- 
vision, to-wit: 2d brigade deployed in line of battle. 1st brigade 
in rear in close columns by divisions, the posling of artillei-y on 
the flanks of the first line, and of the reserve aitillery in the rear 
of the centre of the second line; the throwing out of skirmish 
line; the advancing forward of the whole division in line of 
battle; the changing of front of the line of division, forward and 
to the rear; the falling back of the skirmish line on the line of 
battle; the deploying into column of battalions and deploying into 
line; the charge and rallying, etc. This practical instruction of the 
troops in movements of every day occurrence, while engaged with 
the enemy, was heretofore greatly needed, and was of the greatest 
practical benefit to officers and men. 

On November 28th, the organization of all the troops destined 
for the winter campaign to the rear of Vicksburg being completed, 
the three corps were put in motion; General Hamilton in command 
of the left wing, now in front; General McPherson in command 
of the centre, moving on a parallel road next on the right; and 
General W. T.Sherman, moving from Memphis southeast toward 
Abbeville, being the extreme right. 

The Sixth division of Hamilton's corps being in the lead of the 
column, the 8d brigade was in front. The enemy was met six 
miles out along the road arid a spirited skirmishing comniericed at 
18 



2J4 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

once by the advance cavalry, when after an hour's engagement in 
front, part of the cavah'y was sent to attack the enemy's Hne on 
their left flank, which threw them into a precipitate flight towards 
Holly Springs. Next day, 29th, the march was stopped by the 
enemy on the high plateau at Waterford about noon; the 6th di- 
vision deploying into line of battle on the north side of the valley 
between Waterford and Lumpkin's mill; when soon after the 
skirmishers were engaged on both sides, until part of the Federal 
cavalry emerged from the timber nearest to the left wing of the 
enemy's line; this at once compelled them to leave the ground. In 
their haste the enemy left over 300 boxes of tobacco in the 
place . 

On the 30th, McPherson took the lead and drove the enemy to 
the Tallahatchie bridge, three miles north of Abbeville, where 
Pemberton had his headquarters the day before, arriving within 
two miles of the bridge at night. The rain poured down in tor- 
rents, while General Phil. Sheridan's cavalry, having crossed the 
Tallahatchie below and above the bridge, fell upon the flanks of the 
enemy. This caused them to evacuate the strong fort around the 
bridge; and after burning the same and their magazines at Abbe- 
ville, also the bridges and the long trestle works of the railroad, 
they retreated precipitately farther south toward Grenada. 

The regimental return of alterations for November 30th shows 
that of the 760 men who arrived at Pittsburg Landing, April 6th, 
there has been a total loss of 463, or 61 per cent, in eight months' 
service. 

The railroad south of Grand Junction being our only line of 
communication with our base at Columbus, Ky., it became an 
object of geatest importance to at once set to work to repair the 
several bridges and trestle works of the railroad between Talla- 
hatchie river and Abbeville, three miles distant . The 6th division 
being encamped near the latter place, was detailed to repair same, 



lo-jva Veteran V olunteer Infantry. 2j^ 

by selecting men from the different regiments of the division who 
were to act as pioneers and engineers. This practically demon- 
strated the urgent necessity of organizing a pioneer and engineer 
force, properly officered and instructed in that branch of service. 
Though after ten days, Captain G. S. Werth, of Colonel Bissell's 
Engineer Regiment, arrived with a company of his men, and a 
heavy detail from each regiment of the division was assigned to do 
duty under him, the necessary repairs were not finished before the 
18th of December.* On that day, the division moved forward, 
the 8d brigade leading the column. On the 19th the division 
passed through Oxfonl, where it was reviewed while marching by 
General Grant, and arrived in the evening at Yockena Station 
near Grenada. Here news was received t>f a cavalry force of 
5,000 from Pemberton's army, having made a circuit to the south- 
east from our front, and having turned to our rear and taken pos- 
session of Holly Springs, destroyed several magazines of supplies, 
clothing, etc . ; also of an attack having been made on Jackson, 
Teiin., on the Columbus and Grand Junction railroad. 

The corps of General Hamilton was ordered to fall back from 
interior of Mississippi, and the 6th division by forced march 
reached Holly Springs on the 22d of December, where whole 
blocks were found burned to ruins by the rebels setting fire to the 
govermental store-houses, after Colonel Murphv, commanding 



*A letter from General Grant's Army says, General McArthur is a strict disciplinarian, 
and the regular calls of the day can be heard at the stated periods, running from one end of 
the line to the other, with a regularity that is almost wonderful. He is particularly strict in 
regard to men leaving their commands while in camp, or straggling on the march; an 1 what 
makes the men so readily obey these orders is because all officers are under the same restric- 
tions. No officer or soldier is allowed to leave camp without a pass from his regimental 
commander, approved by the brigade commander, and re-approved at division headquarters 
Colonels, lieutenant colonels, majors, capt;'ins, lieutenants and soldiers all fare alike, and on 
the march no division has so few stragglers as his. The division is the old 6th of the Army 
fif the Tennessee, which advanced on Corinth, and has at various times been commanded uy 
Generals Prenliss, Sherman, Todd, McKean, and last but not least, by McArihur. It is 
composed of three brigades, five batteries and three compmies of cavalry as escort to the 
general. (The 1st Kansas Infantry has been attached to the 1st brigade; the other regiments 
are named in General McKean's report ol Battle of Corinth, and the batteries.) The division 
has had many hard knocks, but is still a good fighting division, and if its regiments were 
filled with recruits would be one of the finest in the Field. 



2j6 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

the post, had surrendered the place to them.* General Hicken- 
looper, says: "Sad, indeed, was your Christmas week above the 
Tallahatchie, where you were forced to live upon the country, and 
demonstrated the feasibility of making one day's rations last seven — 
the key note of Granfs campaign in the rear of Vicksburg^ 
and Sherman's March to the Sea. 

The march was resumed on the 30th of December, the 6th 
division having been assigned to guarding that part of the Mem- 
phis and Charleston railroad which lay between Moscow and 
Colliersville, a line of fourteen miles. 

The 3d brigade was stationed at LaFayette, Tenn., on said rail- 
road, from December 31st to January 12th, 1863, and was several 
times called into line of battle by rebel cavalry approaching the 
place from the north and also from the south. January 2d, the 
15th and 16th Iowa were marched, under command of Colonel 
Reid, of the 15th, to a point near Isbell's farm, three miles north 
of LaFayette, at which rebel scouts had captured some of the men 
of the brigade the day before, while they were engaged in forag- 
ing. The rebel force, however, being informed, as was supposed, 
by Isbell himself, withdrew beyond the reach of our infantry ex- 
pedition, and the two regiments returned to their post. 

January 6th, Captain J. M. Hedrick and Lieutenant Hezekiah 
Fisk, who were captured in the battle of Shiloh, April 6th, 1862, 
rejoined the regiment. 

January 12th, General John A. Logan's division, having arrived 
to relieve our division, the latter resumed march to Memphis, 
where it arrived next day, — the troops of the division experienced 
while in camp near Memphis, a spell of the severest winter known 
for many years past even in Iowa; the men being absolutely com- 
pelled to fully dress up from head to foot before going to sleep at 
night. 

♦While in camp here, especially on Christmas, an old frontiersman of H Compai.y, who 
occasionally had a devotional turn, used to preface his meals of unsalied mush and burnt 
wheat coffee by repeating "What rations we have, though very smiall, are a— sight better 
than none at all."' 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. ^j'j 

Memphis^ Tenn.^ yanuary ij^ i86j . 
Major-General J. B. McPherson, La Grange, Tenn.: 

It is my present intention to command the expedition down the 
river in person . I will take two divisions with me, Logan's and 
McArthur's, I think. It will not be necessary for Logan to move, 
however, until further orders. I do not know where McClernand 
is, but have sent orders for him to proceed to Milliken's Bend, and 
remain there or co-operate with Banks, should he be coming up the 
river. Was Holly Springs destroyed ? Report here says so. 

U. S. GRANT, Major-General. 
Memphis^ Tenn,^ jfajiiiary t'J, i86j. — 2:30 A. m. 
Major-General H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief: 

I will send McArthur's division (all I have transports for) im- 
mediately to join the expedition on Vicksburg; send Logan's in a 
few days, and hold Quinby ready to embark when called for. 
Abandon the railroad north from Jackson at once, and move the 
machine shop and public stores from that place here, and hold all 
the troops from Grand Junction around the railroad to Corinth in 
readiness to be placed on the line from here east. I will go down 
and take McPherson, leaving Hamilton to command and carry out 
instructions for those changes in the old District of West Tennes- 
see. U. S. GRANT, Major-General. 



SPECIAL ORDERS, NO. 15. 

Headquarters Department of the Tennessee, ) 
Memphis^ Teiin.^ January /j, i86j. j 

I. Lieutenant-Colonel C. A. Reynolds, chief quartermaster of 
the department, is hereby ordei"ed to stop all steamboats at Mem- 
phis that may be required to transport troops and stores for the 
expedition down the Mississippi river, and re-charter the same. 

II. Brigadier-General C. S. Hamilton is hereby assigned to the 
command of the Districts of Columbus, Jackson, Corinth, and 
Memphis, headquarters at Memphis for the present, but subject to 



2j8 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

be removed to any other part of the command required by the exi- 
gencies of the service. * * * * 

VI. The divisions of Brigadier-General McArthur, Brigadier- 
General Logan, and Brigadier-General Qiiinby, are detached from 
the command of Brigadier-General Hamilton, and all dispositions 
made for the maintenance of his positions will be made without ref- 
erence to them . * * * * 

IX. The chiefs of artillery and of ordnance will immediately 
procure and ship ordnance stores for 50,000 infantry, 26 batteries of 
artillery, and 2,000 cavahy, at the rate of 500 rounds per man for 
the infantry and cavalry, and refill caissons for the artillery twice. 
This supplv is required in addition to the amount to be kept on 
hand by the troops at all times, but embracing all other stores for 
issue. * * * * 

XI. The divisions now commanded, respectively, by Brigadier- 
Generals Quinby, Logan, and McArthur, are designated to re- 
enforce the expedition operating down the Mississippi river, Major- 
General J. B. McPherson to command the whole. 

XII. Brigadier-General McArthur's division will at once em- 
bark on transports and proceed down the river to report to Major- 
General McClernand for orders until the arrival of Major-General 
McPherson with the remainder of his command . * *- * * 

XIV. Troops on this expedition will want immediately in 
their own hands all the ammunition required by previous orders. 
They will move with three day's cooked rations in haversacks and 
seven day's additional on hand . 

***** By order of 

Majok-Generai. U. S. Grant. 
Jno. a. Rawlins, Assistant Adjutant General. 

January ISth the 15th and IGth Iowa were embarked on the 
steamer Minnehaha (the same that carried the loth Iowa from St. 
Louis to Pittsburg Landing in April, 1862), and the several regi- 
ments and batteries of the 6th division were embarked on fourteen 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 2jg 

other steamers, the Platte Valley being the flagship. On the 20th 
the 6th division had 6,115 men present and 16 pieces of artillery. 
On this day the fleet started toward Vicksburg, where several 
corps were already stationed on the Louisiana side of the river, now 
to try unitedly the solution of the great military problem which had 
just proved a failure to the winter expedition on land, and also at 
Chickesaw Bayou. 

The fleet arrived on the 23d at Milliken's Bend, La., one and a 
half miles above the mouth of the Yazoo river, where about a hun- 
dred other steamers were landed along the Louisiana shore. The 
regiment, with the brigade, went into camp January 25th, near Dr. 
Parker's magnificent plantation, where trees and grass in the sur- 
rounding country evidenced the near approach of spring. The eye 
met nature's green in evei"y direction, the breezes light and warm, 
the sky cloudless deep blue. 

After landing at Duckport, the 15th marched to the estate of 
one , departed, but he had erected several Queen Ana- 
nias cottages, before going, and in them the companies were quar- 
tered. Across Louisiana avenue the line offlcers had pitched their 
tents, that is, those of 'em had who were without assistants to do 
so. Naturally the 15th sent out pickets, among them a jolly gang 
who devised marvelous tales to interest the natives, and cause 
them to obey said gang with marked celerity. So as the caravans 
from the interior, laden with the fat of the land and the sweets 
thereof, arrived at the lines, they were halted just inside the border, 
and the natives informed that the Gineral was sick, or had gone to 
New York, and they could not go to the landing until he returned 
or recovered, but 'smother day they could. Then while a part of 
the gang received the duties imposed by the United States on im- 
ports, others would assess and collect tithes for the state, the rail- 
roads, the alimentary kanawl, the school-marms, home and foreign 
missions, and " else things." In this way the larder and fire-place 
of one of the above cottages was insured against famine, by these 



240 Histo>'y of the Fifteenth Regiment 

Bold Bandits of the Prairies, who would eat, drink and be merry, 
for on the morrow man born of woman, and enlisted in the 15th 
Hawkeyes, might be of few days and short of rations. 

Especially was this the case in the palatial castle, garrisoned by 
C and H Companies; and from the wing held by the latter, after 
the evening meal, (when flour had gin out), would arise sounds of 
revelry by night, and the melodious notes of the Arkansas traveler, 
mingled with orders to swing that lady, first couple forward and by 
the right flank back, then all hearers knew a stag-dance was a 
whooping, and one so exclusive, that to prevent any intrusion by 
those not invited officially, all portholes and openings were closed 
securely beforehand. Then on went the dance, long after Prof. 
Metz's metropolitan band had delivered their evening concert, and 
as the Colonel retired for the night, he gave unto the ofiicer of the 
day and night, full control of the Parish. Still the dances continued 
until ladies and gents were nearly exhausted, when they would ad- 
journ. This was all right until Captain Job Throckmorton was 
officer of the day, and he felt called on to suppress the ball; where- 
upon, after taps had sounded, Job rapped on the outer door of the 
castle and a lady said: " Gway from dar white man," and to other 
rappings, spirits informed him the\' were in Executive Session and 
could admit no one, so the party on the outside retired and held a 
council of war with himself, and decided on strategy, me boy! 
Going to Captain Edwards' shebang across the Avenue, he worried 
Orderly Crawford out of the sleep of the just, and together they 
advanced on the citadel, and Throcky sounded a parley, but the 
house declined a joint session. "Whose voice was that," asked 
Throcky, in a low voice of Crawford, who replied: "Alf B — s," 
and B was entered on Throcky's book of fate, "And who spoke 
then," he said. The Sergeant answered, "Steve F — n," and he was 
duly entered; and before long the O. D. had enrolled Bill W — s, 
Ben M— 1, Jim Mc — e, Ceph H— s, Bill A— y, Jake E— y, John 
F— s, Pike G— t, Dixie H— n, and P. Murphy, Esq. Then the 



Iowa Veteran V ohinteer Infantry. 241 

party on the outside, thinking he had all, retired in good order, 
while the party inside sang: "Oh! the pertaters they grow small; 
a-n-d they plant 'em in the fall; a-n-d they eat 'em tops and all, in 
Saint Joe." Then they whooped up Liza Jane, and ho'ed it way 
into the small hours, and retired to their downy couches (down on 
the floor. 

Next morning the above dozen received pressing invitations to 
attend the opening of the Bastile at the west end, which they eag- 
erly accepted, remaining there as guests for several days. Mean- 
while the United States Court, for the Northern District of Louisi- 
ana, opened in due form, and to the cries of ye sheriff (thinking he 
was in distress), they chipped in $18 a head, the equivalent of their 
late ball tickets. So thoroughly did this squad enjoy army life that 
every one veteraned, and 6 were wounded and 5 captured, 1 1 of 
the 12, in less than a month, at Atlanta. 

While troops of McClernand's corps were engaged in cutting 
and widening the canal across the neck of the Mississippi, opposite 
the rebel stronghold at Vicksburg, a strong detail of 180 men were 
mounted on mules and the expedition sent January 80th, under 
Lieutenant-Colonel Belknap, of the 15th Iowa, to reconnoitre in 
the direction of Richmond, twenty-five miles west of Vicksburg, 
where large numbers of cattle, horses and mules had been hid in 
the neighboring timber. The expedition met the enemy around 
Richmond, had a fight of one hour, in which one man was killed 
and several wounded, but could not accomplish the capture of the 
animals on account of the instructions being to return next day. 
Another similar expedition started out on February 1st, to which 
Captain C. Cadle, Jr., A. D. C. was attached, who was wounded 
by a minie ball marking his ear. 

General Ordei's No. 210, War Department, Adjutant-General's 
Office, dated December 18th, 1862, having placed Major-General 
James B. McPherson in command of the 17th Army Corps, the 
6th Division of General John McArthur, and 7th Division of Gen- 



242 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

eral J. F. Quinby, both heretofore under General Hamilton, were 
assigned to constitute part of the said 17th Army Corps, by Gen- 
eral Orders No. 6, from Headquarters Department and Army of 
the Tennessee, dated Memphis, Januai'y 20th, 1868. 

February 8th, the 2d and 3d Brigades of McArthur's division 
were ordered to embark at once. The 15th and 16th Iowa marched 
on board the steamer Maria Denning, and February 9th the fleet 
started with these two brigades and arrived at Providence, La., 
about seventy miles north of Vicksburg, on the lOth. Both brig- 
ades disembarked, and found the first brigade of the division in 
camp there. The 8d brigade went into camp on the north side of 
Lake Providence, one and three-quarter miles west of the town, on 
the plantation of General Sparrow, known to have been a member 
of the rebel senate at Richmond, Va. February 23d General Lo- 
gan's division, also part of the 17th Army Corps, arrived from 
Memphis, and went into camp south of the afore' mentioned lake. * 

By the arrival of General J. B. McPherson, commanding 17th 
corps, at Providence, February 26th, the work of connecting the 
Mississippi river with the lake, by cutting the canal wide enough to 
admit the largest boats to the lake, and from there to the Bayous 
Macon and Tensas, was taken up and was progressing vigorously 
towards completion. The regiment, in common with other troops 
of the corps, gave heavy details alternately to this very hard work, 
the rain being incessant for weeks, converting the ground they 
were working into sinking mud, and resulting in the increase of the 
number of the sick day by day . 

During the first days of March, all troops belonging to the 17th 
corps were ordered to be ready for inspection by the Inspector Gen- 
eral of the corps. 

The 15th Iowa passed through a rigid and minute inspection on 
the oth of March. This was the fist thorough inspection ever 



*No. of guns in Regimeni, February 25th, 401; No. of cartridges, 30,870; average, 72 rounds 
per man. 



Iowa Veterati Volunteer Infantry. 24J 

made according to the prescribed requirements of the Army Reg- 
idations since the regiment entered the service. After the inspec- 
tion of the general appearance of the men, the arms and equip- 
ments, and the contents of knapsacks of the men were inspected 
singly, and one by one, and before any company was dismissed 
from the parade ground, the commander thereof had to answer how 
man}' he had present, absent, sick present, sick absent, aggregate, 
etc., and was ordered to take his company through the manual of 
arms, then to start by wheeling out, and to march his men in com- 
pany front, by the right flank, again b}- company or by platoon into 
line, etc. Next came the inspection of the regimental and com- 
pany records and books, then the camp and tents of the men, the 
records of the medical and c[uartermaster departments, the interior 
of the hospital and quartermaster tents. The regimental books 
and records attracted the notice and unqualified approbation of the 
Division Commander, as well as of the Inspector General, by their 
general plan, interior arrangement, and the completeness of the 
military history of each member of the command, in every particu- 
lar item agreeing with the entries of the field and monthly returns 
from the organization of the regiment to the day of inspection. 
The Inspector General, lately from the Eastern Army, pronounced 
the records of the regiment to be the most complete he had seen. 

March 10th Lieiiteuant-Colonel Wm . W. Belknap was detached 
from the regiment to serve on the staff of General James B. Mc- 
Pherson as Provost Marshal of the 17th Corps. 

At night, on the 16th of March, the minute guns fired at the 
levee announced the cutting of the dam of the Mississippi, The 
waters of the river, fifteen feet higher than the surface of the lake, 
were rushing into the same with such vehemence and noise as to 
make one remember the falls of Niagara. Soon the wide spread- 
ing and rapidly increasing inundation overflowed large tracts of 
land, and especially the country' north of the lake, which compelled 
the regiments of the 3d brigade, March 16th, to move their camp 



244 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

four miles north of Providence, which, however, being in a low 
cotton field, was abandoned, March 26th, and the brigade brought 
on board the latan to five miles south of the town, encamping on 
the Bass plantation, April 2d, Captain John M. Hedrick, K Com- 
pany, acting Major, (since Cunningham's resignation at Memphis, 
January 20th), received commission as Major of the regiment. 



HE DID NOT PASS. 

When the headquarters of General James B . McPherson, com- 
manding the 17th Army Corps, were at Lake Providence, the 
undersigned was a private in the 15th Iowa infantry of Crocker's 
Iowa Brigade and McPherson's corps, but was on detached ser- 
vice as chief clerk to General Wm. W. Belknap, who was then 
Lieutenant Colonel and Provost Marshal on the staff of General 
McPherson. All persons who passed outside of our lines were 
compelled to procure passes from Colonel Belknap before they 
could pass our pickets. There was a large quantity of cotton in 
the vicinity of Lake Providence and quite a number of patriotic 
(.f") men from the north, who loved cotton more than they did 
their country, were following the army stealing cotton, which they 
shipped north and sold at enormous prices. One evening, while 
sitting with Colonel Belknap in his tent, a Jew approached and 
was admitted, when the following conversation and incident took 
place : 

" Ish Brovost Marshal Pelknap in?" "He is, sir; I am that olli- 
cer," said Belknap. "Veil, Colonel, I vould like a bass to go 
outside your lines." " What for? " said the Colonel." "I vant 
to get some gotton vot vas outside." " Do you own the cotton?" 
" No, I don't own it, but off I don't get it tern rebels vill burn it 
up.'' " I do not give passes for such purposes, nor to men who are 
too cowardly to shoulder a musket at such a time as this!" said 
Belknap firmly. The Jew took from his pocket a large roll of 
greenbacks, and extending the hand that held them toward Bel- 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 24^ 

knap, said: " Colonel, der ish ten tousand tollars vot I vill o^If you 
off you vill gif me a bass foi* sixty tays." Belknap caught the 
man by the throat, turned him around with his face toward the 
opening of the tent and giving him four or five kicks, said: " You 

d d thief, get out of here. There is a steamer at the landing, 

that will start in a few hours, and if I find or hear of you being 
in this department after that boat has left here I will have you 
shot." The Jew made a bee line for the steamer and was never 
again seen in that portion of the army. This was not the only 
time that Belknap was tempted while I was his clerk, and notwith- 
standing all reports to the contrary, we have always believed him 
to be an honest man, and would not believe otherwise if an angel 
from Heaven were to come down and tell us so. Since the war 
we have conversed with a large number of soldiers who served 
under Belknap and we have to find a single one who does not re- 
gard him as one of the bravest men who donned the blue, and one 
of God's noblemen, an honest man. 

Wm. a. Gebhardt, a Company. 



WE RUN A STEAMBOAT ON DRY LAND. 

The last week in February, with others of the 15th, I was de- 
tailed to transfer the steam tug, J. A. Rawlins, from the Mississippi 
to the lake, by order of General J. B. McPherson, commanding 
the 17th Corps. With ropes and tackle we got her over the levee 
and dragged her by inches along Main street in Providence to the 
west end of that street, then south across where other details were 
digging on the canal, then west to southeast corner of lake, a good 
mile and a half from the river, and launched her into the classic 
lake. The time occupied in this feat was about ten days. The 
ostensible purpose of placing the boat on the lake was to find a 
passage down through Bayou Black into Bayou Macon; but it was 
also thought that our Generals and their gay and festive staffs had 
no serious objections to enjoy boat rides on the beautiful lake. For 



246 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

many a time staff officers came to us, with an order from the 
General commanding or the Provost Marshal to run the boat out to 
the west end of the lake, The objective point being Widow Black- 
burn's wine cellar, (although the orders did not so state.) These 
trips being made at night (it is supposed the staff were too busily 
engaged day time to permit of their absence,) and never reaching 
the landing on our return before 1 or 2 o'clock A. m.) I have made 
these trips three and four nights in succession. But the boat was 
frequently utilized in army movements. The engineer' of the boat 
was a civilian, and had been pressed in with the boat, and was 
anxious to get away, and he detailed me as engineer. When I 
first saw the cut in levee it was four feet wide, and the fall into first 
basin (south of the town) about eleven feet, then about four feet 
fall from this basin (through canal) into the lake. Next morning 
the shute was 200 feet wide, and supposed to be twenty feet deep, 
and looked as if one-half of the Mississippi was coming 

through it. 

J. Thatcher, E Company. 



THRILLING EXPERIENCE OF THE GENERALS 
WHO WERE NEARLY SHIPWRECKED. 

About the 25th of March, General McPherson ordered the tug 
J, A. Rawlins to run up the canal, out of Lake Providence and 
into the basin in front of his headquarters; the fall at this time was 
some three feet and the distance only about 100 yards; we had to 
burn some commissary bacon to get sufficient steam to accomplish 
the feat. After reaching the landing Generals McPherson, 
Logan, McArthur and other officers came on board, and we were 
ordered to run out to the west end of the lake some eight miles. 
This tug was a canal boat with an engine in the stern and a cabin 
towards the bow, and not decked over between. The water was 
deep enough on either side of the canal to run the boat, but there 
were trees and bushes in the way; the current was running at a 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 24J 

fearful rate; our bow lay towards the river, and as we swung out 
the current caught us and carried us clear across the canal before 
we could turn the tug down stream. The pilot rang for full 
steam and I pulled the throttle wide open, and looking forward 
saw the pilot was trying to get her back into the canal, with a big 
tree in front of us and about the boat's length ahead. The bow 
came just inside of the tree; knocking the bark off. but the stern 
concluded to go the other side of the tree, the bow gaining ten 
feet, when the stern swinging .crosswise of the current struck a 
tree, and General McArthur and others showed their agility in a 
way far more sudden than graceful, coming down from the roof 
of the engine-room into the hold in a confused mass; while the 
undersigned lost his grip on the throttle and tried to "grab a root," 
but had to jump and shut off that institution. Generals McPherson 
and Logan were " hors de combat " on the hurricane deck. The 
tug careened up stream and the water was just coming over the 
gunwale when the tree at the stern gave way or she would have 
sunk and broken in two. She then swung around and was hard 
aground. We got out a life line to the southern shore and run the 
Generals to land in the yawl. Nobody being severely hurt, they 
enjoyed the adventure greatly and cracked their jokes over each 
others alarming situations, etc., very freely. They went to their 
headquarters telling us to get the tug into the lake and they would 
come aboard and have their pleasure trip continued. A few nights 
later General McPherson, and a party with a band came on board, 
and we ran to the landing at Widow Blackburn's. Orders were 
left to be ready to start at a moment's notice, they saying, " They 
were going to make a call at that house." The band played on 
the porch until after midnight, and having a full head of steam 
and plenty of water in boiler, I concluded to blow off some mud 
at the mud valve. Going to turn it back, the wrench broke and 
the boiler ran empty before I could stop it. Pulling out the fire 
I set two men at work filling the boiler, when just at this critical 



24S History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

moment the party arrived at the boat to return. Imagine my con- 
sternation when the pilot (who was also captain of the tug) com- 
menced cursing me; when General McPherson grabbed him by 
the back of the neck and said: " Hold on, captain, or I will order 
you under arrest at once, I presume the engineer was doing what 
he thought was his duty." Then he said: " We will go back and 
have some more fun;" then, "Engineer, when you get steam 
whistle for us." Back they went, and when I had steam I 
whistled, but it was 2 o'clock in the morning before they 
returned. I mention this incident to show the genial good 
nature of General McPherson, and how jealously he guarded his 
soldiers against any impositions . This captain of the tug was a 

civilian. 

J. Thatcher, E Company. 



THE IOWA BRIGADE, SEVENTEENTH CORPS. 
Report of the Inspector-General. 

Headquarters Seventeenth Army Corps. | 
Lake Providence^ La.^ March 10, i86j. \ 

Colonel M. M. Crocker, Commanding Third Brigade, Sixth 

Division, Seventeenth Army Corps: 

I have the honor to herewith inclose to you an extract from my 
inspection report of the 6th division so far as it relates to your 
command: • 

Iowa may well be proud of the 3d brigade, of the 6th division. 
Col. M. M. Crocker, commanding. It is composed of the fol- 
lowing troops, viz: 11th Iowa Infantry, Lieutenant Colonel Aber- 
crombie, commanding; 13th Iowa Infantry, Lieutenant Colonel 
John Shane, commanding; 15th Iowa Infantry, Colonel H. T. 
Reid, commanding; and the 16th Iowa Infantry, Colonel Alex . 
Chambers, commanding. It turned out for inspection 1,935, rank 
and file. It was a sight to see, and a sight seldom seen. I have 
no desire, nor is it proper to pronounce a eulogy upon the 3d bri- 



lo-wa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 24g 

gade, but it would not be doing the 3d brigade and its gallant com- 
mander justice did I fail in giving them credit and praise which is 
justly and honestly due them ; did I fail in expressing, so far as I 
am capable, my satisfaction and my admiration at the manner in 
which the brigade acquitted itself throughout the entire inspection. 

Since I have been a soldier it has so happened that 1 have seen 
many brigades of many different army corps, both in eastern and 
western armies, but never have I seen a brigade that could com- 
pete with this Iowa brigade. 

I am not prejudiced in the slightest degree. I never saw any of 
the officers or soldiers of the command until the day when I saw 
them in line of battle, prepared for inspection. 

It made my heart swell with honest pride, and I envied the 
Colonel commanding the brigade, and the commanding officers of 
these four Iowa regiments, when I stood on the right of their 
lines, one after another, and saw them drill and go through their 
different evolutions in the manual of arms; everv rifle flashed in 
the sunlight and moved as one; when they ordered arms it was 
"ordered arms," and nothing else; one sound and no more; when 
they charged bayonets in line of battle the point of every bayonet 
was at the height of the eye, and the small of the stock rested 
against the hip at exactly the same instant; when thev broke into 
column of companies, wheeling upon fixed pivots, it was like 
clock-work — perfect. 

In every regiment will be seen many large men, but take this 
brigade together and I never saw such a splendid body of men . I 
passed down the ranks in front and rear; I saw every man in the 
brigade, and I can fully say that I saw no small men, no "pony 
squad." The 4th section of every company was just as large as the 
1st; the guns, ammunition, accoutrements and equipments were in 
most excellent condition; nothing was needed, everything was 
complete . 
19 



2^0 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

I cannot say that any one regiment of the brigade appeared bet- 
ter than another; they all appeared so well. The 11th was the 
strongest; it had 528 enlisted men and 20 officers present for duty. 
The 13th had 470 enlisted men and 22 commissioned officers; the 
15th had 428 enlisted men and 29 commissioned officers; the 16th 
had 405 enlisted men and 33 commissioned officers. In the entire 
brigade there was not to exceed a dozen men unable to be present 
on inspection. In the different hospital tents of the brigade I 
counted eleven men, and not one of them was confined to his cot, 
but appeared to be having a holiday; in short, were convalescent. 
In this connection there is one thing I wish to mention, and that is, 
the intelligence and ability of the line officers of the 3d brigade. 
Every one of them was fully posted, knew all about his company, 
the number of men present for duty, the number absent and where 
they were, the number sick and those on detached service. I speak 
of this for the reason that many of the commanding officers of 
companies whom I have heretofore met on inspection, are not in 
the slightest degree acquainted with their companies, know nothing 
about their commands, and cannot account for their men w^ithout 
referring to the Orderly Sergeants. Of the company, the hospit- 
als, the commissary and quartermaster departments, the company 
and regimental books, the transportation, also, it is useless for me 
to say anything. Look at the Army Regulations and see what 
instructions are laid down, and what is required of troops in the 
field, and then you will exactly know how I found the 3d Brigade 
of the 6th Division of the 17th Army Corps. 

Once more I say that the 3d brigade, commanded by Colonel M. 
M . Crocker, are an honor to the division and corps to which they 
are attached, and an honor to the Army of the Tennessee, an honor 
to their friends at home, to their state and to their country, and I 
know from their record in the field that they must be a terror to 
the foe. I am. Colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WILLIAM E. STRONG. 
Lieut. -Col. and Inspector-General 17th Army Corps. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 2^1 

April 8th the regiments of McArthur's division were drawn up 
in hne by battahons in mass, in front of the 2d brigade headquar- 
ters, where the soldiers were addressed by General L. Thomas 
Adjutant-General of the army, explaining the newly-inaugurated 
policy of the government in regard to arming negroes and organ- 
izing them into regiments and brigades for the purpose of putting 
down the rebellion. General McPherson then followed, and after- 
wards Generals Mc Arthur and Crocker, (the latter promoted Brig- 
adier-General Nov. 29, 1862), all of whom expressed their full 
acquiescence in this much-needed measure of the government. 
Then Colonel Reid took the stand and addressed the soldiers for 
nearly an hour, considering the measure in all its practical bearings 
and most forcibly explaining the necessity of the step, either as a 
war policy against the rebel masters, who, while fighting the bat- 
tles of the rebellion against the government, had to depend on their 
negroes left at home to take care of their families and raise crops 
for the sustenance of the rebel army, or as a measure to give the 
greatest and most efficient help to the Union army by enabling the 
government to withdraw the white soldiers from the many south- 
ern garisons and the marshy and swampy places, leaving such places 
in charge of negro troops acclimatized to a low and marshy ground, 
by which white troops will soon be enabled to concentrate their 
numbers and then penetrate into the interior of the states in rebel- 
lion . 

Finally, he considered it as a matter of justice to a large class of 
negroes themselves, who, having left their masters, have come 
within the Union lines, and are anxious to show their loyalty by 
their acts; and in conclusion the Colonel predicted that within the 
short space of a year the benefits of that measure would be so de- 
veloped in all their bearings that all further opposition to it will of 
itself cease, and that those who did oppose it will try to deny their 
ever having done so. 



2^2 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

The prediction was fulfilled before the year was out. The ques- 
tion thus being brought home to the understanding of the men, all 
declared themselves to be in favor of the measure, including those 
few who were known to have been influenced by small county 
papers that were regularly sent into the camps of soldiers by the 
well-known party at home, whose motto was that the "War is a 
failure . " 

What means the above party resorted to in order to lead the sol- 
diers astray and to create confusion in the army, it must be for- 
ever remembered, that ever since the issuing of the President's proc- 
lamation of January 1, 1868, which was destined to commence a 
new era in the history of this country, as well as in that of the civ- 
ilization of the human race, letters arrived by scores in every 
camp, with every mail, conveying the treasonable doctrine that the 
war was now verging into an " unconstitutional abolition crusade 
against the southern slave-holders with the sole object of freeing 
the negroes from their obligations towards their rightful owners," 
and therefore openly persuading and inciting soldiers to desertion. 
Moreover, commissioned officers of high rank, who formerly used 
to belong to the party now advocating an "armistice with the 
rebels," were known to declare their views in antagonism with the 
proclamation, at the same time, however, all remaining in the army, 
drawing pay, and receiving honors under the government. 

The commissioned officers of the 3d brigade, (11th, 13th, 15th 
and 16th Iowa), while in camp at Lake Providence, having been 
invited to meet at the headquarters of the 11th Iowa, gave expres- 
sion to their sentiments in regard to the President's proclamation 
of January 1st. They almost without exception strongly endorsed 
the same, directing the chairman (Colonel Reid, of the 15th), and 
Secretary (Lieutenant-Colonel Sanders, of the 16th), to forward 
the resolutions to the Governor of the state . 

Those few who were trying to modify the strong language of 
the resolutions, conveying an unqualified endorsement of the meas- 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 233 

ure, were ably answered by Lieutenant-Colonels Shane (13th) and 
Sanders (16th) and Colonel Reid . Here it was that General 
Crocker, in the course of his remarks, declared that since the war ' 
began he entered the army as a Union man, and fought and will 
fight for the Union; that he had no intention to put on a coat with 
one sleeve blue and the other gray; therefore, he would not vote 
now half Union, half "butter-nut." 

The resolutions passed without further remarks. On the next 
and subsequent days the resolutions were read at dress parade in 
each of the regiments. With few exceptions, the men of the 15th 
Iowa expressed their satisfaction with the same. 




2^4 History of the Fifteenth Regitnent 



:p^i?.t -vii. 



ViCKSBURG Campaign. April to end of July, '63. Milli- 
ken's Be\d. Colonel Hugh T. Reid promoted Briga- 
dier-General. Lieutenant-Colonel Wm. W. Belknap 
IN Command. Holmes' Plantation. Grand Gulf. Haines' 
Bluffs. Warrenton. Expedition to Mechanicsville. 
Return to Rear of Vicksburg. Center of McPher- 
son's line. Expedition to Big Black River. Messen- 
ger's Ferry. Interview between General U. S.Grant 
AND General Pemberton. The Correspondence be- 
tween THEM. July 4th, 1863 Vicksburg Surrenders. 
General J. B. McPherson's Congratulatory Order. 
Iowa's War Governor Congratulates Her Sons in the 
Army of the Tennessee, Etc. 

The cutting of the canal connecting the Mississippi river with 
Lake Providence and the bayous Tensas and Macon, and through 
the latter with the Tensas river, running in a general southerly 
course towards the Red river, brought the country along these 
streams under water for several miles in width, from Providence, 
west of the Mississippi, down towards the Black and Red rivers; 
and if the wide spread inundation did not answer as a safe channel 
for steamboat navigation to the south of Vicksburg, it completely 
answered as an extensive watery barrier against any and all incur- 
sions of rebel forces from west of Vicksburg, thus greatly securing 
the government depots and immense amount of commissary, quar- 
termaster and ordnance stores accumulated at Young's Point, for 
the ensuing decisive campaign. 

Against the middle of April all the preparations for the siege 
and capture of Vicksburg being completed, the three army corps 
under General U. S. Grant, 15th army corps; General Sherman, 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 2^5 

17th corps; General McPherson, 13th corps, General McClernand, 
were under orders to move. Osterhaus's 1st division of the 15th 
corps took the advance across the marshy country west of and along 
the Mississippi river towards New Carthage. 

The regiment, with its brigade, left Lake Providence on April 
21st, arriving that night at Milliken's Bend, La., where several 
changes in command were taking place. Colonel Hugh T. Reid, 
being promoted Brigadier-General, was assigned to the command 
of the 1st brigade, 6th division, at Lake Providence, and Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel Belknap returning from staff duty as provost marshal 
of the corps, took command of the 15th Iowa. 

General Crocker, heretofore in command of the 3d brigade, being- 
assigned to command Quinby's 7th Division, 17th Corps; Colonel 
Wm. Hall, of the 11th Iowa, took command of the 3d brigade, by 
seniority, (Colonel A. Chambers, of the 16th Iowa, senior Colonel 
in the brigade, bemg absent with leave). 

April 26th was exceedingly warm. The regiment, with the 3d 
and 2d brigades of 6th division marched. On the 27th it rained 
furiously. The 28th was a beautiful da}', but men, artillery and 
trains floundered in the mud, which was deep and expansive, most 
of the day, and camped at Holmes' plantation, guarding the lines of 
communication from Milliken's Bend to Perkins' plantation, forty- 
three miles in length, until May 1 Ith, when regiment and brigade 
took up the line of march, which continued until near noon on the 
18th, when they arrived at Hard Times Landing, on Mississippi 
river. 

After some dela}' the 15th Iowa marched on board the steamer 
Moderator, one of the few steamers that successfully ran the block- 
ade, and crossed the river to Grand Gulf, where we went into camp 
on the bank of the river. Remained here until the night of the 
19th, when orders were received to embark on transports at once, 
and we were under way for Young's Point at day-break on the 
20th, and reached there about 12 M. The troops landed, marched 



2^6 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

across the point, and immediately embarked on the steamer Cres- 
cent City, which shoved off for Haines' Bluffs at dawn on the 21st. 
Landed at Haines' Bluff, and remained until 3 p. m., when orders 
were leceived to return immediately to Young's Point on same 
steamer, which point was reached at 5 p. m. Here the troops de- 
barked, and as soon as two days' rations could be issued to them, 
marched across the point route to same place as the evening previ- 
ous. Embarking on transports the troops were quickly landed at 
Warrenton, Miss., and immediately took up the line of march for a 
position near the rebel lines. Marched three miles and bivouacked 
for the night, resuming the march at eai'ly dawn of the 22d, arriv- 
ing in position about 10 A. m. near the left of General McCler- 
nand's corps. The l(3th and 11th Iowa were thrown forward as 
skirmishers, but were withdrawn at nightfall, and the brigade pro- 
ceeded toward General McPherson's headquarters, which was 
reached about 10 a. m. on the 23d. At 3p.m. the brigade was 
ordered to resume the position vacated the evening previous. Ar- 
rived about 5 P. M., when the 11th Iowa was thrown out as pickets, 
and the 13th, 15th and 16th went into bivouac at 3 p. m. On the 
24th the 15th relieved the 11th on picket and participated in the 
heavy skirmishing with the enemy opposite. On the 25th, at 5 p. 
M., the 15th was relieved by the 41st Illinois, of General Lauman's 
division. 

May 26th the brigade and division, being relieved by General 
Lauman's division of McClernand's corps, were marched to Gen- 
eral McPherson's headquarters in the centre of the besieging Fed- 
eral lines, where they were attached to the reconnoitering expedi- 
tion under General Frank P. Blair, for the purpose of scouring the 
country in the rear of Vicksburg and towards Yazoo City. 

The expedition started early on May 27th, and reached Mechan- 
icsville about 12 m . of the 29th, when the enemy was met. The 
troops forming line of battle and skirmishers thrown forward to 
engage the enemy; after short skirmishing the enemy gave way 




Alex Chaivibers. 

COL I5^»l0m VOLS. 

brib.ben'l u.s.ms. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 257 

and were pursued two miles beyond the town, where the brigade 
encamped for the night. 

Next morning the enemy, having entirely disappeared, and our 
mission performed, the troops were marched toward Vicksburg, * 
and arrived late at night of the 3lst at Haines' Bluff, tired, sore and 
hungry. 

While in camp here Colonel A. Chambers, of the 16th Iowa, 
having returned from the north, took command of the brigade on 
June 2d. On the 8d Lieutenant-Colonel Belknap received a com- 
mission as Colonel, Major Hedrick as Lieutenant-Colonel, Adjutant 
Pomutz as Major, and Lieutenant E. H. King, of I Company, as 
Adjutant. June 4th, regiment and brigade marched to the rear of 
Vicksburg, taking position in the centre of General McPherson's 
line, on a high, steep and narrow ridge, covered with canebrake, 
the regiments furnishing heavy details daily to the skirmish line, 
and at night for advancing the trenches and working in the same. 

On the night of June 5th a heavy detail from the 3d brigade 
(three hundred men under Major Pomutz, of the 15th), advanced 
beyond the trenches to a high hill protruding westward to within 
one hundred and fifty yards of the massive rebel forts and main 
line of fortifications, separated from the hill by a deep and wide 
ravine, full of dense cane and underbrush . The men, after fixing 
bayonets and sticking their inverted muskets into the ground, were 
at once put to " lively work with the spade." 

An advance line of breast-works and trenches was built on the 
western slope of the hill, and a fortification erected on its top for 
the artillery, when, by day break, the rebels from the opposite line 
were very much increasing their lively attentions to the working 
detail by concentrating their direct and cross-fires from the several 
curves of their" line upon the party on the hill, and inciting them to 

*May 30th was one of the hottest days we experienced, anywhere in the south, marching 
nearly all day through ao immense corn-field in the Yazoo bottoms without water, and not a 
tree within a half mile of the road. Scores of men were prostrated by the great heat, several 
compauies at night having only men enough to make 2 or 3 stacks of arms. 



2^8 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

progress in their work with as much energy and rapidity as Yankee 
soldiers were known to be capable of. 

By daylight the skirmishers occupied the advanced breast-works 
built during the night, and by order of General Ransom, who was 
present the whole night, the work on the fort was suspended . The 
next night the fort was finished and named Fort Ransom. It 
proved to be a very important point in helping most efficiently ihe 
advances and approaches of the next fort on its left, General Lo- 
gan's, the peculiar shape of the protruding hill enabling Fort Ran- 
som to open a terrific flank fire from its battery of eight guns upon 
the massive rebel Fort Hill. 

While in this camp Governor Samuel J. Kirkwood, of Iowa, ac- 
companied by General N. B. Baker, Adjutant-General, Dr. J. C. 
Hughes, Surgeon-General of the state, and ex-Governor R. P . 
Lowe and Hon. James F. Wilson, representative in congress, made 
a visit to the Iowa regiments then around Vicksburg, the state 
being represented by twenty-nine regiments in the extensive siege 
line of General Grant's arm}^ . 

Soon after the party had arrived in the camp of the 8d brigade, 
the line was formed by battalions in mass on a rugged, broken 
ground in rear of the camp, and the Governor addressed the four 
regiments of the command, speaking words of encouragement, cheer 
and patriotism to the men, and assuring them of the liveliest inter- 
est, anxiety, satisfaction, and gratitude on the part of the loyal cit- 
izens of Iowa, whose eyes were turned with pride to their soldiers, 
so nobly fighting the great battles for the government. He was 
ably followed by the Adjutant- General and Representative Wil- 
son, and the visit was a source of universal good feeling and great 
satisfaction to the officers and men, who had not seen visitors from 
Iowa (in such force) since they left the state for the field. 

During their stay around Vicksburg the party were frequently 
going to the front line of the trenches and breast- works, while a 



. loiva Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 2^g 

lively musketry and artillery fire was going on from both sides, to 
see the progress of the siege and to gather "war mementoes" in the 
shape of balls, bullets, shot and shell, of which a great deal were 
lying scattered in every direction on the ground, and more were 
constantly arriving from the rebels. Judge Lowe, of the supreme 
court, can ever proudly cherish the recollection of his patriotic act, 
in having contributed to the reduction of Vicksburg. He fired a 
ten-pound Parrott gun against the strong rebel fort in front with 
his own hand — once. Surgeon-General Hughes performed several 
fine surgical operations during his stay. 

June 11th the camp of the regiment and brigade was moved to 
the right and rear, near division headquarters, while heavy details 
from the regiment and brigade were out daily on the skirmish line 
and in the trenches at night. 

On June 20th a terrible cannonading commenced at 4 A, m. along 
our whole line. The 15th, 13th and 16th Iowa were placed on the 
left of Brigadier-General Ransom's brigade, in order to co-operate 
in any movement that might be required — (the position was near 
Fort Ransom, built for the most part by the 3d brigade). No 
movement of the Infantry taking place, however, the command re- 
turned to camp in the evening. 

At night, on June 22d, orders were received to be ready to move 
at a moments notice, it being understood that Johnston, with a 
rebel force variously estimated at from thirty to fifty thousand men, 
was fast approaching from Canton to the Black river, for the pur- 
pose of attacking the besieging force in rear and raising the siege. 
Next morning early, 23d June, the regiment and brigade started, 
and arrived near Bear creek, 12 miles to the rear, and at Fox's plan- 
tation on 27th, near Messenger's Ferry, the 15th Iowa being sent 
forward to obstruct the ford. 



26o History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

REPORT OF COLONEL WILLIAM W. BELKNAP. 

Headquarters Fifteenth Iowa Infantiy Vols. I 
Camp near Fox's Plantation^ Jtcne 26", i86j. \ 

Lieut. O. D. Kinsman, A. A. A. General Third Brigade, Sixth 
Division, Seventeenth A. C . 

Sir: — In obedience to orders received from Colonel Alexander 
Chambers, 16th Iowa Infantry, commanding 8d brigade, I pro- 
ceeded on the morning of the 27th, with the 15th Regiment Iowa 
Infantry to Messengers Ferry, on Black river, with instructions to 
obstruct the ford at that point, and to remove within our lines Mrs. 
Messenger and family, together with all other persons upon 
the place not too ill to be moved. On arriving at Messengers, 
Brigadier General McArthur, who with Colonel Chambers was 
with the expedition, sent a portion of his escort company under 
Lieutenant Tripp across the river to examine the country and 
disperse a sc[uad of rebel cavalry, (which was observed on the 
opposite side of the crossing,) being protected by two companies 
of the regiment: D, 1st Lieutenant Buchanan, and E, Captain 
Rogers. Company K, Captain Hedrick, was at the same time 
sent about a half mile up, and Company C, Captain Miller, about 
the same distance down the river. 

The few rebels, some fifteen or twenty, as far as could be seen, 
immediately disappeared, and on the return of General Tripp, 
Company G (1st Lieutenant Bye) was ordered to obstruct the ford, 
Company I, Captain Reid, being detailed to protect the working 
party. 

The bottom of the river being extremely soft, and there 
being no trees of any size for some distance to be used for the 
purpose, the obstruction at that point was deemed impracticable, 
especially as it was found that for a long distance the river could 
be crossed with little difficulty, and the working party was with- 
drawn. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 261 

Mrs. Messenger and family, together with four other families of 
white persons on the place, numbering in all fourteen persons, and 
the colored people, were removed and brought within our lines, 
the rear guard under Captain Edwards leaving there only three 
black persons who were unable to travel , Four wagon loads of 
property being also brought. 

On the departure of the regiment for camp, which we reached 
about 8 o'clock in the evening, a small squad of rebels again made 
their appearance on the opposite side. 

In addition to this report, I inclose herewith, for the information 
of the brigade commander, a slip from the Vicksburg S^tn^ of 
May 4th, 1861, which paper was found at the residence of Colonel 
Messenger, with the extract inclosed marked. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. W. BELKNAP, 
Colonel 15th Iowa, Commanding Expedition. 

On the 80th of June, at night, dispatches were received from 
the brigade next on the right of the 3d, conveying intelligence of 
the enemy's arrival to the east of Black river, and of his prepara- 
tions opposite Messenger's and Bridgeport Ferries. At midnight 
Major Pomutz, picket officer, was sent with the 18th Iowa and 
one section of artillery at once to reconnoiter towards Messenger's 
Ferry, and take possession of and hold the same. The object was 
thoroughl}' accomplished, the picket lines established and the artil- 
lery placed in a fortified position. At daylight of July 1st, the 
enemy's advance emerged from the timber beyond a wide field 
sloping down towards the Black river. A brisk skirmishing 
ensued for a while, which subsided towards the middle of the clay. 
In the evening the firing became spirited from both sides, with 
evidences of the enemy intending to force the passage of the river 
at Messengers, as well as at the lower Bridgeport Ferry. Therefore 
next day (July 2d) the whole brigade moved forward, taking posi- 
tions along Black river, near Messenger's Ferry. 



262 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

On the 3d of July, in afternoon, General W. T. Sherman re- 
ceived an official communication from Vicksburg, announcing the 
offer of Pemberton to surrender the place and his army to General 
U . S. Grant. While this intelligence electrified the men of the 
brigade, just preparing to receive an attack of the, enemy, the 
rebel forces across the river being ignorant of the state of affairs, 
made serious demonstrations opposite the Messenger farm. To 
repel their approach Major Purcell of the 16th Iowa, was ordered 
to cross the river with men of his regiment, and keep the enemy 
from approaching the ferry, until relieved. Major Purcell, how- 
ever, having been pushed back towards the river, recrossed the 
same to the western side, for which, and especially for not having 
reported the same during the whole afternoon, while quietly sitting 
in camp, he was placed under arrest by Colonel Chambers, of the 
16th* Iowa, commanding brigade, subsequently court martialed 
at Savannah, Ga., upon application of his regimental officers, dis- 
missed the service by orders from department headquarters. 

The interview between Generals Grant and Pemberton took 
place under a large oak tree, a spot untrodden by either army dur- 
ing the siege. General Grant was attended by Generals Mc- 
Pherson and A. J. Smith. General Pemberton by General Bowen 
and Colonel Montgomery. After introduction of the officers. 
General Pemberton said: 

" General Grant, I meet you in order to arrange terms for the 
capitulation of the city of Vicksburg, and its garrison. What 
terms do you demand ? " 

" Unconditional surrender," replied General Grant. 

" Unconditional surrender," said Pemberton, " Never, so long 
as I have a man left me! I will fight rather." 

"Then, sir, you continue the defence;" coolly said General 
Grant. " My army has never been in a better condition for the 
prosecution of the siege." 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 26j 

THE CORRESPONDENCE BETWEEN GENERALS 
GRANT AND PEMBERTON. 

Headquarters., Vicksburg., yuly j, l86j . 

General: — I have the honor to propose an armistice for 

hours, with a view to arranging terms for the capitulation of 
Vicksburg. To this end, if agreeable to you, I will appoint three 
commissioners to meet a like number to be named by yourself at 
such place and hour to-day as you may find convenient. I make 
this proposition to save the further effusion of blood, which must 
otherwise be shed to a frightful extent, feeling myself fully able 
to maintain my position for a yet indefinite period. 

This communication will be handed you under flag of truce, b}' 
Major General J. S. Bowen. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. C. Pemberton, Lieutenant General. 
Maj. Genl. U.S. Grant, commanding U. S. forces, etc. 

Headquarters Department of the Tennessee, ) 
In Field near Vicksburg., Miss.., July J, iS6j. \ 

General: — Your note of this date is just received, proposing 
an armistice for several hours for the purpose of arranging terms 
of capitulation through commissioners to be appointed, etc. 

The useless effusion of blood you propose stopping by this 
course can be ended at any time you may choose by an uncondi- 
tional surrender of the city and garrison. Men who have shown 
so much endurance and courage as those now in Vicksburg, will 
always challenge the respect of an adversary, and I can assure you 
will be treated with all the respect due to prisoners of war. 

I do not favor the proposition of appointing commissioners to 
arrange terms of capitulation, because I have no terms other than 
those indicated above. 

I am. General, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

U. S. Grant, Major General. 
Lieut. Gen. J. C. Pemberton, Com'd'g Confederate forces, etc. 



264 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

Headquarters Department of the Tennessee, ) 
Near Vicksb7irg, Miss., yiilv j, i86j. \ 

General: — In conformity with agreement of this afternoon, I 
will submit to the following proposition for the surrender of the 
city of Vicksburg, public stores, etc. On your accepting the terms 
proposed, I will march in one division as a guard, and take pos- 
session at 8 A. \i . to-morrow. As soon as rolls can be 
made out and paroles signed by officers and men, you will be 
allowed to march out of our lines, the officers taking with them 
their side-arms and clothing, and the field, staff and cavalry officers 
one horse each; the rank and file will be allowed all their clothing 
but no other propertv. If these conditions are accepted any amount 
of rations you may deem necessary can be taken from the stores 
you may now have, and also the necessary cooking utensils for pre- 
paring them. Thirty wagons also, counting two two-horse or 
mule teams as one, will be allowed to transport such articles as can 
not be carried along. 

The same conditions will be allowed to all sick and wounded 
officers and soldiers as fast as they become able to travel. 

The paroles for these latter must be signed, however, whilst offi- 
cers are present authorized to sign the roll of prisoners. 

I am, General, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

U. S. Grant, Major General. 
Lieut. Gexl. J. C Pemberton, 

Commanding Confederate forces, Vicksburg, Miss. 

Headquarters, Vicksburg, J id}' J, lS6j . 

General: — I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of 
your communication of this date, proposing terms of capitulation 
for this garrison and post. 

In the main your terms are accepted; but in justice both to the 
honor and spirit my troops manifested in the defense of Vicksburg, 
I have to submit the following amendments, which, if acceded 
to by you, will perfect the agreement between us. 



Iowa V eteran Volunteer Infantry. 26^ 

At 10 o'clock A. M. to-morrow, I propose to evacuate the 
works in and around Vicksburg, and to surrender the city and 
garrison under my command by marching out with my colors and 
arms, stacking them in front of my present lines, after which you 
will take possession. 

Officers to retain their side-arms and personal property, and the 
rights and property of citizens to be respected . 

I am, General, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. C. Pemberton, Lieutenant General. 
Major Genl. U. S. Grant, Commanding U. S. forces. 

Headquarters Department of the Tennessee, ) 
Before Vicksburg^ y^'^y 4i I^^S- \ 

General: — I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of 
your communication of 8d July. The amendment proposed by 
you cannot be acceded to in full. It will be necessary to furnish 
every officer and man with a parole signed by himself, which, with 
the completion of the roll of prisoners, will necessarily take some 
time. Again, I can make no stipulations with regard to the treat- 
ment of citizens and their private property. 

While I do not propose to cause them any undue annoyance or 
loss, I cannot consent to leave myself under any restraint by stipu- 
lations. 

The property which officers will be allowed to take with them 
will be as stated in my proposition of last evening; that is, officers 
will be allowed their private baggage and side-arms, and mounted 
officers one horse each . 

If you mean by your proposition for each brigade to march to 
the front of the lines now occupied by it, and stack arms at 10 
o'clock a. M.,and then return to the inside and there remain 
as prisoners until properly paroled, I will make no objection 
to it. 

Should no notification be received of your acceptance of my 
terms by 9 o'clock in the morning, I shall regard them as having 
?0 



266 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

been rejected, and shall act accordingly. Should these terms be 
accepted, white flags should be displayed along your lines to pre- 
vent such of my troops as may not have been notified from firing 
upon your men. 

I am. General, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

U. S. Grant, Major General. 
Lieut. Genl. J. C. Pemberton, 

Commanding Confederate forces, Vicksburg, Mississippi. 

Headquarters^ V icksburg^ July 4th., l86j. 
General: — I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of 
your communication of this day, and in reply to, say that the terms 
proposed by you are accepted. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. C. Pemberton, Lieutenant General. 
Major General U. S. Grant, Commanding U. S. Forces. 



wSPECIAL ORDERS, NO. 20. 

Headquarters Seventeenth Army Corps, ) 

Department of the Tennessee, > 

Vicksburg^ Mlss.^ fuly 4^ i86j. ) 

Soldiers of the Seventeenth Army Corps: Again I rejoice 
with you over your brilliant achievements and your unparalleled 
success . 

Hardly had your flag floated to the breeze on the capitol of Mis- 
sissippi, when springing to the call of our Noble Commander^ you 
rushed upon the defiant columns of the enemy at " Champion 
Hills^'' and drove him in confusion and dismay across the " Big 
Black"' to his defences within the stronghold of Vicksburg. 

Your assaulting columns which moved promptly upon his works 
on the 22d of May, and which stood for hours undaunted, under a 
withering fire, were unsuccessful only because no men could take 
the position by storm. With tireless energy, with sleepless vigi- 
lance, by night and by day, with battery and with rifle pit, with 
trench and iriine, you made your sure approaches, until overcome 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 26y 

by fatigue, and driven to despair in the attempt to oppose your 
irresistible progress, the whole garrison of over thirty thousand 
men w^ith all their arms and munitions of war, have on this, the 
anniversary of our National Independence surrendered to the in- 
vincible troops of the Army of the Tennessee. 

The achievements of this hour w^ill give a nexv meaning to this 
memorable day, and " Vicksburg " will brighten the glow in the 
patriot's heart, which kindles at the mention of " Bunker Hill" and 
" Yorktown." 

This is indeed an auspicious day for you, — the God of Battles is 
with you. The dawn of a conquered peace is breaking upon you — 
the plaudits of an admiring world will hail you wherever you 
may go, and it will be an ennobling heritage surpassing all riches 
to have been of the 17th Army Corps on the 4th of July, 1863. 
JAS. B. Mcpherson, Major-General. 

After the surrender of Vicksburg and of the rebel forces there- 
in. General W. T. Sherman, having received additional re-enforce- 
ments, set out on an expedition against Johnston, towards Jackson . 

General Sherman in his report says: " General McArthur's 
Division of McPherson's Corps, having been ordered up from 
Black river at my request, one brigade was posted at Champion 
Hills, the other two, under the General, reached Jackson on the 
morning of the 14th. I then only waited the arrival of the am- 
munition train to open a furious cannonade on the town from all 
points of our line, when I learned that the enemy's cavalry had gone 
up Pearl River on the east side twelve miles, to Grant's Mills and 
crossed over to the west bank. This force was over 3,000 strong, 
being General Jackson's entire division . Suspecting his purpose 
to be an attack on our trains, and apprehensive for the safety of our 
ammunition, I ordered back to Clinton, during the night of the 
14th, General Matthies' brigade to re-enforce a regiment, already 
stationed there, and by means of the telegraph, which had been 
constructed to my camp, put all parties along the road on their 



268 Histoyy of the Fifteenth Reghnent 

guard. One brigade of the enemy's cavalry approached CHnton 
on the morning of the 15th, and was handsomely repulsed by 
General Mathies. The other brigade made its appearance at 
Bolton, and succeeded in capturing eight wagons, belonging to a 
pioneer company of the 18th Corps, vvith 83 men, partly stragglers 
and partly composing this company, but did not attempt to attack 
the principal train, which was close by, well guarded by Cham- 
ber's Brigade." 

The 3d brigade, having the ammunition and subistence trains, 
in their charge, brought them safely up to Clinton, amid serious 
demonstrations of the enem3''s cavalry. 

Johnston's army having, on the morning of the 16th, evacuated 
Jackson before it could be encircled by our forces, during the sub- 
sequent days, it was pursued east in the direction of Meridian. 
General Sherman says: " It may seem superfluous to call attention 
to the fact that the great mass of troops thus called on for action 
were on the 4th day of July in the trenches before Vicksburg, 
where for near two months they had been toiling in a hot sun in 
close and stifling rifle-pits, and without stopping to indulge for a 
moment in the natural joy at the great success which had crowned 
their labors, they were required again to march in heat and dust 
for fifty miles, with little or no water save in muddy creeks, in 
cisterns already exhausted and in the surface ponds which the 
enemy in his retreat had tainted with dead cattle and hogs; that we 
crossed Black river by bridges of our own construction, and then 
had to deal with an army which had, under a leader of great re- 
nown, been formed specially to raise the siege of Vicksburg, fa'r 
superior to us in cavalry, and but little inferior in either infantry or 
artillery; that we drove him fifty miles and left him in full retreat; 
that we have destroyed those great arteries of travel in the state 
which alone could enable him to assemble troops and molest our 
possession of the Mississippi river; and that we have so exhausted 
the land that no army can exist during this se^sorj vv^jthout hauling 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 26g 

in wagons all his supplies. This seems to me a fit supplement to 
the reconquest of the Mississippi river itself, and makes that per- 
fect which otherwise would have been imperfect." 

The object of the expedition being attained by destroying in a 
most thorough manner all the railroad connections of Jackson, east, 
north, south and west, with all the buildings and storehouses of 
the enemy, rendering that post of no earthly avail to the enemy 
henceforth, the regiment remaining in camp at Clinton until the 
20th when it and the 16th Iowa moved to Bolton's Cross Roads, 
camping there until the 22d, when the whole division was ordered 
to return to Big Black River bridge; reached Baker's creek on 
the 22d, then moved to Bovina station, two miles west of Black 
river, and arrived at the railroad bridge on Black river on the 25th, 
where Colonel Chambers, commanded the Post until July 27th, 
when, being relieved by General Thayer's brigade, we marched 
to Vicksburg and went into camp north of the city betw^een Sher- 
man's old line on the extreme right of the Union army while be- 
sieging the town, and the old rebel fortifications, it being three- 
quarters of a mile from the Mississippi river. 

Major-General U. S. Grant, in his report of the operations of 
the Army of the Tennessee, dated Vicksburg, Miss., July 6th, 
1863, says: 

" At the same time that I ordered the occupation of New Car- 
thage, preparations were made for running transports by the Vicks- 
burg batteries with Admiral Porter's gun-boat fleet. On the night 
of the 16th of April Admiral Porter's fleet, and the transports 
Silver Wave, Forest Queen and Henry Clay, ran the Vicksburg 
batteries. The boilers of the transports were protected as well as 
possible with hay and cotton . More or less commissary stores were 
put on each. All three of these boats were struck more or less 
frequently while passing the enemy's batteries, and the Henry Clay, 
by the explosion of a shell, or by other means, was set on fire and 
entirely consumed. 



2^0 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

•'The other two boats were somewhat injured, but not seriously 
disabled. No one on board of either was hurt. As these boats 
succeeded in getting by so well, I ordered six more to be pre- 
pared in like manner for running the batteries. These latter, viz: 
Tigress, Anglo Saxon, Cheeseman, Empire City, Horizonia, and 
Moderator^ left Milliken's Bend on the night of the 22d of April, 
and five of them got by, but in a somewhat damaged condition. 
The Tigress received a shot in her hull below the water line, and 
sunk on the Louisiana shore soon after passing the last of the bat- 
teries. The crews of these steamers, with the exception of that of 
the Forest Queen, Captain D. Conway, and the Silver Wave, Cap- 
tain McMillan, were composed of volunteers from the army. 

"Upon the call for volunteers for this dangerous enterprise, officers 
and men presented themselves bv hundreds, anxious to undertake 
the trip. * * * It is a striking feature, so far as my observa- 
tion goes, of the present volunteer armv of the United States, that 
there is nothing which men are called upon to do, mechanical or 
professional, that accomplished adepts cannot be found for the duty 
required in almost every regiment. * * * * The result of 
this campaign has been the defeat of the enemy in five battles out- 
side of Vicksburg. The occupation of Jackson, the capital of the 
state of Mississippi, and the capture of Vicksburg and its garrison 
and munitions of war, a loss to the enemy of thirty-seven thousand 
(87,000) prisoners, among whom were fifteen general officers, at 
least ten thousand killed and wounded; and among the killed were 
Generals Tracy, Tighlman and Green, and hundreds, and perhaps 
thousands, of stragglers, who can never be collected and reorgan- 
ized . 

"Arms and munitions of war for an army of sixty thousand men 
have fallen into our hands, besides a large amount of other public 
property, consisting of railroads, locomotives, cars, steamboats, cot- 
ton, &c., and much was destroyed to prevent our capturing it. * 
* * * Por the brilliant achievements recounted in this report, 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry . 2yi 

the Army of the Tennessee, then- comrades of the 9th corps, Her- 
ron's division of the Army of the Frontier, and the navy co-op- 
erating with them, deserve the highest honors their countr}^ can 
award." 

General \ V . T. Sherman said: " As to the great importance of 
the capture of Vicksburg, it made the destruction of the rebelh'on 
certain. General Grant had cut the great rebellion in twain, but it 
needed a few more campaigns to demonstrate to the rebels, and to 
the world, that the fatal blow had been sfiven at Vicksburgr." 

President Lincoln writes: "The Great river, which had been 
fretting and fuming under the iron chain of the rebels, now " went 
unvexed to the sea." 

On July 16th the steamer Imperial arrived at New Orleans from 
St. Louis, the fir-st boat which had gone over that route for more 
than two years, and on the 28th she returned to St. Louis, amid the 
welcoming shouts of thousands. Every shout was a tribute to him 
who had opened the river and sent its waters forever " unvexed to 
the sea." 

Henry Copper, A. M., writes: " Vicksburg was the key of the 
war . " 

General A. Hickenlooper, (our last brigade commander), says: 
" In the fall of the 'Gibralter of the South,' and the severance of 
the confedei-acy in twain, the capture of 31,600 men and 246 can. 
non ; more men and material of war than Grant had in his army 
when he crossed the Mississippi river, up to that time the largest 
capture of men and material ever made in %var . 



TO THE SOLDIERS OF IOWA, IN THE ARMY OF 
THE TENNESSEE. 
Executive Ofhce, loxva City, Iowa, fuly ii, iS6j. 
You have just passed through one of the most memorable cam- 
paigns of history, and are now rewarded for all your toil, privation 
and suffering by beholding the foul emblem of treason trailed in the 



2^2 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

dust, to give place to the glorious banner of Liberty over the City 
of Vicksburg. 

The CN'es of the world have been upon you, and your brave and 
worthy comrades from other states, in admiration of your fortitude, 
patience and indomitable braver^-, watching the progress of your 
work, as one of those great events which shape the destiny of a 
nation . 

You, yourselves, have probablv been unaware of the momentous 
results consequent upon your failure or success. Despots, the 
world over, have earnestlv desired the former, while the good, the 
generous and the nobly brave have prayed Almighty God to give 
you the victory . 

But while the world has been thus observant of you, all lovers of 
liberty in Iowa have beheld, with an intensity of gaze unknown to 
othe's, the deeds of her valiant sons. 

Many thousands of her citizens are bound to you by kindred ties, 
while every one has felt that the name and standing of this state 
were in your hands, that he was honored in your honor and shared 
in 3'our glory. 

The brightest hope of all is realized. You have not only fully 
maintained the lofty reputation of your country and your state, but 
have added greatly thereto, and shown to the world that whoever 
insults the flag of our beloved country must meet the bravest of the 
brave . 

The State of Iowa is proud of your achievements, and renders 
you her homage and gratitude, and with exultant heart claims you 
as her sons. 

Her tears flow for the brave men fallen, and her sympathies are 
warm for the sick, wounded and suffering. 

You have made it a high privilege to be a citizen of Iowa, to 
share your renown; and it will be a proud remembrance to you 
while life shall last, and a rich legacy to your children, that you 
were members of the Army of the Tennessee. 

SAMUEL J. KIRK WOOD, Governor. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 2yj 

REPORT OF COLONEL WM. W. BELKNAP. 

Headquarters 15th Iowa Infantry Volunteers, ) 
Cawp near Vicksbitrg., AIi'ss., August yt/i, l86j. \ 

Lieut. O. D. Kinsman, A. A. A. General 3d Brigade, 6th Division, 

17th Army Corps: 

Sir : — In accordance with Special Orders No. 7, Headquarters 8d 
Brigade, I submit the following report as to the operations of the 
15th Regiment Iowa Infantry Volunteers, from the commencement 
of the siege of Vicksburg to July 4, 1863: 

On April 26th the regiment moved from Milliken's Bend to 
Holmes' Plantation, La., the march being an exceedingly disagree- 
able one. On May 13th we arrived at " Hard Times" Landing, 
thence proceeded across the river and encamped at Grand Gulf — 
remaining there until the night of May 19th, when we were ordered 
to proceed immediately to Young's Point, which we reached at 
about 12 M. on May 20th. Marching across the point the regiment 
embarked on the Crescent City, and arrived at Haines' Bluff on the 
21st; remaining there until 3 o'clock p. m., when we returned to 
Young's Point, and marching to a point nearly opposite Warren- 
ton, embarked for that place; upon reaching which, line of march 
was taken up for the rebel lines, and at about 10 o'clock a. m. on 
the 22d we arrived in front of the rebel works, some distance to the 
left of the position occupied by the 13th Army Corps. Here we 
were severely shelled by the enemj' without loss on our part, and 
that night moved toward the position occupied by the larger por- 
tion of Major General McPherson's Corps, and on the 23d were 
ordered to resume the old position on the left. After picketing 
here in an exposed position for several days, on the 26th the 15th 
was relieved by a regiment of General Lauman's Division, and was 
marched to General McPherson's headquarters, from which, on the 
morning of the 27th, it moved as a part of the expedition of Gen- 
eral Blair, which was ordered to scour the country in the direction 
of Yazoo City. 



2'J4 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

Mechanicsville was reached at noon on the 29th, where we were 
deployed in Hne of battle to meet the enemy, who opposed our pro- 
gress. The enemy retreating, the regiment bivouacked about one 
and a half miles beyond the town, and at 7 o'clock A. M. on the 
30th, we moved towards Haines' Bluff; arriving there on the night 
of the 3 1st, after a wearisome and extremely severe march. On 
the 4th of June we were moved to a point near Major General 
McPherson's headquarters, where we remained until the 23d, fur- 
nishing heav}' details for fatigue parties, to dig rifle-pits and erect 
fortifications, And every evening sending a detachment of sharp- 
shooters to the front, who frequently engaged portions of the ene- 
my with much effect. 

On the 23d we were moved twelve miles to the rear, and on the 
27th to l^ox's Plantation. This regiment, immediately on its arri- 
val, being sent on a scout to Messenger's Ferry, and being stationed 
near the Ferr^- and Black river, in view of Johnston's army at the 
time of the surrender of Vicksburg on the 4th of July. 

The men of the regiment have endured the hardships of these 
severe marches, and the trials of the campaign without a murmur. 
Whether at work in the trenches or acting as sharpshooters, they 
have evinced an alacrit}-, zeal and courage which deserve full com- 
mendation; and in every movement I have had the full co-operation 
of every officer of the command. 

I am, very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

WM. W. BELKNAP, 
Col. Commanding 15th Iowa Infantry. 

The oak tree under which Generals Grant and Pemberton held 
their interview, has long since disappeared, its trunk having been 
cut up into walking sticks and other relics. On the spot where it 
stood is a monument, a pyramid twenty feet high, surmounted with 
a fifteen-inch globe. On the principal side is a large American 
eagle, with wide-spread wings, which cover implements of defense. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 27s 

In one claw he holds the laurel, in the other an American shield, 
and in its beak a pennant inscribed, " E Pluribus Unum." The 
eagle sustains on its wings the Goddess of Liberty. On one side 
of the monument is inscribed: . "To the memory of the surrender 
of Vickbburg by Lieutenant-General J. C. Pemberton to Major- 
General U. S. Grant, U. S. A., on the 4th of July, 1863." 



REPORT OF COLONEL WILLIAM HALL, COMMAND- 
ING 3D BRIGADE. 

Headquarters 3d Brig., 6th Div., 17th Army Corps, ) 
Vicksburg^ j]l/ss., August 21^ lS6j. \ 

Lieut. Col. Wm. T. Clark, Assistant Adjutant-General: 

Sir: — In accordance with Special Orders No. 159, Aug. 4, 1863, 
from Headquarters 17th Army Corps, I have the honor to submit 
the following report of the operations of the 3d brigade, 6th Divi- 
sion, from the commencement of the siege of Vicksburg to the date 
of its fall July 4, 1863: 

The 3d brigade, composed of the 11th, 13th, 15th and 16th Iowa 
Volunteers, and being then, as now, under my command, was at 
the time of the investment of Vicksburg, stationed at Grand Gulf, 
as the temporary garrison of that post, where it performed much 
efficient service in forwarding supplies to the army then investing 
Vicksburg. While in command of that post I caused an import- 
ant bridge over the Big Black river to be destroyed, in order to pre- 
vent any sudden incursion of the enemy from that point. This 
duty was executed by the 11th Iowa under Lieutenant-Colonel 
Abercrombie, assisted by the gunboat, Louisville. * * * * 
In compliance with orders received from Brigadier-General Mc- 
Arthur, commanding 6th Division, at 10 o'clock p. m. on the 19th 
of May I embarked my command on transports, at midnight of the 
same day, and proceeded at once up the river. * 

♦See Uol. Belknap ''s report. 



2'/6 History of the Fifteenth Regiinent 

* * * * On the 22d I moved forward, and about 9 a. m. 
discovered the enemy's pickets on the extreme right of their de- 
fenses. Five companies of the 16th Iowa, under Captain Smith, 
were detached to drive them in, which was successfully accom- 
plished, the companies remaining in front of the enemy's batteries 
and being engaged with their skirmishei's during the entire da}' . 
At the same time I sent the remaining five companies of the 16th 
under Major Purcell, to the right to cover the entire front of my 
advance, and proceeded along the direct road from Warrenton to 
Vicksburg, which runs nearly parallel with the rebel line of de- 
fenses. 

About 11 A. M., I took up my position within range of four 
rebel batteries on the right of the enemy's works. Here I re- 
mained during the day under fire from the batteries, with com- 
panies constantly engaged along the lines with the enemy's sharp- 
shooters. These I succeeded in driving to the protection of their 
works, my skirmishers getting within forty yards of the batteries. 
["See Colonel Belknap's report.] * * * * Early on the 
morning of the 27th, the brigade being assigned a position in the 
Black river Expeditionary Corps, under command of Major-General 
F. P. Blair, the line of march was taken up and I joined the expe- 
dition at Benton Cross Roads. On the morning of the 29th, 
arriving at Mechanicsville, (my brigade being in the advance,) I 
found a detachment of the 4th Iowa Cavalry, which had just been 
engage'd b}' the enemy and driven into town. Passing through 
the town, I ordered the 11th, 13th and loth Iowa in line of bat- 
tle, and with skirmishes thrown out on the front and flanks, ad- 
vanced up the hill held by the enemy, who after a few shots fell 
back. The entire brigade pursued them for two miles beyond 
Mechanicsville, the enemy making repeated stands, but always 
giving way as soon as a regiment was thrown into line to attack 
them. Having followed them for two miles they made a more 
decided stand than they had before done, and brought up a battery 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 2"^^ 

to their assistance. A section of artillery, Company C, 1st Mis- 
souri Light Artillery, which accompanied my command, at once 
opened on them, and caused them to retreat very rapidly. We 
pursued no farther, but bivouacked on the field that night. 

At 7 A. M., on the 30th, the march back to the main army was 
commenced, and taking the Yazoo Valley road, I reached Snyders 
Bluffs late in the evening of the 31st, after an extremely fatigue- 
ing and severe march. [See Colonel Belknap's report.] * * 
* * On June 27th, the command moved to Fox's Plantation, 
where the brigade was employed in doing heavy picket duty on 
four roads leading across Big Black river; remained there until the 
evening of July 3d, then moved to Messenger's Ford, the 16th 
Iowa being posted on the immediate bank of the river and the 
other three on a hill a half mile back, in support of the 10th Ohio 
Battery, then attached to this command. Early on the morning of 
the 4th of July, a detachment consisting of Company G, 11th Illinois 
cavalry, (General Mc Arthur's body guard) and four companies of 
the 16th Iowa, crossed Black river for the purpose of clearing the 
road to " Cowan's House," some two miles from the river. They 
encountered fhe enemy's skirmishers, whom they drove before 
them to the point designated, and held the position until about 
noon, when the enemy appeared in force with artillery, cavalry 
and infantry and opening fire on the detachment, compelled them 
to fall back to the river, and in the afternoon to recross it. 

The 10th Ohio Battery opened on the enemy as soon as the de- 
tachment fell back, and it is thought did considerable execution. On 
the evening of the same day we received the news of the surrender 
of Vicksburg, and at the same time Brigadier General Lauman 
relieved the brigade . 

I cannot close this report without bearing testimony to the alac- 
rity, cheerfulness and gallant bearing which has been shown by 
the officers and uien of the command throifgh all the various and 



2j8 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

trying scenes of the late campaign. In long marches, under the 
heat of a burning summer sun — in skirmishes with the enemy at 
all points of the line of investment, and with Johnston's troops at 
the rear, — in the rifle-pits in front of Vicksbvrg, either with rifle 
in hand as sharpshooters, or with spade throwing up additional 
works, but one feeling appeared to animate them, and that was a 
desire to do their whole duty. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. HALL, 
Colonel llth Iowa Vols., Commanding Brigade. 




Iowa Veteran Volu7itcer Infantry. 2yg 

iPJLI^T VIII. 



Fall and Winter 1863-64 — Expedition to Monroe, La., 
August— To Big Black Bridge, — October — Surgeon 
W. H. Gibbon Inspect the Camp — Where the Quick- 
step Originates — Going to Stay and see it through — 
We Re-enlist for the War — Reported a Veteran 
Regiment January 5th, 1864 — The Vp:teran Roll — 
854 Men. 

The campaign against Vicksburg having been successfully 
closed, the regiment and brigade were paid by Major Stanton, nnd 
soon after, in accordance with instructions from the War Dapart- 
ment, and agreeably to orders from Headquarters of the Army of 
the Tennessee, five per cent, of the men were tendered a furlough 
and officers received leaves of absence for thirty days. Colonel 
Belknap left August 10th, leaving Colonel Hedrick in command 
of the Regiment. 

The Regiment with its brigade took part in General Stevenson's 
expedition to Monroe, Louisiana, Major Pomutz, of the 15th Iowa 
being detailed as division picket officer of the same. The regiment 
and brigade started on August 21st, with a fleet of twelve 
steamers to Goodrich Landing (fifteen miles above Milliken's 
Bend) and from there marched, crossing the Bayous Tensas, Ma- 
con and Boeuf, to Oakridgetown, where the enemy was met. 
After considerable skirmishing, mostly done by the advance 
cavalry, for when the infantry were brought up and formed in 
line, the enemy fell back, pursued on that day and on the next, 
August 28th. At Monroe the enemy made another stand north of 
the town, and near the Washita river, where a spirited engage- 
ment commenced; the enemy soon became aware of preparations 
going on to flank them above and below the towm, and they left 
the place with the military stores therein, and some good redoubts 



28o History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

on the west side of the Wishita, and resumed a deHberate march 
to the rear, in which they were kindly helped by the Union 
cavalry following them closely for eight miles. The object of the 
expedition being to free the northern part of Louisiana from the 
cowardly, vagabond, guerrilla forces hovering around the rich 
farms of the country, and to destroy any rebel govermental maga- 
zines that might be found within reach, and this object having 
been attained, the expedition started back, camping, September 1st, 
at Bayou Macon. Reveille at midnight, and we march at 1 a. m, 
of the 2d, twenty-two miles and in afternoon arrive at Goodrich's 
Landing. September 8d, embarked at 10 o'clock A, m. on 
steamer David Tatum and arrived at old camp north of Vicksburg 
this day at 4 p. m. 

In his most admirable address to Crocker's Iowa Brigade, at 
Iowa City, General A. Hickenlooper said of the campaign: "Your 
well earned rest was unfortunately very soon curtailed by a partic- 
ipation in that ill-advised and fruitless expedition to Monroe, La . , 
during which forced marches of from fifteen to twenty miles per 
day were made through an uninhabitable country, subject to over- 
flow, and from the rich alluvial soil of which had sprung a dense 
growth of rank tropical vegetation, closing in your moving 
columns, as with walls of stone, excluding every breath of fresh 
air, confining the stifling dust, and concentrating the direct and re- 
flected rays of a midsummer sun with an intensity never before 
experienced; water was to be found only in the partially dried up 
and stagnant bayous, filled with reptiles of the most repulsive kind, 
while the unwelcome companionship of the slimy serpent and fes- 
tive " tick " added to the discomforts of your bivouacs. 

The entire campaign appeared to be but a useless and dearly 
bought test of the maximum physical endurance of veteran soldiers — 
none others could have accomplished such a task; many fell by 
the wayside, others sickened and died, and the greatly impaired 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 281 

health and strength of the entire command attested the folly of its 
conception and cruelty of its execution," 

General McArthur having been assigned to the command of the 
Post of Vicksburg, and Colonel Chambers, assigned to command 
the 6th division on September 11th, Colonel Wm. Hall of the 
11th Iowa, being senior, took command of the brigade; on same 
day the regiment and brigade moved to a new camp south 
of Vicksburg, inside of the line of rebel forts between Hall's 
ferry road and the Mississippi river,* Colonel Belknap returning 
from the north took command of the regiment on September 20th, 
and Lieutenant Colonel Hedrick, having received a leave of ab- 
sence started north on October 2d. 

October 1st, the 6th division of the 17th Army Corps was 
numbered 4th division, 17th Army Corps, Colonel Chambers 
returned to command of brigade October 10th, Major George 
Pomutz, while picket officer, was ordered (Special Orders No, 
226, from Headquarters 17th Corps, October 10th,) to pro- 
ceed to Northern military posts, and to cause men of the 3d bri- 
gade, who were improperly absent on detached service outside the 
Department of the Tennessee, to return to their respective com- 
mands forthwith. 



* A SCENE IN CAMP. 
A little incident occurred, while our regiment was in camp south of Vicksburg, that eeem- 
ed out of place for an officer at the time, and yet proved just the ihing to do under the cir- 
cumstances. All will remember the "Beer Nook," up the ravine from camp. One evening 
two of H Company's largest and best service sergeants, Vincent and Rose, came into camp 
with a surplus of Beer nook on hand and were ready to whip the whole southern Confederacy 
if some one would trot it out ; but no Johnnies appearing, proceeded to have a skirmish by 
themselves. liicutenant McArthur being in command of H Company, hastened to the com- 
pany grounds, and ordered the combatants to stop lighting, and go to their tents. Sergeant 
Vincent obeyed, but i?ergeant Rose more belligerent and with fire in his eye, suggested to 
McArthur, that if he would divest himself of his shoulder straps, he, Rose, would proceed to 
make a second class funeral, out of a first class Lieutenant. This was too much for Mac. 
In an instant his coat and straps were tbro'.vn aside and he insisted on Sergeant Rose not 
standing back on account of rank as that was laid aside for the time ; but Rose deeming dis- 
cretion the better part of valor, went into his tent. Mac said it seemed the only thing for 
him to do, but he never was so happy in his life as when Rose entered his tent. He felt like 
giving him a furlough for thirty days. It was the talk of the regiment for some time. Co. 
H was proud of Mac for it, and none were better friends to the end of the service than Mac, 
Rose and Vincent. 

21 



282 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

October 11th, General J. B. McPherson, having started on an 
expedition to Jackson, the regiment and brigade, leaving camp and 
garrison equi23age in camp, marched to Big Black Bridge, fifteen 
miles distant, and garrisoned that Post, until the expedition re- 
turned on the 21st, when the 3d brigade marched to their camp 
near Vicksburg. 

November, 1863: No change of location of camp; no marches. 
Lieutenant Colonel J . M . Hedrick returned on the 15th; weather 
fine; troops in good condition, with plenty of duty to perform; 
remained in camp one and a half miles below Vicksburg until the 
night of the 24th of December, when the 11th and 15th Iowa, 
under command of Colonel Belknap, weie ordered at 11 p. m. to 
re-enforce the small garrison at Red Bone Church, twelve miles 
to the southwest; arrived at 3 a. m. on the 25th, and at 2:30 p.m. 
on the 26th the line of march was resumed and the troops arrived 
in the old camp at 5 p . y\. same day. Companies F and K being 
on guard at the Ordnance Depot, in the city, did not accompany 
the expedition . 

With the exception of these smaller expeditions, the regiment 
and its brigade was allowed to enjoy, for the first time since enter- 
ing into service, a period of rest from the forepart of September to 
the end of January, 1864, doing only garrison duty as picket guard 
around Vicksburg. Reports and records, necessarily delayed 
during the preceding severe campaign, were now to be overhauled 
and completed; and while the men were exercised in drill and (for 
the first time) in target shooting, a minute attention was paid to 
the health of the entire command. 

The Surgeon being ordered to make weekly inspections in regard 
to the health and comfort of the men, and to advance suggestions 
with the view of improving the same, and the officers of the day 
were instructed to see that these suggestions were fully carried out 
jri the vv^hole cornrnand, 



loxva V eteran Vohtnteer Infantry. 28j 

Camp 15th loxva Vo/., JVov . ly, ''6j . 
Colonel W. W. Belknap. 

Sir: — Upon inspection of the quarters this morning, I find the 
police and general cleanliness good, and the tents of the men, with 
very few exceptions, in a condition highly creditable to men and 
officers. But the culinary department in two or three of the com- 
panies is much neglected. Companies H and E have no coffee- 
pots, and the coffee is made in camp kettles. This, in view of its 
direct and positive bad influence upon the health of the men, is 
highly reprehensible. Camp kettles, even when clean and free 
from grease, which is frecpiently not the case, are totally unfit to 
make coffee in. Commanders of companies should see that their 
men are provided with tin coffee-pots. Iron kettles, though used 
constantly, are subject to a slow process of oxidation, the oxide 
being soluble in coffee, and where mixed with a small amount of 
grease, makes a compound which cannot fail to undermine the 
health of the men, generally giving them chronic diarrhoea in its 
worst and obstinate form. Respectfully, 

W. H. GIBBON, 

Surg'n 15th Iowa. 

Camp i^th loxva InJ., Nov. 24., i86j. 
Circular: — The attention of officers is called to the suggestions 

of the within letter of Surgeon Gibbon, the suggestions of which 

Company Commanders will carry out. 

Surgeon Gibbon will make weekly reports of the condition of 

the police and cooking of the Regiment. 

WM. W. BELKNAP, 

Colonel Commanding. 



GENERAL ORDERS, No. 118. 

Headquarters 15th Iowa Infantry, ) 
Vicksburg-., M/ss., A^'ov. 27, iS'dj. \ 

I. The attention of Company Commanders is called to the 

necessity of a more effective policing and cleaning of the camp. 



284 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

The sinks dug for that purpose, and not the parade ground, should 
be the receptacle for old bread, meat and vegetable matter, while 
all other rubbish should be collected in piles each morning before 
guard mounting in time for the police wagon. The health of the 
regiment requires this, and more thorough policing will be expected 
hereafter. The Surgeon reports the tents, as a general thing, com- 
fortable and cleanly, and there is every reason for paying as much 
attention to the ground outside. The officer of the day, on each day, 
respectively, will see that this matter is attended to in all parts of 
the camp. ***** By order of 

WM. W. BELKNAP, 
Colonel Commanding. 



GENERAL ORDERS NO. 121. 

Headquarters 15th Iowa Infantry, ) 
Vicksbiirg^ Miss . , Dec. zj, i86j. \ 

The reports of the officers of the day for 12 days past, show that 
the cooking utensils of the different companies have been reported 
clean as follows: A Company, 12 days; B Company, 4 days; C 
Company, 10 davs; D Company, 8 days; E Company, 5 days; G 
Company, 7 days; H Company, 6 days; I Company, 9 days. Here- 
after officers of the day will report as to the cleanliness of the 
company grounds, tents, cook-tents and cooking utensils. At the 
end of each ten days, while in camp, the reports will be consoli- 
dated, and that company' which the reports exhibit as cleanest in all 
these respects, will be relieved from tour of duty, unless the details 
from the regiment are too heavy to permit it. 

The men should not be compelled to eat food cooked in dirty 
utensils, and experience shows that the health of the regiment im- 
proves with the cleanliness of the camp. By order of 

WM. W. BELKNAP, 
Colonel Commanding-. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 28^ 

GENERAL ORDERS, NO. 123. 

Headquarters 15th Iowa Infantry, ) 
Vic ks burg-, Miss., Dec. 24, i86j. \ 

The consolidated reports of the officers of the day, from Decem- 
ber 14 to December 24, inclusive, show that the companies of this 
regiment have had no marks against them as to cleanliness of 
grounds, cooking utensils and company tents for the following num- 
ber of days: z\ Company, 9 8-9: B Company, 8; C Company, 
81-^; D Company, 7 7-9; E Company, 9 5-9; G Company, 8 4-9; 
H Company, 8j/^ ; I Company, 9^ . A Company being the clean- 
est company reported, the Adjutant will credit every man of that 
company with one tour of dut}^, unless extraordinary details should 
be ordered from superior headquarters. 

The company of the remaining seven, reported cleanest at the 
end of the next ten days, will be credited with a tour of duty. 

By order of 

WM. W. BELKNAP, 
Colonel Commanding. 

General Order No. 1, dated Headquarters 15th Iowa Infantry, 
Vicksburg, Jan . 5, 1864, [same as above order to following num- 
ber of days]: A Company, 9^; B Company, 9 1-10; C Com- 
pany, 7 4-5 ;D Company, 8 1-10; E Company, 8 8-10: G Company, 
8 1-10; H Company, 8 1-5; I Company, 7^^ ; and B Company was 
credited with one tour of duty . 

The camp ground, the interior of the tents, and the cooking 
utensils of the command were never before in such a state of per- 
fect cleanliness as now, all of which resulted in a rapid improve- 
ment of the health of the men within the period of a few weeks, 

About the end of 1863, the government having called upon the 
troops in the field to re-enlist as veterans for three years, or during 
the war, the 15th Iowa, three-fourths of whom had re-enlisted, was 
reported as a veteran regiment on January 5th, 1864. 



286 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

Captain James Monroe Raid, I Company, 15th Iowa, was the 
officer who first reported his company had re-enlisted. It was th^ 
first company to veteran in the regiment, brigade and entire division. 



THE FIRST VETERANS. 

Headquarters 15th Iowa Veteran Infantry, ) 
Vicksburg^ Ji/iss., Jamiarv lOth, 1864. \ 

General N. B. Baker, Adjutant-General. 

Sir: — In my letter of the 6th I stated that Sergeant Francis M. 
Majors, of Company D, was, I believe, the first veteran volunteer 
in this brigade. It should be corrected thus: 

Sergeant Francis M, Majors and Private James W. Carter, of 
Company D, were sworn in by me as veteran volunteers Nov. 19th, 
1868, and are therefore the first veterans in this regiment, and I be- 
lieve in the 8d brigade. 

This may seem a matter of small moment, but the men are proud 
of the honor, and as they came together, and were sworn in to- 
gether, I do not wash to do injustice. 

We have enlisted in this regiment as veterans (of those whose 
time expired January 5th, 218; of those whose time expired since 
January 5th, 106), 824; being over three-fourths. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. W. BELKNAP, 
Colonel loth Iowa Veteran Infantry. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 



287 









ir . CO ' 




, <M «o „- 




. CO OT * £1 • 

CO" a t-'^Tg 

=^^ r^ ^ -o XI 






^^J ^^c^ 




^b^ CO ^ =^ » 






"o '^ ^ <: ii j- 






u-c .'"a 




CM ^ "-^O J? S '^ 






ci 


u ' — ' y 3 >-, t" 


<; 


- p .0 <; 3 ., 

a <^> = ^ ^^ ^ 


Pi 




. - a,7j •-:; a 




3 •-' ^ ^' . eo S ^ 




•-: t7! 'co''^ C'l ^' _ i- 




^.tJ'/^^^-^C^ 




,P'^ .zZ 






CO •- n r ^ ■ ' 




rt i_ -a f. ^ *-■ 'C 




2a<<oS^&: 


u 











K -0 - « if 


Q 




(/5 

w 
a! 








cC , - 




« c c 




c . 9 


yi 






"Ii^^;i5| 


•< 

Z 


rt*^ bOcS cs^ lTf,<A 






— PO Ntete 




^^.O^^EWS 




"^ -^ " s- 




ii c c S 




c 00-" 


tstf 


OJ D 2 


2 


— tUDtlC . 5 


< 


_'-U = 3 3 C n 


u - 7} CO ts «J 


c^ 


§ ^" S).- i^ "3 1 




gjSyj-^ <3<ija 







WOl 






p p 






oo'cf 






Oi Oh 






1> >% 






'^co-5 






CO t. 1— , 






o^^w" 






2?s 




CO 






<< 






S 


U g p 




w 


t: ^'B. 




Pi 


> 




"Uu 






(5°=o 












h x: 3 






<U ~ 1— 1 






(/) ':Oi& 


, * 




1- u 1- 


~ 




b-i k< ti 


?s 




-* 




-0 


P 


S 


(U 




•^-.. 
^ 


|.s 


'-<". ^ 


1 


»^ 


c 




<i 


rt 


^ 




1 — > 




^ 


?S' 







-»<. 


ci 




^ 


wl 


^"^ 












c 


s 






.^ 












to 






.=0 


^ 


■^^' 3 


*Ni 


c 


^■^^: 


3 




arid£< 


ci^ 


0'^ c 


k^ 


z> 


5 . S 


<; 




OZOh 






uT 




aj 


oT Jf ^ 




y 


3 3 0/ 




c 

0) 


Corr 

or, ^ 

<e 




Od 


(U (U c 




i^Pi'i^ 




Age. 


•^ -^ -^ 
01 « ff} 










CO 


bC _ 




Ed 


•^ 3 






aj 




Z 


William 
James H 
Henry M 



h^ 



►2 ° 

zz 



1-1 j':« 



0} 2 

,;^Z 



c 1; ii 

oQ 3 



tifc 



u2i 

in CU ,fe 



10 3 

' o 

d — 
iJ -a 

^ as 



033 



O -in 



CO -^ 



^ ^ 



.— T-^ O • 



w"^*"^ ^ -»• -." rt a rt ctfcc 
■^>-^ H^ be sc r- r7_> > _> _> _> 

O^c^Xc^UU&hOhD-CLOh 



2 b>.-- 

^ ^- C g p 


P 





0>Wy)- 





IC « 


to 


T3 -a 


-a 






a. c 


CL 


ra - s 


03 


^-^.'^0 


s- .2 


■g 0^ 


3 -a 


1, OJ •.^, 1, 


— 1) 


U^JU 


uo 



>- O' 3 

Z^OPH 




^ 



T3 



■;: o tc\c i: 3 ■- 

^i: £ ii -::^£pi 
^- .c5S 505 3 



c E u 






"^ ^ '^" £ 



A 



O O -5 3 3 •- -3 cj 

C^ K £,< ,5,S A< 



CU =-:^ £« «? 



oamQC 



288 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



D 



^ 









i 

Pi 


W'd in head and arm Shiloh April b, 03. 
Pro 6th Cor July 1, '64; wd Shiloh and at 

[Corinth. 

Wd Corinth; capt'd Atlanta July 23, '64. 

Wd in charge on Atlanta July 21, '64. 
Wd Kenesaw Mtn June 17, '64. 

Pro 8th Cor July 1, '64; wd July 22, '64 
[killed on picket Atlanta Aug. 13, '64 

Killed in battle Atlanta July 22, '64. 
Killed in battle Ezra Church July 28, '64. 

Wd Corinth ; wd .v capt'd Atlanta Jul 32, '64 
Wd near Nickajack, Ga., July 4, '64. 


(U 

en ■— 

3 


Feb 26, '64 
Jan 1, '64 

Mar 8, '64 
Jan 1, '64 

Mar 8, '64 

Jan ], '64 
Mar 8, '64 

Jan 1, '64 




Feb 25, '64 
Jan 1, '64 

Feb 20, '64 
Jan 1, '64 

Feb 20, '64 

Jan 1, '64 
Feb 20, '64 

Jan 1, '64 




•t .i. ■'i t .« .^ .^ .- .- 'c .- .- - .- .- •- - .- .- .- 




Penn. 

Va. 

Ind. 

Iowa 

Irelnd 

N. Y. 

N. Y. 

Penn. 

Ills. 

Md. 

Ohio, 

Cana. 

Mass. 

Ohio 

Penn. 
Irel'd 
Ind. 
Irel'd 

N. Y. 


u 

c 

0) 


Davenport, 
Ced'r Rapid.s 
Walerford tp 
Rapids tp, 
Ced'r Rapids 
Elk Riv'r tp. 

do 
Richland tp. 
Pel la, 
Fairfield, 
Ced'r Rapids 
Deep Crk tp. 
Keokuk, 
Richland tp. 
Wd 6 Lyons, 
Waterford, 
Wd4Ke'kuk 
Water lord tp 
CedarRapids 
Rapids tp. 


Age. 


iC^J CO -M ^ '^ C* M O ^ Ci O <M 1- -^ O 'T* c; ^ t- ^ 
l-^J irj C<i <?J W O"! CJ CQ CO Cn 0> (M CI « « CQ CI Ctl CI CJ 


CO 


Hershberger, Wm. C. 
Kimbrough, John A. 
Kemp, George W. 
Klumph, Alonzo 
Mara, John 
McKinster, William 
McKinster, Daniel 
McNiece, Martin 
Martin, John 
Major, William 
Mefford, Bird 
McAllister, Barnard 
Norton, Patrick 
Nordyke, Erastus H. 
Ross, Wesley 
Reed, Samuel P. 
Reid, Daniel 
Shull, Richard R. 
Sweeney, James 
Vandeveer, George F. 



^ 



S^ 3 « 

-I — > 

eo ^ c 

J-* CJ to 

flj « >^-* 



^'CJ 



^-^^.Q 



^ 1) — < ^ 

g £ -a — o 
o o Kj. — • u 







re , It XI nj 

t; >-l bJO M be 



u 


"■ 


^ to ^ aj S 

!J T^ C« C/3 CO 




'> 


Swdn 

Md. 

Ind. 

Penn. 

Ohio, 






P3 






Age. 



C .3 



3 2 § o ^ 

H ■ 






Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 



28g 



o 



' — <N 



S2 <?■»' 



CO 



«3 



3 CO" 



*^^ 

^'^ 



^ c 

c « 



3 



3S?-;; 



, CO 



cS *J — ; 



•c < 



:5 O 



U 5 ^ 



= x 



i5 <?* =* 
c< c 



S S 

o = 

c & 

•r cs 









.S S.5 



- ^ 



.s •< 



p -o 



*j C *5 



CJ 1^ J= 

5i o £ 

COO N 

O p -o 



« o 



rt o 



s ^ 



O O = ' 



CO o> s " i 












T-l CO (Ji t-1 - i 



cS fS 






^ .9 

.IS 

;z;o 



: o . o" 



ctf 






CS o" 

i ix' 









o . 

— C 



''J , ; 

Cxth 









ofcS 



qj !<; .^ T^ ' 






I ,>^ o o o o o o O 



o 



^I'f-'^ 



^.5 



CS ""-7^ — 



^ c S 



cJ w _• X 



JO 
J5 ci - 



O -.3 

3 re ""^ 

U O .3 



22 



-> 


CS 


3 




— — 


X 


OJ 


^^ 


3 





'~ .,' 





•G 


?! 3? 


u 


CS 


u ^ 


.- 





CS u 










MOQli 



EH 






"i^ E cS " 



3 


c« 






c« 


CS 
















<5 





1— : 



















3 


(U 


?? 


3 


n 


-tJ 


T3 

n 


> 


_2 


X 

X 


-c 


cs 





CO 


cS 


3 


3 





OEEK 


2 



>^' to 



E J J J JSc/5^ 



;^ 










Si 












s 












u 













u 






c? 






P 






CO 


72 







< 




15 




CD 


'62. 
63; 
orin 


oi 


nr 


^-"''^ 




?^ 


'='0 , 

. ■ «o 




> 


01-- 







di cS -^ 




IqS^ 










T3-0 -3 




«i 


» J^O 




P 


S fc^ 







OkC 




OUUI? 



ctd 


W 


(U 






w 




oi 






Age 



(M Ot 01 Oi 









c 









cc 




. k. 


CO 


I- c« 


<3 


. Mill 
-Ryn 
off, 
Griffi 


Z 


HiiKa: 




J3S:o^ 




bJl^ > eS 
•0 >.^ eS 




Wc^^QZ 



2go 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



>t 




•C — T! B-TJ 



" cj is ■>— ' 

=;=§ = 



-^'^^ 



-* 


^ 




o 


br 


aj 




« 




C7 


ra 


11 


7< 


<A 


Ul 


^T3 


_ 


3 


3 


c 
9 



OS •-: 



3 -co 

I CO - 



O U (N 



6aD_£ 3 



.s5i 

OS e« 

-c x; "a 

C C J; 

■a T) a. 



be 

in 



_^ ^ 






3 — -w 



o 



•^ •:-, ~ =« 



5 O 

O 2 



« w 



^ ^ Q 






oo'^ i-T-rHsi"^ odes 



(u D c 
Q2A 



-J — S -^ ^ -^ 
CQ CO '?^ :; CO CI :: co 



O^ 2 CO i <M 














<a 


05 


Cd 


^ 



r^^'^'^S TjT^'o ■.-<''* C£ O-T-rf-O Cl-r-T^^T-T ^; 



J2 

1) - 



-£ c i; c 

-> fa 1— ^^-^ I — . 



(U C 



C C XI o c 






8' 



O 

o 






t! t5 o o 5 o"^^"C."V."C"C"C "C "C "C "C "C "C "C "C "C 'Z. "C "C "C 'Z. "C "u. 'u 

cJ:xCJCJUOChC^ g-,;i.c-,a.;Ha.g^&.gHCH c* ci. cu cu, a. o- o- c- c^o^ 






C O 

00 



g 

CO 'P ^ 



6 = o'js . o" 



uiO;::^oc-'0^ 



■a !S J£ ^ * 

So = ^ = 



-1 800 



o J2 o 



tc -.- - — •— 



SI 






^, 



"? 'as Ji -" 

U O L- C D 

_ p Oc, ^ 03 

j= c 5 i; o c 

y 0"^-^ bco 






.- re <u 



'^ 3 j= .b '^ 5 "=« "o 

- •- 1- OJ ,r •- L. U C tc r* 



5 J= 



o ?: 



Age. 



^ «■ <" • -^ 'C5 




Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 



2gi 










^ U T3 X3 s-,.ti 
COcO rrT « S "^ Q 



c '^ 






, rt 



—J - , ra ' — <-M ■" 

S <" «j 

- g g :::; a, S o 

O O O •- c« — sL 






^ ^ ^ to CO^ 

JO CO CO O O " 



^5^ 



I 3 rt O 

-co 

>:^' - 

OJ O ■1-' 

' H ?: •= 



d CI. 



^^"^of -^ • cj" -^ 



^ >-. 3 

-! •:: x; 



t. CO 



D 1) C4 



3 S 
>— , OS 



rv <U 
O) o ^ 

Q. d _^ 

oduQ 



a, cuy 
66^ 



^ (U 

-^ 3 
J! a. 



■U 



S: a, 
ii o 

y 6 



CrtoO'=3Gi'S07SC 



<^ 



c 


T3 






a; 




Di 


— ' 



Z-; 



1-1 (N }> 00 <-i C<! i> CJ tH 

S <u O 1; S aJ^S 4J •" 

>^h Iz; fa ^fa ^ u. Q 



c S S c^ 



Tf "^ "^ "^ "^ CO 

CO O '^D <:D CD o 







cj^c^^7;co7)CLipHC-iCLi&H0HPHCLiPH&HpH(iiai cucua-fiifCci,aHii;'CL,cL, 






« -i-> G 



'2 -" D. - 


a. 




S- .B'B'^'B-cL 




C'k 
er tp 
r tp. 
klin, 
mwa 
loos 
mwa 

tp. 
n tp. 




nter tp 
hlo'ga 
tumwa 
:k C'k 
uglass 
akevill 
:k C'k 
okuk t 
umwa 


S S S « cJS 3 gi 


£ ' 


5 §2-5 Ji-g o5 


B<1:.'=3n3"3j<!j^" 






oaj(ui,'-'<"-'Ot> 




Dra_i.XOl..„D.^ 


OSOcdOoitiiO 


c/3 U U fe Oh 





OQOh-IQQ Jl^O 



Age. 



-*(M'-i?:>o-^i-iooi-iO(M-^oc<ji 



a oj 07 -^ CQ yt fft o? (y; gQ OJ oj g^ cq -^ ct < y? o^ 01 g. ; 



as r; 
C d 

Ih U UJ 

o !_; 



„^ 



,0 g 
^ ^ .h 



P o c 

S *j £ 



« a." -2 

.Is 25 



fcuoo 

3"^ 

uW 

.- o 

-3 ^ 

U C 

Mpq 



J^ 



MUQQ 



o S c 1; .2 



r- ** 



•S-^.2 



, « c S 



^ ^ ^ ^ ^' 

^ t: o o 3 

(u <D o 00 .. 

C3 E K K E K ^ ^ S ^ 



rt cs 
3 rt 



':^^ 2 
I < _r-3 
^ ~ (-1 

cs c , 
> 3 jr, 
u o Ji 

^U E 
« ""5 





cs 


:^ 




^ 


'^ 


r/T 


3 


3 








;"^ 


^ 




7Z^ 


>^'n 


f- 


cs 


OJ 


cuoioi 



c 2 -c 
x: r; o 



tic 

o . £U 

o ^ 

o '-^ 'H 
c fe u 3 

S^^ £.- 



2g2 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



^ 



o 








^ 




CO 


C/3 


„ 


U. 




Pi 


S-. 


< 


3 


% 


*"> 


w 


V 


Di 


rt 




.CI ~ 




c« 




C ^ 




o 




nred 
Corp 








a d 








u a: 




■* coco 




CO CO CO 






u 


- ^ .. 


« .in 


i-H CO CO 

o? 


3 


_ o o 


S 


c 0) u 




CO CO CO 


^ 


CO CO CO 


C 


, ^ , 


W 


^ IC -^ 




CO c^ 


v 




OJ 


OJ 0) <u 




QQQ 


-^ 


(u cT iT 






cS 


cs c« rt 


OS 


> > > 








Cu Cu Q-i 


ci^- 


. £ d 


:2'> 






v 


d, 


CJ 


-" C3 




.£ .£'^ ^ 




.:^.ii £ 


02 


5 5 tj 


ifcio 




Age. 


^ = o* 

0*01 CO 






CO 

IS 


Alber 

hn 

rles 


< 


'5 


Z 


JS cu! 




O U -i 




Vanv 
Weav 
Winn 



U 


< 

% 
w 


Commissioned Dec 26, '62. 

Com's'd Nov 9, '63; capt. July 22, '64, Atl'ta. 

Pro. 2d Lieutenant Oct 26, '64. 

W'd in arm at Shiloh, Apr 6, '62. 

Pro. Sergt. Major July 1, '64. 

W'd left-hand, Atlanta, July 22, '64. 

Pro. 5th Sergt. July 1, '64. 

W'd in face, Atlanta, July 22, '64. 

W'd in head, Atlanta, July 22, '64. 

W'd, Atlanta, July 32, '64. 

W'd head and side in the charge July 21, '64. 

Killed in battle, Atlanta, Ga., July 21, '64. 

Pro. 7th Corpl. Aug. 1, '64. 


W'd and captured at Shiloh, Apr 6, '62. 
W'd face July 4; w'd abdomen & right knee 
W'd in head,"Atlanta,July 21, '64. [July 5, '64 
W'd in knee, Atlanta, July 32, '64. 

W'd in elbow at Shiloh, Apr 6, '62. 


1- 
y . 

^.£ 

3 


Dec 6, '63 
Jan 1, '64 
Apr 26, '64 

Jan 1, '64 

Dec 6, '63 

Jan 14, '64 
Dec 6, '63 


Feb 4, '64 
Dec 6, 63 

Jan 13, '64 
Jan 1, '64 

Dec 6, '63 


Re-En- 
listed. 


Dec 6, '63 

Jan 1, '64 
Mar 31, '64 
Mar 15, '64 
Jan 1, '64 

Dec 6, '63 

Jan 14, '64 
Dec 6, '63 


Feb 4, '64 
Dec 6, '63 

Jan 13, '64 
Jan 1, '64 

Dec 6, '63 


c 

cS 


^ 


"5 •-; J--" .J ^ -— " -— ■ -^ -;; -— ■ -z' ~' rt ui « rt cs cs cs cS cS cS 
^M M be M) p. ^ c. ^ ^ a, E- ^ > ^>. >>>>>>> 

cs t; \i cu i> o 5 o o 5 o o'Z"C."C'\l.'^'Z"u"t. 'Z "p 
U .-i cr 7} X U U U 'J '-J O U C- Di Dm Q- 0- Cu 0- pL, Ph Cl, 




i S "^ • S ^ S S • X -o ;s cs cs 


Ind. 

Eng. 

Iowa, 

Ills. 

Ind. 

Eng. 

Iowa, 

Germ. 


o 

c 


Danville, 
Vernon, 
Pilot Grove, 
Keokuk, 
Keosauqua, 

Vernon, 

Busn's Cor. 

Pilot Grove, 

Danville, 

Troy, 

Keokuk, 

Danville, 


Keokuk, 
Dover, 
Pierceville, 
Keokuk, 

Danville, 
Keosauqua, 


Age. 


C0;*C:TjHOL0fflQ0C0T-C0C0C0OC0C0OOOC01OO 
OJ O? CO 0» O? C^i Ol 01 CQ « O^ O? 01 O? <?» Ol 0« 01 01 CQ Ol CO 


W 
< 


Newton J . Rogers, 
William P. L. Muir, 
Carlos Hicks, 
John J. Wilson, 
fames W. Henry, 
William H. Sellers, 
George DeHart, 
George Harbaugh, 
.Solomon Holcomb, 
Albert Hunter, 
Abijah H. Johnston, 
Christopher Orm, 
Arnold, James M. 
Arnold, Joseph, 
Buck, William C. 
Clark, William 
Davis, Melville C. 
Elmore, Howard 
Grove, Silas W. 
Hall, William 
Harry man, William H. 
Hellwig, Charles 



lotva Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 



293 



be ► 

< 



- o 
bo . 

fee 



S -r-l «■* 



I :* ■£ be, 



bJo 



S 'LO 



•-X 



§1 



(11 ^— I 



-^ ^.£ 



^^ — • 



^00 






.Ji, g W -O oi 



O . 



Q H 



^5^ 



o ■z: ' 



3 j= 



■^TH5Dr-l,-Hi— ( CSi-H 







.^ .i .^ .^ .S; .^ .- .^ .^ .i ^ '^ ^ ^ .^ ^ 

'n "n •— 1- u u '_ ih I, c n 'c 'u 'u 'C 'u, 

PnPuiiiPHPmiifiHCLHPHP-iP-iPuP-iaiP-iCLi 



.2 

IS : 

o 









n-d c - 



cs 



k! 



cs 



3 _ 

3 a 3 c „ 3 ^ 

(3j O t< O 'T rs - 

t/:; C ^ C !L t/> 

o n O t, S o 

I' 0) D a> c^ 1) 

t^ > t=^ > a tid 



'> S ^ '> -^ S "> ^ 

Coocooco 

C b«i ^ C ^ Ui C tii 



C-f <?? T-t Q1 O C>7 -* O^ (M C^ O? C} 01 O? I 



pi c 




■a .-■ 
'^-^ 

00 '^ 

■rt o 

O '-' 

4; be 

^ CO O 43 

c/2 c/5 g r: 

S S "?* ^ 

O g 
'3 "35 






£ E £^ 



ti 10 — ^ -5 
2.30 



■" •- rt - 

=« o £ .^ 
^(j *=■ 

•n CO 3 "^ 



I— >o . c 

■5^ ^ >- J" 

-"C 4> ^ 



5; o o 



tid 



u 
to .t^ — ^ 



<ooooooooooooo 



Di^ 



looooooooooooo 
•aT3"3'0'aT3'0'o"OT3"a"a'0 



_c 3 3 jj" lu nT iT iT oT oT iT 

Q,i-i H-J wi £• £■_> _> > _> _> > > > 

c« ti -T-1 1) o o 'n 'c 'C 'C 'u 'u "c '0 

^c/;UUPiO-iCuPH^^fiHPH 



:^ 


c 


d 






>^ 


c 


cT 








cf 


nf 




£ 


'^ 


c 


c 


ir 


rr 


a 


^ 


tr 


n 


tc 


is 


■S 


!«' 


U 




t) 

PhU 


^ 


^ 


:z;ph 





M 


S 


;::; 


^ 





iz; 






■ o 



s i 



coQO 



o u 
XI > 
«« rz 






o ii 



■bx)-^ 

•C 3 



>;3: 

c^ PL, O c^ oa ^ y5 



Age. 



SO 



c/3 o 



% '7 ^ 

^.:xj^-^- ^ a' 5* — 
ajPaiS — :t:.5 — — S; 
" ■ c 'j~ -Z z: tt 7z 



z: 3 
> o 



2£s:u 



zo^^^^-^5 



.C/5 



= C 



^ cs 13 o P^ c '^S ^ >~.3: 
Z,>:^ Q Aw pq pq m PP Q 



2s 



294 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



L) 



« 

fN 






be 



bJb a, 
•a ^ 






< 



7} 2 



^?: ^ ^ 



^ 


eo 


3 




•— 1 


u 


tS 


o 






c 


<-• 














<! 


o 


1) 


U 










c« 


« 


J3 


u 






CT3 






■n 


3 
O 


1. 


X 


3 


X 






a-a 


U 


^ 



Xl <A 

?- 
rt I.' 

X o 

6/3-5 



^ol 






ei^ 



;ooooooooooooo 

•■UTD'3'a'a'O'O'O'C'O'O'a'O 









t7 


<u 


aT 


ar 


aJ" 


«r 


iT 


iT 


af 


oT 


iT 


oT 


a' 


4r 






























rt 


rt 


CJ 


C4 


CB 


e« 


cS 


CS 


CS 


c< 


c« 


CS 


rt 


C4 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


.i; 


> 


> 


'u 




> 



CI^OhCLiCLiPhDhO-i&hOhC-iP-i&hPhPh 






? o- 



i= o 



- ,- ^ - „ « ■£ "^ J£ -^ «■ g J£ "g . 



3 -C 



», o 



o 



1) "O 






cS o 



<u 



<u 



DiO J 



Age. 



> gj CO CO ■?? CQ CQ ■■:>< CQ Oj ■»> OJ 



H 2 '""' S 

Cw ^ U {i> ^ 

~ XI K cS — 

— • ? c p := 



U 



,^-SJ 



.— I/. I 



.S^o_' 









o i; S c ii 






IN 






^ « 00 

CO 3 O 

3 C 4-. 

be <u - 

<u i: 3 '^ 
" °^£ ^ 

E £ S d 

o o O 1- 
O O U CIh 



Q rt 









oj u 5 

"^ ^ -^ 

d T3 -!-> 
CO ->*< 

pop 




nj C rt (jj C 






-S iJ [j bcbcbJD be «)£■£• 







« ■S 
U^ 


o? 


D OJ 1) OJ 0) 

73 CA! 7} 'Ti 73 


o o 






..2 


«j 


«5 


•_5 3 


c 




o c 






^O 


^ 


^ 


O 


O. 



o ■- o o >r>^ o 5 _ 
c 2 c =- rt ^ 2 15 
iid ^ tii ;^ U On^^fc^ 



Age. 



jCi "-^ ■ 



'"'ft' E^>> bcofcj 

3«iuj:»„ii-'*7, iJ 
o-aa3=<Cujr-5'— t'S 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 



295 






r^ '^ ^ 



J£§ 






be 

3 

< 

O 

"Pa 
bjop 






c< ?■ 






JS o 



<U 3 O <U O "O T3 



!=X)£ tiB 3 
3^ 3—, 

O cS o '^ 
•n C - rt O 

.S5 o g S 

!- ^ ::: js X 

(J ^^.s.s 

T3 T3 TJ t3 "a 






o 
c 

US 

u 



p 




^^^ 

300 


■3 


1-1 




^^-«^ 


. M 




•a 1 — 1« 


ri 






i— 


C 
a, 










IN ,9 




CO 


< 


l,U 




>, 












"^ j:: 












•— . 


■*-' 


)— >co 






« 


anta 
pro 
'64. 





C 










ii ^ 


.,-^ 


^ 


•a 


•< 03 




u 


4J 


Si 3 


bt 

3 

< 


.2- 


s 


?: ni 


u. 




^ 


§1 







30 

U 


ii<! 


10 


^ 


u 


T3 T3 











^^ 


Cu 


% 


0- 



oS Q 



CJ J- u u *^ 



so 



o o S c o o ■ 

' "O T3 "^ "O "O -O 



oS o- 






-a "o 






o o o '"' o =* o ■ 
"a "O "O "o "o 






9Q^Srtcjc«"ctfe!(cstSK"c*cs 






^ >- ^ ._ .:_ .- .« .^ ._ ■_ .:. .::. ._ ._ ._ ._ .- . 

000!-u'-.uuk<s-i:-i-L.s-^s-.:- 



o 



«.2 



cf . — 6 . c. c Q - 6 . o* c c 





IE i 

o 



o« ir 13" 



a, 



be c 
- S 

Cj — 



S I ^ § .2 



a. a. cu 






o ^. ^ o . 



c «. £ 



Oh 

c 

<3 



O t^ 










S b.S 

34^=: 






=^ « •- •- J2 J2 ^ S 



SS «« 



o.S 



t^ 



1^ 



REMARKS. 


PP 

2 = 

-. 4^ 
^ J= 
03 to 

lu cC 
^'^ 

ll 
coco 

CO p 

s s 




■a 

I. 

3 








c 

Pi 


c 
* "S 

0^ 


rt . - 


-5.2 



C 


iJ2 3 

. 


Age. /^ g? 


CO 

< 


- 3 

. >% 

4J H 



2q6 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



O «0 ~ t, LO 

'_'- •- 0,0 



co.t:Ti* 



(N 



lU 



^-^'Z S^ 5 c/3 ?? b 

-^ -^ - < ^^ ^ 

a o <J - P g J 
_ CD ;= oi 5f)3 

- o) a.'— > c ^ 

'^ 5J 

•f, '-^ 

r'" ^ > -" CL. *- -;; 

T-H w) •- j:; (J '-^ 

O t, Ki es ►-, O t- 



*- r ^ ** < S 



00 «\5 3l ^ ■ 

« ^ C — '^ — 

^ beg c <u-^ 
^S < "- = 

w > ^ k **" 

c (u ^ *j 

- « ^ ^ u 

;? "G o u "^ 



_ji Tt< »0 ,~ 

o5P« o 
<^ u al2 - 

^ K ,> O ii 
3 ■" lO r ^ 



>'OT 



: c3 






M, 



:i _ >7 -c 






«, cr 3 p i- 

ra -a u J3 



•a 

c 

<^ 
cP 

^'^ 



CQ- g 

3-a 
"-^ c 



>4-^l 



^ 2 * r- 

O ^ C ^ 

QQ^UQ 



— o 






^ 



^ 

■s 



O 



^ 



30 X O o o 
T3 T3 "O 



c i cs 



'as 



-o t: -'T! cq t3 -o 



^ o o od^=o 

tu C c3 



a;' 



■Z \ O"? 0-7 . 






^^^ o o o 












C C tS «S CS rt C3 



O !U q^ 



o o o o o 






Jv: So Si) ^ o. C, C- c. ^^ ^^ ^__ ___ __ ^^ ^^ ^ ^ __^ ^ ^ 

-n -S 5 oJ o o 5 5 o 'CCZ'Z'Z 'Ci^ 'C 'Z 'Z 'Z 'Z 



>>>>>>>>> 



'z-^ 



o :z: > o :z ■ 






K ... 

" o' c >, c 

l^pC- (jj .- ^- — I 

:^0 Ph;z ;li hh, 



O ta O 



rt 



^ — j: 



r: 5 r: — — 
ca o cs rt ni 






» '^ g & "^ -a -= 2 « 
cL d, 



-2 bcQ 
!« u ^ - . - - ._ 

Di IX O c/} ^H U U M c/5 tn U 



■^ I- 

C V 

be o ' 
rt o 



T3 ft: 



a a, 

03 (U 



O U U O CJ >^.^oo 



Age. 



>-. " « rt ^ W 






5 f, e Z S -O ~ 
O y 



eg 7} « ^O. 






'^s^^i^-Ezz ^;^-'M 



C U5 



^X^ 



O OJ 



5 <u 



1) O) 



C -^ r- 

- rt N i_ ?; 



cs 



: OS ^- ca K-^ *-> .2 ^ 

fli D . 3 s ^ "^ "*-• 
I ^ '^ •■ ■- < aj _r Oh 






e« D c — 



c« 



hCO.; 



ct: 






c^-= 



a; ^ sf to c c u- 



loiva Veteran Volu?iteer Infantry. 



297 



1^ 


cS 10 




^ 


.0 


O'* 


>'" 


LO 


CO 




»^ 


^ 




CO 








CO 
















rrt 






7> 




Tf 








c 

CS 






I— 1 aj 
3 OJ 




<1 




B-of 


p. 


< 


"^ 


an 


■J} 


£~ 




*—> 


-n 







-'-' 


C/J 


^ 


0, 




U 


X 






7) 




> 


co" 


<u 


"Z 


D 


L- 


-< 




<D 





JZ 


W) 




■5* 




C 
<J 

C 


-a 
-5. 




■3 


T3 




< 


, , 




J= 


•" 


o> 




^ 




r- 


bJ3 


-n 




■m 


_ 


-- 


r', 


'^ 




-=■ 


-a 





QJ 


-^ 


5 
a 




(3J 


r- 






? 


ti c 


C3 


< 


% 


C 







^ 





eu 







M 


.j^ 


c 


<S 




'O 


U) 


-0 


U 




"S 










QPhGChU 


a 

X 



ft- 






'^ 




TO ■* ^ "* -^ "* 






<SD 




CS CO 


CO 


CO 






^ 




, 




«^ r 










■^ 


V, 


•X'GO 




■^ 


ou 


■^ 


- 










._ 






^ 








c 






a 


C 


i 


C3 


^ 






1 — 1 


QS 




s 


' — > 




^ 




CO ^ -* 


,70 


■<*< ■* 











CO CD CO CO 







CO ■ 



Pi 



o 'W '^' ; 



CJ _S ^ 
c c; N 

c U 



CO (u rt 



'^o 



oi 



^2 CO 3: 






CO i^ ' "^ 

~; X'co<^ 

. <!i I — .0-0 

S .- S O .il 

CO -V. ^ c -'> 

^' oj oj 1; ^ ^ 
— " -^ 1; z; cj Tj 
u tj -- -^ >" 

O c-i rt oi 2 ^ 
- •- — C > CS 



^ -* ^ " ' 

coco o >-, 
<^^ "^ o^ ^ 

I— ii— 11 — > ^ 
rt ci cS f* 



5 C ^ 



rt 



<:<<;•< 



■ CO 01 




E 












3 


I. 
u 

to 
> 




c 


OJ 




E 








c. 




hJ 






-^=« 




, — 


^ 




x 


^ 


i 


< 


s 


^^ 


<' 



>. « O S Ji ii E 
O O ^ O J- >^ J- 

Z Ci c/D cJ5 72 E-i > 

23 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



U 



^ 











T-H-^ 


o 




^^ 


o^ 




c ..' 


^ c'-P 




- bi 




OJ 


OS 3 


'-"t: > 


t^ 


C'J< 




ftj 


>' =* 


= =*►:; 


< 


5^ 




w 


7< 


V'O J3 


ci 




u t. -; 




b/) ^ 


., ^< 




33 • -5 


o<„r 



c^ j:^ 



>^ 11 



£ O 



tj I. — : "^ 



— , — "z; ^ 






73 — 



-a Oh 



-a -c -3 



U 



c3 ^ 6 



^5 





















A 


■u 


rii 


u 






OJ 


U3 


Pi 





t-hc-^ oio^ o^ i^o 












L-3 I- »0 _ ^ ^ O 



QPQ 



C5CSCScSC3«cSC3CScSctfc3«c!c«cSc3C5CCc303 



"? "a] ^ i£ !E 



P -• o 






o - 



i = ^ - o 



a:.i; 



c rT -^ 



_- c~ i^ M eT c 1^ *j ;g bjD 2 



t-l 



S O O 3 -U 



^ 1) 



^ ■ 



Age. 






L~ .— I Cl Oi o 

' IN *■» -r^ ^< OQ 






«5 "^ -oca 

o & 



•^ o „ ,' •' *^ 






o « 

3J « 



-- ^ o 



c a; 3 



'< h 






i< • — _ U C 

^ S := 6S "< "< 




^^, 



ESS 
o o o 
UCJCJ 



s 


S 


1 




.^ 








hx 


c 


ri 






M 


0) 




:^ 


i) 


U) 




^; 


^ 


— 




■*^ 
























c 






. "ti .t^ 


L» 


M 




c j; 3 




c 




■- .- o 


^ 






Capta 
1st L 
3d Li 








^ 








. o 












z 


^ 


ooo 




ai 








o 




sjy 




a 




^■~ o 








Z-r.-° 








2 o 




Ag 


e. 


OCi cs 
(N CQ (73 








* 








-t-^ 








■n o 








. Hed 

Christ 
ers, 




< 




3 ., >. 




S5 




Thomas 
Frederic 
David M 



loxva Veteran Vohcnteer Infantry. 



299 






-2 cs"- ^ 






so ■* 

(J ' , 
O <?» 






« 



C/3 ^ 



-a ^ 






c u 
(U o 



5 t* 



01 . 

. c- 
.30; . 

CO =? JP 

*< <^ =• o ^ 



u 



« ?^ Si 5 






S^S 



C K . << 

o o c JZ 
o — a> , 

C -5 - rt 

cs xi .s ^ 

10 TD "O T3 



csoo^rr^'^cioooooooooooooooooo 
oi-^-a ^ ■^oi-a-o'o-u-a'C-c'U'a'O'OTj'a'a'O'a'a'o 

-C u •_ t- 
C O (Li « cs c 

^ s a ^ s A 

^^ '^^ '^^ "^d^ '^ ^^ ^^ ^^ 

(•(^ cr^ l•,-^ (•<-^ •'-^ rr-i 'r-*! r^ 



CO JO cp p jO p 




"^ ^ ^T "^ 

^p zp 'p v:> 


^^ CO — " CO -^H T— 1 


la ^ 


TH-r-Ti-Tcf 


fe a t^ s ^A 


C 

OS 


c c c 
ca <s c« ^ 



cococoocococop 
T-T io~ i-Tco th" si" -^ "-^ 



,S:|i"-_--;s<tScScScSiScScSc3cac3c<ScicsiscSc:cScSc«cS 



o&H;z;ci,h=;o::o °o 



- ^'^ ^ :S' "S «• I ^' i :5 

t^ O = == - > ^ - :; O 



-■5 _ 

p > o o 
-^ o 



p > _^ > o o o 

t; -^ al i "O T3 ~ 



3 C 3 O 



D « 



_j; c3 D 3 cs' 

— "n — 'j'-t; 



rt _ ™ '^ 



" TO '^ 

^"Z ^ >! :S — ^ — 
^3c3C'T^^C 



P o 



t^OMI^^iO 



; e ■<■ 



^v5 



:ixi 



E^ 



" 






;.,| 



f^- i ;r £ Q .- <■ ^ « ^ 






ci C 



P«=^' 



r ^-^ =« I 



S^<^' 



o 



CO o *£,«::. fq M C5 n u u o o O S E S S S Ch 73 c/3 X c/: ^ > 



JOO 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



RECAPITULATION. 



Field and Staff. 
Non Com. Stall. 

A Company 

B Company.. . . 
C Company . . . . 
D Compiny.. , . 
E Company . . . 

F Company 

G Company. . . . 
H Company . . . . 

I Company 

K Company. . . 



Totals. 



•a 




u 




c 




o 


CO 






p 


^ 






? 


o 


o 




(J 





Non Comissioned 
Officers. 



. Sers. 
. Sers. 
.Sers. 
.Sers. 
.Sers. 
.Sers. 
.Sers. 
. Sers. 
. Sers. 
. Sers. 



3; 

2; Curs. 2 
3; Cors. 2 
3; Cors. 4 
4; Cors. 
3; Cors. 7 
1; Cors. 2 
5; Cors. 5 
3; Cors. 5 
5; Cors. 6 
2; Cors. 3 



36| 



34; 



36 1 



248 1 



3 
32 
30 
33 
33 
38 
28 
38 
41 
41 
29 



354 



Mustered into the United States service as a Veteran Regiment, at Vicks- 
burg, Miss., January 5, 1864. 



IP^IE^T IIK. 



The Meridian Expedition. February, 1864. On Provost 
Guard at Canton, Miss. We start on Veteran Fur- 
lough. ViCKSBURG. Eight days on the Mississippi to 
Iowa. Reception at Keokuk. A Square Meal. March. 
Rendezvous there again. " Farewell" Dress Parade 
FOR Three Years. We start for the Front. Iowa 
Battalion. Cairo. Paducah, Ky. Clifton. Hunts- 
ville, Ala. 

The Regiment (with its brigade and division) formed a part of 
the expedition under Gener^il W. T. Sherman, to Meridian, leaving 
camp at Vicksburg, Miss., at 8 A. M., February 3d, 1864, and 
marched with the column to the Pearl river, where it was detailed 
as guard to the Pioneer Corps, while they laid the Pontoon bridge 
Feb. 5th, and though not actively engaged in the skirmishes that 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Injantry. jOt 

occurred during the trip, it was in close neighhorhood to the same, 
in hnc of battle, ready to receive the enemy. It is known, how- 
ever, that as soon as the enemy became aware of the infantry get- 
ting into position, it invariably took to retreat, giving up the scarcely 
contested ground. On the return trip the regiment was again oh 
grand guard, while the Pioneer Corps laid the bridge over Pearl 
river at RadclifFe Ferry, Feb. 25th, and on arriving at Canton, 
(26th), it was immediately assigned to duty as Provost Guard, with 
Colonel Wm . W. Belknap as Provost Marshal of the Post. In 
the distribution of the several railroad communications, the com- 
mand did excellent work, and attracted the attention and praise of 
the commanding General. Arrived at camp at Vicksburg March 
4th, distance marched 260 miles. 

The Regiment soon received orders to proceed on veteran fur- 
lough to Iowa, and on March 13th were embarked on the New 
Orleans steamer, Continental, for St. Louis. 

Cairo, March i8, 1864. 

To Gate City, Keokuk, Iowa, (by telegraph): 

The loth Iowa Veteran Volunteers are here on their wa\' to 

Keokuk by boat. There are 425 officers and men; will probably 

reach Keokuk Mondav. 

WM. W. BELKNAP, 

Colonel 15th Iowa Veteran Volunteers. 
Arriving at St. Louis on the 20th, the regiment marched from 
the Continental to and on board the steamer Die Vernon, of the 
Keokuk line, where the 21st Missouri Veteran Infantry, Colonel 
Dave Moore's old regiment, were enjoying a feast, after which the 
tables were cleared and reset, and the 15th Iowa each presented 
with a red ribbon, on which was printed 15th Iowa Infantry Vet- 
erans, St. Louis, 1864, and then marched in to the banquet, which 
the loyal citizens of St. Louis had prepared, and which was under 
direction of a jolly committee of gray beards of that city, who con- 
tinued to stuff oranges, apples and nuts into the boys' pockets, while 



J02 History of the Fifteenth Regiment ' 

said boys, remembering it was generally a feast or famine, stuffed 
themselves with agility and the good things on the table, which far 
surpassed their late life on the lower river, while the committee en- 
joyed the entertainment just as heartily as their guests. 

[Extract]. T\-\& Daily Gate City, Keokuk, March 21, 1864. 

At a meeting of the Citv Rifles and citizens to make preparations 
for the reception of the 15th Iowa ^"eteran Infantry, J. H. Craig 
was called to the chair, and E. Reynolds elected secretary. On 
motion the City Rifles were made a committee to i-eceive the regi- 
ment at the steamboat landing upon their arrival, and escort them 
to their cjuarteis. Messrs. A. Bridgman, [. H. Sullivan, H. W. 
Sample, Geo. C. Furman, H. Tucker, Sam, G. Bridges, D. B. 
Hamill, Wm. Fulton and P. H. Humes, were appointed a commit- 
tee of general reception, and Messrs. R. P. Lowe, J . H. Sullivan 
and H. Tucker, a committee to invite the Mayor, City Council, the 
Commander of the Post, the Military, and other city organizations 
to join in the recejDtion. The following committees were appointed 
to solicit contributions and superintend the tables: 

First Ward — Mistresses John McCune, J. M, Billings, Thos. 
W. Claggett, Misses Anna Belknap, Kate Lowe, and Mary Bart- 
lett, and Messrs. H. Tucker, Chas. Morrison and P. H. Humes. 

Second Ward — Mistresses Geo. Seaton, J. C. Hughes, J. W. 
Rankin, F. H. O'Connor and M. K. Taylcn-; Miss Ellen Martin, 
and Messrs. W. H. Cleghorn, Font Alexander and Captain J. W. 
Kittle. 

Third Ward — Mistresses J. W. Taylor, Buckingham, D. 

B. Hillis, S. Hamill. Misses Sarah Buell, L. Knowles, Messrs. A. 
Collier, W. C. Stripe, and A.J. Wilkinson. 

Fourth Ward— Mistresses D. Collier, R. P. Creel, J. W. Ogden, 
H. Fulton, Wm. Graham, Miss R. Lawrence, and Messrs. Harry 
Fulton, J. C. Patterson and F. N. Weaver. 

Committee on Toasts — ^_J. M. Hiatt, Dr. McGugin, Henry Strong, 
R. H. Gilmore, Dr. M. K. Taylor and Thos. W. Claggett. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 303 

Committee on Music — Captain Morrison, Geo. S. Fuller and J . 
R. Stinson. 

On motion, Hugh W. Sample \yas elected Chief Marshal, with 
power to appoint assistants. 

General A. Bridgman was elected President, J. H. Sullivan, 
vice-President, and Rev. Dr. Gillett as chaplain for the reception 
dinner. Messrs. Sam. G. Bridges, H. Buell, P. H. Humes, S. E. 
Carey, D. B. Hamill, and G. C. Furman, a committee on Decora- 
tion of Hall. T. Tucker and G. C. Furman were made a com- 
mittee to give notice of the arrival of the Regiment by causing the 
church and fire bells to be rung. 



ARRIVAL OF THE FIFTEENTH. 
[Extract] Gate City, Keokuk, Tuesday, Mar. 22, 1864. 

The gallant 15th Iowa Regiment, commanded by Colonel Bel- 
knap, arrived on the Die Vernon yesterday afternoon, and were 
received at the landing by the City Rifles, of which Colonel Bel- 
knap was formerly Captain. The Regiment marched through 
various streets, and on every corner were greeted with heart}' 
cheers, and finally halted on Main, between Second and Third 
Streets, and held a dress parade. 

There are four hundred and twenty of these veterans, and they 
present a fine appearance, notwithstanding the severe campaign 
they have just passed through. All appeared overjoyed at their 
retin-n once more to their homes, and their reception was the most 
enthusiastic of any Regiment of Veterans that have arrived in this 
city . 



PROGRAMME FOR THE RECEPTION OF THE FIF- 
TEENTH IOWA. 
The order of Procession to-day, March 22d, 1864, in honor 
OF THE Fifteenth Regiment Iowa Volunteers. 
The Regiment, commanded by its oflicers, will form at half-past 
I o'clock p. M. on Main street, their right resting on Second street. 



J04 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

The militaiy and provost guard will form at the same hour on 
Main with their right on Third street. The President, vice-Pres- 
ident, Orator of the Day, Mayor, City Council, and city officers 
will take their positions in the line on the left of the provost guard, 
the clergy, judiciary, state and county officers, and the members of 
the bar will take their position in the line next on the left. 

The fire companies of the city will form in the line on the left 
of the above, and the citizens on their left. The line being thus 
formed the military and provost guard will move under the direc- 
tion of the marshal of the day in front and to the right of the reg- 
iment, and the whole will then move under the direction of the 
marshal and his assistants along Second to Johnson, along Johnson 
to Third, along Third to Main, along Main to Eighth, thence by 
countermarch along Main to Fifth street and halt. There the 
reception speech will be delivered by the Hon. Judge Lowe. Re- 
sponse from Colonel W. W. Belknap, after which the regiment 
will be conducted to the dining halls of the Estes house to partake 
of a dinner and the hospitalities tendered by the ladies and citizens 
of the city. After the dinner, the toasts prepared by the commit- 
tee will be read, and responses in their order, interspersed by music, 
and followed by such volunteer toasts and other sentiments and 
amusements as may be best suited to the occasion. 

H. W. SAMPLE, Chief Marshal. 

Harrv Fulton, Sam. G. Bridges, 

Assistant Marshals. 



From The Daily Gate City, Keokuk, Wednesday, Mar. 23, '64. 
Reception of the Fifteenth Regiment. 

Yesterday, according to the published programme, the reception 
festivities to the gallant veterans of the 15th Iowa Infantry came 
off. As early as 1 o'clock the crowd commenced gathering on 
the streets, and by half -past 1, the time for the forming of the reg- 
iment and escort. Main street was lined with people from Second 



Iowa V^etcran Vohmtcer Irtfantry. JO^ 

to Fifth awaiting the appearance of the veterans, who were shortly 
on the ground , By 2 o'clock the procession was formed and 
marched through the streets, (according to programme), and halted 
in front of the Estes house, where they were welcomed home to 
their state, to our city and her hospitalities, in the following very 
able and patriotic address by Hon. Judge Lowe, in which he mani- 
fests a very familiar acquaintance with the history of the regiment 
since their departure from our city a little over two years ago: 



ADDRESS OF HON. JUDGE R. P. LOWE. 
Officers and Soldiers of the 15th Iowa: 

From the partiality of my fellow townsmen, I have the honor 
of making a short welcoming address on this occasion, and of ex- 
pressing to you how sincerely and cordially your return is greeted 
and rejoiced in by them, Nn}', more, I can assure you that this 
rejoicing, this greeting, this welcoming with open and grateful 
hearts is not confined merely to this city and community, but is and 
will be deeply felt and shared in by the people of the whole state. 
And it affords me inexpressible satisfaction to give you joy, great 
joy, for the proud and elevated position in which you to-day stand 
before the country. 

After more than two years of hard military service, you come 
back to us not vanquished, not weary of the service, not despairing 
of the cause, not unwilling to make still greater sacrifices for the 
salvation of your country. But you come back to us battle scarred 
and weather beaten veterans, to repose a few days vipon your arms, 
at your own firesides and among your own kith and kin. God 
bless both you and them. May your communion with them in the 
charmed circle of your homes be as sweet and comforting as your 
deeds of heroism have been brave and brdliant upon the field of 
battle. 

T need not tell you in what estimation the renewal of your ser- 
vices to the government, with that of other regiments, to ride out 



jo6 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

the storm and to fight out the battles of this war, is held by the 
whole country . They regard the magnanimity of the act as 
being above all praise. They feel that it is the highest testimonial 
of your patriotism and devotion to your country. They know that 
it should and does challenge the pride and admiration of every 
true friend of this government; for they are not insensible of the 
important fact that in this great struggle for the life of the fairest 
government organization which the sun has ever rose or set upon, 
that its destiny and fate hang in a large measure upon the arms 
and brave hearts of our veteran soldierv. 

That word veteran is the high distinctive name conferred upon 
those who, after a long and arduous service, have re-enlisted, a 
name around which clusters the association of so many dangers, 
hardships and sacrifices on the one hand, and of renown and glor}^ 
on the other. Yes, it is upon you and your brother veterans, \\ho 
have already been the heroes of so many victories, and gathered 
your inspirations of liberty and the unchallengeable rights of men 
from so many hard fought battle-fields, that the country now con- 
fide for its safety and protection from overthrow by its enemies. 

Ofiicers and Soldiers! Is it wonderful under these circumstances 
that your fellovvf countrymen, on your return, should desire to man- 
ifest in some way their appreciation of the high honor due to you, 
not only for past services but for your wilHngness to consecrate 
and to risk all that you are and all that you have for the great 
stake that is still to be fought for in this contest? 

I well remember, as do all our citizens, that in this month two 
years ago the 15th Iowa, with its due complement of men, fully 
panoplied and officered, left Keokuk for the seat of war on the 
Tennessee river. 

As your winter quarters had been in this cit}', and most of your 
field officers taken from our midst, it was natural from our ac- 
quaintance with 3'ou that we should feel an uncommon interest in 
your welfare and fame; and as you left you carried with you our 



iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. joy 

hearts, our sympathies and our prayers. Yet what a rough intro- 
duction to the hazards and accidents of grim war did you meet 
with in the opening scenes of your career. Scaixely two weeks 
had passed before you were suddenly and unexpectedly precipated 
into one of the hardest contested and bloody battles of this war. 
I refer to the battle of Shiloh; in which your Colonel, now Gen. H. 
T. Reid, was severely wounded; in which your Major, now Col. 
Belknap, was stricken down; in which a number of other officers 
and many men, whose names I do not now recollect, were killed 
and wounded. This but proves how well and faithfully you per- 
formed your part in that terrible conflict, and that you came out of 
the same with your names untarnished as warriors. Since then 
you have participated in the siege of Corinth; afterwards in the 
battle of Corinth; in the ever memorable siege of Vicksburg, and 
the battles therewith connected, and in skirmishes I know not how 
many. You had the distinguished honor of forming a part of 
General Sherman's command in the late wonderful advance far 
into the domain of rebellion. 

In that expedition you left behind you your tents, you took with 
you only eight days rations, you were absent thirty days; during 
which time you travelled near four hundred miles, and inflicted an 
amount of injury upon the material resources of the enemy that 
made them stand abashed, and which filled the whole country with 
astonishment and rejoicing. 

I am reliably informed that since you left us you have travelled 
in the service 3,519 miles; that 1,370 miles of this distance you 
have marched on foot. You have changed and pitched your camps 
one hundred and thirty-three times, and you have witnessed every 
phase of life which attaches to a military campaign. Out of your 
original force with which you left us, some two years since, only a 
little above 400 are found in your regiment to-day. Some have 
fallen in battle; some into the grave from disease, and some by 
the way-side from physical inability. 



j>c»(? History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

This tells a melancholy tale for the fate of many of your com- 
rades. But while we are remembering the living, let us not for- 
get to award all due hondr to the memory of the noble dead. They 
have given their lives in martyrdom to the cause of their country — 
that country upon which has been stamped the signet of the Al- 
mighty as the pledge of its future high destiny, and as a prevent- 
ing intelligence against the storms of faction and rebellion at home 
and the atrocious jealousies and wicked machinations of its enemies 
abroad; that country whose national career has been upon the 
loftiest path in which any nation has ever yet trod, within whose 
loyal limits is contained to-day the finest body of freemen the 
world ever knew, whose banner still floats high and triumphant, 
and under the amplitudes of whose folds, thanks to a kind Provi- 
dence, you have plighted a soldier's faith that you will once more 
range yourselves for the deliverance of your country from the 
stain of treason and the anarchy and ruin which traitor hands de- 
signed to bring upon it. 

This work accomplished, soldiers, and my life for it, that accla- 
mations louder and wilder than ever followed the greatest victories 
of Rome or Greece, or England or France, will reverberate over 
the length and breadth of this land, to the honor and praise of 
yourselves and your companions in arms. 

Officers and fellow soldiers, without detaining you longer, allow 
me in the name of the people of this state to make you thanks, 
warm thanks, for your past services and for your future high pur- 
poses, and may the benedictions of kind Providence be with you 
and about you till your great mission is performed. 

This was responded to on the part of the Regiment bv Colonel 
Belknap in a happy manner, in which he made a grateful acknowl- 
edgement to the citizens of Keokuk, and most especially the ladles, 
for their kindness and the welcome given them. He alluded to 
the long time that the Regiment was with us after they were 
formed, and of the friendship which sprang up between them 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. JOQ 

and our citizens. He also referred in feeling terms to those who 
went with them to the front and never returned, but who had laid 
down their lives in their country's defense; the memories of whom 
were engraven indelibly on the hearts of all. lie spoke of holding 
a dress parade on the evening of their arrival in the same spot that 
they did two years ago, the 17th inst., and of the many changes 
that had occurred in the Regiment since that time, when they were 
1,000 strong, and now numbered but a few over 400. 

At the conclusion three times three cheers were given for the 
people of Keokuk; Judge Lowe, the Colonel and the Regiment 
were also loudly cheered, when they all adjourned to the great 
dining hall in the Estes house to partake of the more than bounti- 
ful repast prepared for them by the ladies. 

Of the supper we need not speak. The tables were spread 
with all the skill, taste and liberality for which our ladies are 
so much noted, and that they achieved magnificent success 
in this particular, needed no confirmation . General Bridgman 
presided, and after the Regiment was seated and the blessing asked 
by Rev. J. J. Stewart, orders were given by the Colonel for the 
men to fall in, which order was readily obeyed. 

Supper being finished, Surgeon M. K. Taylor, in behalf of 
the ladies, presented Colonel Belknap with a beautiful boquet of 
flowers with a short speech, to which the Colonel replied in a few 
pithy remarks. 

He then stated that a large number of the men had inade 
arrangements to leave for their homes on the 4 o'clock train, and as 
that time had arrived they would be compelled to forego the 
pleasure of remaining and listening to the toasts and responses, 
which part of the progi'amme was then set aside and the festivities 
closed by the singing of " Rally around the Flag Boys," in which 
the whole Regirr^ent joined, and with I'epe^ted cheei'ing for the 



jio History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

ladies, the Colonel and, the Regiment, everyone departed delighted 
and the occasion will long be remembered and cherished among 
their most pleasant recollections. 



THE FIFTEENTH REGIMENT. 
[Extract.] The Daily Gate City, Friday, Mar. 25,1864. 

Many have been the remarks that we have heard from our 
citizens as to the orderly and gentlemanly conduct of the 15th 
Regiment while they were stationed with us, and we must say 
that no regiment that has returned to our city has conducted 
themselves in as quiet and becoming a manner. The chief officers 
of the Steamer Die Vernon pay the following and very deserving 
compliment to the Regiment which they brought up from St. 
Louis on their last trip. Colonel Belknap, his officers and men, 
may well be proud of it: 
To the 15th Iowa Regiment: 

As officers of the Steamer Die Vernon, we hereby extend to 
Colonel Belknap, and all the officers and men of his Regiment, 
our hearty thanks for the orderly and gentlemanly manner in 
which they as a regiment and as individuals conducted themselves 
while on the boat, on their recent trip from St. Louis to Keokuk. 

S. S. Matson, Captain. 
W. H. Osborn, Clerk. 



INVITED TO COME IN OUT OF THE DRAFT. 
15th Iowa Infantry Veteran Volunteers. • 
Recruits wanted for the above Veteran Regiment, attached to 
Major General McPherson's Seventeenth Army Corps. 

Remember the large bounties cease on April 1st. Now is the 
time to enlist and avoid the draft! 

The following officers will give all necessary information and 
enlist recruits: 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. ' jii 

James M. Reid, Captain "I" Company; John C. Brash, 1st 
Lieutenant "B" Company; Henry Scheevers, 2d Lieutenant "I" 
Company; L. R. Bissell, Recruiting Officer, Third street, bet- 
ween Main and Johnson. 

WM. W. BELKNAP, Colonel 15th Iowa. 

About April 23d, the men began to report at the rendezvous at 
Keokuk . 



DRESS PARADE. 
The Gate City of Wednesday, April 27, 1864, says: 

The lotli Regiment held their last Dress Parade on Main street, 
last evening, and a large number of people thronged the sidewalks 
to witness this, their "last farewell" parade in Keokuk for three 
years. They made a splendid appearance, and elicited universal 
admiration from the spectators for their fine and soldierly bearing 
and the proficiency which they exhibited in the "manual of arms." 

The Regiment has been paid off and will leave on this mor- 
ning's packet for Dixie. 
From the Keokuk Daily Gate City, Thursday, April 28, '04: 



DEPARTURE OF THE FIFTEENTH. 
This regiment, Colonel W. W. Belknap commanding, departed 
yesterday morning on the steamer Die Vernon for the front, taking 
with them the best wishes of our citizens and the loyal people of 
Iowa at large. May the God of Armies be with them on the 
tented field, and may He turn their enemies back in tlie day of bat- 
tie; and after our glorious Uni,on is once more restored, and the 
stars and stripes wave over every foot of soil in the country, may 
they return again to their homes to enjoy the benefits they are now 
enduring so many hardships to procure; and when the war is no 
more, and peace reigns supreme throughout the land, when all will 
sing with hearts overflowing with gratitude: 

" The Union of hearts, the Union of hands. 

The Union of States none can sever; 
The Union of lakes, the Union of lands, 
And the Flag of our LTnion forever!" 



312 ■ History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

And a shout go out that will vibrate its echoes o'er the hills and 
along quiet dells; a shout that will gladden the heart and moisten 
the eye with tears at the sound of " Peace on earth and good will 
toward men." May we soon realize such rejoicing; realize the 
fact that the nation is stronger and more firmly bound together in 
unity and prosperity than ever before, and hand down to our chil- 
dren a history and a heritage that is not only grand in prospect, but 
sublime and magnificent in structure. 

At Vicksburg the non -veterans of the regiment and those of the 
whole brigade, having been consolidated by order of General Mc- 
Pherson, formed the Iowa battalion of the 17th Corps. Officers 
being detailed from each regiment of the 3d brigade, March 12th, 
Major George Pomutz was assigned to command the battalion, and 
Lieutenant John F. Evans, A Company, detailed as Adjutant of 
same, which formed an effective force by daily drill during that 
month, and were ordered, April 6th, to take charge of the new 
Springfield lifles, (11,000), of the 17th Army Corps, to be shipped 
on steamer Sunshine to Cairo, that post having been assigned as a 
rendezvous for the troops composing the 17th Corps. Arriving 
at that place the Iowa battalion was assigned to garrison Mound 
City, the invasions of the rebel General Forrest into Northern 
Kentuck}' having rendered the government navy yard at that place 
insecure. 

April 25th the battalion was increased by heavy detachments 
from the 15th and 41st Illinois and 3d Iowa, and formed part of 
the expedition under General W. Q. Gresham, on the Tennessee 
x'w&x to Clifton. From there it started. May 5th, with a division to 
Athens and Huntsville, Ala., being the advance guard of the 17th 
Corps then arriving at Cairo, from veteran furlough. 

This expedition, frequently annoyed by rebel cavalry, detach- 
ments of Forrest's command, and by having in charge 900 head of 
cattle destined for General Sherman's arni}^ at Dalton, arrived at 
Huntsville on May 20th . 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. ji^ 

The larger portion of the corps arriving within four days after- 
wards the battalion was disbanded, each of the regiments receiving 
their own non-veterans, and Major Pomutz being ordered to report 
as corps provost marshal on the staff of General Frank P. Blair, 
commanding 17th Army Corps, vice General James B. McPher- 
son, promoted to the command of the Department and Army of the 
Tennessee, vice General William T. Sherman, promoted to the 
command of the Military Division of the Mississippi, vice General 
U. S. Grant, commissioned Lieutenant-General and Commander- 
in-Chief of the Armies of the United States. 

The 15th Iowa having arrived at Cairo from veteran furlough, 
it was temporarily brigaded with the 11th Iowa and 58d Indiana, 
constituting pro tern the 2d brigade of General Force's Division, 
17th Army Corps, and went into camp at Birds Point, Mo. On 
May 2d the regiment, with its temporary brigade and division, was 
ordered to Paducah, Ky., and remained there until May 4th, when 
it embarked on a steamer and was transported to Clifton, Tenn., 
where it arrived on the 6th. May 14th, the 15th Iowa was with 
its old regiments, viz: 11th, 13th antl 16th Iowa, designated the 1st 
Brigade, 4th Division, 17th Corps. May 16th the division and de- 
tachment, under Brigadier-General M. D. Leggett, marched via 
Pulaski to Huntsville, Ala., where it arrived on the 28d. 

By Special Order No, 5, dated Headquarters 17th Army Corps, 
Huntsville, Alabama, May 23, 1864, the number of the brigade was 
changed from 1st to 3d, (commanded by Colonel Wm. Hall, of 
the 11th Iowa), of the 4th Division, commanded by Brig. Gen, M. 
M. Crocker. 



24 



JI4 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



i='^:e^t x. 



THE BATTLE CAMPAIGN OF 1864. 
HuNTSviLLE. On the March. Decatuk. Rome. Join 
General Sherman's Army. Battles at Big Shanty. 
Noonday Creek. Brushy Mountain. The Pickets meet 
and Trade. Battles at Kenesaw. Nick-a-jack Creek, 
Before Atlanta July 20th, 21st, 22d, 28tii. Jonesboro. 
LovEjOY. " Atlanta is ours, and Fairly Won." Re- 
ports. Orders. Recollections. Incidents, Etc. 



The re-organization of the several brigades and divisions of the 
17th Army Corps, having been rapidly completed upon their arri- 
val at Huntsville, Alabama, the whole corps under its new com- 
mander, Major-General Frank P. Blair, Jr., started on May 25th to 
join Sherman's Army of the Military Division of the Mississippi, 
then already engaging the enemy under General J. E. Johnston 
along the railroad line south of Dalton, Georgia. 

While at Decatur, May 27th, General M. M. Crocker, command- 
ing 4th Division, 17th Corps, being forced, by extreme ill health, 
to relinquish the same, General W. Q, Gresham took command of 
the division. 

The regiment, with its brigade, division and corps, marched 
through the mountainous, poor districts of Northern Alabama and 
Georgia, (number of days marched in May, 14, distance marched 
209 miles) to Rome, June 5th, and by way of Kingston and Alla- 
toona arrived at Acvvorth June 8th, where it joined General James 
B. McPherson's Army of the Tennessee, the 17th corps being as- 
signed position on the left of the 15th corps, and thus became the 
extreme left of General Sherman's army, consisting of the Army 
of the Ohio, 23d Corps, Majov-General J. M. Schofield command- 
ing on the right; the Army of the Cumberland, 4th, 14th and 20th 




< f* F ' S"'- 



W. O.Greshaivi. 

BRIG.GEtfL.U.S.YOlS. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. J15 

Corps, Major-General Geo. H. Thomas commanding in the centre; 
and the Army of the Tennessee, 15th, 16th and 17th Corps, Major- 
General James B. McPherson commanding on the left, hesides a 
cavalry corps under Brigadier-General J. Kilpatrick. 

June 10th the regiment and brigade took part in the advance 
towards Big Shanty, pushing the enemy on that and subsequent 
days towards Kenesaw Mountain. On the 15th of June the Army 
of the Tennessee made a general advance upon the enemy, then 
holding a well fortified position upon the first chain of rising 
ground and connected timbered hills, six miles northwest of Ken- 
esaw. 

A heavy and desperate fight was kept up by the enemy along 
and close to Noonday Creek, the winding waters of which, and the 
muddy, wide basin along its banks making it extremely difficult for 
the troops of the 4th Division to throw their lines across in sufficient 
force to dislodge the enemy until 4 o'clock, when Leggett's 3d Di- 
vision on the left, being re-enforced by Harrison's Division of the 
15th Corps, succeeded in flanking and charging the enemy's extreme 
right, by which the 4th Division was enabled to push its lines across 
the creek. The enemy was forced back to the second chain of 
higher ground and steep hills on the so-called Brushy Mountain, 
which, besides offering the best natural line of defense, was im- 
mensely strengthened by an unbroken chain of solid fortifications 
and rifle-pits, affording the necessary salients for a sweeping cross- 
fire by musketry and artillery, and made more complete by a well- 
finished, first-class abatis facing our lines. 

Skirmishing of the heaviest kind, often intermingled with a spir- 
ited artillery fire, was kept up between the contending lines for 
several days and nights, w^e being at the disadvantage of a lower 
ground, with dense underbrush and young timber, and being in 
constant close view of the enemy from their magnificent position . 

On June 19th another general advance was made by the Army 
of the Tennessee amidst a torrent of rain, when, after six hours 



J7<5 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

struggle well kept up by the enemy, the 3d Division on the left 
flanked the enemy's line, and with a vigorous advance the -4th Di- 
vision gained the works of the enemy, who fell back to their well- 
connected line of defense from north of Marietta along the foot of 
Kenesaw Alountain. 

The position thus gained, however, the men camping in rear of 
the works, exposed them to a constant and destructive fire from the 
enemy's sharp-shooters posted on the higher hills beyond an inter- 
vening low, timbered, marshy ground. This was especially the 
case on the line occupied b}^ .the 15th Iowa and other regiments of 
the 3d brigade. Constant skirmishing and artillery fire, throwing 
shot and shell, were kept up in this position for several days and 
nights. 



COMING IN HE KNOCKS ON THE INSIDE. 
While encamped on the slope of Brushy Mountain a splendid 
view of the top of Kenesaw was had from the front end of Colonel 
Belknap's fly, (tent, he had none). One sunny morning Darby 
spread a storm flag, which had been out in the rain the night be- 
fore, over the Colonel's shebang to dry. During the forenoon 
Colonel Belknap laid down on his bed of chestnut leaves, which 
were kept in place by a good-sized sappling on each side, and com- 
menced reading a newspaper. It was not long before a Reb artil- 
leryman on the top of Kenesaw Mountain saw the flag, which un- 
intentionally signaled him that it was headquarters around there, 
and he began shelling that vicinity, but his shells mostly exploded 
before reaching our works. One 20-pounder did not; it struck up 
the hill and rolled down into the fly, knocked on the Colonel's right 
leg and reported his arrival. The Colonel glanced over, saw what 
it was, and started instantly towards Kenesaw to whale the battery- 
man who had been shelling him, but he thought some of his friends 
would like to see the "very latest" from Joe Johnston, so return- 
ing he asked Assistant Surgeon Fisk to come and see what he had 



ioiva Veteran Volu7iteer Infantry. jiy 

under the fly. The Doctor looked in at the rear end of same, and 
found the business end of the shell staring him in the face. He 
was sui'prised, blushed and fell back behind a tree to recover, and 
at once issued orders to the hospital attaches to remove his camp 
equipage nearer the suburbs of Big Shanty, which was done with 
great alacrity.* 

Gen Sherman in his report says: " Kenesaw, the bold and strik- 
ing Twin mountain, lay before us with a high range of chestnut 
hills trendinof off to the northeast terminating- to our view in 
another peak called Brushy mountain. To our right was the 
smaller hill called Pine mountain and beyond it in the distance Lost 
moimtain. All these, though links in a continuous chain present a 
sharp conical appearance prominent in the vast landscape that pre- 
sents itself from any of the hills that abound in that region. Kene- 
saw, Pine mountain and Lost mountain form a triangle. Pine 
mountain the apex, and Kenesaw and Lost mountain the base, 
covering perfectly the town of Marietta, and the railroad back to 
the Chattahoochie. On each of these peaks the enemy had his 
signal stations. The summits were covered with batteries, and the 
spurs were alive with men busy in felling trees, digging pits, and 
preparing for the grand struggle impending. The scene was en- 
chanting, too beautiful to be disturbed by the harsh clamors of 
war; but the Chattahoochie lay beyond, and I had to reach it. On 
approaching close to the enemy I found him occupying a line full 
two miles long, more than he could hold with his force. General 
McPherson was ordered to move toward Marietta, his right on the 
railroad. * * * * On the morning of the 15th Pine 
mountain was found abandoned by the enemy. General McPher- 
son advanced his line, gaining substantial advantage on the left, 

*Soon another shell exploded over our works, and a large piece coming over the Colouera 
fly, hit the upper fork of a young hickory, splitting it to the roots. It then "went for" and 
knocked over the cross pole, upset the kettle of beans Metz, Bosworth & Co. were boiling for 
dinner, and iheu dug a hole in the ground as large as a mess pan between Tyler's thighs, (.who 
was sitting on the ground), and continued on towards the supply train, But the flag remained, 
sunning itself. 



ji8 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

* * * we continued to press at all points, skirmishing in dense 
forests of timber and across most difficult ravines, until we again 
found him strongly posted and intrenched, with Kenesaw as his 
salient, his right wing thrown back to cover Marietta, and his left 
behind Nose's creek covering his railroad back to the Chattahoo- 
chie. This enabled him to contract his lines and strengthen them 
accordingly. From Kenesaw he could look down upon our camps 
and observe every movement, and his batteries thundered away, 
but did little harm on account of the extreme height, the shot and 
shell passing harmlesslv over our heads as we lay close up against 
his mountain town. During our operations about Kenesaw the 
weather was villainously bad, and the rain fell almost continuously 
for three weeks, rendering our narrow wooded roads mere mud 
gulleys, so that a general movement would have been impossible; 
but our men daily worked closer and closer to the entrenched foe, 
and kept up an incessant picket firing galling to him. Every op- 
portunity was taken to advance our general lines closer and closer 
to the enemy. 



ON PICKET AT KENESAW MOUNTAIN. 
On the 21st of June, 1864, our pickets were close up to the rebel 
works; so close that conversation could easily be carried on. Some 
of our boys agreed with the rebel pickets to cease firing, meet them 
between the lines and exchange coffee for tobacco . Lieutenant 
McArthur, of H Company was in command of our picket line, 
and hearing the agreement being made started to the Post making 
the arrangements. On his arrival at that point he found the 
" Yanks and Rebs " between the lines shaking hands with each 
other. Ascertaining that two rebel officers were back of their 
works, Mac suggested they be called out, and he and Sergt. W. 
W. Rose, H Companv, would meet them; which was done; before 
going however, Mac ordered the remainder of his men to fix 
bayonets and if any treachery was shown by the Rebels to charge 



Iowa Veteran V olunteer Ififant/y. jig 

double quick. At this interview, which lasted about an hour, one 
of the very few if not the only case of the kind during the war, 
that day's Atlanta paper was secured, announcing the death of the 
Rebel General, Leonidas Polk, the first authentic news of his de- 
mise. Immediatelv after this meeting closed, and hostilities were 
resumed, Mac sent the paper to General McPherson, commanding 
the Army of the Tennessee. 

On June 27th another general demonstration being ordered, and 
while the 3d division, on the extreme left, with Garrard's Cavalry 
on its flank, wheeled to the right, steadily changing front from facing- 
east to facing south, south-east, towards Marietta — the line of the 
4th division was pushed close to the works of the enemy at the foot 
of Kenesaw proper. After an uninterrupted, terrible fire, from 8 
o'clock in the morning, during which the advanced line of the 
division, especially the 8d brigade, was partly in the rebel fortifica- 
tions, and several companies of the 15th Iowa were holding their 
position in same for half an hour, the whole line was forced back 
in the afternoon . Though this advance of the left of the army 
did not succeed in holding the works of the enemy, exposed as the 
same were in their rear to a concentrated artillery fire, kept up 
with great rapidity during the whole time, it was a successful 
demonstration however,* enabling Hookers and Schofield's forces 
on the extreme right of the army to force the enemy's weakened 
lines across the Noose creek, some six miles to our right, bj' which 
Kenesaw and Marietta became encircled from north to west, and 
to south, our troops thus gaining the Sand town road towards the 

*Duringone of the many heavy demons^tiat ions on Kenesaw mountain, the enemy were 
shellingourliue with a rapidity only attained by artilleristsof long service, the Iowa brigade 
were supporting some batteries, and of coarse took advantage of all protection in the timber 
that they could. Gen. Blair and staft' halted near by and inquired for Col Aildison H. San- 
ders, of the Ififh Iowa, Adjt. Herbert of that regiment pointing to something on the ground, 
head towards a tree, said, "Here is Add trying to get iato his hat." The Colonel weighed 
about ninety pounds, and always wore a hat three or four sizes too large for him. Every 
soldier who knows Col. Sanders can testify that no braver oiHcer ever led men to battle, and 
it is believed to this day that the Colonel was only endeavoring to save his hat. 

One of Gen. B's. Staff. 



J20 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

Chattahoochie river and approaching the raih-oad hne from Ma- 
rietta to Atlanta . 

Lieut. Col. J. M. Hedrick, of the 15th left the Regiment at 
Huntsville, Ala., (May 24th) as Delegate at Large from Iowa to 
the Baltimore convention for the nomination of President; re- 
turned on June 28th. 

The soldiers of the command upon learning the particulars of 
the unanimous re-nomination of Abraham Lincoln, expressed their 
patriotic consent and satisfaction by an increased energy and endu- 
rance during the ensuing days of hard contests. 

July 1st and 2d lively demonstrations were made against the 
enemy's lines opposite the troops of the 8d and 4th divisions of 
the 17th Corps. The rattle of musketry and roar of artillery did 
not cease until near midnight on the 1st, and until 8 o'clock in the 
evening of the second day, when the artillery pieces (with wheels 
mufiled in blankets to prevent noise) were brought down from 
the hills, while at the same time the skirmish line continued a 
furious fire. At half past 8 o'clock, p. m., all troops of the 17th 
Corps left their positions under cover of darkness, and marched 
during the night in rear of the lines held by other corps formerly 
forming the centre of the army, in front of Kenesaw, and by 2 
o'clock A. M. of July 3d they had gained the Sandtown road, 
leading due south towards the Chattahoochie river; thus the 17th 
Army Corps became the extreme right of the army. 

This flanking movement was entirely successful. The 8d brig- 
ade of Gresham's 4th division, in lead of the corps, arrived at 3 
o'clock p. M. on July 3d, to within two and a half miles of Widow 
Mitchell's farm, finding the enemy on the south side of a creek, 
their skirmishers close to the creek, and their troops in line on the 
opposite rising ground sloping towards the creek. While the two 
divisions of the 17th corps were allowed a rest of two hours. Gen- 
eral Giles A. Smith's brigade, of General Morgan L. Smith's divi- 
sion, 15th corps, being on grand guard near the stream, tried to dis- 



iowa Veteran Volunteer tiifantry. J2i 

lodge the enemy from its position . Failing in this, howevei", at 5 
o'clock p. M. the Iowa brigade of the 4th division was ordered to 
the front; the 11th and 13th in advance, supported by the 15th and 
16th Iowa, soon crossed the creek, and after a lively fire from both 
sides, forced the enemy from his position, slowly but steadily driv- 
ing him for a mile, when night intervening, the movement was 
stopped by order of General Blair. 

From General Sherman's report: " On the 1st of July I ordered 
General McPherson to lie relieved by General Garrard's cavalry in 
front of Kenesaw, and to rapidly throw his whole army by the 
right down to and threaten Nickajack creek and Turner's ferry 
across the Chattahoochie . * * * General McPherson 
commenced his movement the night of July 2, and the effect was 
instantaneous. The next morning Kenesaw was abandoned, and 
with the first dawn of day I saw our skirmishers appear on the 
mountain top." 

In his memorial, (Vol. 11, page 62), Sherman says: " It was 
really a continuous battle lasting from the 10th day of June till the 
3d of July, when the rebel army fell back from Marrietta towards 
the Chattahoochie river." 

July -Ith the advance continued. Colonel Belknap in charge of 
the 15th and 16th Iowa, and the 1st Minnesota battery under Lieu- 
tenant Harter, pushed the enemy well towards Widow Mitchell's 
farm, then taking the direction east along the road leading towards 
the Nickajack creek, and leaving the Sandtown road in charge of 
Stoneman's cavalry, the line of the enemy was steadily forced from 
one position to another; the entire 15th, and two companies of the 
16th Iowa being under the immediate command of Lieutenant Col- 
onel Iledrick, deployed as skirmishers, gallantly driving the enemy 
from their advance line of outer works, and being supported by the 
remaining companies of the 16th Iowa, and the battery. At noon 
the 11th and 13th Iowa, being brought up, formed the advance of 
the brigade, supported by the 15th and 16th Iowa. During the 



J22 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

afternoon Major Foster, of the 11th Iowa, having charge of the 
skirmish Hne, the ground was gained up to the heavier outer works 
of the enemy. 

July 5th, * the Iowa brigade continued the advance. In the 
morning the hne of breast-works defending the approach to the 
creek was taken and at 3 o'clock p. M. the Nickajack was reached. 
The situation at the creek soon became extremely interesting. 
While the skirmishes and the lines of battle of infantry were stead- 
ily descending into the extended valley of the creek, and the fire of 
the skirmish line was often mingled with the sound of volleys by 
companies of the slowly retreating enemy, the massive rebel forts 
anil fortifications became visible on the high and bare ground be- 
yond the creek, near Turner's ferry on the Chattahoochie. These 
forts received the fire of our artillery posted on the higli ridge in 
rear of the division lines with entire silence until noon, when they 
commenced to answer with such rapidity and well-directed shots as 
to elicit the admiration of all who stood near by. 

During this fire in front of the 4th division, Leggett's 3d division 
arrived from the Sandtown road, and went into position on the 
right of the 4th division, close to the confluence of the Nickajack 
with the Chattahoochie river. In the evening' the order was given 



*Soon after sunrise, and then very warm, in response to word that one of the 15th had been 
severely wounded, at the first post on the right of the road, Metz, Cunningham, Bosworth 
and Tyler took a stretcher and hastened to the front. From a cot in the road at the edge of 
the timber tliey saw the rebel picket posts, and some 150 yards ahead were our skirmishers 
with rails and dirt thrown up in front. On the left of the road behind a tree in an old split 
bottom chair sat Lieutenant Muir, of E Company, commanding our line, and feeling that he 
was Monarch of all he surveyed (he was — viewing the rear), he raised his hand and signaled 
the advance of the 15th to go back, bnt they had orders from higher authority to bring the 
man in, and at the command, Forward, Trot, they lit out, incited by the yells and balls from 
several rebel posts, but the bloodthirsty Texans were not good shots on the wing, and hit no 
one. In less than Maud S, time the four fell panting among the Vets, behind a rail pile. 
When time restored their breath they laid the wounded man on the stretcher, and at the 
command Prepare to Git, they got— up, and immediately the Johnnies greeted them with 
yells, and 50 of them, (more or less), from posts on both sides of the road, opened fire and 
slung lead all around them, scatteriug dirt and gravel and accelerating the speed of the quar- 
tette, who ran like the devil youbet, until they reached the protection of the cnt, when they 
dropped again, plum exhausted. On reaching the bivouac, Surgeon Gibbon in strong terms 
censured the parly who reported the man severely wounded, and had caused four others to 
risk their lives needlessly, when the wounded man could as well as not have walked back to 
camp alone. 



lozva Veteran Volunteer Infantry. J2J 

to the troops of the 4th division for an advance, preparatory to a 
charge upon the heavy hne of fortifications, which order, however, 
was soon countermanded, it having been ascertained that the Nick- 
ajack could not be crossed in force, without several bridges being 
previously built, on account of its depth, and sinking, muddy 
ground; at the same time it was known that the left of the -Ith di- 
vision was entirely unprotected, there being a gap of over half a 
mile to the next division on the right of the 15th corps. 

July 6th, while all the batteries of the 4th and M divisions of the 
.17th corps, re-enforced by Captain De Gress's battery of twenty- 
pound parrots of the 15th corps, were keeping up a terrific artillery 
fire, concentrating it upon the enem^^'s fortifications, as well as 
upon their double skirmishes on the opposite side of the Nickajack; 
the skirmishers of the 4th division were gaining the opposite bank, 
and firmly established themselves in solid breast-works, thrown up 
during the night. Each brigade was busy, on that and subsequent 
days, constructing bridges across the creek and fortifying their lines 
temporarily. On the 7th of July General Stoneman was ordered 
to move his cavalry across the Chattahoochie, some ten miles below 
the extreme right of the 17th corps, and to make strong demon- 
strations against and upon the railroad line from Atlanta to West 
Point. 

Early in the morning of Jvdy 10th, the enemy haying evacuated 
their massive works in front of the two diyisions of the 17th corps, 
the works were at once occupied by our brigade, and the skirmish 
line advanced to the Chattahoochie, keeping up a liyely musketry 
fire at the skirmishers of the enemy posted on the opposite bank of 
the river. Upon inspection, the works of the enemy were found 
to be of tremendous strength, thirty-six by forty feet base, twenty- 
five feet high, and oyer twenty feet in thickness, and could have 
resisted a daily cannonading by the heaviest pieces for several weeks, 
while at the same time they admitted of a concentration of fires, 
from the several forts, and connected massive breast-works upon the 



324 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

only practicable ground an assaulting column must have marched 
over, of sufficient quantity to destroy and ruin half of the division 
in fve inifiutes, had it undertaken a charge. 

Daily constant musketry tire, mingled with shot and shell from 
the artillery, was kept up while near Turner's Ferry, until the 16th 
of July, when the whole corps being relieved by Stoneman's 
cavalry returning from its last raid, the two divisions of the 17th 
Corps left their positions along the Chattahoochie, and marched 
around by way of Marietta, Roswell, crossing the river twenty- 
five miles above Turner's Ferry, passing through Cross Keys, and 
arriving at Decatur six miles east of Atlanta, at noon of July 20th. 
Thus the 17th Corps became the extreme left of the entire army. 
Next on its right were the 15th and 16th Corps; then the 23d, 
4th, 14th, and 20th Corps, already encircling the Gate City of the 
south, from the Augusta railroad in the east to the North railroad, 
and across the same towards Ezra Church, west of Atlanta. 

The several brigades of the corps having passed through Deca- 
tur, the head of the column turned west, marching on side roads 
nearly three miles in a thick, brushy timber, about two miles south 
of the Augusta railroad, when it arrived on a bare, high ridge, 
running nearly north and south, and opening an extended view to 
the west, across a low and deep valley, which appearetl to be a 
deserted field. Here, without any forewarning by any of their 
skirmishers, the enemy's artillery opened a rapid fire from the ele- 
vated, high ridge beyond the valley, upon the head of the column. 
Soon the Infantry of the 17th Corps formed line of battle, the 8d 
on the extreme left and after throwing out a line of skirmishers, 
moved on steadily across the several ravines and ditches in the 
basin of the field, without eliciting any sign or display from the 
rebel infantry until it fairly reached the first elevation of ground 
on the opposite slope. Here a heavy musketry fire was opened 
upon the advancing lines of the brigades of the 4th division. The 
left of the line (Iowa Brigade) being entirely without support on 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. J2^ 

its left, General Force's brigade, of the 3d division, just arrived, 

was ordered to its left and rear; while the line stopped here for 

the purpose of putting Captain Spear's battery into position. Gen. 

W. Q. Gresham, commanding the 4th division, was severely 

wounded and carried to the rear, when Colonel Hall, commanding 

3d brigade, assumed command of the division, and Colonel John 

Shane, of the 13th Iowa, that of the brigade. Meanwhile, night 

coming on, operations were stopped for the day. • > 

July 21st, early in the morning, a heavy skirmishing was opened 

by both sides, and soon after daylight orders were received by Col. 

Shane, commanding brigade, to advance upon the enemy's works 

on the crest of the opposite ridge . The advance was promptly 

made. 

THE CHARGE OF JULY 21, 1864. 

Headquarters 15th Regiment Iowa Infantry Vet. Vols, ) 
In the Field on the left Flank^ lyth A. C, fuly 22^ ""64. \ 

Lieut. O. D. Kinsman, A. A. A. General 3d Brigade, 4th Di- 
vision, 17th Army Corps: 

Sir : — I herewith transmit a report of the movements of the 
15th Iowa in the charge of the 21st inst.: 

The 3d brigade, advancing on the afternoon of the 20th, took 
position in front of the enemy's works in two lines, the 13th and 15th 
Iowa in front — the former on the right with the 11th in the rear of 
the 15th, and the 16th in the rear of the 13th Iowa. At 8 o'clock 
on the morning of the 21st, skirmishing having been constant after 
daylight, the order was received from Colonel Shane, commanding 
brigade, to advance on the enemy's works in front, the 15th Iowa 
being ordered to keep its right on the left of the 13th Iowa, with 
its left extending in the direction of Force's brigade of the 3d 
division. The whole front line advanced rapidly, with cheers to 
the crest of the hill in full view of the rebel works, and fought 
with valor and determination, and the brigade would doubtless 
have been successful in carrying the works had not the right of 
the line, beyond the 3d brigade, broken and been driven back by 



jz6 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

the heavier line and artillery of the enemy . In the front of the 
15th Iowa, a battery of several guns, previously masked, opened 
upon us with grape and cannister, and when the line was ordered 
to retire it did so in good order, notwithstanding the withering fire 
from the battery. The attack was successful in enabling Force's 
brigade to hold the hill on our left and compelling the evacuation 
of the line by the enemy on the next morning. The officers and 
men of this Regiment did their duty as they always do, and have 
my thanks, and merit commendation for their laborious efforts, not- 
withstanding the fatigues of the long march just concluded from 
the right. 

Our casualties were three enlisted men killed and three officers 
(Lieutenants McArthur, Gebhart and Scheevers) and forty-five 
enlisted men wounded. A list of the same is inclosed herewith. 
I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. W. BELKNAP, 

Col. 15th Iowa Vet. Vol. Infantry. 



LIST OF THE KILLED, WOUNDED AND MISSING 
IN THE ABOVE CHARGE. 

Killed: D Company, 1st Sergeant Richard M. Wilson; E 
Company, Corpoial Chi^istopher Orm. Privates: Albert A. Bean, 
Augustus Smith. 

Wounded: Non Commissioner Staff, Sergeant Major James W. 
Henry, face; Drum Major, Henry Metz, left groin (rupture); A 
Company: Sergeant James Bird, shoulder. Privates: William H. 
Davis, head; Daniel McKinster, left foot; Andrew Mefford, head, 
severel}^ B Company: Privates, Alfred Broadstone, arm severe- 
ly: Isaac D. Hubbard, mortally (since dead); Thomas Rayger, 
arm; Levi Wells, mortally. C Company: Privates, A. C. Hen- 
derson, right arm severely ; S. E. Hawkins, left hand severely; 
Eden Hunt, right thigh severely . D. Company: 2d Lieutenant 
Emanuel M. Gebhart, leg. Privates, Peter Hoover, concussion 
from shell; Andrew McConnell, hand. E Company: Sergeant 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 



327 



James N. Roberts, mortally; Corporals, Abijah H.Johnson, head 
and side severely; Solomon Holcomb, head. Privates, John W . 
Bovven, left breast and shoulder severely; J. W. Cheney, leg sev- 
erely; How^ard Elmore, head; J.J. Henderson, left leg severely; 
C. W.Jamison, head severely; J. F. Orm, leg; R. Orm, left hand; 
O. E. Stuart, left hand severely; B. T. Thomas, thigh severely; 
J. S. Vantreese, ankle; Thomas Wright, mortally (since dead). 
F Company: Privates, Wm. Fitzgerald, left leg severely; J. W. 
Cartel, rupture right side; John Rowe, left arm severely.* H 
Company: 1st Lieutenant H. C. Mc Arthur, left hip severely; 
Color Corporal J. H. Forgeus, right groin. Privates, John Cox, 
left shoulder severely; J. H. Esley, left arm severely; J. D. Ful- 
lenwider, mortally; P. Murphy, head and shoulder; S. A. Van- 
arsdall. I Company: 2d Lieutenant H. Scheevers, foot severely; 
Corporal J. Davenport, mortally; Privates, H. Southan, mortally; 
J. White, side; C. Wolorvous, back. K Company: Sergeant 
Wm. B. McDowell, breast severely; Corporal J. H. Wood, back 
severely. Private Wm. H. Walker, side severely. 

Note — Two men in A Company and one in D Company were 
reported after the above was made. 

RECAPITULATION. 





5 


_' lb 


T3 
■T3 






u 
suo 
tie 

< 


Non-Commissioned Staff , . 






9, 


'?, 


9. 


"A" Company 




2 


...6 
9, 


...6 
4 


6 


" B " Company 




4 


" C Company 

" D " Company 

" E " Company 


'.'.'.'\ 
H 


! 2 

1 


. .3 
...4 
..12 
...3 
..6 
3 


...3 
..A 
..14 
...3 

...7 
5 


...3 

...5 

17 


" F " Com pany 

" H " Company 




...3 

7 


u T n r^ ■' 




2 





" K" Company 






...3 

. .44 


...3 
..51 


...3 


Tofl 


. .4. ..7 


. .55 











*Gr Co was detailed on the 20th as a guard for the 4th Division Supply train and was not in 
this engagement. 



J28 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



Headquarters 3d Brigade, 4th Div., 17th Army Corps, 
A ear Atlanta. Ga.^ July 2ist^ i 



Captain C. Cadle, Jr., A. A. Gen., 4th Div., 17th A. C. 

Sir: — I have the honor to submit my report of the part taken by 
this brigade in the action with the enemy on this day: 

The 4th division, commanded by Brigadier-General Gresham, 
took position on the evening of the 20th inst,, in front of a sti'ong 
hne of the enemy's works, and at a distance of about six hundred 
yards therefrom: the 1st brigade on the right, the 3d brigade on 
the left, and Brigadier- General Force's brigade of the 3d division 
on the left and in refuse of the 3d brigade. In a short time after 
this position was^ taken General Gresham was severely wounded, 
and Colonel Hall, of the 11th Iowa, commanding brigade, assumed 
command of the division, and turned over the command of the 3d 
brigade to the undersigned. Immediately in front of General 
Force's brigade, and to the front and left of this brigade, was an 
eminence occupied by the enemy with infantry and artillery, with 
which they enfiladed our whole brigade front, rendering the pos- 
session of the enemy's position at that point of the last impurtance 
to us. General Force was ordered to advance and take the hill, 
and I was ordered to advance my lines in connection with his, and 
in the event that he met with serious resistance, I was ordered to 
make a strong demonstration against the whole line of the enemy 
in my front. In the meantime Brigadier-General Giles A. Smith 
arrived on the ground, assumed command of the 4th division, and 
directed the subsequent movements. 

At 8 o'clock A. M. of the 21st, General Force moved on the ene- 
my, and my lines were accordingly promptly advanced. The 13th 
Iowa Infantry, commanded by Major Walker, and the loth Iowa 
Infantry, commanded bv Colonel Belknap, in front; and the 11th 
Iowa Infantry, Lieutenant Colonel Abercrombie, and the 16th Iowa 
Infantry, Lieutenant Colonel Sanders, in the rear. It soon became 
apparent that General Force was meeting with a stubborn resist- 




John Shane. 

COLISl" IOWA VOLS. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. j2g 

ance, making the result in that quarter doubtful, when I received 
orders from General Smith to advance on the enemy's works, 
which movement was at once commenced ; but arriving on the crest 
of the hill, and within one hundred yards of the enemy's works, 
and observing that General Force's command held the eminence 
contested for, and that the enemy had fallen back to a strong line 
of works, powerfully manned with an abundance of artillery, cov- 
ering the whole space upon which we were deployed, and over 
which our further advance lay, and being without support, the com- 
mand was ordered to retire to its original position, which was done 
in good order, the object of the advance having been entirely ac- 
complished. The loss to the brigade during the action, which did 
not last more than thirty minutes, was very severe, principally fall- 
ing on the 13th, 15th and 16th Iowa Infantry; the 11th, not being 
from the nature of the ground in its front so much exposed to the 
enemy's fire, suffered but little. 

I cannot speak in too high terms of praise of the conduct of both 
officers and men of the brigade during the brief but bloody conflict. 
The advance line was particularly exposed to a terrible fire of grape, 
canister and musketry from the moment the movement commenced. 
The 18th Iowa, in that brief space of time, lost one-fourth of its 
men; the 15th and 16th in nearly the same proportion; but, although 
thus suffering, and their comrades being momentarily cut down, 
every man acted the hero and veteran, that he was, until the emi- 
nence had been gained and secured from danger of being retaken. 
The commanding officers and men of the several regiments of the 
brigade I have every reason to thank for their hearty co-operation 
in carrying out all orders preparatory to and during the conflict. 
Although but accidentally placed in command of the brigade, the 
evening before, which command terminated with the termination 
of the conflict by the appearance of Colonel Hall on the field, yet 



25 



jjo History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

officers and men obeyed every order as though emanating from some 
long-tried and much-esteemed commander. 

I have the honor to be, respectfully, 
Your obedient servant, 

JOHN SHANE, 
Colonel Commanding Brigade. 



In the evening of July 21st the 4th division marched to the left 
of the 3d division, the 3d brigade on the left of its division, and the 
regiments of the brigade in the following order: 15th Iowa, ex- 
treme left; 13th Iowa, on its right; 16th Iowa, in front of the 13th; 
the 11th Iowa on the right of the 16th; each command to fortify 
its line. 

Meanwhile, the command of the rebel forces at and around At- 
lanta, having been changed from the hands of General Johnston 
into those of General Hood, the latter at once inaugurated a change 
in the strategy and tactics of the war. He adopted the offensive, 
when our troops were in process of formation on a new line, and 
before that line could be well fortified . Thus he attacked the 
Cumberland Army on July 18th in its new position along the 
Peach Tree creek, with a view of turning its flanks before the ar- 
rival of other corps. 

The same aggressive policy did not allow him to leave the 17th 
Corps in the possession of the important ridge of elevated ground 
taken by the corps on the morning of July 21st, that being the key 
to his position southeast of Atlanta, only two miles distant from the 
city. 



BATTLE OF ATLANTA, JULY 22, 1864. 

Headquarters 15th Regiment Iowa Infantry Vet. Vols, \ 
In the Field near Atlanta^ Ga.^ J^^^y 2J^ 1864. \ 

Lieut. O. D. Kinsman, A. A. A. General 3d Brigade, 4th Di- 
vision, 17th Corps: 
Sir : — I have the honor to make the following report of the 

operations of this Regiment in the action of July 22d : 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. jji 

On the afternoon of the 21st, the brigade moved to the left of 
the hne occupied by the 17th Army Corps, on the left flank of the 
army; the 15th being placed on the exti^eme left, with its right 
resting upon the left of the 13th Iowa. 

On the same evening Company B, commanded by 1st Lieuten- 
ant Muir, of Company E, and Companies C and E, were sent out 
on picket and as skirmishers. At about 12 o'clock, sharp firing 
was heard and the skirmishers in front fell back; the line of skir- 
mishers on the right having fallen back, and leaving them unsup- 
ported. They at once, however, re-advanced, but were soon 
driven back and the enemy was upon us in heavy force. The men 
fought gallantly, repulsing their charges and preventing their ad- 
vance beyond the timber. Our left, however, was unsupported. 
A part of the 53d Indiana was thrown on our left as flankers, to- 
gether with a company of the 13th Iowa; but the enemy in strong 
force and overwhelming numbers easilv turned our left flank, and 
driving back the flankers, compelled us to fall back and take a new 
position, which was in a corn field on the right of the main road, 
where the 15th was placed on the extreme right of the new line, 
with the 13th on its left. Here, by orders from the brigade com- 
mander, Company A, under Captain Whitenack, was sent out as 
skirmishers to protect the right flank and the front of the regiment 
and to develop the enemy. This company advanced gallantly into 
a point of woods on the right, but soon fell back, being attacked 
by the enemy in line of battle, and losing in killed, wounded and 
captured in a moment twelve of its men. 

The whole line again fell back, pressed by superior numbers, 
and soon took a position in the main road, occupying the outside 
line of breastworks, erected for the protection of the 3d division 
on the advance to Atlanta, and facing to the rear. Here we 
awaited the advance of the enemy. Flushed with previous suc- 
cesses they came confidently . My men were ordered not to fire 
until each had marked his man, and the number of men of the 45th 



JJ5 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

Alabama and 38th Tennessee in front of the position occupied by 
this regiment, is evidence tiie order was obeyed. No men of the 
15th were lost here. 

The enemy fought bravely and obstinately, and many of them 
were shot down fighting at the muzzles of our guns. The 45th 
Alabama, led by Colonel Lampley and Major Freeman advanced 
on^our line, but was instantly repulsed, every man within view 
being killed or captured. The loth Iowa captured two field offi- 
cers, a captain and many men of this regiment, and the Lieutenant 
Colonel (Gwynn) of the 88th Tennessee; the bearer of the regi- 
mental battle-flag of the 15th Alabama was shot down by Private 
Crowder, Company C, and the colors claimed by him; and the 
commanding officer of this regiment had the satisfaction of per- 
sonally capturing Colonel Lampley, commanding officer of the 
■45th Alabama. The enemy being entirely repulsed from this 
point, we were ordered to occupy another position, and the fight- 
ing of the division was over for the day. Our loss was heavy, 
mostly occurring early in the action, and when the regiment was 
without support on the left . I cannot speak too highly of the 
conduct of the officers and men of the Regiment, all of whom be- 
haved, as far as my observation went, with great gallantry; but I 
may be permitted to especially mention Lieutenant Colonel Hed- 
rick; always brave and gallant, he on this day cheered on the men 
by his presence and words, and gave to those around him his own 
unconsciousness of danger. 

The Regiment mourns the loss of its gallant dead. Veterans 
and recruits fought side by side, and testified their bravery and 
devotion. Lamenting their loss, their comrades know that they 
cherish the memories of men who did not falter when the time of 
trial came. Lieutenant E. M . Gebhart, Company D, was the 
only otHcer killed. Wounded severely at Shiloh, captured there, 
and a prisoner for months, he returned to the Regiment, bravely 



lovja Vetermt Volunteer Infantry. Jjj 

did his duty, and died a soldier's death. The army has in its ranks 
no braver man. 

My thanks are due Adjutant E. H. King and all the officers and 
men of the Regiment for their gallantry, which contributed so 
eminently to the success of the day. 

We had 380 men in line, 131 of whom were killed, wounded or 
captured, a list of which is inclosed herewith. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. W. BELKNAP, 
Col. Commanding 15th Iowa Infantry, Vet. Vols. 



LIST OF KILLED, WOUNDED AND MISSING IN 
THE ABOVE ACTION. 

Killed: A Company: Private Patrick Norton; B Company: 
vSergeant John A. Tovey; Private John C. Lovejov. D Company: 
2d Lieutenant Emanuel M. Gebhart. G Company: Corporal 
Charles B. Vinton; Privates, Harrison Morris, James P. Moss. 
H Company: Privates, Erastus Coleman, Edward vS. Julien. K 
Company: 1st Sergeant Stephen H. Gillespie; Corporals, Joshua 
P. Davis, Benjamin F. Mom3'er. 

Wounded: Lieutenant Colonel John M. Hedrick, left hip and 
arm severely. 

A Company: 2d Lieutenant John F . Evans, right thigh sev- 
erely; Sergeants, James Bird, head severely; Andrew Mitchell, 
foot; Corporals, John Mara, ■ ; James Primrose, ^ ; Wil- 
liam Majors, ; Marinus Rhynsburger, left arm severely; 

Drummer William H . Bole, left leg severely. Privates, William 

H. Davis, ; Benjamin F. Gebhart, ; James Getty, ; 

Napoleon B. Kindred, right hand; William W. Moore, mortally; 
Samuel P. Reed, ; Elihu Smith, mortally. 

B Company: Corporal Josephus A. Waldo, right wrist; Pri- 
vates, George T . Hughes, side severely ; Benjamin F. Lovejoy, 
right leg severely. 



jj^f. History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

C Company: Corporal John Stackley, hand; Privates, Jason R. 
Lathrop, left arm severely; Jacob T. Timbrel, left arm severely; 
Henry VanCleave, left leg severel}^ . 

D Company; Privates, Lycurgus F. Bird, ; Squire Marts, 

right arm severely; Francis M. Phillips, shoulder; George J. 
Reynolds, left arm severely; George Trump, head. 

E Company: Corporal William H. Sellers, left hand; Privates 
Silas W . Grove, knee; Robert Wilson, left arm severely. 

F Company: Corporals, Jacob Slonaker, ; Orson A. War- 
ner, left wrist severely ; Privates, John W. Cox, right wrist sev- 
erely; Thomas J. Morris, left shoulder severely; John L. Tresler, 
shoulder severely. 

G Company: Sergeant John Harger, right hand severely; Pri- 
vate Elias M. Reid, left arm severely. 

H Company: 2d Lieutenant Logan Crawfovd, left lung sev- 
erely; Sergeant Warren W. Rose, head severel}'; Privates, Al- 
fred C. Barnes, mortally; Benjamin Esley, right foot severely; 
Henry Frantz, left arm severel}' ; Joshua D. Gilbert, head. 

I Company. Sergeant W^illiam L. Watson, hand; Corporal 
Isaac M. Christy, hand; Privates, Joseph Ballenger, left arm 
severely; Benjamin F. Brcman, right shoulder; Elkana D. Chan- 
dler, thigh; Solsberry Davis, shoulder; George Haner. back sev- 
erely; Isaac Haner, arm; W^illiam Morrow, left arm severely; 
Cornelius Woolorvous, right arm severely. 

K Company: Captain Thomas H. Iledrick, right arm and 
shoulder severely; Privates, Frederick Buckmaster, mortally; 

William A. Gibson, thigh; Francis M. Scholar, ; Mathias 

W. Stalcop, mortally; Hazael Wycoff, side. 

Captured: Non Conimissioned Stafi: Sergeant Major James 
W. Henry. 

i\. Company: Sergeants, Charles R. Hawle}', James Bird, 
(wounded), Color Corporal John F. Gunning; Corporals, John A. 
Kimbrough, John Mara, (wounded), James Primrose, (wounded) ; 



lorva Veteran Volunteer Infantry. jjj" 

Privates William H. Davis, (wounded), Warren Dye, Amos W. 
Ferguson, Benjamin F. Gebhart, (wounded), James Getty, 
Daniel W. Largent, William W. Moore, (wounded mortally), 
Samuel P. Reed, (wounded), Elihu Smith, (wounded mortally), 
Ellis Smith, Samuel Wilson. 

B Company: Sergeant Amos Overmier; Corporal Edward D. 
Lunt; Privates, William A. Boudinot, Thomas Fennessv, Colum- 
bus P. Fox. 

C Compan}': 1st Sergeant William S. Winters, Corporal 
Joseph W. Hawkins; Privates, James Hawkins, Catlett V. Hiler, 
Charles Johnson, Seth Knowles, Joseph Little, John C. Rea. 

D Company: Sergeant Joseph Heckart, Corporal Wilson S. 
McLain; Privates Lycurgus F. Bird, (wounded), George H. 
Crouch, Philip Deford, George W, Farlin, Peter Hoover, Wil- 
liam Maserva, Andrew McConnell, Marion Rayburn, Stephen 
Stevens, Albert Vanvoast. 

E Company: 1st Lieutenant William P. L, Muir, (commanding 
B Company); Private William H. Rhamey . 

F Companv: Privates Phillip Benner, Watson Cooper, Felix 
Pool. 

G Company: Private Byron South. 

H Company: 2d Lieutenant Logan Crawford, (wounded). Ser- 
geant Sephas C. Harris, Color Corporal John H . Forgeus, 
(wounded 21st); Privates, Alfred C. Barnes, (wounded mortally ), 
Levi Jack LaFlesh, T. H. Benton Marshall, Patrick Murphy, 
Levi T. Streeter. 

I Companv: Sergeants, James C. Bonar, Daniel Verrips; Cor- 
porals, Benjamin F. Keck, Garret W. Colenbrander, Luther B. 
Thomas; Privates Robert Brisbin, John W. Cramer, Charles M. 
Elrick, (ireorge Haner, (wounded), Albert Homewood, Henry 
Kirby, Simon Niermyer, Lorcn Rowell, William H. Rowell, 
Samuel C. Thomas, Isaiah White, Cornelius Woolorvous, 
(wounded), Samuel F. Zarnes. 



33^ 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



K Company: Sergeants John G. Davis, Cyi'us I. Momyer; 
Corporal John Riley ; Privates Frederick Buckmaster, (wounded 
mortally), John S. Clearwaters, Marion Conroy, David Elson, 
Albert Horn, William A. Mathis, Hiram D. Pope, James C. Ran- 
kin, Milton M. Young. 

RECAPITULATION. 



Field and Staff.. 

A Company 

B Company.. . . 
C Company . . . . 
D Company.. . . 
E Company . . . 

F Company 

G Company . . . . 
H Company. . . . 

I Company 

K Company . . . 






O 3 



O 



bC 

< 



■ 1| 

.15 

. 31 
.41 
, 51 

J! 



. 21 
. 6 
.101 

. 61 



. 3 
.33 

.10 
.12 

.18 



,. 6 
.16 

..28 
.31 



Totals, 



121 



551 



87,' 



159 



General Hood, on the 22d, massed his best troops (Hardee's 
corps, than whom there was no better in the Southern army.) 
against the line of the 17th Corps; attacking the same first, in the 
rear of its left flank. 

Just then, however, part of General G. M, Dodge's 16th Corps 
was already moving to the rear of the 17th Corps, and in one in- 
stant the advance was stopped; in the next moment it fiercely 
opposed its noble lines, supported by a battery of eight guns just 
arriving upon the spot, to the rebel assaulting columns and checked 
their further advance. The engagement scarcely commenced at 
this point, when an almost simultaneous attack was made further 
to the rear and left from the direction of Decatur, where Colonel 
Sprague's brigade bravely opposed the further progress of the 
enemy. Thus, the enemy in both places finding sufficient force to 
check their further advance upon the immediate rear of the lines 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. Jj'j 

of the 17th Corps, the left flank of the same (still over half a 
mile from Dodge's right) became the next object. 

The skirmishers of the 3d brigade being soon driven in, the sev- 
eral regiments in the same position to which they had been assigned 
the evening before, fought the advancing enemy with the deter- 
mination and gallantry of veterans. 

The gap, however, between the left of the 15th Iowa and the 
right of the 16th Corps, (already engaged for two hours) remain- 
ed half a mile wide, and being mostly covered with timber, the 
enemy was enabled to bring up heavy masses upon the left flank 
and rear of the 4th Division, 17th Corps, without being detained 
in any way, except by the bravery and. stern determination of the 
officers and men of the entire command, to fight it out against a 
half circle of surrounding enemy . 

After a half hour's magnificent fight, the flankers, (part of the 
53d Indiana and 3d Iowa), having been forced back by overwhelm- 
ing numbers, the left flank of the 3d brigade (the 15th) became 
entirely exposed and turned, and in a short time the regiment and 
brigade lost severely. Nearly' all of the 15th Iowa, wlio were dis- 
abled, Lieutenant-Colonel J. IM. Hedrick, Captain T. H. Hedrick, 
of Company K, and scores of others, while nobly and gallantly 
discharging the duties of their respective positions, were wounded 
by the enemy deploying and advancing upon the unprotected left 
flank and rear of the regiment. 

The brigade being ordered to a new position on the right of the 
old McDonough road, in a corn-field, where the 15th became the 
extreme right of what was remaining of the brigade, the 16th Iowa 
almost entirely, and large numbers of the 11th, 13th and loth hav- 
ing been enveloped in first position and captured. Pressed by 
overwhelming numbers, the brigade soon took a third position in 
the road, occupying the breast-works built by the 3d division the 
day before, and after awaiting some time in the rain for the enemy 
to appear from the woods in the direction of Atlanta, and perceiv- 



Jj8 History of the fifteenth Regiment 

ing another rebel command advancing from the rear, the regiment 
jumped to the outside of the works, and the enemy (45th Ahibama) 
was met with surpassing bravery and repulsed with great slaughter, 
leaving many of their dead and wounded on the field, and captured 
prisoners in the hands of the men of the regiment. About 4 p. m. 
the I'ight of the division and of the corps, having signally repulsed 
the fierce attacks in their front, the enemy gave way and left the 
field, exhausting the remainder of their rage beyond the right of 
the 17th corps and upon the divisions of the 15th corps. 

Thus the important ridge of elevated ground, and the valuable 
position (afterwards Leggett's Bald hill) and the good name of the 
corps were saved. The day would awaken the proudest and most 
glorious reminiscences of the 17th Army Corps, were they not 
coupled with the death of its oldest and best beloved chief. Gen- 
eral James B. McPherson was killed in the rear of the left of the 
15th Iowa at the commencement of the bloody carnage of the day. 

With the fourth position, the fight of the regiment was ended for 
the da}', although it afterwards changed that position, "jumping" 
again to the east side of the breast-works, there to receive a rebel 
force emerging from the timber beyond the corn-field; that force, 
however, was soon driven back into the timber and disappeared. 
While the regiment was in the fifth position, another rebel force 
opened its batteries upon it from the breast-works formerly occupied 
by the brigade at noon. The regiment and brigade were then or- 
dered to a position near the ravine on its right and rear, and finally 
in the evening occupied the position it held the day before. The 
oflicers and men of the regiment present in the several successive 
engagements have done their duty noblv, and ha\e eminentlv con- 
tributed towards achieving the glorious result of the dav . 

Colonel Wm . W . Belknap, in command of the regiment, dis- 

' played his usual gallantry and abilitv in extricating his connnand 

before it was entirely enveloped by superior numbers in the first 

position. While in the fourth position, (same as the third, only on 



loxua Veteran Volunteer Infantry. Jjg 

the outside of the hreast-works), he had the satisfaction of captur- 
ing Colonel Lampley, 45th Alabama, and in the lead of the same, 
when they charged upon the 15th. Lieutenant-Colonel J. M. 
Hedrick imparted his coolness and contempt of danger to the men 
of the command . He was severely wounded in his arm and hip in 
the first position. There Captain Thomas H . Hedrick was also 
severely wounded while discharging his duty with great gallantry; 
there the brave Lieutenant E. M. Gebhart laid down his life, a 
sacrifice for the cause of his country; there nine-tenths of the cas- 
ualties in the regiment were sustained, including the large number 
captured. Captain James M. Reid, of Company 1, always brave 
and reliable on the battle-field, while in the second position in the 
corn-field, became at once the extreme left of the line of officers, as 
others on the left of his company were either captured or wounded 
in the first position, or were detailed as pickets or on train guard, 
(Captain Hanks, with Company G), * and not yet returned. 
Besides his Company I, he continued in command of what returned 
of Company C from the picket line, and of Company H. He cap- 
tured alone seven men, delivering them to the Provost Marshal of 



■ *Company G was detailed July 20th as Guard to the 4th Division supply train back to the 
Chattahoochie river, Captain Hanks commanding. That night we camped about two miles 
from the river. On 21st we loaded the train and then marched until 9P.M. and camped in 
Decatur. On July 23d were ordered out at 6 A. M. to headquarters of 4th Division, south of 
the railroad and about 3 miles from Atlanta. On arriving, we commenced unloading the 
wagons, and rations were being issued to the troops. We were then ordered to re-load wagons 
as quickly as possible, which was done, and the train moved a mile and was then coralled and 
a guard posted. We learned then that the enemy were attempting to flank and turn the left 
and capture our trains, as soon as brisk skirmishing commenced. The train was ordered to 
the rear and we were relieved and ordered to our regiment. We now were near a field a half 
mile to the left and rear of our lines of breast works. A division was crossing the field on a 
double quick and forming line on our left. 1 suggested to Captain Hanks that we form with 
one of tlTe regiments and fight there. He replied he was ordered to the regiment and would 
go. He led the company on a blind road through the timber, which was very dense for a 
quarter of a mile; then halted and came to a front. He went in advance some distance to re- 
connoitre and returned; hearing a line advancing in our front, the Captain said our men are 
falling back. When within a few rods of us wc saw they were rebels, the Captain gave the 
order to About face, double quick march. Before obeying the boys fired a volley into the 
rebel ranks, which they returned. We retreated until we came to some breast. works and 
there made a stand and held them in check, unsupported by any other troops. At times on 
one side of the works, then on the other, advancing or retreating as best we could, in this way 
most of the day, lay on our arms all night, and reached the regiment on the 23d. (Casual- 
ties, sea list of same). B. P. BYE. 



^^f.0 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

the division present. Captain Rogers, of Company E, being driven 
in from tlie picket line, brought in his v^hole company and joined 
in the fight at tlie third position. Several important captures were 
made during the day, one of the most remarkable being that made 
by Private Reuben Meek, of Company B, 15th Iowa. He, with 
some stragglers pressed by him into service, having captured and 
brought in seventy-one rebels, this being only a little less than the 
regiment lost while in the first position. 

On July 23d and subsequent days, the newly-taken positions were 
strengthened by fortifications; the dead were gathered and buried, 
and the wounded taken to the rear. 



Headquarters 8d Brig., 4th Div., 17th Army Corps, \ 
Before Atlanta, Ga., fi'ty 2^tJi, 1864, \ 

Captain C. Cadle, Jr., Ass't Adj't Gcn'l: 

Sir: — I have the honor to make the following report of the part 
taken by this brigade in the engagement of the 22d inst.: 

The brigade was in position on the extreme left of our line in the 
following order, viz: The 11th Iowa, with its right resting on a 
road leading at right angles from the old McDonough or Flat 
Shoal road, to the new McDonough road, and its left resting on 
the Flat Shoal road, being formed in the arc of a circle; the 16th 
Iowa, with its right resting on the left of the 11th and extending 
across the Flat Shoal road and perpendicular to it; the ]5th Iowa 
to the left and about thirty yards to the rear of the 16th and slightly 
in refuse to it; the 18th Iowa to the rear of the 11th and 16th Iowa. 

My line was about three miles southeast of Atlanta, and facing 
from it, in which position it was intrenched with one section of 
Company F, 2d Illinois Light Artillery on the right, and one on 
the left of the 11th Iowa, the first brig-ade bein>'" on mv rioht. 

About 12 M. my line of skirmishers was driven in, and the ene- 
my advanced in force w^ow my front and flank, opening a severe 
fire of musketry and artillery. Receiving orders from General 




OPERATIONS OF FOURTH DIVISION, SEVENTEENTH ARMY CORPS. 



lotva Veteran Volunteer Injantry. J41 

Smith to hold my front Hne, and that my flank would be protected, 
I ordered up two companies'bf the 13th Iowa to the left of the 11th 
Iowa, and two companies to the left of the 16th Iowa, having be- 
fore that sent one company to the left of the 15th Iowa. This 
position was held, 2:>ouiing in a heavy and continuous fire into the 
enemy, and checking- them until completely flanked, and I was or- 
dered to retire. The regiments retired by the right flank in good 
order, the 11th taking position behind the front of the line of works 
built b}' the 1st brigade and facing to the rear. The 18th on the 
left of the 11th, and perpendicular to it and facing south. The 
15th on the right of and in prolongation of the 18th; the 16th Iowa 
and three companies of the 18th, including the one on the left of 
the 15th Iowa, were utterly unable to make their way out, being 
completely cut off and surrounded by a superior force of the enemy. 
This position was held, repeatedly repulsing the enemy, until the 
right of the 15th Iowa was flanked, when the brigade again retired 
and was formed in the rear of the sam.e work, and a portion of the 
works of the 8d division, which position was held, repulsing re- 
peated assaults, until about 4 o'clock p. m., when the enemy again 
advancing in the rear, the brigade was formed on the other side of 
the works, where the enemy were repulsed with terrible slaughter, 
losing two stands of colors and a large number of prisoners. The 
fire again coming in rear and flank the brigade as^ain formed in 
rear of the works, but, owing to a severe fire of artillery and mus- 
ketry on the flank, were finally compelled to retire to a line facing 
south and perpendicular to the line of works, with seven companies 
of the 11th Iowa, their right resting on the hill which was occupied 
on the morning of the 21st inst. by General Force's brigade of the 
3d division, and extending to the left, in which position the brigade 
repulsed assault after assault. 

These seven companies of the 11th remained in the above position 
during the night, with their colors opposite to and but a few feet 
distant from the colors of the enemy. Captain Anderson, Com- 



J42 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

pany A, 11th, with a portion of his own company, and other men 
of the division, holding the crest of the- hill, and most gallantry de- 
feating every attempt of the enemy to advance; the other portion 
of the brigade forming on the left of the 1st brigade, where they 
remained during the night. At the commencement of the engage- 
ment 180 men and 7 officers were on fatigue detail, most of whom 
subsequently joined the command at different times during the day. 

Thus stubbornl}' contesting the ground inch by inch, first on one 
side of the works, then on the other, then back again^ and in the 
open field, front and rear, my command fought, both officers and 
men, with a cool determination and heroic bravery seldom equaled 
and never surpassed. 

When suriounded, the 16th Iowa, under their brave and fearless 
commander, Lieutenant-Colonel Sanders, and the companies of the 
13th Iowa, were most gallantry holding their works, and repulsing 
the enemy in front, not a ipan leaving the line. 

The colors captured by my command were brought in, one by 
Private Geo. B. Hayworth, of Company B, 11th Iowa, being the 
Stars and Bars, and is now in his possession; the other by Private 
E. Siberts, of Company G, 11th Iowa, being the battle flag of the 
45th Alabama, and claimed as a trophy by the 15th Iowa, in whose 
front that regiment charged, the color bearer being reported as 
having been shot by Private Crowder, of Company C, of that reg- 
iment. The whole number of prisoners captured by my command 
and sent to the rear was 257. One Colonel, one Lieutenant-Col- 
onel, one Major, two Captains, three Lieutenants, and 130 enlisted 
men captured by the 15th Iowa; one Colonel, one Captain, and 91 
men captured by the 11th, and 20 men by the 13th. 

Where all officers and men devotedly did their whole duty, I can 
make special mention of but few. Among them Colonel John 
Shane, commanding 13th Iowa, cool and brave, fearlessly rallying 
his men in the thickest of the fight; Colonel Belknap, commanding 
the 15th Iowa, displayed at all times the highest qualities of the 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. J4J 

soldier, cheering his men by his voice, and encouraging them by 
his personal disregard of danger; Lieutenant-Colonel J. C. Aber- 
crombie, commanding the 11th Iowa, who, with a quiet and calm 
determination, inspired his men with his own steadfast spirit; Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel J . M . Hedrick, 15th Iowa, wounded in the noble 
discharge of his duty ; Major Foster, 11th Iowa, also wounded, 
bravely rallying his men; Major Walker, 13th Iowa, killed at his 
post, where the brave should die; Adjutants King, 15th, Prescott, 
11th, and Rood, 13th, for gallant and efficient services. * * * 
* Sergeant Major J. G. Safely, who, with First Sergeant J. A. 
Buck, Company K, 11th (afterwards killed), with a party of men, 
about 30 or 40, made a dash on the works held by the rebels, 
bringing back with them more than their own number, of prison- 
ers, among them a Colonel and a Captain Safely being wounded. 

My warmest thanks are due to Lieutenant O. D. Kinsman, Act- 
ing Assistant Adjutant General, Captain Bassett, Lieutenant Kel- 
logg, Lieutenant Stone and Lieutenant Safely, members of my 
staff, who performed their arduous and trying duties with a heroism 
deserving of the highest praise. 

On the graves of the silent dead, buried where they fell, a grate- 
ful people will look with sorrowing pride, and to the survivors 
award well-earned honor. 

.My loss is very severe, being 4 officers and 33 men killed, 10 of- 
ficers and 140 men wounded, and 22 officers and 455 men missing, 
many of whom are believed to have been killed or wounded, mak- 
ing an aggregate of 664 officers and men. I inclose herewith a 
complete list of casualties, 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WILLIAM HALL, 
Colonel 11th Iowa Volunteer Infantry, 
Commandjngr Brigade . 



j^^ History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



Headquarters 4th Division, 17th Army Corps, 
Before Atlanta^ Ga.^ f^^y 28^ i 



Lieut. Col. A.J. Alexander, A. A. Gen. 17th Army Corps: 
Sir: — I have the honor to submit the following report of tlie 
part taken by the 4th Division, 17tli Army Corps, under my com- 
mand, in the engagement of Friday, the 22d of July, 1864. After 
the attack on the enemy's position by my division on the 21st inst., 
I was ordered by Major General Blair to move to the left of Gen. 
Leggett's division, to meet a similar movement of the enemy, who 
was extending his line in that direction. The 17th Corps now 
occupied the extreme left of the army, and my division w^as on the 
left of the corps, my line running north and south, with the 1st 
brigade, Colonel Potts, on the right, joining General Leggett, and 
the 3d brigade. Colonel Hall, on the left, with regiments thrown 
back, and facing south to protect mv flank, and a picket line run- 
ning back a mile and a half to guard against any movements 
around my rear. This line was intrenched during the night, the 
enemy being engaged throwing up works about a thousand yards 
in my front. Early next morning my pickets were advanced in 
connection with General Leggett's, the enemy's skirmishers falling 
back with little or no opposition, although they were well pro- 
tected by log and earth-works, a short distance behind which we 
came upon a nearly completed line of their rifle pits, the result of 
their previous night's labor. This position was in full view of and 
not more than sixteen hundred yards from the enemy's entrench- 
ments in front of Atlanta, which was but a short distance beyond. 
While making preparations to occupy this line, but before com- 
mencing the movement, reports were sent in from the picket line 
on my left flank, that there were indications of an enemy in their 
front, and very soon after some skirmishmg was heard far back on 
my left or rear, which soon extended along the whole line. The 
pickets were forced back and followed closely by the enemy's line 
of battle, which moved rapidly forward, striking my left flank 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. J4S 

exactly perpendicular to my line of battle. Artillery was also 
opened from a ridge in the rear of their assaulting column, which 
did us considerable damage. I directed Colonel Potts to send two 
regiments of his brigade to Colonel Hall's left, but before they 
were fully in position, they were met by a heavy column of the 
enemy, which they succeeded in checking until their left was 
turned, when they fell back to the works. 

I ordered Colonel Hall to withdraw his two flank regiments 
which this movement enveloped, and to move rhem by the right 
flank around the front or east side of my main line of works, 
having already directed the men occupying that line to take the 
same position and drive back the enemy now already pressing 
their rear. This movement was promptly executed, and success- 
ful except in the case of the l6th Iowa on the left which was com- 
pletely surrounded and over 230 men captured. * * * My 
whole line was now hotly engaged, and although fighting from 
the opposite side of their works, from the one intended when they 
were constructed, still, owing to the absence of an}' deep ditch, it 
afforded them very good protection, while their well directed and 
rapid volleys were doing good execution in the enemy's ranks, 
driving them back some distance into the woods until their fire was 
partially silenced. Skirmishers were immediately ordered out, 
who discovered the enemy, not far back, but apparently in no con- 
dition to renew the attack. This disposition was scarcely made 
when another column was discovered advancing from the south- 
west, threatening, considering the side of the works we now occu- 
pied, our right and rear. To meet this, two regiments of Colonel 
Hall's brigade were formed, perpendicular to the works on which 
the left rested, the right extending west to'ward Atlanta, the re- 
mainder of the brigade still occupying the works. Colonel Potts' 
brigade was formed about 75 yards to the rear of Colonel Hall's 
perpendicular line, and parallel to his, both being directed to hold 
that position against any odds. By the time these lines were 
26 



J4^ History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

formed the enemy emerged from the woods into the open field, in 
solid column, three lines deep, striking Colonel Hall's line on the 
front and right, forcing him back to the works : our skirmishers 
on the road still holding back the enemy, enabling Colonel Hall to 
put his whole brigade back again on his original side of the works, 
and this assault was repulsed. * * * It was now past 4 
o'clock, and not five minutes elapsed from the repulse of the last 
assault, when another still more desperate attempt was made from 
the opposite or east side, in the present rear of Colonel Hall's 
brigade. 

Again the m&n Jumped over their works, and the most desperate 
fight of the day now took place. The enemy, having the cover 
of the woods, could approach in many places within fifteen or 
twenty yards of our works without discovery. Rebel com- 
manders, with such men as would follow them, would not unfre- 
quently occupy one side of the works and our men the other. 
Many individual acts of heroism here occurred. The flags of two 
opposing regiments would meet on the opposite sides of the same 
. works, and would be flaunted by their respective bearers in each 
others faces; men were bayoneted across the works, and officers 
with their swords fought hand to hand with men with bayonets. 
Colonel Belknap, of the loth Iowa Volunteers, took prisoner Col. 
Lampley of the 45th Alabama, by pulling him over the works by 
his coat collor, being several times fired at by men at his side. The 
colors of his regiment were taken at the same time. The enemy's 
loss in this attack must have been very severe. * * * Jt 
was now about 6 o'clock. The forces of the enemy engaged were 
Hardee's corps, two divisions of which were engaged on my im- 
mediate left, Cleburne's in front, and Cheatham's in I'eserve, with 
Walker's division on the right, and Bates' on the left. Other 
forces, who had been left in Atlanta, now advanced from that 
direction, which compelled us to again change our position to the 
east side of our works. This was scarcely done, when we were 



loiva Veto'an Volunteer Infantry . j^y 

opened upon from our left and rear with artillery, loaded with 
grape, accompanied with heavy musketry, which compelled the 
abandonment of another portion of our ground, this attack coming 
from both front and rear. I now formed Colonel Potts' brigade in 
rear of our works and perpendicular to it, with a portion of Col. 
Hall's troops on his right, the remainder occupying the works 
vacated by General Leggett's command. This perpendicular line 
was so enfiladed by the fire from the advancing troops from At- 
lanta, that I was compelled to swing my right still further back, con- 
necting with the 3d division, formed across a corn-field facing south. 
By direction of General Blair, Colonel Wanglein's brigade of 1st 
division, 15th corps, reported to me, and was formed on my left. 
In this position another attack was made by the enemy, by fresh 
troops brought up for the occasion, but it was again unsuccessful, 
though as persistently persevered in as on any previous occasion. 
* * * * By dark the enemy had retired, except along the 
line of works, which position they held until nearly daylight next 
morning, thus being enabled to get off their wounded, but leaving 
the ground literally strewn with their slain. 

VVe remained in this position during the night. In this engage- 
ment, which lasted from 12 o'clock m. until 7 o'clock p. m., seven 
hours, with scarcely any cessation, the only change being in the 
fury with which it raged; the troops of this division displayed the 
greatest gallantry. The first attack, sweeping around our left and 
attacking suddenly in our rear, might have thrown any veteran 
troops into confusion, but at the command they promptly took the 
other side of their works and fought with great coolness. Officers 
did their whole duty, and by their example and efficiency prevented 
any accident, which at many a critical moment would have been 
fatal . Four times during the battle they were compelled by at- 
tacks in their rear to change from one side of their works to the 
other, and change front txoice to repel assaults from the left, thus 



j^cP History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

occupying seven different positions during the engagement, besides 
minor changes of a portion of the command. 

My loss was 1,040 men killed, wounded and missing. * * * 
The loss of the enemy was not less than 4,000 killed and wounded, 
326 prisoners, * including one Colonel, two Lieutenant-Colonels, 
and several other officers, and five stands of colors. Although the 
enemy held a portion of the left of our works, which was of no 
particular importance to either party, I consider their attack an 
entire failure in the object contemplated, and one, a few repetitions 
of which would destroy their own army. 

For over four hours there was no communication with my hos- 
j^ital, and many of the wounded, who were unable to walk, fell 
into the hands of the enemy. I think fully one-third of those re- 
ported missing were either killed or wounded. * * * Colonel 
W. W. Belknap, 15th Iowa, displayed all the qualifications of an 
accomplished soldier. * * * Many acts of gallantry were dis- 
j^layed on the field bv both officers and men, but having been only 
a short time in command of the division, I am unable to give the 
list of names, but refer you to the report of my brigade command- 
ers. * * * * Captains Cadle, Doane, Marvin and Gurley, of 
my staff, had their horses shot; Lieutenant X. Piquet, ordnance of- 
ficer, was captured by the enemy while supplying the command 
with ammunition. * * * 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully. 

Your obedient servant, 

GILES A. SMITH, Brig. Gen. 

From General Wm. W. Belknap's address at the First Brigade 
reunion Sept. 28, 1881: 

The Iowa brigade was attacked first by Govan's brigade of Cle- 
burne's division of Hardee's corps. It contained the following 
regiments: 1st, 15th, 2d, 24th, 5th, 13th, 6th, 7th, 8th and 19th 
Arkansaw and 5th Confederate. This brigade captured the 16th 
•Of which the 31 Brigade captured 257, and the 15th Iowa 138, over one-third of the whole. 



lozva Veteran Vohutteer Infantry. j^g 

Iowa after the most gallant fighting on the part of that regiment, 
as the Confederate General says in his report. Afterward our 
brigade was assaulted by Lowrey's brigade, formed bv the 8d, 5th, 
Sth and 32d Mississippi regiments, and the 16th, 38d and 45th Ala- 
bama regiments, in which the latter regiment was severely pun- 
ished, and its Colonel captured by the Colonel of the 15th Iowa. 
The following orders were issued by General Hardee in accordance 
with orders from General Hood the night before. 

Headquarters Hardee's Corps, 
2ist jfidy, 1864 — 7 :30 p. m , 

General: At dark you \yill withdraw your division within the 
city defenses. You will not take position on the line, but bivouac 
your troops with your left to the right, looking from Atlanta, of 
the railroad. Your skirmishers will be left out and will occupy 
your present line of defenses. It is proper to notify you that 
Cheatham's corps will also withdraw into the city defenses. The 
General enjoins watchfulness upon your skirmishers. 
By command of 

LIEUT.-GEN. HARDEE, 

T. B. Rov, Ass't Adj't Gen. 

To Major General Cleburne. 

The next order is as follows: 

11 p. M. — B}' direction of Lieutenant General Hardee, your divi- 
sion will move at 1 o'clock to-night on the road which will be in- 
dicated by the guide. Your skirmishers will be left on the line 
you occupied to-day . Respectfully, 

T. B. ROY, Ass't Adj't Gen. 

The following is a statement made by Captain Irving A. Buck, 
the Adjutant-General of Cleburne's division, who placed Govan's 
brigade in position on that day: 

" Although 17 years have elapsed, the incidents of the 22d of 
of July, 1864, are distinct in my mind. Our left brigade, Govan's, 
being heavily engaged and needing assistance, I was directed by 



3 so History of the Pifteenth Regiment 

General Cleburne to bring up our reserve brigade (Lowrey's) to 
Govan's aid. While riding back to execute this order I discovered 
that a gap of about a brigade front existed between our division 
and that upon our right (Walker's), the two having swung apart 
in passing through dense woods, where to maintain the alignment 
was impossible. Knowing that the order to Lowrey was given in 
ignorance of this dangerous condition of things, and believing that 
the situation was too momentous to admit the loss of time necessary 
to communicate the facts to General Cleburne, I continued on. 
Finding General Lowrey, and after delivering my instructions, told 
him of this gap, and suggested that it should be filled, stating the 
posture of affairs, and saying that I had no orders to this effect, but 
that under the ciicumstances he would be justified in exercising his 
discretion and powers as a general officer to disregard the order and 
fill the space and avert a great danger. He was prompt to assume 
this responsibility, and after showing him the threatened point, I 
galloped back to General Cleburne, who approved the action. 
Verv fortunate it was that Lowrey so decided, as he encountered 
the Federal troops moving upon this gap, and although he was 
very roughly handled, meeting heavy losses particularly in officers, 
the movement was stopped, which would have severed our corps 
and exposed our division to a flank attack, which could but have 
proven disastrous. This fierce attack upon Lowrey was made by 
your brigade, and the fighting must to a large extent have been by 
the 15th Iowa, as Colonel Lampley, of the 45th Alabama, was 
captured by you personally, and the colors of the regiment, which 
I have seen in your hands since the war, were taken by the 15th 
Iowa. 

Lampley was too slightly wounded to have caused his death, 
which occurred some days later, and it is supposed that depression 
from chagrin at his misfortune contributed largely to his sad end. 
How little cause for shame or mortification he had upon his own 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Injaittry. ^^i 

account or that of his command, none other than yourself, who 
witnessed their gallant conduct, better knows. 

This day was the most severe, fatal and hard-fought which it 
was the fortune of the division to be in during my services with it, 
and the record of its losses well attests the gallantry with which 
attack was made and met. 

IRVING A. BUCK, 
Late Asst. Adjt. Gen., Cleburne's Division. 

In another letter he writes: 

Balthnore^ Augiist 20, iS8j . 

Gen. W. W. Belknap — Dear Sir: — It is with great regret that 
I find my business engagements are such as to forbid my accepting 
your kind invitation to attend the reunion of Crocker's brigade on 
the 26th of September. To assure you this decision has been 
arrived at reluctantly and onl}^ after my going was found to be im- 
possible, is quite unnecessary, as you are well aware that it is a 
cherished desire of mine to meet individually those I have such 
good cause to remember so well collectively. It would afford me 
infinite pleasure to take by the hand those brave men who were 
so often opposed to Cleburne's division in the Dalton — Atlanta 
campaign. But to my mind all other actions sink into minor con- 
sideration beside that of the 22d of July — where the relative merits 
as soldiers were displayed in a fair field and fight. Without detri- 
ment, I can truthfully say, to the reputation of either side, " It was 
Greek meeting Greek." No greater evidence of good troops can 
be given, than by the Iowa Brigade, when taken at the disadvantage 
of an exposed flank, turned by a sudden attack, and when pressed 
back to take up a new line, under fire, without demoralization, re- 
versing their works and defending themselves, with their backs to 
their original front. This severe test of the highest of soldierly 
qualities reflects credit alike upon the command and the commander 
who had disciplined and trained them to this eminent degree of et^- 
clency, M. M. Crocker. As to the damage Inflicted upon us I 



j^2 Histo7y of the Fiftee7ith Regiment 

could well testify, if necessary, but our losses were sufficient in 
themselves — thirty general, field and acting field officers, and a 
total of 1,407 casualties in our division alone. It was never the 
same after this sad day, as the loss of field officers was irreparable, 
particularly in Govan's brigade, and one brigade, Polk's, never 
afterwards appeared as an organization, but the remnant assigned 
to other commands, and Mercer's brigade replacing it in the di- 
vision. The testimony of no one person can add weight to the 
fame of Crocker's men which history accords them and the long 
list of battles upon their colors confirmed. I merely write this as 
a just and willing tribute to their gallantry, as witnessed by one 
upon the opposite side. Well may the survivors of the llth, 13th, 
15th and l(3th Iowa be proud to boast that they were members of 
the Iowa Brigade. Wishing you all a pleasant time antl many 
happy returns, I am, yours respectfully, 

IRVING A. BUCK, 
Late Asst. Adjt. General, Cleburne's Division, 



FROM GENERAL D. C. GOVAN'S REPORT. 

Fort ijicat ions of Atlanta^ yiily jo^ 1864. 

Extracts from it are as follows: 

Captain: — I have the honor to submit the following report of 
the action of mv command in the engagement of the22dinst., 
near Atlanta. 

After being bivouacked about an hour within the intrenchments 
of Atlanta on the night of the 21st inst., I received an order to 
move at 12:80 upon the M'Donough road, and marched accord- 
ingly. Mv men had been much wearied by the operations of the 
20th, the subsequent moving and entrenching upon the Augusta 
railroad, and the fight of the 21st, and the loss of another night's 
rest was a heavy tax upon their powers of endurance. After halting 
for about two hours after daylight, and supplying twenty addi- 
tional rounds of ammunition, my command again moved with the 



lozva Veteran Volunteer Infajttry. j^j 

division, passing Cobb's Mill, until we reached the road leading in 
the direction of the Augusta railroad. In accoi'dance with the 
directions of the division and corps commanders I formed my line 
of battle nearly perpendicular with this road, with my left regi- 
ment upon the west side, and with two regiments of cavalry to pro- 
tect that flank. The road ran somewhat west of north, and I was 
instructed to preserve the same relative position to it, and informed 
that the whole corps would conform to my movements. 1 was 
further told that moving thus, I would take in flank the works of 
the enemy facing Atlanta. The advance was begun at 11:40 
A. M., and was attended with great difficulties, as the way lay 
through a forest having a dense and almost impassable under- 
growth. Frequent halts were necessary in order to correct the 
alignment, and to allow the troops upon my right, time to come up. 
After moving about a mile information was received that a train 
of 500 wagons was parked in an unprotected place in front of me, 
and I was directed to move forward rapidly in order to capture 
these. I accordingly instructed Lieutenant Colonel Brasher^ 2d 
Arkansas regiment, commanding my skirmishers, to press on, and 
drive in the enemy's pickets without firing a gun, which was gal- 
lantly done. My line had now reached Roder's House, where it was 
again reformed and whence it moved forward without again halting. 
I did not encounter the regiment upon picket as was expected, nor 
did I find any traces of a wagon train. About this time the enemy 
opened a section of Napoleon guns from the road, but without 
effect. We now soon came upon our skirmishers who had halted 
under fire from the enemy's works, and the engagement began at 
1 o'clock p. M. 

The entrenchments of the enemy facing Atlanta extended along 
the road upon which we advanced. Contrary to our expectation 
and information we encountered other works almost perpendicular 
to these, and designed to protect him from the very movement we 
were then making. These consisted of two lines of breastworks, 



j>5^ History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

the first about 200 yards in length, the second in its rear and reach- 
ing further to our right, each having in front an almost impassable 
abatis formed by cutting down the thick undergrowth of small 
oaks. A line of battle occupied the ground in front of my right 
upon the extension of the line works. The two Napoleon guns 
before alluded to were upon the right of the first work, and swept 
the road and the woods upon either side. My left the 1st and 15th, 
the 2d and 24th, and half of the 5th and 13th Arkansas regiments 
came full upon these formidable entrenchments. The men charged 
to within 80 paces of them, and sustained for fifteen to twenty 
minutes the withering fiie which was poured upon them, at the 
same time making their way through the abatis of the enemy. 
At length the enemy ceased firing, and called upon my men to 
stop also, saying they surrendered, while some of them aimed their 
guns and were only prevented from firing by their comrades who 
preferred to end the fighting. At this juncture a portion of the 
2d and 24th Arkansas advanced to the works to receive the surren- 
der, when the Federals who filled the trenches, seeing the fewness 
of their numbers, took them prisoners. The enemy made a dash 
upon my centre, and, for a moment, checked the advance, when 
Colonel Murray, 5th Arkansas, collected his men, and gallantly 
charged them back. Meanwhile, the right, consisting of half the 
5th and 13th, Sth and lUth, and the 6th and 7th Arkansas regi- 
ments, had advanced be}ond the flank of the enemy's works, and 
had driven before it the line there opposed, and the 6th and 7th, 
and the Sth and 19th, capturing a battery of six Napoleon guns, 
which before that time had been vigorously used against us. 

Perceiving that the right had passed on, and that the work was 
not yet done upon the left, where my small force was liable to be 
overpowered by the large number whom they thought to capture, 
I directed the right to change direction to the left in order to take 
them in flank and rear. This was promptly and opportunely 
done, and compelled the immediate surrender of all who did not 



loiva Veteran Vohinteer Injantry. jjj 

take flight in the confusion. This timely success i-escued those of 
the 2d and 24th Arkansas who had been entrapped, and the oflicers 
of this command now received the swords of their late captors. 
In making the movement to the left a portion of the 6th and 7th 
Arkansas swept around and reached the open field, across which 
the brigade charged later in the evening. The 1st and 15th Ar- 
kansas took the two guns which were placed upon the road. 

There fell many whose services were invaluable. First among 
these was Jno. E. Murrav, Colonel of the oth Arks. Regiment, 
than whom I think there was no more gallant and promising 
young officer. He had just attained his majority, and was brave 
and chivalrous, of a high order of intelligence, :ind of fine capa- 
city for command. Had he been spared, he would doubtless 
soon have attested his a crv superior military qualifications in a 
higher sphere of usefulness. His loss is irreparable, and has cast 
a gloom over the whole command, where he was universally be- 
loved. So to with Lieutenant Colonel Anderson Watkins, 8th 
Arks. Regiment, who was stricken down, sword in hand, very near 
the enemy's works. Also quite young, he was a true soldier, a 
gifted and valuable officer, possessed of great coin-age, and having 
a high sense of duty. In this attack were wounded Colonel Col- 
quitt, and Lieutenant Colonel Martin, 1st Arks, both severely; 
Colonel Warfield and Lieutenant Colonel Brasher, 2d Arks., Col. 
Smith, Lieutenant Colonel Cameron and Major Douglass, 6th 
Arks., Lieutenant Colonel Hutchinson, 19th Arks., and Captains 
White and Washington, -"ith Arks., both dangerously; besides 
many other brave and valuable officers, whom I cannot name in so 
condensed a report. 

When the men gained the works, they were much scattered and 
mingled, in consequence of having passed through the woods and 
abatis, and with the assistance of my officers, I at once set about 
reforming my line. The regiments, much reduced, were drawn 
up along the enemy's second work. At about 5 p . m. the Major 



j^6 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

General Commanding directed me to move forward again. The 
order was given, and the men passed the works and moved on with 
ahicrity, notwithstanding their thinned ranks and exhausted condi- 
tion. Passing through the woods for about 500 yards, the com. 
mand reached an open field sloping upward and forward, on the 
west side of which extended the continuation of the works that 
had been carried. We were now in the rear of them as they 
fronted Atlanta, but the enemy had faced about and constructed a 
second and parallel line alongside the former, being thus protected 
both in flank and rear. He had also thrown up a work at an angle 
with this, with its left thrown back, which commanded the field 
above referred to and from which he kept up a heavy and con- 
stant flank fire upon my men. Undaunted, however, my command 
gallantly charged across the open field, at the same time changing 
direction to the. left, on which flank the enemy was nearest, and 
carried the entrenchments at about the same time that a force from 
Cheatham's Division, upon the opposite side, took them upon my 
left. With this force were the skirmishers of this Division, which 
had just arrived from their late position upon the Augusta railroad, 
imder command of Colonel Brucum, 8th Arks. Regiment of my 
Brigade, who was dangerously wounded in the charge. This 
position had been several times unsuccessfully attacked, if I am 
not misinformed, and to carry it required the most determined 
bravery and spirit, 

"We now held the most advanced portion of the works that had 
been carried, with our right extended away towards the enemy and 
within 25 or BO yards of him and having our front and rear flank 
exposed to an unintermitting fire. Operations ceased with the 
approach of night and my troops lay in this exposed position, under 
fire, until about 2 o'clock next morning, when, upon my represent- 
ing that it would be extremely hazardous to remain there after 
daylight, I was directed to retire my command to the second work 
taken from the enemy. This I at once proceeded to extend and 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Injantry. JS7 

accommodate to my defense, using for this purpose tools captured 
from the enemy. Brigadier General Lowrey was placed upon my 
right, while the Texas Brigade, having lost its commander, was 
reported to me and stationed in the enemy's first work, in my 
rear." 

Next is the report of General M. P. Lowrey, who commanded 
the brigade with which the 45th Alabama was connected, and 
which attacked us when the 11th, 13th and 15th Iowa were on the 
reverse side of the works. His report is as follows: 

Headquarters, Lowrqy's Brigade, ) 
Atlanta, Ga., J^'b' -9i i^^4- \ 
Captain I. A. Buck, A. A. Gen'l: 

Sir: — I have the honor to make the following report of the 
part taken by my command in the engagement of the 22d inst. 
My line was formed in the rear of Smith's Brigade, on the East 
Point and Decatur road, with the regiments arranged in the fol- 
lowing order from right to left: 1st, 33d, Ala., Lt . Col. R. F. 
Crittenden, and 2d, 32d Miss., Col. W. H. H. Tison; 3d, 16th 
Ala., Lt. Col. F. A. Ashford; 4th, 5th Miss., Lieut. Col. John B. 
Herring; 5th, 3d Miss. Battallion, Lieut. Col. J. D. Williams; 
6th, 45th Ala. Regt., Col. H. D. Lampley; yth, Sth Miss., Col. 
John C . Wilkinson . I was ordered to follow Smith's Brigade, 
500 yards in the rear. The whole country through which we 
passed was one vast, densely set thicket; so much so that it was 
found very difficult either to follow Smith's Brigade, or keep the 
proper interval; as a line of battle could not be seen 50 yards. 
The advance line soon seemed to have had much difficulty in keep- 
ing the proper direction, soon moved by the right flank, then for- 
ward, then by the right flank again, then forward, then by the left 
flank. The difficulty of following the movements in such dense 
woods, can scarcely be imagined. And- to add to the difficulty, a 
part of General Manney's command which I had been informed 
was to remain 300 yards in my rear, soon passed through my line. 



jjcP History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

creating great confusion, which required a considerable amount of 
time to repair. That hne then halted and I passed through it, and 
was reforming in front of it when I received an order from Major 
General Cleburne to move up rapidly. I then started forwards as 
rapidly as possible, but soon received an order from Lieutenant 
General Hardee to move rapidly to the support of General Govan, 
who was on the left of Smith. To do this I must again move by 
the left flank, which I began at once to do. But I soon received an 
order from Major General Cleburne, to move rapidly to the front 
and charge the works, that no time must be lost. I then halted, 
rectified the line, and gave notice to each regiment what they were 
expected to do, and moved forward without delay, being then 
about 500 vards of the breastworks. The right wing of my brigade 
had to cross a glade which was verv miry; and then, before ad- 
vancing far, encountered Smith's Brigade which had been repulsed 
and was reforming. Then, unforseen obstacles threw them into 
confusion, and separated them entirely from the left, the. woods 
being so thick that I could not see 100 yards. of line at one time; 
the derangement was not discovered by me until it was too late to 
rectify it. To add to the difficulties my men had neither sleep nor 
rest for two davs and nights under the rapid maneuvering above 
mentioned, and under the oppressive heat, many good men fell 
completely exhausted, and could go no farther. But notwithstand- 
ing the great disorder, the line, though scattered and thin, rushed 
forward with great impetuosity as though they bade defiance to 
Yankee breastworks. The 8th Mississippi lost their gallant 
Colonel, Adjutant and many other valuable officers and men near 
the works. The 45th Alabama rushed forward, the gallant 
Colonel Lampley leading the charge, who was wounded and cap- 
tured on the works; and Major George C. French was wounded 
in ten paces of the works and captured; three color bearers were 
shot down in rapid succession, one killed and the other two 
wounded. The 16th Alabama captured two Yankee flags which 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 



359 



were left by the retreating foe in front of their works. Tiie 82d 
Mississippi rushed forward ahnost to the works, when one-thiid of 
the command fell at one volley; and two color-bearers were killed 
in quick succession. All the regiments acted well. Taking the 
brigade altogether, J never saw a greater displav of gallantry. But 
they failed to take the works simply because the thing attempted 
was impossible for a thin line of exhausted men to accomplish. It 
was a direct attack by exhausted men, against double their number 
behind strong breastworks. The historj' of this war can show no 
instance of success under such circumstances. I lost in kdled and 
wounded and captured about one-half the men that were in the 
charge — 180 men with their officers being absent on picket detail, 
besides those who had fallen out in the fatiguing march. My loss, 
as will be seen from the accompanying report of causalties was 
(578) five hundred and seventy-eight killed, wounded and missing. 
Many of the captured were first wounded; but also some charged 
over the breastworks and were captured, while others went to the 
works and could not get away. The staff officers with me were 
Captains O. S. Palmer, J. Y. Cannack and Lieutenants A.J. Hall 
and W.J. Milner. All these otficers acted with coolness and gal- 
lantry as they had done on every field. Captain Cannack was 
wounded and captured. Captain Palmer and Lieutenant Hall each 
hada horse killed under him while near the enemy's works. I re- 
formed my command and brought it up to the support of Mercer's 
Brigade in a charge later in the evening, but they were not again 
engaged. I herewith submit a report of the casualties of m}^ 
brigade on the 22d instant: 



1 


■a 






D 


TD 




•a 


U 


























>/ 


o 


o. 




^ 





Capt. J. Y. Cannack 

3d Mississippi Battalion . 
5th Mississippi Regiment. 
8th Mississippi Regiment. 
.32d Mississippi Regiment. 
16th Alabama Regiment. . 
33d Alabama Regiment.. . 
45 Alabama Regiment . . . 



Lowrey's Brigade lost 

Govan's Brigade lost 

Smith's Texas Brigade lost. 



.11! 

13| 
.181 



Cleburne's Division, Total j ,1 



■■• 1| 
, 33 
. .44: 
..71i 
..45i 

.56; 

.38 
..72' 
,360 
,322 
,107 | 
,7891' 



. 1 
. 2 
.11 
. 3 
.23 
.30. 
.34 
.32 

T36 
.91 
185 
412 



..66 

..87- 
86 
..91 
..79 
.131 

.579 
.499 
,311 

,1389 



j6o History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

From these reports and letters you will observe that the brigade 
had the respect of its opponents, and their words confirm our own 
belief and knowledge of your heroic conduct and the severe fight- 
ing of that day. 

General A. Hickenlooper, our last brigade commander, writes: 
" Swiftly changing your position to the extreme left, you were 
once more upon the enemy's flank; and by moving cautiously, 
fighting continuously and gallantly assisting in cariying " Bald 
Hill " with a loss of two hundred and twenty-six in killed and 
wounded (in the brigade); on the morning of that ever memorable 
22d of July, you looked down upon the streets of Atlanta and believed 
that at last the prize had been won; when suddenly, far to the rear 
were heard the dropping shots of the advancing foe, followed by 
the crash of well delivered volleys and the deep bellowing of the 
batteries, which indicated serious battle. While Cheatham's Corps 
moved to the assault from the smoke-veiled front of Atlanta, 
Hardee's — the flower of the Confederate arm} — again and again 
assaulted your position on flank and rear. From noon until night 
cast its dark mantle over this scene of carnage, the contest waged 
with relentless fury. Fighting first upon one side, and then upon 
the other of your hastily prepared entrenchments, with swords fre- 
quently' crossed, bayonets locked and muskets clubbed, you clung 
with desperation to the lines you were ordered to hold, until the 
battle was won . 

While the ground in front of your lines was literally strewn 
with rebel dead, fully one-half your brigade was either killed, 
wounded or captured, and your idolized McPherson lay a mangled 
corpse. With a form the very embodiment of physical vigor, the 
courage of a lion, and modesty of a maiden: possessmg the love 
and devotion of his staff, the affection and confidence of an army, 
and the respect and admiration of a nation; fate decreed that solely 
to a private soldier of this Brigade should be entrusted the sad and 
sacred duty of ministering to the last wants of the dying hero; 




Jaivies B. M^Pherson 

MAJOR GEN'L.GOMMANDER OnHEMMY OFWETENNESSEE. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. j6i 

there, with but this companionship, while the sounds of battle still 
lingered in his ears, and the soft southern winds were singing a 
mournful requiem through the Georgia pines, the soul of our gal- 
lant leader passed to the other shore. 

Never before were the banners of a victorious army so heavily 
shrouded in black, or feelings more depressed by the beat of muf- 
fled drums." 

As conflicting statements have been made as to the command, 
first attack and the locality where the battle of July 22d, 1864, began, 
the following letter from Captain Irving A. Buck, Adjutant General 
for General Pat. Cleburne, of Hardee's Corps, settles the ques- 
tion: 

Baltimore., Dec. z^, 1886 . 
Gen. W. W. Belknap, Washington, D. C: 

Dear General: — In reply to yours of the 9th inst., would say, 
speaking entirely from memory, that the attack on the 22d of July, 
1864, near Atlanta, commenced between 11 and 12 o'clock, prob- 
ably nearer the latter than the former. The first on our side to 
get into it was Govan's Brigade of Cleburne's Division, striking a 
short earth-work across the rear, (McDonough) which was occu- 
pied by the 16th Iowa. The fight was rapidl}' taken up by Cle- 
burne's other brigade, to the right, (Govan being the left) until it 
embraced all his troops. 

I have always understood that the troops in our front were the 
Iowa brigade of Giles A. Smith's Division, The 16th Iowa was 
in part captured by Govan . This should settle beyond dispute, as 
to which they were. Respectfully yours, 

IRVING A. BUCK. 



CADET JAMES B. McPHERSON. 
The list of candidates, in the year 1849, for admission to the 
United States Military Academy, bears the name of James B. Mc- 
Pherson,of Green Creek, Sandusky County, Ohio, Sixth Congres- 

27 



^62 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

sional District. He was nominated by the Hon. R.Dickenson, 
M. C, and admitted, as a cadet, July 1, 1849, at the age of twenty 
years and seven months. 

The chiss of candidates numbered 89. At the examinations for 
admission and in January and June, 1850, it was reduced to 62 
members. Forty-four (44) members, of whom *27 are now Hv- 
ing, were graduated in 1858. The first class, proper^ of 1853 
graduated 52. 

The first and usual alphabetical arrangement of the class for 
studies, fixed his class standing No. 54: but he advanced rapidly, so 
that after the first annual examination in 1850, he stood second. In 
1851, 1852 and 1853 he stood first. 

In the Corps of Cadets he was promoted as follows, from Cadet 
Private: 

June 17, 1850, to Cadet Corporal. 

June 17, 1851, to Cadet Sergeant, and 

June 16, 1852, to Cadet Captain. 

In addition, August 24, 1852, he was appointed Sergeant in the 
Department of Cavalry. 

For the academical year of 1852 and 1853 he was elected Presi- 
dent of the Dialectic Society. In that sphere he gave high evi- 
dence of his fitness for the position of presiding officer, or one in 
authority over a civil body. As a member of the society he is re- 
called, through his efforts before it, as emment in the rules and 
modes of reasoning, and the appreciation of logical principles. 

During the four years of his cadet life he stands charged with 
only nineteen delinquencies. Among thern are three for being in 
bed between 6 and 7 a. m., and one for "asleep on bed 3J^ p, m.;" 
thus indicating that his military instincts and studious habits did 
not always intervene to prevent him from seeking the forbidden 
sleep, -which was, as the Commandant of Cadets was wont to say, 
"all very well if 'twas only permitted," 

*26 at this date.— August 27, '87. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. j6j 

Once his shoes were found "out of place at inspection"; twice 
his tent walls were "not raised at drill"; once he failed to put the 
hand-spike in proper place at drill" and once he was detected with 
"no coat on at 9 and 9^ p. m." 

The great military mistake of his cadet life was in permitting a 
section of his class to ride, in an omnibus, to practical engineering 
drill. For this, August 26, 1852, he was reported for "gross ne- 
glect of duty as squad marcher, not marching his section properly." 
The neglect lost him his captaincy, and caused reduction to the 
grade of lieutenant and quartermaster, as promulgated in the fol- 
lowing order: 



SPECIAL ORDERS NO. 150. 

EXTRACT. 

Headquarters, Military Academy, 
West Pointy Nexv Tork, Septe?nber 27, 18^2. 

The appointment of Commissioned Officers and Corporals exist- 
ing in the Battalion of Cadets are made null and void from and 
after reveille to-morrow, at which time the following appointments 

will take effect : 

***** 

McPherson to be Lieutenant and Quartermaster. 

***** 

By Order of Colonel Lee.* 
[Signed] J. M.Jones. 

1st Lt. 7th Infy. Act'g Adjt. 
The offense, it will be observed, is not recited in the order, and 
it may be inferred that the Superintendent of the Academy felt 
that the punishment was, without the recital, sufficiently severe. 

That the authorities of the Academy hesitated, as to the reduction, 
would seem from their permitting a month to intervene between the 
offense and the promulgation and the punishment. 

♦Brevet Colonel R. E. Lee, F. S. Engineers, subsequently General of the Confederate 
Army. 



j64 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

His classmates will recall the merriment once caused while 
under recitation in philosophy, when General W. B.Franklin — 
then Lieutenant Franklin, of the Engineers, — asked him: "What 
is a felly"? McPherson, in response, as was expected, found the 
true elements of the subject intended to be illustrated; but he went 
far around to find the rim of the wheel. No one more than him- 
self enjoyed the circumlocutional effect. 

He stood prominent in intellectual energy, unaffected simplicity, 
honesty of principles and purposes, intuitive penetration; and 
withal, his large heart was ever open to all the refined and noble 
sensibilities. Never was he flushed with anger, — instead, the 
crowning virtue of moderation, coupled with patience, was ever 
the director. The high injunction: "Establish thy reign in truth, 
in sweetness, and in justice," was ever before his e3'es. His merit 
was measured by greatness of soul . 

The present Superintendent of the Academy — Major General 
Schofield, — his classmate, in a letter to the undersigned, has said of 
him: "It is not easy to specify notable incidents in the cadet life 
of such a man as McPherson. His career was one uniform exem- 
plification of his remarkable character. An equably developed 
and thoroughly balanced mind, regular, industrious, and studious 
habits; scrupulous neatness and good order in person and surround- 
ings; comparatively mature years, and great manly development 
made him a model of excellence in all that gives high academic and 
military standing at the Academy . 

Great as were these mental and physical qualities, they were 
even excelled by the noble generosity of his nature. I recollect 
well when Sill,* by a mere accident, lost his record as first in one 
subject, leaving McPherson head in, that, as in most all others, the 
latter expressed his regret with the most evident sincerity: said it 
v\^as not right but that Sill deserved to be first in that branch of 
study. So, in general, McPherson never failed to concede to his 

♦Brigadier General I. W. Sill, U. S Volunteers, who was killed December 31, 1863, at the 
battle of tjtone River, Tenn. 



loxva Veteran Vohinteer Infcrnfiy. j6^ 

class competitors the most generous recognition of excellence, nor 
to aid liis classmates with even extravagant liberality in their 
efforts to master difficult subjects, and in perfecting their practical 
problems . 

In McPherson's splendid military record as a cadet officer, the 
one only incident deemed w^orthy of censure, which lost to him 
his captaincy, was but an act of kind-hearted generosity to his class. 

In recalling the events our cadet life and of subsequent years, it 
is difficult to find language by which to adequately describe the 
character of the noblest man of our time. 

It was the motto of McPherson. "Deo adjurante, non timendum. 
He recognized that man, the work of the Infinite being, is finite, 
and cannot look on himself without acknowledging it, — so finite, 
so circumscribed, that he hardly knows whether he exists or not." 

A distinguished writer, on a work bearing on civilization, has 
given the following classification : 

"The little minds which do not carry their views beyond a limit- 
ed horizon; bad hearts, which nourish only hatred and delight only 
in exciting rancor, and in calling forth the evil passions; the fan- 
atics of a mechanical civilization, who see no other agent than 
steam, no other power than gold or silver, no other object than pro- 
duction, no other end than pleasure." * * * * 
''For them (all these men) the moral development of individuals 
and society is of little importance; they do not even perceive what 
passes under their eyes, for them history is mute, experience bar- 
ren and the future a mere nothing." * * * * 

"There is a great number of men who believe that their minds 
are nobler than metal, more powerful than steam, and too grand 
and too sublime to be satisfied with momentary pleasure. 

Man, in their eyes, is not a being who lives by chance, given up 
to the current of time and mercy of circumstances, who is not 
called upon to think of the destinies which attend him, or to pre- 
pare for them by making a worthy use of the moral and intel- 



j66 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

lectiial qualifications wherewith the Author of Nature has favored 
him"' 

McPherson rapidly placed himself, as found by others, in the lat- 
ter class — the number who believed that society cannot continue its 
career without the aid and influence of moral means; and with that 
fact as an indestructible base, and a constant endeavor to observe 
the Divine law for the practice of the two precepts of charity 
towards God and towards his neighbor, his youthful cadet life fore- 
shadowed that his works and deeds would be "a numberless off- 
spring born to die no more." 

THOMAS M. VINCENT, 
Asst. Adjt. General U.S. Army. 

August, 1876 . 

[The foregoing sketch of General McPherson, which describes 
our beloved leader so thoroughly, and in such eloquent words, was 
kindly furnished by his associate at West Point and personal friend, 
General Thomas M. Vincent, U . S. Army.] 

From Major General W . T . Sherman's oiflcial report: 
" On the morning of the 22d, somewhat to my surprise this 
whole line (the intrenched position the enemy held on the 21st,) 
was found abandoned, and I confess I thought the enemy had re- 
solved to give us Atlanta without further contest; but General 
Johnston had been relieved of his command and General Hood 
substituted, h. new policy seemed resolved on, of which the bold- 
attack on our right was the index. Our advancing ranks swept 
across the strong and well finished parapet of the enemy and closed 
in upon Atlanta until we occupied a line in the form of a general 
circle of about two miles radius, when we again found him occu- 
pying in force a line of finished redoubts, which had been pre- 
pared for more than a year, covering all the roads leading into 
Atlanta; and we found him also busy in connecting those redoubts 
with curtains strengthened by rifle trenches, abatis and chevaux- 
de-frise. General McPherson, who had advanced from Decatur, 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. j6y 

continued to follow substantially the railroad, the loth Corps, 
General Logan, the 17th, General Blair, on its left, and the 16th 
Genei'al Dodge, on its right, but as the general advance of all the 
armies contracted the circle, the 16th Corps was thrown out of 
line, by the 15th connecting on the right with General Schofield . 
General McPherson, the night before, had gained a high hill to 
the south and east of the railroad, where the 17th Corps had, after 
a severe fight driven the enemy, and it gave him a most command- 
ing position within easy view of the ver}- heart of the city . He 
had thrown out working parties to it, and was making prepara- 
tions to occupy it in strength with batteries. The 16th Corps, 
General Dodge, was ordered from right to left to occupy this posi- 
tion and make it a strong general left flank. General Dodge was 
moving by a diagonal path or wagon track leading from the Deca- 
tur road in the direction of General Blaii-'s left flank. 

About 10 A. M. I was in person with General Schofield exam- 
ining the appearance of the enemy's lines opposite the distiller}', 
where we attracted enough of the enemy's fire of artillery and 
musketry to satisfy me the enemy was in Atlanta in force, and 
meant-to fight, and had gone to a large dwelling close by, known 
as the Howard House, where General McPherson joined. He de- 
scribed the condition of things on his flank and the disposition of 
his troops. I explained to him that if we met serious resistance 
in Atlanta, as present appearances indicated, Instead of operating 
against it by the left I would extend to the right, and that I did 
not want him to gain much distance to the left. He then described 
the hill ocoupied by General Leggett's Division of General Blair's 
Corps, as essential to the occupation of any ground to the east and 
south of the Augusta railroad on account of its commanding 
nature. I therefore ratified his disposition of troops, and modified 
a prexious order, I had sent him in writing, to use General Dodge's 
Corps, * * * and 1 sanctioned its going as already or- 
dered by General McPherson, to his left, to hold and fortify that 



j68 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

position. The General remained with me until near noon, when 
some reports reaching us that indicated a movement of the enemy 
on that flank, he mounted and rode away with his staff. * * 
* * Soon after General McPherson left me I heard the sound 
of musketry to our left rear, at first mere pattering shots, but soon 
they grew in volume, accompanied with artillery, and, about the 
same time, the sound of guns was heard in the direction of Deca- 
tur. No doubt could longer be entertained of the enemy's plan of 
action, which was to throw a superior force on our left flank, while 
he held us with his forts in front, the only question being as to the 
amount of force he could employ at that point. I hastily trans- 
mitted orders to all points of our centre and right to press forward 
and give full employment to all the enemy in his lines, and for 
General Schofield to hold as large a force in reserve as possible, 
awaiting developments. Not more than half an hour after General 
McPherson had left me, viz: about 12:30 p. M.,of the 22d, his 
Adjutant General, Lieutenant Colonel Clark, rode up and reported 
that General McPherson was either dead or a prisoner; that he had 
ridden from General Dodge's column, moving as heretofore de- 
scribed, and had sent off nearly all his staff and orderlies on various 
errands, and himself had passed into a narrow path or road 
that led to the left and rear of General Giles A. Smith's 
division, which was General Blair's extreme left; that a few 
minutes after he had entered the woods a sharp volley was heard 
in that direction, and his horse had come out riderless, having two 
wounds. The suddenness of this terrible calamity would have 
overwhelmed me with grief, but the living demanded my whole 
thoughts. I instantly dispatched a staff oflicer to General John 
A. Logan, commanding the Loth Corps, to tell him what had 
happened; that he must assume command of the Army of the Ten- 
nessee, and hold stubbornly the ground already chosen, more es- 
pecially the hill gained by General Leggett the night before. Al- 
ready the whole line was engaged in battle. Hardee's Corps had 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. j6g 

sallied from Atlanta, and by a wide circuit to the east had struck 
General Blair's left flank, enveloped it, and his right had swung 
around until it hit General Dodge in motion. General Blair's line 
was substantiall}' along the old line of the rebel trench, but it was 
fashioned to a fight outwards. A space of wooded ground of 
near half a mile intervened between the head of General Dodge's 
column and General Blair's line, through which the enemy had 
poured, but the last order ever given by General McPherson was 
to hurry a brigade (Colonel Wauglein's) of the 15th Corps, across 
from the railroad to occupy this gap. It came across on the double 
quick and checked the enemy. While Hardee attacked in flank, 
Stewart's Corps was to attack in front directly out from the main 
works, but fortunately their attacks were not simultaneous. The 
enemy swept across the hill which our men were then fortifying, 
and captured the pioneer company, its tools and almost the entire 
working party, and bore down on our left until he encountered 
General Giles A. Smith's division of the 17th Corps, who was 
somewhat "In air," and forced to ^ighijirst from one side of the 
old rifle parapet and then from the other, gradually withdrawing 
regiment by regiment, so as to form a flank to General Leggett's 
division, which held the apex of the hill, which was the only part 
that was deemed essential to our future plans. General Dodge had 
caught and held well in check the enemy's right, and punished him 
severely, capturing many prisoners. Smith (General Giles A.) 
had gradually given the extremity of his line and formed a new 
one whose right connected with General Leggett, and his left re- 
fused, facing southeast. On this ground and in this order the men 
fought well and desperately for near four hours, checking and 
repulsing all the enemy's attacks. The execution on the enemy's 
ranks at the angle was terrible, and great credit is due both Generals 
Leggett and Giles A. Smith, and their men, for their hard and 
stubborn fighting. The enemy made no further progress on 
that flank, and by 4 P . m. had almost given up the attempt. * 



^yo History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

* * The battle of the 22d cost us 3,722 killed, wounded and 
prisoners. But among the dead was Major General McPherson, 
w4iose body was recovered and brought to me in the heat of liattle, 
and I had it sent in charge of his personal staff back to Marietta 
on its way to his Northern home. He was a noble youth of strik- 
ing personal appearance, of the highest professional capacity, and 
with a heart abounding in kindness that drew to him the affections 
of all men. His sudden death devolved the command of the 
Army of the Tennessee on the no less brave and gallant General 
Logan, who nobly sustained his reputation and that of his veteran 
army, and avenged the death of his comrade and commander. 
The enemy left on the field his dead and wounded, and about a 
thousand well prisoners. His dead alone are computed by General 
Logan at 3,240, of which number 2,200 were from actual count, and 
of these he delivered to the enemy, under a flag of truce, sent in by 
him (the enemy) 800 bodies. I entertain no doubt that in the 
battle of July 22d the enemy sustained an aggregate loss of full 
8,000 men." 



GENERAL ORDER NO. 8. 

Headquarters 17th Army Corps, Department of Tenn. \ 
Before Atlanta^ Ga., yniy 2(5, 1864. \ 

During the blood\^ battle of the 22d inst., in which this corps was 

engaged, Private George y . Reynolds, D Company^ Fifteenth 

Iowa Veteran Infantry was, while in the performance of his duty 

on the skirmish line, severely wounded in the arm. In attempting 

to evade capture he came to the spot where the late beloved and 

gallant commander of the army, Major Gen. McPherson, was Iving 

mortally wounded. Forgetting all considerations of self. Private 

Reynolds clung to his old commander, and amidst the roar of battle 

and storm of bullets, administered to the wants of his gallant chief, 

quenching his dying thirst, and affording him 'such comfort as lay 

in his power. After General McPherson had breathed liis last, 

Private Reynolds was chiefly instrumental in recovering his body, 





Geo. J. Reynolds. 

CO.D.IS^^IOIVAmS. 
1 8 87. 



lozva Veteran Vohoiteer Infantry. jyi 

going- with two of his staff officers, pointing out the body, and 
assisting in putting it in an ambulance under a heavy fire from the 
enemy, while his wound was still uncared for. 

The noble and devoted conduct of this soldier can not be too 
highly praised, and is commended to the consideration of the offi- 
cers and men of this command. 

In consideration of this gallantry and noble, unselfish devotion, 
the " Gold Medal of Honor " will be conferred upon Private 
George jf. Reynolds, D Cotnpa/y, Jr'ijteenth Iowa Veteran In- 
Jantry^ in front of his command. 

This order will be read at the head of every regiment, battery 
and detachment of this cor^Ds. 

By command of 

FRANK P. BLAIR, Major General. 

A. J. ALEXANDER, Lieut. Col. and Asst. Adjt. Gen. 



CAPTURE OF AN ALABAMA COLONEL, ON JULY 
22d, BY COLONEL BELKNAP. 
As related to me by Private Peter E. Cromer of H Company: 
It was in our second position, the Rebs had charged up three or 
four times, and we had beaten them back. Captain Reid and a 
number of the boys would follow them up and pick up all the 
guns they could carr}^, so we had plenty of guns and kept them 
loaded. The timid ones would '' lay low '' and load. When the 
Rebs came up all we had to do was to shoot, then reach back and 
take another gun and shoot. Of course we looked out for the 
fellows that carried guns. Soon a Colonel took jDOsition in front 
of his regiment, (the 45th Alabama), and led them on a charge to 
our works, on reaching which he turned to see if his men were 
with him and began cursing them for cowards, when Colonel 
Belknap grabbed him by the coat collar and yanked him over the 
works, saying, " Look at your men! They are all dead! What 



jy2 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

are you cuising them for!" while several Rebs fired at Colonel 
Belknap, one ball passing through his beard. 

The fact that this Colonel Lampley was exchanged, went home 
and soon died, apparently of a broken heart, has often been pub- 
lished . Had Colonel Belknap acted towards his prisoner in the 
same spirit manifested by the British officer who killed Colonel 
Ledyard, at Groton Heights, in the Revolutionary war, would he 
have helped our cause as much as he did by the course actually 

taken . 

LOGAN CRAWFORD, H Company. 



AN INCIDENT AT ATLANTA, JULY 22d, 18(54. 

Major John J. vSafely, then Lieutenant 13th Iowa and Brigade 
Provost Marshal, had gone to the rear for cartridges for the 16th 
Iowa, and was returning loaded with ammunition, when he en- 
countered Lieutenant Colonel John M. Hedrick, of the I5th Iowa, 
lying at the base of a tree, looking pale and exhausted. The 
Colonel asked him where he was going, and when he said he was 
taking cartridges to the lOlh Iowa, the Colonel said, '' You will 
never come back alive .'' He pointed out to the Major the fact 
that the rebels were already on three sides of their brigade and 
were closing in on the fourth. The blood was streaming from a 
wound low down in the Colonel's side. A bullet had pierced him 
through and through, and while the Major was talking with him 
he fainted away. The Major thought he was dead, dropping his 
ammunition he laid the Colonel's head on the gnarled root of the 
tree and straightened out his body and then went on to the front 
with his load. 

At the Grand Review in Washington the Major was astonished 
to meet General Hedrick alive and apparently- well. The wound 
which he received was one that always caused him severe suffering, 
but it had not been fatal. His regiment and brigade were sur- 
rounded by the rebels but fought their way out, and the line re- 



Iowa Veteran Vohinteer Infantry. jyj 

formed and the position saved. Major Safely says of his old com- 
rade : " General Hedrick was one of the bravest men of that war. 
In the brief interview I had with him as he sat there on the field 
of Atlanta, his bearing and demeanor were those of a true soldier. 
It put nerve into me and made a better soldier than I had ever been 
before. 



STEAL ANYTHING, STOLE A GRAVE, BUT DIDN'T 
CARRY IT OFF. 
About two years ago Major H. C. McArthur, visited Ottumwa, 
and General John M. Hedrick, on introducing him, at a Camp Fire 
of the Grand Army Post, in that city, said, the worst thing he ever 
knew of McArthur, was stealing a grave, and it happened in this 
way. On July 22d, ]864, in that giant of battles before Atlanta, 
when our noble McPherson fell, Mac was in the 17th Corps Hos- 
pital (having been severely wounded in the charge, the day before) 
which was near the point where the rebels made their first assault. 
The hospital tents were shot through and through, and many a poor 
wounded soldier was sacrificed there . Mac's bed of boards was 
riddled with bullets before he would consent to be moved, and his 
wounds were such he could not be carried far at a time. A short 
distance from the hospital was a newly made grave, with a dead 
soldier in it, but the fight came on so suddenly, the body was not 
covered; as those carrying Mac reached this point the firing became 
very heavy and they sought shelter in this grave ; on the dead sol- 
dier, Mac was laid until a lull in the firing, when he was carried f ui"- 
ther back, and with several others, wounded, laid for a while in the 
brush. All at once a headquarter team, panic-stricken, came tearing 
along; the horses were soon relieved of the wagon and one span came 
galloping directly towards Mac, their nostrils distended with fear, 
and thoroughly excited. Mac thought then his time had come, and 
felt he would certainly be trampled to death by the wild horses, 
but just as he expected to feel their hoofs, they made a leap and 



jy4 History of the Fifteenth Regitnent 

jumped clear over him, and he was again saved that day. Mac 
had missed La Fayette Thompson (his faithful colored servant,) 
for some time, soon he w^as seen approaching them amid a hurri- 
cane of shot and shell, carrying the sword, coat and pants belonging 
to the Major; in the thickest of the fight, he had made the perilous 
trip back to the hospital and secured them. As Mac and the others 
had crawled from the place where Fayette left them, he was asked 
how he found them, and replied, he tracked them by the blood 
upon the leaves. Mac was soon afterwards taken in a wagon over 
a Corduroy road (which almost killed him) to Marietta, and from 
there was sent to "God's Country," up north. M. 

Patrick Norton, of "A Company," was born in Massachusetts 
and was about eighteen years of age when he enlisted, he was 
killed in the Battle of Atlanta, July 22d, 1864:, by the explosion 
of a shell, while assisting in carrying John F. Evans, his Lieuten- 
ant, who was severely wounded, off the field. Pat was as fine a 
specimen of physical manhood as the 17th Army Corps had in its 
ranks, and a better soldier never lived. A great many of the old 
boys will remember stuttering Pat, who would knock a man 
down and apologize afterwards that he was compelled to do it as 
his talking machine would not go. 

WM. C. HERSHBERGER. 

July 26th, at midnight, the 15th Iowa, with its brigade, division 
and corps left their position on the left of the entire army, and 
marched that night and the next day, in the rear of the connected 
lines occupied b}' the 15th, 23d 14th, 4th and 20th Corps, and cross- 
Proctor's Creek, arrived in the evening of July 27th on the extreme 
right of Sherman's Army, west of Atlanta, the 3d Division forming 
on the right of the 16th Corps, in position there, the 4th Division 
forming on the right of the 3d, and going into position during the 
night. 

General Sherman says in his report: "Pursuant to the general 
plan the Army of the Tennessee drew out of its Ijnes near the 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. jy^ 

Decatur road during the night of July 26, and on the 27th moved 
behind the rest of the army to Procter's Creek, and south to pro- 
long our line due south facing east. On that day, by appointment 
of the President of the United States, Major General Howard 
assumed command of the Army of the Tennessee, and liad the gen- 
eral supervision of the movement, which was made en echelon. 
General Dodge's Coi'ps, 16th, on the left^ nearest the enemy, Gen- 
eral Blair's Corps, 17th, next to come up on its I'ight, and General 
Los-an's Corps, 15th, to come upon its right and refused as a flank, 
the whole to gain as much ground due south from the flank already 
established on Pi^octor's Creek as was consistent with a proper 
strength. General Dodge's men got into line in the evening of 
the 27th, and General Blair's came into line on the right early on 
the morning of the 28th, his right reaching an old meeting house 
called Ezra Church, near some large open fields by the poor-house 
on a road known as the Bells Ferry on Lickskillet road . Here the 
15th Corps, General Logan's, joined on and refused along a ridge, 
well wooded, which partially commanded a view over the same 
fields. About 10 a, m. all the army was in position, and the men 
were busy in throwing up the accustomed piles of rails and logs, 
which, after a while assumed the form of a parapet. The skill and 
rapidity with which our men construct them is wonderful and is 
something new in the art of war. I rode along his whole line 
about that time and as I approached Ezra Church there was con- 
siderable artillery firing, enfilading the road . * * * I struck 
across an open field to where General Howard was in the rear of 
the 15th Corps * * * and remained there until 12 o'clock . Dur- 
ing this time there was nothing to indicate serious battle save the 
shelling by one or two batteries from bevond the large field in 
front of the 15th Corps. * * * * The enemy had come out 
of Atlanta by the Bells Ferry road and formed his masses in the 
open fields behind a swell of ground and after the artillery firing 
advanced in parallel lines directly against the 15th Corps, expecting 



jy6 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

to catch that flank in air. His advance was magnificent but found- 
ed in an error that cost him sadly, for our men coolly and deliber- 
ately cut down his men, and spite of the efforts of the rebel ofli- 
cers, his ranks broke and fled. But they were rallied again and 
again, as often as six times at some points, and a few of the rebel 
officers and men reached our lines of rail piles only to be killed or 
hauled over as prisoners. 



BATTLE OF EZRA CHUCH, JULY 28, 1864. 

Headquarters 15th Iowa Infantry, Vet. Vols., ) 
Near Atlanta^ Ga . , jfuly 2g, 1864. \ 

Captain C. Cadle, Jr., Asst. Adjt. Gen. 4th Division, 17th Army 

Corps : 

Captain: I have the honor to report, that on July 28, 1864, at 
11 1^ o'clock A.M.I received orders from Brigadier General Giles 
A. Smith, commanding division, to proceed with the 15th Iowa 
Infantry, commanded by myself, and the 32d Ohio, commanded by 
Major A. M. Crombecker, the former regiment belonging to 
8d Brigade, and the latter to the 1st Brigade, of this division, and 
re-enforce the division of General Morgan L. Smith of the 15th 
Army Corps, then attacked by a heavy force of the enemy. The 
movement was promptly made, and line was formed in the timber 
in the rear of General M. L. Smith's division, the 32d Ohio being 
on the right of the line. While there, a regiment w^as called for, 
and the 82d Ohio was sent to the extreme right of the main line, 
gallantly holding that position and maintaining it throughout the 
action. Shortly afterwards, the 15th Iowa was ordered up to the 
main line, and in the midst of a heavy fire relieved the 6th Mis- 
souri Infantry, General Lightburn's Brigade, which regiment had 
been stubbornly fighting from the beginning. After the 15th Iowa 
occupied this line, the enemy made repeated charges, until evening, 
when, repulsed and discomfited, they fell back, and failed to renew 
the conflict, which had continued from noon until near night. The 



Iowa Veteran Vohmteer Infantry. jyy 

15th Iowa, the 64th lUinois (Tate's Sharpshooters) being on the 
right, did their duty nobly, and drove back the enemy with great 
loss at each charge. At 11 o'clock p. m., the 15th Iowa was 
ordered to fill up a gap in Colonel Martin's Brigade, on the left of 
General Lightburn's, and erect works, which was done; but about 
9 o'clock on the 29th, both regiments under my command (the 15th 
and 32d) were ordered to return to their own division. A copy of 
a note addressed by General Morgan L. Smith to Brigadier Gen- 
eral Giles A. Smith as to the conduct of these regiments, is 
attached to this report. Our loss was two enlisted men killed, and 
one commissioned officer, and eight enlisted men wounded in the 
15th Iowa, a list of the same being enclosed herewith. My thanks 
are due the officers and men of both regiments for their gallantry 
and good conduct. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. W. BELKNAP, 
Col. 15th Iowa Inf 'y. Vet. Vols., Commanding. 



LIST OF THE KILLED AND WOUNDED, 

In Re-enforcing Lightburn's Brigade, General M. L. 

Smith's Division, 15th Army Corps, July 28, 1864. 

Killed: A Company: Corporals William Majors, Erastus H. 
Nordyke. 

B Company: Private Thomas Lenehan. 

Wounded: C Company: Privates^ Lewis Crowder, left shoulder 
severely; Rezin T. Spaits, left hand. 

D Company: Private Thomas J. Palmer, in head. 

E Company: Corporal George Harbaugh, head severely; Pri- 
vates, William H. Harryman, side; James H. Rose, knee. 

F Company: Captain Job Throckmorton in face; Private George 
Kearnes, hand . 

G Company: Sergeant Charles W. Kitchell, right arm ; Pri- 
vate Samuel L. Roberts, right arm severely. 
28 



jj8 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

H Company: Private Stephen Forman,head severely. 

I Company: 2d Lieutenant Henry Scheevers, in face; Privates, 
David Goldsmith, shoulder; James F, Nelson, . 

Captured: F Company: Private George Kearnes. 

Recapitulation: Killed, 3; wounded, 14:; captured, 1. Total 
casualties, 18. 



THANKED BY BRIG. GEN. M. L. SMITH, COMMAND- 
ING DIVISION. 

Headquarters 2d Division, 15th Army Corps, | 
Xear Atlajtta^ Ga., J^^^y ^9i 1S64. [ 

Brig. Gen. Giles A. Smith, Commanding 4th Division, 17th 

Army Corps: 

The General commanding thanks you for the assistance ren- 
dered him yesterday, by sending to his support the 15th Iov\'a and 
32d Ohio Regiments under command of Colonel William W. 
Belknap. 

The General also thanks Colonel Belknap and his brave men 
for the efficient manner in which they performed their duty . 
By order of 

BRIG. GEN. M. L. SMITH. 

G. LAFLAND, A. A. General. 



A RECOLLECTION OF THE BATTLE. 
Twenty-one years ago to-day, July 28, 1864, the sanguinary 
battle of Ezi'a Church took place before Atlanta, Georgia. To- 
day the weather is oppressively hot, like it was on that day, and 
the 15th Iowa Veteran Infantry was the only regiment of our 
brigade engaged in that battle. We were ordered to re-inforce 
General Morgan L. Smith's 2d Division 15th Army Corps, and on 
arriving on the field, our regiment, Colonel Belknap commanding, 
was ordered from where it was stationed at the foot of a long 
ridge or hill, to the crest of the ridge to where the main line of our 



loxva Veteran Volunteer Infantry. jyg 

troops were stationed, and under a terrific fire from the enemy ad- 
vanced and relieved the 6th Missouri Infantry. Before we ad- 
vanced, I recollect of seeing at the foot of the hill, General Mor- 
gan L. Smith, Captain C. F. Conn of his staff, and General Giles 
A. Smith, hrother of Morgan L., who commanded our division. 
The two Generals are both dead. Morgan L. was found dead in 
his bed at Jersey City, N. J., aijd Giles A. died of consumption in 
California. They were both gallant officers. Morgan L. could 
out-swear the army in Flanders. The 6th Missouri Infantry were 
in a hot place behind hastily improvised works built from old 
logs, dirt and rails, and had been engaged from the beginning of 
the battle. Their faces were literally begrimed with powder and 
covered with perspiration, and their muskets so hot from repeated 
firing they could scarcely handle them, (and before long we were in 
same condition). When we took their places they retired. 
General M. L. Smith to deceive the enemy and lead them to be- 
lieve he was receiving large re-enforcements, had every flag and 
banner put on the works, having part of our force countermach 
under the hill and then return as if they were new arrivals. 
The 15th Iowa, 35th New Jersey and 6-l:th Illinois (Yates' Sharp- 
shooters), armed with breech loading rifles, (sixteen shooters), 
were engaged in our part of the line. The firing was terrific . 
The Confederate forces were formed in column on the crest of a 
hill; behind them, on a more elevated spot, was a battery of artil- 
lery. At the foot of the hill in their front and parallel with their 
line of battle was a long string: of rail fence between them and 
us. The distance between our two hill top positions being sepa- 
rated by a valley, or open field without timber, was about three- 
quarters of a mile. The Colonel of the sharpshooters picked out 
a squad of his best marksmen and directed them to pick off the 
artillerymen manning the Confederate battery, which they did so 
effectively that it was seon silenced. The Confederate forces 
formed in column on the hill made a grand display as they took 



j8o History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

up their line of march down the hill, marching as coolly and as 
deliberately as if they were going out on battalion or grand re- 
view, till they were full half way to the fence when from our fire 
they commenced falling, being killed or wounded, but they never 
wavered, but closed up and came steadily on towards our works. 

A gallant and handsome general, a magnificent horseman, 
mounted on a large, fiery, dappljsd gray horse, which made him 
conspicuous, led them with drawn saber, who I learned from 
General Govan, of Arkansas, was General E. C Walthall, of 
Grenada, Miss., a very distinguished lawyer, now United States 
Senator from that state. Three times he led that grand veteran 
column, as it were into the jaws of death, to charge upon our 
works and three times they were repulsed — it seemed as if half 
the army were firing at the General. I took seven shots at him 
myself as fast as a musket could be loaded for me. It is not 
strange that I did not hit him, but I have often wondered how he 
escaped, as I learn he and his horse also did, unhurt, with all those 
sharpshooters after his scalp. 

I have seen many mounted officers under fire and in battle but 
never saw any man bear himself with more heroic daring in the 
face of death on every side than he did on that day. He won the 
admiration of his enemies. The officer killed nearest up to our 
works, within five rods of them, as he led the charge, was Captain 
T. I. Sharp, of the 10th Regiment Mississippi Infantry. He was 
a handsome, finely formed gentleman, with dark hair and eyes, his 
eyes wide open and glowing with excitement. His name was on 
his clothing and his initials on his sword which a soldier took from 
his hand, which still grasped the hilt, and gave to me, as I then had 
no sword, having had mine shot away from my side on the day of 
the battle of the 22d of July, before Atlanta, the day General Mc- 
Pherson was killed, and the same day General Govan's Brigade 
captured the 16th Iowa, of our brigade, and its gallant commander 
Add. H. Sanders. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 381 

The battle of Ezra Church lasted while we were engaged, from 
noon until nearly night. Some stragglers who were cut ofT from 
the main body and could not rejoin their command after the last 
charge, wearing butternut uniforms, were brought in as prisoners 
by some of our men, who found them well supplied with tobacco, 
which just then was in great demand; so our fellows were liberal 
with them, traded them something else for their tobacco and they 
were good humored, contented and happy to take a rest. Next 
day I was out viewing the battle-field, and counted 800 dead Con- 
federate soldiers lying along the fence I spoke of at the foot of the 
hill, and this was a small portion of their casualties in killed, 
wounded and captured. Conspicuous, from his large size and fine 
proportions, was the body of Captain John R. Jones, of the 2d 
Tennessee, who was killed leading his regiment and fell at a place 
where there was a gap in the fence. He appeared to be six feet 
and three or four inches in height, must have weighed 250 pounds, 
had a handsome, intellectual face, very dark hair and eyes, and 
bronzed complexion. He led his regiment on foot; his rank was 
designated on the collar of his uniform, which was perfectly new 
and very white homespun flannel of the finest material. Our sol- 
diers cut all the buttons from his coat as mementoes of the battle. 

Keokuk, July 28, 1885. J. M. REID. 



MOST REMARKABLE LOT ON RECORD. 
In a Carload of Soldiers not one is Hungry, so they de- 
cline A Feast with thanks. 

About 10 or 11 o'clock, Tuesday night, after the memorable 
Friday, July 22d, 1864, a train load of wounded men, some rebels, 
but most of them our men, on our way to Macon, stopped at 
a station, I think Grithn. Soon a lady appeared with a servant 
carrying a basket, at the door of our box car, and said, " Anvthing 
I can do for these men." Some asked for water, which was given 



j82 History of the Fifteetith Regiment 

them. " Anything to eat, she enquired," Thank you, we have 
all had a good supper was the reply. 

She stood a moment apparently at a loss what to do, when one 
of Sherman's veterans near the door said, Madam, you are very 
kind to take so much pains to assist us prisoners. 

Dropping her head an instant, she spoke in a tone at first very mild, 

but graduallv increasing to the vehemence of a woman with a will, 

saying, " Our people tell me that I should not do so, but I have a 

brother that was a prisoner up north once, and he tells me that he 

was treated just as well as he could have been among bis own 

friends, and I am trying to pay for it just as well as I can, the}' 

may say what they have a mind to." 

LOGAN CRAWFORD. 

Julv 30th, upon the recommendation of Major General Frank 
P. Blair, commanding 17th Army Corps, Colonel W. W. Bel- 
knap was appointed Brigadier General, and assigned to command 
the 8d Brigade. Colonel Hall, heretofore in command of the bri- 
gade, tendered his resignation and the same was accepted. 



GENERAL ORDERS, NO. 12. 

Headquarters loth Iowa Infantry Vet. Vols., ) 
Before Atlanta^ Ga., yuly ji^ 1^64^ [ 

The undersigned relinquishes the command of this regiment with 
regret, sharing with its members the pleasure of camp life and the 
toils of the Field from the first, I have now no memories of the 
past except those that are pleasant. 

Your few errors I forgive, as I hope for my many short-comings 
to be by you forgiven. Proud of your history, I will always de- 
fend your fame, will ever reverence the memory of your gallant 
comrades who have fallen in action, and will always be a friend to 
the officers and men of the 15th Iowa. 

WM. W. BELKNAP, 
Colonel 15th Iowa Vet. Vols. 



Iowa Veteran Vohintecr Infantry . j8j 

Headquarters 17th Army Corps, Dept. of Tenn., ) 
Provost MarshaPs Office^ Before At /a., Ga., July ji^ 64. \ 

Lieut. Col. A. J. xAlexander, Asst. Adjt. Gen. and Chief of 

Staff, 17th A. C: 

Colonel: — By the well merited promotion of Colonel Wm. W. 
Belknap, 15th Iowa Veteran Infantiy, to the rank of Brigadier 
General of Volunteers, that regiment will be left without a field 
officer, as soon as the order of appointment shall have been issued, 
Lieutenant Colonel J. M. Hedrick, of same regiment, having been 
severely wounded in the engagement of the 22d inst. 

While I fully and gratefully appreciate the honor of serving on 
the staff of the Major General commanding this army corps, I 
deem it my duty to make application for the purpose of being re- 
lieved from my present duty as Provost Marshal of this corps, and 
being allowed to rejoin my regiment. 

I am, Colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GEORGE POMUTZ, 
Major 15th Iowa Inf., Provost Marshal 17th A. C. 



SPECIAL ORDERS, NO. 188. 

Headquarters 17th Arm}^ Corps, Dept. of Tenn., 

Before Atlanta^ Ga., July ji^ 1864. 

VI. At his own request Major George Pomutz, 15th Iowa 
Infantry Volunteers, is relieved from duty as Provost Marshal of 
this Corps, and returned to duty with his regiment. 

The Major General commanding regrets that the interests of 
the service require him to lose the valuable services of this officer 
on his staff, and he takes this occasion to testify to the zeal, activity 
and ability with which Major Pomutz has performed the laborious 
duties of his office. 

By command of 

MAJOR GENERAL F. P. BLAIR. 

ROWLAND COX, A. A. Gen. 



j84 History of the Fifteenth Regi7nent 

GENERAL ORDERS, NO. 13. 

Headquarters 15th Iowa Infantry Vet. Vols., ) 
Before Atlanta^ Ga., August z, 1864. j 

In consequence of the well merited appointment by the Presi- 
dent of the United States, of Colonel Wm. W. Belknap, com- 
manding this regiment, to the rank of Brigadier General, I have 
applied to be relieved from detached duty as Provost Marshal of 
the 17th Corps, and hereb}' assume command of this regiment. It 
is due to the officers and men of the regiment to say that I fully 
appreciate and am proud of the bright name the regiment has won 
in the several battles of this memorable campaign. That name 
must and will be maintained under all circumstances that may 
arise, until the enemies of this first and best government on earth 
will receive their final blow. I appeal to the undying patriotism 
and tried valor of the officers and men to continue in their brave 
work, and to stand to their colors as the) have hertofore, as I will 
stand by it and them. All standing orders will remain in force. 

GEORGE POMUTZ, 
Major Commanding 15th Iowa Infantry. 

The attacks of the enemv on the 28th of July closed the series 
of offensive operations of General Hood. He first fell upon the 
Army of the Cumberland along the banks of Peach Tree Creek, 
July 18th, when that army was the extreme right and nearest wing 
of Sherman's army south of the Chattahoochie river, and met with 
a bloody repulse He next massed the bulk of his best forces 
against the extreme left of the Army of the Tennessee, 17t1i 
Corps, on the 22d of Julv, while it was going into position, at- 
tacking the same in front, flank and rear, and after the heaviest 
efforts displayed during the campaign, he had to order his "beaten 
braves" to withdraw from the field of carnage. Third and last, 
he fell with furious onset upon the 15th Corps, while it was form- 
ing in its new position near Ezra Church, July 28th, on the right 
of the 17th Corps, south, southwest of Atlanta, and was beaten 



loiva Vetei-an Volunteer Infantry. j8^ 

back at all points, leaving his dead and wounded on the field. 
These attacks resulted for him in an aggregate loss of nearly one- 
third of his entire army without having gained a single advantage 
tow'ards raising the siege of Atlanta, Henceforth he confined 
himself, almost without any exception, to defensive warfare, in 
which he had the advantage of a circle of interior lines, of a per- 
fect knowledge of the ground, and of the broken and hilly nature 
of the surrounding timbered country, culminating in the high 
plateau, on which, the besieged city was encircled with massive and 
well constructed first-class works, which were i-endered more com- 
plete by a well devised and finely executed system of abatis, 
ditches and chevaux-de-frise. 

The position of the 17th corps, on the right of the 16th, having 
been extended further to the right, the 4th division, under General 
Giles A. Smith, was assigned position -on the right of Ezra Church, 
* having the 15th corps on its immediate right and somewhat to 
the rear. The line of the division was advanced to the front of 
the church running in a southwesterly direction. The position of 
the 15th Iowa was in the reserve line of works, some 250 yards in 
rear of the first line; that of the 3d brigade, Brigadier-General Bel- 
knap commanding, being on the left of the 4th division, on the right 
of the 1st Minnesota battery. 

August 2d General Wm. W. Belknap was presented by the 
officers of the 15th Iowa with a magnificent sword, saddle and 
equipments, all of which were brought by Lieutenant-Colonel Hed- 
rick on his return from Baltimore, and had arrived in camp some 

•A letter from Atlanta says: -'The old land-marks of the war are fast disappearing. The 
earth-works on the battle-field of July 2-2d are almost entirely destroyed, and what is known 
as Higley Hill, (Bald Hill ? ), has a large brick house directly over the eiirth-works. Thecity 
is building over that field, and lots, where the 13th and 15th lovva charged the rebel works, 
are worth $50U per lot, 50x150 feet. The spot where General McPherson fell is marked by a 
large cannon, upright, resting on a large stone with a cannon ball on the muzzle, the whole 
surrounded with an iron fence made of musket barrels. The battle of Ezra Church was nearly 
four miles west of the city. About half of the field is now used as a city cemetery . Some of 
the earth-works are still standing, but the old Church is obliterated. T-and is worth from 
$5110 to S1,000 per acre. The old timber has been cut down, and a young growth of trees have 
sprung up, and makes it much harder to find the field." 



j86 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

time before. After the presentation speech by Major Pomutz,and 
a "well-worded" answer of acceptance, a general happy feeling 
prevailed, and our new brigade commander was serenaded by the 
splendid silver cornet band of Colonel Potts' 1st brigade (4th divi- 
sion) next on the right. The General's tents, however, being 
pitched in the immediate rear of, and close to the reserve line of 
breast-works on high ground, the lights in and around the tents 
could be plainly seen by the enemy, then only three-fourths of a 
mile beyond the Union advance position and the skirmish line in 
front. The sweet strains of music in the stillness of midnight, 
having "sufficiently enchanted" the General and his guests, at the 
same time awakened and moved the tender attentions of the enemy. 
Scarcely had the band executed its last piece, after playing half an 
hour, and while it was moving off, the sound of one of the enemy's 
guns was heard, and in another instant a traveling rebel messenger, 
in the form of an interesting ten-pound parrott shell, was located in 
the next traverse of the works, thirty or forty yards from the Gen- 
eral's tent to the right, where it exploded and wounded two men of 
the 3d Iowa, 1st brigade. Some one contended that the messen- 
ger's language conveyed a plain order from the rebel otficer of the 
day to have the lights put out near the General's tent . Accord- 
ingly, at once, by unanimous consent, the lights were out, darkness 
followed, and quiet reigned for the remainder of the night. 

The Arm}- of the Ohio, (Schofield's 28d Corps), having arrived 
from the left of the Cumberland Army, on the night of the 2d, took 
position on the extreme right August 3d, connecting with the right 
of the 15th corps; thus the 17th corps became the centre of the 
Army of the Military Division. The musketry and artillery fire 
first commenced on the extreme right, was continued along the 
15th corps, and broke out in front of the 17th, during which the 
skirmish line of the 4th division and of the whole corps was ad- 
vanced across an open field to the edge of the timber in front. 

The 15th Iowa was ordered, in the evening of August 3d, to 



Iowa Vetera?i Volunteer Infantty. j8y 

take a new position in front of the former first line, four hundred 
yards in advance, on the ridge of an elevated ground in an open 
field, facing an extended valley, some one hundred and fift}' yards 
behind the skirmish line. The position was promptly taken, 
amidst a constant fire from the rebel skirmish line, fortified during 
the night. Next day, early in the morning, the new line was at- 
tacked by the enemy beyond the left of the regiment, i^^A division), 
but the line helil and completed with breast-works for the infantry 
and solid fortifications for the artillery . 

The 1st Minnesota battery was on the right of the 15th Iowa. 
By this advance the direction of the brigade line was changed from 
a southwestern to a due southern course. 

From the 8d of August to the 28d the regiment was kept in the 
front line, changing its position to the front and advance five times 
up to Aug. 16th, when its last position was three hundred yards 
from the rebel skirmish line, six hundred yards from the first line 
of rebel breast-works, and three-fourths of a mile from the main 
heavy fortifications and detached forts of the enemy, running in a 
general southerly direction. In all of these positions heavy skir- 
mishing was constant day and night, several times mingled with a 
furious artillery fire from both sides, throwing solid shot, shell, 
grape and canister upon the opposite lines; the latter being espec- 
ially the case where any of our lines were advanced and during 
night were being fortified, the enemy trying to drive our men away 
before the new line could be .so fortified as to resist any attack the 
next day. At all such demonstrations on any part of our division 
front, the line of battle was promptlv formed, without any order 
being issued, each and ever}^ man springing to his post, however often 
during day or night the alarm of rapid volleys was given by the 
skirmishers. * 

*The 15th Iowa were the first to phice heavy logs from and under head-logs to the ground in 
rear, so that when head-logs were knocked out of position by shot of shell, they would not 
drop into the ditch and mash us, hut rolled down over the boys. 



j88 History of the Fifteetith Regiment 

The siege during this month was a constant drawn battle, as the 
lines were from day to day thrown forward, or the skirmishers ad- 
vanced principally at night, )iearer, closer to the main works of the 
enemy. At the same time they were steadily extending towards 
the right, by forming in one line without any reserves in their rear, 
so as to enable the right wing, (Schofield), to approach and besiege 
the line of railroad south, southwest of Atlanta. 

The last position of the 15th Iowa, and that of the Hd brigade, 
was exposed, besides on the front, to an annoying and destructive 
cross-fire irom the right flank, owing to a curve in the line follow- 
ing the ridges of elevated ground. Men were killed or wounded ■\ 
while sitting on the ground immediately in rear of the line of 
breast- works, and also a mile in the rear of their works. 

Assistant Surgeon H. Fisk, of the 15th Iowa, was the only med- 
ical officer in the division who was known to come out to the front 
every morning and attend personally to the men of the command, 
who needed his professional assistance during the exhausting, ex- 
treme heat and constant severe exposures at this period of the siege. 
While he daily attended the Surgeon's call, [still alarm], in front 
of the commanding officer's shcbmig^ [tent fl}' on poles], the rebel 
skirmishers' rifle balls ^vere very often whizzing and zipping all 
around him, and in several instances balls passed between him and 
the patient whose hand he held while studying the pulse. On 
August 17th, while in the rear of three lines of fortifications (which 
were occupied on August 1st) at what was thought to be a fitting 
place for his primary hospital, at 3 o'clock in the afternoon he was 
shot, the ball entering through his left shoulder, passing through 
the sixth rib, and lodging in the sacrum. Medical assistance was of 
no avail, and he died on the 19th. No better man nor one who 
attended his duties more conscientiously can be found in the list 

tLock, of E Company, while eiignged in a friendly bout with a comrade, was shot in the 
head. Vincent, of H Company, when enjoying a quiet game of Hi, Low, Jack, was struck in 
the hip by a rifle ball, and Murphy, of C Company, who was frying Sowbosom, waited to 
brown it a little too long, when a piece ot shell cut one foot nearly ofl", and many others were 
wounded. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. j8g 

of the officers of the army. The Lieutenant commanding the 1st 
Minnesota Battery, (just on the right of the loth Iowa), while sit- 
ting on the ground behind his works, asked for water, and had 
scarcely uttered his request when a musket ball from the right flank 
struck him in the left arm passing through his body and right arm 
killing him instantly, and wounded a soldier standing by. 

No better evidence of the patriotism and real worth, as men and 
soldiers of the officers and men of the regiment and of the brigade 
need be adduced than the fact that they bore the hardships of this 
memorable siege readily, endured hunger, thirst and absence of 
rest or sleep often for several days in succession when circum- 
stances so required; that although, on account of their thinned 
ranks, their detail for the skirmish line came on every other day, 
when relieved they were read}' to sacrifice their rest and go to 
work, digging, fortifying and chopping abatis, etc.; and all this 
cheerfully, in order to accomplish the great object of the cam- 
paign. 

The 15th Iowa had only 263 fighting men, able for active duty, 
during August. Out of ten line officers present for duty one was 
acting as adjutant vice Adjutant King, who was dangerously sick. 
The detail for the skirmish line took daily from 100 to 140 men 
under three or more commissioned officers, most of the rest being 
almost constantly ordered out as working parties, digging trenches 
and approaches to the front, cutting abatis, and strengthening the 
works, etc. At the same time each of these men had his gun and 
accoutrements (with a full ration of " forty rounds" therein) near 
at hand to " Fall in" at once to his assigned position, as of ten as the 
alarm of heavy firing was given by the skirmish line, usually but 
a short distance in front, which happened five to seven times each 
day, and as many and even more often at night; and in all cases 
with or without any alarm. The command was in line of battle 
just before daybreak and standing to arms till daylight, no officer 
or man excepted during the entire siege. 



jgo History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

The enemy's knowledge of the ground whence he had to retreat 
before our advancing lines was an advantage which he made full 
use of, opposite the position of the 17th Corps, and more espec- 
ially in front of the 4th Division . Here the rebel batteries were 
so established as to allow their artillery a vigorous fire on our front 
and on both of our flanks; and the intervening bushy and thick 
timber was sufficiently shot away and thinned by shelling us for a 
couple of days, as to enable them to get a proper direction and 
elevation against our batteries and the colors of regiments support- 
ing them. On the 10th, 11th, 14th and 16th they opened along 
their whole front several times during each day and night, and sus- 
tained a well directed fire for several hours, but were invariably 
silenced by our superior batteries. 

On the 17th, 18th, 20th and 22d their artillery threw a furious 
storm of solid shot and shell, bursting above the division line and 
scattering the timber in every direction. At the same time their 
infantry moved against the skirmish line of the 4th division, but as 
often it was repulsed, and their artillery silenced. 

On August 23d,* the 11th, 13th and 16th Iowa, having com- 
pleted their new line on the left and to the front of the 15th Iowa, 
and occupied the same, the latter regiment sent a heavy detail of 
officers and men to work on the new sap on the right of the 3d 
brigade, the regimental details working alternately during the day 
and night, when on the next day, 24th August, the work was sus- 
pended by orders from department headquarters. In the evening 
the regiment was ordered to construct a new line perpendicular to 
and to the rear of the left of the regiment, facing due north, which 
was finished by the morning of the next day, August 25th, and 
the three left companies ( B, G, K,) of the regiment occupied the 



*The 3d Brigade headquarters were last established in the rear of a line of works erected 
early in August, and deserted on the 7th, the re^jiments advancing further to the front. On 
the 23d, General Belknap received an early visit at 3:S0 o'clock A. m. in the shape of a musket 
ball passing through Lieut. John J. Safely"s tent, on the left, and striking the General's bed 
in the place where he must have been had he not left his couch early in the morning. His 
early rising habit saved his life or limbs that day. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. jgi 

same. This line, facing north, was continued on the left of the 
regiment, by heavy details working without intermission, across 
the old fortifications, which had been erected since the battle of 
Ezra Church, July 28th, and were afterwards deserted by our 
troops, when they advanced to the front, to the position held by 
them on the 24th. The front of this new line, facing due north at 
the point where it commenced, within the position of the 15th 
Iowa, was changed further to the left to face northwest, and still 
further on the left to face due west. 

Thus the new line on the left of the 8d Brigade, with the re- 
maining line of the troops then on their right, formed an irre- 
gular hexagon, with one side towards the southwest left open . 

August 25th, the Army of the Cumberland left its former 
position held during the siege — its 20th Corps having marched to 
the railroad bridge on the Chattahoochie, opposite Vining station — 
the 4th and 14th Corps marched six miles west of the heights near 
Proctor's creek into a well fortified position, and the 16th Corps of 
the Army of the Tennessee also left the position it held on the 
right of the Cumberland Army, and was now occupying part of 
the new line just completed . The rebel forces opposite these 
abandoned positions were at a loss to understand the situation . 
From the position of the 8d Brigade, 4th Division, 17th Corps, 
the view was open to the left, along the low and wide meadow 
a mile and a half. The enemy's skirmishers were seen advancing 
by half dozens about noon, discharging their guns, and receiving 
no answer from the abandoned lines, after a while retreating to 
their lines. Those opposite the skirmishers of the 4th Division 
were soon convinced of the line being held, as the skirmishers as 
well as the batteries had several times shown themselves, when 
tried, to be well alive . 

August 26th, the enemy's batteries opposite the deserted lines of 
the 16th Corps, and of the 3d division, 17th Corps, opened and 
were feeling for the troops that used to answer their calls. Elicit- 



jg2 History of the Fifteenth Regifnent 

ing no reply, however, they turned their whole attention to the 
line of the 4th Division for several hours in the afternoon and 
evening, which proved to be their parting farewell. 

At 8 o'clock p. M. of the same, the regiment, brigade, division 
and corps abandoned their lines and marched (followed by the 
15th and 16th Corps) in rear of the fortifications of the Army of 
the Ohio, gaining the Sandtown road and following the same in 
a southwesterly direction to within five miles of the Chatta- 
hochie river, which changed direction on a side road leading due 
south and halted at 4 o'clock a. m . of 27th; at 8 a. m. it resumed 
march, the Ohio (1st) Brigade, Colonel Potts commanding, 
leading the column in same direction. 

After building several bridges across rivers, creeks and marshy 
ponds, and cutting new roads through the timber, on the 28th 
August, the Iowa brigade, 3d, being in the lead, struck the Atlanta 
and Montgomery railroad, a little above Fairburn station, at 2 
o'clock p. M., where a rebel cavalry brigade under General Ross, 
was met, fought, whipped, and driven to the eastward. On that 
day the regiment and brigade, after fortifying their position east of 
the railroad line, took part in the general destruction of the railroad, 
which was executed by the troops for "twelve and a half miles, the 
ties bound and the iron rails heated and tortured by the utmost in- 
genuity of old hands at the work. Several cuts were filled up 
with the trunks of trees, logs, rock and earth, intermingled with 
loaded shells, prepared as torpedoes, to explode in case of an attempt 
to clear them out, " as General Sherman says, on that night and on 
August 29th . 

August 30th the armies moved directly east towards the Macon 
Railroad in three columns, to-wit: The Ohio Army on the left, 
the Cumberland Army in the centre, the Tennessee Army on the 
right; all on parallel roads, or as nearly so as practicable. 

General Sherman's report says. "General Howard having the 
outer circle had a greater distance to move. He encountered cav- 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Injantry. jgj 

airy which he drove rapidly to the crossing of Shoal creek, where 
the enemy also had artillery; hereafter short cannonading and skir- 
mishing. General Howard started them again and kept them mov- 
ing; passed the Renfro place on the Decatur road, which was the 
point indicated for him in the orders for that day, but he wisely and 
well kept on and pushed on toward Jonesboro, saved the bridge 
across Flynt river, and did not halt until darkness compelled him." 
August 31st the lines advanced, the 16th corps on the right, 15th 
corps in centre, the 17th corps on the left of the Tennessee Army; 
the men covered their front with the usual parapet and were soon 
prepared to act offensively or defensively, as the case called for. 
The 15th Iowa, with its brigade. General Belknap commanding, 
having been in charge of the train, arrived at 3 o'clock p. m., and 
at once took position on the left, when heavy musketry and artillery 
fire was opened on the right, soon enveloping the whole line to the 
left. The regiment, with brigade and division, having been as- 
signed to four different positions that afternoon and night, the last 
position assigned to it at 1 o'clock a. m. of .September 1st, being 
on the extreme left of the Army of the Tennessee on a rocky and 
high range, where the lines were fortified, finishing the work by 
daylight on the right of Battery F, 2d Illinois Artillery, the 13th 
Iowa being on the right of the 15th Iowa, and the 16th and 11th 
on the left of the battery. Daylight revealed the position of the 
regiment and brigade, and the situation of the surrounding country. 
Eastward to the Macon railroad lay a wide, undulating, open field, 
extending across a low ground, gradually rising towards the rail- 
road two miles distant and exposing the whole suj'face of the front 
to open view, with the exception of some occasional spots of groups 
of trees, and a narrow strip of young timber along the creek run- 
ning through the basin of the valley, the latter being the line of 
our skirmishers. The same open ground continued towards the 
south one mile, and towards the north over half a mile, beyond 
which a young, brushy, oak timber closed the view. The lines of 
29 



jg4 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

several divisions were generally facing east, that of the 3cl brigade 
being the extreme left v\^as somewhat refused to the rear. At noon 
the Cumberland Army arrived and took position on the left of the 
4th division, and as soon as connection was established commenced 
to swing its left around towards the Macon railroad, where it con- 
nected with Schofield's Ohio Army, descending on the east side of 
the railroad towards Jonesboro, 

The engagement, which commenced before noon on the extreme 
right (16th corps), and was kept up along the line to the left, now 
broke fiercely opposite the 17th corps and along the Cumberland 
Army. Never, during the whole war, could the lines engaged in 
actual close conflict be seen to such a length and extent at one glance, 
as they could now be seen from the elevated ground whereon the 
left of the 4th division was assigned position. From that point the 
advance and engagement of the skirmish line, as well as the lines 
of battle of several corps, could be plainly viewed. 

After a desperate fight and obstinate resistance, lasting over two 
hours, the enemy, (Hardee and Lee's corps), was brought to waver 
and soon gradually to yield his ground, retreating along the railroad 
towards Jonesboro, followed closely by the lines of the Cumberland 
Army facing south. 

That part of the enemy's line which was facing the Army of the 
Tennessee soon yielded, as the advancing Federal lines began to 
flank their positions, when the 3d brigade, with its division and 
corps, was ordered to the extreme right to protect the right flank of 
the weakened 16th corps. It was marched on a parallel road in 
rear of that corps, and arriving on the right of the same at 6 o'clock 
p. M. at the crossing of the Flynt creek, it met, fought and drove 
the enemy from its well-selected position before night. After the 
fight, and while heavy skirmishing continued in front, the brigade 
was ordered to a new position on the left of the road, the 15th Iowa 
being the left, to connect with the right of the 16th corps at Flynt 
creek. Skirmishing was kept up during the whole of the dark 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. JP5 

night, the enemy's position in front of the 4th division being scarcely 
three-fourths of a mile distant. About midnight artillery firing of 
the heaviest kind, and in rapid succession, v^as heard far away at 
the north for over half an hour, and again about 4 A. m., mostly 
resembling a fire by file from a battalion of cannon. None could 
account for it until, on September 3d, it was ascertained that the 
enemy had burned eighty car loads of fixed ammunition prepara- 
tory to evacuating Atlanta that night; the troops that evacuated 
were the rebel General Stewart's Corps, and some 15,000 Georgia 
State Militia, who endured better times in sufficient degree during 
the siege to make them well remember that one of the staple pro- 
ducts of their state was " Sorghum molasses," and they ought to 
attend to that article instead of ever again meeting " Sherman's 
vandals " face to face. The Macon papers gave them the epithet 
henceforth of " Sorghum Malitia " with some degree of truth . 

September 2d, at daybreak, two batteries opened a furious fire upon 
the enemy in front of the 4th division, and the lines of infantry were 
forming preparatory to an advance, when the enemy resumed his 
retreat — thus giving up Jonesboro. The 3d Brigade, leading the 
17th Corps, started on the right of and parallel to the railroad, the 
15th Corps moving on the railroad. Early in the afternoon, a 
slight cavalry skirmish commenced on the right and in advance of 
the column, when the 3d Brigade furnished a line of flankers; 
later in the evening a brigade skirmish line was sent out, with the 
15th Iowa supporting the same, while the line of the division was 
formed facing south. The lines, thus moving forward, gradually 
changed their direction, lastly to face towards east; in this direction 
the division advanced half a mile, in an open but undulating, 
broken country; took position, and fortified same in an hour. 
Meanwhile, the enemy's skirmishers being pushed back, the divi- 
sion advanced at dark * to another position to the front, connecting 

♦Afi ihe arlvaiice of the brigaiie reached where ihe road turned to the right, a cavalryman 
rode hui-iiedly towards th»^ rear; near the colors of the i5ih, he caught up with cavalryman 
No. 2, also marchinp; to the rear, joining him. Xo. 1 said, ' Hello. Cap, I lold a General 
with a big bushy bea'rd. at the head of i he column, ihat we had bunched the Rebs for him ; 
the next instant the bunched rebs fired a tremendous volley at us. but luckily for ne the shot 
went over our heads; there was a line of cavalry horses in the field on oiir left, but the 
cavalry, where were they? 



jg6 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

with the right of General Woods' division, 15th Corps facing east 
opposite Love joy's Station. 

The line of the Bd Brigade being refused to the rear so as to 
face nearly south, it became exposed to an annoying cross-fire from 
east and south during the night and subsequent days. 

September 3d, General Sherman's circular was published, con- 
gratulating the armies under his command upon the successful 
achie\ ement of the great object of the campaign, announcing the 
evacuation of Atlanta by the enemy on the night of September 1st, 
and the occupation of the same by Slocum's 20th Corps, on the 
morning of September 2d; and also announcing the next destina- 
tion of the several armies, to-wit: The Cumberland Army to gar- 
rison Atlanta and the railroad north to Vinings Station, on the 
Chattahoochie; the Ohio Army to garrison Decatur and vicinity; 
the Army of the Tennessee to be stationed south of Atlanta, pro- 
tecting the Atlanta and Macon railroad. 

Next day, the different trains were moved towards their respec- 
tive destinations, and at 8 o'clock p. m. of September 5th, the 
Army of the Tennessee left their position opposite Lovejoy, arriv- 
ing on the 8th within the massive rebel fortifications, and on the 
the 9th the several brigades, divisions and batteries of the 17th 
Corps were assigned their camps near the A. & M . railroad and 
near East Point, to positions to be fortified at once and the whole 
line was completed by September 15th. 

Now the men, for the first time since the opening of the cam- 
paign, were permitted to enjoy a well merited and most needed re- 
laxation from the continued exhausting exertions of the long and 
severe, but glorious campaign . 

During the siege just closed, the 15th Iowa has been under con- 
stant fire eighty-one days, most of this number the firing having been 
heavy and severe enough, and having lasted long enough during 
days and nights, as to be equal to common battles. It also partici- 



loxva Veteran Volunteer Infantry. jgy 

pated in seventeen battles or advances upon the enemy and re- 
pulsing the enemy's attacks. 

The 15th low^a was under fire, during the siege of Atlanta, on 
the following days: 

In June, from 10th to 30th inclus., Big Shanty and Kenesaw Mount'n, 20 days 

In July, from 1st to 16th inclusive, north of Atlanta, 10 days 

In July, from 20th to 26th inclusive, east of Atlanta, 7 days 

In July, from 27th to 31st inclusive, west of Atlanta, 5 days 

In August, from 1st to 26th inclusive, southwest of Atlanta, 26 days 

In August, 28th and 31st inclusive, south of Atlanta, 2 days 

In September, 1st to 5th inclusive, southeast of Atlanta, 5 days 

Total 81 days 

Days of battles or of advances upon the enemy, or repulsing 

the enemy's attacks: 

June 15th, 19th, 23d, 37th, 4 days 

July 3d, 4th, 5th. 20th, 31st, 22d, 28(:h, 7 days 

August 17lh, 20th, 2Sth, 31st, 4 days 

September 1st, 2d, , , • • • • 2 days 

Total 17 days 



CASUALTIES OF THE CAMPAIGN IN SKIRMISHES, 
ON PICKET, ETC. 
Asst. Surgeon H . Fisk, wounded mortally, before Atlanta, 
August 17; A Company, wounded: Privates, S. Bailie, hand 

and shoulder, Atlanta, August 15; P. Gebhart, , Nickajack, 

July 4; M. McNiece, leg, Kenesaw Mountain, June 17; J. 
Sweeny, left thigh, Nickajack, July 4; W. Watson, right thigh, 
Nickajack, July 4; B Company, wounded: 1st Sergeant W. Lump- 
kin, right leg, Nickajack, July 7; Privates, F. Burger, left hand» 
Atlanta, August 26; J. Fisher, right hand, Atlanta, August 28; J. 
Hardin, right arm, Atlanta, August 28; C. E. Harvey, head 
severely, Kenesaw, June 17; C Company, killed: Sergeant A. C. 
Tanner, Atlanta, August 9; Private G. Fallon, Kenesaw, June 19; 
wounded: Lieutenant S. Rynearson, Kenesaw, June -; Sergeant 
W. C. Laird, abdomen, Nickajack, July 5; Corporal VV . H. Rom- 
esha, lef t ann and side, Atlanta, August 27; Privates J. Coolej', 



jg8 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

left knee, August 23; J. Martin, , Nickajack, July 4; T. Mur- 
phy, right leg, (amputated), Atlanta, August -; D Company, 
wounded: Corporal L. H. Burkhalter, left arm, Nickajack, July 4; 
Privates, A. J. Roach, right leg, Nickajack, July 7; J. Ogg, sun- 
stroke, Atlanta, July 26; E Company, killed: Private J. D. Sel- 
lers, Kenesaw, July 1: wounded: Drummer M. C. Davis, head, 
Nickajack, July 4, and in abdomen and right knee, (leg ampu- 
tated), on July o; Privates, \ V . G. Bish, shoulder, Nickajack, July 
5; J. F. Lock, head, Atlanta, August 11; S. Mariott, leg, Nicka- 
jack, July 5; W. Miller, leg fractured, Nickajack, July 5; H. N. 
Moore, shoulder, Atlanta, August 15; O. Orm, leg severely, 
Nickajack, July 5; J. M. Richmond, hand, Nickajack, July 5; 
C. Warren, left arm, Atlanta, August 25; F Company, killed. 
Private L. Hessemer, Kenesaw, June 24; wounded. Sergeants I. 
Cooper, right shoulder, Atlanta, August 10; W. ^^^ Seater, mor- 
tally, Kenesaw, June 24; Private L. E. Kelly, leg severely, 
Atlanta, August 25; G Company, wounded: Corporal J. C. 
Chapin, mortally, Kenesaw, June 27; Privates, J. Davis, mortally, 
Kenesaw, June 25; C. Finn, left hip severely, Kenesaw, June 27; 
J. Hannan, hand, Kennesaw, June 20; J. A. Lee, head, Nickajack, 
July 4; J. H. Reeves, mortally, Nickajack, Julv 5; R. Sanders, 
■mortally, Nickajack, July 3; H Company, killed: Corporal A. L. 
Stone, Atlanta, August 19; Wounded, Captain N. W. Edwards, 
face, Kenesaw, June 16; Sergeant J. Vincent, right hip severely, 
Atlanta, August 26; Privates, W. Alloway, right thigh severely, 
Nickajack, July 4; B. F. Jordan, head, Atlanta, July 26; P. Mur- 
phy, knee severely, Kenesaw, June 16; W. F. Wills, foot, Atlanta, 
August 3; L. S. Tyler, sunstroke, Atlanta, August 1, again on 
27; I Company, wounded: Sergeant J. C. Bonar, left hand, Nick- 
ajack, July 5; Privates, O. P. Fleming, foot, Kenesaw, June 16; 
L. Half hill, wrist, Nickajack, Julv 5; captured. Private J. Fox, 
Atlanta, August 26; K Company, killed: Private W. S. Clear- 
waters, Nickajack, July 5; wounded. Corporal J. E. Morgan, 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 



399 



head severely, Lovejoy, September 2; Private J. F. St. John, 
left hand, Kenesaw, June 27. 



RECAPITULATION OF LOSSES DURING THE CAMPAIGN, IN 
SKIRMISHES, ETC. 



^^ 



S. c 

O 3 



U 



Field and Staff. 

A Company 

B Company 

C Company .... 2 

D Company 

E Company 1 

F Company 1 

G Company 

H Company 1 

I Company 

K Company • 1 

Sunst. DCol;HCol 

Totals, 6 

Total in charge Ju 21. .. . . 41 7 

Total in battle Ju 22 . 12 ^ 5 

Total in battle Ju 28. .i '^y . . Oj 



14 



1 


87 
1 



11 
4 



59 

159 

18 

291 



Aggregate 



251 



18| 



157 



175 1 



89) 



I 



Surgeon W, H. Gibbon, during the siege on detached service, on 
the 4th Division Board of Operators, returned now^ to the regi- 
ment, and by his excellent treatment, the cases of sickness were at 
once reduced in number, as well as character. 

Adjutant E. H. King, who, being sick with fever since the 
forepart of August, and disabled from active field duty, was elected 
by the officers, and appointed by the regimental commander, 
Chaplain of the regiment on September 10th, having left on sick 
leave for the north that day. First Lietitenant E. P. Bye, G. Co., 
and from August 30th, Second Lieutenant W. C. Stidger, E. Co., 
were detailed to fill the place temporarily. 



400 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

GENERAL FIELD ORDERS, No. 16: 

Congratulatory Order of Major General Howard. 

Headquarters Department and Army of the Tennessee, ) 
East Poitit^ Ga ., September gth^i864. \ 

It is with pride, gratification, and a sense of Divine favor, that I 
congratulate this noble armv, upon the successful termination of the 
campaign . 

Your officers claim for you a wonderful record, — for example, a 
march of four hundred (400) miles, thirteen (l-^) distinct engage- 
ments, four thousand (-4,000) prisoners, and twenty (20) stands of 
colors captured, and three thousand (3,000) of the enemy's dead 
buried in your front. 

■ Your movements upon the enemy's flank have been bold and suc- 
cessful: First, upon Resacca; second, upon Dallas; third, upon 
Kenesaw; fourth, upon Nick-a-jack; fifth, via Roswell, upon the 
Augusta railroad; sixth, upon "Ezra Church," to the southwest of 
Atlanta; and seventh, upon Jonesboro and the Macon railroad. 
Atlanta was evacuated while you were fighting at Jonesboro. 

The country may never know with what patience, labor and ex- 
posure you have tugged away at every natural and artifical obstacle 
that an enterprising and confident enem\' could interpose. The 
terrific battles you have fought may never be realized or credited. 
Still a glad acclaim is already greeting you from the Government 
and people, in view of the results you have helped to gain; and I 
believe a sense of the magnitude of the achievements of the last 
hundred days will not abate, but increase with time and history. 

Our rejoicing is tempered, as it always must be, by the soldier's 
sorrow at the loss of his companions in arms. On every hillside,^ 
in every valley throughout your long and circuitous route, from 
Dalton to Jonesboro, you have buried them .* 

*The official records of the Union and Confederate ariniep show that from Chattanooga to 
Atlanta inclusive, more than 85.000 men were killed and wounded, and more than 30,000 men 
were captured by the two armies during the year ending September 15, l8fi4. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 401 

Your trusted and beloved Commander fell in your midst; his 
name, the name of McPherson, carries with it a peculiar feeling of 
sorrow. I trust the impress of his character is upon you all, to 
incite you to generous actions and noble deeds. 

To mourning friends, and to all the disabled in battle, you ex- 
tend a soldier's sympathy . 

My first intimate acquaintance with you dated from the 2Sth of 
July. I never beheld fiercer assaults than the enemy then made, 
and I never saw troops more steady and self-possessed in action 
than your divisions which were then engaged. 

I have learned that for cheerfulness, obedience, rapidity of move- 
ment, and confidence in battle, the Army of the Tennessee is not 
to be surpassed. And it shall be my study that 3'our fair record 
shall continue and my purpose to assist you to move steadily 
forward and plant the Old Flag in every proud city of the Re- 
bellion. O. O. HOWARD, 

Major-General. 



i^^i^T x:i. 



FALL CAMPAIGN OF 1864. 
Reconnoissance to Fairburn, and to Powder Springs—^ 
General Hood's Whole Army West of the Chatta- 
HoocHiE — Pursuit of Hood to Resacca — Gaylesville — 
Marietta — 15th Iowa to Receive 500 Drafted Men, 
October, 1864 — Cutting Loose from the Old Base — 
March to the Sea — November and December, 1864— 
Savannah. 

General F. P. Blair and General G. A. Smith having left for 
the north on September 21st, the command of the 17th Corps de- 
volved on General M. D. Leggett, and from September 26th on 
General T. E. G. Ransom; that of the 4th Division on General 



402 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

W. W. Belknap; that of the 3d Brigade on Lieutenant Col., J. 
C. Abercrombie of the 11th Iowa, temporarily. The two divisions 
of the 16th Corps, with the army of the Tennessee, were trans- 
ferred September 30th, the 1st Divison under General J . W. 
Fuller to the 17th Corps, and the 4th Division under General J. M. 
Corse to the 15th Corps. 



APPEAL FOR RE-ENFORCEMENTS FOR IOWA REGI- 
MENTS IN THE FIELD. 
Important Corrkspondence Between General Howard 
AND Governor Stone. 

Headquarters Department and Army of the Tennesse. ) 
East Poi?it^ (la.^ September 2jd, 1S64, [ 

To His Excellency VVm. M. Stone, Governor of the State of Jowa. 

Sir: I have the honor to herewith transmit a copy of the 
requisition for drafted men for Iowa regiments in the Army of the 
Tennessee in the field. 

Their record throughout the entire war, the laurels they have 
helped to place upon the victorious banners of the army of the 
Tennessee, and their praise\\'orthy desire to continue their effi- 
ciency, demands attention from the patriotic men of Iowa. With 
the hope that their appeal may meet with success through your 
exertions, I have the honor to be. 

Very respectfully your obedient ser\'ant, 
O. O. HOWARD. Major-General Commanding. 



THE GOVERNOR'S REPLY. . 

State of Iowa, Executive Office, 
Des Moines^ October 8th, 1864. 

Major-General O. O. Howard, Coinnia?iding Army of the Ten- 
nessee^ East Pointy Georgia . 

Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your re- 
quisition for drafted men for Iowa regiments in the Army of the 
Tennessee, and the accompanying letter of September 23d. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 40J 

You are doubtless aware that the distribution of drafted men and 
vohinteer recruits is taken entirely out of the hands of the State 
Executives, and made under the sole direction of the War Depart- 
ment. I have, therefore, no control whatever over the subject, 
and can only unite with you in requesting that the regiments 
designated be filled up as far as the number of men furnished by 
the State will go. The actual number of men clue from this State 
under the late call, after deducting the excesses furnished over for- 
mer calls, is less than 4,000. You will perceive, therefore, that if 
the regiments serving under your command should receive the 
entire number obtained, it will fall considerably short of filling 
your requisition. In my opinion, it is the policy of the Govern- 
ment to send the new levies into the department where they are 
most needed for immediate and active service, and distribute them 
to those regiments which have done the most work and sustained 
the heaviest losses. 

.No one can appreciate more fully than I do the great services 
performed by the gallant Army of the Tennessee, and its high 
claims to the grateful consideration of the country. My admira- 
tion of this army is essentially increased by the fact that many 
Iowa regiments, to whose heoric achievements the State is vastly 
indebted for the high place it occupies in the history of this war, 
have been associated with it from its earliest organization, and 
have borne a conspicious part- in all the memorable campaigns 
which have crowned the soldiers of the northwest with such im- 
perishable honor. 

Entertaining these feelings myself, and knowing it to be univer- 
sally shared in by the loyal people of our State, and having a 
soldiers warmest affection for the noble men who have survived these 
perilous campaigns, I should fail in doing justice to my convictions 
of duty, did I not join with you in earnestly recommending that 
their now thinned ranks be speedily filled. 

Thanking you, General, for this evidence of your kind feelings 



404 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

toward these brave regiments, and the deep interest I am assured 
you constantly manifest in their welfare and good name, I remain 

Very truly yours, 

W. M. STONE. 
By the armistice concluded on the 10th of September between 
Generals Sherman and Hood, the regiment received 42 of the 89 
men captured during the battle of July 22d, who, being exchang- 
ed, joined the regiment during the latter part of September in an 
extremely ragged, emaciated and sickly condition. 



SPECIAL ORDERS NO. 238. 

EXTRACT. 

Headquarters l7th Army Corps, Dep't of the Tennessee, 
A^car Atlanta^ Ga.^ September 24, 1864. 

VHI. In compliance with Instructions from Department Head- 
quarters, division quartermasters will make gratuitous issue of one 
whole suit of clothing to each exchanged prisoner of war of this 
command. 

By command of 

BRIG. GEN. T. E. G. RANSOM. 

ROWLAND COX, A. A. Gen. 

[Official] Ad. Ware, Jr., A. A. Gen. 

[Official] O. D. Kinsman, A. A. G. 

October 1st the regiment, with its brigade and division, received 
marching orders at noon, and started at 2 P . m. on a reconnortering 
expedition, accompanied by General Fuller's 1st Division ; the whole 
under command of General Ransom, and moved in a south, south- 
westerly direction, along the Montgomery railroad: the object of 
the reconnoissance being to find out the whereabouts and the 
strengh of Hood's army on the left bank of the Chattahoochie. 
October 2d, started from the bivouac of the preceding night at 5 
o'clock a.m. The 15th Iowa, in the lead of the two divisions, 
met the enemy at 7 o'clock, and deployed a heavy line of skir- 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 40^ 

mishers, who drove the rebel cavalry in front till 10 o'clock to 
Fairburn; then it was relieved by troops of Colonel Potts' 1st 
Brigade, 4th Division. At the same time the 1st Minnesota Bat- 
tery of Zinch rifles opened at long range, which, after some resis- 
tance, threw the enemy into flight. The object of the expedition 
having been attained, by receiving knowledge of the fact that 
Hood had his headquarters six miles below Fairburn two days pre- 
vious, that since then most of his infantry had crossed the Chatta- 
hoochie at and below Sandtown ferry, and that two divisions of 
cavalry were left to guard their rear, the expedition returned, 
marching twenty-four miles on October 8d to its camp near East 
Point, and received orders to send all surplus baggage and tents to 
Atlanta,' and be ready to move in light marching order at a 
moment's notice.* 

October 4th, the regiment and entire corps started at 5 o'clock 
A. M., passing by Whitehall and thi'ough the several rebel lines of 
heavy fortifications that were opposite the position of the 4th di- 
vision, during the siege back to Ezra Church, thence to the cross- 
ing at Proctor's creek, and along the Chattanooga railroad to 
Vinings Stations, where it crossed the Chattahoochie on pontoons,"j" 
and arrived at night four miles south of Marietta, within the late 
strong rebel breastworks, marched eighteen miles. The 13th and 
16th Iowa were at once detailed to go on a scouting expedition 
some three miles, against supposed rebel cavalry skirmishing 
with our flankers, they returned without having met with any 
of the enemy. Next day (5th) changed camp to three miles 
south-west of Marietta, during the day the 4th, 14th, 15th, 17th 
and 23d Corps, each three divisions strong arrived in the vicinity. 

*A bill of goods, bought on this day by one of the rich patrons of the 4th Division Com. Snb. 
shows prices then ruling were, lor hard tack $5.46 per hundred pounds; pork $15; sugar $19; 
coffee $52; last, but not least, whiskey f 2.28 per gal . 

tPrivate J. Thatcher, E Company, detailed with ITth Corps, p<.ntO(in train, stales they laid 
a pontoon bridge seven Limes across the Chattahoochie river at different points during the 
siege. 



4o6 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

On October yth, the regiment, brigade and division started on a 
reconnoitering expedition in a southwesterly direction, with one 
brigade of Kilpatrick's cavalry and four pieces of light artillery; 
passed Powder Springs at 4 o'clock p. m., where the infantry was 
ordered' forward, the 15th Iowa being in the lead of the 
column, it struck the rebel earthworks south of Dallas at 
7 o'clock A. M., and occupied them for a camp. From 
the appearances on the ground, and from information re- 
ceived it was learned that the rear of the enemy's column 
left these works that day, early in the morning, in the direction of 
Dallas, and thence north; the problem seemed to be solved 
whether the enemy would move west, northwest towards Hunts- 
ville on the Tennessee, or towards Rome, Kingston, etc., northward. 
The latter appearing to be the case, the regiment and division re- 
turned the next day to its camp south of Marietta. 

October 9th, the 4th Division in lead of the Corps, moved at 5 
o'clock A. M., passing through Marietta around Kenesaw Moun- 
tain,* and across the several rebel and Federal breastworks erected 
during the latter part of June and arrived at Big Shanty. 

On the 10th of October the regiment was detailed to escort the 
corps supply train, 247 wagons, being in charge of Lieutenant 
Colonel Joel, Chief Quartermaster 17th Corps; it passed Alla- 
toona, October 12th, and arrived within five miles of Kingston, 
late at night, while the heavy cannonading on the left and front 
of the train going on for some time during the evening just 
ceased . 

That night two companies started at midnight with forty 
wagons to Kingston, the rest of the train remaining in camp till 
4 o'clock next morning. Instructions were received to guard 

*The top of Kenesaw Mouniain oflers a sight seldom, is ever seen anywhere else in the 
isouth; for fifty miles south, and as many or more miles west and north and east, the country 
with all its ranges ol hills and moantains— the South and Noith Carolina ranges of moun- 
tains, the Allato(ma and Chattanooga Mountains— are exposed to view Pieces of shells from 
the besieging Federal Artillery, found scattered on the top, and immediately below wheie the 
rebel infantry was in position, are a proof of the etticiency of the Union batteries, and of the 
excellence of the men who served them during the terrible days of June, 1864. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 407 

against a body of rebel cavalry hanging on the rear and left flank of 
the train. October 13th, at 4 o'clock a. m., the regiment started 
with the train, making five miles to Kingston and eight miles to the 
west of that place, w^here, at 3 o'clock p. m. it overtook the Army 
of the Tennessee in bivouac. 

Here the regiment being relieved, rejoined its brigade, and after 
one hour's rest the 17th and 15th Corps were ordered to move at 
once. The regiment marched in front of the entire column four- 
teen miles to Adairsville, arrived there at 10 o'clock at night, .after 
a march of twenty-seven miles. There it took the cars with the 
division, arriving at Resacca at 2 o'clock a. m., at which place 
Colonel Wever's brigade was engaged by the enemy during the 
afternoon of the preceding day, the distance made by the regiment 
on the 13th was 43 miles. In the morning it was the last regiment 
m the rear of the corps train, and at 4 o'clock p. m. marched in 
the lead of the army. 

On the 14th, at 4 o'clock a. m., took and kept position in the 
northwest fort at Resacca, while the other two divisions arrived in 
the afternoon followed by the 15th, 4th and 14th Corps. 

October 15th, the regiment and division moved at 5 A. m., fol- 
lowed by the rest of the corps, to Snake Creek Gap, where the 
rear of the enemy was met at 10 a. m. showing a stubborn resis- 
tance to our further progress. The lines of battle were formed at 
once by the arriving troops, the regiment and brigade taking posi- 
tion on the left of the road. After considerable skirmish and 
artillery fighting done principally by the 1st Division, an ener- 
getic chai-ge dispersed the enemy, and the Gap was gained at 1 
o'clock p. M . After considerable time lost in removing the ob- 
structions which completely blocked up the passes, sometimes for 
miles, and on the roads and bridges intervening, the command 
pushed on the heels of the fast retreating enemy. After the artil- 
lery and trains had been stopped, the infantry succeeded in gain- 
ing the southern gap of the pass at dark, and went into camp, 



4.o8 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

the artillery and train not being able to pass through till daybreak 
next morning. 

October 16th, early in the morning the corps pushed after the 
fast retreating enemy, over roads and bridges destroyed, and 
marched half a day on the 17th. By orders from General Sher- 
man, the transportation for regiments, brigades, divisions and corps 
headquarters, were reduced greatly,* and all surplus baggage, 
chests, tents, cots, chairs, and trunks, were to be sent away to 
Chattanooga at once. On the 18th of October, the march was re- 
sumed, and Lafayette passed. On the 19th reached Sommerville 
and Alpine, on the 20th Gaylesville, where the troops went into 
camp, while the 'l'i\(\ Corps continued its march to Blue Pond Gap, 
8 miles distant, where the enemy was supposed to be, and where 
the roads divide, one going south, another west and a third in a 
northwesterly direction to the Tennessee river; the presumption 
being that instead of moving south, as information by the farmers 
on the road would have it, the enemy would move north to meet 
their allied forces under Dick Taylor and Forrest, then already in 
the direction of that river. October 21st, the non-veterans whose 
term of service had already expired, were sent in charge of 
Lieutenant-Colonel Alexander, of the corps staff, to Chattanooga, 
there to be mustered out bv the corps mustering officers; Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel J. C. Abercrombie of the 11th Iowa, and lately in 
command of the brigade, having left for the same place. Major 
George Pomutz of the 15th Iowa, took command of the 3d Brigade 
and Captain J. M. Reid, I. Co., command of the regiment. 

General T. E. G. Ransom (then at the point of death,) re- 
linquished the command of the 17th Corps on October 22d and 
was succeeded by Major-General Joseph A . Mower, who on the 
28th received the several divisions of the 17th Corps. On that day. 
General Ransom died. 

*Most of these articles were sent away, and never agai;; recovered, the chests contained 
official records of companies and regiments, which it was thought were exposed to danger of 
being burned or captared, if not sent away. Many of the latter cannot be replaced. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 4og 

October 29th, march was resumed to Coosa river; on the 30th, to 
Cave Springs, where the troops went into camp. Distance marched 
during October, 262 miles; during the last two weeks the troops 
foraged liberally on the country and, notwithstanding the rapid 
marching, the men were in vigorous health and in the best spirits, 
equal to all emergencies. 



GENERAL FIELD ORDERS, NO. 21. 

Headquarters Department and Army of Tenn., ) 
Cedar Town., Ga., Nov. i, 1864. \ 

The officers and soldiers of the Army of the Tennessee will 
hear, with deep sorrow and regret the news of the death of Briga- 
dier General T. E. G. Ransom, lately commanding 17th Corps. 

General Ransom was ill at the very beginning of this campaign, 
but was unwilling to leave the field; and, hoping the attack of the 
fell disease which caused his death was but temporary, he did not 
ceaSe day or night, as was his wont, to exert himself to the ut- 
most in his country's service. 

When the army reached Gaylesville, Ala,, he was compelled by 
aggravated symptoms to relinquish his command, and now we 
learn that on the 28th ult., while being carried on a stretcher to 
Rome, he died. 

General Ransom was much beloved by all who knew him, and 
this army has lost one of its most useful officers and brightest 
ornaments. His noble record is too familiar to need recounting 
here . 

While with me in command of his division of the 16th Corps, 
after the wounding of Major-General G. M. Dodge, in command 
of that corps at Atlanta and Jonesboro, and then in command of 
the 17th Corps during the present vigorous operations, he showed 
himself an officer of the highest order of merit, also a man of 
pure and ele\ ated character. It is with a feeling of deep sorrow 
at our loss that I refer to this young man 50 full of promise, so 
30 



L 



4IO History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

enthusiastic in his country's cause, so untiring in his exertions to 
thwart the efforts of the wicked men who have raised their hands 
against us; but he has done well his part, and like so many others of 
our comrades, who have worked with us, he has gone peacefully 
to the haven of rest. We will cherish his bright memory, and 
strive to attain his irreproachable character. 

O. O. HOWARD, 

Major-General. 

Here Generals Blair and Smith rejoined their commands; Gen- 
eral Belknap relieved Major Pomutz in command of the 3d Bri- 
gade on November 1st, and the latter resumed command of the 
regiment. Surgeon W. H. Gibbon having returned from absence 
with leave, (since September 2od), he relieved Surgeon Horner, 
of the 53d Indiana, who had been in charge of the medical depart- 
ment of the regiment, and had proved to be an efficient and able 
medical officer. 

On this day the march was resumed to Dallas, and on the 2d to 
New Hope Church, and the division arrived November 5th, at 
Marietta, going into camp at the foot of the Kenesaw. 

Here an official communication from the Adjutant-General's 
office, War Department, dated October 17th and 22d, informed 
the regiment that Lieutenant-Colonel Grier, Superintendent of 
Draft Rendezvous at Davenport, Iowa, had been directed to assign 
and forward 500 white drafted men to the 15th Iowa, and notice 
was also received of their being on their way to join the regi- 
ment. 

While at Marietta, the regiment received a large number of 
men, who, having been sick or wounded during the summer cam- 
paign, now rejoined for duty. November 8th, presidential election 
was attended to by the regiment, Mr. Joseph Clark, of Marion 
county, Iowa, state agent, being present. The whole of the com- 
mand, (except a small squad) voted the ticket headed by Abraham 
Lincoln, for president. On the 9th, Major Wm. Penne Clarke, 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 411 

Paymaster U. S. A., paid the regiment up to August 31, 1864; the 
aggregate sum paid to the brigade at this date was $189,257.54. 



SPECIAL ORDER NO. 277. 

Headquarters 17th Army Corps, ) 
Smyrna Camp Ground^ Nov. p, ''64. j 

X. The appointment among the divisions of this corps, of the 
raihoad to be destroyed in accordance with S. F . O. No. 162, from 
Department headquarters will be as follows: 

4th Division from Big Shanty to Noonday Creek. 

1st Division from Noonday Creek to a point one-half mile south 
of Marietta. 

3d Division from a point one-half mile south of Marietta to 
RufF's station . 

The command will be prepared to move at a moment's notice to 
commence the work of destruction, and the work will be done in 
the most thorough manner possible. 
By command of 

MAJOR-GENERAL F. P. BLAIR 

C. CADLE, JR., Assistant Adjutant General. 

November 10th, Captain James S. Porter rejoined the regiment 
with 249 recruits,* having left thirty men besides in several hospi- 
tals while en route, and eleven men having deserted. On the 12th, 
the regiment, brigade and division was marched to Big Shanty for 
the purpose of thoroughly destroying the railroad from that point 
to Noonday Creek, which was done with a will for twelve miles, 
a similar destruction of " Our Cracker line " with the north was 
orded up to Dalton, and south to Atlanta, thus inaugurating the 
policy of cutting loose from the old base, and looking for the sea. 
All the sick and all governmental surplus stores and machinery 
having been previously sent north with hurrying dispatch. 

♦ Roster at end of Part II. 



4i'3 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

November 13th, the regiment with its brigade and division, re- 
sumed march at 9 o'clock a . m., through Marietta, to Proctor's 
Creek, w^est of Atlanta. On the 14th it marched through Atlanta, 
going into camp southeast of the town. Here at night it received 
another detatchment of 189 drafted men and substitutes, through 
the provost Marshal at Atlanta. These men arrived at that Post 
without any officer in charge of them, and without any descriptive 
papers — the officer who brought them from Davenport, Iowa, 
having left them at Nashville; from there they were forwarded to 
Atlanta while the regiment was stationed at Marietta . A self- 
constituted Sergeant who was in the service before, and appeared 
to have taken charge of the detachment en- route to Atlanta, could 
not say how many of the lacking 21 men were left sick at Nash- 
ville, or some hospital on the way, and how many might have de- 
serted. After a long correspondence, which commenced as soon 
as the regiment arrived at the sea, the required muster and de- 
scriptive rolls were received at the regimental headquarters at 
Goldsboro, N . C, towards the end of March, of the next year; 
meanwhile such military description of these men was made as 
could be had by and from themselves, for temporary purposes. 
They were armed and equipped during the first days of the march, 
and were drilled for practical warfare whenever an opportunity 
could be obtained . 

On the same day, General Sherman's orders, regulating troops 
while on the march, were published to the command, by which the 
four Infantry Corps were to march on parallel roads. The Arm}' 
of the Tennessee to be the right wing (15th Corps on the right, 
17th Corps on its left,) the Army of the Cumberland to be the left 
wing (20th Corps extreme left, l-4th Corps the left center) and 
the Cavalry Corps, with its four divisions under General Kilpat- 
rick to be under special immediate command of General Sherman. 

November 15th, the regiment with its brigade (the 32d Illinois 
Infantry, was attached to same on 14th) and division, moved at 6 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 41 J 

o'clock A. M., each of the 3 divisions of the Corps, altei-nately 
taking the lead of same on the successive days, the same rotation 
being the role betw^een the brigades of each division, and also be- 
tween the 5 regiments of the 3d Brigade, 

The 17th Corps marched on the McDonough road in a south, 
southeasterly direction betw^een the Augusta and Macon railroads; 
the 15th Corps on its right, the Cavalry on the right of the 15th, 
and the 17th Corps making constant demonstrations against Jones- 
boro, and further south along the Macon railroad, its artillery be- 
ing ahead for several days. 

The regiment with brigade, passed Monticello on the 20th, Gor- 
donsville on the 21st, Toombsboro on the 23d, and the Oconee 
river on the 20th . Here we met the Hvst of the cnem}^ and after 
some skirmishing drove them . On November 30th, the command 
arrived on the miry, swampy banks of the Ogeechee river. The 
distance marched from Atlanta through the windings of roads 
traveled on to the end of November is 258 miles, from November 
1st to 15th 91 miles, total 349 miles. The country from Atlanta 
to the Oconee is high land with considerable range of hills, princi- 
pally rocky, the streams clear. From the Oconee river the country 
becomes low, mostly sandy, the streams yellowish and turbid, the 
bottoms and banks of streams generally muddy, swampy and in 
some places nearly impassable, though there were but few 
rainy spells during the march . The temperature was warmer 
than during October last, and the command was in good health, 
the men were supplied by liberally foraging upon the country and 
mules and horses swapped for better ones. During the march from 
Atlanta to the sea, amongst other military points of great im- 
portance. General Sherman practically solved an annoying problem, 
to- wit: How^ to march large bodies of troops on the same common 
road without extending their columns to a dangerous length, there- 
by inviting»cavalry dashes of the enemy against either flank of the 
marching column, or more especially against the long lines of trains 



414 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

\\\ the rear. Military nations usually march their army by sections, 
or platoon front, the roads being sufficiently wide to allow the men 
to move along comfortably, thereby contracting the column so as 
to bring the rear thereof within supporting distance of the head; 
the difference in marching a column of three divisions by the flank 
being six or seven miles in length. General Sherman ordered 
each division to take care of its own ammunation, supply and 
hospital trains, together with all the brigade and regimental trans- 
portation, that the latter have the benefit of the roads exclusively, 
and the troops march on either side of the road, through fields, 
plantations and timber, and to bring in their train, whenever they 
arrive in camp. 

This gave the train a quick movement, securing help by some 
troops of the division, detailed especially each day, through bad and 
wornout roads, and it at once precluded the possibility of sudden 
dashes by the enemy, no matter how efficient and bold his cavalry 
might be, into the flanks of a moving train . This explains the 
quick and enormous marches the army made, without losing one 
wagon on so many narrow, almost impracticable roads.* 

December 1st, the regiment, brigade and division crossed the 
Ogeechee river, and marched up to Sevastopol station, on the 
Georgia Central railroad, five miles, and destroyed the same 
thoroughly; after which the march was resumed, arriving at Mil- 
ieu on the 2d, and at Little Ogeechee on the 5th, where the first 
rebel fortifications were found, which were emptied after an hour's 
skirmishmg by the advance cavalry . December 7th, arrived at 
Oliver station, where the rebel works were taken after short skir- 
mishing by the cavalry. 



♦November 30th, I). Co., reported 109 men present. 

Due day when the 15th was on rear guard, a squad of the 32d Illinois while out prospecting 
stopped at a house near the road; it was evident somebody had arrived there before them, as 
thuy found nothing bui ;in old man and he said that the Illinois soldiers had stolen every- 
thing and carried it ofl', except one thing and that, no one could steal , and it was his faith in 
the Lord Jesus. "Don't you be too sure ot that" said the Sucker. "The 15th Iowa will 
pass here soon, and if they run low on faith, they'll yank it out of you," 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry, ^/j- 

On the 8th passed Eden station, and on the 9th arrived at Pooler 
station, (known as Station No. 1), being nine miles distant from 
Savannah, where General Mower's 1st Division of the 17th corps, 
being in the lead, was met with a lively skirmish from an open field 
on the right of the road, and by a livelv artillerv fire coming from 
a car on the railroad track, which, however, after killing and 
wounding twenty-one men of his command were driven from their 
position by our advancing lines, the 4th Division having taken posi- 
tion on the right of the railroad. Assistant Surgeon W. W. Nel- 
son here rejoined the regiment from detached service with the 8d 
Iowa Infantry . Contract Surgeon Gallagher, from November 
10th assigned to the 15th Iowa, was released and ordered to the 
16th Iowa. 

December lOth, the 4th Division being in the lead of the corps, 
after a march of four and a half miles on the State road, parallel 
and close to the railroad, the enemy was met, the railroad crossed 
and line of battle formed on the left of same. INIoved forward, 
and reached, about noon, the junction of the Charleston railroad, 
(three miles from Savannah) under constant and heavy artillery 
fire coming from their forts on the right of the railroad, and from 
two guns moving on the track towards our lines. Here the enemy 
had all the advantage of the ground in his favor, the railroad being 
a straight line for miles, and both sides of same being low and 
swampy ground, with a thick growth of underbrush and young 
timber. 

The lines were at once formed, the loth Iowa being nearest on 
the left of the railroad, and the largest part of the legiment stand- 
ing in water, the rest of the brigade on the right of the railroad; 
and the right of the 4th Division connecting with Mower's 1st 
Division, and Leggett's 3d Division being kept on the right and 
rear as reserve. ISIeanwhile, the skirmishers, wading forward in 
and across the swamp to the front, some 300 yards ahead, engaged 
the skirmish line of the enemy, and a battery on the right of the 



^i6 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

division, where the ground was somewhat elevated, having fortified 
its position sufficiently, opened with full vigor on the enemy, by 
which the skirmishers as well as the artillery of the latter were 
silenced during the fore part of the ensuing night. 

The cannonading of the enemy did considerable damage, one 
company of the 53d Illinois (-tth Division) having lost 11 men in 
killed and wounded by one shell; most of the wounds received on 
this day were frightful bruises, and limbs were terribl}' mangled, 
if the individual was not killed at once. The 4th Division lost 45 
in killed and wounded. 

December 11th, the works commenced the night before, being 
as well finished as could be on such ground, and the several bat- 
teries put into position on the right of the lirigade and division, 
having greatly dilapidated the enemy's fort that looked formidable 
the day before, and the skirmish line having been also advanced 
to the very limit of the deep pond intervening between them and 
the lines of the enemy. The regiment, brigade and division were 
relieved by a division of the 14th Corps, just arriving at the front. 
The division was then moved by a circuitous route around the 
Ogeechee canal to the south, southwest of Savannah, and forming 
on December 13th on the right and rear of Leggett's 3d Division, 
the whole line kept up a heavy cannonading during the whole day — 
when the news arrived that Fort McAllister had been taken by the 
2d division, 15th Corps. 

December 16th, the regiment with brigade was ordered to King's 
bridge, on the Ogeechee river, where, in the course of the afternoon 
the first boats from Admiral Dahlgren's fleet arrived through the 
Ossabaw Sound, with a load of heavy guns and much needed arti- 
cles of subsistence, the men having received no bread for eight 
days past, and all foraging having been out of the question since 
approaching the sea-coast, four-fifths of which was under water. 
Next day the army received its first mail for six weeks. 

On December 19th, the regiment with brigade moved at 2 



Iowa Veterajz Volunteer Infantry. 41^ 

o'clock A . M . , to the left of the two other divisions of its corps, 
to fill up a gap on the road connecting the 17th with the 14th 
Corps, being in front of a rebel fort that kept up a sweeping 
fire on that road, which was in full view of and only a quarter 
of a mile fi-om the fort. Under the cover of a thick English 
fog, the brigade having arrived at 5 a . m. in front of the fort, 
it formed in line of battle at once, and the 15th Iowa furnished 
companies D, H, E, K and B, 800 strong, for skirmishers, half of 
the regiment being kept on that line alternately . At 8 o'clock, 
the skirmishers were re-enforced, and the line advanced and 
drove the enemy's skirmish line to the other side of the pond, 
encircling the fort from north to west, and south, southwest, and 
establishing themselves within 800 yards of the fort. During 
all this time an almost constant musketry and artiller}^ fire, 
throwing a thick shower of grape, canister, solid shot and shell, 
was pouring upon the advancing lines of the brigade. The re- 
cruits of the regiment behaved gallantly; they vied witli veterans 
in keeping their position as well as in advancing their line. In the 
afternoon part of the line on the right of the 15th fell back under 
a heavy fire from the enem}'. They soon rallied, however, and 
got into position again. During the night, and on December 
20th, the lines were fortified as well as the low ground would 
admit, while three batteries were completely paralyzing the enemy's 
skirmishers, as well as their artillery; no living person sliowed 
himself along their whole lines while the batteries played on them. 
In the evening of same day orders were received for a general 
assault on the next day; meantime the depth of the pond was 
sounded in several places during the night. Early in the morning 
of the 21st, however, the skirmishers reported the constant moving 
of artillery and heavy wagons in the direction and vicinity of the 
fort in their front since midnight, which led to the suspicion that 
the fort was being evacuated. When the lines of skirmishers were 
ordered to advance on hastily constructed plank bridges across the 



4iS History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

deep canal running through the centre of the pond, the hist of the 
garrison was making haste to get out of sight. The fort was 
soon taken possession of with eleven pieces of artillery in good 
serviceable condition, with a vast amount of ammunition. 

Leaving a sutBcient garrison in the fort the brigade moved for- 
ward to Savannah, where, towards noon, it was put in camp within 
the precincts and southwestern part of the city. The enemy, un- 
der Hardee, left the day and night before. All the strong fortifi- 
cations and massive works around Savannah, with over '^00 guns 
of the heaviest calibre, and an immense amount of ammunition, 
besides 25,000 bales of Confederate cotton, and a great deal of other 
valuable propert}', to concentrate their demoralized, scattered, and 
remaining forces at Hardeeville, South Carolina. 

Though there were on this expedition no battles fought that 
would compare with those at Shiloh, Corinth, Vicksburg, Kene- 
saw and Atlanta, there was enough done, however, to compel the 
enemy to loosen his grasp over a vast territory, which furnished an 
immense amount of light and heavy ordnance stores from its many 
arsenals and foundries, and most of the prime articles of subsistence 
to its armies. At the same time the Confederacy was severed into 
three parts, several hundred miles of railroads burned and destroj'ed 
beyond hope of repair by themselves, and the Western Arm}' of 
the rebellion, only a j^ear back a formidable host, now fugitive, 
scattered, and completely demoralized . The men of the 15th Iowa 
did their duty full and well, during the whole of the fall campaign 
just closed. From the reconnoissance in force to Fairburn, Octo- 
ber 1st, where, it being in the lead of the column under General 
Ransom, it struck and fought the enemy, October 2d, with gallant 
and acknowledged efticiencv for several hours, driving him close to 
the village; also, through all the severe marches in the pursuit of 
Hood's army, and from Atlanta to the Sea; and when it was again 
brought into fire before Savannah, the large number of its drafted 
men, vieing with the veterans of a hundred battles and skirmishes, 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 4ig 

stood their ground with determined bravery, amidst a shower of 
musket balls, grape, canister, shot and shell, even where parts of 
the line beyond the right of the regiment had yielded their ground 
temporarily under a most galling fire from the skirmishers and the 
heavy works of the enemy. Great credit was given, by superiors 
on the spot, to the men thus showing the true mettle of western 
patriot soldiers; and all praise is due the ofiicers who, by constant 
insti-uction and by practical drill, whenever an occasion could be 
had, thus succeeded in rendering their companies efticient and fit 
for the various important duties of the campaign, though invariably 
only one ofiicer was present to a company, and though the compa- 
nies were filled to their maximum number b}' the arrival of the 
recruits on the eve of starting out on this campaign to the Sea. 

While in camp at Savannah the non-veterans of several compa- 
nies, whose term of service expired during the campaign, (39 iA 
all), were honorably mustered out. Amongst the number was 
Surgeon Wm, H. Gibbon, December 23d, whose efticient services 
for three years past with the regiment, as well as with the Operat- 
ing Board of the 4th Division, rendered him one of the best sur- 
geons of the army, who could not be well spared, and who, upon 
leaving the service, richly deserved the following order of thanks 
of the command. 



MAJOR POMUTZ'S ORDER ON THE RETIREMENT 
OF SURGEON GIBBON. 



GENERAL ORDERS NO. 20. 

Headquarters 15th Jowa Infantry Veteran Volunteers, 
Savannah, Ga., December 2 2d, 1864. 

Surgeon William H. Gibbon, of this Regiment, having this day 
been honorably discharged the U. S. service, the commanding officer 
of this regiment cannot forbear giving expression to the just ap- 
preciation by himself, as well as by the officers and men of his 



420 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

command, of the unabated zeal, efficiency and practical skill with 
which the surgeon has discharged his important duties while con- 
nected with and in charge of the medical department of this regi- 
ment. 

In the earlier part of the military life of this command, during 
the memorable battles of Shiloh and Corinth, he acquired the indi- 
vidual confidence of the officers and men, by his efficiency in the 
line of his profession, as well as by his courageous conduct while 
bravely and skillfully attending to the wounded soldiers in the im- 
mediate rear of the line of battle, then fiercely engaged with the 
enemy . That confidence, well merited then, he retained and de- 
served ever afterward through the entire period of his three years' 
service. The soldiers felt sure that whatever vigilant care, knowl- 
edge of science, and practical skill could accomplish for the sick 
and wounded, was secured to them while under his treatment. 

During the eventful campaign of this year, resulting in the cap- 
ture of Atlanta and Savannah, being one of the selected Board of 
Operators, he displayed those highest qualifications in practical sur- 
gery that have stamped him as " one of the best field surgeons of 
the army . " 

While the surgical operations performed by him have rescued 
and preserved the life and limb of many a brave officer and soldier 
of this and other commands, the same are justly recorded as a 
triumph of the art and science of his profession. 

This command, in hereby tendering thanks to the surgeon for 
his past services, earnestly hopes he may soon return to the field of 
his wonted invaluable usefulness to the army . 

The Adjutant will forwaixl an official copy of this order to the 
Surgeon. 

By order of Major George Pomutz, commanding regiment. 

Wm. C. STIDGER, Adjutant. 

The recommendations to fill the many vacancies amongst the 
officers of the regiment, made and forwarded at Marietta, (Novem- 



Iowa Veteran Vohmteer Infantry. 4.^1 

ber 11th) having been soon after returned, as all railroad communica- 
tion with the north had already been broken above that place, they 
were started anew, as soon as communication was opened by sea 
from King's Bridge (Dec. 17th). The delay necessarily resulting 
from the long distance to Iowa was sorely felt by the command, 
as the few commissioned officers present for duty (one to a com- 
pany) were constantly at hard work to attend to their companies, as 
well as the various important interests of the services in the field, 
from summer to the close of the year.* 

The promptness with which the mails were delivered to the 
Army of the Tennessee, during its long campaigns, was a marvel. 
The credit for this belongs to Colonel A. H. Martland. In a letter 
dated May 24, 1887, he says: 

"My happiest experience during the war was when I arrived at 
" King's Bridge, on the Ageeche river, with the mails for Sher- 
" man's Army on the day after it had completed its March to the 
" Sea. God bless the soldiers, officers and men, who gave me such 
'•a full-hearted welcome on the 17th December, 1864. How it 

*At the last inspection by the Inspector General before Savannah, the 15th Iowa numbered 
an aggregate of 1,048 men (more than the regiment ever had since its or;;anization), without 
counting the 30 men left sick by Captain Porter in various hospitals while en route with his 
detachments of recruits from Nashville to Marietta in the forepart of November, and with- 
out including the 21 men of the second detachment who remained at various stations while 
on the way to Atlanta; who (in all 51), not having reported personally to the regiment, were 
not taken up on the rolls as yet. Most of these men joined the regiment afterwards at 
various points where it was within their reach. 

Thus the 15th Iowa was known to be the largest regiment in the Army of the Tennessee 
during the last campaign, it having daily presented 720 to V45 guns for duty, and in line of 
battle for effective service. 

The evident injustice to officers who were doing faithful work during the severe campaign, 
without adequate rank and pay , was in great part remedied by the arrival at Savannah of the 
Governor of Iowa, who having appointed fifteen commissioned officers, they were at once 
mustered in by the Division Commissary of Musters— their regular commissions to be for- 
warded hereafter by the Adjutant-General's office ol the State. Captain Porter, though ap- 
pointed Major, could not be mustered in as such, by reason of Colonel Hedrick still being 
absent from the command on account of wounds received in July last; and he, as well as 
Lieutenant-Colonel Pomutz, not being mustered in their respective new ranks on their com- 
missions issued last October. Chaplain E. H. King, formerly Adjutant, and "Sd Lieutenant 
Wm. C. Stidger of Co. E. formerly Acting Adjutant, having received commissions as 
Chaplain and Adjutant respectively, were mustered into their new poeitions. 

On the grand review of all the corps of Sherman's army at Savannah, the regiment and the 
brigade (Dec. 29th) were uniformly praised by all superiors, for military appearance, 
cleanliness of arms, equipments, and accoutrements, and their regularity of movement. 

The distance marched from the 1st to the 21st of Decerciber is 160 miles. 



422 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

"happened that the mail reached Sherman's Army at that oppor- 
" tune time, is told in a letter from General Grant to General Sher- 
" man, and may be found embodied in 'Sherman's Memories.'" 

The following letter from General Grant to Benson J. Lossing, 
dated Headquarters Armies of the United States, July 80, 1866, is 
of interest: 

Dear Sir: — Among the subjects which occupied my mind when 
I assumed command at Cairo, in the fall of 1861, was the regular 
supply of mails to and from the troops, not only in garrison, but 
those on the march whose active movements should begin. When 
I commenced the movement on Fort Henry on January 27, 1862, a 
plan was proposed by which the mails should promptly be for- 
warded to and as promptly sent from the army. So perfect was 
the organization that the mails were delivered to the army imme- 
diately upon the occupation of the fort. Within one hour after the 
troops began to march into Fort Donaldson, the mails were being 
distributed to them from the mail wagons. The same promptness 
was always observed in the armies under my command, up to the 
period of the disbandment. It is a source of congratulation that 
the postal service was so conducted that the officers and men were 
in constant communication with kindred and friends at home, and 
with as much regularity as the most favored in the large cities of 
the Union. The postal system of the army, so far as I know, 
was not attended with any additional expense to the service. The 
system adopted by me was suggested and ably superintended by 
A. H. Markland, special agent of the postoffice department. 

Respectfully, 

U. S. GRANT, General, 



GENERAL ORDERS NO. 3. 

War Department, Adjutant General's Office. ) 
Washington^ fanuary 14^ iS6^, \ 
The following resolution of the Senate and House of Represent- 
atives is published to the Army: 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 423 

PUBLIC RESOLUTION NO. 4. 

Joint resolution tendering the thanks of the people and of Con- 
gress to Major-General William T. Sherman, and the officers and 
soldiers of his command, for their gallant conduct in their late 
brilliant movement through Georgia. 

Be it Resolved^ By the Senate and House of Representatives of 
the United States of America in Congress assembled, 

"That the thanks of the people and of the Congress of 
the United States are due, and are hereby tendered, to 
Major-General William T. Sherman, and, through him, to 
the officers and men under his command, for their gallantry 
and good conduct in their late campaign, from Chattanooga 
to Atlanta, and the triumphal march thence through Georgia 
to Savannah, terminating in the capture and occupation of 
that city; and that the President cause a copy of this joint 
resolution to be engrossed and forwarded to Major-General 
Sherman." 
Approved, January 10, 1865. 

By order of the Secretary of War. 

W. A. NICHOLS, Asst. Adjt. Gen. 



AN INCIDENT DURING THE ADVANCE. 

While the 4th Division, 17th Corps in lead of the column, had 
struck the enemy on December 10th, some four miles from Savannah 
and was rapidly crossing the railroad to form on a convenient 
ground on the left of same a terrible shelling was kept up by the 
enemy, especially from a gun-car moving on the track, and coming 
to a destructively close distance of the troops while in process of 
formation. At this time, General Sherman was seen to come up to 
the front, as he usually does when the head of the column gets in- 
to close contact with the enemy, to see the ground for himself. Just 
at the place where several others w^ere hit a short time before, a 
cannon ball barely missed as he went along at the usual gait. The 



^24 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

boys, truly his boys, were at once alive to offer their remarks: 
"He was nearest being killed now of any here," said one; "It did 
not miss him over a foot," said another; while a third, who evident- 
ly had not read the life of Napoleon, chinned in, "The ball is not 
yet made that can hit him," the ball, however, passing by him, 
made quite a stir in the rear amongst the drivers, several of whom 
volunteered the remark, that the train ought not to be so far to the 
front. 

Another i'nstance is known to the men of the 4th Division, when 
(afternoon of September 1st) at the battle near Jonesboro, the 
General just missed being hit by a shell exploding near him in 
front of the 4th Division, 



A RECOLLECTION OF SAVANNAH. 

During our approach to Savannah, and when but a few miles 
from the city, Major-General Frank P. Blair, (commanding 17th 
Corps,) his staff and escort company were leisurely riding along 
one of those straight causeways, through a forest when we saw the 
smoke of a batter\' in our front, distant about a mile, the next 
instant a solid shot came tearing thi'ough the air making everything 
look blue, going directly over the General's head, instantly killing 
the third man in his rear, Lieutenant Reynolds of Wisconsin. I 
was riding on General Blair's rigfht and saw the disturbance of the 
atmosphere as plainly as one can see the sun on a slightly hazy day. 
It is needless to say that we required no order to vacate that road, 
we left it without much ceremony as to the order of our going. 

General Blair was mounted at the time on a beautiful brown 
horse, recently captured from General Van Dorn of the Confeder- 
ate army, which he named for his gallant owner. In speaking of 
the circumstance. General Blair said: "Van sank almost to the 
ground, and that he thought his time was up." After the close of 
the war, General Blair sent General \ An Dorh a check for S300 
and kept the thoroughbred, probably much to the satisfac- 




EdgarT.IYIiller 

CAPT IS^flOWA VOLUNTEERS CO.C. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 42^ 

tion of both, as the horse was a noble fellow, and good money was 
extremely scarce in the collapsed confederacy. 

EDGAR T. MILLER, 
Capt. C. Co., 15th Iowa, Asst. Provost Marshal 17th Corps. 
While crossing the railroad near the 15th Iowa, the ordnance 
officer of the 4th Division, Captain Moore had his leg taken off by 
a shot from the railroad gunboat, which also killed his horse, and 
at the time it was thought the officer was killed, but he yet lives 
and is now in the office of the Commissarv Genei'al at Washington. 



RECOLLECTIONS OF A COLD AND HUNGRY 
NIGHT MARCH. 

After our division was relieved by the 14th Corps we marched 
to the right, and until quite late at night on December 11th. It 
was very cold and tiresome as we marched through the woods, 
halting just long enough to light a fire at the foot of a tree, then 
moving on a few yards and another halt. This continued for hours, 
and being villainously hungry besides, nearly killed us. A man 
came along from somewhere, South Carolina probably, escorting a 
sickly, starved looking southwest quarter of a heifer. Slocum (H 
Company's millionaire) promptly bid five dollars for the knee 
joint down, but the man rapidly disappeared, while the poet sang 

Man wants but little here below. 
Of a Georgia yaller calf; 
But, when he gets the horns and heels 
He wants the other half! 
Some of you will remember of assisting to unload a supply train 
(while the drivers were asleep under the wagons, which were en-' 
route to the left) as we marched by, and issuing crackers on the trot : 
" He that hath plenty of Hard Tack, 
And giveth his Comrade none, 
Shan't have any of my Hard Tack, 
When his Hard Tack is gone. 

— [Extract from one of Co. K's Ballads.] 
The Mercury had evacuated Cairo, and was assigned to Florida, 
about this time, and next morn we found the canal and ground 
frozen solid. Some had their hair frozen to the earth and in their 
frantic efforts to rise and Fall into roll call, left portions of their 
scalps clinging to the mud, and this accounts for the large number 
of bald heads in the 15th. 
31 



426 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 






30 o ?o o odof ^ t-^^a^i-^ cTaJ -rH :o ci c-^t-^ 

C-^ C'^ OT CO C"» <?■? ^"^ ?^ C>* O? C^ i T? C'l ^^ 01 CJ -rH -T-l 



CO Oc/3' O" mOin 






T) 


L. 


0) 


1) 




C/5 






c-J) 


W 






13 









Oc/)" O 



iT 


oT 


iT 


iT 


iT 


iT 


oT 


u" 


v 





«j" 


cT 


a' 


aT 


«' 


iT 


(iT 


1" 


(iT 








































C3 


c« 


rt 


rt 


rt 


ri 


CIS 


rt 


a 


OS 


(rt 


ct! 


rt 


« 


« 


rs 




rt 


rt 


> 


> 


_> 


_> 


> 


_> 


> 


> 


> 


_> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


_> 


_> 


_> 


> 


_> 







cii> 





O e O 



^ „ ^ _ ■" 



CQ 10 CO C5 JO O 10 (N OJ CJ 10 C<i 10 C-^i 




<M 






C/3 C/3t/) 



y5C/3 



^^ 









O 



^ 



^ 

« 
^ 

^ 



•> 
^ 



f^ 



■6 T! TJ 2 5 

1) 1) (U •_2 • - 

-w Vh U- C/J rJ3 

rt nS cj X3 JO 



^•~ 




'^ IC 


-#Tt< 


^^ 


•0 


•00 


<»?o 




OJ 














S 

^ 


1J r-' 


'^ i-H 


c^ ot 


3 


" S 


^ 


S 


f^ 


oA 


0- 




Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. ^2y 



U OJ -^ U U lU a( 1) •— OJ OJ .— OJ 1) K 0) •—•—•—•— .— — d .« .„ lU •'- O) •— •"-■ d .— ._ <u D ."i, 
'*-**- ^ 't^ '-^ "tl "^ '*" ^ '*-'-*-• c/i '^ ■— <^ (.^ Cfi X r/;. U3 X 'J. '^ rj: X' '■*- 'J^ '-« c/3 c/: ^ tf) c^ ^^ C^ c/) 






OotO' 


i 


7)0" 


C a _ 

^o- - ' - - - 


CO " 


o 




JO 53 O 



O C/? O 7} ^ O - r/; O - c/3 O 7) O ' " ' C^ O " ►^O ' 



73 


s 


O 






c3 



o^uij 1) (u 1) D nj oj D m (u jj 1; 5j oriraTa) oTo iraTaraj araririrnrirdTir 

.-.« .Si .-.- .^ .- .^ .^ .^ .S; .« .^ .^ ^ ^ ^ ■* ■^ ^ ^ *'•'■*'' '^ '^ > ^ ^ '^ >>>> > 

x.SQ .SQ k =Q "SQ= QcQcQ c.Q Q 

-£• O • - 3 • S O O . - ° ^- O ■ O • O . ^ :: - O S- ^- . S - ;: :r :: 3 :: 

■* C» i-H GO CO 01 -^ (.. - , _. „ ., ~ ...„„» „^ _. ^ ..„ ^ - _^ ^ ^ w. . 

rS -rH IM C^ C<> OT 07 tH !?,> Cj T-l C0^C0C0i-^i-It-HCJtH,-HC0C0i-('^O}C<J'-'C?C'?^' 



S X 



qI ^ 



^^.ctrl-^-I -^ --''^•^^ «<_-^-^^^'^A^ £c'3 S.h'o .'A^ 

«r ^- aj <" :t: ^- g -.^ cj'CiJi-i^-r-c^ ,rl^ ^' jf ii 5 V, ^> -"— ^ '".■9- ^ ^ i ~ v i^ 
■> 5 £ ij S 5 = ^.^^ > < Z :^ o ^ .5 E S ^ i"-^ "S £ b > i = c =^ - - ^ = » •? •? 

a£on:3 3:5.^^j^S^gc2a^c2:^i^l75Hhhh>>^^^^^^^^ 



428 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



c/j 




\^ 




ai 




< 




S 




w 




a 




■^ 


oJ 








■d :i — 
















cS ^ rt 








Q:5Q 




'*'*'* 




o o ^ 


iJ 








D . 


Tt< 30^ 




(>J l-H 






2 


C^'ri CX 


S 






-r -+ -* 


T3 ■- 


PP F 


(U " 




^C/3 


-* X)'* 




I^! >— 


cC/3 




^ 


coOt^ 


^ 


iT (u iT 






cS 


:« ca s 


C!i 


> > > 




t- t- l- 








— ' — ' ^" 






cli^ 


c 


Z-? 


OJ 




p-> 




to 




Q 


2 




u 


. -^ "• 


TS 


c 


■- 




^ 


U 


Di 


^ T3 TJ 




« 'n CQ 


Age.l 


C-! 3D X) 














w 


111 

0fi 




V V ^■ 




> bD~ 



















a. 




- 








< 




lO 








^ 




CJ 








U 












z 












o" 




S- 




















o 




i; 








"O 




^ 








o 












O 




z 








-a 




"O 












^| 




a u 




aj TJ 




"O 


OJ <U Xi 1) li 














3 3 


-o 


ij T) -a 


T3 -a -o t; 


3 5 -d Tj' ? 3 T3 5 -d TJ T; T3 




i/ 








.-. •— tu U .— .^ ^) .— I, CU 1) o 


























^ J2 


r^ 




r; 


rt c« - 


^J -■njDjsa^a^izid 














7^73 


Q 


:;5QQ 


^ 


QQQ 


75c^QQ75c^Qc^OQGC 




•*^'^-*TH-^-^-f^^iO-t<-*'*-*^ 


:o » o o iS 


0»«51=0»000«00»000 


^ - , ^ ^ ,,^,.„»-^^, -. 



xO 



Q, •'-' Xi -" a, -^ 

* en ' O - bn Ct) " O 









V V 


iT 


6 


V 


oT 


iT 


ai" 


iT iT 


ur 


oT 


V 


aj" 


iT 


iT 


aJ" 


a' 


aT 


af 


iT 


ar 










































Ti rt 


CS 


a 


3 


ri 


-s 


— 


rt rt 


rt 


c^< 


C3 


« 


rt 


rt 


ci 


rt 


rt 


rt 


rt 


cs 


> > 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


.i .- 


> 


■t. 




> 


.^ 


> 


> 




.:: 


> 


> 


> 



Z'> 



wi U 



a 6^ 



/q. io ^ 



tc J_) 



aj c 
c o 
j= ^ .CO _ 

.-^';"!t-iOO'>'?'?"?00— 'OOlC/— ■— ' — .^ Ol C>1 O CO 



Age 





^ 




.^ .:£ 




^0 -g -a^c 






z 






^ C OJ « e ' ,-2 
C— n-C ■->--" 








•<bqMMMMUUU 





u 


X 








i-U 












D — 


C 
U -C 

Eh 

3 C 


-5 
•< 

3 


to 

'o 

zt: 

i r 




g 




(1. 
O 


C 


o 


V ■-= 




oj 




OJ 


n 




^ 


r 


r 


rt 






5 




s 


^ 


^ 




a> 


c 
1 


c 


§ 


— 


'" 


a; 


rt 


CS 




u 


^^ 


aj 








.» 


UOO'JE 


M 


1—1 


►— 1 


t^^SSg 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 



429 



OJ 



a> 



K (U 



rt C^ c^ rt rt 

CCQQG 



r; "a "o Z) "o T3 t; 

— u OJ •- ' 

CO '— c^ •/. ' 

3 jc 



c^ 2 Q X Q Q qjc^ 



GQCc^GC:^ 






Oc/30co ' OxO ' ' " 



a,t^ c-ti ci.-y c 






!> " 1) " OJ " W 

GO O C/5 O (73 O 72 



lU d/ I) OJ 






>>>>>>>>>>>> 



D 1) OJ OJ 
c3 cd rt cd 



U 0) iLi 



>>>>>> 



eU|l^CueI^a-lCLDHeU0H|l^OHOHPHP-l^H&^a^CL|CLla^(l|a^CL, 



o o 



o o 



o 

u 

O 10 «D C7 'M e^j W O CO M ^ go Oti o 



aococo-*-^t-aoaoao 

-H CO -^ CO g? 01 <M -rH T-l 



L'T CO 01 IC Of 



iO t— CO CO 07 

(Tj CO CO CO CO 






<0 

OJ .5 > e« 

c .^ 15 ~ >,<I i> u i' ■— 
■""■■$ ::-rT co ^ ,— ^.-o 

(JO (^ CT) U: U^ coH >^^^^^^^ 






cj >,aj 



5 -s -^ 2- rt I " >< ? Ji ? ;^ _§ 5 S 'cS « u .:: o 
S^Hh Cl, Oh »; Di C 



^-N 






J3 cs c; ca cs rt rt 



i) '-' V - " Oj 

■TiO'J)' C C/3 





> 




;_ 


flj 


<U 




tn 






C C/5 1 


W 


. 




'o\ 






cT 


iT 


tT 


(iT 


cT 


<u 


V 
















ca 


c« 


rt 


ca 


ti 


a 


rt 


> 


> 


> 


> 


.'c 


> 


> 



Ph Ph fin Oh Ph 0- Dh 



^ > 






r o o o ' 

; "U "O "O 






Age. 



*-* cS «, > 

S c = ii T^ .S 5 

O ^. > re — C T3 

'—.•6 > -cTB ^ c 

^'3 ,-u >■?<; 

1- c s< "r (u u = 
-Q -a ^ .y o o o 



430 



Histo7-y of the Fifteenth Regiment 



8 



1 









CO 


• 


\^ 




<A 




< 




% 




U 




Pi 






6 dj ii 6 6 6 aj 




4J ,»_» +J +J -^ .4J ^ 




T3'UT:T3T3r:!T3T352'nT3T!T5=-d'd-d2'a=5'0'T3-dT:5'^'d-T= 




o 11 tL< y 11 w i; 1) ■- •- i; (u <u oj )= w OJ a; ■- 11 •- •- !u a; oj Qj •- (U u OJ 












rt««rtnrtnrt^^gn;^«Z2rtSrt.i2rt^^cscS2rt^ctfcsrt 








PQCGQQ0a.X''^SGQG'xQQQxaw'^QQQ5c^QQQ 


■a 


s; :a;:2:*:i'S "tzti^TJititTt'S: :a;ic^ -*-*-*-* '*'^^'* 


P p p p F ;- p p p p p p p p ppp pppppppp 




— '^ oii-f c; eii^ :c of x'l-'i- of i- ic ^ ^ oft-^^" d~ c-^ oT x' of lO t-^ i- 


■!-> C 


^ ^NC^Ot — ' ^0>.-^r-.-rHr-l^i ^ ^^^i oOT-^O-ir-lT-H-rt^OI 




*J -w .i_i *j -iJ 




r! — -^ c--e a,-e a,-" o. 


% 


d ^c^^ ^O --c^O^^^^ ■^^'' c^dc^O^^^'cJ^ 


-o t 


-* -*-f-t-t-'+ '*^^^-*-*'*'* T)^-*-* '*-*-*'*-t<'*-:t--)- 


P P PPPP PPPPPPPP PPP PPPPPPPP 


V (U 




fc'-^ 


^ ofc-^cio'of ~~of X Lot-Tcic-'io oft-^-f cTt- xx' of ic't-^t-^ 


tu 


:: ^(oicjot—- ^ci — T-i^ — T-r i ^„^i ofr-iOf^^r-irtO? 


C 73 

W ■ 


a =l==a .-.-la--- =- M§- = -l 


^ 


oT iT oT aJ V oT iT iT iT oJ iT iT iT oT iT iT oT v v iT u' iT' v iT oT aT oT iT iT of 




.-4-> — -J^J^-t'-J*-!^*^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^*J4-l*J*^*J-l-J 


rtaic«rtrte«c«cScat«cSc««rt*r-rtscS5«cSrtc«rtrtcartrt«t« 


^ 


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 


r r "u "c ••;; t 'c "C "e: t "e "c c "j; u "" 'c r "c •" t 'c 'C 'C "c ■" x x 'C •;: 




C^CLiCua.&.PH'XCuO-i^HPuPLiPHpHPHELiPLipHP-iCuCLiCLi&HQHCUQ'P-iPH&O-i 






OQ.^ ;;c::z w oz^^c^txzo >;:;u uo>zo ot^ 


<u 




c 


o JJ' o H _' M-i _' H o _•■ p^ 5 _r 5 -'-S _- o _r o 


1) 
12 






Q QP CO&hQO PQOS cqOP opopo p 


Age. 


(XOlO00010501'07 00'*'MlOOX0S00C5-*OC-"Jt-O7OOC"J05O^'0;Ci 


ICJ O} CO 00 lO 00 O^ ■>1 -* or C7 00 CJ Ot Ot -f 0? C7 Ot C3 « 0> CJ W 00 OC O? Tt< 05 d 




73 fe ^ 




§§- ^ -a A. . 


'/) 




£d 


< 



i 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infontry 



431 



"O'CTS'UTJXl'OT! 




(U D OJ a 


OJ cu QJ OJ 














rt rt rt c^ 


rt « ca « 


J^ 








QGQQCQPC 


s 


-*-*^ 


'^ '^ ^ ^ 




:o 


» -^2 IT' 


^ 






1 * 


CO 01 C5 


'n 00 ci I- 


•»s. 


?1 t-H C! i 


" C* <M .— 


a; 






.'s 


cx-w a. 


ti CI, r 


s^ 








mO'-Ti 


Oc/: - 


N 


^"^^ 






JD CO 


50 JO JO p 


S 
^ 


co~ cfcT 


oico cT ^-^ 


C^ i-H CJ :: 


T-< C3 OJ T-H 


^ 






•<v. 


11 " (U 


Oc/2 - C 


^ 






« 






f^ 


u oj a; 1; 


4^ OJ 1) 1. 


^ 






S 


« cs cS cj 


cs cs rt e« 


> > > > 


> > > > 
















OHDHDHCUa^flHC-eUl 


S 






^ 


. Y. 

erm 
hio, 
. Y. 


cT d - 


1 


%00% 


^0 0^ 






a? 














« 


aj 


C/-, 


^^H^^ 


l^-S"^ 


•<i 


(U 3 D 


3 (U '-' - 


<i:i 


> ^ > 


J3 > 3 




rt 3 cS 


3 cj 'C 


i^ 


aa2 


QQ 


.'^ 


C'-J O-J ^ QO C5 r-H 00 1 


^i 


?0 <?? 0:) !M 03 CO CO OJ 1 


se 






3 c i:;jcs ^< p 
n .5 o ^ <u , 5 
* u .1^ -a 3 S - 



— := ^ "S ii o .^^ 
afl— <u «) •- j£ — 1- 
•-ria;(uJ3r;;oo 






^ 



^ 



m (u 


(U (i> (u a> (u 






■c 5 -o -d 2 


5 = -o- 5 2 5 














« Z3 rt C< J3 


^ J3 IS! ^ ^ J2 


Q:^QQc« 


3 3 i- 3 3 = 



1; ^ Qj gj qj 

3 _• ^- 3 3 3 3 

~ i) D -2 5 "2 5 

(/5 ^t:i ^^ X u: O) <« 
JD a! c« X! XI ^ JD 
3^^3333 






C 7} 






l>l>l^Xll^^'U<U'L>CJl^l»QJl^l)Hjajl^fl->OQ-'l^ 






Ch Ci D- 0-1 0-, 0-1 Cm 



^:> 



Ic S ■? '^ i2 ^ = "H rt J£ 2 -o « C ^ j5 



&_«■;; 









c = c ./ 3' Ji c *-- c ■"- c , 

2 -2 . 2 'S2-5 2 o2 32^ 

bDO-i£ Mo-i5 O Mo O O S" i^^ &£ O ex OC o CI. bo S» 

c-a^c-o-^-ac-a-a-orlcr^c-aCc-aCc^ 

3 .2f3'3-'3 rt3 rt^a 

cQ Q3D3Qca QcQ GccQ 



■1^ :^-~. 



CQ t2 ca Ui 



A-e 



1— Tt<X)^X)C5X)Xi— 'COX)X'X'3O«00-— -^OOiOOCS 



o 



1^0 



<^ 



3 C 
, - OS 



! _C O 



fe ,> t; 


HJ 


.'■E J !«'= 


« 


t'^ ^:^ < 


1^ 


Zr^ ji ,, .. 


c 


- ^ * c 

■^.:i g ^ 2 













QafcOK 


1 — 



— u 
' o 2 



— ' c« 5 C =* 

■^ ?; ^(u = '^ ■> tsT? ■-- 



A^ 



.. ^ _ = J? 5 ,^ 3 

,2^^^§.'i^-§^, 

.™rtu--0005;;<u2 

J S g S S ^ ^ fin E &H 



432 



History of the I^ifteenth Regiment 



U 

^ 






■^ 



I 



s 




s 








"K. 




s 




<5 


fA 


U 


^ 




^ 


^ 


< 


8 
« 


S 


•^ 


W 


s 


^ 



8 



D 11 

= 3 _■ _• 






u a; ^ w ^ 





> 






u 


ij 


i; 


73 






c 


T 


tij 






D 








d^&4ciiciHC-iCuP-i&^ 




Iowa, 

Ohio, 

Wis. 

Ind. 

Holl. 

Ohio, 

Ind. 

Mo. 



Di 



2-5 '2 S 

:3 u U 3 « 






.A£e..ia2 



en 



Sfc 



d<: 



= bB.^ 
5x S S - - 2 

I i.E , oT g ^> c 
■■a c -^ — 5 - ^ 

<U C O U -^ O C 'J: 

k; »j csi 05 cc H > ;> 



i/3 






o 



m 



: U — (U ._ — u — 0) il u IJ !U ._ ti , 




:_, c tU ^ x: - P- 

— <UOi-DOO« 



■5^'^ 



^fe 5 c ^ 


rt X! > c^ '^ 


PWWfaffi 



nC X j 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 4jj 










00 iO i> 3D C: !> W 

c^ — OT (M M <^^ -rt - i 






iT 


oT 


oj" 


oT 


iT 


iT 


iT 


iT 


u' 


oT 


oT 


oT 


oT 


oT 


cJ 


(lT 


iT 


iT 


oT 


iT 


<u 


<u 


nT 


aJ 


iT 


(lT 


a7 


«r 


iT 


<u 


oT 


aT 


■u 


aJ 


aT aJ 


re 


CS 


re 


re 


re 


re 


re 


rt 


re 


re 


re 


re 


rt 


rt 


re 


re 


re 


re 


re 


re 


re 


re 


r- 


re 


re 


re 


re 


rt 


re 


re 


re 


re 


re 


re 


re re 


> 


> 


.i; 


> 


> 


.:: 




> 


> 


,r 


.> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


.- 


> 


> 


.i 


> 




> 






> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 






> 




CLp^Qj&^oid^cicijaHa^ciiCLicueupHdldliii^&j&^DHeuOHa-d^p^itCd^p^ic^ 



D ^ 



I B i i . «' >-■ s>: c 



5 §Q tfQ .5 



c 

U 

10 


~ ~ 1: T3 
IfT L- 10 01 


4th 

Burling 
6th Con 
5th . 


= 
re jz 





^ "* C- ^ 
■* CO C>'J -* 


00 SI "* 
C>"» ^ 10 CO 


^ CO 









— DO o ^..^^--re^-* _t^«; b,-^^ =^'-tLire 'Z. 



Cu re 



32 



434 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



U 






U 

^ 






^ 











cS 






o 






c 






4_j 






« 












-/) 






0) 






o 




C/} 


o 




i^ 


'-^ 




1^ 


^ 




< 


o 










^ 


£- 




111 


O 




^ 


Q 

(LI 

-a -a "^ "ri T3 

CJ lU OJ O o 

'ca "cs "rt "5 rt 

QQGQG 






^^ '*'* 'Tf 




"^ 


to o o to -~ 




u 








35 w C^ I- X 






CQ O^ CJ C3 T-H 
















% 


73 ' O 7D O 






T*H-*^-«*' -* 




-o - 


o to o o o 








1) u 


^ ^ ^ •* 




u 75 


c; O CI £^ 00 






?^ <71 O^ d T-i 




C 7} 






&- 1 ^1 




w • 




D 


GO' OmO 




^ 


oT <u oj a> oj 










CS 


a a a a ci 




^ 


> > > > > 




u I- •_ ^ I, 






O-iOh Ph CL,C^ 




k^ 


>^' '- >' i 




^'.t 






iT 


=«• 




o 
c 


Q. .. oT 




0) 


- 3 




-a 


c a" 




00 


O 3 




oi 


ss Iq 








Age. 


SQ T*< O) CO 












<^s^^ 




c/j 


i s w u ^ 




- es - jJ^ IJ 




?5 P SS-c 

8 S 2 w)^ 












^^^^N 


1 



-<^ 



^ 



^ 



^ 





O, 


1/^ 


< 


CO 




o' 


U 


w 




■~ 


;? 


PS 


^ 






<:; 




^ 


u 


O 


^ 

5 


TD 





^aj^iJfQiJ ilii i 



X X jj uj -o ry. 
JD XI ..Q ^ O .a 
3 3 3 3 >r 3 

'J) r} '-!} '-f) O -J) 



^ ^ cS ^ rt cs cs 

,:;5 (;5 C ^:^ Q C G 



J XJ 


1) oi 


a J 








j rs 


3 3 


T 




















.7i 


tn tn 




^ 


XI X! 


X) 



■73 C/] C/3 CZ! 7} 






.O' ' 



' o o o 



= '73!^ _-"^*- - ^ ^ ^ 

W -U-,.,- 5"30--^ IT- - " " " 

^ ^ lo ' - - Ao ^O ' - ' c^ ' - o o o 



11 dj <U SJ 



> > > > > 



3-'tl;tiJ<l><L'(L'<Dl><U(U(L'l-'Q-'flJ 
rtrtcSa!rtc3cSrtc!cScScSctf«cs 









^ 

^Z' 



• CO : 



D 



oph>5^!^ o o iz .^ o m i^ i^; n: 



a, w 



Q. . 



a'Q .S Q ^ Q Q 

jtt • 5 c ^- - - 

TT O '^ O •- rX coo 

•r^D^jr-/::-"^." S^ '^ -^ J- 

r •, 4^ rs f r ■\ -^ '-^ r r^ 7^ "^ "^ -^ -X "^ •/: -^ 



So 



Age. f 



00 cs ■ 



rt O V, 






— fli (- ^ ^ 
T rt 3f i: u cs _ 



Cm (U (1) 



■S S 



-J rt « S^2;3 csx: = i5 
■-<CClfQMg^PHPHD:ic/3 



•-H 


■— 1 


bX3_' 










C/J 




(1) 


1) 


j: t3 


u 




to -o 


o 


I. 


cS rt 


a. 

73 


H 


^^ 



^ S 


.o 


3 5 


o ^ 


^ 4-1 




rt a; 


^^ 



^'X 



—- U, lA 



9 f'-^ 



^^i 



Iowa Veterati Volunteer Infantry. 



435 



ic in 

"^ C Jj C J= 
.•I — ^o ^ 



U 



5 c» 



::; ^ 



T3 "c t: ^ :j 



■~^ ' — '— t^- '^- c/; 'T: 
:« rt rt CS 



3 3 3~^ 



T3 -a 5 "n 5 5 T3 



1) (U Cj (U u 

3 3""*^ 



OJ lU 






3 ^ 
• ^ <U 



< -* '^l 'TP -* ^ ^ 

) (:0 O CD ?o CO o 



jO x: ^ Xi XJ 
33333--3- 



dnQ 






(DO' O- - - c/:0 



"^ Tf "^ "^ -^ -^ -^ ■^ -^ -"^ T^ "^ -^ 

OCOsOsOCOCOCOCDCOCOCOCDCO 



o o o o u ^ 

OOOOO" 






OO- O- - 720' o- - O 



OO' - O- - ' O cw 



u 0) i> (D m 0) aj 

CQ Cd C2 Cj Cj 






<U OJ OJ 
rt rt cs 



-T3 . CUM) 



-O T3 & , 

c o 



o "a « 

'- *J fe ^ -,-, 



^ o d - fc d § =■ 
,2 '^■t^O ^U 



? o o 3 X o t; 

i- •— — c O ■ •— OJ 

ZOOPh^^^Oc/3 



O 



. iTQ 



^ . ii 



bjo 



> o "a 



u 



^ O o o 









fe gl g 

-r Is J5 Oh U 

z, <" '^ a ■£ 




(U ^ 



^ 5 p S id 
'rt rt o C' 5 3 o 
n oq M cq u (J U 



sgs; 



> OS (U D 



43^ 



Histo)'y of the Fifteenth Regiment 



U 















^ 



s 






— « 



o lu 

■a « 



be 



CS 


J3 


Ij 


CS 










c4 


T! 


> 




CS 


13 


'75 


lU 



t; -d -d zi X. "d t; -a -d t; 



3 3 ^'-r-; 3 



i; 1) 1> 1> 0^ 






ri ^ oi rt ::t 






1) (U OJ 

T3 2 2 "O -Hi 
<U .J- .- OJ ■- 

Q 7? M Q c/: 





x'to 














» lo w 1--:' X' L- 


TOOl- 


» t^ 1— -^H 


•""'^''■:r 


r:H iO CC' -^ O i'T 


i-hX'OI 


■^ 


■^ 




O? ?> 


c> 






4_, 


^ J 


r^ 4-> 






t^' 4_) 


V* 4-J 


u ^ 


- ^ t-* ^ 


57 w ^ 


JT" " - 




^ . 57 o ^ ^ 


w 57 " 


O' 


- ' ' - 0' 


7)0- 


cJ^OO ' 


■"•""' 


' '7)0' - 


' cfiO 



C7) 



u SjU - aT" . - 

O w O - w O ' - 



- - - . at"- - - 07^ 



v 


iT 


iT 


oT 


V 


•v 


<U 


V 


v 


V 


aj" 


oT 


iT 


iT 


iT 


iT 


oT 


aJ 


'u 


V 


l;' 


OJ" 


V 


iT 


V 


oT 


oT 


CS 


ctf 


CS 


C3 


CS 


tri 


a 


:i 


C5 


c< 


ri 


CJ 


« 


c« 


cS 


cS 


CS 


C3 


CJ 


CS 


CS 


cS 


CS 


CS 


CS 


CS 


cS 



>>>>>>>> 



> > > > 



> > > > > 



> > 

'c 'c 'u 'u 'c 'C 'C 'n '" 'n vi '^ 'c " 






Age. 



d c CS 6" 

= . • ^ c ^ = '^ -d 

nj4-ics>)i)- c«^i; 



■ C O 

^ = ■ ? -d 
MHO>S 



1^ c-^ 






CS = s a, 

^ (11 



^^Oooa 



Ccsc:c:5c6=i; 
Ocs-^(j-^5U ^ 



■f ? tj ^ 

S 5 !> 2 

a ^ ci (u 



q:hq 

S c 
o c o 



!!E S^ 1^ d ' 
<u — .ii o 

(ii S S 3 00 






^ M CO 






U 



Oi 






_ , — '^ -T3 ^ 

H « c - c , CS 



r* CS u o — 5 






M^ 



lU 



^ z; -& ^t. 






^3 

r- > 

E CS 



1; kU 

1^ 5 -" 



c/^ fe .S < ■ - 
- c c e cs -ti 



f, ci o O t: 



; — ' 3 cs 



' P CS 



' -^ ~ £ ~ ^ 



bi5 



J|._ 



loiva Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 



437 



u 



rt 





> 1 






11 


<U 1 


u 


c/3 






CC/5 1 


W 


. 




^1 



o - S _r 

!- O . O 

^ - ^ in lo 

^ = " - ? 

**- "5 "O ■-*- '-*r '"*r ' — ■ "-^ '-« CO '>*.. •^- c/) '*- yy (*- '-^ CO '-*- x c*^ cti x '-t- — ' — co '-•- 

c3^3jc;cSrt^c;jcjJcB«j3c3^«wj2oJ^rtc<^T!ci:i X!c« 

a :^ 2 Q Q 5 oaGc oQQ-:^Qt^QQr^Q:^CQc^QQQ c^g 
lo •-h"-*'ic C2 ofcji" id -r-Too t-^^'oTc^rx" jot-^^io t-Tci •* rTic — 'd~3: 

1— I CO 1— I ^^ C5 C-? >?? i S 1— I C"! ^-' -^H (7^ O? C-* :: T— T-< 1-^ -^ 1— I O C>^ T-H ?)■ 

faOOfacT) 0^c/;Oc/^0;/D O TsOhOy) 

CO ^ T-H <>J c^^ C"» - i -rH CJ^ ,-1 T-i 0-"i <^J C^ :i ^-^ ^ ^ T- t-H C>1 (?> T-H CI 



iixiDiiiiuijcuDiLcua.DDvi'cbajDcuajiiiULiajDajajuaj 

CL^C^[l^(l^P^P^&^ | £i&^^lCiIia^a.|£^QHPIi&^^^l^|l^^PHP^P^P^ 
c ^ e' • > >^' • 2" ■ .2" • 2'>h' 



:^> 



Age. 



3 O 



3-Q 



-c t; ^ j:: x: 
o O o ic o 



■4-;co^O^^^_.-j--^ 
"T — ^ lO I— I ^ iir SD irj iO 5C ■ 



! '^i -^ CI C>> CO <ffl >— )1C CO 



'S<J =, 



be 



a ?^' "^ - _ 
u=:-- to— ^EOii! S-C/: '^ y aa^ 






-^ !- — " U''— • -—' T3 -^ ^ !I^ ,'2 3 (U •- 



= . S 1^ =o 
* r- C^ Ih IJ 









5 i-'f be- c ^ 






(U •— N 



,— N 



''^ % 5 c — 

._r-^ CO I > o a; ;=- u T3 






c3 rt c3 U 1> O 



k-; -= ■ 



43S 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



I 
I 

I' 



o 

S 



< 

Pi 


Dratted. 

Drafted. 

Substitute. Deserted Nov. 6, '64. 

Substitute. 

Drafted. 

Drafted. 


T3 

to ■-- 

3 


^ ^ ^ ^ ^ zp 
T^ o> 0«J c? o? 


■a i 


-* -^ '^ -+ -f -f 

p p p p p c: 

OccOgo - ■" 


c 
« 


oT iT (iJ~ cT oj (lT 

rt rt "S c: « rt 
>>>>>> 


I- •— I, I, i, >_ 

^ di 0. Ph CL, IX 


12; :> 


£ 6 


y 

c 

m 

a; 


c " ' ^ - ' 
o 

u 

o iS " " " " 


Acre irs-rfi — occc-l 

-^S^- ]01 CO Ol CI CO Ol I 


c/5 

W 
< 


Rudloff, John 
Sulgrove, Emanuel 
Vanhooser, Valentine 
Wacht, Nickolas 
Wooslev, Burrel T. 
Wvatt,John W. 







>-'tj< lO 






O 1^ «o 






iz;"- 1- 






•^ lo "* 












r 4 






cT a 


^ 




S .0 


S 


CO 


o 


<2 


W 


J^ TJ 


•^ 


q u 




< 


W E 


U 


S 






w 


t; TJ 


<5 


ai 




k 




• • Q 


!= 




<U 1^ 4J O 


.^ 






^^ 






'^i 




re CJ..QJ3 r: cart ca es'Sjo'rt'cs^ cs cirt'cs 






J- - zi ~ •— •- ■— u u I. - 1^ '^ ^ t-, ■— <- u 


o 




QQwcA)CQGQOGy5QQc/3QGPC 


^ 


V 


pppp»co»oo:oooo:r:ocO!00 


•^ 


"2 .5 


W T-H Cl CI W r-( T-H M C") ^ CI 


^ 
^ 


i 




SJ 


> 


poppppopooocoojo?c^to:3 


1-^ 




".c"t-^o ^cTo o cTt-^cTcTL'f -^ -r^E-^t-^ f- 






CI — C> C? O T-- ^ CO CJ T-J C7 


55 


"c en 


■^J 4-1 4-J .*_) .^J 


pi 


w^- 


Cc/3C c/20'c/:)"'0~'''''cr)0 73 


<5 






•<-<. 


^ 


oTdJ aroTfLToj oj ^ i^r qS^ ^ 'V qj v v <v (lTiT 


•^ 


c 






d 


csc«rtc;c3csrtrtcsciai«c!sn:rt«rtc« 


o: 


> > > >.>.>.>.> .> .> .^ .> .> .> .> .> .> .> 




1^ 




■^ 'H ~ 'C 'n 'C 'C 'u "C 'u 'u 'u 'u 'V, 'iZ 'C 'u 'u, 




cuD^a^CL,cuCL,cy,o-<^P-i^o-iCuci^cuo-iP-iP^ 


't, 


ciri> 


d o' ^= £ . 


'-0 


^'.t 


O^S O • ^ilhS ^ ^5 o >^ 


5i 




IB 






Q 


■»-i 


D 


.rr3S33-s::3c;"i3:;3 - 


.'•o 


-a 


c 


^ 


•w 


o 

o 


K 


V 


C» 


-a4-'l;-;-a-a~T3*jj->4-iT3a5i-'Tj^ -^ 


"^ 




rj lo lo Lc cj CO iffl CI in o lo CO T-^ ^ c? o ic 


•s.^ 


Age.j 


c^oaoxot-^o^xjoiT-HTti^cO'* CO 


y 


Ci CO ^ -^ Cl CO CO C} C> CJ -rH C7 Cl CJ CO O C( 


8 


en 
5^ 


S o;i-c oj 5« £:r -- S-^^-T £<< "^.^ 

||-S5:^£ii-gi^l^-£.!^-§- 

'0'acu!>^03-3oi:rtu!-«<*«i'~ 



loioa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 



439 



iO 



lO 



o 



d -^S ? '^'^- 

M rt o ■= ;o}^ 

« cQ "U C "^ .S h 

1 . . c "^^ . . . . . . .2i -a . 

1/ V o ■— qj oj ■— oj '^ oj -^ t^ "- - oj .— (u oj •— 1/ 1; .— .— ij .^ ._ D *— 0^ . -- '-J ^ 1^ x» o i> 

•±i '^ -Ij -x C^ '^ CA C^ ■^- ii c/5 i^ Ci5 J3 ■— X '™ '-^ 7: — '-^ X X "— X • — X •— X / '^ •— '-« U- '_ 

Cj>'^ Oi o o to ^ ic 70 t— 10 of ^ io of ci Lt' ■-<" 10 io ^^ -* Lt' LO c; 30 t-^ i— 1 ■■— 1 — IC -^ Xi IC x- 

C^ "" ^ CI 1-1 ?J 70 ,-1 W TO TO 01 '-■'-' "-^ Ot "—TO C) 0} 1— OJ 

coO " " " " ''_''_'_^0_ - J- J- -S}^" 'S) 

■^ •r^. ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^^'-^ ^ ^ ~^ '^ ~^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ -^ ^ -^ ^ ^ -^ -r ^ ~^ -^ -^ -^ ^ •* ^ -^ '^ 

oo»»o«o:soooo!:ooo»»ocsoooojoopocpjspoooooo>c 

or»o'~c5'o'~'-o co'-Tl-s'to t-^ici" cf r^'Locf o'l-d'—-" 10" o"— '*'-':' L-fo xi _r^_r^LO "* x li'x 

(jj T— iCQ 1— 10/ TO 1— iCJTO TO'?^ — 1— '»— I CI -—TO C^CIt-iC^ 

£-t5 . . o g< o S-^ - £■ 

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 

o* 6 . ^ .2 K>^ " F" 

0-5^ O^ O O J: 



CoT^ 



o 3 



U 



O) 1— ) c= CJ TO — TO TO O LO C? 



■C-^"a-35le—-3T3~"S'i;'xT;"x-3~-0~T3-0^~-:: 
CQ -^ TO C7 O — -^ TO TO ■^ '-' a -^ LO — ^ C7 LO C? '^ TO ^/ HO ST "~ 



L-^0->*C>OTOTOC~LOIOX Cl-^O-'-JDOOCJlftOaiOXaiLOXLOTOXCJCSLO-^X 
TOTOTO— 'TOCICCJTOOCJ--^ TOTOCaClCOCjoyTOTO — -^ ~- ^, ^> ^ „-.«-. _j - 



i s«^ ^«^ w-i I-.' j"^ t.-' -'fc' -*^ v»^ '-.^ t^j "^r UL 
' C( — CI T>> — CJ C5 I— ' TO -s** TO O TT 




440 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 






SS 



O 









?5 



^ 



REMARKS. 


0) 
D 

7) 


Mustered 
in. 




Ui b 


Rank. 
Private, 




c 

5 

Q 

c 
o 

x" 

2 
CJ 

"o 


NAMES. > Residence, 



3 






o 
s 



^ 



^ N 



c/j 






t4 






Di 






< 






% 






W 






^ 




'^ '-' 'C '— *^ 'ji; 3j -j:; OJ u 'xs ^ 'ji; '^ oj -^ ■ - u u u ._ u qj 
"^Is^^'s^ c«.c"2l^-^"5^-l r^?-°-^^"F'5-^ ''I' 

G 5 c^ :^ C: X 5 -^ Q f ::^ C '.^ Q C x X C Q Q X C 






-* '^ ^ ^ -* -* -f -+ Tf -*■*'* ^ ^^-^-^ ^ ^ ^ -* 


t3 




»»o;oo;s-Oi=o o:oc=ooo;=:r i=iioo 


<U 




^.~-^---'^. ^^^^-^-.^ .r^ ^r .r* ;r' 


s 




ood t^cTot-^Ci'ar^f — -'cs ?-^o cTx'od t-^ t-'^^x^t-^ 


X 


c 


^c<?— ^<>icccQCQ^CN>r G^i^c<icv>^T^o^;: r-^ o?c^> 


3 


"" 










> 


■^-^'^-^-^^-^-^t-^ -rt<^Tj^■^■^'*■*^ -t^^-*-* 


.^. 


ppppppppp. pppppppo pppp 








aj 


11 


,^^^..^^ - ^ ^ 


— 


-0 


OXf-oot-=;Xr- — cic-^ocTriXE-T _-tJ"xr-^ 


1) 




"o oi -H ■?? r: SQ cQ — c? :: cj — <>? « ^ '-' c^ ~: ■>— SQ oj 




/} 


£"_ _u ^ S":: 3 u ^ ^ u ^^ u ^ £- o , g*^ 


W 




5 


x-O-X' Ox ZxDx'O'x O-x- 


c 




oT u" oT oj' »f ij" 3 *^ j^' *j' w oJ" iT ttj* oT ttT iT oT oT _JJ" aJ oT oT 




r;cSc«rtrtr;eaxcSc3'Sc3?5c:rtc3rt'S«rtrtrt« 


Cd 




>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 




• ^ •— ■— .— ■— ■— •— •— ■— •— ■— •— -— ■— .— ..- — .—. '— •— '•^ •-- .-^ 






-i_i.i.-_i_i.l.;_t.L.u.i_i.^t.'_i.t.i---i- 






5..CL,c^3.cuCL,cua-CuCLa-a,n-a,C-,CL0HC-D«D-D-c..0H 


k 

z 


f' 


(i.^^C)OOciwO-:: &.ChOOOZ^^uSO&. 


4J 




s ^ 


5 






"5. 




C 


D 




o 


Qi 




ft L- 1?? oi o> ryt C'? "?"! I'T l-^ — '?7 T-^ ■?■» w — c>> ic LT CQ -^ o lt 


A 




■^■>'*xa='T'^o^^o^'*oo--c^-H•^ffr-QOO'^■)OTO«^-<t 


__^ 


b? TO ^ CQ c>( rs -* ci '^ ^ CJ (W ^ M « OJ — '^ Ci ct c? c? c> 






-^ 






^ ■ 












< 
2 




J i-|^« is^<= ':isi?:"igi 




^ i = ^ i. f 1 c -:1> t-r.5 -3 1 11 -'i 1< 

1ll||||l|MirNi^|l|i|l 










'<<<:i<'<<^mMMMMM6oOUOO(JUQC 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 441 




"* ^ ^ '^ -* 10 ^f 

O ^ CO o ^ o o 






(lT oT cT oT iT iT nT aT nT u oT iT aT iT iT a;' oT oT iT c' iT iT oT oj oT oT u iT ii a» oj aj _i) 1^ ij _2^ 
'cSc«'Sc3rtcSc3rt(«csnc«c3cScsnics«rtc5c««c«rirtrtrtc3rt<5irtrtrtj:cScS 
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>_>>_>_>_>>^_> 

c/i c/i tfj CO cc ix CO c/3 cfl a5 cc ^ '^ '^ '^ ^ i* 2 ,^ .^ .iiH .SS 

Q QGQQQQQQ QQ QqScqQQ OOQ Q 

c' " " " " " " ' " oc'cc'cc'ccdoCco5cc'^!= = co£ccog 
o -aooooOooo-a°n'o,9 0o^oooT3 0°°'^r- 

LoOToe^ioffJiftoii-Hio 'i^i -^ m s^ xa ^-1 \!i 01 \k ca to ^ oj i.~ -^ o co u? ^^ c-"? ic 



oc5C?X)T-Joo^^ooooo'^■^oci^<^■?ocl^•o»GQ^^-^^!^5t-■X)'-^^-aDlc»^- 
^7 — I'cQ c^ico^io-'j^xciMCQcoffjcocoiJOJdcocvJc^cjrciococQ T-^jo-r-HCQio-^oa^^o^ 



5 2 £ P Ag-a 2 ^ = E = ^ ^ X s 2 ^'O ^ S c -^ I fe 









33 



442 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



^ 


7) 




^ 


s 


^ 


'■^ 




^ 




5 


% 


« 


w 


■^ 


^ 


S: 





o 



.'^ 



^ 

^ 

^ 



« 

^ 

^ 



s 

^ 

8 



8 

^ 







5j i; •— ._ ii ._ ..- .^ 1) o 0^ <o u • — • — 1^ ~ 'j:; ^ 

C^ ul! J- cA C^ ;/; ;/3 X — '*- ^ '*- '— ^ c^ 'i^ * c« U- 

C C c^ x S c^ '^ c^QQ C; ;5 p^x_co G c/: ^_Q 



T3 "^ "a "a xi 

5J 0) Oi OJ • — 



C« Cj re J< « 

CCPQG 






u. u. t. 

QQ_Q 






^ r_ 



t-^c-^io"^— 'arcr'-'*'?f cTx'i-^-f'o co~t-^'-H 

Ol O^ ^ OJ C>J CQ ^ >— :T -7* CI T J 1-1 ^ C* •- 



00 X '-1 3D : 



OJ CJ C^ O ' 



ti o. 






O^c^O 



»— t> 






c^ £{ c-^ CO i-T »" go' o' ^ oi o S ^"^ ^' <?'' ^ i^ '-^ 30 CO t4" c» ^s'cTeo 00 

,-i ^> oj T-i « o^ c? ^ ^ CO '^J cj « ,-. — cj 1-^ cj o^ cQ (N cQ <?J w OT « cv» 

"S'^u- S"^."^ S'-^^tj^ %'ti ^ %^ % ^ ^ ^ ^ . .^, 



xta>i^i'Oi^i^i;<Lioa-'<L'ajD^ooL*oc'<L'^i><voaj^a^ua> 



>>>>>>>>> 



cScsrtrertcSrtrecsrertrtcScsrtWcsci 



c o = = 






O . C Sh o o . . • 







jffl tffiLO— iiOiQwOjyscQiocQoaotgjtop^T- i l o gQ lo to Qj OQ i-~ i-~ cQ oa o 

-*- I r^i -^4^ i--^ r^ r^s i-v1 «^^ ^^ -vOa ^"^ »^ — .^— « ^*^s > ^"^ /-^\ -^^^ i ^^ »^ — ^"v .^ -"^ /^"» ^_i -^^ ^-W 



^£J It^ lij 11^ ' ' *^J *ij '"^ ^^i -W '^"^ *^-J ^*^ ^^ ^"^ !*V llj t*^ T— I tij l,V ii^ i^J ^^ ^'^ «-* *-^ V*^C ^^^« t~^ 

A _„ |C>">3D-^OO^OQOQOOJMCO^C<>t-^:eOt-OQO^T-lOC-CS^-t O'OJ tH -^"^ 



sEnm 



« _ 






c-=: 



0,.'Q 






U3 T3 






C 7j .ii « 



I i -So 

O cS c tt 



^ ^ 






C5 1> 2 



'.2 2 



■g->^.^0§c^£Sp15-sPH^:gWMS"? 



= £ 

Ji ca 



^■. o 



5 a 



■ < J; -a ^ . - ?i 



C/DC/3! 



'f^ ^ M 2 < ^' c . 
- _' OJ , <u ■- u, ^' «) 

_ - ^ . i if i: s'^ i2 s ^^ ° ^ £ 

Pi=oo>cs.--55-Suc?~,52 

73C/2C/DC/:7:c/3C/3CZ3C/2 75CC!Z!E-'HH 



-:Ao'2 



o o 



loxva Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 44J 



• — I-' '^ '^ ■ rj ^ aj •— q; .— QJ .^ U (y .^ <L) .^ 5j OJ •— -^ .— -^ -^ 
(« %- -S) c/: -x Uh '— . ^x ^ '/J %-. t/> ■^- 'il cA "^li c/3 Ch i- c/: tfj «) X cfi 
J3 ni.OX)^ 2 ni^ CSX! rtXJ rt rtJ2 cSXS « caXJ^XJ-^.^ 






^H i-H OT CO C-l 01 W " S tH CO O"! Cv! ;, 1— I O"! 1-^ O"! r-H ; 



oT 


6 


«r 


a" 


«" 


c' 


^7 


ar 


(U 


oT 


£ 


<» 


iT 


oT 


iT 


<» 


V 


iT 


oT 


oT 


oJ" 


-I? 


oT 


Oj" 


















































ni 


^ 


ni 


rt 


rt 


ai 


CS 


CS 


c3 


rt 


rt 


CS 


CS 


PS 


ctf 


Ti 


c« 


cS 


re 


re 


re 


re 


re 


re 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


^ 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


'^ 


^ 


■m 


i_ 


:_ 


u 


1^ 


u, 


^ 


u 


u 


i^ 


u 


^ 


^ 


j_, 


S-, 


^ 


L. 


«_, 


PiOiPiPiPiPir'iPi^'^tOi^iOi^'^-PiPiP'Pir'iPir'inini 



E j=' re - d o' _• d" E c E . >-i . 

5 ° s I ^' S 15 -g _• "g';o :s ^^.-3' -o i3 -^^ ^ -o i g -o . = 



ii^r.- 



E 



ac.-££Ei^E^o25S^Ec-'.,^p ^5 = ^ 






. ^ f ^f^f^ ^^r| .-J ;, S I I I Ul: I S^l §§, 






444 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



IP^AuI^T SZII. 



WINTER CAMPAIGN THROUGH THE CAROLINA'S. 

17th Army Corps on the Extreme Right to Beaufort, 
S. C. — Battle of Garden Corner — Pocotai.igo — Prep- 
arations FOR THE New Campaign (January) — Crossing 

OF THE SaLKAHATCIIIE AND FiGHT OrANGERURG — COL- 
UMBIA — Cheraw — Fayetteville, N. C, — Battle at 
Bentonville — Goldsborough, February and March, 
1865. 

On January 5th orders were received to be ready to move. On 
the 6th, the regiment, brigade and division marched through Sav- 
annah to Bonaventora, where the 15th embarked on the steamer 
Louisburg and was transported via the Wihnington river (empty- 
ing into the sea,) around Hilton Head to Beaufort, S. C, where 
it arrived at 1 o'clock a. m. of the 7th, and went into camp 2 miles 
west of town . Thus the troops of the 17th Corps again bec.ame 
the extreme right column of the army, keeping that position until 
it reached Columbia, the capital of South Carolina, February 16th, 
where the 15th Corps, becoming the right, the 17th formed the 
right centre column. 

January 10th, the regiment, with brigade and divison, advanced 
5 miles west of Beaufort. On the 13th it reached Port Royal 
ferry, which it crossed on the 14th, and soon struck the enemy's 
first line of fortifications, which, after some skirmishing, were 
emptied hy the 3d Division, then in front. At noon passed Gar- 
den's Corner, and struck the enemy's heavy works one mile beyond, 
which were protected by a wide, swampy ground, and a stream 
running through the middle of the same, in a northwest and 
southeast direction, there being only one dyke and road connecting 
the high ground the Union forces were forming on, with the rising 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 44^ 

ground beyond, where the fortifications of the enemy were erected ; 
thus the enemy had a full view of the whole line and of each and 
every skirmisher of the Union army at the edge of the swamp. 
The 15th Iowa was soon ordered to deploy on the left of Colonel 
Wild's Brigade of 3d Division, then sharply engaged by the enemy 
with musketry and artillery, and to push forward to the stream and 
find out if and where the same could be crossed. After a general 
engagement of an hour and a half, along the whole line, the skir- 
mishers were re-enforced, and the regiment advanced briskly 
across the wide, muddy, swampy ground, and charged the rebel 
works with entire success; Company "A" under Lieutenant 
Mitchell, of the 15th, being the first to enter the fort. 

Captain Roger B. Kellogg, of Company A on detached service 
as Picket Officer of the 4th Division, while leading the skirmish 
line at Garden's Corner, as chance would have it, of his own com- 
pany, to the edge of the swamp, was mortally wounded in front of 
his men, by a rebel sharpshooter, and died at Beaufort on January 
17th. 

The enemy, having fled precipitately towards the timber, was 
driven up to the massive works at Pocotaligo, where musketry and 
artilleiy kept up a lively fire till late at night. Next day the ene- 
my, having evacuated their forts, the command went into camp 
north of the town, where it awaited the completion of preparations 
for the ensuing campaign, making several reconnoissances north- 
east and north, towards the Combahee river, where the enemy 
was guarding the bridge*. 

♦The warm temperature of November last had changed, after the command arrived near 
Savannah, into a cold apell, with piercing northern winds; and now, at Beaufort and Pocot- 
aligo, it became quite wintry, with almost continual storms of north winds and cold rains. 
Few of the men. however, had received any new clothing since leaving Marietta, therefore the 
clothing of the men generally, was worn out and sadly deficient for the winter. Moreover, 
the camp was established in a swampy, pine timber, too green to burn when fired, causing a 
great scarcity of fire-wood, which had to be brought in Irom 3 to 5 miles beyond the picket 
lines. The men, however, veterans and recruits, were in the best of spirits, and cheerfully 
entered upon the new campaign. While at Beaufort and Pocotaligo the regiment received 
several squads of men, who had been absent sick in hospitals, or having been captured, were 
exchanged. 



44^ History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

January 28th, all tents and the surplus baggage were ordered to 
be sent to Beaufort, and on the 29th, the command started north 
along the southern bank of the Salkahatchie, on the road to Mc- 
Phersonville, the march progressing slowly because of the road 
being blocked with heavy logs and trees by the retreating enemy 
and all the bridges leading across the overflowed streams being 
entirely destroyed. On the 31st, in camp, waiting for the arrival 
of the left wing, l-tth and 20th Corps; distance marched in January 
105 miles. 

February 1st, the regiment with its brigade division and corps, 
resumed march, General Mower's 1st Division in advance. At 
noon lively skirmishing commenced with the enemy's cavalry, who 
were steadily driven along the road to McPhersonville. 

February 2d, the skirmishing continued and the enemy was 
pushed, though, being evidently reinforced by several brigades, he 
gave way only after obstinate resistance and slowly . In the after- 
noon he fell back across the Big Salkahatchie swamp, stubbornly 
holding the two bridges leading across the same, known as the 
Broxton's and River's bridges, two and a half miles apart; both of 
these bridges were strongly fortified with massive forts and re- 
doubts, and armed with guns of the heaviest calibre, defying 
an}^ approach or assault in front, as the two roads leading across 
the wide streams composing the Salkahatchie swamp were en- 
tirely exposed to their concentric, sweeping, terrible fire. In the 
evening, the 15th Iowa was ordered two miles forward to re-en- 
force General Mower's extreme left brigade, (Colonel Tilson's, ) 
near River's bridge, where a heavy musketry and artillery fire 
was kept up all night. 

February 8d, the regiment was relieved and returned to its own 
brigade. While a lively demonstration was going on in front of 
River's Bridge above, and in front of Broxton's bridge below (by 
the 18th Iowa), the regiment with the rest of the 8d Brigade, and 
the 4th Division, was ordered to cross the Salkahatchie swamp. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 44"/ 

three-fourths of a mile above Broxton's bridge, to effect a lodg- 
ment between the two forts on the opposite bank and flank said 
forts. 

After receiving an additional twenty rounds of ammunition, to 
be carried by the men well above their waists, the Salkahatchie 
was entered, — General Giles A. Smith, commanding the 4th Di- 
vision, General B. F. Potts, commanding the 1st (Ohio) Brigade, 
and General W. W. Belknap, commanding the 3d (Iowa) Bri- 
gade, ahead of their respective columns afoot, and the officers and 
men wading through the thirty-four smaller and wider streams and 
the marshy, stagnant pools composing the Big Salkahatchie swamp, 
a mile and a half wide. The water averaged waist deep generally 
and at many points was still deeper, in a dense cypress timber, full 
of the usual "cypress knees," which were mostly covered with 
water, and running through a thick underbrush and luxuriant 
creeping vines of all kinds, enough to satisfy the taste of any 
amateur botanist. The wading across lasted from 3 o''clock p.m. 
to 4:30 p. M.,and great credit is due to the officers and men of the 
whole flanking party for the steadiness, dispatch and surprising 
regularitv with which the movement was effected by them, with- 
out the least hesitancy or slackening, and amidst a constant play of 
artillery (shelling the woods) from the neighboring rebel fortifica- 
tions at Broxton's bridge, at a place which, according to the cap- 
tured rebel papers, was deemed absolutely impassable by all the 
leading military authorities of South Carolina. 

Not ten minutes after landing on the opposite (northern) bank, 
the 15th Iowa received a sudden attack on its right flank by a 
rebel cavalry and infantry force, (attracted no doubt, by the noise 
of the division column while crossing the timbered swamp), posted 
some 300 yards in a wide and open field, on high, level ground, at 
the edge of the timber where the regiment emerged from the 
swamp. The 14th, without waiting for orders from any of the 
superior headquarters, instantly took arms, changed front from that 



44^ History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

facing west to facing north, and at the same time deploying a heavy 
Hne of skirmishers,closely supported by the rest of the regiment,with 
its brisk and well sustained fire, just at the right moment and at the 
right place, soon compelled the advancing enemy to halt, and soon 
afterwards to take to flight towards the timber beyond the field. 
The main line, as well as that of the skirmishers, was rapidly forti- 
fied, the 15th Iowa having thus become the front of the division, 
while the other regiments of the brigade were forming on its line. 
A wakeful, rainy, cold night followed, during which the men were 
drying their clothes, and fitting their arms and accoutrements to be 
ready to meet the expected attack next morning. During the night 
however, after midnight, a part of General Mower's division also 
effected a landing near River's bridge, after some fight, and by day- 
light the enemy disappeared entirely from the whole Hne it held 
along the Salkahatchie, retreating towards the Augusta, Branchville 
and Charleston railroad. 

February 4:th, the regiment with di\'i^ion marched by a cir- 
cuitous route through the timber north of the Salkahatchie to 
River's bridge, where it put up temporary fortifications on that and 
subsequent da3^s, while the bridge, which had been burned by the 
enemy, was rebuilt, and commutiication with the ammunition, sup- 
ply and other trains of the army restored. 

How perfectly safe people on the north side of the Salkahatchie 
thought themselves to be, appeared within the two days the com- 
mand was encamped at River's bridge, after the enemy had fled. 
At no place during the trip were found such quantities of fine hams, 
chickens and all kinds of provisions, foraged by the division, as 
along the Salkahatchie. People living there avowed openly that 
if the Yankee army could cross such a swamp, there is no use in 
destroying their bridges; the next they expected to hear was that 
the '' Yanks " would jump from tree-top to tree-top to efTect their 
niarch across waters deemed perfectly safe lines by Hardee and 
Beauregard . 



lozva Veteraji Volunteer Infantry. 44g 

The command resumed its march February 6th, changing its 
direction from west, northwest to north, and arrived that day at 
Little Salkahatchie, where the bridges were all destroyed, sunk or 
burned by the retreating enemy. The pioneers and heavy infantry 
details were at work all night to bridge the stream, there over a 
quarter of a mile wide. Next day, after crossing several small 
streams, and maching on abominable, sinking, spongy ground 
throughout the whole day, the 15th Iowa being detailed as rear 
guard and assistance to the -Ith Division train, the command arrived 
at night at Midway station, on the Augusta and Charleston rail- 
road. 

On the next day, February 8th, the 3d Brigade was ordered to 
destroy the railroad eastward for four miles;* the 15th being in 
advance and nearest the railroad bridge on the South Edisto river, 
was met with some skirmishing by the enemy from the opposite 
bank of the river, while the troops were burning the railroad, but 
a brisk answer from the pickets of the regiment caused them to 
look on at the destruction from their side of the river peacefully 
throughout the operation . 

*Gen. U.S. Grant, in his Memoirs, writing of Sherman's March to the Sea, says; " Sher- 
man's army, after all the depletions, nnmbered about sixty thousand effective men. All weak 
men had been left to hold the rear, and those remaining were not only well men, but strong 
and hardy, so that he had sixty thousand as good soldiers as ever trod the earth : better than 
any European soldiers because they not only worked like a machine, but the machine 
thought."' He gives the following description of destroying railroads: 

"The troops, both of the right and left wings, made most of their advance along the line of 
railroads which they destroyed. The method adopted to perform this work was to burn and 
destroy all the bridges and culverts, and for a long distance, at places, to tear up the track and 
bend the rails. Soldiers to do this rapidly would form a line along one side of the road with 
crowbars and poles, place these under the rails and, hoisting all at once, turnover many rods of 
road at one time. The ties would then be placed in piles, and the rails, as they were loosened, 
would be carried and put across these log heaps. When a sufficient number of rails ^vere 
placed upon a pile it woi/ld be set on fire. This would heat the rails very much more in the 
middle, that being over the main part of the fire, than at the ends, so that they would natur- 
ally bend of their own weight ; but the soldiers, to increase the damage, would take tongs 
and, one or two men at each end of the rail, carry it with force against the nearest tree and 
twist It around, thus leaving rails forming bands to ornament the forest trees of Georgia. All 
this work was going on at the same time, there being a sufficient number of men detailed for 
that purpose. Some piled the logs and built the fire; some put the rails upon the Are; while 
others would bend those already sufficiently heated, so that by the time the last bit of road 
was torn up, that it was designed to destroy at a certain place, the rails previously taken up 
were already destroyed." 

34 



450 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

February 9th, the march was resumed, and with constant skirm- 
ishing Grahamville was reached in the evening. The regiment 
and brigade arrived on the 11th near the North Edisto river. 
There the enemy stopped, offering a stubborn resistance from a 
fort on a bluff commanding the bridge on that river, as well as the 
surrounding low countr}' to the south. On Sunday the 12th, a 
heavy demonstration was made by the 4th Division from the timber 
in front of the bridge, while the 8d Division crossed the river, one 
and a half miles below; soon the 4th Division forced the bridge, 
part of division flanking the position of the fort a quarter of a mile 
above, which gave us Orangeburg, situated three fourths of a mile 
from the bridge, the enemy saving themselves by a precipitate flight 
northward towards Columbia. The night at Orangeburg was the 
coldest during the campaign; a stormy north wind made the troops 
suffer throughout the whole night. 

February 13th to 15th, while parts of the 17th Corps were alter- 
nately (by brigades) destroying the Columbia railroad, the rest 
moved along rapidly, making daily some fifteen miles, although 
most of the time skirmishing and driving the enemy in its front, 
until February 16th, when after a quick march of several hours, the 
brigade arrived upon the south bank of the Congaree, from the 
heights of which the command had a full view of Columbia, the 
proud capital of the fugitve rebel chivalry, lying on the opposite 
magnificent heights, across the wide basin of the river. The lines 
were promptly formed on the southern bank connecting with part 
of the 15th Corps forming on the right, while skirmishing and 
artillery fire was kept up vigorously most of the day and late into 
the night, when a heavy fog descended upon the doomed city, com- 
pletely hiding it from our view. During the advance of the 15th 
into position 2 men were wounded, both mortally, by rebel sharp- 
shooters on the rebel side of the river, they coatinued an annoying 
and constant firing until in the afternoon, the 1st Minnesota Battery 
took occasion to display sqme qf its usual fine shots with its 3^ 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 4^1 

inch rifled pieces . A mill on the opposite side of the river, whose 
revolving wheels showed that people therein were at work grind- 
ing, was at the same time observed to be the place whence most of 
the well aimed bullets were started against the brigade. Captain 
Clayton, of the battery, sent one of his 3-inch elongated balls into 
the mill, at once stopping and completely destroying the wheel. 
Then two shells were fired at the house, both of which exploded 
within the same, scattering desolation to all inside . The next shell 
cleared the "shebang," the men taking to rapid flight towards the 
shade of a thick timber in rear of same. Several shots were fired 
from the 20 pd Parrott guns at the new State House, the distance 
being two and a half miles, and left their mark on its damaged 
walls . 

Yankee City, as the rebels called the place where the Union offi- 
cers were kept as prisoners, was in the immediate rear of the 
position of the 4th Division. It contained over six hundred log 
houses of every description, small and large, with more or less com- 
fort to their inmates, according to the ability of the squad of 
prisoners who erected the same for their protection from the in- 
clemency of the weather. 

Several officers from Iowa regiments of the 3d Brigade who 
were captured near Atlanta, July 22d, were known to have been 
there ; all of these were hurridly taken further north by the rebel 
commander just before Sherman's army arrived at Columbia. 
There, near by, can also be seen the resting place of those whose 
fate was never again to see the Sun of the Loyal North . The 
cemetery contained the graves of eleven officers apparently but 
lately interred. 

The 15th Corps, meanwhile extending on the left of the 17th, 
met the enemy in heavy force two miles above on the opposite 
bank of the Saluda river. (This and the Broad river forms the 
Congaree. ) After a heavy artillery fire, however, from the south 



4^2 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

bank of the Saluda, the enemy left towards the bridge on Broad 
river. 

Soon after, the 15th Corps crossed the vSaluda on pontoons laid 
in the evening. During the night, the enemy having withdrawn 
from the island entirley, and while the pontoons were being laid 
across the Broad river. 

February 17th, soon after the rising fog developed the city, a 
party of about forty men (of the 13th Iowa) in charge of Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel Kennedy, and Lieutenants VVm. H. Goodrell and H. 
C. McArthur of the 15th Iowa, both the latter being on the staff 
of General Belknap, commanding the 8d Brigade, crossed the 
Congaree river in flat boats proceeded through the city and raised 
the regimental colors of the 18th Iowa on the new and old State 
houses respectivelv, amidst loud acclamations and manifestations of 
joy on the part of the gathering population of Columbia. 



FIRST IN COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA. ' 
"And Don't You Forget It." 
Lieutenant Henry C. McArthur of H . Co., (then, Aide de Camp 
to General Belknap, commanding the Iov\a Brigade,) is entitled to 
as much, if not more credit than any other man in repairing the 
boats (he working all night upon them) that carried the gallant 
and famous party, of which he was one of the foremost, across the 
swift current of the Congaree river, on the morning of Feb. 17, 
1865, when on the other shore, they chased the Johnnies out of 
their holes and on up through the city, on their way the detach- 
ment captured a horse and buggy, Lieutenant W. H. Goodrell, F. 
Co., our regiment, (then also on General Belknap's staff) and 
color bearer with flags, got into the buggy and drove; Colonel 
Kennedy and Lieutenant McArthur set upon the rear crossbar, 
the "Mounted Infantry" then dashed for the State House, when 
within two blocks of it, a sc^uad of rebel cavalry saw them coming 
up Main street, halted on a side street, and as our party went past 




H. C, IV19ARTHUR 

I ST LIEUT CO. H I5T» IOWA VOLS. 
BREVET mm VOLS. 



Iowa Vetera?! Voluutccr Infaniry. 4jj 

fired at them. Goodrell halted the hiM'se, ]\Ic Arthur jumped off, 
jerked a gun from the huggy and taking aim at the retreating 
cavahy as they galloped off fired, and unhorsed one of them and 
they were not troubled again. It is believed this was the only gun 
fired after any United States troops entered the citv; reaching the 
State House, Mac. was one of the three planting the flag on the old 
Capitol, while Lieutenant Goodrell planted the banner on the un- 
finished new Capitol building and captured a large South Carolina 
flag. 

At this time the skirmishers of Colonel Stone's Brigade, of 15th 
Corps, were on the outskirts of the city, and it was three cjuarters 
of an hour after the above flags had been planted, before any of 
Stone'' s Brigade entered eitJicr State House. The statements, 
called for by the Secretary of War, August 22, 1873, from Major 
McArthur, Colonel Kennedy and Majoi^ Goodrell, to place before 
the British Claims Commission, concerning the burning of Colum- 
bia, S. C, show it to be recognized by all parties that these men 
entered the city, and placed their colors upon both the old and new 
Capitol buildings three quarters of an hour before any other troops 
were there. General \V. T. Sherman, in his statement to the 
Washington Chronicle, Sept. 12, 1873, says: "I knew of a small 
detachment of the 17th Corps, having entered the city prior to the 
regular entry of Colonel Stone's Brigade, of 15th Corps, and treat- 
ed it as irregular at the time, but these men who were in the city, 
THREE QUARTERS OF AN HOUR PRIOR to the advance of Colonel 
Stone's Brigade, and planted their colors on the Capitol buildings, 
now come forward as the most i7nporta)it and conclusive 'fitnesses of 
the Government., as to zvho burned the city of Columbia, and it 
must settle the cpiestion as to whom belongs the honor of planting 
the first United States flag on the State House at Columbia." 

Headquarters 4th Division, 17th A. C. \ 
Near Cohnnbia, S. C, J-^eb. lyth lS6^. \ 
Brigade-General W . W . Belknap, commanding 8d Brigade: 

Sir: Allow me to congratulate you, and through you, Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel J. C. Kennedy, 18th Iowa Vet. Vols., and the men 



^j-^ History of the J^ifteenth Regiment 

under his command for first entering the city of Columbia, on the 
morning of Friday, February 17th, and being the first to plant his 
colors on the Capitol of South Cai-olina. 

While the army was laying pontoon bridges across the Saluda and 
Broad rivers, three miles above the city, Lieutenant-Colonel 
Kennedy, under your direction, fitted up an old worn-out flat boat, 
capable of carrying about twenty men and accompanied by 
Lieutenants H . C. McArthur and Wm . H . Goodrell, of your 
staff, crossed the river in front of the city and boldly advanced 
through its streets, sending back the boat, with another procured 
on the opposite shore for more troops, and on their arrival, with 
seventy-five men in all, drove a portion of Wheelers cavalry from 
the town, and at eleven and a half o'clock A. M., planted his two 
strands of colors, one upon the old and the other upon the new 
Capitol. 

The swift current of the Congaree river and its rocky channel, 
rendered his crossing both difficult and dangerous, and the presence 
of the enemy, but in what force unknown, rendered the undertak- 
ing still more hazardous. Lieutenant-Colonel Kennedy and his 
regiment are entitled to great credit for its successful accom- 
plishment. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 
GILES A. SMITH, Brevet Major-General. 

Official O. D. Kinsman, A. A. Gen, 

Headquarters 4th Division, 17th A. C. ) 
Cohimbia^ S. C ., Febr^iary ly, iS6^ . \ 

Major-General F. P. Blair, Commanding i7th A. C: 

The colors of the 13th Iowa were suspended over the capital 

at 11 o'clock this forenoon. National salute is now being fired by 

Captain Clayton, 1st Minnesota Battery, to commemorate this 

event. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

GILES A. SMITH, Brevet Major-General. 



loiva Vetej-an Volunteer Infantry. ^J5 

INCIDENTS CONNECTED WITH THE CAPTURE OF 

COLUMBIA. 

Among the man}- daring adventures of the war, the crossing of 
the Congaree river, in front of Columbia, South Carolina, on Feb- 
ruary 17, 1865, by a squad of twenty-one officers and men of the 
3d Brigade, 4th Division, 17th Corps, in an old, worn-out ffat-boat, 
and in presence of the enemy, was one of the boldest. The party 
was under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel J. C. Kennedv, of 
the 13th Iowa Infantry; and the loth Iowa takes pleasure in know- 
ing that two of her officers. Lieutenant W. H. Goodrell, Compan\' 
F, and Lieutenant H. C. McArthur, Company H, both at the time 
on the staff of General Belknap, who ordered the movement, were 
among the foremost in pushing that gallant ex^Dloit, to a successful 
conclusion. McArthur had worked most of the previous night 
repairing the old boat and making oars for the same. At about 1) 
o'clock A. M. on the 17th of February, 1865, as venturesome a 
party of soldiers as wore the blue, cut the ropes, and the old boat 
swung out into the rushing w^aters of the Congaree. They pulled 
hard for the Columbia shore, which was reached in safetv, and the 
little band started for the State House. They had gone but a short 
distance when a horse and buggy were captured and pressed into 
the service, and with Lieutenant Goodrell at the lines, the color- 
bearer of the 13th Iowa, with ffag and banner bv his side. Colonel 
Kennedy, of the 13th Iowa, and Lieutenant McArthur sitting on 
a cross-bar over the back spring, they dashed awaj' for the State 
House, leaving orders for the rest of the command to follow^ at 
double-quick, and these four daring spirits were soon a half mile 
away from all Union soldiers; hastening down Main street in Co- 
lumbia, sun'ounded by many rebel soldiers, citizens and negroes. 
When this quartette was within two squares of the Capitol Build- 
ing, and the horse under GoodrelTs guidance going at a furious 
rate, a squad of rebel cavalrymen, drawn up at the ci-ossing, opened 
fire on these impertinent Yanks. Lieutenant Goodrell almost 



4S^ History of the Fiftce7tth Regiment 

pulled the horse back into the buggy. Lieutenant McArthur 
sprang from his seat, grasping the color-bearer's gun, and fired, 
unhorsing one of the fleeing rebel cavalrymen. This shot of Mc- 
Arthur's was the last shot fired in the city that morning and that 
shot killed a rebel. On the arrival of the rest of the squad all 
proceeded to the State Houses. The partv w^as joined by Captain 
John J. Safely, of the 18th Iowa, with additional men who had 
crossed, and he, with the others, behaved most gallantly. 

There were two State House buildings: one, the old one, which 
had been occupied for vears, and a new one in course of construc- 
tion, opposite, with walls completed, and joists in. The object was 
to plant the old flag on the State House in advance of all others. 

At this time there were no other troops within a mile, at least, 
of the State House. Lieutenant Goodrell took the banner and 
planted it on the new Capitol Building; and Colonel Kennedy, 
Lieutenant McArthur and the color-bearer, of the 13th Iowa, took 
the flag across to the old State House, and while they were break- 
ing the door down the Janitor came up the steps with the keys and 
unlocked the door, and in five minutes the flag was waving over 
the State House of vSouth Carolina, and Colonel Kennedv, Lieu- 
tenant AIcArthur and the color-bearer were perched on the roof 
of the old State House, and Lieutenant Goodrell was, with the 
blue banner on the new State House, while all of them were watch- 
ing Colonel Stone's brigade skirmishers of the 15th Corps, rally- 
ing at least a mile from the State House. In a moment more the 
roll of artillery from the 1st Minnesota battery, attached to our 
brigade of the 17th Corps, reached our ears, and vStone's brigade 
skirmishers deployed rapidly. Those on the State Houses were 
intensely anxious to know the cause of this firing of artillery. If 
the enemy had gone between the river and Colonel Stone's right, 
the end had come for that little band. But in a few moments the 
skirmishers were seen rallying, much to their joy and satisfaction, 
and the impression obtained, which proved true, that the batterv 



loxva Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 4^7 

was firing a salute, at the success of that httle squad of daring- sol- 
diers who took their lives in their hands to keep the 17th Corps, 
and more especially "Belknap's Iowa Brigade" to the front; and 
it should be impressed upon the minds of all, that while at this 
time the flags of the 13th Iowa were waving over the State Houses, 
the front of the advance oj tJie iS^h Corps was over one mile from 
the Capitol Buildings. 

The book, " Iowa and the Rebellion," after giving General 
Smith's congratulatory order, and commenting on the event, says: 
" Lieutenant H. C. McArthur, I believe, of the ir)th Iowa In- 
" fantry, but serving on General Belknap's staff, was the person 
" who planted the flag on the Capitol Building." The same writer 
savs: "There were two Capitol Buildings, which may account 
" for the controversy as to who first raised the flag in Columbia." 
But the fact is, both State Houses, the old one, then in use, and 
the -new one, then building, were within one square of each other, 
and Colonel Kennedy and his command took the precaution to put 
one regimental flag on the nexv^ the other on the old State House. 
Lieutenant F. Y. Hedlev, Adjutant 82d Illinois Infantry, and a 
most gallant oflicer, in his book "Marching Through Georgia," 
after speaking of the 15th Corps passing to the left of the 17th to 
effect a crossing of Broad river, three miles above, says, concerning 
the capture of Columbia: 

" While this movement was in progress General Belknap dis- 
" patched a party to make search for a boat, and Captain II. C. 
" McArthur, of his staff, was so fortunate as to find a leaky old 
" scow. He had been a carpenter, and assisted by several soldiers, 
" by dint of hard work all night, succeeded in so repairing the craft 
" as to make it tolerably seaworthy. About 9 o'clock, morning of 
" the 17th, the frail bark was successfully launched, and a party of 
" thirtv men, belonging to the 18th Iowa Regiment, volunteered 
" to cross over. Lieutenant-Colonel Kennedy was in command, 
" and was accompanied by Captain McArthur and Lieutenant 



4sS History of the Jr^ifteenth Regiment 

" Goodrell, of General Belknap's staff. A number of natives who 
" stood about in open-mouthed wonder, ■warned the men against 
"the dangers of the rocky channel and swift current, and some of 
" the soldiers declined to take the risk. Twenty-one, however, 
" and the officers named, embarked and essayed the passage of the 
"stream. It was a desperate undertaking. The current of the 
" Congaree was very swift, and the channel was broken by dan- 
" gerous rapids, which ^vould have deterred less determined spirits. 
" But energ}' and courage were strong in these gallant men, and 
" after several narrow escapes from wreck on rocks, thev landed 
" in safetv on the Columbia side." 

Further on he says: 

" Kennedv went to the Capitol Buildings and displayed the Na- 
" tional flag from the old State House, and his regimental banner 
" from the new one. From the dome of the buildings could be 
" seen the skirmishers of the 15th Corps, nearly a mile away. 
" About three-qiuirters of an hour later Lieutenant-Colonel Ken- 
" nedy and Captain McArthur were standing in the rotunda of the 
" old State House, when an officer with a first-Lieutenant's strap 
" upon his shoulders, and a flag in his hands, rushed in, and with an 
"almost breathless voice, asked: Which is the way out to the 
"dome? What do vou want? inquired McArthur. I want to put 
" this flag out." 

" Well," said McArthur, " You're just too late by three-quarters 
of an hour, and we've had our flag on both buildings for that time!" 
"Who in H — 1 are you!" " From General Belknap's Brigade of 
the 17th Corps!" 

The officer gave vent to an expressive, but impolite ejaculation, 
and in response to a question addressed to him, said he " was from 
the 9th Iowa of Colonel Stone's Brigade, 15th Corps," and this 
Lieutenant added : " Well, it is all right so Jozva gets the credit. ''"' 

To place the matter of "the first entry into Columbia" beyond 
cpicstion, reference is made to^a letter from General Sherman to 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 4^g 

the " mixed commission," dated Washington, D. C, Sept. 12, 1873, 
in which he says: 

" In my official report of the bnrning of Cohunbia, I referred 
"incidentally to a fact of which I had knowledge, that a small de- 
" tachment of the 17th Corps had passed over the Congaree river, 
" had entered Colnmhia, and hoisted their flag on the State Honse, 
"in advance of the regular entry of the 15th Corps. * * * 
" I treated the performance of this detachment as somewhat irreg- 
" iilar, but the men who composed it now become important wit- 
" nesses. * * These witnesses go back to a time three- 
'■'■ fourths of an Jiour before the entry of the head of Stone's 
" Brigade. 

This can be found in the Washington Dally Chronicle., Septem- 
ber 15th, 1873. Thus, this honor so fairly and bravely won, must 
be acknowledged. 

In this creditable and daring exploit of first planting the flag 
over the hot-bed of secession, none are entitled to more honor than 
those brave officers. Lieutenants Goodrell and McArthur, of the 
15th Iowa, who bore so prominent a part in its grand and success- 
ful execution, and were breveted Majors for gallant and merito- 
rious conduct. They were ever appreciated b}- officers and men 
of the Regiment and army, and they have a right to feel proud of 
their record, and of their gallant conduct on that day. 

On February 17th, the troops were constantly moving from 
morning till midnight to the left, there crossing the Saluda and 
Broad river, two miles above the town, the 3d Brigade, 4th Di- 
vision, arriving in its camp north of Columbia, at midnight. 

February 18th, the regiment with brigade, division and corps, 
moved through Columbia, half of which appeared destroyed by 
fire, occasioned by bales of cotton having been set on fire by the 
retreating rebels during the day, and the terrible storm of wind 
defying all human efforts towards checking the rapid progress of 



460 History of the Fiftee7tth Reghnent 

the flames. An immense amount of rebel war material was also 
burned that night. 

After a thorough destruction of the railroad communication 
north towards Winnsboro, (l8th to 21st) the command turned its 
march towards the northeast, crossed the Wateree river on pon- 
toons, February 23d, and arrived on the 25th at the Little Lynch 
creek, which was waded through, waist deep, at McGrougan's 
crossing — this creek having washed its banks and inundated large 
tracts of land. February 26th, the regiment with division arrived 
at the Big Lynch creek, which overflowetl the timber for over a 
mile; here the 15th and 13th Iowa were ordered to cross the stream 
and effect a lodgment on the opposite eastern bank, the two regi- 
ments waded through the water, being in many places breast high 
and averaging waist high, over ground full of holes, the smaller 
and younger boys had often to be grasped l)y the taller men to pre- 
vent them from being carried away in the wide and swift current. 
The men of the regiment having had nothing to eat since the pre- 
vious night, because the regimental foragers had been stopjDcd on 
the other side of the Little Lynch, and especially for the purpose 
of exploring the country in front, two hea\y companies were sent 
out, which explored the vicinity in front and flank, and at the same 
time brought in forage enough to feed the men by morning. 

It speaks w^ell of the men of a large regiment, (I5th Iowa), 
two-thirds of which were new recruits received on the very eve of 
the Atlanta-Savannah campaign, that these and many other cross- 
ings, wading through small and wider streams, pools, marshes, 
swamps and rivers, never elicited a complaint or any sign of hesi- 
tancy on their part; but they went through, like veterans of any 
army in the world, whenever the order was to forward, march. 

This is one evidence that goes to prove the officers are alive to 
their duties, and that they know how to manage, instruct, and lead 
their men; especially when the clothing of the men, by long cam- 
paigns, becomes worn out, ragged and unflt for a winter campaign, 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 461 

and when, sometimes, during rapid marches, it is absolutely impos- 
sible to wait till the men are furnished with subsistence for the 
next twenty-four hours ahead. 

This is where General Hickenlooper says. "In one night you 
reconstructed four bridges and built through water from two to 
six .feet in depth, a causeway nearly two miles in length, while 
your associate corps occupied three days in effecting a crossing of 
this most formidable obstacle yet encountered." And the corps 
came over without getting wet. 

February 2(Sth, the command arrived at and crossed the Black 
creek. Here the 17th Corps went into camp and fortified their posi- 
tions, as the whereabouts of the 15th Corps on the right and of the 
14th and 20th Corps on the left, were not known, and Cheraw, 
where the enemy's whole force under General J. E.Johnstone, was 
reported to be, was only one day's march distant, (Johnstone took 
command of all the rebel forces in North Carolina, February 24th') 
While in this temporary camp, the one of several hundred rebel 
prisoners, who drew the black lot, was shot in retaliation of the mur- 
der of a forager belonging to the 17th Corps, agreeably to General 
Sherman's order published and posted throughout the country a 
week before. 

The weather in February was mostly cold and wet, sometimes 
dry, and very cold, northern winds adding to the usual hardships 
of a winter campaign. Subsistence was procured by a number of 
foragers, with a commissioned officer, who was responsible for 
their conduct ; they generally brought in enough of meat, not so 
much of breadstuffs. Several times, however, foragers were com- 
pelled to go far out into a poor country, and could not return till 
next day; then they had to overtake the column, which had moved 
along. These were cases when "The Boys" showed their stoical 
firmness in still doing their duty full and nobly, under all emer- 
gencies. 

The distance marched in February was 263 miles. 



462 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

On the 3d of March, the three divisions of the 17th Corps moved 
to Cheraw, Mower's 1st Division taking the advance, followed 
by the Ith Division . After an hour's fight, the place was taken 
early in the afternoon, the enemy being driven across the Great 
Pedee river, east of the town. Large amounts of rebel war mate- 
rial of every kind and shape fell into the hands of the Union 
troops. Three thousand small arms, twent}' cannon of every size, 
and two finely finished Blakely guns of English make— captured 
by General Mower — were the trophies of the victory; subsequently 
that officer was permitted to man and attach the latter to his di- 
vision, and he brought them to Washington to the Grand Review. 

On the 5th, the command crossed the Great Pedee on pontoons. 
On the 6th, Bennettsville was taken by the consolidated 4th Di- 
vision foragers and the escort cavalry, part of them having deployed 
as skirmishers before the infantry could come up. 

March 8th, the command crossed the North Carolina line, and 
on that and all subsequent days for over a week, several swamps 
and streams were waded daily, the roads through the poor pine 
timber and the spongy ground becoming now one sinking mire and 
almost impracticable on account of the rain, which had poured 
down in torrents for several days past. At this juncture, however, 
it became important for the troops to move along as rapidly as 
possible, as the Union forces under Schofield were known to be 
advancing from the sea in the direction of Newbern and Goldsboro, 
where all the rebel forces, after the evacuation of Charleston and 
Wilmington, were concentrated under Bragg. Still the ammu- 
nition train, the supply train carrying the remainder of the most 
necessary articles of subsistence, the hospital train, etc., could not 
be well abandoned by the army; therefore the evident necessity 
arose to employ the infantry, during the march, to perform the 
duties of pioneers, as the regular pioneer corps of the several di- 
visions — though greatly incressed by negro recruits during the 
progress of the Carolina campaign— were insufficient for the task. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 46J 

Fully two-thirds of the whole distance the roads were corduroyed 
every day, by which means the train could be brought into the 
camp however late at night. Whole brigades could be seen carry- 
ing rails from the plantations near and laying the same one by one 
close to each other so as to prevent the wagons from sinking in the 
bottomless mire. The officers and men of the regiment were on 
sevei'al occasions highly complimented for having done their part 
with good humor, even jokingly, notwithstanding the fact that for 
the latter it was quite a load to carry their arms and accoutre- 
ments, blankets and haversacks, in such weather and on such a 
ground. In no instance did the regiment arrive in camp, when it 
was on detail as train guard, without bringing up the whole division 
train at the same time. 

General Grant writes of Sherman's march north: "I must not 
neglect to state here the fact that I had no idea originally of having 
Sherman march from Savannah to Richmond, or even to North 
Carolina. The season was bad, the roads impassableycr anything 
except stick an army as he had, and I should not have thought of 
ordering such a move. I had, therefore, made preparations to 
collect transports to carry Sherman and his army around to the 
James River by water, and so informed him. On receiving this 
letter he went to work immediately to prepare for the move, but 
seeing that it would require a long time to collect the transports, he 
suggested the idea then of marching up north through the Carolinas. 
I was only too happy to approve this, for jf successful, it promised 
every advantage. His march through Georgia had thoroughly de- 
stroyed all lines of transportation in that State, and had completely 
cut the enemy off from all sources of supply to the west of it. If 
North and South Carolina were rendered helpless so far as capacity 
for feeding Lee's army was concerned, the Confederate garrison at 
Richmond would be reduced in territory, from which to draw sup- 
plies, to very narrow limits in the State of Virginia, and although 
that section of the country was fertile, it was already well exha^istT 



464 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

ed of both forage and food . I approved Sherman's suggestion 
therefore at once." 

March 10th, the command after wading through five streams on 
the day before, and four streams on this day, arrived at the Big 
Rockfish Creek, where the bridge was half burned by the retreat- 
ing chivah'y, and the rest saved by our closely pursuing cavalry. 
After two hours work by all hands, the bridge seemed to be repair- 
ed sufficiently to allow the infantry to cross the river thereon, the 
division crossed the bridge, wading through the overflowing timber, 
the water being two and a half feet deep for nearly half a mile, 
and went into bivouac on an elevated ground, 13 miles from 
Fayetteville, to await the full repair of the bridge and the arrival 
of the train. The enemy, being known to be at Fayetteville, the 
14:th Corps, marching on a parallel road on the left of the 17th 
Corps, was expected to take the place, agreeably to orders published 
in the evening. 

March 11th, the 4th Division being in the lead of the 17th Corps, 
started at 6 a. m., General Giles A. Smith, commanding division, 
having consolidated all the mounted foragers of the division under 
their own commissioned officers and his escort cavalry, they were 
ordered to take the advance. While the infantry was somewhat 
delayed at the crossing of the Little Rockfish Creek, waiting for 
the rear regiments to close up, the cavalry thus organized was in 
their usual foraging manner pushing along towards Fayetteville. 

About 10 A. .M., evident signs of an engagement going on were 
heard in the direction of Fayetteville, which brought the infantry 
to move on rapidly to the front, General Potts' 1st Brigade in the 
lead, followed closely bv General Belknap's 8d Brigade. 

The cavalry having engaged the enemy, fought him through the 
streets of the town, supported by the 1st and 3d Brigades. After 
an hour's sharp fight, the enemy was driven from the town and 
across the bridge over Cape Fear river, east of the place. Soon 
the infantry raised the Union flag on the court house of the place. 



loxva Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 46^ 

the brass band playing its best martial strain, and the detail for 
provost marshal and provost guard having been made and the latter 
having stacked their arms in front of the court house. When the 
troops of the 14th Corps arrived at the north part of the town, 
their skirmishes became every moment more surprised at there be- 
ing no enemy in town to engage them. Their columns having ar- 
rived, the troops of the 4th Division w^ere ordered to vacate the 
town, and were assigned camp a mile west of the same, where they 
commenced the fighting 2 hours before. 

The capture of Fayetteville by the foragers of the 4th Division 
(common parlance would insist on calling them "bummers") gave 
them quite a "raise in the market." In fact it was a matter of pru- 
dence on the part of regimental commanders to select and appoint 
for foragers men who were known to be thorough, practical 
soldiers, and well fitted to be sent out, sometimes ten or more miles 
on foraging expeditions where they were exposed to a sudden at- 
tack at any moment from the enemy's cavalry. 

While in camp at Favettevillc a dispatch boat, accompanied by 
two steamers, arrived from Wilmington^ on the Cape Fear river, 
thus establishing communication with Schofield's army at New 
Bern and with Terry's army at Wilmington. Up to this day all 
intelligence in regard to the sea coast was principally through the 
many rebel papers captured and brought in by the ubiquitous 
foragers of the command. This intelligence was meagre, however, 
and more especially confined to the movements of the various por- 
tions of the rebel armies under Bragg, Hardee, Beauregard and 
Johnston, and tiiey contained the many appeals and proclamations 
to the inhabitants to lay aside all other considerations and join their 
army to check the progress of Sherman's vandals, thus to redeem 
their name and honor, &c. As experience every day proved, the 
inhabitants did nofcare much for their "name and honor," and be- 
took themselves invariably out of the way. The many prisoners 
taken through the Carolinas agreed in their statements that their 
35 



466 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

soldiers could not be brought to stand a fight, that it was bej'ond 
all conception to what degree their people were terror stricken. 
March 13th, the command crossed Cape Fear river, and took a 
southeasterly direction, which next day was changed to nearly east. 

On the 15th it moved on by-roads, over similar sinking, miry 
ground, arriving at night at the crossing of South river. On the 
16th it crossed Big Swamp, (the whole country being almost one 
swamp) and towards evening the Little Cohera. Meanwhile, 
Kilpatrick's cavalr\-, supported by part of the 20th Corps on the 
extreme left, met the enemv on the 15th near Averysboro in heavy 
force, which stopped the progress of the extreme left column. 
Next day (16th) the rest of the Georgia (Cumberland formerly) 
Army having been brought up a fight ensued, lasting all day — the 
enemy at night giving up their fortified postions and retiring north- 
northeast. 

March 17th, the regiment being in the lead of the brigade, di- 
vision and corps, marched all day, according to the programme 
published the night before, on the road to Clinton, a point 15 miles 
south of Goldsboro, on the Wilmington Railroad. In the after- 
noon, a heavy cannonading was plainly heard to the left, some six 
or eight miles distant, this being the first clear, warm day in sev- 
eral weeks. When the column arrived to within 5 miles of Clin- 
ton, the order was countermanded, the direction being at once 
changed from due east, to northwest, and afterwards to due north. 
At night, after a lively march, the command arrived at Beman's 
Cross Roads . 

The object of changing the direction was known to be to coun- 
teract the movement of Hardee pressing the 14th Corps, that being 
the extreme left column of the army. The 15th Corps, marching 
on the next parallel road, on the left of the l*7th, was therefore, 
ordered at noon to turn at once north, instead of marching to 
Beman's Cross Roads. So the 17th Corps was ordered, later in 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry . 46^ 

the afternoon, to turn north to Beman''s Cross Roads instead of 
marching to CHnton. 

Alarch ISth, Mower's 1st Division of the Corps was ordered to 
follow the road east to Everittsville, a point 5 miles south of 
Goldsboro, while the 3d and 4th Divisions were to follow a par- 
allel road, bearing toward Mount Olive, a point 10 miles south of 
Goldsboro, on the Wilmington Railroad. Though the weather 
was clear and bright, this march was a slow and laborious one, the 
same sinking, miry ground having put all hands to corduroying 
over two-thirds of the 15 miles made. During the day the Big 
Black Swamp was waded through. The same hard work con- 
tinued on the 19th, the regiment having been detailed as rear 
guard in rear of the whole division train, it arrived in camp with 
the train after 11 o'clock at night, forming in line for its camp, 
facing to the rear, and sending its own pickets further back on the 
road. Foragers, arriving at midnight, reported Mount Olive, 6 
miles distant, clear of the enemy, and that it was currently stated 
by the inhabitants of the place that Goldsboro had been evacuated 
by Bragg early in the morning of that day, and that he was mov- 
ing towards Raleigh. 

On the 20th, at half past 1 o'clock in the morning, orders were 
received to be ready to move at 2 o'clock, to join the brigade, and 
the division to move at a quarter to 3 o'clock with 3 days rations, 
to be at once issued to the men, with a full supply of ammunition. 

This order, at the hour of midnight, and with it the sound of the 
many bugles of the several commands near by, were indications 
enough for the men of the regiment, who had scarcely gone to 
rest an hour before " that something was up " as they used to term 
it, and near at hand. Preparations were rapidly made, ammunition 
issued at once, the road leading to the brigade corduroyed for the 
teams to pass while the regiment moved on at the same time, and 
while the brigade stopped for a few moments to take its proper 
place in the already marching column; the rations were hurriedly 



468 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

* 

divided among the men. At a quarter to 3 A . m., sharp, the 4th 
Division led followed by the 3d Division, moving in a northerly 
and northwesterly direction . It waded five creeks (each over 
knee deep) and arrived at 6 o'clock A. m. at Fall Creek, waded 
same, being waist deep and over a quarter of a mile wide, and on 
the other side, at Fall Creek Church, the division went into tem- 
porary bivouac, the troops building fires to dry their clothes and 
prepare breakfast. About 8 a. m., in the far distance to the left 
and front, occasional heavy cannonading was going on, the nature 
of which was known from the fact that on the 19th, while the 20th 
Corps was moving on the extreme left in light marching order 
(without any train or teams) in the direction of Cox's bridge, on 
the Neuse river, it fell upon the strongly fortified position of 
Johnston's whole force near Bentonsville, about 10 miles due west 
of that bridge, which force obstinately contested a further progress 
on that road. After a lively engagement all the afternoon, How- 
ard's Army of the Tennessee, the 15th and 17th Corps, then march- 
ing as the right wing columns, were ordered at night to be brought 
up at once; part of the 15th Corps being already in position on 
the right of the Georgia Army, and the rest of the Tennessee 
Army (six divisions) to take position on its right as soon as they 
arrived . All started a few hours after midnight. At 9 o'clock 
the march was resumed, the 4th Division in advance, the 3d brigade 
leading, all teams and ambulances being left at the creek. Soon 
the skirmishers struck the enemy, (10 o'clock) and a lively fire 
was kept up, driving them along the road, on the edge of wide, 
open fields, until noon, when the adviince was brought to a halt, the 
enemy in front — General Butler's rebel cavalry division — having 
evidently been re-enforced, as their line assumed length on both 
their flanks, and the artillei-y was coming to mingle in the fight. 
The Union skirmish line, however, being also re-enforced, the 
enemy's line again yielded their ground, being now slowly but 
steadily forced back until 3 p. m., when a more regular and well- 



loxva Veteran Volufiteer Infantry. 46Q 

sustained firing of the musketr}' and artillery, and an obstinate re- 
sistance of the enemy, seemed at once to indicate that Cheatham's 
fortified position on the extreme left of the rebel main line had 
been reached near Bentonville. 

Soon the 15th Corps took position along the road, its general 
line facing northwest, the 17th Corps forming on its right and 
taking position facing west. The 4th Division of the 17th Corps 
(Gen. G. A. Smith's) occupied the left of the corps, 3d Division 
the centre, and the 1st division deploying on the extreme right. Dur- 
ing the formation of the line, as well as in the evening and late 
into the night, the musketry fire on the skirmish line was vigor- 
ously kept up, intermingled with heav}' cannonading from both 
lines, which often reminded us of the the old times before Atlanta. 
At night two charges of the rebels were repulsed, and one made 
by the 4th Division, 15th Corps met with a repulse. Prisoners 
captured agreed in stating that part of Longstreet's Virginia Army 
was also in front of the Army of the Tennessee. 

March 21st, at daybreak, the brigade and division were in line 
of battle, and soon after the skirmish line was advanced, when a 
furious fire broke out from both lines . After an hour's contest 
the rebel skirmish line commenced giving way and by 9 o'clock it 
was forced back over half a mile across a deep ravine running- 
north and south, with a swampy ground in its wide basin and thick 
underbrush and young timber covering its whole surface. 

The skirmish line of the brigade and division having been estab- 
lished along this ravine, and connected on both flanks with that of 
the next divisions on their right and left, the lines of the several 
brigades and divisions were forming and fortifying temporarily 
their front on the elevated ground next in rear of and some 150 
yards from the skirmish line; the latter being some 500 yards from 
the main rebel fortifications. (The line of the 3d Brigade was 
established in the following order: 11th Iowa on the left, 13th 
Iowa in the centre, 15th Iowa on the right, two companies of the 



^jo History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

latter being refused somewhat to the rear. During the evening, 
however, the 32d Illinois occupied the right of the 15th Iowa, four 
heavy companies of the latter being on the skirmish line . ) 

At 2 o'clock p. M, General Mower's 1st Division, on the extreme 
right, having been attacked, and the attack having been repulsed, 
the enemy was thrown back upon his own line, and after some 
fight the rebel outer line was taken and a request made for sup- 
port. 

A general advance was ordered along the lines, and the skir- 
mishers of the 4th Division, being at once re-enforced, were soon 
advancing, under a shower of musket balls, grape and canister, to 
within 800 yards of the main rebel fortifications. 

The line, however, not being supported on their left, and more- 
over, the order to move the lines of battle of the whole division 
having been countermanded just at the moment when the skir- 
mishers in front were already started, they had to fall back, first to 
the position previously held by the rebel skirmishers, then to their 
own lines. 

Company A, 15th Iowa, under Lieutenant Mitchell, Company 
I, Lieutenant Williams, Company C, Lieutenant R3aiearson, and 
Company G, Captain Bye, having been the foremost in the 
advance and the last on the retreat when their line became entirely 
unsupported on their left, were highly complimented for gallantry 
and able conduct by General Giles A. Smith, commanding 4th Di- 
vision, and present at the advance of the skirmish line. The regi- 
ment lost in the advance five wounded, two mortally. 

Dui'ing the evening a constant, livel}' fire of musketry and 
artillery was kept up on both sides; during the dark night follovy- 
ing, several times, at the least sign, real or imaginary, of an ad- 
vance or charge, the firing broke out in a perfect fur}', sending a 
storm of bullets, balls and shells into the opposite lines and as often 
bringing everyone in the front to his position in the line of battle. 
Meanwhile, the consolidated rebel force in front, under Hardee, 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 4.^1 

Beauregard, Bragg and Johnston, with all their fortifications and 
heavy works, while trying to stop the progress of Sherman's 
army, found themselves flanked on their extreme right and sud- 
denly exposed to being cut off from their only line of escape . 
During the night they rapidly retreated across the Neuse river, 
burning the bridge after them, the last firings by the rebel skir- 
mishers opposite the position of the 4th Divison were given at 4 
o'clock A, M. of the 22d. At daybreak Lieutenant H . C. Mc- 
Arthur, (of H Company), Aide-de-Camp, and Lieutenant W. H. 
Goodrell, (of F Comjoany), Brigade Picket ofiicer, both on the 
staff of General Belknap, commanding 8d Brigade, climbed over 
the rebel works and were the first Yankees to do so; Mac finding 
a hatchet that the rebels had only partially buried, signifying that 
hostilities had ceased for a while, a la Injun, and with the same 
token rode rapidly to General Belknap, commanding brigade, with 
the news of the retirement of the enemy and with the compli- 
ments of General B. to General Giles A. Smith, commanding 4th 
Division, and with the compliments of the latter to General W. T. 
Sherman, with first information that the rebels had gone. 

March 23d, the brigade with division and corps started, and on 
the 24th arrived at Goldsboro, which place was occupied by Scho- 
field's army, arriving from New 13ern, while the Georgia and Ten- 
nessee armies were rapidly concentrating against Johnston's whole 
rebel force in his fortified position near Bentonsville. 

Arriving at Goldsboro, the 4th Division in lead of the corps, 
and the 15th Iowa leading the division, the command was marched 
into town in order of review by company front, passing before 
General Sherman, attended by Generals Schofield and Terrj- of 
the Eastern army, the men at the same time displaying all the sin- 
gular curiosities and reminiscences, peculiar to the late Carolina 
campaign, in the shape of remnants of captured hams and sides 
sticking on some bayonets, of chickens, turkeys and bacon hanging 
from the shoulders of many a soldier, the men themselves invar- 



472 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

iably in worn out and very ragged clothing, with all kinds of anti- 
regulation hats, caps and several of them without any, and quite a 
number entirely shoeless; while all showed the average high water 
mark through the Corolinas to be near their shoulders, at the same 
time, however, all looking well and in the best of spirits at the 
prospect of ending the long and arduous campaign. 

The regiment with its brigade and division went into camp north 
of the town, between the Richmond and New Bern railroads. 

Next day General Sherman's congratulatory order was pub- 
lished, announcing the close of the campaign and promising rest 
to the troops, and all that the rich stores, magazines and granaries 
of our magnificent country could furnish them. 

The ever memorable winter campaign of 1865, through the 
Carolinas having thus ended, the men were permitted to take a 
short rest of two weeks, proud with a consciousness of having 
faithfully contributed their share towards accomplishing the grand 
object of the severe campaign. 

The master genius who originated and executed the brilliant 
plan, is one of the immortal few who were not born to die; his 
name and fame will live in the military annals of this country, as 
well as of all civilized nations of the world, forever. 

To the men of his army the credit is justly due, of having suc- 
cessfully carried out the laborious and in some instances seemingly 
impossible details of the great work. Hundreds of miles of rail- 
road communications, and several railroad centres, each not less im- 
portant than that of Atlanta, were destroyed beyond hope of re- 
pair; thus separating the arteries of life, the channels of subsistence 
of the rebel army, isolating their troops from each other and sepa- 
rating them from their cities, arsenals, magazines and factories, all 
of which, with immense amounts of war material, fell into the 
hands of the victorious army. The sea coast, with all its impor- 
tant cities and massive fortifications, was evacuated as if at the 
imperious bidding of the conquerors of Columbia. 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 4^^ 

The day, the ever defiant capital of South Carolina was entered 
by the victorious army, Charleston, the birthplace and cradle of 
rebellion, was evacuated by Hardee, hurrying away and out of the 
way, before the expected raid on the only railroad open to him 
would make his escape impossible. And, finally, after a rapid 
march through a continuous course of swamps, and hundreds of 
streams and morasses waded across on foot, the men toiling day 
and night, corduroying the roads fully two-thirds of the distance 
made from day to day for many weeks, while ragged and shoeless, 
and frequently unfed, extricating trains and artillery from the ever- 
lasting bottomless mire; felling forests and building bridges for the 
trains to pass, themselves invariably fording the streams. When the 
separate colums came up at Bentonsville, with the forces of Hardee 
late from Savannah and Charleston, of Bragg from Wilmington, 
of Beauregard from the interior of the Carolinas, of Cheatham 
from Hood's consolidated army — all under the generalship of John- 
ston, their new commander-in-chief, — the whole rebel arm}^ was 
beaten "on their own chosen ground," naturally strong and well for- 
tified, and was compelled to retreat, leaving their dead and wounded 
in the hands of the victors, and to burn the bridges on their retreat. 

The ofiicers and men of the 15th Iowa did their duty during the 
whole of the severe winter campaign, full and well, whatever 
position they were ordered to occupy, whatever work or duty was 
assigned to them, under all circumstances and emergencies, either 
while on the march or engaged with the enemy. In no instance 
was the regiment, or any part thereof, known to be either slow, 
tardy, or deficient in the execution of any order that was intrusted 
to it during the most arduous and most exhausting days of the 
campaign. On the contrary, it received on many occasions the uni- 
form approval and special commendations of the several superior 
headquarters for the promptness, energy and thoroughness with 
which the officers and men of the regiment always performed the 
duties and the work required of, or intrusted to them, and 



4^4 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

when brought under fire, officers and men, behaved with 
marked gallantry and efficiency, such as could not fail to attract 
attention and meiitthe uniform praise and commendation of the 
superior headquarters, witnessing as they did their brave and noble 
conduct on the field, especially at Garden's Corner, near Pocotaligo, 
at Big Salkahatchie, (in both of which the 15th Iowa alone, of the 
troops of the brigade and division, was under fire) and at Benton- 
ville. While this deservedly honors the men, it reflects great 
credit upon their officers, who, besides attending to their various im- 
portant duties connected with an active campaign, paid unremitting 
attention to the large number of new recruits of the command, and 
by constant instruction fitted them for all the practical purposes 
and requirements of military service and discipline. 

The new base of New Bern having been connected bv railroad 
with Goldsboro, (now becoming the temporary outpost of the 
Grand Army,) all hands were at once put to work to entirely refit, 
recuperate and recruit the several commands. Most of the men 
belonging to the loth Iowa, who were in Tennessee or in the 
north during the fall campaign against Hood and against Savannah, 
and could not join their companies before, now arrived, and i"e- 
joined the regiment at Goldsboro.* 

Lieutenant-Colonel J. M. Hedrick having been absent with leave 
on account of wounds received July 22d, 1864, and from Dec. 80th, 

*The 13th Iowa, heretofore the smallest regiment of the 3cl Brigade, about equal to 4 com- 
panies of the 15th Iowa, received some 350 recruits, and 50 returning from hospitals, all of 
whom had been kept iu Tennessee after the command left Atlanta for the sea. They now 
made the 13th once more look like a full regiment. Several hundreds arrived for the 11th 
and 16th Iowa and 'he 33d Illinois. The members thus received by the 5 regiments compos- 
ins ihe 3d Brigade, made an aggregate on the brigade returns of over 4,000 men, equal to a 
division formerly. Captain Ryder of the 32d Illinois received commission as Lieutenant- 
Colonel ; Captain Smithof the 16th Iowa, commission as Major, and later by the muster out 
of Lieutenant-Colonel Add H Sanders as Lieutenant-Colonel. In the llih Iowa, the regi 
ment not having the required mimimun number of aggregate, Captain Ben Beach received 
commission as Lieutenant-Colonel and was mustered in as such in December 1864, at King's 
Bridge before Savannah. In the 13th Iowa, Lieutenant-Colonel Wilson then on the staff of 
General Howard and Captain Kennedy in command of the regiment were commissioned as 
Colonel and liieutenant-Colonel respectively and mustered in as such at Beaufort, before 
entering upon the Carolina campaign in January. Major Marshall of the 13th, resigned after 
having arrived with the recruits for his regiment at Goldsboro. 



loxva Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 4y^ 

1864, detached on General Court Martial at Wheeling, W. Va., 
while at Washington on his way to join the regiment, was detailed 
as a member of the General Court Martial sitting at Washington, 
by special Order No. 137, War Department, Adjutant General's 
office, dated March 21st, 1865.t 

Headquarters 3d Brigade, 4th Division, 17th A. C. ) 
Goldsboro, JV_ C, March 25, iiS6^. \ 

Captain Ad. Ware, Jr., Assistant Adjutant General 4th Division, 

17th Army Cops: 

Captain: — I have the honor to make the following brief 
report relative to the movements of this brigade in the late cam- 
paign: 

Leaving Savannah on the 6th of January, it moved from Poco- 
taligo on the 29th of the same month, entered Orangeburg on Feb- 
ruary 12th, and Columbia, the capital of the state of South 
Carolina, on the 18th of February. Camped near Cheraw, S. C, 
on March 3d; near Fayetteville, N. C, on March 11; and entered 
Goldsboro, N. C, March 24th; having been transported 60 miles 
and marched 484^ miles, corduroying the roads, rebuilding the 
bridges and traveling much of the distance through swamps which 
had to be waded by the men. 

On February 7th, the 11th Iowa Infantry, Lieutenant Colonel 
Ben. Beach, marched from Midway to the bridge over the Edisto 
river, which was defended by the rebels, and compelled them to 
evacuate their position and destroy the bridge . 

On February 17th, a detachment of the 13th Iowa Infantry, 
under command of Lieutenant Colonel Kennedy, accompanied bv 
Lieutenants W. H. Goodrell and H. C. McArthur of the 15th 
Iowa, of my staff, crossed the Congaree river to Columbia, while a 
portion of the enemy were in the city, marched through town, and 
planted, in advance of all others, the colors of that regiment, on 
both the old and new capitol buildings. Colonel Kennedy and 



tDistance marched, during March, was from the 3d to the 24th, 208 miles. 



4y6 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

his men deserve great credit for the successful accomplishment of 
this movement. 

On March 20th, near Bentonville, N. C, the brigade went 
into position; and on the 21st a new line being established, the 
skirmish line was ordered to advance, which it did, driving the 
rebel skirmishers from their pits and actually charging a heavy line 
of battle of the enemj^, only retiring when opposed by an over- 
whelming force. Our loss on the skirmish line was 25. Few 
fields show more traces of severe fighting than the ground occu- 
pied by this gallant line. 

My thanks are especially due Lieutenant W . H. Goodrell, 
brigade picket officer, for the manner in which he handled his 
men on that day. 

On the campaign the following amount of railroad has been de- 
stroyed: Feb. 8th, three and a half miles of S. C . R. R. between 
Midway and the Edisto river; Feb. 18th, two miles of Columbia 
branch S. C. R. R., near Orangeburg; Feb. 18th, one and one-half 
miles Charlotte R. R., between Columbia and Winsboro; Feb. 
19th, one mile Charlotte R. R. ; Feb. 20, one mile same road; Feb. 
22d, two miles same road; total eleven miles. 

The duties of the campaign have been performed and the trials 
of the march endured cheerfully by both officers and men, for 
which they all have my thanks. 

I am, Captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. W. BELKNAP. 
Brig. Gen., Commanding 3d Brigade. 

Official — O. D. Kinsman, A. A. Gen'l. 



GENERAL ORDERS, NO. 5. 

Headquarters. 8d Brigade, 4th Division, 17th A. C 
Goldsbo7-o, JV. C, March 2S, i86^. 

The brigade commander thanks the officers and men of this 

command for the zeal with which the labors of the late campaign 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. ^77 

have been performed, the fortitude with which the trials of the 
march have been endured, and the ready obedience which has been 
given to every order, however severe the duties required. 

The officers and men on the skirmish Hne, on March 21st, near 
Bentonville, N. C, are, with few exceptions, deserving of especial 
mention. Driving the pickets of the enemy, they actually charged 
a heavy line of battle, retiring only when opposed by an over- 
whelming force; few fields show more traces of severe fighting 
than does the ground occupied by this gallant line. 

On the march, and in the performance of other duties, which 
test the character of the soldier, the conduct of this brigade in this 
campaign, assures it the fame it has previously won. 

By order of BRIG. GEN. WM. W. BELKNAP. 

O. D, KINSMAN, Asst. Adjt. Gen. 

On the 8th of April, special orders No. 145, from War Depart- 
ment A. G. O. dated March 25th, 1865, were received, mus- 
tering out Lieut. Col. J. M. Hedrick,to date March 21st, 1865, and 
mustering him into the service again as Colonel same regiment, to 
date March 22d, 1865. He was in possession of the commission 
as Colonel of the regiment, October 28th, 1S64, while on leave 
wounded in Iowa, but could not be mustered in as such, how- 
ever, by reason of a War Department order, requiring all com- 
missioned officers, who receive promotions while absent from 
their regiments, invariably to be mustered in on their new com- 
mission by the Assistant Commissary of Musters of their own 
command in the field. By reason of the Colonel's absence and he 
being unable to be mustered in as Colonel, Major Pomutz (in 
command of the regiment since August 1st, 1864) could not be 
mustered in as Lieutenant Colonel, although holding a commission 
for the same, dated October 28th, 1S64, received at Marietta before 
the Savannah campaign, April 9th, he was mustered in to take rank 
from March 23d, 1865, and on the same day Capt. J. S. Porter, of 



4^8 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

Co. D, was mustered in as Major, on appointment received January 
1st, 1865, to take rank from March 24th, 1865. 

Thus after more than S months, the regiment again had two 
field officers present with it, just on the very ere of the closing 
campaign of the war. 

In General Sherman's report of that campaign he says: "I can- 
not even, with any degree of precision, recapitulate the vast amount 
of injur}^ done the enemy, or the nuantity of guns and materials of 
war captured and destroyed. In general terms, we have traversed the 
country from Savannah to Goldshoro, with an averaged breadth of 
forty miles, consuming all the forage, cattle, hogs, sheep, poultry, 
cured meats, corn meal, &c. The public enem^', instead of draw- 
ing supplies from that region to feed his armies, will be compelled 
to send provisions from other quarters to feed the inhabitants. A 
map herewith, prepared by my Chief Engineer, Colonel Poe, with 
the routes of the four corps and cavalry, will show at a glance the 
country traversed . Of course, the abandonment to us by the 
enemy of the whole sea-coast, from Savannah to New Bern, North 
Carolina, with its forts, dock-yards, gun-boats, &c., was a necessary 
incident to our occupation and destruction of the inland routes of 
travel and supply. But the real object of this march was to place 
this army in a position easv of supply, whence it could take an ap- 
propriate part in the spring and summer campaign of 1865. This 
was completel}^ accomplished on the 21st of March, by the junction 
of the three armies and occupation of Goldsboro. 

In conclusion, 1 beg to express in the most emphatic manner my 
entire satisfaction with the tone and temper of the whole army. 
Nothing seems to dampen their energy, zeal, or cheerfulness. It 
is impossible to conceive a march involving more labor and ex- 
posure, yet I cannot recall an instance of bad temper by the way, 
or hearing an expression of doubt as to our perfect success in the 
end . I believe that this cheerfulness and harmony of action reflects 
upon all concerned quite as much real honor and fame as "battles 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 4'jg 

gained," or "cities won," and I therefore commend all, generals, 
staff officers, and men, for these high qualities, in addition to the 
more soldierly ones of obedience to orders and the alacrity they 
have always manifested when danger summoned them "to the 
front."—." 



"RECOVER ARMS." 



AX OFFICIAL DOCUMENT ESCORTS A IIEXRY RIFLE. 

I hereby certify that on or about the 24:th of December, 1864, 
Avhile on drill with my company near Savannah, Ga., a Henry rifle 
[which was my private property and carried bv me when on duty] 
was stolen from the stack of guns made by the company, which 
was drilling without arms. The gun was a new one, and num- 
bered [4,440]. I have since seen the gun in the hands of one 

Parks, of Company A, 26th Illinois Infantrv, 15th Armv Corps, 
but he refused to give it to me, saying " he procured it from a man 
of the 2()th Arm>^ Corps, but that if he could see the 2()th Corps 
man, and get his monev back, he [P,arksJ would return me the 
gun. 

JOHN D. SLOCUM, 
Private H Co., 15th Iowa Veteran Infantry. 

Station in the Field, S. C, date March 2, 1865. 

Headquarters 15th Iowa Veteran Infantrv; in the Field, S. C, 
March 2, 1865: Respectfully forward to Captain C. W. Kepler, 
Provost Marshal 8d Brig., 4th Div., 17th A. C. By order of 
Major Pomutz; W. C. Stidger, Adjutant. 

Headquarters 8d Brig., 4th Div., 17th A. C; in the Field, S. C, 
March 3, 1865: Respectfully forwarded to Lieut. J. D. Herbert, 
Provost Marshal, 4th Div., 17th A. C. By order of Brig. Gen. 
Wm. W. Belknap; C. W. Kepler Captain and Provost ]Marshal. 

Headquarters 4th Div., 17th A. C; in the Field, vS. C, ^Nlarch 
3, 1865: Respectfully forward to Major John C. Marvin, Provost 



480 History of the Fifteenth Regifncnt 

Marshal 17th A. C. By order of Bvt. Maj. Gen. Giles A. .Smith; 
J. D. Herbert, Lieutenant and Provost Marshal 4th Division, 
17th A. C. 

Headquarters 17th A. C, office Provost Marshal, Cheraw, S. 
C, March 4, 1865: Respectfully forwarded to Col. James Wil- 
son, Provost Marshal General, Department and Army Tennessee. 
E. T. Miller, Captain and Ass't Provost Marshal 17th A. C. 

Headquarters Army of Tennessee, office Provost Marshal Gen- 
eral, Cheraw, S. C., March 4, 1865: Respectfully referred to 
Major F. C. Gillette, Provost Marshal 15th A. C. James Wilson, 
Colonel Provost Marshal General, ^Vrmy Tennessee. 

Headquarters 15th Army Corps, office of Provost Marshal, near 
Xeuse River, X. C, March 21, 1865: Respectfully forwarded to 
the commanding officer of the 26th Regiment Illinois Veteran In- 
fantry, who will mvestigate the matter referred to within, and if a 
gun answering the description be found in his regiment, he will at 
once forward it to these Headquarters. By order of Major Gen- 
eral John A. Logan; Frank C. Gillette, Major and Provost Mar- 
shal 15th Army Corps. 

Headquarters 26th Illinois Infantry Volunteers; in the Field, 
March 23d, 1865: Respectfully returned, together with the gun 
described, which was obtained from the 38d Xew^ Jersey, 20th A. 
C. Ira J. Bloomfield, Lieutenant-Colonel 26th Illinois Infantry. 

Headquarters 15th A. C, office of Provost Marshal, Goldsboro, 
X. C, ]March 25th, 1865: Respectfully returned, together with 
the within described gun, to Colonel Wilson, Provost Marshal 
General, Army of the Tennessee. Frank C. Gillette, Major and 
Provost Marshal 15th A. C. 

Office Provost Marshal General, Army of the Tennessee, Golds- 
boro, X. C, March 26th, 1865: Respectfully returned, with the 
gun described within, to Major John C. Marven, Provost Marshal 
17th Army Corps; James Wilson, Colonel Provost Marshal Gen- 
eral, Armv of Tennessee. 



A 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 481 

Headquarters 17th A. C, office Provost Marshal, Goldsboro, N. 
C, March 26, '65: Respectfully forwarded, with gun, to Lieu- 
tenant J. T. Herbert, Provost Marshal 4th Division. By com- 
mand of Major General F. P. Blair; Jno. C. Marven, Major and 
Provost Marshal 17th A. C. 

Headquarters 4th Div., 17th A. C, office Provost Marshal, 
Goldsboro, N. C, March 27, 1865: Respectfully forwarded, with 
gun, as described within, to Captain C. W. Kepler, Provost Mar- 
shal 3d Brigade. By order Brevet Major-General Giles A. Smith; 
y. D. Herbert, Lieutenant and Provost Marshal 4th Div. 

Headquarters 3d Brig., 4th Div., 17th A. C, Goldsboro, N. C, 
March 27, '65: Respectfully forwarded to Major Geo. Pomutz, 
commanding 15th Iowa Infantry ; also the within described gun. 
By order of Brig. Gen. Belknap; C. W. Kepler, Captain and Pro. 
Marshal. 

Headquarters 15th Iowa Inf., Mar. 27, 1865: Respectfully for- 
warded with within described gun to Capt. N. W. Edwards, Co. 
H, 15th Iowa Inf., who will return the gun to John D. Slocum, 
Co. H, 15th Iowa, if there is a man by that name in said company. 
By order of Major Pomutz; W. C. Stidger, Adjutant, 15th Iowa 
Infantry. 



IP^I^T XIII. 



THE CLOSING CAMPAIGN. 

Return North. Raleigh. Jones' Station. Propositions 
FOR Surrender. Return to Raleigh. Review by Gen- 
eral Grant. "Forward" Again. Jones' Station. Sur- 
render BY Johnston of his Army and North and South 
Carolina and Georgia. Hard Marching to Peters- 
burg. Richmond. Washington. Grand Review. Louis- 
ville. Mustering Out. Farewell Orders of Grant, 
Sherman, Logan, Blair and Pomutz. 
While the army was rapidly being refitted and equipped at 

Goldsboro, General Sherman returned from his trip to City Point 
36 



4S2 Histojy of the Fiftce7ith Regiment 

[General Grant's headquarters), on the 30th of March, and apph- 
cations for leaves of ahsence and furloughs were at once stopped. 
April 6th the news w^as ofhcially published of the great battle 
fought around Petersburg and Richmond on the 31st of March, 
and 1st and 2d of April, and that both places were in possession of 
the Union army. 



SPECIAL ORDERS NO. 18. 

Headquarters 15th Iowa Veteran Infantry, ) 
Goldsboro^ N. C, April p, iS6^ . \ 

Captain Job. Throckmorton, of F Company, of this Regiment, 
will at once turn over to Wm. C. Stidger, Adjutant of the Regi- 
ment, the amount of money confiscated by him under orders from 
these headciuarters, from the gamblers and card players, while 
he was acting as Officer of the Day, during the expedition from 
Atlanta to Savannah, Ga., in November and December last. 

Adjutant vStidger will convert the money thus received towards 
paying for the brass drums bought by the regimental sutler for 
this conimand. By order of 

GEORGE POMUTZ, 
Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding. 

W. C. Stidger, Adjutant. 



On April 9th, General Grant's famous dispatch " Let us finish 
the job now," was announced. All preparations were rapidly 
made, and on the 10th four columns of Sherman's army started on 
the new campaign — the 15th Corps being the extreme right, 17th 
Corps the right centre; lith Corps the extreme left, and the 20th 
Corps the left centre; the left wing moved south of the Neuse 
river and tht right wing north of it on parallel roads . The gen- 
eral direction was towards Raleigh. 

General Smith's ith Division, 17th A. C., being in the rear of 
the corps, and the spongy, miry ground being deeply cut by the 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infa?itry. 48J 

trains of the front divisions during whole days and nights of march, 
was occupied in corduroying the road over two-thirds of the entire 
distance made. The 15th Iowa, being in the rear of the division, 
marched all night, pioneering the last of the train through the 
bottomless mire, and overtook the brigade and division next day, 
crossing the Little river at VVhiteley's Mills. From April 11th, 
the command corduroyed the road, the whole of the distance made 
daily, throughout the entire march, until it fairly struck the solid, 
rolling ground and rocky, mountainous country towards evening of 
the 18th. It crossed the Neuse river on the 14th, passed through 
Raleigh same da}', and went into camp two miles west of the city. 

On the 15th, while marching in a heavy rainstorm that rendered 
the roads in some places almost impracticable, the command re- 
ceived official intelligence of the rebel Johnston's "parleying for a 
surrender," which like electricity went from the head of the 
column to the rear, eliciting unbounded expressions of joy and 
satisfaction. A temporary bivouac was formed near Jones' sta- 
tion, on the Greensboro railroad, the troops awaiting the result. 

While in camp here, on the 17th of April, the news of assassi- 
nation of President Lincoln was received, by which the feelings of 
the troops were thrown into a state of intense exasperation against 
any that wore the clothing usually seen in the southern states since 
the commencement of the war . It reflects credit on the officers 
for having proven themselves at this time able to keep their men 
within the bounds of strict discipline. 

April 19th, the command marched back to within two miles of 
Raleigh and went into camp. While here, the camp being pre- 
sumed to be probably the last one before the close of the war, the 
men of the 15th Iowa, in common with those of the rest of the . 
brigade, favored by a suitable ground, made one of the finest look- 
ing camps laid out during the war, it becoming a topic of curiosity 
and an object of newspaper illustration. 

While in this camp the troops of the 4th Division were reviewed 



484 Histoiy of the Fifteenth Regiment 

by General Smith, its commander, on the 28cl, and the whole corps 
passed in review before General Sherman in Raleigh, in presence 
of its former and oldest commander, General U. S. Grant, on 
April 24th . 

The terms of the former proposition for surrender not having 
been accepted by the government, the troops on the 25th resumed 
their march; the 17th Corps arriving at Jones' station that day. 

Next day (the 26th) official intelligence was received by the 
troops of the acceptance by Johnston of the government's terms 
of surrender, these including his entire army and department, con- 
sisting of Georgia and North and South Carolina. 

On the 27th, the brigade, division and corps returned to its for- 
mer camp near Raleigh, and received ordei's to be ready to march 
to Petersburg, on its way to Washington. 

Thus the campaign, that promised to be lively with desperate 
conflicts on the part of the enemv, came to a sudden close. The 
career and antagonism of Johnston against Sherman, which com- 
menced in the rear of Vicksburg in the summer of 1868, came to 
a final end; the once formidable army he opposed to the progress 
of the army of the Military Division of the Mississippi used up in 
a hundred battles as killed, or crippled, or captured, and the rest 
scattered, run down and surrendered. 

Within the year past that army had been fought, constantly de- 
feated, and driven from one stronghold to another, from one river, 
mountain, pass, railroad centre, city, state to another, until its last 
ditch had been reached. When it was forced there, however, its 
old boasted self reliance and bravery were gone, the men demoral- 
ized and panic stricken, imperious to any appeal, order or threat, 
their leaders without counsel or expedients, and entirely helpless. 
There never was an army more completely conquered, ruined and 
destroyed than Joe Johnston's rebel Army of the Tennessee. 

The 82d Illinois, since November 10th, 186-4, attached to the 
8d Brigade, was detached from the same April 28th and with the 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 4.8^ 

14th and 15th Illinois, formed the 2d Brigade of the 4th Division. 

The 'Job having been finished," the four corps of the Military Di- 
vision of the Mississippi were started on April 29th on their way 
north; the 15th Corps taking the extreme right, the 17th Corps 
the right centre; the 14th and 20th Corps on the left; all marching 
on parallel roads, converging towards Petersburg. 

The 15th Iowa in the lead of l)rigade, division, and its corps, 
crossed the Neuse river, and after marching 14 miles, went into 
camp with the command, to wait for the other corps to take the 
parallel roads assigned to them. While in this camp, throughout 
the next day, (Sunday, April 30th), the men of the regiment were 
reminded in orders that the country through which it would now 
pass having been surrendered, the inhabitants thereof had a claim 
to protection in their persons and property, that all foraging hence- 
forth was strictly prohibited; and that none were to leave the ranks 
during the entire march; which order was strictly complied with. 
Marched in April 110 miles. 

May 1st, the brigade, with its division and corps, passed Forest- 
ville and crossed the Cedar Creek; crossed Tar river on the 2d; 
crossed Sandy creek and passed Ridgeway and VVarrenton depot 
on the 3d; crossed the Roanoke river at Robinson's ferry on pon- 
toons, and the Virginia state line on the 4th; struck the plank road 
at Price's mill on the 6th, and Dinwidie Court House early on the 
morning of the 7th; passed the fortifications at Hatcher's run at 
noon and went into camp at Petersburg in the afternoon of same 
day; having marched 162 miles in seven days, averaging over 23 
miles a day in the intense heat of an unusually early southern 
summer. 

May 8th, the 15th with brigade marched through Petersburg in 
order of review before General Howard, commanding the Army 
of the Tennessee, and General Blair, commanding the 17th Corps, 
reached Manchester on the 9th, and went into camp in full view of 
the city of Richmond, wdnere it remaineil two days. 



486 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

May 12th, crossed James river, and passed through Richmond . 
On 13th passed the Chickahominy bottom and camped near Han- 
over Court House. Crossed on the 14th, the Pamunky river; and 
on the 15th the Mat, Ta, Po and Ny creeks, and arrived at noon of 
the 16th at Fredericksburg, crossing the Rappahannock river. On 
the 18th the command waded the Occoquan river; and on the 19th, 
went into camp near Alexandria. Thus the command marched 
169 miles in less thnn 7 days, averaging 24 miles a day, in an in- 
tense heat, and in a constant cloud of dust. 

May 28d, the regiment, with brigade and division marched 8 
miles, through Alexandria to south of Washington, and went into 
camp close to the Long Bridge, in full view of the city so often 
threatened by repeated incursions of rebel armies, and so gloriously 
rescued and saved by the citizens soldiery of the country, and which 
henceforth is bound to become the political center of civilized man- 
kind, through the irresistible influence of the example shown by 
the loyal people and the heroic armv during the four years of ter. 

rible war. 

General Grant says in his Memoirs: "There was no incident 
worthy noting in the march northward from Goldsboro, to Rich- 
mond or in that from Richmond to Washington City. The arm}', 
however, commanded b}' Sherman, which had been engaged in all 
the battles of the west and had marched from the Mississippi 
through the southern States to the sea, from there to Goldsboro, 
and thence to Washington Citv, had passed over many of the battle- 
fields of the Armj' of the Potomac, thus having seen to a greater 
extent than any other bod}' of troops, the entire theatre of the four 
years war for the preservation of the Union . 

The march of Sherman's army from Atlanta to the sea, and 
north to Goldsboro, while it was not accompanied with the danger 
that was anticipated, yet was magnificent in its results, and 
equally magnificent in the way it was conducted . It had an 
important bearing, in various waj's, upon the great object 



loiva Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 48^ 

we had in view, that of closing the war. All the States east 
of the Mississippi river up to the State of Georgia, had felt 
the hardships of the war. Georgia and South Carolina, and 
almost all of North Carolina, up to this time, had been exempt 
from invasion bv the northern armies, excej^t upon their immediate 
sea-coasts. * * ■* Another great advantage resulting from this 
march, and which was calculated to hasten the end, was the fact 
that the great storehouse of Georgia was entirely cut off from the 
Confederate armies. As the troops advanced north from Savannah, 
the destruction of the railroads in South Carolina and the southern 
part of North Carolina, further cut off their resources and left the 
armies still in Virginia and North Carolina dependent for supplies 
upon a very small area of coimtry, already very much exhausted 
of food and forage. In due time the army from Raleigh, North 
Carolina, arrived and went into camp near the Capitol as directed. 
The troops were hard}', being inured to fatigue, and the}' appear- 
ed in their respective camps as ready and fit for duty as they had 
ever been in their lives. I doubt whether an equal body of men 
of any nation, take them man for man, officer for officer, was ever 
gotten together that would have proved their equal in a great 
battle." 

May 24th, the army of General Sherman was reviewed in 
Washington. The corps moved in the following order: Tjth, 17th, 
2()th and 14th, the head of the column, commencing to move 
through Pennsylvania Avenue at 9 o'clock A. m,, towards the stand 
on which the reviewing officer Lieutenant General U. .S. Grant and 
President of the United States, with the members of his Cabinet, 
and Chiefs of the Departments, as well as members of the Diplo- 
matic Corps, took their stand. The rear of the army passed by at 
half past 4 o'clock p. m. It was impossible to view the marching- 
columns on this, as well as those on the previous day, (the Army 
of the Potomac,) passing in company front, closed in masses, with- 
out arriving at a realization of the immense power tlie Government 



^p88 Histoiy of the Fifteenth Regiment 

of the Great Republic can command, and of the salutary lesson it 
imparted to the evil disposed rebel element on this continent, as 
well as to any and all other powers on the face of the earth . The 
regiment, with its brigade, in going through the performances of 
the review, earned the high commendation of the superior head- 
quarters, and the applause of the generous people. After march- 
ing 12 miles on this day, the command went into camp west of 
Washington. The total distance marched from the Neuse river, 
May 1st to 25th was 359 miles. 

General Grant writes: "The review commenced on the 28d 
and lasted two days. Meade's army occupied over six hours of the 
first day in passing the grand stand which had been erected in front 
of the President's house. Sherman witnessed this review from 
the grand stand which was occupied by the President and his 
Cabinet. Here he showed his resentment for the cruel and harsh 
treatment that had unnecessarily been inflicted upon him by the 
Secretar}' of War, by refusing to take his extended hand. 

Sherman's troops had been in camp on the south side of the 
Potomac. During the night of the 23d he crossed over and 
bivouacked not far from the Capitol. Promptly at ten o'clock on 
the morning of the 24th, his troops commenced to pass in review. 
Sherman's army made a different appearance from that of the 
Army of the Potomac. The latter had been operating where 
they received directly from the north full supplies of food and 
clothing regularly ; the review of this army therefore was the review 
of a body of 65,000 well drilled, well disciplined and orderly 
soldiers inured to hardships and fit for any duty. But without the 
experience of gathering their own food and supplies in an enemv's 
country, and of being ever on the watch . 

Sherman's army was not so well-dressed as the Army of the 
Potomac, but their marching could not be excelled; they gave the 
appearance of men who had been thoroughly drilled to endure 
hardships, either by long and continuous marches or through ex- 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantiy. 48g 

posure to any climate, without the ordinary sheUer of a camp. They 
exhibited also some of the order of march through Georgia where 
the "sweet potatoes spruug up from the ground" as Sherman's 
army went marching through. In the rear of a company there 
would be a captured horse or mule loaded with small cooking 
utensils, captured chickens and other food picked up for the use of 
the men. * * * The sight was varied and grand; nearly all 
day for two successive days, from the Capitol to the Treasury 
building, could be seen a mass of orderly soldiers marching in columns 
of companies. The National flag was flying from almost every 
house and store; the windows were filled with spectators; the 
doorsteps and sidewalks were crowded with colored people and 
poor whites who did not succeed in securing better quarters from 
which to ofet a view of the grrand armies." 



EXTRACT FROM A LETTER OF LINKENSALE TO 
THE KEOKUK GATE CITY. 



The Grand Review. ---Sherman's Troops Win the Lau- 
rels. ---The Iowa Boys.— -General Belknap. 

Washington C/'ty^ May 2g, iS6^. 

The irrepressible telegraph has given you the general outlines 
and man}" of the more interesting details pertaining to the late 
grand review. Let me jot down something thereunto appurte- 
nant, more with the view of congratulating the good people of 
lovs^a upon the part taken therein by the troops from our state than 
of writing a full account of the magnificent display. 

The review on Tuesday was of the troops composing the Poto- 
mac Armv, a part of the Army of James, and Sheridan's cavalry. 
That of AVednesday was of the troops under ]Major General Sher- 
man — the Army of the Tennessee, under Logan, and the Armv 
of Georgia, under Slocum. On either day the displav was verv 



490 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

fine. Had the review ended on Tuesday it would have hccn justlv 
considered as the most magnificent military displa}' ever witnessed 
in America — as altogether worthv the greatest, best government 
on earth. Yet in many respects the review of VVednesdav was 
superior. The officers were, general! v, more manlv in appearance 
and e\idently much better horsemen, whilst the men looked more 
intelligent, more hardy, more self-reliant. The marching on Wed- 
nesday was, confessedly, greatly superior to the marching on Tues- 
day. In fact, it seemed to be absolutely perfect. Every man kept 
his eyes to the front, and the whole column, not less than twenty 
miles in length, kept step to the music of the Union as one man. 
This precision, this perfection of marching, was the wonder of 
the spectators, not less those of the Potomac Army than citizens. 
It was in every man's mouth. All praised it. Certainly the sub- 
limest spectacle of a military nature ever witnessed on this side the 
ocean, was the army of General Sherman as it marched up the 
avenue that day, not a man out of line, or a gun awry in the whole 
pageant, so splendid and animated. 

The northwest was proud of it, and none the less so because 
CA'erybody admitted that the " western boys were ahead." In this 
rejoicing the citizens of Iowa were specially jubilant being about 
as proficient in the matter of jubilation as any folks ever get to 
be. Not a man from the state but felt proud of his citizenship. 
From Secretary Harlan, of the cabinet, down to the humblest em- 
ployee of the government, there was glad rejoicing and lots of it. 

In the 17th Corps is "The Iowa Brigade," General W. W. 
Belknap commanding. Your readers at all familiar with the his- 
tor}' of Iowa troops know the grand record of this command, 
composed of the 11th, Lieutenant Colonel Beach, 13th, Lieutenant 
Colonel Kennedy, loth, Lieutenant Colonel Pomutz, and 16th, 
Add. Sander's old regiment, by whom now commanded I cannot 
remember. These regiments went into the war at the battle of 
Shiloh, and here they were the other day, having marched and 



lotva Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 4gi 

fought, and seiged and " flanked " through eight states of the 
Confederacy. General Belknap at their head, appeared every inch 
a soldier. There is no finer looking officer in the army. Just in 
front of Willard's he was presented with a boquet of flowers, and 
a floral wreath was thrown around his horse's neck. Then the 
shoutings for the Iowa Brigade made the welkin ring again. No 
doubt it was the proudest day of Gener;d Belknap's life. Surely 
he had good right to be proud, for in all that column that marched 
in review before General Grant on Tuesda}^ and Wednesday, there 
was not a brigade equal to the Iowa Brigade — not one. I saw 
them all — all those fortv miles of troops— and I declare solemnly 
that such is the truth. 

I do not mean to say that the troops of the Iowa Brigade are 
any better troops than those in other regiments from our state, any 
or all of them. I am only saying that in this grand review the 
Iowa Brigade made the finest appearance in the whole column, 
and I will maintain that assertion against all comers, devoutly 
leaving the decision to the day of judgment. Nobody disputes it 
here, how^ever. Our boys all did much more than well. They 
did nobly. The citizens of the state here have many times rejoiced 
with a joy unspeakable at the great things they have done for 
themselves, for Iowa, and for the Union, but I think they never 
rejoiced more heartily than they did the other day upon witnessing 
the fact that those of other states gladly conceded to them the 
highest meed of praise. 

But they have all done their duty everwhere, and done it man- 
fully, heroically. No summer soldiers, no sunshine patriots they, 
but brave, earnest men, who have written all over our state escut- 
cheon in colors of living light a record of undying fame, for 
which they shall ever receive the love and thanks of man and 
woman. Linkensale. 

While in camp near Washington, 164 enlisted men of the 15th 
Iowa (five men of the recruits who enlisted in 1862 and 159 draft- 



492 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

ed men) whose term of service would expire previous to October 
1st, ISfio, were mustered out in compliance with orders from the 
Wai" Department and forwarded to Davenport, Iowa, for pay and 
final discharge, May 28th. General Giles A. Smith, having been 
relieved from the command of the 4th Division, and transferred to 
Weitzel's army in Texas, General Wm. W. Belknap, heretofore in 
command of the 8d Brigade, took command of the 4th Di- 
vision, Alav 31st, and Lieutenant-Colonel Ben. Beach, of the 
11th Iowa, being senior ofHcer, took command of the 8d Brigade 
temporary . 

SPECIAL FIELD ORDERS NO. 76. 

Headquarters Military Division of the Mississippi, in the Field. ) 

Wash/nofofi, D. C. May jo^ i86s- \ 

The General commanding announces to the Armies of the Ten- 
nessee and Georgia, that the time has come for us to part. Our 
work is done, and armed enemies no longer defy us. Some of vou 
will be retained in the service until further orders. And now that 
we are about to separate, to mingle with the civil world, it becomes 
a pleasing dut}' to recall to mind the situation of national affairs, 
when, but little more than a year ago, we were gathered about the 
twining cliffs of Lookout Mountain, and all the future was wrapped 
in doubt and uncertainty. Three armies had come together from 
distant fields, with separate histories, vet bound by one common 
cause — the union of our country and the perpetuation of the govern- 
ment of our inheritance . There is no need to recall to your mem- 
ories Tunnell Hill, with its Rocky Face Mountain, and Buzzard 
Roost Gap, with the ugly forts of Dalton behind. We were in 
earnest, and paused not for danger and difficulty, but dashed 
through Snake Creek Gap, and fell on Resacca, then on to the 
Etowah, to Dallas, Kenesaw; and the heats of summer found us 
on the banks of the Chattahoochee, far from home and dependent 
on a single road for supplies. Again we were not to be held back 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 493 

by any obstacle and crosssed over and fought four heavy battles for 
the possession of the citadel of Atlanta. That was the crisis of our 
historv. A doubt still clouded our future; but we solved the problem 
and destroyed Atlanta, struck boldly across the state of Georgia, se- 
cured all the main arteries of life to our enemy, and Christmas 
found us at Savannah. Waiting there only long enough to fill our 
wagons, we again began a march, which for peril, labor and results, 
will compare with any ever made by an organized army. The floods 
of the Savannah, the swamps of the Combahee and Edisto, the high 
hills and rocks of the Santee, the i^at quagmires of the Pedee and 
Cape Fear rivers, were all passed in midwinter, \^•ith its floods and 
rains, in the face of an accumulating enemy; and after the battles 
of Averysboro and Bentonville, we once more came out of the 
wilderness to meet our friends at Goldsboro. Even then we paused 
only long enough to get new clothing, to re-load our wagons, and 
again pushed on to Raleigh, and beyond, until we met our enemy, 
sueing for peace instead of war, and offering to submit to the in- 
jured laws of his and our country. As long as that enemy was 
defiant, nor mountains, nor rivers, nor swamps, nor hun- 
ger nor cold had checked us; but when he who had fought us 
hard and persistently, offered submission, your general thought it 
wrong to pursue him further, and negotiations followed, which 
resulted, as you all know, in his surrender. How far the opera- 
tions of the army have contributed to the overthrow of the Con- 
federacy, of the peace which now dawns on us, must be judged by 
others, not by us. But that you have done all that men could do 
has been admitted by those in authority; and we have a right to 
join in the universal joy that fills our land because the war is over 
and our government stands vindicated before the world by the 
joint action of the volunteer armies of the United States. 

To such as remain in the military service, your General need only 
remind you that successes in the past are due to hard work and dis- 
cipline, and that the same work and discipline are equally impor- 



4Q4 Histojy of the Fifteenth Regbneni 

tant in the future. To such as go home, he will only say, that 
our favored country is so grand, so extensive, so diversified in cli- 
mate, soil and productions, that every man may surelv find a home 
and occupation suited to his tastes; and none should yield to the 
natural impotence sure to result from our past life of excitement 
and adventure. You will be invited to seek new adventure abroad; 
l)ut do not yield to the temptation, for it will lead only to death 
and disappointment. 

Your General now l)ids vou all farewell, with the full belief that 
as in war vou have been good soldiers, so in peace you will make 
good citizens; and if, unfortunately, new war should arise in our 
country, Sherman's Army will be the first to buckle on the old 
armor and come forth to defend and maintain the government of 
our inheritance and choice. By order of 

MAJ.-GEN. W. T. SHERMAN. 

L. M. Daytox, Asst. Adjt. Gen. 

June 1st, the Army of the Tennessee, now under General John 
A. Logan, was ordered to Louisville, Kentucky, and the troops of 
the L5th Corps embarked by divisions on the subsequent days. 

The 4th Division, of the 17th Corps left its camp near Wash- 
ington on the 7th of June, took cars on the Baltimore and Ohio 
railroad via. Harper's Ferry to Parkersburg, (400 miles) on the 
Ohio river, where it embarked on steamboats; the 15th Iowa on 
steamer Bertha, and were conveyed to Louisville (370 miles), arriv- 
ing there on June 12th, and going into camp eight miles west of 
the town . 

On the 15th of June moved to a healthier location on the Bards- 
town pike, five miles southeast of town. On June 17th, Brevet 
Brigadier General A. Hickenlooper was assigned and took com- 
mand of the 3d Brigade. On the 21st the 2d Brigade, General 
Stolbrand, (of the 4th Division, 17th Corps), was ordered away 
and started for St. Louis. 



luzva Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 4g^ 

GENERAL ORDERS NO. 108. 

War Department, Adjutant General's Office, ) 
Washington., D, C., June 2, l86^ . \ 

Soldiers of the Armies of the United States: 

By your patriotic devotion to your country in the hour of danger 
and alarm — vour magnificent fighting, bravery and endurance — 
you have maintained the supremacy of the Union and the Consti- 
tution, OA'crthrown all armed opposition to the enforcement of the 
laws, and of the proclamations forever abolishing slavery — the 
cause and pretext of the rebellion, and opened the way to the 
rightful authorities to restore order and inaugurate peace, on a per- 
manent and enduring basis, on every foot of American soil. 

Your marches, sieges and battles; in distance, duration, resolu- 
tion and brilliancy of result, dim the lustre of the world's past 
militarv achievements, and will be the patriot's defence and right 
in all time to come. 

In obedience to your country's call, you left homes and families, 
and volunteered in its defence. Victory has crowned vour valor, 
and secured the purpose of your patriot hearts; and with the 
gratitude of your countrymen, and the highest honors a great and 
free nation can accord, you will soon be permitted to return to 
your homes and families, conscious of having discharged the 
highest duty of American citizens . 

To achieve these gloiuous triumphs, and secure to yourselves, 
your fellow-countrymen and posterity, the blessings of free insti- 
tutions, tens of thousands of your gallant comrades have fallen, 
and sealed the priceless legacy with their lives. The graves of 
these, a faithful nation bedews with tears, honors their memories, 
and will ever cherish and support their stricken families. 

U. S. GRANT, Lieutenant General, 

[Official] E. D. TOWNSEND, A. A. G. 

On June 20th an official communication from the War Depart- 
ment, A. G. O., dated June 5th, 1SG5, was received, to the effect 



4Q6 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

that Brevet Brigadier General J. M. Hedrick, Colonel of the 15th 
Iowa Veteran Infantr}', was to be retained in the service until the 
completion of the cases before the General Court Martial, of which 
he was a member. (Colonel Hedrick was brevetted March 13th, 
1865, while at Washington, but no official communication ever 
reached the regiment as to his appointment. 

June 25th to the 30th, leaves of absence were granted to officers, 
and furloughs from five to ten per cent, of the men. General 
Belknap having left on the 26th, General B. F. Potts assumed 
temporally command of the division. Adjutant W. C . Stidger, of 
the 15th, having left on the 29th, 2d Lieutenant Edward A. Cham- 
bers, of D Company, was appointed acting' adjutant. 

June 30th, Special Orders No. 326, from War Department, Ad- 
jutant General's office, Washington, dated June 23d, 1865, was re- 
ceived detailing Brevet Brigadier General J . M. Hedrick, Colonel 
15th Iowa Veteran Infantry, as member of a general court mar- 
tial to meet at Wasliington on June 24th, 1865, or as soon there- 
after as practicable, for the trial of such prisoners as might be 
brought before it. 

July 2d, at midnight, orders were received detailing the 3d Bri- 
gade (commonly known as the Iowa Brigade) for an escort of re- 
ception for General W. T. Sherman, expected to arrive in Louis- 
ville early next morning from Cincinnati. The regiment, with 
the rest of the brigade, Brigadier General Hickenlooper command- 
ing, rrioved from camp at 3 o'clock A. m. of July 3d, arriving at 
the levee in Louisville, at 5 o'clock, and forming on Fifth street 
in open lines, fronting eacli other. When the General arrived, the 
regiments of the brigade escorted him to a friend's residence, and 
soon after passed in review before him. At the introduction, by 
General Hickenlooper, of the regimental commanders to the 
General, he expressed his determination to keep free from any en- 
gagements on next day, as he intended to see " His Boys " on the 
4th of July in their camps. 




A.HlCKENLOOPER. 

BOT. BRIB.GEN'L.U.S.WLS. 



loiva Veteran Vohmteer Infantry. 4gy 

July 4th, according to the programme published the evening 
before, General Sherman was to visit all the brigades of the Army 
of the Tennessee, stationed at Louisville, in their own camps. 

He arrived at the camp of the 3d Brigade at noon, without any 
staff of his own, when, according to his desire, the line of the 
brigade at once formed by battalions in mass and in front of the 
15th Iowa. He then spoke to the officers and men of the com- 
mand for twenty minutes, saying, He came on this 4th of July to 
see the men who could not celebrate the great day with their 
friends and relatives at home; he came once more to see the men 
who were associated with him for many years, through many of 
the fiercest battles of the war, before they should be discharged, 
and return home. He thanked them for the important services 
they had rendered their countrv for nearly four years, braving the 
enemy's steel and iron hail in hundreds of battles, and cheerfully 
enduring and conquering all hardships and privations, which on 
many occasions were beyond description. He well remembered 
the regiments of the Iowa Brigade from as early as the battle of 
Shiloh; he knew that it was the oldest brigade organization in the 
Army of the Tennessee, from the time when Colonel, afterwa.ids 
General, Crocker, of Iowa, was in command of it, early in 1862. 
He exhorted the men to be proud of their record and the name 
they had so well earned; to honor it themsehes, by being peace- 
able citizens, when they should return to their homes; to remem- 
ber that they must continue to take care of the country and its in- 
terests, until the great questions now at hand will be solved; for 
that purpose to stand together, and to vote as one body in the right 
direction; to remember that there was and must continue to re- 
main a connecting link betw^een all the officers and men of the 
Army of the Tennessee, as it connected them in the common 
glory achieved by their brave arms; and when again the country 
would need men to stand b\- it, he was sure he could look to the 
men once under his command to be ready to put on their armor 
87 



^g8 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

and try their weapons again, as tlney had done before; when he 
concluded with "God bless you all; farewell."" An involuntary 
outburst of heartfelt cheers rent the air, and the veterans, with 
tears in their eyes, could not cease their enthusiastic shouting until 
he was fairly out of sight. 

There never was a chief more beloved by his men than the 
General, once commanding the Grand Army of the Military Divi- 
sion of the Mississippi, when parting from his men on the 4th of July, 
1865. There was no happier class of men within the vast domin- 
ions of the United States on that same 4th of July than the men of 
the "Old Iowa Brigade." 

July 6th, the order of the War Department was announced, to 
prepare the troops of the Armies of the Tennessee and Georgia, 
(15th, 17th, 20th and 14th Corps,) for muster out of the service. 

At the same time orders were received from the several superior 
headquarters, making regiment and company commanders responsi- 
ble for the completion of the records, books, returns, and reports of 
their commands from the time of their entering into service to the 
. day of their muster out, also for the making out of correct muster- 
out and pay rolls, agreeably to instructions from the Inspector- 
General and Assistant Commissaries of Musters of their respective 
commands. 

In compliance with the above orders, and for the special future 
benefit of the members of the regiment, the officers of the 15th 
Iowa who were directly concerned, at once set to work to fully ac- 
complish the task. All the various returns and reports, monthly 
and quarterly, due either to Adjutant-General office. Quartermaster, 
and Ordnance Departments of the General Government, or to the 
State of Iowa, were made, and back returns, and such as were lost 
in transmission furnished . All the books and records of the several 
companies, also the full correspondence of the regiment, and all 
orders from army, corps, division, brigade^ and regimental head- 
quarters, were posted up and finished to the last day; deficiencies 



loxca Veteran Volunteer Infantry. ^gg 

and neglects of former officers during previous years, back to the 
summer of 1863, were corrected and supplied, and all items entered 
on the descriptive books of companies, as well as of the regiment, 
and these made fully to agree with those of the quarterly, monthly, 
and field returns, and daily and morning reports. The books had 
full and correct special registers of alterations and casualties, to-wit: 
For commissioned officers, separate registers of resignations, deaths, 
muster-out, and promotions; for enlisted men, registers of dis- 
charges, transfers, muster-out, deaths, and desertions, so as to give 
a complete military history of each and all who were ever mem- 
bers of the regiment from its first organization to the last day of 
service . 

With all the above mentioned work achieved, the 15th low^a was 
only a few days behind other regiments, several of whom had no 
records to complete, by reason of having lost part or most of thein 
during the campaign . 



Headquarters Seventeenth Army Corps, 

Lotiisville^ Ky. July ii^ 1865 . 

To the officers and Soldiers of the Seventeenth Arm}' Corps: 

In taking leave of you I feel it my duty to express mv sense of 
obligation, not only for the service you have rendered the Govern- 
ment, but also to acknowledge the debt which 1 owe you personally 
for the reputation, which your valor and good conduct have con- 
ferred upon me. In whatever position I may hereafter be placed 
I shall regard it as a duty to devote inyself to your interests. I do 
not care in this place to recount your services and achievements — 
they are written in the history of our country, and will not be for- 
gotten by those who love our institutions, or honor the brave men 
who have preserved them. I choose rather to depart from a 
custom pleasing in itself, and one which would be especially pleas- 
ant in this instance to me, that of recalling your triumphs, and even 
at the risk of provoking criticism by a departure from the accustom- 



^oo History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

edformalities of a farewell address. I prefer to make some sug- 
gestions, which, I hope, may not only prove useful to you, but 
beneficial, also, to the cause of our country, which you have proved 
that you prized more highly than your own personal interests. 

The order for your disbandment (as you are well aware) has al- 
ready been received, and nothing remains to be done to restore you 
to homes and families except the formal discharge from service. 
Your service demands a better recognition at the hantls of the 
country you have aided to preserve than mere words of applause. 

The Romans made their conquering soldiers freeholders in the 
lands they had conquered; and as upon your return to your homes 
you will find most of the occupations and employments filled by 
adepts from civil life; and as the Government has vast tracts of 
vacant lands, which will be increased by the war, the interests of the 
country and your own will concur in the apportionment of these 
lands to your use and occupancy, establishing a citizen soldiery to 
maintain internal peace and set foreign foes at defiance. 

There is one other and most important consideration to which I 
will point you attention . Simultaneous with the breaking out of 
the rebellion against our government a war was made by one of the 
most potent of European states upon the Republic of Mexico, 
under circumstances and with indications of such an unmistak- 
able character as to leave no doubt that the rebellion and the invas- 
ion of Mexico were but parts of a conspiracy against republicanism 
on this continent . The rebellion has been crushed, after efforts 
and sacrifices that have no parallel in modern war; but the invasion 
of our sister republic of Mexico has, in a measure, been successful. 
Can it be said that we have triumphed and that our republic is 
re-established on a solid and immovable foundation so long as the 
Hapsburgs, supported by the bayonets of France, maintain them- 
selves in Mexico, where they have established, upon the ruins of 
the republic, a system inimical to our own — an asylum for all the 



I 



loiva Veteran Volunteer Infantry . joi 

disaffected in our country, from whence treason will be plotted and 
conspiracies hatched, to he put in operation when opportunity offers 
and to be aided by the same force, impelled hv the same motives 
which led to the ruin of Mexico. 

It is possible that the failure of that part of the conspiracy, 
which aimed at the existence of our government, and which we 
all know to have been aided by the moral influence and material 
aid of the aristocratic governments of France and England, may, 
of itself, defeat the other part of the scheme against our sister re- 
public of Mexico and that Bonaparte may have the good sense to 
withdra\y his troops from that country, knowing that if he does 
not withdraw them they will be driven out by that power which 
cannot submit to have its institutions threatened by the encroach- 
ments of inimical systems on this continent, and to which the in- 
vasion of Mexico was not only a threat but an insult, because we 
had publicly espoused the doctrine that no monarchial government 
should intrude upon this continent, thus taking under our protec- 
tion the feebler republics of this hemisphere. To attack Mexico, 
whilst under our avowed protection, so far as to shield her from 
the establisment of monarchy, was to attack :m ally, and, indeed, 
to attack us. It was done at a time when a conspiracy, hatched 
into life and nurtured into strength by the same malign influence, 
required all our power for its suppression, and disabled us from 
making good the "■ Monroe Doctrine" which we had adopted, and 
which our interests and honor were engaged to maintain . The 
time has come when our power to maintain that principle coincides 
with our interests and our honor . It will be maintained. The 
whole conspiracy, in all its parts must be frustrated. It a\ ill be 
fortunate for us and the whole civilized world if our diplomacy, 
invigorated by our restored power, shall be able to re-establish the 
principle so necessary to our safety and security. If that object 
can be olitained by pacific means then soldier}' is at an end, and 
your sole business hereafter will be to develop, enrich and improve 



^02 History of the Fifteenth RegiTnent 

our great country. To that end our soldiers should be provided 
with homesteads, and in no part of the country would they fare 
better or would they be more useful than in the South which they 
have redeemed. But if the folly and wickedness which first in- 
spired the attempt to overthrow our great republic and the repub- 
lican system in this continent should still prevail, and European 
despots continue to threaten us, by a flanking movement on Mex- 
ico, you will be called on to complete your work. 

FRANK P. BLAIR, Major-General. 



State of Iowa, Executive Department, ) 
Des Moines^ lozva, y?/Iv 12^ iS6^. \ 

Soldiers of Iowa: The conspicuous and honorable part you have 
borne in the arduous 'struggle for the preservation of our national 
government, has excited the admiration of your countrvnicn and 
secured for yourselves an imperishable name. Your constancy 
and patience so often tried, your patriotism and valor universallv 
acknowledged, have culminated in the triumph of national author- 
ity and the perpetuity of the Union which our fathers established. 
With your bayonets the name of " Iowa " has been carved upon 
the brightest pages of American history. From the banks of the 
Des Moines you fought your way to the Gulf of Mexico and the 
Atlantic seaboard, stacking your arms at the close of the war on 
the banks of the Potomac in the shadow of the nation's capitol. 
Such marches, sieges, and battles the world has never witnessed 
before, either in ancient or modern times. Surpassing in concep- 
tion and boldness of execution the world-renowned campaigns of 
Cyrus or Alexander, Caesar or Napoleon, they will give historic' 
grandeur to the age and render immortal the glory of our arms. 
In the name of the people of Iowa, whose country 3'ou have saved 
and whose state you have honored, I bid you a heartfelt welcome 
to your homes, and extend to you the assurance of their pride in 
your fame, and their lasting gratitude for your heroic achievements. 



loxva Veteran Volunteer Infantry. 50J? 

Nobly have 3'ou maintained the honor of our state, in every cam- 
paign and battle, and faithfullv redeemed the confidence reposed in 
your valor. Looking upon your now thinned ranks we are mourn- 
fully reminded of 3'our many comrades slumbering in their lonely 
graves in the fields of glory where they died. Vour banners torn 
by the storm and dimmed by the smoke of battle, we shall receive 
and deposit among the other valued memorials of your fame. The 
remembrance of your honorable scars and many victories will be 
re\'erently cherished and transmitted as a part of the common her- 
itage. Soldiers in war, you return as citizens to mingle with your 
friends and engage in the pursuits of peace. 

Committing to the care of a generous people, the widows and 
orphans of those who are fallen, we invoke for the surviving 
heroes the continual guidance of Him who sheltered them amid the 
trials and dangers of war. 

W. M. STONE, Governor. 



Headquarters Army of the Tennessee, 

Louisville^ A3'., y^dy J3th^ 1S65. 

Orticers and Soldiers of the Army of the Tennessee: 

The profound gratification I feel in being authorized to release 

you from the enormous obligations of the camp, and return you, 

laden with laurels, to homes where warm hearts welcome 3'ou, is 

somewhat embittered by the painful reflection that I am sundering 

the ties that trials have made true, time made tender, suffering 

made sacred, perils made proud, heroism made honorable, and fame 

made forever fearless of the future. It is no common occasion that 

demands the disbandment of a military organization, before the 

resistless power of which mountains bristling with bayonets have 

bowed, cities have surrendered, and millions of brave men been 

conquered. 

Although I have been but for a short jjeriod your commander, 

we are no strangers; afTections have sprung up between us during 



^04 History of the Fifteenth Regitnent 

the long years of doubt, gloom and carnage, we have passed through 
together, nurtured by common perils, sufferings and sacrifices, and 
rivited by the memories of gallant comrades whose bones repose 
beneath the sod of a hundred battle-fields, noi- time nor distance 
will weaken or efface. The many marches you haye made, the 
dangers you have despised, the haughtiness you have humbled, the 
duties you have discharged, the glory you have gained, the destiny 
you have discovered for the country in whose cause you have con- 
quered, all recur at this moment in all the yividness that marked the 
scenes through which we have just passed. 

From the pens of the ablest historians of the land are daily drift- 
ing out upon the current of time, page upon page, volume upon 
volume of your heoric deeds, and floating down to future genera- 
tions, will inspire the student of history with admiration, the patri- 
otic American with veneration for his ancestors, and to the lover 
of republican liberty, with gratitude for those who, in a fresh 
baptism of blood; reconstructed the powers and energies of the Re- 
public to the cause of constitutional freedom. Long may it be the 
happy fortune of each and every one of you to live in the full frui- 
tion of the boundless blessing you have secured to the human race. 
Only he whose heart has been thrilled with admiration for your 
impetuous and unyielding valor in the thickest of the fight can ap- 
preciate with what pride I recount the brilliant achievements which 
immortalize you and enrich the pages of our national history. 

Passing by the earlier, but not less signal triumphs of the war, in 
which most of you participated, and inscribed upon your banners 
such victories as Donelson and Shiloh, I recur to campaigns, sieges 
and victories which challenge the admiration of the world, and elicit 
the unwilling applause of all Europe. 

Turning your backs upon the lilood-bathed heights of Vicks- 
burg, you launched into a region swarming with enemies, fighting 
your way, and marching without adequate supplies, to answer the 



loxva Veteran Volunteer Infotttry. joj 

cry for succor that comes to you from the noble but beleagured 
army at Chattanooga. 

Your steel next flashed among- the mountains of Tennessee, and 
your weary limbs found rest before the embattled heights of Mis- 
sion Ridge, and there with dauntless courage you breasted again 
the enem3'''s destructive fire, and shared with your comrades of the 
Army of the Cumberland the glories of a victory, than wliich no 
soldiery can boast a prouder. 

In that unexampled campaign of vigilant and vigorous warfare 
from Chattanooga to Atlanta, you freshened your laurels at Resaca, 
with grappling with the enemy behind his works, hurling him back 
dismayed and broken. Pursuing him thence, marking your path b}' 
graves of fallen comrades, you again triumphed over superior numbers 
at Dallas, fighting your way from there to Kenesaw Mountain, and 
under the murderous artillery that frowned from its rugged heights, 
with a tenacity and constancy that finds few parellcls, you labored, 
fought and suffered through the boiling rays of a Southern mid- 
summer sun, until at last you planted your colors upon its topmost 
heights. 

Again, on the 22d of July, 1864, rendered memorable through 
all the time for the terrible struggle you so heroically maintained 
under disasters, and that saddest of all reflections, the loss of that 
exemplary soldier and popular leader, the lamented McPherson, 
vour matchless courage turned defeat into glorious victory. 

Ezra Chapel and Jonesboro added new lustre to a radiant record, 
the latter unbarring to you the proud Gait City of the South. 

The daring of a desperate foe in thrusting his legions northward, 
exposed the country in your front, and though rivers, swamps and 
enemies opposed, you boldly surmounted every obstacle, beat down 
all opposition, and marched forward to the sea. Without any act 
to dim the brightness of your historic page, the world rang plaudits 
when vour labors and struggles culminated at Savannah, and the 



^o6 History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

old "Starry Banners," waved once more over the w alls of one of 
the proudest cities of the seaboard . 

Scarcely a breathing spell had passed when your colors faded 
from the coast, and your columns plunged into the swamps of the 
Carolinas. The suffering you endured, the labors you performed 
and the successes you achieved in those morasses, deemed impos- 
sible, forms a creditable episode in the history of the war. Poco- 
taligo, Salkahatchie, Edisto, Branchville, Orangeburg, Columbia, 
Bentonville, Charleston and Raleigh are names that will ever be 
suggestive of the resistless sweep of your column through the ter- 
ritory that cradled and nurtured, and from whence was sent forth 
on its mission of crime, the disturbing and disorganizing spirit of 
secession and rebellion. 

The work for which you pledged your brave hearts and brawny 
arms to the Government of your fathers you have nobly perform- 
ed. You are seen in the past gathering through the gloom that 
enveloped the land, rallying as the guardians of man's honest herit- 
age, forgetting the thread unwoven upon the loom, quitting the 
anvil and abandoning the workshops, to vindicate the supremacy of 
the laws and the authority of the consitution. Four years having 
struggled in the bloodiest and most destructive war that ever 
drenched the earth with human gore; step by step you have borne 
our standard, until to-day, over every fortress and aresnal that re- 
bellion wrenched from us, and over city, town and hamlet, from 
the Lakes to the gulf, and from ocean to ocean, proudly float the 
"starry emblem" of our national unity and strength. 

Your rewards, my comrades, are the welcoming plaudits of a 
grateful people, the consciousness that in saving the Republic you 
have won for your country renewed respect and power at home 
and abroad; that in the unexampled era of growth and prosperity 
that dawns with peace, there attached mightier wealth of pride and 
glory than ever before to that loved boast, "I am an American 
citizen ." 



Iowa Veteran Volunteer Infantry. ^oy 

In relinquishing the implements of war for those of peace, let 
your conduct ever be that of warriors in time of war, and peaceful 
citizens in time of peace. Let not the lustre of that bright name 
that you have won as soldiers be dimmed by any improper act as 
citizens, but as time rolls on let your record grow brighter and 
brighter still. JOHN A. LOGAN, 

Major-General. 

In presenting itself for inspection, preparatory to its inuster out. 
Lieutenant Colonel George Pomutz (by General Order No. 14) 
thanked the officers and men of the Regiment for the promptness 
with which they had always executed and carried out his orders 
since he took command of the Regiment before Atlanta, August 
1st 1804. 



GENERAL ORDERS NO. 14. 



Farewell Order of Lieutenant George Pomutz. 

Headquarters 15th Iowa Infantry Vet. Vols., | 
Near Louisville, Ky., yuly 2j^ iS6^. \ 

The commanding officer of the Regiment takes pleasure in an- 
nouncing that the command is now ready to pass a minute in- 
spection, preparatory to its being mustered out of service and 
return home. It took a few days longer than was anticipated to 
finish the work, as it was deemed all important to have the neglect 
and deficiencies of former years, back to the summer of 1863, 
corrected and supplied; to have the papers, records and books 
of the command completed, so as to save the interests of the 
government, and at the same time to do full justice to each and 
all who have ever been connected with the regiment. As the 
records stand now the commanding officer trusts that they may 
prove a real benefit in future to all of the members of the Regi- 
ment from its first organization to this present time. The day 
and hour drawinsf near when the command will disband to re- 



jOc? History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

turn to their individual pursuits In civil life, the commanding officer 
embraces this occasion to acknowledge the promptness with which 
all of his orders were carried out by the officers and men since he 
took command of the regiment a \'ear ago, before Atlanta, even 
under circumstances during the last year's arduous campaign, that 
have called for the best settled habits of discipline, and have taxed 
to the utmost the energy and well tried endurance of the officers 
and men. He cannot forbear now to acknowledge that under the 
most trying circumstances he could not notice anv slackening on 
the part of the men in doing their full dut}^; that he never heard 
of one single instance of murmuring when duty had to be per- 
formed; that, on the contrary, he had often been witness to the 
readiness, promptness and vigor of execution, and to the gallantry 
with which officers and men ha\'e met and bravely surmounted the 
difficulties arising before them; that as often they had caused him 
to feel proud of their conduct, so they had also elicited, on se\- 
eral occasions, the applause and congratulations of several superior 
headquarters. He returns his last thanks to all officers and men 
for it now. 

While he is well aware of having strictly enforced on all occa- 
sions the orders and prescribed rules of discipline, with a view to 
secure and enhance the efficiency of the command, at the same 
time he is not conscious of ever having, in one single instance, 
either delayed or omitted to see personally that everything due to 
the men was given them, whenever it was in his power to procure 
it for them. Any neglect or carelessness, no matter from what 
quarter, was remedied at once, even if this had to be attained at the 
cost of an unpleasant situation resulting pei'sonally to himself. 

He would call the attention of the command to one object of 
importance before the process of disbanding will be gone 
through with . 

The soldiers of the Federal army who have fought the hundreds 
of battles against the rebellion just closed, and have endured the 




George Pomutz. 

LT.COL.I5r»IOW/l¥OLS. 
BREVET. BRIG. GEH'LU.S.mS. 



Iowa Veteran Vohinteer Infantry. ^og 

hardships and despised the dangers that will ever tax the credulity 
of those who were not present, have shown an example of exalted 
patriotism, of paramount love of our country, of its government 
and of its laws . 

Soldiers of the loth Iowa! Your record was and is a noble one! 
For three and a half years you have borne the baimer of the Stars 
and Stripes, the emblem of the power and unity of our govern- 
ment; at the same time as the exponent of your own tletermination 
to assist in upholding that government and its laws, you have carried 
and defended that banner through a tlistance mai ched and traveled of 
se\en thousand eight hundred and ninet3'-eight miles since March, 
1862. Out of the aggregate number of 1,763 men who have 
been members of the Regiment since its organization, 1,051 are 
out, a fearful proportion of whom comprises those killed, the de- 
ceased, and the crippled and the disabled for life. Proof enough 
of the devotion of the members of the regiment to our govern- 
ment and to its laws. 

Then let our actions and deeds show, when we return to our 
firesides, that we are the foremost in obeying the laws of the 
country we have been fighting to uphold; that in the proud con- 
sciousness of having done our duty full and ^\ell, we are deter- 
mined to keep and enhance the gootl name we have fairly won; 
that \ve are determined to let our future conduct ever be that of 
peaceful citizens in time of peace, as it has been that of true war- 
riors in time of war. GEORGE POMUTZ, 

Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding 15th Iowa. 

July 24th, the Regiment was mustered out of the service. 
" Of the thousand stalwart bayonets. 
Two hundred marched to-day; 
Hundreds lie in Southern soil. 
And hundreds in Northern clay; 
And other hundreds, less happy, drag 
Their shattered limbs around. 
And envv the deep, long, blessed sleep 
Of the Battle-field's holy ground." ^MiJes CReiUy. 



^ZO History of the Fifteenth Regiment 

Of the 1,113 original members of the R.egiment, as near as can 
be learned, there were only three (of the original) officers, and 207 
men at mnster out. Of the 854 veterans, in eighteen months ser- 
vice, there was 2 18 casualties. The regimental records were dcr 
livered to Robert M. Woods, Lieutenant 64th Illinois, and assistant 
commissary of ^Musters, of the 4th Division, 17th Corps, under 
whose direction they were forwarded to the chief mustering officer 
at Davenport, Iowa. 

That night in camp the boys will always remember, from dark 
until midnight; those camped on the hill rolled barrels, kegs and 
hard tack boxes down upon their comrades near the foot of the 
hill, who piled them up and soon there was a dozen bonfires burn- 
ing, amid great cheering from all on the crest of the hill, whenever 
a well aimed barrel or box knocked over a shebang; after tattoo, 
Companies A, F, C, H and G have bonfires and rows of lighted 
candles in inverted bayonets, in the ground along the front of their 
companies illuminating the camp, and guns were being fired 
throughout the regiment in honor of the close of the Regiment's 
service. After midnight we turned in for the last time in the 
field. July 25th, Revielle at 3 a. m. and raining hard; at 5 A. M. 
we start from our last camp, marching past brigade and division 
headquarters, and halt and front before those of the Army of the 
Tennessee, when General John A. Logan walks out in the drench- 
ing rain and delivers an eloquent address to the 15th, after which 
the march is resumed to the levee. We cross the Ohio river to 
New Albany, Ind.. and take cars at noon; arrive via. Michigan 
City at Chicago; late in afternoon of 27th, march to the Soldier's 
Rest, where companies of Chicago's pretty girls attend us at sup- 
per and gave us coffee (not such as your mother-in-law made, but 
similar to that you had brewed for years, which had to float forty 
rounds before being drank,) and quantities of other good things; 
the night passed seeing the citv and in barracks; at 3 p. m. on 28th 
we board cars, and via Joliet and Rock Island arrive at Da\enport, 



Iowa Veteran Volutiteer Infant ly. 



511 



Iowa, in the forenoon of 29th, where Judge Dillon delivered an 
address of welcome; then march out to Camp Kinsman, and soon 
a majority of the Regiment are boarding at various places in the 
city. Men of the 13th and 16th Iowa say that when we desire to 
be paid off we will have to send to town and escort a paymaster 
out. August 2d, no signs of being paid, therefore a detachment 
of 50 or 60 boys go down and call on the paymaster, who promises 
to come out next day sure. Augu<st 3d, at noon, the paymaster ar- 
rives, and at once active operations commence, but at 5 p. m. he 
announces he has not sufficient funds to pay the entire regiment; 
fertile in resources as ever, some of the boys suggest that he nego- 
tiate a loan of the unexpended funds another paymaster ma\' have, 
who, (haviag paid off the ith Iowa,) is approaching and is 
promptly halted, to enable our paymaster to comply with the 
above suggestion, after which the payment is continued, and also 
on the -tth and fifth of August, when the last of the 15th Iowa 
Veteran Infantry was discharged . 

LIST OF DIFFERENT POINTS AT WHICH THE REGIMENT 
HAS BEEN STATIONED. 



No 


• 
STATION 


Date of 
Arrival 


Date Of 








Departure 


1' Keokuk, Iowa, Rendezvous 






March 19, 


'63 


2: Benton Barracks, St. Louis, Mo. 


March 20. 


'62 


April 1, 


'63 


3; Pittsburg Landing, Tenn. 


April 6, 


•62 


25, 


'63 


4 Monteray, Tenn. 


May 5, 


■62 


May 9, 


'63 


5 Corintii, (south of) Miss. 


:!0, 


62 


June 27 


63 


6 Corinth, Miss. 


June 27. 


'62 


July 27, 


'62 


7' Bolivar, Tenn. 


July 31, 


•62 


Sep'mber 12, 


'63 


8 Corinth, Miss., east ol' 


Sep'mber 14, 


•62 


17, 


'63 


9 luka, Miss. 


19, 


'62 


October 1, 


'63 


10 Corinth, Miss., west ot 


October 2, 


'62 


" 5, 


'm 


11 Ripley, Miss. 


9, 


'63 


11, 


'63 


12 Corinth, southwest of 


13, 


'62 


Nov'mb'r 2, 


'63 


13' Grand Junction, Tenn. 


Novemb'r 7, 


'62 


27, 


'62 


14 Tallahatchie River, Miss. 


December 1, 


'62 


December 4, 


'62 


15 Abbeville. Miss. 


4. 


'62 


18, 


'62 


16 Yockena Station, Miss. 


19, 


'62 


20, 


63 


17 Holly Springs, Miss. 


23, 


'62 


:^0, 


63 


18 LaFayette, Tenn. 


" 31, 


'62 


Januarv 11, 


'63 


19 Memphis, Tenn. 


January 18, 


'63 


18, 


■63 


20 Duckport, La. 


■' " 24. 


'63 


f"""ebruarv 8, 


'63 


21 Lake Providence, La. 


February 9, 


'63 


Mdrch " 31, 


'63 


22 Lake Providence, north of 


March 2\ 


■63 


26, 


'63 


23 Lake Providence, south of 


26, 


'63 


April 21, 


■63 


24 Milliken's Bend, La. 


April 21, 


•63 


26, 


'63 


25 Holmes' Plantation, La. 


28. 


'63 


Mav 11, 


'63 


26 


Grand Gulf, Miss. 


Mav 13, 


'63 


20, 


'63 



51- 



History of the Fifteenth Regiment 



LIST OF UIFFERENT POINTS AT WHICH THE REGIMENT 
HAS BEEN STATIONED— CONTINUED. 




27 

28: 

291 
301 

311 

33 

34 

35 

36 

37 

38 

39 

40 

41 

42 

431 

44 

45 

46 

47 i 

48; 

49! 

501 

511 

521 

53! 

54 

55 

56 

57 

5s 

5!) 

(iO 

61 

62 

63 

64 

65 

66 

67 

68 

69 

70 



Haines' Bluff, northeast of 
Wanenton. Mi.-s, 
Mechanicsville, Miss. 
Haines' Bluff 
V'icksburg, rear ol 
Fox's Plantalioii 
Messengers Ferry 
Fox's Plantation 
Clinton. Miss. 
Bolton's Cross Roads, Miss. 
Bovina, Miss. 
Black River R. R. Bridge 
Vicksburg. north of 
Goodrich's Landing, La. 
Monroe, La 

Vicksburg, Miss, northeast of 
Vicksburg, south of 
Black River R. R. Bridge 
Vicksburg, south of 
Red Bone 

Vicksburg, south of 
Jackson, Miss. 
Meridian, Miss. 
Canton, Miss. 
Vicksburg, south of 
Keokuk, Iowa, Veteran Furlough 
Birds Point, Mo. 
Paducah, Kj . 
Clifton, Tenn. 
Pulaski, Tenn. 
Huntsville, Ala 
Decatur, .Via. 
Rome, Ga. 
Kingston, Ga. 
Acworlh, Ga. 
Big Shanty, Ga. 
Brushy Mountain, Ga. 
Kenesaw Mountain. 
jNickajack Creek, Ga 

.Turner's Ferry on Chattahooche River 
Marietta, Ga., souih 
|South of Roswell Fac'ory 
I Cross Keys, Ga. 
Before Atlanta, Ga., east 
' Before Atlanta, southwest 
Ezra Church, Ga. 
Before Atlanta, south-southwest 
Fairburn Stition, on Montgomery 
i; Near Jonesboro, Ga. 
I] Near Lovejov Station 
lEast Point,' Ga. 



June 

July 



20, 
21, 
29, 
3L 

4, 
27, 

2. 



March 

March 
May 



R. R. 



o, 

18, 

" 20, 

23, 

25, 

28. 
August 21, 

27, 
.Sep'mber 4, 

11, 
October 12, 

Dec'ber 24. 

26, 

February 5, 

18, 

" 26, 

4, 

23, 

1, 

2, 

6, 

19, 

23. 

26, 

June 5, 

6, 

<' 8, 

10, 

" 19, 

26, 

4, 

10, 

'• 16, 

17, 

18, 

20, 

27, 

29, 

August 3, 

28, 

31, 

Sepfmber 2, 

" 9, 



22. '63 
30, '63 

June 4, '63 

23, '63 
Julv 2, '63 

5, '63 
13, '63 

20, '63 
" 22, '63 

25, '63 

27, '63 

August 20, '63 

23, '63 

29, '63 

Sep'mber 11, '63 

October It, '63 

21, '63 
Dec'mb'r 24, '63 

'63 " 25, '63 

'63 February 2, '64 
'64| " " 7, .64 
'64; " 20, '64 

'64, March 1, '64 
'64' " 



'64April 
'64 Mav 
'64i "" 



July 



'64 " 

'64 " 

'64 " 

;64 " 

"64 June 

'64 " 

'64 " 

'64 " 

'64 " 

'64 Julv 

'64 "" 

'64 " 

'64 " 

'64 " 

'64 " 

'64 " 

'64 " 

'64lAugust 

'641 " 

'64 " 

'64 September 1, '64 

'64 '■ 5, '64 

'64 October 1, '64 



13, '64 
27, '64 
2, '64 
4, '64 
16, '64 
21, '64 

25, '64 
27, '64 

6, '64 

7, '64 

10, '64 

19, '64 

26, '64 
2, '64 

10, '64 

16, '64 

17, '64 

18, '64 

19, '64 
26, "64 

29, '64 
3, '64 

26, '64 

30, '64 



Iowa Veteratt Volunteer Infantry. 



513 



LIST OF DIFFERENT POINTS AT WHICH THE REGIMENT 
HAS BEEN STATIONED.— CONCLUDED. 



No 

TO 

79 

80 

81 

82 

83 

84 

85 

86 

87 

88 

89 

90 

91 

92 

93 

94 

95 

06 

97 

98 

99 

100 

101 

102 

103 

104 

105 

106 

107 

108 

109 

110 

111 

112 

113 

114 

115 

116 

117 

118 

119 

120 

121 

122 

123 

124 

125 

126 

127 

128 

129 



STATION 



.Fairburn Station, Ga. 

East Point, Ga. 

Near Mariette, Ga., south 

Powder Springs, Ga. 

Near Marietta, Ga., south 

Big Shanty, Ga. 

Near Kingston, Ga. (five miles south) 

Resacca, Ga. 

Near LaFayette, Ga. 

Gaylesville, Ala. 

Coosa River, Ga. 

Cave Springs 

Dallas, Ga. 

New Hope Church, Ga. 

Mariette, (north) Ga. 

Proctors Creek, Ga. 

Atlanta, (southeast) Ga. 

Toombsboro, Ga. 

Millen, Ga. 

Savannah, Jen. Ch'rl'ston &a