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Full text of "A history of the Fire department of Warren, Rhode Island / by Virginia Baker"

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^ History 
of the 

Fire Department 

of 
Warren 

Rhode Island 

Virginia Baker 




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1895 



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A History 

of the 

Fire Department 

of 
Warren 

Rhode Island 

By 
Virginia Baker. 

Author of 
The History of Warren in the War of 
the Revolution, Massasoit's Town, etc. 



9pi 



BOUNDFIELD PrESS 

Warren 
Rhode Island 

1912 



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Copyright, 191 2, 

by 
Virginia Baker. 



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SP. CCl. 



Autho?^'' s Note, 

'The data from which this history is compiled has been care- 
fully collected from authentic sources. From the Town and Town 
Council Records of Warren^ and from the Records of the various 
local Fire Companies liberal extracts have been made. Much 
additional matter has been gathered from old newspapers^ and 
many reminiscences contributed by citizens interested in the -work 
of the Fire Department. 

To all persons who have, in any way, assisted her the au- 
thor desires to express her gratitude. She also wishes to acknowl- 
edge courtesies extended to her by the Chief of the Freetown, 
Massachusetts, Fire Department and the Chief of Fire Alarms 
of Pawtucket, Rhode Island. Special thanks are due Foreman 
William B. Child of the Narragansett Company and Mr. Thomas 
C. Monahan Clerk of the Mechanics Company, of this town, to 
whom she is indebted for many favors. 

Warren^ Rhode Island, igi I . 



A HISTORY OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT 

OF 
WARREN, RHODE ISLAND. 



PRESUMABLY the questioH of protection from fire inter- 
ested the inhabitants of Warren prior to the date of the 
town's incorporation in 1746. However, we find no 
mention made of the subject on the town records until Jan- 
uary 21, 1797. Upon that date a town meeting was held 
at which a motion relating to the purchase of a fire engine 
was made, with the result that the electors passed the follow- 
ing vote: - 

"Voted that the Sum of three Hundred and Sixteen 
Dollars and Sixty Seven Cents Be Granted out of the 
Town Treasury for the purpose of Procuring a fire Enjoin 
for the Use of the Town. 

"Two hundred and forty Dollars of the Above Said Sum 
be Levied on the Poles and Estates in the Town of Warren 
and Collected & Paid into the Town Treasury at or before 
the first Day of May next Pole Tax to be in the Same pro- 
portion as the Last Town Tax. 

"The Above Vote Passed Unanimous. 

"Voted that a Committe of three Be appointed to Pro- 
cure a fire Enjoin for the Town's Use. John Croad Charles 
Wheaton and Samuel Child Be a Committe for the Above 
Purpose." 

Whether the tax levied on the " Poles and Estates" 
failed to furnish the required sum of money we have no 
means of ascertaining. But that the " Enjoine" was not 



2 A History of the Fire Department 

purchased seems evident. There is no record of any re- 
port submitted by the " Committe " if such a report was 
ever made. And no further allusion to fire occurs until 
four years later when at a town meeting, January 31, 1801, 
it was 

"Voted that the Representatives be Instructed to have 
an Act of the Genr' assembly Passed at their next Sessions 
Simmeler to that Respecting fires in the Towns of Newport 
& Providence. 

"Voted that James Maxwell Sylvester Child Ju'' John 
T. Child and Charles Wheaton Be A Committe to Report 
Such Regulations as are Nessesary in Case of fire and to Re- 
port thereon at the Next Annual Meeting." 

At a town meeting held May 4, 1801, further action in 
relation to fire was taken. It was voted that Charles Wheaton, 
John T. Child, John Haile, and James Maxwell should be a 
committee "to Draught an Act Respecting fires in the Com- 
pact Part of the Town and Lay the Same before the Town 
at their Next Meeting." It was also voted "that if any per- 
son Shall be Convicted of Smoking pipes or Segars in the 
Night time within the Compact part of the Town in the Pub- 
lick Streets Between Sun Set and Sunrise he Shall pay a fine 
of twenty five cents lor the first offence and tor the Second 
offence fifty Cents and for the third Seventy five Cents to be 
recovered by Action of Debt before any two Jus.tices for the 
use of the Town to be Commenced by the Town Treas- 
urer." 

Ingenious as this ordinance was, it appears to have proved 
wholly inadequate. Either because the citizens ignored it, or 
were careless with the "pipes and Segars" they were not for- 
bidden to smoke in their homes, or for some other good rea- 
son, the town found it necessary to take still further precau- 



of Warroi, Rhode Island J 

tionary action. The old question of the purchase of an en- 
gine was again brought up and discussed. The town had 
been growing ever since the close of the Revolution. The 
inhabitants were mainly engaged in maritime pursuits. 
There were ship -yards and sail-lofts, cooperages and ware- 
houses that needed protection. It was decided that a fire 
engine was a necessity and at a town meeting called for De- 
cember 26, 1 80 1, James Maxwell, John T. Child, and Wil- 
liam Carr were appointed a committee "to procurean Engoine 
with the Nessesary Apperatus the Said Committe to Draw 
on the Town Treasurer for a sum not exceeding five hun- 
dred Dollars." At the same meeting it was "Voted that the 
Town Treasurer be Directed to Hire Such Sum or Sums 
of Money as May be Necessary to Carry the aforesaid Pur- 
pose into effect." 

The committee went to work with commendable alac- 
rity and, early in the following year, the "Engoine" made its 
appearance in Warren. It was diminutive in size, but it 
bore the proud name of "Hero" and was considered a very 
fine specimen of the machine then in use. It is still in ex- 
istence, being regarded as the chief treasure of the present 
Narragansett Fire Company No. 3, and a description of it 
may not be amiss. 

The little machine measures, approximately, as follows:- 
Wheel-base 66 inches. Rear Track 34 inches. 

Width of Tires. 2 1-8 " Front Track 303-4 " 

Diameter of Rear Wheels 30 inches. 

Diameter of Front Wheels 26 " 

Length from Pivot to End of Side Bars. 86 inches. 

Height of Tank from Ground, 33 

r Width 27 " 

Dimensions ot Tank J Length 42 

Depth 22 1-2 



^ A Histo?'y of the Fire Department 

On account of the tank being round - cornered, the capacity 
is somewhat less than the above figures would seem to indi- 
cate. 

The wheels are fastened to wooden axles by lynch -pins. 
The tires, which are of iron in five sections, are held in place 
by large -headed, hand hammered iron nails. 

There are two end-bars crossing the side-bars. 

The two pumps have a diameter of 6 inches. The 
stroke is 7 inches. 

An extremely old, copper-riveted leather two-inch hose 
is reeled at the top of the machine. The bore at the deliv- 
ery of the nozzle is % of an inch. The goose-neck had, 
originally, a delivery for a 2-inch hose, but this has been 
changed to meet the requirements of the muster rules. It 
now has a delivery for a 2I/2 inch hose. 

On the cover of the odds and ends box, at the rear of 
the engine, is an oval brass plate bearing the inscription 

ISlo. gj 

E 

'Thayer 

Boston 

1802. 

This plate is apparently fastened on by only four cop- 
per nails but, in reality, a heavy bolt beneath it keeps it in 
place. At musters, the Warren firemen have been frequent- 
ly amused by the inefTectual efforts of souvenir hunters to 
dislodge it. 

The Hero is a "bucket machine," that is it has no 
suction hose. When in u^e at fires, it was filled by means 



of Warren, Rhode Island 



5 



of fire buckets passed from hand to hand along a Hne of 
men and boys. It did not take long for a "bucket brigade" 
to empty a well, and Warren's two rivers were frequently 
called upon to assist the tiny machine in the performance 
of its duty. 

The engine having been procured, the next step was 
the organization of a company to work it. At a town meet- 
ing held June 7, 1 802, the citizens elected twelve men to 
form this company, as follows :- 



Captain • , 

Lieutenant 



Charles Collins. 
John Pearce 



Coomer Haile. 
Amos Haile, Jun. 
Jonathan Luther. 
Nathaniel Sanders. 
Nathaniel Phillips. 
Allen Hoar. 
Ebenezer Luther, Jun. 
Seth Peck. 
William Carr. 
Preserved Alg^er. 



Engine Men. 



It would be interesting to know something about the 
the work done by this company. But, unfortunately, no 
company records were kept. All that is known of the en- 
gine men has been gathered from the town records which are 
pitifully meagre in respect to details. 

At a town meeting held April 20, 1803, the following 
persons were appointed: — 



6 



ci History of the Fire Department 



John Pearce. 
Coomer Haile. 
Jonathan Luther. 
Nathaniel Sanders. 
Allen Hoar. 
William M. Hubbert. 

[Hubbard.] 
Palmer Munroe. 
William Carr. 
Seth Peck. 
Amos Haile, Jun. 
Nathaniel Phillips, Jun. 
Ebenezer Luther, Jun. 



Fire Wards. 



On December 5, 1803, '^ ^"^^ voted in town meeting 
"that the Town Treasurer be Directed to Purchase Six 
Trumpets for the use of the fire Wards and Cause the 
Same to be properly Painted at the Expence of the Town." 

By the spring of 1804 ^^e town Fire Department was 
well organized. At a town meeting, on May 7 of that year, 
the following; were elected :- 



James Maxwell. 
William Barton. 
John Haile. 
Charles Collins. 
Level Maxwell. 



Presidents of Fire Wards 



Fire Wards. 



"Injoin Men" 
Ebenezer Luther,Jr. 
Nathaniel Sanders. 
Coomer Haile. 



of Warren, Rhode Island J 

Palmer Munroe. 
Benjamin Haile. 
John Pearce. 
Jonathan Luther. 
Amos Haile. 
Samuel Hoar. 
Nathaniel Phillips, Jun. 
Thomas Baker. 
Gardner Willard. 

A month later, at a town meeting held on June 4, it 
was voted "that Ebenezer Luther Jun. Be Impowered to 
Procure two fire Hooks with the Nessesary Apparatus there- 
for and Lay his Account thereof Before the Town as Soon 
as May be". 

At a town meeting called for June 2, 1 806, the question 
of a proper shelter for the engine was brought up. It is 
probable that, at that date, the Hero had been housed in 
some conveniently located barn or store-house. The Cit- 
izens promptly voted, 

"That a Building Be Erected on the Town Lott for the 
Purpose of Covering sd. Injoin with Nessasary Apparatus 
And the Herce Belonging to the Town and that Mr. James 
Maxwell & Ebenezer Luther Jr. Be Authorized to Procure 
it Built and Lay an Account of the Same before the Town 
as Soon as Said Building is Compleated and that the Said 
James & Ebenezer Draw on the Treasury for the Amount 
of sd. Building." 

The "Town Lott" was what we know, to-day, as the 
"Common", It was purchased by the town of Martin Lu- 
ther in 1800, the price paid being I500. The engine-house 
was erected upon the north-east corner of the lot and re- 



8 A History of the Fh^e Department 

mained standing within the memory of many persons now 
living. 

It was a long, narrow building, running north and south, 
with one door opening on Church Street, and another facing 
west and opening upon the Common. A partition divided 
it into two apartments. The Hero was kept in the north 
end, while the south end was occupied by the hearse. 

On June i, 1807, the electors assembled in town meet- 
inor voted that the Town Treasurer should be instructed to 
"Procure two fire Ladders at the Expence of the Town." 

On May 7, 18 10, it was voted "that the Town Clerk 
notify the Fire Wards of their Appointment and deliver to 
each his Badge, (i.e. a Trumpet.)" 

At a town meeting called for September 14, 181 1, 
The Fire Department received more than the ordinary de- 
gree of notice. The following votes were passed:- 

" Voted that two large Fire Hooks and four Small Fire 
Hooks be procured at the expence of the tov/n. 

"Voted that Four Axes and four Laders be procured 
at the expence of the town. 

"Voted that the roof of the Engine House be contin- 
ued southerly far enough to receive the Fire Hooks and 
Laders: the roof at the south end and northly to rest on 
Locust Posts. 

"Voted that John Stockford, Benjamin Cole, and Jo- 
seph Adams be a Committe to procure such things and make 
such preparations to stop the progress of Fires as the town 
shall direct. 

"Voted that the abovesaid Committe be authorized to 
sell the stone on the town lot belonging to the town. 

"Voted that Twelve Buckets to be kept in the engine 
house be purchased at the expence of the town. 



of Warren^ Rhode Island g 

"Voted that the Fire Wards ascertain the number of 
Fire buckets in the town & to report the owners of houses 
destitute of Fire Buckets to the Town Council at their first 
meeting after Ninety days from date hereof and the council 
are requested to report delinquents to the proper ofticer for 
prosecution, 

"Voted that this vote together with the first Section of 
the Law of the state respecting fires in the towns of Warren 
& Bristol be published in the newspaper, for the information 
of the inhabitants of this town. 

"Voted that the above committe Call on the Town 
Treasurer for a sum of money not exceeding one Hundred & 
Fifty Dollars to defray the expences of the above prepara- 
tions which have been ordered by the town to be made by 
sd. Committe," 

In town meeting, May 4, 1812, the following motion 
was made and carried :- 

"Voted that Benjamin Cole John Stockford and Joseph 
Adams, the Committee appointed by the town to procure 
fire hooks, build an addition to the Engine house &c, be 
authorized to paint said Engine house and the fire Laders 
and present their Bill for the same at the next Town Meet- 
ing for allowance." 

The question of buckets again came up at the next 
town meeting held June 11, 18 12. Whether there was a 
scarcity of these, which were all n^^ade by hand, or whether 
their price was high, or whether the citizens were careless 
and negligent, there is no way of ascertaining, but, for some 
reason, the houses were not properly supplied with these 
very necessary articles. In order to remedv this evil the 
following vote v/as passed :- 

"Voted that the time allowed to the citizens of this 



10 A History of the Fire Department 

town to procure fire Buckets be prolonged three months 
from date hereof, and that the town Council be directed to 
make out a list of delinquents and post up sd list in three 
Publick places in said town and that each delinquent be au- 
thorized to erace his name from sd list as soon as he shall 
have procured his Buckets." 

It is fair to presume that the above vote was product- 
ive of good results, for several years elapsed before buckets 
again became a disturbing element in the town. Doubtless 
the delinquents vied with one another in hastening to secure 
the right to "erace" their names from the lists conspicuously 
posted up in "three Publick places." Some of the buckets 
purchased by them, and inscribed with the date 1812, are 
still in existance. 

But a lack of buckets was not the only difficulty that 
the Fire Department had to contend with. In town meet- 
ing, May 5, 1 8 1 8, it was voted :- 

"That every Man belonging to the Engine shall be 
Fined one dollar for every absence at the regular Meetings 
of the Engine Company and that the Money arising from 
said Fines be appropriated to the repairs of said engine and 
that the Surplus if any shall be divided among the Engine 
Men as a Compensation for their Services." 

One cannot help regretting that there remains no re- 
cord to show the workings of this act. It had one good 
point. If a man was compelled to pay fines he had a chance 
of receiving a portion of his monev back again — provided, 
always, that the expense of the Hero's repairs did not ex- 
haust the treasury. 

As time passed on and the town increased in popula- 
ton, a single small engine was found inadequate as a means 
of protection from fire. Therefore at a town meeting, held 



of Warrefi, Rhode Islci/id II 

August 31, 1824, William Carr, Freeborn Sisson, Joseph 
Smith Jr., Paschal Allen, and John T. Croade were appoint- 
ed a committee to "ascertain the probable expence of a good 
and sufficient Fire Engine for the use of the town." 

This committee reported the results of their investiga- 
tions at the anuual town meeting, April 20, 1825. They 
stated that "an Engine of the first rate" could be procured 
in Boston for five hundred dollars. Whereupon the elect- 
ors immediately voted, without opposition, that "a Fire En- 
gine be procured," the expense thereof to be paid out of the 
town treasury. Messrs. Carr, Sisson, Smith, Croade and 
Allen were given power to make the purchase. 

The engine selected by these gentlemen was somewhat 
larger than the Hero, but resembled it in appearance. It 
was named the "Rough and Ready," but upon the town 
records is generally alluded to as "Engine No. 2", while the 
Hero is designated "Engine No. i." 

On September 10, 1825, the Collector of Taxes was 
authorized to pay the sum of six hundred amd fifty dollars 
to Freeborn Sisson, one of the engine committe, and to take 
a receipt tor the same, said receipt to be "received bv the 
town Treasurer of said collector as cash." 

Upon this same date thirteen engine men were appoint- 
ed to take charge ot the Rough and Ready. Their names 
follow: — 

John Trott. Morris Child. 

Allen Hoar. John Salisburv. 

Stephen Johnson. James E. Bowen. 

Willam Baker. Wm. B. Child. 

Henry W. Child. Joseph Burt. 

Thomas Emery. John Luther. 

John Stockford. 






^^ 



S^^ 



.^ 



12 A History of the Fire IDepartment 

It was voted, also, that an engine house should be 
erected on the lot belonging to Freeborn Sisson on Water 
Street, Mr, Sisson offering the use of his land rent free. 
The site of the engine house is, at present, occupied by the 
block owned bv Mrs. Quirk, and standing between Com- 
pany and Sisson Streets. 

John Stockford was appointed a committee to super- 
intend the construction ot the building, with authority to 
draw on the town treasury for the money necessary to de- 
fray the expenses thereof. He was also empowered to pro- 
cure twelve fire buckets for the new engine. On September 
17, the Town Treasurer was directed to purchase a good and 
sufficient hose for each of the engines. 

At a town meeting held August 28, 1827, an "Act to 
Regulate the Fire Engine companies in the town of War- 
ren" was passed. This act was divided into the following 
sections: — 

"Section i. Be it enacted by the freemien of the town 
of Warren in town meeting legally assembled on the 28th 
day of August A.D. 1827 and by the authority thereof it is 
enacted, that each of the fire Engine Companies in said Town 
shall on the first Saturdav of May, Annually elect a captain, 
lieutenant, Clerk and such other officers as they may deem 
necessary. 

"Section 2. And be it further enacted, that it shall be 
the duty of the captain at all times to preserve order, in the 
company, to preside in the meetings to direct the movements 
of the Engines and of the Company whenever called out, 
and to call special meetings of the company whenever occa- 
sion shall require, and o;enerallv to superintend the affairs of 
the company and to see that the Engine is put in order for 
ser\'ice. 



of Warren^ Rhode hid fid ij 

"Section 3. And be it further enacted that the lieuten- 
ant shall aid the capt. in the performance of his duty, and 
in case of the absence or inability of the Captain shall exer- 
cise all the authority vested in the office of Captain. 

"Section 4. And be it further enacted that the Clerk 
shall keep a fair record of all the proceedings of the com- 
pany, call the roll at the meetings and keep an account of all 
fines collected and shall also keep a record of all fires that 
shall happen & of any remarkable circumstances attending 
the same. 

"Section 5. And be it further enacted that said Fire 
Engine companies shall meet on the last Saturday of every 
month At such hour as the commanding officer shall appoint 
& at such other times as said commanding officer shall di- 
rect for the purpose of working the Engines when necessary. 

"Section 6. And be it further enacted that all meet- 
ings of said companies shall be convened by a warrant from 
the commanding officer of the Company to the clerk one 
day previous to the meetings and the Clerk shall notify the 
members of the company of the time and place of meeting 
on the day thereof, either by personal notice, or by leaving 
a printed or written notice at their usual place of abode. 
And if any command" ng officer or clerk of s:iid companies 
shall neglect his duty prescribed by this section he shall pay 
a fine of one Dollar unless he shall be excused by a vote of 
a majority of his company at their next meeting. 

"Section 7. And be it further enacted that at all meet- 
ings Oi said company, the roll shall be called at the time 
appointed lor the meeting and also immediately preceedinc; 
the adjournment thereof' and at each call of the roll, every 
member who may be absent, shall pay a fine of tv/enty-five 
cents, unless he shall be excused by the vote of the majority 



Izf A History of the Fire Depart nieiit 

of the company at the next meeting. 

"Section 8. And be it further enacted that the mem- 
bers of said companies, shaii be subject to the orders and di- 
rections of the commanding Officers thereof And any 
member of said companies who at any meeting thereof, or at 
a fire, shall neglect or reiuse to obey the orders of his com- 
manding officer shall for every offence pay a fine of five 
Dollars. 

"Section 9. And be it farther enacted that at the cry 
or alarm of fire, each member shall repair as spedily as pos- 
sible to the Engine house, and if the Engine is not there he 
shall endeavor to find her, and shall perform his duty faith- 
fully under the order of the commanding Officer, and any 
member of said company who shall absent himseH from any 
fire, at which his company shall attend shall pay a fine of 
five Dollars, unless he shall be excused by a vote of a ma- 
jority of the company at the next meeting and at the alarm 
of fire, and housinor the Engine the roll shall be called and 
every member then absent shall pay a fine of fifty Cents 
unless he shall be excused in the manner aforesaid. 

"Section 10. Be it further enacted that the command- 
ing officer of said companies shall have power to call on any 
ot the members of said companies at the intervals between 
company meetings, to assist them in any thing relating to 
the Engines. And any member who shall neglect or refuse 
to comply with their request shall pay a fine of twenty-five 
cents. 

"Section i i. And be it further enacted, tliat the clerks 
of said fire Engine Companies, shall collect and account tor 
all fines which shall be incurred by the members of said 
companies under this act, and whenever any member of said 
company, except the clerk thereof, shall refuse or neglect to 



of WiwreUy Rhode Island 75 

pay any fine, by him incurred, the Clerk of the company to 
which said member may belong shall sue for such fine be- 
fore any to justices of the Peace of the town of Warren 
agreeably to the provisions of an act of the General Assembly, 
entitled an Act for enforcing the several town acts relating 
to fire Engines. And when any Clerk of said companies 
shall refuse or neglect to pay any fine by him incurred, or 
shall refuse or neglect to pay over any fines by him collect- 
ed, agreeable to the directions of his company, the command- 
ing officer of said company shall sue for the same agreeable 
to the provisions of the act aforesaid. 

"Section 12. And be it further enacted that all fines 
which shall be collected under this act shall be appropriated 
in such manner as said companies may respectively direct." 

It will be noted that the eleventh section of the above 
act provided for the keeping of records by the various com- 
panies. Probably records were kept but, so far as known, 
none are in existence at the present date. Tradition says 
that both the little "tubs" did excellent service. Unfortu- 
nately the old-time newspapers devoted but little space to 
local events, thougli their columns were filleci with items re- 
-lating to European happenings. The ubiquitous "local 
reporter" was a product of the closing years of the nine- 
teenth ceritury. He was quite unknown, to our great e;rand- 
fathers. 

At a town meeting held April 1 6, i 834, action was taken 
in regard to a Hook and Ladder Com.pany. The electors 
voted "that there be a Fire Hook and Ladder Company 
formed & organized to consist often men, whose business it 
shall be to keep the Fire Hooks and Ladders in good order 
& repair with them immediately to a fire whenever the alarm 
be given, and take charge of them after the fire is over." 



1 6 A History of the Fire Depart/netit 

The men chosen for the new company were 

Wm. H. Turner. Nathan Luther. 

Samuel Pearce. John Luther. 

Henry Baily. Wm. B. Snell. 

Caleb Carr Jr. Daniel B. Wheaton. 

Benj. M. Bosworth. Henry Sanders. 

At this same meeting the bucket question was again 
agitated. John T. Child and William Carr were appointed 
a committee to visit "every dwelling in this town West of 
Little Bridge and ascertain & report to the town Council 
what dwelling houses are destitute of two good and lawful 
Fire Buckets" On May 5, 1834, they reported to the 
Council that more than one hundred houses were in want 
of buckets. The Council immediately ordered the Town 
Sergeant to notify the owners of the houses designated in 
the report that they must furnish themselves with two good 
leather buckets for their respective dwellings within three 
calendar months from date of notice. 

In May 1834, the Council appointed John T. Child a 
committee to procure a good and sufficient hose for engine 
No. 2 and a lantern for the same. Mr. Child was also di- 
rected to "cause such parts of the engine to be painted as 
in his opinion would preserve it from decay. 

In 1835, ^^^ freemen voted that the south end of 
Engine House No. i should be altered and repaired in 
order to afford better protection to the town hearse. 

John Salisbury and John T. Child were made a com- 
mittee to ascertain the condition of the fire hooks and lad- 
ders, and to put them in order if found in need of repairs. 

At a town meeting held August 30, 1836, it was voted 



of Warren, Rhode Island ij 

to allow the clerks of the engine companies two dollars per 
annum, each, for their services. It was also voted that the 
fines collected by the companies should be paid into the 
town treasury. 

In town meeting April, 1838, the fire hooks and lad- 
ders were placed in the care of the Fire Wards. The fol- 
lowing resolution was passed: — 

"Resolved that it any person is hereafter detected in 
injuring, removing, using, or in any way meddling with 
either of the fire Engines, Hooks, Ladders, Buckets, or 
any apparatus belonging to the fire Department of this 
town, except under the direction ot one of the Fire Wards 
or in the presence of one Engine man, he or they giving 
consent to the same, shall on conviction thereof, be fined 
not exceeding five Dollars nor less than one Dollar." 

In 1 840, the Presidents of the Fire Wards were author- 
ized by the town to put the engines in complete order, and 
to procure additional hose and other needed apparatus. 
They were also requested to "keep all the fire apperatus in 
good order." The task assigned them apparently proved 
not an easy one for, three years later, they laid a petition be- 
fore the electors representing that the fire hooks and ladders 
were liable to become decayed owing to there being no con- 
venient place for their safe keeping. They prayed the town 
to extend the engine house on the common so as to afford 
better accomodation for the apparatus. Their petition was 
promptly granted. 

Nothing appears on the records to indicate the meth- 
ods employed in giving an alarm of fire in the early days. 
It is probable that the ancient bell in the Baptist Church 
tower generally clanged out the warning in the good old 
way so graphically described by Poe in his poem, "The Bells." 



1 8 A History of the Fire Department 

There was something picturesque about the manner in which 

night alarms were sent into the settled part of the town from 

the outskirts. 

In 1844, a barn on the Butterworth farm was burned. 

At midnight a horseman, armed with a large old-fashioned 

dinner bell, dashed through the streets like a resurrected 

Paul Revere. 

"Ding-dong! Ding-dong! Butterworth's barn is afire! 
"Ding-dong! Ding-dong! Butterworth's barn is afire!" 
At the weird sound windows flew open and night-capped 

heads were thrust far over the sills. But, before questions 

could be asked, the rider had vanished. 

"A hurry of hoofs in a village street, 
A shape in the moonlight, a bulk in the dark. 
And beneath, from the pebbles, in passing, a spark 
Struck out by a steed flying fearless and fleet: 
That was all ! " 

And it is more than probable that the fire demon had 
finished his work ere the Hero and the Rough and Ready 
were run out of their houses. 

At a town meeting called November 22, 1845, ^^^ ^" 
lectors were asked to appropriate a sum of money for the 
purchase of a third engine. Twenty years had now elapsed 
since the acquisition of Engine No. 2, while the Hero had 
been in service for forty-three years. It was the general 
feeling that a large, up-to-date machine was required for the 
safety of the town, and it was voted "that a sum not exceed- 
ing fifteen hundred dollars be appropriated for the purpose 
of purchasing a Fire Engine and that James Coffin, Haile 
Collins, and Henry H. Luther be a Committee to purchase 
the same with power to draw on the town Treasurer for the 



of Warren^ Rhode Island ig 

amount necessary to purchase the same." 

The engine selected by the above committee was, in 
every respect, a first class machine. It is at present owned 
by the town of Freetown, Massachusetts, and is in excellent 
condition. The body is of cherry, varnished, and the wheels 
are painted. The brakes are about 1 8 feet long, giving 
room for about ten men on each side. The engine bears 
the inscription "L. Button & Co. Builders Waterford N.Y." 

In town meeting April 4, 1846, the committee were 
authorized to procure a house for the engine, and Edmund 
Cole and William B. Snell were appointed to organize a new 
Fire Company, 

On Tuesday evening, April 7, a number of leading cit- 
izens assembled at the hall in Cole's Hotel. William B. 
Snell presided as Chairman, and George W. Carr officiated 
as Secretary of the meeting. Engine Company No. 3 was 
organized and officers elected as follows: — 

First Captain William B. Snell. 

Second Captain .... Thomas G. Turner. 

Secretary George W. Carr. 

Treasurer Joseph B. Child. 

William H. Driscol, George W. Carr, and William B. 
Snell were appointed to draft a set of By-Laws. 

On April 9, the Town of Warren purchased of Ed- 
mund Cole, for 1 400, a lot on Baker Street and, almost 
immediately, steps were taken for the erection of an engine 
house thereon. In the deed the lot is described as bound- 
ed northerly by Baker Street, easterly by land belonging to 
Henry Sanders, southerly by land of Elias Magoun, wester- 
ly by land of Charles Collins. 

On April 11, the new Company met for the purpose 



20 A History of the Fire Department 

of giving the engine a trial. The breaking of one of the 
pumps, however, frustrated their purpose. 

On the 20th inst. they again met and elected these ad- 
ditional officers: — 

Hose Director, ..... William H. Driscol. 

First Engineer, Edmund Cole, 

Second Engineer, .... James B. Barrus. 

Leading Hose Men.* 
John Frieze. John H. Chace. 

Henry A. Bowen. Charles Collins. 

Suction Hose Men. 
Wm. H. Thurber. Allen Drown. 

Chas. H. Collamore. Sam'l Drown. 

The Committee on By-Laws made their report which 
was accepted and the articles from i to 19 were adopted. 

William B. Snell, William H. Driscol, and George W. 
Carr were appointed a committee to obtain an Act of In- 
corporation for the Company which, it was decided, should 
be known as the " Narragansett Engine Company, No. 3." 
It was voted that the engine should be temporarily housed 
in a building located on Sisson Street. 

On April 22, a second trial of the engine was made 
under the direction of the builder, Mr. Button. Again a 
pump was broken. Two days later the machine was once 
more worked and once more it broke down. 

Better luck attended the Company's next attempt. For 
two hours the men labored strenuously and succeeded in 

5!> Samuel Pearcc and John Drown were added at a later date. 



of Wan-en^ Rhode Island 21 

throwing a stream over the "vain" of the Methodist Church, 
a distance of over 140 feet. 

Several other trials followed. Twice again a pump 
was broken. Mr. Button then made certain alterations in 
the machine and, on September 3, it was worked in a man- 
ner "perfectly satisfactory" to the company. On September 
I 2, the cry of fire caused it to be hastily taken out, but the 
alarm proving a false one it was as quickly housed again. 

The first fire at which the engine did actual service 
occurred at 10 a.m., February 6, 1847, when a barn situated 
on the premises of Jonathan Luther on Miller Street was 
lound to be afire. Although the building and its contents, 
hay, were destroyed the old records state that "by the 
promptness of the fire Companies and citizens generally," 
the flames were "got under." The engine was absent from 
the house an hour and a half. 

The first annual meeting of the Narragansett Company 
was held April 6, 1 847. Two Torch Bearers, William A. 
Remington and James L. Mason, were elected in addition 
to the other officers. 

It was voted to impose a fine of twelve and a half cents 
on members found guilty of spitting on the floor of the 
Engine House. 

The troublesome bucket question now again came to 
the fore. In town meeting, April 7, 1847, complaint was 
made that many houses in town were destitute of buckets. 
Earlier in the year, the Town Council had ordered that the 
law regarding them should be published three times in the 
"Northern Star", in order that the citizens might be "re- 
minded of their duty." Charles Randall and Suchet 
Mauran, the committee appointed to ascertain how many 
dwellings in the compact part of the town were equipped 



22 A Histojy of the Fire Department 

with the number required by the law, had found some houses 
with only one, while others had none at all. The neglect- 
ful householders were promptly fined two dollars each, but, 
in a few cases, the fines were remitted as the delinquents 
came before the Council and stated that they found it wholly 
impossible to procure any buckets. It seems a little strange 
that some enterprising person, in view of these periodical 
bucket flurries, did not undertake to keep the market sup- 
plied. 

In town meeting April lo, 1847, ^^ was resolved "That 
the Town Treasurer be appointed to take charge of the lot 
on which the Engine house for Engine No. 3 stands and 
let this lot for a garden if thought Expedient." 

At a meeting of the Narragansett Company, held Au- 
gust 9, 1847, ^^ w^^ decided to invite the Rhode Island Fire 
Company No. i of Pawtucket, to visit Warren for the pur- 
pose of a trial of the two Companies' engines, the trial to 
be followed by a clambake. On motion of Martin L. Sal- 
isbury it was voted that the Narragansetts should "come out 
dressed with as much uniformity as possible" on the occa- 
sion. Friday, August 13, v/as set as the date of the contest. 

Accordingly, at ten o'clock in the morning ot that day 
the "Threes" assembled at their Engine House. The Hose 
Men were clad in red shirts and white duck pants, while 
the remaining men were arrayed in white shirts and dark 
pants. All wore glazed caps, and each man's shirt displayed 
a large figure "3" on the breast. The company formed and 
proceeded to one of the wharv^es where they welcomed the 
visiting company which had arrived by boat. 

A large crowd, among whom were prominent citizens 
of Providence, Pawtucket, and Bristol had gathered eager to 
catch a glimpse of the Pawtucket engine. This machine, 



of Warren^ Rhode Island 2 J 

popularly known as the "Hay Cart" or "Rhode Island 
No. I," was a "double deck" engine, built in Philadelphia, 
but rebuilt by William JefFers of Pawtucket, the designer 
of the "Gaspee" of Providence and the "Nameague" now 
owned by the Watchemoket Company. The work-shop in 
which the "Hay Cart" was remodeled was located on the 
site now occupied by the Spencer Block at the corner of 
Main and North Main Streets, Pawtucket. Mr. Jeffers, 
later, removed his shop to a building at the foot of Timothy 
Street. A portion of this building is still standing, and is 
utilized as a store-house and stock room by the Pawtucket 
Electric Company. 

As the Warren engine and the "Hay Cart" stood side 
by side, the spectators felt little doubt regarding the result 
of the contest. On every side was heard the prophecy, "The 
'Hay Cart' will surely win! That little Button can't com- 
pete with her!" 

After a street parade, the two machines were stationed 
on "the Widow Dorcas Child's Wharf" at the foot of State 
Street, the hose being laid along State Street to Main. The 
big "Hay Cart" threw a stream high above the sign posts 
of Cole's Hotel, and Warren faces grew sad. It seemed 
impossible that the Button could hope to even equal, much 
less surpass, the great Pawtucket beauty. But the men at 
the pumps of the Button looked into each other's eyes and 
set their teeth doggedly. High above the highest point 
attained by the "Hay Cart" sped the stream from the But- 
ton's hose nozzle. The people stared silently — then cheer 
after cheer rent the air. 

The Pawtucket men bore their defeat good naturedly. 
The two Companies, and a number of invited guests, pres- 
ently adjourned to a tent where a genuine old-fashioned 



24 A History of the Fire Department 

clambake was served with true Warren hospitality. This 
tent, like the little Button machine, was a wonder. It was 
the property of the Warren Artillery, made for them by the 
veteran sail -maker Henry W. Gladding. It was a huge af- 
fair, the largest tent owned by any military company in the 
state, and the visitors surveyed it with rriuch interest. 

At the close of the repast a short period was devoted 
to music, and then the Narragansetts escorted the Pawtuck- 
ets to the wharf where, at six p. m., the latter embarked in 
the steamboat "Perry", leaving their hosts with the feeling 
that the day had, indeed, been a red letter one for Warren. 

A few days later the engine was again taken to the 
wharf and, as the records tell us, succeeded in supplying en- 
gines I and 2 with water at the same time. 

In the spring of 1848 the town appointed Suchet 
Mauran, Thomas G. Turner, and William H. Driscol a 
committee to "sink two Wells or reservoirs of water" for 
use of the Fire Department. After considerable discussion 
as to the proper location of these, one reservoir was placed 
in front of the Baptist Church, and the other at the corner 
of Broad and Main Streets. 

The death of Mr. Freeborn Sisson necessitated the 
removal of Engine House No. 2, and John T. Child was 
appointed, August 28, to look up a new location for the 
building at some point north of Miller Street. On Septem- 
ber 21, Mr. Child reported that a desirable lot of land, 
north of the residence of Allen C. Hoar, could be leased 
for a term of ten years at a rental of twelve dollars per an- 
num. He was given power to make "further inquiry" re- 
garding other sites. 

From the summer of 1848 to the fall of 1849 Warren 
suffered from a series of incendiarv fires. Houses, barns, 



of Warren^ Rhode Island 2^ 

stores and wood-sheds were fired by some unknown hand. 
Large quantities of hay were consumed. On April 23, 1 849, 
the barn of James Smith, on Jefferson Street, and the near- 
by barn of Job Smith were both burned to the ground. On 
September 26, two buildings on the premises of Hoar & 
Martin, lumber dealers, were destroyed with all their con- 
tents. On October 12, the barn belonging to Cole's Hotel 
was laid in ashes. 

1 he Cole's Hotel barn deserves more than a passing 
allusion. It occupied a site near the present south-west 
corner of Main and Joyce Streets, and a little to the rear of 
the Odd Fellows Building. It was a large structure, con- 
taining stalls for forty horses. A long shed ran across what 
is now Joyce Street and connected with the hotel opposite 
the barn. In olden times three stage coaches were often 
seen standing side by side in this building. 

When menageries visited Warren the animals were 
accomodated in the shed. Here elephants trumpeted and 
camels kneeled. Here lions roared and girafi^es stretched 
I heir necks. Here Polar bears panted, while their attendants 
showered them with buckets of cold water from the hotel 
well to keep them alive. 

The town offered a reward of two hundred dollars for 
the apprehension of the incendiary and appointed a special 
night "watch" to look out for fires, but it does not appear 
that the mysterious fire fiend was ever discovered. 

The question of a suitable uniform agitated the Narra- 
gansett Company during the years 1849 ^^'^ 1850. Votes 
relating to it were passed, and rescinded, and amended, and it 
seemed impossible to please everybody. In October, 1848, 
it was decided that the uniform should consist of "a Blue 
Hat, Red Jacket, Shirt of Blue Blk., and Duffell Pants." 



26 A History of the Fire Department 

A year later the blue hats were rejected and it was decided 
that red caps were the proper headgear for firemen. A few 
days later, some one suggested that hats like those worn by 
the Newport "Fives" were far more suitable, and the uni- 
form committe were directed to procure them. But noth- 
ing appears to have been done by these gentlemen, and 
May 17, 1850J the company instructed the committee to 
"have the New Hats painted according to their own taste." 
Whether, in the end, any hats at all were purchased the re- 
cords do not show. 

In June, 1850, the "Threes" appointed a committee to 
solicit the citizens for subscriptions for the benefit of the 
company. The Hose Director was authorized to purchase 
tool boxes for the hose carraige, etc., and the Foreman was 
instructed to request the Fire Wards to supply four more 
brass torches. 

On July 31, 1850, the Narragansetts entertained the 
Union Fire Company No. 3 of Providence. Preceded by 
a drummer and fifer they marched to the steamboat "Argo's" 
wharf where they received their guests. From the wharf 
they escorted them through the principal streets to Cole's 
Hotel, where a bountiful collation was served, thence to 
Armory Hall where the visitors remained over night. On 
the following morning the Narragansetts escorted the Prov- 
idence men to the wharf at which the Argo lay in waiting. 
After "having exchanged salutations," the Union Threes 
embarked and were carried to Rocky Point where they en- 
joyed one of Captain William Winslow's clambakes at the 
expense of the Warren Company, and, some hours later re- 
turned to Providence well pleased, let us hope, with their 
outing. 

In town meeting, April 16, 1851, ninety dollars were 



of JVarreriy Rhode Island 2 J 

appropriated for the purchase of a new hose carriage for 
engine No. 3, the Engine Company having made a state- 
ment before the meeting to the effect that the carriage then 
in use by them was "very inconvenient and altogether too 
heavy." 

At this same meeting John R. Hoar, John C. Hoar, 
and WilHam ColHns were appointed a committee to consid- 
er the expediency of building houses tor engines No. i and 
No. 2. They reported, on May 17, that they recommend- 
ed the erection of a house for No. i, to be 28 feet long, 16 
feet wide, and one story high. For No. 2 they recom- 
mended a structure 3 i feet long, 1 8 feet wide, and two sto- 
ries high. 

William Collins, John R. Hoar, and Francis Marble 
were authorized to construct the house for engine No. i 
at a cost of two hundred and fifty dollars, with permission 
to locate it wherever they should "consider it expedient." 
The site they selected was a lot on the east side of South 
Water Street, a little to the South of Washington Street. 
Many years afterward, the building was removed to Baker 
Street where it now stands. It bears the inscription 

He?'o 

Fife Company. No. i. 

1802. 

At the above mentioned May town meeting it was 
voted that in the future, at the annual town meeting in April, 
the Presidents of Fire Wards should make written reports of 
the state of the engines, hooks and ladders, and other fire 
apparatus; should return lists of the men attached to the 
Engine and Fire Hook and Ladder Companies; and should 
offer suggestions in regard to "the better and more effect- 



28 A History of the Fire T)epartnient 

ive organization of the department." In this vote we may 
clearly trace the origin of the annual report of the Chief 
Engineer of the Fire Department. 

On September 8, 1851, the Narragansett Company 
voted to invite the Aquidneck Hose Company No. i of 
Newport to visit Warren. It was also voted to extend an 
invitation to Engine Companies i and 2, the Hook and 
Ladder Company, and the Fire Department, generally, to 
assist "in the reception of the Company and in paying the 
Bills." What response was made to the last mentioned 
vote the records do not show. 

The Aquidnecks accepted the invitation and, on the 
afternoon of September 18, came up to Warren via Bristol 
Ferry. The Narragansetts met them at a quarter to five at 
the boundary line separating Warren and Bristol. After a 
short street parade the visitors were escorted to Cole's EIo- 
tel, where the Narragansetts were dismissed. At half past 
seven they reassembled, and both Companies took part in a 
grand torch-light procession, parading throvigh nearly all the 
principal streets of the town. Alter the parade, refresh- 
ments were served in Marble's Hall on Water Street, and, 
at ten o'clock, the guests were escorted to the Armory where 
they passed the night. They returned to Newport on the 
following morning. 

"Marble's Hall" was located in the upper story of the 
stone building now occupied by Potter and Collamore as a 
machine shop. Francis Marble used the lower story for a 
blacksmith shop, and many people ..ow living doubtless re- 
call the large figure of Vulcan, its upraised hand grasping a 
hammer, which ornamented the front of the edifice. The 
figure was an object of awe and admiration to the boys 
and girls of Warren half a century ago. 



of Warren, Rhode Island 2g 

An unknown incendiary again began making havoc in 
Warren during the latter part of 1850, and he continued 
his dastardly work through a period of more than two years. 
On March i, 1852, the store of Aaron S. Tilly, on Miller 
Street, was destroyed with a good sized stock of hats, caps 
and shoes. Two nearby dwelling houses were also con- 
sumed. Mr. Tilly was the Treasurer of the Narragansett 
Company and his records were lost in the conflagration. 
But he reported to the Company that, to the best of his rec- 
ollection, they showed a balance of $37.62 in the treasury. 

The necessity of procuring a larger and more modern 
engine for the No. 2 Company now became very apparent 
and, in town meeting, April 21, 1852, the sum of $2,500 
was appropriated for the purchase of a machine, with hose 
and hose carriage, and the erection of an engine house. John 
O. Waterman, William H. Driscol, and John C. Hoar were 
appointed a committee to expend the money, and oversee 
the building of the new engine house. 

Tradition says that the Pawtucket engine builder, Mr. 
Jeffers, mortified by the failure of the Pawtucket machine 
at Warren in 1847, had solemnly declared that he would 
design an engine that should surpass the saucy Button tub 
of the Narragansetts. It goes on to say that, in fulfillment 
of his vow, he built the fine machine eventually selected by 
Messrs. Waterman, Driscol, and Hoar. Whether tradition 
is correct or not history does not say, but it was a large and 
handsome Jefi^ers engine which these gentlemen procured 
for Company No. 2. 

The machine, still in the possession of the company, 
is finished in natural color and mahogany with brass trim- 
mings. It has no springs, and is rigged with a tongue for 
hauling by hand. The body is 10 feet 2 inches long, and 



JO A History of the Fire Department 

1 feet 7^-^ inches wide. There are two cyhnders. The 
stroke is adjustable up to ii inches. 

The wheel-base measures 6 feet Gyi inches, the front track 
4 feet iy^ inches, the rear track 4 feet 3 inches. The di- 
ameter of the front wheels is 2 feet 4^^ inches, that of the 
rear wheels is 3 feet i inch. The height of the deck from 
the ground is 3 feet 2,li. inches. The walking-beam stroke 
is 4 feet 5^ inches* The bars are 16 feet 2 inches long. 

The suction is 4 inches. Originally there was a twin 
discharge of 2^ inches, but this has been blocked and the 
delivery diverted through a single discharge of 2^ inches. 
The No. 2 Engine Company appears to have been reor- 
ganized immediately after the purchase of the new machine. 
The first entry in their records is under date of January 5, 
1853, and is as follows: — 

"Ingine met agreeable to notice and Adjourned not 
much done." 

On January 8, a second meeting was held with all the 
members of the Company present. A committee previous- 
ly appointed to draw up By-Laws presented their report, 
and the By-Laws were accepted. 

A motion was made that smoking be prohibited in the 
Engine House and was carried. 

Messrs. Daniel Foster, Rodolphus B. Johnson, and 
John O. Waterman were made a committee to decide upon 
a name for the engine. "After some Deliberation the com- 
mittee made a motion that Engine N 2 be Named the Me- 
chanick. Vote laken and pased unanimous." 

On February 10, 1853, the barn of Lewis Pearce, on 
Company Street, was destroyed by a fire supposed to have 
been started by an incendiary. A horse, two cows, a car- 
riage, and a large quantity of hay were burned. Probably 



of Wa7Te?iy Rhode Island J I 

the "Mechanick" did service at this fire, but no mention 
of it is made on the records of the Company. 

At the annual meeting of the Narragansetts, April, 1 854, 
it was voted "that all the members be a vigilant committee 
to look up new members." The reason for such a vote is 
obvious. In a maritime town like Warren, a goodly portion 
of the members of the Fire Companies were sea-faring men. 
They would join an organization, remain in it a few months, 
then resign and sail away for the West Indies, China, India, 
Holland, or some other distant land. From 1849 ^^ ^^^ 
close of the 50s there was a constant exodus to the gold 
fields of California. It certainly needed a very "vigilant" 
committe to keep the Engine Companies supplied with their 
sufficient quotas of men. 

In town meeting, April 19, 1854, Luther Cole, Clerk 
of the Fire Hook and Ladder Company, presented a re- 
quest for better accomodations for the fire hooks and lad- 
ders, and ladder carriage. The request was referred to the 
Town Council, who appointed Charles Smith and Charles 
Ranciall an investigating committee. Messrs. Smith and 
Randall reported that they deemed it "inexpedient to build 
a new house" for the use of the Company, but recommend- 
ed that the handles of the town pump on the Common 
should "be shifted so as to admit of the free ingress and 
egress of the Carriage of said company." Probably the 
pump handles v/ere shifted, for the Hook and Ladder offi- 
cers seem to have made no further requests. 

At the April meeting it was also voted to remove the 
old "Rough and Ready" to some place between Kickemuet 
Bridge and Barnaby's Corner. This, however, was not 
done, as the residents of Kickemuet objected to having their 
wells and cisterns called upon to supply the needs of a greedy 



J 2 A History of the Fire Depart/nent 

"bucket machine". They were quite willing to run the risk 
of dealing with fires unaided. 

On May 5, 1854, at ten o'clock p.m., an alarm of fire 
v/as sent out from the blacksmith's shop of Nathaniel Cole. 
The Fire Companies promptly responded to the call. The 
No. 2 Company "repaired to the Acqueduct" and "com- 
menced extinguishing the fire with despatch", but unfortu- 
nately, as the Company's records naively state, the building 
was "entirely consumed". 

At a town meeting held November 7, 1854, the Pres- 
idents of the Fire Wards were advised to "alter on the most 
approved plan" the machinery and other appurtenances for 
drying the hose in Engine House No. 3. On April 24, 
the Narragansett Company authorized William P. Freeborn, 
Charles Collamore and Charles L. Wrightington to procure 
three trumpets for the use of the Foreman, Assistant Fore- 
man, and Hose Director of the Company. During this 
same month, Captain Henry P. Carr presented the Mechan- 
ics with a fine American flag. 

On November 7, 1855, a fire broke out in the store 
of D. W. and G. H. Andrews at the corner of Main and 
Child Streets. The records state that it was "put out by 
the Threes in about half an hour", but add that great dam- 
age was done by water. 

At a town meeting held April 16, 1856, the electors, 
on the motion of Benjamin M. Bosworth, voted an appro- 
priation of $300 for the benefit of John Drown who had 
received serious injuries while acting as a fireman in the ser- 
vice of the town at a fire in Hoar and Martin's lumber yard. 

At the same time the Presidents of the Fire Vv^ards 
were authorized to have the lower room in Engine House 
No. 3 plastered, and to make arrangements for introducing 



of Warreii^ Rhode Island jj 

water into the building by means of pipes leading from the 
well of Henry Sanders, or by other means according to 
their discretion. 

On September 13, 1856, the steamboat "New Clifton," 
lying at one of the wharves, was found to be in flames. The 
Fire Companies hurried to the river side and succeeded in 
getting the blaze under control, but the boat was damaged 
to the amount of about $3000. 

At about five o'clock on the afternoon of November 
I, I 856, the Rivet Works of Henry H. Luther, near the 
foot of Sisson Street, were discovered to be on fire. An a- 
larm was quickly sounded and all the engines were hurried 
to the scene. It chanced that the Fire Companies were 
short of men, owing to the fact that many of their members 
had gone to Providence for the purpose of witnessing a 
grand political torch-light procession in honor of the presi- 
dential candidates Fremont and Dayton. 

It soon became evident that the fire was a serious affair. 
The wind was blowing so strongly from the southwest that 
burning shingles were carried across Belcher's Cove and 
scattered in the vicinity of King's Rocks at the boundary 
line separating Warren from Swansea. Other buildings in 
the vicinity of the rivet plant soon became ignited. Among 
these were the soap and candle manufactory of Henry San- 
ders, the carpenter shop of Nathan Kent, the barn of Allen 
C. Hoar, the barn of William H. Driscol, and a foundry, all 
of which, together with the Rivet Works, were totally de- 
stroyed with the greater part of their contents. Several 
neighboring fences were also consumed and, at one time, the 
entire north section of the town seemed threatened with 
destruction. 

Wild excitement prevailed. People came flocking into 



J/f. A History of the Fire Department 

town from all directions. Strangers entered houses and, 
taking advantage of the panic, spirited away various articles 
that attracted their fancy. All sorts of things, ranging from 
feather pillows to children's toys, were appropriated by 
these sneak thieves. One family found their pantry de- 
spoiled of several pies and a quantity of codfish balls that 
had been prepared for the next day's breakfast. It seemed 
as if some of the people who attempted to assist household- 
ers in saving their property fairly lost their wits. Looking- 
glasses were recklessly dashed about — and broken — while 
feather-beds were carefully deposited on the ground. Kitch- 
en utensils were tenderly carried through cross-streets and 
placed in the parlors of houses located at a distance from 
the flames and, at the same time, fine pieces of mahogany 
and rosewood furniture found resting-places in wood-sheds 
and coal-bins. Bedding and napery were tossed over fences 
and trunks of clothing deposited on curbstones. One citi- 
zen was compelled to threaten the life of an excited would- 
be helper in order to save a handsome "grandfather's 
clock" — a family heirloom — from destruction. 

The Warren Fire Companies, finding themselves un- 
able to cope with the flames, summoned assistance from 
Bristol. The King Philip Fire Engine Company prompt- 
ly responded to the call, and did such excellent work that, 
upon November 4, the following resolution was passed in 
town meeting: — 

"In Town Meeting, November 4, 1856, Resolved 
unanimously, by the Freemen of the Town of Warren in 
Town Meeting assembled, that the thanks of the town be 
presented to the members of King Philip Fire Engine Co. 
No. 4 of Bristol, who so promptly came to the aid of the 
citizens of this town on the evening of Saturday, November 



of JViiTTeti, Rhode Island jj 

1st. tor their friendly and efficient exertions in our behalf in 
staying the ravages of a fire, which on that evening, threat- 
ened the destruction of our town. 

"Resolved further, that a copy of this vote of thanks 
be communicated to the Foreman of said Engine Company 
No. 4, and that the Town Clerk cause the same to be pub- 
lished in the Bristol Phenix and the Rhode Island Tele- 
graph." 

The veteran fireman, Thomas M'"Caffrey, recalls the 
burning of the Rivet Works as his "first fire." Although 
only a child of four at the time of its occurence, he distinctly 
recollects that he was passed out of an attic "scuttle" to the 
roof of a house which was in danger of being ignited by 
flying bits of burning wood. Kept from slipping down the 
roof's incline by a rope tied about his waist and secured 
inside the house, he kept watch and, whenever a shingle 
caught, promptly extinguished it by dipping water from a 
bucket and dashing it on the flames. It is almost unneces- 
sary to add that the young fire fighter highly enjoyed his 
novel occupation. 

On the Tuesday evening following the fire the Narra- 
gansetts and Mechanics were entertained in Armory Hall 
by Philip Chase, a prominent ship builder of Warren. A 
fine collation was served which was followed by toasts and 
speeches. The records of the Companies do not state that 
the banquet had any connection with the conflagration, but, 
as Mr. Chase's shipyard was located near the Rivet Works, 
one may hazard a guess that it was given in recognition of 
the services rendered by the firemen to the host. 

An important change in the Fire Department occured 
in 1857. The following resolution was passed in town 
meeting on April 15 of that year: — 



J 6 A History of the Fire Depiuiment 

"Whereas the present system of appointing officers for 
the fire department, is deemed unwise & impolitic therefore 
Resolved that our Senator and Representatives be requested 
to use all honorable means to have the present law in regard 
to the appointment of fire Wards so amended as to give the 
town of Warren the power to elect a chief Engineer and 
four assistants," 

The desired amendment was passed by the Legislature 
and on April 21, 1858, a Board of Engineers was appointed, 
in town meeting, as follows: — 

Thomas G. Turner, Fire Ward and Chief Engineer. 
George Barton, First Assistant. 
William Cole 2nd, Second Assistant. 
Nathan Hancock, Third Assistant. 

On August 4, i860, the Town Council considered an 
application made by Nathaniel L. F. Potter, of Barrington, 
in regard to the purchase of the old Engine, formerly belong- 
ing to the No. 2 Company, which had been renumbered 4. 
The Council considered the application favorably and direct- 
ed the President to dispose of the "No. 4 old fire engine" 
to the best possible advantage. 

Mr. Potter purchased the machine and, for several 
years the "Rough and Ready" did good service at the Nay- 
att Brick Company's yards, where it was used for pumping 
out clay-pits, etc. The records do not show the price paid 
for it. 

On April 18, 1862, at about eleven o'clock a.m., a fire 
broke out in the Warren Ladies' Seminary, located on the 
east side of North Main Street between Wood and Hope 
Streets. When first discovered the flames were bursting 
through the roof The entire Fire Department promptly 



of Warren, Rhode Island. ^j 

responded to the alarm, and soon after twelve o'clcok suc- 
ceeded in checking the progress of the flames The dam- 
age to the building, by fire and water, amounted to about 
l4,ooo which, however, was fully covered by insurance. 
The blaze started in the woodwork about the furnace. 

On the following day a town meeting was held and the 
sum of $300 appropriated for necessary repairs on the va- 
rious engines and hose. The Board of Engineers was 
authorized to oversee its expenditure. 

A fire was discovered in the mill of the Cutler Manu- 
facturing Company on August 11, 1863, at noon. The 
flames were not extinguished until the middle of the after- 
noon. The damage was estimated at between I2000 and 
I3000. 

The Cutler Cordage Mills were established in 1858 
and, eleven years later, the Cutler Manufacturing Company 
was incorporated. Captain Charles R. Cutler, the founder 
of the plant, was, for many years, one of Warren's foremost 
citizens. He was Lieutenant-Governor of the State of 
Rhode Island from 1872 to 1873. 

In town meeting April 15, 1863, it was voted that the 
engines should be used only in case of fire and when in 
need of repairs. On the very next day they were called 
upon in a case of fire. At about half past two in the morn- 
ing, when the town was wrapped in slumber, the Ladies' 
Semmary was again discovered in flames. A few moments 
after the alarm was sounded, the entire edifice was ablaze. 

1 he fire companies made a brave fight but their ef- 
forts were in vain. The building was constructed of pitch 
pine and it burned like tinder. The entire edifice and its 
contents were destroyed, as was also the residence of Captain 
William Martin on the opposite side of Main Street. The 



J 8 A History of the Fire Department 

sparks and burning embers were carried long distances by 
the wind. 

The Warren Ladies' Seminary was founded in May, 
1834, by Robert A. Coffin, its first principal, and others. 
It enjoyed, throughout its existance, an excellent reputation. 
The curriculum included the various English branches, Lat- 
in, French, German, drawing and painting, and vocal and 
instrumental music. Particular attention was given to pu- 
pils desirous of becoming teachers. The students included 
young women from every state in the Union. 

The Seminary building was originally erected for a res- 
idence by Captain Jonathan Wood of Warren, after whom 
Wood Street was named. 

Captain Wood purchased the land on which he built 
his mansion of Cromwell Child in March, 1803. The 
timber of which the house was constructed was brought in 
a sailing-vessel from Georgia. 

The main body of the building was three stories high 
and fronted on Main Street. A wide pillared piazza ran 
around the front and side. The parlors, dining-room, and 
school-rooms occupied the lower floor. The dormitories 
were located in the second story, and the servants' bedrooms 
and studio in the third. The kitchen was at the rear of the 
lower floor. 

At the time of its destruction the Seminary was con- 
ducted by Asa M. Gammell assisted by an able corps of 
teachers. Among the trustees of the institution were 
Ex-Governor Charles Jackson, Reuben A. Guild, Reverend 
Josiah P. Tustin, and General Guy M. Fessenden. The 
Board of Examiners included Doctor Francis Wayland, 
Professor William Gammell, and Judge Alfred Bosworth. 

The officers of the institution were: 



of Warren^ Rhode IsLuid jg 

President Shubael P. Child. 

Vice President .... Henry H. Luther. 

Secretary Thomas. G. Turner. 

Treasurer Charles Randall. 

At a town meeting held April i8, 1866, the electors 
voted an appropriation of $400 for the purpose of erecting 
a house for the truck and ladders of the Fire Hook and 
Ladder Company No. i . This building still stands on 
Baker Street and is in good condition. It is used for hous- 
ing the "Hero". 

In May, 1867, the members of the Narragansett Com- 
pany discussed the question ot introducing gas into their 
engine house, and Daniel K. Bowen was appointed a Com- 
mittee to ascertain the probable expense. No further steps, 
however, were taken until 1868, when the Town Council 
appropriated the sum of I40 for the use of the Company, 
which, on April 21 authorized William Baker and John H. 
Pearce to "lay the money out to the best of their ability." 

The Fire Companies of Warren have always been fa- 
mous for their clam chowders. The first mention of chow- 
der which I find on the records of the No. 3 Company is 
under the date May 5, 1869, when a "proposition was made 
by Benjamin B. Martin that a clam chowder be agitated for 
the benefit of the Co." Frank E. Dana was appointed a 
committee to "canvas the probable expense attending the 
getting up of the chowder," and it appears that he must have 
brought in rather a discouraging report for, on May 11, the 
Company voted that the chowder plan "be abandoned." 

Somewhere along in the fifties and sixties the boys 
used to repeat a rhyme about the firemen. After the fash- 
ion of boys, the world over, they neglected to prefix titles 



^C? A History of the Fire Department 

to the names occuring in their doggerel, which ran thus: — 

" 'Fire! Fire!' says Charles Prior. 
'Where? Where?' says Paul Ware. 
'Up town,' says Joe Brown. 
'The Baptist Meetin' ', says Sam Wheaton. 
'Ring the bell!' says Bill Snell. 
'All out!' says Jack Stout." 

Jack Stout was a colored man and one of the charac- 
ters of the town. He was the father of the famous music- 
ian, Valorius George Washington Hathaway Peck Stout, 
who is vividly remembered by many of the natives of 
Warren. 

The year 1870 witnessed a great change in the meth- 
ods of dealing with fires in Warren, At a town meeting, 
held March 12, the electors passed the following vote: — 
"Voted that Four Thousand Dollars be and is appro- 
priated for the purchase and procuring a Steam Fire En- 
gine, and that Charles R. Cutler, John O. Waterman, 
and Thomas G. Turner be a Committee," 

On March 17, the Narragansett Company held a spe- 
cial meeting for the purpose of discussing the steamer ques- 
tion. The Company voted unanimously to petition the 
committee appointed by the town to place the new steam 
engine in their charge. The petition was immediately 
drawn up and presented to Charles R. Cutler, the Chairman 
of the Town Committee. 

On June 1 5, the Narragansetts voted to canvass for re- 
cruits. But the canvass was unsuccessful. The Chairman 
reported, on June 22, that he was unable to secure any new 
members. Perhaps would-be firemen were waiting to as- 
certain which company was to be the guardian of the new 



of Warren^ Rhode Island. 41 

steamer ere pledging themselves to either. In due time the 
steamer arrived and it created much enthusiasm. It was 
built in Pawtucket by Cole Brothers in 1870. It is a third 
class machine. Its weight is about 6,200 pounds. The diam- 
eter of the steam cylinder is 8 inches. The diameter of the 
double acting pump is 51^ inches. The stroke is 8 inches. 
The capacity is 600 gallons a minute. The diameter of the 
suction is 4 inches. The full length of the suction hose is 
25 feet. The steamer throws one stream of i y^ inches diam- 
eter, or two streams of % inches diameter. 

On the Fourth of July, 1870, the town was on tiptoe 
with interest for, upon that day, the steamer was to make 
her debut. A street parade in which the Engine and 
Hook and Ladder Companies participated occupied the 
morning hours and, at noon, the Threes entertained their 
friends with "lemonade refreshment" at the Engine House. 
At two o'clock the Company formed and, preceded by a 
band, repaired to the Common where, amid much enthusi- 
asm, the steamer was given a trial. At the quarterly meeting 
of the Narragansetts, on the following day, Joseph Kelly, 
James A. Cole, Asbury Thompson, Thomas W. McCaffrey, 
Charles S. Maxfield, and Eleazer Cady were appointed 
"bucket men" to keep the steamer supplied with water. 
On February 8, 1871, a fire broke out in the jewelry 
establishment of Bowen and Company situated on the west 
side of Water Street just south of State Street. The Fire 
Companies hastened to the scene and the steamer did "good 
execution on the devouring element." The Mechanics' en- 
gine refusing to work, the Threes' hand engine was called 
into service. The building was totally destroyed, but others 
in the vicinity were saved after a hard fight of two hours. 
If tradition tells the truth, this fire marked an epoch in 



^2 A History of th^ Fire Dcpartnient 

the history of Company No. 2. Its men worked the Threes' 
engine, cutting through the solid ice ot the river to place 
the suction pipe. On the following dav the newspapers pub- 
lished accounts of the fire and gave all the praise to tlie 
Narragansett Company, and the Mechanics, hurt and dis- 
couraged, began to feel that it v/as hardly worth while to try 
to keep their Company together. 

On April i, 1871, Chief Engineer Charles R. Cutler 
formally tendered the steamer to Narragansett Company, 
No. 3, to have and to hold and to use for all necessary pur- 
poses without interference from town officials, with the under- 
standing, however, that the Company should honor all prop- 
er orders issued by the Chief or his Assistants. 

At a later date Luther Cole, John A. Pearce, and John 
Livesey were appointed a committee to revise the By-Laws 
of the Company to meet the new conditions arising from the 
acquisition of the steamer. The By-Laws, as revised, were 
accepted by the Company on June 13. On June 22, it was 
voted to adopt a code of signals. 

During 1871, the Fire Hook and Ladder Company 
found itself reduced to four members. These loyal support- 
ers were John G. Cole, William Cole, Henry W. Eddy, and 
Charles Munroe. As no recruits could be secured the Com- 
pany was broken up. 

On December 22, 1872, a fire broke out in the Baptist 
Church. The woodwork near the furnace in the basement 
became ignited and a dense volume of smoke poured up the 
large register at the right of the altar. In order to battle 
with the flames the firemen were obliged to creep up 
the aisles on hands and knees After laboring for 



I 



of Warren, Rhode Island. ^j 

about two hours the flames were subdued. Considerable 
injury was done to the interior of the edifice. Nine pews 
on the north side were destroyed, and the walls and wood- 
work were scorched and blackened. A good deal of dam- 
age was also done bv water. 

The Warren Baptist Church was organized in 1764, 
and, in connection with it, Rhode Island College, now 
Brown University, was founded. The original Church edi- 
fice was a plain wooden structure, with a four-sided hip roof 
and a belfry in which was hung a ship bell. The door faced 
directly east and the pulpit was at the west end. In this 
building was held, on September 7, 1769, the first Com- 
mencemenL ot the College, when seven young men took 
their degrees. In May, 1770, the College removed to Prov- 
idence. The church was burned May 25, 1778, when five 
hundred British and Hessian troops raided Warren and de- 
stroyed by fire, not only the meeting-house, but the powder 
magazine opposite it, a privateer on the stocks in one of the 
shipyards, a mill and two dwelling houses at Kickemuit, 
aud seventy large flat-bottomed boats collected on that river 
ror use against the enemy, besides a quantity of tar, pitch, 
and other stores. This Revolutionary conflagration was prob- 
ably the largest ever kindled within the limits of this town. 
The second church edifice was erected in 1784 on the 
site of the former structure, It was 61 feet long and 44 
feet wide, with a tower 44 feet high and 14 feet square. In 
1800 a steeple 431^ feet high was added to the tower. 

In 1844 this building was taken down and the present 
stone edifice erected on almost the same site. This beau- 
tiful specimen of gothic architecture is one of the most ar- 
tistic and striking landmarks of the town. 

On March 8, 1873, ^he town appropriated the sum of 



^^ A History of the Fire Depcwtinent 

^500 for the use of the "Narragansett Fire Steam Engine 
Company," the money to be expended on "new uniforms, 
repairs on the Hall, &c." The Company promptly decided 
to employ I175 in fitting up and furnishing their hall, and 
to procure uniforms with the balance. The "uniform com- 
mittee" were instructed to purchase a certain number of 
uniforms and to use the remainder of the money "for skull 
caps." Unfortunately the committee's report, when ren- 
dered, showed a balance of only fifty cents to the Company's 
credit and, as the records are afterward silent regarding the 
skull caps, we probably shall never know whether they were 
ultimately purchased or not. 

On August 13, 1873, ^^^ Mechanics' Machine Com- 
pany's plant, at the corner of Water and Washington Streets, 
was burned to the ground despite a strenuous effort to save 
it. The structure was of wood, and the flames rapidly licked 
it up. The Company had not long been located in Warren 
and was put out of business by the unexpected disaster. 
The site of the Mechanics' Machine Company's plant is 
now occupied by the large brick building of the Textile 
Finishing Machinery Company. On this same site ships were 
built in the old days of Warren's commercial importance. 

In February, 1874, the chowder question was again 
discussed by the Narragansetts, and it was voted to have a 
chowder, to "borrow a kettle" to cook it in, and to "pay 
damages" in case the kettle should be injured while in use. 
The chowder must have proved a great success, for one 
year later a "chowder fund" was "started." 

On April 3, 1874, the Number 3 Company voted to 
place bells upon their hose carriage. 

On April 17, 1874, a special meeting of the Number 
1 Company was called, and by a vote of eleven yeas to one 



If 



of Warren^ Rhode Island 4^ 

nay, it was resolved to disband the company, The Me- 
chanics had served the town faithfully for forty- nine years. 
Their record was an honorable one. But they had become 
discouraged, and disbanding seemed the easiest way out of 
their many difficulties, 

At a town meeting held March 10, 1877, there was 
considerable discussion regarding ways and means of im- 
proving the Fire Department. But no action was taken. 
Previous to this date, however, the idea of utilizing the 
Kickemuet River for the purpose of supplying the town 
with water had been broached and had met with favor from 
thinking people. 

On February 15, 1878, at half past four in the morn- 
ing, a barn on Market Street owned by Reverend Michael 
M*^Callion and occupied as a livery stable by F. Brown was 
burned, though the horses and carriages it contained were 
removed in safety. At this fire the steamer did good ser- 
vice for four hours and, by means of it, the buildings sur- 
rounding the barn were saved from destruction. 

On March 3, 1878, flames destroyed one of the old 
land-marks of the town. This was the building located on 
the north side of Baker Street, between Lewin and Main 
Streets, and owned by the heirs of Judge Samuel Randall. 

Away back in the early part of the last century Judge 
Randall carried on a private school in this structure, while 
a rival Hall of Learning was conducted in the Warren 
Academy which occupied the lower floor of the Masonic 
Building next door. Party spirit ran high in those old days, 
and as the Randall schoolboys were principally sons of 
Democrats, while the Academy boys were the children of 
Federalists, a great deal of "scrapping" took place during 
recess periods and before and after school hours. This 



^6 A History of the Fi?'e 'Department 

was especially true during the War of 1812, and is hardly 
to be wondered at, for so bitter was the feeling between the 
two great political parties that Warren once witnessed a doub- 
le Fourth of July celebration, the Federalists and Democrats 
finding it quite impossible to unite in a demonstration. 
There were rival processions and rival banquets at Cole's 
Hotel. No wonder the boys quarreled — they imbibed the 
spirit of hostility from their elders. 

Samuel Randall was Town Clerk of Warren from 1 8 10 
to 1 860 with the exception of twelve months (i8i4to 1815) 
when the office was held by Joseph Adams. He was elected 
an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of Rhode Island 
in 1824, and remained upon the bench until 1833, sustain- 
ing the high position with great intelligence and dignity. 

Early in the fall of 1878 the Mechanics reorganized 
and have, ever since that date, been an able and active com- 
pany. The first oflicers elected by the reorganizers were: — 



Foreman . . . . 
Assistant Foreman 
Hose Director . 
First Pipeman . 
Second Pipeman 
Clerk .... 
Treasurer . . . 



John Howe. 
T. K. Finn. 
David Barry. 
John Curtis. 
Owen Kelly. 
Wm. H. Smith. 
Daniel W. Pailthorpe. 



The first fire at which the new company rendered assist- 
ance was in a house on Market Street. This fire occured 
on October 4, 1878. Both the steamer and the hand engine 
of the Mechanics did good work. The steamer was drawn 
to the burning house by horses. 

On October 11, 1878, the Narragansett Company 
attended a muster at Park Garden, Providence, and the 



of Warren^ Rhode Island ^J 

steamer succeeded in making a record of one hundred and 
eighty feet and one inch, although the wind was blowing a 
strong gale against the stream. 

On the evening of Apirl lo, 1879, Joseph Adams, 
Francis E. Dana, James M. Winslow, Charles Whitford, and 
Jeremiah GofF met at the residence of Mr. Dana for the 
purpose of reorganizing the Hook and Ladder Company. 
Francis E. Dana presided as Chairman of the meeting. 

It was decided that the officers of the new Company 
should be a Foreman, two Axe Men, and a Secretary and 
Treasurer. Joseph Adams was unanimously elected Foreman. 

James M. Winslow and Charles Whitford were ap- 
pointed a committee to draw up a set of By-Laws, and F. 
E. Dana was authorized to procure a book for the use of 
the Clerk. 

The Foreman was requested to notify the Chief of the 
Fire Department that the Company had reorganized, and 
would work at all fires to the best of its ability. The meet- 
ing was adjourned sine die. 

At a town meeting held in the month of April, 1880, 
the question of introducing Kickemuet water into the town 
was discussed at length and a committee, consisting of Hon- 
orable Sidney Dean, Doctor Preston Day, and Honorable 
George Lewis Cook, was appointed to confer with "respon- 
sible parties" who stood "ready to introduce a Supply of 
Fresh Water into this town." No definite action regarding 
a Water Works system, however, was taken. 

On May 12, 1880, the Button machine belonging to 
the Narragansett Company scored a victory at a muster held 
at Cedar Grove. Its principal rival was a large and hand- 
some "JefFers" engine, the property of the Watchemoket 
Company No, i. When this engine appeared upon the 



^^8 A History of the Fi?'e Depm-tmcnt 

grounds, decorated with flags and drawn by plumed horses, 
the onlookers exclaimed that it would surely bear away the 
prize. The Watchemoket Company, certain of victory, 
smiled indulgently at the Warren "tub" which looked very 
small and unpretentious beside the big "JefFers." 

At 1.30 o'clock the Warren Company prepared to ex- 
ploit their machine. Two hundred and fifty feet of hose 
were laid and, at one hundred and twenty five feet from the 
nozzle, paper was placed a distance of forty feet to assist the 
judges in their estimates. 

The "Button," worked by determined men, threw a 
stream one hundred and sixty-one feet and three inches in 
length. Then the engine of the Watchemoket Ones took 
its place. The gazers craned their necks and held their 
breaths as the water gushed from the hose nozzle. Then, 
as the judges announced the result, one hundred and fifty- 
one feet and three inches, a buzz of astonishment ran through 
the crowd. 

The trial of machines was followed by a shore dinner 
and, at a quarter past four o'clock, the prizes were awarded 
to the winners in the contest. The Narragansetts received 
a large broom as "an emblem ot the clean sweep" they had 
made. Soon after, three dozen brooms arrived by train from 
W^arren. The little "Button" was decorated with some of 
these and each member of the Company was supplied with 
one. Upon reaching Warren at half past six o'clock, a street 
parade was made, the procession being headed by the Warren 
Drum Corps. 

During the spring and Summer of 1880, the Mechan- 
ics had their engine renovated. The Narragansetts loaned 
their hand machine to the "Twos" while these repairs were 
being made. The Mechanics adopted a uniform this year. 



of Warren^ Rhode Island ^g 

making their first appearance in it at the funeral of a deceased 
member, M. F. Conley. 

On August five the Narragansetts presented the Chief 
Engineer, William Cole, with a handsome gold badge as a 
token of regard. Badges were also presented to the Assist- 
ant Engineers. 

On October 7, 1880, the Narragansett Company enter- 
tained the Narragansett Company, No. 2, of Cedar Grove, 
and the '*Ones" of Watchemoket. On this occasion War- 
ren witnessed the largest and finest Fireman's parade ever 
seen on its streets up to that date. The "Threes" wel- 
comed their guests with a display of fireworks at the Engine 
House on Baker Street, after which all participated in a 
"grand torchlight procession," headed by the Warren Drum 
Corps, eight drums, followed by 

The Chief Engineer and Assistants. 
Foreman and Assistants of Hydraulion Engine 

Company of Bristol. 

First Assistant Dreadnaught Hook and Ladder 

Company of Bristol. 

Narragansett Company, No. 3, of Warren. 

Narragansett Company, No. 2, of Cedar Grove. 

Watchemoket Company, No 1, of East Providence. 

Mechanic Company, No. 2, of Warren. 

The streets were ablaze with illuminations and fireworks, 
and, after parading through the principal thoroughfares the 
hosts, with their guests, repaired to Armorv Hall where a 
bountiful oyster supper was served. Musical selections were 
rendered by Booth's Orchestra, and speeches were made by 
the Foremen of the various Companies, and also bv Lieu- 
tenant-Governor Charles R. Cutler, Honorable Henry H. 



^O A History of the Fire Depurtnient 

Luther, Honorable Charles B. Mason, and Honorable 
Benjamin M. Bosworth Jr. The festivities closed at 
the Engine House with music, speeches, and dancing. 

Late in the autumn, the Mechanics gave their first ball. 
Unfortunately the records of that Company fail to give any 
particulars respecting it but, presumably, it proved to be a 
success. 

On January _^o, 1881, at ten minutes to seven in the 
afternoon, the clanging of the church bells svmimoned the 
Fire Department to Saint Mark's Episcopal Church on Lyn- 
don Street. They found that the Christmas trimmings of 
evergreen had become ig;nited and that the flames were rap- 
idly spreading from the chancel towards the body of the 
edifice. It was an extremely cold evening, and when the 
Broad Street reservoir was reached the firemen experienced 
great difficulty in raising the cover so solidly was it frozen 
down. In the meantime the fire had crept under the ceiling 
of the church and, as the building was of peculiar construc- 
tion, the firemen were badly handicapped in their labors. 

All the Companies worked with a will and, at last, it 
was announced that the flames were extinguished. The tired 
firemen returned to the Engine Houses, put up the ma- 
chines, and then retired to their homes. Scarcely were they 
comfortably settled in bed, however, ere a second alarm 
sounded. They responded to it with creditable alacrity and, 
for a considerable length of time, waged warfare with the 
devouring element. By this time the cold had perceptibly 
increased, and coffee and other refreshments served by la- 
dies ot the neighborhood proved very acceptable to the 
weary workers. After breaking away a large portion of plas- 
tering, the men succeeded in conquering the blaze. 

At a meeting of the Wardens and Vestrv of Saint 



of WarreUy Rhode Island 5/ 

Mark's Church, held March 31, 1881, the following vote 
was passed : "Resolved, that the thanks of the Cor- 
poration of St. Mark's Church be, and hereby is, tendered 
to the Fire Department of the Town of Warren for their 
prompt and efficient efforts in arresting the progress of the 
flames at the fire on Sunday Eve, Jan. 30, 1881. And par- 
ticularly for their great care in preserving the beautiful me- 
morial windows from material damage. 

"And the Clerk is hereby directed to convey to the 
Chief Engineer and to each Fire Company a copy of these 
resolutions." 

(Signed) Daniel L.Turner, 

Sec'y. St. Mark's Church Society. 
The damage done to the Church by this fire was con- 
siderable, but the repairs necessitated by it added greatly to 
its appearance. The edifice was erected in 1829, and con- 
secrated July 15, 1830. At various periods it has been 
enlarged and improved. Alterations made in its interior, a 
few years ago, have largely increased its beauty and impres- 
siveness. There is an interesting fact connected with the 
fire at Saint Mark's. The alarm was rung by Miss Mary 
Jolls Merchant, (now Mrs. Howard K. DeWolf) then a 
little girl not yet in her teens. As the key of the Baptist 
Church was kept at the residence of her father. Doctor Jo- 
seph M. Merchant, little Miss Mary decided that she would 
learn to ring the church bell in order to prevent delay in 
sounding fire alarms. Accordingly she requested the sex- 
ton to instruct her in the art of ringing and, while taking 
her first lesson, came very near meeting with a serious 
accident. The sexton, who was blind, neglected to tell her 
to let the rope slip through her fingers and when, after a 
vigorous pull, the bell suddenly turned over, the child, cling- 



^2 A History of the Fire Departtnent 

ing to the rope, was carried up to the ceiling where her head 
received a very severe bump. She was much frightened but, 
after descending, continued to practice and, in time, became 
as expert a bell ringer as the sexton himself. She sounded 
the alarm for many other fires beside that at the Episcopal 
Church. 

During 1881 the Mechanics revised their By-laws, and 
purchased a flag and three trumpets for Company use. At 
a special town meeting, held April 13, the taxpayers voted 
an appropriation of $250 for their benefit. This very much 
needed sum proved highly acceptable to the Company. 

On April 12, the Hook and Ladder Company held 
the first meeting called since its reorganization. At this 
meeting F. E. Dana announced that, at the March town 
meeting, the electors had voted the sum of $100 for the use 
of the Company. 

A little before two o'clock, on the morning of Novem- 
ber 16, the ringing of the Baptist Church bell aroused the 
town from slumber. The entire Fire Department re- 
sponded to the alarm with remarkable promptness, and 
hastened to Saint Mary's Roman Catholic Church, at the 
corner of Main and Luther Streets, which they found envel- 
oped in flames. 

The steamer was located at the reservoir at the head 
of Broad Street, while the Mechanics stationed their engine 
at a nearby wharf. So fierce was the heat of the fire that 
the greatest difficulty was experienced in working advanta- 
geously. The Parsonage connected with the Church, and 
a small cottage just west of the burning structure, were soon 
ignited. At the most critical moment the water in the res- 
ervoir became exhausted and the steamer was transferred 
to the cistern in the yard of the plant now occupied by the 



of Warren, Rhode Island J j* 

Howland and Wheaton Company at the corner ot Main and 
Broad Streets. The delay caused by this change proved 
fatal, and, at half past three o'clock, the Church was reduced 
to ashes. None of its furnishings were saved, but the great- 
er portion of furniture belonging to the parsonage and neigh- 
boring cottage was removed to a place of safety. Several 
other buildings in the immediate vicinity of the Church 
became ignited, but the firemen promptly checked the spread 
of the flames. 

Chief Engineer Cole had, very early, summoned aid 
from Bristol, and his call was immediately responded to by 
the Hydraulion and King Philip Fire Companies. While 
en route for Warren, both Companies were notified that the 
fire was under control, whereupon they returned to Bristol. 
The Warren engines were housed between five and six 
o'clock. Considering the drawbacks against which the Fire 
Department were compelled to work, it is remarkable that 
thev succeeded in keeping the flames from spreading along 
Main Street. 

Saint ■ Mary's Church was a plain wooden structure 
erected about half a century ago when the parish was first 
organized under the pastorate of Reverend Hilary Tucker. 
The present church edifice, which replaced the original 
building, was dedicated November 25, 1883. Its exterior 
is of an effective style of architecture, and the interior is 
handsomely finished and decorated. 

This destructive fire again aroused interest in the 
question of a town water supply, and, at a town meeting 
held January 7, 1882, it was voted to accept the proposals 
made by George H. Norman for the erection of a plant to 
furnish Kickemuit River water for domestic and other pur- 
poses. A fire, which occured on October 3, succeeded in 



J"^ A History of the Fire Departniefit 

convincing even the opposers of the Water Works scheme 
of its advisabihty. I'his fire was at the carpet lining manu- 
factory of Wilham Warren on North Main Street. It broke 
out at a quarter to eleven in the morning, and, although the 
Fire Department promptly hastened to the spot and did 
heroic work, they were unable, owing to the scarcity of 
water, to subdue the flames. It had been a very dry season. 
Throughout the town wells and cisterns, generally, were 
empty. The Mechanics drew their supply from a well in 
the engine house yard, while the steamer utilized the reser- 
voir in front of the Baptist Church. The Warren Manu- 
facturing Company stretched three lines of hose from their 
plant and, by these means, the buildings adjacent to the 
burning structure were saved from destruction. The Hook 
and Ladder Company did excellent service, also, and many 
citizens assisted the firemen in their efforts. 

In January, 1883, the Water Works plant was completed 
and, on February 5, it was formally accepted by the Town 
Council. The first trial of the hydrants was made on Jan- 
uary 8, by the Narragansett Company. The steamer was 
taken to the south side of the Common and two streams 
were forced up to the clock in the spire of the Methodist 
Church. A single stream was driven about ten feet higher, 
while four streams showed a general average of one hundred 
and twenty-five feet. 

At Miller Street the water reached the clock in the 
tower of the Baptist Church, and, at the Warren Manufac- 
turing Company's plant, it was forced to the vane on Mill 
Number One, and to the towers on Mills Number Two 
and Three from the main pipe at the same time. The low- 
est record was made on Main Street, at the hydrant located 
near the residence of Nathan Sanders, where a stream 



of Warren, Rhode Island 55" 

only sixty feet high rewarded the Company's efforts. 

On January 11, the Company appointed its first hy- 
drant men, Henry S. Burtch, Herbert V. Rounds, and 
Frank S. Chase. 

On May 17, the Mechanics voted to give a ball to cele- 
brate the acquisition of a new hose cart. 

During the month of June the Narragansetts purchased 
four drums and the "Narragansett Drum Corps" was or- 
ganized, with James Collamore as leader. The Drum Corps 
made its first appearance on July 4 ,when the Company took 
part in a parade at Bristol. 

On this same day occurred a fire at which Kickemuit 
water was used for the first time. The alarm was sounded 
at twelve o'clock at noon, when a wooden building situated 
near the turntable of the Old Colony Railroad was found to 
be in flames. The "Threes" were the only company which 
threw water on the flames from the hydrant at the Cutler 
Manufacturing Company's plant. One thousand feet of 
hose were used. 

On April 7, 1884, the Narragansetts celebrated the 
thirty- eighth anniversary of their organization. Twenty- 
five members, arrayed in "new oil cloth suits," reported at 
the Engine House at three o'clock in the afternoon and 
thence were conveyed in a party wagon to South Warren, 
accompanied by the steamer drawn by a pair of horses, and 
the hose-cart drawn by one horse. Several hydrants in that 
section were tried and then the Company returned to the 
compact part of the town giving trials on Main Street, Child 
Street, and at the Common. At the latter spot the steamer 
"beat all former records," throwing the water ten feet above 
the Methodist Church spire. The maximum record of the 
steamer was one hundred and sixty-five feet, that of the 



^6 A History of the Fire Department 

hydrants one hundred and forty-five feet. In the evening 
the Company paraded the streets, then repaired to Cole's 
Hotel where a hot turkey supper was enjoyed. The festiv- 
ities ended with music and dancing. 

On March i8, 1885, ^^^ Mechanics appointed Thom- 
as Finn and David Barry a Committee to wait upon the 
Chiet Engineer tor the purpose of voicing the Company's 
protest against the sale of the Jeffers hand machine which 
the electors in town meeting had voted to dispose of. The 
machine was not sold and it is to be hoped that it never will 
be. It is a relic of Warren's past and, as such, should be 
carefully preserved. It has a good record having, in its day, 
performed its duties faithfully. It is now ( 1911 ) in excel- 
lent preservation. 

In May, 1885, the Mechanics voted to hold drills 
every month, and in November they voted to conduct their 
meetings according to Parliamentary rules. 

In June, 1886, the Narragansetts supplied themselves 
with regulation uniforms. These uniforms added greatly 
to the appearance of the Company as a body. 

On October 29, 1887, the I'own of Warren sold the 
"Button" hand engine to the Town of Freetown, Massa- 
chusetts, for $175. Freetown has recently purchased a light 
chemical engine, but still retains the hand machine which is 
in excellent condition. 

Prior to the sale of the "Button" engine there had been 
considerable discussion in regard to selling the "Hero." 
I'here were many who contended that the "little old-fash- 
ioned tub" was of "no earthly use" as compared with "good 
money." The discussion was carried on after the "Button" 
had been disposed of. Happily, owing to the exertions of 
H.O.Pardey — elected foreman of the "Threes" in 1888 — 



of JVarren, Rhode Island ^J 

the priceless relic was retained. In these days its worth, as 
a curiosity, is better appreciated and, probably, no money 
would induce the town to part with it. 

On February i6, 1888, the Narragansetts paid a visit 
to their retiring Foreman, John H. Brown, and presented 
him with a handsome gold-headed cane as a testimonial of 
their esteem and respect. Mr. Brown had served as first 
officer of the Company for a period oi eight years, and had 
proved himself an active and zealous leader, having ever the 
welfare of his Company at heart. 

An alarm was sounded at twenty minutes past one 
o'clock on the morning of March 6, 1888, which proved to 
be for a fire in a large block located at the corner of Miller 
and Water Streets, owned by Nathaniel Drown and occupied 
by several tenants. It was quite a serious fire and the build- 
ing was badly damaged, the inmates escaping through the 
stifling smoke with difficulty. It was a fire that tested the 
efficiency of the Department for, on two sides, the 
block was surrounded by other structures, and only the able 
work of the fire fighters prevented a very serious conflag- 
ration. That their effiDrts were appreciated the following 
resolution, passed on March 10, amply testifies: — 

"Resolved that the town of Warren in town meeting 
assembled hereby acknowledges its indebtedness to the offi- 
cers and members of the Warren Fire Department for the 
courageous and efficient manner in which they performed 
their duty at the fire of March 6, 1888. 

"Resolved that a copy of these resolutions, signed by 
the town clerk, be sent to each of the fire companies in 
said town." 

On April 9, 1888, the box shop of Benjamin S. Buf- 
fington was partially burned, only the walls of the upper 



^8 A History of the Fire Department 

story being left after a hard fight by the firemen. At six 
o'clock in the evening on the same day, a fire which had 
a tragic ending broke out in the residence of the Stevens 
family on Bristol Neck. Mrs. Stevens, an aged lady, was 
the sole occupant of the house at the time, and she perished 
in the flames before assistance couid reach her. 

On October 8, 1888, a barn on Railroad Avenue, 
owned and occupied by Charles S. Maxfield, was destroyed 
by fire. Its contents, consisting of three horses, carriages, 
harnesses, etc. and a quantity of hay were consumed. Mr. 
Maxfield had already lost another barn by fire in the pre- 
vious spring. 

In April, 1889, the town appropriated $50 for the pur- 
chase of a new truck for the use of the Hook and Ladder 
Company. In May, that Company voted that, in the fu- 
ture, its name should be the "Massasoit Hook and Ladder 
Company." 

On September 5, 1888, the Narragansett Company 
attended a muster at the Dexter Training Ground in Prov- 
idence, They carried the "Hero" with them and, upon 
their arrival in the city, met with the reverse of a cordial 
reception. As they passed along South Main Street a large 
crowd gathered, and the "Hero" was greeted with hoots, 
groans, hisses, and jeers. It was very evident that the pop- 
ulace regarded the "Threes" as a company of "Waybacks," 
which possessed no other machine than the antiquated and 
diminutive "tub." Encouraged by their Foreman, how- 
ever, the men although angry and mortified, pressed on, 
making no response to the insults heaped upon them. 

At the training ground thev encountered more jeers 
and laughter. But they maintained their composure and, 
in due time, the "Hero" proved that it was worthy of its 



of Warren, Rhode Isliuid ^g 

name. When its pumps torced up a vertical stream of one 
hundred and nine feet, the hoots and hisses gave way to 
prolonged cheers. Photographers rushed forward to secure 
a shot at the tiny wonder, and the crowd pushed and jostled 
in a wild effort to get near it. An enthusiastic lady presented 
Foreman Pardey with a bouquet of flowers. The "Hero" 
was only excelled by the "Water Witch" of Providence, 
a considerably larger machine. 

During 1889, the Mechanics gave a highly successful 
dramatic entertainment for the benefit of their Company, and 
the Narragansetts held a fair which netted them the sum 
of $453.09. 

On December 31, 1891, the French Catholic Church 
of Saint Jean Baptiste, at the corner of Main and Hope 
Streets, was partially destroyed by fire, being only saved 
from destruction by the prompt action of the Fire Depart- 
ment. The dense smoke arising from the burning build- 
ing was almost suffocating, but the men remained at their 
posts until the flames were subdued. 

The Parish of Saint Jean Baptiste was incorporated 
August II, 1 88 1, and, during the thirty years of its exist- 
ence, has been under the charge of but four pastors. The 
Church edifice was erected in 1882. The Parish supports 
a parochial school, with a roll of some two hundred pupils. 

On July 28, 1892, a fire occured in Cole's Hotel in a 
room occupied by an aged woman, Mrs. Rosa Donnelly. 
The fire was quickly extinguished, but not before the aged 
woman was fatally burned. 

On March 25, 1893, this hotel was nearly destroyed 
by fire. At about two o'clock in the morning flames broke 
out in the bar-room, and the cloud of smoke rising to the 
apartment directly overhead awakened its occupant, . who 



6o A History of the Fire Department 

quickly aroused the family of the landlord and the guests. 
Cries of fire and the ringing of the church bells gave the 
alarm, and the Fire Department hurried to the scene. Nine 
lines of hose were laid and, in an almost impenetrable fog 
by which they were greatly hampered, the firemen began 
their fight. 

It was a long and tedious battle attended by many dan- 
gers. At a score of different points the flames burst out 
simultaneously. The older portion of the edifice was com- 
pletely gutted. The newer portion was a total loss. It 
was fully four hours ere the blaze was subdued. 

There were thirty- five guests in the hotel and all escaped 
without bodily injury. Most of them were also fortunate 
in saving the greater portion of their personal effects. The 
landlady, Mrs. Jeremiah Goff, lost some rare articles of bric- 
a-brac and china, also several valuable old-time relics, but suc- 
ceeded in saving considerable furniture. 

The lower story of the hotel contained several stores, 
all of which were occupied. The periodical store of Fred 
A. Bliss was a wreck, and the greater part of the stock was 
destroyed. The barber shop of John M^'Donough and the 
offices of the Earle and Prew Express Companv and the 
Warren Telegraph also suffered considerable damage. 

Messages were sent to Bristol and Providence, and 
the Fire Departments of both places stood ready to lend 
assistance if needed, but their services were not required. 
The Warren firemen deserved and won great praise for 
their coolness, promptitude and braverv, and the excellence 
of their work. 

Cole's Hotel was founded in 1762 by Ebenezer Cole 
Junior. His son Colonel Benjamin Cole succeeded him as 
landlord, and was, in turn, succeeded by his son George 



of Warren^ Rhode Island 6l 

Cole. It was a famous hostelry in olden times. Mention 
has already been made of the large barn which was once 
connected with it. 

During the fall of 1778, Lafayette, then in command 
of the troops stationed on the eastern shore of Narragansett 
Bay, made Warren his headquarters for a prief period. Tra- 
dition says that he was extremely fond of the "Rhode Island 
johnny-cakes baked on a board" that were daily served at 
"Cole's Tavern." At one time he and a fellow officer en- 
gaged in an "eating match" in which he easily led his oppo- 
nent. When he bade farewell to Warren he rode away 
with his saddle-bags filled with johhny-cakes specially baked 
for him by the fair hands of Roby Cole, the landlords young 
daughter. 

The large hall connected with the old hostlery was a 
central point in the town's life a Century and more ago. 

All sorts of meetings were held within its walls. Show- 
men exhibited wild animals and monstrosities there, and 
there the "singin' skule" found a home. There banquets 
were served with tables that literally groaned beneath their 
weight of good cheer. 

The present Goff's Hotel occupies the site of Cole's 
Hotel. 

In May, 1893, ^^e Mechanics voted to flv a signal 
from their flagstaff when fires occurred in the daytime in or- 
der to notify the Warren Manufacturing Company's opera- 
tives, many of whom were members of the Company. 

At about seven o'clock on the evening of October 3, 
1895, ^h^ town was startled by the announcement that one 
of the large mills belonging to the Warren Manufacturing 
Company was in flames. In an incredibly short time an 
immense crowd gathered on North Water Street and adjacent 



^ 



62 A History of the Fi?'e Department 

side streets, and, from these points viewed the greatest con- 
flagration that ever occurred in Warren, with the exception 
of that kindled during the Revolution. 

The fire originated in, or near, the boiler-room of 
the Number One, or "old Mill," where a quantity of 
cotton had been placed to dry over night. This cotton, it 
is supposed, was ignited by sparks from the engine. The 
flames were first discovered by Police Ofiicer James Connolly, 
while making his rounds, and he quickly notified William 
M^'Manus, the night watchman of the manufacturing plant, 
who, in turn, sounded the alarm. 

The bells of the various churches immediately took up 
the cry, and the entire Fire Department hastened to the 
rescue. The hose of the Mechanics and Narragansett Com- 
panies were quickly coupled on the hydrants, but the pres- 
sure was so inadequate that the water was unable to compete 
with the flames. It very soon became evident that assist- 
ance from outside must be called for and John Waterman, 
Treasurer of the Warren Manufacturing Company, tele- 
phoned to Bristol, Providence, and Fall River asking for 
aid. 

The Hydraulion Hose Company of Bristol immediate- 
ly responded to the summons. The Bristol mains, which 
are supplied from the Warren Water Works plant, were 
turned off and the engineer at the pumping station in this 
town was ordered to increase the pressure which, however, he 
was unable to do. By this time the fire was raging fiercely, 
and was visible tor miles beyond the limits of Bristol County. 
From every direction people came pouring into Warren in 
vehicles and on bicycles. 

The Fall River Fire Department sent their fine new 
engine "Metacomet" dashing over the long stretch of road 



of Warren^ Rhode Island 6 J 

connecting that city with Warren, and it arrived here in one 
hour and a quarter after leaving the engine house. It was 
stationed on the wharf south of the mills, but, to the dismay 
of the firemen, refused to do its duty owing to some dis- 
arrangement of its mechanism. A special train from Prov- 
idence brought steamers 5 and 8, with hose carts, in charge 
of Fire Commissioners Stillman White and W. H. Luther. 
These immediately went to work, but it was impossible to 
save the mill. 

The Warren Manufacturing Company's plant consisted 
of the old, or Number One, Mill and two other mills, all 
three buildings being joined together and covering an area of 
about six hundred and seventy-five feet in length and sixty- 
five feet in breadth. At the front of the main building, was 
the office, while at the rear, near the Warren River, was a large 
store-house for finished goods. From the old mill the flames 
rushed to the adjacent structures and the whole plant became 
a seething mass of fire. 

It was a sight never to be forgotten. The flames roared 
and hissed like fiery dragons. The heat was intense. The 
sky and river were almost blood red. The river presented 
a weirdly picturesque appearance. Burning bales of cotton 
cloth floated southward with the tide, looking like miniature 
ships afire. Between these darted small craft of every de- 
scription whose owners, armed with boat-hooks, busied 
themselves in securing and extinguishing the blazing bales. 
Over everything rained showers of sparks. Fortunately 
the wind was blowing from the north-east, and the most of 
these were driven into the river. 

The flying sparks and embers, however, ignited many 
surrounding buildings. A large boarding-house opposite 
the mill caught several times, but was not destroyed. A 



^ 



64 



A History of the Fire Department 



tenement house on Sisson Street was ruined, but the occu- 
pants succeeded in saving the greater portion of their house- 
hold effects, though some of these were badly damaged. 

The extensive lumber and coal yards of E. M. Martin 
and Son which adjoined the south end of the mill grounds 
were in extreme danger. A number of small fires started 
in these yards but were extinguished before much mischief 
was done. 

When the flames had completed their work nothing 
remained of the mills but the cellars and a heap of ashes 
and smoking embers. % 1 25,000 worth of finished goods which 
the store-house contained were consumed. The value of 
the property was estimated at S 1,000,000, and the plant 
was insured in a score of companies for about $850,000. 
The finished stock was insured for $100,000. Additions 
to the mill were in process of construction when the fire 
came, and :^6^,ooo had, just previously, been expended for 
new machinery. 

The weekly pay-roll of the Company amounted to 
$8,000. The number of operatives employed was about 
1,500. The fire was a severe blow to Warren, but business 
rallied when a new plant, with modern improvements, was 
opened. 

l^he Warren Manufacturing Company was the pioneer 
of the Cotton industry in Warren. Its first mill was erected 
in 1847, and contained 10,000 spindles. In i860 a second 
mill was built with 18,000 spindles, and in 1873, a third 
mill with 30,000 spindles. The old mill was constructed 
of stone, the later ones of brick. As has been stated they 
were joined together and, practically, constituted one edifice. 
There were three towers, in one of which hung a bell. An 
incident of the fire was the tolline of this bell as the tower 




o 

is 



Z 



U3 



of Warren, Rhode Island 6^ 

succumbed to the ravages of the flames. 

But for the assistance rendered by Providence, Bristol, 
and Fall River, the disastrous results of the fire would have 
been much greater than they were. The out-of-town fire- 
men were entertained with a lunch at Goff's Hotel before 
leaving for their homes. 

On April 9, 1896, the Narragansetts celebrated their 
fiftieth anniversary. Thirty-six members of the Company, 
including Honorable Benjamin Drowne and James B. Bar- 
rus, both charter members, were present at the festivities. 
There were twenty-three invited guests, among these being 
members of the Board of Engineers, town officials, and 
members of the Mechanics Company of Warren and the 
Hydraulion Hose Company of Bristol. A fine banquet was 
served, which was followed by speeches and music. 

On August 16, 1896, the "Threes" attended a muster 
at Riverside where they exhibited the Hero. So eager was 
the crowd to examine the curious little engine that its bars 
were broken in the crush. A piece of the wood was, later, 
presented to the Providence Veteran Firemen's Association. 
The year 1897 will be remembered for the number of 
incendiary fires that occurred during it. They may be listed 

as follows: 

June 20, 1897, 5 o'clock a.m., building on wharf be- 
longing to John Smith at the foot of Miller Street. The 
firemen were kept busy at this blaze for about two hours. 

June 22, 4.30 A.M., fire in a barn belonging to H. 
Trombley. Another fire in the cotton waste house and 
cotton store-house of the Warren Manufacturing Company's 
plant. Fires lasted about two hours. 

July 25, fire at the barn of the Warren Manufacturing 
Company, in which the building was badiv damacred, and 



66 A E 7 story of the Fire Depurtf/ieut 

two horses lost their Hves. 

August 24, a fire discovered in the back entry o\ a 
house on North Main Street, but extinguished without an 
alarm having been given. 

August 29, 2.30 A.M., a fire in a barn belonging to 
Reverend A. D. Bernard, located east of the railroad in the 
northerlv part of the town. In this fire two horses were 
burned to death and about seven tons of hay destroyed. 

September 22, a fire in a barn on Kelly Street, the 
property of Thomas O'Brien. Alarm sounded at midnight. 

October 8, i o'clock a.m., a fire in a barn on Union 
Street, owned by John H. Brown and occupied by Michael 
Hurley. The barn was badly burned and Mr. Hurley lost 
a horse. 

October 31, i o'clock a.m., fire in a barn on North 
Water Street, occupied by John Maloy. The incendiary 
turned Mr. Maloy's horse out oi the building before start- 
ing the blaze, but some harnesses and a quantity of hay were 
burned. 

November 2, 9.20 p.m., fire in the barn of C. H. 
Trombley at the North end of town. The hay contained 
in the building was slightly damaged. 

November 13, fire discovered at midnight in the barn 
of William Collamore on Hope Street. The barn was only 
slightly damaged, but a horse stabled in it lost its life. 

November 14, fire in the barn of John H. Carpenter 
on Jefferson Street. Discovered and extinguished without 
any alarm being given. 

November 17, 4 p.m., fire in a hen-house on the prem- 
ises of James A. Seymour on Child Street. Discovered and 
fortunately extinguished, as there was a break in the water 
main near Mr. Seymour's residence. 



/ 



of IVarren, Rhode Is/mui 6y 

Such a number of incendiary fires kept the town in a 
state of panic. Nervous women found it impossible to sleep. 
Despite a vigilant watch kept by the police and citizens, no 
trace of the "fire bug" was discovered. 

In September, 1897, the residents of South Warren 
petitioned the Town Council to place a hose carriage in that 
section of the town. The petition was granted, and a car- 
riage with six hundred feet of hose was stationed in the barn 
of William B. Nichols at Burr's Hill. A meeting of citi- 
zens was called on September 15, for the purpose of form- 
ing a Fire Company. 

The meeting was called to order by Charles W. Greene, 
who briefly stated its object. George G. Cole was elected 
Chairman and Charles W. Greene Secretary of the meeting. 

After a general discussion of the matter, it was voted 
to form a company to be known as the Burr's Hill Fire 
Company Number Four. The following officers were 
then elected: 

Foreman, George G. Cole. 

Assistant Foreman, . . . George T. Greene Jr. 

Hose Director, Charles E. Gray. 

Leading Hoseman, Richard Smith. 

Pipemen. 
Charles M. Davis. Charles E. Child. 

Hydrant Men. 
Henry M. Darling. Hiram O. Burtis. 

Clerk, Charles W. Greene. 

The incendiarism begun in 1897 continued until the mid- 
spring of 1898. On January 8, at two o'clock in the 



68 A History of the Fire l^epartinent 

mornina;, the fire bells called the Department once again to 
the barn of Reverend A. D. Bernard, the pastor of the 
French Catholic Church of Saint Jean Baptiste. All the 
companies worked with a will, but the structure was com- 
pletely destroyed, five cows and ten pigs perishing in the 
flames. A quantity of hay was also burned. 

On February 5, at half past ten in the evening, fire was 
discovered in the attic of a four story tenement at the cor- 
ner of Main and Kelly Streets, the property of the Warren 
Manufacturing Company. The people living on the lower 
floor heard someone go up the stairway leading to the top 
story, but thought it one of the tenants. The incendiary, 
after starting a blaze among some rags on the attic floor, 
quietly passed down stairs and out of the building. Fortu- 
nately the fire was discovered and put out without the use 
of water. The Fire Department rallied to the scene through 
a deep fall of snow that hampered their movements greatly. 

On February 8, at four o'clock in the morning, a build- 
ing on Joyce Street occupied as an eating saloon by W. F. 
Parkinson was found to be in flames and its contents were 
entirely destroyed. The origin of this fire was doubtful. 
Some considered it the work of the "fire bug." Others 
thought it due to the heating apparatus. 

On February 12, the barn of William T. Honan on 
North Water Street was fired. The damage, however, was 
very slight. 

The following Resolutions were passed on March 14, 
1898: 

"Resolved: That the electors of Warren in town meet- 
ing assembled hereby place on record this formal expression 
of their appreciation of the faithful and energetic services ot 
the members ot the fire department during the past year by 



of JVarren, Rhode Is In /id 6q 

which, notwithstanding the unprecedented number of fires 
which have occurred, the loss and damage therefrom has 
been comparatively light. 

"And be it further resolved That as a more substantial 
token of our appreciation the sum of Two Hundred and 
Fifty Dollars be and the same is hereby appropriated (in 
addition to the former appropriation made at this annual 
meeting) for the use of said department, one hundred dollars 
to the Narragansett Fire Co. No 3 ; one hundred dollars to 
the Mechanic's Fire Co. No 2; and fifty dollars to the 
Massasoit Hook and Ladder Co." 

On April 10, 1898, a shed in the rear of D. L.Tur- 
ner's block on Main Street was fired at about half past nine 
in the evening. The shed was destroyed and an adjacent 
house on State Street, owned by Cyrus Peabody was slightly 
damaged. 

On September 7, at five o'clock in the afternoon, a 
blaze was discovered in a storehouse used by the Warren 
Manufacturing Company at the foot of Sisson Street. No 
great damage to the property was done. 

During the month of September, 1898, the Mechanics 
attended a muster at Bristol where thev succeeded in win- 
ning a prize of fifty dollars in gold. 

On January 17, 1899, at half past six o'clock in the 
evening an incendiary fire was lighted in a barn occupied 
by Doctor Thomas H. Connolly and located on the North 
side of Market Street. Axe-man Manton F. Brown of the 
"Threes," while examining the cellar, discovered a box partly 
filled with hay which had been soaked in kerosene. In it 
was a wax candle fitted into a shingle. This fire was put 
out before any serious damage was done. 

On February 17, 1899, the barn of E. Tromblev was 



JO A History of the Fire l^epartment 

fired. The alarm was 2;iven at a quarter to nine in the 
evening. The snow was very deep, but the Number Two 
Company quickly laid a line of hose and extinguished the 
flames. This was the last of the long list of incendiary fires 
which kept Warren in a state of anxiety for more than two 
years. The incendiary was never captured. 

On November 6, 1899, there was a fire at the plant oi 
the Gas Company caused by an explosion which occurred 
at half past ten o'clock in the morning. About one half the 
building was destroyed. Panes of glass in dwelling houses 
opposite the plant were shattered. 

On June 21, 1900, the Mechanics attended a muster 
and Field Day at Bristol, Rhode Island. Thirtv-two men 
in uniform, and ten fine members of the Company, left 
Warren in the morning on the half past nine train, having 
with them, as guests, fourteen members of the Narragansett 
Company, Number Three, of Warren. Upon their arrival 
at Bristol they were met by a detail of the Hydraulion En- 
gine and Hose Company of that town by whom they were 
escorted to the Common. At half past eleven a short street 
parade was given, atter which the procession returned to 
the Common. 

At twenty minutes past five in the afternoon, the Me- 
chanics went on the stand and succeeded in placing to their 
credit a stream of two hundred and thirteen feet. The 
blowing out of the hose coupling prevented them from en- 
gaging in a second trial, but they bore away the first prize 
ot one hundred and fifty dollars. 

They returned to Warren in the evening on the seven 
o'clock train and were met at the station by the German 
Band. After a street parade they repaired to their hall where 
they kept open house during the evening. Refreshmetits 



of Warren^ Rhode Island yi 

were served, and music and speeches were in order. Dur- 
ing the day they received many compliments on their fine 
appearance and orderly behavior. 

On June 27, 1900, John F. M'^Donough entertained 
the Company with a supper at GofF's Hotel in commemora- 
tion of their victory. The Board of Engineers were the 
guests of honor. Speech making and vocal and instrumen- 
tal music followed the banquet. 

On Thursday, August 2, 1900, the Mechanics attended 
a second Muster given by the Narragansett Fire Company, 
Number One, of Riverside. They left Warren at two min- 
utes past ten in the morning, under charge of Hose Director 
J. J. Cronin, the Foreman being confined to his home by 
illness. The party included twenty-eight members of the 
company, with thirty-six honorary members and substitutes, 
and fourteen men from the Narragansett Company as guests 
making, in all, a body of sixty- four men. 

As had happened in Bristol, the Mechanics bore away 
the first prize of one hundred and fifty dollars, after placing 
a stream of one hundred and ninety-seven feet to their 
credit. Upon their return home at eight in the evening, 
they made a short parade, and then entertained their friends 
at their Engine House with refreshments and cigars, sup- 
plemented by speeches and vocal and instrumental music. 
In December, 1900, the Mechanics acquired a new hose 
carriage, which had been, for some time, greatly needed. 
The Massasoit Hook and Ladder Company, on June 
7, 1 90 1, passed stringent rules regarding absence from fires. 
They voted that each member, not responding to an alarm, 
should be fined one dollar unless able to give a satisfactory 
excuse to the Foreman within ten days. If absent three 
times, without an excuse, and with unpaid fines, members 



y2 A History of the Fire Depart f}ie?it 

should be discharged from the Company. 

The Mechanics observed Memorial Sunday for the 
first time, during this month, by decorating the graves of 
deceased members of their Companv with flowers. 

Michael Hurley, for many years an officer of the Me- 
chanics, died in 1 90 1. He had served as Assistant Foreman 
and Foreman of the Company, and had also held a position 
upon the Board of Engineers. The Company inserted in 
the Warren Gazette a set of Resolutions expressive of their 
appreciation of his able and faithful service. An engrossed 
copy of the Resolutions v/as presented to the family of the 
deceased. 

On January 20, 1902, at a quarter to one a.m., an 
alarm of fire was sent from Barrington and, in> response to 
the request for aid, the Mechanics hastened over the bridge 
between Warren and that town, being soon followed by the 
Narragansetts with the steamer. The fire proved to be 
in a house located on the main road and occupied by Doctor 
Samuel Stephens. On arriving; at the scene of action the 
firemen found themselves seriously handicapped. The steam- 
er refused to pick up water and, as Barrington contained no 
hydrants, the Mechanics were ordered back to Warren to 
lav hose from the hydrant, at that town's northern limit, 
across the bridge to the burning house. Connection was 
made with the steamer at the bridge, but it was half past 
one o'clock before the first water was thrown on the blaze. 
It was impossible to save the house and a small cottage, just 
west of it, was also burned. A barn on the Stephens prem- 
ises was igniteci several times but the firemen succeeded in 
saving that and also some nearby dwelling-houses. It was 
ten minutes past four o'clock before the hose ceased playing. 
The citizens of Barrington, later, sent a letter of thanks to 



of Warren, Rhode Island 75> 

the Number Three Company, and presented the Mechanics 
with twenty-five dollars in January, 1903. 

On December 12, 1902, the residence of Miss Mary 
E. Pearce, at the corner of Main and Broad Streets, suffered 
from a fire in which Miss Pearce was quite severely burned. 

In the spring of 1903 another Fire Company, consisting 
of twenty- nine members, was organized in Warren with head- 
quarters in the Parker Mill District. This organization 
adopted the name of "The Rough and Ready Fire Com- 
pany No 5.," and it is its boast that "every member stands 
up to the name." The first entry upon the records of the 
Company bears date April 6, 1903. Application for a 
Charter was made, in October, by John H. Wardick, Ernest 
Greenwood, Daniel Cloutier, George Corner and Frank 
Dubeau. The first fire at which the Company appeared 
occurred on December 26, 1903, at the Metacomet House 
on Metacom Avenue. 

On January 13, 1904, the Narragansett Company were 
elected to membership in the Rhode Island State Firemen's 
League which the Mechanics had joined some time before. 
This year the Narragansetts observed Memorial Sunday for 
the first time. 

During this year the Rough and Ready Company took 
part in a Hose Reel Contest at Central Falls. They captured 
the championship banner, which they held for two years, 
also a prize of twenty-five dollars in gold. 

On May 25, 1905, the old Butterworth homestead on 
Child Street, near Barnaby's Corner, was destroyed by fire 
caused by a defect in the chimney. The blaze broke out 
at an early hour in the afternoon, but as no alarm was sent 
in to the compact part of the town, the Fire Department 
did not render any assistance. The house was an ancient 



J 4 ^ History of the Fhr Depa?'tment 

one, located on land that had been in the Butterworth family 
for several generations. It was one of the town's oldest 
landmarks, and was famous as having been the birthplace of 
Hezekiah Butterworth, the poet and author, and one of the 
most popular writers in New England during his lifetime. 

The house was occupied by Addison Butterworth, a 
brother of the poet, and he succeeded in saving the greater part 
of his furniture. He lost, however, nearly all of his clothing 

The blaze, fanned by a brisk wind, rapidly consumed 
the house and an adjacent woodshed. A wagon and several 
farming tools were also destroyed. The dense volumes of 
smoke and showers of sparks that issued from the flaming 
building could be seen for miles around. 

It is to be regretted that the Fire Companies were not 
called. Warren has now left but few of her old historic 
landmarks. The Butterworth homestead was an old-fash- 
ioned gambrel-roofed cottage and, with its surrounding stone- 
walled fields, was an excellent type of the New England 
home of the olden times. 

On November 2, 1905, George Bowen, for twenty-five 
years a member of the Narragansett Company and for a 
lengthy period its Assistant Foreman, resigned his office, 
being upon the point of removing his residence from War- 
ren to Providence. Mr, Bowen was well acquainted with 
all the duties pertaining to a fireman's position, and had 
served as judge at many musters. His comrades presented 
him with a handsome morris chair as a testimonial of their 
esteem and respect. 

Memorial Sunday, June to, 1906, was observed by the 
Number Two Company with more than ordinary solemni- 
ties. The Company, in full uniform, and accompanied by 
the Board of Engineers, and the Rough and Ready Fire 



of IViwreu^ Rhode IsLuid Jf^ 

Company Number Five, of East Warren, marched to Saint 
Mary's Cemetery to the music of the Harmony Band. At 
the Cemetery they listened to an address given by John 
M^Pike, a former Foreman ot the Company. This Me- 
morial Sunday is recorded as the most successful one of anv 
observed by the Mechanics. 

On July 17, 1906, the "Twos" presented Mr. Patrick 
W. O'Neil with a handsome picture, Mr. O'Neil having 
resigned the office of Treasurer of the Company, a position 
which he had ably and faithfully filled for six years. The 
presentation speech was made by Mr. M*^Pike, and Mr. 
O'Neil was quite overpowered by this unexpected expression 
of esteem from his comrades. 

On the afternoon of November 11, 1906, the ice 
houses of John H. Brown, located on the West Bank of the 
Kickemuit River, were found to be on fire. The Rough 
and Ready Company were quickly on the spot and the other 
Companies were summoned, but despite all efforts the buil- 
dings were totallv consumed. 

On December 3, 1906, another ancient landmark of 
the town was destroyed by fire. This was the old, two 
story and a half gambrel-roofed house situated on the north 
side of Baker Street at the corner of Water. The 
house was built by Jesse Baker Senior, in 1762, and when 
it was erected South Water Street had not been opened. 
The house fronted towards the south on "a way running 
down to the river," which is now a part of Baker Street, 

Jesse Baker was a cooper and, in his shop near the 
river, carried on an extensive business employing, besides 
skilled workmen, some thirty apprentices. Warren was 
largely engaged in the whaling and West India trade in 
olden times, and the barrels and hogsheads made in the 



J 6 A Historv of the Fire Depart fNent 

Baker cooperage journeved to distant lands and returned 
filled with oil and molasses. 

When Mr. Baker purchased the land on which he 
built his house, he acquired a right in Massasoit's spring 
on the opposite side of the way. Subsequently he and his 
neighbor Martin Bowen excavated about the spring and 
walled it up as a well. 

In 1806 he sold a water lot to his four sons, Jfesse, 
David, William, and Luther Baker, who erected a wharf 
upon it at the foot of Baker Steet. 

When the British raided Warren, a party of hurley 
Hessians visited the Baker house where they amused 
themselves by breaking and burning various household ar- 
ticles. The author of this book has, in her possession, the 
old iron firedogs on which Jesse Baker's kitchen chairs were 
burned. Fhe Hessians' sport was interrupted by a young 
and gallant British officer who drove them from the premises. 

The fire which consumed the old house is supposed to 
have been caused bv the soot in one of the chimneys be- 
coming ignited. The blaze was discovered at about ten 
o'clock in the morning bv three Italians who hastily roused 
the occupants. But, before a rescue could be made, Napo- 
leon Carboneau, a French Canadian lad who slept in an attic 
room, perished in the flames. 

All five of the Warren Fire Companies responded to 
the alarm and worked diligently to save the house, but in 
vain. They, however, succeeded in preventing the fire 
from igniting other buildings in the immediate vicinity. 

For more than a century and a quarter the house was 
owned and occupied by members of the Baker family. At 
the time of its destruction it was the property of Miss Bessie 
Gifford Bowen, a niece of Mrs William Baker. William 



of Warren, Rhode I si (Did jj 

Baker was the last descendant of Jesse Baker to own the 
estate. 

In 1908 the lot upon which the Baker house stood 
was purchased of Miss Bowen by the Massasoit Monument 
Association who have greatly improved and beautified it. 
It is hoped that, at some future day, a fitting memorial 
to the great Indian sachem will be erected on the spot 
so near the site where his royal wigwam stood in 1621 when 
it was visited by Edward Winslow and Stephen Hopkins, 
two of the Pilgrims of Plymouth. 

During 1906 the Mechanics were the recipients of three 
much appreciated gifts, a handsome flag, donated by John 
Campbell, a fife, donated by John M'"Pike, and a new suc- 
tion hose, presented by Joseph B. Hoar, Chief of the Fire 
Department. 

At a muster held in Bristol this year, the Rough and 
Ready Company won the second prize in a Hose Reel 
Contest, fifteen dollars in gold. 

On February 23, 1907, the Mechanics attended a Fair 
at Riverside where they won ten dollars in gold for turning; 
out the largest number of uniformed men. Their Foreman, 
John M'^Pike, received the largest number of votes in a 
contest for a fine rubber suit. 

At a town meeting held in March, 1907, the sum of 
three hundred dollars was appropriated for the purpose of 
establishing a fire alarm signal for the use of the Fire De- 
partment, and for placing telephones in the residences of the 
Engineers and Assistant Engineers and the Foremen of the 
various Companies. 

Only one hundred and eighty dollars of this appropri- 
ation was actually expended. A siren was obtained and was 
installed at the large plant of the Warren Manufacturing 



... 



J 8 A History of the hi re J^epartnwnt 

Company at the north end of the town. That Company 
furnished, gratuitously, all the labor required for setting up 
the siren and has always maintained it without expense to 
the town. 

On labor day, September 2, 1907, the State Firemen's 
League of Rhode Island held its annual muster at Warren. 

The muster was planned and its details carried out by 
the Mechanics, who began to make arrangements for it in 
the early summer. A generous fund, contributed by the 
citizens of Warren was placed at their disposal. 

The Committee of Arrangements was composed of the 
following gentlemen: 

John M^'Pike, Chairman. 
John M. Conrick, Secretary. 
Daniel L. Loughran, Treasurer. 

John H. Brown. Andrew B. Cavanagh. 

William Monahan. Charles Coristine. 

Fred. V. Mann. Samuel Emmet. 

William M'^Kenna. William Boyd. 

The reception Committee consisted of John H. Brown, 
Daniel Loughran, and John M"^Pike. 

I'he Judges of Engine Contests, appointed by the 
Tournament Committee of the League, were as follows: 

Baxter H. Studley, Pawtucket. 

Philip Brady, Bristol. 

Thomas Stevens, Warren 

William H. Mason, Riverside. 

Thomas Rhodes, Pawtuxet. 

Fred W. Cady, East Providence. 

Charles Hunt, Knightsville. 



of IViirren, Rhode Island jg 

Samuel Carpenter, Providence. 

P. M. Laughlin, Cranston. 

Judges of Hose Reel Contests. 
William J. Faulkner, .... East Providence. 

William H. Burke, Bristol. 

George A. Shean, Crompton. 

Everett E. Potter, • Pawtuxet. 

Fred V. Mann, Warren. 

Elaborate preparations were made for what promised to be 
a red letter day in the annals of the town. Bands of music 
were engaged, and a large tent for use on the Muster Grounds 
was purchased by the Mechanics. But, alas! Labor Day 
arrived, bringing with it a rain that poured in torrents 
throughout the day. It was as if the sky had determined 
to show the paltry machines that it had no rivals as far as 
water was concerned. 

The opening event of the morning was a parade, the 
largest of the kind ever seen in the town. There were 
twenty engines, fifteen hose reels, five brass bands, and nu- 
merous fife and drum bands in the line which formed at 
half past ten o'clock on North Main Street. Despite the 
drenching downpour the various Companies presented a fine 
appearance. Among the engines was the famous " Hay Cart" 
entered by the Veteran Firemen's Association of Pawtucket. 

The procession, headed by the Chief Marshal, John 
H. Brown, moved from North Main Street to Child, thence 
through Handy, Market, Federal, Wood, Liberty, Water, 
Miller, Main, Baker, Water, State, Main, Washington, 
Water, Broad, Main, Franklin, to the grounds on which the 
engine contests took place. The hose reel contests were 
given on Massasoit Avenue. 



8o A History of the Fire J^epartment 

The principa] prizes were awarded as tollows: 

A prize ot twenty-five dollars for the best appearing Com- 
pany was divided between the Hydraulion Engine and Hose 
Company of Bristol and the East Providence Fire Company. 

The First Prize of one hundred and fifty dollars went to the 
Volunteer Fire Company, No. i, of Pawtuxet, already hold- 
ers of the State Championship Banner. Their Engine, the 
" P'ire King," made a record of two hundred and eight feet, 
three and a half inches. 

The Second Prize ot one hundred dollars was captured by 
the Cranston Fire Engine Company, No. i, their engine, 
the "Star No. i," a Jeffers machine, making a record ot 
two hundred teet, nine and a half inches. 

The Third Prize, fifty dollars, went to the Natick Fire 
Engine Company. With the "Natick", built by Gleason 
and Bailey, they recorded one hundred and ninety-seven feet, 
two inches. 

There were several other prizes of twenty - five . dollars 
each but I can find no record of their winners. Neither am 
1 able to find the winners of prizes in the Hose Reel Contests. 
In May, 1908, the following notice was issued: 

"All men living south of the South Main Street crossing, 
who are interested in the formation of a Fire Company in 
the South part of the town, are requested to meet at the 
Hose House on Bridge Street, Thursday evening, May 14, 
at 7.30 o'clock." 

(Signed) Joseph B. Hoar, 

Chief of Fire Dept. 

As a result of this invitation, a large gathering of citizens 



J. 







h 



U4 



of JVarreriy Rhode Island 8 1 

of South Warren assembled at the time and place appointed. 
Chief Hoar called the meeting to order and requested Charles 
W, Greene to act as Secretary. 

The Chief addressed the meeting, calling attention to 
the desirability of forming a company to handle the fire 
apparatus efficiently at fires in that quarter of the town. His 
words were listened to with attention and interest and, at 
their close, it was unanimously voted to form a Fire Com- 
pany immediately. 

A Committee of three were appointed to confer with 
the Chief and Secretary regarding the nomination of officers. 

The following gentlemen were unanimously elected 
officers of the Company: 

Foreman, George T. Greene. 

Assistant Foreman, .... Henry M. Slocum. 
Hose Director, . . . William H. Dickerson. 
Cleric, William I. Seymour. 

After a discussion relative to the needs of the new Com- 
pany, during which refreshments were served, the meeting 
adjourned. 

On May 22, a special meeting was called at which it 
was announced that George T. Greene declined to serve as 
Foreman. Charles W. Greene was elected to fill the vacancy 
thus caused. 

The Foreman, with Henry M. Slocum, H. Dewees 
Cady, Fred R. Simmons, and William I. Seymour were 
appointed a Committee to draw up By-Laws. 

It was voted to close the Roll Book, all members thus 
far enrolled to constitute the Charter Members. 

It was voted to call the Company "The Burr's Hill 
Fours" 



82 A History of the Fire Department 

On June 2, the following additional officers were elected : 

H. P. Rowland, . . . Second Asst. Foreman. 

H. S. Child, First Pipeman. 

Wm. G. Faulkner, Second 

B. A. Church, Third " 

T. J. Kilroy, Fourth " 

R. H. Greene, First Hydrant Man. 

C. G. Johnson, Second 

G. B. Arnold, First Axe Man. 

H.A.Nichols, Second 

Jesse Dickerson, First Lantern Man. 

Howard Jones, Second 

On June 24, the By-Laws, as prepared by the Committee 
appointed for the purpose, were adopted and ordered printed 
in book form. 

During the spring of 1909 a Drum Corps was organ- 
ized in connection with the Number Two Company. A 
bass drum and two smaller drums were purchased for use 
by the Corps. 

On June 14, 1909, at a quarter to one in the afternoon 
a barn at "Shore Acres," the farm of Dr. Thomas H. Con- 
nolly in Barrington, was destroyed by Fire. The Number 
Three Company, with the steam.er, responded to the call for 
aid, but no efforts could save the structure. So strong was 
the westerly breeze that sparks were borne across the War- 
ren River to this town where they ignited the carriage shop 
of T. J. Campbell, buildings on the premises of George H. 
Covo, and the handkerchief mianufactory at the corner of 
Water and Baker Streets. None of these buildings, how- 
ever, were seriously damaged. 



of Warren, Rhode Island 8 J 

On Labor Day, 1909, the Mechanics participated in 
the Muster of the State League, at Bristol, capturing the 
first prize of one hundred and fifty dollars and, as Cham- 
pions of the League, winning a beautiful American flag;, 
appropriately inscribed. 

At a town meeting held March 10, 19 10, an appropri- 
ation of two thousand dollars was voted for the purpose of 
erecting a fire station at East Warren. The station was 
constructed under the supervision of the Board of Engineers. 

On November 23, 19 10, the Burr's Hill Fours did 
service at a fire for the first time since their organization. 
The fire destroyed a cottage on Main Street in South War- 
ren occupied by a Portuguese family. 

In the spring of 191 1, a Fife and Drum Band was 
organized in the Number Two Company. 

On April 7, the Narragansett Company celebrated its 
sixty-fifth anniversary by giving an old-fashioned baked bean 
supper served at its hall on Baker Street. Music, readings, 
and an exhibition of club swinging followed the supper. The 
invited guests included the members of the Town Council, 
the Board of Engineers, and representatives of ten Fire 
Companies. The occasion was pronounced a most enjoy- 
able one. 

On April 24, the Massasoit Hook and Ladder Com- 
pany, desirous of making their organization more efficient, 
empowered the Foreman to appoint such additional officers 
as, in his judgement, seemed needful for the Company's 
welfare. 

On October 10, at about half past four in the morning, 
a continuous blast from the whistle of the Cutler Manufact- 
uring Company's plant roused Warren to the realization that 
a fire was in progress. The Fire Department hastened to 



84 A History of the Fire Depin'tment 

the large mill on Cutler Street, where they found a blaze 
under the flooring of the picker room. This blaze had been 
discovered the previous day by employees of the plant who 
had, as was supposed, extinguished it. Prompt action 
rendered by the Department prevented a serious conflagra- 
tion. 

On October 11, at about the same hour in the morn- 
ing, the plant sent out a second alarm. Fire had been 
discovered in a shed adjoining the mill. The shed was 
partially destroyed ere the flames were subdued. Just how 
this second fire originated is not fully known, but it is not 
supposed to have been the work of an incendiary. 

In closing this sketch of the Warren Fire Department 
let us glance at present conditions. All of the various 
Companies are active and efficient under an able and con- 
scientious Board of Engineers. Each Engine and Hose 
Company receives from the town an annual appropriation 
of one hundred dollars, while the Hook and Ladder Company 
receives fifty dollars. By means of tairs, lawn parties, and 
dramatic entertainments the Companies, from time to time, 
have been able to place substantial amounts in their several 
treasuries. 

The Engine Houses have halls well furnished and pro- 
vided with pianos, books, magazines and papers. Those 
members who enjoy games find checkers, cards, etc. ready 
at hand. A great deal of interest in baseball is manifested 
among the men. Indeed the Engine Houses are, so to 
speak, social centres in which the firemen find both rest and 
recreation for mind and body. 

Warren has always been proud of its Fire Department, 
and justly so. The Warren firemen have been ever prompt 
in response to the call of dutv, and have worked, unceasingly, 



of H\irren, Rhode Island S5 

to better the service in all possible ways. They have won 
golden opinions outside the town by their fine appearance 
and gentlemanly behavior at musters, fairs and other gath- 
erings. Their past history is an exceedingly honorable one, 
and, doubtless, the future has much that is good in store 
for them. There may be some persons who do not fully 
appreciate what the services of these men mean to our town 
but the majority of citizens thoroughly realize that the 

Jfire department is one of the 

most important branches 
of our local govern- 
ment. 




of tfjt 
of ti)t 

Jf ire department 

of 

OTarren 
Eijotie Ssflantr 



c?(? Presidents of Kike Wards. 

Elected 



I 804-1882. 



William Barton 
James Maxwell 

Level Maxwell 
John Stockford 

John T. Child 
Sylvester Child Jr. 
James Maxwell 

JohnT. Child 
Sylvester Child 
John Stockford 

JohnT. Child 
Sylvester Child 
Wm. Collins 

John T. Child 
Wm. Collins 
Nathan M. WHieaton 

Wm. Collins 

John 1 rott 

N. M. Wheaton 

Samuel Barton 
Wm. Collins 
John IVott 

Sam'l Barton 
John Haile 
John ^rrott 

Sam'l Barton 
Wm. Carr Jr. 
John Haile 

Wm. Carr jr. 
Shubael P. Child 
John Haile 




Presidents of Fire Wards. 
( Continued. ) 



8g 



Wm. Carr jr. 
S. P. Child 
John R. Wheaton 

S. P. Child 
Suchet Mauran 
J, R. Wheaton 

John T. Child 
James Coffin 
Suchet Mauran 

).T. Child 
S. P. Child 
James Coffin 

J. T. Child 
James Coffin 
Samuel Cole 

James Coffin 
Francis Marble 
John O. Waterman 

S. P. Child 
Geo. T. Gardner 
Geo. Wheaton 

Alfred Bosworth 
Geo. T. Gardner 
Geo. Wheaton 

Wm. Cole 2d. 
Wm. R. Snell 
Thomas G. Turner 

James Coffin 
Geo. T. Gardner 
Charles Randall 



1 841-2 

1848 

T849 

1850 

1851 

1852-3 

1854 

1855-6 

1857 



go Presidents of Fire wards. 

( Concluded. ) 



James Coffin 
Geo. L. Cooke 
Geo. T. Gardner 

Geo. L. Cooke 
James M. Peck 
Elisha P. Phinney 

Geo. Barton 
James Coffin 
Samuel Wheaton 

Geo. Barton 
James Coffin 

Geo. Barton 
Thos. G. Turner 

Geo. Barton 
J. O. Waterman 

Geo. Barton 
Charles R. Cutler 




^^ 



I 





Fire 


Wards. 


QJ^ 




Fi.EcrEi) 






1 l^n"> — 


1 ^! r-" 




Barton, George 


1 L/ "J — 
1856 


1 (-. 5 ; . 

Hoar, Lewis T. 


1841 


Barton, Samuel 


1832 


Hubbard, Wm. M. 


[803 


Carr, William 


1803 


Johnson, Rodolphus B. 


1856 


Gary, Nathan 


1855 


Kinnicut, Robert 


[854 


Chase, Philip 


1852 


Luther, Ebenezer Jr. 


[804 


Ghild, John T. 


1809 


Luther, Jonathan 


[804 


Ghild, Nathan 


1810 


Marble, Francis 


[848 


Child, Shubael P. 


1844 


Mason, Stephen 


[816 


Child, Sylvester Jr. 


1814 


Mauran, Suchet 


[H39 


Coffin, James 


1844 


Maxwell, James 


f8o9 


Cole, Henry 2d. 


1855 


Maxwell, Level 


[804 


Cole, Luther 


1837 


Munroe, Palmer 


[ 803 


Cole, Samuel 


1850 


Pearce, John 


[803 


Collins, Charles 


1804 


Peck, Seth 


r8o3 


Collins, Haile 


^^S 


Phillips, Nathaniel 


.803 


Collins, William 


1832 


Randall, Charles i 


^835 


Driscol, Wm. H. 


1851 


Sanders, Nathaniel i 


[803 


Drown, Henry F. 


1857 


Sisson, Freeborn i 


815 


Eddy, Caleb 


1 8 13 


Smith, Nathaniel P. 


849 


Gardner, Geo. T. 


1843 


Snell, Wm. B. 


851 


Gardner, Joseph 


1848 


Stockford, John i 


812 


Haile, Amos Jr. 


1803 


Trott, John 


812 


Haile, Coomer 


1803 


Turner, Thomas G. 1 


852 


Haile, John 


1804 


Waterman, John O. 


849 


Hiscox, Pardon 


1851 


Wheaton, Charles i 


810 


Hoar, Allen 


1803 


Wheaton, John R. i 


835 






Wood, Haile N. i 


853 



^^ 



g2 



Barton, Thomas 
Barton, Wm. T. 
Buffington, Alvan 
Burt, Joseph 
Carr, Turner 
Chase, PhiHp 
Cole, Edmund 
Cole, Wm. 2d. 
Drown, Benjamin 
Easterbrooks, George 
Foster, Daniel 
Gardner, Charles W. 
GofF, James Jr. 



Axe 


Men-. 




Elected 




8 1 r — 


r S c8 




015 


1 ( » *^ 




1816 


Hoar, Samuel 


1823 


1854 


Hunter, Rufus 


1815 


1849 


Luther, Charles 


1826 


1823 


Luther, Cromwell 


1825 


1823 


Luther, John 


1824 


1850 


Luther, Jonathan 


1815 


1844 


Maxwell, Samuel 


1835 


1844 


Munro, James W. 


1854 


1857 


Pearce, John 


1837 


1839 


Pearce, John Jr. 


1825 


1851 


Pearce, Samuel 


1838 


1858 


Rounds, Spencer 


1856 


1815 


Sawtelle, Hollis 


1855 




Sawtelle, Joseph 


1856 



t^^ 



i 



u 



Fire Engine Company Number One. 

Hand Engine "Hero." 

Elected 

1802 1869. 



9J 



Adams, Joseph 
Alger, Preserved 
Allen, John J. 
Allen, Stephen G. 
Andrews, John 
Baker, Thomas 
Barton, David B. 
Barton, Samuel 
Barton, Thomas H. 
Barrus, Wm. L. 
Blake, Samuel 
Bowen, Henry 
Bowen, Isaac 
Bowen, Jabez 
Bowen, John G. 
Brown, David 
Brown, Geo. S. 
Buffington, Alvan 
Burgess, Frederick A. 
Burr, Henry 
Butterworth, Benj. 
Butts, George 
Cannon, John 
Carr, Caleb 2d. 
Carr, William 
Carr, Wm. Jr. 
Child, Edward A. 
Child, Ezra O. 
Child, Joseph B. 



808 Child, Nathan 

802 Child, Samuel T. 

860 Child, Wm. B. 
817 Davis, Jesse 
816 Davol, John 
804 Davol, Stephen 

861 Davol, Stephen, Jr. 
820 Driscol, James 

863 Drown, Benjamin 

83 I Drown, James 

827 Eddy, Enos 

820 Eddy, James M. 

808 Eddy, Samuel M. 

820 Folsom, John 

827 French, Ephraim 
826 French, Henry 
856 Gardner, Israel 

854 Gladding, Henry W. 

859 GofF, Henry P. 

842 GofF, James 

814 Grant, Daniel 

810 Gregory, John 

852 Haile, Amos 

808 Haile, Benjamin 

802 Haile, Coomer 

828 Haile, John 
808 Haile, William 
835 Hiscox, Pardon Jr. 
840 Hoar, Allen 



808 
811 
825 
808 
838 
810 
828 

813 
826 

814 

810 

840 

849 
810 
810 
840 

813 

858 
808 
810 
811 
802 
804 
802 
821 
860 
840 
802 



Q^ Fire Engine Company Number One. 

( Concluded. ) 



Hoar, Allen Jr. 
Hoar, John R. 
Hoar, Lewis 
Hoar, Lewis T. 
Hoar, Samuel 
Hoar, William 
Hood, Noble 
Hubbard, Wm. A. 
Ingraham, William G. 
Johnson, Stephen 
Johonnot, Oliver 
Kelly, Samuel 
Luther, Asa 
Luther, Ebenezer 
Luther, Henry H. 
Luther, John 
Luther, Jonathan 
Luther, Joseph 
Luther, Wm. Jr. 
Marble, Francis 
Marble, Geo. R. 
Martin, Ezra M. 
Mason, Isaac 
Mason, John B.' 
Mason, Stephen 
Maxwell, James 



1822 


Maxwell, Level 


[808 


1840 


Munroe, Palmer 


1803 


I8I6 


Parker, Benjamin 


1816 


1837 


Pearce, John 


1802 


1 804 


Peck, George 


[832 


1808 


Peck, Seth 


[802 


1820 


Phillips, Nathaniel 


1802 


1803 


Salisbury, John 


1826 


1858 


Salisbury, Theophilus 


1821 


1825 


Sanders, Jeremiah 


1811 


I8I8 


Sanders, Nathaniel 


[802 


I8I4 


Short, Luther C. 


1836 


1814 


Smith, E. G, 


[826 


1802 


Smith, James 


[808 


1832 


Smith, Nathaniel P. 


[848 


1808 


Sparks, Edward 


[814 


1802 


Thornton, James 


^Hl 


1828 


Turner, Daniel L. i 


867 


1849 


Turner, William 


813 


1845 


Turner. Wm. H. i 


840 


1825 


Ware, Paul 1 


820 


i«43 


Whitmarsh, Seth i 


8t2 


181 1 


Willard, Gardner ] 


804 


1840 


Winslow, John L. i 


810 


181T 


Woodmancy,Jeremiah i 


826 


1811 


Wright, Samuel i 


827 



^i*> 



Fire Engine Company Number Two. 
Hand Eng 



95 



Baker, William 
Barrus, Wm. L. 
Barton, David B. 
Bowen, Allen 
Bowen, George 
Bowen, Haile 
Bowen, James E. 
Bosworth, Benj. M. 
Bosworth, Peleg 
Brown, Wm. L. 
Buckner, John 
Burt, Alvan 

Chace, Joseph 

Child, Henry W. 

Child, John T. 

Cole, Robert M. 

Collamore, John S. 

Collins, Haile 

Cooly, Robert G. 

Crowe II, Hiram 

Drown, Henry F. 

Drown, Hezekiah 

Drown, James 

Drown, Nathaniel 

Eddy John E. 

Gardner, James 

Graves, Elisha 

Hoar, Allen 



INE "] 


R.OUGH AND Ready. " 




Elected 




1825 - 


1853. 




1826 


Hoar, Allen C. 


1826 


1830 


Hoar, Charles 


1848 


1848 


Hoar, John 


1827 


1829 


Hoar, John C. 


1836 


1829 


Hoar, John E. 


1840 


1829 


Horton, Josiah T, 


1838 


1826 


Hunter, Daniel 


1827 


1833 


Hunter, Wm. S. 


1840 


1834 


Johnson, Rodolphus B. 


1840 


^H:s 


Johnson, Stephen 


1840 


1827 


Kelly, Lawton 


1840 


1827 


Luther, John 


1826 


1828 


Luther, Joseph 


1826 


1826 


Luther, Nathan 


1840 


^'^^.T^ 


Morgan, Thomas 


1848 


1827 


Munroe, John H. 


1838 


1826 


Munroe, John S. 


1838 


^Hz 


Pearce, Lewis B. 


1827 


1848 


Phinney, Elisha 


1846 


1846 


Rounds, Spencer 


1846 


1840 


Salisbury, John 


1830 


1848 


Sisson, Thomas 


1846 


1826 


Smith, James Jr. 


'835 


1834 


Stockford, John 


1826 


1848 


Tuell, John D. 


1834 


^835 


Warner, Lucius 


1840 


1827 


Wheaton, Daniel B. 


1847 


1826 







%% 



q() Mechanics Fire Engine Company Number Two. 
Hand Engine. ( Jeffers. ) 
Elected 

^"^SZ 1874. 

Adams, John O. 
Albro, Benjamin 
Andrews, Hiram F. 
Arnold, Henry L. 
Babbit, Caleb H. 
Baker, William 
Baker, William L. 
Barrus, Horace G. 
Bosworth, Thos. T. 
Bowen, Abram 
Bowen, Benjamin 
Bowen, Caleb B. 
Bowen, Haile 
Bowen, James 
Bowen, John M. 
Bowen, Joseph L. 
Bowen, Otis P. 
Brown, Andrew 
Brown, Jabez 
Brown, Jabez Jr. 
Brown, Joseph L. 
Brown, Joseph M. 
Brown, John 
Carey, Caleb 
Carey, Henry 
Carey, Nathan 
Champlin, George T. 
Champlin, H. Frank 
Champlin, Jonathan 



1853 


Chase, Hiram 


[854 


1855 


Chase, Philip Jr. 


1854 


1867 


Chase, William 


1854 


1869 


Child, Charles 


[854 


1854 


Child, Cyril M. 


^^S3 


^^sz 


Child, Henry W. 


^^53 


1857 


Child, James C. 


[857 


^"^sz 


Child, John B. 


[854 


^^^z 


Child, Moses T. 


'853 


^'^sz 


Clark, Stephen i 


[869 


^"^^7^ 


Cole, Charles T. 


[860 


^"^SZ 


Cole, John J. 


[854 


^^3 


Cole Thomas 


^^3 


1857 


Collamore, Edwin I. 


[857 


^^S3 


Collamore, Jeremiah 


853 


1854 


Collamore, J. C. 


869 


T853 


Collamore, William i 


869 


1869 


Collins, Henry 


861 


^^53 


Connelly, Michael ] 


869 


T853 


Cooly, Robert G. i 


853 


1853 


Cooly, Rodert H. ] 


853 


1857 


Cornell, H. A. i 


853 


1869 


Coyle, Edward ] 


869 


1855 


Crowell, Hiram ] 


853 


1857 


Crowell, Luther J. ] 


866 


1855 


Crowell, Wm. B. ] 


873 


^^3 


Cummings, Joseph i 


855 


1869 


Davis, Walter ] 


869 


1855 


Drown, Benjamin ] 


853 



/ 



:'i 



I 




i 



i 



Mechanics Fire Engine Company Number Two. q? 
( Concluded. ) 

Loughran, John 
Luther, Daniel B. Jr. 
Manchester, James 
Manchester, William 
Martin, Charles H. 
Mason, Charles 
Maxwell, James H. 
McCusker, John 
McCusker, Terence 
McLeod, Murdock 
Mulvev, James 
Negus, Robert 
O'Brien, Thomas 
Olive, Amor 
Pearce, Lewis B. 
Pearce, Samuel 
Powell, William 
Rounds, Spencer 
Rounds, Spencer Jr. 
Sanders, Daniel 
Sanders, Wm. H. 
Sharpies, John 
Simister, John W. 
Sisson, Shubael B. 
Stanley, George 
Warner, Lucius 
Waterman, John O. 
Wheaton, Daniel B. 
White, Isaac B. 
Winters, William 
Wood, Albert 
Wrightington, Charles 



Drown, Benjamin Jr. 


1853 


Drown, Benjamin F. 


1866 


Drown, James 


1853 


Drown, Joshua C. 


1853 


Drown, Joshua C. Jr. 


1866 


Drown, Nathaniel 


1855 


Drown, Philip 


'853 


Drown, Wm. B. 


1869 


Easterbrooks, Philip 


1855 


Evans, Thomas 


1857 


Fales, Samuel S. 


t853 


Foster, Daniel 


1853 


Gardner, Charles W. 


[858 


HaIl,William 


[869 


Hoar, Allen C. 


^853 


Hoar, Charles 


'853 


Hoar, John C. 


^853 


Hoar, Lewis T. i 


853 


Horton, Josiah T. i 


853 


Hubbard, John W. i 


853 


Hubbard, William 


t853 


Hunter, Henrv R. i 


853 


Hunter, Philip ] 


[869 


Ingraham, Joseph L. i 


853 


Johnson, Charles A. i 


861 


Johnson, R. B. i 


853 


Johnson, Stephen i 


857 


Kent, Joseph i 


853 


LafFey, Michael i 


869 


Lanigan, John i 


869 


Leonard, E. G. Jr. i 


853 


Lewis, Charles i 


853 



L 



g8 MECHANICS Fire Engine Company No, Two. 
[ Reorganized.] 
Elected 



Anderson, William 
Armstrong, Arthur 
Asland, Adam 
Barker, John H. 
Barrv, David 
Barrv, David L. 
Barry, Edward L. 
Barrv, James 
Barry, James P. 
Barry, John 
Beauchene, Arthur 
Beauchene, Arthur S. 
Beauchene, George 
Beauchene, Noe 
Bitneau, Frank 
Bliss, Frank W. 
Bolton, George 
Booth, Wm. M. 
Bowen, Walter A. 
Boylan, William 
Boyle, William E. 
Brown, Allen 
Brown, Fred 
Brown, Joseph 
Brown, Noel M. 
Brown, Redney 
Burke, James 
Burke, James V. 
Burke, Richard 



1 878 191 I . 

88 T Burke, Timothy 1882 

878 Burns, John J. 1903 

881 Bushee, Frank i^97 

902 Butler, John 1878 

878 Butler, John 1885 

878 Butler, Joseph W. 1879 

907 Butler, Patrick H. 1889 
878 Butler, Robert 1879 
878 Caffery, Philip 1896 
878 Calland, John 1878 
891 Campbell, John 1906 

910 Cam.pbell, John J. 1890 

908 Campeau, George 1901 
907 Carlile, William 1882 
881 Cavanagh, Andrew ^9^3 

911 Chappell, Curtis 1902 

878 Clayton, J 1901 
'^'^2> Collins, John 1882 

879 Collins, Michael 1903 

901 Colton, Peter 1888 

905 Conlev, James 

902 Conlev, Martin J. 1892 

909 Conlin, Fred M. 18^5 
6to Connelly, James 1878 
885 Connelly, James E. 1885 
907 Connelly, Michael T. 1878 
897 Conrick, Edward 1883 

906 Conrick, Thomas 1880 
878 Conroy, Frank 1891 



Mechanics Fire Engine Company No. Two. gg 
[ Reorganized.] 
( Continued.) 



Conroy, Michael 
Conroy, Michael B. 
Corcoran, Dennis 
Corcoran, Peter 
Corcoran, Peter J. 
Corcoran, Stephen J. 
Corrello, Salvatore 
Corrigan, Andrew 
Corristine, Charles 
Cosgrove, Peter 
Coughlin, John H. 
Coughlin, Thomas 
Coyle, Edward 
Croke, Jeremiah 
Cronin, James 
Cronin, Michael J. 
Curtis, John 
Dalton, Peter 
Dillon, J. F. 
Donahue, John W. 
Donahue, Michael 
Donnelly, F. 
Donnelly, Thomas F. 
Drown, Charles W. 
Dubois, Charles 
Dubois, Joseph 
Dwyer, John F. 
Dwyer, Thomas 
Edmonson, John 



878 
892 
888 
895 
894 
911 



902 
878 
896 
884 
878 
897 
896 
890 
878 
888 
901 
890 
890 



878 
905 
901 
901 
882 
888 

903 



Edmonson, William 
Emmet, Samuel 
Emmet, Smith 
Esker, Frank 
Fallon, James 
Fallon, John 
Fay, Edward 
Fay, William 
Fernside, James 
Fielding, John 
Finn, Thomas 
Fisher, William W. 
Flaherty, John 
Fleet, Samuel 
Flinn, John 
Franklin, John 
Gagnon, Henry 
Ganev, John 
Gartland, Lawrence 
Gillon, John 
Glancy, P. 
Glancy, Thomas 
Goggin, David 
Grady, Daniel 
Grady, John H. 
Grady, Richard 
Graham, Charles H. 
Grant, William 
Grogan, Michael U. 



903 
896 

906 

910 
878 
878 
878 
878 
878 
909 
878 

903 
883 

903 
878 
878 
907 
901 
879 
878 
901 
881 
898 
896 
886 
891 
891 
878 
883 



L 



lOO Mechanics Fire Engine Company No. Two. 
[ Reorganized.] 
( Continued.) 

Hanley, Michael 
Hannigan, James 
Harchub, John 
Hardman, Thomas B. 
Healy, Howard M. 
Healy, John 
Healy, John C. 
Healy, John W. 
Healy, Joseph 
Healy, Michael 
Healy, William 
Hearn, Patrick 
Henneberry, John 
Henneberry, Nicholas 
Heon, Achille 
Heroas, Frank 
Higgins, Maurice 
Honan, Daniel 
Honan, Patrick 
Honan, T. J. 
Honan, William T. 
Howe, John 
Howland, Charles R. 
Howland, Richard R. 
Hurley, Michael 
JetFrev, Joseph 



1878 


Jones, E. J. ] 


[878 


1890 


Kelly, Charles G. 


[905 


1879 


Kelly, David 


[878 


1889 


Kelly, Edward 


[885 


1903 


Kelly, Owen 


[878 


1878 


Kendrick, Edward 


[879 


1908 


Kendrick, Thomas 


[879 


191 1 


Kendrick, William ] 


[878 


1878 


Kenny, John 


[894 


1908 


Kiernan, T. ] 


902 


1878 


Killion, Bernard i 


878 


1878 


Killion, John ] 


878 


1906 


Kilroy, Thomas ] 


[889 


1905 


King, Nelson B. ] 


902 


1897 


Laffey, John E. i 


878 


1889 


Laffey, Michael i 


878 


1899 


LafFey, Patrick i 


[878 


189a 


Laflame, Alfred A. i 


907 


1878 


Laflame, Louis i 


907 


1878 


Laforest, Adam i 


878 


1880 


Lafrance, James i 


878 


T878 


Lafrance, Peter ] 


878 


1902 


La hey, Maurice i 


903 


1896 


Lailan, Horace i 


884 


1878 


Lajeunesse, Jeffrey ] 


905 


191 1 


Lamb, Philip ] 


879 



Mechanics Fire Engine Company No. Two. roi 
[ Reorganized. ] 
( Continued. ) 

Lannigan, John 
Lavender, Fred E. 
Laveugue, George 
Lavill, Charles 
Lee, Simon P. B. 
Lee, Wm. H. 
Lemoi, Edward 
Lemoi, WilHam 
Lenhart, Adolph 
Locke, WilHam 
Lonergan, John E. 
Long, Nathan 
Loughran, Arthur 
Loughran, Thomas J. 
Loughran, Daniel 
Lynch, Patrick 
Lynn, James 
McCann, Frank 
McCann, Patrick 
McCanna, Charles T. 
McCanna, Hugh 
McCanna, Patrick 
McCusker, John 
McDonough, James 
McDonough, John 
McDonough, William 



1878 


McElroy, Patrick 


1878 


1905 


McGeary, Peter 


1888 


1 90 1 


McGrath, John 


1890 


1905 


McGrath, John F. 


1 90 1 


I89I 


McGrath, R. J. 


1878 


1902 


McGuire, Bernard 


1895 


191 1 


McKenna, James 


1878 


1909 


McKenna. John 


1878 


1906 


McKenna, William 


1905 


1878 


McLoughlin, Michael 


1884 


1878 


McMahon, Patrick J. 


1897 


1878 


McNiff, Charles 


1891 


1878 


McNulty, Daniel 
McNulty, James 











1892 


McPike, John 


1899 


1886 


Malley, John 


1903 


1881 


Mallon, John 


1882 


1885 


Maloy, Charles T. 


1907 


1885 


Maloy, John M. 


1878 


1907 


Mann, Fred V. 


1905 


1906 


Marcou, Joseph 


1896 


1885 


Marks, Thomas 


1884 


I87S 


Marshall, Joseph 


1902 


1890 


Martin, Howard I. 


1907 


1 8 8^:5 


Masterson, Patrick 


1886 


1890 


Maxey, John 


1879 



102 Mechanics Fire Engine Company No. Two. 
[ Reorganized. ] 
( Continued. ) 



Merritt, Joseph 
Mickle, George A. 
Monahan, John 
Monahan, Peter 
Monahan, Thomas L. 
Monahan, William 
Money, John 
Moore, Robert W. 
Morrissey, Daniel L. 
Morrissey, John H. 
Morrissey, Thos. L. 
Mumford, Edward 
Munnigle, James 
Munnigle, John W. 
Munnigle, William 
Murnane, Edward 
Murnane, Patrick 
Murphy, John 
Murphy, John 
Murphy, Peter 
Murphv, T homas 
Murphy, William G. 
Murray, Hugh 
Murray, Robert 
Murta, James F. 
Xoel, Peter 
Neary, John 
Nelder, Herbert G. 
Nelson, James 
Nelson, [. 



1905 


Nevin, Joseph i 


903 


1903 


Norton, John 1 


887 


1895 


O'Brien, Daniel i 


878 


1903 


O'Brien, John i 


878 


1902 


O'Brien, T.J. i 


900 


1 90 1 


O'Brien, Thomas ] 


878 


1878 


O'Brien, Timothy V. ] 


891 


1884? 


Oldfield, WiUiam i 


902 


1878 


O'Leary, John ] 


889 


1892 


O'Malley, JohnJ. i 


905 


I89I 


O'Neil, James i 


878 


1897 


O'Neil, Patrick W. i 


897 


1906 


Pailthorpe, Albert ] 


[888 


1898 


Pailthorpe, William i 


[880 


1878 


Perron, Olivier 


[908 


1897 


Peters, Antonio ] 


[903 


1880 


Petrie, Charles W. 


[905 


1882 


Pfeniger, Albert 


906 


I89I 


Qiiann, William 


[895 


1897 


Ravcraft, John 


[890 


1891 


Remington, G. A. 


[878 


1902 


Robinson, Joseph 


[879 


1903 


Rounds, Charles 


[879 


1903 


Rvan, John 


[883 


1879 


Ryan, John F. 


[894 


1908 


Ryan, William 


[884 


1904 


Ryan, William L. 


1907 


1902 


Scully, Michael 


1890 


1878 


Sharkey, Edward 


1890 


1890 


Shaunessy, James 


[880 



Mechanics Fire Engine Company No. Two. lOJ 
[ Reorganized. ] 
( Concluded. ) 






Shaw, William 
Shea, James S. 
Shea, William 
Sherrold, Theodore 
Simmons, Isaac S. 
Simmons, J. 
Simmons, Joseph E. 
Smith, Edward F. 
Smith, James 
Smith, James F. 
Smith, James F. id. 
Smith, James F. 
Smith, John 
Smith, Thomas J. 
Smith, W^illiam 
Smith, William 
Smith, William H. 
Southwick, Harry A. 
Splain, John 
Splain, Michael 
Stanton, James 
Sullivan, John 
Sullivan, John L. 
Thyng, Ralph 
Tierny, James 
Tierny, James M. 



879 
907 
878 
879 
890 

903 
909 

907 
890 
878 
879 
905 
884 
902 
890 
908 
878 
902 
883 
880 
911 
878 
895 
878 
905 
908 



Toleper, Arthur 
Topham, Robert R. 
Travis, William 
Trombley, Henry 
Tully, William 
Vandell, Louis 
Vandell, Richard 
Victory, Patrick 
Von Banck, Louis 
Wallace, James 
Wallace, John 
Walsh, David 
Walsh, Frank 
Walsh, James 
Walsh, Robert 
Ward, Fred 
Wardick, John H. 
White, Joseph 
Winters, William 
Wood, Robert 



Wyl 
Wyl 
Wyl 
Wyl 
Wyl 



e, James 
e, Janies F. 
e, Joseph 
e, Joseph P. 
e, Robert 



Wynne, Peter 



903 
899 
911 
900 
879 
878 
878 
878 
905 
888 
878 
887 
879 
884 
879 
906 
886 
878 
883 
884 
878 
895 
908 
880 
878 
902 



V^^ 



I04 



Fire Hook and Ladder Company. 

Elected 

1834 I 871. 

Ingraham, Mason 1852 

Johnson, Stephen 1840 

Leonard, Elbridge G. 1866 

Little, George W. 1852 

Luther, David E. 1852 

Luther, John 1834 

Luther, Nathan 1834 

Martin, Charles 1858 

Martin, Ezra M. 1857 

Martin, Stephen Jr. 1855 

Mason, Charles 1858 

Mason, Christopher 1861 

Mason, John B. 1840 

Munroe, Charles 1858 

Munroe, George 2d. 1857 

Munroe, James W. 1852 

Pearce, John Jr. 1835 

Pearce, Samuel 1834 

Place, Charles 1861 

Salisbury, Billings 1844 

Salisbury, John 1848 

Sanders, Henry 1834 

Sanders, Jacob 1834 

Sanford, Alexander G. 1868 

Sawtelle, Hollis 1848 

Sawtelle, Joseph 1848 

Sherman, Joseph H. 1858 

Smith, Charles 1852 

Snell, Wm. B. 1834 

Sparks, Charles 1852 



Allen, Wheaton i 


854 


Baily, Henry i 


834 


Barrus, Horace G, i 


866 


Barrus, James B. i 


852 


Barrus, Nathan L. i 


t853 


Barton, Charles 


[866 


Bosworth, Benj. M. 


f834 


Buffington, Alvan 


r84i 


Burroughs, James Jr. 


835 


Carr, Caleb Jr. i 


834 


Carr, Turner 


840 


Chase, James A. 


853 


Chase, John H. 


860 


Clifford, William T. 


852 


Cole, Allen 


[844 


Cole, Edmund 


[844 


Cole, Henry 


[849 


Cole, John G. 


[854 


Cole, Luther 2d. i 


852 


Cole, William 2d. 


852 


Coleman, Jesse B. 


[852 


Davis, Alfred ] 


[868 


Driscol, James 


[840 


Driscol, John H. 


[844 


Easterbrooks, George 


^835 


Eddy, Henry W. 


[852 


Eddy, William P. 


1852 


Fisher, George 


[852 


Frankland, Joseph 


[852 


Gardner, Joseph 


1851 



Fire Hook and Ladder Company. 
( Concluded. ) 

Surgens, George H. 1855 Wheaton, Daniel B. 
Surgens, Wm. H. 1848 Williams, Edward 
Turner, Wm. H. 1840 Williams, George 



^05 



1834 
1852 
1852 



m'm 



Jo6 Fire Hook and Ladder Company. 

[ Reorganized. ] 

Elected 
1879 191 ]. 



Adams, Joseph 
Aiken, William 
Barton, Alfred C. 
Barton, Edwin S. 
Barton, Percy R. 
Batchelor, John B. 
Bliss, Charles C. 
Brown, Edward V. 
Brown, Joseph E. 
Buckingham, E. M. 
Buffington, Hiram 
Cole, Luther 
Champlin, Henry F. 
Child, Daniel h'. 
Crawley, William H. 
Cutler, Charles W. 
Cutler, Edward R. 
Dana, Francis E. 
Dean, Charles 
DeWolf, Howard K. 
Drown, George L. 
Drown, John 
Gladding, Charles F. 
GotF, Jeremiah 
Hiscox, Edward 



879 Hoar, Joseph B. 19 10 

907 Hopkins, Henry W. 1907 

909 Hunt, Robert 19 10 

909 Kelly, William W. 1884 
879 Livesey, John 1879 
907 Lonergan, James 1909 
911 Luther, Daniel B. 1910 
895 Mallory, George 190? 
891 Martin, Fred S. 1907 

910 Martin, Henry R. 1907 
879 Martin, Joseph W. 1910 

883 McCanna, Charles H. 1909 

884 Merchant, Marcius H. 1907 
897 Miller, Charles R. ^9^7 
891 Munroe, Harry H. 1909 
907 Persons, Clair G. 1907 
907 Rounds, Charles E. ^909 
879 Seymour, Louis R. 1909 
879 Sherman, George 1889 
907 Sparks, Charles H. 1891 

Turner, Daniel L. 1891 

Wilmarth, Albert 1883 

Wilmarth, William S. 1882 

Winslow, James M. 1879 



881 
907 
891 

879 
881 



m.*^ 



I 



Narragansett Fire Engine Comf>any 

Number Three. 

Elected 



TOJ 



Abbot, Charles W. Jr. 
Adams, Joseph 
Aldrich, Lucius E. 
Andrews, David W. 
Andrews, Dura D. 
Andrews, Frank 
Andrews, Samuel C. 
Austin, Herbert L, 
Baker, William 
Barney, Eugene C. 
Barney, William L. 
Barrett, Patrick 
Barrus, Arthur W. 
Barrus, Charles 
Barrus, Daniel A. 
Barrus, James B. 
Barrus, Wm. L. 
Barton, Alfred 
Barton, Benjamin H. 
Barton, Frank D. 
Batchelor, James B. 
Blanchard, E. H. 
Blanchard, John E. 
Bliss, Fred A. 
Bliss, Waiter G. 



1876 


Booth, Samuel N. 


i«73 


1846 


Borden, Charles G. 


1849 


1884 


Borden, Luther M. Jr. 


1846 


1850 


Bosworth, Peleg 


1846 


1884 


Bosworth, Peleg Jr. 


1862 


1883 


Bowen, Abraham 


1846 


I87I? 


Bowen, Albert H. 


1862 


1895 


Bowen, Daniel K. 


1854? 


1862? 


Bowen, Edwin 


1846 


I88I 


Bowen, George E. 


1880 


1847 


Bowen, Haile J. 


1854 


1849 


Bowen, Henry A. 


1846 


1883 


Bowen, James 


1871 





Bowen, James E. 


1846 


1885 


Bowen, James E. 


1908 


1846 


Bowen, Jonathan 


1849 


1846 


Bowen, John H. 


1884 


1875 


Bowen, John M. 


1888 


1877 


Bowen, Martin 


1854 


1^73 


Bowen, Sylvanus H. 


1876 


T889 


Bowen, William Jr. 


1846 


T849 


Bowen, William B. 


1882 


1871 


Bowen, Cliftbrd A. 


1895 


1888 


Brayton, James H.? 





1888 


Bravton, Jeremiah 


1849 



Io8 Narragansett Fire Engine Company 
Number Three. 
( Continued. ) 



Brightman, Thomas 
Brown, Allen 
Brown, C. A. 
Brown, Jabez Jr. 
Brown, John C. 
Brown, John H. 
Brown, Joseph 
Brown, Joseph E. 
Brown, Manton F. 
Brown, Nathaniel ? 
Brown, Noel M. 
Brown, Noel M. Jr. 
Brown, William. M. 
Brownell, John P. 
Buffington, Hiram B. 
BufEngton, James B. 
Burgess, William H. 
Burlingham, Thomas 
Burnham, Gridley 
Burr, Norman G. 
Burtch, Henry S. 
Cadv, Eleazer S. 
Cady, Winfield L. 
Campbell, David A. 
Carr, Alfred C. 
Carr, Caleb A. 
Carr, Clarence L. 
Carr, George W, 
Carr, Joseph S. 
Carr, Turner Jr. 



869 Cary, Joseph 1859 

905 Cary, William N. 1885 

905 Caswell, James B. 1874 

846 Champlin, Henry F. 1876 

859 Champlin, Henry F. Jr. 1898 
874 Champlin, John B. 1848 

847 Chappell, Leon 1903 
879 Chappell, S. W. 1897 
897 Chase, Charles F. 1862 
884 Chase, Edgar F. 1877 
846 Chase, Frank S. 1871 
878 Chase, Henry S. 1871 

846 Chase, James A. 

884 Chase, John H. 1846 

876 Chase, Walter H. 1893 

871 Chatburn, John C. 1911 

846 Child, Charles 1846 

854 Child, Charles E. 1876 

853 Child, Charles T. 1846 

856 Child, Cyril M. 1854 

869 Child, James M. Jr. 1878 

871 Child, Joseph B. 1846 

878 Child, Joseph B. 1873 

860 Child, Luther H. 1847 
846 Child, Moses T. 1854 
884 Child, Samuel S. 1846 
862 Child, William B. 1885 

846 Church, William M. C. 1879 
856 Clark, G. E. 1890 

847 Cleland, Albert H. 1874 



Narragansett Fire Engine Company 

Number Three. 

( Continued. ) 



log 



Clifford, Thomas 
Coes, George H. 
Cole, Charles I. 
Cole, Edmund 
Cole, Everett F. 
Cole, George G. 
Cole, George R. 
Cole, Henry 2d. 
Cole, James A. 
Cole, James V. 
Cole, Luther id. 
Cole, Luther 
Cole, Robert 
Cole, Samuel B. 
Cole, Thomas 
Cole, William 2d. 
Cole, William B. 
Cole, William R. 
Coleman, Jesse B 
Collamore, Charles H. 
Collamore, Fred F. 
Collamore, James S. 
Collamore, Jeremiah 
Collamore, John H. 
Collins, Charles 
Collins, Henry 
Coolv, Robert H. 
Copeland, Henry H. 
Cornell, Alfred R. 
Cornell, Charles H. 



862 Cornell, J. B. 

850 Cornell, William A. 
878 Cornell, William F. 
846 Coyle, Edward 
911 Crowell, Charles A. 
871 Crowell, Hiram D. 
897 Crowell, William B, 
849 Cummings, Joseph S. 
871 Cunningham, William G. 

846 Cutler, Charles R. 
849 Dana, Francis E. 
871 Davis, Benjamin F. 

847 Davol, Sturgis 

851 Davol, Charles S. 
846 Day, Preston 
846 Day, Walter A. 
860 Dean, Charles F. 
900 Dean, James H. 
849 Dean, Samuel H. 
846 Dean, Sidney 
886 Dexter, Lewis B. 
882 Driscol, Fred A. 
854 Driscol, William H. 
854 Drown, Allen 

846 Drown, Benjamin Jr. 
869 Drown, George L. 
854 Drown, H. D. 
894 Drown, James B. 
846 Drown, John 
I^rown, Samuel N. 



1854 
1878 
1871 
1874 
i860 
1856 
1856 

1868 
1862 
1861 
1849 
1882 
1875 

1873 
1871 

1849 

1850 

1875 

1890 

1862 

1846 

1846 

1846 

1869 

1875 
1846 
1846 



IIO Narragansett Fire Engine Company 
Number Three. 
( Continued. ) 

Goss, Sylvester T. 

Graves, Joseph N. 1846 

Greene, George T. Jr. 1878 

Greene, Levi M. 1888 

Greene, Robert H. 1892 

Gushee, Nath'l W. 1862 

Haile, Levi W. 1862 

Haile, William R. 1859 

Hainz, Fred G. 1862 

Hall, Benjamin M. 1902 

Hall, Joseph B. 1869 

Hall, Preston L 1885 

Harrison, J. L. 1852 

Hart, Henry 1861 

Hatch, David M. 1856 

Hatch, George C. Jr. 1862 

Hathaway, Bradford C. 1853 
Hathawav, Sylvester B. 1882 

Haulick, Christian 1850 

Healy, Fernando 1868 

Healy, James 1850 

Heilman, Henry 1850 

Heuser, Lewis 1849 

Higgins, Rufus 1863 

Hinckley, W. O. 1849 

Hiscox, Edward M. 1878 

Hiscox, Svlvester 1866 

Hoar, Charles A. 1876 

Hoar, Charles S. 1874 

Hoar, Joseph 1880 



Drown, Thomas S. 


[846 


Drown, William B. i 


[869 


Dunwell, William T. i 


[874 


Duprey, Joseph ] 


[869 


Eddy, Charles C. 


[849 


Eddy, Henry W. i 


[847 


Eddy, James M. Jr. 


[875 


Fales, James 


[854 


Fales, Samuel S. 


[868 


Fish, Jonathan G. i 


^^2> 


Fish, Joshua S. i 


[856 


Fisher, George E. 


1849 


Fletcher, Fred J. 1 


889 


Follansbee, Frank i 


874 


Ford, Alvan H. i 


868 


Foster, Fred L 


909 


Franklin, George E. 


t853 


Freeborn, William P. 


[848 


Frieze, John 1 


846 


Gamble, David A. i 


862 


Gardner, Charles E. i 


889 


Gardner, George C. i 


878 


Gardner, Joseph 1 


846 


Gardner, Robert C. i 


^SZ 


Gibbs, Edmund D. 


[884 


Goff, Hiram i 


846 


Coff, Nathan Jr. 


846 


Goff, Rufus B. ] 


847 


Goff, Thomas L 


[849 


Gorham, Isaac i 


861 



i 



Narragansktt Fire Engine Company 
Number Three. 

( Continued. ) 

Lee, James M. 
Lent, Joseph H. 
Lent, Walter C. 
Livesev, John 
Luther, David E. 
Luther, George A 
Luther, Horace 
Luther, Jeremiah J. 
Luther, John Jr. 
Luther, John E. 
Luther, William H. 
Makepeace, James A. 
Maker, Arthur J. 
Manchester, Charles B. 
Manchester, Clarence R. 
Manchester, George R. 
Manchester, James 
Manchester, John 
Marks, William 
Martin, Albert F. 
Martin, Benjamin B. 
Martin, PMward J. 
Martin, George 
Martin, Henry R. 
Martin Jeremiah 
Martin, Joseph W. 
Martin, Josiah N. 
Martin, Stephen H. 
Mason, Arthur H. 
Mason, Edward A, 



/// 



Hoar, Joseph B. i 


870 


Hoar, Lewis V. 


875 


Hoar, Will.ird B, i 


895 


Hoar, William B. 


846 


Howard, Franklin A. i 


86 J 


Howe, Linwood E. 


909 


Llowland, Frank A. 


[879 


Hughes, Peter H. i 


847 


Ingraham, Alexander i 


854 


1 ngruhum, John H. 


850 


Jayne, George R. 


[866 


Jeffers, Leland O. i 


908 


Johnson, James H. 


862 


Johonnot, George G. 


Hi 


Jones, James S. 


849 


Jones, Santo rd 


852 


Jordan, William 


849 


Kean, John M. 


859 


Kelley, Charles D. 


861 


Kellev, Howard J. 


909 


Kirllev, John J. 


[907 


Kelley, Joseph A. 


871 


King, William A. 


849 


Kingsley, William C. i 


850 


Laforest, E. A. i 


870 


Langille, A. A. 


1900 


Lawton, Frank B. 


874 


Lawton, George F. i 


847 


Lawton, Harry S. i 


873 


Lawton, William B. 


875 



i 



112 Narragansett Fire Engine Company 
Number Three. 

( Continued. ) 



Mason, Henry W. 
Mason, James L. 
Mason, Stephen H. 
Masterson, William 
Mauran, William A 
Maxfield, Charles S. 
Maxfield, Hiram D. 
Maxfield, John 
Maxfield, William 
Maxwell, William R. 
McAvoy, Martin 
McCaflVey, Thos. W. 
McCaw, William j. 
McCays, John 
McGrail, John 
McKenzie, William J. 
Miller, Horton N. 
Moulton, Amos 
Moulton, Thomas L. 
Mulcahev, Charles 
Mulcahev, George D. 
Mulcahev, John 
M u n roe, Edward 
Munroe, George Jr. 
Munroe, George id. 
Munroe, James W. 
Munroe, Sam'l F. Jr. 
Munroe, William 
Nichols, Galen 
Nichols, Thomas 



849 
846 
860 
870 
846 
870 
847 
846 
847 
882 
856 
871 
879 

852 
868 
882 



849 
849 

849 
880 
847 
846 
849 
866 
862 
861 
891 



Northup, Edwin 1888 

Olive, John R. 1895 

Ormsbee, Charles 1878 
Ormsbee, Samuel A. 1879 

Page, Fred L. 1909 

Paine, Marcus 1878 

Pardev, Harold O. 1877 

Park, Jam^es 1897 

Parker, George H. 1862 

Parker, Joseph L. 1854 

Parker, Leonard 1878 

Flatten James 1878 

Pearce, John H. 1862 

Pearce, Samuel i 846 

Pearce, William H. 

Peck, George B. 1862 

Perry, Albert N. 1884 

Perrv, James B. 1861 

Perry, Willard J. 1884 

Phinney, Charles E. 1868 

Place, Charles E. 188- 

Place, Samuel Jr. 1846 

Ploubert, David A. 1850 

Prentice, D. A. 1859 

Poole(?), Evan 

Read, Joseph P. 1892 
Remington, William A. 1846 

Ross, Elmer W. 1878 

Rounds, Andrew S. 1862 

Rounds, Charles H. 1855 



Narragansett Fire Engine Company 

Number Three. 

( Continued. ) 



113 



1 



Rounds, George F. 
Rounds, George H. 
Rounds, Herbert V. 
Rvan, Lewis 
Salisbury, John Jr. 
Salisbury, Martin L. 
Salisbury, William I. 
Sanders, William H. 
Sawtelle, James B. 
Sawtelle, Joel 
Sawtelle, Joseph 
Schofield, William 
Seymour, Charles F. 
Seymour, Leander F. 
Sharkey, James 
Sherman, Frank I. 
Sherman, Georg^e E. 
Shortliff, William H. 
Simmons, Isaac S. 
Simmons, Jonathan R. 
Simmons, Wm. H. 
Simonds, Joseph N. 
Sisson, Charles 
Slocum, J. Howard 
Smith, Charles S. 
Smith, Frank B. 
Smith, George 
Smith, Henry D. W. 
Smith, Peter C. 
Smith, Zerah B. 



I86H 


Snell, WilHam B. 


1846 


1846 


Sparks, Charles H. 


1878 


1882 


Stanley, Charles H. 


1870 


1862 


Stebbins, Edward 


1847 


1846 


Stetson, William D. 


1877 


1846 


Stevens, Andrew M. 


1888 


1895 


Stevens, Richard 


1878 


1854 


Stevens, Thomas C. 


1885 


1869 


Stevens, Thomas C. Jr. 


1909 


1870 


Summers, George 


1852 


1846 


Surgens, Edward L: 


1855 


1883 


Surgens, George H. 


1849 


1884 


Surgens, William H. 


[846 




Taylor, James E. 


[876 




1852 


Thayer, Francis S. 


[895 


1874 


Thompson, Asbury 


[870 


1876 


Thurber, William H. 


1846 


1878 


Thyng, Walter M. 


[881 


I89I 


Tilley, Aaron S. 


[846 


1862 


Trask, Frank E. 


[911 


T870 


Trott, John i 


846 


1856 


Turner, John A. 


[879 


1846 


Turner, Maxwell W. 


89- 


191 1 


Turner, Thomas G. 1 


846 


1847 


Valpey, John W. 


889 


1870 


Warner, Elisha M. i 


849 


1847 


Warner, Lucius Jr. i 


«77 


^'^'^z 


Weaver, Charles H. 


894 


1846 


West, George N. i 


870 


1849 


West, John R. Jr. 1 


907 



114 



Narragansf.tt Fire Engin^e Company. 

Number Three. 

( Concluded. ) 



Wheaton, George L. C. 1862 

White, William B. 1874 

Whitford, Charles 1874 

Whitford, Thomas 1872 

Whitford, Wanton A. 1878 

Whitney, Dennis 1878 

Wilbur, George M. 1895 

Willard, Henry G. 1895 

Williams, Henry 1852 

Williams, Henry H. 1867 

Williams, William E. 1846 

Wilmarth, Andrew 1874 



Wilmarth, William S. 1875 

Wing, John A. 1852 

Winslow, Daniel Jr. 1848 

Winslow, James M. 1874 

Winslow, John F. 1862 

Wood, Alfred 1854 

Wood, George A. 1878 

Wood, William H. 1854 

Woodmancy, Joseph 1848 

Wrightington, C. L. 1854 

Wrightington, T. W. 1 8 54 



mtm 



Boards of Engineers. 

Electei:) 

1861 I 9 I I . 



1^5 



1861 

Wm. T. Barton, Chief 
Seth Sanders 
John G. Joyce 
Charles R. Cutler 

1862 
Charles R. Cutler, Chief 
Seth Sanders 
John G. Joyce 
Charles Sparks 

1863 
Charles R. Cutler, Chief 
Henry F. Drown 
Charles Mason 
Horace G. Barrus 

I 864 
Charles R. Cutler, Chief 
Henry F. Drown 
Charles Mason 
John G. Jovce 

1865 
Charles R. Cutler, Chief 
Charles Mason 
Henry F. Drown 

1866 
Charles R. Cutler, Chief 
Charles Mason 
Hiram D. Maxfield 



1867 — 68 — 69 
Charles R. Cutler, Chief 
Charles Mason 
Hiram D. Maxfield 
Charles F, Sparks 

1870 — 71 — 72 
Charles R. Cutler, Chief 
Charles Mason 
Charles F, Sparks 
Alexander C. Sanford 

Charles R. Cutler, Chief 
Charles F. Sparks 
A. G. Sanford 
David B. Barton 

1874 
Charles R. Cutler, Chief 
Benjamin B. Martin 
William Cole 2d. 
Benjamin Drown 

1875 
Charles R. Cutler. Chief 
William Cole 2d. 
Benjamin Drown 
William B. Nichols 



ii6 



Boar 



1876 — 77 
William Cole, Chief 
Benjamin Drown 
Charles H. CoUamore 
William B. Nichols 

1878 — 79 — 80 — 
82 — 83 
William Cole, Chief 
Luther Cole 
Charles H. Collamore 
William B. Nichols 

1884—85 — 86 — : 
William Cole, Chief 
Luther Cole 
William B. Nichols 
William H. Crawley 

1888 — 89 — 90 
William Cole, Chief 
Luther Cole 
William H. Crawley 
John H. Brown 

1891 
William Cole, Chief 
John H. Brown 
Harold O. Pardey 
Joseph W. Butler 

1892 
William Cole, Chief 
John H. Brown 
Joseph W. Butler 
William H. Crawley 



ds of engineers. 
Continued.) 

1893 — 94 — 95 
William Cole, Chief 
John H. Brown 
William H. Crawley 
Michael O. Hurley 

81 1896 

William H. Crawley, Chief 
John H. Brown 
Michael O. Hurley 
William S. Wilmarth 

1897 — 98 — 99 — 1900 

g_ Joseph B. Hoar, Chief 
John H. Brown 
Michael O. Hurley 
William S. Wilmarth 

1 90 1 — 02 
Joseph B. Hoar, Chief 
John H. Brown 
William S. Wilmarth 
William H. Smith 

1903—04 — 05 
Joseph B. Hoar, Chief 
John H. Brown 
William S. Wilmarth 
James F. Wylie 

1906 
Joseph B. Hoar, Chief 
John H. Brown 
William S. Wilmarth 
James F. Wylie 
Thomas J. Loughran 



1 



Boards of Engineers. 
( Concluded.) 



117 



1907 — 08 
Joseph B. Hoar, Chief 
John H. Brown 
William S Wilmarth 
James F. Wylie 
Thomas J. Loughran 
Joseph H. Lent 

1909 
Joseph B. Hoar, Chief 
John H. Brown 
William S. Wilmarth 
Joseph H. Lent 
Thomas J. Loughran 



1910 
William S. Wilmarth, Chief 
John H. Brown 
Joseph H. Lent 
Thomas J. Loughran 

191 1 
William S. Wilmarth, Chief 
John H. Brown 
Joseph H. Lent 
Joshua Turner 



V^^ 



f 



it8 



The Burr's Hill Fours. 

Elected 

1908 19 I I. 



Anderson, John i 


909 


Jones, Howard i 


908 


Arnold, George B. i 


908 


Jones, Roland T. ] 


908 


Barry, James F. Jr. 1 


908 


Kiiroy, Arthur L. ] 


908 


Bowers, Lewis H. i 


908 


Kilroy, Thomas J. ] 


908 


Cadv, Edwin A. i 


908 


Leeson, James H. ] 


908 


Cady, H. Dewees ] 


908 


Mabey, Charles N. i 


[908 


Child, Daniel H. i 


908 


Maddox, William ] 


908 


Child, Fred V. i 


908 


Martin, William A. ] 


[908 


Child, Harry S. 


[908 


Maxfield, George i 


908 


Church, Benjamin A. i 


908 


Munroe, Walter H. ] 


908 


Cole, George G. ] 


908 


Nichols, Herbert A. i 


908 


Dickerson, Jesse V. ] 


908 


Peterson, Albert W. i 


908 


Dickerson, John C ] 


908 


Place, Lineas E. 


[908 


Dickerson, Wm. H. i 


908 


Potter, David H. 


[908 


Faulkner, Clarence H. ] 


908 


Rocket, Joseph M. 


908 


Faulkner, William J. i 


908 


Sarris, George Jr. 


[908 


Gillon, James L. 


908 


Sey mour, Clarence H. 2d. 


[908 


Gillon, William 


[908 


Seymour, Frank C. 


[910 


Goff, Henrv 


908 


Seymour, William L 


1908 


Goff, Walter I. 


908 


Simmons, Fred R. 


[908 


Gorman, Thomas 


[908 


Sipple, M. R. C. 


[908 


Greene, Charles W. 


[908 


Slocum, Henry M. 


[908 


Greene, Robert 


[908 


Slocum, Howard J. 


[908 


Greene, George T. 


[908 


Smith, Richard 


[908 


Griffin, Michael P. 


191 T 


Smith, William 


[908 


Harris, Joseph 


[908 


Tanner, Albert K. Jr. 


[908 


Horton, Edmund 


1908 


Tanner, Walter 


[908 


Horton, George B. 


[908 


Titmas, Harry G 


[911 


Howland, Henry P. 


[908 


TuUy, William 


[908 


Johnson, Charles G. 


[908 


Wheaton, Charles N 


[908 



'^^^ 



Rough and Ready Fire Company No. Five, iig 
Elected 



1 903 1 9 1 1 , 



Albert, Thomas 
Allen, Herbert 
Ashworth, George 
Asselin, Napoleon 
Babcock, William 
Barton, Thomas 
Beauregard, William 
Benoit, Herbert 
Besse, Harry 
Boeniger, Samuel 
Bowers, Joshua 
Boylan, John Jr. 
Bn^.sseau, Peter 
Brasseau, Louis 
Brooks, Joseph 
Brownson, Peter 
Burke, James 
Burke, John 
Carter, Edwin 
Chandler, Charles W. 
Chase, Joseph 
Chretien, Elorace 
Clayton, John 
Cloutier, Aurius M. 
Cloutier, Daniel 
Cloutier, Jos. M. M. 
Corrier, George 
Corner, Harry 
Corristine, Hugh 
Corristine, Patrick 



1907 


Courville, Arthur F. i 


1903 


Dubeau, Frank i 


1904 


Dubeau, Zebb i 


1903 


Duval, Clifford i 


1906 


Emery, Philibert - 


1903 


Fisher, Arthur i 


1906 


Fisher, Fred i 


1903 


Fagnant, Zepharin i 


1905 


Gardner, Peter i 


1906 


Gerard, Peter i 


1906 


Gledhill, Simeon i 


1903 


Greenwood, Benjamin i 


1906 


Greenwood, Ernest i 


1907 


Greenwood, William i 


I9I0 


Harris, Joseph i 


I9I0 


Harris, William J. i 


1903 


Hebert, Felix i 


1903 


Heidenrich, Otto i 


1906 


Heuberger, Carl i 


I9IO 


Heuberger, Ernest i 


1906 


Heuberger, Herman i 


I9IO 


Heuberger, Otto i 


1908 


Hodson, Ernest i 


1903 


Hodson, John i 


1903 


Howard, Frederick i 


1903 


Howard, William i 


1903 


Huard, Evangeliste i 


1908 


Johnson, Edward i 


1903 


Johnson, James H. i 


1903 


Kozic, Sebastien i 



I20 Rough axd Ready Fire Company No. Five. 

( Concluded.) 

Laney, Patrick 
Lapane, Edward 
Lapane, Peter 
Lapointe, Henry 
Lapointe, Thomas 
Lauzon, John B. 
Lee, Robert 
Lomas, Thomas 
Maddox, George O. 
Malone, Michael J. 
Marshall, Joseph 
Martin, Howard 
Ogden, Ernest 
Oulette, Napoleon 
Patterson, Samuel 
Pelletier, Charles 
Pelletier, Eugene 
Perrier, O. 
Perron, Olivier 
Perry, George 
Poisson, George 
Poisson, Napoleon 
Proulx, Joseph 
Redfern, Thomas 
Rubery, Albert E. 
Rubery, Joseph A. 
Rubery, Thomas 
Ryan, William 



1903 


Salford, George 


1903 


1907 


Sanderson, David 


1909 


1907 


St. Andre, Adolph 


1903 


1904 


St. Andre, William 


1904 


1903 


St. Onge, Adolphus 


1903 


1904 


St. Onge, Eugene 


1903 


1905 


St. Peter, Joseph 


1907 


I9IO 


Simister, John W. Jr. 


1903 


1904 


Southwood, George 


1904 


1903 


Spragg, Herbert 


1907 


1906 


Stone, John Q. 


1904 


1905 


Sullivan, John L. 


1903 


1906 


Sybolts, Otto 


1911 


1906 


Tanner, Richard 


1906 


1903 


Tierny, James M. 


1906 


1904 


Tobin, John 


1909 


1903 


Trombley, Adelard D. 


1903 


1907 


Trombley, Edmond 


1905 


1907 


Trombley, Philip 


1905 




Torier, Leon 


1903 




1907 


Turner, Charles E. 


1903 


1903 


Turner, Henry 


1903 


1909 


Turner, Joshua 


1903 


1907 


Wardick,John H. 


1903 


1907 


Watts, Arthur 


1907 


1907 


Wild, James 


1906 


1907 


Zombie, Walter. 


1909 


1905 







Ws^t €nb. 




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SOUTHEASTERN MASSACHUSETTS UNIVERSITY 

SPECIAL COLL TH9505.W209 B3 

A history of the Fire department of Warr 



3 ^'^RE DDD73 flDl D 



'l^J^ 



A history of the fire 
department of Warren, R.I 



SP. COL