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Full text of "History of the Forty-sixth regiment Indiana volunteer infantry : September, 1861-September, 1865"

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973.74 
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1755149 



REYNOLDc^ HI<=;T0RICAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01081 



1468 



Digitized by the Internet Arciiive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center 



http://www.archive.org/details/historyoffortysiOOinindi 



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MHE ^'ORTY-SIXTH HxEGIIVlENX 

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Indiana ^, olunteer ^nfantrv 



September, 1S61 - _^eptember, 1S65 



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compiled by y;rder of the " egrimental ^7 1 ssociation 



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Indiana infantry. 4(!th regt., 16C1-1SG5. 

IIi^itory of the Forty-sixth regiment Indiana volunteer in- 
fantry, Septoniijcr. ISCl-Scptember, 1SG5; compiled by order 
of the lici^imentai assoc-iation. (Logansport, Ind.. Press of 
AVilson, Iluniplireys it co.j 1SS8. 

vl, (7i-220 I). 2?,*^. 

Corajiiled by Thod. H. Brinj^hurst nnd Frank Swlgart. 

another copy. 



1. U. S. — Civil war — [{cslnientalJiis^torios — lud. inf.- 



Llbrary of Congress 






JCth. I. Title. 
2—12770 



TO THE 

jcuHstcCi 5Ucn of tI(C 3 ortij-£.ixIft itcniiircnt. 

For the Private SoWiers are the true ileroc.-i uf the \\-\v: uot the otiicers, upon- 
whom too generally falls alj^ the ceilit of successful action. They 
bear the weight of the" liV-a'vy, blows sent Viy the enemy, 
while the glory earned by tEem too often settles 
around those who, althoiiirh more promi- 
nent upon rec(.>ril. are often less 
so upo!! the Hl'UI. 



PREFACE. 

AT the annual meeting of the Forty-sixth Indiana Regi- 
• MENTAL Association, held at Delphi, Ind., in September 
last, it was determined that a History of the Regiment should 
be prepared, and a committee was appointed to compile the 
work. The duty has been performed, and the ('ommittee pre- 
sents this volume as the result of its labor, in the hope that 
the book will serve the purpose of the Association, in giving 
the survivors of the Regiment, in sufficient detail, a record of 
most of the incidents of the service. 

The Committee does not pretend that it has succeeded in 
compiling a work that will entertain the general public, though, 
to many outside of the organization, it may prove interesting. 
It was designed to furnish the survivors of the Regiment, their 
families and friends, a book v>-hich, now and in future years, 
may recall the stirring and exciting scenes through which the 
Regiment passed. 

Much difficulty has been encountered by the Committee, in 
reaching facts and dales through the memory of the members 
of the Regiment. The lapse of a quarter of a century has dimmed 
the memory of nearly all, and left many interesting facts and 
events forgotten. 'With the material at hand, the Committee 
has done the best that was jjossible, and believes that the His- 
tory will be found as complete as could be expected. 

The service of the Regiment was varied. It served on 
land and water. Much of its time was spent on gunboats, 
transports and flatboats. It served in Kentucky, Tennessee, 
Missouri, Arkansas, Mississippi. Louisiana and Texas. It was 



VI PREKACE. 



often engaged independent of other regiments. It was in 
active service nearly four years, and with many of its orioinal 
members as officers. It was in many important actions, and 
acknowledges one hona-fdc retreat. The members of the 
Regiment were liarmonious, and the most unwelcome order was 
always promptly obeyed. 

The members of the Committee acknowledge the pleasure 
they have enjoyed in reviving many forgotten incidents of the 
service, and the companion shij) of the comrades of those event- 
ful days. Even the fatigue, the danger and the suiiering of the 
times, were compensated for, by the acts of kindness they called 
out, and cannot be forgotten. 

'J'he record of no Indiana regiment was dimmed by any act 
that dishonored its mem])ers or the State. The Forty-sixth 
simply claims that it was an Indiana regiment, and that its 
members are satisfied with its record. 

Tiios. H. Bri>'gkukst, 
Frank Savigart, 
July 2, 1SS3. Committee. 



.- v..\. 



^ n ^ ^ii^r 



Ke ^oriv^=S]2A]\ (Indiana. 



CHAPTER I. 

Orgaxizatiox. — FinsT ]\Iau(:h. — Ixdiaxapoli-;. — Madisox. — Loui^villi;. 
— Camp Oaki.axd. — Bardstowx. — Wickijff. — Salt River. — Gex- 

ERAI. XeI.SOX. — DOWX THE RiVER.— EVAXSVILLE. — PaDUCAH. — 

Cairo. — SErTE>rBER, 18(51 -Fekiicav.y, ISO-;?. 

THE campaigns of the "throe mouths' service" were conclu'led. 
The defeat at Bull Run had been sulfered, and the Nation 
wa.s preparing for the desperate struggle, now manifestly upon it. 
Indiana was alive with military preparation. Already she had 
many regiments in the field. Cass, Carroll and White counties 
had recruited and sent the Nation's army six com[)anies of infantry, 
and a considerable number of the citizens of those counties had 
joined organizations in other districts. Portions of a regiment 
had been recruited at Logansport, under a promise by Governor 
Morton that a regiment would be accepted from that point, pro^ 
vided the State should be at no expense foi- quarters. Barracks 
had been commenced there, on a citizens' subscription, and were 
suthciently advanced to be made habitable by the 7th of October, 
ISGl. Final authority for organizing the Forty-sixth Regiment 
was received in the following: 

IxDiAXAPOLis, September 30, ISGl . 
'•Hon. R. P. Dellart. Hon. Giaham X. Fitcb, Newtou G. Scott aurt 
Thomas H. r>riiigLur.st are authorized to raise a regiment, to rendezvous at 
Logansport. Piuild your barrar^ks, hurry up your company organizations 
and put them in camp. 

"By order of Governor O. P. Moutox. 
■'William R. Holloway." 

This stimulated rt-cruiting. and, in a few days, the regiment 
was in camp, made up as follows: 

A full company from Cass county, under John Guthrie,, 
entered September 30. 



10 THE FORTY-SIXTH INDIANA. 

Part of a company from Camden, Carroll countv, under 
David Paden and David Howell, October ',-,. 

A full company frum Delphi, Carroll county, under John H. 
C4ould, October 5. 

A full company from Cass county, under Aaron M. Flory, 
October 7. 

A part of a company from Carroll county, under Bernard F. 
Schermerhorn, Octol»er 10. 

A part of a company from Pulaski county, under Felix B. 
Thomas, October 17, 

A part of a company from White county, under William 
Spencer, October IS. 

A part of a company from Fulton county, unckr Benjamin F. 
Grover. 

A part of a company from V\'aba.>h and White counties, 
under James II. Thomas. 

A part of a company from White cuiintv, under Robert W. 
Sill, October 20. 

A part of a com}>any from Cass county, under N. B. Booth, * 
October 20. _ 

The camp was fully organized and under discipline bv 
October 7, when John H. Gould was a}.>pointed to command the 
barracks, who issue-l tiie first "regimental orders'" on that day. 

On .September 30, ISGl, commissions v.tre issued bv Governor 
Morton to the field olrlcers, as follows: Graham X. Fitch, colonel: 
Newton G. Scott, lieutenant colonel; Thomas H. Bringhurst, 
major; Richard P. DoIIart, adjutant; and, on September 24. to 
David D. Dykeraan, quartermaster; on December 11, to Robert 
Irvin, chaplain; on October 7, to Horace Coleman, surgeon, and to 
William S. Haymon<l, assistant surgeon. 

During October, 18G1, the several companies liaving been 
filled up to the maximum, elections w ere hi/ld for company officers, 
resulting in the following organization.^: 

Company A. — Captain, John H. Gould; first lieutenant, 
"William A. Pigman; second lieutenant, James M. Watts. 

Company B. — Captain, Aaron M. Flory; first lieutenant, John 
T. Castle; second lieutenant, John Al. Arnuut. 

Company C. — Captain, Bernard F. Schermerhorn; tirst lieu- 
tenant, Anthony Garret; second lieutenant, Andrew B. Robertson. 

Company D. — Captaiii, John (Tuthrie; lir-^t liouteriant, Wil- 
liam M. iKjll.uf. Second lieutenant, Charl«j^ A. Brownlie. 



ORGANIZATION". MARRIAGE IN CAMP. MARCH. 11 

Comjiany E. — Captain, William Spencer; first lieutenant, Eli 
R. Herman; second lieutenant, Henry Snyder. 

Company F. — Captain, David llowoll; first lieutenant, 
Bernard B. Dailey; second lieutenant, Atlas A. Benliam. 

Company G. — Captain, Robert W. Sill; first lieutenant, 
Joseph D. Cowdin; second lieutenant, John M. Berkey. 

Company H. — Captain, Felix B. Thomas; first lieutenant. 
George Burson; second lieutenant, James W.Brown. 

Company I. — Captain, James H. Thomas; first lieutenant, 
John W. F. Liston; second lieutenant, X. B. Booth. 

Company K. — Captain, Benjamin F. Grover; first lieutenant, 
Robert 31. Shields; second lieutenant, Jacob H. Leitcr. 

Commissions for the above ofticers were given them at Indian- 
apolis, on December 11, bearing date October 4, ISOl. 

Anticipating an early departure, the several departments of 
the regiment were actively engaged in procuring the necessary 
supplies. An abundance of comfortable clothing was received and 
distributed. An inferior article of Enfield rifles was received. 
Horses were purchased for wagons. [The Wi^gons were met at 
Louisville.] Pending the expected orders to move, the regiment 
was industriously drilled. On the 23th of November the monotony 
of camp life was diversified by the marriage of Mr. William 
Cornell, of Company D., to Miss Annett Smith, by the regimental 
chaplain, Robert Irvin. The ceremony was performed on a plat- 
form, in the presence of the assembled regiment. 

On the morning of the 12th of December, ISGI, the Forty- 
sixth regiment broke camp and prepared for actual service. At 8 
o'clock the line was formed and the regiment was mustered into 
the service of the United States by Lieutenant Edgar E. Phelps, 
of the regular army, for three years. Ofiicers and men took the 
regulation oath, and, led by the Logan band, took up the line of 
march for the war. The route was direct for the depot of the 
Wabash railroad, where the regiment was rapidly and safely 
placed on comfortable ears, and, at 10 o'clock, the train moved 
slowly off toward LaFayette. Just previous to the departure a 
handsome national flag was presented to the regiment by the citizens 
of Logansport, through Mr. Charles B. Lasselle, which was received, 
on behalf of the regiment, by Colonel G. N. Fitch. 

As descriptive of the departure of the regiment, the following 
is copied from the Logans})ort .To^'rn'/l of December 14, ISGl: 



12 TIIK FOKTY-SIXTII INDIANA. 

■'The spectacle wp.s such, as lias never before been witiiessed in tliis 
place. The streets through which the regiment marched were crowded 
with people, and it was scarcely possible to make a passage throush the 
mass. The gleam of the bri^.lu Eiiticlds, t!ie measured tread of the thou- 
sand men. the music, tlie gallant bearing of the soldiers, aud, more than all. 
the thought that all this preparation — this bustle — was, most likelv, the 
opening scene to a bloody tragedy, ga'.-e an interest to the occasion that 
could be experienced at no other time. 

"At the depot the scene was still more exciting. No less than four 
thousiuid persons had gathered there to take a last look at the boys and bid 
them good-bye. ^lothers who had given up their only son, to subject him 
to certain hardsliip, danger aud probable death to vindicate the honor of 
the Government; fathers bravely struggling against fraternal emotion ard 
exhorting their boys to noble deeds iri the defense of the right; brothers, 
sisters, husbands, wives, all shaken by a natural grief at the sad parting, 
yet, with all, not a word of repining, not a wish that the loved cues should 
remain at home in the hour of their country's peril." ( 

Arriving at LaFayette, the regiment v.-a.s received at the depot 
by the Fortieth Regiment, under Colonel Wilson, and by Cox's 
battery. 

On the arrival of the regimetit at Indianapoli.s, camp was 
found already prepared by a detail .sent down in advance, and 
orders were in waiting directing the regiment to proceed imme- 
diately to Louisville. The train was taken for ^Madison on the 
lith of December. 

-dadi.son was reached at 3 a. >r. on the 15th. The reception 
was rather cold and clieorless. The boats intended for the regi- 
ment were not ready, and the men were compelled to accept cpiar- 
ters along the levee until daylight. At G.30 a. m, the right divi- 
sion, under the lieutenant colonel, mnrched aboard the "City of 
lyiadison,"' and the left, under the major, the "Lancaster, Xo. 3." 
At 10 o'clock the boats pushed out into the river. Tlte levee was 
lined with people, who greeted the soldiers with cheers and the 
waving of handkerchiefs. Tiie soldiers responded with such shouts 
as a thousand such throats could utter. 

As the two boats passed down the river, with the crowded 
levee in .^ight and under the sound of the bells ringing for church, 
it recalled to many a similar scene, which occurred on the same 
spot, years before. In lS4tj a company from Cass county was 
going to the Me.vicau war. It came from Logansport, through 
Indianapolis, to Ma-lison, and was transported i)y steamboat from 
Mad!>')n to Louisville on a ^>nnday in. truing. 'J'he saine drummer 



MADISON*. LOL'ISVILI.K. OAKLAND. 



13 



^vho beat to the tune of "The Girl I Left Behind :\Ie^" then, again 
beat to the same tune now from a similar position. 

The passage down the river was uneventful. In landing, one 
of the men walked oft" a plank, and would have been drowned only 
for the prompt assistance of his comrades. This soldier had been 
in the enjoyment of a pair of new shoes, and his apparent anxiety 
to keep them out of the water submerged his head. Quite an 
effort Avas necessary, on the part of the man's friends, to restore 
his vital parts to the atmosphere, at the expense of the shoes. 

The regiment arrived at Jeffersonville at 1 p. ^r. At 4, orders 
came for disembarkation at Louisville. At 7 o'clock the regiment 
was on its camp ground, on or near the Oakland race course, a 
short distance from the city. Orders were out for an immediate 
march, but some delay was necessary, on account of the non-arrival 
of the wagons. A large number of troops were on the ground, 
and tliere was much confusi<;>n. 

The refrimental Avagons arrived on the ISth. The horses were 
hitched up in their new harness and made a grand a[)pearance. _ 
The chaplain. 3Ir. Irvln, organized the postoffice. 
Swain H. Xelsou, of Company A, was injured by the accidental 
discharo-e of a gun. He was subsequently killed at Champion's 
Hill. 

The regiment was restricted to thirteen wagons. This neces- 
sitated the turning over of forty horses. Mr. Van \ orst, the 
wacron-master, was so discriminating in his selection that the l>est 
animals largely predominated on the regiment's side. 

The regiment left Camp Oakland on the IStii of December at 
2 o'clock, and encamped for the night at Fern creek, eleven miles 
from Louisville. - 

The Eleventh Michigan, which left in advance, was already in 
camp. The wagons were behind, and did not arrive in time for 
cookimz. Considerable grumbling arose from the necessity of 
gomu' to bed witliout supper. The wagons straggled in during the 
nioht, and as each one arrived, the driver aroused the camp in find- 
ing hia company. 

Reveille was beaten on the lOth at -i o'clock, and some hours. 
were spent in hunting up camp luoperty and getting into .shape. 
Then there wa-: a march of seven miles to a can\p by a spring, 
and on hilly ground. 

On tlie 'ioth, tifteen miles were made with much com|»laint 
about still limbs and sore feet. During the night, tht^ Fifty-eighth 



14 THE FOnXY-SIXTII INDIANA. 

Ohio, Colonel Carr, arrived and went into camp. Many of the 
men were broken down. Their wagons and some hired teams "were 
loaded with exhausted men, knapsacks and guns. The men were 
so tired that, without waiting for tents, they threw themselves 
upon the ground and slept. During the night tlie thermometer 
fell to twelve degrees. 

On the 21.st the regiment reached Bardstown. forty miles from 
Louisville. The encampment was on the south fork of Green 
rivei'. Here a member of Company I had an attack of insanity. 
He broke from camp and went through houses generally, 
greatly alarming the natives. He was finally subdued. The 
Aveather turned cold and there was much suffering. Some had 
small stoves, which helped considerably. On the 23d a move was 
made to a better location. Great preparations were being made 
for Christmas. Negroes came*in with turkies and pies, all of 
which found a ready market. On the 2Stli camp was again moved, 
five miles south on the pike. 

On the 2d a lai-ge Sibley tent, occupied by a number of 
Company H, took tire while the legiment was on drill. The 
edifice, with its entire contents, was destroyed, and twenty home- 
less wanderers were cast upon the charities of an unsympathizing 
camp. No insurance. On the same day the quartermaster sent a 
trusty agent to town for rations of groceries. Meeting with unex- 
pected good friends, the man became confused in his mission, and 
drew 1,200 pounds of fresh meat. He arrived in camp at midnight, 
and insisted that meat was what the quartermaster wanted. 

The regiment was drilled four hours in the morning and tlnee 
in the afternoon. The latter drill was with knapsacks. None were 
exempt from the duty, except on surgeon's certificate. The earlier 
and later portions of the day were devoted to persimmons, of 
which there v^-as an abundance. 

On the Gth the regiment started for Camp ^^'icklifI', twenty- 
three miles distant, and went into camp at Knob creek, fourteen 
miles. Weather severely cold and roads muddy. Reached Wick- 
liff at 11 A. M. There was great onfusion from the rush of troops 
and stores. Thermometer fifteen degrees. 

The Forty-sixth at Wicklitl', was brigaded with the Forty-first 
Ohio, the Forty-seventh Indiana and the Sixth Kentucky, under 
command of Colonel William 1>. Ha/en, of the Forty-lirst Ohio. 
Squad, company, regimental and brigade schools Avere immediately 
organized, and, in fair weather, tlrilling occu})ied the greater part 



CAMP WICKI.IFK. SALT KIVER. EMBAr.KATIOX. 15 

of tiie day. The regimental drills were enjoyed from 1 to 4 
o'clock each afternoon, a portion of the time witli knapsacks. The 
sick list averaged 12'). 

During the five weeks' stay at Camp WickliiY there was much 
wet and cold weather. The discipline of General Nelson was very 
severe, rendering the first experience of the regiment in military 
life not enchanting. 

The regiment started for the Ohio river on the I4lh of Feb- 
ruary. The vreatlier was very cold, and the roads exceedinglv 
heavy. Sixteen miles were made by evening. The men suffered 
very mucli, and the fatigue was much aggravated by the impera- 
tive orders of General Xelson against straggling. Went into 
camp at dark. The wagons had stalled, and did not come in until 
9 o'clock. T^e weather grew colder and tliere were no tents. An 
abundance of hay was found and appropriated. Feiices were alsa 
used quite liberally. 

The regiment remained in that camp all the next day, and on 
the IGth again took up the line of march, and arrived within two 
miles of the Ohio river at dark. On this last marcli the suflering 
was extreme. Over a thousand men straggled. Many did not gel 
into camp until the next day. The Forty-sixth suffered as little^as 
any regiment, and came into camp in fair order. It was on this 
march that General Nelson gathered in so many swords from 
officers, for permitting their men to lie on the snow. 

On the 17th orders were received to prepare for embarkation 
on steamboats. They were already at the landing, awaiting their 
loads. The assignment of boats for the division was as follows: 

On the "Diana," the Sixth Ohio, with General Nelson, as the 
tlag ship; on the "Autocrat,'' the Twenty-fourth Ohio; on the 
"^John Raines,"' the Fifty-first Olno; on the "Woodford,'^ the 
Thirty-sixth Indiana; on the "Silver ^Nloon," the right Adng of the 
Forty-first Ohio; on the "Lady Jackson," the left wing°of the 
Forty-first Ohio; on the "Glendale," the right wing of the Forty- 
seventh Indiana; on the "Lady Pike," the Teft wing of the Forty- 
seventh Indiana; on the "Izetta," C-mpanies A, F, D and I, of the 
Forty-sixth Indiana; on the " City of 3Iadison," Companies C, H 
and E, and on the "Golden Slate," G, K and B, of the same regi- 
ment; on the "Lancaster, No. 4," the right wing, and on the 
"^Switzerland," the left wing of the Sixth Kentucky. 

A field ofiicer was on each boat. Colonel Fitch was on the 
^•Ciiy of Madison," Lieutenant Colou-l Scott on the "Izeita" and 



16 THE FORTY-SIXTH TXDIAXA. 

Major Bringliurst on the "Goltlen State."' The work of loading 
was accomplished by S p. m., with great difficulty. The loaded 
wagons were backed down the steep bank by large details of men, 
and the miscellaneous equipage of the regiment was piled up on 
the boats' decks in great confusion. It was not assorted until late 
next day. The officers were ordered to run the boats in a pre- 
scribed order, in double column, with the "Diana" in the lead. 
The imperative order to each was to follow his leader, regardless 
of circumstances. The fleet started out in a misty rain, and the 
boats became considerably mixed up. Stops were necessary on 
account of the fog, and at daylight the fleet had made only eighty 
miles. Cannelton was reached by 9 o'clock, where a full supply of 
coal had been ordered and was expected. None was ready, and 
General Nelsoei loudly threatened to hang the proprietor for his 
delinquency. The fleet remained until o.30 v. m., getting what 
coal was possible. 

After considerable running up and dov/n the river, a portion 
of the fleet reached Smithland, at the mouth of the Cumberland 
river, and 315 miles below the starting point. Here the leading 
Tjoats turned up the river, and the " Golden State," with the left 
companies, followed to Evansville, 151 miles above. The other 
"boats, with the remainder of the regiment, had not been seen since 
the start, on the 17th. 

The portion of the fleet now together (seventeen boats), kept 
on past Evansville, and it seemed that the whole expedition had 
lost purpose and was returning at will. The order to follow the 
leading boat was still good, but the nuijor in charge of the "Golden 
State," thinking it a waste of fuel to be thus aimlessly running up 
and down the river, when about twelve miles above Evansville, 
ordered the cai)tain of the boat to run in shore and tie up until 
■General Nelson found out what he wanted to do. Accordingly 
the "Golden State" was turned into the bank and tied up, Avhile 
the soldiers, crew and officers of the boat patiently awaited devel- 
opments. Boat after boat passed ix\< until all seenied gone. 

Suddenly the "Diana," the flag sb-ip, was seen coming down 
,the river, under a full head of steam. Evidently the "Golden 
State" was noticed, for the "Diana" turned short in toward her. 
And now there was tribulation among the occu])ants of the " Golden 
State." The plainest order of General Nelson had been disobe} ed, 
and the reputation of that officer for severe discipline warranted 
any ]>unisluncnt that could be anticipated. 



DOWN THE OHIO. 17 

As the "Diana" came near, an aide of the general's came to 
the side of the boiler deok and inquired the name of the regiment 
and of the colonel, which were given him by the major. In a 
moment the general himself came forward and inquired the reason 
of the boat's position. The major described an accident that had 
occurred near Evansville — not serious. The general said he would 
come aboard and see what was the matter, and the captain of the 
boat hastened to the engineer, to post him on the situation. On 
coming on board, the general sent for that officer and got an accu- 
rate description of the break, and an estimate of the time required 
to repair it. Many inquiries were made by tlie general about the 
regiment and Colonel Fitch. He said the regiment was a good 
one and ^ad good officers, but all had much to learn. He was 
invited to dinner by the major and concluded to stay. 

At dinner the general was very sociable, but there was a cloud 
over the boat officers. The captain had a card suspended over the 
table announcing that one dollar and fifty cents per day would be 
charged officers for board. The general ordered the card down, 
and threatened that if he ever knew him to charge over one dollar 
per day, he would hunt him up and execute him. He said the 
Government paid a large sum for the service of the boats, and the 
soldiers should not be imposed upon. 

After dinner, the general invited the major to go with him on 
board the "Diana," which he did, after leaving orders with the 
captain of the "'Golden State" to come to Evansville, as soon as 
the repairs were comjileted. On the "Diana" the officers of the 
boat and of the Sixth Ohio were about to sit down to dinner. On 
invitation, the general and the major again dined. 

At Evansville, the general and his new aide went to the tele- 
graph office, VN'hence the general sent many dispatches up the river. 
They then returned to the landing, and, as the "Golden State" 
had arrived, the major went on board and started down the river. 
Before leaving, the general gave especial ^orders that the regiment 
should wait at Paducah for orders from him, for he should retain 
it in his division. 

The " Golden State" reached Paducah at 3.30 a. m., on the 
21st. The major immediately reported the regiment to General 
Sherman, who was in his office with his aides, busy forwarding- 
troops on their several routes. He directed tlie Forty-sixth to 
report to General Payne, at Cairo, and at G o'clock the "'Golden 
State," with her three Cfunpanies, was again steaming down the river. 



IS 



THE FORTV-SIXIU IXDIAXA. 



The "City of Madison" and the "Izetta," with the remainder 
of the regiment, reached Paducah on the evening of the 21st, and 
were sent on to Cairo. General Nelson made strenuous efforts 
with General Sherman to retain the regiment, but without success. 

The several companies did not come together until they met 
at Commerce, on the 23d of February. 

On the arrival of the "Golden State" at Cairo, the whole regi- 
ment was ordered by General Payne to report to General Pope, lit 
Commerce, Missouri. 



CHAPTER 11. 



Vacancies and Promotioxs. — Commerce. — Heavy Suelli>'g. — Xew 
Madrid. — Fort Thompson. — Running the Batteries. — Evacua- 
tion. — Xtght March. — Point Pleasant. — Building Batteries. — 
Terrific Bombardment. — Osceola. — Fort Pillov,.— ;Memphis 
Naval Battle. — Taking Down the Flag. — Again Afloat. — 
February -June, ISGQ. 

THE following vacancies and promotions occurred between 
February and June, 1S62: 

Captain Felix B. Thomas, of Company H, resigned March 23, 
1862; Lieutenant George Burson succeeded him, and Lieutenant 
James W. Brown was commissioned first, and James F. Mitchell 
second lieutenant. 

Lieutenant Benhara, of Company F, died April 1, 1SG2; Joel 
Ferris was appointed second lieutenant. 

Lieutenant J. W. F. Liston, of Company 1, resigned April 22, 
18G2; Lieuten.int Jacob McCormick vvas appointed first, and N. B. 
Booth second lieutenant. 

Lieutenant John M. Arnout, of Company B, resigned April 1, 
1862, and was succeeded by Sergeant Matthew K. Graham. 

First Lieutenant Anthony Garrett, of Company C, resigvied 
April 26, 1SG2; Lieutenant A. B. Robertson was commissioned 
first, and Sergeant John Troxell second lieutenant. 

Second Lieutenant Jacob IL Leitcr, of Company K, resigned 
April 30, 1SG2; Sergeant John McClang was commissioned to suc- 
ceed him. 

Second Lieutenant John M. ]>erkey, of Company G, resigned 
May 6, 1SG2; Sergeant James Hess was appointed to succeed him. 

Second Lieutenant N. B. Booth, of Company I, resigned May 
21, 1SG2; Sergeant Joseph H. Benner was commissioned to suc- 
ceed him. 

Captain John Guthrie, of Company D, resigned May 1", 1^G2: 



20 THE FOUTY-SIXTH INDIANA. 

he was succeeiled by Lieutenant William M. DcHart'; Lieutenant 
Charles A. Brownlie was commissioned to succeed him, and Ser- 
geant A. K. Euing was commissioned second lieutenant. 

Captain David Howell, of Company F, resigned February 5, 
1SG2; Samuel Osborii was commjssioned in his place. 

Captain 0>born, of Compan5' F, resigned May 2G, 1SG2; he 
was succeeded by Lieutenant B. B. Daily; Lieutenant Joel P'crris 
was appointed first, and Joseph C. Plumb second lieutenant. 

Lieutenant Colonel N. G. Scott resigned May 2-i, 1SC2; he 
was succeeded by I\Iajor T. IL Bringluirst; Captain John H. Gould, 
of Company A, was appointed major; Lieuter.ant William A. 
Pigraan was commissioned captain of Company A; James M. Watts 
v.'as commissioned first, and James V. Brough second lieutenant. 

Cha^>lain Robert L-vin resigned ^lay S, 18'j2. 

At Cairo were the 15,000 prisoners captured at Fort Donald- 
son, and the gunboats that had taken so prominent a part in that 
magnificent victory. On the 21st orders were received to draw 
rations and proceed to Commerce, forty miles above Cairo. The 
other two boats had not yet ai rived, but the "Golden State" 
steamed out on the 23d, at noon, and reached Commerce, after 
much delay from sandbars, at 6 p. m. 

On the 23d the companies on the "Golden State" began 
unloading, and were soon in camp on the bluffs. The " Tzetta." 
under Lieutenant Colonel Scott, with four of the tardy companies, 
came in and spent the remainder of the day in unloading. On the 
24th of February the regiment was on the road to Benton, Mo. 
Immense quantities of stores and ammunition were on the road, 
and artillery and cavalry were hurrying to the front. Benton was 
reached at 2 o'clock. The town is the county seat, and has all the 
adjuncts of an imposing court. There was a large bar, according 
to the Record, but the members of it were absent, following the 
fortunes of General "Jeff" Thompson. The Forty-sixth filled 
the bench, the bar, the witness and the jury boxes, and members 
of it cried, "O yesi O yesi" from the sheriff's desk. 

The seats were fully occupied by the less ambitious members 
of the regiment. There was a great infiux of law books in regi- 
mental quarters. General Palmer collected about a hundred vol- 
umes of reports and statutes and returned them to the Court-house. 
It was remarked that stray law books were found only about the 
quarters of ex-attorneys. Nothing was di>covcred in other tents 
except chickens and an occasional pig. 



THK MAECH TO. iiADEID. 21 

TJie remaining three companies of the regiment, under Colonel 
Fitch, arrived at Benton on the 25th. They had left the •' City of 
]\Iadison" at Cairo and sliipped on the "SwitzerLind." 

On the 1st of March the regiment left Benton and soon found 
tlie road obstructed by timber and broken bridges. It ^vent into 
canap at 5 p. ^.l. Resumed the march next day. Heavy rain. 
Much mud. Crowded roads. Made five miles in five hour>. At 
3 p. M. stacked knapsacks and marched seven miles to dryer 
ground. On the 3d, reached Avithin thirteen miles of New Madrid, 
with a bright prospect for a fight. Overtook "JefT" Thompson, 
two miles from camp, and captured three of his guns. 

There were now in Pope's column about 9,000 men, with some 
artillery. The Forty-sixth was in the Third Division, under Gen- 
eral PahiBc-r. The First Brigade (the Thirty-fourth and the Forty- 
f-eventh regiments) was under Colonel Slack. The Second Brigade 
(the Forty-third and the Forty-sixth) under Colonel Fitch. ^The 
Seventh Fxlinois Cavalry and the First Missouri Battery were 
attached to this division. 

At 1.30 the column was within two miles of New Madrid. 
City very quiet. A regiment of infantry and battalion of cavalry 
deployed on each side of the road. General Pope came up and 
took position. Skirmishers advanced. As the column came in 
view of the rebels, their gunboats opened fire. Their aim was 
good but their fuse short. The fire was kept up until 5 o'clock. 
In the meantime the Forty-sixth had been assigned, with an lou-a 
regiment, to support General Granger, who was pressing the rebels 
toward the river. On the retreat of the rebels tlie regiment went 
into camp. 

Up to the 13th, skirmishing and manceuvering occupied the 
time. A rebel surrender was now only a question of time. 

On the 14th, at 3 o'clock, the division marched out to relieve 
i^tan ley's First Division, in the trenches. Heavy guns had arrived 
and been placed in battery, ready for business. The rebels had 
become aware of the presence of their new antagonists, and had 
determined to leave. The Forty-sixth waded through deep mud 
and a heavy rain to their position, near the fort. At daylight, a 
pquad of artillerists, under Captain Joseph A. IMower, suspecting 
an evacuation, went into the fort and found it empty. All were 
gone but three men. Two of them were asleep and the other 
drunk. Ca[.tain ?»Iov,-er took the colors of th.e Forty-seventh Recri- 
uier.t and raided them over the fort. As the rai^in^ fou' enabled 



11 THE FORTY-SIXTH INDIaXA. 

the soldiers to see, a shout went up from those nearest, which was 
taken up and repeated to the outermost camp. 

The situation, as formed by the evacuation of tiie forts, left 
the rebels strongly fortitied at Island No. 10, witli six gunboats, 
under Commodore Ilollins, hemmed in, in a twenty-mile stretch of 
river. They had an infantiy force aloiig the road between Island 
No. 10 and Ti]itonsville, a distance, by land, of five or six miles. 
There were two Federal gunboats in the river, with the advantage, 
to them, of being able to go further dc>wn the stream. 

Tiptonsville was the gateway now to Island No. 10. When 
that was lost to the rebels the situation was lost. Tliere was, 
already, a Federal gun at Point Pleasant, on the Missouri side, a 
few miles above Tiptonsville. Now, it was proposed to erect a 
batteiy fui^her down, and opposite Tiptonsville. 

On the IGth of ]\Iarch the regiment started, at 9 v. jr., down 
to the river bank. Extreme silence was enjoined. A few miles 
below New Madrid two large guns were met in the road with long 
ropes attached. Details of a hundred men were invited to "take 
bold," which was done, and, until live o'clock next morning, over 
hills, through swamps, the regiment dragged the guns, when Point 
Pleasant wa? reached, and in half an hour the tired and hungry 
men were asleep. 

At 2 p. M., on the 17th, the regiment started for Riddle's 
Point. To avoid the enemy it took a road back from the river. 
Tlie road was swampy, and led througli woods, cornfields, barn- 
yards, streams and fences. A halt was made back of the ''Point"' 
at 3.30, but too near the river, and a backward move was made. 
The whole division then went into camp on a fine large meadow. 
On the morning of the ISth four meals were due the men, and yet 
no wagons in sight. At 11 o'clock a dash was made for the strag- 
gling cattle, Iiogs and chickens, and the fast was broken at noon. 
At 4 o'cl(>ck all the wagcuis were up and a big supper was pre- 
pared. The long grass was cut and made into beds, and a huge 
sleep was anticipated. At 7 o'clock orders came to prepare for an 
immediate march, with arms and blankets. "Positively no talking 
or cougliing"' was an order often repeated. Marched two and one- 
half miles. The right was halted in pitch darkness. Companies 
A anifC marched on, while the other comp;inies stacked arms and 
were introduced to wagons loaded with spades, picks and empty 
corn sacks. With these the eight companies were armed and 
marched olT in the darkness. 



riddle's POIXT. BATTEraES. _o 

Although the regiment was in ignorance of what was to be 
done, there were those present who knew what was wanted and 
how to accom|..lisli it. A few officers were dodging about with 
lines and peers, and the raen were soon at work, digging here and 
fillina; there, guided by the white pegs arranged by the engineers. 
Bags were tilled and piled up, under their direction. At 12 o'clock 
it began to rain, with a sharp thunder storm. The remainder of 
the night was showery. The regiment was about opposite Tip- 
tonsville, and the noise made by the rebels, as they loaded their 
transports, and their occasional shouts, could be distinctly heard. 

The work on the battery progressed rapidly all night. The 
men had but an imperfect understanding of their work, but they 
had confidence in the intelligence and skill that were directing 
them. Toward daylight a force was put to work digging ritle 
p'its, for the protection of the raen against the gunboats. Nearly 
enough were completed to afford protection for all; but all con- 
tained water. 

When daylight came the men were astonished at their Avork. 
There was a battery of four guus well protected by bags of earth, 
and by embankments. The magazine in the rear was a complete 
room, impervious to any attack. All seemed ready to receive and 
resist successfully, any assault from tlie boats. There were eighty 
riile pits, looking comfortable enough, but rather unpleasantly 
similar to graves. 

After daylight, as the work was being finished, the raen laid 
down, and many of them slept. Others were anticipating the sur- 
prise of the rebels when we opened fire on them. xVbout S o'clock 
a fine large transport came pufiing up the river. When opposite 
the battery, a gun was fired at her. The ball went screaming 
through the air, struck the water just inside the boat, and passed 
over her into the woods beyond. The boat i)Ut on all steara, and, 
after another ineliectual fire from the other gun, passed out of 
range. This scene had scarcely closed when another packet came 
up, evidently ignorant of the situation. At the landing at Tip- 
tonsville, the boats set up a continuous vrhistling to w^arn coming 
boats of the danger, but the one coming up took no notice of it, 
and was soon in range. The guns were both ready, and fired sep- 
arately. The first shot went just ahead of the boat. The second 
struck the water just behind the bow, arose and went crashing 
through the upper works. She kept on and was out of range 
before another shot could be had. In locating the battery, it had 



24 THE rOKTY-SIXTH IXDIAN'A. 

been placed too far up tlie river. A heavy growth of cypress trees 
cut passing boats from view too soon. The men were in high glee 
over the performance, and Avantcd more. Tlie gunners (regulars) 
said to them, ""Wait a little.'' In a little while four rebel gun- 
boats were seen jiutting out from Tiptousville. They came over 
the river and paddled about for a while, and then opened fire. 
The first shell came from a boat directly opposite the rifle pits, 
passing over them and exploding just over the rear trench. The 
company which should have occupied it was at the bayou on 
guard. As each boat obtained position, it ojiened fire, and soon 
there was a perfect tempest of shot and shell. T'heir guns were well 
aimed, and the shells seemed to explode just where they wanted 
them. The round shot were thirty-twos. The rifles were sixes, 
tens arid twelves. Some were all lead, others were iron, M'ith a 
lead ban4 for the rifles. After firing some time the boats changed 
position, and the men liked it less than before. One boat 
remained in front Avhile the others came around toward the 
bayou to obtain a cross fire. A sloop came on an exact line with 
our trenches. She opened with three guns, throwing ten-inch fuse 
shells and six and ten-pound percussion. The fire from all the 
boats was continuous, and left no room outside the trenches for 
any living thing. The loose banks of the pits and trenches vv'ere 
plowed and dashed over the men in them, and the explosion of the 
shells in the air and over the trenches was terrifhc. The heav}' 
shot caused a sound like a sadden storm, and the lighter ones a 
fierce scream. 

The firing continued nearly an hour and a quarter, and with 
very little intermission. Our guns got in only an occasional 
shot. "Wlitn the gunners showed their heads a storm of iron 
came, comjielling all to go down. 

During the firing it Avas re]iorted that the rebels were landing, 
and the regiment Avas called out into line. The rej>ort ])roving 
false, the men went to the pits. Finding that the guns could not 
be dismounted, the fleet dro2^i)ed down the river. But one man 
was killed in the attack, and he had Jio mark or wound about him. 
Dunfee, of Company II, was rendered deaf by the concussion of 
a shell. 

Companies C, D and I were at the bayou, on guard. They 
were nearer to the boats, and Avere often covered Avith the earth 
dashed out by the Ijalls. Nearly every trench showed marks of 
the bombardment. Comi>any A, on the right of the rear trench, 



VlGIiT WITH THE >'AVY. ZO 

roofived a number, very close. F bad tbem overhead. On 
the pits, marks were abundant. H occu})icd those on the right 
of the front, B on the left. The second of B from the left 
received a ball on its edge, -which bounded out over the ground 
instead of into the pit, which it might have done. The first 
pit had two large balls over it, within two or three feet of the 
occupants. One of G's received a ball through the bank, 
Avhich knocked it in, but did no other damage. Two balls 
struck tlie building back of H, v\'hich must have passed very 
close. 

After the engagement the regiment spent the remainder of the 
day in perfecting the works and in building new ones. Enough 
provisions were brought from camp for a partial meal at 2 o'clock. 
The regiment was relieved by the Forty-seventh, at 1*) p. m. 

*rhe force at Riddle's Point consisted of the Tliirty-fourth, 
Forty-third, Forty-sixth and Forty-seventh Indiaria. There were 
also 200 cavalry, three light brass field pieces and two ten-pound 
Parrots, forming the division of General Palmer. At the battery 
below, the tv.-enty-four pounders were worked by a detail of 
regulars. 

Operations at Tiptonsville were plainly visible from the Mis- 
souri side. The rebel gunboats were below, occasionally running 
up and exchanging shots. Heavy firing was constantly heard at 
Island No. 10. On the 22d of March four persons were killed by 
the exjdosion of a shell, thrown by a rebel gunboat, on th.e attack 
on the "Point." It had been kicked about since that time, and 
was considered harmless. A member of the Forty-seventh under- 
took to pick out the powder vvith a lile. lie, with a citizen and 
two boys, was killed by the explosion. 

1'he four Indiana regiments did the duty at the '-Point." 
One v,-ent down each day. The ritle pits at the battery were 
extensively decorated. Some of the regiments cut seats in them, 
built chimneys and otherv\-ise added to their usefidness as lesidences, 
but entirely destroyed them as a refuge from shot and shell. 
Others had to be built. The new pits were ornamented witli wall 
paper, pictures, carjjets, stoves, chairs, etc., borrowed from the 
adjacent abandoned dwellings. 

On the 1st of April a fearful storm of wind and rain swept 
over the camp, blowing down all the tents and flooding the 
ground. 

Ou the -Itli of April the gunboat Curonddet ran the rel.>el bat- 



2C> THE FORTY-SIXTH INDIAXA. 

teries above Island No. 10 and eaine on down to the city. On the 
7th the F'iU$h>irij also ran past. The two then amused themselves 
with the rel)t-l land batteries, silencing the most of them. 

On the Cth a transport, bearing the stars and stripes, passed 
rapidly down the river, turned and came up again. A rebel battery 
opened on it, when the Caronddet opened on the battery and soon 
silencerl it. Later the same gunboat attacked another battery and 
drove the gunners off. A squad was then sent ashore and the 
guns spiked. On the 7th the Oirondeht again came down and 
silenced every battery that could be found. Our peoi)le on the 
3Iissouri side looked on, and were delighted with the entertainment. 

The 7th was the day of the Forty-sixth for duty at the 
"Point." It went out in a heavy rain. At 2 p. m., orders came 
for immediate embarkation. On the same afternoon the huge 
rebel rtoating battery came down the river. It was arrested and 
secured. The regiment embarked at 3.30, on the 0th. With the 
Forty-third, it went on the "Ohio Belle," and landed at Tiptons- 
ville at 6 p. m., and went into cnmp for the night. The rebels 
were coming in and surrendering. Island No. 10 had fallen, and 
tl>e retreat of the rebels was cut off. Three thousand prisoners, 
including Generals Mackall and Gnnt, were captured. The latter 
were on the steamer '-Alec. Scott," and were subjected to a veiy 
annoying scrutiny by the boys of the Forty-sixth. There were no 
introductions. 

This was the end of the campaign against Island No. 10, the 
first move toward the opiening of the ^Iississip))i. In it, as well as 
in the final acts at Vicksburg, the Forty-sixth regiment bore an 
im{)ortant part. . , 

In a congratulatory order to General Fope, General llalleck 
said: 

"I congratulate you ami your command on the success that has 
crowned your toils and cxiiosurc. You have given the final blow to the 
rebellion in Missouii, and provL-d yourselves wonby members of the brave 
army of the West."' 

And General Pope said to his soldiers: 

"Much as the general commanding has desired to shield the forces 
under his command from unnecessary sulTeriug and loss of life, the success 
of our operations required unusual courage and patriotism, and an exhibi- 
tion of the highest (jualities of the soldier. The general commanding has 
expeeted much from the gallant men of this aru'iy, but he is proud and 



OSCEOLA. FOKT PILLOW. "J I 

gratified to-day that bis /luticipalions have betu more than realized, and 
that he has beeo impressed with a coulidence iu tlie otiicers and men of this 
command, which foreshadows for them a most brilliant future." * * 

Up to tlie 15th, the regiment was engaged in scouting over the 
country, cajituring rebels and stores. On the 15th, at T a. >r., the 
regiment went on Ijoard the "G. W. Graham" and the "Emma." 
General Palmer, with bis staff, went on the "Graham." Colonel 
Fitch commanded the brigade. At 3 o'clock the boats were in 
siirht of Osceola, Ark. The smoke of the rel)el gunboats and of 
Fort Pillow was seen across the bend. On the IGth, the lieet, then 
numbering twenty-two transports, crossed ami tied up on the 
Arkansas side. In the evening the mortarboats began throwing 
shells into the fort. At tlie same time the "Jessie Benton," a 
beautiful little tusr belont^-infr to the navv, took fire and v.-as 
destroyed. On the l«th, the paymaster came and interviewed the 
boys, making the first payment on that date. The entire transport 
fleet, e.Kcept the "Graham" and "Emma," went up the river, 
leaving only the Forty-third and Forty-sixth with the gunboats. 

At Osceola the ground was wet and low and the river high. 
The brigade was on land during the rlay and on the boats at nigiit. 
The weather was hot. The sick list, on the 23d, was 104. Up to 
the 9th of 'May, nothing of interest occra-red. Scouting parties 
went inland, in boats, and any employment that offered was 
accepted to occupy the time. Under a "Military Masonic Char- 
ter," a lodge of Masons was organized at a plantation house, near 
Osceola, under the direction of Surgeon Horace Coieman. Regu- 
lar meetings were held, and the institution did quite a satisfactory 
business. Ti^e "jewels" were manufactured at the steamboat 
blacksmith shop. Beyond the usual benefactions of the institu- 
tion, the meetings helped to break the monotony of the situation. 

On the 9th the rebel gunboats came np, and a regular engage- 
ment occurred between the Vtoi JJorn, .Price, Surnpter, ZfOceU, 
Litf.hi Ilthel, licoMrtfiord and the Brarjij, and the Federal tleet. 
The tight lasted over an hour, and resulted in the sinking of the 
CiiichoiufA and JIo>'.nd Citij in shoal water. 

The attack was made just at daybreak, and the men on the 
transports left their beds with commendable promptitude. 

Henry S. Fitch came to Osceola as brigade quartermaster. 
Le Roy F'itch was in command of the "Torrence," a magazine 
boat, belonging to the navy. George Groves, ancither Indiana 
boy, wa>! on duty at one -(f the mortars. 



28 THi: FC'ETV-SIXTH INDIANA. 

Up to the 2d of June there was only the usual routine of duty. 
The regiment was on and oil the hoat each day. 

On the 3d of June, Lieutenant Brownlie was sent down the 
river reconoitreing. lie found a rebel gunboat tied uj), while a 
part of the crew was on shore, getting ice from a house on the 
bank. He surprised and captured seven of them, and brouglit 
them off under the fire of the gunboat. The prisoners were put on 
horseback, behind the soldiers, and made a rough voyage to the 
Federal camp. 

On the same day the major of the Forty-sixth, with three 
companies, was sent down near the fort, on the Tennessee side, 
with orders to construct a raft or bridge from the timber in a house 
known to be there. The bridge was to be used in crossing a creek 
Just outside the fort. In the midst of tlie work firing commenced 
from the ?'ebels, \^liich was replied to by the Federal gunboats. 
Heavy shot Y\-ent over tlie work and plunged into the timber. A 
narrow island, covered with a heavy growth of brush, obstructed 
the view of. the river, and it could not be discovered what the 
cause of the attack Mas. Under the impression that the movement 
was discovered, the detail returned to the boat. The firing was 
occasioned by an attempt by Colonel EUet to cut out a rebel boat, 
just above the fort. He started down with tlie ram Queen of tJic 
We&t, but failed, on account of the heavy fire, to reach the boat. 
Ellet's movement was without the knowledge of Commodore Foot 
or Colonel Filch, and the presence of the detail was "not known to 
Colonel Ellet. The unfortunate movement of the ram prevented 
the brigade from particijjating in an attack upon the fort, while 
the evacuation was in progi e'ss7 f or the rebels were all out in forty- 
eight hours. 

On the 4th, Captain Schermerhorn, with a detail, went over 
and completed tlie raft, but the rebels were gone. 

On each day from the 30th of May, information was received 
that the rebels were evacuating, and it became certain that the end 
of Fort Pirio\\' ^\ as near. On the night of the 4th, the light of a 
great confiagration at the fort was witnessed from the Federal 
fleet. Evidently, a large quantity of stores was being consumed. 
On the oth, at 3 a. .m., the brigade droi)ped cautiously down 
toward the fort, the little steamer, " Hetty Gilmore," in the lead. 
Arriving at the fort, the "Hetty" gave three whistles and all 
landed. The fort was entirely empty. Every thing portable, 
except some iieavy guns, was burned or destroyed. 



FORT PILLOW. MEMPillS. 29 

The gunboats anJ raras came down with, or shortly after, the 
brigade, and by daybreak the fort was thoroughly occupied by the 
invading soldiers and sailors. The Hags of the Forty-third and- 
Forty-sixth Hoated over the parapet of the fort from daylight until 
noon, Avlien they were furled to be again given to the breeze at 
Menijihis. 

Colonel Ellet, in his report to the department, says that on 
the evening of the 4th, he made a reconnoissance of the fort, going 
far enough down to discover that it had been evacuated, and that 
on the 5th he went down with all his rams, before daylight, and 
"planted the stars and stripes on the fort.'' Colonel Ellet is 
mistaken in his facts. Up to 2 o'clock of the morning of the 5th, 
it Avas not certainly known to anybody on the Federal side that the 
rebels were gone. I'he "Hetty Gilmore," with a portion of the 
B'orty-isixth, was at the fort landing before any ram or gunboat 
ap})eared, and none of the fleet, except the " Hetty," came until 
after that boat bad given the signal whicli had been arranged. 

On the 20th of May an accident occurred which cost Company 
H a man, and endangered the lives of three others. A scouting 
party was going down the road, and the major of the Forty-sixth,, 
with J. H. Depoy, Charles Ross and M. L. ]3urson, of Company 
H, were taking a light skiff down along shore, to the opening of a 
lagoon. It was started out just above the steamboats, which were 
lying three or four abreast. The boat was caught in the current 
running under the transports, upset and drawn under. The major 
and one of the men caught to the gunwale of the steamer, and were 
drawn out by some deck hands. The other two Avere carried 
under the boats. Burson Avas drawn entirely under, and caught in 
the opi>osite wheel, and Avas saved. Depoy went clear and was lost. 
Five hundred men standing on the surrounding boats Avere unwill- 
ing Avitnesses of the scene, but Avere unable to render any assist- 
ance. After passing from under the boat, Depoy Avas seen going- 
down the river. He struggled two or three minutes Avith the angry 
current, and finally sunk from vieAV. In. a fcAV days the body was 
found near the mortarboats and buried. 

At noon, on the 5th, the brigade again started down the river, 
leaving Company B, of tlie Forty-sixth, to gather whatever prop- 
erty might have been left undestroyed. At Fulton, two tAvelve- 
]>ound guns Avere taken on board. The brigade arrived at Fort 
Randolph at dark, and found it evacuated. The boats then tied. 
up for the night. 



30 THE FOllTY-SIXTH INDIANA. 

With the rams in advance, the tiL-Gl leaciied a point one and 
one-lialf miles above ^Memphis about 4 o'clock. Seven rebel gun- 
boats Avere drawn up before the city. The ram Queen of the West 
immediately pushed ahead of the gunboats and made a fearful 
dash at three rebel boats coming up in advance of the fleet. That 
dash seemed to settle the business, for the result was so decisive 
that the destruction of the rebel fleet vvas unavoidable. Suj>ported 
by the ram Jfonarcfi, the Qnten kept on her course of destruction, 
until, in a few minutes, the victory was complete. A misunder- 
standing about signals left three of the Federal rams virtually out 
•of the contest. During the action the gunboats kept up a contin- 
uous and effective Are. 

The result of tlie battle was a surprising victory. Of the rebel 
fleet, the Loi-ell and Little lieltl were sunk; tlie J3eaurt(iard and 
Price ran into eacli other and were disabled; the "'/t„//'" Thowpson 
Vk'as blov,-n uji; the Bragg and Syr/i]>ter went ashore in flames; the 
Von iJorii ran out of the fight, and for the present escaped. 

During the fight the blufi's in front of the city -were crowded 
with an excited multitude. By incessant boasting, "Jell'*' 
Thompson had produced the iinpression that his wonderful flotilla 
would jweep the Federal gunboats from the river. The miserable 
fight that he made added mortification to disappointment, and 
when the valiant general and commodore mounted a convenient 
horse at the conclusion, and rode off for a safer place, his adherents 
gave him up. 

The crews of the rebel gunboats clung to the wrecks of their 
vessels and were [dcked up by yawls manned by Federal sailors 
and soldiers. The prisoners, to the number of one hundred, were 
brought to the steamer "Von Puhl" and held until night, when 
they were transferred to the "Piatt Valley" and carried to Cairo. 
While the prisoners were being fished out, a band on one of the 
boats played "Dixie" for the comfort of the slavering rebels. 

Immediately after the. fight, the transports, with the brigade, 
ran iu and tied up. The levee was occupied by a dense crowd of 
people, of every age, sex and color. An intense excitement pre- 
vailed among them. The mass swayed to and fro, as the boats 
paddled up and down, endeavoring to make the lauding. All 
were shouting. There were cheers for the Union and for "Jeff"" 
Davis. Several men were knocked down. There was a great 
demand for papers and for silver coin. Before landing, Coloiiel 
Fitcli had issued orders I'equiring eacli comjtany in the bi'iixade to 



TAKING DOWN' THE FLAG. 31 

select a particular part of the boat for its "company quarters," and 
to assemble tliere on call. Finally, the boats made their landing, 
and a company was sent ashore to keep back the crowd. 

On the 7th, Colonel Fitch appointed Captain John H. Gould 
provost marshal; Major J. C. Major, of the Forty-third, command- 
ant of the pickets and patrols, and Major Bringhurst, of the Forty- 
sixth, commandant at Hoitefield, on the Arkansas side of the river. 
This point was the eastern terminus of the Memphis & Little 
Rock railroad, and was the location of extensive iron works. 
Three large Parrot guns, three locomotives and one hundred and 
fifty thousand dollars' worth of railroad iron were captured at this 
place. Four companies were detailed each day to patrol tlie city. 
A riot at the Grenada depot, on the night of the Gth, was sup- 
pressed bv Company K, after severe measures became necessary, 
one man being bayonetted and two shot. On the afternoon of the 
Cth a detachment was sent up on the blufl' to take down a rebel 
flag that was defiantly floating from a large pole. Great excite- 
ment existed among the mass of people that was present, and 
fearful threats, were made against the men who dared to touch the 
flag. As a meeting with the civil authorities had been arranged 
by Colonel Fitch with the Mayor and City Council, at 3 o'clock, 
it was deemed advisable to M-ait until after that meeting. At the 
appointed time the meeting was held, and an arrangement was 
reached under which the municipal ]>owers of tlie INIayor and 
Council were continued, and, with the military authority, under- 
took to enforce the law and to maintain the supremacy of the laws 
and Constitution of the United States. 

Ac 3.30, a detail of tiiree companies of the Forty-sixth, and 
three from the Forty-third, were sent, under ]Major Bringhurst, to 
take down the obnoxious fiag. Tlie streets around the pole v/ere a 
perfect jam. The mob cursed and taunted the soldiers, who made 
no reply. The battalion was promptly formed around the pole, 
and two sturdy wood-choppers went to work. The promised shots 
for the man who touched the pole did not come, but the pole did, 
and with a crash. In an instant the tlag was stripped from the 
pole and taken possession of by the adjutant of tlie Forty-third 
regiment. The battalion was then quietly marched back to the 
boat. 

Just as the fiag came down two Federal rams passed up the 
river, followed by the rebel steamship Br'cj'j and towing the 
A^ionj'f'.r. botli m.anned by Federal cil-nvs. Tiiose were the two 



32 THE FOKTY-Sl.XTII INDIANA. 

vessels that went ashore on the day of the naval battle. So, all of 
the famous "Thompson navy" was destroyed or captured, except 
the Van Dorn. 

In adilition to the gunboats destroyed and captured, the 
transports "M. R. Cheek," "Victoria," "New Xational," "II. R. 
Hill" and the "Sovereign," were captured at the levee or on the 
way down. All these boats were subsequently used on White 
river and elsewhere against the rebels. 

On the 8th of June Company B arrived from Fort Pillow, with 
an "assorted cargo," prominently among which was thirty hogs- 
heads of prime sugar. Large quantities of cotton and sugar were 
found stowed away in stores and dwellings. Immense quantities 
of both articles were burned by the rebels when they found that 
Memphis would be taken. 

The regiment remained in Memphis until the 13th of June,, 
when it shipped on the "New Xational," to take part in the expe- 
dition up White river, to couvej stores to the army of General 
Curtis, which was coming down from Missouri. 

While at Memphis the regiment missed the boom of the- 
cannOn which, from March 4 to June 7, had never, night or day^ 
been out of the ears of the men. 



CHAPTER III. 



Vacancies and Pkumotions. — Down tue Mississirpi. — White River. — 
St. Charles.— Fuutitications. — Attack. — Explosion op the 
"]\[ouND City." — Victory. — Up the River. — Guerrillas. — Curtis' 
Army.— Helena.— June, lSfj2- April, I860. 

Between June, 1S62, and April, 1SG3, the following vacancies 
and }>roniotions occurred: 

Captain William Spencer, of Company E, resigned June 11, 
18G2; Lieutenant Henry Snyder was commissioned to succeed him; 
and- Charles F. Fisher was commissioned first, and Ellis Hughes 
second lieutenant. 

Colonel Graham X. Fitch resigned August 5, 18G2; he was 
succeeded by Lieutenant Colonel 'J'homas II. Bringhurst; Major 
John H. Gould was commissioned lieutenant colonel, and Cap- 
tain Aaron 31. Flory, of Company ]>, major; Lieutenant Frank 
Swigart was commissioned captain of Company B, Theodore B. 
Forg}- tirst, and Loren C. Stevens second lieutenant. 

Adjutant Richard P. DeHart resigned October IS, 1862; he 
was succeeded by Lieutenant James M. Watts, of Corapanv A; 
Lieutenant James V. Brougli was commissioned first, and Surgeant 
William A. Andrews second lieutenant. 

Assistant Surgeon William S. Haymond resigned L^ecember 2, 
1862; he was succeeded by Corporal Lsrael B. Washburn, of 
Company L 

Lieutenant Eli R. Herman, of Company E, resigned February 
5, 1SG2; he was succeeded by Sergeant Charles F. Fisher. 

Captain James H. Thomas, of Company 1, resigned October 
21, 1SG2, and was succeeded by Lieutenant J. W. F. Liston. 

Captain Robert W. Sill, of Company G, was discharged 
November IG, 18G2, and was succeeded by Lieutenant Joseph D. 
Cowdin; Lieutenant James Hess was commissioned first, and 
Sergeant \Vil!iam H. H. Rader second lieutenant. 



THE FORTY-SIXTH IXUIAXA. 



Captain Jcseph D. Cowden re.signed December 25, 1SG2; he 
was succeeded by Woodson S. Marshall. 

Assistant Surgeon Asa Coleman resigned December 26, 1862. 
Having all the property of the Forty-sixth on board the "Xew 
National" tlie night of the 13th, at 5 o'clock the next mornino- the 
boat pushed out on the "White River Expedition." The o-unboat 
Conestoga led the way, followed by 'the little steamer "Jacob 
Mussleman," the "New National" and the "White Cloud," a boat 
loaded for Curtis' army. A short distance down the ri\er the 
"Clara Dolson," a recently captured rebel steamer, was met com- 
ing up with a Federal gunboat escort. The mouth of White 
river, ISl miles below Memphis, was reache<l at 5 p. m. Goincy 
up, the gunboats Ltxington, St. Louis and Mound City were over- 
taken and became part of the expedition. On tlie 16th, at A 
o'clock, the fleet reached within eight miles of St. Charles, where 
obstructions were expected. A ])arty under Lieutenant Suic^irt 
■was put on a tug, and another under Lieutenant Brownlie on shore 
and instructed cautiously to go up the river and reconnoitre. The 
tug soon returned and reported rebels and boats ahead. The fleet 
anchored until daylight. During the night a raft vras sent down 
hy the rebels, which carried the "National" against the "While 
Cloud," nearly wrecking both. At 6 .v. m. on the 17th, the (nxn- 
boats were under way, and the Forty-sixth was ashore, marehinc 
toward the blutf. Companies A and IJ, supported by Company G, 
were deployed as skirmishers. The gunboats laid off just below 
where the rebel batteries were supposed to be, and readv to open. 
The regiment pushed up over the hill and through a deadenina". 
When within r.OO yards of the top, the rebels and some small guns 
were seen. These and the infantry opened fire, when the regiment 
rushed in and drove the gunners and their supj)orls olf up toward 
their boats. Before the charge, tlie gunboats had commenced 
firing, directing their shots mainly at the light guns on the brow of 
the hill. At that time, it was not certainly known that there were 
larger guns, but, suddenly, the rebels opened witli two sixtv-four 
pound Parrots. In a few minutes a shot plunged into the Sknind 
Cifi/, penetrated her steam chest, and immediately the boat was filled 
with scalding steam, driving the crew over tlie sides into the river. 
A hundred men were alloat. !Many were so badly scalded that, 
being unable to swim, they sank. Yawls and boats pushed out 
from every boat in the fleet to the men's assistance, but the rebels 
came down the bank and tired upon the ii» Ijtlcss sutferers in the 



riGIIT XT ST. CHARLES. 35 

water. Then, the gunboats being signaled to cease firing, the 
Forty-sixtli went in. The right of tlie line was close to the river; 
and, as the left swept around, it had a longer distance to travel, so 
the right was in lirst; but the left, swinging around, came out at 
the river in time to complete the circuit. Company A came in on 
the four small gun battery, and Company B and the left companies 
on the large guns. 

The rebels made no stand aft(;r the Forty-sixth reached the 
top of the hill, but tied up the river. Lieutenant Commanding 
Fry was late getting out, and was badly shot in the shoulder by a 
member of Company B. He was captured and conveyed in a yawl 
to the gunboat Conei^toga, and, subsequently, to Memphis, a 
prisoner. Fry had been an officer in the Federal navy. He had a 
command in the rebel navy at Forts Thompson and Pillow, and 
had come to White river to fortify against the anticipated invasion 
by the Federal army. He had the JMauripas and the "Eliza G." 
and had commenced to drive piles across the river, below the fort, 
but was late. Some years after the rebellion Fry was captured iu 
Cuba and shot by tlie Spanish authorities for his guerrilla practices. 
The log-book and the liag of the Manripas were captured here, 
and are now in the possession of Colonel Fitch. Major Bringhurst 
secured the post liag. lT55x49 

The J\Io>'nd City and the "]\Iussleman"' presented an awful 
spectacle. Fifty-eight men lay dead on the guiil>oat. The decks 
of the "Mussleman'' were covered with men wrapped in cotton and 
oil. The poor creatures were scalded in every imaginable manner 
and degree. Before the 'Olussleman" left for Memphis several of 
the wounded died. 

At niglit the regiment was called on to bury the dead. This, 
after the excessive labor of the day, was a hardshi}). One com- 
pany, at tir>t, worked at a time, l^ater, tM'o v>-ere put on. At 2 
o'clock a heavy rain began and continued until morning. The 
trench dug by the rebels for their small guns wa>^ used for a grave. 
The dead were carried frrmi the Moinnl CiO/, one by one, with all 
proper respect and solemnity, and buried in hostile soil. Later, a 
grateful country rementbered and removed them to a national 
cemetery. 

When the Moiunl City was struck she was towed down along- 
side the "Xational."' As she came in a man, l}ing on deck, iu the 
struggles of death, took hold of a lanyard attached to a inin tliat 
had been made ready to tire. Ho jtuUed the string and disclKuged 



36 THE rOKTY-SIXTFI INDIANA. 

the gun. The shot passed through the Xational, severely wound- 
ing the engineer and cutting off a steam pipe. The deck war: 
covered with sick and wounded men, but, as tlie steam ascended, 
few were injured. 

On the afternoon of the 22d of June, the fleet again started 
up the river, and anchored fifteen miles above St. Charles for the 
night. The ^fo'tnd City, with a guard, remained at her old 
anchorage. Early the next morning the Heet was again going up 
stream. At 10 o'clock the St. IjOuis, in the lead, was fired upon, 
and a man shot. The fleet stopped and the firing became general 
ah>:ig the east bank. The gunboats tlirew shell and grajje. The 
regiment used rifles. The fire was first concentrated on the "'White 
Cloud," which carried two companies of the Forty-sixth, and. 
finally, on the Xational, which was the last boat in the line. 
Breastworks were made of cracker boxes, mattresses, hay, etc. 
The attack continued all day. Throe men were killed, but none of 
the Forty-sixth. James Ryan, of Company 11, fell overboard and. 
was drowned. The same evening the fleet turned and came back 
■ to St. Charles, because of low water. Rebel reports from above 
state that fifteen rebels were killed on the up trip of the fleet. 
The "Catahoula," a former rebel transport, came up with stores 
and remained. A part of the regiment took up quarters on her. 

On the 22d. th.e body of the male of the JIuxf/d City was 
found afloat. 

On the same day an expedition v\as .>-ent down the river to 
overhaid the guerrillas. Four companies of the l'^:)rty-sixth went 
with it. It vras frequently fired on, but suffered no loss. Xothing 
vas effected. On the 2r)th tlie Foi'ty-t'nird (Colonel William E. 
McLean) and the Thirty-fourth (Ca]jtain Swain) arrived on 
five small boats with orders for the entire fleet to again go up 
White river. Only two gunboats went. ()n the 2Sth of June the 
reorganized expeditioii started up, with Colonel Fitch in command. 
Approacliing St. Charles, Companies ]5, G and K were landed and 
sent u[i o\\ the bluff. The place was found aband(;ne(l. The fleet 
landed at 5 p. m. 

On the 29th the fleet again put out, and went twenty-one 
miles above St. Charles by evening. Started again the next morn- 
ing, and was immediately fired on. The "National*' and the 
"Er.a" were the. chief targets.. Thirty balls passed tlirough the 
"National.'" On the "Era" a Thirty-fourth man was killed and 
five wounded. Reached Clareiidon. River falliuLr. lioats x\\\y 



SCOUTIXG OX WHITE RIVER. 37 

I:»ii]g. At noon tliioe regiments went up into town for parade and 
"muster for pay." During their absence the boat hands of the 
"National" had whisky, got into a bloody battle and nearly niur- 
dei'ed each other. None killed. All wounded. 

A scouting party sent out on the 1st was chased in. Some 
lost their horses. Powell, of Comjxiny B, arrived without hat, 
eoat or shoes, and Kreishcr, of Company I, did not get in until the 
evening of the next dav. 

On the 4th of July the tleet again returned to St. Charles. 
The National anniversary was celebrated by the heavy guns of the 
Zicxingtoyi and the band of the Thirty-fourth regiment. 

On the 5th of July the fleet again turned up the river. With 
the hexington in the lead, the boats, in their regular order, cast 
loose and again passed up the tortuous stream. Arrived at Aber- 
deen at 3 p. M. Four companies were sent ashore to reconnoitre. 
Found the' town abandoned. A rebel cavalryman was captured 
and taken to the boats. He confessed that he was engaged iu 
firing on the boats. The gentleman announced his name as "Peo- 
pler" — Mr. Peopler. lie was finally handed over to the Lexington 
for further proceedings. In the evening, while three or four hun- 
dred men were bathing in the river, they were fired on by guerrillas 
m the brush. The chief engineer of the Lexington was killed, 
and a number wounded. The Lexington immediately fired several 
rounds of grape into the brush, and the regiments formed for 
action. The firing lasted over an hour, and was continued at 
intervals all night. 

On the next day, Mr. Peopler was arrayed in a boatman's suit 
and esta1)lished at a prominent point on the up]K-r deck of the 
Loat. It v,-as supposed that his colleagues would pick him off, but 
ho remained there all day, with only the injury that ho received 
from the sun. 

On July 6, six companies of the Twenty-fourth and two from 
the other regiments were sent at 3 in the morning to attack a 
eavalry force, said to be on a neighboring prairie. The rebels 
were met at G in the evening. The action was brought on by the 
Twenty-fourth, which had put three companies in advance, leaving 
the remainder, with the other regiments, in reserve. Suddenly the 
rebels attacked the reserve, but, after a few rounds, fled. On the 
inarch out the Forty-third missed the road and did not get into 
action. A flag of truce came in, asking permission to collect the 
^ead and wounded. 'J'hirtv minutes were liivcn them for this 



38 THE FORTY-SItTII INDIANA. 

purpose. Tliey gathered up their death The wounded Avere left 
in our liands. Their loss was eighty-four. On the Fedei-al side 
there was one killed and twenty Avounded, all in the Twenty- 
fourth. Tlie men returned to camp at 3 p. >r. The sick and 
wounded were taken oil the boats and put in houses. All the 
horses went ashore and quartered in a large stable, where a sign 
read, "Xo Credit." 

At 4 o'clock the brigade was on the road for Duval's Bluff. 
Two howitzers were mounted on the fore wheels of Avagons. No 
enemy was seen until near dark. The country Avas an open prairie, 
AA'ith grass Avaist high. Tlie rebels kept out of reach. As the 
evening came on the men v.ere in better spirits. Tlie absence of 
the burning sun gave them strength. After dark the baud of the 
Thirty-fourth played, much to the pleasure and refreshment of the 
men. Then a regimetit began to sing, and the melody was taken 
up by the others until the entire column Avas singing, much, doubt-*^ 
less, to the amazement of the rebels. 

At 11 o'clock at night the rebel cavalry Avas met. The hoAV- 
itzers Avere brought up and fired Avith rounds from the entire 
infantry line. These, Avith the shouts of the men, seemed to 
unnerve the rebels, and they again lied. In less than an hour's 
marching the rebels Avere again found in line. An angle A\-as 
formed by tlie Forty-third on the north and the P'orty-sixth on the 
east. The howitzers Avero again brought up and tire opened. The 
rebels immetliately broke and lied. The two regiments followed 
them, driving them over their camp and upsetting their corn-cake 
and molasses supper, at which they had been when they AA'ere 
called to meet the Federals. 

After a half hour's rest the brigade turned off for Clarendon. 
The march Avas kept up, Avith little rest, until daylight. The 
men Avere bruken tlow n. No Avater had been met since the riA'er 
Avas left, the e\'ening previous. At daylight there Avas a halt of 
thirty minute?. All dropped on the ground and slept. Resuming 
the march it was almost imjiossible to arouse the men. At 5 
o clock the river was made, and at G. o'clock the column had 
reached Clarendon. The gunboats and the transports Avere there, 
and. the regiments were soon ferried to the other side, a\ here the 
order was ''eat and sleep." 

At 3 r. M. orders Arere received to march at G o'clock. At 5.45 
the regiment Avas in line. At G the transjiort "(^. M. D.," from 
Memphis, arrived. In format ii-n brought by her changed the i)ro- 



MORE SCOUTING. 



belknaf's bill. 39 



s,Manniie, and in two liours the entire expedition was steaming 
down the river. This was a welcome clianire, tor the Forty-sixtli 
had been reduced to 310 etleetive men by fatigue and sickness. 
John Shatt'er, of Company A, was shot on the up trip of the 
"Q. M. I),*' and died July \2. 

On the 9tli tlie '-Golden Era," on which was the Twenty- 
fourth Regiment, struck a snag and sank. The horses were thrown 
overboard and, with the men, Avcrc saved, and put upon the 
"Q. M. D." The rieet reached St. Charles on the evening of 
the 9th. 

When the regiment went up the river, on the 4th, to relieve 
the "White Cloud," S. X. Ponnell, of Company B, discovered a 
dog near some bushes. Supj)Osing that the animal might have 
company, he called the attention of Frederick Fitch, of Company 
I, who had charge of a gun, to the possibilities of the case. Fitch 
^iimediately let a charge of grape into the bushes. It was subse- 
quently known that four guerrillas were killed and four wounded 
by the shot. 

At St. Charles a bill was presented Colonel Fitch, in behalf of 
one C'olonel Belknap, for sundries said to have been absorbed by 
the regiment on the first trip. The bill was against the United 
States, and, after charging for cotton, largely, continued with 
"forty-tive sheep at fo-.ir dollars and fifty cents, forty ^Muscovy 
ducks at sixty ceiits, twenty dozen chickens at seven dollars and 
fifty cents, contents of garden tv/o dollars, six calves at four 
dollars, etc." 

As Company B oecujiied Belknap's premises a day and a night, 
it AVas suppo-ed that its members had aj'propriated the missing 
merchandise, but as each and all denied eating a thing during the 
time, and there being no proof, they were not held, and the bills 
are yet un{»aid. 

On tlie 12th of July two boats, with six companies, were sent 
back to Clarendon, and two more, with six companies, went to 
Indian bay. A prisoner reported that General Curtis" army had 
passed Clarendon and was heading toward Helena. The detach- 
ments had been sent to intercept Curtis, but he had passed. 

The entire expedition left St. Charles for Helena between 8 
and 10 o'clock on the 14th of July, just a month after leaving 
]Mem{)his. 

Curtis' armv was seen along the river, and liearty shouts were 
exchaniiid with them. 



40 THE FORTY-SIXTH INDIANA. 

At Prairie Landing the gunboats av-aited tlie arrival of the 
last boat. At dark, all having arrived, the entire tleet rounded 
jMontgonicj-y"? Point, and made for Helena, %vhere it arri\ ed the 
next morning. 

The Forty-sixth was lirst welcomed by the Logansport com- 
pany in the Ninth Illinois Cavalry (Ca})tain GifTord). 

The sick list at this time M'as large. Two invoices of invalids 
had been sent to jNIempliis from White river. Now there were 
125 on the surgeon's report. ■ 

The "White River Expedition" originated in a suggestion by 
General Curtis, in a dispatch by him to General Halleck, early in 
June, from Batesville, the then headquarters of the Army of the 
Southwest. General Curtis suggested that supplies be sent hini 
by way of White river, and that they should meet him at Des 
Arc. The ex])edition was organized with the consent of General 
Halleck, and the assistance of Major Allen, quartermaster at S^ 
Louis. General Grant arrived at Memphis about the 15th of June, 
after the departure of the expedition, and heartily indoised and 
seconded the movement. On June 26 he .sent to Colonel Fitch 
the foliov.ing order: 

"HfiADQUAKTF.iis Army of the Tennessee, 

'•MEMrms, June 2G. ISG-^. 

"Sii:: I send five sleauiers loaded with supj)lies for General Curtis' 
army. As they necessarily pass through a hostile couutr}-, great caution 
must be exercised to prevent them falling into the hands of the eueniy or 
from being destroyed. I have selected j^ou as the commander of the expe- 
dition, iiud reinforce you with two additional regiments, as j-qu will per- 
ceive from sj.'ccial orders acconi[iauying this. 

"It would be impo.^sibiL' to give special ia.-tructions for the manage- 
ment of thi.> expedition. ]^iuch uuisi necessaiily be left to the discri-tiou of 
the oliicer in command. I woidd suggest, however, that two pieces of 
artillery be placed on the bow of the boat intended to lead; that all of them 
be kept well together; that when you tie up for the night, strong guards be 
thrown out upon the shore, and that troojis be landed and required to march 
and clear out all points suspected of concealing a foe. 

"It is desirable that these supplies should reach General Curtis as 
early as possible. As soon as the boats can possibly be discharged, return 
them, bringing your entire conunand to St. Charles or to where you are now. 

"It is not intended that yoij .'^hould reach General Curtis against all 
obstacles, but it is liighh- tksiruble that he should be reached. 

"U. S. Grant, 
"Coi.oNKi. G. N. Frrnr. "Majur General Commanding, 

■■('onnuanding Expedition on While liiver." 



GUEKKILLAS. >il 

Tlio retaliatory order of Jefferson Davis against Fitch's com- 
mand was issued on tliis expedition. Guerrilla bands were con- 
stantly murdering soldiers and sailors from the woods and bushes. 
They were not soldiers, but indejiendent gangs of assassins amena- 
ble to no law, civil or military. On the 24th of June, Colonel 
Fitch reported the situation on White river, and his action against 
the guerrillas in the following: 

" IlEADQUAnTEUS U. S. FORCKS, 

■ "St. Ciiaki.es, Akk., June 2-i, 186i. 
"Sin: Subsequeut to luy report of the 21st inst., guerrilla bands have 
twice fired into the gunbunts and transports from the woods opposite St. 
Charles, and once upon the pickets above the town, killing a raortarboat 
man who was detailed at Memphis as a part of a gunboat squad to act with 
this regiment, and a seaman on the gunboat Lexington. To put a stop to 
this barbarous warfare, Major Bringhurst was scut with four companies, 
escorted l)y the gunboats Cincinnati and Lexington, up Indian baj- into the 
county of 3Ionroe, where these bandits are said to be raised, with orders to 
post conspicuousl)' copies of the accompanying notice. The expedition 
was successful, seizing some ammunition that was about to be used by those 
bands, and bringing in three prisoners, who were charged with aiding and 
abetting them. One of the prisoners (Moore) appears to be a surgeon of 
the Confederate arm}' on furlough, obtainnl upon tender of his resignation, 
which has not been finally acted on. As a surgeon, he claims exemption 
from captivity under an agreement between belligerents. He was not taken 
as such, but as "a member of or as aiding in the formation of guerrilla 
bands. An investigation of the case is now being made. * * * 

" I remain, general, very respectfully yours, " G. X. Fixcn, 

"Colonel ConunatKli;ig Forty-sixtli Keginient Indiana Volunteers. 
"Ma.jok Gi.xKitAL "Waixaci:, Commanding ^lemphis."' 

[Iiiclosure.] 
>;OTt(E. 

To THE Ixiiaijitants of MnxiMF. C'oL'NTY. Akkvnsas: Guerrilla 
bands rais^'d in your vicinity have tired from the woods upini the United 
States gunboats and tran.-iiorts in ^Vhite river. This mode of warfare is 
that of savaixcs. It is in your power to prevent it in your vicinity. You will, 
therefore, if it is repeated, be held responsible in jierson and .]iroperty. 
Vpou a renewal of such attack, an expedition will be sent against you to 
seize and destroy your personal property. It is our wish that no occasion 
for such a course shall arise, but that every man shall remain at home in 
pursuit of- his peaceful avocation, in which lie will not be molested, unless 
a contiminnce of such barbarous guerrilla warfare renders rigorous meas- 
ures on our part neecessary. 

"By order c^f G. N. Fitch. 

"Jos. D. CowoiN, "Colonel Commanding U. S. Forces. 

"Acting Adjutant. 

"HKAD(,)rAi;Ti:i;s Steamuoat 'White Ci.nri>.' 

•■St. CiiAiiLKs. Aj;i<.., June "24. ISO'.?." 



42 THE FORTY-SIXTH IN'HIAXA. 

In a few days after the expeJitioii into ]\Ionroe county, a 
party with a liai; of truce came in with a connuunication from 
General llin<lman, tiie rebel commandant of the district. The 
document claimed that all the belligerents on White river were 
"regulars," and enlisted under projter regulations, and the general 
claimed the right to dispose his men along White river as he 
might deem proper, "even should it prove annoying to you and 
your operations."" 'i'he document concluded with the remark: '• I 
have ihouglit it but just that I should furnish you with a copy of 
my order, that you may act advisedly, and I respectfully forewarn 
you that should your threat be executed against any citizen of this 
district, I shall retaliate, man for man, upon the Federal officers 
and soldiers who now are, or hert-after may be, in my custody as 
prisoners of war." 

To this Colonel Fitch curtly replied, referring to the despica- 
ble character of the warfare wagfd by ilindraan's guerrillas, and 
comjtaring the conduct of the garrison at St. Charles, in sliooting 
the drowning men of the Federal gunboat, to the heroic behavior 
of the Federal soldiers at Memphis, in rescuing the unfortunate 
Confederates who were thrown into the river by the explosion of 
their' vessel. Colonel Fitch's reply closed with the declaration: 
"Your threat will not deter me from executing the letter of my 
proclamation in every case in which my judgment dictates its pro- 
pi'iety or necessity.'''' 

llindman seems to have rejiorted the matter to the Confed- 
erate government, for immediately there came an 'irder from Jef- 
ferson Davis to retaliate, man for man, on all of the officers in 
Colon.el Fitch's commaiid; and in his book, ''The Rise and 
Fall of the Co!ifederate Governnuuit," J)avis groups ]Major General 
Hunter and General I*h'"'!ps, for recruiting negro soldiers and 
"arming slaves for the murder of their masters," Major General 
B. F. IJutler, who '"hung an inoffensive citizen at Xew Orleans"' 
(Mumford), and "Brigadier General G.N. Fitch" and his com- 
mand, " who are re})orted to have murdered in cold blood two 
peaceful citizens, because one of his men, when invading our coun- 
try, was killed by some unkfiown person while defending his 
home.''' Against these Mr. Davis hurled his analiuunas, and 
declared them deserving the fate of felons. 

1^0 otlicer of Fitch's command fell into rebel hauils until the 
Red river captures, before which time Mr. Davis had rescinded 
his order as against the Fortv-sixlh, on th.e ground of false 



THE PILLOW KAinr. 43 

information. Hindman's mistake occurred in supposing that the I 

prisoners brought from Indian bay \vere killed. Wlien the force | 

returned, the captives were closely confined on a gunboat, and, as j 

they were not visible, the impression was formed that they had j 

been executed. This theory had been adopted by Ilindman, who- | 

reported it to Richmond, highly embellished. ' i 

General Ilindman finally fell a victim to his favorite system j 

of warfare. He was killed after the war while sitting in his house, j 

near Helena, by an assassin who shot him through the window. j 

At Helena, the army of Curtis, as well as tlie Forty-sixth Reg- j 

iment, Avent into a thorough renovation. An entirely new outfit of j 

horses, wagons and clothing was procured. Large numbers of troo}>s j 

were arriving from the X(jrth daily. Most of them were "new ! 

men," dressed in new clothes, and with all the material necessary 
for good service. If they felt any above their ragged brethren,. \ 

they wt^re suliiciently sensible to conceal the feeling. 

On the 1st of August the entire Vicksbui'g fleet came up the 
river. In a few days tlie regiment moved to the "Pillow Farm," 
a fev,- miles below Helena. The general and his family were 
absent. The place was well stocked and in charge of a faithful 
negro. And the agent v.as something of a tinancier. He had dis- 
posed of much of the portable stuff about the farm at fair prices, 
taking pay in "Northern Indiana railroad'' money, which lie 
expected would be redeemed by the cashier, "Sallie .Miller," then 
on the road to Helena. 

On the 3<1 of August the Forty-third and Forty-sixih, with an 
Indiana batterv and the i-'ii'st Ai-kansas Infantrv, ^^'ere sent ao-ainst 
a rebel forre sai<l to be west of Helena. Subseunently the Fifth j 

Illinois was added to the force, and all of it was juerged into the j 

division of General A. P. Hovey, nunibering 3, (MM.) men. An ) 

action had taken place the day before, and it was supjiosed j 

that a hw^e rel)el force wa^ assemblin;^ foi- an attack u))on the 1 

po-t. 'J'he march was exhaiHting fronx the hoat and dn>t. 3Iany { 

fell out, and, during the tir-t two days, several Avent back to the 
river. The column wen: to Clarendon in four days, remained there 
five days and rcturne<l in four days. The returti r.'.arch was not 
fatiguing, as it was cooler. Met no rebels except the usual 
guerrilla srpuids. 3Iuch of the ground traveled had been gone over 
before. Four men were killed, two of whom belonged to the 
Thirty-fourth Indiana. 

About the l!('th a •^Icanier, coming down the ^li-sissipp'i river, 



44 THE FOETY-SIXTII IXDIAXA. 

Struck a bar and was -wieeked. It had on board some 200 soldiers 
returning to their regiments. Very nearly all were drowned. 
Henry Saviors, of Comi)an\- K, was among the lost. Some two 
-weeks afterward, Saylors' body Mas found in the river, near the 
■carap of the Forty-sixth. It had tloated forty miles and stopped 
near his company's quarters. 

On the 2d of September, Colonel Fitch, having resigned, took 
formal leave of the regiment, lie resigned in consequence of au 
injury that disabled him for service. He had accepted leave of 
absence to await the action of the department commander on his 
.resignation. 

Just before the colonel left, the regiment was paraded, and he 
addressed the men in a speech, referring to the fact that in 
marclies, camps, bivouacs, in encounters with the enemy, he had 
been with them for nearly a year. He said lie had to take leave of 
them from necessity. That his ab>ence might be brief or con- 
tinued, as circumstances might determine, but, with the regiment 
•or at home, his best efforts should be used in behalf of it or its 
members. He enjoined u})Ou men and otKcers that they be kind 
to one another, and remember that %\ hat discipline they were under 
■was necessary for their welfare and for the efficiency of the regi- 
ment. He said he left the men under the charge of capable and 
considerate officers, and he hoped that the future of the regiment 
might be as bright as its past. It had won a name creditable to 
our State, and honorable even among enemies. Its members were 
enjoined to do nothing that might tarnish the good name of the 
regiment nor the honor of our State. At the conclusion the regi- 
. ment gave three heany cheers for Colonel Fitch. The departure 
•of the colonel was regretted by all the members of the reginient. 
His care of the men endeared him to all. His discipline was 
recognized as an essential element in the regiment's subsequent 
efficiency, and, in after years, his successor cheerfully ackno"\vl- 
edged that the education of the regimiut to its after capacity, was 
largely due to the early discipline of its lirst colonel. 

The regiment was at Helena, Ark., from July 15, 1SG2, until 
April 9, lbG.3; nearly nine months. During that time it was 
•engaged in various and numberless expeditions, and fights and 
skirmishes with guerrillas. It was on White river four times; to 
Duval's Bluff t\s ice; to Arkansas Post; down the Tallehatchie; 
-east from Helena to IMoon lake, Yazoo Pass and other }»oints of 
]ess note. The history of the regiment is the history of the war 



TALLEHATCHIE. 45 

in Arkansas during that time, for it was with and generally at the 
head of nearly all of the important expeditions that went out. 
The brief summary of the regiment's duties given at or from. 
Helena, during the period indicated, is all that is here necessary. 

Martin L. Rutter, of Company A, was killed, and Daniel Sam- 
eel, of Company D, was wounded, by guerrillas, October 26, 1862. 
Two men of the Forty-third were killed the same day. 

S. C. Levin was elected sutler, October 27. 

On November 5 the regiment sent a scouting party seven 
miles farther west than had before been reached. 

Three companies of the regiment, with others, went on a 
scout forty miles up the river, on the 1st of November. Found no 
rebels, but the ])eople v^•ere excited about the new money that they 
saw for the first time. Large importations of "Northern Indiana 
railroad" money were still being made. It was handled by an indi- 
vidual in Logansport, who sold it to persons who sent it South. 
It arrived in sheets, unsigned, and was filled up according to the 
fancy of the purchaser. That about Helena bore the names^ 
"M.'m. Post," "Alex. Harnett," "Sallie Miller," "Dan Pratt," 
"D. D. Dykeman," "Molly Thomas," etc., etc. It had, for a 
time, a great run, but the officers stamped it out. Latterly it cir- 
culated only away from camp. Expeditions used it largely. 
Those found offering it were court martialed and fined. On one 
occasion a man belonging to one of the new Iowa regiments came 
into the quarters of the Forty-sixth and offered one of the contra- 
band notes for a watch. The amazing audacity of the man was 
admired for a while, Avhen the verdant financier was hooted from 
camp. 

Hamilton Robb, of Carroll county, v\-as elected chaplain by 
the ofncers, on the 5th of November. He was commissioned 
December 13. 

On November 15, Colonel Slack, Lieutenant Colonel Gould 
and Thomas O. Riley were appointed a board of trade. The 
board was sup}»osed to regulate the jnirchase of cotton. 

On November 15 the entire division went on an expedition to 
Arkansas Post. It returned to Helena on the 22d. No results. 

The great "Tallehatchie E.vpedition" started on the 26th of 
November, 1S62. It was composed of not less than 5,000 men» 
with a sjdeudid outfit of artillery and cavalry. The expedition 
went on boats down to the "Delta," a small town on the Missis- 
sippi side of tiie ri\ er. At 5 o'clock ou tlu^ 2rjth the army started. 



46 THE KORTY-SIXTII I>-DIAXA. 

There was a train of 160 wagons, a regiment of cavalry, and a 
number of batteries of artillery. A inarch of twenty-four miles 
■was made by dark. On the 30th of November the rebels wore 
seen near a ferry on Coldwater. A bridge was built and the 
troops crossed over on the 31st. Ko rebels could be found.' The 
return march was begun on the 2d of January. Crossing the Talle- 
hatchie, great numbers of negroes followed and remained with 
the column until the Mississip})i was reached. Early on the morn- 
ing of the last day the boom of the morning gun at Helena was 
heard, and loud sliouts proclaimed the joy of the soldiers in being 
within hearing distance of Colonel Slack and his artillery. The 
Porty-sixth reached the river at S.30 a. m., and was in Helena by 
3.30 p. M. 

On the 1st of January, 1SG3, the following detail for artillery 
"duty was made from the Forty-sixth regiment. It %vas assiorned 
by Captain P. David.son, chief of artillery, to the Sixteenth Ohio 
Pattery, Captain Mitchell, and did good service: 

Company A, Henry C. Canter, Thomas W. Patton; Company 
B, John N. Oliver, Warren L. Wagoner; Comjxany C, Henry A. Gra- 
ham, Jacob Putter; Company D, William H. Powell; Company E, 
Benjamin F. Shoup; Company F, Patrick Callahan; Company G, 
James Johnson, Colon McColloch; Company H, John Chamber- 
lain; Company I, Allen Calhoun, Richard Calhoun; Company K, 
David Haller.' 

The regiment started, on the 10th of Januar)-, on another trip 
up White river. It reached St. Charles on the loth, and remained 
until the ISth, wlien it continued on up to Clarendon and Duval's 
Bluff. It met no old friends and nnide iio nev," acquaintances. 
The return was begun on tlie 19th, and Helena was made on tlie 
22d. The regiment went into camp a mile back from the river. 
The mud was overwhelming. It was reported that a mule and a 
horse were drowned near the center of tlie town. The sick report 
of the ])0st reached 1,2()0. Surgeon Horace Coleman was acting 
"medical director" for the di\ isiuu. 

On the 1-lth of February the regiment started on the "Yazoo 
Pass Expedition." An opening was cut in the levee, and in a 
transjiort the regiment i>assed into ]\Ioon lake, an immense j)ond 
hemmed in by tiie higher land back and the levee on the Missis- 
sippi. A landing was made on a coinparatively dry spot, where 
the remains of an old mill >-tood. It was entitled. "Hunt's MilU," 
and McAUistei-, of Ci'mprmy I. and Haney, i.if Company 1», UH<k 



YAZOO PASS. 47 

the establishment in hand, and in a few days turned out larc^^e 
■quantities ot" a good article of corn-meal. 

On arriving at the "3Iills'' the regiment went into camp, 
expecting to be comfortable for a few days, but the sudden rise of 
the water, caused by the river rusliing through the opening in the 
levee, overflowed nearly the entire countr}-, and left scarcely 
•enough dry land to camp upon. 

Some Avork was done on this visit to Moon lake iu cutting 
-out trees and obstructing timbers, but before much in that line 
was effected the regiment was ordered back to Helena, where it 
.arrived on the 21st of February. 

On landing, orders were received to prepare to embark on the 
"Volunteer" and "Ida May" at 3 o'clock. Although tired and. 
hungry, the men immediately prepared to ship, but before the 
appointed hour orders came '• to wait for pay.'' This order was 
obeyed, and the regiment marched up to the Exchange hotel, was 
paid for two months, and was back on the boats by 10 o'clock in 
splendid spirits. 

On the "Moon Lake Expedition"' three rebels were killed and 
six wounded. Aurllius L. Voorhis and George W. Bruino-ton, of 
Company B, were wounded by guerrillas. 

The real " Tallehatchie Expedition'" was now to begin. General 
Ross commanded. He took the "Volunteer"' for his flagship, and, 
with the Forty-sixth, took the lead. Companies A, C, E, G, H 
and K were on the "Ida May," and Companies B, F, D and I on 
the " Volunteer." The expedition was composed of new troops, 
exce})t the Forty-third, Forty-sixth and the Forty-seventh Indiana. 
Tlie gunboats Chill kof he and l.ielsolb were in advance, followed bv 
fifteen transports and the ram Fv.Uon. The fleet went crashing 
through trees and limbs, tearing off the chimneys and upper wurks 
of the boats. Huge trees were cut down and rolled out of the 
way, and great piles of brush and timber blocked the road until 
removed. The fleet made from two to five miles a day, and often 
at night the starting point of the morning M-as in sight. I'he 
boats were nearly wrecked. I'he smoke stacks M'ere knocked, 
down and the upj)er works torn off'. The " Volunteer"' was a new 
boat, just from Pittsburg. She was highly decorated and in 
perfect onler. After coming through the pass she looked like an 
abandoned scow. 

The brigade consisted of the Forty-third, Forty-sixth and 
Forty-Seventh Indiana, and ihe Twenty-eighth Wiseon>in, under 



48. THE FOKTY-SIXTII INDIANA. 

General Soloman. In addition, there were the Thirty-third and 
Thirty-fifth ^lissouri, the Tliirty-third, Thirty-sixth and Tweiity- 
uinth Iowa, six guns of the Third Iowa Artillery and one company 
of an Illinois cavalry regiment, under General Clinton B. Fisk. 
General Ross commanded the whole. 

The Tallehatchie was reached and better sailing had. Evi- 
dence of the presence of the rebels began to be seen. The trans- 
port "Thirty-fifth Parallel" was passed in flames. She Avas filled 
with cotton and was burned to keep the property from falling into 
Federal hands. All night a constant stream of burning cotton 
floated past the fleet, keeping all hands busy saving the boats from 
conflagration. 

The fleet reached within two miles of the fortifications on the 
11th of March. The Forty-sixth was immediately detailed to 
disembark and proceed toward the town of McTsutt, to ascertain 
whether an infantry force was there, as reported. The Forty- 
seventh was ordered down the river toward the fort. Being neal- 
the left of the column, it was late reporting. The P\)rty-sixth 
having returned, Colonel Bringhurst asked permission of the 
adjutant of General Ross to go on down the river and wait for 
Colonel Slack. Permission being given, the regiment went down 
to within three-quarters of a mile of the fort, and, seeing tl>e rebel 
infantry outside, advanced and attacked them. Companies A and 
B were detailed as skirmishers. The rebels stood, and an engage- 
ment at once came on. The M'hole lino became engaged, and after 
some sharp firing the rebels took to the fort. In the mean time the 
C/iillicothe, ^v\i\\ General Jioss on board, drop])ed down the stream. 
Coming in sight of the f*>rt the rebels opened on the gunl)oat with 
two sixty-eiglit-pound guns, making the splinters fly. 

General Itoss had landed and was with the regiment before 
the infantry engagement was over, and complimented it for its 
behavior. 

Returning, tiie regiment met the Forty-seventh coming down, 
and, althougii tiie Forty-sixth had taken the place assigned to 
Colonel Shick, he joined General Ross in complimenting the 
regiment. 

Samuel Stewart was shot through the groin, and Theophilus P. 
Rodgers in the leg; both of Company B. 

On the Gth of Mnrch an accident occurred which cost the 
regiment one of its best nieml'ers. A light boat containing a stafl: 
officer of General J-ioss, a clerk, Artemas Burnsworth, and B. 



FOKT VEMBEUTOX. 49 

Porter, of Company I, left the "Volunteer'' on an errand to the 
shore. The fleet M-as under good headway and, on returning, the 
boat missed the "Volunteer" and made for the "Ida May." The 
steamer ran down the boat and pa-^sed over it. Burnsworth 
and Porter went entirely under the "Ida May." Porter was 
taken up by a yawl. Burnsworth was seen no more. The other 
two men were hauled aboard the steamer. 

On the 12th of March a general attack was made on the fort. 
Soloman\s brigade was placed between the river and the land 
battery erected a few days before, and to the right of that batterv. 
The gunboats came slowly down the river, and, coming in range 
of the fort, opened with their heavy bow-guns. The land battery 
also opened. Immediately the fort was heard fixmi, and in no' 
uncertain way. Their shells were sent in showers over the boats 
and the land battery. The reV)els had a sixtv-eio'ht-pound ^un. 
which was particularly effective. One of its shells passed through 
the shutter of the ChilU'-.uthe and exploded in the gun-room, 
killing three and fatally wounding nine men. During the engage- 
ment the cotton bales on the up]>er deck of the Cli'dUcothe took 
fire, when a squad of negro firemen went up with hose and extin- 
guished the flames. The ChilllciAlte carried an-lGS-pound gun, 
whose shell could entirely penetrate a bale of cotton or the thick- 
est bank of the fort, and threatened the destruction of their works, 
but the boat could not hold position long enough to eftect what 
was possible under other circumstances. 

On the 16th another attack was made, with the same result. 

On the 19th Wiight xsiuld liad an arm shot off while "lookincr 
out"" for a rebel gun that was liring at a working squad. Nield 
saw the gun fire and gave the word, but before lie could get down 
the ball struck him. He subsetpicntly died. 

On the l!^th the fleet started to return. Much time was lost 
in the dark by the boats becoming entangled, which might have 
been fatal had the rebels understood the situation. 

Met General Quimby, with reinforcements, on the 21st of 
March. The entire expedition was ordered to return and the old 
positions were reached, and on the 23d the Forty-sixth was again 
sent d<'>wn in advance. Approaching the fort, two large yawls, 
filled with men, were seen making olT from the shore. The balls- 
of the advance compelled one party to halt; the other escaped. 
The captured yawl contained fourteen men. 

On the 2od a tree fell across a tent in the camp of the Forty- 



50 



THK FORTY-.SIXTH IXDIAXA. 



seventh, killing four and fatally injuring two men. James Storms, 
of Logansport, -was one of the v,-ounded. 

On the niglit of the 31st of March, Companies B and D stood 
picket Avithin :^0(i ^-ards of the rebels. 

A part)- of rebels came in AAith a flag of truce on April 1. 
Their alleged bu.-^iness was about a prisoner, but they reallv wanted 
to see what was being done on our side. They were held back a 
proper distance. Captain Sikes, the officer," was e.xceedmgly 
sociable, and sat and talked an hour with our Vjfllcers. In retuni, 
the next day our colonel, with a Hag and four men, went over to 
see what they ^vfva doing. They had more success than the rebels, 
and learned nuich about their position. 

Quartermaster Downey, when down near the fort, on the 4th 
of April, was struck in the hand by a rebel shell. The colonel, 
with some men, was in a battery destroying tlie sacks that had 
teen used in tlie work. Th.e shot was drawn by them. On the 
same day, at the same }»lace, a twelve-].ound shell' passed through 
a group of Company K's men. They were sitting around a tree. 
William Johnson was killed and Elihu Shaffer wounded. When 
the report of the gun was heard, Johnson gathered his knees to his 
body. The shell blew out its fuse and passed entirely through his 
knees and body. The brass fuse went through Shatter's hand. 

The fleet again started fur Helena on the .'>th of April. The 
Forty-sixth occupied the "^'olunteer'' alone. On the Gth a cap- 
tain of a boat and a soldier of the Forty-third were killed by 
guerrdlas. A large plantation house in the vicinity was in flames 
in a few minnt<'S. 

The regimeni arrived at Helena on the Sth of April. 



CHAPTER IV. 



Vacan-cies and Promotioxs. — ^MiLLTKEx's Bend. — Dawson's. — D^^■l5AR's. 
— Hard Time-s. — GKA^-D G^L?^ — The Bextox. — Port Girsox. — 
Champion's Hill. — Vicksbirg. — Jacksox. — Dowx the Hiver. — 
April- AiGL. ST, 1868. 

BETWEEN April and August, 1S63, tlie folloAviug vacancie.s 
and pi'omotion.s occurred: 
Ca})taiii Benjamin A. Grover, of Company K, resigned July 
22, 1SG3; lie was succeeded by Lieutenant Robert M. Shields; 
John McClung was comniissioned first, and Chester Chamberlain 
second lieutenant. Surgeon Horace Coleman resigned July 31, 
18G3; Assistant Surgeon I. J3. Washburn M-as commissioned sur- 
geon, and Joshua W. ITuderhill, of Company E, assistant surgeon. 

The following was the organization of the Thirteentli Army 
Corps (]\Iajor General J. A. McCiernand), A])ril 30, 1SG3: 

NiXTJi Dxvisiox (Osterhaus). 
I'lrc^t Jin'j'.iJe (Garrard). Second Brigade (Sheldon). 

Forty-ninth Indiana, Sixteenth Ohio, 

Sixty-nintii Tndiann., Forty-second Ohio, 

One Hundred and Twentieth One Hundred and Fourteenth 

Ohio. Ohio. 

One Hundred and Eighteentli Fifty-fourtli Indiana, 

Illinois, Twenty-second Kentucky. 
Seventh Kentucky. 

AKTILI.EKV. - 

First Wisconsin Battery, Seventh Micliigan Battery. 

cavalry. 
Tliird Illinois Cavalry (Cuinpanies A, E a:id K). 



(!.• > 



OJ THE FORTY-SIXTH INDIANA. 

Tenth Division (A. J. Smith).. 
/'7;>-/ JJrigadc (Burbridge). Secojul Briijade (Landram). 

Sixteenth Indiana, Nineteenth Kentucky, 

Sixtieth Indiana, Seventy-seventh Illinois, 

Sixty-.seventh Indiana, Ninety-seventh Illinois, 

Eighty-tliird Ohio, One Hundred and Eighth 

Ninety-sixth Oiiiu, Illinois, 

T\venty-third Wi^^consin. One Hundred and Thirtieth 

Illinois, 
Forty-eighth Ohio, 

AETILLEKY. 

Chicago Mercantile Battery, Seventeenth Ohio Battery. 

CAVALKY. 

Fourth Indiana Cavalry (Company C). 

Twelfth Division {A. P. Ilovey). 
FtrU Brig'ide (McGinnis). Second Brigade (Slack). 

Elevontli Indiana, Forty-seventh Indiana, 

Twenty-fourth Indiana, Twenty-fourth Iowa, 

Thirty-fourth Indiana, Twenty-eighth Iowa, 

Forty-sixtli Indiana, Fifty-sixth Ohio. 
Twenty-ninth Wisconsin. 

CAVALKY. 

First Indiana Cavalry (Company C). 

ARTILLERY. 

Second Illinois Battery (A), Second Ohio Battery, 

Sixteenth Ohio Battery, First Missouri Battery (A). 

Thirteenth Division (Ross). 
Flr^t Brigade (Soloman). Second Brigade (Fisk). 

Forty-third Indiana, Twenty-ninth Iowa, 

Thirty-tifth ^lissouri. Thirty-third Iowa, 

Twenty-eighth ^Yisconsin. Thirty-sixth Iowa, 

Thirty-third Missouri. 

AKTILI.KRY. 

Tliird I«>wa Battery. 



FOR VICKSBURG. 53 

ForitTKENTu Division (Cair). 
2nrst Brigade (Benton). Strand lirigade (Lawler). 

First United States, Eleventh \Yisconsin, 

Eighth Indiana, Twenty-first Iowa, 

Eighteenth Indiana, Twenty-second Iowa, 

Thirty-third Illinois, Twenty-third Iowa. 
Ninety-ninth Illinois. 

CAVALRY. 

Third Illinois Cavalry (Company G). 

ARTILLERY. 

First Indiana Battery, First Iowa Battery. 

Second Division of Cavalry (Bussey). 
First Brigade (Wiley). Second Brigade (Clayton). 

Fifth Illinois Cavalry, Second Arkansas Cavalry, 

First Indiana Cavalry. Third Iowa Cavalry, 

Fifth Kansas Cavalry, 
Second Illinois Cavalry, 
Sixth Missouri Cavalry. 

On the arrival of the regiment at Helena, it was met by Gen- 
eral Hovey, who ordered the Forty-sixth and Forty-seventh to 
reiuain on their boats, as tliey were to go to VicksLurg. 

On the evening of the 11th the " YoliuUeer,"' with the regi- 
ment, dropped down the river a few miles, with orders to watch, 
and folio\\ the ''Univej-sf,'" the tiagboat of the general. It rained 
heavily all night. U'he next morning (Sunday) the men were busy 
drying and cleaning up. The chaplain was having religious ser- 
vices when the "Universe'' passed down, with colors tlying. The 
sermon was cut off, and in twenty minutes the regiment was on 
board and steaming down the river. The river was very high. 
At 4 o'clock the "Volunteer" was off White river, and at 5 she 
passed Na])oleon, at the mouth of the Arkansas. At 8 o'clock the 
"Volunteer" overhauled three boats that had been ahead. At 10 
o'clock all the leading boats were overhauled at anchor. The 
"Volunteer'' was ordered to take the lead, as she "was the only 
boat that had a competent pilot.'' Accordingly she steamed on 
down. 

The boat was full uf men. All the decks were covered with 



54 THE FORTY-SIXTfl IXDIANA. 

sleeping soldiers, and the night was dark. The river was out of 
its banks, and, in some places, three or four miles wide. The 
dangfT of getting out of the channel, or on the bars, was great, 
and the colonel, feeling the responsibility of the situation, M-ent 
with the captain to the pilot to ascertain how far that olhcial 
could be relied on. It was discovered that the pilot ^^'as a member 
of the First Indiana Cavalry, and had been on that part of the 
river only once before, and then on a coal barge. 

The "Volunteer" ran many risks, and, at 2 o'clock, after rub- 
bing several sandbars, came to anchor without orders, and by 3 
o'clock the whole lleot was huddled around her. At daybreak the 
boat Aras again under way, and at G o'clock tied up near the quar- 
ters of General Grant. 

After bi-eakfast the "Volunteer,'' under orders, was unloaded 
and the property carried up on dry ground. In a few hours orders 
carae to put everything on the boat again. Th.at was done. The 
next morning the boat moved a short distance up the river and the 
regiment went into camp. 

The point where the army was concentrating was at Milliken's 
Bend, twehty miles above Vicksburg. 

All baggage, except what could be carried, was ordered back 
to the boats. The division had no wagons except for ammuni- 
tion. All else was put on the steamers "Cheeseman" and "Cer- 
lew," to be carried past the rebel batteries at Vicksburg. The 
stores were put on the boats without any regard to method or 
order. Things were piled up just as they v.-ere bniught in, and 
worse confusion could not have been constructed. 

On the IGth of April the division began its march. The 
Twent} -fourth led the column, followed by the Forty-sixth, with 
the Sixteenth Ohio Battery between them. Richmond was reached 
before dark, and the regiment remained over night. Marched at 
C.30 on the 17th. Reached Dawson's plantation at 4 p. m. 
Weather exceedingl}' hot. Knapsacks were relieved by the dis- 
charge of overcoats and su}>erlluous clothing. Tiie splendid man- 
sion of "]Mars" Dawson was soon filled by a hot and hungry 
soldiery. The rooms were all taken. During the night terrific 
firing was heard in the direction of Vicksburg. ^ujijiosing the 
transports, a\ ith their baggage, were passing the batteries on the 
little steamers, the Forty-sixth people expressed some uneasiness. 

Left the plantation on the 21st of April. The division ha<l 
built l)ridt,a-s ad»litional to those built bv the enuineer^, and had a 



GKAXD Gl LF. 03 

road to itself. Encnnii)ed that niglit on Dunbar's plaiitation. 
The weathcrlioarding of tile luaiision was used for bedtling. Built 
a bridge on the -2d, and enjoyed heavy rains for four days. 
Marched, on the 2Tth, at noon, over heavy roads, and slop{)ed 
two miles froju the river. Remained a sliort time, and ]nished ou 
tlirough the rain to the river. The division went into camp and 
remained until noon on the '23th. The regiment was marched a 
short distance down the river and exercised in pumping out two 
coal barges that had been ]i)erforated in passing the batteries. 

At 5 o'clock the Eleventli, Twenty-fourth and Forty-sixth 
were put on the "Forest (}iieen" and a coal barge on each side of 
her. Every foot of room was covered. By dark the entire 
division was loaded on five transports and the coal barges. At 8- 
o'clock General Hovey assembled the colonels of the division in 
the cabin of the "Forest Queen" an.d explained to them the pro- 
posed movement. The division was to be on boats and barges 
opposite the I'ebel fort. Tlic gunboats were to silence the batteries, 
when tlie infantry was to run over, land and secure a footing at 
the base of the fort. The transports M'ere then to return for addi- 
tional trooj'S. Governor Yates, of Illinois, was present at this 
meeting. The colonels were directed to assemble their company 
otticers and instruct them in their duties. 

'J'lic division started at 3 o'clock on the morning of the 20th, 
and reached Hard Times at G. The boats tied up nearly oppo- 
site the great fort of Graiul Gulf. It was not then visible through 
the mist, but in an hour it was in plain view. The sight was 
interesting, but not comforting. It was a huge sugar loaf hill, 
with a jilane at its base, some tv/enty feet above the river. Not a 
man or a gun could be seen. The river seemed to run straight 
against the fort, while Black river came into the Alississippi close 
to its right. 

At S o'clock all was ready. The division was on its boats. 
The gunboats Avere at anchor in the stream. The Louisville, 
Lufayette, Urnton, I^itt»bur(j, J/ound City, Caroivldet and the 
Price were in the fleet. Admiral Porter was on the Benton, 
General McClernand on the Price, a!id General Grant was on a 
little tug in the middle of the ri\'er. On a signal from the Penton 
the fleet weighed anchor and stood up stream. Going up a mile, 
the boats turned and came down in line of battle. By this time 
the sun was high enougli to expose the fort to its direct rays, and, 
from the transports, a distinct view couhl be had of every move- 



56 Tin: forty-sixth ixdiaxa. 

raent, and for over tive hours the Thirteenth Corps looked upon 
one of the grandest sights ever witnessed. 

The attack failing to silence the enemy's guns, signals were 
made for the division to land. The corps was then marched along 
the levee past the fort. Below, it went into camp. By morning, 
the entire corps, with two of Logan's brigades, about 20,000 men, 
were ready for the march for Vicksburg. • During the night the 
transports and gunboats ran past the batteries. The rebel cannon- 
ading shook the ground the soldiers sle])t upon. 

Officers of the regiment, who subsequently visited the fort, 
say that the jdateau was very broad, and completely commanded 
by rifle trenches wide enough to shelter four ranks of infantry, 
and with many pieces of light artillery. The time necessary for 
the transports to urdoad and return for reinforcements would have 
been sufficient to annihilate the first detatchments, and, probably, 
most of the succeeding ones. In vieAv of subsequent events, it 
was, perhaps, fortunate that the heavy rebel guns were not 
silenced. 

At 5 o'clock on the morning of the 30th of April the regiment 
*' mustered for pay,'" and, in an hour, with the Twenty-fourth 
Indiana, was marching on the Benion. The P_^leventh went on the 
Lafayette. On the JJcnton, the Twenty-fourth occupied the uppiDr 
deck and the Forty-sixth the lower or gun deck. 

At 8 o'clock the Benton ran up a signal and put out into the 
stream. She was immediately followed by all the gunboats, trans- 
poits and barges — ail heavily laden with infantry and artillery. 
As the licet rounded out, a band at the quarters of General Grant 
pla}ed ''The Kc<l, White ami Blu'o." The checr-^ from the boats 
and the shore, the heavy masses of soldiers on the vessels, with 
the busy preparations on the gunboats for action, produced impres- 
sions on the sjiectaturs that will never be forgotton. 

On the wheel-house of the B-xton stood General Grant and 
Commodore Porter, closely watching the shore. Nothing, however, 
Avas visible on land that indicated that the enemy was pre- 
pared for the movement. The decks were covered with anxious 
soldiers', the guns vvere cleared for action, and the crews were at 
quarters. Opposite Bruinsburg the i>t/<^o/< signaled, " Prei>are to 
land," and slowly rounded to. As soon as the boat reached the 
bank the Forty-sixth and Twenty-fourth Indiana were on shore — 
the first to land. Only one man was seen on the bank. He was 
supposed to be a spy of General Grant's and was sent on board. 



PORT GIBSOX. 57 i 

i 

Two day's rations, to do live, were issued and speedily distril)uted. 1 

There was such haste that many companies were obliged to roll | 

their previsions along as they marched. A rapid movement was ; 

begun. The roads were crowded. At first there was much con- ,' 

fusion, but gradually the advance became orderly and rapid. j 

There were no horses in the column, except those with the I 

artillery. The officers walked with the men. The regiment j 

snatched a few minutes and got supper at 8 o'clock. jMarched, ■ 

with many halts, all night. At 5 o'clock a. m., the 1st of ]May, ' 

the colonel took advantage of a halt and ordered tlie men to pre- j 

pare breakfast. It was fortunate, for it vras many hours before 
another opportunity occurred. Before the lieavy eaters were 
through heavy firing began, and the order came to go forward. 
The regiment was in line instantly, and pushed to the front. 
Rudely jostling an old colonel, he said, "You'll get there in time, 
boys." And many of them did. The road was gorged with 
infantry and artillery — all crowding to the front. The regiment 
went with the tide, and in a few minutes was engaged in battle. 

This point was four miles from Port Gibson, and the result of 

the engagement would determine the campaign. Crossing a 

chasm, the Forty-sixth became separated from the other regiments 

of the brigade, and canie out on a plain near the Magnolia 

church, where it was ordered by General IMcGinnis to support the 

Eighteenth Indiana, whicii was being heavily pressed. About 

that time the Forty-sixth joined the other part of the brigade, and 

and took part in the first clinrge. The Eigliteenth was fighting 

the Fifteenth Arkansas and the Twenty-first and Twenty-third 

AlaViama. A buttery of two guns was in front, within an ijundred 

yards. In the charge on the rebel infantry, the Forty-sixtli went 

through, breaking the rebel lines. Company E ca})tured the colors 

of the Fifteenth Arkansas, and a portion of Comi)any H ran over 

the colors of the Twenty-third Alabama. Cai>tain Henry Snyder 

and James M. McBeth, of Company E. fired upon and wounded 

the color-1)earer of the Fifteenth Arkansas. ]\Icl>eth took the 

if 
colors, but inadvertantly let them pass into the hands of some 

Thirty-fourth men, who had come up. Portions of the Eleventh, 

Thirty-fourtli and Forty-sixth Indiana charged upon and captured 

the battery. This capture has been claimed by each regiment, 

severally, but it m as their joint work. ^Vhoever did the work, it 

was well done. Every horse and every man about the first gun was 

.killed. It was then turned, and, being loaded, fired upon the rebels. 



OS THE FOKTV-SIXTII INDIA NA. 

After ail Ikhiv's rest the regiment wa'^ ordered forward and ta 
tlie riglit. It crossed tlie Port Gibson road and formed on a bare 
hill. Artillery went into battery. Immediately the line was 
opened on from tlie woods in front, where a new rebel line liad 
been formed. A part of the Forty-sixth and some artillerv were- 
sent down and the rebels dispersed. At 5.30 r. m. our line A^as 
■withdrawn, and the men laid down and slept. 

At 4. oil A. M. on the 2d, the army was in motion, and at S 
o'cdock the regiment staeked arms in one of the streets of Port 
Gibson. It remained in town until the next evening, and enjoved 
a well earned rest. 

In the movement from the river, the regiment's behavior 
pleased its friends and satisHe*! the general ollicers. 

The killed and wounded of the regiment were: 

Adjutant James M. Watts, wounded; supposed mortally. 

Coinpaiiy A. — Wounded: Corporal \V. U. Padget, mortally;. 
Charles B. Fawcet, Daniel P. Snyder, John IJeaver. 

Company I>. — Wounded: Henry IJrown. 

Company C. — Killed: David Cripe, Austin Waymire, Corporal 
John K. Shaffer. Wounded: Benjamin Addis, Alexander Lane, 
Jonathan X. Galloway, Isaac E. Smoek. 

Company D. — Killed: Noah Jones, William Loudermilk, 
Alfred Kitchens. Wounded: Corporal Nathan Downham, Cor- 
poral Lovengier, Corporal Crockett, Corporal Theron Kendrick^ 
Michael Blue. 

Company E.— Wounded: William C Shull, Randolph Mere- 
dith, John D. Cummer, D. B. Win, William Hrockus, George W, 
Albert, Bobi'rt Stogdel, Charles Kider, Henry 'i'eeides. 

Company F. — Wounded: Corporal James Cainpl>ell, Jonas 
Sloniker. 

Company G — Killed: J, Swisher. Wounded: Levi C. Clinc. 

Company II. — Killed: Corporal Samuel Fisher. Wounded: 
William Faler, Samuel Coble, Henry Reichaid. 

Com}. any I. — Wounded: Martin L. Surface, Henry C. Davis, 
Daniel Ilarrol, George Beckett, George Schley. 

Company K. — AVounded: Cor]»oral Adam Gaudy, Larkin 
Adamson. Total killed, eight; wounded, thirty-seven. 

Of tlie wounded, Adanisun died on the day of the battle,, 
and Padget on the 3d of May. 

The Forty-sixth had -I'l') men in the action. The colors- 
received three shots. 



ox THE ROAD TO VICKSlirKG, 59' 

On tho 4tli of ^lay, Lieutenant Troxell, of Conipany C, was 
detailed to act as a'ljntant, in place of \Vatts, and Lieutenant 
Brownlie, of Coni}>any L), as (juarlennastev, in place of Downey. 

On the 3d of May the Forty-third and Forty-sixth went on a 
pcoiit. Tiiey found lary;e quantities of provisions. At one place- 
thoy discovered 180,000 pounds of lianis and side meat. It had 
been liauled out by the rebels on the day of the battle. Large- 
quantities of stores had been burned. The division encamped, on 
the night of the 3d, seventeen miles fron\ Vicksburg and twenty- 
five from Grand Gulf. A halt of several days was made for stores. 
Generals Grant, Sherman, Logan and ^FcClernand reviewed the 
division on tho 7th. On the Sth was the "]>ig Wash," when the 
army, after a busy month in the mud and water, met the first 
opportunity to clean up. 

The division left the camp near Edward's Depot on May IL 
Marched eight miles and remained until the I'iili at 3 a. :>[., when 
it took u}i the march for Vicksburg. The first day the road was 
hot and dusty. Artillery and infantry, with thousands of negro 
men, women and cliildren, -were luin-ying forward. Met the 
enemy at 9 o'clock. The Twelfth Division was in advance. The 
Twenty-fourth and the Forty-sixth were in front. Companies A, 
B and C were out as skirmishers. The two regiments pushed 
ahead and found the rebels in a wood, witli a broad, clear field 
between the forces. On the advance of the regiments the rebels 
fell back to their supports. 

The line of march was taken up on the 12th. Before starting 
each man took eighty i-ouuils of cartii'lues and some crackers. 
The sick v/ere put in ambulances, and, v.ith the wagons, sent 
around by another road. At 10 o'clock every ]v>ssible demonstra- 
tion for an intended bat,tle had been made by General Grant, but, 
while they were going or., a road was bting cut through the woods, 
which let the Thirteenth Corps out on another, around the rebel 
left. Four miles were made l>y 4 o'clock, when the division went 
into ca]n[). The lot o( the Forty-sixth fell on a newly })lowed 
tieM, which, under the heavy rain, soon became a pond. 

At -i o'clock, on the 14th, orders came for a march at 4.30. 
At 8 o'clock the I'ain recommenced. Reached Raymond at 11. 
The town was full of rebel prisoners and large details were bury- 
ing the dead of Logan's battle on the 12th. Camped on the night 
of the 14tli, three and one-half miles from the Vicksburg railroad,. 
an<l tiftoen miles from Jackson. 



•oO THE FORTY-SIXTH INDIANA. 

Started at 5 o'clock on the moniing of tlie 15th. Fine 
weather. Good traveling. Reached Clinton, on the railroad, at 
S o'clock. Ai^ain met the rebels, funned line of battle, when they 
again left. The pickets were busy all night. Many prisoners 
were brought in. 

Was on the road again at 5 o'clock on the morning of the 
IGth. Picked up rebel stragglers at eyery step. Companies H 
and I were put out on the Hanks of the column, and captured a 
•large number of rebel ])risoners who had fallen behind on the 
retreat of their army from Jackson. 

Three miles from Bolton, the column^ again struck the rebel 
lines. The Twelfth Division was in advance, and the First 
Brigade was in the lead. The Twenty-fourth (Colonel Spicely) 
Avas in front, then the Sixteenth Ohio Battery, with the Forty- 
sixth following.' Approaching a fine plantation (Champion's), 
where the road ran into a hilly woods, a number of field officers 
were riding in front of the Twenty-fourth, when Sergeant David 
Wilky, of the First Indiana Cavalry, coming from the front, 
reported lines of infantry and artillery within GOO yards. The 
Forty-sixth was ordered up in front of the battery, and a lino of 
battle was immediately formed. The Twenty-fourth formed on 
the right of the road and the Forty-sixth on the left. The Second 
Ohio Battery rested on the right of the Tvrenty-fourth, and the 
Sixteentii Ohio Battery on the left of tlie Forty-sixth, and between 
that regiment and the Eleventh Indiana. But General Grant was 
not yet ready for the battle. The several columns of tlie army 
were on different roads and rapidly concentrating. But two 
brigades of one corps, the Thirteenth, were yet on the ground. 

At 11,45 General C-I^rant, supposing the other columns on the 
other roads were in supporting disiance, ga\e General Ilovey the 
order to advance. The Forty-sixth quickly went forward, and 
formed line of battle on the left of the Twenty-nintli Wisconsin. 
•On its left were the Eleventh and Thirty-fourtli Indiana. The 
Twenty-fourth was on the extreme right. The batteries followed 
-close. A halt was made until 12.15, when the actual advance 
began. The order Avas first received on the right of the line, and 
it, in moving forward, obliqued to the left, compelling the Forty- 
sixth to move also to the left, crowding the Eleventh. That regi- 
ment not being able to give room, the Forty-sixth was finally 
■compelled to occupy ground in the rear of the Twenty-ninth 
Wisconsin. In that situation the brigade advanced, and sharp 



champion's hill. 61 

firing commenced by the whole line. Tiie brigade advanced ii> 
fine order and drove the rebels back over their batteries in con- 
fusion. Tlie rebels crussed a small ravine, and again formed. 
Here was a desj^erate fight. The whole brigade advanced and a 
close conflict ensued. On the left, the Second Brigade, under 
Colonel Slack, liad similar work on hand. Before this general 
encounter, the Eleventh sent for help, and General McGinnis 
directed the Forty-sixth to relieve it. The Eleventh was found 
nearly flanked on both sides and heavily pressed. The Forty-sixth 
came on the ground in good time, and, joining the Eleventh,, 
forced the rebels back. 

The struggle on the first hill was kept up over an hour M'ith 
varying results. Several guns were captured, three of them by the 
Forty-sixth, Avhich were again captured by the rebels. It was 
uncertain, at the end of the hour, where the victory would finally 
be. The fight began too early. Many divisions were yet upon 
the road, and calls for help were unheeded. The larger portion of 
the Thirteenth (McClernand's) Corps heard the thunder of the 
battle and loitered. During the heaviest fighting by Ilovey's- 
division, that general received an order from McClernand to join 
him some three miles back. In his "^lemoirs,'" General Grant 
says: "The battle of Cliampion's Hill lasted about four hours, 
hard fighting, preceded by two or three hours of skirmishing, 
some of which almost rose to the dignity of battle. Every man of 
Hovey's division, and of McPherson's two divisions, was engaged 
during the battle. A^o other part of niy command v:as engaged e(( 
all, except as described before." GeiU'ral Grant attributes the 
failure to prevent Pemberton from getting back to Vicksburg to 
McClernand's delay. 

The most desperate and protracted of the Forty-sixth's fight- 
ing was near and around a log cabin, and near where the guns 
were captured. Here the tide of battle ebbed and flowed. The 
ground was lost and won. The First Brigade would press for- 
ward, victors, only to be driven back, to again advaiue in pur.suit. 
Here many of the regiment fell. Near the cabin, Welch and 
Laquear, of Company D; Mellinger, of Company I; Lieutenant' 
Ferris, of Com{)any I'\ and William Pfoutz, of Company B, fell. 
The balls showered about that cabin, and the wonder v.'as that so 
many escaped. 

The success of Logan's division on the riglit settled the ques- 
tion for tliat dav. Whun llovev's division saw the masses of 



€2 Tin: fokty-sixtii ixihaxa. 

rebel prisoners crowding to tlie rear, it knew why the enemy on 
its front was giving way. The victory was won. 

Tlie Sixteenth Ohio Battery, containing a large detail from 
the Forty-sixth, did good service. It occupied a position of great 
responsibility and danger. Its galhnit commander, Captain 
jMitchell, was killed. 

In his report of the battle of Champion's Hill, General Ilovey 
thus speaks of the First Brigade, near the cabin: "The contest 
here was continued for over an hour by my forces. For over COO 
yards up the hill m}' division gallantly drove the enemy before 
thein, capturing eleven guns and over 300 prisoners under fire. 
The Eleventh Indiana (C^olonel McCauley) and Twenty-ninth 
Wisconsin (Colonel Gill) captured the four guns on tlie brow of 
the hill, at the point of the bayonet. The Forty-sixth Indiana 
(Colonel Bringhurst) gallantly di'ove the enemy from three guns on 
the right of the road, and Colonel Bynam, with the Twenty-foinlh 
Iowa, charged a battery of five guns on the left of the road, kill- 
ing gunnel's and horses and capturing several prisoners." "- * 

The brigade was ordered at the close of the battle to get a 
supply of cartridges and finish the fight, or take part in the 
pursuit. 

Divisions coming up which had not been in the engagement 
Avere sent forward, and tlie 'J'svelth Division prepared for supper 
and rest. 

The spot where the divisioii was to camp was situated in a 
light wood, near the road, but it was preoccu|iiod. It was covered 
"with dead and wounded men. Ivebel and Union soldiers lay 
almost as thickly as stood the living. 'J'he division divided the 
ground with the dead and wounded. All night the ambulance 
corps, with their torches of splinters, came among the sleeping 
soldiers, hunting and carrying out those to whom surgical atten- 
tion would be a benefit. 

On the nnn-ning of the ITth, the brigade was ordered to 
remain to bury the dead and care for the wounded and prisoners. 
Details were made for the work. Negroes were em})loved in 
digging trenches for graves. Wagons scoured the field for arms 
and ammuniiion. and a large detail with negroes, under the medical 
officers, cut trees and built bowers for the wounded. In the Forty- 
sixth, each company sent out men to gather and bury their own 
dead. They were brought to one jilace and buried in oiie grave. 
I'hree who died iu the h<.>s|iita! were burieil there, and one ^\■il*^ 



CHAMPIOX'.S HILL. G3 

M-as not found was afterward buried by the general detail. One 
other, at tlie request of his friends, was buried alone. I'his was 
done on Sunday. On Moiiday the rebels were buried. They were 
put in trenches, in lots of twenties, thirties and uj»ward, as was 
most convenient. 

The loss of the Forty-sixth, in the battle of Champion's Hill, 
was as follows: 

Company A. — Killed: IJenry L. Smith, Silas Davis, S. II. 
Kelson, John Beaver. ^Vounded: Lieutenant W. A. Andrews, 
A. A. Julian, E. J. Lister, John Newell, C. M. Parker, W. C. 
Heartzog, W. A. Kinsey, Levi Canter, AV. H. Duncan, Ralph 
Mc^Iahan, Thomas W. Sleeth, Hugh F. Crockett, S. I. Anderson, 
J. F. Sheridan, Lewis Billard. ]\Iissing: Samuel Patterson, 
A. Smock. 

' Company 15. — Killed: Willinni Pfoutz. Wounded: Peter 
Maise, James C. Dill, 11. B. Ingham, W. II. Bell, Lieutenant J. T. 
Castle, Levi Lynch. 

Company C. — Killed: John 2s. Newhouse: ^^'ounded: Joseph 
Henderson, xVllen Hughes, James N. Thompson, John Shephard. 
jNIissing: Daniel Ilarner. 

Company D. — Killed: Nicholas Welch, "William Laquear. 
Wounded: W. H. Conner, Porter White, Alexander Reece. 

Company E!.— Killed: G. W. Smith.. Wounded: Benjamin 
Ross, Samuel D. Shields. 

Company F. — Killed: Lieutenant Joel Ferris, 3Iichael "I'affe, 
Thomas Nace. Wounded: William Ikiller, Daniel Leslie, James 
JMoran, W. S. Nnce, Alexander lloglar.d, 3Iichael Rader, Beecher 
♦Sliarp, James Crippen, Jefl'erson Dickey, Jacob Hiney. 

Company G. — Killed: Abel Benjamin, Silas Dunham. 
Wounded: AV. H. Bunnell, Flora Shein, Joseph H. Carr, William 
Dillon, T. G. Glasford, Jacob Guest. 

Company II. — Killed: C. P. Burrow, ■M. H. Ager. Wounded: 
J. J. Mowry, L. A. Price. 

Company I. — Killed: William 31. Oliver, T. J. Kistler, 
Thomas Humbert, Charles D. Mellinger. Wounded: Lieutenant 
Jacob McCormick, D. T. Krisher, Chnrles Shaffer, J. W. Walters, 
Samuel Johnson, Henry Whitmore. T. J. Button, George Porter, 
J. White, Solomon Kline, Jonas Stiver. 

Company K. — Wounded: John Hoover, Thomas W. S(^ott, 
William Cook. 

Killed, twenty; wounded., sixtv-one: mls>inu-. three. 



61 . THE FORTY-SIXTH IXDIAXA. 

Of the above wounded, Butler, Stiver, Newell, Glasford, But- 
ton, Shein and Lieutenant Andrews died in a few davs. The 
Forty-sixth took 350 men into the action. 

The effective strength of the division, at the commencement 
of the fight, was 4,180. Of this number, 211 were killed, 872 
wounded and 119 missing, a total of 1,202 — 28.7 per cent. 
The total Federal loss was 2,408. 

On the 19tli the First Brigade started for Vicksburg. The 
Second had gone forward on the day after the battle, but the First 
overtook it at Black river bridge, where it remained, while the 
First kept on toward the city, Avhich was reached at noon on the 
21st. Five thousand prisoners accompanied the brigade to Black 
river .bridge, where they turned off for a point on the Mississippi, 
above Vicksburg. Arriving at the fortifications, the men indulged 
in a rest. At dark an order came directing an assault the next 
morning. The attack was to be general along the whole line. 
In the morning the camps were astir with jtreparation. Before 
the api)oij]ted hour the army was in its several positions. Ours 
fell before three forts, on a ridge, backed, by a hill. The brigade 
was })osted behind Osterhaus' division, and as a support to it. 
On the signal, the whole line, enveloped in fire and smoke, ruslied 
forward. One of Osterhaus' brigades started toward the ridge, 
and our First Brigade closed up to follow, but before Osterhaus 
made half the distance tlie pits, hills, ravines and breastworks 
before us were tilled with men who opened such a fire on the 
advancing columns that they were broken and scattered. At the 
same time two brass twelve-pound guns opened with grape and 
completed Osterhaus' defeat. 'J'ho first regiment of O&teihaus', 
the Seventh Kentucky, was literally swept away. The Twenty- 
fourth and Forty-sixth tlien took the position in front. A heavy 
fire was kept up all the afternoon, but no more assaults were made. 

It was upon this event that General McClernand reported a 
successful entre within the rebel works, and upon which he based 
his famous congratulatory order to his corps; but there was no 
success. 

On June 2, Colonel Kilby Smith, of Ohio; Colonel McMahon, 
of Wisconsin, and Colonel Bringliurst, were detailed by General 
Grant to go to Milliken's Bend and investigate complaints made 
against the commandant of a negro recruiting camp at that point. 
^^'iHle there they witnessed a desperate battle between a rebel 
force of 2,000 and \,',)(n) negro recruits. The battle lasted an hour 



VICKSBUKG. 65 

onl)-. The rebels had 250 killed and wounded, the negroes 100 
killed and 200 wounded. The Twenty-third Iowa, sent up from 
Young's Point the niglit before, rendered no assistance in the 
fight. 

There was not much change In the routine of duty during tlic 
siege. The Forty-si xih was early assigned a position opposite the 
fort, where the fatal charge was made on the 22d. Two com- 
panies were furnished daily for duty on the works, where each 
man disposed of forty rounds. The lines were about GOO yards 
aj)art. The works were an embankment v.-ith sandbags on top,, 
■with intervals between for portholes, and a heavy log on the top. 
The men on duty spent the time behir.d the breastworks, occasion- 
ally venturing a look to catch some careless rebel, or to be caught 
themselves. 

Directly in the rear of the regiment was a battery of four 
guns. Two of them were the ones that the regiment brought from 
New Madrid to Riddle's Point. The otlier two were those the 
regiment captured at Fulton, below Fort Pillow. These, with 
some smaller guns, were lired directly over the heads of the men. 
The firing was incessant. At all hours of the day and night some 
of the batteries were at work, and the noise became so familiar 
that it was scarcely noticed. On the 2d of June, under orders, a 
general cannonading from the batteries upon the rebels com- 
menced at 4 o'clock in the morning. Tv.'o hundred guns were let 
loose on them. In addition, the gunboats and mortars mixed in. 
For six hours the storm continued. 'J'he ritie ])its were Jilled with 
men, but with no expectation of making an as.-ault. Tha rebels 
naturally expected an attack, and liiary of tlieui, curious to see 
what was coming, lost their lives. 

Frisby Richardson, of Company K; Isaac Rinier and Patrick 
Calahan, of Comjiany F, and Sohiman ^I. Cainbiin, of C'c-uipanv 
G, were wounded on the works, and Andixnv J. Bnchelor, of Com- 
pany ]>, was killed by the falling of a magazine. 

On the 2r)th orders were received to pre[)are foi- the blowing 
np of a ft;>rt on the right of the brigade, opj)Osite Logan's division. 
Everybody was in the M'orks in time. At -t o'clock a large fort 
went up in a cloud of smoke and dust. At tlie same moment, the 
artillery on the whole line ojiened on the opposite works, aiid, 
where opportunity offered, the infantry ['icked off careless rebels. 
A desjH'rate tight took ]>Iace M'here the fort was bl')v%-n. which 
lasted until night. On the 2Sih tlie rebels at'.empied t(:> mine 



G6 THE KORTY-SIXTII INDIANA. 

under ti-eiiclits near the regiment's line, but the calcuhntion was 
erroneous and no damage was done. 

About tlie 2Uth of June an approacli to the rebel lines was 
begun from Ilovey's division. A large amount of labor -was spent 
upon it, and its suceess Mas only prevented by the surrender. 
During the progress of that work the rebels and Federals fre- 
quently met on the picket line and had a "quiet talk. 

On July 3, about 10 o'clock, white tiags appeared on the rebel 
works to the left of our bi'igade line. Immediately all tlie svorks 
on both sides were covered with men, and great anxiety was mani- 
fested to discover what vras going on. Shortly the Hags were 
taken down and a squad of rebel officers went over to the rebel 
lines. Rumors came thick and fast, but nothing was known until 
night, when an order came saying that a grand national salute 
^vould be tired at daylight on the morrow; that if the rebels had 
surrendered, it would be blank cartridges; if they had not, it 
would be ball and shell. The salute in the morning told that the 
truce was not broken. At 10 o'clock a large white Hag on tlie 
Court-house told the story of the great victory, and a shout from 
40^000 throats welcomed it. 

In a short time the rebel regiments came out in front of their 
works, stacked their arms and hung u{> their accoutrements. 
'J'hey then marched back. Then rt-gimental Hags \vent up on their 
])ai'apeLS. Those of thy Eleventh and Forty-sixth graced the 
*' big fort." During the morning of the 4th, the regiment drew 
ten days' rations and 150 rounds of ammunition and received orders 
to march at noon. The liberated rebels flocked around the 
soldiers' qiiartei's and were treated with greiit liberalil} . Xot less 
than a hundred were fed by the Forty-sixth. After dinner the 
boys strolled into town. J hey looked over the city, ins{>ected the 
rebel officers and soldiers and returned to cnni}). 

At Champion's Hill the regiment found a large number of 
Springtield ritles, thrown down by the rebels. Six com[>anies laid 
down their Austrians in their ])lace. Now the last Austrian was 
disposed of and a full complement of good guns secured. This 
irregular exchange of arms was the occasi(,)n of an immense 
amount of trouble in the ordinance department. For twenty 
years after tlie colonel received annual demands for an accounting 
of the Austrian guns. 

Started on July 5 for Joe Johnston, at Jack<;(>n. Tliermometer 
10(). \'ery dusty. 'J'hrte army corps lormcd the expeilition. 



;.;.! •,.• 



J I , ■•.' I' 



MARCH TO JACKSOX. G7 

Theywore to march on three roads and meet at Bolton, then again 
separate and meet again at Clinton. Encamped that night near 
Black river, ten miles. This march has been ])ronounced the 
most fatiguing and distressing ever made by the Forty-sixth. The 
regiment remained at that point until the evening of the next dav. 
The line of march was taken up at 5 o'clock, and the bridge m as 
reached. It was so crowded that the regiment M'as unable to 
cross, and went into camp. At 5 o'clock on the morning of the 
'7th the Forty-sixth was on the road, and reached Bolton, eighteen 
miles, at 6 o'clock. Regiments and batteries crowded in, and by 
dark the confusion was desperate. Soon the rain began. Our 
division settled down along the road. Occasional Hashes of light- 
ning disclosed a confused mass of artillery, horses, wagons, men, 
etc. The rain i)ut out the fires, and there was no supper. It 
became totally dark, and for six hours that experience of the regi- 
ment was its worst. During tlie night stragglers came in, waking 
■dozing men with inquiries about their regiment. Horses and 
mules, imperfectly tied, stalked among the men, or got up rows 
willi the horses of the artillery or the wagons. 

The next morning the sun came out hot, and the moisture | 

, was evaporated from the ground in clouds. The regiment moved j 

■out of the water a short distance, and remained until evening. j 

At 4 o'clock the regiments moved out to their positions, and ;' 

made a grand aiipearance. The bands were playing and the men { 

sang patriotic songs. All were in high glee and confident that I 

Johnston would soon be driven ofc. Made three miles by 11 o'clock, i 

and laid down. Started again at S o'clock, on tlie 0th, and made j 

Bolton, ten miles, by 11 o'clock. Skirmishers Vvcre used nearly | 

-all the way between I>oIton and Clinton. At Clinton the regiment j 

rested an hour, overtook a number of willing prisoners, and > 

encamped a mile beyond Clinton. | 

On the lOtli the three corps were again together, and it was { 

late before the regiment obtained its road. At noon the division j 

was M'ithin two miles of Jackson, and went into camp. Very j 

lieavy skirmi*4iing was going on. 

At noon on the 11th the regiment was assigned its position in • 

the line. Skirmished all the afternoon and until dark, when, after 
crossing the New Orleans railroad, the men laid down in line of 
battle. j 

On the 12th of July the Federal lines closed uj) on the town. ' 

Our line was by the Uvo brigade:^, in their order, whh the right on i 



68 TIIK FORTY-SIXTH INDIANA. 

the railroad, and tlie left resting on Benton's division. Lawman's- 
division was on the right of the road, and was rapidly moving up. 
Two comjianies of each regiment were in advance as skirmishers. 
The Forty-sixth was on the right of the division. Tlie Twenty- 
fourth and Thirty-fourth were in reserve. Lawman was far in 
advance of the line, lie charged on a rebel earthwork without 
being able to bring his artillery into action or jtrotect his men. In 
consequence the rebel fire was concentrated on that division, to the 
advantage of tliat on the left. Our First Brigade made the 
advance and got into position without difficulty, but after a sharp 
fight. 

The regiment had none killed in the engagement. The 
wounded were Jeremiah Jolinson, of Compan} G, who died on the 
19th; Alfred H. Hardy, who died on the ISth; George G. Hamil- 
ton, of Company C; John B. Wa]<]ron, of Com])any G; Milton 
Hancock, Amos Oijiut and Cyrus Peabody, of Company I, and 
Lieutenant ^litchell, of Company H. 

The regiment remained in line of battle from the 12th to the 
21st of July. On the 14th a flag of truce went out from our side 
to procure the burial of the dead. The dead of Lawman's division 
had lain out since the 12th, and their burial became a necessity. 
P^<jr the first day aiul niglit the complaints of the wounded were 
constantly heard, but it being im}>ossibIe to relieve tliem, they liad 
perished. Two men had crawled out to the picket line, and Avere 
met and liclped by members of the Forty-sixth. 

The burial party was furnished by the rebels, and they did 
tlieir work very snperu'-ia!!y and in a gr'cat Imrry. A large ptiriion 
of the dead lin'l bv'oii vsoundod u\id died froui Wisnt of attention. 
Some had crawled under trees and luslics. Groups of two and 
tliree were found huddled behind logs in their elTort to shelter 
th.emselves from the shells and balls that showered over them. 

Three liundred bodies were Iniried at this one point. Law- 
man's loss was -175. 

General Lawman was relieved, ami ordeied to report to Gen- 
eral Grant at Vicksl)urg. 

A roster of the rebel army, foun^i at Yicksburg, showed that 
there were, at Jack>on, troops from Texas, Louisiana, Georgia, 
North and South Carolimi, Mississijiju, Alabama, Florida, x\rkan- 
sas, Tennessee and Kentucky — seventy-eight infantry regiments, 
nine of cavalry, and sixteen batteries. 

The relM'ls had a fine band on th(;ir line oi)pi>site the Forty- 



KETURX TO VICIv.SBUIK;. 69 

■^ixth. Each iiiijlu it would phiy until "tattoo." 'J'hey would play 
** Bonnie iUue Flag/' "Dixie," etc., calling out cheers from both 
sides. 

An exciting scene occurred at tlie Insane asylum when the 
assault Avas made at that point. The inmates were terribly excited, 
and were seen at the windows shouting to the soldiers. None were 
liurt, though several balls went through the building. 

Just before daylight on the 21st, a man was brought to the 
lieadquarters of the Forty-sixtli, who said he was just from town, 
and that the rebels were evacuating. The man was sent to the 
quarters of General Blair, and in a few minutes a division was on 
the march for the city. 

The rebels had, before leaving, set fire to many warehouses. 
The conflagration spread, and in a short time the principal part of 
the town was m flames. Across Pearl river xhe rebels had buried 
torpedoes. Only four of them exploded. A horse, drawing a cart 
■containing a man, two women and two children, struck a torpedo 
with his foot and exploded it. The horse, cart and people were 
■distributed over the road. Rebels, with shovels and picks, were 
j)ut to work digging out the dangerous missiles. 

On the 21 St tlie army was employed on the railroads. The 
rails \\'ere torn up and twisted around trees and telegraph poles, 
and the ties were piled and burned. 

On the same day the division started back toward Vicksburg. 
Tlie regiiiient reached Raymond at 5 o'clock. The men were very 
much fatigued. Many did not reach camp until late at night. On 
the 22d the mai'ch was to Jilack river, with lialf the regiment 
lichind. On the next dav, the regiment started for Vicksl>urg, ten 
miles distant, and reached there about noon. 

This hard march was witliout necessity. Hie columns ■w ere 
puslied through at a rate far beyond the ability of the men, and 
against posit)\ e orders. Five miles west of ]5olton tlie regiment 
was deluged with rain, and witnessed the killing of two Wisconsin 
men by lightning. 

On reaching the river, the regiment went into camj> just below 
tlie city. A number of commissions were found awaiting several 
■oliicers and men of the Forty-sixth, but as the regiment had been 
reduced below the minimum, many of those promoted could not be 
luuslcred. This situation was unfortunate. Many of the men 
promoted had rendered excellent service, and deserved their 
commissions, but the order was inexorabh- and could not be evaded. 



70 THE FORTY-SIXTH INDIANA. 

Furloughs were given the men at the rate of one in twenty. 
;Many officers rCvsigned. 

The sick list was small. The men had become inured to 
exposure and hardship, and were able for anything. Many of the 
^vounded rejoined, among them Adjutant Watts, whose recovery 
seemed a miracle. 

The Union loss in killed and wounded in the Vieksburg cam- 
paign, exclusive of the last Jackson expedition, was 8,807. The 
rebel loss in the .same time was 56,000 men killed, wounded and. 
prisoners, 260 cannon, 60,000 small arms and immense stores. 

Under orders, the regiment shipped on board the '-.Baltic,"' on 
the 4th of August, with the Twenty-ninth Wisconsin, for Katchez. 



CHAPTER V. 

Vacancies axd Promotions. — Xatcup:/.. — Algiers. — Berwick Bay. — 
Brasiieak. — Grand Chotf.au. — General r)ri:i5Rii)i;E. — Vermiij.ion- 
vii.LE. — Lake Mai-ripas. — Madisonvii,lk. — Another ExrEDiTiON. 
August. 1S63- January, 1801. 

AUGUST 22, 1SG3, First Lieutenant John T. Castle, of Com- 
pany 15, resigned; Corporal Theodore P. Forgey was com- 
missioned in his place. 

The "Baltic" was one of the IMarine Brigade boats, a trans- 
port fitted up for general purposes. It Avas amphibious, intended 
for operations on both land and water. It had artillery on wheels 
and Avith horses. It was heavily barricaded against ritle balls. 
This boat was not able to hold two regiments, but the orders were 
to put them on, and it had to be done. The Forty-sixth was on 
by 10 o'clock. The TwentA'-ninlh was hardly on by daylight. 
All of the Forty-sixth's jiropcrty was on except the wagons. 
With six other boats, the "Baltic" started at 6 o'clock. At 
4 o'clock r. M. the tleet was at Natcliez, and at 7 o'clock the regi- 
ment was on its camp ground, waiting for the wagons. Two were 
finally borrowed and a portion of the property brought up. In the 
morning the remainder came. By the Tth of Augu.<t, the reginient 
was comfortabh' fixed in good quarters. 

Up to the liith, the regiment remained enjoying a well earned 
rest, when orders came for a removal. At 5 i". m. of that date, 
three wagons were borrowed, and the regiment, with the Eleventh 
Indiana, loaded on the "Ues xVrc." By 8 o'clock everything was 
on board except the men of the Forty-sixth. The boat being 
crowded, it was thought pleasanler on the ground. A three hours' 
rain in the night discounted the conclusion considerably. Just at 
daylight the regiment marched through town and onto the boat. 
The " Des Arc'' was found to be the successor of the "Golden 
State," the boat on which some of our coiiipnnies came dii^n the 



7- THE PNDETV-SIXTH I.NDIAXA. 

OIlio in 1SG2. Suiue of the same ollict'r.s were on the new boat, 
and tliey were much pleased to meet tlie Forty-sixtli. 

The boat stopped a short time ai Port Hudson, and rounded 
to live miles .ibove New Orleans at 8 o'clock, on the 17th of August. 

Up lo the I2lh of September, the regiment enjoyed a good 
rest. Occasional rumors of- sundry expeditions excited their appre- 
hensions, but nothing serious until, on the 12th, an order for a 
march came. The regiiuent was at its very best. The men had 
good clothes, and an abundance of camp equipage, and were in 
good health. The order to move was not really unwelcome, for 
the boys were anxious to see what else the Confederacy had. 

On tiie 22d and 21)th of August, and on the •ith of September, 
grand reviews were held by Generals Grant and Banks. There 
was a splendid display, and the regiment received as much atten- 
tion as any. In the line were forty regiments of infantry, a thou- 
sand cavalrymen and eighty ]>ieces of artillery. On the 4th of 
September, General Grant, while riding at high speed, ran into a 
carriage, was thrown from his horse and severely injured. 

The regiment left Carrollton with the Twenty-fourth and the 
right wing of the Eleventh, on the "]Meteor." In an hour they 
were landed at Algiers, opposite New Oi^leans, and at the eastern 
terminus of the New Orleans and Opclousas railroad. The regi- 
ment laid down along the track, and at midnight, M'itli the Twenty- 
four tli, boarded a train of fifteen Hat cars f(n' Brashear City. The 
cars werf already loaded with pork and crackers, and the men had 
to accommodate themselves on the barrels and boxes. The train 
started with the loudest yells the inen could give. The Algerine^ 
T.ore alarmed, and their teri'or was not deo'ea^ed on learning that 
more western men wei'e passing through their town. 

. Bra^liear City was reached at fi o'clock. The sun was inxensely 
hot. The men sought shelter under anything that ollered a shade, 
and the early part of the day was spent in trying to keep cool. 

A new battle flag was received from Governor Morton while 
the regiment was at ])ra>hear. 

At Carrollton, orders were issued cutting baggage down to 
the smallest possible quantity. The order said: "Personal baggage 
will be reduced to a valise or carpet bag and a roll of blankets for 
oacli officer. No cots or bedsteads will be taken, or tables or 
chairs. A me.ss chest of 100 pounds will be allowed to each mess 
of three to live otlicers, and 2r)0 poun<]s to from six to ten othcers. 
Rubber blankets will be issued to the m(>n." 



EU.VSHEAR. TriE "NEAV HOOSIEES. i6 

Being Avitbout tents, the men built slieltei-s out of tlie scant 
material at hand. A number of wagons and guns bad been 
destroyed by the rebels, when they recaittured the {)]ace some time 
before. The remairiing material awis collected, and, with tlie 
blankets and ponchoes, passable sb'dters were constructed. 

A colored regiment, mnnbering a thousand, belonging to the 
Kineteenth Corps, was at 15i-ashear." The men were stout and 
hearty, and spoke French. 

Previous to the recent advent of troops, the place had been 
occupied by eastern regiments — " Nutmegs," the residents called 
them. Wlien the Twenty-tirst IiidiaTia (artillery) came, its men 
were the first "lloosiers'' that had been seen, and the people, 
taken -svitli their manners, so ditferent from the "Nutmegs," trans- 
ferred their regards to the former. 'I'lds was especially the case 
AV'ith the ladies, a few of whom resided at Berwick. When the 
I'liiid Brigade arrived, another elem.ent was felt at Berwick. The 
"New iloosiers"" were diiTerent from the others. They were 
• excessively familiar and sociable. The chief establishment in town 
was the "hotel," where some of the officers of the other regiments 
boarded. Attached to the hotel was a "bar," but the sale of 
licpiors to soldiers had been forbid<len by the provost marshal. 
Some sales were made, however, on the sly. The lady }»roprietor 
obeyed the order as against the " Ne\'.' Iloosiers," wliich naturally 
irritated those gentlen^cn. Retaliation was determined upon. 
Late one night a party came in front of the gallery and serenadcil 
the ladies. They sang the new war songs, and delighted the audi- 
ence. In the meantime, another squad had gone into the bar-room 
and rolled out several l);irrels of beer and othe'r liixui-jes. 'I'he i»ro- 
prietress, suspecting a flank movement, went into the house and 
discovered the depredation. She became frantic, and was taken 
in charge by a friendly regimental surgeon, wlio did his best to 
pacify the irate lady. The good doctor turned u])on the ineu and 
severely denounced their conduct, lie gave them a terrible lecture. 
■ The men listened with the most res])ectful attention, and the young 
ladies gavo the doctor tin; most profuse thanks for his gallant inter- 
ference. The despoiled ))roprietress believed in the reformatory 
influences of the doctor's service, and was reganling him as her 
best friend, when a young darkey ran up and announced that the 
"New Iloosiers'" were again in the bar-room. \Vhik' a portion of 
the men were deluding the doctor and the ladies with a penitential 
hearing of hi^ lecture, another s>|uad had utterly sacked the 



74 THE FORTY-SIXTH INDIANA. 

prt'iiiises. The duct(n- did not take brt-akfast at the hotel the next- 
morning, as he was regarded as an accomplice in the dei>redation. 
Tlie entire division crossed the bayou the 2Sth of September 
and took up temporary quarters in the town of Berwick. The- 
first experience of the regiment there was a dismal rain of three 
days" duration. Tlie ground was inundated. Messes that had 
built up shelters were comj)elled to roost upon them to keep dry. 
The sun appeared the third day, and, with the wind, gave the- 
place a difi'erent look. 

Orders came to march on the -ith, and were received by the 
men with acclajuation. Other orders changed the date to the 8d, 
on which day, at 7 o'clock, the regiment was on the road. Each 
regiment had four wagons, in which were carried cooking utensils, 
provisions and ammunition. No tents were to be seen. The pro- 
visions were hard bread, coffee and salt. The other articles were- 
to be " procured." 

The regiment reached Centreville, sixteen miles, the first day. 
On the next, Franklin Avas made — twelve n\iles. The boys 
a{)]n'oved of P^ranklin and would liked to have stayed there, and 
the people fancied tlie "Hoosiers." 

On the 5th of October the regiment marched twelve mile? and 
went into camp on a large plantation owned by a Frenchman. An 
extensive sugar mill, with all tlie a)>pliance.s for raising cane and 
making sugar, m ere part of the institution. For some reason great 
care was taken of this property. Orders were issued forbidding 
the burning of rails, killing of sheep or cattle, or the commission 
of any of the usual excesses often indrdged in by the soldiers. 

' ])urliig the day orders were sent to all the colonels to place 
a guard in front of the regiments at the halt in the evening, to 
prevent the burning of rails, etc. This was considered, by the 
soldiers, a great invasion of their franchise. Great dissatisfaction 
was expressed. Just before the halt, the colonel of tlie Forty-sixth 
liad a conference with the captains, when it was arranged that the 
men should be informed that the guard would not be called for if" 
the rails and other property on the regiment's front M'ere not 
disturbed, and the otKcers obtained from the men promises 
accordingly. 

At the halt, the brigade stacked arms in line. In all the- 
regiments, the "orderly's call" was heard, and the regiments 
prepared the recpiired guard. In the meantime, the Forty-sixth 
people were skirmishing for wood and provisions, and by the time- 



or.EYiNT, or:i>ERs. 75 

the guards of the other regiments M'ore out there was nothiug to 
be protected. 

It was not long before tlie genernUs orderly came in and 
notified all the colonels that their presence v,as desired at head- 
fjuarters, and those otKcers met and repaired to the general's 
quarters. On tlie road much speculation was indulged in as to the 
pur])Ose of the call, ^sone could guess. iJut Colonel ]\[cCauley, of 
the Eleventh, puinting to the brigade line, suggested that the 
absence of fences on tlie line had something to do with the 
business. 

General McGinnis was found pacing before his tent in an irate 
condition. He was as straight as a te.nt pole, and held his head 
in the position of a very angry soldier. The othccrs approached 
and respectfully saluted. The general said: " Gentlemen, did you 
happen to get an order this morning requiring the posting of 
guards on the halt, this evening?'' and all responded: "We did, 
sir." Then said the general: "How was the order obeyed? 
Look at the brigade front. The fences are all gone." The colonel 
of the Forty-sixth modestly referred the general to the fence on 
the front of his regiment, and suggested that he be excepted from 
the general censure. ^Looking over and shading liis eyes with his 
hand, the general said: "les, the Forty-sixth has obeyed the 
order. It is the only regiment that has done so. It has its fences- 
intact," Some very pointed remaiks v.-ere then made to the 
delin<juent colonels on the general subject of obedience to orders, 
and the officers were sent back to their regiments. Those diso- 
bedient oflleers always, afterward, insisted that while they were 
detailing guards, as oi'dered, the Forty-sixth pe(q>lo carried oil all 
tlie rails on their fronts, and left them without fences to guard 
and subject to censure for the work of the Forty-sixth. 

The regiment was called on that night f or " a good, honest 
company" to guard a large tlock of sheey) that was on the premises. 
Coinj)any I was detailed. It was afterward charged, by envious 
persctus in other regiments, that seventeen head of fat sheep were 
carried into the Forty-sixth's camp in the night — so jealous were 
some of the good reputation of an honest com|,>any. The proprie- 
tor manifested his gratitude for the care taken of his property by 
presenting tlie field otlicers, the next morning, with a fine dressed 
sheep for consumj»tion during the day's march. 

Somebody brought a goose info the field quarters the same- 
night, and as there was a siiperabiwitlanre of nu:it already on hand 



'76 THE FOfMY-SIXTII IXDIAXA. 

it v/as artistically cooke'l, and, with a polite note, sent to General 
MeGinnis as a fruit of obedience to orders; the goose, as alleged, 
having been caught in the fence preserved under general orders. 
On the march the next day General ]McGinTiis was unusually 
sedate, but his staff otficers that evening confessed that the goose 
■was good, and much enjoyed even by the General. 

On the evening of the 5th the brigade overtook the Nineteenth 
•Corps and camped three miles from New Iberia. 

The First Division of the Thirteenth Corpus passed Iberia on 
the Gth. The Fourth canie^up and encamped near Iberia on the 
same day. On the morning of the 10th the Fourth Division "was 
• on the road westward. No regiment in the division had di'awn 
rations for several days, and none were in a condition to march. 
The last day's march of the Forty-sixth covered twenty-four miles, 
nineteen of Avliich were without water. Camp was reached after 
dark, and tl\e men as they came in were loaded Avith chickens and 
potatoes gathered along the road. 

When daylight came, on the 11th, the men were astonished 
and enchanted with the scene before tlieia. They looked, over a 
broa<l prairie, covered "with a luxuriant crop of tall grass, "just 
the thing for beds." Innumerable cattle were grazing, unconscious 
of the arrival of the Iloosiers. The plain Mas fringed Avitli tijuber 
and cultivated {dantations. The crack of a hundred i-itles raised 
the impression that a skirmish was on, but it was only a skirmish 
for steaks for breakfast. 

On the 12th the brigade camped, for a short stay. A school 
for field ofHcers and brigade drills was instituted. 

On the morning of the ]r>th tiring was ln-ard in front. Again, 
at noon, artillery was heard, and at 1 o'clock orders came for an 
advance. At 3 o'clock the First Brigade took the road and 
marched until midnight, nineteen miles. An attack had been 
made on General Weitzell, but he had driven the rebels olr. 

On the morning of the IGth the brigade moved a mile for- 
Avard and encan\])ed on a fine jirairie. The brigade had just 
broken ranks when a distui'bance occurred in front. Cavalry carae 
•dashing over the plain. Rebel cannon in the timber were tiring. 
The brigade line moved forward, and the cannon opened on the 
-enemy, '^llie artillery and cavalry moved up and found the rebel.s 
trying to get a large drove of cattle out of the Avoods. After a 
'brief fight, the rebels retreated Avith a few of the cattle, leaving 
the most of them for us. 



OPELOUSAS. KURBKIDGE. 7T 

Ou the 17th tlie regiment received orders to encamp near tlie 
quarters of General Franklin, and to do picket duty. In an hoiu ■ 
the regiment was in its new c]uarters. Pickets were l'ui-ni.shed 
toward Opelousas and Grand Clioteau. 

A leconnoissanee was made on the 19th by a cavalry force sjip- 
portcd by the Thirty-fourth Indiana. They went eight miles and 
found the rebels, skirmished and drove them. 

On the 20th the 2!sineteenth Corps marclied, with our First 
Brigade in advance. Some cavalry had gone before. The remain- 
der of the 'J'hiid Division was in reserve. The negro regiment of 
engineers was on the right of the brigade, and marched in perfect 
order, singing "John Brown."' Two hundred and fifty of these- 
men carried arras, the remainder cleared aM'ay obstructions. 

Tlie rebels were posted in a wood, and there ^\■as enough of 
them to make a good fight, but tiiey Hed. Genornl Franklin roilc- 
behind the regiment on the advance, and complimented the men 
for their precise movements. In the presence of the commander 
it is to be supposed the regiment showed off some. The brigade 
went through Opelousas and turned off to Barre's landing, where- 
it arrived tlie same evening. 

Barre's landing is on the Bayou Cortableaux. The diver-; 
sion was made here in the hope of getting supplies by the bayou, 
but as that was found impracticable, the brigade rejoined the- 
column on the 29th. 

On the return of the expedition from 0})clousas, tlie First 
Division, under General Burbridge, was left at the camp formerly 
occupied by the Fir.-t ond Third Di\isions, eight miles from that 
tov\-n. Tlio Third ],)i^ ifiuii camped about Unx-f mik-s ca-t of thul 
camp. Between the two divisions there was a ])lain, or prairie, 
three miles wide, bounded on the right by timber. 'J'he First was 
on Carancro bayou. 

On the 2d of Xovember, Burbridge was attacked by a rebel 
force, which he defeated, but our division was marched nearlv to- 
the scene of action. On the same day, our forage trains were 
driven in. At a house in sight of the camp a captain of the 
Tweiily-eightli Iowa was killed. Three men of the same regiment 
and two of th'- Tiiirty-fourth were killed in the same neighborhood.. 
The captain was in charge of a small guard, and seeing a squad of 
Federals, as he supposed, ahead, rode up and .saluted them. They 
were dressed in blue. They surrounded and shot him, and robbed-. 
him even of his clotiies. 



iS THE FORTY-SIXTH INDIANA. 

Oil tbo 3d, after a few cannon shots, a courier rode in and 
reported that the rebels were making another attack, and it was 
apprehended that a general engagement would result. The divi- 
sion was called in line, but another courier reporting that Burbridge 
had driven the rebels back again, the men M'cre dismissed. 

The First iJrigade was encani}ied in lino of battle on the right 
of tlie road, the Twenty-fourth on the right and the Forty-sixth 
on the left. So decisive were the indications of a battle, that the 
colonel had the men stack arms in line and cook and remain close 
to the guns. The men had an early diniser and it was quicklv 
eaten. 

At noon sharp firing was heard in front. An aide of General 
Washburn's \vas seen riding rapidly toward the brigade, bare- 
headed and waving iiis hat. Tlie Forty-sixth was instantly ordered 
in line, and, in a few minutes, was marching by column up the 
road. Going a short dis^tance, the regiment was overtaken by an 
aide of General Cameron, who ordered the colonel to halt and 
await the pa>fsing of tlie brigade and resume his proper position in 
the column. The colonel respectfully said that he would go on a 
short distance and await the brigade, and give the men the benefit 
of the rest. 

The regiment marched on rapidly for two miles, when men, 
"wagon trains and artillery were seen dashing out of the woods. 
Rebel cavalrymen were seen striking teamsters and artillervmen 
with tlieir sabers. A mule team dashed through and over all 
opposition. Batteries of artillery rushed from the wood-?. Many 
of them were overtaken l>y tin;- rebels and the men kilkd. 

Of the ai-tillcry, two guns of the Secoi'd r^Iassacliuj^etts Bat- 
tery made straight for the regiment, followed closely by the rebel 
■cavalry. By this time the regiment was './ithin shot. The line 
was formed, and the men laid on the ground and went to woi-k. 
The two Massachusetts guns reached the regiment's right, and the 
gunners felt satistiffl to be safe. They declined tiring because 
tliey iiad no water, but they discovered that lire was more neces- 
sary to their safety than water. Both soon got into action, and 
did good service. Tlie ra})id tiring of the regiment and the two 
guns chocked the rL-bels and drove them to the woods. Shortly 
after this, the remainder of the brigade arrived. It was ordered 
to await the arrival of the Second Brigade before pursuing the 
rebels. This was tlie mistake, for when the Second came the 
rebels were on the i<iad to Opelousas. At tlie close of the action. 



CAREXCRO. 79 

Generals Wasl)burn and Cameron rode up to tlie regiment and 
thanked the men for their prompt and timely service, and compli- 
mented them on their general efficiency. The regiment liad none 
killed in this engagement. The wounded were: John J. Viney, 
of Comjjany A; James Luzader, of Company G, and John Howell, 
of Company F. 

Jiurbridge's loss was eighteen killed and 100 wounded. Four 
hundred prisoners M'ere taken. An entire regiment in Burbridge's 
division was captured. 

The rebels had over 100 killeil. 'J'weuty dead and twelve 
wounded were found in the woods 0}i[)0site the position of the 
Forty-sixth. 

During the tight the rebel cavalry moved around on the 
flanks and attacked the camps, but were driven off. 

The camp property of Burbridge's division was all destroyed. 

On the day after the fight General Burbridge personally 
thanked the Forty-sixth for its timely assistance. 

On the night of the battle the entire army came back to the 
•camp previously occupied by the Third Division, and on the morn- 
ing of the Gth all were on the road toward Berwick. A rebel force 
of 8,000 kept close to us. The column was long. The Nineteenth 
Corps was in front. The last of our division crossed and burned 
the bridge at 9 o'clock, and was fired on by the rebels. 

After a march of five miles the rebels made another attack, 
and compelled us to halt and form line of battle, but the enemy 
kept off. 

On the night of tiie 5l.h, the entire camp Asas ar(;ased by the 
explosion of a shell in the quarter.- of the Fuity-sixlh regimi.-!U. 
Charles l^aum, of CompaTiy E, taking advantage of a lull in busi- 
ness, iindertook the bulling of a piece of beef to enable him to keep 
up on the march the next da}-. lie had ])ropped up his camp kettle 
with a shell that he had found near the fire. The shell had not 
Ijeen exploried, and about 10 o'clock,, as lianm was on his knees, 
bloM'ing the coals, the fuse became ignited and the shell went off. 
'J'he kettle and the beef also went off. Baum was rolled over 
several times, but received no injury except having his eyes filled 
Avith dirt. As a large force of the enemy was close, an attack M'as 
expected, and the general otHcers, with their aides, were dashing 
-about in search of the cause of the alarm. Baum was in search of 
his beef, but in neither case was the search successful. 

The head of the column reached \'ermillioii\iUe aViout 10 



!<• ;.'! 



80 THE voiny-sixTU intiiana. 

o'clock. It jiassod on tlirough town and encamped three miles 
beyond. An infantry guard of twenty-tivc Avas left in town to 
guard some bosjKtal stores. The Forty-sixth was stopped and 
directed to remain on the edge of town until the property in it 
was remo\ed. It rained in tonents. The regiment made the best 
quarters possible, and watched for the rebels. A train of wagons, 
containing some forty bales of cotton, was levied on and iield for 
defensive purposes. In the afternoon tlie sun came out, and the 
place had a better look. The night Avas passed without disturb- 
ance, tliough it was certain that there were 10,000 rebels within 
three miles, preparing to take the regiment in. 

Fires were made from fences, and the njon made themselves 
conifortalde for the night. At daylight earnest preparations were 
begun to add to the general security of the position. There was a 
brigiit, warm sun, and blankets and clothing were dried. There 
Mas nothing on tlie flanks. The picket was one of the companies 
and twenty-five cavalrymen. The territory thus protected was 
small, and the regiment v\'as kept together and constantly under 
arms. 

Toward noon the real character of the position became mani- 
fest. From the steeple of the church the rebels were in full view. 
They were seen arriving and settling down in temporary quarters, 
while complete and compact lines were visible for over a mile 
across the regiment's front. Residents were coming in, reporting 
the situation outside, and always in the highest colors. These 
Avere sent back to Genera.l Franklin. Two hundred yards in front 
of the regimeiit, in a cottage, Avas >cen ]io.-ted a squad of rebel 
scouts, obscivin'4" the Inderal positimi. On being disri-vered, it 
Avas driven oft. Tiii-^ created great excitement in ttiv>n. TheJ'e 
Avas a general j>ackiiig up, and a desire to get out. The position 
of the people betAveen tlu' tAvo armies Avas not encouraging. 

At 5 o'clock the sight froui the steeple was grand. The 
})rairie in front presented au aiva of many miles. ^Vithin three 
miles the rebels were visible without the glass, and Avith the glass- 
far beyond that distajice. All were evidently ready for business. 
Three mihs to the rear, tin; Federal army Avas in sight. The tAvo 
army corps had been in line most of the day. Now, at sunset, the 
clearest hour of the day, the heavy, dark lines of infantry, each 
regiment distinguished by its flag, was distinctly seen, Avhile the- 
heavy batteric-, witli their bright guns in line, and the squadrons- 
of cavalry mo\ ip.g about, aibled life and meaning to the scene. 



VERMILLION VILLE. 81 

Midway between tbese great points of interest, and watched 
closely by both, v,-as a line of 300 men, quietly awaiting the approach 
of the rebels, or of night, when they might prepare defenses, \\ ith- 
out being seen by the spies near by. 

xVs soon as it was dark, the C(.)tton bales were rolled into posi- 
tion and active spades completed an ample protection by 10 
o'cloelc. 

The defense being tlnislied, tlie regiment >vas marched in and 
eacli man's phice assigned him, when the regiment went back to its 
former position, to remain until 3 o'clock, when they were to get 
behind the cotton to surprise the rebels, who woidd, naturally,, 
attack tlie original position. 

At 1 o'clock the regiiuent was called in. As it marched 
through t()wn, the rebel cavalry followed and remained until day- 
light, when tlie I'ederal cavalry drove them out. 

The cotton taken for defenses by the regiment was, in ISSO, 
claimed by a Frenchman pretending to be loyal. He sued for its 
value in the Federal Court of Claims, and recovered ^ilO.UOO. 

Lewis -Messner, of Company K, and John Clingin, of Com))any 
G, were captured, two miles from Vermillionville, on the 12th of 
November. They were exchanged about January S. 

The regiment took its jjlace in the brigade line at Vermillion- 
ville bayou, near daylight, on the 8th of November, where the 
army remained, occasionally skirmishing with the rebels, until the 
morning of the iGth, when it cpiietly packed up and moved olf. 
The pickets were kej't out until the last monient, and New Ibei'ia 
was reached without any interference from the rel)els. Lake 
.^lauripas is six miles from ll>erla. The division enca)n}ied there 
the iirst ilay, and leisurely marclied to Iberia the next. Here tl;e 
rebels made their ap}>earance. A^ the division reached camp, two 
wagons of the Forty-sixth, out for forage, with five men, were 
caj'tured. Sliortly afterward a large force appeared and were 
driven olf with ."-lu'lls. 

On the 19th the regiment , went across the Teche as an escort 
to a forage train. Saw rebels at a distance. 

At midniglit of the 19th had orders to fall in at 3 o'clock, 
with eighty rounds and no l)aggage. The regiment was in line 
promptly, and, with the brigade and a squadron of cavalry, started 
for a rebel force, >aid to be at Camp Pratt, near Lake Mauripas, 
Just before daylight the advance ran ujton the picket, captured it 
and ^urrounded the camj;. 



82 THE FORTV-SIXTII INDIANA, 

Tbe rebels ^^eve caught asleep, aiiJ the entire force, except 
two men, captured. The commandant, a major, -was one of the 
unlucky ones. Two rebels a\ ere killed and twelve wounded. One 
hundred men, and t\\ elve couunissioned ollicers, were niounted on 
mule.'i and taken to camp. Two or three of the smaller men were 
assigned to one mule. The brigade, with the prisoners and two 
bands of music, passed through the cam]) of the division, and was 
greeted with hearty shouts. 

Thanksgiving Day was duly observed in camp by the Third 
Division. A platfurm was built in front of headquarters, and the 
ten regiment^, with visitors from other divisions, assembled in the 
morning and had a sermon, prayers, music by two bands and sin»>-- 
ing of religious and patriotic songs by the congregation. Then 
tliere were speeches by men and otticers. On this occasion everv 
soldier held his gun, and all %vere ready to repel an assault that was 
constantly jioiisible. In the afternoon a grand horse race came oil". 
The same ceremonies common on such occasions at home were 
observed. On both occasions of the day the rebels were visible, 
watching, at a safe distance^ the doings of the division. At the 
Thanksgiving meeting the "Veteran"' subject was largely dis- 
cussed and favorably considered. 

The regiment remained at New Iberia until the 19th of Decem- 
ber, Avhen the line of march was taken up for Brashear City. As 
the brigade passed the quarters of General Franklin, the boys gave 
him three rousing cheers, and when they came to the camp of the 
Nineteenth Corps the "Nutmegs" were given a parting yell, such 
as they so heartily despised. 

^ At }'>erwick the division occupied the ground fovmorlv held by 
the Fourth. 

On tilt.' 2-^d the First l>rigade was ferried over the bay to 
Brashear, and the Twenty-fourth and Eleventh went on the cars to 
Algiers. The Forty-sixth and a battalion of the Twenty-ninth 
Wisconsin went on the train at noon, on the 22d, in a heavv rain, 
and reached Algiers at S o'clock in the evening, when the men 
found dry spots along the railroad and slept. The "Veteran" 
subject again came up, and was warmly discussed. 

On the 29th of December, Companits C, F, H and I shipped 
on a steamer for Texas. Landed at Matagorda bav, where they 
met the Seventy-seventh Illinois and the Thirteenth and Fifteenth 
Maine. Remained two weeks, when they returned to Madisonville. 

On the 19th of Januarv the Eleventh and Fortv-sixth were 



MADISOXVILLE. 83 

ferried to the Lake Pontclinrtrain railroad, by ^\-hich they were 
transported to the lake, whore tliey embarked on a steamer for 
3Iadisonville, where they arrived at 9 o'clock and went into camp. 

The regiment remained at Madisonville mitil the 27th of 
Pebruary. Its history there was uneventful. There was no enemy 
in the vicinity, and but little duty to perform. Considerable work 
was done on earthworks, but not more than enough for exercise. 

Leaving Madisonville, the regiment went back to Algiers. 
Here the " Veteran" movement was perfected. Three hundred and 
seven men re-enlisted, dating January 2, 1SG4. The non-veterans 
were assigned to the Twenty-ninth Wisconsin, and, subsequentlv, 
to Yarner's Battalion. 

Orders were received to ]>repare for a march west on tlie 3d 
of March. They were received with great dissatisfaction bv all. 
It was expected that the regiment Avould remain at Algiers until 
the promised fuj'Iough could be had. The Eleventh, Twenty-fourth, 
Thirty-fourth and Forty-seventh had gone home, and the boys 
felt dissatisfied in being obliged to give up their anticipated 
pleasure and enter upon a protracted and dangerous service. Like 
good soldiers, however, they obeyed the order. 

Of the Thirteenth Corps, the Third and Fourth Divisions 
only Avent. The others were in Texas. Of the Third Division, 
the four regiments before mentioned M'ere absent. The corps was 
commanded by General Ransom. The Nineteenth Corps Avas 
complete and commanded by General Franklin. This portion of 
the expedition started from Algiers, another from Yicksbui'g. A 
fleet of gunboats ond niojiitors went up Red river. The nrmv was 
•commanded by General Dauks, the navy under Commodore.- Porter. 



' ( ■> 



(fy/ fo 



CHAPTER VI. 

A'acancies and Puomotions. — llv.v RivKR ExPEDiTiox. — Sabine C'ltoss 
Roads. — Pleasant Hill. — Gkand Ecoke. — Alexandria. — Bcild- 
ING TUE D.oi. — Bayou Rai-ids Bhidge. — Yellow Bayou. — Atcha- 

FALAYA. — MOKOANZA. — GENERAL E.MORY. — VeTEKAN FURLOUGIT. — 

March -June. 1864. 

BETWEEX March and June, 1S64-, tbe following vacancies 
and promotions occurred: 

Captain Joseph C. Plurab, of Company F, resigned March 2, 
1SG4; he was succeeded by Lieutenant Michael Rader. Ser- 
geant George "W". Yates was commissioned first lieutenant. 

Second Lieutenant Jacob lludlow, of Company I, was killed at 
Sabine Cross Roads, April 8, 18(14. No promotion. 

First Lieutenant John McCIung, of Company K, was killed at 
Sabine Cross Roads, A^iril 8, 1Sl!4. Lieutenant Chester Chamber- 
lain was commissioned captain, and George C. Horn first lieutenant. 

That portion of tlie colunm in which was the Forty-sixth left 
Algiers on the Gth of March, A brief diary of the marcli will 
now be suih clout: 

March C>. Left Algiers, arrived at Bra.vliear City and cros.sed 
Ijer\vick bay same day. 

March 7 to 12. Li camp. 

13. ]\Lirelied sixteen miles to Boreland"s plantation. 

14. Five miles beyond Franklin. 

15. In camp. 

16. jNLirched to within six miles of New Iberia. 

17. Seventeen miles to Spanish lake. 

18. Fifteen miles to Vermillion bayou. 

19. To Camp Fair View, near Grand Choteau, eighteen miles. 

20. Eighteen miles to a point two miles beyond "Washington. 
Camped on Bayou Cortabieaux. 

21. In camp. 



'. i 



86 



THE FOKTY-SIXTH INDIANA. 



22. Sixteen miles and camped on Bayou Beof. 

23. Still on Bayou Beof. Twenty-three miles. 

24. Fourteen miles. Camped near a saw-mill. 

25. Fourteen miles. Camped on a rebel captain's plantation.. 
2G. Six miles beyond Alexandria, on the Bayou Rapids. 

27. In camp. The cavalry routed the enemy and captured 
some prisoners. 

28. Eighteen miles on the Bayou Eapids. 

29. Fifteen miles. Encamped on Big Cane. 

30. In camp. 

31. Sixteen miles, on Little Cain. 

April 1. To Natchitoches, twenty-two miles. 
2 to 5. In camp, in rear of town. 

6. Fifteen miles, to Oak Bottoms. 

7. To Pleasant Hill, twenty miles. 

8. Fifteen miles, to Sabine Cross Roads. 

On leaving Algiers, all superfluous and considerable necessary- 
baggage was left. The regiment traveled lighter than ever before. 
The men had no tents, and were expected to make shelter with- 
their ponchoes and blankets. It was not many days before even 
those articles were thrown away. 

On the march toward Alexandria the route laid over the same 
road already twice travele<l by the Forty-sixth. This march was 
enlivened by frequent attacks by the rebels, and the knowledge- 
that a serious battle would be fought. 

At many points on the road where it was supposed it might ' 
occur, the promised "veteran furlough'" was looked for. At 
Natchitoches hope tied, and ihe subject was dropped. 

On the night of the Tth of April, 1SG4, the Thirteenth and 
Nineteenth Corps encamped at Pleasant Hill, nineteen miles from 
Mansfield, or Sabine Cross Roads. The cavalry near this point 
overtook the rebel rear guard, under General Green, and after a 
brief skirmish drove the rebels forward, killing thirty and wound- 
ing sixty men, General Lee's loss being twenty killed and tifty 
wounded. The cavalry then moved on about six miles, and went 
into camp. The infantry force mentioned was well concentrated 
and in high spirits. The baggage and supply trains were well up, 
and the artillery was conveniently parked. Long lines of camp- 
fires gleamed brightly through the thick pine forest. Groups of 
dusty men with high hopes sang patriotic songs around blazing 
pine faggots, while others re]>osed on the soft carpet of leaves,. 



SABINE CROSS KOADS. 87 

dreaming of homo and those who were there watching" for their 
retnrn, little thinking that tlie next niglit w<">uld tind them hurry- 
ing to the same s}iot, broken and scattered, with many lying stiff 
in death, or, with mangled limbs, in the hands of a heartless and 
exaspei'ated foe. A hapjty, joyous night was soon to be turned to 
a day of mourning. 

On the 8th, the sun rose bright in a cloudless sky, ushering in 
a beautiful but to the Union army a disastrous day. At 5 
o'clock, the Fourth Division of the Thirteenth Army Corps, com- 
manded by Colonel Landrum, of the Nineteenth Kentucky, moved 
forward to support the cavalry. At 6 o'clock the Third Division, 
under General R. A. Cameron, numbering, exclusive of train 
guards, about 1,200 men, folloM'ed. After this force came the 
supply ti-ains of the 'Thirteenth Corps. 

At 7 o'clock, Genera! Emoiy, with one division of the Nine- 
teenth Coi-ps, followed b}- the remaining trains of the army, moved 
out. The remainder of tlie Nineteenth Corps, wdiich was the bulk 
of the army present, followed under Major General l^'ranklin. 
The train numbered over GOO wagons, of which those of the gener- 
al's stalf formed no inconsiderable portion. 

The road over which this enormous train was to pass was a 
narrow, tortuous passage, through a dense pine forest — so narrow 
in many places that a single horseman could scarcely pass the moA*- 
ing wagons. The rear guard of the army did not get away until 
after 12 o'clock. At this time the Sixteenth Corps, under General 
A. J. Smith, was on the road from Grand Ecore, Avhere it had dis- 
embarked from boats. 

. About 7 o'clock the c.i^.alry discovered the enemy, about 5,000 
strong, posteil on a deep V>ayou, eiglit nriles from Pleasant Hill 
— a position chosen for the advantage which it gave to them. 
A brisk skirmish ensued — on our side principally with carbines, 
our cavalry being dismounted. The Fourth Division was hurried 
forward and the enemy soon dislodged and driven back. The 
contest here was brief but lierce. The enemy fell back slowly, 
stubbornly contesting tlie ground, closely pursued by the cavalry 
and the small body of infantry. A running fight was kept up for 
a distance of eight miles, when, at 2 o'clock, tlie enemy, after 
passing a plantation of 000 acres, made a determined stand. A 
council of war was now held, at which were General Banks and all 
the general otlicers. It was projiosed to go into camp, issue rations 
and give the Sixteenth and Nineteenth Corps time to get up, and 



88 THE FORTY-SIXTH INDIAXA. 

bo j)rej»ared on tlie next inoniing U) light llie battle that now 
appeared inevitable. U'his wise jtroposition was overrulod, and 
General Lee was ordered to jjusli the enemy. It was argued that 
the enemy was not in foix'c in front, that it was nothing but the 
foree that Isad been opposing the expedition the day or two 
previous, and ihaT tlie eavalry, supported by the infantry then up, 
was suilicient for the wurk. 

During this halt the Third Division had moved up to within 
four miles of the seene of action. While the consultation was 
going on, it Mas oixlered to ao into camp. It remained at this 
point about two hours, when General Cameron I'eeeived orders to 
move at once to the front. 

By this time the battle raged furiously. It M'as found that the 
entire rebel army was in position behind hastih' constructed works 
of logs. I'lie cavalry had bi'oken and fallen back in disorder. 
The cavalry tjain had been halted in the road, blocking it up 
against the advance of artillery and preventing the mass of retreat- 
ing horsemen from escaping, except through the lines of infantiy. 
The Fourth Division fought with ch'speratioii. Th.e reV)ei lines 
were forced, only to be reformed. It had to op})ose the entire 
rebel army, and the struggle was decided by nund»ers. Only 1,800 
men, with a very small portion ot the cavalry, were engaged on the 
Union side in this contest. 

The Federal lines being comparatively sliort, the extended 
lines of the enemy were enaljled to close around this small force, 
and the retreat of a large portion Avas cut oft'. I'he cavalry 
retreated, lea\ing ijifantry, artillery aiid ariiiiiunition train at the 
mercy of the enemy. The infantry cut tliroiigh, oidy to find 
itself again surrounded, 'i'he anmiunition, after two hours" hard 
fighting, was exliausted, and a surrender was inevitable. 

Such was the c<jndition <.if atfairs when General Cameron 
arrived on the ground with tlie Third Division, numbei'ing not 
over twelve iiundred men. Line ot battle was immediately fi.irmed 
with the First Jbigade, composed of the Forty-sixth Indiana ami 
five comj)anies of the Twenty-ninth Wisconsin, under Lieutenant 
Colonel A. 3L Flory, on the right, and the Secojid iJrigade. com- 
posed of the Twenty-fourth and Twenty-eighth Iowa, and the 
Fifty-sixth Ohio, un<ler Colonel Raynor, on the left. The position 
of the division was on the edge of a wood, with an oiicn plantation 
in front. It was about three-fourths of a mile across, with noth- 
ing to obstruct ilie view e.vcejft an occasional swell of the gromid. 



SABIKE CROSS KOADS. 89 

The \vidtli of this open space was iiiure than thrice the lenc»-th of 
the front of the Third Division, now the only troops left to con- 
front the enemy. 

The rebels, elated with their success, came pouring over the 
clearing in successive lines and closely massed columns. They 
were permitted to come within close rifle range before the Third 
Division opened upon them. The Federal position was such that, 
concealed behind logs and fences, it could not be located by the 
rebels, giving an unusually fine opportunity for deliberate aim. A 
deadly volley broke forth from the whole line, breaking the rebel 
ranks, hurling them back in confusion, and leaving the ground 
strewn with their dead and Avounded. The rattle of the deadly 
rifle was unceasing, and the rebel slaugliter terrible. 

The enemy rapidly retreated, but again formed heavier lines 
with fresh troops. Now was the time for the Nineteenth Corps to 
have been brougiit up, and, forming on the right and left, prevented 
the flanking by the enemy, through which they gained their victorv. 
But that was not the arrangement. The Nineteenth Corps was 
four miles in the rear, in camp, and could not be brought up until 
the Third, like the Fourth Division, had been sacriflced. 

The rebel lines, numbering not less than 8,000, advanced ao-aiu 
and again, but could not maintain tliemselves. Each time thev 
Avere driven back by this little force of 1,200. 

Another but a feebler demonstration was made on the front 
by a .<5mall portion of the enemy, while the bulk of tlie force, under 
cover of tlie woods on either side, passed around to the flanks and 
rear of the Federal lines, "j^iis ch-.^ed the contest. Tlie division 
'was surrounded. It ii!:i!ntnined the lino, and endeavored to fall 
back; but the rebels, actually coming among the men, forced them 
to break, to enable the few that could escape, to do so. The men 
fought to the last moment, and continued firing until forced to 
cease by capture, or by the want of ammunition. The struguling 
division fought from tree to tree, pursued by the rebel cavalrv for 
a mile and a half, -when the Nineteenth Corps, coming u]>, saved 
the remnant not kille<l or captured. 

The Nineteenth Corps drove back the rebels with considerable 
slaughter, and night coming on, the conflict ended for the day. 

The cavalry train being in the road, blocked it completely. 
The pine woods were so thick that artillery could not be moved 
through them, so it was impossible to bring off the wagon, artillery 
and ambulance trains, which fell into the hands of the rebels. The 



90 THK FOETY-SIXTH I.MMANA. 

cavalry train nas heavily laden with couiuiib.savy stores a7Kl officers^ 
property, and furnished rich booty. 

This was the battle of Mansfield, or Sabine Cross Roads, Ts'here- 
an expedition fitted out without rej,^ard to expense, iinely a})pointed 
in every necessary material, with an array never before defeated — 
men who had stood at Vicksburg, Jackson, Port Hudson and Baton 
Rouge — was defeated and destroyed with the loss of material 
inestimable, and a sacrifice of life terrible to contemplate, through, 
a }ilan of battle which threw into the fight detachments of troops- 
only as fast as they could be destroyed. One of the great bhuiders- 
of the war was committed here — one for which nobody, as yet, has- 
been called to account. 

The loss of the Federal army at this battle Avas COO killed and- 
wounded, and 1,250 cajjtured. The loss of the rebels, as taken 
from their ofticial re|«orts, was 3,100, of whom, ten days after,. 
1,000 were dead. Texas and Louisiana were in mourning for the 
calamity that feil upon them. Very many prominent officers were- 
killed. General Mouton, of Louisiana, and General Green, of 
Texa.s, the hope of the Confederacy (in that portion of it) were 
victims. Scarcely a company came out without the lc>ss of all or 
nearly all of its commissioned otficers, and the victory in every 
way was most dearly paid for. 

The loss of the Forty-sixth regiment v/as as follows: 

Company A.- — Killed: Archibald Smock. Woundeil: Cap- 
tain William A. Pigman. ^Missing: David C. Murphy, Levi Can- 
ter, Lewis Canter, John AV. Creson, John T. Rees, Horace Deyo.. 

Comj.ianv B. — Killed: None. AVounded: Captain Frank 
Swigart, William 11. Gura-d. Mi^-ing: J.-lin ^V. Castle, John R. 
Cunningham, Joseph Davis, William H. Grant, George W. Oden,. 
Benjamin F. Shelley, Joshua P. Shields. 

Conijiany C. — Killed: George Lane and Robert Lewis. 
Wounded: Joseph Henderson. Mi^sing: William Baeom, 
Thomas S. Evans, Anthony Babanoe, George Huntsinger, Jacob 
Kashner, John Shepherd, Francis 3L Speece. 

Company D.— Killed: Jacob Cripliver. Wounded: John 
!McTaggart, 3Iieh.ael J. Blue, Porter A. \\'hite, Terrence Dunn,. 
Samuel W. Cree. Julius C. Jack^o!i. .Missing: Anthony A. E<kew, 
James H. Gardner, Hiram Lumbard, George \V. Nield, William. 
H. Small. 

Company F. — Killed: None. Wounded: David JJishopi. 
Missing: FHis J. IIuLrhes. 



SAF.IXK CROSS KOAD.S. 91. 

Company F. — Wouiuled: George W. Yates. Missing: John 
Shaffer, George Huffman, Jonathan Iliney, Edward H. Berry,. 
James Coleman, Jacob Gates, Samuel Gable, Jame.s Hastings, John 
Meredith, Jacob Sell. 

Company G. — Missing: Jo.-oph Carr, Jacob Guess, Daniel: 
Cronan, William R. Clouse, William Hay ward, Allen White, 
James C. Chamberlain, Dennis Bagley. 

Company H.— AVounded: Thomas P. DeMoss, Johnson Lid- 
yard. Missing: Jasper N! MuUins, William Fahler, James Fisher, 
James Parsons, Daniel Garbison, Lawrence Hartleroad. 

Company I. — Killed: George Schleh, Lieutenant Jacob Hud- 
low, Missing: Cyrus S. Peabody, John A. Wilson, Bradley Por- 
ter, John Hamilton, .Vmos Orput. 

Company K. — Killed: Lieutenant John McClung, Thomas 
Scott. "Wounded: Jeffer'^on ^larshman. ^Missing: John M. Van- 
meter, David C. Jenkins, Jesse Shamp, William Cook, Samuel 
Johnson, William Kreekbaum, Ambrose McVoke, George Moore, 
George Matthews, Elihu Shaffer, Klmorc Shelt, John Stallard. 

Of the tieid and staff, Lieutenant Colonel A. M. Flory and 
Chajilain Hamilton Robb were missing. Captain William Dellart, 
of Company D, was also missing. 

Recapitulation: Killed, seven; wounded, thirteen; missing, 
eighty-six. 

That portion of the regiment not killed or captured made its 
way back until the advance of the Nineteenth Corps was met. 
The lines were opened and the retreating mass passed through and- 
formed with or behind Franklin's lines, when tin- rebels were 
cliL'cked and driven back. 

On the 9th the entire army was in line of battle at Pleasant 
Hill, fifteen miles from the battletield of the Sth. The Sixteenth 
Corps had reached tliat point from Grand Ecore. Here the rebels 
were whi})ped, and the entire army marched to Grand Ecore, which. 
])oint \\ as reached at nooti on the 11th. 

()n A{)ril 12 the regitnent went to work on intrenchnients. 
Portions of the army straggling in. 

13 and 14. Work on intrenchments. Rei>orts of rebels 
coming in. Bad news from the gunboats above. 

15 to 21. Work on intrenchments. Rel^els waiting and 
watching for the Federals to move. Fleet comes down. Ordered 
to march. Did so at 2.30 a. m., the 21st. Meanwhile the town 
caught lire. Marched until 2 o'clock, the morning of the 23d. 



92 THE FOllTV-SIXTH INDIANA. 

23. Started at C a. m. Readied Jiig Cain. The rebels were 
there, and attacked, the front and rear of the column. Tiiey ^vere 
beaten off with great los.s to them. 

24. Left Big Cain at S a. m., and marched eighteen miles to 
J3ayoa Ilapids. 

25. Eighteen miles, to -vvithin tvro miles of Alexandria. Hot 
.and dust}. 

2G. In camp. Work on intrenchments. 

27. First Division of tlie Thirteentli Army Corps arrived 
from Texas. 

28. Ordered to attack the enemy. Did so and returned. 

29 and 30. Working on the dam. Yery hot. Forty-seventh 
Indiana arrived from home. 

May ]. In line of battle all the time. Rebels get below, on 
the river, and tiireaten trouble. 

2. Ordered to advance c>n the enemy. Skirmished all day. 
Rebels followed to camp and threw in shells. Transport "Emma'" 
•captured below and burned. ' 

3. Very hot. In line of battle all day. Rebels threatening. 
Work on dam ];)rogressing. 

4. Intrenching. Heavy tiring down the river. The "City 
JBell," witli the One Hundred and Twentieth Ohio, captured. 
Boat burned and Colonels Mudd, Bassett and Speigle killed. 
Fifty-sixth Ohio start home on veteran furlough. 

5. Met the rebels. Fought all day. Sharj* shelling. Steamer 
"^Varner,"" with Fifty-sixth Ohio, captured. 3Iany of the regi- 
ment killed and wouuih^d. GuJiboats I'Jiyhteen and TictnUj-jivc 
were burned. "Veteran furloughs" at a discount. 

' G, Skirmished nearly all day. Wfnt five miles. Laid all 
night at Middle bayou. 

7. Started early. Met the enemy at once. Skirmished all 
■day, Sto[»ped at 5 r. m. at Bayou Rapids bridge. Drove the 
rebels across. A Major McXeil, of Texas, was seen examining the 
])ickets, and shot. 'I'here were found on him -S~0'i in Confederate 
money, and very important papers. 

A mistake, or an omission, made at head<juarters, came near 
landing the First Brigade into a rebel prison. General Cameron, 
commanding the division at the time, was at Alexaiulria, sick. 
He had gone back in the afternoon. At 10 o'clock at night orders 
-came to full back to Alexandria. General Cameron was nt)t found, 
and it was never known to whom the orders were delivered. 



•<. ■ kH' 1 



ALEXANDRIA. 92". 

Colonel Bringhuvy^t mm? then the ranking officer, and sliould have 
received them, but at 11 o'clock he had not. Adjutant Watts- 
was sent out to discover the meaning of tlie artiHery and several 
regiments retiring. He returned with the information that the 
Second Brigade and the artillery were falling back; that Lieutenant 
Fuuston, commandant of the ordinance train, was packing up and 
leaving, because of the impression that all were going back. The 
colonel then led out tlie brigade, and the division got out without 
alarming the rebels. When near Alexandria, a courier was met, 
hurrying out to correct the mistake. 

8 to 12. In line of battle at Middle bayou, keeping the rebels- 
back, while tlie dam was being built. Constant attacks from the 
rebels. Ilt-avy explosion at Alexandria. 

13. Ordered to leave at sunrise. Started at 2.30 p. ji. 
Struck the river some miles below Alexandria after dark. 

liiver crowded with boats. Their lights looked like those of 
a city. On both land and river the confusion was great. Appre- 
hensive that the rebels would follow immediately, the boat officers- 
entangled the boats in their haste to start down. On tlie land the 
confusion arose from the difficulty in gt'tting the corps and divisions- 
in their proper places. IMean while, several conflagrations broke 
out in tlie city. 

14. Finally started at 6 a. m. Troops took the levee; the 
wagons the road. Halted at midnight. No time to cook. Build- 
ijigs burning along the road. Constant alarms from front and 
rear. Men exhausted. 

If). Started at 7 a. >[. Went a mile and a hnlf bv 3.30 p. >r. 
Attack nil the rear. Rebel-- -hell sh:np|y and stood deti iiiiinedly. 
The head of the column built a bridge over Bayou Choteau. 
Again started at 5 p. m. Made twelve miles by 1.20 next morning. 
Road full of refugees. Many M-agons burned. 

IG. Laid down in line of battle at 2 a. m. Ordered to march 
at 3. Started at 4. Met the enemy at 7. '^l"'heir lines were a mile 
and a half long. Tlie army M'as closeil up and i)reparatiuns made 
for battle. 

Driving the rebels tliroiigh Marksville, the lines [-assed over 
a plain. As a general engagement was exj)ected, the entire Federal 
army was in line and in sight. Not less than 25,000 men — infantry, 
cavalry and artillery — were visible at once. The cavalry on the 
front were dashing about, while lines of battle and columns of 
infantry, in supjjort or rest;rve, and batteries, either in position or 



'94 THE FORTY-SIXTH IXPIAXA. 

getting into one, could be seen. On the front tlie artilleiy was 
puslied Avell out, and a sliort practice drove the rebels to their right. 
The Sixteenth Corps advanced rapidly on the left of our line, and 
turned the rebels back. The fight then rolled back to our line, but 
soon ceased with the retreat of the enemy. The rebels were 
driven to and through jNIansura, a distance of four miles, where 
they disappeared. Meanwhile both towns had fires. 

After a halt of an hour for lunch, the division was again on 
the road. At 2 o'clock five miles were made from Alansura, and 
the regiment went into camp and slept on tlie bed of a bayou. 

At 3 o'clock on the morning of the 17th, the division was 
^again on the road, without breakfast. Halted at 7, and made 
coffee. An attack was made on the rear of the column, but 
repulsed. The Third Division marched beside the wagon train, 
with an African brigade in front. A dash was made by the rebels 
upon the train, ahead of the negroes. They pushi-d ahead, repulsed 
the attack, and killed two rebels. One negro Mas killed and two 
Mounded, and it was said that a rebel captain killed both the 
wounded men. 

Yellow bayou was reached in the afternoon. The trains were 
.closed up, and haste was made to get the Thirteenth and Nine- 
teenth Corps over before dai-k. The rebels were close up and con- 
stantly firing, 'i'he two corps got over and went into camp. 

Early on the ISth firing began on our pickets and outposts. 
The Sixteenth Corps had been left west of the bayou. General 
Mower's division was on the left, or the farthest west in the 
column. The rebel firing a^ 2 o'clock terminated in a determined 
•yharge by a heavy force. ""Jlie rebels had tv.'clve pieces of artillery 
and fought desperately. Mower beat them back, only to be again 
driven by them. The rebels charged twice with mouuted infantry, 
but were I'epulsed with great loss. 

The Thirteenth Corps was held in camp all day. The fight 
was near enough to be plainly seen. The battle was fought near 
and on a large deadening. It soon took fire, and the smoke and 
fiame more plainly marked the scene of carnage, and added to its 
iiorrors. 

During the entire afternoon the 'J'hirteenth Corps was in line, 
expecting to be called out. Field officers had, without orders, 
called their regiments in line, anticipating the order to support the 
force in action. All over the camp men were at arms, artillcrj- 
Jiorses hitched uj), ofiicers in saddles all ready to dash out, but no 



ATCHAFALAYA, 9a 

orders came. All that afternoon General A. J. Smith, command- 
ing the Sixteenth Corps, and General l^anks, commander-in-chief, 
^vere at the Atchafalaya bayou, not two miles from the conllict, 
and neglected to give an order that would have sent 15,000 men to 
tlie relief of General Mower's 4,000 that vrere being slaughtered by 
8,000 rebels. Six hundred Federal soldiers were killed and 
ivounded in this terrible light. The rebel loss was 1,000. Many 
■wounded men -were burned in the tire of the burning deadening. 

On the 10th, the Third and Fourth Divisions were sent down 
the Atchafalaya, in seareli of rebels. Found but Uvo, who were 
-couriers, with dispatches. The divisions returned to the big pon- 
toon and remained irntil morning. 

The pontoon was laid on steamers anchored close together. 
String pieces were bolted down across the decks, and, upon them, 
a floor of the flat cypress rails of the country was laid. It ma<]e a 
good bridge, but exceedingly crooked from the unequal height and 
length of the boats. Wagons, mules and men crossed on it. The 
artillery was ferried over. On both banks of the bayou, graves 
were dug for the dead of the day of the fight. 

The Forty-sixth passed over at 10 o'clock, the morning of the 
■20th, and marched two miles down. Here the regiment received a 
large mail, liut the pleasure of the occasion Avas clouded in flnding 
letters addressed to so many who would never receive them. Let- 
ters were also received from olHcers who were in prison. 

The march from Alexandria to the Atchafalaya was continuous. 
There was not a halt that could be counted on suflicient for cook- 
ing. Day and night the columns pressed on, stopping a minute or 
■an hour, as c>)!n]^el!ed by riv'unistances. .\t each halt the men 
would lie down and sleep, or not, as time permitted, but there was 
no fixed time announced suflicient for rest or refreshment. The 
rebel army was constantly closely on tlie rear, and kept the retir- 
ing columns always on the alert. The sight of the Atchafalaya 
was most M-elcome, for it })romised rest. 

At ?> o'clock in the afternoon, the brigade started toward the 
Mississippi, nine miles distant. The road was blocked, and no 
move forward Mas made until 11 at night, when the sleepy line 
moved slowly on. Frequent halts were made, lasting from five 
minutes to half an hour. 

At 8 o'clock orders M'ere passed to get breakfast, and crackers 
and coffee were enjoyed. In a short time the men were gladdened 
with the sight of the Mississippi river. The fleet of gunboats and 



9G THE rORTV-SIXTU INMIAXA. 

transports had already arrived, and v>"ere awaiting orders'. General 
McGinnis, with some of his staff, liad come from New Orleans to 
meet his division and resume his command. 

The Third Division had been commanded by General Cameron. 
The First Brigade was under Colonel Bringhurst. The Twenty- 
fourth and Twenty-eighth Iowa and the Forty-seventh Indiana 
Avere alternately in the First Brigade. Colonel Slack commanded 
the Second ]:>rigade of the Third Division. Captain lieury Snyder, 
of Company E, had command of the Forty-sixth until he was 
wounded, near Alexandria, when he was succeeded by Captain Liston. 

Upon arriving at the river, the brigade pushed on toward 
jSIorganza, twenty miles distant, marching until S o'clock. The 
men laid down to sleej), where they remained until 3 o'clock in the 
morning, when they again started, and reached Morgan's Bend at 
noon. 

And now tlie unfortunate Red river campaign was over. An 
expedition, fitted out with the greatest care and liberality, had come 
to naught through the neglect of the controlling otiicers to regard 
the plainest military rules. Human life, money and prestige had 
been sacrificed for nothing. 

To the Forty-sixth the campaign had been one of especial 
hardship and suffering. It had marclied and fought, almost con- 
tinuously, from the Gth of March to the 22d of May. Its jnembers 
had re-enlisted on the 2d of January, under a general and special 
promise of a thirty-day furlough home. ]Most of the men had not 
seen their families for over tAvo years and a half, but were required 
to give up the anticipated pleasure and undertake a long, laborious 
,and dangerous cam}>aign. Tlie regiraenl had marclied over 800 
miles, much of it in the night, and all of it in haste. Comparing 
tl\e condition of the regiment now Avith Avhat it Avas on re-enlist- 
ment, the men remembered Avith sorrow that over a third of their, 
number now occu})ied a rebel prison, tlie hospital or the grave. 

The furlough question had been reopened shortly after the 
battle of Sabine Cross Roads, and the colonel Avas assured by 
General Banks that the regiment should go as soon as possible. 
At Alexanilria it was possible to go, or at least to start, and the 
order Avas offered tlie regiment to go Avitii the Fifty-sixth Ohio, 
and many Avere anxious to start, but, on the next day, Avhen the 
men of the Fifty-sixth came straggling back, leading their Avounded 
comrades, it Avas seen that it A^-as the better judgment that pre- 
ferred to wait. 



RETURN TO NEW ORLKANS. 97 

No difficulty was apprehended in obtaining a furlough at 
Morganza, but, unfortunately, General Banks went straight from 
the Atchafalaya to New Orleans, which threw the business into new 
hands. As soon as Morganza was reached, Colonel Bringhurst 
visited General Emory, the then commanding officer, and presented 
the case. Emory was a "regular''' officer, and had a higher regard 
for " red tape" than any other solid commodity. lie immediately 
fell back on rules and regulations, and decided that the application 
must go on to General Banks through the regular channel. This 
would require much time, and the prospect clouded again. Gen- 
eral McGinuis, and many of the Indiana officers, endeavored to 
move Emory, but to no purpose. 

In a few days it was found that, a steamer was about starting 
down the river, and it was determined among the officers that the 
regiment would try another plan to get off. Just before the boat 
was ready to leave, the men, with their knapsacks and guns, 
quietly marched aboard. The steamer w^as loaded with army 
wagons, and little room could be found for the men, but they 
crowded in. The captain of the boat made no question about the 
presence of the regiment, as it was their custom to take what come. 

When ready, the boat turned out into the stream, but to the 
dismay of the officers in the plot she turned in and landed at Gen- 
eral Emory's headquarters. The general's quartermaster came on 
board to give final orders. Seeing the regiment, he inquired for 
its authority to go. He was told that tlie colonel had the order. 
Diligent search failed to find that officer, and after considerable 
discussion he ordered the boat captain to go on. 

Another difficulty arose before the regiment. It was soon 
discovered that the steamer had orders for Baton Rouge and not 
New Orleans. But it was on the road to the city, and away from 
General Emory, and tliere was no fear that the regiment vvould not. 
get through. 

At Baton Rouge the regiment went into camp and awaited 
events. The Twenty-fourth Indiana Avas there, and helped make 
the stay agret-able. 

On the third day the "Express," a fine, large new steamer^ 
came down the river and rounded to at the landing. The colonel 
immediately went on board to negotiate, and in a few minutes the 
regiment was on the way to the city. The captain and the crew- 
treated the men most hospitably, and just after daylight they were 
landed at Carrolltun, five miles above the city. 



98 TUE FORTY-SIXTH IXDIAXA. 

On tlic voyage down, tlierc Avas some mystery about tlie order 
for tbe regiment's shipment. When Adjutant Watts could be 
found the colonel had it, and when the latter was on hand the 
adjutant had it. 

At Carrollton the regiment went into camp, the best that could 
be done witli no equipage, and the colonel went to see General 
Banks. 

There was no trouble with General Banks. That oilieer freely 
admitted all that was claimed for the regiment, and suggested- 
things in their favor that had not been claimed. He told the 
_ colonel they should have their furlough and when they pleased. 
They could go home now or go into cam]) and prepare for it. In 
reply to the question, "What does the regiment want?" the 
colonel answered, "The men should be paid to Ap]-il 30, have new 
clothes, new guns, twenty days at Carrollton, and a furlough for 
thirty days." 

The general told the colonel he should have it all, and directed 
liim to make out his requisitions and they should be honored. 

The regiment went regularly into camp. It had good 
rations, light drills, put on good clothes, and in fifteen days was 
ready for home. 

In A}>ril, 1SG4, an expedition of four transports and gunboats 
•went from New Orleans up the Sabine Pass into Calcasieu bay for 
cotton. A guard of thirty-seven men, from the non-veteran camp, 
in charge of a captain of the Thirtieth ]Maine, Avas on the boats. 
The fleet had arrived in the bay. The "Wave" and the "'Granite 
City," while lying without steam, were attacked at daybreak, ajid 
captured. Among tlie prisoners were JMnxssell Beece, K. Y. 
McDowell, Hugh Quinn, Joshua T. Colvin, Philip M. Benjamin 
and Jacob Oliver. These "ss ere non-veterans of the Forty-sixth. 
Colvin subsequently died in prison at Tyler, Texas, and 01i\er at 
Hempstead. 

About the same date, John Shea, a non-veteran of Company 
D, was killed and robbed at Algiers. 

Wm. McGlennen, of Company C, was shot and killed by a 
guard, in June, at Algiers. 



I'.-, 



CHAPTER VII. 



TaCANCIES and PltOMOTIOXS.— IIOMEWAKD Bot"N"D. — CAHtO. — INDIAN- 
APOLIS. — LOGANSPOKT. — On tiik Retirn. — Evansvjlle. — Mount 
Vernon. — Guerrilla^. — ^Morgan field. — Hender.son. — Louis- 
vii,LE. — Lexington. — Cattletsburg.— Big Sandy. — Louisa.— Pp.es- 
TONSRURG. — Courts Martial. — Mustered Out. — Home. — June, 
1S64- September, 18(35. 

BETWP2EN June, 1864, and September, 1865, ^vhen the regi- 
ment was mustered out, the following vacancies and promo- 
tions occurred: 

Quartermaster Thomas A. Howes resigned May 27, 1865; 
William S. Richardson, of Company E, was comuiissioned in his 
^ilace. 

Eirst Lieutenant William D. Schiiepp was honorably dis- 
-chargcd September 14, 1864; Lieutenant William Bacome was 
•commissioned first, and Sergeant Daniel Harner second lieu- 
tenant. 

First Lieutenant Josepli Taylor, of Company C, A.as honora- 
bly discharged November 12, 1864; Euos A. Thomas was com- 
Taissioncd in his place. 

Captain J. W. F. Liston, of Company I, resigned November 
29, 1864; Corporal Frederick Fitch ^\•as commissioned for the 
^-acancy, and Sergeant Jacob S. McCormick as first lieutenant. 

Captain James Hess, of Company G, was honorably discharged 
on exinration of term, December 14, 1864; Joseph L. Chamberlain 
■\vas commissioned to succeed him. 

Major Bernard F. Schermerhorn was honorably discharged on 
expiration of term, December 14, 1864; Captain William M. DeHart, 
of Company D, was commissioned in his place. 

Cajjtain William A. Piginan, of Company A, was discharged 
l>y reason of Avounds received at Sabine Cross Roads, December IS, 
1864; he vvas succeeded bv Licutciiant James Y. l>rough. Lieu- 



100 THE FOKTY-SIXTU INDIAKA. 

tenant Jonathan Moore was commissioned first, and Levi C. Lcsotird' 
second lieutenant. 

Surgeon Israel Ix Washburn -svas honorably discharged on expi- 
ration of term, December 20, 1SG4; he was succeeded by Assistant. 
Surgeon Joshua W. Underbill. George M. Doane, of Company B, 
was commissioned assistant surgeon. 

Captain John G. Troxell, of Company C, was honorably dis- 
charged on exi)iration of term, December 20, IS64. Sergeant 
Joseph Henderson was commissioned first, and Sei'geant William. 
Bacome second lieutenant. 

First Lieutenant Charles A. Brownlie, of Company D, \vas 
honorably discharged on expiration of term, December 28, 1SG4;. 
Abram B. Herman was commissioned to succeed him. Sergeant 
Andrew J. Lovenger was commissioned second lieutenant. 

Captain James H. Brown, of Company H, Mas honorably dis- 
charged ou expiration of term, December 28, 1864; Lieutenant- 
James F. -Mitchell was commissioTied first, and Sergeant Martin L. 
Bui'son second lieutenat. 

First Lieutenant Jacob S. ■N[cCormick, of Company I, was 
honorably discharged on expiration of term, December 2S, 1864;. 
•Albert S. Abbott Avas commissioned in his ])lace, and Sergeant 
Robert H. Martin second lieutenant. 

Captain Robert M. Shields, of Company K, -was honorably^ 
discharged on account of expiration of terra, December 28, 1S64;, 
he was succeeded by Lieutenant Chester Chamberlain. George C, 
Horn was commissioned first, and John VanMeter second lieu- 
tenant. 

Captain Fiunh Swigart, of Cuiajiany lii, resigned October 12, 
1S64, on account of wounds received at Sabine Cross Roads; Theo-- 
dore B. Forgy was commissioned captain, Theophilus P. Rodgers 
first, and Marcellus H. Xash second lieutenant. 

Captain Henry Snyder, of Curapany E, was honorably dis- 
charged October 14, 1864, on account of wounds received at Sabine- 
Cross Roads; Charles F. Fisher was commissioned captain, Ellis 
Hughes first and Abram F. Hunter second lieutenant. 

Adjutant James M. Watts was mustered out March 24, 1865,. 
for promotion in the One Hundred and- Fiftieth regiment; Augustus- 
L. Sinks, of Company K, was commissioned for the vacancy. 

On the lath of June, 1864, the "Sultana," a fine large trans- 
port, rounded to at the landing and called for the Forty-sixth. 
The men soon packed up, and, with innumerable specimens of the- 



IIOMEAVARD BOU>'D. 101 

. animal and vegetable kingdom, in boxes and cages, made a forced 
march for the steamer. In an hour everything was stowed and 
arranged, and the men, anticipating the voyage and the visit hoine, 
pronounced themselves perfectly h.appy. 

Without accident or any unusual occurrence, the regiment, in 
A few days, made the landing at Cairo. The colonel immediately 
called on the post quartermaster, with a requisition for transporta- 
tion, by rail, to Indianajjolis. Looking at the paper, the official 
noticed an item specifying sundry horses, and inquired if it was 
a cavalry regiment. He Mas informed that it M'as not; neither 
was it an artillery organization. The official then wanted an 
explanation of the presence of six horses in an infantry regiment 
on furlough. He said the order required transportation fur so 
many men and officers, and he would not transport the horses. 

The quartermaster was told that the men and horses went 
together; that if the horses could not go the men \vould not. The 
colonel tlien made requisition for three days' rations and ordered 
the men int<.i camp. The quaitermaster told the colonel to move 
back oft' the levee, but the men were ordered to occupy a place on 
the front, which they did, and were soon at cooking. The city 
•marshal tried to effect a re!uo^•al, l>ut he- was referrerl to the quar- 
termaster as the person who could relieve the town of the regiment. 

After dark the regiment seemed to become more numerous 
and expressive. Cooking was going on in many unnecessary 
places, and the merchants began to comjdain. At 10 o'clock the 
■quartermaster sent down orders for trans[)ortation for horses and all. 

I'he men tilled the box cars, enjoyed a good slee}), and, at 
early morn, were in Indianapolis. 

The line was formed, and the regiment marched to the 
Soldier's H(.>me. 

The Indianapolis Journol of June 23 thus speaks of the regi- 
ment: 

'■ The receptiojt and welcome of the Forty-sixth Indiana took jilace yes- 
terday, lis aniiouuccd, at the ."^oldier's H(ime and State-House Park. The 
cohuiin was formed at the Home at 11.30. and with the Colonel and Colonel 
James lilakc at the head, escorted by the regimental and Ilahn's bands, 
marched up "\Va-li;ui_nou street to East, and back again to the Hc>me, where 
a bountiful dinner was serveil by the ladies. It was partaken of by the 
regiment witli a cjuiet satisfaction very becoming and gratifying tu tliose 
who served it. The marching of the regiment through the city attracted 
attention, inuticnlarly for the manly bearing and handsome dress of tlie men, 
and tho excellent condition of their arms. * * After dinner the 



NtVy'-JERRYl 



102 ^ THE VORTY-SIXTH INDIANA. 

regiment again marched up Washington street, cuunlermarched, and went 
to the Sta.te-h()use, ■where a large number of citizens, mostly ladies, had 
assembled to hear the welcome of the Governor, and other speeches. * 

" Governor Morton, in his address, said: ' This reception was given as 
a testimonial of the regard in which the Indiana soldiers were lield by their 
friends here and throughout the State. He said the history of all the Indi- 
ana regiments was the same in one grand particular — they all had done 
their duty, honoring the cause and the State." * The Indiana soldiers 
have a double motive for doing well; first, because it is their principle to do 
so, and second, because an unjust stain had been cast upon their valor by a 
colonel of the Second Indiana, at Beuua Vista. The history of that regi- 
ment proved it a true regiment: but a mistake was made, and a wicked col- 
lusion between its colonel and Jeff Davis, had cast an unjust blame on the 
regiment. But that slander had been turned against its authors, and, to-day, 
Indiana soldiers stand as high in public estimation as those of an}' State.' 

"The Governor feelingly alluded to the many brave men of the 
regiment who had fallen, and who will be remembered as the noble dead. 
The Governor then rehearsed the principal events in the history of the 
regiment, and said it had been one of the lirst to re-enlist, and should have 
come home long ago, but the exigencies of the service demanded more work, 
and it was on hand for duty. He wished to thank them particularly on 
behalf of the loyal and grateful people of Indiana for the proudest act in 
their career, their re-enlistment, as Avell as for all the other good they had 
done. 

"Colonel James Blake, representing the Mayor, welcomed the veterans 
home. He said he wanted to welcome them especially on behalf of their vet- 
eran lady friends, some of vrhom they had met at the Soldier's Home. These 
ladies had become veterans by their constant and untiring service for the 
soldier. He also welcomed them to the city oji behalf of the business nxeo, 
who had never failed to sustain the soldier. He lionored the regiment for 
its manly bearing; they looked and aitcd like men who knew and respected 
their relation to society, to tl^e country, und to one another. The otllcers 
seemed to recognize their true position, and tiieir relations v.ith the men 
seemed fraternal. 

"Hearty cheers were then given for the Governor, Colonel Bhd-ce and 
the ladies. Colonel Bringhurst made an approi>riate response to the Gov- 
ernor and Colonel i^lake." 

The regiment reached Logansport on the afternoon of June 23. 
The following aecotint of its recei)tion, from the Logansport Journal 
of the 25th, correctly represents the warm welcome accorded it: 

"A multitude, numbering thousands, gatheit/d at the depot to welcome 
them, and they were somewhat disaj^pointed when the train stoj^ped and no 
soldiers made their appearance. But the disappointment was soon turned 
to rejoicing when it was discovered that the o.t^Hcers, by a wise stratesrcm, 
had stopped t)ie soldiers at a place where the regiment could be formed 



AT HOME. 103 

without iulLTfcieuce from the crowd of friends wlio had Hsscmlded to greet 
its arrival. 

"The reginieut soon made its appearance, headed l)y its own martial 
baud, marching by column of companies. At the foot of Fourth street, the 
Logan Band took the front and the Logan Union Silver Band brought up 
the rear. 

"The regiment, escorted by thousands of citizens, marched up Fourth 
street to Market, up 3Iarket to Seventh, down Seventh to Broadway, down 
Broadway to Fourth, and up Fourth to the Court diouse. where it was formed 
in column of division, when Judge Biddle welcomed the soldiers in an 
eloquent address: after which occurred the most beautiful incident of the 
occasion: two hundred little girls, appropriately dressed in the national 
colors, advanced and presented a beautiful bouquet to every officer and 
soldier. This tribute of the children to valor and patriotism will long be 
remembered by the brave men to whom it was paid. 

"The men then stacked arms and surrounded the two long tables, set 
in the yord. which fairly groaned under the weight of good things which 
the patriotic ladies of the city had prepared for the occasion. 

" After dinner a short time was spent in giving and receiving the warm 
greetings of friends long parted, when the regiment was again formed and 
marched to Market space for dress parade. The proriciency of the regiment 
for drill was fully established by its performance on the march, and at the 
parade. 

" It will be the pride and pleasure of our citizens to make the short visit 
of these, our war-worn veterans, as pleasant as possible, as it will be their 
pleasure ever to cherish in grateful remembrance their toils and sacritices in 
defense of our institution.s. 

"While rejoicing in the presence of our returned friends we do not 
forgot those of their comrades who having made their last sacrifice, now 
repose in our cemeteries, upon the banks of the "Fatlier of AVaters," or in 
uriknown graves. Their mcmor}' shall ever be fresli iu our hearts. 2Sor do 
we forget those who are captives, far from friends and home. For them 
our prayers ascend. At home or at the front, sick, wounded or prisoners, 
our Soldiers will receive the warm sympathy of the loyal men of the coun- 
try: and when Peace shall S[u-ead her wings over our distr;icted land they 
will be the honored sons of a grateful people, transmitting a rich legacy of 
heroic p;itriotism to the generations who shall succeed them." 

Before tlie dinner, Judge Kiddle delivered an address, which 
was listened to by citizens and soldier.s with deep attention. He 
said: 

Officehs and Soi.dif.rs of the Forty-Sixth; 

Yktekans: In the name of this city and county, I welcome you 
home. In the name of the State of Indiana, in tlie name of the United 
Slates - for, thank God, b\ the courage and patriotism of our noble soldiers. 



104 THE FORTY-SIXTH INDIANA. 

we still have a United Stntes — I welcome you home. lu tLe name of liberty 
and humanity, I Vf-ek^ome you home. Thrice welcome to your homes and 
friends. 

Nearlj' three j-ears ago you pledged your lives to the standard of your 
country; you were organized and left for the field. You went to Camp 
AVicklitTe, thence, by the river fleet, to Commerce aud to Island Xo. 10, 
where you aided in Hanking the enem}' in that stronghold. At Xew Madrid 
you were introduced to the Gre of the enemy, and, witli your comrades, 
made him surrender the post. Next, at Riddle's Point, you alone sustained 
yourselves against the terrible and galling fire of five rebel gunboats. Do 
you remember that? Do you remember the toil of that long, gloomy aud 
weary night, during which you gained your position? Aye, you remember 
it; your coiuitry remembers it. From this well-fought field, you went with. 
General Pope's fleet down the Mississipjii river to Fort Pillow, where you 
remained some weeks with the Forty-third, aud left it not until you had 
planted the liag of your country — this flag — on the ramparts of the enemy. 
Thence down the river to Memphis, where you tore down to the dust the 
defianc fiag of the rebellion, and felled its towering stntl" to the earth. The 
tro]>h}' was secured by your hands. Soon ttfter this you went up "White 
river to relieve General Curtis. In tliis expedition with our gunboats you 
sutYercd severely witli heat and toil, but you humbled tlie enemy of your 
couutry, and rebuked him for liis inhumanity. At St. Charles you witnessed 
the terrible explosion of the !Mound City, and the heart-rending suft'erings 
of your comrades in aims. But we cannot tarrj'. You desc-c-nded the river 
to Helena, where you did good service in opening rivers, skirmishing, etc., 
for several weeks, and where the memorable repulse of the arrant rebel. 
Price, took place. At PembcrtDU you fought right under the bristling guns 
of the fort, and within a few yards of our own gunboat Chillicothe. The 
courage of man was seldom more severely tried than yours in this fight, aud 
never was the test better withstood. Xe.vt, before Vicksluirg; then tlirough 
all those severe battles at Port Gibson. Cb.ampion Hills, Jackson and other 
places on the route, when not only your prowess in b;ittle, but your .strength 
of endurance in toiling and marching, was pioved to be of the first order. 
After beating and chasiuu' the enemy in every direction, he was invested at 
Vicksburg, where you lay in the trenches during forty-three days, toiling 
and fighting until he fell, and you entered the city with your comrades in 
triumph. Then, the day after the surrender, you nuirched to Jackson, where 
you completed the triumph of the campaign. From this place you were 
taken to Xew Orleans. Then your expedition into Texas and liattle at 
Carancro ba3'ou. La., will be ever memorable. B;ick to New Orleans; and 
here you did one of the noblest acts nf your lives — you re-enlisterl for 
the war — and it was the desire of thi; Government then to give you 
the furlough which you are ntnv about to enjoy, but the exigency of the 
service would not allow it; you submitte<I cheerfully, as became good sol- 
diers and true patriots. Hence you were taken into the severe campaign of 
Red river, where our arms, for a time, were unfortunate. Under every 
disaster, you comported yourselves as veterans, and wlierever the fault 



AGAIN' TO THE FIELD. 105 

Diigbt lie, if fault there was, no part of it was attached to the glorious and 
.gallant Forty-sixth. 

"You are now before us, hut where arc the comrades in arms that 
went out with you, 1.000 strong, to do battle for the country and for man- 
kind, while you, less than 200, have returned? Alas! they are not here. 
Some are languishing in exile as prisoners of war. but their hearts are with 
us and our Iiearts are with them. Others are lying buried along the valleys 
-of the !\Iississippi and 'White rivers, and on the plains of Red river, but 
their spirits are with us now. . Your comrades who are prisoners, will soon 
be exxJianged and return to our arms; but for those who are locked in the 
prison-house of death, there is no return to us. We must follow them. 
Sad is the suggestion of your retiaii to thn^e whu.se sous and brothers have 
perished in battle. Let u- weep with them lor a time, for tears not ill 
become tlie brave. ■» * * But it is a nol'ic death to die for oue's country. 
How can wc die nobler or better? 

"Tims have I briefly traced your course from your departure to your 
return. Fond hearts and tearful eyes have followed and watched your 
every step and every deed, daily and hoiiily, tluring your absence. While 
you are with us, as you luive done in the tield. prove yourselves triumphant. 

"You have brought hon.e the rui:ged laurels of the soldier, and inno- 
cent maidens will give you wreaths of flowei-s to twine with them. They 
welcome you back from your dangers. Their tender arm^ ill beat the 
battlefield, and they look to you for protection. You will give it to them. 
Kemcmber. each one of you is dear to some heart, and I trust that each of 
you lias some object of love, reverence or nft'ection to keep your hearts true 
to yourselves, your country and your God." 

On tlie conclusion of the dress parade, the regiment vras dis- 
niis.sed until the 26th of July, wlien it wouhl be necessary to leturn 
to the field. 

On the 20th of July t;ie colniud )iubli<hed an order voquiring 
the members of the regiment to assenilde at Logans|i(irt, on the 
■2Ct}i. At the appointed time, every one was present e.vcepting 
tliree, wlio were sick. A ditiieulty in obtaining transportation pre- 
vented the departure until the 27th, when the regiment started for 
Indianapolis, by way of Lafayette. The Capital was readied in 
the evening, and the regiment took up quarters in the general 
camp of the State. 

On the 2Stli, an order was received from General lleint/.leman, 
requiring the P'orty-third and Forty-sixth to remain until further 
-orders. 

The regiment remained quietly in camp until the 11th of 
.August, when orders were received for an immediate march. On 
the 12th, the regiment took the cars for Evansville. Arrived at 
'Terre Haute at 2 p. m. ^!et e.vair«;-erated rumors of the devastation 



lf*C THE P^OKTY-STXTH IXDIAXA. 

being MTOught by tlie rebels on the river. Arrived at Evansville- 
at dark, where the regiment was quartered on a wliarfboat, and, in 
the morning, tlie men were pleased in being led to a beautiful 
grove half a niile from town. 

At 3 o'clock on the next (Sunday) morning, the word came 
that the rebels were crossing tlie river at Shawneetown, twenty- 
three miles below by land. At 9 o'clock, the regiment was on 
an old mail boat, and steaming down the river. At 6 p. m. the 
regiment landed at 3Iount Vernon. Here the people were all under 
arms. The 'Megion" had flowed in from the surrounding country, 
and everybody was awaiting an attack. Firing had been heard at 
Shawneetown, up to noon, but none since, so it was surmised that, 
tlie war would soon begin. The artillery was in battery on the 
levee, and the river front was covered with people. The regiment 
M-as received M-ith hearty cheers. General Hovey was home on 
leave, and the men were rejoiced to see him. 

The regiment marched to the Court-house square, and pre- 
pared to spend the night. The citizens furnished an abundance 
of coffee. 

At midnight a courier from below reported the relxds in posses- 
sion of several boats and a force sutticient to attack Shawneetown 
and Mount Vernon. About that time a railroad ferryboat, from. 
Pittsburg, bound for the Mississippi, rounded to at the landing. 
It was new and capable of carrying a thousand men. The colonel 
impressed the boat, and, before daylight, the regiment was on 
board and on the way down the river, without tlie knowledge of 
the good people of Mount Vernon. 

'J'ho rebel towns along the river were passed without motesta- 
tion, and tlie boats reached Shawneetown at 10 o'clock. xVlong 
the Illinois and Indiana side of the river the boat passed continu- 
ous squads of the legion rushing to the front. 

At Shawneetown the people were all on hand. Thev extended 
a hearty welcome to tiie regiment. That point being safe, it was 
.concluded to go on to Sabine river, where the rebels were. A 
six-pound gun was borrowed, and the ferryboat again pushed out. 
The legion wanted to go, and it was with difficulty that they were 
kept off, so anxious were they for gore. The seat of war was 
readied at 2 oY^lock. The rebels had fallen back, leaving a small 
force on the river. A small gunboat, the Fairphn/, on which were- 
Lieutenants Washington C'onlson and George Groves, of Logans- 
port, was shelling the rebels on the bank. After notifyin-.r the- 



,;vMs,-., " .11 



MORGAN FIELD. ^ 107' 

gunboat, tlie regiment landed nnd skirmislied inland, driving the 
rebels before it. Finding no force that would stand, in an hour 
the regiment returned to the boat. The barges and boats of the 
rebels were destroyed. The three steamers captured by the rebels 
had been released by them. They Avere loaded with cattle for 
Sherman, and, when the approach of the rebels was noticed, the 
cattle were thrown into the river. The most of them were saved;, 
those that swam to the Kentucky side were lost, except a few that 
were subsequently recovered by the Forty-sixth. 

The regiment returned to Shawneetown to arrange a raid 
inland. The ferryboat was returned to the party in charge, with 
thanks, and the regiment occupied the "Jennie Hopkins,"' one of 
the captured boats. 

The regiment then returned to Mount Vernon, and became part 
of a force organized for a raid into Kentucky, toward Morganfield, 
by General llovey. 

On the morning of the arrival of the regiment at Mount Vernon,. 
Dan Rice's circus boat came up to the landing. It made quite an 
imposing appearance. Its band played its most seductive airs, and 
the lady and gentlemen actors displayed their gayest attire. With 
the soldiers in town, the management calculated on a crowded 
house and large receipts. But in a little while the horses were 
impressed to haul the artillery, and some of the show animals to 
mount the men. Lamentation abounded on the circus boat that 
day, but the company still had hope, and went on with the prepa- 
rations necessary for a regular performance in the evening. 

While at Indiana}»olis some designing men had imposed upon 
the boys a lot of advertisements, in the semblance of greenbacks. 
They looked very mucli like live-dollar bills. On the morning 
after the show the treasurer of the institution waited on the colonel 
with a package of the bills, and requested fifty dollars in lieu of it. 
His exi>lanation of the transaction was that he had received them at 
the circus entrance. He had marveled at the predominance of five- 
dollar bills, but had suspected nothing, and liad promptly made 
change. I'he treasurer recapitulated the items in the company's 
bad luck, and promised to collect full damages from the govern- 
ment. 

The preparations for the Kentucky raid were hastily made at 
Mount Vernon. A detatchment of cavalry militia came from Evans- 
ville by land, and a battery of four guns by the river. The coun- 
try aroun.l Mount Vernon turned out about L'U<i men on foot, and a 



''!"'• 



UOS ■ "THE yOETY-SIXTU lXDIzV>'A. 

•company of 'Cavalry. A battery of two guns went from Mount 
Vernon. To mount the cavalrj' and liaul the guns, liorses were 
impressed. Some were contributed. The Thirty-second Indiana, 
which was at Indianapolis for discharge, joined the expedition. 

The cavalry marched along the river opposite Uniontown. 
'The infantry and artillery left Mount Vernon on tlie 17th on the 
transports '-Jennie Hopkins," "General Ilalleck" and the " Cot- 
tage." These were found to be oveiloaded. A portion of the 
men was transferred to the circiis boat, and she was compelled to 
snake the trip. The company had recovered its good humor, and 
the members were Avaving adieus to the soldiers from their deck. 
The band was playing patriotic airs, when the rush of soldiers on 
the br.at changed the situation. 

The expedition, with the Forty-sixth in advance, landed at 
T'niontown, and placed guards around the town. The circus boat 
came in last, and the company was again in good humor. The 
"band was playing and the ladies were waving their handkerchiefs. 
Horses were obtained to relieve the circus company, when it 
anade haste to leave for a more prolitable coTintry. 

At 2 o'clock the column was on the march for Morgantield, 
eight miles distant, liebels were met at different points, but they 
fled without a fight. 

On the ISth, General Paine arrived witli a force from Paducah, 
not knowing that General Ilovey had left Mount Vernon. Major 
General Hughes, of the Indiana malitia, was also on the ground. 

On tlie ] Otli, the column started for Henderson, twenty-five miles 
distant, on tlie river. At vSraith's mills a squad of rebels were met 
and captured. Henderson av as reached at 2 o'clock on tlie 20th, 
•when the motley collection of soldiers was disposed of. Boats 
•yveve sent to Evansville and to Mount Vernon. Trouble arose about 
the destination of some tifty negroes, who had followed the column 
to the river, I'he draft order was in force and the negroes were 
•good for substitutes. Botli the to\vns named wanted the negroes, 
■and the crowd went froni boat to boat, as the inducement of either 
boat predominated. Finally, it was discovered that a comely 
-colored girl was the ruling factor in the business. TI»e }>eople of 
one town captured the girl and led the entire party to their boat. 

The Forty-sixth remained at Henderson until 4 o'clock on the 
:21st, wl\en it left that city and arrived at Evansville at 5 o'clock. 
William Dillon, of Cojnpany G, the only inember of the regiment 
■injured, was seriously shot in the leg. 



LEXINGTON. 109) 

The resjimeut left Evansville on the nwrnrntj' of the 2-l:th of 
Allgu^^t, for Louisville, Avhich was reached before daylight on the- 
2Gth. Just before landing at Porthnul a rebel prisoner fell over- 
board. It was never known whether he reached the shore or the- 
bottom. 

The regiment marched the three rniles between Portland and 
Louisville in a flood of rain, and fourjd no quarters prepared for 
it. Quarters were finally secured in some old barracks, formerly 
occupied by prisoners or passing troops. 

At o'clock on the 27th the regiment was loaded into box 
cars, which had just brought in a load of horses, and started for 
Lexington. 

At Lexington the post was in charge of a Kentucky regiment, 
as a provost guard, which was not remarkable for good discipline,, 
cleanliness or genei-al ethciency. As soon as the Forty-sixth had 
settled in camp the men polished up and a dress parade was had- 
at the Court-house square. All did and looked well, and the next 
day the Kentucky regiment was relieved and the Forty-sixth put 
on provost duty. 

A reviev.- was held by General Burbridge. Six regiments of 
infantry, two of cavalry and a battery were in line. The appear- 
ance of the Forty-sixth satisfied its friends. 

On the morning of the 13th the regiment left Lexington for- 
Cincinnati, and on the 14th, in the evening, crossed the river and 
went on board the "Cottage, Xo. 2," and, at 11 o'clock, started 
up the river. The boat was crowded with military stores for the- 
Big Sandy, and the accommodations for the men were bad. Com- 
pany B was left at Covington to bring up property unavoidably 
left. Arrived at Cattletsburg on the IGth, and the freight and 
Companies C, E, G and K were loaded on five very small steamer.s- 
and started up the Big Sandy. Companies A, E, D and LI marched 
by the mad. The former, after muck ditliculty from low water, 
reached Louisa, twenty-five miles, on the morning of the ISth. 
The others arrived in the afternoon. 

At Louisa the stores and regimental property were loaded on 
push boats. Companies C and G first started with three boats, 
the nien having been furnished with convenient poles for pushing, 
and, as the boats with their crews pa^ssed the soldiers on shore,. 
tliose afioat were benefitted with instructions and advice unlimited- 
The men had no experience in this gout of navigation, and were not 
expert in the use of poles. The propelling pow.er would be- 



110 TUE yOETT-SIXTH INDIANA. 

uneqr.nlly npjilicd, and llie vessel "would turn around, go back, or 
get aground. The distance to be made in this way was foity-two 
miles. 

On the next day, Company F j-houldered poles and started 
with a boat, with instructions not to run into the boats ahead, and 
Companies I, E and K started along the bank. Companies A and 
II remained at Louisa, as a guard. Comp.'xny 13 arrived on the 
19th and marched by land. 

Rations and forage had been brought up by flats. From 
Louisa, there was no ^^•agon road. The work of bringing up the 
stores was done, mainly, by the Forty-sixth. The men cheerfully 
did all the duty required of them, and it proved the hardest of 
their exj)erit'nce. They were wet nearly all the time, and without 
shelter at night. "When the Mater was low, the men were com- 
pelled to get into the river and work the boats over shoals. The 
exposure and fatigue wt-re constant. Some of the boats were ten 
days on the trij). The cargoes were wet by the rain, and spoiled. 
Lieutenant Brownlie bad charge of a crew that was particularly 
unfortunate. He ''stuck,*' a few miles below Prestonburg, and 
reported that the rain had started the oats, with which he was 
loaded, to growing, and that there was a good pasture all over the 
boat from the new crop, growing through the sacks. 

The Burbridge expedition started on the 2Sth of September 
from Preston sbuig. It was composed entirely of cavalry and 
mounted infantry, with two howitzers. There were no "wagons or 
ambulances. The objective point M'as supposed to be Ablngton, 
Virgiiiia, where extensive salt works were said to be in operation. 

I'he Forty-sixth was to remain at Prestonsbui'g, ])intect tlio 
rear and bring forage u]) from Louisa. The duty of the regiment 
was not light. The river rose ten feet and wrecked every boat 
that was on the raging deep, and the storm-tossed mariners 
straggled into camj) in a famisliing condition. On the Gth of 
October the expedition began to straggle in. Generals liurbridge 
and McLairi, with their staff and escorts, came in and went down 
the river on a tiat. The head of the column, under General Hob- 
son, made its ap[)earance the next day. The exjiedition had failed, 
and with great loss. There were not less than 400 wounded, 
beside from 100 to 200 killed. The town seemed to be covered 
with wounded, particularly colored men. The Forty-sixth was 
again left to take caie of the wounded and the {>risoners, and ship 
•out the forai^e. 



PRESTOXSBURG. Ill 

The last of the expedition had come in, and, with General 
Ilobson, started for Mount Sterling and Lexington by the 10th. 
They left Prestonsburg covered with property, and wounded men 
and hundreds of horses were without care. Boats from below were 
due, but it was found that boats bound up had been turned back 
by troops going down, and it became certain that only one could 
be depended on. In addition to a larg'e amount of stores, there 
"were 300 sick and wounded. The rebel prisoners numbered sixty. 
They had been hurried along with the cavalry, and were not in a 
condition to walk. These were mounted on horses, and, under 
guard, sent toward Louisa. The stores ^vere piled up on the bank, 
to be shipped or destroyed, as becaTne necessary. The cripjjled 
horses were shot. Rafts, made from old houses, carried some 
stores. The artillery was hauled off by horses and oxen. By the 
evening of the 11th everything was out or loaded on a boat that 
had come up, and on the morning of the r2th of (October the rec^i- 
ment, Mas ferried over the river and took up the march for Louisa, 
where it arrived at noon on the 13th. 

At Louisa the regiment received orders to take charge of the 
post. On the 16th Company A was sent to Lexington, with the 
v/ounded, the sick, the prisoners and guns. On the same day the 
regiment was ordered to Cattletsburg, to take charge of that post. 
Companies F, D, C, E, H and G were left at Louisa, and B and 1 
marched to Cattletsburg by land. 

On the -1st the regiment was relieved by the Sixteenth Ken- 
tucky, and had orders to go to Nashville, but another order, 
received at ihe same time, revoked it. On tlie 24th of November 
the regiment took passage on the flue steamer "Telegraph" for 
■Cincinnati, and landed there the next morning. At 7 o'clock in 
the evening the "Major Anderson" was boarded for Louisville, 
where the regiment arrived the followins: mornins:. 

The train for Lexington was taken at 3.30 p. m., and the regi- 
ment was in its old quarters at 11 o'clock. 

The next day the regiment was put on provost duty, in differ- 
ent parts of the city. Before leaving Cattletsburg, the companies 
left at Louisa were ordered down. 

From the last arrival of the Forty-sixth regiment to its dis- 
charge, its history Mas uneventfid. The ofiiccrs Mere on detached 
-duty nearly all the time, either at Louisville or Lexington. Colonels 
Bringhurst and Flory M-ere on military commissions or courts 
inarlial in botii cities, and Captain Brough served in that capacity 



112 THE rORTY-SIXTH IXDIAXA. 

in Lexington. The companies were, gtnenilly, on special duty.. 
The rebel and Federal prisons were in charge of the regiment,, 
and all the guards were furnished from the regiment. Captain 
Chamberlain was appointed provost marslial. 

The military commissions had jurisdiction over the guetrilla 
cases, and a large number of them were tried. Where the accused 
was convicted, the penalty was, generally, death, but the com- 
mandant at Louisville was too easily inHuenced to permit man}- 
executions. Two guerrillas were hung at Lexington and one at 
Louisville. The Louisville commission tried the celebrated guer- 
rilla, "Sue Mundy.'' With a body of men, this man had been 
raiding over the State, murdering every soldier he found unpro- 
tected. He was captured on Sunday, tried on Monday and hung 
on Wednesday. Mundy was tried on the single charge of shoot- 
ing a convalescent soldier returning to his regiment from the 
hospital. The squad of soldiers were all butchered, but the one 
man recovered and was able to testify against the murderer. The 
trial lasted just one' hour, when the condemned man was returned 
to the guard-house to prepare for the scaffold. 

Mundy's proper name was M. Jerome Clark. He Mas young, 
well formed, and wore his hair long and in curls. The execu- 
tion took place within the city, and many thousands were out to 
witness it. Captain George Swope, of the Fifth Indiana Cavalry,, 
as provost marshal, otficiated. 

Immediately after the execution, an exciting scene occurred. 
As the immense crowd was making its way back, an enraged bull: 
took the middle of the road and disputed the crowd's passage. 
Pistols were ilred at him, only to increase liis rage. Tlie people 
in the rear, supposing that a "rescue"' was on hand, closed up and 
increased the panic, and it was not until the animal was killed that, 
order was restored. 

At Lexington, as provost marshal, Captain Chamberlain had 
two guerrillas to hang at one time. Anxious to give the con- 
demned all the time allowed — until 4 o'clock — he delayed proceed- 
ings as long as possible, but the chaplain, ]Mr. Green, abbreviated 
the exercises more than was anticipated, and, at the conclusion, 
there was still some time to spare. After consulting with the- 
officers, Chamberlain asked the chaplain to make another prayer^ 
which he did; but, before the conclusion, a man on a liorse, with- 
out a hat and waving a handkerchief, was seen riding furiously 
toward the place. He pio\ed to be the aid of the post command- 



SABINE CROSS ROADS PKISOXKRS. 113 

ant, Avitb an order from General Palmer, ])ostponiug ijie execution 
twenty days. The reprieved man shook hands witli his partner, 
and \s-as shoved into a carriage, and the other was hung, just 
inside the time. 

The reprieved man was again brought to the gallows, and 
again, at the la^t moment, reprieved. Subse<]uently, he was taken 
to Louisville, and the case was heard of no more. 

On the return of the regiment to Louisville the courts sitting 
at Lexington were dissolved, and the otllcers composing them went 
with their regiments. A military commission had just found 
guilty and sentenced to death a man taken as a spy. At Louisville, 
as the president and judge advocate of the commission were stand- 
ing by the stove, they were astonished by the condemned man 
walking in with his budget on his back, and offering his hand for 
a friendly shake. He was ignorant of the result of the trial, and 
evidently had not considered the situation serious. He explained 
that, seeing the men leaving, guards and all, he "had come alonr*- 
with the boys." The ofiicers took the man with them to supper, 
and afterward to the prison, where he was left in charge of the 
provost marshal. On the next day the officers visited General 
Palmer, represented the facts, and obtained a disapproval of the 
finding. 

In December the Sabine Cross Roads prisoners began to come 
back. All bore evidence of the terrible treatment to which they 
had been subjected. They were given the furlough to which they 
were doubly entitled by their extraordinary service and suffering. 
They learned then, and they know now, that a grateful countrv will 
never forget wiiat tiiey did for it. 

John jIcTaggart, of Company D, was shot in the left leg, at 
Sabine Cross Roads. The limb was shattered. When hit, McTag- 
gart sought shelter 1)ehind a log, Near him, behind a tree, a rebel 
was ^ticking off Federal soldiers at his leisure and in suj.posed 
security. Under a sudden impulse, McTaggart shot the rebel dead. 
Straggling rebels robbed iMc'J'aggart of everything except his can- 
teen, and finally a rebel cavalryman, with drawn saber, compelled 
him to give up that article. He was finally rolled on a blanket and 
carried and dragged over a mile to a rebel hospital. Here the limb 
was amputated, and for weeks he laid at the point of death. 
Becoming able to travel, he was sent down the river, and finally, 
after much suffering, reached Xew Orleans. In July, with an 
invoice of sirk and wounded, he arrived at Indianapolis, and was 



v,j ;. , 



114 THE VOKTY-SIXTU INDIANA. 

switclicd off to a liospital outside tlie city. An ofiiccr while home 
on the furlough, hearing of an estvay member of the regiment, went 
to the ho:v)ntal and brought MeTaggart to Logansport. 

Chaplain Robb was captured at Sabine Cross Roads. Faithful 
to his duty, he was at the front with his regiment. When it "was 
surrounded the chaplain rendered all the assistance he could to the 
wounded and sutfering. When the fight was over, and the rebels 
began the business of gathering the prisoners, he looked for some 
invitation tu march oft" with some of the numerous squads that 
were being herded and driven away, but he was left unnoticed, and 
he finally began to inquire about what time they would want to 
take him prisoner. Xow, the chaplain was at a disadvantage in 
not being in uniform. He was dressed in a black suit, much pol- 
ished with wear. He was enveloped in a long black coat, and 
ornamented with a \\'ell-worn black plug hat. Naturally the chap- 
lain had n.ot a belligerent appearance. After some importunity, 
however, Mr. Robb obtained an order to "fall in with that squad," 
and inarched to Mansfield. After considerable correspondence and 
delay he was finally released and sent back. " Father Robb"' will 
never be forgotten by any member of the Forty-sixth regiment. 
He was a practical Christian. He lived his faith. On the march, 
in camp, in hospital or in battle, he was with his men, devot- 
ing his strength and otiei'ing his life in the effort to benefit them. 

After the return of the })risoners from their furlough, the regi- 
ment had an aggregate of 30G men, of whom 330 were present. 

While at Cattlctsburg, a Colonel .Tacob, lieutenant governor of 
Kentucky, was brought f]\>m Lexington under guard, on his way 
out of the Federal lines, \inder a sentence of General I>urV)ridge. 
The absence of the gentleman was desii'able, so Captain Fitch, 
with a detail arid a flag, conveyed liim out to the rebels. 

In February, three daughters of the i-ebel general Breckin- 
ridge were escorted by Cai)tain Fitch, ti) Prestonsburg, via Cat- 
tletsburg, where a rebel escort met tliem and conveyed them 
toward Richniond. 

Elmore Shelt, of Company K, while on guard at the rebel 
prison, shot aiul killed a jirisoner, Marcli -4. An investigation 
exonerated ^helt and justified him. 

Joseph Kilgore, of Company C, was sliot and killed by a Ken- 
tucky st)ldier. w bile the latter was on duty. 'J'lie responsibility 
was put on Kiigoie. The deceased was in comjiany with AV'illiam 
iMcGlennen, wlieii ihe latter was killed bv a guard at ^Vlgler.^. 



LOUISVILLE. 115 

The assassination of tlie President created a profound sensa- 
tion. The regret expressed by tlie rebels was evidently sincere. 
They expected a more favorable settlement from Lincoln than 
they could from liis successor. 

Rebel deserters came in, in squads. Officers and soldiers were 
bomeward bound in droves. The regiment had dress parade for 
the edification of some of them, to the gratification of all. 

On June 5th the regiment moved from Lexington to Louisville, 
leaving the colonel and Captain Ki'ough on court marshal. 

Sherman's army was cuming into Louisville at the rate of a 
thousand a day. A magnificent reception was accorded the general. 
On the 4th of July he reviewed the'army, and it was a grand aft'air. 
There seemed to l)e no difference in public sentiment. The people 
of Kentucky were learning something. 

Av order was received from the war depailment requiring the 
wish of each oilieer on the subject of remaining in the service. Xo 
attention was paid to it. ]\Jen and ofUcers wanted to return home, 
as the M'ar was virtually over, but they wanted to go together. They 
had been associated together so long, and passed through so many 
scenes of death and danger in company, that they wanted to stay 
until all could go. 

IMany of the officers had enlisted as private soldiers. All had 
been ])romoted; tlie jiromotions were earned by faithful service. It 
was afterwards understood that the purpose of the order was to 
transfei" a number to the regular army. Had it included the pri- 
vates, some advantage miglit liave l>oen taken of it. 

'J'he regiment remained at Louisville, Kentucky, doiiig light 
duty, until it was mnstert-d out of the servict'. It furnished 
guards, ordeilies and clerks at tlie headquarter departments, at 
stores and hotels. For a time the latter were withdrawn, when 
there was a general petitioning for their return. One extensive busi- 
ness man \srote: "There have never been men in service in this city 
who have excelled tluse in jirompt and efficient duty, universal 
sobriety and geritleuumly conduct." 

A general otlicer, in response to a comnuinication from the 
coloui-l, in relation to the discharge of the regiment, said: "The 
Forty-sixth has had the fortune, good or bad, always to please com- 
Tuandants uruler whose authority it has been placed. lioth on the 
iic'hl and in g.irrison, its ojih-ers and men have given such satisfac- 
tion as to have been given up with reluctance by those in command. 
This has now much to do in keeping the n-ginu-nt in the service."* 



116 THE FOKTY-SIXTH INDIAKA. 

Tlie regiment was mustered out at Louisville on the 4th of 
September, 1SC5. It was transported to Indianapolis and there- 
paid off, on the 11th. 

And so, the " Forty-sixth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infan- 
try" passed into history. Its members having faithfully served 
their terms of enlistment and re-enlisted, were again merged into- 
the citizenship of the Nation. All felt proud of the record of" 
their regiment, for no page of it brought discredit to its members- 
or the State. 



CHAPTER VIII 



^Cattui'vED at Sarine Ckoss Roads. — Maiich to Camp Fokd. — The 
Camp. — Tkeatmext. — TIemovai.. — Axotiikr Move. — The Hospital. 
— E.SCAPES. — Flout. — Cakr and Guess. — Bagley. — Bacome and 
Evaxs. — Other Escapes. — Exchange. — List of Prisoners. 

THE MARCH TO CAMP FORD. 

AFTER their capture, the prisoners were rapid]y pushed to the 
rear. Along the road from the battlefield to Mansfield, four 
Tuiics, the road was strewn with dead rebels and the debris of the 
battle. Tlie wounded were being gathered up. The country 
was covered \\\\\\ temporary hospitals, to which the rebels w^ere 
carrying their crowds of wounded, 

At I\lansfield 200 prisoners were crowded into the Court-hoLi.-:e, 
;and at night were confined in a room not large enough for half 
the number. This room had been used by rebel troops for quarters, 
and was filled with filth — being in such a condition as might bo 
■expected under the circuui'^tances. The rest of the prisoneis wore 
■corralled on a freshly plowed field, near the town, ami compel led 
to get what rest they migh.t, after a twenty miles'' march and two 
hours' hard fighting, on the ground — saturated as it v.-as with the 
recent rains. Notliing of any consequence had been eaten since 
. five o'clock that morning. Most of the men had lost their knap- 
sacks in the fight, and, with nothing except the clothing liiey stood 
in, hungry and exhausted, they began a long and torturing impris- 
■onmoJit. The cold north wind cliilled the blood and benumbed 
the bodies of the captives, and they esteemed their sufferir.gs great; 
l)Utthe time was to come when they could look back on this night 
as pleasantly pa<;sed, compared with many in their experience. 

On the morning of the 9th, the day after the battle, the entire 
•capture was assembled and moved forwaid toward their de.stina- 
tion, in Texas. No rations whatever were issued to tl:e prisoners. 



118 THE FORTY-SIXTH INDIANA, 

Chilled, liuiiirry ami weary, this band, numbering fifty couimis- 
sioncd officti'i-.s and 1,200 men, was goaded forward between two 
lines of rebel cavalry, llushed with a temporary success, void of 
all the principles of manliood, or the honor of a soldier, and filled 
^\ith a ferocity develoj'ed by their losses and their triumphs. The- 
most insulting epithets were heaped on the defenseless, men; and 
those who, from sickness or exhaustion, reeled in the ranks, were 
treated with a degree of barl»arity almost beyond belief. 

At 6 o'clock in the evening, after a march of twenty-four- 
miles, the staggering column was turned into an open field, with- 
an unbroken fast of two days. About 10 o'clock a small allow- 
ance of wood was given the prisoners, a pint of musty corn-meal, 
with a small quantity of salt beef, no salt, and one baking pan to 
each 100 men. There was no water within a quarter of a mile. 
Eight or ten men were taken out at a time, to fill canteens, of 
which a very small number had escaped the notice of the rapacious 
captors on the field. The entire niglit was spent in trying to make 
a meal from the scanty material at hand, a task almost impossible. 

At daybreak, on the 10th, the haggard procession was again 
put in motion, and marched twenty-five miles. During this day's 
march, many men were forced along by the bayonet and by 
threats of shooting. 

About the same rations were issued as on the evening before, 
with the addition of an abundant supply of water from a creek. 
In keeping with the consideration generally sliown the prisoners 
l>y tlie guards, they encamped above the prisoners, and washed 
their horses and their own persons in the :^treau■l, and in other 
v.'ays rendered the water as filthy as a systematic c-ndeavor could 
make it. 

After marching and halting for sixteen days, the point of des- 
tination was reached. The ■women and children from the country, 
on either side of the road for miles, congregated in motley groups 
to witness the rare sight. The doors and v.'indows of every house 
Avere filled with crowds of haggard women, white-headed children 
and naked negroes, of all sizes and ages. Old men and boys were- 
posting hurriedly to the front, armed with every conceivable 
weapon known to the gunsmith of the last century, and mounted on 
every possible animal. Confederate flags were disjdayed in 
abundance — fit emblems of treachery and villainy. In passing 
any considerable group or towri, the })risoners drowned all shouts, 
of exultation by the rebels with jiatriotic songs. The "Rally 



MAKCII TO CAMP FORD. Hi) 

Rouiiti the Flag"" seeninj to liave new significance, aiul swelling 
out from a thousan<l brave tliroats, drowncl tlu' rebel .shouts and 
yells. Never were tlie rallying songs vf the Nation moi'e appro- 
priately used, nor with greater effect, in impressing uj)on traitors an 
idea of the moral force of the Union, and its inevitable triumph. 

The Rev. Hamilton Robb, chaplain of the Forty-sixth, a man 
of seventy years, made this dreadful marcli, a prisoner. He was not 
released until June, and Avas lield until then in violation of the- 
iiniversal custom of all civilized nations. / 

Previous to the arrival of the prisoners of the Red river cam- 
paign, Camp Ford had been occupied by about SOO men and 
officers, including 150 officers and sailors captured at various 
points CD the coast of Texas. 

In April, 1S64, these men Avere almost destitute of clothing. 
Many, wlien captured, were robbed of all articles not absolutely 
necessary to cover tliem. They bad passed one of the coldest 
winters known in Texas in that destitute condition, ^lore than 
three-fourths of the men had no shoes, for months. In December, 
they had marched to Shreveport, a distance of 140 miles, and back 
in January, through rain, snow and sleet, and over icy roads, with 
no shelter at night, on rations of coarse meal and starved beef. 
Again, in March, they were driven over the same road and back. 
These moves, it was said, were made for the purpose of exchange, 
but they were not finally released until July. When they left the 
prison, many of them were about in tlie condition of Adam and 
Eve on the entree of those individuals into society. 

On llio SOth of A}>ril. tlio Red river prisoners arrived at Camp 
Ford arid v, ere })rom)itly assigned quarters. 

Early in May, some 1,500 officers and men, captured from 
General Steele, in Arkansas, were added to the already crowded 
prison pen, and, at various times, the captures from transports and 
gunboats were brought in, until the corigregation reached four 
thousand eight hundred. 

Steele's men had been captured at Mark's Mills, Ark. Their 
treatment had been most barbarous. As soon as they had been 
marched to the rear, they were systematically and completely 
stripped of everything — hats, boots, coats, pants, shirts and draw- 
ers — and left to go naked, or put on the filthy rags thrown away 
by the scoundrels who robbed them. Their money, watches, and, 
in short, every article in their possession. v,as taken from them. 
Even the treasured pictures of their wives and mothers Nvere taken 



120 THE FOKTY-SIXTH INDIANA. 

and made the subjects of gross, vulgar ribaldry, and then thrown 
iu heaps, when the chivalry rode over theni with their horses. 

AT CAMP FORD. 

Tuis prison was four miles from Tyler, Smith county, Texas. 
It covered an area of about six acres, enclosed by a stockade. A 
trench or ditch was first dug around the ground selected; in it 
were placed, on end, oak or pine timbers, titted closely together^ 
and forming a Avail about eight feet high. On the outside the earth 
was banked up so that the guards, while on their beats, could see 
over the camp. The location was on an abrupt hillside — a kind 
of oak and pine barrens. Every tree and shrub was carefully cut 
down, leaving nothing to protect the prisoners from the drenching 
rains, the chilling dews of night, or the scorching rays of the sun. 
AVithin thi-^ pen the prisoners were turned, and mockingly told to 
" make yourselves comfortable." 

The otlicers had the rare privilege of going to the woods to cut 
logs and limbs, which they carried in on their back>, under guai'd, 
and constructed rude and insulUcienl slielters. Tlins, parties of 
five and ten going out, in time built up cabins, a lal)or not light, 
considering that there Avere only twenty axes and five shovels 
for use. These, among 4,800 men, Avere in demand. An auger 
and an old saAV Avere supposed to be Avithin the stockade, but could 
ncA'cr be found. 

The men, Avith the greatest difticulty, Avith an armful of brush 
brought in one day, and some twigs the next, sougiit to erect 
shelters to protect them from tlic sun. Parties of from ten to 
twenty Avcrc successively passed out. under guard, vs'ith an old ax 
or. two. A short time was alloAved them to procure this class of 
material, but so great was the clamor and eager rush for tlie prison 
gate, tliat, in their ill-humor, the otlicers in charge for days would 
alloAV none to go out. Hundreds of the men dug trenches in the 
'hillsides, and from two to four lived in each, like wild animals. 
The rain ran through the thin covering of earth and made their 
only shelter untenable, even for swine. Others, Avith no enter- 
prise, made no attempts to shelter themselves, and, conse<.piently, 
soon became sick from exjjosure. Many of those unfortunates 
died, and many became cripples for life. 

'J'o add t(> the misery of living in siu.-h hovels, this Avas ofie of 
the wettest seas'>n-; Texas had had fur twenty years. During 



CAMP FOUD. 121 

■the entire months of May and June, and far into July, rain fell 
-almost constantly, literally in torrents — floods overhead and cata- 
racts under foot. With blankets, only in proportion of ten men 
to one — robbed of clothing, in many cases, these unfortunate men 
were compelled, almost naked, to endure the drenching rains day 
and night. V/hat though raiii should cease, the dark gloom of a 
cheerless night, like some demon, would spread its im^penetrable 
vale over the camp, and exaggerate, if possible, the miserv of the 
suflerers. They did not freeze, but they shivered in everv' muscle. 
The body did not become numb, but there was an uneasy, unsatis- 
fied craving for warmth, that seemed worse than a j-ositive'lv colder 
•degree. And with this misery came memories of liome to inten- 
sify the suffering. 

The ragged, haggard, care-worn men, huddled together like 
sheep, as if to kindle a little warmth by contact, and^ move the 
blood that seemed fast ceasing to flow. So, night after night 
•of sleepless wretchedness passed, with no hope of^comfort in the 
coming morn except the warming influences of day. 

Many of the prisoners Mere recruits, on their first campaign, 
and unaccustomed to the exj)osure of even ordinary camp iffe.' 
Upon these the trial soon began to tell, and each night there was 
witnessed the death of some unfortunate breathing out his life in 
•darkness. Lying in the mud, with the rain falling upon him, he 
Ijecame insensible to the loud thunder and the vivid lightning, and 
was beyond the reach of those who tortured him. 

LIFE INSIDE. 

The inside of a rebel prison camp cannot, like many otlier 
things, be imagined. It must be lived — seen, felt— to be 
comprehended. Fancy ajul imagination, in most cases, can 
bring to view scenes of beauty or i.ictures of terror, l>ut the 
degree of wretchedness in real prison life, such as the rebel 
government systematically inij.o.sed on its prisoners of war, \\as 
too extremely brutal and unusual to be ap].recialed outside of 
their infernal boundaries. Such suffering was onlv known in 
Confederate prison i)ens — nowhere else. The pen or tongue is 
inadequate to paint or grouj. in one idea the multiplied sources of 
annoyance, pain and horror that had their rise in the prisons of the 
rebels for Union soldiers. 'J'lu.y eontaino.l a multitude of ra^-ed, 
•dispirited men, covered with tilth, ;ind an.vious onlv about ^he 



122 thf: vorty-sixth i.ndiana. 

moist ordinary and primary necessities of life. Reckless, regardless^ 
of everytluiig except what pertained to their own immediate per- 
sonal existence; shivenn^x with the cold at night and scorched 
with the sun in daytime; without hats to protect the head or clothes- 
to cover tlie body, the elements had uninterrujHed iniluence u{)on 
them, and they became the fruitful sources of disease and death. 

Through the main street of Camp Ford, the larger portion of 
the prisoners passed for water, and Broadway never presented a. 
more busy scene of barter and traiKc than there appeared. Nor 
did any broker's board ever present so much intenseness a«! was- 
exhibited by the prisoners and outsiders in commercial ojjci'ations. 
Here was brought the product of the surrounding country for sale, 
at fabulous prices. Flour at -^500 a barrel I There was no sign of 
shame on the face of the slave-driver, w'hen he demanded from the 
reeling, exhausted prisoner forty dollars for a chicken. Melons- 
sold at ten dollars, and that when they were rotting, in super- 
abundance. 

Trading stands were erected along the main street of the pen- 
Wholesale and retail merchants operated in divers departments, 
and all diving into the pockets of the prisoners. Tobacco was the 
great staple article. Everybody wanted it — few could get it. 
Men would barter their only shirt f(»r it, and it was said the old- 
repudiated quids were worked over and again made do duty. 
"Whisky was sometimes introduced by a guard or an outsider. 
What was called a " drink," about a quarter of a gill, cost a dollar- 

The iirisoners made rings of Vjone, gutta percha, wood, etc., 
and sold them to outsiders, at strong prices. Turning latli-os were 
set up and fancy v.-ork, [wincipally chessmen, turned out, and .'^old 
at paying prices. Combs, violins, earthen^\•are, and many other 
articles were manufactured, and in good style, too, and disposed of 
at remunerating prices. ^lany other articles were made in a 
superior manner, and sold. 

A crockery manufacturer got up several canteens, made of clay,, 
which were in much demand among the rebel soldiers. Jle cast- 
them over a tin one, and tore up a pair of old blue pants for covers. 
The cloth and the strips of an old shirt, for straps, were well 
washed, and the clay canteens, with an old teapot spout for a neck, 
looked, as they hung in front of his quarters, like a lirst rate article,, 
and perfectly nesv. It was not long before a squad of rebel soldiers 
passed through, and were attracted by the canteens, and the entire 
stock Avas sold at extra tigures. Three months after, some of the: 



CAMP FORD. 123 

same squad sauntered through tlie same quarters, and innocently 
inquired for canteens. Remembering his customer;', the prisoner 
said he had none — that lie never had any canteens. One of the 

rebels said that they wanted a d d Yankee who sold them some- 

canteens as they passed up. They were clay only, and when 
they put water in tliem, they just melted. 

After being imposed upon in trading, a portion of the guard 
sought their revenge by persuading some of the men to come to a. 
forbidden line and trade. When they went out to the line, and 
displayed their goods, they were seized by the rebels and robbed, 
of all they had. The prisoners dared not resist, for they were in 
a position which would have warranted the guard in shooting - 
them, so they had to submit. 

But it was not long before the prisoners squared accounts with 
the rebels. When the affair seemed to be forgotten, they were- 
invited in one night to trade. This was forbidden by the rules, 
but the extreme anxiety of the rebels to trade overcame their 
caution and induced them to venture. As soon as the business 
had arrived at an interesting stage, the rebels were seized, their 
pistols taken, and they were robbed of every moviible article about 
them. Their situation obliged them, to submit. 

Exciting and amusing scenes occurred. When a wagon loaded 
with produce entered the camp a dense crowd would gather around 
it. A multitude of purchasers would so confuse the vender that • 
all consciousness would be lost, and his stuff would go without a 
consideration. 

On <»ie occasioti a pompous old planter came iu witli a wagon 
load of produce, driven by a negro. A few hun.dred men sur- 
rounded the wagon, and made offers to purchase. In the mean- 
time the linchpins were removed, and the Avheels slipped to the 
ends of the spindles. The hame-strings were untied and the har- 
ness generally loosened, xibout that time the planter begun to 
suspect something wrong, and ordered his negro to drive out 
quick. Jube cracked his whip, and, lol a general catastrophe- 
ensued. The mules slipped from the harness, the wheels rolled 
off and the wagon, planter, produce and negro experienced sudden 
emancipation. The old gentleman felt a dozen hands in his 
pockets, which quickly relieved him of everything. He lost all 
his produce, his money, his liat, harness (for it Avas valuable 
material) and most of his clothes, while his negro was carried off ' 
to the quarters on the shoulders of the men. 



"]2-l ' THE FOETY-SIXTH INDIANA. 

This "outrage"' called forth the severest denunciations from 
the authorities, but, on investigation, it appearing thai nobody did 
'it, there was no }iunishment. 

ESCAPES. 

Though the prison -was heavily guarded, escapes and attempts 
were of nightly occurrence. During the month of March, a party 
projected and completed a tunnel. It commenced inside of one of 
the cabins, and extended out 150 yards beyond the .stockade; but 
just as all was ready for a general rush, the stockade was extended 
for the accommodation of more prisoners, and the plan was frus- 
trated. This tunnel, afterward, furnished a good place for prison- 
• ers to hide in when contemplating an escape. They would enter 
and remain until the pursuit of them outside was given up, when 
they would go in earnest. Several tunnels were constructed, but 
none were ever made available for their original purpose. One 
large one was within fifteen feet of completion in March, 1S6-1-, 
when the last but one of the prisoners of the Forty-sixth come out. 
It was reported abandoned. This tunnel cost an immense amount 
of labor. A shaft six feet deep was sunk in a cabin. The tunnel 
was then started toward a bank outside, about 170 feet distant. 
The chamber was two feet wide by three feet high. Air holes 
were opened above, under a bunk or a bed, through which the 
miners got breath. I'hc tools used were case-knives; a sled, upon 
Avliich the earth was drawn out in buckets, and ropes made from 
cows' t.'iils. A station wouM be established inidv/ay, to A'.'hieU the 
sled would be hauled by a statioJiary Yankee engine. 'I'he bucket 
would then be put on another sled and hauled to the shaft. The 
iirst sled would, at the same time, return to the work, bearing 
another bucket. The earth was spread under bunks, or in holes 
about the camp, and covered up before daylight. Tiiere was a 
traitor among the prisoners, at last discovered to be one IlaMkins, 
of the One Hundred and Twentieth Ohio. On discovery, he was 
removed outside, and lived about the othcers' quarters, and v.'orked 
for them at tailoring. On coming u[> the river, in Marcli, ISGl, 
this gentleman was thrown overboard, but -w as saved by the deck 
bands, mIio M-ere not posted. 

Nearly every movement in the i>en was knoAvn to the guards, 
and great caution was observed in W()rk!ng on tunnels. None except 
a select few knew ain"thin<j; al)'.'Ul it. Ilebel otticers would conic 



ESCAPES AND CAPTURES. 



125 



in and make a general and thorough examination, kiolcing e.-;peciall}- 
for tunnels, of wliich they evidently knew .^ometh.ing. Ramrods 
and swords were run into the earth, but no discoveries were made. 
'J'he "Grand Trunk" laid too deep. 

The digging of the large tunnel cost an immense amount of 
risk and labor. On one }>art of the line the excavation had to be 
made fifty feet without ventilatiuii —^ almost sulfocating those 
engaged in it. 

A pack of trained hounds was constantly kept for the purpose 
of tracking and hunting down fugitives from the pen, and these 
were under the chargc«of a professional negro hunter. When a 
prisoner was missed, these dogs were made to take the circuit of 
the camp until the track was discovered, which they would follow, 
through woods and swamps, and almost invariably overtake the 
exhausted man. 

Music was often resorted to, to beguile the watchful guards 
while a party was meditating an escape. Attention would be 
attracted by a good song, while a log would be dug up out of the 
stockade, and a party prepared for the venture were getting out. 
Others, more venturesome or desperate, would dravr themselves to 
the top while the sentineFs back was turned, and quietly let them- 
selves down on the outside. 

Hundreds who had secreted their money, bribed guards to 
connive at their escape. Sometimes as many as twenty of a night 
went out in that way. The market price for such favors was live 
dollars in greenbacks. Such contracts were made M'ith men pro- 
fessing Union sentiments, and who would, for monev, take such 
ri.ks.' 

But very few of those who got out of prison escaped. It was 
rare one overcame all the dangers from dogs, rebels, deep rivers, 
swamps, liunger, and tlie many dithculties that beset the way to 
the Federal lines. In from two to ten days the fugitive would be 
brought back and reconsigned to the pen. 

It was seldom the officers discovered the absence of a man < 
esca})ing, until his friends made it known or he was recaptured. 
Keeping his escape a secret gave the man a start of the hounds and 
cavalry, and it gave the camp an extra ration. 

It frequently occurred that when a soldier died a sailor would 
exchange clothes with the deceased, and remove the body to his 
quarters. The sailor would a.*!sume his name, get his rations and 
a chance for exciiange or parol — a privilege not posses.;ed by 



12G TIIK FORTY-SIXTH IXDIAXA. 

sailors. Of the mniibera getting out, it is safe to say that not 
•over one in fifty finally escaped. The others were overtaken and 
brought back, tosuller severe penalties for their effort. 

The nearest point in the Federal lines was at Vicksburg, a 
•distance of 300 miles. 1 here was not a county in the States west 
of the Mis^issi}'pi, within the Confederate lines, but what had a 
party of mounted soldiers, with a leash of trained bloodhounds, 
hunting deserters and conscripts. At least one-half of the popu- 
lation was actively disloyal, and bore an intense hatred to Federal 
soldiers. An escape might well be considered a miracle. 

Most of those attempting to escape, started with little or 
no preparation. They were ignorant of the geography of tlie 
country, and without maps or charts. Many knew nothing 
about traveling at night, and were unaccustomed to traveling in 
forests. Their appearance would betray them to the first man 
"they met. After a few days of bewildered wandering, exhausted 
by hunger and fatigue, many would be willing to barter their free- 
dom for corn-bread, and give themselves up, or, more probably, 
be overtaken by men and hounds, and driven back. Frequently 
men would travel hard all night, and by the first dawn of daylight 
see tlie prison from which they had escaped six or eight houi's 
before. ]Many cases occurred where men had reached the Missis- 
sippi and were recaj)tured while hailing a gunboat or transport. 
Others, within sight of a Federal picket, would be taken by some 
straggling vagabond and delivered u}>. 

Much ingenuity was required and used to conceal the escape 
■of a prisoiier by his comrades. E^'ery morning theie was a general 
roll-call. Tlje camp was divided into sections of from 100 to 200 
men. A rebel sergeant had a roll of these, and it was his duty to 
call tlie list and ascertain the presence or absence of every nuan. 
The prisoners were formed in two ranks, jind two sentinels, with 
muskets and bayonets, passed along the front and rear of the line 
as tl\e rull-call was called. With all this precautioTi, the absent 
ones were duly answered for without di^coAcry. Frequently the 
sergeant, whose duty it was to call the roll, was not able to read 
the names without s})elling, Avhen some considerate Yankee would 
volunteer to assist him, and would inadvertently miss the name of 
an absconding party, liy univei'sal consent, the party covering up 
the aljsence of a friend was entitled t«v the surplus ration. With 
the othcers there wa'* moi-e diiliculty. They were carried on a 
sej)arale roll, but tlu-y were so successliil that tlu- name of an 



CAMP FOKD. 127 

abseulee was oflcn carried a month williout discovery — long 
•enou£rh to insure his sat'etv. 



GENERAL TREATMENT. 

The commanding otticer of Camp I'ord, Lieiitenant Colonel 
Borders, vras an Englishman, a resident of the South about nine 
years. Front association -svith the most reckless and dissipated of 
this semi-barbarous society, he was thoroughly imbued with its 
-worst qualities. By marriage he had stepped into a fortune, and 
had become arrogant and haughty. Here the in.nate brutality of 
the man foun.l full scope and a held for cultivation. The posses- 
sion of power fed his pride and sharpened his malice, ^^'ith all, 
the infamy of his character was intensified by his being a bitter 
rebel. A monarchist, hating ever3'thing republi'can, and with 
unbounded vindictiveness toward Fedeial soldiers, he was a tit 
instrument to carry out the system provided by the leaders of the 
rebellion in the treatment of prisoners. He had an adjutant, 
unprincipled, cowardly, vicious and destitute of the dimmest spark 
of mariliood. Tliis ofiicer's name was Lieutenant McCann. He 
had no principle of action but the slavish one of wishino; to please 
bis superiors. When some of the prisoners were comii^g liome 
througli New Orleans, AJcCann was just being brought in a pris- 
oner. General Canby vras informed of tlie brutality practiced by 
him by r\lajor Xorris, of the Forty-third Indiana, when the scoun- 
drel was put in irons, and a ration of a pint of meal a day, Nvith a 
half })Ound of bacon, ordered him. 

If nii.-n approached loo near the stockade — the limit l;cing ten 
feet — tliey were eitiier shot down or made to mark time at a vig- 
orous " double-tiuick/' at the pleasure and discretion of tlie senti- 
nel. As many of these were boys, not over fifteen years old, it 
^vas very gratifying to tlie embryo traitor to have a Yankee dance 
at his bidding. The inducement, a cocked musket, held at the 
breast of the prisoner and Iiandled in the most reckless manner, 
was gene'vally sutiieienl to get out of a man all the dance there 
Avas in him. As many as th.irty at a time have been sTi])jt'cled to 
this treatment for two houis, or until they became exhausted and 
fell. Confederate ohirers often stood by, enjoying the scene and 
suggesting a bayonet to enliven the performance. 

Men who- Avere overtaken in trying to escajie. and returned to 
prison, W(-r'c ma/i'.- tu .-land cm stumps or 'olocks (.>f ^v(,.od, bare- 



1-8 THE FORTY-SIXTH INDIANA. 

headed, in the sun for four hours, ap.d nfter two hours olT, theU' 
again on for four hours. This, in some cases, was continued for a. 
week. 

Lady visitors sometimes visited the prison, and seemed to 
enjoy the misery they witnessed. 

Groups of prisoners Avere tied up by the thumbs for some 
trilling offense, and suspended so that their toes barely touched the 
ground, and for days were brouglit out and subjected to this tor- 
ture, two hours at a time. Strong men subjected to this punish- 
ment, under a July sun, would faint and fall as far as the ligatures- 
would allow, and would be cut dovrn as soon as a lazy, vicious 
rebel found it convenient to go to their assistance. 

Prisoners were shot down without any attempt at justifica- 
tion. A man was near the gate, asking permission to go out for- 
,wood. The guard ordered him to go away. The man turned to 
obey, when the guard deliberately shot him through the heart. 

A man named Colvert, of the Seventy-seventh Ohio, while- 
quietly walking within the proper limits, was inhumanly shot down 
by a boy fourteen years of age, Avho was, perhaps, ambitious of 
something to boa?t of among his associates an<l tutors. 

S. O. Shoenicker, of the One Hundred and Thirtieth Illinois, 
while sitting in his hut pleading with a friend to become religious, 
was shot dead by a guard, twenty yards behind him. The guard, 
explained that he had a brother killed in battle, and said, "I was- 

bound to kill some d d Yankee for it." As a punishment for- 

the outrage, the boy received a furlough for thirty davs. 

A member of the One Hundred and Seventy-third Xew York, 
was killed while walking towards the fence to obtain his hat, which. 
had blown off. The man who did this act merely remarked, 
"That's three." 

A member of the Thirty-sixth Iowa was shot while walkinty 
along the usual path, early in the evening. Both arms were- 
broken, and the heart was perforated by the ball. lie fell in the- 
arms of his brother, and the brutal murderer was not even chided. 
for his deed. 

An Indian, belonging to the Fourteenth Kansas, was killed. 
as wantonly as any of those mentioned. 

T})e men who committed these outrages belonged to Colonels- 
Sweet and Brtnvn's battalions. 

Barbarous as the treatment of these prisoners was, it was no- 
exception to the rule of treatment of prl.soners by the rebels iu. 



KEKKL PKISOX. 129 

authority. It was not the result of an isohiled case of tlie appoint- 
ment of a brute, without a single instinct of humanity in his breast, 
by mistake, as prison commandant, but was the result of a hellish 
design conceived and put in force by "Jeff" Davis and liis co-con- 
spirators. The orders of those highest in authority were simply 
carried out by those in immediate charge of the pens. The con- 
trast between the treatment of these' unfortunate men and all 
others ^vho fell into rebel hands with the treatment of rebels who 
were fortunate or tmfortunate enough to fall into the hands of the 
Union forces, will always be the brightest page of American liis- 
tory. The rebels who were in the Union prisons were well fed 
and warmly clad and feottsed, v>'ith the best medical attendance, 
and all that could be desired except their liberty. 

RATIONS AND HOSPITAL. 

The regular ration consisted of a pint of corn meal, in the 
bran, and about a pound of beef, with a little salt, for each man; 
but a full ration, even by this standard, was never seen. The 
articles received were of the most inferior quality. The meat was 
often unfit for use. The supply of cooking utensils was not suf- 
ficient for a fourth of those who required them. A small allow- 
ance of vrood was brought in, but so meager was the supply, that 
a large portion of the men would have none. Those having no 
way to cook their beef lost it. Provisions could be bought of out- 
siders, but the prices put them beyond the reach of nearly all. 
How some of the boys v.islied for a supply of "Northern Indiana 
railroad''' money! Tlie olKcers 'of tlie camp permitted every 
advantage to be taken of the starving inmates, and seemed to 
co-operate in creating a demand for what there was to sell. 

The hospital was a new wooden building erected in the woods 
near by. It was large enough for thirty patients, which was about 
one-third of the average sick requiring treatment. Sick men were 
usually carried out to the hospital only when it became apparent 
that death would soon ensue. In the hospital, the sick were put 
on rude wooden bunks, with nothing to smooth or soften them. 
Ko blankets or comforts of any kind were furnished. The 
only advantage in the hospital, over the camp, was that the men 
were raised off the ground — a gain of dryness, at the expense of 
comfort. The same rations were issued to sick and well. If a 
sick man had a blanket, he was fortunate ; but if he had none, he 



130 THE FORTY-SIXTH IXDIAXA. 

■wn.s oLligcJ to sufTer witiiout it. The majority laid almost 
naked, on the bare boards, and were left to get M-ell or die, as tbe 
disease or tiieir constitution determined. 

The medical department was in keeping with all else. A sur- 
geon was detailed, whose duty it was to visit the sick. He usually 
visited the can)p about once a week, and pretended to have an 
inspection, but usually he came at such times as few only' knew of 
of his presence. When he was seen., he issued curses liberally, 
and common, dirty drugs most sparingly. The monthly allowance 
of medicines to camp was not sufticient for one day's treatment of 
the more simple cases. In short, the whole thing was a brutal and 
systematic plan to compel men to die. 

REMOVAL TO CAMP CROCE. 

Os the 12ih of August, 50G of the prisoners were ordered to 
Camp Groce, a distance of 200 miles south. The unfortunate ones 
were taken from every regiment in the camp, and made up of the 
unruly members of the prison community. Ollicers and men who 
bad made themselves obnoxious to the authorities bv resisting or 
protesting against their treatment as prisoners of war, and those 
who had made attempts to escape, were selected to make up this 
detachment. 

^ot over ten minutes" notice was given of the ju'oposed 
march. I'he rations of the day had not been issued, and there was 
nothing to be taken to eat. Rations, it was said, would follow in 
Avagons. 'J'lie liiie vras soon fornif<] outride, bi!t the niarcli was 
dt-layrd many liriurs, vrhilc the men wevo kcj-t in tiiC burning sun, 
without water, wearying ^ith a delay that seenn-d without cause, 
except for the }'ur]:)t:>se of torturing them. John ShalTer, Jasj)er X. 
Midlins, Robert Lewis and David Garbison, of the Fortv-sixth, 
being sick, were not taken, th<>ugli called out. 'I'he road, for the 
entirt; distance, ran. through a pine and oak bai'ren, exti'emely 
■ broken, and ir.tmspfr.-'ed with narro)W strips of timber, with an 
occasional stretch of from live to six miles of desert, without a 
shi-ub or scarcely a blade of grass. The sand was scorching hot 
and ankle deep, and Mith the greatest scarcity of a\ ater. Fifteen 
miles frequently intervened lictween watering jilaces. When water 
was reaclieil it wa~; searce. 'i'he guards had to be served tirst, 
then the horse-, and then the men e.raht try for it. There were 
not over liily eauie'-ns in the hit, ami no u;iv of cirrviitL: \\aLer., 



CAMP GKOCE. 131 

In juslJce to liie guards on iWis excursion, it should l>e said that 
they were the best class yet met. They belonged to the Twcntv- 
first Texas, and numbered 250. The intense heat, without water, 
•caused many of the prisoners to drop by the I'oadside, where they 
were guarded until night came, and then were obliged to overtake 
the column. There were six or eight wagons as.slgned for the 
sick and exhausted, but they did not accommodate one-fourth of 
the number of tliose utterly unable to march. Many were -without 
shirts, their naked backs blistered by the sun. A large proportion 
.^•ere without shoes, their feet burning in the hot sand. Many 
were with uncovered heads, exposed to the almost perpendicular 
rays of the sun. It would be fruitless to attempt to portray the 
iorrors of that distressing march. Those who made it will never 
forget it. 

Camp Groce was at last made, when the saddest days in the 
•prisoners' experience commenced. There were confined in this 
•camp about fifty soldiers, and the officers and crews of the " Wave"' 
and "Granite City," captured at Calcasieu Pass, on the Cth of 
May, 1S64 — in all, about 150 men. Iliey were all sick with fever 
And ague. Of these, eighty died before November. The living 
were in the most destitute condition. 

This prison was fifty-one miles above Houston, on the Houston 
& Texas Central railroad, and two miles from the town of Hemp- 
stead. It was situated in a sharp bend and within a few miles 
of the Brazos river. It was almost entirely surrounded by a strip 
of lov.-, marshy ground, impregnating the air with a deadly 
malaria. About one and a half acres of ground wliv inclosed with 
a tight stockade some twelve feet high. The [irisan Mas supplied 
with water from two wells, which were found filled with rubbish 
and filtli. These, with great labor, v.ere fitted for u>t}, and 
furnished a supply of slimy and unhealthy water. There were 
board barracks, surficient to accomodate C50 men, but in a most 
dilajiidaled c>.>ndition. 

'i'he rations of this camp m hen the new delegation arrived, 
were some better than in the one just left, but they were so-jii con- 
tracted to uncomfortable ['roix^rtions. 'J'iiis camp was commaiuled 
by an Irish captain, who had been a corporal in the regular army, 
and was in Texas at the breaking out of the rebellion, when the 
infamous Twiggs so dis-^raeefullv betra\ed his trust, and »-ave un 
his command of trained soldiers to a cowardly mob. < )f the com- 
panies of tiie prison guards, one was Iri.vli, one German, and two 



133 THK FORTV-SrXTII INDIANA. 

■were Toxans. The men of tlie two first were, almost to a man,, 
loyal. They showed the prisoners every possible favor and kind- 
ness, when not under the eye of their officers. Numerous instances 
oco'urred when tlie guards, after dark, passed out prisoners, and 
even by ropes, let prisoners down on tlie outside, and furnished 
them rations for their journey. As many as thirty, in rapid suc- 
cession, have gone over the stockade on a moonlight night, either- 
by the help of the guard, or through their disregard of duty. 
These attempts to escape were no more successful than at Camp- 
Ford. After wandering about the country a few days, the fugi- 
tives were brought back, having become sick and given themselves 
up, or were captured by the local force. Some, doubtless, died in 
the wilderness. 

The men transferred from Camp Ford had not been long in 
their new quarters before they -were, many of them, taken down 
with fevers, and by the middle of September, there were not 100' 
well men in the camp. The prison presented a most deplorable 
spectacle. Men crazed with fever ran hither and thither, like mad 
men. Night and day the cries of the sick filled the air. Men 
awakened in the morning, after a night of horror, to find their 
bunk-mates dead by their side. Xo medicines were to be had until 
disease had become general in the camp, and many were beyond 
the reach of any remedy. The surgeon whose duty it was to visit. 
the sick seldom came, and when he did he was drunk, and dis-- 
tributed curses instead of medicine. Many days v/ould pass before- 
any medical attendance or relief, beyond what could be furnished 
by the prisoners, could be had. This hideous drama was most 
appropriately closed by the death of the iiendish surgeon with 
delirium tremens. 

After this, those who were thought too sick to be treated in 
camp, were taken to the hospital at lJemj»stead. From ten to- 
fifteen sick men would be jammed into a wagon and carried to the 
hospital, over rough roads, and through the scorching sun. Four- 
inen died during these murderous transits, and were rattled alonor 
with their sulfering comrades to town. 

THE HOSPITAL AT HEMPSTEAD. 

This institution was the low garret of a church. The roof 
was almust within reach of the patients. There was no side win- 
dow — no place for ventilation except tlic small gable windows.. 



HEMPSTliAD. 133 

"The iinier view of tliis den "vvas most Lorrible. There was only- 
enough light to make the scene visible, and the filthy and noisome 
•eftimia that pervaded the place, drove away all who were not com- 
pelled to remain. The fresh air, so greatly needed by the fevered 
•suil'erer.s, seemed to turn in disgust and abhorrence from the thresh- 
Jiold of this cavern. 

The sick were crowded togetlier as thick as it was possible to 
Avedgc them — one tier over another, on rough boards, and gener- 
ally with no mattress or straw. If a man had no blanket, which 
was generally the case, he laid in his rags on the hard boards. 
There were a few mattresses belonging to 'the Confederacy, but 
these, from long use, had become so foul that they were refused 
by all. Helpless and v/ithout assistance, the sick were compelled 
"to disregard all considerations of cleanliness. 

CHANCE OF CAMP. 

In September the yellow fever broke out at Galveston, and 
soon reached Houston and other points north. The Confederate 
guard at the prison, fearing the disease might reach the camp, 
openly threatened to leave and let the prisoners take care of them- 
selves. Oh this the authorities determined to move the camp. 
On the 20th the prisoners were taken west of the Brazos river and 
•encamped twenty-five miles from the railroad, on a low, wet, 
marshy creek bottom. 

There were no-vv only 500 of the original 650 men left. Of 
these only seventy-five were M'ell. On the journey the .sick were 
crowded together in rough wagons, fifteen to a load. Only those 
-who were not able to Avalk were allowed to ride. Those v>-hom the 
bayonet could persuade along were obliged to march on foot. Very 
few were able to make each day's march with any comfort, but they 
had to go or suli'er constant insult and abuse. The trans{)ortation 
was limited, and many dragged them.selves along until they could 
■do so no longer, when they fell exhausted and were left to follow 
when they could, or be picked up when it suited the guard to go 
back for them. On this move six men died in the wagons, and 
were hastily tum];led into holes dug by the wayside. 

At this camp, sick and well alike had no beds but the damp 
ground, and no shelter but such as they could construct witli brush. 
"They were closely packcl on less than half an acre of groun<l, 
where tlie cooking and living was done. Sinks were dn >■ inside 



134 THE FORTY-SIXTt[ INDIANA. 

the lines, \vbieli in the hot sun became unendurable. Water was 
obtained from pools along the bed of the creek — green, filthy and 
rank Avith disease and death. As usual, above the camp the horses- 
of the rebels, numbering nearly 500, Avere kept, watered and cleaned. 
The dirt of a filthy rebel camp was intontionall}' thrown into the 
water. On the banks of the streara were the sinks of the rebels. 
The rains brought down all this disgusting material, and left the 
prisoners no alternative but to use that water or none. 

'J'he sickness rapidly increased. The medical appliances were 
less plenty than nt the otlier pens. Each morning roll-call found 
men present in body but absent in spirit. Death had released them. 
The dead would be found lying upon the ground in the mud, 
hnvini; been denied the satisfaction of a bed, and with no covering- 
except the miserable rags forming their dress. Around these- 
would be set a guard — a formality meant to be considered respect- 
ful, l>ut, under the circumstances, an insult. 

ANOTHER MOVE. 

On the 3d of October, owing to heavy rains and cold v-'inds,. 
ft was decreed again to move the camp. A march of twenty-five 
miles was made to an old camp meeting ground, near the town of 
Chappol Hill, where were some sheds and shelter, upon which the 
encampment was formed. The move from the old camp was much 
like the former marches, rendered worse by a more general and 
thorough exhaustion of the men. Now, a well man was a curiosity 
— none were well. As before, several died on the wagons or by 
the roadside. 

The new camp was also located on a piece of wet ground.. 
Tliere was a springy ridge above it, which kept the pen constantly- 
damp. As before, there was no shelter for the prisoners, and they 
had the ground only for a bed. The cold rains of October had 
now set in, and night after night the camp resounded with the 
•piteous moans of the sick and suffering, aggravated by the distress- 
ing cough, which never ceased. Ghostly forms crowded around 
scanty fires, striving to warm their attenuated bodies, and keep in 
circulation the sluggish blood. And this experience ran through 
many nights of rain and wind. 

About the 15th of October, for the first time, the prison Avas- 
furnished with better medicines, but still far from a sufilciency. 
A surgeon, comjiaratively a humane man, aboumling in f^ood 



CilAPPEL HILL PRISON. 135 

])romise;;, of liiaiicd action ana energy, was allotteu to the prison. 
Health began to inij^rove, but the death rate was four or five per 
day. There was abun.dant shelter for 2,000 men, consisting of 
sheds and board houses, erected by and for the families who came 
there for religious purposes, in times past. In these were quar- 
tered about 400 soldiers — the guard; the rest was taken up by 
the horses, equipments and forage. The established system to 
V. ear out and destroy the prisoners would have been defeated in a 
measure, had they been allowed to have occupied the sheds that 
were empty. About the last of October, the yellow fever having 
subsided, the prisoners were moved back to Camp Groce. On this 
journey, after having tramped over 400 miles from the place of 
capture, the first railroad transportation of the campaign was fur- 
nished the prisoners, and a ride of fifteen miles enjoyed by them. 

The condition of the men on their return to Camp Groce was 
most deplorable. There were 440 of tlie original number. With 
the exception of six successful esca})es, all the rest had fallen vic- 
tims of the infamous treatment to which they had been subjected 
by the scoundrels who had them in charge. Not one in ten of the 
prisoners had a hat, about one in twenty a l^lanket, a few had 
shirts, a few pantaloons, but the majority were cloilied in collec- 
tions of rags that defied description. Only a few had shoes. 

What are known as "northers,"' now frequently occurred. 
Their suddenness rendered them more severe. Often, with the 
thermometer at seventy, dark clouds would start iq) in the north- 
west, and in one or two hours the temperature Avould fall to thirty- 
five. As tlie season advanced, tliese storms increased in frequency 
and intensity, and they were more effective on the prisoners than a 
regular spell of colder weather. The general misery of the pris- 
oners was greatly augmented by their inability to hear from 
home, or in any way to obtain information in relation to the 
progress of tlie war. Nothing was known about the great armies 
of the Nation — of their condition or progress. The exaggerated 
stories of the rebels were known to be false, because unreason- 
able and improbable. It was known that the Red river expe- 
dition was a disastrous failure, and it was feared that similar 
defeats had been suffered in other departments. 

Nothing had been heard of the Forty-sixth regiment but what 
was contained in a short letter from Colonel ]>ringhurst, written 
about June 14th, while on the jNtississippi, to Colonel Flory. At 
the time, the rrgimeru was going home on '' veteran furlough.'' 



13C THE rOKTT-SIXTfl IXDIA.XA. 

At Camp Ford, in Xoveuil^er, a letter was received from Colonel 
B., by the four members of the regiment then remaining. It 
informed them tliat the regiment \s'as in Kentucky. With these 
exceptions, nothing was known of the comrades of the prisoners, 
with whom they had been constantly in company, in camp or field, 
for nearly three years. The Houston Telcrjraph was the vehicle 
of news received by the neighborhood about Camp C4roce. In it 
were published the most stailling accounts of Federal defeats and 
rebel victories. Every action was a Federal disaster, and ruin 
seemed constantly impending over the Xatioii. With all this, 
there ran through the rebel soldiery an anticipation of defeat, 
which belied all their boasts and predictions. 

At Camp Ford, on the 4th of July, the commandant permitted 
the jjrisoners to celebrate the day, with the condition that no 
reference was to be made to the war, or to the questions at issue 
between the North and the Soutli, in speeches. Colonel Dugane, 
of the Seventy-fifth New York; Colonel Flory, of the Forty-sixth 
Indiana, and Captain Crocker, of the gunboat Clifton, and others, 
made patriotic speeches, which were highly ap])reciated by the 
large audience. Patriotic songs were sung, and over 300 sat down 
to dinner, at the aristocratic price of four dollars a ticket. 

On the Sth of November, the Camp Ford prisoners held an 
election for President of the United States. The matter was first 
suggested by the rebel commandant, Colonel Brov\'n. He said tlie 
votes of men coming from so many States would indicate the result 
in the actual vote. The idea was readily adopted by the prisoners, 
and preparations made for the important occasif)n. 'J'he camp awI'* 
divided into wards, and persons indicated distributed slips of 
paper in each. At roll-call, on the morning of the Sth, the tickets 
were drojjped into hats, brought together, and counted. The pro- 
ceeding was altogether fair. There was no bribery nor undue 
influence used. The count showed Clo votes for General 2^IcCiel- 
lan and 1,665 for Mr. Lincoln. 'J'o make the affair more real, sev- 
,eral fights came off, with the usual amount of damage to the par- 
ticipants. Colonel Brown was astonished at the result. He had 
predicted another result, now he declared that Mr. Lincoln would be 
re-elected, and admitted the probable collapse of the Confederacy. 
He bought three gallons of whisky, and, with his officers, got glo- 
riously drunk over the "indication." 

On the loth of Deceniber, 342 men and officers, includinof nil 
of the Forty-sixth pre.-ent, were liotified that tlsey were to be 



XF.W OKLEAXS. 137 

'paroled and to proceed to Xe^v Orleans, by way of Houston and 
•Galveston, immediately. It did not take long to prepare for that 
move. 

The paroled men were conveyed to Galveston by railroad, 
■where they were detained only a few hours, as a steamer was await- 
ing them. With some of the rebel guards, who were as anxious to 
•get away, tlie late prisoners were soon 'happy and safe under the 
stars and stripes. In thirty-six hours the party was landed on the 
New Orleans levee, and felt that the sufferings of so many weary 
■months were over. 

During the voyage across the gulf, John Cunningham, of the 
Forty-sixth, died and was buried at sea. Joseph Davis, of the 
Forty-sixth, died in the hospital shortly after reaching Xew Orleans. 
After living through so much, thus to die almost in sight of home! 

Of this regiment, John ^leredith died at Camp Ford, Jacob 
Oliver at Hempstead, and Robert Lewis and George Lane at Camp 
Groce. Thomas S. Evans died on the plains, in endeavoring to 
escape. Information was brought from Camp F'ord, by Jasper N. 
Mullins, who left there in March. There Avere then 1,500 Federal 
prisoners there, among them Daniel Garbinson, the only representa- 
tive of the Forty-sixth. 

At Shreveport, among others of dilTerent regiments, were John 
•Shaffer, Alexander Reed and William Bacome. The two latter 
had escaped from Camp Groce, were retaken, and taken to Shreve- 
port. JNIuUins escaped from Camp Ford by taking the place of 
Enoch O'Brien, of the Forty-third Indiana. That regiment was 
•called out for parole, and as O'Brien's deatJ!, which had occurred a 
iuonth befort', was undiscovered, Mullins answered to the name and 
was jtaroled. 

On the 13th of November, Lieutenant Colonel Flory, of the 
Forty-sixth, and Ca})tain W. B. Loring, of the L'uited States Navy, 
left the prison at 4 o'clock in the afternoon. It was the custom of 
the jn-ison commandant to give passes each day to Federal otlicers 
to pass out on parole, not to escape. On tliis occasion, a pass was 
written by one of these otiicei's, who put the commandant's name 
to it. With tlieir blankets under their arms, ostensibly to collect 
t)rush, they presented themselves at the gate, showed the passes 
■.and went out. They had ]jreviously sent out, by friends, some 
provisions and rebel clothing, which had been deposited in an 
.apj)ointed place. On getting out, the ofhcers went to a thicket and 
nvaited until dark, in the meantime putting on the Confederate 



138 Tii:-: koiitv-sixtii ixoiana. 

suit'j. At tlark they started, and traveled as rapidly and .steadily^ 
as possible all night. It -vvas estimated tliat they made at least 
thirty rniles that night, which put them beyond the hiunids. The- 
escape was discovered the next morning, and the cavalry and 
hounds immediately put on their track, but neither made that day 
the distance covered by the fugitives the night before, and the 
chase was given up. At daylight the travelers stopped "twenty 
minutes for breakfast," and pushed on, and in twenty-four hours 
after leaving prison, were fifty-fiVe miles away, with twenty miles 
of swamp between them and their old abode. The prisoners were 
then on the head waters of the San Jacinto, aud in a perfect 
■wilderness. 

This description of country extends a distance of 100 miles, 
aud is without a sign of habitation. The region is traversed by 
the San Jacinto, the Trinity aud the Xeches rivers, with their 
numerous tributaries, and is covered with heavy timber and dense 
canebrakes, matted together with briers and other kinds of tangled 
growth, common to some parts of the South. Heavy pine forests 
lay across the track, hujidreds of acres of which had fallen from 
the effects of fire, forming a most intricate abatis, grown up with 
an immense growth of blackberry briers, often ten feet high, and, 
under ordinary circumstances, impenetrable. The fugitives were 
obliged, for many rods, to cut their way through these jungles 
with a knife, and then pass into a canebrake of enormous growth,, 
equally laborious and discouraging. Passing these, there would 
be a stream to cross, which mu.>t be swam, again to enter upon the 
same experience on the other side. 

Thus they ti'avcled day by day, M'ith food in their liaversacks- 
to tetnpt them, but which must last them at least ten days. The 
stock — t\s'elve pounds of V>read and tAvo poiuids of cotfee and 
sugar — must hold out until the cultivated districts were reached.. 

On the 20th they crossed the Neches river, quite a large stream. 
Heavy rains having fallen f'jr two days, the country was flooded,, 
and all the streams were full. Owing to tiie cloudy weather, they 
were not able to travel for two days. With no comjiass, it was 
impossible to keep the directii>n in a wilderness without the sun 
or stars. Again getting a glimpse of the sun, and by good guess- 
ing, the fugitives marched on. At last, food all gone, hungry and 
wet, they reached a cornfield, the limit of civilization. They at 
once filled their haversacks with corn, built a fire in tlie woods,. 
and on a tin-plate cooked their grated eorn-mcal. 



FLOKY AND LOEING. 139' 

Having reached a part of the country where discovery was- 
possible, they prepared for night marching. At dark tliey started, 
guided by the moon, and made the greatest possible distance by 
morning. They had water to wade, bayous to swim, and tangled 
canebrakes to penetrate. About the 25th a cold norther sprung 
up, and ice froze on the water. Struggling through this was labo- 
rious and discouraging. 

As the travelers a])proached the eastern line of Texas, which 
is the Sabine river, they became entangled in bayous, -sN'hich 
formed a })erfect network. Scarcely had they passed one before 
another was met. For two nights they marched hard without, as it 
was afterward learned, making any material advance. Coming at 
length to a saw-mil!, they discovered a negro in a boat. They 
secreted themselves in the brush until dark, when, stealing cau- 
tiously up, they borrowed the boat and quietly drifted out into the- 
bayou. When out of hearing, they rowed down the stream., 
Down this bayou the navigators rowed until 3 o'clock in the morn- 
ing, when, coming to a larger one, running south, they thought 
themselves in the Sabine river. Crossing this, they set the boat 
adrift and took an eastern course, through a dense cypress forest. 
The sky being overcast with clouds, they had no guide for direc- 
tion. After three hours' march, in daylight, they were startled hy 
finding fresh tracks, and came to the conclusion that they were fol- 
lowed; but on examination they jiroved to be their own tracks, and 
they found themselves not over 200 yards from where they landed. 
That day's march was made through briars and swamps. Three 
times they were compelled to build rafts, undress and swim streams,.. 
two of Avhich were fully 100 yards wide, swift, and very cold. 
Three times that day they crossed their own path, it being almost 
impossible to keep direction — getting only an occasional glimpse 
of the sun. Xight found the fugitives on a plain traveled road,, 
which, after a good rest, they followed all night, wading mud and 
water and swimming a very wide, cold stream. At daylight the\- 
entered a dense wood, built a tire and parched and eat their last- 
corn. 

They took the road again at night, and coming to a dilapidated 
but, learned from a woman that they had passed, during the night,. 
the road they should have taken. A retreat was made, and at 
dark the travelers found the road, and stopped at a house for the- 
night. Here the jiarty got a good supper, bed and breakfast, and 
discovered, after a careful cuurse of 4Ut^■^tioning, tliat instead of" 



140 THE FOKTY-SIXTII IXDIAXA. 

^voiiig (.-nst of the Sabine and out of Texas, they wei'e on the west- 
side of that river and only five miles frojn where they set out 

'thirty-six hours before. 

Early next day the river was reached, and crossed on an old 

'table turned bottom u|;). Now there was no mistake, and the fugi- 
tives must be prepared for bold movements before starting. They 
had prepared orders with the signatuie of the colonel of a Texas 
regiment directing them to go to their homes near Vermilliouville, 

-Louisiana, to remount and refit. The order stated that their horses 
had died, and the nien were out of clothes. It was now the inten- 
tion to push boldly on as rebel soldiers. As such they successfully 
passed Niblet's Bluffs, went through the fortifications, eat dinner 
with the rebels, and handled the "vandal lankees'' M'ithout 
mercy. Here, incidentally, the travelers gathered all necessary 

■'information in regard to stopping places on the road. 

They were forty-five miles from Lake Charles, the most dan- 

..gerous point on the road, where a number of escaped men had been 
recaptured and sent back. On the evening of the 30th of Novem- 
ber the travelers reached the city, crossed boldly over at the ferry, 
and lodged with the ferryman, at whose house was a squad of pro- 
vost guards. Their pa})ers were examined and pronounced good, 

•On the morning of the 1st, they rode in the wagon of their host, 
which took them twelve miles on the road, and, with a letter of 
introduction to a friend, dismissed the travt-lers with his best 
wishes and hoj)es for the Confederacy. Traveling some twenty 
vmiles, the ferryman's friend Avas found, who treated the ''boys 
from Vermillionville"' -witli maijcnificent hospitality. 

On the 2d the fugitives tra\(.-led hai'd over a low, flat prairie, 
■co-vered with water, and met the most dangerous adventure of the 
trip. A Confederate colonel, stationed at Lake Chai-les, met the 
fugitives on the road, and ilenuinded their pai)ers. They were 
handed over and closely examined. He deliberately gave it as his 
-opinion that the men were escaped Yankees, and that the papers 

. were foi'geries. This insult was promptly resented in a becoming 
manner, but it required very careful management and skillful 
talking to convince the colonel that tlie }>arty was truly Con- 
federate. This Avas finally accomplished, and the chivalrous officer 
atoned for his unjust suspicions by adding his name to the papers. 
'This made the papers good up to Vermillionville, the point men- 
tioned. Approaching that town, it Avas deemed safer to travel by 
•night and hide by day. Tiu lo were Confeder.ite Iroc.ps at every 



FLORY AND LORIN'G. 1411 

Station and ou the io;k1, and the danger would he increasing as the- 
Federal lines were approached. After marching the first nio-ht 
until 4 o'clock, a heavy rain came on. The men waited until day- 
light and discovered a wood about a mile distant. Here they 
determined to remain all day, but found the M'ood to be only a. 
narrow strip of oak, with no brush, a house on either side not 
twenty rods off, and with the scene not improved by a negro ridino-- 
from one house to the other. Being almost discovered by the 
negro, and most probably seen from one of the houses, they were- 
forced to come out. They found an olucer at home on leave, and 
two rebel soldiers on furlough. The clothes of the fugitives were 
soaking wet, and they were almost frozen, as a norther had come- 
Avith daylight. The rebels made them welcome and gave themi 
hot coffee and good seats at the fire. They remained until after- 
dinner, and were treated with the greatest kindness. A rebel gov- 
ernment wagon train, going east, was oveitaken, and the travelers- 
rode until night. 

Tlio fugitives passed the night of the 3d of December in the- 
woods near Vermillionville, where the Forty-sixth Regiment had 
encamped the year before. Colonel Flory had been over this road 
several times, and remembered it. The travelers had now about, 
eighty miles to the Union line, and walking by night, hiding bv 
day, and living on parched corn, they made the march. They met 
squads of rebels on the road, but would turn off as soon as they 
■would see them. They passed around the towns, and had no fur- 
ther trouble, reaching Berwick Bay on the 7th of December, A. 
gunboat lying in the stream was hailed, but no boat was sent over- 
until moDiing, when they -\>-ere taken on board, the most com- 
pletely overjoyed men of whom it was possible to conceive. Their 
Confederate rags were soon stripped off and suits of navy blue- 
given them. They were once again under the stars and stripes,, 
and with reverence looked on tlie old flag. 

In twenty-Hve days these men traveled 500 miles, swam twenty 
streams, j>ushing their clothes before them, on rafts; for twenty 
days they were in the water almost constantly, and for days had, 
nothing to eat but corn. 

Sergeant Joseph Carr and Jacob Guess, both of Company G,. 
of the Forty-sixth Indiana, escaped from the stockade at Camp- 
Groce on the night of the 3d of September. A good singer of the- 
One Hundred and Thirtieth Illinois, who frequently olHciated in 
this duty, was emi)loyed in attracting the attention of the guard.. 



^42 THE rORTY-SIXTH INDIANA. 

Wlien llie eni'rrtraniueiJt "svas at its height, the fugitives climbed 
the stockade, dropped over, and made the best possible time until 
-daylight. At that time they had only twenty-five niiles between 
them and tlie prison, and were clear of the hounds. All the next 
• day they laid in a prairie, near a small town. The sun was very 
hot, and they obtained but little rest. They made a good march, 
but were much fatigued. On the third night they came to and 
crossed ilie San Jacinto and passed through an immense canebrake. 
On the other side was a cornfield, from which they obtained roast- 
ing ears. The next morning they found themselves, after a labo- 
rious night's march, surrounded by a settlement. They made a 
-detour and were not seen. It was not safe to proceed, so they laid 
by all day, only three hundred yards from a house on either side, 
and between which negroes with dogs frequently passed. During 
the next night the fugitives came to a railroad on Trinity river. 
"While passing a jdantation house, the men Avere attacked by dogs, 
which alarmed and brought out the proprietor. They asked for 
water, v/hen the man began to ask suspicious questions, which 
■scared the travelers and they started on. Carr subsequently learned 
that this man was an ardent sympathizer with escaping prisoners, 
and would have assisted them had they remained long enough to 
have satistied him of tlieir character. 

Carr and his companion then struck a line of Union posts, 
fifteen, twenty and twenty-four miles apart, with whom they rested 
after their night's march. These points were inhabited by Union 
people, who often assisted Union men. At one of these places, the 
man being fri_>m hi;>me, the women dii'ected the men where to liide, 
and then sent them frxnl. She told them thot if tliey would 
remain anulher day, she would p^repare them a quantity of pro- 
visions, and send them some clothing. They remained, for both 
were sick and exhausted. The next day a friendly Irishman 
brought out enough clothing to make them comfortable, and a 
quantity of good ]irovisions. They were now six days out, and 
_Ouess had become so sick that he was unable to proceed. He went 
to a neighboring house, acknowledged himself an escaped prisoner, 
and AS as taken back to tiie stockade, from Beaumont, on the train. 
Carr went on alone, traveling during the night and lying by in the 
daytime. 

The stations on tlie railroad were kept by other than Southern 
people. They assisted escaping pirisoners, in nearly all cases, and 
directed the fugitive^ fr-jm j'lace to I'lace. One .^^latitm I'CVund the 



CARU AXD GUESS. 143 

■Sabine einlcJ the friendly route. Here, \vlien fifteen days from 
the prison, Carr had become very sick, and "was obliged to lialt. 
He had been lying oat in the woods during the day and staying in 
a friendly house at night. He could not remain in the hou.se dur- 
ing the day, because of the railroad hands. He became rapidly 
worse, .and determined to give himself up. The man who had 
been taking care of him took him back to Beaumont on a hand- 
car, twenty-five miles. Heie, Carr went to a friendly house, but 
finding that the family could not conceal liim, directed the projjrie- 
tor to go to tlie military commandant and inform him of the situa- 
tion. Carr was then arrested and taken down to Sabine City, to 
the hospital. He became very ill, and reniained there four weeks, 
when he was promoted to the guard-house. There being a fleet of 
Federal vessels in the bay. Carr wrote, under a flag of truce, to the 
commandant, describing the condition of himself and anotlier 
prisoner, and asking for some clothes. After some delay, a boat, 
under a flag, came off with a pack.age containing a splendid suit 
-of sailors' clothing for each man. The suit embraced every aiticle 
prescribed b}' navy regulations. That the fit was not exact was 
not the fault of the donors. A letter accompanying the clothes, 
stated that tlie suits were the gift of the ofilcers and men of the 
United States ship PocaJiontos. Subsequently Carr's shoes were 
stolen by the guard, afterward his stockings, and finally his over- 
coat. He saved the remainder of his suit by sleeping in it. 

After being in the guard-house five weeks, and being perfectly 
recovered, Carr was sent back to the stockade, and created au 
immense sensation on his enfree witli his fine clothes. 

Dennis Bagley, of Corapraiy (.4, esca})cd from the stockade on 
the 15th of October. He took a wrong direction, and was seen by 
a negro, wading the river. The unusual circumstance \^as reported 
by the boy to his master, who informed some home guards, who 
followed and arrested Bagley as lie ^\■as resting on a log. He was 
returned to the stockade the next day, almost before he was 
missed. Another opportunity olfering on the night of tlie l<jth of 
November, Bagley again went out with William Cook, of Company 
K of the Forty-sixth, and a mr-mber of the Tliirty-fourth Indiana. 
Tliey traveled east, and had good success until they came to the 
Sabine river. A\-here they were seen and sTispected. They were 
halted at .Sihley's Bluff, v.here the three men arresting tliem went 
into a house. Bagley ran olr and escaped. His comrade^, un.will- 
ing to take the risk, were retained. But Ji;igloy was fairlv cap- 



/, ■ I 



.N 



144 



THE FORTY-SIXTH INDIANA, 



tuied the next day at the fatal Lake Charles, wliere he was securely- 
locked up in prison. After six days' confinement, he \\-as taken 
toward Alexandria. When within forty rniles of the city, a dance- 
was gotten up one evening at the camp fire by some Federal pris- 
oners, and Bagley and a member of a Missouri regiment, takin»- 
advantage of the inattention of the guards, again slipped out.. 
The escaped men traveled rapidly all night, and Avere not over- 
taken. They kept on at nights, and, passing near Chiuaville, 
came along the Red river road. At one place they came unex- 
pectedly upon a negro in the woods. lie knew what they were, 
but assured thera that he would not expose them. After getting; 
them food, he got a horse and piloted them twelve miles. Subse- 
quently, vv'hen they heard chopping in the woods, the men wouldi 
go directly to the negroes and obtain food and advice from them. 

At Lake Charles, Lagley heard of Colonel Flory and his com- 
j^anion. The oflicer who had met tliem liad become convinced that 
he had been imposed on, and that the travelers were " the worst 
kind of Yankees." He was annoyed at his own stupidity. 

The travelers crossed the numerous bayous on the road, and. 
finally struck the Atchafalaya. The great width of the stream* 
for a tinxe bafiled them, but after much labor they got over. They 
were now within a day's march of the Mississippi river, and beo-an* 
to be extremely anxious and fearful. On the east side of the- 
Atchafalaya, they stopped to get breakfast at a house on the road- 
side. They passed for Confederate soldiers, and were invited to 
sit dov,-n to breakfast. The proprietor had been a heavy sufferer- 
from Federal soldiers, taking every horse he had, with much other- 
property. He waxed wrotli in relating the outrages; practiced, 
upon him by the Yankees. The fugitives became alanrred at his- 
vindictive utterances, and thought themselves discovered. The- 
breakfast they were eating was rapidly disposed of, and they were 
glad to find themselves again on the outside. There was no ques- 
tion but what the man knew what his visitors were, and was only 
.prevented from attacking them from prudential considerations-.. 
The next day, December 16, brought the wanderers to Morganza,. 
where they were once more under the stars and stripes. 

In Atigust, some thii-ty men of the Forty-sixth escaped from 
the stockade at Camp Groce. They scaled the walls one bright 
moonlight night unobserved, while a ])arty of singers drew atten- 
tion in another direction. After getting outside, the men sepa- 
rated into 6(juads of two or four, and look dill'erent directions.. 



.;( 



EVA>'S AND BACOME. 145 

One of tlie sojuaJs was made up of V\ illiam Bacouitj and Thomas 
Smith Evans. They traveled hard during the night. After cross- 
ing tliO San Jacinto, they entered a wilderness country, in vridth 
from thirty to forty miles, and extending to the Sabine river, the 
eastern boundary of the State, a wild, uninhabited desert, abound- 
ing in marshes and jungles. On getting some forty miles into this 
wilderness, both men were taken sick. Tl^eir rations became 
exhausted, and after wandering about for some days, hunting a 
settlement or habitation, in vain, were obliged to stop from weak- 
ness. Evans became delirious from brain fever, and Bacome, from 
the effects of fever and ague, was rendered incapable of assisting 
him, or in any way alleviating his sufferings. In this deplorable 
condition, in the midst of a desert infested with wild animals, 
muttering around them by day and houiing by night, with no hope, 
they looked for a horrible death. During the day, Bacome would 
roam over the wilderness, attempting to find even an unfriendly 
house, and return at night unsuccessful. Daylight would again 
find him on the same errand, to meet with the same di*;appoint- 
ment, and to pass a horrible night with his suft'ering and sinking 
companion. Four days he passed in this way, but found no signs 
of a habitation, or of a human being. Bacome chose to remain 
v.'ith his companion until he died, rather than seek his own safety 
by deserting him to the beasts that were about him. At last, Evans 
died, alone with his suffering and helpless but faithful friend, with 
the howl of the wolf the last sound that fell upon his ear. 

Bacome dug a grave, as well as he could in his weak state, 
with sticks, and buried his comrade, and only then thought of hi> 
own safety. Almost exhausted, lie nerved himself for a desper- 
ate effort to reach a habitation. After traveling a distance of 
twenty miles through canebrakes and swamps, almost impenetra- 
ble forests, miles of fallen timber overgrown with briars, he was 
comj.elled to give himself up. Ife v.'as kindly treated until he was 
suiHciently recovered to return to prison. Even rebel sympathies 
were enlisted by the story of his sutlerings. 

Wlien Bacome returned to the stockade and related his sor- 
rowful experience, a gloom was cast over his comrades of the reici- 
ruvnt, for both Evans and Bacome were much respected. 

Bacome again escaped, in a few weeks, and was not heard of 
until March, when hearing that J. N. MuUins, a member of the 
Forty-sixth, was at Shreveport, on his way home, he sent him a 
line, stating that hv was in prison at that place. 



146 THE FORTY-SIXTH IXDIAXA. 

In addition to the osca])es olrertdy imrrated, there ■\\ ere numer- 
ous others. Of tliese, but one, so far as known, was successful. 
Lawrence Ilartlerode, who left Camp Groce on the night of the 
4th, reached the Union lines on the 21st of September. He left 
the prison at a time wlien some forty escaped. They divided into 
small parties, but were retaken with the above exception, at various 
times and on different stages of the journey. 

Of the Forty-sixth regiment, who Mere so unlucky, Avere 
Moses Tucker, Ellis Hughes, Alex. Reed, John Briggs, Theodore 
Taylor, George Oden, David Murphy, John T. Reece, Elihu Shaf- 
fer, George W. IS^iold, T. C. Jackson and Anthony A. Eskew. 
Tucker, Hughes, Briggs, Reed and Taylor went together on the 
niglit of the " big escape." Tucker gave up in two or three 
days, Briggs and Taylor were brought back in a short time, fol- 
lowed by Hughes and Reed. Oden, in company witli two men 
from anotlier reginient, got nearly to the Sabine, but, becoming 
sick, had to give up. They were taken to Houston and put in 
jail — again moved and put in jail, where he was when the i)rison- 
ers of the Forty-sixth left Camp Groce. He was subsequently 
paroled. Murphy, Reece and Jackson raet with the usual ill 
luck, and one tine day found themselves back in Camp Groce. 
Kieid and Eskew were lost sight of shortly after they escaped. 
Shaffer escaped with Hartlerode, and was with him several days ; 
they became separated, and Shaffer being sick, was obliged to give 
himself up. Jackson passed for a man of the Forty-sixth who 
was dead. 

In April, ISlU, a)i expedition of four transports and gunboats 
was sent from Xevr Orleans up the Sabine Pass, into Calcasieu 
bay, for cotton, catllu, ete. There accompanied the fleet a squad 
of thirty-seven men, from the "non-veteran camp" at Alo-iers, 
under command of a lieutenant of tlie Thirtieth Maine. Tlie tieet 
had arrived in the l)ay, and ^hile two of the boats were below, 
the others, the "Wave" and the "Granite State," while lying 
without steam, and no proper watch, and with their guard on the 
opposite shore, were attacked at daybieak one morning by a force, 
Avith a battery, from Sabine City. The boats were not iron-clad 
and were exposed, heljdess and unmanageable, to the rebels, con- 
cealed along the bank. After a ^shori but sharp conflict, the two 
boats surrendered. The infantry on shore had taken no part in 
the contest, and might have, for the i)resent at least, escaped, but 
through mismanagement <>n the part of the oflicer iu command, 



LIST OF PEISOyEES, 



147 



they vrc've captured. Among luo.;o prii^oners were IMaxwell Reece, 
K V. McDo^vGll, Hugh Quinn, Joshua T. Colvin, Philip ]il. Ben- 
jamin and Jacob Oliver, "non-veterans," of the Forty-sixth. The 
guard, -with tlie officers and crcAvs of the vessels, were taken to 
Sabine City, thence to Camp Groee, where they met the Red river 
■delegation in August. The captured boats were hid av.-ay for a 
while in the Sabine vhev, but they afterwards engaged in the 
rebel service, and were subsequently destroyed. But little was 
said about this unfortunate affair, and no one was ever called to 
account for the disaster. 



THE PRISONERS 

Of the Forty-sixth Indiana Volunteers captured at the battle of 
Sabine Cross Roads, on April S, 1SC4, were: 

Lieutenant Colonel Aaron M. Flory, 
Ca])tain V/illiam il. DeHart, 
Chaplain Hamilton Robb. 



Sergeants: David Murphy, 

"William Bacome, 
George W. Nield, 
Ellis J. Hughes, 
John Shaffer, 
George Huffman, 
Joseph H. Carr, 
Jaspei- X. Mullins, 
Cyrus J. Peabody, 
John A. Wilson. 



Privo.f.cs : Levi Canter, 

John T. Reese, 
Joseph Davis, 
George AV, Oden, 
Joshua P. Shields, 
George Lane, 
John Slieppard, 
Anthony A. Eskew, 
William H. Small, 
John W. 33rig<2s, 



CorporaU: Lev/is Canter, 

John "W, Castle, 
Thomas S. Evans, 
Herman Hebner, 
Moses ivlcConnahay, 
Theodore Taylor, 
Jonathan Hiney, 
Bradley Porter, 
D. C. Jenkins, 
Jesse Shamp, 
John YanMeter. 

Privates: "William Fabler, 

John W. Creason, 
J. R. Cunningham, 
William H. Grant, 
Benjamin F, Shelly, 
Anthony Babeno, 
Robert Lewis, 
James H. Gardner, 
Lewis Baer, 
Henry ri>kin, 



148 



THE rORTY-SIXTH INDIANA. 



Fricaies: James INI. McBeth, 
Charles T. Rider, 
John W. Welch, 
Samuel Gable, 
John Meredith, 
Dennis Bagley, 
Jacob Guess, 
Allen White, 
James Fisher, 
Daniel Garbison, 
Amos Orput, 
George Sleh, 
Samuel Johnson, 
George W. Matthev\'s, 
George Moore, 
Elmore Shelt. 



jPriiyiiis: Alexander Ileid, 
Moses M. Tucker, 
James Coleman, 
Jacob Yates, 
Jacob Sell, 
J. C. Chamberlin, 
William Hay ward, 
John 1>. Walden, 
LaAvrence Ilartlerode, 
James Passons, 
John Hamilton, 
William Cook, 
William Kreekbaum, 
Ambrose McYoke, 
Elihu Shatter, 
John Stallard. 



The treatment of prisoners of Avar, by the rebels, is the foulest 
blot on the pages of the brief history of the Confederate Govern- 
ment. Whatever may be claimed for the rebel soldiers for 
courage and manhood, the Southern prison pens will always rise 
up to brand with infamy those who stood guard oyer their starved 
and naked captives, and to expose to the contempt of the civilized 
world those in comimmd in Riehmon<l who directed the machinery' 
at Saulsbury. Andersonville, I^ibby, the Texas-})rison pens, and the 
many places of torture in the South, in creating and conducting 
the barbarous system under Avhich Federal soldiers were destroyed.. 
The uniforniity in the conduct of rebel ])risnns proves that thev 
had only one author and ono jrarpose. 'J'he system \\-as deliberately 
devised to destroy men who Avere captured in battle, and the pur- 
pose Avas most diligently and infamously carried out in each indi- 
vidual jirison. FreijUently comj)lained to by the Federal authori- 
ties, Jeiferson Davis and his colleagues could not be ignorant of 
the system, and, having full authority, those men should be held, 
'responsible. 

THE VETERANS. 

Geneka.1. Order, No. 101, War Department, June 25, 1SC3, 
authorized the re-enlistment of three years' men Avho had already 
sei^A'ed tAvo years, and aAvarded such a bounty of $400. This order 
Avas sub^e-pii.-ntly moditled so tliat ukd V-citig in the service nine 



.. ! 



i,) 



VETERAN'S A>'D NOX-VETEKAXS. 149 

-months, and leaving less than a year to serve, could take advantage 
of the original order. In tlie Department of the Gulf, General 
Banks ordered that, in addition to the bounty, re-enlisting men 
should have a furlough for thirty days, and transportation home 
and return. Large numbers from all the regiments in the Gulf 
Department re-enlisted under the original order, and enjoyed tlie 
furlough. The Forty-sixth Indiana began re-enlistuient in Novem- 
ber, 1SG3, and the new organization was comiileted in February, 
18G4, dating back to January 2, lSG-1. The veteran regiment num- 
bered 307 men. The commissioned ofticers under the order vs'ere 
retained with the new organization and granted an honorable dis- 
-charge on the expiration of their three years, or to continue with 
the regiment until the expiration of the new term, or the end of 
tlie war. The right of resignation was always with them. In the 
Third Division, special orders regulated the departure of the 
several regiments on their furlough, allowing only a limited number 
to go at a time. The Eleventh, Twenty-fourth and Thirty-fourth 
started home before the Red river expedition left Algiers, and it 
was expected that the Forty-sixth would go on the return of the 
first of the absent regiments. Those regiments, or some of them, 
returned just prior to or during the retreat down Red river, when 
furloughs were out of the question. Navigation on the river was 
prevented by rebel occupation, and the regiment was compelled to 
await better opportunities. The start was linally made on June 
]5, 1S64. 

THE NON-VETERANS. 

Thi: meml>ers of tlae Forty-sixth, not re-enli>ting, were tem- 
porarily attached to the Twenty-ninth Wisconsin, and mustered 
for })ay. Subsequently, all non-veterans were assigned to General 
Reynolds, for distribution. A non-veteran camp was linally estab- 
lished at Algiers, and Major B. F. Scherraerhorn, of the Forty- 
,si\th Indiana, placed in command. The men were used on 
detailed service, and rendered valuable assistance on many occa- 
•sions. Several of the Forty-sixth men were sent up the river, as 
guards on transports, and several, on other duty, worked them- 
selves into the Texas prisons, and enjoyed the society of their 
former comrades. The non-veterans ^voYe disc'harged as their 
•original terms expired. 



r 1 • 



:k,osteiS' 



FORTY-SIXTH REGIMENT, l.Y.l 



FIELD AND STAFF. 
COLONELS. 

GRAHAM N. FITCH. 
Commissioned Septoiaber 20, ISOl; resigned August 5, 1SG2. 

THOMAS H. BRINGHURST. 

Commissioned major September .30, 1S61, lieutenant colonel 
May 2G, 1862, colonel August 6, 18G2; mustered out with the 
regiment. 

LIEUTENANT COLONELS. 

NEWTON' Q. SCOTT. 

Commissioned September 30, ISGl; resigned May 2-1, 1SG2. 

JOHK H. GOULD. ' 

Commissioned captain of Com])any A October 4, ISGl. major 
INlay 25, 18G2, lieutenant colonel August G, 1SG2; resigned 
February 9, TS03, and ci^mmi^'-iop.ed lieutcnact culonel of the 
One Hi'.ndred and Tliirty-tlfth Kegiuient. 
AARON M. FLORY. 

Commissioned captain of Company B October 6, ISGl, major 
May 25, 18G2, lieutenant colonel February 10, ISGo; mustered 
out with tlie regiment. 

MAJORS. 

BERNARD F. SCHERMERHORN. 

Commissioned captain of Company C October 4, ISGl, major 
February 11, 18G3; mustered out on expiration of term, 
Deceml>er 24, 1SG4. 
^YILLIA.M M. DkHART. 

Commissioned first lieutenant of Company D October 4, ISol, 
captain May IG, 1SG2, major January 1, 1SG5; mustered out 
with the regiment as captain." 

*Tlie reL'inient beiiiL;- redufed iuluw Ihe niiiiiiii'ini, tlie oMicer couid 
not be niustert-d. 



1j4 the yOP.TY-SIXTH INDIANA. 

ADJUTANTS. 

RICHARD P. DeHART. 

Commissioned September 30, ISGl; major Ninety-ninth Regi- 
ment October IS, 1SG2. 

JAMES M. WATTS. 

Commissioned second lieuten.ant of Company A October 4, 
iSGl, first lieutenant May 2C,, TSG2, adjutant October 20, 1SG2, 
major One Hundred and Fiftieth Regiment March 9, 1S65; 
wounded at Port Gibson, Miss., May 1, 1SG3. 

AUGUSTUS G. SINKS. 

Enlisted in Com])any K December 11, 18G1; appointed cor- 
poral June 30, 18G2, sergeant February 14, 18G3, commissioned 
adjutant April 1,18G5; mustered out with the regiment. 

QUARTERMASTERS. 

DAVID D. DYEEMAN. 

Commisioned September 24, ISGl; resigned June 11, 1SG2. 

ELZA J. DOWNEY. 

Enlisted in Company A and appointed commissary sergeant 
December 11, 18G1, commissioned Cjuartermaster June 12, 
18G2; wounded at Fort Pemberton, Miss., in ^larch, 1SG3; 
resigned June 15, 1SG3. 

THOMAS A. HOWES. 

Enlisted in Company B February 22, 1SG2; commissioned 
quartermaster June IG, 18C3; resigned May 27, 1865. 

AVILLIAM S. RICHARDSON. 

Enlisted in Comjtany B November 5, 18G1, commissioned 
- quartcDnaster I**Iay 2S, 1865; mustered out with the rt-giment. 

CHAPLAINS. 

ROBERT IRVIN. 

Commissioned December 11, 1S61; i-esigned May S, 1SG2. 
"HAMIUrON ROBE. 

Commissioned Deceml)er 16, 1862; mustered out with the 
regiment. 

SURGEONS. 

HORACE COLEMAN. 

Commissi')uc-d Ocl<.>bor 7, ISCl; resigned July 31, 1863. 

ISRAEL B. WASHBUP.N. 

Enlisted in Company I December 2, 1861, commissioned 
assistant surgeon December 27, 1862, surgeon October 17, 
1SG3; mustered out on expiration of term, December 28, 1864. 

JOSHUA W. UNDERHILL. 

En]'.~t»;d in Company E November 5, 1861, commissioned 
assistant surgeon December 30, 1SG2, surgeon January 1, 1865; 
mustered out v>-ith the rt- criment. ■ 



r{ 



EOSTKU OF COMPANY A. 155 

ASSISTANT SURGEONS. 

WILLIAM S. HAYMOXD. 

Coinmissioned November 10, ISGl; resiijned December 29, 
1862. 

ASA COLEMAN. 

Commissioned May 14, 1SG2; resigned December 2(5, 1SG2. 

WILLIAM SPENCER. 

Commissioned July 7, 1862; resigned December 29, 1862. 

GEORGE M. DOANP:. 

Eidisted in Company B November 5, 1861, commissioned 
assistant surgeon Jaiiuary 1, 1S65; mustered out with regi- 
ment September 4, 1S65. 

REGIMENTAL NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF. 

WILLIA:M R. 310RSE. 

Private Com}>any B; mustered in November 5, ISGl; pro- 
moted quartermaster sergeant December 11, ISGl; discharged 
April 1, 18G2. 

ALFRED U. 3IcALISTER. 

Private Company I; mustered in Novembers. 1861; appointed 
chief musician November 23, 1S61; honorably discharged at 
Milliken's Bend, La., A])ril 15, 18G3, under General Order, 
No. 14, of Secretary of War. 

JAMES v.. VIGUS. 

Private Company D; mustered in November 5, 1861 ; appointed 
drum major December 11, ISGl; dischai'ged. 



COMPANY A. 

[This company was muslerc-.! inlu \h.^ ser\ ice November 1, ISGl. TLe 
regiment was tiiially discharged September 4, ItiGo.j 

CAPTAINS. 

WILLI a:\[ a. pigman. 

Commissioned tirst lieutenant October 4. ISGl; captain July 1, 
1862; wounded at Sabine Cross Roads; honorably discharged 

■^ December IS, 1S64. 

JxVMES Y. BROUGIi. 

Enlisted in Company A November 1, ISGl; commissioned 
second lieutenant July 1, 1SG2, tirst lieutenant October 20, 
1862; captain February 15, 1SG5; mustered out with the regi-' 
inent. 

FI.RST LIEUTENANT. 

JONATHAN 3I00RE. 

Enlisted in Cuuipany A N..>veniber 1, ISGI; conimissioned 



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156 THE FORTV-SIXTII INDIAXxV. 

second lieulonant May 23, lSt'3, first lieutenaut February 
11, 1865; miLstered out Avith the regiment. 

SECOND LIEUTENANTS. 

WILLIAM A. ANDREWS. 

Enlisted in Company A Xovember 1, 1S61; commissioned 
second lieutenant October 20, 1SG2; killed at Champion's Hill, 
Miss., May IC, 1SG3. 

LEVI C. LEsbURD. 

Enlisted November 1, 1S61; veteran; commissioned second 
lieutenant Jujie 1, 1865; mustered out as first sergeant, with 
the regiment.*^ 

SERGEANTS. 

BERL P. PENNY. 

Veteran; mustered out July 8, 1SG5. 
JAMES HASLETT. 

Dischai-ged October 9^ 1862, disal)ility. 

CORPORALS. 

AMOS M. BALLARD. 

Discharged May 30, 1862, disability. 
FRANCIS THAYER. 

Mustered out December 1, ISGi, expiration of term of service. 
WILLIAM H. PADGET. 

Died May 3, 1863, of wounds received at the battle of Port 

Gibson, Miss., May 1, 1863. 
LEWIS CANTER. 

Veteran; promoted sergeant; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
FRANCIS M. BAUM. 

Discharged May 19, 1862, disability. 
MICHAEL DUNCAN. 

Clustered out DecfUiber 1, 1864, expiration of term of service. 
JAMES T. FRANKLIN. 

Veteran; promoted sergeant major: mustered out September 

4, 1865. 

PRIVATES. 

WILLIAM W. BARNES. 

A]ip()inted musician; mustered out Decentber 1, 1864, term of 

service expired. 
BENJAMIN F. RANDOLPH. 

Aj)pointed musician; mustered out December 1, 1864, term of 

service expired. 
GEORGE C. SMOCK. 

Appointed wagoner; discharged IMay 10, 1862, disability. 

* Commissioned, hut not iiiustercil Ixcauif coiain'.ny IkIhw nnnimum. 



ROSTER OF COMPANY 'a. 157 

JACOB AKER. 

Veteran; promoted to serf^eant; mustered out September 4, 
1S65. 

ALFRED J. ANDERSON. 

Discharged May 3U, 1SG2, disability. 

SAMUEL L ANDERSON. 

Wounded at the battle of Champion's Hill, Miss., May 16, 
1S63; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps and honorably 
discharged. 

ANDREW ASHBA. 

Discharged October IC, 1862, disability. 

JOHN BEAVER. 

Wounded at the battle of Port Gibson, Miss., May 1, 1S63; 
killed at the battle of Champion's Hill, Miss., May 16, 18G3. 

LEWIS BILLIARD. 

Discharged July 29, 1863, because of wounds received at the 
battle of Champion's Hill, Miss., May 16, 1363. 

AMOS bower:man. 

Mustered out December 1, 1S62, term of service expired. 

GEORGE W. BROUGH. 

Mustered out December 1, 1864, term of service expired. 

JAMES D. CAMPBELL. 

Veteran; promoted to sergeant; mustered out September 4, 
1865. 

LEVI CANTER. 

Veteran; wounded at the battle of Champion's Hill, IMiss., 
May 16, 1863; mustered out September 4, 1S65. 

JOHN CORN IS. 

Discharged P'ebruary 5, 1863, disability. 

GEORGE W. CRESON. 

Died at Helena, Ark., October 4, 1862. 

JOHN W. CRESON. 

Veteran; mustered out Se})tember4, 1865. 
WILLIAM T. DAVIDSON. 

Discharged May 30, 1862, disability. 
ROBERT W. DAVIDSON. 

Died at Pittsburg, Ind., May 15, 1863. 

SILAS DAVIS. 

Killed at the battle of Champion's Hill, Miss., May 16, 1863. 

HORACE H. DEYO. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

willia:m h. dunkin. 

Wounded at the battle of Champion's Hill, ]\riss., May 16, 
1863: mu>tered out December 1, 1864, expiration of term of 
Service. 



158 THE yORTY-SIXTH INDIANA. 

ROBER'J' B. EVANS. 

Died in Carroll county, Ind., March 18, 18G2. 
JASPER L. EWIXG. 

Mustered out December 1, 1S64, expiration of term of service. 
CHARLES B. FAUCETT. 

Wounded at buttle of Port Gibson, Miss., May 1, 1863; 

mustered out December 1, 1S64, expiration of terni'of service! 
JOHN F. FISHER. 

Died at Cohuiibus, Ky., September .30, 1SG2. 
JOHN FREED. 

Died at Vicksburg, Miss., July 4, 1SG3. 
RICHARD T. FREED. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 18(35. 
JOHN FRY. 

Discharged May 3U, 1S62, disability. 
THOMAS S\ GIBSON. 

Veteran; promoted corporal; mustered out 8o}»tember 4, 1S65. 
FRANCIS M. GINN. 

Discharged Februarv 30, 1803, disability. 
THOMAS B. GINN. 

Mustered out December 1, 1SG4, term of service expired. 
JOHN M. GRIDER. 

Discharged Mav 30, 18G2, disability. 
ALFRED II. HARDY. 

Died July IS, 1SG3, of wounds received at the siege of Jack- 
son, Miss. 

JAMES HAY. 

Mustered out December 1, 1SG4, term of service expired. 

willia:^ c. heartzog. 

Died Julv 2, 1SG3, of wounds received at Chamijion's Hill, 

:>:iss., May li;. 1SG3. 
JEREMIAH ilOMBACK. 

Mustered out December 1, 1SG4, term of service expired. 
SOLOMON JAY. 

Mustered out December 1, 1SG4, term of service expired 
ENOS JAY. 

Mustered out December 1, 1SG4, term of service expired. 
ROBEP.T G. JOHNSON. 

Clustered out Decetnber 1, 18G4, ternr of service expired, 
SAMUEL N. JOHNSON. 

Mustered out December 1, lsG4, term of service expired. 
ALBERT A. JULIEN. 

Promoted sergeant: wounded at the 1)attle of Chainpion's 

Hill, >liss., May It!, 1sG3; mu-iered out December 1, 1SG4, 

term tif service expiied. 



■ I '' 



KOSTER OF COirrAXY A. 159 

WILLIAM F. JULIEX. 

Discharixed January 20, 1803, disability. 
WILLIAM A. KIXSET. 

Discliarged OL'tober 6, 1SG3, on account of wounds received 

at Cbam})ion*s Hill, Miss., May 10, 1SG3. 
SA31UEL A. KIRKPATRICK. 

Mustered out December 1, 18G4, term of service expired 
BENJAMIN LESGURIX 

Discharged October 4, 1SG2, disability. 
ELTAS J. LISTER. 

Promoted corporal; wounded at Champion's Hill. Mav IG, 

1SG3; mustered out December 1, lSG-1, term of service expired' 
WILLIAM M. MALCOM. 

Died October S, 1SG2, at Helena, Ark. 
RALPH .AIcMAHAN. 

Veteran; wounded at the battle of Champion's Hill, Miss., 

May IG, LSG3; died at Jelfersonville, Ind., Julv IS, ISG.j. 
JACOB Y. 3IcX AM AR. 

Veteran; promoted corporal; mustered out September 5, 1SG3 
JAMES F. MELSON. 

Discharged 3Iay 30, lSn2. 
ISAAC AV. MONTGOMERY. 

Mustered out December 1, 1SC4, by reason of expiration of 

term ol service. 

DAVID C. MURPHY. 

Veteran; promoted sergeant; mustered out Septeniber 4, 1S65 

SWAIN II. NELSON. 

Killed at Champion's Hill, Miss., Mav IG, 1SG3 

JOHN NEWELL. 

Died June 2, 1SG3, of wounds received at the battle of Cham- 
pion's Hill, Miss., 3Iav 16, 1SG3. 

PETER O. FAR REEL. 

Discharged Februarv 11, 1S63: disability. 

SAMUEL B. PAT'J ERSON. 

Captured at Cham]>ion"s Hill, Miss., Mav IG, 1SG3; mustered 
out December 1, 18G4; term of service expired. 

CHAIH.ES M. PARKFR. 

Discharged July 20, 1SG3, at St. Louis, ,AIo., because of 
M-ounds received at the battle of Cham])ion"s Hill, Miss., 
May 16, 16G3; one very severe wound in the face, and loss of 
right arm near the shoulder. 

WILSON II. pj-.T^rri'. 

Died at St. Louis, .^lo., Januarv 2, 1SG3. 
FRANCIS M. I'RFSTOX. 

-Mustered out December 1, 1SG4, term of service expired. 



;' i. 
/ 



/.I ; 



ICO THE yORTV-SIXTH INDIANA. 

HIKA^[ V. IJAXSOM. 

Discharged September 8, 1SC2, disability. 

ADONIRAM .]. HEED. 

Discharged July, 1S62, disability. 

JOIIX T. KEES. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

Ar.SALOM RICIICREEK. 

HEZEKIAIl ROlilSOX. 

Promoted corporal; mustered out December 1, 1865, term of 

service expired. 
MARTIN L. lU^rXER. 

Killed by guerrillas, near Helena, Ark., October 26, 1862. 
XOAH SHaVeR. 

Died at St. Louis, Mo., December 31, 1862. 

epiirtam shap^er. 

IMustered out December 1, 13G4, term of service expired. 
JOllX SHAFFER. 

Died July 12, 1SG2, of wounds received from guerrillas on 

White river, Arkansas. 
JOHN F. SHERD) AX. 

Wounded at the battle of Champion's Hill, Miss., May 16, 

1863; mustered out December 1, 1804, term of service expired. 
CHARLES SHIRAR. 

Discharged October 14, 1862, disability. 
THOMAS W. SLEETH. 

Wounded at the battle of Champion's Hill, ]\[iss., May 16, 

1S63; mustered out December 1, 1SG4, term of service expired. 
ZxVCHARIAH T. SMriH. 

Discharged June 10, 1363; disabilitv. 
HEXRY L.^ S:\nTH. 

Killed at Champion's Hill, ?*Iiss., May 16, 1863. 
ARCHHLVLD SM()CK. 

Veteran; killed at tlie battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., 

April 8, 1864. 

DAXLEL P. SNYDER. 

Wounded at Port Gibson; mustered out December 1, 1864, 
. term of service expired. 
AXDRE^V L. S'lRAIX. 

Di-scharged February 7, 1863, disability. 
JOHX X. STOOPS. 

Clustered out December 1, 1864, term of service expired. 
AXDREW J. SW'ATTS. 

Discharged December 20, 1864, term of service expired. 
THEODORE TEF. 

Clustered out December 1, 1^64, term of service expired. 



ROSTKR OF COMPANY A. 161 

JOHN J. VINEY. 

Promoted sergeant; Avounded at Carancro Bayou, La. ; mustered 
out December 1, 18G4, terra of service expired. 

GEORGE A. WITCIIEK. 

Discharged October 1-i, 1863, disability. 

RUBEN WHITE. 

Clustered out December 1, 1864, terra of service expired. 
PORTS WILSON. 

Mustered out December 1, 1S64, terra of service expired. 

RECRUITS. 

JA^fES A. ARNOT. 

Mustered in February 21, 1SG5; mustered out September 4, 
1865. 

HAin^EY J. BALL. 

^Mustered in January 29, 1864; mastered out September 4, 
]S65. 

HENRY C. CANTER. 

Mustered in March 10,1862; discharged July 16, 1863, disa- 
bility. 

HUGH T. CROCKETT. 

Mustered in October 31, 1862; Avounded at the battle of 
Champion's Hill, ^liss., May 16, 1863; mustered out May 29, 
1865. 

WILLIAM. M. DERN. 

^fustered in July 29, 1864; mustered out September 4. 1865, 

ISAAC N. DERX. 

Mustered in February 21, 1365; mustered out Sei>tember 4, 
1865. 

WILLIAM G. FRANKLIN. 

Mustered January 21, 1864; died at New Orleans, La., Octo- 
ber 3, 1864. 

CARTER FRANKLIN. 

Mustered in !March S, 1864; died at Lexington, Ky., February 

28, 1865. 
GEORGE W. GI^SEMAN. 

Mustered in February 21, 1865; mustered out September 4, 

1865. 
ELIJAH F, GWINN. 

^Mustered in ^Lirch 8, 1864; mustered out June 26, 1865. 
WILLIAM H. GWINN. 

Mustered in 31arch 8, 1864; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
JAMES ^[. GWINN. 

Mustered in January 25, 1865; mustered out September 4, 

1865. 



162 THE lORTY-SIXTII INDIANA. 

HENRY GIBSOX. 

jNIustered in November 11, 1864; mustered out Sc})teniber 4, 

18G5. 
JOHN A. IIAMILL. 

Plastered in February 21, 1SG5; mustered out September 4, 

1S65. 
GRAN 1)1 SON A. :^1AXWELL. 

Clustered in July 29, 1SG4; mustered out September 4, 18G5. 
TIIC^SIAS K. MONTGOMERY. 

Musteied in December 23, 1863; mustered out September 4, 

1SG5. 
GEORGE A. MOORE. 

Mustered in July 29, 1S64; mastered out July 17, 1S65. 

tiio:mas w. patton. 

.Mustered in November 12, 1862; mustered out July 12, 1865. 
JEROME 0. RYHN. 

Mustered in January 29, 1864; mustered out July 13, 1S65. 

wieliam shafer. * 

Mustered in July 27, 1S64; mustered out July 5, 1865. 
nORxVCE M. TIIOMl'SON. 

]Mustered in Januurv 13, 1864; mustered out September 4, 

1865. 
WILLIAAI IL UNDERHILL. 

Clustered in July 29, 1864; mustered out September 4, 1865. 



COMPANY B. 

[This conii>:iiiy was uiustercd info the service Xoveniber 5, IsGl, and mus- 
tcioil nut Stpti'iiilier 4, lsi)5.J 

CAPTAIN'S. 

FRANK SWIGART. 

Sergeant; enlisted November 5, 1661; commissioned second 
lie\ilenant April 2'!, 1862, captain October 16, 1862; wounded 
at Sabine Cross Roads, La., April 6, 1864; resigned on account 
of wounds, October 12, 1864. 

THEODORE R. FORGEY. 

Enlisted XuvemlK-r 5, 18iJl; commissioned first lieutenant 
Septcntber 2, 1863, captain December 27, 1864; mustered out 
witlt regiment. 

FIRST LIEUTENANTS. 

JOHN T. CASTLE. 

Commissioned first lieutenant October 4, 1361; wounded at 
Cl\amv>ion"s Hill, .Mis<., Mav 16, ISi"'-!; rcsiviie'l Au.:,",ist 22, 
1863.' 



KOSTEK OF COIIPAXY B. 163 

MATTHEW K. GRAHAM. 

Sergeant; enlisted November 5, 1861; commissioned second 
lieutenant April 15, 18G2, tirst lieutenant August 30, 1862; died 
of wounds received at Fort Pillow, Tenn., October 15, 1862. 

THEOPHILUS P. RODGERS. 

Enlisted November 5, 1861; commissioned first lieutenant 
December 27, 1S61; mustered out "with the regiment. 

SECOND LIEUTENANTS. 

JOHN M. ARNOIIT. 

Commissioned second lieutenant October 4, 1861; resigned 
April 9, 1862. 

LOREN C. STEVENS. 

P^nlisted November 5, 1861; commissioned second lieutenant 
October 16, 1862; died of disease November 19, 1863. 

MARCELLUS H. NASH. 

ICnlisted Novembers, 1861; commissioned second lieutenant 
June 1, 1865; mustered out wilh the regiment. 

SERGEANTS. 

ISAAC K. CASTLE. 

Discharged February 22, 1863, disability. 
EATON B. FORGET. * 

Discharged August 11, 1862, disability. 
JOHN W. TIPPETT. 

Discharged June 15, 1863, disability. 

CORPORALS. 

AUSTIN ADAIR. 

Discharged April 2-1, 1862, disability. 
R01>ERT 11. liRVER. 

Died at Tolono, 111., December 10, 1362. 
THOMAS CASTLE. 

Discharged June 16, 1863, disaViility. 
THOMAS J^. J A:\IES0N. 

Veteran; discharged SeptemlxT 12, 1364, disabilitv. 
JOHN R. CITNNINGHAM. 

Veteran; taken prisoner at Sabine Cross Roads, La., April 6. 

1864; died at sea, on his "svav home from prison, December 

14, 1864. 
JOHNSON M. REED. 

Discharged September 20, 1362, disability. 

PRIVATES. 

JAY M. RICHARDSON. 

Detailed a? musician; died at Logansjjorr, Iiid., July 21, 1864. 



164 



THE rOETY-SIXTH IXDIAXA. 



GEORGE W. CRONK. 

Detailed as wagoner; discharged May 13, 1S64, disability. 
WILLIAM 11. BELL. 

Veteran; promoted sergeant December 13, 1862: wounded at 

the battle of Champion"''s Hill :yLay 16, 1803; discliarired June 

20, 18G5, disability. 

ASA BLACK. 

Died .Alarch 9, 18G2, at New Madrid, ^lo. 
JAMES BLACK. 

Died at New Madrid, Mo., March 10, 1862. 
CHARLES F. BILLIXGTON. 

Discliarged May 10, 1862, disability. 
HENRY BROWN. 

Veteran; promoted to corporal; promoted sergeant; wounded 

at the battle of Port Gibson, Miss., May 1,^1863; mustered 

out September 4, 1865. 

GEORGE W. BRUINGTON. 

\eteran; promoted corporal; Avounded at the mouth of Yazoo 

Pass February 22, 1863; mustered out September 4, lS6.o. 
JOHN W. CASTLE. 

Veteran; promoted corporal; taken prisoner at Sabine Cross 

Roads, La.; mustered out September 4, 1365. 
SAMUEL S. CUSTER. 

Veteran; promoted corporal; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
JAMES IL CALLER. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

ja:\[es compton. 

Discharged August 1, disability. 

benja:\[ix f. car.ahne. 

Discharged June 16, 1363, disabilit}'. 
GEORGE P. DALE. 

Mustered out December 1, 1864, terjn of service expired. 
WILLIAM DAVIS. 

Discharged 1862, disability. 
JOSEPH DAVIS. 

.Veteran; taken prisoner at Sabine Cross Roads April S, 1864; 

died at New Orleans, La., December 24, 1864, while on road 

home from rebel prison. 

ja:mes c. dill. 

Veteran; wounded at Champion's Hill, Miss., May 16, 1863; 

mustered out September 4, 1865. 
JOHN W. DAGI^E. 

Discharged October 28, 1862, disability. 
ABRAHAM ELLIS. 

Discl)arge<l December IS, 1862, disability. 



KOSTKR OF COMPANY B, 1G5 

DICKINSON J. FOP.GEY. 

Discharged June IG, 1SG2, -without his knowledge, disability, 
while in" hospital. He made two etl'orts to get back without 
success. 
GEORGE W. FORGEY. 

Died at Camp Wicklilie, Ky., February 7, 1862. 

JOHN D. forgp:y. 

Discharged April 2, 1SG2, disability. 

SAMUEL J. FOX. 

Discharged February 10, 1862, disability. 

JOHN FOX. 

Discharged May 10, 18G2, disability. 

JAMES ^V.^ GORDON. 

Discharged :March 14, 1862, disability. 

WILLIAM H. GL^ARD. 

Veteran; wounded at the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., 

April 8, 186-1; promoted corporal; mustered out September 

4, 1SG5. 
AVILTJAIVI 11. GRANT. 

Veteran; taken prisoner at Sabine Cross Roads, La., April 

8, 1864; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
ISAAC GRANT. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
JOHN HERRELL. 

Died at ^lemphis, Tenu., September 18, 1862. 
WILLI A^L HART. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

AMOS J. HART. 

Veteran; juustered out September 4, 1865. 

SAMUEL HANKY. 

Veteran; mustered out September i, 1865. 

JESSE HULCE. 

:\luslered out October 28, 1865. 

WILLIAM P. HORNEY. 

Died at New .Madrid, 3Io., April 21, 1862. 

IIEZEKIAH B. INGHAM. 

Veteran; promoted sergeant; wounded at Champion's Hill, 
]Miss., 3Iay 16, 1S63: mustered out September 4, 1865. 

JOHN J. .JAMISON. 

Appointed wardmaster December 12, 1861; mustered out to 
be api)ointcd hos})ital steAvard in regular army. 

SAMUEL L. .JL^MP. 

Died at Helena, Ark., November 7, 1362. 

WILLIAM B. KEP.NS. 

Detached to Pioneer Corps April IG, 1863; mustered out 
Docembtr 1, 1861, term of service ex|)ired. 



166 THE FOKTY-SIXTH INDIANA. 

LEVI LYNCH. 

Died at New Orleans, La., December 2, 1863, of -wounds 
received at Champion's Hill, Miss., May 16, 1863. 

REESE D. LAIRD. 

Died at Memphis, Tenn., December 13, 1862, of gun-shot 
wounds. 

GEORGE LOBRICK. 

Veteran; mustered out December 4, 1865. 

ada:\ls ^IcMillan. 

Died at Memphis, Tenn., July 14, 1862. 

GEORGE M. McCARTY. 

Promoted to quartermaster sergeant; veteran; mustered out 
September 4, 1865. 

PETER MAISE. 

Veteran; wounded at Champion's Hill, Miss., May 16, 1863; 
mustered out September 4, 1865. 

STEPHEN J. MELLINGER. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
LIENRY T. :\[ARTIN. 

Veteran; promoted corporal; mustered out September 4, 

1865. 
ALBERT MICHAELS. 

Appointed corporal; mustered out December 1, 1864, term of 

service expired. 
AUGUSTUS W. NASH. 

Died at St. Louis, Mo., April 30, 1862. 
GEORGE W. ODEN. 

Veteran; promoted corporal; taken prisoner at Sabine Cross 

Roads, La.; mustered out September 4, 1S65. 
JOHN N. OLIVER. 

Transferred to Sixteeniji Oiiio r^rUtery; mustered out from. 

battery. 

FRANKLIN PFOUTZ. 

Mustered out December 1, 1864, terra of service expired. 
WILLIA.^I I'FOUTZ. 

Appointed corporal ]\Iarch 1, 1863; killed at the battle of 

Champion's Hill, Miss., May 16, 1863. 
SAMUEL N. PENNELL. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1S65. 
PHILIP PEARSON. 

Died near New Waverly, Ind., March 28, 1862. 
JOSEPH REDD. 

Died at Louisville, Ky,, ]\Iarch 14, 1862. 
CHARLES D. REEDER. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1S65. 



; t' 



K, •»■ 



ROSTEK OF COMPANY B. 167 

WILLIAM A. KODGEIIS. 

Appointed corporal April 15, 1SG3; appointed wardmaster 
January 1, 1SG3; transferred to Invalid C'or]).s January 2, 18o4; 
discharged from that organization. 

CIIAU^XY KODGEKS. 

Died at Helena, Ark., September 8, 18G2. 

GEORGE KAXCE. 

Discharged September 20, 1802, disability. 

ABRAHAM RUTT. 

Died June 17, 1862, at Wooster, Ohio. 

JOSEPH M. ROBERTS. 

Veteran; promoted sergeant; mastered out September 4> 
1865. 

SAMUEL STEWART. 

Wounded at Fort Pemberton, Miss., ^larch 11, 18G3; trans- 
ferred to Invalid Corps .January 2, lSG-1; mustered out froia 
that organization. 

THOMAS J. STEWART. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 18G5. 

JOHN T. SHIELDS. 

Discharged April 27, 18G3, disability. 

JOSHUA P. SHIELDS. 

Veteran; taken prisoner at battle of Sabine Cross Ploads, La., 
April 8, 18G4; discharged July 15, 1865, disability. 

JOSEPPI SPECIE. 

Discharged October 17, 1SG2, disability. 

NICHOLAS D. SMITH. 

Died Bl Vicksburg, Miss., June 24, 1SG3. 

SAMUEL TILTOX. 

Discharged September 11, 1$G2, disability. 

WILLIAM F. THOMAS. 

Discharged July 15, 1862, disability. 

AITRELIUS L. VOORHIS. 

Veteran; promoted corporal; wounded at the mouth of Yazoo 
Pass, Miss., February 22, 18G3; mastered out September 4, 
18G5. 

MANLIUS N. VOORHIS. 

Veteran; promoted hospital steward; mustered out September 
4, 1S65. 

ISAAC R. WINTERS. 

Veteran; promoted sergeant; mustered out September 4, 1SG5. 

WAIiREN L. WAGONER. 

Transferred to Sixteenth Ohio Battery, an<I mustered out from 
that ori^ajiizatioii. 



168 THE FOKTY-SIXTH IXDIAXA. 

KOin:KT S. WIIITAKER. 

Died March 1, 18G-1, at New Orleans, La. 

MICHAEL WELSH. 

RECRUITS. 

PHILIP L. ALLHAXDS. 

Veteran; mustered in February 13, 1SG2; mustered out Sep- 
tember 4, 1SG5. 
AUSTIN ADAIl^ 

Mustered in February 27, 1865; mustered out September 4, 

1SG5. 
ANDREW J. BACHELOR. 

^Mustered in February 13, 18G2; died of wounds June 17, 18G3, 

at Yicksburg, Miss., 
EDW^VRD L. liRUINGTON. 

Mustered in February 27, 1685: mustered out September 4, 

1865. 
ISRAEL F. BURNS. 

Mustered in February 27, 1865; mustered out September 4, 

18G5. 
ALFl^ED H. BELL. 

Mustered in January 8, 18G4; mustered out September 4, 

18G5. 
WILLIAM A. CUSTER. 

^Mustered in January 2, 18G4; veteran; mustered out Septem- 
ber 4, 1865. 
JOHN N. CxVMPBELL. 

Clustered in 3[arch 30, 18G5; mustered out Se])tcmber 4, 1865. 
JA:\rES DUFFY. 

Mustered in Se})tember 11, 1862; discharged ]\Lareh 5, 1SG2, 

disability. 
THOMAS C. FOr.GEY. 

^Mustered in ]\Iarch 1, 18G4; mustered out September 4, 18G5. 
ANDliEW J. FORGEY. 

]\Iustered in IMarch 1, 1864; mustered out May 13, 1865, disa- 
bility. 
GEOl^GE W. GOODWIN. 

Mustered in February 27, 1865; discharged May 13, 1865, 

disability. 

JOHN :m. GRENIGER. 

Mustered in J-'ebruary 16, 1865; discharged May 13, 1865, dis- 
ability. 

JACOB D. IIEBISON. 

Mustered in February 16, 1865; discharged May 29, 1865. 

JASPER HUMRICKHOUSE. 

^Mustered February 1<), 18G5; mu:>tered out wSoptember 4, 1865. 



KOSTEK OF COMPANY B. 169 

IIARKISOX liOUIXE. 

Mustered in February 2S, 1805; discharged 'May 13, 1SG5. 

DAVID D. LENOX. 

Mustored in September 11, 1SG2; veteran; mustered out July 
17, ISlio. 

EOIJERT K. LEXOX. 

Mustered in March 22, ISCo; mustered out July 17, 1865. 
WILLI A31 B. LAKE. 

Mustered in March 22, 18G5; mustered .out September -J, 1805. 

ja:\ies Mcpiieeters. 

^Mustered in February 28, 18G5; mustered out September 4, 

1SG5. 

ROBERT AV. McELIIAXY. 

Mustered in March 29, 1SG5; mustered out September 4, 13G5. 
KARinsoX :\rUMMERT. 

Mustered in Julv 27, 1SG5; died at Lexinoton, Ky., June 6, 

IbGy. 

ALFRED MARPOLE. 

Mustered in June 5, 18G4; mustered out June 8, 1865. 

WILLARD G. XASIl. 

^Mustered in IMarch 29, 18G5; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

WILLIAM L. 1»0WELL. 

Veteran; musteix-d in February 22, 18G2; mustered out Sep- 
tember 4, 18G5. 

TH03[AS A. POPE. 

Mustered in February 2, 1864; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
WILLIAM D. PURSELL. 

Mustered in January 29, 1861; di><charged February 22, 1865, 
disability. 

CYRUS T. I'URSELL. 

^Mustered in March 29, 1865; discharged 'Mciy 13, 1865. 
LIXDSAY li. PAYTOX. 

^Mustered in February 16, 1865; mustered out September 4, 

1865. 

DAXIEL ]?00F. 

Mustered in Marcli 1, 1861; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
TIIEOPIIILUS 31. SIIAXKS. 

Mustered in October 7, 1862; promoted corporal; mustered 

out Sejitember 4, 1865. 

BEX.1A3IIX F. SHELLY. 

Clustered in October 7, lhG2; taken prisoner at Sabine Cross 
Roads, La., April S, 1^04; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

JACOB SEE. 

Mustered in 3Lircli 1, 18(;-J. mustered out September 4, 18G5. 



r.,i ,; 



170 THE VOKTY-SIXTII INDIANA. 

ELIIIU SEE. 

Mustered iji ^Nfarcli 1, 1SG4; died at Lexington, Ky., ^larch 2, 

1SG5. 
JOHN STUDAILVKEK. 

Mustered in March 1, 1804; mtistered out September 4, 1S65. 
AVILLIA^r E. TIIO^FAS. 

INtustered in March. 1, 1SG4; mustered out September 4, 1SG5. 

wilija:^! k. winters. 

Mustered in March 1, 18G4; mustered out September 4, 1SG5. 



COMPANY C. 

[This company was mustered into tlie service November 7, 18G1.] 
CAPTAINS. 

ANDREW B. HOBERTSON. 

Commissioned second lieutenant October 4, ]S61, first lieuten- 
ant April 3*), 1SG2, captain Eebruary 11, 1863; resitifned July 
28, 18G3. 

JOHN G. TROXELL. 

Sergeant; enlisted November 7, ISGl; commissioned second 
lieutenant A]M-il 30, 1SG2, first lieutenant February 11, 1SG3, 
captain July 20, 18G3; mustered out Dec. 28, 1SG4, terra expired. 

JOSEPH HENDERSON. 

Enlisted November 7, 1S61; wounded at Champion's Hill May 
16, 18G3; Avounded April 8, 18G4, at Sabine Cross Roads, La.; 
commissioned first lieutenant September 15, 1SG4, captain 
January 1, 1SG5; mustered out with the regiment. 

FIRST LIEUTENANTS. 

ANTHONY G A RKIH'T. 

Commissioned first lieutenant October 7, 18G1; resigned April 
26, 18G2. 

WILLIAM G. SCHNEPP. 

Sergeant; enlisted November 7, ISGl; commissioned second 
lieutenant February 11, 1SG2, tirst lieutenant July 29, 1SG3; 
lionorably discharged September 14, 18G4. 

WILLIAM BACOME. 

Enlisted November 7, 18G1; cajttured at the battle of Sabine 
Cross Roads, La., ..\pril 8, 18G4; commissioned second lieuten- 
ant June 1, 1>*'>5; mustered out as sergeant with the regiment.* 

DANIEL HARNEK. 

Enlisted November 7, 18G1; captured at the battle of Cham- 
pion's Hill, Miss., May IG, 1SG3; commissioned second lieu- 

*Xot nuistercd as lit- utenaiit because company was below minimum. 



EOSTKR OF COMPANY C. 171 

tenant June 2, 1SG5; tirst lieutenant August 2, 1SG5; mustered 
out as first sergeant with the regiment.* 

SECOND LIEUTENANTS. 

[AccouQted for as First Lieuttuants.] 

SERGEANTS. 

LEANDER H. DAGGETT. 

"Wounded at New Madrid, Mo.; mustered out December 1, 

18G4, term of service expired. 
ANDREW \V. BENSON. 

Drowned in tlie Mississippi river July 20, 1SC2. 
JOHN S. CASE, Jr. 

Mustered out December 1, 1SC4, expiration of term of service. 

CORPORALS. 

REASON V. JIcDOWELL. 

Coptured on Colcasieu Pass, in Texas; died at New Orleans, 

La., January G, 1SG.5. 
JAMES D. MORTON. 

Discharged May 20, 1802, by order of General Ilalleck. 
GEORGE W. SHEAFFER. 

Died at Riddle's Point, Mo., April 9, 18G2. 
BENJAMTNE L. WALLIS. 

Mustered out December 1, 1864, term of service expired. 
THOMAS S. EVANS. 

Veteran; taken prisoner at Sabine Cross Roads, La., April S, 

18G4; died in rebel prison at Tyler, Texas, September 1, 1864. 
ROBERT G. GIBSON. 

Discharged December 24, 186.3, disability. 

MICHAEL Vlx\NCO. 

Mustered out December 1, 18G4, term expired. 

JOHN A. ANKRUM. 

Mustered out December 1, 1SG4, term exjiired. 

PRIVATES. 

JOHN SNETIIEN. 

Appointed wagoner; dir?d at Helena, Ark., February 16, 1363. 

CHARLES GARRETT. 

Appointed musician; discharged March 1, 1862, General Order, 

No. 14. 
GEORGE POND. 

Appointed musician; veteran; mustered out September 4, 

1865. 

*>«ot mustered as lieutcunnt because company was below luiuinuim. 



'-" TIIK FOKTY-SIXTH IXDIAXA. 

BENJAMIX ADDIS. 

wllH r '' ^Y ^'^^T' ?J^^'" ^^^^ 1' ^S63; transferred to 
Invalul Corps January 2o, 18G4. 

JOIIX T. ANDREWS. 

Died ou steamer Jul)- 24, 1S62. 

ANTHONY BABANOE. 

Apiil b, lhb4; mustered out September 4, 1SG5 
THORNTON A. BURLEY. 

Mustered out December 1, 1S64. 
JOHN B. BURNS. 

Discharged October 10, 1SG2, disability. 
BENJA]\I1N BURNS. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1S65 
DAVID S. CASAD. 

Died at St. Louis, Mo., December 25, 1862 

ben.lv:niin b. chilcot. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1S65 
SAMUEL CLARK. 

Died on hospital boat October 2 1S62 
GEORGE W. CLARK. 

Died at Helena, Ark., November 12, iSt3'^ 
GEORGE COLLINS. 

DS!:M:?8ir^ '"^""■^'' '''- ''^^ ^^ ^^^^--' ^^■^•' 

ABEL CRANE. 

Veteran; mu.^ered out September 4, 1SG5 
DAVID CRIPE. 

Killed at Port Gibson, Miss., May 1 1SG3 
JOSEPH N. DAVIDSON. * ' 

Died at Vicksburg, Miss., June 27, 1,^G3 
ROSWELL DIXON. 

Ar.T Jfr''^'""^ """^ December 1, 1SG4, term of service expired. 
MILTON DOUGIIERTON. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 18G5 
ALEXANDER II. DUKK. 

A^.pointed sergeant April 20, 18G5; mustered out December 1 
i^Go, term expired. ' 

JOHN EGAN. 

Discharged October 2, 18G2, disability 

JONATHAN N. GALLOWAY. 

\eteran; M-oundi-d at battle of Port Gibson, :^Iis. Afiv 1 
J ftbo; mustered out September 4, 18tM. ' •' — .> , 



KOSTER OF COMPAXy C, 173 

EDWAKD M. GERARD. 

Discharged December 25, 1S62, disability. 
JOSHUA GIBSON. 

Discharged April 25, 1SG2, disability. 
JOHN GILLIGAX. 

Mustered out December 1, 1SG4, term of service expired. 
WILLIAM GOSLEE. 

Discharged December 11, 18G1, disability. 
HENRY C. GRAILVM. 
JOHN D. GRAXDSTAFF. 

Discharged August ], 1S62, disability. 
JAMES D. HARRISON. 

Discharged July 3, 1SG2, disability. 
GEORGE W. HAMILTON. 

Appointed cnr{)oral; wounded July 13, 18G3, at Jackson, Miss.; 

discharged July 12, 1SG3, disability. 
JAMES 3L IIAZELGRO^'E. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 13G5. 
WHITLEY HUNTLEY. 

Died at Helena, Ark., October 28, 1S62. 
GEORGE HUNTSINGER. 

Veteran; killed at the battle of Sabiue Cross Roads, La., 

April 8, lSG-1. 

WILLIA.AI JOHNSON. 

Died at .ALemphis, Tenn., July 11, 1863. 
JACOB KASHNER. 

Veteran; captured at Sabine Cross Roads, La., April 8, 1864; 

promoted sergeant; mustered out September 4, 1SG5. 
PIHLIP W. KITE. 

Mustered out December ], 1SG4, term expired. 
ALEXANDER LANE. 

Killed at the battle of Port Gibson, Miss., May 1, 1863. 
GEORGE LANE. 

Veteran; taken prisoner at Sabine Cross Roads, La., April S, 

1SG4; died in prison at Camp Ford, Texas. 
HENRY S. LANE. 

Veteran; promoted sergeant; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
ROBERT LEWIS. 

Veteran; taken prisoner April 8, 1864, at Sabine Cross Roads, 

La.; died in rebel prison at Camp Ford, Texas. 
JOHN LOVE. 

Appointed corporal July 1, 1862; died on United States hos- 
pital boat (_)ctober 12, 1862. 
EDWARD LOVE JOY. 

Discharged No\ ember 11, 1862, disability. 



!f 



'/ • : 



174 THE FORTY-SIXTH INDIANA. 

JOHN MADER. 

Mustered out December 1, 1S64, term of sen'ice expired. 

JOHK MAXWELL. 

Mustered out December 1, 1SG4, term of service expired. 

DAVID MICKEKEL. 

Died at Riddle's Point, Mo., April 19, 1862. 

JOHN E. MITCHELL. 

Mustered out December 1, 1S64, term of service expired. 

ELI C. MOORE. 

Died at Natchez, Miss., August 12, 18G3. 

WILLIAM McGLENNEN. 

Killed at Algiers, La., May 26, 186-1. 

PARKER McDowell. 

Died at Terre Haute, Ind., May 14, 1862. 

W^ILLIAM McMAIIAN. 

Transferred to Invalid Corps January 15, 1864. 

JOHN G. NEAL. 

Drowned in the Mississippi river July 25, 1862. 

JAMES NEVILLE. 

Discharged June 17, 1S62, by general order. 

JOHN N. NEWHOUSE. 

Killed at the battle of Champion's Hill, Miss., May 16, 1863. 

JOHN W. PETERSON. 

Veteran; promoted corporal; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

benja:\[in pickard. 

Discharged; disability. 
SIMON PEPPINGER. 

Discliarged .June 29, 1863, disability. 
JESSE PJHN(;. 

Died ]\lay 20, 1S62, on way home. 
BENEDICT REAP. 

Mustered out December 1, 1SG4, term of service expired. 
JOSIAII RAPSE. 

^Mustered out December 1, 1864, term of service expired. 
WILSON H. ROIUNSON. 

Discharged November 15, 1862, disability. 
JACOr, RUTTLER. 

Veteran; trausfered to Sixteenth Ohio Battery December 13, 

1863, and discharged from that organization. 

ed:^iond p. van. 

Mustered out December 1, 1864, term expired. 
JOHN SHEPllEIH). 

\'eteran; ])r.>ni<>ted eorporal: wounded at the battle of Cham- 
pion's Hill, .Miss., 'May 16, 1863; captured at the battle of 



"Jl 



■ 1 



i'f 



P.OSTEK OF COirPAXY c. 175 

Sabine Cross Roads, La., April 8, 18G4; mustered out Septem- 
ber 4, 1SG5. 

GEOKGE SHKIXEH. 

Discharged for disability. 
JOHN R. SCIIAEFFER. 

Appointed corporal ^Nlarch, 18G3; died May 17, 1863, of 
wounds received 3Iav 1, 1SG3, at the -battle of Port Gibson, 
Miss. 

JOHN r. SHARP. 

Mustered out December 1, 18G4, terra expired. 
ISAAC E. SMACK. 

Died Mav 17, 18G3, of \s-ounds received at Port Gibson, Miss., 

May 1, 18G3. 

HARVEY SMITH. 

Discharged June 12, 18G2, by general order. 
JOHX W. SMITH. 

Discharged March 4, 1SG3, by geiieral order. 
JOHX A. SXETHEX. 

Discharged March 13, 1SG3, disability. 
FRANCIS M. SPEECE. 

Veteran; captured April 8, 18G-1, at Saliine Cross Roads, La.; 

promoted corporal; mustered out September 4. 18G5. 
DANIEL STINEBAUGH. 

Appointed cor})oral June 25, 1SG3; mustered out December 1, 

1SG4, term of service expired. 
JOSEPH E. TEU. 

^Mustered out December 1, 1SG4, term of service expired. 
FERDINAND A. THAYER. 

D i scha rged, d isabi 11 1 v. 
JOHN R. fHO^LVS. 

Died at Nashville, Tenn., May 17, 18G3. 
JA:\IES N. THOMPSON. 

Died in hosjiital at St. Louis, Mo., of wounds received 3Iav 

IG, 18G3, at the battle of Cham])ionV Hill, 3Iiss. 
EDWARD VI AN CO. 

^^lustered out December 1, 18G4, term of service expir<?d. 
AUSTIN WAYMIRE. 

Died ]N[ay 17, IStw], of wounds received at the battle of Port 

Gibson, Miss., May 1, 18G3. 
EDWARD WAYMIRE. 

Ap))ointed corporal June, 18G3; discharged March 8, 18G4, 

disability. 
AVxVLDO W'. WILLIAMS. 

Trunsfered to Veteran Resei-vo Cor}>s, and dischari^fcd from 

th.at oriranizuliuu. 



/ / 



176 THE FORTY-SIXTH INDIANA. 

AMOS W. WIJ.SOX. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 18G5. 

RECRUITS. 

ANDP.EAV ASHliA. 

Mustered in February 13, 1865; mustered out September -1, 
1865. 

JOHN w. Asiir.A. 

Mustered in February 13, 1865; mustered out September 4, 
1865. 

ALFKP:D ARTIIUK. 

Mustered in October 31, 1362; discharged January 14, 1864, 

disability. 
JAMES IM. ASIIBA. 

^Mustered in February 24, 1865; died at Lexington, Ky., 

April 18, 1865. 
DANIEL M. BUSH. 

Mustered in March 15, 1804. 
SILAS B. DAGGETT. 

Mustered in January 1, 1864. 
PETEK DOW. 

Mustered in January 28, 1864. 
JOHN M. FOSTEK. 

Mustered in November 16, 1864. 
ALLEN HUGHES. 

]\rusterod in December 24, 1861; wounded at the battle of 

Champion Hills, ]iliss., ]\Iay 16, 1863; mustered out December 

1, 1864, term of service expired. 
JOHN HAHDESTY. 

Mustered in November 16, 1864; mustered out May 11, 1865. 
HENRY ^V. JACKMAN. 

:\Iustered in October 28, 1864. 
JOSEPH KILGOKE. 

Mustered in January 12, 1864; died at Lexington, Kv., March 

29, 1865. 
CHARLES :S[. KAUF-AL^N. 

Mustered in July 29, 1864; died at liCxington, Ky., January 

18, 1865. 
JOHN LYNCH. 

Mustered in January 16, 1864. 
DAVID LYNCH. 

Mustered in February 24, 1864; mustered out January 7, 1865. 
EDWARD LEPER. 

Clustered in August 12, 1864. 
RICHARD LANE.^ 

Mustered in February 13, 1865; mustered out June 7, 1865. 



KOSTKK OF CO.MrA>'Y D. 5 77 

MAKTIX FJIUL. 

Mustered in Jainiary 12, 1804; mustered out Mity 10, 1S65. 
ALO^^ZO SHAFFEH. 

Mustered in December 10, 1S63; died at houie ]\fay 27, 1804. 
ITIIIA SHEPHERD. 

Mustered in ?*rarcli 20, 1804; mustered out May 15, 1805. 
GEORGE M. TODD. 

^Mustered in Au'jjust 15, 180,2; died on liospital boat Septem- 
ber 20, 1802. 
JASPER TO:>LOSOX. 

Mustered in September 13, 1802; discharged July 22, 1805, 

disability. 



COMPANY D. 

[This company Tvas mustered into the U. S. Service November 5, 1861.] 

CAPTAINS. 

JOHN GUTHRIE. 

Commissioned October 4, ISOl; resigned ^lay 16, 1802. 

FIRST LIEUTENANTS. 

CHARLES A. BROWNLIE. 

Commissioned second lieutenant October 4, ISO], first lieuten- 
ant May 10, 1802; mustered out December 20, 1804, term of 
service expired. 
ABRAHAM A. HER:\IAX. 

Enlisted >«oveniber 4, 1801; commissioned first lieutenant 
January 17, 1805: mustered out v/iih the regiment. 

SECOND LIEUTENANTS. 

ALEXANDER K. EWIXG. 

Sergeant; enlisted Xovember 5, 1^01; commissioned second 
lieutenant May 10, 1802; resigned May 28, 18tJ3; commis- 
sioned captain in One Hundred and Twenty-eighth Regiment. 
AXDREW J. LOVEXGERE. 

Enlisted Xovember 5, 1801; commissioned second lieutenant 
June 1, 1865; mustered out as sergeant with the regiment.* 

SERGEANTS. 

JORDAX R. TYXER. 

Discharged August 28, 1802, disability. 
JAMES A. PEPPER. 

Died at Xew ^Madrid, :\Io., April 19, 1862. 

*Xot mustortd as lieulcuaut because conipvinj' was behnv minimum. 



;i( ■.'» 



, -ciir; 



i I 1 



i i. 



i") 



178 TIIK FORTY-SIXTH I>"DIANA. 

ANDREW J. LITTLE. 

]Mn<terecl out December 21, ISGl, term of service expired. 

CORPORALS. 

JOIJN B. STEPHENS. 

Discharged October 21, 1802, disability. 

ELIJAH J. ""hunt. 

Discharged October 13, 18G2, disability. 
AMBROSE^^PDEGRAEF. 

Drowned in the ]\[ississippi river July 2, 1862. 
JOHN P. LEMMING. 

Discharged, disability. 
WILLIAM LAYNEAR. 

Killed at the battle of Champion's Hill, Miss., May IG, 1863, 
CORNELIUS B. AVOODRUEF. 

Veteran; promoted sergeant; mustered out September 4, 1SG5. 
WI].LIA3r PL CROCKETT. 

Discharged April 25, 1862, disability. 
ROBERT BENEATIIY. 

Discharged June 19, 1863, disability. 

PRIVATES. 

TIIEORAM W. KENDRICK. 

Detailed musician; veteran; promoted corporal; wounded at 
the battle of Port Gibson, Miss., May 1, 1863; mustered out 
Se))tember 4, 1865. 

JAMES willia:ms. 

Detailed wagoner; discharged October 2, 1862, disability. 
TJIG^IAS J. I5ELL. 

^Mustered out December 1, 1864, lorm of ser^-ioe expired. 

MAirrix V. JU.EW. 

Discharged December 26, 1862, b}' order. 
MICIENEL J. BLEW. 

Veteran; wounded at the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., 

A]>ril S, 1864; wounded at the battle of Port Gibson, Miss., 

May 1, 1863; mustered out Se[)tember -L 1865. 
DAVID 15RL'MINER. 

• ' Discharged l-'elnuarv 17, 1864, disability. 
JAMi:S W.'^F. IK)ON. ' 

Veteran; discharged Juno 22, 1S65, disability. 
ISAIAH BUDD. 

■Mustered out December 1, 1861, term of sei-\-ice expired. 
JOHN P.UTLER. 

Discharged December 26, 1862, disability. 
GEORGE iIaER. 

l/ie<I at BentoJi, .Mo. 



EOSTER OF COMPANY D. 179 

MOSES :\I. CROCKETT. 

Veteran; promoted sergeant; wounded at the battle of Port 
Gibson, Miss., May 1, 1SC3; mustered out Septeiuber 4, 1865. 

PATRICK CLIFFORD. 

Discharged. 

JAMES W. CLOUD. 

Mustered out December 1, 1SG4, term of service expired. 

SA:ylUEL W. CREE. 

Veteran; ^vounded at the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., 
April 8, lSli4; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

WILLIAM CORNELL. 

Discharged December 2, 1863, disabilily. 

DAVID CRIPLIVER. 

Killed at Sabine Cross Roads, La., April 8, 1864. 

GEORGE A. CAS5EL. 

Discharged September 14, 1862, disability. 

KATilAN DUNHAM. 

Died May 20, 1863, of wounds received at the battle of Port 
Gibson, Miss., May 1, 1863. 

PATRICK DOUGHERTY. 

Discharged February 12, 1862, disability. 

GEORGE E. DODD. 

Died at Helena, Ark., October 9, 1862. 

JOSEPH DICKEY. 

Discharged October 4, 1862, disability. 

DAVID E. DICKEY. 

Mustered out December 1, 1864. 

ja:\ies h. doiuhxs. 

^'ete^an: |'romotcd corporal; mustered out September -J, 1865. 

THOMAS DkFOIH). 

Veteran; promoted sei'gcant; mustered nut September 4, 1865. 

JERRY DUNN. 

Veteran; wounded at the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., 
April 8, 1^64; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

ANTHONY A. ESKEW. 

Veternn; captured at tlie battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., 
Ajiril s, ]m;4; mustered out July 21, 18ii5, disability. 

NICHOLAS GRAN>INGER. 

Difd at Helena, Ark., November 11, 1862. 
JAMES GARDNER. 

Veteran; A\ounded at the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., 

April 8, ]8iJ4: mustered out September 4, 1865. 
WILLIAM H. GAREY. 

Disciiargcil .September 14, 1862, by order. 



i :7 4 



ISO THE FOETY-SIXTU IXDIAXA. 

ADAM IIIXKLE. - 

Veteran; mu-tered out September 4, 18G5. 

ABRAHAM B.. HERMAN. 

Mustered out December 1, 1S64. 

EDWARD HATFIELD. 

Discliarged November 20, 18(32, by order. 

JACOB IHTCHEXS. 

Died at St. Louis, Mo., November 3, 1SG2, 

AVILLIAM H. HirCHENS. 

Mustered out December 1, 1S64, term of service expired. 
ALFRED HITCH EN S. 

Killed at Port Gibson, Miss., May I, 1S63. 

SAMUEL L. IRELAND. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

JULIUS C. JACKSON. 

Wounded at tlse battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., April 8, 
18G4. 

NOAH JONES. 

Killed at Port Gibson, Miss., May 1, 1SG3. 

DAVID JONES. 

Died at Helena, Ark., Oct. 12, 1SG2. 

DANIEL O. KEEFE. 

Discharged IVIay 10, 1SG2, disability. 

WILLIAM W. LOUDERMILK. 

Killed at Port Gibson, Miss., May 1, 1863. 
ANJ^REW J. LOVENGERE. 

Veteran; wounded at the battle of Port Gibson, Miss., May 1, 

18G3; promoted .sergeant; mustered out September 4, 18C5" 
THOMAS J. LYNCH. ^ 

Died at ]Mil!ikehV Bond, La., January 10, 1863. 
^yllCHAEL MURP.AY. 

Discharged, disability. 
JOHN ^rcTAGGART. 

Discharged on account of wounds received at Sabine Cross 

Roads, La., April S, 1SG4, bv which he lost a leg. 
PETER :McDERMOT. 

Discharged April 13, 1SG3, disability. 
PATPJCK >IcGLONE. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
W^ILLIAM II. NILES. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
GEORGE W. NIELD. 

Veteran; captured at battle of Sabine Cross Roads, April 8, 

ISuI; mustered out July 25, 1865, disability. 



EOSTKU OF COrPAXY D. 181 

WRIGHT L. XUa.D. 

Killed at Fovt Pembcrtoii, INIiss., ^March IP, 1SC3. 

SAMUEL PERKINS. 

Died at Mound City, 111., xVugust 30, 1SC2. 

WILLIAM II. POWELL. 

Died at Helena, Ark., March 11, 1S63. 

THOMAS ROBISON. 

Mustered out December 1, ISGl, term of service expired. 

JA^LES H. SMITH, 

Mustered out December 1, lSG-1, term of service expired. 

GEORGE SEE. 

Mustered out December 1, ]8G4, term of service expired. 
ANDREW J. STOVER. 

Veterau; promoted corjioral; mustered out September "l, 18G5. 
"WILLIAM H. SMALL. 

Veteran; captured at tiie battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., 

April S, 1SG4; mustered out September -1, 1SG5. 
JOHN SHEA. 

Killed at Algiers, La., April 21, 1SG4. 
DAVID W. SAMSEL. 

"Wounded by guerrillas near Helena, Ark., October 2G, 18G2; 

discharged February S, 1SG3, disability. 
PERRY SPRINGSTED. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
ROBERT SHAW. 

Transferred to Invalid Corps September 20, 18G3. 
LEMUEL II. TAM. 

^Mustered out December 1, 1SG4. 
JAMES TOLEN. 

Clustered out December 1, 1SG4. 
ANDREW J. WOODS. 

Mustered out December 1, 1SG4. 
WILLIAM WOODS. 

Transferred to Marine Corps. 
NICHOLAS WELSH. 

Killed at Champion's Hill, :\liss., May IG, LSG3. 
JOSEPH WILLIAMS. 

Died at Louisville, Ky., December 25, ISGl. 
PORTER A. WHITE. 

Veteran; ))romoted corporal; wounded at the battle of Sabine 

Cross Roads, La., April 8, L^G4; wounded at the battle of 

Champion's Hill, Miss., May l(i, 18G3; mustered out Septem- 
ber 4, 18G5. 
REN J AM IN W A R FI E f J >. 

Died at Louisville, Kv., Januarv It, ls^G2. 



182 THE FORTY-SIXTH INDIANA. 

JOHN WILLIAMSON. 

Died at Jefferson BaiTacks, St. Louis, Mo., February 26, 1363. 

RECRUITS. 

WILLIAM IT. CONNER. 

Mustered in April 3, 1862; wounded at the battle of Cham- 
pion's Hill, Miss., May 16, 1863; mustered out April 5, 1SG5> 
term of service expired. 

JAMES II. JOHNSON. 

HIRAM LU-AIBARD. 

Mustered iu September 10, 1862; died April 16, 1864, of 
wounds received April 8, 1864, at Sabine Cross Roads, La. 

ELI PRUITT. 

MAXWELL REESE. 

Mustered in February 25, 1862; captured at Colcasieu bay, 
Texas, xVpril, 1864; mustered out February 24, 1865. 

DANIEL TOLEN. 

Mustered in September 16, 1862; transferred to Sixteenth 
Ohio Battery; mustered out May 18, 1865. 



COMPANY E. 

[This company was mustered November 5, 1861.] 
CAPTAINS. 

WILLIAM SPENCER. 

Commissioned October 4, 1861; resigned February 5, 1862. 

HENRY SNYDER. 

Commissioncfl second lieutenant October 4, 1861, as captairi 
June 12, 1S62; mustered owl October 11, 1SG4, on account of 
wounds received at Sabine Cross Roads, La., April 8, 1864. 
CHARLES F. FISHER. 

Sergeant; enlisted November 5, 1861; commissioned second 
lieutenant June 12, 1862, as first lieutenant July 7, 1863, as 
captain December 27, 1864; mustered out with the regiment. 

FIRST LIEUTENANTS. 

ELI R. HERMAN. 

Commissioned first lieutenant October 4, 1861; resigned Feb- 
ruary 5, 1S62. 

GEORGE W. SPEXCER. 

Enlisted November 5, 1861; commissioned first lieutenant 
June 12, 1862; honorably discharged June 7, 1S63. 

ELLIS HUGHES. 

Sergeant; enlisted November 5, 1861; captured at battle of 



KOSTER OF CO.MPA>.'Y E. 183 

Sabine Cross Roads, La., April 8, 1864; comiuissioned first iieii- 
tenant 3Iarcli 1, 1805; mustered out with the regiment. 

SECOND LIEUTENANTS. 

PRESTON S. :\IEEK. 

Sergeant; enlisted November 5, ISGl; commissioned seeoud 
lieutenant July 1, 18G3; mustered .out with the regiment as 
sergeant.* 

ABRAM F. HUNTER. 

Corporal; enlisted No^•ember 5, 1861; commissioned second 
lieutenant June 1, 1SG5; mustered out with the regiment as 
sergeant.* 

SERGEANTS. 

JOHN D. HERMAN. 

Died at Burnettsville, Ind., July 25, 1862. 
MARTIN Y. WILEY. 

Died at Burnettsville, Ind., April 9, 1SG2. 

<£CORPORALS. 

CLINTON J. ARMSTRONG. 

Died at Helena, Ark., February 2, 18G3. 
WILLIAM H. KELLEN BURGER. 

Yeteran. 
HENRY BILLINGS. 

Discharged for promotion February 18, 1863. 
WALTER W. :\rcBETH. 

Discharged April 2, 1862. 
\YILLIAM H. GILLMAN. 

Discharged for promotion. 
ROBERT C. HENDERSON. 

Died at Evansville, Ind., April 29, 1863. 

AYILLIAM :d. C. MILLER. 

PRIVATES. 

CALEB A. LAMB. 

Appointed musician; discharged 3Iay 29, 1862, disability. 
THO:\lAS C. BURSON. 

Appointed musician; transferred to Company II June 2, ISG4:. 
JOHN G. SPARKS. 

Detailed wagoner; discharged June 12, 1SG2, disability. 
GEORGE 11. ALBERT. 

Wounded at the battle of Port Gibson, ^liss., ilay 1, 1863; 

mustered out December 1, 186 1, term of service ex})ired. 

*Nol laustcrecl as lieutL'uants because coinpany wus below miuimuni. 



184 



THK FOKTY-SIXTH INDIANA. 



JOSEPil ADAMS. 

Died at St. Louis, 31 o., April 27, 1SG2. 
JAMES AI.KIER. 

Veteran; luustered out September 4, 1865. 
ELZA E. Aim STRONG. 

Discharged June 14, 1803, disability. 
LEVI BEAK. 

Veteran; captured at Sabine Cross Koads, La., April S, 1SG4; 

mustered out September 4. 1805. 

CHARLES 1L\U:M. 

Mustered out December 1, 1SG4, term of service expired. 
RICHARD lURD. 

Discharged December 14, 1SG2, disability. 
HENRY BISHOP. ' 

Discharged August 22, l^^GS, disability. 
DAVID BISHOP. 

Veteran; wounded at the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., 

April S, 1804; died at Lexington, Ky., Eebruary 4, 1SG5. 
PATRICK BURK. 

WILLIAM BOZE. 

Discharged February 1, 1SG3. 
JOHN AV. BRIGGS. 

Veteran; captured at the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., 

April 8, 1804; mustered out September 4, ISOo. 
WILLIA3I C. BPtOCKUS. 

Veteran; promoted sergeant; wounded at the battle of Port 

Gibson, Miss., May 1, 1863; mustered out September 4, 1SG5. 
THOMAS R. BUNNELL. 

Jjischarged 3[ay 22, 1302, disability. 
GJ':0] IG K ^^' . BU X X E LL. 

Mustered out December 1, 1S04, term of service expired. 
EDWARD M. BURNS. 

Died at New Madrid, 3Io., March 10, 1802. 
GEORGE W. CLINGER. 

Discharged July 11, 1863, disabiiitv. 
DANIEL Cl^UMMER. 

Died at 31illiken\s Bend, La., INLiy 31, 1863. 
JOHN B. CRUMMER. 

Wounded at the battle of Port Gibson, Mi^s., 3Lay 1, 1S<3, and 

died of wounds received at Grand Gulf, Miss., May 28, 1S63. 
THEODORE 31. DAVIS. 

lyiustered out December 1, 1864, terra of service expir-ed. 
FRANCIS M. DAVIS. 

Discharged May 29, 1802, disability. 



EOSTEIl OF COMPANY E. 185 

DAVID A. DKBliA. 

Died at Jiardstcwu, Ky,, February 11, 1862. 

JACOB M. DUNHAM. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

Ei»inuA:\r FLEMr^iiNG. 

Discharged 3Iay 22, 1S62, disability, 

SAMUEL FLE3IM1NG. 

Discharged January 4, 1863, disability, 

EDWAED FALK. 

Taken prisoner at the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., 
April 8, 1864; died in rebel prison, Tyler, Texas, xVpril 20, 
- 1864. 

MILTOX M. GOSLEY. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1S65. 
GARDXEli IL\TXES. 

Di.-^charged Mav 25, 1SC2, disability. 
HERMAN ilEBNER. 

Veteran; })romoted sergeant; captured at Sabine Cross Roads 

Ajiril 8, 1864; mustered out Sei)te]nber 4, 1865. 
WnJJA>r A. HERMAN. 

Discharged ^May 26, 1862, disability, 
JOHN HIGGINS. ' 
Wn.LTAM A. HOGLAND. 

Discharged March 4, 1863, disability. 
HENP.Y ITSEIN. 

Veteran; captured at Sabine Cross Roads, La., April 8, 1864; 

mustered out September 4, 1865. 
WILLIAM D. JUr^IPER. 

Vetoi'au; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
WILLIAM J. KENDAL. 

Died at St, Louis, Mo., June 31, 1863. 
HENRY B. LEAZENBY. 

Veteran; mustered out September 3, 1865. 
JOHN Mc ARTHUR. 

Discharged January 1, 1863, disability. 
MOSES A. McCONAHAY. 

Veteran; jiromoted corporal; captured at battle of Sabine 

Cross Roads April 8, 1864; mustered out September 4, 18()5, 
W^ILLIA3l R. ^IclNTIRE. 

Discharged July 14, 1862, disability. 
JAMES M. McC03nJS. 

Veteran; promoted commissary sergeant; mustered out Sep- 
tember 4, 18('>5. 
TIIOAIAS 31 ALONE. 

Veteran; promoted corporal; mustered out September 4, I8ti5, 



n /. 



1S6 THE FORTY-SIXTH INDIAXA. 

EDWARD C. 31EAD. 

Discharged December 13, 1SG2, disability. 
JOSIAH r^IETZ. 

Died at Helena, Ark., Februar}- 14, 1803. 
RANDOLPH MAKIDETH. 

Wounded at Port Gibson, Miss., IMay 1, 1803; died at Xew 

Orleans, La., January 20, 1804. 

JAMES M. :\rcBET]L 

Veteran; captured at the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., 

April 8, 180-i; mustered out September 4, 18C5. 
GEORGE W. 3IURRY. 

Veteran; discharged Marcli 10, 1864, disability. 
NATHANIEL NICHOLAS. 

Mustered out December 1, 1804, term of service expired. 
WILLIA:\r. NICHOLAS. 

Dischai-ged .March 10, 1863, disability. 
DARLINGTON PARCELLS. 

Discliarged December 2, 1862, disability. 
JOHN PEI^ERS. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
MARION RANDAL. 

Died at Bardstown, Ky., January 11, 1862. 
ALEXANDER REED. 

Veteran; caj.tured at the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., 

April 8, 1804; mustered out July 15, 1865. 
CHARLES RIDER. 

Discharged 3Iav 29, 1862, disability. 
CHARLES F. RIDER. 

Veteran; Avounded at the battle of Port Gibson, Miss., May 

1, 1803; mustered out September 4, 1S05. 

Tno:NrAS r. rinker. 

jMustered out December 1, 1864, term of service ex])ired. 
JESSE ROB BINS. 

Discharged :\ray 29, 1862, disability. 
BENJAMIN F. ROSS. 

Veteran; promoted sergeant; wounded at the battle of Cham- 

pi^on's Hill, :\Iiss., May 16, 1863; mustered out September 4, 

1865. 

JOHN G. ROSENTRALER. 

Discharged May 29, 1862, disability. 
JOHN S. SHIELDS. 

Discharged June 13, 1863, disability. 
SAMUEL D. SHIELDS. 

Veteran; wounded at the battle of Cham.pion's Hill, IMiss., 

May 16, 1SG3; mustered out September 4, 1805. 



t > 



EOSTEU OF COMPANY E, 1S7 

ISAAC B. SHIELDS. 

Mustered out December 1, 18G4, term of service expired 
WILLIA3I C. SIIULL. 

Veteran; promoted sergeant; wounded at the battle of Port 

Gibson, Miss., May 1, 1SG3; mustered out September 12, 1SC5 
JEPTHA J. SHULL. 

Veteran; promoted sergeant; mustered out September 12, 3865. 
DECATURE SIMO^iS. 

Mustered out December 1, 1SG4. 
GEORGE W. SMITH. 

Killed at Champion's Hill, Miss., May 16, 1SG3. 

FKAXK SHAUP. 

Veteran; transferred to Sixteenth Ohio Battery Light Artil- 
lery. 

JOHN G. SPARKS. 

Discharged June 12, 1862, disability. 

ROr>ERT S^J'OGDEL. 

Wounded at battle of Port Gibson, ^Nfiss., May 1, 1863; dis- 
charged October 10, 1863, on account of \s'ouuds. 

FRAXCIS M. St. CLAIR. 

Discharged May 29, 1862, disability. 

HENRY L. TEEPLES. 

Veteran; Avounded at Port Gibson, Miss., May 1, 1863; mus- 
tered out September 4, 1865. 

ABNER S. TEEPLES. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1865, 

MOSES W. TUCKER. 

Veteran; captured at battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., April 
8, 1864, discharged July 8, 1865, disability. 

JOHX U. WATERIU^P.G. 

Discharged March 18, 1863, disability. 

JOHX W. WELCH. 

Veteran; captured at battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., April 
8, 1864; mustered out September 4, 1S65. 

DiAX B. wnri\ 

Wounded at battle of l^^rt Gibson, :\riss., May 1, 1863; mus- 
tered out December 1, 1864, term of service expired. 

HIRA3I WYATT. 

Discharged September 2, 1862, disability. 

LEWIS YAZEL. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

MAHLOX U. YOrXG. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

RAZEL YOUXG. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1SG5. 



188 THE I'onxY-. SIXTH Indiana. 

RECRUITS. 

JO] IX EXTZMIXGER. 

Mustered June 1-i, 1802; uied at ^Memphis, Term., July IC, 
1S()2. 
AVILLTA:\r U. GURLEY. 

Veteran; Mustered April 4, lSi)2; transferred to Company I. 

CHARLES GEXTIS. 

Mustered June U, 1SG2; deserted April 12, 18G3. 

JA:\rES G. HAXGHAN. 

Mustered June 18, 1862; died at Helena, Ark., December 27, 

18C2. 
WILLIAM ROBBIXS. 

Mustered January 28, 18G4; mustered out September 4, 1SG5. 
DAVID STEPJIEXSOX. 

Mustered March 28, 18G4; mustered out September 4, 18t-j5. 
MILTOX TAYLOR. 

jMustered October 29, 18G2; discliar<^ed 18Go, disability. 
THEODORE TAYLOR. 

Mustered October 2G, 1SG2; promoted coi'poral; captured at 

battle of Sabine Cross Roads April S, 1864; mustered out 

September 4, 1865. 

COMPANY F. 

[This compuny was mustered into the service Xovember 1-1, 1S51.] 
CAPTAINS. 

DAVID HO^VELL. 

Commissioned October 4, ISGI; resigned February 5, 1862; 

commissioned captain, Seyenty-fourth Regiment. 
SAMUEL OS]'.ORXE. 

Cominissiontd February 6, 1862; resigned May 26, 1863. 
BERXARD B. DAILY. 

Commissioned first lieutenant October 4, 1861, captain 3Lay 

30, 1862; resigned July 26, lso3. 

JOSEPH c. PLV^:\n}. 

Commissioned second lieutenant March 1 , 1863, first lieuten- 
ant May 20, 1863, captain July 20, 1863; resigned March 2, 
18G3. 

JOIIX SHAFFER. 

Sergeant; enlisted Xoyetnber 14, 1861; captured at the battle 
of Sabine Cross Roads, La., April 8, 1864; commissioned cap- 
tain June 1, 1865; mustered out as sergeant .July 19, 1865." 

MICHAFL RADLR. 

Corporal; enlisted Xoyember 14, 1861; wounded at the battle 

*Niil uiustorod as cai>taiii bccaustj company wa.> below miniinuiii. 



nOSTER OF COMPAXY F, 189 

of Champion's Hill, Miss., May 10, 1SG3; commissioned first 
lieutenant December 20, isr.-i; captain August 8, 13G5; mus- 
tered out \vitli the regiment. 

FIRST LIEUTENANTS. 

JOEL FERRIS. 

Sergeant; enlisted Xovember 14, ISGl; commissioned second 
lieutenant April 7, 1802; first lieutenant May 30, 1802; killed 
at Champion's Hill, Miss., May 16, 18G3. 
GEORGE AV. STONE. 

Enlisted Xovember 14, 1801; commissioned second lieutenant 
May 20, 1803, first lieutenant Julv 27, 18G3; discharged August 
10, 1SG4. ' • 

GEORGE ^V. YATES. 

Sergeant; enlisted November 14, 1861; commissioned second 
lieutenant June 1, 1865, first lieutenant July 1, 1805; mustered 
out with the regiment as sergeant.* 

SECOND LIEUTENANTS. 

ATLAS A. BEXIEVM. 

Commi'^sioned second lieutenant October 4, 1801; died near 
Point Pleasant, Mo., April 4, 1802. 
JAMES PERKINS. 

Corporal; enlisted November 14, 1861; commissioned second 
-lieutenant ^lay 30, 1802; resigned February 14, 1863. 

SERGEANTS. 

GEORGE McCORMICK. 

Mustered out December 1, 1804, term of service expired. 
ANTHONY J. TILTON. 

CORPORALS. 

DAVID SNOEBERGER. 

Discharged December 18, 1862, disabilitv. 
LE^V1S SUTTON. 

Discharged April 8, 1802. 
JOSEPH HE]? MAN. 

Discharged Fel.iruary 5, 1863, disability. 
GEORGE \V. SORTER. 

Died at home November 24, 1802. 
DANIEL FRY. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1805. 
JACOB QUIXN. 

Died at .^lilliken's Bend, La., April 15, 1803. 

*Xot mustL-rcd as lieutenant because ci.>i;ipauy Avas below nnn.iuium. 



' >'f\ 



190 THE FOKTY-SIXTII IXDIAXA. 

PRIVATES. 

WILLIAM PADEX. 

Detailed musician; discharged February 1, 1SC3. 

MICHAEL BLUE. 

Detailed musician; died at Helena, Ark., December 25, 1802. 

MATHIAS EASTWOOD. 

Detailed wagoner; died May 14, 1S62, near Fort Pillow, Tenn. 

SILAS ATCHISON. 

Discharged August 25, 1862, disability. 

WILLIAM BARK. 

Died at New Madrid, Mo., April, 1SC2. 

HENRY E. BERRY. 

\'eteran; captured at the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., 
A]»ril S, ISG-l; mustered out September 4, 1S65. 

DANIEL L. BL AUGER. 

Mustered out December 1, 1SG4, term expired. 

FERDINAND BLACK. 

Discharged December 15, ISCl. 

WILLIAM BUTLER. 

Promoted to corporal; killed at the battle of Champion's Hill, 
]Miss., May 16, 18G3. 

JAMES CAMPBELL. 
, Promoted corporal; wounded at battle of Port Gibson, !Miss,, 
May 1, 1SG.3; mustered out December 1, 1SG4, term expired. 
TIL:\[AN a. II. CA.AIPBELL. 

Veteran; mustered out Se]'tember 4, 1S65. 

willia:\i cately. 

Transferred to the Invalid Corps December 8, 1SG2. 
JAMES S. COLEMAN. 

Veteran; capiured :it the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., 
x\pril S, 1SG4; mustered out Septeml)er 4, 1SG5. 

JOSEPH S. COLLINS. 

Discharged September 3, 1SG2, disability. 
JOHN COMPTON. 

I>ied at Bard.-town, Ky., January 2S, 18C2. 
DAVID CONNELL. 

Died at :MiiIiken's Bend, La., Juno 12, 1SG4. 
RILEY COOK. 

Di>charged 1SG2. 

JOHN COOK. 

Discharged April 12, b^G2, disability. 
LAWRENCE CORRIGAN. 

Mastered out December 1, ]SG4, term of service expired. 



ROSTEH OF COMPANY F. 191 

PATRICK CULIIAAI. 

Wounded at Vicksburg, !Miss., during siege; mustered out 
December 1, 1SIj4, term of service expired. 

ABRAHAM COX. 

Died at Helena, Ark., October 24, 1SG2. 

JAMES CRIPPEN. 

Wounded at the battle of Champion's Hill, Miss., May 16, 
1SG3; mustered out December 1, ISO-l, term of service expired. 
XATHAXIEL DICKEY. 

A'eteran; wounded at the battle of Champion's Hill, Miss., 
May 16, l!^6o; mustered out September -1, ]S6.5. 

EPIIRAIM DIX. 

Transferred to ^Marine Corps January, 1S64. 

WILLIAM DOUGLAS. 

Veteran; promoted corpoi'al; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

JAMES H. EASTVrOOD. 

Died at Memphis, Tenn., June 20, 1S62. 

SAMUEL D. EAUSl'. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1SG5. 

MATHIAS S. FRAXKLIX. 

Died at home January 2iJ, 1SG2. 

SAMUEL GABLE. 

Veteran; captured at tlie battle of Sabine Cross lioads. La., 
xVpril 8, 1864; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

ALBERT J. GILLA:\r. 

Discharged February 6, 1863, disability. - 
JACOB, GATES. 

Veteran; promoted cr,rpoi-al; cajitured at the battle of Sabine 

Cross Roads, La., April 8, 1S64; mustered out September 4, 

1865. 
JAMES HASTIXGS. 

Veteran; taken i'ri>onor at the battle of Sabine C'l'oss Roads; 

died while in prison. 
BEXJA^AIIN HASTIXGS. 

Veteran; jironiuted ctupoi'al; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
PETER HASTIX(;S. 

Transferred to ^larine Corps January, 1863. 
JACOB IIEIXEY. 

Veteran; ])romoted sergeant; wounded at the battle of Cham- 

pion'.s Hill, Miss., 31 av IG, 1863; mustered out September 4, 

1865. 

JONATHAX HIXEV. 

Veteran; jjmmoted sergeant; captiired at tlie battle of Sabine 
Cross Roads, La., April 8, i8G4; must'^red out September 4, 
1865. 



192 THE FOKTY-SIXTH INDIANA. 

ALEXAXDER IIOGELAN. 

WouiideJ ai the battle of Champion's Hill, Miss., May 16, 
1863; trail sfoi-red to Veteran Reserve Corps, 1863. 

LEVI HOO\'ER. 

Died in hospital April 2, 1862. 

GEORGE HUFFMAX. 

Veteran: promoted sergeant; captured at the battle of Sabine 
Cross Roads, La., April 8, 1864; mustered out September 4, 
1865. 

SILAS HURLEY. 

Died at Helena, Ark., August 2G, 1862. 

JOHX W. HOWELL. 

"Wounded at Carancro bayou, La., November 3, 1863; mustered 
out December 1, 1864, term of service expired. 

SETII IRELAND. 

Discharged March 14, 1-863, disability. 

SAMUEL JERO-AIE. 

Discharged; date unknown. 

SAMUEL KELLER. 

Discharged November 13, 1862. 

WILLIA^L KNETTLE. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

THOMAS KUHN. 

Discharged September 14, 1862, disability. 

DANIEL LESLIE. 

Veteran; discharged July 12, 1865, disability, caused by wounds 
received in battle at Champion's Hill, Miss., May 16, 1863. 

AVILLIAM MATHERS. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

SAMUEL W. :\IcCRAY. 

Discharged :May 19, 1S62, disability. 

JOHX MEREDLJII. 

Veteran; taken prisoner at Sabine Cross Roads; died while in 
rebel prison. 

HEXRY MILLAIH). 

Died at Helena, Ark., December 1, 1862. 

JA:MES 3l()RAX. 

Wounded at battle of Champion's Hill, Miss., May 16, 1863; 
died at Indianapolis, Ind., June 14, 1863. 

THO.AIAS NACE. 

Killed at Chamj.ion's Hill, :viiss., May 16, 1863. 

WILLIAM F. NACE. 

Wounded at the battle of Champion's Hill, ^Nliss., May 16, 
1863; mustered out December 1, 1864, term of service expired. 



ROSTER OF COMPANY V. 193 

JOS?:Pn NKAiniOFF. 

Clustered out December 12, lSti4. 

WILLI A:M XOJiLE. 

Died at Helena, Ark., IS 62. 

THEOPHILLTS OSBOKN. 

Veteran; mustered out Se})tembcr 4, 1865. 

DAVID FLETCHER. 

Veteran; j>romoted corporal; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

HENRY C. PRUETT. 

Discharged September 11, 1S62, disability. 
"WILLIAM J. RIDIXGER. 

Died at Memphis, Tenn., August 11, 1862. 
ISAAC RIMIER. 

Died of wounds received at Vicksburg, ?iliss., June 15, 1863. 
JOHN ROBINSON. 

Appointed corporal; appointed sergeant; mustered out Decem- 
ber 1, 1864, terai of service expired. 
JACOB SELL. 

Veteran; captured at battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., April 

8, 1864; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
JOSEPH SCOTT. 

Veteran; taken prisoner at battle of Champion's Hill, ]Miss., 

^lay 16, 1863; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
FRANCIS :^I. SHAFER. 

Veteran; promoted corporal; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
WILLIAM F. SWANGER. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
BEECHER SHARP. 

Wounded at the battle of Champion's Hill, Miss., May 16, 

1863; mustered out Decem-bcr 1, 1864, terra of service expired. 
SAMPSON SHUEY. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
JOHN S PENCE. 

Drojtped from the rolls by order. 
ANDREW SPENCE. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
JONAS SLONIKER. 

Veteran; Avounded at the battle of Port Gibson, !Miss., May 

1, 1863; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
MICHAEL TAFFE. 

Killed at Champion's Hill, Miss., May 16, 1863. 
SAMUEL THOMPSON. 

Died at ^^ladison, Ind., July 15, 1803. 
JAMES S. TlilPP. 

Died at Menipliis, 1862. 



•l'\ 



194 THE FOKTY-SIXTH INDIANA. 

ALBERT W. TRIPP. 

Died at :Mcmphts, 1862. 
GEORGE WICKirA:M. 

Discharged April 10, 1863, disability. 
JOSEPH WILLIS. 

Discharged December 16, 1862, disabilitv. 
HEZEKIAII E. YOUNG. 

Died December 2, 1S61. 
JOSEPH ZERXS. 

^Mustered out December 1, 1864. 

RECRUITS. 

WILLIAIM FRANKLIN. 

Discha)-ged; date unlcnown. 
SA.AIUEL CODER. 

Discharged; date unkiiowii. 



COMPANY G. 

[This company was muslered into the Sfirvice November 5, 1S61.] 
CAPTAINS. 

ROBERT W. SILL. 

Commissioned captain October 4, 18G1; discharged November 
1 i J Job—. 

JOSEPH D. COWDIN. 

Commissioned first lieutenant October 4, 1861, captain Novem- 
ber 17, 1862; resigned December 23, 1862. 

WOODSON s. :marsijall. 

Commissioned Februar^• 1, 1863; resi<rnrd July 28, 1863. 
JAMES HESS. 

Sergeant; enlisted November o, 1861; commissioned second 
lieutenant May 7, 1862; first lieutenant November 17, 1862; 
captain_ July 29, 1863; mustered out December 12, 1864, term 
of service expired. 

JOSEPH L. CHAMBEl'vLAIN. 

Enlisted November 5, IsGl; commissioned captain December 
20, 1864; mustered out mIiIi the regiment. 

FIRST liei;tenants. 

JOSEPH TAYLOR. 

Sergeant; enlisted November.''), 1861 ;"^commissioned fin-t lieu- 
tenant .July 2!i, 1863; honoiablv discharged November 12, 1864. 

ENOS THOMAS. 

Comniissi.uu',1 tir^i lieutenant December 20, 1864; mustered 
out "vvith llu! regiment. 



BOSTEK OF COMPANY G. ' 195 

SECOND LIEUTENANTS. 

JOHN M. BERKEY. 

Enlisted Xovember 5, 1861; commissioned second lieutenant 
December 1, 1863; resigned May 6, 1862. 

WILLIAM H. H. RADER. 

Sergeant; enlisted November 5, 1861; commissioned second 
lieutenant November 17, 1862; resigned August 1, 1863. 

JOSEPH H. CARR. 

Sergeant; enlisted November 5, ISGl; v.-ouuded at the battle 
of Champion's Hill, 3Iiss., May 16, 1863; taken prisoner at 
the battle of Sabine Cioss Roads, La., April 8, 1864; confined 
at Tyler, Texas; commissioned second lieutenant June 1, 1865; 
mustered out as sergeant with the regin^ent.* 

SERGEANTS. 

D. M. TILTON. 

Discharged March 28, 1862, disability. 

CORPORALS. 

BENJAMIN F. STEPHENSON. 

Died at Bnrdstown, Ky., February 16, 1862. 
DAVID M. HENDERSON. 

Mustered out December 1, 1864. 
JAMES SWISHER. 

Discharged April 26, 1S62, disability. 
JOHN IIuix'HERSON. 

Died September 26, 18C2, at Helena, Ark. 
NATHAN A. ADAMS. 

Died at MiUikeu's BenJ., La., April 24, 1S63. 
J. H. DUNLOP. 

Discharged August 4, 1862,, disability. 
ALEXANDER GUNN. 

Mustered out December 1, 1864. 
T. AV. G ALL AGE] i. 

Transferred to cavalry. 

PRIVATES. 

EPHRALM MASON. 

Detailed wagoner; discharged June 11, 1862, disability. 
AMAZIAH WATSON. 

Detailed musician; mustered out June 29, 1865. 

E. K. COULSON. 

Detailed musician; discharged October 11, 1862, disability. 
JOHN M. r,UN NELL. 

Mustered out Dtcember ], 1864, term expired. 

*Not mustered as lieutcuaul because company' was below miuimum. 



1 r • r (I 



196 THE F01iTY-SlXT}i IXDIAXA. 

THOMAS 31. -BELL. 

Mustered out December 1, ISOj-, term expired, 

ABEL BENJAMIN. 

Killed at the Lattle of Champion's Hill, ]Miss., May IG, 18G3. 

PHILIP M. BENJAMIN. 

Mustered out December 1, 3804. 

DENNIS BAGLEY. 

Veteran; promoted corporal; wounded in arm; taken prisoner 
at the battle of Sabine Cross Koads, La., April 8, L'^G-i; con- 
fined at Camp Ford and Tyler, Texas; mustered out Septem- 
ber 4, 18G5. 

ja:mes c^riswell. 

Diseliargeil May, 1802, disability. 

WILLIAM H. CLOUSE. 

Veteran; killed at Sabine Cross Roads, La., April 8, 1864. 

LEWIS CHAMBEKLIN. 

Discharged for disability. 

JOHN CLIN GIN. 

Ca})tured at A^ennillionville, La. ; mustered out December 1,. 
1864. 

DANIEL CRONEN. 

Veteran; captured at battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., April 
8, 1864; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

LOT M. CAMLIN. 

Mustered out December 1, 1804. 

SOLOMON M. CAMLIN. 

Promoted to corporal; wounded at Vicksburg, Miss,; dis- 
charged on account of wounds. 

JOSHUA T. COLVIN. 

Taken i)risoner at the Colcasieu Pass, Texas, April 8, 1864; 

died in rebel prison at Camp Grose, Texas, December 26, 

1864. 
LEVI C. CLINE. 

Veteran; wounded at the battle of Port Gibson, Miss., 3Lay 1, 

1863; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
HAMILTON CLINE. 

Clustered out December 1, 1864. 
PETER COLE. 

Veteran; promoted corporal; mustered out September 4, 1365. 
AMOS DUNHAM. 

Killed at the battle of Champion's Hill, Miss., May 16, 1863. 
WILLIAM DILLON. 

Veteran; wounded at the battle of Chamjnon's Hill, Miss., 

May 16, 186.']; wounded at Henderson, Ky., August 21, 1804;. 

mustered out .luly IS, 1865. 



KOSTEU OF COStPAXY G. 197 

HENRY EVANS. 

Mustered out December 21, 1864. 

AVIIXIAM T. EAVES. 

Mustered out July IS, 1SC5. 

DAVID EZRA. 

Discliarged on account of disability. 
HENRY FUNK. 

Discliarged August 24, 1SG3, disability. 
THOMAS G. GLASSFORD. 

Died June 1, 1S63, of wounds received at tlie battle of Cham- 
pion's Hill, Miss., May 16, 1SG3. 
WILLI A,^r ILVrWARD.' 

Veteran; taken prisoner at the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, 

La., April S, 18G4; confined in prison at Tyler, Texas; mus- 
tered out September 4, 1SG5. 
HIRA:^[ N. HUFAM. 

Discharged on account of disability. 
JOHN N. HARBERT. 

Veteran; j-romoted sergeant; mustered out September 4, 1SG5. 
JONATHAN HESS. 

Veteran; discharged April 27, 13G5, disability. 
ROBERT W. HOWARD. 

Died 3Iarch 12, 18G2, at Benton, l\ro. 
GEORGE IMES. 

^Mustered out by order of General Halleck. 
JEREMIAH B. JOHNSON. 

Ivilled at Jackson, Miss., July 19, 1SG3. 
JAMES O. JOHNSON. 

Mustered out December 1, 1864. 
RUDOLPH KLIST. 
-JACOB KANOUSE. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
LEWELLEN KENTON. 

Discharged on account of disability. 
JACOB LARGURT. 

Discharged on account of disability. 
JAMES LL'ZADD1':R. 

Veteran; wounded at the battle of Carancro bayou, La., 

NovemV>er 3, ]*^G3; mustered out September 4, 18G5. 
ANTHONY MASTAN. 

Died at Riddle's Point, Mo., March 2G, 1SG2. 
AMBROSE MUD(;E. 

Discliarged March 15, ISG-t, disability, 
■COLON M<CULLOCH. 

Discharged August 24, 1SG3, disability. 



19S THE FORXy-SIXTH INDIANA. 

SYLVESTER McFARLAND. 

Discharged 3Iay 10, ]Su2, disability. 

JULIUS AicDOXALD. 

Discharged December IS, 1862, disability. 

WILLL-VM MYERS. 

Discharged June 11, 1862, disability. 

JOHN A. XICHOLSON. 

Discharged February 11, 1863, disability. 

JOHN NOLES. 

Died January 6, 1862. 

ELIJAH T. OLIVER. 

Discharged September IG, 1862. 

JOSHUA H. PERFECT. 

Discharged on account of disability; date unknown. 

RICHARD N. PALMER. 

Discharged August 15, 1862, disability. 

ALEXANDER PAIGE. 

Discharged for disability. 

HUGH QUINN. 

Mustered out May 5, 1865. 

CHARLES ROGERS. 

Veteran; promoted sergeant; mustered out September 4, 1865^ 

William' rogers. 

Discharged :»[ay 8, 1862, disability. 
MARTIN ROWAN. 

Discharged January 13, 1863, disability. 
FRANCIS J. RADER. 

Discharged August 12, 1S62, disability. 
JA:v[ES a. REYNOLDS. 

Killed at Carthage, La., May 26, 1863. 
GEORGE M. RIGgInS. 

Died at Rardston'n, Ky.; date unknown. 
JOHN F. SHULTZ. 

Veteran; promoted corporal; mustered out September 4, 1865, 
FLOlvA SHEHAN. 

L)ied June 7, 1863, of wounds received at the battle of Cham- 
pion's Hill, Miss., ]\Lay 16, 1863. 
GEORGE SWARTZELll 

Died at Lemon, Mo., February 26, 1862. 
JACKSON SWISHER. 

Killed at the battle of Port Gibson, Miss., May 1, 1863. 
WILLIAM THOMAS. 
JESSE B.THORNTON. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1865. 



EOSTER OF COMPANY G. 199 

MAKI(3N THO^IPSOX. 

Died at Helena, Ark., November 11, 1862. 
JOHN TTLTON. 

Discharged November, 1S62, disability. 
SYLVAN VAN VOORST. 

Discharged .Tanuary S, 1SC3, disability. 
SYLVESTER WILEY. 

Discharged April 2, 1SG2, disability. • 
JOHN W. ^^'ARWICK. 

Died April 4, 1SG3. 
GEORGE WILLIAMS. 

Mustered out December 1, 1864. 
AARON WOOD. 

Promoted corporal; mustered out December 1, 1S64. 
HENRY WHITE. 

Died September 9, 1S62. 
THOMAS WICKII AM. 

Discharged April 24, 1862, disability. 
J. K. M. WOOD. 

Veteran: drowned at Memphis, Tenu., June 17, 1864. 
ALLEN WHITE. 

Veteran; taken prisoner at tlie battle of Sabine Cross Roads, 

La., April 8, 1864; confined at Tyler and Camp Ford, Texas; 

mustered out September 4, 1865. 
JOHN WHITE. 

Discharged Septetuber 16, 1862, disability. 
JOHN B. AVALDl^ON. 

Veteran: promoted corporal; M'ouuded at Jackson, Miss., July, 

1863; taken prisoner at the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., 

April 8, 1864; contiued at Tyler, Texas; mustered out Septem- 
ber 4, 1860. 
J. W. YOUN']'. 

Discharged January 13, 1863, disability. 
WILLI A:\I YATES. 

Mustered out by General Order, No. 14, General Halleck. 

RECRUITS. 

avillia:\i h. ronnei.l. 

Mustered in January 2, 1862; veteran; wounded at the battle 
of Chamjdon's Hill, Miss., May 16, 1863, receiving two wounds, 
one in body and one in leg; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
JOHN E. CHAMKERLAIN.^ 

Mustered in January 28, 1863; mustered out September 4, 
1S65. 

JAMES C. CHAMBERLAIN. 

Mustered in Se])teniber 14, 1862; taken prisoner at tlie battle 



200 THE FORTY-SIXTH IXDIAXA. 

of Sabine Cross I?oar!>), La., April 8, ISG-i; confined at Tyler 
Texas; mustered out July 18, 1805. 

GEORGE EAVES. 

JMustcred iu ]SoveniI)er 10, 18G4; mustered out September 4, 
1805. 

WILLIAM! II. FRY. 

Mustered in February 17, lSG-1; mustered out June 8, 1865. 

JACOB GUESS. 

Mustei-ed in May 14, 1SB2; wounded at the battle of Cham- 
pion's Hill, Miss., IMay 16, 1SG3; taken prisoner at the battle 
of Sabine Cross Roads, La., April 8, 1804; confined at Camp 
Gross and Tyler, Texas; mustered out A).'ril IS, 1SG5. 

JAMES D. HARRISON. 

]Mnstered in July 2S, 1SG4; mustered out September 4, 13G5. 

JOHN F. RADER.' 

Mustered in January 14, 1SG2; mustered out December 1, 1864. 

FRANCIS :M. SMITH. 

]\[ustered in March 24, 18G2; mustered out March 27, 18G5. 



COMPANY H. 

[This company was mustered into the U. S. Service Xovember 5, 13G1.] 
CAPTAINS. 

FELIX B. THOMAS. 

Commissioned October 4, ISGl; resigned ^Nlarch 28, 1SG2. 

GEORGE IJURSON. 

Commissioned first lieutenant October 4, 1861, as ca])tain May 
29, 1SG2; transferred to colored regiment. 

JAMES W. BROAVN. 

Commissioned second, lieutoiiant October -J, 18nl, as first lieu- 
tenant Iviarch 2'J, lbG2, as captain April 22, 1SG3; mustered 
out on expiration of term December 28, 18G4. 

JAMES F. MI'lTHEL. 

Sergeant; enlisted November 5, ISGl; commissioned second 
lieutenant ?klarch 29, 18G2, as first lieutenant April 22, 1863, 
as captain December 29, 1864, wounded at the seige of Jack- 
son, Miss., July 17, 1863; mustered out with the regiment. 

FIRST LIEUTENANTS. 

MARTIN L. BUl^SON. 

Sergeant; enlisted November 5, 18iU; commissioned second 
lieutenant April 22, 1^(53, as first lieutenant December 29, 
18G4; mustered out with the regiment. 

SECOND LIEUTENANTS. 

JOHN E. DOYLE. 

Sergeant; enlisted No\ ember 5, ISGl; coiamissioued second 



KOSTER OF COMPANY 11. 201 

lieutenant June 1, 1865; mustered out with the regiment as 
sergeant.* 

SERGEANTS. 

ivillia:\i :\r. haz}':n. 

Discharged November 1, 18G2, disability. 
II. F. SOUDERE. 

Veter.an; died September 24, 18G4. 

^ . , ^ CORPORALS. 

JAMES II. BUNTAIX. 

Died October 25, 1S02. 
GEORGE E. MEEK. 
LEWIS PRICE. 

Wounded at the battle of Champion's Hill, Miss., May 16, 

18G3; mustered out. 
J. M. ENSRERGEP.. 

Veteran; promoted sergeant; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
JOHN CHAMBERLAIN. 

Discharged ^Vpril 7, 1863. 
ABRAHAM BRIGHT. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
•SAMUEL E. FISHER. 

Killed at Port Gibson, Miss., May 1, 1863. 
JOSEPH :\IcFARLA ND. 

Died at Ne\v Madrid, Mo., March 13, 1862. 

PRIVATES. 

JOHN H. GILLASPIE. 

Detailed musician; transferred to non-commissioned staff; dis- 
charged 3Iay 15, 1863. 
ANDREW ]]URSON. 

Detailed m\i.^iclan; discharged June 22, 1S62, by order. 
JOSHUA GOSSAGE. 

Detailed \vagoner; discharged December 27, 1863, disability. 
MARSHALL lirAGER. 

Killed at the battle of Chamjiion'-s Hill, Miss., May 16, 1863. 
PETER M. BLEW. 

Discharged May 31, 1862, by order. 
JOHN BROWN. 

Died at Helena, Ark., NovemlK'r 4, 1862. 
COMMODORE S. liURSON. 

Killed at the battle of Champion's Hill, Miss., May 16, 1863. 
FLETCHER P,ORDERS. 

Discharged October 14, 1862, by order. 
JOHN W. BENEFIELD. 

Veteran; promoted corporal; mustered out September 4, 1805. 

*Not mustered as lieutcuaut because couipany vru.s ])elow jniuiinum. 



202 THE FOKTY-SIXTH INDIANA. 

ISAAC CAMPBELL. 

]\Iuslered out December 1, 1SG4. 

MICHAEL B. CRIST. 

Discharged 1SG3, disability. 

GEORGE CRIST. 
Discharged 186-i. 

HENRY CLAPP. 

Discliarged April, 18G3. 

W. H. CRIST. 

Died at Helena, Ark., October, 1862. 

MAURICE CONNER. 

Veterau; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
DANIEL COBLE. 

Died ]NIay 12, 1863, of wounds received at the battle of Port 

Gibson, Miss., May 1, 1863. 
JOHN M. CLARK. 

Died at Memphis, Tcnn., August 1, 1S62. 

MATIIIAS CRIST. 

Discharged May 21, 1862, by order. 

THOMAS CAREY. 

Mustered out Doccniber 1, 1864. 
WILLIAM B. CLARK. 

Discharged May 10, 1862, by order. 
GEORGE CRUM. 

Mustered out September 4, 1865. 
JACKSON CAPPIS. 

Discharged April 4, 1862. 
SAMUEL DUNN. 

Died at St. Louis, Mo., May 13, 1864. 
JAMES II. DUPOY. 

Drowr.cd at Osceola, Aik., Tviay 18, 1S62. 
WILLLVM DAVIDSON. 

Died at Camp WickliO'e, Ky., January 12, 1862. 
THOMAS P. DeMOSS. 

Veteran; wounded at Riddle's Point, 3Io., March 19, 1862;. 

wounded at the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., April 8, 

1S(!4; discharged January 21, 1864, disability. 
AARON DUNEEE. 

T\Iustered out December 1, 1864. 
WILLIAM ENYART. 

Discharged 3Iay 31, 1862, by order. 
JAMES C. EISHER. 

Veteran; promoted cor])oral; captured at the battle of Sabine 

Cross Roads, La., Ajnil 8, 1864; mustered out September 4^ 

1865. 



ROSTER OF COMPANY H. 



203 



WILLIAM FALER. 

Veteran; wounded at the battle of Port Gib?on, 3hs>., .May 1, 
1SG3; captineJ at the battle of Sabine Cross Koads, La., April 
8, 1864; died at home June 13, 18G5. 

SAMUEL FISHER. 

Transferred to Mississippi River Marine Brigade, ISGi. 

WILLIAM FALLIS. 

Discharged 1SG2, by order. 

JOHN H. GILL. 

Discharged November, 18G2, disability. 

THOMAS J. GALLKEATH. 

Discharged >hiy 31, 1862, by order. 

JOSEPH GARBINSON. 
Died 1862. 

DANIEL GARBINSON. ,, , t 

Veteran; captured at the battle of Sabine Cross Koads, J.a.» 
April 8, ISGl; mustered out July 15, 1865. 

GEORGE GOOD. 

Died at Memphis, Tenn., 1862. 

JOHN A. GUNTER. 

Discharged May 31, 1862. 

W. T. HAWKINS. 

Died at rviemphis, Tenn., 1SG2. 

THOMAS HOWARD. 

Mustered out December 1, ISG-L 
HENRY HERRICK. 

Discharged 1S62, by order. 
LAWRENCE HARTELROAD. 

Veteran; promoted corporal; captured at the battle of Sabine 

Cross Roads, La., April 8, 18G-4; mustered out September 4, 

18G5. 
NIXSON HIE AND. 

Discharged May 31, 1862, by order. 

LEWIS J. HASKELL. 

Died at Bard>town, Ky., January 31, 1862. 

JESSE HEIGHT. 

Died at Helena, Ark., July 22, 1SG2. 

THO^IAS B. HEDGES. 

Veteran; promoted corporal; promoted sergeant; mustered 

out September 4, 1865. 
ANDREW KETNER. 

Discharged 1362, disability. 

Q. 0. LITTLE. 
JOHN LEACH, Sk. 

Discharged June 22, 1862, disability. 



204 THE FORTY-SIXTH IN'DIAXA. 

. JOHNSON LIDYAKD. 

Veteran; inusteved out September 4, 1SG5. 

TIIO:\rAS S. LONG. 

Discharged February 5, 1803, dii«ability. 

GEORGE LAMB. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1SC5. 

.JOHN A. MOWRY. 

Veteran; promoted corporal; mustered out September 4, 1SG5. 

.JOHN MYERS. 

Discliarged May 31, 1862, by order. 

JOSTAH H. MAYER. 

Mustered out December 1, 1804, term of service expirtld. 

WILLIAM :\[AYER. 

Mustered out December 1, 1864, term of service expired. 

JOHN J. MAYER. 

Veteran; promoted corporal; wounded at the battle of Cham- 
])ion\s Hill, 31iss., May 10, 1803; mustered out September 4, 
1805. 

-JOHN N. MULLENS. 

Veteran; promoted first sergeant; captured at the battle of 
Sabine Cross Roads, La., April 8, 1804; mustered out Septem- 
ber 4, 1805. 

-JOHN McNAMAR. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1805. 

JOHN McGLAUGHLIN. 

Discharged 1802, disability. 

JACOB OLIVER. 

Taken prisoner at the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., April 
S, 1804; died in prison at Tyler, Texas, November, 1804. 

JOHN OVERMYER. 

Mustered out December 1, 1804, term of service expired. 

GEORGE W. PASSINS. 

Died at Tiptonviile, Tenn., April IS, 18C2. 

JAMES PASSINS. 

Veteran; captured at the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., 
April 8, 1S04; mustered out September 4, 1805. 

CIIxVRLES N. RAVER. 

Discharged May 31, 1802, by order. 

HENRY P. RAVER. 

Discharged 18(;2, disability. 
GEORGE M. ROW. 

Mustered out. 
JACOB REICHARD. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1SG5. 



ROSTEK OF COilPAXY II. 205- 

IlEXKY IIEICHARD. 

Veteran; promoted corporal; \vouik1cc1 at the battle of Port 
Gibson, Miss., May 1, 1863; mustered out September 4, 1S65. 
JACOB RUFF. Jr. 

Died at Evansville. Ind., :NIaY 10, 1862. 

ja:mes ryax. 

Drowned at St. Charles, Ark., June 18, 1SG2. 
ALLEN W. STEPHENS. 

Died at New Orleans, La., Septembers, 1863. 

iSIARTIN SHANK. 

Died at Helena, Ark., February 22, 1863. 

ANDREW J. SKINNER. 

Veteran; promoted sergeant; mustered out September -i, 1865- 
CHARLES SCHOBER. 

Discharged 15*^2. 

GEORGE H. TAYLOR. 

Discharged 3Iay 31, 18G2, by order. 
GEORGE W. TAYLOR, Sr. 

Di.scharged May 31, 1862, by order. 
GEORGE W. TAYLOR, Jk. 

Discharged l'^62. 

IRA C. WASIIBL'RN. 

Died at Memphis, Tenn., October, 1SG2. 

ELHIU P. WASHBURN. 

Veteran; promoted sergeant; mustered out September 4, 1865.. 

DAVLD WOOD. 

Discharged June 9, 1S62, by order. 
GEORGE WASHINGTON. 

Died at Evansville, Ind., May 10, 1862. 
THO^UVS YOl'NG. 

Mustered out December 1, 1861, term of service expired. 

RECRUITS. 

JOHN K. AL^L\. 

Mustered in February 1, 1865; mustered out September l-I,. 

1865. 
JOHN K. BENEFIEL. 

Clustered in Jauuarv 15, 1864; died at Lexington, Ky., April 

14, 1865. 
IRA BROWN. 

^Mustered iu October 19, 1864; mu.stered out September 4, 1865- 

MICHAEL B. CHRIST. 

Mustered in March 13, 1864; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
GEORGE DIAMOND. 

ISAAC FELKKIL 

Clustered in Ftbniary 22, 1865; mustered out Se}>tember 4, 1865- 



-l.'l 



206 THE FORTY-SIXTH I^"U1A^■A. 

RUFUS GILLESPIE. 

Mustered August 2, 1S64; promoted corporal; mustered out 
September 4, 1S65. 

ALBERT HALL. 

Mustered March, 1SG5; promoted corporal; mustered out Sep- 
tember 4, 1SG5. 

GEORGE KEY. 

Mustered February 22, 1865; mustered out September 4, 1.865. 

JAMES KEY. 

Mustered February 22, 1SG5; mustered out Septeaiber 4, 1865. 

SAiNLUEL F. RAWLEY. 

Mustered January 19, 1S62; died at Helena, Ark., April 18, 1862. 

JOHN F. REAP. 

Mustered February 22, 1865; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
CIIARLi:S N. RAVER. 

Mustered March 8, 1664; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
DAVID SKUNK. 

Mustered February 22, 1865; mustered out July 15, 1865. 



COMPANY I. 

[This company was mustered iulo the service December 2, ISO!.] 
CAPTAINS. 

JAMES IT. THO:\IAS. 

Commissioned October 4, 1861; resigned October 21, 1862. 

JOHN W. F. LISTOX. 

Commissioned Hrst lieutenant October 4, 1S61, as captain 
October 22, 1862; resigned Xovember 29, 1864. 

FREDERICK FITCH. 

Corporal; Enlisted December 2, 1861; appointed sergeant 
January 22, 1864; commissioned captain January 1, 1865; mus- 
tered out with the regiment. 

FIRST LIEUTENANTS. 

JACOr. S. McCOMICK. 

Sergeant; enlisted De(;ember 2, 1861; cominissioned first lieu- 
tenant October 22, 1862; wounded at Chami)ion's Hill, Miss., 
May 16, 1863; mustered out on expiration of term, Deceiaber 
28, "1864. 

ALr>Eirr j. arbott. 

Euli^iou D'.'Cfinber 2, ]8''l; ])ro<a<)t(jd sergeant October, 1862; 
Ciunmissioin-d rirst lieutenant .January 2s, ISGo; niu.stered out 
with rcL'iiiient. 



),., 



EOSTKR OF COMPANY I. 207 

SECOND LIEUTENANTS. 

NAFOLEOy B. BOOTH. 

Comiuissioned second lieutenant October 4, 1861; resigned 

May 21, 18G2. 
JOSEPII H. 33EXXEK. 

Sergeant; enlisted December 2, 18.01; commissioned second 

lieutenant May 22, 1SG2; resigned December 29, 18G2. 
JACOB lIUDEoiv. 

Sergeant; enlisted December 2, 18G1; commissioned second 

lieutenant December 30, 18G2; killed at Sabine Cro^ss Roads, 

La., April 8, 18G4. 
ROBEKT II. MARTI X. 

Enlisted December 2, 18G1; appointed corporal; commissioned 

second lieutenant June 1, 1SG5; mustered out with regiment 

as sergeant,* 

SERGEANTS. 

HAMPTOX C. BOOTH. 

Discharged 3lay, 1SG2, disability. 

D. T. KRISIIER..* 

Wounded at the battle of Champion's Hill, Miss., ]May 16, 
18G3; mustered out December 12, 18G4,term of service expired. 

CORPORALS. 

THOMAS COOPER. 

Veteran; promoted sergeant; mustered out September 4, 18G5. 

J. II. MARTI X. 

Dischnrged December 12, 1SG2, disability. 

ROBERT McELHEXY. 

Mustered out December 12, 1864, term of service expired. 

E. A. THOMAS. 

Veteran; transferred to Company G. 

JOHN DOUGLAS. 

jNIusteied out December 1, 1864, term of service expired. 
HEXRY C. CLUM. 

Died at Memidiis, Term., Jurie 14, 18(>2. 

PRIVATES. 

WILLI A:^! SPADER. 

Detailed mu>ieian; discharged May 23, 1SG2, disability. 

MARTIX L. SUREACE. 

Detailed musician; ■wounded at the battle of Port Gibson, 
iNIiss., ]\Iay 1, 1863; died at Evansville, lud., June 20, 18G3, 
from such wounds. 

A..HAROXX. 

Detailed wagoner; discharged May 2-^, ]8G2, by onler, disa- 
bility. 

*isuL iiiui-U'tecl fib lieutcuiinl because coinjiauy was bolow miniiiium. 



20S THE FOKTY-.sIXrH IXPIAXA. 

T. G. BUTTON. 

Killed jMay IG, 1S63, at the battle of Cuampiou's Hill, Miss^ 

ARTEMUS BUKXSWOirjlI. » 

Drowned in Tallahatchie river March G, 1SG3. 
J. BKADY. 

]3ischarged November, 18G2, disability. 
GEORGE W. BECKETT. 

Veteran; wounded at the battle of Port Gibson, ]Miso., Maj' 1,. 

18G3; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
JESSE COLBERT. 

Mustered out December 1, 1S61, term of service exj^ired. 
W. A. CUSTER. 

Veteran; transferred to Company B January 2, ISG-i. 
RICHARD CALHOUN. 

Clustered out December 1, ISGi, term of service expired. 
ALLEN CALHOUN. 

Transferred to Sixteenth Ohio Battery September IS, 1863. 
J. CRISMER. 
ORVIL DEPOT. 

Died at Cairo, HI., August, 18G2. 
WALTER DUNKLE. 

Mustered out December 1, 1864, term of service expired. 
G. Vv^ DIETS. 

Mustered out December 1, 1SG4, term of service expired. 
JOHN H. ENGART. 

Veteran; promoted corporal; mustered out September 4, 1865, 
H. FISHPAUGH. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 18G5. 
D. R. GARRETT. 
JOHN GRASS, Jr. 

Veteran; niu.^;tered out SeptciJiber 4, 1SG5. 
JOHN GRAY. 

Veteran; mu>tered out September 4, 1SG5. 
TH0:VIAS I1U:\IBERT. 

Killed at the battle of Champion's Hill, Miss., May 16, 1863. 
:MILT0N HANCOCK. 

Died at Vicksburg, ^liss., July 27, 1863, of Avounds received at. 

the battle of Jackson, JMiss., July 17, 1SG3. 
JOHN HAMILTON. 

A'eteran; captured at the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La.,. 

April 8, 1864. 
G. W. HOOVER. 

Discliarged ^Lay 28, 18G2, by order. ^ 

SAI^IUEL HUNTER. 

Died at Mcmpliis, Tenn., July 24, 1S63. 



< /. 



-V 



ROSTER OF COMTANY I. 209 

ISAAC JONES. 

Died at Kard.stown, Ky., Jamiarv 25, 1SG2. 
SAMUEL JOIIXSON. 

Discharged Augu.<t IS, 1S63, on account of wounds received at 
the battle of Champion's Tlill, Miss., May 16, 1S63. 
v. J. JULIAN. 

Died at Logansport, Ind., May 25, 1862. 
ANDREW JOHNSON. 

Died at Logansport, Ind., :^Lay, 1862. 
"WILLIAM F. KEEF. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
JOHN G. KRELLER. 

Veteran; promoted corporal; mustered out September 4 1865 
JOHN J. KUSS.MAIEL. 

Veteran; promoted corporal; mustered out September 4, 1864 
JEFFERSON KISTLER. 

Killed at the battle of Champion's Hill, Miss., :May IC^ 1863 
SOLOMON KLINE. 

Discharged October 7, 1863, on account of wounds received at 
the battle of Champion's Hill, Miss., May 16, 1863 
JAMES KERR. 

Discharged May 23, 1862, by order. 
JOHN MURPHY. 

Died at Lagro, Ind., April 27, 1862. 
JOSEPH MYERS. 

Discharged September 19, 1862, by order, disability. 
CHARLES D. MELLINGER. 

Killed at the battle of ChampionVs Hill, Miss., Mav 16 1863 
WILLIAM MAYER. ' ' 

Discharged March S, 1S64, disability. 
JOHN ^[EANS. 
SAMUEL McNALLY. 

Discharged February 7, 1863, disability. 
WILLIAM OLIVER. 

Killed at the battle of Champion's Hill, :\nss., May 16 1863 
JOHN H. I'ERSINGER. 

Veteran: mustered out September 4, 1865. 
BADLEY PORTER. 

Veteran; promoted sergeant; captured at the battle of Sabine 
Cro_ss Roads, La., A])ril 8, 186-.; mustered out September 4 
iMiO. ^ ' 

GEORGE W. I'ORTER. 

Veteran: promoted s(M-geant; wounded at the battle of Cham- 
pion s Hill, Mi^^s., ,May H:>, 1863; mustered out September 4, 



210 THE yoKTY-SIXTU INDIANA. 

C. S. PEADODY. 

Veteran-, promoted sergeant; wounded at Jackson, Miss., July, 
1SG3; captured at the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., April 
8, ISG-i; mustered out September 4, 1SG5. 

J. G. PARISH. 

Killed in Arkansas, near the mouth of AVhite river, by guer- 
rillas, June 28, 1SG2. 

LAWRENCE RUFF. 

Mustered out December 1, 1864, term of service expired. 

WILLIAM SPENCE. 

Mustered out Ueocniber 1, 1864, term of service expired. 

willia:*! sciiofer. 

Mustered out December 1, 1864, terra of service expired. 

J. B. SCOTT. 

Mustered out September 4, 1S65. 

CHARLES SEG RAVES. 

Veteran; mustered out Sej^tember 4, 1SG5. 

JONAS STIVER. 

Died Mav 29, 1863, of wounds received at the battle of Cham- 
pion's Hi'll, Mi^s., May 16, 1S63. 

VALENTINE TODD. 

Mu.-^tered out October 2, 1865. 

• JAMES TODD. 

Died at Osceola, Ark., April 15, 1S62. 

JAMES TUBBS. 

Discharged October 15, 1363, disability. 

HENRY WlllTMORE. 

Veteran; promoted sergeant; wounded at battle of Cham- 
pion's Hill. Mivs., ."May 16,1863; mustered out September 4, 
1865. 

JOHN WHITE. 

Veteran; wour.ded at the battle of Cliam}»ion"s Hill, Miss., 
M:iy 16, ISilS; mustered out September 4, 1S65. 

J. A. WILSON. 

Veteran; promoted sergeant; ca])tui-ed at the battle of Sabiue 
Cross R(xads, La., ^\.]>ril 8, 1864; mustered out September 4, 
1865. 

ELI P. W.VSHIiURN. 

Discharged August 18, 1862. 

J. E. WAIUTELD. 

Veteran; ili>charged .June 22, 1864. 

J. W. WALTEK'S. 

Veteran; woiunled at the battle of Champion's Hill, Miss., 
May 16, isr,;;; died at Royal Center, Ind., July 10, 1864. 



EOSTER OF COMPANY I. 211 



SAMUEL WALTEKS. 

Died at St. Louis, 3io., April 15, 1862. 
W. J. WALTERS. 

Discharged February 9, 1863, disability. 
TAYLOR WILSON. 

Died at Memphis, Teim., October 28, 1862. 
D. M. WHITCOMB. 

Discharged November 16, 1862, disability. 
DENNIS WHITMORE. 

Died at Evansville, Ind., April 15, 1862. 
J. J. WILEY. 

Discharged January 13, 1S63, disability. 
JOHN TERNON. 

Veterau; mustered out September 4, 1865. 



RECRUITS. 

JAMES AIKEN. 

Mustered in August 1, lS6-i. 
WILLIAM BARLOUR. 

Mustered in January 27, 1864; mustered out August 9, 1805. 
ISAAC BELEW. 

Mustered in Marcli 29, 1865; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
JAMES II. BARNIIART. 

]\[ustered in November 3, 1S64. 
THEODORE COX. 

Mustered in Februarv 29, 1864. 
HENRY DAVIS. 

Mustered in February 22, 1862; died May 18, ISG'i, of rounds 

re^ei.-eJ ai the tjuith' of I'ort Gibson, 'IMiss,, jlay ]', 1S63. 
CHARLES DAVIDSON. 

Mustered m September 22, 1862; mustered out -lulv 17, 1865. 
EPHRADf EDMONDS. 

:Mustered in Jaiiuary 27, 1864; died at New Orleans, La., Julv 

30, 1864. ^ 

AUGI^ST EBEIHJNE. 

^Mustered 31areh 29, 1865; mustered out September 4, 18(55. 
GEORGE W. t;Rl',M. 

Mustered February 22, ls62; promotCil quartermaster sergeant; 

discharged January 3, 1865, disability. 
JOHN GJLVSS. Sk. 

Mustere<l Febiuarv 3, 1S64; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
WJIJJAM R. (iUlH.EY. 

Veteran; mustered January 2, 1864: mustered nut Sei.f-mber 

4, 18l;5, ' ■ ^ 



I ( ' 



7 
{ ... / 



- Mi" 



) 1'/ 



212 ruK iORxr-sixTu i>'diana. 

DANIEL GRUFT. 

Mustered January 27, 1S64; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

ISAAC GROFT. 

^Ntustered January 27, 18G-1; died at New Orleans, La., Sep- 
tember 30, ISf.i. ■ 

GEORGE HA^tlLTOX. 

Mustered February. 1, 1S62; died at St. Charles, Ark., July 1, 
1862. 

DANIEL IIARROD. 

Mustered March 26, 1862; wounded at the battle of Port Gib- 
son, Miss., May 1, 1863; mustered out March '~b, 1S65. 

LEVI IIOCKERSMITII. 

Mustered January 27, 1SG4; mustered out March 25, 1865. 

WILLIAM HULL. 

Mustered January 27, 1SG4; mustered out August 21, 1865. 

WILLIxVM HENRY. 

Mustered January 27, 1SG4; mustered out August 21, 1865. 

JAMES A. HOLMS. 

Mustered :\Iarch 10, 18G4. 

LEWIS KELLY. 

Mustered starch 10, 1S64; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

JOHN KELLY. 

Clustered August 1, 1SG4. 

JACOB LIGIITCAP. 

INlustered March 10, 1SG4; died at New Orleans, I^a., June 18,. 
1864. 

JULIUS MAYER. 

Mustered February 1, 1?G2; promoted. 

EDWAP.D P. MOWER. 

Mu-sterod .January 2"i. 1864; promoted corporal; mustered out 
September 4, 18t»5. 

HIRAM MOOFiE. 

jMustered July 19, 1864; promoted corporal; mustered out 
September 4, ISG.'). 

AMOS OPkPIT. 

Veteran; mustered December 24, ISGl; captured at the battle 
of Sabine Cross Roads, La., April 8, 1364; wounded at Jack- 
son, Miss., July, lSii3. 

MIOSES C. PASIXGER. 

Mustered in December 16, 1862; died at Indiana})olis, lnd.> 
May 1, 1863. 

WILLIAM PARKEIL 

^Mustered in FeKiruarv 20, 1864; died at Lagro, Ind., October 
30, 1864. 



EOSTEK OF COMPAXY K. 213 

GEORGE SCIILEII. 

^Mustered in September 22, 1^(>2: wounded at the battle of 
Port Gibson, ^liss., ]May 1, 1S(J3; killed at the battle of Sabine 
Cross Roads, La., April 8, 18(>4. 

KI CII AK D SAN B URN . 

Clustered in Se])teiuber 22, 1S02; mustered out July 17, 1865. 

GEORGE STETLER. 

Mustered in .January 27, ISiU; mustered out July 17, 1SC5. 
JOHN SCHI^VDER. 

Clustered in February 3, 1804; mustered out July 17, 1865. 

GEORGE W. SHRADER. 

jVIustered in January 27, IStU; died at New Orleans, La., 

September 15, 18G4. 
FREDRICK SCHRADER. 

^Mustered in February 8, 1S64; died at New Orleans, La., May 

7, 18C4. 
JOHN YOORHLS. 

Clustered in January 27, 1SG5; mustered out September 4, 1865. 
SAMUEL L. VERNON. 

Mustered in March 29, 1865; mustered out September 4, 1865. 



COIYIF^ANY K. 

[This company was mustered into the U. S. Service XovemhcrS, ISGl.] 
« CAPTAINS. 

BENJAMIN A. GROVER. 

Commissioned (October 4, lSt;l; resigned July 22, ISGS. 
EGBERT ,^r. SHIELDS. 

Commissioned second lieutcTiant October 4, 1861, captain July 

23, 1862; mustered out December 12, 1864, term of service 

expired. 
CIlESTEli CHAMBERLAIN. 

Corporal; enlisted December 11, 1861; commissioned first 

lieutenant July 1, 1864, captain December 13, 1864; mustered 

out with res^lment. 



FIRST LIEUTENANTS. 

JOHN McCLUNG. 

Sergeant; enlisted December 11, 186)1; commissioned second 
lieutenant April 30, 1S62, first lieutenant July 23, 1S63; killed 
at the battle of Sabine Cru>s Roads, l^a., A}>ril 8, L-'''.4. 



214 THE FORTY-SIXTH INDIANA, 

GEORGE C. IIORX. 

Clustered into service December 15, ]R(j1; appointed com- 
missary sergeant September IG, 1S62; commissioned first lieu- 
tenant January 16, 1SG5; mustered out September 4, 1SG5. 

SECOND LIEUTENANTS. 

JACOB II. LEITER. 

Commissioned second lieutenant October 4, ISGl; resigned 
xVpril 30, ]SG2. 

JOHN 31. VAX METER. 

Sergeant; enlisted December 11, 1861; captured at the battle 
of Sabine Cross Roads, La., April 8, 18G4; commissioned 
second lieutenant June 1, 1SG5; mustered out as sergeant "Nvitb. 
regiment.'* 

SERGEANTS. 

GEORGE VAX METER. 

Died on ^lississippi river February 26, 1862. 

IIEXRY A. BRUXD. 

Discharged January 4, 1SG3, disability. 

J. C. MOSES. 

Discharged February 14, 18G3, disability. 

LEVI BURTCH. 

Discharged September 25, 18G-, disability.^ 

CORPORALS. 

AMB]?OSE :McYOKE. 

Veteran; captured at the brittle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., 
April 8, 1SG4; mustered out September 4, 1S65. 

0. c. s:MnTr. 

Discharged September 20, 1SG2, disability. 

JOIIX MAI^SIIMAX. 

Veteran; discharged March 30, 1865, disability. 

JOIIX VICE. 

Veteran; mustered out Sej'touber 16, 18i]5. 

SIMOX MILLEli. 

Discharged July 3, 1863, disability. 

JOXAS IIICKSOX. 

Died at Riddle's Point, Mo., April 7, 1862. 

SlIEI^ALVX IIASKILL. 

Discharged June 10, 1862, by order. 

*Not musteied us lieutrnaiU because company v/as below minnnum^ 



i ) 



''. . I ! X 



EOSTER OF COMPANY K. 215 

PF^IVATES. 

JOIIX STKADLFA'. 

Dctuiled iuu>iL'ian; cliscliar^ed February 20, ISGo, disability 

JOHN HUFFMAN. 

Detailed wagoner; discharged June 10, 1S62, by order. 

LAlHvIN ADAM^<ON. 

Killed at the battle of Port Gibson, Miss., May 1, 1S68 

KOBERTSON .\DA:MS0N. 

Veteran; promoted sergeant; mustered out September 4, 1SG5. 

A. B. ANDREWS. 

Discharged July .31, 1SG2, disability. 

D. R. BALL. 

Veteran; promoted sergeant; mustered out September 4, 18G5. 
J. R. BELL. 

Died at Evansville. Li-L, September, 1SG2. 
ISAAC BEMENDERFER 

Discharged June 10. 1SG2, by order. 
THOMAS BLACKEl'ER. 

Died at Camp Wicklitie, Ky., January 21, ]SG2. 
WILLIAM B RUCKUS. 

Died at Bard^town, Ky., January ID, 1SG2. 
JESSE BUZAN. 

Dischai-ged June 10, 1SG2, by order. 

si:n[on camp. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 18G.5. 
ELIJA CLISE. 

Died at .Mound City, 111., Sej^tember 8, 1SG2. 
DANIEL CLISE. 

Died at St. Louis, Mo., October IS, 1SG2. 
A. P. COLLINS. 

Discliargeil Jiuie 10, 1SG2, by order. 
WILLIAM COUK. 

Veteran; wounded at the battle of Champion's Hill, Miss., 

May IG, 13G4; captured at the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, 

La., April S, lsG4; mustered out Se])Lember 4, 18G5, 
CHARLES W. COLWELL. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 18G5. 
WILLLVM DAVIS. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1805 
JOSEPH GAUDEY. 

Died at Bardstown, Kv., February 9, 18()2. 
LEVI R. HASKMLL. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4. 
ADAM (iAUDEY. 

Promoted corporal; \voundrd at the l>attle of Port Gibson, 



■ I- f 



21G THE FORTY-SIXTH INDIANA. 

Miss., ^lay 1, ISiiS, losing right arm; dischai'ged August 8, 
1863, because of wounds. 

J. HARDY. 

Discharged June 10, 1SG2, by order. 

JOHN A H(30VEK. 

Died of wounds received at the battle of Champion's Ilill, 
:\liss., May Hi, 1863. 

samup:l hoover. 

Veteran; mustered out with regiment. 

Wn.LIAM HUNTER. 

JACOB HEAD. 

D. C. JENKINS. 

Veteran; captured at the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., 
April 8, 18C4; mustered out September 1, I8u5. 

JOHN JOHNSON. 

Vetei-aii; promoted sergeant; mustered out Se|iteraber -1, 1S65. 

SAMUEL JOHNSON. 

Veteran; captured at the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., 
April S, 1864; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

WILLIAM JOHNSON. 

Killed at Fort Pemberton, ]Miss., April 1 4, 1863. 

ASBURY JOHNSON. 

Died at Camp Wickliffc, Ky., February 9, 1S62, 

ISRAEL JOHNSON. 

Discharged November, 1862. 

WILLIAM KREGHBAU:k[. 

Veteran; captured at the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., 
April S, 1864; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

JEFFERSON r^fARSHMAN. 

Veteran; wounded at the battle of Sabine Cross Road:-', La., 
April 8, jS64; mu.sleied out September 4, 1S65. 

GEORGE W. MATHEWS. 

Vetera]]; captured at tlie battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., 
April 8, 1864; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

LEWIS :,IESNER. 

Captured at Vermillionsville, La., November 12, 1863; mus- 
tered out December 1, 1S64, term of senice expired. 

THOMAS McCLEARY. 

Discharged June 10, 1362, by order. 

JACOI? MILLER. 

Discharged .June 10, 1862, by order. 

GEORGE C. :N[00RE. 

Veterau; promoted corporal; captured at the battle of Sabine 
Cross Roads, La., April 8, 1864; mustered out September 4, 
1865. 



KOSTEK OF COMPAXY K. 217 

AVILLIAM 3I00UE. 

Died at Camp Wickliffo, Ky., January 29, 1S02. 

CIIA3U.es PASTE]«. 

Disc]iarged September 25, 1862, disability. 

J. P. TEAM. 

Died at liardstown, Ky., March 17, 1SG2. 

-JOHN RITCIIEY. 

Discharged Januar}' 15, 1S63. 

H. S. RITCDEY. 

Died at St. Louis, Mo., October 23, ISiVZ. 

FRISBY X. RICIIARDSOX. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 18G5. 

F. M. RTED. 

Di.scharged June 10, 1SG2. 

JOSEPH T. ROSS. 

Vetej'an; niustered out September 4, 1SG5. 

JxVMES ROSS. 

Discharged June 10, 18G2, by order. 

MICJE\EL ROOXEY. 

HENRY SAH.OR. 

Drowned in Mississippi river August 20, 1862. 

T. W. SCOTT. 

Killed at Sabine Cross Roads, La., April 8, 1864. 

ANDRE Vr SHAMP. 

Mustered out Deceiriber 1, 1864, term of service expired. 

JESSE SHAMP. 

Veteran: captured at tlie battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., 
April S, 18G4; mustered out September 4, 1SG5. 

SAMUEi. SHIELDS. 

Discharged June 10, 1SG2, by order. 

ELMORE SHELT. 

Veteran; captured at the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., 
April 8, 18G4; mustered out September 4, 1SG5. 

ELHHT SHAFER. 

Veteran; ^^■ounded at Fort Pemberton, Miss., 1863; captured 
at the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., April S, 1864; mus- 
tered out September 4, 1865. 

JOHN .STALLARD. 

Veteran; promoted corporal; captured at the battle of Sabine 
Cross Roads, La., Aj^ril 8, 1864; mustered out September 4, 
1865. 

STEPHEN SHEPPARD. 

^V^JJAM SNYDAM. 

Mustered out December 1, 1864, term (-f service expired. 



' ■ I -^( ; 



2]S THE FORTV-SIXTH INDIANA. 

THEODORE W. STKTNGHAM. 

Died at St. Charles, Ark., January 20, 1SG3. 

WALLACE TRUE.- 

Discharged June 10, LSG2, by order. 

WILBER TRUSLOW. 

Veteran; promoted corporal; mustered out September 4, 1S65. 

GEORGE UPDERGRAFF. 

Died at Helena, xVrk., September 23, 1862. 

HIRAM WllITTEN^BERGER. 

Discharged February 14, 1SG3, disability. 

JOHN B. AVHITTENBERGER. 

Appointed sergeant January 24, 18G2; died at Memphis^ 
Tcnn., October 7, 18G2. 

LYMAX WHITE. 

Transferred to Sixteenth Ohio Battery April 20, 18G3. 

TDIOTHY WnJTA:MS. 

Died at Helena, Ark., October 16, 1SG2. 

FRANCIS WILKINSON. 

Discharged June 10, 1SG2, by order. 

WILLI A:^! WOODS. 

Veteran; mustered out September 4, 1S65. 

RECRUITS. 

WILLIA^J BINKLEY. 

Clustered Febrr.ary 2, 1SG5; mustered out September 5, 1865. 

CELESTINE l^RASANHAM. 

Mustered March 1, 13G4; died at Lexington, Ky., Februai'v 4, 
isr..'). 

JESSE BUZAN. 

Mustered in January 25, 1SG4; mustered out Seiilember 4, 1365. 

NATHAN CAIHI. 

^Mustered in January 27, 1864; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

WILLIAM CHAMBERLAIN. 

Mustered in !>Larch 1, 1S64; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

JOHN L. CLOUSE. 

Mustered in 31arch 9, 1861; tiansferred to Veteran Reserve 
Corps: mustered out September 14, 1865. 

SAMUEL DRAKE. 

Discharged June 10, 1S62, disability. 

DAVID HALLER. 

3Iusteied in <.>ctol>cr 28, 1862; discharged February 5, 1863,. 
disability. 



KOSTKR or COMPANY K. 21!) 

EOSCOE G. HUTCH ENS. 

]\Justered in October 28, 1SG2; mustered out SopteniLer 4, 1865. 

WILL1A3I II. IIUN'rER. 

Mustered in March 8, ISGo; mustered out September 4, 1805. 

ISRAEL D. JOHNSON. 

Mustered in February 2, 18G5; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

JEROME JOHNSON. 

Mustered in February 2, 1865; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

LEVI JOHNSON. 

Mustered in February 2, 1865; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

TIIO.AIAS McCLEARY. 

Mustered in February 2, 1865; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

THOMAS ^IcCLEARY. 

Mustered in July 29, 1864; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

JOIJN MHJ.ER. 

Mustered in July 29, 1864; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

JACOB R. MILLER. 

]Mustered in P'ebruary 2, 1865; discharged May 16, 1865, disa- 
bility. 

SAMUEL :MITj'.ER. 

Mustered in February 2, 18(52; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

ABRAHAM MONEYSMITH. 

Mustered in February 2, 1865; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

GEORGE K. MUMMERT. 

Mustered in March 14, 1861; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

WILLIAM OR.AN. 

Mustered in .March 11, 1S6-J; musterei-I oui September 4, 1365. 

FRANK M. RH^l). 

Mustered in .June 30, 1862; mustered out June 30, 1865. 

JOHN ROONEY. 

.Mustered in February 2, 18;'5; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

NELSON G. SEFPY. 

Mustered in Api'il 11, 13r'2; died at Memphis, Tenn., Aucjust 
31, 1362. 

ENOS 0. STIHNGHAM. 

^[ustered in April 11, 1862; mustered out April 11, 1865. 

JOHN H. STAILEY. 

Mustered in February 2, 1865; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

WILLIAM E. SUTTON. 

r^Iustered ir) A}>ril 11, 1862; died at i'urt I'illow, Tenn., Mav 
15, 1S62. 



■220 THK FORTY-SIXTH IXOiANA. 

DAVID STLT)ABAKER. 

Mustered in March 1, 18iU; mustered out June G, 1SG5. 

RICHARD WAGO^^ER. 

Mustered February 2, 18G5; mustered out September 4, 1865. 

JOHN YOUXT. 

Mustered February 2, 1865; mustered out September 4, 18G5. 

ELLIS LONG. 

Discharged April 16, 1S62, disability. 

UNASSICNED RECRUITS. 

JOHN ANDERSON. 

Mustered September 19, 18G4. 

MILES W. BRAGG. 

Mustered August 5, 1SG4. 

ORSON A. CROFOOT. 

Mustered October 23, 1SG2. 

JOHN ELKINS. 

Mustered February 1, 1865. 

JOSEPH LAYTON. 

Mustered October 29, 1862. 

JULIUS PLANT. 

Mustered .January 4, 1364. 

JOHN RYAN. 

Mustered November 15, 1864. 

ITHIA SHEPPARD. 

Mustered March 31, 1864. 



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