(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "History of the Fourteenth Regiment, Connecticut Vol. Infantry"

''f^^f^ 




COL. DWIGHT MORRIS. 



HISTORY 



FOURTEENTH REGIMENT, 



CONNECTICUT VOL. INFANTRY. 



BY 



CHARLES D. PAGE. 



ILLUSTRATED. 



MERIDEN, CONN.: 

The horton Printing Co. 

1906 



Cjy\^i^ 



LIBRARY of CONGRESS 
TwK) Copies RKe<yt4 

MAY 2 1907 

. CtWfrtfW Entry 

eusi M\ 

CO^V A/ *• 



tnu. 



Copyrighted 1906. 






Published under the auspices of 

CiiARi.EK Lyman, Alhekt F. Hall and 

John McCarthy. 

A Committee of the Society of the 

Fourteenth Connecticut 

Regiment. 



^ 



To the members 

of the 

Fourteenth Regiment. 

CoNNECTicur Volunteer Infantry, 

who still remain to do service 

in the battle of life, 

and to the memory of the 

brave ones 

mustered out, 

these pages are 

dedicated. 



CONTENTS. 

CHfAPTER I.— THE KIRTH OF THE REGIMENT. 

Designed for a "Camp of Instructions. "-The President's Call for Troops^ 
^-Governor Buckingham's Appeal-Revival ^f^ ^nhs^--^^-^^" P 
Foote.-Lack of Discipline.-Mustered into U. S. Serv-e.-Leaxe 
Hartford for the Front.-Towns Represented m the Regmient.-Dr. 
Jewett's Opinions and Memories. 

CHAPTER H— FROM new york to antietam. 
Arrival in New York. -Reception. - Major Hinck's Description of the 
Jouraey to Washington.-An Accident at Easton, .^enn. Arrival at 
Harnsburg.-At Baltimore.-At Washington-Reviewed by the Pres- 
ident-General Wool's Opinion._At Camp Chase.-At F<f ^ E^^^ 
Allen.-Become a part of the Second Corps.-The March to Antietam. 
South Mountain.-Camp on the Boonsboro Pike. 

CHAPTER HI.— the kattle of antietam. 
Description of the Field-The Confederate Forces-Tho ^f--^-^^'^- 
The 14th Regiment Fords the Antietam-The Roulette Farm.-The 
Cornfleld.-Bloody Lane. - Ordered to Support Brooke,_Death of 
General RichardsJn.-On the Plowed Field. -Captain Blinn-Capta.n 
Willard— List of Killed, Wounded and Missing— Report of Lieut. - 
Colonel Sanford H. Perkins. 

CHAPTER IV —AFTER ANTIETAM AND UEFORE FREDERICKSBURG. 

The Regiment Leaves Antietam-March to Boliver ^-'^'^''■-^;'^'2 
the River.-Sickly Conditions of the Camp -The ^-f e of Camp 
Life -Leave for Belle Plain.-The March Down the Loudon V^ ^y. 
The Story of the Bee Hives. -Reach Belle Plain.-The Condition of 
the Camp.— The Camp at Falmouth. 

CHAPTER v.— THE HATTLE OF EREDERICKSBURG. 

Description of the Field.-The Hopelessness of the Attack-The Delay in 
Laying the Pontoons.-The Regiment Crosses-Experiences o the 
Night -The Attack.-The Part that the Regiment Played. -Lt. -Colonel 
Perkins Wounded.-Captain Gibbons. -Charles Lyman's experience. 
-List of Killed, Wounded and Missing.-Captain Davis Report. 

CHAPTER VI.— THE WINTER AT FAEMOUTH. 

Return of the Regiment to Camp.-The Demoralization of the Ranks. 
Captain Samuel A. Moore Overcome. -Better Rf---^- ^^j^^^ 
to Enthuse over the Toast "Across the Rappahanock, -Burial of 
Captain Gibbons-Condition of the Hospital.-Promotions.- Fred 
Doten's Punches.-Surgeon Rockwell, Leaves the Regiment.-Sketch. 
—The Regiment Leaves for Chancellorsville. 



CHAPTER VII. — THE AFFAIR AT CHANCELLORSVILLE. 

Lieut. -Colonel Theodore G. Ellis in Command. — The Regiment Crosses 
the Rappahannock. — Description of the Battlefield.— Little for the 
Regiment to do.— The Break of the nth Corps.— Heroism of the 
Fourteenth Band. — Return to Camp near Falmouth. — List of Killed, 
Wounded and Missing. — Lieut. -Col. Ellis' Report. 

CHAPTER VII.— THE MARCH FROM FALMOUTH TO GETtYSBURG. 

Practical Joke on Chaplain Stevens.— Take up the March to Gettysburg. 
Company A Meets Old Friends. — Character of the March. — Cleaning 
Out a Sutler. — Meet a "Dandy" Regiment. — The Men Hear of a 
Change of Commanding General. — Reach Gettysburg. 

CHAPTER IX.— GETTYSBURG. 

Description of the Field.— Accident to Major Coit.— The Position of the 
Regiment During the Engagement. — Capture and Occupation of the 
Bliss Buildings. — Captured and Burned by the Fourteenth Regiment. 
A terrific Cannonading. Pickett's Magnificent Charge, — Its Repulse. 
— Major Hicks Captures a Flag. — A Day of Gallantry and Heroism. — 
Caring for Wounded Rebels. — Flags Captured. — (Dunn Brown) Capt. 
Samuel F. Fisk's Opinion of the Regiment in Action. — A Night of 
Terror. — Honors Conferred upon the Regiment by Col. Bacheldor. 
— List of Killed, Wounded and Missing. — Official Reports. 

CHAPTER X.— THE SUMMER OF I 863. 

The Regiment Leaves Gettysburg.— The Enemy had Flown. — A Colossal 
Blackberry Party. — Dunn Brown's Description. — Substitutes and 
Drafted Men. — Their Evanescent Nature. — Odd Characters. — The 
Chaplain Has Another Joke.— Death of Line Officers. — Band Con- 
certs. 

CHAPTER XI. — BRisTow station and mine run. 
Experience at Culpepper. — Deserters Shot. — A Set of Guidons Presented 
to the Regiment. — General Owen's Compliment. — Promotions. — Major 
Moore. — Quartermaster Dibble. — Auburn. — The Engagement at Bris- 
tow Station. — Killed, Wounded and Missing. — Mine Run. — An Anxious 
Hour. — Lieut. -Colonel Moore's Decision. — General Warren. — Colonel 
Ellis' Report. 

CHAPTER XII. — STONY mountain and morton's ford. 
The Regiment Reach Stevensburg. — Disorder in Camp. —Prompt Action. 
— Camp at Stony Mountain.— Presence of Ladies. ^Pierce Barron. — 
Neat Appearance of Camp. — Morton's Ford. — The Regiment move 
toward the Rapidan. — The Position of the Regiment.— A Cruel Order. — 
Conditinoof the Commanding Generals. — Capture of Captain Doten. — 
The Killed, Wounded and Missing.— Lieut. -Colonel Moore's Report. — 
A New Commander. — Ladies Sent Out of Camp. 



CHAPTER XIII.— THE WILDERNESS, A TANGLE OF KATTLES AND SKIRMISHES. 

The Regiment Cross the Rapidan.-The Grandeur of the View. -The Old 
Battlefield of Chancellorsville.-Laurel Hill.-Battle of Spottsylvama. 
-A Voiceless Charge.-J. H. Stannard's Account.-Sergeant Wade s 
Record. -Milford Station.- Joseph Schlitcher's Experience.- Toto- 
potomy Creek.-A Southern Mule. - General Hay Killed, Captain 
Fisk (Dunn Brown) Mortally Wounded.-How the Regiment Missed its 
Rations.-The Flag.- Killed, Wounded and Missing.- Report of 
Captain Broatch.— Report of Colonel Ellis. 

CHAPTER XIV— PETERSBURG AND REAM'S STATION. 

The Regiment Shares Rations with the Colored Troops. -The Regiment 
Support General Barlow. -Battle of the "Fleeing Hen."-A Dress Par- 
ade -A Midnight Call.-A Hard March. -Killed, Wounded and Miss- 
ing -Captain John C. Broatch's Report Completed. -Colonel Ellis 
Report -Deep Bottom.-Lieut.-Colonel Moore's Report on Skirmish at 
Deep Bottom.-A Terrible Thunder Storm.-Assistant Sergeant Jew- 
ett's Recollections. - Killed, Wounded and Missing.- Lieut. -Colonel 
Moore's Report. 

CHAPTER XV — FROM hatcher's run to the end. 
The Men have a Glimpse of the End.-Sorrow in the Regiment. -A De- 
tail Ordered to New Haven, Conn.-Lieut. -Colonel Moore's Report on 
Number of the Regiment.-Boydton Plank Road.-A New Chaplam. 
—Inactivity -T he Men Live Underground.-Lieut. -Colonel Moore 
Ordered to Make a Demonstration.-Sergeant Blatchley's Account. - 
Virginia Mud.-High Bridge. -Funeral Services in Honor of President 
Lincoln. -Richmond Has Fallen.-Joy of the Men.- Homeward 
Bound- -The Review at Washington.-Return to Hartford. -Glad Re- 
ception.-Impatient to Reach Home.-Scarcity of Money no Hmder- 
ance.— Return to Hartford.— Discharged. 
Adjutant-General Summary. 

APPENDIX. 

Organization of the Society of the Fourteenth Regiment.-By-Laws.— 
Memorable Meetings.- The Society Incorporated.- Monuments at 
Geltysburg.-Dedication.-Chaplain Stevens' Address.— The Annual 
Reunion at Antietam.-Monument.-Description.-Dedication.-J. W. 
Knowlton's Address. 
Breveted Ofiicers, 
Fox's Statistics and Record. 
Adjutant-General's Summary. 
Official Roster. 



LIST OF PORTRAITS. 



Colonel Dwig"ht Morris (Frontispiece). 
Lieut. -Colonel Sanford H. Perkins, full page, 20 

Colonel Theodore G. Ellis, " 117 

Lieut. -Colonel Samuel A. Moore, " 183 

Chaplain Emmons P. Bond, . . 297 

Major John C. Broatch, . . 271 

Major Cyrus C. Clark, . . 75 

Major James B. Coit, . . 109 

Quartermaster Charles F. Dibble, . 188 

Captain Fred S. Doten, . . 223 

Assistant Surgeon Frederick A. Dudley, 245 

Albert F. Hall, . . . 372- 

Major William B. Hincks, . . 157 

Sergeant Benjamin Hirst, . . 193 

Assistant Surgeon Levi Jewett, . 313 

Q. M. S., J. W. Knowlton, . . 362 

Charles Lyman, . . . 372 
John McCarthy, . . . 60, 372 

Surgeon Philo G. Rockwell, . . 113 

Corporal Joseph Pierce, . . 131 

Assistant Surgeon Charles Tomlinson, 275 

Rebel Girl, . . . . 161 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 

Page. 

The Famous Cornfield at Antietam 20 

Capitol at Washington 21 

Bivouac of the Regiment on the Boonsboro Pike .... 28 

A Glimpse from Cemetery Hill at Sharpsburg 29 

Dunkard Chureh 30 

Bloody Lane Since the War 32 

Cornlield and Mumma Buildings 33 

Antietam Creek Where the Regiment Forded 35 

West View of Roulette House, 1S91 36 

The Spring House 37 

Corner of Mumma's Orchard 38 

Fence Corner Extreme Left of Regiment's Position ... 39 

Roulette House, 1862 40 

Another View of " Bloody Lane " 41 

Roulette Lane 42 

Where the Regiment Supported Brooke 43 

Where General Richardson Fell 45 

The Plowed Field 46 

A Section of " Bloody Lane" 48 

Burnside's Bridge, Antietam 57 

Kimball's Hill, Antietam 58 

Where the Regiment Forded the River 59 

Harper's Ferry 63 

A Street in Harper's Ferry 64 

Jefferson Rock 66 

Armory, Harpers's Ferry 72 

Burnside's Bridge. 18 >i 74 

Where the Pontoons Touched Fredericksburg 74 

Major Lacy's Mansion . . • 78 

Where the Regiment Crossed the Rapahannock .... 80 

Caroline Street, Fredericksburg . . . . . . . 81 

Church and Signal Tower, Fredericksburg 82 

The Old Depot, Fredericksburg 83 

The Causeway, Fredericksburg 87 

Division Hospital • , . . 94 

Fair Grounds Where the Regiment Charged 103 

The Shore of the Rapahanock 104 

On Picket Making Coffee 106 

Chancellor House, 1891 120 



Society of Fourteenth Regiment at Antietam 
Barn at General Mead's Headquarters 

The Round Tops 

Position of Second Corps at (Gettysburg 

Mead's Headquarters, Taneytown Road 

Portion of Field, Gettysburg 

General Hay's Headquarters 

Marker at Bliss Barn Site 

Knowlton Marker at Bliss House Site 

Monument at Gettysburg 

Ground on which Pickett charged 

Headquarters after the Battle 

Spangler's Spring .... 

Mouth of Devil's Den . . . , 

The Two Round Tops from the West 

The Hagerstown Pike .... 

National Cemetery, Antietam 

Morton's Ford .... 

Stony Mountain from Stevensburg 

Brigade Camp, Stony Mountain 

Stony Mountain in Recent Years 

Morton's Ford from the South 

Buckner House from a Distance 

A Nearer View of Buckner House 

Headquarters of Picket, Morton's Ford 

Morton House and Surroundings 

A Scene of Much Coffee Making 

Brock Road Wilderness, Va. 

Society of Fourteenth Regiment at Gettysburg 

Gettysburg Monument 

Society of Fourteenth Regiment at Cemetery H 

Roulette House • . . . . 

Monument at Antietam 

Orange Plank Road, Wilderness 

The White House .... 

Mt. Vernon ...... 



Page. 



13S 
139 
140 
141 
143 
145 
147 
14S 
153 
259 
164 
167 
173 
1 89 
209 

211 
213 

216 
218 
219. 
221 
222 
232 
236 
239 
258 
252 
258. 
265 
281 

359 
360- 



PREFACE. 

The history of the Fourteenth Regiment, Connecticut Volunteers, Infan- 
try, should have been written a generation ago. This would have been 
but justice to the brave men who have since passed away who earnestly 
and rightfully desired to see the record of their gallantry, sacriiice and 
heroism have a permanent form in print. It was also a patriotic duty to 
the State, the service of the Fourteenth Regiment being one of the illus- 
trious chapters in the military history of the Commonwealth. A history 
written at that time would have been more complete in detail and richer 
in personal experience. As time has gone on, memory has become weaker, 
memoranda, diaries, and letters have become scattered and irrecoverably 
lost. It has been my aim to allow the men of the regiment to tell the story 
of its service, and have used my own language to serve only as a thread 
upon which to hang these jewels of memory. The responsibility of writ- 
ing the history was increased when I found the earnestness and willing- 
ness to assist so intense among the surviving members. To write a his- 
tory that would satisfy the intelligence and enthusiasm of such men and 
to do justice to the character of the regiment was, indeed, no small task. 
The limited space of a preface will not allow me to enumerate and ac- 
knowledge all those from whom I have drawn to make up this record. 
The presence of their names in the following pages must be taken as an 
acknowledgement of my gratitude and obligation. 

A few of these sources of information must, however, be mentioned. I 
have been under great obligations to the Committee of the Society of the 
Fourteenth Regiment for their advice, assistance and interest in the 
progress and completion of the work. Mr. Charles Lyman, of Washington, 
D. C, chairman of the committee, has found time amid the multitudinous 
cares of a busy life, to read the chapters from time to time as they have 
been prepared, making such suggestions as his wide experience and good 
taste has deemed desirable. Mr. Albert F. Hall, of Meriden, the most active 
man of the committee, has been untiring in placing in my hands all the 
available material for the history that he could command. His prompt- 
ness in all the details has been an incentive and an inspiration to faithful 
work, and to him more than to any man of the regiment is due the com- 
pletion of the history at the present time. Mr. John McCarthy, of New 
Haven, the third member of the committee, has given valuable aid and 
suggestions as the work has progressed. To Mr. William T. Hincks, of 
Bridgeport, son of Major William B. Hincks, I am particularly indebted for 
the privilege of consulting and copying from his father's diary. This rec- 
ord of Major Hincks was characteristic of his intelligence, and his reputa- 



tion for accuracy and discernment which made it especially valuable. I 
am also under obligations to Sergeant Benj. Hirst and his brother John 
Hirst for the use of forty-four letters contributed to the Rockville (Conn.,) 
Journal for many details of experience on battlefield and march. Ex-Mayor 
A. R. Crittenden, of Middletown, Conn., has given many valuable narra- 
tives and we have quoted liberally from Sergeant E. B. Tyler's bright and 
fascinating record. To Mrs. C. H. Wade, of Northampton, Mass., I am 
indebted for the loan of her husband's. Sergeant Wade's, history of the 
legiment as published in the Soldier's Record. I desire also to acknowl- 
edge my obligations and deep indebtedness to Miss Fayetta Warren of 
Watertown, N. Y. , for her assistance and aid in preparing and perfecting the 
history. Her painstaking care and reliable accuracy as stenographer and 
typewriter has done much toward bringing the history to completeness. 
And so this record goes forth to take its place among others that have been 
made of the valient deeds of those who went out to uphold the principles 
of union and liberty, in the war between the states. If the following pages 
succeed in portraying, even feebly, the many acts of valor and heroism, 
bravery and sacrifice performed by the men of the Fourteenth Regiment, 
then it may be said that the work has been faithfully done. 

CHARLES D. PAGE. 
New Haven Connecticut, July, 1906. 



HISTORY 

OF THE 

FOURTEENTH REGIMENT, 

CONNECTICUT VOL. INFANTRY. 



CHAPTER I. 

The Birth of the Regiment. 

To intelligently understand the beginnings of the Fourteenth 
Regiment, Connecticut \"olunteers, Infantry, it may be well to 
glance at the condition of the Union cause at the front and the 
spirit and temper of the loyal people of the North, just previous 
to its formation. 

During the early spring months of 1862. the Union forces were 
successful upon all the lines of their advance. From the West 
to the Atlantic and from the Potomac to the Gulf, the tide of 
Confederate progress had been checked and turned back. 

General Thomas and Colonel Garfield had won victories in 
Kentuckv, at Prestonburg and Alill Spring, General Grant and 
Commodore Foote had captured Fort Henry on the Tennessee 
River and with P)ull had reduced Fort Donelson on the Cumber- 
land. General Burnside had forced New Berne to surrender, 
Farragut had passed the forts at the mouth of the Mississippi, 
had victoriously entered New Orleans where the Union ^ag had 
again been planted and was triumphantly floating front many 
a stafif and public building. 

The Union loving people were not oblivious to the onward pro- 
gress of the army, and there was a wide-spread feeling that the 
end of the conflict was at hand. This feeling was further 
strengthened by an order from the War Department April 3d.. 
1862, discontinuing enlistments in all the states. April loth. 
President Lincoln, from his great heart, looking through the dark 
cloud then enveloping his own home by the death of his boy^ 
(•3) 



14 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

called upon the people to observe a season of thanksgiving "for 
the glorious successes of oiu' armies at the front." 

The action of the government and the wide-spread belief that 
the armies then in the field were sufficient to meet any emergency 
quickened business and revived industry. Those who had flocked 
to the recruiting offices to offer themselves to the service of the 
country, returned to their homes and found employment in their 
various occupations, and took their places in the peaceful on- 
goings of society. 

The call of the President in 1861 for five hundred thousand 
men had been filled, and the last of Connecticut's quota (13,037), 
the Thirteenth Regiment had left Xew^ Haven March 17th., and 
were doing duty at Ship Island. 

These were the conditions when May 21st the War Depart- 
ment signified its willingness to accept from Connecticut one 
regiment as its part to form a contingent of fifty thousand men 
for a "Camp of Instruction" at Annapolis, Md. 

The next day, May 22, the governor directed that "volun- 
teers be received sufficient to form one regiment to be known as 
the Fourteenth Regiment of Infantry, to serve three years or 
during the war unless sooner discharged. The plan of the regi- 
ment to be the same as those already in the field." 

The regiment was ordered to rendezvous at Hartford. The 
camp was located on the New Haven turnpike about two miles 
from Hartford and was called Camp Foote in honor of Commo- 
dore Foote, who had won merited popularity and esteem in his 
native state for his gallant conduct at Forts Henry and Donelson. 

May 22d Dwight Morris w^as appointed as Colonel. Colonel 
Morris of Bridgeport was well known throughout the state. He 
was born in Litchfield in 1817. and was therefore forty-five years 
of age. Colonel Morris had graduated from Union College in 
1832. and was a member of the General Assembly of Connecticut 
for six years from 1845, ^"^ again in 1880. He had been a 
practicing lawyer in Bridgeport for several years, being Judge of 
Probate for the District of Bridgeport in 185 1. After the war, 
Colonel Morris was appointed United States Consul to France 
from 1866 to 1869, and was Secretary of the State of Connecticut 



The Birth of the Regiment. 1 5 

in 1876. He died siuldcnl}" at his home in Bridgeport September 
26th, 1895. 

It was to be a regiment from the state at large. 
Mainly for reasons we have mentioned, enlistments were slow 
and unsatisfactory. The feeling that the army was large enoug-h 
to meet any emergency had permeated the minds of the people. 
Then again it may be supposed that the prospect of spending an 
indefinite period in a "Camp of Instruction" was not alluring to 
a true soldier, certainly not to that class of men that finally made 
up the Fourteenth Regiment. 

No one at that time would have ventured the prophecy that 
this very regiment, conceived for the dull duties of a "Camp of 
Instruction," was destined to play an important part in some of 
the most sanguinary battles of modern times, and do valiant ser- 
vice in some of the pivotal actions of the great conflict. 

Assistant Surgeon Dr. Levi Jewett in his diary estimates there 
were about two hundred and fifty men enlisted when he joined 
the regiment, July 14th. This was nearly two months after the 
call had been made for volunteers. 

Suddenly all these conditions changed. Reverse followed re- 
verse with the Union army, and the tide of rebellion swept west- 
ward and northward until the loyal people of the North were de- 
pressed and alarmed. 

Governor Buckingham joined with the governors of all of the 
loyal states requesting the President to "call out a sufficient 
number of men to garrison the cities and military posts that have 
been captured b}" oiu' armies and to speedily put down the re- 
bellion that now exists in several Southern states." 

President Lincoln therefore issued an order for the enlisting 
of three hundred thousand more men. Connecticut's quota in 
this call was 7.145. 

July 1st Governor Buckingham issued a call for this number 
of men to form six more regiments. Immediately followmg the 
call the Governor issued an impassioned address and appeal for 
volunteers ; a single sentence of this address will serve to show 
its character and earnestness. 

He says : — "Close your manufactories and workshops, turn 



16 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

aside from your farms and your business, leave for awhile your 
families and your homes, meet face to face the enemies of your 
liberties !" 

Meetings to promote enlistments were held in nearly all of the 
cities and larger towns of the state. These meetings were ad- 
dressed by some of the best known men, and were characterized 
by the most intense patriotic enthusiasm and fervor. The effect 
of the Governor's appeal and the influence of these meetings were 
electrical. From one end of the state to the other, the stirring 
scenes of April. 1861. were reenacted. Young men flocked to 
the recruiting offices eager and earnest to enlist in the service of 
their country. The "lonely squads" of the Fourteenth Regiment, 
that had passed up and down the dusty field of "Camp Foote" 
for weeks, felt the impulse of the new enthusiasm and every day 
brought new members to its ranks. 

Dr. Jewett records the first tangible addition toward the last 
of July when Captain Burpee brought in "a. fine company" 
(Company D) from Wrnon. Soon followed Company R, Cap- 
tain Gibbons, from Middletown, "'who entered camp with band 
playing and flags flying and escorted by the firemen of Middle- 
town." "There was great rejoicing," says Dr. Jewett, "when this 
com])any came into camp and we formed a line and gave them 
three hearty cheers." 

Company followed company in quick succession until the re- 
quisite number necessary to make up the maximum strength of 
the regiment was reached. By August 22d the last man had en- 
listed and the last commission had been signed. Then came the 
busy preparation, and the impatience to move to the front. 

The regiment numbered 1,015 men and were to be armed with 
Springfield rifles, with the exception of Companies A and B, 
which were to be equipped with Sharp's rifles. 

That rigid military discipline was not yet introduced into camp 
we may judge from a statement of Private, afterwards Corporal, 
Albert R. Crittenden, of Company B, who says : — "The first I 
recall after going into 'Camp Foote' at Hartford was the dearth 
of fire arms. The camp guard at our (the left) end of camp had 
only four old smooth-bore muskets, which had once been flint 



The Birth of the Regiment. 1 7 

locks, but were then without locks or bayonets. This serves to 
show how closely available arms had been hustled to the front. Of 
course guard duty under such conditions was a trifle lax, as with 
such equipment we could not stop men from passing over the 
lines if we tried, so, as perhaps it will be remembered by the boys, 
we let them go. I fear this was bad discipline, for when we 
reached the enemy's country and the boys suspected there was 
something good to eat outside the lines, we were quite willing to 
have our backs to them when they went and came. Some times 
we shared an extra bit of fresh pork, lamb or hoe cake, as a re- 
sult of our blindness." 

Touching the same point Nelson S. Bailey of Company B 
says: — "In camp at Hartford the minor details that have to do 
with the art of war were of interest. We noticed particularly 
that 'running the guard' was made a business as well as a diver- 
sion, — by others of course." 

Xo Connecticut regiment ever took to the front a more noble 
representation of the best elements of the state than did the 
Fourteenth. Many of the men had already become moving 
forces in the social, religious, commercial and industrial activities 
of the state. Dr. Jewett says of them : — "They are young men of 
good character." It was indeed a regiment from the state at 
large, a regiment of the people. Xo less than eighty-six towns 
were represented upon the roster. 

August 23d the regiment was mustered into the service of the 
United States by Colonel Webb of the regular army. 

The following was the representation of the towns in the 
make-up of the regiment. 

Company A, Captain James D. Alerritt, Bridgeport, 49 men ; 
Putnam, 8 ; Stratford, Xorwalk, 6 each ; Aliddletown, Trumbull, 
4 each ; Killingly, 3 ; Hartford, Brooklyn, Monroe, Berlin. 2 each ; 
Waterbury, Madison, Huntington, Newtown, Litchfield, Plain- 
field, Wilton, Harrisville, R. I., Thompson, Easton, Sprague, 
Woodstock, Fairfield, East Haddam, Cornwall, i each. 

Company B, Captain Elijah W. Gibbons, Middletown, 93 men ; 
Durham, 6; W^aterbury 2; Bridgeport, New Haven, X^orwich, 
\>rnon, Haddam, i each. 



18 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Company C, Captain Samuel \V. Carpenter, Waterbury, 88 
men ; Bridgeport, Naugatuck, 3 each ; Middletown, 2 ; New Ha- 
ven, Durham, Thompson, Milford, Ellington, Torrington, Wood- 
bury, Vernon, East Windsor, East Haddam, i each. 

Company D. Captain Thomas F. Burpee, Vernon, 75 men ; 
Ellington, 10; Waterbury, 5; Coventry, Willington, 4 each; Mid- 
dletown, 2 ; Bridgeport, New London, Tolland, South Wmdsor, 
Bolton, Rockville, Mansfield, Windsor, Hartford, Westport, i 
each. 

Company E, Captain ^^'illiam H. Tubbs, Norwich, 21 men; 
Middletown, 18; Hartford, 15: Xcw Haven, 6; Waterbury, 
Killingly, 4 each ; Griswold, Sprague, 3 each ; Windham, East 
Windsor, Franklin, Putnam, Preston. Coventry, \>rnon, 2 each ; 
Bridgeport, New Britain, Lisbon, Marlborough, Hampton, Glas- 
tonbury, Chaplin, North Stonington, ^Madison, Wethersfield, 
Plainfield, Thompson, Meriden, New London, i each. 

Company F, Captain Jarvis E. Bliini, New IVitain, 65 men ; 
Bloomfield, 15; Berlin 13; Wolcott, 3: Wethersfield, 2; Bridge- 
port, Hartford, Norwich, Xew Haven. New London, Barkham- 
sted, \'crnon, i each. 

Company G, Captain Samuel F. Willard, ^ladison, 58 men • 
Clinton, 12: Old Saybrook, 10; Westbrook, 9; Guilford, 5; Kill- 
ingworth, 3 ; New Haven, 2 ; Bridgeport, Flartford, Norwich, 
New London, Franklin, East Lyme, Stratford, Vernon, Haddam, 
I each. 

Company H, Ca])tain Sanniel H. Davis. New London, 56 men : 
Waterford, 21; b^ast L^nie, 5; New Haven, 3; Vernon, Water- 
bury, 2 each ; Hartford, ^^liddletown, Durham, Willimantic, Ston- 
ington, Ellington, i each. 

Company L Captain Isaac R. Bronson, Guilford, 24 men; 
New Haven, 22 \ Hartford, 13; Waterbury, 7; Middlebury, 5: 
Coventry, 3 ; New London, Xew Britain, Wethersfield, Farming- 
ton, Bloomfield, 2 each ; Middletown, Norwich, New Milford, 
Windham, Avon, Madison, Norwalk, Willington, Vernon, Elling- 
ton, Woodbury, Naugatuck, New Fairfield, i each. 

Company K, Captain Robert H. Gillette, Norwich, 21 men; 
Hartford, 18: Chatham, 14; Somers. 6; Middletown, 5; Bridge- 



The Birth of the Regiment. 19 

port, Ledyard. (Triswold, 4 each: Waterbury, Coventry, 3 each; 
Madison. Stonington. Preston, Sprague, Farmington, 2 each; 
Sut^eld, Durham, Winchester, Woodbridge, z\ndover, Man- 
chester, Stafford, Walhngford, Chaphn, Frankhn, Bolton, Wind- 
sor, Thompson, East Haddam, Haddam, i each. 

Xo member of the regiment will forget those closing days at 
'"Camp Foote," the hurried bustle of preparation for departure, 
the throngs of people who came to say farewell to father, brother, 
husband, son and friend. 

August 25th, the day for the regiment to break camp and 
start for Washington arrived. We will let Dr. Jewett, a partici- 
pant, tell the story of the departure. He says: — "August 25^1. 
we left camp with bands playing and flags trying, marching to 
the dock in a colunm of fours. As we moved the crowd increased 
and when we reached the corner of Main and State Streets, it 
became so dense that we could hardl\- make progress. Reaching 
the dock six companies boarded the steamer "City of Hartford' 
and four companies upon the transport 'Dudley Buck.' 

When we reached Middletown, it seemed as if the whole city 
had turned out to meet us. The dock and all the space about was 
black with peo])le. Many came to the boats with baskets of fruit 
and food, which were greatly appreciated by the 'boys'. At 
Cobalt a great gun on the hill gave us a roaring 'CJod-speed' and 
there were hearty greetings from a crowd of friends at Middle 
Haddam." Here Dr. Jewett leaves us in his memor}- of the trip 
to Xew York. 

Slowly the steamer and transport steamed out of the Connecti- 
cut River into the broader waters of the Sound. At the right 
lay the old state dear to the hearts of those on board, their birth- 
place, the scenes of their ambitions and hopes, and the homes of 
those they loved who were left behind. Slowly the>- passed the 
familiar hilltops, the rugged cliffs, the undulating shore and the 
broad fields that floated back to the western sky. So the twilight 
drifted into the shadow and the shadow into darkness, and the 
fair scene was hidden from view. Alas, how many were never 
permitted to look upon it again ! 




The famous Cornfield at Antietam. 



CHAPTER II. 



From New York to Antietam. 



We left the regiment at the cUise of the last chapter with the 
soft curtain of night gathering ahout it as the heavily laden boats 
moved sluggishly down the Sound. Thev arrived in Xew York 
early the next morning, wdiere they were refreshed with a bounti- 
ful supply of food by the Soldiers" Relief Committee, but did not 
land, being transferred to a large transport, the "Kill von Kull," 
and steamed down the harbor past Staten Island to the Elizabeth 
River, and up the river to Elizabethport, where the troops were 
again transferred to cars, and after some delay a long train in 
two sections steamed away toward Baltimore, by way of Har- 
risburg and York, Penna. The night had been long and tedious 
and, although not to be compared with the later experience ^ of 
the regiment, it must have been to many a slight foretaste of the 
rigors of a soldier's life. The decks of the steamer were several 
degrees harder, even, than the ground of Camp Foote and were 
withal crowded, dirty and hot, so that there was very little sleep 
or rest. 

On the way to Baltimore the entire journey during the daylight 
hours was characterized by the same outbursts of patriotic 
enthusiasm as that sent out from the shores of their own dear 
Connecticut. 

Private William B. Hincks of Company A, afterwards ^lajor, 
savs : — 



(20) 



^*-«=.*iii6ii^^ 




LT.-COL. SANFORD H. PERKINS. 



I 



From New York to Antietam. 2 1 

"Our progress was a sort of triumphal journey. Steamers 
sounded a salute with their whistles, flags were unfurled and bells 
were rung. Farmers waved their hands and hats as a hurrah 
to us as we shot by. The day wore slowly away. We passed 
through the borders of New Jersey and along the mountains of 
Pennsylvania. The road wound around these mountains and we 
often crossed deep ravines spanned by lofty bridges, down wdiose 
sides one would tremble to look." 

At Easton, Penna., occurred the first casualty to the regiment. 
When the train stopped, which was upon a trestle above the street, 
2d Lieutenant Frederick E. Shalk of Company E left the train 
for a moment and in attempting to again step upon the car, lost 
his footing and fell some thirty feet to the street, striking upon 
his head. He was taken up insensible and was left behind for 
medical treatment, but recovered soon after and rejoined his regi- 
ment, doing valiant service. 

An occasional "hot box" varied the monotony of the journey 
to Harrisburg. In regard to the arrival there Corporal Crittenden 
says : — "We were side-tracked an hour or two at Harrisburg, 
Penna., by reason of an order to hold us as we might be ordered 
to Chambersburg. Lee's cavalry were in the Shenandoah Valley 
and the Pennsylvania border was threatened. Well that we were 
ordered on to Washington or we might have been gobbled up at 
Chambersburg and our history been entirely different." 

During the tarry at Baltimore the regiment passed under view 
of General Wool, who said to Colonel Morris : — " A splendid regi- 
ment, not one drunken man in the ranks ; too good a regiment to 
be sent anywhere but to the front!" 

Wq cannot do better than to allow Major Hincks to further 
tell the story of the journey. He says: — "We passed through 
Harrisburg, a fine old Quaker town, and in time reached Balti- 
more. We marched across the city to the W'ashington depot. 
Call Baltimore a secession place if you will, but we were treated 
better here than in any other place on our route. When we 
halted before entering the city, ladies ran out with pails of water, 
bread and butter and melons for the soldiers. We marched into 
a Soldiers' Relief Building, provided not by the government, 



11 



Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 



but by the citizens of Baltimore, where long tables were spread 
for the regiment and all sat down to as much good bread and 
cheese, ham and cofifee or ice water as we could take care of. 

At about nine o'clock Thursday evening we started for Wash- 
ington in an old cattle train, about forty men in a car. We 
arrived in Washington about four o'clock in the morning and 
marched directly to the barracks. These barracks were very 
large and capable of accommodating one or more regiments. 
About eleven o'clock the next day we were formed into columns 
and with our ponderous knapsacks upon our backs passed up Penn- 
sylvania Avenue to the Long Bridge over the Potomac. Here a 
long halt was made to allow^ a train of mules to pass. We 
crossed over the bridge and found ourselves upon the 'sacred 
soil' of Virginia, and very nasty soil it is : thick yellow dust lay 
three inches deep and we were surrounded by a dense cloud of it. 
Roads run through deep defiles overhung by forts. We came 




^i-^^lfFP: 



-..^sy 



y\S\V^ 



Mir 



fism 



\ 


i f 


' 1 


]'. 




The Capitol, which was in process of rebuilding when the Fourteenth Regiment 
passed through Washington. 



From New York to Antietam. 23 

upon a little s|)ring- and at least five hundred of our men attempted 
to reach it all at once and there was general confusion." 

Dr. Jewett, in his memories, says: — "Daylight soon appeared 
and the great dome of the capitol became visible. I walked out 
to the foot of Capitol Hill and found everything in confusion, 
the building was not completed and the ground was covered with 
huge blocks of stone and marble, stone cutters' sheds and tools, 
derricks, mortar beds, etc." 

Touching the passage through Washington, Corporal Crittenden 
recalls the following: — "As we passed through Washington, I 
recall the reviewing stand where President Lincoln, General 
Scott, Secretary Stanton and other dignitaries stood while we 
passed in review. Our staff-officers and captains entered the re- 
viewing stand and were in turn introduced to the President and 
his staff of officials. When the head of B Company, the left 
of the regiment, reached the stand. President Lincoln was so 
busy we felt we were not to be noticed, so with one accord, we 
struck up loudly singing 'We are coming. Father Abraham, three 
hundred thousand more.' At once he faced us, straightened up 
his tall form, doffed his high silk hat and bowed and bowed until 
we were by. President Lincoln said of our regiment that we 
were the finest looking body of men that had passed through 
Washington. As we had the honor of being the first regiment 
of the second call for three hundred thousand men to pass through 
Washington, it is easy to conclude this was his mental reservation 
which made his statement a fact." 

That night the regiment rested near Arlington Heights, calling 
it Camp Chase, and there was fond hope that a few days rest 
would be had. The journey from Connecticut had been hard and 
fatiguing. It w-as already three days since the regiment left 
Camp Foote and owing to wretched transportation arrangements, 
delays had been long and tedious, with little or no opportunity 
for sleep. Samuel b^isk ("Dunn Browne") sums up the journey 
in the following words to the Springfield Republican : — 

"Our boys on their way to the field sle])t on the dirty decks of 
a steamer, lying together as thick as rows of ])ins on a paper ; 
were packed in dirty, close cars like sheep in a pen ; and marched 



24 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

through dust so thick and fine that, mixed in proper proportions 
with perspiration caused by the intense heat, it formed a good 
plaster cast of every man's face and form. Water is often too 
precious to use for abkitions ; hnen gets dirty ; washerwomen are 
scarce ; clothing of every kind grows ragged and on the whole 
dirt steadily and surely prevails till a regiment of veterans ap- 
pears to the uninitiated like a regiment of ragamuffins. Even 
our short experience also shows that a soldier's is a pretty thirsty 
and hungry life. For three day together, during this our first 
week, we had nothing to eat but a few hard crackers, and 
once a morsel of cheese, and once a slice of ham, apiece, served 
around : and for one night and part of a day we had no water." 

The fond hope that a few days if not weeks would be allowed 
the regiment for rest and recuperation ; that much needed sleep 
would be obtained and rations be more plenty and steady ; and 
that even if lying upon the ground there would be room to 
stretch the legs without being entangled with those of a comrade, 
were not realized. Withal we may imagine the men felt the 
necessity of instruction and discipline in the use of arms. The 
boxes of rifles that had come into Camp Foote were yet unopened. 
Before the morning light of August 29th had dawned upon 
Camp Chase, the long roll was sounded and the men sprung from 
their sleep to meet an impending danger which the call indicated. 
The boxes were hastily opened and the arms distributed, with the 
exception of A and B Companies, which had received their 
Sharp's rifles as they came ofif Long Bridge. After making 
coffee the regiment moved off in light marching order, leaving 
baggage behind and taking only their rubber blankets, toward 
Fort Ethan Allen near Chain Bridge, about ten miles above 
Washington. The threatened danger proved a false alarm. 
Nearer and nearer the regiment was approaching the great army 
and the real activities of war. 

Nelson S. Bailey of Company B writes: — "No impressions of 
moment came to me during our journey to Washington, but when 
we had crossed the Potomac by way of Long Bridge and landed 
with both feet on Virginia soil, I remember clearly my impres- 
sions We were in the enemv's front vard and he was there 



From New York to Antietam. 25 

with his lawn-mowers. I recollect the bivouac at South Mount- 
ain. The lifeless bodies there told us the tale that we were 
marching shoulder to shoulder with death as they had marched. 
The enemy was not far ahead, for two days afterward we caught 
up with them and they 'caught on' to us by passing our way 
shells for which we had no present or prospective use." 

Sunday, September 7th, the regiment, with the One Hundred 
and Thirtieth Pennsylvania and One Hundred and Eighth 
New ,York Volunteers, two new regiments, were as- 
signed to form the Second Brigade of the Third Division, 
Second Army Corps of the Army of the Potomac. Colonel 
Dwight Alorris was placed in command of the brigade and Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel S. H. Perkins assumed command of the regiment. 
The destinies and fortunes of the Fourteenth Regiment were now 
linked with those of the Army of the Potomac. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Perkins had perhaps by instinct and some 
training a larger share of military spirit than the average of the 
commissioned officers who left the state in 1862. Originally 
entering the service as a captain in the Fourth Connecticut Volun- 
teers, he became one of the most efficient officers in that organi- 
zation when connected with the First Connecticut Artillery. 
"L'pon the organization of the Fourteenth, Governor Bucking- 
ham promoted him to the majority thereof and speedily there- 
after to be Lieutenant-Colonel. In this capacity he left the state 
and (Colonel Morris having been assigned to a brigade) it was 
mainly due to his persistent zeal in drilling the men and instruct- 
ing the offices, that when the green regiment was hurled into 
the battle of x^ntietam, within three weeks of muster in, that it 
there won for itself such honorable record. All the fall and 
early winter the Lieutenant-Colonel continued his earnest labors, 
until the second great battle, at Fredericksburg ; where he fell 
very badly wounded in the neck and shoulder. Borne off the 
field under a heavy fire, the regret was deep and general when 
his wounds forced his resignation. Later in the war he served 
as one of the State Allotment Commissioners, and from 1865 had 
been in mercantile pursuits until early in 1873, when insanity 
followed a series of epileptic fits and he was removed to the state 



26 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

insane asylum where he died. His remains were buried in New 
Britain with miHtary honors, December 12th, 1874, the bearers 
being officers of his old regiment. By a singular coincidence 
tw^o of those who bore his dead body to the grave, were two of 
five who just twelve years before bore his living body from out 
the smoke and flame of Fredericksburg." 

With the usual incidents of camp life, the regiment remained 
near Fort Ethan Allen until Sunday, September 7th, when it was 
ordered to be in readiness to move with the Army of the Potomac 
in pursuit of Lee. An exception to this routine was the acci- 
dental shooting of Private Thomas P. Allen of Company B in 
the wrist, which disabled him for further service. The picket 
line of the regiment hafl overrun the picket line of the old regi- 
ments near them and through some error a few shots were fired, 
with this result. 

Under date of September 8th, Major Hinks writes: — "Woods 
near Rockville, Md. We are in a magnificent oak grove and a 
better spot for a camp could hardly be imagined. In these 
same woods two or three other regiments which compose our 
brigade are bivouacked. A\'ithin bugle call there may perhaps 
be 50 or 100,000 men." 

Just as the regiment turned into company streets at the Rock- 
ville camp, James Mc\'ay of Company K, an old man, died of 
exhaustion incident of the days march. He had two sons in the 
same company, who wailed bitterly, touching the hearts of all 
who beheld their grief. i'.oth of the sons, however, went through 
the service and were nuistered out with the regiment in 1865. 

Day after day the regiment marched side by side with the Irish 
Brigade and well do the men of the Fourteenth remember how 
they were jeered and guxed by the Irish Brigade, who "called 
them blue-legged devils and assured them they could not be seen 
for the dust the>- W'Ould kick up getting away from Bobbie Lee 
when he once got after them." It may be recalled, however, 
that after the Fourteenth had been for nearly two hours in the 
thick of the battle of Antietam and had watched the Irish Brigade 
make their charge on the Sunken Road, saw them slaughtered 
and repulsed ; and the Fourteenth went over to support that part 



From New York to Antietam. 27 

of tlie line, then their tune changed and ever after that they 
recognized the Fourteenth as fighting men and were never hap- 
pier than when they were alongside of them in hattle, confident 
that the h^ourteenth would hold its part of the line secure. 

P'our days marching brought the regiment to Clarksburg, Md. 
The following day, September 12th, they arrived at Hyattstown 
and encamped at White Oak Spring upon ground occupied by 
the Confederates two days previous. Step by step they saw the 
desolation and waste of war-ruined homes, dismantled gim-car- 
riages, piles of muskets and the putrefying bodies of horses and 
mules. Saturday, the 13th, the march was continued toward 
Frederick City. The boys were in the best of spirits and sang 
with a will "John Brown's Body" etc. The men were well re- 
ceived and as they passed up the main street were greeted with 
loyal cheers. As they passed an old engine-house in which were 
a number of Confederate prisoners, one called out "What regi- 
ment is that?" "The 14th Wooden Nutmeg" was the reply, to 
wdiich the audacious prisoner answered "You will soon get your 
heads grated." 

The regiment then marched about two miles bevond the town 
and bivouacked in a field near the reservoir. The next morning, 
Sunday, the regiment was called at two o'clock and drew three 
days rations of hardtack. ])ork, sugar and coiTee, and la\ down 
again. At eight o'clock the regiment was again called and be- 
gan the march toward /Vntietam, crossing a stream and march- 
ing until two o'clock, with two short halts, and crossing a range 
of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Here a halt was made in a field 
and coffee cooked and about five o'clock it moved off again, it is 
presumed, to take part in the battle of South Motmtain. They 
were prevented from doing this by difficulty in crossing a canal 
which delaved the regiment several hoiu's. At twelve o'clock 
they were able to pass the canal and marched to the battle-field of 
South Mountain, which that dav had been the scene of a bloody 
contest between McClellan and Lee. Here the men saw for the 
first time the dire effects of war. Sergeant lienjamin Hirst, 
under date of September 15th, says: — "I awoke about five o'clock 
on the battle-field of vesterdav and went out to see what war 



28 



Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 



was without romance. I cannot describe my feeling's, but I hope 
to God never to see the Hke again." 

About ten o'clock the march was resumed, crossing the moun- 
tain at "Turners Gap", proceeding to Boonsboro, which place 
was reached about three o'clock. The column turned east, fac- 
ing Sharpsburg. The enemy was close at hand. 

The march was continued through Keedysville, which was 
passed about nine o'clock. On the line of march acres of soldiers 
were camped upon each side of the road. The scene was at 
once weird and impressive. Hundreds of camp-fires were blaz- 
ing as far as the eye could reach. Some of the men were cook- 
ing, some stretched upon the ground chatting cheerfullv, while 
others were enjoying a few hours sleep that the rest afforded. 
About a mile beyond Keedysville the column of which our regi- 
ment was a part bivouacked in a field on the Boonsboro pike, a 
short distance in the rear of McClellan's headquarters. 

The next day was passed upon these grounds, an occasional 
shell from the enemy breaking the monotony of the hours. There 
we must leave them to await the experience and horrors of the 
coming day. 




Mvouac of the Fourteenth Regiment by the Boonsboro pike, September 15-17, 1862. 
McClellan's headquarters in center. 



CHAPTER III. 

The Battle of Antietam. 

Wednesday, September 17th, 1862, the day of the battle of 
Antietam, called by the Confederates the battle of Sharpsburg, 
was in many respects the most memorable in the history of the 
regiment. Plunged within three weeks after leaving the peaceful 
scenes and avocations of their home state into one of the most 
fiercely fought and bloody battles of the war, with scant military 
drill and instruction in the use of arms ; linked in a brigade with 
two other regiments equally deficient in discipline ; wdth a 
frightful loss of men in killed and wounded, leaves in the minds 
of those who participated in it memories that cannot be efifaced. 




A glimpse from "Cemetery Hill" near Sharpsburg and the Antietam. 

If there was ever an ideal place on this fair earth where men 
should meet each other in battle that place may be said to be the 
environs of Antietam Creek. Standing for a moment on this 
eminence just east and outside the quaint village of Shar])sburg, 



(29) 



30 



Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 



we mav gain an intelligent idea of the surrounding teiritory. 
The view from this point is at once enchanting and grand. On 
the north and east we see the South Mountain range of the 
Alleghanies. their rugged contour broken by several circuitous 
passes or gaps. On the west a hill rises gracefully to a crest and 
slopes back by easy stages to the Potomac, which is not in sight. 
Looking then toward the north, we see this great amphitheater 
of nature with plateau several miles wide and somewhat longer. 
This may be called a plateau l)y forbearance as there is 
scarcelv a \g\c\ acre in iis whole extent, it being covered by low 
billow V ridges. Xearlv through the center of this semi level 




The Dimkard Chi-.rch. 



plain runs Antietam Creek, the course of which can be noted by 
a rank growth of sedge, waterweeds and small trees which mark 
its banks. It is a slow, sluggish stream with an utter disregard 
for straight lines, although its general course may be said to be 
from northeast to southwest. It is crossed by three bridges and 
three fords. Running from .^harpsburg in an easterly direction, 
slightly turning to the north, is the Boonsboro pike and tunning 



The Battle of Antietam. 31 

north, slightly bearing to the east, is the Hagerstown pike. To 
the northwest on the Hagerstown pike stands the Dunkerd 
Chnrch, a quaint brick building resembling an old fashioned New 
England school-housa. which, as W'hittier says : — 

" Still sits the school-house by the road, 
A ragged beggar sunning." 

Singularly enough this worshipping place of a non-combative 
sect was in the xevv forefront of this fierce battle and shows many 
marks of the conflict. The valley is dotted here and there by 
prosperoits farm houses, surrotmded by extensive orchards, and 
the barns and outbuildings show the thrifty character of the 
people. Xearly all of the ground is under cultivation which is 
divided into irregular golden patches of ripening corn and the 
dull hued fields of clover, with here and there the more somber 
brown of plowed fields. Al)out midway, looking from the north, 
we see the 2\Iumma buildings (later burned) and the neat and tidy 
premises of the Roulette farm. Around these latter buildings 
was the center of the operations of the Fourteenth Regiment. 
About a mile to the north and east were the Smith buildings 
which were the Division Hospital. Looking from the northeast 
about two miles on the distant hill, we see the brick buildings on 
Fr} 's farm, the headquarters of General ]\IcClellan. From this 
high vantage ground jMcClellan could ride to and fro and watch 
the rise and fall of the tide of battle. 

Skirting along the Hagerstown pike on the left hand side about 
a mile north of Sharpsburg is a woods which has a depth of about 
a quarter of a mile and several hundred yards long. Then there 
is a field which runs at right angles to the road for about two 
himdred yards, thus making an elbow in the woods. The field 
then turns to the right, and runs along the woods parallel to the 
Hagerstown road for a quarter of a mile, when the wood again 
turns square to the left and extends back about half a mile, mak- 
ing at this point again an elbow with the strip of woods running 
along the road from the church. These woods are interspersed 
with outcropping ledges of limestone, making an excellent shield 
for the men. These were called the "East Woods" in distinction 



32 



Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 



from those on the west side. Another feature of this battle-field 
which mitst be noted is the Sunken Road, since known as "Bloody 
Lane," an outlet of the Mumma and Roulette farms, there being 
lanes from each of these farms intersecting it. This road was 
several feet below the surrounding land and extended a short 
distance west of the church in a southerly direction from the 
Hagerstown turnpike, about three-fourths of a mile. Along the 
eastern edge of this Sunken Road was a low wall which assisted 



..^.J^ 



i^^^:^^^ 




Hldodv Lane" since the war 



in making it a natural and formidable rifle-pit from which the 
Confederates could not be seen by the Federal forces, their 
presence only being detected by the puffs of smoke from their 
nun-(lerous rifle fire or the tops of their butternut hats. So 
fiercely did the battle rage in one section of this Sunken Road 
that for about a quarter of a mile it was called "Bloody Lane." 

On the right, bordering the crest of this western hill, was the 
Confederate Armv under Lee. Its right on the i6th. being on a 



The Battle of Antietam. 



33 



sharp bend of the Creek to the west below Burnside Bridge, and 
running northwest about one-half mile east of Sharpsburg, 
terminating a few miles south of Alercersburg on the Potomac, 
like a gigantic 1:)()W, with its convex side toward the Union forces 
on the east and northeast. On the i/th we find this line has 
been drawn back, its right several hundred \ards south, passing 
through the town of Sharpsburg. then swinging to the northwest, 
its left about a mile from its point of the iTrth, with its concave 
side toward the Union forces. Lee's headquarters were in the 
vicinity of Sharpsl)urg. All of the divisions of the Army of 
Northern X'irginia were now in position confronting the Federal 
forces, excepting the Divisions of AlcLaws and Anderson which 
arrived very early on the morning of the i/th, and A. P. Hill's 
which arrived after noon of that da\". 




Cornfield and Mumnia Building. 



Lee claimed that he had less than 40,000 men. Colonel Taylor 
in his "Four Years with General Lee" fixes the number at 35.255. 
AlcClellan set the Confederate Army at nuich more than this, but 
he always had oriental ideas of his enemy's numbers, reminding 
one of the somewhat extravagant remark of Secretary Stanton 
who said that 'Tf McClellan had a million men. he would declare 
his enemy had two million, and sit down in the mud and yell 
till he had three million." 

The Federal force at Antietam was the First Corps under 



34 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

General Burnside, Second under General E. \*. Sumner, Fifth 
under General Fitzjohn Porter, Sixth under General William 
B. Franklin and Twelfth under General Mansfield. The Federal 
troops which really fought at the battle of Antietam were the 
First, Second, Ninth and Twelfth Corps. This was proven by 
the report of losses, the corps mentioned lost over twenty per 
cent, of their number, as given by JMcClellan, w'hile the Fifth and 
Sixth Corps and the Cavalry division lost only two per cent., 
showing that they were practically unused. 

One who has participated in a battle knows how much and how 
little can be seen, the smoke, the trees and the varying formation 
of the ground limit the vision ; the deafening noise making orders 
hard to be understood ; the ghastly work of shot and shell, the 
shrieking of some of the wounded and the calm fortitude of 
others ; the shrill whistle of shells and projectiles, all lend to 
limit the knowledge of the ongoings of the battle outside of a few 
yards on either side. Orderly advances of bodies of troops can 
be easily described and easily imagined, but the larger the force, 
the more difificult such a description becomes. 

We left the regiment ^Monday night, September 15th, camped 
in a suburb of Keedysville on the Boonsboro turnpike, after the 
long and tedious march from I*"ort Ethan Allen, which they left 
September 7th. The next day the men rested, if rest is possible 
under such circumstances. Occasional shot and shell and the 
sound of cannonading kept the men in mind of an approaching 
battle. General Sumner had ordered General French to have 
his division in readiness to move at daybreak. Army life knows 
no hours. At two o'clock Wednesday morning the regiment was 
aroused to prepare for the march, each man receiving ninety-six 
rounds of cartridges and forty-five caps. Before the mellowing 
dawn of that September morning had touched the surrounding 
hilltops, the regiment was marching toward the scene of the days 
conflict. They crossed the Boonsboro turnpike, turned to the 
right and around the hill and after marching about two miles 
over fields and through woods, and in some instances fences were 
pulled down that obstructed the column, the regiment forded 
Antietam Creek about eight o'clock at the third ford which was 



The Battle of Antietam. 



35 



deep and slippery. Some of the men filled their canteens for 
prospective want while prudence suggested to others to take off 
their shoes and stockings. They were on the right of French's 
division with the 130th Pennsylvania next and the io8th New 
York on the left, marching that day with the Third Brigade 
(Max Weber's) in front, their own Brigade, the Second, under 
Colonel Morris next and the First Brigade, General Kimball, in 
the rear. 



„.-- A 






i I 





After marching about two miles by flank they entered the East 
Woods. The order was given to form line of battle, shells were 
bursting about them, tearing off huge branches of trees while 
shot were cutting the air with their sharp shriek. This order to 
form line of battle was perhaps the supreme moment of their 
experience, as there shot through the minds of the men the 



36 



Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 




A West view of Roulett's House since the war. 



thought of the loved ones at home : t!ie terrible possibilities of 
the engagement made vivid by the ghastly scenes through Avhich 
they had already passed at South ^Mountain; some indeed would 
l)e wounded, some slain outright ; there must inevitablv be suffer- 
ing and death ; and as they looked at the familiar faces of their 
comrades, they wondered who it would be. 

Coming- to a fence, ^Max Weber's Brigade in front passed over 
first. .\s they came in sight the Confederate batteries opened a 
fiet-ce fire and there was a storm of shot and shell. The colunui 
then passed down a slight hill terminating in low marshy ground 
Ijetween the houses of ^Ir. Mumma and William Roulette. 
Company A passed through a corner of ^Ir. Alunima's orchard 
and serious as was the occasion, Major Hincks confesses that he 
and some of his companions picked apples and ate them. The 
same company also felt the scorching breath of Mumma's burn- 
ing buildings. The line was turned a trifle to the right mto a 
cornfield. The spring-house of William Roulette was occupied 
by some belligerent sharp-shooters who were captured by Com- 
pany B, after which the company joined the regiment. At this 
time the right extended to a meadow and the left covered the 



The Battle of Antietam. 



37 



Roulette house and extended to about the left hand side of the 
garden, passing by the Roulette buildings to a fence dividing the 
meadow from the cornfield. Climbing this fence they entered 
the cornfield which was about thirty acres in extent and belonged 
jointly to Mumma and Roulette. The field had a vigorous 
growth of nearly ripe corn and for a time the men were partiallv 




The Spring House where prisoners were captured by Company B. 



hidden from view and suffered little from the shots of the enemy. 
Max Weber's Brigade, the front rank, reached the opposite fence 
several yards ahead of the Second Brigade and their emergence 
from the field drew at once a terrific fire from the enemv, from 
\\hich the men of the Fourteenth suft'ered from over shooting. 
AMien the l^^ourteenth had passed through the cornfield and stood 
on a little ridge on the side next the enemy, there burst upon them 
a perfect tempest of muskctrw The line of troops in front had 
passed well into the open field. It seemed to melt under the 
enemy's fire and breaking many of the men ran through the 
ranks of the Fourteenth toward the rear. Xo enemy could be 
seen, onlv a thin cloud of smoke rose from what was afterwards 



38 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 



Corner of IMu nd. Cornfield position second fence beyond. 



found to be their ritie-pit.s. As by one impulse the hne halted 
on the edge of the cornfield and opened fire. Probably they did 
then but little damage as the enemy were well protected, but 
upon our side the bullets whistled past, cutting ofif the cornstalks, 
and ever}' moment some one of the men would fall. 

This rifle-pit was the Sunken Road which at this time was 
plentifully filled with a quota of Confederate men while the line 
of troops skirted the crest of the hill above them, thus able to 
fire over their heads. 

The conduct of the 5th Maryland afi^ected the regiment 
seriously by breaking and rushing back through the line. Colonel 
Perkins says in his report that they threw his right wing into 
confusion, but although the right and center were broken twice, 
the men rallied on the colors and formed in good order. 

Walker in his "History of the Second Army Corps" says on 
this point : — "The 5th Marvland, whose commanding officer. 
Major rnumenberg, was wounded, was thrown into disorder, 
carrying away temporarily a portion of the 14th Connecticut, but 
the line was handsomely rallied by Colonel Perkins. The 
brigade was then ordered to report to General Kimball ; and first 
the 14th Connecticut and afterward the 130th Pennsylvania 
were advanced to the front line, subsequently joined by the io8th 
New York. All these regiments came under a savage fire, which 



The Battle of Antietam. 



39 



they bore with remarkable composure, considering" that it was 
their first action." 

About a dozen of the men mistaking an order from the cap- 
tain of Company I to charge rushed forward into the open field. 
Not being followed by the rest of the regiment, they fell back 
with the exceptions of William B. Hincks and William H. 
Hawley of Company x\ and Benjamin Hirst of Company D, the 
latter of these seeing the enemy was about to charge went back 
to his regiment ; the other two became so interested in pouring 
shot into the enemy that they did not notice the withdrawal of 
their regiment, and only came to their senses when they saw a 
regiment of Confederates moving down upon them. They beat 




me left of Fourteenth in cornfield. Fence in front and trees at 
right indicate course of sunken road. 



a hasty retreat while showers of bullets followed them. They 
were not able to locate their regiment immediately and had a 
thrilling experience in finding it, Hawley not returning until 
late at night. 

This fence at the farthest side of the cornfield was the farthest 
advance in that direction and a monument has been erected to 
mark the line by the State of Connecticut. They remained in 
this field about three hours according to Colonel Perkin's report. 
The regiment fell back to and over the fence separating the 
cornfield from the meadow where it was reformed, an ordet 



40 



Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 



being given to support General Kimball of Richardson's division. 
The men were then marched back by the left flank to the Roulette 
house, passed betv^een the house and the spring-house on the 
side of the garden, between the barn and the garden, round 
the barn to the lane known as the Roulette lane, coming ^rom 
Bloody Lane to the Roulette buildings, extending in the same 
general direction through the Roulette fields ; to a position by a 
wall of the Roulette lane, which Colonel Morris was ordered to 
take and hold which he did "with the Fourteenth Connecticut 
alone." 




Roulette House, 1862. 



Even in the horrors of battle, there may be some amusing 
incidents. Corporal Crittenden of Company B relates the follow- 
ing: — "Of course we were green and excited and one of our 
sergeants who was in his place in the rear of his section could 
not fire. He edged his way through the line and advanced a 
pace to the front and fired at an angle of about forty-five degrees 
in the air, dropped his piece to his hip, threw down the slide and 
shoved in a cartridge, capped and fired without lifting the rifle 
from his hip, and again he did the same. This was too ludicrous 



TTie Battle of Antietam. 



41 



to escape notice even in battle and one of the boys sang out 'John I 
are you bombarding them ?' This called him to himself and he 
returned to his place in the line." Corporal Crittenden con- 
tinues : — "After we had been in the thick of the battle at An- 
tietam for about one and one-half hours, the Confederate fire 
in front of the left wing of the regiment slackened, and the left 
being on higher ground could look beyond the center and right 
of the regiment to Ricket's Battery, which was on high ground a 
little to the right of us. A line of Confederate skirmishers were 
seen creeping up toward the battery and meeting no opposition. 
Captain E. W. Gibbons saw the move and asked his men if they 
could see any of our troops supporting that batterv. Several 
replied 'no." He said 'they are going to capture that battery.' 
He stepped to the rear and called the attention of Lieutenant- 
Colonel Perkins, I think, to the situation, and returned with in- 
structions to take some men over to the support of the batterv, 
v/hich he did. Some troops came from the right of the battery 




Another view of ''Bloody Lane' 



42 



Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 



and they and the Fourteenth boys met at the rear of the guns, 
and the Confederate skirmish hnc fell back precipitately. The 
left wing then moved back and joined the regiment at rear of 
Roulette barn." 

We quote from Chaplain H. S. Stevens' Souvenir. "The tide 
of battle was moving beyond Kimball, Richardson's division 
coming in for a heavy pull. This division had crossed the An- 
tietam an hour later than the 1^'ourteenth and by the same ford, 
and had at once moved down the stream, its course for a distance 
restrained on the left by the stream and the rough ground along 
it. When the bend at Neikirk's was passed it could extend to 
the left and all the brigades advanced up the slope at rear and 




Roulette Lane, leading to the Sunken Road 



left of Kimball, the 'Irish Brigade' ( Meagher's) on the right. 
Soon the latter brigade was heavily engaged (partly in support 
of Kimball), then Caldwell, then Brooke. The regiments on 
the extreme left, Brooke's men, advanced towards the Piper 
house, fighting hard and successfully, and others that had ad- 
vanced beyond the line of the crooked lane faced to the right 
and charged upon the enemy in the cornfield and orchard be- 
tween Piper's and our line, completing thus the capture or de- 



The Battle of Antietam. 43 

struction of all its remaining occupants. This advance move- 
ment of Brooke on the far left made it necessary that his brigade 
should have support, so Kimball was directed to send him aid. 
As he, naturally preferred to keep his own men, now flush with 
ammunition, he detached his temporary reinforcements, the 14th 
Connecticut and io8th New York, and sent them, under com- 
mand of Colonel Morris, to Brooke." 

While taking this new position, the regiment moving from 
the wall but }et in the Roulette lane, it was subjected to a terrible 
ordeal by the bursting of a shell in Company D, killing three men 
and wounding four. Those killed were Henry Tiley, W. P. 
Ramsdell and R. Griswold. Joseph Stafford and L. Griswold 
each lost an arm and George Colburn and Henry Talcott were 
seriouslv wounded. 




Where the Regiment supported Brooke. 

Sergeant Benjamin Hirst mentions the following incident: — 
''While we were lying in the rear of the stone wall. Sergeants 
Brigham, Stoughten and myself were talking over the events we 
had passed through in the morning, and W. P. Ramsdell quietly 
remarked that if he was going to be hit. he would prefer to have 
the top of his head blown off. When midway between the wall 
and the position assigned to us, I was about the center of the 



44 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

company, urging the boys to close up, when a rebel shell came 
whizzing by and struck about two files in mv rear. As soon as I 
could turn I saw^ about a dozen men lying in a heap and the first 
man I recognized was W. P. Ramsdell with the top of his head 
blown ofif." 

A member of the regiment visiting the battle ground at Antie- 
tam a few years since found the heel of a shell on what he 
thought was the exact spot wdiere the shell burst which made 
such havoc in Company D. It does not require much imagina- 
tion to conclude that it was the same deadly missile. 

Although the bursting of the shell was a great shock to the 
regiment, it closed up and moved on. The nx)vement was con- 
tinued to the left beyond Richardson's regular line to a point 
from ten to twenty rods beyond the fence. Here although not 
within musket range they were within shelling range and some 
were struck. One of these shells ])assed through the ground 
under Hiram H. Fox of Company R. It produced a great 
shock, rendering him unconscious for several hours. Another 
shell struck and killed William H. Norton of Company A. Here 
a serious accident occurred, Robert Hubbard of Company B was 
shot by the careless handling of a rifle by a member of his own 
company. And also Thaddeus Lewis of Company A came to 
his death in the same wav. The regiment was then ordered to 
support a battery at the top of the hill. It was while superin- 
tending the workings of this battery that General Richardson 
was mortally wounded, a detail of the Fourteenth Regiment 
carrying him from the field. The regiment was then moved to 
the top of the hill by orders of General Hancock, who had taken 
Richardson's place in command of the division. General 
Hancock says : — "Finding a consideralile interval at a dangerous 
point between Meagher's Brigade and Caldwell's Brigade, the 
Fourteenth Connecticut was placed here, and a detachment from 
the io8th Xew York on the extreme left." As soon as the 
regiment reached the summit of the hill they attracted the fire of 
some Confederates who had corrse out from Bloody Lane on to 
this plowed field of the Roulette farm. To escape this fire, the 
regiment was ordered to lie down which it did, but the enemy 



The Battle of Antietam. 



45 





Where General Richardson fell. 



havino- the range harassed them until dark, principally with 
shells. The j^-round had recently heen plowed and was covered 
with a la\er of powdery earth. They longed for night to come 
and were well-nigh exhausted, having had no water through the 
day and only a few hard crackers. They heard the distant firing 
far to the left, and expected any time to be called into further 
action. Soon night came and the firing ceased. During the 
night there was a severe rain which w-hile refreshing did not add 
much to the personal beauty of the men. Here they lay all that 
night and the next day and night and until ten o'clock Friday 
morning. 

Chajilain Stevens says: — "/Jl that night through and the 
following day and night they heard the dreadful groans and 
cries of the wounded and dying wretches in Bloody Lane just 
over the hill calling for water or help, or to have taken off others 
who, dead, were lying across or upon their tortured and helpless 
bodies, or for death to release them from their anguish ; but they 
were powerless to render the assistance their hearts longed to 
give." 

Major Hincks gives some details of the trying experience of 
the regiment on the plowed field. Tn a letter to friends at home 
he says: — "We had just moved to the top of the hill to the 
right of the battery and had commenced t(^ form a line by throw- 
ing out our guides as on parade, when one of Cieneral French's 



46 



Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 



aids ordered the Lieutenant-Colonel to make his men lie down at 
once. The action was needful for the enemv had seen us and at 
once commenced shelling us. It was very trying to have to lie 
inactive under fire and listen to the hideous howling of the shell 
varied only by their crash in exploding" and occasionally the 
shriek of some one who was struck. I lay closer to the ground 
than ever before in m}- life, although it was a plowed field and 
an exceedingly dirty place, and I never prayed more fervently 
for darkness than then. This was by far the most trying, 
though by no means the most dangerous part of the clay. 




The plowed tiekl. "Bloody Lane'" in rear. 



Darkness at length came down and the enemy's fire slackened 
and then ceased altogether and the thunder of battle died away. 
We could once more raise our heads and the few of us who were 
fortunate enough to have any rations found an opportunity to 
eat something. I myself had a few crackers and a bit of pork 
which I had taken from a dead man's haversack before I had 
found the regiment. Ordinarily T should have had some 
scruples about partaking of such fare, but this was no time for 
squeamishness. We threw out a few vedettes in front of us 



The Battle of Antietam. 47 

and slept such sleep as we could get on the plowed ground, with 
neither overcoats, blankets or tents. A shower during the night 
wet our clothing- throrgh. 

Every one anticipated that at dawn we should renew the con- 
test, but no such order came. The rebel shari)-shooters opened 
upon us as soon as it was daylight and our skirmishers replied. 
One could not raise his head from the ground without being- ob- 
served and having a shot come whistling over. In some cases 
the rebels, who seemed to be posted in an apple orchard, climbed 
trees to get a better view of us, but from there our skirmishers, 
who were ])osted behind dead horses, rails, rocks, trunks of 
trees or an\' other available shelter, soon dislodged them. 
William Hawley joined us in the night to our great joy, i'or we 
had mourned for him as dead. Fred Doten in trying to clean 
his gun accidentally discharged it, to the great indignation of 
those who lay in front of him and did not care to be considered 
as rebels. The bullet went into the ground near my head. 
Upon our right we connected with a remnant of the Irish 
Brigade and a little farther on was a battery of brass guns. 
Upon the left I do not know what troops were near us, if any. 
I am bound to say that tired, hungry, cold and dirty as w^e were, 
we did not personally have much of the 'On to Richmond' feel- 
ing and personally were not anxious to renew the contest, but 
all day we expected the order and had it come no doubt would 
have done our duty. 

The next night was about as uncomfortable as that which 
l^receded it. Friday morning dawned and no enemy appeared 
in our front. ( )ur skirniishers were advanced for over half a 
mile without meeting opposition. Now we could stand upright 
and look around us. Just in front of us and but a very few 
rods distant was a rebel rifle-pit. Their dead bodies lay thick 
in it and just in front of it lay the dead body of one of our men 
apparently killed in the very moment that he was captured. 
About ten o'clock we were relieved and sent back to the rear 
where we joined the other regiments of the brigade and had 
ammimition, bread and pork issued to us. Thus ended our 
actual share in the battle." 



48 



Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 



Samuel Fisk ("Dunn Browne"') of Company G writes to the 
Springfield Republican under date of September i8th as 
follows: — "The battle itself was a scene of indescribable con- 
fusion. Troops did not know what they were expected to do, 
and sometimes, in the excitement, fired at their own men. But 
in the main for green troops I think we behaved well : the men 
firing with precision and deliberation, though some shut their eyes 
and fired into the air. Old officers said the musketry fire was 




A section of "Bloody Lane" 



the hottest they ever heard. The excitement of battle comes in 
the day of it, but the horrors of it two or three days after. I 
have just passed over a part of the field, I suppose only a small 
part of it, and yet I have counted nearly a thousand dead bodies 
of rebels lying still unburied in groves and cornfields, on hillsides 
and in trenches. Three hundred and fifty I was told by one who 
helped bury them, were taken this morning from one long rifle- 
pit which lay just in front of where the Fourteenth (among 



The Battle of Antietam. 49 

other regiments) made their fight, and were bnried in one trench." 
(This mnst have been the section of the Sunken Road known as 
Bloody Lane.) "The air grows terribly offensive from the un- 
buried bodies : and a pestilence will speedily be bred if they are 
not put under ground. The most of the Union soldiers are now 
buried, though some of them only slightly. Think, now, of the 
horrors of such a scene as lies all around us ; for there are 
hundreds of horses too, all mangled and putrefving, scattered 
everywhere ! Then there are the broken gun-carriages and 
wagons, and thousands of muskets, and all sorts of equipments, 
the clothing all torn and bloodw and cartridges and cannnn shot, 
and pieces of shell, the trees torn with shot and scarred with 
bullets, the farm houses and barns knocked to pieces and burned 
down, the crops trampled and wasted, the whole country forlorn 
and desolate."" 

Thursday night Commissary-Sergeant J. W. Knowlton crossed 
the creek with a light wagon load of provisions and refreshed 
the men as far as the limited supply would admit. 

The regiment was relieved from its tedious and uncomfortable 
position on the plowed ground by General Hancock, to whose 
division they were temporarily attached, at ten o'clock Friday 
morning, going to the rear and joining their own brigade, and 
receiving rations, and bivouacked in the East Woods. 

Thus ends the regiment's share in the battle of Antietam. It 
had indeed been a trying ordeal and its loss of men in killed and 
wounded was very great. The staff of the United States color 
was shot in two by a bullet, and the eagle's head knocked off by 
a piece of shell. The color bearer. Sergeant Thomas J. Mills of 
New London, who had been a lieutenant in the ist C. H. A., was 
mortally wounded, when Sergeant George Augustus Foote, of 
Guilford, volunteered to take his place, and carried the flag the 
remainder of the day. 

The report of the Adjutant-General of Connecticut states the 
loss in killed, 2 commissioned officers. 19 enlisted men ; wounded, 
2 commissioned officers, 86 enlisted men ; missing, 28 enlisted 
men ; total 137. 

Acting Colonel Perkins submitted no report of the battle to 



50 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

the Adjutant-General of Connecticut, but reported the killed, 
wounded and missing as follows : — • 

Company A. Killed, Privates, Thaddeus W. Lewis. Michael 
Maddegan, William H. Norton ; wounded. Corporals, Edward 
L. Humiston, William E. Craig, Privates, Joseph Alix, Henry 
E. Bachelor, Alfred lirown, Joel N. Bradley, Francis Curtis, 
Edward Hill, Duncan McCann, Charles H. l^latt, Stephen D. 
Skidmore, Frederick Tates, Edward A. Wilcox, Frederick Tay- 
lor ; missing. Privates, George P. Beck, Abner S. Whitcomli, 
Musicians. George H. Allen, Lucien W. Hubbard. 

Company B. Killed, Private, Robert Hubbard ; wounded. Cor- 
porals, Frederick R. Beebe, David Maitland, Privates, Samuel 
G. Camp, Charles C. Galpin, Joseph McClusky, Hugh ]\Ic- 
Bravne, Benjamin C. Wilcox; missing, IVivate, George Brown. 

Company C. Killed, Cor])orals, David Mix, Henry Keeler, 
Privates, John H. Smith. Michael Keegan : missing. Private. 
Manfred M. Gibbud. 

Com])any D. Killed, Privates, Henry Tiley, Russell Gris- 
wold, William \\ Ramsdell. John Abby ; wounded. Privates. 
George Colburn, (leorge W. Corbit, William H. Corbit. Loren S. 
Griswold, August Gross, Henry Hospodsky, James Henderson, 
Henry W. Orcutt, (ieorge V. Sloan, Joseph Stafford, Henry Tal- 
cott, Samuel L. Talcott, Thomas \\'ilkie, Christopher Waldo, 
Alfred A. Tatt, Abner S. r>owers, Ansel D. Newell: missing, 
Privates, Frank D. Alain, David 15. Crombie. 

Company E. Wounded, Sergeant, Henry C. Miller, Corporal, 
George Smith, Private, Richard West : missing. Privates, Lucien 
B. Holmes. William F. Lovejoy. 

Company F. Killed. Captain. Jarvis E. Plinn. Sergeant. 
Frederick R. Vam): wounded. Privates. Henry Alcott. Henry 
Beach, John L. Bartholomew, Martin D. Cowles, Peter Frazier, 
Victor Holcomb, — George H. Lewis, Eliphalet S. Packard, Hiland 
H. Parker. J. Frank Smith ; missing. Private, Francis Kavanagh. 

Company G. Killed. Captain. Samuel F. Willard, Private. 
John W. Parks ; wounded. Sergeant, Henry A. Pendleton. 
Privates. George H. Done. Alfred H. Dibble. John A. Hurd ; 
missing. Private. Horace Stevens. 



The Battle of Antietam. 51 

Company H. Wounded, Sergeants, Jolin A. Tibbits, Thomas 
J. Mills, Privates, — S. S. P'ox, John Miner, — F. M. Ames; miss- 
ing. Privates, John Lunger, John Goddard, Lewis L. Latour, 
Christopher Brown, Edward Mitchell. 

Company L Killed, Corporal, Richard L. Hull, Privates, 
Edmund L Field, Raphael W. Benton ; wounded, Privates, Henry 
AL Rossiter, John Ryan, \'alentine Arendholtz ; missing. Corporal, 
Elbert Sperry, Privates, Sylvester J. Taylor, Augustus Flowers, 
Hiram Couch. 

Comi)any I\. Killed, Privates, Benjamin R. haulier, Henry P. 
Yerrington : wounded. Lieutenants, James F). Coit. (ieoige H. 
Crosby, Corporals, John R. Webster, Edward Dorcey, Privates, 
George W. Babcock, H. H. Brainard, Peter Divine, Jacob Dyetch, 
Nelson Bement, John Bayhan, William Carroll. Selden Fuller, 
John Harren, S. D. AUyn, — A. T. Simonds : missing. Corporal, 
N. P. Rockwood, Privates, Frederick Chadwick, T. Farrell, E. 
Weeks, C. Risley, E. Maynard, O. Kibbe. 

Captain Jarvis E. Blinn. of Company F. the first officer to head 
the list of those who were killed in the service of the Fourteenth 
Regiment, was born at Rocky Hill. Conn.. July 28th. 1836. He 
resided there until 1853. when he removed to New P)ritain. 
August 8th. 1862. he enlisted in the company then organizing 
in New Britain for the Fourteenth Regiment. He was unani- 
mously chosen captain and commissioned as such August 15th; 
left the state at the head of his company August 25th ; and 
was constanly at his post until the 17th of September, when, 
early in the day, just as his company was ordered to fall 
back from their somewhat advanced position on the battlefield, 
a bullet struck him, passing through the heart. He made the 
single exclamation "I am a dead man!" and died instantly. A 
friend sa\s of him: — 'T know of no important incidents in his 
life. I onlv know that he was faitliful and true in all the rela- 
tions of life, winning his wav by his own merit to the aiTection 
and confidence of all who knew him. With an earnest devotion 

Note. The names marked with this sign — are not found in State Roster 
•of the Fourteenth Regiment published in i88q. 



52 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

to his country, he gave himself 'wiUing to die if need be. for the 
good cause.' " His remains were taken to New Britain for inter- 
ment. 

Captain Samuel F. AMllard. of Company G, was lujrn in 
Madison, Conn., November 22d, 1822. He passed his life in 
that quiet New England village in mercantile pursuits until his 
enlistment in the Fourteenth Regiment August 6th, 1862. He 
had some military experience, having commanded an independent 
militia company in his own town. Being impressed with his duty 
to his country at the second call for troops, he called upon his 
townsfolk to f(irm a com])any for the war. The ranks were 
quickly filled with the l)est and bravest of the vouth of the town 
and he was unanimously chosen captain. Early in the da\' while 
gallantly leading his men into the thick of the fray, he fell uncon- 
scious and later died. His body was taken to Madison where he 
was buried with military and masonic honors. 

Second Lieutenant George H. D. Crosby, who was mortally 
wounded, died October 23d, 1862. He was born at Barnstable, 
Mass., November 22d, 1840. In 1850 he removed with his 
parents to Middle Haddam, Conn., where he resided until his 
enlistment. He made two unsuccessful attempts to get an ap- 
pointment at West Point, entering Wesleyan University in Mid- 
dletown in the fall of 1861. Having decided military predilec- 
tions, he joined the Mansfield Guard and there studied the tactics. 
He marched with his regiment to Washington and was left with 
a large guard over the camp at Arlington, when the regiment 
marched to Fort Ethan Allen. The government not supplying 
sufficient rations, he purchased them for his men from his own 
limited means, declining to be repaid. When the regiment 
marched from Ethan Allen on the ^laryland campaign, he rose 
from a sick bed in the hospital to join and march with his com- 
panv. A letter written about this time from Sergeant Goodwin 
of his company ( killed later in the war) to his friends, praises 
his coolness under fire and states that his men were growing very 
fond of him. During the battle Crosby was walking from one 
end of his company to the other, encouraging his men. when a 
bullet struck him in the side, passing through his lungs just in 



The Battle of Antietam. 53 

front of the spine, and lodging on the opposite side just under the 
skin. He was carried back to the hospital and a few days later 
sent home where he died, as we have above stated. 

Before leaving the vicinity of Sharpsburg, the officers assembled 
and adopted the following resolution :— 

"Resolved, That we, their fellow-officers, do but simple justice 
to the memory of these brave and devoted officers w^hen we 
testify in this public manner to their efficiency in every public 
and private duty, to their watchful kindness and care over the 
soldiers of their respective companies, to the fraternal courtesy 
ever manifested by them in their intercourse with others, and to 
their earnestness and zeal in the ]:)atriotic cause for which they 
drew their swords." 

It only remains to record a few notices of recognition and 
praise by the several officers in command and in coiffirmation of 
what has been w^ritten, in addition to the full reports of the 
battle by Colonel Morris, Acting Brigadier-General of the Second 
Brigade, and Lieutenant-Colonel Perkins to their superior officers. 

General Hancock says: — "I found the troops occupying one 
line of battle in close proximity to the enemy, who was then again 
in position behind Piper's house. The Fourteenth Connecticut 
Regiment and a detachment from the One Hundred and Eighth 
New York A'olunteers. both under command of Colonel Dwight 
Morris, were in reserve, the whole command numbering about 
2,100 men, wath no artillery. Finding a considerable interval at 
a dangerous point between Meagher's Brigade, then commanded 
by Colonel Burke, of the Sixty-third Regiment New York Volun- 
teers, and Caldwell's Brigade, the Fourteenth Connecticut was 
placed there, and the detachment from the One Hundred and 
Eighth New York Volunteers on the extreme left." 

General French, Commander of the Division, says in his re- 
port: — -"Surgeon Grant organized his Division Hospital under 
fire. The division commissary. Lieutenant Schuffner, and Lieu- 
tenant Hale, Fourteenth Connecticut, division ordnance officer, 
were stretuious in their exertions to supply the command. The 
conduct of the new regiments nnist take a prominent place in 



54 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

the history of this great battle. Unch-illed. but admirably armed 
and equipped, every regiment, either in advance or reserve, dis- 
tinguished itself, but according to the energy and ability of their 
respective commanders. The report of Colonel Morris, Four- 
teenth Connecticut, commanding brigade, exhibits the services of 
his command. There never was such material in any army and 
in one month these splendid men will not be excelled by any." 

Report of Colonel Dwight ^Morris, Fourteenth Connecticut 
Infantry, commanding Second Brigade, of the battle of Antietam : 

"Headquarters Second Brigade, h'rench's Division, 
September 19, 1862. 

Sir : In obedience to orders, my brigade left camp at Keedys- 
ville on the morning of the 17th. After fording the Antietam, 
marching about two miles 1)\- the flank, we formed line of battle, 
the Fourteenth Connecticut on the right, the One Hundred and 
Thirtieth Pennsylvania center, and One Hundred and Eighth New 
York on the extreme left. We marched forward, forming in 
front of William Roulette's house and farm, which was occupied 
bv the enemy, and, having driven them from that position, the 
right rested in a cornfield and the center occupied a space in front 
of an orchard. We were here exposed to a galling cross-fire for 
three hours, but maintained the position. The Fifth ),laryland 
Regiment fell back early in the action, passing through th.e right 
wing of the Fourteenth Connecticut. The right was immediately 
formed by Lieutenant-Colonel S. H. Perkins, and the regiment 
three times formed under a severe cross-fire. !\lajor C. C. 
Clark also rendered great assistance in forming the line. 
Adjutant T. G. Ellis, who acted as my aide, constantly communi- 
cated with General French, and in doing so was greatly exposed 
in conseciuence of the position taken l)y the general amid a very 
hot fire. 

Having received orders to support General Kimball, \Aio was 
obtaining amnmuition, I reported to him, and was ordered to take 
a position near a stone wall and to hold it. This I did with the 
Fourteenth Connecticut alone until ordered to advance the 



The Battle of Antietam. 55 

Fourteenth to support Colonel ]*>rooke, commanding First 
Brigade, Richardson's Division. I took the position assigned, 
and was ordered by General Caldwell, tem])orarily in command of 
Richardson's Division, to remain until further orders. The 
Fourteenth was here shelled by the enemy, until ordered by 
General Hancock, who relieved (General Caldwell from the com- 
mand, to the front which positi<^n the I^^ourteenth held for thirty- 
six hours, constantly harassed by the enemy. From the time I 
was ordered to sui)])ort ( leneral Kimball I remained with the 
Fourteenth and ( )ne hundred and thirtieth Pennsylvania, now 
joined to the l^^irst Ih'igade, and the One hundred and eighth 
New York. For details [ refer you to the reports of the 
colonels of the regiments. 

My brigade cai)tured 2 stand of colors, 2 captains, 7 lieutenants, 
and about 400 privates, who were turned over to the provost- 
marshal at I'oonsborough, besides wounding many field officers 
of the enemy. W'e also took (n'er 400 stand of arms, which were 
turned over to the ordnance officer. I attribute our success in a 
great measure to the constant communication with the command- 
ing general through the day, as well as to the unsurpassed bravery 
of our men. The men in my brigade were all new troops, hastily 
raised, and without drill f)r experience, and although under fire 
for the first time, behaved with great gallantry. In front of the 
last position held by the Fourteenth Connecticut more than 1,000 
of the enemy lie slain. 

My loss in killed, wounded, and missing is 529. 
Very respectfully yours, 

DwiGHT Morris, 

Colonel, Commanding Second Brigade, French's DiAision. 
Lieutenant J. \V. Plume, Assistant Adjutant-General." 

Report of Lieutenant-Colonel Sanford H. Perkins, Fourteenth 
Connecticut Lifantry, of the battle of Antietam : 

"Headquarters Fourteenth Regiment Connecticut A'olunteers, 
Sharpsburg, ^Id., Se])tember 19, 1862. 
We broke bivouac at camp near Keedysville. Md., on the morn- 
ing of the 17th of September, taking position on the right of 



56 Fourteerith Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

your command according to order, and marched about two hours 
by flank, when we formed Hne of battle and moved forward a 
distance of about one-half mile, when we became engaged, our 
position being in a corn-field west of William Roulette's farm- 
house, the enemy occupying a position on the summit of a hill to 
our front. The Fifth Maryland Regiment being slightly in our 
advance, I reserved my fire until they broke, which threw three 
companies of my right wing into confusion, when we opened fire 
from the left and proceeded to rally the right, which having been 
effected, we held our position under a severe cross-fire for nearly 
three hours, during which time, my horse being disabled, I was 
obliged to continue with my command on foot. 

I cannot omit to say that during the time above mentioned my 
right and center were broken twice, but rallied on the colors and 
formed in good order and, when ordered to retire, moved from 
the field with precision, after which we accoiupanied you to sup- 
port General Kimball, wdio was retiring for ammunition, and took 
a position near a stone wall east of the farm-house, holding the 
same until ordered to support Colonel Brooke. 

During this movement, while marching by flank, a shell was 
thrown into our ranks, killing several of our men. The ranks 
were at once closed, the regiment moving forward at quick time 
and in good order. At this time and during the remaining 
thirty-six hours, being under your immediate command, requires 
no further details. 

Where all behaved so well it may seem invidious to particu- 
larize, but I feel bound to mention Captain Blinn, of Company F, 
and Captain Willard, of Company G, who fell at their posts 
gallantly cheering their commands. Also First Lieutenant Coit, 
commanding Company K, and Lieutenant Crosby, of the same 
company, were dangerously wounded, leaving that company 
wathout a commissioned officer. Acting Adjutant Lucas, Assist- 
ant Adjutant-General Ellis, together with Major C. C. Clark, 
rendered great assistance in rallying the command under a gall- 
ing fire, at which time the horse of Assistant Adjutant Ellis was 
disabled. Sergeant Mills, color-bearer, was severely, if not 
mortallv, wounded while bearing and waving aloft our standard. 



The Battle of Antietam. 



57 



and his place was filled b}- Lieutenant Comstock, Company H, 
who, with Sergeant Foote, of Company I, retained them until 
the close of the action. Our colors are riddled with shot and 
shell, and the stafif broken. Captain Gibbons of Company B, 
deserves notice, who. finding the farm-house occupied by a large 
force of the enemy, ordered his company to advance and fire, 
scattering them and driving a portion of them into the cellar, 
where, by closing the door, a large number of them were cap- 
tured. 

As you are aware, our men, hastily raised and without drill 
behaved like veterans, and fully maintained the honor of the 
Union and our native State. 

Total killed, wounded, and missing. 156. 

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant, 

Sanford H. Perkins, 
Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Fourteenth Regiment Con- 
necticut \"olunteers. 
Colonel Dwight Morris, 

Commanding Second Brigade, General French's Division." 





Kimball's Hill, Antietar 



CHAPTER IV. 



After Antietam and Before Fredericksburg. 



It was apparent I'^riday that Lee liad moved his armv across 
the Potomac at the Shepardstown ford and was now safely on 
Virginia soil. McClellan was one (^f the most courteons and 
generous of generals and, although a ])art of his army, the Fifth 
and Sixth Corps and cavalry, were practically unused in the 
battle of Wednesday, did not attempt to further disturlj the 
enemy. Then again he was probably aware that Lee had not 
completed arrangements to meet him. This delay in not finish- 
ing the battle at Antietam gave his army opportunity for rest and 
recuperation. The army though jaded and worn by the terrible 
experiences of the week would, however, have responded to a call 
for a further attack cheerfully. 

The men of the regiment went over the ground and viewed the 
havoc of the l^attle. In consideration for the regiment's service 
at the front, the men were relieved from the disagreeal;)!e duty 
of helping to bnry the dead, though some of the men assisted. 
Saturday afternoon there was an inspection of the regiment in 
common with the entire army. On Sunday religious services 
were held in the beautiful oak grove where the regiment was 
bivouacked, with "flag-draped drums for a pulpit and the inspir- 
ing music of the band serving as church bell and orchestra. ' 

(58) 



After Antietam and Before Fredericksburg. 



59 



This was the first religions service in the field, few have been 
held under such circnmgtances, and none will forget that im- 
pressive occasion. The horrible experiences of the week, the 
deaths of their comrades, many of them attached to each other 
by the ties of boyhood (la_\'s, brothers and relatives, were very 
vivid to them in these honrs of more qniet reflection. 

In the vacancy made by the death of Ca])tain Diinn, wlio was 
killed early in the day of the liattle, ist I.ientenant Samnel A. 
Moore of Company F was promoted to l)e captain. 

Dnring Snnda}' a ration of fresh beef was served which v>as 
the second since leaving Hartford. All the rations the regiment 
had during- the week since reaching Antietam had been fonr 
issues of hardtack, cofifee, sugar and salt pork. 

On September 21st, Sergeant Benjamin Hirst states: — 
"Every man who had cut his body belt to a nice fit was charged 




Where the Regiment forded the : 



60 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

with a new one. A few days before a man wearing his belt 
passing through the loops on his cartridge-box (as do all old 
soldiers) was fined $4." 

On Monday, the 22d, the regiment started on its march to 
Harper's Ferry, fourteen miles distant, directly s(^uth, moving to 
the Hagerstown turnpike, passing the battered and shot riddled 
Dunkerd Church, and through Sharpsburg. The march was over 
a dustv road, the dav was excessivelv hot and iranv of the men 




JOHN MCCARTHY. 
Chief Musician, who led the Band as the Regiment forded the river Sept. 22, 



felt it a hard task to keep up. and it was "Close up, Close up" all 
day. Officers and men were falling out every mile. About two 
o'clock they arrived opposite Harper's Ferry and found the 
Taridges had been burned and it was necessary to ford the river. 
The river at that point was a wide brawling stream with a rajjid 
current, but not more than two or three feet in depth. It was an 
animating scene, the band leading the way playing "Jordan is a 



After Antietam and Before Fredericksburg. 61 

Hard Road to Travel," "'Way Down South in Dixie," "Yanl<ce 
Doodle" and "( Jld X'irginia." Every now and then some un- 
fortunate wight would be carried otf his feet by the current or 
would slide on the slippery rocks that formed the bottom of the 
river and would go under the water, blowing like a porpoise and 
dripping wet, when he emerged, to the infinite amusement of his 
comrades. It was merry work crossing the stream and there was 
a feeling of exhilaration as they passed by the ruins of the arsenal 
where John Brown had fought so stoutly, the band pla} ing "Glory 
Hallelujah." 

We copy on interesting passage from Colonel Frederick L. 
Hitchcock in his "War from the Inside," being some interesting 
sketches of the I32d Pennsylvania Regiment. Speaking of this 
fording the river he sa^s : — "Our division was headed by the 
Fourteenth Connecticut, and as we approached the river opposite 
Harper's Ferry its fine band struck up the then new and popular 
air, 'John Brown's Body,' and the whole division took up the 
song, and we forded the river singing it." 

After leaving Harper's Ferry the colunm marclied through the 
town of Bolivar until it reached Bolivar Heights where they 
encamped, about two miles from the town, wdiich is nestled in a 
valley at the junction of the Potomac and Shenandoah rivers be- 
tween three tremendous hills, or it might be said mountains for 
they form a ]iart of the Blue Ridge Chain, — a most beautiful 
view. Away up on the right were McClellan's headquarters and 
occasionally on a clear day could be seen a balloon hovering in 
the air above to obtain a view of the enemy. The rebel camp- 
fires were in view about eight miles distant. The sight was a 
grand one as the great army was encamped over these hills and 
the view at night of thousands of camp-fires illuminated the hills 
from base to summit. The experiences of the week and the scanty 
supply of food, overcoats and blankets caused great suffering. 
In digging in an old breastwork which ran along the front some 
Sibley tents were found that had been secreted there the week 
before when our troops surrendered the place to the Confederates. 
Also dead bodies were found in this breastwork. These tents-. 



62 



Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 



were promptly made use of for shelter, they being particularly 
welcome owing- to the wet condition of the men from fording 
the river. 

September 27th the sick men of the regiment, who were left 
at Fort Ethan Allen under the care of Dr. Jewett, joined the 
regiment. 

Detachments from the regiment were assigned to duty here 
and there guarding government stores and doing picket duty. 
During the stay at fJolivar Heights there was much sickness in 
the camp, manv times more than two hundred l)eing under the 
doctor's care. This was owing to bad water, lack of proper food 
and no overcoats or blankets, and the nights were cold and frosty. 
A happv feature of the situation was its comparative nearness to 
the Shenandoah River, about a mile away, where the men could 
go to bathe. 




Hat per > Ft 



with Bolivar Heights in the distance. 



Comrade Albert F. Hall, of Company H, relates some experi- 
-ences which may represent that of many others. He says: — 
"The water here was so bad and with other conditions caused a 
great amount of sickness and eventually a large number of 
deaths. Chronic diarrhea was prevalent and I soon became the 
victim of typhoid fever, being carried on a stretcher to the little 
town of Bolivar below us. Here I was placed with others on 



After Antietam and Before Fredericksburg. 63 

the floor of an unoccupied house. ?\lany around me died, but by 
such attention as my conn-ades and the surgeon could give me, 
I escaped death. ( )ne l)right afternoon in October, utterly weak 
as I was, I tried to crawl out and up to the corner, a few rods 
distant. Near the ct)rner house, the lower |)art of which was 
occupied bv sutlers, there was in the back-yard an old lady wash- 
ing", who beckoned me to come in. I did so and dropped upon 
a bench, utterly exhausted and too weak to go farther. The 
name of this old lady was Cross, and she talked to me long and 
earnestly. I found her a good Union woman, with a son in the 
Maryland cavalr\-, living with her daughter in two rooms up- 
stairs. I told her 1 would be so glad if T could get into a place 
where there was a fire. She finally said 1 should have a place 
on her floor near the stove. The following morning. Sunday, her 
daughter appeared, very ])lainly dressed in calico, but with 
bright black eyes and a sym])athetic heart, furnishing water, towel 
and soap I soon felt like a new man, which was completed by 
giving me a clean shirt of her brother's. 

Later I discovered that this }oung lady, Sarah J. Cross, had 
a history, having been instumental in conveying information from 
the Confederate armv to the I'nion forces opj^osite, which fact 
the rebels ascertained and placed her under arrest, placing her 
in charge of her uncle, with the charge that if she escaped, it 
would mean death to him. L'ndaunted. however, this girl per- 
sauded her uncle to allow her to visit her sister at a point of rocks 
some distance away, ()])posite the C^nion lines. She made her 
way there under cover of night, put out the light, and at dawn 
the following dav went out upon the high point of rocks and, 
signalling with her handkerchief, a boat with Union soldiers at 
the oars was crossing. She jumped into a boat and started for 
the other side. Soon the Confederate cavalry dashed around the 
bend and began firing. Standing in the boat, she urged the 
brave men on while the Confederate bullets were flying about 
them. At last they got out of range and reached the Union 
shore. This brave girl stepped ashore and, waving her handker- 
chief, disappeared under the protection of the Union army. After 
the war she married a sergeant of Company B, Cole's Cavalry." 



64 



Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 



Here it may be well to state the routine of the regi- 
ment's life. At five thirty in the morning the men 
were aroused by the roll of the drums. They would 
beat only four or five minutes and the man who was not 
in the ranks when they ceased, dressed, and ready for roll-call, 
was reported to headquarters for punishment. Calling the roll 
took only about five minutes when they were dismissed to get 
their own breakfasts as best they might. The main difficulty was 
the long distance and steep road over which they had to go for 
water and wood. At 7.30 the bugle sounded "Surgeon's Call'' 
when all the invalids went down to have an interview with the 
M. D. The doctor felt the pulse of his patient and looked at his 
tongue and punched him in the ribs, and if he thought him not sa 




in Harper's Ferry. 



After Antietam and Before Fredericksburg. 65 

sick as he represented himself to be swore at him and bade him 
be off. If. however, he thought him really unwell, he gave him 
a nauseous pill before dismissing him. This pill came to be 
known among the men as "No. 9" At 8 o'clock a. m. was guard 
mounting. Some thirty men were chosen from the various com- 
panies to act as sentries for the ensuing twenty-four hours. They 
were marched out, paraded, clothing and equipment inspected, and 
marched off to their posts to the sound of music. At 8.30 the 
regiment was drilled either by company or battalion, usually for 
about two hours. I'rom about 1 1 o'clock until 3 the men did not 
have much to do except to get dinner. From 3 until 5.30 they 
were drilled again and wound up the duties of the day by dress- 
parade. At 8 in the evening was roll-call and at 9 the bugle 
w^as sounded to extinguish lights. 

The retreat call at sundown was really enjoyed and oftentimes 
the fine band of the regiment would extend it into an evening 
concert. The almost universal time killer in camp was cards. 
Various games were played, but poker was king. A game of 
the latter could be found in almost every company street, officers 
as well as men taking a "twist at the tiger." 

There was no question about the morals of the regiment, and 
it may be a joke, but has some significance when it is said that the 
Colonel offered a prize of $5 for any one that heard a man swear. 

The regiment left Bolivar Heights on the morning of October 
30th crossing the Shenandoah on a pontoon bridge and taking 
a hilly road through the mountains a few miles, and then biv- 
ouacked about eight miles from Harper's Ferry, between that 
place and Leesburg. When the regiment left Bolivar Heights 
several of the sick were sent back to the various hospitals. 

There was something inspiring in the sight of the great army 
on the march. The long trains of wagons, the shining brass 
pieces of artillery, the horses with scarlet blankets, the long 
steadily moving column of men. the gleaming steel weapons and 
the echoing bugle calls rouse the martial spirit in a man if he has 
any. Then at night the camp-fires, shining through the dark- 
ness over all the surrounding hills, make the landscape look like 



66 



Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 




'Jefferson Rock'" overlooking^ the Shenandoah River. 



a view of some iireat cit}- in the evening- ; and the Httle groups 
of men around the fires, the stacks of arms, and the horses graz- 
ing, make grou]:»s that a ])ainter might well copy. 

November ist the march was continued down the Louden 
Valley about three miles. ( )n this day a very ludicrous incident 
occurred. While in camp here some of the men strayed out into 
a garden in search of vegetables and met with a c|ueer interrup- 
tion and reception. A red-headed daughter of the "sunny South" 
rushed out and overturned five or six beehives which stood at 
one end of the garden. While "our bo\s" could stand before a 
storm of shot and bullets, they were not disposed to face this 
musketry of nature and beat a hasty retreat before the infuriated 
insects, but later returned and secured the honey, which would 
not have been disturbed in the ordinary course of events. Cor- 
poral Albert R. Crittenden writes of a further development of 



After Antietam and Before Fredericksburg. 67 

this incident. He says: — "After tlie bees were subdued and 
the contents of the hives feh into our hands, to some of us it 
proved an 'apple of Sodom' for we ^ot only bee bread. The red- 
headed daughter of the South and an older female came into 
camp to identify some of the raiders. They liohted on us, not 
because the\- were sure it was us, but as the raiders had on dark 
blue trousers, we were taken to account. Some remnants of a 
honey box were found in one of the compan_\- streets and the 
captain was called on to explain. He said he did not know how the 
honey box came there, they had just moved into their position, and 
all his men were present or accounted for. bTu-thermore, he did 
not believe his men would l)e guilt}- of such actions as thev were 
all pious men and good liaptists, indeed only about six weeks 
had passed since he had seen them all immersed in the Potomac. 
The captain was so positive in his statement of 'facts' and so 
honest about it that the maidens appeared satisfied and took 
leave of us." 

November 2(1, Sunday, the march was continued in the direc- 
tion of Snicker's Cia]). The cavalry in advance kept up a run- 
ning fire with the enemy's horse, cannonading all dax. About 
2 p. m. the regiment was formed in line of battle and skirmishers 
sent out to ascertain about a column of troops in front. Upon 
its being discovered that they were Union men, the march was 
resumed to Snicker's (iap, where they encamped for the night. 
Few of the regiment will forget that encampment. It was a 
bright moonlight night and the men had been sent to these 
heights to keep the Confederates from passing through the Gap. 
Picket-lines were thrown out. The view was a grand one as on 
the one side could be seen the Louden X'alley along wdiich the 
Union troops were camped and on the other side could be seen 
the Confederate army in the Shenandoah X'alley. The lights of 
the camp-fires of each army were ])lainly visible. Some of the 
men claim it was here that it was first discovered that the initials 
"B. C." were imprinted upon the hardtack. 

November 2d the regiment went into bivouac at Uppersville 
There was evidence that the enemy's cavalry were close in front 
and were falling back upon the advance. Tlieir camp-fires were 



68 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

still smoking- and it was apparent they had made a hasty retreat. 
Many of the men who had fallen out from various causes rejoined 
the regiment and at this time it numbered about 450 men, all 
told. A portion of the regiment was detached to guard an am- 
munition train, the rest moving on and bivouacking about ten 
miles from the battle-field of Bull Run. 

November 7th the march was resumed and the regiment had 
their first experience of snow in the South. November 8th the 
march was through Warrenton, Va., with colors flying and band 
playing. General French at the head, and encamped on the out- 
skirts of the town, the inhabitants looking surly enough. Ser- 
geant Benjamin Hirst records under this date: — "Before the 
rebellion Warrenton must have been a very fine city, but every- 
thing now seems deserted. Of inhabitants I saw none but a few 
ladies peering at us through half-opened window blinds, and most 
of them seemed to be weeping. As we marched by, our band 
played 'Yankee Doodle' without consoling them a bit." 

An incident occurred while encamped near Warrenton 
of interest to members of the regiment, which may be here 
recorded. 
I '"Headquarters 14th Conn. \'ols.. Camp near Warrenton, Va., 

November 12th, 1862. 
Captain S. H. Davis, 

Sir : — You are hereby ordered to give in writing immediately 
the reason for the occasion of the noise in your quarters last night 
at or about one o'clock. 

By order of S. H. Perkins, Lieutenant-Colonel, commanding 
14th. Conn. Vols. 
George N. Moorehouse, Acting Adjutant." 

Upon receipt of the foregoing order Captain Davis luade the 
following reply : — 

"Camp 14th Conn. Vols., near Warrenton. Va., 
November 12th, 1862. 
Lieutenant-Colonel S. H. Perkins, 

Commanding 14th Conn. Vols. 

Sir : — In response to your order of this date. I hereby respect- 
fullv furnish 'the reason for the occasion of the noise in my 



After Antietam and Before Fredericksburg. 69 

quarters last night at or about one o'clock'. Late in the night — 
at precisely what hour I am unable to say — I was aroused from 
my peaceful slumbers by partial suffocation and also consider- 
able disturbance in my quarters. Through the thick veil of 
smoke which clouded my vision I beheld the towering form of 
my sable servant Philip — his countenance illuminated by tlie 
mingled light of burning brands — and his snowy teeth — and 
ghastly with an indescribable expression of confusion and horror, 
with one hand frantically, but fruitlessly, endeavoring to extin- 
guish his burning pants — and the other upraised and swaying to 
and fro in the agony of despair, vainly striving to prevent the 
devouring element from wholly destroying the wretched remnant 
of a shelter tent which the said Philip is wont to use as a cover- 
ing. A din of "laughter, coughing, curses and exhortations" 
saluted my affrighted ears. When I had sufficiently recovered 
my senses to realize the 'situation' the extreme ludicrousness of 
the whole scene caused me to join the peal of laughter. The 
terrified African finally succeeded in gaining the open air where 
he continued his incendiary work by unwittingly firing a woolen 
shirt, the property of Captain S. W. Carpenter's colored person, 
by name 'George'. The friendly exchange of compliments be- 
tween the two descendants of Ham which followed this breach 
of propriety, and the increased consternation of Philip ( who now 
began to view himself in the light of the destroying angel com- 
missioned to produce the final conflagration of this mundane 
sphere) furnished new material for laughter — and finally the 
woe-begone expression of that dejected contraband as he sorrow- 
fully sat surrounded by the ruin his hands (or feet rather) had 
wrought, his eyes bedewed with tears of mingled smoke and 
emotion — was too much for human risibles and then I laughed. 
At about this time the festivities of the occasion were interrupted 
by the voice of one I supposed to be yourself, forbidding the 
further continuance of the same which was the first intimation 
I had that I was engaged in disturbing camp. Asking your par- 
don for this my prolixity yet feeling conscious that though neces- 
sary it fails to do justice to the subject, I have the honor to sub- 
scribe myself. Your obedient servant, 

S. H. Davis, Captain 14th Connecticut A^olunteers." 



70 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

It was while here that the regiment learned of the removal of 
McClellan. he being superceded by General Burnside. A fare- 
well review of the troops was given. Notwithstanding his ill 
success, very many of the men had confidence in him and were 
not altogether pleased with his retirement. 

The regiment remained near W'arrenton until the 15th, when 
after a hard march of about a dozen miles, they hivcniacked with 
the rest of the division on a great ])lain not far from Wairenton 
Junction. On November if^th Company A was detached to 
guard a cross-road and s]X'nt the day there while the entire corps 
marched past and in the middle of the afternoon they started 
and overtook them, after marching about ten miles, and encamped 
about two miles in the rear of Falmouth. They remained here 
until three o'clock in the afternoon of the i8th when they took up 
the line of march for IJellc Plain. General French was at the 
head of the colunm, and was saluted with cheers. He swung his 
hat and was cheered in return and really seemed sorry to see the 
regiment go. (leneral French was familiarly known amon.;- the 
bo>s as "General lilinkie," a nickname applied to him from the 
peculiar blinking of his eyes which seemed to move all the muscles 
of his face, they moving up and down like the shutters of a blind. 

The sutler's tent was often the object of attack and most com- 
plete annihilation. Sergeant Wade speaks of one occuring on 
the march from Bolivar Heights to Belle Plain when the Tenth 
New York tipped over a sutler's tent, stealing about two thous- 
and loaves of bread for which the thrifty sutler had been charg- 
ing the men fifteen cents a loaf. A member of Company ¥, 
Fourteenth Regiment, familiarly known as "Auty" was ever alert 
when there was anvthing to eat. Tt was while attempting to 
get his share of the plunder that he accidentally sprained his 
ankle and was taken to Surgeon Dudley's tent, where the ever 
ready surgeon gave him one of his famous No. pills. These 
pills seemed equally efficient in restoring a sprained limb as in 
a case of chronic diarrhea. "Auty" reported himself for duty 
the next day. 

The march was resumed about 7.30 on the morning of the 
igth, the men in the best spirits, but their mood was changed 



After Antietam and Before Fredericksburg. 7 1 

before the day was over. Colonel Morris became bewildered and 
marched them roimd and round, throug'h woods, across .-.treanis 
and through farmer's dooryards. Tlien the guide, who was a 
"secesh" farmer cleared out. The rain fell heavily and the regi- 
ment crossed the same stream four times and every now and then 
would about face and take the back track, and were some five 
hours in marching a distance of four miles. ( )n reaching Belle 
Plain the regiment was marched and countermarched several 
times over the ground and at length, the worst possible spot hav- 
ing been selected, w^ent into camp, the men wet, muddy and 
dispirited, about dark. 

The condition of the regiment at Belle Plain was most un- 
comfortable. It rained for nearly a week after the regiment 
reached there, the cam]) was situated amid swam])s and mud 
flats, their blankets and clothing were wet through and their 
fires could not be made to burn. Detachments from the regi- 
ment as well as the brigade were sent out to unload barqes and 
steamboats. Sergeant E. B. Tvler of Company P) gives a vivid 
statement of the experiences of the regiment at this point. He 
says : — "The march through the Louden X^alley and from thence 
to Falmouth ; the sicklv, disagreeable, nonsoldier-like experiences 
of P>elle Plain where our men, wholly unused to such work, were 
detailed to do duty as stevedores and longshoremen, some slight 
of frame and weakened in muscle by soldier fare, staggering 
from the barges under loads they could scarcely carry, while a 
big, fat, lazy negro stood by, sleepily mouthing out something 
that was supposed to be tally, although almost unintelligible to 
our men. This and the ap]>arent inability of our surgeons to 
cope with the various diseases and ailments that were reducing 
our muster roll da}- by day ; the full import of the dififerences in 
condition, as well as apparent importance in the esteem of the 
government between officers and men, especially those officers of 
high rank ; these were things that tried the metal and patience of 
our soldiers, so recently citizens, with all the rights and privi- 
leges of American citizenship, more than facing Confederate 
musket and cannon." 

By the first of December the conditions of the camp had some- 



72 



Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 



what improved. The band, which had so greatly helped to in- 
spire and encourage the men during these hard days, serenaded 
Lieutenant-Colonel Perkins, playing "Auld Lang Syne" and na- 
tional airs. December 6th the regiment was ordered to break 
camp at Belle Plain and join the army on the Rappahannock. 
The march was a wearisome and trying one. Dr. Levi Jewett 
records his impressions. He says: — "I well remember that 
march. It was a cold day, the mud deep and sticky and a cold 
rain fell nearly all day. toward night becoming mixed with snow 
and hail, and we had as unpleasant a time as I can remember 
during my whole army life. It was pitch dark when we reached 
our destination and w'e were told to go into the pine woods for 
the night. Heavy masses of snow were falling from the trees 
and there w^as nearly a foot of snow on the ground. It was a 
dismal place, — not much to eat and no way to make fires. There 




at Harper's Ferr} 



After Antietam and Before Fredericksburg. 73' 

was not much sleep that night. Colonel Morris with the aid of 
pioneers had a fire made at headquarters where some of us tried 
to get warm. It seemed as if half the boys would be dead before 
morning, but they all seemed to come out bright next day and 
went to cleaning up the ground and making a comfortable camp." 
Here they remained until the evening of December loth, where 
we may leave them to await the events of the coming dav. 




The Burnside Bridge in 




Where the pontoon touched the Fredericksburg shore. 



CHAPTER V. 
The Battle of Fredericksburg. 

It chills the blood to follow the cxjieriences of the Fourteenth 
Regiment during the short time it has been in service. The 
long march from Fort Ethan Allen to Antietam, the terrible ex- 
periences there, the tedious march to IJolivar Heights, the lack 
of proper food and clothing, the wearisome march to Belle Plain, 
the unsoldier-like and disorderly condition of the camp, and the 
heavy work as stevedores, make one wonder how any man could 
live to reach his native state. 

We come now to relate the bitterest of all these experiences 
in what might well be called the massacre of F'redericksburg. To 
iniderstand the details of this horrible battle we may look for a 
moment at the situation. The regiment was encamped now at 
Falmouth, about three miles above Fredericksburg, on the north 
side of the Rai)])ahannock. Fredericks1:)urg, a sluggish South- 
ern city, lies on what might be termed the south side of the 
river, the river at this point running from northwest to southeast. 
It had a few mills which were fed 1)\- a causeway running along in 
the rear of the town between the town and the Confederate for- 
tifications. This causeway was from ten to fifteen feet wide, 
quite deep, and spanned by a number of little bridges, from 
which the planks were removed at the time of the battle. The 

(74) 



The Battle of Fredericksburg. 



75 



town rambles along tlie river front for abont two miles. A high 
ridge directly in rear of the town was called Marye's Heights, 
which encircle the city back some five hundred yards, and are 
the termination of a plateau which rises from one hundred and 
fiftv to two hundred feet in an abrupt terrace from the plain 
upon which the city stands. These heights form a half-circle 




Major CYRUS C. CLARK. 
Wounded at Fredericksburg. 



from the river above to a point below the city some little distance 
from the river, and are most admirably adapted for defensive 
purposes. The rebel batteries, numbering at least one hundred 
guns, were massed on these heights, and covered not onlv every 
street leading out from the city, but every square foot of ground 
of the plain below. A third of the way down the terrace was an 
earthwork filled with infantrv while at its foot ran a stone wall 



76 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

extending southward from the cemetery above the city and was 
continued by an earthwork around the whole circle. Behind 
this stone wall was massed a double line of Confederate infantry. 
To enter either street leading out to those heights was to face 
the concentrated fire of that mass of artillery and the deadly 
work of those three lines of infantry. 

The concentration of the Federal forces on the north side di- 
rectly in front, and the arrival of pontoon bridges to the edge of 
the river several weeks previous, were sufficient to give to so 
astute a military commander as Lee a key to Burnside's plans 
of operation. It is estimated that Lee had at this point about 
85,000 men, the last of which had probably arrived there two 
weeks before the battle. The long delay in making any iv.ove to 
cross by the Federal forces gave the Confederates ample time to 
strengthen what was already an impregnable entrenchment. The 
semi-circular formation of the high ground enabled the Con- 
federate artillery to enfilade the Federal army both at right and 
left. The town lay on the plain between this ridge and the river. 
This position selected by Lee was the strongest for military 
operations that could be imagined. F^'rom this point of writing 
it would seem apparent that the moving of the Federal forces 
was as much to the mind and pleasing of Lee as if he had given 
Burnside written orders, for it would appear as though Burnside 
had no definite plan of his own as he abandoned the project 
which he entertained a few days previous of crossing at Skinker's 
Neck, ten miles or so below the town. To march his army to 
Fredericksburg he proposed to throw over four pontoon bridges, 
one at the north and one at the center of the town, and two 
below. He ordered his grand division commanders to concen- 
trate their troops near the proposed bridges, with Sumner near 
the upper and middle bridges and Franklin at the bridges beloAV 
the town. "The laying of four or five pontoon bridges capable 
of bearing a great army is a work of some time, and the crossing 
of bridges is like passing a defile. To pass 100,000 men with 
a numerous artillery over four or five bridges is as far as pos- 
sible from being a short or easy afifair in a season of profound 
peace, and when there are scores of long range guns ready to 



The Battle of Fredericksburg. 77 

fire upon every head of a column as it debouches from its bridge, 
a serious compHcation is brought into the affair, and it was as 
certain as anything future that as soon as it was announced that 
the engineers were at work on the bridges, the whole Confederate 
army would be on the alert, and that if the movement appeared 
to be serious, any troops that might be on the river below would 
be promptly called on to move to the scene of action as swiftly 
as their swift Southern legs could carry them, and it was alto- 
gether probable that they would not arrive too late. And when 
it is remembered that the bridges were not thrown early on the 
iit-h., and that the attack was not made nor the army crossed 
that day, nor until more than forty-eight hours after work on the 
bridges was begun, it will be clear that all dreams of a surprise 
had vanished, and that the circumstances were well suited to 
filling the minds of Burnside's lieutenants with grave misgiving." 

Many of Burnside's generals advised against the attack, among 
whom was General Sumner of the Second Corps. One wonders 
whether it was the obstinacy of Burnside or pressure from Wash- 
ington impelled him to make this attack which resulted in such a 
fearful sacrifice. Certain if he was a military man of strength 
he must have known that it was impracticable and hopeless. 

About three o'clock Thursday morning, December the nth. 
work was begun throwing over the bridges. The morning was 
foggy and the work continued until ten o'clock when the fog 
lifted and exposed the engineers to a fierce fusillade of sharp- 
shooters secreted in rifle-pits and buildings that skirted the river 
side of the town. So determined was this firing that the work 
had to be discontinued, and the engineers were not successful in 
completing the bridges until about four o'clock in the afternoon. 

We quote from Walker's "History of the Second Corps" in 
regard to the laying of these bridges: — "So complete hide'^d was 
the Confederate's command of the situation, that when the work 
began at the Lacey House, on the morning of the nth., Barks- 
dale's JMississippians did not think it worth while to interfere, at 
first, with the detachment of Fiftieth New York engineers which 
had been charged with this duty, but allowed the bridge to be 
laid nearly two-thirds across the stream, when, bv one vollev. 



78 



Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 



the pontoons were swept clear of men. The position of the 
enemy, thus revealed, was, for an hour, poimded by our artillery, 
from right and left, until it was supposed that a sufficient effect 
had been produced, when the engineers were again ordered for- 
ward, but to no better eft'ect : then again and again the hopeless 
effort was renewed. 'They made,' sa\ s Lieutenant-Colonel Fiser, 
commanding the Seventeenth ^lississippi, 'nine desperate at- 
tempts to finish their bridges, but were severely punished and 
promptly repulsed at every attempt." " 




We left the regiment near Falmouth on the evening of De- 
cember loth. About two o'clock Thursday morning in camp all 
was bustle and animation, fires were blazing, men were hurrying 
to and fro, for the sergeant-major had just been round with the 
order, "Strike tents, pack u]3 and be ready at six o'clock for a 
march and a fight." The men hastened to obey and just as the 
day began to dawn, while they were finishing their breakfasts, 
the boom of heavy guns commenced, indicating that the ball had 



The Battle of Frederickrburg. 79 

opened. But little time was allowed for retieetion for the clear 
ringing voice of the liei;tenant-colone! was heard giving the order 
to fall in and in ten minutes the regiment was in mcjtion. They 
took a circuitous route to avoid being seen by the eneni}- and at 
ten o'clock arrived at a place about one-half mile in the lear of 
the 2\Iajor Lacey house, the headquarters of (jeneral Sumner. 
There the division halted as the pontoons were not yet laid. 
Among the sick left at Belle Plain was Colonel Morris, Com- 
manding (General of the Second Brigade, which was now under 
command of Colonel Palmer of the io8th Xew York. The I32d 
Pennsvlvania had been added to the brigade. The experiences 
had told heavily upon the ranks of the regiment according to 
Sergeant Hirst for while they took into the engagement at An- 
tietam 800 men only 300 muskets left Falmouth. Toward night- 
fall there was a loud and long continued cheer as a signal that the 
bridges had been successfully laid. The order forward was given 
and the regiment passing through a narrow ravine moved toward 
the brink of the river, which they nearly reached when the order 
was countermanded and the regiment marched back and bi- 
vouacked in the underbrush. This underbrush was green and 
wet and it was with great difficulty that tires were made to cook 
ihe coffee and rations. 

Friday morning, the 12th, dawned clear, calm and beautiful, 
and the regiment was earl}' on the move toward the Rappahan- 
nock, passing over the bridge whose southern end was at the 
foot of Hawkes Street. There was a feeling of relief, and the 
band seeking to give expression to the joy of reaching the city 
struck up the tune "Dixie." They were immediately stopped 
by a staff-ofificer who either did not appreciate music just at that 
time or considered it indiscreet. From Hawkes Street the regi- 
ment turned to the left into Sophia Street, the first street irom 
the river and running parallel with it. Here they remained under 
arms the rest of the day, the roll being called as often as everv 
hour to prevent the men from straying from the ranks. The 
houses appeared to have suft'cred considerably from the can- 
nonading of the previous day, but not nearly as much as would 
have been supposed from listening to the bombardment. None 



«0 



Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 



'f^^-Jl 




'^_:--'-':---:^ 



) >i# i^' 






m^ 




Where the Regiment crossed the Rappahannock. 



of the inliabitants were to be seen, they either having retreated 
within the rebel hnes or were hidden in cellars to be out of 
harm's way. Some houses and stores were broken open by 
stragglers, but nothing like indiscriminate pillage took place. 
The queer appearance presented by some of these stragglers was 
very laughable. One would have on a woman's hat or would 
be decorated with a plume of peacock's feathers, another would 
be carrying a large gilt mirror and another still rejoiced in the 
possession of a pulpit bible. The feeling of joy and exaltation 
in reaching Fredericksburg and finding it practically abandoned, 
which even prompted the band to burst out with music, gradually 
wore away and there came over the regiment a gloomy and 
solemn frame of mind. There was something unnatural in t'ao 
quiet of the enemy and it was no longer believed that they had 
retreated. The range of hills back of the town had a gnm and 
threatening appearance ?nd the suspense began to tell upon the 



The Battle of Fredericksburg. 81 

men. Before night the regiment was moved to Caroline Street, 
halting on the north side of the street, the right resting on Hawkes 
Street and the left on Faquier Street. Night came on and the 
men were quartered in the houses in that vicinity, but were al- 
low^ed no fires. Some of the men went down cellar and, darken- 
ing the windows, fried cakes made out of flour they found in 
the house, for supper. Some of these cakes were fearfully and 
wonderfully made, but they were an improvement upon hard- 
tack and salt pork. At night man}- of the men rested in beds 
with one or two comrades, the first they had occupied since they 
left Connecticut. 




Caroline Street, where the Fourteenth rested December 13, 1862. 



The morning of the 13th was foggy and the position of the 
enemy could not be seen nor our own guns on the opposite- side 
of the river. It was generally rumored in the regiment that it 
would be the Second Brigade that would first attack the strong- 
hold of the Confederates. This was no mistake. About nine 
o'clock the regiment was suddenly ordered to fall in and obeyed, 
leaving their half cooked salt beef on the fire. They marched 
to Princess Anne Street and halted between the church and 
court house, the former of which was used as a hospital and the 



82 



Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 



latter as a signal station. The officer in charge of this signa^ 
station was Lieutenant Frederick Fuller of the I32d Pennsyl- 
vania Regiment, now of the Second Brigade. This was a con- 
spicuous mark for the Confederate gunners, one of the upright 
posts that held the belfry having been knocked out already. It 
was gratifying to see the faithfulness with which this otficer did 
his dutv in such perilous sittiation. Backward au'! forward, u]) 







The Church and Signal Tower, Princess Anne Street, Fredericksburg. 



and down, like a music master's ]:)aton did this red signal wave. 
The men of the regiment watching its movement.s in the ^|uaint 
old belfry, sixt_\' feet from the ground, with anxious interest, for 
they well knew that it would in time give in its own language the 
order, forward. 

The regiment was here ordered to prime and fix bayonets. 
Shells came crashing down into the city, tearing down brick 



The Battle of Fredericksburg 



83 



walls and scattering death and destruction around. On- would 
fall amid a group of men, burst with noise, and in a few moments 
pale and mangled forms with bloody garments would be carried 
bv in silence. The regimental officers here dismounted and sent 
their horses back over the river. At noon "Forward Fourteenth" 
was again the word and they moved down the street, some times 
on the double quick, to the depot, turning square to the right 
on to one of the only two bridges b\- which they could cross the 
canal and gain the plain in front of the enemy's position. The 



K.4ii> 



M 










r 


u 


O; 


m^ 


IJLh 


-^. J 


mm 


■HIM 




iAH^ 






m^^kt§H^ 


^ 


Pi#*^^ 


mm 


PSPSfff^ 


ffwprr'.*^^ 




i 



Old Depot. 



firing of a dozen rebel guns came to a focus on each of these two 
points. Lieutenant-Colonel Perkins ran on foot at the head of 
the regiment cheering the men by his voice and example. The 
path was narrow and uneven and the ranks a little disordered. 
Across the causeway they tiled and to the right near a stone wall, 
behind which a number of wounded lay. Some of the faces 
were already white with the strange pallor of death though it 
was but so lately that the fight had commenced. Still on and 
on, out into the open field under the full fire of the enemy's guns. 



o4 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Here the reg-iniental line was reformed and the men ordered 
to lie down. While lyins^ here several shells burst directly over 
the left wing of the regiment, causing much suflfering in their 
ranks. By some mistake the regiment had formed in the rear 
of another regiment and accordingly the Fourteenth had to about 
face, march back a few rods, face to the front, and then lie down 
again. Some of the men of the other regiments jeered think- 
ing the Fourteenth was in retreat, but they were simply obeying 
orders and the regiment showed much steadiness under such a 
heavy fire. Soon the order came to rise and move forward 
again on the double-quick. This brought the regiment to the 
very front just under the heights occupied by the enemy's ar- 
tillery and very close to the sunken road in which were posted 
the rebel infantry. 

Chaplain H. S. Stevens in his "Souvenir of the Fourteenth 
Regiment" says concerning this moment: — "Into a 'slaughter 
pen' indeed, were the men going, but with brave hearts they 
pushed forward, the officers cheering them on. Soon they filed 
to right by a half wheel, for this road was far to the left of the 
point to be charged, until the line came under the partial shelter 
of a slight mound, and formed on the left of Andrews. One 
or two changes having been made here to conform lines to posi- 
tions, instructions were given the men to lie close until ordered 
up. The guns on Taylor's Hill fairly enfiladed the position do- 
ing deadly work, particularly at the left of the regiment, as they 
did in the loth New York near. It was a moment when men's 
hearts are striken with a dreadful expectancy, for the outlook 
was horrible. Kimball's veterans were ordered on, and bracing 
for the fray, they made their straight, fierce rush at the stone 
wall, only to be hurled back by the leaden storm flung out at them 
by tiers of musketry as barks are beaten back by raging gales. 
Then Andrew's brave fellows were ordered up to the charge to 
meet a similar fate. There was a rush, a cheer, a crash of nius- 
ketry with a tempest of bullets driven straight at their breasts, 
and the lines dissolved, stragglers or clusters firing here and 
there, but chiefly dropping upon the ground to be exposed as 
little as possible. Then the Second Brigade was ordered 'up 



The Battle of Fredericksb 



urg. 



85 



and at 'em'. Ah, that charge! A few rods brought the Hne 
to the flat ground (hrectly in front of the old 'Fair Grounds', in- 
dicated at that time by some remaining tall posts and some high 
boards clinging here and there to the rails. Here Colonel Per- 
kins shouted his last command to the Fourteenth. He dashed 
ahead and his brave boys followed. A few rods over ground 
every foot of wh.ich was lashed by artillery, and the leveled guns 
on the direful wall coolly waiting spoke out in unison terrific." 




The Sunken Road in front of the Confederate position. 



Who can dei^ict the horrors of that scene? What language 
can adequately ])()rtray the awful carnage of that hour' The 
belching of two hundred pieces of artillery seemed to lift the 
earth from its foundation, shells screeched and burst in the air 
among the men as if possessed with demons and were seeking 
revenge, the shot from tens of thousands of musketry fell like 
rain drops in a summer shower, brother saw brother writhing in the 
agony of mortal wounds and could oiTer no succor, comrade ' 
saw comrade with whom he had marched shoulder to shoulder 



86 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

in the wearisome marches or shared the meao:er food on then- 
cheerless bivonac, still in death. Men fell like pins in an alley 
before the well aimed hall of a skillfnl bowler. 

To still fnrther quote from Chaplain Stevens : — ■'Ut)wn went 
Colonel Perkins, the leader, down went Major Clark, Captain 
Carpenter and Lieutenant Hawley. Ca])tain Gibbons and Lieu- 
tenants Stanley and Comes went down with mortal wounds and 
Lieutenant Canfield was killed outriiiht. ( )ther officers were 
slighth' wounded and Sers:;'eants Fiske and h\)ot received fright- 
ful wounds ; and so fell Color-l)earer Dart and hosts of good men 
of the rank and tile. ( )n i)ressed the rest as though thinking 
to encompass victory by their daring, reaching to withni one 
hundred and fifty yards or less of the wall, when, hopeless of 
success, most dropped beside the huge fence posts or into little 
hollows for slight protection and to use their guns as best they 
might against the foe. While l\ing l)y one of these posts. Ser- 
geant Dart and Corporal Sx-monds of Company D received fear- 
ful face wounds. A shell struck the ground near them and ex- 
ploded. A fragment tore off most of the face of Dart, fright- 
fully disfiguring him for life, and the shar]) saTid was driven into 
the eveballs of Symonds, quenching light there forever. Ser- 
geant Lyman of the same company was lying close by these wdien 
they were hurt Init strangely escaped harm, and with others put in 
som.e.goo'd work with the rifle. This was to our division the 
real end, and it p'ractically dropped out of the fight for the day." 

Major Hincks relates an incident in regard to Sergeant Foote 
of Company I. "A bullet, 1 am told, struck his cartridge-box 
spilling his cartridges, but he caught one as it fell and gaily ram- 
med it home; a second shot ])ierced his canteen when he raised 
it to his mouth and drank froiu the escaping water through the 
bullet hole ; a third time he was not so fortunate for a bullet struck 
his leg rendering amputation necessary and making him a cripple 
for life." 

Alajor Hincks further says: — "Losing track of our regiment, 
Fred ( Doten ) and I went forward again, but found it harder 
work than the first time. Behind a mound nearly up to the front 
we found Colonel Palmer of the io8th New York, sitting, who 



The Battle of Fredericksburg. 



87 



had been in command of the brigade. He could not tell us 
where to find either regiment or brigade, but pointed out to us 
a color on the ground near, which he thought had belonged to 
the Fourteenth. 1 partly unrolled it and on seeing the three 
grape-vines recognized it as ours and decided that it was best 
to confine our endea\ors to bringing this safely off the field. We 
remained b\- this mound for several hours and watched line after 
line of our trt)0])s go up again to the attack only to be repulsed. 
At length late in the afternoon we made for the rear, I carrying 
the color in one hand and my Sharp's rifie in the other. Near 




which the Regiment passei 



the railroad track we were joined by Fieutenant Sherman of 
Company G. The eneni)- were throwing percussion caps at the 
causeway and seemed to have the range very well for they fre- 
quently burst upon it with a hellish noise. At length we got 
safely over, but it was nearly ten o'clock before we fotmd the 
remains of our regiment. We spent the night as the previous 
one in one of the houses. Next morning I handed the colors over 
to Captain Davis, the senior officer present." 



88 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

The men of the regiment went back to the town either singly 
or by clusters and spent the night much as they did the previous 
one. 

Samuel Fiske ("Dunn Browne") says: — "A few torn and black- 
ened remnants of those fine regiments slowly retired to the city. 
The wounded were mainly brought off, though hundreds were 
killed in the benevolent task. The city is filled with the pieces 
of brave men who went whole into the conflict. Ever}- basement 
and floor is covered with pools of blood. Limbs, in many houses, 
lie in heaps ; and surgeons are exhausted with their trying labors." 

The days following, Sunday and Monday, the scattered mem- 
bers of the regiment rallied together and remained with the rest 
of the division in line by the water's edge. On the evening of 
Monday, the 15th, the regiment was withdrawn under cover of 
darkness and after a weary march through the mud, reached their 
former camp above Falmouth late at night, under the command 
of Captain S. H. Davis of Company H. ranking captain of the 
regiment. 

The following contribution was made by Major Hincks to the 
Minutes of the Regimental Society at its meeting at Hartford 
September 17, 1879: — 

"The regiment was badly cut up in the charge upon Marye's 
Heights, and Sergeant Charles E. Dart, of Rockville, who carried 
the State flag, was mortally wounded. Sergeant George Augus- 
tus Foote attempted to fill his place, but was shot in the leg and 
fell. His biographer. Captain Goddard, says: — 'After lying on 
the field a short time, he tried to rise, but was instantly fired upon 
again by the rebels, wounding him slightly in the head and in the 
hip. All the rest of that awful day, he lay still where he had 
fallen. Three times our men charged over him, of course tramp- 
ling on his wounded leg, while he. half delirious, begged them 
to kill him, to end his sufferings. But no one had time then to 
attend to one poor wounded fellow. That night he managed to 
crawl off to a little hut near the field, where some other wounded 
men had hung out a yellow flag. Here they lay with a little 
hardtack, and still less water, till the third day after the fight, 
when they were visited by a rebel officer with a few men. He 



The Battle of Fredericksburg. 89 

spoke roughly to them, asking, "what they were here for?" and 
two or three began whining and saying they "did not want to 
fight the South but were drafted and obliged to come,' when 
Foote coolly lifted his head and said, "I came to fight rebels, and 
I have fought them, and if ever I get well I will come back and 
fight them again." 'Bully for you' said the officer, 'you are a 
boy that I like,' and at once gave him some water out of his own 
canteen, sent one of his men for more water, washed his leg and 
foot and bound it up as well as he could, paroled him, and helped 
him across the river to the Lacey-house hospital. In fact, he and 
his men gave him a blanket, and cheered him as the wagon 
drove ofif." 

The State flag was picked up, not far from the famous sunken 
road held by the rebel infantry, by William B. Hincks and 
F'rederick B. Doten of Bridgeport. It remained in their keeping 
through the day and they brought it safel\- from the field at the 
close of the engagement. Sergeant Dart died at St. Mary's 
Hospital, Washington, D. C, January 6, 1863. The constitution 
of Sergeant ( afterward Lieutenant ) Foote was impaired Dy his 
wound, which was eventually the cause of his death." 

Corporal, afterwards Second Lieutenant, Charles Lyman of 
Company K in "notes of experience in the battle of Fredericks- 
burg" gives some interesting personal incidents. He says : — 

"Our regiment went upon the field by way of Caroline Street, 
the railroad depot and railroad causeway turning sharply to the 
right under a most galling fire, as soon as we were over the 
canal, which runs between the town and the plateau, which was 
the scene of conflict. After reaching our proper position in the 
line, W'C were ordered to lie down. On our way to this position, 
we passed three hay stacks, and I mention the fact here be- 
cause they will figure prominently in my story later on. While oc- 
cupying the position just mentioned, waiting our turn to 'charge,' 
we suffered much from the enfilading fire of a Confederate battery 
posted on the high ground far to our right. It was at this point 
that John Symonds and Oliver Dart received their serious 
wounds, and not at the far front, as stated by Chaplain 
Stevens in his souvenir volume. Symonds and Dart and I were 



90 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

lying side by side — Symonds on the right, Dart next, and I next, 
with a fence-post about four inches square between Dart's head 
and mine — not a huge fence-post as stated in Souvenir. A shell 
from the battery on our right burst near us, and an irregularly- 
shaped fragment, probably about three inches long and two 
inches wide, struck the ground in front of Symonds, throwing 
sand in his eves and permanently destroying his sight ; lifting 
from its ct)ntact with the ground it tore away part o( Dart's 
upper jaw and nose and struck the post directly opposite my 
head. Hut for the post it would have struck me in the right 
side of my head and probably produced instant death. 

When our time came to charge, and we moved forward, we 
had gone but a short distance when John Julian received his 
wound at my side. A little later Irving M. Charter was also 
wounded at m\- side. These are the only ones I recall who were 
woundetl while touching elbows with me after the wounding of 
Symonds and Dart. 

When we had reached our farthest advance and our charge 
had spent its force, and the renmant was falling back, our fire, in 
mv vicinit\- at least, having wholly ceased, I observed an officer 
come out of the Stevens house immediately in our front, which 
was the headquarters of General Cobb, who commanded the 
Confederate brigade occupying the road behind the stone wall 
against which we had charged, and apparently siu-vey the field 
now covered with our dead and wounded. My rifle was loaded 
and I took aim and fired without apparent result. I immediately 
began reloading for a second shot, but before I was ready the 
man passed out of sight — either into or beside the house — but 
almost immediately reappeared. I was ready and fired a second 
shot, without effect. A sawed fence-post about four inches 
square at the top was standing immediately in front of me, and 
as I was firing my second shot a bullet from the enemy struck 
the corner of the post, knocked a splinter ofif it, was deflected, 
and just passed my right side. But for the post it would have 
struck me just about in the stomach. ^ly man remained in 
sight and I loaded for a third shot. By this time a number of 
bullets came uncomfortably near me. To get a steady aim I 



The Battle of Fredericksburg. 91 

decided to rest my riHe on the top of the post, and as I Drought 
it to my shoulder a bullet struck the stock just back of the 
hammer, was deflected and passed over my right shoulder. Had 
tlie l)all not been deflected it would have entered m\' breast. Not- 
withstanding the incident I rested my rifle on the top of the post, 
took as deliberate aim as possible and fired. The man fell, and 
others immediately gathered about him. I turned and started 
to the rear, noticing as I did so that not a man was on his feet 
within many yards, probably two or three rods of me, and what 
was left of my regiment was at least a hundred vards away, 
llullets were flying very thick about me and 1 had no expectation 
of getting off the field alive, as it was fully three hundred yards 
to the nearest cover. I had not gone far when a bullet went 
through my haversack, which w^as hanging on mv left hip, 
breaking up the few hard-tack I had and punching a hole through 
my coffee and sugar bags. 1 kept moving at a fast walk, but 
had gone but a few yards further when a shell burst over me 
and T felt a heav\- blow between ni}' shoulders on my blanket roll, 
(six or eight inches in diameter), which, I supposed, came from 
a fragment of the shell. A little further on 1 was conscious that 
a bullet passed between my legs about six inches above mv knees 
and a hole in the skirt of m}- overcoat was confirmation of ttie 
fact. Nothing further ha])pened to me until I reached the edge 
of the plateau near the canal. Here T found an excavation into 
the side of a l)ank evidently intended for an ice house which 
had not been finished, onl_\- one side, that toward the enemy, 
having been planked up. This excavation, as I recall it, was 
thirty or forty feet s(|uare and afiforded a complete protection 
from the enemy's rifle fire. I had scarcely reached the place 
when I noticed Jerry Grady, a large muscular Irishman of my 
company (D), crawling in on his hands and knees and noticing 
me at the same time, he said "Thank God, Charles, you are here." 
I said to him "Jerr\-, what's the matter." He replied 'T've got 
it." "Where?," said I. "In my foot," said he. I removed his 
shoe and found in it a minnie ball, which had entered at the heel, 
passed through the entire length of the foot and come out be- 
tween the toes. The wound was a severe one, the bones of the 



92 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

foot, being badly broken and crushed. I bound it up with his 
handkerchief as well as I could, and at his request filled his clay 
pipe with plug tobacco and lighted it for him. While caring 
for Jerry, some one remarked to me "Your blanket saved your 
life." "How so," I said. "There is a hole in it," he replied. T 
removed it, and sure enough there was a hole, the extent of 
which I could not measure with my finger, so unrolled the 
blanket, and found in it a minnie ball, which had passed through 
fourteen folds of it. This then was the cause of the blow I had 
felt between my shoulders when coming off the field and 
evidently the ball had velocity enough to have carried it com- 
pletely through my body but for the blanket. I put it in my 
pocket, and now have it, more than forty-three years after I 
"caught it on the fly." 

During the remainder of the afternoon and until quite dark I 
remained in this excavation, rendering such assistance to the 
wounded — of whom there were probabl}- a hundred before the 
day was over — as the extremely limited facilities at hand 
permitted. In binding up wounds and stopping the flow of blood 
I used handkerchiefs, pieces of blankets, which I cut up for the 
purpose, and even the shirts of the wounded. I have always 
looked back upon the time spent in that place with great satis- 
faction, because of the comfort I was able to minister to the poor 
fellows who were wounded in all degrees, from simple scratches 
to the most ghastly lacerations. I may have saved the lives of 
some. — probably did. Though a boy of nineteen. I tried to do 
a man's and surgeon's work that day. 

As the nighi came on and the fighting ceased. I determined 
to get Jerry Grady to a hospital in the city, if possible. I there- 
fore got him on my back, with his arms around my neck, taking 
a leg vuider each of my arms, and started by way of the railroad 
station, the route by which we had come on the field. By the 
time I had reached the hay-stacks. I was so nearly exhausted 
that I was sure I would not be able to get him into town without 
help, and as there was no help to be had. decided to get up as near 
to a hay-stack as possible, placing it between us and the enemy, 
and make the night of it there. On reaching the place i found 



The Battle of Fredericksburg. 93 

the ground literally covered with corpses, with not a space among 
them large enough to accommodate two men, so I laid Jerry 
down and went within fifteen or twenty feet of the first stack and 
moved several bodies, making a clear space about six feet square, 
then went back on the field and picked up several blankets any 
number of which could be found scattered about, and made as 
comfortable a bed as possible in the space I had cleared. Into 
this bed I put Jerry, and then lay down beside him. Here we 
spent the night, and both slept some, I, more than he, because 
I was without pain, while he suffered intensely. Early in the 
morning I started for town by way of Hanover Street to get 
help, and as there was yet no truce for burying the dead, the 
sharp-shooters of the enemy gave me a pretty warm reception 
while exposed to their fire. None of them, however, made a hit. 
I first applied for help at a temporary hospital, located in a 
wagon shop, just in the edge of the town, but found no one there 
willing to go back on the field with me. Continuing the search 
further, for perhaps an hour, I finally found a man who was 
willing to take the risks involved and go with me. I felt then 
that this man had the true spirit of a soldier and comrade, and 
told him so, and thanked him as warmly as T could for his will- 
ingness to render a service of humanity, which involved real 
danger from the sharp-shooters' fire. Through the protecting 
care of a kind Providence, or the bad markiuanship of the sharp- 
shooters, we went to the haystack and returned with our burden 
without harm, though many bullets came uncomfortably near us. 
We left Jerry in the wagon shop where I had first gone for help, 
and after he had been made as comfortable as possible, I started 
off in search of my regiment, which after some time, I found 
near where it was bivouacked the night before the battle, and was 
welcomed as one come back from the dead. 

The next night I was detailed for service at our Division 
hospital, which had been established at a house on the street 
nearest the river, with large grounds about it, and several very 
large trees in the grounds back of and at the side of the house. 
The wounded officers were mostly cared for in the house, and 
tht non-commissioned officers and privates in the grounds outside. 



94 



Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 



When I reached the hospital I found my friend Gradv there, 
and up to that time his wound had received absolutely no attention 
whatever since the very rude and inadequate dressing I had 
given it on the field. It was now my privilege to cleanse it with 
soap and water and aid the surgeon in giving it such attention as 
the circumstances permitted. 

Of the many incidents connected with the night's service, I 
will mention only two. Sitting with his back leaning against one 
of the large trees was a rather frail but intelligent and refined 




The Division Hospital. 



looking boy. making no complaint, but waiting with infinite 
patience his turn for attention. I brought him a cup of warnj 
broth, a part of which he took, and looked the gratitude which he 
could only faintly express. A half-hour later I went to him again 
and found that the muster-out had already come to him and 
through tearful eyes I looked into the most calm and beautifully 
peaceful face that I had ever, up to that time, or have ever since 
beheld. That face is still photographed in my memory and 
whenever recalled has been a benediction. 

Well towards midnight a man was put upon the rude operating 



The Battle of Fredericksburg. 95 

table under a big buttonball tree in the yard, back of the house, 
for an amputation of the leg above the knee and I called to as- 
sist. My function was to sit on a cracker box opposite the 
surgeon with a candle in each hand, and by the light of these two 
candles the amputation was made. As it was the first amputation 
I had witnessed it was to me intensely interesting and what I re- 
member about it especially was the manner in which the surgeon 
handled the knife and the saw, and that it was a "flap" operation. 

In this recital I have endeavored to confine myself to experi- 
ences that were individual to me and were not common to others. 
What else I did during that dreadful day of December 13, 1862, 
and the two nights following is not here recorded. It is simply 
what every other soldier did who went on to that field of 
carnage." 

The loss to the regiment was killed, i commissioned officer, 9 
enlisted men ; wounded, 10 commissioned officers, 82 enlisted men ; 
missing, 20 enlisted men ; total loss, 122. 

The following is the official report of Sergeant-Major J. G. 
Pelton to the Adjutant-General of the State of Connecticut: — 

"Headquarters 14th Regiment Connecticut X'olunteers, 
Near Falmouth, Va., December 19th, 1862. 

Adjutant-General J. D. Williams, 

Sir : — I have the honor of submitting to you the followmg list 
of casualties in the 14th Regiment Connecticut \^olunteers, dur- 
ing the action at F>edcricksburg, Ya., on the 13th of the present 
month : — 

Lieutenant-Colonel, Sanford H. Perkins, wounded in neck, 
severely. 

Major, Cyrus C. Clark, contusion in side. 

Company A. Killed, Private, George Carlock : wounded. 
Corporal, Frederick Standish, in hand. Privates, David B. Burr, 
in ankle, John Hannagan, in wrist, slightly, Richard Wallace, in 
leg, slightly, Joseph Hart, in chest, slightly ; missing. Private. 
Henry Brown. 

Company B. Killed, Lieutenant, David E. Canfield ; wounded. 
Captain, E. W. Gibbons, since died, Sergeants, Horatio N. Shaw, 



96 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

in arm, severely, G. A. Hubbard, stunned by shell, slightly, 
Corporals, Henry A. Lloyd, in arm, severely, William H. John- 
son, in arm and side, severely. Privates, David B. Lincoln, since 
died, Daniel H. Otis, since died, Charles S. Brooks, in leg, 
severely, James H. Marble, in leg, severely, John E. Vanderwort, 
in leg, slightly, Joseph H. Hilliker, in eye, seriously, William H. 
Johnson, seriously, missing ; missing. Privates, Edwin Strand, 
D wight Wolcott, Enoch Wilcox, William B. Hilliker. 

Company C. Wounded, Captain, Samuel W. Carpenter, in 
foot. Sergeant, Henry L. Snagg, in leg, Private, John Mulville, 
in shoulder ; missing. Privates, Frank J. Percy, Thomas Farrell. 

Company D. Killed, Private, Edward McMann ; wounded. 
Sergeant, Oliver Dart, in face, severely. Corporal, John Symonds, 
in face, severely. Privates, Charles E. Dart, in leg, Joseph Hirst, 
in legs, severely, Jeremiah Gready, in foot, severely, Solomon 
Richardson, in leg, Martin McShane, in hand, x\ugust Gross, in 
side, slightly, John Julian, in foot, slightly, Irving M. Charter, 
in thigh, slightly ; missing, Privates, Martin V. B. Metcalf, 
Albert Town, John McPherson, Charles Fletcher. 

Company E. Wounded, Captain. William H. Tubbs, in neck, 
slightly, Privates, Emerson X. Bailey, in foot, slightly, James 
Maher, in hand, slightly, Henry R. Frisbie, in leg, slightly, 
Frederick Rappenheng, in arm and side, severely, Michael Cun- 
ningham, in arm and side, severely, Franklin Dwight, in leg and 
side, severely, Edward Riley, in arm and head, severely, 
Harmon Farmer, through the breast, severely, James McCor- 
mick, in leg, severely, George Bull, in foot, slightly. 

Company F. Killed, Corporals, Thomas Hart, Birdsey B. 
Beckley ; wounded, ist Lieutenant, Theodore A. Stanley, 
mortally, 2d Lieutenant, William A. Comes, in thigh, severely, 
Sergeants, Wilbur D. Fiske, in breast, severely, Elisha B, Booth, 
legs and ribs, severely. Corporals, Irwin B. Spencer, in knee, 
severely, George H. Lewis, in knee, slightly, Privates, James 
Swain, in head, side and leg, severely, John Manderville, in heel, 
slightly, Charles M. Norton, in wrist, slightly, Chauncey T. 
Parks, in shoulder and leg, severely, William H. Scoville. in 
wrist, slightly, Frederick B. Thatcher, in knee, slightly, William 



The Battle of Fredericksburg. 97 

Ashwell, in knee, slightly, Daniel Steele, in knee, and missing, 
Sylvester Steele, wounded and missing ; missing. Privates, John 
Cogan, Thomas Keogh, Chester N. Weslan. 

Company G. Wounded, 2d Lieutenant, Henry P. Go.idard, 
in leg, slightly, Sergeant, Nathan P). Clemens, in head, slightly, 
Corporals, Frederick Ward, in side, severely, Henry D. Knowles, 
in arm. Privates, William H. Morgan, in back and heel, slightly. 
George Stannard, in arm and side : missing, Privates, Edson 
Spencer, Edward Wilcox. 

Company H. Killed, Sergeant, Robert "Barry, Corporal, John 
Calkins, Private, John Minor ; wounded. Corporal, Erastus Per- 
kins, in head, Privates, William Glossenger, in liead, Robert 
Chadwick, leg and arm, Edward Mitchell, leg and knee ; missing. 
Privates, William H. Mills, Elias L. Jerome. 

Company I. Killed, Privates, William E. Norton, Nelson 
Hodge ; wounded, Captain, Isaac R. Bronson, in bowels, slightly, 
1st Sergeant, Edward L. Fox, in hand and hip, severely. Ser- 
geant, George A. Foote, Jr., in leg, severely. Corporals, William 
Douglass, in shoulder and hip, severely, William H. Seward, in 
leg, slightly, Francis S. Scranton, in breast, severely. Privates, 
William M. Cause, since died, Frederick Beardsley, in heel, 
Charles H. Derby, in foot, slightly, James Hearty, in leg, severely, 
Joseph Janot, in hand, slightly, James Langdon, in arm. severely, 
Andrew Murphy, in ear, slightly, Bernard Starkey, in shoulder, 
severely, Charles Simonds, in both legs, severely, Edison Scott, 
in hip, slightly ; missing. Private, William Mansfield. 

Company K. Wounded, 2d Lieutenant, Frederick B. Hawley, 
in foot, Sergeant, Junius E. Goodwin, in leg, slightly, Privates, 
William N. Carroll, in leg and arm, severely. Nelson J. Bement, 
in hand, slightly, Roland Rising, in hand, severely, Alfred T. 
Symonds, in leg, slightly, J. L. D. Otis, in head, severely ; missing. 
Private, Frank Laughlin. 

I am, sir, your obedient servant, 

J. G. Pelton, Sergeant-Major, 14th C. V. 

Captain Samuel H. Davis, 

Commanding Regiment." 



98 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Captain Elijah W. Gibbons, of Company B, was born in New 
York City November 9th, 183 1. He resided in Middietown 
nearly all his life until his enlistment, his occupation that of a 
cabinet maker and painter. He enlisted in the first call for 
troops May 22d. 1861, in the 4th Connecticut, which afterwards 
became the ist Connecticut Heavy Artillery, and was elected 2d 
Lieutenant Cocpany G. He held this position until May 6th, 
1862, when he resigned and returned to Middietown. When the 
new call for troops was made, he speedily enlisted a full company 
of the young men of Middietown. Henry P. Goddard, after- 
wards captain of Company B, says of him : — "A personal pride in 
dear old 'B' Company doubtless affects my judgment, but I 
think no survivor of the regiment but will agree with me that no 
company in the regiment, all things considered, ever looked or 
did much better. And this was owing to one man more than any 
other, and that man was Elijah W. Gibbons. He showed vvhat 
could be done and what should should be done for men, and 
officers and men should alike bless his memory. From the time 
the regiment left Hartford until his mortal wound, he was never 
absent from his company a day. He led them gallantly at Antie- 
tam, where, by a quick flank movement of his company, he en- 
abled the regiment to capture a large posse of rebels in the 
famous Roulette house. At Fredericksburg he was advancing 
courageously with the regiment when a rebel ball shattered his 
thigh, and he fell. He was picked up by the men who loved him 
so dearly, and conveyed to the Falmouth side of the river, where 
he lingered in great suffering, but sweet resignation, for six days, 
until the 19th of December, when he died." His body was in- 
terred with militar}- honors, but subsequently removed to Middle- 
town. 

Second Lieutenant William A. Comes was born near Danbury, 
about 1836. He was a stone cutter in New Haven at the time 
of his enlistment, June 12th, 1862, as a quartermaster-sergeant 
of the Fourteenth and was commissioned a second lieutenant 
September 17th, 1862, and was assigned to Company F. He 
began to study enthusiastically the duties of his position which 
he had partially accomplished when he was terribly wounded in 



The Battle of Fredericksburg. 99 

the groin at the charge at Fredericksburg. Limping back to the 
hospital, unmindful of his own injuries, he met his nearest friend. 
Drum-Major John McCarthy, who called a surgeon and adi.ii.is- 
tered to him many comforts. All hopes by his friends for his 
recovery were blasted by his death December 21st, 1862. Cap- 
tain Goddard said :- — "I can testify that he was a pure and honest 
man. Not brilliant or dashing, he was faithful and anxious to 
do well whatever was set him to do." 

First Lieutenant Theodore A. Stanley was a native of New 
Britain, being born July 22, 1833. He went to New York to 
learn the mercantile business, remaining until he was 2T,, when 
he returned home to take charge of an important manufactiirmj; 
business. He sacrificed all business interests and devoted his 
energy to the organization of Company B. He was chosen 
second lieutenant. Stanley distinguished himself at Antietam 
by his coolness in the discharge of his duties. Captain Blinn of 
that company being killed in the engagement, First Lieutenant 
Moore was chosen captain and Stanley was chosen first lieu- 
tenant. Captain Goddard says : — "At the battle of Fredericks- 
burg, he was in command of his company (the captain being on 
detached service at the time), and led his men in that grand 
charge on the rebel batteries on Marye's Heights, when the 
storm of shot and shell, grape and canister, blackened the air for 
hours. In this charge Lieutenant Stanley fell mortally wounded 
by a musket ball through the lungs. While being carried back 
to the city, in expectation of immediate death, he told his com- 
rades to leave him on the field and take care of themselves. But 
he survived to be removed across the river, and afterward to 
Armory Square Hospital, at Washington, where, after eighteen 
days of suffering, much of which was intense, yet which could 
not shake his faith in the Savior in whom he believed, his life 
ebbed out with the dying year, on the 31st of December, 1862. 
His body was removed to New Britain and buried with military 
honors." Lieutenant Stanley was very quiet and reticent with 
strangers, and was not well known to many in the regiment, but 
his colonel truly said : — "He was always found to the front, and 
the officers and men of his own company testifv to his uniform 
regard for their comfort and welfare." 



1 00 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Second Lieutenant David E. Canfield, of Company B, was a 
native of New Jersey and was twenty-three years of age at the 
time of his enHstment. He Hved for several years in Middletown 
and then removed to New Haven, where the call for the Four- 
teenth aroused his patriotism, when he went to Middletown and 
enlisted in Company K. Before the regiment left the state he 
was made ist sergeant of his company and November nth was 
promoted to be 2d lieutenant of B Company. He was very much 
beloved by the company as he had been by the members of Com- 
pany K before. Captain Goddard says in his "Memorial of De- 
ceased Officers of the Fourteenth Regiment" : — "The night of 
December 12th. 1862. Lieutenant Canfield, Captain Gibbons, 
Captain (then Lieutenant) Sherman, and the writer, occupied the 
same quarters in a shot-ridden house in the then just captured 
city of Fredericksburg. Never shall I forget the scene as Cap- 
tain Gibbons read us from an old Bible found in the house, till 
the flickering fire-light by which he read died out, and bidding 
us each good-night, he retired. Gibbons was in his sweetest 
mood that night, and Canfield made many anxious inquiries as 
to his views of life and death, and announcing his willingness to 
face the grim conqueror for the sake of his country and God, re- 
lapsed into silence. That was our last night together." 

The following are the reports of Colonel O. H. Palmer, Com- 
manding General of the Second Brigade, and of Captain S. H. 
Davis, commanding the Fourteenth Regiment, the former to 
Lieutenant J. W. Plume, Acting x\djutant French's Division 
and the latter to Colonel Palmer, commanding Second Brig- 
ade: — 

"Headquarters Second Brigade, Camp near Falmouth, Va., 
December 18, 1862. 
I have the honor to report that, pursuant to order, m}- com- 
mand was put under arms at 7 o'clock on the morning of Decem- 
ber II, instant, and proceeded to a point on the railroad 
opposite the city of Fredericksburg, for the purpose of crossing 
th^ Rappahannock into Fredericksburg upon the completion of 
the pontoon bridges, then being laid for that object. By reason 



The Battle of Fredericksburg. 1 1 

of the delay in the completion of the bridges the command did 
not cross that day, but iMvouacked, as directed, near the place of 
crossing. 

On the morning of December I2, the command was again 
under arms at about 7 o'clock and, pursuant to order, :rossed 
the river at about 8 o'clock in the morning into Fredericksburg. 
During the day the command remained under arms in the streets 
of the city, and were cantoned in the vacant houses and buildings 
during the night of the 12th. On the morning of the next day, 
the 13th, the command was again put under arms, and at about 
10 o'clock moved forward as directed, following the Third 
Brigade to the front, leaving the town by way of the railroad 
depot, and formed in line of battle in front of the enemy's in- 
trenchments, 150 yards in rear of the Third Brigade. After 
leaving the city, and upon filing to the right, to pass through the 
depot, the fire of the enemy was very severe. Their guns ap- 
peared to have the exact range of this passage, and the prompt- 
ness and firmness of the troops in making this passage, and 
forming in order under such a fire in front, and also a severe 
cross fire from the enemy's guns on the right, was highly credit- 
able to their firmness and bravery. After forming in line of 
battle, the command remained in position about twenty minutes, 
and was then ordered to advance in line of battle upon the 
enemy's works, and the advance was made in order at double- 
quick in the face of a terrible fire ; but it was found impossible 
to dislodge the enemy from their position. In fact the fire 
of our troops could not be made effective, but that of the enemy 
was terribly efifective. After sustaining this fire until their 
ammunition was exhausted, and until other troops were ordered 
forward to their relief, they were ordered to fall back. Part of 
the command, however, remained on the field until nearly dark. 

The conduct of the officers and men was highly commendable. 
It pains me, however, to report that Colonel Henry I. Zinn, of 
the One Hundred and Thirtieth Pennsylvania Volunteers, a 
brave and gallant officer and a noble man, was killed early in the 
engagement by a musket-ball while fearlessly cheering on his 
men. I regret also to report that Lieutenant-Colonel Sanford 



102 Fourteenth Regiment, j^C. V. Infantry. 

H. Perkins, in comniand of the Fourteenth Connecticut V'ohin- 
teers. a brave and fearless officer, was severely wounded in the 
neck by a musket-ball while nobly discharging his duty at the 
head of his regiment, and had to be carried from the lield. 
Major Cyrus C. Clark, of the Fourteenth Connecticut \"olun- 
teers, a brave officer, was also wounded in the side by a shell 
while making the passage to the field, but it is believed not seri- 
ously. 

In addition to the foregoing, 3 commissioned officers were 
killed and 13 wounded. Privates, killed, 16; wounded, 192; 
missing, not known whether killed or wounded, 64. 

On the night of the 13th, my command was again cantoned 
in the city, and on the morning of December 14th, was marched 
to the rear of the town, on the west side of the river, and re- 
mained there under arms and in bivouac until 8 o'clock on the 
evening of the 15th, at which time it was luarched, as ordered, 
to its present camp near F"almouth. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

( ). H. Palmer, 
Colonel, Coiumanding Second Brigade. 
Lieutenant J. W. Plume, 
Acting-Assistant xA.djutant-Cieneral, French's (Third) Division." 

"Near Falmouth, A'a., December 18, 1862 
Colonel : I have the honor, in accordance with orders received 
today, to submit the following report of the participation of the 
Fourteenth Regiment in the events from the loth to the 15th of 
the present month. 

We received marching orders on the night of the loth and the 
next morning at six o'clock marched to a position in front of 
Fredericksburg. Remained there under arms during the day, 
bivouacked at night, and on the morning of the 12th, crossed 
the river and lay under the fire of the enemy that day in one of 
the streets of the city. About 10 A. AI. on the 13th, the regiment 
was placed under arms, and, after some delays, moved at a 
double-quick out to the front as soon as practicable. We forn-ed 
in line of battle, and lav down to wait for orders. We were ex- 



The Battle of Fredericksburg. 103 

posed here to a very severe cross-fire of artillery, which proved 
very destructive. After two or three efforts, we finally snr 
ceeded in gaining the front of the fight — the men, cheered on hy 
their ofificers. moving up in splendid style, and with the steadi- 
ness of veterans. We remained under a terribly hot fire of in 
fantry and artillery until our division was relieved, when we 
marched ofif the field, bringing off most of our dead and wounded. 
Too much praise cannot be bestowed u])on our gallant Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel, who led us, standing in the very front of the 
fight till he fell severely wounded, and inspiring all witn uinv 
courage and steadiness. The entire regiment, both officers and 
men, are worthy of all praise for their bearing in battle, and to 
single out special instances for enconium would be injustice to all. 
The report of the casualties in the command I have already for- 
warded. 

Respectfully your obedient servant, 

S. H. Davis, 
Captain, commanding Fourteenth Connecticut Volunteers. 

Colonel O. H. Palmkr, 

Commanding Second Brigade." 







The Fair Grounds," where the Fourteenth charged. 




The Shore of the Rappahannock picketed by the Fourteenth during 
the winter of 1862-3. 



CHAPTER VI. 

The Winter at Falmouth. 

Who can wontler that the torn and shattered Httle remnant of 
the regiment went back to their camp near the dingy old town 
of Falmouth with bleeding hearts and depressed spirits? Five 
days before it had left cam]), since which time how much had 
been lost ! I'he men had seen the cause for which they had 
taken their lives in their hands, left their homes wnth all their 
interests, to defend and reestablish, thrown back and repulsed. 
In these dark moments when the tension of the heart strings 
was so intense as to be nearly breaking, they felt that their lives 
v.'ere being made the playthings of high officers in command. 
That they were sacrificed and imperiled along the wandering 
banks of the Antietam, through the blunderings of incom]5etency, 
and thrown against the impregnable intrenchments that skirted 
Marve's Heights bv obstinate stupitlitw Those indeed were 
dark days for the regiment on the h^almouth plaius. Tlie men 
moved about in the duties of the camp with sad hearts and de- 
jected mien. At every turn they missed many of the familiar 
faces of officers and comrades. Lieutentant-Colonel Perkins, the 
commander of the regiment most of the time since it left Con- 
necticut, had fallen from wounds, from which he never recovered 
sufficiently to take command again. He was an efficient officer, 
always being at the head of the regiment to cheer and encourage, 

(104) 



The Winter at Falmouth. 105 

and was dear to the hearts of the men. This was the .-.hadow 
which overhung the whole regiment. Every company met with 
its own peculiar loss. Of one it was the captain who was loved 
for his sterling integrity, bravery and counsel, another had lost 
the genial comrade who gave life and zest to the camp by wit or 
song ; of others it was the trusted lieutenant or faithful sergeant. 
Such a fatality had there been among the officers of the regiment 
that there seemed to l)e little form of organization and many of 
the letters to friends remarked "'we have practically no officers." 

The men began immediately to finish the log huts which they 
iiad begun before leaving for Fredericksburg. There was no 
roll call or dress parade. There was much sickness and the 
general feeling of despondency continued. Along some lines 
there was an improvement as there were rations of onions and 
potatoes isued for almost the first time since leaving Hartford and 
new knapsacks were distributed to take the place of the ones 
left at Fort Ethan Allen. As the hospital accommodations were 
inadequate and meager, the wounded did not receive proper care 
and doubtless many lives were sacrificed on this acount. Of 
the condition of these hospitals Medical Inspector General 
Thomas F. Perley reports to Brigadier-General William A Ham- 
mond, Surgeon-General of the United States Army. He says 
under date about this time: — "There is very general complaint 
of want of supplies necessary to the health of the soldiers and to 
the effective administration of the field hospitals. The supply 
table, substituted by the director of the Army of the Potomac 
for that authorized by regulation, is considered insufficient by 
regimental surgeons, some articles being in excess and others 
defici-ent. The regimental hospitals are very destitute of furni- 
ture of all kinds, and the surgeons say they can get none. At 
this time of year bed-sacks are indispensable and should be fur- 
nished. The surgeons say they can always get hay to fill them. 
The stoves provided for the tents are nearly worthless for the 
purpose. The supply of provisions for the sick and wounded is 
just the commissary's issue of government rations, and includes 
neither fresh bread nor fresh vegetables. There is no supply, or 
nearly none, of suitable articles of food from the medical pur- 



106 



Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 



vevors, as concentrated milk, farina, etc. The hospital clothing 
IS very deficient. Many men, lying sick of typhoid fever at the 
time the army broke camp to cross the river to Fredericksburg, 
left in post hospitals, were frost-bitten. 

I do not believe I have ever seen greater misery from sickness 
than exists now in our Army of the Potomac. In some regi- 
nients which have been long in the field, from which the more 
feeble men have been weeded out, and the numbers reduced to 




On I'ickL-t— Makiuy ColYee^ 



two hundred or three hundred men by casualties and disease, 
v/here medical officers have acquired experience from lorig ser- 
vice in the field, the regimental liospitals are tolerably comfort- 
able in their appointments. In these regiments, however, there 
are few or no patients in hospital, and the surgeons say they have 
very few supplies, such as are needed by sick men, and can get 
them only with great difficulty." 

Although Captain Gibbons of Company B was so seriously 
wounded at Fredericksburg as to make his recovery hopeless with 
the best hospital treatment, he survived in great suffering until 



The Winter at Falmouth. 107 

December 19th. Captain Gibbons was bnried on a pleasant hill- 
side looking- toward the rising- sun, just beyond the outskirts of 
the camp. Over this hill he had marched to battle, leadmg his 
command, six days before. It was a sad and impressive occa- 
sion to the regiment as well as to the members of his own com- 
pany by whom he was dearly loved as a soldier and a man. The 
men moving slowly with reversed arms behind the coffin, the 
v;eird and mournful dirge from the band and the volley of 
musketry over the grave all were different from the ceremonies 
the men were familiar with at home and yet seemed not inap- 
propriate. 

Captain Moore of Company F returned from Washington and 
took charge of his command. Sergeant E. H. Wade, speaking 
of Captain Moore's return has this to say: — "December 17th 
Captain Moore returned to the regiment. He had been sent to 
Washington a day or two before we moved over to Fredericks- 
burg, to get the camp kettles and other property belonging to 
us, and as luck had it was out of the last engagement, — for had 
he been with us, another noble officer would doubtless have been 
killed ; for all the regiment knows that there never was a fight 
yet, but what he always took the lead, and most generally quite 
a ways ahead. On arriving here and seeing only a little band of 
us left. — scarcely one hundred fit for duty, — his feelings over- 
powered him, and for a while he was completely overcome." 

On January 17th General Burnside reviewed the regiment in 
connection with the corps. The regiment numbered about two 
hundred effective men and eight commissioned officers, none of 
the latter of higher rank than captain at this time. Although 
Captain Davis of Company H marched the regiment back to 
F'almouth, Captain Bronson of Companx I, the ranking captain, 
assumed the comn-iand of the regiment upon its arrival. 

January 20th Captain Bronson read a spirited address from 
General Burnside to the regiment assembled upon the parade 
ground and then called for three cheers for the other side of the 
Rappahannock. The response to this invitation was not volumi- 
nous enough to have disturbed Tieneral Burnside if he had been 
asleep fifty feet away. It was a silent expression of the men's 



108 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

lack of confidence in their commander, a silence so intense that it 
practically fell into one of contempt. Orders had beeti given that 
the regiment should be ready to move the day previous, January 
19th, consequently preparations were made, extra rations were 
issued, and a great number of troops marched by the camp in 
the midst of heavy rain. It rained all day and all night until the 
little rivulets became brooks and the brooks became rivers, and 
the road for miles was choked with supply wagons, fast in the 
mud. There was mud everywhere, "trumpets sounded, drums 
beat, whips cracked, mules squealed and men swore." As the 
advance reached the brink of the river, they were met by the 
rebels on the opposite side with mock politeness, who offered to 
assist them in building the bridge and not to open fire upon them 
until they were fairly across, but as the artillery, pontoons, am- 
munition and supply trains were back stuck in the mud, they 
were obliged to decline the hospitable invitation, whereupon the 
Confederates j,eered at them and erected a large sign with the 
inscription "Burnside stuck in the mud." 

Finding it impossible to move the army, it turned back, jaded 
and bedraggled, before the extreme front had moved. It was in- 
tended the regiment should be the rear-guard and thus they 
escaped being participants in what has been known in the history 
of the rebellion as the "Great Mud March." 

Sergeant E. B. Tyler of Company B records the following of 
the experience of the regiment at this time: — "We had been 
spectators rather than active partici])ants in the mud campaign, 
although we had dismantled our camp huts by taking off our 
shelter tent roofs, had our knapsacks packed and stood all day in 
the rain that deepened and rendered still stickier the mud that 
Burnside's army was floundering through until finally the ele- 
ments conquered, the campaign suddenly and ingloriously ended, 
we reconstructed our camp again and passed the remainder of 
the winter in quietness as far as actual warfare was concerned. 
A new captain, Townsend, was sent to us with whom we always 
got along very well, although his prompt decisive way and some 
times rather abrupt manner often upset and disconcerted our first 
sergeant, Russell, whose manner was naturally slow and hesitat- 



The Winter at Falmouth. 109 

ing. Townsend was young-, high spirited, cool and brave in battle, 
and had too many genuine good qualities as a military man and 
officer for the men to regard him with anything but esteem. 
That he could not fill the place in the hearts of the men that 
Gibbons held was hardly a fault of his. Probably no man in the 
regiment could. Broatch, Lucas and Galpin, who had been pro- 
moted to the respective ranks of captain, first lieutenant and sec- 
ond lieutenant of Company A, often took a stroll through our 




MAJOR JAMES B. COIT. 

company street, talking and chatting pleasantly with the boys, 
interchanging news from home and inquiring after our sick and 
absent ones, and while these officers remained with the regiment, 
they never lost interest in the old company in which they first 
obtained their commissions, and every promotion that sent 
i-roatch and Lucas upward in rank caused somethmg akin to 
family pride in the hearts of our boys," 



1 1 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

A sad incident during the encampment at Falmouth was the 
death of two brothers, Francis and Frederick J. HolHster, of 
Chatham, Company K, who died within half an hour of each other 
and were buried together. They lost their blankets at Antietam 
and for three months had to sleep out of doors or crouch scantily 
clad all night long over a smoky camp-fire, from which exposure 
they died. 

January 31st the band of the regiment, always a favorite, being 
the best band in the corps, went down to army headquarters by 
invitation and serenaded General Hooker, who had meantime re- 
placed General Burnside in command of the Army of the Poto- 
mac. The regiment soon saw a great change in rations and 
clothing, with fresh bread every other day and plenty of fresh 
meat, potatoes, beans, peas and other vegetables. These did away 
with the regulation "No. g" and gave the surgeons a rest. This 
had a marked influence on the spirit and good feeling of the boys 
of the regiment. 

About this time important promotions were made of several 
officers of the regiment, ist Lieutenant John C. Broatch of Com- 
pany B was promoted to be captain, ist Lieutenant Fisk of Com- 
pany K was made captain of Company G, Acting Adjutant Town- 
send promoted from ist Lieutenant Company I to captain of 
Company B, Fred B. Doten of Company A to be adjutant, Will- 
iam H. Hawley of Company A promoted to ist sergeant, William 
B. Hincks of the same company promoted to sergeant and Cor- 
poral Charles Lyman of Company D to be 2d lieutenant of Com- 
pany K. Sergeant Hirst says of this appointment: — "There have 
been a number of promotions in the regiment and some new 
officers made, but only one from our company. His name is 
Charles Lyman, of Bolton. He is a good man and will make a 
good officer. After promotion, the officer is put in another com- 
pany, so as not to be too familiar with the men, which makes it 
unpleasant for both." 

During February the regiment received four months pay. 
Much of this was sent to friends at home, while other parts of it 
were used lavishly by the men and, as usual, had disastrous 
effects. About this time there was a complaint of liquor being 



The Winter at Falmouth. 1 1 1 

smuggled into the regimental camp. The sutler was a safety 
valve through which the money was let loose. Sergeant Hirst 
under date of February 5th, says : — "The paymaster came along 
yesterday and gave us four months pay. To-day army rations 
are not good enough for the boys, who are moving from one 
sutler's shop to another, liuying wooden ginger cakes, brandy 
(vinegar) peaches, and castiron pies. They are bound to have a 
feast for once, even though the doctor with his No. 9 is watching 
them." 

About this time Captain Bronson. commanding the regiment, 
was arrested because the regimental picket detail fell short some 
forty or fifty men one morning. Samuel Fiske, captain of Com- 
pany G, being the ranking captain, had command of the regiment. 

Sergeant Hirst speaks of the exchange of coffee and tobacco 
between the boys of the Union and Confederate armies. He 
savs : — "On a fine dav in the sunshine it is rather pleasant picket- 
ing the banks of the river and cracking jokes with the Johnnies 
on the other side. Some times we rig up a shingle for a boat, 
load it with coffee, set it adrift in the stream and watch it drift 
across to the opposite bank. How the Johnnies will watch it 
slowly drifting over and receive it like a long lost friend. They 
in turn will rig up a tobacco boat, and we take the same pleasure 
in receiving it. You can hardly realize that these are the same 
men who were shooting us down a few weeks ago, and may be, 
will be doing the same a few weeks hence." 

Captain Henry P. Goddard, who saw the bright side, has this 
to say of the winter at Falmouth : — "What a winter it was that 
followed in camp at Falmouth with no field ofiicers, and with 
Captains Davis and Bronson alternating in command of the regi- 
ment, for the former could not hold command a week without 
getting into some scrape that usually led to his being put under 
arrest. But it was no use to court martial him for his legal train- 
ing and his habit of getting the whole court on a spree the night 
before the verdict, led the judge-advocate of the division to say 
that it was easier to catch a weasel asleep than to convict Captain 
Davis. 

Ah, what punches FTed Doten used to mix that winter, as we 



1 1 2 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

gathered in each other's Sibleys ; 'When every officer seemed a 
friend, and every friend a brother." It was at some of these 
gatherings that Captain Lee used to give swan like imitations 
and that 'G' officers used to trot out Httle 'Uncas,' the stuttering 
teamster, as a spiritual medium, who used to go into trances and 
therein deliver addresses on didactic subjects, but who got mad 
when Lieutenant Fred Seymour asked him to take a drink in his 
spiritual not material character. Quartermaster Dibble used to 
say that when LIncas got mad at his mules he could swear in the 
most unspiritual manner without stuttering at all." 

The afifairs of Falmouth camp moved on through February 
and early March without any umisual occurrence. The promo- 
tions of the several officers we have mentioned had served to 
bring the regiment back to a more complete organization than 
when it returned from Fredericksburg. 

An exception to this statement may be made in the serious loss 
to the regiment of the services of Surgeon Philo G. Rockwell, 
the first surgeon of the regiment. The care of the manv sick at 
Harper's Ferrv, which has been noted, and the march down the 
Louden Valley to Falmouth and the stay at Belle Plain told very 
seriously upon his health and he was obliged to go home on a 
leave of absence January 5th, 1863. He was not able to return 
to the army and resigned March 8th, 1863. 

From the time of his joining the regiment, he devoted himself 
to the physical welfare of the men. Dr. Rockwell was of an 
enthusiastic, ardent temperdment and was ceaseless in his efiforts 
for the comfort of the men. 

He was appointed Surgeon-General of Governor Hawley's 
staff in 1866. In 1869 he established a sanitarium at Aiken, 
S. C. Dr. Rockwell was a native of Connecticut, being born at 
Norfolk in 1820. He graduated with honor at the medical col- 
lege at Pittsfield, Mass. He established a large practice in 
Waterbury, from which place he enlisted. He died in Aiken, 
S. C. February 4, 1887, his remains being taken to Waterbury 
for interment. 

March 17 the members of the regiment attended the cele- 
bration of St. Patrick's Day by the Irish Brigade. These festiv- 



The Winter at Falmouth. 



113 



ities in honor of the Irish patriot were unexpectedly broken into 
by the sound of rebel guns, causing Generals Hooker. Sickles, 
French and other high officers, who were present to view the 
frolic, to ride off to their commands in hot haste. At this time 
Captain Moore of Company F was in command of the regiment. 
The regiment became greatly interested in the annual election 
in Connecticut. Reports had been freely circulated in the Demo- 
cratic papers in the interests of ThcMuas H. Se\mo\u-, their candi- 
date for governor, that the Connecticut regiments, especially the 




SURCiEON PH[[>0 (;. ROCKWELL. 



Fourteenth, were sorry they had gone to war, were dissatisfied 
with the way it was being carried on. and would get out of it if 
they could. To offset these unfounded statements, the Four- 
teenth at dress parade March 24th passed nearlv unanimouslv 
a series of resolutions endorsing Governor Buckingham. There 
was general rejoicing upon receipt of the news that Governor 
Buckingham had been reelected. 



1 1 4 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

April Tst. was dul}- celebrated by the reg-iment. At about half 
past two. while the men were sleeping quietly, they were aroused 
and marched to the parade ground, formed line of battle and 
awaited orders. It was intensely cold and after several hours 
thev were marched back, reaching their tents about daylight. 

On Sunday, April 5th, President Lincoln reviewed the Army 
of the Potomac on a Inroad plain about four miles from the camp. 
Although the occasion was one of great interest, moment and pride 
to the members of the regiment some of them were not able to 
])\:t on dress suits for the occasion. We cannot forbear quoting 
from Sergeant Hirst upon this subject. He says: — "The other 
dav I was detailed with a squad to go on picket near the Lacy 
house, and arrived there at seven o'clock A. M. We were not 
relieved until ten o'clock the next day when we were marched 
about four miles out of our way to take part in a big review iri 
honor of President Lincoln. I had seen him once before at 
Harper's Ferry and was rather pleased at the opportunit\- of see- 
ing him again. There was some swearing at the long march 
before us after being on duty twenty-seven hours, jiart of the time 
in the cold and ]iart over a smoky fire, but there was no helr> for 
it, to the review we nnist go at once. The whole Army of die 
Potomac was there, dressed in its best bib and tucker, witii their 
arms shining like burnished silver, while we were dirty, sleepy and 
ragged. Just look at us with our overcoats and knapsacks on, 
our blankets in a coil around our shoulders, a canteen filled vith 
water, a haversack containing bits of beef, crackers and poric, 
three or four cooking utensils, such as frying i^ans, tin cups, old 
tomato cans. etc.. hitched to various parts of our body. Of course, 
we were all well armed and some of us had axes besides. We 
were made into a division by ourselves, and T. with a gun on one 
shoulder and an ax. a five ]iounder. on the other, was placed as 
right guide to the division. After nearly the whole army had 
marched past and we came into sight, it was no surprise for me to 
see the President step a little nearer and wonder what damnation 
kind of men would come along next. However, if he. or his 
wdfe, or daughter asked any questions. I think the}' would have 
been surprised to learn that we were a fair sample of the army 
in light marching order, fust after we passed the President, 



The Winter at Falmouth. 1 1 5 

we were moved at doiible-ciuick time for a quarter of a mile, just 
to show what stamina there was in Old Hooker's soft tack. We 
got back to camp just before sunset, thorouohly tired out with 
our two days exertions." 

During April Lieutenant-Colonel Perkins visited the regin^e:t 
in citizen's dress, having been honorably discharged from the 
service for wounds received at Fredericksburg. He was heartily 
greeted by the men, who rejoiced that his wounds had not proved 
fatal. 

In George H. Washburn's "History of the (Jne Himdred and 
Eighth New York \'olunteers" he records a peculiar service for 
which the Fourteenth Connecticut and One Hundred and Eighth 
New York were called. He sa\ s : — "A few days before the move 
for Chancellorsville an incident occurred in disobeying criers 
in our division, which had been ordered out for drill and parade. 
Two nine months Pennsylvania regiments refused to complv 
with the order as their time was nearly out. Cencral b'rench. 
Division Commander, was constantl}' winking, and on a':count 
of this habit, was known as 'Plinky French.' ( )n this occasion 
his eyes blinked as fier_\- as the twinkle of Mars, and the French 
of it was, that the One Hundred and Eighth Xew York and the 
Fourteenth Connecticut were to proceed with loaded guns to the 
camps of the recalcitrant regiments, and bring them out. or 
shoot. They came without further dallying." 

On Monday morning. April 28th, orders were received to 
break camp and be in readiness to move. Tuesda\- morning they 
moved to the Warrenton turnpike in the vicinity of P.ank's Ford, 
where they camped for the night. Sergeant William H. Hawle\ 
was left behind from illness with about twenty others, who were 
afterwards sent to the Potomac Creek Hospital. 

In the afternoon of April 29th. the regiment hastil} jiacked up 
and marched, and instead of going direct to the river, marched 
about five miles further up, nearly opposite to United States Ford. 
The next morning they moved to the vicinity of United States 
Ford, where they halted for a few hours, making cofTee. during 
which time a pontoon was thrown across the river, and the regi- 
ment passed over about sunset, without a shot being fired. 



CHAPTER VII. 

The Affair at Chancellorsville. 

We left the regiment on the evening of Thursday. April 30th. 
after having crossed the Rappahannock on a pontoon near United 
States Ford, and bivouacked in the vicinity of the Chandler House, 
about three-quarters of a mile from Chancellorsville. This "ville" 
was simply a fine old brick mansion of Southern type surrounded 
by stately trees, amounting almost to a forest. It was about ten 
miles from Fredericksburg, with which it was connected by a 
turnpike, plank road and river road, the two former making a 
fork at Chancellorsville, and running nearly ]:)arallel toward 
Fredericksburg. The grounds about the Chancellor House, the 
scene of the battle, were low and swampy, and covered with 
patches of woods, with deep and thick underbrush, being almost 
impenetrable. There seemed to be little work for the regiment 
on this first da}' of the l)attle. About eleven o'clock it was called 
to arms and marched down the plank road to the Chancellor 
House, the headquarters of ( ieneral Hooker and his staff. Heavy 
firing along the front indicated that the Confederate forces had 
opened an attack. The regiment then turned to the right through 
a young growth of pines. There were no skirmishers thrown 
out and at one time it was discovered the regiment was in dan- 
gerous proximity to the enemy. After remaining here two hours 
the artillery fire seemed to slacken, and the regiment retraced 
its course, halted and stacked arms in an open lot adjoinmg the 
plank road on the west side. perha])s half a mile from the Chan- 
cellor House. There were in this lot the brigade, which seemed 
to be held in reserve, and several batteries of artillery. For the 
remainder of the day they were under arms and frequently had 
to fall into line in readiness to move to the front as the cannonad- 
ing grew sharper, but as often broke ranks again. In the even- 
ing the regiment was formed in line of battle on the extreme right 

and threw out pickets for the night. 

(1 16) 




COL. THEO. G. ELLIS. 



The Affair at Chancellorsville. 1 1 9 

After the wounding of Lieutenant-Colonel IV'rkins at the battle 
of Fretlericksburg. from which wound he was never able to re- 
sume his ])osition at the head of the regiment, the command fell 
v\Km Adjutant Theodore (j. Ellis, who was afterwards promoted 
to major, lieutenant-colonel and colonel of the hDurteenth and 
brevet brigadier-general. lie died in Hartford' January 8th. 
1883. aged fifty-two years. Previous to his enlistment he had 
been devoted to civil engineering, a [jrofession for which he had 
special qualifications and in which he became eminent. He did 
much for the Fourteenth Regiment, being thoughtful, accurate 
and intelligent concerning his duties, llis men never doubted 
his thorough devotion to all the i)i)siti()ns which he was called 
u])()n to fill. His manner was genial and friendly toward those 
with whom he had occasion to associate although his criticisms 
were often caustic, though just. 

(Jn the morning of the 2(1. the regiment was relieved and re- 
turned to the camp previously occu])ie(l. Toward nightfall a seri- 
ous charge by Stonewall Jackson on the extreme right of our line, 
which was farthest from the river, and was occupied by the 
Eleventh Corps, caused a ])anic and disastrous route. It was 
under the command of General < ). ( ). Howard. The generals 
had neglected to ])icket their front and the men of the division 
were busily engaged in cooking su])i)er in the dense thicket, hav- 
ing previously stacked their guns, when they were surprised by 
the enemy. 

Of the pandemonium which this panic caused (ieneral Ben- 
jamin Morgan said: — "The stam])ede of the b'leventh Corps was 
something curious and wonderful to behold. I have seen horses 
and cattle stampeded on the ])lains. blinded, apparently, by fright, 
rush over wagons, rocks, streams. an\- obstacle in the way ; but 
never before or since, saw I thousands of men actuated seemingly 
by the same unreasoning fear that takes ])ossession of a herd of 
animals. As the crowd of fugitives swe])t by the Chancellor 
House, the greatest eflr'orts were made to check them : l)Ut those 
only stopped who were knocked down by the swords of stafif- 
officers or the sponge stafl:"s of Kirby's batttery, which was drawn 
up across the road leading to the ford. Many of them ran right on 



120 



Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 



down the turnpike toward Fredericksburg, through our hne of 
battle and picket line, and into the enemy's line. The only reply 
one could get to argument or entreaty was, 'xA.ll ist veloren ; vere 
ist der pontoon?' Although the appearance of thousands of 
fugitives from battle, with ambulances, wagons, cannons, and 
caissons, all in a wild stampede, is apt to be very disconcerting 
and demoralizing to a line of battle, the troops of the Second 
Corps did not appear in the smallest degree affected." 

During this pandemonium caused by the fleeing Eleventh 
Corps, the attempt to resist it b\- the Union troops and the 




House at the pi esent time. 



demonstrations of the attacking enemy, the band of the 
FcLirteenth Regiment, which was n()w considered the best 
in the Army of the Potomac, did its most heroic worlc. We 
cannot resist copying Colonel Frederick L. Hitchcock, who gives 
a beautiful tribute to this band in his sketch of the One Hundred 
and Thirty-Second Pennsylvania Regiment, entitled "War from 
the Inside." He says :— "One of the most heroic deeds I saw 
done to help stem the fleeing tide of men and restore courage was 
not the work of a battery, nor a charge of cavalry, but the charge 
of a band of music ! The band of the Fourteenth Connecticut 



The Affair at^Chancellorsville. 1 2 1 

went right out into that open space between our new- hue and the 
rebels, with shot and sheU crashing all about them, and played 
'The Star Spangled lianner", 'The Red, White and Blue' and 
'Yankee Doodle' and repeated them for fully twenty minutes. 
They never played better. Did that require nqrve? It was 
undoubtedly the first and only band concert ever given under 
such conditions. Never was American grit more finely illustra- 
ted. Its efifect upon the men was magical. Imagine the strains 
of our grand national hymn, 'The Star Spangled Banner', sud- 
denly bursting upon your ears out of that horrible pandemonium 
of panic-born yells, mingled with the roaring of musketry and 
the crashing of artillery. To what may it be likened? The carol 
of birds in the midst of the blackest thunder-storm ? No simile 
can be adequate. Its strains were clear and thrilling for a mo- 
ment, then smothered Ijy that fearful din, an instant later sounding 
bold and clear again, as if it would fearlessly emphasize the re- 
frain, 'our flag is still there.' It was a remarkable circumstance 
that none of them were killed. I think one or two of them were 
slightly wounded by pieces of exploding shells, and one or two 
of their instruments carried away scars from that scene." 

When this break of the Eleventh Corps occurred, the Second 
Brigade was hurried from its position in reserve to support the 
line, and leaving behind knapsacks and other impediments moved 
down the plank road at the doulile-quick, halting at the cross- 
road near the Chancellor House, for the violence of the attack 
seemed to have abated. In a few moments, however, there was 
terrific firing on the Orange Court House road to the right, and 
the men were hurried in that direction for a quarter of a mile 
on the run and turning ofif on the right of the road, formed in 
line of battle in the woods facing the west. It was now dark 
and the enemy ceased firing. The position was changed several 
times through the night, the men resting on their arms. The 
Fourteenth was on the right of the brigade in the second line of 
battle and was unsupported on the right. At this point Com- 
manding Major Ellis sent 2d Lieutenant Lucas of Company A 
to General French to learn what was on their right. Lieutenant 
Lucas was sharply ordered back to his regiment, with the remark 



122 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

that it was "his Inisiness and he would attend to it." There is 
no evidence that he (Hd. 

Soon after dayhght on the morning of Sunday, May 3d., the 
only actual fighting by the regiment occurred. We will let Cor- 
poral E. B. Tyler of Company R, afterwards ist sergeant, tell 
the story of this part of the engagement. He says: — "The next 
morning, May 3d, the enemy o]:)ened fire on us from a compara- 
tively short distance in our front. Although we coukl see but 
little of them on account of the woods and underbrush, we re- 
turned the fire with vigor, thinking that even if some of the shots 
were sent in at random, they might do the enemy as nuich in- 
jury as their shots were doing us ; and their shots, whether b}' 
chance or otherwise, were constantly telling on our men. At 
this time there was evidently some mismanagement in die ar- 
rangement of our Fourteenth position, as there seemed to be an 
open unprotected space to the right of the regiment, while the 
1 2th New Jersey Regiment of our brigade, that should have con- 
nected with our line on the left of our regiment. overla]:)ped it, 
their right falling in the rear of our company. As the New 
Jersev regiment o])ene(l fire Com|)anv P.'s attention was about 
equally divided between the enemy in front and the friends in 
the rear. A movement of our regiment to the right would 
doubtless have been made had not the rebels evidently discovering 
a weak spot suddenly began to a])pear on (nu* right flank, when 
the order was given us to fall back, which we did in very good 
order, carrying our wounded with us and finally coming out of 
the woods at the identical si)ot where we had stacked our knap- 
sacks the night before. Any other regiment than the Fourteenth 
might not have stopped to get their knapsacks under the circum- 
stances, but we had had experience in losing knapsacks and in 
absence of positive orders not to resume them, we hunted up our 
own as quicklv as possible, and then leisurely and in perfect order 
still, went back and took up a new position some distance to the 
rear. The immediate advance of the enemy following us was 
checked bv Carroll's Brigade of our cor]is, who appeared upon 
the scene just in the nick of time." 

Sergeant Hirst says that he would rather have been shot than 



The Affair at Chancellorsville. 123 

to have fallen back at this time. In atten^jting to rally the men 
Captain IJronson of Company I received a bad wound in the 
shoulder and was carried to the rear. The Fourteenth retired 
to the rifle-pits where they remained until early Wednesday 
morning. During this time they were the constant mark of the 
Confederate sharp-shooters, but suffered no perceptible injury. 

( )f their retreat across the river and back to the camp at Fal- 
mouth Major Hincks has this to say: — "We had just gone to 
sleep Tuesday night when we were roused and told the cam- 
paign had been a failure, that the enemy had beaten us and that 
we must retire in jjcrfect silence to the other side of the river. 
Our regiiuent and those next us formed and stood in line for an 
hour or two in the rain, darkness and cold, waiting for further 
orders. Finally we were told to lie down again. At twelve 
o'clock we were again called and after standing in the ranks until 
nearly three, we moved ofif toward the river. Another such a 
journey in the darkness I hope never to have to perform. The 
road had only been cut through the woods the day before and 
every now and then one would strike his foot against a stub and 
go down headlong into the mud and rising hurriedly would go on 
again. Before long we ceased to pick our way at all, but went in 
through brooks, mudholes or anything, taking a bee line towards 
our journeys end. The ])ontoons were recrossetl about daylight 
and at about ten o'clock a handful of us arrived at our old camp, 
having come fifteen miles with less than one-half hours rest. 
The balance of the regiment kept coming in all day." 

Thus ends the part the Fourteenth took in the battle of Chan- 
cellorsville. While there were none killed, the regiment suffered 
largely from wounds. (/a])tain Bronson of Company I received 
his fatal wound, dying June 3, just a month later. The number 
of the regiment at this time was reported by Commanding Major 
Ellis as 2i(). The total number of wounded was 3 commissioned 
officers, 34 enlisted men ; missing, 2 commissioned officers, one 
of whom was Captain Samuel Fisk ("Dunn Browne") who was 
at the time supposed to be killed, enlisted men, 17. 

Major Ellis reports to the Adjutant-General of the State the 
course of the regiment at Chancellorsville and submits the fol- 
lowing list of wounded : — 



1 24 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

■'Company A. Wounded, Sergeant, Edward L. Hunimiston, 
in face, Privates, James H. Bartram, thumb, Charles H. Piatt, 
eye, slightly ; missing. Privates, David Farrar, John Kelly, Sam- 
uel Stone, George Bunyan, Patrick Moore. 

Company B. Wounded, Captain, James L. Townsend, side, 
slightly, 1st Lieutenant, Henry P. Goddard, head, slightly, Cor- 
poral, Henry S. Brooks, shell wound in leg. Privates, Thomas 
Capper, gun-shot in side, Cyrus Priest, gun-shot in shoulder, 
Austin Judd, gun-shot in hand, Edwin Stroud. 

Company C. Wounded, Privates, Edward Kilduff, gun-shot 
in shoulder, Leonard Merchant, gun-shot in hand, Charles Up- 
son, bayonet wound in elbow, slightly, Thomas Byington, head. 

Company D. Wounded, Private, Thomas Stafiford ; missing, 
1st Lieutenant, James F. Simpson, — supposed to have been taken 
prisoner. Private, John Williams. 

Company E. Wounded, Sergeant, Samuel Webster, arm, 
Privates, James Rogers, leg, John McDonald, knee, slightly, Ed- 
win Pierce, Isaac C. Barrows, Jerry Callahan; missing. Privates, 
Timothy Loun, Baltas Wagner, James McCormick. 

Company i'\ Wounded, Privates, Charles R. Bunnell, gun- 
shot in wrist, John ( larvin, gun-shot in foot; missing. Corporal, 
Henry B. Goodrich, Private, Reynold T. Moore. 

Company (i. Wounded, Privates, Ralph Thompson, gun-shot 
in hand, Levi M. Chapman, contusion by shell, Christopher W. 
Boone, gun-shot in ankle, Renslar (ioodale, gun-shot in arm, 
Richard J. Catlwell ; missing. Captain, Samuel h'iske, supposed to 
have been killed. (It was afterwards discovered he had been 
taken prisoner. Ed.) 

Company H. Wounded, Privates, George S. Edwards, side, 
Jeremiah Calvert, hands ; missing. Sergeant, Samuel N. Watrous, 
Privates, John C. Goddard, Amos Dayton, H. E. Hart. 

Company I. Wounded, Captain, Isaac R. Bronson, gun-shot 
in right shcnilder. Privates, luigene W. Dorman, gun-shot in side, 
Charles Kraft, gun-shot in arm, amputated, Charles N. Bartram, 
Andrew Murphy, toe; missing. Privates, Oliver W. Evarts. 
Michael Silver. 

Company K. Wounded, Privates, John Smith, Edward Rig- 
ney, gtm-shot in hand." 



The Affair at Chancellorsville. 1 2 7 

Of Captain Bronson, Captain Fiske ("Dunn Browne") has this 
to say in the Springfield Repubhcan : — "I must give some feeble 
expression of my sorrow — and that of the whole circle of his 
brother officers and soldiers — in the tidings we have just received 
of the death of Captain I. R. l)ronson of the Fourteenth, scirely 
wounded in the fight near Chancellorsville, on Sabbath morning, 
May 3d. He was one of the most earnest, honest and fearless pa- 
triots whose life has been sacrificed in this great cause. Tn camp, 
which is far too often made an excuse for relaxing the prmciples 
of morality and religion that are a restraint at home, he led a 
pure and Christian life. Where profanity and obscenity are. I 
am forced to say, almost the rule, and decent language the excep- 
tion, no impure or irreverent words came from his lips, nor, un- 
rebuked, from those of his men. Of a courage that never left 
him satisfied to be awa\- from his post when action and danger 
were before us, of an earnest patriotism that left none of us in 
doubt what were his motives in coming to the field, of an endur- 
ing fortitude that shrunk from no extremities of hardship and 
privation that came upon us, of a generotis and cheerful spirit 
that was an example to us all, he was a soldier worthy of our 
cause, a patriot without a blemish, a Christian that did not dis- 
honor the name, a comrade of whose loss I can scarcelv trust 
myself to speak. Since the death of the lamented Willard (cap- 
tain of Company G) of my own town and home, slain at Antie- 
tam, no stroke has come home to me, personally, so deeply. Noble 
Christian soldiers both ! A tear to their memory, and a lesson 
to each of us from their lives." 

The following is Conunanding Major Ellis" report to the Ad- 
jutant-General of Connecticut, which is the same as his report 
to the Brigade Commander : — 

"Headquarters Fourteerlh Connecticut Volunteers, 
Camj) near Falmouth, Va.. May 9th. 1863. 

Captain J. P. Postles, A. A. A. G., 2d Brigade. 
Sir: — I have the honor to report the following particulars res- 
pecting the part taken by the Fourteenth Connecticut Volunteers, 
in the late action near Chancellorsville, Va. This regiment cross- 



'28 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

ed the Rappahannock with the Second Army Corps, near United 
States Ford, on the evening: of the 30th of April, and at once 
proceeded to camp near Chancellorsville. The next day we were 
advanced about three-quarters of a mile forward south-east of 
the 'Chancellor House', but were immediately returned to camp, 
where we remained the rest of the day. In the evening, this regi- 
ment was formed in line of battle on the extreme right, and threw 
out pickets for the night. We were relieved on the morning of 
the 2d. and returned to the camp previously occupied. About sun- 
down of the 2d, we were advanced to the front, and formed to 
the left of (iordonsville road, near the "Chancellor House.' From 
this position we were moved along the plank road leading to 
Spottsylvania Court House, and formed in line of battle facing 
to the south-west on the right of the road. The regiment was 
on the right of the brigade in the second line of battle and was 
unsupported on the right. This position was somewhat altered 
during the night, but was substantially that occupied on the morn- 
ing of the 3d. About sunrise on the morning of the 3d instant, 
the first line of battle having been forced by a terrific assault of 
the enemy, this regiment became engaged, the enem\- appearing 
on our front and right flank almost simultaneously. We were 
forced to retire, principallv on account of there being no troops 
on our right to prevent the enemy, which had engaged the front 
line on our right, from passing through the unoccupied interval 
and attaining our rear. After withdrawing, this regnnent joined 
the remainder of the brigade and was placed behind rifle-pits to 
the left. Here we remained from the evening of the 3d. to the 
morning of the 6th, being occasionally under a slight fire, but 
meeting with no loss. About 2 A. M.. on the 6th, this regiment 
was withdrawn and recrossed the river to the camp. 

The strength of the regiment on the morning of the 3d was 21Q. 
\^ery respectfully, 

Theodore G. Ellis, 
Major Commanding the Fourteenth Connecticut." 











The Barn at Meade's Headquarlei s 

CHAPTER VIII. 
The March from Falmouth to Gettysburg. 

The regiment returned to its old camp ground near Falmouth 
for the second time, dejected and sad over another reverse of 
^he cause for which they were fighting. The only relieving feat- 
ure of the engagement was the mortal wounding of General 
^tonewall Jackson of the Confederates. His name had become 
j^ synonym of dash and daring, which was feared by the Union 
soldier. 

About the middle of May the old camp ground at Falmouth, 
which had been the scene of their winter's trials and joys withal, 
was moved about a mile farther from the river in a pine forest. 

While remaining here a practical joke was perpetrated on Chap- 
lain H. S. Stevens by some of the boys, who did not '^eem to 
have regard for clerical dignity. As was his custom, the worthy 
chaplain strolled from the regiment into the near-by woods, with 
a portfolio for the purpose of writing, and while lying on the 
ground, he fell asleep. Some light hearted young lieutenant 
placed an empty whiskey bottle on his arm. It was soon noised 
around the camp and many of the regiment went out to see the 
strange spectacle. Whether the chaplain was awakened by their 
presence or whether he had continued his nap to a legitimate 
conclusion, he soon awoke, and with becoming surprise, took in 
the situation. He was the subject of many expressions of con 
(129) 



1 30 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

clolence for his apparent departure from his usual course of rec- 
titude, for which the chaplain did not exp'-ess much thankfulness. 

It was the general impression in the regiment that they would 
continue here for some time, and the men were engaged fitting 
up the new camp as if such a proionged stay was assured. On 
the 28th of May, however, the regiment was ordered to be in 
readiness to march at thirty minutes notice, and to be supplied 
with three days cooked rations. They were not ordered to move 
until the 14th of June. Meanwhile the most rigid descipline 
was observed, furloughs were forbidden, and the men were not 
permitted to pass beyond division lines. 

Soon after sundown Sunday, June 14th, the regiment broke 
camp in silence, and started on the long march to the Potomac. 
They marched tmtil about midnight, when thev halted at Stafford 
for a little rest. Before dawn the march was resumed and con- 
tinued to Dumfries, which was reached about noon. The regi- 
ment was the rear-guard and the enemy was not far behind them. 

June i6th the march was continued, being a very fatiguing 
one, as the men were out of practice, the day very hot and no 
air stirring. At evening the regiment halted at a i)lace called 
Wolf Run Shoals, having come some twenty-five miles. Colonel 
Smyth, of the ist. Delaware, being senior officer, was in coi^.- 
mand of the brigade. Here at Wolf Run vShoals was stationed 
the Second Connecticut Light Battery. ?\lost of the men of the 
batter}- had been recruited at Bridgeport, the Ikmiic of many of 
the members of Company A of the Fourteenth. There were 
hearty greetings and a short time was spent by friend visiting 
friend. 

June 17th the regiment resumed its march, reaching the 
vicinity of Fairfax Court House that evening. Sergeant Hirst 
relates the experiences of the day as follows: — "It was a terrible 
day, the weather being hot and sultry. The roads were ground 
to powder by the thousands of men who had preceded tis, which 
made our progress very slow, and strong men wilted down as 
though blasted by something in the air. Being on the rear- 
guard, I saw several cases of sunstroke The ambu- 
lances were soon filled with used up men, while hundreds of 



The March from Falmouth to Gettysburg. 



131 



others had to be urqed along, as we were not allowed to leave 

one living man behind The highway was reserved 

for the artillery, army wagons and ambulances ; in the fields on 
each side of the road marched the infantry, covered on the 
flanks by skirmishers and light horsemen. It is strange how 
generous men become on a march. Do }ou want a ]:)ack of 
cards, a book, a blanket, a pair of drawers or perhaps an old iron 




JOSEPH L. PIERCE. 
The only Chinaman inlisted in the Arm}' of the Potomac. 



kettle? Xo, — down they go in the road. All along each side 
of the road are strewn hundreds of blankets, overcoats, and 
even pants and vests. Idiese various articles were made into 
piles and burned by the rear-guard as we moved slowly along." 
While encamped at Centerville, June 19th, the monotony of 
the camp was broken by the cleaning out of a sutler. Major 
Hincks reports this incident as follows : — -"This morning 1 wit- 



1 32 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

nessed for the first time and from a distance, the not uncommon 
spectacle of clearing out a sutler. The victim selected is usually, 
though not always, one who has inspired general indignation bv 
excessively high prices for his goods, and the manner of his 
punishment is on this wise. The guy-ropes that hold up his 
large store tent are secretly cut, the tent, of course, collapses, 
and in the general confusion the numerous and often apparently 
sympathizing bystanders help themselves to all the plunder they 
can conveniently lay hands on. This, of course, is sheer rob- 
bery, yet the sutler's business in many instances is not much 
better. The proper remed\- would be for the government to 
employ a man to furnish the troops at cost or a reasonable 
profit such articles as stationery, tobacco, underclothing, etc. 
Perhaps some of the chaplains could be made useful in this way." 

June 20th the march was resumed to Gainesville. An inci- 
dent of the march still remembered by many of the members of 
the Fourteenth was the meeting of a New York regiment, just 
added to the brigade, who appeared to have been well drilled, 
but had not seen service. Their uniforms were fresh and tidy 
and the men wore white gloves and standing collars. This con- 
trast with the tattered, worn and faded garments of the men of 
the Fourteenth, who had passed through Antietam, Fredericks- 
burg and Chancellorsville, and their long fatiguing m.arches, 
caused some of the latter regiment to jeer and remark that the 
starch would soon be taken out of them. The next day an 
officer in command of this dandy regiment made a complaint 
to Major Ellis that his men had been insulted by the members 
of the Fourteenth hooting at them and calling them white gloved 
gentry. 

The same day the march was over a portion of the scene of 
the second Bull Run battle, where the men were reminded of the 
engagement of the year previous. Half buried bones of Federal 
soldiers could be seen everywhere, trees were broken, and the 
usual amount of army debris that is left by a conflict between 
two opposing forces. Day by day and step by step the regiment 
was approaching the future memorable battle-field of Gettys- 
burg. 



The March from Falmouth to Gettyshurg. 1 33 

On the evening of June 24th the regiment camped at Gum 
Spring, in a severe rain storm, and remained here until next 
day, when they proceeded toward the Potomac, reaching Ed- 
ward's Ferry in the afternoon. After some delay incident to the 
laying of a pontoon bridge, which, soon after dark, the regiment 
passed over, and were again in Maryland. A couple of miles 
farther on the regiment turned into a wheat field about two 
o'clock in the morning, where, tired and jaded, the men slept 
until long after sunrise. 

The march was continued toward Frederick City, camp being 
made June 28th, within a mile or two of the town. June 29th 
the march was resumed toward Uniontown, a distance of thirty- 
two miles, and was the longest and most tedious march since the 
regiment entered the service. Many of the members of the regi- 
ment had kind remembrances of their reception at Frederick City 
on the march to Antietam, and were disappointed when the 
column turned to the right and did not pass through the city. 
About ten o'clock a small brook was forded, the men not being 
allowed to remove their shoes or roll up their trousers on ac- 
count of the delay it might occasion. This caused the dust and 
fine gravel to adhere to their trousers, which soon found its way 
into the worn shoes, causing many of them to become foot-sore. 
A halt of more than five minutes at a time was not made during 
the day. During the march the line passed through Liberty, 
Johnsonville and Union Bridge, and about ten o'clock camped 
near Uniontown, the men being very nnich exhausted. The 
citizens here were very kind to the boys, furnishing them with 
fresh bread, cherries, milk and other luxuries at nominal prices. 

A congratulatory order was read to the troops from General 
Hancock on their endurance of the march. It was during this 
tarry at Uniontown that the troops were informed of the change 
in commanders. General Meade having been appointed to suc- 
ceed General Hooker. For the fourth time during their service 
of ten months the regiment was destined to go to its fourth 
battle under a new commanding general. They had had ]\Ic- 
Clellan at Antietam, Burnside at Fredericksburg, Hooker at 
Chancellorsville and were to have Meade at Gettysburg. Con- 



134 



Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 



sidering" their experience in the three battles mentioned, can it be 
any wonder tliat they received the news with satisfaction? 

The regiment remained at Uniontown until the mornmg of 
July 1st, when orders to march were given, and they moved 
rapidly toward Taneytown, halting for a couple of hours, when 
thev moved forward and crossed the Pennsylvania line, con- 
tinuing until the\' reached a point within two or three miles of 
Gettysburg at alxiut eight o'clock in the evening. They heard 
sharp artillery tiring in their front, which indicated that the men 
would soon have work. Here we will leave them on the edge 
of this supreme battle-field of their experience for another 
chapter. 





The Round Tops. 



CHAPTER IX. 



Gettysburg. 



Elated at his successful retreat through the dilatoriuess of 
JMcClellan and IJurnside at Antietam, and his positive victories 
along the Rappahannock, at Fredericksburg and Chancellors- 
ville, General Lee determined to make his second invasion upon 
the territory of a loyal state. Doubtless this was prompted by 
pressure from the Confederate capital, which was as urgent that 
he should move on to Washington, as the authorities at the 
hederal capital were anxious to press the Union generals for- 
ward to Richmond. To do this it was necessary that Lee should 
disengage Hooker from the Rappahannock, and relieve the 
anxiety at Richmond. Consequently on the 3d of June, leaving 
A. B. Hill's Corps at Fredericksburg, as a mask to his moving 
army. Longstreet's Division marched to Culpepper Court House, 
and Ewell's Corps moved toward the mouth of the Shenandoah 
Valley. Hooker, aware that there was some movement of the 
Confederate army, was yet somewhat in the dark as to its pur- 
(135) 



I 36 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

posed object. He therefore sent Sedgwick's corps on the 6th. 
across the Rappahannock at FrankHn's crossing to make a closer 
reconnoissance, but as Hill remained in position, all that Sedg- 
wick discovered was that the enemy was in force. Stuart's 
Cavalry had been concentrated at Culpepper before the arrival 
of Longstreet's Corps. Hooker, becoming aware of this, de- 
termined to send his whole cavalry force to break up Stuart's 
camp. Accordingly on the 9th General Pleasaton was ordered 
across the Rappahannock to meet Stuart, whom he repulsed. 

This encounter disclosed to Hooker a knowledge of Lee's in- 
vasion of a Xorthern state. That the intelligence was startling 
and required decisive and energetic movement need hardly be 
said. To meet this emergency. Hooker threw out his right along 
the Rappahannock, while the cavalry still held the upper forks 
of the river. Lee upon reaching Winchester, and moving on to- 
ward York and Chambersburg, recalled the troops, ordering them 
to concentrate at Gettysburg. In breaking up his camps along 
the Rappahannock, FJooker moved his left and center on the road 
direct to Washington, following and covering the line of the 
Orange and Alexandria Railroad. 

Of the march of that portion of the ami)- in which we are 
particularly interested, the b^ourteenth Regiment, of the Second 
Corps, we have already spoken in detail in the preceding chapter. 

General Hancock, who had meantime taken command of the 
Second Corps, was summoned to assume the command of Gen- 
eral Reynolds, if he should be killed or seriously wounded, and 
to report if in his mind Gettysburg was a suitable place for 
battle. Hancock arrived soon after the repulse of the First and 
Eleventh Corps, and the death of Reynolds. All was confusion 
and chaos. Dispatching Major Mitchell of his stafif to General 
■Meade, he reported that in his opinion Gettysburg offered a 
suitable position for defense, although somewhat exposed to be 
turned by the left. 

' The battle of Gettysburg has been called "The Waterloo of 
the war between the states." True it is that here the cause of 
the Confederacy touched its Mgh water mark. It is not the 
province of this writing to enter into the details of the battle of 



Gettysburg. 1 3 7 

Gettysburg. It has always been a fruitful theme for the writers' 
pen. Its intensity, the surrounding circumstances, its sangui- 
nary character, and its final result, have always been a favorite 
study of all classes. Historians have written of it, artists have 
painted it, poets have sung of it, and military chieftains have 
studied it. We must, however, tell so much of it as will enable 
us to depict the part the Fourteenth Regiment played. Let us 
then for a moment look at the field. 

Looking westward from Gettysburg, the horizon of vision is 
bounded at a distance of ten miles by the range known as the 
South Mountain, which, running north and south, forms the 
eastern wall of the Cumberland V^alley. The landscape has a 
rolling and diversified surface caused by numerous ridges which 
run nearly parallel with the South Mountain range. The town 
of Gettysburg nestles at the base of one of these ranges. At the 
distance of half a mile to the west of the town is another ridge, 
called, from the Theological Seminary that stands thereon. 
Seminary Ridge. At the town still another ridge bends east- 
ward and southward in an angle formed by Cemetery and Culps 
Hills. Cemetery Hill is so called from being the burial place of 
the town. The distance across the interval between Seminary 
and Cemetery Hills is about a mile. The Emmettsburg road 
runs through this interval to Gettysburg, somewhat nearer Ceme- 
tery Hill. This ridge extends from Cemetery Hill about three 
miles and terminates in a high, rocky, wooded peak, named 
Round Top, near which rises a rough and bald spur of the same, 
which is called Little Round Top. The slopes and the interval 
abound in cultivated fields, with here and there patches of w^oods. 
These ridges have a favorable slope to the rear, afifording ample 
cover for reserves and trains, and a gentle undulating slope to- 
ward the west. 

We quote from Walker's "History of the Second Army Corps" 
of the general distribution of the forces on the second morning: — 
"On the morning of July 2d, the troops were disposed with 
reference to an anticipated attack from General Lee, at an early 
hour, as follows : General Slocum was in command of the right 
wing, which consisted of the Twelfth, Eleventh and First Corps, 



138 



Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 



occupying- Gulps Hill on the extreme right and Cemetery Hill on 
the right center. General Hancock's Gorps was designated to 
occupy Gemetery Ridge, forming the left center. The Third 
Gorps, under General Sickles, was to hold the left. It was Gen- 
eral Meade's intention that this corps should be stretched out 
toward the Round Tops." 

Returning to trace the movements of the Fourteenth Regiment, 




Position'of the Second Corps at Gettysburg-- 



it will be remembered we left them on the night of July ist., 
resting within two or three miles of Gettysburg. About ten 
o'clock the regiment was marched out to do picket duty along 
the Baltimore turnpike. Here the}- remained until next morning 
at daylight, when they were ordered to rejoin their brigade. Of 
this second day, ]\Iajor Hincks says: — "This morning the mist 
hung thick and heavy over the ground. We were recalled from 
the picket line soon after dawn and followed a narrow and 
rugged road which gradually ascended toward the front. After 
we had marched perhaps a couple of miles, we passed a little 
cottage, I think of only one story, hardly large enough to be digni- 
fied with the title of a house. This building was occupied by 
General Meade as headquarters, and we saw quite a number of 
horses saddled and tied to the garden fence. A few rods 



Gettysburg. 



139 



further on we turned off from the road to the left, and after go- 
ing up a little ascent, the brigade was halted in column by regi- 
ments on a grassy field or plateau of considerable size. In front 
of and a little to the right on slightly higher ground was a ceme- 
tery, on the further edge of which ]:)ieces of artillery were planted 
and troops stationed, protected l)y a rough rifle-pit or barricade. 
Immediately in front of us, when the mist had lifted, we could 
see across the plain the distant spires and houses of Gettysburg. 
A little in adyance of us and to our left, in a grove of trees, was 




Meade's Headquarters on Taneytown Roai: 



a battery of brass pieces, WoodruiT's regular battery, I was told. 
Here the line made a sharp bend toward the south, just taking 
in the farmhouse and its outbuildings, and extending toward our 
rear for a long distance until it was finally lost to view in the 
woods and mountains. We tarried in this field for the remainder 
of the day, the men keeping their accouterments on and remain- 
ing close by their stacks of arms." 

It was in this fieUl that an accident occurred, which came near 
costing Captain Coit of Company K his life, and deprived the 



140 



Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 



regiment iov a time of the serviees of a hrave and faithfnl officer. 
A drummer-l)oy. was mounted on an officer's horse, which he was 
taking to tlie rear. The horse evidently heeoming frightened by 
the noise of the tumult, threw the l)o\- to the ground, and plunged 
forward to wdiere the regiment lay. Alen got out of the way as 
rapidly as possible, and all succeeded, excepting Captain Coit, 
who was just rising in the act of drawing his saber, when the 
horse was upon him, striking him full in the face and breast, h 
was a wonder that he was not killed or, at least, badly disfigured 
but in a few da\s the captain was able to return to his reghnent, 
and afterwards i)assed through man\- of the prominent battles 
with it. 




The regiment remained here until ab(-)Ut four o'cl^^k, when 
it was moved about two hundred wards further toward the left, 
passing through an apple orchard and halting on its further edge, 
quite near the headquarters of General Hays, commanding the 
division. Here the regiment was placed behind a loosely con- 



Gettysburg. 



141 



structed stone wall, which commenced near the house and ran 
south for a mile or two until lost to sight among the woods and 
mountains. This was the ground occupied by the regiment dur- 
ing the rest of the battle. This arrangement made it face the 
west and occup\- the ground which had liccn filled by the New 
York brigade. In front was a large and gently sloping plain 
several miles in length from north to south, and perhaps or-e 
mile in width. At its opposite side was a thick belt of woods, 
occupierl b\- the enemy, behind which was a lofty range of hills. 
About miflwa\' of the plain were two picket lines. 




Hay's Headquarters. 



While the regiment lay here in support of Arnold's First 
Rhode Island Battery, heavy firing was heard on the right, ap- 
parently several miles away, the sound advancing and retreating 
as if the tide of battle swayed back and forth. Somewhat later 
there was also heavy firing upon the left. As darkness ap- 
proached, the scene was very grand and impressive, the ground 



142 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

seemed to shake from the thunder of the heavy guns, whose 
bright flashes could be seen. foHowed by loud reports. Gradually 
the firing grew less frequent and by half past ten ceased alto- 
gether and all was quiet for the night. 

Sergeant E. B. Tyler of Company B gives an interesting ac- 
count of the regiment's experience that night and the next morn- 
ing as follows : — "That night as we lay, our knapsacks plumb up 
to the base of the stone wall and pillowed our heads thereon, not 
being allowed to divest ourselves of any other arms or equip- 
ments, we sought for the rest and sleep we so much needed. 
Arnold's Rhode Island Battery just to the left of us finally 
quieted down, although I think we could have slept notwith- 
standing that, but when suddenly there rang out the volleys of 
musketry, the roar of artillery and the rebel yells of the Louis- 
iana Tigers over on East Cemetery Hill, every vestige of sleep 
was dispelled and every man on the qui vive for there is some- 
thing weird, mysterious and almost unearthly in a sudden night 
attack. Then came the clattering of mounted messengers, the 
clear ringing orders of Carroll, as with the First Brigade of our 
division, thc\- rushed across the cemetery to the relief of the 
Eleventh Corps and by their timely aid can be attributed the 
repulse and almost annihilation of the desperately attacking 
Tigers. 

On the morning of the 3d Companies B and D were ordered 
out on the skirmish line, with our reserve lying in the little de- 
pression of the Emmettsburg road. Those of us detailed to go 
out on the line crawled out across the wheat field to the fence 
bevond and lying upon the ground behind the posts and lower 
rails of the fence, began the sharp-shooters drill of the day. The 
space between us and the rebel skirmish line was open and clear 
in the main and the least showing of head, hand or foot was an 
invitation for a target of the same. One thing we soon learned 
and that was the puff of smoke from our rifles when we fired 
made an unpleasantly close target even when we were sure we 
were unseen ourselves. We were stationed two or three fence 
lengths apart and although we could hardly see each other, for 
previous to Pickett's charge the standing grain afforded consider- 



Gettysburg. 



143 



able protection from view, we occasionally spoke to one another 
on either hand for companionship or to ascertain if each was all 
ri^ht. A comrade, I think it was Hiram Fox, next to me on the 
left, said he had spoken to Corporal Huxam, who was next to 
him on the left, but obtained no reply. I suggested to him to 
crawl over to Huxam 's position and see if all was right. He did 
so and reported back that Huxam was dead, shot through the 
head. He had evidently become tired of l}ing flat ui)on the 
ground and firing through the lower rails, and risen up to a 
kneeling position and was aiming through the middle rails of 
the fence, a risk the rebel sharp-shooters had quickl}- availed 
themselves of, and not unlikely the very one that had attracted 
Huxam 's attention was the one that proved too quick for him and 
fired the fatal shot." 




Marker fm the lUiss r.arn site 



The regiment at this time numbered one hundred and sixty 
men, about forty of whom were doing picket duty in front of 
its line. Somewhat to the right and about twenty-five hundred 
feet away were the farm buildings, house and barn, of William 



144 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Bliss. Mr. Bliss was like many other farmers who give more 
attention to the architecture and pretentiousness of their barns 
than they do to their houses. This barn was a rambling struc- 
ture seventy-five feet long and thirty-five feet wide. It was a 
solid oak frame incased by a stone wall one story in height, and 
then of brick. It was plentifully supplied with doors and win- 
dows and hastily made apertures. It was indeed a vertible fort. 
It became known to the boys as the "bank barn," so called by 
having an earthwork driveway extending from the sill of the 
second floor and sloping gradually back to the level ground. 
The Confederate sharp-shooters were not long in seeing the ad- 
vantage of this improvised fort and soon every window, door and 
crevice showed the protuding muzzles of long range rifles ready 
to do their deadly work. During the later hours of the 2d. of 
July it was found that these rifles were picking oflf officers and 
men along the skirmish line which it commanded. Consequently 
the First Delaware Regiment was sent out to capture the build- 
ings and took the ground and some prisoners, but were obliged 
to return. Then four companies of the Twelfth New Jersey 
were detailed for the duty of capturing the grounds and build- 
ings. Thev charged in good style and captured them, taking a 
large number of prisoners and losing some of their own men. 
They were withdrawn after dark. On the morning of July 3d., 
about half past seven, five other companies of the Twelfth New 
Jersey again captured the barn, taking more prisoners, and re- 
turned again to the line. And again this military eelpot was set 
to catch a fresh batch of slippery Confederates. Finding the 
firing intolerable, especially to the men of Arnold's Battery on 
the crest, as well as those on the skirmish line. General Hays 
ordered the Fourteenth Regiment to capture the buildings "to 
stay." Captain S. A. Moore, with four companies of the regi- 
ment, numbering some fifty or sixty men, was sent down to 
capture the brick barn. To reach the barn was a perilous task 
and no man coveted the work. After passing up toward head- 
quarters and down a lane across the Emmettsburg road, it was 
then necessary to cross a field, a distance of nearly eighteen 
hundred feet. Reaching this field, they were given orders to 



Gettysburg. 



145 



break and each man reach the barn as best he could. In doing- 
this the desperate character of the undertaking was realized, as 
they were open to the fire of the skirmish line and the sharp- 
shooters in the barn, together with a flanking fire from the 
brigades of Thomas and McGowan located in "Long Lane," but 
such was the dash and the wild fury of the approach that the 
Confederates left the barn in haste, giving onlv parting shots. 
Captain Moore was the first to enter the barn and the Federal 
soldiers were soon in full command. Several prisoners were 








taken. The Confederates, however, took possession of the housr 
about one hundred and fifty feet away, and sheltered as best they 
could in that and the peach orchard adjoining, where from these 
two sources they continued the firing-. Some of the men were 
wounded in the run to the barn, and soon after they occupied 
the barn, a shell struck it, killing Sergeant Clements and wound- 
ing others. On the way to the barn Lieutenant Seward of Com- 
pany I was shot through the body and Lieutenant Seymour of 
the same company was shot through the leg. Finding that the 



146 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

capture of the barn did not remedy the trouble, orders were given 
Major Ellis to take the remaining four companies of the regiment, 
the other two companies being out as skirmishers, and capture 
the house. Leaving the colors and the color-guard at the wall, 
the route of Major Ellis to the house was much more exposed 
to the Confederate sharp-shooters' firing than was the first detail, 
but on they went, with a vim of determination which character- 
ized the men of the command. It was like dodging ten thousand 
shafts of lighting. They soon reached the house, but lost some 
men on the way. The Confederates left the house as precipi- 
tately as they did the barn, some of their parting shots killing 
Sergeant Baldwin of Company I, and John Fox of Company A 
was seriously wounded in the thigh. 

Things now began to look serious for the brave men who had 
driven out the Confederates, now posted in the rear. The house 
proved a shallow protection and most of Major Ellis' detail went 
to the barn. x\s there were no windows or opportunities to fire 
in the rear of the barn, it looked as if the men were at the mercy 
of the enemy, "in a trap and liable to be extenuinated." They 
had received orders to capture the buildings "to stay" and the 
faithful men knew no other course than to obey comtuands. 
Lieutenant Seymour first suggested to Colonel Smyth that "If, 
in the event of capturing the house and barn, the rebs make it 
so hot we can't hold them, shall we fire them?" Colonel Smyth 
at first gave no reply, but later gave orders to the lieutenant 
in such an event to fire the buildings. Lieutenant Seymour fell 
helpless, and the line rushed on, so that the order did not reach 
the men, and they, being in ignorance of the existence of such 
an order, held on in their beleaguered places. Later General 
Hays sent instructions to burn the buildings. Captain Postles, of 
Colonel Smyth's staff, was dispatched with the order to Major 
Ellis to burn the buildings. Captain Postles bounded off on his 
magnificent charger, going over the ground like a hurricane, 
fully aware of the dangerous character of his mission. He, how- 
ever, reached the barn, delivered the order and returned to head- 
quarters in safety. No sooner was the order given than the men 
proceeded to exegute it. The barn was set fire in different places 



Gettysburg. 



147 



and a straw bed in the house proved a convenient dispenser of 
flame. Then the men, taking up the dead and wounded, started 
back for the wall, running the same gantlet as when they went 
to the barn. They had done their work well and when they 
reached the Emmettsburg road both buildings were in flames. 
It is not to be wondered that such a gallant and perilous deed 
as capturing and burning these buildings, one of the bravest dur- 
ing the whole progress of the war, should be claimed by other 
regiments and companies, but to the honor and glorv of the 




The Monument on the right is that of the Fourteenth Regiment. 



Fourteenth Regiment must be credited this heroic deed. Fot 
several years after the close of the war there was a spirited con- 
troversy as to whom this honor should belong, it being finally 
decided by Colonel Bachelder, the authorized historian of the 
battle of Gettysburg, to whom all the evidence and affidavits 
were forwarded. He admitted the claim and decided that it be- 
longed to the Fourteenth Regiment alone. 



148 



Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 



In Walker's "History of the Second Army Corps" he says: — 
"General Alexander Hays, finding the enemy's skirmishers again 
troubling him from the Bliss barn, sent forward a detachment 
from the Twelfth New Jersey, which captured the barn, with 
the Confederate skirmish reserve. At a still later hour in the 
morning, the enemy again occupying this position, General Hays 
ordered a detachment from the Fourteenth Connecticut, Major 
Ellis, to take the buildings and burn them to the ground. The 
Fourteenth acquitted itself handsomely, losing ten killed and 
fifty-two wounded." 

Colonel Smyth in his official report of the battle says ---"The 
barn and house near it, being reoccupied by the enemy's sharp- 
shooters, an order was received from General Hays, commanding 
the division, to take the barn and house at all hazards and hold it. 
The Fourteenth Connecticut was detailed on this service, which it 
gallantly performed. Soon after an order came from General 
Hays to burn the house and barn, and they were accordingly 
fired." 

Returning to their former position at the wall, it was found 
that the V'wst Delaware Regiment occupied the ground which 
they had left. ?\lajor Ellis therefore stationed the men about 
two rods in the rear. 




The ground over which Pickett's JJi 



Gettysburg. 1 49 

Major Hincks gives the experience of the regiment : — 'At 
about one o'clock there burst upon us most unexpectedlv the 
heaviest cannonade I had ever witnessed. Without waiting for 
orders, which coukl hardly have been heard, we advanced with 
one impulse for a few paces and lay down just behind the First 
Delaware men, who had taken our places at the wall. By the 
good providence of God, the enemy's guns were pointed so that 
the shot mainly cleared us and went over the crest of the hill into 
the valley beyond, where, as we afterwards learned, they sup- 
posed our troops were massed. Else it would seem that our 
little line by the stone wall could hardly have escaped being 
swept away. The wall, being built on a ledge of rock, took 
those shot that fell short and bounded off instead of burying 
themselves in the ground beneath us and then exploding, tear- 
ing in pieces those lying above, as I knew them to do in the 
grove further to our right. I mention these things to account 
for the singularly little damage we sustained from its terrific 
fire. The battery on our left, under Captain Arnold, sustained 
a more serious loss. Its guns kept up a steadv reply for more 
than an hour, though T am at a loss to know what they could 
have seen to fire at, the smoke was so thick. So very thick was 
it that the sun seemed blotted out. One of the guns was 
directly behind me and at every discharge, the concussion would 
throw gravel over me and 1 could not only see and smell the 
thick cloud of Ijurning powder, but could taste it also. I lay 
with my arm thrown over Eddy Hart and so hot was it that 
the drops of perspiration falling from my face made mud of the 
dusty soil on which we were stretched. No one moved or 
spoke save the gunners behind us and ever and anon I could hear 
the ringing voice of the sergeant nearest us giving command 
to aim, fire, (a tremendous crash) load, to be after a brief in- 
terval repeated. Then after a time I judged that he was 
wounded, for his voice was silenced, and out of the cloud came 
another and different voice, repeating the same command. From 
time to time, we could hear the wailing of some one wounded, 
but still their fire did not slacken. When the gunners fell, the 
drivers took their places. I looked up once or twice to see 



1 50 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

brigades, which had lost their way in the lihnding sulphurous 
canopy and were flying wildly hither and thither, trying to 
escape from the storm of bursting shot and shell, which filled 
the air. I saw a fence rail, which had been struck by a shot, go 
spinning through the air as a man would throw a drumstick. 
1 am informed that the thunder of the guns upon this occasion 
was heard for nearly a hundred miles' away, and the story 
hardly seems incredible to one who was upon the ground. I 
utterly despair of giving any idea of the various diabolical 
sounds to which we listened, the howling of the shell as they 
sped through the air was like the voice of the tornado upon the 
ocean, and the sound of their bursting like incessant crashes of 
the heaviest thunder. At length it ceased as suddenly as it had 
begun. There was a complete calm, the clouds broke, and we 
could see the sun shining once more. Our neighbors of the 
battery, whose ammunition had some time since become ex- 
hausted, profited by the occasion to bring up their horses, which 
had not been killed or wounded, and withdrew their guns to the 
rear. One or two pieces which had been pushed out further 
to the front were left behind. \\'e rose from the ground and 
stretched our cramped limbs and, in our inexperience, thought the 
battle was over, but Major Ellis was better posted than we. 'No,' 
said he, 'They mean to charge with all their infantry.' 'Fall in 
Fourteenth' was the order and after a little delay we got the men 
in their places in line, and were soon in the place left vacant by 
the withdrawal of the battery." 

Major Broatch speaks of an incident that occurred as the skir- 
mish line went out. As they were crossing the Emmettsburg 
road a Confederate shell struck the rail fence and threw a rail 
with much force, striking Augustus Guild across the small of 
the back, felling him to the ground. His comrades supposed 
he was killed and left him for dead, going on to the skirmish 
line. When the Confederate army advanced on the charge and 
our skirmishers were driven in William H. Hall and James 
Inglis of Company B found, as they crossed the Emmettsburg 
road, that Guild was alive. They took him up tenderly and 
started to carry him in. They were entreated by the men at 



Gettysburg. I 5 1 

the wall to leave him or they would all be shot. They per- 
sisted, however, in their endeavor, although under a heavy fire, 
and succeeded in reaching the wall, and thus saved his life. 
Guild lived and was discharged June 5, 1865. 

Deducting the two companies that were acting as skirmishers 
at the front and the killed and wounded in the destroying of the 
Hliss buildings, the regiment now numbered about one hundred 
men. To occupy the space at the wall left vacant by the dis- 
rupted battery, it was necessary for the regiment to stretch out, 
leaving only one line. 

All eyes were turned upon the front to catch the first sight 
of the advancing foe. Slowly it emerged from the woods, and 
such a column ! Eleven brigades of Pickett's Division advanc- 
ing obliquely upon the Second Division of the Second Corps, 
Heth's four brigades, commanded by General Pettegrew, in 
front, while that of Lane and Scales formed in their rear. 
There were three lines, and a portion of a fourth line, extending 
a mile or more. It was, indeed, a scene of unsurpassed grandeur 
and majesty. It is no wonder that Major Ellis in his official 
report said "It was magnificent." As far as eye could reach 
could be seen the advancing troops, their gay war flags fiuttering 
in the gentle summer breeze, while their sabers and bayonets 
flashed and glistened in the midday sun. Step by step they 
came, the music and rhythm of their tread resounding upon the 
rock-ribbed earth. Every movement expressed determination and 
resolute defiance, the line moving forward like a victorious giant, 
confident of power and victory. If one listened, he might hear 
the voice of the commander, "Steady men, steady." There is 
no swaying of the line, no faltering of the step. The advance 
seems as resistless as the incoming tide. It was the last throw 
of the dice in this supreme moment of the great game of war. 
On, on, thev come and slowly approach the fence that skirts 
the Emmettsburg road. Watchful eyes are peering through the 
loosely built stone wall. Anxious hearts are crouched behind 
this rude redoubt. Hardly can the men be restrained from 
firing, although positive orders had been given that not a gun 
should be fired until the enemy reached the Emmettsburg road. 



I 52 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

It was, indeed, an anxious moment. ()ne you can see is looking 
at the far off home he will never see again. Another is looking 
at his little ones, as he mechanically empties his cartridge-box 
on the ground before him, that he may load more quickly, de- 
termined to part with life as dearly as possible. Others are 
communing with Hiiu befcjre whom so many will shortly have to 
appear. 

The skirmishers are driven in, l)ut not in confusion, and some 
times about face to return the Confederate skirmish fire, and 
thus gain time to bring in the killed and wounded. 

Slowly the great line moved forward until it reached the 
fence. The men mounted to cross when the word fire ! fire ! 
ran along the I'nion line, crack ! crack ! spoke out the musketry, 
and the men (lrop])e(l from the fence as if swept by a gigantic 
sickle swung 1)\' some powerful force of nature. Great gaps 
were formed in the line, the numl)er of slain and wounded could 
not be estimated by numbers, but must be measured by yards. 
Yet on came the second line in full face of the awful carnage. 
Xo longer could the measured tread be heard, no longer were 
the orders of the commanding officers audible for the shrieks of 
the wounded and groans of the dying filled the air, but on they 
came, meeting with the same fate as their comrades. The third 
line wavered and faltered, even their courage forbiaanig them 
to face such a storm of nmsketry. The color-bearers now ad- 
vanced, apparently in obedience to previous orders, and, at- 
tended by their color-guards, planted their battle flags in the 
ground nnich nearer. Then the firing Ijeing too hot for them, 
lay down, waiting for their men to advance and rally around 
them. One of them in particular was in advance of the others 
and planted his flag not more than ten rods distant from and 
in front of the center of the Fourteenth. The men of the 
regiment still activel)' continued firing. Several of the men were 
fortunate in having two breech-loaders for while one was load- 
ing the other was firing. So rapid was this firing that the 
barrels became so hot that it was almost impossible to use them, 
some using the precious water in their canteens to pour upon 
the overworked guns. Accounts seem to agree that the Con- 



Gettysburg. 



153 



federate line broke quicker in the immediate front of the Four- 
teenth than any where else, and seeing this a shout went up 
from the regiment, which was taken up and echoed and reechoed 
along the whole Union line. In vain did the Confederate com- 
manders attempt to reform their broken columns, colors were 
dropped and the men fled in confusion. Major Ellis gave the 
order to the regiment to fire left oblique to dislodge some of the 
Confederates who had come uncomfortably near the front of 
an adjoining battery. The regiment had just turned when a 
daring and audacious Confederate jumped upon the gun of a 




Headqtiai 



It Gettysburg after the battle 



battery which had been left about two rods in front, when the 
battery withdrew for want of horses, and waved his hat in his 
hand for his comrades to follow. He did not remain there an 
instant, but fell riddled through. With the help of the regi- 
ment's crossfire, the rebels in front of the neighboring battery 
were soon in full retreat. 

Another incident connected with this remarkable record of the 
Fourteenth was the capture of a flag by Major Hincks. The 



154 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Confederate color planted about ten rods in front of the center 
of the regiment still stood. There were no rebels standing near 
it, but several were lying down, waiting for the men to ad- 
vance. Major Ellis called for volunteers to capture the flag and 
instantly Major Hincks, Major Broatch and Lieutenant Brig- 
ham leaped the wall. Brigham was shot down by a retreating 
rebel, but the other two sped on, Hincks finally outstripping 
Broatch ran straight and swift for the color, amid a storm of 
shot. Swinging his saber over the prostrate Confederates and 
uttering a terrific yell, he seized the flag and hastily returned to 
the line. He was the object of all eyes and the men cheered 
him heartily as he reached the ranks. It was the flag of the 
Fourteenth Tennessee Regiment and had inscribed upon it the 
names of the twelve battles in which the regiment had partici- 
pated, viz.: — "Seven Pines, Mechanicsville, Cold Harbor, Shep- 
ardstown, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Oxhill, Harper's 
Ferry, Sharpsburg, Frazier's Farm, Cedar Run and Manasses." 
Theodore F. Rodenbough, Brevet Brigadier-General of the 
United States Army, in his book of "Saber and Bayonet," made 
up of stories of heroism and military adventure, nas this to sa> 
regarding the capture of this flag: — "During the grand assault, 
the Fourteenth Connecticut Regiment was in position opposite 
the left of the enemy's advancing lines ; this regiment was armed 
with Sharp's breech-loading rifles and their fire was very severe. 
Sergeant Wade of this regiment says: — 'By this time the Four- 
teenth were all excited ; they remembered Antietam, Fredericks- 
burg, and Chancellorsville, and over the wall they went ; nothing 
could stop them, and soon they were fighting hand-to-hand with 
the rebels. We captured six battle-flags and forty prisoners ; 

and over one hundred prisoners came in afterwards 

Oh, it was a glorious day for the old Fourteenth ! One of the 
lieutenant-colonels taken by our regiment, coming up to )ur 
thin line, asked us where all our troops were, and being told that he 
could see all there were, exclaimed, 'Oh ! that I had known it a 
half hour since.' Some of the prisoners told us that their gen- 
erals told them they were fighting nothing but the Pennsylvania 



Gettysburg. 155 

militia, but wben tbey saw the ace of clubs, the trefoil badge of 
the Second Corps, they all exclaimed, 'We have been fit^hv.'ug 
the Army of the Potomac' 

After the tirst fire from the Union side had taken effect, 
Sergeant-JMajor William B. Hincks, of the Fourteenth, saw, 
planted in the ground some distance in front, a rebel flag. 
Around and on a line with it were a number of unwounded men 
who had thrown themselves down to avoid the heavy fire. 
He determined to capture the flag. Leaping over the 
wall he ran straight for it. At the same time two 
or three others of his regiment had started for the same 
goal. One of these, an ofiicer, was brought down by a bullet 
ere he had run ten yards. Hincks outstripped the others, 
reached the spot, and with a yell seized the colors by the staff, 
and, waving his sword over his head, was on his way back be- 
fore those around him could devine his purpose. Instantly a 
shower of bullets came all about him ; he was also exposed to a 
scattering fire from our troops. It was 'running the gantlet,' 
indeed. Hincks in his dash across the neutral ground, seemed 
to bear a charmed life. As he neared his own lines, he saw the 
men standing up, regardless of the leaden messengers behind, 
and as he mounted the wall, trophy in hand, the regiment to a 
man wildly cheered the gallant fellow. It proved to be the 
colors of the 'Fourteenth Tennessee.' Major Hincks writes: — 
'We were behind a low stone wall, such as may be seen on any 
New England farm. Parallel to this wall, and perhaps one 
hundred and fifty yards away, was a lane (Emmettsburg road), 
on either side of which were the ruins of a wooden fence. My 
recollection is that our ])eople began to fire as the front line of 
the enemv crossed this fence. This broke their front line ; their 
advance was checked and they began to fire. Then their color- 
bearer ran forward, planted his flag in the ground and with 
several others — I ]:)resume the color-guard — lay down beside 
it, our fire being very hot. At that time I was firing two 
Sharp's rifles, which Lieutenant Hawley was loading for me ; 
they belonged to men wounded early in the day. The regiment 
on our right fired buck-and-ball cartridges, and I think that I 



156 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

was in as much danger from them when I ran to get the flag 

as from the enemy One gun (cannon) which had 

been pushed out a few rods in front of our stone wall remained 
there during the charge, having been disabled. A daring South- 
erner jumped upon this gun and waved his hat; but did not 
live to tell the story. In going after the flag, I ran past thi& 
gun, leaving it upon my left hand." 

The men now careless of shelter stood erect and with loud 
shouts continued to fire into the retreating army as long as they 
were within range. Many of the retreating coluinn lay down 
behind stones and hillocks, and even the dead bodies of their 
comrades, to be protected from the Union shots. Presently, as 
by one common impulse, bits of white cloth and handkerchiefs 
were waved as signals of surrender. In response to these 
signals, our men leaped over the wall and advanced toward the 
retreating foe. When they reached the point where the enemy's 
advance had halted, rebel wounded and unwounded in large 
numbers rose up and surrendered themselves. One of the first 
to leap over the wall was Corporal Christopher Flynn of Com- 
pany K who, advancing far down toward the retreating line, 
picked up a battle-flag which they had dropped in their flight. 
Corporal E. W. P.acon of Company F also seized the flag of the 
Sixteenth Xorth Carolina. Several others were subsequently 
picked up, making five in all which were credited to the regiment. 
The claim has also been made that six flags were captured, al- 
though Major l-'Jlis speaks of (Mfly five in his official report. 
Some have claimed that the sixth flag was a beautiful silk flag, 
which was not given to the proper officers. 

Major Hincks, Corporal Flynn of Company K and Corporal 
Bacon of Company F afterwards received the United States 
Medal of Honor for deeds of special bravery. 

Major William 15. Hinks was born in Bucksport, Maine, but 
moved to liridgeport. Conn., while a lad. He was of scholarly 
instincts and was preparing for a thorough education, when the 
call of his country appealed to his inl)red spirit of patriotism and 
he abandoned his cherished plans and enlisted in Co. A. A man 
of Major Hincks' strength of mind, purity of purpose, integrity 



Gettysburg. 



157 



of character and frankness of manner could not long fail to have 
an influence upon his comrades and win their love and esteem. 
He rose rapidly from a private to the rank of major, although to 
the latter rank he was never mustered. With the exception of a 
short time when lie was on the brigade staff, he was always with 
his regiment going with it through all of its engagements and 
was never seriously wounded. At the close of the war. Major 




WM. B. HINCKS, Adjutant. 



Hincks returned to Bridgeport and became engaged in mercan- 
tile business. His qualities of careful and decerning judgement 
soon won for him the reputation of a sound business adviser, and 
his opinions were often sought in that line. He became the 
custodian of many important trusts. He was also vice-president 
and secretary of many business organizations of his adopted city. 



158 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

For many years he was secretary and treasurer of the City Sav- 
ing's Bank of Bridgeport. He died November 7, 1903 amid the 
universal regret of his fellow citizens and his old comrades of the 
Fourteenth Regiment. 

A number of the field and line officers surrendered their 
swords to Major Ellis and Adjutant Doten. About two hundred 
prisoners were captured, two for every man in the regiment. 
It was indeed a glorious day for the brave Fourteenth. 

An incident occurred many years after relating to this sur- 
render. Among the Confederate officers who surrendered their 
swords was Colonel John A. Fite. of the Seventh Tennessee, who 
handed his sword to Lieutenant-Colonel S. A. Moore (then cap- 
tain) who was standing near Colonel Ellis. Lieutenant-Colonel 
Moore discovered that the sword was a valuable one and must 
have been much prized by its owner. In 1890 Lieutenant-Colonel 
Moore took steps to discover the owner that he might return it. 
To this end he sent a communication to the Memphis Appeal and 
the owner, as we have stated, was soon found. He communi- 
cated at once with Lieutenant-Colonel Moore, satisfying the latter 
that the sword was his whereupon Lieutenant-Colonel Moore 
sent the sword to Chicopee where it was put in the best of order 
and dispatched to Colonel Fite. This incident formed the basis 
between the LTnion and Confederate colonels of lengthy and fre- 
quent correspondence of the most cordial character, in which 
Colonel Fite expressed his appreciation of the magnaminity and 
gallantry of Lieutenant-Colonel Moore. 

Those of the prisoners who were able to walk came in after 
which the boys of the regiment went out and brought in the 
wounded, although under a heavy fire from the skirmish line 
which the Confederates had been able to reestablish. These 
Confederate wounded were tenderly treated and cared for, even 
portions of the precious stone wall being removed so that they 
could be taken in without jolting. Cofifee was made and the 
meager rations shared, showing that 

"One touch of sorrow makes all the world akin" even in the 
horrors of war. 



Gettysburg. 



159 



After dark the picket line was thrown out, ammunition and 
rations issued and the men slept as best they could, leaning 
against the wall, with their equipments on and guns ready for 
action. 

Thus closed the most eventful day of the conflict, a day full 
of incidents, heroism, remarkable situations and brilliant achieve- 
ments of the now slender Fourteenth Regiment. Can it be any 
wonder that the battle-field of Gettysburg is often revisited and 
its scenes of horror and momentous events dwelt upon by mem- 



■i 


^r 






___ 


m 




■Hp^' 


^^^^^s*>- 




..#-«$. 


'IL -S itf-f .ii'"*'^^^B 




M^tH^Str^^y. 


^HB^ - - - -•^B^^«^,.^>- 




' ^^^l^li^M 


'^ ■ ^ ■ ^ 


&m 


fefe^P 


-'£S^ ^t^JlMi, . aiHH 


BK^y^ 


m^'^-:/sm 


i^^. .^JP! 


«■*' ■'4' ' '-^ 


'^^B^^^nSiw^mi 




Sm 


m^m 


l^j^ff 


!^^ 


^M 


l^^l 


t^^^^ 



Spangler's Spring. 



hers of the regiment? The location of the Bliss buildings, the 
sight of the protecting stone wall, the broad plain over which 
Pickett's charge so grandly swept, and Spangler's Spring, where 
Union and Confederate soldiers often drank together, are never 
worn topics of interest and discussion by those that survived. 



1 60 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

In regard to the conduct of the regiment on this memorable 
day "Dunn Browne" writes to the Springfield Republican as 
follows : — "The Fourteenth Connecticut, in whose welfare nearly 
every portion of the state is interested, had a splendid oppor- 
tunity, being in the very center of the line attacked on the after- 
noon of the 3d. instant, and never was opportunity better im- 
proved. Although my own regiment, I can speak with compara- 
tive impartiality of its doings, because my duty on detached ser- 
vice at present called me away to another part of the field. I 
had occasion to view the whole length of our lines, to ride over 
every part of the field ; and in no part of the whole line was there 
evidence of harder fighting or a more gallant charge. Five 
regimental battle-flags are the trophies of its valor, as well as 
about a prisoner for each man engaged. It was a grand sight 
to see in this portion of the battle the charge made by the rebels, 
and the way it was met." 

Another incident which we ma\- note was the finding of a 
daguerreotype by Sergeant Russell Glenn of Company A in the 
hands of a Confederate soldier who had been killed in the 
battle. We will allow Sergeant Glenn to tell the story. He 
says: — "It was on the battle-field of Gettysburg where I secured 
this picture and I prize it as the most valuable relic of my war 
experience. It was on the morning of July 4th, 1863, that I 
went among the Confederate dead who fell during the previous 
day's fight. I, with others, was searching for the sick and 
wounded who were being conveyed to the rear for treatment. 
I had hardly entered that terrible valley of death when I beheld 
a handsome, noble looking youth, lying prone upon his back ; 
his eyes wide open and staring towards heaven. His counte- 
nance wore the most beseeching expression that I ever beheld. 
At first I thought the youth was alive and was about to speak 
to him when I observed that he held something in his hand that 
lay upon his left breast. I stooped over him and discovered that 
he had been shot through the heart and probably did not live 
more than thirty seconds after the fatal bullet hit him. In his 



Gettysburg. 



161 




THE REBEL GIRL. 

From a picture taken from the hand of a >'X)ung rebel just after he was killed at 

Gettysburg, by Russell Glenn, now of Bridgeport. 



hand was a daguerreotype of the above profile, the case of 
which had been entirely shattered by the deadly ball, but. marvel- 
ous as it may seem, the profile remained uninjured. It is cer- 
tain that the poor fellow lived but an instant after being hit, 
but in that short space of time his thought was of the picture — 
probably the face of his sweetheart — and, taking it from his 
breastpocket, he saw the shattered case, but was permitted to 
gaze on the features of a loved one as his soul took its immortal 
flight. I took the picture from the rigid grasp of the dead 



162 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

soldier, and taking the skirt of his coat, wiped off the blood 
from the glass and carefully placed it in my pocket, intending, 
if possible, to find the original, but as yet have not been suc- 
cessful." 

The following is the list of killed, wounded and missing which 
Major Ellis officially reported to the Adjutant-General of the 
State of Connecticut : — 

"Surgeon, Frederick B. Dudley, wounded, in arm, bv frag- 
ment shell. 

Company A. Wounded, Privates, John Fox, musket ball 
through leg, Russell Glenn, in face and hand ; missing. Sergeant, 
Henry M. Cooley, Corporal, William Jacobs, Privates, John 
Geatley, James W. French, sent out on patrol and not returned. 

Company B. Killed, Corporal, Samuel G. Huxam ; wounded, 
Sergeant, George H. Hubbard, in arm. Corporal, Elnathan B. 
Tyler, in foot. Privates, James H. Sage, in head. Augustus 
Guild, in back, by shell, Patrick Dailey, in foot, Hiram H. Fox, 
in hand. 

Company C. Wounded, 2d Lieutenant, Julius W. Knowlton, 
shell wound in back, Privates, William Patrick, in foot, slightly, 
Valentine Lungwitz, slightly, Owen McKewan, in hand, Theo- 
dore C. Byington, in leg, William C. Rice, buck shot in leg. 
Cornelius Dailey, shell wound in back. 

Company D. Killed, Corporal, William Goodell ; wounded. 
Captain, Walter M. Lucas, bruise on kg, Sergeants, George N. 
Brigham, in side, severely, Benjamin Hirst, in shoulder. Corporal, 
David W. Whiting, in hand, slightly. Privates, John F. Julian, 
in temple, Charles Morrison, slightly. 

Company E. Killed, Corporal, Walter F. Standish ; wounded, 
2d Lieutenant, Frederick Shalk, slightly. Privates, Michael Mc- 
Dermott, in leg, Isaac C. Barrow^s, solid shot in leg, in side, by 
shell, Francis Bebo, in jaw, Henry Frisbee, buck shot in hand, 
James Riley, in arm. 

Company F. Killed, Private, Thomas J. Brainard ; wounded, 
2d Lieutenant, John A. Tibbets, in arm, slightly. Privates, Dan- 
ford J. Davis, in head, slightly, James A. Stroazzi, in arm, bruise 
in head, Thomas Finn, in head, slightly, Michael O'Connell, 
slightly. 



Gettysburg. 1 63 

Company G. Killed, Privates, Aaron A. Clarke, Alfred H. 
Dibble, Moses G. Clements, William D. Marsh ; wounded, Cor- 
porals, John S. Stannard, in neck, Stanley L. Chapman, in leg. 
Privates, John B. Stevens, in arm, Edgar S. Ely, in leg, Albert 
M. Hill, in temple. 

Company H. Killed, Private, Thomas M. Ames ; wounded. 
1st Lieutenant, Henry L. Snagg, in leg, 2d. Lieutenant, Frank 
E. Stoughten, in lung, seriously. Privates, Thomas W. Gardner, 
in hand, James Crinyan, in hand and side, Theodore Kohlrisser, 
in hip. 

Company L Killed, Corporal, Joseph Puffer: wounded ist 
Lieutenant, Frederick S. Seymour, in leg, 2d Lieutenant, Samuel 
H. Seward, in stomach. Sergeant. George W. Baldwin, in 
abdomen. Corporal Henry H. Frankenfield, in neck. Privates, 
James W. Benham, in thumb and wrist. Nelson Hodge, in knee, 
seriously, Thomas L. Crittenden, in head, seriously. 

Company K. Wounded, Captain, James B. Coit, run over by 
horse, Private, Francis McVay, in arm." 

The following is Major Ellis' official report to the Adjutant- 
General of the state : — 

"Headquarters Fourteenth Connecticut \^olunteers, 
Camp near Gettysburg, Penna.. July 6th., 1863. 

Brigadier-General H. J. Morse, 

Adjutant-General, State of Connecticut. 

Sir: — I have the honor to report the following as the part 
taken bv the Fourteenth Regiment Connecticut Volunteers, in 
the late battle at this jilace. We arrived on the ground on the 
morning of the 2(1 instant, after being out all night on picket 
some two miles back, and joined our brigade. During the fore- 
noon we supported Woodri'ifif's Battery Regular Artillery. We 
were afterwards for a short time detailed on provost duty, and 
in the afternoon moved further to the left to support Arnold's 
First Rhode Island Battery, where we remained with a slight 
change of position all night, throwing out pickets to the front. 
During the day the regiment was at times under a heavy shell 



164 



Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 



fire, but met with no loss except Captain Coit, who was seri- 
ously injured, accidentally, by a runawa}' horse. 

On the morning- of the 3d., we advanced two companies as 
skirmishers, under command of Captains Townsend and Lucas, 
who maintained their ground nobly until the grand attack of the 
afternoon when they were driven in by the advancing lines of 
the enemy. During the forenoon the regiment was ordered to 
take and hold two buildings, a large barn and house, outside of 
our lines of skirmishers, a little to the right of our position, 
from which the enemy were seriously anno}ing our troops. 




Mouth of Devil's Den, Gettysburg. 



The barn was gallantly charged and taken by four companies 
under command of Captain Moore, the remainder of the regi- 
ment making the attack upon the house, commanded by myself. 
The whole distance from our lines to these buildings being 
commanded by the enemy's sharp-shooters, we met with some 
loss in the attack. It was here that Lieutenants Seymour and 
Seward were wounded. While the regiment was within these 



Gettysburg. 1 65 

buildings and firing from them upon the enemy, a case-shot 
entered the upper part of the barn and exploded, killing and 
wounding some of the men. Having received orders to destroy 
these buildings, they were fired in several places, after removing all 
our killed and wounded, when we retired to the picket reserve, 
bringing oft' all our wounded and arms. We were again or- 
dered to support Arnold's Battery and formed on its right, 
where we remained under the terrific shell fire of In-iday after- 
noon from one o'clock i'. AL, until the battery retired disabled, 
when I moved the regiment forward and to the left to cover the 
space previously occupied by the battery. 

About this time two rebel lines of battle, extending across 
the plain for more than a nfile, preceded by a line of skirmishers, 
and reinforced at two points on the right and left by a third 
line, were observed to emerge from the woods about one-third 
of a mile distant, running nearly parallel to our front, and ad- 
vanced steadil}- across the intervening plain. The spectacle was 
magnificent. They advanced in perfect order, the line of skir- 
mishers firing. Our men were formed in a single line of battle 
along an almost continuous line of low stone wall and fence, 
which offered a considerable protection from the enemy's fire. 
When the first line of the enemy had advanced to within about 
two hundred yards, our fire opened almost simultaneously along 
the whole line. The enemy's first line was broken and hurled 
back upon the second, throwing it also into confusion. De- 
tached portions of the lines were rallied, and for a short time 
maintained their ground. Being mown down by our terribly 
destructive fire, they commenced falling back, when a portion 
of this regiment charged upon them, capturing five regimental 
battle-flags and over forty prisoners. There also afterwards 
came into the lines of this regiment about one hundred or more 
of the enemy, some of which were wounded and gave them- 
selves up. 

Among the officers who personally surrendered to me were 
the following: — 

Colonel John Fite, ;th Tennessee, not wounded, 

Lieutenant-Colonel X. J. George, ist Tennessee, not wounded, 



1 66 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Parkers, 520! North Carolina, wounded, 
Major John G. Richardson, 52d North Carolina, wounded, 
Among those who were taken as prisoners or came within our 
lines wounded, were the following line officers : — 
Captain G. A. Graues, 22d North Carolina, 
Captain George Gillian, 52d North Carolina, 
Captain J. A. Kincain, 52(1 North Carolina, 
First Lieutenant J. C. Warren. 52d North Carolina, 
First Lieutenant J. N. Robertson, 5th Alabama. 
There were many of the Field and Line officers captured whose 
names could not be ascertained. 

The colors captured belonged to the following regiments:— 
14th Tennesse, 
1st Tennessee, 
i6th North Carolina, 
52d North Carolina, 
'^4th Virginia. 
The colors of the ist and 14th Tennessee and i6th North 
Carolina bear the following inscriptions on each: — 'Seven Pines, 
Mechanicsville, Cold Harbor, Shepardstown, Fredericksburg, 
Chancellorsville, Ox Hill, Harpers Ferry, Sharpsburg, Frazier s 
Farm, Cedar Yiim, Alanasses.' The color of the 14th Tennessee 
was the first taken, and was captured by Sergeant-Major William 
B. Hincks. That of the 52d North Carolina was taken by Cor- 
poral Christopher Flynn, Com])any K, and that of the i6th North 
Carolina by Private E. W. liacon, Company V. 

The following is a corrected list of the killed and wounded in 
the above engagements: — Killed, enlisted men, 10; wounded, 
commissioned officers, 10 : enlisted men, 42 ; missing, enlisted 
iP«n, 4 ; total 66. 

This regiment went into action with about 160 muskets. 
I am, General, very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

Theodore G. Ellis, 
Major commanding Fourteenth Connecticut Volunteers." 



*Chaplain Stevens thinks that this flag must be the 14th Virginia as 
the 4th Virginia Regiment was in Stonewall's Brigade and was engaged 
against Gulps Hill. 




The Two Round Tops, Gettysburg, from the west. 



CHAPTER X. 



The Summer oi 1 863. 



We must pause a few moments before the regiment leaves 
Gettysburg. On awakening on the morning of July 4th., it was 
found that the Confederates had advanced their skirmish line and 
a vigorous picket firing was kept up through the day. At times 
there was shot from long range guns and shells, necessitating 
some one of the regiment to be on the alert and warn the men 
of danger. The rain was very severe through the day which 
must have been trying to the great number of Confederate 
wounded who lay directly in front of the regiment, but too far 
out toward their skirmish line to enable the men to give them 
any relief. During the night a humorous incident occurred. A 
number of shots were heard in quick succession from our picket- 
lines, the men hastily aroused took their places at the wall and 
waited patiently for orders. Intently they held themselves in 
readiness to meet the approaching foe; peering into the dark- 
ness, with their weapons in their hands. Several volleys were 
fired and when morning came, it was found that a white cow 
had been the cause of all the trouble. This was the last foe met 
on the battle-field of Gettysburg. 

As the morning broke, it was found that there were no Con- 
federates at the front, and reconnoissances in all directions 
(167) 



1 68 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

showed that Lee was in full retreat on the Fairfield and Cash- 
town roads. Meade seemed to share ^IcClellan's idea that : — 

"He who fights and runs away 
May live to fight another day ; 
But he who is in battle slain 
Can never rise and fight again. 

Twenty-four hours too late the comparatively fresh Sixth 
Corps was at once pushed forward in pursuit on the Fairfield 
road and a brigade of Gregg's cavalry division on the Cashtown 
road. General Sedgwick, in command of the Sixth Corps, find- 
ing the retreating army posted in the F^airfield pass, deemed Lee's 
position too strong to be successfully attacked. 

In the afternoon of July 5th. the regiment was again in motion, 
under command of Colonel Morris who had returned and as- 
sumed command of the brigade, in place of Colonel Smyth who 
had been wounded. They marched slowly and leisurely, making 
frequent halts, to Two Taverns, distant about five miles. Here 
they remained during Monday with the oft repeated question of 
something to eat prominent in their minds. On the morning 
of Tuesday, the regiment was on the move at an early hour and 
continued eight or ten miles to Taneytown. The roads were 
in shocking condition from the severe rains, making the march 
tedious and wearisome, and the men, still being out of rations, 
were weak with hunger. This becoming serious men were de- 
tailed to go into the town and obtain food, the expense of which 
was to be paid by the government. Mour seemed to be the only 
available commodity in that line which served to make sodden 
and unleavened cakes for the men. One patriotic and humane 
resident of the town sold water from his pump at six cents a 
glass. Later in the day the wagon-trains coming up rations of 
hardtack and salt pork were distributed. 

Wednesday. July 8th., the regiment, under command of Cap- 
tain Davis, marched about twenty miles, camping near Frederick 
City. Major Ellis had been left at Taneytown, sick. The next 
day the regiment made a march of twenty-three miles, passing- 
through Frederick City and the villages of Jefiferson and Burketts- 
ville, crossing the South Mountain range at Crampton's Gap, and 



The Summerl'of 1863. 169 

went into camp near Rohersville. Starting again at six o'clock 
the next morning they marched about ten miles, passing through 
the villages of Rohersville and Keedysville, the latter of which 
the regiment passed through on its march to Antietam the Sep- 
tember previous. Major Hincks says : — "The weather was very 
hot and we marched slowly though perhaps this may have been 
due to the presence of the enemy in our front as we heard can- 
nonading all day. About noon we were permitted to halt for a 
brief space and rest. The direction of this movement Colonel 
Morris carried out with singular ingenuity by marching us to 
the top of a high hill, and halting us in the full glare of the 
sun. Farther on near 'Bakerstown', so called, we halted again 
for half an hour and this time, as the sun had now gone down, 
in the woods. Moved on a short distance and halted for the 
night. Sent out picket detail, and bivouacked in line of battle in 
the edge of a piece of woods." 

Saturday morning, the nth., the regiment was again on the 
move, halting a short time at Tenleytown, and then to the front, 
passing through several lines of battle which crossed the road, 
while skirmishing was going on in front. Here they remained 
for the rest of the day. At evening a sudden start was made and 
marched a mile or two close to the enemy and bv order tlirew up 
breastworks of rails and earth, behind whicli they passed the 
night. This was about three miles from Hagerstown. 

Sunday there was marching and countermarching along the 
Hagerstown turnpike, for what purpose the men were ignorant, 
finally taking a turn in a wheat-field in the midst of a severe 
rain, where a line was formed with great nicety. Here it was 
that the regiment learned that Colonel Alorris had been relieved 
of the command of the brigade. Forty-five men, under command 
of 2d Lieutenant William H. Hawley, of Company B, were de- 
tailed to form a skirmish line. They advanced the line three 
times and the regiment constructed a new line of earthworks. 

The 13th. the advance was made still nearer the enemy's line and 
on the 14th. the picket-line entered the rebel works with very little 
resistance, although there was a slight skirmish. The regiment 
marched up by flank and found the Confederate position opposite 



1 70 Fourteenth Regiment, C, V. Infantry. 

a very strong one, much more so than the Union troops held at 
Gettysburg, several cross fences and thorny hedges intervening 
between the two armies. The earthwork was thick and high to 
climb, even when not under fire. The Confederate army, how- 
ever, had safely crossed the Potomac on a rudely made bridge of 
boats and were now making a hasty but orderly retreat. So 
that the battle of Falling Waters was a battle that ought to have 
been fought, but never was. 

The regiment continued its march the following dav, July 
15th., passing through the village of Sharpsburg and renewing 
the remembrances of their first battle in September, 1862. Tak- 
ing the tow path along the Baltimore & Ohio canal, they camped 
about a mile from Harper's Ferry, the distance marched during 
the day being about twenty-three miles. 

Thursday morning the regiment again moved forward, reach- 
ing Pleasant Valley about five miles distant, where it encamped, 
remaining there during Thursday and Friday. While camped 
here some of the regiment, in common with members of other 
regiments of the division, helped themselves to straw from a 
neighboring farmer for their tents. The farmer went to head- 
quarters and made a vigorous protest to General Hays. The 
General went to the door of his tent and looking up and down 
the camp of the division said "Straw, I see no straw. I think 
you are mistaken." Whereupon the farmer was much irritated 
and swore liberally. The General replied "I thought you were 
a bad man and your language proves it. You should study your 
Bible" and taking a Bible from his table presented it to the sur- 
prised and disgusted farmer. General Hays charged him to 
read it carefully and bowed him courteously out of his tent. 
The only drawback to this story is the very remote probability of a 
Bible being on General Hays' table. 

Reveille was sounded at two o'clock Saturday morning and at 
seven o'clock the regiment was on the move, crossing the Poto- 
mac and Shenandoah rivers, and moving down the Louden 
Valley over the same route they passed after leaving Bolivar 
Heights the year before. They went into camp about three 
o'clock and no member of the regiment will forget the abundance 



The Summer of 1863. 171 

of blackberries and the whole division, as well as the Fourteenth, 
feasted plentifully upon this wholesome berry. 

"Dunn Browne" writes to the Springfield Republican as fol- 
lows : — "You ought to have seen our corps move into the huge 
blackberry-field, or rather succession of them, last evening after 
their hot midday march. The habit of military discipline pre- 
vailing kept the men in the ranks till they were regularly dis- 
missed, though every tread crushed out the blood of scores, and 
Uncle Sam's stifif brogans were soaked in dewberry gore. But 
when the order 'Stack arms !' 'Rest !' had been given, in an instant, 
in a nothing of time, in the hundredth part of the "twinkling of 
a bedpost', the whole battle array was melted away. The glitter- 
ing lines of stacked arms were all that were left upright in the field. 
The backs only were visible of a half dozen thousand tired sold- 
iers, who are not wont to turn their backs to the enemy ; and as 
the manna which came from heaven to the Israelites in the wil- 
derness, when the dew rose in the morning, so disappeared this 
gracious provision of Heaven's bounty for our weary boys ; and 
they rose (not very soon) refreshed from their luscious banquet. 
There were enough and to spare. Fields and hills all around us 
are black with them, — more millions of tiny blackamoors than 
our army of abolitionists can put out of the way in a week. But 
we are doing our best ; heaped bowls and plates of blackberries 
for tea and for breakfast ; a few blackberries as we went to bed ; a 
few on waking this morning; (how much better than fiery 
whiskey for that purpose!) and now a few more to start on just 
as we are leaving. It has been a blackberrying on the grandest 
scale I have attended for a long time." 

The next day being Sunday, July 19th., the column still con- 
tinued down Louden Valley which was at first narrow and then 
broadened out into luxuriant farming lands. After eight miles 
the men camped at Gregory's Gap. That evening an order was 
received by Captain Davis to detail three commissioned officers 
and six privates to visit Connecticut and bring on the conscripts 
with which to fill up the depleted ranks of the regiment. Sum- 
moning the commissioned officers together Captain Davis called 
for the drawing of lots for two of the commissioned officers. 



1 72 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

The order said three was exclaimed when Captain Davis said 
that he had already ordered the adjutant to detail him. The 
officers laughed, but were evidently much chagrined to see such 
colossal nerve as the Captain exhibited. Lots were cast and the 
choice fell upon Captain Broatch of Company A and Lieutenant 
Rockwood of Company D, and Privates Glenn. Penhallow, 
Wolff, Murray, Davis and Wade. 

Monday, July the 20th., was excessively warm. The regiment 
marched about twelve miles, camping at Bloomfield that night. 
There were many stragglers on account of the heat and the com- 
mand to "Close up" was often given. Tuesday, the following day, 
the regiment remained in bivouac at this point. Blackberries were 
plenty and there was much more freedom with the men in helping 
themselves to food and necessities than before they saw the de- 
predation of the Confederates ui)on the people of loyal Penn- 
sylvania before the battle of Gettysburg. July 22d. the regi- 
ment with the corps moved on to near Uppersville, passing 
through the village of Paris and going into camp near Ashby's 
Gap, having marched a distance of twelve miles. The regiment 
at this time was in the rear of the Second Corps with several 
provost marshals behind it. 

July 23d., Thursday, the regiment marched at five o'clock pass- 
ing down a hilly road parallel to the mountains until the town of 
Springfield, at the entrance of Manassas Gap, was reached at 
eleven o'clock. Here they remained under arms to support the 
Third and Fifth Corps which had marched up the Gap to attack 
the rebels, who were posted in the vicinity of Front Royal. At 
five o'clock in the afternoon in response to some artillerv firing 
the men were hurried off. The road was hard, tedious and badly 
cut up, but the men went on, reaching the locality of the firing. 
They saw several wounded men, but were not themselves en- 
gaged. They bivouacked on the side of a stony hill, but. being 
tired and exhausted, slept well, although many of the men went 
to bed supperless. The distance made was about twenty miles, 
camp being made about two miles from the village of Linden. 

Friday morning the stress of hunger was almost unendurable 
and as the generals and high officers rode back and forth, they 



The Summer of 1 863. 1 73 

were greeted with shouts of "hardtack" by hundreds and thou- 
sands of voices. The marching had been rapid and excessive, 
the wagon-trains being left far behind. The shouting for hard- 
tack became so annoying to the well-fed generals that an order 
was read saying that rations of that commodity could not then 
be issued, but that presently fresh beef with salt and pepper would 
be given, and that in future shouting hardtack would be con- 
sidered mutinous. Just before leaving camp a scanty supply of 
rations was given out. Camp was broken about noon and the 
route over which the troops passed two days previous was re- 




The Hagerstown Pike, 1891. 

traced, camping upon their old ground near Springfield, reach- 
ing there about four o'clock. The promised rations of fresh 
beef, salt and pepper not having materialized many men went 
out foraging. General Hays, learning this, took the -provost 
guard and sallied out after them and succeeded in arresting ten 
of the Fourteenth, twenty-three from the ist Delaware and more 
from other regiments, which were all sent back to headquarters 
under guard ; and in putting to flight a good many others, 
among whom were several commissioned ofificers. There were 
some ludicrous scenes. At one farm-house some were taken 



1 74 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

in the house and not a few concealed themselves in the tall grass 
in the yard. Suspecting something of the sort, the General 
stood in the path and cursed at them in- his unique style, saying 
that he saw them, every one of them, and bidding them come 
out and surrender. Some of them were easy enough to do so, 
but others remained and were not discovered. 

At half past four Saturday morning, July 25th., the regiment 
was again on the move, marching fifteen miles that day, reach- 
ing White Plains about four o'clock. The march was a severe 
one to the men who were still exhausted for lack of food. 

Sunday it was excessively hot and there were many stragglers 
picked up by the Confederates, among whom were James Mc- 
Cauley and J. H. Ramsdell of Company A, who were hastened 
to death somewhat faster than those remaining in the Union 
army by starvation in rebel prisons. Warrenton was reached 
at eleven o'clock, and after tarrying about an hour the march was 
resumed toward Warrenton Junction, distant about nine miles, 
making twenty-four miles in all. The pace was swift and the 
men were much discouraged and exhausted. A rumor spread 
through the ranks that General Hays was racing the Second 
Corps with the Third Corps. Turning into a large field the 
troops broke ranks and immediately began picking blackberries, 
of which there was a great abundance, much to the disgust of 
General Hays, who, after considerable exertion, got them to- 
gether long enough to stack arms. 

That day completed six weeks since the camp at Falmouth 
was left ; during which time they fought the battle of Gettysburg 
and had marched over four hundred miles. They remamed in 
this camp near Warrenton Junction until five o'clock Thursday 
afternoon, July 30th. During their stay here extra rations of 
pickles, pepper and whiskey were issued. The men were rested, 
refreshed by their greater variety of rations and moved on to- 
ward Elkrun in much better spirits than when they reached War- 
renton Junction. The regiment camped at Elkrun about ten 
o'clock. The next day, although exceedingly hot, the men 
marched a distance of about five miles to Morristown, near 
Kelly's Ford on the Rappahannock. 



The Summer of 1 863. 1 75 

About eight o'clock on the morning of August ist. the brigade 
marched toward the rear for some ten miles, reaching Bristow 
Station at noon. The men rested, writing or rea<iing. in the 
shade until about dark when the regiment and the 1 2th New 
Jersey was ordered to fall in and marched off rapidly along a 
rough country road, running parallel to the railroad, but quite 
a distance to the east of it, for about five miles, t«3 Cedar Run, 
where the two regiments encamped. 

Here they remained until August i8th.. and these days were 
filled with varied experiences. While military duties were not 
so strenuous, there were many trying situations as well as pleas- 
ant occasions. The first of the former occurred August 6th.. 
when Captain Davis, who had been detailed to go to Connecticut 
for recruits, returned to camp with forty-two out of one hundred 
and seventeen with which he started, the missing number having 
deserted on the way, most of them when the boat arrived in New 
York. While experience proved that many of these men, who 
were for the most part conscripts and substitutes, did very 
valiant service and were an honor to the brave old regiment, a 
large percentage were not only conscripts, but nondescripts. 
Perhaps no occurrence brought to the minds of the original men 
of the regiment, now reduced to about eighty, the grea': loss 
they had sustained by battle and disease since their departure 
from Connecticut as did the advent of these new recruits. 1 he 
character of this addition, mostly of foreigners from New York 
City, left little in common between the men. These new men 
had scant sympathy with the cause for which they were fight- 
ing ; they lacked the bond of state pride and the tie of companion- 
ship, made not only by kinship in many instances, comrades and 
school-mates of old, but by the experiences of the days and weeks 
since they entered the service. This motley array of new re- 
cruits, representing fifteen or twenty nationalities, presented 
strange types of character with manifestations at times ludicrous 
and at other times provoking and disgusting. 

No member of the regiment will forget Pierce Barron who was 
assigned to Company B. He was a typical Irishman of the old 
fashioned kind, of an age not less than fifty or fifty-five that 



1 76 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

made it a mystery how he ever got into ranks, so brimful of Irish 
wit, horse-sense, and whiskey when he could get it, as to make him, 
perhaps, the greatest source of enjoyment in an all around way of 
any of them. Some previous service in a New York regiment 
brought him to the Fourteenth a thorough old soldier, although 
undoubtedly a bounty taking substitute. He never flinched or 
shirked any duty that the younger members of the company 
endured. He soon acquired a certain kind of popularity with 
the officers and men that made them wink at any little irregulari- 
ties that might occasionally occur. His cheek was unlimited 
and yet so perfectly natural that he of all others seemed uncon- 
scious of it. Neither will the members forget the collisions that 
often occurred between Barron and John Dermody, an equally 
typical Englishman, tall, straight as an arrow, coming to the 
regiment with a green patch or shade over one eye. His age 
or bad eye would either have undoubtedly exempted him from 
a draft, but Uncle Sam wanted men badly, and accepted him as 
a well paid substitute for some drafted man. The very opposite 
of old Pierce Barron, with a deportment so serious and matter 
of fact that he seldom smiled and least of all appreciated the 
jokes of the old Irishman. Many recall now the occasion when 
sitting around the camp-fire, cooking coffee, Barron accidentally 
turned over Dermody's coffee-pot and how angry the latter was 
and threatened to pour the contents of his rifle into Barron, 
with decided emphasis on the tents, and how Barron responded 
by threatening the contents of his rifle into Dermody, not omit- 
ting the emphasis on the tents. But Dermody was a good 
soldier and many a time when in the humor he would <"ake the 
position of a soldier and give the manual of arms as executed 
in the British army. 

In direct contrast to these two was Antonio Capellini, a 
small man of dark complexion and baboon face, all overgrown 
with hair. No one could converse with him or find out where 
he was born. He could be taught but one duty of a soldier and 
that was that of drawing his rations. He was most careless of 
Uncle Sam's property and when on the march he alv.ays 
straggled and would throw away his gun, bayonet, knapsack, 



The Summer of 1863. 177 

haversack and canteen. It was a common thing to see him 
brought back with his few remaining effects crowded into an 
old grain bag slung over his shoulder. 

Then there was one Neickler by name, seemingly more of a 
quadruped than biped, short and chubby and always falling down, 
both upon drill and on the march and though not hurt in the 
least, did not seem to know how to get up again, lying upon the 
ground as helpless as a turtle turned upon its back. 

Many still remember Joshua Tripp, a man of undcrsize, ap- 
pearing in camp with a pair of trousers by which one would 
imply that the quartermaster had satirically fitted him by furnish- 
ing him with a pair designed for the largest man in the service. 
These trousers were so large in girth that Joshua had to hold 
them up with both hands, and so long that they were folded 
several times over, producing at the ankles an arrangement 
much like that used to cure interfering horses. One could not 
look at him without laughing and the men remember with what 
indignation Lieutenant Galpin received him when he was jter- 
emptorily assigned to Company A. Unlike his scriptural name- 
sake, who led the children of Israel into the land of promise, 
Joshua was not designed by nature to assist in leading the Army 
of the Potomac into the promised land of victory. In fact this 
second Joshua's intellect was so infinitesimal that he could Inrdly 
tell the muzzle of his gun from the breech and many remember 
the ludicrous attempts to teach him how to shoulder his gun. 
Few will forget his being mounted upon a barrel at the quarters 
of the Brigade Guard and the frequent trips of the major to 
attempt to teach him this first requisite of a soldier's service. 
This, however, was useless and was only terminated when the 
head of the barrel gave way and poor Tripp passed temporarily 
cut of sight. Joshua had with him his bounty and so dear was 
it to his heart that he could not resist the temptation to count 
it several times a day. Many of the boys thought he was not 
competent to take care of it and proposed to take it in charge 
and save it for him. To this end they chloroformed him several 
times and made careful search, even digging up every inch of 
ground beneath his tent, but all in vain. It was a perplexing 



1 78 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

question whether Joshua was sane or shamming insanity to ob- 
tain a (Hscharge. However, it became evident after three months 
trial that he was of no service. He was discharged, and, while 
leaving camp in one of the army wagons, Frank Somers of the 
band asked him where he had kept the money to elude their 
search, to which Joshua replied, with a twinkle of his peculiar 
eyes, that he placed it in the folds of the legs of his trousers. 

The genial chaplain was often the subject of a joke. We 
have related one that occurred while in camp at Falmouth. 
Another too good to be lost is one told by Major Hincks and 
recorded in an address before the regimental society at Bridge- 
port in 1879, as follows: — "Candor compels me to state that 
Chaplain Stevens was then, as now, exceedingly fond of sardines, 
almost the only weakness in an otherwise very amiable 
character, and as the government was not in the habit of issuing 
these- palatable little fishes for rations, he had taken a supply of 
them with him when he started from old Connecticut. By the 
time that he arrived at our quarters, however, only a single box 
remained and this happened to be incautiously left in plain sight 
upon the top of his ])ilc of luggage while its owner was absent 
in another ])art of camp. The spectacle of a good man in 
affliction, it has been well observed, is one calculated to make 
even a celestial being wee]). Imagine then the deep pathos of 
the scene when upon Mr. Stevens' return he found that Commis- 
sary-Sergeant Dibble and Adjutant Doten had coolly opened the 
box and were just finishing the contents. 'Why, gentlemen, how 
is this?" he asked. 'Those sardines were mine. Didn't you 
see my initials scratched upon the box?' 'Your initials' said 
Dibble, 'where arc they?' 'Why here' replied the Chaplain, 
'don't you see upon the lid H. S. S., Henry S. Stevens?' 'Really 
then. Chaplain, I must ask your ])ardon' replied Dibble. 'I no- 
ticed the letters, indeed, but entirely misunderstood their mean- 
ing. Both Adjutant Doten and myself supposed that H. S. S. 
instead of meaning Henry S. Stevens stood for Have Some 
Sardines, and accordingly we gratefull}- availed ourselves of 
your polite invitation,' To do our friend Air. Stevens justice, 



The Summer of 1863. 



179 



I think that he was more pleased at the iiii^cniiity of the excuse 
than chagrined at the loss of his sardines." 

Those were pleasant days at Cedar Run and gave the boys 
opportunity for much needed rest and recuperation inasmuch as 
a larger and more varied list of rations was obtained. Added to 
this the opportunity for fishing and bathing was nnich enjoxed. 
Since the battle of Gettysburg and it was seen how the Con- 
federates foraged upon the farmers of the loyal states the bovs 
of the Fourteenth, who had never been great foragers, became 
n.ore or less adept. 




Nulioiuil CcmcLerv, Antietam. 



Among the pleasant i 
Fourteenth Regiment 1 
the finest band in the 
remembered was given 
tended by the ladies of 
was very picturesque, 
fronting a grassy lawn, 
in open order, with sol 
the background were tr 



ncidents were the concerts given by the 
'>and which had gained a reputation as 
army. ( )ne of these concerts especially 
one bright moonlight night and was at- 

the neighboring plantation. The scene 
The white tents were pitched in a grove 

A little way off the band was drawn up 
diers holding candles between, while in 
oops of soldiers, some standing, others 



I 80 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

leaning against the trees or reclining upon the grass, and behind 
them a few dozen of negroes of all ages from the neighboring 
plantations. The band played "When the Swallows Homeward 
Fly," "Ever of Thee I am lM)n(lly Dreaming" and other selec- 
tions, closing with a stirring piece brought from Germany in 
manuscript and entitled "The Second Corps Battle Gallop" 
wherein after an introductory overture, the bugle call and charge, 
the roll of musketry, the boom of artillery and the groans of 
the wounded could all be ])lainl\- distinguished. The whole 
concluding with a grand and almost deafening pean of rejoicing 
at the victory. Many still remember the colored boy who danced 
to the music of the band when they played "Fisher's Hornpipe," 
"Harrigan's Ball" or "Yankee Doodle", but who was much 
perplexed after the first strains of "Thou Art So Near and Yet 
So Far" or "Home Sweet Home". It seemed to take some time 
for him to get through his wooll\- head that it was not dance 
music. 

Fresh squads of newly enlisted men continued to arrive, one 
hundred and forty-three reaching cam]) August loth., and as 
rapidly did they desert, fifty-fom- leaving for parts unknown 
before the i6th. 

Tuesday, August i8th., the outposts were all called in and 
line of march was taken to the rear, a goodly procession as far 
as length was concerned, but only about eighty of the old 
members of the regiment. They joined the brigade at a stone 
church near liristow Station and marched to Elkrim, about five 
miles distant, where they encamped. This same day another 
squad of one hundred and thirty-four men arrived from Con- 
necticut. This was what remained of a total of over two 
hundred, the remainder having deserted en route, some jumping 
from the car windows while the train was in rapid motion, and 
others deserting at stations along the journey. Most of these 
men went under assumed names. \'cry many not remembering 
the names under which they enlisted at roll-call were obliged 
to look into their caps where their names were written on pieces 
of paper. The presence of a large class of men of this charac- 
ter made it doubly difficult for the old and trusted men in the 



The Summer of 1863. 181 

regiment. A constant watch had to be kept that they did not 
desert and very few of them could be trusted to do picket duty. 

At this time the only line officers present were Captains 
Moore, Coit, Lee and Lucas, Lieutenants Nickles, Galpin, Wad- 
bams and Hawley. General Owen commanded the division and 
the colonel of the 12th New Jersey the brigade. As no field 
officers were present, Colonel Morris, Lieutenant-Colonel Per- 
kins and Major Clark having been discharged from the service, 
and Major Ellis being upon court martial duty at Washington, 
by an order from headquarters. Major Hill of the 12th New Jersey 
was detailed to take command of the regiment. There was 
much indignation in the regiment to have an outsider put over 
them. Major Hill was a good officer, but for various reasons 
there was not the same kindly feeling toward the 12th New 
Jersey Regiment among the men of the Fourteenth as there was 
for either of the other regiments of the brigade. Major Ellis 
unexpectedly returned from Washington and took command of 
the regiment and Major Hill was relieved. In spite of all pre- 
cautions desertions continued and roll-call was awaited with in- 
terest to learn how many more had made a safe distance from 
the field of service since the last roll-call. 

August 31st. the camp at Elkrun was broken up and the regi- 
ment in company with the brigade marched at daylight and halted 
late in the afternoon at Hartwood Church, a distance from camp 
of thirteen to fifteen miles, leaving their tents at Elkrun. The 
purpose of this movement was to support Kilpatrick in a pro- 
posed raid. This was about opposite United States Ford on the 
Rappahannock and about eight miles from the old camp at 
Falmouth. 

Having in mind Dunn Browne's derisive remark about General 
Meade's and General Lee's Weekly Express from Alexandria 
to Culpepper, we may say the train started on its return trip 
when the regiment broke camp during the afternoon of September 
3d., and marched back to Elkrun, reaching there about ten 
o'clock. 



CHAPTER XI. 

Bristow Station and Mine Run. 

' The reg-iment continued at Elkrun until the I2th of September, 
with desertions of drafted men and sul)stitutes still continuing, 
although enough remained to give the regiment much the appear- 
ance as before Antietam in regard to size. Many of the new re- 
cruits, however, had shown good material and commanded the 
respect of officers and comrades. About this time a more eligible 
camp was selected close by, which the men were very loath to 
leave when the command to break camp was given September 
I2th, and march was made to Uealeton and on to Rapidan 
Station. l)ivouacking that night within half a mile of the river. 
Next morning the regiment crossed the river and bivouacked 
near Culpej^per, where they remained until the morning of the 
i6th. There was much firing heard during these days, but the 
regiment was not engaged. 

Of their experience at Culpepper Sergeant E. H. Wade says : — 
"Broke camp at nine o'clock and marched through the town of 
Culpepper. Tt was the prettiest town we have been through yet. 
Quite a large number of ladies were to be seen, but not one but 
what was dressed in deep mourning. Xot a smile was on their 
faces, but instead a scowl or frown met our gaze. Even the 
little bovs and girls looked the same and as for the men they 
were saucv and ugly, but we took this all right and the band 
struck up very ai)propriately 'Jordan is a Hard Road to Travel'. 
Went into camp at the top of Cedar Mountain. The enemy was 
near and we could see the flash of their guns as they fired at our 
supply trains." 

September 17th the regiment came down Cedar Mountain at 
six o'clock and marched until about noon. They were in close 
range of the enemy, momentarily expecting to be engaged. To 
avoid attracting attention bv the glitter of their gun barrels, the 

(182) 




LT.-COL. SAMUEL A. MOORE. 



Bristow Station eind Mine Run. 1 85 

men were ordered to trail arms. The location of the regiment 
at this time was Robinson's Run, near Cedar Mountain, about 
ten miles from Culpepper. It was here that the men of the 
regiment passed through a new and trying experience. De- 
sertions of drafted men and substitutes had become so common 
and bold that the military authorities regarded some example as 
absolutely necessary for discipline and good order. Few, if any, 
regiments in the service had been depleted so much by casualties 
in battle and disease as the Fourteenth. As a result a much 
larger number of recuits were assigned to the regiment than to 
other regiments. We have already spoken of the character of 
a large percentage of these recruits and the very many desertions 
from camp and during the journey from Connecticut. Growing 
out of these circumstances Elliott and Laton, members of the 
Fourteenth, the first a drafted man and the second a substitute, 
were sentenced to be shot for desertion. The regiment had no 
part in the execution only as spectators in common with the 
whole division. It, however, loaned its chaplain for comfort and 
band for impressiveness, which lead the way, playing the Portu- 
guese hymn. It was a very bungling affair from the fact that 
not more than one cartridge out of the five did any service. 
After repeated firing the men were pronounced dead and the 
division was marched by companies past the graves and the 
bleeding forms of the victims. New recruits to the regiment 
were after that marched by the graves as a silent example. 

September 20th. the regiment was ordered out on picket duty 
for two days, and Major Hincks says that when they returned 
from picket duty two days later, "The ammunition was all called 
in and a new supply issued, owing to shocking incidents of the 
execution," 

About this time a beautiful set of guidons were presented 
to the regiment by friends in New Haven. The making and 
designing of these guidons was in charge of Mr. Horace Dibble, 
brother of Quartermaster Charles F. Dibble. They were made 
by Miss Annie McCarthy, now Mrs. Annie M. Upton of Salem, 
Mass, Quartermaster Dibble was at the time in New Haven 
on a furlough and took them to the regiment upon his return. 
The New Haven Palladium said of them : 



186 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

" Some of the particular friends of the Fourteenth C. V. in 
this city have been having made for the presentation to that 
gallant regiment a very handsome set of guidons. They are 
made in the style required by the system adopted in the Army 
of the Potomac, whereby not only each regiment can be iden- 
tified by its guidons, but also the brigade, division and corps 
to which it is attached. These for the Fourteenth are of 
heavy silk, triangular in shape, exhibiting a blue field with red 
border. On the blue field is the white satin trefoil badge of 
the Second Corps, bearing in gilt the name of the regiment. 
For richness of material and brilliancy of hue, the boys of the 
Fourteenth need not hesitate to place these beautifully made 
colors alongside those of any regiment in the army. They 
are to be mounted on handsome gilt staves, surmounted each 
with an acorn. Quartermaster Dibble, who is about to leave 
this city to rejoin the regiment, will take them to the camp." 

There was nnich annoyance in the camp of the regiment from 
thieving. John Hirst writing about this time says : — "The day 
the two bounty junipers were shot, I had my knapsack stolen 
and with it my new caj), shirts, stockings, handkerchiefs and, 
worst of all, my diary. Some of these fellows would steal the 
last cent you had if they could get a chance at it." He further 
says : — "The other Sunday we had a call for church and had an 
exhortation from ' Paddy Owen ' (General Joshua T. Owen), 
who is in temporary command of our brigade. He told us 
we saved the battle in Pennsylvania (Gettysburg) by holding our 
ground so bravely, and that if the rebels had been successful in 
their great charge (Pickett's) our whole army would have been 
cut in two and we should have been flanked upon all sides. He 
gave our division, the third of the Second Corps, the most 
credit of any in the army for the victory and said that the 
Second Corps always held the front in time of peril, closing by 
hoping we should always hold it by good deeds whenever we get 
home again." 

During these few weeks the command of the regiment in the 
field and stafif began to assume more tangible shape. We have 
already noted that Colonel Morris was discharged for disability 



Bristow Station '/and Mine Run. 187 

August 14th. Major Theodore G. Ellis was promoted lieuten- 
ant-colonel September 22d, and colonel of the regiment October 
nth. Captain Samuel A. Moore of Company F was promoted 
to major September 22d, and lieutenant-colonel October nth, 
Adjutant Frederick B. Doten of Company F was promoted to 
captain October 20th and William B. Hincks from sergeant- 
major to adjutant October 20th. Captain Carpenter of Com- 
pany C was transferred to the Invalid Corps on account of 
wounds received at Fredericksburg. Captain Davis of Company 
H was dismissed for neglect of duty at conscript camp near 
New Haven. These two captains were the last of the original 
captains that left the state in August, 1862, some being killed 
or dying of wounds and others being promoted. This may have 
given rise to the very common adage in the regiment that "if 
one belonged to the Fourteenth Connecticut he would either 
meet death or promotion within a year." 

September 24th a curious incident occurred. A bull strayed 
from within the rebel lines to a cornfield directly in front of the 
Fourteenth. Captain Lucas of Company D ordered a detail to 
dispatch the beast. While the men were skillful in shooting 
rebels this new object of attack seemed to tax their skill. So 
many shots were fired in such rapid succession that it was 
thought that the Confederates had attacked our lines. Officers 
rode back anfl forth in great excitement and the First Brigade 
turned out under arms. Some of the boys facetiously called this 
the "Third Battle of Bull Run." The enraged officers were, 
however, appeased on receiving liberal portions of the animal 
when dressed. 

The regiment numbered at this time five hundred and eighty 
officers and men present for duty, of which four hundred and 
eighty were recruits, although there were nine hundred on the 
roll. Of these recruits a great many had already deserted. 
There was considerable complaint in the regiment concerning the 
character of the recruits sent to them, some making the claim 
that there was favoritism in the assignment of these men and 
that the Fourteenth Regiment did not have pull enough to se- 
cure picked men as had other military organizations. 



188 



Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 



Major Hincks makes this record in his dairy: — "October 6th, 
bivouac near Culpepper, A^a. We l)roke camp near Cedar Moun- 
tain early this morning and have marched back through Cul- 
pepper and are now lying in a field on the north side of the 
town. On our way here, just before we reached Culpepper, we 
met our new Major. Samuel A. Moore, on his way to join us. 
He was mounted on a nimble little piece of horse-flesh and was 
very gladlv received both by officers and men. in particular by 
the members of his old company with whom he is always a great 
favorite." 




O.-M. CHARLES F. DIBBLE. 



(Quartermaster Charles F. Dibble was a native of Newtown, 
Conn., being born there December 2, 1831. Early in life his 
family moved to New Haven. Two of the brothers, Horace 
and Charles, became prominent in the commercial life of the 



Bristow Station and Mine Run. 189 

city, while a third brother, Frederick, was for many years a 
physician, having a large practice and enviable reputation. 
Quartermaster Dibble was engaged in the manufacture of 
carriage hardware at the time of his enlistment. After his 
service with the Fourteenth regiment he returned to New 
Haven and entered into the manufacture of carriages. The 
success of his business was somewhat intefered with on account 
of ill health, which became serious from 187 1 to the end. He 
died in West Haven, December 26, i<S8i. Quartermaster 
Dibble was a faithful officer and had the unshaken confidence 
of the regiment. In times of hunger and distress, when rations 
were short or completely cut off, the men knew that it was not 
on account o: a lack of energy or alertness to duty of their 
quartermaster. 

October the 6tb the regiment camped at Culpepper where it 
remained until the 9th. While here one hundred and eighty new 
recruits were received. This number of recruits increased the 
regiment to nearer its original size and at dress-parade the line 
extended so far that it was difficult to see the extreme end, much 
more to hear the orders of the adjutant. On the evening of 
October loth, six days rations and sixty rounds of ammunition 
were issued and the regiment marched five miles to the front 
and right of Culpepper, bivouacking in a ravine covered with a 
growth of sassafras. It was a short rest in this sassafras thicket 
and about two o'clock the next morning the men were called to 
arms, broke camp and marched toward the Rappahannock. 
There was great difficulty in forming a line among the sassafras 
bushes by the new recruits and so long was the delay that the 
exasperated headquarters threatened to put the adjutant under 
arrest. Lieutenant William H. Hawley writes that as it ap- 
proached daylight it was discovered that the whole army was in 
motion and that instead of being a forward n:ovement, it was a 
retrograde one toward the Rappahannock. "We crossed the 
river on a pontoon bridge, proceeded to Bealeton Station, where, 
tired, sleepv and hungry after our march of fifteen miles, we ate 
our dinner and supper together and pitched our tents for the 
night." 



190 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

The next morning, the 12th, the men were called to arms and 
marched forward to the Rappahannock. Reaching the river 
there was evidence of a coming fight. The regiment marched 
"by the right of companies" for the first three miles, ready to 
swing into line at any moment, and then in line of battle for 
about two miles. The Confederates who menaced the front 
proved to be cavalrymen and fell back and the men of the regi- 
ment rested for a few hours on their arms. The troops were 
aroused at twelve o'clock and reached the Rappahannock about 
daylight. This was the eighth time the regiment had crossed 
the Rappahannock, in fact it would seem that crossing the Rappa- 
hannock had become a habit and that the troops were ordered 
back and forth over the river when the commanders could not 
think of anything else to do. Breakfasting at eight o'clock, the 
men took up their march toward Warrenton, covering a distance 
of twenty-five miles. There was no opportunity to cook rations 
during the long march and the men were tired, hungry and foot- 
sore. 

This was in the locality of Auburn, a village of a church, a 
blacksmith shop and a postoffice. We will let Lieutenant Haw- 
ley, in command of Company A at this time, tell the story of this 
skirmish. He says : — "Before daylight breakfast was eaten and 
we were again in motion. Had gone but half a mile and halted 
for a moment when Colonel Ellis turned to me ( I was in com- 
mand of Company A and was at the head of the column) and 
said 'Lieutenant Hawley, tell your men to load their pieces.' I 
gave the order 'Attention, Company A.' 'Load at will, load.' 
The order was repeated down the line. This was the first inti- 
mation we had of any danger. Almost immediately after this 
bang, bang went the artillery and the muskets began to crack. 
The morning was very foggy and the firing appeared to be upon 
all sides of us. We feared the rebels had surrounded us in the 
night. We had just forded a little brook and now filed oflf to 
the left into a field, leaving the road and standing in line of battle 
at the foot of a low hill, waiting the order to advance. It proved 
to be only a cavalry dash at our wagon-train. The enemy had 
been lurking around our pickets in the night and made a sud- 



Bristow Station and Mine Run. 1 9 I 

den charge upon our rear, hoping to capture the ammunition 
wagons. They had also planted a couple of guns upon the hill 
in our front, and were about to open on our advancing column 
at short range, with shell and canister, but they found the Sec- 
ond Corps not unprepared, and one of our batteries opened upon 
them before they could fire a single shot, causing a hasty re- 
treat. The Fourteenth was not engaged." 

Lieutenant-Colonel Moore states that while crossing the small 
stream with the regiment, he was ordered to give way to allow 
Arnold's Battery to pass through, after which he ordered the 
regiment to line up by a fence. He is of the opinion, however, 
that the regiment was engaged as he knew one of his men killed 
a rebel captain. 

According to Walker in his "History of the Second Corps" 
the situation here seemed critical as for a few moments it ap- 
peared as if the Second Corps were surrounded on all sides by 
the enemy and seemed destined to be annihilated. 

After this short engagement a strong line of skirmishers was 
thrown out on both sides of the road and all went well until 
about four o'clock in the afternoon when the enemy opened upon 
them near Bristow Station. The regiment, in connection with 
the corps, was marching rapidly by the flank about a half mile 
from the Orange & Alexandria Railroad, on the east side and 
parallel with it. when the enemy, posted on a hill directly in front 
of them, opened fire upon the column with shell. The Four- 
teenth quickened its pace, finally being urged to a double-quick 
and passing through a grove of cedar trees, they came on to a 
broad plateau extending on the left quite down to the railroad. 
When the rear had finally cleared the cedars. Colonel Ellis gave 
the order "By the left flank, forward, double-quick, charge." 
There was some confusion among the new recruits, but on the 
whole they behaved well and as soon as they understood the 
order were in line, ^lost of the men who were lost, either killed 
or wounded, fell in this short march from the woods to the rail- 
road. The men went down the embankment into the cut. up 
the opposite side, forming line of march on the plateau and 
marching to a piece of woods which they entered, then advanc- 



192 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

ing to its farther edge where the order was given to he down. 
In front was a pasture grown up with tall grass and cedar 
bushes. Beyond it were some woods in the edge of which a 
Confederate battery was planted. The Union batteries, however, 
soon made it so warm for the enemy that they fell back into the 
woods, coming out to discharge their guns and then making 
swift time to get back out of sight. There was a general desire 
in the regiment to go forward and capture the battery, but this 
was forbidden by Colonel Ellis, after which some men of the 
regiment, with others of the brigade, went out and brought the 
guns in. Upon the refusal of Colonel Ellis to allow the regi- 
ment to go forward and capture the battery. Sergeant Edwin 
Stroud, of Company B, picked up his gun and briefly remarking 
that he was going to make an advance upon his own account, 
disappeared among the cedar bushes, from which he soon 
emerged, driving before him five rebel prisoners whom he had 
captured single-handed. The regiment was then ordered to with- 
draw to a point near the railroad track where behind a low em- 
bankment they remained in line until after dark, but the attack 
was not resumed. 

Sergeant Benjamin Hirst says of this engagement : — "This 
affair at Bristow Station was one of the most brilliant little bat- 
tles that occurred during the whole war and came about in this 
way. General Lee, whose army was rapidly recruited after its 
return to Virginia, began to get tired of inactivity and so re- 
solved upon a new campaign with the object of driving the 
Union troops out of Virginia and taking advantage of any 
errors that might be committed on the Union side. How near 
he succeeded is told in the battle at Bristow Station where the 
Second Corps, through some mistake of General Sykes, was left 
without support in front of General Early's Division, who was 
thrusting his brigades in the gap betw^een Sykes' rear and War- 
ren's advance. Both sides were taken by surprise. Early sup- 
posed he was following the Union rear when he was attacked 
by Warren and Warren supposed the road was clear in front 
until the head of his column was assailed by the rebels. In the 
mutual surprise Warren displayed the best judgment by seizing 



Bristow Station and Mine Rl 



193 




SARGT. BENJAMIN HIRST, 
From whose letters to the Rockville, (Conn.) Journal, valuable data for this history 
has been obtained. 



the railroad cut and embankment a moment or two before the 
rebels could get there and when the rebels did get there they 
were driven back with great loss. After this repulse, Early was 
more cautious than was his habit and waited too long before 
renewing the attack, when he had at least one-half of the rebel 
arniv under his command while Warren had but the Second 
Corps, containing about 12,000 men only." 

Sergeant E. B. Tyler gives his impressions of this battle in 
the following words: — "It was on one of the 'Express Excur- 
sions' owing to some disarrangement of the time schedule or 
some other mismanagement evidently that the collision at Bristow 



194 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Station occurred October 14th. Hardly deserving to be called 
a battle in all that implies, yet for a short, sharp and promptly 
decided little fight, it was a rare specimen. The rebel attack 
with artillery, cavalry and infantry on our Second Corps, who 
were acting as rear-guard that day, was spirited enough, but thev 
ought to have known better and the short time it took the old 
Second Corps to capture one of their batteries and about five 
hundred prisoners was probably a surprise to some of them. It 
was not a trifling lesson to us, however, and was the first time 
that some of our recruits were under fire. In the mam they 
acted creditably, some being wounded and others taken prisoners." 

The following is the list of casualties to the regiment returned 
by Colonel Ellis : — 

"Killed, enlisted men, 4; wounded, commissioned officers (ist 
Lieutenant Wilbur D. Fisk) i, enlisted men, 17; missing, 4; 
total, 26. 

Company A. Killed, Private, James McLaughlin ; wounded. 
Private William Abrahams. 

Company B. Killed, Corporal Charles Brooks. 

Company C. Wounded, Privates, Watson A. Spring, James 
Somers. 

Company D. Missing, Privates, William Mott, Lindrich Hol- 
comb, Lemuelk Munyan. 

Company E. Killed, Private, Frederick Smith. 

Company F. Killed, Sergeant, Charles McAlhattan ; wounded, 
1st Lieutenant, Wilbur D. F^isk, Privates, William C. Brown, 
Thomas Fisher, Paul Ducest ; missing, Private. Charles Lutz. 

Company G. Wounded, Sergeant, Jonathan S. Scranton, 
Privates, John Dooley, George Mireson, Henry Redfield, Thomas 
Doyle. 

Company H. Wounded, Privates, Orlando C. Pritchard, 
Charles F. Conway. 

Company I. Wounded, Private, John Smith. 

Company K. Wounded, Sergeant, Joseph T. Adams, Privates, 
Andrew Flood, John Doyle." 

Colonel Smyth, commanding the brigade, in his report to 
General Hays, gives the relative position of the regiment in the 



Bristow Station and Mine Run. 195 

morning engagement at Auburn as follows : — "While crossing 
Turkey Creek the enemy opened on the column with artillery. 
An order was received from Brigadier-General Hays, command- 
ing the division, to deploy skirmishers on the right and left 
flanks of the column. I accordingly deployed five companies of 
the First Delaware \'olunteers, under command of Major 
Woodall, and the One Hundred and Eighth New York Volun- 
teers, under command of Colonel Powers, the First Delaware 
on the left and the One Hundred and Eighth New York Volun- 
teers on the right. The Fourteenth Connecticut Volunteers 
were formed in line of battle with the right resting on the road, 
and as the enemy commenced a fire of musketry farther to the 
left, the First Delaware skirmishers were extended by the left 
flank, and the Twelfth New Jersey Volunteers were formed in 
line of battle facing to the left with the right resting on the left 
of the Fourteenth Connecticut. Receiving an order from General 
Hays to advance by a flank on the road and throw flankers on 
the right, the column then moved on." 

In regard to the formation in the afternoon at Bristow Station 
he says: — "About 3 P. M., as the column was marching by a 
flank from a v^^ood toward the railroad near Bristow Station, the 
enemy suddenly attacked the column with artillery. General 
Hays ordered me to form line of battle to the left, and advance 
as the brigade debauched from the wood. I marched it by the 
left flank, owing to the right of the brigade marching in line, 
while the left was obliged to move forward into line as it came 
out of the wood. Some little disorder was occasioned which 
was, however, soon rectified, and the brigade was formed into 
line of battle along the railroad. A column of the enemy ap- 
peared on a hill in our front and a little to our right, and opened 
a fire of musketry. An order was received from General Hays to 
move forward through the wood and charge that column of the 
enemy on their right flank. I ordered my command to fix 
bayonets and advance through the woods. The line was formed 
of the following regiments in succession to the left : The Four- 
teenth Connecticut Volunteers, Twelfth New Jersey, and One 
Hundred and Eighth New York Volunteers." 



196 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

The following is the official report of Colonel Theodore G. 
Ellis to the Adjutant-General of the State of Connecticut: — 

"Headquarters Fourteenth Connecticut Volunteers, 
October 1 7th, 1863. 

Sir : — I have the honor to submit the following report of the 
part taken by the Fourteenth Connecticut Volunteers in the en- 
gagement near Bristow Station, on the 14th instant. We were 
marching along the easterly side of the Orange & Alexandria 
Railroad when we came in sight of the enemy, posted on a hill 
some five hundred \ards west of the railroad, our column 
marching by the right flank, being about the same distance east 
of it. Coming up opposite the enemy's batteries on the double- 
quick, the regiment was marched to the front in line of battle 
across the railroad, and through a piece of woods to its farther 
edge, where we remained for some time in line of battle. In 
advancing toward the railroad we met with most of our loss, 
from a severe infantry fire from our front and right. 

The enemy being driven ofif from the position on the hill to 
our front, we were ordered to advance. After advancing a short 
distance, we observed a line of battle of the enemy through the 
woods on our left. We immediately changed front to left, and 
engaged such part of the line as could be seen through the open- 
ings. Receiving orders to fall back to the railroad, we did so, 
and remained lying in line of battle along its easterly side until 
the troops were withdrawn at night. 

\^ery respectfully your obedient servant, 

Theodore G. Ellis, 
Colonel Fourteenth Connecticut Volunteers." 

Great was the relief of General Warren when night settled 
down over the affair at Bristow and yet all danger was not over. 
It was not in the power of Lee to prevent the retreat of the 
Union army under cover of darkness. No one will forget the 
anxiety of the evening of the 14th of October, the utmost 
silence was commanded, not a camp fire was to be light- 
ed, not a match to be struck. Such utter silence was in- 
voked that the men were instructed to place their hands 



Bristow Station and Mine Run. 197 

between their tin cups and canteens that the tell-tale rattle 
might not indicate that the army was in motion. No word of 
command was to be spoken above a whisper. Thus in ghostly 
silence the army was to steal away, marching by the flank across 
the enemy's front within three hundred yards of their skirmishers. 
About ten o'clock the Fourteenth Regiment, which was in the 
rear of the column, began to move. It was tedious marching, 
having often to go on the double-quick to keep with the rest of 
the brigade, crossing four creeks, some of them deep and all 
cold and chilling. Just before dawn the column crossed Bull 
Run at Blackburn's Ford and then filed out on the side of the 
road where they rested. No wonder the men soon found oblivion 
in sleep, having been sixty hours or more in marching, battle and 
skirmishing. 

The men slept late the morning of Thursday, October 15th. 
During the forenoon the position was changed a few hundred 
yards. Some of the enemy's cavalry made their appearance upon 
the bluffs on the opposite or southern side of Blackburn's Ford, 
a little later getting some guns into position. The regiment was 
lying flank to a sharp fire in an exposed position, but Colonel 
Ellis, seeing the danger, wheeled the regiment so as to face the 
fire and the Fourteenth suffered no casualties as the shells all 
passed over their heads. A detachment of skirmishers from the 
Fourteenth crossed the ford and kept up a rattling fire with the 
Confederates until a large detachment of cavalry crossed upon the 
trot, whereupon the Confederates retreated still more hastily. 

While encamped here an accident occurred to Corporal Jona- 
than W. Phillips, of Company H, who was accidentally shot with 
a revolver by Private Charles H. Garde. The wovmd proved 
fatal, Phillips dying the 19th. He was a worthy soldier and 
there was deep regret in the regiment at his untimely and needless 
death. 

Again we find the regiment on the move on the morning of 
Monday, October 19th, marching at daylight in a drizzling rain 
and carrying eleven days rations, toward Warrenton on the old 
route to Richmond. It seemed to be the return of Dunn 
Browne's express train. They were obliged to ford several 



198 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

deep streams, one of special interest for depth and coldness was 
Kettle Run. The men rested a short time at Manassas Junction 
and were soon after formed in line of battle, expecting an en- 
gagement, as the cavalry were driving the Confederates before 
them. xA-t night they camped near Bristow Station, remaining 
there until seven the next mormng, when they began the march 
toward Auburn, passing through the villages of Gainesville and 
Greenwich, reaching the former place in the afternoon. 

On the morning of October 23d, Auburn was abandoned and 
a move of four miles was made toward Warrenton, and camped 
in a field just outside of the town. Assurances were made that 
the regiment would remain some time at this point and the men 
began industriously to build shelters, the first of five attempts in 
this direction. During these days there were daily regimental 
and battalion drills. There was much sickness in the regiment, 
sixty-five being excused from duty in one day. While at this 
camp the men were glad to greet Lieutenant-Colonel Perkins, 
who. as we have stated, had been discharged on account of 
wounds received at Fredericksburg. 

With eight days rations in their haversacks the troops marched 
on the morning of Saturday, November the 7th, about twenty 
miles to Kelly's Ford, and the next day crossed the Rappahannock 
for the ninth time and at four o'clock in the afternoon bivouacked 
near Brandy Station. At this time Colonel Ellis was on leave 
of absence, the regiment being under command of Lieutenant- 
Colonel Moore. 

It was a relief to the men to learn that there was to be a de- 
cided reform in the over-issuing of rations and ammunition. 
Dunn Browne has this to say on that point: — "Fm greatly en- 
couraged ; more reconciled to not being commander-in-chief of 
all the armies of America than I have been for a long time ; for 
there are actually some glimmerings of sense beginning to be 
perceptible, even in the management of our War Department. 
An order has come down, I am informed by a credible witness 
who says he has seen it, — has actually come down, and is to take 
effect immediately, that the men are not to be compelled to carr^f 
on their backs henceforth more than five davs rations at any one 



Bristow Station and Mine Run. 199 

time. I had utterly despaired of the thing ; had seen the eight- 
davs. the ten-days, and. in one or two instances, the eleven-days 
mule-burden piled on the men's backs over and over again, 
cruelly, wastefully, and uselessly, never once accomplishing the 
purpose, never in any single instance lasting over six days, till I 
had about concluded that the Administration was in some way 
politically committed to the arrangement, and that I might un- 
intentionally be committing high Copperheadism by grumbling 
about it. And another thing: you won't believe me this time, 
I know ; and you needn't : it's too much to ask of you, certainly, 
in the same letter that mentions the above reform, but it's the 
positive fact, nevertheless, that only forty rounds of cartridges 
are required henceforth to be carried by our soldiers. I am 
afraid Secretary Stanton and General Halleck aren't going to 
live long, they are getting so good and considerate all at once ; 
but they couldn't die in a better cause. Why, more cartridges 
have been wasted during this war by compelling the men to carry 
sixty, eighty, and even a hundred rounds, when their cartridge- 
boxes won't hold but forty, than would carry on for ten years a 
small 'scrimmage' like that of England and France in the 
Crimea. And. besides the relief from the burden, the boys will 
no longer be liable to drink gunpowder-coffee from a cartridge 
in their haversack bursting into their sugar or coffee sack, or 
to be blown up by a match setting fire to an extra package in 
their breeches-pocket." 

A stop was made at Rrandy Station through Monday. The 
band of the regiment tendered its courtesy to General French, 
who had asumed command of the Third Corps, by serenading 
him in the evening. 

Tuesday, November loth., the march was resumed, reaching a 
point near Stevensburg, about ten miles east of Culpepper and 
four miles north of Kelly's Ford. Again the army was given 
assurance that a long tarry might be expected here. The camp 
was on a large plain, slightly marshy, and the men for the sec- 
ond time began to make comfortable quarters for the winter. 
While here fresh bread was issued which was a relief from the 
time worn and somewhat animated hardtack. But the hopes of 



200 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

a permanent camp seemed to be dashed and orders were given 
on the morning of the 26th to break camp, pack np and be on 
the march. By ten o'clock Germania Ford on the Rapidan was 
reached, a distance of about eight miles, and a tarry was made 
in a deep ravine for some hours, no fires being allowed. About 
two o'clock they crossed the Rapidan on a pontoon bridge and 
found the unoccupied intrenchments of the Confederates were 
formidable and well-nigh impregnable. The weather was ex- 
tremely cold. After going for several miles along a road shut 
in on either side by a dense forest, they emerged into a compara- 
tively open country and leaving the road followed the column as 
it meandered through the fields and across divers creeks and 
swamps until finally a halt was made for the night on the side of 
a stony hill. 

The corps started the next morning at seven o'clock following 
a road which led through the woods. At about eleven o'clock 
the quick sharp rattle of musketry was heard a short distance 
ahead, showing that the enemy had been encountered. The 
order double-quick was passed down the line and the men 
marched swiftly forward for a short distance, when the narrow 
woods road emerged on to a Inroad thoroughfare running east 
and west. Turning to the right the regiment continued up the 
road toward the west, but the pace was too fast for the men and 
the cohunn strung out badly. A few moments later the regiment 
ascended a hill which had just been vacated by the Confederate 
troops who had retreated only a short distance as the showers of 
bullets that fell around the men of the Fourteenth plainly in- 
dicated. A heavy skirmish line was thrown across the field into 
the woods before which the Confederates beat a hasty retreat. 
Regiment after regiment filed up the hill, and on reaching the 
crest of which, the Fourteenth filed to the left and immediately 
began the building of breastworks. Here the men rested until 
daybreak of the 28th. when they were relieved by the First 
Corps and told to go to the woods, cook coffee and get breakfast, 
with the assurance that no more service would be required of 
them that day. Scarcely an hour, however, had passed when 
they were formed in line of battle with fixed bayonets, skirm- 



Bristow Station and Mine Run, 201 

ishers thrown out in front and an advance was made going over 
the breastworks erected by the regiment the night before and 
now occupied by the First Corps. Indications were that there 
would be an engagement, but the rebel pickets fell back a mile 
or two to their main body which occupied a very strong position 
and could be seen entrenched behind a stone wall about a mile 
and a half distant. A creek running between the Union line 
and these entrenched Confederates had been flooded by the 
enemy, making it impossible to pass. Union and Confederate 
batteries exchanged compliments with hot shot and shell much 
to the discomfort of the Fourteenth Regiment who were directly 
in range of these flying missiles. The men remained under fire 
in a cold drenching rain until dark when they again retired to 
the woods for the night. 

Sunday, the 29th, the Second Corps marched back, their places 
being occupied by the Fifth Corps. The corps then made a 
detour of the Confederate army and it was soon apparent that 
the division of which the Fourteenth was a part was to attack 
the enemy's right flank. A good position was finally gained, 
though several of the men were killed and wounded, but night 
coming on the main attack was postponed until morning. 

At two o'clock on the morning of November 30th. Lieutenant- 
Colonel Aloore received an order from headquarters that an at- 
tack would be made along the whole line at five o'clock, the men 
to be under arms an hour earlier, profound silence to be observed 
and no fires or lights allowed. The morning was bitter cold and 
the men suffered intensely. Lieutenant-Colonel Moore led the 
regiment to its appointed position, other lines of troops converg- 
ing from various directions. The Second Corps was formed in 
two lines of battle, the Fourteenth Regiment on the left. It was 
rumored through the ranks that the attack would be at eight 
o'clock upon the first sound of the bugle, and at the second 
sovmd the men were to charge across the field with fixed bayonets, 
and not to halt or fire a shot until the enemy's breastworks were 
carried. Orders were given that the knapsacks be piled in heaps. 
John Hirst has an incident of interest at this point. "We did not 
go far before we were halted, and stripped ofif our knapsacks and 



202 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry, 

what things we did not need for immediate use. I tell you it 
looked like a desperate undertaking to charge across those open 
fields in the face of those rebel earthworks fully manned as they 
were by some of the best soldiers in the rebel army. A good many 
of our men wrote their names, company and regiment upon pieces 
of paper, which they pinned upon their coats, for very few ex- 
pected if the charge was made to come out of it alive. While 
we were waiting for the word to go, Lieutenant-Colonel IMoore 
came to me and putting his hand upon my shoulder, said : — 'Jack, 
do vou see those works?' 'Yes,' I replied. 'Well, I want to 
see you plant those colors right upon those works.' 'I shall go 
just as far as those Johnnies will let me go alive.' At which 
reply the Lieutenant-Colonel turned away, his teeth set together 
like a vise. I tell you it was a good thing for the Fourteenth 
Regiment that the order to charge never came. We were in 
the front line of battle and our orders were if we got through 
the works, to keep right along as far as we could go, regardless 
of life or limb." 

|. L. (ioss writing to the Aleriden Journal relates this incident. 
"Lieutenant-Colonel Sam Moore, with his thin face, white and 
stern, walking slowly among his men said, 'Men, there is no 
use denying it, but three-quarters of you are to be left in that 
marsh with your toes turned up ; but remember the Fourteenth 
never quailed yet, and I'll shoot the first man that does it now." 

Lieutenant William H. Hawley. of Company B, sums up the 
situation at this point as follows: — "The Fourteenth was in the 
first line of battle where the bullets would strike the thickest in 
the charge. Knapsacks were ordered to be laid aside so that 
no useless weight might encumber the men. And now General 
Warren rides slowly down our lines, his sober face more sober 
than i>sual. He evidently dislikes to sacrifice his brave troops 
in such a desperate undertaking. The rebels have thrown up 
earthworks five feet or more high and in front of them have 
strewn fallen trees and brush to entangle us. Before we reach 
these breastworks a plain one-half mile in width must be 
crossed which will be swept by the fire of eight guns, some of 
them so planted as to give an enfilading fire. Whoever is for- 



Bristow Station and Mine Run. 203 

tunate enough to pass unharmed through the storm of bullets 
and shell and grape-shot and over the obstructions will find him- 
self confronted by a five foot wall with sharp bayonets behind 
it. Eight o'clock has arrived and we expect the order to ad- 
vance. We hear the roar of cannon from our right. General 
Meade has sent word from the right, asking Warren if the 
Second Corps can take the enemy's works. 'Yes' replied Warren, 
'they can take them, but there will be no more Second Corps.' 
Then Meade himself arrives on the ground, surveys the works 
through his glass, reckons the time it will take to reach them 
and shakes his head, saying 'it is of no use to try to climb a wall 
with two ladders.' And so the charge was abandoned. They 
did not, however, see fit to tell us of their decision and so we 
wait with anxious hearts until the sun goes down." 

To continue our narrative of the movements of the regiment. 
Tow^ard night fires were allowed which were grateful to the half 
frozen men. After dark the troops were withdrawn under the 
caution of quietness to the hill occupied the night previous, 
leaving the pickets behind with fires burning to mislead the 
enemy. Major Hincks remarks "that a polar bear would have 
frozen on that hill that night." There was little activity on the 
part of the enemy through the day, evidently intending to draw 
the Union troops forward. December ist the weather proved 
milder and the men were engaged strengthening the breastworks 
which they had built a few nights previous with brush and rails. 
About seven o'clock the men lay down for the night, but were 
soon aroused and ordered to prepare to move. This was the 
night that Lieutenant-Colonel Moore and Major Hincks did not 
sleep on their coveted feather bed from which they anticipated 
so much comfort. The movement, however, this time was a 
retrograde one, moving toward the Rapidan, in perfect silence. 
After marching a few miles the Fredericksburg and Orange 
Court House plank road was reached and Lieutenant Hawley, 
with part of Company D, was stationed at the point where the 
column turned oft" the road toward the river, to direct stragglers 
and the pickets, the latter being left on duty seven hours after 
the departure of the main army. Although this was a dangerous 



204 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

position Lieutenant Hawley crossed in safety and a few stray 
shots from the artillery served to hurry the stragglers across the 
river. The column made a halt of only fifteen or twenty minutes 
from the time they left the extreme left of the Confederate line 
near Mine Run until they crossed the bridge after daylight, and 
the pace was very fast all the way. The pontoons were hastily 
taken up and the men were allowed time to make coiTee and have 
a few hours sleep, and then took up a wearisome journey to their 
old camp at Stevensburg, where they arrived aboiit eight o'clock 
at night. This march may perhaps be put down as the hardest 
and most trying that the regiment ever made. 

Sergeant E. B. Tyler gives the following graphic description 
of the situation here: — "The writer recalls no more serious oc- 
casion in his army experience than at Mine Run in the flank 
movement of the Second Corps when the Fourteenth were lying- 
in the first line of battle, with knapsacks again discarded, a sure 
sign of the desperate nature of the duty expected of us. Just 
in front of us was a narrow belt of woods running parallel to 
our line. This screened us from the view of the enemy. 
Going through these woods to our picket-line, at the fur- 
ther side we could look across the level open fields and 
plainly see the strongly fortified position of the enemy. How 
defiantly their flags waved ; how heart-sickening the well wrought 
abatis in front of their works, for we were only waiting for the 
signal from the right, to charge across the open field amid the 
shot and shell and canister from the artillery and deadly volleys 
from the infantry, hoping against hope that a few of our first 
line might join with the others in clambering through the abatis 
and gain the works. This time there was no secret made of 
what was to be our special duty. No forlorn hope ever faced a 
more desperate prospect and the old Fourteenth was to be in 
the first line. We were to be the living moving breastwork that 
might in some slight measure afi'ord a little protection to the 
second, third or fourth line of infantry that were to follow, some 
of whom it might be hoped would scale the works and gain the 
victory. How slowly passed the time and yet we felt sure to 
many of us these were the final moments of our lives. Some- 



Bristow Station and Mine Run. 205 

how we never for a moment surmised that the old fighting Sec- 
ond Corps would either refuse or be refused an opportunity to 
fight, no matter what the chances against them. 

General Warren, with his staff, was riding up and down our 
line, going from point to point in order to obtain a better view 
of the enemy's lines and works. The men were at rest near 
their stacked arms, ready to fall into place at the first signal and 
as General Warren, who was to give the order that meant life 
or death, rode by, how we scanned his face for some inkling of 
purpose or some sign of encouragement. We saw the care, 
anxiety and burden of responsibility resting upon him, apparent 
in his countenance, serious almost to sadness, yet to us it was in- 
scrutable as the ancient rock faced Sphinx. His record as an 
able, careful commander was not unknown to us, and trust him 
we felt we could and must. The men stood mostly by or near 
their guns, but a little liberty was given them, and once, and 
again, singly or with a comrade or two, we stole out into the 
woods a few rods in front of us to calculate the chances of the 
assault. There seemed to be a fascination in looking over the 
open field. The rebel flag as it waved from its staff some times 
seemed flaunting only defiance to us, and some times in the 
changing lights and shadows of that winter morning, the staff 
obscured, the flag alone visible, waving and furling and doubling 
against the background of some darkening cloud, seemed like 
the friendly invitation of some spirit hand whose dainty beckon- 
ing lifted our thoughts to the great beyond. Then back again 
to our guns, waiting, yet dreading to hear the signal given. A 
deep reechoing sound comes rolling down from the distant right. 
Then another and another. The men sprang to their places, 
some perhaps with faces a little paler than usual, but never a 
man wavered or faltered. Determined to do their duty unto 
death, they stood and waited. But the order to advance came 
not. The gunners stood by their pieces to send back to the 
right the answering response if the attack was to be made, as 
it was to be made simultaneously on the right and by Warren 
on the left, if made at all. But the signal guns on the left 
responded not. The minutes became hours and gradually it 
dawned upon us that the battle planned for us was not to be 



206 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

fought. General Warren had weighed the chances, had counted 
the cost, had become convinced in spite of bravery and courage 
that never had and never should be questioned that to make the 
attack on that stronghold with his one corps miles away from 
anv support would be more the folly of a rash hairbrained mad- 
man than a wise and considerate officer. It was no lack of 
confidence in his men. It is reported he said he did not doubt 
but what his corps could take the works, but he feared it would 
be at the expense of the almost total loss of the same. He 
could not assume the responsibility of the sacrifice and for once 
the lives and the limbs and smarting wounds of the thousands in 
the ranks outweighed the temptation this slight chance offered 
to add new luster to a general's stars. That day and the next 
passed, then came the retreat, one of the best managed and en- 
tirely successful in the carrying out of all its details of any in 
the history of the war. After the long tedious march, second 
to none perhaps we ever made, unless that day we made over 
thirty miles on our way to Gettysburg, thoroughly exhausted, 
we reached our old camp near Stevensburg, and found our com- 
pany losses consisted of one or two of our new men, whether 
captured as prisoners or voluntary deserters, we were not quite 
sure." 

The following is the report of Colonel Ellis to the Adjutant- 
General of the State of Connecticut. There is no record of any 
reports from Colonel Ellis to Colonel Smyth of the brigade or 
Hays and Warren of the division corps recorded in the collection 
of reports published by the United States. 

"Headquarters Fourteenth Connecticut \'olunteers. 
Camp near Stony Mountain, Va. 
Brigadier-Gener.\l Horace J. Morse, 

Adjutant-General, State of Connecticut, 
General : — 

On the 26th day of November. (Thanksgiving Day), we re- 
ceived marching orders, and about daylight started toward the 
the Rapidan, which was distant some six or eight miles. We 
crossed this river at Germania Ford, and went into camp in 'the 



Bristow Station and Mine Run. 207 

wilderness.' some five miles on the other side. On the next day 
we encountered the enemy's skirmishers at a point known as 
Robirison's Tavern, or Old \"erdiersville. On the morning of 
the 28th our division advanced in line of battle upon the enemy's 
position, driving back his skirmishers for about a mile, and un- 
masking his real position, which was a very strong one, on the 
other side of Mine Run. We lay in line of battle all dav, occa- 
sionally shelled by the batteries of the rebels. Early the next 
morning we were relieved by the Fifth Corps ; and to our corps, 
with one division of the Sixth, was assigned the duty of flanking 
the rebel position. As it seemed too strong for attack in front, 
we made a long detour under cover of the woods, and toward 
sunset the advance of our corps encountered the extreme left of 
the rebel army, and drove it back for about a mile. Our regiment 
was exposed to a shell fire, but was not otherwise engaged. 
Here we threw out a heavy picket, and halted for the night. Be- 
fore daylight the next morning, our whole corps was in line of 
battle before the rebel works, which they had so strengthened dur- 
ing the night as to present a most formidable appearance. Hidden 
from the view of the enemy by a thick belt of trees, the knapsacks 
of the men were taken ofif and piled up, and every prenaration 
was made for a desperate charge. But our generals deciding 
that the sacrifice of life would be too great, the attack was not 
made. At dusk we quietly withdrew from our hazardous posi- 
tion, leaving our fires burning, to a neighboring range of hills 
where we passed the night. We remained here the next day also, 
but on the night of the 2d of December, took uj) our line of 
march for the Rapidan River which we reached the next morning 
about ten o'clock, crossing at Culpepper Mine Ford. After a 
couple of hours rest, we resumed our march, reaching our old 
camp upon Mountain Run a little after dark, having accom- 
plished about forty or forty-five miles in the twenty-four hours. 
The loss of the regiment in this afit'air was two men wounded 
and about a dozen missing, most of whom were probably taken 
prisoners. 

Verv respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Thkodore G. Ellis, 
Colonel Fourteenth Connecticut Volunteers." 



CHAPTER XII. 

Stony Mountain and Battle of Morton's Ford. 

We left the regiment after its trying march from the Mine 
Run fiasco, reaching its old camp ground at Stevensburg on the 
evening of December 2d, about eight o'clock. The men were 
thoroughly exhausted and worn, not only by their long and 
tedious marching, but by the weary and anxious hours before 
the Confederate entrenchments at Mine Run. The next morn- 
ing they moved about a mile to a new camp and, acting upon 
rumors through the regiment that they would remain in camp 
for the rest of the season, built huts and made other atrange- 
ments for comfort and rest. 

About this time there was trouble among the new recruits 
owing to the fact that liquor had been smuggled into camp. On 
the evening of December 4th, after Lieutenant-Colonel Moore 
and the Adjutant of the regiment had retired for the night, word 
came down from headquarters that there was much noise in the 
Fourteenth camp which disturbed the other regiments. Upon 
examination it was found that the fires were lighted in all the 
company streets, although taps had sounded some time before, 
and there were lights in many of the quarters. Lieutenant 
Brigham, officer of the day, was ordered by Lieutenant-Colonel 
Moore to take all the men he needed and quell the almost riotous 
scene. He soon reported to Lieutenant-Colonel Moore that he 
was unable to stop the noise. Meanwhile another order came 
down from brigade headquarters that if Lieutenant-Colonel Moore 
was unable to stop the noise, Colonel Smyth himself would attempt 
the task. Lieutenant-Colonel Moore and Adjutant Hincks then 
started out. The men generally fled to their huts on the ap- 
proach of these officers. Passing down a street, one of these 
recruits pushed his head out of the door of the cabin, ofifering 
some insulting epithet to Lieutenant-Colonel Moore as he 

(208) 



i 



Stony Mountain and Battle of Morton's Ford. 



211 



passed and then quickly dodged into his quarters again. But 
Lieutenant-Colonel Moore reached the inside of the cabin almost 
simultaneously with the audacious conscript and gave him a few 
sharp blows with his sword, from the pain of which the man 
howled hideously, the blows l)eing accompanied with some of 
Lieutenant-Colonel Moore's strongest language. Passing down 
another street, a heavy stone was hurled from one of the cabins 
which came near the head of Adjutant Hincks. The Adjutant, 
rushing into the hut, found several men lying upon the floor, 




Stony Mountain from Stevensburg. 



feigning to be asleep, and administered a few lusty blows with 
his saber. This determined attempt to restore order had its 
results and the Lieutenant-Colonel and Adjutant retired for the 
night. 

The next morning the regiment was again under marching 
orders and at seven o'clock moved about three miles and pitched 
their tents upon a bleak ridge, perhaps a mile from the village 
of Stevensburg, where they remained until December loth. 
Many of the new recruits refused to move and were squatting 
about the fires in the company streets, drinking their coffee, 
while the regiment marched out of camp. Seeing this Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel ^loore returned on his nimble steed and dashed 
through the streets making it lively work for the recalcitrant 



2 1 2 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

men to protect themselves. As they jumped up the Lieutenant- 
Colonel hit them many a blow with his broad saber and flogged 
them back to the ranks. It was an effective scene of energetic 
determination and afforded great amusement to the orderly men 
of the regiment. 

December loth, the regiment was moved about two miles 
farther and the men were again engaged building log huts in 
the fond anticipation that they were to have a long rest. This 
was slow work as many details from the regiment were sent out 
to build corduroy roads to Brandy Station, by which route the 
supplies were received. An interesting fact was that at this time 
there were ten captains on duty with the regiment, an unpre- 
cedented fact since the regiment reached Keedysville before 
Antietam. Many of the men were granted short furloughs and 
there were numerous remembrances received from friends at 
home of barrels and boxes containing delicacies and articles oi 
food of real value. However, it was not to be the fortune of the 
Fourteenth Regiment to remain long in one j^osition and as if 
fearing that the regiment would be forgotten, it was again or- 
dred to change its camp December 27th, and marched at nine 
o'clock in a severe rain. That the men were highly incensed 
may be well imagined. The heavy rain, the deep mud in which 
many of the men lost their shoes, the disappointment and what 
they considered lack of faith in the words of the commanding 
ofificers all combined to make ill feeling. After going about three 
miles, the regiment turned off to the side of a rugged hill, called 
Stony Mountain, close to the banks of the Rapidan River and 
within sight of the enemy's picket. It was a wild spot, over- 
grown with pines and underbrush which had never been cut. 
Sergeant Wade perhaps represents the feeling of the men at this 
point. He says: — "Here was just the spot for the Fourteenth. 
There was no doubt in our minds but what we should stay here, — 
at least till they had got force enough to drive the enemy another 
mile, and then, of course, we should move again. We again 
received our accustomed orders, 'put up good huts for you will 
stay here all winter' and so we went to work. But it had 
rained hard all day and we were wet to the skin. We had no 



Stony Mountain and Battle of Morton's Ford. 



213 



time to put up any tents, and so we lay on the wet ground all 
nioht. It was a mystery to us all that we didn't catch our death 
cold. The next morning we went to work, but it continued to 
rain, and we got along slowly. The mud was over a foot deep, 
and the water run a stream through all our streets. But the 
next morning it cleared off pleasant, and we managed by night 
to get our huts nearly done. By the end of the week we had 
them all finished, good streets laid out, and in fact were all ready 
to move again." 



S^®9P*^ 




Brigade Camp, at Stony Mountain, from a drawing by (ieo. W. Hill, of Co. G. 



Touching the proximity of the camp to the enemy, a letter 
from Captain W. H. Hawley gives a vivid idea as follows : — 
"The rebels in front are rather saucy. Lieutenant-Colonel 
Moore went out with a few men to get some boards from a 
deserted house for his stable. A rebel sentry across the river 
sent a bullet whizzing by his ear, but he paid no attention to it 
and did not leave until he had secured his boards. The\' shout 
across the river to our sentries that as soon as we are comfortably 
settled, they are coming across the river to occupy our houses 
themselves. General Hancock does not like the idea of our 
being out here and would not have ordered us out had he been 



2 1 4 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

in command at the time. He is afraid the rel^els wiU come over 
in force some fine morning and gobhle np the Second Brigade. 
We are four miles in advance of the main bod v." 

There was a singularly unmilitary course pursued here. The 
regiment at this time was some four miles in advance of the 
main army and a cavalry picket-line was established between the 
regiment and the army and so rigid was this picket-line that 
there could be no communication by the Fourteenth men with the 
main army without a written permission from General French. 
Even the surgeons were not allowed to pass back and forth in 
their work among the men. 

There was sadness in the camp over the untimely death of 
Lieutenant Edward W. Hart, of Company E, of diphtheria. 
Lieutenant Hart had charge of the laying of the corduroy road 
already noticed as being laid to Brandy Station. In regard to 
this faithful officer, a letter to the New Haven Joiu-nal and 
Courier says: — "He will be sadly missed by his old (G) and new 
com]iany (K) and by the officers of his regiment. But his rela- 
ti\'es ma\' rest assured that while his memory will remain green 
in our hearts forever, we kncnv that his soul is with the God to 
whom he clung amid all temptations. And so we drop a tear 
on the grave of 'the youngest, the noblest, the Ijravest of us all," 

There were many happy days at the camp at Stony Mountain, 
one of the pleasing incidents being the visit of many of the 
officers' wives and friends. The first to arrive was Mrs. Fisk. 
wife of Captain Samuel F'isk, of Company G, who was accom- 
panied bv her bov. She was heartily welcomed and was the 
object of nmch attention, the band serenaded her with some of 
its sweetest music and Lieutenant-Colonel Moore tendered her 
a dinner at which the regimental officers were present. The 
menu was most elaborate, consisting of soup, roast beef, turkey, 
chicken, plum-pudding, four kinds of pie, nuts, apples, cider and 
champagne, and two loaves of cake handsomely frosted, which 
the sutler brought from Washington as a present to the popular 
Lieutenant-Colonel. The band also added its finest strains to 
further complete the hospitalities of the occasion. 

There were manv amusing incidents and situations. We have 



Stony Mo'-^.tain and Battle of Morton's Ford. 



215 



already spoken of I'ierce I'.arron, the witty Irish recruit who came 
to the'reg-iment at Cedar Run. One day here at Stony Mountain 
General Snnth and his staiT rode hy the camp to the top of 
the hill. ( )ld Tierce, who was standing with a group of the men 
of the regiment, saluted and called out with all the hearty en- 
thusiasm of a true son of Erin, "Cod bless ye's, (General Smyth..' 
Smyth, who had Irish blood in his veins, and who felt in the 
humor to notice the old man, stoPi)e(l and spoke to him. "What'.s 
your name, my man?" "liarron, sir. Tierce Barron, sir." 

"Barron Barron, that's a good name. Seems to me you look 

dry, I'.arron," said the Ceneral. "Ah, (ieneral, dear, Tm that 



Stony Momitain in recent years. 



dry T could hardly spake the truth" says Barron. And it is 
vouched for by the men of the ]<-ourteenth that the Ceneral's 
canteen furnished old Tierce with a drink that day. Another 
time as Smvth was riding by the camp, however, old Tierce was 
seen trotting along by his side, showering blessings and blarney- 
ings on him, Imt the Ceneral took no notice of him, and the old 
fehow soon dr()i)i)ed away to one side, his mouth watermg for 
the whiskey he did not get. 



216 



Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 



During- these few weeks at Stony A Fountain there were quite 
a number of rebel officers and men wlio came into camp and sur- 
rendered. These were busy da\s as officers were fitting up 
their quarters for the recejition of their wives and friends. 
There were very many architectural attempts at beauty and, 
utility, and boards and all Ijuilding- material Ijrought fabulous 
prices. There was a great deal of rivalry among the men, the 
streets were better policed and the whole cam]) i)resented the ap- 
pearance of a village neatly ke])t. lUit these days of rest and 
pleasant security from active service were soon closed. About 
four o'clock on the morning of Saturday, February 6th., orders 
were given that the regiment be read}' to move at seven, the men 
to be supplied with ammunition and three days rations. A little 
after the hour the regiment tiled out of camp, leaving their 
canvas covered huts undisturbed in charge of the guard of the 
camp. About this time it was the evident design of the com- 
mander in chief of the I'nion armv that (ieneral lUitler should 
attem])t the capture of Richmond. To attract the attention of 




Morton's Ford from the south. 



Stony Mountain and Battle of Morton's Ford. 2 1 7 

Lee and hold his army from Richmond a show of active opera- 
tions was proposed at this point on the Rapidan. It has never 
been supposed that it was the design of the generals to precipitate 
an engagement with any great number of men at this point. 
General Xewton, commander of the First Corps, was ordered to 
move to Racoon Ford, about three miles above Morton's Ford. 
He did so, but did not cross the river, remaining at this point, 
comparatively inactive, until the evening of the following day. 
The Second Corps, under command of General Warren, was or- 
dered to move to Morton's Ford which it did, moving through a 
belt of woods to a broad plain and formed line of b'attle on the 
north bank of the Rapidan opposite Morton's F^ord. Here they 
remained for about iive hours. The object of this delay can 
hardly be explained for every moment seemed to give the Con- 
federates an opportunity to mass their men. Standing on this 
broad plain and looking across about a mile the Confederate 
troops could be seen moving toward the breastworks from all 
directions, until it was evident that the enemy had many more 
troops than the Union. The course of the Rapidan at this point 
was like a bended bow or crescent. The Confederate entrench- 
ments about a mile distant followed the course of this bend, its 
concave side toward the river and its extreme right and left 
coming down nearl\- to the river. The Confederates also had a 
line of ritie-pits in which were planted about eighty men between 
the bank of the river and the entrenchments. Shortly after 
crossing the river was a ridge extending along in front, near 
which stood the house of Major Buckner. Still farther on stood 
the house of Dr. Morton, from whom the ford took its name. 
The latter house was surrounded by a number of smaller out- 
buildings which were used by the negroes all standing within 
a grove of trees of full growth. There had been the usual neg- 
lect in throwing over pontoon bridges, the pontoon train being 
halted in the mud about half a mile in the rear. The river at 
this point was broad with a swift current and about waist deep, 
although the depth varied, some parts being so deep that the 
taller men were obliged to hold the shorter ones up by the arms- 
to keep them from drowning. About one o'clock the order was 



2 1 8 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

given to move forward. The First and Third Brigades were the 
first to ford the stream and the Second Brigade brought up the 
rear. The water was icy cold, mixed with snow and ice. So 
deep was it tliat the men were obHged to hold their cartridge^ 
boxes above their heads to prevent the ammunition from being 
spoiled bv the water. To add to the discomfort of the men 
there was a cold drizzling rain. On reaching the opposite shore, 
they ascended the liank and advanced at the double-quick across 
an open space which was raked by the fire of a rebel battery, 
fortunatelv aimed too high, and thus none of the men were hit. 




Buckner House at a distance. 

The men were here massed with their conn"ades in a ravine where 
they were protected from the encmx's shot and shell and re- 
mained all day, but little exce])t i)icket firing occurring to break 
the monotony. This, however, was so close and frequent that 
the men could not stand up with safety. From here also could 
be seen troops arriving from all directions toward the Confeder- 
ate breastworks. The position of the Union men was a hazard- 
ous one, being exposed to an attack from the right, left and front 
or from all three quarters combined by a greatly superior force, 
and such an attack could hardlv have failed to dislodge the Union 



Stony Mountain and Battle of Morton's Ford. 



219 



forces from the shallow ravine and drive them hack in confusion 
upon the river, (leneral Hays rode back and forth upon his 
galloping- steed, his reckless manner and incoherent language in- 
dicating that he had added two or three extra fingers to his 
morning dram. (leneral Warren was also indisposed the early 
part of the day, his indisjxisition lifting itself and enabling him 
to be on the field late in the afternoon for a few minutes. The 
brigade commander was also so seriously indisposed as to be un- 
able to sit upon his saddle or even to walk about, but sat listlessly 
in a large arm-chair brought from one of the neighboring houses. 




■w of Major Buckner's House. 



It was nearly dark when there was lively firing from the 
enemy's batteries, resi)onded to by the Union guns across the 
river, and the firing along the skirmish line assumed the propor- 
tions of a volley. The Thirty-ninth Xew York, known as the 
"Garibaldi Guards," was brought up to the support of the skirm- 
ish line. These were prolxddy the most unfit troops in the whole 
corps to take up the duty. They were mostly foreigners, could 



220 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

not understand the langugage of the orders and as they came over 
the crest of the hill and encountered the enemy's fire, they be- 
came confused and instead of keeping their line, recoiled in 
confusion and huddled together in groups, upon which the 
enemy's shot made sad havoc. Finding these men could not be 
depended upon the Fourteenth Regiment was ordered up and the 
sharp, clear voice of Lieutenant-Colonel Aloore was heard "Fall 
in Fourteenth" and the men went forward, stepping over the 
prostrate forms of the Twelfth New Jersey, who lay directly 
before them. The Fourteenth Regiment moved swiftly up to 
the brow of the hill when the order was given to deploy as 
skirmishers, the men Ijeing four or five feet apart. The bullets 
fell thick and fast and the noise was indescribable. Lieutenant- 
Colonel Moore with the right wing and center of the regiment 
marched down the slope on to the broad plain toward the enemy, 
while Adjutant Hincks took the left. A couple of dozen of the 
recruits clustered behind one of the buildings, but were soon 
dislodged and forced into line through the proddings of the 
sharp points of Adjutant Hincks and Sergeant-Major Murdock's 
sabers. The darkness was intense, the artillery had ceased to 
pla}- and the sharp flashes of the musketry were the only indica- 
tions of the whereabouts of the enemy. Above the shouts and 
clatter of the musketry could be heard the sharp tenor voice of 
Lieutenant-Colonel Moore, directing his men and encouraging 
them to proceed. The advance was rapid and the line had now 
reached the Morton houses in a cluster of trees, the men shielding 
themselves behind the garden fence. Just before reaching this 
house Major Coit was wounded and left the field. Captain 
Broatch, senior captain of the regiment, while advancing sword in 
hand was struck by a bullet which shattered his fingers and threw 
his sword twenty feet into the air. Picking it up and grasping 
it in his left hand he swung it over his head, at the same time 
guiding his men with his voice until his wound proved so painful 
that he was obliged to retire from the field. Oscar Abbott, of 
Companv A, had the misfortune to get his gun fouled so that 
it could no longer be discharged, but by the advice of his com- 



Stony Mountain and Battle of Morton's Ford. 221 

panion, brave, Corporal Russell Glenn, continued to go forward 
until Glenn himself received a severe wound when Abbott helped 
him to the rear. 

With the serious losses which the Fourteenth had met in its 
advance, it was not able unsupported to dislodge the Confederates 
from the strong position which they had formed behind the 
Morton house and among the outljuildings. The contest had 
become fierce and in many cases it was a hand to hand fight with 
bayonets in the darkness. Some of the Fourteenth entered the 
buildings and Captain Frederick 15. Doten. of Company F, with 
half a dozen men entered one of the houses and fired upon the 




Headquarters of Pickets near Morton's Ford. 

enemy from the windows. Presently an officer dashed up to the 
house, dismounted, entered and with various expletives, better 
imagined than written, wanted to know what they were doing 
there. It proved to be General Ha^s who, unaccompanied by any 
of his staff, had come out to the skirmish line. Captain Doten 
attempted to explain the situation, stating that there was a large 
rebel force, with which he could not cope, directly in front. 
General Hays would accept no explanation, but ordered him to 
move out and onward. Captain Doten and the men well knew 
the consequences of moving out. but like all Fourteenth men 
they obeyed orders and, opening the back door, stepped out. 



222 



Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 



The General folhnved and nionnted his horse. As he passed the 
corner of the house a sharp rifle shot was heard and General 
Hays fell heavily to the ground. As Captain Doten and his 
men advanced and left the house there was a voice from the 
darkness, ordering them to surrender, saying that he had heard 
the conversation and did not wish to shoot them in cold l)lood, 
adding, "As for your general, we have killed him." This latter 
was not true as the shot had entered the saddle of General Hays' 
horse and he quickly mounted his steed and slid away in the dark- 
ness. Doten could do nothing else than surrender and he and 




Morton House and surroundings. 



his six men were marched out and later took their long journey 
to Libby prison. It proved that the captors of these men were 
four companies of the 44th Georgia Regiment, who were drawn 
up in line of battle in their front. Idie Fourteenth Regiment 
had done a grand work, but it was unable to meet the large force 
of the enemy. Seeing this General Hays ordered up the io8th 
New York and the loth New York Battalion in line of battle. 
Halting them a little just before reaching the house, in front of 
which stood the Fourteenth, he ordered the loth New York to 



Stony Mountain and Battle of Morton's Ford. 



223 



fire. An officer of the loth replied "(lencral, those are our men 
in front of us." General Hays replied "They are rehels," pre- 
ceding his order to fire hy an oath. Crash went that dreadful 
volley and how nianv of the hrave l""ourteenth fell by that stupid 
drunken order will never lie known. There was a loud cry of 
disniaw and the two advancing- rej^inients approached the house. 
The line was further strengthened, the attempt to fiank was 
foiled, the Confederates were routed and the battle ot Mor- 
ton's Ford was at an end. 




CAPT. FREDERICK B. DOTEN. 



Captain hVederiek 15. Doten was born in Shefiield, Mass., in 
1840 and with his i)arents moved to Bridgeport, Conn., in early 
childhood. He enlisted as corporal of Co. A when twenty-two 
years of age and rose l)y steady steps to the captaincy of Co. F 
in October 1863. At the time of his enlistment he was clerk in 
New York. iXfter his discharge from militarv service Mav i. 



224 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

1865, he removed to Chicopee, Mass., and was for a time engaged 
in mercantile business. Later he became cashier of the First 
National Rank of Chicopee, which position he held until his death, 
April 9, 1903. Captain Doten was a favorite of all who came in 
contact with him. His disposition and temperament were con- 
genial and companionable. While his comrades loved him for 
these, they esteemed him for his integrity, his frankness and his 
judgment coupled as these were with gentleness, capacity and 
a courageous faithfulness to dutv. 

Slowly the men of the Fourteenth, discouraged and disheart- 
ened, gathered up their dead and wounded as far as possible in 
the moonless night and returned to the ravine, later crossing 
the river on a temporary bridge, reaching their old camp at 
Stony Mountain soon after midnight. Worn and tired and dis- 
couraged by the fatigue and ill-fortunes of the day the men re- 
tired for rest and sleep. They had hardly closed their eyes when 
Lieutenant-Colonel Moore received an order to take his men out 
and picket the river opposite the ford. This was cruei and 
wicked as there were many troops that had not '.'een in action dur- 
ing the day. but such was the fortune of the brave old Four- 
teenth. The men knew nothing but to obey orders and they 
remained on duty in this ca])acity until noon of the 8th. 

This order was from Colonel Powers, of the io8th New York, 
who commanded the brigade, as may be seen from his report to 
the adjutant-general, commanding the division. 

Regarding the fortunes of the flag in this battle, we may say 
Sergeant Amory Allen of Hartford, bearer of the United States 
flag, and Corporal Robert A. Chadwick, of East Lyme, one of 
the Color-Guard, were killed in charging upon the enemy. Cor- 
poral John Hirst, of Rockville, took the flag after Sergeant Allen 
fell, and carried it during the remainder of the engagement. 

The total loss of the Second Army Corps was two hundred and 
fifty-four, showing that nearly one-half of those killed, wounded 
and missing belonged to the Fourteenth Regiment. 

To support some of the insinuations thrown out in this chap- 
ter, we may read a frank and explicit letter from Captain William 
H. Hawley, of Company K. He writes : — "Do you know that 



Stony Mountain and Battle of Morton's Ford. 225 

when our Second Corps was ordered on that reconnoissance 
February 6th General Warren (corps commander) was so 
drunk as to be unable to be with the corps until nearl\ sundown? 
The papers say he was unwell, but the truth is he was drunk. 
General Alexander Hays, our division commander, had just 
enough whiskey in him to make him reckless and almost like a 
crazy man. Colonel Powers, connnanding- the brigade, was 
really unfit to conuuand by reason of liquor. I suppose I am 
liable to court martial for thus speaking of ni}- superior officers, 
but it is the truth." 

The official report of the casualties as reported by Lieutenant- 
Colonel Moore was killed, 6 enlisted men ; wounded, 7 commis- 
sioned officers, 83 enlisted men ; missing, i commissioned officer, 
18 enlisted men; total, 115. A corrected report as given by 
Chaplain Stevens is killed and mortally wounded, 14; wounded, 
85; captured and missing, if); total, T15. 

The following is the list as reported 1j}- Lieutenant-Colonel 
Moore : — 

Major, James ?>. Coit. wounded, in leg, slightly. 

Company A. Wounded, Cai)tain, John C. Ih-oatch, hand. 
Sergeants, E. A. Wilcox, leg, slightly, Russell ( ilenn, thigh, sev- 
erely. Corporal, (Cornelius Reardon, leg, severely, Privates, Joel 
N. Bradley, ankle, severely, W^illiam Denevan, hand, badly, 
Charles G. Hyatt, elbow, badly, James Henderson, hip, l^adlx , 
John Lotty, leg, badly, Richard Wallace, foot, John DeWolf, hip, 
dangerously: missing, Privates, Henry Walter, Christian Brahll. 

Company l\. Wounded, Corporals, Amnion Xortt)n, ankle, 
slightly, Albert R. Crittenden, arm, slightly, James Inglis, leg, 
severly. Privates, John Anderson, ankle. Pierce r)arron, leg, 
slightly, John Doyle, leg, slightly, Frederick Harrison, l^-east, 
severely, Thaddeus Steinhall, hand, James Wilson, face, slightly. 
Carpenter Weeks, ankle, severely. 

Company C. Wounded, ist Sergeant, William W. Nelson, 
ankle, severely. Sergeant Sylvester G. Lord, hand, slightly. Cor- 
poral William Bennett, hand, slightly. Private John Denby, foot, 
slightly ; missing. Sergeant, Alexander McNeil, Privates, Henry 
Woods, William Braney, Nicholas Dehn, William Pendleton. 



226 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Company D. Killed, Corporal, Henry W. Orcutt ; wounded, 
Captain, Walter M. Lucas, thigh, slightly, 2d Lieutenant, George 
A. Stocking, thigh, slightly, Sergeants, K. E. Newell, thigh, 
severely, Henry Owens, foot, severely. Corporals, Charles Carter, 
leg, severely, James P. Shepard. arm, slightly, Privates, John A. 
Morse, leg, severely, Martin Lyons, shoulder, slightly, Charles 
Williams, leg, Henry Burncastle, Edwin Brockett, groin, severely, 
Peter Benjamin, severely and missing, Frederick Shafer, badly 
bruised. 

Company E. Wounded, Corporal. George Boomer, ankle, 
severely. Privates, Henry Seymour, thigh, severely, Watson 
Jones, abdomen, badly, Robert Kerr, side and arm, William 
Smith, hand, slightly, Wesley Banks, leg, severely, Edward 
Daley, thigh, severely ; missing. Private, Moses Tyler. 

Company F. Wounded, ist Lieutenant, Frederick Shalk, eye, 
contusion. Sergeant, Michael Meyers, head, severely and miss- 
ing. Corporals, Charles M. Schoville, groin, slightly, Danford J. 
Davis, wounded and missing, William Latimer, thigh, slightly, 
Privates, Joseph A. Berry, thumb, slightly. Mace Goning, arm, 
severely, Charles Miller, hand, slightly. Henry i\Iyer, cheek, 
slightly, .Vndrew Smith, scriouslv ; missing. Captain, F". D. Doten, 
Privates, Helenus Dott, John Hines. 

Company G. Wounded, Privates, Richard Lee. foot, slightly, 
Joseph Casserly, leg, slightly; missing. Privates, Thomas Kane, 
Michael Kelly, John Gordon. 

Company FI. Killed, Corporal, Robert Chadwick ; wounded, 
Captain, Henry L. Snagg, foot, slightly. Sergeant, George Mc- 
Cracken, hand, slightly, Privates, Albert F. Williams, groin, 
severely, Hiram Curtis, leg. severely, Theron Sanford. hand, slight- 
ly, James Shorkey, arm, slightly, Peter Boyle, thigh, severely, 
John Nelson, arm, severely, Edward Alunson, thigh, slightly, 
Hans Danielson, head, slightly. Prentice A. Perkins, badly, Julius 
Hinckley, thigh, badly ; missing. Corporal, Silas S. Fox. 

Company L Killed, ist Sergeant, Francis M. Norton, Color- 
Sergeant, Armory Allen, Privates, John Daniels, Thomas Kelly; 
wounded, 2d Lieutenant, George H. Brigham, breast, slightly, 
Sergeants, A. N. Crosby, leg, slightly, Joseph Junot, hip, severely, 



Stony Mountain and Battle of Morton's Ford. 227 

Corporals, William Gorham, thigh, severely, Frederick Beards- 
ley, thigh, slightly. Privates, William Brown, arm, badly, John 
Lynch, side, slightly, Charles Slessenger, side, badly, Charles 
Gillon, leg, badly, James McErvoy, arm, William Thompson, 2d, 
leg, slightly, Timothy Ryan, leg, severely, Thomas Walters, 
shoulder, severely, Oscar Williams, leg, severely ; missing. Cor- 
poral, Philettts Barnum, Privates, Patrick Flynn, William Thomp- 
son, 1st. 

Company K. Wounded, Corporal, Henry Hull, thigh, slightly. 
Privates, Nelson Kingsbury, ankle, severely, Oscar Kibber, fin- 
ger, John Stark, hand, badly, John Wallack, groin, badly, John 
Madden ; missing. Private, John Staub. 

The following is the report of Lieutenant-Colonel S. A. Moore 
to the Adjutant-General of the State of Connecticut: — 

"Headqtiarters Fourteenth Connecticut X'olunteers, 
February 8th, 1864. 

Brigadier-General Horace J. Morse, 

Adjutant-General, State of Connecticut. 
Sir : — I have the honor to submit the following report of the 
part taken by this regiment in the action of the (')th, near Mor- 
ton's Ford on the Rapidan. 

At about one o'clock P. M. on Saturday, the Oth, the brigade, 
to which this regiment is attached, was ordered to cross the 
Rapidan at Morton's l-'ord. This was effected in good order, 
by fording the river, which at this point is nearly waist deep, 
and with but little opposition from the enemy. As the regiment, 
however, moved over the crest of the first hill, they opened a 
shell fire upon us, but without causing us any loss, as their aim 
was a little too high. Al)out half a mile from the ford, the regi- 
ment took up its position with the rest of the brigade, under 
the slope of a hill and in rear of a small white house. Here 
we remained in line of battle, being occasionally shelled by the 
enemy, until about five o'clock P. '\\. At this time the rebels 
made an attack upon our position, and this regiment was ordered 
out to the support of the skirmish line, commanded by Colonel 
Beard. The regiment advanced upon the enemy, deployed as 



228 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

skirmisliers. and drove back their line of battle for upwards of 
half a mile, to a place where there were about a dozen small 
houses and outbuildings situated in a grove of trees. Here the 
enemy made a stand and the regiment fought them hand to hand, 
in some cases using the bayonet, until the One Hundred and 
Eighth New York Volunteers and the Battalion of Tenth New 
York coming to our aid, enabled us to drive them from the build- 
ings. We held this point for upwards of an hour, until ordered 
to withdraw to our former position, which we did. leaving a 
strong picket to keep the enemy from advancing while we were 
carrying off oiu- dead and wounded. We brought oft' all of the 
dead and wounded whom we could find ; but, owing to the dark- 
ness of the night, some probably escaped our search. At about 
II o'clock P. M., we re-crossed the river, taking our dead and 
wounded with us. ( )ur brigade then took up a position near the 
ford, to check any movement of the enemy in case they should 
attempt to cross to our side. Here we remained until the night 
of the /th, when the troops of the Second Cor])s returned to 
their former camping grounds, leaving the Fourteenth to guard 
the crossing at Morton's Ford during the night. At about ii 
A. AI. to-day, we were relieved and returned to camp. 

Captain V. D. Doten, of Compan\- l'\ while trving to capture 
a party of rebels in one of the houses, was himself taken prison- 
er. The officers and the men in almost every case behaved them- 
selves in such a manner as to reflect credit upon themselves and 
upon the command. 

I remain, sir, very respectfully, }our ol)cdient servant, 

vS. A. ^looRK, Lieutenant-Colonel, 
Commanding Fourteenth Connecticut Volunteers." 

Colonel Powers, commanding the brigade, has this to say of 
the Fourteenth Connecticut in connection with other regiments : — 
"The Fourteenth Connecticut, One Hundred and Eighth New 
York and Tenth Battalion deserve great credit for the heavy 
fighting they did ; driving a superior force of the enemy and fre- 
quently using the bayonet. Lieutenant-Colonel F. E. Pierce, 
Lieutenant-Colonel T. H. Davis, Lieutenant-Colonel S. A. Moore, 



Stony Mountain and Battle of Morton's Ford. 229 

Captain Dewey and Captain Tait, commanding respectively the 
One Hundred and Eighth New York. Twelfth New Jersey, 
Fourteenth Connecticut Volunteers, Tenth New York Battalion 
and First Delaware Battalion, did their whole duty." 

There was a suspicious solicitude on the part of General Hays 
for the men of the Fourteenth who were in the hospital. It 
might have been the twdnges of conscience for the cruel order 
which he gave at the Morton house. He and his wife visited 
the hospital daily, bringing oranges and delicacies for the wound- 
ed men. 

It has been contended that it was not in the plan of operations 
that General Hays should cross the river at this point, but simply 
to make a pretense to attract the Confederate troops from 
Richmond. When once over it was evident from time to time 
that it was the purpose of the enemy to flank the Union forces 
and get between them and the river, and military men have testi- 
fied that they were prevented from doing this only by the charge 
of the Fourteenth Regiment. 

Upon the return of Colonel Ellis and learning of the conduct 
of (jeneral Hays, he sought diligently for an investigation. 
None of his requests or efforts got beyond division headquarters. 
He then appealed to the Secretary of War direct and to Governor 
pjuckingham of his own state. While there was naturally re- 
luctance to lay bare the facts of this drunken spree, it would 
doubtless have been accomplished if it had not been for the death 
of General Hays during the Wilderness Campaign. 

Allusion has been made to the expected visits of many of the 
officers" wives and friends. They arrived on the evening of the 
engagement across the river at Morton's Ford. They were es- 
corted to the top of the mountain by Sergeant Charles G. Blatch- 
ley of Comi)any I. After speaking of the arrival of Mrs. Fisk, 
Sergeant Blatchley says: — "The others arrived late on the even- 
ing of the 6th of I-'ebruar}-, during the progress of the battle of 
Morton's Ford. I piloted them up to the crest of the ridge and 
their first experience of camp life was the view of that evening 
battle as they watched with feelings that can better be imagined 
than described, the flash of the musketry across the river where 



230 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

their husbands were facing death in the deepening darkness of 
that winter twihght." 

The regiment remained at Stony Mountain until the evening 
of May 3(1. the men enjoying nuich needed rest, the time being 
occupied by regimental, brigade and division drills. One of the 
incidents of their stay was the building and dedication of a church 
which, although built by the One Hundred and Eighth New 
York and designed for all the regiments, the warm feeling be- 
tween that regiment and the Fourteenth seemed as if it was a 
part of our own mens enterprise. Major Hincks reports some 
considerable religious interest during these weeks. 

On Washington's Birthday a grand ball was given at corps 
headc^uarters for which purpose a large hall was erected of slabs, 
the interior presenting a gay appearance by the display of flags 
from all the regiments of the corps. There was some solicitude 
that the Confederates, who were well aware of what was going 
on, might make an attack. To guard against this, extra pre- 
cautions were taken, the picket guard greatly strengthened, and 
a bogus gun was mounted on the top of the mountain in full 
view of the enemy across the river. 

Several rebel deserters came into camp and reported much dis- 
satisfaction in the Confederate ranks. About this time one hun- 
dred new recruits were added to the regiment from Connecticut, 
but for the most ])art they were good men, although it was said 
one died from old age soon after joining the regiment and an- 
other was totally l)lind. Another was so old and gray that he 
was dismissed from the service, but soon returned wdth his hair 
and whiskers dyed, thus gathering two bounties. 

There were repeated false alarms of the movement of the enemy 
and once the men were called to arms and slept with their equip- 
ments on. Several times the men were order to pack up and be 
ready to move. 

The men here learned of the appointment of General Grant as 
commander of the army. The impulse of a new spirit at the head 
of the armv was soon manifest. All of the ladies were ordered 
from camp and there was a reorganization of the corps, by con- 
solidating them into a more compact form. The five corps of 



Stony Mountain andjBattle of Morton's Ford. 231 

the Army of the Potomac were reduced to three and the Four- 
teenth Regiment which had ahvays been attached to the Third 
Division, Second Brigade, Second Corps, was now transferred 
to the Second Division, Third Brigade, of the Second Corps, 
under General Hancock, corps commander, General Gibbon, di- 
visitjn commander and Colonel Carroll in command of the brigade 
which was composed of the following regiments : — Fourth and 
Eighth Ohio, Fourteenth Indiana, Seventh West Virginia, Four- 
teenth Connecticut, Tenth New York Battalion, One Hundred 
and Eighth New York, First Delaware and Twelfth New Jersey. 

The Fourteenth was without a chaplain at this time. Chaplain 
Stevens being discharged the December previous and no new 
appointment had been made. 

Colonel Smyth invited the ladies visiting in the camp to a re- 
ception at his headquarters where a supper was served, with nnisic 
furnished by the F^ourteenth band. 

A severe snow storm in camp toward the last of March added 
variety to the usual monotony of camp life. Captain Hawley 
describes this in a letter which he sent home by Lieutenant Julius 
W. Knowlton. who was about to return home, being honorably 
discharged on a surgeon's certificate. He says: — "No music of 
sleigh bells greets our ears, but we hear cheers, shouts and ring- 
ing laughter all day long at the mimic battle with sncnv laalls. 
Some times wdiole regiments will turn out under command of 
their officers, and with their regimental colors, and engage in 
the exciting sport. Soon forts are erected and stormed, one party 
flanks the other, prisoners are taken and rescued as if the contest 
were in down right earnest." 

There was a brigade review on the 14th of April, the Four- 
teenth showing seventeen commissioned officers and three hun- 
dred and fort\ enlisted men. There were besides these the picket 
detail and the sick. The following day there was a review of 
the division by General Hancock near Stevensburg, the b'ourteenth 
Regiment reaching its camp ab(^ut three o'clock in the aft-ernoon. 
There was also a cori)s review a few da\s later in which (leneral 
Grant rode down the line and was greeted with a warm welcome, 
as the new commander of the army. 



232 



Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 



About the ist of May orders were given to tear down the huts 
and pitcli tents. This tearing down of the huts was very much 
faciHtated by a terrific wind, vying ahnost with a tornado, as it 
swejjt over the camp. A large pine tree was broken ofif and 
thrown across Colonel Ellis' tent, comi)letely demolishing it. 
I'ortunatelv no one was in it as the Colonel was out riding. 




Tlie scene of much coffee cookini,^ at Stony Mountiiin. 



CHAPTER XIII. 

The Wilderness — A Tangle of Battles and Skirmishes. 

The regiment broke camp on the evening of Tuesday, Ma^ 
3d., 1864, the pickets were quietly called in, rations and ammuni- 
tion distributed, fires were carefully extinguished and the ut- 
most silence was ordered that the enemy might not know of the 
movements of the army. Reaching Stevensburg in about two 
hours the Second Corps joined the rest of the command. 
Strange as it may seem, the line moved along an unfamiliar 
road, passing several deserted camps and trains of wagons 
ready to proceed when the troops had passed. The other corps 
were moving in the same general direction along parallel paths 
and marching until da\light they reached Ely's Ford on the 
Rapidan. Here the h^nirteenth Regiment was massed in a deep 
ravine where they remained for several hours, but were forbid- 
den to build fires for fear the smoke might betray the presence 
of the army to the enemy. By nine or ten o'clock in the morn- 
ing, thev crossed the Rapidan on a pontoon, climbing an almost 
precipitous bank on the southern side and were in the enemy's 
territory. The men were halted and ordered to load. Imme- 
diately in front of them were formidable rifle-pits, unmanned. 
Moving forward they entered a dense pine woods. It was, in- 
deed, a sight of grandeur and power, the view of acres of sol- 
diers with the bristling steel of their arms gave the idea of 
great strength and majesty, and one might conclude that they 
could overcome the world. As they proceeded the woods grew 
less dense, the sun became hotter and taxed severely the en- 
durance of the men who had so recently come from a long rest 
under the shadow of Stonv Mountain. This caused most of 
the men to lighten their knapsacks by throwing away their 
blankets, overcoats and other articles of winter clothing. Some 
of the men tore their blankets into shreds that they might not 
(233) 



234 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

give comfort to the Confederates, but as it was they must have 
obtained many of these articles when they came that way. For 
many miles the way was strewn with these discarded essentials 
which must sooner or later be requisite for the comfort and 
good health of the men. Soon the forest grew denser and the 
men moved along, penetrating the almost impassable thicket. 
During the forenoon they saw ten cross lines of earthworks 
which were grim reminders of the battle of Chancellorsville the 
year previous. The remains of many Union soldiers, identified 
by their uniforms, were seen unburied. Passing the ruins of 
the once stately Chancellor House, they moved a short distance, 
turned into the woods and after considerable superfluous march- 
ing the men were allowed to he down for much needed rest. 
The march had been almost continuous since leaving the old 
camp at Stony Mountain, a distance of twenty-five miles. Arms 
were stacked and a detail from each regiment w^as sent out for 
picket duty. The command of this picket line was given to 
Colonel Ellis. The regiment was in the advance during the 
day and up to a late hour at night couUl hear the marching of 
different regiments as they came in to bivouac around them. 

Before the dawn of Thursday, the 5th, the men were on the 
move, their direction being a little west of south. About noon 
they left the road and passed through a dense pine thicket. On 
the further edge of these woods a barricade of fence rails was 
thrown up. This ])roved of no use as they met no enemy. In 
about half an hour the men retraced their steps, without counter- 
marching, going back over the same ground which they had 
passed in the morning. It was soon evident that the enemy was 
in force near and that an engagement had already begun. The 
bullets were flying thick and fast and in a few minutes the men 
were faced bv the flank and charged forward into the woods. 
A heavv vollev of musketry caused fifteen or sixteen of the regi- 
ment to fall. The Confederates then fell back. i)ursued by the 
Union men, for a distance of twenty or thirty rods, Avhen the 
men of the regiment halted to perfect the alignment, and were 
ordered to lie down, subject to the fire of the enemy's skirmish- 
ers which was after some time checked. As night came on the 



The Wilderness. 235 

men bivouacked in line of battle, their arms in their hands, a 
heavy picket detail being thrown out to protect the front. 
Strict orders were given that there should be no fires and an 
order was also received that there would be a general attack 
along the entire line of the army at precisely four o'clock in the 
morning. 

A comrade states the situation at this i)()int as follows: — 
"As we advanced, the earth thrown up to form the road made a 
natural breastwork. As we went over it, we reached the first 
voUev and fifteen or sixteen were killed. We charged drjwn the 
slope and up the slight incline on the other side, the Confederates 
leaving their position in confusion. We followed them up until 
it got to be quite dark and I should say we went in the neighbor- 
hood of more than a quarter of a mile. Then we halted and lay 
on our arms during the night, the Fourteenth in advance of the 
main line of the army, and with Carroll's Brigade lay out there 
all night, about one-half mile in advance of the main body." 

Among those killed in this first day of the battle of the Wilder- 
ness was General Alexander Hays, who had had command of the 
division since the Fourteenth became a part of the Army of the 
Potomac. 

Dawn had scarcely come when an order was received that the 
time had come for the attack. The men were awakened noise- 
lessly, ordered to fall in and moved forward, entering farther 
the almost impenetrable forest, rendered doubly obscure by a 
fog. The eight regiments of the brigade were formed in two 
lines of battle, the first commanded by Colonel Coons of the 
Fourteenth Indiana and the second by Colonel Ellis of the 
Fourteenth Connecticut, the whole under command of Colonel 
Carroll. The Fourteenth Regiment occupied the left of the 
second line next to the Tenth New York. Captain William H. 
Hawley of Company K, but no w^of Carroll's staff, had charge 
of the heavy skirmish line. 

Major Hincks says :— "Our starting point was near the point 
where the Orange Court House plank road crossed the highway 
on which we had been marching, leading, I presume, to Spott- 
sylvania Court House. We were a little northwest of the cross- 



236 



Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 



ing when we started, but before long crossed the plank road and 
continued to move in a westerly direction parallel to it and upon 
its south side. The lively rattle of musketry from our skirmish- 
ers showed that they had now encountered the enemy and the 
picket were driving them back. Further on we came to the 
place where their reserve had bivouacked as evidenced bv camj)- 
fires and embers still smouldering and meal spilled U]ion the 
ground in their hasty flight. So thick were the trees that it was 



WW 






J«^"€* 



^r^ 



Brock Road, Wilderness, Va 



difficult for the men to advance m line and we could seldom s<"c 
further than a few rods ahead, before long the scattering five 
in front of us had grown more rapid and in a few minutes the 
skirmishers fall back and though we cannot see them, we know 
that we have encountered the main body of the enemy. A 
tempest of bullets cuts the air and the men fall from the ranks 
like autumn leaves in a November gale. Without any order 
that I heard, our line paused and in another instant countless 



The Wilderness. 237 

tongues of flame leaped from the muzzles of our rifles and 
speech is drowned by the deafening and unintermitted roar of 
musketry." 

There was intense fighting for about lialf an hour and in this 
brief space officers and men of the regiment were falling. 
Among those seriously wounded during these moments was 
Captain Fiske of Company G, who died a few days later. Fhe 
men stood like heroes to the work until a regiment at <he right 
gave way, producing something of a panic among several of 
the regiments of the brigade, about half of v/hom fell back to 
the cross roads and were seen no more that morning. The Four- 
teenth boys fell back slowly aud without i)anic facing the 
enemy. The attempt to rally them on the colors was difficult 
at first, but soon succeeded, the mcii gathe.-ing in a nat-.u-al de- 
fense formed by the trunks of several fallen trees which had 
been strengthened by the work of the Confederates ihe night 
before, about five or six rods to the rear of Vvhere thev had been 
fighting. They were ordered to lie down drid again ojxrned fire 
on the advancing enemy. Here they poured such a heavy fire 
into the enemy's flank that the advance was checkec! in that di- 
rection. On the left Captain Nickels of Company I and Lieu- 
tenant Morgan of Company C Had r;illi(\l -;ome forty or fifty 
men and had each man take a tree and n.^dit Indian fashion. In 
front of them was a clearing, the only owe ^■)r niiles, and these 
brave boys saw a Confederate line of batile, with flying colors, 
emerge from the woods on its opposite s^le, bpt nandfui as tiie}' 
were, peppered it so smartly and with such accurate ain; tiiat 
the foe. unaware of their slender numbers, fairly beat a retreat. 

The regiment remained here about aii hour when they were 
ordered by General Hancock to withdrav" to a point on ,he 
Brock road where the natural breastwork h.ad been strengthened. 
Here the shattered ranks were reformed and anunuuition dealt 
out. Colonel Carroll coming up spoke in wirn^ terms of com- 
mendation of the behavior of the regiment. The men were then 
moved a short distance in the rear of the line of battle and told 
they would have twenty minutes for rest and to make coft'ee. 
Hardly five minutes had passed before the Confederates advanced 



238 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

and the Fourteenth was at once called into action and the fiercest 
fighting of the day occurred. The men of the rcginient charged 
with fixed bayonets and luet the enemy and icpelied die ci'arge. 

Major Hincks gives a somewhat dift'erent version of the situa- 
tion here. He says : — "Just then a strong body of troops that 
had not been in action came up, wearing the red diamond l)a'ige 
of the newly attached Third Division of the Second Coips, under 
command of General J. Hobart Ward. He ordered Colonel 
Carroll to join his advance. To this Carroll objected, saying that 
he had less than five hundred men, who had just been under 
fire and an attempt might be made to cut ofi the advance, in 
which case his men would be routed or captured. Then again 
Ward had no authority to give the command, he being of another 
division, but, however. Ward insisted, upon which Carroll ordered 
his men to fall in. but when \\'ar(l had passed on, ordered the men 
to lie down again. The heavy firing continued and presently it 
was discovered that the red diamond division had broken and 
were in retreat toward where the Fourteenth stood, closely fol- 
lowed by the rebels. It was as Carroll had predicted. Ward had 
gone too far out and a heavy Confederate colunm of Long- 
street's had fallen u])on his flank and rear, crushing his line. 
Strenuous eiTorts were made b> the men of the Fourteenth to 
stay this stam|)ede, but were unsuccessful. They, however, were 
able to form line and resist the oncoming foe. The bullets from 
the enemy fell thick and fast, but with effective work by the 
Sharif's rifles, they were held in check for about twenty mimUes, 
some of the men firing eighty rounds of ammunition. The regi- 
ments on each side, however, were not able to check the oncom- 
ing of the Confederates, who approached like a crescent, envelop- 
ing the right and left of the Fourteenth. At this point the 
United States color-bearer. Corporal Henry K. Lyon of Com- 
pany G, was mortally wounded and as he fell handed the colors 
to Colonel Moore, remarking that he had done his best. Lyon 
was taken prisoner and died in the hands of his enemy from his 
wounds. Seeing that resistance was useless with the enemy 
surrounding them in front and right and left flanks, the regiment 
fell back a few hundred yards, being pursued closely by the 



The Wilderness. 241 

enemy, who shouted loudl_\- for tliem to surrender. The reg^iment 
retreated still farther to the rear to a line of breastworks at the 
cross roads which had been thrown up durincr their absence, 
where they were at once reformed in line and ready for further 
service." 

Corporal John H. liillson of Compan\- D relates an incident in 
this conection. He says: — "I was ordered to carry Private 
Charles H. House of Company D to the rear, as he was wounded 
in the foot when Ward broke. I was carrying him on my back 
when we discovered the enemy charging through the trees. 
House, seeing them, clambered down from my back and beat a 
hasty retreat, running much faster with his wounded foot than 
T was able to with two well ones." Corporal Billson further 
says : — "Reaching the rear General Hancock ordered Colonel 
Carroll to retire his men and allow them to cook cofifee .is they 
had done their share. We were just cooking cofifee when the 
Confederates came and Hancock said 'For Ciod's sake, Carroll, 
form \-our men and give us something to fall back on." The 
I'ourteenth left their coffee and formed a line and took ])art in 
Carroll's charge." 

Sergeant E. P>. Tyler gives an interesting description of this 
engagement as follows: — "We lay that night upon our ar:ns and 
some of us, the writer included, who had resolved to go through 
this campaign in light marching order, ^orelv felt tnc need dur- 
ing the chilly night of the blankets and overcoats wc had re- 
solved not to carry. But with the early morning came work to 
warm us up, for after the hasty breakfast of hardtack (and coffee 
if we succeeded in getting it), we formed our line of battle and 
began slowly to crowd back the enemy in our front. Sometimes 
our advance was very slow and every inch hotly contested and 
then again we progressed some distanc^^ in a shoit time, but all 
the while and continuously fighting an almost if not quite u:iseen 
enemy in thick woods. There is a feel'ng of uneasiness in the 
stoutest heart in facing danger that one cannot see and know. 
The mystery is doubly intensified by the sudden, silent dropping 
deal, or fatally wounded, of wen on either hand that somehow 
does not seem to connect itself with the constant roar of musketry 



242 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

that is going on. The zip, zip of the Imhets as they pass so 
closely to your head that you cannot help but think that had the 
rebel aim been varied never so little your career had been ended. 
( Jccasionall}- we captured a few prisoners, some of whom volun- 
tarily deserted their lines and risking the gantlet of fire by both 
sides would come running into our lines, throwing up their 
hands and calling out to us not to shoot. They were evidently 
badly frightened, as well they might be, but we shouted en- 
couragingly to them 'Come on in, Johnny, come on in Johnn\' 
and carefully held our fire until they were within our lines. Our 
shouts to them must have been heard in the rebel lines and per- 
haps encouraged others to take the risk. 

It is hard to tell about passing time in such a fight. A few 
hours some times seem long enough for a day and men often long 
for the night, not only to rest tired bodies, but to regain rest and 
quiet to mind and nerves wTought up to the highest degree of 
intensity. But the real shock of the day came shortly after noon 
when Longstreet, that master of impetuous charges, massed a 
large body of men and precipitated them upon a portion of our 
line he may have had reason to think a little weak. This attack 
struck our line a little to the left of the Fourteenth's position. 
We quickly changed front, moved to the left and then forward 
in a countermarch in the direction of the advancing foe. Before 
opening fire we had to let the broken and depleted renmants of 
a regiment that had been stationed on this part of the line fall 
back into or through our ranks. That done we opened fire. 
How defiantly and continuously that rebel yell of the oncoming 
foe held its own even above the volleys of musketry, and this 
was wholly a battle of infantry and musketry. Still onward 
they come. Our men had halted and keeping their line in as 
good shape as possible were awaiting the shock. But we were 
not idle ; the men, many of them lying close upon the ground, 
some of them resting on one knee, were firing rapidly and low. 
Offtcers and file closers were cheering them and encouraging 
them, sending the wounded to the rear and strengthening the 
ranks by using their rifles as freely as the men. And 
now they had come so near we began to distinguish the brown and 



The Wilderness. 243 

butternut colored uniforms among the trees and our rifles had 
distinct targets and the increasing closeness of their shots showed 
they too were having the same advantage. Now we could see 
them still more plainly. They were not coming fast, simply mov- 
ing forward slowly, steadil}- and. Oh, so obstinately and surely ! 
We could not check them. I am sure our Sharp's rifles never 
did better service for the few brief minutes than now, but their 
yells and their volleys and their advance seemingly was not to be 
stayed. There could oifly be one result, unless speedily rein- 
forced, we should be overpowered and captured within five min- 
utes. The volleys from our rifles were growing weaker and 
scattering. Our color-bearer had planted the flag stafif firmly on 
the ground and kneehng or lying beside it upheld it with his up- 
stretched arms." 

Sergeant Tyler was at this point wounded and taken to the 
rear. His wounds did not prove fatal and he was discharged 
July 25th, 1865. He died at his home in W'estfield August i6th, 
1899. He was a native of Kingston, N. Y., coming to Connec- 
ticut in his boyhood where he remained until his death. As a 
soldier he was brave and patriotic and as a man full of good 
deeds and uprightness. 

Sergeant Charles G. Blatchley of Company I graphically 
states the situation of the regiment just before Longstreet's 
charge as follows : — "Our regiment was partly armed with 
Sharp's breech-loading rifles, and this fact came very near re- 
sulting in our capture. The deadly fire which we had kept up 
in front of us had held l)ack the enemy at that point till they had 
driven our troops back on both sides of us, leaving our little 
regiment sticking out like the toe of a horseshoe in the line. 
The dense woods prevented us from discovering this until the 
break reached our own flanks. I was awakened from my ab- 
sorption in the business of saving my country by looking up, as 
I did occasionally, to see if the flag was still there, to find it 
gone. In another second I realized the fact that I was almost 
alone, and that the flag was rapidly making its way to the rear. 
I followed it." 

During the evening the regiment was moved farther up the 



244 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

road and occupied part of the nio;ht in building new breastworks 
along the west side of the road where they rested until the 
morning of the 7th, when they were called at daybreak and made 
preparations to move. The regiment was marched and counter- 
marched in several directions during the day, but was not en- 
gaged. 

Corporal Crittenden has this to say regarding the movements 
of the Fourteenth on the 7th of May: — "We maneuvered for 
position and to find the enemy. During the day we passed a 
bastion or redoubt where a battery had been placed, and General 
Sedgwick was killed. There was firing and the army was fol- 
lowing the enemy. Wc were not directly engaged on the 7th, 
but moved from place to place where it seemed there might be 
fighting." 

During that night new breastworks were thrown up where 
the regiment rested until the 8th, when they agam followed the 
enemy, the regiment making several movements without being 
engaged. The men lay in the woods along the road during the 
night and early morning of the 9th., when they again resumed 
their march and in the afternoon had a skirmish with the enemy, 
the object being to gain possession of a wagon-train which was 
unsuccessful. At night a crossing was made of the Po River, 
where the men rested. The river was crossed three times dur- 
ing the night, it being difficult to ascertain the proximity or 
direction of the enemy. 

Under the date of May loth, 1864, John Hirst writes : — "We 
were in line pretty early this morning and expected some hot 
work before breakfast when we recrossed the Po. After march- 
ing around considerable our division was ordered to go to the 
support of another corps which was having a hard fight, and 
being driven back. At this time the woods were on fire in dif- 
ferent places and the enemy were throwing shot and shell at a 
rapid rate right into our teeth as we advanced to the front. How 
we got through it all I don't know, but we were kept right along 
until we came near to their breastworks and had it hot and 
heavy until our seventy rounds of amnnufition were exhausted, 
when we were relieved and ordered to fall back about one 



The Wilderness. 



245 



hundred and fifty yards where we received more ammunition and 
then threw up a Hne of breastworks for our protection during 
the night. This breastwork business is getting to be a great 
thing in the army and is the first thing we have to do as soon as 
we come to a halt. It <k:)n't matter how far we advance, we 
find the rebels have thrown up breastworks to impede our 
progress, and if we gain an incli of ground from them, we put 
up one at once for its protection. Grant is sticking to them like 
a leech and I think we are getting the best of it." 




ASST. SURGEON FREDK. A. DUDLEY. 



Corporal John H. Billson of Company D says the corps re- 
ferred to by Hirst was the Fifth Corps. 

On the morning of the loth. the Fourteenth, in company with 
the brigade, crossed the river and went to the support of the 
Fifth Corps which had been lieavily engaged with the Con- 
federates, but the fight was over before the Fourteenth arrived. 



246 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Good authority relates that: — "When the Fourteenth, in con- 
nection with the brig^ade, were called to the support of the Fifth 
Corps, the infantry firing had mainly ceased when we reached the 
position given us, but there was considerable every little wh'le 
and shells were crashing and tearing the trees. While we wer< 
there one of the Fifth Corps officers happened to pass along just 
in the rear of our regiment and a piece of shell wounded him, 
going through the calf of the leg, breaking it and making a bad 
wound. ( )nr surgeons saw it was a case that needed immedi:ite 
attention, so they cut some trees, made stakes, rigged a table and 
etherized the officer, who was bleeding to death. Tn tlie midst 
of the shell firing the leg was amputated and the man then sent 
to the rear." 

It was here that an order was read from General Grant, con- 
gratulating the men on the good service they had performed, but 
stating that there was work yet to be done. 

The regiment then moved out into a valley and along its west- 
erly side. In front was Laurel Hill. ()n a clearing back of this 
hill was a battery throwing shells over the heads of the men and 
a number of the Fourteenth were wounded by these bursting 
shells. The advance was over a tangled road which was passed 
with much difficulty and it was necessary to halt several times to 
reform the line. The woods were on fire and the heat and 
smoke were almost suffocating, but the men moved on till within 
a few paces of the enemy's works which opened upon them with 
galling fire. The men, however, kept up a brisk fire upon the 
enemy, maintaining their position for several hours when being 
out of ammunition the regiment was relieved and lay in the sec- 
ond line still in front of the breastworks all that night and during 
the nth. 

Corporal Crittenden relates the following circumstances in re- 
gard to the explosion of these shells: — "Colonel Carroll, I think, 
came down to our regiment and asked that a detail of men be 
sent up the hill with Sharp's rifles to silence the battery. A num- 
ber of the Fourteenth men were detailed or volunteered for the 
purpose. We went into the woods and after going some distance 
ran right into the Confederates, who had formed a line of breast- 



The^Wilderness. 247 

works on the other side of a stream. These works were well 
manned and five men from Company B were wounded, four of 
them so badly that they never returned to the regiment. While 
we were up there in the woods the charge occurred. They 
swung around our left and came up the other side of the hill. 
When we were withdrawn from there the regiment had left tlie 
valley. We struck them about eleven o'clock that night in rear 
of the Fifth Corps and bivouacked on a side hill." 

Colonel Ellis reported the number of men in this engagement 
as eleven officers and two hundred and twenty enhsted men. 

We come now to that phase of this campaign of May, 1864, 
known as the battle of Spottsylvania. About midnight the regi- 
ment broke camp, marching to the left through woods, under- 
brush, valleys and over hills until near daybreak, when they 
reached a position in a wooded road under cover of a slight ridge. 
Orders were given to make the equipment secure and to move 
forward noiselessly, no order was to be given, but when the 
general advanced to the front and raised his sword, the men were 
to charge upon the enemy's works. This voiceless charge was 
made about four o'clock and the men moved ])romptly up the 
ridge, not being discovered for some time. 1die left of the line, 
however, was first seen from the slight height of the hill and im- 
mediately the volleys from the battery of eighteen guns of the 
enemy were opened upon them. The firing, however, was too 
high to do much damage to the regiment. On, on they went, 
the Fourteenth Regiment passing over the crest of the ridge 
into a depression. It was soon seen tliat there was confusion 
in the Confederate works, the infantry falling back while the 
artillery were not able to train their guns sufficiently to damage 
the men in the depression. Tlie men of the Fourteenth went 
over the first line of breastworks and capinred more ))risoners 
than they had had in their own ranks, sei ding them to ;he rear 
under charge of Captain Nickels. Advancing about a quarter of 
a mile farther on a line of skirmishers was met a.id behind them 
a strong line of battle, compelling the men to fall back to tlie 
first line of breastworks, where they turned the iMiemy's gmis on 
them and gave them several of their own shot and shell. The 



248 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

men cif the l^'ourteentli worked two of these g-iins under the di- 
recti(Mi of Lieutenant-Colonel Moore and Lieutenant Morgan, 
and later drew them oiT the field, liftin.,:^ ihem over the breast- 
works, taking them to the crest of the rulge and using them to 
fire u])on the enemy. 

This line of breastworks was excavated about eighteen inches 
deep and had earth thrown up to make the works. The men of 
the Fourteenth were ordered to dig a trench on the outside of 
these breastworks to make them available for the L'nion side. 

The Confederates soon after alteiupted to recapture the works 
and guns under General John B. Gordon. Charge after charge 
was made of the most desperate character, but without success. 
These charges so desperate in their efiforts, but unsuccessful in 
their result continued until about nine o'clock at night. ( )n the 
last charge the Confederates came into the works and a hand to 
hand fight took ])lace, most of the men hurt being pierced 
through the head or in the side with rebel bayonets. One Four- 
teenth man had thrust his bayonet through the breast of a Con- 
federate, the Confederate also having thrust his bayonet through 
the neck of the Fourteenth man, the two men stood dead against 
the breastworks, the guns of each serving to brace them and 
hold them in this stancHng position. 

During the course of these charges the Fourteenth was moved 
to the left to give j^lace for the Third Division, and lay in the 
Confederate entrenchments all night. This move brought the 
regiment near a corral in which were about forty or fifty horses. 
It was soon discovered that the Confederates were attempting to 
seize these horses on the opposite side. It was a desperate 
moment and to save them from being taken by the Confederates 
the horses were all shot. Soon after nine o'clock, it began to 
rain and the night was one of terror and distress. 

During this engagement Lieutenant-Colonel Moore was 
wounded in the knee and taken to the hospital. 

Here it was that ( ieneral Stuart of the Confederates was taken 
prisoner and Corporal A. R. Crittenden and a detail took Stuart 
to General Hancock. While on the march one of the detailed 
men quietly clipped otT a button from General Stuart's coat. 
This button is now in the possession of Corporal Crittenden. 



The Wilderness. 25 1 

We will allow J. E. Stannard of Company G to give his ver- 
sion of this battle. He says: — "]\Iay nth was rainy and we 
spent the day in building rifle-pits and skirmishing. The roads 
were muddy and the brush thick, making it hard to get along. 
At midnight we started toward the left through the heavy rain. 
We did this as quietly as possible, for we were near the enemy's 
line, and it was not desirable that they should know all that we 
did. We came to a halt about four o'clock in the mornmg and 
though wet through, lay down on the ground to sleep, who ever 
heard of a soaking keeping a soldier from wanting to sleep. 
At this time we were near the Landron House. Just before 
daylight we started to move, going in a line of battle toward the 
enemy's works. We could not see them, however, as we were 
passing over land covered with scrub pines and other small 
growth. We must have covered half the distance before we 
were discovered. A shot was heard, the boys gave a yell, and 
started at a double-quick on, to, and over the breastworks. All 
this was done so quickly that the 'Rebs' had had no warning of 
our coming and could do nothing but run which they did in fine 
style. This was at the s])ot known as 'Bloody Angle.' Here 
the bayonet was used and I well remember seeing a man v^^ith a 
bayonet through him pinning him to the ground. We drove 
them for about half a mile when we came to another line of 
works which stopped us. Then we went back to the first line of 
works and waited for developments which were not long in com- 
ing. We captured at this charge twelve brass pieces and 
the boys had a chance to try their lian.ls as artillery men. I do 
not know what the result was. Here the rebel generals, John- 
son and Gordan were captured. The line of worlcs v.-as heavy 
and we turned them for our own use taking up our position on 
the side meant for the outside. We had not waited long be- 
fore the rebels returned our call. They came up on the other 
side of the works and we had it hand to hand all day. The 
colors of both sides were on the works at the same time within 
a few feet of each other, and bayonets were used freely. As 
it was raining hard all of this day that no doubt helped us to 
stand the strain. At this time Colonel Ellis had command of 



252 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

the regiment and walked l)aek an*] forth luiek of the hne, exposed 
to a heavy fire. The ijnUet for him ha(i never l)een cast. At 
about ten oVdock the rel)eLs abandoned tiie Hne, and thus ended 
tlie 1)attle of Spottsx Ivania." 

As soon as it was hoht on the mornin"- of the 13th a picket 
line was advanced to find the enemy and as the detail went out 
they passed over the breastworks and ditch. This ditch was 
literally filled with dead Confederates, many being killed in bat- 
tle while others were crushed by comrades falling upon them. 
The heavy rain through the night had filled the ditch which 
mingled with the blood from tlie wounded men gave the ditch 
the api)earance of being filled with blood. There was no enemy 
in sight and but little firing on the ])icket line, the troops remain- 
ing here most of the day without active work. There was a 
slight engagement to the left. The regiment passed this point 
and lav down for the night on a side hill. 

On the morning of the 14th some Confederates were seen and 
tihe Fourteenth Regiiment advanced to the left, but it was soon 
discovered that they were prisoners in the hands of the cavalry. 
During the da}- there was a rumor of the enemy being in front 
and the regiment was formed in line of battle, but it proved to 
be a small body and nothing took place but a little skirmishing. 

Sergeant E. H. Wade says: — "On Aiay 15th we left our 
camp at four (Vclock, went some three miles and caiue to the 
Fredericksburg and Richmond turnpike. Mere we found thous- 
ands upon thousands of troops scattered all around. It v/as ex- 
pected the enemy would attack us here. At four o'clock our divi- 
sion went out on picket three miles, and stopped for the night on 
top of a high hill. Here we stopped until six o'clock the next 
afternoon, when we came back about a mile and then returned to 
the same point. Here we ])ut uj) our tents and laid down to rest, 
but at twelve o'clock got u]), and started on again, but didn't 
go far, where we remained most of the 17th." 

During the night of the 17th the regiment was called out to 
form a skirmish line with two or three other regiments and ad- 
vanced upon the enemy's jjosition. 'Idie next day. the 18th., was 
passed on the skirmish liiie, being at times under a shell fire, but 



The Wilderness. 255 

meeting with no casualties. In the afternoon the regiment was 
ordered out to meet a small band of the enemy which they drove 
back after sharp firing. 

The purpose of these movements was to ascertain the where- 
abouts and strength of the enemy. As the Confederates were do- 
ing the same for the same purpose there was constant clashing 
and firing on both sides. The casualties, however, on the part 
of the Fourteenth were very slight. Toward night the Four- 
tenth skirmishers were again sent out and encountered a body 
of Confederates who proved to be more numerous than was an- 
ticipated and the regiment was called in. When the regiment 
was ordered in the enemy fired one volley and disappeared. On 
the 19th. the regiment remained in camp until evening when an 
attempt was again made by the Confederates to capture a wagon- 
train, but were unsuccessful. 

On the 20th the regiment was called upon to witness the execu- 
tion of a soldier of the Nineteenth ]\Iassachusetts who had de- 
serted his regiment three times during the recent battles. Of 
the further movements of this day Sergeant Wade says : — "At 
eight o'clock we had orders to be read}- to move at eleven, and 
at that time started and marched all night, going to the right 
of Guiney Station early in the morning. At eight o'clock we 
halted just long enough to cook our coffee and then went on. 
The sun was hot and the road dusty, but we stood it very well. 
Toward noon we passed through the village of Bowling Green. 
It formerly had a population of some two thousand inhabitants, 
but scarcely any men could be seen but negroes, all of them being 
in the rebel army. The women did not like our coming that 
way at all, but that was the least of our troubles. We were told 
that the enemy had occupied the town up to the morning of our 
arrival there and had started nine thousand soldiers from there 
to reinforce Lee, but on learning that we were coming sent them 
back toward Richmond. We rested here a few moments and 
then started again, arriving at ]\Iilford Station in the course of 
two hours. We went a little way out of the town and went into 
camp in a piece of woods, where we went to work putting up 
breastworks which we worked on until twelve o'clock when we 
rested for the night." 



256 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

On the niornino- of May 22(1 the iT^inient was ordered out, 
the cavah-y l)eino- in the advance. The regiment had proceeded 
but a short (hstance when they were opened by a battery of the 
enemy hidden from view. Line of battle was formed and the 
men advanced and there was a shght skirmish. This was the 
skirmish at Milford Station. Tlie Confederates shelled the regi- 
ment considerably. The cavalry brought up quite a lot of Union 
troops they had recajnured from the enemw 

Monday, May 23d, the regiment started at seven o'clock and 
marched until one when they were stopped by a Confederate 
force of some size. They were near the North Anna River and 
found the Confederates ver\- plentiful pud strongly entrenched 
in their earthworks. Toward night the regiment moved to the 
left and supported a battery. The regiment was protected by 
being under the brow of a hill. 

The regiment started about four o'clock the next morning and 
moved over the hill reaching some breastworks where they 
tarried about an hour when the\- moved to the Xorth Anna River, 
a branch of the I'auumkey River. They found the bridge across 
the river had been tired by the enemy. Xear the end of the 
bridge was a Confederate battery. The regiment was in the 
second line of battle and were shelled severely by this battery. 
The Fourteenth was advanced as a skirmish line and drove the 
enemy from the bridge, cai)turing some prisoners. The battery, 
however, was removed before the men could climb the steej) 
bank of the river. The enemy was (|uickly pursued. The skirm- 
ish line was reformed but the C;)n federates disappeared into a 
piece of woods, safely ensconced behind a fence and oj^ened fire 
upon the I'^nu'teenth, pepj^ering them severely. The regiment, 
however, held its own. rresently it was seen the Confederates 
were advancing in force while in the rear the rest of the brigade, 
which had now crossed the river, were advancing to the support 
of the skirmish line, h'or a few moments it seemed questionable 
whether the brigade would reacii the regiment in season to sup- 
port it or the enemy in front would ca])ture them. The former, 
however, reached the sui)p()rt of the regiment and there was 
severe fighting for an hour and a half. 



The Wilderness. 257 

Sergeant E. H. Wade, speaking of this engagement, says: — 
"At four o'clock in the morning we moved over the hill to some 
breastworks, but after stopping here an hour crossed the river, 
where we formed a line of battle, near a piece of woods. Soon 
after this our brigade was ordered out on the skirmish line. We 
had to go through a heavy piece of woods and it was awful. 
We finally managed to get to the railroad. Here about fifty 
of the enemy had piled up rails across the track, and were firing 
at us, but we kept pretty low. Soon, however, they got a big 
gun in position and threw grape and canister at us unmercifully, 
but doing little damage after all. At five o'clock we had a 
dreadful thunder storm, and were completely drenched to the 
skin. At dusk we were relieved by the Twentieth New York, 
and went back to where the rest of the army lay. Cooked some 
cofifee and had just lain down for the mght when our regiment 
had to get up and carry shovels and picks, spades and axes to 
the front, as skirmishers were putting up breastworks for pro- 
tection. By the time we got through this job it was three 
o'clock. We had an hour's rest, when we were called up and 
went to the front, where we built more breastworks and guarded 
them. During the day one of the rebels came in 1)etween our 
lines and the enemy's and gave some of our wounded men who 
lay there some water. They would not let us take them off the 
field. We had no rations at this time for three (la\s and were 
quite hungry. A couple of pigs lost their way into our camp and 
in ten minutes the boys had them dressed and in their fry- 
ing pans." 

Private Joseph Schlichtcr of Company V> relates an interesting 
incident in connection with this engagement at North Anna River 
as follows: — "May 22d, 1864. we reached North Anna and the 
regiment immediately set to work building fortifications which 
were completed early in the evening. Toeing very tired, we 
didn't stop to pitch our tents, so we lay in the open field to sleep. 
My tent mate said to me, 'Joe, I wouldn't lay on your back and 
have the moon shine in your face for it may injure your eyes.' 
I only laughed at him and fell fast asleep. 

On the 23d, we bivouacked on the banks of the North Anna 



258 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

River and that evening I discovered I was moon blind. I began 
to think Comrade Chaplie's words had meaning in them, but I 
didn't give it away just then. ( )n the morning of the 24th, we 
crossed the river and immechately (le])loyed as skirmishers. We 
advanced toward the rebel lines and kept the earthworks under 
a heavy fire until dark. The ril)els formed a tlank movement 
which compelled us to retreat. We retreated for about a cpiarter 
of a mile in good order when we again formed in a line or 
battle. Presently Adjutant Hincks, who was commanding our 
regiment at that time, asked 'Is Joseph Schlichter here?' 1 an- 
swered 'Yes sir.' 'Will you go out and see if we have an out- 
post or not, or whether there are any men between the enemy 
and us' he said. 1 didn't like to tell him I was unable to go on 
account of moon blindness, fearing I might be thought a coward, 
so T started. After picking my way the best I could toward the 
enemy's lines for some time I received the challenge, 'Halt, who 
comes there?' 'Friend without a countersign' I replied. 'What 
regiment do you belong to?' he asked. Thinking these were re- 
bels I answered, 'The Sixteenth North Carolina." I was imme- 
diately ordered to lav down mv arms and surrender which I did. 
'What regiment do I surrender to?' I asked. 'The Fifteenth 
Massachusetts" was the reply. All right I am glad to hear it for 
I belong to the l*\:)urteenth Connecticut' I said. The lieutenant 
of the b^ifteenth Massachusetts advanced and took a good look 
at me. 'What makes you lie and tell us you belong to the Xorth 
Carolina regiment?' he said. 1 told him the circumstances 'and' 
said I 'if your answer had been dilTerent 1 should have made an 
about face and double-ciuick march toward the bunion lines. 
When I was ordered to surrender I knew I was still in the Union 
lines. 'How came you to give me the Sixteenth North Carolina ?' 
he then asked. 'Because I knew that regiment was in front" I re- 
plied. 'How did you know?" 'Because' I answered 'there were 
some prisoners captured this afternoon belonging to that regi- 
ment." 'Who commands your regiment?' was his next cjuestion. 
'Adjutant Hincks'. 'Did he know you couldn't see?" he asked. 
'No sir" I answered, 'I did not tell him.' He said 'You did 
nobly, I want to see your commanding officer." 'Yes', he said, 



The Wilderness. 261 

'The Fifteenth Massachusetts is on the skirmish line.' I re- 
turned with the lieutenant to my regiment when they saw I was 
moon blind. This lasted six weeks and in that time was not ex- 
cused from duty. I was led by two comrades from the time we 
left North Ann until we reached Petersburg-." 

Concerning Joseph Sohlitcher Sergeant Tyler observes : — "Of 
the ten old memebers left June ist., 1864, it is believed that only 
one went through the whole three years without ever leaving 
the regiment on account of sickness, wounds or especial detail to 
other dut}- and that one was Private Jo.--eph Schlitcher. Xever 
missing a battle or skirmish or any action in which the Four- 
teenth was ever engaged, always remaining as he enlisted, a 
private, yet he enjoys the distinction that some of his comrades 
have accorded him of having probabl}- poured more lead into the 
rebel ranks than any other man in the l<"ourteenth, at least if 
ever a question of this nature should arise, our 'Joe" would be 
the champion that Company B would put forth." 

Continuing our narrative of the movements of the regiment, 
on the morning of the 25th a flag of truce was sent out to ask 
the privilege of taking off the wounded men of the regiment 
who lay before the enmy. This was refused. It continued to 
rain heavily and the regiment remained at this point during the 
dav and night, and until five o'clock in the afternoon of Friday, 
the 26th, wdien the left wing of the regiment made a charge on 
the enemy's works to dislodge some Confederates who had es- 
tablish a post of observation directly in front. There was severe 
fighting for a short time, the regiment losing several men and one 
officer. Lieutenant Henry W. Wadhams. At eleven o'clock that 
night the regiment was withdrawn from the rifle-pits and crossed 
the river at the same place from whence they started three days 
before. 

Sergeant I'enjamin Hirst is of interest at this point. He 
says: — ^"On the morning of the 26th could see the rebels very 
plainly and skirmished with them all day until nearly dark when 
the Fourteenth and two other regiments were ordered to charge 
the enemy's advanced works on the left. The works were car- 
ried after a desperate struggle which lasted until after dark. 



262 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

The works were held until the dead and wounded were removed, 
after which the reiiinients were recalled and ordered to fall 
back over the river. In this battle, which the h\)urteenth call 
onl_\- a skirmish, the reg'iment n.umbered just eii^iit officers and 
one hundred and sixt_\-five men." 

He further sa}-s : — "The I^'ourteenth Res^iment marched all 
nig-ht of the 2r)th until two o'clock of the morning- of the 27th. 
wlien they rested until (la\li_oht and then resumed their march, 
which was kept up until three in the afternoon when the column 
halted for two hours. At five the march was again resumed 
and kept up until eleven o'clock when the wearied men went 
into camp and rested until daylight of the 28th. At daylight we 
again moved forward and crossed the I'amunkey River about 
seventeen miles from Richmond at ten m the morning. There 
was a cavalr\- skirmish gning on in our front which died out 
as we advanced. After marching about a mile beyond the river 
we came to a halt and built breastworks l)ehind which we lay all 
night. ( )n the morning of the -()th we advanced two miles and 
then built more l)reastworks behind which we lay until the morn- 
ing of the 31st when it was moved further to the front and set 
to work building more breastworks behind which we lay until 
the morning of the 30th when we again advanced. After going 
about two miles there was a heavy skirmish in our front and 
Burnside was having a big fight upon our left. The Fourteentli 
Regiment went into position behind a hill and remained there 
until the morning of the 31st. when it was moved further to the 
front and set t;) work l)uilding more breastworks while heavy 
firing was going on all along the line." 

In a letter from John Hirst, written behind these works, he 
savs : — "We have had a rough time of it since we left Stony 
JMountain. We have thrown away our overcoats and blankets 
through inaljilitx to carry them. The days are warm, but last 
night was the coldest we have had since breaking camp. We 
have been marching and fighting nearly every day since I wrote 
you, but have had no regular battle since Spottsylvania. The 
cavalry had a shar]) fight out here last Sunday and there was 
heavv firing on ;\b)nday. We v ere not engaged, but may have 



The Wilderness. 263 

to go in at any moment. We arc nearer Richmond than 1 have 
ever been before and we expect to have more or less fighting 
every day for some time yet."" 

The regiment crossed Toto])Otomoy Creek, a slow, sluggish 
stream, several times during the 31st, maneuvering for position. 
In the afternoon they were moved to the right where there was 
a sharp conflict on the skirmish line. After this the regiment 
was moved to the extreme front within a few rods of the enemy's 
position. Here they built breastworks and remained through the 
night. They were under constant fire, and some of the men 
were wounded. Colonel VM\s, l)eing in temporary command of 
the brigade and other regiments and Lieutenauit-Colonel Moore 
being wounded at Spottsylvania, the regiment during this part 
of the campaign was under the command of Captain John C. 
Broatch. 

Covering the dates of June 1st and 2d Sergeant Hirst says: — 
■■June 1st. the I^'ourteenth lay behind the breastworks constructed 
bv them the dav before. In the afternoon the Fnnrteenth, which 
was now full}' armed througho'j.t with Sharp's rifies, was sent 
out to hold the skirmish line while the rest of the corps made 
a change of base. At daylight of June 2([., we left in a hurry, 
the relx'Is keei)ing pretty close to our heels for about two miles 
when our artillery opened u])on them and drove them back. 
We kei)t on the march until we reached (^old Harbor, where the 
rebels threw a few shells at us without damage, behind the hill 
where we were stationed. At dark we moved forward to sup- 
port a green regiment in the front line, now for the first time 
engaged with the rebels. We had a sleepless night of it as the 
rebels would rush out, fire a volley and then get under cover. 
It rained all night." 

On the evening of June 2d a gap in the line being discovered 
by the Confederates they attem])ted to capture a wagon-train 
and the Fourteenth was withdrawn from their position and 
hurried up to resist the attack. About this time ( leneral Terry 
appeared, coming down from Washington with a company of 
artillery and succeeded in driving away the Confederates and 
the bA)urteenth secured the wagon-train. This was a surprise 



264 Fourteentli Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

to the enemy and in their hasty retreat they left a mule which 
was immediately mounted by Corporal Charles A. Beebe of 
Company C. The nude, loyal to his Southern instincts, went ofif 
at a rapid rate toward the rebel line. Heebe being unable to dis- 
mount. He was carried directly into the enemy's line, but for- 
tunately escajKMl tlKjuoh he did not find his regiment for two 
days. 

The night of June 2d the regiment bivouacked in a field not 
more than one hundred yards fn-m the enemy's picket line. In- 
structions were i^iven to charge al da\'light. At early dawn the 
Fourteenth was fornx'd in line of battle and everything made 
fast in the way of accouterments, position being taken in front 
of an open field along wdiich skirted a fence. At the sound 
of the bugle the charge was to be luadc over the fence and in- 
tervening space on to the Confederate lines immediately in front. 
There was much delay in accomplishing this, the troops at tb.e 
right having difficulty in getting through the jungle. After 
something more than an hour, the meii on the right, having 
pierced the jungle, appeared in sight and connected with the 
regiment, the bugle sounded and on went the regiment. They 
passed over the fence and mounting a ridge the men were ex- 
posed to a terrific volley from the enemy. For a time it was 
alive with fire. The men were dropping, wounded, all along the 
line. To reach the eneiuy the men were obliged to pass through 
a jungle verv thick and tangled and almost impenetrable. They 
finalh- succeeded, however, in crossing this growth of underbrush 
and the regiment rushed on to the rifle-pits only to see the enemy 
making good their escape. This skirmirh line of the Confeder- 
ates retreated to the main line of the army and immediately there 
was sharp firing by the Confederates toward the Fourteenth Regi- 
ment. The firing being intolerable, the men fell behind the dead 
bodies of Confederate soldiers, usmg tin plates and pans to throw 
up earth to cover these dead bodies to serve as protection. A 
New York regiiuent on the right advanced farther to the front, 
but were driven back, but the Fourteenth were able to maintain 
their position during the rest of the battle. Heavy picket firing 
was kept up during the day. Company I) was directly in front 




The Monument of the Fourteenth Regiment at Antietam, erected by the 
State of Connecticut. 



The Wilderness. 267 

of the rebel guns and prevented their tiring them, using their 
Berdans sharp-shooters with good effect. They succeeded also 
in digging trenches under their breastworks though which they 
passed and getting behind trees poured hot shot into the enemy. 
Some of the men were injured by shots striking the trees and 
glancing ofif. 

About six o'clock on the evening of the 4th. troops were dis- 
covered moving along down behind their lines and massing in 
front of the immediate position of the Fourteenth. The men of 
the Fourteenth well understood this meant a charge and made 
preparations to meet it, guns were trimmed and ammunition 
tucked into the breastworks in front. ( )n came the enemy and 
when about fifty feet away there was heavy shot poured into them 
all along the Union lines. Shot after shot was fired and wrought 
havoc with them. Those immediatel}- in front of the Fourteenth 
was the Forty-Second North Carolina Regiment. Thev soon 
became thoroughly demoralized, some retreating, wdiile some fell 
upon their faces. Some of them surrendered, crying "Yanks, 
don't fire, don't fire!" An officer of this North Carolina regiment 
was among these and -seeing the few men inquired, "Where are 
your men ? I thought the line at this point was at least four men 
deep, the fire came so fast and thick." Another prisoner said, 
"I thought you were just en masse here because there was a per- 
fect stream of fire from this part of the line." 

June 5th was occupied in strengthening the breastworks and 
with slight skirmishing during the day. During this time a 
rebel flag of truce was recognized in the immediate front of the 
Fourteenth. They sought to recover the bodies of their wound- 
ed and killed. As many of the latter were used as breastworks 
and covered with earth the flag of truce was not entirely suc- 
cessful from the Confederate point of view. The Fourteenth 
Regiment was censured for allowing this humane act. 

On the 6th the Confederates charged upon the Union works, 
but were repulsed with much loss. There was much skirmish- 
ing going on during the remaining days of Cold Harbor, though 
the regiment suffered but little. 

Speaking of the experience of the regiment on the 7th Sergeant 



268 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

E. H. Wade says : — "On Tuesday a flag of truce was sent to the 
enemy asking for a cessation of hostilities till we could bury our 
dead. They consented to it and all the dead were buried where 
they fell, except the colonel of the One Hundred and Sixty-fourth 
Xew York. Each army had been fighting for several days and 
quite a number of dead of both sides lay between us. So the flag 
of truce was accepted, firing ceased and both parties went out and 
buried all the dead. For an hour or so both Union and rebel 
were together and we had a good chance to talk to each other. 
The rebels were right glad to see us, they came and shook hands 
with us and we had a good conversation with them. Only one 
hour before we were but one hundred yards apart, hiding behind 
trees and breastworks, eagerly watching for a change to shoot 
each other, and now were together talking and chatting as if the 
best of friends. Soon the dead were all buried and then both 
armies went back to their old positions, and in a short time were 
firing the same as ever." 

Dr. Levi Jewett was sent out by Colonel Sm}th with this flag 
of truce, with a detail of pioneers. Dr. Jewett reported that he 
was most friendly received and every assistance rendered to en- 
able him to accomplish his work. 

The regiment remained here until June 12th. During this 
stav there was continual skirmishing going on in their front ex- 
cept for the time when the Forty-second North Carolina Regi- 
ment lay in frr^it of them. This regiment, bleeding and broken, 
said. "Yanks, if you'uns won't fire, we'uns wont." This com- 
pact held for some days when one morning the North Carolina 
regiment called out. "The Sixth Alabama boys is going to suc- 
ceed us and they fire at sight. Now, Yanks, lie low." 

The men of the Fourteenth and of the Forty-second North 
Carolina exchanged cofifee and tobacco, the former throwing 
cofifee in little bags which was reciprocated by the Confederates 
throwing packages of tobacco. 

On the loth the troops were withdrawn from the breastworks 
and moved about a mile to the rear. Rations were served and as 
fast as the troops were sup])lie(l, they moved off toward Peters- 
burg. About this time the Fourteenth Regiment was ordered 



The Wilderness. 269 

back to the breastworks and instructed to keep up their fires as a 
feint to cover the retreat of the main army and were told that 
a body of cavalry would be sent to their support. Seeing the 
Fourteenth move away, it was supposed by the officers of the com- 
missary department that they had been supplied with rations, 
so the train moved on, leaving the men of the Fourteenth with 
empty stomachs and empty havensacks. They remained in the 
condition for three days, their only sustenance being obtained 
from herbs and berries which the\' were able to pick in the w'oods 
and a stray piece of hardtack that had been trampled on by the 
horses. The regiment remained here until the evening of the 
1 2th at nine o'clock when they were withdrawn and moved on 
toward Petersburg. 

Sergeant Wade says : — "We were soon on the march and did 
not stop only for an occasional rest until we got nearly to the 
James River, being on the go just about twenty-four hours and 
making nearly thirty miles. It was an awful tramp for us and 
half the boys feet were blistered." 

Just before crossing the pontoon over the James River a small 
bodv of rebel cavalry appearerl in the rear. About the same 
time a larger bodv of cavalrv was seen coming from the direction 
of the enemy. It was difficult to tell whether these latter were 
Union or Conferate cavalry, but the small cavalry in the rear soon 
discovered the larger body to be Union troops and turned and 
fled. They were followed by the Union cavalry and the sight 
was a beautiful one as these two bodies galloped over the ridges 
toward the setting sun. 

Soon after crossing the James River the march was resumed 
and a rapid pace was taken directly acrtiss the country, through 
wood, swamp, brooks, without regard for roads, but as direct a 
line for Petersburg as the crow would fiy. After first crossing 
the river the march was not so rapid, but through some delay 
General Hancock had not received his orders and was late in 
reaching Petersburg, consequently the men were hurried forward 
without more than an hours rest at any time and without rations 
until Petersburg was reached before dawn on the morning of the 
l6th. 



270 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Leavino- the regiment here under the shadow of Petersburg-, it 
only remains for us to trace the movements of the regiment dur- 
ing its six weeks of almost incessant skirmishing, copying the 
official rej^orts of the commanding officers. Hy orders of the 
government the reports of the commanders were to be made by 
epoch. Captain Broatch's report to Lieutenant T. E. Parsons, 
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, is the only one who observes 
this order. Captain Broatch made no report to the Adjutant- 
General of the State of Connecticut. 

The limited space allowed in these pages for strictly personal 
biography makes it difficult to do justice to a character of such 
sterling worth and value as that of Major John C. Broutch. All 
who were brought into contact with him loved him with ardent 
alTection and respect. Mr. Broutch had a patriotic love, not 
onl}- for his comrades of the Fourteenth regiment, but for anv 
one who had done honest service for the country. He was truly 
the friend of the soldier. Major Broutch was born in Middle- 
town, Conn., March 14, 1843. Before entering the service he 
was emi)l(\ve(l in mechanical work in his native city. In 187 1 
he was chosen superintendent of the Mitklletown Water Works, 
which position he held for thirty years. Major Broutch rep- 
resented the town of Middletown in the General Assembly in 
1887 'I'^'l ^""'^^ fo^" o'l^' y^^r Department Commander of the G. A. 
R. Dr. Levi Jewett a comrade in the Fourteenth regiment and 
a close friend in all the after years of his life sa}s of him : — "As 
I was associated with him during the war I can bear witness to 
his good character, uniform kindness of disposition and cheer- 
fulness under the most trying circumstances, during the tedious 
marches in the summer's heat and winter's cold, through storm 
and rain and snow, by night and day, his cheerful presence lielp- 
^d to encourage the many and to cheer the spirits of his asso- 
ciates." Major Broutch died in Middletown. Conn., April 2d 
igo4. 

Concerning the fortunes of the flag in the battle of the Wilder- 
ness, we quote the following from an address made by Major 
Hinks at the annual meeting of the Society of the h^:)urteenth 
Connecticut Regiment at Hartford in 1879: — "Later in the day, 



The Wilderness. 



271 




:^IAJOR JOHN C. BROATCH. 



durino: an attack by Lono;streers Corps, Corporal Henry K. 
Lyon, of Xew Haven, a brave recruit wlio carried the the United 
States color, was mortally wounded. Handino- the dag to Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel Moore, he said, 'Take 'i. Colonel, I have done 
my best!' Colonel Moore gave it to John Hirst, of Rockville. 
The regiment at this time was almost surrounded and in danger 
of being captured, but Sergeant Hirst brought the flag safely 
from the field, and carried it from that time through every battle 
until he safely deposited it in Hartford after the regiment was 
mustered out. The State color had also a narrow escape from 
capture at this time, its bearer having planted it in the ground 
while attending to his wounded comrade. Corporal Lyon; but it 



272 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

was savetl by the promtness of Sergeant Thompson. Corporal 
Robert Wolfe, of Waterbury, a member of the color onard, was 
wounded in this engagement, and subsequently at the battle of 
Ream's Station." 

The follow^ing is the list of killed and wounded during and 
since the battle of the Wilderness : — 

"Lieutenant-Colonel S. A. ^loore, woundeil, knee, slight. 

Major, James 15. Coit, wounded, wrist, severely. 

Company A. Wounded, 2d Lieutenant, W^illiam Murdock, 
ankle, slight. Corporals, William Jacobs, knee, badly, John Kelly, 
hand, slight. Privates, Burritt Styles, arm and leg, Patrick Moore, 
leg, Patrick Ryan, finger, slight, William Blucher, leg, John Rid- 
ley, breast, Charles Sullivan, hand, James Ringwood, head ; miss- 
ing. Corporals, Thomas Henderson, Privates, James H. Bartram, 
Richard Ringwood. 

Company B. Killed, Privates, Lucius E. Bidwell, George S. 
May, James Scully, Samuel Herring ; wounded, 2d Lieutenant, 
Robert Russell, hand, ist Sergeant, Elnathan B. Tyler, thigh. 
Sergeants, William H. Dean, body, severely, Edwin Stroud, foot, 
severely, Joseph McClusky, chest, severely. Corporals, A. L. Nor- 
ton, leg, amputated, Heman F. Crowell, breast, Hiram H. Fox, 
arm, slight, William Hall, ankle, severely. Privates, Dwight 
Davis, leg and side, Edward Duffy, body, Thomas Gleason, leg, 
badly, James Ha}s, 2d, leg, Henry A. Lawrence, hand, Thad- 
deus Steinheil, hip. William Taylor, arm and shoulder. John Teal, 
William X'ickner. body. Randall M. Tallman. leg; missing, Pri- 
vate, Charles E. Pample. 

Company C. Killed, Private, Stephen D. Kittle ; wounded. 
Sergeant, Sylvester G. Lord, leg, severel>-. Corporals, Robert 
Wolfe, hand, slight, Edward Kilduff, feet and groin, Charles A. 
Beebe, head. Privates, Frederick A. Chase, thigh, Cornelius Daly, 
heel, Jonathan Taylor, shoulder, Oscar Rander, hand, Sylvanus 
W. Beckwith, knee, Charles Miller, arm. badly, John Suffang, 
hand, slight, Edward Rose, knee, severely, Frederick A. Ellis, 
neck, slight, Daniel B. Joice, leg, severely, John Dernby, foot, 
severely, James Coles, hand, slight, James Moran. arm ; missing, 
Sergeant William A. Rice, 



The Wilderness. 273 

Company D. Wounded, ist Lieutenant, Newell P. Rockwood, 
arm, 2d Lieutenant, George A. Stocking, head, ist Sergeant, El- 
bert F. Hyde, face, slight. Sergeant, George E. Worcester, leg, 
severely. Corporal, Morris Altwin, hand. Privates, Bradley Nich- 
ols, arm, Charles H. House, ankle, slight, William Larcuui, hand 
Michael Carroll, hand, Charles H. Brown, foot, James Drew, 
arm ; missing. Privates, Purson Davis, Charles Lamphere, James 
McWilliams, ^lartin Lyons. 

Company E. Killed. Privates, Daniel Timmons, Patrick 
Lloyd, Alonzo P.. Cole; wounded, ist Sergeant, James AL iMoore, 
head, Sergeant, George K. Bassett, head, badly, Corporals, Jos- 
eph Keenan, John Carroll, finger, slight, Sanford Bugbee, Pri- 
vates, Jeremiah Callahan, hip, Carlos B. Cole, ear, slight, Thomas 
Dorns, arm, John D. Dixon, Lev\-is Bush, arm, Timothy Lown, 
finger, slight, Patrick Mahoney, John Parker, David Patterson, 
James Riley, ankle, severely. William Smith, arm, James Norton, 
arm ; missing. Private, William Boscher. 

Company F. Killed, Privates, Albert S. Frost, William C. 
Brown; wounded, 1st Lieutenant, Frederick Shalk, hip, 2d Lieu- 
tenant. L. F. Norton, arm. slight. Sergeant, Charles M. Scoville. 
thigh, badly, Corporals, Charles W. Norton, mouth, badly, Jos- 
eph Thomas, arm. Privates, Joseph A. Berry, mouth. Lewis G. 
Burton, arm, George W. Doty, foot, James Holland, foot, ^^lorris 
B. Hanford, hand, Charles Miller, hand, slight, John Winter, 
leg, severely. James \\'arren. breast, slight ; missing. Corporal, 
Elijah W. Bacon, Privates, David Gebhardt, John Hines, William 
E. Mott, Sidney Smith. 

Company G. Killed, Privates, Luther R. Hine. Edward F. 
Norton, James Brown ; wounded. Captain, Sanniel Fiske. should- 
er. Corporals, Augustus L. Dibble, hand and arm, Henry K. 
Lyon, wounded and missing, Edgar S. Ely, breast, slight. Peter 
Kelly. Privates, Charles Decker, finger, slight, Peter Hughes, 
cheek, slight, Jerome Kelsey, thigh, severely, Charles Lutz, leg, 
Henry P. Lynch, leg, George Mayer, hand, slight, John O'Con- 
ner, leg and arm, John Richardson, arm, severely, John S. 
Stannard, toes, Richard Lee,, arm. slight, Patrick Daly, arm, 



274 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Ir.fantry. 

badly, Charles V. Wilson, breast and wrist, William H. Morgan, 
throal:, Benjamin Stevens, jaw ; missing-. Corporal, Sanford Fos- 
ter, Private, William Hancock. 

Company H. Killed, Sergeant, William Glossinger, Privates, 
Patrick Kernin, James P. Conners, Jacob Kearn ; wounded, ist 
Lieutenant, Samuel H. Seward, arm, amputated, Corporal, 
Charles Laurie, hand, severely, Privates, James Crinion, hand, 
slight, James Allen, head, Carnon Mackie, arm, severely, Charles 
Rehmer, shoulder, Charles Card, wrist, Daniel Pia, bowels, 
badly, John Pals, back ; missing. Privates, Joseph P. Starkey, 
Alexander ( )rr, Robert Isles, Woodruff Haskins, John Davis, H. 
Herman Schluter. 

Company L Wounded, Sergeant, Frederick Beardsley, 
wounded and missing. Corporal, Thomas Crittenden, groin, 
badly. Privates, James Picket, cvrm, amputated, Edward Good- 
man, George Thomas, thumb and side, Stephen ]\Ialoney, hip 
and missing, Nathan A. Palmer, finger. 

Company K. Killed, ist Lieutenant, Henry W. Wadhams, 
Privates ]\Iichael Shaughnessy, Chester C. Burton. Charles C. 
Borroughs ; wounded. 2d Lieutenant, George H. Lillibridge, 
thigh, severely, C\:»rporals. John J. Ih'ierly, hip. slight. Christo- 
])her Mvnn. hi]x Edward iMtzgerald. ban;!. Francis Daly, wrist 
and ann. Privates, Chester C. Field, head and throat, (ieorge 
Wallack. knee, badly, Alfred Cowles. hip. William N. Carroll, 
leg. l)adl\-, George Flammer, head, severely, Oscar Kibbe, leg 
severely. iM-ancis McVay, breast, Thomas Madden, Thomas Mc- 
Grath, fingers, George Si^ndler. shoulder, Stephen D. Allen, 
breast ; missing. Private, Chauncey Kingsbury. 

( )f those wounded the following have since died: — Captain, 
Samuel Fiske, Company (J. ist Lieutenant. Frederick Shalk, 
Company F, Sergeant, Joseph McClusky, Company B. Private, 
Charles A. Beebe, Compan\- C." 

Among those wounded at the Wilderness was Captain Samuel 
Fiske from whom we have often quoted under the nom de plume 
of Dunn Browne. Born in Shelburne, Mass., July 28th, 1828, 
and being wounded in the battle of the Wilderness was taken 
to the hospital at iM-edericksburg, \'a., where he died May 23d., 



The Wilderness. 



275 



1864. He was conspicuous in the regiment as he Hved a Hfe 
full of valuable lessons and replete with stirring action. He 
was bright, lively, loving and beloved. He graduated in 1848 
from Amherst College. After graduation he taught for two 
years and then became a tutcM" at Amherst for three years. In 
1855 he spent a year in Europe and the East. He wrote cn- 




ASST. SURCiEON CH.\KLES TOMLINSON. 



trancing letters to the Springfield Republican during his jour- 
ney abroad. After his return from Europe he was settled as 
pastor of the Congregational church at Madison where he re- 
mained for seven years and from which he enlisted as a private 
in Company I. His ministry was marked by originality and 
independence of action. In his pastorate he won the affection 
of his people and when he resolved that his duty to his country 
in jjeril was even higher than that to his people, it wrung their 
hearts to part with him. His body was taken to Madison by 



276 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

a part of his parishioneers where funeral services were held 
and thence the remains were removed to Shelburne Falls, his 
native place, where Professor W. S. Tyler of Amherst preached 
a sermon tender with personal grief. 

First Lieutenant Frederick E. Shalk was another serious loss 
to the regiment during this series of battles under consideration. 
He was a German by birth, moving to this country quite early 
in life. He enlisted from Norwich. Prior to that he had re- 
sided in Uncasville. It will be remembered that we have 
alluded to him previously as falling from the train while mak- 
ing a short stop at Easton, Pa., on the route of the regiment from 
New York to the front. He was a faithful soldier and a trustv 
officer. ( )f vigorous and energetic constitution, but cheerful 
disposition, he was equally ready for duty or danger, for fun 
or frolic. This disposition made him a great favorite with the 
men of the regiment. He was wounded at Spottsylvania and 
died May 21st., 1864. He was taken to Lebanon for burial. 

First Lieutenant Henry W. Wadhams was one of three 
brothers who enlisted from Litchfield, Conn., all of whom were 
killed in the struggle for the nation's life. All these brothers 
were killed in battle. Sergeant Edward Wadhams of the 
Eighth Connecticut was killed in the assault on Fort Darling, 
Captain Luman Wadhams of the Second Connecticut Artillery 
was mortally wounded at Cold Harbor and First Lieutenant 
Henr}- W. Wadhams on the south side of North Ann River. 
The subject of this sketch was born August 14th., 1831. He 
was a machinist at Waterbury, where he enlisted July 4th., 
1862, in Company C. He was buried near North Anna River. 
His whole military career was marked by loyal devotion to 
duty and his desire to faithfully serve his country. 

The following is the report of Captain John C. r)roatch : — 

"Headquarters Fourteenth Connecticut N'olunteers, 
August 7th., 1864. 
Lieutenant : — 

The following is respectfully submitted as a brief sketch of 
the operations of this regiment during the present campaign, 
divided into five epochs, as required by Special Orders, No. 209,. 
headquarters Army of the Potomac. 



The Wilderness. 277 

FIRST EPOCH. 

Left camp at Stony Mountain at dark May 3, 1864; crossed 
the Rapidan River at Ely's Ford next morning; halted and went 
into camp for the night on the old Chancellorsville battle-field 
at 2 P. M. Resumed our march upon the morning of the 5th., 
moving through a place called Todd's Tavern, and toward 
Spottsylvania Court-House. Halted toward noon and threw 
up breastworks. In the latter part of the afternoon marched 
back again over the same ground to a cross-roads, where we 
advanced in line of battle into the woods which bordered the 
road, receiving a iirc from the enemy, but without being able 
to return it, as some of our own troops were in advance of us. 
Loss in the regiment about fifteen killed or wounded, among 
whom were two commissioned officers. At daylight next morn- 
ing moved upon the enemy, the brigade being formed in two 
lines of battle, the I'ourteenth u])on the left of the first line. 
After advancing for u])ward of half a mile met the enemy, and 
were hotly engaged with them. Fell back for a distance of 
four or five rods, but i)rom])tl\' rallied and comi)letelv repulsed 
the rebel attack. Were then relieved by another line of battle, 
and the brigade was ordered to withdraw for a short distance to 
the rear, where it was resuj^plied with cartridges. The regi- 
ment received the hearty commendation of Colonel Carroll, 
brigade commander, for its conduct upon this occasion. Later 
in the day, an attack being made by the rebels upon ihe left 
flank of our lines, a part of our brigade was swung around to 
meet it. For upwards of twenty minutes the Fourteenth held 
that part of the enemy's line opposite to it in check. At the 
expiration of that time the iMrst Delaware, which was upon its 
left, being outflanked by the rebel line and forced to retu'e, the 
Fourteenth fell back in good order to the cross-roads, where 
it was at once reformed in line and ready for further services. 
Our loss this day was severe, particularly in officers. 

SECOND EPOCH. 

Upon the 9th of ^lay, the march to Spottsylvania Court- 
House having been resumed, crossed the Po River and went into 
bivouac for the night. Upon the loth. recrossed the river and 



278 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

up a position in a piece of woods some 50 or 60 yards in front 
of the enemy's works, and o])ened a heavy fire upon them. 
Our ammunition at lent^th lieini;- exhausted, we were reHeved 
and ordered to fall hack to a more sheltered position. This was 
done in good order. xAt night threw up breastworks. Upon 
the night of May 1 1 quietly withdrew from our position and 
marched all night toward the east. At daybreak next morning 
made a charge upon the enemy, and taking them by surprise, 
assisted in capturing the prisoners, guns, etc., taken upon that 
occasion. Several of the captured guns were turned upon the 
enemy and worked with good eiTect by members of this regi- 
ment. We occupied for the remainder of the day a position 
farther to the left. Were under a constant fire, but being pro- 
tected by a low breast work our loss was small. 

THIRD EPOCH. 

Received marching orders about midnight Alay 20th. Our 
line of march led by Massa])onax Church and (juiney's Station, 
and through Howling (Ireen and MilfiM'd Station. Crossed the 
Mattapony River below this latter ])lace in the afternoon on the 
2 1 St., and took up a position, which we fortified. Cpon the 
22(1. went out skirmishing, but were unable to discover any- 
thing except a small force of rebel cavalry. 

Upon the 23d., marched to the banks of the North Anna River. 
Crossed this river upon the morning of the 24th. About I P. M. 
we advanced ui)on the enemy, deployed as skirmishers, drove 
them across a plowed field, and, with the assistance of other 
regiments of the brigade, from out a breastwork which tliey 
occupied u])on the edge of a piece of woods. Continued to 
skirmish with the enemy in the woods until nearly dark. May 
26th., toward evening, half of the h^ourteenth, under command 
of Captain Nichols, was ordered to drive the rebels from a post 
of observation occupied by them about 200 yards in front of our 
line. This task was done in good style, with the loss of i 
commissioned officer killed, and 3 or 4 men wounded. 

FOURTH EPOCH. 

That night we withdrew across the North Anna, and, march- 
ing down the north bank of the river all the next day, crossed 



The Wilderness. 279 

moved up to attack the rebel position upon the north side. Took 
the Pamimkey at Taylor's Bridg'e upon the 28th. Upon the 
30th. advanced to Totopotomoy Creek, 10 miles north of Rich- 
mond. Upon the 31st moved up to the front to support Gen- 
eral ( )\ven's l)rii^ade : are not, however, engaoed. Upon the 
night of June i, our regiment, with another, is left upon picket 
in front of our works, while the remainedr of the brigade is with- 
drawn and marches toward Cold Harbor. We are withdrawn 
a little before daylight and rejoin the rest of the brigade upon 
the afternoon of the 2d. near the above place. At daylight next 
morning advance upon the enemy and take up a position, distant 
about TOO yards from their works, which we are subse(|uently 
ordered to fortify. An attack made upon us by the enem}' in 
this position is easily repulsed. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

John C. Broatch, 
Captain, Commanding Regiment. 
Lieutenant T. E. Parson.^, 

Acting Assistant Adjutant-( leneral." 

The following are the official reports of Colonel Theodore G. 
Elhs to the Adjutant-General of the State of Connecticut: — 

"Headquarters Fourteenth Connecticut X'olunteers, 
June 7, 1864. 
General : — 

Although during the past month I have not been continually 
in command of my regiment, being part of the time in command 
of the brigade, and during the battles in which the regiment has 
been engaged having been ])laced in command of other regi- 
ments, in addition to my own, whereby my attention has been 
somewhat diverted from it, I feel it incumbent upon me to make 
the best report of the movements and engagements of the regi- 
ment since the commencement of the present campaign that lies 
in my power. On the evening of May 3 the regiment left 
Stony Mountain, on the Rapidan, with the four other regiments, 
composing the detachment stationed at that point, which T then 
commanded, and marched to join our brigade nea;' Brandy Sta- 



280 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

tion. ]\Iarchin.i4- all ni,e,iit we crossed the Rai)i(lan with ihc rest 
of our corps at Ely's Ford about daylight and preceeded to the 
old battlefield at Chancellorsville, where we halted for the night. 
The next day our corps inarched southwesterly toward Todd's 
Tavern, where it was attacked in force by the rebel arniv. We 
turned northward and marched to the cross-roads, al^out 5 miles 
west from Chancellorsville, formed by the junction of the plank 
road from Chancellorsville to ( )range Court-House and the road 
upon which we marched. The firing was quite heavy when our 
brigade reached the scene of action. We were formed in line 
of battle imiuediately north of the cross-roads, and advanced 
into the woods, where we at once became engaged with the 
enemy. The L\:)urteenth was in the first line of battle and be- 
haved nobly, at one time executing a change of front under fire 
to repel an attack on our left. IJefore going into action our 
force was 20 commissioned officers and 325 enlisted men. 

The battle was resumed at daylight on the r)th. Our brigade 
advanced to the attack and moved forward about half a mile 
through the woods, changing front toward the northwest, and 
crossing the ])lank road running westward from the cross-roads. 
Here the enemy were found in force. After being engaged 
in the front line until our ammunition was exhausted, the 
regiment was withdrawn to the second line until again supplied. 
In the early part of the afternoon the enemy made a fierce and 
desperate assault ui)0!i our left fiank, which was for some time 
resisted, but our brigade being unsupported on the left, it was 
obliged to fall back beyond the north and south road before 
mentioned. During the rest of the afternoon the regiment was 
placed in reserve near the road, being occasionally moved as 
dififerent points were threatenexl. In the evening we were moved 
a short distance up the road, and were engaged most of the night 
in constructing breastworks along the west side of the road. 
Our force in this day's engagement was 18 officers and 300 en- 
listed men. 

On the 7th. <Sth, and ()th we were formed in line of battle at 
various jioints, changing our position more to the southwest. 
About dark on the evening of the Qth we crossed the River Po 



The Wilderness. 



281 



near Air. Giles Graves' house and encamped for the night. The 
next morning- our (hvision liad recrossed the river, and went to 
the support of the Vihh Corjis. \\"e marched hy a cicuitous 
route to the left, where we lay for some time exposed to a 
heavy shell lire in rear of i)art of the Fifth Corps. Soon our 
brigade was in line of battle. We advanced over the line of 
breastworks, l)ehin(l which lay part of the corps we were su|- 




Orange Plank Road, Wilderness. 



porting, and charged forward against the enemy. Our advance 
was through a tangled road, difficult to pass in order, dis|)ersing 
our men, and obliging us to halt occasionally to reform our line. 
To add to the difficulty, the woods were on fir.^ for some dis- 
tance over which we had to ])ass. At times the heat of the fire 
was suffocating. ( )ur men, however, moved bravely forwaid, 
under cover of the woods, to within about 50 paces of The 
enemy's works, which opened ui)on us a galling fire. Unable 
to advance farther, we opened fire upon such of the .meiuy as 
could be seen, and maintaining our position for about six hours, 
when, our ammunition being exhausted, we were relieve:! and 
lav in the second line, still in front of the breastworks, a'l that 
night and the next day. ( )ur force in this engagement was ii 
officers and 220 enlisted men. About midnight we marched 
eastward with our corps to the right of the rebel position, where 



282 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

about daylight on the I2th an assauh was made upon the encnu^'s 
works. We were in the second Hue, and passed over the rebel 
intrenchnients directly after a portion of the First Division, 
which ])receded us. We captured a great number of prisoners, 
which we sent to the rear in charge of Captain Nickels. We 
pursued the flying enemy for about a quarter of a niile, when 
I found our men becoming scattered, our colors in advance of 
any other troops, and the fire from the enemy's second line of 
works becoming serious. The rebels had also rallied -nd w. re 
advancing a line of battle in our front. I therefore ordered our 
men to fall back to the first line of works. In this first line 
were the enemy's cannon, which were all captured, ^lany of 
these guns were turned on the enemy. Two of them -Acre 
worked by men of the Fourteenth, under direction of Lieut. -nant- 
Colonel Moore and Lieutenant Morgan. These guns were 
draw^n oft' by our men. Our force in this engagement was 8 
commissioned officers and 200 enlisted men. The regiment was 
afterward moved to the left during the day and lav in tne •.cbel 
entrenchments all night. 

The 13th and 14th were passed in the same \icinity with diglit 
changes of position. About dark on the evening of t!ie 14111 our 
brigade was marched westward to another line of ritie-i)its to 
resist an expected attack. The Fourteenth remained m the 
works in line of battle. On the night of the T7th, !he regiment 
being on i)icket, it was formed into a skirmish line with some 
two or three other regiments and advanced upon the enemy's 
position. The whole of the i8th. was passed upon the skirmish 
line, the regiment being at times under a shell fire, but meeting 
with no casualties. We were relieved at night. On Sunday, 
the 22(1, we were again engaged in skirmishing with the enemy's 
cavalry, near Milford Station. About 11 A. M., on the 24th., 
we moved across the North Anna River and were engaged most 
of the day in a severe skirmish with the enemv. Our line ad- 
vanced and drove the rebel skirmishers about half a mile across 
a wheat field on the left and through the woods on the right. 

We were relieved at night with our ammunition nearly ex- 



The Wilderness. 283 

pended. Our force this day was 7 commissioned otficers ard 185 
enlisted men. The next morning" the regiment was again 
moved to the front, and was engaged all day in throwing np in- 
trenchments. (Jn the 26th., ahout 7 P. M. the Fourteenth with 
two other regiments was ordered to advance and drive the 
enemy from their advanced works on the left of our position, 
which they did in gallant style after a terrific struggle, which 
lasted until dark. The strength of the regiment engaged in 
this encounter was 8 commissioned officers and 165 enlisted men. 
The 27th. and 28th. were passed in marching down the left l,>ank 
of the Pamunkey River, which was crosseil about 4 P. ZvL on 
the 28th. The next two days were passed near tlie river, witli 
some slight changes of position. On the afternoon of the 31st. 
we were moved to the extreme front, where our picket were en- 
gaged with the enemy. Here we remained all tlie next day, be- 
hind breastworks, which v.e had partiall} constructed dining the 
night. On the night of June ist. the regiment was left behind 
on picket when the corps moved to Cold Harbor, rejoining it 
the next day about 5 P. J\I., after a hard dav's march. i,)n the 
morning of the 3d. the whole line moved forward toward the 
rebel works, causing some sharp skirmishing but no general 
engagement in our vicinity. ( Jur men intrenched themselves 
in front of the enemy's works and remained quiet, .xcept a 
continued exchange of shots between the pickets. At times, 
however, the enemy opened a severe fire, from wliich we were 
protected by our wr^rks. On the e/ening ot Lhe 4th. a charge 
was made by the rebels, which was handsomely repulsed. 

The strength of the regiment is at jiresent 7 comuiissioiied 
officers and 160 enlisted n^.en. The pri?sent campaign has thus 
far been a severe one. Since -.ts comnien.cenienr to the j^resent 
time, the regiment has been m line of battle and imder fire 
almost every day. At night we have almost invariably 
bivouacked in line, ]M-epared for an attack. The fatigue and 
exposure of the night marches, and continual encounters with tlie 
enemv have been extraordinary, but the officers and men of this 
regiment have met them nobly and uncomplainingly, clieerfully 
bearing all the hardships they have been called upon to endure. 



284 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Anioiii^' the officers especially noted for their gallantry in the 
various actions in which they have been engaged, I would men- 
tion the names of Lieut. Col. S. A. Moore and Adjt. William B. 
Hincks. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant. 

Theo. G. Ellis, 
Colonel Fourteenth Connecticut A'olunteers. 
Brig. Gen. Horace J. Morse, 

Adjutant-General of Connecticut. 
Recapitulation. Killed, Commissioned officers, i ; enlisted 
men, 20; wounded. Commissioned officers, 11 ; enlisted men, 129; 
missing, enlisted men, 24. Total, 185." 

Washington, D. C, August 9, 1864. 
General : — 

I have the honor to sulMuit the following report of the opera- 
tions of this regiment from June 3 to June 20, 1864: — 

At the date when I closed my last report the regiment was 
occupying an intrenched position immediatelv in front of and 
about 100 yards from the enemy's works at Cold Harbor, a place 
10 miles northeast of Richmond, \'a. An incessant picket fir- 
ing was kept up between the two sides. On the evening of the 
3d. of June the enemy made an attack upon us in heavy force. 
Their skirmishers advanced with fixed bayonets, followed by 
several lines of battle. They were met by a very heavy fire, 
which caused them to fall back in confusion. One lieutenant 
and 3 ])rivates came over into our works and were captureil They 
stated that they belonged to the Forty-second North Carolina 
Regiment, Martin's brigade, Hoke's division, of Beauregard's 
army. During the night the enem\- could be heard removing 
their dead and wounded, and by daylight had carried otT all but 
3 of the dead, who were too near our i)osition to be removed 
with safety. 

On the 5th. 6th, and 7th of June picket-firing was 1 cpt up 
by the enemy, which was replied to by our men with considerable 
elTect. Private Henry Worden, of Company A, shot one of 
their sharp-shooters in the very act of discharging his piece, 



The Wilderness. 285 

killing him instantly. Private Franklin M. Gofif, of Company 
B, wounded 2, who were seen to be carried off upon stretchers. 
This was at a distance estimated at about 800 yards back of the 
enemy's second line of fortifications, and was done .with a 
Sharp's rifle. It is interesting, as showing the comparative value 
of that weapon and the Springfield rifle, several trials with the 
latter, using an ordinary charge of power, failing to carry that 
distance. 

On the night of the 5th. of June, the enemy advancing his ■ 
skirmishers, our men fired upon them under the impression that 
they contemplated an attack. The enemy replied from his breast- 
works, and for some fifteen or twenty minutes, each party think- 
ing itself attacked, a very heavy fire was kept up, doing, how- 
ever, but very little damage on either side. Such mistakes as this 
cannot always be avoided when the enemy is in such close 
proximity. After the firing had ceased a working party was 
sent out, which, under cover of darkness, threw uu a rille-pit for 
the protection of our pickets, some 25 yards in advance of our 
main line. The two were connected by a deep trench, which 
aft'orded shelter to our men in passing backward and forward. 

June 17th., toward evening. Assistant Surgeon Jewett. of the 
Fourteenth, was sent out by Colonel Smyth, commanding the 
brigade, with a number of pioneers, under the protection of a 
flag of truce, for the burial of the dead lying between our 
brigade and the enemy. This was in consequence of an arrange- 
ment entered into between General Grant and General Lee. Dr. 
Jewett reported that he was politely received, and afforded every 
facility in the execution of his ofiice, by a staff ofiicer of General 
Alartin, who commanded the brigade of the enemy opposite us. 
On the evening of the loth. ofjune our brigade was relieved by 
another, and we withdrew for about half a mile to the rear, to 
enjoy a much-needed rest. 

Theo. G. Ellis, 
Colonel Fourteenth Connecticut \'olunteers. 
Brig. Gen. H. J. Morse, A. G., State of Connecticut." 



CHAPTER XIV. 

Petersburg and Ream's Station. 

Before dawn of the i6th of June, we find the re^^iment in 
front of J'etersliuri:^-. The men were wearied, jaded, half starved 
and foot-sore. The long- series of skirmishes and battles, almost 
incessant since the regiment left Stony Mountain, and their rapid 
march to reach Petersburg had told heavily upon the physical 
con;liti;)n of the men. Even Colonel Ellis in his ot^cial report 
■itters the first complaint regarding the severe service of the regi- 
ment. 

Before light the regiment, in company with the brigade, was 
ordered to charge the enemy's line. Ceneral Hancock pro- 
tested against this, saying that his men were in no condition to 
fight, as they had had nothing to eat in several davs, whereupon 
General lUitler, having command of the colored troops, replied 
that his troops had one days rations and desired that they should 
be shared. A detail of the regiment was then sent down to the 
colored troops and boxes of hardtack were l)rought up. There 
was not time, however, to divide these rations among the men 
before the charge was ordered, but this order to charge was 
stayed and a heavy skirmish line was advanced. There was a 
brisk fight, but the regiment lost only one man, although cap- 
turing some prisoners. With an unloaded gun Private John 
(ieatley of C()m])any A in this advance of the skinuish line cap- 
tured three armed rebels and brought them in as prisoners. This 
brave soldier in the afternoon, being still on the skirmish line, 
wounded two of the enemy, one of them fatally. The regiment 
remained on the line during the night. 

The next morning, the 17th, the\- were moved to the left t) 
support Ceneral Barlow. Here they remained until evening 
when they were instructed to advance their line nearer the 
enemy's position,. The Fourteenth did this, moving through a 

(286) 



Petersburg and Ream's Station. 287 

morass with much difficulty, driving back the Confederate skir- 
mish hne and retaining their advanced position for several hours 
under a severe fire. Owing to the faihire of two other regi- 
ments that were designed to connect upon the left, the regiment 
was ordered by the brigade commander to fall back. At this 
time the regiment numbcreil about one hundred and tift>- men, 
about thirty being away drawing rations, leaving but one hun- 
dred and twenty to take part in this charge. Although the tiring 
was severe, the loss to the regiment was one killed and four 
wounded. 

The next morning the l)riga<le was advanced, the Fourteenth 
Regiment being in the second line. Upon reaching the Con- 
federate breastworks, they found them abandoned. Possession 
was taken of these breastworks by the Union troo])s, these works 
becoming the outer line of the Union army during the long 
seige of Petersburg. This was within gun shot distance of die 
enemv's line and was about the point where lM)rt Stedman was 
later established. 

Manv of the regiment will remember an incident about thi^ 
time. Approaching a small unoccupied house a screech was 
heard as if some depredations were being made upon a hen- 
roost. It was discovered that a solitary hen was the only occu- 
pant of the house. Xot having a temperament that loved the 
tumult of war it beat a iiasty retreat toward the rebel lines. 
She was fired u])on by several of the boys, the firing being re- 
sponded to on the Confederate side until the whole line was in 
action. Xo one was reported killed and this "Uattle of the Flee- 
ing Hen" has never been placed on any official list of battles. 

We will allow Sergeant Wade to tell the course of the regi- 
ment at this point. He says :— "Thursday, June i6th, was a 
hard and bloody day. Quite a skirmish fight took place in the 
morning, our skirmishers driving the enemy into their rifle-pits, 
a brisk fire was kept uj) all day and at six o'clock our forces 
on the left made a terrible charge. For three hours nothing 
could be heard but dreadful cannonading and volleys after 
vollevs of musketry. As we had had no rations for three days 
and there being no signs of our teams coming up that night, 



288 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

our general borrowed one tlays rations of the Seventeenth Army 
Corps, but late at night our teams arrived and we had all we 
wanted. The next morning we moved to the left to support the 
First Division. Here we went to the extreme front and com- 
menced ])utting up breastworks. At night the troops on the left 
made an advance and we tried the same, but were unsuccessful, 
as there were Init tliree regiments of us, and so we came back 
to our works. While la\ing there, a member of Companv F, 
( )vid \\ .Shaw, was shot through the heart. He had been off 
drawing rations, had just returned and was in the act of putting 
down on the ground a blanket full of hardtack, when he was 
shot. He had been with the regiiuent but about a week. At 
twelve o'clock at night we moved back a short distance and tried 
to slee]). Hut we were called up early and moved to the right 
and advanced through some woods a little ways, where we 
halted till noon, when we went out clear to the front and sup- 
ported a l)riga(le of the Fourth Division, Second Corps, while 
they made a charge. The\- advanced on and on till thev had 
got near the enem}-'s works, when they rose up and tired into 
them, and so luurderous was their volleys that they had to come 
back without acciMuplishing their oliject. A great many were 
killed and wounded, in fact the field where they crossed to make 
the charge was covered with the dead. At night we moved a 
little ways to the left. The next day, Sunday, everything was 
quiet and no charges were made. The boys improved every 
moment of the day in resting, for the idea of getting any sleep 
nights had been given up by the bo\s. 

Monda}', jui^^ 2Cth, we were relieved toward noon by the 
Sixth Corps and went l;)ack a couple of miles, when we were told 
to put up our tents, as we might stay there a week or more. So, 
of course, we went to work next morning and had just got our 
streets nearly laid out when orders came to pack up, and at ten 
o'clock we started in the direction of the Weldon railroad. It 
was the hottest day of the season and we were nearly suffocated 
by the dust. ( )ur division w^ent about three miles and then came 
back where we halted for the night. 

June 22(\ we moved to the front early in the morning and put 



Petersburg and Ream's Station. 289 

up some breastworks. During the day the enemy attacked our 
extreme right, capturing one of our batteries and over one thou- 
sand prisoners. They shelled us dreadfully, but few were hit. 
We expected an attack every moment, but thev did not trouble 
us again. On Friday we were relieved by the b'ifth Corps and 
went back some two miles to the rear in a piece of woods, where 
we made ourselves as comftjrtable as we could, considering the 
intensity of the heat and the drvness of everything, we having 
had no rain for twenty tlays. We stopped here till Monday, 
June 27th, when we had orders to move at eleven. We went 
some two miles near the Petersburg and Norfolk railroad and 
then went on al)()Ut three miles further where we established a 
division [ticket line. It was only a five mile march, but it did 
seem as if we should all die before we got to a sto])ping place. 
The sun was hot and quite a number were sunstruck. We were 
in the rear of everything and were supposed to be out there to 
protect our supply trains froiu attack by the rebel cavalry and 
any guerrillas that might be prowling around. There were cpiite 
a number of plantations around here, and plenty of hogi, cows, 
sheep, geese and turkeys wdiich were confiscated by the troops. 
The inhabitants had mostly cleared out and left what they 
couldn't carry with them, which came very handx for us. Some 
of their provisions they had put in barrels and hid in the woods 
near-by, but soldiers' eyes are ever open and so, while pr-owling 
around to see what they could see, came across a lot of salt shad, 
butter, etc., and we lived well for awhile. We suffered a good 
deal while here for water and dug several wells near our camp. 

Monday, June 28th, at eleven o'clock we had orders to move 
end soon were on the go. A\'ent some two miles along the side 
of the Petersburg and Xorfolk railroad and then three miles 
further toward the front, although our division is on picket. 
June 29th we came back to our old camp and then moved from 
there to the camp wdiere the Sixth Corps had been, they having 
gone to help Sheridan. We stopped here until July 2d when 
we moved about a mile to the right in a piece of w'oods. ]\Ion- 
day, July 4th, we had a dress parade, the first we have had for 
ten weeks. The band came to the regiment and it seemed good 



290 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

to have them with us, if only for a little while. We stopped 
around here until July 14th. One day we would move perhaps 
a mile to the right, the next day a mile to the left, never stopping 
'n any one place but a day or two at a time. Friday, July 15th, 
we marched about a mile to the rear when we were ordered to 
clean up the ground, put up our tents in good shape, raise our 
bunks about a foot from the ground and make ourselves as com- 
fortable as possible. We worked hard all day and got our tents 
up and bunks made. The boys went to bed early and all was 
still when at eleven o'clock at night General Smyth, our brigade 
commander, rode through the camp and cried out in his peculiar 
style, 'Fall in immediately, with your equipments, haversacks 
and canteen on' and in eight minutes the whole brigade of eight 
regiments were in motion. We didn't know but the whole rebel 
army were upon us, but soon found out that we were going to 
destroy a fort and some earthworks that we captured from the 
enemy when we first came here and that were of no use to us 
now. We worked till eight o'clock Saturday morning, when we 
were ordered back, having done our work. It was dreadful 
dusty and we could not see the men ahead of us. Sunday, July 
i/th, we had a detail of one hundred and twenty-five men to 
go out on fatigue duty, but we did not have so many men, and 
the Adjutant was obliged to detail some sergeants and corporals 
to act as privates. We started for our work, but the order was 
counter-manded after we had gone Init a short ways. July igth 
was a hard rainy day, the first wc had had for six weeks. July 
2 1st we drew potatoes, beets, turnips, onions and pickles from 
the Sanitary Commission. They had jireviously issued good 
provisions to us and at this time we were living as good as any- 
one could ask. July 22d we marched alxnit a mile to the left, 
and put up our tents and had a good camp in the woods. We 
stopped here till Tuesday, July 26th, when after drawing a days 
rations, we started on the march. Went about two miles when 
we stopped and drew two more days rations and then traveled 
all night long, crossing the Appomattox River at four o'clock 
Wednesday morning, making twenty-five miles we had been 
since four o'clock the nigiht before. It seems the enemv were 



Petersburg and Ream's Station. 29 1 

trying- to g'et around our flank. l)ut the Second Corps were or- 
dered here. The enemy attacked the First Divisi(^n the night 
before we arrived, but our boys drove them from their breast- 
works and captured four of their twenty pounders and many 
prisoners. Wednesday morning early we crossed the James 
River and moved into some breastworks where our division staid 
all day. We were close to the banks of the James. A large 
gun-boat and a monitor lay in the river near-by and every little 
while they would throw some thirty-two pounders over to the 
rebels which would keep them pretty low. Thursday our divi- 
sion went to the front. We shifted our position several times 
during the day. and at night moved out of the woods into an 
open lot and camped for the night. \\'e stopped here fill just 
at dark Friday night when we packed up and were soon crossing 
the James, having received orders to be back in front of Peters- 
burg at four o'clock the next morning, ^^'hat a dreadful march 
that was. It seemed as if the men would drop down dead, but 
on they had to go, there being a Provost (luard in rear of the 
corps, driving up the stragglers. \\> arrived in the near of 
Butler's corps in time to support him. as he had orders to make 
a charge early. At the appointed time his negroes made i grand 
charge, blew np one of their forts and took quite a number of 
prisoners. Two corps lay near ready to advance, but no order 
was given, and so we lav around there all day. and at night 
moved to our cam]:) that we had left a week previous, ^\'e liad 
had about as hard a time during that week as we ever did. The 
next day we moved about a mile back in this woods and during 
the day were paid for six months service which came very hand\'. 
We sto])]ied around here until August 12th and were ]iretty busy 
all the time on fatigue duty, making roads, putting u]) l^reast- 
works and the like. We had got om- camp in good shape. Each 
company had their tents in a line, and over the whole an arbor 
was fixed which was formed of boughs and leaves to ])rotect us 
from the sun. lUn notwithstanding all our work the smi would 
creep in and the flies wguld swarm around by the hundreds. 
I'riday. August 12th. we liad orders ^U noon to be read\ to move 
at four o'clock, and at the time a])pointed commenced marching. 



292 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

At aljout nine o'clock we reached City I'oint and rested for the 
night and the next day till dark, when we took a transport for 
Deep Bottom, arriving there at six o'clock Sunday morning. At 
eight o'clock we got olT the transport and lay around the hank 
of the river until ten o'clock when we were ordered to the front." 
Assistant Surgeon Levi Jewett gives an interesting account 
of the siege of Petersburg. He says: — "The Fourteenth Regi- 
ment left Cold Harbor after participating in that unfortunate 
affair. We pulled out of the trenches on the night of June loth, 
1864, being careful not to alarm the rebels, who were within a 
few yards of us, ready to fire if they should detect our move- 
ment. Not a word was spoken above a whisper — no rattling of 
canteens, coffee pots, bayonets or equipments and we moved 
silentlv off into the darkness of the night. One solitarv shell 
was fired high over us, leaving a trail of fire like a rainbow as 
we moved out, showing that the enemy were on the alert and were 
suspicious that something was going on, but we got awav with- 
out any disturbance. We marched wnth the long line of the 2nd 
Corps, through the Chickahominv section and made no stop till 
about noon of the next day when we reached the James River, 
which we crossed on a pontoon bridge two thousand feet long, 
ever water eighty feet deep. Gen. \\'arren with the Fifth Corps 
followed close behind us and a whole day was required for the 
armv to cross, although several steamboats were there to assist. 
We had a long march of many miles to Petersburg which we 
reached in the night. Some unsuccessful attempts had been 
made to capture it before our arrival and the small rebel force 
continued to hold it. It was Gen. ( Irant's intention to capture 
the city before it could be re-inforced, which would cut off the 
railroads which furnished supplies to Richmond. Gen. Lee was 
equal to the occasion, however, for he soon had his whole army 
there and rapidly fortified it so that it resisted all our attacks 
upon it for a long time and we settled ourselves down for a long 
siege. On. (irant soon had his whole army of a hundred 
thousand men spread out in a semi-circle south of the city and 
earth-works and forts were built which involved much hard work 
in the hot sun, and a great deal of work in the night. The 



Petersburg and Ream's Station. 293 

Fourteenth Ret^iment occupied Fort McGilvery uear the right 
of the Hue, which was also occupied by a battery of the First 
Connecticut Heavy Artillery. The roofs and spires of the city 
were plainly visible and we were much interested in watching the 
effect of the shells as they were fired into the city and to see 
them explode among the rebel works, ddie}- sent back as many 
as we sent in and we found it necessary to dodge them and to 
jump to cover when the word was given. We were soon moved 
to Fort Stedmen. a short distance to the left and occupied a 
breastwork and were kept busy sharp shooting with the rebs who 
were only a few rods away, and we were obliged to lie low for 
safetv. We were moved several times to places where the line 
needed re-enforcing or when an attack was expected or to sup- 
] ort a battery, or to go on skirmish line or picket or to take part 
in an attack, and were always on duty. We had continuous 
hard work or fighting during the whole siege, occupying ditTer- 
ent places on the whole front of six miles. We were in one 
heavy battle at the extreme left at Hatcher's run where an unsuc- 
cessful attem]3t was made to secure the South Side Railroad. 

Twice during the siege we were sent twenty nfiles uj) to Deep 
I'.ottom on the North side of the James River to threaten Rich- 
mond from that direction and had considerable fighting with the 
enemv, capturing a battery and some j^risoners. I remember the 
long march we had on the night of the 2(^11 of July coming 
l)ack to Petersburg just in time for the great mine explosion. 
We were to be rushed in to support the attack if it had been 
successful, but as it failed we took no part in it. l)a\- after day 
and week after week, the siege went on and we had but little 
rest, being always under fire and ready to attack if there was an 
opi)ortumtv. The worst fight which we had during the siege 
was at Ream's Statit)n on tiie WeMon railroad ten miles below 
the citv. We were sent down with Clen. Hancock and a i);)rtion 
of the Second Cori)s about 10,000 strong, to destroy the railroad 
which supplied the rebel capital. We pulled out of the entrench- 
ments the night of August 22nd and marched off to the South. 
The country through which we passed had not been devastated by 
war and the crops were growing and the farms and plantations 



294 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

were in g-ood order, principally occnpied by women and children 
and slaves. Scarcely a white man was to be seen as all who 
were able, were off with the army, fighting the Yankees. We 
did not distnrb private property or annoy the inhabitants. If 
any plundering was done it was by stragglers or deserters, but 
occasionally a wandering pig or an innocent calf or an unsus- 
pecting lamb or a simple minded goose found its way into the 
soldiers' camp kettles. Apples and squashes and green corn and 
garden vegetables were abundant. ( )ur men ate quantities of 
green corn, boiled or roasted and seemed to thrive on it. Most 
of such things though are usually gobbled up by the Cavalry who 
are always raiding and scouting through the country so that 
there is but little left for the infantr}' men. Oin* horses lived on 
the luxuriant grass which they preferred to the quarter-master's 
grain. 

We reached the Weldon railroad at "Reams" on the 24th and 
went right to work tearing up the track, burning everything 
combustible and heated the iron rails so they could not be used 
again. A long line of smoking fires were soon seen up and 
down the road and several miles were destroyed as thousands of 
men were engaged in the work. We soon ruined the half 
mile assigned to our regiment and then we rested watching 
the long line of smoking fires extending off toward North 
Carolina. We were expecting the enemy to come and try to 
drive us off, and we kept pickets out in front to watch, and 
some loaded cannon ready to give them a reception, but they 
did not come that day. We also burned a large machine 
shop, a blacksmith shop, a water tank, with the railroad build- 
ings and cut down the telegraph poles and felled trees across the 
track. Cotton and corn and sweet potatoes and peanuts appeared 
to be cultivated (piite extensively, also a tall kind of corn which 
they call sugar cane, but which I think is sorghum. When night 
came on we tried to get a little rest, expecting to jump up at the 
sound of the "long roll," but were not disturbed. I slept on a 
rubber blanket between two rows of corn which formed a kind 
of cradle so I could not fall out. The dew was heavy and the 
grass dripped as though wet by rain. Our guns were stacked 



Petersburg and Ream's Station. 295 

in rows in front of ns ready for immediate use and we were 
called at three in the mornini;- and had coffee and liardlack and 
bacon before sunrise. All these things are impressed on my 
memory as it was my last day with the army and 1 was destined 
to be wounded and disabled before night. In the afternoon the 
expected attack came. ( ien. Lee had become aware of what was 
going on and had sent a large force to drive us off. 'Idie woods 
were thick in our front so that the enemy could not be seen, 
and we only learned of their api)roach by our scouts and pickets. 
We also knew they were coming by the frightened birds flying 
toward us and the startled s([uirrels. rabbits and small game 
scurrying in our direction, showing that the line of battle was 
sweeping all before it. .Soon the battle was on with the sudden- 
ness of a clap of thunder. The crackling of the nuisketry was 
continuous mingled with the heavier sound of the cannon, the 
shouts of the officers and above all was the shrill and continuous 
"rebel yell" punctuated by their rapid footsteps, showmg that 
they came into the fight on the run. It was a time of terror and 
it seemed im])ossible for our men to hold their line against such 
a fierce assault. They fought well till tliey .saw the rebel line 
extending around their flank and to their rear when they had 
to fall back slowly and in good order, firing as they went. Just 
at this time I was struck down by a fragment of shell and was 
taken a short distance to the rear just in time to escape being 
run over l)v the enemy. Our retreat was brief as darkness 
came on and the fighting ceased. In the night the rebels with- 
drew leaving us in possession of the railroad, which the\- never 
occupied again during the war. I was conveyed to City Point 
m an ambulance where 1 received excellent surgical care and was 
then sent to Washington by hospital boat. 1 did not see the 
regiment again till 1 came to Hartford after the war closed. 

After the battle of Ream's Station the l-'ourteenth rejoined the 
armv and continued to perform active and useful serxice during 
the fall and winter. They were i)resent when Lee"s army left 
Petersburg and took i)arl in the memorable pursuit which ended 
with the surrender at Ai)pomatt:)x and the close of the wa'"." 



296 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

The following" is the list of the killed, wounded and missing 
t-om June i ith to July r)th, iF/;4 : — 

"Comi>any A. Killed, Private, William Rradshaw, near Peter- 
hurg-, \'a., June iC)th ; wounded. Private, John 11. l'\)untain, 
head, slight, near Petersburg, June i8th. 

Company B. Wounded, Privates, John Doyle, hip, slight, near 
Petersburg, June 17th, Jan:es Hays, head, slight, near I'etcis- 
burg, June 20th. 

Company D. Wounded, ist Sergeant, Elbert F. Hyde, head, 
severely, near Petersburg, June 17th, Corporals, William H. Cor- 
l;itt, arm and side, (since died) near Petersburg, June 17th, 
James i>. Shepard, leg, severely, near Petersburg, June 17th, John 
H. P.ilson, arm, severely, near Petersburg, June 22d. 

Company E. Wounded, Corporal, Francis Gallagher, hand, 
slight, near Petersburg, June 17th. 

C(>m])an\- I*". Killed, Private, ( )vid P. Shaw, near Petersburg, 
June 17th. 

Company G. Killed, Private, James Brown, Cold Harbor, 
June Qth, missing, F'rivate, Peter Hughes, neat Petersburg, June 
17th. 

Compau}- K. Wounded, Private, Peter Ciray, head, severely, 
near Petersburg, June i8th, missing. Private, John Smith, n^a'" 
Petersburg, June 22d." 

The following is the report of Captain John C. Broatch, cov- 
ering the fifth epoch : — 

"Headquarters Fourteenth Connecticut Volunteers, 
August 7th., 1864. 
Lieutenant : — - 

FIFTH EPOCH. 
Upon the 12th of June leave Cold Harbor and march, via 
Long Bridge, to Charles City Court-House, on the James. Cross 
the James upon transports at Wilcox's Landing in the night of 
the 14th, and the next day march toward I'etersburg where the 
enemy is ag-ain in our front, arriving near that place in the even- 
ing of the 15th. Advance our skirmish line upon the morning of 
ihe i6th. driving the skirmishers upward of half a mile and cap- 
turing some prisoners. Our loss one man killed. (Jn the 17th of 



Petersburg and Ream's Station. 297 

June we are moved toward the left of the hne. witli instructions 
to support General Uarlow's division. Construct works in front 
of the enemy, but toward night are ordered to advance our line 
still nearer. Idiis was done with good success, a position being 
occupied not nnich o\er fifty yards from the encmx's works. 
This was held for several hours, until, owing to a failure of 
other troo])s upon the left to connect, our l)rigade was ordered 
\o withdraw. L'pon the morning- of the iSth of June moved. 
upon the enemy's works farther to the right, but f!)und litem de- 
serted, merely a thin skirmish line having been left to check ottr 
advance. Wednesday, July 2y (Tuesday, 26111), 1864, received 
marching orders and at 3:30 P. AT. march toward Xew ?\lafket 
on the James River, arriving there upon the following morning, 
having crossed in our route the Appomattox River at Point of 
Rocks and the James at Deep Bottom. Upon the 28th of July 
our division is moved out to support the cavalry, but the Four- 
teenth is not engaged with the enemy. That night are ordered 
t', construct a line of bVencli rirte-jjits. .\t dusk u])ou the 2<)th 
move quietlv out of our position and march back toward Peters- 
burg, reaching a point near that place before daylight upon tiie 
following morning. July 30th all this day remained massed be- 
hind a hill ready to su])port any attack, if called upon. At night 
returned to our old camp upon the left and rear of the j^osition 
held by our army. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 
John C. Broatch, 

Ca]itain C^^mmanding. 
Lieutenant T. K. Parsons, 

Acting Assistant Adjutant- General." 

The following is the rejiort of Colonel Theodore ( i. Ellis to 
die Adjutant-( ieneral i)\ the State of Connecticut: — 

Washington. \). C August ()tli, 1864. 
Brigadier-General IL J. Moksk, 

Adjutant-( ieneral State of Connecticut. 

(ieneral : — 

A little after dark, upon the iJtli, our regiment, with the re>t 
of the corps, left Cold Harbor and commenced om- march lowar 1 



298 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

the south side of Richmond. We reached Charles City Court 
House, u])on the janies River, after marching iminterrnptedly, 
ihat night and all the next day, and until ten o'clock on the 
night of the 14th. 

Upon the 15th marched towards Petersburg, near which place 
we arrived at about ten P. M. 

Early on the morning of the i^th the skirmishers of our bri- 
gade advanced upon the enemy, driving their skirmishers back 
for upwards of a cjuarter of a mile, and obtaining a much better 
position, besides capturing about fifty prisoners. Our loss was 
very small. Private John Geatley, Company A, in this advance, 
captured three armed rebels, and brought them in as prisoners, 
with an unloaded gun. In the afternoon, upon the skirmish line, 
the same man wounded two rebels, one of them api)arently 
fatally. 

L^pon the T/th of June our brigade was moved to the left 
with instructions to support (leneral IJarlow's l^ivision. At 
night, we were instructed to advance our line nearer to the 
enemy's position. The regiment did this in good style, moving 
forward through a dense and thickly wooded swamp, driving 
in the enemy's skirmishers, and taking up a position about fifty 
yards in front of their line, and opening upon them an effective 
fire. We held this position for two or three hours, when, owing 
to the failure of troops upon the left to connect, we were ordered 
by our brigade commander to withdraw. At the time when this 
advance was made, a detail of some thirty men was absent, 
drawing rations, leaving but about one hundred and twenty men 
to go forward. Our loss was only one killed and four wounded. 

On the following morning our brigade was massed for a 
charge, the Fourteenth being placed in the second line. Upon 
advancing, it was found that the enemy had avacuated the line 
of works in our front, falling back to a stronger position. 

Upon both of these occasions, the conduct of officers and men 
was excellent. 

Since June 17th our regiment has not been engaged with the 
enemy, though one or two men have been wounded by the 
enemy's sharp-shooters, and we have twice been shelled by their 



Petersburg and Ream's Station. 299 

Datteries. W'e have, however, hunu' an efficient part in con 
structing- the works, and in tlie varions sie,q-e operations which 
will vet tjive us Tetershnr!:;-. and render the rehel capital initen- 
able. 

We nnniher now about fourteen officers and one hundred and 
sixty men, havin,^- l)een somewdiat increased in strength by the 
return of men from the hospital, exchanged i)risoners. etc. 

\'er\- respectfully, your obedient servant. 
Tiii>:oi)OKr: (i. Eli. is. 

Colonel Fourteenth C. V." 

Lieutenant-Colonel Moore says: — "On August 14th. 1864, T 
was in command of Smyth's lirigade, consisting of ten regiments, 
bv order of ( ieneral Hancock, corps commander. I was ordered 
to march from the roar oi Petersburg to City Point, where five 
.steamers were awaiting us. My orders were to .sail down the 
river until twelve o'clock at night, then o])en my sealed orders, 
which directed me to turn, go back U]) the river, as far as I 
could and land. At daylight August 15th. 1X^4, we were at 
Deep Bottom where the enemy opened on us. 1 gave orders to 
fall back to a ravine where we disembarked and formed a line of 
l.>attle awaiting furthers orders. General Hancock with the rest 
of the corps reached Deep r)Ottcm about ten o'clock, having 
marched across the country. The General gave me orders to send 
the steamers back to City Point. I was then relieved by Colonel 
Pierce of the One Hundred and Eighth New York Volunteers. 
I returned to my regiment and was in command at the battle of 
Deep Botttom, August 15th and i6th. 

The regiment now approaches the skirmishes at Deep Bottom, 
fvbout daylight of August 15th the regiment was ordered to 
form a skirmish line to relieve a skirmish line of the Third Divi- 
sion. As the course lay across a plain. tbe\ were o])en to an at- 
tack bv the enemy much more than if they had moved out before 
davlight. The enemy was intrenched upon hills which skirted 
the edge of this ])lain. To avoid the inevitable slaughter which 
would have occurred if the regiment had gone down in a body, 



300 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

(jetachnients of six or eight were sent or.t at a time taking a 
2igzag course to avoid the Confederate shot. At least two-thirds 
of the men were required to reheve the Hne, the remainder of the 
regiment forming a reserve and being posted in the rear of the 
center. During the rest of the day and the day following there was 
continual fire kept up, but the men being protected by barricades of 
rails no one was injured. On the afternoon of the i6th it seemed 
to be the purpoise of the commanding generals to draw the atten- 
tion of the enemy from movements designed at other parts of the 
line. The regiment was ordered forward across a plain along 
the edge of which skirted a cornfield. They succeeded in driv- 
ing in the enemy's skirmishers and remained in this position until 
evening when they were relieved by another regiment. 

While laying here at Deep Bottom on what is known as Straw- 
berry Plains a Confederate fort located on a hill near the position 
of the Fourteenth annoyed the Union gun-boats that lay in the 
river. A detail of the Fourteenth Regiment sharp-shooters was 
sent out to silence this gun. They went out about half past nine 
in the morning and so thoroughly did they do their work that 
the gun did not speak again that day, the sharp-shooters firing 
being so accurate that the men could mot move to man the guns. 
A rebel officer who was in the fort at the time told a member 
of the regiment in later years that every movement of the men 
in the fort drew out the most accurate fire from the sharp- 
shooters. 

About this time the regiment had a repetition of their old 
experience. Eighty-six new recruits were added to the regiment, 
but there being no muskets for them, they were left on the bank 
of the river at Deep Bottom under command of Captain Simp- 
son. When the fighting was over, it was found that thirty of 
theiu had left for parts unknown. 

The following is the li^t of killed and wounded at Deep Bot- 
tom : — 

''Company A. Wounded, Private, Henry Phillips, arm, 
severly. 

Company B. Wounded, Private, William W. Miller, side, 
(since died.) 



Petersburg and Ream's Station. 301 

Company ¥. Wounded. I'rivate, James Warren, hi]). sliij;-ht. 

Company I. Killed, Private, William X. r)artlelt. August 
i5th; wounded. Private, J. 15. Kirby. arm. severelw 

Company K. Wounded, Privates, Calvin Lamphere, back, 
slight, Edward Regney, foot, slight, did not leave the regiment." 

The following is the rei)ort of Lieutenant-Colonel S. A. ^^loore 
to the Adjutant-(ieneral of the State of Connecticut: — 

"Headquarters Fourteenth Connecticut X'olunteers, 
August >oth. 1864. 
Brigadier-Cieneral Horace J. Morsk, 

Adjutant-General State of Connecticut. 
General : — ■ 

I have the honor to submit the following official report of 
the skirmish near Deep Bottom north of the James Rivtn-, \'a.. 
on the if)th day of the present month. 

About daylight cm the morning of the 15th. I was ordered to 
take my regiment and relieve a ])ortion of the skirmish line held 
by the Third Division of our cori:)S. This order coidd ha\e been 
executed with less difficulty had it reached us l)ef;)re da\light. 
for the skirmish line was in the middle of an open plain, at the 
foot of a low range of hills, upon which the enemy were en- 
trenched. The line however was relieved with but sm dl loss 
u]>on our part, the men being sent down in detachments of from 
four to six at a time. 

It took about two-thirds of our. men to relieve the line. A 
"eserve was formed of the remaiu'ler. which was posted in the 
woods in rear of the center. During the rest of the day and ni^on 
the morning of the day following, constant firing was kejit up b\- 
both parties, bin as our men were well protected by rails which 
had been piled up into a slight barricade, no one of them was 
hurt. 

l']>:)n the afternoon of the i^th it was deemed advisable to 
attract the attention of the enem\- at this ]):)int, while im]) )rtant 
movements were taking place U])on another ])art of the line. 

The I-'ourteenth was ordered t:> move forward across the open 
plain, mentioned abo\-e, t(j the edge of a narrow corntield which 



302 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

bordered the enemy's works. This was done in good style. The 
hne went forward upon the double-quick, under a sharp fire of 
both musketry and artiller}-, and occupied the position assigned to 
it, driving in the enemy's skirmishers. The reserve was now 
brought up under cover of the woods to a point near the left of 
our line, and in this position the regiment remained until after 
dark, when we were relieved by another regiment. 

This movement was designed only to draw the attention of the 
enemy from other points, and in this was entirely successful. It 
called forth expressions of satisfaction, both from our brigade 
and division commanders, under whose immediate superintend- 
ence it was executed. 

Very respectfully. 

Your obedient servant, 

S. A. Moore, 
Lieutenant-Colonel commanding regiment." 

According to Lieutenant-Colonel jMoore, the regiment left 
Deep Bottom on the morning of August i8th when they were 
moved back to Petersburg and then sent forward to support the 
Fifth Corps. The march had been very exhausting, the roads 
having a most liberal supply of A'irginia mud and the men having 
little time to cook coffee or rest. Here they remained until 
.\ugust 22d and assisted, with the brigade, in supporting the 
Fifth Corps when the line of march was taken toward Ream's 
Station, reaching there on the morning of the 24th. Thev were 
engaged during the day in tearing up the \\'eidon railroad, the 
great artery of supplies for the Confederate army. The manner 
of tearing up this railroad was unique. After lifting a generous 
length of road, the rails were taken from the sleepers, the latter 
being piled up in cob house style upon which the rails were 
placed. The sleepers were then fired, heating the rails so their 
weight would bend them in the middle. It was a source of de- 
light to the men of the Fifth Corps to take these rails in their 
heated condition, twisting one about another and forming a 
Maltese cross, their corps badge. The Fourteenth Regiment men 
could hardly do this as the rails could not be twisted into the 
shape of the trefoil. 



Petersburg and Ream's Station. 303 

Duriiio- the eveiiinj;' the officers had a merry time, hardlx- 
aware of what the coming day would disclose. It is a remark- 
able fact that upon the eve of this tragic affair at Ream's Station 
every one of the captains were present with their companies, a 
fact unprecedented since the battle of Antietam. Of this number 
of ten captains one-half were killed, wounded or missing. 

On the morning of the 25th of August four companies of the 
Fourteenth Regiment, under command of Captain Broatch, were 
advanced as skirmishers. The remainder of the Fourteenth, in 
connection with the brigade, advanced in support of the skirm- 
ish line when suddenly there was firing in front and Colonel 
Symth decided to fall back to their former position near the 
station to avoid being cut ofif. This was done under the protec- 
tion of a piece of woods. Here the main body of the corps was 
drawn up in line of battle. 

Sergeant C. G. Blatchley graphically describes the situation at 
this point. He says : — "We had here two divisions of the Sec- 
ond Corps. The enemy, we believed, outnumbered us three to 
one. \\> acted on the defensive solel}-. Our position was 
nearly in the shape of a horseshoe pointed at the end. ( )ur divi- 
sion occupied one side and the other, the other. General Han- 
cock posted his cannon in the point and on the railroad side. 
Down the center of the horseshoe ran a depression, ending back 
of a little church, in a swamp. I belonged to the second division 
which held what would have been called the rear line. It faced 
the opposite wa\- from the railroad and we were consequently 
back to back, with tlie space perhaps of two hundred \ards be- 
tween us. Our brave men on the railroad held their posititMi 
against four or five fearful charges l\v overwhelming numbers 
and were only driven out when their anuuuniti(Hi was all gone." 

Mr. r.latchley further says: — ■'\\'hen at last the railroad line 
gave way. we were called from our line to this side to repel the 
charge, and facing about we countercharged over the little A 
shaped battle ground to mwi the oncoming foe. In the !em])est 
of eonfiict that fallowed, organizations almost disappeared. 
When near night the attempt was made to reform a i)art of the 
line and fill u]) a ga]) in \\liat had been our original line. ( ien- 



304 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

eral Smyth callctl for the One Hundred and Eighth Xew York 
and the colonel responded, 'I am here. General, but I have no 
regiment.' To the call for the Fourteenth Connecticut, perhaps 
ten of us responded 'here." In obedience to the order, with per- 
haps a score of others, we dashed into the gaj). to be swept as 
cjuickl}- out of it by the enfilading fire which the enemy at that 
moment pouretl in from the toe of the horseshoe. 

Amid the blinding Hashes of a terrible thunderstorm in one of 
the darkest nights I think I ever saw, both sides retreated and 
we lost, besides a great number of men, all our artillery but one 
single gun that a little party, of which I was one, pulled out by 
hand in that driving storm. These were the first cannon that 
the Second Corps ever lost and it is said that General Hancock 
sat at the root of a tree beside the road that night, the picture 
of distress over the disaster." 

The regiment falling back began making breastworks, but be- 
fore they were completed the cavalry skirmishers directly in front 
were driven in. This was followed by a third attack by the 
enemy made upon a portion of the line directly in the rear of 
the regiment. These were mostly heav\- artillery regiment, com- 
posed largely of raw recruits, broke their line and the enemy en- 
tered the gaj). The Iu)urteenth was ordered by (ieneral (jibbons 
to reform the line. They went forward on the double-quick 
facing the terrible fire of musketry and artillery. The left wing 
of the regiment succeeded in retaking this line which had been 
broken and retained it until nightfall. The right wing, after los- 
ing heavily, was compelled to fall back to its original position. 
This it held until about dark when they were surrounded on 
three sides by a heavy fire and it w?s forced with the rest of the 
division to fall back and make new breastworks. DuTing that 
night the Second Corps was marched back to the defense of 
Petersburg. 

The engagement ha<l indeed been a severe one for the l*\iur- 
teenth Regiment and the loss heavy. It carried into the fight 
seventeen offtcers and one hundred and fifty armed men. It lost 
in killed one ca])tain and fi>ur men. three captains, the assistant 
surgeon and fourteen men wcjunded and one cajitain. one lieuten- 



Petersburg and Ream's Station. 305 

aiil and t\vc'nt\-six enlisted men niissini^'. leavint;" to tlie re,i^inicnt 
after the engagement ten ot^cers and one hundred and six enhsted 
men. We have already noted thait the evening before every cap- 
tain of the regiment was nn duty and that five of them were 
either killed, wounded or missing during the engagement. These 
were Captain William H. Hawley who was temporarily on Col- 
onel Smyth's brigade stalf and who was killed instantly. Cap- 
tains Simpson, Nickels, IJrigham and Assistant Surgeon Jewett 
wounded and Captain Lee and Lieutenant Aloore taken prisoners. 

Of the rescue of Captain Nickels Sergeant Henry Lydall of 
Company F gives an interesting account as follows : — 

'in the afternoon of August 25th, 1864. during a charge upon 
the Confederate batteries on the battle-field of Ream's Station, 
our advancing line suddenly broke and retreated, overwhelmed by 
the terrific fire that was raining down upon us, and I being slightly 
in advance of our main line, with my attention occupied by what 
was being enacted in front, suddenly realized that our forces 
were on the retreat, and that I was left almost alone, and it 
seemed to me then as though the whole fire of the enemy was 
directed at me : and realizing at that moment the wisdom of the 
old adage that 'discretion is the better part of valor.' I imme- 
diately hunted for cover, which I was so fortunate as to find in 
c. deserted rifie-pit a short distance to the rear. Mere I found a 
comparatively safe, but unpleasant shelter, where I was com- 
pelled to lie flat until the shadows of night concealed me from the 
view of the enemy, when peering forth I could see the flickering 
lights of many lanterns, and I know that the human vultures 
were at their unholy work of robbing the dead and wounded. I 
then crept from my ])lace of concealment and began making my 
way cautiously over the field without knowing which way to go, 
when suddenly I heard a call from a comrade who had fallen 
wounded in two ])laces. 1 sto])ped and made him as comfortable 
as j)ossible with the means at hand, cutting cornstalks to make 
him abed, then as he was suffering terriblv from thirst. 1 started 
out in search of a s])ring that I knew to be somewhere in that 
vicinity, and rounding a hill or knoll where 1 supposed the spring 
to be 1 found mvself in the midst of (luitc a force of the rebs 



306 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

and a prisoner of war. I not forgetting my own terrible thirst 
managed to work my way through to the spring, and was filling 
my canteen when I felt a hand upon my back and turning with 
the expectation of seeing a rebel guard. I was delighted to find 
not only a Union soldier, but a member of my own company. 
Comrade Pardee and me at once determined to attempt to escape 
under cover of the diarkness, so guessing as nearly as possible at 
the direction necessary to seek for our forces, we worked our way 
cautiously over the battle-field until we came to the breastworks 
we had assisted in throwing up that day, wben we heard a voice 
calling for assistance ; stopping to investigate we found it came 
from Captain Nickels, Company D, laying there wounded, shot 
through the leg and unable to move, and to add to his misery the 
rebel cavalry had been there and robbed him of hat, coat, watch, 
money and other valuables, and only desisted from taking his 
boots on discovering that in trying to move them from his wound- 
ed, limb, they caused him such intolerable suffering as to touch 
the heart of even a rebel cavalryman ; and as if to add still more 
to the poor Captain's suffering the rain just then began to pour 
down in torrents, and we not being able to carry him, made him 
as comfortable as possible with our rubber blankets to protect 
him somewhat from the inclemency of the weather. We then 
started, he giving us directions where to go, hoping to get as- 
sistance that we might return and bring the Captain within our 
lines where he could be cared for. We had proceeded ])erhaps 
two miles in the direction he had pointed out to us, when we met 
Adjutant Hincks and another comrade who had heard of Cap- 
tain Nickels being left on the field, and were coming back in 
search of him, and with them we retraced our steps and brought 
the wounded man to where our ambulance train was stationed, 
when Adjutant Hincks left me to take charge of him until we 
should reach such a place as he could be attended to l)y the sur- 
geons. r>ut the end of that night's hardships was not yet, for after 
the ambulances had started, its way being over stumps, stones and 
uneven ground, making such thumping and jostling that Captain 
Nickels was unable to endure the pain it caused, and I was com- 
pelled to procure a stretcher and with such help as I could pro- 



Petersburg and Ream's Station. 307 

cure from str;iL,^i;U'rs I traiii])C(l alun^- llirdiimli thai wlinlc iii^lil. 
some limes I would I)e williout help aud would l)e com])elled lo 
wait, aecostiuii' the weary strai2;',Q"lers as they i)assed, im])loriu|n- 
theuT to give the L'aptaiu a little assistance towards safet\-. and 
the treatment he stood so much in need of. P'ourteen \\ear\' 
miles we tram])ed carrying' the wounded man that night, througli 
wx)ods and swamps and over rocks until just as da_\- dawned 
upon us, we reached the hospital tent more dead than ali\e. and 
left the brave man to the tender mercies of the surgeons." 

The following is the list of the killed, wounded and missing 
Ream's Station : — 

1st x\ssistant Surgeon. Levi Jewett. wounded, head. 

Company A. \\'ounded. Private. Charles Tf. Adams, foot; 
missing. Privates. Thomas Purcell. Thomas Callahan. 

Company I?. Killed. Private, James Anderson; wounded. 
Captain, George X. llrigham. leg-; missing. Private. Charles E. 
1 ollard. 

Company C. Wounded, Captain, James F. Simpson, hack. 
Corporal, Robert W'oltT. k\g. Private. Cliarles Long", bowels; 
missing', 2d Lieutenant. Janies M. ]\Ioore. Private. Cicorge Rich. 

Companv D. Killed. Corporals. John ()'P)rien. David W. 
Whiting; wounded, Corporal. Charles E. ^Morrison, shoulder; 
missing. Sergeant. Joseph Murray. Privates. John Rollins, John 
Alennix. 

Companv E. Wounded, Privates, John Degnan. arm, Puell 
Kenc}", shoulder; missing, Ca])tain, Henry Lee, Cor])oral, James 
Rogers, Privates, John Parker. Thomas Doms. Samuel lUirke, 
llenrv Seymour. Austin IL Shelley. 

Conipanv F. Killed. Private. Pdenry M. ^Foore; wounded. 
Privates. Henr\' \). C.oodrich. arni, (Teorge Stackpole. breast; 
r.iissing, ist. Sergeant, Imri A. Spencer, Privates. John L. liar- 
tholomew, Anson D. Cla])p. 

Companx' ( i. Wnnnded. ("(irporal. Xelson ('. Mnrrax. foot. 
Private. Joel C. Smith, neck. 

Compan\' II. Missing, Privates, (ieorge Smith. ( harles John 
son, Patrick I I. Schiff. 

Com])any 1. Wounded. Ca])tain, James K. Nickels, leg. I'ri 



308 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

vates, George Manville, thigh, Joseph Robinson, head, Frank 
WilHams, head; missing. Privates, Martin Nolan, Wilham Rob- 
inson, John Gennings. 

Company K. Killed, Captain, William H. Hawley ; wounded. 
Sergeant, Junius E. Goodwin, leg ; missing. Sergeant. Paul P. 
Noyes, Privates, George M. Blake, Henry W. Bowers." 

The regiment had come again to one of the sad moments of 
lis service. We have noted their discouragement in the old cam^, 
at Falmouth after F'redericksburg over the loss of officers. To 
many this moment was as keen in sorrow and grief as then. 
One of the most regretted losses to the regiment was Captain 
William H. Hawley. He was not only a brave officer, but a 
man of noble, generous spirit, companionable and with unspotted 
nitegrity. He was born in Bridgeport October 5th, 1840, an-- 
was a bookkeeper when he enlisted, not then being quite twenty- 
two years of age. Always faithful and efficient when with the 
regiment, he won distinction as a staff officer and a promising 
career seemed opening when he was cut down in the severe 
engagement at Ream's Station. He was shot through the head 
while directing a skirmish line and fell from his horse, breathing 
but a few times. His remains were taken to Bridgeport where 
funeral services under the charge of the cit}- government of 
Bridgeport were held. 

Captain James R. Nickels was a native of Maine, being born 
in Cherryfield July 14th, 1843. He removed to Norwich, Conn., 
m early life where he lived with an aunt. He was a clerk in a 
store when the war broke out and before enlisting in the Four- 
teenth Regiment he served three months with the Third Connec- 
ticut Regiment. He was a genial companion, a thorough officer, 
remarkable for his accurate knowledge of and performance of 
duty. Captain Nickels survived his wounds until the following 
February where after many weeks of suft'ering he died of their 
effects. 

The following is the report rendered by Lieutenant-Colonel 
S. A. Moore to the Adjutant-General of the State of Connecti- 



Petersburg and Ream's Station. 309 

"I U';i(l(|uarlcrs I-'ourtccnlli ( omuTliciU \'( .lunleers, 
Aui^ust ^-.oth, i8(^»4. 
brigadier-CleiHTal 1 IdUAci: J. Morse, 

A(ljiitaiit-( ieneral State of Connecticut. 

General : — 

I have the honor to sul)mit the following- official report of thj 
part taken by this reoiment in the action of the 25th of August, 
at Reams' Station, upon the W'eldon Railroad. 

Upon the 24th, the regiment had been employed all day in 
destroying the railroad track by burning the ties and bending the 
rails. 

Earh- upon the morning of the 25th, the brigade of which 
this regiment is a part, was massed in a sugar-cane field, in ex- 
jectation of an attack from the enemy, who were reported to 
be advancing in force. 

At about 1 1 o'clock A. M.. the enemy having attacked our 
inckets below and to tiie south of the Station, our brigade was 
sent out to their support, with orders to engage the enemy, and 
if possible to find out in what force they were in in that direction. 
Lour companies of the Fourteenth were deployed as skirmishers 
under command of Captain Broatch. The remainder of the regi- 
ment advanced in line of battle parallel with the railroad, in sup- 
port of the skirmish line of the brigade, which steadily advanced, 
driving the skirmishers of the enemy before it, for upwards of 
half a mile. I-'or a portion of the time we were under a lire of 
both musketry and artillery. 

It was at this time that Captain Hawley of Company K was 
killed. 

Having advanced as far from our jiosition as was considered 
piudent. Colonel Smyth, our brigade commander, halted the 
command and sent back for orders. Before these reached him. 
however, the sound of heavy firing almost directly in his rear, 
decided him to march back to our position near the Station, to 
prevent our being cut ofif from the main body of the corps. This 
was done under cover of the woods and without molestation 
from the enemy, excepting that a few shells were thrown at us 
from one of their batteries. 



310 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

We found the main body of the corps drawn up in order of 
hattle, in tlie form of two sides of a square; one of the sides 
west of the raih'oad and parahel to it, and the other side runnnij^ 
at a right angle to it, and from west to esat. In this form they 
liad already successfully repelled two attacks made by the enemy. 

( )ur brigade, with one other, was ordered to throw up a breast- 
work running in an oblique direction, across the same iield in 
which we had been massed in the morning to connect the ends 
of these two lines, thus forming an irregular triangle, in which 
the troops stood behind slight breastworks, facing outwards. 

Before we could complete our slight barricade of rails and 
earth, the cavalry skirmishers in our front were driven in. At 
the same time a heavy artillery tire was opened upon us from our 
-.-ight flank and rear. This was followed by a third attack by 
the enemy, made in heavy force upon that portion of the line 
directly in our rear, the troops who occupied this position of the 
line, lieing principally heavy artiller}' regiment belonging to the 
1st Division, and composed to a great extent of raw recruits, 
broke, and that admitted the rebels int(^ our enclosure. 

The I'ourteenth was now faced by the rear flank, and formed 
in line of battle on the reserve side of our breastworks. We 
were then ordered by General Gibbon, our division commander, 
and General Hancock in person, to charge and try and recover a 
portion of lost ground. We went forward at a double-quick, ex- 
posed to a heavy fire of both musketry and artillery. 

The left wing, with Lieutenant-Colonel and Major, succeeded 
in retaking a portion of the line left by the troops which had 
I'roken. This ])osition the\' held until after dark, firing all the tini';, 
when the\' were ordered by Colonel Smyth, the brigade comman- 
der, to withdraw, which they did, drawing off with them some 
of our artiller\- which had been aljandoned, and wdiich they had 
saved from being captured by the enemy. 

The right wing, after losing heavily, both in killed and pris- 
oners, was compelled to fall back to its original position. This 
it held until about dark, when the heavy fire poured into it from 
front, rear and one flank, forced it in common with the rest of 
the division, to fall back a short distance to a better position, 



Petersburg and Ream's Station. 3 1 1 

where it coiiuiKMiccd tlirowiii!^' up a new line i>f l)reast\vorks. 
J)urint^- the iiij^iTt, hi)\vever, the corps was \\ith(h-a\\n to the Hue 
of the defences around Peterslniri^-. ( )tu- l(^ss in this enga<i,emenl 
was severe. l)eini;' c)ne Captain and lour men known to l)e kihed. 
three Captains, one Assistant Surj^ecn. and fourteen men wound- 
eck and one Ca])lain. one Lieutenant, and tweutv-six men luissing". 

We carried into the tij^ht seventeen officers, and about one 
hundred and fifty armed men. We drew off the field, thereby 
saving' them from falhng into the hands of the enemy, one brass 
cannon and one lim1)er belonging- to AIcKnight's battery, and one 
caisson and one hmber belonging to the 3d New Jersey battery. 

I can not close this report without alluding to the loss this 
regiment has sustained, in the death of Captain William H. Haw- 
lev of Company K. recorded above. At the time of his death he 
filled the office of brigade inspector, and was acting upon the 
staft' of the Colonel commanding the brigade. This responsible 
and difficidt station he filled alike with credit to himself and his 
regiment, and to the satisfaction of all with whom he came in 
contact. 

His l(xss is deeplv felt, not onlv in this regiment, but through- 
out the entire l)rigade. 

I am, (ieneral, 

\^ery respect full y . 

Your obedient servant. 

S. A. ^[OORR, 

Lieutenant-Colonel Ci^mmanding l^^nrteenth C. V." 



CHAPTER XV. 
From Hatcher's Run to the End. 

The story of the services of the Fourteenth Regiment for the 
restoration of the Union and the reestabhshment of the g-overn- 
ment is vveUnig-h told. True it is that it had several months yet 
of service, but this service was not so intense and strenuous as that 
through which the regiment had passed and their present duties 
no doubt seemed almost like play. 

They returned to the defences of Petersburg after the unfortu- 
nate affair at Ream's Station. John Hirst writes: — "For --h^ 
next few weeks the Fourteenth had a rest from fighting, but were 
kept busy a good deal of the time in building more and stronger 
forts and when not thus engaged were sent out on picket. We 
do not stay anywhere more than two or three days at a time. We 
were in Fort Davis for a day or two and as soon as we got nicely 
settled, we were ordered to leave and take a position near Fort 
Morton. The boys are on duty all the time, one day on the skir- 
mish line and the next day on the reserve." 

It was evident that the day of strategic battles like Gettysburg 
or the formidable defenses of Fredericksburg was over, that now 
almost within the glimmer of the lights of Richmond it was ap- 
parent to most of the men that the struggle was nearly over. The 
grief and sorrow of the men when they returned from Ream's 
Station has been noted. Although the casualties were not so 
large as at many of the other engagements, the smaller ranks of 
the regiment felt them as keenly. Those that had dropped out 
from service at the battle of Ream's Station were among those 
who had been familiar to the men since the regiment left Hart- 
ford, The noble Captain Hawley had gone, Captain Nickels was 
languishing in the hospital and the regiment was deprived of the 
ever faithful care of Assistant Surgeon Jewett. We may imag- 
ine that from now to the close of the regiment's service there was 

(312) 



Hatcher's Run to the End. 



31^ 



more sober tliouL^ht fulness than ever l)cfore. If not much older 
in years, the men of the res^iment were, at least, older in the ex- 
periences of war. i*"or that reason we find less hilarity and fes- 
tivity than during the winter at Stony ^Mountain )r the somewhat 
joyful experience of the regiment at Cedar Run during the sum- 
mer of 1863. Then again it may well be realized there was the 
lack of companionj^hip, the regiment being made up more largely 
of substitutes and new recruits. Although the battle at Ream's 




ASST.2SURGEON LEVI JEWETT. 



Station does not take a ])lace along side of the battle of Gettys- 
burg in history yet the ex])erience of the Fourteenth Regiment 
was nearly as severe. It will be remembered that at ( lellysljurg 
the regiment went into the l)atlle with one hundred and sixty 
men, (about one hundred and sixty, says Coloni'l hdlis ) and los- 
ing sixtv-six, while at the battle of Ream's Station Lieutenant- 



314 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Colonel Moore reports the regiment took into the battle one hun- 
dred and sixty-seven men and lost by killed, wounded and miss- 
ing, fifty-one men. 

The regiment stopped in the vicinity of the defenses of Peters- 
burg until September 15th, when it was ordered to pack up and 
move in the direction of Prince George Court House. The rebel 
cavalry made a raid on the Union cattle pastures, capturing over 
one hundred head. The regiment stopped here until September 
24th, where it was eng-aged building a fort. All of the men able 
to work were on duty the whole time. At noon of the 24th the 
men were called in and ordered to report to the division. When 
they reached the division the regiment was sent out on picket. 
Sunday a detail was made of an officer and three men from each 
company to go to the rear about half a mile and fix up a camp. 
They took the camp that had recently been used by the Seven- 
teenth Connecticut and which was occupied by the regiment 
when it came in from picket duty. They were subject to some 
shelling by the enemy, but no damage was done. Tuesday, Sep- 
tember 2()th. the regiment was called up at one o'clock and or- 
dered to draw two days rations and be ready to move at four 
o'clock. It. however, did not move until dark of that dav when 
it Avas ordered to the extreme front as vedettes. They were 
within a hundred yards of the enemy. It rained hard most of 
the night and something before light the regiment was moved 
back to be out of range of the enemy. 

About this time Sergeant Wade, Corporal John J. Brierly of 
Company H, Corporal Frederick A. Ellis of Company C and 
Robert Kerr of Company E were ordered to New Haven to re- 
>'eve four of the regnnent VNdio had 1)cen there since February 
to guard soldiers when in camp and to take recruits to the front. 

In the latter part of September, 1864, in response to an order 
from General Hancock, who sent out a circular letter to each or- 
ganization in the Second Corps, recjuesting the commander to 
send to headquarters a brief synopsis of the organization and 
services during the war, Lieutenant-Colonel Moore made the 
following report :^ 



rom 



Hatcher's Run to the End. 3 1 5 



"1 U'a(l(|nancrs lM_)unccnili ( ■oimrclicut X'ohintcers, 
Septemlx'i- -'•lli, i^H- 
Lieutenant Theron E. Parsons, 

Acting Assistant A(liulant-( ieneral, .vl r.rig-ade. 

Lieutenant : — 

I have the honor to submit the following- report in compliance 
with circular of September 25th, from Headquarters 2(1 A. C. 

L Date of ( )rganizati(Mi of the Regiment, (muster into ser- 
vice.) August 2T,d, 1862. 

Original strength, (aggregate,) - - - - i-Oi5 

Recruits received since organization, - - - i.OOO 

IL Present strength. Eor duty, - - - - 236 

do P.orne upon rolls, (aggregate,) - 663 

IIL Names of Battles in which engaged. 
Antietam, Sept. 17, 1862. Wilderness, Alay (k 1864. 

Fredericksburg, Dec. 13, 1862. Laurel Hill, ^lay 10, 1864. 
Chancellorsville, ^lay 3, 1863. Spottsylvania, May 12, i8r-4 
Gettysburg, July 3, 1863. Cold Harbor, June 3. 1864. 

P>ristoe Station, Oct. 14. 1863. Cold Harbor. June 6, 1864. 
Morton's Ford. Feb. 6, 1864. Petersburg, June 17. 1864. 
Wilderness, May 5. 1864. Ream's Station, August 2S, 1864. 

Names of Skirmishes in which engaged. 
Ivalling Waters. July 14. 1863. Xorth Anna River, ^lay 24, '64. 
Auburn, ( )ctol)er 14, i8()3. Xorth Anna River, ^lay 2(), ■()4. 

Blackburn's Ford, Oct. 17, 1863. Petersburg, June 16, 1864. 
^line Run, Nov. 29. 1863. Deep Bottom, August 15. 1964. 

IV. Loss in action. () oificers killed, 71 men killed; 41 officers 
wounded, 505 men wounded; 5 officers missing, 138 men missing, 
(aggregate.) 7'x). 

\'. Colors ca])ture(l from the enemy. Five, ca])ture(l at battle 
of (icttysl)urg. viz. 1st and i-|th I'ennessee, if)th and ^2i\ .Xorth 
Carolina, and 4th X'irginia. 

(hnis captured frt)m the enemy. Two 3-in. rilled pieces c.ip- 
tured May 12. 18^)4. 

\I. Colors lost. None. 



3 1 6 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Note. At the battle of Ream's Station, upon the 25th ult., 
this regiment drew ofif from the field, thereby saving .hem from 
capture by the enemy, one brass cannon and one limber belonging 
to McKnight's Battery, and one limber belonging to the 3d New 
Jersey Battery, also one caisson belonging to same Baitery. 
Very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

S. A. Moore, 
Lieutenant-Colonel commanding regiment." 

Near the latter part of October, General Grant made one more 
effort to get possession of the South Side Railroad. General 
Hancock, with the Second Corps and a portion of Gregg's caval- 
ry, was ordered to be ready to move at two o'clock in the morn- 
ing of October 27th, each man to be supplied with four days ra- 
tions and sixty rounds of ammunition. The route was to be as 
follows : — "Move out by the Vaughn road, cross Hatcher's Run, 
pass by Dabney's mill and Wilson & Arnold's steam sawmill, 
cross the open country to Claiborne's road near its intersection 
with the White oak road and recrossing Hatcher's Run near the 
Claiborne road bridge, take the road running northwest from the 
vicinity of the bridge to the South Side Railroad and, if possible, 
seize a commanding position on that road." This was the enter- 
prise laid out by General Grant for the Second Corps. In this 
enterprise the now depleted ranks of the Fourteenth Regiment 
were called upon to take a prominent part. 

Concerning this engagement John Hirst writes : — "We left 
camp last Tuesday and marched to the rear of the Fifth Corps 
where we halted until Wednesday afternoon when we marched 
to the extreme left on the Welden Railroad, where we were again 
halted until three o'clock the next morning when we resumed 
our march. We went about a couple of miles before we struck 
the rebel vedettes who fired at us and then ran. Our brigade 
(Smyth's) had the lead and was deployed as skirmishers and 
flankers. A part of our regiment was out as flankers which left 
the rest of us at the head of the colunm. We went along pretty 
well until between eight and nine o'clock we struck the rebel line, 



I 



From Hatcher's Run to the End. 3 I 7 

which opened Hre iipiiii us, l)ut soon fell hack across a creek where 
they had t^ood works thrown up and soon o])ened fire upon our 
skirmishers. Wdiile the flankers and skirmishers of our brio;ade 
were reformini^:, the rest of us charged and carried the works, 
taking a few prisoners and losing some men. There was one 
regiment from Georgia that tried to hold the works, but was 
broken and scattered through the woods. Soon after we got rid 
of the Georgians, we formed a line of battle and again advanced, 
while the skirmishing was kept up on both flanks, besides a 
strong line in front which we steadily drove l)atk until near noon, 
when we came to a plank road in possession of the Johnnies who 
opened upon us with artillery. Our skirmishers on one side and 
our cavalry on the other soon outflanked them and they had to 
fall back. In the meantime our artillery came up and opened 
Are, under cover of which we got possession of the road. Jusf 
ihen a heavy rain storm came up and drenched us to the skin, 
compelling us to lay still until it was over. After the storm 
was over the artillery u])on both sides opened fire and the battle 
commenced again. The rebels were not idle, but hard at work 
upon our right flank where they drove in our cavalry and were 
making for our battery, which their guns were trying to silence. 
\\'e were moved at double-quick for a little way when we saw 
the Johnnies forming behind a house and barn ])rett\- close to our 
! latter}-. We charged them and drove them clown the road to a mill 
near a bridge where we captured a few of them, the remainder 
of them crossing the bridge and going up a hill into some woods, 
ddiey came near fetching me upon their last charge. A riflle 
ball cut the strap of my knapsack clean off my shoulder and 
went through my rubber blanket. The knapsack, lurching over 
to one side, nearly threw me down. Some of the boys reached 
for me and the colors, but I was all right, and if they don't 
get nearer than that I shall remain so. We next took possession 
of one of their rifle-i)its on the brow of a hill opposite to the 
rebels, l)Ut with the creek between us. If we could have brought 
a few more men into action when we first came up we might have 
captured that rebel batter_\- : but we had to stop before r^^aching 
it as we were exposed to a tlank attack and we had to fight upon 



318 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

hoth flanks as well as at the front while the rest of the corps was 
coming- up. The rebels wanted the plank road real bad and during- 
the day charged it three times, but were each time repulsed by 
portions of our Second and Third Divisions. If the Johnnies 
could have got the road our whole l)rigade would have been 
captured, for there was no getting out with the enemy fighting 
us on every side. I did not see any of the fighting outside of the 
Second Divisions and some cavalry, but I know the First Divi- 
sion had out a strong skirmish line facing Petersburg. After 
dark we began to "get out, a few man at a time, silentlv falling 
back over the hill, where we were reformed preparatory to mov- 
ing back to camp. We left behind us one man from each com- 
pany on picket and also Dr. Dudley with our killed and wounded 
who were unable to walk. T think the rebels had us in a pretty 
tight place and a part of the Fifth and Nine Cori)s had to come 
out and open a road in our rear. The roads were ankle deep in 
nuul, but we kept up our return march until two o'clock in the 
morning when we rested until daylight, when the Fifth Corps left 
us and our brigade was put (^n duty as rear guard. We finally 
got back into our lines all right and last night we got into our 
old camp, wdiere I am now writing." 

One of the unfortunate features of the engagement was the 
capture of the entire picket line of ten men belonging to the 
Fourteenth Regiment. 

The following is the list of killed, wounded and missing in the 
engagement at Boydton Plank Road, ( )ctober 27th, 1864: — 

"Major, John C. IJroatch, wounded, thigh. 

Compau}' A. \\'()unded. Sergeant, (^scar A. Abbott, foot. 

Company J]. Wounded, Corporal, Hiram H. Fox, foot. Pri- 
vate. James Hays, foot. 

Company C. Wounded, I^-ivates, John Ijurns, body, William 
Fllis, (since died), John Edwards, John Sufi^ang, since died) ; 
missing. Private George Rich. 

Company D. Wounded, Corporal, Henry F. Hospodskv, arm. 

Company E. Killed, Private, Samuel Mason ; wounded. Cor- 
poral, Sanford Pugbee, knee. 



From Hatcher's Run to the End. 3 1 9 

Company 1-. Missin.i;-. Privalcs, jaiiics 1'. Alc.U. William 
Carring-ton, diaries Recklcr. 

Company II. Wounded. Con)oral. Jcreniiali ( i. Dunbar, foot. 

Conipau) I. Killed, i si Lieutenant, Perkins I'.arlholomew. 

Companv K. Wounded. Privates. Alonzo Criswold. Jacob 
Schneider. Lett on picket. Sup])osed to have been taken iM'is- 
oners. 

Conipanx A. James W. iM-ench. Stephen 1). Skidmore. 

Companv V. Sergeant. William R. Lattimer. Privates, James 
Holland. John Stevens. 

Company C. Private, Martin Stevens. 

Company L Privates, James Xolan, I'atrick Healey, Peter 
Wilson, Joseph Smith." 

A serious loss to the regiment was the killing of Lieutenant 
Perkins Bartholomew. He enlisted from Xew London as a cor- 
poral in Company H and was afterwards promoted to ist Lieu- 
tenant of Comi^any T. He was a brave soldier and a good 
officer. 

The following is the official rejMirt of Lieutenant-Colonel S. A. 
^loore to the Adjutant-General of the State of Connecticut:— 

"Headquarters Fourteenth Connecticut Volunteers, 
October 30th, 1864. 
Brigadier-General H. J. Morse, 

Adjutant-General State of Connecticut. 

General : — 

I have the honor to submit the following report of the i)art 
taken by this regiment in the late action near P.oydton Plank 
Road. 

Early upon the morning of the 27th, we left camp on the 
Weldon Railroad, near the \aughn House, and inarched in a 
westerly direction till about daylight, when 1 was ordered to 
deploy four com])anies of this regiment on the right, as !l;uikers, 
to cover the I'.rigade, which was done under the command of 
Lieutenant William Murdock. Three companies were also de- 
tached on tlu' K'fl, under coinmaud of Major John C. P.roatch. 
We then advanced about a (piarter of a mile, when we came in 



320 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry, 

sight of the rebel works on Hatcher's Run. Here we formed in 
hne of battle on the right of the brigade, with the three remain- 
ing companies, and charged across the rim and up a hill into 
the enemy's works, taking some prisoners. 

Our loss here was Major Broatch wounded, one enlisted man 
killed and four wounded. 

Sergeant Albert DeForest, of Campany A, of this regiment, 
being at the head of the flankers on the right, was the first to 
observe the telegraph wire running in rear of the enemy's works, 
which he promptly cut. 

We then reformed and marched by a road running in a north- 
erly direction, about two miles, where we halted, and were joined 
by the companies which had been acting as flankers on the right, 
under command of Lieutenant Alurdock, they having been re- 
lieved by a portion of the Third Division. 

After a rest of about half an hour, we again proceeded, having 
Companies G and R, under command of Captain Frank E. 
Stoughton, deployed as flankers on the left, and Company D, un- 
der command of Lieutenant Robert Russell on the right. 

Near the Boydton Plank Road we were attacked, and being 
joined by the companies which had been out as flankers, were 
deployed as skinnishers, and so advanced to the left, about a 
quarter of a mile, we halted until relieved by the cavalry. 

We then joined the brigade, which had advanced across an 
open field to the right, and was facing the enemy's works. At 
this point we lay under the shell fire directed from the front and 
right flank, for about an hour, when we were ordered forward 
to and across the plank road, crossing a brook on its westerly 
side, and were formed facing to the south, under cover of a bank. 

At this time, firing being heard on our right flank, we were 
ordered to file to the right under cover of a hill. This was doi.e 
on the double-quick, and the cavalry being driven in at this point, 
we charged over the hill and drove the enemy from their works, 
with (to us) but small loss. 

The regiment occupied the works thus vacated, rcmai-iing in 
them till nearl_\- 5 o'clock (1*. M.) when T was ordered to take 
the regiment from the works, and deploy it on the road on the 



From Hatcher's Run to the End. 32 1 

left flank of the bris^adc. Before this could he done, however, 
the enemy attacked us in front. 

It was at this time that Lieutenant Perkins Bartholomew, of 
Company I, received the wound of which he soon after died. 

I at once sent a sergeant to the General commanding- the brig- 
ade, for further orders, and was directed to hold the position then 
occupied. 

The enemy being rei)ulsed in this attack, fell back to their 
works. We remained in the works till alx^ut ir o'clock, when, 
pursuant to orders, we withdrew, leaving a throng picket line. 

Throughout the whole day the conduct of both officers and men 
was deserving of praise. Lieutenant Lartholomew, who was 
one of our most promising young officers. 

Major Broatch, while in command of a portion of the skirmish 
line, received a severe but not dangerous wound. 

Surgeon Dudley was left behind, wdth medical supplies, to take 
charge of the wounded who could not be moved. 
\'ery resi)ectfull. 

Your obedient servant, 

S. A. MooRK, 
Lieutenant- Colonel, commanding regiment." 

In early Xovember a commissioner from the State of Connec- 
'i'cut visited the regiment for the purpose of taking the votes of 
the men for president. 

On Xovember T3th Emmons P. Bond of Xew Britain was 
appointed as chaplain. The regiment had been without a chap- 
lain since the discharge of Chaplain Stevens about a year 
previous. 

Chaplain Emmons P. Bond was born in Canterbury, Conn., 
and graduated at Brown University, Providence, R. I., in 
185 1 and from the Madison University Theological Seminary, 
N. Y., two years later. U^pon his graduation he settled as 
pastor of the Baptist church in New Britain. He was oc- 
cupying this position when he was mustered as chaplain of the 
regiment November 13th, 1864. Mr. Bond remained with the 
regiment as its chaplain a little over five months, resigning 



322 



Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 



April 26, 1S65. He returned to his pastorate in New Britain 
where he remained until 1867, when he became Principal of 
the Connecticut Literary Institute at Suffield. He was later, 
for seventeen years, pastor in Wethersfield, being a portion of 
this time associate editor of the Religious Herald oi Hartford. 
Declining in health he gave up professional work in 1896 and 
went to live with his son in Pennsylvania, where he died Feb- 




CHAPLAIN EMMONS P. BOND. 



ruary 28, 1899. Chaplain Bond was scholarly and refined and 
was much esteemed in the communities where he labored. 
His service with the regiment covered so brief a period, that 
but few of the men became personally acquainted with him. 

The regiment was moved to Fort McGilvery in front of Pe- 
tersburg, liere it remained until November 29th. when they 
were ordered to be ready to move in tlie direction of Fort Bross. 
After breakfast of the 30th, in company with the brigade, it 



From Hatcher's Run to the End, 323 

ir.oved until two o'clock to relieve the Xintli C_'or])s. Deccnibci" 
^'th, the men had just commenced l)uilding- huts for the wintei 
'♦vhcn they were ordered to he in readiness to move at half ])ast 
four the next day to relieve the Fifth Corps. On the 7th the 
-egiment v;ent on picket. It was expected there would l)e an 
'I'ttack, but it did not take place, ddie men ])itched their shelter 
tents and encamped several days when they moved a mile far- 
ther toward Patrick Station. Here the men took possession of 
huts already made which was fortunate as the weather was \ery 
cold and frosty. December iith John Hirst recordr. :- "\W"ather 
very cold and the reo^iment laid around all day waiting- for orders. 
December 13th the regiment was on the move again until noon 
and passed through the place where the}- last built huts, but found 
tliey had been torn down and the logs and boards carried away. 
All hands were kept busy rebulding the huts until noon of the 
i^th., when the regiment formed in light marching order and 
moved to corps headquarters to witness the presentation of 
medals voted by Congress to members of the regiment for cap- 
turing iiags at Gettysburg. Allusion has been made in the sketch 
of the battle of Gettysburg of the presentation of these medals 
to Major Hincks, Corporal liacon and Corporal Flynn. 

There was a general complaint at this time of the ])oor charac- 
ter of the rations. All accounts seem to agree that the winter be- 
fore Petersburg, at what was called Fort }*lorton, was monoto- 
nous and without special activity on the part of the regiment at 
large. 

J. E. Stannard relates some exiieriences of the men during 
this period of inactivit\- as follows:- "At Fort Morton, on the 
hne before Petersburg, in the winter of 1864-5, wood became a 
scarce article, and it was no small part of our work to find a su]i- 
plv and get it into the cam]). Every tree for miles around had 
been cut, even to the roots. There was also a class of men who 
were very sh}- about exerting themselves to do such work as re- 
quired them to cut and carry wood into cam]) and cut it again 
""eady for use. As the nu'U were usuall\- in 'a mess' of from 
foui- to six that tented together (when we had tents) it w-as the 
custom for each to do his ])art toward keei)ing up the supplies 
of wood and water. A certain mess consisted of four, and among 



324 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

ihem was a man of the class noted for lack of energy such as 
required him to gather wood. This man we will call George. 
The fort was located on the line where the sharp-shooters had 
a good range and were not slow to fire at anything that ofifered 
a target. A tree stood in front of the fort on the slope and in 
mil range of the sharp-shooters and exposed to the extent that 
no one had ventured to go out and cut it. One day wood was 
especially scarce and George was invited to contribute a little 
rf his energy toward increasing the supply. As usual he had 
some very important excuse and could not assist in the under- 
taking. The patience of the other three became exhausted and 
he was given to understand that he should do his share in re- 
plenishing the supply, and do it at once, or take the consequences. 
He said he didn't know w^here to get any. The tree standing 
in front of the fort was pointed out to him and he was told to 
go out and cut it. He denm.rea, saying he did not believe any 
cf the crowd would dare to go out there and cut it. One of the 
boys took this for a challenge and said. Til go out and cut half 
^\•ay into the tree if you'll expose your carcass to cut the other 
half.' Well, George could do nothing but accept, so an axe was 
found and the challenger started over the fort and made quick 
time to the tree, he didn't stop to make many observations, not 
much, Johnny Reb would find him quick enough. He put in 
his best strokes and soon had his half of the tree cut, meanwhile 
Ihe sharp-shooters had got the range and were prepared to give 
George a warm reception. George was gritty enough to fell the 
t' ee and ran for the fort. The tree was left until dark and then 
tut up and taken to the 'gophers' as our bomb proofs were called. 
George was not called on for wood again for some time. 

Fort Morton was on the line of works not far from the Ap- 
pomattox River. Sharp-shooters used an old chimney back about 
two miles from the line. Saps and mines and any other old 
thing was a go in those days, every man had to look out for 
himself when a sharp-shooter got after him. If a man got a hok? 
through his body it was just a 'ventilator.' 

At this place we were obliged to live under ground, like a 
gopher. The shells from the rebels came into our camp too 
thick to make it healthy to live top of the ground. The line of 



From Hatcher's Run to the End. 325 

works was at the cRst of the hill so that the ground descended 
in the front and at the rear. To build our 'bomb proof we dug 
a trench about six feet running directly to the rear and about five 
feet deep. This carrietl the water off and left the ground dry. 
To make them bomb proof we dug a trench about three feet 
vide starting from the main trench and dug it about five feet 
long, then we dug out a s([uare hole in the ground at the end of 
this trench, this was ilug to a level with the first trench and made 
^he floor to our house. We then took timbers, logs or anything 
v/e could find long enough to reach across the hole and covered 
the hole over,excepting a small opening over which we placed 
a pork barrel with both ends out. This was to be the chimney 
for we dug out a fire-i)lace near one corner and then covered 
the top over with the dirt taken out of the hole, this was piled 
tip as high as we could get dirt to pile up. The entrance was 
through the trench, for a door w-e hung up a piece of bagging. 
The fire-place was a liole cut into the side of the opening and 
liad a flue cut up to the jiork Itarrel through which the smoke es- 
caped. For bunks the lower one was on the ground, the upper 
one was placed directl\- over the lower and was made with pine 
poles held up b\- crotches set into the ground at each end. In 
this hole four men could keep house and feel that they were 
safe while inside as no shell could reach them. With a couple 
of hardtack boxes for cupboards and the arm\- l)lankets men could 
make themselves C()mfortal)le, and feel that it was a luxurv com- 
pared with some of the accomodations furnished liy L'ncle Sam. 
This was the usual wa}' of building (|uarters when the lay of 
the land would ])ermit it. in such a place four of us of the 
F^ourteenth Connecticut Regiment kept house for several months 
?nd were comfortable as comfort goes in the armv. At four 
o'clock every morning we were caled out to stand in the breast- 
works until after daylight. This was to jirexent a surprise, for 
it would be at this time that the t'nem\- would be most likelx' to 
try to be familiar. IhU he never found us napping. Did xou ever 
see a new recruit when he w;i.s first under hre? Well, the fool 
would run tlie risk of ha\-ing his block-lK-ad blown off if an\- one 
shnuK! tel' liim to kee]) down out of sight of the c-ueuiy. tiu'y rll 
wanted to show what l)ra\'e idiots the\ were. 1 saw one leap uj) oii 



326 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

the breastworks one morning-. Well, he came down again, but he 
had tile con^pliments of a sharp-shooter with hnn in the shape of a 
piece of lead in his hip." 

Toward the last of January or early in February General 
Grant endeavored to make another effort to break up the Confed- 
erate route of supplies by a movement on Dinwiddie Court 
House. The forces designed for this duty were Gregg's Cavalry 
Division, the Fifth Corps, Second and Third Divisions of the 
Second Corps, accompaned b}- the Tenth Massachusetts Battery 
i'nd Battery K 4th U. S. General Humphreys was in command, 
having taken the place of General Hancock who was in the 
hospital. Following this order it did not take long for the regi- 
ment to pack up and it was soon on the move in the same direc- 
tion and place as in the first battle of Hatcher's Run. The regi- 
ment had not proceeded very far before the skirmishing com- 
menced in good earnest and kept up until afternoon when the 
Confederates massed their troops and attempted to break the line 
much in the same place they broke in the last engagement. 
Breastworks, however, had been thrown up. but the Confeder- 
ates charged against them seven times, but each time were 
lepulsed. The regiment was ordered to support a battery and so 
did not get into the thick of the fight. They received no damage 
until thev changed front. It was during this change that Lieu- 
tenant Bartlett was killed and Lieutenant Graham and several pri- 
vates were wounded. 

Sergeant Charles G. L>latchle\- says of the experience of the 
legiment at this time:- "One of these engagements took place 
in February, i<%5. Our line had been formed and rifle-pits 
thrown u]) and the ])icks and shovels carried away by the Pioneer 
Corps when it was discovered by the fire of the advancing enemy 
that a mistake had been made and the line was at exactly right 
angles to its pro]KT direction. The change in the line was quickly 
made and a new line of works erected luider fire b\' the men 
without tools and the celerity with which this was accomplished 
showed what could be done under a certain amount and kind of 
pressure. We occupied this line for several days and one night 
here I had the experience of being frozen in bed ; it rained and 



From Hatcher's Run to the End. 327 

:rcezini;' as it fell, our l)l;uikctls wx-re linnly frozen to the earth 
and we nnder them in the morning-." 

The following is the list of the killed and wounded : — 

"Company A. Wounded, Private, Samuel Stone, neck, 
severely. 

Company C. Wounded. 1st Lieutenant. Ira A. (jraham, breast, 
severely. 

Company E. Killed, ist Lieutenant. Franklin Dartlett ; wound 
ed, 1st Serg-eant, (ieorge K. Bassett. arm. 

Compau}- F. Wounded, Private, Thomas Shean, hand. 

Campany K. Wounded, Private, Crayton Billings, breast, 
slightly." 

Lieutenant Franklin liartlett was the youngest officer in the 
regiment. He was Ijorn in Pridgeport. Coim., in 1845, ^"tl was but 
seventeen years old when he enlisted, lie was ])romoted to cap- 
tain, l)ut his commission was not received until after his death. 
Although slight of frame and }<)ung, he bore his part untiinch- 
ingly. His remains were taken to Bridgeport for funeral ser- 
Mces and he was borne to the grave by six commissioned offi- 
cers, including Lieutenants Hawlc}' and Knowlton of the h^iur- 
Tcenth Reu'iment. His was a life of loyal and successful endeav 
cr to be of use to his comrades and his country.. 

The following is the official report of Lieutenant-Colonel S. A. 
Moore to the Adjutant-General of the State of Connecticut: — 

"Headquarters luxirteenth Connecticut X'olunteers, 
March ^oth. 1865. 
Brigadier General H. J. Morse, 

Adjutant-General State of Connecticut. 
General : — 

1 have the honor to submit the following as a rei)ort of the part 
taken by this regiment in the late oijcrations. 

\\\^ left cam]) near the l)a\is I louse on the morning of thi 
5th of February, about 7 A. Al.. and marched down the X'auglv.i 
Road, until near Hatcher's Run, when we countermarched, and 
marched by a road on the left to the Armstrong House, where we 
took position in su])])ort of the lolii Mass. Patlery. Mere we re- 
mained until about ^ I '. M . At that time, the enem\ h.avino- at- 



328 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

lacked the line on our right, we changed front forward on first 
companw l^ringing our hue at a right angle with the line at- 
tacked. This was done to repel any attack which might come 
from that direction. It was here, and while changing front, that 
fhe casualities which I have to report occurred. We remained 
In this position until the morning of the nth inst.. when we 
n^arched to our present camp., 
I am, General, 

Aery respectfully. 
Your obedient servant, 

S. A. Moore, 
Lieutenant-Colonel commanding regiment." 

The troops returned to camp tired and wet. After this skir- 
mish at Hatcher's Run there was a better supply of rations and 
very little for the men to do. To many of the men it was a try- 
ing time, it was either a speed}- cessation of hostilities and they 
would be allowed to see their dear ones at home or it would be 
(ieath. Two or three corps reviews took place. General Grant be- 
ing the reviewing officer. The troops were well dressed on these 
occasions, marched well and felt in good spirits. 

On the 25th of March rations for five days were served and 
j.mmunition of cartridges given out. Lieutenant-Colonel Moore 
had been detailed to take a force of five hundred men and make 
a demonstration near the left of the line. This was for the pur- 
])Ose of drawing the attention of the enemy from movements 
along other parts of the line. The Fourteenth Regiment, the 
'i welfth New Jersey, the Sixty-Ninth and One Hundred and 
Sixth Pennsylvania \"olunteers were assigned to Lieutenant- 
Colonel Moore for this purpose. On the way to the picket line, 
it was subject to some shelling by the enemy without doing any 
liarm. Four companies of the Fourteenth were deployed as skir- 
mishers under comand of Captain Murdock and one company 
under Lieutenant Russell as flankers. They found the enemy 
.strongly posted on the opposite side of Hatcher's Run. To cross 
the Run was difficult and at times seemed almost impossible, but 
finally succeeded and the works were taken with about seventy 
jM-isoners. About eleven o'clock the command returned to camp 



From Hatcher's Run to the End, 329 

after destroying the bridge across the Jvun which the men had 
buih. There were no officers or men killed, but several were 
wounded severely. 

The following is the official report of Lieutenant-Colonel S. A. 
Moore to the Adjutant-Cieneral of the State of Connecticut:— 

"Headquarters lM)urteenth Connecticut A'olunteers 
March 27, 1865. 
llrigadier-General H. J. Morse, 

Adjutant-Ceneral of Connecticut. Hartford, Conn. 

General :- 

I have the honor to report that upon the 25th instant I was de- 
tailed bv (ieneral William Hayes, commanding the Second Di- 
vision, Second Cori)s. to take a force of five hundred men and 
make a demonstration near the left of the line held by the corps, 
for the ]ntrpose of drawing the attention of the enemy from move- 
ments which were taking place further to the right. 

The regiments assigned to me for this purpose were the 14th 
Connecticut, the 12th Xew Jersey. 69th and io6th Pennsylvan- 
ia Volunteers. 

On our way out to the picket line several shells were thrown 
at the column by the enemy, without, however, doing much harm. 
Upon reaching the picket line, near the Armstrong house, I de- 
ployed four companies of the Fourteenth as skirmishers, under 
tommand of Captain Murdock. ( )ne comi)any under Fieutenant 
Russell was also deployed upon the left, as dankers. The re- 
mainder of the command being formed in line of battle, we ad- 
\anced for about half a mile, most of the way through thick 
woods, when we found an entrenched skirmish line of the ene- 
my, strongly posted on the op])osite side of Hatcher's Run. 

We attacked them, but for a time it seeme(l imi)ossil)le for the 
men to ford the Run, it being wide and dee]), and the trees from 
loth ranks being felled into the steam, so that their branches 
presented a very serious obstacle to crossing. 

At length, however, our skirmishers effected a ])assage, ca])tur- 
ing the enenn's works, with about se\-enl\ ])risoners, one of whoiu 
was a conunissioned officer. Another commissioned officer was 



330 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

taken at a house about half a mile farther on. Near this house 
an earthwork was found which had been thrown up for artil- 
lery, but which was unoccupied. 

I did not think it advisable to advance any further with the 
small force under my comand. A bridge was built across the 
Run and a skirmish line established, the main part of the force, 
however, being kept on this side. The enemy were seen moving 
in the woods beyond, in considerable numbers, but they made 
no effort to retake the ground that they had lost. 

At about II o'clock P. M., the object for which we were sent 
cut having been accomplished, we returned to camp, after hav- 
destroyed the bridge across the Run. 

The following is a list of the casualities sustained by the Four- 
teenth Connecticut \ olunteers : — 

2d Lieutenant, John T. Bradley, Company K. v.^^tmded in ann, 
severely. 

ist Sergeant, Russell Glenn, Company A, wounded in breastt, 
severely. 

Private, Dennis Driscol, Company D, wounded tn leg, se\-erely. 

Private, William Young, Company I, wounded in leg, severely. 

Private, John Bayhan, Company K, wounded in neck, severel}-. 

Private, Jesse J. Hoadley, Company K, wounded. 

We lost no officers or men, killed. 

I am happv to state that the officers and men behaved well in 
all respects in this affair. Captain Murdock, commandmg the 
skirmish line. Captain Morgan, commanding the remaining com- 
panies of the regiment, and Adjutant Hincks, all rendenid me val- 
uable assistance. 

The following named enlisted men distinguished themselves, 
being the first to cross the Run, some of them wading in water up 
to their necks : — 

jst Sergt. Russell Glenn, Co. A., Private Pierce Barron. Co. B. 
Sergt. Everett P. Dudley, Co. G., Private Edward Riley, Co. E. 
Corp. Hiram H. Fox, Co. B., Private George W Smith, Co F. 
Private Patrick Moore, Co. A., I^rivate George W. Sanford, 
Co. H. 



From Hatcher's Run to the End. 33 1 

i'rivate James Kerns, Co. 15., I'rivate Pierre Morel, Co. K. 
1 liave the honor to he. Sir, 

Your ohechent servant, 

Samuel A. Moore, 

Lieutenant-Colonel 
Commanding- Fourteenth Connecticut \'oli'nteers." ■ 

Sergeant Charles (i. I'.latchley o-ives the folowing description 
cf the months spent l)efore Petershurg: — "The record of these 
nine months hefore Petershurg would make a very monotonous 
story. There are in them intensely stirring incidents; night at- 
tacks on both sides ; the thrilling experence of creeping nc^iseless- 
iy up with bated breath toward their lines one moment, and the 
next enveloped in the blinding flash of suffocating smoke of 
battle. I only had this once, once was enough. Or lying behind 
cur own works with the ready rifles loaded and capped as they 
were, even when we sle]jt on them ; peering through the darkness 
into the black space in front of us, to find it suddenly swarming 
full of the gray and the butternut in the mad attempt to break 
our lines. ( )r perhaps back in the bomb-proofs, which we had 
learned to build, after from eighteen to twenty- four hours duty in 
the front line, just lying down for a little rest, before our eyes 
were fairly closed to be called out by the quick sharp rattle of 
musketry or the heavy detonations of the mortars or the shriek- 
ing yell of the riflle cannon shots as they came tearing through 
the trees. ( )ne minute in those days was ample time to trans- 
form a sleeping soldier on the reserve into a soldier alert, armed 
i.nd accoutered, all ready for business. We alwaAs slei)t with our 
clothes on and unless on the rear reserve with our accoutrements 
on and the right hand on the barrel of the rifle. 

We did a great deal of what was called fatigue duty in this 
campaign. Soldiers became adepts in the handling of the pick 
and shovel, and when the necessity arose, a level jilain would be 
t'-ansfigured with breastworks and forts in an almost incredibly 
:-<hort space of time. This work was not without its excitements; 
v.'c did not ]n\-v it, but it was not because it was not dangerous 
enough. 1 remember working upon one of the extensions of the 



332 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

fortifications, commonly called among- the soldiers Fort Hell. 
The . rebel fort Damnation was immediately opposite, and both 
forts were appropriately named. The entrance to Fort Hell was 
by means of what was known as the Jerusalem Plank Road and 
the opposite fort had a clean sweep of that road from their parapet. 

We were constantl}- changing position here and the monotonous 
round went from picket to fatigue duty, and fatigue duty to pick- 
et ; building quarters one day, moving out the next ; called out with 
sudden alarms, or taking part in sudden sallies ; one day ofif to 
the right of the line, the next to the left or in the center. Day by 
day our lines were lengthened, then straightened and shortened 
and lengthened again, and the process repeated again and again, 
compelling^ the enemy to weaken their line to meet these move- 
ments until all was ready for the great final assault, which crushed 
the whole with one great blow." 

Monday and Tuesday, March 27th and 28th, 1864, the Four- 
teenth rested in its comfortable camp for the last time as on the 
iiiorning of the 29th they marched out through the picket line 
and moved up Hatcher's Run, drove in the rebel picket and threw 
up two lines of breastworks. They did this amidst a drenching 
rain which lasted for several days. March 30th the regiment was 
moved farther to the left and the left wing was sent out as skir- 
mishers. There was sharp work along the line all day and very 
heavy firing to the right and left. Idle regiment slept on their 
arms along the line until two o'clock in the morning of the 31st, 
when another move was made to the left, the men wading in mud 
nearly up to their knees. "If there was one thing more than 
another that became indelil^ly impressed upon the men's minds 
of the Fourteenth in their peregrinations wth the Arm}- of the 
I'otomac it was plodding through this everlasting Virginia mud. 
It was one of the most powerful allies of the rebel host in the 
winter and spring movements, it had a variety of consistency, it 
could be struck thick or thin and usually knee deep. The boys 
facetiously designated their feet as 'iiontoons,' 'mud scows' and 
'ambulances'. It was no macadamized road and the cry of 'On to 
Richmond' was generally over a five mile course in \'irginia mud 
loaded with their forty pound knapsacks, sixty rounds of car- 



From Hatcher's Run to the End. 333 

triclges and haversacks tilled with four da\s rations." It is no 
wonder that the men of the h'onrteenth responded tardily to the 
^appellation of the sacred soil of N'irginia. 

April 1st the weather cleared and the sim shown warm and 
I'rig-ht. There was heavy fighting on the right and left, hut the 
; egiment did nothing hut take care of the gunners in their front. 
'! he men sle])t upon their arms. April 2d the regiment moved 
still farther to the left to the I'.oydton Plank Road and then ad- 
vanced in line of hattle through the rehel works, the enemy fall- 
ing hack as they ai)proached. At two o'clock April 4th tlic march 
was resumed and rations were served and the regiment moved 
forw^ard. It rained some during the day and a train of wagons 
r.nd some prisoners were captured. April 5th the regiment 
started early and marched all day, being out as skirmishers, driv- 
ing the rebels continuously and taking some prisoners. At night 
the regiment went out on picket. 

During these days of marching back and forth there hung 
ever the minds of manv of the regiment a bow of ho])e that the 
cud was not far otT. The resistance of the enemy was visibly 
more feeble and showed lack of well devised plans both of attack 
.'uici defense, .\pril 7th the regiment started again at daylight and 
binder the shell tire drove the enemy back over the river at High 
Ih'idge. The enemy was attempting to fire High r)ridge, but was 
prevented. Here a sharp fight was had, but the bridge was 
saved and the enemy driven through Farmville. April gth they 
were again in line early, but the march was slow and at noon 
a halt was made to await orders. Toward night there was a 
sharp skirmish and a number of artillery were captured. 

Sergeant Charles (I. Illatchley has this to say of the engage- 
ment at High Bridge and the days immediately following: — ■ 
''Our last engagement with the enemy was at the crossing of the 
Appomattox River at High Bridge. We came ui)on them at 
daylight, setting fire to the bridge ; men forgot all rules and dis- 
cipline in the enthusiasm of the moment. ( leneral Harlow, who 
commanded our division, rode at the head of the column wiih his 
staif over the bridge into the ranks of the enemy, firing his pistol 
at them as the\- were trNing to ai)pl\- the match to the tar on the 



334 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

bridge. After him went the One hnndred and Eighth New York 
?.nd then the Fourteenth Connecticut. We began to fire from the 
bridge marching by the flank, without orders and without any 
line of battle. This was the only time I ever saw this movement 
executed, .\cross the bridge we formed quickly in the meadow 
and on we went for miles over the hills, through the town of 
Farmville, where we chased the retreating foe and charged on 
liie hen-coops of the village at the same time. We did not lose 
a single man in this charge, so far as I know, though we had 
some verv narrow escapes. As we came on to the top of one of 
the hills, a shell buried itself in the ground at my feet and ex- 
I'loded, literally covering me and the men next me with gravel 
stones, but without hurting any of us . 

Just at nightfall of that day the last man in our brigade to 
give his life for his country was killed, that was our commanding- 
General Sm}th, as noble a fellow as ever held a sword. Our 
congratulations over that days work were changed suddenly to 
gloom and manv a soldier cried that night at the loss of a man 
vho had shared our perils and hardships so constantly antl so 
bravely. 

On Sunday, the Qth, late in the luorning we were ordered from 
the road into the field, and the further information was given that 
v>-e were to have twenty minutes for coffe : this order w^as looked 
U]:)on with suspicion. Such an order had not been issued for 
weeks, at least, and it was grimly asserted that the soldiers knew 
enough to get their breakfast without orders, antl that the officers 
knew this, therefore this order had some sinister meaning. Some 
few went to the business of making the coft'ee, most of us too 
tired to care much, lay down to rest instead. Twenty minutes 
passed, an hour passed, two hours passed, still we lay there and 
no signs of any change. Strange rumors began to find currency ; 
some one had seen the rebel lines with guns stacked and had 
heard that a proposition for surrender had been made ; then that 
Lee had actually surrendered. This news was tabooed by nearly 
everybody, and the very few that even dared to think there might 
be something in it were laughed at as credulous fools: but the 
lumors grew thicker and more positive and finally some of ou'; 



From Hatcher's Run to the End. 335 

officers went up to investigate. Their report made some converts, 
hut the majority remained unl)elie\'ino- stiU. ddie thin^- that fin • 
all\- settled the question was the firino- of hlank cartridi^es liy a 
hattery of artillery in the ravine l)ehind us. This, however, was 
(|uickly stopped. General (irant refused to allow anythino- that 
looked like exultation over a fallen foe. The most extraordinary 
scene I think I ever witnessed was that which greeted the ^p- 
pearance of (k'neral ?\Ieade passing- through the lines to con- 
gratulate his troops on the victory. Men were completely be- 
side themselves : they tlunk their caps into the air. threw their 
kna]xsacks under his horse's feet ; danced an;l laughed and shout- 
ed and rolled t)n the ground and cried all at the same time. Men 
who declared when they went into that field, in the morning that 
ihcy were so foot-sore that another step was impossible went 
out of that field that afternoon to the tune of Yankee Doodle, 
with steps as light as boys just out of school." 

John Hirst writing to his brother, Sergeant IJenjamin Hirst, in 
a letter written at I'.urkes' Station under date of April I4t]i sa\s:- 
"I write to let you know we are all right after our great march 
in pursuit of General Lee. I suppose }ou know more about it 
from the papers than I can tell you, but J am glad to let you 
know that our regiment was so very luckv as not to lose a man 
during the whole march. Colonel Moore was wounded accident- 
ally. It seems he had alone taken four prisoners when one of 
;hem started to run awa}- and the Colonel in hastil}' drawing his 
revolver fired it ofT, the ball going through his leg. I do not think 
he is hurt very badly as he rode oft alone to have it dressed, say- 
ing as he went that he was good for four more Johnnies. We did 
not lose many men in our division during the whole time after we 
got the rebels started, but we have a great number played out witli 
sore feet and a great many others are barefooted. All of us are 
in good spirits over the result. 1 tell }ou after we once got in- 
side their works, we pushed them harder than men were ever 
drove before. They had to leave their hos])ital and commissar} 
tents standing and the first day we captured a great number of 
jirisoners. 1die second day they got the start of us and it was 
night before we came vp to them, but we kept taking ])risoners 
nil along the road and cutting off their wagon-trains. This was 



336 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

iscpt up (lay after day until General Lee surrendered last Sunday. 
The rebels themselves destroyed a lot of stufif to keep it from 
falling- into our hands. I never saw men more demoralized than 
tliey were after we got them started. ( )ur army moved in heav}' 
columns, each corps moving in three cohnnns and in supporting 
distance of each other. In front of all was a heavy skirmish line 
which was sure to keep the rebels moving. At High I'ridge on 
the railroad our brigade imder (ieneral Smyth hatl a nice little 
skirmish with the rebels, who were trying to set it on iire, but 
our bo_\s were too smart for them and got it before one span 
was burnt ; and what little damage was done can soon be fixed 
up. The wagon bridge was captured without much damage. Gen 
eral pjarlow. commanding our division, says it was the prettiest 
skirmish he ever saw. I am sorry to say that General Thomas 
A. Smyth, commanding our brigade, was mortally wounded in 
this engagement and died soon afterwards. lUit what is the use of 
■ny writing more than to say that when ( ieneral Lee's lines were 
uroken, he had sixty thousand men and when he surrendered he 
bail but eleven thousand muskets. The woods were swarming with 
rebels who had been fleeing on their own hook and the day after 
the surrender over ten thousand came in and were paroled. T 
suppose you had a big time of it in the Xorth when you got the 
news, for I tell you the boys did some shouting here when Gen- 
eral Meade came along and told us the news." 

The following is the list of wounded from March 30th to 
April loth:— 

"Lieutenant-Colonel, S. A. Moore, leg, flesh wound. 

Company A. Private, Richard Wallace, contusion by shell, 
slightly. 

Com])any 15. Private, James Kerns, wrist, severely." 

The following report was mide by Captain J. Frank AkTrgan to 
tiie Adjutant-General of the State of Connecticut : — 

"Headquarters Fourteenth Connecticut X'olunteers, 
April nth, 1865. 
Brigadier-General Horace J. Morse, 

Adjutant-General State of Connecticut. 
General : — 
I have the honor to report that during the past twelve days 



From Hatcher's Run to the End. 337 

this regiment has taken an active part in the movements which 
resulted in the capture of Richmond and Petershurj^. and the 
surrender of Lee's army. 

Durinti" this time it has marched, with the Second C'or])s, a 
part of which it forms, not less than one hundred and hft\- miles, 
dirough an unknown and difficult country, skirmishino- fre<iuentl_\- 
with the rear guard of the enemy. 

Frequently, too. during this time, we were without rations, our 
supply trains were unahle to keep u]) with us, and as we were 
given no time to collect food from the country, there was much 
.suffering from hunger. This was for the most part uncomplain- 
mgly borne, the men appearing to be so impressed with the neces- 
sity of giving Lee's shattered army no rest or opportunity for es- 
cape. 

The captures by our brigade during the above period amounted 
to some twenty pieces of artillery, fifteen hundred stand of small 
arms, and many prisoners. It was also in a skirmish with our 
brigade, near High P)ridge, that Colonel Taylor, (ieneral Lee's 
Adjutant General, was killed. 

It would be a difficult matter to determine which of the regi- 
ments of the brigade are entitled to the credit (^f the captures just 
named, but it is indisputable that the Fourteenth did its full share. 

( )ur losses, owing, I presume, to the rebels being so fatigued 
r.nd demoralized as to be incapable (^f fighting well, are less than 
they have been ujion any ])revious occasion when we Inn-e met 
the enemw 

I have the honor to be. Sir, 

^'our obedient servant, 

J. Frank ]\Iok(;an, 
Captain, commanding '. egiment. 
( )t'ficial : 
William 15. Ilincks, Adjutant." 

News was received on the 15th of the assassination of Presi- 
dent Lincoln which spread a gloom over the hearts of the men. 
On the day of his funeral at Washington appropriate services 
were held at brigade headquarters. Chaplain I'ond officiated and 



338 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

the regimental band, which had done such vahant service during 
the regiment's career, furnished music for the sad occasion. 

April i6th the regiment was putting up tents and on the 17th 
was notified it was likely to remain here for some time, streets 
were laid out, shanties built and canvas stretched over the huts, 
streets were policed and the regiment remained here until May' 
2d, when it received orders to move. While here the men ming- 
led freely with the Confederates and all were mutually glad the 
v/ar was at last over. At one o'clock May 26. the men were again 
on the march. It was understood that they would march to 
Washington, by way of Richmond, a distance of about two hun- 
dred miles. This was considered a long distance, but every mile 
covered brought the men nearer to their homes, there w-as little 
complaint and the route was enlivened by songs and jests and 
joyousness. The roads were passable and the regiment was fre- 
quently greeted by companies of negroes and Confederates who 
sang songs of welcome and expressions of good wishes and con- 
gratulations that the war was over. Ma>' 6th the regiment was 
within the environs of Richmond. It was no longer "On to 
Richmond." Every step of the men grew firmer, the eye brighter 
and the musket grasped with more loving grip than ever. The 
Fourteenth Regiment held the front of the column, preceded bv 
Its magnificent band, the men receiving many encomiums for their 
soldierly appearance. Up past Castle Thunder, that sink of 
degradation, past Libby Prison, that hell upon earth, and on 
past the still smoking ruins of the half Iiurncd city. Approach- 
ing the capitol the corps was ordered to shoulder arms and pass 
in review by General Halleck. After a short rest they moved 
about five miles out of the city where they encamped for the 
night. The march was continued day after day, making some 
twenty-five or twenty-eight miles each day. May loth they were 
near the old battlefield of the Wilderness, the fighting ground of 
Spottsylvania, to the right of Laurel Mill and in time approached 
'he land overlooking Fredericksburg. Here they found many 
tokens of the fight for the possession of the city. The men 
marched on quietly without noise, as if conscious of moving over 
ground sanctified by the suffering and death of their conn-ades. 



From Hatcher's Run to the End. 339 

They rested for a time just outside the eity and at lialf ])ast three 
passed throu.^h the sht)t riddled streets, stacked their arms and 
rested for a short time when they crossed the Rappahannock on 
a pontoon bridge and the Fourteenth camped near its old camp- 
ing- ground near I'^almouth. Everything looked familiar to the 
"old bovs" who knew every stump and tree along the ri\er. May 
iith the column moved on and few will ever forget the terrific 
thunder storm that overt(H)k the men. Quite a number of horses 
ciud mules were killed b\- lightning. They moved about three 
miles during this storm which the men described as one of the 
most awful in their experience. They then made tents, putting 
their bayonets in their guns and sticking them in the ground and 
covering them with blankets or canvas, but they were little better 
than nothing. 

'May 15th the regiment reached Four Mile Run near Alexan- 
dria, Va., where they encamped to await the grand review of all 
the troops in the United States Army. It was rainy and the time 
hung heavily with the men as every hour that kept them from 
home seemed to be needless. 

Tuesday, May 27,d, the Fourteenth Regiment marched at seven 
clock in the morning for the grand review at Washington 
which they reached at ten o'clock. The line of march was down 
Maryland Avenue, around the Capitol, up Pennsylvania Avenue 
and then back to camp. They were cheered heartily and the boys 
gave their old commander. General Hancock, a royal greeting. 

These were hilarious days for the boys of the Fourteenth as 
'veil as of the corps. There was little sleep and much fun and 
joking. ( )n the morning of the 31st the regiment was again in 
motion, this time through \\'ashington, to take the train for dear 
old Connecticut. There was little military restrictions during this 
journey home. They passed through Baltimore and Philadelphia, 
being received along the line with enthusiasm. At Philadel])hia 
thev had supper ])rovi<led by the "Cooper's ."^lio]) Soldiers Aid 
Society" and in Xew \'ork the\- were received by Stale Agent 
J. H. Almy after which the\" took the ste;uner "( iranile State" to 
Plartford, arriving there Saturday, the 8th of June. 

We quote from the Hartford Courant the following account 



340 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

of the reception of the regiment : — "The City Guard, Captain 
Vv'illiams and Governor's Foot Guard, Major Hunt, headed by 
Colt's Band, were at the boat to receive and escort the regiment 
in its march through the principal streets of the city to their 
camping ground on Park street. After forming in line, the)' 
marched up State Street to Central Row, where they stacked arms 
and Colonel Bissell made a short address of welcome, which was 
leplied to in behalf of the regiment by their colonel. During the 
speech by Colonel Bissell, Private John Geatley of Companv A, 
Bridgeport, was pointed out as the brave soldier who captured 
three rebels at Petersburg, with an unloaded musket. He was 
led to the front and vociferously cheered. They were then dis- 
missed (at half past eleven) for breakfast, which had been w^ait- 
ing for them since early in the morning, and was served by Cap- 
tain Parker of the Trumbull House. After breakfast the march 
was resumed through the principal streets to the camp on Park 
Street. 

The returning veterans could not "but have been gratified at 
their reception. The weather has been beautiful all day. A cool 
breeze tempered the heat of the sun and had it been especial!}' 
arranged for the occasion, it could not have been better. All 
along the line of march the national flag was thrown to the breeze ; 
and from window and balcony weaving of handkerchiefs and 
vvelcome home" attested the joy of the large crowds at the safe 
return of the remaining members of the Fourteenth." 

The boys so near home could not be restrained and the_\- soon 
"ound their way to the afternoon trains. Not one in five had an*- 
mone}' to i)ay his fare, Init that was nothing, "they were going 
'lome." The conductors, be it said to their credit, uiuforml\- 
passed on with a smile. The men returned June the loth, and 
turned over their camp and garrison equipage. Saturday, June 
i5th, the paymaster arrived and the men were paid off, com- 
mencing with Company A and received their discharges which 
had been signed in Washington May 31st, Lieutenant-Colonel 
Moore being the last man to l^e discharged in the regiment. 

The following is the final report made 1)y Colonel Ellis to th-e 
Adjutant-General of the State of Connecticut: — • 



From Hatcher's Run to the End. 341 

"liarlford, ('(inn.. I'\'l)niar\ Jjtli. i.Sf)(). 
J')riga(lier-( Icneral II. J. Morse, 

Adjutant-Cieneral State of Connecticut. 
General : — 

The last re])ort made, brought the rei^'iment to llurkesville 
junction, where it remained to recruit and drill for several weeks, 
iviaj. Gen. IJarlow. in command of the division, on witnessing the 
dress parade of the regiment, pronounced it the best of the twen- 
ty-two regiments of the division, ddie steadiness of the men in 
llie ranks was particularly noticed. 

The new^s of the assassination of President Lincoln was receiv- 
ed by telegraph April 15th. On the day of the funeral in Wash- 
ington appropriate services were held at brigade headquarters, 
at which Chaplain IJond, of the 14th Connecticut, officiated, and 
the regimental band furnished the nuisic. 

The regiment left llurkesville junction on April 30th, and 
marched for Alexandria, via Richmond a.nd h^redericksburg. 
AVhen the second corps marched through Ivichmond, ^\3.\ 5th, 
1he Fourteenth was placed at the head of the column of 20,000 
men and won many encomiums from the troops drawn up to re- 
ceive them. The regimental band, which was second to none in 
■"he army, took its share of praise. The column passed in review 
before General Halleck, and marched past Libbey Prison and Cas- 
tle Thunder, where so many of our comrades had been confined. 
At Fredericksburg the regiment halted and stacked arms, on 
the old battle-ground of December 13th, 1862, reviving the sad 
reminiscences of that eventful day, and convincing all of the 
utter hopelessness of the task that dav assigned us. 

( )n the 14th of May the regiment reached the vicinitv of Alun- 
son's Hill, opposite Washington, and went into camp. ( )n tlu 
23d, it took part in the grand review of the armies of the Ignited 
States. 

The regiment was mustered out in the field, on the 31 si of 
May, 1865 ; and at once proceeded homeward, leaving Washing- 
ton on the 1st day of June. 

The work of the soldit'rs was done, and the few sur\-ivors of 
the three years campaign were in high spirits at the prospect of 



342 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

leturning to their homes. In all, i8 officers and 210 men came 
home with the regiment. 

We passed through J Baltimore and Philadelphia by rail, and 
were very flatteringly received. At Philadelphia we were enter- 
tained and provided with a supper by the 'Cooper's Shop Sold- 
iers Aid Society'. Upon our arrival at New York we were re- 
ceived by the gentlemanly and efficient State Agent, Col. J. H. 
Almy, who had provided dinner and cjuarters for the men at the 
I'attery barracks, and a small steamboat to carry the regiment 
around to the 'Ciranite State', which was to carry us to Hartford. 

For the credit of the regiment I would here state, that no 
restrictions were put upon the movements of the men during the 
journey home, or while in New York. The necessity for strict 
discipline was past, and such as chose left the boat for some 
hours. 

We arrived at Hartford on Saturday, the 8th of June, where 
we were received with every possible kindness that could be wish- 
ed for. The demonstrations of good feeling and sympathy for 
the returning soldiers by the people of Hartford, will ever be held 
in grateful remembrance b\- the members of the regiment. 

After being escorted through the principal streets of the city, 
we marched to the rendezvous on Park street. The men were 
then allowed to go home to spend Sabbath, returning the next 
week for final payment and discharge. 

It is w^orthy of note that this regiment during the three 
vears that it was in active service, was never taken away from 
the front. It participated in all the great battles fought by the 
Army of the Potomac, after it went into the field in the latter part 
of August. 1862, until the fall of Richmond and the surrender of 
Lee. It has taken part in thirt}-three {^^) battles and skir- 
mishes. 

The regiment has captured five colors and two guns, from the 
enemy in fair fight, and more ])risoners than the original numl)er 
of the regiment, and at Ream's Station drew ofif part of Mc- 
Knight's and part of the 3d New Jersey Batteries which had been 
left to the enemy. 

The actual loss in killed and wounded has been upwards of 



From Hatcher's Run to the End. 343 

eig'lit hundred, ])esidcs the many counted as missing, who occupy 
unknown graves in the Wilderness and around Petersburg. 

In repeated instances the regimental commanders have earned 
and received commendation from their superior officers, but from 
a feeling of modesty have not recorded it. The character and 
standing of the regiment in the iield was considered of the great- 
est importance, and little was done for reputation at home. A 
high state of discipline was always maintained, so that the regi- 
ment was called 'the fourteenth regulars,' and which obtained 
tor it a reputation unsurpassed b}- any other. 

While under my command the regiment never, even under the 
hottest fire, gave way or fell back without orders, and often held 
its position with fixed bayonets after the ammunition was ex- 
hausted. 

There are some members of the regiment whose names have 
figured but little in official reports, who have had much to do 
with making it what it was. Quarter-Master C. F. Dibble, who 
remained with the regiment from its organization to its muster- 
out, deserves the highest praise, and the thanks of every man in 
the regiment for his efficient management of his department. 
He waived promotion to retain his position. Had he left us, his 
place could not have been satisfactorily filled. 

Surgeon F. A. Dudley was likewise an able and efficient offi- 
cer, and though his abilities were the means of taking him awa\- 
from the regiment much of the time, to take charge of the Divi- 
sion Hospital, yet in battle he was always at hand to attend to the 
v,-ounded. He was wounded at Gettysburg and taken prisoner 
at Hatcher's Run, October. 1864, voluntarily, through his zeal 
lor our wounded. 

Dr. Levi Jewett, Assistant Surgeon, was also verv seriousl\ 
wounded at Ream's Station, August 251I1. i8(')4, while attending 
to the wounded. A shell exi)lode(l near him and badly shattered 
the bones of his face and head. 

Assistant Surgeon Charles Tomlinson is also deserving of great 
credit for the fearlessness with which lie followed tlu' reuiment 



^44 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

into many of the hottest eng-agements to attend to the immediate 
wants of the wcnmded. 

Very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

Theodore G. Ellis, 
Late Colonel 14th Conn. Vols. 

and I'irevet Brigadier-General." 

And thus we come to the close of the service of the Fourteenth 
Regiment. It, indeed, took a heroic and prominent part in what 
was in many respects the most important and remarkable conflict 
of arms in inodern times. That conflict, so weighty in its import 
to the destiny of our country, settling as it did many momentous 
questions, to which, when the nation had become adjusted, urged 
It along the high road of progress and development in all the 
better achievements of national life. Ikit at what cost? Figures 
fail to express it, words cannot portray it, a glance through these 
pages may give but a hint of it. 

This record has followed the regiment from the time it moved 
(;own the Sound on that tranquil summer afternoon in 1862, the 
dear old State dissolving from view by the enveloping shadow of 
night, has traced it on its long tedious marches, noted it in days of 
hunger and sufifering and distress, has been with it on the lonely 
bivouac and recorded the bravery of its men on many a hard 
fought battlefield. If any one perusing this record, imperfect as 
it is, gains therefrom a larger impulse of patriotism and a broader 
iud more hopeful view of our country's destiny that patriot 
ism and hopefulness will be a portion of the inheritance be- 
t.ueathed to him by the fortitude and valor, sufifering and bravery 
rf the noble Fourteenth Regiment, Connecticut Volunteers. 



SUMMARY. 

Tlie followini;' is the ()ffici;i.l suniniar\- of the Reo'imeiits' ser- 
vice pubHshed by the Adjittant-General of Conn., in his annual 
report for 1866: 

The Fourteenth Regiment was organized in August, 1862, and 
left Hartford for Washmgton. D. C, on the 25th day of August, 
1862, numl)ering one thousand and fifteen (1,015) officers and 
men. It was imme(Hatel_\' attached to tlie ,\rm\- of tiie Potomac 
ciud remained in that army for nearly three years, taking an act- 
ive ])art in all of its campaigns, and was finalh' mustered out 
< f service on the 31st of May, 1865. 

Since the organization of the regiment, six hundred and ninety- 
J:even (697) substitute and volunteer recruits have been received 
from the State, thus making, with the one thousand and fifteen 
(1,015) original men. a total number of one thousand seven hun- 
•Ired and twenty-six (1,72^)). who have served in its ranks. At 
the date of its muster out the regiment numbered two hundred and 
lhirt\-four (234) officers and men, present and absent. 

The regiment has taken i)art in the following 

ENGAGEMENTS. 

Autictaui, Md.. Septeml)er 17th, 1862. Loss in killed. 2 com- 
missioned officers, and k; enlisted men ; wounded. 2 commissioned 
officers, and 8f) enlisted men : missing, 2'^ enlisted men. Total 
loss, 137. 

Fredericksburg, ]\i., Decem])er 13th. 1862. Loss in killed. 1 
commissioned officer; 9 enlisted men ; wounded, lo commissioned 
cfficers, d^i enlisted men : missing, 20 enlisted men. Total loss, 
122. 

Chaiicellors-ville. I'a.. May 1st. 2d and 3d. 18^)3. Loss in 
'v'ounded, 3 commissioned ofificers, 34 enlisted men ; missing, 2 
commissioned officers, 17 enlisted nuMi. 'Total loss. =,(). 
(345) 



346 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Gettysburg, Pa., July 2d and 3d, 1863. Loss in killed, 10 en- 
listed men; wounded, 10 commissioned officers, 42 enlisted men; 
missing, 4 enlisted men. Total loss, 66. 

Falling U^Ucrs, Va., July 14th, 1863. 

Auburn, ]\i., October 14, 1863. 

Bristoc Station, Va., October 14th, 1863. Loss in "killed, 4 
enlisted men ; wounded, i commissioned officer, 17 enlisted men ; 
missing, 4 enlisted men. Total loss, 26. 

Blackburn's Ford, J^a., October 17th, 1863. 

Mine Run, Va., November 29th, 1863. Loss in wounded, 2 en- 
listed men; captured, 12 enlisted men. Total loss, 14. 

Morton s Ford, J\t., February 6th, 1864. Loss in killed, 6 en- 
listed men ; wounded, 7 commissioned officers, 83 enlisted men ; 
missing, i commisssioned officer, 18 enlisted men. Total loss, 

115- 

JVildcrncss. Va., May 5th and 6th, 1864. 

Laurel Hill. Ta., May loth, 1864. 

Spottsyh'auia, J 'a.. May 12th, 13th, 14th. i8th and 22d, 1864. 

North Anna River, Va., May 24th and 26th, 1864. 

Totopotomay, Va., May 31st, 1864. 

Cold Harbor, Va., June 3d, 1864. 

Cold Harbor, Va., June 6th, 1864. 

Loss (from May 5th to June 6th) in killed, i comiuissioned 
officer, 20 enlisted men; wounded, it commissioned officers, I2() 
enlisted men; missing. 24 enlisted men. Total loss, 185. 

Petersburg, ]'a., June nth to July 6th, 1864. Loss in killed, 
3 enlisted men ; wounded, 9 enlisted men ; missing, 2 enlisted 
men. Total loss. 14. 

Deep Bottom. Va., August 15th and i6th, 1864. Loss in 
killed, I enlisted man ; wounded, 6 enlisted men. Total loss, 7. 

Ream's Station, J 'a., August 25th, 1864. Loss in killed, 1 
commissioned officer, 4 enlisted men ; wounded, 4 commissioned 
officers, 14 enlisted men ; missing, 2 commissioned officers, 25 
enlisted men. Total loss, 50. 

Boydton Plank Road, J\i., October 27th, 1864. Loss in killed, 
I commissioned officer, i enlisted man; wounded, i commissione;! 
officer, 12 enlisted men ; missing, 4 enlisted men ; supposed prison- 
ers, 10 enlisted men. Total loss, 29. 



Summary. 



347 



Hatcher's Run. la.. I'chruary 51I1, 1865. T.oss in killed, i com- 
missioned officer: wounded. I commissioned officer. 4 enlisted 
men. Total loss. (). 

Hatcher's I\uii. I 'a.. .March 25th, 1865. Loss in wcninded, i 
commissioned officer, 5 enlisted men. Total loss. (>. 

High Bridge, la.. h'anii-:'illc. la., and Surrender of Lee's .Inux 
] a., from March 30th, to April 10th, 18^)5. Loss in wonnded, 1 
commissioned officer, 2 enlisted men. 'Total loss, 3. 



CASUALTIES. 
N-illed in action, . . . . . 

Died of wounds, . . . . . 

Died of disease, . . . . . 

Discharged prior to nnister-ont of reginient. 
Missing at muster-out of regiment. 



132 

65 

169 
416 

78S 






i/^iM rorOCO M i-H LOW Onio 
WW r^Tf o\t~,wi-iw 
w lo w w ro 


NO 


Unas- 
signed 
Recr'its 


M M 


N 


W 


00 • • 00 Tt- 


M U-) IT) O N 

H W CO 




- 


O M • N ro 
M . w U-) 


NO Tj- ON O 


NO 

M 


hH 1 fO • " ro 00 


r- lo '^ H N 

H MM 




C3 


M • •lOONWVOOLOONM lO 
w . . Tt W 1-1 N c«^ 


r- 00 N • vo ON 


N t^ ON r- N N 


w ■ ^ : : ^ s 


':^ NO 00 t-- (N 00 

w N N 


Q 


r- Tt w t^ 00 


O W NO M W 
N W Tf 


NO 
NO 


o 


O M M vo N 

l-H lO 


lO 00 O w CO 
N w N 


00 


M 1 :? - : - ^ 
1 


00 't N 00 
M fO 


NO 


< 


00 w • ^ J^ 


M ON O fO ^^ 
fO w N 


o 


Field 
and 
Staff. 




• • • w 


w _ (M ON , 


! 




X 

u 


Missing in action, probably killed, 
Deaths from accident, .... 
Fatallv wminderl 


a 

1 


c 

1 
'o 
o 

< 


1 

o: 


Died in prison, 

Died of disease, 

Discharged for disability, . . . 
Unaccounted for at muster-out, . 


"o 
C 

Cw 


i 



APPENDIX. 

Organization of the Society of the Fourteenth Connecticut Regiment. 

It is not surprising' that the men who had passed through the 
sufferings and experiences which these pages have attempted to 
record should feel a tenderness and sympathy for each other 
which did not bind them to average men. This bond, unsurpassed 
except by ties of kinshi]), served as a cord which united tbem in 
a subtile, but tangible interest and fellowship. It has been a 
boast of the American ])cople that its citizen soldiers, who had 
served their country in the struggle of war, fell ' 'ick into the 
peaceful relations of life as ice dissolves in the mellowing tem- 
perature of the streani. There were no exceptions to this in the 
returning members of the Fourteenth Regiment. After their 
honorable discharge, each sought his own place on the farm, in 
the store, in the workshop, in the counting room and in trade, 
each performing his own share in the avocations of peace and 
industry. This bond of sympathy and desire for association, 
however, still remained, and we are not siu^prised to find there 
was almost sinndtanously, with the close of the war, a desire 
for a closer association of the members of the regiment where 
these men could hold meetings, war (la}s and scenes c. uild be 
rehearsed and their experiences be recounted. 

To further this purpose an attempt w^as made to form a union 
of the commissioned officers of the regiment at New Haven on 
September 17, 1866, under the title of the Fourteenth Connecticut 
Regimental Union. This was followed by a meeting September 
17, 1867, at Xew London. This, bowever. was hardly democratic 
enough for the members (^f the Fourteenth who recognized a 
brotherhoo ' among the enlisted men as well as among the com- 
missioned officers. Conse(|uentl\-, at .Middletown, September 
17th, 1868, an organization was ])erfecle(l of the officers and en- 
listed men, the pur])ose of which was "to assist in keeping fresh 
(349) 



350 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

the memories and strengthen the ties of friendship formed dur- 
ing the years of service in the X'ohmteer Army of the United 
States." This association was to be bound together by a few 
by-laws, rather more in the interests of order than restriction. 
The constitution and l)y-laws adopted are recorded to show the 
scope and i)urpose of the organ' Tation. 

CONSTITUTION. 

Adopted Septeniher i/tli, iS86, and anioiidcd in 1893, iSQ?- iQO-^ and 1903. 
Whereas, 'I he inemhers of the Fonrteenth Regiment of Conneeticut 
Vohmteers, at a meeting held at the McDonough House, in the City of 
Middletown, State of Connecticut, on the seventeenth day of September, 
1868, resolved to form an organization, composed of the officers and en- 
listed men of said Regiment, for the purpose of perpetuating reminiscen- 
ces of the past, and the mutual interests of its members ; therefore in fur- 
therance of this object, we, the said members present at said meeting, 
hereby enact the following 

BY-LAWS. 

Sectitin i. The name of this organization shall be "The Society of 
the Fourteenth Connecticut Regiment." 

Section 2. The officers of this organization shall consist of a Presi- 
dent, two Vice-Presidents, a Secretary, (amended in 1903 by the addition 
oi an Assistant Secretary), a Treasurer, a Chaplain, (amended in 1902 
In the addition of an Assistant Chaplain), a Necrological Committee of 
two and an Executive Committee, consisting of the President, Vice- 
Presidents, Secretary and Treasurer. 

Section 3. The election of officers shall take place annually, at the 
time and place of holding the yearly meeting, commemorative of the first 
engagement of the Fourteenth Regiment, viz: September 17th. 

Section 4. Tlie place of meeting for each year shall be designated 
at the previous meeting, liy a vote of tlie organization. 

Section 5. The b'xecutive Committee shall arrange the programme 
of exercises, and transact all the necessary business preparatory for and 
ai the time of each annual meeting, and in emergencies shall have power 
to change the place and time of the annual meeting. 

Section 6. All members of the Fourteenth Regiment Connecticut 
Volunteers shall be eHgil)le to membership, who have received an hon- 
orable discharge from the service of the L^iited States (amended Sep- 
tember i6th., 1893, by adding 'Any son of a member or deceased member of 
this Society, or of any lionorably discharged meml)er of our regiment, 
who has attained the age of eighteen years, and is of good moral char- 



Appendix, 351 

acter, and of good standing in the connnunity where he resides, may be- 
come an Honorary Mcml)er of the Society, upon the recommendation of 
the Executive Committee, and the payment of the regular fees and dues 
of active members ; such honorary member to have the privilege of attend- 
ing the meetings of the Society, but not of voting on its strictly busi- 
ness matters.' Further amended, Sepember, 1897, but including 'wife 
or daughter' as eligible to honorary membership under the same limita- 
tions as 'sons'.) 

Section 7. Any person eligible, as per the preceding By-Law, who 
shall pay into the hands of the Treasurer of the organization the sum 
of fifty cents, shall be dcenied and declared a member (or honorary mem- 
ber) of the organization, sul)ject to the approval of the Executive Com- 
mittee. 

Section 8. Each member shall pay to the Treasurer the sum of fiftv 
cents, at the time of each annual meeting. The money so received shall 
be used toward defraying the expenses of said annual meeting. 

Section 9. These By-Laws may be altered or amended by a two- 
thirds vote of the members present at any annual meeting." 

The General As.senibly of Connecticut at the January Ses.sion, 
1886, passed a special act incorporating 

The Society of the Fourteenth Connecticut Regiment, which 
act was approved by His Excellency, Governor Henry B. Harri- 
son, February 19th, 1886. 

It seems fitting that the annual reunion should be fixed upon 
September 17th, the anniversary of the battle of Antictam, where 
the regiment had its iirst experience in battle. These meetings 
have usually been held in various cities and locaHties from which 
any number of members were enlisted, and have been character- 
ized by good feeling and comradeship. One of the features of the 
organization has been a necrological committee whose duty it has 
been to record biographical sketches of deceased members from 
year to year. While, as it has been intimated, these meetings have 
been characterized by close companionship and a recital of scenes 
and trials of their .service, there has been a shadow of sorrow as 
these records of departed comrades have been read from year to 
year; once it may be the beloved officer, at another time the 
genial man in the ranks, all brothers in the family of the 
Fourteenth. 

The minutes of these regimental reunions have been pul)lishe(l 



352 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

from year to year by its Recording Secretary, Comrade J. W. 
Knowlton, and a copy placed in the State Library at Hartford. 

While the business of these meetings may be said to have been 
largely of a routine character, there have been many pleasant and 
interesting incidents. At several of the meetings the old tattered 
flags of the regiment have been loaned by the state. 

In 1871, at Rockville, Governor jMarshall Jewell and staff were 
guests of the Society. 

In 1872, at Madison, Mrs. Willard, wife of Captain Willard, 
distributed copies of the last words of her husband. 

In 1873, at Waterbury, a daughter of Lieutenant Wadhams, 
(now Mrs. Ralph N. Blakeslee), was introduced by General 
Ellis and adopted as a daughter of the regiment. 

In 1878 titles were dropped when speaking or writing of the 
members of the regiment, excepting where allusions were made 
to deceased members. 

In 1879 the annual meeting was held in Hartford, which en- 
abled the society to take part in "llattle Flag Day," when the flags 
carried by the several Connecticut regiments were placed in 
permanent cases in the Capitol. At this meeting Major Hincks 
read a paper on the fortunes of the flag during the several en- 
gagements. 

In 1880 a protest was made against the promiscuous use of the 
trefoil, the badge of the Second Corps. 

In 1882 a movement was started for a monument at Gettys- 
burg. 

In 1883 the Society took part in the unveiling of the statue 
of Governor lUickingham in Hartford June i8th. 

In 1885, at Meriden, a beautiful state flag was presented from 
lad\- friends of the regiment by Miss M. B. Chase, daughter of 
Comrade Fred A. Chase, Corresponding Secretary. 

In 1887, at New Britain, steps were taken for the decoration 
of the graves on Southern battle-fields. Chaplain H. S. Stevens 
having for the most part charge of the work. At this Mieeting 
Lieutenant-Colonel Perkins' war-horse "Elizabeth" was led into 
and around the hall. Also a letter was received from Mrs. 
George E. Pickett, widow of General George E. Pickett, of the 



Appendix. 353 

fanidiis cliar^v at Clclt} sl)uri;-. wlio ])R'senU"(l to the Society a 

beautiful lloral souveuir of ])resse(l llowers aud ^Tasses picked 

upon the battle-tield of ( iettysburo-. Mrs. i'ickett wrote a.s fol- 
lows : — 

22 Grant Place. \\\asliington, D. C, September i;,lli, 1887. 
President of the Fourteentli. Connecticut Regimental Association, 

My dear Sir: — Through your kind courtesy 1 offer to the 'iMiurlecntii 
Connecticut Regimentc.1 A.ssociation, this little Souverir greeting which has 
naught to commend it beyond the fact that each Hower, and sprig of grass, 
was plucked from the sacred soil of Gettysburg's historic field by my own 
hands, and thus shaped as a Souvenir of the great day on which the 
bravest men on earth came together from the North and the South .n 
the fullness of their love and reconciliation, — meaning lo feel they were 
citizens of our free and glorious country, their own. 

The daisies of July, 1863, watered in blood in the shriek of war. — those 
of July, 1887, watered in tears in the peace of heaven. Mutually forgiv- 
ing hearts, hearts that live to vie in illustrating one cause. 

Then let us fore\er rely upon the truth of that holy declaration, "Pless- 
cd are the Peacemakers." 

Sincerely and faithfully yours, 

AfKS. George li. Piikett." 

In 1893, at Rockville, a departure wa.s made from the tistiai 
rule by admitting- lineal male descendants of members of the regi- 
ment to honorary membership in the Society. 

In 1894, at Savin Rock, Colonel Morris visited the Society 
and was very heartily received. This was a little over a week be- 
fore his death. Movements were also ptit on foot at this meet- 
in_G; ft)r the erection of a uK^nitment at Antietam. 

Tn 1897, 'It "Madison, dauo-hters and wives of the members of 
the rei;"imetit were admitted to honorary- membershii) to the So- 
ciety. 

In 1901. at Savin Rock, Benjamin Hirst, actiui;- as President, 
made an address on the experiences of the rej^iment at Antietam. 
At this meeting also there were touching addresses ui)on the 
assassination of President ^IcKinley. 

A pleasing feature of man\- of these meetings weri' congratttla- 
tory telegrams from Coimectictit and other regiments that might 
l)e holding their retmions on the same da\". 



354 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

DEDICATION OF THE MONUMENT AT GETTYSBURG. 

Allusion has been noted of the movement for a monument at 
Gettysburg at the meeting of the Society in 1882. This culmi- 
nated the following year in the dedication of a shaft located at 
the stone wall. We cannot do better than to copy the account 
of the excursion and dedicatory exercises as found in the min- 
utes of the Society. 

"On the morning of July ist, 1883, comrades and friends to 
the number of seventy-eight, left Jersey City at eight o'clock for 
Gettysburg, for the purpose of unveiling the monument erected 
by the regiment upon the field occupied during July 2d and 3d, 
1863. The party arrived at Gettysburg without mishap at six 
o'clock in the afternoon, and were met at the station by Cliaplain 
Stevens, and a delegation of the Seventeenth C. \'., and escorted 
to the ])ul)lic s(]uare. where they were received b}- man}- citizens 
and the line was dismissed. The next day Fourteenth men were 
found everywhere ; scattered over the whole field ; on foot, in 
carriages and on horseback. 

At eight o'clock in the evening a big camp-fire was lighted 
close to our monument, and speeches, songs and reminiscences 
filled the hours till well toward mitlnight. The place, the hour, 
the moonlight and above all, the memories, made this a notable 
epoch in the historv of the regiment. 

During the forenoon of jul_\- T^d the time was given over to 
continued rambles over the field, and at two o'clock line was 
formed and moved to the monument, accompanied by the Uattle 
Field Memorial Association, and a large number of citizens. 
When the line was halted in front of the monument every com- 
rade uncovered, and prayer was offered by Conn-ade J. E. Durand. 
'America' was sung by the whole assembly. The chairman of 
the Aronument Committee, Conn-ade John C. r)roatch, i^resented 
the monument to the Society. The President of the Society, 
Comrade Samuel A. Moore, then in a few well chosen words, 
surrendered the monument to the custody of the Rattle Field As- 
sociation. 

At this period in the exercises it was moved and voted that 
because of the intense heat the remaining exercises be held in 



Appendix. 355 

Zeigler's woods, a few rods to ihc iiordi. r])on rcacliiiij^- this 
refreshing; shelter, Cha])lain Stevens delivered an oration whieh 
received the deserved plaiuHts of all. 

A portion of Chaplain Stevens" address was as follows : — 

What a victory was that, my comrades ! 
"What an hour of g-lory for you! ^'our rilles were hot in y<iur 
hands from the fifty or more rounds sped from them in the death- 
dealino- -vay, Init your hearts were hotter with their overwhelm- 
inc: joy. Wounds, hunoer, home-longiny-, prospective hardships 
and "'.angers were k)st sight of in the supreme hour of your 
victorious rejoicing. Hut what a small band \du had become re- 
duced to. staiiding by this wall, now a heap of ruins I In munber 
scarcely equaling one maximum company of those ten maxinuim 
companies that entered the field ten months previously. What 
wonder that a sturdy prisoner as he stepped over xour wall and 
saw vour thin line inquired : "Where are your men ? and when told 
they were here, said: 'We could have gone through if we'd 
had another line of men." Then, taking another look, ex- 
claimed: 'My ( lod ! we could have gone through as it was if 
we had known how few you were!' and added regretfully, with 
an oath, as he went oil over the hill. 'I'd like to try that over 
again!' Well, the I'ourteenth would have been willing. ( (.'beers. ) 
Wdiat a jt)yous night was spent here, albeit the cries of the 
womided in their agonies far in \(iur front, smote your hearts 
with ])ain ! And what a glorious 'lnde])endence Day' dawned 
the next morning! 'Tis true. \ ou ai)i)rebended another attack 
and you rebuilt \our shattered wall, rather desinnis that it 
should come. lUit \-our foe was too wise: be bad received too 
bitter a lesson to be willing to re])eat his former attemiU. \ou 
tarried here until the 5th. during which (la\- some of xou were 
among the details to bury the slain and then you left Gettys- 
burg to return to it no more until now. I'.ut ( iettysburg has 
lived in your memories and conversation all these intervening 
vears. and now \-ou come to see it once more and bid it a final 
good-bye. ^'ou look once again on the tiekl and position that 
have been picturt'd in your memories, and the old thrill comes 
back to \-ou : and \()U will carry away that thrill with }(»u and 
keep it — aye, forever! 



356 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

You ])lace here, where you stood, by battle l)eg-irt, on Gettys- 
burg's glorious day, your historic and symboHc memorial, pur- 
chased largely by the contributions of you who are poor, and 
poor because you gave the best days and best strength to save 
your nation from disruption. Your stone is not mortuary, not 
sarcophagal, but historic, for this is not a cemetery ; it is not 
reared in honor alone of those who fell here or fought here, 
but to commemorate the regiment and its history as a whole. Its 
granite substance felt the shock of the battle which helped make 
a victory for the Union, and it will hold for you through ages, 
the position you held. Its upper base will give to passers-by 
your regimental designation, of which you can never be ashamed, 
and the command you were connected with. One of its tablets 
will tell, in epitome, your history, with your numbers, your 
losses and the great battles you fought in set forth ; and the 
other will tell what you did here on this world-renowned field. 
Its finial is the badge of the grand old corps with whose work 
and fortunes you were connected during all your army service — 
the symbolic trefoil which you so delight in still. Its polished 
sides will flash in view of passers on distant roads and here 
upon the line denominated, and so admitted by General Long- 
street, 'the high-water mark of the rebellion" will help indicate 
where the highest, mightiest surge of the slave-holders" re- 
bellion was shattered and overcome at the stem front of the 
Second Army Corps, and the legends on your shaft will show 
that you, my comrades, men of the Fourteenth Connecticut, were 
a part of the living bulwark that broke it.'" 

At its close' Rally Round the Flag' was sung with more than 
usual feeling. 

Hon. David H. Buehler, President of the Battle Field Asso- 
ciation, accepted the monument on the part of the Association, 
and in doing so paid a very high tribute to the valor and the 
soldierly record of the Fourteenth, particularly mentioning the 
capture of the Bliss buildings, which he characterized as one of, 
if not the, most brilliant episodes of the three days' battle. He 
was followed by Colonel John B. Bachelder, Government His- 
torian of the battle, who, in words that made every Fourteenth 



Appendix. 357 

man more proud tlian ever of his regiment, placed our record 
high up among the l)est of the arm}-. 

WilHam Haines, of the Twelfth New Jersey, after a warm 
tribute to the Fourteenth, extended an invitation for all to 
join with that regiment in a like dedication next year. 

.\,fter remarks by Cc^nn'ades Dwight Morris and rienjamin 
Hirst, and singing 'Auld Lang Syne,' the benediction was pro- 
nounced by Conn-ade J. E. Durand. 

The big pipe was then brought into use and passed from com- 
rade to comrade. Photographs of the scene were taken and 
sociality reigned until the time came when we must depart to 
reach our special train for home." 

In 1885 the Society secured an acre of the (lettysburg field 
which embraced the site of the IJliss buildings, the boundaries 
of this plot afterwards being marked by stone posts with cut 
tops, having the inscription '■14th C. \'." There was erected 
at the center of the barn site a monumental marker. "This is 
of granite, rustic dressed, three feet high, three feet wide and 
sixteen inches thick, standing on a cut granite base eleven inches 
high, the whole resting on an artificial, circular, turfed mound, 
thirteen feet in diameter and two feet high. The front of the 
marker has a circular sunken medallion containing our corps 
badge in relief, and the back an oval medallion with '14th C. V.' 
in large incised letters. The top is beveled, the front bevel 
furnishing a large polished tablet having inscription as follows: 
The 14th Regiment Connecticut \"ols., A. M. July 3, 1863, 
ca])tured here from Confederate Sharp-Shooters the large barn 
of William lUiss and his Dwelling House near, and upon re- 
tiring burned both buildings by order of the Div. Commander. 
Centre of I')arn site.' " 

A pillar also was erected to mark the extreme right of the 
regiment on the ridge, having on its cut be\eled lop and front 
the inscription, '■14th, C. \'. Right of Regt.. July _', 3 ..K: 4, i8r)3." 

Later Conn-ade J. W. Kninvlton contriliuted a niarker to 
designate the site of the lUiss house, ddie establishment of 
these markers and the erection of the monument at the stone wall 
were largely initiator\ in the erection of momiments and gave an 



358 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

impetus to the erection of moiuiments by Connecticut and other 
regiments. Other regiments were allowed under certain condi- 
tions to erect monuments on the ground owned bv the vSociety 
of the Fourteenth Connecticut Regiment. 

A TRIP TO THE BATTLE-FIELD. 

It was natural that the regiment should hold one of its annual 
reunions on the battle-field of Antietam. Through the instru- 
mentality of efficient committees, arrangements were made for 
this excursion and reunion September 17, 1891, and about three 
hundred and thirty left Jersey City September 14th. The 
weather was all that could be desired and the party full of antici- 
pation and joy sped across New Jersey and Pennsylvania, stop- 
ping first at Gettysburg. Here a day was spent rambling over 
the historic battle-field, parties being conducted by competent 
guides and many smaller parties wandered at will over the 
memoraljle scenes. 

( )n the morning of the i^th the party left Gettysburg and 
reached Antietam at half past four in the afternoon. The mem- 
bers of the delegation were lodged at various farm houses and 
in Sharpsburg. Arrangements for their conveyance had been 
carefully made. The headquarters of the President and Secre- 
tary were appropriately located at the Roulette house so full of 
memories of the day of action twenty-nine years before. The 
regimental fiag was planted, indicating that the regiment had 
come for the purposes of its reunion. As darkness approached 
a huge camp-fire was kindled near the bank of P)loody Lane 
where by speech and song hours sped on till midnight. Fervent 
and patriotic addresses were made by Comrades Seward, Moore, 
Knowlton, Stevens, Lyman, Fletcher and Davis and Congress- 
man Russell and State Senator Coffin. The occasion attracted 
a large gathering of neighboring people wdio were impressed 
with the weirdly fascinating scene. The following day the re- 
union was held at the Roulette house. The meeting was one of 
great impressiveness hallowed by the remembrances of their ex- 
perience in 1862. 



Appendi 



359 



The f()ll()\viii^- nioniiiii;- ilie i)arty visited Harper's l"\'rry after 
which the}- took trains, some returning- to tlieir homes, some 
visiting Washington while others made a more extended tour 
among the hattle-tields of lesser moment, ahout two hundred 
visiting the ill-fated tield of JM-ederickshurg. 



-r- 



?^- ';; ■ — :;r - ' i :i! i!}j ' 



IBH amam fpir 

i i i i ""TT 
u 'EI' 




Many of the excursionists paid their respects to the President at the White House. 



THE MONUMENT AT ANTIETAM. 

Taking advantage of an act of the Asseml)ly of the State of 
Connecticut ap])ropriating- a thousand dollars to an\- regiment or 
batterv that desired to erect a momunent on the hattle held of 
Antietam, a committee was chosen in iS()3 to fully realize' this 
action for the henelit of the regiment and after much discussion 
a design for a monument was selected, the stxle being an obelisk. 
The dimensions of the monument are as follows: — "'Idle base six 
feet three inches scpuire b\ t\\-o feet high, second stone three feet 
seven inches S(|uare b\- one foot four inches high. The shall one 
solid stone hfteen feet live inches high, two feet ten inche< al the 



360 



Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 




le name of Washington at 



Ixjttom reccdino- to a point at the top. The monument having- 
a total height of eighteen feet nine inehes al)ove its foundation. 
The inscriptions are as follows : — 

"Front — (Corps Badge.) 

The Fourteenth Connecticut X'ohmteer Infantry, 2d Brig., 3d 
Div. 2(1 A. C, advanced to this ])()int in a charge, about 9:30 A. 
AI., Sept. 17th, 1862, then fell back eighty-eight >ards to a corn- 
field fence and held position heavily engaged nearly two hours ; 
then was sent to the support of the First Brigade of its Division 
at the Roulette Lane. 2 hours ; then was sent to the extreme left 
of the First Division of this Cori)s, to the support oi the Bvooke's 
Brigade, and at 5 P. \l. was placed in support ])et\vt,^en the Bri- 
gades of Caldwell and Aleagher of that Division, overlooking 
'Bloody Lane', holding position there untH. 10 A. M of the 19th, 
when relieved. 

Rear — (Connecticut Coat of Arms.) 

Erected by the State of Connecticut, 1894. 

Right Side. 



Appendix. 361 

This monunu'iit stands on llie line of Conipanios 11. and (j., 
near the left of the Rei^inieiit. In ihis hattle the Res^ipient lest 
38 killed and mortally wounded. SS \vonn(le('.. and .11 reported 
missing. 

Left Side — {V. S. in eircle.) 

Regiment mustered August 23, hSAj. with I(.l5 r.-en ; recruits, 
(v.)'/ men; total. 1712. T.attle record from Antietam to Appo- 
mattox : engagements, 34 ; killed and mortally wounded, 202 ; died 
of disease, 186; wounded, 579; discharged for disability, 319." 

The plot, which is twenty feet by twenty, was purchased and 
contributed to the Society by Captain A. Park Hammond. 

ft was decided to dedicate this monument Thursday, October 
nth, 1895. antl to that end arrangements were made for an excur- 
sion upon this date. Also the Eighth Regiment Association, 
Eleventh and the Sixteenth Connecticut X'ohmteers arranged to 
dedicate monuments on the Antietam tield on the same day. A 
party of nearly three hundred left Jersey City on Monday, Octo- 
ber 8th, for the purpose of dedicating these monuments erected by 
the State of Connecticut. The route took in Gettysburg where 
the party arrived about half past eight in the evening. The next 
day, Tuesday, was spent in visiting the memorable battle-field 
and on Wednesday at one o'clock a special train started for An- 
tietam, arriving at Sharpsburg about five o'clock. 

Thursday morning at ten o'clock the services of dedication were 
held, at which a large number of villagers were [)resent. The 
programme for the dedicatory services was simple and impres- 
sive. It consisted of 

Music Sharpsburg Band. 

Prayer Rev. Walter J. Yates. 

\'ocal Music — "Flag of Freedom", Male Choir. 

Address J. W. Knowlton. 

\'ocal .Music — '"America", "Doxology" Male Choir. 

Address, Chai)lain II. S. Stevens. 



362 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

COMRADE KNOWLTON'S ADDRESS. 

Comrade Knowlton spoke as follows: 
"Comrades and Friends : — 

On this consecrated field, hallowed by the sacrifice of blood and 
human life there was enacted the tragedy of war. 

Thirty-two years ago, opposing factions hereon submitted the 
question of nationality, as against tlie right of secession, to the 
arbitration of the sword. 




J. W. KNOWLTON, Q. M. S. 

This peaceful field, those billowy tracts, heard the clash of arms, 
felt the tread of near 200,000 men, and the absorbing soil drank 
the red blood of one out of every eight of that vast host. 

Well may this be called a consecrated field, with such a bap- 
tism from the font of life. 

With reverent hearts we gather here to manifest our gratitude 
to the living actors of that day, and to mingle our tears with our 



Appendix. 363 

praises of the dead, wlio. l)y the saeritiee of their Hves. (hd all 
men could to brinj^- the heritag-e of peace and unity. We are 
here to mark the s])()t where the h\)urteenth rei^iment, an un- 
(Irilled body of i.ooo Connecticut soldiers, hut thret' weeks frmn 
their firesides, met first the foe. and met them bravely. To this 
spot thev came. — ai>"ainst a bitter storm of lead and shell that 
poured from yonder sunken road, and the hill beyond, as well 
as from either flank, — a lurid storm that mortals could noi breast 
and live. Death and wounds were in their midst, but those men 
endured them both mUil directed to a new ])()siti()n less than three 
Inmdred feet awaw ( )n this new line the\- settletl .down to work, 
as thoui^h expectinm' there to staw and there for o\er two hours 
they did stay, with the whiz of l)ullets and the crash of shell their 
constant visitants. 

r shall not. in my brief talk, describe in detail the several move- 
ments of the day, but will leave that interesting' story to another. 
onl\- (jUotiui;' from the report of the division commander, (, ieneral 
b^rench, in wdiich he says: "'riie conduct of the new regiments 
must take a prominent ])lace in the history of this great battle. 
Undrilled, but admirably e(|uipped, every regiment, either in 
advance or reserve, distinguished itself, but according to the 
energv and abilit\()f the conunanders. . . . There 

never was such material in any army, and in one month these 
splendi<l men will not be excelled by any.' The truth of the 
general's prophecy is shown in the Fourteenth's record (~>f thirty- 
four battles, from Antietam to Ai)pomattox, as inscribed on this 
noble memorial erected by the State of ConnecticiU to the regi- 
ment. 

These tons of granite, wrought in graceful lines, with mar- 
velous skill, will stand through the varying vicissitudes of storm 
and sunshine, telling the grim story to men of every clime, — and 
methinks. that the warm light of every September moon will 
awaken in this Xew I'jigland stone, a soul, that will go out and 
testify to the unmarked dead, o'er all these fields, that a grateful 
])eople has not forgotten and never will forget the sutTermgs or 
the valor of those who stood 1)_\ the I'nion in those days. It will 
tell them of the myriad schools throughout the land, wher.- daily, 



364 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

the stars and strips now float, and teach a noble fealty to the 
nation, instilling a patriotic glow into the youthful mind. It will 
tell the unknown dead, were their forms clad in the blue or in 
the gray, that loyalty will never be forgotten or disloyalty for- 
given. Let us all believe that to this story answer will come from 
all the moonlit September air, a glad Amen ! So glad, and so full, 
that through the North, and through the South, there will be no 
doubt that the blood of brothers, shed in strife, has become a 
lasting seal to national unity. 

Comrades, to you who stood here in that past time, and bared 
your breasts in your country's defense, this moment is one of com- 
mendable pride. To the people of our state you were, and are, 
an honor — ^in testimony of which, this shaft stands an enduring 
emblem — symmetrical, as your manly qualities ; firm, as was your 
fidelity to your country; and its solidity is a fit symbol of your 
unswerving loyalty. And not alone with you. Comrades, lies all 
the pride of this day, for the bcaniing eyes of your friends here 
])resent, tell that they, too, are filled with joy that they are with 
you in this grand hour when a visible testimonial to your great- 
ness is dedicated on this field. These friends have been with 
you on the great battle ground at (iettysburg, where your prow- 
ess carved a special line on the monument of fame — a line cut 
in great letters high up on the pillar — letters so great and Imes so 
high, that, for all time, the world will not cease to give you 
glad acclaim ! 

So, the two fields of honor that they know, Gettysburg and 
Antietam, fill them with wonder that mortals could brave, endure 
and do so much — but, could the_\' l)e led to Fredericksburg, that 
slaughter place ; to Chancellorsville, to Morton's Ford, that spot 
unknown to fame, where one-third of your number were killed 
or wounded — to all the other of your thirty-four engagements, to 
their wonder would be added veneration ! 

A fragment of the regiment is here this day, surrounded by 
brave comrades of other regiments, who in their turn sufifered 
privation, pain and discouragements — and, in the end had, with 
vou, the great jov that came with victory. W'ith you. they bore 
their part, though separate on this and other fields, and with 



Appendix. 365 

you thev to-dav are citizens of a common state, applying" them- 
selves to the civic duties that are their part, with the same obed- 
ience and fortitude that all exhihited a third of a centurv ago. 

In those days there were none who could tell of what would 
come when the citizens who had become soldiers came back to 
citizenship again. The whole world was in dread of the lawless 
hordes that would swarm from hamlet to haiulet, and from the 
lonely wayside cottag'c to the village mansion, when the ranks 
were broken, and the restraints of military law were no longer 
potent. The subject occupied the thoug:ht and excited the ap- 
prehension of people of every continent. Few indeed, in our 
Republic were there, but felt that when the last si^ldier was nnis- 
tered out. and cast idle on the land, dire trouble would ensue. 
But, thanks to the quality of manhood of which the soldiery was 
composed, the whole military contingent (|uietly assimilated, with 
not a ripple to disturb the body politic. 

This meuKM-ial is placed here by a grateful jieople. not alone 
AS a record of a regiment that had unusual service, biU also as 
a tribute to your fealty to the nation, before, during and since 
the war of the Rebellion. Tt s]x^aks for the living as well as for 
the dead. Erected to those brave men who died just here, and 
to those who have died in peaceful homes on the hillsides of Con- 
necticut ; erected to those who now toil in the fields and in the 
shops, and to him who died full of years and honors but a few 
days since. It stands for the tears and anxieties of mother and 
of wife, who all those long- months suffered by the beartlistones 
in New England — and this firm granite is no more fixed than 
were the hard furrows that seamed the determined faces of the 
fathers whose sons were offered on the altar of the country. It 
stands in strength and dignity, telling that restless and an;bitious 
plotters were once met and brought to the knowledge that we are 
a nation. 

Yea. it tells at present, and will tell the future disturber of our 
peace, that all over this broad land, sturdy, loval men will, as 
before, ([uickly respon.l to their country's call, and like you, be- 
come heroes in a day. 

That coming generations may be led to venerate the l1ag", and 



366 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

incited to deeds of valor in its defense, we dedicate this monu- 
ment to the Fourteenth Connecticut Vokmteers." 

Chaplain Stevens' address was not delivered from manuscript, 
and no verbatim report was taken at the time. Standing on the 
platform the Chaplain requested the people to place themselves 
so as to get a clear view of the field in which the monument stands. 
He then pointed out the East Woods where the regiment formed 
in line of battle, the Mumma buildings. Roulette house and barn, 
Dunker church, position of batteries and "Bloody Lane." He 
then described in thrilling words the advance of the regiment 
through the cornfield, and its withdrawal to the Roulette house. 
Then proceeding down "Bloody Lane" various items of interest 
were related and the whole company stood on a knoll which, on 
the day of the battle was the noted "ploughed ground". On a 
jiile of cornstalks for a rostrum, he pointed out to eager eves the 
headquarters of McClellan, and near at hand traced the position 
of various bodies of troops, the monument of the l'^)urteenth, and 
related their experience in their most exposed position, and their 
subsequent change to the support of a battery further toward the 
I'nion left. Incidents and observations by several of the veter- 
ans, questions by many of the company answered by the Chaplain, 
all lent a deep interest to this part of the program, which was as 
valuable as it was unique. 

Tn the evening a meeting was held in the Reformed Church at 
Shar])s]nu-g which was filled to the doors with exciu-si(~)nists and 
citizens to enjoy a "camp-fire". Comrade J. W. Knowlton pre- 
sided and speeches were made by several of the veterans, inter- 
spersed with music and recitations. 

Friday at one o'clock the train bore the ])artv to Washington by 
way of Harper's h\M-ry, arriving at Washington at five o'clock 
where the company dispersed, some going to Fredericksburg, 
others to Petersburg, while others spent a day at Stony Mountain, 
crossing the Rapidan at ^Morton's Ford and dining with Major 
C. C. Buckner and family, renewing the acquaintances formed in 
1 89 1, and enjoying an ideal \lrginia home. Later the visiting 
delegation of the I^^mrteenth Regiment to Major Buckner pre- 
sented him with a ])eautiful clock as a token of their regard and 
appreciation for his hospitality and kindness. 



LIST OF BREVETS 

Conferred upon Officers and Soldiers of the Fourteenth Regiment. 

AppointiiK'Hts l)y brevet in the I-'oiirteenth Regiment C. V, in- 
fantry which served in the war for the suppressing of tlie re- 
belHon made l)y the President by and with the advice and con- 
sent of the Senate. 

To be Brigadier-Generals by Brevet : 

Brevet-Col. James B. Coit, :\Iajor 14th Conn. Vols., for gallant 
;ind meritorious services at the battle of the Wilderness, Ya., to 
date from March I3di, 1865. 

Col. Theodore G. l^llis, of the 14th Conn. A'ols., for gallant 
and meritorious services during the war. to date from Match 
13th. 1865. 

To be Colonels by B)revet : 

Brevet Lieut-Col. John C P.roatch. ^Lajor of the 14th Conn. 
Vols., for gallant and meritorious services at the battle of ''.ryd- 
ton Plank Road, near Petersburg. \'a.. to date from ^larc!'. i.^Ui. 
1865. 

Brevet Lieut. -Col. James P.. Coit, :\Lajor of the 14th Conn. 
A'ols.. for gallant and meritorious services at the battle of Gettys- 
burg, Pa., to date from March 13th, 1865. 

To be Lieutenant-(/olonels b\ lirevet: 

Major John C. Broatch, of the J4th Conn. \'ols., for gallant and 
meritorious services at the engagement at Morton's Ford, on the 
Rapidan, \'a., to date from March 13th, 1865. 

Major James B. Coit, of the 14th Conn. \ols.. for gallant and 
meritorious services at the battle of Antietam, Mil., to tlate from 
IMarch 13th, 1865. 



(367) 



THE FOURTEENTH REGIMENT BAND. 

Frequent mention has been made in the foregoing pages of 
the band of the regiment. The band was held in high esteem 
not only by the comrades of its own regiment but also by the 
members of all of the regiments of the brigade and corps. It 
was made up of tiien of no mean attainments as musicians, 
more than one being leaders of local bands at the time of their 
enlistments, and very many of the "principle musicians" had 
won enviable reputations for musical talents in local organiza- 
tions. It has been noted the many places where the band im- 
parted courage and inspiration in times of conflict and upon the 
long tedious marches It has been recorded of its part in the 
solemn Sunday service after the battle of Antietam, of its 
timely notes when the regiment and corps forded the river at 
Harper's Ferry, of its bursting into an exhuberance of joy 
when reaching Fredericksburg, its heroism and bravery dur- 
ing the pandemonium that reigned at Chancellorsville during 
the stampede of the nth corps, of its inspiring concerts at 
Cedar and Elkrun, and the part it played at the receptions and 
occasions of hilarity when the regiment was encamped within 
the shadow or Stony Mountain. 

Soon after the organization of the regiment the proposition 
was made to Colonel Morris to organize a band for service 
with the regiment. Colonel Morris not only assented but gen- 
erously offered to furnish instruments to those who had none. 
Comrade John McCarthy was placed in charge of the organi- 
zation of the band, who immediately called about him those 
who finally constituted the musical organization. The origi- 
nal sixteen members of the band were as follows : 

Leader and Chief Musician — John McCarthy. 

E Flat Cornets — Charles B. Merrells, Lewis Senglaub. 

B Flat Cornets— George Kurtz, Fred Kurtz. 

(368) 



TTie Fourteenth Regiment Band. 



369 



Alto Horns— William (). Gilford, Nathan Stowe. 

Tenor Horns — Reuben G. Snagg, Nelson L. Stowe. 

Baritone — John Lines. 

B Flat Bass — Franklin wSomers. 

E Flat Bass — Benjamin Parkhurst. 

Snare Drum — Seth D. Hungerford. 

Bass Drum — James L. Jordon. 

Cymbals and Fife Major — Philo P. Bush. 

John McCarthy resigned and was discharged Jan. 29, 1863. 

About this time by order of the War Department the bands 
connected with the Army of the Potomac were abolished. 
This was but temporary, however, as they were re-established 
after an interval of four months, when Charles B. Merrells was 
made leader, and the band continued to do valuable service to 
the end of the war. 




H 



HI . 

ai I 



< 



u 



z 

S3 


< 


Z 

< 


w 
c/2 


^^ 


> 




1 


Of 


U 


H 


-^ 


UJI 






cjO 


Qc:i 




P 


Q 


ii 


2 


( ; 




g 


'-' 


rri 




ai 


s 


-7 


o 



o s 

O 5 



o 



d 
O 


la 


c 

o 
W 


t- (^ ro (TJ HH r-MD vo CO O 


1 


> 

W 

!^ 


o 

1 



u 

s 
s 

q 

o 

Q 

Q 


3 

o 


..... 

« CO VO -t 0^ vovO N CO M M 1 M 
Mi-iMM)-HMMM(NN On 

1 1 


6 

1 

O 




1^ CO O 't ON u^-O hH CO M N 

„„C)WWMMI-H(NM 


CN 


o 








1 

! 

o 

Q 
W 

Q 

C 

z 

w 
►J 

J 

5 






o 






00 

00 




E 


•MMi-H -rONN^MN 




£2 
S 

o 


I i 
I 




o 


Q 

3 


oQ •< pq ci a" w &; o^ ffi hh' m^ 

feu 



(370) 



-> r-^.9. 



ri o 

g-^ 



bjT) O TO O 



5;:; 2 ^ 0) 03 >.-j- 
O Q 0) 0) o ™ 

^ o Ph Q p^ m ffi 



u-)0 ^ u-5 ro O " O 



03 - 



IS ns i: .-^ Pu -S -^ ^ 






bi3 



« 'C; 'a> -S ^ C C .^ 



<; &H 'o o :p :§ 



2^ ^* i- ^ ^ ^ -O 



'/-)^ -*-'!-j_io3Cfl-t-'ti--'-'-' 

§a §§-g £•§§-■— £.2 

^ ^ ,S "^ I -^ a; ^ ^ ^ :s ^ 's -s 

^ ^-g^ 03 g- g g-SQ ^ S C 



OJ oi 






1^ 10 



^;=: > -t^ ^ c b^-j- ^ £ -^ ^ ^ 

'^ ^ ^Sh c« ^ -^ ^ C O o .<u ^2 oj 
aja)72fe^fj^^^^^-<rtb/D 

::.o^y^o^p^b*'^-^^^c 

? o -S -p S 

^ 00 03 C g c ti^'j; 






03 ^ -^ 
^ o ?. 



O bJO 



fl 4: <u v^ 



o S * s -f, = i S = c i'--^- - 



CJ (D 






<U ^ C 



W 03 



!-, O =0 ^ '^ •'-' fc ■ J - ^ 

T-T C I? 









(371) 




AI,BERT F. HAU,, 
Meriden, Conn. 



JOHN McCarthy, 

New Haven, Conn. 



History Committee of the Society of the Fourteenth Regiment, 1905-06. 



(372) 



OFFICIAL ROSTER 

OF THE 

Fourteenth Regiment C. V. Infantry. 

Published by the Adjutant-General of Connecticut, 1889. 



FIELD AND STAFF. 

DwiGHT Morris, Bridgeport, colonel, enlisted ]\Iay 23, 1862; mustered 
IV August 23, 1862; discharged on account of disabilit,v August 14, 1863. 

Theodore G. Ellis, Hartford, colonel, enlisted June 18, 1862; mustered 
in August 23, 1862, as adjutant; promoted from adjutant to major April 
4, 1863; to lieutenant-colonel September 22, 1863; to colonel October 11, 
1863; to brigadier-general by brevet March 13, 1865; mustered out with 
regiment May 31, 1865. 

S.\NF0RD H. Perkins, Torrington, lieutenant-colonel, enlisted May 23, 
t86i, mustered in August 2^, 1862; promoted from captain Co. I ist, C. V. 
n. A. to major June 7, 1862 (not mustered) ; to lieutenant-colonel August 
4, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va. ; discharged on 
account of disability April 20, 1863. 

Samuel A. Moore, New Britain, lieutenant-colonel, enlisted July 16, 
1862, mustered in August 23. 1S62; promoted from captain Co. F. to ma- 
jor September 22, 1863; to lieutenant-colonel October 11, 1863; wounded 
May 12, 1864, Spottsylvania, Va.. wounded April 6, 1865, Farmville, Va. ; 
discharged June 6, 1865. 

Cyrus C. Clark, Middletown, major, enlisted May 22, 1861, mustered in 
August 23, 1862; promoted from captain Co. H. ist C. V. II. A. August 
23, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg. Va. ; discharged on 
account of disability February 28. 1863; appointed major and P. M. l^. S. 
Vols. February 28, 1863; discharged November i, 1S65. 

James B. Coit, Norwich, major, enlisted May 26, 1862, nmstercd in Au- 
gust 20, 1862; (See sergeant-major 2d C. V.) promoted from captain Co. K 
October it, 1863; wounded h'ebniary (k 1864. Morton's Ford, Va., woinid- 
ed May 6, 1864. Wilderness, \'a., wouiidd .\ugust \(k 1864. Deep Bottom. 
Va., wounded September 6, 1864, IVlersburg, Va. : discharged on account 
of disability September 9, 1S64; promoted lieiUenant-colonel by brevet 
March 13, 1805: colonel by brevet March 13. 1865: brigadier-general by 
brevet March 13, i8()5. 

Note— This Ro.ster has been carefully compared with llie Otlicial Roster published 
by the Adjvitant-General of Connecticut in iSSg. 
(373) 



374 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

John C. Broatch. Middletown, major, enlisted July 31, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; (See private Co. A, 2d C. V.) promoted from captain 
Co. A October 22, 1864; wounded October zy, 1864, Boydton Plank Road, 
Va. ; discharged on account of disability February 4, 1865 ; promoted lieu- 
tenant-colonel by brevet March 13, 1865; colonel by brevet March 13, 1865. 

Frederick B. Doten, Bridgeport, adjutant, enlisted August i, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; promoted from ist lieutenant Co. F April 14, 
1863 ; captain Co. F October 20, 1863. 

William B. Hinks, Bridgeport, adjutant, enlisted July 22^ 1862, muster- 
ed in August 20, 1862; promoted from sergeant-major October 20, 1863; ma- 
jor April I, 1865 (not mustered) ; mustered out with regiment May 31, 
1865. 

Charles F. Dibble, New Haven, quartermaster, enlisted June 4, 1862, 
mustered in August 22,, 1862; mustered out with regment May 31, 1865. 

Philo G. Rockwell, Waterbury, surgeon, enlisted July 10, 1862; mus- 
terd in August 23, 1862 ; discharged on account of disability March 8, 1863. 

Frederick A. Dudley, New Haven, surgeon, enlisted August 11, 1862; 
mustered in August 2^, 1862; (See hospital steward 7th C. V.) ; mustered 
assistant surgeon; promoted April 2, 1863; wounded and captured July 3, 
1863, Gettysburg, Pa. ; paroled January 14, 1865 ; mustered out with regi- 
ment May 31, 1865. 

Levi Jewett, Windsor Locks, assistant surgeon, enlisted July 14, 1862, 
mustered in August 23, 1862; wounded August 25, 1864, Ream's Station, 
Va. ; discharged on account of disability January 4, 1865. 

Charles Tomlinson, New Haven, assistant surgeon, enlisted August 3, 
1863, mustered in September 26, 1863 ; discharged June 5, 1865. 

Henry S. Stevens, Cromwell, chaplain, enlisted August 21, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; discharged December 22, 1863. 

Emmons P. Bond, New Britain, chaplain, enlisted October 15, 1864, mus- 
tered in November 13, 1864; discharged April 26, 1865. 

NON-COMMTSSIONED STAFF. 

Henry P. Goodard, Norwich, sergeant-major, enlisted June 11, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; promoted 2d lieutenant Co. G August 20, 
1862. 

John G. Pelton, Middletown, sergeant-major, enlisted August 4, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; promoted from sergeant Co. B September 
17, 1862; 2d lieutenant Co. E March 7, 1863. 

James J. Gilbert, Waterbury, sergeant-major, enlisted July 24, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862 ; promoted from sergeant Co. C l-'ebruary 4, 
1863; dropped from rolls by error April 15, 1863; discharged on account 
of disability January 19, 1864. 

Henry L. Snagg, Waterbury, sergeant-major, enlisted August 4, 1862, 



Official Roster. 375 

mustered in August 20. 1862; promoted from sergeant Co. C April 15, 1863; 
1st lieutenant Co. H September i, 186,3. 

William B. Hincks, Bridgeport, sergeant-major, enlisted July 22, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; promoted from sergeant Co. A June 16, 
1863; adjutant October 20, 1863. 

WiLLi.\M MuRDocK, Middlctowu, sergeant-major, enlisted August 4, 
1862, mustered in August 20, 1862; promoted from sergeant Co. B Octoljcr 
20, 1863 ; 2d lieutenant Co. A March 28, 1864. 

Ir.\ a. Grah.vm, Durham, sergeant-major, enlisted August 6, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; promoted from sergeant Co. B March 26, 1864; 
2d lieutenant Co. H July 27, 1864. 

Charles E. Penhallow, New London, sergeant-major, enlisted July 11, 
1862, mustered in August 23, 1862; promoted from 1st sergeant Co. H July 
27, 1864; 2d lieutenant Co. D January 13, 1865. 

Charles M. Austin. iNIiddletown, sergeant-major, enlisted June 16. 
1862, mustered in August 20, 1862; promoted from ist sergeant Co. K 
January 13, 1865; mustered out wtth regiment May 31, 1865. 

William A. Comes, New Haven, quartermaster-sergeant, enlisted June 
12, 1862, mustered in August 23, 1862; promoted 2d lieutenant Co. F Sep- 
tember 17, 1862. 

John W. Post, New Britain, quartermaster-sergeant, enlisted July 19, 
1862, mustered in August 23, 1862; promoted from sergeant Co. F Septem- 
ber 17, 1862; died November i, 1862. 

Frederick S. Seymour, New Britain, quartermaster-sergeant, enlisted 
July 17, 1862, mustered in August 23, 1862; promoted from sergeant Co. F 
November 13, 1862; ist lieutenant Co. I June 3, 1863. 

Russell L. Perkins, New Britain, quartermaster-sergeant, enlisted Au- 
gust 14, 1862, mustered in August 23, 1862; promoted from private Co. F 
June 4, 1863; mustered out with regiment May 31, 1865. 

Julius W. Knowlton, Bridgeport, commissary-sergeant, enlisted June 
24, 1862, mustered in August 23, 1862; wounded July 3, 1863, Gettysburg, 
Pa.; promoted 2d lieutenant Co. C January 11, 1864. 

Samuel D. Cruttenden, Guilford, commissary-sergeant, enlisted Au- 
gust 7, 1862, mustered in August 2;}, 1862; promoted from private Co. I 
June 4, 1863; mustered out with regiment May 31, 1865. 

.\lfreu G. Mollan, Bridgeport, hospital steward, enlisted July 24. 1862, 
mustered in .August 2^, 1862; (See private Co. T. 6th C. V.) died Novem- 
ber 25, 1862. 

Wilbur W. John.son, Middletown, hospital steward, enlisted .\ugust 5, 
1862, mustered in August 20, 1862; prompted from private Co. 15 January 
I, 1863; mustered out with regiment May 31, 1865. 

John McCarthv, Ni'w lla\<.-n, iirim-iii.-il inusici.-ni. enlisted Jiuie _>5. 1862, 
mustered in August 23, iSdj; pn.inoinl 21I lieutenant Co. B December 13. 
1862, (not nnistered) ; discharged J.muary 29, 1863. 



376 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Philo p. Bi'SH, New Haven, principal musician, enlisted June 14. 1862, 
mustered in August 2^, 1862 ; discharged on acccnuit of disability February 
4. 1863. 

Charles B. Merrills, Waterbury, principal musician, enlisted August 
13, 1862, mustered in August 20, 1862; promoted from Private Co. C May 
I, 1863; reduced to ranks and transferred to Co. C April 25, 1864. 

Louis Senglaub, Waterbury, principal musician, enlisted August 8, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862 ; promoted from private Co. B May i 1863 ; 
mustered out with regiment May 31, 1865. 

George Kurtz, Waterbury, principal musician, enlisted August 19, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; promoted from private Co. E April 22, 1864; 
mustered out with regiment May 31, 1865. 

COMPANY A. 

James D. Merritt, Bridgeport, captain, enlisted August 18, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; resigned December 20, 1862. 

John C. Broatch, Middletown, captain, enlisted July 31, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; promoted from ist lieutenant Co. B January i, 1863; 
wounded February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, Va. ; promoted major October 
22, 1864. 

William Murdock, Middletown, captain, enlisted August 4, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; promoted from sergeant-major to 2d lieu- 
tenant March 28, 1864; wounded May 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va. ; promoted 
1st lieutenant July 5, 1864; captain February 14. 1865; mustered out with 
company May 31, 1865. 

George N. Morehouse, Bridgeport, ist lieutenant, enlisted August 12, 
1862, mustered in August 20, 1862; resigned December 5, 1862. 

Walter M. Lucas, Middletown, 1st lieutenant, enlisted July 31, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; promoted from 2(1 lieutenant Co. B August 
20, 1862; captain Co. D June 5. 1863. 

George C. Rii-ley, Norwich, ist lieutenant, enlisted December 22, 1862, 
(not mustered) ; commissioned December 22. 1862, (not mustered) ; trans- 
ferred to Co. A, loth C. V. January 19, 1863. 

Miles S. Wright, Bridgeport, 2d lieutenant, enlisted August 12, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; proni()te<l 1 si lieutenant Co. C November 
20, 1862. 

Charles W. Galimn, Middletown, 2d lieutenant, enlisted August 5, 
1862, mustered in August 20, 1862; promoted from 1st sergeant Co. B 
August 20, 1862; dishonorably discharged December 20, 1863. 

Orsamus B. Sawyer, Madison, 2d lieutenant, enlisted July 31, 1862, 
mustered in .\ugust 20, 1862; promoted from sergeant Co. G January 13, 
1865; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 



Official Roster. 377 

Frederick B. Hawi.ev, Bridgeport, ist sergeant, enlisted July 22, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; promoted 2d lieutenant Co. K November 
II, 1862. 

William H. Hawley, Bridgeport, ist sergeant, enlisted July 22, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; mustered sergeant: promoted ist sergeant 
February 10, 1863: 2d lieutenant Co. B June 3- i^^'3- 

Franklin F)Akti,kix Bridgeport, ist sergeant, enlisted June 21, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; mustered sergeant; promoted ist sergeant 
August — , 1863; 2d lieutenant Co. E March 28, 1864. 

Albert Deforest, Stratford, ist sergeant, enlisted July 26, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted corporal February 

10, 1862; sergeant September 11, 1863; ist sergeant Septeml)er i, 1864; 
2d lieutenant Co. G February 17, 1865. 

Russell Glenn, Bridgeport, ist sergeant, enlisted June 19, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862 : mustered private ; promoted corporal February 

11, 1863; wounded July 3, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa.; promoted sergeant Feb- 
ruary 14, 1864; wounded February 16, 1864, Morton's Ford, Va., wounded 
October 28, 1864, Hatcher's Run, Va. ; promoted ist sergeant February 

25, 1865; wounded March 25, 1865; Hatcher's Run, Va. ; discharged June 

12, 1865. 

Oscar A. Abbott, Norwalk, sergeant, enlisted June 24, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted corporal September 11, 
1863; sergeant April i, 1864; wounded October 2"], 1864, Boydton Plank 
Road, Va. ; discharged on account of disability June 9, 1865. 

Henry M. Cooley, Bridgeport, sergeant, enlisted July z},, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; captured July 3, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa.; parole 
not shown ; reduced to ranks August 3, 1864 ; promoted sergeant Fel)ruary 

26, 1865 ; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Lucius L. Dyer, Bridgeport, sergea'nt, enlisted August 9, 1862. mustered 
in August 20, 1862; promoted 2d lieutenant Co. C March 3, 1863. 

John Geatley, Bridgeport, sergeant, enlisted May 28, 1862, mustered, 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private; captured July 2, 1863, Gettysl)urg 
Pa.; parole not shown; promoted corporal June 2}), 18O4; sergeant .August 
3. 1864; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

William B. Hincks, Bridgeport, sergeant, enlisted July 21. iS()2, nuis- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted sergeant J'ebruary 
10, 1863; appointed sergeant-major June 16, 1863. 

Edward L. Himisto.n;, liridgei)ort, sergeant, enlisted June. 5, 1862, 
mustered in August Jo, i8()2; mustered corporal; wounded Septeml)er 17. 
1862, Antietani, .Md.; prouKjted sergeant February 10, 1863; wounded .M;iy 
3, 1863, Chancellorsville, Va. ; transferred to 159th Co. 2(1 Battalion \'. 
R. C. March 4, 1864; discharged July 5, 1865. 

*Geor(;e W. Wells, Hartford, sergeant, enlisteil July 29, iS()3, nuis- 



378 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

tered in July 29, 1863 ; mustered private ; promoted corporal June 2^, 
1864; sergeant February 26, 1865; transferred to Co. K, 2d C. V. H. A. 
May 30, 1865. 

EmviN A. Wilcox, Bridgeport, sergeant, enlisted June 4, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private; wounded September 17, 1862, 
Antietam, Md. ; promoted sergeant September 11, 1863; wounded Feb- 
ruary 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, Va. ; transferred to 4th Co. 2d Battalion 
V. R. C. October 11, 1864; discharged on account of disability December 
9, 1864. 

George H. Batchelor, Bridgeport, corporal, enlisted July 18, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; transferred to 159th Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. 
February 17, 1864; discharged July 5, 1865. 

*WiLLi.\M Bleecher, Bristol, corporal, enlisted September 9. 1863, mus- 
tered in September 9, 1863 ; mustered private ; promoted September 8, 
1864; transferred to Co. K, 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

Theodore F. Bradley, Bridgeport, corporal, enlisted August 4, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; reduced to ranks October i, 1862; mustered 
out with company May 31, 1865. 

Harry Burnham, Groton, corporal, enlisted April 13, 1864, mustered 
in April 13, 1864; (See corporal Co. B 2d C. V. H. A.); mustered pri- 
vate; promoted August 3, 1864; transferrred to Co. K, 2d C. V. H. A. May 
30, 1865. 

William E. Crak;, Bridgeport, corporal, enlisted July 22, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam, Md. ; 
discharged on account of disability April 29, 1863. 

Benjamin Curtis, Stratford, corporal, enlisted July 26. 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted February 10, 1863; died 
June 9, 1863. 

Frederick B. Doten, Bridgeport, corporal, enlisted August i, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; promoted ist lieutenant Co. F March 3, 
1863. 

Robert L. Fields, Bridgeport, corporal, enlisted June 4, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability January 24, 1863. 

John Hann.\gan^ Southport, corporal, enlisted July 8, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; mustered private; wounded December 13, 1862, Fred- 
ericksburg, Va. ; promoted October 2H, 1863; mustered out with company 
May 31, 1865. 

Thomas Henderson, Bridgeport, corporal, enlisted June 12, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted October 21, 1863; 
captured May 5, 1864, Wilderness, Va. ; paroled November 30, 1864; mus- 
tered out with company May 31, 1865. 

William Jacobs, Bridgeport, corporal, enlisted August 8, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; nnistered private; promoted February 9, 1863; 
captured July 2, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa.; paroled August 29, 1863; reduced 



Official Roster. 379 

to ranks December 9. 1863: promoted corporal December 12. 1863; wound- 
ed May 6, 1864. Wilderness, Va. ; died May 25, 1864. 

John Kelly. Putnam, corporal, enlisted August 8, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; nnistered private; captured May 3. 1863, Chancellors- 
ville, Va. ; paroled May 15, 1863; promoted October 28, 1863; wounded 
May 24, 1864, North .\mia, Va. ; mustered out with company May 31, 

1865. 

Henry D. Lees, Norwalk, corporal, enlisted July 9, 1862, mustered m 
August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted August 19, 1862; mustered 
otit with company May 31, 1865. 

*Fk.\nk P.\st()k. Voluntown, corporal, enlisted July 31, 1863, mustered 
in July 31, 1863; mu.stered private; captured October 14, 1863, Bristoc 
Station, Va. : paroled April 16, 1864; promoted corporal February 26, 
1865; transferred to Co. H, 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

Cornelius Re.\rdon, Norwalk, corporal, enlisted July 12, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted September 11, 1863; 
wounded February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, Va. ; died February 10, 1864. 

Frederick St.\ndish, Bridgeport, corporal, enlisted June 9, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, 
Va. ; discharged on account of disability March 4, 1863. 

*JoHN B. T.\CK, Preston, corporal, enlisted July 31, 1863, mustered in 
July 31. 1863; mustered private; promoted September 11, 1863; reduced 
to ranks (sick) September 8, 1864; discharged October 27, 1864. 

George W. Allen, Hartford, musician, enlisted July 10, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Lucien W. Hubbard, Bridgeport, musician, enlisted July 19, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; captured October 14, 1863, Bristoe Station, Va. ; 
died April 16, 1864, Richmond, Va. 

Seth W. Hungerford, Waterbury, musician, enlisted August 5, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; (See private Co. D, ist C. V.); mustered 
private; detailed musician; wounded October 21, 1864, Petersburg, Va. ; 
mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

William B. Nichols, Bridgeport, wagoner, enlisted August 13, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Aaron S. Abbott, Norwalk, private, enlisted June 24, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability March 10, 1863. 

*William G. Abrahams, Vernon, private, enlisted September 30. 1863, 
mustered in September 30, 1863; wounded October 14. 1863. Bristoe 
Station, Va. ; discharged May 31, 1865. 

*Charles H. Adams, Plymouth, private, enlisted .August 2, 1864, mus- 
tered in August 2, 1864; wounded August 25. 1864, Ream's Station, Va. ; 
deserted November 16, 1864. 

Joseph Alix, Brooklyn, private, enlisted July 14, i8()2. nuistered in 



380 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam, Md. ; discharged 
on account of disability February 28, 1863. 

*R0BERT Anderson, Groton, private, enlisted August 6, 1864, mustered 
in August 6, 1864; transferred to Co. K, 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

*WiLLiAM H. AsHBURN, Hartford, private, enlisted August 7, 1863, 
mustered in August 7, 1863; deserted November — , 1864. 

*Albert Babcock. New London, private, enlisted July 23, 1863, mustered 
in July 23, 1863; discharged on account of disability October 26, 1863. 

*Edward D. Bailey, Hartford, private, enlisted July 13, 1863, mustered 
in August 7, 1863; transferred to Co. H, 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

James H. Bartram, Stratford, private, enlisted August 12, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; wounded May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville, Va. ; 
died May 7, 1864. 

Horace Bartram, Bridgeport, private, enlisted June 6, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va. ; 
discharged April 10, 1863. 

George B. Bartram, Bridgeport, private, enlisted June 6. 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Henry E. Batchelor, Bridgeport, private, enlisted August 9, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam, 
Md. ; transferred to 41st Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. December 2, 1863; 
promoted corporal January i, 1864; discharged August 8. 1865. 

George P. Beck, Bridgeport, private, enlisted May 28, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; deserted December 27. 1862. 

Oscar R. Beers, Stratford, private, enlisted August i, 1S62, nnistered 
in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability April 20, 1863. 

Samuel Benson, Putnam, private, enlisted June 13, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; deserted Octol)er 7, 1862. 

*James Berry, New Haven, private, enlisted September 15, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 15, 1863; missing in action August 25, 1864, Ream's 
Station, Va. ; probably killed; no further record Adjutant-General's Office, 
Washington, D. C. 

*Andrew Blair, Sterling, private, enlisted August 2, 1864, mustered in 
August 2, 1864; transferred to Co. H. 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

*Jekemiah Blunt, Waterbury, private, enlisted August 22, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 22, 1863 ; died November 18, 1863. 

*Jactfues Borgoin, Middletown, private, enlisted September t8, 1863, 
mustered in September 18, 1863; deserted December 4, 1863. 

*Fred C. Bowman, Bridgeport, private, enlisted August 22, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 22, 1863 ; discharged May 29, 1865. 

Joel N. Bradley. Huntington, private, enlisted August 9, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; wt)unded September 17, i8()2, Antietam, Md. ; 
wounded February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, Va. ; mustered out with com- 
pany May 31, 1865. 



Official Roster. 




381 


)\\ n. ])ri\alc, ciilisti 


-d August 


15. 1862. nius- 


iscliar.i^c'd on accoii 


ut of (lisa 


liility I'cbruary 



George A. P.kadi.ev, Xewl 
tered in August 20. 1862; ( 
25, 1863. 

William Bkadshaw, Litcliticld, private, enlisted June 25. 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 18O2; killed June 16, 186.4, Petersburg A' a. 

Alfred Brown, Bridgeport, private, enlisted August ii, i8()2, nnistered 
in August 20. 1862: wounded September 17, 1862, Antietani, Aid.; mus- 
tered out with company A I ay 31, 1865. 

Henry Brown, Plainfield, private, enlisted August 9, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; killed December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg. Va. 

*Charles Brown, Hartford, pri\ate, enlisted August 7, 1863. mustered 
in August 7, 1863; deserted August 20, 1863. 

*WiLLiAM Brown, Stonington, private, enlisted August 7. 1863. mustered 
in August 7, 1S63; transferred to U. S. N. May 5. 1864: served on U. S. 
S. "Banshee"; deserted October 8. 1864. 

*\ViLLiAM Brown, 2d, New Haven, private, enlisted August 22, 1863, 
mustered in August 22. 1863; supposed captured September — . 1863, 
Culpepper, Va. ; no further record Adjutant-General's Office, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Thomas Brown, Hebron, private, enlisted Hecember 10. 1864, mustered 
in December 19, 1864; transferred to Co. K, 2<\ C. V. 11. .\. May 30. 1865. 

James Brothers, Putnam, private, enlisted July 31. 1862. mustered in 
August 20, 1862; (See private Co. H nth C. V.): transferred to Co. C, 
nth Regiment V. R. C. July 20. 1863; died ^^lay 16, 1865. 

*Christain Buhll, Waterbury, private, enlisted August 22, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 22, 1863 ; captured February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, Va. ; 
died in rebel prison, place and date not shown. 

George Bunyan, Bridgeport, private, enlisted August i, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; captured May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville, Va. ; paroled 
May 13, 1863 ; deserted August 7, 1864. 

David B. Burr. Trumbull, private, enlisted August 16, i8()2, nnistered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksliurg, Va. ; 
discharged on account of disability November 21, 1863. 

*JoHN Burke. Groton, pri\ate, enlisted August 5, 1863, mustered in 
August 7, 1863; died Octoljer 27, 1863. 

*Thomas Callaghax, Manchester, private, enlisted August i. 1864, 
mustered in August i, 1864; wounded and captured August 25, 1864, 
Ream's Station, Va. ; paroled March 10, 1865; died March 28, 1865. 

Leverett Campbell, Wilton, private, enlisted July 16. 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded September -17. 1862. .Antietam. AFd.; deserted 
December 16. 1862. 

*James Campbell, Hartford, private, enlisted August 7. i8()3. mustered 
in August 7, 1863; captured October 14, 1863. IJristoe Station, Va. : paroled 
May 8, 1864; deserted July 19, 1864. 



382 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

*Edwarij Campbell, Norwich, private, enlisted July 18, 1863. mustered 
in July 18, 1863; died January 18, 1865. 

*James H. Cannon^ Hartford, private, enlisted July 7, 1863, mustered 
in August 7, 1863; discharged December 8, 1863. 

George Carlock, Bridgeport, private, enlisted July 19, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; killed December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va. 

*Henry a. Chase, Canaan, private, enlisted August 7, 1863, mustered 
in August 7, 1863 ; deserted November 15, 1863. 

*Charles F. Chester, Stonington, private, enlisted August 5, 1863, 
mustered in August 5, 1863; deserted August 2;^, 1863. 

*Patrick Clark^ Meriden, private, enlisted August 8, 1863, mustered 
in August 8, 1863 ! captured May 5, 1864, Wilderness, Va. ; paroled 
November 30, 1864; transferred to Co. H, 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

*JoHN Cook, Salisbury, private, enlisted August 8, 1863, mustered 
in August 8, 1863 ; deserted August 25, 1863. 

John Colter, Jr., Brooklyn, private, enlisted June 11. 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; deserted September 19, 1862. 

*Edward Cornwall, Hartford, private, enlisted August 7, 1863; mus- 
tered in August 7, 1863; deserted August 21, 1863. 

George Corcoran, Bridgeport, private, enlisted September 4, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 4, 1863 ; transferred to 40th Regiment N. Y. Vols. 
April 24, 1864; re-transferred June 22, 1864; transferred to Co. H, 2d 
C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

*James Crawford, Colchester, private, enlisted August 8, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 8, 1863 ; captured October 14, 1863, Bristoe Station, Va. ; 
died April 28, 1864, Andersonville, Ga. 

*Sterry H. Cruff, Thompson, private, enlisted August 28, 1863 ; 
(See private Co. E 13th C. V.); transferred to Co. K 2d C. V. H. A. 
May 30, 1865. 

*John Cunningham, Hartford, private, enlisted August 7, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 7, 1863 ; discharged June 29, 1865. 

Hanford Curtis, Stratford, private, enlisted July 26, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; died December 15, 1862. 

Francis R. Curtis, Stratford, private, enlisted July 31, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam. Md. ; 
discharged March 10, 1863. 

Anthony Daniels, Killingly, private, enlisted July 14. 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

John A. Dean, Bridgeport, private, enlisted May 28, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

^Frederick Dengler, Burlington, private, enlisted September 9, 1863, 
mustered in September 9, 1863; deserted October 14, 1863. 

*WiLLiAM Donovan, Cromwell, private, enlisted Sei)tember 3, 1863, 
mustered in September 3, 1863; wounded February 6, 1864, Morton's 



Official Roster. 383 

Ford, Va. ; transferred to 5th Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. April 6, 1865; 
discharged on account of disability October 11, 1865. 

John English, Hartford, private, enlisted July 2^. 1862, mustered 
in August 26, 1862; deserted April 24, 1863. 

Charles R. Engelhardt, Bridgeport, private, enlisted August 7, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability Feb- 
ruary 8, 1863. 

David H. Fakrar. Harrisville, R. I., private, enlisted July 10, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; captured May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville, Va. ; 
paroled IMay 13. 1863 ; died August 10, 1863. 

*Dennis Farley, Middletown, private, enlisted December 15, 1864, 
mustered in December 15, 1864; deserted February 9, 1865. 

*Thomas Fleming,, Glastonbury, private, enlisted August i, 1864, 
mustered in August i, 1864; deserted August 28, 1864. 

John H. Fountain, Thompson, private, enlisted July 22, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; wounded June 18, 1864, Petersburg, Va. ; mus- 
tered out with company May 31, 1865. 

John Fox, Bridgeport, private, enlisted July 8, 1862, mustered in August 
20. 1862 ; wounded July 3, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa. ; transferred to 8th Co. 
2d Battalion V. R. C. December 18, 1863; transferred to Co. H lOth 
Regiment V. R. C. July 10. 1864; re-enlisted veteran August 30, 1864; 
promoted corporal January 11, 1865; sergeant June 11, 1865; discharged 
November 15, 1865. 

*Phelps Fox, Granby, pri\ate, enlisted August 21, 1863, mustered in 
August 21, 1863; transferred to Co. K 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

James W. French. Monroe, private, enlisted August 11, 1862; mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862 ; captured July 2, 1863. Gettysburg, Pa. ; paroled 
August 29, 1863; captured October 27, 1864, Hatcher's Run, Va. ; paroled 
March 30, 1865; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Amzi Garabrant, Bridgeport, private, enlisted August 9, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; discharged October 9, 1862. 

*Ch.\rles E. Goodrich, North Canaan, private, enlisted August 7, 1863, 
mustered in August 7, 1863; transferred to Co. K 2d C. V. H. A. May 
30, 1865. 

*George Gordon, Cromwell, private, enlisted August 22. 1863 ; nms- 
tered in August 22, 1863; transferred to Co. K 2d C. V. H. A. Alay 
30. 1865. 

*J0HN Hagamand, Bristol, private, enlisted Septenil)cr 11, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 11, 1863; captured October 27, 1864, Stony Creek, Va. ; 
paroled February 17, 1865; furloughed March 18. 1865: failed to return: no 
further record Adjutant-Cieneral's Office, Washington, 1). C. 

*Thomas Hagan, Westport, private, enlisted August 3, 1864, nuistercd 
in August 3, 1864 ; transferred to Co. K 2d C. V. II. .\ . May 30, 1865 . 

Joseph Hart, Killingly, private, enlisted July 14, 1862, mustered in 



384 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

August 20, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va. ; dis- 
charged December 8, 1863. 

*Thomas Hart, Bristol, private, enlisted Septemlier 18. 1863, mustered 
in September 18, 1863; transferred to Co. G 24th Regiment V. R. C. 
March 10, 1865 ; discharged August 14, 1865. 

*James W. Henderson, East Haddam, private, enlisted September 13, 
1863, mustered in September 13, 1863 ; wounded February 6, 1864, Mor- 
ton's Ford, Va. ; transferred to Co. K 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1SO5; 
(correct name Hezekiah Schetler. ) 

Edward Hill, Killingly, private, enlisted July 14, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam, Md. ; 
transferred to Co. F 3d Regiment V. R. C. August 13, 1863; discharged 
July 6, 1865. 

Charles G. Hyatt, Norwalk, private, enlisted July 12, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, Va. ; died 
February 28, 1864. 

*J0HN Jackson, Lebanon, private, enlisted August 5, 1864, mustered 
in August S, 1864; deserted August 28, 1864. 

*Franklin JohnSqn, Milford, private, enlisted August 8, 1863, nuis- 
tered in August 8, 1863; see Franklin Thompson. 

Charles Johnson, Suffield, private, enlisted December 9, 1864, mus- 
tered in December 9, 1864; transferred to Co. K 2d C. V. H. A. May 
30, 1865. 

John Kellev, Glastonbury, private, enlisted December 9, 1864, mus- 
tered in December 9, 1864; deserted February 12, 1865. 

Francis A. King, Bridgeport, private, enlisted July 19, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Richard Kirk, Norwalk, private, enlisted July 23, 1862, mustered in 
August 20. 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

George E. Langguth, Bridgeport, private, enlisted July 24, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; transferred to 39th Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. 
September 26, 1863 ; discharged June 29, 1865. 

William Larkins, Sprague, private, enlisted June 19, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; deserted September 9, 1862. 

Thaddeus W. Lewis, Bridgeport, private, enlisted June 19, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; killed Septeml)er 17, 1862, .\ntietam, Md. 

*Charles Loomis, Waterbury, private, enlisted September 8, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 8, 1863; transferred to U. S. N. ALay 5, 186.^; S'^rvcd 
on U. S. S. "Augusta"; deserted October 19. 1864. 

John Lotty, Bridgeport, private, enlisted June i-j. 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; wounded February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, Va. ; dis- 
charged May 24, 1865. 

George E. Lover, Redding, private, enlisted August 16, 1862, mustered in 



Official Roster. 385 

August 20, 1862; capturod May 18, 1864. Spnttsylvania. Va. : pamlrd 
March i, 1865; discharged July 21. 1865. 

Michael Maddigan, Bridgeport, private, enlisted July 25. 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; killed September 17, 1862, Antietam, Md. 

Duncan C. McCann, Bridgeport, private, enlisted July 5. i^^^^- "nis- 
tirod in August 20, 1862; captured May 18, 1864, Spottsylvania, Va. ; par- 
oled March i, 1865; discharged July 21, 1865. 

James McCauley, Easton, private, enlisted August ii, 1862, nuistcred 
in August 20, 1862; captured July 20, 1863, Warrenton, Va. ; died Marcii 
2^, 1864, Andersonville, Ga. 

John McCarrick, Cromwell, private, enlisted Dccemher 14, 1864. nuis- 
tered in December 14, 1864; deserted April 6. 1865. 

*JoHN McDonald, Hartford, private, enlisted August i, 1863, mustered 
in August I, 1863; deserted June 27, 1864. 

George McFall, Alanstield, private, enlisted December 17, 1864. mus- 
tered in December 17, 1864; transferred to Co. K 2d C. V. H. A. May 
30. 1865. 

*James McLaughlin. Ilarwinton. private, enlisted September 14. 1863, 
nmstered in September 14, 18(13: killed October 14, 1863, Bristoc Sta- 
tion, Va. 

Benjamin F. Merrill, W'aterhury, private, enlisted August g. 1862, 
mustered in August 9, i8(ij; discharged on account of disability March 

19, 1863. 

*Charles Milling, Meriden, private, enlisted August 8, 1863, mustered 
in August 8, 1863; deserted October 25, 1863. 

*WiLLiAM Miller, Meriden private, enlisted September 4, 1863, mus 
tered in September 5, 1863; deserted May 18; 1864. 

Patrick Moore, Woodstock, private, enlisted July 13, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville, Va.. wounded 
May 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va. ; mustered out with comv)any May 31, 1865. 

William Moore, Suffield, private, enlisted December 9, 1864, nuistered 
in December 9, 1864; transferred to Co. K 2d C. V. 11. .\. May 30, 18O5. 

*John Moland, Enfield, private, enlisted July 30, 18(14, nuistered in 
July 30. 1864; deserted August 28, 1864. 

*George Muller, New Haven, private, enlisted August i. 18(13. nui>- 
tered in August i. 1863; deserted IMay 2, 1864. 

*EinvARi) Murphy, Waterbury. private, enlisted August JJ. 18(13. nuis- 
tered in August 2J. 1863; deserted November 9, 1863. 

*John Nelson, Hartford, private, enlisted July 29, 1863. mustered in 
July 29. 1863; discharged December 11, 1863. 

*\ViLLiAM F. Nelson. Norwich, private, enlisted July 2^. 1863. must- 
tered in July 25. 1863; deserted .\ugust J". 1863. 

\\'tlltam II. Norton, 'rnimbiill. jirivate, enlisted .\ugust 4, 18(12, mus- 
tered in August 20. 18(12; killed September 17, 18O2. .Antietam. .Md. 



386 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

*Peter O'Connor, Wallingford, private, enlisted August i, 1863, 
mustered in August i, 1863; discharged May 2, 1864. 

*JosEPH Orr, Waterbury, private, enlisted August 22, 1863, mustered 
in August 22, 1863; transferred to Co. K 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

*Herman Parsons, Bloomfield, private, enlisted September 28, 1863, 
mustered in September 28, 1863; died December 25, 1863. 

*Samuel Y. Perry, Waterbury, private, enlisted August 22, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 22, 1863; discharged April 24, 1864, by reason of trans- 
fer to U. S. N. ; no further record Adjutant-General's Office, Washington, 
D. C. 

*James Phelan, Vernon, private, enlisted September 2, 1863, mustered 
in September 20, 1863 ; transferred to Co. H 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

Henry Phillips, Bridgeport, private, enlisted June 12, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded August 16, 1864, Deep Bottom, Va. ; died 
October 24, 1864. 

Charles H. Platt, Norwalk, private, enlisted July 12, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam, Md., wound- 
ed May 3. 1863, Chancellorsville, Va. ; discharged February 5, 1864. 

William Powers, Putnam, private, enlisted July 31, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability May 24, 1863. 

*Thomas Purcell, Waterbury, private, enlisted September 28, 1863, 
mustered in September 28, 1863 ; captured October 14, 1863, Bristoe Sta- 
tion, Va. ; paroled March 15, 1864; captured August 25, 1864, Ream's 
Station, Va. ; paroled March 10, 1865; discharged June 28, 1865. 

*James Racey, New Haven, private, enlisted July 30, 1863, mustered 
in July 30, 1863; deserted August 17, 1863. 

Jesse H. Ramsdell, Bridgeport, private, enlisted July 28, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; captured July 20, 1863, on march from Warrenton, 
Va. ; died February 4, 1864, Richmond, Va. 

Sherwood S. Reynolds, Fairfield, private, enlisted August 7, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

*JoHN Ridley, Bristol, private, enlisted September 11, 1863, mustered 
in September 11, 1863; wounded June 3, 1864, Cold Harbor, Va ; absent, 
sick in hospital at muster out of company; no further record Adjutant- 
General's Ofifice, Washington, D. C. 

Simon W. Riley, Middletown, private, enlisted December 15, 1864, 
mustered in December 15, 1864; deserted April 6, 1865. 

*JoHN Riley, Hartford, private, enlisted July 29, 1863, mustered in July 
29, 1863; deserted August 17, 1863. 

Thomas Riley, Suffield, private, enlisted December 9, 1864, mustered in 
December 9, 1864; discharged July 5, 1865. 

Thomas Ring, Bridgeport, private, enlisted July 30, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability December 13, 1863. 





: (1 


u^trr 
lid 


r.l ill 

JUIK- 


14. 1 


isru, 


iini: 


^tered 


I Ri 


\rr, 


Va. : 


; did 


1st . 


-'2, 1 


i''~''>.^. 


imis- 


\,.,-i 


1 _'S 


, iX( 


)4. as 


I)(i! 


\" ; 1 


:liscll 


arged 



Official Roster. 387 



James Ringwoom. lurlin, i>i-ivate. enlisted jmu' J5, 
August 20, 1862; killed lime ;, iX()4. C-ld llarhor. 
7. 1864. 

RiCHARii RiNcwiioii, lierliii, private, enlisted August 1 
ill August _'0. \H()J: cai)tiire(l May 25, 1864, North Anna 
August 25, i(Sr)4, Andersoin ille. (ia. 

*Chakles Rohekts, VVatcrbury, private, enlisted Augi 
tered in August 22, 1863; transferred to U. S. X. A] 
Samuel Roberts ; served on U. S. S. "Agawani" ; 
January 25, 1866. 

*Thomas Rumble, Tdrringldn, private, enlisted September 11, i8()3, 
mustered in September 11, 18(13; died November 24, 1863. 

*Patrick Ryan, Hartford, private, enlisted July 29, 1863, nuistered in 
July 29, T863; wounded May 6, 1864, \\'ilderness, \'a. : transferred to 
Co. G 9tb Regiment V. R. C. date not shown; discharge July 20, 1865. 

*James Ryan. Cromwell, private, enlisted September 15, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 15. 1863; deserted ]\Iay 29, 1864. 

*Hezekiah Schetler, I'^ast Haddam, private, enlisted September 13, 
1863, mustered in Septemlier 13, 1863; see James \V. Henderson. 

*Henry Schmiht. New lla\en, private, enlisted .August 3, 1863. mus- 
tered in August 3, 18(13; discharged on account of disability December 
17. 1863. 

Silas N. Sherman, 'irumbull. private, enlisted July 24, 1802, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 18(15. 

Stephen D. Skiumore, Bridgeport, private, enlisted July 7, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; (See pri\ate Co. D. 3d C V.) : wounded Septem- 
ber 17, 1862, Antietam, Md.; captured October 2i<. 18(14, Dinwiddie C. 
H., Va. ; paroled Feliruary 17, 18(15; mustered out with C(imi)any May 
31. 1865. 

*Geor(;e Smith, ist, Hartford, private, enlisted July 30, 1863, mus- 
tered in July 30, 1863; captured October 14, 1863, Bristoe Station, Va. ; 
I>aroled April 16, 1864; transferred to Co. H 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

*George Smith, 2d., Torrington, private, enlisted September 8, 1863, 
mustered in September 8, 1863; wounded May 12, 1864. Spottsylvaip.i, 
\ a., wounded September 30, 1864 Petersburg, Va. ; discharged on ac- 
count of disability June 16, 1865. 

'^JoHN Smith, Harford, private, enlisted July 31, 1863, mustered in 
July 31. 1863; deserted August 17, 1863. 

Matthew Smith. Suftield, jirivate. enlisted December 9. 18(14. mus- 
tered in December 9, 18(14; transferred to Co. K 2(\ C. A\ II. A. May 30. 
1865. 

RoM.wzo v.. Sxow, I<;ast Haddam, iirivate, inlisted Jiiiu' o. iSoj. nuis- 
tered in August 20, 1862: transferred to Co, D nth Kegimeiii \'. K. C. 
March 2, 1864; discharged June 5, 1865, 



388 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

*George H. Snyder, Stoningtoii, private, enlisted July 24. 18O3, mustered 
in July 29, 1863; deserted August 17, 1863. 

*Bernhard Stephens, Union, private, enlisted September 12, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 12, 1863; captured, date and place not shown; died Au- 
gust 28, 1864, Andersonville. Ga. 

Samuel Stone, Putnam, private, enlisted June 17, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; captured JNIay 3, 1863, Fredericksburg, Va. ; paroled May 
15, 1863; wounded February 5, 1865, Hatcher's Run, Va. ; mustered out 
with company May 31, 1865. 

*Francis Storms, Waterbury, private, enlisted x\ugust 22, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 22, 1863; transferred to Co. I i8th Regiment V. R. C. 
May 24, 1864; discharged July 25, 1865. 

*Burritt Styles, Meriden, private, enlisted August 8, 1863, mustered 
in August 8, 1863; wounded May 12, 1864; Spottsylvania, Va. ; discharged 
on account of disability June 16, 1865. 

^Charles Sullivan, Manchester, private, enlisted September 8, 1863, 
mustered in September 8. 1863 ; wounded May 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va. ; 
transferred to Co. H 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

Albert Sweet, Putnam, private, enlisted June 12, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability December 22, 1862. 

William L. Sweet, Putnam, private, enlisted June ir, 1862. mustered in 
August 20, 1862; transferred to Co. B 3d Regiment V. R. C. July i, 1863; 
discharged August 22,, 1865. 

*Frederick Tanner, Plainfield, private, enlisted August 15, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 15, 1863; transferred to Co. H 2d C. V. H. A. May 30. 1865. 

Frederick Tatro, Putnam, private, enlisted July 15, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam, Md. ; dis- 
charged on account of disability January 20, 1863. 

Frederick Tayl'jr, Bridgeport, private, enlisted June 4, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Autietam, Md. ; deserted 
December i, 1862. 

*Franklin Thompson, Milford, private, enlisted August 8, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 8, 1863; fell out on march and captured May 18, 1864; 
died August 12, 1864, Andersonville, Ga. ; (correct name Franklin Johnson.) 

Oliver K. Tomlinson, Bridgeport, private, enlisted May 2^, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; transferred to Co. C 24th Regiment V. R. C. 
January 21, 1864; discharged May 15, 1865. 

*JosHUA Tripp, New London, private, enlisted July 24, 1863, mustered 
in July 24, 1863; discharged December 13, 1863. 

^Charles Turner, Easton, private, enlisted September 15, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 15, 1863; deserted October 19, 1864. 

*William Tyrrell, Easton, private, enlisted September 15, 1S63, mus- 
tered in September 15, 1863: transferred to Co. H 2d C. V. H. A. May 
30, 1865, as William Tyrall. 

Richard Wallace, Bridgeport, private, enlisted June 25, 1862, mustered 



Official Roster. 389 

in August 20. 1862: wounded 1 )ccrnil)fr 13, iS()_>. iM-fderickslniro-. Va., 
wounded I""el)ruar\- 6, \H(>4, Murtnn's I'ord. \'a. ; uuistL-rrd out witli com- 
pany May 31, 1865. 

Samuel B. Wakelee, 'Irnuiliull, private, enlisted July 2_|. 1862. nuis- 
tered in August 20, 1862; transferred to 82(1 Co. 2d I'.attalion V. K. C. 
January 29, 1864; discharged July 24, 1865. 

*Henry Walter, Bridgeport, private, enlisted September 8, 1863. mus- 
tered in September 8, 1863; captured February 6. 1864, Morton's Ford, 
Va. : died July y, 1864. .Vndersonville, Ga. 

^^AlK■HAEL Ward, Hartford, private, enlisted July 29, 1863, mustered in 
July 29, 1863; deserted Augu.'^t 17, 1863. 

^HucH Wakren, Hartford, private, enlisted July 29, 1863, mustered in 
July 29, 1853; deserted August 17, 1863. 

*Harrv Warden, New Haven, iirivate, enlisted September 17, 1863, 
nnistered in September 17, 1863: deserted b'ebruary 4, 1865. 

*Levi Week.s, Hartford, pri\ale, enlisted July 29, 1863. mustered in 
July 29, 1863; deserted August 17, 1863. 

Russell W. Whituomb, Monroe, private, enlisted June 9. 1862, mus- 
tered in .\ugust 20, 1862; discharged on account of disabilitv Maich 1, 
1863. 

Abner S. Whitcomu, Cornwall, private, enlisted July 22, 1862, uuis- 
tered in August 20, 1862; de.'^erted September jj. 1802. 

Joseph H. White, Bridgeport, private, enlisted August 9, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability January 3, 
1863. 

"AxiiRES Wilson, Hartford, private, enlisted July 29, 1863, nmstered in 
July ^9, 1863; discharged on account of disability August 5, 1864. 

*James Wilson, Hartford, private, enlisted July 29, 1863, mustered in 
July 29, 1863: (See pri\ate Co. H J2d C. V.): deserted August 17. 1863. 

*WiLLiAM Williams, Hartford, private, enlisted July 29, 18(13. nnistered 
in July 29, 1863; deserted August 2S. 1863. 

*JoHN WiNSLOw, New Haven, private, enlisted August 8, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 8, 1863; captured October 14, 1863, Bristoe Station, \'a. ; 
paroled November 19, 1864; deserted February 7, 1865. 

John Wise, Suffield, private, enlisted December 9, 1864, mustered in 
December 9, 1864 ; deserted February 27. 1865. 

William Wodllev. liridgeport, private, enlisted June ti. 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

*JoHN D. WoLK, Waterbury. jirixate, enlisted September 20, 1863, mus- 
lercd in September J). 18O3; wounded b\-bruary (>, 18O4. Morton's b'ord, 
Va. ; discharged on account of dis.ability June 10, 1865. 

CO^H^•\NY B. 

Fi.i.iAii W. Cu'.iioNS. Middletown, captain, enlisted July 31, 1862, nurs- 
lered in .August .;o. 18O2: (See 1st lieutenant Co. (i 1st C. V. 11. .\. ) ; 



390 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

wounded Decc-nil>cr i.?, 1862. Fredericksburg, Va. : died December 19. 
1862. 

James L. Tovvnsend, New Haven, captain, enlisted August ig, 1862. 
mustered in August 2^, 1862; (See private Ritle Co. C .^d C. V. ) ; promoted 
from 1st lieutenant Co. 1 February 4, 1863; wounded May 3. ''^63, Clian- 
cellorsville. Va. ; dismissed Decemi.er 2, 1863. 

Henry P. Godiiard, Norwich, captain, enlisted June 11, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; promoted from 2d lieutenant Co. (i to 1st lieutenant 
February 4, 1863; wounded May 3. 1863. Chancellorsville, Va. ; promoted 
captain March 28, 1864; discharged April 26, 1864. 

George N. Bricham, Vernon, captain, enlisted July 16, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; promoted from 2d lieutenant Co. I to ist lieutenant 
March 28, 1864; captain June 26, 1864; wounded August 25, 1864, Ream's 
Station. Va. ; discharged December 8, 1864. 

John C. Broatch, Middletown, ist lieutenant, enlisted July 31, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; promoted captain Co. A January i, 1863. 

Robert Russell, Middletown, ist lieutenant, enlisted August 5, 1862, 
mustered in August 20. 1862; (See corporal Co. A 2d C. V.); mustered 
sergeant; promoted ist sergeant February 9, 1863; 2d lieutenant November 
18, 1863; wounded May 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va. ; promoted June 26, 1864; 
mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Walter M. Lucas, Middletown, 2d lieutenant, enlisted July 31. 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; promoted ist lieutenant Co. A August 20, 
1862. 

Davu) E. Canfield, Middletown, 2d lieutenant, enlisted July 16, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; promoted from ist sergeant Co. K Novem- 
ber 13, 1862; killed December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va. 

William H. Hawley, Bridgeport, 2d lieutenant, enlisted July 22. 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; promoted from ist sergeant Co. .\ June 3. 
1863; 1st lieutenant Co. D October 20. 1863. 

. Wu.LiAM L. Cj. Pkitcharu, Waterbury, 2d lieutenant, enlisted August i, 
1862, mustered in August 20. 1862; promoted from ist sergeant Co. C 
February 15, 1865; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Charles W. Galpin, Middletown, ist sergeant, enlisted August 5, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; promoted 2d lieutenant Co. A August 20, 
1862. 

J. Frank i\h)Rc..\N, Middletown, ist sergeant, enlisted August 6. 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; mustered sergeant; promoted November 18. 
1863; 2d lieutenant Co. C April 4. 18(14, 

Flnatiian B. Tyler. MiddletDwn, ist sergeant, enlisted August 7, 1862. 
mustered in August 20, 1S62; (See private RiHe Co. B 3d C. V^. ) ; mus- 
li red corporal; wounded July 3. 1863, Gettysburg, Pa.; promoted sergeant 
October 25, 1863; ist sergeant April 26, 1864; wounded May 6, 1864, Wil- 
derness, Va. ; discharged July 24, i8()5. 



Official Roster. 391 

Hexrv S. Brooks, Alitldlelown, sergeant, enlisted Angnst 5, 1862, inns- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted corporal February 
9, 1863 ; wounded May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville, Va. ; promoted sergeant 
March 23, 1865; mustered out with company May 3r, 1865. 

John Cody, Middletown, sergeant, enlisted August 2. 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; mustered private: promoted corporal January 4. 1864; 
sergeant April 26, 1864; mustered out willi company May 31, 1865. 

William H. Dean, Middletown, sergeant, enlisted July 31, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted corporal February 
9, 1803 ; sergeant October 25, 1863; wounded May 6, 1864, Wilderness, 
\a.; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Ira A. Graham, Durham, sergeant, enlisted August 6, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted corporal October 25, 
1863; sergeant January 4, 1864; appointed sergeant-major March 26, 1864. 

George A. Hubbard, Middletown, sergeant, enlisted July 31, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, P^redericksburg, 
Va., wounded July 3, 1863. Gettysliurg. Pa.; reduced to ranks (sick) Jan- 
uary 4, 1864; mustered out with company Aiay 31, 1865. 

Joseph McClusky, Middletown, sergeant, enlisted August 6, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; wounded September 17. 1862, 
Antietam, Md. ; promoted corporal October 25, 1863; sergeant, April 20, 
1864; wounded May 12, 1864, Spottsylvania, Va. ; died May 25, 1864. 

William Murdock, Middletown, sergeant, enlisted August 4, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted corporal October i, 
1862; sergeant February 9, 1863; appointed sergeant-major October 20, 
1863. 

Fkederuk B. Nye, ]\liddletown, sergeant, enlisted August 5, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted sergeant May 25. 
1864; nnistered out with company May 31, 1865. 

John G. Pelton, Middletown, sergeant, enlisted August 4, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; appointed sergeant-major September 17, 1862. 

Horatio N. Shaw, Middletown, sergeant, enlisted August 7. 1862. nnis- 
tered in August 20, 1862; (See priwate Co. A 2d C. V.) ; mustered corporal, 
promoted October 21, 1862; wounded December 13. i8fi2, iM-edericksburg, 
Va., discharged on account of disability March 23, 18(13. 

ErnviN Stroud, Middletown, sergeant, enlisted August 5, i8()2. nnis- 
tered in August 20, 1862; nnistered |)rivate ; promoted corporal b'eliruary 
9, 1863; wounded May 3. 1863. (Iiancellorsville, Va. ; promoted sergeant 
November 20, 1863; wounded May 10, 1864, Po River, Va. : transferred to 
Co. K 2d Regiment V. R. C. bebruary 5. 1865; discharged July 3. 1865. 

Frederick R. Beebe, Middletown, cori)oral. (.■nlisted .\iigust 3, 18(12, 
mustered in August 20. i8()2; wounded Septemlier 17. i8()2, Antietam. Md.: 
discharged on account of disability b'ebriKiry 11. iS()3. 

*AuGUSTLs [loDWELL, New Ha\en. eori)oral. enlisted July 18, 18(13. mils- 



392 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

tered in July i8. 1863 ; mustered private ; promoted March 23, 1865 ; trans- 
ferred to Co. E 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

William S. Bonney, Middletown, corporal, enlisted August 5, 1862. 
mustered in August 20. 1862; mustered private; promoted August 13, 1862; 
transferred to 2d Co. ist Battalion V. R. C. July 25, 1863; died July 28. 
1863. 

Jeremi.\h K. CoKiiETT, Middlctowu, corporal, enlisted August 4, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted March 2^, 1865, 
mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Albert R. Crittenden, Middletown, corporal, enlisted August 11. 1862; 
mustered in August 20, 1862; nnistered private; promoted August 25, 
1863 ; wounded February 6, 1864. Morton's [•"ord. Va. ; mustered out with 
company May 31, 1865. 

Hem.\n F. Crowell, Middletown, corporal, enlisted August 2, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted January 4, 1864; 
wounded May 5, 1864, Wilderness, Va. ; nnistered out with company May 
31. 1865. 

P.\trick Dah-ev, Middletown, corporal, enlisted August 5, 1862, mus- 
tered in August zc. 1862; mustered private; wounded July 3. 1863, Gettys- 
burg, Pa.; promoted October 25, 1863; transferred to U. S. N. May 5, 1864; 
served ou U. S. S. "Admiral" and "iMirt Morgan"; deserted October 31. 
1864. 

HiKAM 11. Vox, Middletown, corporal, enlisted .\ugust 2, 1862, nnistered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private; wounded July 3, 1863, Gettysburg, 
Fa.; promotetl corporal April 26, 1864; wounded May 6, 1864, Wilderness. 
Va.. wounded October 27, 1864, Boydton Plank Road; mustered out with 
company May 31, 1865. 

William H. Hall, Middletown, corporal, enlisted August 20, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted April 26, 1864; 
wounded May 10, 1864, Laurel Hill, Va. ; discharged on account of dis- 
c-'bility February 14. 1865. 

Samuel Huxiiam, Middletown, corporal, enlisted .'\ugust 8, 1862; mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; ]n-()inoted l'"el)ruary 9, 1863; 
killed July 3, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa. 

Jamk.s Inclis, Middletown. corporal, enlisted ,\ugust 5, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted January 4. 1864; woundeu 
February 6. 1864. Morton's Ford. Va. ; discharged on account of disability 
June 12, 1865. 

William H. Johnson, Jr., Middletown, corporal, enlisted August 5, 
1862, mustered in .A.ugust 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted October 
I, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862. Fredericks1)urg, Va. ; transferred to 
Co. F 3d Regiment V. R. C. July 13, 1863; reduced to ranks August 21, 
1863; discharged July 6, 1865. 

ilENKV .\. Li.ovii, Middletown. corporal, enlisted July 31. 1862. mus- 



Official Roster. 393 

tered in August 20, 1862; wnuuded DcccuiIkt 13, iXr)_'. iMH-dc-ricksljurs. 
Va.; died January i_', 1S63. 

David Maiti.axi., Middk-towu. corporal, enlisted August 6. T.%2, nnis- 
tered in August 20, iSdj; wounded September 17, iSf)j, Autietani. Md. ; 
discharged on account of disability December iS, iXf)_'. 

*Amon L. Norton. Wolcott. corporal, enlisted July 25, iSO^, nuistered in 
July 25, 1863; (See private Co. D 5th C. V. ) ; nuistered i)ri\ate: i)romot- 
ed January 4, 1864; wounded ]'"ebruary 6. i,S()4, Morton's l'"or<l. Va., 
wounded June 3, 1864, Cold Harbor. Va. : died Jtuie .V). 1804. 

James H. Sage, Middletown. corporal, enlisted .August S- i8'>2, nuistered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private; wounded Jidy 3, 1803. Ciettysbury. 
Pa.; promoted October 25, 1863: di'^charged on account of (lisability No- 
vember 12, 1863. 

Richard V. Singleton. Aliddletown. corporal, enlisted .\ugust 4. 1862. 
mustered in .August 20, 1862; (See private Co. .\ 2d C. V.) discharged on 
account of disability March 4, 1863. 

Gl'ERNSEV 15. Smith, Durham, corporal, enlisted .August 5, 1862, nuis- 
tered in .August 20, 18(12: captured November 17. i8((2, W'arreutou, Va. : 
paroled Janu;iry — , 1863; discharged on account of disability J.anuary 30, 
1863. 

^Randall AI. Tallman, Windham, corporal, enlisted .\ugust 21, 1863. 
nuistered in August 21, i8()3 ; mustered private; wounded June 3, 1864, 
Cold Harbor, Va. ; promoted March J,^. 1865; transferred to Co. K s-i 
Regiment C. V. H. A. May 30. 18(53. 

Eugene S. Bowers, Aliddletown, musician, enlisted August 5, 1862. mus- 
tered in August 20. 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Pierre P. Hurlburt, Middletown, musician, enlisted July 31, 1862, mus- 
tered in .August 20. 1862; discharged on account of disability Janu.ary 31, 
18O3. 

Nelson L. Stowe. Waterbury, musician, enlisted .August 8, i8()2, mus- 
tered in August 2C. li^Gj; mustered private; detailed musician; mtislered 
out with company May 31, 1S65. 

George S. Parmelee, Middletown, wagoner, enlisted July 31. i8()2, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of dis.ability December 
29, 1862. 

Thomas P. Allen, Middletown, private, enlisted .August 4, i8()2, mus- 
tered in August .;0. i8f)2; wounded September 2^, 1862, h'ort luhan .Allen, 
Va. ; discharged on ;iccouut of disability December i, 1S62. 

*J()Hn Anderson. 2d, l.isbim, private, enlistd July 23, i8()3. nuistered in 
July 25, 1863; wounded bVbniary 6, 1854, Morton's b'ord, \'a. ; transferred 
to U. S. N. April 20, i8()4; served ou I". S. S, "Ino"; discharged July 30, 
1865. 

*James .Anders:)X. Litchfield, private, enlisted .August 3, 18(14. nuistered 
in August 5, l8()4 ; discli.'irged i!U .accnuut of disability June 20, 18O5. 



394 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Nelson S. Bailev, Middletown, private, enlisted August 2, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability February 5, 
1863. 

*PiERCE Barron. Hartford, private, enlisted July 25, 1863, mustered in 
July 25, 1863 : wounded February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, Va. ; transferred 
to Co. H 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

Lucius E. BiuwELL, Middletown, private, enlisted July 31, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; woimded December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, 
Va.; killed May 5, 1864, Wilderness, Va. 

*JoHN Barclay, Wallingford, private, enlisted August 3, 1864, mustered 
in August 3, 1864; deserted August 21, 1864. 

Isaac Brainard, Middletown, private, enlisted August 5, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability April 18, 1865. 

Edward H. Brewer, Middletown, private, enlisted August 6, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; died April 2, 1863. 

*MiCHAEL Brennan, Branford, private, enlisted July 25, 1S63, muster'^d 
in July 25, 1863; captured, date and place not shown; died July 3, 1864, 
Andersonville, Ga. 

Charles S. Brooks, Middletown, private, enlisted July 31, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, 
Va. ; killed October 14, 1863, Bristoe Station, Va. 

George Brown, Middletown, private, enlisted August 6, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; missing in action September 17, 1862, Antietam, Md. ; 
probably killed; no further record Adjutant-General's Office, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

^Gottfried Bruno, Newtown, private, enlisted September 30, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 30, 1863; captured Octol)er 14, 1863, Bristoe Station, 
Va. ; paroled November 20, 1864; discharged June 5, 1865; (correct name 
Gottlief Spitzer. ) 

*John Buckley, Cornwall, pri\ate, enlisted August 6, 1864, mustered 
in August 6, 1864; deserted August 21, 1864. 

Levi P. Burr, Haddam, private, enlisted August 11, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; deserted Novem1)er 2,^. 1862. 

Nathaniel Butler, Middletown, private, enlisted August 4, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; died l'"ebruary 3, i8()3. 

Sami;el G. Camp, Durham, prixate, enlisted August 6, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; wounded Seiitenilier 17, 1802, Antietam, Md. ; discharged 
on account of disal)ility March 3, 18(13. 

Earl T. Campbell, Durham, iirivate, enlisted .\ugust 19, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability January 2t„ 
1863. 

Thomas Capper, Middletown, private, enlisted July 25, 1802; mustered 
in August 20, 1S62; wounded May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville, Va. ; trans- 
ferred to 41st Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. September 14, 1864; discharged 
August 15, 1865, term expired. 



Official Roster. 395 

James H. Carson, Greenwich, jjiivate. enlisted Deceniher 7. iH6,^, mus- 
tered in Dcceml)er 7. 1863; deserted May -'5, i8()5. 

*Am!ert Chai'PEI.i., Windliani. private, enlisted .\ni;nst ,^t, 1.S63, nnistered 
in Augu.st 31, 1863; transferred In C>k K mI C. V. II. A. May 30, 1865. 

Albert H. Chamberlain, .\li<ldlclu\vn. pri\ate, enlisted May 9, 1864. 
mustered in .May Q. 1864; tra...,rerred to Co. e. _'d C. V. H. .\. :\lay 30. 
18OS. 

ASHiiEL .\. Clakk, .Middletown, pri\ate, enlisted Aus^nst 6, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20. 1862; discharged on account of disability January 30. 
1863. 

Alpheus D. Clark. Middletown, private, enlisted August i, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20. 1862; transferred to 57th Co. 2d Battali(Mi V. R. C. 
September 9, 1863; promoted corporal; transferred to 50th Co. 2d Battal- 
ion October 18, 1865 ; promoted captain Co. D I22d Regiment U. S. C. I. 
January 20, 1865; discharged January 17, 1866. 

William H. Clark, Middletown. private, enlisted Jidy 30, 1862, mus- 
tered in .\ugust 20, 1862; mustered out with company May 31. 1865. 

AVn.LiAM Clancey, Norwich, private, enlisted July 2,^, 1863, mustered in 
July 2jt,. 1863; transferred to Co. E 6th Regiment V. R. C. April 28. 1864; 
re-transferred May 3, 1865; transferred to Co. A 2d C. V. H. .\. May 30, 
1865. 

Marvin Cook, Middletown, private, enlisted .Vugust 4. 1862. nnistered 
in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability January 2H. 1863. 

Charles S. Crowell, Middletown, private, enlisted August 5, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; transferred to 41st Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. 
December 2, 1863 ; discharged August 4, 1865. 

DwiGHT Davis, Middletown, private, enlisted .A.ugust 6, 1862, mustered 
in .August 20, 1862; wounded May 5, 1864, Wilderness, Va : mustered out 
with company ^lay 31, 1865. 

'^'William Dengi-h), Bristol, private, enlisted September y, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 9, 1863; transferred to Co. G 14th Regiment Indiana 
Vols. October 8, 1863, a deserter therefrom under name of .\sher W. 
Foster. 

*John Dermodv, North Canaan, private, enlisted .August 7, 1803, mus- 
tered in August 7, 1863; wounded ( )ctolier 14, 18^)4, Bristoe Station, \'a. : 
discharged May 20, 1865. 

^Nicholas Dock, Hartford, private, enlisted .August 7, 1863, mustered 
in August 7, 1863; deserted Alarch 1, 1864. 

*Josei'h W. Donnelly, Hartford, private, enlisted .August 5, i8()3. mus- 
tered in .August 5, 1863; deserted August 18. 18O3. 

*John Doyle, (dastonbury, private, enlisted .August 5, 1803: mustered 
in August 5, 1863: wounded I'Vbrnary 6, 1864, Morton's lM)rd, \'a., wound- 
ed June 17, 1864, IVtersbnrg, \":i. : deserted August 20, 1864. 

*Samuel Drew, Salisbury, private, enlisted August 8, 180:?, unistered 
in August 8, 18O3; deserted October 11, 1863. 



396 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

*EnvvARD Di'FFY, Caiitoii, private, enlisted September 8, 1863, mustered 
m September 10, 1863; wounded May 12, 1864, Spottsylvania, Va. ; dis- 
charged on account of disability August 17, 1865. 

William Eck, Middletown, private, enlisted July 16, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; deserted August 25, 1862. 

John Edie, fBridgeport, private, enlisted August 5, 1863, mustered in 
August 5, 1863; deserted August 21, 1864. 

John Edv^ard, fBridgeport, private, enlisted August 4, 1863, mustered 
in August 4, 1863; discharged July 14, 1865. 

*Casper L. Elliott, Lebanon, private, enlisted July 24, 1863. mustered 
in July 24, 1863 ; discharged July 5, 1865. 

*Thomas English, Winchester, private, enlisted August 8, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 8. 1863; transferred to Co. B 2d C. V. 11. A. May 30, 
1865. 

Amos H. Fairchild, Middletown, private, enlisted August 4, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; died March 8, 1863. 

*JoHN Fahy, New Haven, private, enlisted August 7, i8()3, nuistered 
in August 7, 1863; transferred to Department of N. W. April 22, 1864; 
no further record Adjutant-General's Office, Washington, D. C. 

William B. Flacg, Woodstock, pri\alc, enlisted March 29, 1864; mus- 
tered in March 29, 1864; discharged on account of disability May 5, 1865. 

*James Flooii, liartford, private, enlisted August 7, 1863, nuistered m 
August 7, 1863; discharged October 11, 1865. 

*JoHN Flynn, fNew Haven, private, enlisted July 25. 1863. mustered 
in July 25, 1863; deserted August 14, 1863. 

Charles H. Gali'in, Middletown, private, enlisted August 6, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam, Md. ; 
discharged on account of disability Deceml)er 31. 1862; (See private Co. 
M ist C. V. Cavalry.) 

*JosEPH W. Galloway, Salisbury, private, enlisted August 8, iS'^i';, 
mustered in August 8, 1863; captured October 14, 1863, Bristoe Slalioii, 
Va. : died March 21, 1864, Augusta, Ga. 

*Grafton Gates, Vernon, private, enlisted September 2^,, 1S63, mus- 
tered in September 2^, 1863; transferred to U. S. N. May 5, 1864, as 
Judson Gray; served on U. S. S. "Bienville" and "Arkansas"; dischargel 
June 30, 1865. 

Thomas Gleason, Middletown, private, enlisted August 5, 186.2, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; wounded May (>, 1864, Wilderness, Va. ; deserted 
April 18, 1865. 

Franklin M. Goff, Middletown, private, enlisted August 5, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

*Albert Grobe, New Haven, private, enlisted July 18, 1863, mustered 
in July 18, 1863; deserted August 25, 1863. 

Augustus Guild, Middletown, private, enlisted August 4, 1862, nuistered 



Official Roster. 397 

in August _'0, iSO_'; wDundrd July 3. 1S63. Gcttysl)urg. Pa.; dischargcl 
June 5, 1865. 

*Patrick Haines. Cornwall, private, enlisted August 5. 1863. mustered 
in A.ugust 5. 1863; deserted August 23. 1863. 

*James Hall, Hartford, private, enlisted July 31, i8()3, mustered in 
July 31, 1863; deserted August i^, 1863. 

*Jame.s Hannan^ Grotdu, private, enlisted August 5, 1863, nuistered in 
August 5, 1863; deserted September 12, 1863. 

=''FuEi)EKic Harrison, Griswold, private, enlisted July 25, 18(13, mustered 
in July 25, 1863; wounded February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, Va. ; died 
February 12, 1864. 

*Thomas Harvey, Hartford, private, enlisted July 21, 1863, mustered 
in July 21, 1863; discharged on account of disability December 9, 1863. 

*George Harris, Stonington, private, enlisted August 7, 1863, mustered 
in August 7, 1863; deserted August 25, 1863. 

Thomas Harris, Woodstock, private, enlisted April 8, 1864, mustered 
in April 8, 1864; deserted April 18, 1865. 

*James Hayes, ist., Hartford, private, enlisted July 30, 1863, mustered 
in July 30, 1863; womided June 20, 1864, Petersburg, V'a., wounded October 
27. 1864, Boydton Plank Road, Va. ; no further record Adjutant-General's 
Office, Washington, 1). C 

*James H.wes, 2d., Groton, private, enlisted August 5, 1863, mustered 
in August 5, 1863; wounded May 10, 1864, Laurel Hill, Va. ; transferred 
to Co. H 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

^George Hayes. Berlin, private, enlisted August 7, !S()3, mustered in 
August 7. 1863; died June 30, 1864. 

John Henderson, Groton, private, enlisted April 13, 18(14, mustered in 
April 13, 18(14; transferred to Co. H October 9, 1864. 

*Saml-el Hekrinc, Farmington, private, enlisted September 9, 1863, 
mustered in September 9, 1863; killed June 3, 1864, Cold Harbor, \'a. 

Joseph H. Hilliker, Middletown, private, enlisted Jidy 26. 18(12, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; wounded December 13, 18(12, Fredericksburg, 
Va. ; discharged on account of disability April 2, 1863. 

William P. Hilliker, ^liddletown, private, enlisted Jidy 24, 1862, mus- 
tered in .August 20, 1862; killed December 13, 1862. l-"redericksburg, \'a. 

*Charles Hoffman, Windham, private, enlisted August 5, 1864, nuus- 
tered in August 5, 18(14: deserted August 21, 18(14. 

Clark P. Holmes, Middletown, private, enlisted August 4. 18(12, nuis- 
tered in August 20, 1862; captured October yj, 1864. Boydton Plank Road. 
Va. ; paroled Feliruary 17, 1865; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

*WiLLL\M Holt, Xew lla\en, pri\ate, enlisted July 18, \'^^},. mustered 
in July 18, 1863: diseliarged on account of disability I'\'l)ruary 15, 1S64. 

'"Thomas Holt, Stonington, private, enlisted July 29, 18(13, mustered in 
July 29, 1863; deserted August 14, 1863. 



398 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

*George Holman, f.vew Haven, private, enlisted Augnst 4, 1863, mns- 
tered in August 4, 1863; deserted August 25, 1863. 

*Henry H. Hooks, Windham, private, enlisted August 21. 1863, mustered 
in August 21. 1863; furloughed from hospital IMarch 26, 1865; failed to 
return; no further record Adjutant-GeneraFs Oflice. Washington, D. C. 

Robert Hubbard, Middletown. private, enlisted August 6. 1862. mustered 
in August 20, 1862; killed September 17, 1862. Antietam, Md. 

Daniel B. Hubbard, Middletown. private, enlisted August 2. 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20. 1862; discharged on account of disabilitv Januarv 19. 
1863. 

Gilbert H. HuiUiAKD. Aliddletown, private, enlisted August 4, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability June 19. 
1863. 

Malcom S. Ingham. Middletown, private, enlisted July 31. 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20. 1862; discharged on account of disabilitv February 14. 
1863. 

William H. Johnson, Middletown. private, enlisted August 5, 1862, 
mustered in August 20. 1862; killed Decemlier 13, 1862. I'redericksburg, Va. 

Sherman Johnson, Middletown, private, enlisted August 4, 1862. mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered out with company May 31. 1865. 

Wilbur W. Johnson. Middletown. private, enlisted August 5, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; appointed hospital steward January i, 1863. 

*Thomas Johnson, Voluntown. private, enlisted July 29. 1863. mustered 
in July 29, 1863 ; deserted August 14, 1863. 

*John Johnson, Hartford, private, enlisted August i, 1863, mustered 
in August I, 1863; deserted August 14, 1863. 

^William Jones, Hartford, private, enlisted July 31, 1863, mustered in 
July 31, 1863; deserted October 23, 1863. 

Austin Junn, Middletown, private, enlisted August 5, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville, Va. ; died June 
9, 1863. 

James Keirnes, Middletown. private, enlisted August 5, 1862. mustered 
in August 20. 1862; wounded March 31. 1864. Hatcher's Run. Va. ; dis- 
charged on account of disability July 10, 1865. 

Henry A. Kent, Pomfret, private, enlisted August 20, 1863, mustered 
in August 20, 1863; transferred to Co. E 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

Eugene W. Kenyon, Middletown, private, enlisted August 7, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; died December 31, 1862. 

Christian H. King, Middletown, private, enlisted August 4, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862 ; discharged on account of disability January 
19, 1863. 

*Henry a. Lawrence, Waterbury, private, enlisted August 22. 1863, 
mustered in August 22, 1863; wounded May 10. 1864, Laurel Hill, Va. ; 
discharged on account of disabiHty May 8, 1865. 



Official Roster. 399 

*MiCHAEL Lenard, \\'asliington, private, enlisted September 14, t8()3, 
mustered in Septeber 14, 1803; deserted December 18, 1863. 

David B. Lincoln. Aliddletown, private, enlisted July 31, i8()2, nnistered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded December 13. 1802, l-'redericksburg, Va. ; 
died December 17, 1862. 

Charles E. Lonc, (ila^tonbury, prixale, cnti>led 1 )e>,H>nib'.T 12, 1864, 
mustered in December 12, iS()4; transferred tn Co. ]•: jd C. V. II. A. May 
30, 1865. 

Richard Lvmii, (ilastonlinry, pri\ale, enlisted December 14, 1864, 
mustered in December 14, 18(14 ; transferred to Co. H 2d C. V. U . A. ]\lay 
^^0, 1865. 

*George B. Manning, Hartford, private, enlisted July 21, 1863, mustered 
ir July 21, 1863; deserted October 14, 1864. 

James H. Marble, Middletown, private, enlisted August 6, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericks- 
burg, Va. ; discharged on account of disability February 14, 1863. 

George S. May,, Middletown, private, enlisted July 30, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; killed May 6, 1864. Wilderness. Va. 

Hugh McBrayne, Middletown. private, enlisted August 4, 1862. 
mustered in August 20. 1862; (See private Co. A 2d C. W): wounded 
September 17, 1862, Antietam, }^ld. ; discharged on account of disability 
December 3, 1863. 

Daniel AIcCartv, Glastonlnny. private, enlisted December 7, 1864, 
mustered in Decem))er 7, 1864; deserted April 18. 1865. 

*Henry McGill, Norwich, private, enlisted July 24, 18(13, nnistered in 
August I, 1863; deserted August 14, 1863. 

*BERNARn McGrevor, Plymouth, private, enlisted December 5, i86a, 
mustered in August 5, 1864; deserted August 21, 1864. 

*David McIntyre, Southington, private, enlisted September 17. 1863, 
mustered in September 17, 1863; died April 22, 1864. 

William W. Miller, Middletown, private, enlisted August i, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; killed .\iigust 16, 1864, Deep Bottom, Va. 

Aaron Moffitt, Killingly, iirivate, enlisted August 18, 1863, mustered 
in August 20, 1863; died October i, 1864. 

Michael Murphy, Columbia, private, enlisted December 3, 1864, 
mustered in December 3, 1864; transferred to Co. H 2d C. V. H. A. 
May 30, 1865. 

*JuLius Nagle, Norwalk, private, enlisted October 2, 1863. mustered in 
October 2. 1863; deserted October 11, 1863. 

*Ja.mes O'Brien, Hartford, private, enli-ted July 21. i8(.). niu-tered in 
July 21. 1864; deserted \ii.t-uM 21, 1864. 

Daniel H. Otis, Middletown, private. enli>ted August 4, i8()2. mustered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, iM-edericksburg, Va. ; 
died December 13, 1863. 



400 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

*Carl Pami'le, Norwalk, private, enlisted October 2, 1863. mustered in 
October 2, 1863; captured May 12, 1864, Spottsylvania, Va. ; dieil July 
24, 1864, Andersonville, Ga. 

Wilbur Peck. Middletown, private, enlisted August 4, 1862. mustered 
in August 20, 1862 ; mustered out with company May 31, 7865. 

*RoBERT Phillips, Milford, private, enlisted August 8, 1863, mus- 
in August 8, 1863; died March 15, 1865. 

John Planter, Danbury. private, enlisted December 17, 1864, muscercd 
in December 17, 1864; deserted April 7, 1865. 

*Charle.s E. Pollard, Franklin, private, enlisted July 2^,, 1863, mustered 
in July 25, 1S63; captured August 25, 1864, Ream's Station, Va. ; paroled 
Octo])or S, 1864; transferred to Co. E 2d C. V. l\. A. May 30, 1865. 

CvKis S. Priest. Middletown, private, enlisted August 2, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded May 3, 1863, Cbancellorsville, Va. ; trans- 
ferred to 159th Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. September 14, 1864; discharged 
July 5. 1865. 

I. Beauchamp Prior, Middletown. private, enlisted .Vugusl 5, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; mustered out with '^ompan\ May 31. 1865. 

*Ranfori) Rigcs, Meriden, prixate, enlisted August 8, iu6.^, musteied 
in August 8, 1863; (See private Co. 1'" 27111 C. V.; ; transicrn>d to Co. E 
2d C. V. M. A. May 30, 1865. 

Davis W. Robinson, Durham, private, enlisted August 5, 1862, nnistered 
in August 20, 1862; transferred to 82d Co. 2 Battalion V. R. C. January 
29. 1864; transferred to Co. F i8th Regiment V. R. C. April 22, 1864; 
promoted corporal September i, 1864; discharged June 2/, 1865. 

*John Rohback, Norwalk, private, enlisted Octolier 2, 1863. mustered 
in October 2, 1863; transferred to Co. V. 2d C. V. H. A. May 30. 1865. 

William Russell, Middletown. private, enlisted August 6, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; died l*\'l)ruary 18, 1863. 

Joseph Schleihter, Middletown. pri\ate, enlisted July 21, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered out witli company ^lay 31. 1865, 

James Scully, Bridgeport, private, enlisted September 15, i8fi3, 
mustered in September 15, 1863; killed May (\ 18(14, Wilderness, Va. 

Louis SENc;L.\i'r,, Waterbury, pri\ate, enlisted August 8, 18O2, mustereil 
in August 20, 1862; (See private Co. A 2d C. V.); appointed priucipai 
musician May i, 1863. 

Joseph N. Shailor, Middletown, iirivate, enlisted July 31, '.S62, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of di.-^abilit\ l-'ebruary 
II, 1863. 

*Frank Shannon, Hartford, private, enlisted June 30, 1864, miLstered 
in June 30, 1864; deserted August 21, 1864. 

Andrew Shirer, Middletown, private, enlisted August 2, i8h>. mistered 
in August 20, 1862 ; died January 3, 1863. 

Thomas Slocum, Danbury, private, enlisted December 17, 1S64, 
mustered in December 17, 1864; deserted May 26, 1865. 



Official Roster. 401 

Martin W. Smith. Middlrtnwn, private. (.nlisUd AiiLV-i 5, i(%-. 
mustered in August 20, iXftj; discliarged on accoiuit of disalfility January 
17, 1863. 

William D. Smith. Middlotnwu. ])rivatL\ enlisted August 2, 1S62. 
mustered in August _'0. 1.S62; wounded July 3. iSf).:?. (icttysburg, Pa.; 
mustered out with C(iini)auy May 31, 1865. 

John Smith, Danliury. private, enlisted December 17, 1864, nuistered 
in December 17, 1.864; deserted March 25, 1865. 

*Warren Smith, llartbird, private, enlisted July 28, 1863, nni.-tered in 
July 28, 1863, discharged May 29. 1S65. 

William H. Spencer, Middletown, private, enlistee' August 4. 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; discharged on accoimt of disability Febru- 
ary I, 1863; (See private Co. A ist C. V. H. A.) 

*Gottlief Spitzer, Newtown, private, enlisted September 30, 1863, 
mustered in September 30, 1863; see Gottfried Bruno. 

William E. Starr, IMiddletown, private, enlisted August 11. i86.^ 
mustered in August 20, 1862; lischarged on iceount of disability De- 
cember II, 1862. 

*Thadddeus Steinheil. Norwalk, private, enlisted October 2, 1863; 
mustered in October 2, 1863; wounded bA-bruary 6, 18(14, Morton's For.l. 
Va., wounded May 10, 1864, Laurel Hill, Va. ; transferred to Co. F 2d 
C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

William Taylor, Middletown, private, enlisted August 6. 1862. 
mustered in August 20, 1862; wounded May 10, 1864, F^mrel Hill. Va. ; 
mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

*JoHN H. Teale, New Haven, private, enlisted July 2j. 1863, mustered 
in July 27, 1863: wounded May 10, 1864, Laurel Hill, Va. ; transferre 1 
to Co. b: 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

*EnwARi) Thompson, Vohmtown, private, enlisted July 20. 1863, 
mustered in July 26, 1863, deserted August 14, 1863. 

*Hiram H. Tucker, Killingly, private, enlisted .\ugust 15. 1863, 
mustered in August 15, 1863; died April 27, 1864. 

John E. Vandervoort, Durham, private, enlisted August 5, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862. Fredericksburg, 
Va. ; transferred to Co. F 3d Regiment V. R. C. July 13, 1863: detailed 
musician August 18, 1863 : returned to ranks October 4, 1864: discharged 
on account of disability January 25, 1865. 

^William Voicka. Norwalk. private, enlisted October 2, 18(13, mustered 
in October 2, 1863; wounded May 10. 1864. Laurel Hill, \'a. : dischaiged 
June 2T„ 1865. 

Thomas We.wkk. Daubury. private, enlisted December 17. 18(14. 
nuistered in Decemlier 17, 18(14; dishonor-.bly discharged by (ieneral Court 
Martial June 19, 1865. 

♦Carpenter Weeks, iuistford, private, enlisted .August 21. 18(33, 



402 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

mustered in August 21, 1863 ; wounded February 6. 1864, Morton's Ford, 
Va. ; discharged on account of disability July 8, 1865. 

*JoHN Welsh, Meriden, private, enlisted August 22, 1863, mustered in 
August 22, 1863 ; deserted October 28, 1863. 

*Franklin B. West, Putnam, private, enlisted September 15, 1863, 
mustered in September 15, 1863; captured October 14, 1863, Bristot 
Station, Va. ; died January 19, 1864, Richmond, Va. 

Enoch Wilcox, 2d., Middletown, private, enlisted August 5, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; (See private Co. F. ist C. V.), killed ])e- 
cember 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va. 

Benjamin C. Wilcox, Middletown, private, enlisted August 2, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, i8t)2. Antictam, 
Md. ; discharged on account of disability January 30, 1863. 

*James Wilson, Norwich, private, enlisted July 25, 1863, mustered in 
July 25, 1863 ; wounded February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, Va. ; trans- 
ferred to U. S. N. May 5, 1864; served on U. S. S. "Bienville" and 
"Oneida" ; discharged December 5, 1865. 

*Thomas Wilson, Prospect, private, enlisted August 8, 1863. mustered 
in August 8, 1863 ; transferred to 2d Regiment ^Massachusetts Cavalry 
February 20, 1864; a deserter therefrom. 

George Williams. Coventry, private, enlisted December 10. 1864, 
mustered in December 10, 1864; transferred to Co. E 2d C. V. H. A. May 
30, 1865. 

DwiGHT WoLcoTT, Middletown, private, enlisted July 31. 1862. mustered 
in August 20, 1862; killed December 13. 1862, Fredericksburg, Va. 

George E. Wood, Middletown, private, enlisted July 31, 1862. mustered 
in August 20, 1862; transferred to 19th Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. Angiist 
6, 1864; discharged July 31, 1865. 

COMPANY C. 

Samuel W. Carpenter, Waterbury, captain, enlisted August 4, iS<')2, 
mustered in August 24, 1862; (See ist lieutenant Co. D ist C. V.) ; 
wounded December 13, 1862. Fredericksburg. Va. ; transferred to captain 
Co. E i6th Regiment V. R. C. September 15, 1863; discharged November 
29. 1867. 

James F. Simpson, Waterbury, captain, enlisted August 4, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; mustered 2d lieutenant; promoted ist lien- 
tenant Co. D February 4, 1863; promoted from ist lieutenant Co. D 
October 20, 1863; wounded August 25, 1864, Ream's Station, Va. ; dis- 
charged on account of disability November 16. 1864. 

Frederick J. Seymour, Waterbury, ist lieutenant, enlisted August 4, 
1862, mustered in August 20, 1862; promoted captain Co. G November 
12, 1862, (not mustered) ; discharged December 24, 1862. 



Official Roster. 403 

Miles S. Wright, Bridgeport, ist licuiinrint. enlisted August u. 1862. 
mustered in August 20, i(%2; promoted imut m] lieutenant Co. A No- 
vember JO, 1862, (not mustered) ; dismissed Mareh i, ]H()t,. 

Ika a. (iKAHA.M, Durham, 1st lieutenant, enlisted August 6. 1S62, 
nuistered in August 20, 1862; promoted from 2(\ lieutenant Co. H January 
13, 1865; wounded February 5, 1865. Hateher's Run. \'a. ; nuistered out 
with company May 31, 1865. 

Lrcus L. Dyer, Bridgeport, jd lieutenant, enlisted August 9. t86.', 
mustered in August 20, 1862; promoted from sergeant Co. A AFarcii 3. 
1863; 1st lieutenant May 16, 1863, (not mustered); dishonorably dis- 
charged February 11, 1804. 

Jfi.irs W. Knowlton, Bridgeport. 2d lieutenant, enlisted June 24, 1862, 
nuistered in August 23, 1862; promoted from commissary-sergeant Janu- 
ary II, 1864; discharged on account of disability March 29, 1864. 

J. Frank Morgan, Middletown, 2d liutenant, enlisted August 6, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862: promoted from ist sergeant Co. B April ^. 
1864; captain Co. H June 26, 1864. 

J.\MES M. Moore, East Windsor, 2d lieutenant, enlisted August 6, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; promoted from sergeant Co. E July 16, 1864; 
killed August 25, 1864, Ream's Station. Va. 

George A. Stocking. Waterbury, ist sergeant, enlisted July 12, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862 ; promoted 2d lieutenant Co. 13 November 1 3, 
1863. 

William H. Nelson, Jr., Waterbury. ist sergeant, enlisted July 26. 
1862, mustered in August 20. 1862: mustered private; promoted sergeant 
November 3. 1863; ist sergeant November 16, 1864; wounded February 6, 
1864, Morton's Ford, Va. ; reduced to sergeant September 20, [864; pro- 
moted 1st sergeant Februay 15, 1865; mustered out witli company Mav 
31. 1865. 

WiLLi.\M L. G. PRiTCH.\Kn, Waterbury, ist sergeant, enlisted August 1, 
1S62, mustered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted corporal 
January 14, 1864; sergeant March i, 1864; ist sergeant September 20, 1864; 
2d lieutenant Co. B February 15, 1865. 

Henry F. Bissel, Waterbury, sergeant, enlisted July 30, 1862, iiiu>tu--d 
in August 20, 1862; mustered corporal; promoted February 9, 1863; trans- 
ferred to Co. F 3d Regiment V. R. C. Julv 13, 1863; dischaiged Jnlv 0, 
1865. 

l^'JEHERUK A. Chase, New Haven, sergeant, enlisted July 5, 1862. mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted sergeant November 
3. 18O3 ; reduced to ranks January 24, 1864; wour.dcd May 5, i8!'i4, Wil 
derncss, Va. ; discharged on account of disability Alarch 9, 1S65. 

John E. Durand, Waterbury, sergeant, enlisted July 16, 1862, nnistcred 
in August 20, 1862; fliscli.-irged on account of disability .\pril 2. 1863. 



404 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

James J. Gilbert, Waterbury, sergeant, enlisted July 24, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; appointed sergeant-major February 4, 1863. 

Sylvester G. Lord, Vernon, sergeant, enlisted August 2, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted corporal November 3, 
1863; sergeant January i, 1864; wounded February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, 
Va., wounded May 10, 1864, Po River, Va. ; mustered out with company 
May 31, 1865. 

Alexander McNeil, Waterbury, sergeant, enlisted August 2, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862 ; mustered corporal ; promoted sergeant Noveni 
ber 3. 1863; missing in action February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, Va. ; sup- 
posed killed; no further record Adjutant-General's Office, Washington, 
D. C. 

BiRDSEY Pickett, Waterbury, sergeant, enlisted June 24, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; (See private Co. D ist C. V.); mustered corporal; 
promoted February 10, 1863 ; died May 10, 1863. 

William A. Rice, Waterbury, sergeant, enlisted August 2, 1862. mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862: mustered private: wounded July 3, 1863, Gettys- 
burg, Pa.; promoted sergeant April 14, 1S64; killed May 6, 1864, Wilder- 
ness, Va. 

Henry L. Snagg, Waterbury, sergeant, enlisted August 4. 1862. mustered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksl)urg, Va. ; ap- 
pointed sergeant-major April 15, 1863. 

DwiGHT L. Somers, Waterbury, sergeant, enlisted July 31. 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted corporal October i, 
1862; sergeant February 9, 1863; transferred to 76th Co. 2d Battalion V 
R. C. October 14, 1863; discharged on account of disability November 13, 
1863. 

Henry W. Wadhams, Waterbury, sergeant, enlisted August 4, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va. ; 
promoted 2d lieutenant Co. D March 3, 1863. 

*JoHN Barton, North Stonington, corporal, enlisted August 3, 1863, 
mustered in August 3, 1863; mustered private; promoted November i. 
1863; reducd to ranks (sick) January 13. 1864; deserted February 12, 
1864. 

Charles A. Beebe, Waterbury, corporal, enlisted July 2, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private; captured May 3, 1863, Chancellors- 
ville, Va. ; paroled May 13, 1863; promoted January 14, 1864: reduced to 
ranks May 8, 1864; killed June 3, 1864, Cold Harbor, Va. 

*WiLLiAM Bennett, Southbury, corporal, enlisted August 8. 1863, mus- 
tered in August 8. 1863; mustered private; promoted November 3. 1863; 
wounded February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford. Va. ; deserted May 20, 1864. 

Matthew Budge, Waterbury, corporal, enlisted August 5, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability March 30, 1863. 

*JoHN Burns, Groton, corporal, enlisted August 3, 1863, mustered in 



Official Roster. 405 

August 3, 1863; mustered prixalc ; i)r(nnote(l N()veuil)cr 3. 1S63". reduced 
to ranks Januar)- 13. iSr)4; wounded ()oct()l)er 27. 1864. I'.oydton Plank 
Road, Va. ; died November 15, 1864. 

Theodore D. Bvington, Waterbury, corporal, enlisted August 11. iS'u, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; wounded Septembei- ',';, 
1862, Antietam, Md.; promoted February 10. 1863, wounded May 3, 1863, 
Chancellorsville, Va. ; wounded July 3. 1863, Gettysburg, Pa.; transferred 
to Co. K i8tb Regiment V. R. C. December i, 1863; discliarged July 20, 
1865. 

William Carey, Waterbury, corporal, enlisted July 10, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; (See private Co. D ist C. V.) ; mustered private; in- 
jured July 2, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa.; promotd July 6, 1864; reduced to 
ranks May 16, 1865; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Lucius Curtis, Waterbury, corporal, enlisted July 30, 1862. nuL^tered in 
August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam, Aid.; discharged 
on account of disability March 30, 1863. 

*JoHN Edwards, Pomfret, corporal, enlisted September 12, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 12, 1863; mustered private; promoted November I, 
1863; reduced to ranks January 13, 1864; wounded October .7, 1R64, 
Boydton Plank Road, Va. ; discharged July 14, 1865. 

Frederick A. Ellis, Waterbury, corporal, enlisted August 6, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; uuistered private; wounded Alay 12, 1864, 
Spottsylvania, Va. ; promoted September 14, 1864; discharged June 21, 
1865. 

Edward A. Judd, Waterlmry, corporal, enlisted July 8, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted January 14, 1S64; reduced 
to ranks (sick) April 15, 1864; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Henry Keeler, Waterbury, corporal, enlisted August 2, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862: killed September 17, 1862, Antietam, Md. 

b:i>w.\KD KiLDUFF, Waterbury, corporal, enlisted July 12, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; uuistered private, wounded May 3, 1863. Chancellors- 
ville, Va. ; promoted .■\i)ril 14, 1864; wounded June 3. 1864, ("old Harbor, 
Va. ; reduced to ranks (sick) December 9, 1864; promoted eorjioral J;ui- 
uary i, 1865; uuistered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Patrick Mi-.M.miox, W'alerburw corporal, enlisted August 1. i8()2. mus- 
tered in .\ugust 20, i8r)2; mustered private; promoted November 14. i8()4; 
died May 15. t8()5. 

David Mix. Waterbury. cori)oral. enlisted July 15, i8(>2. mustered 
in August 20, 1862; (See jirivate Co. D ist C. V.); killed September 17, 
1862, Antietam. Md. 

Hemax a. Mokkis, Watertown. cori^oral, enlisted June 2,-!,. 18(12. mus- 
tered in .\ugust 20, i8()2; mustered private; iironioted .\iigust 14. 1802: 
reduced to ranks (sick) November 1. i8(>3; transferred to Co. .\ ('lli 
Regiment V. R. < ". December 18. iS()3; promoted corporal; died January 
-'5. 18O4. 



406 Fourteenth Regiment, C. jV. Infantry. 

James Morrian, Avon, corporal, enlisted February i6, 1864, mustered 
in February 16, 1864; mustered private; promoted April 14, 1864; wound- 
ed June 3, 1864, Cold Harbor, Va. ; reduced to ranks (sick) ; transferred 
to Co A. 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

George W. Monson, Waterbury, corporal, enlisted July 15, 1862, mus- 
stered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted October i, 1862; 
reduced to ranks (sick) November i, 1863; transferred to Co. I 4th 
Regiment V. R. C. September 26, 1864; promoted corporal; discharged 
July 15, 1865. 

John O'Hara. Andover, corporal, enlisted February 17, 1864, mustered 
in February 17, 1864; mustered private; promoted April 14, 1864; deserted 
May 20, 1864. 

Seth W. Percy, Waterbury, corporal, enlisted August 2, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; wounded September 17, 1862, 
Antietam, Md. ; promoted October 5, 1862; transferred to Co. F 3d Regi- 
ment V. R. C. July 13, 1863; drowned August 2, 1864, Hartford, Conn. 

*Thomas Ryan, Meriden, corporal, enlisted September 5, 1863, mustered 
in September 5, 1863; mustered private; promoted November i, 1863; 
reduced to ranks; transferred to Co. A 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

Eugene Tryon, Hartford, corporal, enlisted February 25, 1864, mustered 
■in February 25, 1864; mustered private; promoted April 15, 1865; trans- 
ferred to Co. B 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

Frederick F. Welton, Waterbury, corporal, enlisted August 9, 1862, 
mustered in August .^0, 1862; mustered private; promoted February 10, 
1863; died March 22, 1863. 

Robert Wolfe, Waterbury, corporal, enlisted July 12, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted January 14, 1864; wound- 
ed May 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va., wounded August 25, 1864, Ream's Sta- 
tion, Va. ; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

'^JoHN Wri(;ht, Hartford, corporal, enlisted July 30, 1863, mustered 
in July 30, 1863; mustered private; promoted November i, 1863; reduced 
to ranks (sick) January 13, 1864; deserted January — , 1864. 

Franklin Aldkich, Waterbury, musician, enlisted August 4, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; transferred to ranks; deserted March 14, 1863. 

Eli Charter, Waterbury, musician, enlisted August 8, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; (See nnisician Co. B ist C. V.); deserted March 4, 
1863. 

Nathan Stowk. Milford, musician, enlisted August 5, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; nnistered private; detailed musician; mustered out 
with company May 31, 1865. 

John Lines, Waterbury. musician, enlisted August 15, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private; detailed musician; mustered out 
with company May 31, i8()5. 



]iri\atr, enlisted 


August 


15. 


i86j. 


:1 out with Cdiiip 


any May 


.^1. 


iSf5. 


private, enlisted 


August 


18, 


1862, 


May 28, 1863. 









Official Roster. 407 

A.UGUSTUS Bavek, Walcrhury, vvag<iuer, enlisted June 23, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Ferrinc AiiHK, Waterl)tn-y, pri\ate. enlisted August 8. 1862, mustered 
in August 20. 1862; (See iirivate Co. B 10th C. V.); deserted March 3. 
1863. 

George A. Ahams. ist., Waterlmry 
mustered in August 20, 18(12; mu-terv 

George A. Auams. 2d., Waterbury, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; deserted 

Treat D. Andrews, Waterbury, private, enlisted July 28, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability January 6, 1863. 

Frederick Austin, Waterbury, private, enlisted July 29, 1862, mustererl 
in August 20, 1862; captured, date and place not shown; died April 8, 1^64, 
Richmond, Va. 

Jonathan R. Baldwin, Waterbury, private, enlisted July 29, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability April 14, 
1863. 

*Edward Beach, Suffield, private, enlisted August 18, 1863, mustered in 
August 18, 1863 ; transferred to unassigned detachment V. R. C. January 
26, 1864; discharged on account of disability February it, 1864. 

Sylvanus N. Beckwitm. Fairiield, private, enlisted Feliruary 24. 1864, 
mustered in February 24, 1864; wounded May 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va. ; 
transferred to Co. A 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

John Bergan, Canton, private, enlisted November 18, 1864, mustered in 
November 18, 1864; deserted December 25, 1864. 

"''William Birch, Meriden, private, enlisted Septemljer 15, 1863. nnisli-r- 
cd in September 15, 1863; deserted July 13, 1864. 

Franklin Blake, Waterbury, private, enlisted August 8, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; deserted I'^eliruary 20, 1863. 

*John Blann, jNew llaveu. private, enlisted August 4, 1863, luus- 
t.red in August 4, 1863; wounded October 27. 1864, Boydton Plank Road. 
Va. ; died November 10, 1864. 

Wm-Liam F. Bowen. Avon, jirivate, enlisted November 14, i8()4, mus- 
tered in November 14, 1864; transferred to Co. .\ 2d (.". \'. II. .\. May 
.10, 1865. 

*WiLLiAM Brahenv, Grotou, prixate, enlisted August 4, 1863, mustered 
in August 4, 1863; killed February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, \'a. 

*I''kederick Brennan, Litchheld. private, enlisted August 4, i8t)3, nuis- 
tered in August 4, 1863; captured Octol^er 14, 1863, 15ristoe Station, Va. ; 
paroled .April 16, 1864; transferred to Co. .\ 2(1 C. V. 11. A. May 30, 1865. 

^"George Bkeen, Norwalk. jirixale, enlisted October 2, 1863, mustered in 
(k-tober 2, 1863, deserted Ocloler 21, 18(13. 

IIkxkn- W. r.Kowx, Waterbury. !>ii\ate, enlisted .\ugust 4, i8()2, muster- 
ed in .\ugust 20, l8()2; nuistered out witli company May 31. 18(15. 



408 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Jeremiah U. Brown, Ellington, private, enlisted August 4, 1862. mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; died April 5, 1865. 

John Bull, fPetersburg, Va., private, enlisted October 31, 1864, mustered 
in October 31, 1864; appears on Mustered Out Roll as transferred to V. R. 
C. October 30, 1864; no further record Adjutant-General's Office, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

*JoHN A. Burns, Hartford, private, enlisted July 31, 1863, mustered in 
July 31, 1863; deserted August 12, 1863. 

*RoBERT Burton, Meriden, private, enlisted September 2, 1863, mustered 
in September 2, 1863 ; fell out on march between Culpepper and Center- 
ville, Va., October 11-16, 1863; no further record Adjutant-General's Of- 
fice, Washington, D. C. 

Bazil Candee, Waterbury, private, enlisted August 6, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; died September 11, 1864. 

Edward Carroll, Torrington, private, enlisted July 8, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; deserted March 29, 1863. 

Henry Castle, Waterbury, private, enlisted August 15, 1862. mustered 
in August 20, 1862; (See private Co. D ist C. V.); mustered out with 
company May 31, 1865. 

*SinNEY O. Case, Hartford, private, enlisted August 21, 1863, mustered 
in August 2T, 1863; transferrd to Co. A 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

Lyman B. Chatfield, Waterbury, private, enlisted June 30, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; captured October 14, 1863, Bristoe Station, Va. ; 
paroled April 16, 1864; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

John D. Chatfield, Waterbury, private, enlisted August 12, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; captured October 14, 1863, Bristoe Station, Va. ; 
paroled April 16, 1864; discharged June i. 1865. 

Joseph A. Chamberlin, Naugatuck, private, enlisted July 21, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; died April 12, 1863. 

*WiLLiAM Chapman, Sharon, private, enlisted July 25, 1863. mustered 
in July 28, 1863; died January 15, 1864. 

Charles C. Chappel, Hartford, private, enlisted January 14, 1865, mus- 
tered in January 14, 1865; transferred to Co. A 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 
1865; (correct name Charles C. Randall). 

John Clark, Andover, private, enlisted February 17, 1864, mustered in 
February 17, 1864; deserted May 20, 1864. 

George Clark, Canton, private, enlisted November 17, 1864. mustered in 
November 17, 1864; deserted December 25, 1864. 

*James Coles, Meriden, private, enlisted September 7, 1863, mustered in 
September 17. 1863; wounded May 12, 1864, Spottsylvania, Va. ; deserted 
June 30, 1864. 

William Collins, Hartland, private, enlisted November 21, 1864, mus- 
tered in November 21, 1864; deserted December i"], 1864. 



Official Roster. 409 

EmviN A. Ckaw, Watcrbury, private, enlisted Auj^ust 15, i86j. mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; discliarged on account of disaliilitv January 3, 
1863. 

John Crane, Bridgeport, private, enlisted January 4, 1865, nmstered in 
January 4, 1865; transferred to Co. A 2d C. V. 11. A. May 30, 1865. 

Cornelius Daley, Middletown, private, enlisted July 31, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded July 3, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa., wounded May 
T2, 1864, Spottsylvania, Va. ; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

*Edmond Danford, tNew Haven, private, enlisted August 8, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 8, 1863; (See private Co I 20th C. V.) ; discharged on ac- 
count of disability April 4, 1864. 

*NiCH0LAS Dean, Torrington, private, enlisted September 7, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 7, 1863 ; missing in action February 6, 1864, Morton's 
Ford. Va. ; supposed captured; reported died at Richmond, Va. ; no fur- 
ther record Adjutant-General's C)fifice, Washington, D. C. 

Michael Delaney, Waterbury, private, enlisted August 7, 1862. mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; died September 12, 1863. 

*JoHN Dermby, tNew Haven, private, enlisted August 28. 1863. mustered 
m August 28, 1863 ; wounded February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford. Va., 
wounded May 12, 1864, Spottsylvania, Va. ; deserted July 25, 1864. 

John Donovan^ Guilford, private, enlisted February 25. 1864, mustered 
in February 25, 1S64; deserted March 29, 1864. 

James Donnely, Wethersfield, private, enlisted November ly, 1864, 
mustered in November 19, 1864; deserted December 25, i8()4. 

Samuel E. Doolittle, Waterbury, private, enlisted July 31. 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; deserted March i, 1863. 

William Doyle, Waterbury, private, enlisted September 12, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 12. 1863; deserted November 23, 1863. 

Charles 1u)\vari)s, Glastonbury, private, enlisted December 7, 1864, mus- 
tered in December 7, 1864; transferred to Co. A 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 
1865. 

*Christian Eiche, Washington, private, enlisted September 7, 1863, 
mustered in September 17, 1863; deserted November 30, 1863. 

William H. Ellis, Waterbury, private, enlisted August 11, i8(>_'. nuLs- 
tered in August 20, i8f)2: killed October ly, 1864, I'.oydtmi ri.ink \<^ya(\, 
Va. 

*Charles 1<\\llon. tNew Haven, private, enlisted September 13, iS()3, 
mustered in September 13, 1863; deserted October — , 1863. 

Thomas Farrell, Waterbury. private, enlisted July 12. 18O2. nmstered 
ir August 20, 1862; wounded December 13, 1802, b'rederieksburg, Va , 
transferred to i8th Co. 2d I'.attalion V. R. C. August 12, 18(14: disch.irged 
on account of disability July 12, 1865. 

James Francis, Glastonbury, ])riv;ite, enlisted l'\-bru;iry 17, 18(14, mus- 
tered in bVbruary 17, i8()4; disebarged June J.},. i8()5. 



410 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

David L. Fkisbie^ Waterbury, private, enlisted August 12, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

*Charles Frey, Fairfield, private, enlisted August 4, 1864, mustered in 
August 5, 1864; transferred to Co. E 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

Edward Fuller, Waterbury, private, enlisted July 12, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; deserted November 24, 1862. 

James F. Gaunt, Waterbury, private, enlisted August 9, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability March 19, 
1863. 

Duncan D. Gibbud, Waterbury, private, enlisted June 23, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862 ; transferred to Co. C 20th Regiment V. R. C. October 
3, 1863; discharged July 10, 1865. 

Manfred M. Gibbud, Waterbury, private, enlisted August 8, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; deserted September 17, 1862. 

*Thomas Gilligan^ Norwich, private, enlisted August 3, 1864, mustered 
in August 3, 1864; deserted August 20, 1864. 

William C. Goodrich, Waterbury, private, enlisted August 6, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam, Md. ; dis- 
charged on account of disability November 29, 1862. 

*Antonio Grcso, Bridgeport, private, enlisted August i, 1864; mustered 
in August I, 1864; deserted September 13, 1864. 

Charles T. Hamilton, East Haddam, private, enlisted July 29, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam, Md., 
died October 29, 1862. 

Charles Haley, fHartford, private, enlisted August 5, 1863; mustered 
in August 5, 1863; discharged on account of disability September 13, 1864. 

*Julius Herman_, fHartford, private, enlisted August 5, 1863; mustered 
i,; August 5, 1863; captured October i-|, 1863, Bristce Station. Va. ; pa- 
roled April 16, 1864; discharged May 2^, 1865. 

*Henry Herman, fHartford, private, enlisted August 7, 1863, nnistered 
in August 7, 1863; deserted August 18, 1863. 

Thomas M. Hill, Waterbury, private, enlisted August 5, 1862, nnistered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded Septeiii])er 17, 1862, Antietam. Md.. dis- 
charged June 5. 1865. 

*Henry Hink, Hartford, private, enlisted August 5. 1863. mustered in 
August 5, 1863; transferred to Co. E 2d C. V. H. A. May 30. 1865. 

^Albert Hoffman, New Haven, private, enlisted August 7, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 7, 1863; captured Octolier 14, 1863, Bristoe Station, Va. ; 
paroled April 16, 1864; transferred to Co. A 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

*TnHN Hogan, Salisbury, private, enlisted .Kugust 7. 1863, mustered ir 
August 7, 1863 ; deserted August ao, 1863. 

James Howard, Suffield, private, enlisted November 21, 18(14, mustered 
in November 21, 1864; deserted December r], i86^. 



Official Roster. 411 

Thomas ]lr(;iii:s. Aiulovcr, private, enlisted Feljniary 17. 1864, niu'.- 
tered in February 17, 1864; deserted May 20, 1864. 

Clark L. Hikh. Waterbury, private, enlisted August 2, 1862, nnistered 
in August 20. ^S()2: nnistered out with eompany May 31, 1865. 

Phillip Hutton, Madison, private, enlisted February 25, 1864, nuis 
tered in February 25, 1864; deserted March 29, 1864. 

JoHX Jones, Waterbury, private, enlisted August 1. 18O2, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, AiUii-tam, Md. ; died Octo- 
ber 12, 1862. 

*RiCHARu Jones, (iroton, private, enlisted August 5, t8C)3. mustered m 
August 5. 1863; deserted September 21, 1863. 

Daniel B. Joyce, Waterliury. private, enlisted August 2, i8()2, nnistered 
in August 20, 18(12; wouiuled May 12, 1864, Spottsylvania, V'a. ; discharged 
July 5. 1865. 

*JosEPH Judge. Cornwall, private, enlisted August 8. 1863. mustered in 
August 8, 1863; deserted August 22. 1863. 

*J()HN Kane, Waterford, private, enlisted August 7, 1863, mustered in 
August 7, 1863 ; deserted November 2^, 1863. 

AIiCHAEL Keegan, Thompson, private, enlisted August 5, i8()2, nnistered 
in August 20, 1862; killed September 17, 1862, Antietam, Md. 

*James Keefe, Waterbury, private, enlisted September 12, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 12, 1863; deserted November 7, 1863. 

*JoHN Kei-T, Hartford, private, enlisted August 5, 1863, mustered in 
.\ugust 5, 1863; (See corporal Rifle Co. D 2d C. V.); transferred to Co. 
A 2d C. V. H. A. .May 30, 1865. 

'''Peter B. Kelly, Old Lyme, private, enlisted September 12, 1863. mus- 
tered in September 12, 1863; captured, date and place not shown; died 
October 11, 1864, Andersonville, Ga. 

*JoHN Kelly, Hartford, private, enlisted August 5, 1863, nnistered in 
.\ugust 5, 1863; deserted August 18, 1863. 

* Patrick Kelly, Stonington, private, enlisted August 8, 1863, mustered 
in August 8, 1863; deserted August 22, 1863. 

*Thomas B. Kini-caide, Hartford, private, enlisted .-Vugust 7, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 7, 1863 ; deserted August 20, 1863. 

Stephen D. Kittle, Granby, private, enlisted February 2_'i,. i8()4, mus- 
ttred in February 2^, 1864; killed May 24, 1864, North Anna River, Va. 

^William Lane, Middletown, private, enlisted August i, 1864, mustered 
in August I, 1864; transferred to Co. A 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

Albert L.\tus, New Haven, private, enlisted August 4, 1863, mustered in 
August 4, 1863; (See private Co. H 13th C. V.) ; dischargd on account of 
disability January 4. 18(14. 

JoHX Lee. (iuiltord. private, enlisted l-'ebruary 2,v iS'-/|. i-uistored in 
l-ebruary 25, 1864: deserted March 29. 1864. 

*.\i.oNzo C. Lii'i'iN(()TT. .\ew liritain. private, enlisted .August i. i8()4. 
luustered in August i. 18O4: discharged May 29, 1865. 



4 1 2 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

*Charles Long, Vernon, private, enlisted September 13, 1863, mnstereci 
in September 13, 1863; wounded and captured August 25, 1864, Ream's 
Station, Va. ; paroled September 24. 1864 ; transferred to Co. E 2d C V. 
H. A. May 30, 1865. 

Valentine Lungwitz, Waterlmry, private, enlisted July 16, 1862, nuis- 
tered in August 20, 1862; wounded July 3, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa.; mustered 
out with company May 31, 1865. 

James S. MallorYj Waterbury, private, enlisted July 25, 1802, nuistered 
in August 20, 1862; discharged August 18, 1862; enlisted in U S. N. .Au- 
gust 25, 1862; served on U. S. S. "Jamestown"; reported as deserted De- 
cember 13, 1862. 

*James Marks, Waterbury, private, enlisted September 12, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 12, 1863; captured December i, 1863, Orange Court 
House, Va. ; paroled November 17, 1864; furloughed December 4, 1864; 
failed to return; no further record Adjutant-General's Office, Washington, 
D. C. 

*Charles MasoNj Vernon, private, enlisted October i, 1863, mustered 
in October i, 1863; captured October 14, 1863, liristoe Station, Va. ; pa- 
roled November 20 1864; deserted January 4 1865. 

Owen McCuen, Waterbury, private, enlisted June 24, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; wounded July 3, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa.; deserted May 20, 
1864. 

James McLaren, Waterbury, private, enlisted July 16, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; deserted February 13, 1863. 

Thomas J. McLaiu), Waterbury, private, enlisted August 6, 1862; mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; transferred to Co. B 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 
1865. 

Leonard J. Merchant, Waterlnn-y, private, enlisted July 21, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; wounded May 3, 18O3, Cliancellorsville, Va. ; 
discharged December 2^, 1863. 

Charles B. Merrill, Waterlmry, private, enlisted August 13, 1862, mus- 
'tered in August 20, 1862; appointed principal musician May i, 1863; trans- 
ferred from principal nnisician to private April 25, 1864; discharged May 
17, 1865. 

*Charles Miller, fNorwich, pri\ate, enlisted September 4, 1863, nuis- 
tered in September 4, 1863: wounded May 10, 1864, L.aurel Hill, Va. ; 
transferred to Co. D 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865: transfer to 2d C. V. 
H. A. canceled; further investigation shows, died in liands of enemy May 
11-12, 1864. 

John Miller, Enfield, private, enlisted November 17, 1864, mustered in 
November 17, 1864; transferred to Co. A 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

Henry Mohr, Hartford, private, enlisted Fel)ruary it, 1865, mustered in 
February 11, 1865; transferred to Co. A 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

Gregory Monuoe, Waterbury, private, enlisted July 25, 1862, mustered in 



Official Roster. 413 

August 20, 1862; (See ])ri\ate Co. A Slli C. V.) ; discharged on account of 
disability March 9, 1863. 

John IMortox. llartford. private. enHsted I''el)rnary 25, 1864, mustered in 
Feliniary 25, 1804; transferred to Co. A 2d C. V. II. A. May 30, 1865. 

John MuLvn.i.F., Waterlmry. private. enHslt'd July 3. 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; wounded l)ecend)er 13. 1862. iM-ederieksljurg, Va. ; dis- 
charged on account of disability J,anuar_\ i. 1863. 

*CHRiSTr.\N Mfi.i.KR. V\'ashins;ton. private, enlisted Sei)tenil)er 7. 1863, 
mastered in SejUember 7, i8()3; captiu'ed October 14. 1803, Le.\ington, Va. ; 
paroled November 20, 1864; deserted January 4, 1865. 

Bernard Murphy, Middletown, private, enlisted March i. 1864. mus- 
tered in March i, 1864; deserted April i, 1865. 

*JoHN Nicholas, Washington, private, enlisted Septeiuber 7. 1863. nuis- 
tered in September 7, 1863 ; deserted October 18, 1863. 

Patrick T. O'Neil, Waterbury, private, enlisted August 14, 1862. nuis- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered out with company May 31. 1865. 

Robert W. Osborn, Naugatuck, private, enlisted July 21, 18O2, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; died December 21, 1862. 

William Patrick, Waterbury, private, enlisted July 8. 1S62, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; wounded September 17. 1862. Antietam, Md.. wounded 
July 3, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa.; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

*WiLLiAM Pendleton, Meriden. private, enlisted August to, 1863. mus- 
tered in August 10. 1863; captured I-"ebruary 6, 1864. Rapidan River, Va. ; 
died July 6 1864. Andersonville. Ga. 

Frank J. Percy, Woodbury, private, enlisied August 9, 1862, mustered m 
August 20. 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam, Md.; missing in 
action December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va. ; probably killed: no further 
record Adjutant-General's Office, Washington, D. C. 

Detlef Plathe, Waterbury, private, enlisted Jid}- i8. 18(12, nuistered ni 
August 20, 1862; captured and paroled December 13. 18(12. I'redericksburL;-. 
Va. ; deserted April 20, 1863. 

Frederick E. Pkitchauh, Waterbury, private, enlisted July 28. i8()2, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862: transferred to Co. F 3d Regiment V. R. C. July 
13, 1863 ; discharged July 6, 1865. 

Charles C. Randall, Hartford, private, enlisted January 4. 18(15. nuis- 
tered in January 14, 1865; See Charles C. Chappel. 

*OscAR Rander, New 15ritain, private, enlisted September 15, i8()3, mus- 
tered in September 15, 1863: wounded May 6, 1864, Wilderness. Va. : de- 
serted June 30, 1864. 

Samuel Reddy, Greenwich, iirivate, enlisted I-'ebruary 2(). 18(14. mustered 
in February 29, 1864: transferred to Co. A 2d C. \'. II. .\. .May 30. 18(15. 

*George Rich. Bridgeport, private, enlisted .\ugust 5. i8(>4, mustered in 
August 5, 1864; captured October 28, 1864, Stony Creek. \'a. ; paroled 
February 17, 1865 ; deserted April 4, 1865. 



414 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Frederick S. Robertson, Waterhiiry, private, enlisted July 15, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

James F. Robbins, Waterbury, private, enlisted August i, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; (See private Co. E 8th C. V.) ; wounded Sep- 
tember 17, 1862, Antietam, Md. ; deserted December 14, 1864. 

Edmund S. Root, Waterbury. private, enlisted July 25, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; died January i, 1864. 

*Anton Rosenburgen, Orange, private, enlisted September 12, 1863, 
nuistered in September 12, 1863; discharged on account of disability Janu- 
ary 4, 1864. 

*Edward Ross. fBridgeport, private, enlisted September 5, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 7, 1863; wounded May 10, 1864, Laurel Hill, Va. ; trans- 
ferred to Co. A 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

Dwight F. Russell, Waterbury, private, enlisted July 2^, 1862, mustered 
in August 20. 1862; deserted September 17, 1862. 

William C. Scott, Waterbury. private, enlisted August 12. 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability November 2, 
1863. 

Patrick S. Shay, Waterbury, private, enlisted July 10, 1862, must.M-ci 
in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability October i, 1862. 

*Henry Smidth, Roxbury, private, enlisted September 17, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 17, 1863; discharged January i, 1864. 

Charles R. Smith, Waterbury, private, enlisted July 23. 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; deserted August 7, 1863. 

John H. Smith, Waterbury, private, enlisted July 23, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862: killed September 17, 1862, Antietam, Md. 

Henry M. Smith, Waterbury, private, enlisted August i, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; transferred to Q6th Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. January 
18, 1864 ; discharged August 19, 1865. 

Elmon E. Smith, Waterbury, private, enlisted August i, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862 ; ( See private Co. E Sth C. V. ) ; discharged on account 
of disability March 3, 1863; (See private Co. E 6h C. V.) 

David Smith, Greenwich, private, enlisted February 29, 1864, nnistered 
in February 29, 1864; captured May 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va. ; escaped from 
Savamiah, Ga., December 21, 1864; sent to Broome Street Barracks, N. Y. 
January I, 1865; no further record Adjutant-General's Office, Washington 
D. C. 

James Somers, Naugatuckl private, enlisted July 24, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862 ; wounded October 14, 1863, Bristoe Station, Va. ; dis- 
charged May 31, 1865. 

*Watson M. Spring, Simsbury, private, enlisted August 28, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 28, 1863 ; wounded October 14, 1863, Bristoe Station, Va., 
wounded October 27, 1864, Boydton Plank Road, Va. ; discharged May 29, 
1865. 



Official Roster. 415 

*Charles Sprixc;. Newtown, private, enlisted September 28, 1863, mns- 
tered in September 28, 1863; transferred to Co. A 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 
1865. 

*Henry Stevens, tBridgeport, private, enlisted September 28, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 28, 1863 ; captured October 14, 1863, Bristoe Station, 
Va. ; paroled November 20, 1864; discharged June 5, 1865. 

*JoHN Stone, fNew Haven, private, enlisted August 28, 1863, mustered 
in August 28, 1863; transferred to Co. A 2d C. V. H. A. ^Nlay 30, 1865. 

*JoHN SuFFANG, Torrington, private, enlisted September S, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 8, 1863; wounded May 10, 1864, Laurel Hill, Va., 
wounded October 2"], 1864, Boydton Plank Road, Va. ; transferred to Co. 
B 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

Johnson Taylor, Vernon, private, enlisted February 15, 1864, nnistered 
in February 15, 1864; wounded May 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va. ; died May 20, 
1864. 

*Charles H. Thomas, fHartford, private, enlisted August 22, 1863, 
mustered in August 22, 1863; captured October 14, 1863, Bristoe Station, 
Va. ; paroled April 28, 1865 ; discharged August 28, 1865. 

*Michael Thompson, Norwich, private, enlisted August 3, 1864, mus- 
tered in August 3, 1864; deserted August 20, 1864. 

James Tobin, Waterbury, private, enlisted June 24, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietani, ]Md. ; died, date 
and place not shown. 

Charles A. Upson, Waterbury, private, enlisted June 30, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20. 1862: wounded May 3. 1863, Chancellorsville, Va. ; 
captured May 5, 1864, Wilderness, Va. ; died December 3, 1864, Florence, 
S. C. 

*Henry Wagxer, Ledyard, private, enlisted August i, 1863, mustered in 
August I, 1863; captured October 14, 1863, Bristoe Station, Va. ; paroled 
March 21, 1864; discharged May 24, 1865. 

=^James Wagner, New Haven, private, enlisted July 29, 1863, mustered 
in July 29, 1863, deserted August 23, 1S63. 

*JuLius Walter, Hartford, private, tnlisted August 30, 1863, mustered 
in August 30. 1863; deserted September 21, 1863. 

■Michael Walsh, Avon, private, enlisted February t6, 1864, nnistered in 
February 16, 1864; discharged June 2T, 1865. 

Thomas Wall, Guilford, private, enlisted February 25, iS()4, mustered 
in February 25, 1864; deserted March 29, 1864. 

Charles B. Warner, Waterbury, pri\ate, enlisted August 4, 1862, nnis- 
tered in August 20, 1862; deserted February 14, \'^Ux 

*John Ward, Hartford, private, enlisted July 30, 1S63, mustered in July 
30, 1863; deserted August 12, 1863. 

*John a. Waterman, Rocky Hill, private, enlisted .\ugust iS, i8()3. 
mustered in August 18, 1863; (See private Co. F 8th C V.): discharged 
June I, 1865. 



4 1 6 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

*James Watson, Hartford, private, enlisted Jul)^ 30, 1863, mustered in 
July 30, 1863; deserted August 12, 1863. 

*Thomas Watson, Hartford, private, enlisted September 8, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 8, 1863 ; transferred to U. S. N. as Thomas Wilson 
April 21, 1864; served on U. S. S. "San Jacinto"", "Hendrick Hudson", 
"Stars and Stripes"', "Ino"" and "Restless'" ; discharged August 18, 1865. 

^Frederick Weber, Waterbury, private, enlisted August 22, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 22, 1863; captured December i, 1863, Rapidan, Va. ; died 
February 21, 1864, Richmond, Va. 

*Henry Weiget, Bristol, private, enlisted September 9, 1863, mustered 
in September 9, 1863; captured October 13, 1863, Rapidan or Bristo-' Sta- 
tion, Va. ; died August 13, 1864, Andersonville, Ga. 

*James Welch, ist, Hartford, private, enlisted July 30, 1863, mustered in 
July 30, 1863; deserted August 12, 1863. 

*James Welsh, 2d, Hartford, private, enlisted July 20, 1863, mustered in 
July 20, 1863; captured December i, 1863, Rapdan, Va. ; died February 20, 
1864, Richmond, Va. 

*JoHN Welch, Waterbury, private, enlisted September 7, 1863, mustered 
in September 7, 1863; transferred to U. S. N. May 5, 1864; served on U. S. 
S. "Robert R. Cuyler" ; died June tj, 1864. 

Abner C. White, Waterbury, private, enlisted August 11, 1862, mustered 
in August II, 1862; transferred to Co. D 22d Regiment V. R. C. Novem- 
ber II, 1863; discharged on account of disability September 23, 1864. 

*Henry a. Wilson, Southington, private, enlisted September 12, 1863, 
mustered in September 12, 1863; fell out on march from Culpepper to 
Centerville, October 11-16, 1863; no further record Adjutant-Generars 
Office, Washington, D. C. 

James Williams,, Andover, private, enlisted February 17, 1864, mustered 
in February 17, 1864; deserted April 25, 1864. 

*RoBERT Woods, Hartford, private, enlisted July 2, 1863 ; mustered 
in July 2, 1863 ; discharged on account of disability December 13, 1863. 

*Henry Woods, Waterford, private, enlisted August 18, 1863 ; mustered 
in August 18, 1863 ; captured February 6, 1864, Morton"s Ford, Va. ; sent 
to Millen, Ga., November 11, 1864; no further record Adjutant-Generars 
Office, Washington, D. C. 

John Wortley, Waterbury, private, enlisted July 29, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

COMPANY D. 

Thomas F. Burpee, Vernon, captain, enlisted July 12, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; promoted major 21st C. V. August 25, 1862. 

Walter M. Ll^cas, Middletown, captain, enlisted July 31, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; (See private Co. A 2d C. V. ) ; promoted from 



Official Roster. 417 

1st lieutenant Co. A June 5. \^(\^: ununded July 2, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa., 
wounded February 6. 1864, Morton's I'ord, V;i. ; resigned March 14, 1864. 

John G. Pelton, Middletown, captain, enlisted August 4, i86j, nuistercd 
in August 20, 1862; promoted from 1st lieutenant Co. E .March 27. 1864, 
mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Ik.\ Emery, Vernon, ist lieutenant, enlisted July 16, 1862, nnistered in 
August 20, 1862; resigned January 2^,. 1863. 

James F. Simpson, Waterbury, 1st lieutenant, enlisted .August 4, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862: promoted from 2d lieutenant Co. C l-'ebruary 
4, 1863; captain Co. C October 20, 1863. 

WiLLi.AM H. H.WVLEV, Bridgeport, ist lieutenant, enlisted July 22. 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; promoted from 2d lieutenant Co. P) October 
20, 1863; captain Co. K December 5, 1863. 

Newei.l p. Rockwood, Windsor, ist lieutenant, enlisted July 14 J862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; promoted from 2d lieutenant Co. K Decern - 
ner 5, 1863; wounded May 6, 1864, Wilderness, ^^'^. ; discharged on account 
of disability December 8, 1864. 

Chelse.-^ C. Vinton, Vernon, 2d lieutenant, enlisted July 18, i8()2, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; discharged IVcember 26, i852. 

Henry W. Wadhams, Waterbury, 2d lieutenant, enlisted August 4, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; promoted from sergeant Co. C. March 3. 
1863; 1st lieutenant Co. K November 13, 1863. 

George A. Stocking, Waterbury, 2d lieutenant, enlisted July 12, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; promoted from ist sergeant Co. C Novem- 
ber 13, 1863; wounded February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, Va., wounded 
May 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va. ; promoted 1st lieutenant Co. T November 18, 
1864. 

Charle.s F.. Penhall')\v, New London, 2d lieutenant, enlisted July 11. 
1862. mustered in August 2;^, i8f)2 ; promoted from sergeant-major January 
13, 1865; mustered out with conijiany May 31, 1865. 

Frank E. Stoughton, \'ernon, ist sergeant, enlisted July 15. i8;)2, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; promoted 2d lieutenant Co. H June 3, 1863. 

Elbert F. Hyde, Ellington, ist sergeant, enlisted July 30, 1862, mustered 
in .August 20. 1862; mustered corporal; promote:! sergeant February 9, 
1863; 1st sergeant October 22. 1863; wounded May 6. 1864, Wilderness, 
Va., wounded June 17, 1864, Peter.sburg, Va. ; discharged June 8, 1865. 

George N. Bri(;h.\m. Vernon, sergeant, enlisted July 16. i8'i2. mustered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded July 3, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa.: ])romoted 2(1 
lieutenant Co. I November 16, 1863. 

Wii.r.i.\M H. CoRiuT. Mansfield, sergeant, enlisted .\ugust 11. i8()j. nnis- 
tered in .\ugust 20, 1862; mustered private, wounded Septeinher 17. 18(12. 
Antietam, Md. ; promoted corporal February 9, 1863; wounded June 17. 
1864, Petersburg, Va. ; promoted sergeant January 29, 1865; mustered out 
with company May 31, 1865. 



4 1 8 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Charles E. Dart, Vernon, sergeant, enlisted Jnly 15, i8()j, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; wounded Deceml)er 13, i8(ij, Fredericksburg. Va. ; died 
January 6, 1863. 

John Hirst, Vernon, sergeant, enlisted July 20, 1862, mustered in Au- 
gust 20, t8()2; mustered private; promoted corporal October i, 1863; ser- 
geant November 10, 1863; mustered out with company May 31, 1S65. 

Benjamin Hirst^ Vernon, sergeant, enlisted July 16, 1862; mustered in 
August 20, 1862; wounded July 3, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa.; transferred to 
52d Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. April 28, 1864; discharged on account of 
disability July 9, 1865. 

Charles E. jMorrison, WilHngton, sergeant, enlisted August 11, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; wounded July 3, 1863, 
Gettysburg, Pa.; promoted corporal July i, 1864; wounded August 25, 
1864, Ream's Station, Va. ; promoted sergeant April i, 1865; discharged 
]May 30, 1865. 

Joseph Murray, Vernon, sergeant, enlisted August 6, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted corporal October 18, 1862; 
sergeant February 9. 1863 ; captured August 25, 1864, Ream's Station, Va. ; 
escaped from Salisbury, N. C. February i, 1865; mustered out with com- 
pany May 31, 1865. 

Kilbourn E. Newell, Ellington, sergeant, enlisted July 18, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862 ; mustered private ; detailed musician ; promoted 
corporal February 9, 1863; sergeant October i, 1863; wounded February 6, 
1864, Morton's Ford, Va. ; promoted 2d lieutenant Co. H January 22, 1865. 

*Henry Owen, Vernon, sergeant, enlisted September 23, 1863, mustered 
in September 23, 1863; (See 2d lieutenant Co. F 5th C. V.); mustered 
private; promoted sergeant October i, 1863; wounded February 6, 1864, 
Morton's Ford. Va. ; died February 25, 1864. 

Otis H. Waite, Vernon, sergeant, enlisted July 25, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; reduced to ranks October 15, 1862; discharged on ac- 
count of disability January 5, 1863. 

George E. Worcester. Rockville, sergeant, enlisted July 26, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862 ; mustered corporal ; promoted April 27, 1864 ; 
wounded IVIay 10, 1864, Spottsylvania Court House. Va. ; discharged on ac- 
count of disability February 18, 1865. 

*MoRRis Altwin, Waterbury, corporal, enlisted August 22, 1863. mus- 
tered in August 22, 1863; mustered private; promoted April 27. 1864; 
wounded May 6. 1864, Wilderness, Va. ; deserted April 18, 1865. 

John H. Billson, Vernon, corporal, enlisted July 29, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862 ; mustered private ; promoted October 22, 1863 ; wounded 
June 22, 1864, Petersburg, Va. ; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

*Charles Carter, Hartford, corporal, enlisted July 31, 1863, mustered 
in July 31, 1863; mustered private; promoted November i, 1863; wounded 
February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, Va. ; deserted November I2, 1864, 



Official Roster. 419 

*MicnAKi. Cakkoi.l, llartford, corjjoral, cnlistcfl July 30, 1863, mustered 
in July 30, 1863; mustered private; wounded May 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va. ; 
promoted January i, 1865; transferred to Co. F 2d C. V. If. A. May 30, 
1865. 

WiM.i.AM II. Dai.n'tv, Vernon, corporal, enlisted July 26, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted F"ebruary 9, 1863; reduc- 
ed to ranks (sick) ; discharged on account of disability January 11, 1864. 

Charles C. Eijwarijs, Vernon, corporal, enlisted July 16, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; (See private Co. B 1st C. V.) ; wounded Sep- 
tenil)er 17, 1862, Antietam, Md. ; reduced to ranks October i, 1862; trans- 
ferred to general service U. S. A. November 12, 1862; discharged on ac- 
count of disability November 28, 1862. 

Charle.s Fletcher, Vernon, corporal, enlisted August 8, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted F'ebruary 9, 1863; 
reduced to ranks ; transferred to Co. H October 20, 1864. 

Jerome F>. Fuller, Vernon, corporal, enlisted July 12, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability December 8, 1862. 

William W. Goodell, Vernon, corporal, enlisted July 15, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted February 9, 1863; killed 
July 3, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa. 

Henry Hospod.sky, Vernon, corporal, enlisted July 15, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted July i, 1864; wounded Sep- 
tember 17, 1862, Antietam, Md., wounded October 27, 1864, Deer Creek, 
Va. ; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Charles Lyman, Bolton, corporal, enlisted July 21, 1862. mustered in 
August 20, 1862; promoted 2d lieutenant Co. K ]\Iarch 3, 1863. 

John A. Morse, Willington, corporal, enlisted August 9, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private; captured and paroled December 13, 
1862, Fredericksburg, Va. ; wounded February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, Va. ; 
promoted corporal January 29, 1865; mustered out with company May 31, 
1865. 

*JoHN Myer, I'^aston, corporal, enlisted September 16, 1863, mustered in 
September 16, 1863; mustered private; promoted September i, 1864; trans- 
ferred to Co. F 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

Henry W. Orcutt, Vernon, corporal, enlisted July 16, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; mustered private; wounded September 17, 1862, Antie- 
tam, Md. ; promoted November 3, 1863 ; wounded February 6, 1864, Mor- 
ton's Ford, Va. ; died February 7, 1864. 

*James Shepard, Hartford, corporal, enlisted July 2"], 1862. mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted Novmber 3, 1863; wound- 
ed February 6, 1864, Morton's F"ord, Va., wounded June 17, 1864, Peters- 
burg, Va. ; died June 25, 1864. 

Erwix Stoughtox, Vernon, corporal, enlisted July 16, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability January 13, 1863. 



420 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

John Symonds, Vernon, corporal, enlisted July i6, iS6j, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va. ; dis- 
charged on account of disability February 7, 1863. 

Carlos C. Tracy,, Vernon, corporal, enlisted July 21, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; transferred to general service U. S. A. November 11, 
1862; discharged on account of disability November 28, 1862. 

David W. Whiting, Vernon, corporal, enlisted Augu»:t 4, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted February 9, 1863; wound- 
ed July 3, 1863, Gettysburg. Pa. ; killed August 25, 1864, Ream's Station, 
Va. 

Edward P. Allen, Vernon, musician, enlisted July 28, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; (See captain Co. F 5th C. V.); mustered private; 
detailed musician ; returned to ranks ; mustered out with company May 
31- 1865. 

Elisha p. Beebe, Ellington, musician, enlisted August i, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862 ; mustered private ; detailed musician ; discharged on 
account of disabilty January 15, 1863. 

Reuben G. Snagg, Waterbury, musician, enlisted August 8, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; detailed musician; mustered 
out with company May 31, 1865. 

Franklin P. Someks, Waterbury. musician, enlisted August 13, 1862, 
mustered in August 20. 1862: mustered private; detailed musician; dis- 
charged on account of disability May 6, 1865. 

Henry E. Williams, Vernon, musician, enlisted July 22, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; transferred to ranks; transferred to Co. F October 
20, 1864. 

Philip A. Corey, Vernon, wagoner, enlisted August 9, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; detailed brigade wagon-master; mustered out with 
company May 31, 1865. 

Matthew Farrell, Vernon, wagoner, enlisted July 22, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; transferred to ranks; discharged on account of dis- 
ability February 27, 1863. 

Wells G. Thrall, Vernon, wagoner, enlisted August 13, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private; detailed wagoner; mustered out 
with company May 31, 1865. 

John Abby, Vernon, private, enlisted July 22. 1862, mustered in August 
20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam, Md. ; died September 
24, 1862. 

*RoBERT Allen, New Haven, private, enlisted July 30, 1863, mustered in 
July 30, 1863; deserted November i, 1863. 

*Joseph Andrews, New Haven, private, enlisted July 30, 1863, mus- 
tered in July 30, 1863; deserted August 21, 1863. 

Samuel Barrows, Vernon, private, enlisted August 9, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability July 21, 1863. 



Official Roster. 421 

*Charles Bau(i\, Rristiil, private, enlisted September 9, 1863, mustered 
in September 9, icS(),^; wonnded May 12, 1864, Spottsylvania Court House, 
Va. ; discharged <>u account ot' disability June 16. i<S65 ; (correct name 
Ferdinand Schnndt. ) 

*Eu\VAKU Bendek, Sinisbury, pri\ale. enlisted September n, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 11, 1863; wounded and captured February 6, 1864, Mor- 
ton's Ford, Va. ; paroled December — , 1864; transferred to Co. B 2d C. 
V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

Peter Benjamin, Vv'aterbury, private, enlisted August 2211 1X63, nnis- 
tered in August JJ. i8()3 ; wounded and captured b'ebruary (), i8()4, Mor- 
V. H. A. May 3c. iS()5. 

"PiEKUE r)ESS.\NS()N, Soutliingtou, private, enlisted Se])teml)er T2, 1863, 
mustered in September 12, 1863; captured December i, iS()3, Mine Run, 
Va. ; died May 31, ]864, Andersonville, Ga. 

Abner S. Bowers, Vernon, private, enlisted August 2, 18(12, nuistered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam, Md. ; dis- 
charged on account of (li^al>illty February 3. 18(13. 

*JoHN BrauleVj Hartford, private, enlisted July 31, i8()3, mustered in 
July 31. 1863; deserted August 15, 1863. 

"=Ch.\rles Brown, Hartford, private, enlisted July 29, 1863, mustered 
in July 29, 18(13: transferred to Co. B 2d C. V. II. .\. May 30. i8(:)5. 

'''Chaki.es II. likowx, Norwich, private, enlisted July 18, 1863, mus- 
tered in July 18. i8f)3: wounded May 10, 1864, Si)ottsylvania Court House, 
Va. ; deserted July 31, i8()_i. 

*Fdwin Brockett, New Haven, private, enlisted Septeml)er 18, 1863, 
mustered in September 18, 1863; wounded Feliruary d, i8()4, Morton's 
Ford, Va. ; died February 24, 1864. 

*Henrv Bin?NCASTLE, Bridgeport, private, enlisted September 17, 1863, 
mustered in September 17, 1863; wounded and captured bebruary 6, 
1864, Morton's Ford, Va. : died August 30, 1864, Andersonville, (ia. 

John Burns, Manchester, private, enlisted December 7, ]8()4. nmstered 
in December 7, 1864; transferred to Co. F 2d C. V. II. .\. .May M\ 1865. 

Thomas Buttekwokth, Vernon, private, enlisted July i(). 18(12, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1892; discharged on accomU of disability Xovemlier 
5. 1863. 

Frederick Cahoon, Wrnon, ]iri\ate, enlisted August 5, i8()2, nmstered 
in August 20, i8(')2: (See private Co. B 1st C. V.); transferred as Fred- 
erick Cohoon to general service L'. S. A. November 12. i8{)2; desertui 
December 7. i8C)2. 

*RlCH..\Kii C.xsii.M.w. (irotoii, private, enlisted July 30. i8()3. mustered 
in July 30, 1863: deserted .\ugust 13, i8()3. 

Irving W. Chaktkk, I'.llingtou, private, enlisted July 28, i8()2, mustered 
in August 20. i8()2; wounded December 13. 18(12. iM-ederickshurg. \'a. ; 
transferred to C'o. b" m\ Regiment \'. R. C. July 13, 1803; discharged 
July 6, 1865. 



422 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

*I<"rederick Cheever, Torrington, private, enlisted Septenilior 17, 1863, 
mustered in September 17, 1863; discharged on account of disability 
August 10, 1864. 

*MuNROE Church, East Haddam, private, enlisted September 5, 1863, 
mustered in September 5, 1863 ; discharged on account of disability March 
15, 1864. 

George W. Colburn, Vernon, private, enlisted July 26, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam, Md. ; dis- 
charged on account of disability November i, 1862. 

^William Collington, New London, private, enlisted July 24, 1863, 
mustered in July 24, 1863 ; deserted October 24, 1863. 

George W. Corbit, Coventry, private, enlisted August 8, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam, Md. ; died 
October 17, 1862. 

David B. Crombie, Vernon, private, enlisted July 25, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; deserted September 19, 1862. 

*RoBERT P. Cum MINGS, New Haven, private, enlisted July 30, 1863, 
mustered in July 30, 1863 ; deserted August 18, 1863. 

Oliver Dart, Jr., South Windsor, private, enlisted August i, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, 
Va. ; discharged on account of disability February 8, 1863. 

Jacob Davis, fNew Haven, private, enlisted September 14, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 14, 1863; tlischarged on account of disability De- 
cember 8, 1863. 

PiERSON Davis, East Hartford, private, enlisted August 26, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 26, 1863; captured May 12, 1864, Spottsylvania, Va. ; 
paroled March i, 1865 ; transferred to Co. F 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

*Charles Demott, fHartford, private, enlisted August i, 1863, mus- 
tered in August I, 1863; deserted September 30, 1863. 

Michael Dorsey, Glastonbury, private, enlisted December 7, 1864, mus- 
tered in December 7, 1864; discharged on account of disability September 
6, 1865. 

*James Drew, North Stonington, private, enlisted July 31, 1863, mus- 
tered in July 31, 1863; wounded May 24, 1864, Hanover Junction, Va. ; 
deserted July 20, 1864. 

Dennis Driscoll, Glastonbury, private, enlisted December 7, 1864, mus- 
tered in December 7, 1864; wounded March 25, 1865, Hatcher's Run, Va. ; 
died April 25, 1865. 

*Thomas Duffy, Hartford, private, enlisted August i, 1863, mustered 
in August I, 1863; captured October 14, 1863; Bristoe Station, Va. ; paroled 
February 22. 1865; transferred to Co. B 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

James Duffy, Glastonbury, private, enlisted December 7, 1864, mus- 
tered in December 7, 1864; deserted April 28, 1865. 



Official Roster. 423 

James Fakrell, Vernon, priv.-itc, enlisted An-nst 9, 1862, mnstered in 
August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability February 2, 1863. 
Michael Fay, Ellington, private, enlisted July jf), 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; mustered out with company .May 3'- i''^f>5- 

*Thomas Fenton, Hartford, private, enlisted July 29, 1863, mustered 
in July 29, 1863; transferred to Co. B 2d C. V. 11. A. May 30, 1865. 

*Ch.\kles Fisher. New Haven, private, enlisted July 29, 1863, nuis- 
tered in July 29, 1863 ; deserted June 16, 1864. 

Robert Gilmore, Vernon, private, enlisted July 16, 1862; mustered in 

August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability December 24, 1863. 

*JoHN Glasgow, New Haven, private, enlisted July r], 1863, mustered 

in July 27, 1863: (See private Co. 1 i8tli C. V.); deserted August 

14. 1863. 

*Frederick Goobell, Wethersfield. private, enlisted September 7, 1863, 
mustered in September 7, 1863; deserted ()ctol)er 14, 1863. 

*JoHN GoKMAY, Soutliington, private, enlisted September 8, 1863. mus- 
tered in September 8. 1863; transferred to Co. B 2d C. V. H. A. May 
30, 1865. 

Jereml\h Greadv. Vernon, private, enlisted July 30, 1862, mustered m 
August 20, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg. Va. : dis- 
charged on account of disability December 28, 1863. 

Lorin S. Griswold, Vernon, private, enlisted July 14. J'"^^)-^. nmstered in 
A.ug.i.st 20, 1862; wounded September 17. 1862. Antietam. Md. ; dischargv.l 
on account of disability January 13. 1863. 

Russell Griswold, Vernon, private, enlisted August 6. 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; killed September 17, 1862, Antietam, Md. 

August Gross, Vernon, private, enlisted July 16, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862. Antietam. Md.. wounded 
December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va. ; mnstered out with company 
May 31, 1865. 

*Ferdinand Grosloff. Torrington, private, enlisted September 17, 1863, 
mustered in September 17, 1863; deserted April 30, 1864. 

*John J. Heber, Southington, private, enlisted August 8, 1863, mustered 
in September 8, 1863; captured December i, 1863, Rapidan River. Va. : 
died March 17, 1864, Richmond. Va. 

James Henderson. Ellington. i)rivate, enlisted August 9. 1862, nmstered 
in August 20, 1862: wounded Sei)tember 17, i8()2. .\ntietam. Md.; died 
September 30. 1862. 

, August Hemmann, Vernon, private, enlisted July 19, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; transferred to 7th Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. Novem- 
l>er 28, 1863; discharged June 19, 1865. 

OuRiN (). II ILLS, Vernon, private, enlisted July 21 1802. mustered in 
August 20, 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Joseph Hirst, Vernon, private, enlisted July lO. 18(12. nmstered In 



424 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

August 20, 1862; wouuded December 13, 1862, Fredericksl)urg, Va. ; trans- 
ferred to 53d Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. August 24, 1863 ; discharged July 
10, 1865. 

*LoDWiCK HoLCOMB, Woodstock, private, enlisted August 20, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1863; captured October 14, 1863, Bristoe Station, Va. ; 
died July 18, 1864. Andersonville, Ga. 

Charles H. House, East Windsor, private, enlisted January 28. 1864, 
mustered in January 28, 1864; (See private Co. G 25th C. V.); wounded 
May 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va. ; transferred to Co. B 2d C. V. II. A. May 
30, 1865. 

*Chakles a. Ho.me, Cromwell, private, enlisted October i, 1863, mus- 
tered in October, i 1863; transferred to Co. B 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 
1865. 

*JoHN HuGAL. Meriden, private, enlisted August 8, 1863, mustered in 
.August 8, 1863; discharged on account of disability April 15, 1864. 

*Edward Hughes, Meriden, private, enlisted August 8, 1863, mustered 
in August 8, 1863; captured December i, 1863, Rapidan, Va. ; died Jan- 
uary 22, 1864, Andersonville, Ga. 

Patrick Jackson, Vernon, private, enlisted July 17, 1862 mustered in 
August 20, 1862; wounded May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville, Va. ; died June 
4, 1863. 

*Thomas Jackson, New Britain, private, enlisted September 12, 1863, 
mustered in September 12, 1863; captured December i, 1863, Mine Run, 
Va. ; died July 13, 1864, Andersonville, Ga. 

Elisha Johnson, Willington, private, enlisted August 9, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; died July 13, 1863. 

John F. Julian, Vernon, private, enlisted August 7, 1862, mustered in 
y\ugust 20, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va., 
wounded July 3, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa. ; died July 8, 1863. 

Henry W. Justin, Vernon, private, enlisted July 15, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

*Charles Lampheke, East Haddam, private, enlisted September 5, 
1863, mustered in September 5, 1863 ; missing May 6, 1864, Wilderness, 
Va. ; no further record Adjutant-General's Office, Washington, D. C. 

*WiLLiAM Larkum, Sprague, private, enlisted July 22, 1S63, mustered 
in August 22 1863; wounded May 10, 1864, Spottsylvania, Va., wounded 
September 5, 1864, Petersburg, Va, : transferred to Co. F 2d C. V. H. A. 
May 30, 1865. 

Henry A. Lee, Vernon, private, enlisted July 18, 1862, mustered m 
August 20, 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

*John Lee, Cornwall, private, enlisted August 8, 1863, mustered in 
August 8, 1863; deserted August 22, 1863. 

George A. Lillie, Coventry, private, enlisted August 11, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disabilitv December 
3, 1862. 



Official Roster. 425 

*TnoMAS LociAX, Hartford. i>ri\atr. iiili>t(.'d .\ui;ust 7. 1X63. nuistfred 
in August 20, 1863; deserted Auiiu^t _'(). 1X63. 

*Ani)ke\v Lovejoy, Stonington. private, enlisted August 7. iXh^. mus- 
tered in August 7, 1863; discharged l-'eliruary _'i. \X(>4. 

*Maktin Lyon.s. fHartfoid, jirivate, eidisted August 7. iSf),?. mustered 
in August 7. 1863; wounded I-\'l)ruary (>. icS()4, Mortiui'^ j-'urd. \';i. ; mis- 
sing in action May 12, iS()_i, Spottsylx auia. \'a. ; prii1)a1)ly killed; no fur- 
ther record Adjutant-General's Office, W'ashiuytDU. 1). C. 

*Thomas Mahone, Meriden, i)ri\ate. enlisted August 8. i8()3. nnis- 
tered in August 8, 1863; wounded No\ ember 2y. i8t,3. Mine Run, Va. ; 
discharged Alarch 12, 1864. 

Frank D. Maine, Vernon, private, enlisted July iS. 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability October 2, 1862. 

Edward W. Mann, Vernon, private, enlisted July 21, 1862. mustered in 
August 20, 1862; killed December 13, 1862, I-'redericksburg, Va. 

*Jnn.\ Mannix, Bridgeport, private, enlisted July 27, 1864, nuistered 
in July 27. 1864; missing in action August 25. 1864, Ream's Station, Va. ; 
probably killed; no further record Adjutant-General's Office, Washington, 
D. C. 

*Louis Marquette, New Haven, private, enlisted Septeud)er 8, 1863, 
mustered in September 8, 1863; cajjtured Deeemlier 1, iS()3. Rapidan, \'a. ; 
paroled October 8. 18(14; transferred to Co. 1) 2d C. V. II. .\. .May 30, 
1865. 

*Henrv Mason, Woodstock, private, enlisted September g. 1863. mus- 
tered in September 9, 1863; transferred to I'. S. X. .Ajiril ig, 1864; served 
on U. S. S. "Commodore Perry"; discharged January 20. i8()5. 

James .\. Mavnard, Ellington, private, enlisted .Vugust 4. i8()2. nuistered 
in .\ugust 20. 18(12; transferred to locth Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. De- 
cember 2. i8()3; transferred to Co. E 18th Regiment V. R. C. April 22. 
1864; discharged June 24. 1865. 

*Michael McC.vktv, Norwich, private, enlisted .August 5, i8()3. nuistered 
in .August 5, 1863; discharged December d. i8(>3. 

*P.\Ti<iCK McCoy, Hartford, private, inlisted .\ugnst 7. 1803, mustered 
in August 7, 1863; deserted March 2^. i8()4. 

*John McCourt, Torrington, |)rivate. enlisted September 11, iS()3, mus- 
tered in September 11, 18(13; de-rrled l'\bni;iry 28, iS()5. 

='=James McDo.nai.ii, Cornwall, ))ri\;ite. eiilistt'd August 8, 18(13, mustered 
m .August 8, 1863; deserted ,\ugiist 22. i8()3. 

Martin McGuane, Vernon, iirivate. enlisted .August y. i8(L', mustered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded 1 )ectMiiber 13, iSfij, Fredericksburg, Va. ; 
transferred to 5th Co. 2i\ Battalion W R. C. June 24. 18(13; deserted 
l-"ebruary 4, 18(14. 

''dlicH M(■(il.\•T^■. Hartford, jirixale. enlisted July 2,^. 18(13, mustered in 
July 2^^, 18(13; transferred to Co. II 2d C. \'. II. .\. .May 30, 1865. 



426 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

*WiLLiAM McGkath, Plymouth, private, enlisted August 5, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 5, 1863; deserted August 22, 1863. 

James McGrath, Manchester, private, enlisted December 7, 1864, mus- 
tered in December 7, 1864; transferred to Co. B 2d C. V. H. A. May 
30, 1865. 

David McIntosh, Vernon, private, enlisted July 19, 1862, mustered in 
August ao, 1862; discharged on account of disability January 26, 1863. 

John McPherson, Vernon, private, enlisted July 29, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va. ; 
transferred to Co. B 24th Regiment V. R. C. December 4, 1863; dis- 
charged June 27, 1865. 

*James McQuinlan, Lebanon, private, enlisted August 5, 1864, mus- 
tered in August 5, 1864; transferred to Co. B 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 
1865. 

James McWilliams, Madison, private, enlisted March 12, 1864, mus- 
tered in March 12, 1864; missing in action May 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va. ; 
probably killed; no further record Adjutant-General's Office, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

*Charles L. Mead, Hartford, private, enlisted August 7, 1863, must-^rcd 
in August 7, 1863 ; deserted August 22, 1863. 

Martin V. B. Metcalf, Vernon, private, enlisted July 29, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; wounded December 13. 1862. Fredericksburg, 
Va. ; died January 3, 1863. 

*Alfred Miller Oxford, private, enlisted August 8, 1863, mustered 
in Augu-st 8, 1863 ; captured October 14, 1863, Bristoe Station, Va. ; died 
July 19, 1864, Andersonville, Ga. 

*Herman Miller, fNew Haven, private, enlisted September 11, 1863, 
mustered in September 11, 1863; discharged on account of disability De- 
cember 16, 1863. 

*John Mitchell, Hartford, private, enlisted August 5, 1863, mustered 
in August 5, 1863 : transferred to U. S. N. May 5, 1864 ; served on U. S. 
S. "Otsego", "Valley City" and "Fort Morgan" ; discharged August 22. 
1865. 

Thomas Moore, Vernon, private, enlisted July 28, 1862, mustered m 
August 20, 1862; deserted March 9. 1863; (See corporal Co. B 2d C. V. H. 
A.) 

Ezra A. Morse, Willington, private, enlisted August 9, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; deserted November 12, 1864. 

George W. Morton,, Vernon, private, enlisted July 25, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862 ; captured May 5, 1863, Chancellorsville, Va. ; paroled May 
15, 1863; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

*William Mott, Westport, private, enlisted August 22, 1862, mustered 
in August 22, 1862; killed October 14, 1863, Bristoe Station, Va. 

*Lemuel K. Munyan, Thompson, private, enlisted August 28, 1863, 



Official Roster. 427 

mustered in August 28, 1863; captured Octol)er 14. 1S63, Bristoe Station, 
Va. ; died January 28, 1864, Richmond, Va. 

*JoHN Murray, New Haven, private, enlisted August 7, iSf)^, nuisterod 
in August 7, 1863; deserted Novemlier 1, 1863. 

*James W. Needham, Stonington, private, enlisted August 6, 1864. mus- 
tered in August 6, 1864; transferred to Co. B 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

*Henry Netts, Bristol, private, enlisted September 9, 1863, mustered in 
September 9, 1863; transferred to Connecticut January 20, 1864, on ac- 
count of fraudulent enlistment; no further record Adjulaut-Cenerars Of- 
iice, Washington, D. C. 

Ansel D. Newell, l^llington. private, enlisted August 4, 1862, nuistered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, .\ntietani. Aid.; dis- 
charged on account of disability October 24, 1862. 

*Charles J. Newton, Norwich, private, enlisted July 23, 1863, mustered 
in July 23, 1863; transferred to U. S. N. April 27, 1864; served on U. S. S. 
"Agawam", "Mackinaw" and "Gamma" ; discharged May 20, 1865. 

*Bradley Nichols, Fairfield, private, enli.sted September 25, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 25, 1863 ; wounded May 5, 1864, Wilderness, Va. ; died 
June 21, 1864. 

*JoHN O'Brien, Meriden, pri\ate, enlisted July 27, 1863, nuistered in 
July 27, 1863; wounded August 2=,, 1864, Ream's Station, Va. ; died Sep- 
tember 19, 1864. 

*John F. O'Brien, New Haven, private, enlisted July 27, 1863, mustered 
in July 27, 1863 ; transferred to Co. B 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

Ch.xrles O'Brien, Canterbury, private, enlisted December i, 1864, mus- 
tered in December i, 1864; transferred to Co. B 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 
1865. 

John A. Ogden, Vernon, private, enlisted July 19, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; transferred to Co. F 3d Regiment V. R. C. August 13, 
1863; promoted corporal September 10, 1864; discharged July 6, 1865. 

*Jean Paul, New Canaan, private, enlisted July 27, 1864, mustered in 
July 27, 1864; deserted August 14, 1864. 

George A. Pierce, Vernon, private, enlisted July 24, 1862, nuistered iii 
August 20, 1862 ; transferred to U. S. N. May 5, 1864 ; served on U. S. S. 
"Otsego", "Valley City" and "Shamrock" ; discharged July 26, 1865. 

Lyman D. Pinney, Vernon, private, enlisted July 22, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability December 17, 1862. 

Frank Powers, Glastonbury, private, enlisted December 9, 1864, mus- 
tered in December 9, 1864; deserted April 3, 1865. 

*JoHN Quinn, Hartford, private, enlisted July 7, 1864, mustered in 
July 7, 1864; deserted August 14, 1864. 

Willlam p. Ramsdell, Vernon, private, enlisted July 2-,, 1862, mus- 
tered in .\iigust 20, US62: killed September 17. iS()2, Anlietaiu, Md. 



428 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Norton A. Reed, Ellington, private, enlisted July 15. 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; died December 14, 1863. 

Richard P. Reed, Vernon, private, enlisted July 21, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; discharged May 30, 1865. 

*AuGUSTUS Rector, Trumbull, private, enlisted September 9, 1863, 
mustered in September 9, 1863 ; deserted December 3, 1863. 

Solomon L. Richardson, Ellington, private, enlisted August 4, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, 
Va. ; discharged on account of disability April 2, 1863. 

*Jeremiah Rilev, New Haven, private, enlisted July 24, 1863, mus- 
tered in July 24, 1863; deserted August 22, 1863. 

*James Rillev, Waterbury, private, enlisted July 2;^,, 1864, mustered in 
July 23, 1864; deserted August 14, 1864. 

*Charles W. Risley, Vernon, private, enlisted September 24, 1863, 
mustered in September 24, 1863: (See ])rivate Co. A 25th C. V.); cap- 
tured December 2, 1863, Hartwood Church, V;i. ; died September 28, 1864, 
Andersonville, Ga. 

*JoHN Rollins, Hartford, private, enlisted June 29, 1864, mustered 
in June 29, 1864; captured August 25, 1864, Ream's Station, Va. ; paroled 
October 8, 1864; deserted November 29, 18(14. 

*Daniel Ross, Stamford, private, enlisted July 2y. 1864, mustered in 
July 2J, 1864; deserted August 14, 1864. 

William B. Root, Vernon, private, enlisted July 16, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; transferred to Co. 1) 6th Regiment V. R. C. Octclier 
21, 1863; discharged July 5, 1865. 

*Ferdinand Schmidt, Bristol, private, enlisted September 9, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 9, 1863; See Cliarles Baron. 

William Scott, Vernon, private, enlisted July 10, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; captured, date and place not shown; died July 7, 18(14, 
Andersonville, Ga. 

*John Shaw, fNew Haven, pri\ate, enlisted July 24, 1863, mustered 
in July 24, 1863 ; deserted May 5, 1864. 

George F. Sloane, Vernon, private, enlisted July t8. 1862, nnistered in 
August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, i8()2. .Antietam, Md.; discharg:_-(l 
on account of disability December 13, 18(12. 

*Andrew Smith, Waterbury, private, enlisted August 29, 1863, mustered 
m August 29, 1863; transferred to C^ieneral llosi)ital. New Haven, Conn.. 
October 22, 1864; failed to report; no further record Adjutant-General's 
Office, Washington, D. C. 

Charles Smith, Canterbury, private, enlisted December i, 1864, mus- 
tered in December i, 1864; discharged on account of disaliility June 12, 
1865. 

John W. Smith. Vernon, private, enlisted July 22, 18(12, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; deserted June 4, 1863. 



i8()j, mil 


stered 


un, Md. 


; dis- 


i.^. 1S62, 


mus- 


iitietain. 


-Md. ; 



Official Roster. 429 

James B. Si-encer, Vernon, privalr, enlisted Jnly 2S, i<S()_'. nuislered 
in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability April 29, 1863. 

Thomas Stakfokh. Vernon, private, enlisted Jnly ig, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, i8()2: wounded and missing in action May 3, 1863, Chan- 
cellorsville, Va. ; i)rnl)al)ly died on field; no further record Adjutaiit-Gene- 
ral' Office, Washington, I ). C. 

Joseph Stafford, VeriKiii, ])ri\ale, enlisted August b. 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; wounded Septenil)er 17, 1862, .Antietaiii, Md. ; discharged 
on account of disability December _'(), 18O2. 

Lyman K. Stearns, Vernon, private, enlisted July 2ii, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; died March t6, 1865. 

Alfred A. Taft, Ellington, private, enlisted August 6, 1862, mustered 
in August 20. 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam, Md.; dis- 
charged on account of disability November 24, 1863. 

Henry Talcott, Coventry, private, enlisted August 13, 
in August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antiet 
charged on account of disability October 17, 1862. 

Samuel L. Talcott, Coventry, private, enlisted August 
tered in August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, /' 
died October 14, 1862. 

*Ta-cius Talcott, Manchester, private, enlisted September 13, 1863, 
mustered in September 13, 1863; died March 9, 1864. 

Michael Tierney, Vernon, private, enlisted August 9, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; died October 24, 1862. 

Henry Tiley, Vernon, private, enlisted July 29, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; killed September 17, 1862, Antietam, Md. 

Albert H. Town, Vernon, private, enlisted July 31, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, i8b2; missing in action December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, 
Va. ; probably killed; no further record Adjutant-Cieneral's Office, 
Washington, D. C. 

*CoRNELius Vandervleet, Merideii. private, enlisted September 14, 1803, 
mustered in September 14, 1863; discharged on account of disability 
December 2, 1863. 

Christopher Waldo, Vernon, private, enlisted .\ugiist 9, 18(12, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862. Antietam, Md.; died 
April 30, 1863. 

*Jacob Walter, Southingtoii, private, enlisted September 8, i8()3, mus- 
tered in Septemlier 8, i8()3; transferred to Co. P, j<\ C. \'. II. .V. May 
30, 1865. 

Charle.s White, luifield, jirivate, enlisted December 2. 18(1.4. mu.^iered 
in December 2, 1864; transferred to Co. B 2d C. V. II. .\. May 30, 1865. 

Thomas W^ilkie, Tolland, private, enlisted July 15, 18(12, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; wounded September 17. i8()2. .Viuietaiii, .Md. ; died 
October 23, 1862. 



430 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

John Williams, Vernon, private, enlisted Augnst 2, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; captured May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville, Va. ; paroled 
May 15, 1863; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

*Charles Williams, Plymouth, private, enlisted September 16, 1863, 
mustered in September 16, 1863; wounded February 6, 1864, Morton's 
Ford, Va. ; transferred to U. S. N. May 17, 1864; served on U. 'S>. S. 
"Santiago de Cuba" and "Sebago"; discharged August 29, 1865. 

Augustus W. Winans, Vernon, private, enlisted July 19, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability January 
15. 1863. 

*CoNRAD Witt, Wethersfield, private, enlisted September 8, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 8, 1863 ; wounded November 27, 1863, Mine Run, Va. ; 
discharged on account of disability June 2, 1865. 

Adam Woldert, Vernon, private, enlisted July 23, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; committed suicide February 3, 1863. 

*JoHN Wright, Putnam, private, enlisted September 8, 1863, mustered 
in September 8, 1863; deserted April i, 1865. 



COMPANY E. 

William H. Tubes, Norwich, captain, enlisted June 15, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va. ; 
discharged on account of disability February 20, 1863; appointed captain 
and commissary of subsistence U. S. Vols. January 28 1865; discharged 
May II, 1866. 

Henry Lee, New London, captain, enlisted May 24, 1862, mustered in 
August 2S, 1862; (See corporal Co. C 2d C. V.) ; promoted from ist lieu- 
tenant Co. H July I, 1863; captured August 25, 1864, Ream's Station, Va. ; 
paroled December—, 1864; discharged January 31, 1865. 

Morton F. Hale, Norwich, ist lieutenant, enlisted June 15, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; (See quartermaster ist C. V.); promoted cap- 
tain and commissary of subsistence U. S. Vols. November 26, 18O2 ; dis- 
charged May 31, 1866. 

John G. Pelton, Middletown, ist lieutenant, enlisted August 4, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1S62; promoted from sergeant-major to 2d lieu- 
tenant March 7, 1863; ist lieutenant June 3, 1863; captain Co. D INLirch 
27, 1864. 

Franklin Rartlett, Bridgeport, ist lieutenant, enlisted June 21, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; promoted from ist sergeant Co. A to 2d 
heutenant March 28, 1864; ist lieutenant September 14, 1864; killed Feb- 
ruary 5, 1865, Hatcher's Run, Va. 

Charles O. Baldwin, Middletown, 2d lieutenant, enlisted June 15, 
1862, mustered in August 20, 1862; (See sergeant Co. A 2d C. V.); re- 
signed December 19, 1862. 



Official Roster. 431 

Frederick E. Shalk, Norwich. 2(1 lieutenant, enlisted June 6, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted sergeant August 
14, 1862; 1st sergeant February 9, 1863; 2d lieutenant June 3, 1863; wound- 
ed July 3, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa.; promoted 1st lieutenant Co. F November 
13, 1863. 

EmvARi) W. Hart, Madison, 2(1 lieutenant, enlisted July 31, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; promoted from 1st sergeant Co. (i. November 

13, 1863; died January 3, 1864. 

*Thomas Hall, Washington, 2d lieutenant, enlisted September 9, 
1863, mustered in September 9, 1863; promoted from ist sergeant Co. 
1 February 15, 1865 ; transferred to Co. M 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

James R. Nichols, Norwich, 1st sergeant, enlisted May 29, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; promoted 2d lieutenant Co. I August 20, 1862. 

Edmund Smith, Middletown, ist sergeant, enlisted June 6, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted corporal August 

14, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam, Md. ; promoted sergeant 
November 3, 1863; ist sergeant July 15, 18(^)4: reduced to ranks Decem- 
ber 30, 1864; promoted sergeant January i, 18(15 : mustered out with com- 
pany May 31, 1865. 

George K. Bassett, Killingly, ist sergeant, enlisted June 10, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862 ; mustered corporal ; promoted sergeant Novem- 
ber 12, 1862; wounded May 13, 1864, Spottsylvania, Va. ; promoted ist 
sergeant December 30, 1864; wounded February 5, 1865, Hatcher's Run, 
Va. ; discharged July 14, 1865. 

Emerson N. Bailey, Middletown, sergeant, enlisted June 3, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; w^ounded December 13, 1862, 
Fredericksburg, Va. ; promoted corporal P^ebruary 9, 1863; reduced to 
ranks November i, 1863: promoted corporal January 5. 1864; sergeant 
July 15, 1864; discharged June 3, 1865. 

Lyman L, Bassett, Killingly, sergeant, enlisted June 7, 1S62, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered corporal; promoted November 12, 1862; re- 
duced to ranks (sick) ; unistered out with company May 31, 18(15. 

Henry R. Frksiuk, Middletown, sergeant, enlisted June 3, i8hj, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered ])ri\ate; wounded Decemlier 13, i8(ij. i'"red- 
erick.sburg, Va., wounded July 3, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa.; iiromoted corpo- 
ral December 30, 1863; sergeant .\pril 20. 1864; mustered out with com- 
pany May 31, 1865. 

George H. Lillibridge, Franklin, sergeant, enlisted July 14, 1802, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; wounded May 3, 1863, Chaucellorsx ille, \'a. : 
promoted 2d lieutenant Co. G December 7, 1863. 

George B. Matthews, Thompson, sergeant, euli-ted June 10, 18(12, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; mustered private: promoted coriioral i'eb- 
ruary 10, 1863; sergeawt December 15, 1864; nuLstereil out with company 
May 31, 1865. 



432 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Henry C. Miller, Norwich, sergeant, enlisted May 30, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862 : ( See private Rifle Co. A 2d C. V. ) ; wounded Septem- 
l^er 17, 1862, Antietani, Md. ; discharged on account of disability Novem- 
ber 17. 1862. 

James M. Ab)ORE, East Windsor, sergeant, enlisted August 6, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; nui^tered corporal; promoted November 
I, 1863; wounded June 3, 1864, Cold Harbor, Va. ; promoted 2d lieutenant 
Co. C July 16, 1864. 

S.VMUEL Webster, Sprague. sergeant, enlisted June 11, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded May 3, 1863. Chancellorsville, Va. ; trans- 
ferred to icoth Co. 2(1 Battalion V. R. C. December 2, 1863, as sergeant; 
promoted ist sergeant January i, 1864, discharged on account of disability 
September 24, 1864. 

S.\NFORD BucBEE, Plaiuiield. corporal, enlisted June 13, 1862, mustered 
in August 20. 1862: mustered private; promoted February 10, 1863; wound- 
ed May 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va. ; wounded and captnr-d October r], 1864, 
Boydton Plank Road, Va. ; paroled February 17, 1865; discharged on 
account of disability August 22, 1865. 

George C. Boomer, Hartford, corporal, enlisted June i6, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted November i. 1863; 
wounded February 6, 1864, Morton's Fi)rd, Va. ; nnistered out with com- 
pany May 31, 1865. 

*J0HN Carroll, Waterlmry. corporal, enlisted August 22, 1863, mustered 
in August 22, iS()3; nnistered private; promoted xVovember 3, 1863; 
wounded May 7, 1804, Wilderness, Va. ; reduced to ranks; deserted July 
31, 1864. 

John Frrzi>,\TRKK, Hartford, corporal, enlisted July 19, 1862. mustered 
in August 20, iS()2: nnistered private; promoted November i. 1863; mus- 
tered out with company May 31. 1865. 

Francls Gallacher, Norwich, corporal, eiili.^ted July i^. 1862, mustered 
in August 20. 18(12; mustered private; promoted April 20, 1864; wounded 
June 17. 1864. Petersburg. Va. ; mustered out with company May 31, 
1865. 

John Griffin, Middletown, corporal, enlisted June 4. 1862. nnistered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted January 24. 1865; mus- 
tered out with company May 31. 18&5. 

John J. HrKLiii-Rx, New Haven, cfirporal, enlisted June 25, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; died May 21, 1863. 

=^'Joseph Kanan, East Haddam, corporal, enlisted October i. 1863. mus- 
tered in October i, 1863; mustered private; promoted November 3. 1863; 
wounded Alay 7. 1864, Wilderness. Va. ; deserted August 2, 1864. 

Charles M. Lewis, Middletown. corporal, enlisted June 2}^, 1862. mus- 
tered in August 20. 1862; reduced to ranks; wounded May 13. 1864, 
Spottsylvania. Va. ; promoted C)ctober 22,, 1864; nnistered out with com- 
pany May 31. 1865. 



Official Roster. 433 

Timothy Lowx, Middlclown, corpin-al, enlisted June 9, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, iS()j: mustered private; wounded May 3, 1863, Chancellors- 
ville, Va., wounded May 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va. ; promoted March 20, 
1865; mustered out with company ]\Iay 31, 1865. 

*George E. Roberts, Hartford, corporal, enlisted July 16, 1863, mus- 
tered in July 16, 1863 ; mustered private ; promoted November 3, 1863 ; 
reduced to ranks December 17. 1863 ; discharged May 29, 1865. 

Henry N. Robinson, Franklin, corporal, enlisted May 29, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability May 26, 1863. 

George Seufert. Middletown, corporal, enlisted June 7. 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; reduced to ranks; mustered out willi conii^any May 
31. 1865. 

*George Smith, North Canaan, corporal, enlisted August 2, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 2, 1863; mustered private; promoted November i, 1863; 
reduced to ranks; transferred to Co. F 2d C. V. H. .\. May 30, 1865. 

W.^lter F. Standish, Sprague, corporal, enlisted July 12. 1862, mus- 
tered in x\ugust 20, 1862; mustered private: promc^ted February 9. 1863; 
killed July 3, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa. 

Henry Von Gries, Hartford, corporal, enlisted June 3. 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted June 30, 1862; discharged 
on account of disability April 20. 1863. 

W.\LTER B. Dorm.\n. \\'aterl)ury. musician, enlisted August 8. 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; mustered private: detailed ninsician October 
20. 1864; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Edg.\r B. Jones, New Britain, n.nisician. enlisted July 9, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Irving L.'\mphere, Meriden, nnisician, enlisted July 7, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private: detailed musician: mustered out 
with company May 31, 1865. 

*JuLius F. Se.\rle, Barkhamstead, musician, enlisted August 2(\ 1863, 
tered in September 22, 1863; transferred to Co. F 2d C. V. 11. A. ^hiy 30, 
mustered in August 26, 1863; mustered private; detailed musician; died 
February 23. 1864. 

JosiAH F. WiLLisTON, East Windsor, musician, enlisted August 6. 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; mustered out with company May 31. 1865. 

Charles A. Tubes, Norwich, wagoner, enlisted June 9, 1862, mustered 
in August 20. 1862: mustered out with company May 31. 1865. 

*Wesley Banks, Xorwalk. private, enlisted t)ctol)er i. 1863, mustered 
in October l, 1863: wounded I'\bruary 6, 1864. Morton"s b'ord. \'a. ; died 
February 9, 1864. 

Isaac C. Barrows, Vernon, ])rivate. enlisted August 7. i8()2. nni--tered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded .May 3. 1863, Chancellorsville. \'a.. woiuid- 
ed July 3. 1863, Gettysburg. Pa.; transferred to 41st Co. 2d Battalion 
V. R. C. Septemlier 14, i8()4: discharged .\ngust 6, 186.5. 



434 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Samuel Barns, Hartford, private, enlisted August 15, 1862^ miistered 
in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability November 4, 
1863. 

Frank Bebo, Putnam, private, enlisted June 16, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; wounded July 3, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa.; mustered out 
with company May 31, 1865. 

James P. Bentley, North Stonington, private, enlisted June 3, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; deserted November 13, 1862. 

*Daniel Birch, Glastonbury, private, enlisted September 9, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 9, 1863; transferred to U. S. N. May 4, 1864; served 
on U. S. S. "Cyane"; discharged May 22, 1866. 

*WiLLiAM BoRCHERs, Vemon, private, enlisted September 20, 186.3, mus- 
tered in September 20j 1863; captured May 27, 1864, Hanover Junction, 
Va. ; died August 19, 1864, Andersonville. Ga. -• 

Terrence Brady, Norwich, private, enlisted July 15, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 
. *William Brown, fNorwich, private, enlisted July 25, 1863, mustered 
in August 7, 1863 ; deserted April 24, 1864. 

Anthony Brothers, New; Haven, private, enlisted June 22, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, .1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, 
Va. ; discharged on account of disability October 27^ 1863. 

*WiLLiAM Buchanan, fHartford, private, enlisted October i. 1863, 
mustered in. October I, 1863; deserted pecember 3, i_863. 

*Edvvard Buckley, Woodstock, private, enlisted- September 10, 1863, 
mustered in September 10, 1863; wounded August 17, 1864, Deep Bottom, 
Va. ; died October i, 1864. 

George H. Bull, Windham, private, enlisted July 5. 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; wounded, captured and paroled December 13, 1862, Fred- 
ericksburg, Va. ; transferred to Co. C 24tb Regiment V. R. C January 21, 
1864; discharged June 28, 1865. 

*Samuel Burke, East Haddam, private, enlisied September .24, ■ 1863, 
mustered in September 24, 1863; (See private Co. D._22d C. V.) ; captured 
August 25, 1864, Ream's Station, Va. ; died November 12, 1864, Salisburv, 
N. ,C. 

■ Jeremlxh Callahan. Norwich, private, enlisted May 2^, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; wounded May 3, 1863, ChancellorsyiUe, Va., 
wounded May 13, 1864, Spottsylvania, Va. ; mustered out with company 
May 31, 1865. ' . 

*Daniel Cameron, Norwich, private, enlisted August 5, 1864,- mustered' 
in August 25, 1864; transferred to Co. F 2d C. V. H. A. May.30, i865,^ 

Henry Cavarly, Salem, private, enlisted August 13, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; deserted September 10, 1862. 

Carlos P. Cole, Coventry,, .private, enlisted -August 12, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded May 7, 1864, Wilderness, Va. ; mustered out 
with company May 31, 1865. 



'"^'^'-'^"^ Official Roster. '""'' ^S^ 

Alonzo E. Cole, Coventry, private, enlisted August. 12;^ 1862, .mus|er^d 
in August JO, 1862; killed May 25, 1864, North Anna River, Va. 

♦Thomas Cooimcu, Trumbull, private, enlisted September 11, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 11, 1863; deserted f\-tober 12, 1863. 

*George W. Corning, fHartford, private, enlisted October i, 1803, mus- 
tered in October i, 1863; died April 7, 18(14. 

John Crandall, Norwich. ])ri\ale, enlisted July 17, iSo_>. uiustered in 
August 20, 1862; transferred frotn (ieneral Ibispital, \\'asbin.!.;ton, 1). C. 
to company June 18, iS()3; failed to reiiorl ; no further record Adjutant- 
General's Office, \Vasliingt.>n, D. C. 

Daniel Crowley, Sprague, private, enlisted July 8, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; deserted August 4, 1863. 

*JoHN Cum Mixes, INleriden, private, enlisted August 8, 1863, mustered 
in August 8, 1863; died February 20, 1864. 

Michael Cunningham. Norwich, private, enlisted July 16, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Frederick.sburg, 
Va. ; discharged on account of disability May 19, 1863. 

Edward Dailey, Middletown, private, enlisted June 28, 1862, nmstered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, Va. ; 
mustered put with. company May 31. 1865. /■■ 

John' Degnan, Norwich, ))ri\ate, enlisted June 5, 1862. n:ustcredm 
August 20, 1862; Wounded August 25, iXfq, Ream's Station, \:\.\ trans- 
ferred to 7th Co. 2d P.attalidu \\ K. C. April 18, 1805; discharged Jmie 
29, 1865. 

Martin Dillon, \'ernnn. private, enlisted August 9, 1862, mustered ip 
August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability November 14, 1864,., 

*John D. Dickson,. tNorwich. i.rivaie. enlisted August 2, 18(13. mustered 
in August 7, 1863; wounded M^\ 7,. i-^'M. Wilderness. Va. : deserted August 
9, 1864. 

Charles L. Dorman, New .Haven, private, enlisted July 28, 1802, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; mustered out with company May 31, i8()5- 

Orrin Dorman, New Haven, private, enlisted July i, i8()2, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; captured October 14, 1863, P.risHie Station, Va.-j d^_d.;No- 
Yember 29, 1863, Richmond, Va. -/ . r.; 

*Thomas Dokns, West Hartford, private, enlisted September 15, 1863, 
mustered in September 16, 18(13: wounded May 13. lS()4. Spollsylvania, 
Va. ; captured August 25, i8()4. Ream's Station. Yd.: paroled September 
24, i8()4: transferred to Co. 1) 2d C. V. H. A. May 30. iSb5. 

Franklin Dwkiht. Hartford, iirivate. enlisted July 24. 18O2, nui.stered 
in August 20, 1S62; wounded December 13, i8()2, iM-edericksburg, Va. ; 
died June 13, 18C3. 

Henry bjnv akds, Xorwich. private, eiili-ted May 31. i'^^>-- mustered in 
Aaigust 20, 18(12; discharged t,n account, of disability November 21. 1862; 
(See private Co, D 6th C. V.) 



436 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Nathaniel Eldridc;e. Preston, private, enlisted July i6, 1862, mustered 
in i^ugust 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability June 8, 1863. 

*Charles H. Ellis, Meriden, private, enlisted August 28, 1863, mustered 
in August 28, 1863; deserted May 18, 1864. 

Harmon Farmer, Middletown, private, enlisted June 3, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va. ; 
died December 30, 1862. 

Louis Fray, Middletown. private, enlisted June 15, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability April 25, 1863. 

*JoHN C. H. Froentz, Bridgeport, private, enlisted August 2, 1864, 
mustered in August 2, 1864; wounded August — , 1864, Ream's Station, 
Va. ; transferred to Co. F 2d C. V. II. A. May 30, 1865. 

*Patrick Geary, fHartford, private, enlisted August 8, 1863, mustered 
in August 8, 1863 ; transferred to Co. F 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

William O. Guilford, Waterbury, private, enlisted August 8, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; transferred to Co. K October 20, 1864. 

Charles Hartson, Chaplin, private, enlisted July g, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Philip C. Hartie, Norwich, private, enlisted June 7, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability December 9, 1862. 

*WiLLiAM Hastings, Cromwell, private, enlisted September 5, 1863, 
mustered in September 5, 1863; deserted Octo1)er 12, 1863. 

*Thomas Hayes, Canton, private, enlisted September 15, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 15, 1863 ; deserted November 7, 1863. 

Edward Healy, Norwich, private, enlisted July 16, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam, Md. ; discharged 
on account of disability November 25, 1862. 

*Oscar F. Hewitt, New London, private, enlisted July 16, 1863, mu.-.- 
tered in July 16, 1863 ; discharged on account of disability November 14, 
1863. 

Frank Hilbert, Middletown, private, enlisted August 5, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

*William Hogan, South Windsor, private, enlisted August 31, 1863, 
mustered in August 31, 1863; deserted May 18, 1864. 

LuciEN B. Holmes, Glastonbury, private, enlisted June 14, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; transferred to Co. F 3d Regiment V. R. C. Au- 
gust 13, 1863 ; discharged on account of disability October 5, 1864. 

George F. Huntington, Norwich, private, enlisted July 7, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; transferred to 78th Co. 5th Battalion V. R. C. 
October 19, 1863; discharged on account of disability November 20, 1863. 

George A. Hutchins, Hampton, private, enlisted June 2, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; transferred to Co. B 14th Regiment V. R. C. June i, 
1863, discharged June 26, 1865. 

Thomas Irons, Norwich, private, enlisted July 12, 1862, mustered in 



Official Roster. 437 

August 20, i86_>: (Sc'o privntc Co. F loth C. V.) ; mnsttTcd out witli com- 
pauy May 31, 1865. 

*VVats()N Jones, Vernon, i)rivatc. enlisted October i, 1863, mustered in 
October I, 1863; wounded l'"ebruary 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, Va. ; died 
February 9, 1864. 

Thomas Kavina^ Middletown, private, enlisted August 5. 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability February 7, 1863. 

BuEt.L Keeney, Windsor, private, enlisted July 12. 1862. mustered in Au- 
gust 20, 1862; wounded August 25. 1864, Ream's Station, Va. ; mustered 
out w^ith company May 31, 1865. 

Wn.i.iAM G. Kelly, Marlborough, private, enlisted August 4, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, 
Va. ; discharged on account of (lisal)ility May 30, 1864. 

Frederick Keppenberg, Hartford, private, enlisted July 7, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va. ; 
discharged on account of disability June 25, 1863. 

Robert Kerr, Killingly, private, enlisted July 7, 1862, mustered in Au- 
gust 20, 1862; (See private Rifle Co. B 2d C. V.) ; wounded February 6, 
1864, Morton's Ford, Va. ; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

*Seigfried Kramer, Vernon, private, enlisted September 22, 1863. mus- 
1865. 

Frederick W. Kurtz, Waterbury, private, enlisted August 19, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; transferred to Co. K October 20, 1864. 

George Kurtz, Waterbury, private, enlisted August 19, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; appointed principal musician April 22, 1864. 

Madison Lamphere, Hartford, private, enlisted August i, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; transferred to i8th Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. 
October 7, 1863 ; drowned March 3, 1865. Lyme, Conn. 

*Frederick Leahr, Waterbury, private, enlisted September 16, 1863, 
mustered in September 16, 1863; deserted October 2H. 1864. 

Patrick Lloyd, Norwich, private, enlisted July 15. iS()2, mustered in 
August 20, 1862: killed May 11, 1864. Wilderness, ^'a. 

William ¥. Lovejov, Norwich, private, enlisted June it), 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; killed Septemlier 17, 1862, .Antietam, Md. 

*Oscar S. Lull, Ledyard, pri\ate, enlisted July _'S, i8()3, mustered in 
Juy 28, 1863; transferred to Co. I', nth Reuinu-ut V. R. C. April 17, iS()5; 
dischar-ed July 25. 1865. 

"=JoH.\ l.^•^( II, Avon, pri\ale, enlisted September S. i8()3, mustered in 
September S. i8f)3; deserted October 1 J, l8()3. 

J.\M|-.s Mahkk. Middletown, prixate, enlisted July (j. l8()j, mustered in 
August 20, iS()2; wounded December 13, i8()j, I'Vedericksburg, Va. : dis- 
charged on account of disabilit_\- .Mart'b 17. 1803. 

*Patruk AI.mioxev. Norw.ilk, prixate, enlisted September 30, 1863. 



438 Fourteenth Regiment;^ £rV. Infantry. 

miiat,ered..in..,SepteiiTl)ep- 30, -,1863 ;-"'WOtJ?id€d -May:.ilr:rj864, Spottsylvania, 

Va. ; transferred to Co. F 2d C. V. U. A. May 30/1865; . . -.' : . 

,,:JO^>|4'>RSifi;?Haftf.Qrd,;:Jjpiyjrte/-eiiJiste^^^ 

gysj 20^/l^fe;/4i[ai>sfej;r&d 'tq-j4,t-li Go,-r24:-rBattali§)>i::y; .-R.; G.: : Febntary :i6, 

1865; discharged August 19, 1865. .;^'c'-,' .-' vrr,r-"c"o^ 

•,/^5-fVMiJ£L^;]VlASpNj.Guilfor4i=15rkvc^6s-ei^^^^^ 

Aug^ist i.^ iS6^.;.,kilied -.October 37i:T86it, ^Hatcher's Run, Va;'-: .os J4;j;g;;i'i i:": 

_. James ,MGCoRJVii-c*Ci Hartford, -^private, ejulisted J\nie, i0;/;rS62>;niustc5ned 

iu. August. 20,/ l86?■,..■wo^^iJd^/DeJ£m■\]^ ■13^ -iSbij Frede.riek&fetirg;.; Va.v 

wounded May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville, Va?j;-Tkserte,<i; I^Iay ;(2, •l:864:.".:v.- :.■• • 

_, Michael McDf.rmott. Killingly,--.pri\'atc. enlisted Jvme:ri5;- 1862,-, rhvls- 

ei-,ed,-in-„AA.^u-s't jo. \X()-j. wmmdcd' Juls ;^ iSf)^, Gettysburgj^ Ra. r'trans- 

ferred to Co. 1 loth; battalion. V.R; C. SopteUjLber-j30i;,,i863y- discllarge'd' 

. Jp^N^.MxpQU^%Vy-,-fio^.kh.- private. euHsted-Jm^,^- 3£.ri;862,ri3iuster-ed in' 
August 20, 1862; wounded -Jvj[ay:vi. 1863. Chanc^Hor^vi-lleT-^Va.-; tfansf erred 
t.o.jjSth: Go.-.2d-Battai,iiSMi y.-.R.'C.^Sept^ambe^.-B^y i863'--d:i?i:ha,rg$d Jun:e 39, 
^^$S-r.::~('o"x bolrrrjovr : (.V .D i?s: C .oD oiWy: oi:\-;riq ooZ) :i.ao: .c-: i-:::;; 

* jo H N j;,^4cGp i^j ;:S9ut|^ ffiS|o»]i : W iv^t e,i H0i*li>s,tfd S eDtefpbef lO; r )?863,: tiiM^ 
tiir^ejd; iiif~)^^pl^ii^r;riO)ri;863-;..dese4;ted> Pct^^^^ •;■ - ; : rv:^/' 

*David Miller, Southington, private, enlisted September 9, 1863, iTfij^: 
tej-.ed. iH^~i;Septcnil kt o', 1863;,- ■ -captured • May "4v i3v6"4,. : Braixdy ; St;itio.p„ Va. ; 
paroled Ndvcmln r 30. 1864; furloughed lieceniber 9, 181649 failed to return; 
no further- rccurd Adjutant-Gcnerar.*. Office-, -Wa-shington. Dv. C; ' : ; . : : 

William J. i\ioRK.iu-:,\n, LisliDu; privatfij- enlisted -July. 8.: '.1862, duustered. 
ia-A.«gH,st';20,; 1802 ; -discharged on acc-ount of -disability Febi/yary"i%i863. 
;2f A;UGp5TV^;-NoBnE,- Fa,ntjii>giron,, private; enliste<l Jidy 2ji, J864, ' niu'stfered : 
in July 23, 1864; tran&fejretl-to Co.- F 2d C. V. H. A. May ;30,;:i86f -l " ' 
;f|;AM_E;^ NoK'fo-N^-Jfcw -liaven. pri\a4e, enlisted July ,1.8; ;iS63,;muste:red in 
July 18. 1863; wQy-ndfed -May 27. iN(m. Nt>rtli Anna Riyer.y^a;^-;. t-raiisferre^b 
t€);Q95iGpi-4|6thrRegii^ent/NT YyjYols. ; a deserter tUe^re/rqnv ,:^' ;:;-,- : /; 

Jacob OBENNAUER,.;<^risw0;l-d>;-pri.^'ate,':enbste-d- -May 29, ; -1862, diiu-stered 
iU'-A«gustp.20,M-862-5:-di-SGhai-g^d pn ■;a-G€onnt of. disaliility March' 26, I-863;. • 

*JoHN>;RARlvgR;;-H'artf(5)rd,.-priyat€i.> enlisted July 30. 1863 ;-muBtered in 
J:tfly 3Q,.-i863:; yvo-imcted May 6,. 1864,. WiUlerness-.ya. ; captured ;August 25, 
1864,-, Ream's -StatToiv Y^. ■; par^^led March' i,. r86S;; "discbarged July-5,;:i865.- 

*David Patterson, Norwich, private, enlisted Aygust 5, 1863. rawSjteTed. 

iH':AugHS,t--5j- 1863;;- wounded May 13,- i864,_.SpottsylyauJa, Va. ;--ti-ansfen-ed 

to Co. F 2d C V. H. A. May 30,-1 865.-..-' - . • ■_■'.>. .; -- ■ ■ ' -, 

r-EpWi-i^- RiERS, ■Hartf<>r(l, priAUlv, enlistud July 11, 1862, mustered in A\\- 

gaj:St 20r,'f86^-s:-*QUJ>de(l ■Viay .^, i8()3,- Chanceliorsvil-k'. Va. ; nnistered out 

with company May 31, i865;,- -: -■-■•■ '•"•,■.' '■ ■ - ; 

.rtJl3H>5pRAyrW:Q'i^^ftyj;New,?fi3;yen, . p^riv-ate, ■enl-i-s-ted July, i?> ,1863, • niysteTed 



.X-rinclnl . Official Roster. 43^ 

m July iS; 1.86.V; transferred -to'-Cdu GV-l-Sl' k^girtienUTV !^. C. "Novehiber 
30. 1803; discliarged on acdiAfnt -of^iJabil^ M&r:dli'%i,-'T864.' , ' ■• " "■- ' 
James RiLEY.l^li'ddletrtwn, private; eiYli^Uxl July ■6/1^2, miYsti&red'-ifi \\u- 
gust 20, 1862; wounded July 3, 1863, Getty slWIi^gv Par/ Womwded : MSy -7^ 
?864,-Wi1demeS^ A^.^ •?risdiai'ged'J\n>e'5V"lF865^"'^i-:'I ."■"■;.> >:-:.f-' ::;:':-- 

Edwarp Ril-SY', K"aftfG?di-"pri"va'tev'.enlisted "Aifga'sl '6; 'ii862,."^'ustgf.ed''irt. 
Arugust'26J i-§62? ■w^i«f<ftd^Dei:eitil)er"YJ;qi86^,r.Ft«^^ 

teredo out 'H'^it4T"'c(>^Van3^Way''3fr''i^ ;".^'5' ,?• ""-i.'r.-ji'qoS rr: 'rrro: 

*ALExA5i'iJfek •'RtoffiW-rsoN-, •Gokhes^er;"p^rv^t?, "fenlisted" A^Ugufet"^, -'1863;- 
niHS?CTea-iii^i^tigrist7';"i8%rtfrnsfei<r^d::to'"U^^ M.-- April :2t3i 864';-- Served 
on U. S. S. "Perry", "New H^aip^lq-irij"' atid '--'^SMith :CafC)litia'V:;dis'-- 
ciffirged' Atv^ifet 26, 'i86S'."- '^'^^J"''= .•;;•.•■••• . ■ '--.o'// .y::;;;Yx2 rT:r>T_- 

*WiLLiAM Roberts, Goshenrl)ri\%te; ettlistect August: J.>)^r863, ^mustered: 
in' A\lgtt'st"i; 1S63"; -deserfed "Septtfiflb^T'^Tr J865.' ' ■•■'^' ' .j-.-izj/.t?. ■■;•:::;;' 

*James a. Robinson, Berlin, private, e"nli^steH'"Septie-nib6f. 2;' i^3;'.mits.^. 
tefed^ii^Septeri-Ybfer 2, '1863;. ti^artsiefred to'rath' Co. -^d BAtfaliofr-V./Ri C- 
November 4, 1863; di.scbarged on aGctKuit'of diaabUity- Janxtary lOp i864'.v' 

• JaWe's ^OGERi^^'Welhersfield; private, ewitsted"' "J tme"i^, .1862,: imistered in 
Ariglist 20, ' :-862V w'bUilded May- j,' 1863', 'GbaheettorsviU'e; -V^'. ;.':eaptiTi:ed 
August 25, 1864, ReJri?i's-''&at"i(gnV V'al'j'died" February 28^, ii8!55;-:Salisby.ryt; 
N: (!:.--■' ■■^^' .OF. -O-l ^^J^.^r:-; ,,:::■■■:■ .- .r^-ylZ .z^:^-?. ::v:y.-Z'^ 

' GaA-R^.ig^■M.:•S^AK'teN,-^■Windl^^fhl,■^p'ri^•ate;.el^^iite^^ 
lered in August 20, 1862; deserted November 23, .i862;:>."':vr:o-;-fj."r:/v .;i^'8: /"^ 

-^MEN«'?'SEYiMnG'R/Saftrord,.pri\rate/-mtlisted-:.A^^ 

itf'=Aug1ist'"?7, lg^g";'"-W6unde'd- February- 6r-r8'64J.'M©rfen!s-EQrdi:-Va:-: cap- 
tured August 25, 1864, Ream's Station, Va. ; paroled March 10, 18^:^; 
tfausfrncdiu Ca- D:2d^C. 'V:-!*; -A: 3)ffl% :3d, "1865: LI .":"?r::Z ." XAirr.:-^ 

* J< u 1 X S H A w; ■" rta¥ef5drd> ■ prtuarej-'-eril \&ii<k :Arignst o §, ) li^^ : imiSteted'vin: : 
August 5, 1863; deserted August 24, 1863. .rC8r .or v;:I,: ./. .'.' .V D 

i Gfi6kG6''S*fi<Y, •Gi4gWolci,2-^Hvate;'evilKtedvJ^^^^ 
giTst:-2b^ 1862-'; :dte(^h{fi*'g€d-oii:'accOiint of disabtey-:February'.6,.'jS63.- . • ,' -•■ 
Baltas Schanz, Windsor, private, enlisted August 4, 1862, mustered in: 
August- 2d>"?§6'2'[- imi.'istered oiirVrtli company 'May'-giviSes.—.v,-'" ^.:::. )'..: 

" '^AusTJJj' H"'/S jiECtEYv' Waterford, ' private, -.-(hiTi sled: Angust^.;-^,.ol864^;- 
mustered in August 20, 1864; captured August .:a^, .■i'864,- Ream's, ^tatton,: 
Va";"-par^'d-Mafeh"3b;T?8652v'dlschargcd:Qn.acGOTmt .af:disa1)ilrty: July 7, 
1865. _ ••-^^'•- •'■ ■ ■■ •'■■••■■■■ :V':^' .• -.•-:■;;:;■ V -■■ " - ■ 

^''GiidRG6"SL^t-K,-.M"i5:ldletVnvu. privalo. enlisted Jiime 9V i8S2v:3nHstered in 
AH'g^st-."20,^'T862';disCVfarfje'd on. account of disability ^Augast>;■^2,.^I.863".•■■ :' 
*Davii) SI.OTI<f^E,."N~.gw■■I^avcn;rprlvat'e,"•cn^isted•"J'^iy''2gu■■1 wus^tefcd ■• 
iff 7uIy'2g,-'l86sY fransfevrcd" to 'Cd7 F:2di€\ Yv H';- A: May 30. .1865.. • .': 

•'^WpLi.ik'ii' "Sm.H)t;, Hart f(MX1, 'private,' b'nli-5ted:A,ugti-st 5.: 1863. .musttjred 
in'AUgu'srt 5; iKTJ.i:' wounded February f5; 1864. :A[orl6ivs' Pond,' Va;.- wound-, 
ed May 7, 1864, Wilderness, Va. ; deserted June 24. 1864. 



440 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

William L. Smith, New Haven, private, enlisted July 8, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; deserted July 2, 1863. 

*Henry Smith, Groton, private, enlisted July 28, 1863, mustered in July 
18, 1863 ; deserted September 21, 1863. 

^Frederick Smith, Preston, private, enlisted June 30, 1863, mustered in 
June 30, 1863; killed October 14, 1863, Bristoe Station, Va. 

*Peter Smith, Wethersfield, private, enlisted September 8, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 8, 1863; vv^ounded November — , 1864, date and place 
not shown; transferred to Co. D 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

*Peter J. Smith, New Britain, private, enlisted July 26, 1864, mustered 
in July 26, 1864; deserted August 28, 1864. 

*JoHN Snyder, Westport, private, enlisted August i, 1864, mustered 
in August I, 1864; deserted August 28, 1864. 

Robert Starkey, Hartford, private, enlisted July 11, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; died April 13, 1863. 

John Starkey, Hartford, private, enlisted July 11, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; deserted June 4, 1863. 

Henry Stevens, Griswold, private, enlisted July i, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; transferred to 64th Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. October 24, 
1863 ; discharged on account of disability April 28, 1865. 

*Samuel Steele, Stonington, private, enlisted July 30, 1863, mustered in 
July 30, 1863; captured November 30, 1863, Mine Run, Va. ; died August 
6, 1864, Andersonville, Ga. 

Artemus Stockman, New Haven, private, enlisted August 5, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862 ; discharged on account of disability February 28, 
1863. 

*Lyman E. Sweet, Litchfield, private, enlisted August 4, 1863, mustered 
in August 4, 1863; (See private Co. E 8th C. V.) ; transferred to Co. F 2d 
C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

Daniel Timmons, Middletown, private, enlisted June 3. 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded May 6. 1864. Wilderness, Va. ; died May 8, 
1864. 

Moses Tyler, Norwich, private, enlisted July 15. 1862; mustered in Au- 
gust 20, 1862 ; captured February 6, 1864. Morton's Ford, Va. ; died April 
14, 1864, Andersonville, Ga. 

*WiLLiAM Ulrick, Vernon, private, enlisted September i, 1863, mus- 
tered in September i, 1863; deserted August 15, 1864. 

*Alexander Vogel, Bridgeport, private, enlisted July 25, 1864, mustered 
in July 25, 1864; admitted to hospital. City Point, Va., August — , 1864; 
no further record, Adjutant-General's Ofifice, Washington, D. C. 

Baltas Wagner, Hartford, private, enlisted June 3, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862: (See wagoner Rifle Co. E 3d C. V.) ; wounded May 2, 
1863, Chancellorsville, Va. ; transferred to 23d Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. 



Official Roster. 441 

August 17, 1863; ro-cnlistC(l votcrau August 29, 1864; transferred to Co. 
G 24tli Regiment V. R. C. December 15, 1S64; diseharged X()vem])er 18, 
1865. 

Albert K. West, Preston, private, enlisted May 4, 1862, mustered in Au- 
gust 20, 1862; discharged on account of disaliility January 24, 1863. 

Richard West^ Putnam, private, enlisted June 16, 1862, mustered in Au- 
gust 20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam, Md. ; discharged on 
account of disability June 8, 1863; (See private Co. K 1st C. V. Cavalry). 

Michael West, fllartford. |)ri\ate, enlisted September 17. 1863. mus- 
tered in September 17, iS()3; deserted .March 31. 1864. 

*Joseph Wilson, Berlin, private, enlisted September 12, 1863, mustered 
in September 12, 1863; absent sick in hospital May 31, 1865; no further 
record Adjutant-General's OlTice, Washington, D. C. 

George Woodworth, Hartford, private, enlisted July 20, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability May 26, 1863. 

*William Wort, Norwalk, private, enlisted July 22, 1864, mustered in 
July 22, 1864; transferred to Co. D 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

COMPANY F. 

Jarvis E. Blinn, New PJritain, captain, enlisted August 6, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; killed September 17, 1862, Antietam, Md. 

Samuel A. Moore, New Britain, captain, enlisted July lO, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 22,, 1862; mustered ist lieutenant; promoted September 17, 
1862; major September 22, 1863. 

Frederick B. Doten, Bridgeport, captain, enlisted August i, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; promoted from corporal Co. A to ist lieutenant 
March 3. 1863; appointed adjutant April 14, 1863; promoted from adjutant 

Theodore A. Stani.ev, New Britain, ist lieutenant, enlisted July 15, 
1862, mustered in August 23, 1862; mustered 2d lieutenant; prouKjted 
Septenuber 17, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, 
Va.; died December 31, 1862. 

Wilbur D. Fisk, New Britain, ist lieutenant, enlisted July 17, 1862, 
mustered in August 2^,, 1862; (See private RiMe Co. 11 3d C. V.); 
mustered sergeant; wuunded December 13, i8()2, Frederick.siburg, 
Va. ; promoted 2i\ lieutenant Co. 1 March i, 18(13; 1st lieutenant 
June 5, 1863; wdumled October 14. 1863, Bristoe Station, Va.; dis- 
charged on account of disability October 27, 1863. 

Frederick V.. Sii ai.k. Xorwicb, ist lieutenant, enlisted June 6, 1862, 
mustered in Augu^I _'o, iS()j; (See private Rillo Co. D 3d C. V.); 
promoted from 2(1 lieuten.nU Co. V. November 13, 1863; wounded 
February 6. 1864, M..rlou\ b'ord, Va., woundeil M.iy (., iXrq, WiKler- 
ness. Va.; died May 21, i8()4. 

JosEi'H F. TuoMrsoN, Hartford, ist lieutenant, enlisted July 15, 1862, 



442 Fourteenth RegirBeriti--CoV. Infantry. 

must-ered,.--i-n:' August >20, ,1,86a;- •■|)-fpm-oted from seFgeant>,^<).-K >.tp ad 
lreiUen:a«-tvS;e^pteiwl>er' 30, :i8j5'4; ,^st--lieuteiiantjanua,ry> 29,- •.1.865 ;r;.imis-) 
tered out with company May 31, 1865. -,^g; 

_;,Wii)LrA-M'iA;.T(JpME5, Ne-vy Haven,; 2d >li-eiitenant, enlisted June l%,-riT^2, ■ 
mustered 'in/ Au-gHst: i?3,- :l86"2-.;: pro iiToted from (luartcrmasteF-sef.geai^t-. 
September ■i7,-i862; /woiinded.-DecembvM- 13-, ■■ 1862, RrederkksbuTg, 
Va.r:di€d:E^ceinber-2i,j5::862..:;,: - .-;• •:.■.. - .^,n>.; _ . 

. JoH.N.A.. TiTJBiTS, :NeW: Loiidf^i, ; 2d lieute-nant^jfenlisted' J,uly" I2; 1862,; 
mustrerc'd' -in- August 2Tr, i86j;- prpm&t:ed .:fro'm- -ist .serg'eani;-; Gor/.H 
March 3, 1863; w(,iunded July 3, ■i'863, Getty^sbu-rg,-- Pa-r j; 4t|cj);argGd 
dn-:a<:count;.?if .disability July i/V •i863;;7appQiiited: cap-tail? ,■ arnd-com- 
nwssarry of :^tfesi§tence' U; S. Vols; -M;ay 2,8, ' J864; major by brevet; 
July 24, 1865; discharged July 3r, r86s- -,-' ' :,•.:;•:•' ••,.■: 

h.JijtJjej-K^g FivNoRTpN-J-NeVv, -IJfjtain^ 3d lieittenant-, enlisted. A'-^fASt, 9,:- 1:862, 
mustered .m. ■August-::23r::."i86^2;;,mus,tered ' private; promoted corporal;- 
F«b:nirary9; i;863-, .lat -.^ef geanf : .J^uly l ,• ••i863';.,2,d- rieiit-en'31'lt ■ De.cerrtiiber 

5. 1863; vF6und.e;di;date.'\a.nd .'^^'Qe' .i^ot .s-h,Dvv;n;i :tiismis;aed ■ S-eptember 

6, 1864. 

Leveritt Howell, New Britain,, ist^s.er^eant, enlisted August 6, 1862, 
mustered in August 23. 1862; ai^ftM'fged on account of disability 
January:.^; 1863.::, •. '^j^:l:\o ,r:i:;]q';:; .-■ ; ■ '-' . :"' .'/ , , '. 

Imri A.i.SraNCEg;Blaoififiet;d, -isirrseirgetant, enlisted Ju.Ly 28/, 1862,- nurs3-: 
tered i^n •'August ::23,"r,>i8629 irruSteced-'cbTlporai^ wsu-aded/. December 
1.3;; 1862:,; .'Fj-e-derickslburg.-.Via:^: -prbftiot'ed; .sergeanCoFebJ'W'-ary: to,';:i863; ^ 
1st sergeant February 17. 1864; captur.e.d'^ Aagnst'-r25;,i:)iB64^-.;>Reafti'^': 
&tatroii,;''Va.- paroled"- M'arch.' io,'rj86s-;i ,r^uced.:tOTcSergeaiit:-(sii2ik) ; 
dS^chai-gedMay io/i86s:: .::" ■) :-'"'^ bolv-o-iq :Ld8: .C- :r.rj-r;A rrf br::^^ 

AiVgiLst '23, r8&2:; iliusterjed" c'erporailrpraraated-' O'cto.^er--i,.-!>if862:;;: de- 
duced tcr r<tuk.s::(sici:) ;Octobei-v:2S,- 1863; cfjiptliined- M'sy .■9^"i'864;"EbpSi 
FX)"rd>''-Va'.T.:di«d' Janttkry.-?5, -tiB&Sv-Fliareiicej'iS..' vC. :::;>.r .■;: Tjoxrrojq-jc; 
Elisha S. Booth, Jr., Barkhamsted, sergea'iitj.'.ejiHsteid-o^aly 24^.^1862/' 
raitel-erje;d in••Au■g^Js•t■'■23,.^l862^•■mt^^tered:■;eaTj^a^a'I^ piiemot^H jOcto'B^r 
I, ; .18624 "wounded^ DeGenT)bfir::i;3/)0iB'62;s:<.Erederidk's|i,ni?g, iilVa.g-^died: 
January -.gv .1863.' .:. -v .?.' "■:'::: j^^j^I j-^r:;;:!-;/ :::::\'JV.-r:iE bj-^lr.:::- 

:Fre0erjck R. 15n6, Btoorafteld, sergeant, e^iiisted; Jiily.29, 't862;:i5nusteT.eiL'' 
in-AuguM 23, :l86:2; JciltedrSe-ptember -17;: iS6^, Ariti'etaTn, :M:d.- .-, -;r.;l 
William R. Lati^.^r,: Bip-0^lfield,■,''sfergea■M,;;c)iiisted^July -29, :J86^^;pilJSr-j 
taiU^ i.i^ August' ;23>rj86'2;rmtust;erfe.d private;: wnundeH .;May;:3,; :r8Sl3, 
Charicel1ohsyilTe,.'V>.;/lii5bmoted;;cofpiBral:K'6vember:,J;,,-;i-863;;: wounded: 
February 6; ,',iS64,.::3V[oTtdTr'9 /Fotd; ■ V.a.;; pramoted; 's e;rgeaiit-:'Se;pi,Btn'ber • 
ij-:'i864;' .ca;pturfed:-,QctQ)ber: 27,.. .■1864V- Boy dton-,iP.lank>':Rba,d;'^ 
paroled February 17, .1865; mustered out .with compairy ;May :3JVi865." 

.:S£(DRGE H':ll^E"wisrNeW-.BTitain sergeant", •enlisted Jiily:26, .1862,: mu:s- 



.vTJnc^al .VOj^ial-:R<«t^; -;~od; :-•: 443 

tered in Angust 23/ l86^;: miHtcre-cl f)rivate; wounded Soptenibt-r 17, 
1863,' A^itietanlv 'Md.; ■pconioied - eorporal October , I7,- 1862; wounded 
December 13V ;j«62;-:;.FFed.erfck§b'urg, Vji,-;- pTpmoUd .^ergfant, Febru- 
ary 9, 1863; discharged mi account of dis^Wiity- Oetqber 2, .l863/- • 
- Henjb.y-.LydalL/ New J'.ritam, sergeant, .«li}istcd vAwgii^tA/lSfei.-nnjs- 
tered in August 2^, 186^; niustered private; : promoted GorjP'or^l jj^e-fe- 
ruary 10, .1863; .'Serg"e:anfc.oN,Qy§mib«r 1, 1863; -mustered, QUtoS^ilk'.fiQ?"- 
pa.ny Mayr-^l:;- 1^5-' -U !■■'■■ ■ ::<:...'- ' - -■: ;■ .:.:. ,^.-rv::,\ ■;} 

-'GHAjOiSS- Mt^ALHA'TT^N,..Ne.W Britain, Sei^^geants enlisted July 16, -1863, 
mustered in? Augu^t::23iv)|:8^^:;:-mnstefed.;jpriyait.e;; -pronicjted r^ergvant 
E^bruaTy:^^9vcr.86^:;;ki1ledJ;4ctQi)et]"i4, ..l8j53,-:Brjsta.^ .¥?-//;:: 

. • MiuhAEJi.:-MY£RS, New; B:rjta;irt;;'Sei:geant,:etiHst,e(i, Jn.lfy_ 28> ;.i862, njiUst^i:?^; 
in August 23, 1862; .mu^te.redvprJ[ya._t^i;~protTiotef} corporal jJ^ebruary- 
9, •: -1^63;;- ; : sergeant Nov enibeii ; 4:,: '.i863-;TcWCHi;n d«:d- 411 d ■-. c^iptXir?:d ■ .Fdjr uar y 
6^18647 MortojfsvFordyi Vrft,-r.xiied ; $,ept-em'ber .20, - 1864;, r Andersonvillev 
Qzy -y'-'^. -'::■: "■::" h:j]:::"0-r/ :7,'^.^-' .'^' "' ' '; : "oinr::,/::; :."" . ■■• ' 

• JDhn" W; Post, NeW^2B:Fit■aiJl^,,5ergeant:,,'enli,^ted July-;ig,; iSda^rninstered- 
in August 23, 1862; appointed-;Cii>a:rtetmaster-i sergeant Septeii>bt5r;i7; -1862.- 

. GttARiES: M. Scoyjf-L/ New- Britain-, -sfrgeaiihienlL 1862, 

nnt§;ter.ed/in' August,. ;?3.: J^M ;m-u^^.re4.:priva.t'e;. detailed / wagoner;; 
r^etufiiied to faaks:;-.-prGmote4' Tcefpsjr'aii .Moyeinber • i, ; 1363.; wou^ded^ 
FKbf;u^Ty .^,-^:r864J:■Mo:Ft0:H'5'_:Ftrrd;, \f,a;i'vjy-5rmotedy:serge;a;nt:-FeJjruar;y:. 
17, -.i.^^-;-: w^oirjid^d May/12, J8642 Spo^tt^yljvarnj^tcrVa,--;' reditic.ed to ranks 
G5ick);.)died:fju4y 14; J1864. -rq :-j:zvhq "jj-n.^ ■ :: . ■ ..: 

Frederick S. .Sri'-M(>UR/;3New;-Bfita^n,::§^EgBant, enlisted July 17, 1862; 
mustered- • i.i^ • -A-u'gUst -.■■23» M^>^,n-j pr,e»3l0t£e4.-3''-<l".aT:t:e-r;niJister-it:rge:^iit 
November 13, i862..:.:,,X: .s rocki^C j'^;-:; ^- J ;i.C3i .?.:. :s-j^-;/, •:' ;^-;-j; 

.;£;«-ARCES- N.- VenseLj, New' Jiritain, sergeHnt, enlisted August •7:,--.-f862, 
mv\§;teri2;d:7m Apgu-grtj23-,. 1862; mvs tered i)rivate; pr.inioCed oofpural 
QKJtotberp^; i862;--seFgeaixt/:Fel3.FMafy '9^ 1863; redacud Uj rauks (sick),! 
OfGtot)e^.:2S,;r.i863'. -promoted :sergeanl•:N:0!ve^p'|5,er.^I,^■;I■^3;^tTa^^,■5fer 
to Co. A 24th Regiment V. R. C. December 12, 1863; discharge^ jMiT;er. 

28,..i865^.. .: ■ ... •,;•". ■ '• .■ •■ .^ --: /.■^Z .-)/.![ ;:/.!,-o7i-i' 

Ei)\yARi>.H:.WAiiE, New Britain, .sergeant, enlisted/ Aygjrl^t.Sf. I^?^;njps-;i 
tex^d- ill .August' : 23; : i8f">2; inusiercd , priya,t;e;;, promoted: .cafpo.ral; Ffeb- 
ruary. ;io/ 1863; sergeanl Xoveni'ljer la,-- 1863?- d.i«<:h,ar-g;ed/ M;ay-. 3;!:^: 
1^5.1.. - :;^-;-,--: :.iiV ./ :\ ■.-:::.: :::.:iy .>;)^' .:. v;;:,: ;)■;:- ::::^v.- :v:-l 

■ EvijAH W- iP^"?PN,^^flin, corporail,'v€nUs|§d J^|^tyT28;-i802t;}ntj5ter^5l.)jn> 
Augustp:23-. _iiB62.;;,7Ti-nstiM-cd private-c gfomt^ted; ;P-^bu3-aity-:-.20, ."-l864v>r 
medal -of hoflor- awarded for c-aptivt-e,; of •.flag>::-kr}'1ed:-.Ma;y. 0iTj864, 
WiAderne^s„-Afav;- /■ -. ■ ::■•,-•■:■ '> r: ; ; ;::- i'/ir-- .■ " ■ ' :" ':r 

..BuaJSEy .F)Ec;fc?Jj=:Y,<-Ber.Un, corporal; e>Tii3ted;:A.ugtistr;7j, •1862.; ni«$ter<fd : 
in August 23,. 1862; nnl.^te^ed private; promoted October 5, 1S62; 
killed December ■13,/ 1862; ■Fredericksburg,:- Va. . 



444 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Charles R. Bunnell, New Britain, corporal, enlisted Augnst 6, 1862, 
mustered in August 23, 1862; reduced to ranks October 5, 1862; 
wounded May 3, 1863; Chancellorsville, Va.; discharged on account 
of disability August 17, 1863. 

Henry Cooley^ New Britain, corporal, enlisted August 11, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; deserted October 2, 1862. 

Ralph Cowles, New Britain, corporal, enlisted July 16, 1862, mustered 
in August 2;^. 1862; mustered private; promoted February 9, 1863; 
transferred to Co. E 3d Regiment V. R. C. August 17, 1863; pro- 
moted sergeant December 15, 1864; discharged July 12, 1865. 

Edward C. Cowles, Bloomfield, corporal, enlisted July 30, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 2;^, 1862; mustered private; promoted September i, 
1864; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Danford J. Davis, Berlin, corporal, enlisted August 7, 1862, mustered 
in August 23, 1862; mustered private; wounded July 3, 1863, Gettys- 
burg, Pa.; promoted November 16, 1863; wounded and missing Feb- 
ruary 6, 1864, 'Morton's Ford, Va.; probably died on field; no further 
record Adjutant-General's Office, Washington, D. C. 

Thomas Finn, New Britain, corporal, enlisted August 4, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; mustered private; wounded July 3, 1863, 
Gettysburg, Fa.; promoted November 13, 1863; transferred to Co. B 
24th Regiment V. R. C. December 4, 1863; discharged June 27, 1865. 

Moses Gilbert, Jr., Berlin, corporal, enlisted August 7, 1862, mustered 
in August 23, 1862; mustered private; promoted October 5, 1862; 
discharged on account of disability December 11, 1862. 

Edmund D. Gilbert, New Britain, corporal, enlisted July 17, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 22, 1862; deserted October 2, 1862. 

Henry B. Goodrich, New Britain, corporal, enlisted July 18, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 2^, 1862; captured May 3, 1863. Chancellorsville, Va.; 
paroled May 15, 1863; reduced to ranks (sick); wounded August 25, 
1864, Ream's Station, Va.; discharged on account of disability April 
28, 1865. 

Thomas Hart, New Britain, corporal, enlisted July 22, 1862, mustered 
in August 23, 1862; killed December 13, 1862, Fredc-ricksburg, Va. 

Michael McMahon, New Britain, corporal, enlisted July 17, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; mustered private; promoted February 9, 
1863; wounded May 3, 1863, 'Chancellorsville, Va.; reduced to ranks 
(sick) O'cto'ber 25, 1863; captured May 8, 1864, Ellis Ford. Va.; 
paroled March 2, 1865; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

*Peter MiLi.KK, Vernon, corporal, enlisted October i, 1863, mustered 
in October i, i8()3; mustered private; promoted February 17, 1864; 
transferred to 126th Regiment N. Y. Vols. April 16, 1865; a deserter 
therefrom. 

Charles W. Norton, Berlin, corporal, enlisted August 7, 1862, mus- 



Official Roster. 445 

tered in .\ut;u>t _',^, iS<)_': mnstered ])rivate; wnundcd December 13, 
i8()2. l-'rcdericksburg, Va.; pmmuted February 17. 1864; wounded 
May 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va.; discharged July 11, 1865. 

Joseph Pierce, Berlin, corporal, enlisted July 26. 1862, mustered in Aug- 
ust 23, 1862, mustered i)rivate: promoted Novem'ber i, 1863; mus- 
tered out with cnmpany May 31, 1865. 

James A. Stkoazzi^ New Britain, corporal, enlisted Jidy 31, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23. 1862; mustered private; w.iunded July 3. 1863, 
promoted September i, 1864; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Henry E. Talcott, New Britain, corporal, enlisted August 6, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; mustered private; promoted February 9, 
1863; reduced to ranks October 25, 1863; discharged May 31. 1865. 

*JosEPH Thomas, East Haddam, corporal, enlisted September 15, 1863, 
mustered in September 15, 1863; mustered private; promoted Novem- 
ber 17, 1863; wounded May 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va.; transferred to 
Co. ^r 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

DwiGHT H. Wright, New Britain, corporal, enlisted August 7, 1862, 
mustered in August 2^, 1862; mustered private; promoted October 5, 
1862; died October 23, 1862. 

John Tnm.\n, New Britain, nnisician, enlisted August 7, 1862, mustered 
in August 2,^. 1862; transferred to ranks; transferred to 22d Co. 2d 
Battalion V. R. C. October 6, 1864; discharged August tq. 1S65. 

J. WnxARD Parsons. New Britain, musician, enlisted August 11, 1862, 
mustered in August 2^, 1862; transferred to ranks; discharged Feb- 
ruary ID, 1863. 

Henry E. Williams, Vernon, musician, enlisted July 22, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; transferred as private from Co. D October 20, 
1864; detailed musician; mustered out with companj- May 31, 1865. 

*AuGUSTUS Addicks, Waterbury, private, enlisted September 22, 1863, 
mustered in September 22, 1863; See Charles Meyer. 

Newton A. Alcott, Wolcott, private, enlisted August 7, 1862, mustered 
in August 23, 1862; transferred t<i Co. D 2d C. V. H. A. May 30. 1865. 

Henry Alcott, New Britain, private, enlisted .\ugust 6. 18(12, mustered 
in August 2^, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862. Aniielam, Md.; dis- 
charged on account of disability January 26. 1863. 

James P. Alcott, Wolcott, private, enlisted August 6, 1862, nnrstered 
in August 23, 1862; missing in action October 27. 1864, Boydtmi 
Plank Road, Va.; probably killed; no further record Adjutaut-Gen- 
eral's Office, Washington, D. C. 

Edward O. Allen, Bloomflcld, ]irivate, enlisted July 2S. iX()2, mustered 
in August 2:^, 1862; deserted October i, 1862. 

William Ashwell, Bloomfield, private, enlisted August 7, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 2;^, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietani, 



^Hfe Fourteenth Regimerit, C. V. Infantry. 

Md., wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va.; transferred 
to 159th Co. 2d Battalion V. R. 'C. February 17, 1864; discharged July 
5. 1865. 

John L. Bartholomew, New Britain, private, enlisted August 6, 1862, 
mustered in August 23, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Anlietam, 
Md.; captured August 25, 1864, Ream's Station. Va.; died October 
13, 1864, Salisbury, N. C. 

*JoHN Barrett, Vernon, private, enlisted September 29. 1863. mustered 
in September 29, 1863; transferred tn 37th Regiment Mass. Vols. 
January 8, 1864; a deserter therefrnm. 

George F. Beach, New Britain, private, enlisted July 19, 1862, mustered 
in August 2^^, 1862; discharged cm account of disability December 24, 
1862. (See private Co. F 8th C. V.) 

Henry Beach, New Britain, private, enlisted August 6, 1862, mustered 
in August 2^, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam. Aid.; 
discharged on account of disability April 29, 1863. 

*MAfHE\v • Beers, fNew Haven, private, enlisted September 15, 1863, 
mustered in September 15. 1863; deserted May 3^ 1864. 

*Joseph A. Berry, New Haven, private, enlisted July 29, 1863, mus- 
fiered in July 29, 1863; wounded February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, 
Va., wounded Mlay 12, i8()4. S])nttsylvania, Va.; deserted August 6, 
1864. 

*Louis C. Blanc, Waterbury, private, enlisted August 22, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 2:2. 1863; deserted February 27, 1864. 

George B. Booth, New Britain, private, enlisted July 17, 1862, mustered 
in Angust-23, 1862; ap^pornted hospital steward 'U. S. A. September 
7,-1863; discharged July 15, 1865. 

"Thomas Jv Brainard, Bloomtield, private, enlisted July 29, 1S62, mus- 
tered in August- 23; 1862; killed Tul\- 3, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa. 

*WiLLtAM BranBi-S.- Hartford, private, enlisted July 27, 1863, mustered 
in July 27. 1863; killed' I\l ay 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va. 

^Bernard Brady, Hartford,-, private, -enlist-ed July 29, 1863, mustered 
in July 29, 1863; deserted ATigust 16, "1863. •■' 

^William C. Brown, New Haven, private, enlisted August 5, 1863, 
mustered in August 5, 1863-;- wounded" October 14, 1863, Bristoe 
Station, Va^; killed June 6, i864vC6l<i Harbbi", Va. 

.*ChaRles Brown, New- Haven, private, eiilisted July 25, 1863, mus- 
tered 4a July is,-'-l863;- k-ille<i Oct(dn-r 74, 7863. Bristoe Station, Va. 

*Charles Brun, fNew Haven, private, enlisted July 25, 1S63, mustered 
in July 25.-i863;'deserted October 14, 7863. 

*Eras C. Bitck7Ngham, Norwich, ]irivate, enlisted July 25, 1863, mus- 
tered in July 25, 1863; died March 3, 7864. 

Chari.es F.- RcFLE^i, -New -Britain, private, enlisted July 18, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 2^. 7862; died April 3, 7863. 



privjite, unlisted Jann;iry 4. 1S64, 


mns- 


dvd May (). ]S(>4. Wihkriiess. V.i. 


; died 


•. prixatr, enlisted August 22. iSO,^. 


nius- 


.1 erred m C-k 1) -'d C. V. 11. A. 


May 



/{tJobW ."official Roster. 447 

Lewis G. BrKTox, llrooklyn 
tered in January 4, iS()4; \\(Hii 
June ig, i.%4- 

*Ant(i\e (^Ai'iLEXE, W'aterliiu 
tered in August _'_', iS().^; trai 
30, 1865. 

WiixiAM Carkinctdx, Wocidstoek, private, enlisted Mareli to, |8()4. nuis- 
tercd in March lo, 181)4: captured ()ct.)lier 27. 181)4, P,,,ydt.in IMank 
Road. Va.: died l-'eburary 17. 1865, Richmond. Va. 

*Thom.\s Cakk. Norwalk. iirivate enlisted October _'. 1863. nuistered in 
O'ctober 2, 1863; captured October — , 1863, Bristoe Station, Va.; 
paroled N'ovem'ber 20. 1864; furloughed December 20, 1864: failed to 
return; no further record Adjutdnt-General's Office, Washington, D. C. 

I'^RAXcis Cavanaugh, New Britain, private, enlisted August i, 1862. mus- 
tered in August 2T,, 186-2; killed September 17, 1862, .\ntietam, Md. 

William Cavanatch, New Britain, private, enlisted July 31, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 2Ji, 1862; transferred to 76th Co. 2d Viattalion V. R. 
C. October 14, 1863; discharged June 28, 1865. 

*Anson D. Clapp, Meriden, private, enlisted August 8, 1863, mustered 
in August 8, i863;(Soe private €0. A 8th C. V.); captured August 
25, 1864, Ream's Station, Va.; paroled September 24, 1864; trans- 
ferred to Co. M 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

*Lafayette Clark, Lebanon, jirivate, enlisted July 25, 1863, mustered 
in July 2S. 1863; transferred to Co. D 2d C. V. H. A. AFay 30. 1865. 

Henry M. ConfRX. New Britain, private, enlisted August 7. 1862. mus- 
tered in Augusrt 23, 1-862; discharged May 31, 1865. 

John Cogan, Berlin, private, enlisted August 9, 1862, mustered in -Vug- 
ust -23, .1862; killed December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va. 

*George Colson, Vernon, private,. enlisted September 2g, 1863, mustered 
in September 29, 1863; deserted October 23, 1863. 

. Oscar Conant, Nt)rwich, private, enlisted September 2, 1864, mustered 
in September 2, i8f>4; transferred to Co. M 2d C. V. U. A. May 30, 
1,865. 

*James Cooper. Hartford. i)ri\ate. enlisted Jvdy 31. i8(),?, mustered in 
July 31-, 1863.; died .\pril 2. 1864. 

Martin D, Covvles. Bioomtield, private, enlisted July 28. 1862. mus- 
tered, in ' August 2T,. i8()2; wounded September 17. 1862. .Vntietam, 
Md.; deserted December 1. 1802. 

..James E. Crosi.ev. I'.loomlield, private, enliste<l July 28, 1862, nmstered 
in-.Augu.st 2^^. 18O2; wounded July 26, 1864, Strawberry Tlains, Va.;- 
dis:charg'ed on account of disability April 24, ]><l\^. 

*Charles Dennev, Hartford, private, enlisted July 29, 1863, nmstered in 
July 29, 1863; deserted October 23, 1863. 
. ^Constant Dexxis. \\',-ilerbury, private, enlisted Sejiteniber 17. 1863, 



448 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

mustered in Septeniiber 17. 1863; transferred to Co. M 2d C. V. H. A. 
May 30, 1865. 

Michael Donahay, Lebanon, private, enlisted February 27. 1864, mus- 
tered in February i" , 1864; transferred to 102 Regiment N. Y. Vols. 
April 24, 1865 ; a deserter therefrom. 

*Helenas Dott, Meriden, private, enlisted August 8, 1863, mustered in 
August 8, 1863; captured February 6. 1864, Morton's Ford, Va.; 
paroled March — , 1864; deserted .\pril 18. T864. 

George W. Doty, Middletown, private, enlisted September 15, 1862. mus- 
tered in T^Iarch 15, 1864; assigned from Co. D 24th C. V. March 15, 
1864; wounded May 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va.; deserted June 30, 1864. 

*JoHN DowD, Hartford, private, enlisted July 31. 1863, mustered in 
July 31, 1863; deserted October 14, 1863. 

*Paul Duerest, Meriden, private, enlisted August 8, 1863, mustered in 
August 8, 1863; wounded October 14, 1863, Bristol Station, Va.; de- 
serted December 12, 1864. 

*Thomas Duffy, Hartford, private, enlisted July 8, 1863, mustered in 
July 8, 1863; deserted November 8, 1863. 

David Dougherty, Westport, private, enlisted August i, 1864, mus- 
tered in August I, 1864; deserted August 13, 1864. 

*Alexander DrvAL, fHartford, private, enlisted August 21, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 22. 1863; transferred to Co. C 24th Regiment V. R. C. 
March 10, 1865; deserted July 30, 1865. 

*JoHN Elliot, Hartford, private, enlisted July 30, 1863, mustered in 
July 30, 1863; deserted August 16, 1863. 

*WiLLiAM Erway, Easton, private, enlisted October i, 1863, mustered in 
October i, 1863; deserted October 14, 1863. 

*Thomas Fisher, Groton, private, enlisted July 29, 1863, mustered in 
July 29, 1863; killed October 14, 1863, Bristoe Station, Va. 

Peter Frazer, Berlin, private, enlisted July 30, 1862, mustered in August 
2T„ 1862; wounded Septemher 17, 1862, Antietam, Md.; discharged on 
account of disability January 24, 1865. 

Albert S. Frost, New Britain, private, enlisted August 8, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 2},, 1862; killed May 12, 1864, Spottsylvania, Va. 

Charles Frost, Jr., New Britain, private, enlisted August 5, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 22,, 1862; captured October 27, 1862, Snicker's Gap, 
Va.; paroled November 22, -1862; discharged on account of disability 
January 9, 1863. 

John Gavin, BloomCield, private, enlisted August 2, 1862, mustered in 
August 23, 1862; wounded Alay 3, 1863, Chancellorsville, Va.; trans- 
ferred to 86th Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. November 14, 1863; dis- 
charged on account of disability December 20, 1863. 

*David Gillhardt. Waterbury, private, enlisted August 22, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 22, 1863; missing in action May 6, 1864, Wilderness. 



Official Roster. 449 

Va.; probably killed; no further record Adjulant-Gcneral's Office. 
Washington. D. C. 

Thomas H. Gilhekt, P.erlin. i)rivate. enli>led July ,^o. i86j, nnistered 
in August 2T;, 1862; discharged on account of disability December 11, 
1862. ^ 

*JoHN Gilbert, fHartford, private, enlisted July 30, 1863. mustered in 
July 30. 1863; deserted November 8, 1863. 

*Ernest Girard, Bristol, private, enlisted Septem1)er 10. 1863, mus- 
tered in September 10. 1863; deserted April 18, 1865. 

LoREN H. Goodrich, New Britain, private, enlisted August 2. 1862. mus- 
tered in August 2:^. 1862; discharged on account of disability Novem- 
ber 28. 1863. 

Edward L. Goodwin, New Britain, private enlisted August i, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 2^^, 1862; discharged on account oi disability January 
-'7, 1863. 

*James L. Goss, East Haddam, private, enlisted October i, 1863. mus- 
tered in October i. 1863; wounded May 10. 1864, Laurel Hiil, Va., 
wounded August 16, 1864, Deep Bottom, Va.; transferred to Co. D 2d 
C. V. H. A. Miay 30, 1865; (See James Warren). 

*Max Gozzens, Vernon, private, enlisted September J^. 1863, mustered 
in September 23, 1863: wounded February 6, 1864, Mortou's l-^ord, 
Va.; transferred to 5th Co. 2d Battaliou V. R. C. April 6. 1865; dis- 
charged on account of disabilitj- October 18, 1865. 

Morris B. Hanford, Wilton, private, enlisted March 31, 1864, mustered 
in March 31, 1864; (See private Co. I 23d C. V.); wounded ]\lay 10, 
1864, Laurel Hill, Va.; transferred to 4Tst Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. 
April 17, 1865; discharged December 11, 1865. 

*WiLLi,\M Harman, Stoningtou, private, enlisted July 29, 1863, mus- 
tered in July 29, 1S63; deserted August 16, 1863. 

^Michael Henderson, Stonington, private, enlisted July 29. i8()3, mus- 
tered in July 29, 1863; deserted August 16. 1863. 

*JoHN HiNES, Hartford, private, enlisted July 29, 1863, mustered in 
July 29, 1863; deserted April 18, 1865. 

Victor Holcomb, Bloomheld, private, enlisted August 7, 1862, mustered 
in August 2^, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam. Md.; 
discharged on account of disability February 4, 1863. 

James Holland, Madison, iirivate. enlisted March 16, 1864. mustered in 
March 16, 1864; wounded May 10. 1864. Laurel Hill. Va.; cajitured 
October 27, 1864. Boydton Plank Road. Va. ; paroled February 17, 
1865; transferred to Co. D 2d C. V. H. A. May 30. 1865. 

Edwin A. Howell. New Britain, private, enlisted August 6. 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; discharged on account of disability June 5, 
1863. 



450 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

George A. Hunn, New Britain, private, enlisted August 7, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; discharged on account of disability June 10, 
1865. 

*Daniel Irving, East Granby, private, enlisted September 12, 1863, 
mustered in September 12, 1863; deserted October 28, 1863. 

Theron S. Johnston, Wolcott, private, enlisted August 7, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 2^, 1862; deserted May 21, 1865. 

Thomas Keough, New Britain, private, enlisted August 4, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericks- 
burg, Va.; transferred to unassigned detachment V. R. C. December 

22, 1864; discharged on account of disability January 21, 1865. 
Ralph Kent, Jr., New Britain, private, enlisted July 25, 1862, mustered 

in August 2;^, 1862; discharged on account of disability December 

23. 1862. 

Alfred J. King, New Britain, private, enlisted July 19, 1862, mustered 
in August 23, 1862; deserted September 14, 1862. 

*JoHN Knowles, New London, private, enlisted July 24, 1863, mustered 
in July 24, 1863; deserted August 13, 1863. 

*JOHN Krimer Farmington, private, enlisted August 2, 1864. mus- 
tered in August 2, 1864; deserted August 13, 1864. 

*James Lee. Simsbury, private, enlisted September 8, 1863, mustered in 
September 8, 1863; deserted Novem'ber 8, 1863. 

*EDWARn Lee, Cornwall, private, enlisted August 10, 1863, mustered in 
August 10, 1863; captured October 15, 1863, Bristoe Station, Va.; 
paroled November 16, 1863; deserted April 18, 1865. 

*Andrew Lorenson, Hartford, private, enlisted July 25, 1863, mustered 
in July 25, 1863; (See Andrew Smith). 

*JoB Magar, Clinton, private, enlisted December 28, 1863, mustered in 
Decemiber 28, 1863; transferred to Co. D 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

John Mandeville, New Britain, private, enlisted July 2, 1863, mustered 
in July 2, 1863; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va.; 
transferred to 159th Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. February 17, 1864; 
discharged July 5, 1865. 

William W. Marvin, New Britain, private, enlisted August 6, 1862, 
mustered in August 23, 1862; discharged on account of disability 
October 15, 1862. 

Dempster H. Mason, Bloomfield, private, enlisted July 29, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; discharged on account of disability Febru- 
ary 20, 1863. 

*James McCarthy, Hartford, private, enlisted August 5, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 5, 1863; (See Charles Vogel). 

*Charles Meyer, V\^aterbury, private, enlisted September 22, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 22, 1863; transferred to Co. D 2d C. V. H. A. May 
30, 1865. (Correct name Augustus Addicks), 



Official Roster. 451 

Hans Mkvek, jl I art ford, private, enlisted Sei)teiiil)er 7, iSd.^, mustered 
in September 7, 186,3; discharged on accfuint of disability October 
31, 1863. 

*Charles TI. ATiller, Madison, private, enlisted September 5, 1863, 
mustered in September 5, 1863; wounded I'ebruary 6, 1864, Morton's 
Ford, Va., wounded May 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va.; transferred to Co. 
D 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

*WiLLiAM Miller, East Haddam, private, enlisted August 8, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 8, 1863; deserted April 18, 1864. 

Reynold T. Moore, New Britain, private, enlisted July 19, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; captured May 3, 1863. Chancellorsvillc, Va.; 
paroled. May 13, 1863; transferred to Co. D 22d Regiment V. R. C. 
Niovember 11, 1863; discharged July 2, 1865. 

*Henry M. Moore, Berlin, private, enlisted September 25, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 25, 1863; killed August 25. 1864, Ream's Station, 
Va. 

*William E. Mott, Hartford, private, enlisted July 27, 1863, mus- 
tered in July 27, 1863; captured May 6, 1864, Wilderness. Va.; escaped 
March 20, 1865; transferred to Co. D 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

*Henry Myers, Portland, private, enlisted September 5, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 5, 1863; wounded February 6, 1864, Morton's 
Ford, Va.; deserted July 22, 1864. 

*Edwin V. Nelson, Colchester, private, enlisted July 16, 1864, mus- 
tered in July 16, 1864; deserted August 20, 1864. 

^William Nelson, East Haddam. private, enlisted July 25, 1S64, mus- 
tered in July 25, 1864; deserted August 20, 1864. 

*Jackson C. Newp.oli), Hartford, private, enlisted July 16, 1864, mus- 
tered in July 16, 1864; deserted August 13, 1864. 

*JoHN C. Nye, Waterbury, private, enlisted .\ugtist 22. 1863, mus- 
tored in August 22. 1863; discharged on account of disability Novem- 
ber 4, 1864. 

Michael O'Connell, New Britain, private, enlisted August 6, 1862, 
mustered in August 23, 1862; wounded July 3, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa.; 
mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

David Packard, New Britain, private, enlisted July 22, 1862. mustered 
in August 23, 1862; died June 27. 1863. 

Eliphalet S. Packard, New Britain, private, enlisted July 17, 1862, 
mustered in August 23, 1862; wounded Septenrber 17. i86_>. Antietam, 
Md.; discharged on account of disability l'"e'bruary 11, 1863; (See 
private Co. A ist C. V. H. .\.) 

Chacxcen- T. Park. New Britain, private, enlisted Anuust 11, 1862. mus- 
terv.xl in .\ugust 23, 1862; wounded December 13. i8()2. l"ro lericks- 
burg, Va.; discharged on account of disaliiliiy May 26, 1863. 

Hiland H. Pakkek. New Britain private, enlisted .\ugust 11, 1862, 



452 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

mustered in August 23, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam, 
Md.; transferred to Co. F 20th Regiment V. R. C. February 6, 1864; 
discharged July 6, 1865. 

*Alfred B. Pardee, East Windsor, private, enlisted August 2, 1864, 
mustered in August 2, 1864; (See private Co. K I3tli C. V.); trans- 
ferred to Co. M. C. V. H. A. May 30, 1S65. 

George H. Fenfield^ New Britain, private, enlisted August 6, 1862, 
mustered in August 23, 1862; died December 20, 1862. 

John L. Perkins, New Britain, private, enlisted August 11, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; died June 14, 1864. 

Russell L. Perkins, New Britain, private, enlisted August 14, 1862, 
mustered in August 2^, 1862; appointed quartermaster-sergeant June 
4, 1863. 

*JuLius Pornin, Meriden, private, enlisted August 8, 1863, mustered in 
August 8, 1863; furloughed November 4, 1S64; failed to return; no 
further record Adjutant-General's Office, Washington, D. C. 

*Charles Rahlin, New Haven, private, enlisted September 27, 1863, 
mustered in September 27, 1863; captured October 27, 1864, Boydton 
Plank Road, Va.; paroled February 16, 1865; transferred to Co. D 
2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

George P. Rockwell, New Britain, private, enlisted July 2S, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23,, 1862; discharged on account of disability October 
12, 1862. 

Fred W. Rossburg, New Britain, private, enlisted August 7, 1862, 
mustered in August 23, 1862; discharged on account of disability 
January 12, 1863. 

*Hans Schroder, New Haven, private, enlisted July 2^, 1863, mus- 
tered in July 23, 1863; captured December i, 1863, Rapidan, Va.; 
died March 23, 1864, Richmond, Va. 

William H. Scovill, New Britain, private, enlisted August 9, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericks- 
burg, Va.; discharged May 23, 1865. 

*Charles H. Shaw, Waterbury, private, enlisted August 22, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 22, 1863; deserted October 14, 1863. 

Ovid P. Shaw, Salisbury, private, enlisted September 3, 1862. mus- 
tered in April 2, 1864; transferred from Co. E 28th C. V. April 2, 
1864; killed June 17, 1864, Petersburg, Va. 

J. Frank Smith, Bloomfield, private, enlisted July 30, 1862, mustered 
in August 23, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam, :\Id.; dis- 
charged on account of disability April 28, 1863. 

Joel C. Smith, Madison, private, enlisted February 23, 1864, mustered 
in February 23, 1864; transferred to Co. G April 16, 1864. 

George W. Smith, l\ew Britain, private, enlisted July 22, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 



Official Roster. 453 

*Andre\v Smith, Hartford, private, enlisted July 25, 1863. mustered 
in July 25. 1863; wuunded I'ebruary 6. 1864, Morton's Ford. Va.; trans- 
ferred to 55th Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. March 9, 1865; di.-,charged 
September 15. 1865; (correct name Andrew Lurensi.n). 

*SiDNEY Smith. Sonthington, private, enlisted September 29, 1863, 
mustered in September 29. 1863; captured May 12, 1864, Spottsyl- 
vania. Va.; paroled March to, 1S65: transferred to Co. 1) 2d C. V. H. 
A. May 30, 1865. 

*JoHN Smith, Enlield, private, enlisted May 20, 1863, ninslered in May 
20, 1863; transferred to Co. 1) 2d C. V. H. A. May 30. 1865. 

J.-\MEs W. Snow, New Britain, private, enlisted July 16, 1862, mustered 
tered in August 2t,. 1862; deserted July i, 1863. 

George St.xckpole. Madison, private, enlisted March 12, 1864, nmstered 
in March 12. 1864; wounded .\ugust 25, 1864. Ream's Station, Va.; 
transferred to Co. M 2d C. V. H. A. May 30. 1865. 

Sylvester \V. Steele. \\'ethersheld, private, enlisted July 18, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 2^^. i8()2; killed December 13. i8()2. i'"redericksburg. 
Va. 

D.\NiEL Steele. Berlin, jirivate. enlisted July 28, 1862, nmstered in .Vug- 
ust 23, 1862: wounded December 13, 1862. Fredericksburg. \'a.; mus- 
tered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Austin N. Steele, Wetberstield, private, enlisted .August 7, 1862, mus- 
tered in .\ugust 2^, 1862; discharged on account of disability January 
24. 1863. 

Henry Stedm.xn, Berlin, private, enlisted July 31, 1862, mustered in 
August 2S. 1862; discharged on account nf di^ability December 13. 
1862. 

*JoHN Stevens. New Canaan, private, enlisted September 26. 1863, 
mustered in September 26, 1863; captured October 2~, 1864, lloydton 
Plank Road, Va.; par.ded February 17. 1865; transferred to Co. M 2d 
C. V. H. A. May 30, 1S65. 

*Jeremiah Sulliv.'XN, Plainfield. private, enlisted July 28. 1864, nms- 
tered in July 28, 1864; transferred to Co. M 2d C. V. 11. .\. May 30, 
1865. 

James Sw.mne. P)loomr:eld. jjrivate, enlisted .\ugust 2. i8()2. nmstered 
in August 2;^. 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va.; 
discharged on account of disability March 4, 1864. 

"^JoHN W. Taylor, Litchiield. private, enlisted August 5, 1863, mustered 
in August 5. 1863; deserted December 9. 1863. 

*Adeli!Ert Tanner, Groton. private, enlisted .\ugust 5, 1863, mustered 
in August 5. 1863; transferred to Co. M 2d C. \'. 11. .\. May 30. 1865. 

*Ezra p. Tanner, Hartford, private, enlisted .\ugust 4, 1863. mustered 
in .\ugust 4, i863;trausferre(l tn 16th Co. 2d I'.attalion V. R. C. .-Kug- 
ust 5. 1863; transferred to Co. C i8th Regiment; discharged July 26, 
186^ 



454 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Frederick B. Thatcher, New Britain, private, enlisted August ii, 1862, 
mustered in August 23, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericks- 
burg. Va.; discharged on account of disability March 26, 1863. 

Edward H. Thresher, Berlin, private, enlisted August 7, 1862, mustered 
in August 23, 1862; mustered out with company M!ay 31, 1865. 

Thomas Upson, Jr.. Berlin, private, enlisted August 7, 1862, mustered 
in August 23, 18612; discharged on account of disability January 14, 
1863. 

*Frederick Verner, Salisbury, private, enlisted August 6, 1863, mustered 
in August 6. 1863; reported on M. O. Roll as absent in arrest since 
March i, 1864. 

*Charles Vogel Hartford, private, enlisted August 5. 1863, mustered 
in August 5, 1863; wounded October 2, 1864, Petersburg. Va.; dis- 
charged June 2, 1865; (correct name James McCarthy). 

Lucius Wadsworth, New Britain, private, enlisted July 16. 1862. mus- 
tered in August 23. 1862; died September 13, 1862. 

James Warren, East Haddam, private, enlisted October i, 1863, mus- 
tered in October i. 1863; (See James L. Goss, correct name). 

*Thomas Watkins. Winchester, private, enlisted August 5, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 5, 1863; discharged on account of disability December 
9. 1863. 

Chester U. Westland, Bloomlield, private, enlisted August 11, 1862, 
mustered in August 23, 1862; killed December 13, 1862, Fredericks- 
burg, Va. 

William W. Westover, New Britain, private, enlisted July 25, 1862, 
mustered in Augu.st 23, 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 
1865. 

*Charles Wheeler, Norfolk, private, enlisted August 6, 1863, mustered 
in August 6, 1863; captured December i, 1863, Rapidan, Va.; died 
February 17, 1864, Richmond, Va. 

*Charles White^ Hartford, private, enlisted August 7, 1863, mustered 
in August 7, 1863; transferred to U. S. N. April 18, 1864, as Thomas 
White; served on U. S. S. "Gem of the Sea" and "Roebuck"; dis- 
charged July 21, 1865. 

*John Wilson, Hartford, private, enlisted July 31, 1863, mustered in 
July 31, 1863; admitted to General Hospital September 22, 1863; no 
further record Adjutant-General's Office, Washington, D. C. 

*Robert Wilson, East Haddam, private, enlisted September 5, 1863, 
mustered in September 5, 1863; deserted October 12, 1863. 

*James Wilson, Southington, pri\ate, enlisted September 22, 1863. mus- 
tered in September 22. 1863; deserted October 12, 1863. 

Hugh Wilson, Guilford, private, enlisted February 13, 1864, mustered 
in February 13, 1864; discharged on account of disability May 26, 1864. 



Official Roster. 455 

Jackson Willis, Woodstock, private, enlisted March 19, 1864, mustered 
in March 19, 1864; discharged on account of disability June 9, 1865. 

*Charles S. Willey, Sterling, private, enlisted July ,30, 1H64, mustered 
in July 30, 1864; deserted August 20, 1864. 

Edgar L. Williams, New l^ritain, private, enlisted July 28, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; transferred to 41st Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. 
August 8. 1863; discharged July i"] , 1865. 

*JoHN Williams, ist, Hartford, private, enlisted August 7, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 7, 1863; transferred to U. S. N. May 5, 1864; served 
on U. S. S. "Morrimac"; deserted last quarter, 1864. 

*JoHN Williams, 2d, Hartford, private, enlisted August 7, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 7, 1863; deserted November 8, 1863. 

*JoHN Williams, 3d, Hartford, private, enlisted July 29, 1863. mus- 
tered in July 29, 1863; deserted April i, 1864. 

*JoHN Williamson, Hartford, private, enlisted August 7. 1863, mus- 
tered in August 7, 1863; transferred to U. S. N. April 30, 1864; served 
on U. S. S. "State of Georgia" and "Dictator"; supposed discharged 
at close of war. 

*JoHN Winter, Hartford, private, enlisted August 7, 1863, mustered 
in August 7, 1863; WDunded May 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va.; deserted 
November 14, 1864. 

COMPANY G. 

Samuel F. Willard, Madison, captain, enlisted August i, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20. 1862; killed September 17, 1862, Antietani, Md. 

William W. Hart, Madison, captain, enlisted July 21, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered ist lieutenant; promoted September 17, 
1862; resigned October 29, 1862. 

Samuel Fisk, Madison, captain, enlisted August 8, 1862, nuistered in 
August 22,, 1862; promoted from ist lieiUenant Co. K January 19, 
1863; wounded May 6, 1864, Wilderness. Va.; died May it,. 1864. 

Frank E. Stoughton, Vernon, captain, enlisted July 15, 1862. mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; promoted fr()m 2d lieutenant Co. H to ist 
lieutenant June 10, 1864; captain July 29, 1864; discharged on account 
iif disability January i, 1S65. 

Willia.m J. Shkrm.w. New Haven, ist lieutenant, enlisted July 29. 1862. 
mustered in August 20, 1862; mustered 2d lieutenant; promoted Sep- 
tember 17. 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam. Md.; resigned 
January 2.},. 1863; prdmoted captain Co. D February 14, 1863, (not 
mustered). 

Frederick I!. 1 Iav.i.kv, I'.ridgeijort, i^t lieutenant, enlisted July 22. 1862, 
mustered in August 20. iSOj; ])n minted from 2d lieutenant Co. K 
h>brnary 4, 1863; discharged January 20. i8()4. 



456 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Frederick N. Fox, East Lyme, ist lieutenant, enlisted August ii, 1862, 
mustered in August 23. 1862; promoted from ist sergeant Co. H to 2d 
lieutenant Co. G January 13, 1865; ist lieutenant February 17. 1865; 
mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Henry P. Godd.ard, Norwich, 2d lieutenant, enlisted June n, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; promoted from sergeant-major August 20, 
1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va.; promoted ist 
lieutenant Co. B February 4, 1863. 

George A. P~oote, Jr., Guilford. 2d lieutenant, enlisted August 7, 1862, 
mustered in August 2^, 1862; promoted from sergeant Co. I Febru- 
ary 4, 1863, (not mustered); discharged on account of disability Sep- 
tember 17. 1863. 

J. S.\MUEL ScR.VNTON, Madisou. 2d lieutenant, enlisted August 4, 1862. 
mustered in August 20, 1862; mustered sergeant; promoted 2d lieu- 
tenant September 27. 1863; wounded October 14. 1863, Bristoe Station, 
Va.; discharged on account of disability March 2, 1864. 

George H. Lillibridge, Franklin, 2d lieutenant, enlisted July 14, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; promoted from sergeant Co. E Decem- 
ber 7, 1863; transferred to Co. K December 7, 1863. 

Perkins Bartholomew, New London, 2d lieutenant, enlisted July 24, 
1862, mustered in August 2^, 1862; promoted from ist sergeant Co. 
H March 30, 1864; ist lieutenant Co. I June 26, 1864. 

Albert DeForest, :5tratford, 2d lieutenant, enlisted July 26, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; promoted from 1st sergeant Co. A Febru- 
ary 17, 1865; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Charles Smith, Madison, ist sergeant, enlisted July 31, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; transferred to Co. F 3d Regiment V. R. C. 
July 20, 1863; reduced to sergeant February 29, 1864; discharged July 
6, 1865. 

EuwARi) W. Hart, Madison, ist sergeant, enlisted July 31, 1862, mus- 
tered in .Xugust 20, 1862; mustered corporal; promoted sergeant 
February g. 1863; ist sergeant September i, 1863; 2d lieutenaiit Co E 
November 13. 1863. 

John T. Bradley, Madison, ist sergeant, enlisted August 18, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted corporal Sep- 
tember 30, 1862; sergeant September i. 1863; ist sergeant November 
13, 1863; 2d lieutenant Co K January 13, 1865. 

Joseph Bishop, Madison, ist sergeant, enlisted August 15, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted corporal Febru- 
ary 9, 1863; sergeant January 31. 1864; ist sergeant January 13, 1865; 
mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Nathan C. Clement, Guilford, sergeant, enlisted August 4. 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20. 1862; mustered corporal; wounded December 13, 
1862, Fredericksburg, Va.; promoted sergeant February 9, 1863; died 
January 30, 1864. 



Official Roster. 457 

James U. Ccin'ki.in. Madison, seri^caiU, enli>tt(l July 30, 1862, mus- 
tered in Au;4u>t 20. iS()j; inu>lered corpural; promoted Septembei 

30, i8C)_'; reduced to ranks; mustered out with compau}- May 31, 1865. 
Augustus L. Dibisle, Old Saylirook, sergeant, enlisted July 25, 1862, 

mustered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; wounded Septembei 
17, 1862, Antietani, Md,; promoted corporal Septemhcr r, 1863; 
wounded May (), i8()4, Wilderness, Va.; promoted sergeant January 
13, 1865; mustered out with company May 31, iSO^. 

George C. Down, Madison, sergeant, enlisted August i. 1862, nuis- 
tered in August 20, 1862; (Sec private RiHe Co. C 3d C. V.); dis- 
charged on account of disability February 27, 1863. 

Everett L. Dudley, Old Sayhrook, sergeant, enlisted July 30, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; nuistered private; promoted corporal 
February 9, 1863; sergeant December 5. 1863; mustered <iut with 
company May 31, 1865. 

Charles F. Hand, Madison, sergeant, enlisted July 31, 1862, nuis- 
tered in August 20, 1862; reduced to ranks September 30, i8()2; trans- 
ferred to Co. F 2d Regiment U. S. Cavalry October 2H. 1862; pro- 
moted captain Co. E 63d Regiment U. S. C. I. .April 2b, 1864; resigned 
May 14, 1865. 

Nelson C. Murray, Madison, sergeant, enlisted .August 15, 1862, nuis- 
tered in August 20. 1862; mustered private; promoted corp.jral No- 
vember 13, 1863; wounded August 25, i8()4, ReamV Station. Va.; pro- 
moted sergeant January 13, 1865; mustered out with comiiany May 

31. 1865. 

Henry A. Pendleton, Madison, sergeant, enlisted July 31, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, i8()2, .\ntietam, 
Md. ; discharged on account of disability January 20, 1863.. 

Orsamus B. Sawyer, Madison, sergeant, enlisted July 31, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted corporal February 9, 
1863; sergeant November 13, 1863; 2d lieutenant Co. A January 13, 
1865. 

Benjamin E. Stannard, New Haven, sergeant, enlisted August 7, 1862, 
mustered in .August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted sergeant 
May I, 1863; mustered out with company May 31, i8()5. 

Stanley L. Chapman, Westbrook, corporal, enlisted August 4, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; wounded July 3. 1863, Gettysburg. Pa.; 
discharged on account of disability December 26, 1863. 

William Dawes, Old Saybrook, corporal, enlisted July 25, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; prtunoted February 10, 
1864; discharged June 8. i8f)5. 

J'Ji(;.\K S. 1'"ly, Madison, corporal, enlisted July 30, 1862, mustered 
in August 20. 1862; mustered private; Wdunded July 3. i8()3, Gettys- 
burg, J'a.; promoted OctLiber 1, i8()3; mustered out with company 
May 31, 1865. 



458 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Sani^ori) FfiSTER, Madison, corporal, enlisted August 4, 1862, mustered 
ill August JO, 1862; mustered private; wounded September 17, 1862, 
Antietam, Md.; promoted September i, 1863; captured May 6, 1864, 
Wilderness, Va.; paroled March 3, 1865; died March 12, 1865. 

^Peter FIughes, fBridgeport, corporal, enlisted August 10, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 10, 1863; mustered private; wounded May 6, 1864, 
Wilderness, Va.; promoted January 13, 1865; transferred to Co. M 2d 
C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

*Peter a. Kelly, Groton, corporal, enlisted July 21, 1863, mustered 
in July 21, 1863; mustered private; promoted February 24, 1864; 
wounded May 5, 1864, Wilderness, Va.; deserted June 24, 1864. 

*DAVir) King, Norwich, corporal, enlisted July 13, 1863, mustered in 
July 13, 1863; mustered private; promoted January 13, 1865; trans- 
ferred to Co. M 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

Henry D. Knowles. Madison, corporal, enlisted August 4, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericks- 
burg, Va.; discharged on account of disability January 15, 1863. 

*Henry K. Lyon, New Haven, corporal, enlisted July 13, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 18, 1863; mustered private; promoted September i, 
1863; wounded and captured May 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va.; died May 
14, 1864, Parker's Store. Va. 

John H. Meigs, Madison, corporal, enlisted July 30, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted February 9, 1863; 
transferred to .21st Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. August 10, 1863; dis- 
charged June 26, 1865. 

William S. Myers, Madison, corporal, enlisted July 30, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; died November 24, 1862. 

Henry Phelps, Old Saybrook, corporal, enlisted August 11, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted February 5, 
1864; discharged June 8, 1865. 

John S. Stannard, Guilford, corporal, enlisted, July 31, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted February 9, 1863; 
wounded July 1-3, 1863, Getty.sburg, Pa.; reduced to ranks (sick) 
September i, 1863; wounded May 6, 1864, place not shi>wn: discharged 
(in accnunt of disability June 9, 1865. 

John B. Stevens, Madison, corporal, enlisted August 4, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, i8()2; nui>lere(l private; wounded July 3, 1863, Gettys- 
burg, Pa., wounded June 5, 18(14, C(dd Harbor, Va.; promoted Jan- 
uary 13, 1865; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Frederick S. Ward. Old Saybrook, corporal, enlisted July 24, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; killed December 13, 1862, Fredericks- 
burg, Va. 

Alfred N. Wilcox, Madison, corporal, enlisted July 30, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted February o, 1863; 



Official Roster. 459 

transferred to Cn. C lytli KeginuMil V. R. C. January 1.3. 1804; re- 
duced til rank> l'"eliruary 1.?. 1X64; prduinted serireant September 1, 
1SO4; discharged July 13, 1865. 

Thomas White, Killingvvorth. c<ir])()ral, enlisted July 31. iH(>j. nuis- 
tcred in August 20, 1862; discharged nu accnunt uf di>abilily January 

10, 1863. 

George W. Ihi.i.. Madison, nuisician. enlisted August 7. 1862, mus- 
tered m August 20. i8f)_'; uiu>tered nut with company May 31, 1865. 

*JoHN Kenny, Hartford, musician, enlisted August 10, 1803, mus- 
tered in August 10. 1863; transferred to ranks; deserted December 
19. 1863. 

Edcak Moody, Madison, musician, enlisted July 31, i8r)2. nuistered ni 
August 20. 1862: mustered private; detailed musician; mustered nut 
with company May 31, 1865. 

Paysox \V. Tucker, Madison, wagoner, enlisted July 31, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered nut with ouipany May 31, 1865. 

*JoHN Ali;ekt()N, Hartford, private, enlisted July 30, 18(14, nuistered in 
July 30, 1864; (See Alartin B. Stevens). 

Charles N. Appleby, Madison, private, enlisted August 8, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability February 

11, 1863. 

Henry L. Bailey, Madison, private, enlisted August 2, 1862. mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered out with comp.any May 31, 1865. 

Henry F. Beckly^ Clinton, ])rivate, enlisted August 5, 1862. mustered 
in August 20, 1862; transferred to 23d Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. Sep- 
tember I, 1863; discharged July 20, 1865. 

Thomas Birmingham, Hartford, private, enlisted June (), 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; deserted February lo, i8{)3. 

Christopher W. Boone, Westbrook, private, enlisted August ;, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; wounded May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville, 
Va.; transferred to 159th Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. February 17. 1864; 
discharged July 5, 1865. 

Washington Bristol, Madison, i)rivate, enlisted .\ugust 12. i8()2, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; discharged on acciuint of disability July 
10, 1865. 

*James M. Brown, North Sloniugtou. private. (.Milisled August 3, i8()3, 
mustered in August 3, 1863; killed June i;. 18(14, Cnld jlarb.u-, Va. 

*WiLLL\M HrcHANON, Suftield, i)ri\ate, enlisted August 18, 18(13. mus- 
tered in August 18, 1863; tran-ferrcd to 1st Regiment ^Massachusetts 
Cavalry Octoiber 8, ]i^():>,: a doerUr therefrom; (cm-rect name William 
To.bey.) 

RiCHARii J. Cahwkll. Old Saybmok, i)rivate, enlisted July 31, 18O2. 
mustered in .\ugust 20. |8()_'; wniinded and captured May 3, 18(13, 



460 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Chancellorsville, Va.; paroled May 13. 1863; mustered out with com- 
pany May 31, 1865. 

Matthew Cane, Madison, private, enlisted August 8, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; deserted April 25, 1863. 

*JosEPH Caserlv, Hartford, private, enlisted August 10, 1863, mustered 
in August ID. 1863; wounded February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, Va.; 
deserted April 16, 1864. 

Levi M. Chapman, Wesbrook, private, enlisted August 6, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1S62; wounded May 3, 1863, Chancellorsvilie, Va.; 
mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Aaron A. Clark, Haddam, private, enlisted August 14, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; killed July 3, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa. 

*Thomas Clark, Hartford, private, enlisted July 24, 1863, mustered in 
August 10, 1863; captured October 14. 1863, Bristoe Station, Va.; 
paroled May 7, 1864; deserted March 20, 1864. 

Moses G. Clement, Guilford, private, enlisted July 31, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; killed July 3, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa. 

*JoHN Connor^ Thompson, private, enlisted September 9, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 9, 1863; dishonorably discharged November 7, 1864. 

*Er)WARU Cook, Hartford, private, enlisted August 10, 1863, mustered 
in August 10, 1863; transferred to U. S. N. May 5, 1864; served on 
U. S. S. "Otsego"; discharged October 15, 1864. 

CoRNETT M. Crampton, Madisou, private, enlisted July 30, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; died October 17, 1S62. 

Darius Curtis, Madison, private, enlisted August 8, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; transferred to 114th Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. De- 
cember 7, 1863; discharged on account of disability March 18, 1864. 

^Patrick H. Dailey, Simsbury, private, enlisted September 9, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 9, 1863; wounded May 24, 1864, North Anna River, 
Va.; transferred to 119th Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. January 19, 1865; 
discharged July 2T , 1865. 

*RiCHARD Davis, Washington, private, enlisted October 2. 1863, mus- 
tered in October 2, 1863; transferred to i6th Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. 
November 4, 1863; transferred to Co. I i8th Regiment V. R. C. May 
24. 1864; discharged July 25, 1865. 

*WiLLiAM. Davis, Tnunbull, private, enlisted September 10, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 10, 1863; died November 11, 1863. 

*JoHN Davis^ Norwalk, private, enlisted October 2, 1863, mustered in 
O'ctoiber 2, 1863; discharged on account of disability March 28, 1864. 

♦Frederick Decker^ Monroe, private, enlisted September 11, 1863, mus- 
tered in Septem'ber 11, 1863; wounded, date and place not shown; 
transferred to Co. A 62d Regiment New York Vols. February 4, 1865, 
as Charles Decker ; a deserter therefrom. 

Wilbur R. Dee, Madison, private, enlisted August 8, 1862, mustered 



Official Roster. 461 

in August 20, i86j; discharged nn accuunt nf disability Januarj- 30, 
1863. 

Alfkei) H. DiiiiiLE, Wostbrook, private, enlisted August 6, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862: killed July 3, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa. 

(]eok(;e H. Doane, Clinton, private, enlisted August 8, 1862, nuistered 
in August 20, i8()2; wounded September i", 1862, Antictam. Md.; dis- 
charged on aecnunt of disability January 26, 1863. 

William Donahue, Madison, private, enlisted August 5, 1862, nuistered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered out with cninpany May 31, 1865. 

*JoHN Dooley, Sharon, private, enlisted August 10. 1863, mustered in 
August 10. 1863; wounded October 14, 1863, Bristoe Station, Va.; 
deserted February 16, 1864. 

*JoHN DowD, fNew Haven, private, enlisted September 5, i8()3. mus- 
tered in September 5. 1863; captured October 14, 1863, Cedar Run, 
Va.; paroled ]\Iarch 21, 1864; transferred to Co. M 2d C. V. H. A. 
:\Iay 30, 1865. 

*Thoma.s Dovle, Hartford, private, enlisted August 10, 1863, nuistered 
in August 10, 1863; wciunded October 14, 1863, Bristoe Station, Va.; 
wounded by railroad accident April 24, 1864; discharged on account 
of disability July 21, 1865. 

William B. Dudley, Old Saybrook, private, enlisted .\ugust 9, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; transferred to 22d Co. 2d Battalion V. R. 
C. October 26, 1864; discharged August 22, 1865. 

*JoHN Eagan^ Warren, private, enlisted August 10. 1863. mustered in 
August 10, 1863; deserted April 16, 1864. 

*Elijah Eggleston, Meriden, private, enlisted .August 8, 1863, nuistered 
in August 8, 1863; (See private Co. F ist C. V.); discharged on ac- 
count of disability December 17, 1863. 

*Manuel Fernandez, Simsbury, private, enlisted September 4, 1863, 
mustered in September 4, 1863; deserted May 3. 1864. 

*CuRTis ^^^ Flint. New Haven, private, enlisted .\iigust 3, 1803, mus- 
tered in August 3, 1863; captured October 14, [863, Brist.ie Slatiiui, 
Va.; died March 2/. 1864, .\ndersonvilIe, Ga. 

Henry E. Foster, Madison, private, enlisted August 5, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability May 15. 1864. 

John W. Gardiner, Madison, private, enlisted August 7. 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered out with company ]\Iay 31. 1865. 

Ransler Goodale, Killingworth, private, enlisted .August n. 1862. mus- 
tered in .August 20. 1862; wounded .'ind captured May 3. 18(13. Chan- 
cellorsville. Va.; jiaroled May 15. 18O3; transferred to i.sgtii Co. 2d 
Battalion V. R. C. February 17, 1804; discharged nn account of dis- 
ability January 14, i8()5. 

*J()H.N (iOKUON, tNcw Haven, ])rivale, enlisted Sei)teinber 5, 18(13. uuis- 
tered in September 5, 1863; captured h'ebruary 6, 18(14, Morton's 
Ford, Va.; died July 7, 18(14, .Anders, )n\i]Ie, Ga. 



462 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

*George D. Greene, Hartford, i)rivatc, enlisted August ii, 1863, mus- 
tered in August II, 1863; discharged June 6, 1865. 

William R. Crumley, Westbrook, private, enlisted August n, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; transferred to Co. D 24th Regiment 
V. R. C. January 25, 1864; discharged on account of disability August 
IS, 1864. 

John M. Hall Madison, private, enlisted August 6, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; discharged May 30, 1865. 

*WiLLiAM J. Hancock, Hartford, private, enlisted August 10 1863, 
mustered in August 10, 1863; captured May 2, 1864, place not shown; 
died November 22, 1864, Andersonville, Ga. 

Frederick H. Harris, Clinton, private, enlisted August 10, 1862 mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; deserted May 3, 1863. 

*WiLLiAM Hayes, Hartford, private, enlisted August 10, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 10, 1863; (See private Co. I i8th C. V.); supposed 
captured October 13, 1863, on the march from Rappahannock River; 
no further record Adjutant-General's Ofihce, Washington, D. C. 

Albert M. Hill, Westbrook, private, enlisted August 8", 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded July 3, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa.; died July 
29, 1863. 

Joseph W. Hill, Old Saybrook. private, enlisted August 11, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; captured November 22. 1862. London Coun- 
ty, Va.; paroled December 12, 1862; discharged on account of dis- 
ability March 5, 1863. 

*LuTHER R. HiNE, East Haddam ,private, enlisted September 8, 1863, 
mustered in September 8, 1863; (See private Rifle Co. C 3d C. V.); 
killed May 5, 1864, Wilderness, Va. 

Abraham Hunter, Madison, private, enlisted August 8, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability May 15, 1863; 
(See private Co. A 2d C. V. H. A.) 

*William Huntley, Woodstock, private, enlisted September 9, 1863, 
mustered in September 9, 1863; transferred to U. S. N. Mlay 5, 1864; 
served on U. S. S. "H.)race Beals"; deserted July 24, 1864. 

Frederick H. Hurd, Guilford, private, enlisted August 9, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered out with company jNIay 31, 1865. 

John A. Hurd, Clinton, private, enlisted August 5, 18(12, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; wounded Septeniber 17, 1862, Antietam, Md.; dis- 
charged on account of disability January 8, 1863. 

*Anthony Hurst, New Haven, private, enlisted July 18, 1863, mus- 
tered in July 18, 1863; transferred to Co. M 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 
1865. 

William S. Jones, Madison, private, enlisted August 8, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability December 8, 
1862. 



Official Roster. 463 

*l'j>\\AKii !•'. JiniNSdX. l''anniiiKt"n, prixate, cnlislcd .\uKn--t 15. 1863, 
mustered in August 15, i8()3; deserted l''ebruary 14, 1865. 

^Thomas Kane, Stoningtcin, private, enlisted July 30, 1S63, mustered 
in July 30, 1863; captured I«"ebruary 6, 1864, .M.)rtMn'> Ford, Va.; died 
September 4. 18(14. Anderxiuville, Ga. 

*JoHN KAVANAr(;n. 1 l.irtford, private, enlisted July 19, 1863, mustered 
in July 19, 1863; wdunded May (>. i8()4. Wilderness, Va.; deserted 
July 9, 1864. 

Alson a. Kf.i.sev. Westbrook. private, enlisted Aus;ust 6, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; died March 27, 1863. 

Jerome Kelsev, ..ladison, private, enlisted August 14, 1862. nnistered 
in August 20. 1862; wounded May 12, 1864, Spottsylvania, Va.; trans- 
ferred to Ii6th Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. November 2, 1864; dis- 
charged on account of disability July 18, 1865. 

*Chakles Kellev, New Haven, private, enlisted July iS, 1863, mus- 
tered in July 18, 1863; discharged May 29, 1865. 

*MiCHAEL Kellev, New Haven, private, enlisted July 30. 1863, mustered 
in July 30. 1863; captured February 6, 1864, [Morton's Ford, Va.; en- 
listed in 8th Regiment Rebel Infantry while prisoner; re-captured by 
U. S. troops at Salisbury, N. C; discharged July 13, 1865; discharged 
canceled April i, 1870. 

*Thomas Kellev, Groton, pri\ ate, enlisted July 29, 1863, nnistered i.i 
July 29, 1863; deserted August 17, 1863. 

*Charles Kerrigan. New Haven, private, enlisted July 29. 1863, mus- 
tered in July 29, 1863; discharged on account of disability December 
15, 1863. 

*James King, Cornwall, private, enlisted August to, 1863, mustered in 
August 10, 1863; deserted August 27. 1863. 

Alpheus L. Knowles. Madison, private, enlisted August 4, 18O2, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

John L. Lane. Madison, private, enlisted August 12, 1862, umsiered 
in August 20, 1862; died July 10, 1863. 

*WiLLiAM Lansdown, Southiugton, private, enlisted September 17, 1863. 
mustered in September 17, 1863; transferred to U. S. N. May 5. 1864; 
served on U. S. S. "Merriniac"; deserted August 22, 1864. 

Charles Latue, Westbrook, private, enlisted August 4. 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; died October 21, 1862. 

*George Lavenduskie, New Haven, private, enlisted July 30. 1863, mus- 
tered in July 30, 1863; captured, date and place not shown; died 
Noveml)er 6. 1864. .Andersonville, Ga. 

*Charles Lawrence, Trumbull, private, enlisted September 9, 1863, 
mustered in September 9, 1863; discharged IVIay 29, 1865. 

OziAS C. Leffingwell. Madison, private, enlisted .August 4, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; died December J^. 1862. 



464 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

*RiCHARD Lee, New London, private, enlisted July i6, 1863, mustered 
in July 16, 1863; wounded February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, Va., 
wounded May 24, 1864, North Anna River, Va.; transferred to Co. 
I 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

*Charles D. Londy, Groton, private, enlisted July 30, 1863, mustered 
in July 30, 1863; transferred to U. S. N. ^May 5, 1864, as Charles D. 
Long; served m U. S. S. "Otsego"; discharged September 2T, 1864. 

*Thoma.s Low, Hartford, private, enlisted July 31, 1863, mustered m 
July 31, 1863; deserted August i", 1863. 

*Ch.\rles Lutz, Preston, private, enlisted July 30, 1863, mustered in 
July 30, 1863; wounded ]\Iay 12, 1864, Spottsylvania, Va.; deserted 
July 24, 1864. 

*Henry Lynch, Hartford, private, enlisted August i, 1863, mustered in 
August I, 1863; wounded Mlay 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va.; deserted June 
16, 1864. 

William D. 1\L\rsh, Madison, private, enlisted August 12, i86_'. mus- 
tered in August 20. 1862; killed July 3, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa. 

*George Mayer, Hartford, private, enlisted July 25, 1863, mustered in 
July 25, 1863; wounded May 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va. ; transferred to 
Co. M 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

Jehiel H. Meigs, Madison, private, enlisted August 5, 1862, nnistered 
in August 20, 1862; discharged on accmnit of disability March 26, 1863. 

William H. Morgan, Madison, private, enlisted August 6. 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; wounded December 13. 1862. Fredericksburg, 
Va.. wounded May 24, 1864, North Anna River, Va.; transferred to 
Co. H 14th Regiment V. R. C. November 27, 1864; discharged June 
29. 1865. 

*Henry Morgan, New Britain, private, enlisted September 4, 1863, 
mustered in September 4, 1863; died December ig, 1863. 

*JOHN Morris, Manchester, private, enlisted August 31, 1863, nnistered 
in August 31, 1863; deserted February 12, 1864. 

*James Murphy Hartford, private, enlisted July 28, 1863, mustered 
in July 28, 1863; deserted May 10, 18(14. 

*George Myerson, Woodstock, private, enlisted September 9, 1863, 
mustered in September 9, 1863; wounded October 14. 1863, Bristoe 
Station, Va.; transferred to Co. 1 2d C. V. H. A. ^lay 30. 1865. 

Dennis L. Norton, Madison, private, enlisted July 30, 1862 , mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Fdward F. Norton, Madison, private, enlisted August 8, 1862, mustered 
in .August 20, 1862; killed May 5, 1864, Wilderness, Va. 

John O'Connor, Madison, private, enlisted July 30. 1862. mustered in 
August 20, 1862; wounded May 12. 1864. Spottsylvania, Va.; deserted 
October i, 1864. 

Henry B. Page, Old Saybrook, private, enlisted August 4, 1862. mus- 



Official Roster. 465 

torcd in Au.mist 20, 1862; discliargcd mi account of disability January 
15. 1SO3. 

John W. Parks, Clinton. priv;itc, oidistcd Anjiust (^. 1.S62, niustcrcd in 
August 20, l8(>_'; wounded Septcnilur 17, iSf)_'. Anlictam, Md.; died 
September 21. 1862. 

John Patterson. Madison, private, enlisted \u,i;ust 2. 1862. mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered out with company ]\lay jr, 18^15. 

*J()HN Pkdko, Windsor, private, enlisted Septenil)er 15, 1863. mus- 
tered in September 15, 1863: discharged on account of disability 
February i, 1865. 

*Jamf.s Pkrkv, Harwinton, ])ri\ate, enlisted Se])tenil)er 9, 1863, nuis- 
tered in September 9, 1863; deserted August 20. 1864. 

VV'iLi.iAM J. Post, Clinton, private, enlisted August 11. 1862. mustered 
in August 20, 1862; transferred to C.). I 3d Regiment V. R. C. Sep- 
tember I, 1863; discharged July 31, 1865. 

*TiM0THY Preston. Suffield, i)rivate. enlisted August 18, 1863, mustered 
in August 18, 1863; dropped from rolls as fraudulent enlistment. 

*JoHN D. Redfield. Madison, private, enlisted July, 30. 1862. mustered in 
August 20, 1862; died December 14. 1862. 

Orrin D. Redfield, Madison, private, enlisted August 12, 1862, nmstered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered out witli company May 31, 1865. 

*WiLLiAM H. Redfield, New Haven, private, enlisted August 8. 1863, 
mustered in August 8, 1863; wounded October 14, 1863. Rristoe 
Station, Va.; wounded May 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va.; transferred to 
Co. I 2d C. V. H. A. M'ay 30, 1865. 

"^JoHN Richardson, Rocky Hill private, enlisted Scptem1)er 9. 1863. 
mustered in September 9, t8()3; wounded May 24. i8()4. North Anna 
River. Va.; deserted April 18, 1865. 

*James; Riley, Hartford, private, eidisted June 29, 1864, nmstered in 
June 29, 1864; deserted August 27, 1864. 

*Charles R0BERT.SON New Haven, private, enlisted August 8. 18V,, 
mustered in August 8, 1863; transferred to Co. I 2d C. V. H. A. May 
30. 1865. 

*Charles RiM'i', Waterbury. private, enlisted .\ugust 22. 18O3, nmstered 
in August 22, 1863; transferred to Co. 1 2d C. \\ II. .\. May :-,o. i8()5. 

George R. Rl-ssei.l, Clinton, private, enlisted .\ngust 3. 1862, nmstered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded December 13. i8()2, I'revlerickshi'rg. V'a.; 
transferred to 41st Co. 2d Pjattalion V. R. C. .\ugust 8. 1863; re-trans- 
ferred March 11, 1864; mustered out witli couijjany .May 31, 1865. 

Jones R. Sheldon, Clinton, private, enlisted .August 0. 1862, mustered 
in August 6, 1862; discharged on account of d'isabilitj^ March 27, 1863. 

Charless H. Smith, Madison, private, enlisted July 31, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; died December 5, 1862. 

Joel C. Smith, Madison, private, enlisted J"\'bruary 2.^. i8()4, mustered 



466 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

in February 23. 1864; transferred from Co. F April 16, 1864; wounded 
August 25, 1864, Ream's Station, Va.; transferred to €0. F 2d C. V. 
H. A. May 30, 1865. 

WoRTHiNGTON Snow, Madison, private, enlisted August 10, 1865, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; died August 11, 1863. 

Edison W. Spencer, Madison, private, enlisted August 7, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; killed December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va. 

Henry L. Spencer, Clinton, private, enlisted August 4, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Edward B. Stannard, Madison, private, enlisted July 30, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; deserted October 31, 1862. 

Ezra D. Stannard, Westbrook, private, enlisted August 6, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; died December 22, 1862. 

George E. Stannard, Clinton, private, enlisted August 6, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; w^ounded December 13. 1862, Fredericksburg, Va.; 
died January 26, 1863. 

John E. Stannard, Clinton, private, enlisted August 6, 1862, mustered 
in August 20. 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

*George W. Starr, Stonington, private, enlisted July 30, 1864, mustered 
in July 30, 1864; transferred to Co. I 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

*Thomas St. Clair, Hartford, private, enlisted July 19, 1864, mustered 
in July 19, 1864; deserted August 18, 1864. 

Horace B. Stevens, Madison, private, enlisted August 11, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; killed September 17, 1862, Antietam, Md. 

*Martin B. Stevens, Hartford, private, enlisted July 30, 1864, muster-id 
in July 30, 1864; captured October 27, 1864, Boydton Plank Road, Va.; 
paroled February 5, 1865; discharged May 24, 1865; (correct name 
John Alberton.) 

Ralph S. Thompson, Madison, private, enlisted August 9, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; wounded M'ay 3, 1863. Chancellorsv'ille. Va.; 
transferred to 159th Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. February 17, 1864; dis- 
charged July S, 1865. 

John B. Tully, Old Saybrook, private, enlisted August i, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; died January 26, 1864. 

*JoHN Tuttle, Sharon, private, enlisted August 8, 1863, mustered in 
August 8, 1863; transferred to 50th Regiment Pennsylvania Vols. 
April IS, 1864, a deserter therefrom. 

*MoRTON Walsh, Goshen, private, enlisted August 5, 1863, mustered in 
August 5, 1863; transferred to ii6th Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. ApvW 
25, 1865; discharged August 21, 1865. 

*Louis Wesley, Waterbury, private, enlisted July 26. 1864. nnistered 
in July 26, 1864; deserted August 27, 1864. 

Daniel H. Willard, Madison, private, enlisted August 11, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability Decem- 
ber 12, 1862. 



Official Roster. 467 

Edwin M. Wilcox, iMadison, i)ri\aU', enlisted July 30, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; wMundcd. captured and paroled December 13, 1862, 
Fredericksburg, Va.; captured May 3. 1863, Chancellorsvillc. Va.; 
partded May 15, 1863: wMuncUd May 6, 1864. Wilderness, Va.; mus- 
tered out with company May 31, 1865. 

*Thomas Wilson, Salisbury, private, enlisted July iS, 1S63, nuistered 
in July 18, 1863; deserted August 25. 1863. 

*Thomas Wilson, Lebanon, private, enlisted August 3, 1864, nuistered 
in August 3, 1864; deserted August 27, 1864. 

*Charles B. Wilson. Hamden. private, enlisted September 18, 1863. 
mustered in September 18, 1863; wounded May 24. 1864. North Anna 
River, Va.; discharged on account of disability November ig, 1864. 

*George W. Wilson, Litchfield, private, enlisted July 27, 1864, mus- 
tered in July 27, 1864; deserted August 27, 1864. 

*George Wilson, Westport, private, enlisted July 29, 1864, mustered in 
July 29, 1864; deserted August 27. 1864. 

*Peter Worden, Vernon, private, enlisted September 22, 1863. nuistered 
in September 22. 1863; transferred to Co. M 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 
1865 . 

Charles R. Wright, Clinton, private, enlisted .\ugust 6, 1862. mus- 
tered in' August 20. 1862; discharged on account of disability March 
26, 1863. 

Henry H. Wright, Killingworth. private, enlisted August 19, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 
1865. 

COMPANY H. 

Samuel H. Davis, New London, captain, enlisted July 12. 1862, mus- 
tered m August 23. 1862; dishonorably discharged September 17, 1863. 

Henry L. Snagg. Waterbury, captain, enlisted August 4, 1862. mustered 
in August 20, 1862; (See corporal Co. D ist C. V.): promoted from ser- 
geant-major to 1st lieutenant September i, 1863; cai)tain October 20, 
1863; wounded July 3, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa.. w(Uinded February 6, 
1864. Morton's Ford, Va.; discharged on account of disability May 
5. T864. 

J. Frank Morgan, Middletown. captain, enlisted .\ugust 6. 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; (Sec private Co. .\ 2d C. V.); promoted 
from 2d lieutenant Co. C June 26, 1864; mustered out with company 
May 31. 1865. 

IIenrv Lee, New London, ist lieutenant, enlisted May 24. 1862. mus- 
tered in .\ugust 2T,, 1862; promoted captain Co. l-'. July i. 1863. 

Samikl H. Sew.\ki), Waterbury. i>t lieutenant, enlisted .\ugiist 13. 18(12. 
mustered in August 2;^,. 1862; promoted from 2d lieutenant Co. I 



468 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

October 20, 1863; wounded May 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va.; discharged 
July 8, 1864. 

James E. Comstock, Waterford, 2d lieutenant, enlisted July 17, 1862, 
mustered in August 2^, 1862; discharged on account of disability De- 
cember 14, 1862. 

Frank E. Stoughton, Vernon, 2d lieutenant, enlisted July 15, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; promoted from 1st sergeant Co. D June 3, 
1863; wounded July 3, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa.; promoted ist lieutenant 
Co. G June 10, 1864. 

Ira a. Graham, Durham, 2d neutenant, enlisted August 6, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; promoted from sergeant-major July 2';, 1864; 
1st lieutenant Co. C January 13, 1865. 

KiLBOURN E. Newell, Ellington, 2d lieutenant, enlisted July 18, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; promoted from sergeant Co. D January 
22, 1865; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

John A. Tibrits, New London, ist sergeant, enlisted July 12, 1862. mus- 
tered in August 2^, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Ant'ietam, Md.; 
promoted 2d lieutenant Co. F March 3, 1863. 

Jonathan Rogers, Jr., New London, ist sergeant, enlisted August 18, 
1862, mustered in August 23, 1862; mustered sergeant; wounded De- 
cember 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va.; promoted ist sergeant March 
4, 1863; reduced to ranks (sick) October 26, 1863; discharged on ac- 
count of disability November 18, 1863. 

Perkins Bartholomew, New London, ist sergeant, enlisted July 24, 
1862, mustered in August 23, 1862; mustered corporal; promoted ser- 
geant November 10. 1862; ist sergeant November 26. 1863; 2d lieu- 
tenant Co. G March 30, 1864. 

Charles E. Penhallow, New London, ist sergeant, enlisted July 11, 
1862, mustered in August 2;^, 1862; mustered sergeant; promoted 
April 27, 1864; appointed sergeant-major July 27, 1864. 

Frederick N. Fox, East Lyme, ist sergeant, enlisted August 11. 1862, 
mustered in August 2^, 1862; mustered private; promoted corporal 
September 28, 1862; sergeant April 27, 1864; ist sergeant July 28, 1864; 
2d lieutenant Co. G January 13, 1865. 

William F. Chadwick, East Lyme, ist sergeant, enlisted August 12, 
1862, mustered in August 23, 1862; (See private Co. H 5th C. V.); 
mustered private; promoted sergeant January 3, 1865; ist sergeant 
January 27, 1865; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Robert Barry, New London, sergeant, enlisted July 11. 1862, mustered 
in August 23, 1862; killed December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg. Va. 

Thomas W. Comstock, New London, sergeant, enlisted July 21, 1862, 
mustered in August 23, 1862; mustered corporal; promoted February 
9, 1863; reduced to ranks May 11, 1863; promoted corporal September 



Official Roster. 469 

I, 1863; sergeant Nuvcnibcr 1, i8()3; transferred t.i nnassigncd de- 
tachment V. R. C. January 29, 1865; discharged July 10, 1865. 

Jeremiah G. Dini'.au, Waterford, sergeant, enlisted August 7, 1862, 
mustered in August 23. 1862; mustered private; promoted corporal 
February 5, 1864; wounded October 2-, 1864, Boydton Plank Road, 
Va.; promoted sergeant April i, 1865; mustered out with company 
May 31, 1865. 

*Francis French, North Stonington, sergeant, enlisted August 3, 1863, 
mustered in August 3, i8()3; mustered private; promoted sergeant 
August 2T,, 1863; reduced to ranks April 28, 1864; deserted May 3, 
18O4. 

William Glossengek, New London, sergeant, enlisted July 22, 1862, 
mustered in August 2},. 1862; mustered private; wounded December 
13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va.; promoted corporal February 9, 1863; 
sergeant April 2"/. 1864; killed May 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va. 

*George McCracken, North Stonington, sergeant, enlisted August 3, 
1863, mustered in August 3, 1863; mustered private, promoted ser- 
geant October 26, 1863; wounded February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, 
Va.; reduced to ranks April 27, 1864; deserted May 3, 1864. 

*JoHN McFarlin, Hartford, sergeant, enlisted August 10, 1863, mus- 
.tered in August 10, 1863; mustered private; promoted corporal August 
^2, 1864; sergeant January 3, 1865; deserted April 15, 1865. 

Thomas J. Mills, New London, sergeant, enlisted August 21, 1862. 
mustered in August 2},. 1862: (See ist lieutenant Co. D ist C. V. H. 
A.); mustered private; pr.imoted sergeant August 2},, 1862; vvounded 
September 17, 1862, Antietam. Md.; died October 17, 1862. 

Samuel N. Watrous, New London, sergeant, enlisted July 15, 1862, 
mustered in August 2},, 1862; mustered ct)rporal; prcmioted January 
I, 1863; captured May 3. 1863, Chancellorsville. Va.; paroled May 13, 
1863; reduced to ranks; mustered out with company ALiy 31. 1865. 

Allen H. Willis, New London, sergeant, enlisted July 29, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 2T^, 1862; deserted August 31, 1862. 

Thomas M. Ames, Waterford, cor])oral, enlisted .August 5, 1862. mus- 
tered in August 2:s- i8(')2: mustered private; wounded Septemljer 17, 
1862. Antietam. Md.; prouDted February 9, 1863; killed July 3. 1863, 
Gettysburg, Pa. 

James M. Beebe, New London, corporal, enlisted July i(), i8()2, nuistered 
in August 22,. 1862; (See private Co. D 12th C. V.); mustered pri- 
vate; promoted November 10, 1862; deserted March 2-j . 18(13. 

Robert Blair, New Haven, corporal, enlisted .August 13. 18(12, nuistered 
in August 2}^. 1862; mustered private; promoted September 2't\>, 1862; 
reduced to ranks: dietl Septeml;er 29. 18(13. 

WiLi.i.vM .A. Carpenter, New London, enlisted .August 7. 1862. mus- 
teretl in .\ugust 2:S' 1862; deserted .August 2^,. 18(12. 



470 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry, 

Robert A. Chadwick, East Lyme, corporal, enlisted August 2, 1862, 
mustered in August 2^, 1862; mustered private; wounded December 

13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va.; promoted October 26, 1863; wounded 
Pbruary 6, 1864. Morton's Ford, Va.; died February 7, 1864. 

James Cochran, Waterford, corporal, enlisted August 15. 1862, mus- 
tered in August 2^, 1862; mustered private; promoted February 9, 
1863; deserted May 5, 1864. 

Albert O. Comstock, Waterford, corporal, enlisted July 24, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; died December 11, 1863. 

*Chari.es F. Conway, Stonington, corporal, enlisted August 3, 1863, 
mustered in August 3, 1863; mustered private; promoted November 

14, 1863; wounded Ofctober 14, 1863, Bristoe Station, Va.; reduced to 
ranks August 22, 1864; captured October 27, 1864, Stony Creek, Va.; 
paroled February 22, 1865; transferred to Co. I 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 
1865. 

Silas S. Fox, East Lyme, corporal, enlisted August 8, 1862, mustered 
in August 23, 1862; mustered private; wounded September 17, 1862, 
Antietam, Md.; promoted November i, 1863; killed February 6, 
1864, Morton's Ford, Va. 

Thomas W. Gardener, Waterford, corporal, enlisted July 28, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; mustered private; prom-Ued February 9, 
1863; wounded July 3, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa.; discharged on account 
of disability December 29, 1863. 

John C. Goddard. New London, corporal, enlisted July 2^, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; mustered private; promoted January 27, 
1865; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

*Charles Laurel, Vernon, corporal, enlisted September 24, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 24, 1863; .mustered private; promoted February 
5, 1864; wounded May 6, 1864, Wiilderness, Va.; transferred to Co. D 
i8th Regiment V. R. C. October 29, 1864; discharged July 22, 1865. 

*Edward Lyman, Litchfield, corporal, enlisted August 4, 1863, mustered 
in August 4, 1863; mustered private; promoted October 26, 1863; de- 
serted May 3, 1864. 

Orlando A. Middleton. New London, corporal, enlisted July 11, 1862, 
mustered in August 23, 1862; reduced to ranks August 23, 1862, dis- 
charged on account of disability A'pril 7, 1863. 

Erastus B. Perkins, New London, corporal, enlisted August 9, 1862, 
mustered in August 2Ti, 1862; mustered private; promoted November 
10, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va.; died 
December 31, 1862. 

Jonathan W. Phillips, New London, corporal, enlisted August 7, 1862, 
mustered in August 23, 1862; mustered private; promoted October 
I, 1863; accidentally wounded O'cto'ber 14, 1863; died October 19, 1863. 

George A. Smith, New London, corporal, enlisted July 11, 1862, mus- 



Official Roster. 471 

tered in August 23, 1862; reduced tu ranks (sick) November 10, 
1862; discharged nu account (jf disability March 12, 1863. 

James Wiggins, New London, corporal, enlisted June 7, 1862, nnistered 
in August 23, 1862; reduced tv) ranks (sick) November 10. i8(>2; dis- 
charged on account of disability December 18, 1862. 

George A. Buddington, New London, musician, enlisted July 21, 1862, 
mustered in August 2t,. 1862; mustered out with Cduipany May 31, 
1865. 

Albert F. Hall, New London, musician, enlisted August 14. 1862. mus- 
tered in August 2^, 1862; transferred to Co. F 3d Regiment V. R. C. 
July 20, 1863; transferred to ranks September 22, 1863; discharged 
July 6, 1865. 

Charles Fletcher, Vernon, musician, enlisted August 8, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; transferred from Co. D October 20, 1864; detailed 
musician; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Osmond D. Smith, New London, wagoner, enlisted July 14, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

*James Allen, East Haven, private, enlisted September 18 1863, mus- 
tered in September 18, 1863; wounded IMay 6, 1864, Wilderness. Va.; 
deserted August 4, 1864. 

Robert Archer New London, private, enlisted July 14, 1862, mustered in 
August 23, 1862; deserted September 13, 1862. 

*George L. Baker, Vernon, private, enlisted September 2, 1862, mustered 
tered in September 22, 1863; transferred to Co. I 2d C. V. H. A. May 
30, 1865. 

John Barker, New London, private, enlisted July 14. 1862. mustered 
in August 22, 1862; died January 14. 1863. 

John B. Bartholomew, New London, private, enlisted July 11. 1862. 
mustered in August 23, 1862; transferred t^i Co. F 3d Regiment V. R. 
C. July 20, 1863; discharged July 6, 1865. 

*Charles B. Beers, Norwalk, private, enlisted October 2, i8()3. nnis- 
tered in October 2, 1863: transferred to Co. T 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 
1865. 

William Bell. Vernon, private, enlisted December 2, 18O4. mustered 
in December- 2, 1864; deserted Feb.ruary 25. 1865. 

Samuel Botsford. New Haven, private, enlisted June 2. 1862. mustered 
in August 2^, 1862; (See musician Rifle Co. V 2(1 C. V.): transferred 
to Co. I 2d"c. V. H. A. May 30. 1865. 

*Peter Boyle, Norwalk, ])rivate. enlisted September 12, i8()3, nuL^^tered 
in St^^iteTrAer 12. 18^)3; (See private Co. II 8th C. V.); woundeil Feb- 
ruary 6, 1864. Morton's I'ord. Va.; transferred t-i Co. .\ 14th Regiment 
V. R. C. September 2t„ 1864; discharged July 24, 1865. 

Horace T. Brown, New Haven, private, enlisted August 9, 1862. nnis- 
tered in August 23, 1862; mustered out with company Ma}' 31, 1805. 



472 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Christopher Brown^ Waterford, private, enlisted August 15, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 2S, 1862; deserted September 17, 1862. 

James Brown, Enfield, private, enlisted December 2, 1864, mustered in 
Decemiber 2, 1864; discharged June 6, 1865. 

William H. Bullis, New London, private, enlisted July 14, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; deserted August 2;^, 1862. 

Daniel L. Burrows, New Haven, private, enlisted August 8, 1862, 
mustered in August 22, 1862; died November 15, 1862. 

*JosEPH Butler, Meriden, private, enlisted August 8, 1863, mustered in 
August 8, 1863; discharged June i, 1865. 

Jeremiah C. Calvert, Waterford, private, enlisted July 28, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 2^, 1862; wounded May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville, Va.; 
discharged on account of disability June i, 1865. 

William G. Carroll, New London, private, enlisted August 9, 1862, 
mustered in August 2^, 1862; discharged May 30, 1865. 

John F. Caulkins, Waterford, private, enlisted August 15, 1862. mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; killed December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, 
Va. 

*Peter Cavanaugh, New Haven, private, enlisted August 4, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 4, 1863; deserted August 15, 1863. 

^William Cearmilk, fNew Haven, private, enlisted April 16, 1863, 
mustered in April 16, 1863; deserted August 16, 1863. 

Abel T. Chapman, New London, private, enlisted June 14. 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; deserted September 10, 1862. 

*Henrv Chemnitz, Litchfield, private, enlisted August 4, 1863, mustered 
tered in August 4, 1863; deserted August 15. 1863. 

*James p. Connors, fNew Haven, private, enlisted September i, 1863, 
mustered in September i, 1863; killed May 24. 1864, North Anna 
River, Va. 

*Edwari) Cromwell, Bridgeport, private, enlisted September 30, 1863, 
mustered in September 30, 1863; transferred to U. S. N. May 5, 1864; 
served on U. S. S. "Bienville"; discharged August 18, 1865. 

James Crynan, New London, private, enlisted July 16, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 2S. 1862; wounded July 3, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa., 
wounded May 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va.; discharged March 10, 1865. 

*HiRAM Curtis, Bristol, private, enlisted August 26, 1863, mustered 
in August 26, 1863; wounded February 6, 1864. Morton's Ford, Va.; 
deserted November 30, 1S64. 

Franklin Daniels, Waterford, private, enlisted August 9, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; transferred to 159th Co. 2d Battalion V. R. 
C. February 20, 1864; discharged on account of disability January 
14. 1865. 

Henry E. Dart, Waterford, private, enlisted August 5, 1862, mustered 
in October 23, 1862; captured May 3. 1863, Chancellorsville, Va.; 
paroled May 15, 1863; deserted June 9, 1863. 



Official Roster. 473 

*JoHN N. Dakt, Lcdyard, jirix air, mlislcd Aut;iist 4. i8()3. niuslcrcd in 
August 4, iS().^: discliargrd April _'.^. 1864, by reason of transfer to 
U. S. N.; no further rrcnrd Adjutant-General's Office. Washington, 
D. C. 

*Charles L. Davis, Hartford, private, enlisted August 2, 1864. mus- 
tered in August 2. 1864; transferred to Co. I Jd C. V. IT. .\. .May 30, 
1865. 

John Davis, Norwalk, private, cMilisted Octdlier _', \H()T,. nuistered in 
Oct.)her 2, i86.s: wuunded .May 3. i«'>.^. Cliancellur>ville, Va.; cap- 
tured May T2, 1864, Spottsylvania, Va.; par(ded Augu>t -'-', i8()4; de- 
serted November 14, 1864. 

Jo-SEPH M. Dawsett, New London, private, enlisted .\ugust g, i8()j, 
mustered in August 2;^, 1862; died August 0. 18^)4. 

.A.MOS Dayton, Waterford, private, enlisted .August 5, 1862, mustered 
in August 23, 1862; captured Miay 3, 1863. Chancellorsvillc, Va.; 
paroled May 15. 1863; deserted June 9, 1863. 

William A. Dayton, Waterford. private, enlisted .\ugust 5, 1862, mus- 
tered in .\ugust 2^. 1862; discharged on account of disability .\pril 
2. 1863. 

John Donald, New London, private, enlisted .August 16, 1862, mus- 
tered in .August 2^. 1862; deserted .August 26, 1862. 

Cornelius Donahi^e, New London, private, enlisted June 7, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 2;i, 1862; discharged on accoiuit of dis;ibiliiy May 26. 
1863; (See private Co. G nth C. V.) 

Thomas Drudy, New London, private, enlisted .August g, 1862, nuis- 
tered in August 23, 1862; transferred to 159th Co. 2d I'.attalion V. R. 
C. September 14, 1864; discharged July 5. 1865. 

*Charles Duncan, Stonington, private, enlisted .August 3, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 3. 1863; promoted 2d lieutenant Co. TI 3gth Regi- 
ment New York Vols. December 30, 1864; resigned June i. 18(15. 

^Phillip Dunn, Litchfield, private, enlisted August 3. 1863. mustered in 
August 3, 1863; deserted August 15. 1863. 

*Phillip Eichmann, Rhineb'k, N. \\, private, enlisted September 6, 
1863, mustered in September 10, 1863; captured Deceml)er 3, 1863, 
Rapidan. Va.; confined at Richmond, Va.. December 5, 1863; no 
further record .Adjutant-General's Office, Washington. D. C. 

George S. Edwards, Waterford, jirivate, enlisted .August 15. 1862. mus- 
tered in August 22, 1862; wounded .May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville, Va.; 
died O'ctober 29, 1864. 

*John Errichson, Southingtoii, i)ri\ate, enlisted September 29. 1863, 
mustered in September 2(), i8()3; transferred to U. S. N. Alay 5. 1864, 
as Jolin lM-ick>oii; served on U. S. S. "Chicoi)ee'"; di>charged .April 
2(), i8()f). 



474 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Charles E. Fenner, New London, private, enlisted June 24, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862: deserted August 27, 1862. 

*JoHN Franklin, Hartford, pri\ate, enlisted August 3, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 3, 1863; transferred to U. S. N. May 5, 1864. as John 
Francis; served on U. S. S. "Chicopee"; discharged January 6, 1866. 

*HENRy Frost, Norwalk, private, enlisted September 29, 1863, mustered 
in September 29, 1863; deserted March 22, 1865. 

Pierre Gagnon, Simsbury, private, enlisted November 29, 1864, mustered 
in November 29, 1864; transferred to Co. C 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 
1865. 

Charles H. Garde, New London, private, enlisted August 12, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; wounded May 10, 1864, Spottsylvania, Va.; 
transferred to Co. I 19th Regiment V. R. C. January 30, 1865; dis- 
charged July 24, 1865. 

Thomas Goff, New London, private, enlisted July 14, 1862, mustered 
in August 23, 1862; (See private Co. L ist C. V. H. A.); discharged 
on acount of disability Septem'ber 20, 1863. 

John Green, Waterford, private, enlisted July 26, 1862, nuistered in 
August 23, 1862; killed December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va. 

John Gurley, Jr., New London, private, enlisted August 7, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; died November 15, 1862. 

*Jereml\h Haggerty, North Stonington, private, enlisted August 4, 1863, 
mustered in August 4, 1863; discharged on account of disability De- 
cember 29, 1863. 

*Charles J. Hanford, New Canaan, private, enlisted September 12, 1863. 
mustered in September 12, 1863; died May 5, 1864. 

* An drew Harwooii, Oxford, private, enlisted August 8, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 8, 1863; discharged on account of disability March 10, 
1865. 

*JoHN Henry, New London, private, enlisted August 3, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 30, 1863; captured October 14, 1863, Bristoe Station, 
Va.; paroled November 20, 1864; deserted January 20, 1865. 

John Henderson, Groton, private, enlisted April 13, 1864, mustered in 
April 13, 1864; transferred from Co. B October 9, 1864; supposed 
captured October 28, 1864; no further record, Adjutant-General's 
Office. Washington, D. C. 

*JrLius Hinkey, Meriden, private, enlisted September 6, 1863, mustered 
in September 6, 1863; wounded February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, Va.; 
transferred to Co. C 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

*WooDRUFF Hosktns. Granby, private, enlisted September 2, 1863, nuis- 
tered in September 2, 1863; killed May 12, 1864, Spottsylvania, Va. 

''^Thomas B. Hussev, Waterbury. private, enlisted September 15, 1863, 
mustered in September 15, 1863; transferred to U. S. N. May 5, 1864; 



Official Roster. 475 

served on U. S. S. "HDracc Beals"' and '"Rliode Island"; discharged 
August i8, 1865. 

James Irving, New London, private, enlisted August i,^, 1862, nuistered 
in August 23, 1862; deserted August 2,3. 1862. 

*RonEKT Isle, Southington, private, enlisted October i. 1863. nuistered 
in October I, 1863; killed May u. 1S64, Spottsylvania, Va. 

Elias L. Jerome, Waterft)rd, private, enlisted July 28, 1862, nuistered 
in August 23, 1862; killed December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va. 

*JoHN Johnson, Vernon, private, enlisted October 2, 1863, mustered in 
October 2, 1863; transferred to U. S. N. May 2, 1864; served on U. S. 
S. "Saratoga" and "New Hampshire"; discharged April 2, 1866. 

*Charles Johnson, Groton, private, enlisted August 3, 1863, mustered 
in August 3, 1863; captured August 25, 1864, Ream's Station, Va.; 
died November 25, 1864, Salisburj% N. C. 

*JoHN Jones, New Haven, private, enlisted August 3, 1863, mustered 
in August 3, 1863 ; killed October 14, 1863, Auburn, Va. 

*Charles E. Jones, Stonington, private, enlisted August 3. 1863, mus- 
tered in August 3, 1863; deserted August 15. 1863. 

*Peter Kalb, Litchfield, private, enlisted August 4. 1863, mustered in 
August 4, 1863; deserted August 15. 1863. 

*Jacoi! Kearn. Litchlield. private, enlisted August 4, 18(13. mustered in 
August 4. 1863; killed May 24, 1864, North Anna River. Va. 

*Patrick Kernin, Canton, private, enlisted September 8. 1863. mus- 
tered in September 8, 1863; killed May 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va. 

*Charles Kline, Seymour, private, enlisted September i, 1863. mus- 
tered in September i, 1863; killed October 14, 1863. Bristoe Station, 
Va. 

Charles H. Knight, Waterford, private, enlisted July 24, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 2S, 1862; transferred to Co. F 3d Regiment V. R. C. 
July 20. 1863; detailed musician" October i, 1863; discharged July 6, 
1865. 

'■'William J. Knight, Meriden, private, enlisted September 12, 1863. 
mustered in September 12, 1863; deserted April 7, 1864; enlisted in Co. 
D /th Regiment New Jersey Vols. Sei)lember 14, 1864, as a substitute; 
no further record. 

Theodore Kohlrisser, New London, private, enlisted July 23, 1862, 
mustered in August 23, 1862; wounded July 3, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa.; 
transferred to Co. E 24th Regiment V. R. C. January 29, 1864; dis- 
charged June 26, 1865. 

Ernest Krah, Hartford, private, enlisted June 16, 1862, mustered 
in August 23, 1862; killed October 14, 1863, Bristoe Station, Va. 

*Michael Langdon, Groton. private, enlisted August 3, 1863, mustered 
in August 3. 1863; deserted August 15. 1863. 

Charles V. Latoik, New London, private, enlisted July i(), 1802, nuis- 



476 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

tered in August 23, 1862; discharged on account of disability FcIm-u- 
::ry 6, 1863. 

Lewis G. Latour, New London, private, enlisted July 12, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 2^, 1862; wounded September i/, 1862, Antietam, Aid.; 
discharged on account of disability January 16, 1863. 

*Ei)WARD Lee, Cornwall, private, enlisted July 28, 1863, mustered in 
July 28, 1863, dishonorably discharged July i, 1865. 

*WiLLiAM Leonard, Meriden, private, enlisted September i, 1863, mus- 
tered in September i, 1863; captured December i, 1863, Mine Run, 
Va.; died August 19, 1864, Andersonville, Ga. 

John Luncek, New London, private, enlisted July 16, 1862, mustered 
in August 2^1. 1862; deserted September 17, 1862. 

John ]VL\ck, Avon, private, enlisted November 18, 1864, nuistered in 
November 18, 1864; deserted December 2^, 1864. 

*Kigan Mackey, Meriden, private, enlisted September i, 1863, nuis- 
tered in September i, 1863; wounded May 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va.; 
transferred to Co. C 2d C. V. H. A. Alay 30, 1865. 

Jabez B. Mavnard, Waterford, private, enlisted August 16, 1862, mus- 
tered in .\ugust 2;^, 1862; died June i(\ 1864. 

Le.ster J. Maynard, New London, ])rivate, enlisted July 14, 1862. mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; discharged nn account of disability March 
30, 1863. 

EnvvARD McCaffrey, New London, private, enlisted July 30, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 2T,. 1862; deserted September 5, 1864. 

*Th().\ias McCoy, Litchheld, private, enlisted August 3, 1863, mustered 
in August 3, 1863; deserted August 15, 1863. 

Edward McCrady, Litchfield, private, enlisted August 3, 1863. mustered 
in August 3, 1863; deserted August 15, 1863. 

*JoHN McDonald, Stonington, private, enlisted August 3, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 3, 1863; deserted August 15, 1863. 

John McDonald, Windsor Locks, private, enlisted November 2t„ 1864, 
mustered in November 2S. 1864; transferred to Co. C 2d C. V. II. A. 
May 30, 1865. 

*ALnERT McGrath, Waterbury, private, enlisted, September 18, 1863, 
mustered in September 18, 1863; captured December i, 1863, Rapidan, 
Va.; died October 10, 1864, Andersonville, Ga. 

Wn.LiAM Miller, Granby, private, enlisted November 2^, 1864, nuis- 
tered in November 25, 1864; discharged July 21, 1865. 

^Charles Miller. Litchfield, private, enlisted August 4, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 4, 1863; deserted August 15, 1863. 

William S. Mill.s, New London, private, enlisted August 12, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 2^. 1862; killed December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, 
Va. 

John Miner, New London, private, enlisted .August 11, 1862, mustered 



Official Roster. 477 

ill August 23, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862. Antietain, Md.; 
killed December 13. 1862, Fredericksburg. Va. 

l-j)\vARi) Mitchell, New London, private, enlisted July 14, 1S62, mus- 
tered in August 23. 1862; wounded December 13. 1862, In-edcricks- 
burg, Va.; deserted September 24, 1864. 

Henry Mitchell, New London, private, enlisted July 17, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; deserted August 2"/, 1862. 

*George Moore, Cornwall, private, enlisted August 10, 1863, unistererl 
in August 10, 1863: captured, date and place not shown; parole not 
shown; transferred t.. Co. C 2d C. V. H. A. :May 30, 1865. 

*I'jiWARi) Moxsox. Lyme, private, enlisted August 10, 1863. nuis- 
lerod in August 10, 1863; wounded February 6, 1864, Morton'.. Ford, 
Va.; transferred to U. S. \. April 21. 1864; served on U. S. S. "Gov. 
Buckingham" and "James .Adger"; discharged May 11, 1866. 

Joseph P. Morgan, East Lyme, private, enlisted August 8, 1862. mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; discharged July 8, 1865. 

'•^James Morgan, Hartford, private, enlisted August 10, 1863. mus- 
tered in August 10. 1863; deserted September 13. 1863. 

*Frank IMorfit, Meriden, private, enlisted Septeml)er 1. \'^(''}^, nuis- 
tered in September i. 1863; deserted IMay 3. 1864. 

*Charles D. Morse, Sinishin-v, private, enlisted August 2, 1863, nuistered 
in August 2, 1863; died I-\'bruary ly. 1864. 

"James Ml'Llen, >>ashington, ]irivate. enlisted September 12. 1863, 
mustered in September 12, 1863; killed October 14, 1863. Bristoe 
Station, Va. 

*AxTHOXY Mullony, (irotou. private, enlisted August 3. 18(13, mus- 
tered in August 3, 1863; deserted August 15. 1863. 

Charles H. Monroe, New London, private, enlisted July 12. 1802, iiius- 
lered in August 2^^, 1862; discliarged on account of disability January 
31. 1S63. 

George INIunroe, Williiuantic, private, enlisted July 11, 18(12. mustered 
in August 2},, 1862; transferred to L'. S. N. April 19. 18(14; served on 
U. S. S. "J. S. Chamber^" and "Princeton"; deserted September 2(1, 
1864. 

'''Patrick AlrRPHV. (iroton. private, enlisted .\ugust 3. 18(13. mustered 
in August 3, 18(13; captured May (1. 18(14. ^\"ilderness, Va.; paroled 
December 11, 18(14: deserted January 22. 18(15. 

*Philip Mver, Litchlield. jirivate. enlisted August 4. 18(13. nuistered in 
August 4. 1863; captured May 6. 1864, Wilderness. \'a.: jiaroled Xo- 
vember 26. 1864; iran>ferre(l to Co. C 2d C. V. H. A. May 30. 1865. 

*JoHN Nelson, Hartford, jirivate. enlisted Scptcmher 13. 18(13. mus- 
tered in September 13. 18(13; wou'.ulcd February (>. 18(14. Morton's 
Ford. Va.; transferred to U. S. X. May 3. 18(14; served on U. S. S. 
"Augusta". "Cambridge", "Susciuehanna" and "Xew Hampshire"; de- 
serted February 12, 1S66. 



478 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Frederick W. Niles, New London, private, enlisted August 7, 1862, 
mustered in August 23, 1862; died December i, 1862. 

*JoHN NoLANi), West Hartford, private, enlisted September 13, 1863, 
mustered in September 13. 1863; killed October 14, 1863, Bristoe 
Station, Va. 

*AuGUSTUS NoocAN, Hartford, private, enlisted August 10, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 10, 1863; discharged on account of disability October 

15, 1863. 

*Alexander Orr, Hartford, private, enlisted August 10, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 10, 1863; captured May 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va.; died 
September 9, 1864, Andersonville, Ga. 

John H. G. Osborn, New London, private, enlisted July 22, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; discharged on account of disability October 
31, 1864. 

*JoHN Pai.ls^ fNew Haven, private, enlisted September 28, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 28, 1863; wounded June 3, 1864, Cold Harbor, 
Va.; admitted to New Haven Hospital September 20, 1S64; no further 
record, Adjutant-General's Office, Washington, D. C. 

James M. Perkins, Waterford, private, enlisted August 6, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; transferred to U. S. N. May 5, 1864; served 
on U. S. S. "Snowdrop"; discharged June 8, 1865. 

^Prentice A. Perkins, Ledyard, private, enlisted July 22, 1863, mus- 
tered in July 22, 1863; wounded February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, Va.; 
transferred to Co. C 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

*Hans Peterson, Fairfield, private, enlisted September 30, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 30, 1863; died November 29, 1863. 

Daniel Pia, New London, private, enlisted August 4, 1862, mustered in 
August 23, 1862; wounded June 3, 1864, Cold Harbor, Va.; transferred 
to 49th Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. December 2^, 1864; transferred to 
Co. E i8th Regiment V. R. C. December 30, 1864; discharged June 
24, 1865. 

*Thomas Pierce, Old Lyme, private, enlisted August 10, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 10, 1863; deserted November 15, 1864. 

*Orlando C. Pritchard, Cornwall, private, enlisted July 28, 1863, mus- 
tered in July 28, 1863; (See private Co. B ist C. V. H. A.); wounded 
and captured Ottober 14, 1863, Bristoe Station, Va. ; died February 

16, 1864, Richmond, Va. 

*Charles Rehmer, New Haven, private, enlisted July 18, 1863, mus- 
tered in July 18, 1863; wounded May 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va.; de- 
serted July 6, 1864. 

*Henry E. Rice, Hartford, private, enlisted July 12, 1864, mustered in 
July 12, 1864; died January 6, 1865. 

Ralph Robinson, New London, private, enlisted July 11, 1S62, mustered 
in August 23, 1862; deserted August 24, 1862. 



Official Roster. 479 

IIenky a. Rogkks, W'atcrford, private, enlisted July _'8. iS6j, mus- 
tered ill August 23, 1862; deserted September 10, 1862. 

Michael Russell, New London, private, enlisted August 8, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 2^, 1862; deserted September 21, 1862. 

*Ge()K(;e W. Sanford, Oxford, private, enlisted September i, 1863, mus- 
tered in September r, 1863; transferred to Co. 1 2d C. V. H. A. May 
30, 1865. 

*Theron a. Sanford, Bristol, private, enlisted August 2, i€S63, mus- 
tered in August 2, 1863; wounded February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, 
Va.; transferred to 41st Co 2d Battalion V. R. C. April 17. 1865; 
transferred to i^gth Co. August 29. 1865; discharged December il, 
1865. 

*Thomas Saunders, Litchfield, private, enlisted .\ugust 3, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 3, 1863; deserted August 15, 1863. 

^Herman Schluter, New Haven, private, enlisted July 18, 1863, mus- 
tered in July 18, 1863; killed May 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va. 

*George Schmidt, Westport, private, enlisted August 6, 1864, mustered 
in August 6, 1864; killed August 25, 1864, Ream's Station, Va. 

*James Sharkey, Warren, private, enlisted August to, 1863, mustered 
in August 10, 1863; wounded February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, Va.; 
transferred to C. I 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

*Patrick H. Sheaff, Montville. private, enlisted August 5, 1864, mus- 
tered in August 5, 1864; captured August 25, 1864, Ream's Station, 
Va. ; paroled October 9, 1864; furhmghed October 31, T864; deserted 
November 11, 1864. 

*Martin Singhi, Easton, private, enlisted September i, 1863, mustered 
in September i, 1863; deserted June 11, 1864. 

William Sinclair, West Hartford, private, enlisted November 25. 
1864, mustered in November 25, 1864; deserted December 23, 1S64. 

Joshua F. Sisson, Stonington, private, enlisted August 13, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; deserted September 20, 1862. 

*WiLLiAM Smith, ist. Union, private, enli.sted September 16. 1863. 
mustered in September 16. 1863; transferred to Co. I 2d C. V. H. A. 
May 30, 1865. 

*William Smith, 2d, Vernon, private, enlisted September 13. 1863. 
mustered in September 13, 1863; transferred to U. S. N. May 5, 1864; 
served on U. S. S. "Virginia"; discharged August 25, 1865. 

*George Smith, Hartford, private, enlisted July 13. 1864. mustered in 
July 13, 1864; transferred to Co. I 2d C. V. H. A. May 30. 1865. 

Robert Staplins, Waterford. private, enlisted July 25, 1862, mustered in 
August 23, 1862; transferred to Co. C 24th Regiment V. R. C. Janu- 
ary 21, 1864; discharged June 28. 1865. 

*JosEPH P. Starkey, fNew Haven, private, enlisted .August 8. 18(13. iiuis- 
tered in August 8, 1863; killed May 0, 1864, Wilderness, Va. 



480 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

John W. Steele, Wethersfield. private, enlisted November 21, 1864, 
mustered in November 21, 1864; transferred to €0. C 2d C. V. H. A. 
May 30, 1865. 

Simeon C. Thompson, New London, private, enHsted July 21. 1862, 
mustered in August 2;}, 1862; discharged on account of disability 
December i, 1862; (See private Co. K ist C. V. H. A.) 

George W. Tillett, Waterford, private, enlisted July 25, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 2^, 1862; discharged on account of disability March 
12, 1863; (See private Co. M ist C. V. Cav.) 

*Edward Vernon, Glastonbury, private, enlisted September i. 1863, 
mustered in September i, 1863; killed October 14, 1863, Bristoe 
Station, Va. 

GoTTFRiET Wagner, New London, private, enlisted July 23, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 2S, 1862; died September 9, 1862. 

*JoHN White, New Britain, private, enlisted July 22, 1864, mustered in 
July 22, 1864; deserted August 21, 1864. 

Albert F. Williams, New London, private, enlisted August 7, 1862, 
mustered in August 23, 1862; wounded February 6, 1864, Morton's 
Ford, Va.; discharged June 14, 1865. 

Frederick Williams, New London, private, enlisted August 16, 1862, 
mustered in August 23, 1862; deserted August 26, 1862. 

^Joseph Williams, Fairfield, private, enlisted July 28, 1864, mustered 
in July 28, 1864; deserted August 21, 1864. 

*Charles Wilson, East Hartford, private, enlisted August 2, 1864. mus- 
tered in August 2, 1864; deserted August 21, 1864. 

*William Woods, Waterbury, private, enlisted September i, 1863. mus- 
tered in September i, 1863; deserted May 3, 1864. 

*Henry Wright, fHartford, private, enlisted September 29, 1S63, mus- 
tered in September 29, 1863; transferred to U. S. N. May 5, 1864; 
served on U. S. S. "Merrimac": deserted last quarter, 1864. 



COMPANY L 

Isaac R. Bronson, New Haven, captain, enlisted August 19, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 2;^. 1862; wounded December 13, 1862. Fredericks- 
burg, Va., wounded May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville, Va. ; died June 3, 
1863. 

James R. Nichols, Norwich, captain, enlisted May 29, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; (See private Rifle Co. D 3d C. V.); promoted 
from 1st sergeant Co. E to 2d lieutenant August 20, 1862; 1st lieu- 
tenant Co. K February 4, 1863; captain November 13, 1863; wounded 
August 25, 1864, Ream's Station, Va.; died February 20, i8()5. 

James L. Townsend, New Haven, ist lieutenant, enlisted August 19, 



2^. iX(, 


2; WMundcMl May 2, iSi 


r)3. Chanccllors- 


lin C.I. 


1") l'\"l)ruary 4, iSC\:?. 




W'u- 1 


'rilaiii. 1st liciUcnant. 1 


jiilistfd July 17, 


■t 2.^. 


1862; promuicd from 


qnarlcrniaster- 



Official Roster. 481 

1862, mustered in Au.^ust 
villc. Va.; i)i-nni, .tcd oapl 

Frkokkkk S, Sk.vm(HR, 
1862, nuistcrcd in Auru 
sergeant June .^, i8(),:i; wounded July 3, 186.3. Gettysburg. Pa.; dis- 
charged on acc.iunt nf disability April 2y. 1864. 

Pekkins P).\kth()I.(imk\v, New London, ist lieutenant, enlisted July 24, 
1862, mustered in .August 2,3, i8()2; promoted from 2d lieutenant Co. 
G June 26. 1S64; wounded Octolier 27. i8()4, P.iydton Plank Road; 
died October 28, 1864. 

George A. Stocking, Waterlmry, ist lieutenant, enlisted Jidy 12, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; pr.)moted from 2d lieutenant Co. D 
November 18, 1864; mustered out with company May .^i, 1865. 

Samuel Fisk, Madison, 2d lieutenant, enlisted August 8. 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; promoted ist lieutenant Co. K August 20. 1862. 

Wilbur D. Fisk, New Britain, 2d lieutenant, enlisted July 17, 1862, 
mustered in August 23, 1862; promoted from sergeant Co. V March 
I, 1863; 1st lieutenant Co. F June 5, 1863. 

Samuel H. Seward, \\ aterbury, 2d lieutenant, enlisted .\ugnst 15, 1862. 
mustered in August 2^,, i8()2; mustered corporal; wounded December 
13. 1862, Fredericksburg, Va.; promoted ist sergeant February 11, 
1863; 2d lieutenant June 5, 1863; wounded July 3, 1863. Gettysburg, 
Pa.; promoted ist lieutenant Co. H October 20. 1863. 

George N. Brigham, Vernon, 2d lieutenant, enlisted July 16. i8()2, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; promoted from sergeant Co. 1) X.nember 
16, 1863; wounded February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, Va.; promoted 
1st lieutenant Co. B. March 28, 1864. 

Edward A. Fox, Waterbury, ist sergeant, enlisted August 13. 1862, 
mustered in August 2t,, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, I^'redericks- 
burg, Va. ; discharged on account of disability February 14, 1863. 

Francis M. Norton, Guilford, i.st sergeant, enlisted .-Xugust 7, 1862, 
mustered in August 2^, 1862; mustered private; promoted sergeant 
February 9, 1863; ist sergeant July i, 1863; killed I'ebruary 6, 1864, 
■ Morton's Ford, Va. 

*Thomas Hall, Washington, ist sergeant, enlisted September 9, 1863, 
mustered in September 9. 1863; mustered private; promoted sergeant 
April II, 1864; 1st sergeant September i, 1864; 2d lieutenant Co. E 
February 15, 1865. 

Charles G. Rl.vtchlev. (juilford, ist ser.geant, enlisted .August 13. 
1862, mustered in .An.girst 2^. 1862; mustered i)rivate; jiromoted ser- 
geant May 8. i8()4; ist sergeant l-'ebruary 15. i8().; : nnistered out with 
company Alay 31. i8().t. 

.Amorv Ai.lk.x. Hartford, sergeant, enlisted July 9. l8()2, nnistered in 
Augu^t 2:},. 18O2; mu.steretl private; promoted corporal l^'ebruary 9, 



482 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

1863; sergeant July i, 1863; reduced to ranks; killed February 6, 
1864, Morton's Ford, Va. 

George W. Baldwin, Middlelniry, sergeant, enlisted July 28, 1862. mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; mustered corporal; promoted February 11, 
1863; wounded July 3. 1863, Gettysburg. Pa.; died August 14, 1S&3. 

Frederick Beardslee, Orange, sergeant, enlisted June 18, 1862, mustered 
in August 23. 1862; mustered private; wounded December 13, 1862, 
Fredericksburg, Va.; promoted corporal November i, 1863; wounded 
February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, Va.; promoted sergeant April 11, 
1864; wounded and captured May 12, 1864, Spottsylvania, Va.; parole 
not shown; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

William M. Canso, New Haven, sergeant, enlisted July 17. 1862, 
mustered in August 2j^. 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericks- 
burg, Va.; died December 16, 1862. 

Adaro E. Crosby, Coventry, sergeant, enlisted July 29. 1862, mustered 
in August 23, 1862; mustered private; promoted corporal February 9, 
1863; sergeant September i, 1863; wounded February 6, 1864. Mor- 
ton's Ford, Va.; discharged May 18, 1865. 

George W. Darrow, New Haven, sergeant, enlisted June 16, 1862, 
mustered in August 23, 1862; discharged on account of disability 
January 22, 1863. 

Henry C. Dudley, Guilford, sergeant, enlisted August 7, 1862, mus- 
tered in x\ugust 23, 1862; died January 17, i8C)3. 

Charles S. Dudley, Guilford, sergeant, enlisted August 12, 1S62, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; mustered private; promoted sergeant Octo- 
ber I, 1862; discharged on account of disability January 27. 1863. 

George A. Foote, Jr., Guilford, sergeant, enlisted August 7, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; (See private Rifle Co. C 3d C. V.); wounded 
December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va.; pmmoted 2d lieutenant Co. 
G February 4. 1863. 

William Gorham, Guilford, sergeant, enlisted August 6, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; mustered private; promoted corporal No- 
vember I, 1863; wounded February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, Va.; pro- 
moted sergeant January i, 1865; mustered out with company May 
31, 1865. 

Eugene Hart, Hartford, sergeant, enlisted July 9, 1862, mustered in 
August 23, 1862; mustered private; promoted corporal November i, 
1863; sergeant June 4, 1864; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Joseph Janot, New Haven, sergeant, enlisted July 8, 1862, mustered in 
August 23, 1862; mustered private; wounded December 13, 1862, 
Fredericksburg, Va. ; promoted sergeant September i, 1863; wounded 
February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, Va.; died May 8, 1864. 

*John Moore, Fairfield, sergeant, enlisted September 25, 1863, mustered 



Official Roster. 483 

in September _>5, iSf),:;; niu^tcrcd prixaU' ; pruniDtcd ser^eanl January 
5, 1864; rednccd to rank> August 1. iSf)^; (Inserted April iS. 1865. 

*JoHN L. Thomi'So.n, R(ick\ Hill, srrticant. cnlislrd Angust 7, 1863. 
mnstered in August 7, iSf).v. mustered private; promoted sergeant 
November 3, 1863; deserted November 7. 18(13. 

Philetus M. Barnum, MiJdlebury. corporal, enlisted August 11. i86_\ 
mustered in August 23. 1862; mu>tert'd private; ])romoted November 
I, 1863; captured February fi, i8()4, Morton's Ford. Va.; died October 
10, 1864, Andersonville, Ga. 

Thomas L. Critenton, Hartford, corporal, enlisted July iS, i86_', mus- 
tered in .August 2Ti. 1862; mustered ])rivate; wounded July 3, 1863, 
Gettys'burg, Pa.; i)romoted cori)oral Marcb 14, 1864; wound^-d May 
12. 1864, Spottsylvania, Va.; discharged on account ot disabilitv May 
31, 1865. 

William Doi'(;la.s, New London, corporal, enlisted June 16, 1862, nnis- 
tered in .August 2^,. 1862; (See private Rifle Co. C 2<\ C. V.); wounded 
December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg. Va.; transferred to 41st Co. 2d 
Battalion V. R. C. September 30, 1863; discharged July 15, i8()5. 

Oliver W. Evarts, Guilford, corporal, enlisted August 5, 1862, nnistered 
in .A.ugust 2^, 1862; mustered private; promoted February 9, 1863; 
killed May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville Va. 

*Patrick Flvnn, Torrington, corporal, enlisted September 9. 1863, 
mustered in September 9, 1863; mustered private; captured Febru- 
ary 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, Va.; parole not shown; promoted De- 
cember 29, 1864; reduced to ranks; deserted February 28, 1865. 

Henry H. Fran ken field, Hartford, corporal, enlisted May 28, 1862, 
mustered in August 2;^, 1862; (See private Co. A ist C. V.); mustered 
private; prcmioted February g, 1863; wounded July 3. 1863, Gettys- 
burg, Pa.; transferred to Co. F 20th Regiment V. R. C. Janr.ary 18, 
1864; promoted ist sergeant June 12, 1864; discharged June 30, 1865. 
George J. Hall, Guilford, corporal, enlisted .\ugust 15, 18(12, nuistered 
tered in .August 2,^, 1862; discharged on account of disability Decem- 
ber II, 1862. 

Georce H. Hawlky, New Haven, coriioral, enlisted June id. 1802, nnis- 
tered in .August 2^, i8()2; discharged on account of disability January 
January 27, 1863. 

*Charles Hayes, Norwich, coriior.al. enlisted July .'8, i8()4. nuistered 
in July 2H. 1864; nuistered jiriv.ate; i)romote<l January 1. 1805; trans- 
ferred to Co. C 2d C. V. II. .\. May 30. t8(.5. 

Richard L. Hull, Guilford, corporal, enlisted .\ugust 7, i8()2. mustered 
in .August 23, 1862; killed Seiitemb-.r 17. i8()2, .\ntietam, Md. 

*Thomas O'Neil. Old Lyme, corporal, enlisted July 2/. i8()4, nuistered 
ip July 27, t8()4; mu>tere(l pri\ate; promoted January 1, 18(15; trans- 
ferred to Co. C 2(1 C. V. II. .\. May 30. 1865. 



484 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Joseph Puffer, Coventry, corporal, enlisted July -'8, 1862, mustered in 
August 2:i, 1862; mustered private; promoted October i, i86j; killed 
July .3, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa. 

William Roberts, Windham, corporal, enlisted August 23, 1862, mus- 
tered 'n August 23, 1862; (See private Co. D 8th C. V.); mustered 
private; promoted October i, 1862; discharged on account (if dis- 
abilitj April 2. 1864. 

Frai'-'is S. Scranton, Guilford, corporal, enlisted August 15, 1863, 
mustered in August 15, 1863; (See private Ritle Co. D 2d C. V.); 
wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va.; died December 
14, 1862. 

Elbert H. Sperry. New Haven, corporal, enlisted June 24, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 2T,. 1862; deserted September 2t„ 1862. 

*Thomas Wilson, New Haven, corporal, enlisted July 18, 1863, 
mustered in July 18, 1863; mustered private; promoted November I, 
1863; deserted May 10, 1864. 

*James Wilson, Southington, corporal, enlisted September 12, 1863, 
mustered in September 12, 1863; mustered private; promoted No- 
vember 3, 1863; reduced to ranks March 14, 1864; reported captured 
and shot in rebel prison at Anders.jnville, Ga.; no further record, 
Adjutant-General's Oifice, Washingtrin, D. C. 

*WiLLiAM A. Clarke, Meriden, musician, enlisted August 8, 1863, 
mustered in August 8, 1863; mustered private; detailed musician; dis- 
charged May 29, 1865. 

James L. Jordan, New Haven, musician, enlisted August 11, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; (See private C<k B 2d C. V.); discharged 
on account of disability March it, 1863. 

*JoHN Mackte, Vernon, musician, enlisted Septemlier 29, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 29, 18(^3; mustered private; detailed musician; 
transferred to Co. C 2d C. V. H. A. as private May 30. 1865. 

Benjamin B. Parkhurst, New Haven, musician, enlisted August 11, 
1862, mustered in August 23, 1862; mustered out with company May 
31, 1865. 

Samuel D. Cruttenden, Guilford, wagoner, enlisted August 7, 1862, 
mustered in August 2;^. 1862; transferred to ranks; appoint.,'d com- 
missary-sergeant June 4, 1863. 

Henry E. Parmelee, Guilford, wagoner, enlisted August 7, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; mustered private; detailed wagoner; dis- 
charged on account of disability December 23, 1863. 

*Joseph Acker, Southington, private, enlisted September 11, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 11, 1863; deserted October 16, 1863; (correct 
name George Fennel). 

*Charles Allen, fNcw Haven, private, enlisted September 5, 1863, 
mustered in September 5, 1863; deserted October 27, 1863. 



Official Roster. 485 

*L()Uis AMiDiF.r, North Carolina. i)ri\atc', enlisted Scptenihcr 13. 1.S64, 
mustered in Se])tenil)er 15, 1X1)4; tran>Ierre(l to Co. C 2d C. V. II. A. 
May .30, 1865. 

''AVii-i.iAM Andkkson. Meriden. private, enlisted Sei)tenil)er cS, l.Sfi.^. 
mustered in September 8, 1863; deserted October 16, 186.3. 

*JoHN L. .'\R.STRtJP, Groton, private, enlisted August 11, 1863, nnistered 
in August II. 1863; transferred to 14th Regiment New York Cavalry 
September 4, 1863. 

Valentine Arendhoi.tz, Nangatuck. private, enlisted August 11. i8()j. 
mustered in August 23. 1862; wounded September 17. 1862. .\ntio- 
tam, Md.; discharged ou account of disability February 8. i8')3. 

Bt^AS Arwels, New Haven, private, enlisted June ly, 1862, mustered in 
.\ugust 2T:,. 1862; discharged on account of disability February 8, 1863. 

Charles M. Bartram, New Milford, private, enlisted July 21, 1862, 
mustered in August 22,, 1862; killed May 3, 1863. Chancellorsville, Va. 

*Charles Bangston, Colchester, private, enlisted August 11, 1863, mus- 
tered in August II, 1863; died October 29, 1863. 

William N. Barnett Guilford, private, enlisted August 6, 1862, nnis- 
tered in August 22i, 1862; killed August 15, 1864, Deep Bottom, Va. 

*William Becg, T hompson, private, enlisted September 7, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 7, 1863; deserted March 26, 1864. 

Joel C. Benton, Guilford, private, enlisted July 21. 1862, mustered in 
.August 22,, 1862; died October 20, 1862. 

Raphael \V. Benton, Guilford, private, enlisted August 7, 1862, nuis- 
tered in August 22,, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam, 
Md.; died September 26, 1862. 

James W. Benham, Middlebury, private, enlisted August 11, 1862, 
mustered in August 23, 1862; wounded July 3, 1863. Gettysburg, Pa.: 
discharged on account of disability December 24, 1863. 

John Berry, Preston, private, enlisted January 22. i8()5. umstered in 
January 23, 1865; transferred to Co. L 2d C. V. 11. 

*vViLLiAM Bergreve, Kast Lyme, private, enlisted 
mustered in August 11. 1863; discharged on ace 
December g, 1863. 

Gilbert S. Betts, Woodbury. i)rivate. enlisted Jime 11. i8()2. nnistered 
in August 23, 1862; deserted September 13. 1862. 

Maro p. Blaikmau. Middlebury. private, enlisted .\ugust II. 1862. 
mustered in August 22,. 1862; discharged on account of di>ability 
February 16! 1863. 

*Charles Bl.\ckmax, llartford. ])rivate. enlisted July 31. i8()3. mus- 
tered in July 31. 1863; deserted August 12. i8()3. 

*MAfRKE Bovw ATi.ks. Watcrtowu. i)ri\ate, enlisted August (i, i8()4, 
mustered in .August C). 1864; deserted .\ugu>t 14. 1804. 

Jeffrey Brknnan, New llaven, ])rivate, enlisted December 15, i8()3. 



.\. May 


30. i8()5. 


.\ugust 


II, i8()3. 


nut of . 


rlisability 



486 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

mustered in December 15. 1863: wounded May 6, 1864. Wilderness, 
Va.; deserted January 8. 1865. 

*WiLLiAM Brown, Branford, private, enlisted Jidy 25, 1863, mustered 
in July 25, 1863; wounded February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, Va.; 
discharged on account of disability May 31, 1864. 

*JoHN Brown, Watertown, private, enlisted September 8, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 8, 1863; deserted August 16, 1863. 

*RoBERT Brock, fNorwich, private, enlisted August 3, 1863, mustered in 
August 3, 1863; deserted August 12, 1863. 

• Philo p. Bush, New Haven, private, enlisted July 14, 1862, mustered in 
August 2;^. 1862; transferred from principal musician; discharged on 
account of disability February 4, 1863. 

*Arthur Campbell, Harwinton, private, enlisted September 11, 1863, 
mustered in September 11, 1863; captured May 14, 1864, Spottsyl- 
vania,. Va.; paroled IMarch i, 1865: transferred to Co. G 2d C. V. H. A. 
May 30, 1865. 

Henry Chenv, Windsor, Vt., private, enlisted August 3, 1864, mus- 
tered in August 3, 1864; deserted October 8, 1864. 

Odell Chittenden, Guilford, private, enlisted August 13, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 2^1. 1862; discliarged on account of disability January 
12, 1863. 

*JoHN Christenson, North Stoniugton, private, enlisted August 4, 
1863, mustered in August 4, 1863; deserted November 19, 1863. 

Phillip Clancey, Wethersfield, private, enlisted May 31, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23. 1862; deserted August 2t,, 1862. 

^Frederick Clark, Old Lyme, private, enlisted August 11, 1863, mus- 
tered in August II, 1863; deserted November 7, 1863. 

James Clark, Entield, private, enlisted December 2, 1864, mustered in 
December 2, 1864; (See private Co. C 8th C. V.); transferred to Co. 
L 2d C. V. H. A. May 30. 1865. 

*Robert Clifton, Branford, private, enlisted July 25, 1863, mustered 
in July 25, 1863; deserted November 7, 1863. 

Peter Cooper, Hartford, private, enlisted July 20. 1862, mustered in 
August 23, 1862; wounded July 3. 1863; discharged on account of dis- 
ability December 6, 1863. 

Hiram Couch, New Fairfield, private, enlisted July 22, 1862. mustered 
in August 2Ti, 1862; deserted September 2^, 1862. 

John Cullon, Plymouth, private, enlisted February 13, 1864, mus- 
tered in February 13, 1864; deserted March 2,^. 1864. 

*JoHN Daniel, New Haven, private, enlisted July 25, 1863, mustered in 
July 25, 1863; killed February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, Va. 

Charles De Groat, Burlington, private, enlisted January 12, 1865, mus- 
tered in January 12, 1865; transferred to Co. L 2d C. V. H. A. May 
30, 1865, 



Official Roster. 487 

Charles II. r)ERi;v, Farniin,yt<>n, private, mli^tod July u, 1X62. mus- 
tered in August JT,. iS()j; wnundcd December i,^ iX()j, l'"rederick>lnirg, 
Va. ; deserted I'ehruary Jo iS(),v 

George Dixon, Norwalk. private, enlisted l<'el)ruary u, iS()4, nnistered 
in February 12, 1864; died February 24, 1864. 

FuGENE W. DoK.MAN, lvirmingt< >ii, private, enlisted May ,^0. T862, mus- 
tered in August 2T,. 1S62; wounded May 3, 1863, Chancellnrsville, Va.; 
transferred to Co. H ist Regiment V. R. C. December 8, 186,3: dis- 
charged June 23, 1865. 

Henry B. Dudley, Guilford, private, enlisted August 7, 1862. nnistered 
in August 2S, 1862; discharged .ui account nf disability January 30, 
1863. 

*Thomas Duefy, Branford, private, enlisted July 25, 1863, mustered 
in July 25, 1863; wounded May 19, 1864, Si)otisy]vania, Va : trans- 
ferred to Co. C 2d C. V. II. A. May 30. 18O5. 

John Dunlap, New Haven, private, enlisted June g, i8()2, mustered 
in August 23, 1862; deserted August 28, 1862. 

*Einv.ARD Elliott, New Haven, private, enlisted July 18, 1863, mustered 
in July 18, 1863; shot for desertion September 12, 1863. 

*George Fennel, Southington, private, enlisted September 11. 1863, 
mustered in September 11. i863;_See Joseph Acker. 

*James Fenton, Fairlield, private, enlisted September 9. 1863, unistered 
in September 9. 1863; deserted May 4, 18(14. 

Edmond I. Field, Bloomheld, prixate, enlisted August 7, 1862, mustered 
in August 2;i, 1862; wounded September 17, i8()2, Antietam, Md.; died 
September 18. 1862. 

"=James Fi.sher, New Milford, private, enlisted August 2, 1864, mus- 
tered in August 2, 1864; deserted August 14, 18(14. 

Augustus Flower, Bloomfleld, private, enlisted July 2(\ 18(12, mustereil 
in August 27,, 1862; deserted September 23, 18(12. 

ICdwarii Imiwlek, Guilford, private, enli-ted Jidy _M, 18(12, mustered in 
August 2;]. 1862; discharged ou account of di.-ability h'ebruary 12, 
1863. 

Sllden Fuller, Chath;un, priwite, enlisted Xovember 30, 18(13. nnistered 
in Xv)vember 30, 1863; (See prixaie C. 1', i>i S(|uad Cav.): discharged 
on account of disability April 30, 18(14. 

*Charles Gillon, .Menden, ])riv;ite, enlisted .Sciitemlu'r 8, i8!i3, mus- 
tered in September S, 18(13 ; wnuuded Indiruavy d, 18(14. Mdrton's 
]'..rd, Va.: tv.-in.lerred t,. Co. L 2<I C. V. H. A. .May 30. 1805. 

bjiw.\Kii G(ii)ii.\i.\x. Xew Haven, jirivate. enlisted .\ugust d. 18(12, mus- 
tered in .August 2,^. i8()2: wounded May 10. 18(14. I.aurel Hill. Va.: 
mustered uul with company May 31, 18(15. 

*l)\\i(,nT r.. (iooiiwi.x. Waterliurv, private, enlisted .\ngust 22. l8(i^ 



488 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

mustered in August 22, 1863; captured, date and place not shown; 
died November 8, 1863, Richmond, Va. 

Dennison C. Hall, Waterford, pri\ate, enlisted September i, 1864, 
mustered in September i, 1864; transferred to Co. C 2d C. V. H. A. 
May 30, 1865. 

*MiCHAEL Hanlon, Morris, private, enlisted August 3, 1863, mustered 
in August 3, 1863; deserted August 12, 1863. 

James Hearty, Norfolk, private, enlisted July 12, 1862, mustered in 
August 2S, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va.; 
transferred to 3d Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. July i, 1863; discharged 
June 12, 1865. 

Patrick Healey, Suffield, private, enlisted August 2;^, 1864, mustered 
in August 23, 1864; captured October 27, 1864, Boydton Plank Road, 
Va.; died January 2S, 1865. Richmoud, Va. 

Luther E. Higby, New Haven, private, enisted July 21, 1862, mustered 
in August 23 1864; discharged on account of disability February 6, 1863. 

Charle.s E. Hine, Waterbury, private, enlisted August 12, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 2;i, 1862; discharged on account of disability January 
29, 1863. 

Arthur Hitchcock, Waterljury, private, enlisted June 9, 1862, mustered 
in August 2^^, 1862; (See private Co. D ist C. V.); transferred to Co. 
F 3d Regiment V. R. C. July 3, 1863; promoted 2d lieutenant Co. D 
25th Regiment U. S. C. I. June 5, 1865; discharged December 6, 1865. 

Nelson Hodge, Coventry, private, enlisted July 29, 1862, mustered in 
August 2^, 1862; wounded Jnly 3, 1863, Gettysburg. Pa.; died Novem- 
ber 2, 1863. 

Thomas Hughes, West Hartford, private, enlisted December 6, 1864, 
mustered in December 6. 1864; transferred to Co. C 2d C. V. H. A. 
May 30, 1865. 

George A. Hi'LL, Guilford, private, enlisted August 7, 1862, mustered 
in August 2^^. 1862; discharged ou account of disability October 31, 
1863. 

*James Hyatt, Cornwall, private, enlisted September 5, 1863, mustered 
in September 5. 1863; discharged on account of disability March 2, 
1864. 

George Ingham, New Haven, private, enlisted June 23, 1862, mustered 
in August 2Ti, 1862; (See private Co. E ist C. V. H. A.); discharged 
on account of disability January 15, 1863. 

William Irwin, East Granby, private, enlisted November 30, 1864. 
mustered in November 30, 1864; transferred to Co. C 2d C. V. H. A. 
May 30, 1865. 

*James G. Jackson, Vernon, private, enlisted September 24, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 24, 1863; transferred to 39th Co. 2d Battalion V. 
R. C. January 5, 1864; deserted January y, 1864. 



Official Roster. 489 

John Jenninc.s, Windsor, Vi., private, enlisted July J(). iSf)4. niustere'l 
in July 29, 1864; captured August 25, 1864; Ream's Slaliuu. Va.; pa- 
roled Septem])cr — . 1864; died Septemlier 26, 1864, 

*Th()Mas Jonks, Kartford, private, enlisted Sei)tenil)er 24, 1863, mus- 
tered in September 24. 1863; transferred to U. S. X. May 5. 1864, as 
Charles Jones; served on U. S. S. "P.ienville" and "Richmond"; dis- 
charged July 15, 1865. 

James J. Judce, Hartford, private, enlisted July 14, 1862, mustered in 
August 23. 1862; transferred to Co. 1' 15th C. V. August 25. 1862. 

*Thomas Kelley, Harttord, private, enlisted August i. 1863, nnistered 
in August I, 1863; captured February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford. Va.; died 
August 26, 1864, Andersonville. Ga. 

James Kerney, East Granby. private, enlisted I)eceml)er 5, 1864, mus- 
tered in December 5, 1864; captured March 25. 1865, JIaicher's Run, 
Va.; paroled March 30, 1863; transferred to Co. C 2d C. V. H. A. May 
30, 1865. 

Lawrence Killoucih, New Haven, private, enlisted July 10, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 2i. 1862; deserted September 15. 1862. 

*James Kirby, Chaplin, private, enlisted September 3, 1863, nuistcred 
in September 3, 1863; wounded August 15, 1864. Deep Bottom, Va.; 
discharged on account of disability May 6, 1865. 

Charles Kraft, Hartford, private, enlisted July 2. 1S62, mustered in 
August 23, 1862; wounded Mlay 3, 1863; Chancellorsville. Va.; dis- 
charged on account of disability x^ugust 18, 1863. 

James Lan(;uon, New Haven, private, enlisted July 8, 1862, musterevl 
in August 23. 1862; wounded December 13. 1862, Fredcrickslnirg. Va.: 
discharged on account of disability September 12, 1863. 

Joseph A. Leete, Guilford, private, enlisted August 7, 1862, mustered 
in August 2T,. iS()2; discharged on account of disability January 21. 
1863. 

Edwin A. Leete, Guilford. ])rivate. enlisted August 7. i8()2. nnistered 
in August 27,, 1862; discharged on account of disability I.'iuuary 26. 
1863. ^ 

Jesse Lee, West Hartford, private, enlisted December (i. 18(14. nnistered 
in Decenrber 6, 1864; transferred to Co. L 2d C. \'. II. .\. May 30, 
1865. 

AiiRAM \V. LosKV, Bristol, private, enlisted December (>. 18O4. mustered 
in December 6. i8r)4: transferred to Co. C 2i\ C. V. II. A. May 30, 
1865. 

*\Vn.LiA.\i LfucATE. Pomfret. i)rivale, enlisted September 8. i8<)3, nnis- 
tered in September 8. 1SO3; de-erted .\ugiist 22. i8()4. 

*John Lynch, Rocky Hill. pri\ate, enlisted September 7. i8()3. nnistered 
in September 7. 18(13; wouiuled l-'ebru;iry (). 1804. M.inon's Ford, Va.; 
deserted March 27. 1804. 



490 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

*JoHN Macin. Groton. private, enlisted August 4. 1863, mustered in 
August 4, 1863; deserted May 4, 1864. 

Stephen Maloney, New Haven, private, enlisted February 6, 1864, 
mustered in February 6, 1864; killed May 12, 1864, Spottsylvania, Va. 

Patrick Maloney, iMew Haven, private, enlisted July 23, 1863, mustered 
in July 2T,, 1863; discbarged on account of disability March 21, 1864. 

George S. Manville, Middlebury, private, enlisted August 11, iS6_', 
mustered in August 22,. 1862; wounded August 25, 1864, Ream's Sta- 
tion, Va.; died October 2, 1864. 

William Mansfield, Hartford, private, enlisted June 7, 1862, mustered 
in August 2T^, 1862; missing in action December 13, 1862. Fredericks- 
burg. Va.; probably killed; no further record. Adjutant-General's 
office, Washington. D. C. 

Louis Mathiew. New Haven, private, enlisted September 19, 1864, mus- 
tered in September 19. 1864; transferred to Co. L 2d C. V. H. A. May 
30, 1865. 

*John McCabe, Waterbury, private, enlisted August 22, 1863, mustered 
in August 22, 1863; deserted October 4. 1863. 

*Thomas McCormick, East Haddam, private, enlisted September 2'^, 
1863, mustered in September 28. 1863; transferred to Co. L 2d C. V. 
H. A. Mlay 30, 1865. 

Frank McDonali), Windsor, Vt., private, enlisted July 2"], 1864, mus- 
tered in July 2"], 1864; deserted August 21, 1864. 

James McDonald, 2d, Windsor, Vt., private, enlisted July 2~, 1864. 
mustered in July 2"/, 1864; transferred from hospital. City Point, Va., 
to Connecticut, September 8. 1864; failed to report; no further record, 
Adjutant-General's Office, Washington, D. C. 

Hugh McEwen, New Haven, private, enlisted July 17, 1862, mustered 
in August 2},, 1862; discharged on account i)f disability November 20, 
1863. 

William McIntyre, , private, enlisted July 9, 1862, mustered in 

August 2Tf, 1862; deserted August 24, 1862. 

*Charles McRay, Plymouth, i)ri\ate, enlisted August 6, 1864, mustered 
in August 6, 1864; deserted August 14, 1804. 

' Cornelius McReady, Berlin, private, enlisted Decemlier i, 1864, mus- 
.tered in December i, 1864; deserted b'ebruary 11, 1865. 

*VViLLiAM Miles. New Britain, private, enlisted July 30, 1863. mustered 
in July 30, 1863; deserted August 12. 1863. 

George Monroe, Windham, iirivate, enlisted May 31, 1862, mustered in 
August 22,, 1862; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Michael Mooney, East Windsor, private, enlisted February 10, 1864. 
mustered in Februarj' 10, 1864; deserted March 23. 1864. 

William Moore, Vernon, private, enlisted December 2. 1864. mustered 
in December 2, 1864; deserted April 2, 1865. 



i>U- 


(1 July 


-'5. '^''.l 


1, mil 


stored in 


ate. 


, (.Mllisll 


■d Septe 


mher 


5. -HOj, 


red 


Octnl 

villo. ( 


)ei- 14. 
ja. 


1863. 


liristoe 


.W<\ 


July 


5. iS()_'. 


mu> 


■tered in 


ili-,t 


.<i July 


29, 186. 


2, niu 


stered in 


13. 


iS()_'. 


I'Vedericksljurg. Va., 


. V; 


;i.; mustered .) 


ut \v 


itli com- 



Official Roster. 491 

*GEORr.E Mover, fHartford, jirivate. en 
July 25, 1863; deserted August 12. iSf)^. 

*Charles AluLi.ER, Mast Haddam. pv'n 
mustered in September 5, 1863; captn 
Station, Va.; died June 21, 1864. Ander 

Luis Muller, Norwalk. private, enli 
August 2Ti. 1862; deserted September 1 

Andrew AIuri'HV, Hartford, private, ei 
August 2^. 1862; wounded l)eeeml)er 
wounded IMay 3. 1863, Chancelbirsville 
pany May 31, 1865. 

Corxei.ius Murphy, Hartford, private, enlisted August 13, 1862. mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; transferred to Co. F 3d Regiment \'. R. C. 
July -O. 1863; dishonorably discharged October g, 1863. 

William Murphy, Hartford, private, enlisted July 5. 1862, nmstered 
in August 22, 1862; deserted August 24, 1862. 

George Myer, fBridgeport, private, enlisted August 4, 1863, mustered 
in August 4, 1863; deserted August 12, 1863. 

John Myers, Hartford, private, enlisted January 26, 1864, mustered in 
January 26, 1864; deserted February 24. 1864. 

*Hans Nelson, Groton, private, enlisted August 4, 1863, mustered in 
August 4, 1863; captured December i, 1863. Rapidan. Va.; died Feb- 
ruary 23, 1864, Richmond, Va. 

*MARTiN Nolan, East Haddam. private, enlisted September 5, 1863. 
mustered in September, 5, 1863; captured October 14, 1863, Bristoe 
Station, Va.; par(jled March 21, 1864; captured August 25, 1864, Ream's 
Station, Va.; paroled February 26, 1865; transferred to Co. L 2d C. V. 
H. A. May 30, 1865. 

James Nolan, Marlborough, private, enlisted August 29, 1864, mustered 
in August 29, 1864; captured October 27, 1864, Petersburg, Va.; died 
December 26, 1864. Petersburg, Va. 

William E. Norton, Madison, private, enlisted .\ugust 7. 1862, mus- 
tered in August 2,^. i8()2; killed December 13. 1862, JM-edericksburg, 
Va. 

Georce I. Norton. Guilford, private, enl 
in August 2S, 1862; discharged -May 31. 

*JoHN O'Brien, Hartford, pri\ate, enli 
June 30, 1864; deserted .August 14. 1804. 

*Michael O'Connor, riymouth, private. 
in July 2:i, 1864; deserted .\ugu>t 14, 1 

*James O'Neu., New 1 Liven. pri\:ite. ( 
in July 29, 1863; de>erted .\n.uusi u. i!~ 

*TiM()THV O'Neil, Woodstock, private, 
tered in September 8, 18(13; capturetl 



listed 


.\ 


ng 


ii-l 


15. 


1802. 


mns 


tered 


, 18(15. 
















iste.l J 


111 


le 


.^0, 


18(1 


14, musteri 


.■d in 


■, enlisi 




1 . 


Inly 


-',v 


18O4, 


mns 


tered 


S(.4. 
















enliste 


d 


J> 


ily 


2(), 


18(13. 


nius 


tered 


enlists 


<1 


Si 


i-pte 


mbe 


r 8, 1 


8(13, 


niii-i- 


Deeei 


111 




■ J, 


i8( 


>3. M 


line 


Kun, 



492 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Va. ; re-captured by U. S. troops April — . 1865, Salislniry, N. C. ; dis- 
charged July 13, 1865. 

Nathan A. Palmer, North Haven, private, enlisted September 10, 1862, 
mustered in April 25, 1864; transferred from Co. R 27th C. V. April 
25, 1864; wounded May 10, 1864, Laurel Hill, Va.; discharged Feb- 
ruary II, 1865. 

James Pickett, Middletown, private, enlisted July 2, 1862, mustered 
in August 23, 1862; wounded M'ay 6, 1864, Wilderness, Va.; discharged 
on account of disability November 28, 1864. 

John C. Pratt, Waterbury, private, enlisted August 13, 1862, mustered 
in August 2^, 1862; captured November 19, 1862, Falmouth, Va.; 
paroled November 22, 1862; deserted December 6, 1862. 

*Richard Quinn, tHartford, private, enlisted July 31, 1863, mustered 
in July 31, 1863: deserted August 12, 1863. 

John Reagdon, Hartford, private, enlisted July 9, 1862, mustered in 
August 23. 1862; discharged August 23, 1862, (minor). 

Miles G. Richardson, Guilford, private, enlisted July 21, 1862, mustered 
in August 2S, 1862; died November 2. 1863. 

Joseph G. Robinson, Bridgeport, private, enlisted February 3, 1864, 
mustered in February 3, 1864; wounded August 25, 1864, Ream's Sta- 
tion, Va.; discharged on account of disability February 14, 1865. 

*William Robinson, Groton, private, enlisted July 29, 1864, mustered 
in July 29, 1864; deserted August 25, 1864. 

David Morton Roberts, Norwalk, private, enlisted February 12. 1864, 
mustered in February 12, 1864; discharged July 3, 1865. 

John Rose, Windsor, Vt., private, enlisted August 2, 1864, mustered in 
•August 2, 1864; deserted August 25, 1864. 

Henry M. Rossiter Guilford, private, enlisted August 9, 1862, mustered 
in August 23, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam. Md.; dis- 
charged on account of disability January 2, 1863. 

*Henrv Rown, Hartford, private, enlisted August 3, 1863, mustered in 
August 3. 1863; deserted August 12, 1863. 

*Thomas Ryan, Hartford, private, enlisted August 3, 1863, mustered 
in August 3, 1863; wounded May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville, Va.; trans- 
ferred to Co. L 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

Timothy Ryan, Avon, private, enlisted December 28, 1863, mustered 
in December 28, 1863; wounded February 6, 1864. Morton's Ford, Va.; 
transferred to Co. L 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

John Ryan, Avon, private, enlisted June 14, 1862, mustered in August 
23, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam. Md.; mustered out 
with company May 31, 1865. 

*Charles Schultz, Vernon, private, enlisted October 2, 1863, mustered 
in October 2, 1863; captured, date and place not shown; died August 
12, 1864, Andersonville, Ga. 



Official Roster. 493 

*IIamilton Scott, Litchrk-ld. private enlisted August 4, 1.S63, niuslered 
in August 4, 1863; deserted Sept. 12, 1S63. 

1 HOMAS M. ScRANTON, Guilford, private, enlisted August 15, iS6j. mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; captured, date and place nut >liii\\n; parule 
not shown; died January 3. 1863. 

Lewis W. Scranton, New Haven, i)rivale, eidisled July 9, i86j, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; died March 21, 1863. 

Edison Scutt, Waterbury, private, enlisted August 13. 1862. mustered 
in August 23, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va.; 
discharged on account of disability February 2^. 1863, 

*JoHN Shay, Norwich, private, enlisted July 25, 1863, nuistered in July 
25, 1863; deserted August 12, 1863. 

Harvey R. Shipman, New Haven, private, enlisted July 4. \i>()2. nuis- 
tered in August 2^, 1862; deserted November 27,. 1862. 

Michael Silver, Hartford, private, eidisted August 2, 1862, nuistered 
in August 2S, 1862; wounded May 3, 1863. Chancellorsville, Va ; mus- 
tered out with company M.'ay 31, 1865. 

Charles Simons, Willington, private, enlisted August 13, 1862. nuis- 
tered in August 2^. 1862; wcuinded I^ecember 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, 
Va.; died February 19, 1863. 

*Charles Slessenger, New Britain, private, enlisted September 12. 
1863, mustered in September 12, 1863; wounded February 6, 1864, 
Morton's Ford, Va. ; died February 24, 1864. 

*Georc,e Smith, Groton, private, enlisted July 31, 1863, mustered in 
July 31, 1863; deserted July 31, 1864. 

*JoHX Smith, ist, Hartford, private, enlisted July 31. 1863, mustered 
in July 31. 1863; wounded October 14, 1863, Bristoe Station, Va.; 
transferred to U. S. N. May 5, 1864; served on U. S. S. "Chicopee." 
"Mattabessett"" and "Newhern"; discharged August 2;^, 1865. 

*John Smith, 2d. Waterbury, private, enlisted August 22. 1863. mus- 
tered in August 22, 1863; captured October 14, 1863, Bristoe Sta- 
tion, Va.; died July 8. 1864, Andersonville, Ga. 

*JosEPH Smith, Norwich, private, enlisted July 29, 1864, mustered ir 
July 29, 1864; captured October 27. 1864, Boydton Plank Road. Va.: 
parole not shown; transferred to Co. L 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

*Charles Snow, Vernon, private, enlisted September 28, 1863. mustered 
in September 28, 1863; discharged on account of disability December 
17. 1863. 

*Hans Skenson, Groton, private, enlisted .August 4. 1863. mustered 
in August 4, 1863; discharged on account o\ disability January il, 
1864. 

John H. Staples, Fairfield, private, enlisted November 3. 18(12. mus- 
tered in Noventber 18, 1863; transferred frt)in Co. I 23d C. V. Novem- 
ber 18, 1863; discharged August 31, 1864. 



494 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

George H. Starr, Guilford, private, enlisted April 4, 1865, mustered 
in April 4, 1865; transferred to Co. C 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

Barnard Starkey, Hartford, private, enlisted August 5, 1862, mustered 
in August 23, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va.; 
deserted February 16, 1863. 

*JoHN Stewart, Meriden, private, enlisted August 8, 1863, mustered 
in August 8, 1863; deserted October 16, 1863. 

*JOHN SuLs, Vernon, private, enlisted October i, 1863, mustered in 
October i, 1863; deserted October 6, 1S63. 

Michael Sullivan, Enfield, private, enlisted August i, 1864, mustered 
in August I, 1864; transferred to Co. L 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

Sylvester J. Taylor, New Haven, private, enlisted June 13, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 23, 1862; transferred to Co. D 12th Regiment V. R. 
C. August 13, 1863; ddscharged June 28. 1865. 

*Thomas Taylor, Preston, private, enlisted August 3, 1863, mustered 
in August 3. 1863; deserted May 4. 1864. 

*James Taylor, Hartford, private, enlisted July 24, 1863. mustered in 
July 24, 1863; captured, date and place not shown; died October i, 
1864, Andersonville, Ga. 

*Thomas Tearney, Stamford, private, enlisted July 20, 1864, mustered 
in July 20, 1864; deserted August 14, 1864. 

*Th()mas Thayer, Thompson, private, enlisted August t8, 1863, nuis- 
tered in August 18, 1863; captured October 11, 1863, Culpepper, Va.; 
died February 23, 1864, Richmond. Va. 

Albert E. Thompson, New Haven, private, enlisted June 10, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 22, 1862; (See private Rifle Co. C 3d C. V. ) : discharged 
on account of disability January 10, 1863. 

*WiLLiAM Thompson, ist, Stonington, private, enlisted August 4. 1863, 
mustered in August 4, 1863; captured February 6, 1864, Morton's 
Ford, Va.; diied July 15, 1864, Andersonville, Ga. 

*WiLLTAM Thompson, 2d, Rocky Hill, private, enlisted Septemlier 8, 
1863, mustered in September 8, 1S63; wounded February 6, 1864, 
Mbrton's l^n-d, Va.; transferred to U. S. N. May 5, 1864; served on 
U. S. S. "Chicopee"; discharged April 26, 1866. 

William Thompson. 3d, fHartford, private, enlisted September 22, 
1863, mustered in September 22, 1863; transferred to U. S. N. ^Nlay 5, 
1864; served on U. S. S. "Banshee"; deserted September 5, 1864. 

John Thompson, ist. Rocky Hill, private, enlisted September 7, 1863, 
mustered in September 7, 1863; transferred to U. S. N. May 3, 1864; 
served on U. S. S. "Brooklyn"; died March 8, 1865. 

*John Thompson, 2d, fHartford, private, enlisted September 7, 1863, 
mustered in September 7, 1863; transferred to U. S. N. May 5, 1864; 
served on U. S. S. "Chicopee"; discharged February 28, 1866. 

*George Thomas, Ledyard, private, enlisted August 4, 1863, mustered 



Official Roster. 495 

in August 4. 1863; \v(unuk'(l May i_'. 18(14, Spottsylvania, Va.; deser- 
ted July 2. 1864. 

'^Fleetwood TdiM.is, Veruou. priNate, enlisted October _'. 1863. mustered 
in October _'. i8(),^; nin>tcre(l in as Frederick Tnpit/; prom.iled hos- 
pital steward U. S. A. a. I'loct u . lod C. T(.pli> March _>_'. 1864: dis- 
charged May 23, 18O5. 

*Endho Truer, Hartford, private, enlisted AuL;u>^t 3. 1863, nin>tered in 
August 3, 1863; deserted Augu>t 12, 18(13. 

*J()HN II. W.M.Tii.M.L, luist Haven, private, enlisted July 19, 1864, nnis- 
tered in July 19, 1864; deserted .August 14. 1864. 

*Jllius W'.vrbl'kch, Hartford, private, enlisted .\ngust ic, 1863, nuis- 
tered in .August 10, 1863; deserted September 12. 1863. 

*Thom.\s W'.vtkks, North Stonington, private, enlisted August 3, 1863. 
mustered in August 3, 1863; wounded February 6, 1864, Murton's 
Ford. Va.; transferred to U. S. N. May 5. 1864; served on U. S. S. 
"ChicO'pee"; discharged April 26, 1866. 

■■''VViixiAM Watson, Morris, private, enlisted .August 3, 1863, nuistered 
in August 3, 1863; deserted August 12. 1863. 

Charles B. Wells, Wethersfield, private, enlisted .August 19, 1862, nuis- 
tered in August 23, 1862; deserted August 24, t8()2. 

*James WelcHj Hartford, private, enlisted July 30. 1863. nuistered in 
July 30, 1863; deserted October 14. 1863. 

*Patrick Welch, Farmington, private, enlisted September 8, 1863. mus- 
tered in September 8. 1863; captured December i. 1863. Aline Run, 
Va.; died February 20. 1864. Richmond. Va. 

Merriman Williams, Guilford, ])rivate, enlisted .August 15. 1862, mus- 
tered in August 2^, 1862; discharged on account <if disaliility March i, 
1863. 

*William a. Williams. Hartford, private, enlisted July 29. i8()3. mus- 
tered in July 29. 1863; discharged .April 2^^. 1864. by reason of trans- 
fer to U. S. N.; no further record. .Adjutanl-Generars OlVice. Wash- 
ington. D. C. 

*Frank Williams, Glastonbury, private, enlisted September 5, 1863. 
mustered in September 5, 1863; wnunded .August 25, 1864. Ream's 
Station, \^a.; deserted October 11, 18(14. 

.Austin Williams, Salem, private, enlisted December 12. ^^>(^;>,. mustered 
in December 12. 1863: wounded b\'bruary (1, 18(14. Morton's l-'oril, 
Va.; transferred to Co. K. T9th P.attali.iU \', R. C. January 28. 1865; 
discharged July 24, 1865. 

Frederick Willi ke, i'".llington. pri\ale. euli^u■(l .\ugust 7. 18(12, mus- 
tered ill .August 2,^. 18(12: di>ch;irged .May 18. 18(15. 

^■d).\xiEL Wii.Ki.xso.x. Hartford, private, enlisted .\ugust 3, 18(13. mus- 
tered in .August 3. 1863; transferred to U. S. X. .May 5. i8()4; served 
on U. S. S. "Merrimac"; deserted August 8, 1864. 



496 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

Peter O. Wilson^ fNew Haven, private, enlisted July i"]. 1864, nnistered 
in July 2"], 1864; captured October 27, 1864, Stony Creek, Va. ; paroled 
March 10, 1865; transferred to Co. C 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

Henry Wilson, Groton, private, enlisted April 13, 1864, mustered in 
April 13, 1864; deserted August 11, 1864. 

*WiLLiAM Young, Columbia, private, enlisted November 29, 1864, mus- 
tered in December — , 1864; transferred from Co. A, nth C. V. De- 
cember — , 1864; wounded March 25, 1865, Hatcher's Run, Va.; dis- 
charged July 17, 1865. 



COMPANY K. 

Robert H. Gillette. Hartford, captain, enlisted September 6, 1862, not 
mustered ; commissioned captain, ( not nnistered ) ; resigned December 20, 
1862. 

James B. Coit, Norwich, captain, enlisted May 26, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; mustered ist lieutenant; wounded September 17, 
1862, Antietam, Md.; promoted May i, 1863; wounded July 3, 1863, 
Gettysburg, Pa.; promoted major October 11, 1863. 

William H. Hawley, Bridgeport, captain, enlisted July 22, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; promoted from ist lieutenant Co. D Decem- 
ber 5, 1863; killed August 25, 1864, Ream's Station, Va. 

Samuel Fisk, Madison, ist lieutenant, enlisted August 8, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; promoted from 2d lieutenant Co. I August 20, 
1862; captain Co. G January 19, 1863. 

James R. Nichols, Norwich, ist lieutenant, enlisted May 29, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; promoted from 2d lieutenant Co. I February 
4, 1863; captain Co. I November 13. 1863. 

Henry W. Wadhams, Waterbury, ist lieutenant, enlisted August 4, 
1862, mustered in August 20, 1862; promoted from 2d lieutenant Co. 
D November 13, 1863; killed May 26, 1864, North Anna River, Va. 

George H. Lillibridge, Franklin, ist lieiUenant, enlisted July 14, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; transferred as 2d lieutenant from Co. 
G December 7, 1863; wounded May 5, 1864, Wilderness, Va.; promo- 
ted 1st lieutenant September ig, 1864; discharged May 15, i8r>5. 

George H. D. Crosby, Middletown, 2d lieutenant, enlisted May 2T, 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam. 
Md.; died O'ctober 23, 1862. 

Frederick B. Hawley. Bridgeport, 2d lieutenant, enlisted July 12, 186.?, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; promoted from ist sergeant Co. A 
November 11, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va.; 
promoted ist lieutenant Co. G February 4, 1863. 

Charles Lyman, Bolton, 2d lieutenant, enlisted July 21, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; promoted from corporal Co. D March 3, 1863; dis- 
charged May 31, 1863. 



Official Roster. 497 

Newei.i, p. RdCKWdoi), Wiiul-or, jd licnlniaiU, enlisted July 14, iS()j. 
mustered in An.unst JO. iS(>j: nni-tered CDrpural; ])r, mioted -erKcant 
November 12, 1S62; 2d lieutenant June 3, iHfi.^; ist lieutenant C(_). D 
December 5, 1863. 

John T. Bradley. Madison, J(\ lieutenant, enlisted .\u}2:ust 18. 1862. 
mustered in August 20. 18(12; proniDted fr.im 1st ser.yeant Cu. G Janu- 
arj- 13. 1865; wounded March 2^. 1865. liatcherV Run, Va.; died 
March ji^. 1865. 

David K. Cankield, ^Middletown, ist sergeant, enlisted July 16. 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; promoted 2d lieutenant Co. B Novem- 
ber 13, 1862. 

Charles M. Austin, Middletown, ist sergeant, enlisted June 16. 1862. 
mustered in August 20, 1862; mustered sergeant; promoted Novem- 
ber 13, 1862; appointed sergeant-major January 13, 1865. 

Joseph T. Adams, Stonington, ist sergeant, enlisted May 31, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20. 1862; mustered sergeant; wounded October 14. 
1863, Bristoe Station, Va.; reduced to ranks (sick); promoted sergeant 
September 30, 1864; ist sergeant Januarys 13, 1865; mustered (Uit with 
company May 31, 1865. 

Lucn^s J. ILsTES, Hartford, sergeant, enlisted June 9. 1862, nuistered 
in August 20, 1862: mustered corporal; promoted sergeant January 
I. 1865; mustered out with company M^iy 31, 1865. 

Christopher Flvnn, Sprague, sergeant, enlisted .August 12, 1862. mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted corp'iral No- 
vember 9, 1862; wounded May 10, 1864, Laurel Hill. \^^.; prcunoted 
sergeant March i, 1865; mustered -lut with company May 31. 1865. 

Junius E. Goodwin, Hartford, sergeant, enlisted July 19, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; wounded December 13, 1862, Fri.'dcricks- 
burg, Va.; killed August 25, 1864, Ream's Station. Va. 

William E. Miller, Thompson, sergeant, enlisted July 7. 1862. nuistered 
in August 20. 1862; (See private. Rifle Co. B. 2d C. V.); mustered 
out with company May 31. 1865. 

Paul P. Noyes, Stonington. sergeant, enlisted June 7, 1862. nuistered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered corporal; promoted sergeant Inly 18, 
1863; captured August 25. 1864, Ream's Station, Va.; paroled October 
17, 1864; mustered out wiith company ]\Iay 31. 1865. 

Joseph F. Thompson, Hartford, sergeant, enlisted July 15, 1802, mus 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted corporal No- 
vember 13, 1862; sergeant April 2^. 18(14; 2d lieutenant Co. F Septem- 
ber 30, 1864. 

*Chester Burton, Brooklyn, corporal, enlisted August 13, 18(13. mus- 
tered in August 15, 18(13; mustered jirivate; promoted I'ebrnary 2^. 
18(14; killed May 10, 18(14, Spottsylvania, Va. 

NoRMANU .\. IkKKK, Chatham, corporal, enlisted .August 14. 18O2. mus- 



498 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

tered in August 20, 1862; (See private Co. F, 12th C. V.); deserted 
August 28, 1862. 

John Brierly, Norwich, corporal, enlisted June 10, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted February 4, 1863; 
wounded May 10, 1864, Spottsylvania, Va.; discharged May 31, 1865. 

Patrick Cuktiss, Hartford, corporal, enlisted July 28, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted January i, 1865; mus- 
tered out with company Mby 31, 1865. 

*Francis Dailey^ Hartford, corporal, enlisted July i^, 1863, mustered 
in July 27, 1863; mustered private; promoted March i, 1864; wounded 
May 5, 1864, place not shown; reduced to ranks (sick) July i, 1864; 
deserted September 23, 1864. 

Edward Dorcy, Norwich, corporal, enlisted June 2},, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam, ]\Id.; died 
Qctober 8, 1862. 

*Ed\vard Fitzgerald, Norwich, corporal, enlisted July 28, 1863, mustered 
in July i"^. 1863; mustered private; promoted November i, 1863; 
wounded Alay 10, 1864, Spottsylvania, Va.; deserted July 15. 1864. 

Andrew Flood, Chatham, corporal, enlisted July 2},, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private; wounded October 14, 1863, 
Bristoe Station, Va.; promoted February 25, 1864; mustered out with 
company May 31, 1865. 

Edward Gelston, Coventry, corporal, enlisted July 16, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted March i, 1S64; re- 
duced to ranks May i, 1864; promoted January i, 1865; wounded 
February 7, 1865, Hatcher's Run, Va.; mustered out with company 
May 31, 1865. 

Frederick M. Goff, Chatham, corporal, enlisted July 18, 1862, nnistereJ 
in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability March 15, 
1863. 

Henry Hasler, Ledyard, corporal, enlisted August 13, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private; wounded May 11, 1864, Spottsyl- 
vania, Va.; promoted April i, 1865; mustered out with company 
May 31. 1865. 

Henry H. Hull, Norwich, corporal, enlisted ]\Iay ij, 1862, mu.stered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted November 13, 1862; 
wounded February 6, 1864, Morton's Ford, Va. ; discharged on ac- 
count of disability March 2, 1865. 

*Thomas Madden, Hartford, corporal, enlisted July 31, 1863, mustered 
in July 31, 1863; mustered private; wounded February 6, 1864, Mor- 
ton's Ford, Va.; promoted February 20, 1864; wounded May 15, 1864, 
Spottsylvania, Va.; transferred to Co. G 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

Stephen M. Russell, Haddam, corporal, enlisted June 9, 1862, mus- 



Official Roster. 499 

tered in Ausn-^t 20, 1862; (See private Cn. K, 8th C. V.); reduced to 
ranks (sick); discharged on account of disahilit.v Feljruar}- 15, 1863. 

Alpheus Sears, Hartford, corjioral, enlisted July 11, 1862. mustered 
in August 20, 1862; mustered private; promoted Xovemher 13, 1862; 
deserted December 31, 1862. 

Alfred T. Symonds^ Windham, corporal, enlisted July 30, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; mustered private; prouioted November 13, 
1862; wounded September 17, 1862, .\ntietam, Md., wounded Decem- 
ber 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va.; transferred to Co. .\, i8th Regi- 
ment V. R. C. September i, 1863; discharged June 28, 1865. 

John R. Webster, Hartford, corporal, enlisted August 5. 1862, nuis- 
tered in August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862. Antielam. M'd.; 
died Oicto'ber 6, 1862. 

Simon A. Armstrong, Montville. musician, enlisted August ly, 1862. 
mustered in August 20, 1862; transferred to ranks; mustered out with 
company May 31, 1865. 

WiLLiAAt O. GuiLFORH, Waterbiu-y, nnisician, enlisted August 8. 1862, 
mustered in August 20, 1862; transferred as private froui Co. V. Octo- 
ber. 20, 1864; detailed musician; mustered (jut with company May 31. 
1865. 

Frederick W. Kurtz, Waterbury, nnisician. enlisted .Vugust 19. 1862, 
mustered in August 20, i8f)2; transferred as jirivate from Co. F. Octo- 
ber 20. 1864; detailed musician; mustered out with company May 
31, 1865. 

Leverett W. Stone, Hartford, musician, enlisted July 30, 1862. nnistered 
in August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability January 12, 
1863. 

William Cutler, Hartford, wagoner, enlisted June 17, 18C12, nnistered in 
August 20, 1862; transferred to ranks; nnistered out with company 
May 31, 1865. 

Reuben T. Ackley, Chatham, private, enlisted July 5, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; transferred to Co. F, 3d Regiment V. R. C. August 

13, 1863; transferred to 27th Co. 2d Battalion December i, 1S63: dis- 
charged on account of disability February 16, 1864. 

William R. Allen, Xorwich. private, enlisted July 11, 1862. mustered 
in August 20, 1862; died March Q, 18O3. 

Stephen D. .\llv\, Ledyard, private, enlisted August 14, i8()2, uuistered 
in .August 20, \i^Ci2: wounded Sei)tember 17. i8f)2. .\ntie;ani, Md.; 
wounded May 24, 1864, Xortli Anna River, Va.; died June 8. 18O4. 

^Andrew Anderson, .Merideu. private, enlisted .\ugust 8, 1863. nnistered 
in .\ugust 8, 1863; (See private Co. R, 9th C. V.); captured October 

14, 1863, Bristoe Station, Va.; died June 2;^, 1864, .\ndorsonvillc, Ga. 
Oliver C. Avery, Chatham, private, enlisted July 26. 1862, mustered 

in -August 20, 1862; died December 4. 1862. 



500 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

George W. Babcock. Norwicli, private, enlisted June lo, 1862, mustere'l 
in August 20, 1862; wnunded September 17, 1862. Antietam, Md.; dis- 
charged on account of disability October 20. 1862. 

John Bayhan, Chatham, private, enlisted August i, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; wounded September 17. 1862, Antietam, Md., wound- 
ed March 25, 1865, Hatcher's Run, Va.; discharged on account of dis- 
ability July 17, 1865. 

Nelson J. Bemont, Norwich, private, enlisted August i, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1S62, Antietam, Md., 
wounded December 13. 1862, P^redericksburg, Va.; mustered i.uit with 
company May 31, 1865. 

*Crayton Billings, Windham, private, enlisted August 21, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 21, 1863; wounded February 5, 1865, Hatcher's Run, 
Va.; transferred to Co. G, 2d C. V. H. A. May 30. 1865. 

*George W. Blake, Guilford, private, enlisted August i, 1863, nnis- 
tered in August i, 1863; captured August 25, 1S64, Ream's Station, 
Va.; died, date not shown, Salisbury, N. C. 

Stephen G. Bolles, Aiarlborough, private, enlisted June 21, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; deserted September 22, 1862. 

John. C. Bowers, Hartford, private, enlisted August 13, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; transferred to Co. G, 2d C. V. H. A. May 30, 1865. 

Henry W. Bowers, Somers, private, enlisted August 14, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; captured August 25, 1864, Ream's Station. Va.; 
paroled March 2, 1865; mustered out with company May 31, 1865. 

Horatio H. Brainerd, Somers, private, enlisted August 14, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862. Antietam, Md.; 
discharged on account of disability November 13, 1862. 

Cornelius Brennan, Norwich, private, enlisted June 21, 1862, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded July 3, 1863, Gettysburg, Pa.; transferred 
to 23d Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. August 17. 1863; discharged July 
5. 1865. 

*Charles Burrows, Killingly, private, enli.sted August 15, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 15, 1863; killed May 24, 1864, North Anna River, Va. 

*Owen Burke, Vernon, private, enlisted October i, 1863, mustered in 
October i, 1863; transferred to White Hall, Pa., April 6, 1865; no 
further record, Adjutant-General's Office, Washington, D. C. 

William H. Carroll, Wallingford, private, enlisted May 30, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam Md., 
wounded December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg, Va., wounded Miay 6, 
1864, Wilderness. Va.; discharged on account of disability June 13, 
1865. 

*Edward Cavanaugh, Salisbury, private, enlisted August 8, 1863, mus- 
tered in August 8, 1863; deserted Olctober 15, 1863. 

Frederick W, Chadwick, Stafiford, private, enlisted August 2, 1862, 



I 



Official Roster. 501 

mustered in Au.nust jo. iSCjj; di-cliariied nu accimnt uf disahililj- 
April I. 1S63. 

*Jamks Clark, Middlctinvn, i)rivate, enlisted July _'S. 1X6,^ inustered 
in July jX, iXf).;;; (lc>encd .\ut;u>t id. 1X04. 

•AIakti.v Coi.i.iNS, \e\v lia\en, pri\atr. Lnli>t(.(l July _X. i.Xf),:?, nuisli-rcd 
in July _'X, 1X6,^; discharged im account oi disability January 7, 1X64. 

'•=I-"ka\k Coi.e.man, Stonington, ]iri\ate. enlisted July 30, iX(),^. nHi>tercd 
in July 30, 1863; deserted September 12, 1863. 

*JoHN CoNLON, New Milford, private, enlisted August 12. 1X63, mustered 
in August 12. 1863: discharged on account .'if disability l)eceml)er 12. 
1X63. 

Ai-FREU CowLES, Famiington, private, enlisted August 7, 1X62, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; wounded May 10. 1X64, Laurel Hill, Va.; dis- 
charged September 7, 1865. 

John Cunningham, Hartford, private, enlisted July 21, 1X62, nnistered 
in August 20, 1862; died December 3, 1X62. 

*Dennis Daii.ev, Hartford, private, enlisted July 25, 1X63. mustered 
in July 25, 1863; transferred to Co. G. 2d C. V. H. A. May 30. 1865. 

*JoHN Dale^ Hartford, private, enlisted July 5, 1853, mustered \n 
July 5. 1863; deserted October 14. 1863. 

*WiLLiAM Daobeneckek. New Haven, private, enlisted July 31. 1X63. 
mustered in July 31, 1863; transferred to Co. G, 2d C. V. H. A. May 
30, 1865. 

Peter Divine, Hartford, i)rivate, enlisted August 13, 1862. mustered in 
August 20, 1862; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam, Md.; trans- 
ferred to Co. from hospital July 3, 1863; failed to report; no further 
record. Adjutant-GeneraTs Oftice, W'ashingtcm, D. C. 

James D(k;an. Middletown, private, enlisted May 31. i8()2, mustered 
in August 20, 1862; transferred to 23d Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. 
August 17, 1863; discharged as James Dugan July 5, 1865. 

Hugh Dokington, Norwich, private, enlisted July 16. 1862. mustered in 
August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability February X. 1X63. 

*NoYEs Downs, Woodstock, private, enlisted September n;. iX()3. mus- 
tered in September 19, 1863; deserted December 10. 1863. 

*JoHX DoYi.E. New Haven, jirivate. mlisted July 25, i8f)3. mustered in 
July 25, 1863; wounded October 14. iX()3. P.ristoe Station. Va.; de- 
serted January 10. 1864. 

Jacob Dvetch, l.edyard, private, enlisted .August 11, i8()2. mustered in 
August 20. 1862: wounded Septeml er 17. 1X62. Anlietam. Md.; trans- 
ferred to 114th Co. 2(1 llallaliou \'. R. C. b'ebruary 15. 1X04: discharged 
July iX. 1X65. 

*GeoK(;e lu.i.is, Meriden. private, enlisted .August X. iX(i3, nnistered in 
.August X, 1X63; discharged ou account of di-ability October 2_^. 1X03. 

'I'uoM.xs 1<".\KKK1.1.. il;irtf(ird. itriv.ite. enlisted lulv 0. iX()2. nmstereil 



502 Fourteenth Regiment, C. V. Infantry. 

in August 20, i?62; wounded September 17, 1862, Antietam. Md.; 
transferred to 96th Co. 2d Battalion V. R. C. November 2S. 1863; 
discharged on account of disability July 12, 1865. 

Eugene Field, Somers, private, enlisted August 15, 1862, mustered in 
August 20, 1862; discharged on account of disability February 10, 1863 

Chester C. Field, Somers, private, eniisted August 15, 1862. mustered 
in August 20, 1862; killed May 10, 1864, Laurel Hill, Va. 

*GEORr,E Flammer, Hartford, private, enlisted July 28, 1863, mustered 
in July 28, 1863; wounded May 10. 1864, Laurel Hill, Va.; deserted 
May — . 1865. 

*WiLLiAM Foster, Meriden, private, enlisted August 15, 1863, mustered 
in August IS. 1863; captured December i, 1863, Rapidan, Va.; died 
Miarch 10, 1864, Richmond, Va. 

Benjamin R. Fuller, Chatham, private, enlisted May 27, 1862, mus- 
tered in August 20, 1862; killed Septcmlier 17, 1862, Antietam, Md. 

Franklin Fuller, Chatham, prixate, enlisted July 2^,, 1862. mustered 
in August 20. 1862; died October 6, 1862. 

Selden Fuller, Chatham, private, enlisted June 2, 1862, mustered in 
August 20. 1862; wounded September 17, 1862. Antietam, Md.; dis- 
charged on account of disability I'ebruary 13, 1863. 

*James Garev, Vernon, private, enlisted September 30, 1863, mustered 
in September 30, 1803; discharged on account of disability January 
7, . 1864. 

John Glynn, Hartford, pri