(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "History of Green County, Wisconsin"













'._.« ^ 






v\ 



A. 



.,* 



L > » 



<s> 

































^ 



& 



»>*, 

































,.0 



* 



*0 ,T* . 






(J « 



* "C^ 






^ 










*<■ 






* -^ 






**, 





















.4* 









^0 



o 






.*-»/»<» ■ 















* 






o. 



.,* 






OUTLINE of GREEN COUNTY 



YORK 


NEW GLARUS 


EXETER 


BROOKLYN 


ADAMS 


WASHINGTON 


MT. PLEASANT 


i 

ALBANY 


JORDAN 


MONROE 


SYLVESTER 


DECATUR 


CADIZ 


CLARNO 


JEFFERSON 


SPRIN6 GROVE 



HISTORY 



OF — 



GREEN COUNTY, 



WISCONSIN. 



By HELEN M. BINGHAM. 



lo<?/% >0-f 



MILWAUKEE: 
B V R !) I C K ,V A R M I T A G E, PR I N T E R S. 

1(H) MICHIGAN STREET. 

KS77. 



PREFACE. 



Before the days of newspapers in a new country, the 
county and family records are almost the only means 
by which the dates of important occurrences are pre- 
served. Nevertheless, when a county has been settled 
fifty years, each man, by reference to the dates set down 
in his family Bible, and to the year in which he came, is 
able to fix a great many other dates, thus: "Barber 
and Newcomb had been here a year when I came, in 
v :>'7. Holland came the next spring. Smith came the 
year our bain- died, and that was '38. Brown must 
have come in '37, for it was the description of the 
country, in his letters, that induced the Smiths to leave 
Illinois. Jones came the 10th of vSept. '39. That was 
the day Tom was born, and I remember Jones was 
camped right in front of my house, because some of his 
cattle had given out." 



VI. 



Alas, that the good mother of the house must shake 
our faith in her husband's chronology in this way! 
k * No, Pa, that was the day Mary was born. [ know, 
because Mrs. Jones said 'twas a pity she wasn't a boy, 
she had such a good head." There is always a possi- 
bility that dates arrived at by the course just illustrated 
may be wrong - ; but usually there is also a great proba- 
bility that they are right, and when the same dates are 
obtained in two or more families, the probability be- 
comes almost a certainty. In proportion to their num- 
ber, their correctness is disputed not nearly so often as 
the correctness of later dates which are verified by the 
newspapers of their time. 

In the effort to make this history correct, a great 
many letters have been written, and a great many visits 
have been made in the several towns. Assistance has 
been received from over two hundred persons, more 
than one-fourth of whom came to the county before 
1840, some of them before 1830. With all the avidity 
of DrvdenV reaper, who 

fills his oreedv hands. 



And binds the golden sheaves in brittle loands." 

I have seized upon these individual gleanings from 
memory's field, and bound them together. The result 



VII. 



of this labor has recently been submitted to a number 
of old settlers, in the hope that a comparative view of 
the recollections of many persons might lead to the 
detection of errors which escaped those who had fewer 
data to guide them. 

One of the main objects of the following pages is a 
faithful delineation of life and manners in the early days 
of the county. With' this object in view, record has 
been made of some incidents .which are, in themselves, 
so trivial that one who knew of them said he supposed 
they were put in to fill up. 

I cannot sufficiently express mv gratitude for the kind 
assistance which has been rendered me both by old 
friends and by those to whom I was hitherto a stranger. 
It has made mv task one to be remembered only for its 
pleasures. I am under special obligations to the town 
clerks and to the county officers for information con- 
tained in the records under their care, and to Col. 
Edwin E. Bryant, Adjutant General of Wisconsin, who 
allowed me to examine all the muster rolls in his office. 

With the greatest diffidence as to their judgment upon 
it, and with just one plea in its behalf, the history is now- 
submitted to the people of Green County. The plea is 
ibis: It is often said, though whether the saving orig- 



Vlll. 

inated with an* unsuccessful historian cannot now be 

ascertained, that that people is most fortunate whose 

history is most wearisome to read. Will those to whom 

this history is the dullest and most monotonous of books 

have the charity to infer that Green is the most fortunate 

of counties? 

11. M. B. 

Monroe, June 18, 1877. 



HISTORY OF GREEN COUNTY. 



Green County is a square of sixteen townships. It 
is one of the six counties in Wisconsin that border upon 
Illinois. Eighty miles from its eastern boundary is Lake 
Michigan; forty miles from its south-western, and sixty 
miles from its north-western boundary line, is the Miss- 
issippi. The counties bounding it in its own state are 
Dane on the north, Rock on the east, and La Fayette 
and Iowa on the west. 

Geologically, Green County is in the limestone dis- 
trict of southern Wisconsin, and nearly all of its western 
half is included in what is called the lead region of the 
state, which is, as is well-known, a driftless region. 
The eastern half of the county, in which the marks of 
drift currents are everywhere discernable, is remarkable 
for including at Exeter the only lead mines found in the 
three states of Illinois, Iowa, and Wisconsin outside of 
the driftless region. 

The surface of the county is undulating. Prof. J.. 
D. Whitney, in the State Geological Report for 1S62, 
has called attention to the fact, that while the whole 



io History of Gi'een County. 

north-west is characterized by three divisions of surface, 
— the bottom land, the bluffs that shut it in, and the up- 
land or prairie, — the surface of the lead region has cer- 
tain peculiarities of its own, which are principally due 
to the erosion of its streams. There is, in this region, 
a rapid alternation of bluffs and valleys. The valleys 
branch again and again in every direction, and their 
width is usually in proportion to the size of the streams 
that wander through them. The conformations of sur- 
face in south-western Wisconsin present, therefore, a 
marked contrast to the comparatively unbroken level of 
the south-eastern part of the state. Green County 
partakes of the peculiarities of both regions, and may 
be regarded as the connecting link between them. Near 
its western boundary the hills are many, and the valleys 
are narrow; but in the interior of the county the valleys 
along the small streams grow so much wider than those 
in the lead region, that the bottom land of Sugar River 
is as wide as that of the Mississippi, and the undulations 
of surface gradually grow longer and gentler, until, a 
little before the eastern border of the county is reached, 
the surface becomes a level prairie. 

The soil is varied, like the surface. In a few places 
where the sandstone comes to the surface it is a sandy 
loam. The usual surface rock is the Galena limestone, 
which underlies the soil at a depth varying from a few 
inches to eight or ten feet, and, with the exception of the 
deep clay loam in some parts of the northern and west- 
ern towns, the usual soil is a rich black loam, with a 
large admixture of vegetable mould, and a subsoil of 



History of Green County. 1 1 

clay. Good crops of all kinds are raised in every town, 
and even in the hilliest towns the undulations are so 
gradual that there is very little land which can not be 
cultivated. Hence, the good drainage and all the other 
desirable results of a rolling country are enjoyed here 
without the disadvantages of a too broken surface. 

The Pecatonica and Sugar rivers and their larger 
tributaries afford excellent water power for manufac- 
tures, while the innumerable streams that start from the 
springs on the hillsides complete the natural fitness of 
the county for becoming one of the leading live stock 
counties in the United States. 

Good timber is abundant. It is especially heavy in 
the north and west, and every town has its groves of 
ash, elm, maple, hickory, walnut, basswood, poplar, and 
various kinds of oak. The healthfulness of the county, 
which is unsurpassed, is probably due, in great measure, 
to the elevation of the land. The elevation of the fol- 
lowing places was determined by the surveys of the 
Southern Wisconsin Railroad Company: 

ELEVATION ABOVE 
Lake Mich. Sea Level. 

Brodhead, - - - - 221 S04 

Juda, 353 936 

High land south ot Monroe, - - 500 1,083 

Pecatonica River Crossing, Town 1, Range 6, 196 779 

Juda is shown by these surveys to be 348 feet higher 
than Milwaukee, 113 feet higher than Janesville, 79 feet 
higher than Madison, and 312 feet higher than Prairie 
du Chien. 

The territorv included in the State of Wisconsin was 
first claimed by the French, by whom it was ceded to 



12 History of Green County. 

Great Britain. At the close of the revolution it was 
claimed by Virginia, and ceded by that state to the 
United States, after which it was under the territorial 
government of Ohio until 1800. From that time until 
1809 it was a part of Indiana territory. It was then 
Included in Illinois territory until 181S, when it was 
attached to Michigan territory. On the 4th of July, 
1S36, it was organized as the territory of Wisconsin. 
When Michigan territory extended as far west as the 
Mississippi, that part of the territory lying between 
Lake Michigan and the Mississippi was divided into two 
counties, Brown and Crawford. The division was such 
that that part of Green County which is comprised in 
fthe four towns, Brooklyn, Albany, Decatur, and Spring 
Grove, was in Brown County, whose county seat was 
Green Bay, while the remainder was in Crawford Coun- 
ty, of which Prairie du Chien was the county seat. So 
far as this county is concerned, the memory of man 
goeth back only to 1826-7. In 1826 there began to be a 
•great deal of talk about the lead mines of south-western 
Wisconsin. In 1827 the interest in them was as general 
.as the interest in the California gold mines in '49, and 
there was such a rush to them from all parts of the 
country that sometimes the boats that came up the 
Mississippi from St. Louis could not carry half of 
those who wanted to come. Probably the first white 
men who saw what is now Green County passed this 
way in 1S26, on their way to the mines near the river. 
The first who remained came in '28, to trade with the 
Indians. Their names were McNut and Boner. They 



History of Green County. 13 

stopped at the old Indian, or Sugar River diggings, 
near the present village of Exeter, where they were 
soon joined by an interpreter named Van Sickles, and 
by miners. Some time prior to 1S29, John B. Skinner 
and Thomas Neal began to work at the Skinner dig- 
gings, in the township since called Monroe. In 1S30 
Andrew Clarno built the first house in Clarno town- 
ship, and two years later William Wallace and Joseph 
Paine, who had been working at the mines, settled near 
him. New miners came occasionally, but the number 
of settlers did not increase until after the Black Hawk 
war, which broke out in the spring of 1S32. Although 
this war lasted only three months, it must not, on that 
account, be passed by as unimportant. It cost about 
three hundred lives, whites and Indians, and even the 
great rebellion was not a greater source of anxiety, in 
its time, than was the Black Hawk war to the early 
settlers. Prior to the war, in October, 1S29, the south- 
ern part of Crawford County, including, of course, the 
greater part of the future county of Green, was orga- 
nized as Iowa County, of which Mineral Point was the 
county seat. Most of the depredations of the Indians 
during the war were committed in the mining districts 
of Iowa County. Hundreds of miners left the country 
and never returned. The movements of the Indians 
were so stealthy and so rapid that the settlers, separated 
by long distances from each other, were in the wildest 
alarm. Their thoughts when awake, their dreams when 
asleep, were all of the Indians. Finally they sought 

refuge in the forts, of which the more important were 

2* 



14 History of Gree?i County. 

Fort Union, near Dodgeville; Fort Jackson, at Mineral 
Point; Fort Defiance, five miles south-east of Mineral 
Point; Mound Fort, at Blue Mounds; Funk's Fort, near 
Gratiot's Grove; and Fort Hamilton, at Wiota. Other 
forts were at Platteville and White Oak Springs. Most 
of the forts were simply yards, with close fences made 
of upright, ten-foot slabs. There were houses in the 
yards to which settlers removed their families and house- 
hold goods. It is the opinion of Mr. O. H. P. Clarno 
that the worst of the war was inside the forts. The 
children of the various families were soon arrayed 
against each other in a struggle in which an armistice 
was a thing unknown, and the mothers not only assisted 
them, but also en^ao-ed in such hostilities on their own 
account that a dispute as to the ownership of a frying- 
pan has sometimes been known to lead to the conversion 
of that pacific utensil into a weapon of war. 

This is not the place for a detailed account of the 
war, for none of its battles were fought within the limits 
of Green County; and the departures of the settlers of 
Exeter and Clarno to places of safety are elsewhere 
described. Galena and all the villages of Iowa County 
furnished volunteers; and, after a few engagements, 
Black Hawk's forces were overpowered, and he himself 
was taken prisoner before the arrival of Gen. Scott, 
who, in eighteen days (a rapidity of travel that was 
thought remarkable), had transported nine companies of 
artillery from the seaboard around the lakes to Chicago. 
But the soldiers escaped the tomahawk of the Indians 
only to become the victims of that equally relentless foe, 



Hlstoiy of Green County . 15 

the Asiatic cholera. Of 2S0 men commanded by one Col. 
Twiggs, it is said not twenty survived. Doubtless many 
were buried alive. At one time, writes one who was in 
Chicago while the troops were there, when several were 
jDla-ced beside the hole in which they were to be 
buried, one of the number moved, and asked for water. 
He lived to rejoice in good health. 

After the war, immigration increased. To the new 
comers, as to the earliest settlers, those who had partici- 
pated in the war ever appeared as heroes. For years 
the one unfailing subject of conversation, the subject 
which never grew old and never was out of place, was 
the war. Every incident was told over and over again. 
There was a man named Bennett Million, who used to 
play the fiddle at the dances in Monroe. He, w T ith a num- 
ber of others, had been surprised by the Indians, some- 
where near the Pecatonica, and chased by them. The 
fright made one of his companions insane, and several 
others were killed. Mr. Million saved himself by roll- 
ing in the mud until so covered by it that he could hide 
on the ground. His experience was interesting and ex- 
citing, and many a time, in later years, the gay company 
for whom he played bade him lay by the fiddle and the 
bow, and tell them his story of the war. 

Iowa County was partially surveyed before the war, 
much earlier than would have been necessary had not 
the lead mines brought it into notice. In 1S35 the land 
was brought into market, and many settlers came to 
the county in '35-6. Probably nine-tenths of those 
who came now or any time before 1840 came from 



1 6 History of Gree?i County. 

Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, or Virginia. It is 
difficult to ascertain the states of their nativity. A very 
large proportion of them came from Illinois, but they 
had gone there a few years before, when "Eelinoise" 
was the boundary of the civilized world. The Indiana 
immigrants were, many of them, born in Ohio, and 
many who came from Ohio had spent their earlier years 
in Pennsylvania or Virginia. At this time hardly any 
one came directly from New England, but some who 
were by birth the children of New England came from 
New York state. The settlers of 1S35-6-7 endured 
privations of all kinds. The nearest markets were 
Mineral Point, Galena, and Fort Winnebago. The dif- 
ficulties of going to market were increased by the fact 
that the streams, which a few years later were shallow 
enough to be forded, were now so deep that teams were 
oblio-ed to swim across them, and the banks were so 
steep that travelers carried shovels with which to cut 
them down. One might travel days at a time, in south- 
ern Wisconsin, without seeing a house, and dismal 
prophets had foretold that this state of things must con- 
tinue. A history of the Black Hawk war, published in 
1S34 by J. A. Wakefield, after remarking that if the 
four lakes " were anywdiere else except in the country 
they are, they would be considered among the wonders 
of the world," added this discouraging conclusion : " But 
the country they are situated in is not fit for any civilized 
nation of people to inhabit. It appears that the Almighty 
intended it for the children of the forest." Janesville 
was then in its infancy, and for two or three years Mr. 



History of Green County. 17 

* 

Janes came to Green County to buy provisions of the 
farmers. Madison was thought of; but when the seat 
of government was located there in 1S37 there were but 
three white men in Dane County. 

About the same time that Wisconsin was separated 
from Michigan, Iowa County constituted her portion of 
the future little Green one election precinct. Henry 
Dodge, the first governor of the new territory, appor- 
tioned to each county its number of councilors and rep- 
resentatives, and the number allotted to Iowa County 
entitled her eastern election precinct to one representa- 
tive. The election was held where Monroe has since 
grown up, at the blacksmith shop of a Mr. Brown 
(familiarly known, from the material of his clothes, as 
Buckskin Brown), and resulted in the election of Wm. 
Boyles, of Cadiz. Other things than political affiliations 
determined a candidate's success in those days. There 
were very few young women in the country, and it is 
said that every single man in the precinct favored the 
election of Mr. Boyles because he had eight unmarried 
daughters. At the first session of the first Wisconsin 
legislature, which convened at Belmont, Iowa County, 
in the fall of 1836, Mr. Boyles presented a petition 
(which had been drawn up and circulated by Mr. Daniel 
S. Sutherland), asking for the organization of a county 
which should have the limits of the present county of 
Green, and be called Richland. The petition was grant- 
ed, so far as setting off a new county was concerned, 
but some one objected to the name because it was " too 
matter-of-fact," and Mr. Boyles was invited to select 



1 8 History of Gree7i County. 

another. According to one account he selected Green, 
as indicative of the bright color of the vegetation, and 
refused to change it to Greene in honor of Gen. Greene. 
Another account says he selected Greene, and when the 
act of the legislature was printed the final e was omit- 
ted by mistake. Be this as it may, for some years the 
name was usually written Greene. 

To the act which detached this county from Iowa, 
was proposed an amendment attaching it to that county 
for judicial purposes. Action on the amendment was 
deferred until the next session, so that when the legisla- 
ture adjourned in December, 1836, Green County was 
left detached from Iowa County, without any authority 
to organize, and without being attached to any county 
for judicial purposes. In this state of affairs, Iowa 
County claimed jurisdiction over Green, and, having 
appointed Daniel S. Sutherland and Wm. Bowen jus- 
tices of the peace, directed them to hold an election for 
county officers; but when the people assembled election 
day, Mr. Sutherland urged them not to do anything 
which might be understood as an acknowledgment of 
Iowa's authority over Green, and it was unanimously 
resolved that no election should be held. There fol- 
lowed nearly a year in which Green County had no 
government or legal organization. By an act of the 
legislature, which was approved January 15th, 1S38, 
Green Count}' - was fully organized ; but ' while the bill 
was before the legislature some one said that Green 
■was indebted to Iowa County for a portion of all the in- 
debtedness of the mother county incurred prior to 



History of Green County. 



l 9 



March 4th, 1S37. From this unfortunate statement 
arose a claim of Iowa County against Green for $537.73. 
But, though the claim was urged as late as 1S50, and 
though the lawsuits to which it gave rise cost the people 
of little Green as much as the amount claimed, yet 
they always insisted that, as they had derived no benefit 
from the expenditures for which they were charged, the 
claim was unjust and should not be paid, and it never 
was paid. 

The following table shows the population of Wis- 
consin from 1S20 to the organization of Green County 
in 1S3S: 



COUNTIES. 


1820. 


1830. 

964 
692 

i,539 


1834- 

i,957 
810 

2,633 


1836. 

2,766 
1,220 

3,218 
2,892 


1838. 


Brown 


952 
492 


3,048 
850 

5,234 

3,!3i 
172 

18 


Iowa 


Milwaukee 






















Grant 










2,763 
494 























The first election in the new county was held March 
5th, 1838, at the house of Jacob LyBrand, in Monroe, 
or New Mexico. Two hundred and thirty-one votes 
were cast, and Daniel S. Sutherland, Wm. Bowen, and 
Daniel Harcourt were elected county commissioners. 
What was called the annual election was held in August, 
at which time the following officers were elected : Daniel 
Harcourt and James Reily, commissioners; Jehu Chad- 
wick, treasurer; Jarvis Rattan, coroner; Jabez Johnson, 
assessor; Hiram Rust, register of deeds, and Jabez John- 



20 History of Green County. 

son, collector. Soon after this election, a copy of the 
newly published laws of the state was received, and it 
was found that the ioth of September was the day ap- 
pointed by law for holding the annual election. Con- 
sequently no certificates were issued to the officers elect- 
ed in August, and another election was held in Septem- 
ber, the result of which is given in the course of this 
sketch. The commissioners had for clerks, this first 
year of the county's existence, Hiram Rust, Mortimer 
Bainbridge, and Win. Rittenhouse, successively. The 
commissioners' work was as follows: They appointed 
judges of elections, ordered that Green County consti- 
tute one election precinct, that elections be held at the 
house of Jacob LyBrand, and that the district court be 
held at Jacob Andrick's. They charged Joseph Paine 
$1.50 for tavern license for three months, and Jacob Ly- 
Brand $20.00 for license to retail merchandise for one 
year. They established the boundaries of road districts 
one and two, received and granted several petitions for 
roads, and issued orders to the amount of $129.67. 

The first court held in Green County, was the United 
States district court, Hon. Chas. Dunn presiding. It 
was held in April, 1S3S, at Mr. Andrick's house, now 
known as the Niles place, south of the village of Mon- 
roe. The first grand jury, Hiram Rust foreman, met 
in the blacksmith shop of Buckskin Brown. Once, 
when Judge Dunn was here, the gran/1 jury found an 
indictment against a woman. Before the hour for the 
trial, and before the grand jurors had come out of their 
room, which opened into the court room, the Judge 



History of Green County. 21 

opened a door and said to the woman, " the best thing 
for you to do is to run," and she speedily disappeared. 

The first person tried by a jury was Daniel Harcourt, 
who was charged "with removing and destroying - the 
boundaries of a lot of land." Road viewers had been 
appointed to lay out a road to which Dr. Harcourt was 
opposed. The projected road was described by its prox- 
imity to certain marks of the government surveys; 
namely, the stake on the corner of the section, and the 
trees called witness trees, upon the bark of which had 
been cut letters and figures showing the quarter section 
and the number of the section. The road viewers met 
to perform their duty, but they found that Dr. Har- 
court and his son-in-law had removed the stake, and 
that the marks on the witness trees had been so nicely 
filled with moss and lichens that no one unacquainted 
with their position could tell where they had been. The 
case turned on the removal of the stake. Dr. Harcourt 
claimed that the original stake had been destroyed by a 
fire, that he and his son-in-law had put another in its 
place, and that, having put it there themselves, they had 
a right to take it away again. The jury returned a 
verdict of not guilty. In October, 1839, Frederick Bedt- 
ner made the first declaration of intention to become a 
citizen. John Thorp, the first naturalized citizen of 
Green County, took the oath April 14th, 1S41. The 
first divorce was granted in 1842, and there were eight 
divorce cases before '50. 

Lawsuits occupied some of the commissioners' time. 
Their journal's first mention of a suit is the following: 

3 



22 History of Green County. 

"April 2d, 1839. Whereas Jacob LyBrand obtained an 
order to take out license to vend merchandise in the 
county of Green, at the July term of this court in '38, 
and has failed to comply with the law in that case 
made and provided, therefore, ordered, that suit be insti- 
tuted against said Jacob LyBrand in the district court of 
said county, in an action of debt to the damage of said 
county of $100." 

In 1S39 a tax of one-half of one per cent, was levied 
on the valuation of all taxable property. For conve- 
nience of assessing, the county was divided into three dis- 
tricts, and it was ordered bv the commissioners that first- 
rate land be valued at three dollars per acre, and second- 
rate land at two dollars per acre. The territorial reve- 
nue from Green County in 1839 was $90.58, which was 
five per cent, of all taxes. The produce of the county 
in 1839 was as follows: 

Wheat, n,953 bushels. Indian Corn, 25,610 bushels. 

Barley, 85 " Potatoes, 15,603 " 

Oats, 20,245 " Wool, 1,045 lbs. 

Buckwheat, 788 " 

Immediately after the organization of the county 
there arose a contest for the county seat, which had the 
effect of preventing immigration while it lasted, and of 
inducing many who had come to go away. Shortly be- 
fore the organization of the county, Judge Andrick laid 
out a town, where he lived, which he called New Mex- 
ico, but which he neglected to have recorded in the 
land office at Mineral Point. It was supposed that this 
town of New Mexico would be the county seat of the 



History of Green County. 23 

prospective county, and Mr. Payne besought Judge 
Andrick to sell him an interest in it, which the Judge 
refused to do. Mr. Payne then laid out a town, which 
was immediately north of New Mexico, and which in- 
eluded land on both sides of that now occupied by the 
railroad track. Mr. James Campbell, who was Mr. 
Payne's surveyor, remembers that while they were sur- 
veying, Mr. Payne stopped work to make a last effort 
to purchase a share in New Mexico, and that he re- 
marked, on his return from his fruitless visit to Judge 
Andrick, " New Mexico isn't recorded, and if the old 
fool wo'n't let any one else have half the county seat, he 
shan't have any part of it himself." The act of the 
Burlington legislature which made this a county, also 
located the county seat at New Mexico, referring, of 
course, to Judge Andrick's town. As soon as this act 
was passed, Mr. Payne named his town New Mexico, 
and hastened to the land office at Mineral Point. A few 
miles behind him rode Judge Andrick, 23iirsuing him 
with a speed compared to which the most rapid move- 
ments of the Indians who followed him in 1S32 and of 
the sheriff who sought for him in 1S49 were as the crawl- 
ing of a snail to John Gilpin's ride. Mr. Payne reached 
Mineral Point before Judge Andrick, and got his New 
Mexico on record first, which made it the county seat by 
law. But, moved by a petition which was presented by 
Mr. Sutherland, the member from Green, the legisla- 
lature, at its next session, repealed this law, and appoint- 
ed three commissioners to select a county seat. To in- 
duce Mr. Sutherland to work for the repeal of the first 



2.J. history of Gree7i County. 

law, a large number of the voters of Green County had 
pledged themselves to submit to the decision of the 
commissioners, whatever it might be. The commission- 
ers, after looking the county over, selected a place which 
they called Roscoe, about two and one-half miles north- 
east of the present village of Monroe. The place was 
not acceptable to the people. It was then made to ap- 
pear before the legislature that Mr. Sutherland owned 
all the timber in the vicinity of Roscoe, and that his in- 
fluence had led to the selection of that place. The rep- 
resentation was a mistaken one, as regards both the 
ownership of the timber and the influence exerted by 
Mr. Sutherland. But this law was also repealed, and it 
was decided that the question of the county seat should be 
decided by a vote of the people. In the meantime, it was 
undertaken to dig a well in Mr. Payne's town, but, after 
digging about forty feet, those interested in it became 
discouraged, and gave up the attempt. The belief then 
became general that the county seat must be at some 

o j 

place where water could be more easily obtained, and 
Messrs. Payne, LyBrand, and Russell offered to give 
the county 120 acres of land near the spring — Mr. Russell 
stipulating that his share of the gift should be for the 
benefit of a county seminary. Mr. Andrick had also 
abandoned the hope of making his town the county 
seat, and had united with others in claiming that honor 
for a site which was situated a short distance south of 
Roscoe. At the election, in May, 1S39, the point at issue 
seems to have been not so much the comparative merits 
of the two sites under consideration, as the comparative 



History of Green County. 25, 

popularity of the men who had selected them ; and the 
tickets of one party were marked, " For Andrick, Wil- 
coxon and Sutherland," while those of the other party 
read, " For Payne, LyBrand and Russell." The vote 
was a tie, Andrick and Sutherland's site having received 
just half the 136 votes cast. A second election was held 
in June, and though there were cast six votes more than 
at the other election, the result was a second tie. This, 
result was inadvertantly brought about by Mr. Ly- 
Brand. Election day each party knew how many voters 
it had in town, and knew, too, that Mr. LyBrand's side 
had one more man than the other. To make assurance 
doubly sure, Mr. LyBrand sent into the country for 
another voter, paying his messenger $2.50 for the trip. 
The man, whose name was Elias Luttrell, came, but, 
much to Mr. Ly Brand's surprise, he voted with the 
opposition. A third election was held in August. An- 
drick and Sutherland were now the champions of a 
site which was almost the geographical centre of the 
county ; but, as votes were cast for men, rather than for 
places, it was probable that this election would result, 
like the others, in a tie; when Mr. Ly Brand, taking" 
advantage of the great popularity of a peculiar kind of 
hat, braided by Mrs. Rust, offered to give one of them to 
a young man, named Porter, if he would induce some 
miners at Sugar River diggings to come to the polls. 
The offer was accepted, and the votes thus gained loca- 
ted 'the county seat. The selection of a name for the 
town was left to Dr. Harcourt, one of the county com- 
missioners, and he selected Monroe. 

3* 



2,6 History of Green County. 

In August, 1S39, the land given for a county seat 
was deeded to the county, Mr. Ly Brand reserving the 
privilege of selecting, from his forty acres, six town lots 
for himself. In May, 1840, Mr. Ly Brand was desired, 
by the commissioners, to make choice of his six lots. It 
appears from the following entry in their journal, dated 
June 1st, 1840, that he failed to do so: "Whereas no 
specified time is designated for the selection of said lots, 
and sufficient time having been given to the said Jacob 
LyBrand to make such selection as by him provided in 
said deed; and whereas he has hitherto neglected, and, 
by so neglecting, refused, and by so doing, waived his 
right to make such choice; and whereas provision is 
made in the above named deed that Green County, be- 
fore offering any portion of the town of Monroe for 
sale, shall make a deed to said Jacob LyBrand of six 
building lots, in said town, as provided in said deed; now, 
be it ordered that the following lots be selected — " A 
deed of the six lots chosen for him was accordingly 
offered to Mr. LyBrand. He declined to accept it, and 
selected other lots, which the commissioners, being, in 
their turn, willing to delay matters, neglected for some 
time to deed to him. But they had advertised in the 
Wisconsin Enquirer, a paper published at Madison, a 
public sale of lots in the town of Monroe, to be held 
the 8th of October, 1S40. The sale was to begin at ten 
o'clock. Early in the morning of that day, therefore, 
Mr. LyBrand was given a deed of the lots he had 
chosen. 

Mr. I. A. Lapham, in a little history of Wisconsin, 



History of Green County. 2f 

published in 1844, sa ys there were in Green County, in 
1840, 247 horses, 1,459 neat cattle, 608 sheep, 3,605 
swine, 2 stores, 1 grist mill, and 3 saw mills. A tax of" 
one per cent was levied on the valuation of all property 
in 1840, the valuation being the same as in 1839. In 1844. 
the county taxes were as follows: 

County charges, including only the 

expenses of the courts and fees of 

officers for performing' the duties 

required by law, - - - 3 mills on a dollar. 

Contingent expenses, - - \]/ 2 " " " 

Support of schools and erection of 



school houses, - 2 *A " " 



u 



Roads and bridges, - - 1 mill " " 

Support of poor, - - 1 " " " 

1S40 saw inaugurated a system of economy for county- 
commissioners, which wai- adhered to until '49, and which 
is illustrated by this passage from the journal : "This 

day (October 7th, 1S40) appeared, and filed 

his account against Green County for the sum of thirty- 
six dollars, and moved the court here for an allowance 
of the same. And after the matter being considered,, 
and fully understood by the court, it is ordered that he 
have an order made in his favor for the sum of eighteen 
dollars.'" This system being understood, bills were 
usually made out With reference to being allowed only 
in part. 

In 1842, Green County had two election precincts, 
called Monroe and Sugar River. Others were set apart 
in the following year. In November, 184S, there were 
eight election precincts, namely: Monroe, Greenville,, 
Jefferson, Exeter, Mill Creek, Calimine, Decatur, and 
Albany. 



28 History of Gree?i County. 

It took some time to find out what officers were need- 
ed to do the business of the county. In 1S3S, and again 
in '39, an assessor and a constable were elected. In 1840, 
the number of assessors was increased to three, and in 
'41 the number of constables was increased to two. A 
collector and three fence viewers were elected in 1840, 
and six road supervisors were elected in '41. In 1S43, 
justices of the peace were elected in each precinct. In 
1844, each precinct elected justices, fence viewers, and 
a constable. 

In 1840, school districts were organized. There were 
ten, and they were set off in the following order: Ros- 
coe, Richland, Monroe, New Mexico, Union, York, 
Green, Mill Creek, Fairfield and Pennsylvania. 

At this time the county commissioners were also 
school commissioners, but in 1S41, and each year there- 
after, until '49, three school commissioners were elected. 
The first school commissioners were Elias Jones, Wm. 
C. Green, and E. T. Gardner. In 1845, there were seven- 
teen school districts which had had school three months 
the preceding year. In 1847, twenty-five districts, in 
which there were 1,323 school children, had school three 
months; and seventeen districts, in which there were 
514 children, had no school. 

The number of petitions and orders for roads re- 
corded in the commissioners' journal during the first 
years of the county's existence makes one wonder that 
the commissioners ever had time to attend to anything 
besides roads, and the wonder grows when one reads 
petitions in which the wished for road is described by its 



History of Green County. 29* 

proximity to John Chryst's stack yard, the slough near 
Wm. Rittenhouse's stable, and other similar landmarks.. 
In 1S42 the first bridge in the county was built across. 
Sugar river, on the road from Janesville to Monroe. In 
1S43 a bridge over the Pecatonica, and a second bridge- 
over Sugar river, on the road from Madison to the Illi- 
nois state line, by way of New Mexico, were built, and 
in '44 Sugar river was spanned by a bridge on the road 
from Monroe to Beloit. Of these four bridges, Joseph 
Woodle built the first, Ezra Durgin and Jacob Linzee: 
the second, John B. Sawyer the third, and Jacob Linzee 
the fourth. 

In 1 841-2, nearly every masculine heart in the county 
was fired with a desire to get wolf scalps, and many 
pages of the commissioners' journal for that time are 
filled with the names of successful hunters. The con- 
duct of some who engaged in this onslaught upon the 
wolves was marked by all of a crusader's strange ex- 
travagance. A few of them suffered from a hallucina- 
tion that led its victim greatly to exaggerate the num- 
ber of wolves laid low by his valorous hand. Such 
unfortunates exhibited, in their wildest moments, scalps 
which indicated that in this country the wolf and the 
fox, and even the wolf and the woodchuck, lay down 
together; and the worthy commissioners wej - e often 
much troubled by their mad clamor for reward. 

184.3 was tne y eal * fi rst fixed upon by the Millerites, 
or Second Adventists, for the end of the world. Ten 
years had now elapsed since Wm. Miller began preach- 
ing, and as early as 1840 the number of his disciples was 



30 History of Green County. 

thought to have reached fifty thousand. Many who 
did not profess his faith awaited with fear and tremb- 
ling the opening of the fateful year. The winter of 
1842-43 was one of almost unparalleled severity. Early 
in November, the snow fell to a great depth. With the 
exception of a few days in January, the ground was 
covered until April, and the idea that the world wa s 
to be destroyed by cold gained many adherents in 
Green County. The roads, that year, are thus described 
by Mr. S. F. Chipman, in Guernsey's History of Rock 
County : " Road-tracks across the prairie would catch 
the drifting snow until they attained to an elevation of 
two to four feet, which very much endangered the safety 
of meeting teams; for, in turning out, the horse that 
stepped from the path would often sink and plunge so 
deep that the mate would fall on to or over him, and both 
be floundering for dear life in the deep snow, with more or 
less icy crusts to cut and maim them." Mr. Chipman 
tells of meeting, one cold morning, a sleigh in which 
were four men who had missed their way while going 
from Monroe to Janesville. They had wandered over 
the prairie two days and nights, without food for them- 
selves or horses, and had just decided to kill and eat one 
of their horses, wdien Mr. Chipman found them and di- 
rected them to a house two miles distant. Corn was 
everywhere so scarce that winter that men came to 
Green County from a hundred miles aw r ay to buy, 
and many cattle died of starvation. After a time, only 
three men in the county had corn to sell. They sold 
for twenty-five cents a bushel; but one of them, a very 



History of Green County. 31 

sanctimonious man, said, " let us charge fifty cents. " 
"No, said one of the others," lengthening his sentence 
with strong Anglo Saxon expletives, " that may do for 
you, but, as for me, I have a soul to save, and shall charge 
only twenty-five cents." Speculators wanted to buy all 
this farmer's corn, but, as the grateful customers of Mr. 
Thomas Bowen still remember, he refused to sell to any 
one more than one load at a time. 

In Mav, 1S48, Wisconsin became a state, and Green 
County passed under the supervisor system of govern- 
ment. Since the organization of the state government, 
as before, most of the officers of the county have been 
well qualified for their positions, and, with one excep- 
tion, they appear to have conscientiously performed the 
duties devolving upon them. The exception is Horace 
B. Poyer, county clerk from the year 1S49 to 1855, and 
forger of county orders. Probably no man in the 
county was ever more generally popular, more implic- 
itly trusted, than Mr. Poyer at the time he was engaged 
in his forgeries. An investigating committee appointed 
by the supervisors reported December 27th, 1S55, as 
follows : " The matter is involved in much obscurity, 
owing to the destruction and mutilation of records and 
papers. We are therefore unable to make so full and 
perfect a report as we could desire. We have, however, 
detected frauds committed from the year 184S to 1S54, in- 
clusive. The aggregate amount of which the county 
has been defrauded (so far as we are able to state from 
our imperfect means of ascertaining), including orders 
altered, orders wholly fraudulent, and the same raised 



5 2 History of Green County. 

for weights and measures, and exclusive of $895.17 of 
■orders, for the issuing of which no bills or resolutions 
•can be found, is $2,541.28; from which deduct $696.80, 
the amount canceled by Poyer, and there remains a bal- 
ance now due the county of $1,844.48." The value of 
the orders which the report refers to as canceled, was 
saved for the county by the fact that a year before the 
forgeries were generally known, A. Ludlow and Asa 
Richardson became convinced that a large number of 
■orders which they had bought were fraudulent. Their 
efforts to ascertain the truth were discovered by Mr. 
Poyer, who engaged two attorneys, to whom he made 
a confession, expressing at the same time a great desire 
to repair the wrong he had done. All the fraudulent 
orders which had been discovered were immediately 
canceled, and Mr. Poyer expressed great pleasure in his 
•own reformation. He won the confidence and the deep- 
est sympathy of all who knew his secret. They be- 
lieved he had been the victim of circumstances which 
could never mislead him again. After some time, how- 
ever, it was discovered that the confession was less full 
than it had been represented to be. Other forgeries, 
even forged certificates of wolf scalps, were discovered, 
and, after paying his attorneys with a forged land war- 
rant, Mr. Poyer fled to a distant state, where, under an 
assumed name, he is said to be leading an honorable life. 
The next event of importance was the building of 
the railway. The Milwaukee and Mississippi Compa- 
ny purposed building roads from Milwaukee to Madison, 
Prairie du Chicn, and Dubuque. The Dubuque branch 



History of Green County. 33 

was to pass through Jancsville, but that city, having at 
that time a more realizing sense of its value to the road 
than of the road's value to it, received the project so 
coldly that the company said Janesville should not have 
a road. The Madison road was built through Milton 
instead of Janesville, and all idea of the Dubuque branch 
was abandoned. Green County began then to look for 
some other way of getting a road, and Janesville had 
been sufficiently humbled to be willing to help her- 
Early in 1852, gentlemen living in Albany sent a peti- 
tion to the legislature, asking to be incorporated as the 
Southern Wisconsin Railroad Company, with authority 
to build a road from Milton, by way of Janesville, 
through the counties of Green, La Fayette, and Grant, 
to some point on the Mississippi. While all the inhab- 
itants of Green County were agreed in the desire for a 
road, they differed widely in the choice of a location for 
it. Those in the northern half of the county wanted it 
to go by Albany ; and, with the exception of one or two 
old settlers, who had never been satisfied with the loca- 
tion of the county seat, and who hoped that a railroad 
north of Monroe would re-open the old county seat 
question, those in the southern half were quite as unan- 
imous in the desire to have it pass through Monroe. 
News of the Albany petition reached Monroe. As soon 
as possible, one or two citizens, believing that if you 
would have a thing done to suit yourself you must do 
it yourself, went to Madison, and, there being no inter- 
ested person there from Albany to prevent, changed the 
Albany bill by inserting in the place of the names of 

4 



34 History of Green County. 

the men who originated it, the names of men living in 
and around Monroe. Thus changed, the bill passed, 
and there was no longer any doubt that if there was a 
road it must go through Monroe. The road was sur- 
veyed, and some stock was taken by the farmers. In 
the fall of 1S53, grading began at Monroe ; but the com- 
pany lacked means to carry on the work, and early in 
'54 g ave U P its charter to the Milwaukee and Mississippi 
Company, so that the projected road was thenceforth 
known as the Southern Wisconsin Branch of the Mil- 
waukee and Mississippi Railroad. Many men in Green 
County now subscribed liberally, but, there being still 
a lack of money, farm mortgages, payable in ten years, 
were resorted to. In mortgaging their farms, some of 
the farmers were influenced wholly by a desire to get 
the railroad here, but most of them were also moved by 
a spirit of speculation. Stock in the railroad company 
was given them for their mortgages, and the general 
opinion of its value was such that farmers made their 
mortgages as large as the company would allow them to 
be. The comjDany promised to pay the interest on all the 
mortgages, and promised that no mortgages on land 
west of Brodhead should be sold until the road reached 
Brodhead, and none from west of Monroe until the 
road reached Monroe. In October, 1S54, stock to the 
amount of $485,900 had been taken. The greater part 
of it was in Green County, but the mortgages given in 
the vicinity of Shullsburg amounted to $128,000. By 
February, 1S56, work on the road had begun. The 
mortgages were taken to New England, where they 



History of Green County. 35 

sold readily. The company also obtained money at 
three different times by mortgages on the road ; but much 
of the money obtained in these ways was used on the 
Prairie du Chien road, and work on the Southern Wis- 
consin was not prosecuted with the vigor the mortgage- 
ors had hoped for. The road to Prairie du Chien was 
finished in April, 1857, but the company had not then 
the money to push forward the other road. In August, 
before the track was laid to Brodhead, the road was 
sold on the third mortgage; stock went down to ten per 
cent., and the iron for the road between Brodhead and 
Monroe was held in New York for the duty, which, 
with the storage, amounted to $20,000. The Bank of 
Monroe advanced the money to pay the duty, being 
partially repaid by farmers who gave their notes at the 
time for various amounts, and work was resumed. The 
track was laid to Brodhead in September, to Juda in 
November, and to Monroe the last of December. It 
was really Green County, not the railroad company, 
that brought the road from Janesville, and a great num- 
ber of citizens are entitled to a share of the credit of it; 
but, much as it cost in money, the greatest cost of the 
road was in the anxiety and long suspense it brought 
the mortgageors. 

The company assumed an appearance of great fair- 
ness towards the mortgfasreors. Sometimes a director 
was chosen from among them, and, as was especially 
the case in the election of Judge Dunwiddie, this was 
conducive to the interests of both the company and 
the mortgageors; but the appearance was frequently 



^6 History of Green County. 

deceptive. On one occasion, all the stockholders and 
their wives were given a free ride to Milwaukee, to 
attend a railroad meeting. They were all urged to go, 
but, after their arrival at the meeting, some pretext was 
raised by which almost every one of them was prevented 
from voting. The agreement of the company in regard 
to using the mortgages from the country west of Mon- 
roe was so far kept that, before the sale of the road in 
August, 1S57, all those given west of Green County 
were released. The desire for the road was so great in 
La Fayette County that Mr. E. D. Clinton, the general 
agent of the road, and the man who, more than any one 
else, was the cause of its extension from Janesville, found 
more difficulty in releasing the mortgages than he had 
found in obtaining them. Two men refused to comply 
with the condition of a release, which was to pay the re- 
corder's fee, and in these cases Mr. Clinton paid the 
costs himself. The mortgages given in the western 
part of the county were all sold before the road reached 
Monroe, and the promise in regard to paying the interest 
on the mortgages was not fulfilled. After the comple- 
tion of the road, the stock was raised by a fictitious divi- 
dend and by some other devices to ninety per cent. The 
holders of the mortgages were by this time glad to sell 
them, and the company bought them and settled with 
the mortgageors by buying their stock at ninety per cent. 
A few of the farmers had previously effected a settlement 
with the purchasers of their mortgages, and paid more; 
but ten cents on a dollar was all that any of them were 
obliged to pay, and a few of them never paid anything. 



History of Green County. 37 

The only other railroad in Green County is the Mad- 
ison branch of the Northwestern railroad, built in 1864. 
It passes through the village of Brooklyn, in the north- 
eastern part of the county. Other roads are hoped for, 
as is more fully explained in the sketches of Cadiz and 
Albany. 

When the war broke out, Green County responded 
nobly to the call made upon her. Her first company, 
Company " C," of the third regiment, was enlisted in 
April and May, 1861 ; it was one of the three companies 
of the third regiment which, with two companies of the 
Massachusetts fourth, fought at Bolivar against more 
than three times their number, and captured a heavy 
field piece, which was brought from the field by the 
Wisconsin companies under command of Lt. O'Brien, of 
Green County. Not less brave and efficient were the 
soldiers sent forth at a later day. But the very number 
of their heroic services makes it impossible to tell them, 
for every company furnished numberless instances of gal- 
lant conduct, of patient endurance, and unselfish devo- 
tion, and so far as any one who was not himself among 
their number can write it, the record of the marches 
and battles of Green County's soldiers has already been 
written in the Military History of Wisconsin and the 
annual reports of the Adjutant General of the state. 
[See appendix.] 

In December, 1861, Green County was credited with 
229 soldiers. In August, 1862, her total credit was 708, 
and 355 men were still lacking under the calls that had 
been made at that time. In the fall, twenty-five men 

4* 



38 



History of Green County. 



were drafted, but for various reasons only twelve of 
them were mustered into service. Under the call of 
October, 1863, for 300,000 more, the quota of Green 
County was 223. Under the four calls of 1S64, dated 
February 1, March 14, July 18, and December 19, her 
quota was 1326. It has been impossible to find the cred- 
its of the several towns in the early part of the war, but 
the quotas and credits of each town, from October, 1863, 
to the end of the war, are shown in the following table : 



TOWNS. 



Adams 

Albany 

Brooklyn 

Cadiz 

•Clarno 

Decatur 

Jefferson 

Jordan 

Monroe 

Mount Pleasant. 
New Glarus. 
Spring Grove. . , 
Sylvester. 



Washington 
York 



Total. 











</i 


K V 










X O 


UT3 . 
00 C 










v 


5 >>e 










>~ *-• 


i«j E 


c/5 

a 

O 


U 


03 

c 

u 




O v. 

.2 S-^o 
5 "-co 

3 « H 


■* j 

e u 5 


3 


<U 


<L> 






■*i "> & 


a 


ti 


> 


Q 


to ^ :- 

S'sJ} 


H 


51 


30 


4 


H 


6 




95 


72 


11 


5 


10 




71 


49 


9 


4 


8 




63 


3° 


13 


17 


8 




89 


57 


12 


12 


11 




115 


75 


17 


26 


23 




50 


35 


11 


9 


6 




115 


95 


10 


16 


H 




53 


32 


10 


9 


6 




207 


139 


67 


32 


30 




86 


69 


6 


6 


11 




5 2 


30 


11 


4 


6 




84 


61 


15 


21 


11 




74 


56 


5 


6 


9 




59 


34 


12 


S 


9 




62 


19 


4 


20 


6 




1,326 


883 


217 


209 


174 


II 



o 
H 



54 
99 
7i 
68 

93 

142 

61 
136 

57 
270 

93 

5i 
109 

77 
63 
50 

M94 



Green County's treatment of her soldiers and their 
families was generous as well as just. At a special 
meeting of the supervisors in May, 1861, on motion of 
Mr. Adams, it was " Resolved, that, in the opinion of this 



History of Green County. 



39 



board, the county will be willing to pay all the necessary 
expenses of maintaining the families of all those who 
may volunteer (that may need such assistance) during 
the war." The aid thus early promised was continued 
to the end, and the towns were individually as prompt 
and persevering as the county. The following state- 
ment of the amounts raised to pay bounties to volun- 
teers, and to aid the families of the same, is from the 
Sentinel of July 26th, 1865: 



TOWNS. 


RAISED BY 

TAX. 


BY SUB- 
SCRIPTION 


TOTAL 

AMOUNT. 


REMARKS. 




4,760 OO 

II,000 OO 
II,000 OO 

4,120 OO 

9,640 OO 
14,600 55 

8,420 00 
13,500 00 

3,300 00 
20,845 °° 


I,IOO OO 

6,050 OO 

3,500 OO 
1,000 OO 

3,136 OO 

8.99+ 45 
1,885 °° 
7,900 00 
1,200 00 
1,777 00 
11,035 00 
5,Si5 00 
3,197 00 
3,100 00 
4,400 00 
2,900 00 
125 00 


5,Sco OO 
17,050 OO 

15,431 9 2 

5,120 OO 
12,776 OO 

2 3,595 55 
10,305 00 
21,400 00 
4,500 00 
22,622 00 
11,035 °° 
20,215 °° 

9.397 °° 
17,213 00 

14,637 00 

9,800 00 

5,7 3 5 °° 


Stated near as possible. 

Collect'd of tax voted, $5,700 00 
Stated near as possible. 

tt a tt 


Clarno 


Exeter 


For families support. . 142 45 
Collected 8,70500 

Collect'd of tax voted, 10,845 00 
All collected. 


Jefferson 

Jordan 

Monroe — town . 
Monroe-village. 
Mt. Pleasant". .. 

New Glarus 

Spring Grove . . 

Sylvester 

Washinp-ton .... 
York. 


14,400 00 

6,200 00 

14,113 00 

10,237 00 

6,900 00 

5,600 00 


All collected. 

Collected of tax voted, 4,800 00 

" " " 7,013 00 

6,23700 

Collected of subscrip'n 2,60000 

Stated near as possible. 


Total 


159.535 55 


67,iH 45 


226,682 47 









Raised by the county for the support of the families of vol- 
nnteers, or their children, from the beginning of the war 
up to Agust 1st, 1S65, $ 54,102 35 

Whole total 280,784 S2 

Previous to any consideration of the history of the 
several townships, it may be well to take a general view 
of the progress made by the county, since the organi- 
zation of the towns, in wealth and population, in its indus- 
tries, and in its provisions for education. The county is 
free from debt, and its condition has always been one of 
increasing prosperity, as is indicated by the following 
statistics: 



4° 



History of Green County. 



!>. 

i— t 

o 

H 

On 

oo 

o 
fa 

O 

u 

w 

•J 
< 

O 

w 

< 

o 

4—1 

o 



•glgi ui pjBog 
A^uno3 An pazilBtiba 
SB a.OB .isd uopBiip^ 



00 

vo o o o o o 

CO •«*- N NCOO 



m 



vo O Vo O 

z^ o m o 

O GO NO vo 



O O 00 o o o 

C O r^O"!") 



••*■ On vo vo 0\ t-» 



CO 

ts 

00 



•pazijBnba 
sb A5.13do.1j \\v 

JO UOI}BUIBA fE|OX 



pc >n On o •*• vooo ^t-NC no vo vo ~ ro « >■* no r- 
■N no co r»GO « OOO O i>. "N m~50r/i •- no no 
GO « NC MO vooo 00 C4 vo On O NO l-~ On ro O ro -h 



re vooo O^OnNc-OnGvoOO ■tf-vO wtsri + 
•+N !>. vn in ro ro ro Cn On ro >N •«}- « t^>- On -+■ 
N -d-rorovOTj--^-rovo>-. ^J" O -6- ro -3" -3- N M 



«^ 



•pazijunba 
si; Ajjadtuj ibs-jj 
jo QopBiipsA l^iox 



+ N*>n + •+vo no 
On — On O fOi : 

•J- C\ ui « vO c CO *o 



OCfim iono N vo Q On O 
On NO no On N o •- +5 l>-GO 
O « C\\C O N O X» vo rONO 



rONO 

— ro N c} 



m 



ro t~- -f» ro ~ ' G vo -f 



cf vo ooo 

CnOO — ro vo r^-VO +f)3\N NCO ^1- -i 
"" 'J-MM !S ^- « rONO ro \N ro ro N 



rOAO 
vo ro t^\cT 



vo 

oo 
vo 

'■^ 

m 



o 

ro 
°°« 
t> 

On 
nC_ 
vo 



CO 
00 



•oj-bS3jSSv 1^}°!, 



IN CnOO NO IN ~ 
r< vooo — « On 
00 !""» ro On VO !>. 

vooo" ro rONC~ vr> 
ro -«t-'0 •"*- roOO 
is Tt- ro ro voO 



<» 



•A^-isdoaj; 
[usgjouopBniBA* 



On CnOO t^ d — 
>N "1X1 nC — On 
ro !■-» ro 1^» vo t>« 

c?nG ocT ro s o" 
NO -^-f-NO <s « 
h ton s-*"l 



^ 



OOONO O -+0 O QvoONTh 
m +J<. O °0.\O OnC^ 1-^ N •*; 
-" ~ C? ro VT' o" vr.oor iCo t> 

VO0O 5\rJ-ON^-t-,^-»rN-t-- 



-w +o o _ 
oo vo o r o vo 



VO iS vo 

vo On (" 



OOO 

- -+- O vo On On 
O -d- t"; O vo On On no NiOOi 
pOnO" On ro t-^ On t-» 'O cO ~~no" 
NO vo N VOOO iN 00 tJ- vo 1^ -*• 
M •"+■•-1 fO-^-rOi-i rocO>-< " 



vo 

NO 






On 
O 
IN 

VO 



Oi 
00 



'pazijunba 

si: X^jsdojj \\v. 

jo uoj;ih\|i:a l^^ox 



rooo On OOO ro 
t^ COOO GO Q t^ 
1^ ro vo O On in 

OO*" <s" rf OO" C*NO~ 

o x--t^t>»co o 

N « » M «i^) 



m 



i- >- t->. 1^.no On O vo vo O nQ 
(*) + m ror) «'-OOro vo'O 

°°. ^ ^ 1 1 ^ °. " 1 ^^ 
N m" ►,* fi rf m" ~~nC~ Onn6" rT 
Onini — no vo O "INuih On 
m r<)N s rot* m n o h 



•pazijimba 
sb Ajjadojj I^ 3 H 
jo uoi^uniBA ibiox 



On O MD -+■ ■+■ On 
- t-~ - in - NO 
vo ro ro r> OnOO 

in" r-C tFoo" *f ro 
O -+NO no O 00 

M M M H fOU 



m 



?' 



O " >-0O ONTt-vo-i t^ 
OnOO i-i in O ONroi-NO iNOO 

•"^ t? -t- ro ro -Pno" rT O On O 
NO NO tJ-nO On O N « O N 

Hf(MP)!N!HHf)NH 



ro 



vo 

ro 

\o 

nS 



ro 



OS 

oo 



•pazipmba 

sb A^jadojjj n B 

jo uopBnjBA p^ioj, 



N«l iflN O H 

-t- vo - y o ■+ 

- N -J-CO l> w 

C?n Cn «F ro -T 1-^ 
■- rl- ro vonO ■*■ 



&$ 



I GO ro Th 
i NO nO 00 
i ro O O 



ro in >i 
rovo rq 



•pazijunba 
si; Ajjadojj ibs-jj 

JO UOpBll[BA IB}OJ, 



88 

OO VC' 



ONO 
O On O 
~ "N GO 

ro r> Nod'oO " 

-| ■*■ ro t!- vo ■*■ 



Q iS O « 
OOO O " 
C__ CO_ On ro 

rovooo'ooT 

ro Th « Mi 



<^ 



75 

* 

O 



nO 

1—1 

ON 

ro 



X 

ro 



NO ro vo VO 

i- 1 rONO NO 
r»-00 vo r5 

O 4 : No"'tC 
no vo i-i 1- 



8-+ O < 
CnQ i 

tPgo" vo- 
vo-«j- « i 




•r< k' *<n ►.■• — * ***** K 



■*■ 

°°» 
1> 

ro 

NO 
<r> 



00 
On 

vo 

m 



o 

h 



History of Green County. 41 

The taxes levied in Green County in 1876 were as 
follows: 

State tax, - $17,770 19 County school tax, $ 3,523 54 
County tax, - i9?7~3 n State loan tax, - i>475 50 
Delinquent tax, 4S3 77 Total tax, - 42,976 11 

MANUFACTURES. 

The attention given to manufactures has been limit- 
ed by the insufficient facilities for transportation. It is 
thought that the completion of either of the projected 
railroads running north and south, would give a new im- 
petus to creative industries. But even now the manu- 
factures of the county are varied and important, as will 
be seen by reference to the histories of the several 
towns. The progress of the county in this respect has 
been much greater since 1S70 than the progress indica- 
ted by the following table for the decade ending in that 
year : 

STATISTICS FROM CENSUSES OF i860 AND 1S7O. 

No. of establishments, 

No. of steam engines, 

No. of water wheels, 

No. of males employed, 

No. of females employed, 

Capital invested, .... 

Wages, ..... 

Cost of materials, .... 

Value of products, 

AGRICULTURE. 

The agricultural products of the county have changed 
materially within the last ten years. This was formerly 



i860. 


1870. 


"5 


201 


T 


10 


Not given. 38 


253 


647 




^3 


$283,625 


$47o,o35 


77.716 


197,967 


605,099 


671494 


855.950 


i> i33<364 



4 2 



History of Green County. 



a great wheat county, many farmers raising forty bush- 
els an acre. Soon after i860, while no marked change 
was observable in other crops, the wheat crops, from 
some cause not clearly understood, grew smaller. Even 
on new land the yield was comparatively small, and 
farmers wisely turned their attention to the raising of 
cattle. Now, wheat is brought here from other states, 
-and stock, cheese, butter, eggs, hides, tallow, and wool 
have taken the place of the wheat, corn, and oats that 
used to be shipped to the eastern markets. 

The following table shows the number of acres de- 
voted to the culture of specified crops in 1876: 



TOWNS. 



Adams 

Albany 

Brooklyn 

Cadiz 

•Clarno 

Decatur 

Exeter 

Jefferson 

Jordan 

Monroe 

Mt. Pleasant. 
New Glarus. 
Spring Grove 
Sylvester. . . . 
Washington . 
York 

Total 



Wheat. 



733 

373 

183 
1,240 

727 
846 

377 

57^ 

6 43 
502 

601 

1,501 

895 
805 

73o 
997 

".779 



Oats. 



M56 

2,847 

3,°9° 
!,7i4 

2,598 
3,258 

2,25s 

3,i95 
1,180 

1,478 

3,9 l6 
1,614 

2,584 

3P95 
2,201 

!,43i 
37,9*5 



Corn. 



2,167 
3,675 

3,44 2 
3,97o 
4,5o8 
4,85 6 
34S1 
5,48o 
1,740 

2,756 
4,559 
i,739 
5,796 

4,45° 
2,703 
!,534 

56,856 



Barley, 



50 
24 
IO 

241 

145 

22 

28 

27O 

30 

95 
20 

93 
30 

28 
112 

95 
1,293 



Rye. 



60 
302 

28 

454 

345 
189 

10 

190 

395 
96 
4° 
3 1 

376 

7i 
60 

60 
2,707 



Hops. 



IO 

4 

5 



4 
3 



4i J* 



To- 
bacco. 



17 

3 



11 



3i 



History of Green County. 



43 



SELECTED STATISTICS OF THE AGRICULTURE OF GREEN COUNTY" 
FROM UNITED STATES CENSUSES. 



Bushels of Wheat 

" Rye 

" Indian Corn. . . 

" Oats 

Barlev 

" Buckwheat. .. . 

Pounds of Wool 

" Polatoes 

" Butter 

" Cheese 

No. of Horses 

" Milch Cows 

" Working Oxen . . . 

" Sheep 

" Swine 

Value of farms 

Acres of improved land . . 
Value of orchard products 



1850. 



148,997 

54° 

133,595 

152,487 

4,3 6 5 

9S7 

14,858 

16,634 

113,867 

8,417 

i,779 

1,277 

1,402 

5,764 
8,026 

I ,°44>73 6 

47,307 

484 



i860. 



53!>9 66 

5,°5 2 
540,402 

359,374 
9,623 
1,025 

37,7! 7 

75,366 

673,966 

76,227 

5,57o 

8,254 
2,194 

10,817 

17,291 

$ 5,061,339 

190,229 

$ 2,812 



1870. 



541,859 

25,469 
947, 1 05 
743,oi9 

I 5, I o7 
5,226 
139,110 
184,195 
909,485 
358,830 

9,744 

IJ ,474 

154 

39,477 

35,879 
$10,269,402 

250,998 

$ 28,952 



Since stock raising has been one of the leading- pur- 
suits — and now nearly every farmer is a stock dealer — 
much attention has been given to the improvement of 
stock. The importations during the past seven years 
have been many and large. At the present time there 
is probably no other county in this state, or in Illinois,, 
that sends as many and as good hogs and cattle to mar- 
ket as are sent from this county, and the indications are 
that Green may soon take the lead in fine sheep and 
horses also. A natural result of this new industry is the 
increased manufacture of cheese. In 1S70 there was 
not a cheese factory in the county. In 1S76 there were 
in operation more than fifty factories, which made in the 



44 Histo?y of Green County. 

aggregate over 2,000,000 pounds — much more than was 
made in any other county, and about one-eighth of the 
whole quantity made in the state. 

The higfh rank of the countv as an agricultural coun- 
ty, is due in part to the influence of the Green County 
Agricultural Society. This society was organized July 
4, 1853, with the following officers: E. T. Gardner, 
President; J. V. Richardson, Secretary; John A. Bing- 
ham, Corresponding Secretary; A. Ludlow, Treasurer; 
and six vice-presidents. A fair was held in November 
of that year, at the court house, at which time one hun- 
dred dollars were paid for premiums. The next fair 
was held in October, 1854, in a new fair ground, just 
north of the village of Monroe. The money to fence 
the fair ground and erect the necessary buildings, was 
raised by selling life memberships at ten dollars each. 
At this fair the premiums amounted to tw r o hundred 
dollars. The fair ground was paid for in 1S55 by sell- 
ing life memberships. It included seven and one-half 
acres, and cost fifty dollars per acre. On the seventh of 
July, 1857, the society was reorganized under a state 
law for the encouragement of agriculture, which was 
passed in 1856. The fair ground now used is a little 
east of the village, and, with the buildings, is worth 
from eight to ten thousand dollars. 

The following is a classified statement of the premi- 
ums and diplomas awarded by the society in 1S76, at its 
twenty-fourth annual fair: 



History of Green County. 



45 



CLASSIFICATION". 



Cattle . , 

Horses 

Sheep. 



Swine 

Poultry 

Farm Products 
Farm Implements. , 

Manufactures 

Household Fabrics* , 
Fruits and Flowers. 
Other exhibits 



Total. 



Am't of 
Premiums 



$ 



271 00 

230 00 

76 00 

112 

17 



00 
00 



70 00 
15 00 
56 00 
25 00 
84 00 
2S0 00 



$ 1,136 00 



No. of 

Premiums. 



45 
50 

34 

21 

7 2 
2 

16 

37 
60 

12 5 



484 



No. of 
Diplomas. 



4 
3 



50 

9> 

1 



i-O 



37 



The following is a complete list of the presidents of 

of the society : 

E. T. Gardner. O. J. White. 

John A. Bingham, (elected twice). Thomas Emerson. 



Thomas Fenton. 

S. M. Humes, (elected twice). 

John H. Bridge. 

Israel Smith. 

Charles F. Thompson. 

E. T. Gardner. 

D. S. Sutherland. 

J. V. Richardson. 



J. H. Warren. 

F. F. West. 

E. T. Gardner. 

H. W. Whitney, (elected twice). 

Thos. H. Eaton, (elected twice). 

Franklin Mitchell. 

A. Ludlow. 

J. S. Smock, (elected twice). 



The following are the names of the other officers 
elected at the annual meeting in January, 1 S77 : W. A. 
Wheaton, Vice-President; James H. Van Dyke, Treas- 
urer; A. S. Douglas, Secretary; C. E. Adams, Record- 
ing Secretary; A. Ludlow, Superintendent. 

STATISTICS OF POPULATION. 

Owing to emigration to the west, Rock, Green, and 

5 



4 6 



History of Green County. 



several other counties in Wisconsin which have been 
steadily increasing in wealth have diminished in popu- 
lation since 1S70. 

The following table shows the increase since the or- 
ganization of the county, and the decrease since 1S70: 



1838, 
1S40, 
1850, 

1S55, 



494 1 860, 

933 1S65, 

8,566 1870, 

i4,7 2 7 1S75, 



19,808 
20,645 
23,611 
22,027 



Table showing the change in each township since 
1850: 



TOWNS. 



Adams 

Albany 

Brooklyn 

Cadiz 

Clarno 

Decatur 

Brodhead 

Exeter 

Jefferson 

Jordan 

Monroe , 

Village of Monroe 

Mt. Pleasant 

New Glarus , 

Spring Grove 

Sylvester , 

Washington 

York 



1S50. 



2 75 
54 6 
53i 

459 

7i5 
553 



450 
692 

39i 
1,146 



579 
3ii 
703 
712 

307 
191 



*iS6o. 



S40 

i,385 
1,061 

920 

i,372 
1,618 



1,040 

1,466 

S69 

2,171 



1,240 
960 

I ,°53 

i,i3 2 

838 

904 



1S70. 



1,007 

i,374 
1, in 

1,401 

1,637 
911 

1, 54 s 
949 

i,673 
1,083 

1,128 

3,4°8 
1. 164 

958 
1,236 

iP34 
901 

i,oSS 



1875- 



9*3 

1,15° 
1,138 

!,349 

i,5 IQ 
701 

1,428 

8S3 

i,7H 
1,026 

903 
3,227 
I no 

'975 

1,238 

876 
870 

1,016 





NATIVITY OF POPULATION. 






Native. 


Foreign 


1850, 
1870, - 


15,439 

18,532 


4,369 
5P79 



♦These figures are taken from the U. S. Census of 1S60, but there seems to be 
some mistake about them. They make the population of the county only 18,869. 



History of Green County. 



47 



NATIVITY IN 1870, BY TOWNS. 



TOWNS. 



Adams 

Albany . . 

Brooklyn 

Cadiz 

Clarno. . 

Decatur 

Brodhead 

Exeter 

Jefferson 

Jordan 

Monroe 

Village of Monroe. 

Mt. Pleasant 

New Glarus 

Spring Grove .... 
Sylvester 



Washington. 



York, 



Foreign. 



37o 
297 

222 

137 

302 

144 
220 
1S2 
258 
264 
199 
699 
211 
467 
158 

215 
290 

444 



PLACE OF NATIVITY OF POPULATION IN 1S70. 

Born in the State, 10,643 Born in British America, 



u 


New York, 


2,261 


u 


Ohio, 


1,244 


u 


Pennsylvania, 


1,722 


u 


Vermont, 


39i 


(( 


Illinois, 


697 


u 


Other states, 


1.574 



u 

u 
u 
a 
a 
a 



Eng. and Wales, 

Ireland, 

Scotland, 

Germany, 

France, 

Sweden & Nor'y, 1,017 

Other countries, 1,269 



272 

593 
942 

5o 

892 

39 



5^79 



Native population, 



18,532 

NATIVITY IN 1875. 

17,289 Born in British America, 254 
" Eng. Scot. & Wales, 604 
" Ireland, 879 

" Germany, 832 

" Switzerland, Hol- 
land, Bohemia & 
France, 1.207 

" Sweden, Norway 

and Denmark, 960 
Other nationalties, 2 



17,289 



4.738 



a8 History of Green County 



COLORED POPULATION. 

1 8 so, - - None. 1870, 42 

i860, - - None. 1875, - - 25 

SEX AND AGE IN 1870. 

Males, 12,042 

Females, ",569 

Males between ages of 5 and 18, - - - 4,040 

Females " " " - 3>9 Sl 

Males " 18 and 45, - 4,256 

Males 21 and upwards, - - - - 5^54^ 

Male citizens, 5>°4° 



SCHOOLS. 

When the town governments were organized in 1849, 
the schools were intrusted to town superintendents; but 
since 1S61 they have been under the supervision of 
county superintendents. The following is a list of the 
county superintendents: Wm. C. Green, elected in 1S61 
and '63; Edwin E. Woodman, elected in 1865; D. H. 
Morgan, elected four consecutive times, and T. C. Rich- 
mond, the present incumbent. Mr. Woodman being 
absent at the time of his election, and subsequently, Mr. 
Green held the office during that term. The superinten- 
dent's report for the year ending August 31, 1S76, con- 
tains the following statistics: 

No. of school districts, ..... 104 

No. of school houses, .... - 133 
Cash value of school houses and sites, - - $102,438 
No. of persons in the county between the ages of 

4 and 20, ' 8,573 

No. between 4 and 20 who have attended school, 6,614 

No. under 4 who have attended school, - - 12 

No. over 20 " " " - - 97 
Average No. day's attendance of those who have 

been members, ------ 80 

No. of different persons employed as teachers, - 265 



History of Green County. 49 

Average wages of male teachers per month, $34 09 

" " female " " 22 31 

Amount paid for services of male teachers, I 5> 1 95 54 

" " " female " 16,370 09 

No. of private schools, 5 

No. of pupils who have attended them, - - 100 

No. of children incapacitated for instruction from 

defect in intellect, ------ 5 

No. of children incapacitated for instruction from 

detect in hearing, ----- 5 

There are, in the county, three schools with two de- 
partments each — those at Monticello, Juda, and New 
Glarus, and three with three or more departments each 
— those at Monroe, Brodhead, and Alhany. There are 
five school libraries, the largest of which is at Monroe. 

The following statistics of illiteracy are found in the 
censuses of 1850 and '70: 

No. of adults in 1850 unable to read and write, - 95 

" males " " " " 44 

" females " " " " - - 51 

" native birth " " " 72 

" foreign birth " " " 23 

No. over 20 years of age in 1S70 unable to read, - - 345 

" " " " " write, - 600 



No. of males " 

" females, " 
" native birth " 
" foreign birth " 



U U 

U a 

a a 

a a 



279 
321 
232 

^6S 



The following is the apportionment of the school 
fund income for Green County for 1877: 



Adams, 


- $160 72 


Jordan, 


- $177 94 


Albany, - 


193 11 


Monroe, 


561 70 


Brooklyn, - 


- 202 95 


Mt. Pleasant, 


■ 175 43 


Cadiz, 


213 20 


New Glarus, 


182 04 


Clarno, 


- 246 82 


Spring Grove, 


197 21 


Decatur, 


3iS 57 


Sylvester, 


i.S5 39 


Exeter, 


141 04 


Washington, 


■ 1 7 l 93 


Jefferson, 


230 01 


York, - 


186 93 



The apportionment is at the rate of 41 cents per 

scholar. 

5* 



5° 



History of Green County. 



It is creditable to our common schools that some of the 
best students that have been at the State University have 

J 

gone from this county, and a little examination will 
show that the schools of Green County have kept pace 
with those of any other county of the same population 
in the state. Mr. Richmond is now doing the schools 
a great service by raising the standard of teachers' ex- 
aminations, and by giving the teachers, in institutes of 
several weeks' duration, the instruction of which they 
are most in need. 

CHURCH EDIFICES IN GREEN COUNTY IN 1S76. 



TOWNS. 


4-J 

C 
V 


n 


rt 
G 
C 

bjj 

D 
u 

be 
a 



O 


c 

.2 

>-> 
r> 
en 

CD 


R 

CO 

X. 

h-1 


■~ 
U 
> 

r* 


"3 


u 


6 
"o 

rt 
O 


C 
1) 

<1 


c 

T. 

"C 
H 

O 


be 

c 

> 


a 



"3 

t3 












1 
1 






I 
























1 








I 


























Attica 


*I 

I 
I 
I 
I 
























Cadiz . 
























Clarno , 








1 














i 




1 
1 

1 




















Brodhead 


1 


1 

1 


1 






I 












1 

2 

1 






1 


Tuda 












I 










1 

1 




































I 

I 

I 






















Monticello 


1 

1 


1 


.... 


1 
1 


1 


1 


2 


I 


I 



























I 








i 

1 




























I 

I 


1 


























1 






















York 








1 
















Postville 


I 


1 
















• ■ 





























*In Dane Couuty. 



History of Green County. 5 1 

PAUPERISM, DISEASE AND CRIME. 

The first mention of paupers in the county commis- 
sioners' journal is this of January, 1S43: "Ordered that 
Alexis Van Ornum he paid only $30 for nursing and 
for funeral expenses of Benjamin Jacobs, a poor per- 
son." From 1849 until '60 each town took care of its 
own poor. In 1S60 the supervisors elected three superin- 
tendents of the poor — Hiram Rust, I. M. Bennett, and 
Ransom Drake — and appropriated $2,000 to buy a 
county poor house and farm. The farm is in Mount 
Pleasant. The superintendents erected a building in 
the summer of 1861, and additional building's were 
erected in 1S70 and '73. During the year ending Nov. 
15, 1S76, the average number of inmates at the poor 
house was 53, and the whole number of week's sup- 
port given to inmates was 1,996. The average cost to 
the county of each week's maintenance was $1.46. The 
poor commissioners also expended about $1,500 for the 
poor living in the several towns. The principal build- 
ings on the poor farm were destroyed by fire on the last 
day of May, 1S77, but new buildings will be erected as 
soon as possible. 

The number of persons sent from Green Countv to 
state institutions prior to August, 1876, was — 

State Hospital for the Insane, 65 Industrial School, - - 13 
Institute for the Blind, - 3 State Prison, - - 23* 

" Deaf and Dumb, 8 



*This is the number on the records at the prison, but these records only show 
by what county the prisoners have been convicted and sentenced. The commit- 
ment papers do not state whether prisoners had a change of venue to or from 
any county. Neither do they show to what county prisoners sentenced by the 
United States' Courts belonged. 



-> 



History of Green County. 



OFFICERS OF GREEN COUNTY. 

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS. 



NAMES. 



Daniel S. Sutherland. . . . 

Wm. ( Bo\ven 

Daniel Harcourt 

Jas. Rilej vice D. Harcourt 
Jer. Bridge, vice D. S. S. 

Wm. Bojles 

Asa Brown, vice J. Bridge 

Davis Bowen 

Wm. Boyles 

Josiah Pierce 

Davis Bowen 

Asa Brown 

Daniel Smiley 

Henson Irion 

Asa Brown 

Joseph Kelly 



When elected 



March, 1838 



Sept., 1838 
Oct., 1S38 

1839 
1840 

1841 



1S42 
1843 



NAMES. 



Thos. S. Bowen . 
Wm. C. Green . 
Hiram Rust. . . . 
Hiram Brown . . 
Wm. C. Green.. 
R. D. Derrick.. 
Hiram Caulkins. 
T. W. Thompson 
Wm. Boyles . . 
Henry Adams. 
Wm. Boyles . . 
Wm. Brown . . 
Wm. Brown . . 
Wm. Coldren . 
Thos. L. Sommers 



When 
elected' 



1844. 



i3 4 5- 



1846. 



1847. 



1848. 



SUPERVISORS. 



From 1S49 to '62 the chairmen of the town super- 
visors elected in April of each year constituted the 
county board of supervisors. Their names are given in 
the histories of their respective towns. A state law 
approved March, 1S61 made the board of supervisors 
to consist of three electors, one to be elected in each of 
three supervisor districts. Elections were to be held in 
November of each alternate year, and the term of office 
was to begin the first of the following January. 

Elected in 1S61 : 



Ezra Wescott, 



E. R. Allen, 



Henry Adams. 



History of Green County. 53 

These supervisors divided the county into three su- 
pervisor districts, as follows: 

P irst District. — New Glarus, York, Exeter, Brooklyn, Wash- 
ington, Mount Pleasant. 

Second District. — Jefferson, Spring Grove, Decatur, Sylvester, 
Albany. 

Third District. — Adams, Jordan, Cadiz, Clarno, Monroe. 

Elected in 1S63: 

1st District — Henry Adams. 

2d " E. R. Allen, (resigned, Hiram Dunwiddie ap- 

pointed by the Governor). 

3d " Ezra Westcott, (died, J. V. Richardson ap- 

pointed by the Governor). 

Elected in 1S65 : 

1st District. — Albert Pierce. 
2d " Hiram Dunwiddie. 

3d " J. V. Richardson, (resigned, Wm. Brown ap- 

pointed). 

Elected in 1867: 

1st District.— J. W. .Smith. 
2d •' Wm. Coldren. 

3d " J. M. Stayer. 

By a change in the law, supervisors elected in 1S67 
from the odd numbered districts held office for one year, 
while those from even numbered districts held office two 
years. 

Elected in 1S6S: 

:st District. — J. 
3d " J. M. Stayer. 



1st District. — J. W. Smith. 



54 History of Green County. 

A law of 1869 increased the number of supervisors 
in Green County from three to nine. 

Elected April, 1869: 

1st District. — F. R. Melvin. 

Leopold Seltzer. 
2d District. — David Dunwiddie. 

J. B. Perry. 
3d District. — Samuel Chandler, (resigned, S. W. Abbott 
appointed). 

A. De Haven. 

Those elected in the second district held office only 
until November, when three supervisors were elected: 

J. B. Perry. R. J. Day. M. H. Pengra. 

The law of 1869 was a special law for Green County, 
and was declared unconstitutional by the supreme court. 
In obedience to a law published in 1S70, the county re- 
turned, after the April election of 1S70, to the system 
of government wherein each town and village is repre- 
sented. 



OTHER COUNTY OFFICERS. 



56 



History of Green County. 

























. . . 




' • 




. . 


• b 


. . . 






























• • 


• *-. 






























. J 


) . CO 


. — 


• c 
























. 1 


> ' 53 ■ F 
.13 .5. 


• > 

1 . <U 




• _cy • 

:w : 




OS 

o 

H 




















: :*£ 

> • i— < 


- 

■ C 




> -CO 

: g 




CO 




< 




















: .0 


• r 

. r 


i "E- 


<j : E 


; 5 


'. & 


* V 

• CO * 

• o • 






















: *w 


■&. 


1 : > 


i :jr 




\x 


' : £ : 
















•J s 




. . . r 








; * " <u " 


! ! ^ 




W 












: c -a 

G ri 


TJ s* v . 




! 5 


; • is 


• 








Q 












• +3 JZ 
3 u 


o . — c 




c 


• > 




: ■ £ 
















. s. s 

sa Ri 


P. C 

. Smi 
A. Bi 








i : 


: . 3 

. .Q 
















[0< 


;C0 ;G^ 




^ 


: :^ 


; 


: !pq 


c/5 














Uh i-H 


. . . . 












Pi 














r— < — « 


. . . . 












w 

u 

1— 1 

fa 

fa 


w 


:Craken 
n Saut. 
wthorne 
wthorne 
wthorne 
i C. Mil 
i C. Mil 
n 


t 

h Fostei 
merson. 
h Fostei 


. r- 

• C 

\ z 

r- 


* — 

• C 

: 3 


• i-ri 


M 


• 'ri • 


o 
> 

H 

O 


< 


Joseph Mc 
Abner Va 
James Ha' 
James Ha 
James Ha 
Hambletoi 
Hambletoi 
Asa Brow 
L. Hurlbu 
L. Hurlbu 
Wadswort 
Francis E 
Wadswort 


• "C 


. c 

• 3 




■ 3 • 


H 




.-5 


. s 


Q 


. ri . 

:Q : 




. CD .<U<L><U<D(Li<U<U • • ■ 






• . 




. 


u 






CO 


CO CO CO CO CO CO CO £ 


. 


# 




# 


>. 


•^i . 


fe 




. 3 


"i 


• "i 




, . 


-o 


TJ . 


g 




o 


OOOOOOOuo 


i> 


. > 


, 4-J 


, , 


3 


3 


O 




r; 


^ ^ j2 -- J^ ~ ^ "3 ■ 


i> 


. > 

. o 
■Ph 




. Jg . 


J3 


r] . 




g 7) 

w q 






C G C C C "H "g* b 


o 

0< 




* (™* ' 


o 

CO 


co 




-*_j 


-4— » -*— 1 +J 4-J *-< W 4-) _C". 






. CO 1 




H 


H 


r 


REGIST 
DEE 






Wm. Rit 
Wm. Rit 
Wm. Rit 
Wm. Rit 
Wm. Rit 
Win. Rit 
Wm. Rit 
J. V. Ric 






• <U 




L 


O 




• i— « 

H 


CO 

cu 

5 


-A 

. CO 

- cu 

• £ 
■i ' >— 


. N 


: M : 

. CO , 

• £ • 


o 
o 

*— . 


^3 * 

o • 

ri ; 

•-A ; 
















• • 

6 % : 




• • 


cc 


• • 


. r- < 


•T3 • 


• ■ 




» 


fa 














• 


ri 


• • 


: g 


• c • 

• s * 


5 . 


* 




>— * 












11 : 


4-J 


4-1 


5 


• P 


ico 


4-1 

CO 

O . 


is • 




w 












£ H J 


2 ;^ : 


H 


'. 6 
o 


■^ 


• f~* ± 


P-l 


Oh • 

rt • 




33 

C/3 












^ x : 


S : ^ : 


CO 


■E 


; j^ 


• CZ3 ; 


CO . 


u : 




"»* 












<U ri . 

CO r- 


g ifa . 


CO 


. r- 1 




'".'—>! 


CO 

ri . 


m : 
















£>o : 




u 


• O 


; o 


» : < : 


5 : 


•t 1 






CO C\ O H n ro + io\C r^CO CN C 


M M 


ro -+ 


■ w:\Q t> 


•CO c 


\ <-> 




CU u 


ron i — l — i — I — I — ) — i- -l — 1 — 1- "" 


; IT, 1/1 1/) 1/ 


) U-) Vi~, U" 


u~, w 


,VO vO 






COCOGO&OCOCOCOCOCOGOCOGOCO 


GO 00 


GO GO 


co go co 


GO CO 


CO GO 




c* 1; 



































History of Green County. 



SI 





1 


. 














• • 






• 


• »— 




» • • 








• • 




J_, 


-4— I 




" C/3 


• i/ 


> • 73 


" c/ 


J * J 




g 

u 

as 


• OS 


0. 


• 3 

:5 


• b 

• c 


; j2 

• "So 

• 3 

• 




C • «3 

i : ^ 




o 


:u 


■ u 


; q 


:c 


:Q 


:c 


:o 




H 


•55 


:&. 


•03 


:^ 


I ';C0 


:<z 


i :^ 




% 




•u 


■PC 


H 


j< 


:«j 


• < 


: : > 








• • 


> 




' a 


> 


• i 


> 




0) 










• i-^ 












. . ;g 




. ^ 


■ . "T3 




t3 






' . T3 




. T3 


■ ; • -a 




T3 










• ^N 












: : '% 




: £ 


: : : > 




£ 






. . G 




. c 


' • * c 




£ 






• ■ 3 




■ 3 


: • ; 3 




3 






: :Q 




:"Q 


: Q 




Q 






" "M 




■PQ 


: : :°^ 




pq 






■ *-. 


»™ 






















• 0) 


• 4. 


• 














13 


: be 


; b 


o ; 

















• 5 


? 


* — 


^ c 


r* 


; c 


• o 

: : £ 

•CO 




Q 


• c 
■ o 




• pq 


; |> 


* > 


;|> 




o 


• ^ 


• M 


• 


• i 


• 13 


. ~ 


» • 




s 


' rt 


rt 


\X 


:js 


:S 


:S 


• . c] 




s 






, H 


:& 


irt 


;p> 


• G 
;73 




£ 


J 


;J 


:£ 


: t 


•fe 


: fc 


• \— lj 




• 


• 


-a 


• 








. 




• 


• 


•-* 


• 




• 




• • 




■ 


• 


tf 


• • 




o • 








c 


c 




. c« 


. t: 


: ^ 


b 


; bij 




c3 

be 


< : 


ed 


. cy 




• 53 


i- 


^ 53 







u 


:J 


)J 


g 


r 


. r^ 




s : 


a ; 


s 


• 13 


H 




CC 






s • 


g : 


XI 



• 3 


3 
r 


:h 


w 


:w : 




Q : 


£ ! 


• 5 • 
;C0 ■ 


5 

CD 


•u : 


u 


•u : 








T3 


• 








• • . 




• • 








C • 










• • * 




• • • 








jBS • 


• 








• * i 




■ * ■ 








"53 ; 


r" 








• ^ • 




• . ■ 






<U 








• p ' 




• • • 






i> . 


















53 ■ 

' 

fe : 

co : 


o ; 

d : 

o ; 
— • 


5 

<—• 

H 


• 53 1 

3 • 

:0 : 


-a 

o 
c 

T3 


\ 53 ■ 
|S ; 


P3 


* — * 

• CO . 




t/5 . 


s ; 


15 

.2 


. 05 


1) 


• 3 • 


^ 


;W : 




3 : 


ffi : 


£ 


•t5 • 


< 


•fc • 


Q 


jfe : 




M cO ~t- tr-.O 


t^co as o 


- r» ro -t 


■ Lr>0 !>• 


VO vO OC <3 


CO^O b 


. i>, r^ i>. t^. 


• t^ l^ t->. 


00 


yj 


co co 


CO 


CO CO 


X 


CO 


co co co 


CO 


r^co 


X 





00 






o 

— 

C4 
en 
CS 

> 

a 
o 






■^ bOi 2 i- E 









rt 



•4-" C O rt ^ 

-» 1) J +J ^ 2 V. 



„ 2 5 v rS -c o 



U3 



> 

S «^ c 

r J aj 
G r. cj ^ 
O ^'^^ 

E2 iT° c 






p i 

5 Q 



be 



'0) 1) 



aj sj 



« ..•- 



-, 



« Ss « ~ 5 ^ ^ - 



O !-. 
71 1) 

.-. (J 



u n c = ? 

CU i) 






CO 



OJii 



X 



rt 3 
tfl tn 



C 
CU 

us s: 



3 i-,~ 3J= 






c 

'o 

— 



o 

c 



a 

V) 

o 



00 
00 



< .rt E^^C-o^ ^_ s 



cThC cJ 
u -? v f> 

>-> rt 



•2o 



r* 1 m .. 

" <u u 



13 



5 <a 
rt t/} 

Cft 



1^8 



1) 



00 



>> o ^ *■ •- tor* « ^ fa -2 

r-J « u o oji 

b.s e 



E o o o 

u y<C ej 
y y O 7) 



en O 



4J C U 



CJ 

3r O 



O 
rt* 



rt 3 
tJE«^ 



CD 



S ^ ,„ rt — c .3 S o F, 



c -V 



.2 OB^ 

.3 > T3 
O rt o 

sfl*c 



3 <" 
cu u 

> . E rt *-■ C 1 



rt rt o: 



" sjc'rt t. ° '- f* « r 

o H jb cu 

k -*-* JE 

cu 



■<-" 



- 
CU 
Q, 

3 

73 



o 

CJ-E « «• 

— j- cu 



CJ 
JE > 



rt - a-s r, 



2 H -E "i- cj CJ 
O 3 U.rt o >*-3 71 
o -j _S ~ o. ^-* 

>. cu 



c 



T3 w G ° *-• ^^ r- '- O — * ^ 






cj .E 



c c 

«-c c 

E O rt 
3^u § ^rt 

E >-■ t; TE E 



§3-n^ 

^ 71 B 

^ CJ ^ 

rt3! 3 

71 y Ci 

rt d o 



= &S^3 S5rt a:;.; 

_. +-» II J-J -^ «~H .— I 



X C CJ E p " rt 

U O G B cs^SL 

s rt Q,CJ - - ^ 

- *j Cu cu rt - , 

rt cj r; J5 ~* >~> Cj 



1 "»! S '3 



1-. +j 

00 7! O T3 7! 

" v 3-- E C S e 

so-o „ rt c 5 



•^ Cj 3 4= y -M CJ 

^« 5 « c cjx; 

« 03 O C -rt i^h 

± rt J q *j ? 



^ 



i-rt B 






CU 



eeSe -jE^'" 



CO s- - •> 

^ 2£-3.cj s^u §_ bj^^ c 



O •- -*- 1 rt 



> o-- 



CJ CU ( 

at 



9-8 



OT3 
rt 



CU - 
..AX 



E T, 71 o U" « S S 'J '/iET 

S^C!^rr S J,J (CcJ g 

-v. 5 t> -E -^ *^ u ~ — *7)C*E -^.^-i^; 

ffia?E S o*!-jSMo?ou 



58 



History of Green Coimty. 



a 

o 

o 
o 



•~ •-, 

cS cS 



c/5 05 

O O 
g | 



I- 

!>PQ 



c c c 

C >-" r« 



>» 



bo 

e 



5 ir-i:- £ « 
e « 13 g £ 
3 i5 b2 bd «s 



£~x:x J !* 



CD Ch Cl- Q 



_j~ - * % 3il 



c 





2 

13 

cS 
o? 

< 



O 



c 
o 

05 

a 

£ 
o 



CS 





c 

ID 



■4-1 

O 

CO 

cS 

s- 



O 

o 

Oh 



4 



Z 

i— i 

H 

o 
u 

I 

to 

& 
w 

I— I 

o 
>< 

H 

Z 

O 

u 

OS 

w 

E 
H 
O 



O 
>< 
W 
> 

t/2 



CS 



6 ,£! 



C 
O 

- 



& S & S w <» co .c 

^* "5 << * o 5 c <■ I 

< £ ^fe H H H 



bo 

13 



CS 

>CO 



u 

To 
c 

CS 

a 

CO 

13 



CO 



p 
pq 

5 



cS 



o 

to 
C 



c 

cS 

bo 

o 






c 

cS 
bo 






bjo 



X 



oi 

- 

h 


o 



4) O «J 

V) -X> (A 

~ Z Z 

o c c 

X X -c 

c c 3 

<u o o 



see 

H H c 



"J V <u 

^£Ji =£ o3 oj 
2 2 c 2 ?r- ^ 

h H fc S oj. « 



a; 



PQ 



o 
o 
u 
C 

CQ 



-4-1 
-4-1 

o 



-4-4 

o 

Oh 



-4-> 
4- 



0) 

cs 

. — 

— 
cS 



H 
oi 

D 
O 

o 
o 

w 
►J 
o 



13 
o 



75 

13 

H 

CS 

O 

Z 



C/5 

a 
u 

Oh 



CS 

O 

Z 



c 
o 

-a 



u 

Q^ 

> 



CS 

PQ 



3 
£ 









O 



bJD 



^ 

^ 



B3 
^ 13 



00 Cn C ►- <"» CO -f lt.O t^CO O* O " f) « + >-r.vO t^GO ON O h 

fO fC ■)" ^ "t T -t + "t -t + 'f ^. •J") "". "". !0 ^i ^ ^". ^ LO^O ^C 

COCCOjMXXMMCOOOOOOOMWCOMCOGOOOOOCOOOCOOO 



History of Green County. 



59 



c 
3 
u 



<U 

o 



H 



O 
- 



u 
at 

a 



-t-J 

cs 
3 



s-. 



c 






cu 
bJ) 






— 



T3 

C 
C 

> 



bC 
O 

Q 



c 

> 
U 



CD 



c 

<u 

> 

CU 

G 



T3 
C 

> 

u 

J 



u 

(J 



c 
U 



CD 






< 



5 



CO 

U 



y: 

< 









O 

H 
o 

O 



O 

w 

H 

x> 
o 
cu 



cj 

H 

X3 
O 
CD 



X! 

cj 

H 

O 
u 



cu 

N 

1j 

CO 



cu 

N 

ID 
co 



s- 

QJ 
N 

■u 

CU 

CO 



bJO 



.be 



£ '£ 



x: 
.bjO 

I 






bC 



£ 



CM 



3 
PQ 



W 



S- 

PQ 

C 






n ro -1- "-;vO i^co On O i-h N c*o ^- iovo *>• 
COCX)GOGOCX)COCOGOCOCOCOCOCOCX)CX)X) 



6o 



history of Green County* 



REPRESENTATIVES OF GREEN COUNTY IN THE 
LEGISLATURE OF WISCONSIN. 

TERRITORIAL GOVERNMENT. 



COUNTIES. 



Iowa 



MEMBERS OF 
COUNCIL. 



REPRESENTA- 
TIVES. 



Ebenezer Brigham 

John B. Terry 

Jas. R. Vineyard. . 



Wm. 
Geo. 



Boyles.. . 
F. Smith. 



Dane, Dodge, 
Green and 

Jefferson . . 



Dane, Dodge, 
Green, Jeff- 
erson, Sauk 



Dane, Green 
and Sauk.. 



D. M. Parkinson. 
Thos. McKnight. 
Thos. Stanley . . . 
James P. Cox 



Eb. Brigham .... 
Ebenezer Brigham. j 

Lucius J. Barber. . 
John Catlin 



Danl S. 
erland . 



Suth- 



John Catlin 



Alex. L. Collins.. . 



Alex. L. Collins. 



Lucius J. Barber. 
James Sutherland 

Isaac H. Palmer. 
L. Crossman. . . . 
Robert Masters. . 

Chas. S. Bristol.. 
Noah Phelps. . . . 
Geo. H. Slaughter 
Mark R. Clapp. . 
Wm. M. Dennis. 
Noah Phelps .... 

Chas. Lum 

Wm. A. Wheeler 
John W. Stewart. 
E. T. Gardner. . . 

Alex. Botkin 

John W. Stewart. 



i st legislative 
assemblv, 1S36, 
'37 and '38. 



2d legislative 
assembly,iS3S, 
'39 and '40. 

3d legislative 
assembly, 1 840, 
'41 and '42. 

4th legislative 
assembly, ist& 
2d sessions, '42, 

'43- 

3d session, '45. 



4th session, '46. 



5th legislative 
assemblv, 1st 
session, 1847. 
Special session 
April 1 847, and 
2d session, '48. 



The first convention to form a state constitution con- 
vened October 5, 1S46, and adjourned December 16, 
1846. The members from Green County were Davis 
Bowen, Noah Phelps, Wm. C. Green and Hiram Brown. 
The members of the second convention, which was in 
in session from December 15, 1S47, to February 1, 
1S48, were James Biggs and Wm. McDowell. 



History of Green Cozmty. 



61 



STATE GOVERNMENT. 



YEAR. 



1848 
1849 
185O 
1851 
1852 

1853 

1854 

1855 
1856 

1857 
1858 

1859 
i860 

1 86l 

1862 

1863 

1864 

1865 

1866 

1867 

1868 

1869 

1870 

1871 

1872 

1873 
1874 

IS75 
1876 

1877 



SENATORS. 



E. T. Gardner. . . , 

E. T. Gardner. . . . 
Alexander Botkin, 
Wm. Rittenhouse. 

T. S. Bowen 

T. S. Bowen 

F. H. West 

F. H. West 

Geo. E. Dexter... 
Geo. E. Dexter. . . 
John H. Warren. . 



John H. Warren. . . . 

John W. Stewart 

John W. Stewart . . . 

E. A. West 

E. A. West 

W. S. Wescott 

W. S. Wescott 

Henry Adams 

Henry Adams 

Henry Adams 

Henry Adams 

J. C Hall 

J. C. Hall. 



Orrin Bacon 

Orrin Bacon 
Harvey T. Moore. 
Harvev T. Moore. 

J. B. Treat 

J. B. Treat 



No. of 
Senatori- 
al district 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
24 
24 

24 
24 

2 4 
24 

24 

24 

24 

24 

24 

2 4 

24 

24 

24 

24 

24 

24 

24 

12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 



Henrv Adams. 
John C. Crawford. 
William C. Green. 
Julius Hurlbut. 
Truman J. Safford. 
Thomas Fenton. 
Abner Mitchell. 
Amos D. Kirkpatrick. 
Martin Flood. 
Martin Flood. 
James E. Vinton. 
Wm. Brown. 
Albert H. Pierce. 
Edmund A. West. 
Walter S. Wescott. 
Martin Mitchell. 
James Campbell. 
Obadiah J. White. 
Calvin D. W. Leonard. 
Harvev T. Moore. 
Walter S. Wescott. 
Ezra Westcott. 
Wm. W. McLaughlin. 
Frederick B. Rolf. 
Wm. W. McLaughlin. 
David Dunwiddie. 
Daniel Smiley. 
Egbert E. Carr. 
Lucius W. Wright. 
David Dunwiddie. 
Albert H. Pierce. 
Jacob Mason. 
J. F. Wescott. 
Thomas A. Jackson. 
C D. W. Leonard. 
Thomas A. Jackson. 
Orrin Bacon. 
Marshall H. Pengra. 
Marshall H. Pengra. 
John Luchsinger. 
C. R. Deniston. 
C R. Deniston. 
John Luchsinger. 
Franklin Mitchell. 
John Luchsinger. 



6* 



62 



History of Green County. 



GOVERNORS OF WISCONSIN. 

Henry Dodge, appointed April, 1836. 
Henry Dodge, appointed March, 1839. 
James Duane Doty, appointed September, 1841. 
N. P. Talmadge, appointed June, 1844. 
Henry Dodge, appointed April, 1845. 

UNDER STATE GOVERNMENT. 



Nelson Dewey, (2 terms). 
L. J. Farwell. 
Wm. A. Barstow. 
Coles Bashford. 



Edward Saloman, (vice Harvey). 
James T. Lewis. 
Lucius Fairchild, (2 terms). 
C. C. Washburn. 



Alex. W. Randall, (2 terms). Wm. R. Taylor. 
Louis P. Harvey, (died). Harrison Ludington. 



GUBERNATORIAL VOTE IN GREEN COUNTY. 



1848. 
1849. 
1851. 

i853. 

1855. 
1857. 
1859- 



Dewey, dem., 


- 481 


1861. 


Harvey, rep., 


1,461 


Tweedy, whig, 


406 




Ferguson, dem., 


661 


Dewey, dem., 


- 443 


1863. 


Lewis, rep., 


2,046 


Collins, whig, 


324 




Palmer, dem., 


836 


Farwell, whig, 


- 504 


1865. 


Fairchild, rep., - 


1,552 


Upham, dem., 


530 




Hobart, dem., 


728 


Barstow, dem., 


- 769 


1867. 


Fairchild, rep., - 


2,094 


Holton, rep., 


748 




Tallmadge, dem., 


1,137 


Baird, whig, 


' 153 


1869. 


Fairchild, rep., - 


2,002 


Barstow, dem., 


600 




Robinson, dem., 


920 


Bashford, rep,, 


- 1,128 


1871. 


Washburn, rep., 


i,757 


Randall, rep., 


i,i5 6 




Doolittle, dem., 


934 


Cross, dem., 


- 832 


1873- 


Taylor, dem., 


1,366 


Randall, rep., 


1,726 




Washburn, rep., 


1,402 


Hobart, dem., 


- hH 1 


i8 7 5- 


Ludington, rep., 
Taylor, dem., 


1,960 
i,595 



RFPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS. 

DELEGATES FROM TERRITORY. ' 



Geo. W. Jones, 
James D. Doty, 
James D. Doty, 
Henry Dodge, 



elected 1836. 
" 1837. 
" J 839- 
" 1841. 



Henry Dodge, elected 1843. 
Morgan L. Martin, " 1845. 
John H. Tweedy, " 1847. 



History of Green County. 



63 



SENATORS SINCE THE ORGANIZATION OF THE STATE. 



Isaac P. Walker, 
Henry Dodge, 
Isaac P. Walker, 
Henry Dodge, 
Charles Durkee, 
Jas. R. Doolittle, 



elected 


1848. 


u 


I84S. 


u 


1849. 


u 


iSsi. 


u 


IS55- 


u 


1857- 



T. O. Howe, 
Jas. R. Doolittle, 
T. O. Howe, 
Matt. H. Carpenter, 
T. O. Howe, 
Angus Cameron, 



elected 1861. 
1863. 
1867. 
1869. 

i873- 
1S75- 



MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 

*FROM FIRST DISTRICT. 

elected 1848. 

[from second district. 
elected 1849. C. C. Washburn, elected 1857. 



Wm. Pitt Lynde, 



Orsamus Cole, 
Ben. C. Eastman, 
Ben. C. Eastman, 
C. C. Washburn, 



Amasa Cobb, 
Amasa Cobb, 
Amasa Cobb, 



1 85 1. C. C Washburn, 
18^3. L. Hanchett, (died) 
1855. W. D. Mclndoe, 



1859. 
1 861. 
1862. 



Jfrom third district. 

elected 1863. Amasa Cobb, 
" 1865. J. Allen Barber, 
" 1867. 



elected 1869. 
" 1871. 



§from third district. 
J. Allen Barber, elected 1873. Henry S. Magoon, elected 1875. 



CIRCUIT COURTS. 

The act establishing the territorial government of 
Wisconsin provided for the division of the territory into 
three judicial districts, and for the holding of district 
court by one of the three judges of the supreme court 
in each district. The three judges were Chas. Dunn, 



*By the state constitution, adopted March, 1848, the counties of Milwaukee, 
Waukesha, Jefferson, Racine, Walworth, Rock, and Green, constituted the first 
congressional district. There was one other district in the state, and each dis- 
trict had one representative. 

fin 1849 the number of districts was increased to three. Rock, Green, La 
Fayette, Grant, Iowa, Dane, Sank, Adams, Portage, Richland, Crawford, Chip- 
pewa, St. Croix, and La Pointe were included in the second. 

Jin 1861 the state was divided into six districts. Green, La Fayette, Iowa, 
Grant, Crawford, Richland, and Sauk were the third. 

§By a law puplished April 4, 1872, Grant, Iowa, La Fayette, Green, Rich- 
land, and Crawford constitute the third district. 



64 History of Green County. 

David Irvin, and Wm. C. Frazer. Green County was 
in the first, or Judge Dunn's district. Judge Irvin was 
assigned to the court in that part of the territory after- 
wards included in the state of Iowa; but on the 12th of 
June, 1838, the territory of Iowa was organized, and 
the legislative assembly which convened in the follow- 
ing November made a new assignment of districts. 
From July, 1839, until Wisconsin became a state, the 
second district, which in 1S39 included the counties of 
Walworth, Rock, Green, and Dane, and of which Green 
County formed a part until 1848, was Judge Irvin's 
district. In 1848 the state was divided into five judicial 
circuits, the first of which was composed of Racine, 
Walworth, Rock, and Green. By a law of 1870, which 
went into effect January 1, 1S71, Green, Rock, and 
Jefferson constitute the twelfth circuit. 

Circuit judges who have presided in Green County; 

Edward V. Whiton, 

James R. Doolittle, 

John M. Keep, to fill vacancy, 

David Noggle, - 

Wm. P. Lyon, - 

H. S. Conger, . - - 

H. S. Conger, .... 



elected August, 


1848. 


« 




1853- 


u 


April, 


IS56. 


It 


u 


1859- 


u 


u 


1865. 


u 


u 


1871. 


a 


CI 


1876. 



TOWNSHIP HISTORIES. 



EXETER. 



In the beginning were the lead mines. The Sauk, 
or Sugar River, diggings were situated a little over a 
mile southwest of the present village of Exeter. The 
squaws were the first miners, but they had neither the 
knowledge nor the tools to make their labor very profit- 
able. With such instruments as they could make, they 
picked out the surface or float mineral ; and when their 
excavations became too deep to step into, they threw in 
a dead tree on which they climbed up and down. When 
a vein ran under the rock, they dug it out as far as they 
could reach, built a fire in the hole thus made, and, when 
the rock was heated, cracked it by pouring on water. 

The first white man who saw these diggings was a 
miner named Burke, who happened to pass them after 
losing his way on a journey across the territory. Led 
by his account of what he had seen, McNut and Boner, 
two traders, went to the diggings in 1S28, and built a 
trading house there. They were undoubtedly the first 
white men to settle in the county. In August of the 



66 Histoiy of Gi'een County. 

same year, Win. Devise, who had already spent some 
time in prospecting at the diggings, went there to live. 
Almost always after this there were transient miners at 
the diggings. While Mr. Devise was preparing to go 
to Exeter, Edward D. Beouchard, a Frenchman, began 
to mine there. In the fall, Mr. Devise was followed by 
his employees, Wm. Wallace and wife, and J. R. Black- 
more. It has been said that soon after the arrival of the 
Wallace family at Exeter, Louisa Wallace, afterwards 
Mrs. Chas. Thomas, was born there, and that she was 
the first white person born in Green County. Mrs. 
Thomas thinks she ought to have had the honor ascribed 
to her, for Exeter was the home of the family at the 
time of her birth, but she was born in Galena, August 
7, 1830. Mr. Devise, who is now living at Bellville, 
is a Virginian. At the time under consideration, he and 
Mr. James Hawthorne were partners. Their acquaint- 
ance began at Vandalia, from which place they jour- 
neyed together in 1S27 to Shullsburg, where they en- 
tered into partnership, and where, in about a year, Mr. 
Devise left Mr. Hawthorne to carry on their mining 
enterprises there alone, while he went to Blue Mounds. 
Soon after this he went to Exeter, and then Mr. Haw- 
thorne went to Blue Mounds. 

After their arrival at the diggings, McNut and Boner, 
by means of whisky and a few worthless baubles, pos- 
sessed themselves of ail the lead raised by the Indians. 
In August, 1S2S, when there happened to be no white 
person there except the traders and Van Sickles, their 
Dutch interpreter, McNut killed Boner. Whether the 



History of Green County. 6*j 

deed was prompted by a desire to possess alone the 
treasure filched from the Indians, or was the unforeseen 
result of a drunken quarrel, cannot now be ascertained. 
Van Sickles hastened to Blue Mounds, the nearest set- 
tlement, with the news. McNut, probably supposing 
Van Sickles had gone somewhere else, also went to 
Blue Mounds, and was lying there drunk when Van 
Sickles arrived. The next day, miners, one of whom 
was Robert Kirkendoll, now of Cadiz, buried Boner 
near the spot where he was killed ; but the plow long 
ago removed all traces of this first grave. McNut 
was arrested and sent to Prairie du Chien, where six- 
teen other men w T ere awaiting trial for murder. Since 
Van Sickles, the only witness against him, was a noto- 
rious liar, McNut was acquitted; and immediately after 
his release he left the country. Van Sickles was very 
much dissatisfied with the trial, not because he laid any 
claim to veracity, but because one of the men called on 
to swear to his bad character was Jacob Hunter, whom 
Van Sickles declared to be a greater liar than himself. 
After NcNut's arrest, Devise and Beouchard obtained 
control of the mines. In the spring of 1829, they built 
a log smelting furnace near the old trading house, and 
broke the first land broken in the county. The first 
crop was a crop of turnips raised in 1S29. It appears 
from Prof. Salisbury's biographical sketch of Mr. De- 
vise, in volume 6 of the Wisconsin Historical Collections, 
that in the fail of 1829 Mr. Devise went to Fulton and 
Peoria Counties, Illinois, and brought up a drove of 
hogs, and that in the summer of 1S30 he broke sixteen 



68 History ojf Green County. 

acres, on which he raised, the next year, corn, pumpkins, 
turnips, and oats. 

The Indians foresaw their own doom in the advent 
of more skillful miners, and endeavored to avert it by 
throwing the windlasses into the shafts and carrying 
away the ropes. They stole all the mineral left on the 
ground, but were too cowardly to go into the shafts to 
steal, though few shafts at the Exeter diggings have 
been sunk more than thirty feet. The name diggings, 
by the way, was so universally applied to the excava- 
tions for lead that when a stranger asked a man who 
had once worked there the way to the mines, the man 
stared and said he did not know. After a little conver- 
sation, a sudden light burst upon him, and he exclaimed, 
with the air of a discoverer, " Oh, you mean the 
diggings! " 

The customs of the miners, and the rules in regard 
to the diggings were much the same at Sugar River as 
in the more populous mining districts. The government 
did not sell mineral land for a number of years after 
other land had been in the market, but when a miner 
discovered a lead he was allowed to make a claim there 
of two hundred square yards. Claims frequently proved 
unsatisfactory, were abandoned, and then claimed by 
other miners who made them productive. In such cases, 
the first miner sometimes insisted that he had never giv- 
en up his claim, and a quarrel was the result. The 
miners' houses were many of them holes in the hillsides. 
A traveler might derive his first knowledge of the ex- 
istence of a habitation by his sudden descent into it 



History of Green Cou7ity. 69 

through the chimney, which consisted of a barrel with 
the ends knocked out. There were also sod houses and 
log houses. 

There were few women at any of the diggings in 
the state. In some places where a hundred men were 
at work, there was not one woman; and many of the 
men became as careless of their dress as the wolves 
were. A miner who worked sometimes in Green Coun- 
ty, and sometimes farther west, says that one day, 
when he had not seen a woman for several years, he was 
called to ferry Mr. and Mrs. Paine over a stream, and 
that he ran in an opposite direction as though a tribe of 
Indians was after him. Another miner says that while 
he was digging at Mineral Point, all the men came up 
from their shafts one day to see a woman that one of 
their number had discovered in an emigrant wagon. 

Some of the miners made fortunes in a short time; 
others dug for years with no success. A few, working 
with a definite purpose, engaged in other occupations 
after a few years, and are counted with the best citizens 
of the county; but most of them were reckless and im- 
provident, spending all their earnings, whether large 
or small, and being sometimes rich and sometimes mis- 
erably poor. Two miners usually lived and worked to- 
gether. There was hard work to be done outside the 
mines. James Slater, who went to Exeter in 1S2S, and 
who is now a resident of Clarno, tells of walking from 
Exeter to Blue Mounds — a distance of twenty-eight 
miles — for a bushel of potatoes, which he bought of Mr. 
Brigham for two dollars, and carried home on his back. 

7 



yo History of Green County. 

One-sixteenth of the lead raised belonged to the gov- 
ernment. It was paid by the smelters, who bought the 
lead of the miners, usually paying them from eight to 
ten dollars a thousand pounds. Mr. Hawthorne, who 
left the mines in 1833, says the highest price he ever 
received was twenty dollars per thousand pounds. The 
first lead smelted at Exeter was hauled by oxen to Ga- 
lena, where it sold for eighty dollars per ton. In 1833, 
Col. Hamilton, who had a furnace at Wiota, built some 
boats with which he attempted to transport his lead 
down the Pecatonica, Rock, and Mississippi rivers to St. 
Louis ; but two of the boats were overturned, their con- 
tents were lost, and the experiment was never repeated. 
The tariff excitement that accompanied the election of 
President Jackson, brought lead down to its lowest price, 
and caused many miners to leave Green County; but 
Mr. Devise, with four employes, kept on trading and 
smelting through 1S30 and the greater part of '31. 
Sometime in 1S31, John Dougherty established a trading 
post near the furnace. Prof. Salisbury says that the 
first information the settlers on Sugar River had of the 
Black Hawk war was given by the Winnebagoes about 
noon one May day to Dougherty's half-breed wife, and 
that they all started that same day to Galena. As all 
the teams had gone some days before with lead, the 
fugitives went with an old buggy and a broken down 
yoke of oxen. Mr. Devise afterwards went to Wiota, 
where he assisted in the erection of Fort Hamilton. 
He took an active part in the war, sometimes fight- 
ing, sometimes going on long and dangerous jour- 



History of Green County. yi 

neys as messenger of the commanding officers; and, 
when he was mustered out he received a dollar a 
day for the services of himself and horse during the 
war. As soon as the war was over, Mr. Devise, the 
Dougherty family, and a number of miners returned 
to the diggings. Their buildings had been burned 
during their absence, and Mr. Dougherty found his 
merchandise, which had been left buried in the ground, 
much injured by moisture; but a barrel of metheglin 
which had been made early in the spring " to keep" 
was found so much improved that all present drank im- 
moderately, forgetting, until intoxication came, the un- 
usual strength of its ingredients. Mr. Beouchard went 
away from Exeter a month before the war, intending 
to return soon. He was a scout during the war, and did 
not return to Exeter for a year, and then he remained 
but a short time. He has now lived at Mineral Point 
nearly forty years. Before he came to Wisconsin in 
1819, he was sent by the Hudson's Bay Fur Company to 
the Pacific ocean. He went to the diggings near Galena 
in 1822. 

Soon after his return, Mr. Devise sold his fur- 
nace to Mr. Dougherty, and thenceforth worked in the 
mines until 1850. It is thought that during his mining 
life he made and lost or spent about $40,000. In 1835 
Mr. Dougherty sold the furnace to Camp (or Kemp) 
and Collins. From that time the di^g-ing-s were known 
as Kemp and Collins' diggings. John and Joseph Camp 
were natives of Cornwall, England; the Collins broth- 
ers, only one of whom, William, worked in Green 



*j2 History of Gi'een County. 

County, were Irish. A great many of the first miners 
at Su^ar River were from England and Ireland, which 
explains the appearance in Green County of the Eng- 
lish name of Exeter. The other name, Sugar River 
Diggings, came from the Indian name of the river in 
that vicinity, Tonasookarah, meaning sugar, and refer- 
ring to the maple trees on the river banks. With the 
new firm came new traders and miners, but traders and 
miners do not make villages. In the winter of 1835-6, 
while looking for a place to make a claim, Henry F. 
Janes, for whom Janesville was named, and his cousin, 
John Janes, went to the diggings for provisions. It was 
very cold and dark when they reached the place to which 
they had been directed, and no miners were there. 
While they were making arrangements to pass the 
night, supperless and shelterless, they saw a light. Sup- 
posing it was an Indian camp, they hastened to it, but 
found a miner, Michael Welsh. " He received us," 
wrote Mr. Janes twenty years later, " with all the hos- 
pitality with which a Wisconsin miner could receive a 
stranger, and any attempt on my part to describe that 
would be but a failure to do justice to that noble heart- 
ed class of the citizens of Wisconsin. We were now 
snugly ensconced in a warm cabin by a roaring fire, and 
soon had a stool placed between us on which was a 
pyramid of potatoes, a dish of pork swimming in a mini- 
ature lake of gravy, and a tin cup of coffee for each of 
us. * * * We then went over to where New Mex- 
ico was afterwards laid out, explored there two or three 
days, and then to Hamilton's diggings, and finally back 



History of Green County. 73 

again to Rock river. I then selected the claim that 
Janesville is built on." 

The cabin of Michael Welsh stood where the vil- 
lage of Exeter is; and there was a still older cabin there 
built by Pierce Bradley. Both houses were built before 
the war, and there was a small garden adjoining each. 
Mr. Welsh was an Irishman, who had been educated to 
be a Catholic priest. Mr. Bradley was a native of New 
York. He had an Indian wife, and when the Indians 
went away he went with them. Soon after the war, 
Thomas Welsh built a house where the village is. He 
cultivated a little ground, and his wife, known as old 
mother Welsh, kept tavern there. 

At the diggings, new miners were constantly coming 
and going, but they made no permanent improvements. 
Camp and Collins cultivated the land broken by Mr. 
Devise, but it was not until 1838 that James Slater be- 
gan to make the third farm in the township. The next 
farms were made by Joseph Dunbar, John Ferguson, 
Leonard Ross, Geo. Magee, Chas. George, John Arm- 
strong, Amos Harris, and Wm. and Robert Oliver. 
These farmers all came to the county before the war, 
or very soon after it, but, with perhaps two exceptions, 
their farms were made after 1S40. 

In 1839 or '40, Chas. Stevens built a log tavern and 
a furnace where the village is. The new furnace at- 
tracted miners, and the village began to grow, so that 
the year 1841 saw it in possession of a post office and 
three stores. The stores were kept by Thomas Somers, 
always called Tom Somers, John S. Litchfield, and 



74 History of Green County. 

Hiram Calkins, the latter gentleman afterwards taking 
into partnership with him Alvinza Hey wood, who has 
since made one of the largest fortunes made in the gold 
mines of California. 

In 1S41, a traveling Mormon preacher stopped at the 
school house in the village, and preached the first ser- 
mon preached in the township Like many subsequent 
religious meetings, the services were attended by the 
miners, who are described as making a model audience, 
listening attentively to the sermon, and giving generous- 
ly when the hat was parsed around. 

In 1842, Exeter had her first dance. It was at one 
of the taverns, for there were two taverns at that time, 
kept respectively by Ezra Durgin and Brainard Blod- 
gfett. People were in attendance from Beloit and Illi- 
nois. They ate supper in the kitchen, and then took 
out the table and danced, two sets at a time, till morning. 

Most memorable of all gatherings in Exeter is a 
fourth of Jul\ celebration held there in 1843. The 
orator was a man known to fame as " the wild Yankee." 
He stood on a barrel of whisky ; and, while he spoke, 
Tom Somers, cup in hand, sat by the faucet, and, for a 
consideration, gave drink to the thirsty. Gentlemen 
who attended the celebration say that the following are 
some of the sentences they applauded : " Let us carry 
our thoughts back to that time when our forefathers, 
led by Columbus, crossed the pathless ocean, without 
star or compass to guide them, and landed on the desert 
rock of Plymouth." "Let us recount the history of 
that great struggle in which they so nobly fought, bled, 



History of Green Cou?ity. 75 

and died. The hand of Omnipotence was against them, 
but, by the grace of God, they conquered." 

In 1843, Exeter was platted, and, at the same time, 
transformed into the proudest of all little villages. She 
cherished the hope of becoming the metropolis of the 
county. Her pride was fed by Tom Somers, who said 
that though Monroe might fill her public square with 
court houses, she could not keep the county seat away 
from Exeter. For a number of years there were two 
furnaces, high hopes, a great deal of money, and mouths 
enough to drink five tons of coffee in a year, at Exeter. 
Then, lead grew less abundant; and, though Exeter 
would not see it, it was evident that the heyday of her 
youth and pleasure was ended. Her oldest friends left 
her, one by one, for California, and Tom Somers, her 
truest admirer, died ; there were none to sing her praises, 
and Dayton, her irrepressible younger sister, hinted that 
she was passe , and had better retire. The hint was re- 
ceived as a belle of acknowledged position is likely to 
receive such a hint from one who first disputes her sway. 
But, in the rivalry that ensued, the advantages of wealth 
and natural fitness for the desired pre-eminence were 
all with Dayton, and Exeter soon gave up the struggle. 
Yet Exeter has not now the appearance of a defrauded 
sister. Unlike Decatur, she makes no show of having 
known better days. All traces of the old life have 
passed away, leaving her, instead of the bitterness of 
disappointment, untroubled quiet and content. 

Dayton had its origin in a saw mill, which it is thought 
Samuel Leland built. In 1847, P. P. Havens of 



•76 History of G?'een County. 

New York and Lorenzo Fuller of Ohio bought 
the mill of Samuel Leland and Mahlon Lewis. The 
only building near the mill was a log house occupied 
by Mrs. Lewis and her sons. After a year or two the 
new mill owners wanted a school house. They gave 
the lumber, and the few farmers who lived near enough 
to send their children there to school assisted in the erec- 
tion of the building. When it was done, all concerned felt 
that the love they bore to learning was expensive; 
but they hired their teacher, and took her to the village 
of Exeter to be examined. Exeter had for some time been 
negligent in providing for her school, for which reason 
Mr. Heywood, the town superintendent, gave all the 
money in his hands to the new school, and it proved 
to be enough to pay the teacher three terms. To meet 
a want of that part of the county, Messrs. Havens and 
Fuller, with William and Amos Kirkpatrick, decided 
to transform the saw mill into a grist mill. Before the 
change was effected, Amos Kirkpatrick became sole own- 
er of the mill, which he finished and sold in 1850 or '51. 
While the mill was building, Mr. Havens laid out a vil- 
lage, which, at the request of one of the mill hands who 
had lived at Dayton, Ohio, was called Dayton. Im- 
provements began at once. The first building de- 
signed for a store was built by Harvey Church. Be- 
fore the completion of mill and store, Wm. Rhinehart 
and Samuel Gracy began to build a hotel which was 
finished in 1S51. One of its rooms was rented to Geo. 
Duncan for a store, and he was soon after appointed Day- 
ton's first postmaster. 



History of Green County. 77 

Dayton is now a flourishing village. The flour mill 
of Thomas Green and the cheese factory of Ross and 
Richmond, with the stores and shops of Messrs. V. 
Ross, Wm. Green, Dick, Ellis, Doolittle, Wackman, 
and Rutty make the place an important one to the towns 
of Brooklyn and Exeter. The addition known as East 
Dayton was platted some years since by Mr. M. T. 
White. 

The first town meeting in the town of Exeter was 
held at the house of L. D. Barnes, in the village of Ex- 
eter. For a short time after the rise of Dayton, town 
meetings were held alternately at Exeter and Dayton. 
As late as 1S50 Exeter had twenty-two dwellings, two 
stores, one hundred and four inhabitants, and some 
rights that Dayton respected. But now that Exeter 
has no store, no post office, and not even a blacksmith 
shop, town meetings are always held at the Dayton 
hotel, which for twenty years has been owned by 
A. D. Hymers. 

Among: the first farmers who srave their attention to 
the improvement of the stock of the county, was Mr. 
Lysaght of the town of Exeter. His sheep and blood- 
ed horses, arc said by stock-raisers to be exceptionally 
fine. Other large stock-growers are Messrs, Ferguson, 
Magec, Ross, Ruff, and Wade. 

LARGEST FARMERS IN EXETER IN 1876. 



Names. 


No. of Acres. 


Names. No. of Acres 


Henry Aebly, - 


- 335 


Geo. Magee, - - 500 


T u .zz. Bradbury, - 


160 


Jas. Marshall, - 240 


M. Clark, - 


220 


Marshall estate, - 271 


John Crawford, 


171 


W. W. & G. W. Morse, 410 


Jas. Cunningham, 


200 


P. H. Multer, 170 



78 



History of Green County. 



Names. 

D. D. Day, - 
Jos. Dunbar, 
Wm. Edgar, - 
A. J. Edwards, - 
M. Ellis, 
Nicholas Elmer, 
Estee estate, - 
A. Fulton, 

John Ferguson estate, 
L. Gassett, - 
Joseph Green, - 
P. P. Havens, 
Henry Hetty, 
Balthazar Hosly, 
Dennis Kerwin, 
F. Laroque, 
Jas. Lewis, 
Robert Lynn, - 
John Lynn, - 
Wm. Lysaght, - 



No. of Acres. 


Names. 


No. of Acres 


I70 


Isaac Norris, 


l6o 


24O 


W. B. Norris, - 


- 287 


24O 


N. S. Park, - 


220 


l6o 


Sarah Patterson, 


- 200 


200 


John Richards, 


I92 


460 


Leonard Ross, - 


" 237 


320 


M. Ross, 


l6o 


l6o 


Wm. Ross, 


- l82 


, 4OO 


Ruff estate, 


28o 


l6o 


W. A. Smith, - 


- l6o 


- 293 


Jerry Staley, 


l6o 


, 25O 


J. S. Staley, 


- 238 


- 320 


W. A. Smith, 


l6o 


471 


Melchoir Steussy, 


- 183 


I90 


John Vance, 


200 


l6o 


E. Wade, 


- 340 


200 


Alex. Wallace, 


260 


l6o 


J. D. Wallace, 


- 234 


l6o 


Robert Wallace, - 


l6o 


- 1,085 


H. B. Winston, 


- 215 



•OFFICERS OF TOWN OF EXETER FROM 1 849 TO '77 INCLUSIVE. 



CHAIRMEN. 



CLERKS. 



John Porter. 
James Hare, (3 years). 
W. C. Kesler. 
John Ferguson. 
C. D. W. Leonard. 
James Hare. 
M. M. Morse. 

C. D. W. Leonard, (2 years). 
Martin Flood. 

J. W. Norton. 
J. W. Smith, (2 years). 
J. W. Norton, (2 years). 
J. W. Smith. 

A. W. Heal. 
Wm. Rhinehart. 

B. B. Brownell. 
H. G. Silver. 

B. B. Brownell. 
Otis Ross, (2 years). 

D. D. Day. 

E. C Morse, (3 years). 



A. K. Stearns. 

John B. Perry. 

A. K. Stearns. 

John Burt. 

Geo. C. Duncan. 

W. W. Shephard. 

Geo. E. Duncan. 

J. B. Ormsby. 

John Norton. 

Jas. Norris, (2 years). 

J. W. Smith. 

M. T. Smith. 

H. G. Silver, (6 years). 

C. D. W. Leonard. 

E. C. Morse, (4 years). 

L. D. Dalrymple. 

Volney Ross, (4 years). 



> 



MONROE. 



Monroe has disputed with Exeter the honor of being 
the first abode of white men in the county. The first 
comers were miners, John B. Skinner and Thomas 
Neal. They discovered mineral on the banks of the 
stream since called Skinner, erected a smelting furnace 
there, and had been working in the vicinity several years 
when the Black Hawk war began. The general opin- 
ion of the old settlers seems to be that the first discov- 
ery of lead on the Skinner was in 1S29; but Mr. Stew- 
art, in his sketch of Green County published by the 
State Historical Society, says "some of them say it was. 
in 1827." In 1834, Hiram Rust and Leonard Ross came 
together from New York state, and built a cabin on 
what is known as the Pratt farm, east of the village of 
Monroe. In the spring of 1835 the Y broke thirteen 
acres where the barn is on Wm. Brown's farm. Their 
claim also included a part of the land now in the county 
fair ground. In 1S35, Mr - Rust examined the old Skin- 
ner mines, which he found deserted. They were on 
sections three, ten, and thirteen; some of them were 
seventy feet deep. On section three there were a dozen 
shafts which were about twenty-eight feet deep, and 
which Mr. Rust supposes were abandoned for a reason 



So Histo?y of Green County. 

which is readily understood after a moment's considera- 
tion of the order in which the rocks of the lead region 
are arranged. Though the thickness of each layer is 
variable, the order is invariably as follows : surface, clay 
and soil; hard, white limestone; shale; gray limestone, 
the ordinary surface rock of the mines, containing veins 
of lead, and, in its lower beds, zinc and copper; blue or 
brown limestone, cutting off the veins; yellowish lime- 
stone, in which the veins are renewed; sandstone, con- 
taining no veins; lower magnesian limestone. In the 
shafts referred to, the sandstone was reached after dig- 
ging about twenty-eight feet. They were undoubtedly 
abandoned then in obedience to the general belief of 
that time that no lead could be found below the sand- 
stone. Mr. Rust and Joab Enos sank these shafts three 
or four feet lower and struck rich veins. They con- 
tinued to mine here through 1835-6, being joined in the 
latter year by N. Cornelius, who came from Illinois to 
Wisconsin some years before; and Mr. Rust thinks they 
raised more lead than has ever been raised in the county 
since, in the same length of time. 

In 1835, Joseph Paine, having removed from Clarno, 
began to farm where the village of Monroe is now. 
About the same time, Jarvis Rattan, an Illinoisan who 
had been for many years a miner, built the second house 
in the village, and Julius Austin settled just west of the 
village — his brother, Elijah Austin, who came with him 
from Illinois, settling in Clarno. Jacob Andrick came 
the same year from Ohio, and made a farm in that part of 
Clarno which is now included in the southern part of the 



History of Green County. 81 

village of Monroe. There were at this time two cabins 
at the Skinner diggings, occupied by Nicholas Hale 
and Richard Palmer, and their families. Mr. Hale cul- 
tivated a small tract of land which miners, of whom 
Mr. Hale may have been one, broke before the war. 
In 1S36, the brothers Robert and Hiram Delapp came 
from Illinois. The former made a farm where Mr. 
Cornelius now lives, Mr. Cornelius being farther west, 
on what is called the Chamness place. Daniel S. Suth- 
erland came in 1S36, from Illinois, to the farm where he 
still resides. At the land sale in Mineral Point, when a 
friend bought the farm for Mr. Sutherland, there was 
quite a strife for it. The price of land, good or bad, 
was $1.25 an acre, except where more than one person 
wanted it, in which case it was sold to the highest bid- 
der. The price of Mr. Sutherland's land was run up 
to $2.50 an acre, by a man who kept a little store at 
Mineral Point. He did not pay for it that day, and, 
according to the rule in such cases, the land was offered 
for sale the next day. Before the hour of the sale a 
number of Mr. Sutherland's friends gathered in the 
store, and, by one pretext and another, kept the mer- 
chant busy until the farm was bought at the usual price. 
Land purchases were often attended with excitement, 
and sometimes with danger. One Monroe farmer, while 
on the way to Mineral Point to buy eighty acres which 
joined his farm, learned that one of his acquaintances 
had started on the same errand two hours before him. 
At first he was in despair, for he had only the money 
to pay the government price, and the success of his 



82 History of Green County. 

whole life seemed to him, then, to hinge on his poses 
sion of the eighty acres. But the bearer of the bad 
news had these words of comfort : " You will neither 
of you reach the Point before the office is closed; to- 
morrow I will lend you all the money you need to bid 
against him, for you are a farmer and he is a speculator." 
The farmer arrived at Mineral Point after dark, and 
went to bed, but not to sleep. The suspense was too 
great to be endured. A little after midnight he arose, 
and, with his money and the description of his land in 
his hand, went to the land office. He felt around in the 
dark until he found the door, which he pounded with 
the energy born of a last hope; and when, after a time, 
a few horrible oaths told him there was some sleepy 
wight within, he was filled with a wild delight which 
the sweetest music had never given him before. Then 
followed a practical exemplification of the text, though 
he will not rise and give him because he is his friend, 
yet because of his importunity he will rise and give 
him. First, the deafened man opened the door, swear- 
ing he would not do business in the night; then, swear- 
ing still, he took the description and the money. The 
farmer went to sleep then, but, rising betimes, went 
again to the office to see the discomfiture of his specu- 
lating rival, who had relied so much on his earlier start 
from Monroe that he stopped for the night eight miles 
this side of Mineral Point. At another time, two 
would-be purchasers started together from Monroe. 
The one who had least money knew a shorter road to 
Mineral Point than the other knew, but the knowledge 



History of Green £ounty. 



83 



was of no advantage for he could not get away from 
his companion. In vain he stormed and declared that 
no one who bought the land away from him should 
ever return to Monroe alive. Greek had met Greek, 
and the victory was not to be gained by threats. Final- 
ly, when the greater part of the road had been traveled 
over, the involuntary guide turned back, and the other 
went on and bought the land. 

With Mr. Sutherland came Thos. Bragg of Vir- 
ginia and Geo. Nobles of Illinois, both of whom were, 
after a few years, at work on their own farms near the 
village. In 1837, Chas. S. Wilcoxon bought Mr. Rust's 
farm, and Mr. Rust moved to his present residence. 
A. J. Sutherland and Geo. Reeder, both of whom made 
farms in the eastern part of the town, came in 1837 — 
the former from New York, the latter from Ohio. 

The next farmers were Asa Brown, Dixon Bailey, 
Mrs. Morton, and Thomas Morton, who all removed 
herefrom Illinois in 1839. So much for the beginning. 
In contrast with this list of early farmers is given now 
a list of the largest farmers of to-day. 



Names. 


No. of Acres. 


Names. No 


. of Acres. 


John Bleiler, 


" 392 


Geo. PofT, 


2IO 


T. J. Bragg, Sen., - 


420 


A. Rust, - 


225 


J. M. Chadwick, 


- 24O 


C. J. Simmons, 


ISO 


Peter Chandler, 


SO 


J. S. & L. S. Smock, 


280 


D. W. Clark, - 


- 3SO 


D. S. Sutherland, 


167 


H. G. Cleveland, - 


220 


J. B. Stearns' estate, 


380 


Robert Crow, - 


- 322 


P. & N. B. Treat, 


l65 


C. Delano, 


24O 


S. Truax, 


320 


M. Geigle, 


- ICO 


F. M. Wagner, 


225 


Jacob Kundert, 


560 


Thos. Walker, 


l35 


A. Ludlow, 


1,766 


John Wenger, - 


220 


R. Nalty, 


320 


W. S. Wescott, - 


35° 


Henry Parr, 


- I20 


Wescott & Chandler, 


200 



84 History of Green County. 

The following are the principal stock-raisers and 
dealers in Monroe: J. M. Chadwick, who, with his 
brother, J. C. Chadwick, of Juda, ships about three- 
fourths of the stock that is shipped from the county; J. 
S. and L. S. Smock, importers and dealers; Wm. Brown, 
one of the first in the county to import fine cattle; A. 
Ludlow, who shipped to New York the present year 
the largest drove of Durham cattle ever shipped from 
the state by one man; T. J. Bragg; G. O. Stearns; 
Hodge Bros. 

There are four cheese factories in the township, of 
which Jacob Kundert, George Figy, G. O. Stearns, and 
W. S. Wescott, have each one factory. Two of them 
make Swiss, and two of them make American cheese. 

Monroe held her first town meeting April 3, 1849, at 
the court house. One hundred and forty-nine voters were 
jDresent, but hardly any of them had ever attended a town 
meeting, and no one seemed to know how to proceed. 
After an awkward pause, some one, tired of playing 
Mr. Micawber, exclaimed, "What do they do at town 
meetings?" Mr. Daniel S. Sutherland, who, when a 
boy, had attended town meetings in New York, re- 
plied, "first, they put some one in the chair, and then 
they go to work." Mr. Sutherland was then called to 
the chair, and this is the work they did: Taxes of $125 
for contingent expenses, $25 for the support of the 
poor, $200 for making and repairing roads and bridges, 
and $300 for schools were voted; the running at large 
of domestic animals, and, as the record says, other inci- 
dental questions were considered, and the usual town 
officers were elected. 



History of Green County, 85 

OFFICERS OF TOWN OF MONROE FROM 1849 TO '77 INCLUSIVE. 

CHAIRMEN. 

D. S. Sutherland. C. S. Foster, (2 years). 

H. Rust. A. L. Cleveland, (2 years). 

T. N. Machin. Samuel Truax. 

C. S. Foster, (2 years). Wm. Brown, (2 years). 
Jas. Bintliff. Norman Churchill. 
L. Hurlbut. J. V. Richardson. 

S. Truax, (vice L.H. resigned). James H. Van Dyke. 

E. T. Gardner. W. H. Pierce. 

Hiram Rust. John Bolender, (2 years.) 

F. H. West. Lewis McKahan. 

A. L. Cleveland. John Bolender, (3 years). 
Daniel S. Sutherland. 

CLERKS. 

H. B. Poyer, (3 years). W. W. Wright, (2 years). 

B. Dunwiddie, (2 years). J. C. Richardson. 

D. B. Priest. Joseph Peters, (2 years). 

E. C. Moulton, (vice D.B.P.) J. Jacob Tschudy. 

J. C. Richardson, (3 years). Lewis Rote, (14 years). 



'3* 



EARLY HISTORY OF THE VILLAGE OF 

MONROE. 

READ IN MONROE MARCH 21, 1876. 



The first house in the vicinity of the Village of Mon- 
roe was that built by Hiram Rust and Leonard Ross, 
Hn the summer of 1834. In the winter of 1834-5, these 
"two bachelor housekeepers were the only white men 
in the township, and they had a full taste of the pleas- 
ures of solitude. They had little work; to do, and were 
entirely free from that anxious hurry and bustle that 
cheats most housekeepers out of the calm, peaceful hour 
which should follow a good dinner. After each meal 
they sat back comfortably from the table to talk and 
"feed their fancies with sugared suppositions." Some- 
times while they were thus engaged, the squaws came 
in, and, dipping their fingers into the pork dish on the 
table, transferred its contents to their hair. When the 
feminine love of ornament had been thus gratified, Mr. 
. Rust usually gave his visitors bread, with which they 
• sopped out the remaining gravy, and made a good din- 
Mier, Though they did not use them themselves, the 
-squaws conceived a violent fancy for the knives seen on 
ifche white men's table. Frequently, after their visits, 
iwo or three knives were missing; but, in a day or two, 



History of Green County. 87 

one of the noble braves, aesthetically weaker, if not 
morally stronger, than his squaw, would come in, and, 
without any talk about the woman's tempting him, lay 
the knives on the table and go away in silence. The 
chief sometimes compelled Indians to return stolen arti- 
cles. When Mr. Cornelius was numbered among the 
bachelor housekeepers of this vicinity, an Indian bor- 
rowed a eun at the cabin to shoot a deer which he r ; aid 
he had seen but a minute before. Mr. Enos wont with 
the Indian to see him shoot. They went cautiously, so 
as not to alarm the deer. Sometimes the Indian stopped 
and listened, always making Mr, Enos stop too. At 
each of these pauses he contrived to increase the dis- 
tance between him and Mr. Enos. When they were 
several feet apart he lay down in the tall grajs, pretend- 
ing he wanted to listen with his ear on the ground. 
Mr. Enos waited until his patience was exhausted and 
then went on; but the Indian was not in the place where 
he had dropped down, and though three white men 
looked for him all night, they could not find him. The 
next winter, for two bushels of corn, the Winnebago 
chief had the gun returned. The Indians had a sense 
of honor which made an Indian's promise as reliable as 
a white man's, and, as far as they could be, they were 
hospitable. The squaws were much more willing to 
give away their maple sugar than the whites were to 
eat it, and when they had soup, visitors were always in- 
vited to partake. A volume might be made of the early 
settlers' reminiscences of the Indians, and the habits of 
the vanished race are curious enough to warrant a still 



-88 History of Green County. 

further digression from the history of our own town 
and village. One gentleman observed the progress of 
an Indian courtship. The girl proposed to her hesitat- 
ing admirer that they should take a march of twenty- 
five or thirty miles to see how well she could do the 
work of a squaw. They went, she carrying all the 
things usually carried on a march, and doing all the 
work. He was satisfied with this trial of her strength, 
and soon after their return to the camp they were 
married. 

In 1835, Mr. Paine built the first house built in the 
village. It was near the place now occupied by the 
house on what is known as the Capt. Foster place, and 
it marked the spot where Mr. Paine had concealed him- 
self from the Indians in the Black Hawk war. A little 
later in the season, Mr. Jarvis Rattan built the second 
house. A house of that day was a log house. A year later, 
Milwaukee contained only two frame, and Chicago only 
two brick houses. The first white child born in Monroe 
was a daughter of Mr. Paine's, and the last Indian born 
here was born on the sunny side of Mr. Paine's house, 
the first winter of his residence here. The Indians had 
only stopped there to cook something which they had 
shot, and, when the pappoose was but an hour old its 
mother bathed it in snow and swung it over her back, 
and its journey west began. 

In 1S36-7, Robert Ream, George McFadden, and 
Mordecai Kelly settled here with their families. Mr. 
Ream was the father of Vinnie Ream, and was the first 
postmaster in Monroe. In the spring of 1838 he moved 



History of Green County. 89 

to Madison to keep tavern in a log house, which was 
then just a year old, and which was the first house built 
in Madison. 

In 1S37, two frame buildings, one a store the other' 
a tavern, were erected here by the firm of Bininger, 
Smith & Paine. The lumber was brought from Penn- 
sylvania, down the Alleghany and Ohio rivers to the 
Mississippi, then up the Mississippi to Galena, whence 
it was hauled across the country. The firm failed, and 
in less than a year the store was closed ; but soon after 
the failure, Mr. Jacob Ly Brand opened a store in the 
same building. 

In the spring of 1838, Mr. John Hart, now of Mil- 
waukee, started with a stock of ready-made clothing 
from Milwaukee to Galena, where he intended to open 
a store. When he had advanced on his journey as far 
as the hill which is south of the railroad in Monroe, one 
of his horses suddenly sickened and died. The only 
man in the village who had horses was Joseph Paine, 
and he had so few that Mr. Hart could neither buy nor 
hire one for the remainder of his journey. Mr. Paine 
said, however, that this was probably as good a point as 
Galena for a store, and that he had a log house which 
might be appropriated to that use. As it was impossi- 
ble to go on with one horse, Mr. Hart remained. He 
sold on credit, and so, when horses became more numer- 
ous, there was still a reason for his remaining; but in 
time all bills were paid. The year 1838 also brought 
to the village Mr. John Porter and his family from 
Missouri. 



90 Histoiy of Green County. 

The next year there was a school. It was taught by 
Miss Lucy Goddard, whose home was in "the state," 
as Illinois was called then. Everybody contributed 
something towards her salary, and the contract pro- 
Tided for her to board 'round. About twenty children 
were in attendance, several of them coming from Clarno. 
The same summer the Rev. James Ash, who lived on 
Mr. Austin's farm just out of the village, and who be- 
longed to the Rock River Conference, organized the 
first religious society in the town. It began with less 
than a dozen members, but is still in existence, and is 
now the oldest society in the county. The first meeting 
was held at the house of Dixon Bailey, northwest of the 
village. None of the villagers joined the society, but 
most of them attended its meetings. 

[The contest for the county seat, which convulsed the village 
from 1S38 to '40, having been already described in the sketch of the 
county, is omitted here.] 

Let us now picture to ourselves this place as it ap- 
peared in 1840. The typical log house of that time 
contained but one room. This room had one window, 
one door, and a fire place with an outside chimney, 
which was built of sticks and mud. Other features of 
the domicil were less uniform. If the occupants were 
wealthy and somewhat inclined to luxury, they had a 
board floor. If they made no pretensions to wealth or 
elegance, they dispensed with a floor or' had one made 
of split logs called puncheons. The great fault of the 
house was that, when the door was open, the smoke 
from the fire place was very likely to enter the room. 



History of Green County. 91 

This evil could not be so easily obviated by keeping the 
door closed as ignorant people may suppose. Usually,, 
the one window was an aperture provided with a 
wooden shutter that excluded light as well as air* 
Consequently, either the door or window was always 
open, the choice between them being determined by the 
direction of the wind. Most of the settlers had come 
from states farther south than this, and did not at once 
adapt their habits to a northern climate. The first 
thing to do each morning was to let in the light. Light 
having been admitted, the draught of the fire was regu- 
lated by putting up a cloth partition between the open- 
ing and the fire place. The cloth was easily suspended 
from the roof or from the floor of the loft. The loft — 
when there was one, for it was not found in all houses 
— was reached by a ladder, and was used as a sleeping 
room. The roof was made of what the Yankees called 
shakes, and western people called clap boards, held in 
place by logs laid crosswise. The advantages of such 
a roof were three. It afforded wakeful persons an 
opportunity of studying geography of the heavens with- 
out getting the neck-ache. It enabled people who had 
no door key to barricade the door on the inside and then 
go out on top of the house and view the landscape o'er 
like a prairie dog before they went away. It also 
enabled visitors who arrived when the lord of the 
manor was absent to go in and make themselves at 
home. Perhaps this advantage was not apparent in the 
village, but in the country many a traveller slipped in- 
to the house of a brother bachelor to warm and rest 



Q2 History of Green County. 

himself, and then departed in the same free, if not easy, 
way. There was no cellar. Vegetahles were kept in 
root houses, and pigs ran under the house. If the 
wealth or size of the family increased, a second room, in 
all respects like the first, was built, the two apartments 
being connected by a door. But it was a very large 
family that required two rooms, and so common was it 
for a house to consist of one room that house and room 
were synonymous terms. A lady who came here in 
1840 was surprised, early one morning, to hear a girl 
say she had just mopped three houses. Her admiration 
of the girl's energy was somewhat diminished when she 
found the labor had all been expended in three diminu- 
tive rooms. 

It is easy to enumerate the houses here in 1840. 
Three different parts of the village were known by three 
different names. Beginning with New Mexico proper, 
the most important house was Jacob Andrick's, now 
the residence of Mr. Niles. Across the road was the 
home of his brother, Christian Andrick. Near by was 
a third building used at different times as post office, 
court house, and store. In North, or Paine's, New 
Mexico was Mr. LyBrand's store, a frame building. It 
stood just west of Mr. Paine's public square, which is 
now known as the little park south of the railroad. 
East of the park or square, was Mr. Hart's house, in 
the front part of which -was his store. Just south of 
where the railroad bridge is, was a log house in which, 
to use the old phrase, school was kept. Between the 
school house and Mr. Hart's store was a cabin occupied 



History of Green County. 93 

by Mrs. Churchill and her family. Near Mr. Sheehan's 
present residence was a frame building, which, in a dif- 
ferent locality, is known to us as the planing mill, but 
which was known then as " the tavern." Near the 
depot grounds, was the blacksmith shop of Buckskin 
Brown. The log house on Capt. Foster's place was 
occupied by Robert Kirkendoll and his family, and the 
Ream house, near the site of Mr. Geo. Spangler's resi- 
dence, was the home of Mr. Joseph Smith, who had 
formerly lived in Clarno. Last, but not least in impor- 
tance, among the twelve houses contained in the three 
villages was that occupied by Mr. John Porter just west 
of the spring. This was the only house in what was 
then called Monroe. It was built by Mr. Rattan, be- 
fore the people were hampered in the selection of 
building spots by such things as streets, and when the 
county seat was laid out, was found to be in the road. 
The Kelly and Kirkendoll families had lived in it, and 
it was here Mr. Rattan lived in 1S37, when he raised 
wheat on the court house square and threshed it on a 
threshing floor on the site of the Universalist church. 
Here, in the summer of '40, was the first wedding in 
Monroe; and Mr. Joseph Kelly, who was then justice 
of the peace, came from Clarno, to perform the cere- 
mony which allowed Mr. Joseph McConnell, a resident 
of " the state," to take away Miss Eurana Porter. The 
house was a desirable one on account of its proximity to 
the spring, and as the thoroughfare was not crowded, it 
was allowed to remain some time longer. Like two or 
three other cabins whose builders had gone away, it 



94 History of Green County. 

was the property of any one who obtained possession 
of it. Accordingly, when Mr. Porter, in the fall of '40, 
announced his intention of moving out, two or three 
families made preparations to move in ; and the question 
most discussed in the social circles in these three villages 
came to be, who is to live in the house by the spring? 
When the dawn of the long looked for moving day was 
seen at last, Mr. Porter solved this puzzling problem by 
carrying the goods of one of his neighbors into the 
house before his own were carried out of it. A 
rail fence was made around the house, and in the 
summer of 1S41 those who passed that way leaned over 
the rails and gazed with ever new surprise at the un- 
wonted sight of flowering beans and poppies. Fences 
were regarded as a luxury rather than as a necessity in 
1840, though most families having no permanent fence 
had a few rails to fence a garden in the summer, and a 
stack yard in the winter. A fence was the more con- 
venient because hogs ran at large, and there were four 
times as many hogs as persons in the county. All the 
pigs went to market then, or at least to town, and 
thronged as mendicants around every door unprotected 
by a fence. They had all the energetic boldness of pio- 
neers, and, when the outside gleanings proved insuffi- 
cient to satisfy their hunger, they entered at the open 
door. Tradition tells of a sorrowful company at the 
tavern whose roasted wild turkey, left by the cook a 
moment while other things were preparing for the 
table, was seized by these hungry sentinels and borne 
away. 



Histo7'y of Green County. 95 

As there was hardly anything to be bought, the log 
house of 1840 contained only such furniture as had been 
brought from some former home, or the ingenuity of its 
inmates had contrived. Benches supplied the place of 
chairs; dry goods boxes served as tables; bottles were 
used as candlesticks; and a rag in a saucer of lard was 
a not unusual kind of lamp. A good bedstead was 
made in this way : the ends of two poles being stuck 
into the side of the house, the other ends, which pro- 
jected into the room, were supported by poles resting on 
the floor. A few poles were laid on the frame work 
thus made, and the bedstead was completed. When 
there was company, the bedstead was sometimes made 
to support a temporary table. In houses of two rooms 
the inner door was accustomed to come down and serve 
as a table; and, since the cotton cloth used then for table- 
cloths allowed all the moisture on the tea-cups to pene- 
trate to the door, such inner doors appeared ornamented 
with a series of rings, very suggestive of good dinners 
to those who understood them, but very perplexing 
to those unaccustomed to society. Aristocratic families 
had clocks with weights hanging down to the floor, — 
clocks which had kept time in the family for more than 
a generation. Next in the social scale were families that, 
having no heirlooms in clocks, had been able to pur- 
chase "patent clocks." Common folks went by the 
sun. 

Now and then a wall was adorned with a portrait of 
George Washington, at which little boys were expect- 
ed to look whenever called on to give an account of 



96 Histoiy of Gree?i County. 

themselves. A more common household treasure was 
one of a character similar to the epitaph which the 
Vicar of Wakefield hung on his wall. It was a picture 
of a willow and of a funereal woman pulling a child by 
the hand and leaning over a tombstone, whereon were 
written the names of the departed. But, while the epi- 
taph addressed itself to the wife only, — "inspiring her 
with a passion for fame, and constantly reminding her of 
her end," — the more modern ornament directed its me- 
mento mori to all the family alike, and joined to the 
warning a promise of a moderately enduring name on 
a guarded tombstone, provided (every promise has its 
limitation), the person addressed died while there was 
still vacant space on the stone. But the especial delight 
of every housekeeper was seen in the pictures on her 
dishes. In those days, plain, sober folks, ate their pork 
and potatoes from plates adorned with pictures of archi- 
tecture more wonderful than the Pantheon, the originals 
of which could have been found only in some lunatic's 
castles in Spain ; and, when dinner was over, these strange 
combinations of the useful and beautiful were all dis- 
plaved on a shelf called a dresser, where each plate 
rested on its own edge, and each cup stood in its own 
saucer. It must not be supposed, though, that the fore- 
fathers of the hamlet lived entirely on pork and potatoes. 
As late as 1S43, in one week and from one herd, a 
hunter killed in this vicinity fifty deer, and other kinds 
of game were abundant. The bee trees contained honey 
for all, while plums and all kinds of berries grew in the 
greatest abundance where the village is now. Crab 



History of Green County, 97 

apples sweetened with molasses had a prominent place 
on every table, and the festal board was often graced 
with sheep sorrel pies, and sometimes with mandrake 
pies. 

The deserted cabin used as a school house deserves 
a little of our attention. The seats had no backs, and 
there were no desks. The children sat doubled over 
like figure lives, and held their books in their laps. 
Sometimes, while they buzzed their lessons over to 
themselves, they rocked back and forth, to the time of 
their buzzing. The little abecedarians rocked and 
buzzed as many hours as the oldest scholar. Sometimes 
they swung their feet, which hung several inches above 
the floor. Sometimes they curled them up under them 
for warmth. Along two sides of the room was a shelf, 
where, when the master had time to set them a copy, 
the older children wrote. Parents had no fear lest the 
children, on coming home at night, should announce a 
change of text books. Those who had grammars 
parsed. Those who had arithmetics ciphered through 
a great many sums, and the master helped them on the 
hard ones. But one lady says she attended school here 
from 1 84 1 to '51, and never studied arithmetic until the 
last year, when she was fifteen years of age. Not until 
she was thirteen did she begin to learn to write. She 
committed her reading book and spelling book to mem- 
ory, was called the best speller in school, and her friends 
were well pleased with her progress. 

A description of the society of Monroe in 1840 would 
be a description of the society of the county. Socially, 

9* 



98 History of Green County. 

village and county were one. Everybody in the county 
knew everybody else, and there was a community of 
pursuits, interests, hardships, and sympathies that brought 
all the settlers into one brotherhood. The social centre 
of the county was the tavern. Private houses being 
small, most social gatherings were necessarily here ; and 
here, too, everybody went, as often as he could, to learn 
the news and see his neighbors. So vividly does this 
tavern stand out in all the chronicles of the early settlers 
that a student of the county's history soon is prone to 
think he, too, sees it in its olden form. Let us follow 
such a retrospective student as, in fancy, he enters unseen 
at the old tavern door. Perchance the first person he 
sees is Mrs. Paine, the voluble hostess, who has just 
broken off a long story of the Indian war, to discipline 
the children with her slipper. All undismayed, he seats 
himself and waits, sure that she will soon resume her 
story. In the intervals given to government, there is 
leisure to observe the other occupants of the room. 
Here is a group just returned from a " burying " at An- 
drick's grave yard. There was no clergyman with them, 
for there is none this week within several miles. Here 
is Mr. LyBrand, who, with his precise and punctilious 
ways, seems strangely out of place in a new country; 
and yet he cannot do business where there is competi- 
tion. If you double the value of his goods, his customers 
get twice as much for their money. Reduce the value 
of the goods one half, and they will wait on their 
shelves forever for the price that was fore-ordained for 
them. In a few years he must be moving on to the 



Histoi'y of Grcc?i County. 99 

West, but whenever he goes, he will be remembered 
kindly by many he leaves behind him. His are the 
warmest friendships, the fullest of unselfish sacrifice, 
that our unseen listener hears of among the settlers. 
Leaning over the fire is Mr. O. C. Smith, of the old 
firm, Bininger, Smith & Paine. He and his brother, 
w r ho together had $10,000, are spoken of as the two 
men who came to the county wealthy. The older 
brother is dead, the property is gone, and the younger 
brother is destined to be laid in a pauper's grave. Near 
the door is Mr. John Hart. He is the owner of a small 
library, which has been read and discussed over and 
over again by the reading part of the community. 
Reading: matter is so scarce that women sometimes take 
Washington and the doleful woman from their frames, 
in order to read again the bits of newspaper back of 
the pictures. 

Our unseen observer stays a long time in his quiet 
corner. Meanwhile, the visitors come and go. Some- 
times the observer sits alone; sometimes he has the 
company of a noisy group of miners, who make the 
walls ring with their jokes and quarrels. Now, there 
enters a young man destined to become an honored 
member of the legislature of another state. A few 
hours ago, hearing there was a letter for him in the 
post office, he dropped his work and hastened after it, 
only to learn that he could not have the letter until he 
paid the postage. Now, he is asking his friends to lend 
him money. Two or three wallets are quickly brought 
out, and soon he holds the precious letter. It forms its 



ioo History of Green County. 

own envelope, and is fastened with small red wafers. 
Where we might expect the three-cent stamp to be, the 
postmaster has written twenty-five cents. Now, atten- 
tion is fixed on a victim of the toothache. Red pepper 
and hot needles proving powerless to reach the aching 
nerve, the sufferer thinks he must go to the dentist ten 
miles away. The dentist is a blacksmith, who, after his 
patient has lain down upon the floor, sits down on him, 
and pulls the tooth out with a turnkey. But here is 
a man who bids the sufferer think no more of the black- 
smith and the turnkey. He produces a small piece of 
hickory wood called a punch, which he directs another 
man to hold against the aching tooth, and with a hammer 
he pounds the wood until the tooth flies from its socket. 
The victim groans a little as he finds they have knocked 
out the wrong tooth; but they try again, this time suc- 
cessfully. Now, some one announces that Sunday 
week, there'll be preaching at Mr. Austin's house; and 
another brings news of a bee at Mr. Andrick's. Still, 
the unseen man sits in his corner. He listens to the 
conversation of men who astonish him by their general 
information, as well as by their shrewd, common sense; 
and then he gives ear to some good dame who describes 
the process by which she makes saleratus from ashes, 
and to another who retails the contents of the almanac 
that " he " bought at the low price of ten cents, when 
he went to Galena. He listens to conversations in 
which neighbors tell, with great minuteness, the par- 
ticulars of the journey here, the events which induced 
them and their brothers and their uncles to come, what 



History of Green County. 101 

time of day these events occurred, whether it was be- 
fore or after dinner, and how they know it could not have 
been early in the morning. The unsuspected listener 
sees that, for uneducated people, in a new country, this 
talk is almost the only avenue of escape from intellect- 
ual torpidity, and is ready to applaud it as he applauds 
the action of a man who, when confined many years in 
a dark dungeon, kept the use of his faculties by hunting 
three little pins upon the floor, throwing them down 
again as soon as found. And our friend is neither 
shocked nor surprised by the discovery that many of 
the settlers are intemperate; for he knows that never 
until 1 80S was there a temperance society of any kind 
in any part of the United States, and that the society 
organized then, like all the temperance societies of the 
next twenty-five years, allowed members to drink liquors 
at public dinners, dedications of churches, ordinations 
of clergymen, and ministerial conventions. He knows 
that when, in 1833, at a meeting of the American Tem- 
perance Union in Philadelphia, some one advocated total 
abstinence from all that may intoxicate, even the original 
apostles of the temperance movement opposed it, on 
the ground that it would be injurious to health, and that 
they regarded him who advocated it as a crazy radical, 
likely to bring disgrace upon the cause. 

And now a dance at the tavern, to which fathers 
and mothers come with all their children, affords a good 
opportunity to study the styles of dress of a dozen 
different years, in nearly as many different states. In 
the course of the evening, liquors seasoned with nut- 



102 History of Green County. 

meg are passed around. In the ball-room, half a dozen 
women sip from one glass; in the bar-room, men drink 
from bottles, something less than half a dozen wine 
glasses at a sip. In the bits of talk to which he listens, 
the visitor is surprised by the changes that many of the 
names of the settlers are undergoing; he observes, for 
example, the change of Clarno into Clino; Chilton into 
Shelton; Hawthorne into Hartharn ; and Hensonlr-i-on' 
into Hanson Ireons. Occasionally, in the pauses of the 
dance, he hears the people say, in joyful manner, to- 
morrow we shall know; I'll have mine to-morrow; the 
peddler comes to-morrow. It is Mr. Ludlow upon 
whose coming these expectations hang. To his energy 
the people are indebted for many comforts and conven- 
iences otherwise unattainable. His route is from Chi- 
cago to Madison, via Rockford, Belvidere, and Monroe; 
and, though there are only blazed trees and Indian trails 
to mark the way, he makes the trip every month. In 
the summer, he crosses the rivers in ferry boats. In the 
spring and fall, when the strength of the ice is uncer- 
tain, he first walks across. If there are no signs of 
danger, he crosses with one horse. If it still seems safe, 
the wagon is taken over. His customers are always 
watching for him at the appointed time. Hastening to 
meet him, they ask, " did you remember my tobacco?" 
" have you brought some pretty calico?" And he is al- 
ways able to say he has remembered and brought what- 
ever they wish. He stops a day or two at the tavern, 
intrusting his money, done up in a leather mitten, to the 
landlady, who puts it under the floor. Such is the hon- 



History of Green County, 103 

esty of the people that although everybody goes to see 
his goods, which seem to be scattered all over the 
tavern, and although in all his travels he has never 
had a lock on his wagon, he has never lost a single 
article. 

The observer has marked many other good qualities 
of the settlers. He sees that it is by their own force of 
character they make their way. Many of them are the 
children of pioneers, and they have never been given 
those weapons for the battle of life which we call educa- 
tion and culture. The habit of encounterinsr and over- 
coming obstacles as pioneers has developed within them 
a tendency to resistance which is not always agreeable,, 
but their life brings them more virtues than faults- 
They are ever hopeful and helpful. They feel it nc* 
hardship to go ten or twenty miles to care for the sick 
and sorrowing. There is a spirit of kindly affection 
among them never called out in older places. The lit- 
tle successes of each one are rejoiced over by all, while 
individual misfortunes are regarded as common calami- 
ties, which all hands are ready to repair. They are all 
as one kindred. The good matrons are everybody's 
aunts; and their husbands, unless they happen to be 
squires, like Squire Rust and Squire Gardner, are 
uncles, like Uncle Jimmy Hawthorne, and Uncle Dan- 
iel Sutherland. All find their own good qualities re- 
flected back to them from their neighbors and their 
county. When asked concerning the home of their 
adoption, they say it is the best new country God ever 
made. And, as our historical student brings his long 



104 History of Green County. 

sojourn at the tavern to an end, he says to himself, "These 
patriotic settlers are worthy of their county. 

' They are each of the breed of* the heroes, 

The manhood attempered in strife, 
Strong hands that go lightly to labor, 
True hearts that take comfort in life. 

In"?each is the seed to replenish 

The world with the vigor it needs, 
The centre of honest affections, 

The impulse to generous deeds.' " 

A building intended for a temporary court house was 
erected in the summer of 1S40, where the United States 
House now stands. The contractors were A. J. Suth- 
erland and James Campbell. In the fall, however, be- 
fore its completion, it was accidentally destroyed by fire. 
The next spring, the county commissioners agreed with 
Demas Beach to lend him $400 for six years, for which 
consideration he was to erect a building in which the 
county should have the use of certain rooms. This 
building, since known as the American House, had a 
court room and county offices on the second floor, while 
the ground floor was used for a store and dwelling. 
When court was not in session, a shoe shop was kept 
in the jury room. The building was ready for use in 
November, 1S41. 

In the spring of 1841, one of the citizens of Monroe, 
who had endured many of the hardships of frontier life, 
was called on to bear trouble of a new kind. The un- 
fortunate man was the postmaster, Mr. Noah Phelps. 
The postmaster's duties were not arduous. Only three 
newspapers were taken at the office. Sometimes, owing 



History of Green County. 105 

to high water, there was no mail for a month, and the 
receipts of the office were only about $3.00 a year.. 
Whatever the duties of the office were, Mr. Phelps per- 
formed them faithfully and well — always thawing: and 
drying the mail by the fire when it had been dipped in 
the river, and always striving hard, as a faithful servant 
of Uncle Sam, to avoid being convinced by letter wri- 
ters, whose postage was in proportion to the distance 
their letters were sent, that the continent was only five 
hundred miles wide. But political parties had been or- 
ganized in Monroe in 1S40, and it happened that the 
party which elected Gen. Harrison president that year 
was not the party which received the aid and sympathy 
of the postmaster, who accordingly lost his office, being 
the first victim brought under the political axe in Green 
County. It was several years, however, before elective 
offices were made dependent on political views. Com- 
paratively few of the early settlers had any aspiration 
for office, and a man who had both the ambition and 
the qualifications, received the support of all parties.. 
For years, Mr. Rittenhouse held, at the same time, the 
three offices, clerk of the circuit court, county clerk, 
and register of deeds. He spoke of them as " my offi- 
ces," and everybody else, both before and after election 
day, called them " Rittenhouse's offices." 

Occasional shopping expeditions to other places were 
still necessary. The shoppers travelled in a covered 
wagon, and carried — besides the load intended for mar- 
ket — corn for the horses, food for themselves, cookings 

utensils and bedding, a gun, and a scythe for cutting- 

10 



106 History of Gree?i County. 

fodder. (In those days women preferred to have their 
husbands go shopping with them.) Bad as the roads 
were, there was some pleasure travel. In November, 
1S42, a party went from Monroe to Mineral Point to 
see a murderer hung. 

In 1842, the county built a kind of bastile. Remem- 
bering the fate of a house built upon the sand, the com- 
missioners paid fifteen dollars for a foundation of stone. 

1S43 is memorable, in the annals of Monroe, as the 
year in which James R. Vineyard, a state senator, was 
tried here for the murder of C. P. Arndt, also a senator, 
or councilor, as the name was then. An account of the 
murder reads like a telegram from Texas. An alter- 
cation arose during a session of the council, and, imme- 
diately after the adjournment, Vineyard shot his antago- 
nist in the council chamber. The jury acquitted him, 
and the acquittal was the signal for great rejoicing. 
Mr. Vineyard received his friends at the new Monroe 
House, and entertained them so well that they rose 
almost to a level with those men of Shakespeare's, 

So full of valor that they smote the air 

For breathing in their faees, beat the ground 

For kissing of their feet; 

and when the question, were you ever intoxicated, is 
propounded to the most temperate of the old settlers, it 
is likely to elicit the reply, Yes, when Vineyard was 
acquitted. 

A brewery was built this year, and several new 
buildings made more clear the outline of the public 
square: the Monroe House on the north side, built by 
John R. Walling; a second dwelling on the west side; 



Histo?y of Green County. 107 

two stores on the south side, built by Beach, Goodhue 
and Slawson; and the old frame store of New Mexico, 
which was now moved over to the north side. There 
had been a tailor shop on the east side a year. 

By 1S44, one-third of the land in the county was 
entered. Soon after the land came into market, a great 
number of acres, including much timber land, were 
bought by New England speculators — a proceeding 
that the settlers regarded as iniquitous. All non-resi- 
dents who owned land were called speculators, and 
opposition to speculators was held to be an essential 
element of loyalty to the county. The usual form of 
opposition was stripping the timber from the land of 
the obnoxious class. To a great extent it was the spec- 
ulators' timber that fenced the farms, and kept the 
cooking stoves and the saw mills running. Ordinarily, 
wood cut from any speculator's land was good enough; 
but a speculator owning land east of Monroe died, and 
(as though his death was an addition to his former in- 
dignity to the settlers), from that time until the timber 
was all used, his land, known as "dead man's land," 
was the favorite place of supply in this part of the 
county. Until 1844 the speculators made no effort to 
defend themselves, but in that year a number of them 
engaged J. A. Bingham to prosecute every one found 
cutting their timber, and for a time the old hatred of 
speculators was forgotten in the new desire to resist a 
citizen who dared to become a representative and de- 
fender of the obnoxious class. For a year or two, it 
seemed as though the more the timber cutters were 



10S History of Green County. 

prosecuted, the more they developed a martyr-like per- 
sistency and a very un-martyr-like aggressiveness. 
These qualities might have reached the heroic, had not 
the courage of the choppers wasted away so rapidly 
that their conduct became the laughing stock of the 
countv. A brother of Mr. Thomas W. Thompson 
once came from New York to visit him. At Milwau- 
kee he hired horses and a covered carriage for the 
remainder of the journey. Before his visit in Sylvester 
was over, he wanted to see the county town. He 
started, but lost his way. Presently he saw three men 
and three loads of rails standing in the road before him. 
Before he was near enough to ask for information, they 
all started. Two of the men had horse teams, and they 
soon disappeared. Air. Thompson then called loudly 
to the man with the ox team to stop, but the more he 
called, the more the man pounded his oxen. Psycholo- 
gists may well tell of the strange influence which, under 
favorable circumstances, a man who concentrates his 
mind on one thing is capable of wielding, even if he 
does not utter a word. In this case, the circumstances 
were favorable, and the concentration was perfect; and, 
in an incredibly short time, both oxen and rails seemed 
to have been inspired with the belief that only a specu- 
lator would ride in such a fine carriage as that which 
was coming behind them. The oxen galloped, and the 
rails flew off at the sides; and the last Air. Thompson 
saw of the driver, he was clinging with both hands to the 
wagon, from which the last rail was gone, while the 
oxen were making time to which Air. Thomuson, in 



Histoiy of Green County. 109 

his amazed and bewildered condition, was entirely un- 
able to bring his high-spirited horses. 

In 1S44, tne brick court house was begun. The 
contractor, Mr. Wm. Dunton, burned his own brick, 
and it was not until April, '46, that the building was 
ready for use. A cemetery was laid out in '44, just 
west of the village, which at that time contained twen- 
ty-nine dwellings; and a frame school house was built 
the same year, near the present residence of Dr. Mon- 
roe. In this school house, in the summer of '45, 'Sir. 
and Mrs. Matthew Wells, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Truax, 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Kirkendoll, uniting: under the 
rules and regulations of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, formed the first religious society in the village. 
As late as 1845, there was but one well in Monroe, 
that one being on the place where Mr. Banta lives. It 
was generally regarded as woman's work to carry 
water from the spring; and those who had large fam- 
ilies and who lived far from the spring had in this way 
all the exercise they needed. This was especially the 
case when it happened, as it sometimes did, that after a 
laborious wading through the mud, seeing thev were 
almost home, and going into a joyful calculation of how 
long the two pails of water they carried would last, 
how many faces, windows, and dishes it would wash, 
how many potatoes and turnips it would boil, they 
slipped in the mud, and, like the milkmaid whose story 
they had so often pondered at school, fell prostrate, los- 
ing the treasure so full of promise a moment before. 

Nevertheless, these women did not encourage men to 

10* 



ii'o History of Gree7i County. 

drink anything stronger than water, as is proved by the 
existence of a temperance society, which in the fall of 
'45 had ninety members. Nor did this daily exercise 
weaken in any way the effect of the common law 
which forbade any woman, especially any young woman, 
to walk when she went to a dance. Though she might 
have carried the water for a washing during the day, 
and might have done the washing, yet, however short 
the distance to the tavern, she must ride to the 
party. It was a natural result of this social law that, 
before the days of livery stables, comparatively few 
young men could take any one to a dance. Another 
result was another inexorable law forbidding any young 
man to invite one girl without inviting, or persuading 
some one else to invite, all the other girls in the family. 
One lady says she has been one of seventeen girls to go 
to a party with one young man, and that she has been 
to many parties to which two gentlemen escorted all 
the young ladies. At supper the ladies sat down first, 
and their partners waited on them. A man compelled 
to wait on seventeen hungry girls would hardly care to 
practice his steps much in the ball room, or if he did, he 
would probably go too fast for the music; but it was 
mercifully provided that, once at the party, a girl might 
receive, until it was time to ride home, the devoted at- 
tentions of any pedestrian there, and accordingly all the 
gentlemen served at the supper table. 

Long before this, the learned professions were repre- 
sented in Green County; but, with a few honorable ex- 
ceptions, they were represented, as they are in all new 



History of Green County. 1 1 1 

countries, by men poorly qualified for their work. The 
principal physician based his practice on the belief that 
when blisters, calomel, and the lancet will not save a 
man, nothing will save him, but that bleeding is then to 
be resorted to in order to make him die more easily; 
and he is said to have bled, blistered, and salivated his 
patients successively or simultaneously with an energy 
that made this a very easy place to die in. Physicians 
seem to have been distinguished by peculiarities in their 
dress, rather than by those in their practice. There was 
one who was always called the calico doctor, not that 
there was anything unusual at that time in the calico 
coat he wore, but the name was distinctive because his 
principal rival always wore buckskin clothes and a coon- 
skin cap. Most of the ministers scorned book learning 
and relied on inspiration. They made up in noise what 
they lacked in ideas. Their favorite subject was the 
day of judgment. One, who spoke in a nasal, sing- 
song tone, described it as a day when the sun will be 
darkened, the moon will be turned to blood, the tangents 
will fly out of their sockets, and the cattle will stick up 
their tails and run. Another, who was heard by those 
of the villagers who remained at home, as well as by 
those gathered in the court room, spoke as follows: 
" In that solemn hour, my dearly beloved bretheren and 
sisteren, all sinners will be call-ed before the judgment 
seat to receive their sentences. First, the murderers will 
be call-ed, then the burglars and highway robbers, then 
the horse thieves and the gamblers, and last and worst 
of all the Universalists will be call-ed." There was one 



j 12 History of Green County. 

minister who made some pretense to education. He 
had a Greek testament which, although he could not 
read it, he brought out whenever he found himself 
beaten in a theological argument. With his finger on 
the open page he would say, here is the original Greek, 
which proves that I am right; and, as his brother was, 
like himself, unable to read the passage, this always 
.ended the dispute. Professional men came in the order 
in which there was a demand for them. First appeared 
the doctors, some of whom never thought of doctoring 
until they came here, and most of whom were willing 
to preach. Next were the ministers, and then came the 
lawyers, the first of whom had nothing to do. One 
lawyer came and went away before 1S40, and his dis- 
couraged successor went in 1841. Two came in 1842, 
both of whom would have starved had the law been 
their only means of support. But public sentiment was 
undergoing a curious change. Before 1838, and even 
later, the people had little to do with law, and they 
prospered so well that they were reluctant to change. 
Even the county organization they lamented as an evil. 
But after they had become accustomed to the workings 
of the new government and to the courts, there was a 
reaction in favor of law; and, notwithstanding the dif- 
ference in population, there was more litigation in the 
ten years beginning with 1842, than in the decade next 
following. As an extreme example of this reactionary 
ieeling is quoted the case of Mr. Paine,*who, it is said, 
had forty summons served on him in one day. The 
.number is probably an exaggeration, bat the example 



History of Green County. 113 

is a good one. Though formerly prompt enough in the 
payment of debts, he now refused payment in a number 
of cases, saying, " if you're going to have law here, you 
may as well use it." And there were many who were 
willing to use it. With great freedom of speech and 
manners, with the freest hospitality, and the greatest 
brotherly kindness, there existed a seemingly incompat- 
ible severity of judgment, and an admiring approval of 
all severe punishments. At one time a grand jury in 
Monroe came near indicting a man for playing cards, 
and subpoenaed Mr. F. F. West to explain the nature of 
card playing. Mr. West told the jury he could not give 
the desired information without the assistance of a pack 
of cards. The jury ordered a pack brought in, and Mr. 
West explained its uses at some length, enjoying at the 
end of the explanation the satisfaction of seeing all his 
hearers thoroughly interested and pleased, and some of 
them so enthusiastic that their continued investigations 
were a matter of no doubt whatever. But even in the 
midst of legal proceedings men sometimes showed that 
it was more agreeable to them to fight their own battles 
than to intrust the duty to a lawyer. A case in point is 
that of Mr. Peter Rutledge, one of the early settlers of 
Jefferson, and afterwards a resident of Washington. 
He was indicted for giving a challenge to fight a duel. 
At the trial it appeared that, while riding horseback in 
Washington, he met a man to whom he said: "Here's 
a pistol, d — n you, take it and defend yourself." Mr. 
Rutledge's attorney, the Hon. David Noggle, claimed 
that this was not a challenge, and he was trying to prove 



114 History of Green County. 

that his client was innocent of the charge brought against 
him, when Mr. Rutledge, a Virginian as full of pride 
as any of the F. F. V.'s and as ready to defend his hon- 
or, arose and silenced his advocate with the words, " sit 
down, Xoggle, you don't know what you're talking 
about." He then denied as calumnious the implied as- 
sertion that he did not know how to give a challenge, 
and insisted that no one who understood the law would 
deny that there was one in the words which have been 
quoted. Judge Whiton decided that they did constitute 
a challenge, and the prosecution then went on to show 
that Mr. Rutledge bore a bad reputation before he came 
to Wisconsin, that he had stabbed one man, inflicting a 
dangerous wound. The stabbing was proved, and Mr. 
Rutledge's friends despaired of saving him from the 
penitentiary. They brought rebutting testimony, but 
this made the prisoner more impatient than anything 
that had been said against him. He again took the 
floor, and, in spite of the remonstrances of his and of the 
opposing council, in spite, too, of the repeated order of 
the court to be quiet, he acknowledged the stabbing, 
and gave his reasons for it, and then his reasons for the 
challenge. He gained the sympathy of all jDresent, and 
was acquitted. 

Some of the lawyers who practised here while 
Judge Irvin was on the bench, and the number included 
many whose residence was out of the county, seem to 
have believed, like Aaron Burr, that law is whatever is 
boldly asserted and plausibly maintained, The daemon 
of gush seems to have taken possession of them, and they 



History of Green County. 11-5 

talked so long and so strangely that the justices were 
reduced almost to imbecility, as is shown by the follow- 
ing bit of Green County history: A lawyer, distin- 
guished for education, dignity, and piety, stated his case, 
and the justice said to him: u The right is clearly on 
your side. I think I may decide at once in your favor." 
"Hold on," cried the second lawyer, who, like his op- 
ponent, came from Madison, "I haven't told my side, 
yet." When he had finished, the justice said: •• 1 was 
mistaken, the rig-fit seems now to be on your side." 
" But I have still something more to say," said the first 
lawyer, who then launched forth in long continued 
praises of the majesty of the law, and of the sacred 
responsibilities of the law's officials, closing with a state- 
ment of the duty of this particular justice. The justice 
was much affected by his appeal, but, before he had time 
to give a decision, up sprang the other lawyer, apparent- 
ly in a frenzy of righteous indignation. Pointing con- 
temptuously at his opponent, he said, " that sanctimo- 
nious hypocrite hopes to deceive you by all this cant; 
he takes you for a has^wood man; he thinks he can 
grease and swallow you; can such hypocrisy succeed? 5 
" No," said the now irate justice, "it can no: succeed; 
"I decide in your favor." 

Sometimes, however, the justice showed a remark- 
able ability to weigh conflicting claims, as is shown in 
the case, Harcourt vs. Bedtner. Dr. Harcourt was 
called to prescribe for Mrs. Bedtner, a mile and a half 
away. Arrived at the house, the Doctor found he had 
forgotten his saddle bags, in which were his medicines ; 



n6 History of Green County. 

and he sent Mr. Bedtner after them, When the Doctor 
presented his bill, Mr. Bedtner refused to pay. The 
case was tried before a justice who decided that Mr. 
Bedtner owed nothing, as, in going after the saddle 
bags, he had rendered as great a service as the Doctor 
had rendered him. 

When the district court was in session, the 
lawyers felt obliged to say something that would 
make a strong impression in a short time; for there 
was always a possibility that Judge Irvin would 
adjourn court at a moment's notice, and go hunting. 
The Judge was a man of whom no rival would have 
said to the lady of their choice, as was said to Amy of 
Locksley Hall, "he will hold thee something better than 
his dog, a little dearer than his horse." In the Judge's 
opinion, the three things most essential to a happy exis- 
tence were gun, horse and dog; and to intimate friends 
he stated very frankly his belief that his gun was the 
best gun in the United States, that his pointer, York, 
was the best dog in the world, and that his horse, 
Pedro, was possessed of more sense than any lawyer in 
his court. It was supposed that his strongest feeling 
was his affection for York; and more than one poor 
man, when judgment was rendered against him, rue- 
fully, and probably mistakenly, attributed his misfortune 
to a kick, which in some hour of wanton pride he had 
bestowed upon York. The Judge had' no natural qual- 
ifications for his office above those of any honest, indo- 
lent, pleasure-loving man, who firmly believes that 
everything southern is good, and everything "Yankee" 



History of Green County. 1 1 7 

is thoroughly bad. His talk was more of prairie 
chickens than of law; and his knowledge of law was 
so limited that in court he was in the habit of ordering 
a recess, that he might take his successor, Mr. Whiton, 
then a practising attorney, one side, and ask him the 
law bearing on the case under discussion. The follow- 
ing is said to be a charge given by him to a jury in 1841 : 
" It appears from the evidence that the plaintiff' and 
defendant in this action are brothers-in-law. On the 
Wabash river, in the state of Indiana, they associated 
themselves together for the purpose of swindling their 
neighbors. Not content with that, they got to swind- 
ling each other, and I am like the woman who saw her 
husband and a bear fight: 'fight husband, fight bear; I 
don't care which beats.' And, gentlemen of the jury, 
it is a matter of indifference to me how you bring in 
your verdict." Five minutes after the jury had retired 
the sheriff was instructed to see if they had agreed. A 
negative answer was returned; whereupon, the jury 
was immediately ordered in and discharged. 

At the close of his term of office, Judge Irvin went 
to Texas. Judge Knapp, in his Early Reminiscences 
of Madison, says that, " as penuriousness had prevailed 
over love, leaving only kindness in the bosom of Judge 
Irvin, York was left in the kind family of Joe Kelly at 
Monroe, where he died;" and "the high bred Pedro 
fared worse: he was sold for the purpose of drawing 
the plow and the lumber wagon." Mr. Kelly pro- 
nounces the above a mistake. Judge Irvin was a Vir- 
ginian, and he always spent his winters in the south. 



11 



Ii8 History of Green County. 

During these absences from Wisconsin, York, to whom 
all the old settlers concede a place in the history of 
Green County, was left in Monroe; but when the 
Judge went south to remain both York and Pedro ac- 
companied him. 

In 1S44 or '45 Sanger's stage-coaches began to run from 
Milwaukee to Galena, by way of Monroe. There was 
a coach going one way or the other every dav, and each 
coach was capable of carrying seventeen passengers. 
Preference was given to through passengers, and Mon- 
roe people were never able to pre-engage a seat for a 
journey in either direction. There was so much travel 
that Monroe men sometimes waited a week for a seat, 
and were then obliged to find some other conveyance. 

A package of old letters written in Monroe in 1845 
and succeeding years gives some facts of interest to 
those who care to follow the progress of the village. 

It was about this time that Green county gained the 
name of " the sang county," a name so well known that 
one of our representatives at Madison began his first 
speech there by proudly announcing himself as the 
member from the sang county. Sang, which being in- 
terpreted means ginseng, was very abundant here; but 
as men, women, and children devoted all their leisure 
moments to digging it, the supply was exhausted in a 
few years. Mr. Ludlow bought all there was, being 
the onlv person in this part of the sang region who 
shipped it to New York, and says he made more money 
on it than on any other little thing he ever dealt in. A 
letter dated August, '46, says: "Flour is $3.00 a barrel. 



History of Green County. 119 

Wheat can't be sold. Oats are twelve and one-half 
cents, and corn twenty cents a bushel. Wild hay is 
$2.50 per ton. A boy from Maine has dug five hun- 
dred pounds of ginseng within three months and sold it 
for twenty-two cents a pound." It is not recorded 
whether wheat was ever too abundant to be "iven 
away, but two or three years later Mr. C. J. Simmons 
hauled oats from his farm in Washington to Janesville, 
and sold them for six and one fourth cents a bushel; 
and, as the oats did not bring him as much money as he 
needed, he sold some yearling calves for $3.50 apiece. 

In 1846, Mr. Samuel Spangler's gun shop had its 
beginning, and Mr. Ludlow opened a store to which 
his old customers came from all directions. In 1847, our 
chronicler mentions as signs of progress a public library 
and preaching three times every Sunday. The Pres- 
byterians, Christians, and Methodists had each a regu- 
lar minister, though the Christian minister was partly, 
and the Presbyterian minister was wholly, supported 
by eastern missionary societies. One letter (written to 
induce immigration) has this significant remark : "Please 
tell James Collins this would be a very good place for 
him as a preacher if he still works at his trade of mak- 
ing chairs." There was also a Mormon shoemaker 
here who preached sometimes. There were several 
Mormons in this vicinity, some of whom are still here, 
but none of them were ever polygamists. In '47 the 
Methodists began, on the land given them for that pur- 
pose by Mr. LyBrand, the first meeting house in the 
county. It was finished in '48, the same year the 



120 K 

Chris I the : \ use use I a mar- 

ble shou. In '47, the United States H use was built by 

Chas. H ind Mr. Eilert opened; . _ stoi e on the 

n 1 th - . >f the - [uare. 

A : fact ...:.... : lairuerreiari, a 

Mr. Th 5. Emerson, as bis as the 
irst j< shy si re he ... ad of a pples b 

Das and s Id or. the square for a c* 

e . . . . I >f in the letters :" 1 : - v . A letf ar : :" 

'49 speaks of s carried off by the Cal rnia :. er, 

- - - : -T - ■ wagons left this place las 

T " thre six x ke of 

_ provi- 

- 

: . ; mdred Iwell _ 

its. A sav -mill 
■ . - s : 

- 

let c for the 

In ti Fall - Mr. H. ur- 

- -'- 

: the sem on the follow ig 1 l 'S: 

.* says the truste "will conduct a 

- 100I the Etin, undei - board. - p *sist- 

rnish the room- - rent the: with 

stc nd pipe, an furnish rbel; he v 

compensation such sun:- as he may collect for tuition.*' 
.ougrh students of all ages nd desrrees of advance- 
men: we ceived, the seminary v : great power for 

good in its time. In August, : : -":. Mr. Burchard held, 
at the . the . . institute in Green 



Histor . -' ~r -zen County. I 

: ntinuec al week - 7 he land on whi:i 

: - . v -.vii t:t -.--. ■■ . - ::::":: : _ . '. : : :he 

; r : :•-.:. I: - 7i 

: . . ■ -. .:.;:- . :" : . .~ v ~z~ :he : :i~. in 

-iS or Tut no deed was given until - ..en 

Tohn B. Bachman and Geo. Bloom, who had purchased 

m — 

all the stock, received a deed. 7 .-. _-..:_: 
school there a short tune, after rich the braiding was 
sold several times, being once used as a carper:: er 7 shop, 
and becoming, in : 

--.: ~ :: i 






In 1S50. there came : M< nroe an old man. who 
he v. the Sew Z: inland Agricultural Soci 

to select farms for men who ed to come wc He 

wore a broad brimmed hat. a cc at, an red fL 

nel shirt; he was plain and unassuming m bis maun: - 
a::.: sreeZly :e;. . _ ry - ; ~u7 ., H = - . .". ::.: Xew 
Z upland Agricultural Society ealthv that it 

had founded and endowed a college, and had deposited 
a lar_ 1 sum of monev in the bank at Wc 
mont. It had been such a benefit to its meml t : hat 
thev had all become -wealthy. Influenced by the5, 
ports, the farmers of Greer County formed an . _ _d- 
tural - . :id they invited Mr. Hitchcock — for - 

the old ofentlem. a was c — : act as then 

- long as he should be with them. Meanwhile. 2 
J : ::: \Y. 7.v7 :\ ;. 7.r7. .:_ e n: re »::.::.; in -7 :::r:e. .:::.i 
. al citi - vho had land to sell, were devoting the 7 
:e to the work o: assisting Mr. Hitchcock. Some 
one of them took him out every see e : :: 



122 History of Green County. 

and those who went oftenest excited the jealousy of 
those who had tailed to secure his company. He rode 
all over the county several times. At one time, think- 
ing his Vermont friends would prefer living near each 
other, he decided to buy a whole township, and thought 
he would take Clarno ; but he also selected land in other 
parts of the county, and in other counties. Finally he 
published a notice that, on a certain day in September, 
he would meet the farmers of Dane, Rock, and Green, 
and conclude his partial contracts with them. Mr. 
Hitchcock brought no money with him, and, not being 
fitted by education to write an order on the Woodstock 
bank, he employed Mr. Dunwiddie, and kept him wri- 
ting drafts a whole diiy. With these drafts he paid his 
creditors, some of whom soon found to their sorrow 
that the drafts were not honored at the Galena bank, 
whereupon Mr. Hitchcock swore that a lawyer who 
could not write a draft that would bring money was a 
humbug, notwithstanding which there began to be a 
suspicion that Mr. Hitchcock was a humbug. Shortly 
before the time appointed for the land purchase, Mr. 
Hitchcock married a widow living in the village. 
Charivaris were fashionable then, and there was a 
charivari the night of the wedding. It was good, after 
the manner of its kind, ending with the entrance of 
three goats at the window of the bride's 'parlor. When 
morning dawned Mr. Hitchcock had gone, and he has 
never been seen in Monroe since that time. He was 
undoubtedly insane. After his disappearance, his wife 
and sons came from Vermont, in obedience to the direc- 



History of Green County. 123 

tions given in his letters. They were very worthy 
people, and remained here several years, hearing nothing 
from the husband and father who had assumed the name 
of Hitchcock. When the farmers came, on the appoint- 
ed day, and found there was to be no sale, they stood 
around the streets for a time, telling what they had 
always believed, and then called a meeting of the agri- 
cultural society. J. V. Richardson was called to the 
chair, and nominations for president were declared to 
be in order. The old hat and coat of Mr. Hitchcock 
were brought in as the regalia of the president, who, it 
was agreed, must be some one who had been dear to 
the departed. One gentleman was nominated because 
of the oysters he had given Mr. Hitchcock; others were 
brought forward who had loaned their horses, or worn 
out their buggies in the service. Then Mr. Stewart 
urged the claims of Mr. Taylor. He was understood 
to say that once when half a dozen of them were show- 
ing Mr. Hitchcock the town of Spring Grove, they 
came to a small brook. They were all anxious that the 
old gentleman should keep his feet dry. One offered 
boots, another offered to make a bridge of his coat, still 
another to bring stepping stones, but Mr. Taylor seized 
the venerable personage in his arms and carried him 
over the stream. Mr. Taylor was unanimously elected. 
He was arrayed in the official coat and hat, after which 
the society discussed the best method of carrying butter 
to market. There were several subsequent meetings, 
all conducted in a noteworthy manner, peculiar to them- 
selves; and until a recent time the recollection of them 



124 History of Green County. 

has been a source of unalloyed pleasure. But lately — 
since the authorship of Shakspeare's plays has been at- 
tributed to Bacon — the opinion has gained ground that 
the society was guilty of an injustice to Mr. Stewart; 
and Mr. Taylor, with a frankness that must commend 
itself to both Shakspeare and Bacon, declares that Mr. 
Stewart himself performed the work which got his 
friend into office. 

A more formidable visitor than Mr. Hitchcock was 
the cholera, brought to the village by a teamster. 
About half a dozen persons died, and a panic ensued, 
which led to this entry in the record of the circuit court, 
September 3, 1S50: " It having been made to appear 
that a mortal sickness is now prevalent at Monroe, 
where this court is now sitting, it is therefore ordered 
that this court do now adjourn." 

In April, 1850, was started the Green County Union, 
subscriptions to which might be paid in cash, grain, po- 
tatoes, butter, eggs, wood, lumber, saw-logs or labor. 
It was edited by J. W. Snow, and published in Francis 
Emerson's stone building on the south side of the square. 
The first number contained this promise: " In reference 
to the subject of politics we shall studiously avoid in- 
juring the feelings of any one." The Union lived only 
about a year. In May, 1851, John W. Stewart pub- 
lished the first number of the Sentinel. It was a whig 
paper for a few months, and then the Rev. J. Walworth 
and O. D. Moulton bought it and made it an organ of 
the democratic party. In September, 1854, the paper 
passed into the hands of republicans, Geo. W. Tenney 



Histoiy of Green County. 125 

and N. L. Stout, the latter of whom was connected 
with the paper only about a year. 

The papers of 1S53 complain that Monroe has never 
had a baker, and is " much in want of a person who 
will butcher regularly." The village had already re- 
covered from the surpise occasioned by her first barber 
shop; and both baker and butcher were here before the 
end of the year. The need of a bank was first pointed 
out by an Ohio congressman by the name of Delano, 
while he was here on a visit. In accordance with an 
agreement made with him, J. A. Bingham opened in 
May, 1854, an exchange office, in which he was joined 
in the fall by A. Ludlow. Circumstances prevented 
Mr. Delano from taking any interest in the business, 
but through his influence J. B. Galusha came from Ohio 
to act as cashier, and early in iS^6, the firm, which, 
having been joined by Asa Richardson, was known as 
Ludlow, Bingham & Co., obtained a charter as the 
Bank of Monroe, and in May of the same year, the 
first notes of the bank were issued. 

In February, 1855, in the destruction of the jail, the 
county suffered her second loss by fire. This led to the 
erection of a stone jail, and, a little later in '56, to the 
erection of a fire proof building for county offices. The 
stone jail was used until the last and best of the county 
buildings in Monroe was built, in 1870, to take its place. 

In 1855, the senator from Green, Mr. West, intro- 
duced in the senate a bill whose object was to take from 
the town of Clarno that part of the township now in- 
cluded in the village of Monroe. A remonstrance was 



a 26 History of Green County. 

sent to Mr. West, and he withdrew the bill; but soon 
after this, during his absence from the senate, the bill 
was introduced again, and passed, all unknown to the 
good people of Clarno, who, in April, 1855, elected as 
their town clerk, Alfred Wrisberg, who lived in that 
part of the town which had been transferred to Monroe. 
Their blissful ignorance ceased when their votes at the 
fall election were thrown out on the ground that, be- 
cause of his residence in Monroe, Mr. Wrisberg, who 
made the returns, was not legally a town clerk of 
Clarno. 

In 1857, the foundry of R. Sylvester & Co. did away 
with the necessity of a trip to Janesville or Beloit every - 
time any part of a threshing machine was broken. In 
January, 1S5S, Monroe was joined to the rest of the 
world by the railway; and in the following April, when 
she had the town-like possessions of a brass band, a fire 
company, and one sidewalk before a private house — 
being that built by Mr. J. S. Bloom in the spring of 
1857 — the village was incorporated, and the early histo- 
ry of Monroe was ended. 



LATER HISTORY. 



The village has had but a moderate number of sen- 
sations since its incorporation. The greatest of these 
grew out of the war. In the summer of 1862, there 
was in Monroe a man who was said to have expended 
.a. large sum from his private funds in purchas- 



History of Green County. 127 

ing Sharp's rifles for the Confederate army, and to- 
have served six months as a Confederate soldier. He 
expressed treasonable sentiments so freely that a public 
meeting: was held to consider his case. D. W. Ball was 
chairman of the meeting, and W. W. Wright was sec- 
retary. Addresses were made by T. H. Eaton, E. Bart- 
lett, F. Q. Ball, and L. Davenport, after which it was 
" resolved that the said Morris Rosa be allowed twenty- 
four hours in which to leave the county, failing to do 
which he remains at his peril." Morris Rosa went; but 
there were other secession sympathizers who resided in 
the county. To decide upon the course to be pursued 
with them, other meetings were held. At a meeting 
held the 29th of July, and presided over by Mr. L* 
Rood, the following resolutions were adopted : 

Resolved, That all the citizens of this community be requested to 
take and subscribe to the annexed oath : 

« I, , of the Town of , in the County 

of Green and State of Wisconsin, do solemnly swear that I am a 
loyal citizen of the United States of America, that I will bear true 
allegiance to the same, that I will to the utmost of my abitity sup- 
port the Government in its efforts to suppress the rebellion ; that in 
rendering such support I will discountenance in every possible man- 
ner by word or action every sentiment or expression the tendency of 
which may be to encourage disloyalty to the Government, and that 
I will not, by word or deed, countenance any disloyal, secret organiza- 
tion; and for a violation of this oath may I suffer the just penalty of 
the crime of treason." 

Resolved, That any person refusing to subscribe to said oath shall 
be considered and is our enemy, whom it is our first duty, as good 
and loyal citizens, to expel from our midst. 

Resolved, That in all summary proceedings under the authority 



128 History of G?'een County. 

of this meeting, the course indicated and ordered in Gen. Pope's Or- 
der No. 3, (which we annex; be adhered to and carried out, so far as 
applicable to the case, the same as though we were acting in his de- 
partment and under his authority. 

Resolved^ That a judicial committee of fifteen of our best citizens 
be appointed to investigate and take judicial cognizance of all refusals 
to take, and subscribe to, and violations of said oath, and that the 
Home Guards being organized here to-night be authorized and 
ordered to faithfully execute the decrees of said judicial commtttee. 

On motion the following named gentlemen were appointed such 
judicial committee : 

B. Chenoweth, U. Davenport, 
X. R. Usher, Arabut Ludlow, 

C. S. Foster, D. W. Ball, 

M. Reitler, W. W. Wright, 

John A. Bingham, B. Dunwiddie, 

Edmund Hill, George King, 

J. V. Richard-on, Wm. Brown, 

J. S. Bloom. 

Messrs. E. Bartlett, A. J. Sutherland, Harris Pool, S. E. Cole, Dr. 
S. Porter and C. Godfrey, were appointed a committee to invite 
citizens to take the oath. 

pope's order no. 3. 

Headquarters Army of Virginia, ) 
July 23d, r862. I 

Commanders of army corps, divisions, brigades, and detached 
commands will proceed immediately to arrest disloyal male citizens, 
within their lines or within their reach, and within their respective 
stations. Such as are willing to take the oath of allegiance to the 
United States and will furnish sufficient security for its observance, 
shall be permitted to remain at their homes and pursue in good faith 
their accustomed avocations. Those who refuse shall be conducted to 
the South beyond the extreme pickets of this army, and be notified 
that if found again anywhere within our lines, or at any point in the 



History of Green County. 1:0 

roar, they will be considered as spies, and sul e extreme 

rigor of military law. If any person having taken the oath of al- 
legiance as above specified shall be found to have \ iolated it, he shall 
be she:, and his property seized and co ed. 

The oath was left with L. Rote, who was justice of 
the peace. A majority of the citizens hastened to sub- 
scribe their names to it; and some who did not do it 
voluntarily, did so from fear. A few refused. Of these, 
one, who was an old resident of Sylvester, was marched 
to the village limits, and ordered to keep outside. 
Another, a resilient of Clarno, rode part way home on 
a rail. While the excitement caused by these eases 

discipline was at its height, one Steves, of Durand, 

a man who was generally believed to he a secessionist, 
chanced to be in the village, lie was denouncing the 
proceedings in a violent manner, when some one re- 
marked than probably Mr. Steves had better take the 
oath. A crowd formed, and escorted him to the court 
house, and summoned Mr. Rote from his supper table 
to administer the oath. Mr. Rote read! it and asked the 
prisoner if he would subscribe to it. Being answered 
in the negative, he said nothing more, tor by that time 
the office was so full of men who wanted to take it 
that he was obliged to light a candle and go up 
into the court room to accommodate them. When 
about sixty men had been sworn, proceedings tip stairs 
were interrupted lw a cry that those who had been la- 
boring with the man below were riding hint out of town 
on a rail. Mr. Steves' fate made copperheads cautious 
about expressing themselves in Monroe; and his resist- 
ance taught union men to be less busy in seeking out 

13 



130 History of Grec?i County. 

offences. This was the last encounter of the kind dur- 
ing the war, but it was long before men heard the last 
of this. Mr. Steves brought suit against twelve citizens 
of Monroe. In selecting the twelve, he was assisted by 
Monroe men whose opinion of the war was the same 
as his own. All those selected were zealous supporters 
of the war, and most of them were members of the 
committee of fifteen appointed the 29th of July; but a 
majority of them were opposed to such violent measures 
as were adopted in Mr. Steves' case, and some of them 
did not reach the square that night until the work was 
done. One of those sued was Mr. Rote, whose part in 
the affair has been told. On the other hand, some who 
helped carry the rail were not mentioned in the suit. 
The case was tried in 1S65 in Milwaukee; Judge Miller 
jDresided, and during the trial gave vent to his feelings 
by exclamations of " oh! " and "horrible!!" The dis- 
union element predominated in the jury, and damages 
were awarded Mr. Steves to the amount of $5,000 and 
costs. 

The robbery of the Bank of Monroe, in October, 
1S64, is still a subject of wonder and sjDeculation. Bur- 
glars entered the bank in the night and blew the safe 
open with gunpowder. The explosion, which broke all 
the glass in the room and carried the safe door, weigh- 
ing one hundred and fifty pounds, through the opposite 
wall and left it under the staircase, was heard a long 
distance; but the night was dark, and the burglars es- 
caped with $25,000 in money. They had dropped one 
package of $5,600, and one small door in the safe was 



History of Green County. 131 

so warped by the action of the powder that they had not 
been able to open it. In that compartment was 
$100,000. 

The greatest improvement to be noted in Monroe 
since its incorporation is in its manufactures. In July, 
1865, Messrs. Whitney, Treat, Lloyd, Pullen, Patterson, 
and Billings organized the Monroe Manufacturing Co., 
with a capital of $25,000. The works were burned in 
June, '72, and in the following August the company 
was re-organized as a stock company with a capital of 
$40,000 with A. C. Dodge, president, and H. W. Whi- 
ting as business director and secretary. The general 
business of the company is manufacturing farm wagons, 
carriages, and farming implements. The usual number 
of men employed is twenty-five. Fine carriages and 
sleighs are made at several other places in the village, 
and wagon shops are numerous. 

Another important manufacturing establishment, is 
the planing mill of Dodge, Churchill & Co. Its histo- 
ry is as follows: The brick flour mill on Racine 
street was built by Moulton & Fish in 1S50. The 
machinery was afterward taken out, and in the spring 
of 1859 Norman Churchill and Jesse Robertson put 
in its place wood cutting machinery. About the 
same time a Janesville firm converted Payne's old tav- 
ern (which had been moved to its present position and 
used successively as tavern, cabinet shop, and flour mill) 
into a planing mill. In '61 Mr. Churchill united the 
machinery of the two mills in the historic frame build- 
ing. A saw mill has since been added, and the business 



132 History of Green County. 

has been enlarged so as to include the manufacture of 
doors, sash, blinds, screens, cheese boxes, and brackets. 
The manufacturing establishments in the village include 
two other saw mills, two flour mills, two breweries, two 
marble shops, a gun shop, furniture shops, and a brick 
yard where both red and white brick are made; and a 
large number of persons find employment in the manu- 
facture of clothing, patent medicines, cigars, confec- 
tionery, and pop. Three lumber yards and a large 
number of groceries and dry goods houses do a thriving 
business. Nearly all the old land marks have disap- 
peared from the square since the village was incorpo- 
rated. Of the new buildings required by the increase 
in business the largest and best were built by B. Chen- 
oweth, Elisha and Jared Mosher, Washington Hill, 
McKey Bros., Eilert and Whitney, D. F. Corson, Hen- 
ry Duerst, Treat & Co., John W. Stewart, Peter 
Wells, John H. Bridge, and the German Turners. 

It is claimed that there is no point of shipment in 
Wisconsin, outside of the great centres of transporta- 
tion, where a larger amount of produce is bought and 
sent to market than at Monroe. During the two 
months ending Dec. 30, 1S76, the First National Bank of 
Monroe paid upon the checks of Barber & Van Dyke, 
Johnson & Gillett, and J. M. Chadwick, stock and pro- 
duce dealers, the sum of $227,675.71. These firms do 
not deal in cheese, which is supposed to, have brought 
into the county during the year 1S76 nearly $200,000. 
Moreover, a great many shipments were made in the 
two months referred to, by the producers and by other 



History of Green Comity. 133 

firms dealing in cattle, sheep, hogs, and grain, of the 
value of which no record has been kept. The bank to 
which reference has just been made is the result of the 
union, in May, '64, of the old Bank of Monroe and the 
First National Bank of Monroe organized in February, 
'64, by Messrs. Chenoweth, Hoffman, Perine, Bingham, 
and Jacob and Mathias Marty. The second and only 
other bank in Monroe was that of N. R. Usher & Co., 
(Usher & Thrall). It was not a bank of issue, and after 
an existence of three or four years was closed in '64. 

Schools and churches have kept pace with the ma- 
terial progress of the village. In 1S66, the school dis- 
tricts were united, since which time the schools have 
been more or less perfectly graded. Three school build- 
ings furnish accommodations for nearly 900 pupils. 
Several newspapers have been born and have died 
since the village was incorporated. Mr. Tenney's suc- 
cessors in the editorship of the Sentinel were James 
Bintliff and E. E. Bryant. Mr. Bryant left the paper 
to enter the army, and the firm name became Bintliff 
& Carr. A little later in the war Mr. Bintliff entered 
the army, still retaining his interest in the paper, which 
was edited by Egbert E. Carr. In July, '65, the paper 
passed into the hands of A.J. High and C. A. Booth. 
Five years later Silas E. Gardner purchased Mr. High's 
half of the paper, and leased it to Mr. Booth. 

The Jeffersonian Democrat, edited by Geo. C. Baker, 
lived only from late in the summer of 1856,10 April, '57. 
In the fall of 1857, the Independent Press, edited by S. 
P. Condee and E. C. Moulton, arose from the ashes of 



J 34 



History of Green County. 



the Democrat. Mr. Moulton withdrew from the Press 
in January of the next year; and three or four months 
later Mr. Condee sold it to gentlemen who transformed 
it into the Albany Times. The next venture in the way 
of a newspaper was that of N. L. Stout, who published 
the State Rights a year or two, beginning in the spring 
of 1S59/ The next was that of A. W. Potter, who, in 
January, 1870, started the Green County Republican. 
In the fall of 1S72, F. J. Mills started the Liberal Press, 
which in September, 1873, was consolidated with the 
Republican, the new paper being known at first as the 
Republican and Press, but latterly as the Green County 
Reformer. It was edited by A. W. Potter and Geo^ 
H. King, until January, then by Mr. Mills until April, 
then by G.J. Patton until January, 1S75, since which it 
has been edited by I. T. Carr, with whom Wm. Bul- 
lock was associated the first year. For two or three 
years Mr. Geo. South has published a semi-monthly 
paper called the Sun. 

VILLAGE DIRECTORY FOR 1877. 



CLERGYMEN. 



James Evans, Methodist. 

J. Fisher, Universalist. 

Henry Uphoff, German Methodist. 

John M. Obermiller, Ger. Catholic. 

S. E. Miner. 



P. J. Clawson. 

A. S. Douglas. 

B. Dunwiddie. 

J. X. Bradshaw. 
Hall & Rood. 
X. A. Loofbourow. 
Wm. Monroe. 



ATTORNEYS, 



PHYSICIANS. 



D. R. Howe, Christian. 

Whitelaw, Baptist. 

J. McGinnity, Irish Cath. 
Fotsch, Lutheran. 



E. T. Gardner. 
B. S. Kerr. 

H. Med berry. 

Frederick Byers. 

F. B. Righter. 
W. O. Sherman. 



History of Gree?i County. 135 

DENTISTS. 

J. S. Reynolds. S. M. Smith. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF MONROE. 

A. Ludlow, President. J. B. Galusha, Cashier. 

Geo. W. Hoffman, Vice-President. H. Ludlow, Ass't " 

DRY GOODS MERCHANTS. 

Bostwick & Cheney, dry goods S. Lewis, dry goods. 

and clothing. F. S. Parlin, dry goods,clothing, 

B. Chenoweth, dry goods and carpets, notions, &c. 

clothing. J. B. Treat, dry goods, clothing, 

boots and shoes, crockery, &c. 

MERCHANT TAILORS. 

Hoehn & Weber, tailors and deal- Peter Spahr. 

ers in dry goods. A. Wettengel & Son. 

TAILOR. 

J. Cohn. 

BOOTS AND SHOES. 

A. \V. Goddard. J. J. Tschudy. 

JEWELRY. 

Geo. H. King. H. G. Van Wagenen. 

A. B. McKelvey. 

DRUGS. 

C. E. Adams. J. K. Eilert. 

Bradshaw & Adams. 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 

A. J. Kane. R. D. Vaughn. 

GROCERIES AND CROCKERY. 

Bennett & Son. Ed. Ruegger. 

J. Bolender & Co. Schuler & Kleb. 

J. Carroll. Treat & Co., Treat's block, on 

Glascott & Bragg, north side of west side. 

square. D . S. Young & Co., east side 

L. B. Johnson. square. 

BUTTER AND EGGS. 

John Sissons. Grant & Fairlamb. 

FRUIT AND CONFECTIONERY. 

John Kleckner. 

MILLINERY AND FANCY GOODS. 

Mrs. Wm. H. Allen. J. H. Miller. 

Mrs. Meyer. 

DRESS MAKERS. 

Mrs. Robertson. Mrs. Willy. 

Miss A. Smith. 



6 History of Green County. 

W. S. Bloom &: Co., 
Harp ^ r - 

FVMPS ABU - 

ChurchilL 
_ -d Anton Miller. 

J. H. Foster. 

. ~ ^ Persons & Barr 

A C Docge. 

T. L. Rood. 

J HOTELS AND PRO 

H . I.A. Gfc «* United Howe, Lo 

- tze, north side square. 

- 
Ti 

„ ' : oicott 

" 

- ABLES. 

,1 U. F. Zeigler. 

Gk ■ ■ ■ ' 

H.G. White tedBaer ' 

\V. M. V. 

- --- 

CO 

W W ght s - 3 

T. L. StimmeriL 

H.G A - Son. J 

J.I: K ' 

aith Smo 

mi: 
_ t T Dr/ " mill, 

rchill anmg J^y ,. miU> 

milL 

Leuenbe: . Somer. 

t, u I. D. Mc - - 

J 

VABD. 

R ' .' n. 



. 



M. Rusch» cigars 
Monroe > I > s, V C ! 

P N . . A S* - - . . » ^ - - 

' . . J . . £( 

A. . : 

P v So v v 5 - - 

x « ax.. :> . . 
R 



•.'... i : . . 



X . . . I 



N 



N . . A 

... A 

- . N ... . - 

W i -■. . 

s; W, Stewart y< Br ; i n « 

\ ■ N . V* ■ . 

N \ N { 

! N X. 

' N \ I N V X .^ ( , . N . 

Trsa w n , 

n ,-x V. v .n x 

. 
WWW. » . N . . x . - 

■ s . \ ! ' 



CLARNO. 



The first man who came to Green County to farm 
was Andrew Clarno. He visited the county as early as 
1827. In 1829 he selected a part of section 30 of the 
township which bears his name, for a farm, and, after 
spending the winter of i829-'3o at Skinner diggings, he 
began work on his claim. In 1831 he persuaded Wm. 
Wallace and Joseph Paine, Mr. Wallace's son-in-law, to 
settle near him with their families. He had been 
acquainted with his new neighbors in Illinois, whence 
they all came to Green County. The next year the 
Black Hawk war broke out, and the Wallaces and 
Paines went to Willow Springs, where, to use the 
phrase of the time, they "forted" during the war. On the 
day selected for going to the fort, Mr. Paine, fearing no 
immediate danger, walked leisurely to the Pecatonica, 
three or four miles south-west of his house, to bail out 
the ferry boat. The two families were nearly ready to 
start and expected to overtake Mr. Paine by the time the 
boat was ready for use. At the river, Mr. Paine was 
surprised and startled to find that the Indians had been 
there before him. They had stolen his ferry boat and 



History of Green County. 139 

gone he knew not whither. Their camp fires were still 
smoking, and lie thought he could discern one dusky 
warrior lurking in the grass and watching him. No 
long time elapsed before Mr. Paine was again at his 
cabin. Almost in despair, he saw that Air. Wallace still 
sat smoking his pipe, and that the preparations for the 
journey had made no progress whatever since he went 
away. Very soon, however, the wagon was made ready 
and the flight began. It was not much like the removal 
of patriarchs. They took no large flocks and herds, no 
rich treasure with them. As Mr. Paine expressed it, 
they threw in the women and children, and started. In 
a short time darkness overtook them. There were no 
roads except Indian trails. With a wagon, it was diffi- 
cult to follow the trails in the day time ; after dark it was 
impossible. They stopped for the night in a little grove 
on the Capt. Foster place in the village of Monroe. 
Here, without daring to strike a light, they sat in silence 
and waited for morning. Sometimes the long silence of 
the night was broken by a wild whoop in the distance. 
Once they saw Indians passing by, and great was their fear 
lest some movement of the horses or the children should 
betray them. But a strong wind carried all sounds of the 
little camp in an opposite direction. Morning came at 
last, and the travelers went on in safety to the fort, crossing 
the Pecatonica nearly as far north as Argyle. The day 
after their flight the deserted home was visited by soldiers 
sent out from the fort to warn and assist the settlers ; but 
they found the cabin burned and its contents destroyed. 
At this time, Mr. Clarno was in Illinois, where he had gone 



140 History of Green County. 

after his two sons. Hostilities having begun, he stopped 
on his return at Fort Hamilton, so-called in honor of a 
son of Alexander Hamilton, Col. W. S. Hamilton, who, 
as early as 1823 had distinguished himself by his bold 
enterprises in Illinois and Wisconsin, and who used to 
say, half in earnest, half in jest, that he might have been 
quite a man but for his distinguished father, with whom 
people always compared him. Mr. Clarno was made 
captain of a company of soldiers, and his son O. H. i*. 
Clarno, then a little boy, had charge of a gun inside the 
fort. 

After the war, the settlers returned to their homes, or 
rather to their land, for this was all they had. Mr. 
Clarno, who had neither oxen nor horses, helped his boys 
across the streams, and father and sons walked from the 
fort. In 1S33 ^ r - P^ me induced James Hawthorne to 
come to Clarno. Mr. Hawthorne had come to the mines 
in the western part of Iowa County in 1827, had after- 
wards returned to New York state, and had again come 
west on hearing that Uncle Sam had given miners per- 
mission to work on the Dubuque side of the river; but 
he was soon driven from Dubuque by the cholera, and 
during the war he was at White Oak Springs. When 
a boy of seventeen, Mr. Hawthorne served in the war of 
181 2 as a substitute for a drafted man, though, as substi- 
tutes were not accepted by the government, he was 
known through his soldier life by the name of the drafted 
man. In 1832, wishing to try again the life of a soldier, 
he offered $125 for a horse, but he could not get one for 
that amount, and, as a horse was an indispensable part 



History of Green County. 141 

of a soldier's outfit, he took no active part in the Black 
Hawk war. 

During the winter of iS33- , 34, O. H. P. Clarno was 
left alone on his father's claim. To while away the long 
evenings, the Indians undertook to teach him their lan- 
guage. After a time, he observed that the woods around 
his cabin were full of little piles of corn cobs, and now 
was explained the hitherto mysterious diminution of his 
corn. While some of his instructors were giving him a 
lesson, the habit had been for others to shell a few ears 
of corn, putting the corn into the bags or pockets always 
carried on their persons. This exercise being over, they 
went into the house, to relieve the teachers who had pre- 
ceded them. In 1834 Abner Van Sant and his son-in- 
law, John W. Deniston, moved to Clarno from Missouri, 
and in iS^^-^6 they were joined by Matthew. William, 
and Peter Wells, Jonathan Snyder, A. De Haven, 
Calvin Hale, Adam and Levi Starr, and Joseph Kelly 
of Ohio, John Patterson of Indiana, T. S. and Wm. 
Bowen, natives of New York but directly from Illinois. 
O.J. White, Wm. Chilton, and Wm. Draper of Illinois. 
Jacob Starr of Virginia, Joseph Smith of Pennsylvania, 
P. C. Grupe of Missouri, Wm. and John Blunt, Wm. 
Brown, Henry Ater, and -, — *-*•*- McDonald. Mr. De 
Haven returned to Ohio in 1836, and remained several 
years, during which time his brother-in-law, John Cam- 
eron, worked his Clarno farm. Besides these men who 
made homes, there were probably many single men, 
Certainly there were Cutler Wilkins of Missouri, Wm. 
Baird of Ohio, now, as for many years a prominent 

'3 



142 History of Green County. 

citizen of Sylvester, and James Campbell of New York, 
the first settler in the town of Albany. Whenever a new 
settler came, those here before him helped him raise his 
house. One of the best attended of the Clarno raisings 
was that at Mr. Starr's, where both house and barn were 
built the same, day the logs were cut. 

In October, 1S35, occurred the first wedding in the 
county, being that of Mr. J. R. Blackmore and Miss 
Nancy Wallace. In the same month, Chas. Deniston, 
Green County's eldest son, was born. When he was but 
a few months old, a squaw stole him from his cradle, 
leaving her own baby in his place ; but timely pursuit 
forced her to make another exchange of children. Christ- 
mas was celebrated in 1835 by a dance at Mr. Deniston's. 
People came thirty and forty miles to attend it, and many 
of them waited in the vicinity a week in order to attend 
a New Year's ball at Mr. Paine's house in Monroe. 
Sometime in the winter of iSt,^-^6, John Patterson, who, 
with his family, lived on what is called the Goodrich 
farm, went to Mineral Point to enter his land. Coming 
home he lost his way, and was out all night. He suf- 
fered so much from cold that soon after reaching home 
he died. He was the first white person to die a natural 
death in Green County. 

In the absence of other sources of amusement, the 
Indians were sometimes' found amusing. One of 
Mrs. Deniston's visitors was a squaw who wrapped her 
baby in a wolf-skin. The child's condition was not that 
of happy comfort which babies who listen to their 
mother's songs associate with rabbit-skins, and Mrs. Den- 



History of Green County. 143 

iston gave the mother clothes for the child. The squaw 
was pleased, but quite unable to use the gift, and a white 
girl offered to dress the baby, on condition that she was 
first allowed to wash it. The puzzled mother gave 
assent, and the pappoose was washed and dressed. 
Then the mother put it on the floor and for a whole hour 
danced around it in ecstacy of delight, accompanying 
the dance with such strange noises and contortions that 
those who went in to see her were convulsed with laug-h- 
ter. Indian visitors were sometimes so loath to go away 
that Mrs. Deniston, the gentlest and kindest of women, 
was forced to keep a stick with which occasionally to 
clear her house. After one of his hastiest departures, a 
Winnebago chief flung back to her the name "cross 
squaw," and she was thenceforth known by that name 
among his followers. Until she had learned by expe- 
rience that they were not dangerous, the Indians were 
likely to impose upon a woman. A few Indians entered 
the house of Mr. Jesse Mitchell in Sylvester, just before 
supper one washing-day ; and seeing that Mrs. Mitchell 
was afraid, they took from the line where they were dry- 
ing, all the stockings of the family, filled them with 
mush from a kettle on the stove, and carried them away. 
The first sermon preached in Green County was 
preached in August, 1835, at the residence of Matthew 
Wells, by Daniel Harcourt. In the summer of 1836 
Rev. James McKane, who resided in Illinois, and belong- 
ed to the Rock River Conference, organized the first 
religious society organized in Green County. The mem- 
bers were Matthew Wells, his wife and daughter, Mrs. 
Maria Blunt, and Wm. Baird. 



144 History of Green County. 

Among the good gifts which nature has bestowed 
upon the town of Clarno are Richland and Honey 
creeks. The name of the former creek explains itself. 
Tradition says the other records the experience of a man 
who was looking for a place to make a claim. He felled 
a tree, upon which he walked across the stream. In the 
course ot his travels he returned to the bridge, and drank 
from the brook. To his surprise, the water had the taste 
of metheglin, and, though examination showed the 
reason of this to lie in the fact that he had felled a bee 
tree for his bridge, he ever afterwards spoke of the stream 
as Honey creek, and others followed his example. It 
was upon Honey creek that Van Sant and Deniston 
built in 1S36 the first mill in the county. So great was 
the desire for a mill that nearly every man in the county 
offered his assistance in building; it. Beginning as a feed 
mill, it soon grew into a flour mill. Van Sant and Den- 
iston hauled flour (.0 Galena even' week, and did business 
for their Green County friends at every visit to the city, 
until it seemed as though nothing could be done in the 
county without the assistance of these stirring, whole- 
souled men. In 1 S37 two saw mills were built on Honey 
creek. One, near the grist mill, was built by Van Sant 
and Deniston and Henson Irion, the other, where Banta's 
mill is now, was built by Joseph Smith and Joab Enos. 
A year or two later, John Church built another saw-mill 
near Smith's mill. By 1S38 Clarno farmers found 
in Madison a market for much of their produce, and 
Madison was largely dependent on Clarno. After the 
completion of the capital, the garrison at Fort Winne- 



History of Green County. 145 

bago afforded the best market, and then for many years 
there was a demand at the pineries for everything the 
farmers could produce. 

A lady who moved to Clarno in 1838 gives a glimpse 
of things as seen through a housekeeper's eyes : We, 
like most families, brought flour, meat, and a little money 
with us. When our money was gone, we did without 
things. Flour was $13 (it had been $16), and pork 
$30 a barrel. Calico was fifty cents a yard, and other 
kinds of cloth were proportionally high ; but in many 
families the men wore buckskin clothes, tanning the 
skins themselves, and the women were so industrious 
with the spinning-wheel and the loom that the cloth of 
the family cost only what was paid for the warp of its 
linsey. I bought some soft soap and paid a dollar a gal- 
lon. The next year I made soap to sell, but it wasn't 
worth much then. At first butter was fifty cents a pound, 
and after awhile we had to do without butter ; we had 
no money, and nothing to barter. By the time we had 
cows, butter was down to a shilling. That was the way 
with everything ; so high we couldn't buy it the first 
year, so plenty we couldn't sell it the next. The usual 
meat was bacon from Galena. After a year or two, men 
killed hogs here. Sometimes they went into the woods 
and killed those belonging to other people, much as they 
took other people's timber. Visits were all-day affairs. 
That was southern fashion. Invitations to spend the 
afternoon were never given here until New England 
people became numerous. At first the eastern and south- 

13* 



146 History of Green County. 

ern people seemed like oil and water, but circumstances 
soon made them good friends and neighbors. 

In 1840 Daniel R. Howe, now pastor of the Christian 
church in Monroe, taught the first district school in 
Clarno. There were other district schools in the county 
that year, but it is thought that Mr. Howe's school was 
the first to begin. Before the school began he was requir- 
ed to pass a written examination, the arithmetical part 
of which consisted of the question, How much would 
twenty bushels of oats come to at thirty cents a bushel? 

The part of Clarno's history most widely known, is 
that which relates to the Hawthorne burglary. The bur- 
glars entered Mr. Hawthorne's bed-room between mid- 
night and daylight, July 25. 1S57, m oved a cradle which 
stood near the bed and in which was a sick child, drew 
from under the bed a trunk containg $1500, and carried 
the trunk to the barn, where they took out the money. 
It was evident the theft was committed by some one 
acquainted with the house, and two men, Samuel Jackson, 
who had worked for Mr. Hawthorne, and his friend Wm. 
Garrington, were arrested the next morning. The money 
was not found in their possession, and, as they proved by 
the clerk of the Monroe House that they were in their 
room at 1 o'clock that night and came down to breakfast 
at the usual time the next morning, they were discharged. 
But several circumstances indicated their guilt. The 
track made by the thieves from the barn to the house 
showed that the thieves had only socks on their feet ; and 
wet and dirty socks, which a washerwoman identified as 
Garrington's, were found near the barn. Moreover, a 



History of Green County. 14.7 

peculiar boot-track from the barn towards town was like 
a track which one of the men had been seen to make at 
the hotel. A detective policeman was employed. He 
introduced himself to Garrington and Jackson as a coun- 
terfeiter, and so far gained their confidence that they 
entered into partnership with him. Davis, so the officer 
called himself, then went away to engage a woman to 
assist them. In his absence, and by his direction, the 
suspected men were re-arrested, Monday, August 10, and 
put under bonds so heavy that bondsmen could not be 
found. Davis returned, and passed a counterfeit bill, for 
which he was arrested Friday, August 14, and put into 
Garrington's cell. Davis then wrote a letter to a friend, 
asking to be bailed out. This letter he read to Garring- 
ton. The next morning Davis' friend, a second detective 
officer, appeared and granted his request. Later in the 
day, in accordance with a promise which Davis had 
made Garrington the day before, the friend visited Gar- 
rington in jail. Garrington's bail was $2,000. His vis- 
itor told him that he had $1,500 good money; that 
he would add to it $500 in counterfeit bills, deposit 
it all in the bank, and, with the certificate of deposit, pro- 
cure Garringron's release, if Garrington would, as soon 
as he was out, go with him to the place where Mr. 
Hawthorne's money was concealed, and get him $500 in 
gold, with which he could redeem the counterfeit bills 
before their real nature was discovered. Garrington gladly 
agreed to this plan, and was released just at dark. The 
greater part of the money was buried near Smith's mill- 
pond. That night Garrington went with the policemen 



,14s History of Green County. 

and dug it up, and, while thus engaged, told his new 
friends that he had a short time before killed a man in 
Ohio. As they were returning to town, merry as larks, a 
number of men sprang from the brush on either side of 
the road, and took Garrington prisoner. On the 28th of 
August, Wm. Morgan, alias Wm. Jones, Wm. Marcy, 
and Wm. Garrington, was given up to an officer who 
came with arequisition from the governor of Ohio. He 
left behind him a complete set of burglar's tools and a 
knife, which Mr. Hawthorne, believing it was meant for 
him, cherishes with peculiar care. Garrington was sent 
to the Ohio prison for life, since which he has attempted 
to kill one of the wardens. He is regarded as one of the 
worst men in the prison. Jackson was sentenced on the 
8th of September to nine years in the penitentiary, but 
two days later he made his escape from jail, and he has 
never been retaken. 

The only village in Clarno is Shueyville, a place 
which Mr. Van Sant first selected for a milling town, 
before he went to Cadiz, and of which J. W. Shuey 
built the first house in iS47-'48. It is a village only in 
name, and the place derives its only importance from the 
saw-mill and flour-mill which Mr. Shuey built near it on 
Richland creek, both of which are now owned by 
Henry Truempy. Besides these two, there are four 
other mills in Clarno : the flour-mill of Jared Banty, and 
the saw-mills of M. Bowers, H. Beckman and David Fritz. 

There were in 1876, four cheese factories in Clarno: 
Jacob Niklaus made Swiss cheese, F. Lenherr made both 
Limburger and Swiss cheese, and Zumbrunnen and 
Wittmer had two Limburger factories. 



History of Green County. 149 

Clarno is the best farming town in the county. 
Other towns have as good land, but in none of the others 
is all the land of the best quality, as it is in Clarno. 

LARGEST FARMERS IN CLARNO IN 1S76. 

Name. No. of Acres. Name. No of Acres. 

George Adams 320 Daniel Leiby 240 

Jacob Adams 380 Peter Lichtenwalner 1S8 

George Beach 215 John McCammant 290 

Eli Chapin 200 James Moreland 260 

O. H. P. Clarno 357 H. C. Morse 180 

G. W. Clingman 234 Samuel Raymer 287 

Levi Deal 240 Fredt rick Staver 160 

Alpheus De Haven 360 Henry Thorp 240 

T. G. De Haven 266 A. J. Trickle 240 

Martin Dribelbis 160 Edward Trickle 400 

David Fritz 165 Henry Truempy 315 

George Goodrich 340 T. B. Wells 200 

James Hawthorne 480 O.J. White 279 

Wm. Hogan 194 John Whitehead 180 

Joseph Kleckner 257 James Wilkins 230 

LARGEST STOCK GROWERS. 

T.J. Anderson. Henry Thorp. 

O. H. P. Clarno. O.J. White. 

James Moreland. 

Clarno has one of the three town-houses in the coun- 
ty. It was completed in the spring of 1858. The first 
annual town meeting was at the residence of Isaac Cal- 
lender, and the elections were held that year at the res- 
idence of John Blunt. 

OFFICERS FROM 1S49 TO 1 877 INCLUSIVE. 

CHAIRMEN. 

Thos. S. Bowen, 3 years. Simon Bartlett, 2 years. 

Henson Irion. Jacob Adams. 

Israel Smith. Simon Bartlett, 2 years. 

Thos. S. Bowen. Wm. J. Hodges. 

Israel Smith. A. Albright. 

Thos. S. Bowen. Samuel Wagner. 

Israel Smith, 2 years. W. J. Hodges. 

Jacob Mason. T. H. Eaton. 

Thos. S. Bowen, 7 years. W. Beekman. 



*5° 



History of Green County. 



CLERKS. 



J. W. Shuey, 5 years. 

Alfred Wrisberg, 2 years. 
J. W. Shuey, 3 years. 

Wm. McDowell. 
J. W. Shuey, 3 years. 

Hiram Ticknor. 
J, W. Shuey. 



Jacob Adams, "4 years. 

J. H. McVean. 

Jacob Adams. 

Peter Gnagi. 

Joseph Kleckner, 4 years. 

C- H. Adams, 2 years. 



CADIZ. 



As is evident from the history of Exeter, Monroe, and 
Clarno, many of the earliest settlers came to the county 
from the mines to the west of us. It was probably in 
1S34 tnat George W. Lot of Pennsylvania came from the 
mines and made, in the south-east corner of the town- 
ship, the first claim made in Cadiz. Wm. Boyles from 
Indiana, and Stephen G. and Nicholas Hale and Bennett 
Nolen directly from the mines, but before the Indian war 
from Illinois, settled near him. Next, in the spring of 
1836, came Jesse W. Shull, a Pennsylvania!!, who came 
to Green County from a trading house, which he had 
kept several years, and around which was growing up 
the village called for him Shullsburg. 

The second wedding and the first school in the county 
were in Cadiz. In August, 1836, Mr. James Hawthorne 
and Miss Massy R. Boyles were married. , Preparatory 
to the wedding, Mr. Hawthorne went to Mineral Point 
to get a license, and, arriving there in the absence of the 
functionary who was to give it, was obliged to wait two 



History of Green Con?ity. 151 

or three days. In consequence of this, the wedding- 
guests were at Mr. Boyles' before him. As he approach- 
ed the house he met many who had tired of waiting and 
come a few miles to meet him. The ceremony proved 
that the minister had spent the long hours of waiting in 
preparing himself to shine when the bridegroom came. 
When everything else had been said and done that could 
be said and done, he had the bridal pair kneel on the 
puncheons while he made a prayer, in the course of 
which he repeated the whole of the fifth chapter of 
Ephesians. 

The school was taught by Ralph Hildebrant in the 
summer of 1837, m a smoke-house built on a root-house 
The house, or houses, belonged to Mr. Nolen, and the 
school included Clarno as well as Cadiz children. There 
was a store "in the state" at this time, so near the terri- 
torial boundary line that its owner, Geo. Curdner, board- 
ed at Mr. Shull's. The first death in Cadiz was that of 
the merchant's brother, Christopher Curdner, in 1S37. 

In those days the vicinity of the Pecatonica would 
have answered almost all the requirements of a hunter's 
paradise. Even in a summer evening, one had only to 
float down the river for a little while, to get a shot at a 
deer, and years after the settlement of the county there 
was one place where two men speared a wagon-load 
of fish in a single night. 

The wolves were exceedingly troublesome. It was 
with, if not to, their music that the hunter marched home 
when he carried his game from the woods. At night they 
serenaded him to a most unreasonable length, and, for 



152 History of Green County. 

their trouble, were often shot through the port-hole near 
his door. Traps of various kinds were set for them, but 
the number caught was much smaller than the number 
of domestic animals carried away. Mr. E. T. Gardner, 
who went to Cadiz from Illinois in 1840, had a large lit- 
ter of pigs that he took great care to save. When they 
were small, he covered them at night with a wagon-box ; 
and when this enclosure was outgrown, he built them a 
high, tight pen by his cabin. One night there was a 
great noise among the pigs, mid Mr. Gardner fired his 
pistol into the darkness. The report was followed by a 
pattering of feet that sounded like rain, and the pigs 
became quiet; but the next morning they were all gone. 
Horses had to be watched almost as carefully as the pigs, 
for the streams were so miry that a horse that went alone 
to the brook was not likely to come back. Hay — and 
the best of wild hay grew on the bottom lands — was cut 
where even oxen could not stand, and carried away on 
pitchforks. 

In 1839 Mordecai Kelly and Wm. Bridges settled in 
Cadiz, and before the end of 1841 John Billings, Philip 
Michaels and Elias Deyo were there. They all came from 
Indiana. Before 1S40, Martin Burt and Felix O'Fling 
from Illinois, had begun on Skinner creek, where Geo. 
Michael's saw-mill is now, the first mill in the town. 
It was not finished until 1841, before which time it be- 
came known as Gardner & Burt's mill. Cadiz has almost 
always had more mills than any other town in the county. 
Around four of its mills, four small villages have grown 
up. The saw-mill owned by C. R. and J. C. Deniston 



History of Green County. 153 

in the village of Cadiz, on Honey creek, was built in 
1844 by Van Sant and Deniston. Mr. Vatf Sant hoped 
to build up there a manufacturing town, for which he 
chose the Spanish name of Cadiz ; but both he and Mr. 
Deniston died within two years after the mill was built. 
The first man who went to Cadiz with his family was 
David Cline. The next was John Saucerman, who lived 
in a tent while his house was building, and whose family 
suffered a great fright one evening because the baby was 
missing and it was believed the wolves had carried it 
away. Now, quite a number of dwellings are clustered 
around the mill ; but Cadiz, though a platted village, has 
never had either hotel or store. South-west of the vil- 
lage is David Klassv's saw and grist mill. 

The saw and grist-mill at Martin was built in 1S45- 
46, by Isaiah and Nathaniel Martin. The village of 
Martin was platted in 1869, and in the summer of 1S76, 
had within its limits twelve families, a store and post- 
office, N. Martin's mills, including an unfinished woolen 
mill, and Hasse's furniture factory. The Pecatonica, 
which enters Cadiz after draining over half the lead 
region of Wisconsin, and which gives Martin its excel- 
lent water power, is always turning, seemingly to see 
where else in Cadiz man is preparing to make use of its 
strength to do his work. As yet it looks in vain. The 
resources of the town can never be fully developed with- 
out a railroad. A company called the "Lone Rock, 
Dodgeville, and Free-port Railway Co." has been organ- 
ized, and during the present year its project of building 
a road along the Pecatonica valley, from Dodgeville via 

H 



154 History of Green County. 

Argyle and western Green County to Freeport, has given 
rise to several town meetings and some voting; but there 
is no immediate prospect of a road. 

Browntown and Franklin are unrecorded villages. 
Browntown, on the left bank of the Skinner, dates its 
beginning from a mill built in iS^6-'qj by Wm. Brown, 
Henson Irion, and John Wood, and consists of Emanuel 
Divan's flour-mill, the usual store and blacksmith-shop of 
country villages, and dwellings enough to make a total of 
ten buildings. The store and dwellings of Franklin find 
the reason of their being in the saw-mill of J. E. and 
Geo. L. Shattuck, which is also a factory of wagon fel- 
oes and broom handles. At a very early day speculators 
bought a large tract of land in Clarno and Cadiz, 
and borrowed money of the Franklin Bank in Illinois 
to pay for it. They were never able to pay the bank, and 
so gave up the land, which was thenceforth called the 
Franklin land. Before the organization of the towns, the 
Methodists divided the county into circuits, and the name 
of the circuit in which this land lay was Franklin. The 
usual place of holding meetings in the circuit was a 
school-house on what is now section one of the town of 
Cadiz, and gradually the name was restricted to this par- 
ticular place. A steam saw-mill, built there in 1854 by 
Benjamin Chenoweth and Henry Barber, was called the 
Franklin mill, and when a post-office was established 
there, the people wanted to call it Franklin. The post- 
office department objecting, it was called Lamar ; but the 
place is Franklin still. 

The other post-offices of Cadiz are Skinner and Wau- 



History of Green County. 155 

semon, on sections three and six. Cadiz's only tavern, 
the well known Buckhorn, was built by Joseph Paine, 
who soon after 1840 traded a mule for a tax title to the 
quarter section of land on which it stands. It was so 
much the fashion then "to dicker" wool, corn, lead, or 
some other commodity for whatever one wanted to buy, 
that a Green County justice once astonished a man who 
was hoping for money by rendering judgment in his favor 
for a thousand feet of basswood lumber. All the little 
money in the county was hoarded up to buy land and pay 
taxes; and how to take care of this little was an important 
problem. As most of it was hard money, it was neces- 
sary to deposit it somewhere. Notwithstanding his efforts 
to conceal it, the care of a hundred dollars — when that 
was all the money he had — was evident enough to give 
Mr. Lake of Spring Grove the troublesome reputation of 
being enormously rich. At one time, a neighbor went to 
his cabin to borrow ten dollars, and Mr. Lake told him 
he would get the money as soon as he had been to the 
spring. He went out, apparently to get a drink, but 
really with the hope of digging up his money without 
letting it be known that he kept it in the ground. As he 
dug he heard a laugh, and, turning around, he saw his 
neighbor watching him. The ground was no longer a 
desirable safe, and the money was moved to a straw 
stack. Going to the stack one day after an absence from 
home, he found that the cattle had uncovered his golden 
store. Before he could conceal it again, he was address- 
ed by a young man who thenceforth, with his friends, 
looked upon Mr. Lake's farm as a place every part of 



1^6 History of Green County. 

which might conceal treasure more valuable than the 
buried riches of Captain Kidd. Of all the guests of the 
Buckhorn, probable none ever passed a more anxious 
night than Mr. M. H. Pengra passed there in 1S48, when 
on his way to enter land. He had with him in a shot 
pouch, $200 in coin, mostly in half dollars and Mexican 
five-dollar gold pieces. The pouch was too heavy and 
bulky to be easily secreted. Once when he tried to keep 
it in an inner pocket of his coat it broke through the 
pocket and fell to the ground. He sought relief by going 
to bed with it as early as possible, but Mr. Paine's 
entrance into his room an hour or two later, with a 
request to be allowed to sleep with him, filled the night 
with suspicions which murdered sleep as effectually as 
Mr. Paine's sudden transformation into AH Baba's forty 
robbers could have done it. 

When Mr. Paine first bought his land in Cadiz he 
built a cabin on it, and laid out a village to which he 
gave the name of Pecatonica City. The new village did 
not grow as Monroe had grown. The cabin was unoc- 
cupied, except as travelers stopped there occasionally ; 
and, when careless pilgrims forgot to put out the fire 
they had kindled, there was no one to do it for them ; 
whence it happened that Pecatonica City was destroyed. 
From its ashes arose the Buckhorn, which Mr. Paine 
sold to John Bringold. It was always Mr. Paine's pecu- 
liarity to forget the particulars of business transactions. 
As passionate and turbulent as he was careless and for- 
getful, he often quarreled with those who had accounts 
with him. In the spring of 1849 ne quarreled with Mr. 



History of Green County. 



*57 



Bringold about the rails on the land, and, as Mr. Brin- 
gold insisted on taking them, Mr. Paine shot him dead in 
the field. Mr. Paine was taken to Monroe, but, before 
the time for his trial, he escaped to California, where he 
died in December, 1875. Once since then a moment's 
passion, and if not a willful, at least a careless use of a 
gun at a charivari, cost the life of a citizen of Cadiz. 
In this case the unfortunate doer of the deed delivered 
himself up to the law, and was tried and acquitted. 

LARGEST FARMERS IX CADIZ IN 1S76. 



Names. 


No. of Acres 


;. Names. 


No. of Acres, 


August Bast, 


- l6o 


Geo. Michaels, - 


- 3 2 9 


Sol. Binger, - 


l8l 


J. W. Montgomery, 


199 


W. Binger, 


- l6o 


Mason Parmer, 


- 180 


Warren Clark, 


l6o 


A. Pickett, - 


161 


E. Divan, - 


- 5 6 5 


M. Reinhart, 


- 160 


Henrv Divan, 


198 


J. V. Roberts, 


401 


E. F/Evans, 


- 198 


H. Rush, - 


- 4 2 4 


F. S. French, 


160 


S. Saucerman, 


210 


W. Fuller, 


- 2 39 


J. H. Shank, - 


- 172 


W. & G. Hodges, 


230 


M. Shank, - 


180 


M. Kellv, Sen., - 


- 180 


Hiram Smith, - 


- 3S5 


S. Kelly, 


166 


T. D. Taylor, 


192 


John Keller, 


- 186 


P. Timmons, 


- 233 


David Klassy, 


205 


G. Truman, - 


162 


M. Kratzer, 


- 160 


E. Ullom, - 


- 280 


Geo. Lawver, 


235 


John Warner, 


160 


F. Long, - 


- 160 


Thomas Watson, 


- 165 


C. W. Loomis, 


160 


N. L. B. Wescott, 


176 


John Loomis, - 


- 200 


F. F. West estate, 


- 453 


A. Ludlow, - 


160 


Edward Whitehead, 


45° 


S. P. Lynch, 


- 3 2 ° 


Levi Whitehead, 


160 


N. Martin, 


437 


W. Whitehead, 


160 


Ben. Michaels, - 


- 221 


Whitney & Treat, 


- 200 



LARGEST STOCK RAISERS. 

Wm. & James Bratley. Shank Bros. E. Ullom. 

The first voting place in Cadiz was the house of Mrs. 
Deniston, but for some years there has been a good 

14* 



'58 



History of Green County. 



town house. When Cadiz and Jordan were united in 
the Calimine election precinct (named in remembrance 
of a Winnebago head chief), the usual voting place was 
Michaels' mill. 



OFFICERS FROM 1S49 TO '77 INCLUSIVE. 



CHAIRMEN. 



John Wood. 
E. Divan. 

Alfred Flowers. 
Wesley Swank. 
W. M. Brown, (5 years). 
Ezra Wescott, (7 years). 
M. Reinhart, (2 years). 
Henry Rush. 

CLERKS. 

Wesley Swank, (3 j r ears). 
Isaac Williams, (3 years). 
J. G. Sanders, (3 years). 
E. Djvan, (H. Irion acting). 
C. R. Deniston. 
Isaiah Michaels. 
Francis Haughey. 
C. R. Deniston. 
J. M. Stayer. 



J. H. Land. 

J. M. Stayer, (2 years). 

Warren Clarke. 

C. R. Deniston, (2 years). 

J. M. Sta\er. 

M. Reinhart. 

E. F. Evans. 

H. Rush. 



J. G. Sanders. 
Henson Irion. 

F. M. Bradford, (2 years). 
J. A. Meacham, (3 years). 
B. C. Curtis, (2 years). 

J. A. Meacham, (2 years). 
B. C. Curtis. 

G. L. Shattuck, (2 years). 



'.' 



ADAMS. 



Before the Black Hawk war, the work of surveying 
and sub-dividing range six was intrusted to Gen. James 
Biggs, of Ohio. In the prosecution of his work, which 
was finished in 1S34, he discovered in the northwestern 
part of town three a very rank growth of the lead weed, 
a plant whose roots are said to extend forty feet below 
the surface. Gen. Biggs knew that the Indians re- 
garded a line of this weed on the surface as an indica- 
tion of a fissure which might contain mineral, and in the 
intervals of his work as surveyor he began to dig there. 
His labor was so successful that he made the place his 
home; but for several years his family spent much of 
the time at Hamilton's diggings. In the fall of 1837 
Wm. Brazel settled in the southern part of the town, 
and in '38 Jonas Shook settled where he still resides 
near the eastern boundary of the town. Geo. Morrison 
in '41, Wm. Morrison, Samuel Truax, James H. Bailey, 
Gabriel Long, Lemuel Iliffe, and Matthew Cunning- 
ham, in '42, were the next settlers. Mr. Cunningham 
was a Virginian. All the other settlers named after 
Gen. Biggs came from Illinois. Messrs. Truax, Bailey, 



160 History of Green County. 

and Long came to the southern part of the county in 
^39. Mr. Bailey's house was the first voting place in 
the town. 

In the summer of 1842 the first religious society in 
Adams was organized. The first minister was Dr. 
Church and the second was Mr. IlifFe, who had been 
accustomed to "exhort" in Illinois. 

One of the saddest accidents that occurred in the 
first years of the county's existence occurred in Adams, 
in January, 1843. It was at the raising of Win. Morri- 
son's house. James Brown, of Monroe, was on the 
roof, and one of the logs which held the shingles in 
place rolled to the ground, throwing him down and 
killing him instantly. 

Sometime prior to 1846, Chauncey Smith built a saw 
mill on the creek which had for many years been called 
as it is called now, the Dougherty, in commemoration of 
the early visits there of Exeter's Indian trader. After 
the building of the saw mill, Mr. Osborne, who, in allu- 
sion to the wild ducks there, fastened upon the mill pond 
and its locality the name of Puddle Duck, corrupted into 
Puddle Dock, set up a carding machine there. It 
changed owners, and under the care of Geo. Ball and 
E. M; Milliard grew into a fulling mill. In 1868 the 
saw mill was washed away, and its companion and sur- 
vivor the fulling mill has recently been transformed into 
a flour mill. This mill, of which L. M. Stevens is pro- 
prietor, and Jacob Karlen's cheese factory, are the only 
manufacturing establishments in the town. 

In 1S47, Mr. Wilderman, a young man who was living 



History of Green County. 161 

at Mr. Shook's, excited the wrath of the community by 
entering a piece of timber which adjoined his own land, 
and formed part of the claim of a man whom Mr. Wild- 
erman called, in defence of his own conduct, speculator. 
It was the Monroe doctrine, and it prevailed all over 
the county that, by fair means or foul, claim jumpers 
should be made to deed their land to the squatters. 
Those who intended to bring about this result in the 
present case were afraid of Mr. Shook's opposition. 
They therefore sent a man to pick a quarrel with him, 
the result of which was that Mr. Shook was arrested 
just before dark and taken to Attica. Twenty men 
then appeared at the door, and called upon Mr. Wilder- 
man to come out. He declined to go out, and thev en- 
tered the house. On one side of the room were two 
high bedsteads, one in each corner. Mr. Wilderman 
stepped between the bedsteads, and, having snatched a 
large butcher knife from the table, defended himself so 
well that his assailants were forced to retire to bind up 
their wounds. When Mr. Shook knew the real cause 
of his arrest, he had the rioters arrested. After a whole 
night's wrangling at the court house, they were set free 
on a recognisance. Their release was followed by the 
burning of Mr. Shook's grain stacks, and this by a long 
continued prosecution. Under similar circumstances, 
life and property have been endangered in almost all 
the other towns. One man who entered land was put 
through a hole in the ice into Smith's mill-pond, and 
held there until he promised to give the squatter a deed, 
but in no other case was the trouble of such longf con- 



ir: History of Green County. 

xinuance and such notoriety as this that Mr. Wilder- 
man : a a. 

_ 

In : 346, a quarrel of two drunken miners. Patrick 
Ryan and Patrick Egan. resulted in Ryan's killing 
Egan with a drill. An indecisive trial followed, and at 
; . c nd trial no witnc sses appearing against him, Rvan 
as discharged. Like Cadiz and Mount Pleasant, 
. s has a second murder on her records. In the case 
referred ::. there * a dispute about money which a 
demanded of the father of her child, for its sup- 
port. After many altc . . . n other places, the dis- 
pute chanced to be renewed at a hotel in Monroe, and 
• oman shot and killed the man. She was tried and 
acquitted. 

In 1 - - . a mail route was opened from Albany 
to . le. Ada ad an office on this route, and 

Mr. Shoe le first postmaster, named it Willett, 

because there was but one office of that name in the 

■ 

X. nited : ;ce has for a long time been kept 

Puddle Duck, a place which h the advantages of 

pc ;ig a . . .1 location and more houses than any 

other one place in the town, and of being the usual place 

of holding meetings. 

A history of Adams that left out her mines would be 
■■complete as Newcastle without her coal. The 

Badger _ ejs, -ection eleven, were discovered in 1843, 
John Bailey, an old Exeter miner. He was looking 

for a bee-tree, and happened to notice that in the dirt 
hich the badgers had thrown out of their holes there 

were pieces of lead. The Newkirk diggings, section 



Hi story of Green Com ; 

24, on land bought in 1S36 by Mi ew Newk k, 

a wealthy citizen of P: . . ■ a, wc e 

'42 bv Tohn Bailey an fonas S ... . . 

good example of what Miss rhackers . sthestn ... 

part played in "life by the t ngs thai &vei 

For rears their owner was looking fc : :ie 

when they should lead him to the source < . iless 

wealth. e town vi as . ... fa nous es, :he 

money, and the la": . tat wc own ... I . ack 

mouths; but when all these I [js wen swallowed up 
that was the end. It was not 1 x \ when much 1 
the float mineral had been rais V Newk 1 Ve- 
gan to work the mine s. He had be< ... ced that 
there was a . tint of lead there, and, 5 sauk 
expressed his will' ess in 1 e atset to spei $20,000 
in searching for it. The . ef was list the nor 

ground in the lead districts of Illinois, [< w \\ • 

consin, that the mineral extei fled . al hundre< ... 
below the surface, and that most - afts .. tort . 
the lower deposits. This 1 1 was s t ear- 

ly than ever be: . s ^ ;. -\ I e >oet Pert . who 

was the next year . . State G< - fWisct 

sin. Mr, Percival visited the Newki v and 

his published report ... to -a rem.. ... t . g in 
the blue limestone in that vicinity ." .is •• in its character 
unlike any other I have examined," r . ... 

special reference to Adams, the followin »e from 

a letter written bv Mr, Percival in An. ust, 1S53, n 
be of interest in this connection: •• I will lust Efive you 
a touch of the mining la. . uage; 1 \\ .. .... 



164 History of Green County. 

pect, and, after prospecting several days, I struck a lead 
and raised a lot of bully mineral; but it was only a 
bunch in a chimney without any opening, so I petered 
out and a sucker jumped me." 

The Xewkirk diggings were under the supervision 
of the Rev. James Smith, whom Mr. Xewkirk sent 
from Philadelphia in 1S50. By Mr. Smith's direction, 
the mineral found was tested in Philadelphia. The 
lead was a carbonate of lead. Silver ore was found 
containing 1 */ per cent, of silver, and copper ore con- 
taining 56 per cent, of copper; but no veins of either 
copper or lead were followed out, because Mr. Xew- 
kirk had resolved to make his mine a deep one. After 
a time, the water came in so rapidly that a pump was 
kept going night and day to keep it out. The pump 
was worked by a tread-wheel about thirty feet in diam- 
eter, and the wheel was turned by oxen. In 1857, ow- 
ing to financial embarrassments, the work stopped. 
When it was resumed, two pumps were used, and a 
steam engine was employed to work them. Buildings 
for the pumps and engine were begun in '64, on a scale 
corresponding to the great success anticipated. The en- 
gine house is some distance from the mine. Two long 1 
walking beams passed from the engine to the pumps, 
through an underground passage way which was 
meant to be arched over with solid masonry. The en- 
gine was powerful enough to drive, besides the pumps, 
the machinery of a saw mill and flour mill; and the 
engine house was really designed as a flour and saw 
mill, but the requisite machinery was never put in. In 



History of Green County. 165 

1866 Mr. Newkirk engaged another agent in place of 
Mr. Smith, and some disagreement then about accounts 
led to the Smith- Newkirk lawsuit — a case which, for 
interminable intricacies, has no parallel in Green 
Countv, and which at the present time bids fair to grow 
out of comparison with all suits except, perhaps, the 
famous case of Jarndvce and Jarndyce. L nder the 
superintendence of Mr. Wm. Monteith, work in the mine 
went on five months longer, and then stopped never to 
begin again, In 1S66, Mr. Newkirk sold the land to 
Mr. Monteith, who has made it much more productive 
above the surface than it ever was below. Pumps and 
engine are gone, the shafts have nearly been filled up, and 
the mill is used as a grain barn; but the mammoth tread 
wheel and the half-finished arched passage way still 
remain, unchanged monuments to the great expecta- 
tions once raised there. 

A large proportion of the inhabitants of Adams are 
of foreign birth. Most of the foreigners are Irish, but 
there are also many Norwegians, and a few Germans, 
as is indicated by the following list: 

LARGEST FARMERS EN 1S76. 
Names. 

Edmund Barry, 
Ante Benson, 
Geo. Bleiler, 
E &J. Bl timer, 
Christopher Boman, 
H. M. Brazel (heirs of), 360 
Thomas Byrne, 
Thomas Carey, 
*Thomas Collantine, 
John Conway. 

♦Largest stock raiser j. 



No. of Acres. 

" 346 

3 S0 

- 44O 


Names. 

Owen Knight, 
A. K. Lien, - 
K. L. Lien, 


N< 


). of Acres, 
300 

453 
211 


J 40 


James Menahan, - 




1 So 


l6o 


Hugh Monahan, 


- 


260 


)f ), 360 
- 2O0 


William Monteith, 
Frank Mullin, 




240 

2^6 


366 

- 3 2 ° 


John Mullin, 

Andrew Nelson, 




292 

160 


3o5 


George Poff (heirs of), 


240 








»S 



i66 



History of Green County. 



Names. 

♦Michael Grotty, 

Thomas Everson, - 
♦Michael Flanagan, 
*William Flanagan, 

Patrick Flanery, 

James Gilligan, 

Tames Grant, - 

Reuben Holcomb, 

H. C. Jorunbv, 

Richard Keegan, - 

John Knight, Sen., 

OFFICERS OF ADAMS FROM 1849 TO 1877 INCLUSIVE. 



No. of Acres. 


Names. No. 


of Acres, 


- 5 60 


Jacob PofF, - 


28o 


167 


Gilbert Post, - 


182 


- 4 6 5 


John Reiley, 


l6o 


300 


*John Ryan, Sen., 


200 


- 160 


Richard Scott, 


280 


180 


Adam Shrake, 


24O 


- 200 


Jonas Shook, 


277 


340 


James Smith, Sen., - 


320 


- 160 


James Smith, Jun., 


280 


160 


John Sullivan & Co., 


360 


- 240 


Edward Toban, 


280 



CHAIRMEN, 

Samuel Kelly (2 years). 

A. L. Grinnell. 

Jonas Shook. 

James Smith (4 years). 

Jonas Shook. 

James Smith. 

Royal M. Jackson (2 years). 

Richard Scott. 

Jonas Shook (2 years). 



CLHRKS. 



T. M. Biggs. 
R. M. Jackson (6 years). 
E. D. Jackson. 
James Smith. 
Jonas Land (3 years). 
Thos. Byrne 



Levi P. Duncan. 

James Smith. 

J. F. Grinnell. 

Joel Kelly (2 years). 

Levi P. Duncan. 

Adam Shrake (2 years). 

Jonas Shook. 

Thos. Byrne. 

Wm. Monteith (4 years). 

Jonas Land. 

Thos. Byrne (3 years). 

C. M. Ball. 

Thos. Byrne, (3 years). 

Fred Hummel (3 years). 

Henry Gilligan (5 years). 



♦Largest stock raisers. 



JEFFERSON. 



In 1835, Jonathan E. Clark of Ohio built on section 
thirty-two the first house built in the town of Jefferson. 
Thither, in the spring of 1836, he brought his family 
from the mines. He was not long without neighbors. 
In the fall of 1836, David Bridge, also from Ohio, built 
on section twenty what was called the prettiest cabin 
this side of Chicago. Settlers had so much to do, and 
it took so much time to get lumber and puncheons, that 
in all the towns some families lived at first in doorless 
and fioorless houses. Doors were the only things for 
which lumber was provided. It was lumber that Mr. 
Hawthorne had brought from Galena to make a cabin 
door that made the first coffin in the county — Mr. 
Patterson's. In Mr. Bridge's cabin, a puncheon floor 
was made in the ends of the room, and there the beds 
were made. At first, Mr. David Bridge and his father, 
Mr. John Bridge, slept at one end of the room, and Mr. 
Jeremiah Bridge and his family slept in the other end. 
A homeless family asked and obtained leave to sleep 
on the ground in the middle of the room, but rattle- 
snakes that raised their heads there were inhospitably 



1 68 History of Green County. 

cut off, ere they were fairly out of their holes. Other 
settlers in 1S36 were Daniel Harcourt, John Chryst, and 
Joseph and Simeon Forbes, all from Indiana. In the 
winter of 1836— '7 Mrs. Jeremiah Bridge died. The set- 
tlers of ib'37 were Wm. Rittenhouse, F. T. Kendrick, 
James Riley and Henry Minert from Indiana, Jehu 
Chadwick from Pennsylvania, and James Christie, 
Michael Alben, and Joel De Camp. Most of those who 
came in the next few years came from Pennsylvania. 
Thev were not only bound to each other by recollec- 
tions of the home they had left, but they selected their 
farms here with reference to the new ties that might be 
formed through church organizations. The north-east 
corner of the town became a stronghold of the Baptists, 
section seventeen was a Methodist centre, and the Chris- 
tians congregated on and near section thirty-two. Be- 
fore there were any churches, a man so tall that some 
of the boards in the floor of the loft had to be moved to 
make room for his head preached once at Mr. Clark's 
house. All the people came with ox teams, some of 
them from a long distance, and good Mrs. Clark meant 
to give them a dinner. The dinner was put to boil in 
kettles suspended over a fire which was built by 
the side of a brook; and then the women, remembering 
the praise given to Mary, went in to hear the sermon. 
While they listened, an unexpected storm arose, the 
stones which supported the kettles were blown down, 
and the dinner was washed away in the brook. The 
catastrophe was explained by the supposition that the 
minister's head had penetrated and broken a storm 



History of Green County. 169 

cloud, but the minister thought that if some of the 
women had been contented to watch the dinner, all 
would have been well. 

Soon after his arrival here, John Chryst constructed 
a " horse mill " for grinding buckwheat. Crops of all 
kinds were raised in 1S37— '38. ^ ne man raised great 
quantities of oats, which he sold for forty-four cents a 
bushel. Another raised potatoes, four hundred bushels 
an acre. Some good things were lacking vet. There 
were hardly any stoves, and the ever-praised old fire- 
place did little more than burn those who sat near it. 
In the spring, after his first winter here, Jeremiah Bridge 
laid a floor in his cabin, and found that the ground on 
which his family had lived all winter was frozen to 
the depth of eight inches. One day when Mrs. Chad- 
wick set aside her wheel to get dinner she found her fire 
had gone out. Friction matches had never been seen 
in the county at that time, and J. M. Chadwick, then a 
lad of fifteen, was sent three-quarters of a mile for fire. 
Going home, he was obliged, in order to keejo fire, to stop 
frequently to gather up and burn dry twigs and barks, 
so that his return was delaved until the familv was in 
a very unusual state of mind and appetite. If Charles 
Lamb, who thought that since in most families dinner 
is no precarious or unusual thing it is therefore a less 
appropriate time than many other occasions during the 
day for saying grace, had dined at Mr. Chad wick's that 
day, he would no doubt have seen a peculiar beauty in 
the ceremony. In 1S3S, Mr. LyBrand had matches to 
sell at twenty-five cents a bunch (a bunch consisting of 



15* 



lyo • History of Green County. 

;about twenty-five matches glued together at one end), 
$}ut they were of so poor a quality as to be of little use 
except to quiet the apprehensions of children who had 
heard ±00 much about fire and brimstone. Those were 
the days of borrowing and lending. Mr. Daniel Bridge 
once went nine miles to borrow a brush scythe, and was 
told that he might get it from another borrower who 
had taken it nine miles farther. Everybody with an 
axe to grind, though he lived as far away as Orange- 
ville, went to Mr. Bridge's. 

Among the first civil appointments made in Jefferson 
was the appointment, some time before the end of 1841, 
of John Cain to the office of justice of the peace. The 
petition asking for the appointment was written by a 
resident of the town, and is said to have begun as fol- 
lows: " To his majesty, Henry Dodge, governor of Wis- 
consin and superintendent of Indian affairs; We, your 
jhumble subjects, ever praying, do humbly pray." 

A Methodist camp meeting, the first in the county, 
was held in Jefferson in the summer of 1S41, and later in 
the season there was " a basket meeting," lasting five 
days. 

Almost as soon as she came here, Mrs. John Bridge 
instituted weekly spelling schools, which were held at 
her home, and attended by all the children -within a 
mile. In 1840, Jefferson paid her school tax and drew 
her portion of the public school fund ; but this was paid 
in Mineral Point bank-notes, and even before it was 
paid, the bank had failed. Jabez Johnson taught Jeffer- 
son's first school, at the house of David Bridge, but in 



History of Green County. 171 

1841 a school house was built on Mr. Rittenhouse's 
farm, and in this the first teacher was Wm. Jones. Mr. 
Chadwick, fearing his children might lose their way on 
the prairie, ran a furrow from his house to the school 
house with his breaking plow, which was drawn by 
five yoke of oxen and which made a furrow twenty 
inches wide. On this furrow the children walked un- 
til the snakes, pleased with the soft ground, took up 
their abode there, and then they walked in the high 
grass by its side. 

The villages of Jefferson are two — Juda, in the north- 
east corner, and Twin Grove, almost in the centre of 
the township. Jehu Chadwick entered, sold, and bought 
back again the land on which Juda is built, after which 
he sold several lots and gave lots for a cemeterv and 
Baptist church. The first building there was a log 
school house, called, for the old home of the settlers, 
the Pennsylvania school house. The first person buried 
in the cemetery was James Chadwick, who died in 
September, 1846. People who had moved their dead 
from farm to farm, as their own homes had changed, 
now brought the precious remains to the new cemetery; 
so that when, a few years later, the growth of the 
unexpected village necessitated the removal of the 
cemetery, some coffins were taken up for the third 
time. The church was b'uilt in 184S by the soci- 
ety which was organized by Elder Wm. Stilwell, 
September 19, 1840. This was the first Baptist society 
organized in the county, and it numbered thirteen mem- 
bers. Elder Stilwell lived in Illinois, but for four years 



372 History of Green Coimty. 

preached to the society once in two months. As he 
was not willing to give up his other churches, and as 
.all were anxious to have preaching every week, Deacon 
Davis went to Pennsylvania in 1845, t° ^ n< ^ a minister. 
Elder G. R. Patton, who had charge of five churches, 
-was induced to give them up, sell his home, and come 
to Wisconsin. While he was selling his property Dea- 
con Davis came home, and found that during his ab- 
sence the people had engaged another minister, Elder 
Lewis. Deacon Davis remonstrated, but the desire to 
have Elder Lewis was by that time so great that remon- 
strance would have been in vain, had not the Elder him- 
self been touched by the injustice to his brother minis- 
ter., and refused to stay. Elder Patton arrived in Octo- 
ber, 1845, an d is still the pastor of the church. In 1S64 
it was necessary to build a larger church. Since then, 
letters have been given to a great many who were go- 
ing west, or who wanted to form other churches. The 
number of members is now two hundred and fifty-one. 
The first dwelling house in Juda was that of George 
Debolt, who built a dwelling and a blacksmith shop about 
the time the first church was built. The next comer 
-was Garrett Clawson, who built a wagon shop. The 
third dwelling was Edward Tenney's, and through his 
efforts a postoffice named Juda was established there in 
1849. Soon after this, Robe'rt Hanna came from Penn- 
sylvania, bringing with him a few groceries and dry 
goods, which he kept for sale in his house. A little 

later another store was opened by Broadbent, and 

at began to be hoped that there might sometime be a 



History of Green County. 173 

village. Two hotels, kept respectively by Robert Han- 
na and John Overton, sprung into existence and into 
rivalry with each other; and when the coming of the 
railroad was foretold, Barney Taylor and John Overton 
platted the place as Springfield, a name now used 
only by lawyers and scribes, for, as the postoffice depart- 
ment refused to change the name of the office to Spring- 
field, the people have refused to call the village anything 
but Juda. Soon after Springfield, or Juda, was platted, 
a number of enterprising business men were numbered 
among those interested in her improvement. Promi- 
nent among these were Messrs. Axtell, Sherman, J. C. 
Chadwick, and S. and D. Witmer, and few, if any, 
have done more to promote the welfare of the vil- 
lage than was done bv the gentleman last named. 
Being the only point of shipment in Jefferson — a 
town which has some of the best land, best farms, 
and best stock in the county — the growth of Juda 
is necessarily sure. The Judsean, a diminutive but spicy 
paper recently started by Witmer and Stair, will here- 
after be likely to keep before the people of the surround- 
ing country the good points of the village, chief among 
which are West & Reed's flour mill, Christian Karlen's 
American cheese factory (one of the largest in the state), 
the stores of Mess re. Byrne, Newman and Stair, and 
the large stock business of J. C. Chadwick. 

The first voting place in Jefferson was the house of 
A. Sanborn, near Twin Grove, which is a village of 
two streets, where the neighboring farmers have their 
children started on the road to learning and their horses 



.174 History of Green County. 

shod, where they hear the gospel Sundays, and get their 
mail and all the treasures of a country store on week- 
days, and where the only butter factory in the county 
in which the churning is done by horse power may be 
seen. The factory belongs to J. M. Chadwick, and is 
under the direction of Robert Start. 

The twin groves were a favorite resort of the Indi- 
ans, and there were well-worn trails to the grove from 
Freeport and Mineral Point, that, like the old trail 
from Monroe to Exeter, lasted years after those who 
maoTe them had passed away. After the coming of the 
whites, the Indians stopped each year at the groves, on 
their way from Fort Winnebago to Chicago, where 
they were paid their annuities, and, as they filed along 
in their trail, which in places was a foot below the sur- 
face, the line was sometimes half a mile long. About 
two hundred spent the winters of iS35-'6 and '36-'y at 
the groves, and one night in the fall of '36, they dug 
and carried away all but one bushel of an acre of Mr. 
Clark's turnips. And yet they were not an unmixed 
evil. Besides their services as tanners, — and the most 
durable suits the settlers had were made from skins the 
Indians tanned, — they brought with them tea-kettles, 
■frying-pans, and various household conveniences, which 
'they may have stolen somewhere else, but which the 
"whites gladly bought, paying in provisions. 

The first house at the corners, as Twin Grove is 
sometimes called, was the house of Jonathan Hill, built 
about 1S45. It was a good place for a blacksmith shop, 
■and Jonathan Cabel, who made the second home there, 



History of Green County. 



*75 



kept a wagon and blacksmith shop. Among the farm- 
ers who lived near was Isaac Sanborn, who about 1850 
started a pottery there, where jugs and crocks have since 
been made almost every year; and about the close of the 
war Harrison Clevenstein opened a store there. Since 
then there has always been one store there. Rightsell 
& Co., E. L. Walker, and George Wells have done a 
large business there. The postofhee at the corners was 
first christened Montezuma. It was then moved south- 
west and named successively Hope, Josephine, and New- 
kirk, with which name it went back to the village about 
1S60. Not being very profitable it was discontinued for 
a time, and when it was established again it was named 
Twin Grove. 



LARGEST FARMERS IN JEFFERSON IN 1876. 



Names. 

J. Andrews, 


No. of Acres. 
- ISO 


Names. 

D. Holmes, 


No. of Acres. 
- 220 


J. J. Armstrong, 
Win. Bradley, - 


l3 5 
l6o 


John Howard, 
H. Hunt, - 


l6o 
- 280 


G. W. Bridge, 


l62 


D. Keister, 


l6o 


*J. H. Bridge, - 

S. Bryant, 
*John Carter, 


- 298 
24O 

- 338 


John Meyers, - 
G. R. Patton, 
W. C. Penn, - 


- 20I 

195 

- 170 


Wm. Carter, - 


l6o 


I. Ravmer, 


22C 


*J. C. Chad wick, 


- 87O 


C. Roub, - 


- 177 


J. J. Chadwick, 


200 


*Jacob Roderick, 


64O 


*J. M. Chadwick, 


- 797 


J. W. Roderick, 


- 200 


VV. VV. Chadwick, - 


300 


J. B. Searles, - 


24O 


*J. Chambers, 


- 368 


*A. South, - 


" 3 2( > 


J. Chryst, 


180 


Peter Starr, - 


320 


J. Emerick, 


- 320 


W. Stevenson, - 


- l6o 


John Fisher, - 


200 


A. Stull, 


2IO 


C. Foster, - 


- 3 2 ° 


J. M. Swartz, - 


- l6o 


*L. Gapen, 
M. T. Gapen, - 
S. Hale, - 


400 

- 240 

160 


M. G. Todd, - 
A. Will, - 
D. Witmer, - 


415 
- l6o. 

*9£ 



♦Largest stock growers. 



176 



History of Green County 



TOWN OFFICERS FROM 1849 TO '77 INCLUSIVE. 



CHAIRMEN. 

Jeremiah Bridge. 

John Barrey. 

h. dunwiddie. 

Wm. Coldren. 

h. dunwiddie. 

Wm. Coldren. 

D. W. Ball. 

Wm. Blackford, (3 years). 

H Dunwiddie. 

John H. Bridge. 

Isaac Trembly. 



CLERKS. 



E. J. Blackford. 

J. Andrews. 

E. Hosier, (5 years). 

E. J. Blackford, (4 years). 
W. F. Pritchard. 

J. BOLENDER. 

H. Hunt, (2 years). 

F. Barnum. 



James Stevenson. 

L. Gapen. 

D. Witmer. 

S. Witmer, (2 years). 

Wm. Coldren, (2 years). 

S. Witmer. 

D. Witmer, (5 years). 

E.J. Blackford. 

H. Hunt. 

J. Roderick. 



S. M. Hanna. 

H. Hunt. 

H. Frankenberger, (3 y'rs). 

V. B S. Newman. 

E. J. Blackford, (3 years). 

C. F. Fisher. 

J. A. Patton, (3 years). 



SYLVESTER. 



The first of the Pennsylvanians in the eastern part 
of Green County was Allen Woodle, who came to 
southern Wisconsin in 1S35. ^ n tne s P r i n g °f ^S^, 
Allen and Win. Woodle, the latter bringing his family, 
came to Sylvester and built the first house in the town- 
ship, though it is thought Mr. McCraken bought, at. 
the land sale in '35, the first land bought in the town- 
ship. In the fall they were joined by their brother, 
Joseph Woodle and his family. The settlers of 1S37 
were Joseph McCraken, a native of New York, but 
for some years a resident of Illinois, Thos. Woodle and 
Jesse Mitchell from Pennsylvania, and Davis Bowen 
from Virginia. Mrs. Bowen, who came in 1S3S, has 
lived in Sylvester longer than any other woman now 
there. 

In the winter of 1837-8, Joshua Davis, a very esti- 
mable young man who came from Pennsylvania with 
Mr. Mitchell, died of the '-winter fever " — probably 
the typhoid fever of modern times. He was attended 
by Dr. Harcourt, whose medical studies consisted, it is 
said, of a few experiments made with lobelia and a few 



16 



iyS History of Green County. 

other medicines on a calf. He visited his patient three 
times a day and charged a dollar a visit. Dr. Harcourt, 
whose name was usually pronounced Haircourt, was no 
more popular in Sylvester as a preacher than as a doc- 
tor. The common opinion of him seems to have been 
expressed by Mr. McCraken, who, after listening to a 
long harangue of the doctor's, remarked to a fellow 
sufferer: "The Lord never called Haircourt to preach; 
oh, no! he wouldn't have done that. He called Bear- 
court, or some other court, and Haircourt thought he 
meant him." In some respects the Doctor seems to have 
been one of the most agreeable of the early preachers. 
He comforted those frightened by the doctrine of election, 
by saying: "Don't believe it; God don't choke religion 
down any of His children as an Indian rams a knife 
down the throat of a deer." In the funeral sermons of 
his own patients he was naturally to their virtues a little 
kind, and funeral sermons then had in them the possi- 
bilities of dreadful things. At one funeral in Monroe in 
1843, the minister preached his subject to hell, showed 
a possible avenue of escape, and preached him in again 
so many times that the audience was almost frenzied. 
One woman rose to q-q out and the minister ordered her 
to sit down. She replied that she would not stay and 
hear such talk, to which he retorted, that she could 
not get through the crowd, but he had under-estimated 
the humanity of his audience. 

Amos Sylvester of New York, Joseph and Jacob 
Reeder, Buckeyes, A. G. Houghton, a Kentuckian, who 
was in Monroe in 1835, and Rees Rush and Benjamin 



History of Green County. 179 

Mitchell, Pennsylvanians, came in 1S3S. Among the 
settlers of 1839 were Thomas W. Thompson, who had 
spent one year in Clarno, John Sylvester, Sylvester Hill, 
Justus, James, and Andrew Sutherland, Erastus Hul- 
burt, Mrs. Rachel Sylvester, Mrs. Jerusha Colton, from 
New York, Dr. Wm. Griffith, who platted the village 
of Monroe, Jacob Stull, Isaac Betts, and Miss Rachel 
Palmer from Pennsylvania, and Sullivan. 

The first school in Sylvester was the York district 
school, taught by Mr. Isaac Woodle. The first wed- 
ding was that of Mr. Wm. Baird and Miss Elizabeth 
Woodle. 

The citizens of Sylvester seem to have been the first 
in the county to avail themselves of that best means ot 
education within their reach, a debating society. From 
1S42 to '50 the village of Monroe was never for any long 
time without some organization of the kind, but Sylves- 
ter had a society in the winter of 1S39-40. Most of the 
questions discussed were political, and great interest 
was taken in the meetings. Svlvester lost the charac- 
teristics of a wilderness more rapidly than the towns 
that were settled before it. Settlers came in more 
rapidly, and it cost them much less time and trouble to 
get lumber and flour from Clarno and other merchan- 
dise from Monroe than it had cost those towns to get 
all the necessaries of life from Galena. 

In Sylvester, as in the other towns, every house was 
open to travelers. Hospitality was both a duty and 
pleasure; but to a housekeeper who, like one of the 
hostesses of Sylvester, had a family of ten, with no 



i8o Mist t '••;> • 

help, and with a house whose dimensions were only ten 
by fourteen feet, the duty must have been more appar- 
ent than, the pleasure. In many cases, the acquain- 
tance begun by giving the stranger a dinner grew into 
a life-long friendship, but sometimes the visitor proved 
to - . uisance. One hon i :eeper, to ph some 
s guests, killed her i brood of chickens 

lon<* bei f ched tl e described as "frying," 

and, as a reward for her kindness, had the mortification 

hearing her son pitied because, in his "boiled shirt," 
put on in honor of the company, he seemed too good to 
live in such a cabin, which cabin was one of the best 
houses in the county. Another housekeeper went to 

eat incovenience to sret a good breakfast for two 
men who voluntarily promised to pa} a high price, 
eaten, they asked her to change a larger bill 
than she had ever had, and, as she could not change it, 
they paid nothin .-. Usually the amount [mid was entirely 
at the option of the guests. Many travelers Mopped at 
Mr. Thompson's in Sylvester. If they paid well, it was 
all right; and if they did not pay anything, it was all 
right. The highest price ever charged was a shilling 
a meal audi a shilling- a lodging. Once ten men ami a 
woman with their horses stopped, over night. They 
had their own provisions, except butter and milk, which 
Mrs. Thompson supplied. Every bed in the hoc.se, all 
the bedding, and all the stables were given up to the 
travelers and their horses, but the total charge of ninety 
cents was complained of as exorbitant. As a general 
thing, travelers were not delayed by being borne hcav- 



Mistory of Green County, 

' . . . . , . D • 

the only -. • 
oi • . . 
'J .. 
• 
of CO 
only furniture ra* c di- 



id yet tl o i . 

ion : . . 

A . i ' ' Hill 

built. 

ill thi first 1 

• , wn v. 
. '1 ;.-. n - on rai thing to sell, he ; . 

:m 
. I ... led hi . ; 

- <-.. The ad 

To this i Aed, as th< 

th<: the year in ol 

A ; ut in 

[r, 1 ' he rtore v. a . -.. 

he 
[Jntil ■■■ .' > it o no po in 

Syl 

wa. oul boun two 

po ' . X. Re Lc 



1 82 History of Green County. 

Then, Sylvester post office was established at Thomp- 
son's store, and Chas. Thompson was the first post 
master. 

Of all the ancient foes of dull monotony, no other 
had so Ions: a life and so strong- a constitution as a road 
fight. Road fights were common to all the towns, and 
they had an infinite variety which makes the selection of 
a typical example difficult, but perhaps Sylvester gives as 
good an example of them all as can be found. Mr. Justus 
Sutherland petitioned the town board of Sylvester to so 
change a road that it would go around instead of across 
his land. The petition was not granted. He appealed 
from the decision of the board to a justice of the peace. 
The commissioners summoned by the justice to consider 
the matter ordered the road changed, but, through 
ignorance of the law, did not file their order with the 
town clerk within the thirty days allowed by law, and 
the omission left the order of the town board in force. 
By the advice of his lawyer, Mr. Sutherland fenced up 
the road, but his opponents tore the fence down. It 
was taken down several times, for truth crushed to earth 
is not more sure to rise again than was this fence. 
Then Mr. Sutherland and his sons armed themselves 
and stood guard. The first traveler who came that 
way flourished a pistol at them, but, seeing them de- 
termined, turned around and went away. At the next 
term of court, suit was brought against Mr. Sutherland 
for obstructing the highway, but Judge Whiton decided 
that the road was not a legal road because the law re- 
quired that in every order for a road the width should 



History of Green County. 183 

be stated, and this had been omitted in the case under 
consideration. Through the winter following this de- 
cision, the road remained fenced up, and the dispute was 
supposed to be ended. But Mr. Sutherland was still 
smarting under the injury which his feelings, if not his 
property, had sustained the year before, when the town 
board sent men on to his land to work the road, and at 
the next term of court he sued the board for trespass. 
This lead to a diligent study of road laws, and Judge 
Whiton learned that an act subsequent to that on which 
he had based his decision, legalized all roads in existence 
at the time the first law was enacted. He then reversed 
his decision, and the road was re-opened. Again Mr. 
Sutherland petitioned the town board, but with the 
same result as before; for before this time the road 
question had become the question that divided the town 
at elections, and the party opposed to a change in the 
road had elected its candidates. Again he appealed to 
the justice, also with the same favorable result as before; 
but this time the filing of the commissioners' report was 
omitted because Mr. Sutherland's lawver, Geo. E. Dex- 
ter, had been elected state senator, and he thought the 
easiest way of settling the matter was to have the road 
changed by an act of the legislature. With this end in 
view, he introduced a bill which would have passed, all 
unknown to Mr. Sutherland's opponents, had not Judge 
Noggle, of Rock County, been a member of the legis- 
lature. The Judge had at one time counseled the town 
board, and he still felt enough interest in the case to de- 
feat Mr. Dexter's bill. The next step in the controversy 



184 



History of Green County. 



was the endeavor of Mr. Sutherland's friends to make 
it appear that the report of the commissioners had been 
properly filed. The a tempt was a failure, but about 
that time the board proposed a compromise to which 
Mr. Sutherland assented. 

LARGEST FARMERS IN SYLVESTER IN 1876. 



Names. 


No. 


of Acres. 


Names. 


No. of Acres 


S. D. Ball, 


- 


I76 


Peter McVean, 


- l6o 


J. C. Barber, 




604 


G. Nicks, 


200 


E. Berry man estate, 


- 


275 


G. S. Pengra, - 


- l6o 


Geo. Bloom, 




215 


M. H. Pengra, 


l6o 


S. R. Bloom, - 


- 


200 


J. J. Putnam, - 


- 4IO 


J. E. Bowen, 




430 


Henry Roderick, 


480 


~B. B. Bowell, - 


- 


24O 


R. D. Searles, 


- l6o 


T. A. Bowell, 




245 


S. R. Stephens, 


200 


J. S. Brown, 


- 


165 


Lavina Stewart, 


- 327 


G. W. Bulfinch, - 




l6o 


Isaiah Staffauchei 


•, l6o 


W. C. Gorham, 


- 


345 


Sol. Sutherland, 


- l6o 


Wm. Hart wig, 




37o 


A. R. Sylvester, 


352 


Darwin Hulburt, 


- 


180 


Samuel Vance, 


- 3 6 ° 


Samuel Hutzel, 




289 


Mat. West, - 


288 


Jacob Luchsinger, 


- 


229 


Samuel West, - 


- 524 


S. T. Mallory, 




200 






LARGEST STOCK RAISERS. 




Henry Roderick. 


A 


. W. Sutherland. P. 


McVean. 



Samuel Ball, Saw and Grist Mill. 
Samuel Dennis, Steam Saw Mill. 

PROPRIETORS OF CHEESE FACTORIES. 

W. C Gorham, American Cheese. 
P. & H. Staflaucher, Swiss Cheese. 

TOWN OFFICERS FROM 1 849 TO '77 INCLUSIVE. 



CHAIRMAN. 



Thos. W. Thompson. 

Cyrus Benson. 

Wm. Bulfinch, (2 years). 

M. H. Pengra, (4 years). 

J. M. Searles. 

Jasper Clemmer. 

A. W. Sutherland. 

I. M. Bennett. 

L. Frankenberger, (2 years). 

L. Hare, (2 years). 



D. Murdock, (2 years). 

G. S. Pengra. 

Solomon Sutherland. 

G. S. Pengra. 

M. H. Pengra. 

Wm. DuBoise, (2 years). 

J. S. Brown. 

D. W. Ball. 

L. Hare, (2 years). 

G. S. Pengra. 



History of Gi'een County. 185 

CLERKS. 

M. C. Sutherland, (2 years). L. Frankenberger, (2 j'rs). 

Oliver Lindly, (3 years). M. H. Pengra, (5 years). 

H. T. Thompson, (3 years). J. M. Miller. 

L. Frankenberger, (3 y'rs). W. S. Pengra, (2 years). 

W. W. Sutherland. M. H. Pengra. 

M. Colton, (2 years). B. B. Bowell, (4 years). 



MOUNT PLEASANT. 



Most fitly named of all the towns is Mount Pleasant. 
No one can ride over its gently sloping hills and 
through its long valleys at any time from seed time to 
harvest, without blessing the good taste of those who 
first described it in its name. 

A part of the first land broken in the county was in 
this township, but as the house and furnace belonging 
with the farm were in Exeter, the honor of being the 
first settler in Mount Pleasant was reserved for John 
Mitchell, an Englishman, who came to the county with 
Camp and Collins. He had made important improve- 
ments when Mr. Pierce came to Washington in 1837. 
Leonard Ross and Elias Luttreli had also cultivated 
land in Mount Pleasant when Mr. Pierce came, but 
their home was at the Skinner diggings. When but 
one or two settlers had purchased land, the fairest por- 
tion of the township was seized by speculators. One 
man, Caleb Hopkins by name, bought 2,240 acres in 



1 86 History of Green County. 

Mount Pleasant and Washington, the greater part of 
it in Mount Pleasant. 

John Burt, Chester Bushnell, and perhaps Samuel 
Robb settled in Mt. Pleasant as early as 1S40. Michael 
McNutt, Edward Raymond, John, Daniel, and Benja- 
min Rima went in 1842, and found there John Lewis, 
James and Thos. Gillett, Foster Steadman, and Lewis 
Nixon. Visitors of the township in '43 remember see- 
ing, on their claims, Wm. Boyles jun. (at whose house 
the first town meeting was held), Thos. Morton, Josiah 
Munts, Leonard Heacox, Lyman Smith, Lewis Vin- 
cent, Geo. W. Barks, John Manley, Abner Aikens, 

Edward Gillis, John McLany, John Sergent, and 

Whaley. Many of these men, like many who came after 
them, spent their first years in the county at Exeter. They 
followed each other into Mount Pleasant in such quick 
succession that the oldest inhabitants are unable to agree 
on the order in which they came. Among the settlers 
of '44 were Ira Foster, Benjamin and W. W. Truax, 
Abraham Pratt, Porter Pratt, Samuel Hopkins, Geo. 
Rogers, Barnett Sunday, Wm. Kessler, John Bain, 
James Cassle, James Bedell, Lewis and Artemus Silver, 

Pliny Colton, Wm. Fulton, St. John, and 

Baker. Various states were represented among them, 
but a majority of those named were from Ohio. 

On the tenth of July, 1S44, there was discovered in 
Mount Pleasant a murder, which caused the greatest 
excitement in the county at the time, and which has re- 
mained a mystery ever since. The murdered man was 
Mr. Arthur Smith. His body was found in his field in 



History of Gree?i Cou?zty. 1S7 

the eastern part of the township, where he had been 
breaking prairie. The ground still bore the marks of a 
struggle for life, and, though the remains were so 
changed by the wolves and the summer sun as to be re- 
cognized only by the clothing, yet upon the skull, found 
some rods from the body, could be seen several fractures 
made by a small hatchet which had hung on the plow 
and which showed, when it was found on the ground, 
the use last made of it. Mr. Smith must have been 
killed the 28th of June, as he was seen about sunset that 
day, and the next morning his oxen were running about 
in the yoke. He had sold his claim for $200 in gold, 
and he was probably killed for his money. The con- 
tents of a trunk in his cabin were scattered in a way that 
showed there had been a hasty search there for some- 
thing; but the money escaped the eye of the murderer,, 
and was found, after the discovery of the murder, done 
up in the cloth intended for a wedding suit. Suspicion 
attached itself to several, but nothing was proved 
against any of those arrested; and some of those who 
attempted to ferret out the murderer became convinced 
that the deed was done bv some one living out of the 
county. Thirteen years after this murder, an old man, 
whom trouble had made insane, shot and killed his son- 
in-law. He was tried and acquitted, and these two 
make up the record of violent deaths in Mount Pleasant. 
Like Adams, Mount Pleasant had in old times a claim 
society which sometimes had exciting work to do. A 
man in Cadiz once entered eighty acres in Exeter that 
Mr. John Troy had claimed. The circumstances were 



1 88 History of Green County. 

such as to excite general indignation against the sjuecu- 
lator; and the society, most of whose members were 
Mount Pleasant men, sent him a summons to appear in 
Exeter at a specified time, with a specified sum of money 
to pay Mr. Troy for the improvements he had made. 
Instead of going himself, the purchaser of the land sent 
Mr. Noah Phelps, to make some compromise. Mr. 
Phelps proposed to the members of the society, most 
of whom were assembled to enforce their demands, that 
Mr. Troy should buy the laud of the speculator, paying* 
the government price. They grimly made answer that 
they had not a hundred dollars among them, but to the 
proposition that they should all sign Mr. Troy's note 
with him, in case some one could be found to lend him 
the money, they readily agreed. There was one man 
in Monroe who had the money — Mr. Alanson Corson. 
To him, Mr. Phelps and Mr. Gardner, would-be-peace- 
makers, betook themselves. It was night, but they called 
him up, obtained the money, and hastened on to Cadiz. 
The speculator was awakened and easily persuaded to 
deed the land to Mr. Troy; but, when he called his 
wife, she refused to sign the deed without a present of 
a new dress from Mr. Troy. By this time the patience 
of the sleepy and half frozen peace-makers was ex- 
hausted. They intimated that, previous to the bestowal 
of such a gift, Mr. Troy would observe the lady's so- 
journ in a country so warm that dresses suitable to the 
climate of Cadiz would be quite out of place. Still the 
wife insisted that a dress for a deed was one of the rights 
of women. She was strengthened and encouraged by 



History of Green County. 1S9 

the example of a determined matron who, rather than 
sign without a dress, had suffered " him " to lose a sale, 
and by the knowledge that sometimes in such cases the 
husband secretly paid for the dress himself. But history 
records few victories for human rights achieved at four 
o'clock in a winter night. It was hard to stand for a 
principle (or a dress), wne.i three men were telling her 
that if she did not yield her husband would be killed; 
and just as the day was dawnino- she wrote the words 
that to Mount Pleasant and Exeter were only an assur- 
ance of peace, but to the writer were two black warn- 
ings that she had prepared the way for a total loss of 
her time-honored tax. 

In 1843, R- ODel 't Witter built a saw-mill on Little 
Sugar river, in the western part of Mount Pleasant. 
The mill was built for Chester Witter, who soon sold 
it, however, to Mr. Steadman, by whom it was sold to 
Mr. Truman. In 1S45, John Williams, who had built 
Shobar's mill, the first mill on Richland creek, began to 
build a grist-mill on Little Sugar river, near the central 
part of Mount Pleasant. The next year was the " sickly 
year," when nearly all the inhabitants of the Sugar river 
valleys were victims of the "chill fever," a fever described 
as differing from ague in the absence of "shakes," well 
days, and appetite. All of Mr. Williams' family w r ere 
sick, he died in August, 1846, and the mill was never 
finished. In 1845, Mr. Steadman was made a post- 
master on the mail route from Monroe to Madison. The 
most striking peculiarities of the surface in that part of the 

county are the mounds bordering "long hollow," a long 

.7 



190 History of Green County. 

valley which extends from Mt. Pleasant far into Wash- 
ington. In reference to these mounds or bluffs, Mr. Stead- 
man named the office Monticello, meaning little moun- 
tain. A year or two later, he laid out, on the south 
side of the river, near the mill, a village to which he 
gave the same name. Jacob and Mathias Marty bought 
the whole village, vacated the greater part of it, and 
then extended it on the other side of the river. The 
only buildings in the vicinity of the village were the 
mill, the dwelling known as the mill house, and the 
house on Mr. Steadman's farm. -To induce him to set- 
tle there, the new proprietors of the village gave a lot 
to Mr. Peter Wilson, who in 185 1 built the first house 
on the north side. The same year Sylvester Hill built a 
house which was both store and dwelling, and the Marty 
Bros, built a hotel. Several dwellings were built in 
1852. O. R, Bacon's flour mill was built in '54 and Sweet- 
ing Taft's saw mill in '56. New stores and shops have 
since appeared from time to time to meet the demands 
of the two towns, Washington and Mt. Pleasant, from 
which the village draws its support, and with which it is 
steadily growing. Among the successors of Mr. Hill 
in the mercantile business in Monticello were George 
Campbell now of Portage, Garland and Noble now of 
Santa Barbara, Cal., and Messrs. Robert Godfrey, A. 
Jennison, R. Bridges, and O. R. Bacon. Prominent 
among those in trade there at the present time are A. 
Witter, S. Dunbar and J. Berkey. One of the few stores 
in the county conducted by a grange is at Monticello. 
For a brief period beginning in 1874, Monticello 



History of Green County. 



91 



had a newspaper, the Monticello Items, published by 
Stair & Lane. A more successful enterprise is that un- 
dertaken in 1866 by the Monticello Manufacturing 
Company, a stock company organized with the follow- 
ing officers: O. R. Bacon, president; Thos. Scars, sec- 
retary; and Samuel Johnson, treasurer. The company 
built a woolen mill in 1866, and two years later another 
building was erected for a store house. Fourteen per- 
sons have constant employment at the mill, which con- 
sumes on an average twenty thousand pounds of wool 
ill a year. Yarns, blankets, balmoral skirts, and all 
kinds of woolen cloths are made. There is also a saw 
mill connected with the woolen mill. The officers of the 
company are at present, Orrin Bacon, president; Thos. 
Sears, secretary; Benjamin Chenoweth, treasurer. 



LARGEST FARMERS IN MOUNT PLEASANT IN 1876. 

No. of Acres. 
- 3OO 



Names. N 

R. Aylsworth, - 


fo. of Acres, 
- 200 


Isaiah Bubbler, 


*95 


Sarah Baker, 


160 


R. Barlow, 


165 


Peter Bertram, - 


■ 200 


Jud. Bowen, - 
Joseph Chandler, 


243 
- 211 


Henry Cheesbro, - 


160 


W. II. Coates, - 


170 


Thomas Conway, - 


200 


Richard Dooley, 
John U. Elmer, 


- 240 
200 


Elijah Evans, - 


- 165 


E. Fenton, - 
Gideon Gillet, - 


473 
- 4 X 3 


John Gillett, 
Jesse Gist, 


160 

■ 275 


E. B. Milliard, 


160 


Mary Ilutchins, 
John Ilurlbut, 


- 240 
260 


John Jenny, - 
E. Layton, - 
John Lewis, 


- 160 
160 

- 228 



Nam 

John Marty, 

L. W. P. Morton, 277 

Samuel A. Newman, 160 

Charles Parkins, - 200 

Franklin Pierce, - 240 

R. Pryce, - - 200 

Henry Rhiner, - 240 

James Richards, - 190 

Caspar Schindler, - 315 

David Sears, - 177 

Sears Brothers - 200 

Artemus Silver, - 224 

C. Silver, - - 224 
Anton Staffaucher, 240 
Dietrich Staffaucher, 200 
John Sutherland, - 280 
N. Swager, - - 241 
Siloam Tone, - 332 
Cyrus Troy, - - 210 

D. II. Walling, - 179 
Cyrus Whittier, - 203 
Wm. Wood, - 255 



192 



History of Green County. 



LARGEST STOCK GROWERS. 



Thos. &. Wm. Fenton. 
Gideon Gillet. 



Jesse Gist, 
B. L. & Wm. Wood, 



The Chicago papers gave Mt. Pleasant the credit of 
sending the largest flocks of sheep sent to Chicago in 
the spring of 1S77. They went from the farms of B. 
L. and Wm. Wood and numbered i,Soo. 



PROPRIETORS OF CHEESE FACTORIES. 

Henry Babbler, Swiss Cheese. A. Staffancher, Swiss Cheese. 
John Marty, Swiss Cheese. J. U. Elmer, Swiss Cheese. 

Rheiner, Babbler & Co., Swiss J. & R. Regetz, Limburger 
Cheese. Cheese. 

TOWN OFFICERS FROM 1S49 TO 1877 INCLUSIVE. 



CHAIRMEN. 



Henry Adams, 2 years. 
Arunthus Thomas. 
Thos. Fenton. 
Henry Adams. 
Thos. Fenton. 
Samuel Johnson, 2 years. 
Jesse Gist, 2 years. 
James Broderick. 
C. F. Thompson. 



CLERKS. 



James L. Powell, 2 years. 
M. Marty, (resigned,' C. H. 

Wood worth appointed). 
Alonzo H. Jennison. 
James Broderick. 
Alonzo H. Jennison. 
F. R. Drake. 
Cyrus Troy. 



Jesse Gist, 4 years. 
John F. Van Slyke. 
Jesse Gist. 
G. W. Baker, 4 years. 
A. H. Pierce, 3 years. 

F. K. Studley, 2 years. 

G. W. Baker. 
A. H. Pierce. 



Henry Adams. 

John F. Van Slyke, 2 years. 

W. E. Noble, 3 years. 

B. C. Baker. 

S. Johnson. 

F. K. Studley, 9 years. 

David Sears, 2 years. 

Henry H. Bissell, 2 years. 



SPRING GROVE. 



Among the pioneers of Green County were many 
single men, some of whom could hardly be called set- 
tlers. "My home was under my hat," said one who 
may be taken as a representative of the class. Yet they 
did good work in taming the wilderness, and, whether 
they went from to town and from county to county, as 
work and the hope of gain called them, or kept bache- 
lor's hall on their own land, they were an important 
element in the society of that time. Bachelors' parties 
were among the most enjoyable gatherings there were. 
Not infrequently, a dozen bachelors met in the evening 
at Smith & Enos' mill, or at some brother's cabin, and 
spent the night in fun and jollity. Occasionally, they 
went as far as Hamilton's diggings to hear the Colonel 
tell, in his entertaining way, of the great men he had ■ 
seen at Washington; and sometimes they had a party 
to which married men and their wives were invited. 
At one such party at Mr. Rust's, the floor was turned 
bottom side up after supper, "so as to have a clean, smooth 
surface " on which to exercise the light fantastic toe. 
Among the pleasantest parties of this kind in the east- 
ern part of the county, was that given by Mr. Lake to 



17* 



194 History of Green County. 

celebrate the gathering of the first fruit from his or- 
© © 

chard, which was one of the first orchards in the county. 
Mr. Rust's blackberry preserves are still sweet in mem- 
ory, and those who have forgotten the flavor of Mr. 
Lake's apples still praise the hot biscuit he made for sup- 
per. But if these bachelors cooked well, they did not al- 
ways cook willingly. One acknowledges that he often 
went hungry because he had no time to cook. Mr. Asa 
Richardson used to carry his cream over to Mrs. Rust, 
preferring to do without butter rather than churn. 
Another, who proposed to a girl the evening he was 
introduced and married her the next time they met, ex- 
plains his haste by saving, " it was the way then to do 
things up pretty quick, and as I had to work out doors 
as much as any of the men, nobody needed a wife more 
than I did." The arrival of a young lady anywhere 
within fifteen miles was an especial promoter of the 
labors of hair cutting, shaving, washing, ironing, patch- 
ing, and darning among the bachelors. There were no 
photographers to catch the shadow of these self-made 
men, but an indication of the beauty and harmony 
to which they were expected to attain in their dress is 
given by a bit of the exjDerience of a gentleman who in 
1S42 went with two companions from Monroe to see a 
newlv arrived belle of Spring Grove. Despite much 
preparation, there were still three or four holes in his 
coat. His companions, who, like himself, are now well 
known all over the county, told him they could not in- 
duce him in such a plight, and, under pretense of 
pinning up the holes, they managed to grasp the coat 



History of Green C:un: ic^ 

so as to tear it into pieces small as those to 
freshman's garments are redi >h. W 

thu- bereft of his coat, no ol jection v. as . I . - 

ducing him. 

The first improvements in 5] ag Grove i re made 
by an old ' chelor wh -; . - : aght tc 

been Church. In the summer f 1836, - ... 

fenced, and cultivated ten acres which he s 
year to Daniel Baxter of New York, who immediate 
went there to live. The next settle] was Mr. Eli 
Kline from Indiana. In '37, he and bis sc as, John and 
Isaac, built a carding mill where the village : Spi 
Grove, of which it was . eginning, - now. For 
many years after this, the stream on v c was ailt, 

and which is now called Spring creek, was - sd Mill 
creek, fin ';;. French Lake ght his present home 

in Spring Grove. II. 5 a \ g ■ .. . . 

ing to the W sc sin mil es d '27, built on his fat e '- 
f pi 'on the wall which gave : Lie::. Jackson the - >4) 

name of Si - allj The next year bi 
Davis of Pennsylvania, who says it cost m 
move his family and household goods from G 1 : . 
Spring G - rom Penns at Galena, 

Samuel Myers af Indiana, who purchase la terest 
the carding mill, and at whose house j elec- 

ts in Mill creek pre< were he 
phen Bowen, Archie Davis, H 
Judkins. . ably Alf< Blakely, and E. P. P. 

dy, came. The les were aade |ae Vt i 

Eyck, Ad as De :, and James K -v ; Mr. 



196 History of Green County. 

Ten Eyck's in 1839, the others in 1840. Mr. Kildow 
came to the county from Pennsylvania in 1837, and 
helped build Paine's tavern that year. 

The carding machine was a great help to Mill Creek 
precinct, which included most of the territory included 
now in the towns of Spring Grove and Jefferson. Pub- 
lic opinion required settlers to wear homespun cloth, 
and all the wool in the county was carded at Kline's 
mill, to which was added, after a time, a fulling mill. 

In the first vears of its existence, the abolitionists 
made this precinct a principal field of their labors. 
Probably the first abolitionists in the county were Jacob 
LyBrand and G. W. Rogers of Monroe. Perhaps the 
most active of them all was Hollis W. Button of Spring 
Grove. Mr. Button was originally a democrat, but 
while in Illinois in the winter of i840-'4i, cnance led 
him to attend a meeting which brought upon him the 
suspicion of being an abolitionist, and he was mobbed 
by his democratic brethren. This treatment awakened 
in him a new interest in the anti-slavery agitation. He 
read anti-slavery books and papers, and soon became an 
abolitionist, laboring unceasingly to convert others. For 
several years the abolitionist made nominations for as 
many of the county officers as they had men to fill. 
" The first time this was done," says Mr. Button, " we 
had seven votes and a half, all cast in Spring Grove." 
The half vote was the vote of a man who scratched all 
the names on the abolition ticket except Mr. Button's. 
It was very unusual for abolitionists to hold office in 
Green County. Even the office of road master was de- 



History of Green County. 197 

nied them. One of their number was once appointed 
judge of elections, and half a day elapsed after the time 
had come for him to take the oath of his office before 
he was allowed to take it, the objection being that an 
abolitionist's oath was not to be believed. In August, 
1845, tne abolitionists, who then numbered thirty-one 
in the county, induced a Mr. Mathews of Racine Coun- 
ty to lecture to them at the court house in Monroe. A 
place of entertainment was found for him at the house 
of an influential and very worthy Baptist, but the host 
did not know, until he had kept his guest one night, 
that the subject of the coming lecture was abolition, 
and when he did know it, his conscience would not al- 
low him to keep Mr. Mathews an hour longer. Another 
abolition meeting was appointed for the next 4th of 
July, but, when those interested in it assembled, they 
found the court house fastened against them; where- 
upon Mr. LyBrand wrote an account of the affair for 
an anti-slavery paper, and desired all the other aboli- 
tionists to subscribe their names to the article. This 
they refused to do, on account of some personal criti- 
cisms which it contained, and Mr. LyBrand was so dis- 
pleased by the refusal that he never worked with them 
after that time. The strongest instrument in weaken- 
ing the opposition to their cause was a Methodist min- 
ister, by the name of McKey, from Janesville. Escorted 
by Mr. Button, he made the tour of the county as a 
preacher, and in this capacity gained great popularity. 
The field being made ready in this way, he went over 
the county again as an abolition lecturer, and from this 



i'/\ History of Green County. 

ent to Wiots . .here he - nearlv killed 
mob. All his late admirers flocked to hear him, 
and many were converted to his views. y orae of the 
churches were nearlv broken up by the differences of 
opinion that followed the lectures, nd there were 
Meth - that called McKey the devil's ploughshare 

that tore up the churches, and ;i big nigger Button " the 
devil. Not long after this the Rev. J. D. Stevens, the 
Presbvterian cler^vman. made M me .: the -ta- 

the underground railroad. Now and then an 
abolitionist fell from the rank-. The first vote in Jor- 
dan for an abolition ticket was that of Ij a C r ey, 
in I ■ S47. The vote involved him in an argument which 

m lead to blows. He whipped his antagonist, but 

afterwards changed his opinion of the measures of the 

(i party, ai. 1 he was the one that ought to 

have been flogged. The next abolition v ;an 

were cast by Lemuel and Miner Taylor. In '52 the aboli- 

. to be numerous enough to be courted by 

:h the opposing political parties, though an abolition 
meeting in Cadiz thi . attended by only about 

half a dozen men, and one of them showed his con- 
tempt for it by brir. , a basket of corn which he 
shelled during the meeting. Among the leading abo- 
lit: at this time were James Kiidow, Mordecai 
Vanderbilt and Wm. Wilford, of Spring Grove; J. W. 

uart and Donald Johnson, of Decatur; Wrn. Mc 
Dowell and Joseph W. Smith, of Clarno; D. II. Mor- 

n and Thos. Lindley. of Sylvester; L. Chamness and 
Thos. II. Millman, of Monroe: and Samuel Overmeyer, 



History of Green (.....». wm 

of Albany, Man} others who were opposed to slav< ■ 
were no1 counted as abolitionists because the^ did not 
approve of all the measures of the abolition party, 

In 1 8 | | , what was called a temporary [ u> >t office \\ .i> 
opened in Mill Creek precinct, No mail route w as open 
thai way, but Mr, Kildow, who lived on section thirty, 
was authorized to receive and distribute mails, and the 
settlers took turns in carrying the mail From Monrot 
to Mr, Kildow's house. In recognition of the great 
numbei of springs and groves in the precinct, Mr, 
kiLI.'w called the office Spring Grove, In '48, when 
.t mail route was opened Prom R.ockford to Mineral 
Point, 1 1 was made t«> go l>\ the Spring Grove offi< 
and Mr, Kilduv received .1 v. mmission as post master, 
which he resigned in '57, in ordei to remove to the 
southern part of the town, riu- office then went w< 
into [efferson, \\ here it was named Oakley, with which 
name it was moved in [860 to its present resting place, 
t lie village of Sp i Grove, rhe Peedee office, in the 
southern part oi the town, was also established in 186 
For several years aftei M 1 . Baxtei went to Spring Grove 
he kept .1 store tber< 1 w hich there w as no store in 

the town until about 1 Phe people traded with A. 

Ludlow, until he went into business in Monroe, and 
t luu with Geo, \\ . Hoffman, until he op< ned .1 store in 
Oheco, rhen Mr. J, Hoffman opened the first store in 
the village oi Spring Grove, which, though changing 
owners occasionally, still continues there with Mr, John 
Kelly's woolen mill, the child of Kline's fulling mill, 
Thru- was formerh .1 ■ ood store and .» tavern .it Clai 



200 History of Green County. 

ence, a little village on Sand Prairie, near the north- 
east corner of the township. Around the Sugar River 
crossing on the Beloit road, there had been for a num- 
ber of years a settlement of Canadians, sometimes 
called Derrick's settlement, as the settlement of the im- 
migrants from the Wabash around Spring Grove was 
called Kline's settlement. Prominent in Derrick's set- 
tlement were the families of Boslow and Dr. P. B. 

Springstead. Dr. Springstead's son and son-in-law, 
Chancellor Springstead and Wm. Sherry, built in 1841 
the first house on Sand Prairie. Clarence was the 
child of this settlement. The first house was built in 
'45 by Wm. Sherry. For a number of years'the vil- 
lage grew, and then, when Brodhead and Juda began 
to grow, it wasted away as an apple tree withers, and 
yellows, and dies, when a walnut begins to grow by its 
side, and by the time the railroad was completed 
the life of Clarence was gone. Like Decatur, the other 
village that died that Brodhead might be, Clarence had 
for some time borne a bad reputation. Counterfeiters 
had given it a notoriety that must have gone far to rec- 
oncile its best friends to its decline. 

The report of the county clerk for 1877 shows that 
this year Spring Grove leads all the other towns in the 
most important crop in the county. Following is an 
extract from the report: 



Of Wheat — New Glarus has 


i the la 


rgest 


No 


. acres, 


927 


Corn — Spring Grove 


i< 


u 




a 


6,600 


Oats — Sylvester 


u 


(( 




u 


3^31 


Barley — Jefferson 


It 


u 




it 


2^2 


Rye — Cadiz 


u 


K 




u 


584 


Hops — Clarno 


M 


(( 




u 


H 



History of G?'een County. 



20I 



Tobacco — Decatur lias the largest No. acres, 

Flax Seed— York 

CulhVd Grasses — Clarno 

Potatoes — Jordan 

Roots — Exeter 

Apples — Clarno 

Timber — Washington 

Clover Seed, bush. — Sylvester, 



u 
a 



2 4 

3,357 
127 • 

6 

2,600 

44 1 7 
33 2 



LARGEST FARMERS IN 



Names. No 


of Acres 


Hugh Alexander, 


4IO 


Frederick Arnsmeir, 


325 


James P. Atwood, 


200 


*Pervine Atwood, - 


706 


David Austin, - 


344 


Norman Barker, 


240 


S. L. Boyles, 


200 


John A. Brant, 


215 


James H. Clemons, - 


245 


*David Davis, 


280 


P. L. Dederick, 


171 


F. H. Derrick, 


207 


S. B. Douglas, - 


645 


F. Dreakev, - 


1 60 


Eli Frisbie, 


160 


J. B. Galusha, 


4°3 


August Geise, - 


220 


A. J. Goodrich, 


160 


Jacob Haas, 


267 


Thomas Hamilton, 


260 


Esther Hostetter, 


170 


Thos. A. Jackson, 


160 



SPRING GROVE IN 1876 

Names. 

Wm. Johnson, - 

Abram Knutson, 

Levi Knutson, - 

A. J. Kreider, 

J.J. Kreider, 
* French Lake, 

Wm. Martin, - 

W. W. Martin, 

Sarah Myers, - 
*J. J. Newman, 

Asa Nichols, 

Wm. O'Neil, 

C. I. Putnam, - 

[esse Schrock, 

Thos. Shall; 

August Schurd, 

Benj. Stabler, - 

Josiah Straw, 

Jacob Ten Eyck estate, 657 

Daniel Vanderbilt, 260 

Chas. A. Warner, 191 



No. of Acres. 
260 
272 

- 191 
l6o 

- l6o 
962 

- l8o 
l6o 

- 187 
388 

- 240 
24O 

- ISO 
l6o 

- 2l6 

179 

37" 



John II. Woodling, 



320 



The first voting place in the town was Hostetter's 
mills. 

TOWN OFFICERS FROM 1S49 TO '77 INCLUSIVE. 



CHAIRMEN. 



J. W. KlLDOW. 

Abner Mitchell, 3 years. 
R. D. Derrick, 2 years. 
E. A. Newton, 2 years. 
Daniel Dunwiddie. 
R. D. Derrick. 
E. R. Allen, 6 years. 
Pervine Atwood, 2 years. 



*Largest Stock Growers. 



J. W. KlLDOW. 

Daniel Dunwiddie, 2 years. 

E. R. Allen. 

Daniel Dunwiddie, 2 years. 
J. W. KlLDOW. 
W. W. Martin. 

F. H. Derrick, 3 years. 



iS 



202 



History of Green County. 



CLERKS. 



Alden Frisbie. 

John R. Bussey. 

A. D. Tenney. 

E. R. Allen. 

A. D. Tenney. 

A. S. Dye. 

L. E. Towne, 3 years. 

Wm. B. Cooley. 

Wm. Colby. 



Andrew Boyles, 2 years 

John Myers. 

J. W. Kildow, 3 years. 

Thos. A. Jackson. 

L. M. Knowles. 

Thos. A. Jackson, 5 years. 

Andrew Boyles, 4 years. 

E. R. Allen. 



JORDAN. 



No reverence attaches itself to the modern Jordan. 
It may be a very good creek in its way, but the town 
which it waters has a bad reputation, for which both 
town and stream must suffer. No pilgrim stranger 
ever stands on this Jordan's crooked banks. If, per- 
chance, there be one who wishes to do so, he is whisked 
off by some one mindful of his county's honor to the 
Jordan prairie of Decatur; he is let down into mines in 
Monroe, and dragged to the top of the mounds in 
Mount Pleasant; he is made to admire the level land 
and tine crops of Spring Grove, and the undulating 
land and fine crops of York; but when his time and 
strength are gone, he has not seen Jordan. Green 
County finds her proverbially necessary skeleton in the 
closet, her black sheep in the flock, in this town. 
Josephus himself, could he hear the jokes and the ex- 
pressions of sympathy of which Jordan land and Jordan 



History of Green County. 203 

farmers are the subjects, would lose all reverence for 
the historic name, and his next volume might hear upon 
its title page this warning addressed to would-be Jordan 
farmers : 

Pull oft* your coat, and roll up your sleeve, 
For Jordan is a hard road to travel, I believe. 

In 1S65, that part of Jordan which borders on Skin- 
ner creek was declared to be a good oil country, and a 
great many with faith in the fitness of all things for 
some good believed the report. A man supposed to be 
acquainted with the Pennsylvania oil district visited the 
Skinner land, and warned the citizens that, if they hesi- 
tated, wise men from the east would step in before 
them, and occupy this newly discovered road to fortune. 
They did not hesitate. In March '66, the ''Farmers' 
Oil and Lead Co.,"" a stock company having "power 
and authority to mine and dig for mineral, ore, and coal, 
and to bore and search for salt, oil, and petroleum," was 
incorporated. An engine was bought, and a bore forty 
feet deep was sunk. Meanwhile, oil was really found in 
one or two springs, and, though the incredulous in- 
sisted that a little investigation would show that some 
cruel joker had first found it in a Monroe grocery, land 
owners on both the Monroe and the Jordan side of Skin- 
ner felt that they were among earth's favored few. But 
this glorious summer was followed by a winter of dis- 
content. The company abandoned the enterprise and 
dissolved, and the price of Skinner land went down 
again, since which time there has been no popular hope 
for Jordan. But after all, there is something to be said 



204 History of Green County. 

for the town. It is healthful. Among the oldest set- 
tlers in the town is Mr. John Stevens. He happened 
to camp there while he was taking his family from 
Missouri to the east, for health. A stay of one night so 
invigorated the invalids that a longer stay, a further re- 
newal of strength, then a home there and perfect health 
followed. Other settlers testify to a similar improve- 
ment of their health in Jordan, and one centenarian 
spent his last score of years there. 

If people do not choose to farm in Jordan, other 
sources of wealth are open to them there. One of these 
is a fine hard limestone, which is almost a marble, and 
which only needs a railway to bring it into demand as 
a building stone. Lead is found in small quantities all 
over the town, and some shafts have yielded a large 
amount. One farmer struck a three hundred dollar 
bunch with his plow. The Indians mined extensively 
in Jordan, and had seven smelting furnaces just over the 
town line in Adams, where thev carried the lead from 
northern Jordan on account of the natural conveniences 
there for washing it. In the stream on his farm, Mr. 
Wm. Soper has found hundreds of pounds which he 
thinks the Indians took there to wash. It is believed 
that the only natural cranberry marsh in southern Wis- 
consin is in Jordan. It is not large, but since its discov- 
ery, cranberry vines have appeared spontaneously in 
several other places in the town, and there is little doubt 
that the culture of cranberries in Jordan might be made, 
and will sometime be made profitable. In the western 
part of the town there is an inexhaustible bed of ochre, 



History of Green County. 205 

which has been found, by examination of a specimen 
sent to Ohio, to be identical with the ochre from which 
the excellent and well known Ohio paint is made. 
Along Jordan and Skinner creeks are wide beds of peat, 
from three to ten feet in depth. The peat is of an ex- 
cellent quality, but, except to a limited extent as a fer- 
tilizer, no use is made of it, for Jordan has too much 
good timber to be willing to dig for fuel. Had Jordan 
a fertile soil there would be nothing in the town to com- 
plain of. Good water is abundant. Jordan and Skinner 
creeks traverse the town from north to south, and Jor- 
dan farmers claim that there is an average of one spring 
for every forty acres in the town. There is properly 
no prairie, but the bottom lands are very wide and 
level, and the remark of the American Cyclopaedia that 
the hills in Green County "are arable to their very 
summits," shows that the hills alone do not make Jordan 
a poor town. The under-drainage is so perfect that in 
case of heavy rains the roots in cultivated ground are 
sufficient to prevent the soil from washing, and the in- 
jury from drouths is comparatively small, because the 
soil does not bake like an undrained surface, and, being 
always porous, it easily absorbs the dew and vapors of 
the air. 

But good health, good drainage, and good water are 
the rule in Green County, and since others of the towns 
are supplied with lead, fine limestone, and peat (the 
town of Washington, for example, has a bed of lime- 
stone exactly like the so-called marble of which the 
normal school building at Platteville is built), all these 

• iS* 



206 History of Green County. 

good things count for nothing, and, because it has the 
poorest soil in the county, Jordan is unhesitatingly con- 
demned as a very poor town. It would seem, though, 
from the learned Dr. David Dale Owens' Geological 
Report of the mineral region of Wisconsin that Jordan 
has nothing to be ashamed of in the way of soil. A 
measure of the value of a soil is the average quantity 
of organic matter, in other words the plant food, it con- 
tains. The average quantity of organic matter in one 
hundred specimens of the soil of Massachusetts analyzed 
by Prof. Hitchcock, was 7.68 per cent. In specimens 
from New York it was 6.64 per cent. In Dr. Owen's 
report, published in 1S39, is given the following analysis 
of soil from " township two, range six east, Green 
County, Wisconsin : " 



u 
u 

u 



Water, 3. per cent. 

Salts, soluble in water, - 3. 

Salts, soluble in dilute muriatic acid, - - 0.5 

Silicious matter, - 82. 

Organic matter, - - - - - - 11.5 " 

It will not be claimed that all the soil in Jordan is as 
good as that which Dr. Owen analyzed, but where 
some of it is so much better than the average soil in 
New York and Massachusetts, it does not seem prob- 
able that the townshijD as a whole is much inferior to 
the average land in those states. That it is much bet- 
ter land than is generally supposed might be inferred 
from the fact that a large proportion of its inhabitants 
are foreigners who went there, not only without a 
knowledge of the language, customs, and climate of the 
country, but without money enough to pay for the land 



Histoiy of Green County. 20 

they settled on, and that they are now, almost without 
exception, possessed of good homes and large farms. 
Good crops of all kinds are raised in Jordan. It must 
be admitted that in a great part of the town the land 
does not grow more valuable from year to year, but in 
these cases the farmers have done nothing to raise the 
value of their farms. Some farmers who use no fertil- 
izers raise crop after crop on a field until it is exhausted, 
and then, without seeding it down, they call it pasture. 
Were Jordan so poor a town as to render such a course 
impossible, her reputation would be much better. But 
better methods are coming into use, and it is not too late 
to rectify mistakes. Jordan land will bear a great deal 
of abuse. One of the best farms there, a farm which 
would be called good in any town or state, was bought 
by its present owner as a worn out farm, and, by only 
a reasonable amount of care, brought by him to its 
present excellence. 

The earliest settlers in northern and middle Jordan 
were Robert Brazel, John Trotter and Joshua Chilton, 
all from Illinois. The former came in '37, the latter 
two in '39. Wm. Brazel came in '40. John and Geo. 
Yazel, Nathaniel Matthews, James and Absalom Kelly, 
who all came to the county in iS39-'40, were in the 
southern part of the town before the end of '41. John 
Pinney and Jacobs were in western Jordan be- 
fore 1840, and there were two or three men in Lafayette 
County so near the boundary line that they have been 
counted as Green County settlers. James Mills was al- 
ready on his farm just west of "lattice bridge," and 



2oS History of Gi'een County. 

Hunter was a few miles farther north. The place 



now called Wiota was then called " the cape," in whim- 
sical allusion to the fact that one of the first families 
that settled there came from a cape on the Atlantic 
coast. The Wiota of that day was at the junction of 
the forks of the Pecatonica, just west of the north-west 
corner of Cadiz. Steamboats from some point on 
Rock river ascended the Pecatonica as far as the junc- 
tion in 1S45, and it was supposed there would be a city 
there. The settlers of 1843 were Henry Hard and 
Curtis Cary, of Ohio; John and Geo. Chilton, of Vir- 
ginia; John and Wesley Church, of Illinois; and 

Shafer. Next, in 1S44, came Mr. John Soper, of Ver- 
mont. Lars Larson (sometimes called, in accordance 
with the Norwegian custom which allows individuals 
to affix to their names the name of their native place, 
Lars Larson Bothan), came in 1844. It is thought 
he was the first Norwegian to settle in the county. He 
was followed the next year by Axel Iverson (Stortottle), 
and almost every year since then Norwegian immigrants 
have come to Lafayette and western Green. Some of 
the eastern towns, particularly Albany, have also a large 
number of Norwegians among their farmers. Since 
1845, t°°' a gi'eat many Irish immigrants have made 
their homes in Jordan. In 1843 or '44 Dr. John Church, 
already mentioned as a preacher, built 'a saw mill in 
Jordan. In '47, John Bachman built the first grist mill 
in the town, and in '48 Benjamin Cross and Lemuel 
and Miner Taylor built the second saw mill. 

The first road laid out in the town was the White 



History of Green County. 



209 



Oak Springs and Exeter, territorial road, recorded as 
being on the line between Adams and Jordan. It fol- 
lowed the ridge, some parts of which are on the line, 
■while others are half a mile - south of it. The first 
school was taught in the early summer of 1S41, by 
Miss Emma Green, in a cabin owned by Mr. Joshua 
Chilton. The first school house was built in 1S44, by 
Win. and Robert Brazel, Joshua Chilton, and Mrs. 
John Trotter. It was on the Wm. Brazel place, since 
known as the John Scott place. The first public school 
taught in it was taught by James Tennyson in the win- 
ter of '44- '45. The first frame school house was built 
in '48 in "the Blaine" district, near the south-east cor- 
ner of the town. The only post office in Jordan is 
that at Jordan Centre, where there are a number of 
dwellings and a school house, and where a church is 
building. 

There are four cheese factories in Jordan, owned 
respectively by Miner Taylor, Jacob Figlan, F. Haflner, 
and a company. 

LARGEST FARMERS IN JORDAN IN 1876. 



Names. 


No. of Acres. 


Names. 


No. of Acres 


Wm. Ableman, 


- 2SO 


Andrew Fryslie, 


- 348 


F. Anderson, 


200 


Richard Gibbons, - 


200 


Wm. Ault, 


- I78 


L. O. Grove, 


- 160 


F. Babbler, - 


220 


Andrew S. Hanson, 


200 


John Beach, 


- 344 


Mary Jane Hanson, 


- 3°5 


D. E. Benson, 


160 


Frantz Hafrner, 


266 


Chas. Beyerhofrer 


- 220 


Geo. Hart wig, - 


- 253 


Joseph Blum, 


2 55 


Iver Iverson, 


- 240 


Owen Burns, - 


- 160 


Daniel Kesler, 


160 


B. Ellis, 


200 


Lars Larson, 


- 220 


Thore Erikson, 


- 180 


James Lewis, 


268 


Ole Evenson, 


179 


John MaGrath, 


- 251 


Peter Fenne, 


220 


Richard MaGrath, 


238 


John D. Fritsch, - 


220 


A. Mevthaler, - 


- r 97 



-2IO 



History of Green County. 



Names. 


No. of Acres, 


Names. 


No. of Acres 


Horace Sawin, 


175 


Kund Torson, 


240 


Thore Severson, 


- 2l8 


Trotter estate, - 


- x 93 


Squires & Cook, - 


l6o 


Jacob Voegley, 


293 


A. Schultz, 


- 190 


A. Wiggins, 


- 182 


C. Stephens, 


i So 


Miles Wilson, 


220 


*L. Taylor. 


- 473 


*A. P. Wells, - 


- 220 


*Miner Taylor, 


4*7 


O. F. Wells, 


200 


Bottel Toiefson, 


- 248 










MILLS. 

Samuel Blackford, Saw and Grist Mills. 
H. Rust, Saw Mill. 

The first town meetings were held at the Ostrander 

school house. 

OFFICERS FROM 1S49 TO '77 INCLUSIVE. 

CHAIRMEN. 

Warren Osgood. Wm. Biggs. 

Thos. White, 3 years. J. K. Bloom. 

Wm. Munson. N. T. Hanson. 

Levi Spaulding. Iver Iverson, 4 years. 

Wm. Munson, 3 years. Geo. R. King. 

James Y. Cleveland, 2 years. Iver Iverson. 

Taylor Wickersham, 2 years. JSamuel Blackford, 2 yr's. 

H. G. Cleveland, 2 years. Iver Iverson. 

Iver Iverson. J. B. Blackford. 



CLERKS. 



T. N. Ellis, 2 years. 

M. Satterlee. 

Isaac Trembley. 

H. G. Cleveland. 

M. Devareaux. 

D. H. Morgan. 

H. G. Cleveland, 3 years. 

J as. M. Cook. 

H. G. Cleveland, 2 years. 



Wm. H. Allen. 
Taylor Wickersham. 
Wm. Biggs. 
J as. M. Cook. 
Jacob Deetz, 3 years. 
Nelson Rust. 
N. T. Hanson, 2 years. 
Jacob Deetz, 6 years. 



*Largest stock growers. 



WASHINGTON. 



About the time the capitol at Madison was begun in: 
1837, Josiah Pi erce of New York landed at Milwaukee,, 
where he was almost immediately engaged to go to 
Madison and board the workmen. His was the second 
family in Madison. In the following November, he re- 
moved to a cabin which he had built during the sum- 
mer in what is now the town of Washington, Green 
County. The cabin, whose dimensions were sixteen by 
eighteen feet, was on the line of nearly all the travel 
from the eastern part of the state to Galena, and there 
was hardly ever a night that some one did not stop 
there. Sometimes the guest was Gov. Dodge attended 
by his colored servant, who rode at a respectful distance 
behind the Governor, and carried his excellency's pistoL 

This was the time of the "wild cat" currency. Ap- 
parently everybody could issue money and as much as 
he chose, and those who did not issue it had no trouble in 
getting it, though it was often not worth the getting. 
Mr. Albert H. Pierce, then seventeen years of age, 
could easily earn $30 a month at farm labor, but it took 
$50 dollars to buy him an ordinary coat. A man who 



212 History of Green County. 

was hauling flour from Galena to the garrison at Fort 
Winnebago once broke down near Mr. Pierce's, and 
finding he could not go on with the whole load, kindly 
sold Mr. Pierce two barrels at thirteen dollars a barrel. 
Mr. Noah Phelps, who helped survey Green County 
before the Black Hawk war, returning at the conclusion 
of his work to his home in New York state, wished to 
bring his family to Wisconsin in 1S37. ^ e was neai "ly 
ready to start in May, when the banks suspended specie 
payment. As all his money was in bank notes, and as 
government land could be bought only with coin, he 
was obliged to wait. When specie payment was re- 
sumed the next May he was still ready to come, and in 
June, '38, he made the second home in the town of 
Washington. By iS42-'43, when the next settlers came 
to Washington, there were so many people in the county 
that residence in it was no longer presumptive proof of 
acquaintance with all its inhabitants. The settlers in 
the different parts of Washington seem to have had 
very little to do with each other, and it is now impossi- 
ble for any of them to give a chronological list of the 
first comers. Samuel Holloway, of Illinois, went to 

Washington in '45, before which time Wise, 

Vance, Franklin Pierce, J. S. Fessenden, Elias Wright, 

of Ohio, and Kirkpatrick, of Pennsylvania, had 

made their claims. Elijah Roby, of Ohio, went in '46, 
and C. J. Simmons went in '47. Among the next set- 
tlers were Samuel O. Allison, of Illinois; Hiram Bain, 
of New York; James Richards, of Indiana; John 
Perine, Barney Becker, Wm. Tucker, James Crouch, 



History of Green Cou?ity. 213 

Webster, Jas. Parks, Sires, James Lang, Sol- 
omon Willis, John Frost, Hendrickson, and James 

Hilton. In '46 and a few suceeding years, a great many 
Swiss went to Washington from the colony at New 
Glarus, and at the close of the Mexican war the soldiers' 
land warrants gave a new impetus to the settlement of 
the town. 

Washington is watered by Skinner creek and 
by several branches of Sugar river. It is more abun- 
dantly supplied with timber than New Glarus, to 
which town it is similar in having a good soil, a broken 
surface, and a Swiss population largely engaged in the 
rearing: of stock and the manufacture of cheese. It is 
unlike New Glarus in having once thrown the whole 
county into a commotion. The exciting cause was an 
ignorant bov who went to Madison and told that his 
employer in Washington had murdered a man. The 
story was the more shocking from being told of one 
who was as little likely as any man in the town to be 
suspected of crime, and until the boy had confessed that 
the whole story was false and had been sent to the re- 
form school there was little else thought of in the 
county. This was the second time that the grave of a 
living man was sought for in Green County, where evi- 
dence of murder will probably be necessary hereafter to 
make men take up the cry of murderer. 

Washington is mainly distinguished for her cheese. 
Since a part of this book has been in type it has been 
stated on the authority of the manufacturers that 
1,000,000 pounds of American, 775,000 pounds of Lim- 

19 



214 History of Green County. 

burger, and 225,000 pounds of Swiss cheese were made 
in Green County in 1S76, and sold at an average price 
of twelve cents per pound for Swiss cheese, and ten 
cents per pound for other kinds. No estimate has been 
made as to how much of this valuable product Wash- 
ington might claim, but no other town except New 
Glarus has made so much. Following is a list of 
Washington's factories in '76. Several new ones have 
been started the present year: 

CHEESE FACTORIES. 

Names of Manufacturers. Kinds of Cheese. Names of Manufacturers. Kinds of Cheese. 

D. & H. Freitag, Swiss & Limb. J. Zimmerman, Swiss. 

G. Witwer, Swiss. John Gange, American. 

Jacob Karlen, Limburger. Jobn Boss, Limburger. 

N. Gerber, Limburger. M. L. Barney, American. 

G. Behler, Limburger. E.W. Cheesbro, American. 

R. Karlen, Swiss. Miller, Frautschy ik Co., Lim- 

C Theiler, Limburger. burger. 

M. Zumbrunnen, Swiss and Limburger. 

LARGEST FARMERS IN WASHINGTON IN 1876. 

Names. No. of Acres. Names. No. of Acres. 

James Barney - - 265 John Gempler, - 160 

Anton Baumgartner, 260 Geo. Gill, - - 240 

John Baumgartner, - 160 Andrew Harper, - 360 

Caspar Becker, Sen., 401 Fridolin Hefty, - - 203 

Caspar Becker, J un., - 171 Thos. Hefty, - 401 

David Benkert - 165 Gustavus Hilton, - 177 

J. G. Biddlingmeier, - 200 Benedict Isely, - 160 

Adam Bloomer. - 387 Christopher Isely, - 240 

John Bloomer, - - 180 Rudolph Karlen, - 302 

Fridolin Blum, - 263 Richard Keegan, - 384 

Jacob Buergy, - - 172 Thos. Leman, - 200 

L. Burtis, - - 310 Win. Leman, - - 180 

E W. Cheesbro, - 200 Wm. Maguire, - 280 

John Dick, - - 168 Melchoir Marty, - 257 

Fridolin Elmer, - 200 Benedict Miller, - 260 

J. S. Fessenden - 160 James Murphy, . 160 

Wm. Fleury, - - 320 Patrick Purcell, - 400 

Jacob Frautschy, - 200 E. Roby, - 160 

John Frautschy, - 160 Melchoir Schlittler, 180 

Dietrich Freitag, - 253 Christopher Schuler, - 167 

John Gange, - - 280 Michael Shay, - 160 



IIisto?y of Green County. 



l 5 



Names. No. 

C. J. Simmons, 
John Tcehan, 
Christ. Theiler, 
Jeremiah Thurlow, 
Dietland Tomm, 
Joseph Voegly, 
Peter Wagner, 
Jacob Weissmiller, 
Christ. Wessenberg, - 

LARGEST STOCK GROWERS. 

E. W. Cheesbro. M. J. & O. Zumbrnnnen. 

C. J. Simmons. 

The first town meetinsr in Washington was held at 

the house of James Lang. 

OFFICERS FROM 1S49 TO 1877 INCLUSIVE. 



of Acres. 


Names. No 


. of Acres, 


560 


M. Wittenwyler, - 


l6o 


160 


Gottlieb Wittwer, 


3 2 3 


200 


Jacob Zimmerman, 


198 


166 


Bernhard Zweifel, 


164 


200 


Pridolin Zweifel, - 


2IO 


302 


Fridolin Zwickey, 


163 


211 


Gottlieb Zumbrunnen, 


I92 


286 


Jacob Zumbrunnen, - 


298 


24O 


Martin Zumbrunnen, 


62O 



CHAIRMEN. 



Elijah Roby, 
Albert H. Pierce. 
Elijah Roby, 
Albert H. Pierce. 
Elijah Roby, 4 years. 
Albert H. Pierce. 
Elijah Roby. 
Argalus Loveland. 
A. H. Pierce, 
L. Seltzer, 2 years. 
Samuel Shook. 

CLERKS. 

Wm. Tucker, four years. 

M. J. Hancock, two years, re- 
signed, Addison Macomber 
appointed. 

Argalus Loveland, two years. 

J. M. White. 

L. Seltzer, three years. 

F. Bloom, Jr., four years, re- 
signed, M. L. Barney, ap- 
pointed. 



Franklin Pierce, 3 years. 
L. Seltzer, 2 years. 
Franklin Pierce, 
L. Seltzer. 
S. T. Clayton. 
Benedict Miller. 
S. T. Clayton. 
Samuel Shook, (resigned, 

Adam Bloomer, appointed). 
Fridolin Blum, 3 years. 



Jacob Hefty, four years,, re- 
signed, J. Frautschy ap- 
pointed. 

Jacob Frautschy, two yrs. 

L. Seltzer, two years, re- 
signed, S. T. Clayton ap- 
pointed. 

Benedict Miller, five 
years. 



DECATUR. 



The history of Decatur begins with the history of 
Centre ville, " a paper city " laid out in 1836 on the west 
bank of Sugar river, within half a mile of the place 
where the village of Decatur arose some years later. 
Upon the plat of Centreville, which was exhibited in 
Milwaukee, Detroit, and the eastern cities, were repre- 
sented steamboats, churches, warehouses, and blocks of 
stores. Thus portrayed, the place was the cause of 
inanv a yearning for a western home, and a brisk sale 
of high priced business lots and four acre out lots be- 
gan. Careful, prosperous farmers and tradesmen, 
wealthy speculators, and penny-saving laborers all em- 
braced the opportunity to make a good investment, and 
purchased real estate in what the agents called the grow- 
ing, bustling city of Centreville. One by one the pur- 
chasers learned that they were the victims of a fraud, 
that their land was no better than might have been 
bought at the government price. And so undesirable 
did it seem, when the unsettled state of the country was 
made known, that although their titles were unquestion- 
ably good, yet, so far as can be ascertained, not one of 



History of Green Couftty. 217 

the purchasers of Centreville lots ever claimed a foot of 
the much lauded city, or ever settled within the limits 
of Decatur township. The place had indeed been sur- 
veyed and divided, as the plat showed, but the red stakes 
marking these divisions were the only marks of their 
presence which w T hite men had ever left in the so-called 
city. Possibly too, though its social advantages were 
hardly of the kind to attract immigrants from the east, 
the city w T as as populous as its owners had claimed, for 
it was an Indian hunting ground. Here were found 
the marks of Indian labor which endured longest in 
Green County. The remains of an Indian council house 
and blacksmith shop could be seen here until 1847, when 
they were destroyed by a prairie fire. In one place in 
this vicinity, the first settlers found an acre or two of 
holes dug in the sand, which it is supposed the Indians 
had used as store houses for their corn; and Mr. Wm. 
Jones found, on attempting to cultivate one of their old 
corn fields, that they had entirely exhausted the soil. 
Aside from the arrow heads which are occasionally 
turned up by the plow, few relics of the Indian are ever 
found in Green County. Mr. Jonas Shook remembers 
seeing an Indian burying ground north of Dayton in 
1837, and in '41 Messrs. John B. Perry and brother, 
Thos. Gillett, and others opened some mounds on "lost 
prairie," a little east of the village of Exeter, and found 
bones that it seemed to them must have belonged to a 
race of giants. The mounds were in two rows, one 
row on each side of the opening or prairie, with twenty- 
five mounds in one row and twenty-six in the other. 

19* 



2i8 History of Green County. 

For many years after the advent of the whites, a rem- 
nant of the Winnebagoes visited their old Centreville 
hunting ground each winter, spending the summer at the 
mouth of the rivei*. In their long snow shoes they hunt- 
ed over the ground very rapidly, and usually remained 
but a few weeks; but sometimes, as in the winter of 
1842-^3, the cold weather kept them till spring. They 
numbered but a few families, and most of their children 
were half breeds. Being partially civilized, they some- 
times made their pilgrimages in wagons, but their mode 
of life was essentially Indian. Their lodges, covered 
with storm proof mats, which the squaws had woven, 
were some of them thirty feet long. In the middle of 
the larger ones was a fire, round which the inmates lay 
and warmed themselves. Two Frenchmen lived with 
the Indians, one of whom, named Lavelle, told Mr. E. 
T. Fleek in i84i,that game was much more abundant in 
the vicinity of Sugar river then than it was when he 
first saw the country in 1826. He ascribed the change 
to the decrease in the Indian population. 

The first settlers in Decatur township settled on Jor- 
dan prairie, near the Little Jordan creek. The first claim 
was that of John Moore of Ohio, made in 1839 on section 
twenty. In the following year he was joined by his son- 
in-law, Thos. Chambers, by John J. Dawson, and by 
Samuel Rowe. The first person born in the township 
was Caroline Chambers, born in 1840. In 1841 Robert 
Mattox and E. T. Fleek settled on section seventeen. 
In the winter of iS4i-'2, a post office was established, 
which the postmaster, Mr. Moore, named Decatur, in 



History of Green County. 219 

honor of Commodore Decatur. The office gave the 
name to the election precinct, and still later to the vil- 
lage and the township. 

To Decatur belongs the honor of having the first 
bridge in the county. It was built in 1842, a little north- 
east of the site of the village of Decatur, at the place 
where the river was crossed by the Indian trail from 
Sand Prairie to the northern part of the county, and by 
the territorial road from Janesville to Galena. The 
next settler, Win. Jones, came in 1842. Soon after his 
arrival he built on Sugar river, section fifteen, the first 
saw mill in the township. The first grist mill was built 
by Edson and Brown, but was not begun until 1S49. 
In i842-'3-'4, Donald Johnson, David Bigelow, Wm. 

F razee, Thos. Stewart, Axtell, and probably some 

others, settled in the town. Many more came in 1S45 than 
had come before, and the work of breaking prairie was 
carried on with such energy that the decaying vegetation 
on the overturned sod produced malarial fever. In some 
neighborhoods almost every person was sick, and some 
died who might have recovered under proper care. 
Men sometimes went both to Monroe and to Exeter for 
a physician, and were unable to get one in either place. 
To their failure was ascribed, in a few instances, the re- 
covery of the sick. One man who, as a physician, was 
never heard of in Decatur after the summer and fall of 
1846, made between two and three thousand dollars by 
his practice along the Sugar river at that time. Mr. 
David Bigelow was the first victim of the fever, and 
the first person to die in the township. 



220 History of Green County. 

The reputation of Decatur has not always been good. 
At a very early day the township was infested with 
counterfeiters and thieves. The counterfeiting was 
probably confined to making bogus silver half-dollars 
and dimes, but those engaged in it also bought and put 
in circulation counterfeit bills. Were the inhabitants of 
Decatur as imaginative, as garrulous, and as idle as the 
Spaniards, their reminiscences of the counterfeiters 
would be a fund of entertainment for their children 
equal to that furnished little Spaniards by legends of 
the buried and enchanted treasures of the Moors. How 
fortunate that time and inclination forbid! It would be 
troublesome to have boys running away to the woods 
to look for remains of fine horses left there to starve 
because those who put them there never dared to go 
back and feed them. Nobody would like to have neigh- 
bors' children slipping into his cellar, to see if the walls 
had been blackened by the fumes of chemicals; and still 
worse would it be if gamins were always waiting on 
the corners to ask the dimensions of the box of sand 
which somebody's respected ancestor might be fabled 
to have bought, foolishly believing it held a thousand 
dollars of the "queer." While the counterfeiting was 
in progress, Decatur had within her borders a floating 
population that no more belonged to her than to the 
rest of the county, and some of those engaged in it lived 
in other towns. But the centre of it all, so far as Green 
County was concerned, was Decatur township. Decatur 
men who went abroad in those days say that it always 
took them twice as long as other travelers to pay their 



History of Green County. 221 

bills, for, although large sums might be taken from 
other parts of Green County without hesitation, the 
smallest bill was never taken from Decatur until " the 
detector " and the microscope had been consulted. The 
end justified the hope of good citizens that the corrup- 
tion would work itself clear. Soon after 1850, the vis- 
its of the transient class ceased, and the unlawful prac- 
tices were ended. A few years later Monroe became 
the headquarters of another gang of countefeiters. Their 
business was suddenly brought to an end by the gov- 
ernment, since which Green County has been free from 
the stigma which the conduct of such men attached to 
her. 

The village of Decatur, to which reference has once or 
twice been made, was laid out in the spring of 1848, by 
Mr. Wm. Jones. He had, himself, built the first dwelling 
there, and he now built the first hotel. A few years later, 
Mr. I. F. Mack bought the greater part of the village, 
and, as the Decatur plat had never been recorded, he 
platted eighty acres and had it recorded as Floraville, 
the name being a compliment to his mother-in-law, and, 
it is thought, the only compliment of the kind which 
history records. But Mr. Jones insisted that the village 
should either continue to be called Decatur, or should 
be named for his mother-in-law; and in 1852 an act of 
the legislature restored the old name. 

The refusal of Decatur to give $7,000 for a railway 
was her own death sentence. When the road reached 
Brodhead in 1857, Decatur had five stores, two hotels, 
two blacksmith shops, a wagon shop, a shoe shop, and 



222 History of Green County. 

about four hundred inhabitants. All the business and 
all the best houses immediately went over to Brodhead. 
The next year, the bridge, where the first bridge in the 
county was built, was taken down, and moved farther 
south to shorten the road to the all-swallowing town. 
The mills followed, and Decatur was literally a de- 
serted village. There are now fifteen houses standing 
there, but several of them are unoccupied, and " the 
sounds of population fail." 

The original owners of the town of Brodhead were 
E. D. Clinton, I. F. Mack, John P. Dixon, E. A. West, 
E. H. Brodhead, and J. L. B. Thomas. As hiid out by 
them in the spring of 1S56, the town was a mile square; 
but the only house there was a log house owned by 
Samuel Lampson. The place was named for Mr. 
Brodhead, and he promised to give a bell to the first 
church built there. Clinton would have been an ap- 
propriate name for the village; but Clinton Junction 
had been named for Deacon Clinton, Kilbourn City had 
been named for another railroad man, and it seemed 
right that Mr. Brodhead should have his turn in honor 
of this kind. Citizens of Waukesha, Deacon Clinton's 
former home, were the first from out of the county to 
ally themselves with the new town. The next comers 
were Vermonters, led by Messrs. Moore, Laird, and 
McLaren. There was the usual question as to which 
way the village should grow. At first business seemed 
likely to keep south of the railroad, and Messrs. Clin- 
ton and Dixon had each a natural desire to lead it into 
the street bearing his own name. But Martin Mitchell 



History of Green County. 22£ 

(a business man from the village of Decatur, and the 
first clerk of the town), and a few others, happened to 
build north of the railroad in the street between these 
rival streets, and this half way ground became the nu- 
cleus of the village. Dwellings went up in the new 
town in the summer of '56 as fast as workmen could be 
found to put them up. Before the end of September, 
Messrs. Sherman & Clinton had erected two good 
stores and were preparing to build others; and Messrs. 
Laird & Coffin were ready to entertain all guests of the 
village at the Manly House. Laird, McLaren & Co.'s 
lumber yard (the first in the county, and the only one 
until N. H. Allen started his in Monroe the next year), 
Messrs. Clinton's warehouse, and a number of stores 
appeared in 1S57. In the first eighteen months after 
the town was platted, lots were sold to the value of 
$1 12,000; and at the end of her second year, B rod head 
had over six hundred inhabitants. In the fall of '57, 
thanks to the farmers, to Deacon Clinton, to Messrs- 
Graham, the contractors, and to J. T. Dodge, the engi- 
neer who had charge of the work, the railroad reached 
Brodhead. In February, '58, the dullest month of the 
year, the freight shipped from Brodhead amounted to 
896,014 pounds. Monroe, Brodhead's senior by tw r enty- 
two years, shipped 1,212,206 pounds during the same 
time. 

One of the first improvements in the new village 
was the mill race, which Thos. and John Hendrie dug 
from the river dam near Decatur to the site of the flour 
mill which Messrs. Hendrie, H. B. Stewart, and S. C 



224 History of Green County. 

Pierce built in Brodhead. Citizens of Brodhead sub- 
scribed several thousand dollars to assist in defraying 
the expenses of the race, which is eighty feet wide, and 
nearly three miles long, and which furnishes the power 
for a foundry, several wagon shops, and the Norwegian 
plow factory. The plow factory, which makes twenty- 
five plows a day, was built in 1874 by W. A. Wheaton, 
C. W. Mitchell, H. C. Putnam, and H. H. Sater. 

Since August, 1S69, Brodhead has had a bank, known 
as the Bank of Brodhead. The stockholders are 
Ephraim Bowen, J. V. Richardson, Edwin Ludlow, 
and Mrs. Thos. Hendrie. It grew out of the necessities 
of the place, for in point of activity Brodhead is fulfill- 
ing the promise of its infancy. With good manufac- 
turing facilities, Brodhead has also the advantage of 
being the point of shipment for a jDart of Rock Coun- 
ty as well as for a large part of Green. There has 
always been a great deal of business done there, 
and conductor Wadsworth says there are nearly twice 
as many passengers to and from Brodhead as to and 
from Monroe, though the tickets sold in Monroe amount 
to more than the tickets sold in Brodhead. Since 1S70, 
Brodhead has enjoyed the honors and privileges of an 
incorporated town, and, [notwithstanding her greater 
age, wealth, and size, if Monroe was not the county 
town, she might have reason to fear that her lively 
neighbor would quite overshadow her. 

Unlike Monroe, Brodhead never had to wait for any- 
thing. There were religious meetings there from the 
first, and Dr. Morris had established his reputation in 



History of Green County. 225 

the town as a good physician long before Brodhead 
was thought of. For some time after the village was 
started, the Congregationalist was the only religious 
society, but the first church was built by the Methodists, 
to whom Mr. Brodhead gave the promised bell. Polit- 
ical meetings were held at the depot at first. Early pro- 
vision was made for public schools, including a high 
school; and since her fourth year Brodhead has never 
been without a newspaper. Beginning in the latter part 
of '59 the Brodhead Reporter was edited two years by 
L. W. Powell, and after him for a short time by T. J. 
Johnson. In '6i the life of the Brodhead Independent 
began. It has been edited successively by I. F. Mack, 
sen., I. F. Mack, jun., E. O. Kimberly, Morse & vStone, 
and E. O. Kimberly, the present proprietor. 

The village is already so old that this brief sketch 
has had space for but few of the names of which a more 
detailed history would make frequent mention, so old 
that it has already been called to mourn the death of 
some who were long and intimately connected with its 
progress. The names of J. B. Blanchard, John L. Mc 
Nair (whose brother and former partner Miles McNair 
still lives in the village), Edson Clinton, H. T. Moore, 
and W. B. Wheaton will at once suggest themselves in 
this connection. 

BRODHEAD DIRECTORY FOR 1S77. 

BANK OF BRODHEAD. 

Bowen & Co. 

DRY GOODS. 

B. R. Clawson. Orr & Putnam. 

Kurtz Bros. S. Stewart. 



Morrison & Son. 



20 



226 History of Green County. 

BUTTER AND EGGS. 

G. S. Parlin. 

GROCERIES. 

Dickinson & Son. F. W. Smith. 

F. W. Owen & Co. 

CIGARS AND TOBACCO. 

Wm. Fleek. 

FURNITURE. 

F. B. Smith. Shirk & Atkinson. 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, MUSIC AND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. 

B. W. Beebe. 

PROPRIETOR YOUNG HOUSE. 

J. A. Young. 

DRUGS AND GROCERIES. 

Broughton Bros, Clark & Towne. 

HARDWARE. 

Bloom & Roach. G. T. Spaulding. 

BOOTS AND SHOES. 

L. S. Fisher. J. Myers. 

Fred Hintz. Chas. Itman. 

J. Bush. 

PRODUCE DEALERS. 

Edward Cole. T. D. Laird. 

LUMBER, SASH AND BLINDS. 

H. Bowen. Lampson & Button. 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

Bloom & Roach. Geo. West. 

J. B. Searles. 

MERCHANT TAILORS. 

E. Hahn. Wm. Moonej. 

MILLINERY. 

Miss C. Burnham. Mrs. J. Thompson. 

Mrs. Mary A. Cole. 

LIVERY. 

J. A. Broughton, Geo. B. Wooster. 

Jas. Mitchell. 



History of Green Comity. 227 



MEAT MARKETS. 

Wm. Clapp. Sawyer & Douglas. 

Ross & Taylor. 

WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER. 

John J. Pfisterer. O. Errickson. 

PHOTOGRAPHERS. 

M. Jones. C. W. Lucas. 

ATTORNEYS. 

C. N. Carpenter. A. N. Randall. 

PHYSICIANS. 

R. Broughton, M. D. R. Morris, M. D. 

E. W. Fairman, M. D. L. E. Towne, M. D. 

DENTIST. 

F. R. Derrick. 

HARNESS SHOPS. 

Brandt & Golden. Colby & Wright. 

CARRIAGE FACTORIES. 

Bartlett & Son. Williams & Ballou. 

Lauby & Beck. 

FOUNDRY AND MACHINE SHOP. 

Rugg isi Gosling. 

FLOUR MILL. 

S. C. Pierce & Son. 

PLANING MILL. 

Worcester & Cole. 

NORWEGIAN PLOW FACTORY. 

Chamberlain, Mitchell & Co. 

OFFICERS OF BRODHEAD FROM 1870 TO '77, INCLUSIVE. 

CHAIRMEN. 

I. F. Mack. Geo. Spaulding. 

A. C. Douglas. L. H. Lasselle. 

H. T. Moore. J. V. Richardson. 

Burr Sprague. S. C. Pierce. 

CLERKS. 

[. V. Vance. P. J. Clawson. 

O. S. Putnam. H. Kimberly, five years. 



228 



History of Gi'een County. 



LARGEST FARMERS IN 



DECATUR IN 1 876. 

Names. No. of Acres. 

R. G. B. Fleek, - 564 
W. E. Gardner, - 508 

S. Graham, - - 187 

Daniel Keene, - 170 
Phil. Kihvine, - 168 

French Lake, - - 321 
L. N. Lewis, - 176 

I. F. Mack, - - 283 
Wm. Maddock, - 232 

Washington Mitchell, 380 

Thos. M unger, - 175 
Alex. Murray, - 400 

W. P. Murray, - 200 

S. Northcraft, - - 320 
S. C. Pierce, - 397 

H. D. Putnam, - 232 
j. J. Putnam, heirs, 381 

Sam. Rowe, heirs, - 249 
Andrew Smith, - 200 

Mrs. E. Spangler, - 160 
Thos. Stewart, - 222 

W. Straw ser, - - 164 
Jacob Ten Eyck's heirs, 483 



The first town meeting was held in the school house 



Names. 


No. of Acres. 


Wm. Asm us, - 


- 165 


W. Atherton, 


!93 


Frank Atkinson, 


- 247 


J. I. Bo wen, 


316 


F. J. Burt, 


160 


James Burt, - 


166 


H. W. Button, - 


- 45° 


Rufus Colton, 


206 


Jesse Copp, 


- 160 


Lydia Copp, 


160 


W. K. Cortelyou, 


- 240 


*J. N. Davis, - 


520 


J. J. Dawson, - 


- 3 6 o 


Martin Dixon, 


3S0 


R. J. Day, 


- 208 


John Douglas, 


3*3 


*D. Dunwiddie, 


- 418 


Wm. Frazee, 


240 


A. G. B. Fleek, 


- 291 


*B. H. Fleek, 


5 6 4 


*E. T. Fleek, 


- S40 


J. A. Fleek's heirs, 


240 


J. B. Fleek, 


- 340' 


Fred Gumber, 


4 2 4 



near the residence of Wm. Jones. 



TOWN OFFICERS FROM 1 849 

CHAIRMEN 

Geo. Gardner. 

Alexander Clark, two years. 

Samuel Northcraft, two yrs. 

John J. Putnam. 

Alex. Clark. 

John J. Putnam. 

E. T. Fleek, two years. 

D. Dunwiddie, three years. 

CLERKS. 

Martin Mitchell. 
Rowley Morris, six years. 
Martin Mitchell, two years. 
Donald Johnson. 
R. M. Smith, three years. 
S. A. Potter, two years. 



to 77 INCLUSIVE. 

John P. Laird, two years. 

John Douglas, two years. 

J. N. Davis. 

W. A. Wh eaton, three yrs. 

R. J. Day, rive years. 

D. Dunwiddie. 

J. V. Richardson. 

A. N. Randaal. 

C. N. Carpenter, six years. 

Alfred Wood. 

C. N. Carpenter. 

P. J. Clawson. 

H. Kimberly, five years. 



* Largest stock raisers. 






YORK. 



The first settlers of Green Comity never tired of ex- 
tolling the beauty of its prairies. Sometimes, when 
they watched the play of the sunlight on the long 
grassy billows before them, something of its bright- 
ness entered into their own hopes; and, with unusual 
confidence in the world's progress, they remarked to 
each other, sometime, though it vvo'n't be in our day, 
these prairies will all be in farms. Then, because they 
had come, originally if not immediately, from a wooded 
country, and it seemed to them more in accordance with 
the fitness of things to spend life making a clearing 
than to take one of nature's making, a great many of 
them turned their backs on the beautiful prairie and 
made their homes in the timber, though a few of them, 
after grubbing away their best years, adopted a contra- 
ry opinion and removed to the prairie, where they 
speedily acquired a competence. Even while they ad- 
mired the prairies, most of these denizens of the forest 
lamented the country's great scarcity of trees; and, as 
the Indian was known to be the cause of some of the 

20* 



230 History of Green County. 

inconveniences to which they were subject, they as- 
cribed the deficiency of trees also to him, or at least 
to the fires which he sent sweeping over the country 
every year to make the hunting good. By the time 
York was settled, prairies were in better repute than 
they had been five years before. It does not appear 
which one of the opposing theorists on the treelessness 
of prairies numbered the first settlers of York among 
his followers. These pioneers may have seen the cause 
of prairies in climatic influences, in dried-up lakes, 
or in peculiarities of soil ; though, since they saw that 
the seeming deficiency of trees was really a blessing — 
and there has always been a superabundance of wood 
land — it might have seemed to them a pity to deny the 
blame-laden Indian the credit of it. Whatever their 
theory was, and it is possible they never bothered them- 
selves with any theory, the first settlers of York left 
the timber of the northern and western parts of the 
town unclaimed, and made their settlement on the 
prairie, near the south-east corner of the township. 

John Stewart, the first settler, came from Ohio in 
1840. The next settlers, Wm. C. Green, Chas. Reed, 
and Ezra Wescott, came together from New York 
state. They also came in 1S40. In i84i-'2, Amos Con- 
key, Albro, Chester, and Wm. Crowell, Joseph Miller, 
Philander Peebles, H. H. Hurlbut, J. F. Wescott, Wm. 
Spears, and Simeon Allen came, most of them from New 
York, the others from Ohio. Most of them settled at once 
in the south-eastern part of the town, calling their settle- 
ment Green's Prairie. They were poorly prepared for 



Histo?y of Gree?i County. 231 

the cold winter of i842-'3, but they had health and 
hope, and only one person died — a little daughter of 
Philander Peebles, who had contracted consumption in 
New York. 

It was several years before any settlement was made- 
in the northern and western parts of York. Since 1S53— 
'4— '5, these parts of the town have been mostly occu- 
pied by Norwegians. There are also a few Germans 
and Irish, and near the south-west corner, Yankees are 
numerous enough to give one place the name of Yankee 
hollow. 

As the prairie north of Green's Prairie was settled r 
it began to be called York, in honor of the original 
home of the people; and at the suggestion of the Rev.. 
Augustus Hurlbut, the first clergyman in the township,, 
this name was given to the town, which would probably 
have been named for Mr. Green had not Green been 
the name of the county. In 1846 or '47, Green's Prairie 
obtained a post office, to which the first postmaster,. 
Lemuel Chase, gave the name of Farmer's Grove, in 
allusion to a grove near his house, A little later, Ed- 
ward Sendel opened a store on the prairie. Both office 
and store were farther north and west than the present 
village of Farmer's Grove. Mr. Sendell closed his 
store and Mr. E. T. Gardner opened another a short 
distance west of the site of the village. In the mean- 
time Bern post office, named by admirers of the Hunga- 
rian general, had been established on York prairie, and 
the Farmer's Grove office had been moved south, and 
after several changes in the ownership of the store, 



232 History of Green Coimty. 

store and office met at the house of Mr. J. F. Wescott, 
where the small village of Farmer's Grove has grown 
up around them. 

The village of Postville dates its beginning from the 
arrival of Albro Crowell, who made his home there 
when he first came to the county. The second and 
third houses were built by Ira Walker and Edwin 
Crowell. In 18^8, Gilbert Post built the fourth house, 
the lower story of which was used as a store. After a 
time, Mr. Crowell started another store. A drug store, 
a tailor shop, a harness shop, and more dwellings fol- 
lowed. The Stewart post-office, so called for York's 
first settler, was moved there from its first place a mile 
or two west, and the village was recorded as Postville. 
Through all succeeding changes Postville has pros- 
pered. The first store has been transformed into a 
hotel, and long ago the village was thought large 
enough to have a saloon; but York has never had a 
board that would grant a license. 

During the summer of 1876 four large cheese fac- 
tories, all owned by companies, were in operation in 
York. At Farmers' Grove, at the factory north of the 
village (where was formerly Eli George's tavern, the 
first voting place in the town), and at Yankee Hollow 
Limburger cheese is made. At Postville the cheese is 
American cheese. 

LARGEST FARMERS IN YORK IN 1 876. 



Names. 


No. of Acres. 


Names. No. of Acres. 


O. Ames, 


- 175 


D. Ash, - - 205 


C. Anderson, 


224 


Holver O. Brenden, - 161 


Hans Arneson, 


- 200 


Ole Burgeson, - 160 



History of Green County, 



2 33- 



Names. No 


of Acres. 


Names. No 


. of Acres 


Wm. Byrne, 


300 


Joseph Miller, 


340 


*Richard Byrne, 


480 


R. S. Mosher, - 


1S9 


S. C. Campbell, 


230 


Helga Olson, 


233 


A. Crowell, - 


189 


^Gilbert Olson, 


45° 


R. Crowell, 


190 


M. J. Owens, guardian 


,265 


James Cullen, 


320 


J. M. Peebles, - 


164 


A. O. Eidsmoe, 


170 


P. Peebles, - 


241 


C. O. Eidsmoe, 


242 


♦Gilbert Post, - 


4S9 


Hans Embertson, 


220 


Chas. P^eed, sen., - 


240 


K. T. Fjose, 


J 95 


T. C. Richmond, 


279 


*Hiram Gabriel, 


6 43 


Davis Robb, 


203 


*J. S. Gabriel, 


280 


S. M. Sherman, 


176 


R. Gabriel, 


170 


B. O. Slitten, 


204 


Geo. Gilbert, 


3 6 5 


Ole C. Sorum, - 


172 


C. Gulson, 


39° 


A. A. Strowmen, 


288 


Andrew Hanson, - 


200 


Erick Sviggum, 


259 


Ole O. Hougen, 


1 So 


Hans S. Sviggum, 


223 


H. H. Hurlbut, - 


171 


Knud J. Sviggum, - 


200 


Ole Jeremiason, 


214 


Ole & A. Thompson, 


360 


John Johnson, 


326 


Christian Toreson, - 


161 


A. O. Jorde, 


178 


John C. Ula, 


170 


Annon Kjellesvig, 


167 


J. T. Vollen, - 


TOO 


Erik Larson, 


240 


A. Wheeler, 


i So 


Ole H. Lee, - 


191 




• 


TOWN OFFICERS 


FROM 


1849 to '77 inclusive. 






CHAIRMEN. 




Wm. C. Green, four } 


ears. 


J. Stewart. 




J. Stewart. 




D. Stewart, three 


years. 


Wm. C. Green, four years. 


D. C. Day. 




P. Peebles. 




P. Peebles. 




H. H. Hurlbut. 




D. Stewart, five years. 


J. Stewart. 




P. Peebles. 




No record for 1861. 




J. S. Gabriel, three 


years. 


H. H. Hurlbut. 










• 
CLERKS. 




E. B. Crowell. 




D. .Stewart, two y 


ears. 


E. T. Gardner. 




F. A. Dunham. 




E. B. Crowell. 




J. F. Wescott, two 


years. 


H. Gabriel, three years. 


' J. M. Peebles, five 


years. 


J. F. Wescott. 




A. O. Eidsmoe, two 


years. 


H. Gabriel. 




J. A. Kettleson. 




H. H. Hurlbut. 




Wm. C. King. 




A. Alder. 




A. O. Eidsmoe. 




J. F. Wescott. 




A. Peterson. 




No record for 1S61. 


« 






*Larg-est Stock Growers. 





ALBANY. 



In 1S40, five years after he came to the county, 
James Campbell built the first house in the town of 
Albany. It was near Sugar river, about a mile farther 
south than the present village of Albany. The same 
year, Mr. Higby built a house in Rock County, which 
was so near the north-east corner of Albany that it has 
been called the first house in the township. Mr. Camp- 
bell did not go to Albany to live until 1S41. It is his 
opinion, and the opinion of Mr. Christopher Martin, 
who came from New York in 1S40, and who lived with 
Mr. Campbell during parts of i84i-'42, that the next 
comers were Hiram Brown and Samuel Mitchell, both 
of whom were here before the end of '42, as were also 
John Broughton and Wm. Burgess. Some of the next 
settlers were Christopher Minert, Joshua and A. Whit- 
comb, S. L. Eldred, and Aaron Broughton in '43, 
Daniel Smiley, Asa Comstock, Wm. Webb, Israel 
Phillips, and A. S. Holmes in '44. Gilbert McNaught, 

McVee, Edward Copp, Geo. Bagley, Price Hills, 

and Aaron Kellogg, were among those who came in 
184.5-46. Among the occasional residents of Albany 
was Reuben Folsom, or old Reube the wolf hunter, a 



History of Green County. 235 

discharged soldier who came from Fort Winnebago to 
Sylvester in 1S40, and who would have made a good 
character for one of Cooper's novels. Kind, generous 
and brave, with a fund of anecdotes equaled only by 
his wonderful power to endure hunger and fatigue, he 
was at home with all the settlers, but his most constant 
companions were his dogs. A cave in the bank of the 
river, a few miles from the village of Albany, is pointed 
out as one of his retreats. 

The locality of the village of Albany was first 
known as Campbell's ford. The land comprised in the 
village was entered by James Campbell and Thos. 
Stewart, and through their influence Capt. E. O. Pond 
and Dr. S. F. Nichols went there in the spuing of 1846, 
and built a log cabin (the first in the village), which was 
occupied by the families of both until a frame house 
could be erected. With a yoke of oxen S. A. Pond, 
then sixteen years of age, hauled the lumber for the 
second house from Amos Sylvester's mill, being some- 
times obliged to first cut the logs and take them to the 
mill. Both houses were east of the river, the log 
house about ten rods from where the dam now is, and 
the frame house on the ground where Mrs. Pond still 
resides. At that time there were but two frame, and 
two log, houses between the ford and Janesville. On a 
few rough shelves in one corner of Capt. Pond's house, 
the frame house, were kept the dry goods and the boxes 
and barrels of groceries constituting Albany's first store. 
The report that Pond and Nichols were going to build 
up a village at the ford attracted others. A. R. Bur- 



236 History of G?'een County. 

gor and John and Nelson Stevenson came with them, 
and in August, Robert Gleason, who was employed to 
build the mill the next year, removed there with his 
family. In '46, with the assistance of J. V. Richardson 
as surveyor, Pond and Nichols laid out the village of 
Albany. They also built a saw mill, and succeeded in 
getting a mail route established from Beloit via Janes- 
ville, Albany, and Exeter to Mineral Point. Capt. 
Pond was the postmaster at Albany. The next year, 
J. B. Sawyer and Dr. Stearns built the American 
House, Capt. R. H. Hewitt opened a general store, and 
several new families came. They all shook with the 
ague, and all talked proudly of their beautiful coun- 
try and their noble river. In the mean time, the flat- 
tering prospects of Albany had led Messrs. Bugor and 
Stevenson to lay out the village of Independence, on 
the river, three-fourths of a mile below Albany, but 
Independence never grew beyond half a score of 
houses. 

Zebina Warren's grist mill, R. J. & Wm. Richard- 
son's general store, S. A. Pond's book and drug store, 
and a number of shops were among the acquisitions of 
Albany in iS49-'5o. A sad occurrence in May, '51, 
seemed for a time to blast the prospects of the village. 
Moved by a spirit of wild adventure, Wm. Richardson 
and S. A. Pond went over the dam in a skiff, and the 
former lost his life, the latter barely escaping. The 
Richardson brothers had just bought a large stock of 
goods, and had made preparations to build a large bus- 
iness block; but the surviving brother was so overcome 



History of Green County. 237 

with sorrow that he closed the store and left the place. 
But enterprise could not be stopped. J. H., L. H., and 
E. F. Warren became the successors of the Richardson 
Brothers, and E. Bowen, Robson and Prentice, Jas. 
Campbell, Hunter & Kellogg, E. B. Noble, Burt & 
Harris, John Lemuel, C. T. Barton, J. Johnson, J. 
Dunkleburg, T. Carrier, V. R. Vancuren, and a score 
of others were soon identified with the business inter- 
ests of the village, which promised to become the lar- 
gest village in the county, and even the death, before 
1855, of several leading men, Capt. Pond, Zebina War- 
ren, and Robson and Prentice among them, delayed its 
progress but a little time. S. A. Pond did a large real 
estate and brokerage business, and a Madison firm 
opened the Bank of Albany. S. & A. Johnson erected 
a sash, door, and blind factory, and T. Kellogg another 
grist mill. In May, '58, I. S. Dexter and Y. T. Lacy 
transformed Monroe's languishing "JefFersonian Dem- 
ocrat " into the Albany Times, in the control of which 
they were succeeded by Joseph Baker. 

The tenor of Albany's way has never been even. 
Fate has doomed her to an astonishing number of re- 
verses and disappointments. Her failure to get the 
Southern Wisconsin Railroad has been told in another 
part of the history. Recovering from this disappoint- 
ment, she fixed her hopes on a Sugar river valley 
road, and, with James Campbell as the champion of her 
claims, seemed likely to achieve success. In June, 1857, 
subscriptions to the road reached nearly $100,000. De- 
pot grounds were purchased at Albany, and failing 

21 



2 3S History of Green County. 

then, the project has occasionally been revived, and this 
year, more than for several years past, hopes are enter- 
tained that it may sometime be accomplished. The 
projected road, for which the grading from Albany to 
the state line has long been done, is to form a connect- 
ing link between the road from Madison to Portage, 
and the road from Rockford to Rochelle. 

The crisis of 1S57 ruined some of the business men 
of Albany, and the decline in southern securities caused 
the failure of the bank in 1861 ; in 1S66 the river carried 
away the saw mill, the sash and and blind factory, and 
the bridge; a freshet of 1S6S destroyed the Warren 
store and flour mill, damaged the Kellogg mill, and 
again took away the bridge, and a fire that year de- 
stroved five stores. Messrs. Warren, Tompkins, and 
Eroe, vS. A. Pond, Parker & Kellogg, J. F. Lacy, 
[ohn Hahn, and J. Lemuel rebuilt that same year, 
and in a manner that made the change a great im- 
provement to the village, all the buildings destroyed 
in 1S6S; but the loss from fires which in 1S69 and 
'71 destroved a hotel, a gun shop, and five stores, has 
been put partially repaired. The Albany Times came 
to an end when its editor entered the army, and its only 
successor, Messrs. Osgood & Bartlett's Albany Journal, 
was published only from October, 1865, to May, 1866. 
There is no bank in the village, and the number of stores 
— which may fairly be taken as an indication of the pros- 
perity of the village — is smaller now than of old, includ- 
ing only those of Bartlett and Roberts, H. B. Jobes, J. M. 
Dodge, and John Lemuel. Brodhead, Evansville, and 



History of Green County. 



2 39 



Brooklyn have dispelled the brightest of Albany's vis- 
ions, at least for a time; but they can not destroy her 
good water power, which is even now persuading 
Messrs. J. H. and E. F. Warren, and S. A. Pond to 
build a large woolen mill there; nor can they entirely 
destroy her hope of a railroad, the realization of which 
would, she thinks, restore to her all her old life and 
activity. 

At the present time Albany ranks first among the 
unincorporated villages of the count}-. In 1S76 the vil- 
lage lots in the town of Albany were appraised at 
$43,065. Those of other towns followed in this order: 
Jefferson $30,270; New Glarus $20,49^; Mount Pleas- 
ant $18,006; Brooklyn $16,010; Exeter $8,573; Cadiz 
$3,285; while lots in Monroe and Brodhead were valued 
at $696,075, and $253,826. 

LARGEST FARMERS IN ALB AN V IN 1 876. 

Names. ] 

Richard Atkinson, 

Jeremiah Brewer, 

Aaron Broughton, 
*John Broughton, - 

F. J. Burt, - - 

J. W. Carver, 

John Carodine, 

John B. Chase, 

Mrs. Asa Comstock, 

Lewis Comstock, 

Edward Davis, 

S. L. Eldred, - 

S. R. Eldred, 

John Flint, 

Joshua Flint, 
*Thos. Flint, 

Wm. Francis, 

Ole Gilbertson, 



of Acres. 


Names. 


No. of Acres. 


200 


Richard Harrier, 


2O0 


24O 


A. S. Holmes, - 


- 200 


l6o 


Moses Ingram, 


l6o 


560 


J. D. Jenks, 


- 2 24 


200 


Aaron Jones, - 


l6o 


200 


Edward Jones, - 


164 


214 


Wm. Jones, - 


20O 


20I 


Ole Kettleson, - 


160 


171 


John F. Lacy, - 


l6o 


165 


Ole Leverson, 


200 


29O 


Edward Llovd, - 


24O 


4OO 


Hosea Ludington, 


l6o 


l6o 


Christopher Minert, 


- -54 


l6o 


Thos. Mitchell, 


242 


220 


Mary Meredith, 


- J 7 L 


28o 


Geo. Moore, - 


280 


l6o 


N. B. Murray, - 


160 


220 


Mrs. S. F. Nichols, 


-77 



* Largest stock growers. 






240 



History of Green County. 



Names. 

W. S. Peckham, 
*Israel Phillips, - 
Evan Pryce, - 
J. M. Purinton, 
H. D. Putnam, 
Win. Reese,Sen., 
John Shaler, - 
C. B. Smiley, - 



Aaron Broughton. 
Julius Hulburt. 

John Broughton, 2 years. 
W. B. Welton. 
John Broughton. 
Daniel Smiley, 2 years. 
John Broughton. 
John Wood. 



No. of Acres. Names. 

421 Daniel Smiley, 


No 


. of Acres 
2O0 


■ 340 
320 

- 160 
200 


Benj. Svvaneutt, 
John Trow, - 
John H. Watkins, 
Joshua Whitcomb, 


- 


173 

220 
164 
24O 


182 


John Williams, 




220 


176 


John Wood, 


- 


160 


400 








LBANY 


FROM 1849 TO '77 INCLUSIVE. 


CHAIRMEN. 







CLERKS. 



Gilbert McNaught. 
Z. Warren. 
A. R. Burgor, 3 years. 
Jacob G. Shoemaker. 
Hiram Brown. 
S. A. Pond. 
Hiram Brown. 
Ira S. Dexter. 
John B. Perry. 
Hiram Brown. 



Daniel Smiley, 
John Broughton. 
Daniel Smiley, 5 years. 
Israel Phillips, 2 years. 
E. F. Warren, 6 years. 
J. M. Purinton. 
E. F. Warren. 
Israel Phillips, 2 years. 

M. T. Gleason. 
Hiram Brown. 
Hiram B. Jobes, 3 years (C. 

S. Tibbitts appointed). 
J. B. Perry, 2 years. 
Hiram Brown, Jr. 
H. B. Jobes. 
J. H. Ludington. 
Richard Glennan. 
J. B. Perry, 5 years. 



♦Largest stock growers. 



BROOKLYN. 



Of at least five of the sixteen townships in Green 
County, the first settlers were by birth the children of 
Ohio. The first of the Buckeyes in Brooklyn was J. 
W. Haseltine, who, though he did not begin to make a 
home there until 1845, bought, in December, 1839, the 
land on which he is living now. At Mr. Haseltine's 
solicitation, another Buckeye, W. W. McLaughlin, the 
first settler in Brooklyn, went to the township in the 
autumn of 1S42, taking with him a flock of sheep and 
thirty-four head of cattle. He completed his first cabin 
and moved into it the first day of November, just five 
days before "the hard winter" began. His house was 
on the line of travel from the southern part of the 
county to the pineries, whither a large part of the pro- 
duce of the county was hauled; and, though Mrs. Mc 
Laughlin was the only woman the family saw for three 
months, men stopped at the house several times every 
week, and whatever supplies the family needed were ob- 
tained from them. The stock was not so easily provided 
for. Mr. McLaughlin hauled straw fifteen miles, but, in 



21' 



242 History of Green County. 

spite of all he could do, all the sheep and most of the 
cattle died before spring. 

Among the next settlers were Chas. Sutherland, A. 
D. Kirkpatrick, Henry Montgomery (whose death the 
next year is thought to have been the first in the town- 
ship), and his sons Tracy and Cyrus A., who all came 
in 1844. Prominent among the settlers of 1845 were 
Jas. F. Eggleston, Stephen H. Ludlow, Jeremiah An- 
derson and his son Amos, Wm. R. Smith, sen., Wm. 
R. Smith., jun., Leroy Hudson, John Sawin, Monroe 
Carpenter, and Martin Flood. Most of these settlers 
were in the northern and eastern parts of the town. 
They went to mill and to market in Dane and Rock 
Counties much oftener than in Green, and when they 
were sick their hopes centered in Dr. Fox in Dane 
County. Many of them lived on Jug Prairie, a fertile 
prairie in Rock County and the eastern half of Brook- 
lyn, which derives its name from a remark of one of the 
first settlers who went one day to Rock County to 
trade. So many of his neighbors had sent by him for 
vinegar and molasses that by the time he reached his 
destination he had nearly a dozen jugs in his wagon. 
To a joke of the bystanders, as he drove up to the store, 
he replied, oh, yes, I come from jug prairie ; and in spite of 
the effort of the good people on the prairie to change 
the name to temperance, the name jug has stuck ever 
since. 

While the prairie in the eastern part was filling up, 
another settlement was growing in the south-east cor- 
ner of the town, where in 1S43, Maj or Downer (so 



History of Green County. 243 

generally called Major that his Christian name is for- 
gotten) built a saw mill on Sugar river. One or two 
log houses were built there about the same time. In 
November, '44, Chester Witter removed from Monti- 
cello to Downer's saw mill, as the place was called, and 
a few months later he and John S. Litchfield, of Exeter, 
built the first grist mill in Brooklyn. At the raisins' 
Mr. Geo. Durgin climbed to the ridge pole, and made 
a speech, in the course of which he gave the place the 
name of Winnesheek — a name rendered familiar to the 
earliest settlers of the countv by an Indian village 
where Freeport is now, and bv a Winnebago chief. 
Nearly ten years later, Connecticut people with more 
love of home than good taste changed the name to Mil- 
ford. This name not proving satisfactory, but two or 
three years passed before the village was dubbed Attica. 

Before 1S45 Dustin had a distillery and D. D. & 

W. W. Day had a store in Attica. At the present 
time the principle points of interest in Attica are Joseph 
Bartlett's saw and grist mills, J. Crampton's carding 
machine, a cheese factory, owned by a company, the 
stores of C. D. W. Leonard and Wm. Young, and a 
hotel. The southern part of Attica was originally in- 
cluded in the township of Albany, but was transferred 
to Brooklyn in answer to petitions from the village, the 
first of which was presented to the Countv Commis- 
sioners in November, 1851. 

Across the town, diagonally from Attica, on land 
entered by Chas. Sutherland, is Brooklyn, the youngest 
village in the county. The necessity for this village 



2 |,| History of Green County. 

began with the building of the Madison division of the 
Chicago & Northwestern Railway in 1864, and the first 
house was built that year by H. Capwell. Beginning 
in the corner of the county, on the east side of the rail- 
road, the village was afterwards extended on the west 
side by Alonzo Melvin, whose farm', lying in the three 
counties of Dane, Rock, and Green, bounds it on the south 
and west. The village has also spread over into Dane. 
The leading business interests of the village are repre- 
sented by E. G. Andrews and Son, produce merchants, 
whose elevator is the largest between Madison and 
Beloit; Melvin, Blair & Co., manufacturers of 140,000 
pounds of American cheese per annum; Johnson & 
Gliddin, proprietors of a feed and planing mill and 
cheese box factory; L. J. Wilder, B. S. Axtell, Mar- 
vin Bros., merchants; Lovejoy and Richards, lumber 
dealers, and D. H. Glidden, proprietor of the hotel. One 
of the largest granges in the county is that which has a 
store in the village of Brooklyn. It numbers about a 
hundred members, and its weekly meetings, which are 
varied by debates, essays, and dramatic representations, 
are largely attended. Its members carry home books 
from their circulating library, and feel repaid for their 
long rides by the recreation, the general information, and 
the ability to conduct public meetings gained at the 
regular gatherings of the association. , 

Town meetings in Brooklyn are held sometimes in 
Attica, sometimes in the village of Brooklyn. The 
first meeting was held at the house of Nelson J. Patter- 
son, April 7, 1849. The number of votes cast was 



History of Green County. 



2 45 



eighty-two. J. W. Haseltine acted as clerk of the 
meeting 1 and made the first returns to the county. The 
county clerk hesitated about receiving the returns be- 
cause the clerk elected for the year had not brought 
them, but finally took them because they were "in better 
shape than those from half the towns." At a town 
meeting held at Attica, April 7, 1S74, it was found that 
twenty-three men were present who had voted at the 
first meeting twenty-five years before. By order of the 
meeting - the clerk recorded their names as follows : 



Davis Fenton. 
Jonathan Smith. 
*William Kirkpatrick. 

C. D. W. Leonard. 
Franklin Patterson. 
N. J. Patterson. 
Alonzo Purington. 

*Po\vell Shell. 
David Healhman. 
John Pace, Sen. 

D. N. Shaw. 
Ezra Doolittle. 



Cyrus A. Montgomerv. 

O*. P. Stowell. 

Otis Thompson. 
*W. W. McLaughlin. 

J. F. Egijleston. 
*Sylvester Gray. 

Joel Smith. 

J. W. Haseltine. 

Jeremiah Anderson. 

Wm. R. Smith, Jim. 

Chas. S. Grav. 



LARGEST FARMERS IX BROOKLYN IN 1S76. 



Names. 



No. 



Jerry Anderson, 
A. Bennett, - 
John Dalrvmple, 
Peter Derimer, 
Ezra Doolittle - 
J. F. Eggleston, 
Wm. Gih, 
J. W. Haseltine 
Geo. Hollerbush, 
Daniel Johnson, 
S. D. Kirkpatrick, 
Wm. Lay ton, 
Wm. Lee, - 
C. D. W. Leonard, 



of Acres. 


Names. 


No 


. of Acres 


l6o 


Stephen Lewis, - 


- 


l6o 


220 


T. Lewis, 




l6o 


3>° 


AT Melvin, 


- 


353 


28o 


Jas. McCoy, 


- 


280 


200 


John McClairinon, 




160 


2 54 


W.W. McLaughlin 


est. 


238 


179 


Thos. O. Patrick Nevil 


160 


261 


John Pace, 


- 


160 


340 


Frank Patterson, - 




220 


3iS 


J. N. Patterson, 


- 


1S0 


279 


Alonzo Purington, 




200 


219 


James Root, 


- 


160 


182 


A. J. Sawin, - 




160 


220 


E. C. Smith, - 


- 


160 



♦Messrs. Shell, S. Gray, Kirkpatrick, and McLaughlin have since died. 



246 



History of Green County. 



Names. No. of Acres. 

Joel Smith, - - 220 

Stephen Swan, - - 280 

W. M. Tallnian, - 320 

David Watkins' estate, 240 



TOWN OFFICERS OF BROOKLYN FROM 1 849 TO '77 INCLUSIVE. 



Names. 

A. H. Waldo, 


No. of Acres 
24O 


John Weaver, - 
W. W. Young, 


- 200 
220 



CHAIRMEN. 



A. D. KlRKPATRICK. 

Chester Witter, 2 years. 

H. M. Allen. 

Martin Flood. 

W. W. McLaughlin. 

Martin Flood. 

A. D. KlRKPATRICK. 

H. L. Hyde. 

W. W. McLaughlin. 

Levi Crawford. 



O. P. Stow ell, 3 years. 
Edmund Hill, 2 years. 
W. B. Patterson. 
H. M. Allen. 
James McCoy, 2 years. 
Tracy Montgomery, 
[as. McCoy, 9 years. 



CLERKS. 



W. W. McLaughlin, 6 y Vs. 

J. A. Sawin. 

D. N. Shaw. 

Henry R. Allen, 3 years. 

W. W. McLaughlin, 3 y'rs. 

C. D. W. Leonard. 

James Root. 

C. D. W. Leonard. 

F. R. Melvin. 



E. J. Andrew. 

Edw'in Netherwood, 3 y'rs. 

M. F. Ross. 

J. W. Haseltine. 

M. F. Ross, 3 years. 

B. S. Axtell.* 



NEW GLARUS. 



In July, 1845, f° ur men 5 Armstrong, Greenwood, 
Slater, and Jackson bv name, had claims in what is now 
called New Glarus. There was not a single inhabitant 
there who owned the place on which he lived ; but the 
time had come when the long waiting of the unoccupied 
township was to be rewarded. Here w 7 as to be shown, 
as it was to be shown in no other township in the county, 
how the superfluous- and poverty-stricken children 
of the old word are transformed in the United States 
into prosperous and useful citizens. Early in 1S45 *- ne 
Emigration Association of Glarus determined to re- 
lieve the crowded population of that canton by send- 
ing a colony to the United States, and Fridolin StreifF 
and Nicholas Duerst were delegated to come in advance 
of the colony and select a place for the settlement. 
They left Switzerland March 8, 1845. At the conclu- 
sion of a long voyage they were met in New York by 
friends of the society, and on the nth of May they 
started with Joshua Frey of Pennsylvania, on their 
search for a home for the colony. They arrived at 
Chicago the morning of the 19th of May, and here the 



.248 ///story of Green County. 

search began. They traveled over Illinois and a large 
part of Missouri, Iowa, and Wisconsin. Their aim was 
to rind a place with a healthful climate, convenient mar- 
kets, good soil and water, and plenty of timber. They 
selected the township named by them New Glarus, and 
on the 25th of July they purchased twelve hundred 
acres in sections fourteen, fifteen, twenty-two, twenty - 
three, and twenty-seven of that township. The pur- 
chase was made at Mineral Point, where Mr. StreifF 
took the first step towards becoming a citizen of the 
United States. Not being sufficiently acquainted with 
the language to take the usual oath, the ceremony, so 
far as he understood it, consisted in kissing the bible. 

The first work of the commissioners was to lay out 
a road from Green's Prairie to the prospective village, 
after which, on the 6th of August, Mr. Frey left them 
to return home. Meanwhile, Messrs. Duerst and StreifF 
had hastily erected a few shanties for the colonists who 
were daily expected. The society had not wished to 
send the colony so soon, but the emigrants became so 
impatient that it was impossible to restrain them, and 
they were permitted to start the 16th of April. Some 
communities paid the traveling expenses of those of their 
emigrants who could not pay for themselves, and during 
the night of the 15th and 16th of April, charitably dis- 
posed persons raised the money to pay for the passage 
of a number of families that wished to come but for 
whom no provision had been made. The colonists went 
to St. Louis and thence to New Glarus, where thev 
arrived August 12. Their progress had been delayed 



History of Green Cou?tty. 249 

by some misunderstanding, on account of which the 
commissioners were looking for them in Chicago while 
they were waiting in St. Louis for instructions from the 
commissioners. At first they were crowded together 
in a few shanties. Then, as they were able, they built 
log houses; and whenever a house was built, a shanty 
was taken down and the lumber used to make the floor 
and the door of the new house. Few of the houses had 
two windows, none had more than two. The doors 
had wooden hinges that Mr. Streiff made himself. Two 
months after the land was bought, Mr. Duerst, who had 
never intended to remain in this country, returned to 
Switzerland, shaking as he went with the ague. The 
whole care of the colony now devolved on Mr. Streiff. 
Some of the colonists had a little money, but most of 
them were so poor that, as one of them expressed it, 
"if they had to pay six cents for a cat, they couldn't buv 
it." A few went to Thompson's settlement to work, 
and a few others spent the winter in Galena; but as a 
whole the colony was so helpless that Mr. Streiff was 
compelled to ask for help. The Association sent him 
<£ 1,000, with which he bought provisions, oxen, seed, 
agricultural implements, and whatever else was indis- 
pensable before the people could take care of themselves. 
Provisions were bought by the quantity, and sold to 
families at the lowest possible price. There was little 
in the houses, and little room for anything besides the 
folks and the beds. One stove and a few chairs were 
bought. Bedding had been brought from Switzerland, 
and beds were made on the floor so close to each other 

28 



250 History of Green County. 

that a housekeeper who confesses to many tears because 
the men stuck their dirty boots against them, says that 
while she made her bed she always stood on some other 
woman's bed. In the mountainous land of their birth, 
the people had never known such winds as swept 
through their cabins that long, first winter; and some- 
times when they crept shivering to bed they had to take 
their few umbrellas with them. Fearful of being de- 
ceived by the harmless appearance of the Indians who 
visited them occasionally, timid men and women told 
till they trembled with terror the stories they had heard 
of Indian perfidy and cruelty. No wonder. that where- 
ever Mr. Streiff turned he found a woman in tears; no 
wonder that his incessant labors excited little gratitude, 
and that he wrote home, " I shall remember the year 
1845." The wonder is that on a thousand dollars he 
could keep nearly a hundred persons from fall to spring 
in such a way that they should be grateful to him in 
after year's. He did this, but, though often urged, he 
has never consented to take charge of another colonv 
from Switzerland. Through the winter, the men were 
busy cutting wood and splitting rails. In the spring, 
the work of breaking prairie began. The Association 
sold each man twenty acres at three florins an acre, on 
ten years' time without interest. Some men bought 
more land, and some claimed land adjoining them, and 
paid for it in 1855, when the deeds were given by the 
Association. The commissioners divided the land so 
that the shares were as nearly as possible alike in their 
advantages in wood and water, and then, when all had 



History of Green County. 251 

promised to abide by the result, the shares were drawn 
by lot. Rules for the government of the colony pro- 
vided that no one should cut wood from another's land, 
but all might cut from the road. During the first year, 
two families at least should live in one house, and colo- 
nists should help each other in building houses and barns. 
Until their land was paid for, they were not to dig for 
mineral. After it was paid for, they might dig; but if 
lead was found, the land was to be given up to the so- 
ciety, in which case the owner was to be paid the origi- 
nal cost of the land and the value of his improvements 
in cultivation and buildings, but nothing for the lead. 

The reports that went back from the colony were 
so encouraging that several times in the summer of 
1846 recruits came from the mother country. One of 
them was J. Jacob Tschudy, who was sent to assist in 
the care of the colony. A report of the condition of 
the colony dated November 20, '46, and printed for cir- 
culation in Switzerland, contains the following: The 
owners of lots were Fridolin Hoesli, John' Kun- 
dert, Paulus Kundert, Henry Hoesli, Leonard Ham- 
merli, Mathias Smith, George Legler, Mrs. Barbara 
Hoesli, Abraham Schindler, Balthasar Durst, Niklaus 
Durst, David Schindler, Markus Hoesli, Mathias 
Duerst, Fridolin Hefti, Fridolin Legler father, Fri- 
dolin Legler son, John Caspar Legler, Oswald 
Babler, Fridolin Babler, Henry Aebli, Hilarius Wild, 
Mathias Hoesli, Jost Triimpi, Jost Becker, Fridolin 
StreifF, Gabriel Baumgartner, Caspar Zwicki, Fridolin 
Oertli. Six men with their families had gone away, 



252 History of Green County. 

and three men, J. Jacob Tschudi, Peter Hoesli, and 
Jacob Ernst had not yet drawn their lots. There had 
been two births and seven deaths, and the colony num- 
bered at that time 125 persons. There were twenty 
houses, of which thirteen were in the village. One hun- 
dred and nine acres had been broken, seven hundred 
bushels of corn and " more than enough potatoes " had 
been raised. The live stock owned by individuals con- 
sisted of two horses, ninety-seven head of cattle inclu- 
ding eighteen oxen, one hundred and ninety-nine pigs, 
and nine sheep. Fowls were still owned in common. 
A few orchards had been set out. A few garden vege- 
tables, "as peas, chiccory, cabbages and tobacco, also 
pumpkins were planted bv way of trial." Fortunately, 
the experiment succeeded, especially in peas and pump- 
kins. The ground was thought to be too new for 
wheat, and there was complaint that the potatoes "were 
not so good as in Switzerland. There were as yet but 
few fences, and the crops were much injured by the 
swine as well as by field mice. The prairie fires de- 
stroyed hay stacks and fences, and some of the colonists 
lost their hair in saving their hay-covered houses. 
Published extracts from Mr. Streiff's letters show that 
the people were well, but, on account of the hard work 
they had done, very ragged, also that there was a gen- 
eral desire for a minister and a school. After Mr. 
Tschudy's arrival, he was, until the people were able 
to pay for all services rendered, overseer, minister, phy- 
sician, and teacher. In the summer of '46, the first 
Swiss school was taught. The next school was Eng- 



History of Green County. 253 

lish. The first frame house in the colony was a school 
house, though previous to its erection some of the log 
houses had been boarded over. The people showed no 
great anxiety to learn the English language, but the 
children learned it at school, and it gradually made its 
way in the colony. More efficacious than the schools 
in Americanizing the people was the habit of the 
young men and women of going out to service. For 
years all the hired girls in Monroe were from the col- 
ony, and with the language they also acquired in their 
various homes many of the ideas and customs of the 
countrv. Married women sometimes left their families, 
walked to Monroe, washed three or four days, took 
their pay in flour, old clothes, or whatever they could 
£et and carried it home on their backs. The men were 
naturalized very soon. Usually before an election each 
party had an agent at the colony who offered to pay 
the naturalization fees of all who would vote for his 
candidate. The second or third year after the arrival 
of the colony, Conrad Ott opened a store in the village. 
Mr. Frederick Egger, who succeeded Mr. Tschudy as 
agent of the Emigration Society, was the second mer- 
chant. The third store was that of Mr. Tschudy, 
who soon sold it to Mr. Gus. Alder. About the 
time of its appearance, Dr. Samuel Blumer, the first 
physician, and the Rev. Wm. Streisgood, the first cler- 
gyman, came from Switzerland. In 1855, a stone church 
was built. For five or six years there was no black- 
smith in the colony, and for ten years the people went 
to Winnesheek to mill. Mark Luchsinger was the 



254 History of Green County. 

first blacksmith, and David Klassy built the first mill. 
One of the colonists has had the curiosity to search 
the county records to see how early and how often the 
names of New Glarus and her citizens appeared. The 
result is as follows: April, 1847, New Glarus school 
district was credited with forty children and school three 
months. Frederick StreifF was appointed road super- 
visor. January, '48, said supervisor made his report 
and was paid. A road was laid out from Exeter by 
way of New Glarus and Green's Prairie to the Mineral 
Point road. July, '48, J. Jacob Tschudy was allowed 
an account for bringing; witnesses to United States 
Court. February, '49, J. Jacob Tschudy was petit 
juror. November 16, '49, a petition from township 4 
north, range 7 east, asking to be set off from the town 
of York as the town of New Glarus was granted, and it 
was ordered that the first town meeting should be held 
at the school house in the village of New Glarus the 
first Tuesday in April, 1850. January, 1S50, J. Caspar 
Legler was paid $2 for a wolf scalp. November, 1850, 
the result of the first assessment of the town was re- 
corded, to which is added by way of contrast the assess- 
ment of '76 : 

1850. 1876. 

Value of taxable property $8,915 00 $3-3>996 00 

Amount of state tax 17 83 744 32 

County tax 57 95 § 2 6 1 1 

School tax 13 37 173 02 

Blind asylum 00 60 

Total tax 89 75 1,743 45 

The village of New Glarus, apart from its interest as 
a piece of Switzerland in America, is an important one. 



History of Gi'een County. 255, 

The hotels of S. Luchsinger and H. Marty, the cheese- 
factory of the New Glarus Cheese Manufacturing Co.,, 
the saw and flour mills of F. Kundert, the brewery of 
Hefty and Elmer, the stores of F. E. Legler, F. 
Tschudy, and A. Kundert, with their various minor 
accompaniments, enable the village to meet all ordinary 
wants of the township. At the cheese factory in the vil- 
lage of New Glarus, Mr. Wilder made in 1S76, 136,000 
pounds of American cheese. For several years cheese 
has been shipped directly from this factory to England.. 
In their old home the Swiss were accustomed to the 
care of herds and the making of cheese, and as soon as 
they saw the uneven surface and innumerable springs 
and brooks of New Glarus, they rejoiced over the 
adaptation of their new home to the industry learned in 
the old. From the very first they made cheese to use 
at home and sell in the county, but its manufacture in 
large quantities was delayed until some five or six years 
ago when Mr. Nicholas Gerber started two factories in 
southern New Glarus and one in Washington. At 

CD 

first only Swiss cheese was made, but of the two lines 
of industry the manufacture of Limburger cheese is 
now the more important. Besides the factory of Amer- 
ican cheese already mentioned, there is one other, that 
of Hoesly & Lenherr. 

The following: table shows about the amount of 
Swiss and Limburger cheese made in 1876 by the 
largest manufacturers in New Glarus and Washington:: 



256 



History of Gi'een County. 



(TABLE REFERRED TO ON PRECEDING PAGE.) 

Lbs. of Swiss. 



G. Babler, 
Jacob Boss, 
Jacob Freitag, 
Nicholas Gerber, 
Jacob Karlen, 
Paulus Kundert, - 
Geo. Legler, 
Staffaucher & Weiss, - 



No. of Factories. 

- I 
I 

- 1 

3 

- 3 
i 

- i 



5,000 

6,000 
8,ooo 

20,000 



Lbs. of Limburger. 
22,000 
24,000 

• • • • 

227,900 
24,000 



The Swiss are among the best farmers in the county. 



LARGEST FARMERS IN NEW GLARUS IN 1 876. 



Names. 

Albrecht Baebler, 
Christopher Baebler, 
Fridolin Baebler, 
Fridolin Becker, 
Jacob Burgy, 
Adam Duerst, 
Balthasar Duerst, 
Jacob Duerst, 
Jacob Duerst, Jun., 
J. Henry Duerst, - 
Samuel Duerst, 
Thos. Duerst, 
Julius Eichelkraut, 
Elmer Bros., - 
Mathias Figy, - 
Henry Geiger, 
Caspar Hauser, 
Caspar Hefty 's estate, 
John Hefty, - 
J. Jacob Hefty, - 
Andrew Hoesly, - 
Henry Hoesly, Sen., - 
Henry Hoesley, 
John Hoesly, 
Jost Hoesly, - 
Mathew Hoesly, 
Peter Hoesly 's estate, 
Peter Jenny, - 
John Klassy, 
Peter Klassy's estate, 



No. of Acres. 
270 
160 

" 185 
ISO 

- ISO 
l6o 

- l8o 
2IO 

- 2IO 
3OO 

• 24O 
170 
270 
4OO 
24O 
l6o 
2IO 
3OO 
220 
ISO 

350 

2IO 

l6o 

ISO 
4OO 
280 
200 
24O 
200 
200 



Names. 

Balthasar Kundert, 
Fridolin Kundert, - 
Oswald Kundert, 
Paul Kundert, 
Thos. Kundert, - 
Fridolin Legler, Sen., 
Geo Legler, Sen., 



No. of Acres. 
- 265 

49O 

l6o 

S3© 
3OO 

215 
4OO 



Friedrich Luchsinger, 196 

John Luchsinger, - 200 

Fridolin Marty's est., 160 

M. North, - - 300 

Anton Ott, - - 190 

Jacob Rueggy, - - 165 

Adam Smith, - 420 

Frid. & Abe. Schindler, 220 

Joseph Schindler, - 160 

Dietrich Staffaucher, 195 

Jacob Steussy, - - 350 

Melchoir Steussy, - 190 

J. Jacob Streiff, - - 200 

Peter Streiff, - - 280 

Joseph Trogner, - 175 

Joshua Wild, - - 210 

Nicholas Zentner, - 290 

Fridolin Zimmerman, 160 

Gabriel Zimmerman, 190 

Adam Zweifel, - 160 

Henry Zweifel, - - 160 

Jost Zweifel, - - 280 

Zwicky Bros., - - 235 



History of Gi'een County. 



2 57 



TOWN OFFICERS OF NEW GLARUS FROM 1S5O TO '77 INCLUSIVE. 



CHAIRMEN 

John Wescott, 2 years.. 
Joshua Wild. 
Rudolph Baumgartner. 
Melchoir Steussy. 
Peter Jenny. 
Melchoir Steussy. 
Henry Trumpy. 
A. Alder, resigned; F. 

Egger, appointed. 
Melchoir Steussy, 5 years. 

CLERKS. 

Joshua Wild, 7 years. 

Peter Jenny. 

Mathias Steussy, 10 years. 



Henry Hoesly, Jr. 

Henry Trumpy. 

Melchoir Steussy, .2 years. 

Conrad Zimmerman, 2 y'rs. 

M. Steussy. 

John Luchsinger, 2 years. 

M. Steussy. 

Conrad Zimmerman, 2 y'rs. 

John Luchsinger, 2 years. 



Chris. Luchsinger, 6 y'rs. 
Thos. Luchsinger, 3 years. 
M. Steussy. 



APPENDIX. 



SOLDIERS OF GREEN COUNTY. 



Though carefully compiled from the records in the 
Adjutant General's office at Madison, the following list 
of Green County soldiers is far from being as complete 
as it was hoped that it would be. In May, 1S65, in 
obedience to instructions from the legislature to perfect 
the records in his office, the Adjutant General sent blanks 
in the form of company books to each Wisconsin regi- 
ment. Each book was meant to contain the name and 
time of service of every man who was a member of the 
company at any time between its original organization 
and its muster out. In most regiments some of these 
blanks w r ere filled out and returned, but from some regi- 
ments no records were received. Many of those sent 
(being made at the close of the war, when it was diffi- 
cult to learn the history of men who had died, or who 
had been discharged or transferred to or from other 
companies) were necessarily very imperfect. Some 
officers returned only the names of men who had en- 
listed in their companies. Others gave the names of 



260 History of Green County. 

those transferred to their companies, but omitted those 
transferred from them. Some officers gave the residence 
and the place to which the soldier was credited. More 
of them omitted one of these places and a few omitted 
them both. Some gave the rank of soldiers at the be- 
ginning of their service, and their promotions, others 
gave only the rank at the time of muster out. Imper- 
fect as the\- are, these records are the best in the state, 
as the records turned over to the chief mustering officer 
at the muster-out of the regiments were all sent to 
Washington. 

This list includes all those for whom the records re- 
ferred to give Green County either as the residence or 
as the place credited. It is defective, first, in giving, in 
some cases, the place credited as the place of residence; 
secondly, in omitting the names of all Green County 
men who were credited to other counties and for whom 
no residence was given; and thirdly in lacking the 
names of nearly all those who belonged to companies 
whose records are not found at Madison, though a few 
•of these last have been obtained from other sources. 

INFANTRY.— First Regiment. 

Name. Rank. Residence. En Utt. ^ered'out 

Hewitt. Robert Paym'r... Albany May, 1861... Aug. 1861 

Second Regiment., 

Peck, Henry W Lt.-Col.... Monroe Apr. 1861... July, 1861 

F. R*. Melvin Private... Brooklyn May, 1861... Aug. 1861 

Co. K. 

Lucbsinger, Fridolin ?... Segt New Glarus Oct. 18bl 

Geiser, Frederick Corp'l " Dec. 1861... ............. 

Wichser. Mathias " " Oct. 1861... April, 1862 



History of Green County. 261 

Second Regiment — Continued. 

v.iur t?»v-it R „i,i„ n „„ Date of Whenmus- 

Namk - Rank - Residence. Enlistment. tered out. 

Bopp, Adam Private... New Grlarus Dec. 1863 

Bopp, Jacob " ... " " 

Dietland, Thos " ... " Dec. 1861 

Frey, Sebastian " ... " " 

Heitz, Pauly " ... " Oct. 1861... Jan. 1863 

Hoesli, Henry " ... " Dec. 1863 

Hoesli, Samuel " ... " Oct. 1861... Aug. 1862 

Klase, Fridolin " ... " Dec. 1863 

Knobel, Henry « " ... " " 

Kubly, UbiahV. " ... " Oct. 1861... Oct. 1862 

Luchsmger, Melchqir &..: " ... 

Luchsinger, Fridolin lt ... 

Marty, Fridolin " ... " Oct. 1862... 

Sperri. Henry T. c " ... " Oct. 1861... June, 1864 

Staub, John " ... " Feb. 1862... May, 1862 



Streiff, Fridolin b « ... Oct. .1861 

Trumpy, Jacob /'. 



a « 



REFERENCES FOR SECOND REGIMENT. 

a Died at City Point, Va., June 20, 1X64. 

b Promoted Sergeant. 

c Promoted First Lieutenant. 

/ Discharged for wounds. 

g Killed at Gainesville, Va., August 28, 1862. 

h Died at Fredericksburg, Va., June 29. 1862. 

i Died a prisoner ot war, Richmond, November 18, 1863. 



Third Regiment. 

Co. A. 

Bowden, Samuel « Private Feb. 1862 

Godfrey, Isaac d. " ... Monroe Jan. 1862... Dec. 1862 

Co. B. 

Hamberly, Frederick " ...Exeter Jan. 1864... 1864 

Peebles, Guilford " ... York Sept. 1864... June, 1865 

Co. C. 

Flood, Martin e Capt Exeter Apr. 1861. 

Gardner, Silas E, f. Sergt Monroe " 

O'Brien, Moses 4 r 1st Lt u " 

♦Smith, Charles C. £ 2nd Lt Exeter " 

Rollins, Geo. W. h 2nd Lt Monroe June 1861. 

Bryant, Edwin E. / 2nd Lt " Apr. 1861.. 

Hunter, James W.y. Sergt ,( " 

Raymond, Seth k " Juda " 

Pierce, Dwight / " Washington " 

Kramer, Jonas Corpl Juda Apr. 1861... Sept. 1861 

Collins, James m '• Exeter " ... Jan. 1865 

Cook, Geo. H. / " Monroe " ...July, 1865 

Foster, Win. H </ " « ... July, 1864 

Gay, Geo. -v " Washington " 

Coon, John D " Decatur " ... July, 1864 

Brisbane, Wm " Jefferson " ...July, 1865 

King, Chas. H " Monroe " ... " 

Allen, Oliver M Private... Exeter " ... Jan. 1863 

Annis, Fluette " ... Decatur " ... June, 1862 

Auchenbaugh, Daniel •' ... Spring Grove... May, 1861... July, 1865 

Becker, John t " ... Washington Apr. 1861 

23 



... May, 


1865 




... July, 
... June, 


1862 
1864 


... Jan. 


1865 



262 



History oj Green County. 



Third Regiment — Continued. 



Name. Rank. 

Bemis, Joseph W. zv Private... 

Betts, Adelbert A. c 

Birmingham] Zeb. « 

Blunt, Isaiah 

Blunt, Jas. E 

Booth, Geo. L 

Booth, Win. H 

Bowden.Geo. W.e 

Boyer, John L 

Bridge, Josephus C 

Bryant, Levi J. c 

Busic, Win. F 

Carter. Win. L 

Case, Jacob M 

Case, Samuel S 

Clark, Austin v 

Clarno. Wm 

Clarno, Valentine 

Collins, Jesse .. 

Conners. Andrew W 

Conroy, James 

Conroy. Thos 

Cook, Ziba <* 

Crawford, Alonzo P 

Crawford, Wm. F 

Crossland, Chas. A 

Cumley, Jacob o 

Deffendeffer, Chas. F 

Durrell, Amos A 

Durrell, Geo. 

Durrell, Joseph G 

Drake. John 

Fleek, ' Wm. If. H 

Frasher, John B 

Fuller, Henry, « 

Gans, Geo. c 

Godfrey, Jerome C 

Golden, Jas 

Goodhue. Wm. F 

Grace, John 

Green, Chas. R 

Green, John M. -v 

Hattery, John 

Hay den, .Samuel 

Hopkins, Melville 

Jackson, Richard 

Jennings. Guilford D 

Johnson, Wm. F 

K ester, Joseph 

K ester, Silas 

Kimberly, Wm. A. y bl\., 

Kohle, John c „ 

Land, Jackson 

Land, Joseph c 

Lindley, Amos L. c 

Leonard, Benjamin c 

Lovelace, Anson W. z...., 
Lovelace, Jefferson 



a 
a 
a 
a 
it 



(.<■ 
i< 

.. 

ii 
, * 

(i 
i . 

<i 
it 
it 
if 

ii 
It 

it 

ii 
« 
* 

(i 
ii 
I' 
ii 
ii 
ii 
ti 

a 

ii 

a 

a 

a 

it 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

it 

•( 

it 

a 

a 

a 

ii 

<( 

a 

ii 

a 

n 

it 



Date of 

Enlistment. 

Apr. 1861.. 



Residence. 

Cadiz 

Monroe 

Exeter 

Clarno 

Monroe Jan. 1864 

" Apr. 1861 



When mus- 
tered out. 



c 
a 



July, 1865 



, Jan. 1864.. 

Sining Grove... May, 1861.. 

Jefferson "Apr. 1861.. 

York May, 1861.. 

Monroe Apr. 1861.. 

Brooklyn May, 1861.. 

Monroe Mar. 1862.. 

Feb. 1862.. 

Monroe June, 1861.. 

Mar. 1862.. 



Exeter Apr. 1861.. 

Jan. 1862.. 

Adams May, 1861.. 



Mar. 1862.. 

Jefferson June,1861.. 

Monroe June,1861.. 

Jefferson Apr. 1861. 

Monroe 



a 



Monroe Jan. 1864.. 



a 



ii a 

York May. 1865. 

Decatur Apr. 1861. 

t< «• 

Monroe 

Brodhead 

Monroe May, 1861. 



July, 1865 
June, 1864 
Dec. 1861 
July, 1864 
Aug. 1863 
July, 1865 

July, 1868 
Unknown. 

Juiyj"l865 
Mar. 1865 
July, 1864 

Juiy"'l865 



Oct. 1862 
it 

July, 1864 

July, 1865 



Brodhead " 

Monroe Apr. 1861. 

York 



Monroe May, 1861. 

New Glarus June, 1861. 

Svlvester Apr. 1861. 

Clarno 

Monroe May, J 861. 

Jefferson Apr. 1861. 

" Dec. 1863. 

Jan. 1864. 

Brodhead May, 1861. 

Sylvester Apr. 1861. 

Monroe Jan. 1864. 

a a 

Z\".'Z" Jan. 1862! 

Exeter Apr. 1861. 

Sylvester 



a 
a 



Dec. 1862 
July, 1865 



June, 1863 
Dec. 1861 
July, 1865 



June, 1862 
July," 'i860 
Dec. 1862 



July. 1864 
July, 1865 

tt 



May, isti4 
June, 186-5 
June, 1864 
April, 18(« 



April, 1863 



History of Green County. 



263 



Third Regiment — Continued. 



Name. Rank. 

Loveland, Frank Private. 

Mat-key, John J 

Martin, Wm 

McBride, Artis a 

McFarland, Robert AV 

Mclvenney, Alonzo 

Milled, Ephraim 

Morgan, Carroll 

Morris, Philip 13. " 

Mosier, Stewart E. u 

Parks, John 

Payne, Willard 

Pitzcola, August 

Poff, Henry 

Raymond, Henry u 

Richardson, Geo. II c 

Roberts, William 

Ruegger, Frederick C z... 

Ross, Edgar « 

Rourke, David 

Royce, Orvil 

Saekett, Chas. W 

Shaw, Gilbert J 

Sheffield, Seymour, J.*... 

Snyder, Geo. W 

Springsted, Wm 

Sutherland, Geo. A 

Thurlow, Albion 

Thurlow, Isaac s 

Underwood, Josiah «<?.... 

Waldo, John L 

Walker, Willard 

Warner, Andrew 

Warner, Jacob 

Webb, Abner c 

Webb, David 

Webb, Reuben 

Wilcox, Junot c 

Williamson, Geo. W. y ... 

Winans, Emery. F 

Winans, Isaac \V. r 



Residence. 



Witter, Eugene c. 

Wood, David 

Wood, Wm 

Yarger, Perry L. q 

Co. D. 

Aultj John 

Bechtel, Samuel 

Hawkins, Francis M 

Kilby, Hezekiah 

Lay ton, Thus 

Morton, Francis -c 

Rut ledge, Amos W 

Vellom, Silas \V r 

Co. E. 
Patton, Robert W 

Co. F. 
McCammant, Absalom... 



it 

a 
a 
(( 

i' 
a 
a 
tt 
it 
a 
a 
a 
t 

a 
a 
it 
a 

a 
a 

(4 
it 

a 
t i 
it 
a 
it 
a 
i' 
a 
it 
a 
(i 

•'£ 
it 

a 
a 
a 



't 
tt 

.i 
.« 

a 

'et 

a 
it 

a 



I (ate of 
Enlistment. 

Washington April 18<d... 

Monroe Ian. 1864... 

Jefferson Apr., 1861... 

Jan., 1864... 

Washington Apr.. 1861... 

Attica June,1861... 

Jan., 1864... 



Monroe.. 
tt 



When mus- 
tered out. 

July, 1865 

a 



May, 1864 
Dec. 1862 
July, 1865 



it 

tt 



May, 1861... 

Apr., 1861... 

Washington May, 1861... 

Monroe Jan., isiii!... 

" May, 1861... 

Feb., 1864... 

Jefferson Apr., 1861... 

Washington " 

Monroe 

Jefferson 

Dayton May. 1861... 

Decatur " 

Monroe June, 1861... 

" Jan., 1862... 

" Apr., 1861... 

" May, 1861... 

" Feb., 1864... 

Spring Grove... Apr., 1861... 

Monroe Dec 1863... 

Washington May, 1861... 

Apr. 1861... 

Monroe '* 

Clarno " 

Sylvester 

Monroe i( 

New Glarus June,I861... 

Washington Apr. 1861... 

Dec. 1863... 

Monroe June-1862... 

Exeter Apr. 1861... 

Mt, Pleasant.... " 

Jan. 1862... 

Dayton May, 1861... 

Clarno Apr. 1861... 

Monroe Jan. 1864... 



Apr. 1861, 



July, 1864 

Dec. 1862 

Jan. 1862 

July, 1865 

Jan."" 1863 
July, 1864 



July, 1865 
Jan. 1863 
May, 1862. 

July, "1865 

Apr, 1863 
July, 1865 



July, 1865 

July, 1864 

July, 1868 

Aug. 1863 

May. 1S64 

July, 1864 

July, 1865 

June, 1862 

May, 1863 

.Ma v. J863 

May. 1864 

July, 1865 



Monroe Feb 

Mai 



1862. 

1862. 
Feb. 1862. 
June. 1862. 
Mar. 1862. 



Feb. 1862... 

Monroe Mar. 1862... 



June, 
July, 

July, 

July, 

Oct. 

Dec. 

Feb. 

Mar. 



1862 
18(55 
1865 
1865 
1862 
1862 
1863 
1863 



tt 



May, 1862... July, 1865 
Dec. 1863... July, 1865 



264 History of Green County. 

Third Regiment — Continued. 

_ -a . , „„ Date of When mus- 

Name. Rank. Residence. Enlistment. tered out. 

McGill, James Private Jan. <{ 1864... July, 1866 

Perrine, Henry " - Monroe 

Co H 

Harris, Amos E £ Mar. 1862 

Mason, Wm.H.* Feb. 1862 

McKnight, Jas.F.s Apr. 1862... 

Rood, Andrew " Mar.^1862... July, ( 18fc> 

Rood, Ever..... ••• -• T ,„.••• „ 

Starr, Daniel/ " ... Clarno Jan. 1862... 

Co I 

Washington, Wm " Mar. 1862... July, 1865 

Coa°t'es, Wm. H " Nov. 1863 



CorWt David'.'.'.'.' '.:.'.' " J^- 1862 .. May, 1862 

Mayes Samuel W « Feb., 1862... Jan. 1863 

Santas, John R u - Oct 1862 



a " << 



Willetts, Aniaziah 
Unassigned Men. 

Blake, Isaac R ' Feb. 1864. 

Coldren, Orth M Dec. 1863 

Gill, Edwin - " Mar. 1864. 

« Feb. 1864. 



Johnson, Thomas.... 

Keenan,John " Jan. 18b4 

REFERENCES FOR THIRD REGIMENT. 

a Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps. 

b Never mustered. 

c Discharged because of wounds. 

e ffinoteo^&o?May M8M,^™2col., May 25, '63; Trans, to Vet. Res. Corps, Dec. '63. 

o Promoted Captain Co. I; Died at Cedar Mt., August 12, 1862, of wounds. 

h Promoted First Lieutenant Co. B. 

i Transferred to Co. A. and promoted to Adjutant, October, 1862. 

j Promoted Captain Co. F.; died of wounds, Chattanoga, June 8, 1864. 

A- Promoted First Lieutenant Co. A. 

/ Promoted Second Lieutenant. 

mi Promoted First Lieutenant. 

;; Promoted Drum Major. 

o Promoted Hospital Steward. 

p Promoted Corporal. . 

q Died at Frederick City, November 26, 1861. 

/■ Died of wounds, at Alexandria, October, 1862. 

Killed at Antietam, September 17, 1862. 
t Killed at Dallas, Ga., May 25, 1864. 
it Killed at Bolivar Heights, October 16, 1861. 
v Died at Frederick, November, 1861. 
to Died at Richmond, December 21, 1861. 
x Died at Fayetteville, April 18, 1864. 
y Died at Chancellorsville, May 3, 1863. 
z Killed at Cedar Mt., August 9, 1862. 
aa Died at Baltimore, September 1, 1861. 
hb Promoted Corporal. 

Fifth Regiment. 

Co F 

Johnson, Volnev L Musician Monticello June 1861... Aug. 1862 

Wright, Eugene L " " May, 1861... 

Burdick, Aaron M Private... Albany May, 1861... Sept. 1862 

Dysent, James D.«/. '< ... " May, 1865 

Johnson, Rodney K " ... «' „ July, 1865 

Masterston, Wm. D " ... ' 



History of Green County. 



265 



Fifth Regiment — Continued. 



Name. 

Smith, Frederick W. b ... 

Smith, Joseph F. " d 

Walrath, Alvin 

Wilson, Pliny c 

Hammond, Brant C 

Co. I. 

Flint, Thos 

Lacy, Yates T 

Mason, Henry B b 

Wright, Timothy d 

Carnvvell, Forest H d 

Baker, Geo. W 

Burnheim, Benjamin 

Bartholomew. Chauncey 

Bluebaugh, David 

Cosat, John J c 

Dunn, James 

Fayette, Albert A 

Fessendeji, Elliott N 

Gange, Win 

Gilbert, Franklin, Jr. e... 

Girkee, August F 

Hone, Menzo 

Hopkins, Win. T. c 

Hurlbut, Spencer W. c ... 

Jewell, Isaiah 

Lamoroux, Samuel 

La Rose, Lewis 

Lemuel, John 

Martin, Jacob 

Milks, Ezra 

McFarland, John C 

McKinney, Burdet E 

Moore. Chauncey..... 

Purington, Alonzo C 

Roberts, Win. H 

Robertson, Lewis C 

Ross, Thos. A 

Scroggins, Jacob L 

Seymour, Francis 

Slothower, David 

Stettson, Thos. L 

Tibbits,Chas. I 

Whipple, Allen 

AVilson, Jacob L 

Witter, James 



Rank. 

Private 
tt 


Residence. 

.. Monroe 

. Albany 

i' 

ii 


Date of 
Enlistment 

July, 1861. 
May, 1861.. 

tt 

Nov. 1864 . 

Aug. 1864.. 

Sept. 1864.. 
Aug. 1864.. 

it 

" Sept. 1864!! 

a 

tt 

.. Aug. 1864.. 
n 

a 

a 

tt 

'1 

ti 

.1 

a 

a 
ti 

Sept. 1864... 
Aug. 1864... 

ii 

. Sept. 1864... 


When 
tered 

. July, 
. Feb. 
Sept. 
. June, 

. May, 
. June, 

. July, 

. June, 

t 

! May, 
. June, 

1 
t 
t 
1 

July, 


inus- 

out. 

1865 

1865 

1863 

1861 


Chapl'n. 

Capt 
Sergt .... 


.. Cadiz 

. Albany 

i< 


1865 

1865 
1865 


ii 


ti 


1865 


Corpl 

ii 

Private . 
a 


a 

. Monticello .... 
. Mt. Pleasant . 
. Albany 


1865 

c 

1865 
1865 


a 


a 


i 


i< 
it 
tt 
ii 


. Monticello 
. Mt. Pleasant . 
. Washington 


t 

1 
t 
1 


a 
ii 


. Washington 
. Sylvester 


1 
1865 


a 


. Albany 

a 




ii 


June, 

i 

i 
i 

i 

May, 
June, 

a 


1 S65 


<» 


a 


; 


it 

tt 
i< 


. Monticello. 

. Albany 

ti 




ii 

a 
a 


a 

. Albany 

Albany 

Washington.. .. 
Albany 

Albany 

Monticello 

Mt. Pleasant .. 

<< 

Monticello 


1865 

1Si!5 


a 

a 

a 

ii 

it 

d 

a 

it 

ti 

a 

it 

a 

ti 


Aug. 1864... 
n 

a 
a 

Sept. 1864... 

Aug. 1864... 

a 

. Aug. 1864... 

a 

Sept. 1864.'!! 

Aug. 1864... 

a 

a 

Sept. 1864... 
Aug. 1864... 


June, 

a 

a 
a 
a 
a 

Aug. 

June, 

t i 

a 
ti 
a 

ti 
a 
H 
n 


1865 

1865 
1865 


t< 


it 




ti 


a 




ti 







REFERENCES FOR FIFTH REGIMENT. 

tt Transferred to 5th Battallion Wisconsin Infant.y 

b Promoted 2nd Lieutenant. 

c Promoted Corporal. 

d Promoted Sergeant. 

e Killed at Petersburg, April 6, 1865. 

/ Discharged because of wounds. 



23 



266 History of Green County. 

Sixth Regiment. 

^ -r> -j Date of When mus- 

Nake. Rank. Residence Enlistment, tered out. 

Hall, John C. « As't Surg Juda Oct. 1862... July, 1865 

Co. K. 

McCauliff,Wm Private... York Sept. 1864... June^lSeS 

Mevthalef, Jacob " ... Adams 

Scott, John d. 



Wheeler, John " ...York " ... June, 1865 



REFERENCES FOR SIXTH REGIMEXT. 



a Promoted Surgeon, July, 1864. 

d Died April 1, 1865, at City Point, Va. 



Seventh Regiment. 

Co. B. 
Clinton, Henry P« 2nd Lt Brodhead Aug, 1861... Nov. 1862 

Co. D. 
Pratt, Oliver d Sergt Brooklyn " ....Nov. 1863 

Co. H. 
Newell, Grandison P. c... Corpl Dayton .... June, 1865 

REFEREXCES FOR SEVENTH REGIMEXT. 

a Promoted Quartermaster. 

c Promoted Sergeant. 

d Discharged because of wounds. 



Eighth Regiment. 

Armstrong, Lewis G As't Surg Sept. 1862... Nov. 1862 

Co. A. 

Warner, John Private... Spring Grove... Oct. 1864... Sept. 1865 

Co. C. 
Chatwood, Win "' Sylvester " ... " 

Co. E. 

Smith, John W Sergt York Oct. 1861... « 

White, Edwin B Corpl " Aug. 1861... Nov. 1862 

Ames, Geo. R Private... " Sept. 1861... Sept. 1865 

Ames, LabenL " ... " Aug. 1861 ... Sept. 1864 

Burr, John " ... " " ... Jan. 1863 

Day, Ellis."- " ... " " 

Gilbert, Chas. L " ...Albany " ... Sept. 1865 

Walker, Joel W " ...York " ... Sept. 1864 

Co. G. 

McNair, James M " ...Brodhead Sept. 1861... Sept. 1865 

Peterson. James " ... Jefferson 0„ct. 1861... Sept. 1864 

Co. H. 

Estcee. Stephen A Capt Exeter June,1861 

Morley. Alonzo W Sergt " Aug. 1861... Sept. 1865 

Wood, Andrew *' " " ... July, 1862 

Vermilion, G. T. b Corpl " " ...Oct. 1862 

Heal, WalterS " " Sept. 1861... Aug. 1864 

Barber. R. A. h Private... " Aug. 1861... Oct. 1864 

Barnes, Wm. E. /' " ... Mt. Pleasant ... Oct. 1861 

Baxter, Chas " ... " ... Aug. 1861 



History of Green County. 



267 



Eighth Regiment — Continued. 



Name. Rank. 

Behr, Julius Private.. 

Brownellj Russell 

Burt, Abraham / 

Chamberlain, James C /.. 

Cluxton, Sanford 

Corse, Chas. k 

Devlin, John R a 

Edwards, Daniel S. a 

Ellis, Lewis 

Gilbert, James 

Green. Thomas a 

Ham, Jesse a 

Havens, Luther 

Heal, Nelson c 

Jerryham, J 

Jones, Cassius M 

Jones, John F 

Jones, Wm. H. H 

Lewis, David 

Lewis, Joseph a„ 

Loomis, David K 

Loomis. Orson B. d 

Mahar, Henry E 

Noggle, Christopher C 

Oleson, Edwin II 

Oliver, Henry 

Parker 

Peresoy, Benjamin F 

Powell, John M <? 

Ross, \Vm 

Ross, Milton 

Raynier, Win. R 

Robison, Irvin 

Russel, John L 

Rutherford, Jacob S 

Spears, Robert 

Stevens, Wm. « 

Thompson, Ferris 

Thompson, Otis 

Waldo, John 

White, Pliny II. c 



Residence. 



Date of 
Enlistment. 

Sylvester Oct. 1864.. 

Exeter Sept. 1861.. 

Brodhead Aug. 1861.. 

Sylvester " 

Exeter Sept. 1861.. 

" Aug. 1861.. 

Brooklyn Oct. 1861.. 

Mt. Pleasant ... Sept. 1861.. 

Jordan Feb. 1865.. 

" Oct. 1861.. 

Exeter Aug. 1861.. 

. Sept. 1861.. 



a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 



Aug. 1861. 
Sept. 1861 ! 



When mus- 
tered out. 
Sept. 1865 
Aug. 1864 



Sept. 1865 

Sept." "l 865 
it 

a 
a 
a 
<e 

Oct. 1864 
Oct. 1862 

Sept. 1865. 

a 

a 



Monticello Aug. 1861... Sept. 1865 

Exeter Sept. 1861... 

Mt. Pleasant ... Aug. 1861... Oct. 1864 



Exeter Sept. 1861. 



Brooklyn July, 1864.. 

Aug. 1861.. 

Exeter " 



Sept. 1865- 

Oct, 1864 

Sept. 1865 

Oct. 1864 

Sept. 1865. 



a 
a 
'i 



Sept. 

Aug. 

Sylvester ' 

Jordan Jan. 

Brooklyn July, 

Exeter Aug. 

Brooklyn Sept. 



Monroe. 
Dayton . 



Aug. 





. Oct. 


1864 


1861.. 




u 


1861.. 


. Sept. 


1865 




. Oct. 


186+ 


1864.. 


. Sept. 


1865 


1864.. 




a 


1861.. 


. Dec. 


1861 


1861.. 


. Sept. 


1864 


, 


. Jan. 


1862. 


1861.. 


. Jan. 


1863 



Jan. 1863 



REFERENCES FOR EIGHTH REGIMEXT. 



a Promoted Corporal. 

b Promoted Sergeant. 

c Discharged because of wounds. 

d Died at Sulphur Spa, Mo., January 24, 1862. 

e Died at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., August 12, 1863. 

/ Died at Corinth, October 6, 1862. 

a Died at Farmington, Julj r 5, 1862. 

h Died at Belleville, Wis., September 26, 1863, of wounds. 

i Died at Milliken's Bend, La., July 9, 1863. 
j Died at Farmington, Miss., July 3, 1862. 
1c Died at Vicksburg. November 14, 1863, 

/ Promoted to Chief Musician. 



: > 



. : :':.•■;.■-;. /* . : . v; Co* -;: . . 



N \ ru Regimkn 



■ 

c : 

Swky. J*kt - 

y.:.-: -■- '-.■: -■- 
I^-m^M. l>»vi i i 



Gafcrial 



Rasac 



Cwpl. 



':..- ■--:•:• 



- -" • --v.: 



>m < 



" 'i:v 
Private M -_:r\>e.„ 



Ms t; . Mir. 

Jar Jaa. 



Winston S 



_ Moauroe 



- 



iad I : M«uw 

: - : 









- uat._ . 



^ - *• " - 






r I-:'- ' - 

Bniitf. Fran 






0* 



_ Waskiagtoa — 



- 
Fi«£i. Bukkart « 

: 



: :sa 






" • . :>>= 



idkacL 



■ 



- 



7«au*£r. 



Mr. - 

Claras 




M«aroe__ 



- 



' 



_ Jar 
_ Jaae- 



JLegler, G«o- * — 



• 



r- J-^ml. 



= jl£.*t. Jacob 

Heur 

-i-i-c-iia. 

*jy- Frter 

■rll- Bafcaasar -*" 
WanwadDa 









- 



:■;- : ., - .-: 



\ = 






Mobjtv* 

Mt. Pfeasaat _ 



- ..-:• 






. 19EL 



_ 



H-rj. 



_ Washington 

: 



_ ■ - 

Jalj- 13<5 



History of Green Count -. 



^ ■■ 

- 



- 




• 


! 

■ 


m 
tr 1 

- 


- 
- 

. - 



§ Eleventh Regiment. 

• .-.tine E... .Private 

. -. ---.••. 

I 

.;' Died Alia- I Ilk. 



Thirteenth Regime 

ipman. Ja-. F. ?... Major 

Colby, samuel F. .-.•-.' 

I 

irin E.. I Monroe - 

Ma: I timer P. B ] 

Porter- Washir \ 

Fpham ?. H '. ■ ' . 

d Barer. B E ri ite .. ■ 

I 

--_•-• 

::. 

iritt- Robert H t c. 

rren. En-ene E 1st Li - 

: . ; ■ i 

re, Jam-- 5erg - 

Par 1 

: Feb . : 

i. He 

ailing . : .-. • 

: ' - " - 
•■:-:_ ::- . ■ -i..- 

Hur - Deeat - 

::•.--"■_ 



270 



History of Gi'een County. 



Thirteenth Regiment — Continued. 



Name. 



Abbey, James m Priv 

Adams, Augustus W. «... 

Anderson, Wm. A./. 

Barnum, Chas. E. o 

Bennett, Alonzo 

Botsfori, James M. b 

Brayton Joseph 

Brayton, Sidney/. 

Brown, Geo 

Bump, Geo W 

Cates, Seneca P 

Clark, E. W 

Clark, Samuel M 

Cooper, Elijah E 

Cowen, Warren 

Creazin, Francis 



Rank. 



ate 



Residence. 



Date of 
Enlistment. 



When mus- 
tered out. 



Grossgrove, Sam. L.... 

Dake, James R 

Dodge, John M 

Dunkelburg, John II. 

Edgar, Chas. W 

Ellingson, Elling 

Fayette, Wm. H 

Gapin, Michael 

Griffith, Edwin 

Heath, Joel 

Henn, Chas./. 

Hulburt, David G 

Hutchins, WardS./.. 

Huyck, Edgar q 

Johnson, Wm 

Keely, Michael F 

King, Francis 

Lawless, Thos. r 

Lyon, Thos. I./. 

Meighells, Elmer J..*. 

Maddock, Wm 

McCreedy, Geo. W. t. 

McCreedy, Silas 

Morris, Thos 

Murphy, John « 

Murray, Wm. H 

Murrav, Wm. P 

Nichols, Wm. H 

Nichols, Stewart 

Orcott, Geo. D. v 

Parslow, Francis 

Patrick, James K 

Patterson, James N... 

Pratt, Win. C 

Price, James L 

Redner, John, 

Robb, John 

Robb, Lemuel 

Rochfort, Philip/. 
Rock wood, 
Rock wood, Geo. 



.. Albany 


. Oct. 1861.. 
. Nov. 1861.. 

Oct. 1861.. 
. Sept. 1861.. 
. Nov. 1861.. 

Sept. 1861.. 

Oct. 1861.. 

Nov. 1861.. 

Oct. 1861.. 

Sept. 1861.. 

Oct. 1861.. 

t> 

Sept. 1*1.. 
. Dec. 1861.. 

Sept. 1861.. 

tt 

Jan. 186].. 






... Albany 

... Mt. Pleasant . 
... Sylvester 

... Exeter 

a 

... Albany 

... Decatur 


Nov. 


1864 


Nov. 
. Nov. 
May, 
Apr. 
Dec, 
Nov. 
Jan. 
Nov. 


1862 
1865 
1862 

1863 
1862 
1861 


<< 


1862 
1864 


... Brooklyn 

... Exeter. 

... Albany 

a 


« 


Nov. 
Dec. 


1864 

U 


. . 


1862 


... Albany 

Ct 

a 

it 
it 


Dec. 1863.. 
Sept. 1861.. 
Jan. 1864.. 
Oct. 1861.. 
Dec. 1861.. 
Feb. 1864.. 
Sept, 1861.. 
Oct. 1861.. 

Sept. 1861.. 
<t 

. Oct. 1861.. 
. Dec. 1861.. 

Jan. 1864.. 

Oct. 1861.. 
. Sept. 1861.. 

a 

. Feb. 1864.. 

.-. 

n 

c. 

a 


Nov. 
Nov. 
May, 
Nov. 

Aug. 

Nov. 

Jan. 

. Nov. 


1865 
1864 
1865 
1864 
1865 
1865 


... Monroe 


1864 

1862 

1865 


... Sylvester 

... Mt. Pleasant . 

... Albany 

... Sylvester' 

... Albanv 

... Brooklyn 

... Albany 

a 


tt 




Nov. 
Nov. 


1865 
1864 


Nov. 
Nov. 


1865 


... Monticello 
... Decatur 


1864 


... Brooklyn 




Nov. 


1864 


... Albany... 




.. Brooklvn 


. Dec. 1861.. 
. Jan. 1862.. 

Sept. 1861.. 

it 

a 

. Oct. 1861.. 

Sept. 1861.. 

tt 

'. Dec. 1863*.! 
Nov. 1861.. 
Mar. 1864.. 






Dec. 


1865 
1865 


tt 


1862 


it 

... Albany 

... Mt. Pleasant . 

... Brooklyn 

tt 

tt 




. Aug. 
Apr. 


1862 
1862 


Nov. 
July, 

Mar. 

Nov. 

Nov. 
June, 


1864 
1865 

U 


... Exeter 

... Monroe 


Nov. 1861.. 

a 

Oct. 1861.. 

Sept. 1861.. 

. Nov. 1861.. 


1862 
1865 


a 


1' 

1864 
1865 



History of Green County. 



Thirteenth Regiment — Continued. 



Name. Rank. 

Rolfe, Byron L. f. Private 

Rolfe, Wm.M.w " 

Ross, Franklin M *' 

Sanderson, James " 

Searles, C. 0. b 

Sherman, Geo. x " 

Smith, Chester A. d. " 

Snell, John b « 

Stanton, Geo. M./. « 

Starkweather, E. A. v.... " 

Stockwell, Henry " 

Taylor, Alonzo H. / « 

Taylor, 'Thos..^ " 

Van Loan, Reuben " 

Wade, James E. f. " 

Walling, Percy 11./. 

Warner, Franklin F " 

Watkins, John " 

Webster, Emmet A " 

Wells, Peter G " 

Welsh, Martin " 

Whipple, IraE " 

Wardsworth, Chas. H " 

Co. G. 

Baker, Joseph H. b 

Baxter, Leroy 

Chapel, Austin C. b " 

Chapel, Reuben H. b 

Cleveland, Ira 

Cowan, Uriah H 

Derrick, Edwin S. /. 

Eitei. Louis 

Frany, Geo " 

Frisbee, David C 

Hall, Hiram K 

Halverson, Halver 

Kiefer, Nicholas 

Martin. John V. oa 

McNitt, Nathan B 

Menot, Armstrong C 

Menot, Isaac N 

Menot, John M " 

Menot, Thos. J " 

Menot, AVilson S. z " 

Penn, John bb *' 

Shaff, Wm.H " 

Sherry, Osmer D " 

Co. 1. 

Anderson, Louis 

Erickson, Nelse " 

Hall, Wm. H 

Martin, Jonas " 

Ross, Franklin M " 

Co. K. 

Allensworth, Jacob " 

Babkirk, Henry S " 

Heimbach, Thos d. " 

Hopkins, Madison 



Residence. 



Albany Sept. 

Jan. 

Monticello Nov 

Albany Sept. 1861.. 

Sylvester Oct. 1861.. 



Date of 
Enlistment. 
1861.. 

1NI5-L. 
1861. 



When mus- 
tered out. 

Nov. 1864 

Nov"" 1864 

Nov. 1865 



Albany Sept. 1861... Nov. 1865 

Mt. Pleasant ... Dec. 1861... 

Monroe Oct. 1861... Dec. 1864 

Brooklyn Sept. 1861 

'■ Sept. 1864... June, 1885 

Albany Sept. 1861... Nov. 1865 

Monroe Oct. 1861... Apr. 

Sylvester " ... May, 

Brooklyn Sept. 1861... Nov. 

Mt. Pleasant ... " ... Julv, 

Brooklyn Oct. 1861... Nov. 

Sept. 1861 

Mt. Pleasant ... " 



1863 

1862 
1865 
1865 
1864 



Albany Jan. 1862. 

Brooklyn Sept. 1861. 

Albany Oct. 1861. 



1865 
June, 1865 

1865 

Nov."" 1864 



Monroe Dec. 

" Jan. 

Spring Grove... Sept 

a 

a 
a 

Monroe Jan. 

Brodhead Sept. 

Spring Grove... ' 

Monroe Feb. 

Spring Grove... Sept. 



1861... Nov. 1865 
1862... Apr. 1862 
1861... Nov. 1865 



Sept. 1861. 



1882. 
1861. 

1864! 
1861. 



it 



Brodhead Jan. 1862. 

Spring Grove... Jan. 1864. 
... Sept. 1861. 
... Jan. 1864 
... Sept. 1861. 



a 
a 
a 
a 

a 

Monroe. 



Mar. 1864. 



New Glarus Jan. 1864 

Feb. 1864. 

Albany Nov. 1861 

Attica Feb. 1861. 

Albany Nov. 1861. 

Sylvester Oct. 1861. 

Jefferson Nov. 1861. 

Oct. 1861. 

Sylvester " 



June, 1865 
Apr. 1862 
Nov. 1865 
June, 1865 
Apr. 1862 

Aug." 1*865 

Nov. 1865 
Nov. 1864 

May, 1865 

June, 1865 

1865 

June, 1865 
Nov. 1863 



Nov. 1864 

Nov. 1865 

Sept. 1864 

Nov. 1865 

July, 1865 



Jan. 1862 
Aug.""i862 



272 History of Green County. 

Thirteenth Regiment — Continued. 

NA * E - »***■ *****». Enlist. *2£E£3L 

Kent, Albert B Private... Juda Oct. 1861... Mav, 1862 

Morrison, Burton H. dd.. " ... " « 

Morrison, James " ... " " ...July, 1865 

Robinson, Cyrus B. ee " ... " Nov. 1861 

Swan, Isaac " ... " Oct. 1861... Nov. 1865 

Swan. John •' ... " 

Taylor, L. C " ... " Nov. 1861... 

REFERENCES FOR THIRTEENTH REGIMENT. 

a Promoted Lieutenant-Colonel. 
b Promoted Sergeant. 
c Promoted Captain. 
fl Promoted 1st Lieutenant. 
e Promoted 2nd Lieutenant. 
J Promoted Corporal. 
g Discharged on account of wounds. 
j Promoted 2nd Lieutenant, 31st regiment. 
k Died May 23, 1862, at Lawrence, Kansas. 
I Died June 23, 1862, at Columbus, Ky. 
m Died March 15, 1864, at Nashville. 
h Died October 10, 1X61, at Stevenson, Alabama. 
o Died June 20, 1862, at Lawrence, Kansas. 
p Died April, 1863, in Green County, Wis. 
q Died August 27, 1862, at Columbus, Ky. 
r Died March 1, 1864, at Nashville. 
8 Died October 10, 1864, at Stevenson, Alabama. 
t Died April 15, 1863, at Paducah, Ky. 
u Died August 1, 1832, at Columbus, Ky. 
v Died November 29, 1864, at Jeffersonville, Ind. 
w Died June 8, 1865, at Nashville. 
x Died March 15, 1861, at Nashville. 
y Died March 28, 1863, at Fort Donaldson. 
z Died November, 1862, at Ft. Henry, Tenn. 
aa Died February 17, 1865, at Madison, Wis. 
bb Died June 4, 1865, at Nashville. 
dd Died March 9, 1865, at Madison, Wis. 
ee Died September 21, 1864, at Nashville. 
ff Promoted Commissary of Subsistence, November, 1862. 



Fourteenth Regiment. 



Co. K. 

Benoy, Thomas c Private.... 

Countryman, Elias H " 

Cowles, Chas. a c " .... 

Foley, Henry C c " .... 

Johnson, James " 

Willrout, Adam A. d " .... 

Thied, Ernest d " .... 





Oct. 1861... 


. Oct. 1865 


cc 


Nov. 1861... 


U 




Dec. 1861... 




u 


Oct. 1861... 


. Oct. 1865 


t( 


Nov. 1861... 


« 


u 


« 


(C 




Oct. 1861... 


(C 



REFERENCES FOR FOURTEENTH REGIMENT. 



a Died at Brownsville, Ark., September 2, 1864. 
o Promoted Sergeant. 
rf Promoted Corporal. 



History of Green County. 273 

Fifteenth Regiment. 



Name. Rank. Residence. 



Date of When mus- 

Enlistment. tered out. 



Co. E. 

Lokke, Guldbrand a Corpl York Nov. 1861 

Bremien, Halver C " " Dec. 1861.... Dec. 1864 

Dahl, Guldband " " 

Espelee, Helge " York Nov. 1861... Aug. 1862 

Gundhaus, Christian c... Private... " 

Hansen, N " ... " " ...Dec. 1864 

Homlebeck, Peter d. " ... New Glarus Dec. 1861 

Irjellerrig, Anond " ... York Nov. 1861... Dec. 1864 

Jensen, Halver/. " ... " Oct. 1861 

Lee, Christofferfl.^ " ... " Dec. 1861 

Lindloe, Ole A " ... ' ; Oct. 1861 

Nielson, John/ '■ ... New Glarus Nov. 1861 

Syversen, Bryngrel " ...York " ... April, 1863 

Co. G. 
Pederson, Christoffer " Monroe Nov. 1861... Aug. 18(12 

Co. H. 

Eide, Nels J. k « ... New Glarus Feb. 1862 

Evanson, Erick " ... Spring Grove... Dec. 1861 

Knudson, Christian " ... ; ' ... 

Co. I. 

Guldbardson, Anders Corpl Jan. 1862 

Nilson, Erick / Private Feb. 1862 

Thompson, Ole G " Jan. 1862 .. Feb. 1865 

REFERENCES FOR FIFTEENTH REGIMENT. 

a Killed near Hope Church, Ga., May 27, 18(34. 
C Died while at home on furlough, August 4, 1862. 
d Died at Bowling- Green Ky., October 12, 1862. 
/Died at Nashville, January 12, 1863. 
ij Died of wounds January 17, 1863, at Murfreesboro. 
h Died at Nashville, August 27, 1863. 
./ Died at Iuka, August 31, 1862. 
k Promoted Corporal. 
/ Died at Louisville, Ky., April 9, 1804. 



Sixteenth Regiment. 

Co. F. 

Green, John J Private... Brooklyn Jan. 1864... July, 1865 

Smith, Calvin C " ... Brodhead Dec. 1863... Feb. 1865 

Co. K. 

Norris, James Capt Monroe Jan. 1864... July, 1865 

Carr, Isaac T 1st Lt " " ...Sept. 1864 

Richmond, Geo. a Sergt Dec. 1863... July, 1865 

Cleveland, Horatio G. b c Private... " " ...Nov. 1864 

Steadman, John S. b " «' ...July, 1865 

Andre, Geo. W. d " ... " " ... '« 

Baker, Louis " ...York " ... " 

Baxter, Leroy " ... Monroe " ... " 

Beedy, Alonzo " ...Cadiz Nov. 1863... " 

Benson, Peter " ... York Dec. 1863... " 

Bradley, James " ... Cadiz Sept. 1864... " 

Brean, Jonathan " ... Clarno " ... " 

Brown,EdwinR " ...Cadiz " 

Brown, Joseph A e " ... Jefferson Jan. 1864... " 

24 



-74 



History of Green County 



Sixteenth Regiment — Continued. 



Name. Rank. 

Brown, Sanford S Private 

Bruger, Solomon 

Blumer. Ezra 

Blunt. Win. /'. 

Burkholder/Wm. T 

Clark. Elmore J 

Cline, John D. di. 

DeHaven. Albert T. d..... 
DeHaven. Wesley W. e... " 

Denuare. Richard/ " 

Divan, Walter g 

Devereaux, Dwight M. // 

Edwards, Wm. e 

Eitel, Gottlieb 

Ennis. John W. dk 

Gallion, Thomas I 

Garrett, Jacob 

Garrett. Richard 

Glass. John K 

Gleason, Geo. W 

Gyer, Samuel 

Hill, Norman 

Hingee, /Yugust C 

Heekman, James 

Hopkins, Frank 

Hurlbut, Julius C. / 

Jones, Joseph I 

Kelly, Joel d 

Linzee. Chas. H 

Linzee, Duman 

Martin, Peter 

Moore. AVm 

Morton. James 

Niles, Milo 

Olsen, Kundt 

Peebles, Albert 

Pierson, Leonard 

Reinhart, Wm 

Rigel. Simon 

Roberts, Sylvester 

Rogers, Cheny 

Saucerman, Simon 

Scovil, Edwin 

Sheppard, P. A 

Shriner. Chas 

Shull, Lewis W. e 

Shull, Morgan " 

Smith. Morris D. d •• 

Smith. Ralph 

Snyder. Abraham * ; 

Snyder. Wm '• 

Super, John Q. A 

Spalding, Theodore W.... 

Starr, Levi " 

Starr. Wm 

Strunk, Philip II 

Stuky, Christian 

Taylor, .Miner*/. 



Residence. 


Date of 
Enlistment. 


When mas- 
tered out. 


Cadiz 


... Dec I860... 






(< 


•* 


July, 


1865 


Monroe 


a 






Clarno 


... Jan. 1864 . 
... Dec. 1863... 




c« 


July, 


1865 


Jefferson 


%i 




tt 




" 








... Jan. 1864... 


July. 


1865 


Clarno 


... Dec. 1863... 




•• 


Jordan 


.. 








i> 






Sylvester 


• ; 






York 


.. 


July, 


1865 


Clarno 


... Jan. 1864.. 




if 


Adams 








York 


** 


May, 


1865 


i i 




July, 


1865 


It 


♦ *' 


*i 


Clarno 


... Nov. 1863.. 
.... Dec. 1863... 




Monroe 






Jefferson 


" 


July, 


1865 




.... Jan. 1864.. 




.. 


Jefferson 


. . Dee. 1863.. 




•• 


Cadiz 


.... Feb. 1865.. 




•• 


Monroe 


Dee. 1863.. 




it 


Clarno 


Adams 


.... Jan. 1864.. 


. Julv, 


1865 


Monroe 


.... Dec. 1863.. 


. May, 


1865 


ec 


•• 


. July. 
- May, 


1865 


u 


i' 


n 


(C 


•• 


a 




.... Sept. 1864.. 


1865 


('. 


.... Dec. 1863.. 


- July. 


1865 


Jordan 


•• 


'. Nov. 


•• 


York 


• • 


a 


Jefferson 


" 


.,' 




.... Sept. 1864.. 


1865 


Clarno 


.... Dec. 1863.. 


. July 


, 1865 




.... Jan. 1864.. 




n 




.... Dec. 1863.. 




it 




• » 




a 




Jan. 1864.. 




it 


Monroe 


.... Dec. 1863.. 




1865 


Clarno 


. • 


. duly 


, 1865 




tt 


•• 




. . 






Adams 


.. 




ec 


Jefferson .... 


e« 


a 


Monroe 


, 


a 


tt 


•• 


a 




•• 




it 


• • 


. July 


. 1865 


Jefferson 


u 


a 




.... Jan. 1864.. 




tt 


York 


..... Dec. 1863.. 




tt 


Monroe 


. . 


. May : 
. July 


, 1865 


Jordan 


■• 


. 1865 



History of Green County 



n 



Sixteenth R egi m e xt — Continued. 



Name. Rank. 

Trogner, John H Private. 

Trogner, Joseph D. m " 

Van Horn, E. W. d " . 

Wiggins, Sumner W " 

Wilcox, La Fayette W. ... " 

Whipple, Porter j> '* 

White, James o " 

White, John A. n 

White, Joseph '• 

Youngblood, Wm. H " 



Residence. 
New Grlarus .. 


Date of 

Enlistment. 

Dee. 1868.. 


When 
fcered 

May. 


i;ui.— 
out. 

1865 


York 

Washington 


Jan.. 1864... 

it 

.. Dec. 1863... 
« 


July. 
May- 


1865 


Jefferson 

Jefferson 

Jordan 


.. Jan. 1864 

.. Jan. 1864... 
.. Dec. 1863... 


Aug. 
July, 


1865 
1865 



REFIRENCES FOR SIXTEENTH REGIMENT. 

it Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
b Promoted to 2d Lieutenant, 
c Discharged because of wounds. 
d Promoted to Corporal. 
e Promoted to Sergeant. 

/Transferred, August, IS65, to Veteran Reserve Corps. 
Killed at Lovejoy, Ga., September 3, 1W4 . 
h Died at Rome, Ga.. November 15, 1864. 
i Died at Nashville, June, 1864. 
j Died at Chattanoga, July 2, 1864. 
k Died in Hospital, December, 1864. 
I Killed before Atlanta, Julv ■:':•., 1804. 
m Died at Cairo, 111., May 5, 1864. 
)< Died at Goldsboro. X. C, March, 24, 1865. 
o Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps. 
p Died of wounds, at Rome, Ga., June 15, 1861. 



Eighteenth Regiment. 



Co. B. 

Jackson. Cha-^. H Capt.... 

Jackson, Thos. A. b 1st Lt.. 

Boynton, Samuel B. b 2nd Lt. 

Walkey, Jacob e Sergt .. 

Farmer. Henderson b 

Frovve, Samuel S. b 

Johns, Henry T 

Holmes, Geo. W 

Aldridge, David Corp! 

Shaw. -Joseph L. i 

Cunningham, M. B 

Ball, Chas. M 

Worcester, Herman B.... 

McGuinness. Abram 

Rogers, Daniel A. d 

Ellis. Orwin J 

Hunt. John L Musician 

Adair. Alexander Private... 

Adair, Eben j 

Alexander, James 

Bailey, Francis M. // 

Bailey. Hiram £. k 

Bailey. Samuel 

Baldwin. Samuel C 

Barnhouse, W 

Beedy, Alonzo // 

Bray, Norris M. // 



Brodhead Oct. 

Monroe Nov 



a 

n 

a 



it 
<• 
a 
a 
it 



Spring Grove... Oct. 
Brodhead 



a 

it 



it 
tt 
a 



Oct. 

Monroe Dec 

Brodhead Oct. 

Dec 

Brodhead < let. 



Nov 

Monroe Dec. 

Brodhead Oct. 

Monroe Nov 



Spring Grove... Dec. 

Monroe Dec 

Oct. 

Mar 

Brodhead Nov 

Spring Grove... Dec. 
Monroe 



1861... July, 1865 

... Apr. 1865 

. 1861... Dec. 1862 

Nov. 1862 

1861... July, L865 

" ... June. 1862 
1862 

, 1861... May. 1865 
1861 

, 1861... Mar. 1865 

1861... Mar. 1862 

June, 1862 

. 1861... Mar. 1865 

1861... Jan. 1863 

1861... . " 

. 1861... Sept. 1862 
ti 

1863"! Juiy" "1865 
. 1861.... June, 1^65 

1861 

. 18G2... Apr. 1865 
. 1861... July, 1862 

1861 

... Aug. 1862 
" 1865 



276 



History of Green County. 



Eighteen t 1 r Reg i me n t — Continued, 



N OIE, 

Butcher, Benjamin 

Bussey, Mahlon I. c 

Bryant, J. P 

Carpenter, James M. »'.... 

Carter. Joseph 

Chase. John W. d 

Clapp, Jonas G. // 

Combs, Elias 

Condon, Clinton B 

Conklin, John n 

Cottle, ('has. II J. 

Crosby, Geo. W 

Daughenbaugh, A. J 

Davis, Benjamin S. o 

Davis. Geo. W. // 

Davis. James D 

Death, Michael J. / 

Denson, Wm. H 

Derrick. Theodore J 

Devereaux, Alvin E 

Douglas, James \V r . q 

Dunbar, Richard d. 

Egma. Ziniri 

Farmer. Isaac N 

Farmer. James 

Farmer. John A. r 

Fitch, James A 

Green. Albert M 

Goff, John s 

Hall, Henry t 

Hall, James it 

Halstead, Juan W 

Hansen, ('has. (> 

Harden, Wm. H 

Heath, Asa W 

Heath, Osborn 

Hileman, Elijah 

Hiteheock, Hiram v w 

Hopkins. Hannibal H. it, 

Hopkins, Wm. B 

Hooker- Wm 

Jackson. Sylvester S. *... 

Kasson, A. M 

King John S 

Kirby. Isaiah 

Knapp, Fllnathan 

Knapp, James ]{.jj 

Laird, Richard C. b 

Loucks, Geo. S 

Lucia, Andrew J 

Marsh Albert K 

Mason. David H 

McGuire, Redmont y 

Meir. Henry 

Minnegben, Michael 

Mooney. Thos. h 

Moore, John W 

Myers, John H 



(i 



a 
a 
n 
it 
a 
(• 
a 
a 
i< 
a 
it 



Rank. 


Residence 


Date of 
Enlistment. 


when mus- 
tered out. 


Private . 


.. Clarence 


.. Dec. 1861.. 


. July, 


I860 


a 




,. Nov. 1861.. 




a 


1; 


. Monroe 


. Feb. 1862.. 






a 




.. Jan. 1862.. 






a 


(• 


.. Feb. 1865.. 


. July, 


1865 


.. 


i- 


.. Jan. 1862.. 




a 


a 


it 


.. Oct. 1861.. 




-.• 


d 


i. 


,. Dec. 1861... 


. June, 


1862 


a 


. Clarence 


,. Feb. 1865.. 


. July. 


1865 


a 




. Dec. 1861... 






<■ 


. Brodhead 


Oct. 1861.. 


. Feb. 


1865 


a 


. i 


Mar. 1862.. 


. Jan 


1862 


a 


ȣ 


. Jan., 1862.. 


July, 


1865 


a 


. Spring Grove.. 


. Mar. 1862... 






(i 


n 


Oct. 1861... 


July, 


1865 


a 


a 


Dec. 1st).;... 


■ May, 


1865 


.. 




Dec. 1861... 






« 




d 


Mar. 


1865 


a 


■ Clarence 


Feb. 1865... 


July, 


1865 


a 




Oct. 1861... 


Jan. 


1865 


a 


Brodhead 


Jan. 1862... 






a 


a 


it 
Mar. 1862... 


July, 
May, 


1865 


ii 




1862 


<t 




Feb. 1865... 


July, 


1865 


a 


■ Brodhead 


fc b 




Cl 


a 


■ Spring Grove.. 


Oct. 1861... 






i< 


• Brodhead 


it 


July, 


1862 


a 


• York 

• Monroe 


Dec. mn 

Nov. 1861... 


Jan. 


1863 


t> 


■ Brodhead 


Feb., 1862... 






K 


a 


Oct. 1861... 






,. 


Feb. 1865... 
a 


July, 


1865 


a 


Monroe 


Feb. 1862... 


Feb. 


1863 


a 


Brodhead 

■ Monroe.... 


Nov. 1861... 


Nov. 


1862 


a 


Brodhead 


Oct. 1861... 


Apr. 


1865 


i< 


a 

. Monroe 


Feb. 1862... 






(> 


Dec. 1861.... 







Brodhead Feb., 

Sept. 
Oct. 



Soring Grove.. 

Brodhead 

Spring Grove.. 
York 



1865.. 
1863.. 
1861.. 



July, 1865 



Nov. 1861... 
Jan., 1862... 
Nov. 1861.... 



Sept. 1864 

1865 
June, 1862 
Sept. 1864 

Sept. Wt2 



Brodhead. 



July, 



Jordan. Jan. 1862... 

Monroe Dec. 1861.... 

Brodhead Sept. 1864... 

Feb. 1862... 

Pedee Feb. 1865... 

Brodhead Dec. 1863.... 

Nov. 1861... 

" Dec. 1861.... 

Feb. 1865... 



1863 
Dec. 1862 
June, 1862 



Apr. 
July, 



Julv 



186 
1865 

1865 



Mar. 
July, 



1865 
1865 



History of Green County. 



1 *T "- 

-7/ 



Eighteenth Regiment — Continued. 



Name. 

Newberry- Win. W Private 

Olds, Wilson 

Packard, Chas. E. z 

Perkins. Norris C. «« 

Phillips. Geo. W 

Phillips Gilbert H. h 

Price, Asa C 

Price, Peter bb 

Post, Ezra W. cc 

Rogers, Franklin A 

Kourke, Win 

Salmon, Thos 

Sanborn, Jos 

Sisson, Esek S 

Smith, Francis G 

Soper, Eben 

Soper, John Q. A 

Spencer, Win. H. dd 

Steadman, John S 

Stewart, Ezra 11 

Teis, Frederick e 

Van Norman, P 

Youngj Isaac W. g 

Young, John 

Youngblood, Daniel, ee.... 

Waite, Edward F 

Wallace, Andrew // 

Webb, Allen 

Webb, Geo. \V 

Wilder, Wilbur F 

Willets, James d 

Williams, Chester W.#... 

Worley, Valentine 

Wright, E. L " ... 

Co. K. 

Brunner. Malcolm/' Sergt 

Jackson, Alexander / Private... 

Lennen, Michael, hk " 

Myers, Chas. G " ... 



i( 



lANK. 


Residence. 


Date of 
Enlistment. 


When nuis - 
tered out. 


vate . 


. Monroe 


.. Feb. 


1862.. 






it 


. Clarence 




a 


July, 


1865 


a 






1862.. 






'i 


. Brodhead 


.. Jan. 


1862.. 






t< 


. Jordan 




i 


. June, 
July, 
Aug. 


1862 


a 




IX',;;. 




• i 


1863 


u 


. Brodhead 


Feb. 

Nov 

. Dec. 


1862.. 
1861.. 
1863... 






a 


June. 


186-> 


>. 


tc 




..' 


cc 


Feb. 


1865... 


. July, 
Sept. 


1865 


<t 




1862 


'• 




. Dec. 


1861.. 


Mar. 


1865 


it 






4 


A pr. 


1865 


H 


. Monroe 


. Jan. 


1862." 


Mar. 
July, 


1865 


it 




1862 


ii 


. Brodhead 


. Feb. 


1862... 






U 


. Monroe 


. Oct. 


1861... 


Nov. 


1862 


ii 


. Brodhead 


. Oct. 


1861... 






H 


. Pedee 


July, 


1865 


ii 


. Monroe 


. Feb. 


1862... 






,1 


. Spring Grove.. 


. Oct. 


1862... 






i< 


. Brodhead 


. Feb. 


1862.... 


Feb. 


1863 


<l 




. Jan. 


1862... 






£• 




. Dec. 


1861... 


J une, 


1865 


" 


<t 


Feb. 1862.... 


July, 
Aug. 


1865 


ii 


a 


1862 


i< 


a 





Brodhead 

Nov. 1861., 

May, 1862.. 

Jordan June 1862.. 

Brodhead 



April, 1865 
July, 1865 



Oct. 1861... July, 1865 

Spring Grove... " ... July, 1863 

Monroe Mar. 1862 

Spring Grove... Jan. 1864 



REFEEENCES FOR EIGHTEENTH REGIMENT. 

a Promoted to Major, May, 1863 : Lieutenant-Colonel, March, 1871 ; Colonel, July, 1865. 
/> Promoted Captain. 
d Promoted Sergeant. 
e Promoted to 2d Lieutenant. 
h Promoted to Corporal. 
i Died at Iuka, October 21, 1863. 
/ Died at Madison, February 21. 1861. 
k Died at St. Louis, May 20, 1862. 
/ Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
m Killed at Vicksburg, May, 1863. 
n Died at Memphis, January 22, 1863. 
o Killed at Jackson, Miss., May 11. 1863. 
p Died at Memphis, November 11, 1863. 
q Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps. 
r Died at Vicksburg, July 21, 1863. 
s Died at Nashville, March 19, 1861. 
t Died at Huntsuille. Ala., March 31, 1861. 
u Died at Pittsburg Landing, May 23, 1863. 
v Promoted Steward. 
W Killed at Nashville, February, 1865. 



278 History of Green County. 



REFERENCES FOR EIGHTEENTH REGIMENT— Continued. 

x Promoted 2d Lieutenant. 

ij Killed in Confederate prison, by guard, April, 1862. 

z Died near Corinth, May, 1862. 
CM Died at Corinth, June 19. 1862. 
bb Died at Providence, La., March 2, 1863, 
<-c Died at Corinth, May 30. 1862. 
f Irl Killed at Shiloh, April, 1862. 

ee Died, June, 1862. 

ff Died at Columbus, Ky., December, 1862. 
gg Died at Pittsburg Landing, April 19, 1862. 
hh Died of wounds, December 21, 1862, at St. Louis. 

ii Died, July 7, 1862, at Corinth. 
jj Died at Memphis. 
tr Transferred to some other company. 



Twentieth Regiment. 



twi.,.t. r>.»-,^ t?„ .^i„.,„r. Date of When mus- 

Name. Ra.nk. Residence. Enlistment. tered out. 

Payson, Geo. L Corp'l Monticello Aug. 1862... July, 1865 

Hickman Benj. F. a Private... " '* 

McAven. James " ... " " ...July, I860 

McCarty. Geo. L " ... " " 

Williams. Edward " ... " " 

REFERENCES FOR TWENTIETH REGIMENT. 
a Transferred to Invalid Corps. 



Twenty-First Regiment. 

Co. E. 

Jackson, Andrew Private.... York Nov. 1863.... July, 1865 

Satterlee, John W. b " ... " " 

Co. G. 

Douglas, Chas. A. c « ...Dayton Aug. 18(32 

Day, Calvin P " ... " " ... June, 1865 

REFERENCES FOR TWENTY-FIRST REGIMENT. 

b Absent— wounded — at muster out of company. 
C Died at Rural, Wis., April 12, 1863. 

Twenty-Second Regiment. 

Co. (J. 

Bintliff, James Capt Monroe Aug. 1862... Dec. 1863 

Eaton, Thos. H 1st Lt Monroe Aug. 1862.. Jan. 186;! 

Annis, Fluette a 2nd Lt Decatur Jan. 1864... June, 1865 

Booth, Chas. A.* Scrgt " Jan. 1864... June, 1865 

Ball, Stephen F. // " Jefferson Mar. 1864... Mar. 1865 

Cole, Wm. S " Monroe Aug. 1862... June, 1865 

Denniston, John C. c Corpl Cadiz 

Puffer, Myron H. c " 

King, Wm. H Sergt Monroe 

Gates. John R. c '• 

McCracken, Aaron H. r... Corpl Sylvester " ...Mar. 1864 

Seltzer, Leopold d. " Washington " 

Tochterman, Chris, g (i Monroe *' ...Dec. 1864 

Witham, Wm.J " Jordan " ... June, 1865 

Phelps, Emmel F '« Monroe " 

Cole, Amos H " Jefferson " 

Sears, Allen Music'n... Monticello " 



(( << 



History of Green County. 



2 79 



Twenty-Second Regiment — Continued. 



Name. Rank. 

Adair, Mathias /. Private 

Adair, James 

Aldinger, Edward/ <? 

Alien. Gideon k '' 

Barrus, Ira M " 

Blake, Isaa.cC 

Canfield, Win. H. P. / " 

Carr, Isaac T. e 

Clouse, Josiah... 

Combs, Newel E '' 

Cox.Wm. E 

Crooks, Geo " 

Cunningham, H. L. e m .. 

Damon, Samuel « 

Darling, Abner 

Darling, Nelson 

Denney, Isaac M " 

Denney John 

Divan, Win. A. o 

Donnan, Eben J 

Enderson, Ole/ 

Erickson, Ole g " 

Fleek, Henry Jj.er f ' 

Galeson, Nels /. 

Gardner, Edwin 

Gleason, Ezekiel P. e 

Gray, Thomas " 

Gray, Timothy t " 

Greedell, Daniel * 

Griffin, Alonzo H 

Hale, Grin J 

Hancock, Myron J 

Hansen, Stener 

Holmes, Wm. H 

Hunt, Wm. J. a 

Iverson, Thor e 

Jackson, Jesse B. v 

Jackson, John J. C. w.... 

Johnson, John 

Kettleson. Ole " 

Kerner, Adolph 

King, Robert R 

King, Zaphna L 

Knudson, Knud A. e 

McDonnell, James '* 

McConnell, John " 

Michaels, Eli " 

Michael Joseph 

Moore, James S. x 

Morgan , Carroll 

Proesher, John D " 

Proesher, Thomas 

Ransom, Geo. C. y 

Rennelson, Ole 

Rhines, Marvin L '* 

Rima, Michael / **■ " 

Robinson, Geo i( 

Saucerman, Absalom *' 

Shrake, Solomon R. e " 



Residence. 
... Monroe 


Date of 
Enlistment. 

Aug. 1862 
e» 

a 

a 
a 
<( 
.. 
a 
i. 
a 

July, 1862." 

Aug. 1862.. 

a 

July, 1862 
Aug. 1862. . 

Dec. 1863" 
July, 1862.. 
Aug. 1862 

a 

a 
i< 

July, 1862... 
Aug. 1862.. 

July, 1862.'.'.' 

Aug. 1862 

Aug. 1861 

Aug. 1862.. 
a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

Sept. 1864'.! 
Aug. 1862 
July, 1862... 

Aug. 1862.. 

it 

Dec. 1863,' 

Aug. 1862.. 
ii 

n 


When 
terec 

June, 


mus- 
1 out. 

1865 


(< 




. Cadiz. 


June, 
June. 




... Jordan 


I860 


... York. 


1863 


... Jefferson 




... Monroe 


Aug. 
June, 

June, 
May, 

June. 

June, 


1863 


n 


1865 


it 


;< 


... Farmers Grove 
... Decatur 


.1 
it 


cc 


1865 
1865 


... Cadiz 

... Monroe 


1S65 
1865 






a 






... Decatur 






Oct. 

June, 

May, 
June, 


1864 


<< 


1865 


a 

it 
... Monroe 


1 

1865 

1885 
(i 


.6 Skinner 


•i 


... Monroe 


a 


<( 




... Jordan 


Jan. 


1863 


... Monroe 




a 






... Skinner 


June, 

July, 
June, 

May, 
June, 

June, 


1865 


a 


u 


... Monroe 


(1 


a 


11 


;. 


It 


... Jordan 

... Monroe 


1863 
1865 


a 


cc 




cc 


... Monroe 

... Farmers Grove 
... Monroe 


cc 

1863 
1865 

1865 






.. Cadiz 


n 
n 
n 


Feb. 

June, 

< 


1864 
1865 


... Monroe 


1 



2$Q 



History of Green County. 



Twenty-Second Regiment— Continued. 



Name. 

Sisson, Martin H 

Siverson, Christopher 

Snyder, James F 

South, Enoch 

Squires, Albion C 

Taft, Win. M. e 

Tree, Christopher^ 

Ullom, Win. T 

Walter, Lewis 

Ward, Chauncey /'. 

Wetzler, Joseph S 

Wilson, John H. P 

Wright, Ben.i. F 

Worley, Aaron, aa 

Zumbrunnen, Gottlieb.... 

Co. I. 

Banker, Richard R. e 

Thomasj Daniel 

Co. K. 

Perkins, Lester cc 

Stewart, John 

Newman, Ephraim H. tin 

Newman, Van B. S. & 

Raymond, Bishop T. //.... 

Penn, Win. C. h 

Scott, Thurston C, 

Chadwiek, Win. W 

Pletts, Samuel 

Lovelace, Harrison 

Mitchell, Judson A.^' 

Parriott, W. P. c 

Stull. Jacob 

Jones, Warren c 

Newman, Wm. S. c 

Clawson, Josiah R. c 

Berry, John H. mm 

Davis, Z.P. z 

Debolt, John r 

Cramer, John (kgg 

Jordon, John C 

Stephens. Sylvester R 

Austin, Elijah W. //// 

Austin, Seth, ii 

Baker, Frederick jj ss 

Ball, Geo. B 

Betts, Peter M 

Booker, Win. IL.tr 

Bouten, Byron C 

Bouten, Harlow T 

Bouten, Marvin J. tr 

Boyer, Andrew <? 

Bradshaw, C. W. kkjj. 

Bridge, Jacob 

Brooks, Elijah 

Burns, Thos. A 

Caughey, Lewis R 

Chambers, John A. e 

Churchill, Urias ?■ 

Churchill, Arthur S. <-.... 



Rank. 
Private. 

it 

(t 

<< 

£•' 

ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 

a 
ii 



ii 

Capt 

IstLt... 

•2nd Lt, 
Sergt ... 

a 



Residence. 



Date of 
Enlistment. 

Jordan July, 1862... 

Monroe Aug. 1862.. 

Brodhead " 

Monroe '' 

Jordan " 

Skinner ' l 

£i a 



When mus- 
tered out. 
June. 1865 



'a 
a 



Jan. 1861 
June. 1865 



New Glarus Sept, 1861... May, I860 

Sylvester Jan., 1861 

Cadiz Aug. 1862 

Monroe " 

Jefferson Dec. 1863 

Brodhead Aug. 1862 

Monroe 

Washington 



a 

a 



!... Oct. 


1861 


... June, 


1st ;:> 


.... Nov. 


1865 


... June, 


1865 



Brodhead.. 

it 



Jefferson. 



Corpl. 



. Juda , 

Jefferson... 

Sylvester... 
Jefferson..., 
Monticello 
Monroe 

Jefferson.... 

a 



a 

a 
a 



Mont.^ello. 
Jefferson.... 



Monroe... 
Jefferson. 



a 
a 



Private... 

14 



ii • 

ii 
i. 
ii 
i. 
ii 
ii 

u 
ii 
ii 
ii 

a 

a 

ii 

a 
ti 
a 
a 
a 
a 
n 
a 
ti 
tt 



June, 1865 
June, I860 

i* 



Sept. 1862 
Jan. 1863 



June, 

July, 

June, 

Feb. 

Jan. 

Oct. 



1865 
1861 
1865 
1863 
1863 
1864 



June, 1865 



Oct. 1864 



a 
a 
a 
a 
ti 
ti 
a 
it 
a 



a 
a 
it 



Oct. 186:: 
June, 1863 



June, 1865 



Musician Monticello 

Jefferson 

Monroe 

" Feb. 1861., 

Spring Grove... Aug. 1862. 

Jefferson 

Monroe 

Monticello 

Decatur " ... Feb. 1861 

Sylvester June, 1865 

Dec. 1863 

Decatur Aug. 1862... June, I860 

Monticello 



Monroe... 
Sylvester 
Jefferson. 
Monroe... 
Jeffei'son. 



a 
a 
u 

(C 

a 
a 
a 



Jan. 1st;.", 

Dec. 1863 

June, 1865 

June, 1865 

June, 186") 



History of Green County. 



281 



Twenty-Second Regiment — Continued. 



Name. 


Rank. 




. Private 




«. 




i 


Covert, James M 


a 


Covil, Orin M. tr 


i- 


Danabaugh, Chris.# 1... 


'•' 




a 




a 


Davis, Samuel A. ee 


a 


Drake, Nelson A 


<: 


Endfield, Frederick 


a 




(( 




a 


Feather. Peter W 


d 


Frost, John N. tr 


a 


Fulker, Win 


a 


Gould, Snyder 2 


a 


Hale, Francis M. 3 


a 


Hale, Win 


a 




u 


Hanz, Peter 


d 


Hattery, Alexander 


» 


Helmer, August 4 


a 


Hemington. Win, H 


a 


Holz, Frederick 


t> 


Hopkins, Albert, <?... 


a 


Howard, Harley J 


a 


Hunholz, Michael J 


Li 


Jackson, Alonzo 


tt 


Jones. Wm. G.djj. 


a 


Kildow, Joshua P 


»'« 


Lindley, Chas. C 


tt 


Lindley, Wm, E 


« * 


Lockhart, Jas. W... 


a 


Matteson. Chas. E 


<t 


McManus, Sylvester 


a 


Mitchell, Abner A. tr 


a 


Miner, Thos E 


a 


Moon, Israel C. tr 


ii 


Morris, Robert 6 


a 


Morrison, Henry W 


a 




>t 


Pengra, M. H 


t. 


Richardson, Levi ., 


a 


Richardson, Stephen C.... 


a 


Roby, Hazzard 2 


a 


Roby, Henry W 


<( 


Sanborn, David P 


a 


Scudder. Jotham 


a 


Sherry. Jerrold W 


i< 


Shonahan, Richard... 


a 


Slater, Wm. H. q 


(( 


Stahlnicker, Jas. W. 8.... 


tt 


Steepleton, Peter 


tt 


Swan, Richard 7 


<t 


Thorpe. John 


tt 


Tillotson, Nelson 


tt 


Turgeson, Hans 


(E 



Residence. 



Date of 
Enlistment. 

Brodhead Aug. 1862.. 

Monroe " 

" Dec. 1862.. 

Brodhead Aug. 1862.. 

Sylvester Dec. 1863.. 

Jefferson Aug. 1862.. 



Montieello. 

Jefferson.... 



Monroe Feb. 1864. 

Sylvester Aug. 1862. 

Montieello " 

Twin Grove " 



Juda " 

Sept. 1864. 

Jefferson Aug, 1862. 



When mus- 
tered out. 
June, 1865 



June, 1865 



June, 1865 

June, 1863 
June, 1865 

Nov. 1862 
June, 1865 



dune, 1865 



June, 1865 



Jefferson. 



Decatur 

Monroe 

Montieello. 



Spring Grove. 
Sylvester 



Decatur. 

Spring Grove... 

Monroe 

Jefferson Dec. 1863 

Aug. 1862. 

Monroe Dec. 1863 

Jefferson " 

Decatur " 

Monroe Aug. 1862. 

Sylvester " 

Decatur " 



tt 
tt 


... June, 


1865 


tt 




Ct 


tt 
tt 

tt 
tt 


... Feb. 
... dune. 


1864 

1 Si v\ 
tt 


tt 

tt 

t. 


... Mar. 
.... June, 


1863 
1865 


It 


.... June, 


1865 



Montieello 

Monroe 

Jefferson.... 

Decatur 

Jefferson.... 
Montieello. 
Jefferson.... 

Monroe 

Jefferson.... 



June, 1865 



Apr. 1864 

dune, 1865 

tt 

Oct. 1863 
May, 1863 

June, 1865 



dune, 1865 

a 



Sept. 1864. 



282 History of Green County. 

Twenty-Second Regiment — Continued. 

Name. Rank. Residence. wB^fSL* W^enmus- 

„ TT _ _ . , Enlistment. tered out. 

Young, Henry 11 Private... .Jefferson Aug. 1862 

Young, Samuel " ... Monroe " .... June, 1865 

Warner, Win. H 10 ' : ... Monticello 

West. Samuel " ... Sylvester Sept. 1864... June, 1865 

Willis, Geo. M " ...Decatur " 

Woodle, Thos " ...Jefferson " .... June, 1865 

VToodling, Levi S. 12 " ... Decatur Aug. 1802 

REFERENCES FOR TWENTY. SECOND REGIMENT. 

a Promoted Captain. 

b Promoted 1st Lieutenant. 

c Promoted Sergeant. 

d Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps. 

e Promoted Corporal. 

/Discharged on account of wounds. 

g Promoted to Hospital Steward. 

h Promoted "2nd Lieutenant. 

i Died at Danville, Ky., January 20, 1863. 

j Died at Lexington, Ky., December, 1862. 

A: Died at Danville, Ky., January 20, 1803. 

1 Died at Danville. Ky., December 27, 1862. 
m. Died of wounds, June 7. 1864. 

n Died at Danvilie, Ky., January 12, 1863. 

Died at Danville, Ky., January 17, 1863. 

p Died at Nicholsville, Ky., December 23. 1862. 
q Died of wounds at Nashville, January, 1863. 
r Killed at Thompson's Station, Tenn., March 5, 186.;. 
s Died at Danville, January 9, 1863. 
t Killed at Resaca, May 15, 1864. 
u Died at Lexington, Ky., 1863. 
v Died at Nashville, March 15, 1864. 
w Died of wounds, at Nashville, July 29, 1864. 
x Died at Louisville, July 2, 1865. 
y Died at Louisville, February 23, 1864. 

2 Killed at Resaca, May 15, 1864. 

oa Died at Danville, December 21, 1862. 

cc Organized the Company. Resigned before it was mustered. 

ee Discharged for disability caused by inhuman treatment while prisoner of war. 
rjg Died of wounds, July 1, 1864. 
hh Died at Nashville, May 2, 1863. 

ii Died at Jefferson Barracks, July, 1864. 

jj Death caused by treatment while prisoner of war. 
kk Died at Anapolis, April 25, 1863. 
mm Died at Libby Prison, April 8. 1863. 
nn Died at Nicholasville, December 25. 1862. 

ss Died at Anapolis, April 23, 1863. 

1 Died at St. Louis, May 6, 1863. 

2 Died of wounds, at Indianapolis, October 19, 1864. 

3 Died of wounds, at Resaca, June 2, 1864. 

4 Died of wounds, at Louisville, July 4, 1864. 

5 Died at Anapolis, April 24, 1863. 

6 Died at Paducab, February 14, 1863. 

7 Died at Louisville. January 2, 1863. 

8 Died at Lexington. 

9 Died at Danville. January 16, 1863. 

10 Died at Nashville, March 18, 1863. 

11 Died at Danville, January 5, 1862. 

12 Died of wounds, May 19,'l864. 

tr Transferred to another company. 

Twenty-Third Regiment. 
Weirich. Christian B. «... Chapl'n... Monroe Oct. 1862 



REFERENCES FOR TWENTY-THIRD REGIMENT. 
a Died at Ifoung's Point, La., February 15, 1863. 



History of Green County. 



-S3 



Twenty-Fifth Regiment. 

Co. B. 
Gilliss, David G Private... Albany Mar. 1864 



Twenty-Seventh Regiment. 

Co. H. 
Jorde, Kittel X. " Private... York Aug. 1862 

Co. I. 
Carter, Joseph " ... " Dec. 1862 June, 1865 

REFERENCES FOR TWENTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT, 
a Died at Helena, Ark.. August 9, 1863. 



Thirtieth Regiment. 

Co. E. 

Drake, Francis R Private Aug. 1864 Tune, 1865 

Drake Emerson, C " " .... " 

Co. H. 

Smith, John " ... Decatur Dec. 1863 

Co. K. 

Cunningham, Thos. a " ... Clarno June, 1863 

REFERENCES FOR THIRTIETH REGIMENT. 
a Transferred to Invalid Corps, April, I8t!4. 



Thirty-First Regiment. 



West, Francis H. a Lt.-Col.... 

Gaylor, Joseph B As't Surg 

Ball, James M " ... 

Thatcher, Alvin H Musician 

Co. B. 

Stephenson, 11. B. mm.... Capt 

Treat, Nathaniel B. b 1st Lt 

Beattie, Thos. c 2nd Lt 

Winslow, Ira Sergt 

Bridge. Cornelins M " 

Noble, Ceo. W " 

Bridge, Isaac N " 

Weed, Chas. A. d Corpl 

Schuler, Jacob d. " 

Gerber, Peter d " 

Alexander, Jesse Private... 

Bartlett. Edmund " ... 

Beebe.JohnT " ... 

Blaisdell, Geo. U k ' ... 

Bloom, Wm.S./ " ... 



Monroe Aug. 1862. 



it 



Feb. 1864.. 

York Dec. 1862... 

Monroe Aug. 1862.... 



June, 1865 
Nov. 186a 
July, 1864 
June, 1865 



Cadi.z 

Jefferson. 
Monroe... 
Jefferson. 
Jordan.... 
Monroe... 

Clarno 

Monroe... 



a 
st 

a 



Feb. 1863.. 
Aug. 1862.. 



June, 1863 
June, 1865 



Apr. 1865 

•1 



May, 1865 



2 84 



History of Green County. 



Thirty-First Regiment — Continued. 



Name. 

Brooks. Win. M 

Bussey, Nelson 

Campbell, John 

Clark, Lyman tf 

Ellison, Thos. Jr 

Elmer, Conrad 

Emerick, Samuel 

Emerson, Turner 

Engler, Albert 

Folsom. Wm. F 

Gerber, Jacob 

Glaus, Dominic 

Gloege, Herman L 

Heer, Frederick 

Hoesli. Jost k 

Hoffer, Nicholas 

Hogans, Stephen R. d 

Grinningex - , Joseph , 

Jones, Wm, M 

Knobel, Abraham 

Knobel, Caspar/ 

Manley, Richard m , 

Noble, Abraham 

Pitman, Henry 

Ransom, Andrew 

Raymer, Jesse , 

Robinson, Wm 

Schroyer, Geo. F 

Schuler, John 

Snyder, Caspar 

Sommer, Ulrich 

Stievick, Jacob 

Staffaucher, Isaiah 

Staffaucher, Jacob , 

Staifaucher, R,udo)ph 

Stevens, Ira C 

Stevens, John F 

Stevenson, David M 

Stroeder, David « , 

Van Wagenen, James H, 

Virtue, Samuel 

Virtue, Thos. o 

Weber, August , 

Weismueller, Jacob 

Wei den, John 

Wells, Thos 

Zweifel, Peter 

Co. E. 
Stevens, Hiram c , 

Co. F. 

Burns, Chas. W 

Raynor, James c 

Putnam, Oliver S.f. 

Dolsen, Wm B 

Smith, Alba D 

Morse, Calvin 

Chase, Geo. W 

Bancroft, Frank II. d 



Rank. 

Private., 
it 

a 


Residence. 

. Spring Grove. 

. a 

. Monroe 


Date of 
Enlistment. 
.. Feb. 1865.., 
.. Aug. 1862... 

U 
U 

u 
c< 
u 

a 
a 

Cf 
(C 

u 
it 

a 

u 
a 
a 
u 
a 
a 
a 


When mus- 
tered out. 
.. July, 1865 
. May, 1863 
. June, 1865 


a 


ft 


. May, 1865 

tt 

tt 
tt 


a 
a 

i< 


,. Mt Pleasant . 
. Monroe 


a 


%i 


tt 


it 
t« 


. Monroe 


tt 

.t 


* i 

• i 


.. 


. May, 1863 
. June, 1864 


.. 


.. Clarno 


. May, 1863 


a 


.. Monroe 


a 




a 


.. June, 1865 


(( 


. Monroe 


,. May, 1865 
. June, 1865 


a 


.. Clarno 


a 


.. Cadiz 


tt 


it 


.. Cadiz , 


tt 


i * 




.t 


.. Cadiz 


tt 

a 
a 
u 
t( 
a 

Jan. 1864.. 

Aug. 18(32... 
tt 

tt 

it 
tt 

Cf 

" Nov. 1862".: 

.. Aug. 1862.. 

tt 




it 


. June, 18(55 


it 

a 
it 
.. 

a 
a 
it 


.. Cadiz , 

.. Sylvester 

.. Jordan 

.. Washington" 

.. Monroe 


tt 
tt 
.1 

tt 

1865 

. June, 1865 

tt 


a 


a 


.. July, 1865 


a 
•t 
a 
it 
a 
(t 


.. Mt. Pleasant. 
.. Mt. Pleasant . 
.. Monroe 


tt 
tt 

. June, 1865 
.. May, 1865 


it 






it 


.. Monroe 


tt 
« 

tt 


. June, 1865 


it 


a 


.. Oct. 1864 


it 


a 




a 


.. eft\j rson 


tt 

Jan. 1864.. 
, Aug. 1862... 

it 
Cf 

Nov. 1863... 

'Aug. 1862.. 
Apr. 1864.. 

Aug. 1862... 

tt 

tt 
tt 
tt 

tt 


. June, 1865 


ft 

tt 
tt 


.. Monroe 

.. Clarno 


. July, 1865 
. May, 1865 
. Nov. 1863 


tt 

2nd Lt 

Capt 

Sergt 

tt 
tt 


.. New Glarus ... 
. Monroe 

a 
a 
a 


. May, 1865 

. June, 1865 

tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 


a 


<< 


tt 


a 


Davton 


tt 


a 


. Albany 

<t 


tt 
tt 



History of Green ^County. 



285 



Thirty- First Regiment — Continued. 



Name. 

Sine, John 

Heal, Albert W 

Brownell, Eenj. 13 

Martin, Patrick 

Brown, Chas 

Bray ton. Chae 

Jacobs, Win. M 

Bowen, Henry W. q 

Aldrich, W111.C./ 

Allen, Austin W 

Bennett, Franklin 

Broderiek, Edward 

Broderiek, James 

Brooks, Isaac 

Bump, Henry C 

Bump, Henry F 

Burgor, Harv-ey 

Burt, Ceo 

Carsaw, Samuel H 

Cowen, Myron 

Church, Win. * 

Davis, Fen ton 

Dick, John 

Dunn, (too. W 

Dunn, Win. M. / 

Fisher, Philip 

Fitch, Gilbert G 

Fletcher, Robert 

Flood, Thos 

Flood, Peter 

Foster. Albert E 

Gilbertson, Andrew 

Greidenweier, Peter h 

Grover, Asher 

Hall, LeviN.r 

Hemstreet, Clark 

Hoskins, Joseph D 

Howard, Win. H 

Hoyt, Erastus C. // 

Huntington, Chas 

Iverson, Ole 

Johnson, Simon 

Jones, Horace B 

Jordan, Alonzo P 

Kirkpatrick, John. W. D 
Kirkpatrick, Montg. A... 

Klassy, Gustave ~" 

Klassy, Thos 

Laird, Alpheus x 

Laird, Jerome y 

Leonard, Albert 

Lewis, Alfred z 

Loomis, Oscar A 

Lozier, Geo '. 

Maddock, Geo. W 

Martin Timothy 

McCarinon, Geo 

McCoy, Henry 

McManus, Harvey 

McNaught, John J 



Rank. 
Corpl .... 



Private 
a 

a 
a 
(< 

a 

a 

a 

1 

a 
'i 

a 
i< 
<c 
a 
c< 
a 
a 
it 
a 

a 
a 
<>' 
(< 
(< 
a 
a 

it 
it 
II 
(( 
(< 

a 
'i 
a 
n 
it 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
ii 
a 
tt 
it 
ii 
a 
«< 
n 



Residence. 



Date of When m us- 
Enlistinent. tered out. 

Juda Aug. 1862... June, 1865 

Dayton 



" Oct, 

Exeter Aug. 

Dayton 

Albany 



1863. 
1862,. 



June, 1M'5 



Dayton... 
Sylvester 
Albany ... 



Aug. 1862. 



Dayton . 
Albany 



tt 



Oct. 

Dayton Aug 

Albany 



Brooklyn 

Attica 

Dayton.... 
Albany ... 



a 
a 



... June, 1&65 

EC 

."" Nov. 1863 
... June, 1865 



1862... May, 1865 

1862... •• 

' ... July, 1865 

' ... June, 1865 

t 

' '," June, 1865 

' ... July, 1665 

; ' ... June, 1865 



it 

1 1 



Dayton.... 
Brooklyn, 



June, 1865 
July, 1865 



Albany 



Dayton 

Albany 

Dayton 

Albany , 

Monticello. 
Albany 



a 



Dayton " 

ii a 

a "" it 

U tt 

Albany " 

Washington Jan. 1861.. 

Albany June,1862 

" Aug. 1862 

Dayton " 

Albany " 



a 

Dayton. 

Albany 
<« 

Dayton. 
Albany , 



... Oct. 


1863 


... J uiie, 


1865 


... June, 


1865 


... June, 

EC 

It 

... June, 

u 


1865 
1865 


... May, 
... July, 
... June, 


1865 
1865 

1865 


... July, 


1865 









IE 




EE 
EE 


... June, 1865 

EE 


EE 


EE 


EE 
EE 


... July, 1864 
... June, 1865 



*s M 



2S6 



History of Green County. 



Thirty-First Regiment — Continued. 



Name. Rank. 

Mills, Alexander Private. 

Mitchell, Henry 

Morton Wm. M. e " . 

Mullen, James " 

Murray, Wm. H " . 

Nooris, Isaac " 

Norton, Claaence E " 

O'Neil, Joseph E " . 

Parker, Addison J " 

Patterson, John " 

Potter, Washington " 

Remington, Leroy " 

Rutty, Jerome L. e " 

Rutty, Samuel L " 

Shaw, Adney N. aa " 

Simmons, LaFayette " 

Smith, Benj. F e " . 

Spurling, Nelson " 

Steiner, David " 

Wade, Samuel W Private . 

Whiffle, John W 

White, Benj. B 

Wilder, Chas 

Wilson, Alouzo " 

Ziegler, John J " 

Co. G. 

Rogers, Geo. D. hh Capt — 

Ball, Farleu Q, o, y 1st Lt .. 

McQuillan, James d Corpl.... 

Seavy, Joseph Sergt. . . 

Blanchard, Thos. T Corpl... 

Bailey, Asa " — 

Rowe, Luther T " .... 

Dixon, Wm " — 

Cameron, Wm " 

Adair, Alexander Private . 

Anderson, Ole " 

Ballard, Geo. L 

Bennett, Arnold " 

Bennett, Geo. B 

Berry. Geo. W 

Brown, Simon e " 

Butler, Louis H. dd 

Divan, John " 

Divan, Urias " 

Elmer, Jacob " 

Emberson. Christopher . " 

Forsythe, Edwin E " 

Forsythe, Geo. W " 

German, Daniel " 

German, Gottlieb " 

Giesland, Joseph J " 

Grinnell. James.. " 

Hayes, Frederxk " 

Hawkins, Wm. R " 

Henson. Andrew " 

Jones. Wm " 

King, Geo. R 



Residence. 



Albany. 



Brodhead 

Dayton 

Albany 



Date of 

Enlistment. 

Aug. 1862... 



Dec. 1862.. 
Aug. 1862.. 



<< 



Nov, 
Aug. 



1862.. 
1862.. 



When mus- 
tered out. 
June, 1865 
May, 1865 
June, 1865 
July, 1865 
May. 1865 
July, 1865 

U 

July, 1865 



Dayton. 

Albany . 
Dayton. 



June, 1865 
Mar. 1865 
June, 1865 



Albany 

Dayton " 

Feb. 1862... 

Albany Aug. 1862... 



Albany Aug. 1862. 

Dayton " 



Monticello. 
Brooklyn.. , 



York Sept. 

Monroe " 

Oct. 

Washington " 

Monticello " 

Adams Nov. 

Washington " 

Adams Oct. 

Jefferson Sept. 

Nov. 

Adams Dec. 

Washington Nov. 

Sylvester Sept. 

" Jan . 

Jefferson Oct. 

" <-'ept. 

Momoe Nov. 

Albany Jan. 

Monroe Oct. 

New Glarus Sept. 

York Nov. 

Washington Oct. 



1862. 
1862.' 

1862'. 

1862! 

1862. 

1862. 

1862. 

1862. 

1862 

1864. 

1862. 

1862. 

1862. 

1864. 

1862 

1862. 

1862. 

1862. 



May, 1865 
June, 1865 

u 
u 

(6 

June 1865 

it 

May 1865 

June 1865 
it 

Feb. 186:i 

July 1865 

June 1*65 

July 1865 

Jan 1865 



.... Nov. 1862. 

Monroe Oct. 1862! 

Adams Dec. 1862. 

Monroe Aug. 1802. 

Clarno Oct. 1862. 

York Sept. 1862. 

Aug. 1862. 

Monroe Nov. 1862. 



July 
May 
July 
May 

July 

July 

May 
July 
Jan. 

July 

Oct. 



1865 
1865 
1865 
1865 

1865 

1865 

1865 
1865 
1864 

1865 

186S 



April 1864 

July 1865 

June 1865 

Mav 1865 



History 



of Green County. 



-*-, 



Thirty-First Regiment — Continued. 



Name. 

Klassy, Thos 

Layton, John ff 

McCauliff, John 

McDonald, James g<j. . . 

McMulle , Zebulon 

Mullen, James 

Muzzey, Piiny D hh 

Olson, Erich 

O'Neil. Joseph 

SlomiKer, David 

Smith, John S.r 

Smith, Francis ii 

Smith, Win. N 

Snyder. John 

Stair, Wm 

Stalder, John 

Stoller, UJrichjfj 

Streiff. John 

Thatcher, Alvan II 
Thurlow, Jeremiah e . 

Wright, Edgar 

Zimmerman, David... 

Co. H. 

Kennedy, Michael 

Kerns, Edward 

Kerns, Joseph H 

Kyle, Urias 

McBride, James 

McCri'lis, Frank 

Merrill, George, e 

Mill man, Francis C kk 

Morrison, James N 

Murfit, Richard 

Niemeyer, '-^orge 

Pratt, Solomon A 

Wincenviele, Sam 

Wittwer, Samuel 

Zimmerman , Peter 

Co. I. 

Allen. Justin W 

Bartlett, Eugene 

Bartlett, John E 

Foster, Ira A 

Kennedy. Michael 

Osgood, Cyrus W 

Stanley, Jeff 

Webster, Benj 

Co. K. 
Farley, Wm. W 



Rank. Residence. E S^mLt. 

Private Jan. 1864.. 

" .. Monroe Sept. 1863. 

.. Adams Oct. 1862. 

" .. Washington '• 

" .. Adams. Nov. 

" . . Albany Dec. 

" .. Washington Oct. 

.. York 

" .. Albany Nov. 

" .. Washington " 

.. NewGlarus. ... Sept. 1882. 
" .. Washington Nov. 1862. 

. York Sept. 1862. 

Jan. 1864. 



1862., 

1862. 

1862.. 



When mus- 
tered out. 
July 1865 

July* 1865 

May "1865 
July 1865 



1862. 



July 1865 



July 1865 



Washington Sept. 1862. 

... Nov.,-1862. 

Monroe Oct. 1862 . 

York Sept. 1862. 

Washington. ... Nov. 1862. 

Monticello " 

NewGlarus .... Sept. 1862. 



May 1865 
July 1865 

July 1865 



Feb. 1863 
Sept. 1863 



Aug. 1862.. Aug. 1863 



Monroe ' l 

Monroe Aug., 1862. 



Clarno. . 
Monroe. 
Clarno. . 



Albany " 

Washington Jan. 1864. 

Washington " 

Monroe " 



June 1865 

June 1865 

June 1865 

June 1865 

June 1865 

July 1 864 

June 1865 

July 1865 

July 1865 



1862.. March 1865 
.. June 1865 



Exeter Aug 

Albany 

Albany 

Albany " 

Dayton " ..An/. 1863 

Albany " .. June 1865 

Juda 

Sylvester April, 1882, Feb. 1863 

Monroe Aug. 1862.. June 1865 



REFERENCES FOR THIRTY-FIRST REGIMENT. 

a Promoted Colonel, October, 1863 ; Brevet Brigadier-General, March, 1865. 

b Promoted Captain. 

c Promoted 1st Lieutenant. 
d Promoted Sergeant. 

e Promoted Corporal. 
/ Promoted 2d Lieutenant. 
(J Promoted Major, July, 1865. 

./ Promoted Sergeant-Major. 

k Died at Madison, December 9, 1863. 

I Died at New York, March 27, 1865. 
m Died at Murfreesbure, December 19, 1863. 






2SS 



History of Gi'een County. 



RKFKRENCES FOR THIRTY-FIRST REGIMENT— Continued. 

n Died at Columbus. Ky., July 29, 1863. 
o Died at Monroe, December 6, 1803. 
p Died at Racine, December 19, 1862. 
q Appointed Regimental Postmaster. 
s Died at Murfreesboro, November 29, 1863. 
t Died at Albany, August 27, 1863, 
v Died at Murfreesboro, December 18, 1863. 
v Died at Racine, January 16, 1863. 
w Died at Winona, Minn., September 12, 1863. 
cc Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps. 
y Died at Murfreesboro, January 9, 1864. 
z Died at Racine, February 22, 1863. 
oa Died at Chicago, September 25, 1863. 

bb Promoted Major, October, 1863; Lieutenant-Colonel, Nov. 
drl Died. July 24, 1S63, at Columbus, Ky. 
//Died, May 8, 1864, at Monroe. 
<ig Died 

Mi Died at Murfreesboro, April 2. 1864. 
it Died of wounds, at Kingston, Ga.. August 9. 1864. 
/>' Died at Columbus Kv., May 7, 1863. 
kk Died at Monroe, March 24, 1864. 
U Died at Albany, August 27, 1863. 
mm Promoted Major, November, 1863. 



1863 ; Colonel, July, 1865. 



Thirty-Third Regiment. 



Name. Rank. 

Burbank. Jerome Surgeon 

Davis. Elijah T., a Private. 



Residence 



Date of 
Enlistment. 

Brodhead July 1864.. 

Adams Dec. 1862.. 



When mus- 
tered out. 
Aug." 1865 
Sept. 1863 



REFERENCES FOR THIRTY-THIRD REGIMENT. 
a Promoted Sergeant. 



Thirty-Fourth Regiment. 

Co. B. 

Anderson. Paul Corporal. 

Burbank, Israel, h Private... 

Everson, Arne, c 

Everson, Norway :i 

Grinnell. James " 

Jordit, Kunst 

Owry, Henry " 

Co. G. 
Hampshire, Prank " 



Adams 


. ... Nov. 1862.. 






it 


.... Dec. 1862. 


. Sept. 


1863 


it 


.... Nov. 1862.. 






tt 


.... Nov. 1862.. 


Sept. 


1863 


k 


it 


Dec. 
Jan. 


1862 


Monroe. . . . 


it 


1863 


Adams. ... 


it 


Dec. 


1862 



Jordan Dec. 1862.. Sept. 1863 



REFERENCES FOR THIRTY-FOURTH REGIMENT. 
b Promoted Sergeant. 
c Died, August, 1863. 

Thirty-Fifth Regiment. 

Co. D. 

Barlow, Richard Private.. Mt. Pleasant. . . Aug. 1864 . Oct. 1865 

Burk. Orlando II " .. " ..Jan. 1864 

Jordan, Elijah " .. " ..Dec. 1863.. Mav 1865 

Jordan, Leonard " .. " ..Aug. 1864.. " 

Knight, Ralsey " .. " .. " ..July 1865 

Lemon, William " " ..'".. " 

Lemon. James " .. " .. " May 1865 

Co. E. 

Palmer, Stephen, a l - .. " ..Jan. 1864 

Simmons. Harrison, h.. " .. Brooklyn " .. March 1866 

Hook. Sidney S., c " .. " .. " 

Co. H. 

Luchsinger. Thos., b — Corporal. New Glarus. . .. " .. March 1866 

Stenssy, Alexander Private... " ....Feb. 186L. " 

Co. K. 
Boylan. John W " ..Exeter Jan. 1864.. Jan. 1866 



History of Green County, 



2S9 



REFERENCES FOR THIRTY-FIFTH REGIMENT. 



a Died at Morganza, La., August 25, 1864. 

b Promoted to Sergeant. 

c Died at Morganza, La., Sept. 23, 1864. 



Thirty-Sixth Regiment. 



Name. 

Co. D. 

Walkey. Jacob 

Potter. Wesley S., a 

Adams, Levi J 

Babmtt, Ashley 

Burgi, John , 

Beckman, Michael, h... 

Carle, David EL, c 

Clemmer, Joseph W., d. 

Davan, Frederick, e 

Dyson, David,/ 

Campbell, EliD 

Frost, Geo. W., g 

Gans George, h 

Hanna, Win 

Henderson, Wm., i 

Jackson, James T 

Lownsbury, Andrew, li.. 

McLain, George, j 

O'Connor. Martin, j 

Patton. Wesley 

Porter, Stafford D., m... 
Raymer, George W.,j... 

Raymer, Thonias C 

Sellick, Alfred 

Shaughenesey, Michael.. 

Scott, Wm B 

Utiger, Godfrey, I 

Vance, James P , n 

Vanderbilt, Eugene 

Vanderbilt, John W. H. 
Welchance, John C, )'.. 

Wells, Curtis N 

Wenger, Frederick 

Wright, Milan D.,/ 

Roderick, Wm. W., j 

Co. H. 
Sanders, Joei 



Rank. 



Residence. 



Date of 
Enlistment. 



Captain... Monroe Mar. 1864. 

1st Lieut. Brodhead " 

Private... " Feb. 1864. 

.. Monroe Mar. 1864. 

Feb. 1864. 



Brodhead. 

Juda 

Monroe 



When mus- 
tered out. 

Mar. 1864 

May 1865 

July 1S65 

Aug. 1864 

July 1865 



Twin Grove.. 
Jefferson.. . 

Sylvester Mar 

Monroe 

Juda 

Monroe 



Brodhead 

Monroe " 

Mar. 1864. 

Monticello Feb. 1864.. 

Monroe : Mar. 1864 . . 

Feb. 1864.. 



tl 






Mar. 1864. 
Feb. 1864. 

If. 


. July 

• Aug. 


1865 
1864 




July 


1865 


Mar. 1864'.' 

a. 


July 

LI 


1865 


Feb. 1864 




July 


1865 


Lb 


July 


1865 



July 1865 



Juda 

Jefferson. 



Brodhead. 

Juda 

Monroe. .. 
Brodhead. 
Jefferson, 



Private . . Monroe Mar. 1864 



.. July 


1865 




.. July 
. . Mar. 


1865 
1865 


.. July 


1S65 



REFERENCES FOR THIRTY-SIXTH REGIMENT. 

a Promoted Captain. 

6 Died in Rebel Prison, at Salisbury, N. C, November 15, 1864. 

c Killed at Petersburg, Va., June 16, 1864. 
d Promoted to Commissary Sergeant. 

e Discharged on account of wounds. 

f Killed at Ream's Station, August ib, 1864. 
Killed at Petersburg, July 19, 1864. 
h Promoted to Sergeant. 

i Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps. 

3 Promoted to Corporal. 

k Died at Madison, May 8. 1864. 

I Killed at Cold Harbor, June 4, 1864. 
m Died at Petersburg, January 28, 1864. 
n Promoted Captain, 
o Died at Andersonville, September 10, 1864. 



«5* 



290 



History of Green County. 



Thirty-Seventh Regiment. 



Name. 

Co. C. 

Green, John a 

Parker, A. J 

Riddle, Freeman B. h.. 

Lawrence. Philip c 

Green, Wm. H. d 

Green. Wm. c 

Perkins, Thos. e 

Day, Albert/ 

Ace. Elijah. 

Bryant, David Z 

Domey, Henry g 

Estee, John W. of 

Evans, Bon Devine h. . . 

Martin, John i 

Ross, Otis h 

Peregov. Nathaniel 

Co. H. 
Seiieidigger, Andrew fj. 



Rank. 



Residence. 



Date of When mus- 

Enlistment. tered out. 



Capt 

IstLt... 
2nd Lt. 
2nd Lt. 
Sergt . . 
Private 



April 1864.. July 1865 

" .. Nov. 1864 

Mar. 1864 

June 1865 

York Mar. 1864 

Dayton July 1865 

Mar. 1864 

York " .. Julv 1865 

Exeter 

York •• .. May 1865 

Exeter tk 



Private . . Exeter Mar. 1864. 



Aug. 1864 



Private . . Monroe Nov. 1863 . 



REFERENCES FOR THIRTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT. 

« Promoted to Major, Oct., 1864 ; toLieutenant-Colonel, Dec, 1804 ; to Colonel, July, 1865 
b Killed at Petersburg, June 18, 1864. 
c Promoted 1st Lieutenant. 
d Died of wounds, July 9, 1865. 
e Promoted to Sergeant. 
/ Promoted to Corporal. 
«; Killed before Petersburg, April 2, 1865. 
A Captured July 30, 1864. Supposed to have died. 
i Died October 9, 1865. 



Biutliff. James a 


Col 


Tochterman, Chris 


Ass't Sur. 


MeCraken, Aaron H 


Adj 


Co. B. 




Rice. A. D 


Private . . 


Rice. M. H. b 


'■ 


Sawyer. R. D. c 


u 


Co. C. 




Bintliff, Gershom 


Private . . 


Co. D. 






IstLt.... 


Eoylands. Ben. L 


Sergt 


■Glover, Franklin 


£fc 


Wyatt, John de 


Corp*l . . . 




bt 


Stephenson John S. /.. . 


It 




Private . 


Baker. A. M 


ti 




l; 


Bloom. J. K. P 


tt 


Clemmer. Jacob 


tt 


Cauehey, Thos. L 


tfc 


Chambers, J. M 


it 


Chapman Benj. F 


tt 


Dumars, Thos 


a. 


Feather. Jeffeison h 


It 


Frankenberger, Henry c 


u 


Gist, Geo. V 


Lb 


Grace. Wm. J 


fcl 



Thirty-Eighth Regiment. 



Monroe Mar. 1864. 

Cadiz Nov. 1864. 

Monroe Mar. 1864 . 



July 1865 



Dayton Mar. 1864.. July 1865 



July 1865 



Mouroe Feb. 1865. . July 1865 



Monroe. 



Mar. 1864. 



.... Aug. 1864. 
Mar. 1864. 



11 
11 



Aug. 1864. 
Mar. 1864. 
Aug. 1864. 
Mar. 1864. 



Aug. 1864. 
Mar. 1864. 



Julv 1865 
Maf. 1865 
July 1865 

July 1865 

July "1865 

June 1865 
.< 

July 1865 

It 

June 1865 

Julv 1865 

June 1865 

July 1865 

July ' "l865 
June 1865 
July 1865 



History of Green County. 



291 



Thirty-Eighth Regiment — Continued. 



Name. Rank. 

Griffith. T Private . . 

Hammond, A. d " 

Long. Abner " 

Keith, M 

McCrakfii. J. VV 

Nobles, Geo. J 

Phillips, G 

Pierce, Jos. M. c " 

Randall, Jacob " 

Smith, Geo 

Wallace, D 

Walker, J. M. i 

Co. E. 

Caldwell, S. B Private.. 

Donges, John k " 

Gill, FredO 

Kline, I. J " 

Killer. Jacob " 

Kilwine, P. W 

Newcomer, Geo. I li 

Newcomer, Joseph " 

Co. F. 

Foster, Wm. H. m 1st Lt. ... 

Glover. Frank d s Private. . 

Smith, Irwin " 

Co. H. 

Corey. D. W Capt 

Frees, Benj. M. j 1st Lt 

Adams, Wm. n. Sergt 

Shank, J. B. Jr Sergeant. 

Pool, Harris " 

Baily, J. A * 

White, Geo. P 

Ford, John A Corporal. 

Saunders. John G " 

Hawkins, Wm. R o " 

Thorp Geo. W. d 

Snyder, Joseph p " 

Jordan, John C " 

Wallace, William 

Austin, Martin Private. . . 

Bai ey, J 

Bates, Wm 

Baxter, A. B 

Blanchard, C... 

Booher, J. J " 

Brown. Wm. H " 

Campbell, Wm 

Cory, J W 

Davis, J " 

Deetz, L 

Dexter, A.W " 

Dolau, Martin " 

Dunaway, C " 

Dunn. Nelson q lt 

Emerick, Wm " 

Endriken, S :. " 

Farlin, W. H " 

Fitzaerald, S " 



Residence. 

t« 


Date of 
Enlistment 

. Aug. 1864. 

tt 


When 

terec 

. June 

tt 


mus. 
I out. 
1865 


it 
it 
it 

it 


Mar. 

tt 

Aug. 

tt 


1864. 
1864.' 


tt 

• July 

. June 

tt 


1865 
1865 


11 
tt 
it 
It 

LI 

It 


. Mar. 

Aug. 
Mar. 
Sept. 
• Aug. 

t ; 


1864. 
1864. 
1864. 
1864. 
1864. 


• July 

. June 

. Jan. 

tt 

1 1 

• July 


1865 
1865 
1865 

1865 


Pedee 


Aug. 

t • 
tt 

1 1 
t. 


1864. 


. June 


1865 


Spring Grove . 

t. 
it 


. June 
• July 
. June 


1865 
1865 
1865 


Pedee 


tt 




Julv 


1865 
1865 


it 
Monroe 


tt 
. Sept. 


1864. 


"tt 
. April 

• July 
. June 


tt 


1865 


Spring Grove. 


. Sept. 


1864. 


1865 


Monroe 

tt 

it 

Cadiz 

Monroe 

tt 


. Aug. 

Lt 
tt 

Aug 

tt 

tt 


1864. 
1864.". 


Jan. 
. June 

• July 

July, 
tt 

tt 


1865 
1865 
1865 
1865 


tt 


tt 




tt 




tt 


tt 




tt 






tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 




tt 




tt 
tt 




July, 


1865 


Mt. Pleasant.. 

Exeter 

Cadiz 

Sylvester 

Clarno 

Mt. Pleasant. . 

1 1 


tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
t. 
tt 




July, 

tt 
tt 

Dec. 

July. 

tt 

tt 


1865 

1864 
1865 


tt 


t. 




t. 




tt 


tt 
tt 




Dec. 

tt 


1864 


tt 


tt 




tt 




Adams 

Cadiz 

Monroe 

tt 


tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 




tt 

tt 
t. 
tt 




tt 


tt 




tt 




tt 


.t 

tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 








Clarno 


July, 

tt 

tt 


1865 


Adams 

Clarno 





3 9 2 History of Green County. 

Thirty-Eighth Regiment— Continued. 



rank. 



Name. 

Frost, W.J Private 

Hawkins, F. M 

Jewett, M 

Johnsou, M u 

Killgore E. M 

Land, Sidney c 

Leahv, John lt 

Ligar, Aagar c 

Lindlev, 0. W. c 

Loveland, Thos ••• 

McCardle, G. R 

McMillan, J. S tt 

Mears, John 

Miller, Emanuel u 

Miller, John u 

Miller, J. S tl 

O'Neil, Thos u ■■ 

Patterson, A. W 

Priewe, Wm. F t 

Randall. J.N 

Sanders, J. A... 

Sanders, Wm. D... 

Satterlee, Rob- rt e 

Small, Frank 

Snyder, Elias 

Snyder, T. H 

Start, S. S. c 

Staver, S. W tt 

St. Clair. R. L 

Stubbs, Wm. H 

Sullivan, John 

Trogncr, Geo 

Virtue, Stephen 

Warren, John 

West. Joseph tt 

Wheeler. Nelson u 

Wickersham, G u 

Winkler, Andrew 

Wondcrly, E. D u 

Wood. Geo. J 

Ho^A.H Private.. 

Co. K. 

Redfield, Elisha . • 

Stevens, Jacob C Musician 

Chapman, George W Private. . 

Fields, N. A 

Jefferson, James. 

Kane, Henry.... 

Stevens, Jacob C tt 

Vantassel. Wm. R 



Date of 
Residence. Enlistment. 

Spring Grove.. Aug. 1864. - 

Clarno 

Mt. Pleasant.. 
Monroe 



Adams . 
Monroe. 



Sylvester. 
Decatur... 
Clarno — 



When mus- 
tered out. 
July, 1865 



Dec. 1864 
July, 1865 






Monroe. 
Cadiz.. . 
Monroe. 



Clarno 

Mt. Pleasant 

Cadiz 

Monroe 

Cadiz 



June, 1865 
July, 1865 



Monroe 

Mt. Pleasant. 
Clarno 



Adams 
Clarno. 



Jordan. 
Clarno.. 
Monroe. 



Cadiz 

Monroe 

Sylvester 

Adams 

Monroe 

Mt. Pleasant.. 
Sylvester 

Cadiz Aug. 



1S64.. June 1865 



Adams.. 
Monroe. 



Adams. 
Monroe. 



" . . Adams 

REFERENCES FOR THIRTY-EIGHTH REGIMENT. 



a Brigadier-General, by Brevet. 
b Killed April 2,1805. 
c Promoted to Corporal. 



d Promoted to Sergeant. Washington, D. C. 

e Died of wounds, April 18, 1865, at vvasnnibi"". " 



f Died of wounds, July, 1864 



History of Green County. 



3 93 



REFERENCES FOR THIRTY-EIGHTH REGIMENT— Continued. 

f/ Promoted to Commissary Sergeant. 
Ji Died of wounds received June, 1864, 

i Appointed Chaplain. 

j Promoted to Captain. 

k Died of wounds, April 20, 1865, 

I Died January 13, 1865. 
m Promoted to Captain Co. D. 
n Promoted to 2d Lieutenant, 
o Killed April 2, 1865. 

p Died at City Point, Va., December 15, 1864. 
q Died of wounds, April 2, 1865. 

s Promoted 2nd Lieutenant. 



Forty-Second Regiment. 



Name. 



Rank. 



Bradshaw, H. N. a Ass't Sur. 

Co. F. 

Benson, Ezzan H Captain.. 

Heal, Nelson Sergeant. 

Benson, Edward Corporal.. 

Bryant, Lewis N Private. . . 

Do'tv, Alraon M. M 

Dick, Wm. H 

Ferrin, Louis A " 

Hall, Wm. H 

Ham, Wm 

Haskiu,John " 

Havens. Albert P " 

Lawber, Joseph " 

Markham, John "• 

Morgan, James H " 

Ross, Enos " 

Spencer, Dennis M " 

Staley, Jeremiah S " 

Turner, Robert " 

Webber, Martin C " 

Co. H. 
Patrick, J. R 



Residence. 
Monticello.. . 


Date of 
Enlistment. 


When mus- 
tered out. 


Brooklyn.. 
Exeter 


Sept. 1864. 
.. Aug. 1864. 


June 1865 


Brooklyn , . . 
Exeter 


Sept. 1864.. 

U 

Aug. 1864.. 

U 
ti 
11 
tl 

u 


bt 

tt 
It 


11 




Exeter 


June 1865 

Lb 
It 


u 


u 


16 




U 
t( 

it 


May, 1865 
June. 1865 


tl 


LI 


;l 


U 


U 


it 


.1 


It 


.» 


Brooklyn 

Exeter 


It 

U 


tt 



Aug. 1864.. 



a Declined. 



REFERENCES FOR FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 



Forty-Third Regiment. 

Co. I. 

Berry. Edwin Corporal.. Mt. Pleasant.. Sept. 

nerrick, Gilbert A Musician. " .. Aug. 

Annon, Geo Private*.. York " 

Edwards, Allen a " .. Mt. Pleasant. . Sept. 

Edwards, Frank " .. Exeter " 

Greenwood Joseph " .. NewGlarus... " 

McGoon, Richard " .. Mt. Pleasant.. Aug. 

REFERENCES FOR FORTY-THIRD REGIMENT 
a Died at Johnsonville, Tenn.. November 21, 1865. 



1884. 
1864. 

1864'. 



1864. 



Mav. 1865 



Mav. 1 865 



Forty-Fourth Regiment. 



Ball. James M Surgeon.. Monroe.. 



. Nov. 1864.. Aug. 1865 



294 



History of Green County. 



FoRT^-FlFTH REGIMEMT. 



Name. Rank. 

Ruf. Karl Adjutant- 
Co. A. 

Hoehn. Henry g 2nd Lieut. 

Co. E. 

Jordi, Jacob : Private. . . 

Jordi. John b 

Law. Frederick C " 

Scharpf. Geo " 

Voegli, Abraham " 

Yoegli. Balthasar c " 

Co. F. 
Jacobson, Jacob " 

Co. I. 

Leibelt, Friedrich / Musician. 

Grave. Philip Private. . . 

Co. K. 

Nonveiler. Max d Sergeant. 

Lentz. Daniel Private... 

Niebahn, Chlstopher e . " 



T?psiripii.-p Date of 

Kesiaence. Enlistment. 

Monroe Sept. 1864.. 

NewGlarus... Nov. 1864.. 

Monroe Feb. 1865.. 



When mus 
tered out. 
July. 1865 



Mt. Pleasant. 

Exeter 

New Glarus. 



Mav, 1865 
July. 1865 



Decatur " 

Jefferson Oct. 1864. 



July. 1865 
July,'"i865 



Exeter Feb. 1865. 



REFERENCES FOR FORTY-FIFTH REGIMENT. 



b Died at Nashville, July 1, 1865. 

c Died at Johnsonville, Tenn., May 13, 1865. 

d Promoted to 2d Lieutenant. 

e Promoted Corporal. 

/Appointed Bugler. 

g Promoted to Captain. 



Forty-Sixth Regiment. 



Co. A. 














Johns. Henrv T 


. 1st Lieut 


Brodhead 


.. Feb. 


1865. 


. Sept. 


1865 


Carr. Isaac T. f 


2d Lieut. 


, Monroe 


. Jan. 


1865. 


t V 




Ablemau, Christian 


. Private.. 


. Jordan 




t; 


tt 




Ableman, Joseph C 


t. 


bb 


.. Feb. 


1865. 


tt 




-\ lbright. David <x. . 


14 

bb 


Clarno - 




U 
It 


t . 
It 






. Washington. 




Baughman. Mathias. .. 
Beedy. Geo. R 


bb 


Jordan 




. . 


It 




b. 


Cadiz 


. Jan. 


1865.. 


May, 


1865 


Beekman, John F 


• 1 




. Feb. 


1865. 


. Sept. 


1865 


Beyerhoffer. Chas 


.. 


Jordan 


. Jan. 


1865. 


tt 




Bloom. Frederick 


bb 


Washington. . 


. Feb. 


1865. 

U 


May, 
Sept. 


1865 


Bloom. Peter 


1865 




b. 






It 


.( 




Bovlan. Aaron A b 


.. 


Washington... 




It 


u 




Bradshaw, James C b.. 


bb 


Monroe 


. Jan. 


1665.. 


ti 




Brager Sever A. c 


bb 


Sylvester 


. Feb. 


1865.. 


lb 




Burt, Christian 


lb 

U 


it 
Monroe 


. Jan. 


1 t 

1865".' 


b. 




Bnshnell, Clark E 




Case. Samuel S 


bb 


u 


. Feb. 


1865.. 


b. 




Cessna. Chas. A 


bb 


bb 


. Jan. 


1865.. 


bt 




Chase. Edwins S 


bb 


Deeatur 


. Feb. 


1865.. 


. . 




Cross, Joseph D 


bb 


Monroe 


. Jan. 


1865.. 


Aug. 


1865 


Cummings, Joseph 




Jefferson 




It 


Sept. 


1865 


Emberson, Hans 


b. 


York 


. Feb. 


1865.. 


bt 




Errickson. Hans 


bb 


tt 




u 


b . 




Fairbank, Randolph 


11 


Monroe 




it 


tt 





History of Green County. 



-95 



Forty-Sixth Regiment — Continued. 



Name. 


Rank. 


Residence. 


Date of 
Enlistment. 


When mus- 
tered out. 


Fawver, Philip N 


Private . 




. Jan. 1865.. 


Sept. 1865 




tt 


Cadiz 

. York 


Feb. 1865.. 

tt 


t it 


Gilbert, Geo 


. b 


Grayson, Joseph a 




fab 


Hansen, John C. a 


,. 


. York 


tt 


tt 


Hefty, Adam 


tt 


. Washington. . 


tt 


tt 


Hildebrant, James 


tt 


. Cadiz 


. Jan. 1865.. 


tt 


Hills. Hiram 


tt 


. Monroe 

1 1 


Feb. 1865.. 


tt 


Hills, Nelson 


tt 


Hoffman, Daniel 


u 


. Cadiz 


tt 

tt 


tt 




. Spring Grove. 


tt 


Iverson, Erick 


tt 


. York 


tt 


tt 


Jacobson, Jacob 


It 
tt 

tt 


tt 


tt 
Jan. 1865.. 


tt 


Jeremiahson, Ole 


tt 


tt 


Jones, Thos. H 


. Clarno 


tt 


Johns, Henry F 


tt 


. Jefferson 


tt 


lb 


Johnson, James H 


tt 


tt 


tt 


tt 


Johnson. John 


tt 


. York 


. Feb. 1865.. 


tt 




1 1 


. Svlvester 


. Feb. 1865.. 


Sept. 1685- 


Kerr, Joseph 

Kimble, Jesse a 


tt 
tt 
tt 


Clarno 


tt 
tt 
tt 


1 1 


. Monroe 

. Spring Grove. 


tt 


Klumb, Thos. C 


tt 


Legler, Nicholas 


tt 


New Glarus, .. 


tt 


tt 


McLain, Daniel H d 


tt 


. Sylvester 


u 


tt 


Meachem, Horace 


tt 




Jan. 1865.. 


tt 


Meyer, Gottfried 


tt 


. Jordan 


" 


t. 


Moore, Wm 


tt 

tt 




. Feb. 1865.. 

tt 


1 1 


Morrison, Chas 


. Clarno 


tt 


Neska, Karl 


tt 


tt 


tt 


tt 




tt 


. Jordan 


tt 


tt 


Norder, Casper 


tt 




tt 


tt. 


Olson, Helge 


tt 


. York 


tt 


tt 


Oprecht, Fredolin 


1 1 


. Washington.. 


1 1 


tt 


Osgood. Samuel K 


tt 


. Jordan 


tt 


tt 


Parks, John ft. b 


'. t 


. Washington.. 


tt 


tt 


Parks, Wm 


tt 


i fc 


tt 


tt 


Peterson, Peter 


tt 


. Svlvester 


tt 


it- 


Phillips, Edwin 


tt 




June 1865.. 


tt 


Pilley, Daniel F 


tt 
tt 


. Jefferson 

Sylvester 


. Feb. 1865.. 

tt 


tt 


Pollock, David 


tt 


Re ir, Andrew a 


tt 
tt 


York 

Cadiz 


tt 
tt 


tt 




tt 


Robb, Nelson 


tt 


. Sylvester 


tt 


tt 


Rogers, Hezekiah D 


tt 


t i 


tt 


tt 


Scott, Albert W 


tt 


tt 


tt 


May 1865 


Severson, Bryueril b 


tt 


tt 


tt 


Sept. 1865 


Smith, Wm 


tt 


. Cadiz 


ti 


tt 


Smith, Frederick 


tt 


. Clarno 


tt 


tt 


Smith, Joseph 


tt 


Jordan 


Jan. 1865.. 


tt 


Springsted, Jeremiah W.b 


tt 


. Jefferson 




tt 


Streiff, Thos 


tt 


. Washington.. 


Feb. 1865.. 


tt 


Stukv. David 


tt 


Clarno 


tt 


tt 


Sutherland, Richard 


tt 


Svlvester 


Jan. 1865.. 


tt 


Thompson, Andrew 


tt 


Cadiz 


Feb. 1865.. 


tt 


Thompson, Chas 


tt 


Spring Grove. 


tt 


tt 


Thompson, Ever 


tt 


Sylvester 


tt 


tt 


Thompson, Nelson 


tt 


Spring Grove. 


tt 


tt 


VanHorn, Wm. C 


tt 


. Cadiz 


. Jan. 1865.. 


tt 



296 



History of Green County. 



Forty-Sixth Regiment — Continued. 



Name. Rank. 

Voegel, Jost Private . . 

Webb, Aaron A 

Webb, Allen 

Wech, Aaron ■' 

Weisniiller, John " 

Zweifer, Jacob " 

Co. F. 

Luchsinger, A CorpU — 

Albertson, Andrew Private . . 

Bakken. Anders l * 

Born, Ole C 

Davenport, Seymour ... " 

Elmer, John " 

Hatfield, Wamba 

Norder, Dietich " 

Peckham, Benjamin — " 

Spangler, Elia's ■* 

Staffancher, John A " 

Zentner, Frederick " 

Co. G. 

Clarke, Daniel Jr u 

Elmer Fridolin " 

Micheleon. Erick " 

Olson, Andrew " 

Streiff, F 

Svigyum. Erick S " 

Ward, Julius A 

Co. H. 

Turnipseed, Wm Corp'l.. .. 

Co. I. 

Sherman, S M. / 2d Lieut.. 

Johnson, Wm. R Sergeant. 

Wescott, John 

Minor, Thos. J 

Purington, Alonzo " 

Kettleson, Ole Corporal.. 

Satterlee, Henry " 

Chapel, James H " 

Crowell, Henry A " 

Baebler, Oswald 

Allen, Eliakim R 

Anderson, Michael e " 

Babcock, Samuel J. a. .. " 

Bridgman, Hosea " 

Byrnes, Wm " 

Coffee. Jarvil " 

Colby, David " 

Crooks, Wm " 

Crowe, Rosel " 

Disch, Martin " 

Durst, Thomas " 

Eidsmoe. Michael lt 

Elliott, Henry " 

Everson, Ole " 

Friday, Jacob tv 

Fowler, R. B " 

Gabriel, Hiram. " 

Garrett, John " 

Garrett, LaFayette " 



Kesiripnop Date of 

Kesidencp. Enlistment 

Washington... Feb. 1865 

Monroe Jan. 1865 



Jefferson ( 

Clarno Feb. 

Washington... ' 



1865 



Sylvester. 
York 



Adams Jan. 

Albany Feb. 

M't Pleasant .. 

Brooklyn 

Sylvester .... 

Jefferson 

Decatur 

M't Pleasant... 
Sylvester 

Monroe 



1865 
1865 



Washington.. . 

Clarno ■ 

York 

Farmers Grove. 

York 

Cadiz 



Monroe. 



York Jan. 

" Feb. 

11 Jan. 

Feb. 



Jan. 



Spring Grove. 

Brookij-n 

Clarno 

Jefferson 

Spring Grove. 

Jeft'erson 

New Glarus.. 
Spring Grove.. 

Clarno Jan. 

Decatur 

Albany Feb. 

Jeft'erson 

York 

Decatur Jan. 

Monroe 

Albany Feb. 

New Glarus » 

York '.'.".. 



1865 
1865 
1865 
1865 



Adams Jan. 

New Glarus Feb. 

Spring Grove.. 

York 

" Jan. 



1865 
1865 

1865 



1865 
1865 



1865 
1865 



1865 



When mus- 
tered out. 
Sept. 1865 



it 
it 



a- 
ll 

it 
.t 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 
tt 



History of Green County. 



-97 



Forty-Sixth Regiment — Continued. 



Name. Rank. 

Gorhara, Henry C Private 

Gorham, Wm. C " 

Haas, Jacob 

Halverson, Arno " 

Hefty, Fabian 

Hilton, James F • t 

Hurlbut, Rollin N 

Jones. Jeremiah F 

Kelly, Stephen 

Kuudert. Fridolin 

Lee, Ole H 

Lee, Solomon " 

Martin, Isaac Edgar " 

Martin, Isaac N " 

Miner, Wm. A 

McCaslin, Francis M " 

Nolton, Daniel " ; 

Olson. Ole 

Olson, Peter " 

Olson, Thor 

Owrey, John " 

Peebles, Jared N " 

Peebles, Nelson " 

Peebles, Royal M 

Purrinton, Chas. H •' 

Purrinton, Martin 

Ripley, Mose:s D 

Root, James ,L 

Satterlee, Francis E 

Schindler, Adam 

Schindler, Andrew 

Smith. James S " 

Smith. Salmon " 

Smith, Samuel J 

Straw, Daniel - 

Teal, Abram " 

Thompson, Erick t- 

Tomliu, Christopher... " 

Trickle, Emanuel 

Wescott, John E " 

Zimmerman, Frederick. " 

Zimmerman, Henry 

Co. K. 

Cameron. John 

George, Daniel " 

Oprecht. Baltasar " 



Residence. 
York 



Date of When mus- 

Enlistment. tercel out. 



Spring Grove 

Adams 

New Glarus 
York 



Brooklyn 

New Glarus 

York 

Brooklyn.... 
Spring Grove 



Albany. 
York . . . 



Brooklyn. . . 

Albany 

Spring Grov 
Brooklyn.. . 
Jefferson . . . 
New Glarus 

Monroe 



Spring Grove 

Decatur 

Albany 

Clarno 

Brooklyn. . . 

Clarno 

Cadiz 

New Glarus 
Spring Grove 



Monroe. . 
Jefferson. 
Monroe.. . 



Feb. 


1865.. 


Jan. 
Feb. 


1865;; 

1865.. 


Jan. 
Feb. 


1865.'.' 
1865.. 


Jan. 
Feb. 
Jan. 


.1 

It 

1865.'. 
1865.. 
1865.. 


Feb. 


1865.'. 


Jan. 
Feb. 
Jan. 
Feb. 


1865.'. 
1865.. 
1865.. 
1865.. 


Jan. 
Feb. 
Jan. 
Feb. 


1865.'. 
1865 . . 
1865.. 
1865.. 


Jan. 
Feb. 


1865.! 
1865.. 




• 



May 1865 
Sept. 1865 



REFERENCES FOR FORTY-SIXTH REGIMENT. 



a Promoted to Corporal. 

b Promoted to Sergeant. 

c Promoted to Drum-Major. 

d Died at Athens. Ala., May 29, 1885. 

e Died at Huntsville, Ala., September 2, 1865. 

/ Promoted to Captain 



36 



2 9 8 



History of Gree7i County. 



Forty-Ninth Regiment. 



Name. 


Rank. 


Residence. 


Date of 
Enlistment 


When mus- 
tered out. 


Co.B. 










Thomas, James a 


Private. . 


. Brooklyn 


. Feb. 1865. 




Co. D. 










Farmer, Geo. D 


■• 


. Decatur 


ii 


. May 1865 


Fisher, Chas. A 


u 


. Spring Grove. 


" 


It 


Co. G. 










Back, Theodore J b 


ii 


. Monticello 


.i 


.Nov. 1865 


Chamberlain, Chas.G b c 


lb 


. Albany, 


.i 




Chesbro, Eldridge W — 


11 


. M't Pleasant.. 


u 


. Nov. 1865 


Dodge, Chas 


'• 


. Albany 


ii 






11 


" 


tl 


. July 1865 




11 




. Mar. 1865. 


. Nov. 1865 


McDermot, John 


lb 


1 1 


Feb. 1865. 


bG 


Mickelson, Andrew 


lb 


. Decatur 


ii 


.; 




I. 


it 


n 


■ t 


Mickelson, Kanute 


lt 


ii 


ii 


•* 


Miller, Geo. W 


•• 


. M*t Pleasant.. 


n 


u 


Milligan, Wm. W d 


•• 


. Albany 


•' 


It 


O'Neil, Thos. H 


u 


. M't Pleasant.. 


n 


u 


Peckham, Nelson A 


11 


it, 


. i 


. Sept, 1865 


Phillips, Truman E 


■ I 


. Albany 


n 


. June 1865 


Rolfe, Geo. H 


.. 


. M*t Pleasant.. 


n 


. Nov. 1865 


Rolfe, Lewis K 


.. 


. Albany 


.i 


•• 


Skillin^e, Thos. H 


1. 


. M't Pleasant.. 


ii 


.i 


Sherbundy, John L 


•• 


. Sylvester... . 


.i 


.i 


Titus, Wm. He 


■• 


. M*t Pleasant . 


.i 


n 


Walling, Saxton IS 


11 


1 1 


n 


n 


Winter, Chas. J 


■ I 


. Brooklyn 


•• 


. 


Wilson, Ira W 


.1 


. M't Pleasant. . 


u 





REFERENCES FOR FORTY-NINTH REGTMENT. 



a Died at Rollo, Mo.. August 3, 1865. 

b Promoted to Corporal. 

c In Hospital when Company mustered out. 

d Promoted to Sergeant-Major. 

e Promoted to Sergeant. 



Fiftieth Regiment. 



Bryant, Edwin E Lt. Col . . . 

Morris, Edward Chaplain. 

Co. A. 
Wisdom, Clayton Private.. . 

Co. B. 

Allen, Justin W. a 2d Lieut.. 

Harris. Joseph b Corporal. 

Phelps, Henry I. b 

Daniels, Lewis S. b Private.. 

Edson, Seth " 

Fox, John O. c 

Reiser. Peter d 

Lake, John R 

Perkins. James 

Turner, Swmpson e " 

Webber, Elijah A 

Co D. 
Monroe, John 



Monroe Feb., 1865.. Feb. 186t> 

April, 1865.. Jane. 1866 

Decatur Feb. 1865.. 



Brodhead 

Mt. Pleasant. 



Mar. 1865. 



May. 1865 



1865 



May, 
June, 1866 



Decatur Jan. 1865. 



History of Green County. 299 

Fiftieth Regiment — Continued. 

v, Mf i[.„ v Tf^ifUme,. Dateof \V1kii nms- 

NAME - KAISK - KesKleii. ( Enlistment. tered out. 

Co. H. 

Chapman. Geo Private . . Alt. Pleasant. . . Feb. 1865.. May. 1805 

Co. I. 

Estee, Andrew J " .. Albany " .. June. 1866 

Reynolds. Wm l - .. Decatur Jan. 1865.. Feb. 1866 

Roe, Isaac • .. " Feb. 1865.. May. 1865 

Smith, Samuel W. fh. . " ... Alt. Pleasant.. ; - .. June. 1866 

Co. K. 
Scott. Benjamin •- .. Decatur Jan. 1865... 

REFERENCES FOR FIFTIETH REGIMENT. 

a Promoted to Captain. 

/> Promoted to Sergeant. 

c Died at Boonville, Mo, June !», isi>:>. 

(I Died at St. Louis, Augusta, 1865. 

e Promoted to Corporal. 

/'Died at St. Louis, May 18, 1865. 

Fifty-First Regiaient. 

Sutherland. A. J Adjutant. Alonroe Feb. 1865.. Aug. 1865 

Co. E. 
Jones, Thos. W Private... Adams Mar. 1865.. 

Co. F. 

Emerson, Robert F " . Jordan " .. May. 1865 

Grimes. Chas. H '■ .. Mt. Pleasant. . " ..Aug. 1865 

Hamilton, Robert " .. Jordan " .. May. 1865 

Johnson, Myron " .. Sylvester 

Pace. Chas. B •• .. Jordan •• ; " 

Co. I. 

Hanna, Oliver P. AI " .. Adams -i 

Pengra. Winfield " .. Sylvester 



Fifty-Second Regiaient. 

Co. A. 

Warren, Ezra G. a Private... SyrVester July. 1865 

Shaffer, Jason R kl .. Adams Mar. 1865.. 

REFERENCES FOR FIFTY-SECOND REGIMENT. 
a Promoted to 2d Lieutenant. 



SHARPSHOOTERS. 

Co. G. 

Melvin, Shephard K. «... Segt Brooklyn Sept. 186] 

Alelvin, A. A Private... " Mar. 1865... Nov. 1865 

Melvin, E. " ... " Sept. 1861... Sept. 1862 

MeMn, T. D. b " ... " " 

REFERENCES FOR SHAI! PSIIOOTKRS. 

a Died at Hairison's Landing, Va.. July 16. 1862. 
I> Died at Mechanicksville, Va., June U. 1862. 






300 Histoiy of Green County. 

CAVALRY — First Regiment. 



\\-\if Rank KVxhI.mh-p Date of When mus- 

ftAMB - KANK - Kesiaence. Enlistment. tered out. 

Clinton, Geo. 0. a Eat.Adj't Brodhead Dec. 1861.... Sept. 1864 

Persons, Horace T.J As'tSurg Albany Apr. 1863... Jan. 1865 

Co. B. 

Esterly, Francis P. 1 2nd Lt Monroe July, 1865 

Allen, DeWitt C '. Private... Spring Grove... Sept* 1863... 

Baldwin, Egbert D. b " ... Decatur Aug:. I860 

Beattie, David " ... " Sept. 1863... 

Burkholder, Henry <• ... " 

Cleveland, Roger S. d.. ... •• ...Jordan Oct. 1863... 

Conroy, Michael " ... Decatur Aug. 18(53... Sept. 1865 

Culbertson,Thos. d " ...Jordan Oct. 18(33... July, 1865 

Ganz. Hamilton " ... Decatur Sept. 1863... 

Gill. Win " ... Spring Grove... 

Hopkins, Madison P " ... Decatur " ... " 

Matskie, Win " ... " 

Mayer- John T •' ... Spring' Grove... 

Merritt, Alexander T " ...Decatur Aug.^1863.... 

Murray, Albert W " ... " 

O'Neil, John B '• ... Spring Grove- 
Palmer, Thos. L '• ...Jordan Oct. 1863 

Putnam, Henry 0. d •• ... Decatur Aug. 1863. ... July, 186") 

Simons, Judson d " ... " Sept. 1863... May, 1865 

Seeber, Alfred W. c " ... " Aug. 1863 

Spangler, Wm *' ... " •• ... July, 186") 

Stabler. John ... Spring Grove... 

Stewart- Ezra H. d " ... Decatur 

Ten Eyck. Caspar H " ... " 

Warn, Wm. 1 '" ... " 

Co. D. 
Searles! Henry P ■' ... Decatur Dec 

Co. E. 
Babbitt, Warren C " ... Monroe 



1863.. 


. July, 


1865 




. June, 


1865 


1863.. 
1863 

1863.. 


. July. 
July. 


1865 
1865 



.. 



Kean, Jasper X. <\ 

Co. G. 

Britton, John W '* .. Monroe Nov. 

Conren, i'riah 11. / '• ... Decatur Jan. 

Daggett, Ira ** ... Monroe Dec. 

Green. Chas. R.^f " : 

Hunt,' Geo. A "• ...Brodhead Jan. 1864... 

Co. K. 

Clinton, Chas. W. // ! .. Brodhead Oct. 1863 

Bates, Warren W.»- - * ... Spring Grove... Sept. 1863... July. 1865 

Benson, Jas. A '" ...Sylvester Aug. 1863.... 

Brisbane. Hiram A. d " ... Decatur 

Callender, Chauncey F. d " ... " 

«'raps, John 15 " ... " 

Craps, Wm * ... " Nov. 1863... 

Davis, Samuel G. d '• ... Sylvester Aug. 18(53.... 

Fancher, Abram A. d ... Decatur Sept, 1863... 

Garrison, Wm. A ... Spring Grove... 

Leisure, Daniel d " ... Decatur Aug. 1863... . 

Mitchell, Jay J " ... " 

Par-low, Frank B " ... Albany *' ... May, 1865 

Pomroy, Robt. H i- ... Spring Grove... " ...July, 1865 

Shoves, Lewis F. d " ... " ... Sept. is*;:;... •• 

Woodur, Ira^ " ... Decatur ... " 






History of Green Cotmty, 301 

First Regiment — Continued. 

V,up TJihik- Ponirlanno Date Of Wlieil 11U1S - 

" NaME - Rank - Residence. Enlistment. tered out. 

Co. M. 

Ferguson, Robt. R Private... Jordan Nov. 1863... July, 1865 

Phillips, James W " ... " Dec. 186:].... June, 1865 

Rush, Arnold «' ... " " ....July, 1865 

RECORD NOT FOUND. 

Miner. Edgar S., Brodhead. 

REFERENCES FOR FIRST REGIMENT. 

u Conimissioned Captain Company B. September, 1862. 

b Taken prisoner at Varnel Station. <ia.. May, 1861. Probably died in prison. 
C Died at Louisville, June 29. 1864. 
fl Promoted to Corporal. 
e Died at Tallahoma, July 8, 1864. 
/Promoted to Regimental Hospital Steward. 
g Promoted to Sergeant. 
h Died March 29, 1864, at Murfreeaboro. 
i Promoted to 1st Lieutenant. 
j Promoted to Surgeon, April, 1863. 



Second Regiment. 
Co. C. 

Lee. George. Private... Brooklyn Feb. 1865 

Lee, John J " ... " " 

Co. F. 
Palmer, Wallace a '•' ... Mt. Pleasant ... Dec. 186L... July, 1865 

Co. K. 
Welch, John H " ... Monroe Nov. 1863 

REFERENCES FOR SECOND REGIMENT. 

ii Promoted ro Sergeant. 



Third Regiment. 

Co. II. 

Cross, Benjamin b Private... Monroe Feb. 1864.. Sept. 1865 

Harding, Zadoe " ... " " ...July, 1865 

REFERENCES FOR THIRD REGIMENT* 
b Promoted to Corporal. 

Fourth Regiment. 

Co. B. 
Alderman, Clark L. a Private... Brooklyn Dec. 1863 

Co. L. 
Gettle, George b " ...York " 

Co. M. 

Hill, Washington 1st Lt Monroe Mar. 1864... July, 18Gr> 

Coon, Phillip H Sergt " Feb. 1864 

Chilton, Wm. C '• " ....Aug. 1865 

Burke, Frederick Private... Monroe 

Carter, Wm. E. c " ... " " 

Chase, Wm. B " ... " " ... June, 1865 

Divyar, Patrick ** " 

2,6* 



o° 2 



History of Green County. 



Fourth Regiment — Continued. 






Name. Rank 

Deniston, Wm. R Private.. 

Putts, Win 

Putts- Martin 

Giesland, Joseph J 

Grant James 

Glenon, Redmond 

Greenleaf, [saac J 

Hamilton, Wm. S 

Haffner, Myron d 

Henderson, Edward 

Henderson. Wm e 

•Johnson, John L. « 

d oh nson , ( I eo 

\\ n«©bel, John. 

Kdrkendoll, Robert 

Land, Alpheus^ - -. 

Land, Ctoas 

Lemont, Steven \V. /. 

MeLain, James,// 

Meadham, John A 

Perrigo, Jas. R 

Phillips, Wm 

■ I, Ira <i. d 

Powers. John II. j. 

Sat terlee, [ra -I 

Shaffer, Geo. C. k 

Shaffer. Rufus X. d 

Shutts, C. A 

Sparks, Eli / 

Steece, John E. W 

Stevenson Josephus E. d 

Stewart-, Wm 

Sympkins, Lock wood 

Tschabold, David 

I Pham. ('has. H 

Witter. Robert W. dm... 






Residence. 

... Monroe 


Date of 
Enlistment. 

Feb. 1864... 

U 

t. 


When 

tered 

. June, 

July. 
. May, 

.' May, 

. Aug. 
, May, 


inus- 
out. 
1865 

1865 
1865 

I8i;:. 


<< 


t« 


ii 


it 


it 


1866 


... Brooklyn 

... Monroe 


... Mar. 1864.. 
Feb. 1864.. 

U 


1865 
1866 




... Jan. 1864... 

... Feb. 1864... 






t: 


ii 


ii 


. May, 

. May, 


1866 


... Cadiz 


" 


1 865 


.... Monroe 


.. 




.... Albany 






.... Monroe 


ic 






a 


: ( 


-. 


. July, 
. Aug. 


1865 


... Monroe 


u ■ 
u 


U 

1865 


it 


>( 


it 


. .July. 
'. Oct. 


1865 


«' 


t( 




• • 


c. 


1865 


• • 






(i t. 


.< 


u 


. May, 
. July, 


1866 

1 m 


>; 


.. 




.-. 


u 


. June. 
. May, 
. July, 


1865 


.. 


.. 


186(1 


. • 


a 


1866 


a 


tt 





•REFERENCES FOR FOURTH REGIMENT. 

a Killed by accident at Morganza, La., August I. 1864. 
b Died at Baton Rouge, October 29. 1864. 

c Died at Baton Rouge, September 1, 1864. 
■•/ Promoted to Corporal. 
•e Died at Madison, June 10, 1865. 
/ Promoted to Sergeant. 
U Died at Madison, April 2. 1864. 

i Died at Baton Rouge, September, 1864. 

i Died at Baton Rouge, April 29, 1864. 
fc Promoted to Quarter-Master Sergeant. 

/ Died at CaiTOliton, La., May 24, 1864. 
m Died iit Baton Rouge, November, 1864. 
'* Died at Madison, October 4, 18<>1. 



LIGHT ARTILLERY— First Battery 



Bueli r. Henry Private... Monroe Sept. 1864. 



History of Green County. 



3°3 



Fifth Battery 



Name. 

Pinney, Oscar F. «... 
Hill, Washington.... 
Humphrey., Chas. 15 

Gardner, Geo. Q. b , 

Smith, Almon c 

Laiferty, Geo. J 

Booth, Elijah d 

Dickson- John e 

Wynian, Chas. M. <•... 

Stout, Braddock/. , 

Eley, Aaron /'. , 

Elliott. Robert P./..., 
McKnight, John T..., 

Adair, Chas. g 

Adair, Ezra 

Adams, Clarence E 

Adams. Howard 

Alexander, Thad. I.... 

Allen, David 

Bailey, Wm. W 

Baker, James C 

Baldwin ,Oscar F 

Ball, Geo. W. // 

Ball, Win. H 

Barling - , Ruths 

Barnes, Chas. W 

Bast, Frederick 

Bccktel, John 

Beedy, Cyrus 

Beedy, John 

Belt, James N 

Bintliff, Alfred i. 

Black, Carl 

Black, Frederick 

Black, Rollin S 

Booth, Lyman 

Booth Robert L 

Bratley, Joseph 

Bratley, Luke 

Bridge, John W , 

Bridges, Otis S. // 

Buck, Walter/ 

Bullard, Byron I 

Burk, Thomas P 

Burkholder, Henry 

Busick, Edward I 

Campbell, Martin /•.... 

Campton, James B 

Campton, James V 

Carmaii, John G 

Caughey, John W , 

Clark, Bos t wick 

Clarno, Andrew o 

Coates, Elisha M 

Coates, Hamilton 1 

Coates, Washington B 

Cowen. John 

Crow, Wm 

Cunningham, ( 'lias. C 



*. 



Rank. 

Capt 

Sr. 1st Lt 
Jr. 1st Lt 

2nd Lt 

2nd Lt 

Sergt 



Residence. 
Monroe 


Date of 
Enlistment. 
... Sept. 1861.. 


When mus- 
tered out. 


cc 




Dec 186*' 


»c 


cc 


Apr. 186:; 
Nov. 1864 


cc 


cc 


cc 


cc 




cc 


cc 


Dec 1S64 


cc 


.. 


June, 1865 



Corpl Monroe... 

" Jefferson. 

" Monroe... 



Private. 



i. 



cc 

c' 






c 

k'C 

cc 
cc 

<c 



c> 

ii 






a 
a 






Monroe 

Mt. Pleasant ... Feb. 
•' ... Sept. 

Feb. 

.Sept. 

Adams Dec. 

Cadiz Sept. 

Feb. 

Sept. 

Monroe 



1864.. 

1861. 

1864. 

1861 

1863. 

1861. 

18(14.. 

1861. 



Mt. Pleasant 

Monroe 

Cadiz 



c. 



Monroe Dec. 1863. 

Sylvester Jan. 1864. 

Monroe Sept, 1861. 

Jan. 1864. 

Sept. 1861.. 

Jan. 1864 

Apr. 1863.. 

Dec. 1863.. 

Cadiz Aug. 1862.. 

" Sept. 1861.. 

Momoe Dec. 1863... 

Monticello Sept. 1861.. 

" Nov. 1864 . 

Monroe Sept. lsiil.. 

Adams Jan. 1864.. 

Sept. 1861.. 

Monroe " 



June 1865 

cc 

Oct. 1861 
June, 1865 
Sept. 1864 
June, 1865 



Sept. 186:; 
Sept. 1864 

Sept"l864 

June, 1865 



tt 

a 

>c 
c> 



Monroe. 



Cadiz .... 
Monroe. 



Sept. 1864 
June, 1863 
Feb. 1863 



June, 1865 
Mar. 1863 
June, 1863 



Mt. Pleasant 



Dec. 1863.. 

Feb. 1864.. 

Aug. 1864.. 

Monticello Sept, 1861.. 

Monroe Dec. 1863.. 

Sept. 1861'.. 

Monroe 



June, 1885 
.. 

,. 

a 

Oct. 1861 
June, 1865 



3°4 



History of Green County. 



Fifth Battery — Continued. 



a 

a 

<< 
a 



Name. Rank. 

Dale, Geo Private 

Dale, James 

Dale, Joseph 

Davenport, Wm. S 

Davis. James 

Disi-h- John / 

Divan- James M 

Divan, Walter 

Diane. Robert 

Dunn. James B. h 

Dunn, John W 

Dunn, Wm. C 

Eley, Daniel 

Eley, Joseph 

Fa \v ver, J acob 

Fillebrown, John M 

Foot, Geo. M./ 

Forbes, Josiah C 

Forhv, John 

Fry, Frank / 

Galusha, David II 

Gapin, Wm. R 

Gardner, Walter S 

Gearhart , Jam es 

George, Wm 

Graham, James A. £&».. 

Gray, Tilbery 

Gundy, Daniel 

Haley, Oscar P 

Hall. Joseph D 

Hamilton, Geo. H. q 

Hastings^ David E 

Havens, Nathan H 

Haw ver, Henry 

Hayburn, Joseph h 

Hendrickson, Thos. A 

Hicks, Chas. B 

IIi«ks, Gurdon, Jr 

Hill, Joseph 

Hutchins, Samuel W 

Hoffman, Joseph 

Jewett, Chas. A.//// 

Johnson, Volney L 

Jones, Thos. W 

Kean, Isaac H 

Kelly, Christopher C 

King, Benjamin II 

Kinney, De Marcus L 

Knipschield, Ailam 

Leahy, Jerry 

Lawhorn, James 

Lewis, Samuel 1 

Lewis, Wm. R 

Loom is. Alonzo 

Loomis, Cornelius W 

Loomis, Hartman 

Lounsbury, Daniel C 



Residence. 



i< 



tt 
ft 



<> 
a 
tt 

tt 

a 
a 
a 
ii 
.. 
U 
a 
it 

it 

a 



Date of 
Enlistment. 

Feb. 1862.. 

Jordan Jan. 1864.. 

Skinner Sept. 1861.. 

Monroe 



Monroe 



Cadi/. Fan.M864.. 

Sept. 1861.. 

Monroe " 

Sept. 1864.. 



Monroe. 



Jordan. Nov. 1864.. 

Monroe Sept. 1861.. 



Monroe. 



When mus- 
tered out. 
June, 1862 

June, 1865 
tt 

Sept. 18(34 
June, 1865 

Sept. 1864 
June, 1865 

June, 1865 

<t 

ft 

a 



Sept. 1864 
Sept. " 1864 



.Monroe 

a 



Dec, 1863. 

Feb. 1864. 

" Sept. 1861. 

Clarno Dec. 1863. 

Jefferson 

Monroe Sept. 1861 



Dec. 1863.. 



Cadiz 

Mt. Pleasant. 

Cadiz 

Jefferson July, 1861. 

Monroe Sept. 1861. 

xMt. Pleasant ... Dec. 1863. 

Monroe Sept, 1861. 

Adams " 

Mt. Pleasant ... 
Monroe 



Sept. 1864 
June, 1865 

Sept. 1864 
June. 1865 



Nov. 1862 
Sept. 1862 

June, 1865 



Mt. Pleasant 



Aug. 1864. 
Sept. 1861. 



Adams Jan. 1861. 

Sept. 1861. 

Cadiz Dec. 1863. 

Monroe Sept. 1861. 

Jordan Aug. 1862.. 

Monroe Sept. 1861. 



Jordan 

a 



Juda 



Feb. 1*64.., 
Sept. 1861.. 



Sept. 1864 
June, 1865 



June, 1865 
Nov. 1862 

June, 1865 

Nov. 1864 

June, 1865 
t< 

't 

a 

Sept v 1 864 
June, 1865 



Histoiy of Gi'een County. 



3°5 



Fifth Battery — Continued. 



Name. 

Lord] Thomas C P 

Lounsberry, Isaiah II 

Luther. John / 

Mack, James 

Maoomber, Albert s 

Marshal. Albert I 

McBride, Edward 

McConnell, Geo. T 

McConnell, Stewart 

McCraken, Win. S 

McDaniel, Andrew I 

McDermott, Daniel 

McKnight, Andrew I 

Miller. Aaron 

Miller, Henry C 

Miller, Morgan H. t 

Mitchell. Allen u 

Morey, Sylvester H. v 

Morris, John to 

Moulton, Isaac R 

Mountford, Samuel 

Murray, Napoleon B 

Nelson, John // 

O'Brien. Nicholas.// 

Orvis, John 

Parks. James // 

Payne, Royal P 

Perkins. Stephen 

Phillips, John 

Pratt, David W 

Pratt, Oliver P 

Preston. Wm 

Reynolds, Samuel C 

Rice, Nathan P 

Richardson, Wm. x 

Riley, Jesse 

Robb, John C 

Robertson, ('has. II 

Ross, John dd 

Ross, Joseph W 

Rutledge, Chas. A 

Satterlee, Henry 

Sackett, Chas 

Sackett, Michael 

Shatfcr, John 

Shipley, Thos. // 

Sickinger, Joseph 

Sickinger, Lewis 

Sisson, Francis i, 

Slawson, Alfred 

Small, Leonard W. i. 

Smith, Ellis II 

Smith, Geo. II. L 

Smith, John C 

Smith. John F. y 

Snow, Orrin D 

South. Chas. A 

South, Chas. F 



Rank. Residence. E ^Sment. 

rivate Sept. 1861.. 



" '.'.'. ZZZZZZZZZZ Mar. 1864.'.' 

" ... Monroe Jan. 1864.. 

" ... Mt. Pleasant ... 

• ... " ... Sept. 1861.. 
... Monroe 



i. 



it 



li 






st 

a 

a 
It 
tt 
it 
t . 
<i 
It 
i> 
'c 



Dec. 

Monroe Sept. 



Monroe. 



Nov. 
Sept 
Dec. 
Jan. 

Sept 



1863. 
1861. 

186L 
1861. 
1863. 
1864. 
1861 . 



Cadiz Nov. 

Sept. 

Monroe 



Jan., 

" Sept. 

Jordan Jan. 

Mt Pleasant ... Sept. 

... Feb. 

Monroe Sepl . 

Dec. 

Monroe Sept. 



Dec. 

Cadiz Sept. 

Monroe 



Mt. Pleasant ... Dec. 
... Jan. 

Sept. 

Monroe Sept. 



Oct. 

Sept, 



1861. 
1861. 



1864. 
L861. 
1864. 
1861. 
1864.. 
1861. 
1863. 
1861. 

1863." 

1861. 



1863. 
1864. 
1861. 
1863. 

186L 
1861. 



When mus- 
tered out. 
Oct. 1861 
Sept. 1864 

June, 186") 

June, 186") 

Sept. 1864 

Aug. 1862 
Dec. 1862 
June, 1865 

Sept. 1864 
Aug. 1862 



Aug. 1863 
Nov. 186} 
Sept. 1864 
June, 1865 

June, 1865 



Sept. 1864 
June. 1 s <i"> 



Sept. 186-1 
June. 1865 



June, 1865 

a 



June. 1865 

Feb. 1863 
June", 1865 



'• Jan., 1864 

Mt. Pleasant... Dec. 1863 
Monroe Sept, 1861 



Monroe. 



,1861.. 
(( 

I' 

tl 


. Sept. 

. Nov. 
. Sept. 


1864 

1 862 
1864 


it 
i> 

i i 


. June, 
. Sept. 
.. Mar. 


1865 
1864 
1863 



306 History of Green County. 

Fifth Battery — Continued. 

Name. Rank. Residence. ift&StSL ^ he V nx T 

Enlistment. tered out. 

bouth, John M Private.... Monroe Sept. 1861.... Sept. 1864 

Sparks, James W. * " " 

Staver, Geo. AA\ /'. " ...Cadiz " ...» June, 1865 

Stewart, James «« " 

Stiff, Ira W " ... Mt. Pleasant ... " ... Junel 1865 

Stiff. John W 

Strohm, Cornelius W. *... " « 

Sutherland, Daniel '' ... Sylvester June,1864... June, 1865 

Sweeny. Edward " ...Adams Dec. 1863.... 

Sweet, Reuben ee c< Sept. 1861... . .. 

Taft, ChasW " ...Cadiz " ... June, 1865 

Taft, S. C « ... « Dec. 1861... 

Thomas, John Q.pb « Sept. 1861 

Thompson, Jesse C " ... Monroe June, 1865 

Thompson, Wm. F " Sept. 1861... Aug. 1862 

Titus, Daniel d •• « ... j une , 1865 

Titus, Geo. cc " " 

Titus, Louis " ... Mt. Pleasant.... Dee. 1863... June. 1865 

Titus. Wm. 11 " ... " Jan. 1863 

Van Matre, C. N " ... Monroe Sept. 1861... June, 1865 

Van Matre, Jas. K. * " « 

Verley, Wm. A " « 

Walker. Geo " Feb. 1864... 

Ward. Michael*. " ...Monroe 

Wareck, Daniel " Sept.1861... 

Wareck, Geo " Jan. 1864... 

Wareck, Jeremiah " " ... " 

Wareck, John F. h " ...Cadiz Sept. 1861... 

Wareck, John H " Jan. 18154. .. 

Wareck, Reuben " Sept.1861... " 

Wareck, Samuel R. h " ...Cadiz 

Warren, Chas. F " ... . . •' ... Oct. 1864 

Webb, Reuben " ... . Oct. 1861 

Webster, Edwin A. it. " Jan. 1864 

Webster. Samuel C " Sept.1861... June. 1865 

Webster, S. S " ... Aug, 1862... 

Wei tz, David r " ... Sept.1861 

Weltz, Wm - " ... June. 1865 

AVells. Thomas '" Jan. 186-1... 

Wheeler, Nelson " Sept.1861 

White, Geo " 

White, John " ... Monticeilo June, 1865 

Wickersham, E. C " ... Sept. 1861... Sept. 1864 

Williams, Geo. W " ... Jan. 1864... June, 1865 

Williams. Levi " ... 

Williams, Peter S " ... Sept.1861... 

Wilson, F " Dec. 1863... 

Wilson. Franklin " Sept.1861... " 

Wilson, Sheldon L " Dec. 1863... 

Winslow, Wm. G. /'. " ... Monroe Sent. 1861... 

Wright, K. F « ... Monticeilo Feb. 1864.... 

REFERENCES FOR FIFTH I! ATT FRY. 

a Died, February 17, 1803. of wounds received at Stone River. 

b Promoted to ( '.iptain. 

c Died at luka, August 23, 1802. 

ii Promoted t<> 1st Lieutenant. 

<■ Promoted to 2d Lieutenant. 

/Promoted to Sergeant. 



CC 

cc 



History of Green County. 307 



references Foil Fit'TH battery — Continued. 

<j Killed at Stone River, Tenn., December 13, 1862. 
// Promoted to Corporal. 

i Appointed Bugler. 

j Died at Louisville, August 24. 1804. 

k Transferred to Invalid ( !orps. 

/ Transferred to Battery No. 2. 

Died at Nashville, July 24, 1864. 

p Died at Louisville, March 22, 1863, 

</ Died at Madison, August 25, 1864. 

r hied February 6, 1863, of wounds received at Stone River. 

8 Died at Lookout Mountain, July 25, 1864. 

1 Died at Karmington Miss., September 2, 1862. 
u Died at Bowling Green, December 11. 1862. 

V Died at Madison, February 4, 1864. 

w Died at Bitf Shanty, Ga., June 30, 1864. 

c Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps. 

</ Killed at Chaplin Hills, Kv., Octobers, 1862. 

z Died at Murfreeshoro, April 1, 1863. 
aa Died at Anapolis, Md., July 9. 1863. 
bb Died of wounds at Murfreeshoro, January 29, 1863. 
re Died of wounds at Murfreeshoro, February 9, 1863. 
dd Died at Jacinto, Miss., July 12, 1862, 
ee Died at Nashville, February 22, 1863. 
ff Promoted to 2d Lieutenant 2d Iowa Cavalry. 
gy Promoted to Quarter-Master Sergeant. 
Ii'h Died at Chattanoga, March 30, 1864. 

ii Died at Chattanoga, Jnly 21, 1864. 



Eighth Battery. 

Namk r*\tk Residence Date of When mus- 

iMAMt. Kank. Residence. Enlistment. tered out. 

Preeland,Wm.H Private... Monroe Nov. 1861... Nov. 1862 

Miller, Wm J. a " ... 



U " 



REFERENCES FOR EIGHTH BATTERY. 
a Transferred to Marine Service. 



Thirteenth Battery. 
Webber, Truman Private... Exeter Dee. 1863. 



FIRST HEAVY ARTILLERY. 

Co. D. 

Peck, Henry W i Capt Monroe Oct. 1863... June, 1865 

Bridge, Cornelius V. «... 1st Lt Soring Grove... Nov. 1863... Aug. 1865 

Ball, Chas. M. b Sr. 2d Lt. " ... «' ... May, 1865 

Hanehett, Wm, M. b Jr. 2d Lt. Albany Aug. 1865 

Glennan, Richard c Sergt '* " 

Brownfield, B. B " Monroe Sept, 1863... July, 1864 

Ostrander, John H " Spring Grove... Oct, 1863... June, 1865 

Miller, Geo. W. d " Monroe Sept. 1863 



3 oS 



History of Green County. 



First Heavy Artillery — Continued. 



Name. Rank. 

Morse, Geo. W Bugler.... 

Allison, John W. e Private... 

Austin Julius H 

Austin, Shadrach/. " 

Baird, John 

Baker, John \N . g " .. 

Barmore, David R 

Barrow, Wm " 

Bennett, Chas. P l> " .. 

Bennett, Joseph C " 

Betts, Aclelbert A " 

Blair, ltomanzo 

Brown, Geo " 

Brownfield, John A. / f< 

Barrington, Reuben (t 

Bussey. Geo. W " .. 

Cameron, Geo. W " 

Case, Chas. W.J * .. 

Chambers, Bobert B " 

Clemans, Isaac M " 

Cole, Harvey F. A 

Crook, James J 

Dean, Joseph G 

Dunkleburg, Isaac " 

Dutcher, Wm. A ; ' .. 

Eley, Erastus/ " .. 

Eley, Wm. H " .. 

Engel, Randolph 

Gainor, Peter/. " 

Hilton, Joseph D 

Holland, John " .. 

Inwhotf, Samuel 

Jones, Geo. J. w/ " 

Jones, Peter ww " 

Kildow, Joshua/. " 

Lewis, Daniel 

Loveland, Harrison n "• .. 

Mahan, Peter o 

Mason, Hugh 

Mather. Chester C i! .. 

Mathews, Wm. II 

McKinney, Alonzoj* " 

Meacham, Win. R. q 

Newcomer, Jacob 

Nichols, Geo 

Ostrander, Jeremiah D... 

Ostrander, Thos. L. r " .. 

Rainboth, Geo 

Rainboth, John * 

Reed, John W " .. 

Sawin, Wm. A. t '• 

Spalding, John W " .. 

Stahl, Abraham / " 

Stoleap, Frederick R " 

Stowell, Martin T " .. 

Tierney, Dennis " 

Townsend, Henry W. «... " 

Trow, John '* 



Residence. 

Exeter 

Monroe 



Date of When inus- 
Enlistment. tered out. 
Oct. 1863... Aug. 1865 



a 

a 



... Aug. 1865 



Spring Grove. 
Monroe 



Jefferson. 
Monroe... 



Sept. 1863... Aug. 1865 

Oct. 1863 

Sept. 1863... Sept. 1S65 
Oct. 1863... Aug. 1865 

Sept. 1863 

Oct. 1863 

Sept. 1863... Aug. 1865 



Spring Grove. 

Jefferson 

Monroe 

Jefferson 

Spring Grove. 



Albany. 

Monroe. 



Monroe... 
Jefferson 



Oct. 1863... Mar. 1865 

Sept. 1863... Aug. 1865 
it ti 

Oct. 1863.'.'.' June, 1864 
Sept. 1863... Auff. 1865 

Oct. 1863!'.'. July. 1864 
Sept. 1863... Aug. 1865 

Nov. 1863 

Oct. 1863 

\ug. 1865 

" ... July, 1864 

Sept. 1863!" 



Oct. 1863... 



Aug. 1865 



Washington ... 

Monroe 

Jefferson 

Albany 

Monroe 

Spring Grove. 
Mt. Pleasant.. 
Washington ... 

Jefferson 

Albany 

Spring Grove. 

Jefferson 

Monroe 

Spring Grove. 

Albany 

Spring Grove. 



Albany . 



Sept. 1863... June, 1865 

" ... Aug. 1865 
ft <« 

Oct. 1863.'.'.' 

Sept. 1863 

Oct. 1863... Aug. 1865 

Nov. 1863... 

Sept. 1863 



Oct. 1863... Aug. 1865 
Sept, 1SC,: J ,... 

" ... May, 1865 

a 



Monroe. 

a 

Jordan.. 
Clarno... 
Monroe. 
Albany . 

Monroe. 
Albany . 



Oct. 1863... Aug. 1865 

U (C 

".'.' July, 1864 

Sept. 1863 

Oct. 1863... June, 1865 

(C 

Sept. 1863.'.'.' A'u'g.""i865 

Oct. 1863 

Sept. 1863... May, 1865 

.... Aug. 1863 

Oct. 1863... Feb. 1866 

" ... July, 1865 



Sept. 1863 

Oct. 1863... May. 1865 



History of Green County. 



3°9 



First U eavy Artillery — Continued. 



vate. 
« 



Name. Hank 

Trow. Michael Pri 

Trow, Win. Z 

Wardwell, Geo. W. v 

Webber, Geo. L 

Wells, David 0. w 

Williams, Geo. I>. ?-' 

Williams, Joseph M 

Williams, Seth C. i. 

Wood, Andros L 

Yarger, Cal vin /. 

Ziegler, Uriah i 

Co. E. 
Welden, Peter E 

Co. H. 
Eudington, James II. ./... 

Co. K. 
Bryce, John 

Co. L. 

Bradley, Seth M 

Edleman, Eli 

Edleman, Franklin II 

Edleman, Milton 

Kingsland, Geo 

Kinyon, Aaron 

Kinyon, AVm 

Landgraff, Geo. II 

Landgroff, John M 

Longley, Hamilton 

Miller, Peter 

Ostrander, AVm. ,! 

Pop, Nicholas 

.Stevenson, Beard M 






Residence. 

Albany 

n 

Monroe 



Date of When mas- 
Enlistment. tered out. 

Nov. 186.°. Vug. 1865 

Oct. 1863... 



" ... Aug. 1S65 

Jefferson Sept. 1863 

Oct. 1863 

Monroe ... Aug. 1865 

Spring Grove... 
Mt. Pleasant ... 

Jefferson Sent. 1863... 

Monroe Oct. 1863... 

Decatur Sept. 1864... June, 1865 

Albany " 

Brodhead \ug. 1864 

Jefferson Sept. 1864... June. 1865 



Aug. 1864. 






Mt. Pleasant ... 

Jefferson Sept. 1864. 



REFERENCES FOR FIRST HEAVY ARTILLERY. 

<i Promoted to Captain. 
b Promoted to Junior 1st Lieutenant. 
c Promoted to 2d Lieutenant. 
<if Died at Chicago, October 23, 1864. 

c Veteran Volunteer. Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, April, 186;"). 
/'Lost on Board U. S. Transport North America, December 22, 1864. 
-/ Died at New Orleans. December 14. 1864. 
h Died at Cairo, 111., September 28, 1864. 
i Promoted to Corpoi al. 
./ Promoted to Sergeant. 
h Died in Rock County, October 1", 1864. 
/ Died on Steamer Julia, February 6, 1864. 
>n Died at Brashear City, La., December 3, 1864. 
mm Died at Fort Berwick, La., August 23, 1864. 

n Lost from U. 8. Transport North America, December 22, 1864. 
o Died at Fort Berwick, La., August 23, 1864. 
p Died at Fort Jackson, La., July 22, '861. 
q Died at Fort Jackson, La., July 1, 1864. 
/■ Died at Fort Berwick, La., September 1, 1864. 
js Died at Fort Jackson, La., June 24, 1864. 
t Died at Fort Berwick, La., October 25, 1864. 
a Died at Fort Berwick, La,, September 13, 1864. 
v Died at Fort Berwick, La., September 9, 1864. 
w Died at Madison, Wis., March 31, 1865. 
if Died at New Orleans, September 15, 1864 . 



IO 



History of Green County. 



Record of the muster in of the following named men was found, but the 
record did not give the number of the regiment to which they belongs! : 

MISTERED IK IN SEPTEMBER, OCTOBER, AND NOVEMBER. 1864. 



Akin, John. Dayton 
Ault, Wm., Jordan. 
Biggs. Dighton, Adam.-. 
Biggs, George, York. 
Bratley. James, Cadiz. 
Campbell. A. J., Dayton. 
Christopherson, 0., York. 
Connor, James. York. 
Davis. J. ('.. Dayton. 
Day, D.C, Dayton. 
Deunian, J., Dayton. 
Denny, Albert. Cadiz. 
Fall, Samuel, Dayton. 
Fisher, F. York. 
Gerber, Peter, Adams. 
Hamilton. Peter, Dayton. 
Flart. Levi, Dayton. 
Hart. Wilson, Cadiz. 



Hoffman, S. P., Dayton. 
Jones, Covil, York. 
Kirkpatrick, R., Dayton. 
Meydoller, A., Adams. 
N'orris, Joseph, Dayton. 
Olsen, Henry, Adams. 
Pallado, Daniel, Cadiz. 
Pember, Chas. A., Cadiz. 
Reinhart, Wm„ Cadiz. 
Robinson, Win. F 1 ., Dayton. 
.Sherman, S. M., Y r ork. 
Shoemaker, Martin, Dayton. 
Smart, AVm. M., Dayton. 
Taylor, T. D.. Cadiz. 
Thompson. 

Wheeler, Joseph, Dayton. 
Witherell, Philander, Dayton. 



NileSj VanBuren, Dayton 
Tony. Gabriel. Monroe. 



MUSTERED IN IN FEBRUARY, 1865. 

Wood, Lemuel D., York. 



MUSTERED IX IN NOVEMBER. 18f3: 



Ault. John, Clarno. 
Burk. Gilruan, Y'ork. 
Dale. John. Cadiz. 



Chase, Wm. 
Cross, B. S. 
Cunningham, Wm. 
Ellison, Caleb. 
Fitzgerald, Win. 
Forsythe, McKenzie. 
Fuller, Abel. 
F'uller, Richard. 
George, Wm. 
Hewlett, II. P. 
Limpsay, Chas. IL 
Lindsy, Duncan. 



McKoag, Michael, Jordan. 
Soper, F'oster R., Jordan. 



MUSTERED IN IN DECEMBER, 1803. 

Mason, James C. 
McCalLGeo. 
Richardson, Nathan. 
Rima, David. 
Seott. Hiram. 
Skinner, Win. H. 
Starr, Wm. 
Thompson, Geo. W. 
Torgenson, Kanut. 
Webb, David. 
Welch, Andrew. 
Xeiglcr, Sam. 



H185 80 



■<* 



* 






TO 



' « 













o 




"•°° /^v§fc\ - c sialic* *> / 

*+ 'Are.* / % 




V 






-*. °"^w! ; **"** J - 








o 









v >u <. "fr 









A 






* . * s 



c 



Q v 









# , i 










N. MANCHESTER, 
INDIANA 46962 



_\ 



J5 • 



& 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 





014 754 847 3