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Full text of "History of Hendricks County, Indiana, together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history, portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens"

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1516254 



GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



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ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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HISTOKY 



OF 



Hendricks County, 



INDIANA, 



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■)OKTin:R X/mi SiCETCUES OF ITS CIl'IKS, VILLAGK3 AND TOWKS, 

EDL"CATIONAI., KELIGIOtJS, CIVIL, MILiTAP.T, A>'D I'OLniCAL 

HISTORY, POKTRAITS OF PRCiMLNT£>;T I'ERSOXS, AND 

BIOGRAPHIES OE ki;pk;^=entative citizen?. 



ALSO A CONDENSED 



HISTORY OF INDIANA, 



EMBODYING ACCOUXTS OF PREHISTORIC RACES, ABORIGINES, WINNE- 
BAGO AND BLACK ]IA\\ K WARS, AND A BRIEF REVIEW OK ITP 
CIVIL AND I'OLITICAL HlSrORY. 



II-LlESTitATKU. 



CHICAGO: 
INTER-STATE PUBLISHING' CO. 
1885. , I 



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1516254 



CHAPTER Vr. 



THE PATRIOTIC ROLL. 



Statistical Eecokd of Bendkicks County Volunteees in thi; 
Late Wae. ■ ■ 

The following record, taken mostly from the Adjutaiit-Gcncral's 
reports, aims to give not only the name of every volunteer, but 
his rank, date of muster in, promotions, wliat became of him, and 
if mustered out, v/hen. It is a valuable list for reference, and a 
chapter of history to whic'i our posterity may point with ever in- 
creasing pride. 

SEVENTH INDIA>A IKFANTET (thEEE MOKTHS). 
COMPANY A. 

Officers. 

James Burgess, commissioned Captain April 20, 1861; mus- 
tered out at expiration of term; re-entered service as Lieutenant- 
Colonel Seventieth Infantiy. 

P. S. Kennedy, commissioned First Lieutenant April 20, ISOJ; 
mustered out at expiration of terra. 

J. S. Miller, commissioned Second Lieutenant xVpril 20, 1S61; 
n^iustcred or.t at expiration of term. 

Hon- Commissioned Officers. 

C. F. ILogatc, mustered in as First Sergeant April 21:, ISCl; 
out Aug. 2, 1861. 

O. A. Bartholomew, mustered in as Sergeant April 24, 1861; out 
Aug. 2, 1861. 

W. C. Banta, mustered in as Sergeant April 24, 1861; out Aug. 
2, 1861. 

W. L. Vestal, mustered in as Sergeant April 24, 1861; out Aug. 
2, 1861. 

J. E. Homan, mustered in as Corporal April 24, 1861; out Aug. 
2, 1861 

(338; 



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HISTOF.y OF JIEND.UCKS COUKTT. 



339 



"W. M. Walker, imistercd in as Corporal April 2J:, 1861; out 

Aug. y, 1S61. 

v. n. Lyon, mustered in as Corporal April 24, 1861; out Aug. 

2, 1861. 

Hubbard Linoeiifelter, mustered in as Corporal April 2-1, 1861; 

out Aug. 2, 1861. 

Miltiades Cash, mustered in as musician April 21, 1861; out 
Aug. 2, 1861. 

James Landon, mustered in as musician April 2-1, 1861 ;out Aug. 

2, 1861. 

Pidvates. 

Allison, Joseph, mustered in April 24, 1861; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Armstrong, Samuel, mustered in April 2i, 1861; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Beard, Al., mustered in April 24, 1861; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Bartley, William, mustered iu April 24, 18G1 ; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Bell, J. J., mustered in April 2i, 1861; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Bland, A. V., mustered in April 24, 1861; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Bait, J. J., mustered in xVpril 24, 1861; ont Aug. i^ 1861. 
Buchanan, Simeon, mustered in April 24, 18Gl;out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Burcham, Franklin, mustered in Ay)ril 24, 1861; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Burhop, Jesse, mustered in April 24, 1861; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Burgin, A. S., mustered in April 24, 1861; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Brewer, Dennis, mustered in April 24, 1SG1 ; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Brown, Harrison, m.ustered in April 24, 1861; ont Aug. 2, 1861. 
Cord, B. II., mustered in April 24, 1861; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Crane, J. M., mustered in April 24, 1861; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Crane, T. J., mustered in April 24, 1861; out Aug. 2, ISGli 
Curtis, J. P., mustered in April 24, 1S61-, out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Curtis, R. M., mustered in April 24, 1861; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Emmons, John, mustered in April 24, 1861; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Evans, A. C, mustered in April 24, 1861; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Fawkner, J. C, mustered in April 24, 1861; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Filer, G. W., mustered in April 24, 1861; one Aug. 2, 1861. 
Franklin, R. V., mustered in April 24, 1861; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Freeman, B. D., mustered in April 24, 1861; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Gilliland, J. P., mustered in April 24, 1S61; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Givens, Jeremiah, mustered in \pril 24, 1S61; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Grcg<?, George, mustered in April 24, 1861^, out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Gregg, W. P., mustered in April 24, 1861; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Hackley, James, mustered in April 24, lS-61; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Hackley, Joseph, mustered in April 24, 1S61; out Aug. 2, 1861. 



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340 HI8T0KV OF UENDRICKS COUNTY. 

IloUsclaw, J. JS^, mustered in April 24, ISCl; out Aug. 2, ISGl. 
IIoItsclaw,Marshall, mustered in April 24,1SG1; out Aug. 2, 18G1. 
Homan, W. G., mustered in April 24, ISGl; out Aug. 2, 18G1. 
Hunt, E. F., mustered in April 24, 1861; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Hurin, F. IL, mustered in April 24, 1861; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Irons, W. W., mustered in April 24, 1861; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Jenkins, W. M, mastered in April 24, ISGl; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Kebner, Moses, mustered in April 24, 1861; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Kertley, T. J., mustered in April 24, 1S61; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Latshar, E. D., mustered in April 24, 1861; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Matlock, J. T., mustered in April 24, 1861; out Aug. 2, 1801. 
McCorn)ick,A.S, mustered in April 24, ISGl; out Aug. 2, 1801. 
Miller, W. T., mustered in April 24, 18C1; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Moore, J. S., mustered in April 24, 1861; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Ohaver, John, mustered in AprU 24, 1861; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Parker, W. F., mustered in April 24:, ISGl; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Pearson, William, mustered in April 24, 1861; out Aug. 2,1861. 
Perkins, J. J., mustered in April 24, 1S61; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Perkins, S. R., mustered in April 24, 1861; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Ricliards, George, mustered in April 24, 1861: out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Eobbins, M. D. L., mustered in April 24, 1S61; out Aug. 2, ISGl. 
Rose, M. H., mustered in April 24, 1S61; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Scearce, J. W., mustered in April 24, 1S61; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Seearce, J. T., mustered in April 24, ISGl ; out Aug. 2, ISGl. 
Scearce, N. J., mustered in April 24, 1861; out Aug. 2, 1S61. 
Smith, J. W., mustered in April 24, 1861; out Aug. 2, ISCl. 
Smith, W.D., mustered in April 24, 1S61; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Stevens, Charles, mustered in April 24, 1861; out Aug. 2, 1S61. 
Thompson, J. C, mustered in April 24, 1861; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Todd, 0. J., mustered in April 24, 1S61; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
yestal, J. N., mustered in April 24, 1861 ; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Wadley, Jonathan, mustered in April 24, 1861; out Aug. 2, 
1861. 

Walker, J. C, mustered in April 24, 18G1; out Aug. 2, 1861. 
Welshans, Alfred, mustered in April 24, 1861; out Aug. 2, 1861. 

^ SEVENTH INDIANA. INFA.NTRY (tHREK YEAEs) . 

Officer. 

W. C. Bftnta, commissioned Captain Company B Sept. 1, ISGl; 
promoted Major March 12, 1S63; Lieutenant-Colonel April 23, 
1863; mustered out Sept. 20, 1864. 



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HISTORY OF HENDLU0K8 CO0IITY. 
COMPANY B. 



341 



Officers. 

"W. 0. Eanta, commissioned Captain Sept. 1/1861; ? promoted. 

A. M. Luke, commissioned Second Lieutenant Sept. 1, 1861; 
promoted First Lieutenant Oct. 1, 1862; Captain March 12, 1863; 
mustered out Sept. 20, 1864. 

V. n. Lyon, commissioned First Lieutenant Sept. 1, 1861; re- 
signed Oct. 1, 1832; re-entered service as Major Ninth Indiana Vol- 
unteer Cavalry. 

J. V. Hadley, mustered in as Corporal Sept. 13, 1861; promoted 
Sergeant; Second Lieutenant Oct. 1, 1862; First Lieutenant March 
12, 18G3; mustered oat Sept. 20, 1861. (Captured in Wilderness.) 

J. W. Adams, mustered in as Sergeant Sept. 13, 1861; promoted 
First Sergeant; Second Lieutenant March 12, 1863; mustered out 
Sept. 20, 186-1.. 

Non-Commisskned Officer's. 

L. H. Davis, mustered in as First Sergeant Sept. 13, 1861; Jdied 
of disease Oct. 6, 1862. . 

James Bartholomew, mustered in as Sergeant Sept. 13,1861; 
discharged for disability Oct. 5, 1862. 

T. J. Lockhart, mustered in as Sergeant Sept. 13, 1861; dis- 
charged .Jan. 31, 18G2, for disability. 

B,. P. Parkes, mustered in as Sergeant Sept. 13, 1861; promoted 
Second Lieutenant Fourth U. S. Calored Troops. 

Aaron Acton, mustered in as private Sept. 13, 1861; promoted 
Corporal; Sergeant; captured at \Yuldon Road; mustered out March 
16, 1866. 

"VV. S. Odell, mustered in as private Sept. 13, 1861; promoted 
Corporal; Sergeant; mustered out Sept. 20, 186-?. 

H. M. Stranghan, mustered in as private Sept. 13, 1861; pro- 
moted Sergeant; First Sergeant; mastered out Sept. 20, 186i. 

William Hussey, mustered in as Corporal Sept. 13, 1861; pro- 
moted Sergeant June 15, 1862; mustered out Sept. 20, 186i. 

J. H. Helton, mustered in as Corporal Sept. 13, 1861; promoted 
Sergeant; veteran; transferred to Twentieth Infantry. 

Washington West, niustered in as Corporal Sept. 13, 1861; dis- 
charged for disability July 28, IS 32. 

G. W. McClintick, mustered in iis Corporal Sept. 13, 1861 ; dis- 
charged for disability Jan. 1-4, 1863. 






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34:3 HISTORY oy hendeicks countv. 

K. C. Ilarris, mustered in as ,Corporal Sept. 13, 18G1; veteran; 
transferred to Twentieth Infantry. 

L. N. AVest, mustered in as Corporal Sept. 13, ISCJ; captured in 
the Wilderness; died in Anderson ville Prison, Aug. lY, 18C-1. 

E. B. Hamlet, mustered in as Corporal Sept. 13, ISGl ; died 
April 1, 1862, of wounds received at "Winchester. 

J. II. Hall, mustered in as private Sept. 13, 1861; "promoted 
Corporal; mustered out Sept. 20, ISGi. 

J. W. Morgan, mustered in as private Sept. 13, 1861; promoted 
Corporal; captured in the Wilderness. ' 

J. M. Wliite, mustered in as private Sept. 13, 1861; promoted 
Corporal; mustered out Sept. 20, 1864. 

J. E. Clements, recruit, mustered in as private Jul}' 21, 186'2; 
promoted Corporal; transferred to Twentieth Infantry. 

Wesley Lockwood, recruit, mustered in as private July 19, 1862; 
promoted Cor.poral; transferred to Twentieth Infantry. 

M. C. West, mustered in as musician Sept. 13, 1861; died Feb. 
14, 1862, of disease. 

J. D. Walker, mustered in as musician Sept. 13, 1861; captured 
at Cold Harbor, June 3, 1864. 

J. H. Kendall, mustered in as wagoner Sept. 13, 1861; out Sept. 
20, 1864. ^ •' . ■, 

Privates. 

ActOD, A. J., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged April 9, 
1862, for disability. 

Adams, A. J., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged June 27, 
1862, for disability. 

Adams, James, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged Feb, 21, 
1862, for disability. 

Adams, Sidney, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 1864. 

Alford, W. H., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 1864. 

Ashby, Henry, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; veteran; killed in 
the Wilderness, May 5, 1864. 

Bartholomew, Benjamin, mustered in. Sept. 13, ISGl; veteran; 
died June 7, 18C4, of wounds leceived in action. 

Black, Joseph, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 1864. 

Bray, £. C, mustered in Sept. 13, 1S61; discharged May 3, 1864, 
for disability. 

Burns, John, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; died March 12, 1864. 

Cassidy, Patrick, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 1864. 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



3Jt3 



Clements, John, mustered in Sept. 13, 18C1; discharged July 
22, 1SG2, for disability. 

Cochrou, jabez, mustered in Sept. 13, 18G1; veteran; mustered 
out July IP, 1S65. 

Coflin, W..W., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged Sept. 2, 
1862, for disability. 

Cross, Charles, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; killed in battle May 

9, 1864. 

Cummings, G. W., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged Dec. 
•14, 1862, for disability. 

Davis, David, mustered in Sejjt. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 186-1. 
Davidson, Silas, musteredi n Sept. 13, 1861; discharged Oct. 3, 

1862, for disability. 

Davidson, William, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; captured at tlie 
Wilderness; mustered out Feb. 3, 1865. 

Davidson, John, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; deserted May 1, 
1863. 

Douglass, Abraham, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 
1864. 

Doolcy, Henry, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 1S61. 

Downey, John, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged Jan. 17, 

1863, for disability. 

Eaton, Grundisou,mustered in Se].t. 13, 1861 ; out Sept. 20, 1864. 
Faulkner, Squire, mustered in Sept. 13, 1881 ; discliarged Dec. 
14, 1861, for disability. 

Franklin, W. T., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged Feb. 

10, 1863, for disability. 

Franklin, Columbus, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged Jan. 
22, 1863, for disability. 

Galliger, William, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; veteran; trans- 
ferred to Twentieth Infantry; died at Andersonville, July 31, 1864. 

Gowlns, R. M., mustered in Sept- 13, 1861; died at Cumberland, 
Md., Dec. 18, 1861. 

Harshborger, William, mustared in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged 
May 30, 1862, for disability. 

Harshborger, A. J., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; veteran; trans- 
ferred to Twentieth Infantry. 

Hadley, Ira, mustered in Sep-. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 1864. 

Hammond, S. E., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; transferred to Vet- 
eran Reserve Corps. 

Harper, C. R., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 1864. 



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HISTOKV OF HENDEIOKS COPNl'Y. 



Hacklcy, G. E., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discliarged Jan. 25, 
1SG3, for disability. 

Ilarapton, J. M., imisterod in Sept. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 1SG4. 

Higgins, W. T. mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; died Marcli 1, 1862. 

iliggiiis, Ct. p., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 186-1. 

Hutchinson, Isaac, mustered in Sept. 13, 1801; died April 24, 
1862. 

Hyatt, Eufus, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861 ; out Sept. 20, 1864. 

Jobe, N. W., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; captured at the Wil- 
derness; mustered out Fob. 1, 1865. 

Jones, J. W., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 186-1. 

Jones, Joseph, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; killed in battle, May 
25, 1864. 

Lawton, I. G., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged July 25, 

1862, for disability. 

Leak, David, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 1864. 

Loekwood, Matthew, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 
1864. 

Marsh, William, mustered in Sept. 13, 1S61; out Sept. 20, 1864. 

Martin, Henry, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 1864. 

Montgomery, Alvah, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 
1864. 

Moody, G. W., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; captured at the 
Wilderness; died at Andersonville, Oct. 2, 1864. 

McPheters, W. G., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 1864. 

Myrick, R. H., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged Jan. 29, 

1863, for disability. 

Nash, I. N., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; died at City Point, Ya., 
June 18. 1864, of wounds. 

Niswanger, Samuel, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged Oct. 
3, 1862, for disability. 

Odell, H. 0., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; captured on AYeldon 
Road; mustered out May 30, 1865. 

Odell, J. M., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 1864. 

Pearson, William, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged Aug. 

25, 1862, for promotion. 

Ridge way, John, muster jd in Sept. 13, 186 1; out Sept. 20, 1884. 
Round, Franklin, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged April 
9, 1863, for disability. 

Robins, William, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged Dec. 

26, 1862, fur disability. 



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HISTOKY OF HENDIilCKS COUIJTY. 



345 



Sinitli, Howard, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; transferred to Vet- 
eran Ecservc Corps July 29, 1S63. 

Swindler, C. T., mustered in Sept. 13, ISGl; captured at Wilder- 
ness; mustered out Feb. 21, 18G5. 

Tliompson, T. J., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; died Jan. 4, 18C4, 
of disease. 

Toney, Iliram, mustered in Sept. 13, 18G1; veteran; transferred 
to Twentieth Infantry. 

Turner, W. J., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged Dec. 19, 
1862, for disability. 

Watts, L. S., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 1864. 

Walker, John, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged Sept. IS, 

1862, for disabilir,;. 

Walton, Amos, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 1S64-. 

West, William, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; died Feb. 12, 1862, 
of disease. 

Weaver, Ellis, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; transferred to Fifth 
United States Artillery. 

White, David, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; transferred to Veteran 
Eeserve Corps July 18, 1863. 

Worrick, Calving mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 1864. 

liecrvAts. 

Bray, J. M., mustered in March 11, 1862; discharged Feb. 9, 

1863, for disability. 

Bray, Wesley, mustered in March 11, 1862; transferred to 
Twentieth Infantry. 

Bray, William, mustered in July 19, 1862; died July 6, 1864, of 
wounds. 

Batchel, Eobert, mustered in May 29, 1862; transferred to 
Twentieth Infantry. 

Cassidy, Michael, mustered in July 21, 1862; transferred to 
Twentieth Infantry. 

Doyle, J. M. L., mustered in Aug. 8, 1862; killed at the AYilder- 
ness, May 5, 1864. 

Gregory, Eli, mustered in March 11, 1S62; transferred to Twen- 
tietli Infantry. 

Mills, Eleazer, mustered in April 1, 1862; killed at North Anna 
River, May 23, 1864. 

Smitli, David, mustered in; transferred to Invalid Corps Aug. 
18, 1863. ' ■ 



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HISTOEY OF HENDKICKS COUNTY. 
COJtPANY H. 

Officers. • - ■ 

S. J. Banta, commissioned Captain Sept. 1, 18G1; resigned Jnoe 
11, 1862. 

E. D. Brjant, commissioned First Lieutenant Sept. 1, 1861; pro- 
moted Captain June 12, 1862; mustered out Sept. 20, ISGi. 

M. D. L. Eobbius, commissioned Secoud Lieutenant Sept. 1, 
1861; promoted First Lieutenant June 12, 18G2. 

Wadley, Jonathan, mustered in as First Sergeant Sept. 13, 1861; 
promoted Second Lieutenant June 12, 1862; resigned Feb. 5, 1863. 

R. M. Curtis, mustered in as Sergeant Sept. 18, 1861 ; promoted 
First Sergeant; Second Lieutenant March 1, 1863; mustered out 
Sept. 20, 1S64. 

Non-Co?7iraissioned Officers. 

Brook B. Freeman, mustered in as Sergeant Sept. 13, 1861; dis- 
charged as private Sept. 11, 1862, for disability. 

Silas Strange, mustered in as Sergeant Sept. 13, 1862; discharged 
Oct. 6, 1862, for wounds. 

J. N. Hoitzclaw, mustered in as Sergeant Sept. M, 1861; dis- 
charged Sept. 27, 1862. for wounds. 

W. K. Pierson, mustered in as Corporal Sept. 13, 1861; pro- 
moted Sergeant; First Sergeant; captured at Yellow PIou.?e; mus- 
tered out Marcli 21, 1865. 

Samuel Holmes, mustered in as Corporal Sept. 13, 1861; pro- 
moted Sergeant; wounded at Petersburg; mustered out Sept. 20 
1864. 

James Howell, mustered in as Corporal Sept. 13, 1S61; promoted 
Sergeant; mustered out Sept. 20, 186-1. 

Eraslus Hunt, mustered in as Corporal Sept. 13, 1861; promoted 
Sergeant; discharged Oct. 20, 1862, for wounds. 

John Ohaver, mustered in as Corporal Sept. 13, 1861; promoted 
Sergeant; mustered out Sept. 20, 1861:. 

E. T. Robins, mustered in as Corporal Sept. 13, 1861; promoted 
Sergeant; mustered out Sept. 20, 1863. 

B. H. Cord, mustered in as Corporal Sept. 13, 1861; discharged 
as private Oct. 3, 1862, for disability. 

J. S. Ogden, mustered in as Corporal Sept. 13, 1861; discharged 
July 8, 1862, for wounds. 

Allen Ball, mustered 'in as private Sept. 13, 1S61; promoted 
Corporal; deserted near Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1862. 



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HISTOET OF HENDEICKS COUNTY. 



34T 



T. J. McAIullen, mustered in as musician Sept. 13, 18G1; ap- 
pointed principal musician Nov. 1, 1SG3. 

J. S. Armstrong, mustered in as musician Sept. 13, 1861; out 
Sept. 20, ISG-l. 

Allen Powers, mustered in as wagoner Sept. 13,1861; dis- 
charged June 1-i, 1862, for disability. 

C. F.Hall, mustered in as private Sept. 13, 18C1; promoted 
Corporal; mustered out Sept. 20, 1864. 

John Hornaday, mustered in as private Sept. 13, 1861; promoted 
Corporal; tilled at the Wilderness, May 5, 1S6-1. 

J. M. Leat, mustered in as private Sept. 13, 1861; promoted 
Corporal; mnstercd out Sept. 20, 1864. 

R. S. Powers, mustered in as private Sept. 1.3, 1861; promoted 
Corporal; mustered out Sept. 20, 1864. 

Elisha Straughn, mustered in as private Sept. 13, 1861; promoted 
Corporal; mustered out Sept. 20, 1864. 

William Stricklin, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; promoted Cor- 
poral; mustered out Sept. 20, 1864. 

J. C. Turner, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; promoted Corporal; 
mustered out Sept. 20, 1864. 

Thomas Grant, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; promoted Corporal; 
transferred to Twentieth Infantry. 

Privates. 

Arbuckle, Samuel, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; sent to Govern- 
ment fortifications by sentence of General Oonrt Martial Dec. 23, 
1862. 

Baxter, Thomas, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861 ; discharged April 
9, 1863, for disability. 

Bartholomew, L.W., mustered in Sept. 13,1861; discharged 
Oct. 20, 1861, for disability. 

Ballanger, Valentine, mustered in Sept. 1-., 1861; discharged 
Nov. 29, 1861, for disability. 

Boyd, Ira, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; oat S-pt. 20, 1864. 

Boyd, Aaron, mustered in Sept. 14, 1861; discharged Nov. 15, 
1862, for wounds. 

Bryant, S. M., mustered in Sept. 13, 1S61; out Sept. 20, 1864. 

Burks, J. S., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 1864. 

Cassidy, J. D., mustered in Sept. 13, 1S61; captured at Yellow 
House; mustered out March 21,1865. 



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8-18 HISTOKY OF UENDEICKS COUNTY. 

Carter, G. W., mustered in Sept. 13, 18G1; discharged May 13, 
ISGljior disability. 

Clernmons, Thomas, mustered iu Sept. 13, 1861; captured at 
Yellow House; mustered out May 23, 1865. 

Conquest, William, mustered in Sept. 13, ISGl; discharged 
March 4, 1863, for disability. 

Cummings, E. L., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged Sept. 
6, 1S62, for disability. 

Cummingoer, John, mustered in Sept. 33, 1861; died at Alexan- 
dria, Ya., Dec. 28, 1863, of disease. 

Day, George, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; captured at Yellow 
House; mustered out jMan;h 21, 1865. 

Donaldson, "William, mv stored in Sept. 13, 1861; wounded June 
1, 1864. 

Dodson, Martin, musterod in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged April 
9, 1SG3, for disability. 

Downs, William, muste^'ed in Sept. 14, 1861; out Sept. 20, 1864. 

Faulkner, G. S., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged for pro- 
motion Aug. 6, 1863. 

Franklin, John, musterel in Sept. 14, 1861; discharged Nov. 20, 
1862, for disability. ; 

Gully, Berry, mustered in Sept. 13, 1881; discharged May 23, 
1862, for disability. 

Hampton, John, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 1864. 

Havens, Eufus, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; died at Cumber- 
land, Md., Feb. 12, 1862, of disease. 

Hess, W. M., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861, out Sept. 20, 1864. 

Helton, T. J., mustered in Sept. 13, 18G1; transferred to Invalid 
Corps Aug. 18, 1863. 

Helton, "William, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged May 10 

1862, for disability. 

Helton, James, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; promoted Corporal. 
Hough, James, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 1864. 
Hnltz, A. D., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 1864. 
Hyton, T. K, mustered in Sept. 13, 1S61; discharged Jan. 10, 

1863, for disability. 

Irvin, G. W., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; captured at the Wil- 
derness; mustered out May 29, 186.5. 

Kesler, Willis, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged Nov. 3, 
1862, for wounds. 



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HISTOKY OF HENDKICKS COUNTT. 



349 



Kesler, B. F., mustered in Sept. 13, ISGl; discharged Aug. 19, 
18G'i, for wounds. 

Kesler, John, mustered in Sept. 13, 1S61; discharged I^ov. 24, 
1S62, for disability. 

Kendal], George, mustered in Sept. 13, 1S61; died June 20, 18C4, 
of wounds. 

L-aw, Stephen, mustered in Sept. 13, 18G1; discharged Feb. 20, 
18C3, for disability. 

Lewis, James, mustered in Sept. 3, 1861; captured at Yellow 
House; mustered out March 2, 1365. 

Lewis, J. H., mustered in Sept. 14, 1861; discharged Dec. 26, 
1862, for disability. 

Lochhart, Thomas, mustered ii. Sept. 13, 1861; wounded June 2, 
1864; mustered out Sept. 20, 1804. 

Lovell, Washington, mustered in Sept. 14, 1861; captured at 
Yellow House; mustered out ]\[f rch 21, 1865. 

Marvel, Josiah, mustered in Siipt. 13, 1861; dropped from rolls 
as deserter. 

Martin, James, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; captured at the Wil- 
derness; mustered out July 17, 186 5 

McCoy, J. n., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; died at Green Spring 
Eun, Va., Dec 31, 1861, of disease. 

McCoy, Alfred, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; captured at Yellow 
House; mustered out March 21, 1863. 

McPheters, W. II., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; died at Cumber- 
land, Md., Jan. 1, 1862, of disease. 

Ohaver, Joseph, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged May 10, 
1862, for disability. 

Osborn, John, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; wounded at North 
Anna River. 

Pierson, Hiram, mustered in Sept. 13, 1S61; transferred to' In- 
valid Corps Aug. 18, 1863. 

Pierson, James, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged Aug. 6, 
1862, for disability. 

Pierson, W. H., mustered in Sept. 14, 1861; died at Cumber- 
land, Md., Aug. 8, 1862, of distase. 

Pierson, Josei.h, mustered ir. Sept. 13, 1861; discharged Aug. 
13, 1862, for disability. 

Poe, S. S., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged Dec. 3, 1863, 
for disability. 



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HISTORY 01 HEHDEtCJiS COUNTi'. 



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Printiboll, Maurice, liuistfred in Sept. 13, ISGl; captured at tlio 
Wildet-nocs May 5, 1865. 

Rhiner, William, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 186i. 

Robins, C. G., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; discharged Aug. 14, 
1S62, for wounds. 

Siples, ^Y. II., mustered in Sept. 13, 1801; out Sept. 20, 1864. 

Simujons, JSTelsou, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; appointed mu- 
sican; mustered out Sept. 20, 1864. 

Small, Kuglic}', mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; captured at Yellow 
House; mu:-.tered out March 21, 1865. 

Snider, Joseph, mustered in Sept. 14, 1861; deserted at Wash- 
ington, Sept. 7, 1862. 

Stutsman, AVilliam, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; transferred to 
Invalid Corps Sept. 30, 1S6£. 

Steele, Josephus, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 1864. 

Stewart, V.''. T., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 1864. 

Surber, G. W., mustered in Sept. 13, 1S61; discharged Jan. 17, 
1863, for disability. 

Swain, Wesley, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 1864. 

Tout, Homer, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 1864. 
, Tout, George, mustered ii, Sept. 13, ISGl; out Sept. 20, 1864. 

Tout, Goluuabus, mustcre3 in Sept. 13, lS6i; wounded at the 
Wilderness; muf'.tcred out Jiept. 20, 1864. 

Turner, J. M., mustered i;i Sept. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 1864. 

West, II. M., mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; killed at North Anna 
River, May 25, 1864. 

Wilkinson, William, mus'ered in Sept. 13, 1861; appointed wag- 
oner; mustered out Sept. 20, 1864. 

Wilson, Isaac, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; died at Elkwater, 
Va., Dec. 17, 1861. 

W^orley, William, mustered in Sept. 13, 1861; out Sept. 20, 1864. 

Recruits. 

Bartley, W. L., mustered in March 11, 1862; deserted at Phila- 
delphia Hospital Oct. 30, 1864. 

Bryant, A. P., mustered in Aug. 5, 1862; discharged Oct. 13, 
1863, for disability. 

Gregg, W. P., mustered in July 21, 1833; discharged Aug. 5, 
1863, for disability. 

Morri.9, J. W., mustered ia March 11, 1862; discharged Dec. IS, 
1869, for disability. 



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HISTOET OF HEKDEICKS CODHTY. 351 

Xicincycr, "William, mnstcred in April 1, 18G2; captured at Yel- 
ji-r.r House; inusteved out Aug. 1, 18>j5. 

Towers, Edv/prd, mustered in July 19, 1S82; transferred to 
Twonticth Infantry. 
S\v.iin,"Nath<T.a, mnstercd in July 19, 1SG2; trKnsferred to Twcn- 
I tictli Infantry. ■ 

! Svfain, Tliomas N., mustered in July 19, 1S62. 



COMFAKT I. ■ .■ ■ ., • ; ; ■■•, 

Private.'). " '■ ■ 

Ciiywcod, J. E., mustered in Sept. 13, 18G1; veteran; transferred 
to Twentieth Infantry. 

Iladley, A. C, mustered iu Sept. 73. 1S62; veteran; transferred 
to Twentietli Infantry," 

Slaves, J. Q. A., nuistercd in Gept, 13, IGC^jTetcraT-; transferred 
to Twentieth Infantry. • 

Smith, McKendree, mustered in rs private Sept. 13, 1861; pro- 
moted Corporal; veteran; transierred to Tweatieih Infantry. 

EIGHTH IHFANTRT. 

COIiIPAKY B. ■ ■- . 

■ Officer. 

Nicholas Miller, mustered in as private Aug. 55, 1861; veteran; 
promoted Sergeant; Second Lieutenant July 19, 1865; mustered ! 
out as Sergeant Aug. 28, 1865. 

Non-Commissioicd G'jjicer. 

Jacob Martin, mustered in as private Aug. 25, 1861 ; veteran ; 
promoted Corporal; Sergeant; mustered out Aug. 28, 1865. 

ELEVENTH IN FANTRY. 

Oflcers. 

J. A. Comingore, commissioned Assistant Smrgeon April 9, 
1S62; Surgeon Dec. 26, 1862; resigned Sept. 13, 1864. 

J- C. Scearce, commissioned Assistant Surgeon Jan. 2, 1863; 
Surgeon Sept. 14, 1861; mustered out July 26, 1865. 

Non-Co7nmissicned O^icsrs. 



frank Lawhead, mustered in as Corporal Aug. 31, 1861; out 
-^pril 26, 1865. 



«, C. P. Hall, mustered in as Corporal Aug. 31, 1861. 






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352 



illSTOKY OP HENDKICKS COITNTY. 

I^/'ivaies. 



Duley, H. C, nuietered in Aug. 31, 1861; out Aug. 30, 1SC4. 
Ellis, J. S., mn.stcred in Aug. 31, ISGl; died June 1, 18G3, of 
vvound'j received at Champion Hills. 

Jackson, Jehu, mustered in Aug. 31, 18G1. 

Pernell, George, mustered in Aug. 31, 1861; discharged Oct 

23, 1862, for disabilitj. 

Eobcrts, B. W., mustered iu Aug. 31, 1861; died at "icoknk 
lowa, Oct. 5, 1862. 

Wills, J. W., mustered in Aug. 31, 1861; discharged Aug. 1, 
1862, for disabilitj . 

Wills, ^Y. F., mustered in Aug. 31, 1861; out Aug. 30, 1864. 
Winstuad, Dani(;l, mustered in Aug. 31, 1861; discharged jMav 

24, 1862. 

_ Winstead, Olive;,- mustered in Aug. 31, 1861; out Aug. f^0,lS61. 



' .•;■',■. COJIPAJiT B. 

J-'rivates. ".'•■. • ■ 

Puddj, liicharc, mustered in Aug. 31, 1861; discharged Sep* 
17, 1862, fordisablitj. 

Dubois, J. T., rcusterod in Aug. 31, 1861. 

Godfrey, J. D., mustered iu Aug. 31, 1S61; veteran; n. us tereJ 
out July 26, 1865. 

Kobbs, Ansclm, mustered in Aug. 31, 1361; discharged Av^g. 
15, 1863, for promotion in U. S. Colored Troops. 

Johnson, J. H., -nustered in Aug. 31, 1861; veteran; p-oracte^l 
Corporal; Sergeant; mustered out July 2 6,1865. 

Eichter, Andrew, mustered in Aug. 31, 1861; veteran; mustered 
out July 26, 1865. 

THIRTEENTH INFANTKY. 
COirpANY E. 

Privat 
Drumm, J. A., loustered in Sept. 20, 1863; out Sept. 5, 1865. 

BETENTEENTII INFANTRY. 

Officer. 
Cox, JEIenry, commissioned Assistant Surgeon April 25, 18C2. 

UNASSIGNED. 

Pratt, Andrew, sabstii-ute, mustered in Sept. 1, ISGi. 



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HISTORY OF lIEN'DRiCKS COUNTT. 



353 



eighteenth i^ fantkt. 
' . oompa?;t h. 

Bennett, John, mnstcred in Aug. 26, 1864; out July 6, 1865. 

TWENTIETH INi'AKTKY. 
COliLPANY F. 

Officer. 

John Kistlor, commissioned Captf in July 22, 1861; discharged 
Nov. I'i, 1«G2. , _. . ,,. , _ 

Private. 

Yonnt, Levris, mustered in Jan. -t, 18C4; veteran; wounded at 
tlic AVilderness; transferred to Yete/an Keserve Corps; mustered 
out July 1-i, 1865. 

COMPANi" G. 

Privaies. 

Caywood, J. E., mustered in Jan. 4, 1864; from Seventh Infan- 
try; veteran; captured at the WiU erness; mustered out Julv 12, 
1865. 

Iladley, A. C, mustered in Jira. 1, 1864; from Seventh In- 
fantry; died in rebel prison in December, 1864. 

Swain, Nathan, mastered in Aug. 7, 1862; from Seventh Infantry; 
mustered out May 31, 1865. 

Swain, T. N"., mustered in July 19, 1862; from Seventh Infautry ; 
mustered out May 31, 1865. 

COHPAN f H. 

Noji-Commissicned Officers. 

D. R. Cottrell, mustered in Feb 20, 1864, as Corporal; veteran; 
promoted Sergeant; mustered out July 12, 1865. 

John Dickey, mustered in as Sergeant Feb. 20, 1864; veteran; 
promoted First Sergeant; mustered out July 12, 1865. 

TWENTY-FIRST INFANTRY. 
COMPAT'Y E. 

Non-Coinmissioned Officers. 

M. L. Rietzel, mustered in as private July 24, 1861; veteran; 
promoted Sergeant; mustered oat Jan. 13, 1866. 

W. H. Richardson, mustered in as private July 24, ISCl; pro- 
moted Corporal; discharged Oct. cO, 1833, for disability; mustered 



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HlBTOr.T OF UENDKICKS COUNTY. 



in again March 30, lS6i; was finally mnsterecl out Jan. 13, 186C. 

S. M. Tindei', mustered in as private July 24, 1801; veteran; 
promoted First Sergeai^t; mustered out Jan. 13, 186G. 

A. C. Evans, mustered in as private JMarcli 4, 1864; promcteii 
Corj'oral; mustered out Jan. 13, 1866. 

Privates. 

Hadley, G. W., mustered in July 24, 18G1; died at New Orleans, 
Sept. 7, 1SG2. 

Hartv.'eg, John, mustered in July 24, ISGl; veteri'.n; masteced 
out Jan. 13, 1865. 

Scherer, L. E., mustered in July 24, J 861; out July 31, 1861. 

Taylor, .^ M., mustered in July 24, ISGl; veteran; discliar:;cfl 
June 1, 1865, for disability. 

Taylor, L. 0., musteied in July 24, ISGl; killed by provost gu ;rd 
May '24, 1865. 

"Winstead, James, mrstered in July 2i, 1861; out July 21, 1EG4. 

"' ' Hecridts. 

Barton, Wm., mu:ter id in Aug. SO, 1864; deserted Sept.lS,lS 34. 

Bradsbaw, Alex-iuder, mustered iu March 24, 1864; died at Ea on 
Rouge, La., xVug. 15, 1864. 

Crawford, Taylor, mustered in March 24, 18G4; died at M(m- 
jhis, Oct. 25, 1864. 

Evans, J. M., mustered in April 14, 1864; out Jan. 13, 1866. 

Gv.'in, Seth, mustered in March 23, 1864; discharged ]\Iay 10, 
1865, for disability 

Keller, John, mustered in April 1, 1SG4; out Jan. 13, 1866. 

O'JM'eal, Bailey, mustered in Sept. 26, 1864; out July 22, 186 5. 

Pearcy, James, mustc red in March 24, 1864; out Jan. 13, 18 50. 

Richardson, J. K., mustered in March 28,1864; out Jan. 13,1816. 

Eoupe, J. T., mustered in April 15, 1864; out Jan. 13, 1860. 

Todd, "Wesley, mustered in Sept. 2S, 1864; died at Baton Rou,;e. 
La., Dec. 16, 1864. 

Tindall, A. C, mustered in Nov. 10, 1863; deserted July 1,18 J5. 

Tinder, J. W., mustered in March 17, 1864; died at Baton Rou^e^ 
La.. June 25, 1865. 
• Zenor, Squire, musteied in Sept. 26, 1864; out July 22, 1865. 

UNASSIGXEU. 

Recruits. 
Burly, Hiram, mustered in April 1, 1864. 






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HISTOKT OF HENDillCKS COUNTT. 



355 



Barto'j, WilliiMn, substitute, musjtered iu Aug. 30, 1SG4. 

Burdy, Eli, mustered in Oct. 3. 18G4. 

Dudley, Preston, mustered in Sipt. 30, 1864. 

Green, Charles, mustered in Sept. 29, 1864. 

Lee, W. II., mustered in Feb. 8, 1864. ' -■ 

Shelter, Christian, mustered ia Sept. 26, 1864. 

Wilcox, Lovet, mustered iu Oct. 3, 18G4. • . 

TWENTY-SIXTH INFANTKY. 
COMPANY E. 

Privates. ■ \ \.' " i: ,-■ 

Kean, J. C, mustered in Aug. 30, 1861; discharged May 1, 
1862, for disability. 
Love, William, mustered in Au,^. 30, 1861 ; out Sept. 21, 1864. 
Earidan, Silas, raustcrcd in Aug. 30, 1861; out Sept. 21, 1864. 

TWENTY-SEVEN'.' U INFANTKY. 



COMPANY A. 

Ojjlars. . . - ... 

Samuol Porter, mustered in as Corporal Sept. 12, 1S61; promoted 
Second Lieutenant Sept. 18, 1862; First Lieutent^nt May 4, :IS63. 

J. F. Prtrsons, commissioned Second Lieutenant Aug. 30, 1861; 
resigned in December, 1861. 

I 

foety-sevent:! infantry. 

company h. 

Prlvcie. 

Hall, F. H., mustered in Dec. 13, 1861; out Dec. 12, 1864. 

fifty-first infantry.. 

Offi-Cdrs. 

W. W. Scearce, commissioned Capt-ain Company K March 25, 
1862; Major May 1, 1865; Liiutenant-Colonel June 1, 1865; 
mustered out Dec. 13, 1865. 

J. W. Sheets, commissioned Crptain Company C Oct. 11, 1861; 
Lieutenant-Colonel Ajn-il 25, lS6f; died as Captain, of wounds re- 
ceived iu action, June 21, 1863. 









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356 



HISTORY OF lENDKIOKS COUNTY. 



OOirrANY A. 

Officers. 

J. H. Fleece, commissioned Captain Oct. 11, 1801: resigned 
Aug. 9, 1862. ^ 

Milton Russell, commisGioned First Lieutenant Oct. 11, 18G1- 
Captain Aug. 10, 1862; Iionon.blj discharged Dec. 30, 1864. 
^J. A. Givens, mustered iu a:? Corporal Dec. 13, 1861; promoted 
Captain Mav 1, 1865; mustered out Dec. 13, 1865. 

W. A, Adair, mustei-ed iu as First Sergeant Dec. 13,1861- pro- 
moted Second Lieutenant Ap.'il 24, 1862; First LieutenautAucr 
10, 1862; honorably discharged Marcli 12, 1865. ° 

John Emmons, mustered in fs Corporal Dec. 13, 1861; promoted 
First Lieutenant May 1, 1865. 

Harvey Slavens, commissioned Second Lieutenant Oct 11 1861- 
died Marcli 27, 1862, at IS'ashvillo, Tenn. ' ' 

^Y. II. Harvey, mustered iu as private Dec. 13, 1861; promoted 
Second Lieutenant Sept. 1, 1862; mustered oat Dec. 14, 1864. 

Non~ Commissioned Officers. 

John Harlan, mustered in as Sergeant Dec. 13, 1861; discharged 
May 2, 1862, for disability. 

G. A. Proctor, mustered in as Sergeant Doc. 13, 1831; died Mny 
30, 1863. > ^ 

Amos Weaver, mustered in as Sergeant Dec. IS, 1861; dis- 
charged MarcIi 11, 1865, of wounds received at Daltori. 

W. KMcLevad, mustered in Dec. 13, 1861; discharged Oc^. 
25, 1863, for disability. 

S. G. Cool:, mustered in as private Dec 13, 1861; veteran; pro- 
moted Sergeant; mustered out. Dec. 13, 1S65. 

J. E. Proctor, mustered in as private Dee. 13, 1861; veteran; 
promoted Sergeant; mustered out Dec. 13, 1865. 

Silas Gardner, mustered in as Corporal Dec. 13, 1861 • deserted 
May 1, 1862. 

W. T. Linn, mustered in as Corporal Dec. 13, 1861; out Dec 
14, 1864. 

M. A. Dyer, mustered in as Corporal Dec. 13, 1861; veteran ; 
mustered out Dec. 13, 1865. 

VYillis Slovens, mustered ir, as Corporal Dec. 1-3, 1861; dis- 
charged June 29, 1882, for disability. 

G. W.Shackleflird, mustered in as Corporal Dec. 13, 1861; vet] 
eran; mustered out Dec. 13, 1865. 



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HISTOKV OF II EJJI. RICKS COUNTY. 



357 



W. B. Gibson, mustered in as Corporal Dec. 13, lSt31; out Dec. 

14, 1861:. 

F. M. Barber, innstercd in as private Dec. 13, 1861; veteran; 
promoted Corporal ; mustered out Dec. 13, 1865. 

W. T. Jourdan, mustered in as private Deo. 13, 1861; veteran; 
promoted Corporal; mustered out Dec. 13, 1S65. 

John Eoborts, mustered in as private Dec. 13, 1861; veteran; 
promoted Corporal; mustered out Dec. 13, 1865. 

J. M. White, mustered in as private Dec. 13, 1861; veteran; pro- 
moted Corporal; mustered out Dec. 13, 1865. 

W. A. Phillips, mustered iu as -private Oct. 15, 1863; promoted 
Corporal; mustered out Dec. 13, 1365. 

W. A. Jones, nmstpred in as musician Doc. 1.3, ISGl; discharged 
June 19, 1862, for disability. 

George Allison, mustered in as musician Dec. 13, 1861 ; dis- 
charged July 5, 1863, for disabilit}-. 

Pr'i.va ',e?. 

Adams, G. W., mustered in Dec. 13, 1861; killed JNIay 28, 1S63. 

Alley, David, mustered in Dec. 13, 1S61; veteran; mustered out 
Dec. 13, 1865. 

Allen, .John, mustered in Dec. 13, 1861; deserted Aug. ], 1862. 

Bryan, A. A., mustered in Dec. 13, 1S61; died May 11, 1862. 

Budd, David, mustered in. Dec. 13, 1861; killed at iMurt'reesboio 
Jan. 2, 1862. 

Brown, O. F., mustered in Dee. 13, 1861; discharged July 5, 
1863, for disability. 

Buchanan, Joseph, mustered in Dec. 13, 1861 ; died Feb. 10, 1861. 

Cochrane, William, mustered in Dee. 13, 1S81; dischaiged June 
19, 1862, for disability. 

Condiff, R. A., mustered in Dec. 13, 1861; killed at Columbia, 
Jan. 19, 1865. 

Cole, V/. L., mustered in Dec' 13, 1861; out Feb. U, 1865. 

Duckworth, William, mustered in Dec. 13, 1S61; killetl at Mur- 
freesboro, Jan. 2, 1862. 

Davis, William, mustered in Dec. 13, 1861; discharged Oct. 27, 
1862, for disability. 

Ellington, J. J., mustered in De^;. 13, 1861; discharged June 23, 
1862, for disability. 

Fleece, J. B., mustered in Dec. 13, 1861; killed at Nashville, 
Dec. 16, 1864. 



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35S 



HISTOl'.V OF IIIONDKIOKS COUNTV. 



Freiiije.'ir, G. J., niti.-tcrei.! in Dec, 13, ISGl; died Aiij.'. ], 1UC3. 

Frazier, Kicliard, mustered in Dec. 13, ISGI; deserted Nov. 1, 
1862. 

Givcns, J. Ii., mustei-ed in Dec. 13, ISOl; discliargcd June 20, 
1S63, for disability. 

Gardner, Tliomas, niustered in Dec. 13, ISOl; deserted June 
17, 18G5. 

Gwinn, Samuel, niustei'ed in Dec. 13, 1S61; disciiargcd July .t, 
1SC2, for disability. 

Gardner, Aii'liony, n-nstcred in Dec. 13, 1S61; died Dec. 7, 13G3. 

Houston, WiUiani, m.istered in Dec. 13,1861; veteran; nuistered 
out Dec. 13, 1S65. 

Harrison, ^Y . H., mustered in Dec. 13, ISGl; out Dec. M, 1,J6-1 
. .Hunt, J. AV., tnusteitid in Dec. 13, ISCl; discharged Marci 1, 
1863, for disability. 

House, AY. T:\, ninstored in Dec. 13, 1S61; discharged July 10, 
1S62, lor disability. 

Davis. F. M., nmsterod in Dec. 13, ISGl; out Dc 14, 1564. 

Jones, .Tesse, mustered in Dee. 13, ISGl; discharged July .5, iSG-', 
for disability. 

Johnscn, S. A., mustered in Dee. 13, 1S61; out Dec. 13, IS'io. 

Lookabaugh, John, mustered in Dec. 13, ISGl; veteran; dese -ted 
June 17, 1S6.5. 

Lovell, William, mustered in Dec. 13, 1S61; out June i, LSG.o. 

Moore, G. W., mustered in Dec. 13, 1S61; out May 2. ISG:?. 

Moore, H. C mustered in Dec, IS, ISoi; veteran; mustered out 
Dec. 13, 1S6.5. 

Morris, Mason, nius'ered in Dec. 13, ISGl; veteran; dese ted 
June 17, 1SG5. 

Morris. John, mustered in Dec. 13, ISGl; discharged Miiy 1, l.!C2, 
for disability. 

McCormick, G. \Y., mustered in Dec. 13, ISGl; died April 5. 
1S65. 

McCormick, Bi.'rryman, mustered in Dec. 13, 1861; dese ted 
June 17, 1865. 

Pai;c, Williamson, mustered in Dec. 13, ISGl; discharged Feb. 
1, 1SG3. for disability. 

Kussell, Logan, mustared in Dee. 13, 18G1; discharged Sept. IS, 
13G2, for dirability. 

Rose, Tiiomas, niuste/ed iii Dec. 13, IS I!; dirc::argtd Si/pt. Jo. 
1862, lor disability. 



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HISTOUY OF HE.''.'DRICKS COUNTS. 



359 



Kosc, J. 1., niustered in Dec. 13, 1801; died Sept. IS, 1S62. 

Sears, Joseph, mustered in Dec. 13, 1S61; killed at Stone River, 
Jan. 2,]SG2. 

Slavens, Milton, mustered in Dec. 13, 1861; discliai-i^ed June 2.5, 
1SG2, for disability. 

SoutherlaT), Ja.mes, mustered in Dec. 13, IStll; died July 1, 1SG2. 

Shepherd, Edward, mustered in Dec 13, 1861; died at Camp 
Chase, Oluo, June 1, 1863. 

Shecklcs, James, mustered in ])cc. 13, 1861; discharged Aug. 1, 
1862, for disability. 

Sujith, J. P., mustered in Dec 13, 1861; out Dec. 1-1, ISGi. 

Schrayer, Daniel, mustered in Dec. 13, ISGl; out Dee. li, 1861. 

Trotter, J. C, mustered in Dec. 13, 1801; discharged Aug. 10, 
1862, for disability. 

Tout, William, mustered in T'ec. 13. 1861; veteran; deserted 
June 17, liiOo. 

Warreii, J. M., mustered in D.-c. 13, ISGI; died Jan. 30, 18G2. 

Walker, J. E., mustered in Da;. 13, 1861; transferred to marine 
service Sept. 20, 1862. 

Warrick, Amos, mustered in Dec. 13, 1861; veteran; mustered 
out Dec. 13, 1S65. 

Jiecy I'ifs. 

Adau:s, D. S., mustered in Se[.t. 11, 1862; died Jan. 25, 1863. 

Brown, Marcellus, mustered in July 29, 1863; killed by acci- 
dent at Athens. Tenn., April 20, 1861-. 

Brooks, J. W., mustered in Aug. 10, 1863; deserted June 17, 1S65. 

Concliff, Ij. a.., mustered in A ig. 1, 1863; died Oct. 29, ISGi. 

Crabb, J. H., mustered in Oco. 5, 1863; transferred to \^eteran 
Reserve Corps April 6, 1861; died Feb. 1.5, 1865, of wounds re- 
ceived at Nashville. 

Danner, Allen, mustered in June 15, 1863; out Dec. 13, 1865. 

Dayton, W. S., mustered in Sept. 21, 1863; out Dec. 13, 1865. 

Douglas, John, mustered in March 28, 1861; out Dec. 13, 1865. 

Ellis, W. A., mustered in July 29, 1803; out Dec. 13, 1865. 

Ellis, J. F., mustered in March 28, 1863; out Dec. 13, 1865. 

Fitch, Marion, mustered in Oct. 22, 1862; out Oct. 32, 1865, as 
Hospital Steward, 

Green, F. M., mustered in Oct. S, 1863; oat June 9, 1865. 

Givens, G. S. , mustered in No 7. 11, 1861; out Dec. 13, 1865. 

Job, A. P., mustered in Uavah 11, 1865; out Dec. 13, 1805. 



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HI^TOKY OK IIENDKIC^KS COL'NTY. 



McConnick, J. W., umstcred in July 22, 1863; died at Indian- 
apolis March 13, J SOS. 

McConnick, W. S., mustered in Aug. 21, 1S63; transferred to 
Veteran Reserve Corps April 1, 1S65. 

McConniclv, S. L., mustered in March 29, 1S64; deserted June 
IT, 1865. 

Moore, AV. P., mustered in Aug. 12, 1S63; deserted June 15, lS6o. 

Parhhurst, W. T., mustered in Sept. 8, 1862; transferred to 
Veteran Reserve Corps Dec. 12, 1863. 

Parker, D. E., mustered in June 24, 1803; out June 13, 1S65. 

Rice, Warren, mustered in Nov. 25, 1803; deserted June 15. 1805. 

Round, J. P., mustered in Nov. 11, 1861; out Nov. 15, 1865. 

Shinei', G- E., mustered in June 20, 1803; deserted July 10. 1865. 

Tout, ^Y. T., mustered in Juiie 6, 1863; died April 10, 1865. 

"VVhite, W. T., mustered in Sept. 11, 1802; died Dec. 28, 1862. 

Ward, J. A., mustered in July 29, 1803; died Jan. 15, 1866, ot 
wounds. 

Ward, 11. N., mustered in July 29, 1803; out Dee. 13, 1865. 

COJEPANY 0. 
OficCl'S. 

J. W. Sheets, commissioned Captain Oct. 11, 1361; promoted 
Lier. tenant-Colonel. 

Sa,inuel Lingerman, commi ;sioned First Lieutenant Oct. 11, 1861 ; 
Captain June 30, 1863; died May 1, ISOi. 

i). W. Hamilton, mustered in as private Oct. 0, ISOl; promoted 
Captain Oct. 29, lS6i; resigned May 23, 1865. 

George Gregg, mustered in as private Jan. 2, 1862; veteran; 
promoted Second T-ieutenaiit March 1, 1865; First Lieutenant 
May 1,1865. Ca[ita!n June 1, 1865; dropped from rollsa s a deserter. 

G. H. Adams, mustered ii as private Dec. ll, 1861 ; veteran; pro- 
moted Second Lieutenant May 1, 1865; First Lieutenant June 1, 
18G5;' Captain Oct. 1, 1865; mustei-ed out Dec. 13, 1865. 

A. T. Dooley, commissioned Second Lieutenant Oct. 11,1861; 
First Lieutenant June 30, 1863; honorably discharged ]\[arch 12, 

1865. 

C. E. StepheTis, mustered in as First Scrgciint Dec. 14, 1801; pro- 
moted Second Liontenan t.ju leSO, 1>03; uinstered out Feb. 15, 1805. 

j^on- Cvr.i'irdssioned Officers. 

W. F. Hadden, mustorel in as S'.jcgo;int Dec. 14, 1861; dis- 
charged Oct. 20, 1862. for disability. 






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HISTOUY OF HKXDKIOKS COUNTY. 



361 



J. T. Dinwiddie, mustered iuas Sergeant Dec. H, ISfil; veteran; 
mustered out Dee. 13, 1S05. 

D. C. Lane, mustered in as Ser^^'eant Dec. 14, ISGl; out Dec 1-4, 
ISCl. 

William Kelly, mustered in as Sergeant Dec. 14, 1861; out Dec. 
14, 1S64. 

J. M. Mundav, mustered in as Corporal Dec. 14, 1861; mustered 
out Dec. 14, 1S04. 

J. A. M\mday, mustered in as Corporal Dec. 14, 1S61; killed at 
Stone River Dee. 31, 1863. 

Calviu Dickiiisim, mustered iu as Corporal Dec. 14, 1861; out 
Dec. 14, 1864. ^ 

Floyd Dickinson, mustered in as Corporal Dec. 14, 1801 ; out 
Dec. 14, 1864. 

J. C. Call, mustered in as CorpoVal Dec. 14, 1S61; veteran; 
mustered out Dec. 13, 1865. 

J. V. Parker, mustered in as Corporal Doc. 14, 1S61; out Doc. 
14, 1864. 

"\V. V. Brown, mustered in as Corporal Dec. 14, 1861; otit Dec. 
14, 1864. ■ - , . 

J. G. Adams, mustered in as private Dee. 14, 1861; veteran; pro- 
moted Corporal; mustered out Dec. 13, 1865. 

W.' C' Clemens, mustered in as private Doc. 14, 1S61; veteran; 
promoted Corporal; mustered oit Dec. 13, 1865. 

^V. H. Jelf, mustered in as private Dec. 14, 1S61; veteran; pro- 
moted Sergeant; mustered out Dec. 13, 1865. 

C. S. Kurtz, mustered in as p-ivate Dec. 14, 1S61; vetera:i; pro- 
moted Corporal; mustered out Dec. 13, 1865. 

W. B. Osborn, mustered in fs private Dee. 14, 1861; veteran; 
promoted Sergeant; mustered out Dec. 13, 1865. 

William Shackley, mustered in Dec. 14, 1861; veteran; pro- 
moted Sergeant; mustered out Dec. 13, 1865. 

J. W. Tout, mustered in as private Dec. 14, 1861; veteran; pro- 
moted Corporal; mustered out Dec. 13, 1865. 

S. W: AVatts, mustered in as private Dec. 14, 1861; veteran; pro- 
moted Corporal; mastered out Dec. 13, 1865. 

W. C. Welshaus, mustered iu as musician Dec. 14, 1861; out 
Dec. 14, 1864. 

"W. M. Crawford, mustered in as wagoner Doc. 14, lS6i: out Dec. 
14, 1864. 



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3G2 HISTOF.Y 01' HENDUICKS COUN'TY. 

Privates. '.'.... 

Arbiic-kle. F. JL, imiitei'cd in Dec. 14, ISCl; ont Jan. 9, 1865. 

Bates, J. N., mustered in Dec. l-l, ISCl; out Dec. M, 1.864. 

Bryant, Jnnics, mustei'cd in Dee. 14, 1861; out Dec. 14, 1864. 

Curtis, tluey, mustered in Dec. 14, 18GJ; dischai'ged Aug. 30, 
1862, for disability. 

Cox, C. P., mustered in Dec. 14, 1861; veteran; inu»tcred out 
Dec. 13, 1865. 

Champion, J. ¥.., musten.d in Dec. 14, 1861: out Dec. 14, 1864. 

Dooley, Arthur, mustere^l in Dec. 14, 1861; out Dec. 14, 1864. 

Dixon, X. L., mustered in Dec. 14, 1S6I ; o'.it Dec. li, 1864. 

Eaton, Reuben, mustered in Dec. 14, 1861; veteran; mustered 
out Dec. 13, 186.5. 

Ellis, R. IL, mustered in Dec. 14, 1861; died July 4, 1862. 

Flinn, Mason, mustered in Dec. 14, 1861 ; deserted Nov. 16, 1862. 

Gasjier, John, mustered in Dec. 14, 1S6!; veteran; discharged 
June 19, 1865, for disability. 

Greenlee, William, mustered in Dec. 14, 1861; out Dec. 14,1864. 

C4odfrey, J. A., mustered in Dec. 14, 1861; veteran; n)usteredout 
Dec. 13, is65. 

Hancock, "V^'illiam, mustered in Dec. 14, 1861; transferred (c 
Corps d'Afrique June 20, }S64. 

Hilton, Stephen, raustorod in Dec. 14, 1861; died July 2, 1862 

Hall, II. C, rnusturcd in Dec. 14, 1S61; veteran; nfustered out 
Dec. 13, 1865. 

Hodson, J. B., mustered in Dec. 14, 1861; veteran; mustered ou; 
Dec. 13, 1865. 

Iddings, J. O., mustered in Dec. 14, 1861; died April 12, 1862 

Jones, A. W., mustered in Dec. 14, 1S61; deserted May 14, 1862. 

McDaniels, T. A., mustej-ed in Dec. 14, 1861; killed while pris- 
oner, May 12, 1863. 

McAVilliams, C. A., mustered in Dec. 14, 1861; killed at Blunts- 
ville, Ala., May 2, 1863. 

Newman, Charles, mustered in Dec. 14, 1861; discharf^'cd Nov. 
9, 1864, for disability. 

Osborn, Silas, mustered in Dec. 14, 1861; killed at Day's Gap, 
April 30, 1863. 

Pike, 0. H., mustered in Dec. 14. 1861; out Dec. U, 1864. 

Phillips, Eli, mustered in Dec. 14, 1861; killed at Stone Kivej, 
Jan. 1, 1863. 



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HISTORY OF HICXDKTCKS COUNTY. 


363 




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j EiiiiHicn-, II. C, mustered in Dec. 14, ISGl; veteran; 


mustered 






i out Dec. 13, 1865. 








1 K'niiid-^, II. S., mustered in Deo. 14, ISGl: died Feb. 


19,1862. : 






i Shirley, T. J., muetered in Dec. 14, 1861 ; dischargee 


May 18, 






1SG3, for disability. 








Stiirriian, Silas, iiiustered in Dec. 14, 1861; deserted Sept 


10,1862. 1 






1 Scherer, J. B., mnstored in Dec. 14, 1861; discharged Nov. 14, j 






: 1862, fur disability. 


! 






Sharpe, William, mustered in Dec. 14, 1861; out Dec. 


14, 1864. 






South, J. M., mustered in Dec. 14, ISGI; out Dec. 14, 


1864. 1 






Tcniplin, K. T., mustered in Dec. 14, 1861; veteran; 


out Dec. 






i J 3, 1S64. 


1 
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i Yennice, M. V., ii;'istered in Dec. 14, ISOl; dibcharged Jurie 28, 






! 1SG2, for disability. 








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Craig, 11. J., mustered in Sept. 25, 1863; out Dec. 13 


, 1805. 






1' Carter, R. L., mustered in Nov. G, 1863; out May 18, 1 


865. 1 






Davis, J. S., mustered in Nov. o, 18G2; died Dec. 15, 


1802. 1 






Gilbert, A\'. T., mustered in Jan 21, 1862; veteran; mustered out 






' Dec. 13, 180.:. 








1 Hollett, A. W., mustered in July 14, 18G3; out Dec. 1 


3, LSGo. , 






1 Hodsoii,!! B., mustered in Oct 5, 1863; out'Dec. 13, 


1865. 






1 Hardwick, "Wiliiam, mustered in Oct. 6, 1863; out Dee 


13,1865. ; 






Hyton, John, mustered ia Oct. 13, 1864; out Oct. 19, 


1865. ' 






Lewis, S. "\Y., mustered in Nov. 2, 1863; died Marcli 3, 


1803. ■■ 






1 Mendenhall, 0. B., mustei'cd in June 2, 1862; died. 


1 






j Owens, Harrison, mustered in Oct. 2, 1862; dischar 


^ed Auril 






' 20, 1864, for wounds. 


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Kumlc}', Joseplms, mustered in Oct. 6, 1864. 


1 
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Eobbius, Michael, mustered in July 24, 1863; out Dec. 


13, 1865. 






Seilhymet, J. T., mustered in Aut;. 3, 18d3; out Dec. 


13, 1865. 






Strange, Silas, mustered in Oct. 24, 1SG4; out Sept. 13 


1865. 

1 






COMPANY K. 








Offic<n's. 








"William W. Scearce, commissio.ied Captain March 25, 


1802; pro- 






moted Major and Lior.tenant-Colonel (see above). 


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George W. Scearce, mustered in as Sergeant Dec. 16, 1861 ; coui- 






niissionfd Second Lie-atenant ]Marjh 21, 1S63; mustered out Jan. 




; 25,1865. 


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HISTORY OF BKNJ?I;ICi:r, COlMTV. 

Privates. ' '•■ -'^ 



^^Casb, Miltiades, mustered in Dec. IG.lSGl; deserted Marcl, 2y, 

Wliri'^'^^w",','-''''"^ ^" ^^'°- ^^'^^^''^^^ ^°^°^^^^' March 26,1860 
bontherlan, William, mustered in Feb oo 10^.9. /■ ,' 

March 13, 1863. ' ^^' ^^'^char^^ed 

Astlev, S^ C mustered in April 20, 186-1; out Dec. 13, 1865 
\^hite, S. T., mustered m April 26, 18C4; out Dec. 13, 186;.. 

FIFTY-THIKD INFANTUV. 

Ojjloers. 

.sS;,io.S'c;;s;:t.^iriS^^^^^^^ 

■9/; !?/"■'''"'' '""''"■''' '" "'^^''-^'^ ^^^'-g-^a^t Company A Id, ' 
24, 1M.2; promoted Adjutant April 3, 1863; nn.stered mit jti, ^^ [ 

J. W. Scearce mustered in as Corporal Company A Feb ^4 'i 

1662; promoted Fu-st Lieutenant Jul, 28, 1864; Ad^ut;nr^;3" ' 

asO; uxustcred out July 3, 1865. •"[ -ua; 1, | 

M. H Eose, commissioned Assistant Surgeon .^fay 25 1-r,^- '^ 

Surgeon March 16, 1863; mustered out April 3, ISO. ^ ' ,' 

il. (.. lodd, conumsmoned Assistar.t Surgeon April 25, 1S6:'. ' 

COMPANr A. 

Oncers. '\ 

Robert Curry, commissioned Caiuain Jan 19 iq«.,. • , ! 
June 13,1862. I '■<i'" jan. i^, 1862; resigned j 

W. D. Smith, mustered m as Sero-eaiit Feb 9t iqp:. j ' 

I'irst Lieutenant Sept 19 ise- J-;£ .■ ' ^^'^^5 P^"^"^" '^ ; 

Ji.Iy 22, 1864. ' ^ ^ '" '"''"°" '"^ ^^'^»f«. G'^-. i 

Non-Oornmissioncd Officers. ' j 

A,^on. flatten, muste, 3d in as Sergeant Feb. 24, 1862 \ 

p p p ■':"' "^"^'^'-^^^ '" ^« Sergeant Feb. 24, 1S62. 1 

J O 'r ^ ' """''^'"^ "' "^ ^^^■P'^^^1 ^«b. 24, 1862. . ^ 

J. U. lodd, mustered in as Corporal Fob. 24 186^ I' 



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HISTORY OF IIKNI'KICKS COUNTY. 



365 



W. M. Jenkins, mustered in as Corporal Feb. 21, 1S62. 

A. A. Slcetli, mustered in as Corporal Feb. 24, ]S62. 

L. IL D. Pinc-knej, mustered in as Corporal Feb. 24, 1SG2. 

A. J. Bridges, mustered in as musician Feb. 24, 1862; veteran 
mustered out July 21, 1865, as First Sergeant. 

Charles Eutli, mustered in as musician Feb. 24, 1862; veteran 
promoted Sergeant; mustered out July 21, 1865. 

Henry Andei'son, mustered in as private Feb. 24, 1SG2; veteran 
promoted Corjioi'al ; mustered out July 21, 1S65. 

Harrison Black, mustered in as private Feb. 24, 1S62; veteran 
promoted Sergeant; mustered out July 21, 1S65. 

T. M. Edwards, mustered in as private Feb. 24, 1S62; veteran 
promoted Corporal; mustered out Jul}' 21, 1S65. 

J. H. Knight, mustered in as private Feb. 24, 1862; veteran 
promot(;d Corporal; mustered out July 21, 1865. 

Edward Lacy, mustered in as private Feb. 26, 1SC2; veteran 
promoted Corporal; mustered out July 21, 1865. 

Anderson McDaniel, mustered in as private Feb. 24, 1862 
veteran; promoted Corporal; mustered out •Xuly 21, 1865. 

W. A. Oliaver, mustered in as private Feb. 24, 1862; veteran 
promoted Sergeant; mustoi'ed on; July 21,, 1S65. 

S. L. Stowdcr, mustered in as pi'ivate Feb. 24, 1862; veteran 
promoted Corporal; mustered out July 21, 1865. 

W. E. Spurgin, m-ustcrod in as private Feb. 24. 1862 eran 
promoted Sergeant; mustered out July 21, 1865. 

Ptnvates. 

Berry, "\Y. R. , mustered in Feb. 24, 1862; veteran; mustered out 
May 19, 1865. 

Berry, 11. S., mustered in Feb. 24, 1862; veteran ; mustered out 
May 29, 1865. 

Belveale, Seth, mustered in Feb. 24, 1SS2; veteran; mustered 
out July 21, 1865. 

Cross, Jackson, mustered in Feb. 24, 1802: veteran ; mustered out 
July 21, 1865. 

Carncs, W, H., mustered in Feb. 24„ 1862; veteran; mustered 
out July 21, 1865. 

Chamberlin, J. R., mustered ii Feb. 24, 1862; veteran; mustered 
otit June 10, 1865. 

Curtis, J. D., mustered in Feb. 24, 1862; veteran; mustered out 
July 21, 1865. 



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366 



HISTOI V OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



Curtis, H. S., mustered in Feb. 2i, 1S62; veteran; mustered out 
Jnly'yi, 1SG5. 

Carmer, J. C, mustered in Feb. 24, 1862; veteran; mustered out 
July 21, 1865. 

Cannon, I. N., mustered in Feb. 2i, 1862; veteran; mustered out 
July 21, 1865. 

Grey, T. C, mustered in Feb. 24:, 1862; veteran; mustered out 
July 21, 1865. 

Hooten, D. W., mustered in Feb. 24, 1862; veteran; muster:d 
out July 21, 1865. 

Hule, C. J., mustered in Feb. 24, 1862; veteran; mustered out in 
May, 1865. 

Hartwell. ^Y. H., mustered in Feb. 24, 1S62; veteran; died June 
28, 1864, of wounds received at Keuesavv. 

Lacy, J. D., mustereil in Feb. 24, 1862; veteran; mustered oit 
July 21, 1S65. 

Long. Benton, mustered in Feb. 24, 1862; veteran; mustered o'.'t 
July 21, 1865. 

Mann, W. S., mustered in Feb. 24, 1862; veteran; mustered oi t 
July 21, 1865. 

Maloney, Patrick, mu3:eredin Fell. 24, 1S62; veteran; inustere 1 
out July 21, 1865. 

Matliias, J. "W., mustered in Feb. 24, 1862; veteran; mustered 
out July 21, 1S65. 

Mitchell, John, mustered in Feb. 24, 1862; veteran; Uiusterei; 
out June 24, 1865. 

Meek, N. C, mustered in Feb. 24, 1862; veteran; mustered ou '. 
July 21, 1865. 

Newsome, Jose, mustered in Feb. 2ti, 1862; veteran; musterec 
out July 21, 186.5. 

Osborn, Benjamin, mustered in Feb. 24, 1862; veteran; mustered 
out July 21, 1865. 

Pratlier, T. L., mustered in Feb. 24, 1S62; veteran; mustered out 
July 21, 1865. 

Poe, W. H., mustered in Feb. 24, 1862; veteran,; mustered out 
July 21, 1865. 

Park, AVilliam, mustered in Feb. 24, 1862; veteran; mustered 
out July 21, 1865. 

Eose, Montgomery, mustered in Feb. 24, 1862; veteran; mus- 
tered out July 21, 1865. 



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HISTORY OF HENDl.ICKS COUNTY. 



367 



Kicliardson,L. D., musterod in Feb. 24, 1862 ; veteran ; mustered 
out June 20, 1865. 

Koss, A. E., mustered in Feb. 2-t, 1S62; veteran; died in hands of 
the enemy July 3, ISG-i, of wounds. 

Eaojan, J. K. P., mustered in Feb. 24, 1862; veteran; mustered 
out June 20,1885. > 

Stiles, J. W., mustered in Feb. 24, 1862; veteran; mustered out 
July 21, 1865. 

Smith, J. W., mustered in Feb. 24, 1862; veteran; mustered out 
July 21, 1865. 

Smitli, G. S. P., mustered in Feb. 24, 1862; veteran; mustered 
out July 13, 1865. 

Smith, W. T., mustered in Feb. 24, 1862; veteran; mustered out 
July 21, 1865. 

Thompson, B. F., mustered in Feb. 24, 1862; veteran; mustered 
out July 21, 1865.- 

Wood, G. W., mustered in Feb. 24, 1862; veteran; mustered ou 
July 21, 1865. 

Wingfield, J. N., mustered in Feb. 24, 1862; veteran; mustere 
out July 21, 1865. 

FIFXY-FOURTH INFANTET. — (tHRK£ JIONTUo.) 
COMPANY H. 

Officers. 

J. H. Gray, commissioned Captain June 3, 1862; mustered out 
with regiment. 

J. AV^. Lakin, commissioned First Lieutenant Juno 3, 1862; 
mustered out with regiment. 

T. J. Kirtley, commissioned Si'ond Lieutenant June 3, 1862; 
mustered out with regiment. 

Non- Commissioned Officer. 

A. C.Evans, mustered in as First Sergeant, June IS, 1862; out 
with regiment. 

"W. 11. Calvert, mustered in as Sergeant June 18, 1862; out with 
regiment. 

E. T. Lotsliear, mustered in as Sergeant June 18, 1862; out with 
regiment. 

J. C. Hart, mustered in as Seigeant June IS, 1862; out with 
regiment. 



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E. iS^. lioUisoii, tiuistorcd in as Sersreant June IS, 1SG2; out with 
regiment. 

A. S. IJcConni'jk, mustered in as Corpoi-.i! June 18, 1802; out 
witli regiment. 

J. N. Crayton, mustered in as Corporal June IS, 1SG2; out with 
regiment. 

Harden Pope, mustered in as Corporal June IS, 1862; out with 
regiment. 

William Smith, mustered in as Corporal June IS, 1SC2; out with 
regiment. 

W. N. Laken, mustered in as Corporal June IS, 1SG2; out with 
regiment. 

W. F. Steele, mustered in as Corporal June IS, 1SG2; out with 
regiment. 

J. W. Sparks, mustered in as Corporal June IS, 1SG2; out widi 
regiment. 

- W. C. Kichardson, mustered in as Corporal June IS, 1862; oit 
with regiment. 

G. B. Catshall, mustered in as musician June IS, 1862; out wich. 
regiment. 

■ J.W. Cut.shall, mustered in as musician June IS, 1S62; out widi 
regiment. 

Privates. 

o Appleby, Wesley, mustered in June 18, 1SG2; out witli regimei t. 

Almond, J. K., mustered in June IS, 1S62; out with regiraert. 

Allen, Samuel, mustered in June IS, 1862; out with regimei t. 

Andrew, W. H., mustered in June IS, 1862; out with regimei t. 

Eohannon, J. S., mustered in June 18, 1862; out with regimei t. 

Brewer, Tennis, mustered in June IS, 1862; out with regimei t. 

Bryant, Zachariah, mustered in June 18, 18G2; out with regi- 
ment. 

Coleman, 11. T., mustered in June IS, 1SG2; out with regimei t. 

Childs, B. F., mustered in June IS; 18G2; out with regiment. 

Conaly, T. G., mustered in June IS, 1S62; out with regiment, 

Crayton, J. H. A., mustered in June 18, 186:4; out with regiment. 
,^ Clark, James, mustered in June IS, 1862; out with regiment. 

Colman, G. W., mustc-ed in June IS, 1SG2; out with regimen . 

Doan, J. £., mustered in June IS, 1SG2; out with regiment. 

Dickey, Alfred, mustered in June IS, 1S62; out with regimoct. 

Dunnovin, Benj., mustered in June 18, 1SG2; out with regiment. 

Dixon, Jesse, mustered in June IS, 1862; out with regiment. 



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Diie,i5c, Leandor, mustered in June IS, 1302; out with regiiucnt. 
Dugan, Frank, mustered in June IS, 1S02; out with regimcut. 
Dennis, 0. A., mustered in June 18, ISO'3; out witli refriiuent. 
Dobson, J. N., mustered in June IS, 1802; out with regiment. 
Edwardsj John, mustered in June 18, 1SG2-, out witli regiment. 
Ellis, W. A., mustered in June IS, 1SC2; out with regiment. 
Ferguson, H. C, mustered in JnnelS, 1S62; out with regiment. 
Graves, A. S., mustered in .Tune IS, 1SG2; out witli regiment, 
©uolky, Charles, mustered in Juno IS, 1802; outwitii roginicnt. 
Garrison, David, musteixd in Juno IS, 1S02; outwitii regiment. 
Ilanimond, 11. C, mustered in .June 18, 1SG2; out with regiment. 
Hall, E. II., mustered in June IS, 1S02; out with regiment. 
Harvey, E. M., mv tered in June IS, 1S02; out with regiment. 
Hanihliii, G. 'SV., mustered in Jnne IS, 1802; out with r.'giinent. 
Jackson, Z. W., ioustored in June IS, 1802; out with regiment. 
Little, L. W., mustered in June IS, 1SG2; out with regiment. 
Miles, T. J., mustered in -June IS, 1SG2; out with regiment. - 
Alurphy, Harden, mustered in June IS, 1S02; uut witli regiment, 
Mattox, R. W. , mustered in June 18, 1802: out with regiment. 
Mitchell, AV. M., mustered in June IS, 1802; o;!t with regiment. 
Merritt, M. AV.. mustered iii June IS, l■'^02; out with re:.'iment. 
Million, G. W., mustered in Ju le IS, 1802; out wirdi regitnent. 
McCormick, J, "W., mustered in Jane IS, 1802; out with regiment. 
McDaniels. Josiah, mii.-tercd in Juno 18, 1SG2; on', witli rogiincTit. 
Morgan, William, mustered in June 18, 1802; out with regiment. 
Moore, John, mustered in June 18, 1802; out with regiment. 
Manning, Thomas, mustered in June 18,1802; out with regiment. 
Moore, Isaic, mastered in .June IS, 1802; out with regiment. 
McDaniel,AVilliarn, mustered in June 18, 1SG2; ouf with regiment. 
Osboru, F. X., ;nustvBred in -Jui e IS, 1S02; out with regiment. 
Owen, N". II, mustered in .Iuik: 18, 1SG2; out with regiment. 
Osborn, Henry, mustered in .]i:ne IS, 1802; out with regiment. 
Pearcy, Jan^cs, musterei] in .June IS, 1SG2; out with regiment. 
Parsloc, Louis, inu-tered in June 18, '1802; ontwith regiment. 
Potts, George, mu-tored in Jnne 1>, 1S02; ontwith regiment. 
Ridge «'ay, Charles, mustered in JnnelS,lsG2; ontwith regiment. 
Hansom, Perry, mustered in -J-'nc IS, 1S02; out with re:,'imeut. 
Stone; W, jS"., mustered in Jnrel'^, 1802: out with regiment, 
Shipley, J, B,, mustered in Juno IS, ]>02: out witii regiment. 
Turner, William, mu-teredin .June IS, 1SG2; out with regiment, 
Tisdalc, William, mustered in June 18,1802; ontwith regiment. 



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Watts, J. S., mustered in June 18, 1862; out with regiment. 
Wilis, E. C, mustered in June IS, 1802; out witli regiment. 
Williams, Joseph, mustered in Jane IS, 1S62; out with regiment. 
Worril, W. W., mustered in June 18, 1SG2; out with regiineni. 
Wood, J. R., mustered in June IS, 1862; out with regiment. 
Walker, J. C, mustered in June IS, 1862; out with regiment. 
White, W. H., mustered in June 18, 1862; nnt-with regiment. 
Welsh;iiis,William, mustered in June 18,1862; out with regiraeni, 

FIFTV-FOUKTH INFANTRY (one YEAK). 
COMPANY F. 

Officers. ■ . 

W. n. Neff, com.missiofied Captain Oct. 2o, 1862; mustered oir, 
with regiment. 

D. D. Jones, commissioned First Lit^utenant Oct. 25, 1862; mus 
tered out with regiment. 

B. F. Davis, commissioned Second Lieutenant Oct. 25, 1862. 
resigned Feb. 21, 1863. 

No'ii- Commissioned Officers. 

James Planners, mustered in as First Sergeant Oct. 30, 1862. 

J. R. Covey, mustered in as Sergeant Oct. 30, 1862; out as pri- 
vate Dec. 8, 1863. 

W. A. Jones, mustered in as Sergeant Oct. 30, 1862. 

J. A. Chapman, mustered in as Sergeant Oct. 30, 1862. 

J. F. Woodard, mustered in as Ser*e.ant Oct. 30, 1862. 

T. H. Jacks, mustered in as Corporal Oct. 30, 1862; out Dec. 8, 
1863. 

T. J. Nelson, mustered in as Corpora! Oct. 30, 1862; out Dec. 8, 
1863. 
■ James Cox, mustered in as Corporal Oct. 30, 1862. 

Fajette Trotter, mustered in as Corporal Oct. 30, 1862; out as 
private Dec. 8, 1863. 

J. W. Reed, mustered in as Corporal Oct. 30, 1862. 

W. S. Clark, mastered in as Corpora! Oct. 30, 1862; out Dec. 8, 
1863. 

J. F. Andrews, mustered 'n as Corporal Oct. 30, 1862. 

B. C. Howe, mustered in. as musicir.in Oct. 30, 1862. 

G. F. Givens, mastered in as miisiyian Oct. 30, 1862. 

Lyman Herrington, mustered in as wagoner Oct. 30, 1802. 



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• HISTOEY OF HEXDEIOKS COL'NTV. - 37 

Privates. 

Aairlieni-t, Peter, innstered in Oct. SO, 1S62. 

Bly, Isaac, mustered in Oct. 30, 1S62. ' ■ • 

Becklehelinci', John, mustered in Oct. .30,1SG2. • ' ' • ■ 

Bollard, J. R., mustered in Oct. 30, 1862. . ,: • 

Birch, J. Yi., mustered in Oct. 30, 1862. \'-' 't: ' 

Bails, Audrey/ J., mustered in Oct. 30, 1863. 

Clark, John, mustered iu Oct. 30, 1862. .■■ ■>• V -■ 

Cooper, Cliesley, mustered iu Oct. 30, 1862. ■' 

Cuuninp;ham, William, mustered in Oct. 30, 1862. 

Clark, Eenben T., muctcred ii Oct. 30, 18 2. 

Clajpool, Thoiorts B., mustered in Oct. 30, 1862. -^ ■ 

Cuenemeth, John W., nuisteied in Oct. 30, 1862. 

Dnvis, Hiram N., mustered ir Oct. 30, 1862. : 

Davis, Levi, mustered in Oct. 30, 1862. 

Davis, Janics, mustered in Oc't. 30, 1863. 

Dowry, Levi, mustered in Oc . 30, 1862. . ' ' ■; 

English, John, mustered in Oii. 30, 1862. 

Ferrin, Isr.ac, mustered in Oc;. 30, 1862. • ' '. • '•■■■'" 

Forbs, John W., mustered in Oct. 30, 1862; out Dec. 8, 1863. 

Foss, Xathaniel H., mustered in Oct. 30. 1S63, 

Fobs, Albah A., mnsterod in Oct. 30, 1862. ' - ■ ,■•■■, ..-■ './ 

Francis, John II., mustered in Oct. 30, 1862. ••' ■ 

Floar, Jauie.-. IL, mustered in Oc". 30, 1862. - '■ . -:■ ' '.^ 

Farreil, John, mustered iu Oct. 30, 1862. 

Givfus, John R., mustered ir Oct. 30, 1862. 

Gibson, Madisoi>, mustered ii. Oct. 30, 1862; out Dec. S. 1863 

Granstafi", Gustavus, rnusterec in Oct. 30, 1862. 

Hufrmaii, Elisha, mustered in Oct. 30, 1862. 

Ilevitli, Abraham, mustered i i Oct. 30,1862, out Dec. 8. 1863 

Hert. Aleekin A., mustered i:i Oct. 30, 1862. 

Hutchison, Joseph, mustered in Oct. 30, 1863. 

Isley, Anderson H., mustered in Oct. 30, 1S62. 

Jacks, Francis G., mustered in Oct. 30, 1SG2. 

Kindred, Addison P., mastered in Oct. 30, 1862. 

Kelsoj Garrison, mustered in Oct. 30, 1862. 

Kelly, Erasn\us S., mustered 'n Oct. 30, 1862. 

Leak, Henry B., mustered ir Oct. 30, 1862; out Dec. 8, 1863. 

Logi.n, James P., mustered ir Oct. 30, 1862; out Dec. 8, 1863. 

Mallett, Jeremiah, mustered iu Oct. 30, 1862. 

McCrary, John, mustered in ()ct. 30, 1862; out Dec. 8, 1S63. 



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HISTORY OF HENDKtCKS COUXTY. 



Morris, James M., mnsterijcl in Oct. 30, 1SG"2. 

McEntrye,Tliomas J., inustere.l in Oct. 30,1862; out Doc. 8,1803. 

Mallet, Thomas, mustered in Oct. 30, ISGi^. 

Neff, John, mustered in Oct.3" ,1862. 

Neal, Charles J., mustered in Oct. 30, 1S62. ... 

Osborii, James C, mustered in Oct. 30, 1862. 

Piper, James P. tl., mustered in Oct. 30, 1862. 

Piper, Benjamin F., musteied in Oct. 30, 1862; out Dec. 8. 

Powley, James E., mustered in Oct. 30, 1862. 

Richardson, Francis, mustered in Oct. 30, 1S62. 

Rush, James J., mustered inOct. 30, 1S62. 

Stoker, John, miistered in Oct. 30, 1SG2. 

Smitli, John C, innstcrcd in Oct. 30, 1862. 

Smith, John U., rau.-^tcred in Oct. 30, 1S62. 

Smith, Willirtin, mustered in Oct. 30, 1862. ; .' , ..' 

Sulten, Ellicrt, mustered in Oct. 30, 1SG2. .,'■.- 

Sweeden, Davis, mustered in Oct. 30, 1862. .'. '' ', ■ 

Stutesm;.n, John, mnste;-cd in Oct. 30, 1862. " 

Trotter, T. IT., mustered in Oct. 30, 1862; out Dec. 8, 1863. 

Trimble, John C, mustered in Oct. 30, 1862. 

Walker, Georwe M., m.nstered in Oct. 30, 1862. ' . 

Wyatt. Samuel, ,mnstcred in Oct. 30, 1862; out Dec. S, 1863. 

Wall, Mark v., mustered in Oct. 30. IS62. ' 

Wright, F. A., -nuster-d in Oct. 30, 1862; out Dec. 8,*18G3. 

Whitely, Francis. mns:cred in Oct. 30, 18^3. 

Whlted, John, mastered in Oct. 30, 1S62. 

Ziminerintin, John, mustere,! in Oct. 30, 1862. 

Logan, F. M., mustered in I'^'ov.. 22, 1862; ont Dec. 8, 1863. 
Sharp, Robert, mustered in Oct. 30, 1S62: out Dec. 8, 1863. 

FIFTY-FIFTH IN.FANTRY (tUKKE lEONTfls). 
COKPANV G. 

Officer. 

Frank A. Coons, commissioned Second Lieutenant July IS, 1862: 
mustered out with legimen;; ■e-cntered service as Captain in One 
Hundred and Thirty-eightii Int'antry. 

Private. 

Whlnjates.T.W., mustered ia June 10, IS62; out witli regi inent. 



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HISTOIiY OF HENDEICES COUNTY. 373 

FIFTY-NINTH INFANTRY. 
COMPANY B. 

Officers. 

"W. A. Ro^ei'3, coinmissioned Second Lieutenant Dec. 26, 186 L; 
resigned Sept. 3, 1S62. 

S. W. Minter, ranstercd in as private Jan. 1, 1862; promoted 
Second Lieutenant June 1, 1865; mustered out with regiment. 

' Non-Commissicned Officers. ■. ' ' 

Enoch Alexander, mustorod in asSergCMiit Oct. IS, 1861; veteran. 

J. N. Dunnington. mustered in as Corporal Nov. 1, 1S61; out 
April -i, 1865. 

O. P. Boyd, mustered in as Corporal Dec. 1, 1861; promoted 
Second Lieutenant. 

A. H. ModJrol, mustered in as Dorporiil iSTov. 1, 1861; veteran; 
promoted Sergeant; mustered out July 17, 1865. 

T. B. Alexander, mustered in at private Nov. 1, 1861; veteran; 
promoted Corporal; mustered out July 17, 1855. 

J. B. ilyrick, mustered in as piivate March li, 186-t; promoted 
Corporal; mustered out July 17, 1865. 

D. W. Osburn, mustered in as p -ivate March 1-t, 186-1; promoted 
Corporttl; mustered out July 17, 1865. 

J. F. Snodgrass, mustered in as private March 2, 1S64:; pro- 
moted Corporal; mustered out Ju.y 17, 1865. 

PriV'ttes. 

Bowman, William, mustered in Oct. 18, 1861-;]discharged; minor. 

Masters, J. S., mustered in Jar. 1, 1862; veteran; mastered out 
July 17, 1865. 

McGraw, Ttiomas, mustered in Doc. 1, 1861; veteran; mustered 
out July 17, 1865. 

Roark, Thomas, mustered in ^ ov. 1, 1S61; died at Yicksburg, 
Miss., Sept. 30, 1863. 

Recruits. 

Ale.xahder, Hugh, mustered in March 2, 1864; out July 17, 1865. 
Appleby, W. H... mustered in i .arcli 16, 186-1; out July 17, 1S65. 
Garrison, J. P., mustered in. X'arch 2. 1S64; out July 17, 1865. 
Hu'oMe, J. A., mastered in M-uch 2, 1861; ouc July 17, 1865. 
Masters, L. R., mustered in AL.rcli 2, 1861:: out July 17, 1865. 
McAnincli, J. W., mustered in March 2, 1864; out July 17, 1865. 






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HISTORY OT HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



Wallace, J. W., mustered in Marcli 14, 1S64; out July 17, 1865. 
Ward, W. A., mustered in March 3, 1SG4; out June 9, 1S65. 

SEVEN nrrrH infantry. 
Officers. 

James Burgess, commissioned Lientenant-Co^oncl Aug. 9, 1862; 
promoted Colonel One Hundred Twenty- fourth Infantry. 

Z. S. Eagan, commissioned Captain Company C, Aug. 5, 1S62; 
Major March 1, 1864; mustered out with regiment. 

Leroy II. Kennedy, commissioned Assistant Surgeon April 4, 
1863; resigned Sept. 4, 1SG3; cause, disability. 

COia'ANY A. 

Z. S. Ragan, commissioned Oaptaia Aug. 5, 1863; promoted 
Major. 

W. C. Mitchell, commissioned First Lieutenant Aug. 5, 1862; 
(Japtain March 1, 1864; mustered out with regiment. 

J. M. Rogers, mustered in as First Sergeant July 24, 1882; pro- 
moted Second Lieutenant ^[ay 14, 1863; First Lieutenant Jtarch 
1, 1864; mustered out with regiment. 

J. F. Banta, commiasione;! Second Lieutenant Aug. 5, 1862; 
died of disease Jlay 14, 1863. 

J. J. Wills, mustered in as Sergeant July 24. 1S62: promoted 
Second Lieutenant Xov\ 14, 1864; mustered out with regiment. 

Non- Commissioned Officers. 

Franklin J. Butcham, muitered in as Sergeant July 14, 1862; 
out June 8, 186.5. 

D. N. Ilopewood, mustered in as Sergeant July 17, 1862; out 
June 8, 1865. 

John Hammond, mustered in as private July 25, 1862; pro- 
moted Sergeant; mustered out Jime S, 1865. 

M. J. DufFey, mustered in as Corporal July 17, 1862; killed near 
Atlanta, July 24, 1864. 

J^ M. Cook, mustered in as Corporal Aug. 4, 1862; out June 
8, 1865. 

C. F. Ferguson, mustered in as Corporal July 14, 1862; out 
June 8, 1865. 

B. F. Bolen, mustered in as Corporal July 17, 1862; discharged 
Nov. 12, 1864, for disability. 



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HISTOEY OF IIENDKICKS COUNTY. 



375 



S. R. Richardson, mustered in as Corporal July 26, 1SC2; out 
June 8, 1865. 

S. S. Wills, mustered in as Corporal July 25, 1862, out June 
8, 1865. , 

J. D. Corapton, mustered in as Corporal July 16, 1S62, out June 
S, 1865. 

Pi'ivates. 

Archer, Alexander, musterbd in Aug. 4,1862; discharged Oct. 8, 
1863, for disability. 

Asher, J. F., mustered in Aug. 1-, 1S62 ; transferred to Veteran 
Reserve Corps Jan. 10, 1865. 

Barker, J. C, mustered in Aug. 1, 1SG3; discharged March 22, 
1863, for disability. ' 

Bedford, C. PI., mustered ir July 21, 1S62; out June 8, 1365. 

Blunk, Adam, mustered in July 1-1, 1862; discharged Jan. 20, 
1863, for disability. 

Brewer, George, mustered in July 30, 1862; out Jane S, 1865. 

Bray, L .F., mustered in' July 25, 1862; out Juno S, 1865. 

Bringle, J. J., mustered in July 23, 1SG2; out Juno S, 1S65. 

Brown, M. L., mustered in Ju'y 21, 1862; died at Gallatin, 
Tcnn., April 11, 1863. 

Bareham, S. G., mustered in July 2S, 1862; died at Scottsville, 
Ky., Nov. ly, 1862. 

Buchanan, James, mustered in July ?5, 1862; discharged Dec. 
8, 1862, for disability. 

Carter, A. W., mustered in July 21, 1862; promoted Corporal; 
mustered out June 8, 1S65. . 

Carter, J. B., mustered in Aug. 5, IS62;died at Sandersville, 
Tenn., Feb. 6, 1863. 

Carey, S. W., mustered in Aug. IL, 1862; discharged Dec. S, 
1862, for disability. 

Crawford, M. L., mustered in July 2S, 1862; out June 8, 1865. 

Crawford H. H., mustered in Julj 24, l'S62; out June S, 1865. 

Daun, Clarkson, mustered in Aug. t, 1S62; discharged Jan. 27, 
186.3, for wounds. 

Denwiddie, R. C, mustered in July 21, 1862; out June 8, 1865. 

Duncan, Henry, mustered in Aug. 8, 1862; discharged Dec. 9, 
1862, for disability. 

Duffey, ileockiah, m.ustered in Aug. 10,1862; discharged Marc!i 
17, 1863, for disability. 



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Ellit,It. G., mustered in Aug. 11,1862; transferred to Veteraii Ke- 
servo Corps April 30, ISGl. 

Falkrier, William, mustered in July 25, 1S62; discharged Dec. 
4, 1S6-2, for disability. 

Glover, A. R., mustered in July 25, 1S(J2; out June 8, 1865. 

G\vinn,\V. P., mustered in July 14, 1862; killed at Reaacn, Ga., 
May 15, 1864. 

Harper, R. F., mustered in Aug. 8, 1862; discharged Oct. 31, 
1802, for disability. 

Iladley. Lot, mustered in July 21, 1862; out June 8, 1805. 

Ilarliii, T. S, mustered iti July 24, 1862; died July 23, 1SG4, of 
■wounds received at Peach Trei Creek. 

il^mnah, Tluiinas. mustered in July 28, 1862; out June S, 1865. 

Iliatt, Spencer, mustered in July 28, 1862; out June 8, 1865. 

Jacksun, William, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; died at Scotts- 
ville, Ky., Xov. 24, 1862. 
- Jackson, Hardin, mustered ;n Aug. 11, 1862; oat June S, 1865. 

Kendall, Silas, mustered in Aug. 8, IS62; discharged Jan. 22, 
1S63. lor disability. 

Knighton, J. W., mustered in July 22, 1862; killed at Pesaca, 
Ga., May 15, 1S64. 

Lookebill, P. 0., mustered in July 15, 1862; out June 8, 1S05. 

Martin, J. P., mustered in vu]y 15, 1862; out June 8, 1865. 

Martin, W. K., mustered in July 23, 1862; out June S, 1865. 

Matthews, J. H., mustered m July 22, 186,2; out June 8, 1S05. 

Matthews, J. jST , mustered i i July 22, 1S62; discharged Jan. 27, 
1863, for disability. 

Osborn, J. H., mustered in July 19, 1862; out June 8, 1S65. 

Osborn, Nicholas, mustered in Aug. 4, 1862; out June 8, 1865. 

Pitts, A. H., mustered in Aug. 4, 1862; died at Gallatin, Tenn., 
Dec. 29, 1862. 

Potts, G. W., mustered in A.ug. 6, 1862; out June 8, 1865. 

Pratt, James, mustered in July 21, 1862; out June 8, 1865. 

Eeitzel, J. H., mustered in July 25, 1862; out June S, 1865. 

Reitzel, Adam, mustered in July 28, 1862; discharged May 13, 
1863, for wounds. 

Richardson, J. D., mustered in Aug. 4, 1862; discharged Nov. 
28, 1862, fur disability. 

Roberts, J. A., mustered in .^ug. 5, 1852; out June 8, 1865. 

Ragan, R. E., iiiustered in Aug. 10, 1862; out June 8, 1865. 

Sbarpe, William, mustered in July 22, 1862; out June 8, 1865. 






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HISrORT OF irENDlilCKS COUNTY. 



-« __5> 



377 



Sport, Y. W., mustered in Aug. 5, 1S6'2; out June 8, 1S6o. 
Scott, Stephen, mustered in July 28, 1862; out June 8, 1865. 
ShackletbrdjJ.H.G., mustered in July 17, 1862; out June 8, 1865. 
Thompson, J. A., mustered in July 23, 1862; out June 8, 1865. 
Turney, J. A., mustered in Aug: 4, 1862; out June 8, 1865. 
Viquesriey, J. A., mustjred in Aug. 7, 1862; out June 8, 1865. 
"Waddle. Stmuel, mustered in July 21, lS62;out June 8, 1865. 
Wills, J. M., mustered in Aug. 27, 1862; ou: June 8, 1865. 
Williams, N". C, mustered in July 25, 1862; out June 8, 1865. 
. Wood, J. C, mustered in July 26, 1862; out June 8, 1865. 

■ ^ COMPANY F. 

Tran^^farreii to Thirty third Infantry June 8, 1865. 

Bales, William, mustered in Jan. 24, IS64- . 

Bryant, Woodson, mustere-l in Jan. 24, 1864, 
Bourne, James N., mustered in March 26, 1864. 
Elliott, William, mustered in Jan. 24, 1864. 
Gamboid, Eri A., mustered in Jan. 21, 1864. 
Hardin, James T., mustered in Feb. 24, 1864. 
Lewis, John, mustered in Jan. 24, 1864. 
Lamb, Lindsey, mustered ja Jan. 24, 1861. 
Ste«-art, William, musterec' in Jan 24, 1864. 

COMPANY H. 

Stone, L. P., mustered in Jan. 24, 1864; transferred to Thirty- 
third Indiana Volunteer Infantry June 8, 1865. 

COMPANY K. 

Officers. 

J. T. Matlock, commissioned First Lier.ter.ant April 11, 1863; 
promoted Captain April 11_ 1863; honorably discharged Oct. 25, 
1864. 

J. C. Hadley, mustered in as Corporal July 22, 1862; promoted 
Second Lieutenant Jan. 24, 1865; Captain April 1, 1865; mustered 
out with regiment. 

O. A. Bartholomew, commissioned Second Lieutenant Aug. 1, 
1862; promoted First Lieutenant April 11, 1863; resigned Sept. 
18, 1864, 

Privates. 

Carnes, Kichard, muster ;d in July 16, 1862; died at Bovling 
Green, Ky.,Dec. 21, 1862. 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTV. 



Crtrter,S.R., mustered in Aug. 7, 1S62; discharged Nov. 20, 1S62. 

Oiavpool, J. AY., mustered in Aug. S, 1S62; promoted Sergeant; 
mustered out June S, 1S65. : : 

Constable, Xoah, mustered in July 22, 1362; died at Bowling 
Green, Ky., Nov. 9, 1862. 

Crawford, Elisha, mustered in July 24, 1862; out June 8, 1865. 

Ciinningliain, John, mustered in July 25, 1SG2; transferred to 
Enciiieer Corps Aug. 13, IS'35. 

Carter. J. B., mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; died at Gallatin, Tenn., 
April 5, 1863. 

Euglehart, Martin, inusterel in J uly 19, lS62;out Jane S, 1865. 

Gordon, Jonatlian, mustered in Aug. 4, 1862; died at Chatta- 
nooga, Tenn., July 8, 1864. 

GulIcy,TVm.,niustered in Ar.g. 10, 1862, discharged Jan. 22, 1863. 

Hayden, J. B., mustered in July 21, 1862; died at Bowling 
Green, Ky., Nov. 10, 1862. 

Howland, "\V. E , mustered in July 19, 1862; out Jane 8, 1865. 

Jelf, J^. A., mustered in Au.c. 9, 1862; discharged Oct. IS, 1863. 

Jones, 11. C, mustered in Aug. 7, 1862; out June S, 1S65. 

King, Curtis, mustered in July 29, 1862; promoted Corporal ; 
mustered out .June S, 1865. 

Jjawson, M. M., mustered in July 30, 1S62; out June S, 1865. 

Lockridge, J. G., mustered in Aug. 4, 1862; disciiarged Jan. 
22, 1863- 

Maloney. John, mustered in July 25, 1862; discharged March 9, 
1863. 

Monroe, Jacob, mustered in July 29, 1862; out. June S, 1865. 

Nash, K. T., mustered in Jul_- 29, 1S62; died at Bridgeport, Ala., 
March 13, 1864. 

RoL'ers, J. F., mustered in July 30, 1861; out June 8, 1865. 

Rodgers, John, mustered in Aug. 11, 1862; promoted Corporal; 
discharged June 3, 1S65. 

Russell, J. C. mustered in Aug. 9, 1862; promoted Corporal; 
mustered out June 8, 1S65. 

South, B. F., mustered in Ai g. 10, 1862; out June 8, 1865. 

Spaulding, J. C, mustered iu July 19, 1862; killed at Peach 
Tree Creek" July 20, 1864. 

Stephens, J. S., mustered in -lug. 9, 1862; died at Sandersville, 
Tenn., Feb. 23, 1863. 

Talbott, J. T., mastered in Ji.ly 19, 1862; promoted Corporal; 
mustered out June S, 1365. 






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HISTORY OF HEXJRICKS COUNTY. 



379 



Taylor, "\Y. F., mustered ia Aug. 8, 1S62; died at Sandersville, 
Tenn., Jan. S, 18G3. 

Templin, Simeon, mustered in Aug. 9, 1S62; out June 8, 1865. 

Watts, B. F., mustered in July 26, 1S62; out June S, 1865. 

"Wilson, G. M., mustered in July 19, 1862; killed at Resaca, May 
15, 1864. 

Woodrnfi', Stephen, mustered in July 19, 1S62; discharged Jan. 
28, 1865, for wounds. 

FOURTH CAVALRY (SEVENTY-SEVENTU REGIMEKt). 

Offlcei's. 

L. S. Shuler, commissioned Captain Coinpany A Aug. 1, 1S62; 
promoted Lieutena-t-Colonel Sej)t. i, 1862; Colonel Feb. 12, 1S63; 
resigned May id, 1863; cause, disability. 

T. R. Lawhead, mustered in as Corporal July 2-1:, 1862; pro- 
moted Adjutant May 11, 1863; r.,-signed June 9, 1S63. 

Henry Cox, commissioned Assistant Surgeon April 25, 1863; 
declined. 

J. W. Smith, mustered in as Sergeant July 24-, 1862; promoted 
First Lieutenant Jan. 10, 1S63; Captain Dec. 6, 1864; mustered 
out as First Lieutenant with regiment. 

Wiliiam L-vin, mustered iu as First Sergeant July 34, 1862; 
commissioned Second Lieutenart Jan. 10,1863; resigned Aug. 4, 
1863. • 

J. W. Tinder, mustered in as private July 29, 1862; promoted 
Sergeant; Second Lieutenant June 1, 1865; mustered out as Ser- 
geant with regiment. 

If on- Commissioned Ojjlcers. 

J. i!f. Vestal, mustered in as Sargeant July 23, 18G2; out June 29, 
1865; 

Alfred Welshans, mustered in as Sergeant July 24, 1862; 
appointed Quartermaster Sergeant; mustered out June 29, 1S65. 

G. B. Ballard, mustered in as Corporal July 29, 1862; promoted 
Commissary Sergeant; mustered out June 29, 1865. 

P. G. Fry, mustered in as Corporal July 29, 1862; discharged 
Feb. 17, 1863. 

D. O.Adams, mustered in as buj^'Ier July 24, 1862; promoted 
Corporal; mustered out June 21.', 1865. 

Miltiades Cash, mustered in as bugler July 24, 1862; died of 
wounds received at New Market, Teun., Dec. 3, 1863. 



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HISTOKT OS HENOniCJCS COUNTY. 



J. J, Bell, mustered in as saddler July 29, ISG2; out June 29, 
1865. 

Newton Halloway, mustered in as wagoner Aug. 9, 1862; deserted 
Dec. 8, 1862, with horse and equipments. 

Privates. 

Armstrong, J. W., mustered in July 28, 1862; out June 29, 1865. 

Baugh, W. W., mustered in July 28, lSG-2; transferred to Vet- 
eran Ecserve Corps May 8, 1861. 

Courtney, Thomas, mustered in. Julj 21:, 1862; promoted Cor- 
poral; out June 29, 1865. 

Dibble, H. R., mustered in July 30, 1S62; promoted Corporal; 
mustered out June 29, 1865. 

Hall, S. A., mustered in July 29, 1862; promoted Kegimental 
Commissary. 

Haynes, C. F., mustered .'.n July 23, 1862; out June 29, 1865. 

Hewlett, T. H., mustered in July 24, 1862; out June, 29, 1865. 

Hill,J.Q., mustered in July 30, 1862; discharged March 1, 1863. 

McConn, P. G., mustered in July 27, 1362; out June 29, 1865. 

Osborn, John, mustered in July 29, 1862; out June 29, 1865. 

Osborn, J. P., mustered in July 28, 1862; out June 29, 1865. 

Stapp, J. W., mustered in July 28, 1862; discharged Nov. 4, 
1862. 

Stntzman, David, mustered in July 29, 1862; out June 29, 1865. 

Todd,J.M.,mustered in July 29, 1862; discharged Iiec. 20, 1862. 

Turner, G. P., mustered in Aug. 9, 1S62; died' at Camp Nelson, 
Ky., Feb. 17, 1864. 

Rodgers, S. R., mustered in Dec. 24, 1863; out June 29, 1865. 

Reave, Jonathan, mustered in Dec. 27, 1SG3, out June 29, 1865. 

SEVENTY-EIGHTH INFANTET (siXTY DAYS). 
COMPANY E. 



Officers. 

A. J. Lee, commissioned Captain Aag. 4, 1862; mastered out 
with regiment. 

Anderson, Snoddy, mustered in as First Lieutenant Aug. 4, 
1862; mustered out with regiment. 

John Harrison, mustered in as Second Lieutenant Aug. 4, 1S62; 
mustered out with regiment. 



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HISTOKY OF HEND^CKS COUNTY. 

Non- Covnnissioned Officers. 



581 



A. D. Kellej, mustered in as Sergeant Aug. 5, 1S62; out with 
regiment. 

E. R. Smith, mustered in as Sergeant Aug. 5, ■ 1863; out with 
regiment. 

Michael Sells, mustered in as Sergeant Aug. 5, 1862; out with 
regiment. 

Harvey Gibbon, mustered in as Sergeant Aug. 5, 1862; out with 
regiment. 

Kichard Wilcox, mustered in as Sergeant Ao.g. 5, 1862; out with 
regiment. 

J. E. Garrison, mustered in as (Corporal Aug. 5, 1862; out with 
regiment. 

AYilliam Bossveli, mustered in as Corporal Aug. 5, 1862; out 
with regiment. 

J. E. Wortli, mustered in as Corporal Aog. 5,' 1862; out with 
regiment. 

Daniel Scannell, mustered in as Corporal Aug. 5, 1S62; out witli 
regiment. 

J. H. flulse, mustered in as Coiporal Aug. 5, 1862; out with 
regiment. 

John Richardson, mustered in as Corporal Aug. 5, 1862; out 
with regiment. 

L. R. Masters, mustered in as Corporal Ang. 5, 1862; out with 
regiment. 

Elijah Clark, mustered in as Corporal Ang. 5, 1862; out with 
regiment. 

M. L. Hadley, nmstered in as musician A.ug. 5, 1862; out with 
regiment. . 

Privates. 

Appleby, J. H., mustered in Aug. 5, 1862: out with regiment. 
Arnold, G. W.,- mustered in Aug. 5, 1862'; out with regiment. 
Allen, T. J., mustered in Aug. 5, 1862; o,nX with regiment. 
Alexander, J. FI., mustered in Aug. 5, ISS2-, out witli regiment. 
Appleby, "\Y. H., mustered In Aug. 5, 1S62; out with regiment. 
Brown, Edward, mustered in Aug. 5, IS62; out with regiment. 
Bowman, William, mustered in Aug. 5, 1362; out with regiment. 
Brown, J. W., mustered in Aug. 5, 1S62: out with regiment. 
Burton, J. "W., mustered in Aug. 5, 1862'; out with regiment. 
Ballinger, John, mustered in Aug. 5, 1S62; out with regiment. 







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HISTOEV OF HE.S'DIIICKS COUNTY. 



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Baldwin, W. A., mastered in Aug.' 5, 1S63; out with regiment. 
Bryant, D. P., mustered in Aug. 5, 1SG2; out with regiment. 
Benbow, Harvey, mustered in Aug. 5, 1SG2; out with regiment. 
Crawford, A. N., mustered in Aug. 5, 1S62; out with regiment. 
Crews, H. L., mustered in Aug. 5, 1S62; out with regiment. 
Cosner, Mahlwu, mustered in Aug. 5, 1SG2; out with regiment. 
Chirk, L. L., mustered in Aug. 5, 1S62; out with regiment. 
Dunbar, James, mustered in Aug. 5, 1862; out with regiment. 
Dunlarey, J. W., mustered in Aug. 5, 1SG2; out with reginicnl. 
Dixson, Calviu, mustered in Aug. 5, 1SG2; out with regiment. 
Ellis, James, mustered in Aug. .5, 1862; out with regiment. 
Estes, J. T., mustered i;i Aug. 5, ]S62; out with regiment. 
Fry, Obadiah, mustered in Aug. 5, 1862; out with regiment. 
Gamson, C ^Y ., mustered in Aug. 5, 1SG2; out with regiment. 
Gibbius, D. 11., mustered in Aug. 5, 1862; out with regiment. 
Gum, Anderson, muste.-ed in Aug. -5, 18G2; out with regiment. 
Horner, T, J., mustered in Aug. 5, 1862; out with regiment. 
Hailan, T. J., mustered in iVug. o, 1SG2; out with regniieiit. 
Herdel, Lewis, iunstered in Aug. 5, 1S82; out v/itli regiment 
Harney, Wilson, rauste 'ed in Aag. .5, 1862; out with regiment. 
Johnson, W. H., niuste.'od in Ar.g. 5. 1S62; out with regin;ent 
Johnson, L. J., musterel in Aug. 5, 1662; out witli regiment. 
Johnson, Sanford, miist.'red in Aug. 5, 1SG2; out witl> regiment 
Kersey, Ezra, mustered m Aug. 5, 1862; out with regiment. 
Kelley, J. R..., niustered in Aug. 5, 1862; out with regiment. 
Kelley, AV.E., mustoied.in Aug. o, 1862; out with ru* 



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Xiplinger,Absaloni, mustered in Aug. 5,1862; out with regiment. 
Long, L N., mustered i\ Aug. .5, 1862; out with regiment. 
Long, J. T., mustered ii. Aug. 5, 1362; our, with regimeiit. 
Littell, M. T., mustered in Aug. 5, 1862; out with regiment. 
Madison, Anson, muste.-ed in ..A.ug. 5, 1862; out with regiment, 
Mann, Vf. E., mustered in Aug. 5, IS62; out with regiment. 
McAninch, M. 0., mustered in Aug. 5. 1862; out with regiment. 
McAninch, J. W"., mnst;red in Aug. .5, 1S62; out svith regiment. 
McHafSe, 0. F., muster-jd in Aug. '^, 1862; out with i-egiment. 
JTcCollum, John, niuste-ed in Aug. 5, 1862; out with regiment. 
AtcGolluin, Smith., nuistfred in Aug. o, 1362; out with regiment. 
Nelson, C. A., m.ustereu in Acg. .5, 1S62; out with regiment. 
Omslcr, diaries, mustered in Aug. 5, 1862; out with regiment. 
Osborn, Daniel, mu3ter3d in Aug. 5, 1S62; out with regiment. 
Pruett, B. A., mustered in Aug. 5, 1862; out with regiment. 



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Pruett, Eli, mustered in Au^. 5, 1S62; out with rcorimeiit. 
Pliillips, T. E., mnstered in Aug. 5, 186:3; out with rei^iment. 
Phillips, Josial), mustered in Aug. 5, IS62; out with regiment. 
Phillip-, Israel, mustered in Aug. 5, 1SC2; out with regiment. 
Phillips, J.'F., mustered in Aug. 5, 1SG2; out with l-egiment. 
Page, "W. J., mustered in Aug. 5, 1S62: out with regiment. 
j Prtge, W. H., mustered in Aug. 5, 1S62; out with regiment. 
Page, P. L., mustered in Aug. 5, 1862; out with reg ment. 
Pierson, B. T., mustered in Aug. 5, 1802; out witli regiment. 
Kuth, W. A., mustered in Aug. 5. 1862; out with regiment. 
Rushton, Elam, mustered in Aug. 5, 1S62; out with regiment. 
Robards, Casper, mustered in Aug. 5, 1862; out with regiment. 
Reese, J. L., mustered iu Aug. .5, 1862; out witli regiment. 
Shields, David, mustered in Aug. 5, 1862; out v.ith regiment 
Suoddv. J. A., mustered in Aug. 5, 1862; out with regiment. 
Snodgrass, J. W., mustered in Aug. 5, 1862; out with regiment. 
Swope, Samuel, mnstered in Aug. 5, 1862; out witli regiment. 
Stringer, W. T., mustered in Aug. -5, 1S62; out with regiment. 
Tincher, J. T., mustered in Aug. 5, 1862; out with regiment. 
Tincher, T. J., mustered in Aug. 5, 1862; out v/ith regiment. 
Tinclier, W. H., mustered in Aug. .5, 1862; out with regiment. 
Yaughn, James, mustered in Aug. 5, 1862; out with regiment. 
"Wallace, Pharo, naustered in Aug. o, 1S62; out with regiment. 
"Walters, Thomas, mustered in Aug. 5, 1862; out with regiment. 
Wall, W. H., mustered in Aug. 5, 1SG2; out with regiment. 
Wilcoxsou, J. S., mustered in Aug. .5, 1862; out with regiment. 
AVhillow, Eli, mustered in^ Aug 5, ^862; out with regiment: 
"Walls, John, mustered in Aug. 5, 1362; out with regiment. 
Young, Christian, mnstered in Aug. 5, 1862; out with regiment. 
York, Francis, mustered in Aug. 5, 1862; oat with regiment. 

SEVE^rTY-NI^"TH INJAUTR 
COitPANT C. 

Officer. 

Eli F. Ritter, commissioned Captain Ma_y 9, lS6i; mustered out 
with regiment. 

COMPANY F. 

Officer. 

. Benjamin T. Pojnter, mustered in as Sergeant Aug. 7, 1862; 
promoted Second Lieutenant Nov. IT, 1862; killed at battle of 
Stone River, Jan. 2, 1863. 



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3S4 HiSTo:iv OF hendkioks county. 

Non-Commissioned Officer. 

J. "W. McKee, mastered iu as Corporal Aug. 7, 1862; out ai 
private June 7, 1865. - 

Private. 

Boats, Bartns; mustered in Aug. 12, 1862; missing in action Kt 
Chiekamauga, Sept. 19, 1863. 

COMPANY K. ■ 

Officers. 

J. W. Jordan, eom'nij^ioaed Captain xlug. 25, 1862; honoiablv 
discbart;cd Jaly 16, 1864. 

D. "W. Hoadlej, mus ered in as private Aug. 22, 1862; promu:(.d 
First Lieutenant Feb. 2J;, 1864; Captain Jan. 1, 1865; mustered uut 
with regiment. 

Tyra Montgomery, conmissioned First Lieutenant Aug. 25, IStJi, 
resigned Nov. 12, 1862. 

A. T. Stone, commissioned Second Lieutenant Aug. 25, 1862. 

I}or. - Vomm iss ion ed Officers. 

W. H. Tout, mustered in as First Sergeant Aug. 1-1, 1862; tra in- 
ferred to Veteran Reser -e Corps April 10, lS6i. 

Reuben Patterson, miistered in as Sergeant Aug. 15, 1862; oiu 
as private Jnne 7, 1865. 

L.,"\Y. Jenkins, mustered in as Sergeant Aug. 26, I8S2: out Jnni.' 
7,1865. 

11. N. Osborn, musteied in as Sergeant Aug. 18, 1862; diet ri! 
Chattanooga, Tenn., Dec. 1, 1863, of wounds. 

K. R. Wood, rnnster.^d in as Sergeant Aug. 22, 1862; out ;i5 
principal musician June 7, 1865. 

William Hulzizer, mi.stered in as Corporal Aug. 15. 1862; traTi?. 
ferred to Veteran Reser e Corps; mustered out June 29, 1S65. 

W. F. Danwiddie, mistered in as Corporal Aug. 14, 1862; dis- 
charged March 2S, 1863. 

G. D. McLain, niustesed in as Corporal Aug. 22, 1862: promotL-i 
First Sergeant; mu.stere' out June 7, 1865. 

William Logan, muotJred in as Corporal Aug. 15, 1862; on' ;'•- 
private June 7, 1865. 

Daniel Sanders, mustered in as Corporal Aug. 22, 1862; tr.^''=' 
ferred to Veteran Reser-'eCo.'ps; mustered out June 17, 1S63. 



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HISTORV OF HENDKICKS COUNTY. £65 

U. T. Stone, mustered in as Corporal Aug. 22, 1862; discharged 
Feb. 10, 1863. 

G. R. Simins, mustered in as Corporal Aug. 22, 1862; transferred 
to Veteran Keserve Corps July 20, ISoJr. 

P. H. Crofton, mustered in as private Aug. 28, 1862; promoted 
Sergeant, mustered out Juno 7, 1865. 

W. T. Endaly, mustered in as private Aug. 19, 1862; promoted 
Corporal; mustered out June 7. 1865. 
R. V. Franklin, mustered in as priv.ite Aug. 22, 1862; promoted 
j Sergeant; mustered out June 7, 1865. 

' I. W". Gray, mustered in as privfte Aug. 31, 1862; promoted 
I Sergeant; mustered out Juno 7, 1S65. 

1; A. S. Hollingsworth, mustered in a-^ private Aug. 22, lS62;pro- 
i' moted Corporal; mustered out June 7, 1865. 

I J. W. R'ly, mustered in as private Aug. 22, 1862; promoted 
|: Corporal; mustered out June 7, 1865. 

H. C. Ratliff", mustered in as private Aug. 26, 1862; promoted 
Corporal; mustered out June 7«1865. 

J. A. Snyder, mustered in as private Aug. 12, 1862; promoted 
Corporal; mustered out June 7, 1865. 

James White, mustered in as priva:e Aug. 20, 1862; promoted 
Corporal; mustered out .June 7, 1865. 

G. W. Brown, mustered in as inusici m Aug. 14, 1862; dfscharged 
April 8, IS 03. 

O. if. Dennis, mustered iu as musieian Aug. 22, 1862; dis- 
charged April 22, 1S63. 

J. H. Mauley, mustered in as wigoner Aug. 14, 1862; dis- 
charged Feb. 10, 1863. 

Privates 

Ayersj H. W., mustered in Aug. If), 1862; transferred to Veteran 
Reserve Corps; mustered out June 30 1865. 

Annich, Isaac, mustered jn^ Aug. 2:;, 1862; out June 7, 1S65. ' 

Annieh, "\V. C, mustered in xing. ;'2, 1862; out June 7, 1865. 

Biirsott, D. O.. mustered in Aug. 14, 1862; died Dec. 27, 1862. 

Biirsott, T. F. , mustered in Aug. .'4, 1S62; discharged March 
7. 1863. 

Brown, J. W., mustered in Aug. 2:', 1862; died Jan. 6, 1863. 

Bly,W.G., mustered in Aug. 22, IS 52; discharged March 8, 1863- 

Bly, J. F., mustered in Aug. 22, 1862; discharged April 29, 1863. 

Bennett, J. T., mustered in Aug. 22, 1S62; transferred to En- 
gineer Corps July 20, 1 64. 



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Braj, T, E., mustered in Aug. 22, 1S62; died in Anderson-il' 
Prison, Sept. 23, 1S64-. , ''' 

Caywood, H. Y., mustered in Aug. U, 1862; out June 7, Lsc.3 
Courtney, Wallace, mustered in Aug. 14, 1862; transferred to 
Veteran Reserve Corps Oct. 29, 1863. 

Crofcon, A. R., mustered in Aug. 31, 1S62; discharged ^iImv Oii 
1865. 

Davis, Lewi?, mustered in Aug. 14, 1862; out Jane T, 3S6.5. 
Dobson, J. A. C, inustered in Aug. 14, 1862; transferred to Vet- 
eran Reserve Corps Jan. 15, 1864. 

Douglas, David, mustered in Aug. IS, 1862; out June 7. 1S65. 
Eaton^ Harrisou, mustered in Aug. 15,1862; discharged ilurc'i 
30, lSo3, 

Eliingwood, Hiram, mustered in-Aug. 15, 1802; died Sept. 2J 
1861, of wounds. 

Evans, G. I., mustered in Aug. 19,1862; discharged Feb. !:,1S0:J. 
Fitch, D. B., mustered in Aug. 14, 1862; discharged Jan. :,, ISr,::^ 
Fitch, J. W., mustered in Aug.. 14, 1862; discharged Feb ''i 
1863. 

Garrel, James, mustered in Aug. 15, 1802 y out June 7, : SO-l 
Graham, E. W., mustered in Aug. 15, 1862; died Feb. li, ISC::, 
Hetlicoat, W. A., mustered in Aug. 22, 1862; discharfre.l April 
19, 1863." 



Hendricks, ililton, mustered in Aug. 14, 1862; discharm 



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2S, 1S<::3, for wounds. 

Hartley, G. B., nnstered in Aug. 14, 1862; out June 7, ;S65. 

Hollelt, Mark, mustered in Aug. 15, 1S02; died Aoril 1, ISO:;. 

Herring, E. E., mustered in Aug. 15, 1862; died March 3c, 18t;.:i. 

Hultz, John, mustered in Aug. 14, 1862; died March 30, ISO::. 

Hollett, J. A., mustered in Aug. 14, 1S62; killed at Kcnesnv,-. 
June IS, 1864, 

Jones, W. M., mustered in Aug. 22, 1862; out June 7, U 05. 

Kite, Isaiah, mustered in Ar.g. 22, 1862; transferred toA eter;::: 
Reserve Corps Aug 19, 1863. 

Leach, E. S., mustered in Aug, 22, 1802; died at Murfrecshon . 
Tenn,, March 2, 1863. 

Loy. Tobias, mustered in Aug. 22, 1862; out June 7, ISO k 

Leonard, Frederick, mustered in Aug. 14, 1862; disc !;n-_":l 
March S, 1S63. 

Lacy, W. H., n(nitered in Aug. 14, 1S62; died at Chattn'ioo.';'.. 
Tenn., March IS, 1833. 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



387 



Manker, H. E., mustered in Aug. 30, 1S62; transferred to 
Company B Sept. 20, 1862. 

Myers, J.^ S., mustered in Aug. 12, 1862; died at Nashville, 
Tenn., Dec. 24, ISW. 

McNeely, Samuel, mustered in Aug. 21, 1862; died at Mur- 
freesboro, Tenn., Feb. 14, 1863. 

Marvel, D. I., mustered in Aug. 21, 1862; discharged Aug. 31, 
1861. 

McDaniel, Mahlon, mustered in Aug. 22, 1S62; discharged April 
28, 1803. 

Mann, K.R., mustered in Aug. 22, 1862; discharged May 13,1865. 

McKee, Allen, mustered in Aug. 22, 1S62; died at Nashville, 
Tenn., Jan. 27, 1863. 

McLain, R. S., mustered, in Aug. 28, 1862; discharged May 17, 
1865. 

McLain, J. S., mustered in Aug. 30, 1862; discharged March 6 

1863, for wounds. 

Morgan, J. R., mustered in Aug. 31, 1862; died at Kno.wille 
Tenn., March 13, 1861. 

Obney, William, mustered in Aug. 13, 1862; one June 7, 1865. 

Pearcy, Isaac, mustered in Aug. 22, 1862; out June 7, 1865. 

Patterson, Williain, mustered in Aug. 22, 1862; discharged April 
6, 1863. 

Parnell, George, 'mustered in Aug. 22, 1862; transferred to En- 
gineer Coros Ju!v 20, 1864. 

Pulliam, J. F., mustered in Aug. 26, 1862; discharged Jan. 31 
1863. 

Perkins, S. H., mustered in Aug. .30, 1862; out June 7, 1865. 

Rice,G. E., mustered in Aug. 15, 1862; discharged JMarch 7,1865. 

Ramsey, F. M., mustered in Aug. 22, 1862; out June 7, 1865. 

South, Archibald, mustered in Aug. 15, 1862 ; died June 28 

1864, of wounds. 

Smith, Levi, mustered in Aug. 15, 1862; out June 7, 1865. 

Shirrel, Leonard, mustered in Aug. 22, 1802; transferred to Yet:- 
eran Reserve Corps Nov. 25, 1864. 

Sears, W. R., mustered in Aug. 22, 1802; out June 7, 1865. 

Tyler, C. W., mastered in Aug. 12, 1862; discharged Feb. 28 
1803, for wounds. 

"Wirt, F. M., mustered in Aug. 15, 1862; out June 7, 1S65. 

Wells, S. R., mustered in Aug. 15, 1862; died at Nashville 
Tenn., Dec. 29, 1802. ' .. ' 



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Wells, G. "W., mustered in Aug. 15, 1S62; out June 7, 1S65. 
Worrel, Legraud, mustered in Aug. 22, 1862; died at Cbattca- 
nooga, Tenn., March 20, 186-1. 

Recruits. 

Moore, W. P., mustered in Aug. 12, 1863; transferred to Fifty- 
' first Indiana Volunteer Infantry June 7, 18G5. 

Patterson, Eli, mustered in Sept. 10, 1862; out June 7, 1865. 
Eice, Warren, mustered in Nov. 23, 1863; transferred to Fi;'tj- 
iirst Indiana Volunteer Infantry June 7, 1865. 

NINETY-EIGHTH INFANTEY. ' ■' ' .•; 

Officers. '■ . ', 

. J. B. Homan, commissioned Captain Sept. 18, 1862; promoted 
Major March 2, 1864; resigned as Captain Dec. 26, 1S64, for disa- 
bility. 

L. D. Robinson, mustered in as First Sergeant Aug. 16, 1832- 
commissioned Assistant Surgeon JNTov. 5, 1862; resigned Auo-. H, 
1863. 

coiipa:^t q. 

\ Officers. 

Tilberry Reid, commissioned Captain Aug. 21, 1362; resigi.ed 
Dec. 219, 1862. 

John Worrel, commissioned First Lieutenant Aug. 15, 1862: 
promoted Captain Jan. 1, 1863; resigned Sept. 26, 1864. 

B. F. Thomas, commissioned Second Lieutenant Aug. 21, IS 52; 
promoted First Lieutemmt Jan. 1, 1863; Captain Sept. 27, 18)4. 

J. C. Ilussey, mustered in as Corpora! Aug. 15, 1862; promo'ed 
Second Lieutenant May 10, 1S63; First Lieutenant Sept. 27, 1864. 

B. A. Reid, mustered in as Sergeant Aug. 15, 1S62; promoted 
Second Lieiitennnt Jan. 1, 1863; died April 26, 1863, of disease. 

Johnson Smith, mustered in as private Aug. 15,1862; promoted 
First Sergeant; Secoi\d Lieutenant May 1, 1805; mustered out £s 
First Sergeant vvitli regiment. 

Non-(^om7nht<ioned Officers. 

B. F. Beckwith, must Ted in as Sergeant Aug. 15, 1362; cait 
June 5, 1S65. 

I. X. Vance, mustered in as Sertjeant Aug. 15, 1S62; out June 
5, 1865. 



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BISTORY OF HENDKICKS COUNTY. 



3S9 



J. D. Hazlewood, mustered in as Sergeant Aug. 15, 1S62; out 
June 5, 1865. 

Amalpluis Braj, mustered in as private Aug. 15, 1S62; pro- 
moted Sergeant; mustered out June 5, 1S65. 

I. O. Beckwith, mustered in as Corporal Aug. 15, 1S62; trans- 
ferred to Vetei'an Reserve Corps -Tan. 15, 1864. 

Tiaomas Rogers, mustered in as Corporal Aug. 15, 1862; out as 
private June 15, 1865. .; .'. - 

H. F. Kurtz, mustered in as Ciorporal Aug. 15, 1S62; out June 
2, 1865. 

D. W. Davis, mustered in as Corporal Aug. 15, 1862; out as 
musician June 5, 1865. 

H. C. Harper, mustered in iS Corporal Aug. 15, 1862; dis- 
charged March 27, 1863. 

J. B. Lang, mustered in as Co -poral Aug. 15, 1862; died at La 
Grange, Tenu., April 14, 1863. 

Allison Graham, mustered in as Corporal Aug. 15, 1862; died 
at Oxford, Miss., Dec. IS, 1862. ■ 

H. B. Johnson, mustered in as private Aug. 15, 1862; promoted 
Corporal; mustered out June 5, 1865. 

Rodney Jeger, mustered in as private Aug. 15, 1862; promoted 
Corporal; mustered out June 5, 1865. 

R. S. McHaffie, m.ustercd in at- private Aug.. 15, 1862; promoted 
Corporal; mustered out June 5, 1865. 

Aaron Overstreet, mustered ii as private Aug. 15, 1802; pro- 
moted Corporal; mustered out .J ine 5, 1865. 

W. S. Hall, mustered in as rrusician Aug. 15, 1862; oat June 
5, 1865. 

O. "W.Averj, mustered in as ra isician Aug. 15, 1862; discharged 
Jan. 15, 1863. 

W. B. Richardson, mustered' :n as wagoner Aug. 20, 1862; dis- 
charged March 27, 1S63. 

S. G. York, mustered in as private Aug. 15, 1862; out as wag- 
oner June 5, 1865. 

Privates. 

Brown, J. T., mustered in Arg. 15, 1863; died at Fort Fowler, 
Tenn., Feb. 4, 1S63. 

Brown, Elcanah, mustered in jVug. 15, 1833; transferred to Vet- 
eran Reserve Corps Sept. 1, 1S6-- . 

Bray, James, mustered in Anj;. 15, 1^62; out July 21, 1865. 
25 






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HISTOtJT OF HENDEICKS COUNTY. 



Barker, Jasper, mustered in Aug. 15, 1SG2; died at home Dec. 
13, 1S64, of wounds. 

Brewer, G. W., mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; died at Jefferson 
Barracks, Mo., March 4, 1861:. 

Cabel, E. W., mustered in Aug. 15, 1862; discharged Nov. 29, 
186-i, for wounds. 

Clark, Absalom, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; out June 10, 1865. 

Day, John, mustered in Aug. 15, 1862 ; died at Memphis, TcLn., 
Feb. 22, 1863. 

Evans, J. E., mustered in Sept. 13, 1862; discharged Dec. 8, 
1862. 

Elliott, Abraham, mi.stered in Aug. 15, 1862; deserted April 
7, 1863. 

Hayden, Allen, mustered in Aug. 15, 1862; out June 5, 186.5. 

HaU'bill, John, mustered in Ang. 20. 1862; out June 5, 1S65. 

Johnson, W. S., mustered in Aug. 15, 1862; died at Marietta, 
Ga., Aug. 9, 1864, of wcainds. 

Johnson, Atkins, muctered in Aug. 15, 1S62; out June 5, 1865, 

Kendall, J. P., musteied in Aug. IS, 1862; out June 5, ISGo. 

Linville, Solomon, mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; discharged Feb. 
16, 1863. 

Lewis, T. M., musterec in Aug. 15, 1862; out June 5, I860. 

Leak, F. M., mustered in Aug. 15, 1882; out June 5, 1865. 

Millinam, J. S., mnste.-ed in Aug. 15, 1S62; out June 5, 1865. 

Marley, Orran, rausterid in Aug. 15, 1862; out June 5, 1S65. 

ri[athew5, II. B., mastered in Aug. 20, 1862; discharged March 
31, 1863. 

Osborn, T. J., mustered in Aug. 1.5, 1862; died at Fort Fowler, 
Tenn., Jan. 22, 1863. 

Robbins, Stev/art, mustered in Aug. 15, 1862; died at Camo 
Sherman, Miss., Sept. 1, 1863. 

Bose, L. M., mustered )n Aug. 15, 1S62; died at Fort Fowler, 
Tenn., Jan. 30, 186-3. . 

Rnshton, Henry, mustered in Aug. 20, 1S62; discharcjed. 

Scliotfen, Enoch, mustered in Aug. 15, 1862; out June 5, 1865. 

Schotten, David, musteied in Aug. 15, 1862; out June 5, 1865. 

Slaughter, "William, miiftered in Aug. 15, 1862; out June 5,1866. 

ShanuDn, .J. R , musterei in Aug. 15, 1862; out June 5, 1865. 

Staley, William, mustered in Aug. 15, 1862; out June 5, 1365. 

Stipe, Pleasant, muster(:d in Aug. 15, 1862; killed at Atlanta. 
Ga., Aug. 13, 1864. 



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HISTORY OF HENDEICKS COUNTY. 



391 



Saunders, Larkin, mustered in Auor. 20, 1862; out June 5, 1S65. 

Sawyers, W. W., mustered in Aug. 20, 1863; out June IS, 1S65. 

Sawyers, D. C, mustered in August, 1862; died at Scottsboro, 
Ala., April 6, 186i. 

Turner, J. W., mustered in Aug. 20, 1862; died at Memphis, 
Tenn.,Mayl7, 1863. 

Thompson, Robert, mustered in Aug. 15, 1862; out as Corporal 
June 5, 1865. 

Vaiinice, II. N., mustered in Aug. 15, 1862; out June 5, 1865. 

Veeley, Jesse, mustered in Aug. 15, 1862; discharged. 

York, A. J., mastered in Aug. 20, 1862; out June 15, 1S65. 

Fork, John, mustered in Aug. '20, 1862; out June 5, 1865. 

Recruits. 

Holley, J. D., mustered in Sept. 18, 1S62; out June 5, 1865. 
York, F. M., mustered in March 16, 186i; transferred to Forty- 
eighth Infantry June 5, 1865. 

co>rPA2.rY H. ■ 
Officers. 

J. B. Roman, commissioned Captain Sept. IS, 1862; promoted 
Major (see above). 

J. F. Parsons, commissioned First Lieutenant Sept.^ IS, 7862- 
died March 20, 1863, of disease. 

Nehemiah Rawlings, mustered in as First Sergeant Aug 10 
1862; promoted Second Lieutenant Aoril 16, 1863; res ironed Sent' 
IT, 1861:. ' =^ r • 

Hon-Ctnmnisshned Officers. 

J. M. Hensley, mustered in as Corporal Aug. 12, 1S62; pro- 
moted First Lieutenant U. S. Colored Troo}>s. 

D. T. Eivertts, mustered in as Corporal Aug. 12, 1862; promoted 
Sergeant; mustered out June 5, 1S65. 

"Winiam.Williams, mustered in as'Corporal Aug. 15, 1S62; died 
Dec. 7, 1863, of wounds. 

Piobert Ilackley, mustered in as Corporal Aug. 9, 1S62; dis- 
charged Jan. 1, 1863. 

J. A. Jordan, m.nstered in as private Aug. 18, 1862; promoted 
Corporal; mustered out June 5, 1365. 

J. 11. Pebworth, mustered in as private Aug. S, 1862; promoted 
Corporal; mustered out June 5, 1865. 



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HISTOUY OF HENDKICKS COUNTY. 



E. F. McCollum, mustered in as musician Aug. 12, 1S62; out 
June 5, ISGo. 

Privates. 

Budd, Elliot, mustered inAug. 10,'1S62; discharged Feb. 1, 1SC3. 

Baker, J. "W., mustered in Aug. 10, 1S(32-, out June 5, 1S65. 

Coffin, H. C, mustered in Aug. 10, 1SG2; out June 5, lSn.5. 

'Cundi'ff, J. A., mustered in Aug. IS, 1SG2; out June 5, 1SG6. 

Clark, Joseph, mustered in Aug. 19, 1SC2; discharged Jan. 1, 1S63. 

Chapman, H. K., musiered in Aug. 19, ]SG2; died July 4, ISGl, 
of wounds. 

Dlckerson, Darius, mistered in Aug. 12, 1SG2; died. 

Darman, li. T., musteied in Aug. 15, 1SG2; out June 5, 1SG5. 

Doughty, Adoniram, mustered in Aug. 15, 1S62; out June 5,18Gd. 

English. Matthew, mustered in Aug. 12, 1SG2; transferred :o 
Veteran Reserve Corps C'ct. 26, 1SG3. 

Gully, Perry, mustered in Aug. IS, 1SG2; discharged Sept. 0, 
1S63. 

Holly, J. D., musterec in Aug. 12, 1862; transferred to Con- 
pany G. 

Johnson. F. B., mustered in Aug. 10, -1862; out June 5, IS65. 

Lamb, H. T., musterec. in Aug. S, 1SG2; discharged ilay 5, 1SG3. 

Lamb, Anderson, mus ered in Aug. S, 1862; died at Memphis, 
Tenn., Dec. 7, 1SG2. 

McDaniel. Levris, mustered in Aug. 10, 1862; discharged March 
13, 1SG5. 

Pebworth, R. II., mus ered in Aug. S, 1862; died at Indianapo- 
lis, Oct. 21, 1S62. 

Parson?, G. M., mustered in Aug. 19, 1862; mustered out Jui^e 
5, 1865. 

Pennington, David, mustered in Aug. 19,1862; out June 5,186-5. 

Rolston, J. B., muste-ed in Aug. 10, 1862; died, at Memphis, 
Tenn., Nov. 26, 1862. 

Robins. John, rausterel in Aug. 10, 1862; transferred to Marine 
Brigade April 13, 1863. 

Shepherd, I. M., mustered in Aug. 15, 1862; died'at East Point, 
Ga., Sept. 6, 1864, of wounds. 

Smith, B. '>Y., musterei: inAug. 19, 1862; discharged March It, 
186.3. 

Treecy,'J- A., mnsterelin Aug. 18, 1862; died in Richmond 
Prison April 7, ISG-t. 

"Walters, Harrison, mustered in Aug. 15, 1862; out May 20,1865. 



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HISTOKY OF HENDKICK3 COUNTY. 393 

ONE UUNDRED AND SEVENTEENTH INFANTKT (fIX MONl Hs). 
COMPANY A. 

Officeis. • . 

Isaac Wantland, commissionod Captain July 1, 1S63; mustered 
out with regiment. 

T. J. Kirtley, commissioned First Lieutenant July 1, li63; mus- 
tered out with regiment. 

J. H. Harris, commissioned Second Lieutenant July 8, 1863; 
mustered out with regiment. 

N on- Commissioned Officers. . , 

i3. F. Childs, mustered in as First £:er^eant July 22, 1S63; tut 
Feb. 24, 1864. 

J. W. Wills, mustered in as Sergeant July 22. 1S63; out as First 
Sergeant Feb. 24, 1864. 

E. fl. Hall, mustered in as Sergeant July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 
1864. 

William Gregory, m.ustered in as Strgeant July 22, 1863; out 
Feb. 24, 1864. 

W. N. Stone, mustered in as Sergeant July 22, 1863; out Feb. 
24, 186.5. 

F. M. Osborn, mustered in as Corporal July 22, 1863; out Feb. 
24, 1864. 

W. H. Ftouch, mustered in as Corporal July 22, 1863; out Feb. 
24, 1S64. 

Monroe Boggs, mustered in as Corporal July 22, 1863; out Feb. 
24, 1864. 

William M. Lakin, mustered in as Corporal Julv 22, 1863; out as 
private Feb. 24, 1864. 

Young, Murry, mustered in as Corporal July 22, 1863; out as 
private Feb. 24, 1864. 

Charles Mc Farland, mustered in as Corporal July 22, 1863; out 
as private Feb. 24, 1864. 

C. W. Morrow, mustered in as Corporal July 22, 1863; out Feb. 
24, 1864. 

Joseph William.s, mustered in as Corporal Feb. 22, 1863; out 
Feb. 24, 1864. 

W.T. Blackwell, mastered in as private July 22, 1863; promoted 
Corporal; mustered out Feb. 24, 1864. 



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HISTORY OF HENDEICKS COUNTY. 



S. J. Bobaimon, mustered in as private July 92, 1S63; i)roinotcd 
Corporal; mustered out Feb. 24, 1864. 

J. F. Case, mustered in as private July 22, 1862; promoted Cor- 
poral; mustered out Feb. 24-, 1864. 

C. A. "White, mustered in as private July 22, 1862; promoted 
Corporal; mustered out Feb. 24, 1864. 

J. L. Wright, mustered in as musician July 22, 1863; out Feb. 
24, 1864. 

, Louis Green, mustered in as musician July 22, 1863; out as ]iriu- 
cipal musician Feb. 24, 1864. 

Privates. 

Applebr, Wesley, mustered in July 22,1863; out Feb. 24, 1?64. 

Allen, B. F., mustered in July 22, 1863; discharcred. - 

Burkshirc, Rinald, mustered in July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1564. 

Bray, T. J., mustered in July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1864. 

Bartholomew, Ft. J., mustered in July 22,1863; out Feb. 24, 1 i64. 

Burcham, Levi, mustered in July 22, 1S63; died at ludianapMlis, 
Ind., Aug. 7, 1863. 

Brougiiton, Elias, mustered in July 22, 1863; transferred to f'ev- 
entli Indiana Volunteer Cavalry. 

Beale, L. C, mustered in July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1864. 

Cutts, Absalom, mustered in July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1; 64. 
. Clark, Isaac, mustered in July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1864. 

Celia, Trueman, mustered in July 22, 1863; transferred to Elev- 
enth Indiana Volunteer Infantry. 

Cheasman, TV". H., mustered in July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, li64. 

Crews, Josiah,. mustered in July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 186J. 

Dean, William, mustered in July 22, 1863; out Feb, 24, 1S6J, 

Dixon, Jesse, mustered in July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1864. 

Davis, j^athan, mustered in July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1864. 

Estis, A. J., mustered in Aug. 15, 1863; died at Knoxvi.le, 
Tenn., in December, 1864. 

Ellis, S. J., mustered in July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1864. 

Evans, A. C, mustered in July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1864. 

Falls, T. ^Y., mustered in July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1864. 

Fisher, James, musts' ed in July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1864. 

Griffith, "W. H., mustered in July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 186... 

Gunc, J. B., mustered in July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1864. 

Gibbs, Henry, mustered in July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1S64. 

Housh, "W. P., mustered in July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1864. 



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395 



Hamblen, G. W., mustered in July 22, 1S63; out Feb. 2i, 1S64. 

Hinsoii, JVewton, mustered in July 22,1863; out Feb. 2-1, ISGi. 

Hiday, Jacob, mustered in July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1864. 

Hains, E. \V., mustered in July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1864. 

Haskett, Caswell, mustered in July 22, JSC3; out Feb. 24, 1S64. 

Hiatt, Eli, mustered in July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, ISGJ. 

Hamble, Alvin, mustered in July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1S64. 

Harris, J. R, mustered in July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1864. 

Hay worth, Sylvanus, mustered in July 22, 1SG3; died at Camp 
Nelson, Ky., Jan. 2, 1864. 

Kirkendoll, G. W., mustered in July 22, 1S63; out Feb. 24, 1864. 

Lindley, C. Z., mustered in July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1864. 

Lyle, James, mastered in July 22, 1863; transferred to Seventh 
Infantry. 

McCalmet, Thomas, mustered in July 22, 1863; died at Indian- 
apolis, Aug. 28, 1863. 

Morgan, Elisba, mustered in July 22, 1863;' out Feb. 24, 1864. 

Moon, Warner J., mustered in July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1864. 

Miles, J. A., mustered in July 22, 1S63; out Feb. 24, 1864. 

Mann, Henry, mustered in July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1864. 

Moon, Jesse, mustered in July 22, 1363; out Feb. 24, 1864. 

Mendeiihall, J. C, mustered u July 2.5, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1864. 

McCoure, Jesse, mustered in July 22, 1S63; died at Knoxville, 
Tenn., >Nov. 28, 1863. 

McPherson, J. B., rnustereo. in July 22, 1863; died at Knox- 
ville, Tenn., Dec. 6, 1863. 

Moore, A. J., mustered in Jaly 23, 1S63: out Feb. 24, 1864. 

Norton, William, m.ustored in July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1864. 
" Odell, T. S., mustered in July 2-2,"lS63; out Feb. 24, 1864. 

Owens, K R., mustered ia July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1864. 

Pierson, Thomas, mustered ia July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1864. 

Poe, John, mustered in July 22, 1863; transferred to Seventh 
Cavalry. 

Powers, Greenbjrry, muste'-eJ in July 22,1863; out Feb. 24, 1864. 

Pittinger, H. M., mustered in. July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24,1864. 

Roach, G. W., mustered in July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1864. 

RushtoR, Joshua, mustered u July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1864. 

Stephenson, E. F., mustered in July 22, 1S63; out Feb. 24, 1864. 

Stephenson, W. L., mustered in July 22, 1863; deserted Aug. 
15, 1863. 

Stephenson, W. T., mustered in July 22, 1363; out Feb. 24, 1864. 



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596 



HISTOKY OF HENDRICKS COUNTV. 



Sturdevant, H. A., mustered in Julv 22, 1S63; ont Feb. 21, lS6i. 

Snodgrass, T. T., mustered in July 22, 1SG3; out Feb. 2i, 186i. 

Stout, S. B., mustered in July 22, 1S63; out Feb. 2i, lS6-i. 

Stewart, Hugh, mustered in July 22, 1S63; out Feb. 24, ISCi. 

Sterner, Henry, mustered in Aug. IS, 1863; out Feb. 24, 186-i. 

Stewart, C. W., mustered in July 22, 1803; out Feb. 24, 1834. 

Smith, A. J., mustered in July 22. 1863; ont Feb. 24, 1864. 

Scott, "William, mustered in July 22,1863; transferred to Seventh 
Cavalry. ". ■ ' " 

, Tisdale, W. J., mustered in Jnly 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1864. '■ 

Thomp3on,"\Villiam, mustered in July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24,1864. 

Teter, Eber, mustered in July 23. 1863; out Feb. 24, 1864. 

Thomas, G. "W., must3red in July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1861. 
-Town, Isaac, mustered in July 23, 1S63; deserted Aug. 8, 1863. 

White, C. B., mustered in July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1864. 

"Walker, J. 0., mustered in July 22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1864. 

"Winston, Joseph, muftered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1S(4. 

"Waltop, Henry, mustered in July 22, 1SG3; out Feb. 24, 186.. 

"Watts, A. H., mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1864. 

York, F. M., mustered in July "22, 1863; out Feb. 24, 1S64. 
* 

COMPANY B. 

Officers. 

"W. S. King, coramissioned Captain 'July 15, 1863; mustered 
out with regiment; re-entered service as Captain in One Hundred 
and Thirty-second Infant ;y. 

T. S. Marshall, commissioned First Lieutenant July 15, 186i'; 
mustered out with regiment. 

C. F. Hogate, comniisf.ioned Second Lieutenant July 15, 186^ ; 
mustered out with regime nt. 

Non-Commissioned Officers. 

"Warren Ohaver, mustered in as First Sergeant July 23, 1863; 
out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Enoch Harlan, mustered in as Sergeant July 23, 1863; out Feb. 
23, 1864. 

James Harlan, mustered in as Sergeant July 23, 1863; out Feb 
23, 1S64. 

"Willis Kesler, mustered in as Sergeant July 23, 1863; out a; 
Commissary Sergeant Feb. 23, 1864. 






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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COONTV. 



397 



0. F. Brown, mustered in as Sergejiiit July 23, 1SG3; out Feb. 
23, lS6i. 

J. O.Todd, mustered in as Corporal July 23, 1S63; promoted 
Sergeant; mustered out Feb. 23, 1864. 

John Ballinger, mustered in as Corporal July 23, 1SG3 ; out 
Feb. 23, 1864. 

Erasmus N. Jeffers, mustered in as Corporal July 23, 1863 ; out 
Feb. 23. 1864. 

Himelius Kendall, mnstered in as Corporal July 23, 1863; out 
Feb. 23, 1864. 

E. D. Nichols, mustered in as Corporal July 23, 1863; out Feb. 
23, 1864. 

AL D. Hud ley, mn?tered in as Corporal July 23, 1S63; died at 
Wild Cat Mountain, Ky.,Sept. 28, 1863. 

J. A. Gross, mustered in as private July 23, 1863 ; promoted 
Corporal; mustered out Feb. 23, 1564. 

Wilson Harvey, mustered in as ya-ivate July 23, 1863; promoted 
Corporal; mustered out Feb. 23, 1S6J. 

G. W. Nave, mustered in as priv'ate July 23, 1863 ; promoted 
Corporal; mustered out Feb. 23, 1S64. 

■ Addison Soots, mustered in as private July 23, 1863; promoted 
Corporal; mnstered out Feb. 23, I564. 

G. W. Cummings, mustered in as Corporal July 23, 1863; out 
as private Feb. 23, 1864. 

Enoch Eobbins, mustered in as Corporal Jnly 23, 1863 ; out as 
private Feb. 23, 1864. 

Levi Bartholomew, mustered in is private July 23, 1863; out as 
Hospital Steward Feb. 23, 1864. 

Thomas "Welshans, mustered in is musician July 23, 1863; mus- 
tered out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Privates. 

Anderson, W. P., mustered in July 24, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 
Beard, J. M., mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 
Beeson, William, mnstered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 
Crawford, W. H., mustered in Jnly 23, 1863; died at Knoxville, 
Tenn., Dec. 21, 1863. 

Carter, J. M., mustered in Juh 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 
Curtis, William, mnstered in Ji ly 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 
Demoss, W. A., mustered in J.ily 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 
Depew, J. E., mustered in Julj 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 
Dixon, Addison, m^ustered in Jnly 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 



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HISTOlJY of HENDEICKS COUNTi'. 



Easter, Jolm, mustered iu July 33, 1S03; out Feb. 23, 1S6J:. 

Enfield, Jacob, mustered in July 23, 1SG3; deserted Nov. 10,1S63. 

Ensminger, H. B., mustered in July 23, 1S63; out Feb. 23, 1SG4. 

Field, Andrew, mustered iu July 23, 1S63; out Feb. 23, ISCi. 

Fiscus, A. I^., mustered in July 25, 1S63; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Gregg, William, mustered in July 30, 1S63-, out Feb. 23, 1S64. 

Groves, Kobert, mastered in Aug. 3, 1S63; out Feb. 23, 1861. 

Gasper, James, mustered in July 23, 1S63; out Feb. 23, ISGi. 

Gregg, J. M., mustered in July 23, 1S63; out Feb. 23, ISfii. 

Hadley, 0. R., mustered in Juiy 23, 1S63; out Feb. 23, loG4. 

Hayworth, S. D., mu=tered in Jniy 23, 1SG3; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Hayworth, Lindloy, mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 18G4. 

Houk, N. J., mustereJ in July 23, 1SG3; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Hodge, L. D., mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Hunt, William, mustered in July 23, 18G3; out Feb. 23, 1864.' 

Hyten, John, mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Irvin, Joseph, mustered in Aug. 3, 1S63; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Jefiers, J. il., musterLd in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1S64. 

Jones, Ezekiel, mustered in July 23, 1803; out Feb. 23, 1SG4. 

Job, A. P., mastered in July 23, 1SG3; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Kesler, Oliver, mustered in July 23, 1863; discharged Aug. 30, 
1863. 

Keleher, D. B., mu=tored in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 
. Kintt, A. A., rausttn-jd in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Eiug, W. J., mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Kuun, O. F., mustered in Aug. 3, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Lawton, I. G., mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Lacy, Henry, mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Lasley, Howard, mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Long, W. H., mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1S64. 

Maden, -ilfred, mustered in July "23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Mastin, Eeuben, mustered in Juiy 23, 1863; drowned July 23, 
1863. 

Mastin, Matthias, mustered in Jaly 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1SG4. 

Mastin, Nathan, mustered in Jnlj 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

■McAuinch, J. F., mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 
- Matlock, Leander, mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 18''4. 

Matlock, A. R., mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Mattison, S. F., mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Morieal, Thomas, mustered iu July 23, 1863; died at Camp Nel- 
son, Ky., Oct. 6, 1863. • ' 



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399 



Newman, Edward, mustered in July 23,1863; out Feb. 23, 1S64. 

Nichols, W. II., mustered in July 23, 1.SG3; out Feb. 23, 1864. 
Ohaver, James, mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1S64. 

Osborn, J. U., mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864.. 
■ Osborn, TV. II., mustered in Jnly 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Osborn, David, mustered injuly 23, 1863; died at Danville, Ind., 
Jan. 20, 1864. 

Patterson, Frederick.musteredin July 23,1863; out Feb. 23,1864. 

Pliillips, J. F , mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Phillips. Cyrus, mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 
■ Potts, Stephen, mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Poures, J. F., mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Prindibill, John, mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Richardson, George, mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 
'1864. 

Rudd, Jehu, mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Eudd, H. M., mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Rose, Dwight, mustered in Aug. 3, 1863; died at Knoxville, 
Tenn., Nov. 23', 1863. 

Stoops, C. "W., mustered in Aug. 3, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Scherer, William, mustered in Aug. 3,1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Stewart, Albert, mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864- 

Stanley, Logan, mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23. 1864. 

Swain, "W". B., mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Taylor, W. H., mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Tincher, W. H., mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Tincher, T. J., mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Tout, J. O., mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Tout, H. C, m ustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23. 1864. 

Tomlinson, Q. C., mustered in July 23,1803; out Feb. 23. 1864. 
- Voiles, John, mustered in July 23, 1863; discharged Sept.l2,lS64. 

White, WilUnm, mustered in July 23, 1S63; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Williamson, Jacob, mustered in July 23, 1S63; out Feb. 23, 1S64. 

Wood, Joseph, mustered in July 23, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

Wilson, J. C, mustered in Aug. 3, 1863; out Feb. 23, 1864. 

NINTH CAVALRY (oXE HC.VDRED AND TWESTi'-FIRST REGIMENT). 

Offxer. 

V. H. Lyon, commissioned Capt:iin Company I Jan. 9, 1864; 
promoted Alaj.ir March 8, 1864; Lieutenant-Colonel June 4, 186-5; 
mustered out with reariment. 



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400 



HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COD^iTY. 



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C01IPA.NY I. -■ * '. 

Officers. 

: V. H. Lyon, commissioned Captain Jan. 9, 1S64. 

Wiiliaiii Itobbius, commissioned Second Lieutenant Jan. 9, 1864; 
promoted Captain March 11, ISGi; resigned March -1, 1865. 

T. F. Cofer, comraiisioned First Lieutenant Jan. 9, ISGi; pro- 
moted Captain March 5, 1865; mustered out with regiment. 
■ W. H. Calvert, mustered in as private Jan. 1, 1864 ; promoted 
Second Lieutenant Jan. 1, 1SG5; First Lieutenant March 5, 1865; 
mustered out with regiment. 

J. S. Watts, mustered in as private Jan. 1, 1864; promoted Sec- 
ond Lieutenant March 11, 1864; killed in action at Franklin, 
Tenn., Dec. 17, 1SG4. 

T. J. Conatj, mustered in as private Jan. 15, 1864; promoted 
Second Lieutenant March 5, 1S65; mustered out with regiment. 

N on- Commissioned Officers. '' . 

T. J. Adams, mustered in Jan. 15, 18S4; out as Hospital Stew- 
ard Aug. 28, 1S65 

J. F. Franklin, musttred in Jan. 1, lSt>4; out as Quartermaster 
Sergeant Aug. 28, 1865. 

S. L. Hawkins, mustered in Jan. 15, 1S64; discharged May 14, 
1865, as Quartermaster Sergeatit. 

Enoch Hayucs, mustered in Jan. 15, 1864; discharged July 28, 
1865, as Yeterinary Surgeon, 

"Willis SUvens, mustered in Jan. 15, 1S64; out as First Sergeant 
Aug. 28, 1805. 

G. W. Cummings, mustered iu Marcii 9, 1864; out as Sergeant 
Aug. 28, 1865. 

William Ellington, mustered in Marcii 9, 1864; out as Sergeant 
Aug. 28, 1S63. 

Conley Highland, mustered in Jan. 15, 1864; out as Sergeant 
Aug. 28, 1865. 

Thomas Hyten, mustered in Jan. 15, 1864; out as Sergeant Aug. 
28, 1865. 

Jeiierson Bait, mustered in Jan. 1, 1864; discharged as Sergeant 
May 22, 1865. 

G. H. Clements, mustered in Jan. 1, 1364^ out as Corporal Aug. 
28, 1865. 

William T. Franklin, mustered in Marcii 9, 1864; out as Corpo- 
ral Aug. 28, 1865. 



(5 



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3:'.; 



4i^ 



eiSTOEY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



401 



W. II. Scearce, mustered in Jan. 1, ISCi; out as Sergeant July 
24, 1865. 

James Hollett, mustered in Jan. 15, 1S6-1; discharged as bugler 
July 14, 1S65. 

Jesse Cummins, mustered in Jan. 15, 1864; out as saddler Aug. 
28, 1865. 

James Pierson, mustered in April 30, 1864; out as farrier July 

26, 1865. 

K. H. Reaves, mustered in Jan. 1, 1864; out as wagoner Aug. 
28, 1865. 

Friv-des. 

Almond, J. K., mustered in Jan. 1, 1864; out Aug. 2S, 1865. 
Ashby, Leander, mastered in Jaa. 15, 1864; out Aug. 28, 1865. 
Adams, H. F., mustered in Feb. 3, 1864; missing in action at 
'Florence, Ala., Aug. 28, 1865. 

Ayears, Wesley, mustered in I'eb. 11, 1864; out Aug. 28, 1865. 
Burden, Jolin, mustered in .Jan. 1, 1864; out Aug. 28, 1865. 
Bales, J. H., mustered in Jan. 1, 1864; out Aug. 28, 1865. 
Bunton, B. C, mustered in Jar. 15, 1864;*out Aug. 28, 1865. 
Brown, J. E., niustered in Feb. 8, 1864; discharged Jan. 22, 1865. 
Blacketer, Ephraim, mustered in Feb. 3, 1864; out Aug. 28, 1865. 
Baxter, Thomas, mustered in Fjb. 11, 1864; out Aug. 28. 1865. 
Clements, J. JS'., mustered in Jtn. 15, 1864; out Sept. 2, 1865. 
Clements, Reuben, mustered in Jan. 1, 1864; out Aug. 28, 1865. 
Clay, S. C, mustered in March 9, 1864: dischnrged June 27, 1865. 
Clark, J. "W., mustered in Feb. 3, 1864; out Aug. 28, 1865. 
Guynn, Joshua, mustered in Jai.l, 1864; out Aug. 28, 1865. 
GregjT, Martin, mustered in Jan. 15, 1864; out Aug. 28, 1865. 
Heathcote, E. T., mustered in ,'an. 1, 1864; out Aug. 28, 1885. 
Hurley, F. S., mustered in Jan. 1, 1864; died at Pulaski, Tenn., 
Nov. 19, 1864. 
Heathcote, Edward, mustered in Jan. 15, 1864; deserted Au^. 

27, 1864. 

Harlan, B. F., musterei in Jan. 15, 1864; discharged Juno 29, 
1865. 
. Hart, Aaron, mustered in Jan. 15, 1864; out July 10, 1865. 

Helton, Andrew, mustered in ,^an. 15, 18S4; out Aug. 28, 1865. 

Hampton, Stephen, mustered ii Jan. 15, 1S64; discharged July 
21, 1865. 

Hens >n, J. H., mustered in Feb. 16, 1864; discharged June 10, 
1865. 



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402 



HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



Hacklej, W. H., mustered in March 9, lS6-i; out Aug. 4, ISGo. 
Hedsor, Nicholas, mustered in Marcli 9, 1864; died at Indianap- 
olis Dec. 11, 1865. 

Jackson, Willit>m, mustered in Jan. 1, 1864; discharged Juno 
16, 1865. 

Lewis, J. D., mustered in Jan. 15,1864; died at Madison, Ind., 
May -2, 1865. 
Loebhart, Jacob, mustered in Jan. 1, 1864; out Aug. 28, 1865. 
Larrance, John, mustered in Jan. 1, 1864; out May 26, 1865. 
Lamb, L. L., mustered in Jan. 1, 1864; discharged July 21, 1865. 
Matthews, J.M., mustered in Jan. 1, 1864; out Aug. 28, 1865. 
McCarty, S. A. Y/., mustered in Jan. 1, 1864; out Aug. 28, 1865. 
Meeritt, W. J., mustered in Jan. 1, 1864; discharged July 21, 
1865. 

Middletoii, Joseph, mustered in Jan. 15, 1864; out Sept. 2, 1865. 
Miller, James, mustered in Jan. 15, 1864; out Aug. 28, 1S65. 
[ Moore, John, mustered in Jan. 15, 1864; out Aug. 28, 1805. 
Nave, C. A., mustered in Jan. 15, 1864; out Aug. 28, 1865. 
Ogden, Isaac, mustered in Jan. 15, 1864; cat Aug. 28, 1865. 
Paris, W. 11., mustered in Jan. 1, 1864; discharged June 2, 1865. 
Parker, J. M., mustered in Jan. 1, 18G4; out Aug. 2S, 1865. 
Parsons, A. A., mustered in Jan. 15, 1864; discharged July21, 
1865. 

Eodgers, LP., mu.stcred in Jan. 15, 1864; discharged May 3, 
1865. 
Ehoads, J. L., mustered in Jan. 15, 1S64; out Aug. 10, 1865. 
Keed, James, mustered in Jan. 1, 18G4; out Aug. 23, 1865. 
Eodgers, "W. X., mustered in Jan. I,jl364; out July 26, 1865. 
Shipley, J. B., mustered in Jan. 1, 1864; died at Indianapolis, 
Ind., March 14, 1865. 

Soper, Eugene, mustered in Jan. 15, 1864; out Aug. 28, 1865. 
Soper, F. T., mustered in Feb. 3, 1864-; out Aug. 28, 1865. 
Timms, E. D. T., mustered in Feb. 3, 1S64; out Aug. 28, 1865. 
Thomas, Robert, mustered in Jan. 15. 1864; discharged July 25, 
1865. 

Todd, Marshall, ^nustered in Jan. 1, 1864; dischar:;eJ June 2, 
1865. 
Thrift, L.J. A., mustered iu Jan. 1, 1S64; out Aug. 28, 1865. 
Watson, F. M., mustered in Jan. 1, IS'64; out July 24, 1865. ' 
"Washburn, .Jerem.iah, mustered in Jan. 1, 1864; transferred to 
Veteran Reserve Corps; discharged July 1, 1865. 



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HISTORY OF HENDKICKS COUNTi'. 



403 



"Woody, John, mustered in Jan. 1.5, 1S64; out Aug. 28, 1865. 
"VVinstead, Daniel, mustered in Jan. 15, 1864; out Aug. 28, 1865. 
Warren, Alfred, mustered in Feb. 11, 1864; died at Raysville, 
Ind., April 20, 1864. 

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTT-FOUKTH INFANTRY. 

Officer. 

James Burgess, commissioned Colonel March 1, 1864; resio-ned 
July 9, 1864. ■ ° 

COMPA>'Y D. 

Office.'s. - "\ \ ,■■■■■ "■ 

John Kistler, commissioned First Lieutenant Jan. 21, 1864; re- 
signed March 8, 18G4. 

Yan L. Parsons, commissioned J'^irst Lieutenant Feb. 24, 1864; 
resigned Sept. 21, 1864. 

M. K. Stanley, commissioned Si;cond Lieutenant Feb. 20, 1864; 
resigned July 28, 1864. 

A. M. Williams, mustered in as Sergeant Dec. 10, 1863; pro- 
moted Second Lieutenant March 3 ), 1865; mustered out with reg- 
iment Aug. 31, 1865. 

Non-U oimnissi( •ned OjfLcers. 

W. B. Bryant, mu.stered in as iSergeant Dec. 10,',1S63; promo- 
ted First Sergeant; mustered out Aug. 31, 1865. 

O. M. Campb'jl!, Miiistcred in £.s Sergeant Dec. 10, 1SC3; died at' 
Marietta, Ga., Aug. 25, 1864. 

Gr. L. Parsons, mustered in as Corporal Jan., 21, 1S64; died at 
Cleveland, Tenn., July 22,1864. 

F. M. White, mustered in as C( rporal Dec. 10, 1863; promoted 
Sergeant; mustertd out Aug. 31,. 1865. 

S. 0. Smith, mustered in as Go;'poral Doc. 10, 1S63; out as pri- 
vate Aug. 3i, 3865. > 

Joseph Bundy, mustered in as )riv'Mte Dec. 10, 1863; promoted 
Sergeant; mustered out Aug. 31, 1S65. 

W. T. Hyte;i, !nustcied in as piivate Mai'ch 10,1864; promoted 
Corporal; mustered out Aug. 31, 1865. 

Colonel W. Powers, mustered n as private Deo. 10, l'^63; pro- 
moted Sergeant; mustered out A ig. Z\, 1865. 

Pr hates. 

Blanton, Dudley, mustered in Dec. 10, 1S63; out June 22, 1865. 



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404 



HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



Brown, J. A. ^Y., mustered in Jan. 21, 18G4; out Aug. 31, 1SC5. 

Bandy, Robert, mustered in Jan. 21, 1864; out Aug. 31, 18G5. 

Blunk, G. 11., mustered in Jan. 21, 1864; out A!ug. 31, 1S65. 

Bandy, Keuben, mustered in Jan. 21, 1864; deserted I'rura 
Eiglity-l'ourth Infantry; returned. 

Christie, J. M., mustered in Dec. 10, 1863; out Aug. 31, 1865. 

Dobson, A. S., mustered in Dec. 10, 1863; out Aug. 31, 1865. 

Doley, Thomas, musterad in Dec. 10, 1863; out Aug. 31, 1865. 

Evans, David; mustered in Dec. 10, 1863; out Aug. 31, 1865. 

Gill, Enos, mustered in Dec. 10, 1863; out Aug. 31, 1S65. 

Goudy, George, mustered in Jan. 21, 1864; died at Marietta, 
Ga., July 29, 1865. 

Haden, H. E., mustered in Dec. 10, 1863; out Aug. 31, 1865. 

Hopkins, oN'oali, mustered in Dec. 10, 1863; died at Nashville, 
Tenn.,Dec. 21, 1864. 

Jones, S. F., mustered in Dec. 10, 1863; died at Washington, 
D. C.,Feb. 18, 1865. 

J'ohnson, Augustine, mustered in Jan. 21, 1864; out Aug. 31, 
1865. 

Kinder, J. M., mustered in Dec. 10, 1863; died at Marietta, 
Ga., Oct. Y, 1S64, of wouads. 

Kinder, W. S., mustered in Dec. 10, 1863; out Aug. 31, 1S65. 

Kirk, Van Buren, mustered in Dec. 10, 1863; out Aug. 31, 1865 

Kistler, F. M., mustered in Dec. 10, 1863; deserted March IS, 
18 6. 

ilcAlister, J. A., mustered in Dec. 10, 1S63; discharged July 
10, 1865. 

McGloud, J. M., musteied in Dec. 10, 1863; out Aug. 31, 1S65 

Parsons, II. A., mustered in Dec. 10, 1863; deserted Sept. 1. 
1864. 

Richardson, W. H., mustered in Dec. 10, 1863; died at Marietta. 
Ga., Aug. 24, 1864. 

Sheckels, James, mustered in Dec. 10, 1S63; out Aug. 31, 1865. 

Stanley, Ely, mustered in Dec. 10, 1863; died at Allatoona, Ga., 
June 20, 1804. 

Stanley, WilJiam, mustered in Jan. 21, 1S64; out June 12, 1865. 

Stutesman, Samuel, mr stored in Jan. 21, 1S64; out Aug. 31, 
1865. 

Stephens, A. J., mustered in Jan. 21, 1864; discharged Jan. 23, 
1865, for wounds. 

Tolbj-, W. H. H., mustei-ed in Dec. 10, 1863; out Aug. 31, 1865. 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



405 



Thompson, James, mustered in Jan. 21, 1S64; discharged Jnlj 
10, 1865. 

"Watts, Owen, mustered in Dec 10, 1SG3; out Aug. 31, 1865. 

Wilson, J. T., mustered in Dec. 10, 1863; out Aug. 31, 1865. 

Woodhurst, H. A., mustered in Dec. 10, 1863; out June 15, 
1865. 

one hundred and thirtr-second indiana volunteek infantry 
• ..■.,.. (100 days). 

compantt h. 

Officer's. 

W. S. King, commissioned Captain May 17, 1864; mustered out 
witli regiment; re-entered service as Captain in One Hundred and 
Fifty-sixth Indiana Volunteer Infantry. 

Z. K. McCormack, commissioned First Lieutenant May 17, 
1864; mustered out with regiment. 

J. M. Emmons, commissioned Second Lieutenant May 17,1804; 
mustered out with regiment. 

Privates. 

W. E. Alley, W. P. Anderson, G. W. Abler, David Brown, J. 
T. Blanton, "William Eoswell, J. M. Barlow, Elliott Bndd, Alfred 
Benbov,',cJ. JST. Campbell, William Curtis, Joshua Cook, C. S. 
Darnell, E. C. Dibble, S. E. Da7is, J. "W. Davidson, W. J. David- 
son, J. "VY. Duncan, Quincy Davis, John Easter, Smith Pancett, 
A. M. Fiscus, Charles Foley, S. M. Fielder, Xehemiah Fielder, 
"W. C. Grimes, J. E. Garrison, John Ilyten, C. E. Harlan, JST. J. 
Houk, Asbury Huff, L. D. Hodges, Lindley Hayworth, J. Ham- 
mond, D. F. Hill, S. B. Haywo"th, Elisha Hampton, D. B. Kele- 
her, Oliver Kesler, J. G. Lockridge, J. "W. Lee, Howard Lasley, 
Francis McKahan, Joseph McAninch, H. J. Montgomery, J. W. 
McMullen, J. "W. Miller, Joseph Moreland, "W. D. Monett, "\7. J. 
Miller, W. S. Mills, S. F. Madison, G. W. ^ve, James Oliaver, 
F. M. Osborn, Hamlin Owens, "W. S. Owens, Eli Purnell, L. "W. 
Parsloe,, C. W. Parker, J. F. Proctor, Eobert Page, Williamson 
Page, George Eicliardson, Frank Eussell, D. C. Eussell, J. W. 
Eiggon, Daniel Southerland, Gazaway Sullivan, Charles Saire, J. 
S. Straagan, J. W. Stapp, Tliomas Staton, Howard Staton, James 
Sargent, E. W. Smith, Moses Turner, J. W. Tout, George Tincher, 
E. C. Talbot, Luther Vaughan, Thomas Welshans, Joseph Woods, 
26 



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406 



HISTOET OF HENDRICKS COUNTT. 



William "Welshans, James Wells and N. U. "Wells, all mustered 
in May IS, ISO-i. 

ONE HUNDRED AND FOETT-EIGHTH INFANTRY. 

Officers. 

William Ivvin, commissioned Quartermaster Feb. 24, 18G5; • 
mustered out with regiment. 

C. W. Stewart, commissioacd Chaplain March 1, 18G5; mus- 
tered out with regiment. 

COMTANY A. 

Private. 
Warner, W. W., mustered in Feb. 3, 1S65; out Sept. 5, 1S65. 

COMPANY B. 

Officers. 

J. H. McClure, commissioaed Second Lieutenant Feb. 15, 1SG5; 
promoted First Lieutenant ^ag- 2, 1865; mustered out with regi- 
ment. 

E. M. Woody, mustered in as private Feb. 13, 1S65; promoted 
Second Lieutenant Aug. 2, 1865; mustered out with regiment. 

Non- Commissioned Officers. 

M. B. Hopwood, mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out as First Ser- 
geant Sept. 5, 1865. 

M. L. Farlow, mustered in Feb. 13, 1S65; out as Sergeant Sept. 
5, 1865. 

J. W. Phillips, mustered in Feb. 13,1865; out as Sergeant Sept. 
5, 1865. 

J. H. Graves, mustered in Feb. 13, 1-865; out as Corporal Sept. 
5, 1865. 

Joseph McAnincli, mustered in Feb. 13, 1SG5; out as Corporal 
Sept. 5, 1865. 

E. C. Wills, mastered in Feb. 13, 1865; out as Corporal Sept. 
5, 1865. 

C L. Warner, mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out as musician Sept. 
5, 1865. 

Privates. 

Allen, S. E., mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; ont Sept. 5. 18G5. 
Ayres, J. L., mustered in Feb. 13, lSo5; out Sept. 5, 1865. 









.L- 



HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



407 



Brown, J. H., mustered in Feb. 13, 1SG5; out Sept. 5, 1S65. 
Brannon, Jeff., mnstered in Feb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1S6.5. 
Boes, Anthonj, mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Carr, Bonne, mustered in Feb. 13, 18G5; out Sept. 5, 1S65. 
Covert, Edward, mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Cosner, jST. W., mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Cornwell,- William, mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Corn well, Benjamin, mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5,1865. 
Correll, L. R., mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Creekmore, W. H., mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Creekmore, Calvin, mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Evans, S. "W., mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Easter, William, mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Evans, Warnick, mustered in Feb, 13, 1865; out Sept. -5, 1865. 
Epps, D. "W., mustered in Feb. 13, 1S65; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Fetter, G. \V., mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Fields, Andrew, mustered in Feb. 13, 1S65; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Fiscus, A. jSf., mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1S65. 
Graves, James, mustered in Feb. 13, 18G5; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Garrison, D. 0., mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1S65. 
Hotchkiss, Jolm, mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Hodges, D. L., mustered in Fel. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Hodsou, J. B., mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Hannah, James, mustered in Ftb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Hogue, J. F., mustered in Feb. 13, 1S65; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Lovett, Elias, mustered in Feb. 13, 1865;' out Sept. 5, 1S65. 
Lee, J. W., mustered in Feb. IT., 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Marlej, Mvis, mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1S65. 
McCurdy, A. "W., m^ustered in ."F'eb. 13, 1S65; out Sept. 5, 1S65. 
Martin, J. V., mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1S65. 
Martin, G. C, mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Mullens, Jolm, mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1S65. 
Moore, Fillmore, mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
McCuUoch, J. H. A., mustered in Feb. 13,1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
jSTewman, Samuel, mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Phillips, William, mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
• Piersou, Josiali, mustered in F"'b. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Richardson, J. D., mustered in Feb. 13,1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Rudd, Bryant, mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Soots, David, mustered in Feb. 13, 1865. 
Stewart, I. J., mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COtJNTT. 



Sarchet, Nathaniel, niustereJ in Fob. 13, 1S65; out Sept. 5,1805. 
Svvarts^, J. W., mustered in Feb. 13, 1S65; out Sept. 5, 1S65. 
Tomlinson, Q. C, mustered iu Feb. 13, 1S65; out Sept. 5,1505. 
Wills, J. W., mustered in Feb. 13, 1SG5; out Sept. 5, 1S65. 
White, W. N., mastered in Feb. 13, 1S05; out Sept. 5, 1S65. 
Wooten, W. J., mustered in Feb. 13, 1S65; out Sept. 5, 1805. 
Wooten, F. M., mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1S65. 

COMPANY c. 

Officers. 

E.. M. Curtis, commissioned Captain Feb. 17, 1SG5; mustered 
out with regiment. 

N. J. Scearce, comi.iissioned Second Lieutenant Feb. 17, 1805; 
promoted First Lieutenant July 1, 1SC5; mustered out with regi- 
ment. 

M. D. L. Brown, ra istered into Company G as private Jan. 31, 
1865; commissioned S3cond Lieutenant Company C July 1, 1S05; 
mustered out with reg;n:ient. 

No I- Commissioned Officers. 

•E. M. Straughn, mustered in Feb. 17, 1865; out as First Str- 
geant Sept. 5, 1S65. 

J. S. Burks, mustered in Feb. 17, 1865; out as Sergeant Sept. 
5, 1865. 

James Helton, mustiTcd in Feb. IT, 1865; out as Sergeant Sept. 
5, 1865. 

Joseph Ohaver, mustered in Feb. 17, 1865; out as Sergeant Sept. 
5, 1865. 

William Strickland, mustered in Feb. 17, 1865; out as Sergeant 
Sept. 5, 1865. 

J. M. Gregg, mnsteied in Feb. 17, 1865; out as Corporal Sept. 
5, 1865. 

W. T. Stewart, mustared in Feb. 17, 1865; out as Corporal Sept. 
5, 1865. 

Privates. 

~ Bryant, S. M, mustered in Feb. 17, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865 
Curtis, W. W., mustired in Feb. 17.J1865; out Sept. 5, 186.".. 
Cook, S. E., mustered in Feb. 17, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Downward, W. P., mastered in Feb. 17, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Ensminger, Henry, mustered in Feb. 17, 1865; out Sept. 5, I860. 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



409 



Glasscock, George, mustered in Feb. 17, 1S05; 'out Sept. 5, 1865. 

Keslor, Covington, mustered in Feb. 17, 1SG5; out Sept. 5, 1S65. 

Matlock, A. R., mustered iu Feb. 17, 1865; out Sept. 13, 1S65. 

McMullen, T. J., mustered in Feb. 17, 1865; out as principal 
musician Sept. 5, 1S65. 

Pattison, F. F. H., mustered iu Feb. 17, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 

Powers, Joseph, mustered iu Feb. 17, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1805. 

Petty, James, mustered in Feb. 17, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1S65. 

Rogers, Addison, mustered in Feb. 17, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 

Sacra, Ciiarle.-, mustered in Feb. 17, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 

Todd, J. O., mustered in Feb. 17, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 

Tout, C. C, mustered iu Feb. 17, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 

Tout, Ilomer, mustered in Feb. 17, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 

"Wilson, George, mustered in Feb. 17, 1805; out Sept. 5, 1805. 

Williams, G. F., mustered in Feb. 17, 1865; discharged July 
9, 1865. 

Wilson, F. M., mustered in Feb. 17, 1865; died at Danville, 
Ind., March 5, 1865. 

Wilson, W. L., mustered in Feb. 17, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 

Welshans, Thomas, mustered in Feb. 17, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 

Wilson, David, mustered in Feb. 17, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1805. 

COSIPAKT D. 

Private. 
Fogleman, Samuel, mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 

COMPANY E. 

Non-Commhslcned, Officers. 

D. D. Jones, mustered in Feb. 17, 1865; out as First Sergeant 
Sept. 5, 1865. 

J. M. Emmons, mustered in Feb. 17, 1865; out as Sergeant Sept. 
5, 1865. 

Privates. 

Costen, John, mustered in Feb. 15, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Clark, J. F., mustered in Feb. 15, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Heney, J. W., mustered in Feb. 11, 1805; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Hole, J. A., mustered in Feb. 15, 1805; out Sept. 5, 1805. 
Paul, Joseph, mustered in Feb. 14, 1S65; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Seiger, Charles, mustered in Feb. 10, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
West, H. J., mustered in Feb. 14, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
West, L. R. mustered in Feb. 15, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS CODNTV. 
COMPANY F. 



Finton, Simon, mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Finter, James, mustered in Feb. 10, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1S65. 
Hendricks, Alexander, mustered in Feb. 14,1865; out Sept. 5, 
1865. 

Luke, Samuel, mustered in Feb. 14, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Maglej, Jacob, mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
NeitEng, Nicliolas, mustered in Feb. 13.1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Smith, W. B., mustered in Feb. 14, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 

COSIPANY G. 

Non- Commissioned Officer. ' - .'<. 

Stephen Fowler, mustered in Feb. 14, 1865; out as Sergeant 
Sept. 5, 1865. 

PHvates. 

Brown, M. D. L., mustered in Jan. 31, 1865; commissioned Sec- 
ond Lieutenant Company C. 

Corey, Joseph, mustered in -Jan. 28, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
CottreIl,'W. M., mustered inFeb. 3, 1S65; deserted Feb. 10,1865.* 
Garrety, John, mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; deserted Feb. 15, 1865. 
Hook, G. W., mastered in Feb. 2, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Morley, Ralph, mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
. IMillspaugh, B. C, mustered in Feb. 11, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Oswald, C. A., mustered inFeb. 11, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
Rea, Ellis, mustered in Feb. 11, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
EoUin, G. W., mustered in Feb. 7, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
"ft'enninger, Pliilip, mustered in Jan. 31, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 
"Wilson, Jacob, mustered in Jan. 28, 1865; deserted Jan. 31, 1865. 

COr.rPANY H. 

Non- Commissioned Officer. 

A. T. Hart, mustered in Feb. 20,1865; out as First Sergeant 
Sept. 5, 1865. 

Privates. 

Kelley, Michael, mustered in Feb. 16, 1865; deserted March 1, 
1865. 

Nichols, C. F., mustered in Feb. 11, 1865; deserted March 1, 
1865. 



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Jfo-n-Comniu-ruyri^J Ovicen. 


! Tiio!iia5 Ve-se' 


s, mnstere^i in Feb. 16, 1565 : c-- &s Corporal 


Sept. 5. ISoo. 




H. B. E.i^ari 


s, -^nsterei i- ~-:. "6, 1565 ; on: -= — -^icis" 


1 ±12. 2-3, 15?.5. 


,- 


Pcier Francis, 


^-^ster^ii i- Feb. 1-5, 1S6-5; out as "irr^fcfan Sept 


5, 1S65. 


■ 




PrhaU^. 


ATi(ler£<j-"', .Jo^' 


-. inii5tere<i ''^ Feb. 15, 15-55: dese^re' "'•''j-;-'- 10, 


156-5. 




ATvey, J. P.. - 


-nszeren ^n Feb. 15. 1555: o-t V^t l=>. T555. 


Baldrn, James, 


mnsrerel in Feb. 16. T 33-5; niTt Sept 5, "1-53. 


Bo-s-ers, E. E., 


mnster&i in^Feb. 15, 1563: oat Sept. 5, 155-5. 


CourlLiiej, Hen 


iersc'^ rrnstered in Feb. 15, 1555': out Sent. 5. 


155.5. 




Den-p.n. Da-i- 


Is. mnstered in Feb. 17, lSo5 : on: Sepn 5, 1555. 


1 DoT-^.'nfte, T. C 


., mustered in Feb. 13, 15^55: out Sept. 5, 1553. 


GszretTj Join:, 


mr-terel in Feb. 1:3, 155-5; out Sept. 5, 1565. 


1 Jones, C E., nmstere-i in Feo. 15, 15c>5: OTit Sep;. 5, 1555. 


- Late,' W. R., I 


nuster&i in Feb. 16, 155-5; out Sept. 3. 1565. 


MarlsT, "R^lpK, 


mnstered in Feb. 1:3, 1555; out Sept. 5, 1S6.5. 


1 T>'-=— ;-- T * 


'T^uste^d -■'' Feb. 15. ^--^a: out "^r?.v 1-3, T>-^5. 


- Phipps. T. L. E.. mnsterei in Feb. 15, ISiJS: on: Sep- 5. 15o5. 


' Eirh^J. D-. T- 


zsze7-ed in Feb. 16, 1S65: oat Sept. 5, 1555. 


Trent, S. ?^, r: 


n5:6red in Feb. 15, 155-5; ont Sent. 5. 1555. 


Tjler, P.-eston, 


musterei in Feb. 17. 1565: out Sen:. 5, 1565. 


Tvler. C. W., master^-" "- Feb. 'T. 15o5; i^.i^.---\-^i Vs-Jll, 


1S65. 


' 


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0^c.'t. 


S. J. Banta, CDmtnissioneii Csptain Feb. 25, 15-5: mnsierei :": 


with, rejlment. 




J. mToifT] o- 


r^missij'-e'i First Iieu:cnan: Feb. £5, 1565. — " - 


\ tered ont ^:n re. 


:inient. 


1 


Sor^-Corruirdi-iiyiiiil O^ccr^. 


r "^far"- e— Lc'Kikwcod, mastered in Feb. Id, 1^65 : on: -s Serrea- : 


See:. 5, 1S65. 





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412 



HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



J. M. Sims, mustered in Feb. IG, 1865 ; out as Corporal Sept. 
5, 1S65. 

H. P. Wright, mustered in Feb. 15, 1SG5; out as Corporal Sept. 
5,1865. 

Privates. 

Allgood, Spencer, mustered in Feb. 15, 1865; out June 19, 1865. 

Coble, Daniel, mustered in Feb. 15, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 

Coleman, Levi, mustered in Feb. 15, 1S65 ; out Sept. 5, 1865. 

Hollingsworth, Albert, muftered in Feb. 15, 1865 ; out Sept. 5, 
1865. 

Kelly, J. G., mustered in Feb. 16, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 

Long, J. H., mustered in Feb. 16, 18G5; out Sept. 5, 1865. 

Maddox, E. R,, mustered in Feb. 13, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 

Martin, Albert, mustered i-i Feb. 21, 1865 ; deserted Feb. 28, 
1865. 

INIclSabb, George, mustered in Feb. 16, 1865; out Sapt. 5, 1865. 

Moore, Isaac, mustered in Feb. IG, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 

Poulter, "W. W., mustered in Feb. 16, 1865; out Sept. 5, 1865. 

EIGHTH UNITED STATES COLOEED INFANTRY. 

' Recruits. 

Alexander, Julius, musterei in Sept. 29, lS6i. 
Belt, Benjamin, mustered in Sept. 2i, 1861. 
Benton, Henry, mustered in Sept. 24, lS6i. 
Crane, "Webster, mustered i'l Oct. 6, 1864. 
Hobbs, Lewis, mustered in Sept. 21, 1864. 
Kendall, Henry, mustered i i Sept. 24, 1864. 
Eoberts, William, mustered in Sept. 26, 1864. 




T 



f.?i iVl'l'KU 1-Vv71-. 



CHAPTER VII. 



THE BAR. 



PKEPAEED ET CHaELF.S FOLET. _ . . ■ • 

"When the vvriter of this sketch located at Danville, in the sprino- 
of 1S63, to practice law, he found James M. Grecrg, Christian C. 
Nave. Joseph S. Miller, Leander M. Campbell, Peter S. Kcnnedj 
and Sinaou T. Fladley engaged in the practice of that profession at 
that place. Of these, Mr. Kennedy afterward removed to Craw- 
fordsviUe, Ind., where he is engaged in the practice in connection 
with his son. Gregg, Iladley and Nave have died. I will give a 
sketch of each of these deceased brethren in the order in whicli 
their deaths occurred, including .J. S. Ogden who was not in the 
practice at the time mentioned, IS'.l-j, and who died after the death 
of Mr. Hadiey and before that of Mr. Nave. 

jAiXES M. Geegg. — Mr. Gregg ^vas the first resident attorney of 
Danville to die. He died in June, 1SG9. The bar promptly held 
a meeting on the occasion, Colonel C. C. Nave presiding, and the 
writer of this acting as secretary. B,em.arks were made by all of the 
members of the bar, the number of whom had increased since the 
writer located in Danville in 1SG3, and all bore testimony to the 
many excellent characteristics of the deceased. He was respected 
by all, botli in and out of the profession, and his death was 
regretted by the entire community. The remarks of Simon T. 
Hadiey were the most replete with the biographical facts of Mr. 
Gregg's life, and v,'ere as follows: 

"The deceased was b^rn in Patiick County, in the State of Vir- 
ginia, on the 20th day of June, 1S06, and was reared in that county. 
He emigrated from there to this county in January, 1S30, stopping 
at -Judge Jessup's, in the southeast corner of the county, for about 
eighteen months, most of which time he was employed in making 
rails and clearing up the forest. In September, 1831, he came to 
this place (Danville) and was employed by James J. Giyen, the 
only dry-goods merchant in town, as clerk in the store. In Sep- 
tember, 1S33, he left the store and commenced writing in the 

(41.3) 



\ 



■I 






Ui 



HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



clerk's office for me as deputy. _In October, lS3-i, be was ap- 
pointed County Surveyor, but still continued with me in the clerk's 
office writing, when not engaged iu surveying. In 1S37 he was 
elected Clerk without opposition. He took the office at the close 
of my term in 1S3S, and served one term of seven years, during 
which time he made himself acquainted with the law, and at the 
close of his term, not being re-elected, he commenced the practice 
of law with good success. Since that time he was elected to and 
served one term in Congress; also one term in the State Legis- 
lature." 

Mr. Gregg was elected to Congress in the fall of the memorable 
campaign year, 1S56. His election to the Legislature occurred 
early during tL ; war of the Rebellion. To Congress he went as a 
Democrat. To the Legislature he was elected by the combined 
Union sentiment of both the Republican and Democratic parties. 

SnioN T. Hadley.— IMr. Hadley died March 7, 1872. The writer 
cannot describe the deceased better than by quoting the remarks 
made by him at the bar meeting on the occasion of Mr. Hadley's 
death, to wit: 

"I came to Danville in 1S63 and formed a partnership with Mr. 
Hadley in the practice of law, which continued until I enlisted in 
the army in 186i. On my return the partnership was not renewed, 
but I occupied a roo:n with him as an office for three or four years, 
thus having good opportunities to study and learn his character on 
which I put tlie following estimate: He was honest and desired 
justice to all persons. This is saying very much. His leading 
traits were industry and patience. He was remarkably even teui- 
pered. He was an indefatigable worker. If he was intemperate in 
anything, it was in working, a kind of intemperance most rare. By 
his industry, patience and fidelity he built up a reputation with tlie 
masses of the community for integrity and reliability, such as no 
other man in the county ever attained, and such as probably none 
of us will ever attain. With the masses, his opinion on business 
matters had the weight of aatliority; it was law. He was so very 
cautious that he was timid. He seldom or never in matters he 
deemed important, gave counsel or advised people, on the strength 
of his own opinion. Every tMng he undertook was well weighed 
and considered. He was not calculated to be a leader in the enter- 
prises of men. His mental organization and constitution were such 
that he was best fitted to fill a place or post whose duties would 
be discharged according to rules and regulations, and no man would 






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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



415 



be more faitliful in such a post. He possessed laroje secretiveness 
of cliaracter, keeping liis thoughts, plans and designs to himself 
and having few confidants. Indeed, it took a long time of close 
observation to learn his character. Of his religions convictions, 
his faith and hopes, I know but little. I only know that once he 
dropped e.xpressions that indicated his belief in the doctrine of the 
sovereignty of God in ordering and shaping the affairs of men. 

" Our brother was born in North Carolina, Sept. 23, ISOl. He 
learned the saddler's trade in 1S18. Commenced teaching school 
in 1S19. Married Mary Iladley in 1824. Moved to Plendricks 
County in 1S2G. "Was elected Clerk and Recorder in 1S30 and 
commenced the discharge of the duties of those offices in 1831. 
He moved to Danville in the spring of 1832, nearly forty years ago. 
He was re-elected Recorder in 1837, again in 1844, again in 1851 
and again in 1855. He served as Clerk and Recorder both seven 
years, and as Recorder alone twenty-two years. He was President 
of the'Bank in Danville [The First National] from its organization 
in 1S63 until within two or three months past, and contributed 
much to the success of that institution. He was a Director of it 
at the lime of his death. 

"His wife died Jan. 12, 1866, and since then the loss of her so- 
ciety made him somewhat lonely. In a brief notice I prepared of 
her death for publication, I said of her, 'With meekness and humil- 
ity she discharged her daily round of duties, until the messenger 
of death called her hence.' How truly can we speak thus of our 
brother. Mr. Hadley and his wii'e greatly resembled each other 
in many traits of character. He died respected by all and beloved 
by a great many." 

Mr. Hadley never read law. His practice was confined to deed 
writing and probate business, almost exclusivsly, the routine of 
which he picked up while serving as Clerk and Recorder, and he 
did much of such business. The statutes and a small probate 
work constituted his law library, yet niany people, particularly the 
pioneer settlers and their children, sought his opinion on quite a 
variety of legal questions, and I doubt whether I ever saw a man 
who could reach as correct a conclusion atid give as good advice 
from the common-sense standpoint alone as he; and in his line of 
work his opinion was law withttie masses. Hs possessed good nat- 
ural talent for jlld^;^ng human nature. 

Jesse S. Ogdp3'. — Mr. Ogden was born in Taylor County, Ya., 
Aug. 23, 1839, and came with his parents to Danville in 1856, 



T 



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HISTOEi' OF HENDRICKS COUNTr. 



where he resided up to the time of his death. His parents were 
poor, and quite earl j he was compelled to help support himself and 
the family by such work as a hoy can get in and about a countrv 
village. He had a desire for an education and for a while paid his 
tuition in the Danville school by doing janitor's work. In August, 
ISCl, he enlisted as a private in the Seventh Indiana Infantry, and 
was wounded in the right hand at the battle of Winchester where 
his service ceased. He returned to Dauville and was elected Re- 
corder of the county on the Republican ticket, which ofhce he filled 
until the end of his terra. "\V hile serving as Recorder he read law 
and was admitted to the bar in June, 1S67. He was elected Prose- 
cuting Attorney in 1S70, and to the" Legislature in 1S72. He 
formed a partnership in the law with John V. Hadley, which con- 
tinued up to the time of his ceatb. He was constituted for action 
rather than reflection, in the ^)ractice of the law. He was a fluent 
speaker. He left many friends, and a wife and five children who 
live in Danville. 

Christian C. N" aye.— Mr. I^ave is the fourth and last resident of 
the Danville bar that has died. The remarks of the writer at the 
bar meeting on the occasion jf his death so fully cover his biog- 
raphy that I copy the same: 

"Christian C. Nave was U ru Aug. 22, 1803, and died on Sun- 
day, Aug. 3, ISSi, being al nost eighty-one years old. Of his 
boyhood I know nothing. Be read law with Colonel James P. 
Taylor, at Elizabethtown, in Carter County, Tenn. On the 2Sthday 
of March, 1S2T, he was admitted to the bar at that place to prac- 
tice law. He followed his pr')fession there until the fall of 1S31, 
when he started out to find aiotherplace to locate, going to the 
State of Georgia and from chers to Springfield, 111., and from 
there to Indianapolis, Ind. On the way to the latter place he 
passed through the town of Danville, staying all night here Dec. 
5, 1S31, being the first time h'3 ever was here. At Inditinapolis he 
was cautioned against locating in a malarious region, and was 
advised to come to Danville, because the situation was high and 
rolling. Accordingly he returned to Danville and established 
himself in the practice of the law Dec. 19, 1S31, andhad been 
here continuously ever since in that business, except while he was 
serving in the Mexlcau war. When lie came to Dauville to locate 
he found that the venerable Jadge Marvin had preceded him a few 
days in beginning the practice of the law in this place. 

''Colonel Nave was married to Miss Lurena Rich Dec. 2, 1838. 



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HISTOET OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



417 



Six children were born to them, four of wliom are now living and 
will be in attendance at his funeral. His wife died June 12, 1S52. 

"He was elected Captain of a company that was raised at this 
place for service in the Mexican war, which became Company I of 
the First Indiana Regiment, and of which lie became Lieutenant- 
Colonel. After serving about nine months in that capacity, he 
resigned and returned to Danville, being succeeded as Lieutenant- 
Colonel by the Major, Henry S. Lane, who afterward became Gov- 
ernor of the State and a United States Senator. 

"He served for two terms in the House of Representatives of 
Indiana in ISSiand 1S35, and for three terms in the Senate, 1S39, 
1S40 and 1842. He was a !nember of the Constitutional Conven- 
tion that framed the present Constitution of the State. 

"He was an indomitable worker in his profession. When he 
undertook a cause he sunk his identity completely in that of his 
client. For many years he maintained tlie reputation in this and 
adjoining counties with the masses of the people of being a very 
great lawyer. He had numerous clients, and the aggregate of the 
fees he received v.'ould be very larga. The first case that he had 
in our Supreme Court that I have noticed is reported in Third 
Blackford, being a decision of that court at the jM"ovember term,lS34. 

" Colonel Nave never married thi second time. He reared his 
motherless children "as best he could, and the old settlers bear testi- 
mony tliat ^lis efforts in tiieir behalf were earnest and untiring. 
For more than thirty-two years he lived a widower, and for many 
years his children liad all been married and gone. Those who liave 
seen Colonel Nave only of late years have seen an old man alone 
and lonely, and seemingly with no one to care for him, and yet that 
old man once had a pleasant home and happy family. His wife 
was a lady of cnlture and reflneraoit, kind-hearted and universally 
beloved. He married her while on a visit to Tennessee. She was 
a teacher at that time. The few old settlers remaining who knew 
her, speak of her in the highest terms. Her loss to Colonel Nave 
was irreparable. That he had faults only shows that he was hu- 
man, but, in my humble judgment, the sum of his virtues greatly 
outweighed his faults, and now that he is no more let us imitate 
the former." 

From the above it will be seen that his professional career in 
Danville continued for nearly fifty-three years, and dnrino- all of 
that time it is doubtful whetliertho interests of any client ever suf- 
fered because of any neglect on his part. He was very public 



ilS 



HISTORY OF HENDEICKS COUNTY. 



spirited and contributed largely to every enterprise tliat he tlionglit 
was calculated to develop tlie country, and by some of them he lost 
large sums of money. He introduced cultivated fruits into the 
town of Danville and was ever ready to help disseminate seeds and 
plants among his neighbors. 

The day (Saturday) preceding his death he caused to be filed in 
the Circuit Court a complaint in his own handwriting. He died 
in his office library-room, which he used as a bed-room, being un- 
willing to be removed elsewhere. He was a remarkable man in 
I many particulai-s and had prominent individual characteristics. 
Tliere have been otlier members of the Danville bar wdio have 
removed elsewhere and died, but the above named, Gregg, Hadley, 
Ogden and Nave, are all of the members of the bar who have died 
resident of Danville. On the death of Mr. Grego-, the bar'estab- 
lished the precedent of having the oldest practicing lawyer to pre- 
side over the meeting, who was Air. Nave, and he presided at the 
meetings on the deaths of Gregg, Hadley and Ogden. Joseph S. 
Miller presided on the occasion of the death of Mr. Nave. 

In a pigeoji-liole bo.x in the clerk's office, the writer deposited 
copies of the Danville papers containing notices of. and the bar 
proceedings on, the deaths of the four gentlemen mentioned above. 
Should the practice be kept up, each in his turn will have a brief 
but very perishable record. 

Before taking up the present members of the bar, I must make 
mention of an old citizeri of Danville, known to everybody as 
Judge Marvin. 

Hexky H. Maevin was born in Luzerne County, Pa., Feb. 22, 
1802. While he was an infant his parents removed to Ohio. He 
passed the most of Iiis bojhood with his parents in the country, 
helping to clear off the forests, but attended school sufficiently to 
get a better education than most country bo3"S. He read law in the 
office of Osmer and Henry Curtis in Mt. Vernon, Ohio. Colum- 
bus Delaney was a law student in that office at that time. 

He located in Danville in December, 1S31, having previously 
passed through the place on his waj^ to the State of Illinois, where he 
staled something like a year before he returned. In locating at Dan- 
ville , he preceded Colonel Ni" ve afew days. He began the practice of 
law immediately but in an irregular way, for he was not admitted to 
the bar until in lS34r. Before his admission to the bar he taught 
a grammar school, probably the first school in Danville in whicli 
grammar was taught. 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



419 



In those days, to be admitted to the bar and be authorized to 
practice law was not the easy thing that it now is, thouo-h it takes 
as long now to make a good lawyer as it did then. While no easier 
or shorter road has been found to good lawyership, yet by virtue 
of the present Constitution of the State, all birriers to the bar have 
been removed, as to all males twenty-one years of age possessino- a 
good moral character. The groat majority of the legal profession in 
Indiana, to-day, were admitted to the bar under the present Con- 
stitution, and I think it would be interesting to some to know 
something of the steps taken bf the old lawyers to be admitted. 
Beside evidence as to the moral character of the applicant, he had 
to undergo an examination by a committee composed of members 
of the bar appointed by the court for the purpose, as to his knowl- 
edge of law and his qualifications generally to practice. That ex- 
amination had to be followed by two others, that is by the two 
presiding judges of two judicial circuits, and if all such examina- 
tions proved satisfactory, the applicant was, on taking the proper 
oath, duly admitted to the bar and licensed as a practicing lawyer. 
Mr. Marvin has l^indly furnished me with tlie following certificates 
relating to his admission, which I give verl)atirii. 



"State of Indiana, 
" Hendricks Countv, 



Hendricks Circuit Court, 
October Term, 1833. 



"I, Simqn T. Hadley, Clerk of said court, do hereby certify that 
at said term of said court it was, o^i motion, ordered to be certified 
that Henry H. Jlarvin was a man of good moral character. I do 
therefore hereby certify that he (the said Marvin) is a man of o-ood 
moral character. 

Seal of the Cir- 1 

cuit Court of " ^^®" under my hand with the seal of the 



Hendricks 
County, In- 
diana. 



court affixed at Danville this 6th day of July, 
A. D. 1833. 

"S. T. Hadley, C/e/-^-. " 
Indorsed 

"Certificate of 
- Moral Character." 

The seal was a mere ink scroll, in a square form. 

■ The Hon. B. F. J^Iour.is— 

'•'• Presid'int of the Fifth Judicial Circuit: 
"The undersigned having. e.xf.miued Mr. Henry H. Marvin 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS CO0NTY. 



tonching his qualification to practice law, recommend him to jour 
honor for a license. 

'■'■Danville, Oct. 13, 1834. 

"J. Morrison, 

" "W. QtJARLES, 

" William Herod, 
• ' - " Christian C. Nave, 

""Calvin Fletcher." 
" State of Indiana, to-wit : 

"We, Eethuel F. _Morris, President Judge of the Fifth Judicial 
Circuit, and Amory Kinney, President Judge of the Seventh Judi- 
cial Circuit of the State of Irdiana, do certify that Henry H. Mar- 
vin has produced to us sat'isfactory evidence of his good moral 
character, and we having examined him touching his qualifications 
to practice law, do hereby licmse and permit him, the said Henry 
H. Marvin, to practice as an attorney and counselor at law in all 
the Circuit and inferior Cour:s of said State. 

"Given under our hands and seals, this 20th day 
of October, A. D. 1834. 

"B. F. Morris. [l. s.] 
"Amort Kinney, [l. s.]" 

The seals vcQr& ink scrolls. Annexed to the foregoing certificate 
of the two judges were two certificates of the clerk of the Circuit 
Court of Putnam County. The first must have been considered in- 
sufhcient, for the second cove /s the same and more ground, to-wit: 

"State of Indiana,) 
" County of Putnam. ) 

"I, Arthur McGanghey, Clerk of the Circuit Court for said 
county, do certify that the above licensed Henry H. Marvin was, 
by order of the Circuit Court, admitted to practice as an attorney 
and counselor at law in this 'lounty, and that he took the oath re- 
quired by law. 

"Given unde.- my hand and the seal of said court 
[seal.] at my ofh'ie in Greencastle, on the 21st day of 

October, jS34. A. McGauohet, Clerk.'" 

" The State of Indiana, ) Putnam Circuit Court, October Term, 
"Putnam County, ( ^^- 1S34, Tuesday, Oct. 21. 

"Be it remembered, tliat on :he above day of the above term of the 
above court, before the court in session, personally appeared the %vith- 
in named Henry H. Marvin, and took an oath to support the Consti- 



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HISTORY OF HENDSICKS COUNTY. 



421 



[seal.] 



tution of the United States and the Constitution of this State; and 
an oath of ofBce, to-wit : That he will, in all things, faithfully execute 
the duties of an attorney and counselor at law according to the best 
of his understanding and abilities; whereupon said Marvin was 
fully admitted to practice as an attorney and counselor at law 
agreeably to the within license, and to law. 

"In witness whereof I, Arthur McGaughey, Clerk 
of said Court, hereunto set my hand and affix 
tlie seal of said court, at Greencastle, this 21st 
day of October, 1S31. 

" A. McGauguey, ClerkP 
The seals used by Clerk McGaughey were not ink scrolls, but 
stamped impressions. Mr. Marvin has not practiced any since the 
writer came here in 1S63, and probably had not for a number of 
years before. He is much interested in the study of astronomy, 
and has some theories of his own which he has talked of publish) no-. 
Let us now turn to the present active members of the bar. I 
will unme them in the order of the dates of their admission. All 
were admitted to the bar, for the first time, .at Danville. It gives 
me pleasure to say that I believe tl-em to be as reliable and honor- 
able, both in their professional and private lives, as are the members 
of any bar in the State. For legal learning and natural ability I 
believe they will compare favorably with the bar of any mere 
county seat in the State. I liave no hesitation in saying that their 
clients need have no fears but that their business will be faithfully 
attended to. ' -. 

Joseph S. Miller, born Sept. 11, 1S26, in Ilighlaud County, 
Ohio. Came with his parents to Hendricks County in April, lS3o. 
They removed to Danville in December following. He read law 
at Danville in the office of William C. Wilsou, now of Lafayette, 
Ind., and was admitted to the bar in Danville, Nov. 20, ISoO, and 
has been in practice there ever since. In December, IS^iS, he was 
appointed Prosecuting Attorney for the counties of Hendricks, 
Marion and Johnson, by Conrad Baker, Lieutenant-Governor, act- 
ing as Governor, to fill a vacancy. At the next ensuing election 
he was elected to that place for a term of two years. He was 
married to Miss Ellean Patty on t^^e 16th day of November, ISIS 
and after her death ho was married to Miss Jane Fletcher, both of 
Hendricks County. He has four childien. On the 20th day of 
April, 1861, he enlisted in Company A, Seventh Regiment Indiana 
Volunteers, under the call for three-moudis men, and was the first 
27 



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422 



HISTORY OF HENDEICKS COUNTY. 



man in Hendricks County to volunteer. He raised the company, 
which was the only company raised in Hendricks Conuty for the 
three-months service, and was commissioned as Second Lieutenant, 
and served as such until the expiration of the term of enlistment. 
In politics he is a Republican, and it is worthy of mention that lie 
was a delegate from Indiana in the convention at Philadelphia, Pa., 
in 1856, that nominated Fremont for President. He has been 
longer in the practice of law than any man in Danville. He is not 
a member of any church. ' ,. • 

Leandek M. Campbell was born in Mason County, Ky., Feb. 
12, 1S33. His education was obtained in the country schools. He 
read law books and taught school alternately for several years, and 
spent one winter in the law office of his brother, T. C. Campbell, 
at Maysville, Ky. He came to Hendricks County in the winter of 
1S52. He taught school in the south part of the county for a while, 
and was admitted to the bar in Danville, April 7, 1854, where he 
has practiced law ever since. He was elected Prosecuting Attorney 
for the counties of Hendricks and Putnam for a term of two years. 
Eo salary was paid the Prosecuting Attorney at that time. His 
compensation depended solely on fees received for convictitins. 
For one year he was in partnership with John V. Hadley, in the 
law. He is now State Senator for the counties of Hendricks and 
Putnam, having been elected to that position in ISSi. Ho is 
married and has two grown daughters, one of whom is the wife; of 
Attorney Thad. S. Adams. The other is unmarried and is study- 
ing painting, favorable notices of lier work having appeared from 
time to time in the press. Mr. Campbell states that he has not 
missed attendance at any term of court since his admission to ;he 
bar. He is a Republican in politics. Does not belong to any 
church. 

Charles Foley was born Jan. 3, 1S3.5, at Indianapolis, Ind. His 
mother died in the fall of 1839, he being the only surviving child. 
In the spring of 18-13 his father removed to a farm four miles north 
of the city, near where Crown Hill Cemetery now is, where he staid 
most of the time until he attained his majority. He attended the 
neighborhood schools some of winters, they being typical schools 
of the rural districts of Indiana of those days, the Marion Coui ty 
Seminary some, and Hanover College the first year of the scien- 
tific course. He spent two winters teaching in Hendricks County, 
and in the spring of 1857 started to the West with an outfit of sur- 
veyor's instruments, and after visiting iSTebraska and Iowa located 



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HISTORT OF HENDRICKS COUXTi'. 



423 






in Harrison County, Mo., where he followed survejing and teach- 
ing until the breaking out of the war in 1861, when he went to 
Indianapolis, Ind., and entered the law ofHce of the late Horatio 0. 
Neweomb and John S. Tarkington, as a student, and in the spring 
of 1S63 located at Danville to practice law. He was admitted to 
the bar at the next ensuins: term, the August term, 1863, of the 
Hendricks Circuit Court, and has practiced there continuously ever 
since, except during 100-days service in the summer of 1864, as a 
private in Company H, One Hundred and Tliirtj-'Second Regiment 
Indiana Volunteers. In the fall of 1863 he formed a partnership 
with the late Simon T. Hadley in the practice of the law, which 
continued until the spring of 1864, when he enlisted in the above- 
named service. On his return from the serrlce he occupied a room 
for several years as an office with Mr. Hadley, without being in 
partnership. He was married Jan. 31, 1867, to Miss Eliza Ann 
Leach, of Pittsboro, Hendricks County. Tiiey have one child, a 
boy, in his ninth year. He is a Republican in politics. His anti- 
slavery views atid the fact that he had been a Republican candi- 
date for Presidential Elector in Missouri, in 1860, hastened his 
exit from that State. He does not belong to any church. 

John V. Hadlet was born Oct. 31, 1839, in Hendricks County, 
was educated in the common schools of the county. Enlisted Aug. 
20, 1861, in Company B, Seventh Indiana Volunteers. He served 
until Feb. 22, ISGo. He participated in a number of battles, no- 
tably Port Republic, the second battle of Bull Run, where he 
received a flesh wound, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg aud the Wil- 
derness, beside minor engagements. On the 5th day of May, 1864, 
he was taken prisoner at the battle of the Wilderness. He seems 
to have gone the rounds of the rebel prisons, for he was an inmate 
of prisons in Virginia, Georgia and South Carolina. He escaped 
with some other prisoners Xov. 4, 1864, and after much hardship 
and many exciting adventures he and party reached tbe Union 
forces at Knoxville, Tenn., Dec. 10 following. He was dis- 
charged at "WashingtOQ City. He read law in Danville, was ad- 
mitted to the bar in June, 1866, and has been in the practice at 
that place ever since, having been in partnership with Leander M. 
Campbell, Jesse S. Ogden (now f eceased), Richard B. Blake and 
Enoch G. Hogate. In the winter of 1884 the firm of Hadley, Ho- 
gate & Blake was dissolved, and Mr. Hadlej is now alone. In the 
early part of his professional career he varied the monotony of 
waiting for clients by writing a pamphlet of his prison life and 



I I. 



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I, • • ■ 



42i 



HISTORY OF HENDKICKS COUNTY. 



experiences in making his escape, which had a good sale in tlio 
county. He was married March 1.5, 1S65, to Miss Mary J. Hill, 
of Hendricks County. They have three children. He owns a 
large farm and takes much interest in Hereford cattle, with which 
he is experimenting. He is President of the Board of Directors 
of the First National Bank of Danville, and is a member of the 
Christian church. He is Republican in politics. 

Thomas J. Cofer was born Sept. 2, 1S39, in Hendricks County, 
and was reared on a farm four miles north of Danville. His edu- 
cation was mostly acquired at the district school of the neighbor- 
hood. He enlisted as a private in Company K, Sixteenth Regi- 
ment Indiana Volunteer Infantry for one year, and served until the 
expiration of the term of enlistment. Being in Washington City 
and not in service, on the 23d day of May, 1SG2, he went to 
Fredericksbflrg, Va., on a visit to the Seventh Regiment Indiana 
Volunteers. The next day he went with the regiment to the 
Shenandoah Valley and remained there until June 9, 1S62, in the 
meantime participating in the battle of Port Republic, at which 
he was wounded and taken prisoner by the rebels. From thence 
he was taken to various rebel prisons, and was paroled in Decem- 
ber, 1S62. lie then came back to Hendricks County. He re-en- 
listed in the fall of 1863 in Company I, Ninth Indiana Cavalry, 
becoming First Lieutenant and afterward Captain, and served until 
Sept. S, 186-5, when he was finally discharged. He returned again 
to Hendricks County and engaged in the dry -goods trade, at which 
he continued until the year 1S72, when he was admitted to the bar 
in Danville, at which place and business he has continued ever 
since. He was elected Prosecuting Attorney in the fall of 1872, 
and served for the term, two years. Since his term of ofKce ex- 
pired he has served four years as Deputy Prosecutor. He is now 
in partnership with Newton M. Taylor, in the practice of law. He 
was married Nov. 9, 1S6.5, to Mary S. Seearce, daughter of William 
Scearce, a neighbor of his father's. The}' have two children, girls, 
living. In politics he is a Republican. He does not belong to any 
church organization. 

Richard B. Blake was born in Hendricks County, Ind., ilarch 
14, 1850. He graduated in June, 1ST2, at Asbury, now De Pauw, 
University, at Greencastle, Ind. He was admitted to the bar in 
Danville, Oct. 16, 1872, ar.d has continued in the practice of law 
at that place ever since. He was elected Prosecuting Attorney 
for one term, serving from 1878 to ISSO. He is in partnership 



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HISTORY OF HENDEIUKS COUNXr. 



425 



with Enoch G. Hogate in the practice of law. He was married to 
Miss Antoinette E. Moore, of Danville, Dec. 22, IST-i. He has 
been a member of the Methodist Episcopal church about fourteen 
years, having joined while attending school at Greencastle. 

Enoch G. Hogate was born Sept. 16, 1S49, at Centerton, Salem 
Co., N. J. He graduated at Allegheny College, Meadville, Pa., 
in June, 1872. On the 16th day of October, 1S72, he was admitted 
to the bar in Danville, and has practiced law there continuously 
ever since. He is in partnership with Richard B. Blake. He was 
married May S, 1S73, to Miss Mary J. Matlock, of Danville, who 
died leaving him three children. He was married a second time, 
Aug. 10, ISSl, to Miss Anna C. Huston, of Danville. He has 
been a member of the Methodist Episcopal church since 1866. 

Newton M. Tatloe was born Oct. 3, 1847, at Attica, Fount- 
ain Co., Ind. Was educated in the public schools of that place 
and at Asbury University, at Greencastle, Ind., where he re- 
ceived the degree of Bachelor of Science in 1873. He read law 
for one year at Greencastle with Brown & Hanna, attorneys, and 
graduated at the Law School of the State University at Blooming- 
ton, Ind., in 1875, after a one-year course there. He served as a 
privafe in Company E, , One Hundred and Thirty-fifth -Regi- 
ment Indiana Volunteers, in the 100-days service, in the sum- 
mer of 1864. "Was married Aug. 11, 1875, to Miss Lu Ensey, 
of Annapolis, Parke Co., Ind.; removed to Danville immedi- 
ately, was admitted to the bar, where he has been in the prac- 
tice of the law ever since. He is now in partnership with Thomas 
J. Cofer. Was elected Prosecuting Attorney in the fall of 1880 for 
the Nineteenth Judicial Circuit for a term of two years. He has 
two children. Is a Republican in politics. Does not belong to any 
church, but is a Unitarian in faith. 

James 0. Parker was born 03t. 11, 1853, at Jonesville, Bar- 
tholomew Co., Ind. Received his education in the public schools. 
Read law in Danville and was admitted to the bar in 1876. 
Practiced , law until the year 1880, when he went into the dry- 
goods business with his father-in-law, William N. Crabb, in 
which business he continued until some time in 1881, when he be- 
came connected as editor and publisher, with The Hendricks 
County Republican, of which paper he finally became sole editor 
and publisher. He sold out the Repuhlican in April, 1885, to 
Messrs. Moffett & Riddle, and has resumed the practice of law. 
He is in partnersliip with James A. Downard in the law and ab- 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



Btracting titles. Mr. Parker was married to Miss Victoria J. 
Crabb, of Danville, on the 31st day of October, 1S77. They have 
two children. He is a member of the Methodist church. 

Thad. S. Adams was born Nov. 6, 1S53, in Hendricks County. 
Educated in the coiumon schools of the county. Read law in 
Danville and was admitted to the bar- at that place in the spring of 
187T. Was married May 6, 18S0, to Miss Effie Campbell, of Dan- 
ville, daughter of Attorney Leander M. Campbell. They have one 
child. Is Deputy Prosecuting Attorney for Hendricks County. 
Is Republican in politics. Does not belong to any church. 

James A. Downard was born Nov. 15, 1S.55, in Hendricks 
County. Attended the common schools and Butler University (at 
Irvington, Ind). He read law at Dani^llle and was admitted to the 
bar at that place in June, IS'TS. He is in the practice and is in part- 
nership with James 0. Parker in tlie Law and in abstracting titles 
and loaning funds. He was married May 22, 1884, to Miss Don- 
aldson, of Danville. He does not belong to any church and is a 
Republican. 

Murat "W. Hopeins was born' Oct. 20, 1857, in Hendricks 
County. "Was edncated in tlae common schools of the county. He 
graduated in tho Law Department of fche Iowa State University; 
located at Iowa City, State of Iowa, in June, 1881. Was admitted 
to the bar in Danville in September, ISSl. He was married April 
20, 1882, and has one child. He is a psirtner of Robert Ilollowell 
in the practice of law. Is a member of the Christian or Disciples' 
church. He is a Democrat in politics. 

George W. Brill was born in Hendiicks County, Dec. 16, 1859. 
Received his education in the common schools of the county and 
at the Central Normal College at Danville. Read law in Danville 
and was admitted to the bar at that pbaee in June, 1883, where he 
has since been engaged in the practtce. He is a Democrat in 
politics. Does not belong to any churcSi, and is not married. 

Cassius Clay Hadley was born in Hendricks County- He at- 
tended the common schools of the c«>unty, the Central Normal 
School at Danville, and Butler University at Irvington, Ind. He 
read,law in Danville, and was admitted to the bar in June, 1883. 
On the dissolution of the la-v firm of Hadley, Hogate & Blake, 
in February, 1885, he became clerk to Mr. Hadley, of that firm, in 
which capacity he is now engaged. Is a Republican in politics, 
and a member of the Christian church. Is not married. 

Robert HoLLOWELLwas bora Jan. 6, 1858, in Parke County, Ind. 



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HISTORY OF HEXDiilCKS COUNXr. 



42T 



Was educated at the coinmoii schools of the county. Read law 
some in Danville, and graduated in the Law Department of the 
State University of Michigan in the spring of 1883. Was admitted . 
to the bar in Danville in September, 1883. Is a partner in the 
practice of law with ilurat W. Hopkins. Is a Republican in 
politics. He is not married. 

George C. Harvey was born in Rockville, Parke Co., Ind. At- 
tended Wabash College four years. Read law in Danville, and 
was admitted to the bar there in September, ISSi. Is now in the 
practice. He is the Corporation Clerk. His father was killed at 
the battle of Shiloh, April 6, 1862, as Captain of Company 1, 
Thirty-first Indiana Volunteers. He is not married, belongs to no 
church, and is a Republican. 



^^^ 




— < 

V 



CHAPTER VIII. 



THE PRESS. 



G' 

"7 



Impkovements in Journalism, and Increase in its Power. — Early 
Papers in Hendricks Cohntt. — Papers at Danville, Plain- 
field AND North Salem. — Journals now Published. — Sketches 
OF THE Editors. 

In the development of modern civilization there is no more 
potent factor than the newspaper, and, at the same time, there 
has been no e;reater pfogre.^s in anything for fifty years past 
than in American journalism. Fifty years ago the country had 
few newspapers that could be considered paying property. The 
metropolitan journals devoted about as much space to foreign as 
to domestic news, while country weeklies seemed to consider that 
•which happened at home as of no importance whatever, and imitated 
the larger papers in style and contents. The telegraph and railroads, 
assisted by that enterprising spirit which is inseparably connected 
with successful journalistic management, have wrought most grat- 
ifying results. Local ne.vs has become the main feature of weekly 
country newspapers, and all journals of the better class are fore- 
most in adraucing the bust interests of the localities fromlwhich 
their support comes. 

In Hendricks County, journalism has kept pace in the march of 
improvement with other professions and industries. The wide 
circulation of the papers at present published, and the large 
number of outside pape.-s that are taken here, 'afford the best 
possible evidence that th3 people are intelligent, enterprising and 
progressive. In Danvilbj alone 200 copies of the Indianapolis 
papers are distributed every day. 

Although many able writers have been employed upon the 

county press in former years, without disparagement to any of 

them, it can safely be asserted, that the journals of the count_;, 

taken as a whole, were never better conducted than at present. 

The editors are gentlemen who understand their business thor- 

onghly, and do their utmost to give their patrons good, clean, 

reliable newspapers. 

(428) 



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I 



HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



429 



Journalism in this county is not jet forty years old. In the 
spring of 1846 the Danville Advertiser was established, with 
Joseph Graham as publisher and Dr. H. G. Todd (still residing 
at Danville) as editor. Dr. Todd and several other public-spir- 
ited citizens bougiit tlie press for Mr. Graham, in order to secure 
a paper here. The Advertiser was a six-column folio, and com- 
posed almost entirely of reading matter, there being few adver- 
tisements. It was Whig in politics, and, indeed, it was founded 
purely in the interest of the "Whig party, for which it continued 
to act as an organ during the entire period of its existence. After 
a few years it changed hands, and fur a time it had a checkered 
career, iiaving various owners and being issued under several 
different names snccfssively, but remaining of the same political 
faith. 

In 1856 it ajjpeared as theD anville Republican, under which 
title it was issued continuously until the' spring of 1864. A]iril 
23, of that year, the first number of the iZ^/i^^/'jc/t.s County Union 
was published by W. P. Gregg & Co. It was an uncomi^romis- 
ing war pa]>er, and had, flying at its mast head as a motto, the 
words, "To preserve the Union soldiers must vote at elections as 
well as fight in the field." The name " Union " was selected in 
preference to tlio former name of ''Republican," in order to gain 
the support of the war Democrats, which it succeeded, to some 
extent, in doing. It was ably edited, and was a success from the 
start. It continued under tiie management of the above firm, till 
July 14 of the same year, when Colonel Lawrence S. Shuler, a 
gallant soldier, became sole proprietor, with Colonel James M. 
Gregg as editor, and Gid. B. Thompson in charge of the local de- 
parttnent and assistant in the business management. 

Colonel Shuler continued to publish tlie paper until April 20, 
1865, when he sold it to James L. Singer, who became editor 
and publisher, and roimiincd as proprietor of the ]iaper until March 
15, 1866, when John X. Seearc3 bought the office and became 
"editor and proprietor." Mr. Scearce continued at the helm of 
the Union for over thirteen years, changing the name in 1ST4 to 
the Danville Union. Under hi.m the paper pros|iered and was 
for most of the time on a good paying basis. During a part of 
his administration Dr. A. Furnas was agricultural editor, and con- 
tributed largely to the value and interest of the paper. In 18G6 
O. H. Smith was educational editor. Jan. 2, 1879, Mr. Scearce 
Bold the Union to J. E. Sherrill, who had begun the publication 



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HISTOKY OF UENDEICKS iloijNTV. 



of the Danville Repuhlicaii. Mr. Sherrill merged the Union 
into the Hepuhlican, but the new paper was of short lite. Jan. 
30, 1S79, less than one month after the suspension of the Danville 
Union^ another Hendricks County Union came into existence. 

-The new fiim was South, Hathaway & Co., and the paper at 
once struck the public favorably, there being something of an ad- 
vantage in the old name, " Union." In a few weeks Mr. Sherrill 
sold his Re-publican office and business to the new Union firm, S. 
F. Wishard and Jim B. Greene being added to the same. A. G. 
South soon left the firm, and in a few months Mr. Qreene retired, 
the paper being continued by Hathaway & "Wishard. Aug. 4 of 
the same year Mr. Wishard sold his share to John K. Rankin, 
and Hathaway & Rankin wore the proprietors till Nov. 7, when 
O. H. Smith bought Mr; Rankin out, and Hathaway & Smith 
were then the publishers, while Mr. Smith became editor. In 
December, ISSO, Mr. Smith i)0Ught R. F. Ilathaway's share of the 
paper, and became editor and proprietor. Feb. 11, 1882, he sold 
to Parker & Bowen, of the Repuhlican, who continued to issue 
the Union from their office for about two months, on account of 
certain advertising contracts. 

These gentlemen had, Oct. 13, 1881, started the Ilendrichs 
County Repuhlican, which is now the Republican paper of Dan- 
ville. Feb. 10, 1SS3, Mr. Bowen sold his interest in the ofiiee to 
William N. Crabb, and the paper was published by Crabb & 
Parker, with Mr. Parker as editor and manager until the mouth of 
April, 1SS5. After Mr. Bo^ven's departure Samuel F. Wishard 
was local editor for one yea •. In March, lSS-4, Mr. Bowen re- 
turned to the paper, with which he was connected as local editor 
until April, 18S.5. In this month Crabb & Parker sold to the 
present proprietors, Mofl'ett & Riddle. 

The Repuhlican has the same heading and size (30 x 44, six- 
column quarto) as when first published. It is all printed at home, 
on the first successful steam press ever brought into the county. 
It is uniformly Republican in politics, but claims to be indepen- 
dent in everything else. Tlie job-printing department is a profit- 
able one, as one man is emT)loyed constantly on job and press 
work. The Rep^ublica.)), whi "h had not a subscriber when its first 
issue was printed, now has a circulation of 1,600. 

This completes the record of Whig and Republican journalism 
in Danville, except t'lat two papers have been moved, there from 
Plainfield, botli named the Progress. The first was in ISTTjby John 



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HISTORY OF HENDRirKS COUNTY. 



431 



N. Vestal, ■who suspended after six months, and the second occa- 
sion was in May, 1SS3, when George V. Mechlcr made a like vent- 
ure. He, too, soon lost money, and gave it up. 

The opposite political faith has been represented by several pa- 
pers, all at Danville. The first bore the enterprising title of the 
Butcher Knife, and was founded in 1856 by George Gregg. It 
lived four years, arid then died out, in the midst of the strong Un- 
ion sentiments which pervaded the community at the opening of 
the war. 

The V>'i.xw\\\& Indian'mn was esti.blished in 1S70 by parties hail- 
ing from Greensburg. Soon afte-, it became the property of a 
stock company, and then for a time it was in charge of Dr. Hag- 
gart, who was followed bj' two brothers named Hay. In 1S72 the 
office was purchased byC. N. Walls, who retnained in control un- 
til the fall of 1875, when the ofiice aud material were sold and sent 
to Illinois. 

In February, 1878, E. D. King founded the Democrat^ remain- 
ing editor and publisher until Au(;nst, 1879, building up an influ- 
ential and profitable paper. At tl e latter date mentioned, he sold 
to M. A. Barnett, who in turn c osed out his office in October, 
ISSl, to J. 0. Parker, of the Rej. ublican, E. D. King, having re- 
turned from a year's absence in Colorado and founded, Sept. 15, 
1380, the Ilendriclcs Counts/ Gazette, which is now the Democratic 
paper of the county, and one of tii 3 leading country journals of the 
State. Launched in the midst of ;. presidential campaign,- the Ga- 
zette at once assumed a leading and influential position. Its editor 
was indicted for libel under the Grubbs law, but so transparent 
was the action of the partisan grand jury that Mr. King was never 
brought to trial, the judge quashing the indictment and throwing 
the case out of court. 

In August, 1SS2, Mr. King retired froiii the Gazette, and it 
passed through various controls, till Aug. 1, ISS-t, when its pres- 
ent proprietor, Will A. King, with John W. Cravens, purchased 
the good will and business. The lattergentleman in a few naonths 
resumed the mercantile business, and Mr. King became sole pro- 
prietor. He is a practical newspaper man, having been connected 
with his father as co-publisher :)f the Gazette at its commence- 
ment. There are probably few county papers that surpass the Ga- 
zette in- circulation and influence. It is conducted in a conserva- 
tive manner that gives influence to its sayings, and as a paper of 
local standing, it receives a large patron.age from political oppo- 



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HISTOET OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



nents over the county. Its subscription price is $1.50, and its cir- 
culation is between 1,200 and 1,500. In the spring of 1SS5 it be- 
came financially embarrassed, and at present writing its future is 
uncertain. 

Plainficld has had several papers, the first being Once a Week, 
founded by John A. Deem, in 1SG2. This was suspended after a 
short time. It was afterward revived by John N. Vestal, who 
gave it the name of the Citizen, and published it for some time. 
He then sold it to Charles S. McNichols, who issued a paper for a 
while under the name of the Tribune. 

George V. Mechler, Nov. 11, 18S0, issued the first number of the 
Plainfield Progress, which he ran suceessfally two or three years. 
Though a Democrat himself, he published it as an Independeut 
sheet (being in a strong Republican locality) and was very success- 
ful. In fact, he became, so to speak, too prosperous, and in May, 
1S83, removed to Danville, to compote with the journals at the 
county seat. This was a disastrous step to him, and he was soon 
obliged so suspend. Immediately after his removal Horace G. 
Douglass and J. A. Fullen commenced the issue of a paper under 
the old name of the Plainfield Progress. But two weeks passed 
between the two papers, Messrs. Douglass & Fullen issuing their 
first number May 31, 1SS3. i\Ir. Fullen shortly withdrew, going 
West, wlience he has, however, returned. Douglass retained con- 
trol until May 12, 1SS4, when he obtaiiseJ au appointment at the 
Reform School, and sold the oflice to A. T. Harrison, the present 
editor and proprietor. The Progress was at first a five-column 
quarto, but was soon increased in size to six columns. It was po- 
litically independent, under Mr. Douglass, but Mr. Harrison has 
made it a Republican sheet. It is not rigidly partisan. The Prog- 
ress has made a general circulation m the southern part of 
Hendricks County, and in adjacent parts of Marion and Morgan 
counties. 

North Salem is the only other village in the county that has been 
blessed with a printing office. J. J. and H. E. Heniion came from 
Eochedale, Putnam County, in July, ISS-t, and until March, 18S5, 
published regularly the North Saleni Reporter, a six-column 
quarto, independent in politi'^s. In the month last mentioned 
the Messrs. Hennon returned to Rochedale. 

Jesse W. Riddle, of the Pejnihlican, was born in Perry County, 
Ind., July 31, ISOl, the son of James H. and Catharine (Goad) 
Riddle. The father is still living,a farmer ofPerry County. Jesse 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



43c 



was reared on the paternal farm, and received a good English edu- 
cation, first in the district schools and then in the Centra] Xormal 
College, of Danville, wliere he graduated in June, 18S3. He then 
followed teaching for two years at Pittsboro, this countj, when in 
April, ISSo, he entered upon journalism bj purchasing a half in- 
terest in the Ecjmilican. 

Will A. King, editor and proprietor of the Gazette, was born in 
Cincinnati, Ohio, May 5, lS6i, and is the oldest of the children 
now living of E. D. and R. A. King. At an early age he entered 
the printing office of his father, and became a thorough workman 
in the ''art preservative of all arts." His father is an editor of 
over thirty-years e.xperience, and under his careful guidance the 
son not only acquired the mechanical knowledge of the business 
but became thoroughly competent to assume any position connected 
with the newspaper office. In 1SS2 he became co-publisher with 
his father in founding the GazetU^o? which he is now the sole 
head. His conduct of the paper is highly commended bv men of 
all parties. It wields a strong iafluence in its partv, and lias a 
circulation and advertising patroi age largely above tlie averao-e of 
county papers throughout the Stace. Mr. King is unmarried.'' 

Arthur T. Harrison, editor and proprietor of the Flainfield 
Progress, was born June 1, 1858, in Cliesterfield, Madison Co., 
Ind., the son of John A. and Nancy E. (Diltz) Harrison. The 
father was a school-teacher for a number of years, but, removing 
to Anderson (the county seat) in 1859, he practiced law there until 
his health failed, a few years since. His wife died in 1SG3. Mr. 
Harrison was the leading lawyer in his county, and one of the 
ablest and best-known members cf the legal profession in Indiana 
He was a liard worker, and popular with all who knew him He 
was Prosecuting Attorney fron 1S62 to 1SG6, two terms, and 
was a candidate for Eepreaentative in 1S59; but, as a rule, he 
avoided politics. The son alter ded school at Anderson from' his 
fifth to his fourteenth year, and tlien served two years as an ap- 
prentice to the printer's trade o i the Anderson Herald. A term 
at school was succeeded by six months more on the Herald. At 
the earnest request of his fatlier. he then entered the latter's office 
to study law. He was soon thrcvn upon. his own resources, owino. 
to his father's failure in health. He was admitted to the bar in 
June, 1,879, and to practice befcre the Supreme Court in ISSO on 
motion of Judge Walter March, of Muncie. He then practiced 
law in Madison County until March, 1883, the last year in part 



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HISTOEY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



nersliip with J. F. McClure. His incliaatioas all tlie time led Iiim 
toward journalism, and during lS7S-'9 Le was local editor of the 
Madison Herald. In March, 1SS3, he went to Bement, 111., where 
for nine weeks he ran the Gazette for the owner. Returning to 
Muncie, he worked on the Dally JSlews until May, 1SS4, when he 
came to Plainfleld and purchased the office, business and good 
will of the Progress, which he has since very creditably conducted. 
Mr. Harrison was married Sept.^ll, 18S3, at Mooresville, Morgan 
County, to Miss Clara Davis, daughter of Joshua M. and Rachel 
(Demoss) Davis. In politics Mr. Harrison is a zealous Republi- 
can. He and wife are active members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 




Hi, 






CHAPTER IX. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Educational.— Progkessin-Methodsaxd Ideas.— The Schools of 
Hendricks County.— Central Normal College.— Pu^^lic 
BoiLDiNGs.— Reform School at Plainfield.— Old Settleks' So- 
ciety.— AoRicuLTrRAL Statistics.- Agricultural Societies.- 
Hendricks County Medical Society. 

" That people which has the best books and the best schools is 
the best people; if it is not so to-daj, it will be so to-morrow » 
These words, from the pen of the French educator and itatesman ' 
Jules Simon, deserve to become a household quotation the world 
over, for no more potent nor. expressive truth was ever uttered 
Of course all progress and education is not derived from the studv 
of books, and as Ilosea Ballou hac; said, "Education commences at 
the mother's knee," and every word spoken within the bearinc^ of 
little children tends toward the formation of character; but at 
the sarae'time no other one agency is so powerful as the common 
school in developing a nation of self-governing people. 

The citizens of this county feel a just pride^in their progress in 
educational methods, which have fully kept pace with the advance 
ment in wealth and the development of material resources ' As 
soon as the county was sufficiently setth;d to enable any neighbor- 
hood to open a school, a school-house was provided and the services 
of a teacher secured. Often a room of a private house was occupied" 
and sometimes the deserted cabin of a squatter became a tempo- 
rary school-room, in whicli tlie old-time masters, who worked on 
the tuition plan, flourished the rod and taught the rudiments of 
reading, writing and arithmetic. The first school-houses built 
were structures of the rudest kind, such as no pioneer would be 
content to occupy as a dwellin r. Built of logs, with floors and 
benches of punclieons, witli a huge fireplace and a stick and mud 
chimney, they were little calculated for comfort or convenience 
Window-glass was too expensive an article to be used in the con' 
struction of a school-house, and therefore greased paper was 

(435) 









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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTi'. 



substituted for it. The writing desk was a notable feature in every 
school-room. It generally extended across one end or one side of 
the room, and was made of a slab, held in its place by wooden 
pins. For architectural effect, probably, certainly not for conven- 
ience, it was fastened high up on the wall, and the pupil, in order 
to use it, must climb upon a high wooden bench and sit there 
without a support for his back or his feet. 

Of the qualiiications of the teachers of those davs, the less said 
the better. Many were accounted good teachers who, in these 
days, would be nnable to secure a certificate even of the third 
grade. Yet the most of them put to the best use the little talent 
and less training they had, and succeeded in planting o-ood seeds 
in the minds of tlieir pupils. Some of the best minds this county 
has produced were those of men whose whole school education was 
received in the log school-houses of the pioneer days. 

The progress of education here is only a miniature reproduction 
of what has taken place more slowly among all civilized nations. 
In recent years improved methods of meiitHl culture have aided 
the teachers in securing better results. The primary object of edu- 
cating children is not that they may escape labor thereby, but that 
they may labor more intelligently. Children should be taught 
that employment leads to happiness, indolence to misery, and that 
all trades and professions whereby an honest livelihood is main- 
tained are honorable. R-.ght living is the end to be achieved, and 
it is the workers that do die 'most good in the world. The man 
who constantly and intelligently ^thinks, is above temptation. 
The women who honorably labor in the various trades are to be pre- 
ferred and honored above those who sit with folded hands. It is 
education that makes duty more apparent, lessens toil and sweetens 
life. It is by true education that the moral responsibilities of the 
human family are better understood. 

Methods are now sought for and followed in the school-room. 
The child's capacity and character are better understood now than 
in the pioneer days. The red is laid aside, ajul children are no 
longer forced under the lash to order and apparent studiousness. 
Fretful and cruel teachers are giving way to those who love chil- 
dren, and again will mfnkiud draw nearer to the millenniurL 
through the influence of t.ie law of love. In this age better at- 
tention is paid to hygieno and ventilation in the school-room. 
Houses are lighted, airet' and warmed in a rational manner. 
Since the introduction of the "automatic " school desks tiiere need 



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437 



be no more disagreeable seating in our school-rooms. Tiie inventor 

In' H r. Jr^^'-^^^-'i -^ t''« blessings of the countless 
thousand J healthy men and women who, in this generation, as 
chddren, are comfortably seated in many of our best schools 
_ New and better studies have been added to the course of'studv 
in our common schools within the last decade. Now, the child 
IS taught to apply what he learns, directing his course of study 
in the line of us mental activity, cultivating the good, and re- 
sh-aiuing the evil propensities. Tlie time was, not far back, when 
only a hmited knowledge of '"reading, 'riting and 'rithmetic," 
could be acquired m the common schools. The highest aim of 
the youth^ot the pioneer days was to write a fair hand, spel 
oia ly, and solve mathematical puzzles. This age is movinc. in a 
better educational sphere. The change was of course gradual 
It was a long struggle of ignorance and bigotry against education' 
in which the latter has been crowned the victor, lut few teac ler^ 
chng to the old theory. Little by little they are growin. aw" 
from the old system. A few tea<.hers, who do not^impro^ve are 
yet voanes at the shrine of their ido!s-the birch, the dunce-can 
and otlier old fashioned methods. But, "uncecap 

"Too weak tlie sacr;d shrine to guard," 

they must soon yield to the new education, and enter the conflict 
agamst error and for a better edu .-ational life. 

In this struggle tor better methods, opinions covered with a-^e 
and honors have been marched oif tlie stage of human action and 

npp.anted by facts and principles which have cost years of toil 
to discover, and more years to establish. To the close student' 
and observer tins theory is now only in its application to our 
schools. It is the normal or natural method. This is the theory 
ot education that antedates all others. The ancients tauHit by 
objects when but few of the ,nost wealthy men of that daj" coulJ 
afiord books. _ In fact, text-book knowledge is a new thing to the 
world. The nrst teachers gave instruction orally. They were, by 
the force of c.rcumstances, independent of text-books To this 
excellent plan has been added th3 written method. Then it was 
principally by observation that mpils received instruction By 
placing the objects before the puj.ils tiie teacher could easily 'reach 
heir m.nds by his lectures. In this age blackboards, spelling- 
tablets, slates, cliarts and other school apparatus is in general u°e 
in our best schools. In the schools of to-day, it is through the 




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HISTOKY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



eye that a mental picture is for tried from the printed page which 
children draw upon paper or boards from the ends of their fingers. 
Well qualified teachers do not think of depending upon text-books 
at their recitations, but rather imitate the ancient normal methods. 
In order to meet the demand for better qualified teacliers, normal 
training schools have been established in this and other States. 
The teachers', institute is also an outgrowth of the demand for 
teachers of a higher standard. Now, true education is admitted 
to be the drawing-out and developicg of that which the child 
already possesses, instead of the old crowding theory of pioneer 
days. 

There is perhaps no question which can so deeply interest the 
people of a county as that of obtaining teachers of known and 
tried ability. In the period of tlie early settlement of this 
county almost any one could teach. That time, with all of its 
rude school appliances, has rolled a'::-ray. The claims of to- t. 
can no longer be met by appliances of even a decade ago, for ex- 
perience is beginning to show tliat teaching, like every other de- 
partment of human thought and activity, must change with the 
onward movements of society, or fall in the rear of civilization 
and become an obstacle to impro-rement. The educational 
problem of to-day is to obtain usefal knowledge — to secure the 
practical part of education before the ornamental, and that in the 
shortest time. An intellectual life of the highest culture is what 
is called for in a free conntry like ours. An intelligent man is 
better qualified for any of the duties of life than an uneducated 
person. This is an admittea fact. In truth, a free nation's safety 
is wrapped in tlie intelligence of its citizens. Only an educated 
people can long sustain a free republic ; therefore it is the duty 
of the State to educate that her free institutions may stand through 
all ages as sacred and endeared monuments of the enlightened 
people. 

Education sweetens and hedges in the family circle and drives 
away frivolity and gossip from a community, protecting the 
members from the inroads of vice a'ld immorality'. It is the 
strong bulwark of educatioi' that binds the nation of 56,000,000 
people together for advancement that she may shine in the near 
future the brightest star in the constellation of governments. 
Rapid strides have been made in education within the last half 
century, but the field of improvement is yet boundless, and the 






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439 



wort <)f education must still go on, and make perhaps greater 
changes than those from the time when 

"The sacred seer witli scientific truth 
In Grecian temples taught the attentive youth ^ 
With ceisless change, how restless atoms pass 
From life to life, a transmigrating mass," 

to that of to-dav, when men's thoughts are directed to the inves- 
tigation of wliat they see around them. 

THE SCHOOLS OF ItENDEICKS COUNTY. 
BY T. K. GILLELAKD. ' 

If the different conditions of society in different countries, and 
the different parts of. the same country, and of different individ- 
uals in the same community are the result of chance, then the 
study of history can do no good r,nd can only have for its object 
the mere gratification of idle curiosity. 

But if these are not the resuk of chance, tlien the events and 
facts of history, whether they ccmcern individuals, communities 
or nations, must be the consequence of antecedent causes and are 
the developments of time, depending upon a fixed law. 

This being true, we are able, tlirough a knowledge of tlie past, 
to provide,- in a degree, for the contingencies of the future. 
Therefore a clear insight into th3 past is the b'est view we can get 
of the future. 

Herein is the value of history, which should be known, because 
whatsoever happened aforetime happened for our instruction. 

During the last generation the leading conflict was one of 
muscle ; during the next, it will be a conflict of thought- 

The early pioneers of Hendricks County laid wisely and well 
the foundation upon which faturo society was to bo builded. They 
fully realized that in such a country as this their scattered 
numbers would by natural growt i and immigration soon become a 
teeming population, and that by ":heir strong arms and strong/aith 
in the future, this howling wilderness would ere long bo changed 
into a fruitful field of harvest, and that their struggles with'nature's 
obstacles^ for the benefit of posterity would bring to their chil- 
dren wealth and leisure, which must cause tliem to forsake the 
simple lives and frugal habits of their fathers and mothers, and 
live far different lives, and eng.ige in very different pursuits and 
avocations, in which without education and moral training they 
could never be successful. They also believed and acted upon the 



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HISTOKY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



idea tliat the most valuable entailment which any people can leave 
to posterity is intelligence and virtue. 

No better class of emigrants ever peopled a new country 
than those who made the first settlement in Elendricks County in 
the year 1S20. 

Of the early schools and school-houses many interestino- remi- 
niscences are told. Beech was the educational timber of the times- 
out'; of tlie trunks were built the school-houses, ar.d limbs in 
the hands of the teachers furnished the unanswerable argument in 
most cases of discipline, and served to brighten the ideas and 
quicken the thoughts of dull pupils of both sexes. The housos 
were the log cabins, sometimes without floors ; a huge fire-piaoc 
in one end jf the house in which was kept a burning log herp 
supplied the heat. The windows were made by sawing out a Icr 
from one side of the house and placing in the openi[ig a ruce 
- sash ; oiled paper was used in the windows as a substitute k'V 
glass. The writing desks were made of slabs and laid upon pii 3 
driven in the walls of the hut. The seats were made of puncheon, 
backks=, with legs so long tliat a child's feet were never per- 
mitted to touch the floor. The teacher's emblem of wrath, when 
not in use, lay upon two pins in the wall near the teacdier's chair. 
The teacher was usually master of the situation in everjthinj 
except the subjects which he was required to teach, and many ,1 
venturesome youth came to grief for reaching a little bevond th ) 
teacher's ken in the scholastic field. 

In the summer of 1S3.3. less than three years from the time thi- 
first ripe ear of corn was gathered by civilized hand in Hendrick:; 
County, two schoohhouses had been built, one of them in Liberty 
Township, half a mile south of Cartersburg, and the other, or. 
Thomas Loekhart's land in Guilford Township, and William Hin- 
ton (t!ie writer's uncle) and Abijah Pinson were engaged, in the 
work to whicli Hendricks County owes her greatness. In this way. 
in every neighborhood, the earliest settlers made the best possible 
provisiqn for the education of their children, and every winter in 
the rude log cabin, with its greased paper windows, its dirt or 
split puncheon floor, its rough hewn benches, and its huge log- 
heap fire, the pioneer teacher had his flock of eager learners around 
him. 

And, looking back from this period to that time it seems, from 
what we know they accomplished, 'that greater eflTurts very nearly 
made up for their want of educational facilities. 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTi'. 



441 



A day's work in scliool tlien was not five hours, but from sun-np 
till sun-down. Right or wrong, it is impossible to make an old man 
see that greater progress was not made bj pupils under tliis old 
regime than at present. 

From that day until this, with the development of the country, 
the moral and educational interests have moved onward, until to- 
day it may be said that our school system is the greatest success of 
any public enterprise. 

Tlie schools ran along on^about the same pod-auger style which 
prevailed from the beginning until about 1S70, wlien there was an 
awakening and a looking up which burst into a blaze of enthusi- 
asm in '73, when the county snperintendenc}' was instituted. At 
that time imperfect classification was all the organization which it 
was thought possible to accomplish in the district schools. But 
aboutybiw of our teachers had ever received normal training, and 
these but a term or two. Gradation and a course of study had not 
been dreamed about. These two things and normal-trained teach- 
ers and their selection by the officials and not by the rabble were 
the four beacon lights which our most efficient County Superin- 
tendent, J. A. C. Dobson, believed in and worked for during his 
ten years of service, and I feel that I may say he has been justified 
by his faith througli his works. 

A higher course of study has been adopted by the county board 
for pupils who have completed the common-school course. 

Graduation from the common-school course has been so much 
encouraged and materially increased by the skillful manipulation 
of A. E. Rogers, the present Superintendent, that last year there 
were seventy graduates. 

The last log school-house disappeared from Hendricks County 
more than twenty years ago. 

There are in the county lOS school buildings, or three more than 
one for every four square miles. 

Of these buildings fifcy-four are brick and the others are frame; 
some of them are elegant buildings; all can be made comfortable 
in any kind of weather. The number of sittings are sufficient for 
the accommodation of everj' child in the county at one time. In 
the fifty-four brick houses are eighty-nine rooms, accommodating 
4,000 of 7,082 children of the county. 

Included in the number of schools are sixteen graded schools 
wliich furnish employment for fifty-four teachers. 

The whole number of teachers employed ia 1834-'8o 147 

Number of male teachers 85 



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442 HISTORY OF HENDEICKS COUNTY. 

Number of female teachers 62 

Enumeration 1S84 7.082 

Enrolled in the schools 18Sa-'8i ; 5,830 

Average daily attendance 4,375 

Average number to each teacher 31 

Per cent, of enrollment on enumeration 83 

Per cent, of attendance on enrollment 73 

Amount expended for special purposes 18S3-'81 §57,621 .15 

Amount expended for tuition purposes " " 36,683.71 

Total expenditures 9-1,303.80 

Trustees' valuation of school property 151,400.00 

Average daily wages per teacher 188t-'85 2. £6 

In addition to the facilities for iustructiou in tlie public schools 
we have located at Danville the Central Normal College and Com- 
mercial Institute, which was orijanized September, 1876, with only 
fortv-eight students in attendance. Of these, thirty had been 
students under the same teachers in other institutions. From the 
first, the school has steadily improved in numbers and increased 
its facilities, until it is now one of the popular schools of the 
country. 

We have, also, Central Academy, located at Plainfield, an insti- 
tution of great promise, which furnishes such literary instruction 
as is generally given in High Schools of our cities, joined, how- 
ever, with a larger amount of Chri.-^tian teaching than is common 
in such schools. 

"What of all this 3 Much every way. When I try to think back 
through the sixty-two yeai-s of Hendricks County's school history, 
review.my own brief experience, the trials, failures and successes, 
memory becomes crowded with incidents that tell of mutations, 
progress, development. We see our county rising from infancy to 
manhood. Our fatiiers looked forward to a grand culmination of 
all the appliances embraced in their wise system. The log cabin 
has passed away, and the frame or brick building has taken its 

place. 

The old, rickety and rough bench, without a back, has given 
place to the elegant desk and settee. Instead of the untidy school- 
room, with its puncheon floor and miserable furnishings, we now 
have the tasteful edifice, supplied with all the educational appli- 
ances that utility and educational economy can furnish. Old things 
have passed away, and all things have become new. The county is 
rising in strength and power, nd will make no backward move. 
Her rich soil, her wealth, her railways, her newspapers, her cen- 
tral commercial position in the industries and e.xchange of the 
State, her industry and prosperity, all tell what her future must 
be. May her sous and daughters be worthy of their sires. If so 



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mucli bas been done in sixty-two'years, what may we expect at her 
hnndredth anniversary — in 1923? 

Men and nations are as they are tautrht. As a people elevate 
and sustain their educators, so will their educators be found, in 
turn, the great instrumentality which brings them intelligence, 
freedom, prosperity and peace, and in the end true honor and 
glory. 

THE CENTRAL NORMAL COLLEGE, 

located at Danville, is not only the pride of Hendriclcs County 
but in the front rank of the leading educational institutions of the 
State. This school was organized by Professors Darst and Harper, 
at Ladoga, Montgomery County, in the autumn of 1S'?6, with forty- 
eight pnpils in attendance. The outlook was not such as to inspire 
con/idence and a hope of permanent success at this time, but the 
founders, being ycung men of energy and ability, began to push 
the work with such vigor that the community was forced to acknowl- 
edge the power which was rising in their midst. One by one tho 
lovers of learning turned from their various employments to find 
a home witliin the coilecre walls. 

At the close of the first year twelve persons, having completed 
the course prescribed by the institution, received the degree of 
B. S. Several of these graduates have become distinguished as edu- 
cators in this and other States. One of the number, Miss A. 
Kate Huron, has since been a m.ember of the faculty, and has not 
only added much to the success and prosperity of the school, but 
has enrolled her name among those of the most prominent teachers 
of the State. JS"ear the close of the year, Prof. Darst having 
resigned, Prof. Harper called to his aid the genial and scholarly 
Frank P. Adams, of Kentucky, afterward the loved and honored 
President of the institution. 

The second year opened up with an increased attendance, and 
everything bid fair for a most prosperous year. So rapid was the 
growth during tlie second and third terms that it became evident 
that unless the accommodations were increased it would be impos- 
sible to fulfill the promises made in the circulars and catalogues, 
and the development of the sclnoWiiust be checked in its very 
infancy. 

Realizing the condition of affairs toward which they were drift- 
ing the faculty and citizens went to work with a will to raise a suf- 
ficient amount by voluntary contribution to erect an addition to 



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HISTOKY OF HENDKICKS COUNTY. 



445 



the building tlien occupied b}' the school. Tlie people of the town 
and surrounding country were generally interested in the enter- 
prise and many donated liberally, but some, tliinking, no doubt, 
that they could enjoy the benefits witliout bearing the burdens, 
withheld their means, and the result was that on the 10th of May, 
1S78, the institution with 175 students, library and apparatus, was 
removed to tnore commodious quarters in the pleasant little city of 
Danville. The citizens threw open their homes to the students and 
did all in their power to aid and encourage the faculty, yet the work 
was arduous and it was witli great difficulty that the school was 
enabled to move on without a break in its work. 

Soon after the removal, and just as the institution was beginning 
to take root in its ne'v field, Prof. Harper was succeeded in the 
presidency by Prof. F. P. Adams. The new president had already 
ingratiated himself into the hearts of his associates, and had won 
the confidence and esteem of both students and citizens; conse- 
quently they n-ere ready and willirg to assist him in the great work 
which he had so reluctantly undertaken. But witli all this it was 
an Herculean task to bring harmony out of chaos, and to reinstate 
a structure which seemed tottering in its foundation. 

Prof. Adams entered upon his duties fully realizing the difficul- 
ties which stood in the way of success, but throwing his whole life 
and soul into the enterprise he was not only enabled to meet the 
demands made upon him, but to purchase the Danville Seminary 
building constructed a few years before by the Methodist Episcopal 
church at a cost of 830,000. The use of the building had been fur- 
nished the school free of charge, but the transfer of ownership 
enabled the president to make many needed improvements. Once 
more the bow of promise shed its benign raj-s upon the institution. 
But clouds were gathering in the distance and before the year had 
closed Prof. M. T. Travers, a young man of ability and fine social 
qualities, was compelled by failing health to relinquish his position, 
never again to be permitted to resume the work which he had so 
well begun. In him the school lost a true friend and a faithful, 
earnest worker. 

Tlie commencement exercises were unusually interesting and the 
graduates young ladies and gent^Bmen of refinement and ability. 
The first classic class, consisting of three members, viz., S. M. Cut- 
ler, "W. T. Eddingfield and S. E. Thomas, received the honors of the 
institution with the degree of A. B. 

After the usual vacation activities were resumed and continued- 



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446 



HISTORY OF HENDKICKS COUNTr. 



without interruption until spring. Students came pouring in from 
every direction. The president saw that liis teaching force must 
be increased and immediately called to his aid three men of wide 
reputation and acknowledged ability, viz.: Dr. Joseph Tingley, 
for twenty years a teacher in Asbury (now De Pauw) University; 
Prof. Alex. C. Hopkins, formerly State Superintendent of Public 
Instruction, and Prof. John A. Steele, for many years a teacher in 
the National Normal University at Lebanon, Ohio. The school 
now seemed to take on new life, and few institutions of learning 
have marched to tlie front with more rapid strides or maintained 
their positions witii a more determined purpose than did the Cen- 
tral Normal College under so able a corps of instructors. 

The two years following were eventful only in that they sent 
from the door of the college liundreds of young men and women 
with higher ideas of life than liad ever occupied their minds before. 

During all this time Prof. Adams had worked with untirinjr zeal 
to strengtlieu and build up the various departments of the school. 
But disease had begun its work and was fast staying the hand 
which had labored with sucli unselfish devotion for the cause of 
education. On the 25th of November, 1SS2, at the early age of 
thirty years, he closed tiie book of life, and was laid to rest in the 
east cemetery near where his noblest work was done. A beautiful 
monument marks the place of his silent abode but a more endur- 
ing one is reared in the memory of those wlio mourn his untimely 
death. No one presumed to take his place, but acting in accord- 
ance with the unanimous wish of the faculty, his bereaved com- 
panion took upon herself the name which he had worn. 

The new president was not ignorant concerning the affairs of 
the school, and having at her side Prof. Steele, who had previously 
been appointed Yice-President, she performed her duty with 
credit to herself and satisfaction to those under her employ. The 
major part of the work, it is true, was intrusted to Prof Steele, a 
man of rare ability both as a teacher and a business manager. He 
being well acquainted with the plans of the late president, suc- 
ceeded in carrying them out so perfectly thattliere was neither jar 
nor discord. 

Two more years of valuabi ) work were given to the public. The 
school building was improved and its capacity increased by fitting 
up some of the rooms which had not been in use, and partitioning 
others. The president erected for herself a beautiful and commo- 
dious dwelling just opposite the college; also a large dormitory 



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HISTORY OF HENDKICKS COUNTY. 



447 



for rooming and boarding students. Many new and valuable books 
were added to the library, and such apparatus as was needed from 
time to time. Xotwithstandingall these expenditures and many oth- 
ers, the resources were ample to meet them, and the credit of the in- 
stitution was never shaken, even for a moment. But this high 
degree of prosperity was not reached without effort. Everybody 
connected With the school worked faithfully for the advancement 
of its interests. Especially was this true of Frof. Steele who, not 
being disposed to shirk responsibility, confined liimself too closely 
to his desk and thus laid the foundation of the disease which was 
soon to step between him and his most cherished profession. His 
friends admonished him to desist tVom his work, and, if possible, 
regain his failing health. But he was so deeply impressed with 
the grandeur and magnitude of the work in which he was eugao-ed 
that selfish thoughts had little power to turn him from his course. 
It was late in the autumn when he reluctantly consented to leave 
Danville for a time, in order t at he might enjoy the advantages 
of a more genial clime. Having solected Jacksonville, Fla.,he re- 
mained at that place for a few wee . 1 n finding the atmosphere 
too humid for pulmonary diseases, 'le repaired to Thomasville, Ga. 
Here he remained with liis brother until the opening of spring. 
As soon as the weather would permit, he turned his f\ice home- 
ward, fully realizing that his days on earth were few. On the 27th 
day of March he a rived at Danville, greatly emaciated, and in fee- 
ble health, but his joy at being onc3 more in the midst of interested 
and loving friends knew no bounds. 

During his absence, the wants cf the school were not neglected. 
Every teacher was at his post wo-king earnestly for the advance- 
ment of his classes. The students were considerate and kind, and 
the utmost harmony prevailed. On Tuesday morning, May 5, 
while the school was assembled in the chapel to attend their accus- 
tomed exercises, and while the music of an hundred voices wafted 
on the balmy breath of spring, was floating in at the open door of 
his chamber, Prof. Steele sle t the sleep of death. 

His near rela ves and friends sccoinpanied by two members of 
the faculty, bore his lifeless body lo the old cemetery near Coalton, 
Ohio, and with many tears and i;.any flowers they laid it tenderly 
away beside the sacr dust of he- who gave her life for his. 

It seems but little less tlian irarvelous that any institution of 
learning, indepeudentof endowment of any kind, and unsupported 
by the State, could not only sup])ort itself, but could even grow 



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448 



HISTOKY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



and prosper under sucli calamities. Nevertheless it is true that 
the present year (1885), has brought the largest returns of any in 
the history to the school, and at no time has there been more uni- 
versal satisfaction on the part of those in attendance. 

Free from debt or incumbrance of any kind, supported by thou- 
sands of enterprising young ladies and gentlemiii througliout this 
and other States, lionored and respected at home and abroad, free 
from sectarianism and bigotry of every kind, located in one of the 
most charming, moral and healthful towns in the State, supplied 
with an excellent library and apparatus, and above and beyond all 
a. faculty of enterprising, progressive and efficient teachers, the Cen- 
tral Normal College stands a living monument of those who have 
given the best efforts of their lives. for its advancement, and a true 
exponent of independent thought, personal responsibility and 
Christian civilization. 

Franklin Pierce Adams, President of the Central Normal 
College. — Born, lived, died — the common biography of the mill- 
ions. Tiiese three chapters of common history have borrowed 
lustre from the personality of him who moved among us, with 
high aims, to such a noble end. He was first cradled in his 
mother's arms Nov. 16, 1852. She, one of nature's true gentle- 
women, stamped upon this coin the name which gave it commercial 
value — Frank. Had she left him unnamed until an appellation 
must be carved upon his tombstone she could not have chosen 
another more descriptive of his character. 

Plis life until fourteen differed little from that of other farmer 
boys, marked only by an earnest desire to secure an education. He 
went to Lebanon — that place of blessed memory to so many men 
and women of our time?. He was taken sick before long, when 
he came to Danville to claim the hospitality of his uncle, G. "W. 
"Wayland. When his health was restored sufficiently he placed 
himself under the tnition of Prof Gilmore, then principal of the 
Danville Academy. Soon he was called home to the death-bed of 
his sister. This was the fall of 1867. He then went to Hamilton 
County, Ohio, where he taught his first school. He returned to 
Lebanon where he pursued his studies until 1871 when he gradu- 
ated in the scientific course. While he was yet upon the rostrum 
from which his oration had been delivered, Mrs. Roberts secured 
him to work with her in the l^ormal School at Catlettsberg, Ky. 
He stayed with her until her marriage, when he succeeded her in 
the management of the school. His connection with this institu- 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



449 



tion lasted three years, at the expiration of wliich time he engaged 
to teach with Prof. H. N. Carver, of Medina, Ohio, while he pur- 
sued his classical studies. Having worked on an average of seven- 
teen hours a day in class and study, he completed his course in 
1875. 

Ai'ter graduation he returned to Kentucky and found employ- 
ment as principal of a graded school in Independence, tlie capital 
of his native county. Here he remained two years, assisted dur- 
ing the first by Miss Ora Wilson, who, the 17th of December, in 
the second year, became his wife. 

That teaching sliould be his life-work was now an established 
fact, and he was seeking a place of more extended usefulness when 
his uncle, G. "W. Wayland, proposed that he should correspond 
with Prof W. F. Harper, of Ladoga, who was then in need of a 
good man. Few letters were exclumged until Prof Harper enthu- 
siastically informed us, — " I have the man. You will all like him. 
He is Frank P. Adams, of Kentucky. He will be with us for short 
session." 

Saturday evening, June 30, 1S77, a crowd, which a heavy sum- 
mer shower could not disperse, was collectedoii the college campus. 
The people had come to follow the band to meet the Eastern train 
which boi-e to them the now professor. Everybody was interested. 
The students had planned this reception, but teachers and hun- 
dreds of the good citizens mingled in the concourse and formed 
the procession to the depot and thence to the Baptist church, 
where was met the new man whose life was then consecrated to 
the service of t!ic institution. 

Thus he was welcomed to the school in the beginning of its exist- 
ence. In reply to the welcom.e tendered him, he said : ''My hap- 
piness is more than I can bear. I iiave been trying to think what 
I ever did to tall forth such a demonstration as you have accorded 
me. A sense of my own weakness is the most distinct impres- 
sion of my mind. But as I thank you for this reception, I also 
promise you ray be^t efforts, my heartiest endeavors, the most de- 
termined energy of my life." How well this pledge was kept 
throughout the eventful years, let the fraternal feelings of liis as- 
sociate teachers and the hearts cf his loving students testify. His 
familiar mingling with them strengthened the bond of friendship 
which had been sealed with the first warm grasp of his hand. 

He had seen mucli of life and was ready with practical sugges- 
tions whenever he was consulted upon any of the pei'ple.xities wliich 






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450 



HISTOET OF HENDKICKS COUNTT. 



vex student life, with advice whenever told of the plans more hope- 
ful ones had fixed for their future. All those qualities which en- 
deared him to his friends welded him, with chains hard to be severed, 
to his immediate kindred, and above all to those of his little house- 
hold. Frank in his social intercourse; fair in his business transac- 
tions, and just; faithful in the discharcre of his duties, — this is the 
character — a tnemorj sweet to his brothers and sisters, — the herit- 
age, lie leaves this prosperous institution, — the gem that in woman- 
hood little Efhe will prize more than accamulated wealth, i\ 
talisman that will make warm hearts warmer toward the living- 
wife. 

^ JAIL AND POOE FARM. 

The jail ana sherifi's residence is also a building worthy of the 
county and its inhabitants. In its construction the comfort and 
health of those wlio were to be confined there were considered, 
and tlie best arrangement consistent with the safety of the prison 
ers was made for both. All prison reformers who have inspected 
this jail are constrained to compliment the humanity of its designs. 
The cost of this building was about $30,000. 

The county asylum is situated on a farm of eighty acres, one 
mile east of Danville. It is also a large and substantially built 
edifice, of sufiicient size to accommodate all the destitute poor of the 
county with a home, which in its beauty of location and attractive 
improvements and surroundings and substantial comforts is cer- 
tainly sutSeient to mitigate in a very great degree the bitter lot of 
those wlio are obliged, on account of the misfortunes that have 
gathered around them, to seek an asylum beneath'its hospitable 
roof. This building and the farm upon which it is situated cost 
the county over §iO,000, and is an enduring monument to the 
benevolence of the people who prompted its erection and willingly 
met the cost. 

INDIANA EEFOEII SCHOOL FOE BOYS. 

The law providing for the establishment of this important insti- 
tution was approved March S, 1S67, and, soon after, the present 
site was selected, than which a more beautiful and appropriate one 
could scarcely be found. Situated on a beautiful upland nearly 
a mile southwest of the village of Flainfield, and fourteen miles 
west of the State capital, on probably tlie best watered tract of 
land in the State, amidst a quiet, orderly, intelligent community, 
the school eni'oys many privileges denied other public institutions. 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COONTY. 



451 



Work on the first buildings was at once commenced, and Frank B- 
Ainsworth was regularly installed as Superintendent Oct. 31, 
1867. On the 1st of January, 1S6S, they were ready to admit 
inmates, but the first boy was not admitted till Jan. 26. He was 
from Hendricks County. 

Mr. Ainsworth reraaiued in charge of the institution more than 
eight ^years, and was succeeded April 5, 1S76, by James O'Brien. 
He was followed, April, ISSO, by Tiiomas J. Charlton, under whose 
efficient and prudent management the school has continued to 
steadily improve. The present officers are as follows: Board of 
Control, L. A. Baruett, Danville, President; Lewis Jordan, Indian- 
apolis, and H. N. Helms, Carlisle; Superintendent, T. J. Charl- 
ton; Matron, Mrs. Alice R. Charlton; Chaplain, John G. Blake, 
Indianapolis; Physician, Amos Carter, Plainfield; Consulting Phy- 
sician, T. E. Evans, Plainfield. 

The eighteenth annual report for the year ending Oct. 31, 
1884, shows the total number admitted since the opening of the 
school to be 2,057; number received during the year, 395; number 
of inmates at close of year, 437; released on '-ticket of leave," 182; 
"ticket of leave" boys returned, forty-four; homes procured for 
boys, thirty-eight. 

This is not a prison but a charitable institution — a reform school, 
in the full sense of the word, for those whose home influences have 
been unfortunate, and who are in danger of becoming hardened 
criminals. Every boy is in school one-half of each day, except 
during tlie warm summer months, when only the primary grades 
are in session. The farm consists of 225 acres, but so much of it 
is waste land along the creek and taken up by buildings and play 
grounds, that only 145 acres are used for cultivation and pasture. 
The inmates are divided into twelve families, of about thirty-five 
boys each. A family is in charge of au officer called "house- 
father," who is responsible for the discipline and condition of his 
family. 

The present number of boys fi'om Hendricks County is thirty. 
The institution contains three distinct departments — the schools,, 
the manual labor department and the family instruction. The 
schools are conducted on tlie halt-day system, the boys who work 
in the forenoon attending school in the afternoon, and those who 
attend school in the forenoon engaging in some kind of labor 
during the allernoon. All schools are graded like public schools. 

That the school is doing its work well is a thoroughly proven 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COCNTY. 



fact. Nearly 1,503 bojs have passed through the institution and 
are now out in the world. Over ninety per cent, out of that num- 
ber are leading honest and honorable lives. 

THE HENDRICKS COUNTY OLD SETT'LEES' SOCIETY 

was organized in 1S72 at Green Yalley Farm, with William D. 
Truster as President and AI. G. Parker, Secretary. Ten annual 
re-unions have been lield, on the tiiird Saturday in June. 'No attempts 
have yet been made to collect early history, and the meetings are 
entirely social in character. Speeches and addresses are made by 
pioneers, and orations have been made by Gov. O. P. Morton and 
ex-Senator Joseph E. McDonald. Marion and Putnam counties 
are frequently represented at these gatlierings, which sometimes 
include 8,000 to 10,000 people. The last meeting at Danville was 
in 1SS3; it was thinly attend3d on account of rainy weather. In 
1SS4 tlie society was re-organized at Green Yalley Farm, ten miles 
south of Danville, and there the re-union of ISSo was held in 
August. 

AGRICULTCEAL. 

Following are a few statistics of the more important crops, taten 
from the Fifth Annual Eeport of the Enreau of Statistics of Indi- 
ana. 

Wheat- — Of this cereal there were planted in 1SS3 a total of 
39,397 acres, and in the year previous 44,284 acres, or nearly equal 
to two full townships of land. The yield was 445,042 bushels in 
18S3; 782,431 bushels in 1882; 444,272 bushels in 1881; 521,883 
bushels in 1580; and 553,506 bushels in 1879. 

Co7'n. — In 1883 there were planted 41,638 acres to corn, and in 
1882 there were 45,670 acres. The yield in 1SS3 was 1,308,205 
bushels; 1,600,963 bushels in 1882; 847,073 bushels in 1881; 1,259- 
687 bushels in ISSO; and 2,016,351 bushels in 1S79. 

Oals.—An acreage of 3,374 prodnced in 1SS3, 117,855 bushels 
against a yield the previous year of 126,988 bushels. 

Potatoes. — In 1SS.3, 785 acres produced 85,460 bushels ; while 
in 1882 the yield was 63,975 bushels. 

Ti?not/i y.—Thn acreage i.. 1SS3 was 18,391 ; yield, 36,309 
tons ; yield in 1882, 1S,4'96 tons. 

Clover.— Acreage in 1S83, 12,321 ; crop in 1883, 25,401 tons ; 
in 1882, 11,104 tons. 

Maple Jfolasse-s. —GaWous in 1882, 5,726 ; in 1883, 7,SS3. 



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HISTOEY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



453 



Maple A%«r.— Pounds in 1S82, 1,175 ; in 1883, 812. 

Sorghum Molasses.— GaWons in 18S2, ll,liO ; in 1883, 9,471. 

Sorghum, Sugar.- — Pounds in 18S2, 230. 

Tile I>rai7i.—Rods reported in 1883, 336,388, against 318, 428 
rods in 1882. 

Cider. — In 1882, 5,292 gallons were made. 
Vinegar. — In 1883, 739 gallons of this condiment were man- 
ufactured. 

Milk. — In 1883, the number of gallons reported were 1,831,838, 
against 1,656,740 gallons in 1882. 

Bees and Honey.— in 1883 the stands of bees reported were 
718 in number as compared with 499 in 1882. The product of 
honey was 4,777 and 7,875 pounds in the respective years. 

Butter. — In 1883 there were made 433,686 pounds, the prod- 
uct uf the previous jear being 365,718 pounds. 

Eggs.— In 1SS3, dozens, 186, 162 ; previous year, 259,713 
dozens. 

Wool.— 1\iQ wool-clip of 1882 reached 91,182 pounds ; that of 
18S3, 91,963 pounds. 

Horses. — In 1883, the number of horses reported was 6,934, 
against 7,439 in 18S2. 

2lules.—ln 18S3, 811; in 1882, 605. 

Cattle — In 1883, 18,295; in 1882, 19,820. 

//o^.';.— Number of stock hogs in 1883, was 32,495; 1882, 24, 
983; number of fatted hogs, 1883, 25,208; 188:^, 39,594; weight 
of tatted hogs in 1883 was 6,797,360 pounds. 

Shee_p.—ln 1883, 20,085; in 1882, 20,431; Iambs in 1883, 7,838; 
in 1882, 10,267. 

Poultry. — In 1883 there were reported 149 geese, 97 ducks, 33 
guineas, 10,916 dozens of chickens and 547 dozens of turkeys. 

Apple Trees.— In 1882, of bearing age, 83,380; non-bearino- 
age, 159,396; in 18S3, bearing, 54,223; non-bearing, 32,089. 

Peach Trees.— Be^'mg age, in 1882, 9,545; non-bearinc 
8,986; in 1883, bearing, 7,156; non-bearing, 7,700. 

Pear Tt'ees. — In 1882, bearing age, 3,467; non-bearing, 3,883- 
in 1883, bearing, 3,010; non-bearing, 2,964. 

Plum Trees. — In 1882, bearing age, 647; non-bearing, 1,032- 
in 1883, bearing, 570; non-bearing, 1,031. 

Quince Trees. — In 1882, bearing, 183; non-bearing, 243; in 
1883, bearing, 211; non-bearing, 296. 
29 



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HISTOKY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



Cherry Trees.~\x\ 1SS2, bearing, 6,927; non-bearing, 3,2G5; 
in 1883, bearing, 4,902; non-bearing, 2,937. 

Siberian Crabs. — In 1882, bearing, 417; non-bearing, 552; in 
1883, bearing, 753; non-bearing, 611. 

Grape Yines. — In 1SS2, bearing, 8,292; non-bearing; 3,755; in 
1883, bearing, 5,678; non-bearing, 2,714. 

Blue and other Wild Grasses. — Acres in 1882, 52,332; in 
1883, 46,184. 

Unused Flow Zand.—Acres in 1882, 4,489; in 1883, 3,117. 

Timbe?' Zand. — Acres in 1882, 70,384; in 1883, 66,855. 

THE EENDKICKS COUNTY AGRICCTLTUBAL SOCIETY 

was organized in 1852, and bought grounds three acres in extent, 
a mile west of Danville, lor fair purposes. Many changes were 
made, and additions to the grounds were purchased from time to 
time. Fairs were held annually until 1881, wlicu the society 
having previously become involved in debt, it was totally unable 
to pay its premiums, and the property was sold. The grounds 
are now owned by the noted horseman, B. T. Buford. 

THE PLAINFIELD HOKTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

was organized a number of years ago, and has held a number of 
exhibitions. After the death of the county society, new life was 
attempted to be given this Plainlield organization by naming it 
the 

PLAINFIELD HORTICULTURAL AND HENDRICKS COUNTY AGRICULT- 
URAL SOCIETY. ' 

A fair was held at Plain aeld in the fall of 1884, which was 
financially not successful. Daniel Cox is President of the long- 
named organization. 



THE HENDRICKS COUNTY MEDICAL SOCIETY. 

As the objects for which the Hendricks County Medical Society 
fvas organized have been ful'y set forth in its Preamble, Consti 



tution, By-Laws and Code c^ Ethics, at its organization, further 
comment will be unnecessary. The medical gentlemen whose 
names are appended to this Constitution met in Danville, on 
the 29tli day of April, ]S54, and organized the Hendricks County 
Medical Society, by electing the following officers: 






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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 455 

"President, Henry G. Todd, M. D. ; Vice-President, Wilson 
Lockhart, IVI. D. ; Secretary, J. Joel Wright, M. D. ; Correspond- 
ing Secretary, Leroy H. Kennedy, M. D.; Treasurer, Henry Cox, 
M. D.; Censors, Thomas B. Harvey, M. D., Bradley Barthol- 
omew, M. D., Henry H. Moore, M.D." 

Following this was tlie adoption of their Constitution and By- 
Laws. '■ 

PREAMBLE. - 

"We, the undersigned practitioners of medicine and surgery 
in the county of Hendricks, and vicinity, for the purpose of 
promoting harmony and good fellowship, and of elevating the 
cause of medical and the collateral sciences, associate ourselves 
under the following 

CONSTITUTION. 

"Art. 1. This association shall be denominated the Hendricks 
County Medical Society. 

"Art. 2. The officers of this society shall consist of a President 
Vice-President, Recording Secretary, Corresponding Secretary, 
Treasurer and three Censors, all of whom shall be elected by 
ballot, annually, and each officer shall serve until his successor is 
duly installed into office. 

"Art. 3. Any regular and reputable practitioner of medicine 
may become a member of this society, by signing this Constitu- 
tion, paying into the treasury wo dollars, and complying witli 
such other regulations as may be liereafter provided by law. 

"Art. 4. Any distinguished literary gentleman may become an 
honorary member of this society, by a vote of two-thirds of the 
members present at any regular meeting; provided that mtice co 
that effect had been given at any j^revious meeting of tlie society. 

"Art. 5. The society shall have power to form a library and a 
cabinet of specimens, in the various departments of natural 
science, and pathological specimens and illustrations, both from 
the donations of individuals and other societies, and bv levvino- 
taxes and fines, agreeable to the regulations which may be here- 
after provided by law. 

'•Art. 6. This society may opej a correspondence with similar 
associations in this State and suc'i others as it may from time to 
time direct. 

"Art. 7. This society shall mset at such times and places and 
engage in such deliberations as may from time to time be ao-ieed 



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456 



HISTOKT OF HENDEICKS CO0NTY. 



w 



upon, and may enact By-Laws for its government, iiol? inconsistent 
with this Constitution. 

"Akt. 8. The society may admit honorary members upon com- 
pliance of tlie applicant with the same forms as are prescribed 
for the admission of bona fide members, except that no initiatory 
fee shall be required. He shall not be permitted to vote, nor 
shall he participate in any of the proceedings, except by express 
permission of the society. ' • .i ' '' 

"Art. 9. One-third of all the members shall constitute a 
quorum for the transaction of business; but on all subjects in- 
volving the rights, interests or standing of any member, a 
majority of all the members siiall be present. 

'"Aet. 10. This Constitution may be amended at any stated 
meeting of the society, by a vote of two-thirds of the members 
present; 'provided^ the amendment has been proposed, in writing, 
at a previous meeting. 
Henry G. Todd, Eisdon C.Moore, 
D. J. Depew, Henrt H. Moobe, 

J. A. Co.MINGOE, TlIOilAS P. SeLLEE, 

David Todd, Wilson Lockhakt, 



J. Joel Weight, 
Leeoy H. Kennedy, 
Thomas B. Haevey, 
Heney Cox, 



B. Baetholoiiew, W. F. Haevey." 
"BY-LAWS. 

"ACT I. 

^^ Duties of Oncers. 

"article l 

" The President shall preside at all meetings of the society, 
preserve order, and see that its deliberations are conducted accord- 
ino- to the rules and regulations governing deliberative bodies, 
except so far as they may be otherwise provided for in the Con- 
stitution and By-Laws. He shall have power to call special 
meetino'S of the society at his discretion, or upon the written 
request of three members. He shali sign certificates of member- 
shio and those of discharge; also, the warrants authorized to be 
drawn upon the Treasurer; all the official instruments and pro- 
ceedings of the society. He shall doSiver an inaugural address o^ 
enterino' upon the duties of his office, and a valedictory at the ex- 
piration of the same, and shall perform such other duties as are 
prescribed in the Constitution and By-Laws of the society. 



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HISTORY OF HENDEIOKS COUNTY. 



457 



"article II. 

" The Yice-President shall, in the absence of the President, 
perform the ordinary duties assigned to that office, and shall 
deliver a written address the second meeting after his election. 

"article III. 

" The Recording Secretary shall keep a fair and legible record of 
the proceedings of the society; a list of the members' names, with a 
specification of such as fail to pay their taxes and fines; preserve 
all papers belonging to the society, subject at all times to the in- 
spection of the members, and perform all other duties belonging 
to the office. 

"article IV. 

"The Corresponding Secretary shall conduct the correspondence 
of the society under its direction, and make a report of such 
matters as he may deem proper. 

'•'article v. * 

"The Treasurer shall collect all dues of the society, and pay 
upon presentation the orders regularly drawn on him by the Presi- 
dent and Secretary. He shall keep a full account of all moneys 
received and disbursed, and make satisfactory reports thereof at 
least annually, and oftener if requested by tlie society. Upon the 
expiration of his term of office, he shall exhibit to the parties 
appointed to receive them, an account of the receipts and dis- 
bursements of his term, accompanied by vouchers when practi- 
cable, and hand over to his successor in ofiice all moneys, books, 
papers, or other property held and received by virtue of his 
office. He shall provide a suitable place for the society to hold 
its sessions, and fuel, light, stationery and other necessary con- 
veniences therein. 

"akticle ti. 

"The Censors shall examine applicants for membership, and if, 
in their opinion, such applicants are worthy to be admitted, they 
shall report accordingly. jSTo person shall be admitted to an ex- 
amination until he produces satisfactory evidence to the Censors 
that he sustains a good moral character, and has studied medicine 
and surgery with some regularly authorized practitioner at least 
three years previous to his application, unless he be a graduate of 
some college or university. 



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HISTOEV OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 
"article VII. 



" It shall be the dutj of the Secretary to give notice in the county 
paper of the time and place of holding each meeting at least two 
consecutive weeks next preceding the time of holding such 
meeting, together with the names of those persons from whom 
addresses or dissertations may be expected." 

"ACT II. 

'•^Duties of Members. 

"article I. 

"Every member of this society shall pay an annual tax of at 
least one Jollar; and any member who shall neglect to pay the 
same, or any fine that may be levied agreeable to the provisions 
of this act, three months after having been notified by the Secre- 
tary or Treasurer of such delinquency, shall forfeit his member 
ship nor shall he enjoy any immunities belonging to the society, 
nntil all arrearages be paid. • 

"article II. 

" The regular meetings of the society shall be held on the Third 
Ttiesday of the months of January, April, July and Octobsr, 
unless otherwise ordered at a previous meeting of the sociecy, 
tlie April meeting being the annual meeting. 

"article III. 

"The President shall appoint at every meeting at least one pers^m 
to write and deliver, a dissertation at the next meeting, and no 
person shall be required to write such dissertation unless he ^e 
notified of his appointment by the Secretary two months previo-ts 
to the time at which it is to be delivered, and shall accept such 
appointment. 

"article IV. 

" At any regular meeting of this society every member sha'l 
liave the privilege of reportine such cases (that have come under 
Lis own observation) as he may deem important. 

"article v. 

"It shall be the duty of each member of this society to keep a 
faithful record of each important case of disease which he treats, 
noting tlie age, sex and condition of the patient; the cause, when 






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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTV. 



459 



obvious; the type, symptoms, treatment, duration and termina- 
tion of the disease; and, when practicable, tlie^os^j^o^'feffi appear- 
ances. The material facts of wliieh record he shall embody in an 
intelligible form, and present it to the society' at the first stated 
meeting in each year. , 

"article VI. 

" All addresses, dissertations, or reports, delivered or read before 
the society, shall be written in a neat, legible hand, on good 
paper, and shall be the property of the society, to dispose of as 
it may think proper. 

"article VII. 

"The regular set addresses before the society shall be public, aad 
when the subject admits, before a mixed audience, and shall be 
delivered in the forenoon session. 

"article VIII. 

\- " 

"Any member may invite such persons to attend the sessions and 
deliberations of the society as he may think proper, except iu 
cases of private business, when none but members shall be present, 
except to give evidence. 

"article IX. 

" It shall be the duty of each member of tliis society, upon re- 
moving beyond its bounds, to make the fact known to the society, 
and such persons shall thereafter be considered honorary members. 

'^article X. 

" It shall be the duty of each committee to examine, thoroughly, 
the particular subject given it in ^charge, and no report shall be 
received until it has beeu read and approved by a majority of such 
committee. 

"article XI. 

"These By-Laws may be altered or amended, Jat any regular 
meeting of the society, by a vote of two-thirdsj of the members 
present; such proposed alteration or amendment always to be 
presented in writing." 

At one of the regular meetings of the same year, the National 
Code of Ethics was also adopted by this society, as the following 
will show: 



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460 HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 

"NATIONAL CODE OF ETHICS. 
"adopted by the' 
"HENDKICKS COUNTY MEDICAL SOCIETY. 

"CHAPTER I. 

"Of the Duties of Physicians to their Patients and of the 
Obligations of Patients to their Physicians. 

"Art. I. — Duties of Physicians to their Patients. 

"Section 1. — A physician should not only be ever ready to obey 
the calls of the sick, but his mind ought also to be imbued with 
the greatness of his mission, and the responsibility he habitually 
incurs in its discharge. Those obligations are the more deep and 
en-during, because there is no tribunal other than his own con- 
science to adjudge penalties for carelessness or neglect. Phy- 
sicians should, therefore, minister to the sick with due impressions 
of the importance of their office; reflecting that the ease, the 
health and the lives of those committed to their charge depend 
on their skill, attention and fidelity. They should study, also, in 
their deportment, so to unite, tenderness with firmness, and coii- 
descension with authority, as to inspire therninds of their patients 
with gratitude, respect and confidence. 

"Sec. 2. — Every case committed to the charge of a physician 
should be treated with attention, steadiness, and humanity. 
Keasonable indulgence should be granted to the mental imbecility 
and caprice of the sick. Secrecy and delicacy, when required by 
peculiar circumstances, should be sti-ictly observed, and the 
familiar and confidential intercourse- to which physicians are ad- 
mitted in their professional visits should be used with discretion 
and with the most scrupulous regard to fidelity and honor. The 
obligation of secrecy extends beyond the period of professional 
services; none of the privacies of personal and domestic life, no 
infirmity of disposition, or flaw of character observed during pro- 
fessional attendance should ever be divulged by him except when 
he is imperatively required to do so. The force and necessity of 
this obligation are indeed so great that professional men have, 
under certain circumstances, been protected in their observance 
of secrecy by Courts of Justice. 

" Seo. 3. — Frequent visits to the sick are, in general, requisite, 
since they enable the physician to arrive at a more perfect knowl- 
edge of the disease, to meet promptly every change which may 



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BISTORT OF HENDRICKS COUNTT. 



461 



occur, and also tend to preserve the confidence of the patient. 
But unnecessary visits are to be avoided, as they give useless 
anxiety to the patient, tend to diminish the authority of the phy- 
sician, and render him liable to be suspected of interested motives. 

"Sec. 4r. — A physician should not be forward to make gloomy 
prognostications, because they savor of empiricism, by magnifying 
the importance of his services in the treatment or cure of the 
disease. But he should not fail, on proper occasions, to give to 
the friends of the patient timely notice of danger, when it really 
occurs; and even to the patient himself, if absolutely necessary. 
This office, however, is so peculiarly alarming when executed by 
him, that it ought to be declined whenever it can be assigned to 
any other person of sufficient judgment and delicacy. For, the 
physician should be the minister of hope and comfort to the sick; 
that, by such cordials to the drC'Oping spirit, ho may smooth the 
bed of death, revive expiring life, and counteract the depressing 
influence of those maladies which often disturb the tranquillity of 
the most resigned, iu their last moments. The life of a sick 
person can be shortened not only by the acts, but also by the 
words or the manner of a physician. It is, therefore, a sacred 
duty to guard himself carefully 'n this respect, and to avoid all 
things which have a tendency to discourage the patient and to 
depress his spirits. 

" Sec. 5. — A physician ought not to abandon a patient because 
the case is deemed incurable; for his attendance may continue to 
be highly useful to the patient, and comforting to the relatives 
around him, even in the last pe iod of a fatal malady, by alleviat- 
ing pain and other symptoms, f.tid by-soothing mental anguish. 
To decline attendance under such circumstances would be sacrific- 
ing to fanciful delicacy and miftaken liberality that moral duty, 
which is independent of, and far superior to, all pecuniary con- 
eideration. 

" Sec. 6.— Consultation should be promoted in difficult or pro- 
tracted cases, as they give rise to confidence, energy, and more 
enlarged views in practice. 

" Sec. 7. — The opportunity which a physician not infrequently 
enjoys, of promoting and strengthening the good resolutions of 
his patients, sufiering under the consequences of vicious conduct, 
ought never to be neglected. His counsel.s, or even remonstrances, 
will give satisfaction, not offense, if they be proffered with polite- 
ness, and evince a genuine love of virtue, accompanied by a sin- 



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462 



HISTORY OF HENDEI0K3 COUNTY. 



cere interest in the welfare of the person to whom they are 
addressed. 

'■Article li.— Obligations of Patients to their Physicians. 

" Sectiox 1. — The members of the medical profession, upon 
wh,uin are enjoined the performance of so many important and 
arduous duties toward the community, and who are required to 
make so many sacrifices of comfort, ease and health, for the wel- 
fare of those who avail themselves of their services, certainly have 
a right to expect and require that their patients should enter- 
tain a just sense of the duties which they owe to their medical 
attendants. 

" Sec. 2. — -The first dutj' of a patient is, to select as his medical 
adviser one who has received a regular professional education. 
In no trade or occupation do mankind rely on the skill of an un- 
taught artist; and in medicine, professedly the most difficult and 
and intricate of the sciences, the world ought not to suppose that 
knowledge is intuitive. 

" Sec. 3. — Patients should prefer a physician whose habits of 
life are regular, and who is not devoted to company, pleasure, or 
to any pursuit incotnpatible with his professional obligations. A 
patient should, also, confide the care of himself and fj^mily, as 
much as possible to one physician; for the medical man who has 
become acquainted with the peculiarities of constitution, habits 
and pre-dispositions of those he attends is more likely to be suc- 
cessful in his treatment than one who does not possess that 
knowledge. A patient who has thus selected his physician should 
always apply for advice in what may appear, to him trivial cases, 
for the most fatal results often supervene on the slightest accidents. 
It is of still more importance that he should apply for assistance in 
the forming stage of violent diseases; it is to a neglect of this 
precept that medicine owes much of the uncertainty and imper- 
fection with which it has been reproached. 

" Sec. J:. — Patients should faithfully and unreservedly com- 
municate to their physician the supposed cause of their disease. 
This is the more important, as many diseases of a mental origin 
stimulate those depending oa external causes, and yet are only to 
be cured by ministering to ihe mind diseased. A patient should 
never be afraid of thus making his physician his friend and ad- 
viser; he should always bear in mind that a medical man is under 
the strongest obligations of secrecy. Even the female sex should 
never allow feelings of shame or delicacy to prevent their disclos- 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 4:63' 

ing the seat, symptoms, and causes of complaints peculiar to them. 
However commendable a modest reserve may be in the common 
occurrences of life, its striett observance in medicine is often at- 
tended with tlie most serious consequences, and a patient may 
sink under a painful and loathsome disease which mio;ht have 
been "readily prevented had timely intimation been given to the 
physician. 

"Sec. 5. — A patient sliould never weary his physician with a 
tedious detail of events or matters not pertaining to his disease. 
Even as relates to his actual symptoms, he will convey much 
more Information hy giving clear answers to interrogatories, than 
by the most minute account of his own framing. Neither should 
he obtrude the details of his businefs nor the history of his family 
concerns. 

"Sec. 6. — Tlie obedience of a patient to the prescriptions ol 
his }>hysician should be prompt and implicit. He should never 
permit his own crude opinions as to their fitness to infliieuce his 
attention to tliem. A failure in cne particular may render an 
otherwise judicious treatment dan jerous, and even fatal. This 
remark is equally applicable to diet, drink, and exercise. As 
patients become convalescent they are very apt to suppose that 
the rules prescribed for them may be disregarded, and the conse- 
quence, but too often, is a relapse. Patients should never allow 
themselves to be persuaded to take anj* medicine whatever, that 
may be recommended to tliem by the self-constituted doctors and 
doctresses, who are so frequently met with, and who pretend to 
possess infallible remedies for the care of every disease. However 
simple some prescriptions may appear to be, it often happens 
that they are productive of much mischief, and in all cases they 
are injurious, by contravening the plan of treatment adopted by 
the physician. - - 

" Sec. 7. — A patient should, if possible, avoid even \\iq friendly 
visits of a physician- vrho is not attending him; and when he 
does receive them, he should never converse on the subject of his 
disease, as an observation may be made, without any intention 
of interference, which may destroy his confidence in the course 
he is pursuing, and induce him to neglect the directions pre- 
scribed to him. A patient should never send for a consulting 
ph3'sician without the express consent of his own medical attend- 
ant. It is of great importance chat physicians should act in 
concert; for, although their modes of treatment may be attended 



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464 



HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



with equal success when employed singly, yet conjointly tbcy are 
very likely to be productive of disastrous results. 

" Sec. S.— "When a patient wishes to dismiss his physician, justice 
and common courtesy require tliat he should declare his re;isons 
for so doing. 

" Sec. 9. — Patients should always, when practicable, send for 
their physician in the morning, before his usual hour of going 
out; for by being early aware of the visits he has to pay during 
the day, the physician is able to apportion his time in sucli a 
manner as to prevent an interference of engagements. They 
should always be in readiness to receive the visits of their phy- 
sician, as the detention of a few minutes is often of serious incon- 
venience to him. 

"Sec. 10. — A patient should, after his recovery, entertain a just 
and enduring sense of the value of the services rendered him by 
his piiysician; for tiiese are of such a character that no mere 
pecuniary acknowledgments can repay or cancel them." 

There are many other things of minor importance, to the 
public at least, in the Code, which we have not space for in this 
connection. 

This society continued from year to year until the breaking out 
of the late war, when, most of its members having enlisted, so 
few were left to hold meetings that they were discontinued until 
the year 1866, when the times for its regular meetings, specififd in 
its By-Laws, were observed, and have been ever since. 

At the annual meeting of the Indiana State Medical Society in 
1872, as a basis on whicli to organize this society under the statute 
relating to voluntary associations, passed resolutions providing for 
the incorporation of county medical societies. It was not, liow- 
ever, till the annual meeting of 1875 that the requisite number — 
twelve counties — reported to the Secretary of the State society, at 
which time, "On motion, the preamble and resolutions and tlie 
new Constitution were then adopted by more than a two-thirds 
vote, on a division — afEmative fifty-eight; negative seventeen." 
The State society, having now adopted the delegate system of 
representation from incorporated auxiliary county societies, .he 
Hendricks County Medical Society at one of its regular meetings, 
in the year 1S75, changed its Constitution, as was thought, to 
comply with the State society, and the laws of the State relative 
to such associations. The delegates from the Hendricks County 



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HISTOKY OF HENDRICKS COUffTY. 



46.5 



Society were admitted at the State society at its annual meeting 
in 1S76. As will be seen by the report of a committee on creden- 
tials farther along, the Constitution of the Hendricks County 
Medical Saciety was defective in the description of its seal. When 
this fact became known, most of the physicians of the county who 
were not members of this society organized a new society, and as 
a result, at the annual meeting of the Indiana State Medical 
Society, in May, 1S77, there were two sets of delegates, each 
claiming to represent the Hendricks County Medical Society. 
The following is the report of the Committee on Credentials: 
'f Your committee, to whom was referred the claims of the rival 
delegations from Hendricks Coun'3', submit the following report: 
The evidence, oral and documentary, shows that the Hendricks 
County Medical Society was organized in 1854, and has continued 
in existence ever since; that when the State society adopted the 
delegate system of representatiriu from incorporated auxiliary 
county societies, the Hendricks County Society clianged its Con- 
stitution to conform to the requirements of the State society and 
laws of the State providing for the formation of voluntary asso- 
ciations. The Constitution, as changed, was left with the recorder 
of the county, and his certificate taken fjr it, which certificate 
was presented to the Secretary of the State society, authorlzino- 
him to enter the county society on tb.e roll of auxiliary societies 
and their delegates were admittod to the State society. It has 
.been subsequently ascertained that the Constitution was not re- 
corded, and was defective in not giving a particular description of 
its seal and the postoffice address of its members; that these tech- 
nical defects were unknown to its members, who were actincr in 
good faith, nnder a cunviction that all the demands of the State 
society and the laws of the State had been complied with; that 
after it was ascertained that the requirements of the law had not 
bsen fully complied with, a new society was organized, in which 
all the statutory requirements were observed; that the said latter 
society applies for admission ti) the State society; that such ad- 
mission would require the Statu society to set aside its action ad- 
mitting'the delegates from the Hendricks County Society last year, 
which action was taken on the'.r presenting a certificate from the 
county recorder stating that the society had complied with the 
law. Your committee, therefore, recommend that the 'old' 
Hendricks County Society be permitted to correct the errors 
in their Constitution, and that the delegates from said society 



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HISTORY OK HENDRICKS COUNTY. 

bo admitted to .eats dnring the present session of the State 

'°'='^'^- - "C. B. HlGGINS, 

" J. R. WlEST, 

" W. H. Bills, 
- " Willi AH Lomax, 

" S. E. MuNFORD, 

" Committee:' 

Pn^S^ ^r-Tl"\ l""^ ^'^'^'' °^ Association of the Hendricks 
County Society had been corrected and recorded, however, abont 
a month before this committee made its report. Below is a copy 
01 trie same: ^-^ 

"COXSTITUTION AND AETICLES OF ASSOCIATION 

OF THE HENDPJCKS COUNTY MEDICAL 

SOCIETF. 

Hendricks County Medical Society, and shall be auxiliary to and 
under the control of the Indiana State Medical Society. 

"Art. II. The officers of this society shall be a President 
Vice-President, Recording Secretary, Corresponding Secretary 
Treasurer, and three Censors, each of wliom' shal^ be lectj 

been duly installed into office. 

"Art. III. Any regular and reputable practitioner of medicine 
may become a member of this society by signing this Constitu- 
tion paying mto the treasury two dollars, and complying, with I 
such other regulations as may be hereafter provided by law" j 

';Art. IV. The President shall preside at all meetinc.s of the 
society, preserve order, and see that its deliberations ''are con- ' 
aucted according to the rules and regulations governing delibera- 
tive bodies, except so far as they may be otherwise provided for 
by this Constitution and By-Laws; he shall have the power to call 
special meetings at his discretion, or upon the written request of 
three members; shall sign certificates of membership, and those 
ot discharge; also the warrants authorized to be drawn upon the 
Treasurer, and all the official instruments and proceedings of the 
society. ^ o "^ 1-"^ 

"Art. v. The Vice-President, in the absence of the Presi- 
dent shall perform the ordinary duties assigned to that office. 
Art. VL The Recording Secretary shall keep a fair and 




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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



467 



legible record of the proceedings of the society, a list of the 
members' names with a speeiticntion of such as fail to pay their 
taxes and fines, preserve all papers belonging to the society, sub- 
ject at all times to the inspection of the members, and perform all 
other duties belonging to the oiEce. 

, "Art. VII. The Corresponding Secretary shall conduct the 
correspondence of the society, under its direction, and make a full 
report of such matters as he may deem proper. 

"Art. YIII. The Treasurer shall collect all dues of the 
society, and pay on presentation the orders regularly drawn on 
him by the President and Secretary; he shall keep a full account 
of all moneys received and disbursed and make satisfactory 
reports thereof at kast annually, and oftener if requested by the 
society; upon the expiration of his term of office he shall exhibit 
to the parties appointed to receive them an account current of the 
receipts and disbursements of his term, accompanied with 
vouchers when practicable, and hand over to his successor in 
office all moneys, books, papers, or other property held and re- 
ceived by virtue of his office; he shall provide a suitable place 
for the society to hold its sessions, fuel, lights, stationery, and other 
necessary conveniences. 

"Art. IX. The Censors shall examine applicants for member- 
ship, and^if. in their opinion, such applicants are worthy to be ad- 
mitted they shall report accordingly. No person shall be admitted 
to an e.xamination until he produces satisfactory evidence to the 
Censors that he possesses a good moral character and has studied 
medicine and surgery with some regularly authorized practitioner 
at least three years previous to his application unless he be a 
graduate of some regular medical college. 

"Art. X. One-fourth of all the members shall constitute a 
quorum for the transaction of business, but on all subjects involv- 
ing the rights, interests or standing of any member, a majority of 
all the members shall be present. 

"Art. XL The society shull have fhll power to adopt such 
measures as may be deemed most efficient for mutual improve- 
ment, for e.xciting a spirit of emulation, for the dissemination of 
useful knowledge, for promotirg friendly professional intercourse 
among its members, and for tlu; advancement of medical science. 

"Art. XII. It shall have power to censure or expel any mem- 
ber for unprofessional conduct, or violation of the Code of Ethics 



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468 



HISTORY OF HENDRICKS CODNTT. 



adopted by this society. It shall have power to raise money of 
its members by a tax of not more than two dollars, and the annual 
dues to the State society. It shall have power to fix a fee-bill for 
regulating the charges of its members for their professional ser- 
vices. It shall have power to adopt a seal for the use of the 
society. It shall hold four regular meetings annually on the 
third Tuesday of the months of January, April, July and Octo- 
ber, the April meeting being the annual meeting. And shall 
hold such other meetings as three members of the society may 
call. - 

"Art. XIII. Any member moving out of the county without 
giving notice to the Secretary sljall be dropped from the roll; also, 
any member may withdraw from the society after paying all dues, 
provided no charges for unprofessional conduct or violation of the 
Code of Ethics are against him. 

"Art. XIY. The society adopts as a part of its regulations 
the CodeofEtliics of the American Medical Association (National 
Code of Ethics). 

"Art. XV. The members of this society pledge themselves 
to observe 'alt the requirements of this Constitution, the Code of 
Ethics, the requirements of the State Medical Society to which 
this society is auxiliary, and that they will in no way countenance 
or encourage quackery in any of its forms or pretensions. 

"A-et. XVI. This Constitution may be amended at any reg- 
ular meeting of the society, by a vote of two-thirds of the mem- 
bers present." 

This was signed at the time by — 
Allen Heavenridge, Joel T. Barker, 
R. C. Moore, James H. Brill 

J. H. Orcar, 
W. J. Hoadley, 
J. N. Green, 

Wilson Lockhart, Thomas Evans 
Thomas F. Dryden, B. Mendenhali. 
" Recorded April the 10th, A. D. 1877, at S o'clock a. m. 
^ " Leroy Rawlings, 

'•'•Recordenr of Eendricks County^ 
I 
This society makes no fee-bills by which its members shall be 
governed, but every member is allowed to make such charges for 
his services as he sees proper. 



F. W. Smith, 
B. Bartholomew, 
I^. C. Talbott, 
W. F. Harvey, 



F. C. Ferguson, 
J. A. Osborn, 
Thomas J. Adams, 
L. H. Kennedy, 
Joseph Eastman, 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



469 



Below are the 
bership since its 
Adams, T. J., 
Bartholomew, B, 
Barker, J. T., 
Brill, J. H., 
Comingor, J. A. 
Cox, Plenry, 
Carter, Amos, 
Depew, D. J. , 
Davidson, A., 
Drjden, T. F., 
Depew, M. F., 
Dixon, C. R, 
Eastman, J. A., 
Evans, T., 
Ellis, Thos. E., 



names of those who have been admitted to mem- 
organization in 1854: 



Ferguson, F. C, 
Farabee, C. E., 
Green, J. N., 
Graham, Thos. C, 
Harvey, Thos. B., 
Harvey, W. F., 
Hoadley, ^Y. J., 
Heaveniidge, A., 
House, G. H. F., 
Hurt, G. K., 
Kennedy, L. H. 
Lockhart, "Wilson, 
Lawson, W. T., 
Moore, H H., 
Moore, R. C, 



White, J, F. 



White, C. A. 



Mendenhall, B., 
Mansbridge, J. W., 
Orear, J. H., 
Osborne, J. A., 
Oscar, J H., 
Parker, M. G., 
Eagan, J. S., 
Seller, Thos. R., 
Smith, F. W., 
Summers, H. C, 
Strong, J. T., 
Todd, H. G., 
Todd, David, 
Talbott, R. C, 
Wright, J. J., 




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CHAPTER X. 



BROWN TOWNSHIP. 



SiTOATiox. — Description. — Earlt Settlement. — Township Offi 
CERS. — First General Election. — Political History. — Popu- 
lation and Taxation. — Biographical. •. ' .- 

Brown Township lies in the northeast corner of Hendricks 
County, and contains about twenty-five square miles of land, in 
townships 16 and 17 north, ranges 1 and 2 east. It is bounded on 
the north by Boone County, on the east by Marion County, on the 
south by Lincoln Township, and on the west by Middle Township. 
It is drained by White Lick, which passes through tlie western 
side of the township, along which is a fine rolling country of the 
best kind of soil. Along the eastern border is also a high rolling 
country, from which the water runs into Eagle Creek. The cen- 
tral portion of the township is level, and, before artificial drainage 
was resorted to, very wet; but now almost every portion of it is 
well drained, producing the finest crops of corn of any portion of 
Hendricks County. The soil of Brown Township, both clay and 
alluvial, is of most excellent quality, and furnishes to the people of 
the township an inexhaustible storehouse from which independence 
and wealth are bsing rapidly drawn. 

Until 1S63 Brown included, besides its present territory, all of 
what is now Lincoln. It ■was named, in honor of James Brown, 
who was the first white settler within its borders. The first white 
inhabitant, however, within the present limits of Brown Township 
was David Sparks, who came in 1S27. Very few men settled in 
the township until after 1830. 

Brown is so situated as to have neither railroad station, town, 
nor postoffice within its borders. There are two churches — one 
Methodist Episcopal and one Missionary Baptist. More persons 
of foreign birth reside in Brown Township than in any other town- 
' ship in Hendricks County. In the central part is a very large 
settlement of Irish, to whose enterprise and industry the county 
owes the reclamation of a considerable area of valuable lands from 

(470 ) 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



471 



a worthless and pestilence-breeding swamp, and its transtbrraation 
into productive fields. In area Brown Township ranks as the ninth 
in the county; in wealth and number of inhabitants the twelfth; 
and in the density of population the eighth. 

OFFICIAL. 

Following are lists of the various township ofRcers, so far as 
they can be obtained, from the year 1833 to the present time: 

Justices of the Peace: Edward Railsback an(i Hugh Goudy, 
1833; James Ward, 1835; George Tyler, 1836; Benjamin M. 
Logan, 1839; Francis T. Leith, 1812; James Euggles, 1813; 
George Tyler, 1841; William Worrel, 1S45; George Tyler, 1S46; 
WhitsonjSTelson.lSlS; Asa S.White, 1849; Daniel B. South, 1851; 
Whitson Nelson, 1S53; J. H. Schenck, 1854; William C. Nelson, 
1855; Asa S. White, 1857; Ebenezer S. Watson, 1858; J. T. 
Burns, 1859; ^.^. Gossett, 1861; James Ballard, 1862; William 
McDaniel, 1865; Edward T. Doyle, 1866; Joseph Cooper, 1867; 
James Gandy, 1868; William Hopkins, 1869; Thomas J. Reed 
and William Symraonds, 1870; George Dickerson, 1872; William 
Cofi'man and George W. Howard, 1874; Hiram Gray and Adam 
Beaman, 1876; Thomas C. Dollahite and James Smoot, 1878; 
Thomas G. Reed and Thomas J. Sandusky, 1882. 

Constahles: George Tyler, 1831; Archibald Smith, lSS2-'3; 
Lemuel Shockley and .Joseph D. Happart, 1834; Gaten Manyfiold 
and Reuben Smith, 1835; Beverly Ballard and Samuel Betts, 
1S36; Beverly Ballard and Thomas H. Harding, 1837; Lewis Rice 
and Beverly Ballard, 1838; James Ballard and Armstead Ward, 
1839; H. H. Moore and Aaron Gamble, 1841; V. D. Brown and 
Richard Nash, 1844; John Bristow and Noah Harding, 1845; 
Gaten Menipee, Henry Evans and Mark HoUett, 1846; Manoah 
Swaim and James Constable, 1848; Isaac Nash and Robinson Tur- 
pin, 1849; Abraham Warrick, 1850; James Ballard and James 
McAllister, 1851; Joseph Wilson, John Hendricks and Henry 
Stewart, 1852; Stephen Call, William R. Callahan and Jacob 
Welshon, 1853; Enoch W. King, 1855; Albert S. Macca'y, Henry 
Stewart and Enoch W. King, 1850 ; Enoch W. King, Benjamin B. 
Goudj and William Harris, 18^7; Enoch W. King, H. Garner 
and I. G. Hoadley, 1858; John Berry, Robert C. Walker, James 
G. Hoadley, 1359; George W. Nash, Benjamin 0. Davidson and 
Vincent G. White, 1860; Henry Straughan, John W. Arbuckle, 
James G. Hoadley and William Harris, 1861; Edward Roberts, 



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HISTOEY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



Bailey Smith and John M. Rice, 1862; George C. Eugglcs and A. 
L. Brown, 1S63; William L. Ilatchett and Joseph Cooper, 1864; 
"William L. Ilatchett and F. M. Fitch, 1865; Bailey Smith and 
Joseph M. ToUe, 18G6; Isaac Pearcy and John Marvel, 1867; 
James Pearcy and J. Ed. Roberts, 1868; R. C. Walker and Ed- 
ward Roberts, 1869; Elijah Smith and Allen McDaniel, 1870; 
Elias B. Coombs and George T. Turley, 1872; Eli S. Bray and 
William Coombs, 1874; E. C. Toole and G. W. Spicklemire, 
1876; Lewis Herring and Lewis McDaniel, 1878; George W. 
McCrary and Josophus Dodson, ISSO; James jST. Hough and 
Erownlee Sandusky, 1882; Charles R. Reed and William Gibbs, 
1884. 

Trustees: Edward T. Doyal, 1854; A. Tharp, 1855; William P. 
Shirley, 1856; J. S. Lang, 1857; S. W. Hardin, 1858; William 
Hopkins, 1859-'61; G. G. Menifee, 1862; Ebenezer Tomlinson, 
1863; W. L. Shirley, 1864; Nicholas Lawler, lS65-'8; Allen 
McDaniel, 1869; William Hopkins, 1870-'2; J. P. Catterson, 
1874-'6; G. W. Spicklemire, 1878-'80; S. M. McCaslin, lS82-'4. 

Clerks: William Hopkins, 1S54; Asa S. White, 1856; George 
W. Nash, 1S5T; T. B. Dai nail, 1858 (office abolished). 

Trensurers: Lewis S. Hunter, 1854; B. M. Logan, 1856-'7; Lewis 
S. Hunter, 1858 (office aboli;hed). 

Assessors: Marion Ballard, lS70-'2; William C. Mitchell, 1874; 
Marion Ballard, 1876; John W. Smith, 187S; James Ballard, 
1880; James S. Hogan, 1882. 

FDIST GENERAL ELECTION. 

The first general election in which Brown Township participated 
was that of 1828. The poll-book and tally-sheet are yet in exist- 
ence, and begin as follows: " At an Election held at the hous of 
James Brown on the 4th day of August 1S2S for the purpos of 
Electing one Goviner one Lieutenant Goviner one Representator 
to Congress one Siiiitor one representative to State Legislater one 
Coriner the following is a list of the number of votes taken and 
also the number Each Candidate receive." The names of twelve 
voters follow, and, as they were nearly all the early settlers of the 
township, their names are w. rth recording: James Brown, Joseph 
Runion, Joshua Newham, William Harris, Thomas Nash, Daniel 
Newham, George Tyler, James R. Smith, Shannon Foster, Edward 
Railsback, Jesse Smith and Nathaniel W. Hults. For Governor 
James S. Ray received nine votes and J. T. Canby, two; for Lieu- 



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HISTOEY OF HENDEIOKS COUNTY. . 475 

tenant-Governor, Milton Stapp received eleven votes; for Eepre- 
sentative, John W. Cox received ten votes; for Senator, Calvin 
Fletcher received ten votes; while ten votes were cast in favor of 
a constitntional convention. ■ •• . •• 

POUTICAL. , 

In politics Brown has always been strongly Democratic. The 
only presidential year when it has failed in its duty to that party 
was 1S60, when, owing to the division of the Democratic vote 
between two candidates, Lincoln received a small plurality. The 
vote in the different presidential elections lias been as follows: 



1836— Martin Van Buren 73 44 

■William H. Ilarrlson.. . 28 

1844— James K. Polk 162 69 

Henry Clay : 93 

1848— Lewis Cass 124 19 

Zichary Taylor 105 

Martin Van Barea 3 

1852— Franklin Pierce 144 53 

Winfield Sco;t 91 

1856— James Buchanan 350 103 

John C. Fremont 147 

1360— Abraham Lincoln 210 12 

Stephen A. Douglas.... 198 
John C. BrecKinridge.. 29 
John Bell 1 



1864-George B. McClellan... 153 84 

Abraham Lincoln 68 

1868- Horatio Seymour '. . 171 9S 

Ulysses S. Grant 75 

1873— Horace Greeley 146 9& 

Ulyssts S. Grant 50 

1876— Samuel J. Tilden 153 10& 

Rutherford B. Hayes. . . 44 

Peter Cooper 40 

1880 -Winfield S. Hancock... 180 115 

James A. Garfield 67 

James B. Weaver 43 

1884— Grover Cleveland 199 142 

James G. Blaine 57 

Benjamin F. Butler 22 



STATISTICAL. 



The population of Brown Township was, by the census of 1S80, 
1,322. In 18S5 the number of acres of land assessed was 15,966.75 ; 
value of same, $378,630; value of improvements, $32,030; per- 
sonal property, S?6,507; total value of taxables, $497,217; number 
of polls, ISO; number of dogs, 139; amount of State tax, $686.65; 
county tax, SI, 497.61; township tax, $994.12; tuition tax, $442.76; 
special school tax, $840.56; road tax, $994.44; endowment ta.x, 
$24.86; bridge tax, $497.24; total tax levied, $7,102.54; delinquent 
tax, $450.32. 

BIOGRAPHICAL. 

Alexander H. Ariuckle, one of the prominent and successful 
farmers and stock-raisers of Brown Township, was born July 
14, 1836. In the spring of 1557 his parents, John M. and 
Elizabeth Arbuckle, settled in Brown Township on the farm 
now owned by our subject, where the father died. Eight of 
their family of eleven children are living— John W., Nancy, 
"William R., Washington M., Melvina H., Matthew H., Esther 



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474 



HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



and Alexander H. The deceased are — Martha, Franklin and Fran- 
cis M. The latter was a soldier in the civil war, and served 
between two and three years, a member of the Fifty-first Indiana 
Infantry. Alexander II. Arbnckle received a fair education in his 
youth, and subsequently taught school a short time. Since com- 
ing to Hendricks County lie has engaged in farming, and now 
owns the old homestead, wliicli contains 307 acres of valuable land. 
He is a liberal, public-spirited man, and one of the most substan- 
tial and influential men of the township. He was married in March, 
1859, to America Graham, who died in August, 1S79. To them 
were born four children — Alvin, Ulysses G., Ellison and John F. 
(deceased). In January, 18S1, Mr. Arbuckle married Eebecca 
Combs. They have one child — Mattie. 

James Ballard was born in Scott County, Ky;, Feb. 26, 1815, a 
son of Beverly and Hannah Ballard. In 1834 he accompanied his 
parents to Marion County, Ind., and the following year to Hen- 
dricks County, locatittg in the eastern part of Lincoln Township. 
Of a large family of children, but five are living — James, George, 
Amanda, Grandison and John C. James Ballard was reared on a 
farm, receiving a common-school education, and after leaving 
school engaged in teaching a short time. In 1840 he settled on his 
present farm on section 6, Brown Township, where he owns 125 
acres of valuable land. He is one of the leading agriculturists of 
the township, and a prominent and popular citizen. He has 
served as Trnstee of Brown Township one year. Justice of the 
Peace five years, and several years as Assessor. Mr. Ballard was 
married Jan. 2, 1840, to Sarah Corbaley, daughter of Jeremiah and 
Jane Corbaley, of Marion County, Ind. To them have been born 
twelve children, nine of whom are living — Hannah, Emily A., 
Francis M., Melvina,Zerelda, Albert, Mollie, America, and Ettie S. 

James P. Catierson, a prominent farmer and stock-raiser of 
Brown Township, is a native of Owen County, Ky., born March 
20, 1827. In the fall of 1832 his parents, James and Sarah Catter- 
son, moved to Marion County, Ind., and there he was reared to 
ma'ihood. He was a soldier in the Mexican war, enlisl^ing in May, 
1S47, and serving till July, 1348, and participated in many im- 
portant engagements. Afcer the breaking out of the Kebellion, 
be agiin enlisted in the defense of his country, in August, 1S62, 
and was appointed Second Lieutenant of Company F, Seventy- 
ninth Indiana Infantry. He was afterward j)romoted to First 
Lieutenant and then to Captain of his company. He participated 









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HISTOKT OF HENDKICKS COUNTf. 



475 



in the engagements at Perrjville, Stone River, Mission Ridge, and 
otliers of minor importance. He was wounded in the right foot at 
Stone River, and was discharged in April, lS6i. In 1865 he set- 
tled on the farm in Brown Township where he now lives. He has 
100 acres of valuable land, all under a high state of cultivation. 
He is an infiaential man in the township, and has served two terms 
as Trustee. Mr. Catterson was married Nov. 11, 1852, to Emer- 
ine T. McKee, daughter of "William and Jane McKee. To them 
have been born eleven children, seven of whom are living — Buena 
Z., James S., Louetta, Cora M., Sallie "W., Emma F., and Indiana 
M. The deceased ^re^ Alva R., Elzena, Minnie R. and Elizabeth 
J. Mr. Catterson is a member of the Masonic fraternity and the 
Grand Army of the Republic. In politics lie is a Greenbaclcer. 

Oeorge Dicker son \i a native of Muskingum County, Ohio, born 
March 7, 1833, a son of Jehu and Nancy Dickerson, natives of 
Delaware. His parents had a Ifcrge family eleven of whom are 
living — Perry, Lewis, Elizabeth, George, Samuel, Lawson, John, 
Mary A., Jane, Margaret and Samantha. George Dickerson was 
reared in his native county. In his youth he learned the carpenter's 
trade, which he has followed in connection with farming. He 
came to Hendricks County in 1860 and located in Brown Town- 
ship where he owns fifty acres of well cultivated land on which 
he has a pleasant residence and £;ood farm buildings. Mr. Dick- 
erson was married July 28, 1861, to Angeline Dickerson. To 
them have been born four children, 
living — Albert R., Effie A. and Fred, 
politics Mr. Dickerson is a Democrat, 
est in all public affairs, but has no aspirations for oflicial honors. 
He was once elected Justice of the Peace but refused to serve. 
He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

James G. Dickerson was born in Muskingum County, Ohio, 
April 21, 1827, a son of Burton and Sarah CWebb) Dickerson, his 
father a native of Delaware and 'his mother of Maryland. In 
1837 his parents came to Hendricks County, Ind., and entered 
forty acres of land on section IT, Brown Township, which they 
made their home till death. Their family consisted of seven 
children, three of whom are li'^ing — James G., Angeline and 
Mary J. James G. Dickerson was ten years of age when his 
parents came to Hendricks County. His youth was spent in 
assisting his father clear a heavily timbered farm. He has always 
lived on the oldjhomestead and in addition to the original forty 



but three of whom are 
Charlie is deceased. In 
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HISTORY OF HENDKICKS COUNTY. 



acres entered by his father, owns 132 acres, making a fine farm of 
172 acres. He is an enterprising, public-spirited citizen, and is 
one of the influential men of his township. He was married in 
October, 1850, to Sarah Snjdei-, of Marion County, •who died in 
March, 18S1. Four of the seven children born to them are living 
— James T., Marinda S., Melvina A. and Sarah J. In October, 
1882, Mr. Dickerson married Constant Starkey, daughter of David 
Starkey, of Marion County. He and his wife are members of the 
Christian church -which he has served as Deacon and Elder. In 
politics he is a Democrat. 

Joseph JTunUiOuser, deceased, was born in Virginia, Feb. 28, 
1830, and died on the old homestead in Brown Township, Oct. 20, 
1876. His fatlier, Martin Funkhouser, moved to Hendricks 
County, Ind., about 1846, and here he lived the remainder of his 
life. He was married Sept. 8, 1853, to Nancy E. King, a 
native of Kentucky, born Oct. 8, 1834, a daughter of William S. 
and Parmelia King, who moved to Decatur County, Ind., "when 
she was a child and later to Hendricks County. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Funkhouser were born seveu children five of whom are living — 
Sarah J., Ellis M., Viola A., Lucinda G. and Martin O. Cosander 
and "Wyatt C. are deceased. Mr. Funkhouser was an upright, 
honorable gentleman ; public-spirited and benevolent, he was a 
valuable citizen of the township and was esteemed by all who 
knew him. He was a prominent member of the Christian church. 
Mrs. Funkhouser resides on the homestead in Brown Township, 
which contains eighty acres of choice land all under cultivation. 
She is also a member of the Christian church. 

Milton Hendricks is a native of JeiFerson County, Ind., born 
June 13, 1831, a son of John and Linda M. (Buchanan) Hendricks. 
"When he was three years old his parents moved to Hendricks 
County and located in Liberty Township, where they lived till their 
death. His father entered forty acres of wild land, which was the 
nucleus of the home in the new county. Five of a large family of 
children are living — Sarah A., Milton, Catherine, Harriet and Ros- 
ana. Milton Hendricks was reared on a pioneer farm, receiving 
but a limited education. After leaving home he engaged in farm- 
ing for himself, till the breaking out of the Kebellion. In August, 
1862, he enlisted in the Seventy-ninth Indiana Infantry, and par- 
ticipated in many important battles and skirmishes. He was 
wounded in his left ankle jjint, arid was obliged to have his foot 
amputated. He was honorably discharged in February, 18G3, and 






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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



477 



after his return Home again engaged in agricultural pursuits. He 
owns a fine farm of 107 acres, and his improvements are among 
the best in the township. He is a prominent and highly esteemed 
citizen of the county and has been elected to different positions of 
trust and responsibility. Mr. Hendricks was married March 14, 
1858, to Mary E. Sparks, daughter of Galen and Lydia Sparks, 
early settlers of Hendricks County. To them have been born 
eight children, six of whom are living — Cora A., Myra J., Orestes 
H., Yada B., Lora M. and Erie G. Mary and Charles T. are de- 
ceased. 

William J. Herring^ deceased, was a native of Harrison County, 
Ky., born Jan. 20, 1S24, a son of George and Elizibeth Herring. 
"When he was a boy he accompmied his parents to Hendricks 
County, and here he grew to manhood. He was married Feb. 24, 
1848, to Isabel Worrell, daughter of Richard and Jane Worrell, 
natives of Kentucky and early settlers of Hendricks County, where 
her mother died. Her father is now living in Kansas. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Herring were born four children— Richard, Mary A., 
Martha M. (deceased) and Elizabeth J. Mr. Herring was an lion- 
orable, npright Christian man, a member of the Missionary Bap- 
tist churcli. He was a liberal, public-spirited citizen and was loved 
and esteemed by all who knew him. He died April 3, 1876. His 
widow resides on the old homestead on section 34, Brown Town- 
ship, and is one of the most estimable and respected of Brown's 
citizens. 

Joseph HoUoway is a native of Surrey County, Va., a son of Will- 
iam and Winifred Hollo way, and was born Sept. 10, IS 11. In 
1831 he accompanied his father to Marion County, Ind., but the 
same year his father went to Tennessee, where he remained five 
years and then came again to Indiana. Joseph entered 164 acres 
of Government land in Brown Townsliip, Hendricks County, and 
went bravely to work to make a farm out of an uncultivated and 
heavily timbered tra':t of land. His industry and energy have won 
him success and he now has one of the best farms in the town- 
ship and has a pleasant homo for his declining years. He was mar- 
ried in 1832 to Elizabeth Cool, daughter of William and Polly 
Cool, natives of Pennsylvania. To them have been born eight 
children — Mary E., JohnW., Eliza A., Henry E., David W., Indi- 
ana, Willis G. and George W. ; the latter is deceased. In politics 
Mr. Holloway is a Democrat. He is a member of Brownsburg 
Lodge, No. 211, F. & A. M. 






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HISTOET OF HESBEICES COUNT r. 



Joseph Lemar, one of tLe prominent and enterprising farmers 
of Brown Township, is a native of Diilaware, born Jnue 26, 1807, 
a son of Lake and ^anej Lemar- He was reared in his native 
State and wlien twenty-seven years of age accompanied his parents 
and brother and sister to Franlilin County, Ohio, -where he 
remained a year, when he moved to ^tekAe County, and in 1SS3 
caine to Hendricks Cuunty, Ind., and settled on section 17, Brown 
Township, where he owns a fine farm of sixty acres all -well im- 
proved. Mr. Lemar was married in Preble Conutv, to Snsan 
Morrow. Of the four children born to them but one, Creighton, 
is living. Martha J., Clark and Frances A. are deceased. In 
polities Mr. Lemar is a Republican. He and his wife are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, 

George W. Marvel is a native of Muskingum County, Ohio, 
born April 29, 1831, a son of Kobert and Sirah Marvel, who eame 
to Hendricks County, Indiana, in 1835, and entered eighty acres 
of wild land in Brown Township. Here he was reared on a pio- 
neer farm, receiving but a limited education. He is one of the 
prosperous citizens of Brown Township, and owns 155 acres of 
valnable land. , When a young man he learned the plasterer's 
trade, at which lie has worked in connection with farming. Mr. 
Marvel was married in March, 1852, to Sarah Dickerson, and to 
them were born six children, but three of whom — Franklin P., 
Ottie M. and Posa M. — are living. Margaret, Ectie and Clara are 
deceased. Mrs. Marvel died in May, 1873, and the following 
October Mr. Marvel married Lncinda "Watson, of Vigo County, 
Ind. Mr. and Mrs. Marvel are members of the Christian church. 

John Marvel was born in Hendricks County, Ind., Feb. 10, 
1837, a sou of Pobert and Sarah Marvel, earh' settlers of Brown 
Township. He was reared in his native county, reseiviiig but a 
limited education, as his services were early required at home. 
He has always devoted his attention to agriculture, and is one of 
the representative successful farmers of the township. He owns a 
fine farm of eighty acres, and his improvements are an:i0Tig the 
best in the township. He was married in February, 1859, to 
Mary L. Wilson, and to them have been born eight children, but 
three of whom are livino; — Canala, Evert and Annie. 

CD ? 

James W. Phlllijps, one of the successful farnners of Brown 
Township, is a native of Jefferson County, Ind., born April 7, 
1837, a son of Tiiomas and Susan Phillips. His fiither was a na- 
tive of !^orth Carolina, and immigrated to Indiana with his parents 



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HISTOET OF HENDRICKS COUNTT. 



479 



in an early day. Of ten children born to his parents six are living 
— Newton E., James ^Y., Alexander W., Melville, Milton A. and 
Susan. James AY. Phillips was reared in his native county, and 
made it his home till the fall of 1865, when he moved to Hen- 
dricks County, and in 1S67 settled on the farm where he now 
lives, on section 22, Brown Township. His farm contains 105 
acres of fine land, and his imprgvements are large and comfortable 
and in good repair. Mr. Phillips is an energetic, industrious man, 
and is one of the prosperous farmers of Hendricks County. He 
was married July 4, 1861, to Lydia M. Gray, of Jennings County, 
Ind. To thera have been born four children — Charles H., Clar- 
ence, Iva J. and Koy. In politics Mr. Pliillips is a Republican. 

Isaac H. Schenck, ane of the prominent pioneers of Brown 
Township, is a native of Butler County, Ohio, born Dec. 27, 1815, 
a son of Samuel and Mary (Hoffman) Schencb. "When he was 
thirteen years of age his parents moved to Marion County, Ind., 
where he grew to manhood. In 1841 he settled in the woods of 
Hendricks County, entering the sixty acres of land on section 16, 
Brown Township, which is now his valuable farm. He has been 
one of the enterprising, public-spirited men of tlie township, and 
has assisted materially in its development. He has served several 
years as Township Trustee, and as Justice of the Peace four years. 
Mr. Schenck was married April 22, 1841, to Nancy J. Harris, 
daughter of Benjamin and Elizaboth Harris, of Marion County, 
Ind., formerly of Kentucky. To them have been born eleven 
children, eight of whom are living — Rebecca A., Caroline, Levi 
H., Riley. James V., Nora C, Thomas J. and George. The de- 
ceased are — Mary E., Tilman H. and Ellen M. Mr. and Mrs. 
Schenck are members of the regul ir Baptist clinrch. 

Harvey Turpin, son of Robison and Rachel Turpin, was born 
in Flendricks County, Ind., Feb. 28, 1837. He remained at home 
till manhood, and in August, 1862, enlisted in the Fifth Indiana 
Cavalry. He participated in many severe battles and skirmishes, 
among others Rosaca and Rheatovn. In July, 1864, he was capt- 
ured, and was confined in Andersonville Prison two months and 
thirteen days, and in Florence two mouths. He was exchanged at 
Charleston in December, 1864, a id was given a furlougli- home. 
He was discharged in April, 1865, and again took up the peaceful 
pursuit of agriculture. He is one of the substantial and enter- 
prising farmers of Brown Tovvnship. His homestead on section 
15 contains 110 acres of choice land, and he also owns forty acres 



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480 



HI3T0KT OF HENDRICKS COUNTT. 



in Boone Conntj and sixty in Hendricks County. He takes an 
active interest in all public affairs, and is a liberal supporter of 
any measure that promises benefit to bis township. He was mar- 
ried Sept. 5, 1867, to Parmelia F. Smith, who was born May 28, 
1840, a daughter of Aaron and Frances Smitli, of Boone Couuty. 
They have a family of six children — Eachel F.. Mary E., Yiola 
M., Flora E., Harrison E. and Homer E. Mrs. Turpin is a raem- 
ber of the Baptist church. 




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is. 



.J- . 



CHAPTER XL 



CENTER TOWNSHIP. 



Desceiption. — Early Settlement. — Towxship Officials. — Fiest 
Election. — Political. — Population, PiiopERTr and Taxation. 
— Danville . — Description. — Incorporation. — Town Officers. 
— BusixEss Directory. — Banks. — Professional Men. — 
Churches. — Societies. — Statistical. — Biographical. 

Center Township is rightly named, occupying a central position 
in the county. It contains about forty-six square miles in con- 
gressional townships 15 and 16 north, ranges 1 east and 1 west. 
It is bounded on the north by Union and Middle townships, on 
the east by Middle and "Washington, on the south by Liberty and 
Clay, and on the west by Clay, Marion and Eel River. It is 
drained by the west fork of White Lick, some of its tributaries 
and Mill Creek. In its course across Center Township, the west 
fork has eroded a deep, narrow valley, which makes some rather 
abrupt bluffs along this stream, but otherwise the surface of the 
township is beautifully undulating throughout most of its extent, 
the north part being level. The natural drainage of Center is 
the best in the county, except Guilford, and in it is the highest 
elevation of land in the county. Its soil is better adapted to the 
cultivation of grass and small grain than to that of corn. Almost 
every square foot of land in this township is utilized for cultiva- 
tion or for pasture, and in the northwest part of it are some of 
the finest woodland pastures in- the world. 

The earliest settlement in this township was in 1S23, but there 
were not over half a dozen families in the township until after the 
location of the county seat and the establishment of the town of 
Danville. 

OFl .CIAL. 

"We give the names of the incumbents of the most important 
township officers, with the years of their election. The list is as 
nearly complete as possible: 

(481) 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



Justices of the Peace: Samuel Wick, 182G (resigned 1830); 
Lewis Mastin, 1829 (resigned 1830); John C. Julian, 1830; William 
A. Stephens, 1831 ; Job Osborn and Noah Harden, 1833 ; Larkin K. 
Campbell, 1834; John Dunn, 183-1; William A. Stephens, Job Os- 
born and Eldred Huff, 1836; Samuel Brenton, D. S. Carter, James 
Dugan and William Miller, 1837; Stephen C. Crawford, 1811; 
James Dugan and Samuel Mclogue, 1843; Henry Miller, 1841; 
Edmund Clark, 1846; Samuel Melogue, James Dugan and James 
Christie, 1847; James Ward, 1848; John D. Burks, 1850; Jesse S. 
Woodard, 1851; Henry Miller, 1852; William Astley, Robert H. 
West and Job Osborn, 1854; Peter S. Kennedy, John D.Burks 
and Benjamin F. Tout, 1855; K. H. Morehead, 1856; Enion 
Singer, William Howland, Salmon Hall and Leonard T. Maccoun, 
1856; Allen P. Burks, 1857; George S. Rich and William 
Astley, 1858; Enion Singer, 1860; Julius A.Perkins, 18G2; Eniou 
Singer and Willis Tabert, 1864; F. M. Darnall, 1865; R. H. 
Morehead and William Henson, 1866; Samuel Craddick, 1867 
E. C. Dibble, 1S6S; Linn Rammel and James T. xMatlock, 1869 
R. H. Morehead and Enoch Henry, 1870; Simon Rammel, 1872 
E. H. Morehead and Enoch Henry, 1874; N. M. Taylor and 
Thomas Nichols, 1876; Simon Rammel, 1878; Thomas Nichols 
and James W. Hamrick, 1880; Asa Martin, 1882; Thomas 
Nichols, James W. Hamrick and Joseph S. Miller, 1S84. 

Constables: John Nichols and William Faught, 1831; James 
Parks, John Nichols and David Adams, 1832; Peter McRoberts, 
G. Hufford, Chirk Davis and D. C. Adams, 1833; James Dugan, 
Joel Jelf, Gideon HuQord and Isaac Williams, 1834; William 
Hiton, George Darnell, William Hazelrig and Samuel Melogue, 
1838; Zachaviah R. Clark and L Stutsman, 1844; Zaehariah R. 
Clark, James Douden^ P. S. Dickens and George P. Ellis, 1845; 
Zaehariah R. Clark and S. L. Hawkins, 1846; Joseph McCalmant, 
Boaz Williams, Samuel R. Pearson and Jonathan Irwin, 1847; 
J. L. Miller, Elijah Huff, James Stutsman and John C. Hagin, 
184S; John Brown, Aaron Hart, Jesse Thompson and Lewis 
Pearcy, 1850; Daniel D. Hambleton, Andrew W. Tout, John 
Glover and Jacob K. Moore, 1851; Daniel D. Hambleton, Charles 
Ficklin, Andrew W.Tout and Parks Brittain, 1852; Orrin B. Fenton, 
Hugh Miller, Edmund H. Straughan and Edwin S. Meek, 1853; 
John W.Hawkins, Daniel D. Hambleton, Elijah Huff and Andrew 
W.Tout, 1354; John Faucctt, Andrew Tout, George H. Walker and 
Edward Smith,", 1856; Leonard T. Maccoun, Simon Rammel and 



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HISTOEY OF HEXDRICKS COUNTY. .-L-'lS. 



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483 



J. Eussell, 1857: Isaac Ohaver, John Emmons and William W. 
Hajs, 1858; Isaac Oliaver, James Stutsman and John Emmons, 
1S59; James Stutsman, "William B. Keeney and James Stapp, 
1860; David Dotj, A. V. Bland and William E. Lee, 1861; 
Tiiomas Nichols, Jr., and John J. McMullen, 1862; James Stuts- 
man, William Welshans and John J. McMallen, 1863; Gazway 
Sullivan, B. P. Hyten and John J. McMnllen, - ISoi; Samuel 



Le&i. 



C. Workman and John Drain, 1865; Samael Leffen, 



t^ T.William H. JSTicliols and John Drain, 1866; Elisha Straughao, 

John Barton and Henry C. Tout, 1867; William Cross, Dr. 

;_ Furnas and J. Ohaver, 1868; Georj^e Dopew, 1869; John Whyte 

:~ and AVesley Depew, 1870;. Wesley Depov?-, Silas E.Cook and 

Andrew T. Tout, 1372; Jesse Cummins and Silas E. Cook, 1861; 

Jesse Cummins and J. B. Barton, 1876; John F. Crim and C. M. 

Baugh, 1678; Horace Colvin, Henry S. Curtis and Cyrus M. 

. Baugh, ISSO; Henry S. Curtis, William W. Comingore and Will- 

' iam Barton, 1833; E. M. Strau:,'han and E. C. Wills, 138i. 

Trustees: Robinson C. Russell, 1837; Abiaiu BUitkI, 1853; 
Lawrence S.Shulsr, lS59-'60; Squire Wade, 1361; James jSTich- 
ols, 1362-5; H. 6. Perkins, 1860; Alfred Welshans, 1867- 
'72; J. P. Dibble, 1874; John N. Shirley, 1876-'8; George W. 
Scearce, 1880; John ilesler, 1382; Joseph W, Beekman, 1834; 
George W. Scearce, 1885. ' ■ 

Cierlfs; H. C. Perkins, 1857; iSTicholas T. Hadley, 1853 (office 
abolished). 

Treasurer: James Christie, lS57-'8 (office abolished). 
Assessors: W. H. Nichols, 1870; Jesse Cummins, 1872; Amos 
Hook, 1874; E. M. McCoun, 1876; William Hutchings, 1878; 
Samuel B. Ensrainger, 1830; John B. Hale, 1882. 

FIRST ELECTION. 

The oldest document in existence pertaining to Center Town- 
ship is believed to be the poll-book and tally sheet of the general 
election held Aug. 7, 1826, when the people voted for congressman, 
senator, representative, sheriff and coroner. Altogether, sixty- 
six persons voted iu Center Township at this election, indicating a 
population at that time of perhaps 200. We give below the names 
of the voters, as entered on the poll-book. Many names are spelled 
incorrectly, but we leave it to the reader to correct them mentally. 
The list is doubly valuable, e.s it includes all the first pioneers of 
the township: 



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484. 



HISTORY OF HENDEICKS COUNTY. 



Francis Barbee, Thomas Hiiiten, Richard Chirty, Elijah Tomp- 
Bon, Dickison Toinpson, James Tompson, Jeramiah Cutbirth, 
Thomas Nichols, William More, Juner, George More, Senor, 
Thomas Shelton, Jonathan Wyet, Nathaniel kirk, Thomas Irns 
[Irons], Ezekioi More, William Cir.'cgj George More, Junior, Moses 
Williams, "William Moore, Sen., Joi'm Green, Samuel Gwin, John 
Briant, John Ristine, Martin Coopper, David Downs, Eli Twn- 
send, Samuel Herriman, Thomas Howel, Thomas J. Walker, John 
Hanner, Tomas B. Clark, David Adams, Robbert Coopper, Lemuel 
Hopkins, Joseph Dunn, George W. Pope, William Herren, 
Stephen Cook, Jesse Cook, Silas Briant, Abel Standly, Levy 
Kindman, Eli Moris, Job Osbern, Daniel Clark, William Pope, 
Buriah Dunn, Andy Clark, John Dunn, John Calor, James 
Downard, Pre=teu Pennington, Nirarod Harrison, James Logan, 
John More, John Downs, James Williams, David Medlock, 
Steplien Annel, Thomas Walker, Jefferson Medlock, P. S. Dickens, 
David McDonald, Levy Jessnp, George C. Brightman and Erasmus 
Ni'.-kles. 

At this election Thomas Blake for Cona;ress received sixty-two 
votes, and Ratliff Boon, two votes; Josiah F. Polk for "Sennittor," 
thirteen, Calvin Fletcher, thirt^'-seven, and John W. Redden, thir- 
teen; Thomas J. Medlock (Matlock) for "Representive," forty- 
seven, John Syms, fifteen, and Isahia (Isaiah) Drury, two; John 
Dunn for Sheriff, thirty-eight, and Robert Cooper, twenty-three; 
William Faught for "Curener," forty-one; Preston Pennington, 
nine, and P. S. Dickens, one. 

POLITICAL. 

Two years later, at the presidential election of 1S2S, the number 
of voters had increased four-fold, or to 252. Andrew Jackson re- 
ceived 166 votes, am ohn Qnincy Adams eighty-eight; plurality 
for Jackson, seventy-.. ght. The township has been first Whig and 
then Republican, continuously, except that it gave Jackson major- 
ities in 183S and 1S32, and in 1856 it gave a majority of one for 
Buchanan. Following is the vote at each presidential election: 

78 



.160 
. 88 

306 186 
.120 
1830— Wm. Henry Harrison. .231 61 

Martin Van Buren 170 

1841— Henry Clay. 376 27 

Jamea K. Polk 349 



1823 — Andrew Jackson. ... 

John Q'iiucy Auams 
1833 — Ardrew Jackson. . . . 

Henry Clay 



1848— Zaciaary Taylor 147 

Lewis Cass 117 

Man in Van Buren 2G 

1852— Winfield Scott 174 

Fra3akl in Pierce 146 

John P. Hale 7 

1856 — James Buchanan 306 

Joha C. Fremont 305 

Millard Fillmore 4 



30 



28 



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HISTOKY OF HEMDRCUKS COUNTTT. 



435 



18C0 — Abraham Lincoln 302 178 

Stephen A. Douglas .. . .124 
18G0 — JohuB'eckenridfTe .... 55 

John Bell '. 5 

1864— Abraham Lincoln 457 454 

George B.McClellan... 3 
1SG8— Ulysses S. Grant 3C8 310 

Horatio Seymour 188 

i872— Ulysses S. Grant 408 159 

Horace Greeley 249 



187G— Rutherford B. Hayes... 452 164 

Samuel J. Tilden 288 

Peter Cooper 15 

1880-James A. Garfield 544 272 

Winfield S. Hsncock. . .272 
James B. Weaver 12 

1884-Jume3G. Blaine 544 201 

Grover Cleveland 283 

Benjamin F. Butler. ... 15 
John P. St. John 10 



During tlie late war the people of DanriUe and vicinity were 
very strong in tlieir Union sentiments, and so wrought up were 
they in 1864 that luetliods were pursued in the political campaign 
that would tind few defenders now, and which were palliated, not 
excused, by the peculiar conditions of tlie times. Returned sol- 
diers and otlier Unionists held the polls, and by one means and 
anotRer kept the Democratic vote down to three, while 457 votes 
were given for the Union ticket. Tliis and other incidents caused 
many of the Democratic citizens of the county to conceive a dislike 
for Danville which has lasted to this day, and which has had a per- 
manently injurious effect upon the business of what ought to be a 
more thriving town. The ill-fetling was such during the later years 
of the war that some Democrats threatened to come and burn the 
court-house, and for a time this structure was carefully guarded 
and the streets regularly patrolled by the patriotic Danvilleites. 

STATISTICAL. 

The population of Center Township was in ISSO by the United 
States census 3,255, about half of this number being in Danville. 
The following statistics as to property and taxation, exclusive of 
Danville, are for the year 1SS5: Acres assessed, 28,593.05; value 
of same, SS04,99G; value of improvements, §128,039; value of lots, 
$1,248; value of improvements, -3785; value of personal property, 
§•285,903; total ta.^ables, §1,220,971; polls, 291; dogs, 224; State 
tax, §1,610.67; county tax, §3,526.58; township tax, §244.19; 
tuition tax, §2,026.31; special school tax, §2,011.76; road tax, 
$3,052.43; endowment tax, §61.05; bridge tax, §1,220.94; total 
taxation, §16,321.18; delinquent taxes, §350.14. 

DAirVT-.LE. 

In the chapter on "early history" is recorded the establishment 

of the county seat, and beginning of the towa of Danville. Daniel 

Clark, the first Justice of the Peace in Center Township, was the 

man who built the first cabin in Danville, in the year 1824. Sev- 

31 



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486 



HISTORY OF HEUDRICKS CODNTr. 



eral families at once settled here, to grow up with the capital of the 
new count}', and by the following winter the population was suffi- 
cient to support a school, the first session of which was taught by 
Wesley McKiiiley. The first physician was Dr. Garrett. Levi 
Jessup, the first County Clerk, kept the pioneer hotel, and was suc- 
ceeded in that business in 1S2S by Colonel Thomas Nichols, wlio 
came to Danville in that year and assumed the ditties of Sheriff', 




PDBLrC SCBOOL BUILDING, DAMVILLE. 

while he kept hotel and built houses as well. In 1829 he built the 
first brick school-house in tlie county, at Danville. The venerable 
Colonel is stiU living in the town, and th.ough more than fourscore 
years of age, is active and .n possession of all his faculties unim- 
paired, tie is now Justice of the Peace, and one of the most gen- 
erally respected and popnlar citizens of tlie county. The first 
church of the township was a Regular Baptist, and was organized 
in Danville about the year 182S. 




HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COONTY. 



487 



Danville is the largest town in the county, and is situated a half 
•nilefrom the depot of tiie Indianapolis, & St. Louis Railroad, on 
ail elevated position on the west bank of the west fork of Wliite 
Lick, and is surrounded on all sides by a beautiful country, pleas- 
antly diversified by iiills and valleys, and farms and woodlands, 
covered with a rich carpet of blue grass. In addition to the county 
public buildings described elsewhere, Danville contains a commo- 
dious and elegant public school building, erected in 1873, at a cost 
of §25,000, the Central Normal College and Business Institute, 
and fine churches, some of which are very creditable structures. 
The business portions of the town are generally well built, and 
consist of substantial two and three story brick blocks. No town 
of its size in Indiana has a greater number of neat, cosy and com- 
fortable residences, some of which are deserving of being called' 
elegant. The citizens justly pride themselves on the educational 
and religious privileges of the place, and the high standard of 
morality which society here maintains. 

There is not a saloon in the town, and indeed there has not been 
one in the county for a third of a century. Attempts have been 
made at various times to obtain licenses and sell liquor here, but in 
every case the parties have been prevented, ia one way or another. 

INCORPORATION. 

Danville was incorporated early in its history, as is seen from 
the follov/ing record: 

"We, the undersigned. President and Clerk of an election held 
at the court-house in the town of Danville, on the 24th day of Janu- 
ary, A. D. 183.0, agreeably to an order of the Board of County 
Commissioners, within and for the county of Hendricks, at their 
January' term, 183.5, fur the purpose of electing five Trustees to 
serve the corporation ot said town of Danville, do certify that at 
the election aforesaid, we, the undersigned, President and Clerk as 
aforesaid, after being duly sworn according to law, dii^ proceed to 
lay off the said town into five districts, as follows, to wit: District 
No. One is composed of Blocks Nos. 1, 2, 3, 14, 15 and 16; District 
No. Two, of Blocks Nos. 17, IS, 19, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33 and 34; Dis- 
trict No. Three,of Blocks Nos. 4,13,28 and 35; DistrictNo.Four, of 
Blocks Nos. 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12; District No. Five,of Blocks 
Nos. 20, 21, 22, 2.3, 24, 25, 26, 27, 36, 37, 3Sand 39; and after the 
division of said town into districts, and the same being made 
known to the qualified voters thereof, who then proceeded to elect. 









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4SS 



HISTOEY OF HENDPaCKS COUNTY. 



one Trustee from each districl,^ whereupon the following persons 
were duly elected, to wit: District jSTo. One,' Henry G. Todd; Dis- 
trict No. Two, Jubal Lee; District No. Three, Charles B. Naylor; 
District .No. Four, James il. Gregg; and District No. Five, Will- 
iam S. Crawford. The foregoing certificate given pursuant to the re- 
vised code for such case made and provided, together with an act 
entitled ' An act amendatory of the act entitled an act for the in- 
coporation of towns,' approved Feb. 2, 1832. Given under our 
hands and seals, this 27th day of January, 1S35. 

"J. W. Gregg, President. 

"Heney G. Todd, Clerk." 
After some years, tlie town surrendered its corporate charter, but 
it was re-incorporated in 1859. 

OFFICIAL. 

The officials now serving are as follows: Trustees, First "Ward, 
TV. T. Lawson; Second Ward, J. J. Bell; Third Ward, Thad. S. 
Adams; Fourth Ward, E. il. Hall (President); Fifth Ward, James 
L. McCoun; Treasurer, L. D. Ravvlings; Clerk, George C. Harvey; 
Marshal, George W. Long; Chief Fireman, J. J. Bell. 

BUSINESS DIEECTOET. 

That the business of Danville has grown to no mean proportions 
may be seen from the foUosring business directjry, compiled in the 
spring of ISSo: Adams & Emmons, abstracts; J. J. Bell, harriess; 
H. C. Bennetr, barber; Biddle & Douglass, hardware; Black & 
Dooley, wagon and blackssnith shop; A. E. Brattin, jewelry; W. 
W. Carrier, sewing machines; J. T. Clark & Co., meat market; 
J. W. Craddick, photographer; Thomas Dinwiddle, blacksmith; 
Dooley & McCoun, hardware: Zach. Dooley, grocer; Ddwnard & 
Parker, abstracts; Thomas Dudley, barber; Martin Englehart, 
blacksmith; First National Bank; Gerlash & Hennings, bakers; 
Yancy Gre^n, grocer; Hadley, Homan &Co., banker^; E. H. Hall, 
grocer; L B. Elawkiiis, sewing machines; Haynes Bros., flouring 
mill; W. W. Hicks, baker; B. F. Howell, grocer; Henry Howell, 
grocer; Hunt & Henry, millinery and dressmaking; H.Huston, 
grocer; J. M. JefFers, dry goods; Johnson Bros., barbers; Keeney 
& Son, feed and sale stable; Keeter & Co., grocers; Keleher Bros., 
druggists; Will A. King, editor Gasetie; James Lewis, dry goods; 
Manning Bros., music; Julius Marsh, druggist; McClelland & 
Thompson, undertakers; W. R. McClelland, furniture and wall pa- 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTT. 



489 



per; McCoun & Co., dry goods; James T. McCurdv,carrias(e maker; 
\y. H. McPlietridge, harness; John Mesler, grocer; Moore & 
Sons, restaurant; Charles Morris, tobacco and notions; Moffett & 
Riddle, editors RepuMlcdii; Fred Neiger, wagon shop; Nichols 
Bros., druggists; H. A. l^'atterson, boots and shoes; A. P. Pounds, 
hardware; J. W". Prendergast, photographer; Mrs. EL. H. Rader, 
jewelry; Rawlings Bros., dry goods; C TV. Keichard, druggist; 
John Rowe, livery stable; Charles Sanders, grocer; G. W. Scearce, 
boots and shoes; R. B. Sears, bakery and restaurant; Sherley, Sho- 
walter & Co., dry goods; I. M. Silvey, livury; Smitli, Pearson & 
Co., saw-mil! ; C. W. Stewart, books; G. W. Tout, meat market; 
Towles & Son, druggists; Abraham Trueblood, coal; Vaught & 
Allen, grocers; W. A. Vawter, dry goods; Wade & Norton, furni- 
ture; G. W. Wayland, books; Ed. "Weibcl, barber; Alf. "Welshans, 
merchant tailor; Jamss A. "Wilson, proprietor Mansion House. 

BANKS. 

The First National Bank was organized Sept. 23, 1S63, by ^Si- 
mon T. Iladley (President), Samuel P. Foote (Cashier), and twen- 
ty-live others, with a capital stock of St30,000. This was afterward 
increased to $165,000, and still later decreased to $S2,500, the 
present amount. Simon T. Hadley was succeeded in the presi- 
dency by Allen Hess, Jesse R. Cope and John V. Hadley. The 
last named has been President since June, 1877. The present Cash- 
ier is Benjamin F. Tliomas; Assistant Cashier, L. D. Rawlings; 
Directors, John V. Hadley, Benjamin F. Tliomas, Jesse R. Cope, 
Samuel Little, James A. Bowen, Cyrus Osborn and Enos Hadley. 
The stockholders number about fifty. 

The banking house of Hadley, Homan & Co., of Danville, was 
established in July, 1873, by J^icholas T. Hadley, Jehu Hadley, 
Joseph p.. Homan, Isaac Piersol, Mordecai Hadley, "William G. 
Hadley and Zeno Hadley. Business was at first carried on under 
the name of the Danville Banking Company, the capital stock be- 
ing $7-5,000. The business was thus conducted until .Jan. 1, ISSO, 
when all the stockholders withdrew, excepting Nicholas T. Had- 
ley and Joseph B. Homan, who constitute the present firm. 

PKOFESSIOXAL. 

The professions are well and ably represented in Danville. Those 
in the law are: Thad. S. Adams, L. A. Barnett, Richard B. Blake, 
George "W. Brill, Leander M. Campbell, Thomas J. Cofer, James 



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490 



HISTOEY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



A. Downard, Charles Foley, John V. Hadley, Georgia C. Harvey, 
Enoch G. Hogate, Robert F. Hollowell, Murat "W. Hopkins, Jo- 
seph F. Miller, Cliristian A. Nave, James 0. Parker, Newton AI. 
Taylor and James A. Wilson. The physicians in practice are: 
Bradley B. Bartholomew, Marshall F. Depew, C. E. Farabee, Will- 
iam J. Hoadley, Frank H. Huron (Hom.), Thomas W. Johnson 
(Horn.), Leroy H. Kennedy, W. T. Lawson, Madison G. Parker, 
and Charles A. White. 

CHURCHES. 

Methodist Episcopal. — Christianity is more than a creed, more 
than a philosophy. It has in it the vital significance which is the 



















METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH, DA>-VILLE. 



life of all creeds. It ha? a comprehensiveness which embraces 
everything that is permanen' in all of the philosophies, yet beyond 
them, beyond feeling and beyond intellect, Christianity means 
living and being. Words may express something of emotion and 
thought, but Christian faith can only be exemplitied in life itself. 
Life means development and growth. Christianity is most 



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HISTOEY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 4(<1 

thoroughly alive. The benediction which rested upon the few 
disciples that gathered around the Master when his farewell words 
were spoken to their sorrowing hearts, has become the power 
which to-day gives impulse to the civilization of the earth. The 
idea of "feeling and knowing" that "God's power was in the 
human heart," which, from the lips of the Moravian missionary, 
was dropped as a germ into tlie consciousness of John "Wesley, has 
budded and blossomed and fruited until now it brings spiritual 
sustention and strength to 25,000,000 of human beings. "What its 
influence has been unto those whose work is done, and whose re- 
ward has come, can only be computed by celestial mathematics. 

Other churches follow in the wake of progress and civilization. 
Methodism came here ',vith its potent influence strong upon those 
pioneers that first chopped down a few trees, and cleared away the 
underbrush to make room for the little patch of corn that should 
lielp out in sustaining life, until the cabin should be finished, and 
the clearing should be lengthened and broadened into the gan-den 
and farm. Its power gave strength and courage to them in their 
loneliness, when, between cabin and cabin, miles of forest and 
brush intervened, unmarked by roadway or path. In the dreary 
months aiid years of isolation, of sturdy, exhausting toil, of strong, 
stern endeavor, which is almost beyond our comprehension now, 
upon which has been founded the culture and refinement of suc- 
ceeding tirrtes, Methodism kept alive by its simple faith, courage 
to wait, to endure, and to do. Those who represented the Method- 
ist church in those times have done their work and passed to 
their reward, and they have left the earth fairer' through their en- 
deavors, and they have added nobility and strength to the human 
spirit by their faith, their devot'on, their eonstancy and their 
Christian lives. 

In the winter of 18S2-'3 there was the first Methodist preaching 
in this region at the house of Kobert "Wilson, near present Shiloh 
church, and a class was organized with Robert Wilson as Leader. 
This was the first class establisjied in the county. Soon after pros- 
perous classes were organized at Xorth Salem, Danville, Stilesville, 
"Wesley Chapel and at or near Lizton. At the first quarterly meet- 
ing for White Lick Circuit, held at Robert Wilson's on Oct. 25, 
182S, there were present John Strange, P. E.; Joseph Tarkington, 
A. P.; Peter Monicle, L. P., and Robert "Wilson and "Wesley Mon- 
icle, Leaders. At that meeting Aaron Homan, Gideon "Wilson and 
Elisha Kise were appointed a committee to make an estimate of 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



the^amoimt necessary to build a meeting-house near Eobert Wil- 
son 8. Early the next season tbe arrangements were perfected and 
^le house built-the first Methodist meeting-house !n Hendricks 
County. At that same meeting the receipts from the different 
classes were shown to be as follows: Martinsville, $4 3U- White 

$2^00; Talbot sS2.12i; CoUen's, $.43|; George MonucalfsS.OO 
John Denny, 8LO0; making a total of S19.93f, out of which sum 

itVx I"' • ^■' ''''''''^ ^^-'^^ ^"^ -^^^^Ph Tarkington 
§16.b2J These sums may seem small to us, but out of what they 

possessed they gave more than we do from our abundance, and 
more than that it is by the work so well done by those that have 
passed away that the possibility is given us to enlarge the offer- 
ings they laid upon the altars of the church. 

At the quarterly conference held in Danville, Auo- 4 1S38 it 
was ordered that R S. Dicken, Daniel McCreary,' Hez^ekiah Smi'th 

rt -d ^. n l^^n- -^•C'-^^f-'d be appointed a committee to 
divide the Danville Cuxuit into two circuits; also at the same time 
It was ordered that S. B. Caywood, R. C. Russel and 11. Eauimel 
be appomted a committee to form an estimate of the probable cost 

W^"r ? %TxJ '' ^"'^^"'- ^' ^ subsequent conference 
Wm. Henton, R. C. Russel, Wm. C. Cline, James Logan and Samuel 
Brenton were elected Trustees for the Daoville church, which was 

church. This church was occupied for public worship until 186.5 
when It was converted into a parsonage, ai,d the- chapel of the Dan- 
ville Academy was fitted up and used for church purposes 

Prior to thistime the church society in Danville had taken the 
.lead in educational • matters by organiring and building up the 
Danville Academy, which was operated ^nder the auspices of this 
quarterly conference, furnishing thereby educational advantages of 
a ^^^h grade. This enterprise commenced in 1858 and fasted 
until 1663 Among the prominent educators who at different 
times had charge'cf this school were Profs. Tarr, Lummis, 0. H. 

if^Jin'/; f -^^^''-n '"^ '^'"^^^ ^'''^^ ^" *^'^ enterprise the 
Methodists of Danville spent about $13,000. Much good work 
was done for the development of morals and intellect, and the en- 
deavor was kept up until there was no longer a necessity for any 
denomination to lead in school matters, a system of graded schools 
of high order having been established in the town. To the Meth- 
odists, more than to any other religious society, is due the credit 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 493 

for tlie educational advantages wliich have been possessed by Dan- 
ville in the past, and the high standard which exists now. In the 
spring of 1S7S the society transferred, for a nominal consideration, 
all of tlie school property in which tliey had invested so much to 
the Centra] Xormal College, and to-day the Methodists see with 
pleasure that the endeavors which they made thirty years ago are 
resulting now in this school, a pride to the town, and a blessing to 
its 800 pupils. The cliapel of the Academy was used for church 
purposes until it was transferred to the Central Normal College in 
1S7S. That year the present church edifice was begun and finished 
at a cost of 810,000, and on the 2Cth day of January, 1S79, it was 
dedicated to the service of God. Milton Henton, i^Ioses Keeny, 
Eloomfield White, B. K. Beale and IST. T. Hadley were Trustees 
during the erection of the present church building, and too much 
praise cannot be awarded them for the management and cure which 
has resulted in a church home so sightly, pleasant and commo- 
dious as is the First Methodist Episcopal Church of Danville. 

Danville was organized into a station in 1S53. Before that, 
among the preachers who followed each other in the circuit were 
J. Tarkington, Joseph White, Asa Beck, Israel Lewis, D. F. 
Streight, Hezekiah Smith, Frank Richmond, J. B. Demotte. 
After that came the following preachers in charge: C. S. Burgner, 
N. L. Brakeman, Samuel Godfrey, Allen Gurney, George Warner, 
Luther Taylor, D. F. Barnes, T. C. Workman, F. Taylor, Kelson 
Green, Thos. S. Webb, Francis M. Favey, Samuel P. Colvin, 
George W. Bower, James H. Claypool, Joseph C. Eeed, R. D. 
Utter, and the present incumbent, Rev. J. H. Hull. 

Tbe following is the officiary of the church: Trustees, Milton 
Henton, Fres. ; E. G. Hogate, Sec; Geo. W. Wayland, Treas. ; 
I. N. Estop and Simeon Templin. Stewards, L. D. Rawlings, E. 
G. Hogate, W. R. McClelland, Dr. F. H. Hnron, Dr. T. W. John- 
son, Dr. C. E. Harlan, Rev. C. W. Srewart, J. M. Graham, Wm. 
A. Vawter and J. M. Silvey. 

The present condition of the church society is most encouraging, 
looking to present usefulness and future results. 'The present 
pastor. Rev. J. H. Hull, was appointed to this station in August, 
1884. Formerly he had been Presiding Elder for this district, 
and is well acquainted with the kind of work necessary to the 
prosperity of the church and for the fullest evangelical results. 
The church parlors are so arranged as to be quickly made a part 
of the auditorium, and it is pleasant to state that the building is 






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HISTOET OF BENDEICKS COUNTY. 



thus frequently filled to its utmost capaeit}-, givino; accommoda- 
tious to 700 people. We all feel that tlie church, with its 260 
members, is ia good condition, numerically, financially and spirit- 
ually, with a house of worship which can be a home for a great 
many years to come, and we are looking forward with hope and 
confidence to a'more perfect work, to a much greater influence for 
the difi'asion of a knon-ledge of that " perfect love which casteth out 
fear." 

The first Sunday-school organized by the Methodists in Dan- 
ville was opened in the old brick school-house, located on lot 1, 
block 23, with Henry Eammel as Leader. Father Rammel was at 
that time an ordained Elder in the church. He died about four 
years ago at the ripe age of ninety-five. After this organization had 
continued one year it disbanded, and then there was a union Sun- 
day-school, with John Baker as Superintendent. This school met 
in the old Presbyterian church on lot 1, block 15. This continued 
one year, when the Methodists withdrew from their support, and, 
as a s'ociecy, were interested in no scliool until 18i0, when they 
organized again into a Sunday-school, with John Green as Super- 
intendent. Tliis school lasted two years and then disbanded. 

At a political meeting in the old court-house on Saturday night, 
in the latter part ot' October, ISii, there happened to be in attend- 
ance Hezekiah S. McCorraack, Milton Henton and "Win.V. Bishop, 
who were good sterling Methodists. In a conversatii^n then they 
three resolved that a Methodist Sunday-school should be started 
the next day week. Daring the service the next day notice was 
accordingly given out by the pastor, Rev, D. F. Streiglit, and on 
the day fi.-ced this school started on its career with about fifty 
pupils in attendance, and it has been increasing ever since, until 
now it nnmbers over 400, oflicers, teachers and pupils. Of the 
three brethren who, even better than they knew, launched it on its 
onward and upward course, Brother Milton Henton is still with us, 
teacher of class Xo. 1, and we are encouraged with the hope tliat 
many years may intervene before we are deprived of his eff'orts 
and Iiis presence. Brother H. S. McCormack is still living and 
doing his Master's work. • \Vm. V. Bishop worked with us until 
1876, when he moved to Lebai.on, Ind., where, in January, ISSl, 
•he finished his course and passed to his reward. Levi Reynolds 
and H. S. McCormack had charge of this school the first year. In 
1845 Levi Reynolds was chosen Superintendent and so served until 
April, 1846, when H. S. McCormack was elected. He continued 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTT. 



495 



in office until April, 1S60, wlien he was succeeded by Dr. Levi 
Ritter. He was snuceeded June 21, 1S6S, by Charles F. Hogate, 
who served until June, 1S69, when Dr. Ritter was again elected, 
who served until June 12, 1870, when he was succeeded by D. M. 
Cox, who died while in office in September, 1870. The school 
was then conducted by the Assistant Superintendent, A. Cham- 
bers, until Oct. 9, 1870, when Wm. V. Bisliop was chosen Super- 
intendent at a special election. Pie continued in office until June, 
1873, when he was succeeded by E. G. Hogate, who discharged the 
duties of the office until June, 1876, when R. B. Blake was elected. 
He was succeeded by A. Chambers March 4, 1877, who had 
charge of the school until Sept. 30, 1877, when he resigned, and 
E. G. Hogate was elected to his place. In June, 1878, W. R. 
McClelland was made Superintendent, and nnder his able man- 
agement the school attained to unexampled prosperity, and school 
and church can but be under lasting obligations to him for his 
efforts and his devotion to their interests. In June, 1881, he was 
succeeded -by E. G. Hogate, who, in turn again, in June, 1882, was 
followed by Brother McClellan, who kept charge until June', 1SS4, 
when Conrad E. Harlan, present Superintendeiit,was elected to office. 

The Secretaries of the school, as far as can be ascertained from 
the record, have been as follows: Edward Clark, John G. Harding, 
OIlie Chambers, J. S. Ogden, E. G. Hogate, Otis Hadly, James 
^McLean, Samuel Pierson, Mary Bishop, J. H. Pearson, Jennie 
Hancock, Jesse Cummins, Carrie Thornbro, James V. Cook, 
Laura Beckwith, Harry Waterous, Carrie Emmons, Elsie Stewart, 
Emma McCurdy and Laura McCurdy. 

The Treasurers have baen OUie Chambers, Milton Henton, 
Charles AVynants and Brother Geo. W. Wayland, who has been 
Treasurer for many years. 

The following is the roster of officers and teachers as the school 
is now organized: Superintendent, Dr. C. E. Harlan; Assistant 
Superintendents, Dr. T. W. Johnson and Miss A. Kate Huron; 
Secretary, Laura McCurdy; Treasurer, G. W. "VVayland; Teachers, 
Milton Henton, S. L. Hawkins, C. "W. Stewart, Mrs. J. T. 
McCurdy, Mrs. Serena Dunbar, Mr. S. W. Judy, Mrs. S. Hogate, 
Miss Meivie Hall, Enoch G. Hogate, Charles S. Wynants, Mrs. 
C. A. "White, Mrs. Olive Pendograst, Mrs. Mary Ogden, Mrs. 
Susie Pierson, Miss Delia Phillips, Dr. F. T. Huron, Mrs. J. T. 
Keeny, Mrs. Alice Pike, Miss May Pierson, John Trotter, Mrs. 
Wesley Hart, Mrs. E. G. Hogate and Miss Linia Walden. 



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HISTOEY OF HENDRICKS COCNTV. 



This school lias done much for the church. The whole church 
is manned to-day with tliose who are or have been constant and 
devoted workers in the school. Trustees, class-leaders, stewards, 
the whole officiary ot'tlie church are in the Sunday-school in some 
capacity. The church singing is done by the scholars of the 
school, and with the membership of the church to-day almost with- 
out exception, from the child wlio can hardly lisp God's name to 
those whose hairs are white, and with their work almost done, are 
awaiting the summons home, the first vital spark of religious en- 
thusiasm was lighted up in Sunday-school work. As the church 
of the present is the Sunday-school of the past, so the Sunday- 
school of the present will be the future church. This school is 
now on the rising; tide, and we are glad to see constant proofs that 
it is advancing in interest, increasing in numbers and growing in 
general efficiency, and may it loug be "as a city that is set upon 
a hill, whose light cannot be hid." 

Church, of Christ. — This congregation of disciples was organized 
in the fall of 1844- by Elder L. H. Jameson, of Indianapolis. The 
charter members were: ^Mr. r,nd Mrs. Allen Hess, Mr. and Mrs. 
Asa S. "White, Mr. and Mrs. James Odeil, Mr. and Mrs. "Wesley 
B. Sears, Mr. and Mrs. "Wesley Bell, Mrs. Margaret McPlietridge, 
Mrs. Celia Cake, and Mr. and Mrs. Samuel A. Verbrike. Asa S. 
"White, Indianapolis; James Odeli, Plainfield; Mrs. "Wesley Sears, 
Danville, are all who are living at this time. 

The first officers were: Allen Hess, Asa S. "White, Elders; "Wes- 
ley Bell, James Odell, Deacons. The organization was effected at 
the residence of Asa S. "White. For years tliey met to worship in 
private houses and in the old court-house. In the year of 1852 
the congregation was large enough to build a good frame structure, 
in which it worshiped for more than twenty years. 

They had no settled ministry for many years, but had the teach- 
ing of able, godly men, such as L. H. Jameson, Thomas Lock- 
hart, N. Waters, Wm. Jarrett, John O'Kane, O. F. Badger, A. I. 
Hobbs, and others. 

After the war of the Eeballion "Wm. E. Jewell settled with 
them-as their first pastor. He was an able minister, and his work 
and influence is still felt in tl is community. 

He was followed by U. C. Brewer, who has preached here more 
or less for thirty years, liaving been its pastor two different terms 
of several years each. No man can st-ind higher in all this com- 
munity. 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



497 



Following ministers have served the church: W. H. Blanks, W. 
S. Tingley, George G. Peale and Ira J. Chase, who is its present 
pastor. 

Revival meetings have been held by Jewell, Hobbs, Lockhart, 
J. H. McCullough, P. T. Russell, Brewer, Jarrett, A. K Gilbert, 
John 0. Miller, D. R. Van Buskirk, and the present pastor. 

The present beautiful and commodious house of worship, tiie 
largest in the city, is of brick with a biick chapel annex. Its 






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CHRISTIAN CaCRCH, DAXTflXE. 






foundation was laid in 1874 — the auditorium 60 .x 42, the chapel 
56 X 32. The cost was between §15,000 and $20,000. 
' The Sunday-school was organized in 1852, Moses Cavitt being 
its first Superintendent. The cliurch numbered at this time (1S53) 
about thirty substantial members. Its present membership is 
some 260, as shown by. the reccd. Its increase from its organiza- 
tion may be reckoned at more than 1,000. Tiie present Sunday- 
school is well attended, and has for its Superintendent Mrs. Mary 
Hadly, who spares no pains to bring the school to the hio-hest 
degree of efSciency and power. The schcwlis missionary first and 



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HISTOEY OF HENDRICKS CO0NTT. 



last, and has an enrollment of 240, with an average attendance of 
154. The attendance on the Lord's day meetings of the ciiurch is 
above the average. 

An anxiliarj society of the Christian TTomen's Board of Mis- 
sions meets monthly, with Mrs. Mary Hadly, Pres.; Mrs. U. C. 
Brewer, Treas.; Miss Jennie Davis, Sec. 

A Ladies' Aid Society is also sustained, looking toward keeping 
np the necessary repairs, caring for the poor, etc., which holds 
monthly meetings. 

The present church officers are: Pastor, Ira J. Chase; Elders, 
Dr. "Vy^. J. Hoadley and A. J. Bowen; Deacons, James Nichols, 
Thomas Eeynolds, George Acton, William McPhetridge and Albert 
McLain; Trustees, Hon. John V. Hadly, Hon. James Morgan and 
Adam Downard; Treasurer, J. J. Bell; Clerk, Ellsworth Acton. 













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PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, DANVILLE. 



The Presbyterian Church was organized in 1832, prominent 
among the early members being Daniel 3IcAuley and wife, "Will- 
iam McLeod and wife, Jacob K. Moore and wife, Alexander Morris 



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HISTOET OF HEND/CICKS COUNTV. 



i99 



nnd family, and Henrj G. Todd. Among the pastors who liave 
serred this cono-regation arc Rev. S.iniuel G. Lowiy, Hill, Moody, 
Chase, Theophilus Lowry, Henry Hammer, Samuel Wishard, Henry 
L. Dickerson, G. D. Parker and xL S. Dickey. The last named 
is the present pastor, and resides here. Services are held every 
Sunday. Tbe fii-st house of worship used by the Presbyterians wa 
a frame structure in the nortluvest part of town, erected at a cost 
nf 81,000. This was used about tjn years, and then tlie present 
church was built, at an expenditure of §5,000. It is aframo vStruct- 
ure on Main street north-east of the public square. The society is 
entirely free from debt. The present Elders are Albert Downard, 
Isaac Lawsoa and Henry G. Todd; Deacon, James Christie; Trustees, 
Jacob K. iloore, "Wiljiam Smith and Henry G. Todd. The mem- 
bership of the church is now but forty having been reduced by 
de])artures, etc. The Sunday-school has an average weekly attend- 
ajico of perhaps ninety, and its Superintendent is Mrs. Spillman. 

The C LuyJjovland Prc'ihyteriaro Church was organized by AY. T. 
Ferguson July SO, 1SS2. and is therefore tbe youngest church in 
Danville. The tirst members were John 0. and Elizabeth H. Wish- 
ard, C. It. Rose, Isaac and Elizabeth Piei'sol, Enama Carnett, Asa 
and Margaret Black, W. T. and Anna M. L^wson, S. A. and E. 
B. Hall, Lawrence, David M. and Mary E. Vannice, Elizabeth 
Scearco, Mollie E. Warner, Mary :i. Cooper, J. B. Harlan, Clem- 
ence and J^Tancy "W'illianison, Maiy C. ileCord, James and Susan 
Reed, Ruth A. Cash, Asa and Martha Martin, Charles and Jane 
Hadley and Ella M. Nave. The society first used tlie regah\r Pres- 
byterian church, then that uf the ilissionary Baptists. At the first 
meeting C. R. Rose, S. A. Hall and W. T. Lawson were selected as 
Ruling Elders: and Asa Black a^id Isaac Piersol were ordained 
Deacons. Rev. L. J. Hawkins, cf Franklin, was pastor fur the 
first half year, and then Rev. F. P. Witherspoon came to this pul- 
pit from Lebanon, Tenn. He remained two yea.'-c. until June, 1SS5, 
when he lelt, and was followed in this charge by Rev. A. H. Whate- 
ley, also of Lebanon. In December, 1SS3, the first steps were 
taken toward erecting a house of worship. January following, J, 
B. Harlan, W. T. Lawson and Charles Hadley were elected 
Trustees. At the same meeting B. T. Buforil, Isaac Piersol, S. 
A. Hall, John 0. Wishard and W. T. Law.9on were chosen as a 
building committee. Work on th3 church was begun in the sprino- 
of ISSi, and completed in Novenber of the same year, and ded- 
icated I^ov. 30, by W. T. Ferguson and the pastor. It cost 86,200 



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HISTORY OF HENDUICKS COO^TT. 



and will seat 250 persons. B. T. Buford has become Deacon in 
place of Asa Black. The membership is forty. Mrs. Anna Law- 
son is Superintendent of the Sunday-school, which has an averarre 
attendance of sixty to eighty. 

The Regular Baptist Church was organized early in the " thir- 
ties." Early members were William Faught and wife, Thomai 
Flathers and wife, Joel Jelf and L. T. Founds. Elder J. W. Thomas 
preached for some time previous to 1S3C. Elders TVilliam liar- 
din and Thomas Hooten each served for a number of years. The 
latter's back was broken by a falling shed and he died a year after 
the distressing accident. Elder Erasmus D. Thomas commenced 
iiis labors here before the war. Services are held monthly. The 
brick church Uocd by this society was erected in 'iSSi and 1S55, 
at a cost of $1,500. It will scat 500. The members, many of whom 
live in the country, number 100. The church has no debt. There 
is no Sunday-school. 

The Missionary Baptist Church was organized Nov. 9, 1850, by 
members from the Belleville church. Prominent in this move- 
ment were Moses Cavett and wife, EufusTharpe, Ricliard Christie 
and David Downs. They soon built them a liouse of worship, which 
cost perhaps $1,200. The money for this was raised chiefly through 
the efforts of the wife of the first pastor. Tlie present minister 
is ReV. Mr. Chaffee, a professor in Franklin College, who comes 
here' the second and fourth Sunday in each month. He com- 
menced his labors here in the spring of 1SS5. Previous to that 
date there was an interim of two years without services. This 
period came after the pastorates of Harper, Sherrill and Beman. 
The present membership of the church is forty. The Sunday-school, 
under the superintendency of H. 11. Crawford, has an average 
attendance of fifty. 

The Friends' Church (of Mill Creek Monthly Meeting) was organ- 
ized in 1S75. The first members were Henry and B. F. Howell, 
Wyatt Osborn, William F. Ilamrick, William Cox, John War- 
nock, John McPheters and their wives, Mrs. J.W. Estep, and E. L. 
Smith. Within a year steps were taken toward building a church, 
which was completed in 13Tr> at a cost of $4,000, and is entirely paid 
for; situated on the corner of Cross and South streets. Services 
are held the first and fifth days of each week. The membership is 
about 100, and the Sabbath-school has an attendant membership 
of sixty, and meets at 9:15 a. m. of each first day. Abraham 
Trueblood is Superintendenr. 



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HISTOET OF HENDEICKS COUNXr. 



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FBIENDS' CHDRCH, DANVILLE. 



SOCIETIES. 



Wester?!, Star Lodge, No. 26, F. c& A. 31., was organized under 
dispensation Feb. 10, 1816, and the charter is dated May 30 fol- 
lowing. James L. Hogan was the first "Worshipful Master; J. D. 
Parker, Senior Warden, and "William L. Matlock, Junior "Warden. 
Colonel Thomas Nichols, the venerable Justice of the Peace, was 
the first man initiated into the secrets of Masonry 'in this lodge, and 
also in Hendricks County. He was made a Mason Feb. 13, 181:6, 
and is still a member of the lodge, of which he was Master for 
twelve years. The present officers are: C. A."\Yiiite, W. M. ; "W^ill- 
iam Norton, S. ^\'. ; John Fitzgerald, J. W. ; T. J. Cofer, Sec. ; 
and M. G. Parker, Treas. The present membership is eighty-two. 
Lodge meets the Tuesday evening on or before full moon. 

Danville CAapto', No. 46, R. A. M., was chartered May 23, 
32 



502 



HISTORY OF H END KICKS COUNTY. 



1S60, with Eeece Trowbridge as the first Grand High Priest; E. 
Singer, King, and Jacob Fleece, Scribe. The present membership 
is thirty-two, and officers: W. H. Cash, H. P.; Thomas Nichols, 
K.; J. K. Moore, Scribe; S. S. Hall,Treas.; T. J. Gofer, Rec. Chap- 
ter meets the TTednesday after each full moon. , 

Colestock Council, No. 26, R. & S. M., was organized under dis- 
pensation Aug. 24, 1S6S, and cliartered in July of the following 
year. C. E. Perkins was the first Thrice Illustrious Master; T. N. 
Jones, Deputy Illustrious Master; W. G. Homau, P. C. "W. ; J. K. 
Moore, Recorder. The present officers are: E. D. Nichols, T. I. M.; 
^Y. H. Cash, D. 1. M.; S. W. Steele, P. C. W.; Thomas Nichols, 
Recorder. There are at present sixteen members of the council, 
which meets Monday on or before the full moon of each month. 

Danville Chapter, No. 39, 0. E. S., was chartered in 1879, with 
T. S. Adams as Worthy Patron; Eliza M. Johnson, Worthy Ma- 
tron; and Mary E. Cooper, Assistant Matron. The present mem- 
bership is si.xty. Officers: W. G. Parker, Worthy Patron; Ruth 
Towles, Worthy Matron; Sarah Hogate, Assistant Matron; E.J. 
Horaan, Treasurer; and Lottie Daggy, Secretary. Chapter meets 
every other Friday evening. 

Silcox Lodge, No. 12-3, I. 0. 0. F., was organized Jan. 14, 1853, 
by John W. L. Matlock, Ohio Cleveland, R. H. Morehead, Theo- 
dore P. Hoy, George F. McGinnis, J. B. E. Reed and J. S. Har- 
vey as charter members. The first ofScers were: John W. L. 
Matlock, Noble Grand; H. S. McCormicI-c, Y. G. ; William Astley, 
Sec; D. G. Wilson, Treas.; J. G. Mulligan, 0. G. ; William 
Jeffers, I. G. ; D. D. Hamilton, R. S. N. G. ; R. C. S. Maccoun, 
L. S. N. G. ; James H. Taylor, R. S. Y. G. ; R. Cope, L. S. V. G. 
Since organization 381 have been initiated into the lodge, and 
eighty-seven are now active members. The present officers are: 
Cyrus M. Baugh, N. G.; T. B. Jackson, V. g'. ; C. Thornbrough, 
R. S.; W. A. Talbott, P. S.; J. W. Tinder, Treas.; George W. 
Scearce, N. M. Taylor and 0. E. Harlan, Trustees; George W. 
Scearce, R. 3. N.' G.; N. M. Taylor, L. S. N. G.; C. E. Harlan, 
Warden; C. W. Wynant, Con.; H. N. Vannice, R. S. Y. G. ; F. 
Neiger, L. S. Y. G. ; H. H. Crawford, I. G. ; E. M. Tinder, 0. G. 
The lodge meets every Wednesday at their hall, which is situated 
in a building owned by the order. L. iL Campbell is P. G. Rep. 
to G. L. U. S., and is prominent in the State Grand Lodge. 
Thomas L. Bedford, of this lodge, was initiated in 1828 in the first 
lodge started in Philadelphia. He never misses a meeting, except 



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HISTOKY OF HENDEICKS COtJNTr. 



503 



when sick, and is one of the oldest Odd Fellows in the United 
States. 

Matilda Lodge, M. 47, D. of J?., was chartered Feb. 24, ISTl, 
on application of E. H. Morehead, S. S. Corbin, E. M. Tinder, 
Cnrlis King and A. R. Matlock, who were Odd Fellows. Tlie 
ladies initiated the first night were Jiatilda Morehead, Mrs. J. 0. 
McQnesney, Mrs. H. M. Smith, Mrs. Lizzie Cox, Mrs. M. E. 
Howe, Airs. L. J. Corbiu, Mrs. E. Singer, Mrs. William Newman, 
Mrs. E. Wynant, Mrs. W. M. Bennington, Mrs. "W. T. Lynn, 
Mrs. E. M. Tinder, Mrs. L F. Pierson, Mrs. S. G. Dibble, Mrs. 
George Chamberlain, Mrs. George W. Scearce, Mrs. A. Hart, 
Mrs. C. King, Mrs. A. J. Johnson, Mrs. J. T. Scearce, Mrs. C. S. 
Gaskill, Mrs. J. B. Harlan, Mrs. A. Lininger, Mrs. I. Matlock, 
Mrs. C. E. Harlan and Mrs. M. E. Cnrtis. The leading ofBcers at 
present are: Mrs. Sally Talbott, N. G.; Mrs. Anna M. Taylor, Y. 
G.; Miss Lon Thornbrough, Sec; Miss Cora.Baugh, Treas. The 
lodge meets every third Tuesday at Odd Fellows' Hall. 

Jesse S. Ogden Post, No. 164, G. A. R., was mustered April 
27, lSS3,by GeneralJ. E. Carnahan, Dep. Com. There were at first 
fifty-eight members, wbich number is now swelled to 111. The 
first officers were: Alfred Welshans, Com.; John Mesler, S. Y. C. ; 
James J. Bell, J. Y. C; Thomas J. Cofer, O. D.; Daniel Keleher, 
O. G.; Charles W. Stewart, Chap.; John W. Tinder, Q. M.; E. 
H. Hall, Adj.; Leroy H. Kennedy, Sur.; "William H. Nichols, S. 
M.; Stanley A. Hall, Q. M. S. The present official roll is: Alfred 
Welshans, Cora.; William Norton, S. Y. C; James J. Bell, J. Y. 
C; E. D. Nichols, 0. D.; J. W. Tinder, Q. M. ; C. A. White, 
Sur.; Ira J. Chase, Chap.; D. B. Keleher, O. G.; William H. 
Calreri:, Adj.; John Bayne, S. M. Two comrades have died since 
the post was mustered — Henry H-. Eader, Dec. 6, 1SS4, and Joseph 
W. Beekman, April 2.5, 1885. The post meets the second and 
fourth Friday of each month at Knights of Pythias Hall. 

Danville Lodge, No. 4S, K. P., was organized June 12, 1874, 
with twenty -eight members. The first officers were: C. W. Wy- 
nant, P. C; Thomas N. Jones, C. C. ; Charles H. Dill, Y. C . ; 
W. M. Hess, Prel.; D. B. Kelehe:-, M. at A.; Lee Hunt, M. of E.; 
Washington Gregg, M. of F.; I". C. Waterous, K. of E. & S.; 
J. T. Clark, L G.; Jesse Cummins, O. G. The membership is at 
present about fifty. The officers are: John Mesler, P. C; M. W. 
Hopkins, C. C; E. C. Wills, Y. C; C G. McCurdy, Prel.; M. 
Englebart, M. at A.; Lee Barnett, M. of E.; D. B. Keleher, M. of 



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504 



HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



F.; C W. Wynaut, K. of R. & S.; J. C. Whitehead, I. G • and 
A, Gentry, 0. G. Lodge meets every Monday night ' 

Jrr" tT""^'' ^- ■ ''' ^- ''• ^- ^' "^^ ------<i J-e 5 

18<4, among the prominent members being E. M Tinder Kp^,-.' 
Howe 1, ^Y. TLinu, James T. McCurdy, Aharon Hart J ^l^" 
and James O Parker. It had at one time fifty ^enibe sad 
prospered until ISSO. It had a nominal existence "until the fall J 
18S1 when it was dropped because the members mostly belonged 
to other orders of equal or greater interest to them. The I OR 
M. was a social and benevolent order. • ' 

TAe Citisens^ Building, Loan Fund and Savings Association 
of Danvnie was organized April So,' 1S83. It meets theT 
.Monday evemng in each month, and the directors meet the second 

ot $100 000 each. Tne second series was opened April I 1SS5 
The prohts of the lirst series for the first year were elht ;„ t,' 

T^ L. TT ;. P"''''''' directors are: James O. Parker Pres ■ 

Dr.F.n^Huron,V.P.; James A. Downard, Sec, d'w j 
Hadley, Treas.; and William R. McClelland. 

The name Mi^tual Insurance Company of Danville is bein<. 

organized, to insure property in tliis county. At nrecent .vrJr 
A (A n/^(-v I t ;. ^^'^•.i'jj. xii, piesenc wntino" 

«40,000 1,»vo been applied for. When 8300,000 of applie,ti„„° 
are,„, pol.ces ,ill be .rU,e„. The Director, a,e: Jar e 



James 



STATISTICAL. 

The population of the town by the census of ISSO was 1,59S- it 

College, who generally number several hundred. The following 
staust.cs ot property and tax'ation are for 1SS5: Number of acres 
assessed 2o .09; value of same, $1S,9S2; value of improvem:nt: 
^JjS,, Jb value of lots, So7,72S; value of improvements, $15^,440! 

polL, 2o0, dog., oO; State tax, SS26.13; county tax, $1 79S 30- 
T^^^lf^-'^' r^^' ^^^^°°^ tax,Sui.5,;'eLo;vm^; 
S S^loLs °° ' ^'''■''' '"''"' '^^' ?1^'013.26; delinquent 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 505 

BIOGRAPHICAL. 

Bradley Bartholomew^ M'. D., is one of the oldest medical 
practitioners in Hendricks County. He established his practice 
first at Belleville in the soiitheni part of the county in 1S32, and 
in the spring of 1S38 he removed to Crawfordsville, Montgomery 
Co., Ind., and from there to Danville in the fall of ISiO. He was 
born iu Charlotte, Yt., Oct. 26, 1804, a son of Levi and Eosanna 
(Castle) Bartholomew. When he was two years of age his parents 
removed to Coventry, IST. Y., and in 1814: they came to Ohio and 
settled on a farm in Clermont Count}'. At fourteen, his father 
gave him his time. '\ He attended and taught school untirhe was 
twenty years old wher he began to study medicine with Dr. A. V. 
Hopkins, of Bethel, Ohio, he having studied tlie Latin language 
with Dr. Dameron while teaching at Point Pleasant, Ohio, in 1822. 
He defrayed the expenses of his medical education by teaching, 
j having taught in Ohio and Kentucky. In 1S2S he went to Ghent, 
! Ky., where he taught and practiced medicine at Port William, 
: near Ghent, nntil the fall of 1831 when he came to Greensburg, 
Ind. In the spring of 1832 he parsed his examination before the 
Indiana State Medical Society at Connersville, receiving a license 
to practice in the State. He then went to Greenfield, Hancock 
County, and became associated with Dr. Lot Edwards where he re- 
mained until coming to Belleville, Hendricks County, in the fall 
of 1832. He attended lectures in the Miami Medical College at 
' Cincinnati in the classes of 1856-'7 and graduated as M. D. in Feb- 
ruary, 1857, and also secured a diploma from the Ohio Medical Col- 
lege at Cincinnati in ISoS. His long practice in Danville has 
j made his name familiar in nearly every household in this county. 
' The prevailing diseases when he first began to practice in the 
county were intermittent, remittent and typhoid fevers. At that 
; time ho was obliged to undergo many hardships, taking many long 
■ and tedious rides through unbroken woods with only bridle paths, 
' through all kinds of weather. He is a member of both State and 
I County Medical Associations, and is one of the founders of the 
' County Medical Society. June 15, 1856, he was married to Har- 
riet T., daughter of James and Pr'scilla (Tucker) "Ward, of Belle- 
ville, Ind. Her father was a native of Virginia and her mother of 
Kentucky, they coming to Indiana in 1812 and were the first set- 
tlers of Madison, Ind., then a hamlet of block houses inhabited by 
j Indians. They have four children living — Orion A., an attorney 



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606 



HISTOKY OF HENDEICK8 CODNTY. 



at law, Oharion, Iowa; Eev. William F., pastor of the Methodist 
Episcopal church at Corjdon, Iowa; Laura, wife of Nathan J. 
Scearce, druggist of Danville; Emily, wife of Dr. 0. M. -Colvin, of 
Des Moines, Iowa. Mary E. died Oct. 1, 184=}-, aged four years, 
and Levi W. died Nov. 2, 1871, aged twenty-nine years. Dr. 
Bartholomew and his wife have been members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church of Danville for many years. He is a member of 
Western Star Lodge, No. 26, A. F. & A. M., and has passed the 
chair of Worshipful Master. Politically he is a Republican but was 
originally a Whig. 

John Bayne^ dealer in boots and shoes, was born in Northamp- 
ton County, Pa., March 2, 1831:, a son of James and Lydia (Beisel) 
Bayne. When he was twelve he went with his parents to Lehigli 
County, Pa., and in his eighteenth year he went to Rushville, Pa , 
where he served two years at the shoemaker's trade. In the fall of 
1S54 he went to Canfield, Ohio, working there at his trade until 
the spring of 1856, when he came to Indiana and followed his 
trade at Dayton for two years. In the spring of 1859 he went to 
Avoca, Ind., and soon after to Bainbridge, Ind., where he remained 
till September, 1860. He then located in Marion Township, Hen- 
dricks County, where he carried on farming and shoemaking until 
July, 1862, when he enlisted in the Union service a member of the 
Eighteenth Battery, or Lilly's Light Artillery, for three years, ov 
during the war. In October, 1862, while on duty at Frankfort, 
Ky., he received a spinal injury which caused his discharge in Feb- 
ruary, 1863. He then returned home and when partially recovered 
from his injury, in 1864, be resumed farming and shoemaking. 
which he fullowed till 1878, since which he has been engaged in 
his present business in Danville. He was married April 14, 1856. 
to Miss Elizabeth Treap, of Canfield, Ohio. They have two chil- 
dren — Lydia L., and Kobcrt A., a teacher of North Salem, Ind. 
While in Marion Townsiiip Mr. Bayne held the office of Township 
Trustee four years. He is Sergeant-Major of Jesse S. Ogden Post, 
No. 164, G. A. R., and he and his wife are members of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. 

James A. Bowen, a farmer of Danville, was born near Flemings- 
burg, in Fleming County, Ky., Dec. 15, 1810. When he was fif- 
teen years of age he began to learn the tanner's trade near his 
birth-place, serving an apprenticeshipof four years. At the age ot 
nineteen he worked as a journeyman tanner in Flemingsburg a 
few months, after which he went to Cincinnati, where he worked a 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



507 






short time when he returned to Fleminojsburg. From there he 
went to Mason, Ky., where he worked till 1832, when he became 
associated with Thomas Darnell in the tanning business at Poplar 
Plains, Ky., under the firm name of Darnell & Bowen. At the 
end of four years he sold out and in 183G he came to Indiana, 
locating in what is now Maysville, in Putnam County, where he 
engaged in tanning till about 1SJ:2. He then purchased a farm 
near Maysville, to which he moved his tan-yard aud carried on 
farming and tanning till 1852, when he devoted his entire tirae to 
his farm nntil 1565. He then farmed in Center Township, Hen- 
dricks County, until 1S77, when he retired from active life and has 
since made his home in Danville where he expects to spend the 
rest of his days. He has been twice married, his first wife being 
Kebecca Keith whom he married in 1836 and who died in 1839. 
He was married to his second v.'ife, Teressa Sander, Nov. 5, 184:0. 
They have eight children living: Nancy Jane, wife of James Ford, 
of Ladoga, Ind. ; Lydia Ann, at home; Mary, a teacher in Ala- 
bama; Eliza, widow of the late W. H. Scearce; Matilda, wife of 
Dr. Frank C. Furgeson, of Indianapolis; Amanda, at home; 
Ciiarles F., local editor of the Hendricks County Repuhlioan, 
and "William Y.,on a farm in Center Towuship. Robert C. died 
in infancy, and Oliver W.died when two years of age. Mr. Bowen 
and wife are members of the Christian church of which he is an Elder. 
George W. Brill, attorney at la.v at Danville, was born in Lib- 
erty Township, this county, Dec. 16, 1859, where he was reared. 
He was a sou of William and Jennett (Mathew) Brill. His father 
died when he vras fourteen years old. He was reared in his native 
place, and received his early education in the district schools, and 
afterward attended the Central Normal College at Danville during 
lS79-'80-'Sl-'82. He began reading law at home inlSS2, andin 
1883 he entered the law office of Hadley, Hogate & Blake as a law 
student, and iu the meantime taught school several terms. In 
March, 1883, he was admitted to the bar in. Danville but did not 
enter upon the practice of law until August, 1881, when he opened 
his present office in Danville, where he is meeting with fair success, 
and has his share of the law business of the county. His father 
was a native of Virginia and of German descent, and his mother 
was a native of Scotland. His parents came from Virginia about 
1857 and settled in Center Valley, Liberty Township, where his 
father followed farming till his death in 1874. His mother is still 
living on the homestead farm in Liberty Township. 



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508 



HISTOKT? OF HENDKICKS COUNTY. 



llordecai Carter, Deputy Auditor of Hendricts Counjty, was 
born in Guilford Township, Hendricks Co., Ind. His parents 
"were Newlinand'Beulah (Hunt) Carter, and both are descendants of 
pioneers of the county of about 1827. He 'was reared a farmer and 
educated in the district schools of his native place, and in the 
High School at Plainfield, taking a course of book-keeping at the 
'latter place. ' On reaching His majority, he traveled as a salesman 
for tlie implement house ofEwald Over of Indianapolis at times for 
three years, and while thus employed he sold the right of a self- 
opening gate which he had invented. In ISSl he, in connoctio'^ 
with J. B. Carter, purchased a saw-mill at Plainfield which tliey 
operated one year under the firm name of J. B. & M. Carter, he 
retiring from thefirmin October, 1882. He then became associated 
with S. Hiss, the firm name being Hiss & Carter, dealing in farm 
implements, wagons, buggies and carriages. Feb. 2, 1SS5, he was 
made Deputy xiuditor by Cornty Auditor John Kendall. He is a 
men'iber of the Society of Friends of Plainfield. He is Secretary 
and Trustee of McCartey Lod[;e, ISTo. 233, I. O. O. F., of Plainfield, 
and is also Secretary of the Hendricks County Horticultural and 
Agricultural Society. 

Thornaa Clai'h, of the firm of Clark & Co., butchers andicattle 
dealers, is a native of Hendricks County, Ind. He was born near 
Danville, April 13, 18iS, and is a son of S. G. and jMary A. (Mount) 
Clark, both of whom are deceased. He lived with his parents till 
he was twenty years old, then engaged in the marble trade with 
Samuel Steele under the firm name of Steele &vClark, behaving 
worked at the same business some time with Mr. Steele. He re- 
tired from the firm in 1877 and opened a meat market at Danville, 
being associated with different partners till 1884, when his present 
partner was admitted to the fi.-ra, the firm name being Clark & Co, 
Mr. Clark enlisted in the late war in Company C, One Hundred 
and Forty-eighth Indiana Infantry, Feb. 1,1865, and was discharged 
Sept. 5 of the same year. He was married Jan. 11, 1870, to Miss 
Melissa Adams, ofDesMoine;;, Iowa. They have one child — Ada. 
He and his wife are members ^f the Methodist Episcopal church of 
Danville. Mr. Clark began lifa with no means, but through his own 
efforts he has built up a per nanent and profitable business, his 
market being the oldest inDaiiville. 

William Thomas Conn was born near Louisville, Jefferson Co., 
Ky., Dec. 6, 1814, a son of Fuigh'and Julia Ann (Elankenbeker) 
Conn, who were natives of Virginia. He was reared a farmer 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



509 



and remained on the farm with his parents till attaining his 
inajoritj. He came to Indiana v/ith his parents in 1S32 and set- 
tled in Clark Conntj where he remained till 1840. He returned 
to Jefferson County where he was married April 20, 1837, to Miss 
Eiisebia N. Garr, born near Danville, Bojle Co., Ky., Aug. 7, 181S, a 
daughter of Louis and Nancy (Thrailkeld) Garr. When twelve 
years of age she removed with her parents to Jefferson County re-- 
maining there till her marriage. Eight children have been born 
to them — Miranda, wife of the late Benjamin Moon, of Center 
Township; Etna, wifeof James Rodgors, of Rochester, Ind.; Martha 
E., wife of Henry "Wiley, in Cantor Township; Mary A., at home; 
Edward H., a farmer of Center Tor.-nship; Samuel L., of Indianapo- 
lis; William N., of Eel River Township, and James F., of Center 
Township. Immediately after hi? marriage Mr. Conn returned to 
Indiana and located in Clark County. In 18-10 he returned to 
Jefferson County, Ky., remaining there till 1853 when he again 
came to Indi-ana and has since ])ursued farming in Center Town- 
ship, Hendricks County. He and his wife and five of their children 
are members of the Regular Baptist church. Two of their children 
belong to the Missionary Baptist, and one to the Christian church. 
Henry Harrison Cvatoford is a native of Hendricks County, 
Ind. He was born in Franklin Township, near Stilesville, July 
10, 1810, where he lived with his parents, Moses and Melinda 
(Churchman) Crawford, until manhood. Dec. 10, 1861, he was 
married to Miss Julia A., daughter of Andrew B. and Sarah (Bar- 
nett) Shelleday. They have five living children — Edward A., 
Sarah Hettie, Moses, George Waland and John. One child died 
in infancy, and a daughter, Myra Jane, died Sept. 18, 187-4, aged 
nearly six years. Since his mr.rriage Mr. Crawford has lived on 
the homestead farm of Mr. Shelleday, where he has pursued farm- 
ing till the present time with the exception of the time he spent in 
the army. He enlisted in August, 1862, as a private in Company 
C, Seventieth Indiana Infantry, serving till June, 1865, when he 
was discharged at Indianapolis at the close of the war, having 
participated in the battles of Rushville, Resaca, Cassville, New 
Hope Church, Lost Mountain, Kenesaw, Peach Tree Creek, At- 
lanta, Savannah and BentonvlU. He was with Sherman on his 
march to the sea, and was at the grand review at Washington at 
which city he was mustered out in June, 1865. He is a member 
of the Missionary Baptist church, and his wife belongs to the 
Presbyterian church of Danville. In politics he has always voted 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COTJNTr. 



the Republican ticket. He has held tiie ofEce of Deacoti of the 
Danville Baptist church since 18T4. 

James E. Daugherty, one of the prominent agriculturists of 
Center Township, was born Feb. 8, ISil, in Montgomery County, 
Ind., a son of James and Mary At\n Dacgherty, natives of Ken- 
tucky. His parents settled in Montgomery County in 1830. His 
mother died July 31, 1872, aged sixty-sis years. His father is liv- 
ing near Ladoga, Montgomery County- They had a family of five 
children — William W., Mrs. Nancy Stover, Mrs. Catherine Bird 
(died Aug. 1,1881), Mrs. Minerva Hashbargcr and James E.,who was 
married May 27, 1869, to Eliza Jane Maccoun, born in Jackson 
Township, in August, 1819, a daughter of John "W. and Melvina 
Maccoun. They have four children — Henrietta, Edgar, Charlie and 
Mary. In October, 1869, Mr. Daugherty bought and moved to 
his farm on section 31, entered in pioneer days by Jesse Kennedy. 
He has added to this property by purchasing the adjoining farm, 
and is now the owner of 556 acres all under improvement. Mr. 
Daugherty is also engaged ia buying and shipping all kinds of 
stock. John "W. Maccoun, father of Mrs. Daugherty, is one of the 
largest land-owners in Center Township. 

William T. Davis, junior member of the milling firm of 
Haynes & Davis, proprietorsof the Cominercial Mills of Danville, 
was born on a farm near Powellsville, Worcester Co., Md., xVug. 4, 
18-1:5. He lived with his parents, Todd F. and Levicy (Littleton) 
Davis, till reaching his majority, receiving only a common-school 
education. On leaving home he went to Salisbury, Md., and 
clerked in a store about two years. In 1869 he came West and 
worked in a machine shop in East St. Louis, 111., at engineering, 
about two years, and during that time he was in the employ of the 
I. & St. L. R. R. Company in Hendricks County. In 1871 he 
permanently settled in Danville, and was engineer in the Peerless 
Mills until 1878 when he was employed as a clerk in the store of 
Yancy Green, of Danville, till Jan. 1, 1ST9. He then engaged in 
the mercantile business at Reno, Hendricks County, which he dis- 
continued in August, after which he was engaged in business a 
short time in Indianapolis. In 1881 the present firm of Haynes & 
Davis was formed, he having purchased an interest in the Peerless 
Mills. In 1883, after great improvements, the name of the 
mill was changed to the Commercial Mills. While at Reno, Mr. 
Davis served as Postmaster. He was married Jan. 12, 1871, to 
Joanna Moore, of Danville. They have three children living — 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTT. 



511 



Levicy, Cheivor and Yirgil L. Loda died at fleno, Dec. 1, 1S80, 
aged S.ve years. Mr. Davis and wife are members of the Christian 
church of Danville. Ho is a member of Silcox Lodge, No. 123, I. 
O. O. F., of which he is past Grand, and is also a member of the 
Grand Lodge of the State of Indiana. 

Adam Doiunard, a retired farmer of Danville, is a native of 
Ohio, and was born in Fayette County, July 25, 1819. When about 
three years of age he was brought to Indiana by his parents, 
James and Elizabeth (Curry) Downard, who located on a farm in 
Guilford Township, on which the Reform School building at 
Plainfield is now situated, and where he lived till he was twenty-, 
two years of age. In 1843 he settled on a farm in Center Town- 
ship, where he farmed till 1850, when he removed to Marion 
Township. In ISGO he returned to Center Township, where he 
lived on a farm two miles west of Danville till 1869, when he gave 
up agricultural pursuits and became a resident of Danville. Aug. 
5, 1842, he was married to Miss Mildred Bereman, of Center 
Township, Hendricks County. They have had five children — 
Jesse James, who died Oct. 5, 1867, aged twenty-four years; Mary 
Elizabeth, who died March 10, lSi6, aged five months; William 
P., who died May 7, 1869, aged nearly twenty-two years; Thomas 
Allen, who died in April, 1854, aged nearly four years; and Oliver, 
who died Feb. 19, 1884, aged over twenty-Sve years. Mr. Down- 
ard and wife have been members of the Christian church since 
1842, and he has held the office of Trustee eight years. Mrs. 
Downard was born in Mercer County, Ky., Feb. 16, 1823. Her 
parents, Thomas and Nancy (Emmerson) Bereman, both dying be- 
fore she was twelve years of age, she in 1S35 came to Hendricks 
County to live with her brother, Jesse Bereman, with whom she 
remained until her marriaije. 

James A. Downard, senior member of the law firm of Downard 
& Parker, at Danville, was born in New Winchester, Hendricks 
Co., Ind., Nov. 15, 1855, a son of David M. and Cassandra 
(Morgan) Downard. He was reared on a farm in Marion Town- 
ship, where he obtained his primary education in the district 
schools. He afterward attended Butler University at Irvington, 
Marion Co., Ind., one year, an 1 during 1876-'77 he took a course 
in Bryant & Stratton's Commercial College, at Indianapolis, from 
which he graduated in November, 1877. He then immediately 
entered the office of Cofer & Taylor as a law student, where he 
studied till June, 1878, when he was admitted to the bar at Dan- 



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512 



HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



ville. He retnaiued in the same office till Aucriist, 1880, when lie 
began the practice of law with Thad. S. Adams, the firm name be- 
ing Adams & Downard. He retired from the firm in December, 
18S1, and became associated with Marshall Todd in the law_ and 
abstract business. In April, 18S-1, Mr. Todd was succeeded by 
James 0. Parker, -the firm name now being Downard & Parker. 
May 22, 18S4, he was married to Miss Maud L., daughter of the 
late William H. Donaldson, of Danville. In 1881 he was elected 
Clerk of Danville, holding the office byre-election for three years. 
He is a Master Mason and mej^mber of Western Star Lodge, iS'o. 
_26, A. F. tfe A. M., of which he has served one term as Junior 
AYarden. In 1882 he was elected Secretary of the Hendricks 
County Republican Central Committee, and was re-elected in 
1884. 

Robert H. Downard^ son of James and Elizabeth Downard, 
was born March 11, 1822, in Morgan County, Ind. He lived at 
home till his marriage, which occurred March 16, 1S18, to Cath- 
erine King, who was born in Kentucky, July 20, 1823. When she 
was nine years of age her parents, William and Elizabeth King, 
settled in Washington Township, where her father died. Her 
mother died in Illinois. Mi', and Mrs. Downard have had six 
children — Louesa, the eldest, who died at the age of fifteen months; 
William A. and Albert B., residents of Greenwood County, Kan.; 
Henry F. and Jennie May, at home; and Fanny L., who died at 
the age of eleven years. Mr. Downard bought the place where he 
resides in 1867. His home farm contains 252 acres of land, 
located in sections 6 and 31. In 1874 he rented his farm and went 
to Greenwood County, Kan., where he bought two farms, one of 
225 acres and one of 162 acres. He still owns these farms, which 
are now occupied by his two eldest sons. Mr. Downard returned 
to this county in 1882. In politics he is a Republican. He and 
his wife are members of the Old School Presbyterian church. Ilis 
father, James Downard, was a native of Pennsylvania. He spent 
his youth in Ohio, and from there went to Kentucky, where he 
was married. His wife was a native of Kentucky. After his 
marriage he lived in Ohio eleven years, and in February, 1823, he 
emigrated to this county, and located in Guilford Township. He 
was an energetic business man, and was possessed of considerable 
means. He entered 900 acros of Government land in different 
parts of the country, a part o:' the town site of Danville covering 
one of his land entries. He don^tted twenty acres of land for 



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HISTOET OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



513 



county buildings, on which the court-house now stands. Mr. 
Downard was in early days County Judge. His first home was in 
Guilford Township, and is now owned and occupied by the State 
Reform School. He reared a large family to maturity — Mrs. Cyn- 
thia Russell, died in Clinton County ; Mary Arm, married Rev. 
Andrew Prather, and died in Texas; Mrs. Jaue Burks, residino-iu 
Illinois; Mrs. Sarah Little, died in this county; Adam, of Dan- 
ville; Robert R., our subject; David M.j of Marion Township; 
Jonathan, died in California; William, died in Missouri; and 
Thompson, in Clinton County, Ii.d. James Downard and his wife 
are both deceased. 

Abram Eastcs was born in Shelby County, Ky., July 11, 1819, 
sou of Joel and Lucy (Sanders) Eastes. He was reared on the 
home farm, remaining with his pirents till he grew to manhood. 
He began farming for himself in Shelby County in 1842, remain- 
ing there till March, 1852, when he sold his farm and came to 
Hendricks County, Ind., purchasing his present farm in Center 
Township. In 1839 he was mf,rried to Miss Louisie Crook, of 
Shelby County, Ky. They havi si.x children living — Lou Ella, 
wife of James F. O'Hair, of Putiam County, Ind.; John William, 
farming in Lucas County, Iowa; Mary Ann, wife of Isaac Car- 
son, of Dayton, Wash. Ter. ; Walter, a farmer of Hendricks 
County; Jesse, traveling salesman for the wholesale house of Pen- 
field & Son, Willoughby, Ohio; ;md Charlie, at home. Five chil- 
dren are deceased — James Pleasanc, died Aug. 21, 1857, aged over 
twelve years; Henry Jefferson, died Dec. 6, 1864, aged nearly 
eighteen years; George Thomas, died Jan. 16, 1882, aged thirtv- 
three; Joel Franklin, died March 14, 1885, aged over three years; 
and Ira Urban, died July 17, 1871, aged over two years. Mrs. 
Eastes was born May ;M, 1821, in Shelby County, Ky., a daughter 
of John and Mary (Radford) Crook. She lived with her parents 
till her marriage, and was educated in the common schools. 
Although a member of no church, she was reared a Baptist, and 
still adheres to the doctrines taught by her parents. 

William Thom.jpson Eddingfield, teacher, was born Nov. 9, 
1850, at Pisgah, Butler Co., C'hio. His parents, John J. and 
Sarah Eddingfield, were of Erglish and German descent, and 
were married near Bethany, Butler Co., Ohio, in 1843. To them 
were born seven children, of whom five survive — G. W. E., a 
successful physician at Mace, Monf-omery Co., Ind.; Mary A., 
wife of J. H. Lynn, at Whitesville, lud. ; Oscar, farming on the 



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HISTORY OF HENJ)RICKS CODNTY. 



old homestead near New Eoss, Ind., with whom the mother makes 
her home, the father having died in the fall of 1S75; James C, a 
successful teacher, and our subject. The latter spent his early 
life on a farm near New Eoss, Montt(oraery Co., Ind., to which his 
father removed in the fall of 1S5S. His educational advantages 
were limited to a few months in the year in the country scliools, 
he having to assist his father to improve their farm, but he made 
the best use of his time, and at the age of nineteen was enabled to 
take charge of the school in his neighborhood, where he met with 
a good degree of success. The following year he taught at Center, 
two miles north, and the next year he returned to Greenwood, 
where he taught one year, giving good satisfaction. The next 
year he taught at Hunt's school, and the three years following at 
Maple Grove, two miles north of Ladoga, with marked success. 
In the meantime he spent one summer in the National Normal 
University of Lebanon, Ohio, and one spring and summer at the 
Northern Indiana Normal Scliool at Valparaiso, Ind. In Septem- 
ber, 1877, he entered the Central Normal College, then located at 
Ladoga, and resolved to take "he scientific course. Before the close 
of the year the school was removed to Danville, Ind., and the 
principalship of the commercial department placed in his hands, 
which through his efficient management increased in numbers 
and interest, and was soon one of the leading departments of the 
school. Having graduated with honors, he began the classic course 
in the fall of 1878, completing tlie course during the year, and 
during this time he taught three classes daily. Mr. Eddingfield is 
just closing his seventh year in the Central Normal College, and 
is now looking forward to a year's recreation in the West, when he 
hopes to return and resume his work in the school to which he is 
80 much attached. He was married at the Grand Hotel, Indian- 
apolis, by Elder U. C. Brewer, pastor of the Central Christian 
Church of that city, May 1, 1879, to Miss Bien Travers, sister of 
Prof. M. T. Travers, then teacher of penmanship in the college. 
Three bright children— Stella Bca, Ina Dea, and Frank Travers — 
have blessed their marriage. Stella is deceased. Mr. and Mrs. 
Eddingfield are active workerc in the Christian church, of which 
they are members. 

John W. Estep, a retired merchant and farmer of Danville, was 
born near Eichmond, Wayne Co., Ind., Oct. 17, 1815. His parents 
were John and Jemimah (Wright) E~tep,hi3 father a native of Mary- 
land, and his mother of Pennsylvania. They came to Indiana in 



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515 



1812, and lived in Wayne Connty until their death. Oar subject's 
educational advantages were very limited. He helped his mother 
prepare flax fur weaving, and assisted his father on a farm till his 
eighteenth year, after which he was allowed to keep whatever he 
earned. At the age of twenty he began teaching in the public 
schools of "Washington Township, Wayne County, wliich be fol- 
lowed a part of three years. By the time he had reached his 
twenty-first year he had accumulated enough money to purchase 
200 acres of Government land in Whitely County, Ind. He was 
married Feb. 6, 18iO, to Rachel Falls, of Wayne County, a native 
of Yirginia, by whom he had five children, all of whom are deceased 
except one son, Isaac Newton, a farmer of Center Township, near 
Danville. In 1853 Mr. Estep sold his farms in Wayne and Whitely 
counties, for which he received $1,000, and purchased a farm of 
180 acres in Floyd Township, Putnam Co., Ind., for $3,800, where 
he engaged in buying and selling hogs till 1859, when selling part 
of his property, he having accumulated about 600 acres of land, 
he came to Hendricks County. Here he settled on a farm adjoin- 
ing Danville, having purchased a half section of land in that 
vicinity. In 1S61 he was one of the prime movers in founding the ' 
Danville Academy, and was the first man to subscribe toward 
building it. The Academy is nov/ known as the Central Normal 
College of Danville. He lived on his farm, carrying on farming 
and dealing in everything in which there was any money, until 
1877, when ho retired from business and is now living in one of 
the most pleasant residences in Danville. He has accumulated 
about $90,000, much of which he has given to his children and to 
charitable, church and educational purposes. His wife died June 
4, 1884, being a member of the Society of Friends. He is a mem- 
ber of the. Jlethodist Episcopal church, having connected himself 
therewith in June, 1832. He was also of Methodist parentage. 
His present wife, nee N. J. Hurdle, was als'Crof Methodist parent- 
age, and is a member of the same church. 

<7/a/'^ ^. Farabee^ 2L. D., was born near Salem, Washington 
Co., Ind., Dec. 16, 1847, a son of Benjamin C. and Susan (Haghey) 
Farabce. He was reared on a farm until nineteen years of ao-e, 
when, in order to raise money vith which to educate himself, he 
began working on the New Alb;.iiy & Chicago Railroad, working 
and attending school alternately for two years. In the fall of 1869 
he entered Asbury University at Greencastle, Ind. (now De Pauw 
University), which he attended, teaching part of the time to defray 






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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



expenses, until 1S73. The same fall he came to Hendricks County 
and taught school there till 187S. Jan. 1, 1876, he resolved to 
prepare himself for the practice of medicine, and in connection 
with teaching he studied under Dr. \V. J. Hoadly, of Danville. In 
the spring of 1878 be entered the Kentucky School of Medicine at 
Louisville, Ky., taking- a summer course of lectures. In the fall 
of 1879 he entered the Medical College of Indiana at Indianapolis, 
from which he graduated Feb. 27,-1880. He began the practice 
of medicine at Danville in April, 1880, aud has secured a good 
patronage. He was married March 21, 1876, to Miss Cora P., 
daughter of Aaron and Margaret (j\[cKindley) Hart. They have 
three children — Bernice, Nellie and Archibald. He and his wife 
are members '>f the Society of Friends at Danville. Our subject is 
physician for Hendricks County poor, and a member of the State 
and county medical societies. He is also connected with the Tri- 
State Medical Society, and is Secretary and Treasurer for the Hen- 
dricks County Medical Society. 

Charles Foley was born in Indianapolis, Jan. 3, 1835, on the lot 
where the Joioriial building now stands. He is a son of Moses and 
Mary Ann Foley, the latter being a sister of the late Hugli O'Neal, 
who was atone time a most eminent attorney of Indianapolis. In 
1843 his fatlier sold the lot on which the building stands to the 
Koberts Park Methodist Episcopal Church, and moved to a farm 
neap Crown Hill Cemetery, where he grew to manhood arid where 
his father died in 1870. Mr. Foley spent the four years immedi- 
ately before the Rebellion- surveying in the State of Missouri. He 
read law in the office, of th-3 late Judge Newcomb & Tarkiugton, 
of Indianapolis, and in May, 1863, he commenced tiie practice of 
law in Danville, where he has been continuously eijgaged ever since, 
except during 100-days service in the army of the United States in 
the summer of 1S61:. He is engaged in the general practice of 
law. He was married Jan. 31, 1867, to Eliza Ann Leach, of Pitt5- 
boro, Hendricks County. One child has been born to them, named 
Bruce Foley after the family of George Bruce, near Indianapolis. 
Ho was born Oct. 2, 1876. Mr. Foley is a member of the Masonic 
fraternity. He is not a mjmber of any church. He has never 
sought political favors. 

Dr. Allen Furnas was born in Clinton County, Ohio, March 27, 
1821, the eldest of eight children of Isaac and Esly Furnas, native.^ 
of South Carolina, early settlers of Ohio, and in 1826 moved to 
Marion County, Ind., where they spent the last years of their lives. 



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HISTOET OF HENDRICKS COONXr. 



517 



His education was obtained under adverse circumstances, havioor 
very little opportunity to attend school. After the work on the 
farm vras done for the day he spent his evenings in studying by 
the light of a hickory bark or by scooping out a turnip and filling 
the cavity with lard, and putting a wick in it. His father was a 
physician and he therefore had access to some medical books, and 
after reaching manhood he went to Cincinnati and studied with Dr. 
Curtice, subsequently attending a course of lectures at the Fhysio- 
Medical College. In 18i5 he began his practice in Marion County, 
and in ISiT moved to Hendricks County and located at Danville. 
In 1851 he moved to the farm where he has since lived, three miles 
southwest of Danville, and for five years continued his practice in 
connection with his farming pursuits. Since then he has given 
his e.Kclusive attention to the work of his farm, making a specialty 
of fruit culture. He also pays considerable attention to the raising 
of sugar-cane, and is President of the Northern Indiana Cane- 
Growers' Association, and Vice-President of the National Associa- 
tion. He was President of the Indiana State Horticultural Asso- 
ciation two years. He is an able and frequent contributor to the 
State and National agricultural journals. His farm contains 160 
acres, and is now carried on by his son-^n-law. He was married in 
1847 to Zeruiah A. Hodson, a native of North Carolina. They 
have but one child, a daughter — Laura H., wife of William E. 
Mendcnh^U. In 1868 Dr. Furnas was elected to represent his 
county in the State Legislature, and was twice re-elected, serving 
six years. One term he was the nominee of both the Republican 
and Democratic parties. He is a birthright member of the Society 
of Friends. 

James Gorrell^ a farmer of Cencer Townsliip, is a native of Ken- 
tucky, born in Bourbon County in 1816, a son of James and Re- 
becca (Caywood) Gorrell, the father a native of Ireland, and tlie 
mother a native of Maryland, of Scotch descent. In 1833 he came 
with his mother and sister to Indiana and settled on a tract of un- 
cultivated land in Center Township, this county, three miles east 
of Dan\ille, on which he still lives, it being now a fine farm. His 
mother lived with him till her death in 1849. Nov. 1, 1S3S, he 
was married to Miss Amanda Uai.iilton, of Center Township. They 
have had eleven children, of whom eight are living — John, of Madi- 
son County, Iowa; Marilda Ann, wife of John Monday, living near 
Danville; Daniel II., of Iowa ; James M., of Center Township; 
Amanda Martilla, wife of Joseph Hashbarger, of this township ; 
33 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



William 0., of this township; Mary Frances, wife of John Hayes, 
of Center Township, and Charlie, at home. Martha, wife of Eobert 
Ramsey, is deceased, and two children died in infancy. Mr. Gor- 
rell came to Hendricks County before much clearing had been done 
in Center Township, and at that time Danville was but a small 
hamlet. At the age of seventeen he began to support himself and 
also his mother. He has been successful through life, and at 
present owns 236 acres of land which he has accumulated by his 
own persevering industry and economy. 

Marti7i Gregg, a retired farmer of Danville, Ind., was born in 
Grayson County, Ya., Feb. 14, 1811. He is the fourth of six sons 
of John and Elizabeth (Dickenson) Gregg. His father having died 
when he was only four years old, he went with his mother to Pat- 
rick County, Va., where ho lived until his eighteenth year. He 
then came to Indiana alone and lived in Centerville, AYayne County, 
until 1843 when he came to Hendricks County and purchased a 
farm near Danville, which is now the county poor farm. He sold 
his farm in 1863 and retired from the business. In 1864 he was 
elected one of the commiesioners of Hendricks County, which posi- 
tion he held byre-election for fourteen years, and during his term 
of service the court-house, 'county jail and county poor-house were 
built and he was chosen by the board to superintend the work. 
Jan. 24, 1839, he married Mary J. "Wortman, daughter of John 
and Elizabeth (Medaris) "Wortman, of "Wayne County, Ind. She 
was born in Hamilton County, Ohio, Feb. 3, 1816, and when eleven 
years of age she came to Centerville, Ind., where she lived till her 
marriage. They have three children living — Martha, wife of Henry 
Curtis, of Danville; Marv, wife of S. R. Holt, of Indianapolis, and 
Emma, still at home. Those deceased are — Sallie, wife of E. D. 
Nichols, died Feb. 30, 1880, aged thirty-six years, and Henry, aged 
thirteen, died Feb. 18, 1862. Mr. Gregg is politically a Republican, 
but was originally a "Whig. His wife is a member of the Method 
ist Episcopal church. 

James T. Hadley was born in North Carolina, July 16, 1796, 
a son of Simon and Elizabeth Hadley, grandson of Joshua, great- 
grandson of Joshua and great-great-grandson of Simon Hadley, who 
was born in Ireland, of English parentage, and settled in the Penn 
colony in the latter part (^f the seventeenth century. Thus the 
Hadleys trace their descent through 200 years of American ancestry. 
Simon Hadley brought considerable' wealth to the new colony and 
as habitually as he wore his clothes carried his money with him 













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519 



He was found dead in his stable and was supposed to have been 
murdered by his servant for liis money. He was a man of note and 
it'rfiuence. The Hadlejs have been noted for their thrift, both in 
this and the old country. The most of them have been farmers 
and all have owned the land they worked. Until the last genera- 
tion or two all have been Friends, and none were military men 
until the late civil war, when several bore afms in defense of the 
Union. About 1730 Joshua Hadley, Sr., moved to North Caro- 
lina and settled on Leaf Kiver, and from him the families in this 
county trace their origin. Our subject, James T. Hadley, lived 
in his native State till manhood, and there married Elizabeth Ricli- 
. ardson, a native of the same State, of English descent.' He was an 
enterprising, and, for a farmer, an active business man. His anti- 
slavery convictions and ambition to live in a country where an active, 
progressive man would have a better opportunity to develop his 
powers, led him to leave his native State and move to a newly 
settled part of the country, and in 1825 he located in Center Town- 
ship, this county, bringing with him a family of eight children. 
He was an energetic and ingenious mechanic and found ample use 
forliis knowledge of tools in the new country. He manufactured 
wagons, worked at the blacksmith's forge, built a saw-mill at Green- 
castle which he ran two years, built on contract the depot, turn- 
table and other buildings for the railroad company at Greencastle, 
and in many other ways displayed the variety of his mechanical 
powers. In early life he was a Quaker, and although not identified 
■with them in his later life, their teachings undoubtedly influenced 
him to the end of his days. His family consisted of eleven chil- 
dren, eight born in North Carolina and three in Hendricks County 
— Mrs. Martha Nichols, of Danville; Jehu, of Franklin Township; 
Mrs. Julia Ann Vannice, of Marion Townsliip; Mrs. Nancy Mat- 
lock, of Danville; Mrs. Sinia Hadley, of this count}-; Edom E., of 
Marion Township ; Edmund R. , Ornm E. and John Oliver, deceased ; 
Mrs. Elizabeth Tinder and Mrs. Jane Homan, of Danville. Mrs. 
Hadley died Aug. S, 1863, in the seventy-fourth year of her age. 
Feb. 28, 1S71, while crossing the railroad with his team, he was 
struck by a locomotive and instantly killed. Thus closed a long 
and useful life, and of all the pioneers none are more favorably or 
better remembered. 

Nicholas T. Hadley^ of the banking firm of Hadley, Homan & 
Co., is a native of Chatham, N. C, where he was born Oct. 5, 182i. 
His parents, Simon T. and Mary (Hadley) Hadley, came to Hen- 



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520 



HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUXTY. 



<]ricksCountj, Ind'., when he was about two years old, first settling 
in Center Township two and a halt' miles southwest of Danville. 
When he was eight years old his parents located iu Danville where 
lie lived with them until he grew to manhood, he being educated 
in the schools of that place and in Wabash College, at Crawtords- 
ville, Ind. In lSi6 he was appointed Deputy in the County Clerk's 
office, where he served till 1855, when, being elected County Treas- 
urer, ho held that othce until the fall of 1857. He then resumed 
the position of Deputy County Clerk which he held till 1868, and 
being previously elected County Clerk, he assumed the duties of 
that office, holding that position four years. In January', 1872 
while County Clerk, he was elected Cashier of the First Nationa'.. 
Bank of Danville and served as such one year, when he helped to 
found the Danville Banking Company of which he was Cashier until 
it was succeeded by the banking house of Hadley, Iloman & Co 
He was married Aug. 31, 1852, to Mary J., daughter of Aaroi: 
Homan, of Danville. They have two childi'en — Otis C, clerking; 
in the bank of Iladley, Homan & Co. ; and Frank O., of Kansa;-. 
City, Mo. 

Stanley A. Hall, fanner, resides on section 1, Center Township 
where he settled in the fall of 1876. His farm contains 262 acre^. 
and is one of the most beautiful homes and most valuable farm:; 
ia__the township. It was entered frum the Government by Danie 
Hamilton, but bought by Mr. Hall of Jesse S. Jackson. Mr. Hal' 
was born iu Canfield, now in Mahoning Co., Ohio, in 1836. He 
came to Hendricks County, Ind., in 1859 and in 1862 enlisted ii 
the Fourth Indiana Cavalry and served in the defense of the Cnioi 
three years. He was Commissary Sergeant of his regiment twi' 
years and the last year was First Lieutenant. His regiment vra 
assigned to the Army of the Cumberland, and he participated ii 
the Atlanta campaign and other important events of the war. He 
was married in lS6i to Emma B. Archer, of CarroUton, Ky., with 
whom he became acquainted when in the arIn3^ They have fni- 
children— Charles S., Edvrard F., Herschel S. and Stella G. Mr. 
Hall's parents, Salmon and Maria (Austin) Hall were natives o: 
Connecticut and moved to Ohio when young people, and settled ii 
Mahoning County, and wore married in the year 1827. In ISit- 
they moved to Mount Pleasant, Iowa. In 1852 they returned ti 
Wells County, Ind., svhere they remained a few years, and thci 
moved to Danville, Ind. In the year 1862 they removed to Grove 
1 ind, Putnam Co., Ind., where they lived until their death, tin 



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521 



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mother dying in the year 1SS2 at the ago of seventy-five, the father 
dying in the year 18S5 at the age of eighty- two years. Their family 
consisted of nine children, namely: Cornelia, the eldest child died, 
aged threeyears; Edward, the youngest son, died, aged twelve years; 
Elizabeth, wife of John Dooly, died in Danville, Ind., aged forty- 
seven years. Those now living are Mrs. Sarah J. Biatchley, Mrs. 
Ella C.Dooly, Stanley A. Hall, Francis H. Hall, Sheldon "W. Hall 
nd Chester F. Hall. " 

Conrad E. Harlan was born at Upshur, Ohio, Aug. 19, 1842, 
second son of J. B. and Lucinda (Bonebrake) Harlan. Hia 
mother died when he was seven years old, after which he lived 
with his Grandfather Bonebrake till his sixteenth year, attending 
the schools of his neighborhood. He tlien came to Danville witli 
his father, and attended the Danville Academy three years but 
was obliged to leave before graduating on account of his father's 
illness. He then studied Latin and the sciences one year and at 
the same time studied dentistry with his father. At the age of 
twenty he commenced general practice, being associated with 
his father till he was twenty-four years old. Since 1SG6 he 
has practiced dentistry in Danville. May 12, 1861, he en- 
listed in the One Hundred and Thirty-second Indiana Infantry, 
and served in Kentucky, Tennessee and Alabama, returning home 
in September, 186-1:. He was married Oct. 17, 1866, to Annie M. 
Bedford, daughter of Thouias L. and Catharine (Hearne) Bedford, 
of Danville. To them wero born three children — Kate L., bora 
Nov. 1. 1867, a graduate of the Danville High School; Edith A., 
born July, 1870, and Wilbur K., born March 5, 1876. Mrs. Harlan 
was born March 30, 1847, and died Jan. 11, 1883. Dr. Harlan 
has been a member of the I. O. O. F. fraternity for twenty-two years. 
He has belonged to the Methodist'Episcopal church ten years and 
Superintendent of the Sabbath-school for the past year. In politics 
he is a Reoublican. . 

Joshua B. Harlan, youngestson of Aaron and Elizabeth (Gregg) 
Harlan, was born in "Warren County, Ohio, Dec. 30, 1815. He 
left Warren County May 12, 1888, and studied medicine eighteen 
months with Dr. Wilkinson, of Upshur, Ohio, at which place he 
engaged in the practice of dentis ry. Kov. 17, 1839, he was mar- 
ried to Lucinda, daughter of Conrad and Lydia Bonebrake, and to 
this union were born five children — Theophilus L., born Sept. 10, 
1840, and died March 24, 1859; Conrad E., born Aug. 19, 1842; 
Lydia D., born Jan. 16, 1844, died Feb. 12, 1866; D. Emma, bon» 



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522 



HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



Au^. 19, 1847, died July 23, 18i9, and Aaron, born May 8, 1849, 
and died July 27, 1849. His wife died July 23, 1849, and Oct. 22, 
1855, he was again married to Mary J., daughter of Thomas and 
Catharine Bedford, of Centerville, and to them have been born three 
children — Charles K, born Nov. 22, 1850; George B., born May 4, 
ISGl.and Helen E., born Jan. 5, 1866. Aug. 12, 1851, Dr. J. B. 
Harlan and Dr. 0. H. Kendrick opened a dental office in Center- 
ville, Ind., and Dec. 12, 1855, he formed a partnership with Dr. J. 
F. Wilson, in Greencastle, Ind. March 22, 1857, he removed to 
Danville and opened a dental office which is now carried on under 
the firm name of J. B. Harlan & Son. He has belonged to the Pres- 
byterian church twenty-six years. He has been a member of the 
I. 0. O. F. fraternity for thirty-six years, having passed all the 
chairs. Politically he is a Republican but was formerly a Whig. 

SamuelL. Hawhins, of Danville, Ind., was born in Bath County, 
Ky., October, 1820, a son of William and Abigail (McVey) Hawkins, 
with whom he remained until reaching his majority. He came 
with them to Danville in 1836, and when becoming of age, in 1841, 
he made a prospecting trip to ilissouri. In about a year he returned 
to Danville, and after attending school a few months he taught a 
subscription school in what is now known as the Huron district, 
in Washington Township, Hendricks Connty, one term of sixty-five 
days. He then began to learn the trade of a wheelwright in Dan- 
ville with his brotlier-in-law, W. H. Cash, working the first year at 
$10 per month and the second year at §12 per month. After serv- 
ing his time, instead of following that trade he engaged in the man- 
ufacture of furniture, which he followed until December, 1863, 
when he enlisted in Company I, JSfinth Indiana Cavalry, for three 
years, and during the \\'ar he was appointed Quartermaster-Ser- 
geant of his regiment. He participated in nine engagements, the 
most important being Nashville and Franklin. While at Gravelly 
Spring, Ala., in January, 1865, he was taken sick, and not fully 
recovering he was discharged for disability, at Port Gibson, Miss., 
May 17, 1865. He then returned home and a year later he engaged 
in house-painting at Danville, which he followed until 1867, when 
he was made Deputy Sheriff by William H. Calvert, serving four 
years. In the fall of 1872 hp was elected Sherifl' of Hendricks 
County, and re-elected in 18T4, serving two terms of two years 
each. He was then made Deputy Sheriff by his successor, A. B. 
Bryant, serving as such two years, having served in all ten years. 
He has since lived a retired life. Nov. 17, 1843, he was married 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COtlNTY. 



523 



to Miss Louisa, daughter of John and Lydia (Barnes) Cash, who 
was born in Pulaski County, Ky., April 8, 1824. She came to 
Hendricks County with her parents in 1831, settling in Center 
Township. Her mother having died when she was quite young, 
she lived most of the time with an elder sister at Danville, attend- 
ing school till her marriage. Mr. and Mrs. Hawkins are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church of Danville. They have four 
children living — Lydia, wife of J. N. Terry, of Philadelphia; 
Lucian B., of Danville; Retta, wife of C. B. Hauser, of Logans- 
port, Ind,, and Seldon T., foreman of the Hendricks County Re;piih- 
licaii, of Danville. Alleine died March 21, 1850, aged two years; 
"VVilber F., died Aug. 30, 1856, aged four years; Emma, died March 
1, 1859, aged nearly 'wo years and Nellie, died May 7, ISSO, aged 
thirty-fouryearis. Mr. Hawkins is a Master, Koyal Arch and Coun- 
cil Mason, and is also a member of Jesse S. Ogden Post, Xo. 164, 
G. A. E., of Danville. 

Murat W. Hoplcins, senior member of the firm of Hopkins & 
Hollowell, attorneys, was born in Brown Township, this county, 
Oct. 20, 1857, a son of William and Ruah Ann (Harding) Hop- 
kins. His father is a native of Maryland and came to this county 
in 1838, and his mother was born in Kentucky, and came to this 
county in the year 1833. Murat remained on the farm till his 
eighteenth year, attending the district schools and the Brownsburg 
High School till then, after which he taught in the schools of the 
county five years during the winter terms, attending the State Nor- 
mal School of Indiana, at Terre Haute, the remainder of the ^ear. 
During this time he also commenced to read lavr, and in the tall of 
1880 he entered the law department of the State University of 
Iowa, from which he graduated as LL. B. in June, 1881. He 
then returned home and taught school the following winter and in 
spring of 1882, he located in Danville, having been admitted to 
the bar in Danville, in October, 1881. Jan. 1, 1885, Robert T. 
Hollowell became associated with him in the practice of law. April 
20, 1882, he was married to Miss Allie L., daughter of Tyra Mont- 
gomery, of Mattoon, 111. They have one child — Kate Elliott, born 
at Danville, Ind., July 12, 1883. Mr. Hopkins and wife are mem- 
bers of the Christian church ai Danville. He is a member of 
Brownsburg Lodge, No. 241, A. F. & A. M., and is Chancellor Com- 
mander of Danville Lodge, No. 43, K. of P. In politics he is a 
Democrat. 

James M. Jeffera, merchant of Danville, Ind., was born in Cen- 



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624 



HISTOEY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



,ter Township, near Danville, July 3, 1840, a son of Lindsay and 
Elinor (Nichols) Jefl'ers. When about six years of age his parents 
moved to Danville where he was educated in the public schools. 
In early life he worked at the carpenter's trade, but on becoming of 
age he engaged in clerking until he enlisted in Company B, One 
Hundred and Eighteenth Indima Infantry, to serve six months, in 
1862. He served eight months, being on duty mostly in East 
Tennessee. After being mustered out at Indianapolis he returned 
to Danville where he clerked for several firms. He has also served 
as postoffice clerk at Danville several years under Postmasters S. R. 
Craddick and James Gregg. In ISSl he embarked in the mercan- 
tile business in which he is still engaged. He was married May 9, 
1872, to Miss Ann: Gibbs. He is a member of the Christian church. 
Rodney Jeget\ Treasurer of Hendricks County, Ind., was born 
in Clearfield County, Pa., March 21, 1844. He is the eldest of 
four sons of Julius A. and Esther Ann (Warrick) Jeger, who came 
to Hendricks County in 1844 and settled in the woods in what is 
now Lincoln Township. His father was a native of the West India 
Islands, and his mother of Pennsylvania. His father being a farmer 
and a merchant, our subject was reared to follow both pursuits. 
In 1850 he removed with his parents to Lizton, Hendricks County, 
where he remained until his eighteenth year, he having attended 
the public schools till that time. On leaving home he joined the 
Union array, enlisting in Company G, Ninety-ninth Indiana 
Infantry, to serve three years. He was promoted froin private to 
CorpoVal Feb. 28, 1864. He was mustered out at Washington, D. 
C, June 5, 1865, having participated in the battles of Yicksburg, 
Jackson, Mission Ridge and the Atlanta campaign, after which, his 
health being impaired, he was granted a furlough and returned home 
for fifteen days. After returning to the army he was placed on duty 
at Chattanooga, not being able to join his regiment, which was 
with Sherman on his march to the sea. In February, 1865, he was 
sent, via Cincinnati, Pittsburg and Baltimore, to Moorehead City, 
N. C, to join his regiment, but being intercepted by the Confeder- 
ates, he engaged in a battle at Kingston, N. C, reaching his regi- 
ment at Goldsborojust prior to the surrender of Lee's army. His 
regiment was soon after ordereJ with Sherman's army to Wash- 
ington, and took part in the grand review in May, 1865, and 
was soon afterward mustered out. ■ Being dismissed from the army 
he returned to his home in Lizton and in the spring of 1866 he 
attended the Central College at Danville (now the Central Normal) 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COQNTY. 



525 



one term. In the summer of 1866 he engaged in farming. In 
1874 he became associated with bis brother, Hother Jeger, and J. 
H. Kendall in the mercantile business atid grain and stock trade at 
Lizton, under the firm name of Jeger, Kendall & Co. Mr. Ken- 
dall retired from the firm in the following year and soon after his 
brother was succeeded bj "William L. Leak, they doing business 
together until 1880, the firm name being Jeger & Leak. In 1880 
they discontinued the mercantile business, and in ISSl they engaged 
in the manufacture of lumber in Scott County, Tenn., in connec- 
tion with their grain and stock trade, where they are doing an 
extensive business. In November, 1882, he was elected on the 
Republican ticket. Treasurer of Hendricks County, assuming the 
duties of the office 'n September, 1883, and is the present incum- 
bent of that office. April 28, 18G7, he married Miss Evaline, daugh- 
ter of Sandrum and Sarah (Leach) Leak, of near Lizton. He and 
bis wife are members of the Christian church of Lizton, of which he 
has served as leading Elder since 1880. He is a member of Jesse 
S. Ogdea Post, No.iei, G. A. E., of Danville. 

Aquilla Jordan, Jr., section 1, Center Township, settled on his 
farm in October, 1857. His homestead contains 197 acres, on 
sections 1 and 12, and he owns 200 acres in another tract on section 
12. He is one of the most prosperous farmers of the township, 
and owns a beautiful home, having made most of the improve- 
ments himself. ' He is a son of Aquilla and Elizabeth (Curtis) 
Jordan, natives of Bedford County, Ya., who, after their marriage, 
moved to Ross County, Ohio, in 1828, and in 1830 to Hendricks 
County, Ind., and settled in Liberty Township. Their family 
consisted of eleven children — George, Sophiah, Wilson, Susannah, 
Samuel, Eliza L., Andrew I., Jabel L., Aquilla and Elizabeth 
(twins), and Sarah J. Jabel and Wilson died in Ohio, in infancy. 
Andrew and Eliza reached maturity, and at their death left 
families. The rest of the family are living. Aquilla, Jr., was 
born in Ohio, Aug. 20, 1830. He was married in 1850 to Amanda 
Bunton, who was born Sept. 16, 1835, and died April 21, 1855, 
leaving one son, John W. He subsequently married Sarah Duval, 
who was born April 13, 1831, and died Jane 6, 1884. • To them 
were born four children — Jane A., George W., Emma Alice and 
Samuel. 

J. P. Eeeter, senior member of the firm of Keeter & Co., gro- 
cers, of Danville, was born near Ruthcrfordton, Rutherford Co., N. 
C, Nov. 22, 1853. He was reared a farmer, and came to Hen- 



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526 



HISTORY OF HENDBICKS COUNTY. 



driclis County, lad., in 1S71, first locating at Plaintield,;^ where he 
pursued i'arraing until 1879. He then followed farming near 
Clermont, Marion Co., Ind., uutil September, 1SS2, when he 
removed to Indianapolis, where, for a short time, he carried on a 
livorj. He sold out his livery business in 18S3 and came to Dan- 
ville, where he has since been engaged in the grocery trade. Dec. 
6, 1877, he was married to Miss Samantha, daughter of the late 
John Williams, of Washington Township, Hendricks County. 
They have tliree children — Effie, Iva and Charley. Mr. Keeter 
and his wife are members of the Christian church. 

Thomas £. Keleher, of the firm of Keleher Bros., druggists, of 
Danville, was born June 17, 1853, near Hogansburg, IS. "Y. When 
an infaut his parents came to Indiana, settling in Danville, where 
he lived till his sixteenth year. He then left home and was en- 
gaged as a book canvasser in Iowa for several months, he being the 
general agent for the publisher, E. Hanniford, of Chicago. He 
left Iowa in 1871 and went to California, where he was employed 
in driving a stc;ge between Trinidad and Eureka for one year. He 
was then employed on a sailing vessel almost a year. In 1874 he 
took a contract to get out 2,000,000 feet of red-wood saw-logs, in 
which business he was engaged till 1877. During the winter of 
1877-'8 he attended the St. Joseph College at Rohnerville, Hum- 
boldt Co., Cal., and in the spring of 1878 he went to Crescent City, 
where hg was employed as tallyman on the shipping docks for 
Joe E. Walls until December, 1378. He then returned to Indiana 
and engaged in farming in Center Township. In 1879 he was 
married to Miss Josephine Courtney, of Danville, who died in fall 
of 1881. They had one child — John Dudley. In the spring of 
1883 he took a trip through Missouri, Nebraska and Kansas, re- 
turning in November of 1833, since which he has been engaged in 
the drug business with his brother in Danville. In July, 1884, he 
was married to Miss Elsie Adelia Reed, of Upper Sandusky, Ohio. 
Have one child — Thomas Burtrand. 

Daniel B. Keleher, of the firm of Keleher Bros., druggists, of 
Danville, was born near Hogansburg, St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., 
April 4, 1847, a son of Maurice and Marguerite (Brady) Keleher. 
When twelve years of age he came to Danville, Ind., with his 
father. At the age of fifteen he began to learn the trade of a 
shoemaker with George Chamberlain, with whom he remained two 
years. In June, 1863, he enlisted in the Union army in Company 
B, One Hundred and Seventeenth Indiana Infantry, to serve si.t 




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HISTORY OF HE^fDElCKS COUNTr. 



527 



months. He was discharged after serving nine months, and in 
May, 1864, he enlisted in Company H, One Hundred and Thirty- 
second Indiana Infantry, for 100 days. In March, 1865, he enlisted 
in Company A, One Hundred and Fifty-sixth Indiana Infantry, for 
one year, or during the war. He was discharged with hie regi- 
ment at the close of the war, having participated in the battles of 
Blue Springs, Bull's Gap, Walker's Ford, Blanc's Cross Hoads, 
and seven-days fight in Bean's Station Valley, Clinch River, Clinch 
Mountain Gap and Strawberry Plains. After being discharged 
from the army he returned to Danville and worked at his trade 
till 1879, after which he traveled for a wholesale leather house at 
Terre Haute, Ind., until 1881. He was then employed in the drug 
store of Frank Pierson, of Danville, until the fall of 1883, since 
which time he has been associated with his brother, Thomas B. 
Kelehor, in their present business. He was married July 2, 1868, 
to Mary E. Comingore, of Danville. They have four children — 
Alfred Guy, Luella C, Lillian K. and Lora Eva. One child, 
Thomas B., died in 1876, aged six months. Mr. Keleher is a Master 
Mason, and belongs to "Western Star Lodge, No. 26, and Knights 
of Pythias, a member of Danville Lodge, No. 48. He is also a mem- 
ber of Jesse S. Ogden Post, No. 164, G. A. R. He has been 
Warden in the Masonic order, and is a member of the Grand 
Lodge of Indiana, Knights of Fythias. 

John Kendall, Auditor of H'jndricks County, Ind., was born in 
Clay Township, near Pecksburg, Hendricks County, Jan. 16,1843. 
He is the youngest of four sons of James G. and Sallie D. (Bales) 
Kendall, pioneers of the county, having settled here about 1837, 
both of whom died before our subject reached his fifteenth year. 
He was reared a farmer, receiving most of his education at the 
Union High School in Westfield, Ind. His residence is in Clay 
Township. He held the office of Township Trustee from 1872 till 
1882, with the e.xception of one term, and in 1882 he was elected 
Auditor for a term of four years, from Nov. 1, 1SS3. Feb. 7, 
1867, he was married to Miss Margaret Roberts, of Westfield, Ind. 
They have two children — Abbie and Ethan. They are members of 
the Society of Friends of Amo. 

Joseph P. Lewis was born ii Bracken County, Ky. While he 
was a lad his parents moved to Indiana, stopping in Fayette and 
Rush counties. Joseph went back to Kentucky and was married 
to Louisa Leak in June, 1834. He moved to Hendricks County in 
1835, and lived there continuously until his removal to Nebraska 



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HISTORY OF EENDEICKS COUNTY. 



April 1, 18S5, where he went to join his children in Custer County. 
He could relate matij interesting experiences of pioneer life, such 
as how the settlers beat their corn into meal in a hominj mortar, and 
attended mill at Crawfordsville for several years, going one day 
and returning the next on horseback, which he did many times. 
On the death of his wife he married a widow lady, Mrs. Eliza Bell, 
of Hendricks County. They have several children. Uncle Joe, 
as he was familiarly called bj everybody, lefc a host of friends 
and well-wisliers behind him. 

G. Dallas Lind, M. D., Professor of Natural Sciences and Draw- 
ing in the Central Normal College at Danville, was born near Car- 
lisle, Cumberland Co., Pa., Oct. 30, 1847. When about two years 
old his parents, Samuel and Catharine (Myers) Lind, moved to 
Clarke County, Ohio, where he v'as reared on a farm until he reached 
maturity. He attended the common schools till he was twenty 
years of age, and in 1867 attended a Normal School at New Car- 
lisle, Ohio, about six months, af!;er which he taught a country school 
near his home till 1869. He then attended the National ISormal 
School at Lebanon, Ohio, from which he graduated in the scien- 
titic course in the class of 1S70, after which he taught scliool and 
read medicine one year, and in the winter of lS71-'72 he took a 
course of lectures in the Physio-Medical Institute at Cincinnati, 
Ohio. In the spring of 1873 he located at Clinton, Mo., where he 
practiced medicine six months, after which he practiced in Hamil- 
ton, Iowa, until the fall of 1879, when he was engaged as Professor 
of Natural Sciences at Danville. In March, 1SS3, after taking a 
partial course of lectures in Central College of Phy^sicians and Sur- 
geons, he received the degree of M. D. In the spring of 1884 he 
began to teach drawing as well as the sciences- in the Central Nor- 
mal College. He is the author of the following works : " Method 
of Teaching in Country School;;," "Normal Outlines," "Easy E.x- 
periments," "Blank Speller," "Teacher's and Student's Library," 
and "Man." 

Huihard B. Lingenfelter, farmer, resides on section 7, Center 
Township, where he settled in October, 1867. His father, Yolen- 
tine Lingenfelter, was born in Winchester, Clark Co., Ky., in 
1809, and was there reared and learned the saddler's trade, which 
he followed a number of years. In 1851 he moved to Hendricks 
County, Ind., and bought the farm now owned by J. E. Dougherty. 
He engaged extensively in stock-raising, making a specialty of 
short-horn cattle and mules. He brought with him from Kentucky 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



529 



a herd of short-liorns, and was the first to engage in that industry 
in Hendricks County. He subsequently moved to Hamilton 
County, Mo., wliere he still lives. His family consisted of four 
children — Hubbard B. ; Prudence, wife of L. S. Shuler; Margaret, 
wife of Captain Augustine Dunn; Mary, wife of George Allen. 
Hubbard B. Lingeufelter was born in Kentucky in 1842. He was. 
reared a fiirmer and has followed that arocation since attainine: 
manhood. His home, which contains 107 acres, is one of the most 
pleasantly located in Center Township, and his improvements have 
nearly all been made by himself. He married Mary Nave, daughter 
of Christian C. Jfave. They have three children — Margaret, Ben- 
jamin and Scott. 

William i?. ^[cClelland, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Hen- 
dricks County, was born near Clermont, Marion Co., Ind., June 
21, 184-6, where ho lived until reaching his majority. He was 
reared a farmer and was educated in the common school durinc the 
winter terms, working on his father's farm the rest of the year. 
He is the second of six sons of Jonathan D. and Eliza J. (Wilson) 
McClelland. On leaving home he was married to Miss Sadie, 
daughter"of James and Rachel (McPhemage) Nichols, Oct. 9, 1872. 
They have one child — Harry Nichols. Mr. McClelland is a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Epi3co])al church at Danville, in which he 
has served as Steward, and has been Superintendent of the Sab- 
bath-echool. He is a member of Silcox Lodge, No. 123, I. O. 0. F., 
of Danville. He has passed all the chairs and is a member of the 
Grand Lodge of the State of Indiana. 

Robert 2fc0ee was born in Kentucky in 1S20, and at tlio age 
of ten years he came with his parents, William and Elizabeth 
(Asher) McGee, to Indiana, they settling one mile northeast of 
Danville. His father was of Scotch-Irish descent, a native of New 
Jersey, and his mother was of German descent, a native of Ken- 
tucky. His father entered land in Center Township on which he 
lived till his death in 1S42, his wife having died in 1S3G. The 
subject of this sketch was reared in this county after his tenth year, 
and received a limitrtd education by attending a subscription school 
in Danville during the winter terms. After his father's death in 
1842, he became part owue' of the farm by purchases, which he 
sold in 1845, and the sam3 year purch.ased his present farm in 
Center Township, four miles east of Danville. Oct. 6, 1859, lie 
was married to Sarah English, of Rush County, Ind. They have 
four children — Craig, a farmer of Washington Township; Mary 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



Elizabeth, Sarah Jane and Martha Jewel, living at home. ' Mr. and 
Mrs. McGee are metnbers of the Christian church at Danville. In 
politics he is a Republican. 

Fletcher M. Mitchell resides on section 31, Center Township. 
His farm was formerly owned by his uncle, Solomon Mitchell, a 
pioneer of Center Township, who willed it to our subject. The 
homestead contains 102 acres of valuable land, and in addition to 
this Mr. Mitchell owns thirty acres in "Washington Township. The 
Mitchell family have many representatives in Hendricks County. 
They are the descendants of two brothers, William and Hiram, who, 
with their brother Solomon, settled in Center Township in the fall 
of 1832. Solomon Mitchell was born in Bath County, Ky., in De- 
cember, 1806, and died in the spring of 1875, in Center Township, 
Hendricks Co., Ind. He ,was a bachelor, and an industrious, 
wealthy citizen. Heat one time owned between 400 and 500 acres 
of land in this township. Hiram is still a resident of Center. 
Fletcher M. Mitchell was born in Center Township in the spring 
of 185i. He resided with his father, James M. Mitchell, in Center 
Township, until August, 1864, tlien moved to Kentucky with his 
father and lived there until August, 1865, when he moved to 
Marion County, and lived in Marion County until the fall of 1875. 
He married Sarah F. Brown, a daughter of John Brown. She died 
April 2, 18S4,_ leaving two children — Albert H. and Lurena. He 
then married Clara Tharp, a daughter of John and Susan Tharp, 
in the summer of 1885, and still resides in Center Township. 

Thomas JVichoIs, one of the oldest settlers of Hendricks County 
and Justice of the Peace at Danville, is a native of Kentucky, born 
near Bardstown, Nelson County, Nov. 5, 1803, a son of James 
and Rachel (Jackson) Nichols. He was reared a farmer. He came 
to Indiana in April, 1821, with his father's family, settling with 
them about two miles below the bluffs of "White River, in Morgan 
County, but in tlie following year they came to Hendricks County, 
and settled on the east fork of White Lick Creek, in wliat is now 
Guilford Township. At the time of their arrival there were but 
few settlers in the county. In 1825 they moved to what is now 
Center Township, locating two miles west of Danville. His father 
being aged and inSrra, he remained with liim until Dec. 27, 1S2T, 
when he was married to J^fartha Hadley, daughter of James and 
Mary (Richardson) Hadley, of Center Township, when he settled on 
a tract of land in the vicinity of Danville. In 182S being elected 
Sheriff of Hendricks County, he removed to Danville, where he has 



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HISTORY OF HENimrCKS COUNTY. 



631 



siuce resided. He has served as Sheriff of Hendricks County 
twelve years— from 1S2S till 1832, 1841 till 1S4S and 18G0 till 
1864, the term of office being two years, but he has been re-elected 
for the second term each time. Id the winters of 1833-'34 and 
1835-'36 he represented Hendricks County in the Indiana State 
Legislature as Assemblyman. In the spring of 1873 he was elected 
Justice of the Peace of Danville, and has held the office by re- 
election, his present term extending to April, 1889. In 1832 he 
was Captain in command of a company in the Black Hawk war, in 
the regiment known as " the Bloody Three Hundred." He has six 
children living — Nancy, widow of George W., Powell; Serena, wife 
of Charles A. Rose, of Putnam County, Ind.; "William H., Deputy 
Auditor of Hendricks County; Erasmus D., a druggist at Dan- 
ville; Julia A., wife of R. H. Harney, of Lebanon, Ind., and 
Oliver E., clerking in the drug store of his brother in Danville. One 
child died in infancy, and two, a son and a daughter, after reach- 
ing maturity, ilr. and Mrs. Nichols are members of the Method- 
ist Episcopal church. He is a Master, Royal Arch and Council 
Mason, and was the first Mason made in Hendricks County. He 
served as Worshipful jMaster of liis lodge fourteen years and High 
Priest of his chapter two years, Politically he was originally an 
old-lineWhig, and his first presidential vote was cast for Henry 
Clay in 1824. He now affiliates with the Republican party. 

William n. Nichols, Deputy Auditor of Hendricks County, 
Ind., was born near Danville, in Center Township, Hendricks 
County, Feb. 24, 1841. He is the second of four sons of Thomas 
and Martha (Iladley) Nichols. He had the advantage of obtaining 
only a common-school education. His father being a carpenter he 
began to work at that trade when quite yoang, but abandoned it 
before becoming of age. From the age of twenty to twenty-two 
years he worked in a printing office at Danville. He was then 
variously employed until June, 1863, when lie enlisted as a private 
in Company B, One Hundred and Seventeenth Indiana Infantry, 
for six months, and served iu Kentucky and Eastern Tennessee. 
The Colonel of his regiment was Thomas J. Brady of Star Route 
fame. After his discharge at the expiration of his term of service 
he returned to Danville and worI;ed mostly at thecarpenter's trade 
until April, 18^2, when he became Deputy Auditor under "W". M. 
Hess, and served as such until April, 1875. He was then employed 
as bookkeeper in the bank of the Danville Banking Company un- 
til November, 1879, when, having been elected Auditor of Hen- 

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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



d ricks County in November, 1878, for a term of four years, he 
assumed the duties of his' office. On retiring from the office at the 
expiration of the term, he resumed contracting and building. In 
October, ISSi, he was deputized County Auditor by County Audi- 
tor John Kendall. He was married to Miss Laura, daughter of the 
late Coleman C. Cash, of Danville, May 8, 1868, by whom he had 
one child — Jessie Pearl, who died at the age of nearly three years. 
He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church 
of Danville, fle is a member of Western Star Lodge, No. 26, 

F. & A. M. ; Danville Chapter, No. 46, K. A. M., and of Colestock 
Council, No. 26, R. & S. M., and of Jesse S. Ogdcn Post, No. 16i, 

G. A. E. He has served as Secretary and Junior Warden of the 
lodge, High Priest in the chapter, Eecorder of the council, and 
Sergeant-Major of the post. 

Adrian A. Parsons, Recorder of Hendricks County, was born 
in Guilford County, N. C.,Nov. 7, 1846. His parents, Nelson and 
Elvira (Swain) Parsons, came to Indiana in 1852, first settling in 
Bridgeport. His father was a millwright by trade. Mr. Parsons 
lived with his parents in Hendricks and Marion counties until lie 
was seventeen years of age. He enlisted in the Union army in 
Company I, Ninth Indiana Ca\ airy. Dec. 23, 1863, to serve three 
years, or during the war, as a ])rivato. He was discharged at the 
close of the war at St. Louis, Mo., in x\ugu3t, 1865, having par- 
ticipated in numerous battles £.nd skirmishes during Hood's raid 
in Tennessee. After his discliarire he returned to Washington 
Township, Hendricks County, and being disabled by a gunshot 
wound received at the battle of Spring Hill, Tonn., he attended the 
Danville Academy two, years £.nd the Earlham College at Rich- 
mond, Ind., one term, when^ having expended all his money, he 
taught school during the winters and worked on farms in the sum- 
mer seasons until 1872. He then engaged solely in farming in 
Washington Township till 1876 when he added bee-keeping to his 
farming pursuits. In tlie fall of 1882 he was elected on the Repub- 
lican ticket Recorder of Hendricks County for a term of four 
years, which uffice he still holds. April 10, 1870, he was married 
to Miss Mary M., daughter of ]>aruey and Hannah (Gossett) Fox, 
of Washington Township, Hend .icks County. They have six cliil- ; 
dren — Lester, Norman, Ethel, William, Edith and Gilbert. He is ' 
a member of Jesse S. Ogden Poit, No. 164, G. A. R. 

FranTi Plerson, druggist, of Danville, was born in' Washington ' 
Township, Hendricks Co., Ind., July 30, 1856, a son of Isaac 



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H. and and Mary (Clark) Pierson. His mother died when he was 
an infant, and at the aoje of ten 3'ears he came witli his fatlier to 
Danville, where he attended the public school until lie was four- 
teen years of age. At that age he began to provide for himself by 
working by the month, and when he was sixteen he began working 
in a saw-mill with his father during the summers and attending; 
school 'u\ the winters till he was twenty years old. He then clerked 
in Indianapolis one year and in 1S77 returned to Diinville, where 
he was employed in John Alisler's heading factory for a short time. 
Mr. Misler then placed him in his drug store as clerk, where he 
was enii.iloyed by him and by his successor, J. M. lioach, several 
months, when in August, 1S7S, he purchased the drug store of Mr. 
R'jach and establishe'' his present business. He was married April 
3, ISSJr, to Miss Madie McKee, of Center Township, Hendricks 
County. They have an infant daughter — Euth Alice. Mr. Pierson 
is a Kniglit of Pythias and has passed all the chairs of Danville 
Lodge, No. 4S, and is a member of the Grand Lodge of the State 
of Indiana. 

Charles Ji. Boss, a retired farmer of Danville, was born in 
Mercer County, Ky., March 7, 1806, the youngest of two sons of 
Charles and Mary (Lewis) Rose. He was reared a farmer at his 
brother's home, and Sept. 3, 1S39, lie married Barthena P., only 
daughter of Isaac Alitcliell, of Mercer County, Ky. She was born 
July IS, 1S05. and died at Danville, Ind., April 19, ISSO. Mr. 
Pose engaged in agriculture for himself in 1S2S on a small farm in 
Mercer County, given him by his father, on which he lived until 
1S36, when, losing his property, he rented land in the same county 
where he farmed till ISoO. lie then removed with his family to 
Indiana, where he purchased a farm of 135 acres in Eel River Town- 
ship, Hendricks County, on which he farmed for eight years, when 
he exchanged his farm for one in Center Township near Danville, 
known as the J3il!y Blanton fann, containing 172 acres, on which 
he lived eight years. In 1866 he retired from fiirming and became 
a permanent resident of Danville, where until lately he has dealt 
and traded in real estate. In 185i he was elected one of the County 
Commissioners of Hendricks County for a term of three years, and 
re-elected in 18-57, but at the end of one year lie resigned, having 
sold out and removed from that part of the county. He has four 
children living— M. H. Rose, M. D., of Thorntown, Ind., who 
served as a surgeon in the Union army through all the late war; B. 
M. Rose, who served four years as a private in the Union army; 
34 



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HISTORY OF HENDEICKS COUNTY. 



Elizabeth Ann, wife of W. A. Caldwell, of Kentuckj; and Mollie 
R., widow of the late Dr. John T. "Warner, of Neosha Falls. Zilpha 
died at Danville in 1S75, aged twenty-nine years; Charles Dwight 
died in the army atKnoxville; Tenn., in 1863, aged nineteen year's; 
William died in Kentucky, aged twenty-two months, and Leslie 
died near Danville in 1SG2, aged fourteen years. Mr. Rose and his 
entire family are members of the Presbyterian church of Danville. 
Politically he is a Republican. 

Robertson O. Sussell was born in Guilford County, iST. C, Sept. 
15, ISll. In his twentieth year he came to Indiana on a prospecting 
tour and about two years later settled in Danville, Hendricks 
Count}^ in 1S32. He being a carpenter followed that trade till 1S12, 
when he turned his attention to farming. He purchased his pres- 
ent farm in 1S37, and has resided on it and pursued farming since 
1844. He came to Danville with limited means but by persever- 
ance and economy he is now the owner of alai-ge property in Dan- 
ville and in Center Township. In 1S35 he was married to Alice 
Bonfield, a native of Clark County, Ky., and a daughter of ?.[crecu 
and Susan (Hardesty) Bonfield, who came to this county in 1833. 
They have two children living — Martha, wife of Simeon Tcmplin, 
of Center Township, and John C, a farmer in Center Township. 
One child, Susan, died in August, 1846, aged over one year. Mr. 
and Mrs. Russell have been members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church over fifty years. He was one of the first Board of Trustees 
and helped build the first church in Danville. Besides serving as 
Trustee eight years he has served several years as Steward. He 
has also filled the office of School Trustee for Center Township. In 
politics he affiliates with the Republican party but was originally a 
Whig. 

J. E. Skeirill, publisher of educational, religious and subscrip- 
tion books, was born on a farm in Jefferson Township, Putnam Co., 
Ind., Jan. 19, 1S52, a son of James W. and Mary C. (Denny) 
Sherrill. He received his early education at the district school and 
afterward attended the Ladoga Seminary and the Normal School 
at Lebanon, Ohio, and at Ladoga and Danville, Ind. At the age 
of seventeen he began teaching in the district schools of JefTerson 
Township, which he followed about ten winters. In March, 1S7S, 
he began to publish the "Normal Teacher," a journal devoted to 
the use of public schools, the first two numbers being published at 
Ladoga, Ind. In the following May he removed to Danville, where 
he published the '• iSTormal Teacher" until August, 1884, when he 






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Hi'STOEY OF HENDEIOKS COXTSmT. 



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635 



sold it to Prof. ^Y. H. F. Henry, of Indianapolis. In the mean- 
time he has added to his publications a series of educational, relig- 
ious and subscription books, and carries on an extensive business 
at Danville. Feb. 13, 1S79, he was married to Miss Annie, daughter 
of H. K. Mitchell, of New Philadelphia, Ohio. They have two 
children — Gail and Cidney Dee. He is a member of the Mission- 
ary Baptist church and his wife belongs to the Methodist Episco- 
pal church. 

Gustavus L. Spillman, Prof, of Languages in the Central Nor- 
mal College at Danville, was born in Zurich, Switzerland, Nov. 6, 
1855. His parents emigrating to America in 1856 he was left in 
his grandmother's charge till May, 1SG7. He then came with his 
grandmother to the United States and joined his parents at Tell 
City, Perry Co., Ind., remaining with them till reaching his ma- 
jority. He attended scliool in tiie old^ country, and afterward the 
schools of Tell City. In January, 1877, he entered tlie Normal 
School at Yalparaiso, Ind., attending it till the summer of 1878. 
He then tauglit the German language in tlie schools of Eockport, 
Ind., until tlie summer of 1880, when he entered the Central Nor- 
mal College as a student, and teacher of German. He graduated 
from that institution in the scieiititic class of ISSI and in the classic 
course in the class of 1882, since which he has held the position of 
teacher of the languages. Nov. 13, 1S82, he was married to Miss Lot- 
tie Peterson, of Tipton, Ind. She is a native of Sweden, and came to 
America in 1869 with her parents, Gustavus and Gustava (Gabrial- 
son) Peterson. She graduated from the Tipton High School in 
the class of 1S7S. Mr. and Mrs. Spillmaii have one child named 
Stella Cornelia. He is a member of Tell City Lodge, No. 206, I. 
O. 0. F., and a member of the Evangelical church at Tell City, 
and his wife belongs to the Presbyterian church of Dauville. 

Bennett Siczln, only son of John and Matilda (Darnell) Swain, 
was born oil the homestead in Center Township, Hendricks Co., 
Ind., Nov. 21, 1837. His birthplace has always been his home, 
he owning all of the homestead but forty acres. He is one of the 
enterprising citizens of the tov/uship, and an industrious and pros- 
perous farmer. He was married in Montgomery County, Ind., 
Oct. 21, 1S61, to Jemima J.. Cht-lwick, a native of Montgomery 
County, Ind., born March 29,1838, daugiiter ot Jehu andPeninnah 
Chadwick, early settlers of Montgomery County. Her father died 
May 7, 1S79, and her mother is still living on the homestead. Mr. 
and Mrs. Swain are members of the Eapiist church. 



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HISTORY OF HKNDRICKS CODNTV. 



John Sioain, deceased, was one of the pioneers of Hendricks 
Conntj. He was born in Fleming County, Ky., Dec. 22, ISll. 
He was reared in his native county and in November, 1831, came 
to Plend ricks County. In Januaiy, 1S32, he was married to Ma- 
tilda Darnell, a native of Montgomery County, Ky., born April 2, 
1810, daughter of Henry and Sally (Turpin) Darnell, who settled 
in Hendricks County in September, 1831. Soon after his marriage 
Mr. Sivain moved to Kentucky and remained till the fall of 1834, 
when he returned to Hendricks County, and settled on 160 acres 
of land on section 22, Center Township, which had been entered 
by Mr. Darnell and presented to Air. and Mrs. Swain. Of this 
land Mr. Swain made a fine farm, where he resided till his death, 
A])ril 23, 1871, aged fifty-nine years four months and one dav. 
Mrs. Swain still lives on the homestead. To them were born three 
children, but two of whom are living — Elizabeth, widow of John 
Turpin, of Sangamon County, 111., and Bennett. Eliza married 
Samuel Williams, and diec Dec. 28, 1859. Mrs. Swain's parents 
made Center Township. their home till death. The father died in 
1846 and the mother in 1854. The family adhere to the faith of 
the Baptist church. 

Jeremiah Tindei\ deceased, was born in Woodford County, Kj., 
Nov. 19, 1808. He was married Jan. 27, 1831, to Catherine Rad- 
ford, and to them were born five children, all of whom are livino- 
— ^meon Dudley, in Platte County, Mo.; Jolin William, and 
James Franklin, of Hendricks County, Ind.; Huldah Jane, wife 
of W. E. Crawford, living in Labette County, Kan., and Samuel 
Martin, in Shawnee (bunty, Kan. Mrs. Tinder died in 1841, and 
Mr. Tinder was married to Mrs. Delilali Ann Wells, of Kentucky, 
April 2, 1843. To this union were born two children — Annie E. 
and Jei-emiah, both deceased. Mr. Tinder came to this county in 
1834, settling in Marion Township, near Danville, where he lived 
till his death, Dec. 6, 1874. His father was a native of Scotland 
and his mother was a native of Germany. Their children were — 
Joel, Jesse, Jeremiah, Martin, Lydia, Dicy and Susan. On com- 
ing to this country his father first settled in Virginia, and from 
thei-e moved to Shelby County, Ky. 

John W. Tinder was bor.i in Marlon Township, this county, 
Jan. 22, 1835. He obtained his education in the district schools 
of his neighborhood, and remained on the home farm till be was 
twenty-t.vo years old. He then married, Feb. 5, 1857, Laura, 
daughter of William F. and Jane (Crawford) Hamrick, of Marion 



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HISTORY OF UE.NTJRICKS COUNTi". 



537 



Township, and to tlieni were born two children — James Williuin, 
born ilarch 3, 1S5S; died March 9, ot" the same year, and Carrie, 
born Feb. 11, 1S62; died Jan. IS, 1S63. They have reared several 
children. Linnie \Vallen, now living with them, was taken at the 
age of nine years. After liis mariiage Mr. Tinder purchased a 
farm of eighty acres in Marion Township, where ho fanned till 
June, 1SG3, when he enlisted in the Fonrtli Indiana Cavalry under 
Colonel L. S. Shulerand served over three years. He was wounded 
in the leg at Bardstown, Ky., which disabled him for two months. 
He was engaged in the battles of Cliickamauga, Resaca, Mnrfrees- 
boro and Jonesboro raid, and was mustered out with his regi- 
ment in September, 1S65. After the war he returned to Marion 
Township, where he farmed till August, 1S67, since which he has 
resided in Danville, where he owns a fine home and three acres of 
ground on Main street. He also owns 140 acres in Marion Town- 
ship, most of which he has rented. Mr. Tinder and his wife are 
members of the Metliodist Episcopal church. He has held the 
office of County Commissioner by re-election since 1SI7, ins pres- 
ent term expiring in 1889. He is a member of the I. O. 0. F. 
fraternity, and has passed all the chairs of his lodge, and was rep- 
resentativ'e to the Grand Lodge one year. He has been Quarter- 
master of the Ct. a. R. Post since its origin in 1SS3. 

Elder Erasmm D. Thoiiias was born in Harrison Township, 
Fayette County, Ind., Nov. 13, 1S21. He was reared a farmer, 
receiving his early education in the schools of his native couutj-. 
When nineteen years of age he began teaching school and taught 
in his own district tlireo winters. He was married March 16, 
1843, to /Mary G. Thompson, a native of Warren County, Ohio, 
born Feb. 17, 1825, daughter of Wilson Thompson, a minister of 
the Regular Baptist churcii, and widely known for his successful 
ministry and prominent work in jjolitical circles, being two terms 
a member of the Indiana Legislature, and at one time a candidate 
for Congress from his district. After his marriage Mr. Thomas 
engaged in farming in Fayette and Tipton counties for seven years. 
In 18-19 he embraced Christianity, and utiited with the Regular 
Baptist church. He very soon felt it his duty to devote his life to 
the work of his divine Master, and began preparatory studies for 
the ministry. In May, 1S51, he was ordained at Williams Creek 
church, Fayette County, and the ne.xt two years were spent in that 
county. In the fall of 1853 he was called to the pastorate of the 
church at BigRun, Marion Co. , Ind., and now for a period of near- 



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HISTOEY OF HENDRICKS CODNTr. 



ly thirty-two years he has liad charge of that parish, although at 
the same time he has had the care of other churches. He now has 
charge of four — Big Run, Mount Pleasant, Danville and Palestine. 
He lived in Fraidclin Township, Marion County, till October, 1SG3, 
when he mnved to Hendricks County, and has since lived in 
Center Township, on section 30, where he owns a good farm of 
140 acres, which is carried on by his sons. His wife died May 17, 
1870, leaving a family of ten children — John A., a minister of the 
Christian church, located at Columbus, Ohio; Charles, an attorney 
of Bedford, Iowa; Lewis E., a minister of the Regular Baptist 
church, at Ashley, Ohio; "William, of Eel River Township; Albert 
M., with his father; Erasmus W., of this township; Edward D., 
of California; Marshall, at home; Mrs. Phcebe E. Morgan, of Tay- 
lor County, Iowa, and Mrs. Hattie M. Tinder, of this township. 
May 17, 1871, Mr. Thomas married Mrs. Mary E. Holcomb, a 
native of Posey County, lud., born Oct. 8, 1845, widow of Tillman 
Holcomb, and daughter of James Rosborough. She has one son 
by her first marriage — Aubrey Holcomb. Five children were 
born to this marriage — Harvey C, Joseph (deceased), Frank W., 
Mary and Raymond. Elder Thomas is a son of David F. and 
Pha'be Thomas, natives of Tompkins County, N. Y., and early set- 
tlers of Fayette County, Ind. His father was a hero of the war 
of 1812. His mother died i.T Fayette County in 1872, aged seventy- 
eight years, and his father in this township in October, 1882, aged 
eighty-eight years. His grandfather, iliner Thomas, was a minis- 
ter of the Regular Baptist church iti ISTew York, and moved to 
Fayette County, Ind., in 1821, where he lived till his death, in 
July, 1830. He was in the active work of the ministry about forty 
years, and administered the rite of baptism to over 1,200 persons. 
Henry G. Todd, M. D., was born in Louisville, Ky., April 1 
ISU, a son of Rev. John and Sarah (Soda) Todd. "When he was 
about thirteen years of age his parents removed to Charleston, Ind., 
and from there to Paris, Ky., about 1S38. He attended the com- 
mon schools until his eighteenth year, when he entered the office 
of Dr. John B. Duke, at Paris, to sttjdy medicine, and studied 
with" him until attending lectures in the Transylvania University 
at Lexington in the winter of 1S30-'3L, after which, in the summer 
of 1831, he began to practice in Danville, Ind., where for fifty- 
three years he has been in uninterrupted practice, with the ex- 
ception of one year — 1856 — when he lived at Indianapolis. He 
has for many years been a member of medical societies of the 



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HISTORY OF HENDEICKS COUNTY. 



539 



county and State, and was the first President of the Hendricks 
County Medical Society, whicli position he held many terms. In 
the winter. of lS49-'50 he was a member of the Constitutional Con- 
vention of the State of Indiana, and was a member of the House of 
Representatives in the Indiana State Lecjislature in the year 1854. 
Politically, he was oricrinally a Whig, but since the organization 
of the Eepublicans he has affiliated with that party. Sept. 18, 
183i, he was married to Serena, daughter of William and Sarah 
(Richards) Ilenton, of Danville. They have five children — Minerva, 
wife of William M. Steele, of Reno, 111.; William Addison, a 
physician, of Chariton, Iowa; Laura, wife of Joseph Olieaves, of 
Rockville, Ind.; JMarshall, a druggist, of Indianapolis, Ind., and 
Henrietta, still at home. Dr. and Mrs. Todd are members of the 
Presbyterian church of Danville, of which he has been a Ruling 
Elder about forty-five years. 

Jamea TF. lodd was born on the homestead on section 31, Cen- 
ter Township, where he now lives, June 1.5, 1843, and has always 
lived in Hendricks County.. His father, James Todd, Sr., settled 
in Center Township in an early day, and entered 200 acres of land 
from the Government in 1S3J-, the deed bearing the signature of 
President Andrew Jackson. James W. owns a part of the old home- 
stead, and has been a successful and worthy descendant of his 
father. He was married to Mary Mitchell, daughter of Lorenzo 
and granddaughter of Hiram Mitchell. They have three children 
— Alice L., Amanda J. and jifaggie E. 

'William A. Yawter, merchant, of Danville, Ind., was burn in 
Laf^.yette, Tippecanoe Co., Ind., May 22, 1858, the eldest son of 
A. J. and Elizabeth (Richardson) Vawter. His father followed 
teaching, and taught in various places. He was Superintendent of 
the Lafayette public schools five years, and Principal of the Bap- 
tist Seminary at Ladoga, Ind., five years, and in those schools our 
subject received the most of his education. At the age of fourteen 
he was apprenticed to Wright, Baker & Co. to learn the book and 
job printing, with whom he remained nine years. In November, 
1881, having given up the printing business, lie went to Plainfield 
and engaged in the dry-goods business. In April, 1833, he re- 
moved his stock of goods to Danville, where he still carries on the 
business. Sept. 24, ISSl, he w,is married to Miss Alice R., 
daughter of Harlan Hadley, of Plainfield, Ind. They have two 
children — Cora C. and William B. Mr. Vawter and his wife are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church of Danville. 



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HISTORY OF HENDKICE.3 COUNTV. 



George W. Wayland, dealer in books and stationery, and fire in- 
surance agent, at Danville, Ind., was born near Visalia, Kenton Co., 
Ky., April 28, 1829- His parents, Joseph and Catharine (Shaver) 
"Wayland, were of German descent, and came to Kentucky in 1808. 
He lived witli his parents until 1848, when he went to Indepen- 
dence and commenced to learn the trade of saddler and harness- 
maker, working as a journeyman at the sa7ne place till 1851. He 
then engaged in the satne^ business for himself till 1856 in Inde- 
pendence, when he removed to Lebanon, Ind., where he cari'ied on 
the business until 185S, when he removed his business to James- 
town, Ind. In January, 1862, he changed from harness and sad- 
dlery to a general mercantile business. In December, 1861, he 
was appointei-! Postmaster of Jamestown by Montgomery Blair, 
which office he held until Jan. 1, 1865. In the following Febru- 
ary he removed to Danville and worked at his trade as a journey- 
man in the harness shop of W. H. McPhetridge until October, 1865, 
"when he established himself as a harness-rnaker and carriage-trim- 
mer, which he followed till 1876, since when he has carried on his 
present business. In 186S he was elected Coroner of Hendricks 
County for a term of two years. In 1872 he was elected one of 
the School Board for a term of three years and was again elected 
in 1878. He was married May 2, 1850, to Nancy Kelley, of Ver- 
sailles, Ind., who died at Jamestown, Ind., Feb. 20, 1860, leaving 
three children — Lucy, wife of F. I). Robert?, of Danville; Adelia, 
who died Feb. 2, 1857, aged three years; Calista (Kitty) still at 
home, and Confucius Lane, of Seattle, Wash. Ter. Mr. 
"Wayland was again married, Jan. 22, 1S67, to Nancy J. Barnett, 
of Danville. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church of Danville, of which he^has been Class Leader nine- 
teen years. He is now a Trustee, having held that position many 
years, and has been Treasurer of the Sabbath-school for the past 
fifteen years. He is a member of Silco.K Lodge, jSTo. 123, I. 0. O. 
F., at Danville, of which he is Past Grand. 

Alfred TFe^sA^MS, a merchant of Danville, was born at Ci-aw- 
fordsville, Montgomery Co., Ind., July 25, 1840. When an infant 
his parents, William and Elizabeth (Britton) Welshaus, moved to 
Milton, Pa., where they liveu until his twelfth year, when they set- 
tled in Hendricks County, Ind.. living at Brownsburg and Spring- 
town until coming to Danville in 1855. While at Springtown, he 
began to learn the shoemaker's trade which he finished at Danville. 
At the age of si.xteen he begi-.n to maintain himself and also as- 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



541 



sistecl his parents. His fatlier dying in ISGo, he wholly supported 
his mother till 1S77. In response to the first call of President 
Lincoln ho enlisted April 24, 1S61, inCorapanj A, Seventh Indiana 
Infantry, as a private for three months, and was on duty in West Vir- 
ginia. Being mustered out at the expiration of his term of service, 
he returned to Danville and worked at his trade till June, 1S62, 
when he enlisted in Company A, Fourth Indiana Cavalry, to serve 
as a private three years. He was soon promoted to Duty Sergeant 
and then to Quartermaster-Sergeant of his regiment. Pie was dis- 
charged at Nashville, Tenn., at the close of the war, in July, 1S65. 
He participated in the battles of Chickaniauga.Allatoona, Franklin, 
Columbus, Selina, Tullahoma, Atlanta, New Market, and a number 
of others. He then returned home and followed shoemaking in 
Danville about one year, after which he carried on a boot and shoo 
store in connection with shoemaking. In 1S69 ha was elected one 
of the trustees of Center Township, which position ho held till 
1ST5. In 1S7G he discontinued the boot and shoe store; being 
elected Treasurer of Hendricks County, serving one term of two 
years. He then purchased a farm in the vicinity of Danville and 
pursued farming until 1SS2, since which he has carried on the 
clothing and merchant tailoring business at Danville. In 1SS2 he 
was elected one of the members of the school board and was chosen 
Treasurer by that body, still holding that position. In June, 1876, 
he was married to Miss Emma J. Parker, of Danville.- They have 
three children — Gracie, Bertha and Sammie. He and his wife are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church. He is a Master 
Royal Arch and Council Mason and was'"\Vorshipful Master of the 
lodge of Danville for four years. He is also a member of Jesse S. 
Ogden Post, No. 164, G. A. R. 

Charles A. White, M. D., was born near Salem, the county seat 
of Washington County, Ind., Jan. 4, 1845. His parents were Max- 
imillian and Martha (Miles) "White. He removed with them to 
Hendricks County in the autumn of 18-51, locating in Liberty 
Township, two miles south of Belleville, thosi the principal business 
town in the county. He was reared a farmer, and received a good 
common-school education. At the age of nineteen he began the 
study of medicine in the office of Drs. R. C. Moore and L. II. Ken- 
nedy, at Belleville, remaining under their preceptorship about four 
years, entering Rush Medical College, Cliicago, in the class of 
lS67-'68. In the spring of ISoS he began the practice of medicine 
in Monroe County, Ind., near Eloomington. He formed a part- 



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HISTOET OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



nership with John Dancer, M. D., of South Milford, LaGrange 
Co., lud., March 15, 1S69, with whom he remained for two 
years, during which time he took a second course of lectures and 
instruction at Hush Medical College, where he graduated Feb. 1, 
1871, and was unanimously chosen by the class numbering eighty- 
five, to deliver the valedictory address. In April following his 
graduation he located at the flourishing village of Wolcottville, La 
Grange Co., Ind., continuing his partnership with Dr. Dancer, 
which relation was sustained until April 1, 1S73, when on account 
of the failing health of his wife he returned to Hendricks County, 
the place of her birth, and home of their parents. He located in 
Danville Jan. ], ISTi, having formed a partnership with Henry G. 
Todd, M. D., for a period of three years. From Marcb, 187S, till 
Oct. 1S79, he had associated with him in the practice, Wilson T. 
Lawson, M. D., since which t:me he has practiced alone. Jan. 21, 
1S73, he married Miss Dee A., daughter of TolUver B. and Matil- 
da (Gill) Miller, near Clayton, Hendricks County. They have had 
born to them two children — Geraldine Mas Miller, born June 14, 
18S0, and Glyndon De Laskie Miller, born Nov. 1, 1881. Dr. 
and Mrs. White are meuabcrs of the Methodist Episcopal church 
of D.uiville. He was made a Master Mason in Ionic Lodge, at 
"Wolcottville, in 1870. He is a Royal Arch and Council Mason, 
has passed the chair of Worshipful Master in both the lodges to 
which he has belonged, which station he now holds in Western 
Star Lodge, No. 26, F. & A. M., of Danville. He is a member of 
the county and State medical societies. He served as a private in 
Company A, One Hundred and Seventeenth Indiana Volunteers, 
during the war of the Rebellion. 

Samuel W. Williams was born in Clark County, Ky., Nov. 22, 
1831. He came with his pareats, William and Margaret (Braley) 
Williams to Hendricks County in the fall of 1836. They settled 
in Marion Township, where they lived till lSi-4, then removed to 
Middle Township, where our subject lived till he was twenty 
years old. He began life for himself in Center Townsljip, buying 
forty acres of land, to which he has added from time to time, and 
now owns 300 acres of well-cultivated land. Feb. 25, 1855, he 
was married to Miss Eliza Sw.iin, daughter of John and Matilda 
(Darnall) Swain, of Center Township. She died Dec. 29, 1859, 
leaving two children — John W., of Union Township, and Sarah E., 
living at home. He was again r^arried Dec. 22, 1861, to Mrs. 
Elizabeth (Turpin) Craig. Mrs. Williams had one son, Charles, 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



543 



by her first husband. She was born Oct. 9, 1828. Mr. Williams 
was one of the prime movers uf the Grange organization in 1872, 
and was one of tiie charter members of Talbot Grange, No. 757, of 
Center Township, of which he is now Master; he is Past Grand- 
ofSilcox Lodge, ISTo. 123, I. O. O. F., at Danville. His parents 
were natives of Clark County, Ky., and are numbered among the 
worthy pioneers of Hendricks County. Both lived to a good old 
age; the father died in 1SS2 aged seventy-three years, and the 
mother in lSS3aged seventy-one years, both being members of the 
Regular Baptist church. Mrs. Williams' parents were Roberson 
and Eacliel (Powell) Turpin, both natives of Scott County, Ky., 
where they lived until lS34,whenw,thoy came to Hendricks County 
with a family of three children. They settled in Lincoln Township 
on a farm of eighty acres, to which they had added until their farm 
contained 500 acres. Her father died Aug. 33, ISSO, aged seventy 
five years, and her mother, July 31, 1880, aged seventy-three years, 
leaving eight children, five of whom, three sons and two daughters, 
are living in Hendricks County, one in Boone County, Ind., and 
two in Illinois. 

Eldridge C. Wills, janitor in the Hendricks County court- 
house, at Danville, was born in Liberty Township, this county, 
July 31, 1842, where he was reared a farmer and lived with his par- 
ents, /Vmos S.'and Lucinda (Tatmr.n) Wills, until manhood. June IS, 
1862, he enlisted in Company H, Fifty-fourtli Indiana Infantry, to 
serve three months, and was out nearly five months on duty in Ken- 
tucky. He re-enlisted Feb. 13, 1S65, in Company E, One Hun- 
dred and Forty-eighth Indiana Iifantry, to serve one year, and on 
the organization of his company he was made a Corporal. He was 
mustered out at the close of the war at Indianapolis, Sept. 5, 1865, 
and after receiving his discharge from the war he returned to Clay- 
ton, Hendricks County, where he followed farming until 1869, 
when he worked at the carpenter's trade till 1870. He then en- 
gaged in teaming in Danville until 187S, w1ien he was appointed 
janitor of the Hendricks County court-house by the county com- 
missioners, holding this position until 1882. He then held the 
office of Deputy Sheriff for several months during 1882,and in 1882 
also served as City Marsha . In 1880 he was elected Coroner of 
Hendricks County, and served as such two years. In 1883 he 
served as Constable of Center Township, and in 1884 he was again 
appointed janitor of the county courthouse. Jan. 1, 1866, he was 
married to Miss Julia Bell, of Danville. They have two sons — 



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HISTOKY OF HENDraCKS COUNTY. 



Charlie A. and Harry. He and his wife are members of Uie 
Christian chnrch. He is a member of Jesse S. Ogden Post, jS''o. 
164, G. A. R., and has held tlie position of JMaster of Finance in 
Danville Lodge, No. 48, K. of P., for two years. 

James A. Wilso/i, attorney at law, was born at Peoria, 111., Sept. 
15, 1S54, and is the youngest son of William and Sarah F. (Hosea) 
"Wilson. His father having gone to California and not having- been 
heard from, was supposed to be lost, ho was reared ,by his grand- 
father, W. F. Hosea, of New Philadelphia, Ind., until his eixteentL 
year. He worked on tiie farm till he was thirteen, after whicli he 
supported his grandparents, by working in a stave-mill, for three 
years. After leaving his grandparents he continued to work in a 
stave factory uutil tlie fall of 1870, and during that time he at- 
tended school for the first time, working for his board. During the 
spring and summer of lS7i he worked on a fruit farm near Sey- 
mour, Jackson Co., Ind., and in the following winter he again at- 
tended school,^ working on a farm for his board. In the spring 
and summer of 1872 he again worked on a farm ia Jackson County, 
part of the time attending the Normal School at Little York, Ind. 
He again attended school in the winter of lS72-'73, working for 
his board as before. In the spring of 1S73 he attended the Blue 
River Academy near Canton, Ind. During the summer of 1873, 
while working on a farm in Jackson County, he broke his arm, 
which' caused him to be laid up till the following winter, when he 
was engaged as a teacher in a school in Du Bois, Orange, Brown 
and Morgan counties until the spring of 1881, and attended school 
at Blue River Academy or the Southern Indiana Normal at Paola, 
Ind. He also studied law under his brother, E. G. Wilson, and in 
the spring of 1880 he became associated with his brother, L. F. 
"Wilson, in the practice of law at Nashville, Ind. After he gave 
up teacliing, in 1881, he engaged solely in the practice of law witli 
his brother. In November, 1881, they removed to Danville, his 
bi'other retiring from the firm in May, 1S84. In connection with 
their law practice, he and his brother published at Danville the 
Hendricks County Gazette, a Democratic paper, until August. 
ISSij'siace which he has devoted his time entirely to his law prac- 
tice at Danville. June 15, ls81, he was married to Miss Julia A., 
drughter of "William B. Cooper, of near Mooresville, Hendricks 
County. They have one child — Grace. Mr. "Wilson is a Master 
Mason. Politically he is a Democrat and is the chairman of the 
Democratic Central Committee. 






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CHAPTER XII. \- 

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CLA.Y TOWNSHIP. 



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Okganization. — Description. — Early Settlement.— Township 
Officials. — First Election. — Political History. — Pecksbcrg. 
— Alio. — Coatesville. — Reno. — Hadley. — Property and TAxa- 

TION. BrOGRAPHIf'.VL. 

This township was formed by separatina; frotn the north end of 
Franklin Township three tiers of sections of land, and taking off of 
the southeast corner of Marlon three sections, making for Claj- 
Township an area of twenty-four square miles. Tl;e organization 
was effected by the Board of Commissioners in ISio. Tiie surface 
is rolling, and tlie soil for the most part good; especially is this so 
in the eastern portion, but much of the western half of the town- 
ship is only second-rate land. It is drained by the three forks of 
Mill Creek. 

The first settlements in this township were made about the year 
1S25, ancf the prominent families who came previous to 1832 were: 

Obadiah, George and John Tincher, John Hadley, Joel and 
Jesse Hudson, AYilliam Benbow,Dr. Kersey, jS^ewbry Hunt, Abra- 
ham West, Nicholas Orsburn and George Hancock. 

OFFICIAL. 

The following list of those who have held the several township 
offices, is believed to be nearly complete, as it is made from the 
election returns on tile in the office of the County Clerk. 

Justices of the Peace: Robert Harvey, lS45-'50; Amiel Hunt, 
1S51; Amiel Hunt and Alfred V. Coffin, 1S55; Amiel Hunt 
and William W. ' Wellman, 1859; Cyrus L. Stanley, ISGO; 
Robert ^K Harvey, 186-3; Cyrus L. Stanley, ISGl; Thomas 
Mendenhall, 1866; William P. Jenkins and A. Bundy, 1S68; 
Thoruas C. Mendenhall and Joel T. Tinder, 1870; Cyrus L. 
Stanley, 1871; John S. Roberts and Joseph Bandy," 1872; Thomas 
C. Mendenhall and Asa J. Martin, lS7i; Josepli Williams and 
Thomas C. Mendenhall, 1S78-'S2. 

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HISTOKY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



Constables: William Moore and Alfred Hunt, 1845; William 
Tincher and James Wright, 1846; Hiram D. Jones and James 
Wright, 1S47; John C. Gambold and Cjriis Moore, 1848; Cyrus 
Moore and John Riishton, 1849; James Crews and William Hatch- 
ings, 1850; Milton Wright and Thomas E. Harrison, 1851; A. M. 
Cleghorn and William Page, 1852; Joseph Me An inch and Milton 
Wright, lS53-'4; Joseph McAninch and William Tincher, 1S55; 
William Tincher and Henry Yount, 1856; Quiucy C. Tomlinson 
and John A. PJiillips, 1857; Quincy C. Tomlinson and Benja- 
min Hiatt, 1S5S; Cyrus L. Stanley and Eenal F. Svvaim, 1859; Al- 
fred V. Coffin and Stephen S. Kitchen, 1S60; John A. Phillips 
and Stephen S. Kitchen, 1861; John. C. Gainbold and James 
Queen, 1862-'3; Himelius Kendall and Annuel Edwards, 1S64; 
Jason Tomlinson and Josiah Phillips, 1866; William M. Farmer 
and John C. Gambold, 1867; P. P. Thomas and George Smith, 
186S; William White and Joseph Buudy, 1869; Stephen Clime- 
worth and Zimri Warren, 1870; James L. Astley and Zimri "War- 
ren, 1872; John Harris and Annuel Edwards, 1874; John Cham- 
pion and William Stanley, 1876; John Champion and William 
Stanley, 1878; Lewis Shaw and Woodsoa Pryaut, 1880; J. A. Po- 
hannou and John Crews, 1S82; W. H. Crose and John Crews, 
1884. 

I'l-uniacs: Elias Grimes, 1856; Eobcrt Harvey, 1857; Addison 
Coffin, 1S5S; James Kersey, 1859; Milton Hadley, 1860; Job 
Hadley, 1860; David Walker, 1861-'3; Samuel N. Hubbard, 1864; 
Benjamin T. Schorer, 1866; Caleb Hunt, 1867-'S; John jNTew- 
man, 1869-'70; John Kendall, 1872-'6; Elias Ginnes, 1878; John 
Kendall, 1880; John K Phillips, 1882; S. D. Edwards, 1884. 

Clerks: Milton Wright, 1856; William Tomlinson, lS57-'8 (of- 
fice abolished). 

Treasurers: Moses Burgess, 1856-'T; Dr. James Kersey, 1S58 
(office abolished). 

Assessors: Elwood Stanton, 1870; Joshua Brown, 1872; Amos 
Hoak, 1874; E. D. Wheeler, 1876 -'80; F. M. Smith, 1882. 

FIRST ELECTION. 

The poll-book of the gener>i.l election, of 1846 (held at Spring- 
field, Aug. 8) gives the names of 101 voters, which are here cop- 
iea, as forming a nearly complete list of the pioneers of that day: 
Peter Long, Wesley Hardwick, Joshua F. Hackings, Mordecai 
Samuels, Abraham West, Benjamin Picket, Caleb Hunt, Thomas 






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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



547 



J. Hadley, Erasmus Nichols, Milton Aslier, Phineas Moon, Eli 
Hodson, Job Hadley, Henry Bland, Kobert Harvey, Menchor Coe, 
John Candift', John Harlan, John Gambold, Phineas Tomlinson, 
Ransom Estes, Edward r>. Estes, John Johnson, Mathias Alaster, 
Carver Eenbool, Timothy Swain, Clark Hill, David Mastin, Henry 
Coats, James Wright, William Talbot, Hiram D. Jones, Elijah 
Anderson, Isaac Miracle, William H. Dalton, Harvey Stanley, 
Samuel Stanley, Francis Huckings, Edward Tomlinson, Miles T. 
Richardson, Allen Pearson, James Pearson, George Tincher, 
Henry E. Goolman, Winson Yates, Jesse Turbeville, Jonathan 
Mendenhall, Hugh McKee, Harvey Richardson, Tandy Scott, Eli- 
jah Wright, Solomon Rushton, Benjamin Gaeres, Joel Haggins, 
Eleazer Hunt, Jabez Watson, Jolin Wright, Thomas C. Parker, 
Milton White, John Stanley, William S. Benbow, Charles Green, 
Robert Walker, Edward Newham, Jacob Workrider, Jesse Watson, 
Albert Hunt, John JSTewham, William Mann, A. Edwards, Jesse 
M. Hackett, James Acres, Alfred Hunt, Ellis King, Henry Wise, 
Asahel Mann, William Tancher, Alexander Adams, Robert B. 
Stanley, l>'athan Harvey, Blake Swain, William Hayworth, John 
Harrison, Silas Dixon, William Benbow, Nathaniel HLadley, Jere- 
miah Sniitli, Eli Phillips, John Edwards, Samuel Phillips, Jo- 
seph ]\rorris, Wesley Pearson, Elihu Dixon, Elam Benbow, Price 
F. Hall, James Hayworth, John Hancock, William Cosner, Joel 
W. Hodson and William Beecbardson, 

poLrrioAi. 

In political sentiment the people of Clay ItRve always been over- 
whelmingly Republican, and before the birth of that part}' they 
were as loyal to its predecessor, the Whig party. The township 
was also a stronghold of free-soilism during the days of Clay and 
Webster, and in the campaigns of ISiS and 1S5'2 many more votes 
were given to the Free-Soil than to the Democratic candidates. 
Following is the vote cast at each presidential election from 1S48 
to ISSi, inclusive: 



1S48— Zachary Taj-lor 57 'il 

Martin Van Buren. .. . 30 
Lewis Cass 9 

1853— Winficld Scott ...'...,89 4.5 

John P. Hale 44 

Franklin Pierce 27 

18oC— .Joun C. Fremout 1.53 100 

James Buchanan 53 

Millanl Fillmore 7 

1360— Abraham Lincoln 174 136 

John C. Breckinridge 38 



1860— Stephen A. Douglas. . 7 
John Bell 6 

18G4- Abraham Lincoln 241 220 

George B. McClellan. 31 

1SC3— Ulysses S. Grant 301 266 

Horai-lo Seymour 35 

1873— Ulysses S. Grant 802 231 

Horace Greeley 71 

1876— Rutherford B. Hayes... 320 246 

Samael J. Tilden 80 

Peter Cooper 3 



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HISTOKY OF HENDRICKS COTJNTV. 



1880— James A. Garfield, .. 
Winfield S. Hancock. 
James B. Weaver. . . . 
Neal Dow 



363 2GG 
96 
3 
3 



1884— James G.Blaine 303 200 

Grover Cleveland 97 

John P. St. John 11 

BeDJamin F.Butler. . . 6 



PECESBURG. 

Claj' Township' is tlie smallest in the county, but is tlio most 
densely populated (eighty to the square mile) and has the most 
villages and ])ostoffices, which are five in number, three on the 
Vandalia line and two on the Indiana & St. Louis Railroad. 

Pecksburg, which was named in honor of tlie first President of 
the Vandalia Pailroad. is near the east line of the township, on 
section 31. It lias one store, kept by Abraham Bowen, who is also 
Postmaster and. station agent. There is also a church, of the 
Lutheran denomination, where services are usually held every 
other Sunday. William Tinster preached for several years, and 
in 1SS2 removed to Mud Creek. At present writing there is no 
regular pastor, the last one having been liev. Mr. Keller, now in 
Kentucky. The congregation numbers about fifty. Sunday-school 
sessions are hold every Sunday, under charge of Allen Keitzcl. 
Pecksburg is not prosperous as a village, and has now but fifty in- 
habitants. 

Alio. 

Two miles west of Pecksburg, on sections 2, 3, 3i and 35, is 
Amo, the voting place of the township, and a prosperous place of 
200 inhabitants. It was laid out in 1S50 by Joseph Morris, and 
called Morriitown, which name was dropped for that of Amo by 
some of its classical-minded citizens. The first iiouse was built by 
"William Tomlinson, who lives yet in the village. The business 
firms of to-day are: E. B. Owen, general store; Cook & Masten, 
grocery and meat market; Thomas Mendenhall, grocery; Roberts 
& Marshall, saw-mill; Pearson_& Snodgrass,livery; GAY. McCloud, 
livery; I. PL George, drugstore and pos-otfice; A. J. Crosswaite, 
blacksmith and wagon shop; ^V. W. Ralstun, station agent. 

SCHOOLS AND Cftt'RC.TIES. 

The.handsome brick school-house was coinpleted in 1S63, at a 
cost of §8,000. There are four .-ooms, three of which are occupied. 
The teaclicvs for the present year are Joseph J. Doane, Mrs. JS^aomi 
Ratliffe and Miss Anna Hawkins. There are 150 pupils on the 
rolls. 

/Society of Friends. — Of the three churches, that of the Friends 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



549 



is the oldest. They organized about 1S40, and built first a log 
church. This was speedily succeeded by a frame structure, which 
was used forty years and then gave way to the present structure, 
which was completed in the fall of 1SS3, at a cost of §1,500. 
Among the early members of this society were Philip Johnson, 
John Cosner, Annuel Edwards and Asael Hunt. Services are held 
on the first and fifth days of each week. 

The Bnptist C/uo'cA was organized about the time of tlie war, 
and the frame church was built a year or two after, seating 400, 
and costing §2,000. Among the early members were Elijah 
"Wheeler, Harding Tinclior, Milton Bland, Hiram Bland, Samuel 
Hubbard and their wives. The first regular pastor was Rev. Mr. 
Edwards; next was Rev. Wilson G. Trent, and then came succes- 
sively Revs. Moore, Sherrill, L. A. Clevinger and R. N. Harvey. 
The church has about 100 members. 

The Methodist Enisco])al Church was organized in 1S67. The 
church was completed in that year, having been begun in 1866, at 
a cost of $2,000. Among the first members were William H. 
Tush, "Winlield Hiiies, John McAninch, "Wesley Johnson, M. "W. 
Cosner, John M. Champion, Harbert Fencer, John Gasper, S. F. 
Tincher, James E. Ralston, with their wives, Mrs. Martha A. 
Tincher, Mrs. Liniada Stanley, Mrs. E. Cosner, George "W. Fencer 
and Mrs. Nancy Newman. The pastors have been in succession. 
Revs. F. M. Pavy, B. H. Bradbury, Thomas Bartlctt, J. F. McDan- 
iel, W. C. Davidson, Nelson Green, D. "W. Risher, Nelson Green 
Jesse Hill, J. B. Combs, Elihu Mason. The last named, the 
present pastor, lives at Coatesville, and conducts services here 
every two weeks. The present membership of the church is 
thirty-five. 

COATESVILLE, 

the largest town in the township, having about 600 inhabitants, 
is situated in the western part, on sections 5, 6, 31 ando 32. Its 
business firms are as follows: 

Isaac Eaughman, Coatesville House; James Brown, slioe sliop; 
John Brown, boarding house; J. M. Bourne, druggist; Bryant & 
Sharp, druggists; D. "W. Campbell, general store; T. L. Campbell, 
furniture; Henry Crews, restaurani,; Draper & Garabold, general 
store; E. R. Ellis, harness; Alex. Fetrow, saw and planing mill; 
Nathan Fisher, freight and express agent; Tiiomas Gibbons, har- 
ness; George N. Glass, photographer; Allen -Job, hardware; "W. 

H. Johnson, livery; "W. N. Lakin, wagon and agricultural iraple- 
3.3 



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550 



HISTOEY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



merits; Elias H. Marker, miller; "William Newkirk, contractor; D. 
W. Risher, postoffice and grocery; Robbins & Baughman, drug- 
gists; IS'oali Siler, blacksmith; "Wier & Tucker, drj-goods; Joseph 
Williams, Justice of the Peace. 

The legal profession is represented by C. L. Stanley and ,W. H. 
Talbot; the medical by Tilghman Hunt and Stephen Hunt. 

EELIGIOUS. 

TAe Methodist Episcopal Church has been organized nearly fifty 
years. Their first church was burued about IS60, tliat now used 
being their second edifice; it was built in 1SC3, at a cost of §2,000. 
The present membership of the clmrcli is 105. Services are held 
every Sunday. The present pastor is Rev. E. Mason, who has no^,' 
been here two years. He was preceded by Revs. J. B. Combs, 
two years; Jesse Hill, two years; D. W. Risher, three years; Nel- 
son Green, three years; John McDaniel, W. D. Davidson and B. 
H. Bradbury. The Trustees of the church now are Tilghman 
Hunt, Joseph Williams and Abner Miller. S. P. Brown is Super- 
intendent of the Sunday-school. 

The Missionary Baptists organized their church in 1S71, anc 
built their frame church in 1873, at a cost of $1,200. The mem- 
bership is about forty, and services are held monthly. The presen'. 
pastor is Rev. G. W. Terry, of Stinesville, preceded by Revs. 
Sherrill. Jesse Buchanan f.nd John F. Crews. Following are the 
church officers: Clerk, Jesse Harlan; Moderator, Harding Tin- 
cher; Treasurer, Darius Crews; Trustees, J. F. Crews, David 
Walker, Darius Crews and Harding Tincher. 

SOCIETY. 

Coatesville Lodge, No. £57, /. 0. O. K, was organized Nov. 27, 
1870, with tiie following first members: Joel T. Tinder, Wallace 
Snowden, Williaiii Lakin, William jSTewkirk and Alva W , San- 
ders. The present officers are: 0. S. -Newton, N. G.; J. N. 
Bowen, V. G.; J. G. Sharp, Secretary; W. M. Lakin, Treasurer, 
David Fisher, Warden. 

EENO. 

i^ a small station on the Indiana & St. Louis Railroad, on section 
30. It has about 100 inhabitants, and is fourteen years old, 
dating from the construction of the railroad through the town- 
ship. In business at Reno are William Rammel, postoffice and 






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BISTOEY OF FENDKrCKS COUNTY. 



551 



general store; Jolm "Walden, general store; T. L. Hadlcy, broom 
factory; T. L.Gose, blacksmith; William Worlino, blacksmith; "Will- 
iam Crimmel, station agent; Jesse Alberson, shoe shop. 



HADLEV 



is a railroad station on section 23, and has but few inhabitants. 
There is a postoffice, store and Friends meeting-house. 

STATISTICAL. 

In 18S0 the population of Clay Township was 1,9G5. The fol- 
lowing statistics of property and taxation are for 1SS5: Acres of 
land assessed, 14,493.48; value of same, §399,561; value of im- 
provements, Sl'i'ijOOO; value of lots, ST, 416; value of improvements, 
$22,400; value of personal property, $278,208; total taxables, 
$878,585; polls, 287; dogs, 1-30; State tax, $1,197.79; county tax, 
$2,615.20; township tax, $878.60; tuition tax, $1,120.05; special 
school tax, $2,779.30; road tax, $1,757.20; endowment tax, $43.93; 
bridge tax, $878.60; total tax, $13,131.58; delinquent tax, $825.52. 

BIOGRAPHICAL. 

James N . Bourne is one of the wide-awake, enterprising busi- 
ness men of Coatesville, where lie has lived since 1876. For a 
time after coming here he was engaged in the livery business, but 
since Decfimber, 1877, has beenengaged in the drug business, in 
which he has built up a large trade. His father, William S. 
Bourne, was a native of Garrard County, Ky., and one of the pio- 
neers of Putnam County, Ind., v/here he died, in Jefl'erson Town- 
ship, in September, 1872, and where his wife still lives. They had 
a family of eight children. James N. is the only one living in 
Hendricks County. He was born in JefE'ers'^n Township, Putnam 
Co., Ind., in 1847. He remained with his parents till after the 
breaking out of the war of the Rebellio!). when he enlisted, in 
March, 1864, in Company A, Twenty-seventh Indiana Infantry. 
He participated iu some of the most important battles of the last 
years of tlie war, including the Atlanta campaign and Sherman's 
march to the sea; thence to Washington, where he was in line at 
the grand review of the army. He married Sarilda J. Hill, a 
native of Putnam County, Ind., daughter of Andrew J. Hill. 
They have had five children — Everett, Maggie, Bertha, James A., 
and Ralfo. Bertha is deceased. 

D. IF. Camplell, merchant, Coatesville, is a native of Jenniugs 



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HISTOKY OF HENDKICKS COtlNTi". 



County, Inl, born in 1844, a son of Luther J. Campbell, one of 
tlie early settlers of that county. He remained at liome till eight- 
een years of age, and in 1S62 enlisted in defense of tlie Union, 
and was assigned to the Eighteenth United States 'lufantry, and 
served six years. During the war his regiment operated with the 
Eastern army, and he participated in a number of severe engage- 
ments, and during General McClellan's peninsular campaign 
formed a part of General Butler's command. Alter the close of 
the war he served on the "Western plains three years, and there bad 
many thrilling expLTJencos. The regiment was stationed at differ- 
ent forts doing garrison duty. In November, 1S66, they were 
transferred to Fort Piiil Kearney, and were there at the time of 
the slaughter of Captain Fettemore and his command, the partic- 
ulars of which may be of interest to our readei'S, as our subject 
Was directly concerned in the transaction. Mr. Campbell, as Ser- 
geant, was detailed with a party of men to go some distance from 
the fort to procure fusl, and Captain Fettemore, with ninety-six 
men, accompanied them as a guard. They were considerably 
annoyed by the Indians, and when nearing the fort on tliL-ir return 
Captain Fettemore determined to turn back and attack them, while 
the wooding party proceeded to the fort. Tiiis was a fatal eiror, 
as he was decoyed to a ravine and at once attacked by thousands of 
Indians on both sides, and the entire party slaughtered, not a man 
escaping. After the expiration of his term of service Mr. Camp- 
bell returned to Indiana and soon after located in Cuatcbville and 
settled down to the peaceful vocation of a merchant. He has been 
successful in this branch of business, and is now the oldest mer- 
chant in the village. He has a fine brick store, which he erected 
in 1S77, and has also one of the best re^idence3 in the town. He 
has built up a large trade, his annual sales amounting to $40,000. 
He was married in 1S09 to Mary A. Allen, of Putnam County, 
Ind. They have two children — Lenna and Flora. 

James Ch)'isty, section 29, Clay Township, is one of the pioneers 
of Hendricks County. He was a son of James and Elizabeth 
Christy, and when a child moved with them from Virginia to Put- 
nam County, Tud., where they both died. In 1S2S he came to 
Hendricks County and settled on laud entered by his father in 1S2S. 
He has been a successful financier, and has by industry and energy 
made of his land a good farm and acquired a competence for his 
. old age. He has been thrice married. His first wife was Harriet 
Kinsler. Their only child, a daughter, died in infancy. His second 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COLTs'TV. 



553 



wife was Kesiah Vice. To thetn were born three children — JMary, 
James A. and Robert K. His third and present wife was Nancy 
Flinn. Thev iiave had two children — "William Sherman and 
Charles. The latter is deceased. "\Yilliam Sherman was born 
June 5, 1S05, and lives witli his parents on the homestead. He is 
an industrious, enterprising 3'onng man, intelligent and well edu- 
cated, and takes an active interest ip all enterprises of social or 
mental benefit. 

Jesse F. Elrod was born in North Carolina, A.ilg. 29. 1S21, a 
sou of Joseph and Catlicrine Elrod, the former born in 1806, and 
the latter in ISIO. In 1S34- Joseph Elrod and his family, and John 
Gambold and George Fansler and their families left North Caro- 
lina to seek homes in the wilds of Indiana, and after a journey of 
six weeks arrived in New Garden, ten miles north of Riclimond, 
Wayne County. The father lived but two years after his settle- 
ment in the new country, and after his death, in 1836, the mother 
moved to Hendricks County with her family, and settled on forty 
acres of leased land in Franklin Township. She died in Co.itcs- 
ville, Sept. 10, 1877. The family consisted of seven children, four 
of whom are li\'ing — Jesse F., Barbara Ann, Charles and Joseph. 
Jesse F. Elrod was twelve years of age when he came to Hen- 
dricks County. He remained with his mother till manhood, and 
in connection with farinincr was engao^e'l in niillino' several years. 
In 1863 he bought the farm where he now lives, on section 31, Clay 
Township, adjoining the village of Coatcsville, which contains 108 
acres of choice land, and is one of the pleasantest homes in Clay 
Township. He was married to Lydia Pursell, a native of Marion 
County, Ind;, born June 8, ISS-i, daughter of Benjamin and Mary 
(Strong) Pursell. The former lives at Tuscola, 111., but the latter 
has been dead many years. Mrs. Elrod died Sept. 28, lS8i, leav- 
ing her husband and children to mourn the loss of a true and 
affectionate wife and mother. The children are four in number — 
Samuel H., Charles W., William F. and Mary A. 

Josephus B. GamloM^ of the firm of Draper & Gambold, gen- 
eral merchants, Coatesville, Ind., is a son of -John C. Gambold, one 
of the pioneers of Hendricks County. John C. Gambold was born 
in Pennsylvani;), in November, 1805. His parents died when he 
was a child and he was placed in a family named Green and with 
them went to North Carolina and was reared in a Moravian settle- 
ment. He was married to Nancy Sw-aini, a native of that State, and 
in 1831- they came to Indiana in company with Joseph Elrod and 



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HISTOE'S' OF HENDKICKS COUNTr. 



family and located in "Wayne County. In 1S35 he moved to Hen- 
dricks County and settled in Clay Township. In 1856 he started 
for Minnesota, and before reaching; his destination, at Delhi, Dela- 
ware Co., Iowa, in January, 1S57, his wife died. The family 
remained in Minnesota till 1859, and then returned to Clay Town- 
ship, where the father died June 2, 1S70. His family comprised 
ten children, six of whom are living; — Levi S., Eri A., Louisa C, 
Mary J., Josephus B. and Cynthia A. Joseplius B. Gamboldwas 
born in Clay Township,- Oct. IS, 1839. Aug. 7, 1S61, he enlisted in 
Company A, Twenty-seventh Indiana Infantry, and served three 
years and two months. He participated in the battles of Win- 
chester, Cedar Mountain, Antietam, Chancellorsville and Gettys- 
burg;was transturred West and participated in the Atlanta campaign. 
He escaped without injury save a slight wound at Dallas, Ga. 
After his return from the war he was employed by the Terre Haute 
and Indiana Division of the Vandalia Railroad till 1S72, and the 
next three years by Pierson, Fellows & Stanley, merchants of 
Coatesville. In 1SS2 he formed his present partnership with Mahlon 
B. Draper. He was married to Mwry E. Brown, of Putn;tm County, 
Ind. They have two children — Charles and ElIaE. 

William Greenlee is a native of Hendricks County, Ind., born in 
September, 1830. His father, Abncr Greenlee, settled in Marion 
Township in 1829, and there he was reared and educated. He 
enlisted in October, IStU, in the Fifty-first Indiana Infantry, and 
served in the defense of his country three years, two months and ten 
da3"s, pai'ticipating in many iiiip(_a'tant campaigns and battles. He 
was in General Buell's command atShiloh; was at Stone River, with 
General Streight on his noted raid, at Franklin, and later with Gen- 
eral Thomas at jS'ashville, where he was discharged Dee. 17,186-1. 
He returned to Hendricks County, and in 1SG5 bought the farm on 
section 28, Clay Township, where he has since lived. He is a model 
farmer and has one of the pleasantest homes in the township. He 
has been twice married. His first wife, Martha Bryant, is deceased. 
His present wife was Melinda J. Pierson,daughterof Ervin Pierson. 
He has had two children, only one of whom is living — Ernest, bora 
Sept. "16, 1876. His eldest son, Emerson, died in infancy. 

MiUi'iiE. Radley is a representative of one of the mostpromi. 
nent pione^T fainiliesof Hendricks County, and is one of the oldest 
living natives of the county. He was born in Center Township in 
December, 1829, a son of Simon T. Hadley, the second Clerk of 
Hendricks County. He has lived in Clay Township since 1870 and 



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HISTOEY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



555 



owns a fine farm on section 32. He now resides in tlie village of 
Amo. His wife was Jane Phillips, daughter of John Pliillips. They 
have no children, but have an adopted daughter — Sarah. 

Mordecal Hadley is a representative of one of the leading pioneer 
families of Hendricks County. His ancestors were early settlers of 
Pennsylvania. Subsequently one branch of the family moved to 
North Caroliny, another to Kentucky and a third to Massachusetts, 
for whom Hadley of that State is named. The grandfather of our 
subject, Joshua Hadley, was a member of the North Carolina 
branch, and was born May 23, 17i3. He married Ruth Lindley, who 
was born at London Grove, Ph., March 25, ITio. Their son, Joshua 
Jr., was born in Chatham County, N. C, Dec. 13, 17S3, the thir- 
teenth of sixteen children. Joshua, Jr., was married twice. His 
lirst wife was Lydia Hiatt, by whom he had one daughter, who 
grew to womanhood and inari-ied William White, and died several 
years ago. ilr. Hadley's second wife was Rebecca Hinshaw, who 
was born in Randolph County, N. C, Feb. 20, 1789. Their fam- 
ily consisted of eleven children, ten of whom grew to 'maturity. 
In the fall of 1S3S they came to Hendricks Count}', Ind., and settled 
in Clay Township. At that time their tv/o eldest children were 
married. Mr. Hadley died Aug. 23, 181:7. As is characteristic of 
all members of the society of Friends, he was strongly opposed to 
slavery, one object of his leaving North Carolina being to escape 
the evils resulting from it. He was a man of decided convictions, 
strong in the support of what he believed to be right, and equally 
earnest in denouncing what he believed to be wi'ong. Pie was a 
well-educated man and for some time a teacher in his early life. 
His wife survived till April 19, 1SS2, dying at the age of ninety- 
three years. She was a woman of great energy and fortitude, and 
strong religious convictions, and a devoted Bible student. She was 
a frequent attendant at church, riding horseback when bet^veen 
eighty and ninety years of age. Mordecai Hadley was born in 
Chatham County, N. C, June 30, 1827, and was ten years of age 
when his parents moved to Hendricks County. He was educated 
in the schools of his adopted county, remaining with his pai-ents 
till manhood. He has been twice married. His first wife, Sarah 
Jane Clark, was born in Chatham County, N. C, in July, 1827, and 
died in October, 1877. His present wife, Susan Lindley,' was born 
in Chatham County, N. C, May 16, 1812. Mr. Hadley is one of 
the leading citizens of Clay Township, representing its most pros- 
perous agriculturists. 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS OOUNTT. 



W. JV. LoMn is the proprietor of the carriage and wagon factory, 
Coatesville, Ind., one of the principal enterprises of tlie town. 
He is a native of Illinois, born in 1845. His father, "William H. 
Lakin, is a native of Ohio, moving thence to Illinois about 1S45, 
and in 1859 coming to Hendricks County, Ind., and locating in 
Plainfield, where he still lives. W. N. learned his trade of his 
father, and was for some time associated with him in business in 
Plainfield. He then went to Danville and remained a year, and in 
1809 located in Coatesville. In 1875 he erected a commodious 
building to accommodate his growing trade, and in 1885 built an 
addition, 20 x 45 feet in size, as a storeroom for his carriages and 
agricultural implements, which is a leading feature of his business. 
He carries on a general blacksmithing business. He is one of the 
most prosperous business men of the town and one of its most in- 
fluential and enterprising citizens. He married Louisa C Gam- 
bold, daughter of John Gambold, a pioneer of Hendricks County. 
They have one son — Otto F. 

George TF. MoCloud, proprietor of the livery and sale stables, 
Amo, lod., was born in Lee County, Va., Dec. 27, 1811- His 
father, John McCloud, died in 1819, and in 1830 his mother, with 
her four children — George W., jSTancy, Thomas and Archlif, 
moved to Ilendriclcs County, Ind., and settled in Franklin Town- 
ship. Of the family, Georgo "W. is the only one living. He mar- 
ried Eunice Bray, a native o.^" Kentucky, daughter of Henry Bray. 
To them "^QXQ, born twelve children, seven of whom are living. 
His wife died several years ago and he subsequently married Eliz- 
abeth Elliott, who died Jan. 14, 18S5, leaving two children. 

Daniel Oshorn^ one of the pioneers of Hendricks County, was 
bora ia Hart County, Ky., in 1811. In 1829 his father, Daniel 
Osborn, Sr., emigrated with his family to Hendricks County, and 
settled in what is now Franklin Township, and lived where he 
first settled till his death, in 1839. His wife survived her husband 
till 1855. They had a family of seven children, two sons ai:d five 
daughters. Of these there are living Margaret, Christina, Daniel 
and Mary. Daniel Osborn, Jr., married Mary Broadstrect, a na- 
tive of Clark County, Ind. She died in 1882. Mr. and Mrs. 
Osborn had twelve children, nine of whom are living, eight sons 
and one daughter. 

£li Phillips, deceased, was one of the first settlers of Clay 
Township. He was born in Stokes County, iST. C, in 1805. He 
was reared in his native county and there married Peggy Cosner, 



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HISTOET OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



557 



who was born in ISli, a daughter of John and Abigail Cosner, 
who came from North Carolina in 1S32 and settled in Clay Town- 
ship, Hendricks Co., Ind., where the father died in 1S49 and 
the mother Jan. 1, 1S61. In 1S33 Mr. Phillips moved to Indiana 
and settled on a traot of wild land on sections 33 and 3i, Clay 
Township, on which he lived till 1867, when he moved to Atno, 
where he died Jan. 1, ISSl. To Mr. and Mrs. Phillips were born 
twelve children, all in Clay Township; six are living — William; 
Pamelia, wife of Bennet Osborn; Phoebe, wife of William Season; 
Abigail^ wife of William Demoss, of Kansas; Jane, wife of John 
Walls, of Stilesville, and Arcade, wife of Dr. H. C. Summers. 
Mrs. Phillips makes her home with her daughter, Mrs. Summers. 
She has one brother and four sis'ers living older than she. The 
eldest, Mrs. Alary Vass, was born Jan. 1, 1795. 

Jonathan F. Phillijps, the eldest son of Samuel and Rachel 
(Newman) Phillips, resides on the southeast quarter of section 5, 
Clay Township. His farm contains 12S acres of valuable land, 
located on sections i and 5. He was born in Clay Township, April 
16, 1S40. He remained with hi? parents till July, 1863, when he 
enlisted in the One Hundred and Seventeenth Indiana Infantry 
for six months'. He was discharged after a service of seven months, 
and in February, 1S65, enlisted in Company B, One Hundred and 
Forty-eighth Indiana and served till the close of the war. He 
was married March 23, 1S6S, to Makina Couch, a native of North 
Carolina. They have a family of five children — Alma, Lora, 
Aldus, Am.anda and Olney. 

Samuel Pkillips, deceased, was one of the pioneers of 1836. He 
was born in ISOS, in North Carolina, a son of John S. and Sally 
Phillips, who emigrated from Forsyth County, N. C, to Wayne 
County, Ind., where the father lied, and in 1836 the mother and 
two unmarried children, Saiuuel and Sally, came to Hendricks 
County, and settled on section 4, Clay Township. Samuel bought 
a tract of land, but a few acres of which had been cleared of the 
timber, and on it a small log cabin had been built. This land he 
cleared and improved and made his home till his death, in July, 
18S0, and it is still the home of '.lis widow and younger children. 
He was m.arr;?d in 1839 to Rachul Newman, a native of Pandolph 
County, N. C, born in ISIS, a daughter of John and Elizabeth 
Newman, who came to Hendricks County in 1837, and settled in 
Franklin Township, where they botli died. To Mr. and Mrs. Phill- 
ips were born seven children — Jonathan F.; Sasanna E., wife ot 



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HISTORY OF HENDKICKS COtTNTr. 



Enoch Harlan; Lewis A. ; Sally JM., wife of William Shirley; John 
N., Oliver P. and Emery E. Mr. Phillips in an early day hauled 
a load of wheat to Lawrenceburg, which he sold for $9.00, the 
time occupiied in going and returning being fourteen days. 

Simo7i Raimnel^ one of the pioneers of Hendricks County, was 
born in Franklin County, Ind., Nov. 16, ISlS, a son of Rev. Henry 
and Elizabeth P. (Heward) Rammel. Henry Ramniel was a na- 
tive of New Jersey, and a minister in the Methodist Episcopal 
church. He came to Indiana in 1S17, and in 1828 to Hendricks 
County, and settled in Danville. He organized the first Method- 
ist society in Center Township. He died Feb. 21, 1882, aged 
eighty-six years, one month and twenty-eight days. He was mar- 
ried three times and had a family of seven children, six of whom 
lived till maturity — Eli, a Methodist minister, died in Kansas in 
October, 1SS3; Simon; Elizabetli, deceased; James, of Nebraska; 
Ruth, of Illinois; Lydia A., deceased; Henry, deceased. Simon is 
the only member of the family living in Hendricks County. Pie 
is by trade a mason, and has been one of the most industrious 
and enterprising citizens of Danville. He has served as Justice of 
the Peace twelve years. He has been twice married. His first 
wife was Lavina Ball, and to them were born four children — 
David,- William, Eliza and James. His present wife was Cynthia 
A. Griggs. 

'[Villiam Rammel, merchant and Postmaster, Reno, Ind., is a 
son of Simon Rammel and grandson of Rev. Henry Rau'.mel, one 
of the earliest settlers of Danville. He was born in Danville, in 
1852, and has been a life-long resident of Hendricks County. In 
August, 1881, he located in Reno, and bought the stock of general 
merchandise of William Davis, and at the same time was appointed 
Postmaster. His is the only store of any importance in the place, 
and he has a good trade, his annual sales amounting to $5,000. He 
was married to Jennie, daughter of David Ha worth. They have 
two children — Otis and Clara. 

Cyrus L. Stanley, attorney at law, Coatesville, Ind., is a son of 
Samiiel Stanley, one of the pioneers of 1S31. Samuel Stanley was 
a native of North Carolina, and was there married to Anna Bow- 
man. They were members of the society of Friends, with strong 
anti-slavery principles, and not wishing to rear their children un- 
der the influence of that institution, ia the fall of 1830 they left 
North Carolina, and with a one-horse team came to Indiana, be- 
• ing six weeks in making the journey. Their family at that time 



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HISTORY OF HENDEICKS CODTSTY. 



559 



consisted of five children, the eldest fourteen, and the youngest 
two years of age. They located near Kichinond, "Wayne County, 
where, April 6, 1S31, Cyrus L. was born. The same season they 
moved to Hendricks County and settled or? the east half of the 
southwest quarter of section 23, Clay Towiisliip. The land was 
heavily timbered with no improvements. Mr. Stanley erected a 
log cabin fourteen feet square, and began clearing his land, which 
he made his home till his deatli in October, 1850. His wife survived 
him but one week. He was an upright, honest man, of a quiet 
disposition, but decided in his convictions. He was in politics a 
Whig, strongly opposed to slavery, and was as conscientious in his 
political as in liis religious views. He had a family of eiglit chil- 
dren, all of whom are living except Barkley, who died in October, 
1849. Tlie surviving children are Harvey, of Douglas County, 
Kas. ; Rebecca, of Dallas County, Iowa; Sarah, of Warren County, 
Iowa,; William, of Parke County, Ind.; Cyrus L. ; Levi, of Warren 
County, Iowa, and Anna Jane, of Huron, Dak. The second son, 
Barkley, learned the carriage-makei-'s trade,' and settled in Spring- 
ville. He took a prominent part in politics; was a strong anti- 
slavery man, a member of the Iree-Soil party, and a delegate to 
the convention that nominated Martin Van Bnren in 1848. Ho 
died in October, 1849, leaving a wife and one child, the former 
since deceased. Harvey and Barkley were prominent in the early 
settlement of the county. Harvey was well educated and taught 
school a number of years. After reaching maturity he cleared a 
fsrm of his own, but in 1871 removed to Kansas. Cyrus L. Stan- 
ley has been a resident of Clay Township since his infancy. He 
has always given some attention to agriculture, and owns a fine 
farm. He was also for some time engaged in the mercantile busi- 
ness, and since 1870 has devoted considerable time to the practice 
of law. He was originally in politics, a "Whig, but since its or- 
ganization, has been a Republican. In 1860 he was elected Jus- 
tice of the Peace, and was re-elected i'l 1?64, but resigned before 
the expiration of his term, and in 1868 was again elected to the 
same office. He has also served as Commissioner of Hendricks 
County. Mr. Stanley has been twice married. InlSSO he mar- 
ried Lucy Elrod, who died in 1853, leaving one daughter — Mary 
Elma. In 1857 ho married Sarali Jane Bi-aun, a native of Ohio. 
They have three children — Eva Ettie, Ena Ethel, and Oscar 0. 

H. C. Summers, M. D., is a native of Putnam County, Ind., 
born in 1849, a son of Benjamin F. and Marion (Ceilings) Sum- 



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HISTORY OF HENDKICKS COD^'TY. 



mers. His paternal grandfather, Eev. Cornelins Summers, was a 
native of Kentucky and one of tlio pioneer Presbj'terian ministers 
of Nortliern Indiana. His maternal grandfather, Rev. Harvey 
UoUings, was a native of North Carolina, and a pioneer Methodist 
minister of Putnam County, Ind. H. C. Summers was reared in 
his native county, where he received his literary education. He 
began the study of medicine with Drs. Holman and Johnson, of 
Martinsville, Morgan Co., Ind., and subsequently attended, in 
1872-'73, a course of "lecturas at the medical department of the 
University at Louisville, Ky. He then returned to Putnam 
County and entered the office of Drs. Ellis and Smythe, at Green- 
castle, and later entered the Ohio Medical College, Cincinnati. 
After being at Cincinnati two months he was prostrated with ty- 
phoid fever and was sick about three months. This prevented him 
from graduating, and lie returned to Indiana, and in 1874 formed 
a partnership with Dr. S. C. Monnet, and located at Amo. In the 
fall of 1S77 he returned to Cincinn-:iti and graduated in the spring 
ofl87S. Dr. Summers was married Sept. IS, 1879, to Arcada 
Phillips, daughter of Eli Pliillips, one of the pioneers of Clay 
Tov>'nship. 

Abraham Williamson, farmer and stock-raiser, seciion 28, Clay 
Township, Hendricks Co., Ind., is a native of Somerset County, 
N. J., born Aug. 24, 1827. When he was twelve years of age he 
accompanied his parents to Ohio, and there grow to manhood. 
"When twenty-three years of age he came to Indiana and lias since 
been a resident of Clay Tov/nship, Hendricks Co., Ind. In 185.5 
his fether-in-law, James Kersey, Sr., gave him forty acres where 
he now resides, which he has improved and erected good build- 
ings, and now has a pleasant home. He was married jSTo v. 29, 185i, 
to Mary Kersey, daughter of James Kersey. She died April 29, 
1879, aged forty-three years, four months and four days, leaving 
five children — Rachel, Eva, liuella, Lillian and James Claude. 




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CHAPTER XIII. 



EEL RIVER TOWNSHIP. 



DiiscEiFriON. — Early Settlement. — First Items. — Mills and 
Distilleries. — " Boulder Club.'' — "Could Ilead Bird Tracks." 
— Township Officers. — Fikst Election. — Political History. 
— Peopeety and Taxation. — North Saxem. — Business. — 
Churches. — Lodges. — Biographical. 

. This is tlie uortLwest township of the county, and is bounded as 
follows : On the north by Boone County, on the east by Union and 
Center townships, on the south by Marion Townsliip and Putnam 
County, and on the west by Putnam and Montgomery counties. In 
number of streams and in natural drainages, Eel River Township is 
equal to Guilford, except that the east and west sides of the town- 
shipifrom its center toward the north, is not well drained by these 
streams, and is rather flat, but no part of the township may be 
called wet land. In the southwest corner of Eel River Township 
are the highest hills in Hendricks County, and just below where 
Rock Branch flows into Eel River, some of the hills rise 100 feet 
from the bed of the stream, and are covered with native evergreen 
trees. 

Near the southwest corner of the township, from difterent direc- 
tions, come together five considerable streams, to form Eel River 
proper. These five streams spread out orer the township like a 
fan, and make as many beautiful valleys, which are separated bv 
undulating ridges which were originally covered with a dense 
growth of sugar maple, walnut, oak and poplar trees. From many 
points in the township extensive tracts of country may be seen at 
one view; and as the delighted beholder looks out upon vistas of 
rich farm land, stretching down the valleya, Tvitli alternating fields 
of dark green corn or golden wliert, while upon either side stretch 
away beautiful undulating hills, diversified by open woodland and 
cleared fields, upon which hundreds of fiit, sleek cattle are feedino- 
upon the rich carpet of blue grass, or ruminating beneath some 
mighty old monarch of the primeval forest, he can hardly realize 

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HISTOKY OF HENDRICKS COCNTV. 



that be lias before him a realitj", and tliat the picture he sees is not 
a dream about some fairj land. As may be already inferred, there 
is little land in Eel River Township that is not first-class. The 
soil is uniformly good, and is adapted to grain and grass alike. 

SETTLEMENT. / 

In the spring of 1S24 Noah Bateman and Eeuben Claypool set- 
tled in this township a mile south of North Salem, and were fol- 
lowed in the fall by John Claypool and John S. "Woodward. 
Among those who located in the township previous to 1830 were 
James Trotter, Ileury Bales, J. and Martha Page, John F.Benson, 
Eobert Covey, Enoch Davis and his sons, William, Frank and 
Jesse; Willian^ Dewitt, Dr. Collins, Andrew Clifton, James Camp- 
bell, Mr. Cram and the Fenningtons. John F. Benson built the 
first mill in the county on Eock Branch, in 1820. Colonel Kichols 
says it was a very patient and industrious mill, but " rather slow." 

Mr. Benson's mill stood only a few years, and in 1829 Mr. Crum 
built a mill on Eel Fiver, not far from the location of the Benson 
mill. As early as 1830 some one started a distillery at Crum's 
mills. This was the first distillery in the county. It is believed 
that there has never been a distillery in any otlier township except 
Centei-, but there was, from, time to time, a number of different 
distilleries in Eel Fiver Township, which, in an early day, bore 
mucdi fruit in the form of drunkenness and immorality; but with 
the still-house passed awa}- its effects, and in its ph.co the tenets 
of temperance and religion have brought forth sobriety, morality 
and prosperity. 

The date of organization of this township cannot be definitely 
ascertained, but it was soon after that of the county. 

BOTTLDER CLUB. 

In defense of their property, which was often taken and sold by 
the constable, the citizens passed a "stay law," which they de- 
nominated a "boulder club." Whenever the constable advertised 
any property for sale, on the night before the sale the club would 
carry a few bushels of boulders and pile them upon the premises 
as a legal ncrtice to the constable not to offer the property for sale. 

Justice Hartman was required by the County Court, once upon 
a time, to appear before it with his docket as evidence in a certain 
cause in hearing, and when the docket was brought into court. 



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HISTOEY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



563 



neither the 'Squire himself, the Court, the Clerk, nor any of the 
Ifiwvers conld read a single word of it. Mr. Hartman sugsfested 
that "Bill" Davis be sent for, as he had helped him out of several 
such quandaries, and could read " bird tracks." 

FIEST CHUECH AND SCHOOL. 

The first church organization in the township was a Regular 
Baptist, which was organized at Round Town, by the Peuningtons 
aud others, at an unknown date. 

The first school was taught about 1S29, ia a house one-half mile 
southeast of North Salem, by "William Dewitt. This man had fled 
from Now Orleans for some crime, joined a pirate vessel, and with 
it sailed more than once around the world, and finally left the 
vessel to seek a new and different life in the wilds of the JS'orth. 
He was a man of intelligence, and was one of the most successful 
pioneer instructors in Hendricks County. He was one of the 
principal teachers of Eel River Township for a number of years. 
He died near North Salem at the advanced age of 115.' He used 
to say to his neighbors, after he was passed 100 years old, that if 
he did not get out of this wet country, he would never again be 
the man he had been. 

OFFICIALS. 

The varjous township offices in Eel River ha,ve been held succes- 
sively by the following persons: 

Justices of the Peace: Reuben Claypool, 1S2G (resigned 1S29); 
Christian Hartman, 1S29; Young L. Hughes, 1830; William Trot- 
ter, 1S32; William Davis, 1834; William Trotter, 1837; Matthew 
Mark, 1839; William Trotter, 1842; Rybert D. Covey, 1845; Will- 
iam Trotter, 1847; Thompson Fanner, 18-49; Jacob G. Fanght, 
1850; Preston Pennington, 1851; John S. Woodart and Robert D. 
Covey, 1855; John J. McPhetridge and Preston Pennington, 1859; 
C. B. Trowbridge, 1860; Robert D. Covey, 1863; A. H. Proctor, 
1864; Jacob H. Fleece, 1867; Aaron Smith and Minatree Penning- 
ton, 1868; Hiram T- Storm and Joseph Jones, 1870; W. H. Fleece 
and W. S. Pound, 1871; Robert D. Covey, 1872; E. T. Robbins 
and Miciiaol Higgins, 1874; Buford Howell, 1876; W. J. K. P. 
Jones, 1878; Milton Lowder and William D. Long, -ISSO; Milton 
Lowder and Elisha Christie, 1884. 

Constables: William Buttery and James Lacy, 1831; William 
Davis and William Davidson, 1832; William Davis and Anderson 






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HISTOijr OF HENDKICKS COUNIY. 



Trotter, 1833; Chesley Page and Archibald L. Wliitt, 1S34; Een- 

jamin Havens and Samuel iM. Holland, 1835; Benjamin Havens 

and "Wakefield Trotter, 1836; John Emmons and Benjamin 

Havens, 1837; Preston Pennington and A. L. AV^hitt, 1S3S- 

William Davidson and John Davis, 1839; Archibald L. 

Whitt and John jN'. Harlow, 184i; Reuben H. Ely and William 

D. Webb, 1846; Eeubeu H. Ely and William H. Mack, 1S4S; 

Eeuben' H. Ely and Crockett Hedge, 1849; Archibald L. Whitt, 

and Crockett Hedge, 1850; Robert Hackley and Archibald L. Whitt 

1851; H. Lapham and Archibald L. Whitt, 1852; Daniel Davidson 

and William Y. Howard, 1853; William V. Howard apd James II. 

Craig, 1854; William V. Howard and James H. Craig, 1855; James 

B. Proctor and John K. Harlow, 1856; A. L. Cutter and Geor^'c 

Duckworth, 1S5T; Archibald L. Whitt and George Duckworth, 

185S: James Emmons and Robert Hackley, 1859; P. S. Duckworth 

and John Pennington, ISGO; G. Duty and H. Clay, 1861; V7iil- 

iam S. Pounds andRobsrt Hackley, 1863; Williaih Scott ai,d 

Noah Toney, 1863; P. S. Duckworth and Jacob Harlan, 1864- J. 

F. M. Davidson and D. Tucker, 1865; William B. Woodard and 

James B. Proctor, 1866; G. H. Adams and Francis Russell, 1867; 

Reuben Hampton and John T. Hedge, 1863; John Hypes and 

Robert Oreah, 1869; J. T. Waters and James Jones, 1870; Robert 

Hackley and Samuel C. Clay, 1872; Granville Davis and W. L. 

Wright, 1874; J. E. Clements and W. S. Howell, 1876; D. C. 

Smith and J. C. Adair, 187S ; Martin Cramer and John Lytle, ISSO; 

George Chadd and George M. Bales, 1882; Jacob Higgins and 

William P. Stephens, 188 i. 

Trustees: George D. Doty, 1856; Smith Russell, Preston 
Pennington and Joseph Waters, 1857; George S. Wren, 1 858; 
James Trotter, 1859-'62; James H. Clay, 1863; James Trotter, 
1864-'69; James H. Shields, lS70-'72; Samuel McDanieJ, lS74-'70; 
Waller M. Benson, 187S-'80; John Durham, lSS2-'84. 

Clerks: R. D. Davis, 1856; James M. Emmons, 1857-'5S (office 
abolished). 

Treasurers:- Owen Davis, 1856; James D. Trotter, 1857-'5S 
(office abolished). 

Assessors: Samuel Jones, 1870; Benoni M. Jones, 1872; Will- 
iam C. Mitchell, 1874; W. W. Hawker, 1876; Jess^ Baker, 1S7S- 
'80;David A. Clements, 1882. 

FIRST ELECTIOJT. 

The poll-book of the general election of Aug. 7, 1826, gives the 






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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



565 



names of twenty-seven who voted at that election, and includes 
nearly all of the first settlers. Here is the list, with the spelling 
preserved as in the poll-book: Abel Penning, Lewis Benson, 
Jacob Shoemaker, William Turner, Jacob Crumb, Adis Jones, 
.James Fowlar, Jesse Turner, John Warker, hampton Pennington, 
Danniel Turner, John Woodard, John Turner, David Evans, Ed- 
ward Turner, William Ilinton, David Claypool, Win Jones, Chris- 
tain Hartman, John Fowler, David Claypool, Seign., Noah bate- 
man, Young L, Hugs, John Claypool, Alvah Benson, Little Hugs 
and William Fowler. 

At this election Thomas H. Blake, for Congress, received twenty- 
seven votes; Josiah F. Polk, for Senator, thirteen; Calvin Fletcher, 
nine, and John W. Reding, five; Tliomas J. Matlock, for Represent- 
ative, eighteen; John Simms, six, and Isaiah Drury, 3; John 
Dunn, for Sheriff, twenty-five, and Robert Cooper, two; Preston 
Pennington, for Coroner, thirteen. 

POI.ITtCAL. 

Two years later, at tlie presidei tial election of 1828, tlie num- 
ber of votes had increased to forty-two. Of these, Andrew Jackson 
received thirty-five, and John Quincy Adams received seven. Po- 
litically, the township has been rather inconstant. The voters are 
now nearly divided between the two great parties, but in the past 
sixty years the tov/iiship has given majorities to one party or 
another with no regularity. Following is the vote fur President at 
each election from 1S2S to ISSi, inclusive: 

28 



1S28— Andrew .Jackson 35 

.Jobn Quincy Adams.. 7 

1833— Andrew .Jackson 88 6-5 

Henry Clay 23 

183G — Martm Van Bureu .... 30 15 
William H. Harrison.. 21 

1814-James K. Polk 117 41 

Henry Cliy 76 

1848— Zachary Taylor 119 30 

Lewis Cass 89 

1852— Franklin Pierce 135 19 

Winfield Scott 110 

1856— James Buchanan 134 17 

John C Fremont 117 

Millard Fillmore 18 

1800— Stephen A. Douglas. .. 144 8 
Abraham Lincoln .... 136 
.John C. Brtckinridge. 27 
John Bell ". . . - 7 



1864 — Abraham Lincoln 183 

George B. McClellan . . .58 

1808— Ulysses S. Grant 201 

Horatio Seymour 143 

1872— Ulysses S. Grant 206 

Horace Greeley 196 

f^harles O'Conor 2 

1876— Rutherford B. Hayes.. 219 

Samuel J, Tilden 183 

Peter Cooper 9 

1880— James A. Gartield 241 

WinfieldS Hancock.. 228 
James B. Weaver 19 

1884— Grover Cleveland 240 

James G. Blaine 233 

Benjamin F. Butler. . 6 
John P. St. John .... 5 



125 
58 
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33 

13 



STATISTICAL. 



By the census of 1830, Eel River Township had a population of 

1,998; and there must now be considerably more than 2,000. ' The 
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following statistics of property and taxation are for 1SS5: Acres 
of land assessed, 26,S64-.51; value of same, §772,620; value of im- 
provements, §126,509; valueof lots, $1,968; valueof improvements, 
$16,760; value of personal property, S275,J:-t7; total taxables, $1,- 
196,310; polls, 354; dogs, 192; State tax, 81,612.56; county tax, 
83,o21-.30; township tax, §478.55; tuition tax, $2,002.58; special 
school tax, $3,198.88; road tax, $2,392.60; endowment tax, $59.- 
81; bridge tax, $1,196.30; total tax, $16,987.93; delinquent tax, 
$1,164.67. • :,. . ;.^; ■ 

NOETH SALEM. . , ' 

North Salem, the only village in the township, was laid out in 
1835, by John and David Claypool and John S. "Woodward. It 
enjoyed a nioderate degree of prosperity until the recent construc- 
tion of the I., B. & S. Railroad, since when it has flourished be- 
yond the dreams of its founders. Its population is now 500, and 
its business is rapidly growing. Those now in business at North 
Salem are enumerated in the following list : J. D. Adair, postofRce; 
T.J. Adams, physician; J. T. Bailey, boots and shoes; Daniel 
Bales, pool-room; John P. Chapman, livery stable; Chadd & 
Chadd, liverv stable; J. M. Carter, carpenter; "W.C. Conover, crr- 
penter; Davis & Davis, stock dealers; F. M. Davis, miller; E. F. 
Davis, blacksmith; Davis &Smith, furniture and undertaking; Da- 
vis Bros., restaurant; Granville Davis, harness; Fleece & Fleece, 
hardware; W. 11. Fleece, general store; M. J. Fleece, Fleece 
House; L. W. Hole, station agent; G. E. Hackley, W. H. Hack- 
ley, blacksmiths; Scott Hiett, meat market; Gardner & Hockcr, 
dry-goods; Napoleon Hackley, barber; Gord. Hedge, barber; 
Powell Haines, pool-room; W. J. K. P. Jones, druggist; J. S. 
Linn, boots and shoes; J. A. Lytle, general store; W. ^Y. Leach, 
grocer; Lumpkin & Davidson, dry-goods; J. S. Linn, attorney; 
Zacli. Reagan, carpenter; Benjamin Robbins, carpenter; J. D. 
Roberts, phy3ician;|M. D. Ribble, druggist; G. G. Sowder, wagL n 
shop; Milton Sowder, Justice of the Peace ; Surber & Clay, stock 
dealers; J. M. Surber, boarding house; "Worley & Son, skatirg 
rink. 

EELIGIOUS. 

The JletAodist Episcopal Church is the oldest at North Salen, 
and was organised over lifty years ago. Reuben Claypool was a 
Methodist minister, and ])reached to his neighbors in their private 
cabins from the earliest date, and about 1833 a class was formed. 



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BISTORT OF HfiNDEICKS COUNTT. 



567 



Among the prominent early members were John S. and Charity 
"Woodward, John Claypool, wife and children, Chester and JVIartha 
Page, Mrs. Jerusha Covey, and William and Eleanor Jones and 
family. The present church, the second belonging to the society, 
was built before the war, at a cost of §1,200. The membership is 
about eighty-five, and services are held every Sunday, by Dr. J. L. 
"Smith, of Jamestown, who commenced his labors here in Septem- 
ber, ISSJr. He was preceded by T. F. Drake, two years; W. 
Fletcher Clark, three years; David Hanley, one year, and D. P. 
McLain, two years. 

The Christian Church was organized in 1837, with Charles 
Fleece and Thompson Farmer as Elders. It has "between 300 and 
400 members. Services are held monthly, by Rev. 0, P. Bado-er, 
of Greencastle. He was preceded by Revs. D. Collins, one year; 
W. B. F. Treat, two years; A. J. Frank, three years; William 
Holt and A. Plunkett. The Sunday-school is under the superin- 
tendeucy of George H. Duncan. 

The Baptist Church was organized before the war, and the build- 
ing erected during the war, at a cost of $1,000. Among the first 
members were Preston Pennington, Elizabeth Ballard (senior and 
junior), Susan, Levi, Mary and Eliza Pennington, Thomas, Susan 
and George Barber, John I^. and Mary Y. Clemens, and Eaton 
Bales. There are now about sixty members. Rev. John Case 
commenced preaching here before the war, and died near hereafter 
the war. Rev. W. M. Benson, of near Danville, has officiated ever 
since. Services are held monthly. 

SOCIETIES. 

North Salem Lodge, No. 142, F. & A. M.^ was chartered May 
2.5, 1853, and is the oldest secret order in the village. The present 
officers are as follows : J. W. Gulley, W. M.; J. A. Hadley,S. W.; 
L. L. Thrift, J. W.; John H. Bunton, S. W. ; D. A. Clemens, J. D. ; 
J. M. Owens, Treasurer; George^W. Rollins, Secretary; William 
R. Gill, Tyler. The lodge has fifty-six members, and meets the 
Wednesday evening on or before the full moon in each month. 

North Salem Lodge, No. 158, /. 0. 0. F., was chartered April 
15, 1SG5, with the following first members : William Adair, John 
S. Woodward, James White, John M. Hensley, James Shakles and 
H. W. Hackley. The present officers are: James K. Britton, 
N. G.;. James M. Davis, V. G.; W. W. Hocker, Rec. Sec; 
S. F. Fleece, Perm. Sec. ; A. J. Weekly, Treasurer. The order 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



has sixty-six members, and the meetings occur Friday night of 
each week, at Odd Fellows' Hall. 

Joe Fieace Post, No. 3S3, G. A. R., was mustered in September, 
ISSJ:, witii ten charter members. There are now twenty-four com- 
rades. Tiie present officers are: T. J. Adams, Com.; J. \V. 
Galley, S. V. C; S. li. Davis, J. V. 0.; J. S. Linn, Adj.; I. K^ 
Vannice, Q. M. ; A. Soots, Chap.; B. F. D.ivis, Surg. . The post 
meets tlie second and fuurtii Saturday of each month. 

BIOGEAPaiCAL. 

■James S. Chculd., senior member ofthe firm of Chadd (feChadd, pro- 
prietors of livery stable, was born Dae. 22, lS-±fJ, in Putnam County, 
Ind. He is a son of Samuel and Sarah Chadd, natives of Kentucky, 
who came to Putnam County' in 1836, where the father died in August, 
ISSO. His mother still resides in Putnam County. They had a 
family of six children — John T., David M., William J., James S., 
America J. (deceased), and ilary M. Our subject was reared in 
Putnam County and followed farming the most of his time till he 
removed to Hendricks County, when he continued his agricultural 
pursuits till ISSO. He owns about forty acres of land in Putnam 
County. In November, 1880, he, in connection with Charles "W. 
Carver, opened a livery stable at North Salem. This partnership 
continued about two years, when Mr. Carver retired from the firm, 
and his brother-in-law, Samuel M. Chadd, became a partner. "March 
1.5, 1871, he was married to Miss Mary E. Chadd, daughter of 
David and Mary A. Chadd, who were early settlers of Marion 
Township, this county. To them has been born one cliild — Dora 
M., born Jan. 4, 1S72. Mr. David Chadd has been twice married, 
and was the father of eleven children — Cynthia, Mary E., Lee A., 
David A., George M., James W., Samuel M., Ruth, Iva O., John 
C. (deceased) and Susan R. (deceased). Chadd & Chadd are square- 
dealing, enterprising business men, and have carried on their 
present business successfully. In politics they are Democrats. 

Hendey'son Cooh, deceased, was born Aug. 16, 1820, in Surrey 
County, N. C, a son of John and Edith J. Cook, who were also 
natives of North Carolina. He came to Hendricks County, Ind., 
in 1844, and was there marrijd to Miss Nancy J. Banta, who was 
born at Madison, Ind., Marjii 31, 1832, a daughter of Cornelius 
and Rebecca (Eccles) Banta. Seven children have been born to 
them — Horace G., Edgar W. (deceased). Lulu M., Edith R., John 
B., Charles M^and Edward J. Tliree of the above named-^John, 



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569 



Edith and Lulu — are teaclicrs in the public schools of this county. 
Mr. Cook settled on a farm in the west part of the township in 
March, 1872, where lie remained till liis death, which occurred 
Sept. 23, ISSi. He was esteemed by all who knew him for his- 
many virtues and sterling integrity. In politics he affiliated witb 
the Republican party. His widow still resides on the home farm^ 
and is the owner of 160 acres of land in a good state of cultivation. 

William E. Cox, son of Daniel H. and Lucinda Co.x, was born 
June 10, 1S32, in Montgomery County, Ind. His parents were 
natives of Kentucky, who came to Montgomery County, Ind., irt 
an early day. Tiiey had a family of nine children, seven still liv- 
ing—William E., Mary E. , Nancy J., Joseph A., Lucinda E.,, 
George M. and Daniel L. John and James are deceased. Our 
subject was reared on a farm, and received only a limited education. 
He has followed fanning pursuits through life. He resides in th& 
eastern part of this township. His first wife was Sarah Doyel, 
daughter of Farmer and Elizabeth Doyel, of Montgomery County, 
After her death he was married to Sarah Ray, daughter of Carsoo 
and Cynthia Ray, also of Montgon-.ery County. To tliis union was 
born one child, named Samuel C. He was again married, tins 
time to Mary Plummer, daughter of Joseph and Ann Flummery 
the latter deceased. Mr. Cox has served his township as School 
Director. In politics he affiliates with the Denaocratic party. He 
is a member of the' Christian church, and his wife belongs to the 
Methodist E]jiscopal church. 

Robert F . Davis is a native of Hendricks County, born Feb. i^ 
1852, a son of AValter and Mary M. Davis, the latter deceased. 
He was reared and educated in the district schools of his native 
county. Feb. 1, 1872, he was united in marriage to Miss Eliza 
Fritchett, born April 22, 1853, in Hendricks County, a daughter of 
James and Elizabeth Fritchett, natives of Kentucky, now residents 
of Union Township, this county. They have two children — Eula- 
lie W., born Feb. 5, 1873, and Mary B., born April 23, 1877. Mr. 
Davis has been successful in all his business undertakings, and 
is now the owner of a good farm in the eastern portion of Eel 
River Township. Folifically he is a Frohibitionist. Both he and 
bis wife are worthy members of tae Christian church. 

Walter Davis, son of Nathan and Nancy Davis, was born Dec- 
12, 1823, in Montgomery County, Ky. His father was born \v, 
Kentucky and his mother in Virginia. They were among the first 
settlers of Eel River Township, where Mr. Davis entered a large 






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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



tract of land, and died in 1848, his wife having died several years 
previous. Ten children were born to them — Louisa, John, Eliza- 
beth, Walter, Quincy, Catherine, William, Franklin, Susan, Mar- 
ion, five of whom are deceased — Louisa, Elizabeth, Catherine, 
Robert Franklin and Susan Ann. Walter Davis was married Jan. 
26, 1843, to Mary M. Spears, and to them eight children were 
born— Quincy A., Martha E., Naiicy A., Kobert F., Francis, 
Charles E., John Spears and Lafayette, of whom John S. and La- 
fayette are deceased. Mrs. Davis died June 16, 1S61, and Mr. 
Davis was married again April li, 1S63, to Mary A. Scott, of Ken- 
tucky, and to them were born six children — Bettie L. (deceased), 
Walters., Lorenzo D., K.Nynthe, Thomas C.,-EdgarL. Mrs. Davis 
died in i^ovember, 1873, and he was married again to Matilda 
South Dec. 8, 1875. Mr. Davis has been engaged in farming from 
boyhood and is one of the heading agriculturists in this township. 
He is the owner of 505 acres of land. He is a member of the 
Methodist church. 

William Davis, a prominont farmer of Eel River Township, was 
born April 22, 1820, in Montgomery County, Ky. His parents 
were Enoch and Nancy Davis, natives of Virginia. They came 
to Hendricks' County, Ind., and settled in this township where 
tlioy remained till their death. Si.x of their children are still liv- 
ing — Jesse,- Frank, William, Ciiarles M., Owen and John. Our 
subject was reared to manhood on a farm and "received but a lim- 
ited education. May 21, 181:0, he was married to Catherine Zim- 
merman, daughter of John and ISTancy (Myers) Zimmerman, 
natives of North Carolina and Kentucky respectively, who came 
to this county in 1833. To them have been born twelve children 
— Sirali E., wife of Isaac N. Yannice; Nancy, v/ife of George 
Duncan; Minerva J., wife of James Britten; Mary, deceased wife 
of Frank Frame; Ammda, wife of James Hunt; Jesse F., married 
Alice McPiietridge; John E., married Mary Cook; Frances, wife 
of Frank Fleece; Clarinda, wife of John Page; Vilitia B., mar- 
ried Richard Hypes; Josephus, married Ella Benson; and Minnie 
M. They have also living with them a grandchild, name Minnie 
O Frame. In 1340 Mr. and Mrs. Davis settled on the homestead 
now occupied by them, aid .vhich contains 190 acres of well cul- 
tivated land. Tliey are both earnest members of the Christian 
church, he being an Elder of the same for twenty-five years. 

John Darham, a prominent farnier and stock-raiser of Eel River 
Township, was bo.-n May 3, 1838, in Montgomery County, Ind., a 



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HISTORY OF HKNDKICKS COD NTT. 



571 



son of John and Mary (Fields) Durham. His parents were natives 
of Kentucky, who came to Montgomery County among the early 
settlers. His father was twice married and had by his first wife 
five children — Henry C, John, Snsan A., Mary F. ai'j James W. 
He was married a second time to Sarah Stubbins, of Montgomery 
County, and to this union were born eiglit children — Celia, Mattie 
J., Sarah D., Samuel W., Emma B., Charles, Nancy J. and Harry. 
He died in Montgomery County, after a life of great usefulness, in 
May, 1S76. Our subject was reared and educated in the common 
schools of his native county. He was married Dec. 22, 1SG5, to 
Miss Lee A., daughter of Lee and Miranda Tucker. They have 
I had seven children — Charles 0., Frank C, John L., Clarence S., 
Harry C, Thomas G. and Mary F. In 1865 Mr. Durham settled 
on his present farm in this township and is the owner of 460 acres 
of improved land. He is now seiving his fourth year as Trustee 
of this township. Politically he affiliates with the Democratic 
party. 

James M. Emmons was born Oct. 8, 1828, in Giles County, Va., 
a son of Jayhew and Sarah Emmons. His parents came to Hen- 
dricks County, Ind., in 1833, locating in Marion Township. In 
1840 they settled in Eel River Township and here our subject 
grew to manhood. He learned the carpenter's trade wliich ho fol- 
lowed alternately witli farming until 1S7S, in which year he was 
elected by the Republican party, Sheriff of Hendricks County, 
serving as such two terms. He resided in Korth Salem from 1849 
till 1S7S when he removed to Danville, but in March, 1883, he re- 
turned to Eel River Township and has since resided in the south- 
ern portion of it. He was married Jan. 20, 1853, to Elizabeth .J. 
Trotter, daughter of .James and Sa:-ah Trotter, natives of Virginia, 
and early settlers of this county. To Mr. and Mrs. Emmons have 
been born eleven childreu — Sarah C, James O., Charles E., Lon 
D., Ida M., Oliver J., Eldred E., Lulu G., Adinah D., John W., 
and Stanley. The last two mentioned are deceased. Mr. Emmons 
enlisted in-May, 1864, as Second Lieutenant of Company H, One 
Hundred and Thirty-second Indiana Infantry, in the 100-days ser- 
vice, andserved principally in Tennessee and Alabama. In Feb- 
ruary, 1865, he re-enlisted, this time in Company E, One Hundred 
and Forty-eighth Regiment, and served until the following Septem- 
ber, priucipally in Tennessee, when he received an honorable dis- 
charge at Nashville. Both Mr. Emmons and his wife are members 
of the Christian church, and respected members of society. 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



Clinton F. Fleece, M. D., deceased, was born in Boyle County, 
Ky. , Jan. 2, 1818, and in 1810 he graduated at the Medical College 
in Louisville, Ky. He remained in Kentucky till 1858, when he 
removed to Trenton, Mo., and subsequently came to North Saleui, 
Ind. In 1883 he went to Kansas but returned to North Salem the 
followinj^ year. He received a stroke of paralysis in May, 18S1, 
and a second and fatal stroke Oct. 22, following. He died in Octo- 
. ber, 1884, and was buried with Masonic honors hy his brethren ot 
the North Salem lodge. He was married four times, his last wife 
being !Miss Sarah J. Crose, daughter of George "W. and Mahala 
Crose, and to this union were born two children — Carrie E. and 
Effie M. He left a widow and seven children to mourn his death. 
Mr. Fleece was an eminently successful physician and always dis- 
charged the duties of his calling in a conscientious manner. In 
him Hendricks County lost one of her most worthy citizens and 
the medical profession an able member. 

Jacob H. Fleece was born June 4, 1829, near Danville, Ky. He 
was a son of Charles and Mar}' (Harlan) Fleece, who came to this 
township in 1836. He was reared to manhood in Hendricks County 
and received a common-school education. In October, 1853, he 
was married to Miss Lettie Ashby, daughter of Silas and Nancy 
Ashby, of Putnam County, lad. They are the parents of three 
children— Silas F., Lulie and Joseph. In 1853 he, in connection 
with his brother, John Fleece, engaged in the mercantile business 
at Ladoga, Montgomery County, in which he continued till 1854, 
when he returned to his farm in this township. Having been 
elected County Recorder in the fall of 1859 he assumed the duties 
of his ofdce in the spring of 1860, serving till the fall of 1861 when 
he resigned. In September, 1861, he was made Captain of Com- 
pany A, Fifty-first Indiana Infantry, and remained in the service 
till September, 1862, when he tendered bis resignation. He is at 
present serving his second term as Hendricks Conuty's Represent- 
ative in the Legislature, reflecting credit upon himself as well as 
his constituents. Mr. Fleece is the owner of 273 acres of well- 
improved land. He is a member of the Masonic order and also 
belongs to the Grand Army of the Republsc. He and his wife arc 
members of the Christian church. ■ - o 

Edmund R. ^aofZey, deceased, was borm Oct. 11, 1821, in North 
Carolina, son of James T. and Mary Hadlej, who were among the 
early settlers of Marion Township, this county. He received an 
education such as the common schools of his day aflorded, and 



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HISTOKY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



573 



endured many of the hardships of pioneer life. He was married 
Oct. 21, 1S41, to Sarah A. Ragan, a native of Mercer County, Ky., 
born Nov. 2S, 1822. She was a daughter of Abner A. and Mary 
Ragan, who were early settlers of Hendricks County. To this union 
were born eight children of whom six survive — Mary J., Sophia E., 
James A., Giliun T., William J., and Eva P. John E. .and Henry 
are deceased. In 1865 Mr. Hadley located in Eel River Town- 
ship where lie resided till his death, which occurred May 30, 1875. 
He was a member of the Christian church the greater part of liis 
life and his true Christian spirit was recognized by all who knew 
him. His widow resides on tlie homestead. She is a member of 
the Christian cluircli. 

Tobias D. Hays was born Jan. 16, 1S46, in Carter County, East 
Tenn. In 186-1 he enlisted in the Union service at Knoxville, East 
Tenn., in the Quartermaster's dej^artment, and served till the close 
of tlie war. In the spring of 1(S66 he came to Center Township, 
Hendricks Co., Ind. He remained here but a short time when 
he removed to Boone County, f.nd from therein a short time to 
Montgomery County, Ind., where he remained till 1869, working 
on a farm during the summer months and attending school at Craw- 
fordsville in the winter. Thus by his own exertions he acquired a 
good education. Sept. 7, 1S69, he was married to Harriet F. Brown, 
born Dec. 7, lSi2, a native of Kentucky, and daughter of George 
and Martha Brown. Her parents came to Hendricks County, Ind., 
in 1816 remaining there till 1866 when they removed to Montgom- 
ery County, Ind. Mr. and Mrs. Hays have two children — Charles 
M. and Joe F. Shortly after his marriage Mr. Hays with his wife 
returned to his native State where they remained till the spring of 
1871. He then returned to Hendricks County, Ind., where he now 
has a fine farm of 165 acres in Eel River Township, one-half mile 
east of North Salem. Both he and his wife are members of the 
Christian church. 

James H. Heady, M. D., was born April 10, 1S55, in Putnam 
County, Ind., the youngest child of Emri and Elizabeth Heady. 
His parents were natives of Kentucky. They are both living, hav- 
ing passed the years alloted to man, and are still hale and hearty. 
Of a family of fifteen children born to them fourteen are yet living. 
James H. received his early education in the district schools of 
his neighborliood, and when eighteen years old entered Asbury 
University, at Greencastle, Ind., remaining there three years. 
During the fall of 1877 and winter of 1S7S he attended the Ohio 



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HISTOET OF HENDRICKS COUNTT. 



Medical College, at Cineinuati, Ohio, and in April, 1S7S, he began 
practicing in Boone County, Ind. In the spring of 1879 he attended 
the Ohio Medical College taking the -practical course, after which 
he continued his practice in Jamestown, Boone County, until the 
fall of 1879. He then attended the Indiana Medical College at 
Indianapolis, from which he graduated in the spring of ISSO. He 
then resumed his practice at Jamestown, remaining there till May, 
1884, since which he has built a large and lucrative practice at 
North Salem, Hendricks County, and is recognized as one of the 
most successful physicians in the county. Nov. 30, 1S78, he was 
married to Rebecca A. Davis, daughter of Levi and Caroline Davis, 
of Boone County. They have had three children — Nora, Carl 
(deceased) and Etliel. Mr. Heady and his wife are members of 
the Missionary Baptist church. He is a member of Nortli Salem 
Lodge, No. 158, L O. O. F. 

Eli Hendricks, deceased, son of Henry and Martha Hendricks, 
was born Nov. 9, 1809, near Cincinnati, Ohio. He came to Wayne 
County, Ind., where he was reared to manhood and received a 
rudimentary education. May 19, 1836, he was married to Miss 
Mary E. Dinwiddle, born June 27, 1815, in Bourbon County, Ky. , 
a daughter of John and Jane Diawiddie. Nice children were born 
to them of whom only three survive — James "\Y., a leading farmer 
and stock-raiser of this township; Amos D. and Isaac D. In 1837 
Mr. Hendricks settled with his family on an uncultivated farm in 
the northern part of this township and endured some of the hard- 
ships of pioneer life. He was an earnest member of the Presby- 
terian church and served his church as Elder for many years. His 
death occurred Nov. 2, 1869. He was a kind husband and father 
and was respected by all who knew him. He was a man of sterling 
integrity and was upright in his dealings with his fellow men. His 
widow still resides on the old homestead. 

Thoinpson Henry ^^%\)Om\Vi Montgomery County, Ind., Aug. 
16, 1839. His parents, George and Elizabeth Henry, were natives 
of Kentucky and early settlers of Montgomery County, aiid in 
1816 they settled in Eel River Township, this county, where the 
father died in 1819. Their children are — John "W"., James R., Susan 
M., Lydia E. and our subject. The latter spent his youth on a 
farm and obtained a good education in the common schools of his 
neighborhood. He taught school and farmec! alternately about two 
years, and in April, 1867, he married EstelLne Jessee, daughter of 
Samuel and Margrret Jessee, of Boone County, Ind. They have 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 675 

seven children — Marj J., George R., Oliver A., Alice C, Eflie L., 
Mattie A. and Fredonia. In February, 1885, Mr. Henry moved 
with his family from Boone County to the northern part of Eel 
River Township, this county, where he owns 182 acres of land. In 
May, 1862, he enlisted in the Fifty-fifth Indiana Infantry to serve 
three moutlis and^ was in the fight at Richmond, Ky., where he 
was wounded in the foot, which disabled him for a short time. lie 
was discharged at the expiration of his term of enlistment, and in 
June, 1863, he re-enlisted in the Third Indiana Cavalry. He I 
served at Walker's Ford, Morristown, Nashville, near Knoxville, 
Tenn., and at Raleigh, N. C, and numerous other battles of less 
note, making twenty-eight in all. He was honorably discharged in 
August, 1865. He is a member of Antietam Post, Ko. 162, G. A. I 
R., at Jamestown, Ind. He is a member of the Methodist Epis- ! 
copal church. i 

Aafoji V. Hester, son of Adam and Ann (Van Zant) Hester, 
was born June 6, 1828, in Fleming County, Ky. In ISSi he came [ 
with his parents to Putnam County, Ind., and about five j'ears | 
later removed with them to Montgomery County, Ind. He was j 
married in Montgomery County, Sept. 4, ISoS, to Sarah McDan- ! 
iel, born July 10, 1840, a daughter of Jiidson and Sarah McDan- 
iel. They have had s;!ven childrun — Mary C, born Dec. 6, 1859, i 
and died Oct. 26, 1874; Laura L., born Feb. 8, 1861; Melviua, ! 
born Dec. 27, 1864; xVinanda, born Nov. 6, 1867; HattieF., born j 
Sept. 7, 1871; Eva and Evert (twins), born June 20, 1875, the lat- i 
ter died Aug. 1, 1876. In 1858 Mr. Hester removed from Mont- j 
gomery to Boone County, Ind., remaining there till the spring of j 
1865, when he settled on his present farm in the northern part of ! 
Eel River Township. He has followed farmins: throurrh life in I 
which pursuit he has been moderately successful, owning a farm of j 
eighty acres. He is a member of the Christian church. Politically, | 
be is a Republican. Mrs. Hester died Jan. 24, 1876. She pos- i 
sessed many excellent traits of character and was respected by all : 
who knew her. < ' | 

Michael Higg'ins, a pioneer of Hendricks County, vvas born j 
Sept. 7, 1820, in Mercer County, Ky. He was but six months old : 
when his parents, Thomas and Nancy Higgins, came to Putnam ; 
County, Ind., where they remained but a short time, when they 
came to Hendricks County, they being among the first settlers of 
Marion Township. Here his father entered 240 acres of land, and 
struggled hard to secure for his family a comfortable home. His ' 



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HISTORY OF HKNDRICKS COUNTY. 

death occurred in ^[arcli, 1S5-)-. Micliael Higginswas thus i-eared 
to raanliood in HeiidrickvS County, and with his father shared the 
toils of the day from early youth. April 2G, ISiS, he married 
Polly Robbins, daughter of "William and Leah Robbins, natives of 
New York, at that time. residents of Hendricks County. They 
had one child — 'NVilliam T. 31rs. Higgins died and he was again 
married Nov. IS, 1S45, to Lydia Robbins, daughter of Jacob and 
Barbara Robbins. They have had four eliildren — Sarah A., Jacob 
L. , Christopher C, and Mary (deceased). In 1SC9 he removed 
from Marion and has since then made his home in the southern 
part of Eel River Township, owning a good farm of 1S4 acres. He 
served three years as Trustee of Marion Township. He is a mem- 
ber of the Christian ciiurch. 

Milley Hiilble, daughter of William and Sarah (Loury) New, 
was born March 21, 1822, in Warren County, Ky. In 1833 she 
came with her father's family to Hancock County, Ihd., where her 
mother died two years later. After a residence there of about ten 
years Mr. New removed to Boone County, where he remained till 
his death Feb. 25, 1SS5. He had been married thi-ee times and 
had a family of eight children of whom seven are now living — 
Fannie T., Milley, Elizabeth J., Nancy, Sarah, Daniel and Lewis. 
Our subject was married Jan. 29, 1813, in Boone County, to Will- 
iam Walker, and to them were born three children — Lewis, Will- 
iam and Simon. The latter was a member of the Fortieth Indiana 
Infantry, and lost his life at the battle of Pittsburg Landing. 
Mr. Walker died Nov. 21-, 1817, and June 11, 1852, our subject 
- was again married to Leonard Hubble, he being a native of South 
Carolina. Of the nine children born to this union, seven areliv- 
ing — Enoch J., Leonard, James H., David W., Nancy J., Fannie 
and Rebecca E. In 1858 Mr. -and Mrs. Hubble came from Boone 
to Hendricks County and settled in the northern part of Eel River 
Township, where Mr. Hubble died. Mrs. Hubble still resides on 
the old homestead and is the owner of 115 acres of good land. Siie 
is a member of the Christian church. 

Mrs. Mary Jones was born March 12, 1S31, and is a native of 
North Carolina. She is a daughter of John and Lydia Robbins, 
who came to Hendricks County in 1835, Mr. Robbins remaining 
here till his death in March, 1881. The mother is still living with 
her children, six of whom, one son and iive daughters, are living. 
Onr subject was married Aug. 12, 1852, to James D. Walker, son 
of Goodlow and Rebecca Walker, of this county, the former de- 



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577 



ceased. To this marriage were born four childreu, Ls. o now living 
— Oliver M., married Lydia A. Cunover, daughter of SarauelJ. 
and Ella W. Conover, of New Albany, Ind., and has three chil- 
dren — Laura E. , Lottie O. and W. Treat; and Ilattie A. married 
Horace Cook, son of Henderson, deceased, and Nancy J. Cook, of 
Eel River Township, this county, and to them liave been born one 
child— Nellie L. Mattie J. was born Nov. 9, 1S55, and was mar- 
ried Jan. 29, lS7i, to J. J. Clay, and died Jan. 9, 1S77, leaving one 
child — Charles C.,born Nov. 23, 1S74. Charles F., born Juno 2i, 
1858, died April 23, 1862. In 1858 Mr. Walker settled on the 
farm now owned by our subject. In September, 1861, he enlisted 
in the Seventh Indiana Infantry, and participated in many of the 
important battles of the war, in one of which lie was taken prisoner 
by the Southern troops. He was confined in Andersonville Prison 
about three months and in other prisons for the same length of 
time, from the effects of which he died at Florence, S. C, Dec. 4, 
1864. Our subject was again married May 12, 1872, taking for her 
second husband David D. Junes, son of William and Eleanor Jones, 
of Hendricks Count}-. He, too, was a soldier in the Union army 
and died in 1873 from diseases contracted v/hile in the service. 
Mrs. Jones and her children are members of the Christian churcK. 

William J. K. P. Jones, druggist and notary public, was born 
Oct. 20, 1844, in Hendricks County, lud., a son of Wynn and Mary 
Jones. His father was born in Virginia, in December, 1797. He 
came to Morgan County, Ind., in 1816, and in 1818 came to 
Hendricks County, and settled in this township. Our subject was 
reared to manhood in his native county, receiving a fair education, 
and subsequently taught school for a short time. Ho was mar- 
ried July 11, ISrtS, to Elizabeth Bales, daagrhter of Tarlton Bales 
(de-jeased). To them have been born one child — Samuel W. (de- 
ceased). In 1868, in company with John Robbius, Mr. Jones 
opened a drug store at North Salem, in ^vhich he was engaged 
about two years. He then went to Lizton, this county, but soon 
returned to North Salem and again engaged in the drug business 
in partnership with Granville G. Sowder. At the end of six 
monthsilr. Sowder retired from the firm, leaving Mr. Jones sole 
proprietor. ]N[r. Jones has been twice commissioned Notary Pub- 
lic, and is one of North Salem's most influential citizens. He is a 
member of North Salem Lodge, No. 158, I. 0. 0. F. In politics 
he is a Democrat. 

Jacoh LockKart was born in Morgan County, Ind., April 14, 






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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



184-7, a son of German and Leah Lockhart, the former a native of 
Kentucky, but now deceased, and the latter of North Carolina. 
When he was about three years old, his father having died, his 
mother, now a resident of Eel River Township, came to Marion 
Township, this county, where he lived till 1S6S. His educational 
advantages were limited, as he was obliged to share in the labors 
of the farm from a mere boy. He has followed agricultural pur- 
suits through life with success, and has acquired, by his own indus- 
try, a farm of 1S7 acres. He was married March 5, 1871, to Miss 
Adeline Davis, daugliter of Walter and Mary Davis, of this town- 
ship. They have one son — Oscar. In November, 1SG3, Mr. Lock- 
hart enlisted in the Ninth Indiana Cavalry, participating in 
many battles. _ He was honorably discharged in September, 1S65. 
He is a member of the G. A. It. Post at North Salem, and is also 
an earnest member of the Christian church. 

Jaynes A. Lytle was born April 2G, 1833, in Boone County, Ind., 
and was one of the first children born in that county. His parents, 
Edward and Mary Lytle, were natives of Cincinnati and Ken- 
tucky respectively. They came to Tippecanoe County, Ind., and 
subsequently to Boone County, where they lived till their death. 
Our subject followed farming till he was twenty-five years old, 
when he began working in a saw- mill. He was employed in 
various mills in his native county till Angust, 1862, when he en- 
listed in Company I, Eighty-sixth Indiana Infantry. He partici- 
pated in the battles of Murfreesboro, Tenn., and Perryville, Ky., 
and was honorably discharged in November, 1863. While in the 
service he contracted a disease for which he draws a pension. 
After his return from the war he worked in a saw-mill till 1868, 
when he came to North Salem, this connty, and for fifteen years 
was proprietor of the North Sqlem Saw-mill. In December, 1883, 
he began buying and shipping timber for an Indianapolis firm, and 
in February, 1885, he engaged in the mercantile business, having 
bought out Mr. W. J. K. P. Jones. He was married April 3, 
1854, to Martha J. Gibson, and to them have been born five chil- 
dren — John F., Mollie, Thomas B., Annie B. and Mattie J. Mr. 
Lytle is a member of North Salem Lodge, No. 158, I. 0. O. F., 
and also of the Grand Army vf the Eepablic. 

Levi Martin^ a leading citizen of Eel River Township, was 
born March 10, 1826, in Union County, Ind., a son of James and 
Mary Martin, the former a native of North Carolina and the latter 
of Ohio. In 1833 his father came with his family to Hendricks 



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HISTOKY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



579 



County, and entered 160 acres of 'land in Eel River Township, 
which he cleared, remaining here till his death in December, 1S49. 
His wife survived him till October, 1879. Of their twelve chil- 
dren five are living — Jesse, William, Henry C, Oliver 11. and Levi. 
Levi Martin came to this county with his parents in 1833, and was 
married March 20, ISoO, to Emeline Fullen, daughter of Charles 
and Sarah Fullen, of Hendricks County. Of the six children born 
to this union, two are living — Charles F., married to Mii-anda F. 
Tucker, and Horace G., married> to Libbie liussell. After a mar- 
ried life of over a quarter of a century Mrs. Martin died April 27, 
1877, and for his second wife Mr. Martin married Mrs. Cassie Dar- 
nall, widow of the late Simpson B. Darnall, of Kokomo, Howard 
Co., Ind., and daughter of Philip and Eliza M. Smith, natives of 
Kentucky. Mr. Martin has a fine farm of 155 acres. He is a 
member of the Masonic fraternity, and politically he is a Republi- 
can. He and his wife are members of the Christian church. 

Oliver P. Owen was born in Eel River Township, Hendricks 
County, Dec. 23, 1855, a son of Horatio (deceased) and Margaret 
Owen, who were natives of Kentucky. Horatio Owen canie to 
this township in 1832 and entered a tract of land on which he re- 
mained till 18'i8, and then moved two miles southeast of that place 
within one mile of Xorth Salem, where he resided until his death, 
in April, 1881. His widow is at present residing at North Salem, 
this county. Of their children three are living — James M., Oliver 
P. and Keziah. Oliver P. was reared to maidaood on a farm and 
received a fair education. He has followed farming through life, 
and now has a pleasant home. He is the owner of 130 acres of 
land on which are good and substantial buildings. Nov. 21, 1880, 
he was married to Florence M. Duckworth, who was born in' Hen- 
dricks County, Ind., Sept. 11, 1862, and is a daughter of James J. 
and Mary E. Duckworth, who were early settlers of this county. 
This union has been blessed with one child — Taylor W., born Dec. 
5, 1882. Mrs. Owen has two sisters and one brother living — Sarah 
E., Lettie and George. Mr. Owen and his wife are both active 
members of the Methodist church. 

Robert 21. Page was born in Hendricks County, Ind., Feb. 18, 
1838, a son of "William and Elirabeth Page, natives of Virginia. 
They came to this county about 1832, and the following year set- 
tled in Eel River Township, remaining here till their decease. 
Ten children were born to them, of whom seven are living — Mc- 
Elender, Nancy, Andrew J., Jeremiali, Robert M., Demerius and 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS CODNTV. 



"Williamson. Mr. Page, on coming to tliis township, entered orer 
100 acres of beavily-timbered land, which, in a few years, he by 
his industry and perseverance transformed into a well cultivated 
farm. Kobert M., onr subject, was thus reared to manhood amid 
the scenes of pioneer life, and from his youth he was obliged to 
share the labors of the farm. Aug. 15, 1861, he was married to 
Elizabeth Morplien, daughter of Benjamin and Jane Morphea, of 
Hendricks County, natives of Ohio and North Carolina respect- 
ively. To them has been born one son — Francis M. In 186i Mr. 
Page enlisted in the One Hundred and Thirty-second Indiana In- 
fantry, Company G, in the lOO-days service. He was on duty 
principally in Alabama, and at the expiration of his term of en- 
listment he was honorably discharged. He owns a good farm sit- 
uated in tlie southern part of this township. He is a member of 
the Christian church. 

Joseph Plmmner, a pioneer ot Eel River Towjiship, was born in 
Greene County, Ohio, Oct. 17, 1S13, a son of Levi and Mary 
Plummer, the father a native of Maryland, and the mother of In- 
diana. In 1815 his parents came to Fayette County, Ind., and 
lived there five years, and thence moved to Morgan County, where 
tliey also remained five years, and in 1825 came to Hendricks 
County. Our subject was reaied to manhood on a farm amid tlie 
stirring scenes of pioneer life, and received but a meagre educa- 
tion. Aug. 2, 1832, he was married in Morgan County, Ind., to 
Ann Day, and to them wore born nine children — Mary, Martha, 
Thomas, Levi, Hannah, Fannie, John, Ann and Richard D. After 
a married life of over a quarter of a century, deatli entered his 
home taking his beloved wife Jan. 18, 1870. May 14, 1872, he 
was married to Ljdia Burgan, daughter of Isaac and Sarah Bur- 
gan, who were among the early settlers of Hendricks County. In 
the spring of 1835 Mr. Plummer settled in the eastern portion of 
Eel River Township, where he has since lived. He owns 565 acres 
of good tillable land. Of Mr. Plummer it may be said that he is 
a self-made man, and according to his own statements he started 
life with virtuiilly nothing but his strong arras and his determi- 
nation to succeed. * 

Jeremi'th F . Radford was bom March 10, 1850, in Putnam 
Conpty, Ky., and is a son of Jeplitha (deceased) and Nancy J. Rad- 
ford, who were natives of Kentucky. Of his father's family of 
thirteen children, five are now living — John "W.^ Jeremiah F., 
Louisa, Nancy C. and Charles H. From his boyhood our subject 



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has devoted himself to agricultural pursuits, in which he has been 
eminently successful. He is the owner of a farm containing eightj- 
eight and a half acres in a fine state of cultivation, situated in the 
western part of tliis township, on which he settled in 1876. He 
received a fair English education in his youth, and Nov. 6, 1873, 
he was married to Miss J^ancy A. Gillin, a daughter of Willis Y. 
Gillin,' of Putnam County, Ind. They are the parents of one 
child— Freddie, born Aug. 3, 1879. Politically Mr. Eadford casts 
his sufiVage witli the Democratic party. 

Marquis De. Lafayette Eihhle, druggist, was born Sept. 5, 1857, 
in Marion County, Ind., a son of Samuel "W. and Nancy Ribble. 
He was reared to manhood on a farm in hig, native county, and 
was there married March 16, ISSl, to Miss Amand E. Dut}', of 
Coles County, 111. They are the parents of two children — Muriel 
B., born Feb. 17, 1882, and Nancy M., born Nov. 5, 18Si. In 
. ihe spring of 18S3 Mr. Ribble came to North Salem, this county, 
and engaged in the drug business, being assosiated with Mr. J. J, 
Banta till March, ISSi, when Mr. Banta retired from the firm, 
since which !Mr. Ribble has carried on the business alone, and is 
meeting with gratifying success. He and his wife are members of 
the Oiristian church. He is a member of North Salem Lodge, No. 
158, I. O. O. F. In politics be is a Demoei-at. 

Washington Riggen, a retired farmer of North Salem, was born 
Dec. 22, 1812, in Mason County, Ky., a soa of Rev. John W. and 
Elizabeth (Kelley) Riggen, natives of Maryland and Virginia re- 
spectively. He obtained a rudimentary edtication, and at the age 
of sixteen years began to learn the blacksmith's trade, which he 
followed about thirteen years. Feb. 21, 1S33, he was married to 
Miss Mary Ncttser, and of the nine children born to this union five 
are living — Henry V., John W. (a minister), Rice B., Alice and 
Maria E. May 1, lS6i, Mr. Riggen married for his second wife 
Mrs. Anne R. Riggen, daughter of Sanford and Eleanor A. Wren. 
By her first husband Mrs. Riggen had nine children, seven ot 
whom are now living — William PL, Ann E., Elizabeth, Richard II., 
Caroline 13., Sarah L. and Robert E. In the spring of 1SG4 Mr. 
Riggen came to Hendricks Count}' and settled in the eastern p.u-t 
Eel River Township, where he remained till his removal to North 
Salem in the fall of 18S2. Ho and his -wife are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, in which he \\s.s served as Steward and 
Class-Leader. He has been a liberal contributor to both church 
and State enterprises, and enjoys the respect of his fellow citizens. 
37 



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HISTOET OF HENDRICKS COONTY. 



James Trotter was born in Virginia, and when two years of ao-e 
came to Owen County, lud., with his parents, who in 1S28 settled 
near Nortli Saleai, in Eel River Township, Hendricks County. 
His father entered a large tract of 1,500 acres of land, and was 
actively engaged in forwarding the various enterprises which 
tended to develop the resources of the county, until his death, about 
1S50. James Trotter was married to Miss Sarah Whitt, a native 
of Virginia. Of a large number of children five are livino- — 
Elizabeth, William W., John C, Catherine and James M. He 
had served as Trustee of Eel River Township for nine years, and 
was prominently identified with many of the improvements made 
during his time in tli^e township. He died Feb. IG, ISYG, respected 
by all who knew him. James M., the youngest son, was born Feb. 
3, 1811, in Eel River Township, where he was reared to manhood. 
He was married June 7, 1800, to Miss Nancy E. Grose, born "Nov. 
11, 1841, in Hendricks County, a daughter of Andrew and Nancy. 
Grose, natives of Kentucky and early settlers of this county. To 
them have been born six cliildren — John W., Florence R., James 
W., Gretta E., Mary C. and Retta M. Mr. Trotter has, with the 
exception of a short time spent in the South and at St. Paul, Minn., 
been a resident of Hendricks County. He has a pleasant farm of 
100 acres in the eastern part of Eel River Township. Both he and 
his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Jojin D. Trotter, deceased, was born Nov. 3, 1815, in Lee 
County, Va., and was a son of John and Nancy Trotter. He was 
reared to manhood in his native State, and having received a fair 
education he engaged in teaching school for a short time. He came 
to Hendricks County, Ind., in 1839, and settled in Eel River Town- 
ship. Dec. 16, ISil, he was married to Sarah Jones, who was 
born Dec. 10, 1821. Of the nine cliildren born to this union seven 
are living — Richard J., Nancy, Horace A., John P., Catherine A., 
Charles Y. and Lee B. In 1870 Mr. Trotter moved to the farm 
where his widow still resides, and which contains eighty acres of 
land. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church at tiic 
time of his death, which occurred July 7, 1870. He was a mem- 
ber of the F. & A. M. and the I. 0. O. F. societies, and in politic- 
he was a Democrat. 

Dandridge Tucker, farmer and stock-raiser. Eel River Town- 
ship, was born March 3, 1S27, in Casey County, Ky., the only son 
of Lee and Miranda (Durham) Tucker. "When seven years old his 
parents removed to Indiana, where his youth was spent in assist- 



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HISTOET OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



583 



itig his fether to clear and improve his farm, and in attending the 
subscription schools. He was married May 5, 1850, to Miss 
Catherine Davis, born March 11, 1830, in Montgomery County, 
Ky., a daughter of Nathan and Nancy (Kid) Davis, who came to 
Hendricks County in 1835. They are the parents of four children 
— David L., Natlian A., Miranda F. and Robert E. After his 
marriage he settled on his present farm, and has met with good 
success in his agricultural pursuits. Mr. Tucker is a member ot 
the Methodist Episcopal church. His wife was a member of the 
Christian church till her death, which occurred Feb. 15, 1883. 
Politically Mr. Tucker is an active worker in the Republican party. 
In 1857 he was appointed Township Trustee under the old consti- 
tution, and was elected Treasurer of the Board, serving in this 
capacity until the new constitution was adopted. He is a member 
of the Masonic fraternity, and belongs to Danville Council and 
Chapter, and to Hapiel Regg Lodge, No. 200, having held every 
office in the lodge many times. Pic is one of the oldest repre- 
sentatives in the Grand Lodge, and is also a member of the Ma- 
sonic Veteran Association, which was organized in 18S3. 

Lee Tucker, deceased, one of the worthy pioneers of Hen- 
dricks County, was a native of Virginia, born in Bedford County, 
May 4, 1803. He was the eldest son, and third child of a family 
of ten children of Dandridge and Nancy (Settles) Tucker, natives 
of Virginia. His father was the son of "William Tucker who 
served in the Revolutionary war for seven years, during which 
time he with a friend. Captain Dandridge, obtained leave of ab- 
sence, and returned to their homes and were married, each agree- 
ing that the first son of the one should bear the name of the other. 
Hence the name Dandridge came into the Tucker fLimily'. Will- 
iam Tucker married a Miss Lee, a member of the same family of 
which the late General Robert E. Lee was a descendant. Our sub- 
ject was eight years of age when his parents settled in Casey 
County, Ky., where he was reared to manhood on a farm, receiving 
such education as the schools of those early days afforded. Ue 
was married Feb. 7, 1826, to Miss Miranda Durham, a daughter of 
Thomas and Frances (Moss) Durham, natives of Virginia and 
Maryland respectively. They -.-ere pioneers of Kentucky, experi- 
encing many of the Indian troubles in the settlement of that State. 
Mrs. Tucker was born in Mercer County, Ky., now Boyle County, 
Dec. 16, 1805. After his marriage Mr. Tucker resided on the old 
homestead, and continued his farming pursuits nntil the fall of 



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HISTORY OF HENDRIOKS COUNTV. 



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lS3i wlieii, on account of his opposition to slavery, he came to 
Indiana arriving tliere Sept. 12, 1S31. He purchased 160 acres ot 
unimproved land in Eel River Township, he being one of the first 
settlers. He then entered eighty acres of Government land, to 
which he subsequently added forty acres more where he began 
making his frontier home, and by his untiring industry he was 
highly successful. In 1S26 he and his wife united with the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, and he was soon after appointed Class- 
Leader, serving in that capacity until his removal to Indiana. He 
organized a church society consisting of six members, their place 
of worship being his house, and later he organized the first Sabbath- 
school in the township which was also held in the house of Mr. 
Tucker. He served as Class-Leader, Steward and Trustee until hi; 
death, and his house was always the home of the preachers. He 
was an earnest advocate of the cause of temperance all his life, 
and was the first man in his township to refuse to furnish intoxi- 
cants at his log rollings or in his harvest field. Politically he wa; 
an old-l,ine "Whig, but becanae a liepublicau on the organization ol 
that party. He was always among the foremost to aid m every 
enterprise for the benefit of the community. He died June 'SB, 
188-1, his wife having died July 24, 1S72, after living happily to- 
gether for forty-f )ur years. Two children were born to them — 
Dandridge and Lse Ann, wife of John Durham. Besides caring 
well for his own family he has reared eight orphan children who 
grew to be useful inembers of societr. 

Isaac I^. Vannice was born in Hendricks County, Ind., May 
28, 1839, a son of Lawrence and Caroline Vannice, natives of Ken- 
tucky, and early settlers of this county. His father at present re- 
sides at Danville, Ind. His mother is deceased. Of their nine 
children eight are living — Margaret L., Pha?be E., Harvey N. , 
Isaac N., David M., William E., James O. and Mary E. Our 
subject received bat a rudimentary education. He was reared a 
•farmer and is one of the successful agriculturists of this town- 
ship. Sept. 21, 1861, he was married to Sarah E., daughter of 
William and Catherine Davis, of this township. Of their eigh.t 
children six are living — William H., OliverP., Ettie, Laura, Hat- 
tie M. and Ida M. Charles and Lilly are deceased. In 1875 Mr. 
Vannice came from Marion Township and settled on liis present 
farm in this township. In August, lSt)2, he enlisted as a private 
in the Ninety-ninth Indiana Infantry, but was soon promoted to 
the rank of Sergeant, which position he held till 1S65, when he was 



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honorably discharged. He participated ia many battles, amoiii^ 
them being the siege of Vicksbiirg, Mission Eidge, siege of Atlanta, 
Fort McAllister, Goldsborongh, and was with Sherman in his 
march to the sea. Mr. Vannice is a member of the I. O. 0. F. 
He and his wife are members of the Christian church. 

Joseph Waters, a pioneer farmer of Eel River Township, was 
born Nov. 30, ISli, in Lincoln County, Ky., a son of jSTathaniel 
and Elizabeth Waters, the former a native of Maryland, and the 
latter of Kentucky. His parents were among the early settlers of 
this township, having located in the soutliern part on Rock Branch. 
Of their family of eleven chiklren five are living— Samuel D., 
Nathan W., George H., Elizabeth and Joseph. Our subject was 
reared on a farm and obtained a limited education in t!ie schools ot 
his neighborhood. June 16, 1S3.5, ho was married to Julia A. 
Hocker, born Dec. 11, 1813, a daughter of George and Nancy 
Hocker, natives of Kentucky. To them have been born eleven chil- 
dren, of whom five are living— Nancy E., Sarah A., Owen H., 
George H. and Newton E. After his marriage Mr. "Waters re- 
moved to Kentucky but returned in a sliort time to Hendricks 
County. He has followed farming through life, and now owns 141: 
acres of improved land. He settled on his present farm near North 
Salem in 1852. He was among the ^jfirst Trustees of Eel River 
Township, and served creditably for>iine year. In politics he is a 
Democrat. Both he and his wife are members of the Christian 
church. 

Frcmcis JL White was born June 12, 1S44, in Eel River Town- 
ship, Hendricks Co., InJ. He is a son of Bloomfield and Mary 
•White, of Danville, this county, who were among the early settlers 
of Eel River Township. Of his father's Eiimlly of nine children, 
three are now living — Francis M., Marg-aret and Sarah E. In 
March, 1866, Mr. White was united in marriage with Amanda D. 
.Davidson, daughter of Samuel and Catherine Davidson, of this 
county. Three children have been born to this uiiiou — William 
L., James D. and Estella. In June, 1S63, ^r. White enlisted in 
the One Hundred and Twenty-fourth Indiaiaa Infantry, and partic- 
ipated in the battles of Nashville, Columl-us, Franklin, siege of 
Atlanta and many others. Ho was honor.ably discharged in the 
fall of 186-5. He is a member of the Jesse Ogden Post, G. A. R. , 
at Danville. He and his wife are members of the Christian church. 
He has a fine farm of eighty acres, all uno!«r a good state of culti- 
vation. . " 



t. 



JV' 



586 



HISTOET OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



Abraham Whitenack, deceased, was born Oct. 31, 1824, in 
Warren County, Ohio, a son of Andrew and Katie Wliitenack, 
natives of New Jersey. Pie received a fair education in his youtli, 
and Jan. 25, 1855, he married Caroline E. Keynolds, daughter of 
William and Nancy (Snodgrass) Reynolds, the former a native of 
Pennsylvania and the latter of "Virginia. To them have been 
born twelve children, of whom eight are now living — Ella, Llew- 
ellyn P., Isalona, Levona, Viola, Theresa, Oscar O. and Leon A. 
Mr. and Mrs. Whitenack settled in Hendricks County, Ind., in 
February, 1857, where Mr. Whitenack died Feb. 10. 1SS2. His 
widow still resides on the old homestead, and is an active workt.'r 
in the Baptist church. Mr. Whitenack was a public-spirited man, 
and always encouraged the various enterprises which tended to 
develop the resources of his township. 

Alexander M. Williams, one of the leading farmers and stock- 
raisers of this township, ^vas born J\ine 26, 1840, in Hendricks 
County, Ind. He was a son of James B. and Eliza Williams, who 
came to this county about 1837, _settling in Marion Township, where 
they died. Our subject was reared to manhood on a farm, and in 
the management of which he has been very successful, and now 
owns a fine farm of 232 acres. Jan. 30, 1S67, he was married to 
Rebecca A. Faussel, daughter of Isaac and Unity Faussel, of Hen- 
dricks County. To them was born one child — Harry W. Mrs. 
Williams died June 21, 1S6S, and he was again married July 20,. 
1871, to Martha A. Griggs, a native of Kentucky, born March 3, 
1842, a daughter of David and Emiline Griggs. By this union 
there has been born five children^Emiline, Anne, Uiban L., Flora 
and Dicy. In the fall of 1863 Mr. Williams enlisted in the One 
Hundred and Twenty-fourth Indiana Infantry, under the command 
of General Scoville. He participated in the siege of Atlanta, the 
battles of Franklin and Nashville, Tenn., and numerous other en- 
gagements of minor importance, and was honorably discharged in 
September, 1865. He is a member of the G- A. R. Post at North 
Salem. 

George S. Wren was born Sept. 11, 1819, in Montgomery County, 
Ky." His parents were Sanford and Eleanor Wren, natives ot 
Virginia. They had a family of ten children, of whom six sur- 
vive — Enoch S., John R., Thomas S., George S., Sarah A. and 
Anne R. Those deceased are — Andrew J., Richard W., Eliza and 
Lncinda. Our subject was reared to manhood in his native State. 
His father died when he. was fifteen years old, and lie was then 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



587 



thrown on his own resources. He was married Doc. 9, 1841, to 
Caroline Daris, who was born in November, 1S21, a daughter of 
Eenjamin E. and Nancy Davis, the 'ather a native of Virginia, and 
the mother of Kentucky. To them have been born six children — 
Eliza A., Sarah F., William Z. T., Benjamin F., Mary E. and Ida 
J. In 1852 Mr. "Wren came, with his wife and four children, to 
Eel River Township, this county, and bought 160 acres of land. 
He has since added forty acres to his original purchase, and is now 
the owner of 200 acres of land, which he has gained by his own 
exertions. He has served his township as Trustee for two years. 
He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and a true 
Democrat. 



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CHAPTER XIV. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP 



Desckiption. — Eakly HisToitT. — FiKST ScEiooLS. — Township Offi- 
cials. — FiKST Election. — Political History. ^Pkopekty and 
Taxation. — Stilesville. — Business, Churches and Societies. 
— Biographical. 

Franklin is situated in the southwest corner ot the county, and 
contains parts of township 1-i north, ranges 1 and 2 west. It is 
bounded on the north by Clay Township, on the east by Liberty, 
on the south by Morgan and Putnam counties, and on tlie west by 
Putnam County. The township is rolling in the central, and level- 
in the northwestern and southeastern portions. It is drained by 
Mill Creek and its tributaries in the central and western parts, and 
Mud Creek in the southeastern. The streams which pass through 
this township are small, but their valleys are wider and the extent 
of bottom lands along- their banks is s;reater than that of the 
streams in any other part of Hendricks County. There is but lit- 
tle second-rate land in Franklin Township, and it ])0ssesses a much 
greater proportionate extent of alluvial lands than any other town- 
ship in the county. So far as corn is concerned, Franklin Town- 
ship is the Egypt of Hendricks County. 

FIRST EVENTS. 

The first settler in Franklin was Judg-e Nathan Kirk, who, with- 
out doubt, located on Mill Creek where the old Terre Haute road 
crosses it, in 1820, and kept a house of entertainment. The next 
settler of whom we can get any account was Jeremiah Stiles, the 
founder of Stilesville, in 1S80. He settled there in 1823, and was 
closely followed by John Swart, Jolui and Isaac Wilcox, John 
Eslinger, David Ocsburn and Jacob Reese. It is not known when 
Franklin Town.-.r"i,^* was organized but it was soon after the begin- 
ning of Hendricks County. Jere Stiles was the first .Justice of the 
Peace. He laid out the town of Stilesville in 1830. S.amuel Wick 

(588) 



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HISTORY OF HENDKICKS COUNTY. 5S9 

was the first merchant in the place, and Dr. Mahan the first physi- 
cian. 

The first religious meetings in the township were held by the 
New Lights, and John Smart and Thomas Woods did tlie prcaeli- 
ing. This denomination organized a church at Orsburn's horse- 
mill, which was the most noted place in the townsliip until about 
1835. At this mill the Cliristian church was organized by Tiiomas 
Lockhart, in 1832. There are at present five churches in the town- 
ship — Christian, Methodist, Presbyterian, Missionary and Regular 
Baptist. Three of these are in the village of Stilesville. 

In comparison with the otiier townships, it stands ninth in area, 
tenth in wealth, ninth in the number of inhabitants and eighth in 
the derisity of its population. It is tlie only township in the county 
that is not touched by a railroad. 

The first schoul in Franklin Township was taught in 1831, by 
Jed iah White, one mile south of Stilesville. The district consisted 
of two townships. Thomas Barker was successor to Mr. AV'iiice in 
the school. He was a good teacfier, of fair attainments, but addicted 
to the use of "tanglefoot." Often, at noon recess, he would go to 
the village and return much exhilarated, and would devote the 
afternoon to illustrated lessons in politeness, which the children 
enjoyed hugely. In 1831 Eli Lee taught the first school in Stiles- 
ville; in connection with this he also mended shoes. One day while 
a class was up rattling off its lesson, and the teacher was pegging 
away on a shoe, Luke Stiles, who had been sent out from the school 
to prepare some fuel, cut down a tree which fell the wrong way and 
came down with a crash across the school house. 

OFFICIAL. 

Following are the names, with the years of election, of those 
who have held the various offices in Franklin Township since its 
organization: 

Justices of the Peace: Jeremiah Stiles, 1830; Richard II. Van 
Dike, 1831; Wilcox, 1832; Joshua Pickett, M. P. Mitchell and B. 
R. Warmley, 1S31:; Nelson Woods and Isaac Wilcox, 1S35; Berry 
Burks, 1838; Berry Burks, 1843; James Borders, 181:5; Berry Burks, 
1848; Alexander L. blasters and Absalom Snoddy, 1850; Ilenr}- 
Mc.lUister, 1851; Absalom Suoddy and Ciiristopher Wilson (con- 
tested, and David Scott chosen at special election), 1855; John 
Havens, 1856; Jeremiah Gentry, 1858; James W. Matlock and 
Charles W. McClure, 1859; Absalom Snoddy, Daniel McAninch 



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HISTORY OF HENDEICKS COUNTY. 



and John Mulholland, 1860; Absalom Snoddy, David Scott and 
Daniel McAninch, 186i; Absalom Snoddy, J. T. Pearcy and Dan- 
iel McAninch, 1S68; Absalom Snoddy, O. E. Hnme and. Charles 
Eossj 1870; James W.Matlock, 1872; John K. Kelly, Elisha McAn- 
inch and Absalom Snoddy, 187-1; Elisha McAninch and John- 
- Campbell, 1878; Jolm H. Baldock, ISSO; Elisha McAninch, E. 
N. Evans and W. H. Ealdock, 1882; J. Q. Barrow, ISSl. 

Constalles: William Shipley, 1831; Isaac Wilcox and George 
Hancock, 1832; Absalom Snoddy and Thomas M. Hults, 1833; 
Edward Shipley and Moses C. Hough, 183-1; Edward Shipley and 
George Morris, 1835; James G. Hibbs and William Recce, 1836; 
William Garrison and Thomas Broadstreet, 1837; William Gar- 
rison and Wili;,im R. Kirk, 1838; T. N. Morris and William R. 
Kirk, 1889; Jesse Garrison and Anderson M. Cleghorn, ISii; Absa- 
lom Snoddy and Anderson M. Cleghorn, 18i5-'6; Jesse Garrison and 
William Bryant, 18-17; Thomas J. Nichols and David Alley, 1S4S; 
Anderson M. Clcghorn and David Alley, ISiO; Henry McAllister 
James R. Dickens, 1850; Jesse Garrison and A. G. Detrick, 1851; 
John W. Sharp and William Page, 1852; George Kreigh and 
Joseph H. Bryant, 1853; Solomon Stephens, 185-1; Joseph S. Bry- 
ant, and C. A. Borders; 1855; James "Vermillion and A. N. Hod- 
son, 1856; David Allen and Richard Bryant, 1857; L. W. Stringer, 
1858; David McNabb and 0. E. McAffee, lS59-'60; W. B. Walls, 
Jacob Phillips and David McNabb, 1861 ; William A. Baldwin, 
1862; L. Kinney, H. Cecil and A.K Hodson, 1863; Samuel Swope, 
Joseph Walls and John Kelley, 1861; Preston Page and D. P.Bry- 
ant, 1866; J. M. Green, Lazarns Kinney and Joseph Walls, 18GS; 
Joseph Walls, S. Evans and J. F. McAninch, 1869; J. Richard- 
son, John Wilson and William A. Baldwin, 1870; John Richard- 
son, and J. W. Matlock, 1872; O. E. Hume, John Richardson and 
A. A. Snoddy, 1874; B. F. Tignor, John Richardson and William 
McAninch, 1876; John Richardson and John Maliouey, 1S7S; Will- 
iam Appleby, John B. Bair and W. A. Baldwin, 1880; A- J. Har- 
baiigh, and" J. R. Coble, 1882; William Burris and A. J. Har- 
baugh, 1884. 

Trustees: David Scott, 1854; George Kreigh, 1856; J. Williams, 
1857; James Borders, 1858; Bluford Scott, 1859; William Tincher, 
1860; Blulbrd Scott, 1861; M. Sells, 1862; J. Harrison, 1863; M. 
Sells, 1864; J.- A. Milholland, 1866-'9; A. B. Bryant, 1870; Al- 
pheus Harlan, lS72-'74; Casper Robards,lS76-'78; John W. Brown, 
1880; J. R. Kelley, 1882; John A. Osborn, 1884. 



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HISTORl OF HENDKICKS COUNTY. 



591 



Clerks: E. F. Rogers, 1856; J. S. Masters, lSo7; A. L. Mas- 
ters, 1858 (office abolished). 

Ireasurers: J. W. Matlock, 1856-7; Bluford Scott, 1858 (office 
abolished). 

Assessors: Hczekiah Gentry, lST0-'72; Amos noak, 1874; Ed- 
ward Iluinpston, 1876; James E. Humpston, 1S7S-'S0; A.E. Will- 
iams, 1882. 

FIRST ELECTION. 

The poll-book of the general election of 1831 (held Aug. 1, at 
Stilesville), gives the names of forty voters, which are here copied, 
unchanged, as a nearly complete list of the first settlers: "William 
Shipley, Jonathan 'Sparks, Joseph Petto, Jacob Reace, Jerremiah 
Stiles, James Kelly, John Brown, George II. Keller, George Mor- 
riSjGcorge Hancock, Henry Reo£e,William Thomas, Peter Pearson, 
Thomas Wood, Edward Shipley, Samuel Wick, Daniel Aus- 
tin, Lorenzoe Y). Cleghorn, James Walls, Isaac Odle, William 
Scott, Carles Smith, Silas Rujtin, William Wilcocks, Absalom 
Snoddy, Samuel Gerber, Monroe Cleghorn, Joseph Cleghorn', 
William Snoddy, James Prichett, Eli Lee, (Frederick Cosner, Will- 
iam Becknel, Joshua Ruston, James Bray, James Wiece, John 
Hancock, Silas Bryant, Nicholas Osbourn and Garry Morris. 

The vote at this election was counted by James Walls and Silas 
Bryant as judges, with Thomas Wood and John Hancock as clerks, 
and Jeremiah Stiles as inspector. They reported as follows: 
"We, the inspector and judges of this election, after being duly 
qualified, proceeded to receive, count and compare votes and find 
them as follows, viz.: For Governor, James G. Reed got twenty- 
two votes; Noah Noble got seventeen votes. For Lieutenant-Gov- 
ernor, Ross Smiley got twenty-two votes; Wallis (first name 
unknown) got cwelve votes. For Congress, RatlifF Boon got twenty- 
two votes; John Law got eighteen votes. For Senitor, Willis G. 
Conduit got twenty-five votes; Levi Jessup got fourteen votes. 
For Represeutatfve, John Hannah got twenty votes; Lewis Mastin 
got twenty votes. For Sheriff, Thomas Nicols got twenty-seven 
votes. -For Commissioner, John Woodard got tsventy-nine votes; 
Alex. McCalment got twenty vites; Jacob Canady got seventeen 
votes; David Matlock got six votes and Reubin Claypool got four 
votes." 

POLITICAL. 

In politics Franklin was heavily Whig until 1856, and since then 



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592 



FISTOKY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



has been Kepublican, generally two to one, as compared with the 
opposition vote. Following is the vote for President at each elec- 
tion since 1836 : - 

67 

87 

121 

121! 



1S36— "William H. Harrison.. 88 ^ 63 
JIartin Van Buren 25 

1844— Henry Clay 118 85 

James K. Polk 33 

James G. Birney 5 

1848— Zachariah Taylor 8S 60 

Lewis Cass 28 

ilartin Van Buren 19 

lS53—Winficld Scott 123 77 

Franklin Pierce 46 

John P.Hale 1 

1856— John C. Fremont 127 68 

James Buchanan 59 

'Millard Fillmore 1 

ISGO— Abraham Lincoln 135 77 

Stephen A. Douglas. .. . 58 
John C.Breckinridge.. 5 



1864— Abraham Lincoln . . ..125 
George B. McClellan . . 58 

18&3— Ulys=es S. Grant 193 

Horatio Seymour 105 

1872— Ulysses S. Grant 197 

Horace Gieelev 73 

1876— Ruiherfurd B. Hayes. . .317 

S-fmuel J. Tilden 94 

Peter Cooper 13 

1880— James A. Garfield 204 

Winfield S. Hancock .113 
James B. Weaver 9 



Neal Dow 

18Si— James G. Blaine 

Grover CleTelaod. . . 
Bi njamiu F. Bu Irr. 



. 1 

.193 
.108 
. 4 



91 



84 



John P. St. John 3 



STATISTICAL . ■ ■ 

The census of 1S80 gave Franklin a population of 1,363, and a 
Safe estimate now would be 1,500. The following statistics of 
property and taxation are for 1885: Acres of land assessed, 18,- 
910.80; value of same, $-1:88,744-; value of improvemetits, $50,- 
720; value of lots, $4,337; value of improvements, $15,893; value 
of "personal property, $189,758; total taxables, $749,452; polls, 
212; dogs, 143; State tax, $1,005.34; county tax, $2,198.06; town- 
ship tax, $299.78; tuition tax, $952.35; special school tax, $1,701.79; 
road tax, $1,498.90; endowment tax, $37.47; bridge tax, $749.45; 
total tax, $10,041.15; delinquent tax, §683.88. 



-2, 



.STILESVILLE 

was laid off as a village in 1828, and a small settlement started. 
The opening of the National Koad through this county in 1830, 
passing directly through Stilesville, made this point of some im- 
portance. It was a station at which all emigrants to the great 
West aimed to take a dinner or a night's lodging. The village 
prospered, and, though in time it lost its relative importance, it 
has held its own in population, having now 350 inhabitants. There 
is not a village in Indiana t lat has a more orderly, intelligent and 
kindly population than Stilesville. All the place needs is a rail- 
road, and this it may have in a few years. It has a daily mail and 
hack to the Vandalia Railroad, which is but five miles distant. 
The present business firms of Stilesville are: Jacob Bruce, hack 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



693 



and mail line; A. N. Crawford, blacksmith; Elder & Crawford, 
meat market; Mrs. Ellmore, millinery; "William H. EUmore, shoe 
shop; E. N. Evans, carpenter; B. M. Gentrji, postoffice; Gentry 
Bros., general store; J. N. Green, physician; A. Heavenridge, 
druggist and physician; A. W. Johnson, boarding house; A. D. 
Kelley, merchant tailor; A. L. Masters, dry-goods; N. G. Mas- 
ters, physician; W. McKenzie, saddlery and harness; Alvin Moudj, 
grocery; A. Osborne, druggist; W. A. Shoptaugh, hotel; Samuel 
Swope, undertaker; Tiguor & Richardson, blacksmiths. 

Stilesville has a fine new brick school building, which is now, in 
the spring of ISSo, being completed at a cost of $5,000. It is two 
stories and a basement in height, f.iid will have three rooms and a 
vestibule, with three teachers. This building, with the three 
churches, adds very much to the looks of the village. 

RELIGIOUS. 

The Missionary Baptist Church has been organized between 
forty-five and fifty years. The frame church first used was built in 
ISiO. Among tlie early members of the society were Davis Bos- 
well, Abraham Bland, James "WaMs, Moses Crawford, Josiah Gar- 
rin, their wives, and Mary Reese. The present fine brick church 
was completed in 1S32, at a cost of §3,000. It has a handsome 
slate roof, and will seat 300 people. The membership is about 
seventy-five. Among the early pastors were Revs. John Jones, 
" Uncle Ben" Arnold, John Mugg, Jacob and John Rynearson. 

The Christian Church was organized and their first house of 
worship was erected in 1812. This was a frame church, and cost 
$1,000. Among the first members were Daniel Osborne, John 
"W. Bryant, John R. Robards, George W. Snoddy, James Snoddy 
and their families. After using their first church over thirty 
years, a nice brick one was erected, with neat slate roof, costing' 
altogether §2,500. The membersliip of the society is approxi- 
mately 100. Services are held monthly. George W. Snoddy 
preached over forty years, dying in April, 1832. Commeiicin>3' 
somewhat before his death, Rev. A. J. Frank, of Greencastle, took 
charge of this parish, which he managed three years. Then Rev. 
A. M. Connor and a brother officiated for three months, after 
whom came Rev. Mr. Gilchrist, of Irvington, who remained nine 
months. He was the last regular pastor. The present officers of 
the society are: Elders, J. N. Green, Daniel Ooborne, C. Robards 



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594 



/ 



HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



and J. W. Brown; Deacons, William A. McAainch, Jr., and 
William Page; Clerk, W. A. Slioptaugh. ' 

'£Ke Methodist Episcojpal Church lias been organized at least 
forty jears. Sarvices were held for many years in the school- 
house, and in 1850 they built their present church, at a cost of 
$1,600. It will seat about 200. Among the early members were 
Isaac Smart, William Cline, John Chirk, John Richardson, James 
Borders, Joseph Bishop, Edward Jackson, Elisha McAninch and 
their wives. The ministers liave been, in order, James Williams, 
Joseph Woods, J. F. Woodruff, Elias Gaskin,— Bridges, Miles 
Woods, W. W. Pewett, William Giunis, Asa Beck and J. V. P. 
Miller. The last named, the present pastor, commenced his labors 
here in tlie fall of 1SS4. The present membership of the society 
is about fifty. 

SOCIETIES. 

Laralee Lodge, No. 131, i^. ck A. M., was organized in May, 
1852, and has now thirty-one members. The present officers are: 
James Pratt, W. M.; William Applebee, S. W.; John S. Ellmore, 
J. W.; A. Heavenridge, Sec; William Page, Treas. ; James 
Tincher, S. D. ; William Ellmore, J. D.; W. A. McAninch, Tyler. 
The lodge meets the Monday evening on or preceding the fuli 
moon of each month. 

Enoch Alexander Post, No. 265, {?. A. E., was mustered in the 
fall of 1SS3 with thirteen members. The membersliip has now 
increased to forty-seven. The present officials are: J. B. Garri- 
son, Com.; L. S. Rector, S. V. C; O. P. Bowen, J. Y. C. ; 
Alfred Benbow, Adj.; F. M. Osborne, 0. D.;T\Villiam Houston, 
Q. M.; A. N. Crawford, Chap.; Smith G. York, O. G. 

BIOGRAPHICAL. 

John Wesley Brown, section 26, Franklin Township, is a son 
of Amiel and Susannah Brown. He -was born Sept. 26, 1836, on 
the farm where he now resides. He was married Sept. 26, 1S59, 
to Sarah J. Smart, daughter of Isaac Smart, who came from Ohio 
to this township in 1S51, at present living in Ca.;s County, Mo. 
To them were born two children — Virgil died at the a^e of si.v 
months and Effie died at the age of tw^o years, ^rs. Brown died 
Jan. 21, 1862, aged twenty-one years, and Mr. Brown married for 
his second wife Mrs. M. W. CritchfielcL widow of J. G. Critchficld. 
She was born in Bourbon County, Kv., a daughter of Robert and 






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TIISTOKY OF HENDKICKS COUNTY. 



595 



Eliza Turner. Tuey have two children — Ora A. and Jessie "W. Mr. 
and Mrs. Brosvn are consistent members ot the Christian church. 
Mr. Brown has served acceptably as Township Trustee, and has 
been prominently identified with all enterprises for the good 
of his township'. In politics he is a staunch Republican. Amiel 
Brown, father of our subject, was born Sept. 10, 1810, in Gull- 
ford County, In'". C, and in 1S2C his parents. James and Rebecca 
Brown, moved to "Wayne County, Ind., from thence to Morgan 
County, and subsequently settled in Iowa, where they died. Amiel 
Brown was married in 1S32 to Susannah Burris, a native of Ilio-h- 
land County, Ohio, and a daughter of John Burris. They reared 
seven children— Mrs. Louisa Jane Crawford, died at Stilesville, May 
22, 1881; John W., our subject; Mrs. Elizabeth A. Swope, a resident 
of Stilesville; Mrs. Mary F. Dunningtou, deceased; Yerlin G. 
living in Kansas; Mrs. Carrie E. Hollingsworth, deceased, and 
Laura P., residing at Stilesville. After his marriage Mr. Brown 
settled in Liberty Township, and in 1835 moved to Clay Township. 
He came to this township in 1814, settling on a farm on section 
2G, which contains 160 acres of excellent land and is now owned 
and occupied by our subject. Amiel Brown died at the old home- 
stead April 13, 1869. His wife died Aug. 2, 1883, in her seventy- 
fourth year. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

Bary M. Gentry, of the firm of Gentry Brothers, general mer- 
chants, Stilesville, Ind., is a representative of one of the pioneer 
families of Hendricks County. His father, Elaxton Gentry, was 
born in Culpeper, Ya., June 1, 1766, and was reared in Cnlpeper 
.and Lee counties. He was twice married. His first wife was a 
Miss Brush, who died in Virginia. He afterward moved with his 
children to- Kentucky, where he was married in September, 1816 
to jSTancy Hough, a native of New Jersey, who moved with her 
parents to Kentucky when a child. In the autumn of 1832 Mr. 
Gentry came from Kentucky to Hendricks County, Ind., with a 
four-horse team. His family at that time consisted of eio-ht chil- 
dren, the eldest of whom, Garland, the only child by his first mar- 
riage, was married and brought his wife and child. They located 
in what is now Franklin Township, Mr. Gentry buying 155 acres 
of land. They cleared and cultivated a farm where" they reared 
their family, and where the father died April 9, 1845, and the 
mother May 23, 1853. They are buried on the homestead oo land 
selected for that purpose by the father. Mr. Gentry was prom- 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTT. 



inentlj idexitified with the early history ot Franklin Township. 
Poh'tically he was in early life a Jackson Democrat, but in 1840 
voted for General Harrison. He was a member of the Cumber- 
land Presbyterian church. Seven children were born to this sec- 
ond marriage — Melvin A., Eliza J., Bary M., John'W., Sarah Ann 
(deceased), Jeremiah and Hezekiab. Bary M. Gentry was born 
in Kentucky, Jan. 16, 1821. After attaining manhood he engaged 
in agricnltural pursuits till 1S71, and still owns a fine farm in 
Adams Township, Morgan County. He has accumulated a fioe 
property by industry and frugality, being in limited circumstanced 
when he started in life. In March, 1871, he became associated with 
his brother Hezekiah and established the general mercantile busi 
ness in Stilesville, where they have built up a good trade which is 
constantly increasing. , Mr. Gentry married Elizabeth J. Ludlow, 
a native of Kentucky, daughter of Nathaniel Ludlow. They have 
had a family of ten cliildren, six of whom are living — Melvina A., 
Nancy J., Joanna, Harrison, Candace and John W. Mr. Gentry's 
brother Hezekiah was born in Kentucky, Aug. 16, 1830. He mar- 
ried Mary A. Wilcox, a native of Hendricks County, born Dec. 29, 
1831:. They have one daughter— Sarah A., born March 19, 1851, 
now the wife of James M. Tincher. 

Jonathan N. Green, 3£- D., Stilesville, Ind., was born in Guil- 
ford County, N. C, Aug. 23, 1825, a son of John and Charity 
(Swaim) Green. In 1835 his parents moved to Hendricks County, 
Ind.. and settled on a farm near PlainSeld. In 1837 they bought 
a farm in Center Township, where the father died in 1S40. The 
mother survived her husband several years. They had a family of 
eight children, four of wliom are living — Leno W., of Center 
Townsliip; INIartha, wife of John Lan;b; Martin L., a Methodist 
minister, at "West Lebanon, and Jonathan N. Dr. Green began the 
study of medicine in lSi6 with Drs. Henry G. and David Todd, of 
Danville, and remained with them throe years. He tht-n located 
in Stilesville and began the practice of his profession. In the win- 
ter of 1857-'58 he attended lectures at Rush Medical College, Chi- 
cago, 111., and graduated in the spring of the latter year. He has 
built up a large practice, having won the C'jufidence and esteem ot 
all who know him. He was married to Eva Y. Pope, a native ot 
Liberty Township, born in 1833, a daughter of Jamas N. Pope, a 
pioneer of Hendricks County. 

John A. Grimes, a resident of section 10, Franklin Township, 
was born Aug. 17, lS2i, in North Carolina. His parents, John and 



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HISTORY OF HENDRrCKS COrNTr. 



597 






Marj Grnnes, were boru, reared and married in tliat State and emi- 
grated o this county i„lS33, locating in this townsliip. Tliev 
brought four children with them-Elias, Elihn, AYilliam and John' 
of whom the latter is the only one now residing in this eonnty' 
Ihc fa her died here in 1855, his widow surviving him till 1868 
John A Grimes was married Oct. IT, 1849, to Rebecca Morgan, a 
nat.ve of Tennessee, whose parents settled in Hamilton (Jounty, 
lod where they died. Mr. and Mrs. Grimes have seven children 
-Oliver Morton, Charles F., Rozilla E., Hannah D., Ellsworth 
Francis M and Ehoda L., all living at home. Mr. Grimes is in 
comfortable circumstances, owning a fine farm of 137 acres. Politi- 
cally he is a Republican. He and his wife are members of the Reg- 
ular Baptist church. . . ° 

Jehu Eadley is one of the most prominent farmers of Hendricks ■ 
County His farm is one of the best in the county, and none have 
required more labor to change from a state of nature to that of hio-h 
productn-ene.s. Marcii 4, 1838, Mr. H.dley bought 320 acres°of 

d °"r:r?:n'' '''■"'"'■" ^°^^-"^'^'t^' -t «iat°time a swamp 
a jacent to Mill Creek which flowed through it, a sluggish stream' 
Ihe part of his purchase which was arable was covered with a 
heavy growth of timber. Old settlers pronounced the estate value- 
ess and predicted starvation to the owner, but to-day it is the model 
arm of tl^e county. This change'has been wrought by incessant 
toil and perseverance. Two thousand rods of tile drainao-e,^ 400 
rods of open ditch, one mile of levee on the banks of Milfcreeh 
indicate the character of tbe improvements. Every acre of tlie 
and IS improved The fine park and amphitheatre was built for 
he use of the old settlers, who have held their annual re-unions 
there for thu-teen years, with an average attendance of 6 000 per- 
sons. Mr. Hadley at one time owned 650 acres, nearly all of which 
he improved. Probably n,. other man in Hendricks Countv ha. 
cleared and improved as much land as he. Part of tliis h'e has 
sold, and part he has deeded to his children til! his firm is now 
reduced to 200 acres. His beautiful brick residence, built in 187.1 
IS amodel^of convenience and comfort, and cost, with surroundina-'' 
out-bu.ldings, over $10,000. No r.ian in Hendricks Countv is moi°e 
widely known, and certainly no one is more highlv respected for 
the many qualities that combine to make a true manhood than 
Jelm Hadley In deal he is more than just, he is generous. Hon 
orable himself he never distrusts a man till helms proved him 
Liberal and charitable, he never refuses aid to a worthy man ' ' 



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HISTOKY OF HENDEICKS COUNTY. 



object, and for forty years the needy have known that in him they 
had a friend who never tnroed any empty-lianded away. Strom' 
in his likes and dislikes, he loves his friends but eschews his ene- 
mies. Mr. Hadley was born in Chatham County, N. C, Oct. 19, 
1810, and in 1S25 accompanied his parents, James T. and Maiy 
(Richardson) Hadley, to Hendricks County and located in Center 
Township. He was married Aug. 3, 1837, to Jerusha Stiles, a 
native of Vermont, born July 19, 1819, daughter of Jeremiah and 
Sibyl Stiles. Her father was the founder of Stilesville, locatino- 
there in 1821. Mrs. Stiles died in January, 1828, and was the first 
married woman who died in that place. Mr. Stiles subscqnentl}' 
married again. He died of cholera, at Savannah, Mo. But three 
of his children are living — Mrs. Hadley, Mrs. Sibyl Whicker, and 
Lewis (son of the second marriage). One son, Luke, a physician, 
of Chicago, 111., died in 188-1. To Mr. and Mrs. Hadley have been 
born ten children — Mrs. Nancy Daggy, of Danville; Mrs. Mary 
Gibben, of Butler, Mo.; Henry, of Eel River Township; Sibyl, 
deceased, wife of William Wilson; George Wasliington and Marcus 
Lafayette, enlisted in the wf.r of the Kebellion and died in the serv- 
ice; Mrs. Alice Matlock, of California; Mrs. Laura Masten, of this 
township; .John and Jerusha (twins), at home. Mr. Hadley is a 
member of the Christian and Mrs. Hadley of the Missionary Bap- 
tist church. 

Thomas Harrison, deceased, was born in North Carolina in 
1800, and removed with his parents to Kentucky, where he mar- 
ried Nancy Bryan, a native of East Tennessee, born Nov. 28, 1807. 
In the fall of 1832 they moved to Hendricks County, Ind., and 
settled on section 19, Franklin Township, where Mr. Harrison 
died Nov. 11, 1846. Mrs. JIarrison still lives on the homestead, 
which contains 160 acres of valuable land. Mr. and Mrs. Harrison 
had a family of six children, three of whom are living — Mrs. Mar- 
tha Walls, John and Mrs. Emeline Swinler. James died at the 
age of fifteen years, Nathan aged seventeen yenrs and William 
aged forty years. The latter was married and left a widow and 
four children— I va, Oscar, Ada and Wilmie. Mrs. William Har- 
rison, whose maiden name was Eliza Bartholomew, daughter of 
Benjamin and Sabrina (Johnson) Bartholomew, lives on the home- 
stead with Mrs. Harrison. 

A. Heavenri.dge, 21. D., Stilesville, Ind., ,was born in Union 
County, Ind., May 22, 1829. His father, William Heavenridge, 
born 1791, was a native of Louisiana, and when fifteen years ot 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTT. 



599 



age moved with his parents to Tennessee, and thence to Union 
County, Ind. He subsequently located in Henry County, and from 
tliore moved to Putnam County, and thence to that part of Morgan 
County which is now a part of Hendricks. He afterward moved 
to Wabash County, where he died Feb. 17, 1864. His wife died 
April 16, 1862. Our subject was reared on a farm, and ifarch 1, 
1S53, began the study of medicine with Dr. Moody, of Stilesvilie, 
remaining with him two years. He attended two courses of lect- 
ures at Kush Medical College, Chicago, 111., in the winters of 
1854:-'5 and lS57-'8, graduating in the spring of the latter year. 
He then located in Stilesvilie and, with the exception of three 
years spent in Putnam Count}', has since resided here. He is a 
close student of his profession and has built up a large practice. 
He was married to Sarah McKenzie, a native of Virginia, who 
removed with her parents to Kentucky, where her father died, and 
in lSi4 she accompanied her mother to Pntnam County, Ind., 
removing to Hendricks County in 1849. To Dr. and Mrs. Heav- 
enridge have been born three children, but two of whom are living 
— Eugenia and Frank M. Gertrude died in childhood. 

Mslville F. MoHaffie, section 29, Mill Greek Township, Putnam 
Co., Ind., is so prominently identified with the material and social 
interests of Hendricks County that its history could not be consid- 
ered complete without mention of him. He was born in Knox 
County, Tenn., Dec. 27, 1826, a son of Andrew E. and Kancy 
(Woods) McHalfie. His mother died when he was three years of 
age leaving three children— Nancy E., widow of William P. Rob- 
erts; Melville F. and Tluirza Jane, who died aged twelve years. 
In October, 1832, his father settled in Franklin Township, Hen- 
dricks County, three-fourths of a mile from Stile3ville,living a short 
time in a tent. He bought 640 acres of Government land, coming 
to this county with some money compared to the majority of the 
early settlers. He improved his farm rapidly and soon had a good 
home. He married" a second time, in Angust, 183S, in Blount 
County, Tenn., Nancy D. Kilburn. One child was born to them, 
Mary Angeline, now a resident of Stilesvilie. Andrew McHaffie 
was one of the prominent, enterprising citizens of Hendricks 
County, noted for his honorable dealings and benevolence. He 
died Oct. 17, 1863, aged sixty-five years and six months. His 
widow died in Arkansas in 1881. His father, John McHaffie, 
served nearly six years in the war of the Revolution, and was pres- 
ent at the surrender of Cornwallis, and for his gallantry won a 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTV. 



Captain s commission. He died in Tennessee, about thirty vears 
after the close of the war, aged fiftj-two years. He liad ,noved to 
tha State ,n ISOl. His widow survived him many years and died 
at the residence of A.E.McHaffie, in Franklin Township. Mel- 
ville F^McHafhe remained with his father til! twenty -four years of 
age. He was married Aug. 15, 1S50, to Mary Ann Thomas, a 
«at,ve of West Philadelphia, born July 16, 1S30, daughter of Jon- 
athan Thomas, who moved to Ohio, and died in Preble County 
The mother subsequently married Theodore Long, and with him 
moved to Mill Creek Township, Putnam Co., Ind., where they 
both died March 4, 1S51. Mr. McHaffie moved to a cabin on 
section 29 near their present residence. He at that time owned 
no laud his cabin being on his father's land. He has been very 
successful in all his business operations, and is now one of the 
largestland owners of Indiana. His home farm contains 1000 
acres, situated on sections 28 and 20, Mill Creek Township and 
sections 20 and 21, Franklin Township, Hendricks County His 
residence was built in 1S72, at a cost of $10,000. He also owns 
nearly all of section 27, 160 acres of section 22 and eighty acres ot 
paction 8 Franklin Township. In 1858 he bought 1,153 acres of 
land, part of it improved, in Bates County, Mo. The latter he has 
so,d at a profit ot 810,000. Mf. and Mrs. McHaffie have had ten 
children s,.. of whon. are living-Florence Alice, wife of Charles 
W. i^-Klges of Indianapolis; George W., of Franklin Township- 
Inez B., wife of Dr. G. N. Masters, of Stilesville; Oscar S., Mel- 
ville E. and Mary E., at home. Clarine Yirginia married Thomas 
b. -Hog-gess, of Macon, Misc., and died after fourteen months of 
married life. Andrew E. died aged seventeen years; Clarence V 
aged two years and Marcus, aged three and a half years. In poli- 
tics Mr. McHaffie is a Democrat. 

Jonathan L. Newman is one of tiie most prominent and success- 
ful farmers of Franklin Township, and a representative of one of 
the first families to settle in Hendricks County. His father, John 
Newman, was bora in Guilford County, K C, of Irish descent. 
He was reared >n his native county, and there married Elizabeth 
Lacy, also a native ofNorth Carolina, of English descent. In 1^3-1 
he came to Hendricks Coun'y, Ind., and entered 480 acres of land '■ 
or, section IS, Franklin Township, tie soon after returned to ' 
North Carolina, but in 1S36 came again to Indiana and built a lo-^ ' 
cabin on the southeast quirterof the section. This cabin i. still 
*ta-.dmg and is one of the olde.t residences in Hendricks County. ' 



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HISTOPwY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY, 



GOl 



In May, 1S3S, lie moved his family to their frontier home, where 
he lived till his death in November, 1S55, aojed seventy-one years. 
He was a man of good education for the times. His opportunities- 
for receiving instruction were'limitcd, but he was fond of I'eadiiig- 
and thus acquired a fair knowledge of the literary and business 
world. He becran life in meager circumstances, but accumulated 
a competency by his good management and practical business al)il- 
• ity. In politics he was an Abolitionist. His wife survived him 
but eleven month?, dying in October, 1S56. Their family con- 
sisted of three children, two of whom, Jonathan L. and Mrs. 
Rachel Phillips, are living. Miriam is deceased. Jonathan L. 
Newman was born in Randolph County, N. C, in 1820, and was 
about eighteen years of age when he accompanied his parents to- 
Hendricks County. , He assisted his father in clearing and im- 
proving the farm, and succeeded him in its ownership. He lias- 
been successful in his pursuits and now owns 675 acres of valuable 
land. He married Maria C. Phillips, daughter of Eli Phillips. To 
them have been born four daughters — Hiirriet, wife of William C 
Robinson ; Mary E., wife of Frfaik Johnson ; ilartha E., at home, 
and Julia, wife of Harrison Shields. In politics Mr. Newman is a 
Democrat. 

Dr. John A. Osborne, druggi.it, Stilesville, Ind.,.is a representa- 
tive of one of the pioneer families of Hendricks County, a son of 
Hardin and Priscilla (Tincher) Osborne. Ilardin Osborne was- 
born in Rockcastle County, Ky., in 1S04. His father, Nicholas 
Osborne, was a native of Virginia, and when a young man moved 
to Kentucky, .where he married Susanna Rolierts, and in IS'iJr^ 
moved with his family to Hendricks County, Ind., and located in 
Clay Township, entering the land now owned by Isaac Ratliif. 
Seven or eight years later he moved to Liberty Township where 
he died at the age of eighty-seven years. Hardin was the eldest 
of a large family. He was married near the present village of 
Anio, in August, 1.S29. Four or five years later hesottled in Clay 
Township, where he died March 8, 1863. His widow is still liv- 
ing and makes her home with lier children. Tliev had a fiimil}- of 
eleven children, eight sons and three daughters, nine of whom are 
living. Five sons served in the war of the Rebellion. Thomas 
J. was a member of the Ninety-ninth Indiana Infantry, and died 
at La Grango, Tenn., in January, 1863. Nicholas s^^rved three 
years, a member of the Seventieth Indiana Infantry. He was 
wounded in the left arm, and has never recovered from its effccrs. 



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HISTORT OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



Silas enlisted in October, 1861, in the Fifty-first Indiana Infantry, 
and was killed in 1S63, while with Colonel A. D. Streight on his 
raid through Georgia. William B. was a member of the same 
company aiid was captured while on the raid and imprisoned sev- 
eral months. He re-enlisted and served about five years. James 
H. served three years in the Seventieth Indiana Infantry. The 
other surviving children are — Mrs. Nancy Jane Bercham, of Lin- 
coln, Neb.; Melinda, wife of William M. Reitzel; John A., George 
W., Henry C, and Mrs. Sudio Harrison, of Vigo County, Tenn. 
Dr. John A. Osborne was born in Liberty Township, Hendricks 
Co., Ind., May G, ISll. When twenty-two years of age he began 
the study of medicine at Belleville, with Drs. Moore & Kennedy, 
and in 1861 attended lectures at Hush Medical Colle£re, Chicao-o, 
111. He graduated from the Indiana Medical College, Indianapolis, 
in 1871. He practiced two years in Clinton County, Ind., and 
then returned to Hendricks County, where he has since lived. In 
1878 he was elected Recorder of Hendricks County and served four 
years. His health became impaired and he was unable to practice, 
and after the expiration of his term ofoflice engaged in fariring 
till Feb. IS, 188.5, when he. located in Stilesville, and became estab- 
lished in the drug business. He was married to Harriet W. Kay, 
a native of Ohio. They have three children — Maud, Inez and 
Harry. 

David Reitzel was born in Guilford County, N. C, Nov. 21, 1806, 
a sou of Henry and Catherine Reitzel, also natives of North Caro- 
lina, of German descent. He was reared in his native county and 
was there married April 1, 1830, to Deborah .Marshall, a native of 
the same county. In 1831 he and his wife and infant son started 
for Indiana, the objective point being Farke County, but as that 
county was considered unhealthy located in Hendricks County. 
They were accompanied by Joshua Pickett, who also settled in 
Franklin Township. Mr. Reitzel entered 160 acres of land on sec- 
tion 7. No improvements had been made and he has made hjs 
presetit fine farm by his own industry and energy. He has added 
to his first entry till he now owns 300 acres, all well improved. 
He 13 one of the most substantial farmers of the county, having 
acquired a competency for his declining years. His wife died 
Aug. 6, 18-19. They had a family of ten children — William M., 
Hannah C, Sarah C, Lucinda -J., Martha Ann, Matild H., Mar- 
tin L., John H., Eli F., Aaron R. Seven of these are now living. 
Hannah, wife of William McCormack, died Feb. 21, 1873; ^Martha 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COCri^fTr. 



603 



A., wife of Olivt-; Saudess, died in 1862, and Eli F. died ac^ed five 
years. March 7, 1850, Mr. Reitzel naarried Susan Lietzmrn, a na- 
tive of Wjthe County, Ya., born Jan. 30, 1827. Two children 
were born to them— Saloraa E. and David A. Mrs. Eeitzel is a 
daughter of Charles and Mary Ann Lietzman, who settled in Dan- 
ville in 1S30. The father, a native of Germany, and a tanner by 
trade, died in 1840, and the mother died in 1871. Mrs. Reitzel 
is the only daughter living in a family of eight children, three of 
whom are dead-Catharine, Jane and James, the last named dyino- 
m infancy. Those living are— John, Theodore, Charles and Will! 
lam. ^ Politically Mr. Reitzel was formerly a Whig, but has affilia- 
ted with the Republican party since its organization. 

James Snoddy, one of the prominent pioneers of Hendricks 
County, was born in Eourbon County, Ky., Jan. 4, 1799, a son of 
John and Mary Snoddy, his father a native of North Carolina and 
his mother of Yermont. In 1823 his parents moved to Owen 
County, Ind., where they died. Our subject was reared and edu- 
cated in his native county. IIo was married in 1819 to Rachel 
Everman, a native of Ohio, bom Nov. 18, 1803. Her mother 
died when she was a child, and her father subsequently moved to 
Kentucky, and later to Owen County, Ind., where he died. In 
1820 our subject settled in Monroe County, Ind., and in 1830 came 
to Hendricks County and locate! on section 30, Franklin Town- 
ship, entering^a tract of 1^0 acres of wild land, where he lived till 
after the death of his wife, when he sold his farm and has made 
bis home with his daughter, Mrs. Stringer. "Mrs. Snoddy died 
Oct. 1, 1877. She was from girlhood a member of the Christian 
church. Mr. Snoddy is a member of the same denomination. In 
politics he votes the Republican ticket. Of his seven children, but 
one, Mrs. Mary E. Stringer, is living. The deceased are— John,' 
Nancy, Moses W., Julian, Martha J. and James W. 

Edmund St ringm' \7&B born in Bullitt Connty, Ky., Nov. 28, 
1825. His parents, Thomas and Mary Stringer," came from that 
county to Indiana with their family of nine children, and settled 
in Hendricks County. The first year they lived near Stilesville, 
and then entered eighty acres of Government land in Adams 
Township, Morgan County, where they passed the rest of their 
lives. The father died June 17, 1847, aged eighty years, and the 
mother Jan. 3, 1854, aged seventy year.s. Of a familv of nine 
children, five, Mrs. Susan Gentry, Mrs. Sylvia Clark, James, Lewis 
and Asa are deceased. The living are— Reuben, Edmund, Rich- 






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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COaNTY. 



ard and Mrs. Minerva Halts. Edmund Stringer remained on the 
homestead till after the death of his parents, and succeeded them 
in its ownership, making it his home till 1SG9. He then lived two 
years on his father-in-law's farm, and in 1S72 bought the furm 
where he now lives, on section 3-i, Franklin Township. His home 
contains seventy-nine acres of valuable land, and he also retains the 
old homestead in Morgan County. Mr. Stringer was married Oct. 
3, ISoS, to Mary Ellen Suoddy, a native of Hendricks County, born 
in this township May 26, 1S33, daughter of James and Rachel 
Snoddy. They Iiave two children— Eberle and Warren. Mr. aud 
Mrs. Stringer are members of the Christian church. In politics he 
is" a Democrat. 

William Tincher, section 9, Franklin Township, was born in 
Monroe County, Ind., March 18, 1825, a son of John and Polly 
Tincher. His grandfatlier, Robert Tincher, was one of thefiist 
settlers of Clay Township, M;-",? county, "and lived there till his 
death, his sons John, Ro b«^'' , .^Sborge and Obadiah also being early 
settlers of Hendricks C^ ^n'iA-p' John and Polly Tincher had a 
family of four childreu--Emeline, Rebecca, Robert and Williai i, 
the latter being the only one living. The mother died in Putnam 
County, and the father subsequently married Mrs. Aseneth (Fox) 
Carter, widow of Aaron Carter, and to them were born four chil- 
dren — Mrs. Hannah Evans, of Illinois; Mrs. Mary J. De Pew, ct 
Marion Township; Obadiah, of Guilford Township, and John, of 
Morgan County, Ind. The second wife died and the father mar- 
ried again. Flis third wife survives him. He died in June, 1St1\ 
aged thirty-eight years. William Tincher was married April ( , 
1645, to Martha A. Fitts, a native of Indiana, born April 6, 182£, 
daughter of Henry and Elizabeth Fitts. Her father died in Put- 
nam County-, and her mother at her residence, in ISSO. Mr. and 
Mrs. Tincher have had eight children — John, enlisted in the war 
for the Union in the One Hundred and Seventeenth Indiana In- 
fantry, and died at Knoxville, Tenn.; William U., resides in Kan- 
sas; Mrs. Eliza A. Woods, of this township; James M., of Stiles- 
ville; George W., at home; Sarah E., wife of Rev. Lewis S. 
Smith, a Methodist minister, now of Tippecanoe County; Harri- 
son T., an attorney of Inlianapolis; Flora X. and Charles D., :!• 
home. After his marriago Mr. Tincher lived near Coatesville t:l: 
the spring of 1S5S, and then located 0!i his present farm, where lie 
owns 335 acres of valuable land. He is purely a self-made 
man. He was but seventeen years of age when his f dher dieJ, nr.d 



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. HISTORY OF HENDEICKS COUNTV. 



605 



since then has been obliged to rclj on his own resources, but en- 
ergy, frugality and business tact have been rewarded, and he is 
now one of Franklin Township's most substantial and reliable 
citizens. He has served his township efficiently as Trustee. He 
and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

James Walls, a pioneer of Franklin Townsliip, was born in 
"Wilkes County, i!^. C, and was there married to Mary Kennedy. 
In 1825 they moved to Indiana that they might provide a better 
home for their family. They located in Monroe County, and re- 
mained one season, but not being satisfied with the country de- 
termined to look further before making a permanent location. 
Accordingly, in the spring of 1826, Mr. Walls came to Ilendrieks 
County and entered eighty acres of land iii Franklin Township, 
near the present site of Stilesville, now owned by his son John. 
He built a log cabin, into which he moved his family, and at once 
began the improvement of his land. By hard work on tlie part of 
himself ard wife they improved their land and made a good home, 
gradua''/ adding to the first purchase till they owned 200 acres. 
He ' as a man of strong force of character, and a worthy specimen 
of the honored pioneers, who converted the forests into fruitful 
fields. He died in the prime of his manhood, Nov. 22, 1841, his 
wife surviving him till Jan. 12, 1873. Their family consisted of 
ten children — Susan E., Keuben P., Mary Ann (deceased), Eliza- 
beth and Sarah (twins, the latter deceased), Nancy L., Joseph, 
James, "William and John. 

Reuben P. Walls, section 19, Franklin Townsliip, was born in 
North Carolina in 1824, the second of ten children of James and 
Mary (Kennedy) Walls. After the death of his father in 1811, he 
took charge of the farm, and with the assistance of his mother, 
who was a woman of fine executive ability, the work of improve- 
ment progressed. In 1862 he located on Ms present farm, where 
he owns 120 acres of fine land, all under cultivation. He was mar- 
ried Sept. 9, 1817, to Martha Harrison, a native of Knox County, 
Ky., born Jan. 27, 1S2S, daughter of Th'otiaas Harrison, a pioneer 
of Hendricks County. Mr. and Mrs. "Walls have had a family of 
eleven children, six of whom are living-— Frances, Marion C , 
Howard "W., Nancy, Lora E. ard Alva J. James T. died at the 
age of twenty-six years, leaving a wife a.nd two children; Mary 
Angeline, aged twenty-nine years; Clara E., aged twelve years; 
Alice, aged one year; and one daughter in infancy. 

Joseph JL Woods, County Commissioner of Hendricks County, 



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HISTOKY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



was born in Franklin Township, Hendricks Co., Ind., March 
27, 1S45. He was reared a farmer, and educated at the district 
schools of his neighborhood until the spring of 1865, after which 
he attended the Danville Academy almost a year. In September, 
1866,he entered the Asbury,now theDe Pauw, University at Green- 
castle, Ind., which he attended three years, leaving at the close of 
the Freshman year in June, 1869. Mr. Woods was a son of Lo- 
renzo N. and Catherine (Coble) Woods. After leavins; school he 
taught in the district schools of Hendricks County for six years 
during the winter terms, farming the remainder of the year. In 
1877 he discontinued teaching and has since followed farming ex- 
clusively in Franklin Township. In November, 1SS2, he was 
elected one of the County Commissioners oF this county, and as- 
sumed the duties of the ofhce in the following December. He was 
married Feb. 7, 1872, to Miss Eliza A., daughter of William and 
Martha (Fitz) Tincher, of Franklin Township, born Aug. 19, 1850. 
Thev have two children- — Homer A. and Ernest. He and hi? 
w'.e are members of the Methodist Episcopal church at Stilesville, 
ji which ho is Steward and Trustee. 



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. CHAPTER XV. 

GUILFORD TOWNSHIP. 

I Desceiption.—Dkaixage.— Early Settlement. -First Political 

I Campaign.— Political Historv.— Township Officials.— Peop- 

j ertt and Taxation.— Plainfield.— Business, Schools, 

I Churches and Societies.— Biographical. 

The township of Guilford, the only one of the size of a Congres- 
sional township, occupies t!ie southeastern corner of the comity 
and IS bounded as follows: On the north bj Washington Township' 
on the east by Marion County, on the south by Mor-an County' 
and ov Che we^t by Liberty Township. It has the best natural 
drar age of any part of Hendricks County. White Lick passes 
thi.ugh its center, the East Fork through the east side, Clark's 
Creek between them, and the West Fork and a small tributary to 
It passes through the west side. The uplands are onlv gently roll- 
ing, and are generally quite fertile, while along each of these 
streams^are valleys of unsurpassed fertility. In these streams is 
gravel enough to macadamize all the roads in the county, and 
along their banks is grown corn enough to feed a city. Much of 
the upland along the Middle and the East forks was originally cov- 
ered with waluut, poplar and maple trees, and is almost as cood 
as bottom hand. The only land in Guilford Township which may 
becalled second rate for Hendricks County, is alon- the water- 
shed between the East Fork and Clark's Creek, and on the hi ah- 
.ands on the west side of the West Fork; and any one who will 
pass along the ridge will be able to controvert the idea that oak 
timber is growing scarce in this county. 

FIRST SETTLERS. 

Guilford was the first settled township in the county, and its oc- 
cupancy dates back to 1820. In that year Samuel Herriman 
James Dunn, Bat Ramsey, Harris Bay, John W. Bryant, and 
George Moore settled on White Lick, south of Plainfield, near the 
Morgan County line. Some of these settlers raised some corn and ' 
potatoes in 1S20. I'l the spring of 1821 Xoah Kellum, Thomas ' 
=— -— (607) 






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HISTORY OF HENDEICKS COUNTY. 



Loclchart, a Mr. Pluinmer and Felix Belzer settled on the East 
Fork, and Matthew Lowder, Elias Hadley, Jesse Hockutt and Rob- 
ert Toniliiison, on ^Yhite Lick, soutli of Plaintield. In tlie spring 
of 1S23 David Carter settled in tlie northern part of the township, 
and was tlie first to locate in the neigliborhood of Plainfield. In 
the same year, James Downard settled on the State farm. 

The settiing-ap of Guilford Township was more rapid than that 
of any other portion of tlie county, so that in 1824 it contained 
more population than the other townships combined. A very 
large majority of the early comers were Friends. The townsliip 
was named by Samuel Jessup, in honor of Guilford County, N. C, 
wlience a larg-e number of its settlers immigrated. 



FIRST ELECTIONS. 

Samuel Jessup was the first Justice of the Peace in Guilford 
Townsliip and Hendricks County. He was elected in the autumn 
of 1S22, under the jurisdiction of Morgan County, to which Hen- 
dr',KS County was attaclied for two years for judicial purposes, be- 
+"^16 its organization. Mr. Jessup's election was the result of tiie 
■■■first political catnpaign in the county. John and Samuel Jessup, 
on East Fork, were candidates, and Gideon Wilson, up by Sliiloh, 
was also a candidate. There were fifteen vuters below and eiglit 
up in Mr. "Wilson's neighborhood. A caucus was held in the Fair- 
field neigiiborhood, and it was found that there would be no elec- 
tion if all the candidates remained in tlie field, and as Samuel iiad 
the most votes, it was decided that John should withdraw irom ihe 
race, which he did, and Samuel was elected. 

The poll-book of the first general election held in Guilford Town- 
ship (Aug. 7, 1S26, at the house of John Jessup) gives a list of 
forty-two voters, which is here copied in full, as the best possible 
catalogue of tlie early settlers: Timothy Jessup, Tliomas Lock- 
hart, James McChire, John White, jSToali Kelluni, Isaac Sunders, 
Harmon Iliatt, Adin Ballard, Benjamin Sanders, Henry Bland, 
Eobbert Tomblinson, Joseph CIiand!er,John Hiatt,Elilm Jackson, 
Joseph Ballard, Charles Reynolds, PratW. Jessup, Joseph Jessup, 
Joel Jessup, John Hawkins. Lee Jessup, Abijah Piiison, John Jes- 
sup, Joscpli P. Jessup, Levi Cook, Henry Reynolds, Timothy H. 
Jessup, James C. Tomblinson, Joseph Cloud, John Lemon, John 
Carson, David Stutesman, James Ritter, William Merritt, Solomon 
Edmunson, John Ballard, David Ballard, Robert Lemon, Joseph 
Hiatt, Jesse Kellum, Thoi.ias R. Ballard and John Burris. The 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COL'NTT. 



609 



vote in tliis township at tiiat election was as follows: For Con- 
gressma'!, Thomas H. Blake, tliirtj-seven; Ratlifl' Boon, three. 
For Senator, Josiah F. Polk, twentj-one; Calvin Fletcher, four- 
teen; John "W. Redding, two. For Representative, Thomas J. 
Matlock, thirty-nine; Isaiah Driiry, two. For Sheriff, Robert 
Cooper, thirty-nine. For Coroner, James McClure, fifteen. 

Two years later, at the presidential election of 1S2S, the number 
of votes had increased to seventy-two, of which number John 
Quincy Adams received sixty-nine and Andrew Jackson onlv 
three. 

« 

Another interesting election return bears date of April 5, 1852. 
The township voted on the question of grantine; liquor license, 
and seventy-nine votes were cast against the proposition, while not 
one was given for it. 

POLITICAL. 

Few co'amunities in the world are as unequally divided in politi- 
cal sent' jient as Guilford, which has been almost unanimous in its 
loyalt" to the Whig party and its successor, the Republican party. 
The largest number of votes ever given the .Democratic ticket was 
fit'ty-two, in 1836. In .186i, Lincoln received 575 votes, and 
McOleiland'One. Following is the vote for President at each elec- 
tion since 1S2S: 



1828— -Jobu Quinc}- Adams 
Andrew Jacksoa ... 



60 
3 



66 

80 



1833— Henry Clay 80 

Andrew .Jackson 6 

1836— WiUi:im H. Harrison. .165 113 
Martin Van Buren 53 

1844— Henry Clay . . .' 236 208 

James K. Polk 28 

James G. Biruey 18 

1&48— Zachariali Taylor 142 93 

Marlin Van Buren 49 

Lewis Cass 20 

1852— V/infiald Scott 124 40 

John P. H^Ie 84 

Franklin fierce 86 

1856— John C. Fremont 301 269 

James Buchanan 32 

Millard Fillmore 2 



1800- 



320 



-Abraham Lincoln 343 

Slephen A.Douglas 33 

John C. Breckinridge. . 1 
John Bell 1 

1864 — Abraham Lincoln 575 

George B.McClellan... 1 

1868— Ul.vsses S. Grant 675 

Horatio Sej'mour .... 5 

1872— Ulysses S. Grant 525 

Horace Greeley 18 

1876— Rutherford B. Hayes. . .641 

Samuel J. Tilden 25 

Peter Cooper 19 

1880— James A. G iraeld 531 

Wlneeld S H ■ncock .. 47 
James B Weaver 13 

1884— James G. Blaine 454 406 

Grover Cleveland 48 

John P. St John 39 

Beoj-imin F. Butler 25 



574 
670 
507 
616 

474 



OF 'ICIAL. 



Following is, as nearly as possible, a complete list of those who 
have held the various township offices, together with tlie yuars ot 
election: 

Justices of the Peace: James JlcClure, 1S29; Harmon Iliatt, 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICJSS 






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1830; Zadok Smith, 1S34; Harmon Hiatt, Jaiuas T. Downard and 
John Pinson, 1S35; Joel Ilodgen, 1S3C; Joel Ilodgen and "Wash- 
ington Done, 18-il; John Reagan, ISio; Joel Ilodgen and Alex- 
ander "Worth, 1S47; James S. Odell and Carey Keagan, 1849; 
James G. Odell, 1850; Isaac Osborn, 1851; Milton Harvey, ISo-l; 
William Faulkner and Carey Reagan, 1855; Joseph Dennis, 1850; 
■ Perry Ransom, 1S57; Isaac M. Shideler, 1859; Eli Johnson, 18G0; 
Lafayette Oursler, 1863; Eii Johnson and Jesse IST. Townron, 1864; 
Asa Martin, 1865; Ransom "Wooten, 1S6G; Eli "Watson, 1867; 
Berry A. Tomlinson and Solomon Shinafelt, 18GS; Samuel M. 
Cook, 1869; James M. Odell and Morris K.Ellis, 1870; Jonathan 
L. Moffatt, 1872; Eli Johnson, 1873; Eli Johnson and John P. 
Ballard, 1876; Thomas Archey, 1S7S; Eli Johnson, ISSO; Thomas 
B. Archer, 1882; Richard Duddy, 1884. 

Constallcs: Granville P. Barker and '"William Bryant, 1836; 
Ziniri Vestal, 1837; "William Hamlet and Isaac Holton, 1838; 
""William Bryant and John Shelley, 1839; Eli McCaslin, 1844; Eli 
M- Jaslin and John C. Johnson, 184-5; Eli McCaslin and Line 
Jfown, 1847; Coleman Francis, Rufus Ostler and Yerlin Jones, 
1848; • John Moon and Eli McCaslin, 1849; John Dobbins and 
Barney A. Tomlinson, 1850; "Willis H. lV;lhite and "William Glass- 
cock, 1851; Benjamin McConaha, and John Tauksley, 1852; John 
Dobbins and "William Moss, 1853; Joseph Talbot and Robert Ed- 
monds. 1854; John Medaris, Loten Jenkins and George "W. 
Stephens, 1855; Caleb Dalton, Isaac Sparks and Madison Law- 
rence, 1856; John D. "Williams and B. A. Tomlinson, 1857; Milton 
Harvey and Joseph Cox, 1858; Cargy Eeagan and "W. H. "Williite, 
1859; Perry Ransom and "W. H. "Wilhite, 1860; Perry Ransom 
and Amos Easterling, 1861; Joseph A- Co.x and F. Shirley, 1862; 
Edward D. Stratton and John Sims, 1S63; William H. Thompson 
and John Dobbins, 1864; John Dobbins and Isaac Sparks, 1865; 
Nathan Hubbard and Jonathan Mendenhall, 1S66; Elijah Eddy 
and A. ^V. Greenlee, 1867; "William K. Lakin and Elijah Eddy, 
1868; David McNabb and Charles Doan, 1869; Thomas J. Stewart 
and Daniel McXabb, 1870; Thomas J. Stewart, 1S72; Thomas 
Stewart and Henry "Widdows, 1874; Thomas Stewart and "William 
Lakin, 1876; "William Lakin and "Willsam Stone, 1878; "William 
Sorters and John Craig, 1880; "William Sorters and Peter Bry- 
ant, 1882; Corry Edmonds, 1SS4. 

Trustee-?: Charles Lewder, 1856; Elisha Hobbs, 1857; Jesse 
Hockett, 185S; Elisha Hobbs, lS59-'60: Carey Reagan, 1861-'64; 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



611 



Dillon Haworth, 18G5-'67; Carey Eeagan, 186S-'74; Ebenezer 
Tomlinson, 1S76-'7S; David Hadley, ISSO; Ebenezer Toralinson, 
1SS2-'S4. 

Clerhi: Perry Ransoine, 1S56; Hiram Lindley, 1857; Elias 
Jessup, 1858 (office abolished). 

Treasurers: Solomon Blair, 1856; "William F. Harvey, 1857- 
'58 (office abolished). 

Assessors: Eli Overman, 1870; Hugh J. Jessup, 1872; Amos 
Hoak, 1871:; Hugh J. Jessup^ 1876-'82. 

STATISTICAL. 

The population of Guilford Tov;nship was determined by the 
census of ISSO to be 2,691. The following figures of property and 
taxation areTor the year 1885: Acres of land assessed, 22,097.15; 
value of same, $707,188; value of improvements, $134,629; value 
of lots, $18,439; value of improvarnents, $67,735; value of personal 
proper v, $335,275; total taxables, $1,263,266; polls, 387; dogs, 
213; ' tate tax, $1,709.42; county tax, $3,73-1.68; township tax, 
8SS4. %'; tuition tax, $2,623.25; special school tax, $3,351.68; road 
tax, i.2,526.50; endowment tax, $63.16; bridge tax, $1,263.25; 
total tax, $18,836.64; delinquent tax, $1,311.39. 

- PLAINFIELD. 

The second town in the county in size is Plainfleld, pleasantlj' 
situated in a beautiful valley on the east bank of White Lick, on 
the Indianipolis & Terre Haute Railroad, now known as the Van - 
dalia line. It was laid out by Elias Hadley and Levi Jessup in 
1839. Thomas "Worth built the first frame house in town, and 
"Worth & Bro. were the first merchants. 

Plainfleld was duly incorporated as a town in 1839, when an 
election was held to choose five trustees. Following is the report 
of the officers of the election: 

""We, the undersigned president and clerk chosen and qualified 
according to law, do hereby certify that we did, on tiie morning of 
the 25th day of May, 1839, lay off the said town into five districts, 
to wit: That the town lots lying east of Center street and north 
of the national road shall be known as the first district; that the 
lots lying east of Center street south of the national road shall be 
known as the second district; that the town lots lying between 
Center and Mills streets 8outh of the national road, shall be known 
as the third district; that the town lots lying between Center and 






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HISTOKY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



Mills streets north of the liatioiial road, shall be known as the 
fourth district; and tiiat the town lots lying west of Mills street 
shall be known as tlie fifth district. 

"And we do further certifj that David G. Worth, Eli K. Cavi- 
ness, James M. Long, Andrew Prather and James M. Blair were 
duly elected Trustees of the town of Plainfield according to law. 

" David G. Worth, President. 
"Attest: Isaac OsBORN, Clerk. " 

At this election the following twenty-three persons voted: Daniel 
Berker, David G. Worth, M. G. Taylor, David Berker, Jesse 
Hacket, James M. Blair, A. C.[Logan, A. Prather, Luther Sikes, 
James M. Long, James T. Downard, Eli K. Caviness, M. G. Cor- 
lew, Joel^odgai, Huling Miller, Thomas J. Perth, Benjamin 
Lawrence, David Phillips, V. C. Githens, John Shelley, Isaac 
Osborii, Isaac Holton and William Osborn. 

The town has no charter now, the same having been surrendered 
many years ago. It was found that the township government was 
best, >n the ground of both efficiency and economy. Plainfield 
has t 3ver retrograded, for while its business is purely local, it has 
always been healthy and steady, and the population and wealth of 
the place have steadily increased. There are now nearly 1,000 
inhabitants. The business firms of 1885 are enumerated in the 
following list: 

Pleasant AUman, livery; Misses AUmau, dressmaking; A. A. 
Brown, attorney; A. Carter, physician; II. T. Conde, agricultural 
implements; Douglass & Carter, saw-mill; Douglass & Strong, 
builders; W. C. Douglass, builder; Dennis & Adams, wagons and 
wood- work; Caleb Dalton, meat market; T.E.Evans, physician; 
Ellis & Sons, saw-mill; Kobert Edmonds, builder; Teresa Ellis, 
dreosmaker, G. W. Fogleman, builder; Miss Eosa Fogleman, 
dressmaker; Nerius Frazier, blacksmith; W. T. Fawcett, boots 
and shoes; Green &Hadley, druggists; CyrnsGrccn, station agent; 
T. B. GuUefer, physician; Miss C. A. Havens, dre-smaker; Iliatt 
& Sons, saw and flouring mill; Harlan Hadley,* livery; W. L. 
Hamar, dentist; B. G. Harlan, dentist; A. T. Harrison, editor 
Plainfield Progress; xVnson Hobbs, grocery and hotel; Hiss &, Car- 
ter, agricultural implements; S. Hiss, undertaker; I. A. Johnson, 
harness; Allen Jackson, livery and sale stable; Ellwood Johnson, 
greenhouse; Adam Jones, nursery; R. A. Kelley, barber; T. B. 
Kiiman, postoffice; A. M. Lewis & Co., hardware; Lawrence & 
Small, real estate and insurance; Robert Lewis, physician; McMil- 






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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTr. 6I3 

len & Son dairy ; P. F. Moore, grocer; Mrs. Newlin, boardin. 

AmPh iV f ' '""^^'' '^"P' ^^^^""'^^ 0^^°^' blacksmith- 

MitPhihps druggist; A. M. Pritchett, builder; Frank Phillips' 

re taurant O W Sdhvan, shoe-shop; N. R. Schooley, coal dealer- 
Eh Spray da,ry; I. R Sivage, livery; J. T. Strong, physician; E 
J. Shaw, dry-goods; W. R. Snipes, grocer; F. W. Smith, ph v.t 
f c>an; Wm. Townsend, grocer; Moses Tomlinson, Jewelr; ph^ 
^graphy and mill; Will Tncker, barber ; Tomlinson & Co., ba^ke s •" 
W. A Ayatson, grocery; Wm. Wilkin, blacksmith; Ellw^od Was' 
son, blacksmith, J. C. Worth, feed stable; Mrs. J. E. Walker m i " 
hnery anddressmaking; Mrs. A. Wagoner, millinerv and drTs ' 

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SCHOOLS. 

The town has a fine public-school building, two stones in heic^ht 
erected m S67 nd 1S6S, at a cost of $12,000. It contain^'x 
rooms, used by a many different instructors. J. R. Owens is „;" 
(lt>8.^ principal, uid the assistants are Addison Moore Willia,! 
Douglass Sue M.Millin, Ida Phillips and Mrs. Elva T. C ^ 
The enrollment reaches about 300 annually. The affairs of the 
school are well managed under Ebenzer Tomlinson's trusteeship 

Central Academy, located at Plainfield, is controlled by a 
Board of Trustees appointed, by three Quarterly Meetin.s^f 
the society o Friends-Plainfield, White Lick and Fairfield 
There are eighteen Trustees, six from each Meetin. The 
school was organized in 1881, and is consequently four year 
V'T.-?' academy building was completed in 1882 at a 
cos of 85 000. The school has no endowment, and 1 sL 
ported by the tuition fees. These, however, are v ry moderate" 
ranging from $7.80 to $9.00 per term, there being three Terms , I 
year. The object of the academy i.s stated to be^" to fLntTs h 
literary mstructionas is generally given in the High Schools of our 
cities, joined, however with a larger amount of Christian teachin. 
than IS common in such schools." There are three cou^ses-the 
grammar school, the English and the Latin. The Princ'-oal ! 
George W. White, A. B. -t-rincpai is 

RELIGIOUS. 

Of the the churches, there are several, all well supported. 
m^ CAnsfAan Church was organized in March, 18.30, with the 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



following as the first members: David F. Cox and wife (only 
ones now living), John Hadlej, Jonathan Hadlej, David Carter, 
Ezekiel Hornaday, Pliram Hornaday, Pliram Green, Abijah Cox' 
with their wives, and Alexander Shawver, seventeen in all. They 
soon built a hewed-log church, having first held their .meetings in 
the settlers' cabins, and in that primitive strncture, half a mile 
ftorth of where is now Plainfield, they worshiped forfive or sixyears. 
They then erected a frame church in the village, using the same 
for twenty years, when it was succeeded by the present brick struct- 
ure, built on the site of the frame, at a cost of $3,000. Among 
the first ministers were Revs. Michael and Job Combs, Lewis 



Comer, John Secrest, 



Oatman and John O'Kane. For the 






past two years their spiritual interests have been attended to by 
Rev. Urban Brewer, of Danville. 

The Methodist Episcopal society has been organized some forty 
years, and has used the same building as a phace of worship, coi.- 
tinuously. Among the early members were 0. H. Dennis (only 
one living), Riley Taylor and wife, Alexander Worth (foundef cf 
the society) and wife, William Owens, Sebastian Hiss, Fred 
Trucks and Mrs. Higgins. The church has now about 100 men.- 
bers, and the present pastor is H. H. Dunlavy, who commenced 
his labors here in September, 1SS4. He was preceded by Revs. G. 
W. Switzer (three yeai-s), Green (two years), Johnson (one year), 
Eeard (two years) and Siddell (two years). The present Trustees 
are John Moore, S. Hiss and William Lakin; Stewards, Isaac A. 
Johnston and John Moore. The Sunday-school has forty membeis 
and meets before church services every Sunday morning, undtr 
the superintendency of John Moore. 

The Western Yearly Meeting of Friends V!?,% organized in the 
ninth month, 185S, the first members being Eleazer Bales, Charles 
Moore, Matthew Stanley and Robert W. Hodson, and their fami- 
lies. Their house of worship was completed in ISoS. It is of 
brick, and with the grounds, twelve acres, cost $14,000. In 1873 
an unfortunate difference of opinion arose as to the doctrine and 
practice, which has permanently divided the society. The "con- ' 
. servatives" meet on the first and fourth days of each week for' 
worship. 'Their Elders are Albert Maxwell and Davis Meeker; \ 
their Overseers, Joel D. Carter and Albert Maxwell. The "liber- ' 
als" advocate a more active system of religious work. They also 
meet the first and fourth days of the week. Their Clerk is Josiah ' 
Morris; Treasurer, Moses Hadley; Elders and Overseers, Jesse Hor- ' 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. . 615 

Dey, Calvin Ooborn, Ehvood Stantou, Brazleton Hadlej, Ehvood 
"Wassoii and Jesse D. Hiatt. The "liberals" are in possession of 
the church property, the "conservatives" renting other quarters. 
The former won a suit brought in Circuit and Supreme Court, and 
are now defendants in a second suit, yet undetermined. 

The Baptists have had a regular organization for some thirty 
years. Among the first meinbers were Adam Jones and wife, 
Orrin Bonner and wife, Samuel McCormick and wife, "William 
Douglass and wife and children. After a time the society pur- 
chased the church which had been occupied by the Friends, and used 
the same for a number of years. In August, lS8i, they dedicated 
their present brick church, which cost $3,000. Services are held ev- 
ery alternate Sunday, the present minister being Rev. A.B.Chaffee, 
of Franklin. The membership of the society is about seventy., 
The Sunday-school is under charge of Henry Straiighan. 

The African Methodist Episcopal Church has been supported 
for some fifteen j'ears. It met for a long time at the Morgan 
school-house, two and a half miles from Plainfield, and in 1S79 
commenced holding its services in the village. The church erected 
in that year cost about §G00. There are about twenty-five mem- 
bers. Hev. Roberts has been the pastor for two years past. The 
colored Baptists also have an organization, with occasional services 
conducted by a clergyman from Indianapolis. 

SOCIETIES. 

Plainfield Lodge, No. 286, i^. c& A. 21., was organized Oct. 
21, 1862, with the following officers: Amos Easterling, "W". M.; 
Caleb Easterling, S. "W. ; Amos Alderson, J. W. ; Madison Osborn, 
Secretary; Carey Regan, Treasurer; IS". Y. Parsons, S. D. ; William 
i). Cooper, J. D. ; Thomas Powell, Tyler. The list of present 
oflicers is: William H. Morgan, W. M. ; Allen Pritchett, S. W. ; 
D. F. Cox, J. W. ;Eb. Tomlinsou, Treasurer; T. Reagan, Secretary; 
A. D. Krewson, S. D.; William C. Douglass, J. D.; Stephen Os- 
' born, Tyler. The lodge has now a membership of thirty-three, and 
meets at Masonic Hall the Monday evening on or before the full 
moon in each month. 

McCarty Lodge, No. 233, /. 0. 0. F., has a membership of 
thirty-eight, and meets every Friday night at Odd Fellows Hall. 
The present officers are: jS". M. Frazier, N. G. ; N. Boggs, V. G.; 
M. Carter, Secretary; W. R. Snipes, Treasurer; T. B. Kinnan, 
P. G. 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COONTT. 

11 ^l^i? \^T\ ^'''' ?'■ '^*^' ^- ^- ^•' ^^' '^'^^^■^-^'^ J^ne 
11, ISSa, with torty members. The present number of members 

as sixty-seven The officers are: Taylor Reagan, Commander; I 
A. Johnson, Adj.; John Walker, Q. M.; Anson Hobbs, S. V C • 
Henry Straughan, J. V. C; Charles Doane, Chap. The po^t 
meets the hrst and third Monday evenings of each month, over 
JbLobbs's grocery. / 

FKIENDSWOOD 

is a station on the L & V. Railroad, in the southeastern corner of 
the township, in the midst of the richest community and bes^ 
improved farms in the county. Large quantities of milk and 
other dairy products are shipped thence to Indianapolis. 

BIOGRAPHICAL. 

Harris Almond, eldest son of Matthew and Rebecca Almond 
was born in Richmond County, N. C, Jan. 5, ISOD. His father 
immigrated with his family to Indiana in the fall of ISll and set 
.tied m what is now Wayne County where his wife died. He then 
removed to Winchester, Ind., where he remained four years and 
in the fall of 1827 he located in Hendriclcs' County, and in the fall 
of 1S2S he removed to Bridgeport, Marion Co., Ind., where he re- 
sided twelve years. He tlien settled in Henry County. Iowa, where 
he died in 1S76. He had a family of six children by his fikuvTfe 
and two by his second. Harris Almond, whose name heads this 
sketch, being the eldest son, he was obliged to assist his father on 
the farm thus his educational advantages were limited, he havino- 
the benefit of school but a few months during the year He wa°s 
married in 1S29 to Ruth Lakey, a native of Ohio. Ifter marrin^e 
he settled on eighty acres of land in Marlon County, goin^ in debt 
for the land, which he afterward sold, and bought eight/acres in 
Washington Township and later bought another eighty acres ad 
]oining, and on this land he resided about thirty-three years His 
wife died April 12, ISil, leaving three ehildren-Sarah J., wife of 
Samuel Weer; Pleasant and John. He was again married Oct. 
17 1S41, to Anna Montgomery, and to this union were born two 
children, one dying in infancy and the other after reaching matur- 
'Z,^ f ^^^'^^ ^'^^ ^^'^"^ ^- 1S77, and he was married in October, 
1877, to his present wife, Mrs. Parthena Tucker. She was the ' 
widow of George Tucker by whom she had seven children, four of 
whom survive. She is a native of Kentucky. Mr. Almond i^' 
now in his seventy-seventh year, and has been a member of the 






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HISTORY OF HENDKICKS COUNTY. 



617 



Cliristian church for forty-eight years, of which he has been Deacon 
twenty-one years, and he has served as Trustee about thirty years. 
In politics he is a staunch Republican. 

Pleasant Almond, a successful stock-raiser and business man of 
Piainfield, is a native of Hendricks County, Ind., born Jan. 3, 
1836, the eldest son of Harris and Rntli (Lakey) Almond, natives 
of North Carolina, who came with their parents in childhood to 
Indiana and were reared in IV^arion County. After their marriage 
they moved to Hendricks County, where they lived the remainder 
of their lives. Pleasant Almond was reared a farmer, receiving a 
common-school education. In 1857 he was married to Minerva J. 
Hadley, daughter of John and Edith Hadley. After his marriage 
he settled on a farm in Guilford Township a mile and a half east of 
Piainfield, on the National Road. Here he lived till 18S1, and by 
industry and energy improved his land, till he has 200 acres under 
cultivation. He has made a specialty of stock-raising, having tlie 
best grades of English draft and Clydesdale horses, Jersey cattle 
and Poland-China hogs. In 1881 he left the farm and moved to 
Piainfield, where he has a pleasant home. His wife died in 1S73, 
leaving three children — Theophilus, Poscoe and John H. In 1S74 
he married Mrs. Mary Osborn, widow of Madison Osborn. Tliey 
have one daughter — Mary. Mr. and Mrs. Almond are members 
of the Christian church. 

John M. Carter is a native of Hendricks County, Ind., born May 
16, 1832, the only son of David and Euth (Hadley) Carter, natives 
of North Carolina, who moved to Ohio with their parents, where 
they were married, and in 1822 moved to Hendricks County, Ind., 
and settled on a tract of heavily timbered land which is now the 
site of the town of Piainfield. Daviil Carter at one time owned 
600 acres of land and at the time of his death owned 500 acres. 
Ilis wife died about 1871 and he in ISSl. They were members of 
the Christian church, of which lie was for several years an Elder. 
Their family consisted of nine children, one son and eight daughters 
— Jane, Matilda, Mary, Martha A., John M., Sarah, Orpha, Ara 
M. and Zipporah. John M. Carter spent his youth on his father's 
farm and alter his marriage settled on a tract of wild land, of which 
he made a good farm, on which he lived till 1864, when he moved 
to Piainfield and engaged iu the mercantile business. He afterward 
returned to his farm, and remained till 1870, when he again 
engaged in the mercantile business till 1874. He then lived on 
the farm till 1883, and since that year has lived retired_from active 



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HISTORV OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



bu&iness. He still owns his tarin in Washington Township, which 
contains 1S3 acres of valuable land, with a good residence and farm 
buildings, and is now occupied by his son. Mr. Carter has served 
four years as Township Clerk. He and his wife are members of 
the Christian church, of which for the past fifteen years he has 
served as Deacon, and at present is Superintendent of the Sunday- 
school. He was married in 1852 to Susan "Wells, and to them have 
been born two children — David W., and Mary, wife of Dr. J. T. 
Strong. In politics Mr. Carter is a staunch Republican. 

John FuUen, a prominent and successful business man of Plain- 
field, was born in Fayette County, Ind., Dec. 25, 1S21, the second 
son of John and Jemima (Harrell) Fallen, natives of Virginia, 
who moved to Fayette County, Ind., in an early day. The fatlier 
died in Fayette County, and John subsequently moved with his 
mother to Johnson County and settled on land entered by his father 
before his death. Tliere he grew to manhood and remained till 
1872, when he moved to Hendricks County and located in Plain- 
field, where he has since lived. He owns a fine farm of 200 acres 
in Johnson County, all under cultivation, and until his removal to 
Hendricks County he was successfully engaged in farming and 
stock-raising. He has accnmulated a good property and is now 
living retired from active business life. He was married in ISil 
to Rachel Smith, who died in Plainfield in ISSl. They had a fam- 
ily of five sons aud five daughters; four of the number are living. 
July 14, 1881, Mr. Fullen married Mary E. Barton. Mr. Fulien 
has been a member of the Baptist church since 184.3 and for sev- 
eral years has been Deacon of his church. His wife is a member 
of the same denomination. 

Elias Hadley, deceased, was one of the early settlers of Hen- 
dricks County. He was born in Chatham County, N. C, Aug. 5, 
1809, a son of Jeremiah aud Mary Hadley. When he was three 
years of age his parents moved to Butler County, Ohio, and subse- 
quently to Hendricks County, Ind., and settled in Guilford Town- 
ship, where they both died. Oct. 14, 1829, Elias Hadley was mar- 
ried, in Butler County, Ohio, to Miss Cox, daughter ofMordecai 
and Nancy Cox, a native of Butler County, born in 1814. After 
his marriage he settled on a tract of wild land which is now the 
site of Plainfield, but at that time was heavily timbered. He cleared 
and improved a farm, which he subsequently sold and bought one 
north of Plainfield, where he lived till 1874, when he rented his 
farm and moved to the village and lived retired from active busi- 



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HISTORY OF IJENDKICKS COUNTV. 



619 



ness till his death, Dec. S, 1SS4. The farm contains ISO acres of 
valuable land, all under cultivation. To Mi-, and Mrs. Hadley, 
were boru sixteen children, six sons and ten daughters, t ,relve of 

whom are living — S , Hiram, Nancy, Mary, Jane, David, 

Enos, Emma, Susan, Addie, Oscar and Arthur. Mr, Hadley was 
a member of the Christian church fifty years and his wife is a 
member of the same denomination. 

John Hanna, a son of James Parks Hanna, was born Sept. 3, 
1827, in what is now apart of the city of Indianapolis. His father 
entered and improved eighty acres of land in "Warren Township 
and there died Aug. 31, 1839, leaving a widow and five children, 
John being the eldest. The mother died in 1844. John and the 
children remained on the farm until 1S46, when, at the instance 
of General Robert Hanna, their guardian, the}' broke up house- 
keeping that they might go to school. The subject of this sketch, 
determined to acquire an education, started for Greencastle in Feb- 
ruary, 1846, with only 8^ in his pocket. He walked the entire dis- 
tance, entered the university, got the position as janitor of the col- 
lege, worked his way through college and graduated with honors 
in June, 1850. He then entered the law ofiice of Judge Delaney 
R. Eckles and there finished the study of his profession. He then 
became the law partner of his preceptor and settled in Greencastle. 
He was elected Mayor of the city of his adoption and served three 
years. After Judge Eckles went upon the bench as Circuit Judge, 
Mr. Hanna formed a partnership with the Hon. John A. Matson, 
which continued until the spring of 185S when he went to Kansas. 
He was the same year elected a member of tlie Territorial Legislat- 
ure from the county of Lykins, now Miami, and served as such 
during the session of 186S-'9; was chairman of the judiciary com- 
mittee, introduced and carried through the act abolishing and pro- 
hibiting slavery in the Territory; was an earnest-working Repub- 
lican in politics. After remaining one year in Kansas he returned 
to Greencastle and resumed the practice of Is.-^-. In the presidential 
canvass of 1860 he was the Republican elector of the Seventh Dis- 
trict, and as such voted for Abraham Lincoln. Prior to the Chi- 
cago convention he had advocated the nomination of Edward 
Bates, of Missouri, for the Presidency. Aftersrard Mr. Bates became 
Lincoln's Attorney-General. Hon. Henrj S. Lane and Schuyler 
Colfax recommended the appointment of Mr. Hanna for United 
States Attorney for the district of Indiana, and he was also recom- 
mended by Mr. Bates, and appointed a few days after the inaugu- 



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HISTOET OF HENDKICKS COUNTY. 



ration of President Lincoln. He served four years; then his re-ap- 
pointraent was ordered by Mr. Lincoln, although his name was not 
sent to the Senate until after the death of the President. He con- 
tinued to serve until the split between Johnson (the successor of 
Lincoln) and the Republican party, when he denounced Johnson, 
and at a Johnson meeting held in Indianapolis he introduced a 
series- of resolutions which was the immediate cause of his being 
removed, and Alfred Kilgore was appointed. This proves clearly 
that Mr. Hanna's political opinions were not in the market, to be 
transferred as merchandise. He furnished Mr Kilgore all the infor- 
mation desired as to the business of the office; assisted him in the 
trials the first term after his appointment. Mr. Hanna then formed 
a partnership with General Fred Kncfler, of this city, in the prac- 
tice of law, and has devoted his time entirely to the practice of his 
profession, except in the ca'ivass of 1868, when he, at the request 
of his political friends, canvassed the county of Putnam as a can- 
didate for the Legislature. Although defeated he ran ahead of the 
State ticket. Since 1868 he has made no political speeches, although 
known as a decided, out-spoken Republican in politics. His life at 
the bar has been a constant ^/arfare and he has more than the usual 
share of hotly contested litigated cases. He has perhaps been 
engaged in as many jury trials as any lawyer of his age. As United 
States Attorney during the war his position was one requiring great 
labor, yet, without assistance, he managed to discharge his duties 
to the entire satisfaction of the Government. The prosecutions 
for violations of the draft laws, the revenue laws, confiscation acts, 
conspiracies, treasons and felonies were numerous, as the records 
of the court attest.. As a successful prosecutor his record was sat- 
isfactory to those who gave him their influence. Since he com- 
menced the practice of law in this city he has been engaged in a 
number of the most prominent murder cases for the defense, the 
Clem case perhaps being the most noted. His practice at present 
is remunerative. He still resides at Greencastle, where he has a 
lovely home near the town. His family library is the best in the 
county and the favorite resort of his children of evenings. He 
regards it as money well spent, and it is his boast that he never 
had a moment's concern about the whereabouts of his boys at 
night. His sons incline to be farmers rather than profes- 
sional men. The oldest is now a farmer in Hendricks County. 
While attending the University Mr. Hanna became acquainted 
with- Miss Mahala Sherfy, of Perrysville, Vermillion County, who 



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BISTORT OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. ' ' 621 

was atteudino; the female collegiate seiaiDaiy, iheu lu charge cf 
Mrs. Larabie, wife of J^rof. William C. Larabie. Miss Sherfy and 
Mr. Haima graduated from the same rostrum in June, 1S50, and 
May, 1S51, they were married. Mrs. Haiiua was a woman of 
liberal educatiou and superior intellect, and in the fullest sense of 
the word a true wife. As a Cliristian she was loved by her neigh- 
bors and idolized by her husband. She was the mother of seven 
children, one who died in infancy. She died in the spring of 1S70, 
leaving her husband three sons and three daughters. Mr. Hanua 
remained a widower two years then married Mrs. Emma Pothorff, 
of Greencastle. Tliey have now another son and daughtei', eight 
in all. His children are devoted to him, and it seems a labor 
of love for him to work in their interest. His eldest child, a 
daughter, Lillie, graduated at the University two years ago. Mr. 
Hanua was, therefore, the first graduate of the institution that 
furnished a daughter for graduation. His second daughter and 
two of his sons are now attending the same University. He 
believes in giving girls equal chance with boys in the advantage of 
education, and, therefore, insisted that the University open its 
doors to both, which was finally done. The result has proven 
that the '• honors " may be won by the so-called weaker sex if they 
are given an equal opportunity. Mr. Hanna's great success in his 
profession has demonstrated that he is a man of much more than 
ordinary natural ability, starting out a poor boy comparatively, 
v."ithout friends or money, working his way through college and 
attaining an enviable and high position both as a civil and crim- 
inal lawyer. It is certainly a great incentive to other poor young 
men to go and do likewise. Mr. Hanna's record shows that he has 
descended from an ancestry that had rendered service during the 
Revolution. His great-grandfather was a native of South Carolina 
and was there engaged during the entire struggle for American 
independence in behalf of liberty and the stars and stripes. He 
had a large family of sons. Mr. Hanna's grandfather, John 
Hanna, was one of the elder brothers. The late General Robert 
Hauna, the younger, and several more of the family removed to 
Brookville, Franklin County, early in the histury of Indiana Ter- 
ritory. General Robert Hanna was a member of the convention 
that framed the first Constitution of the State in 1816. The father 
of the subject of this sketch was a mere boy at the time they first 
came to Indiana. They removed to Marion County in 1S26. The' 
grandfather settled on a farm near where the poor house now 



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622 



HISTORY OF HEXDEICKS COtJNTr. 



stands in Wayne Township; his brother Joseph, a short distance 
from him ou the Gia\,'i'aidsville State road. James Parks Hanua, 
father of John, lived ivith his uncle, General Ilanna, up to the 
time of his marriafije with Miss Lydia Howard, of New Jersey. 
Four years ago Mr. Hanna removed the remains of his fatlier and 
mother to Greencastle cemetery, where they will probably remain 
until that day when the graves and the sea will be called on to 
give up their dead. M"r. Hanna's record is one worthy of emula- 
tion, and should be inscribed in the pages of history. 

In person he is about live feet eiglit inches in lieight, with a 
heavy, square frame, though not inclined to corpulency, dark hair, 
eyes and complexion, and seems to be in the full strength and 
vigor of manhood, plain and unassuming in manner. A stranger 
upon entering our court could at once single him out as one of the 
leading spirits of the Indianapolis bar. 

In 1S81 Mr. Hanna was nominated by the Republican conven- 
tion for Eepresentative in Congress from the capital city district, 
and was elected at tlie State election in October, defeating the 
Hon. Franklin Landers, the incumbent, and one of the most popu- 
lar men in the district, 1,39S votes. 

" Nothing is difficult beneath tlie sky, 
Man only fails because lift fails to try." 

Mva 'W. Hornaday is a native cvf Hendricks County, Ind., 
born in "Washington Township, Oct. 8, lSi5, the eldest son of 
Isaiah and Elvira Hornaday, his fatlier a native of Ohio and his 
mother of North Carolina. They were married in Hendricks 
County, and settled inTVashington Township, and then they moved 
to Brownsburgh, Lincoln Township, in 1875, where they now 
reside. Alva Hornaday was reared a farmer, attending the com- 
mon schools of his district. He remained with his parents till his 
marriage, and tlieu bought what is known as the old William 
Townsend farm, which contains 136 acres of choice land. His 
residence is a neat one-story frame building, and his farm buildings 
are among the best in the township. Mr. Hornaday is a thrifty 
and one of the representative agriculturists and stock-raisers of the 
county. He was married in 1875 to Ella E. Co.x, daughter of 
James H. and Lillus Cox. They have one child — Elvira Belle 
Hornaday. Mr. and Mrs. Hornaday are members of the Chris- 
tian church. 

. Asa Hunt is a 'native of Highland County, Ohio, born May 5, 
1807, the fifth of seven children of Asa and Sarah (Gilford) Hunt. 






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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COL'NTy. 



623 



In his youth he assisted his father on the farm, and later worl<ed 
three years m a carding and woolen mill. When he was twenty 
years of age his father died, and the management of the farm de- 
volved on him till the estate was settled by his elder brothers. 
He was married when twenty-three years of age, to Lydia Ste- 
phens, of Highland County. After his marriage he settled in Clinton 
County, Ohio, and twelve years later moved to Hancock County. 
In 1851 he moved to Hamilton County, led., where he lived 
twelve years, and thence to Indianapolis. He lived in Indianapo- 
lis five years and a half, and in 1870 exchanged his property there 
for property in Plainfield, where he has since lived. He owns 
one of the finest honses in Plainfield, built by Mack Shideler, lo- 
cated on Long Mound, one of the pleasantest sites in the township. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Hunt have been born six children— Mary A., 
Levi S., Cjrus A., Gideon, Eunice and Jesse L. They are mem- 
bers of tlie society of Friends. In politics he is a Republican. 

Judge Alexanden^ Little was one of the first settlers of Hendricks 
County. His parents, Tliomas and Mary (Campbell) Little, came ' 
to the United States about 17T0 and located in Virginia, removing 
later to Mercer County, Ky. Their family consisted of eight 
children— Molly, Xancy, Sally, John, Peggy, Jane, Thomas and 
Alexander. The mother died March 25, ISOS, and the father Dec. 
5, ISli. Alexander Little married Eachel, daughter of William 
and Ann Eobinson, and to them wore born twelve children — Anna, 
born Aug. 27, 1801, married Robert McKnight; Polly, born Jan. 
20, 1803, married James Green; Patsy, born Oct. 30,1801; Betsy, 
born May 1, 1S06, married John Canary; John, born April 12, 
1808, married ISI'ancy Rawlings, who died and he afterward mar- 
ried Jane Beasley; Samuel, born April 26, 1310, married Rebecca 
Green; Rachel, born June 24, 1812, married James Richardson; 
William, born March 5, 1811, married Sarah Downard, who died 
and he subsequently married Mary Lee; Rebecca, born April 29, 
1816, married three times— first, Josiah L. "Wines; second, Jacob 
Welch, and third, Aaron Wilhite; Joseph, born Feb. 22, 1S18, was 
killed when a young man by being thrown from a horse; Robert, 
born Dec. 23, 1819, married Mildred Thompson, and after her 
death Maria Worth; Sarah, born Oct. 22, 1823, married Joseph 
Simpson, who died and she then mirried John Wilhite. In an 
early day Judge Little and his family moved, to Washington 
County, Ind., and in 1830 came to Hendricks County. While in 
Washington County he was a Lieutenant and then Major in the 



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624 



HISTORY OF HENDKICKS COUNTY. 



first militia organization of the State. He held several offices of 
trust; was Associate Judge, and served several terms in the Ter- 
ritorial Legislature. ■ After coming to Hendricks Connty he served 
one term of three years iu the State Senate. He died July 26, 
lSl-9. His wife died Sept. 7, 1851. 

Samuel Little is a native of Mercer County, Ky., born April 26, 
ISIO. The day of his birth his father. Judge A. Little, started for 
"Washington County, Ind., where he entered a tract of land. He 
cleared a small piece, planted it to corn and returned to Kentucky 
for his family, moA'ing to Washington County the following June. 
In 1S30 he moved to Hendricks County and settled in Liberty 
Township. Samuel Little was married in "Washington County, to 
Rebecca Greei:, and in February, 1S30, moved to Hendricks 
County and settled in Liberty Township, on the farm now owned 
by his son Thomas. To his original entry of eighty acres he added 
till he owned 400 acres of valuable land. He has been one of the 
most successful stock-raisers of the county, having some of the 
finest grades of cattle and hogs. In 1SS4 he left the farm and 
moved to Plainfield, where he has a pleasant home. His wife died 
in 1SS3. They had a family of eleven children; four died iu in- 
fancy, and one, Joseph, after reaching maturity. The living are 
— Sarali, wife of Edward Crawford; Elizabeth, wife of Daniel Cox; 
Mary A. , wife of Benjamin Edwardson ; Kobert and Thomas. Dec. 
14, LSS3, Mr. Little married Margaret A. McKnight, widow of 
Alexander McKnight, by whom she had eight children; four are 
living, two died in infancy, and two in adult age. Mr. Little has 
been a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church fifty years, 
and has served as Elder several years. His first wife was a moniber 
of the same denomination. His present wife is a member ot the 
0:d Presbyterian church. He has been President of the Plainfield 
and Cartersburg gravel road twenty years, and is one of the stock- 
holders and Directors of the First National Bank of Danville. 

William C Mills, a prominent old settler of Hendricks County, 
was born in "Wayne County, Ind.-, at the present site of Economy, 
May S, 1S16, the second son in the family of eight children of 
Henry and Hannah (Woodward) Mills, natives of North Carolina, 
the father born in March, ITSO, and the mother Sept. 5, 17'J0. 
They moved from their nativ ) State to East Tennessee, and thence 
in 1314 to Indiana. They located near PJchmond, and then 
m'jved to Economy, where they lived two years, but not liking 
"Wayne County, returned to Tennessee; subsequently moved again 



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HISTORr OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



625 



to Wayne County, where they lived till 1829, when they came to 
Hendricks County and settled on eighty acres of land on the farm 
now owned by Aaron Mills. The father died in 1833, in Morgan 
County, 111., and the mother in 1862, near the same place. Five 
of their children are still living. Henry Mills was a valuable man 
in the new settlement. He was a natural mechanic, and handy 
with all kinds of tools. He was a good penman, and was often 
called upon to write deeds, contracts, wills, etc He was a great 
reader and was well informed on all subjects of general interest. 
William C. Mills was about thirteen years of age when his parents 
moved to this county. He received a good education for the early 
day, but the greater part of his time was spent in assisting on the 
farm. He remained with his mother till his marriage, and then 
settled on a tract of land in the woods, on the Lick Fork, where he 
lived eight years. After clearing and improving his land, he sold 
it. and subsequently made several changes, and in the fall of 1855 
bought the farm of Joseph Moffett, to which he moved in 1856. 
He owns about 800 acres of land, about 400 acres under cultivation 
and the rest good pasture laud. Mr. Mills has made a specialty ot 
stock-raising, which he has made a successful and lucrative busi- 
ness. He is a shrewd business man, an upright, honest citizen, 
and merits the success ho has achieved. Mr. Mills was married in 
1831) to Rebecca Hadley, a native of Randolph County, N. C, 
born April 3, 1820, daughter of John B. and Elizabeth Hadley, of 
Morgan County, Ind. They have had a family of ten children, six 
of whom are living — John H., Charles H., Amos H., Mary E., 
wife of Wayne Macy, Oliver H., and Aaron H. Mr. and Mrs. 
Mills are birthright members of the society of Friends. 

Isaiah Slvage is a native of JS'orth Carolina, born near Eliza- 
beth City, Sept. 18, 1826, a son of John and Ann Sivage, natives 
of the same State. When he was sixteen years of ago he left his 
native State and came to Indiana, stopping the first winter in 
Eichmond. He then removed to Hancock County, and in 1846 to 
Hendricks County, and found employment on a farm near Bridge- 
port. He was married in 1848 to Axie Hudson, and settled on 
Mill Creek, six miles southwest of Danville, in the woods, where 
he cleared and improved a farm. In the spring of 1860 he sold 
his farm and bought another of 140 acres, three and a half miles 
south of Plainfield, where he lived twenty-four years, and in 1884 
rented his farm and moved to Plainfield, where he now has a livery 
and sale stable, and is also engaged in buying and shipping horses. 



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HISTORY OF HENDKICKS COUNTY. 



His wife died in ISoC, leaving two cliildren, both of whom died 
soon after. In ISGO he married Sarali Hadley, wlio died in 18G4 
leaving two children — Indiana and "William E. Jan. 31, 1SG6, he 
married Eunice Lindlej, daughter of Thomas and Mary Lindley. 
of Parke County, Iiid. Mr. Sivage and his family are members of 
the society of Friends. 

Eienezer Toinlmsoti is a native of Hendricks County, Ind., born 
May 26, 1S26, the fifth son of James C. and Nancy A. (Doan) 
Tomlinson, natives of Guilford County, N. C, the father born in 
1799 and the mother in ISOO. In 1819 James C. Tomlinson and 
his wife moved to Hendricks County and settled about five miles 
south of Piainfield, in the woods, and made for themselves a home 
where the}- have lived about sixty-six years. They reared a family 
of eleven children, eight of whom are living. Ebcnezer Tomlin- 
son was reared in his native county, receiving his education in the 
common schools. Attaining his majority he engaged in an-ricult- 
nral pursuits, which he followed till 1S65, when he left tlie farm 
and engaged in the dry-goods business in Piainfield till 1881, when 
he organized Tomlinson & Co.'s Bank, of Piainfield, of which he 
is the principal owner and controller of the business. He has been 

■ a successful business man, fmd owns two farms and his residence 
in the village of Piainfield. In 1876 he was elected Township 
Trustee and served two terms, and in 1SS2 was again elected and is \ 
still an incumbent of the ofiice. He was married Feb. 6, 1852, to' 

■ Miss Damsel "Watson, of Brownsburg, Hendricks County. To 
them have been born two children — Terrillus B. (deceased), and' 
Tennessee, now the wife of Milton Phillips. Mr. Tomlinson is a , 
member of the Masonic fratsrnity, Piainfield Lodge, No. 2S7. He^ 
is a member of the society of Friends. His wife is a member of 
the Missionary Baptist church. 

William A. Watson, grocer, Piainfield, Ind., is a native of Jeff- 
erson County, Ind., born in January, 1831, a son of Ebenczerand 
Ann "Watson, his father a native of Virginia and his mother of 
Kentucky. In 1839 his parents moved to Hendricks County, aiid 
settled in Brown Township, where the mother died in 1874 and the 
father in 18S4. The latter was well and favorably known in the 
county, and for nine years served as County Commissioner. He 
died at the advanced age of eighty-four years. His family con- ^ 
sisted of nine children, four sons and five daughters, ail of whom' 
lived till maturity. William A. "Watson was reared in Brown 
Township, on his father's farm, receiving a good education. He 



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HISTORY OF UENDKICKS COUNTV. 



627 



followed agricultural pursuits till ISTi, when he sold his farm and 
moved to Indianapolis, but in March, 1875, returned to Hendricks 
County and located inPlainfield, buying an interest in the flouring 
mill. He subsequently sold his interest in the mill and has since 
beeu engaged in the grocery business. He keeps a full line of 
groceries and provisions, and has built up a good trade. He was 
married in 1855 to Susannah Fuukhouser, and to them have been 
born three children. Mr. and Mrs. Watson are members of the 
Missionary Baptist church, of which he is Trustee and Treasurer. 

John R. Weer, a prominent and enterprising farmer of Guil- 
ford Township, was born in Warren County, Ohio, Feb. 22, 1831, 
a son of Elijali and ^Margaret (Cox) Weer, natives of North Caro- 
lina, who settled in Washington Township, this county, in 1832, 
where the father died in 1850, and the mother in 1865. They 
were active members of the Christian church, he serving as Elder 
several years. Their children were ten in number — Emily, Samuel, 
John R., David, Hiram, Harris, Julia, Elizabeth, Martha and 
Amanda J. John R. Weer was reared on his father's farm, in 
Washington Township. After the death of his father he took 
charge of the farm, and after his marriage bought the interests of 
the rest of the heirs. In addition to the 120 acres entered by his 
father, he now owns 215 acres which makes a fine farm of 335 
acres. He has made a specialty of stock-raising and in 1884 fat- 
tened 121 head of Poland-China hogs. He has been one of the 
most successful horse-breeders in the township. In 1882 he 
moved to Plainfield, giving the management of his farm to his son- 
in-law, George Carr. He was married in 1853 to Emma Gunn, 
daughter of John and Lydia Gunn. They have three children — 
Martha A., wife of Theodore Walton; Lydia, wife of George Carr, 
and Ernest E. Mr. and Mrs. Weer are members of the Christian 
church, of which he is an Elder and Trustee. 




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CHAPTEE XVI. 



LIBERTY TOWNSHIP. 



Description. — First Settlement and Eault History. Eemi- 

niscences of joshua marshall.— political hlstory.— township 
Officials. — Statistics. — Clayton. — Belleville. — Carters- 
BUKG.— -Centre Valley. — Biographical. 

Liberty Township is in the southern part of the coutitv, and is 
bounded as follows: On the north by Center and "Washiiio-toD, on 
the east by Guilford, on the south by Morgan County and on the 
west by Franklin and Clay. It comprises about forty-nine square 
miles, in townships 1-i and 15 north, ranges 1 east and 1 west. It 
is the largest township in the county. The surface in the northern 
and eastern portions is high and rolling, while the southwestern 
portion is low, level, and in places inclined to be swampy. East 
Fork crosses the northeast corner of the township near Clayton, 
and passes out of it near the southwestern corner. The natural 
drainage of the higher portions of the township is excellent, and 
the small streams or branches generally afford an abundance of 
pure water the season through. Mud Creek Valley, in the south- 
west, is of easy drainage on account of the large proportion of sand 
in the soil. The lands of the township are fertile throughout and 
well cultivated, and the most e.xtensive farmers in the county live 
in it. 

EARLY history. 

The first settlement was made in October, 1822, on the National 
Road east of Belleville, by William and Thomas Hinton, James 
Thompson and Eobert McCracken. The first ground was cleared 
on the Pearson farm. "William Pope and his son, James N., who 
was then sixteen years old, came in the spring of 1823, which year 
brought into the township George Matlock, James E. Barlow, 
Samuel Hopkins, William Brown, William Ballard, and if not in 
the same year, soon came David Demoss, John Cook, Moses Craw- 
ford, John Hanna, Thomas Cooper, George Coble and Jonathan 
Pitts. William Hinton taught the first school in the township j 

(628) 



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HISTORY OF HENDEICKS COUNTY. 



629 



and county in the fall of 1S23, in a school -house which had been 
built that fall, one-half mile south of Cartersburg. 

Thomas Hinton was the first Justice of the Peace, and "William 
Pope, a Baptist minister, did the first preaching, and organized tlie 
first Baptist church in Hendricks County, in his own house, in 
the autumn of 1823. 

The first brick dwelling house in the county was built in 1830, 
for Jesse Cook, just south of Belleville, by Joseph Y. Pope and 
"William Hinton. The act authorizing the organization of Hen- 
dricks County designated the house of "William Ballard, which was 
on the old Terre Haute road, south of Belleville, as the place of 
holding the courts, but "William Ballard died before the county 
was organized, and George Matlock, who kept tavern on this road 
a mile east of Mr. Ballard's, laid off a town wliich he called Hills- 
boro, and made a strong eilbrt to get the conntj seat located there; 
but failing in this, and meeting his death in 1825 in an affray with 
his brother-in-law, the Hillsboro enterprise was a failure. 

In connection with the early history of Liberty Township, 
Joshua Marshall, now of Kirkville, Iowa, writes: 

" In the autumn of 1826 my father, William Marshall, of Surrey 
County, N", C, emigrated to Indiana and settled in the south part 
of Hendricks County, I being then in my nineteenth year. Evan 
Davis, my brother-in-law, with his family, ca,iae at the same time 
and settled near by. At that time most of the land belonged to 
the Government, and settlements were scattering. "We frequently 
went as far as five miles to help each other raise our log cabins 
and stables. A few settlers had preceded us — Edward and Joseph 
Hobson, William Rushton, John Cook and sons — Levi, Jesse and 
Stephen, with their families — Edmond Cooper, Jeflerson Matlock, 
Rev. "Wm. Pope, Thomas Irons, Judge Little, "William Herron, 
William Townsend, Joshua Hadley, Bowater Bales and others. 

"Not having saw-mills, we felled a nice tall gray ash and cut it 
into 4x6 lengths, split out puncheons, dressed the ends to a 
uniform thickness and then laid them on sleepers. They were 
jointed with saw and ax, and made a good floor. We split our 
clapboards for roofing and door shutters. "We had plenty of elbow 
room, and were anxious for our neighbors to help build our cabins 
and roll logs so as to get them out of our way, in order to raise a 
little corn for bread and to feed our stock. We were mostly poor 
yet contented, and looked forward to better days and more con- 
veniences. We were all neighborly and kind to each other. 
40 



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630 HISTOKY OF HENDRICKS COtlNTr. ''■' 

" Danville had been laid out into lots and a few cabins were be- 
ing built. David Matlock and others bad settled near bj and 
were opening farms. Religious privileges were fccarce, not a 
church or school-honse, to my knowledge, being then in the 
county. The Friends had formed a society and worshiped in a loo- 
house near Mooresville, in Morgan County. Rev. Mr. Pope, a 
Baptist minister, then living near where Cartersburg now is, 
preached frequently in his own house to attentive, though small, 
audiences; and we were glad thus to meet, hear preaching, and 
form each others acquaintance. In the spring of 1829 Joseph 
Tarkington, a Methodist minister, established a preaching place at 
the house of Edinond Cooper, then residing on Mud Creek, at the 
crossing of the Indianapolis and Terre Haute road, and there a 
class was formed of si c members — -Evan and Rebecca Davis, 
Mother Cooper and two daughters, and Hannah Snodgrasa. 
Shortly after this, in June, 1829, at a two-days meeting held in 
Rutnam County, I joined the church and invited Rev. John Mur- 
Ber to come to Hendricks County and preach at my house. At the 
appointed time he came, and seven joined the church. Three 
"weeks later he came again and seven more joined. Thus a society 
was formed in the settlement where Salem church now stands. In 
August of the same year Evan Davis, Father Crutchfield, Bowater 
Bales, myself and a few others commenced work on a hewed-log 
church, which was raised in the presence of an 'assembled multi- 
tude.' About this time Evan Davis bnilt a saw-mill on White 
Lick, and there we had our lumber sawed out for flooring and seat- 
ing. Evan Davis was Class-Leader and I was assistant. By Christ- 
mas there were seventy-tive members. In the summer of ISSi I 
visited Salem church, and found the old log church had been re- 
moved and in its stead was a beautiful frame building, nicely 
painted and finished inside and out. Near by stood a handsome 
brick school-house. Surely this wilderness has ' budded and blos- 
somed like the rose.'" 

FIRST ELECTIOIi. 

The poll-book of the general election of Aug. 2, 1S30, gives the 
names of thirty-nine votei's in Liberty Township, and these prob- 
ably include most of the first settlers. The names are here copied 
as recorded in that docmnent, which is more than half a century 
old: Evin Davis, Joshua Marshall, Jacob Harper, Abraham 
"Woodward, Lewis Coopper, Samuel Gwin, Thomas Coopper, Ed- 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS OOUNIT. 



631 



mand Coopper, Cornelions Coopper, George Dawes, William Rusli- 
toD, George Rushton, John Cook, Jonathan Mills, William Allen, 
James Hiuett, George Rushton, Michael Kerkum, JesSe Allen, 
William Cawerby, William Marshall, Nathan Snodgrass, Joshua 
Rushton, Joel Wilson, Silons Grigory, Boyeter Bails, Cornelions 
Jonson, Jesse Rushton, Joshua B. Pladley, Robert Coopper, John 
Mills, Thomas Harper, William Townsend, Nathan Cook, Robert 
H. Irvin, Silous Rushton, Martain Coopper, Eli Moon and Jesse 
Whippo. 

The vote at this election was as follows: For Representative, 
Alexander Worth, twenty-four; Gideon Johnston, thirteen; for 
Associate Judges, Samuel Jessup, thirty-four; Elijah Anderson, 
twenty-three; Jr-nes Downard, ten; for Clerk, Simon T. Hadley, 
thirty-eight; for Recorder, Simon T. Hadley, thirty-eight; for Com- 
missioner, James Trotter, thirty-two; for Coroner, Isaac Williams, 
eight; for School Commissioner, Harmon Hiatt, thirty-three. 

POLITICAL. 

In the days of the Whig party, Liberty Township distinguished 
itself for heavy Whig majorities; and since 1856 it has been as 
loyally Republican. Following is the vote of the township at each 
presidential election: 

1833— Andrew Jackson 56 20 

Henry Clay 36 

1836— Wm. Henry Harrison. .155 180 

Martin Van Buren 25 

18-14— Henry Clay 246 169 

James K. Polk 77 

■ James G. Birney 3 

1848— Zachary Taylor 199 106 

Lewis Cas5 93 

Mariin Van Buren 8 

lS53—Winfield Scott 210 101 

Franklin Pierce 109 

John P. Hale 9 

1856— John C. Fremont 247 147 

James Buchanan 100 

Millard Fillmore 21 

I860— Abraham Lincoln 277 187 

Stephen A. Douglas 90 

John C. Breckinridge.. 8 

JohnBe'l 7 



1864— Abraham Lincoln 335 270 

George B. McClellan... 65 

1868— Ulysses S. Grant 400 269 

Horatio Seymour 131 

1872— Ulysses S. Grant 354 205 

Horace Greeley 149 

1876— Rutherford B. Hayes. . .353 167 

Samuel J. Tilden 185 

Peter Cooper 44 

1880-James A. Garfield 419 243 

Winfield S, Hancock. . .176 
James B. Weaver 30 

1884— James G. Blaine 387 198 

Grover CleTelnid 189 

Benjamin F. Butler 19 

John P. St. John 18 



OTFIOIAL. 



The following lists are of those who have been incumbents of the 
various township offices, together with the years of their election: 

Justices of the Peace: James Grice, 1829; Robert Cooper, 
1831; James Green, 1833; William T. Matlock, 1835; James S. 



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HISTORY OF HENDEICKS COUNTY. 



Odell and J. S. Wills, 1S36; Clayton T. Swindler, 1841; John W 
Bryan, 1S45; Nathan Meredith, 18i7; John W. Bryan lSi9- 
iXathan Meredith and Clayton T. Swindler, 1851; Araos s' Wills' 
1854; Jacob S. Redmond and Elisha Franklin, J,S55- Amos s' 
AYdls and Samuel J. Banta, 1S5S; Elisha Franklin and J. F Powell' 
lSo9;.John P. McCormick, 1860; Amos S. Wills, 186-> Elisha 
Franklin, 1863; William Williams, 1864; Amos S Wills and 
Abraham Bland, 1866; W. W. Irons, 1868; H. A. Marley 1869- 
Amos S. Wills and Abraham Bland, 1870; Elisha Franklin and j' 
Ballard, 1872; Amos S. Wills and H. C. Harper, 1874- Amos 
Elmore and H. F. Swindler, 1876; Araos S. Wills and D H 
Watts, 1878; John Glover and Reuben Franklin, 1880- Alvin 
Graves, R. C. Franklin and William Shepherd, 1882; Dan Watts 
and M. F. Jones, 1884. 

Constables: Goodwin Taylor and Bluetbrd Wilson 183-'- Jo 
seph Herron and Goodwin Taylor, 1833; Joel Richardson and 
Goodwin Taylor, lS34-'5; Goodwin Taylor and John McMul- 
len, 1836; Joseph Herron and Archibald McMicliael, 1837- jJhn 
J. McMnllen and Joshua D. Parker, 1838; Joshua D Parker 
and G. W. Wills, 1839; John J. McMnllen and Alexander Mas 
ters, 1844; Jacob R. Odell and John J. McMullen, 1846- Joel 
Jelf and Herbert Pansier, 1847; Joel Jelf and John J. McMullen 
1848; Joel Jelf and W. R. Lawhead, 1849; Benjamin Hiatt and 
John J. McMullen, 1850; Herbert Pansier and John J. McMullen 
1852; Herbert Pansier and Nathaniel Case, 1853; Thomas Canay' 
Asbury Ungles and John J. McMullen, 1854; G. W Wills H 
Cook and Herbert Pansier, 1855; John J. McMullen Thomas 
Hannah and Alfred Richardson, 1856; William Cox, John J Mc 
Mullen and Alfred Hadley, 1857; D. K Hopwood, L. H. Kennedy 
and Henderson Cook, 1858; Squire Faulkner, William Cornettand 
W. W. Jones, 1859; William P. Cornett, John M. Cook and T J 
Kirtley, 1860; James J. Wills, V7illiam P. Cornett and John m' 
Cook, 1861; J. 0. Riley, William J. Morgan and Joel Jelf, 1S62- 
F. M. Cook, Jeremiah Johnson and A. S. iMcCoruuek, 1863'- WiH- 
iam Poulter, William J. Moro^an and William H. Hussey.' 1S64- 
William J. Morgan, Zim Cook and Wes. McClure, 1865- J^ s' 
Rhodes, D. C. Houks and B. Pearson, 1866; Robert G. Liule E 
W. Farmer and John A. Roberts, 1867; C. G. Cantley, J F Mar- 
tin and J. A. Pricker, 1868; J. L. Rhodes, 1869; C. G. Curtley 
William W. Jones and John Done, 1870; G. Adams and John 
Wills, 1872; John Worrell and John B. Cook, 1874; John Glover 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



63J 



and Charles Maddox, 1S76; John Glover, O. Winstead and Wes. 
Sawyer, 1878; James Sims, Oliver Winstead and Amos Marker, 
1880; Fred Oaklej, J. W. Bishop and George Esinon, 1882; Georco 
McHaffie and William Cline, 1881. ■ ° 

^Trustees: Reuben A. Coverdale, 1856;. Milo H. Moon, 1857, 
l;onng Short, 185S;Eisdon C. Moore, 1859-'67; Daniel Cox, 1868- 
Alfred Hadley, 1869; Risdon C. Moore, lS70-'72; Alfred Iladlev' 
187i-'76; E. E. Eeid, 1878; William C. Swindler, lS80-'83; 
Elisha Franklin, 1884. 

Cler^: Taliaferro B. Miller, 1856-'5S (ofRce abolished). 

Treasurer; Eisdon C. Moore, 1S56-'5S (office abolished). 

Assessors: Y. W. Short, 1870; James T. Walls, 1873; William 
C. Mitchell, 1874; W. J. Morgan, 1876; Elisha Franklin, 1878-'83. 

CENSUS KEPOET. 

By the United States Census of 1880. the population of Libertv 
Township is 2,604. The following figures concerning property 

I and taxation are for 1885: Acres of land assessed, 30,654.81; 
value of same, 8875,587; value of improvements, §166,874; value 

! of lots, 89,380; value of improvements, $25,904; value of person- 

i alty, 8397,450; total taxablos, 81,475,201; polls, 440; dogs, 210; 

, State tax, 81,990.34; county tax, $4,349.30; township tax, 8SS5.- 
13; tuition tax, 82,765.36; special school tax, 87,596; road tax, 
$2,313.80; endowment tax, 873.76; bridge tax, 81,475.30; total 
taxes, 834,433.14; delinquent tax, 81,074.39. 

CLAYTON. 

Clayton is the largest village in Liberty Township, having 500 
inhabitants. It is situated on the Vandf^lia Eailroad, in the north- 
western part of the township, on sections 33 and 34. It was 
platted in 1851, by George W.Wills, and contains about eleyen 
acres, which tract was purchased from Elizabeth Wills. Its first 
name was Claysville, in honor of the Kentucky statesman, and had 
its name afterward changed because there was already a postoffice 
m the State by that name. The first house was built by Thomas 
Potts, and the second by Lewis T. Pounds, b-?th frame structures. 
The first store was opened by Parker & Foote, the second by 
Eichard and James Worrel, and :.he third bj Morrison & Thomas, 
m which the first postoffice was kept by P>enjarain F. Thomas, 
about 1852. The first hotel was buiH by George W. Wills, and 
was run by Ephraim Hartsuck. 



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The first church was erected bj the Cumberland Presbyterians 
upon a lot in the south part of the village, donated by Richard 
Worrel. The second'was built by the Missionary Baptists in what 
was then the northwest corner of the village. The work was done 
by Amos S. "Wills, and the cost was $1,500. This has since been 
replaced with a fine brick church, at a cost of $3,300, in size 40 x 60 
feet, on the old site. The third church was the Christian, built in 
1S64 and dedicated the following? year. It cost $2,300 and is 38 x 48 
feet in size. Tiie Methodist Episopal church was built in 1867, at 
a cost of $3,300, and is a substantial brick edifice. 

The first phj'sician was Dr. Lyon, following whom came Dr. C. 
T. Lawrence, The first Justice of the Peace was Amos S. Wills, 
elected in 1853. The first flouring mill was builtin 1852 by John 
Miles and James Worrel. This mill has been remodeled and re- 
fitted, having now the roller process. The proprietors, Clark & 
Harrison, have an extensive business. 

The first school was taught in 1852 in a frame building which is 
nsed now as a wagon shop. The present school building is a bea.i- 
tiful two-story structure, which contains six rooms. Its cost was 
$15,000. 

The only elevator at Clayton was built by Johnson Bros, in 
1882. It is 24 X 60 feet on the ground and sixty feet in height. 
Its capacity is 30,000 bushels. 

EELIGIOtrS. 

t 

The oldest religious society, as before mentioned, is the Cumber- 
land Preibyterlan, organized about 1852, by Kev. Samuel Mitcheli, 
with the following first members: Samuel Little and wife, A. T. 
Scott and wife, H. Smith and wife, John Alexander and wife and 
John Countt and wife. Their first house of worship was a frame 
structure erected in the south part of Clayton, in 1852, at a cost ot 
$600, which was occupied till 1372, when it was moved to its pres- 
ent site, repaired, and for some time it was used by diflerent 
denominations as a church. Satnuel Little and Zach. Reagan were 
the first Elders of this society. The present Elders are Samuel 
Little and William Reagan. The present membership is abou*- 
thirty-five. The pastor is Rev. Mr. Witherspoon. 

The Missionary Baptist Church was founded March 11, 1854, 
by John Yawter, Jacob Rynearson, M. Elliot, Davis Boswell and 
Moses Crawford, who held letters of dismissal from the Belleville 
church, and a number of others, fifty-eight in all. The first Trus- 



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HISTORY OF HENDKICKS COUNTT. 



635 



tees elected were Ricbard "Worrel, Francis Edmonson and John 
Ryncarson. Rev. Joseph Roberts was called as the first pastor. 
Ricbard Worrel, Hiram Norman and James Glover were elected 
Deacons. * 

The Christian Church was organized Dec. 7, 1863, by Rev. 
Thomas Lockhart and O. P. Badger. Samuel B. Hall and John 
R. Ballard were cliosen as the first Elders, and George Acton and 
James Ferguson, Deacons. The charter members were sixty-three 
in number. The church built in 1865 cost $-3,650. The pastors of 
the church have been Revs. Thomas Lockhart, O. P. Badger, Jem- 
erson, Sherman, Canfield, Miller, Jewel, Frank and Brewer. The 
membership at present (1585), under Rev. Urban C. Brewer, num- 
bers seventy-five. Elder Thomas Lockhart, now. in his ninety- 
third year, has aided in the conversion of 7,000 souls, a wonderfal 
record-. 

MASONIC. 

Clayton Lodge, No. -163, F. & A. 31., was organized May 29, 
1873, with the following charter members: John Harrison, James 
H. Ryuearson, William E. Howland, Thomas F. Dryden, Nelson 
Sowder, Amos S. Wills, John N. Wills and W. C. MUchell. The 
first officers appointed by the Grand Lodge, at Indianapolis, were: 
Amos S. Wills, W. M.; James H. Rynearson, S. W., and Thomas 
F. Dryden, J. W. The first meeting was held in a hall built over 
the wagon-shop of Stephen Scott. Later tlie members built a 
larger hall over the store owned by John Harrison, and fitted the 
same up in a complete and elegant manner. The present member- 
ship is twenty, and the officers are: Williaia Brown, W. M. ; C. 
O. Hainos^, S. W. ; D. B. Wills, J. W.; Edner Johnson, Treas. ; 
Thomas F. Dryden, Sec; Alfred Worrel, S. D.; A. T. Wills, J. D. 



. BELLEVILLE, 

the oldest town in the county, after Danville, was laid out by Will- 
iam H. Hinton, Lazarus B. Wilson and Obadiah Harris, in 1829. 
This was about the time of the construction of the Cumberland 
Road, and Belleville grew rapidly in population and importance, it 
soon became the center of learnirg and style for all the county 
and, in those dajs, if a starchy young gentleman or lady was seen 
anywhere in the north part of the county, he was considered to be 
from Belleville. But with the completion of the Indianapolis & 
Terre Haute Railroad, in 1850, passing more than a mile north of 



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HISTOKT OF HENDKICKS COUNTY. 



the village, Belleville's greatness began passing. away, and now it 
has little but its history to boast of. 

The first house was built by William H. Hinton, who kept also 
!he first store. The first resident physician was Dr. B. B. Bar- 
tholomew, now of Danville. The village contains three religious 
organizations, the Methodist, Christian and Baptist. There are 
but two church buildings, however, belonging to the first two 
denominations mentioned. There are two stores, the proprietors 
being respectively W. J. Cope and Hamrick & White, two black- 
smith shops and a wagon-shop. The population is about 250. 

The White Lick Church (Baptist) was the first of any denomi- 
nation organized in Hendricks County. It was formed March 27, 
lS2i, by Eld.r William Pope, with the following members: 
Thomas Hinton and wife, James Thompson and wife and Chris. 
Pope. This little band met at the house of Elder Pope for several 
years, and in 1831 built a church at Belleville — a frame building 
30x40. After a number of years the church was divided, a por- 
tion going to Clayton and organizing the Missionary Baptist 
church. Many of the first members having died, the Belleville 
church went down, and but one or two members now survive. The 
church building, too, has been torn down. 

Belleville Lodge, No. 205, L 0. O. F., was organized in April, 
1859, by John 0. Gilliland, Dr. L. H. Kennedy, James T. Mc- 
Curdy, Z. S. Reagan and Dr. E. C. Moore. The last named was 
chosen the first N. G. ; John O. Gilliland, Y. G.; L. H. Kennedy, 
Sec, and James T. McCurdy, Treas. 

CABTERSBT7KG 

is on section 31, in the northeast corner of the township, and is a 
station on the Yandalia Railroad, to the construction of which it 
owes its existence. It was laid out in 1S50, by John Carter, after 
whom it was named. The first house was built by David Carter; 
the first store by Simon Hornaday, who occupied it with a stock of 
merchandise and was also the first Postmaster. The first hotel 
was kept by David Carter. The present house of entertainment is 
kept by Harvey Rawlinga. The pioneer blacksmith shop was 
opened by David Stutesman. The present merchants of the place 
are: Phillip & Pruitt and Coe & Cox. Messrs. Cox & Clark also 
deal in grain. The village has 200 inhabitants and maintains two 
religious organizations. 



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HISTOKY OF HENDKICKS COUNTY. 
RELIGIOUS. 



637 



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The Methodist Episcopal Church was fonned in the winter of 
1S56-'T, by Eev. Jesse Woodward, witli John Biddle, William 
Little, Eichard Poe and their wives, Mrs. Brad}' and others as first 
members. Their house of worship was built in 1857, at a cost of 
$750. It is 30 X 42 feet in size, frame, and located in the northwest 
part of the village. There are at present about seventy members. 
The Sunday-school has sixty-five pupils, and is in a prosperous con- 
dition under the superinteudency of James A. Clark. The present 
Trustees of the church are: J. McCormick, John Biddle and 
Harvey Rawlings. The Stewards are: J. McCorinick and George 
Silch. The present pastor is Eev. J. Dunlavy. 

The Bajytist Church was constituted March 21, 1804, with Eev. 
R. M. Parks as pastor, and the following first members: II. D. 
McCormick and wife Jane, E. T. McCormick and wife Sarah E., 
A. S. McCormick and wife Matilda, Christine, "William, Nancy, 
Sudy, Cynthia and Moses Tomlinson, James and Sarah Haydcn, 
John A. and Sarah Yeatch, Isabel Silch, Joseph K. and Elizabeth 
Little, Hazzard and Margaret J. Woodhurst, Anna Martin, Sarah 
A. Snodgrass, Oliver P. Garr, Susan Dilley, Charles Maddos, 
Greenberry Baker (who united with the chnreh in his ninetieth 
year), James Eoach, George Plufford and Hannah Owens. E. T. 
McCormick was chosen the first Clerk. The society has a frame 
church, 3-1 x -44 feet, erected in 1868, at a cost of $700. The pres- 
ent membership is 105. A. S. McCorinick is Clerk; J. A. Veatch, 
Moderator; J. K. Little, James Hayden, J. A. Veatch, A. S. Mc- 
Cormick and S. M. Pearson, Trustees. The pastors have been, in 
succession, Eevs. E. AI. Parks, B. A. Melsou, W. Trent, J. W. 
Sherrill, P. M. Buchan and J. W. Crews- The society is in a pros- 
perous condition, and the church is undergoing repairs which will 
cost nearly as much as the building itself. 

CENTEK VALLEY 

is a postoffice on section 25, in the southern part of the township. 
There is no village at that point. 

BIOGRAPHICAL. 

Alfred W. Carter, a successful farmer of Liberty Township, 
was born in Lincoln County, Ky., April 18, 1833, the second sou 
of John and Martha (Alford) Carter. His father was born in 1801 



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HISTOKT OF HENDRICKS COUNT!'. 



an I died in 1864. His mother was born in 180S and died in 1S78. 
Their family consisted of eiglit children, five sons and three daugh- 
ters. When twenty years of age Alfred W. Carter left home and 
came to Hendricks County,Ind., having, when he reached here, but 
$1.35 in money. He worked by the month during the summer, 
and in the winter attended school, until he had §150 and a horse. 
Prior to coming to Hendricks County his entire schooling had 
been but nine months. He was married in 1856 to Mary J. Short, 
daughter of Young and Elizibeth Short, of Belleville. After his 
marriage he rented land in different parts of the county till 1860. 
He bought three acres of land, with house, one-half mile west of 
Clayton, where he was living at the breakingout of tlie Rebellion. 
In August, 1SG2, he enlisted in Company C, Seventieth Indiana 
Infantry, and served till June, 1S65. He participated in the bat- 
tles of tlio Atlanta campaign, and thence went to Washington, D. 
C. , where he was mustered ont. After his return home, he bought 
forty acres of land on whicli he lived about eighteen mouths, when 
he sold it, and in 1869 bought forty acres which is a part of his pres- 
ent liorae. He now owns 15IiV acres of choice land with a cood 
brick residence and convenient farm buildings. His wife died in 
1S67. Of tlieir five children, only two are living — Dora F., wife 
of William Harrison, and L;.wrence E. Elizabeth, died in infancy 
in 1857; Warren G., died July 14, 1884, aged twenty-four years; 
Lucy, died in infancy in 1862. In 1869 he married Mrs. Mar- 
garet J. HarailtoD, who died in November, 187S, leaving one 
daughter — Nellie G. In 1880 he married Mrs. Nancy J. Lew- 
alen, and to tliem has been boim one daughter — Mabel. Mr. 
Carter and his wife are members of the Christian church, of which 
he has been Eider and Trustee. Mr. Carter has traveled over half 
the States and Territories in the Union and is very well known. 
He is known throughout the country as a successful farmer and 
reliable basiness man. He has been associated with the courts 
continuously for the past ten years, having acted as administra- 
tor, guardian and Commissioner. He has executed official bonds 
to the amount of $L5,000, and for the faithful performance of such 
trusts, he has won the confidence and esteem of all who come in 
contact with him. 

Daniel Cox, son of Abijah and Sarah (Carter) Cox, is a native 
of Hendricks County, Ind., burn July 23, 1827. His parents were 
natives of North Carolicia, his father of Randolph County, born 
Sept. 27, ISOO, and his mother of Chatham County, born in 1799. 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



639 



In 1S23 Abijali Cox and his wife moved to Indiana and settled in 
Eiclimond, AVayne County, where he had a brother. While there, 
when absent from home, their cabin was entered and a chest con- 
taining §300, given him by his father, taken away. This left him 
M-ith nothfng but his horses and wagon. In lS2i he went to Ileu- 
dricks County and settled on section 2S, Guilford Township, where 
he entered eighty acres of land, which he improved and afterward 
sold, and bjught IGO acres in Washington Township, where he 
lived till his deatli in 1S51. His wife snrs'ived him till 1SG3. 
They were members of the society of Friends, but were excom- 
municated for marrying out of the church. They subsequently 
joined the Christian church and remained consistent members the 
rest of their lives. They had a fumily of seven children, three of 
whom are living. Daniel Cox remained with his parents till man- 
hood. He was given a good education and taught two years. He 
then learned the tanner's trade, at which he worked two years, 
when his father died and he then took cliarge of the homestead 
for his mother. He was married in April, 1S52, to Elizabeth Lit- 
tle, who was born May 10, 1833, a daugliter of Samuel Little. 
Mr. Cox is Treasurer of the Indiana Horticultural Society, and 
President of tiie Hendricks County Agricultural and Horticultural 
Society, also President of the Farmers' Cj-operative Insurance 
.Company, representing §1,750,000. He and his wife are members 
of the Christian church, of which he is an Eider. 

Thomas F. Dryden, M. Z>., Clayton, Ind., is a native of Ohio, 
born in Adams County, Oct. 20, 1S35, the eldest son of Isaac and 
Martha (Bowles) Dryden, his father a native of Delaware and his 
mother of Virginia. When he was about four years of age his 
father died and his youth was spent on a farm, attending the dis- 
trict schools. Ho came to Indiana in 1S53, and worked on a farm 
some time. Having from his boyhood had a desire to become a 
physician he hailed with delight the opportunity given him to 
study medicine with Dr. Hutchison, of Mooresville. He afterward 
attended a course of lectures at the medical department of the 
Michigan University, Ann Arbor. He then went to Detroit, 
Mich., where he was a private pupil of Dr. William Brodie, an 
eminent surgeon, remaining with him about six months. He 
subsequently entered the Ohio .Medical College, Cincinnati, from 
which he graduated in 18.59. In addition to his deo-ree of M. D., 
he in 1875 had an honorary degree conferred on him by the 
Indiana Medical College, and has certificates from the chemical 



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640 



BISTOEY OF BEA'DEICKS COUNTY. 



and pharmaceutical departmental Ann Arlior, and the clinical de- 
partment at Detroit. He began the practice of his profession at 
Northfield, Boone Co., Iiid., iu 1859, remaining there till the break- 
ing out of the Kebellion, -when he enlisted in the thi-ee-months 
service as a private. He afterward entered the three-years ser- 
vice as Hospital Steward of the Fifteenth Indiana Infantry, but 
always acted in the capacity of Assistant Surgeon or Surgeon. 
He was at many important engagements, among others Rich Mount- 
ain, Shiloh, Murfreesboro and Mission Eidge. He was mustered 
out June 25, 1864, but was immediatelj appointed Post Surgeon 
at. Johnson ville, Tenn., where he remained till August, 1865. He 
then returned to Indiana and lived in Morgan County till June, 
1866, when he located in Clayton, wherie he has built up a large 
practice, and has made an enviable reputation both as a physician 
and surgeon. Dr. Dryden was married in 1868 to Mrs. Sarah E. 
Johnson, a lady of culture and refinement. She died in 1872, 
leaving no children. Dr. Drjden is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church; also of the Masonic fraternity, Clayton Lodge, 
No. 463. In politics he is a Republican. 

Theodore H. GlUeland, teacher in the intermediate department 
• of Cartersburg graded schools, is one of the oldest teachers in Hen- 
dricks County. He was born in Indianapolis, Ind., Sept. 6, 1SI6, 
the only son of John O. and Nancy J. (Pope) Gilleland, and grand- 
son of "William Pope. In 1851 his parents moved to Hendricks 
County, where, in connection with working at his trade (plasterer), 
his father engaged in farming. He attended in his boyhood the 
district schools, and later, the Belleville Academy, and in the 
spring of 1877, a term at the State Nornaal School, at Terre Haute. 
He commenced teaching in 1868 and has taught nine years in 
Belleville, five years in Brownsburg acid three years in Carters- 
burg. He has been a successful disciplinarian and instructor and 
has a reputation second to none in the county. Iu addition to 
teaching he cari'ies on a small farm on section 31, Liberty Town- 
ship. He was married Feb. 26, 1874,. t® Amanda ]M. "Wilson, of 
Danville. They have two children — Dais;j Land Raymond I. Mr. 
Gilleland is a member of Belleville Lodgra, No. 205, I. 0. O. F. 

John Harrison, merchant, Clayton, Led., is a native of Knox 
County, Ky., born Oct. 30, 1830. He was the eldest of seven 
children of Thomas and Nancy (Bryain) Harrison, his father a 
native of North Carolina and his mother ©f Tennessee. In Decem- 
ber, 1832, Thomas Harrison moved to Hendricks County, Ind., 



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641 



and located on a tract of heavily timbered land in Liberty Town- 
ship, where he lived till his death in 1846. His wife still liyes on 
the old homestead, aged seventy-eight years. She was hurt while 
milking a cow about sixteen years ago, and is still lame from its 
eflects, but with thisexception has good health. Of their children two 
daughters and our subject are the only ones living. John Harrison 
was but two years of age when his parents moved to Hendricks 
County. He was reared on his father's farm and in his boyhood 
attended the district schools. On reaching manhood he engao-od 
in dealing in live stock, and although having but limited means he 
was successful, and by 1S67 had acquired sufficient means to buy 
the store and stock of goods of J. R. Ballards He was associated 
with A. IS". Clark, under the firm name of Clark & Harrison, 
four years. He then bought Mr. Clark's interest and conducted 
the business alone till ISSO, when he sold a half interest to his 
former partner and the firm has since been Clark & Harrison. 
They carry a full line of general merchandise and have one of the 
best stores in the county. Their store, which was erected by Mr. 
Harrison in 1S74, is a two-story frame building, 22 x 60 feet in size 
the upper floor used as a Masonic Hall. Mr. Harrison has built 
two residences in Clayton, the last, in which he lives, being a model 
of taste and convenience. He was married in 1S62 to Margaret E. 
Clark, a native of Putnam County, Ind., a sister of A. N. Clark. 
They have had two children, but one of whom— Katie St., is liv- 
ing. Mr. Harrison is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Clay- 
ton Lodge, No. 463. He and his wife and daughter are members 
of the ilethodist Episcopal church. 

Horace Eunt, druggist, Clayton, Lid., is the second son of Alford 
and Jane Hunt. He spent his youth on his father's farm north of 
the village of Clayton, receiving his early education in the district 
schools and later attending the Central Normal College, Danville. 
After leaving school he was employed by Hunt & Eowe, dealers in 
buggies and farm implements, in Delphi, the county seat of Car- 
roll County, Ind., a year, and in 18S4 bought the stock and fixt- 
ures of T. J. Allen, druggist, Clayton. He carries a full line of 
drugs, m^edicines, paints, oils, glass, varnish and toilet articles. He 
is a young man of good business ability, and his steady habits and 
uprightness hare gained him many friends. He owns a fine farm 
of 102 acres two miles north of Clayton, in Center Township, on 
which are good buildings and a pleasant two-story residence. 

William TF. Irons, resident of Cartersburg, Ind., is a native of 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



Liberty Township, born May 29, 1835, the fourth son of Thomas 
and Sarah (Franks) Irons. He spent his boyhood and youth on his 
father's farm, and was given a good education, completing it at tlie 
old seminary in Belleville, where he was assistant teacher one term. 
After leaving school he was employed in the clerk's office at Dan- 
ville, by his brother John, two years. He was married in 1856 to 
Miss Mary "W. Clark, daughter of Edmund Clark, an ex-Sheriff 
and Treasurer of Hendricks County. After his marriage he went 
to Indianapolis, where he remained till the breaking out of the Re- 
bellion, when he enlisted in Company A, Seventh Indiana Infantry. 
, After his return from the war he moved to Hendricks County and 
settled on the farm in Liberty Township, which is now owned by 
John A. Miles. He has been engaged in the commission business 
in Indianapolis since 1876. He has a family of four children. 

Albert Johnson, merchant and grain-dealer, Clayton, Ind., is a 
native of Marion County, Ind., born Sept. 19, 1843, the eighth of 
nine children of Jeremiah rnd Susannah Johnson, his father a 
native of Connecticut and his mother of Virginia. His parents 
moved to Indiana in 1821 and settled in Indianapolis, and in the 
spring of 1855 moved to Hendricks County. The mother died in 
1863 and the father in 1S76. Albert Johnson received his early 
education in his native count2' and later attended the academy at 
Danville. After leaving school he engaged in farming till 1876 
when he located in the village of Clayton and began dealing in 
grain, and in 1880 opened a general store in company with his 
brother Edwin. Their store building, which was erected by them- 
selves, is 38 X 60 feet in size, two stories high, and is arranged 
conveniently for their business. The upper floor is used as a pub- 
lic hall. Their grain elevator, located on the line of the Vandalia 
Kailway, has a capacity of 30,000 bushels of wheat. ^Ir. Johnson 
was married in 1867 to Miss Mary E. Snoddy, of Morgan County, 
Ind., and to them have been born three children — Gertrude, Emma 
and Arthur A. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson are members of the Chris- 
tian church, of which he is a Trustee. 

Jeremiah Johnson, son of Aholiab and Hannah Johnson, was 
born at Killingly, "Windham Co., Conn., Aug. 23, 1792, and in 
1795 or 179G he removed with his parents to Stafford, Tolland Co., 
Conn. "With the exception o' about three years, when he lived 
with his mother's father, Jeremiah.Bacon, at Middletown, Conn., 
he continued to live with his father and work at farming and get- 
ting such education as the common schools then afforded, some- 



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643 



; imes teaching district schools in the winter, till he was about 
, hventy-one years of age. In 1813, during the war with Great 
j Britain he served as a volunteer in the militia of Connecticut 
for about seventy days, guarding the port at New London and vi- 
cinity for which service he long afterward obtained bounty land 
from the United States Government. After the close of his mili 
tary service he went South as far as Washington, seeking his 
fortune,_and for a short time worked on the new Capitol the old 
one having been burned by the British, but believing there was 
some easier way of getting a living he soon left and went to 
Baltimore where he shipped on board a private armed sloop for i 
crmse. Soon taking a dislike to that kind of life he was dis- 
charged at one of the West India Islands called Virgin Gorda 
whence he returned to his father's home in Stafford There he 
taught the district school, numbering not less than 100 scholars 
for one term, and early in the spring of 1815 he started with I 
sinal trunk, containing a few articles of wearing apparel and 
about SoOin money, for the great New West leaving the balance 
of his savings placed on interest. He traveled by mail sta^e to 
Philadelphia, whence, after placing his trunk on board one oi the 
brge wagons then constantly passing between Philadelphia and 
Ji^ittsburg, he traveled on foot to the latter place. At Pittsbur.. in 
company with another Eastern man, he constructed a flat-'boat 
and loaded it with coal and floated down the Ohio Eiver to Cin- 
cinnati when boat and cargo were sold for what he could ^et 
hTom Cincinnati he very soon went to a reesntly settled German 
village about twenty miles northwest of that city where he tai.o-ht 
the young Germans the English language and such other rudi- 
ments of education as circumstances permitted, till the time when 
the authorities of Indiana fi.xed the site of the present Indian- 
apohs for the capital of that State. Soon after he learned that 
fact he hired a couple of men with each a four-horse team, loaded 
them with provisions and such other articles as were necessary in 
a new settlement, and leaving his German friends started throu<.h 
the then unbroken forest for the future city, fording streams and 
cutting their way through the woods, beieg guided by a small 
compass. After much time and enduring many hardships he at 
ength reached the place of his destination. Here he detained 
his teamsters till they, together with s.ch assistance as those 
already there could afford, had built him a log cabin, bein. the 
third ,n that place. His first dining table .vas the head of a°flour 



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HISTORY OF HENDKICKS COUNTY. 



barrel, his first plate a clean maple chip, and his first bedstead was 
framed into a corner of the cabin. He at once commenced deal- 
ing in provisions, groceries, powder, lead, etc. "When the first 
brick court-house was built (used for a State Plouse for several years) 
he took the contract for the brick work and in company with 
John Johnson, who came. there from "Virginia, and one of whose 
daughters afterward became his wife, made the brick and com- 
pleted his contract to the acceptance of the authorities. At that 
time money was a very scarce article, and the State obligations 
with which he was paid for his work were at a heavy discount, and 
had it not been for the money due him in Connecticut which was 
collected and sent to him as fast as possible, he probably would 
have become bankrupt. He was generally reasonably successful in 
business though sometimes suffered serious losses, as when brino-- 
ing a boat-load of salt up the "VVabash River the boat suddenly 
sunk and boat, salt, and wearing apparel of himself and assist- 
ants were a total loss, leaving him and his companions to beg their 
way home over 100 miles, fie invested his savings in land at 
Government prices, which of course advanced in value as the county 
became settled. "When the National Road was laid out west from 
Indianapolis he laid out the village of Bridgeport on land which 
he owned, and built a hotel, steam mill, and store. "When the 
plank road was built, he took an active interest in it and gave the 
right of way through all his land and ground for a depot at 
Bridgeport and much otherwise to encourage the building of the 
railroad. He was active and energetic in business and did much in 
promoting the cause of education and agriculture in the State, im- 
porting improved breeds of cattle from other States. Plis ances- 
tors were of pure English stock and according to the tradition of 
the family some of them left England and settled in Massachusetts 
on the restoration of Charles II., on account of their participation 
in the civil war as soldiers and partisans of Cromwell. He reared 
a family of nine children, seven sons and two daughters. He sur- 
vived his wife and daughters several years and died at Clayton, 
Hendricks County, March 20, 1876. 

J. Sherry Jones, telegraph operator and agent for the " "Van- 
dalia Line," at Clayton, Ind., is a native of Hendricks County, 
born June 13, 1S58, the third son of Adam and Harriett Jones, 
natives of England, who came to America in 1849, and settled in 
Plainfield, Hendricks Co., Ind., in 1S55, where our subject was 
born and reared. He received a good education, completing it at 



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HISTORY OF HENDEIQKS COUNXr. 



645 



tbe Plainfield High School, and learned the art of telegraphy in 
the railroad office of that place, under tlie direction of Cjrus 
Green. After completing his studies he was employed in the rail- 
road ofuce at Brownstown, 111., and in Januarj', 1SS3, vp.as trans- 
ferred to Clayton, whore, in addition to the duties of operator, he 
has charge of the passenger and freight departments of the rail- 
road. He is also a silversmith by trade, and carries on a general 
repairing business when not engaged with the duties of his posi- 
tion. 

William Little, deceased, was a native of Kentucky, born March 
5, 1814, the third son of Alexander and Rachel Little, who were 
among the first settlers of Hendricks County, locating south of 
Cartersburg. After reaching manhood Mr. Little engaged in farm- 
ing and stock-raising, and accumulated a large property, ownino- 
at the time of his death 430 acres of land, 150 acres, being the 
homestead. He was married in 1S40 to Sarah Downard, who died 
June 18, 1858, leaving seven children— Ann J., James A., Joseph 
K., Leonard "W., Isabelle E., Cynthia E. and Clay M. In 1859 he 
married Mary E. Rarden, daughter of Asbury and Catherine Ear- 
den, and to them was born one daughter — Hattie M., wife of Sam- 
uel Holdermau, of Hendricks County. Mi-. Little died Jan. 29, 
1876. He was an active member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, and one of the most liberal and earnest workers at the time 
the church at Cartersburg was built. Mrs. Little has been a mem- 
ber of the same church twenty-five years. 

Franli H. Martin, hardware merchant and dealer in aoricult- 
ural implements, Clayton, Ind., is a native of Hendricks County, 
born Oct. 7, 1860, the eldest son of J. F. and Julia A. (Hunt) 
Martin, his father a native of Kentucky and his mother of In- 
diana. He spent his youth on bis father's farm, receiving his 
early education in the district schools and later atteuding the Dan- 
ville Normal School a year. After leaving school hj engaged in 
the dry-goods business in Clayton a year, and in 1883 became 
established in his present business, locating on the we^t side of the 
square. His is the only exclusive hardware store in Clayton, and 
he has built up a good trade. He is a young man of strict busi- 
iness mtegrity and his close attei^tion to his pursuits and fair deal- 
ing have won him many friends. He was married in 1883 to 
Laura V., daughter of Thomas A. Borders, of Hendricks County. 
Charles TF. 2£cClure is a native of East Tennessee, born Sept. 2 
1826, the third son of a family of ten children of William and 
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HISTOKT OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



Fenny (Kose) McClure, natives of Virginia. In the spring of 1S30 
his parents moved to Hendricks County, Ind., and settled on a 
tract of wild land two miles southwest of Clayton. The mother 
died in the spring of 1850, and tlie following fall when the father 
was rolling logs the chain broke and a log fell on him, crushing 
him in such a manner that he lived only a few hours. Charles W. 
McClure was reared and educated in Hendricks County, remaining 
with his parents till manhood. He then engaged in farming at 
which he has been uniformly successful. He was married in ISol 
to Edna Hiatt, daughter of Harmon and Martha (Boyd) Hiatt. 
After his marriage he wont to Iowa and remained three years, and 
in 1854 returned to Hendricks County, and located on his present 
farm, which contains eighty acres of valuable land with a good 
residence and farm buildings. Mr. and Mrs. McClure have had 
six children — Laura E., wife of Jilelvin Harkrider; Elizabeth, wife 
of Eeed Pick; Fannie V., Charles A., "William A. and James W. 
Mr. McChire is a member of Clayton Lodge, No. 463, A. F. & A. 
M. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. Mrs. McClure's father, Harmon Hiatt, was born in Gray- 
son County, Va., Nov. 20, 1796, and her mother, Martha Boyd, 
was born Aug. 18, 1792, a daughter of John Boyd, a hero of the 
Kevolutionary war. They were married July 25, 1819, and in 
1822 moved to Hendricks County, Ind., and -settled .in Guilford 
Township removing to Liberty Township in 1834. The father died 
in 1849, and the mother July 24, 1882. They had a family of eight 
children, five sons and three daughters, of whom two sons and one 
daughter are living, all in Indiana. 

Amos D. McCormicTc, farmer and stock-raiser. Liberty Town- 
ship, is a native of Fayette County, Ind., born near Connersville, 
Auo'. 23, 1819, a son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Case) McCormick, 
his father a native of Pennsylvania, born in 1789, and his mother 
a native of Kentucky. Samuel McCormick moved with his parents 
to Ohio when a boy, and was there married. He located in Prehle 
County after his marriage, and later moved to Butler County, and 
thence, in 1812, to Fayette County, Ind. He helped to build a fort 
on the present site of Connersville, but owing to Indian troubles 
returned to Ohio, but a year later moved again to Fayette County,., 
and in 1820 to Indianapolis, where he cleared fifteen acres of land, 
which is now included in the public square. In 183G he moved to 
Hendricks County, and settled near where our subject now lives. 
In 1864 he moved to Cartersburg, and in 1866 returned to tlie farm 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



6i^ 



where bo died in Jnne, 1867. His wife died in lS3i. Their family 
consisted of eight sons and two daughters — Jolin, Jacob, William, 
Dorcas, Archibald, Amos D., James, Thomas, Elizabetli, and a 
son not named, of whom but two sons are living. In 1S3S he 
married Matilda Clark, who survived him till July, 1S70, and to 
this union^were born four children — Samuel L., Plarvey, Virrinda 
and Riley. Ho was a member of the Baptist churcli, and for many 
years was a preacher in the denomination. Amos D. McCorraick 
was reared in Marion County, Ind., and there received the greater 
part of his education, completing it in Hendricks County. Since 
reaching manhood he has given his attention to agricultural pur- 
suits and now has a good farm of eighty-four acres. He was mar- 
ried in 183S to Susannah Jordan, daughter of Aquila and Eliza- 
beth Jordan, early settlers of Hendricks County, where the father 
died July 8, 1844, and the mother in December, ISGi. To Mr. 
and Mrs. McCormick have been born two sons — Aquila S. and 
Jolm W. 

John Miles, a pioneer of Liberty Township, who has done much 
toward the development of this county, is a native of Pasquotank 
County, K. C. , born Jan. 30, 1814, a son of Thomas and Sarah 
Miles. He was left an orphan at the age of seven years, wlicn he 
was bound out to Thomas Pritchett, with whom he moved to Wash- 
ington County, Ind. On account of the abuse he received from 
Pritchett he was released. He was bound out to another party to 
learn the blacksmith's trade, but not liking this pursuit he was 
again released. He then went to work on the farm of Thomas 
Irons for 25 cents per day, and at the end of three years he had 
saved from his earnings enough to enter eighty acres of land. He 
still continued to work for Mr. Irons, and at the end of four vears 
became his partner, tliey engaging as contractors on what was the 
Clay County Canal, which they followed successfully about three 
years. He then bought 145 acres, on which he at present resides. 
He was married in the spring of 1840 to Elizabeth, eldest dauo-hter 
of John and Mary HoUingshead, when tie settled with his bride 
on the, farm, where they have since resided, their house beino- a 
small log cabin. Mr. Miles has been very successful in his farm- 
ing pursuits, and by his industry and economy he has acquired a 
large property. He has provided for his family of three sons and 
three daughters, and still owns 1,500 acres of land. His surplus 
means he loans out to his neighbors. Beside his farming pursaits 
he at the same time traded in stock, dealing in cattle, hoo-s and 






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HISTOKY OF HENDKICKS CODNTV. 



Diiiles. Tliis beino; before the days of railroads, his stock was 
driven to market on foot, over poor roads and in all kinds of 
weather. While not being a member of any church he has always 
been a liberal supporter of them, being among the most liberal 
contributors. 

John A. Ililes, one of the leading farmers of Liberty Township, 
was born on the old homestead in this township, Dec. 29, 184i, a 
son of John and Elizabeth (Rollingshead) Miles. He was reared 
on the farm, and received a good education, completing it at the High 
Schools of 13elleville and Danville. Attaining his majority he began 
life for himself and engaged in farming and stock-raising. He has 
been one of the most successful stock-raisers of the county, and 
has a good grade of horses, cattle and hogs. His farm contains 
700 acres of land, situated on the National Koad, in a high state 
of cultivation. His residence, a large two-story brick, built in 
1876, is a model of convenience and architectural beauty. His 
farm buildings are among the best in the township. Mr. Miles 
was married in 1873 to Flora, daughter of W. H. Fritts, of Owen 
County, Ind. They have four children — Yictoria M., jSTettie E. , 
Mattie E. and John. Mr. Miles is a member of Belleville Lodge, 
No. Go, F. & A. M. 

Thomas J. Miles-, a prominent and successful farmer of Liberty 
Township, is a native of Hendricks County, born Sept. 24:, lSi2, 
the eldest son of John and Elizabeth (Hollingshead) Miles. His 
youth was spent in assisting his father on the farm, and three 
months of the year, when his services were not needed at home he 
attended the district schools. He remained with his parents till 
twenty-three years of age, when he began life for himself and en- 
gaged in farraino- and stock-raising. He has been successful and 
now owns 555 acres of choice land, and his stock are of the best 
grades. He was married in 1871 to Talitha Tudor, of Morgan 
County, Ind., and settled onthe farm adjoining his present home. 
He afterward bought the 375 acres which comprises his homestead 
and built his brick residence, which is one of the best in the town- 
ship, where he has lived since 1876. Mr. Miles is a liberal, public 
spirited and enterprising citizen and is one of the foremost to 
assist any laudable enterprise. In 1863 he enlisted in Company H, 
Fifty-fourth Indiana Infantry, and served Iiis country four months. 
He has a family of five children — Horace G., Mary M., Jeflerson 
W. T., Ruth A. and John E. 

Rndon C. 2foore, 31. D., Belleville, lad., is a native of North 



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HISTORY OF HENDKICKS COUNTT. 



649 



Carolina, born in Guilford County, April 3, 1820,. the youngest of 
ten children of Thomas and Ann K. (Go]dberry)Moore, natives of 
Maryland. In 1S30 his parents moved to Hendricks County, Ind., 
and settled in Guilford Township, where they lived till their death. 
He was reared on a pioneer farm, and in his youth attended the 
old log-cabin schools. When seventeen years of age ho began 
the study of medicine with his brother, S. G. Moore, a physician 
of Belleville, and took his first course of lectures at the Kentucky 
Medical College, Louisville.' He began his practice at Belleville, 
and in 1849 attended a course of lectures at Rush Medical College, 
Chicago, ni., from which ho graduated in 1850. He then returned 
to Belleville, where he has sir.ce lived and has built up a large 
practice. He has beon a hard student and has excelled in his 
profession, having now a reputation second to none in the county. 
He was married in 1816 to Emeline Green, who died in 1856 leav- 
ing one daughter, now deceased. In 1860 he married Allie R. 
Banta, daughter of Cornelius Banta. To them have been born 
ten ch-ildren. Dr. Moore is a member of Belleville Lodge, No. 
C5,F. & A. M. and Bellevilje Lodge, No. 205, LO.O.F. He and his 
wife 9iXQ member of the Christian church. 

Addison E. Rogers, Snoerintendent of the public schools 
of Hendricks County, is a native of this county, born March 
5, 1846, the youngest but one of nine children of Henry and Mary 
(Hadley) Rogers, natives of North Carolina, who settled in Lib- 
erty Township, Hendricks Connty, in 1844. His mother died 
in 1855. He was reared on a farm, attending in his boyhood the 
district schools and later thj schools of Clayton and Danville 
Academ_v. Upon reaching his majority he began his career as a 
teacher, teaching his first school in Franklin Tovv'nship, this county, 
in 1866-'67. He was a successful instructor and disciplinarian and 
gained au enviable reputation in liis profession. In June, 1883, 
he was elected to his present position for a term of two years, and 
was re-elected in 1SS5. He gives his entire attention to the duties 
of his office and has elevated the grade of the schools of the county 
in a marked degree since holding the position of Superintendent, 
and his painstaking and efficient management is recognized by all 
interested in the welfare and advancement of the educational inter- 
ests of the county. Mr. Rogers was married in 1867 to Miss 
Mary E. Henderson, daughter of William and Amanda Henderson 
of Hendricks County. He is a member of the Odd Fellows' fra- 
ternity and the Grand Army of the Republic. 



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HISTOKY OF HENDEICKS CODNTY. 



Henry Rogers was born in Chatham County, N. C, Nov. 17, 
1808, a son of Henry and Nancy Rogers, natives of Virginia, and 
grandson of Joseph Rogers. He remained with his parents 
till his marria.ge, when, having been reared to the life of a farmer, 
he engaged in the vocation for himself. In the fall of 1839 he 
moved to Hendricks County, lad., and settled on what is his pres- 
ent valuable farm, at that time a tract of timber land very little 
cleared. He bought 160 acres of land for §1,365, all on time, but 
by hard work and economy he succeeded in paying for it, and now 
has a competency for his declining years. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Mary Hadley, died in 1850, leaving nine sons, seven of 
whom are living — Cyrus, born Nov. 12, 1830; George F., born 
Dec. 29, 1831; Zeno, Jan. 24, lS3i (now deceased); Thomas, Nov. 
11, 1835; Job, Oct. 27, 1S3S; William, Sept. 13, 18-10 (deceased); 
Solon R., June 2, 1813; Addison E., March 5, 1810; Moses C, June 
18, 1S48. He afterward married Elinor Lindley, a native of Chat- 
ham County, N. C, born in 1815. They have three children — 
Mary E., born June 8, lS5i; Nancy J., born Feb. IG, 1856, and 
James H., born Jan. 20, 1860, In 1851 Itr. Rogers joined the 
society of Friends, his wife being a birthright member of that 
society. 

Rev. John Rynerson, deceased, was born in Mercer County, Ky., 
Jan. 2, 1805. He spent his youth on a farm, obtaining a good 
education, and subsequently taught several terms of school. He 
moved to Hendricks County, Ind., when a young man, and located 
in Belleville, and was one of the contractors of the National Road, 
He subsequently returned to Kentucky, but four years later came 
again to Hendricks County, where, having entered the ministry 
of the Baptist church, he was instrumental in establishing the 
church of his choice. He again located in Belleville, and organ- 
ized a church, of which he was pastor several years. He died in 
186i, having lived a useful life, and endeared himself to the hearts 
of the people he served. He was twice married. His first wife, 
Elizabeth Cunningham, whom he married in Kentucky, died in 
1850. They had a family of eleven children. In 1851 he married 
Sarah Goss, daughter of George and Mary (Arnold) Goss, early 
settlers of Owen County, from North Carolina. The Goss family 
were the first settlers of the town which bears their name. To the 
second marriage of Mr. Rynerson were boru five children, four of 
whom are living— George G., Jessie F., \vife of Winfield Eaton, 
of Morgan County, Ind., Merlin M. and_Eddie V. Mrs. Ryuer- 



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HISTORY OF HENDKICES COUNTY. 651 

son lives . on the old homestead which before its subdivisiou 
contained 2i0 acres of valuable land. She is a member of the 
Missionary Baptist church. 

William Shej^herd, a successful farmer of Liberty Township, 
was born in Fleming County, Ky.,Fcb. 2S, 182S, the fifth of ten 
children of Solomon and Margaret (Tout) Shepherd, natives of the 
same county, of English parentage. In the fall of 1833 his parents 
moved to Hendricks County, and settled a miie south of Danville, 
but a year later bought eighty acres of wild land of Richard Thomp- 
son, three miles south of Danville. This land they cleared and 
cultivated and made their home the rest of their lives. The father 
died in August, 1851, aged sixty-tliree years, and the mother in 
1860 aged sixty years. They were earnest Christians, members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. But four of their ten children 
are living. "William Sliepherd was five years of age when his 
parents moved to Hendricks County, and was reared on a frontier 
farm, his youth being spent in assisting his father in the work of 
clearing and cultivating his land. The first school he attended 
was taught in a log cabin, and was of the most primitive sort. 
His education was limited, as schools were few in the county at 
that time and his services were required on the farm. He re- 
mained at home till his twenty-third year, when he was married to 
Melissa Downs, daughter of Daniel and Mary Downs, of North 
Carolina, but later of Hendricks County. After his marriage he 
settled on the farm where he has since lived, which at that time 
was mostly unimproved. He has cleared his land, and now has a 
goodf^irm of forty acres, with a pleasant residence and comfortable 
farm buildings. To Mr. and Mrs. Shepherd have been born three 
children; but two are living— Sarah A., wife of A. H. Terhune, and 
Cora A., wife of William Weesner. In politics Mr. Shepherd is a 
Republican. He was elected Justice of the Peace in ISSO, but 
refused to qualify. He and his wife are members of the Mission- 
ary Baptist church. \ 

Amos Stewart Wills, one of the pioneers of Hendricks County, 
was born in Montgomery County, Ky., Jan. 1, 1809, the eldest of 
four children of Michael and Elizabeth "Wills. His parents were 
natives of Maryland. They moused to Kentucky in a very early 
day where the father died, leaving our subject to the care of a 
widowed mother when a mere child. His youth was passed on a 
farm and in attending school. "When he grew to manhood he 
worked at the carpenter's trade in connection with farming. He 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



was married Maj- 12, 1831, to Miss Lucinda D. Tatman, of Mont- 
gomery County, Ky. Sept. 1, 1831, they started for Hendricks 
County, lud., in a wagon drawn by oxen, arriving at their destina- 
tion on the 15th of tlie same month. He had previously sent 
SlOO to his uncle, John Darnell, who entered eighty acres of land 
for him. He then purchased another tract of eighty acres in Lib- 
erty Township and proceeded to clear his farm, on which he re- 
sided abont forty years, his farm at that time containing 240 acres. 
He then disposed of this land, and bought his present little farm of 
seventeen and a half acres, with good brick residence, just beyond 
the town limits of Clayton. Mr. Wills was first elected Justice of 
the Peace in ISIO and served five years when he was appointed 
Assessor of Hendricks County. In 1852 he was again elected Jus- 
tice of the Peace, which oliice he has held to the present time, 
serving as such in all thirty-eight years. To Mr. and Mrs. "W^ills 
have been born thirteen cliildren, of whom five sons and three 
daughters are living. This old couple have lived contentedly 
together for over fifty year.; and together they experienced all 
phases of pioneer life. They are members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. Mr. Wills has been a member of the Masonic fra- 
ternity since 1847. In politics he was a Whig, and on the or- 
ganization of the Republicans he afliliated with that party.. He 
is a strong temperance advocate. 




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CHAPTER XYII. 



LINCOLN TOWNSHIP. 



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Geographical Description. — Pioneer History. — First Religious 
Organization. — Political History. — Township Justices, Con- 
stables, Trustees and Assessors. — Statistics of Property and 
Taxation. — Brow.-sburg. — Business, Churches, Lodges, Etc. 
— Biographical. ■ , 

Lincoln , one of the smallest townships in the county, is bounded 
on the north by Middle and Brown, on the east by Marion Count}-, 
on tlie suiith by "Washington, and on the west by Middle. It was 
organized by act of the county commissioners in 1863, by a divis- 
ion of Brown Township into two very near equal parts. The sur- 
face of Lincoln is almost a level plain, except in the western part, 
along White Lick, where the land is broken and rolling. Tb.e 
land along the stream is rich. The level portion has a very diver- 
sified soilj the black alluvial part is very rich and productive, 
while some of its clay soil is third rate in its advantages for pro- 
duction. 

FIRST events. 

The first settlement in the territory of Lincoln Township was 
made by James Brown, in the autumn of 1S24. Previous to 1830 
the following came: G. W. Tyler, William Harris, Daniel and 
Thomas Newman, Daniel Brown, "William Merritt, Robison 
Turpin, Caleb Shirley, John. Given, Larkip Dollahite, James 
Shirley and Thomas Nash; also Harvey and T. H. Barlow, who 
settled with their father Enoch just outside the limits of Browns- 
burg, in 182S. In 1830 and soon after Asa McDaniel and sons, 
Joel Smith and sons and Peter Metsker settled in the neighbor- 
hood of Brownsburg. 

The first Justice of the Peace was Edward Railsback. 

Swaira's tavern, on the road two miles east of Brownsburg, was 
a general resort for many years, especially for those of the settlers 
who were convivially inclined. 

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HISTOKT OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



In the year 1828 or '29, the Regidar Baptists built a church at 
the cross-roads south of Thomas Newham's, in which Archibald 
Thorne taught, in the same year, the first school in the township. 
Thomr.3 JSTewham, D. D. Brown, Y. J. Brown, William Harris, 
Mrs. Kice and some others were pupils of this school. The next 
school district organized was near Browusburg, where Jesse Smith 
taught first in 1832, in the log house wiiich still stands at the toll 
gate, one-half mile west of town. Rev. Thomas Sparks began his 
education at this school. The church organized in the meeting 
house just referred to was the first church organization in the 
township, and among the earliest of Hendricks County. This 
congregation worshiped hero for several years, and then built them 
a new house on the farm of Mr. Swaim, the proximity of which to 
a tavern proved disastrous to the morals of many of the brethren, 
and the congregation was dissolved and re-organized at Salem, 
three miles below, where the church still exists. . ■ 



POLITICAL. 

In politics Lincoln was Bepublican until about fifteen years ago, 
since when it has gone Democratic. Following is the vote for 
President at each election: 



1864— Abrah am Lincoln 147 54 

George B.McClellan... 93 

1868— Ulysses S. Grant 168 24 

Horatio Seymour 144 

i872—Uiysse3 S. Grant 168 3 

Horace Greeley .165 

lS76-SaBU6l J. TildeD 209 43 

Rutherford B. Hayes.. .167 
Peter Cooper 8 



1860— "Winfield S.Hancock... 188 40 

Jame.s A. Garfield 139 

James B. Weaver 7 

1884— GroverClevtland 195 25 

James G. Blaine 170 

Benjamin F. Butler. ... 13 



OFFICIAL. 

Following are the names of those who have been elected to the 
more important township offices, with the years in which they 
were chosen: 

Justices of the Peace: Jacob P. "Welshans and William M. 
Brown, 1SG3; Harrison S. Turpin, 1865; W. £. Brumfield and 
William Hylton, 1866; Thomas W. Morgan and John W. Smith, 
1867; Robison Tiirpin, 1868; Isaac C. Nash, 1869; William B. 
Eoagland and Jacob Miller, .1870; Israel L. C. Bray, 1872; Isaac 
W. Gray, IS"!; Joseph M. Tolle, 1876; Isaac W. Gray, 1878; Jo.=<eph 
M. Tolle, ISSO; Charles W. Tyler, 1882; Joseph M. Tolle and 
Robert Miller, 1384. 

Constuhles: William P. Jones and Israel L. C. Bray, 1"^63; 



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HISTOKY OF HENDEICKS COUNTY. 



655 



Will Rob. Smith and Israel L. C. Bray, 1864; Heath and Henry 
Stewart, 1865; H. R. Barlow and Thomas W. Wingate, 1866; John 
Davidson and Josiah McDaniel, 1867; Josiah McDaniel and John 
Kainey, 186S; Benjamin F. Logan and Simeon Tharpe, 1869; H. 
G. Turpin and Robert A. "Watts, 1870; Benjamin F. Logan and 
Daniel South, 1872; Redding Bray and Charles Ridgeway, 187-4; 
Benjamin F. Logan and Redding Bray, 1876; William J. Eblin 
and John Garvey, 1878; Edward Hughes and Solomon B. McClain, 
ISSO; Philip E. Stevensonand Benjamin F. Anderson, 1882; Ever- 
son Eaton, Horacf) Cook and Thomas Gorner, 1884. 

Trustees: Simpson B. Darnell, 1863; Lewis S. Hunter, 1864; 
Jesse R. Cope, 186o-'66; John W. Parker, 1867-'68; James A. C. 
Dobsou, 1869-'70; John W. Parker, 1872-76; Stephen H. Thomas, 
1878; Albert W. Davidson, 1SS0-'S2; J. F. Lingeman, 1884. 

Assessors: Robert V. Franklin, 1870; John S. McOlain, 1872; 
William G. Mitchell, 1874; John W. Davidson, 1876-'78; Theodore 
Stout, ISSO; Alvin M. Brown, 1882. 

CENSUS KFPOriT. • , ' 

By the census of ISSO, the population of Lincoln Township was 
1,610. The following statistics of property and taxation are for 
1885: Acres of land assessed, 14,812.64; value of same, $400,- 
525; value of improvements, $132,483; value of lots, $16,558; value 
of improvements, $28,377; value of personalty, $238,692; total taxa- 
bles, 8806.85: polls, 279; dogs, 174; State tax, $1,107.45; county 
tax, $2,416.60; township tax, $632,37; tuition tax, $870.24; special 
school tax, $:i ,224.92; I'oad tax, $1,264.74; endowment tax, $40.32; 
bridge tax, $806.64; total tax, $10,595. 11 ; delinquent tax, $1,128.22. 

BEOWNSBUEG. 

The village of Brownsburg, witli 800 inhabitants, is on sectioa 
11, in the noithern part of the township, and is a station on the 
I., B. & W. Railroad. Itjvaslaid out by WilliamHarris in 1835, 
and named by him Harrisburg, but the name was changed to 
Brownsburg when the postofSce was established. B.__^il . Jj.ogan 
was the first merchant at Brownsburg. 

Brownsburg was incorporated in 1848^ in which year the Board 
of Commissioners of Hendricks County ordered the following offi- 
cers elected: Chairman, clerk and five trustees. The election 
was held June 24, 1848, and resul;ed in the choice of the follow- 
ing: Chairman, Henry H. Moore; Clerk, T. J. White; Trustees: 






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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COCNTT. 



First Ward, William M. Dinwiddie; Second Ward, T. J. White; 
Third Ward, Sam Bctts; Fourth Ward, Gaten Menifee; Fit'tii 
Ward, Jaraea Davidson. Ten votes only were cast at this first 
election. 

The corporation died after some years, but in 1870 it was revived. 
; Brownsbnrg's business firms in 18S5 are: 

Mrs. T. D. Anderson, millinery; T. D. Anderson, blacksmith; 
James Bonney, drugejist; Bell & Watts, hardware; O. F. Brown, 
wagon-maker and blacksmith; A. G. Bohannon, livery; Cook & 
Co., saw-mill and fence factory; Owen Clark, shoe shop; Cope & 
Hunt, general store; John Dugan, grocery; W. F. Dinwiddie, gro- 
cery and postoifice; Ellis Bros., tile factory; Grandison Eaton, 
brick yard, Charles Forshee, wagon-maker and blacksiiiith; M. D. 
Green, druggist; J. W. Griflith, barber; James Hogan, grocc-; 
Mrs. Hunt, millinery and dress-making; E. C. Keen, meat market; 
Joseph H. Kelley, barber; Mary Laiigsdale, dress-making; 0. D. 
Lumkins, furniture and undertaking; Charles Miller, shoe sho]i; 
S. W. McDonald & Bro., general store; Thomas O'Day, groce-; 
Malachi Quinn, grocer; D. W. Sparks, grocer; Smith & Hawk- 
ins, grist and saw mill; C. L. Tomlinson, livery; J. M. Toll, gen- 
eral store; Samuel W. Watts, grocer; Hugh'Young, grocer. 

The medical profession is represented by Joel T. Barker, A. W. 
Davidson, T. A. Graham and J. L. Marsh (Horn.). The attorneys 
are J. H. Johnson, John K. Jones and John E. Sheehan. 



RELIGIOUS. 

Christian Church. — The oldest and leading church in Browns- 
burg, and the second formed in the township, is the Christian, 
which was organized in_lS3o,_ by Thomas Lockhart, with seventeen 
members. John L. Parker and V. Cress were the elders. Tho 
society now uses a brick church built in 1S59, at a cost of $1,500. 
It will accommodate 400 people. The membership is very large — 
about 250. Services are held monthly, Rev. Mr. Gilchrist, of 
Irvington, being the present pastor. He was p -eceded by J. Y- 
Ludwig, of Greencastle, A. J. Frank, of Greeucastle, and Johr. 
Camfield, of Indianapolis. The present Elders aad Overseers are: 
J. A. C. DobsonandB. O.Davidson; Clerk, L. S. Hunter; Dea 
cons, Charles Tyler, Theodore Cnill, Charles Harmon and Everett 
Hopkins. The Sunday-school has 100 members, and is in charge 
of Jesse R. Cope. 

The Methodist Episcojpal Church ^a.s, the second organized in 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS CODNTT. 



657 



the village. They have a brick church, which is about ten years 
old. The society, however, is small, and not in a prosperous con- 
dition. The oldest member living is Mrs. Forshee. Occasional 
services are now held by Rev. Mr. Warren, of Clermont. Revs. I. 
P. Patch, T. M. Webb and JohiiB. Demott have filled the pulpit 
bereduri.ig the last few years. 

The Pre-shyterian Chiirch was organized by George Long, who 
raised money to build a church in 1S65. This cost $2,300.. Amono- 
those who have served as pastors here are Revs. Beach, McKee 
and Mayo. The pnlpit at present is filled by Rev. H. L. Dicker- 
son. The membership of the societ}' is about twenty. 

St. M(tlachy''s Catholic Churches oldest record bears date Auo-. 
26, 1S67, and was made by Rev. D. J. McMiiUen, through whose 
exertions tiie church was built. Very Rev. Aug. Bcssonies was 
there Feb. 20, 1869, and the first resident priest commenced his 
labors there Oct. 20, 1869. He was succeeded, after a time, bv 
Rev. Dennis O'Donovan. The latter served some years at this 
point, and then exchanged with Rev. Thomas Logan, of Green- 
castle, where he remained a year or two. Returning in 1877 he 
found the parish in debt for certain improvements made by Father 
Logan, and O'Donovan denied the. validity of the debt. Bishop 
Chatard took the opposite view, and to secure the creditors cr^ve a 
mortgage on the church property. Father O'Donovan contested 
the right of the Bishop to mortgage the property, but the court 
decided for the Bishop. The latter then asked, and obtained from 
the; Supreme Court, a writ of ejectment against the priest, who 
also lost a subsequent suit for $50,000 damages for loss of employ- 
ment, etc. During these tx-oubles, mass was regularly held at 
private houses or in a rented hall, by Revs. Patrick Shepherd, Cas- 
per Seller, Charles Curran and E. J. Spelman. The last named is 
the present pastor, and came here in April, 1881. Father Spelman 
was born in Cincinnati, Sept.' 28, 1S50; was ordained priest by 
Bishop de St. Palais at New Albany, April 3, 1873; wus assistant 
priest at St. John's Church, Indianapolis, until January, 1875, and 
pastor at Rushville till July 26, 18S0, when sickness compelled 
him to resign. He then remained at Indianapolis until ;!])pointed 
to this charge. His congregation includes eighty-five families. Ser- 
vices are held every Sunday. 

SOCIETIES. 

Brownshurg Lodge, No. 18S, /. 0- 0. F., was organized in 



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• 658 HISTOET OF HENDKICKS COUNTY. 

1857. Of the members of that organization, there are bow living 
Jacob P. Welshans, J. II. McQuowti (charter members), J. A. C. 
Dobson, Hughes White, Isaac Long and S. "W. Potts. The lodge 
ceased meeting at the opening of the civil war, but was revived in 
1866, since when it has prospered. It has now forty members, 
and meets at Odd Fellows Hall every Wednesday niu-ht. The 

present officers are: S. W. Watts, N. G.; E. C. Keen, V.G.; A. N. 

Crouch, Sec; J. H. McQqowu, Treas.; J. A. C. Dobson, T. H. 
Barlow and J. H. Johnson, Trustees. 

BrownHburg Lodge, No. 241, F.&A. il£,was organized in 1559, 
with the following members: J. T. Davidson, 'H. W. White, J. P. 
Welshans, William Harris, William McDaniel, Joseph HoUoway 
and S. M. Potts. The ledge now has a membership of from sixty- 
five to seventy, and meets at Masouic Hall on Thursday evenino- 
on'or before each full moon. The oScers are: B. P. Jones, W. M.; 
John Pvidgeway, S. W.; J. H. Johnson, J. W. ; C. W. Tyler, Tresis.; 
J. M. Tolle, Sec; James Ellis, S. D..; A. B. Smith, J. D. ; Horace 
Cook, Tyler. 

John A. Hollett Post, No. 2-i2, G. A. E., v/as mustered in the 
fall of 18S3, with eleven members, and named after a gallant fol- 
dier of the Seventy-ninth Indiana. It has now a membership of 
about thirty, and meets the first and tliird Tuesday of each mor th 
at Grand Army Hall. The present oflicers are: W. A. Ellis, Com.; 
Is^athan Cook, S. Y. C; J. T. B. Hollett, J. Y. C. ; Sidney Cook, 
Q. M. ; S. W. Watts, Adj.; G. W. McCrory, O. D.; J. A. C. Dob- 
son, Chap.; Horace Qotik, O. G. 

The Trustees of -^'iJ^yillage of Brownsburg for 1885 are Robert 
Bell, James Bonuey and A. W. Davidson. The School Trustees 
are Dr. J. T. Barker, F. M. Hughes and Jesse R. Cope. 

BIOGEAPHICAL. 

John G. Adams, deceased, was born June 19, 1817, in Harrison 
County, Ky. When a boy he came with bis parents, James and 
Eleanor Adams, to Putnam Countj, Ind., whv-e he was married 
Sept. 29, 1847, to Sarah E. Park, a daughter of John and Melinda 
Park, of Putnam County, formerly of Kentucly. To Mr. and M^s. 
Adams were born nine children — •St'^linda E., Sarah J., Francis Y^., 
Jonn A., Margaret E., Dalcena, James M., Letha H. and Mary 
E. Margaret E. and Dulcena are deceased. Mr. Adams's death 
occurred in August, 1865. He was a kind husband and fatlier 
and was universally respected. His widow still resides on the 



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HISTORY OF HENUKIOKS COUNTY. 659 

home farm which contains eighty acres„ She is a member of the 
Christian church. 

Theophilus H. Barlow was born iu Harrison County, Ky., Feb. 
1, 1820, a son of Enoch and Jane Barlow. _ In 1S2S his parents 
moved to Hendricks County, Ind., and settled in the northern part 
of Wasliington Township, on land entered by his father in 1S26. 
He is the only one living of a family of twelve children. He was 
reared and educated in Hendricks County, and is now one of the 
leading agriculturists of Lincoln Township. He owns 223 acres of 
land, all under cultivation, and his improveriients are among the 
best in the township. He was married Aug. 2J:, 18i2, to Susan 
A., daughter of John and Elizabeth JMoberly, early settlers of 
Hendricks County. They have had eleven eliildren, two of whom 
are living — Mary A., now Mrs. Kobert Belf, of Brownsburg, and 
Abbie Z. Mrs. Bell has nine children — ^Clyde TV., Lloyd T., 
Ernest E. and Grace I. (twins), ISCellie S., Charles H., Zoe M., 
Estelle C. and Clara P. Eliza J., wife of Aaron ISt. Crouch, died 
Dec. 25, 1S79, leaving three children— Estella May, William H. 
and Joanah S. Enoch M. died March C, 1S70, aged twenty-two 
years. Thcophilus died Oct. i, 1363, aged oine years. "William 
Harvey died Sept. 4, 1S61, aged seven years. Gillum L. 
was killed by a run-away team May 29, 1S71, aged ten years. 
Charles A. died Feb. 1, 1881, aged sixteen years. Three died in 
infancy. Mr. Barlow and his family are members of the Presby- 
terian church, which- he has served as Elder twenty-five years. He 
is a member of Brownsburg Lodge, No. ISS, L O. 0. F. In poli- 
tics he is a Eepub'.ican. 

Yolney J. Brovm was born Feb. 1, 1S17,, in Scott County, Ky., 
a son of Daniel and Elizabeth Brown, natives of New Jersey and 
Delaware respectively. They moved to Hendricks County, Ind. 
in 1828, and settled in Lincoln Township w.Jiere the father entered 
160 acres of timber land, and endured nuiuy discomforts in his 
pioneer home. To his parents were bora ten child i-cn, but two 
now living — -Yolney J. and George. Yolnej- J. came t.; this county 
with his parents when a boy and was here i-eared to luanhood. He 
has worked at the carpenter's trade for ra.any years, but his chief 
occupation through life has been farming, and he now owns a good 
farm of 140 acres, under a high state of cnltivation. March 25, 
1841, he was married to Susan Butler, bo>ni in Franklin County, 
Ind., April 12, 1816, a daughter of Williiim and Nancy Butler. 
They have had five children — William M., Isaac H. (deceased), 






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HISTORY OF HENDEICK3 COUNTT. 



Ellis E., Jane Y. and Lazena (deceased). Mr. and Mrs. Brown 
are members of the Christian church. 

Joh7i Coi'Uss, son of jMichael and Hannah Corliss, is a native of 
County Galway, Ireland. "When he was about fitteen years of ago 
he immigrated to America, and settled in Hendricks County, Ind. 
He has always fallowed farming pursuits and now owns a good 
farm of ninety-six acres, situated in Hniou Township, this county. 
He was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Greeley, a daughter 
of John and Bridget Greeley, and to them were born nine children, 
six of whom survive. Those living are — Michael, John, Mary T.. 
Thomas, Delia and Patrick. Mr. Corliss is a consistent member 
of the Roman Catholic church. In politics he is a Democrat. 

Mrs. Maria Davis, daughter of Daniel and Annie (Smith) Xcw- 
ham, was born Oct. 16, 1818, in Scott County, Ky. When very 
young she removed with her parents to Hendricks County, Ind., 
where she was reared. April 16, 1840, she was married in this 
county to Thornton F. Goiliam and to them were born six chil- 
dren — John A., Daniel S., William, Thomas J., Priscilla and 
Thornton. Thomas J. is deceased. Mr. Gorham died in January, 
1853, and our subject was again married, this time to James Davis, 
in August, 18G0. Mr. Davis died in December, 1878, leaving Mrs. 
Davis owner of a good farm of 100 acres in Lincoln Township. 
Mrs. Davis is a member of the Regular Baptist church. 

Benjaviin 0. Davison was born Oct. 2, 1833, in Hamilton 
County, Ohio, a son of Robert and Mary Davison, the former a 
native of Ohio and the latter of Kentucky. In 1837 they came to 
Hendricks County, Ind., from Ohio, settling near Brownsburg 
where his father entered 160 acres of nncultivated land. Here 
they experienced some of the discomforts of pioneer life. Seven 
children were born to them of whom four are living— Sarah A., 
Margaret E., John W. and our subject. The latter was reared 
on a farm in this county. Ho was married April 10, 1856, to 
Theressa Shirley, daughter of "William P. Shirley, an early settler 
of Hendricks County. They have three chikh ni — William P., 
Thomas J. and Carrie E. Mr. Davison lived on iiis farm, one mile 
north of Brownsburg, until the fall of 18S1, when he retired to 
Brownsburg. He owns a good farm of 125 acres, all under a high 
state of cultivation. For several years he has served as Elder 
in the Christian church. Politically he is practically independent. 

Q-randison E aton is a native of Hendricks County, Ind., born 
Sept. 13, 1837, a son of Greenup and Mahala Eaton, early settlers 



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HISTOKY OF HtNDEICKS COUNTY. 



661 






of Hendricks County from Kentucky. He was reared and educa- 
ted in his native county and in his youth learned the bricklayer's 
trade, which he has followed the greater part of tlie time, and at 
onetime was engaged in contracting and built some of the best 
houc-es in the township. He owns a fine farm of 100 acres, which 
he superintends in addition to working at his trade. In August, 
1861, Mr. Eaton enlisted in Company B, Seventh Indiana Infantry, 
and served till August, lS6-±. He participated in some of the 
most important battles of the war, among them being Greenbriar, 
"Winchester, Cedar Mountain, second Bull Bun, Fredericksburg, 
Gettysburg, "Wilderness, Petersburg and Spottsylvania Court- 
House. In January, ISGo, Mr. Eaton was married to lilary F. 
Lawler, of Hendricks County. They are members of the Christian 
church. Mr. Eaton has been a member of the "Village Council 
three years. 

John W. Griffith^ one of the prominent business men of 
Brownsburg, was born in Putnam County, Ind., March 10, 1835, a 
son of Samuel and Camelia R. (Witty) Griffith. His father was 
one of the pioneers of Putnam County, locating there in 1820. 
He died at Vicksburg, Miss., of cliolera in 1837. The mother is 
now the wife of John Couley, of Franklin County, 111. "When 
fourteen years of age our subject began to work as a farm hand 
which he continued two years. "When sixteen years old he went 
to Grcencastle and began learning the barber's trade, serving an 
apprenticeship of three years. He then worked as a journeyman 
about ten years visiting mainly the towns on the Mississippi 
River. He has been a resident of Brownsburg since 1876, where 
he has built up a good trade. He is thoroughly conversant with 
all branches of his trade in additi.Mi to which he carries a stock of 
jewelry and does a watch-repairing business. Afr. Griffith was 
married Nov. 18, 1863, to Rebecca Steepleton, of Edgar Count}', 
111. Of the eight children born to them but two, the eldest and 
youngest, are living — Camelia E. and Carl. Mr. Gritiith enlisted 
in July, 1861, in Company C, Eighth Illinois Infant ;, and par- 
ticipated in the battles of Fort Donelson, "Vicksbur-' Ra^-mond, 
Jackson and others of less importance. He wan a faithful 
soldier and was honorably discharged in August, 1861:. Before the 
war he was a Democrat in politics but since the war has given his 
suffrage to the Republican party and is one of the most earnest 
workers in its ranks. He is a member of the Christian chnrch. 

James G. Hoadley was born in September, 1824, in New Haven 
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HISTOKY OF HENDEICKS COUNTY. 



County, Conn., a son of Alvah and Aurelia Hoadley, who moved 
to Hendricks County, Ind., in 1S3S, and the following spring set- 
tled in Lincoln Township. Mr. ELoadley was reared on a farm and 
received but a limited education. He lias been a resident of this 
township since coming Iiere with his parents in 1S39, with the 
exception of one year spent at Pittsboro, and one j-ear at Arno, 
where he was engaged in the mercantile business. He was mar- 
ried in August, ISiG, to Miss Elizabeth Larsh, of this county, for- 
merly of Kentucky. They have four children — Alva T., Sarah E., 
Cerena and Mary. Mr. Hoadley is one of Lincoln Township's 
leading farmers. He owns 193 acres of land in tliis county and 
eighty acres in La Porte County. In politics he casts his suffrage 
with the Democratic party. He is a member of the Christian 
chiirch. , 

Wiley G. Hull, son of Jesse and Mary Hull, was born iMay 11, 
1810, near Zancsville, Ohio. His parents had a family of eight 
children of whom only twj survive — ^^Yiley G. and Giles. Wiley 
G. was brought to Indiana by his parents at a very early age, 
and when he was nine ycf.rs of age he was left an orphan. He 
then lived with Dr. Le\i Eitter, of Pleasant Garden, Putnam 
County, for several years, and at the age of fourteen he began to 
learn the blacksmith's trade with "Wtlliain "Wilkin, of Plaintield, 
Hendricks County, with whom he remained several years. In 
Se]>tember, 1S61, he enlisted at St. Louis in the Second Missouii 
Cavalry and participated in numerous battles and skirmishes, 
among which were Chattanooga, Prairie-De-Hand, Little Missouri, 
Selma, iurkville and Meirphis. He was slightly wounded during 
the campaign and his con;;titutioii was greatly impaired. He was 
honorably discharged in September, 186-5. Jan. 25, 1S66, he was 
married to Jane Walker, a daughter of Joseph Walker (deceased). 
Nine children have been born to them, six now living — Sarah L., 
Wade, OUie, Haskett, Oscar and Ada. Elora, Iva and Laura are 
deceased. Mr. [lull is at present living on his farm in the north- 
east part of Lincoln Township. He is a uicmberof the Grand 
Artny of the Pepublic. He also belongs to the Christian church. 

William Ryltoa, a prominent farmer and stock-raiser of Lincoln 
Township, was born in Gr.iyaon County, Va., July 5, 1S29, a son 
of Samuel and Elizabeth Hylton, natives of Virginia. His parents 
came to Hendricks County, Ind., in 1835, and for a short time 
lived near Cartersburg, th;n removed to Washington Township 
where the father died in .J auuarj, 18-12. Of a family of si;-: chil- 



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HISTOKT OF HENDKICKS COUNTT. 



663 



dreii, but two are living — William and Taraanda J. Wesley, Eli, 
Stephen and E"ancy £. are deceased. William Hylton was reared 
and educated in Hendricks County. His early life was spent on a 
farm and since attaining matiiiood he has eug.iged in agricultural 
pursuits. He owns a iino farm of 160 acres and his residence and 
farm buildings are comfortable and commodious. He was mar- 
ried in September, 1S50, to Margaret J. Barlow, daughter of John 
and Martha Barlow, early settlers of Montgomery County. To 
them have been born nine children, but Hve of whom are liviuo- — 
Theodra A., Viola, Lillie B., Maggie and William H. Charles 
W., John S., Martha and Mary E. are deceased. Mr. Hylton has 
been prominently identified with the Presbyterian church many 
years, and is serving as Deacon and Elder at the present time. He 
has served as Commissioner of Hendricks County three years. 

William M. Jenkins was born iu Guilford County, IST. C, Oct. 
15, 1833, a son of John and Eebecca Jenkins, early settlers of 
Hendricks County. He was reared on a farm, receivino- a o-ood 
education iu the public schools. He remained at home till April 
1861, when he enlisted in Company A, Seventh Indiana Infantry, 
and served three montlis. In February, 1863, he enlisted in the 
Sixty-third Indiana Infantry and served till tlie following August, 
when he was discharged on account of ill-health. He then re- 
turned to Hendricks County, and has since devoted his atten- 
tion to agriculture. He has a good farm of seventy-five acres on 
section 22, Lincoln Township, all under cultivation. Mr. 
Jenkins was married in January, 1863, to Hannah L. Beed, who 
died in",March, 1867, leaving two children — Luella W. and John 
L. In November, 1876, \^ married Elizabeth J., daughter of 
James W. and Bachel Townsend, of Fount;i.m County, Ind. To 
them have been born three children — Geoi'^e il., Katie A. and 
Susan L. Mrs. Jenkins is a member of the Presbyterian church. 

Dr. John L. Marsk vf&s born in Brown Township, Hancock 
County, Dec. 27, 1851. His father, Jonas iKarsh, was one of the 
first settlers of the county having moved from. East Tennessee to the 
county in 1S37 and lived 'continuously upon tiie samefiirra until his 
death in 1877. Daring this time he helped to clear the forests, 
drain the swamps, make roads a.id convert the wilderness into 
broad grain fields. He reared U large family of children and o-ave 
them a liberal education. Some are graduates of Asbury Uni- 
versity and all have ^ occupied prominent positions in the social 
and political affairs of the coimty. One son has been County 



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664 HISTORY OF HENDKICKS COUNTY. 

Clerk eiglit years and is now a prominent attorney at Greenfield; 
another son is an attorney, and the youngest is a physician, the 
others being farmers. To his children ho bequeathed a record of 
a sterling character and Quaker lionesty which he in turn received 
from his father who was a Quaker of the strictest faith. 
John L. Marsh, the youngest sou, at the age of eighteen entered 
the office of Dr. William Trees as a medical student. In 1S72 
and 1S73 he attended a course of lectures in the Louisville Med- 
ical College and was in attendance at the United States Marine 
Hospital for the remainder of the year. The next year he 
attended the Ohio Medical College receiving the degree of M. D. 
at the close of the term. He was the youngest member of the 
graduating class being just twenty-one years old. After leaving 
college, in 1S74, he located in "Warrington, Hancock County, and 
commenced practice with his preceptor. In 1S77 he moved to 
Greenfield where most of his relatives lived, and where he built 
up a fine practice. Not being satisfied he determined to move to 
Indianapolis but friends persuaded him to go to Brownsburg as it 
was close to the city and otlierwise desirable. This he did in the 
fall of ISSl, and has practiced medicine at this place for the past 
four years. Daring this time he has enjoyed a fine practice built 
np among strangers and without assistance, opposed by the local 
jirofessiun on account of his liberal ideas and belief in progressive 
medicine, as his idea of medical practice is to use any remedy in any 
manner that will most speedily cure disease and relieve sufl'ering. 
In 1S79 he commenced the publication of a medical journal .xt 
Greenfi.eld, devoted to liberal medicine. This proved a success 
and soon gained a good circulation, ^he next year it was moved 
to Indianapolis where it is still being published with some mod- 
ifications by its original editor in conjunction with other parties. 
The ofiice of publication is IIS N'orth Illinois street, at which 
place the Doctor has a consultation otfiee. In 1SS3 the Ijeach 
Medical College was organized on a liberal basis, and the chair of 
physiology was given to Dr. Marsh, which position he still retains, 
as the college has proven a success financially and otherwise. The 
Doctor's motto of professional life has been to be honest and 
upright with his patrons and to never slander or speak slighting'y 
of other practitioners but to attoncP strictly to his own business. 
The Doctor's social life has been a pleasant one. In 1S7.5 he 
married Laura E. Trees, daughter of John W. Trees, of "Warring- 
ton, [nd., who has contributed largely to his success in life. She 



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HISTOEY OF HEiNT^RICKS COUNTT. 



665 



attends to ber domestic duties to the almost entire exclusion of 
fashionable life and sees tliat home is what it should be. Duiinej 
the ten years of married- life three children have been born to 
them. Florence, tlie eldest, died at the age of four years and this 
was the greatest affliction the family has sustained as she was a 
child of unusual promise. Mabel, the next, is now five years 
old and is a beautiful and intelligent ciiild, having her niind 
enriched by travel and contact with people until her knowledge 
is greater than many grown people. Katie is the baby and bids 
fair to make another Florence. The Doctor each year leaves the 
cares of business and with his family takes a trip to some of the 
fishing resorts and spends a few days in boyhood pleasures and 
takes a renewed lease on life. They have a nice residence with 
his office near by, in one of the best localities in Brownsburg. 

James M. Me^lcer was born in Hendricks County, Ind., Feb. 
3, 1856, a son of Peter and Elizabeth Metsker, pioneers of this 
county. He was reared and educated in his native county and 
since attaining manhood has devoted his attention to agricult- 
ural pursuits, owning now a fine farm, on section 28, Lincoln 
Township. Mr. Metsker was married April 14, ISSO, to Mira A. 
Barlow, daughter of Harvey and Sarah J. Barlow. To them liave 
been born three children— Robert L., Eva .M. and Alpha G. Mr. 
and Mrs. Metsker are members of the Presbyterian church, and 
among the prominent young people of Lincoln Township. 

'William n. IT. Metsker is a native of Hendricks County, born 
April 3, lSJr9, a son of Peter and Elizabeth Metsker, his father a 
native of Ohio and his mother of Delaware. His parents were 
early settlers of Hendricks County and were prominent in assisting 
in its development. His father died in December, ISSi, and his 
mother is still a resident of Lincoln Township. They had a family 
of eight children, but four of whom are Uviasf — John T., William 
H. H.,, James M. and Mary. W. H. H. Metsker was reared a 
farmer, a vocation he has followed since attaining manhood. He 
has been successful in his pursuits and now owns 165^1- acres of 
valuable land on section 22, Lincoln Tovrnship. He was mar- 
ried Dec. 21, 1871, to Melinda J. Merritt, daughter of George 
"W. Merritt, of Washington Townthip. They have six cliildren — 
Nora M., Cora E., Ora L., Mary £., Lillie II. and Charles O. Mr. 
and Mrs. iletsker are members of the Presl.'jterian church. 

Isaac C. Nash, a pioneer of Lincoln Township, was born March 
27, 1S17, in Madison County, Ohio. His parents were Thomas 



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606 



HISTORY OF HENDEICKS COUNTY. 



and Hannah Nash, natives of Pennsylvania and Virginia respect- 
ively. They einijrrated to Indiana in 1825, and lived one year in 
Marion County. They then came to Hendricks County, locating 
on White Lick Creek in Lincoln Townsliip, where they entered 
eighty acres of land. About lSi5 they moved to Missouri, remain- 
ing there till their death. Of the nine children born to them six are 
living— Margaret, Elizabeth, Isaac C.,Mary S., Sarah A. and Daniel. 
George, Eichard and Jeremiah are deceased. Our subject came 
to this county witli his parents when a boy and was here reared 
to maturity. ^He was first married Jan. 23, ISll, to Cilicia Wilson, 
daughter of Williani and Nancy Wilson. They have had nine 
children— William J., Mary E., Clarinda, Thomas J., Edward F., 
George A., Cilicia, John and Albcrtus. John and xilbertus are 
deceased. Mrs. Nash died Dec. 13, 1S60, and Mr. Nash was 
again married in April, lS6i, to Eliza J. Faucett, daugliter of 
Joseph and Rebecca Faucett, early settlers of Hendricks County. 
In lSi.3 Mr. Nash settled on section 3, this township, and now 
owns 220 acres of land. He is a member of the Presbyterian 
church and has served as Elder several years. His wife is a mem- 
ber of tlio Methodist Episcopal church. 

Charles W. Need, a prominent farmer of Lincoln Township, was 
born in Bourbon County, Ky., March 29, 1834, a son of Nathaniel 
and Sallie Neal. His mother died when he was a year old, and 
when he was nine his father died. His early life was spent in his 
native State and in Illinois, and in 1S64 he came' to Hendricks 
County, Ind., and located in the southern part of Lincoln Township 
where he has since lived. ]Ie owns a large farm of 400 acres, and 
his improvements are nnexcelled in this county. Air. Neal 
was married July 4, 1S61, to Emma S. Bradley, of Kentucky. Four 
cliildren have been born to tiiom— Tabner, Claude, Forest, and 
Lorenzo; the latter is deceased. In politics Mr. Neal is a Demo- 
crat. 

Thomas JVeioham, a pioneer of Lincoln Township, was born Oct. 
30, 1816, in Seott County, Ky., a son of Daniel and Annie New- 
ham, the former a native of Maryland, and the latter of North 
Carolina. In the fall of 1826 his parents moved to Hendricks 
County from Marion Count), Ind., where they had located a short 
time. They then settled on section 20, Lincoln Township, wiiero 
they lived till th.eir death, and where our subject yet resides. Here 
he v»-as reared to manh'jiod, receiving but little education, as his 
services were re!_[uired on the farm. He now has a good farm of 



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HISTOKY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



CC7 



130 acres of land under a high state of cultivation. In 1844 he was 
married to Miss Xancy Turner, of Boone Co.untj, and to them were 
born two children, both of whom are deceased. Mrs. Newham 
died in lS-19, and he was married to Miss Nancy (Larimore) Mor- 
gan, of Marion County. Of eiglit children born to them only one . 
survives— Robert F. Mr. Newham has held the office of School 
Director. 

John K. T. Patterson, son of Francis and Margaret (Eoss) Pat- 
terson, was born in Fleming County, Kj'., Feb. 7, 1813. His 
parents moved with their family to Hendricks County, Ind., in 
1S35, remaining here till their death. Of their family of five cliil- 
dren, but two survive— John K. Y. and Susan. John K. Y. was 
married in August, 1835, to Miss Arie Shockley, daughter of James 
B. Shockley, of Fleming County, Ky. To thorn have been born 
ten children— James PI., Francis M., William E., John W., Silas, 
Eosanna, Esther, Margaret E. (deceased), America and' Carrie. Mr.' 
Patterson saw much of pioneer life in his youth. He has been 
engaged in agricultural pursuits from his youth and has met with 
success. He has a farm of 19G acres of land, and resides in the 
■western part of Lincoln Township. 

Emanuel Prebsten- was born June 15, 1813, in Scioto County, 
Ohio. His parents were John and Christena Prebster, natives of 
Germany. They were the parents of si.t children, of whom three 
are living— Keuben, Christian, and Emanuel, our subject. The 
latter came to Hendricks County, Ind., with his father's family, 
who entered a large tract of wild land in Lincoln Township, at that 
time known as Brown Township. His educational facilities were 
very limited, he being obliged to help his father on the farm from 
his boyhood. Oct. 8, 1850, he was married to Mrs. Mary (Mil by) 
Hollett, born March 24, 1821, in North Carolina, a daughter of 
Thomas Milby, and widow to the late Mark Hollett. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Prebster were born three children— Eliza C, Anderson and 
Everson. Mr. Prebster has been successful in his agricultural 
pursuits and n.^w owns a good farm of 150 acres. In politics he 
is a Republican. In 1873, having for some tinio previous been 
afflicted with a rheumatic swelling in the knee, he had one of his 
limbs amputated above the kne ). 

■ Robert Salmon, a native of Ohio, was born in Hamilton County, 
Feb. 13, 1S18, and was a son of Jeremiah and Nancy Salmon. His 
father was a native of Pennsylvania, and his mother of Ohio. They 
had a family of nine children, of whom only four are livint^— 



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niSTORf OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



Robert, Jeremiah, Margaret and Nancj A. Robert Salmon was 
married in his native county, April 29, ISiO, to Priscilla Pines, 
who died in 1S67. They had a, family of eleven children seven of 
whom survive — Hester A., Nancy, 8usan, Clarkson, Benjamin, 
Jeremiah and George. Mr. Salmon married for his second wife in 
November, 1S67, Mrs. Eliza A. (Siirber) Prebster, widow of the 
late Fi-ederick Prebster, of this county. Mr. Salmon is a member 
of the United Brethren chm'ch, and is a liberal contributor to both 
church and State enterprises. He resides on his farm in the 
northern part of this township. 

William Todd, one of the representative citizens ot Lincoln 
Township, is a native of Chillicothe, Ohio, born Oct. 2, IS 16, a 
son of James and Mary A. Todd. When he was two years of age 
his parents moved to Switzerland County, Ind., where they both 
died. Three of their seven children are living — "William, Henry 
and Rose. Those deceased are — Prilly, Matilda, John and Harriat. 
AVilliani Todd was reared in Switzerland County. In 1S36 he 
came to Hendricks Comity, and soon after went to Boone County 
and entered forty acres of land, subsequently buj'ing forty acres 
adjoining. He lived in Boone County till the fall of 1S42, when 
he came to Hendricks County and located in the southern part of 
Lincoln Township, where he lived nearly forty years. In the fall 
of 18S0 he retired from the active labors of the farm and moved 
to Brownsburg, where he has a pleasant home. His farm of 115 
acres is under a higii state of cultivation, and the improvements 
are among the best in Lincoln Townsliip. He has been an ener- 
getic, frugal man, and is now reaping the reward of his early years 
of toil. Mr. Todd was married Sept. 12, 1S39, to Leanna New- 
ham, who was born May 20, 1S20, a daughter of Daniel and Annie 
Newham, early settlers of Hendricks County. They have one 
child — Mary A., now Mrs. "William Reuick, of Brownsburg, this 
county. In politics Mr. Todd is a Democrat. 

Lincoln C. Tomlinson, proprietor of the livery, feed and sale 
stables, Brownsburg, Ind., is a native of Hendricks County, Ind., 
born March 2S, 1S59, a son of John and Harriett Tomlinson, of 
Plainfield. He was reared and educated in his native county, and 
is one" of the prominent young business men of Brownsburg. He 
was married .lune 29, ISSl, to AUie De Happard, of Brownsburg. 

Anderson Turpin, son of Ilobison and Rachel Turpin, \vas born 
in Scott County, Ky., in October, 1831. In 1S3-1 he came with 
his parents to Hendricks Cointy, Ind., where he was reared to 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



669 



manhood. Nov. 20, 1S53, he was united in marriage to Miss 
Louisa E. Rnpard, of Clark County, Ky. Six children have been 
born to them — Wilkerson, Mary E., William H., Martha E., 
Rachel A. and Ora A. Mary E. and Ora A. are deceased. Mr. 
Turpin is the owner of a tine farm of eighty acres and is meeting 
with success in his agricultural pursuits. He and his wife are 
earnest members of the Christian church. 

Henry Turpin was born Jan. 11, 1835, in Hendricks County, 
Ind., a son of Kobison and Rachel Turpin, natives of Kentucky. 
His parents came to this county in lS3i, and settled on a tract of 
timbered land in the southern part of Lincoln Township, residing 
here till their death, which oceuiTcd in 1S80. Nine children were 
born to them, seven of v/hom are living — Anderson, Henry, Har- 
vey, Doctor, Martha, Jacob and Elizabeth M. Henry Tui-pin was 
reared on a farm. He received a fair education, and for a short 
time was engaged in teaching school. In August, 1862, he en- 
listed in Company I, Seventh Indiana Infantry, and participated 
in the battles of second Bull Run, Antietam, Eredcricksburg, and 
a number of others. He received a wound in the shoulder at the 
battle of the "Wilderness in May, 186-1:, which disabled him for two 
months. At the end of that time he again reported for duty and 
was recruited into Company G-, which, subsequently became con- 
solidated with the Twentieth Indiana Infantjy. He was present 
at Lee's surrender to General Grant. fie was honorably dis- 
charged in June, 186.5, when he returned home, and Nov. 28, of 
the same year, he was married to Amelia E. Brock, of Decatur 
County, Ind., formerly of Kentucky. They have three children — 
Cora B., William C. and George H. Mjr. Turpin ranks among 
the leading farmers of Lincoln Township,' and is the owner of 200 
acres of land. He and his wife are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

Preston Tyler, retired farmer, was born in Hendricks County, 
lud., Sept. 4:, 1833, a son of George and Lncinda Tyler, natives of 
Kentucky. His father was one of tlie early settlers of Hendricks 
County, and entered 120 acres of Government land in Lincoln 
Township, which he made his home till his death. His family 
consisted of ten children, sevon of whom are living — Lutitia, 
Susan, Preston, Benjamin F., Charles W., Lydia and Melinda. 
Kittie, Alfred and George are deceased. Preston Tyler was reared 
and educated in his native county, and has always made it his 
home with the exception of ten years spent in Marion Connty, 



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670 



HISTOEY OF HENDEICKS COUNTY. 



7p 



He lias been a successful ac^riculturist, and owns a fine farm of 
seventy-one and a half acres, but since ISSO has lived in Browns- 
burg. He was married Dec. 15, 1S54, to Allie Smith, daughter of 
Thomas and Susan Smith. They have one son — Willis, born May 
26, 1S64. In February, 1865, Mr. Tyler enlisted at Indianapolis 
in Company I, One Hundred and Forty-eighth Indiana Infantry, 
and served till the following September. He and his wife are 
members of the Christian church. 






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idSslii'ii-iVsiciv 







CHAPTER XYIir. 



MARION TOWNSHIP. 



Geographical Desceiption. — Pioneeks. — ^New "Winchester. — 
Chdkches. — Political Histoky. — Justices, Constables, Asses- 
soKS, Trustees, etc. — Statistics. ^Biogeaphical. 

This township is bounded on the north by Eel Kiver, ou tlio 
enst by Center and Clay, on the south by Clay, and on the west 
by Putnam County. The surface is for the most part undulating, 
and in some places nearly flat. The streams are all mere branches, 
which put out from. springs and flow toward both Eel River and 
Mill Creek. There is a clay subsoil throughout the entire extent 
of the township, and much of the land is second-class for grain, but 
it is all first-class for the orrasses. Little gravel is found in this 
township, and, consequently, there has been but very little im- 
provement of the highways, which get very bad in long continued 
wet weather. The farmers of Marion Tc'wnship fully realize the 
advantages of their soil for the production of grasses, and have a 
larger acreage in open and woodland pastra-e than any other town- 
ship, and send to market a larger number of the fat cattle and siieep 
than any other township in the county. 

In every new country the settlements are first formed on the 
streams, and in Ilendricks County it begajn on "White Lick, south 
of Piainfield, and then followed up "White Lick and its East- and 
"West forks, and then spread out over the country like a fan, and, 
therefore, those townships farthest from the streams were last in 
settling, and Marion Township did not have a single settler within 
its borders until nearly two years after the coui\ty was organized. 
The first settlers were Tliomas Samuels, Xury "West, John and 
Isaac Hays, and Daniel, Thomas and David Higgins, who settled 
in the township from 1S26 to 1S27. From 1S2S to 1S32, Paul 
Faught, Moses Cavett, William Elackketter, "William and Harvey 
Euntain, G. W. Turner, "Wesley Morgan, Peter Yaimice, Thomas 
Chadd, John Hancock, James McCownaud William Hays settled 
in difi'erent portions of the township. 

(C71) 



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672 HISTORY OF HEKDKIOKS COUNTY. 



New Winchester was laid out in 1832 by "Wesley Morgan and 
James Bronangh. It is situated a little west of the center of the 
township and seven miles west of Danville, on theRockville road. 
It contains about 100 inhabitants, and is a place of little impor- 
tance. There is a postofBce, the only one in the township, and a 
store, kept by J. O. Kennedy. Edward Scott keeps a blacksmith- 
shop, and 1,. H. Ricl\ is a shoemaker. There are two physicians, 
William Eobbins and T. T. Brazier. There are also tiiree churches, 
the only ones in the township. The oldest is the Cliristian, which 
has a congregation of about 100. The present pastor is Rev. D. 
Collins, of Nortli Salem. He was preceded by Revs. Oliver P. 
Badgei', Canfield and Heckethorue. Services arc held the first 
Sunday in each month. The next oldest church is the Baptist, 
with an attendance of 125. The pastor is Rev. Alex. Mayhall, 
of JMew Maysville, who \vas preceded by Revs. Sheirill, Keller 
and Layton. Services are lield the third Sunday in each montli. 
The Cumberland Presbyterian church hp.s a congregation of per- 
haps ninety. Rev; Morton Long, the pastor, resides here. Before 
him were Revs. Hawkins f.nd Yan Dyne. An Odd Fellows' lodge 
was maintained here for several years, but died about ISSl. 

FIRST ELECTION. 

The poll-book of the general election of Aug. 3, 1S36, heldat New 
"Williamsburgh, gives the names of thirty-one voters, whicli afford 
a partial list of the first settlers. Here are the natnes, as written 
on this document: "William Hodges, Elijali Sutton, David Fox, 
Henry Tomlinson, "William Bailey, Abraham Lewis, Alexander 
Bryant, William Tomlinson, James Turner, Brr.dford Samuel, R. 
"W. Shannon, Jeremiah Culbertson, Joseph Lewis, Jr., JaTnes 
Maccoun, .John Higgins, Jacob Fox, Henry Bland, William Hay- 
worth, John Mahan, John Robins, Jordan Denny, William Robins, 
John Yicory, Joseph Robins, Wesley Morgan, Hiram Tomlinson, 
B. S. B. Parker, Moses Tomlinson, Jeremiah Hunt, Martin Han- 
cock and Thomas Higgins. 

At this election Jacob B. Lowe, for Congress, received fifteen 
votes, and George L. Kiunard, fourteen; Christian C. Xave, for 
Representative, received fourteen votes, James Anderson, thirteen, 
and Job Osborn, three; Edmund Clark, for Sheriff, received twen- 
ty-three votes, and James Siggersou, seven; Henry H. Marvin, for 
Probate Judge, received twenty-four votes. 



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HISTORY OF HEXDEICKS COUNTi'. 
POLITICAL. 



673 



The political sentiment of the people of Marion Township has 
been rather variable. From 1836 to 1S52 it was Whii^ by dimin- 
ishing majorities; in 1856 it was carried by the Democrats; then 
until after the war it worshiped the Eepcblican gods; and from 
1868 to the present time it has been loyal to the Democratic party. 
Following is the vote at each presidential election: 



1836— William 11. Harrison. . 4 3 
Mnrtin VanBuren 9 

1844— Henry Clay 04 

James K.Polk 6 

1843— Zachary Taylor 123 

Lewis Cn?s 83 

Martin VanBarea 8 

1852- Winfield Scott 90 

Franklin Pierce 96 

JohLiP.Hale 2 

ISoC — Jaroes Bucbanau 134 

John C. Fremont 94 

Millarcl Fillmore 16 

18C0 — Abraham Lincoln 137 

Stephon A. Douglas 103 

JohnC. Breckenridge.. 30 
John Pen 8 



34 
58 
39 



40 



34 



18G4— Abraham Lincoln 130 

George B.McClellan. .. 91 

186S— Horaiio Seymour 160 

Uijsses S. Grant 124 

1873 — Horace Grerley 1.57 

Ulysses S. Grant 129 

1876— Samuel J. Tilden 179 

Rataerford B.Hays 123 

Peter Cooper '. 5 

1880- Wmfield S. Hancock ... 183 

Jarmes A. Garfield 139 

Jam^s B. Weaver 7 

1884— Grfflver Cleveland. 18.5 

James G Blaine 12G 

Beajamin F. Butler 2 

Jolan P. St. John 1 



39 
39 
28 
56 

40 

59 



OFFICIAL. 



Following are the names of those who have been selected Justices, 
Constables, etc., for Marion Township, together with the years in 
wliich they were chosen; 

. Justices of the Peace: Harmon Brittain and Samuel Shannon, 
1833; Job Turner, 1838; David Higgins, 1843; Lemmon Christie,' 
1843; Lemmon Christie, 1818; George AT. Brown, 1851; Henry C. 
Harper, 1853; Benjamin Robins, 1854; William Kirkpatrick, 1855; 
James Sheets and Elisha Bailey, 1858; B.. F. Faught, 1S62; Joseph 
H. Sellers, 1863; W. W.Graham and G. R. Harper, 1866; John 
A.Orth, 1867; John Armstrong and James Crews, 1870; W. W. 
Graliam and G. Washington Turner, 1372; G. Washington Turner 
and Anthony W. Kelly, 1874; Joseph Allison and Anthony W. 
Kelly^ 1878; Joseph Allison and John Q. Hill, 1382. 

Constables: John Hayes and Ale.xaodor West, 1833; iS'atiianiel 
Brittain and James Turner, 1S34; Thomas C. Gray and James 
Turner, 1835; JS'athaniel Brittain and James Turner, 1836; Thomas 
C. Gray and James Turner, 1S37-'S; "Robert Parsons and F. Taylor, 
1839; Jeremiah Culbertson and George M. Turner, 1841; Miciiael 
Higgins and Jeremiah Culbertson, 'l845-'6; David Gricr.-s and 



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HISTOKT OF HENDKICKS COUNTY. 



Jeremiah Culbortson, ISiT; Levi Armstrong and Jeremiah Cul- 
■ bertsoD, 1S4S; Andrew Atkins and Jeremiali Culbertson, 1S49; 
Jeremiah Culbertson, 1S50; Jeremiah Culbertson and James 
Lymes, ISol; Jeremiah Culbertson and William Plampton, 1852; 
J. B. Proctor and William Hampton, 1S53; William Hampton 
and Elijah Tinder, 1854; William Hampton and W. Stewart 
Kobbin?, 1S55; Michael Higgins, Sr., and Daniel Higgin?, 1856; 
Washington A. West and Daniel Higgins, Sr., 1857; Xury E. 
West and James Turner, 185S; George L. Tiiompson and Gcorgawuy 
Sullivan, 1859, Toliver Stephenson and George P. Turner, 1860; 
Toliver Stephenson and Richard F. Harper, 1861; W. F. Parker 
and Logan Brown, 1862; S. P. Thrift and William Bales, 1863; S. 
P. Tbrilt and J; :ne3 Hemphill, 186-1; Bichard F. Harper and Logan 
Brown, 1865; John M. Miindy and Alfred McCoy, 1SG6; H. C. 
Hays and James Crews, 1867; James Crews and John M. Mundy, 
1S6S; James Crews and Thomas B. Hankins, 1869 ; Austin Bohan- 
non and Henry Dooley, 1870; Austin Bohannon and John R. 
Shannon, 1872; A. Dooley and James A. Bohannon, 1871; Robert 
Armstrong iind James A. Bohannon, 1876; Joseph T. Waters and 
James A. Bohannon, 1878; James A. Bohannon and James Crews, 
1880; James Montgomery and James Cr^ws, 1882; James Fields 
and J. F. Bailey, ISSl. 

Trmfees: Ricco Trowbridge, 1856; William Pinson, Sr., 1S57; 
James Sliarp, 1858; Jolm X. Shirley, 1359; Aaron T. Dooley, 
1860^'l;Michael Higgins, lS62-'3; Levi Aruistroug, 1861-'5; Michael 
Higgins, 1866; Levi Armstrong, 1867; John Bayne, 186S-"9; H. 
E. West, 1870-'2; Michael Higgins, 1871:; William Byrd, 1876-'S; 
William W. Graham, lS80-'82; A. W. Kelly, 1881. 

Clerks: Reuben S. AVard, lS5G-'7; William Byrd, 1858 (office 
abolished). 

Treasurers: William H. Fanght, 1856-'7; Michael Higgins, 1S5S 
(office abolished). 

Assessors: Joseph Allison, 1870; C. M. Griggs, 1872; William 
C. Mitchell, 1874; Richard F. Harper, 1S76-'S; Samuel M. Tin- 
der, 1880; M. P. West, 1SS2. - ■ 



ST/ TISTICAL. 



The population of Marion Township bj the census of 18S0 wa^ 
1,29S. The following statistics of property and taxation are for the 
year 1SS5: Acres of land assessed, 21,470.58; valueof same, 6655,- 
635; valueof improvements, §77,972; value of lots, S64C; value 



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HISTORY OF HENDKICK3 COUNTY. 



675 



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of improvements, $2,246; value of personalty, 8^84,263; total tax- 
able property, $920,762; polls, 243; dogs,_lS7: State tax, $1,225.34; 
county tax, $2,680.77; township tax, $919.90; tuition tax, $1,164.- 
59; special school tax, $612.67; road tax, $1,839.80; endowment 
Jax, $46; bridge tax, $919.90; total taxes, $11,373.26; delinquent 
taxes, $730.70. 

BIOGRAPHICAL. 

Lewis Blackketter was born in Putnam County, Ind., Oct. 16, 
1825, a son of William and Elizabeth (Clounch) Blackketter, with 
whom he lived till manhood, accompanying them to Hendricks 
County when five years of age. He lived on the homestead till 
I860, when he, with the rest of the family, moved to Missouri, and 
with them returned to Hendricks County in 1S71, and has since 
lived on section 17, where he has a pleasant home. He was mar- 
ried Oct. 1, 1848, to Elizabeth Alexander, a native of Hamilton 
County, Ohio, born Jan. 1, 1827, daughter of Eobert Alexander. 
They have thi'ee children — Weslej', living with his parents; Georore 
W., of tliis township, and Spicey Jane, wife of Edmund Williams, 
also of Marion Township. In politics and religion Mr. Blackketter 
adheres to the faith of his father, being a Republican in the former, 
and his entire family being members of the Christian church. 

William BlacJcJcdter was born in Mecklenburg County, Va., Feb. 
19, 1795, and when a boy accompanied his father to Mercer County, 
Ky. At the age of nineteen years he enlisted in the Kentuckv 
militia and was one of the heroes that fought under Jackson at 
Orleans. He went down the river from Louisville, Ky., to New 
Orleans in a flat-boat. After the war he returned to Mercer County, 
Ky., walking all the way. Jan. 27, 1820, he was married to Eliz- 
abeth Clounch, a native of that county, born Nov. 20, 1800. In 
1821 they moved to Jadcson County, Ind., thence in 1824 to Green- 
castle, Putnam County, then a place of three cabins. Borrowino- 
a few boards he made him a camp by a lo^ and lived tlicre six 
weeks, till he raised a cabin, working part of the time at 12-J- cents 
per day for meat and bread for his fixmily. In the tall of 1S25 he 
bought a tract of Government land three miles from Greencastle, 
where they lived till 1830, when ho entered 240 acres of land in 
Marion Township, Hendricks County, on which they lived till the 
fall of 1865. They then sold tlieir farm and removed to Nortliern 
Missouri, but in September, 1S71, returned to Hendricks County 
and bought his old farm again, where they still live in the enjoy- 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



nient of a fair degree of health. Thej have shared each other's joys 
and sorrows sixty'-five years, and in this time have lived in three 
States and experienced many privations and hardships incident to 
pioneer life. Their family consisted of six children, all of whom 
reached maturity — Jane, deceased, was the wife of William Alex- 
ander; Lewis, of this township; Lucinda, wife of Isaac McRey- 
nolds; Alvin, deceased; Emily and Wesley. In politics Mr. Black- 
ketter is a Republican. lie and his family are members of the 
Christian church. 

Henry H. Buntaiii, son of William and Leaner (Wilson) Bun- 
tain, was born in Mercer County, Ky. , Nov. 23, 181S. He was 
reared a farmer an4 has followed that avocation most of his life. 
He was also engaged in the manufacture of brick in the early days 
of this county. He came v.'ith his parents to tliis county from Ken- 
tucky in 1S32 and lived with them till his marriage in 1837 to 
Frances Kobbins. She was born in Nortti Carolina, Sept. 6, 1S19, 
a daughter of William and Leah Robbias, natives of Noith Caro- 
lina, who settled in Hendricks County in the spring of 1S33. Her 
father died April 16, 1S71, rtged about ninety years, his wife hav- 
ing died a izw j-ears previous from a paralytic stroke. Their chil- 
dren were — John and Benjamin, deceased; Mrs. Elizabeth Denny, 
living in this township; Mrs. Lourany Bfu-nard, of Putnam County; 
Mrs. Frances Buntain; Mrs. Folly Pliggins, Jacob, Mettie, Joab, 
all deceased; William, of Putnam Coiiuty; Mrs. Eunice Wright 
and Mrs. Selraa Steel, both deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Henry Buntaiii 
have seven children living — ^Benjamin C, at home; Mrs. Mary C. 
Dooley, of this township; Mrs. Leaner L. Wright, also of this town- 
ship, whose first husband died in Tennessee while serving in the 
late war; Mrs. Martha E. McCoun, of this county; John H., Sarah 
E. and Charles L., all at home. Joseph E. died, aged twenty-two 
years; Ruth Ida died at the age of four years, and one child died in 
infancy. Mr. Buntain is an ardent Repmblican, as was also his 
father, who left Kentucky because of his antipathy to slavery. lie 
has served one term as County Commissioiaer and several terms as 
Trustee of Union Township. He is a member of North Salem 
Lodge, No. 142, F. & A. M. His entire family are members of the 
Christian church. Our subject's father was born where Harrodsburg 
now stands, in the historic " Harrod's Fort." He and his wife arc 
both deceased. They were the parents of the following children — 
Mrs. Sarah Keller, died in Kansas; Mrs. Julia Ann Christie, lives in 
Pntnam County; James V., lives in Buchanan County, ^lo.; Henry 



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HISTORY OF HEND.7JICKS COUIJ-TY, 



677 



4 



H., our su'ojoct; Theodore, a resident of New Winchester, Ind.; 
Mrs. Martha Weddle, died in this county; Mary J., lives in New 
Winchester, wliere slie owns property; William H., resides at Dan- 
viHe; John A., of this countj, and Mrs. Nancy B. Goodwin, a 
widow residing iti Kansas. 

Benjaviin B. Dodson, deceased, one of tlie early settlers of 
Marion Township, was born and reared in Wavne County, Kv 
He can,e to Hendricks County when a young man," but sub^enuentfy 
returned to Kentucky and married Lethena Tbon;pson, a native of 
Madison County, that State. lie then came again to Indiana and 
settled on section 25, Marion Township, on an eighty-acre tract 
entered from the Government. A few years later he moved to sec- 
tion 31, Center Township, where he lived till his death, Aug. 20 
ISSO, aged eighty-one years. His first wife died in IS40 Their 
cliildren were three in nuinbor-Jesse T., John E. (deceased), and 
riiomas M. He suhsequently married Lucinda Lockhai-t, who at 
her death left four children— Larkin G., Stockton and .Mrs. Mary 
Wise. His third wife was Catherine Lockhart, and to them were 
born five children— William, Mrs. Helena Beason, Mrs Alice 
Conn, Catherine and Nora. Mrs. Dodson is living in Monto-omerv 
County, this State. " 

Jesse T. Dodson, son of Benjamin R. and Lethena (Tiiompson) 
Dodson, is a native of Hendricks County, Ind., born in Center 
Township, Dec. 31, 1S35. He was a memb-r of his father's faniilv 
till his marriage, assisting in the work on the farm. Afrer his mar 
riage he settled on land of his father's on section 36, Marion Town 
ship, where he has since lived. He has a pleasant home and is 
one of the representative citizens of the township. Mr Dodson 
was married Dec. 22, 1S.57, to Arthnsa R. Wylie, a native of Gar 
rard County, Ky., born Oct. 9, 1839, daughter of David and 
Jemima Wylie. Mr. and Mrs. Dodson have no children. They 
are members of the Baptist church. In politics he is a Democrat! 
Aaron T.Dooley, a prominent citizen of Hendricks County wis 
born in Franklin County, Ky., J„ne 28, 1.S33. His latlier, Thomas 
S.DooIey, was a native of Virginia, but was reared in Kentuck'v 
and died in that State in 1S69. His motlier was a native of Ken 
tucky and died in 18i8. He cauie to Indi.-ina in 1851 and located 
in Marion Township. He etdisted in the vrar of the Rehellion'aud 
was commissioned Second Lieutenant of Company C, Fifty-first 
Indiana Infantry, commanded by Colonel A. D. Strci-ht His 
first engagement was at Stone River, May 3, 186-3. Thev wer^ 



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HISTORY OF HEXDKICKS COUNTV. 



captured and the officers were taken to Libby Prison, where tlioy 
were kept in close confinement till March 12, 1S65, when he was 
exchanged, and was soon after mustered out of the service. Sin,;e 
his return from the war he has lived on section 2S, Alarion Town- 
ship, wliere he owns a pleasant home. He was elected Trustee of 
his township in 1S60 and 1S61. In 1876 he was elected Coruuiis- 
sioner .of Hendricks County, and after serving efficiently three 
years was re-elected in 1879. He was hiarried Nov. 23, 1853, to 

Elizabeth , and to them were born two children — Nancy, 

died in 1S60, and Mary, married A. Thompson and died leaving 
two children. Mrs. Dooley died in 1860, and in 1861 Mr. DooUy 
married Malinda E. AYest. They have eight children; all are at 
home — -Levi. Clarence, Lillie, Ira, Daisy A., "William, Elizabe'h 
and Yirgil. Mr. and Mrs. Dooley are members of the Cumberland 
Preibyteriaa church. He is a member of North Salem Lodgj, 
No. 158, I. O. O. F. 

William IFi Gnihco/i, a prominent citizen of ]\Iarion Townshi]), 
was born in Mercer Counry, Ky., Nov. 1-1, lS3i. His parents set- 
tled on section 10, this township, in November, ISIO, his fatlitr 
bujing 21:0 acres of land (school lands) in that section. Of thcr 
children, four were born in Kentucky, our subject being the eldest. 
James died in Kentucky, aged one year; Frederick died at tl e 
age of seven years, and Samuel enlisted in the Eighteenth Mii- 
souri Infantry in August, 1861, and died in camp at Laclede, Mo., 
Oct. 28, 1861. Three of their children were born in tliis township — 
John, Nancy Ellen (wife of Warren Hardwick) and Joshua. The 
father, Young W. Graham, died in April, 1846, aged thirty-fiva 
years. After his death the family only retained eighty acre::, 
which is now the home of his widow and her. son Joshua. Will- 
iam W. remained witli his mother till his marriage to Susan A. 
Stephenson, which occurred Jan. 1, 1857. She was born Feb. 25, 
1839, .in Clark County, Ky. Her mother died in Kentucky an I 
her father married again, and about ISll came to this township. 
Mr. and Mrs. Graham lived a short titne on the Eynerson farm 
and in October, 1858, moved to Putnam County, Mo., where ^Ir. 
Graham bought si.xty acres of land. In September, 1861, they 
returned to tliis township and lived on rented land till the spring 
of 1865 when he bought p.'operty in the village of New Winche.-- 
ter, on which he has since resided. In addition to his residcnei; 
property he also owns a small farm ab<'.>ut a half mile from the vil- 
lage. In lS69-'70 he was engaged ia tlie mercantile business here. 



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HISTORY OF HENDEICKS COUNTY. 



679 



Mr. Graham was electedJnstice of the Peace in ISCG, and has held 
that ofBce at different times about seven years. In 1880 he was 
elected Township Trustee and re-elected in 1SS2. In politics he 
is a Democrat. He and his wife are members of the Missionary 
Baptist church. 

Abner Greenlee, deceased, was born April 19, 1791, in Virginia, 
where he was reared. His father, John Greenlee, having died in 
Vii'ginia, he came with his widovv'ed mother to this county, and in 
1S26 settled in Pulnaui County, Ind. In 1827 he married Mary 
B., daughter of James Cliristie, a Virginian, one of tlie early pio- 
neers of Putnam County, where he died. They had a family of live 
children — Eliza Jane, died in 1851, aged nineteen years; James, 
residing on the old noraestead; William, of Clay Township; ]\[rs- 
Rebecca Atcheson, of Illinois, and Mary Elizabeth, died in 1851, 
aged two 3'ears. After his marriage Mr. Greenlee bought eighty 
acres of Government land on section 20, to which he added by sub- 
sequent purchases till he owned 270 acres in this township and 160 
acres in Clay Township. He resided on section 20 till his death,- 
■which occurred June 21, 1877, aged eighty-two, after a married 
life of fifty years spent on the pioneer farm located by him in 1827. 
His widow is still living on the homestead, with her son James, 
aged seventy-eight years, 

James Greenlee, son of Abner and Mary Greenlee, was born on 
the place wliich he'now owns and occupies, Feb. 5, 1836. He was 
married March 2, 1S56, to Elizabeth Bryant, born in Hendricks 
County, Dec. 25, 1834, daughter of Anderson and Sarah Bryant. 
Her parents came to this county in 1827, where her father died 
Oct. 14, 1SS4. Her mother still survives, aged seventy-one years. 
Mr. and Mrs. Greenlee have six children — Mrs. IMartha Ellen Bird, 
of Franklin Township; "Woodson E., of Illinois; James W., of 
this township; John jS''. M. ; Tighlraan A. and Eliza Jane, all at 
home. Mr. Greenlee owns 138acres of land where he resides, also 
a small tract of ten aci'es a half mile from his home. He is a mem- 
ber of the Methodist church. In politics he afhliates with the Re- 
publican party. 

Edom R. Hadley, one of the prominent citizens of Marion 
Township, was born Aug. 17, 1819, in Chatham County, N. C. His 
parents, James T. and Mary (Richardson) Hadley, settled in Center 
Township in 1825, bringing with them a family of eight children, 
our subject being the si.xth child. His father brought consid- 
erable means to the pioneer settlement, and was a man of thrift 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



and energy. Edoin R. Hadley was reared to a farm life and was 
given tlie advantage of sucli scliooling as conld be obtained in those 
early days. He lived under tlie l:ome roof till S 'pt. 10, 1846, wlien 
lie was married to Miss Louisana, daughter of Peter C. and Sarah 
A. (Smith) Yannice. Siie was born Feb. 7. 1S29. They have three 
children — Louisa Jane, wife of George W. House, residing in 
Grecnsburg, Decatur Co., Ind.; Milton M., graduated from Lincoln 
University, in Login County, 111., in 1SS3, and is now princi- 
pal of the public schools, of Chestaut, 111.; and Charlie E., resid- 
ing in Center Townsliip. After his marriage Mr. Hadley made 
his home in Eel River Township till 1S50, where he owned a farm 
of 240 acres. He then sold that property and bought a farm of 
25-2 acres in Center Township, remaining there till the fall of 1367, 
when he settled in his present home, on section 29, this township. 
He has a well-itn proved farm of 280 acres and a beautiful home — 
the reward of a life of industry combined with frugality. Mr. Had- 
le}^ is Republican in politics. H imself, wife and sons are members 
• of the Cumberland Presbyterian clui!-cli. 

Tilbncm Hadley, son of "SYilliam T, and Beulah Hadley, wa; 
born April 18, 1839, on the old homestead in this township, where 
his grandfather settled in 1829. He was reared a farmer and has 
always followed that avocation. He remained at home till 1861 
when he went to Clarke County, Iowa. At the end of a year he 
returned home, and Feb. 28, 1863, lie was married to Susannah 
Jane Coffin, born in 1813, in Hendricks County, Ind. Her father, 
Charles Coffin, came to this county "when a young man and was 
liere married. Her parents are deceii^sed. Two children were born 
to this union — -Melworth K., who died at the age of sixteen years. 
and Julia A''ashti, now a resident of Texas. Mrs. Hadley died Xov. 
19, 1866, aged tweuty-chree years. Mr. Hadley married again Sept. 
8, 1869, to Hannah Hadley, a native of Clay Township, this county, 
and daughter of Nathan and Olive HJadley, of Clay Township. To 
them were born six children, all of wkom are living — Luther, Olive, 
Beulah, Smithie, William and PauL Mr. Hadley resides on sec- 
tion 13, wlicre he I as a farm of 400 acres of excellent land, 100 
acres of which is in Clay Township. He also owns the White cor- 
ner property and a dwelling house on West Marion street, in Dan- 
ville,, and three and a half sections of land in Crosby County, Tex.-is. 
He is a member of the society of Friends. Politicall}' he is a Repub- 
lican. 

Willlmn T. JlacVeif, a representative of one ot the most promi- 






HISTORY OF HENDKECKS OOaNTT. 



6S1 



nent pioneer families of Hendricks County, resides on section 13, 
Marion Township, on the original entry made by his father, Simon 
Hadley, in 18i^9. Simon Iladley was born in North Carolina, the 
tenth month, 6th, 1765, and was married fifth month, 10th, 1787, 
to Eh'zabeth Tiiompson, a native of tlie same State, born eighth 
month, 7th, 1770. In 1S29, with two sons, Tiiomas and William, 
aged nineteen and fifteen years, respectively, they came to Marion 
Township and bought eighty acres of laud ott section 13, ten acres 
of which had been partially cleared and a riide'cabin built. Here 
the father, aided by his sons, rapidly made a farm, and soon after 
bought 172 acres of the Government. Here the father died fourth 
mouth, 3d, 1S43, and the mother eighth month, 16th, ISii. They 
had a family of fourteen children, all born in North Carolina, 
William being the only one now living in Hendricks County. Two 
sons, Thomas and William, accompanied their parents to this 
county; four, James T., Joshua T., Simon T. and John T., subse- 
quently; Jonathan settled in Clinton County, Ohio; four daugliters, 
Martha Thompson, Sarah Hadley, Elizabeth Hadley and Mary 
Hadley, settled in Morgan County, Ind., and one daughter, Eutli 
Hadley, remained in North Carolina. Simon Hadley was a strong 
anti-slavery man, and a birthright metnbor of the society of 
Friends. His firm principles and good life endeared him to the 
hearts of the pioneers, and he is still remembered by all who 
remain of the early settlers. The homo of his parents has always 
been the home of William T. Hadley, although his finely improved 
farm of 200 acres, his beautiful residence and other improvements 
bear no resemblance to the rude cabin amid the stumps and brush 
in which life here was commenced. He is one of Marion Town- 
ship's most prominent citizens, a man of good principles, kind, 
hospitable and charitable, a valuable member of society, and 
universally respected for his upright life and honorable dealings. 
In politics he is a Republican: In religion he is a member of the 
society of Friends. He was married eleventh month, 12th, 1S37, 
to Beulah Hunt, a native of North Carolina, born si.xth month, 
30th, 1S16, daughter of Zimri Hunt, an early settler of Hendricks 
County: Mrs. Hadley died first month, 23d, lSJ-3, leaving two 
children— Tillman, who now lives near his father, and Daniel, 
who died at the age of twenty-two years. Tenth month, 1st, ISiS, 
Mr. Hadley mairied Paith Moody, who was born tenth month, 
20th, 1S22, a daughter of John and Mary Moody, who came from 
North Carolina and settled in Parke County, Ind., in the fall of 



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682 HISTORY OF hp:ndkicks county. 

1829. To thera have been born three children — Harriet S. Stanley, 
of Clay Township; Martha, who died in her seventeenth year, and 
Mary E. Ilodson, who settled in Clay Township and died twelfth 
month,' 21st, 1S69, in her twentietli year. 

Franklin Hixynes was bora in DiitcKess County, !N. Y., April 7, 
1833, a son of Charles and Maria Haynes. In 1826 lie removed 
with his parents to Clinton County, Oliio, where he grew to man- 
hood and was there married Sept. 12, 1846, to Lydia jSTedry,- a na- 
tive of that county, born July 16, 1S30'. They have eleven children 
living — Mrs. Eva Downard, residino- iaJKansas; Mrs. Eliza Bianton, 
of Indianapolis; Mrs. Alice Christie, of Buffalo, JN'. Y.; Benjamin, 
living at home; James aiid Alfred, of this township; Oliver, of 
New Salem; Charlie, at liome; Edinand, of Kansas, and Wilson 
and Franklin, at home. Mr. Haynes followed farming in Clinton 
County, Ohio, until June, ISoS, with the e.xceptioa of three years, 
when he was engaged in the mercantile trade. He then bought a 
farm, known as the Jim Maccoun fariii, in this township, where 
he lived six years, and after several elianges he settled on his 
present farm on section 31 in 1871. His farm contains 2SJ- acres 
of land all of which is well cultivated a-ad is one of the best in the 
township. Since his residence in the township he has been ex- 
tensively engaged in buying and shipping all kinds of live stock, 
and liis large farm is also dev(;ted to raising stock, his son Benja- 
min being associated with him in the business. His shipments 
during the year 1884 amounted to §12.5,000. Politically Mr. 
Haynes is a Republican. He and hLs wife are members of the 
Christian church. His parents came to Hendricks County and 
settled in Center Township in 1858 wfcere both died, the father at 
the age of seventy-two years, and the imother several years later 
aged seventy-two years. Of their children, Charles and William 
live at Danville; Thomas resides in ludiauapolis; Samuel in Kan- 
sas; Asa remained in Ohio; their eldest daughter, Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Howlan, and Mrs. Amanda Henssim, reside in Kansas; Mrs. 
Mary Bowsman resides in Danville; Mrs. Almira Haines, of 
Clayton, this county; Enoch died in Kajrisas, and Mrs. Zuba Martin 
died jn Clinton County, Ohio. 

Henry 11. Jl'iys-, son of J jhn and Catherine Hays, was born 
June 29, 1821, in Mercer County, Ky. He came with his parents 
to this township in 1837, where he wa.-5 reared to manhood. He 
was married Feb. 9, 1848, to Mary K. Rose, a native of ]\[ercer 
County, Ky., born Aug. 27, 1831. Her parents, Lewis A. and 



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HISTORY OF HENDEICKS COITNTY. 



683 



Flora Rose, settled in this township in 183i, where her father died. 
Her mother is still living in Danville. Mr. and Mrs. Haj-s have 
ei_2;ht children living — Lewis, of Clay Coanty, 111. ;, Mrs. Sarah 
AV^eekly and Mrs. Ettie Underwood, also of Clay County, 111. ; 
John M., of Center Township, this county; Arthur, of this town- 
ship; Scott, at home; Mrs. Laura Underwood, of this township, 
and Kate, at home. In April, 18i7, Mr. Hays settled in -his pres- 
ent home on section 15, where he^wns a fine farm of 160 acres. 
Mr. Hays and his family are members of the Cumberland Presby- 
terian church. He was one of the cliarter members of Danville 
Lodge, A. F. & A. M. His parents were natives of Virginia, but 
went to Kentucky in early lite where thej were married. In 
1827 John Ha^'S came to this county with his wife and two 
children, Mrs. Sarah Faught (deceased) and our subject. He set- 
tled in this township on section 30, entering eighty-seven acres of 
land from the Government. During their residence of one year in 
Bartholomew County, Ind., their third child, John Harvey, was 
born, and now lives on section 33, this township. Six children 
were born to them in this township — George, deceased; Mrs. 
Sarah Riley, deceased; James, on section 39, this township; Eliza, 
wife of A. W. Kelly; John Thomas, of Center Township, and 
Mrs. Catherine Christy, deceased. The father owned at one time 
414- acres of land which he [nade by his own exertions, having, 
after paying for his small land entry, but 50 cents on which to be- 
gin life in his new forest home. He died at his home on section 6 
in March, 1871, aged seventy-one years. His widow yet resides 
on the old homestead. 

Anderson Hedge, section 33, Marion Township, was born in the 
State of Virginia, ]S"ov. 33. 1833, and was iive years of age when 
his parents, "William and Lucinda ]Hedge- moved to Hendricks 
County, Ind. They settled in Marion Township, where the father 
died a few years later. The motlier survived till 1858, and lived 
to see her children all married and settled im homes of their own. 
Her children were twelve in number — James, Mrs- Perlina Farmer, 
George, Mrs. Mary "Wright, John, David, Mrs. Melinda Robbins, 
Mrs. Anna Gibson, Crockett, Harrison, xlnderson, and Mrs. Lu- 
cinda Bales. Five of the family are livijig — James (the eldest, 
aged eighty-two years), John, Mrs. Robbin^;, Harrison and Ander- 
son. Anderson Hedge was married Aug. 29, 1S46, to Leah Dodd,a 
nativeof Floyd County, Va., born June 14, 1834, daughter of John 
P. and Sarah Dodd, early settlers of Mart'on Township. About a 



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68i HISTOKY OF HENDETCKS COUNTY. " 

year after tlieir marriage, in the fall of ISiT, Mr. Hedge bouglit 
eighty acres of his present farm, and they began making for 
themselves a home. In 1S56 he added 120 acres to his original 
purchase, and now has one of the best improved farms in the 
township, The log cabin hasgivea place to a fine residence and a 
forest to cultivated fields. In ISSi Mr. Hedge embarked in a new 
enterprise' which promises to be a snccessful venture. He built a 
dam across a small stream whj.ch runs across one corner of his 
farm and stocked the pond with about 1,500 German carp. Mr. 
and Mrs. Hedge have had si.v children, but two of whom, Charles 
A. and Otie S., are living. Charles was born in 1S62. He mar- 
ried MoUie Gill and lives on a part of the homestead. Otie, born 
in 1865, married Linnie Wright and lives with his parents. James 
M. died in ISGO, aged sixteen months; Sarah C, in 1866, aged 
nineteen years; John AV., in 1866, ag«d seventeen years; Clara P., 
in 1878, aged twenty-eiglit years. The latter was the wife of -John 
G. Ridpath, and left two children — -John "William and Sarah A. 
In politics Mr. Hedge is a Democrat. He takes an active interest in 
politics and has cast all his votes iti the same precinct. He is in 
the strictest sense an honorable man, his word at all times being 
as good as his bond. 

Michael Hlggins was born in Putnam County, Ind., Aug. 5, 
182-3, a son of David and Helen (Xludd) Higgins, the former a 
native of Kentucky, born in 17y5, and his mother of Maryland. 
They were mariied in Kentucky and soon after moved to Lawrence 
County, Ind., and later to Jefferson Township, Putnam County, and 
in March, 1831, came to Hendricks County and settled on the 
southeast quarter of section 33, Marion Township, on land entered 
by his brother Thomas in 1828. He became one of the most pros- 
perous citizens of the county, adding to liis first purchase till he 
owned a landed estate of 500 acres. His family consisted of eight 
children, three born in Putnam ansi five in Hendricks County — 
David, of Edgar County, 111.; Michadl; yii-%. Eliza Ann Cavett, of 
Lucas County, Iowa; John A., of Colorado; Mrs. Elizabeth Pai-ker, 
of Saline County, Kas.; Mrs. Heten Aldrich, deceased; Mrs. 
Nancy Carter, of Hendricks County; and ^lary Jane, deceased. 
Daniel Higgins died in 1851, and IWLj-.s. Higgins several years later, 
at the residence other daughter, Mr.?. Carter, aged seventy-seven 
years. Micliael Higgins was marrJed Oct. 7, 1817, to Elizabeth 
Plaster, who was born Sept. 30, 1822, daughter of William Plaster, 
an early settler of Middle Township, -where he died in 18S0, his 



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HISTOKT OF HENDRICKS COITNTT. 



685 



wife surviving him but a short time. Mr. and Mrs. Higgins have 
a family of six children — William T., David A., Mrs. Nancy Jane 
Wilson, Mrs. Cassandra Hunt, Charles E. and May. Tiie eldest 
four are married and settled near the homestead, in Marion 
Township. Mrs. Higgins died Aug. 15, 1883. Mr. Higgins 
is the largest laud-owner in Marion Township, his title deeds 
showing tlie proprietorship of SSO acres of valuable land, includ- 
ing the greater part of his father's property. He is one of the 
reliable citizens of the township, and has served his townsmen as 
Trustee and Treasurer. In politics he is a Democrat. 

Daniel Hunt was born in Guilford County, IM. C, Dec. 25, 1825, 
a son of Zimri and Rebecca Hunt, pioneers of Hendricks County, 
locating on section 2, Marion Township, in November, 1827, with 
their six children — Beulah, deceased wife of William Hadley; 
Stephen, died in the service during the late war; Mary, deceased 
wife of Israel Ilarlan; Asenath, married Goldsmith ILirlan, and 
resides in Parke County, Ind. ; Ithamar, deceased, and Daniel, our 
subject. Five cliildren were born to tlieni in this township — 
Mrs. Anna Pike, of Clay Township; Mrs. Lydia Moore, of Putnam 
County; Mrs. Jennette Huddleston, a widow residing in Colorado; 
Mrs. Pebecca Hackins, deceased, and Zimri, Jr., of this township. 
Zimri Hunt, during his life, cleared two larms, and lived to enjoy 
his life of toil. He died at the age of seventy-seven years, July i, 
1871, being in jeligious belief a Quaker. His wife died Aug. 13, 
1S77, aged seventy-nine years. Daniel Hunt began to work for 
himself at the age of twenty years, and was employed on diiferent 
farms about five years, and out of his savings he bought 106 acres 
of timbered laud on sections IS and 19 of which land he yet re- 
tains sixty-six acres. He lived on and improved his land three 
years before his marriage, which occurred March 19, 1851, to Ellen 
Hunter. She was born in Putnam County, Ind., in 1S31-, and was 
a daughter of Charles Hunter, an early settler of that county. 
They have three children — -Bedial Jamal, wife of F. P. Wright, 
living iu Missouri; Charles Zimri, of Clay Township, and Lydia 
Ellen, at home. Mr. Hunt has lived on section 19 since 1851. 
Tlie home farm contains 213 acres of land. He also owi:s other 
land, making in all 145 acres, mostof which is improved, all being 
acquired by his own industry and economy. Mr. Hunt was reared 
a Whig, in politics, and since the organization of the Kepublicau 
party he has voted that ticket. He is a worthy citizen and has 
the confidence and esteem of all his neighbors. 



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6S6 HISTOEY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 

Ithamar Hunt, son of Asher and Jane (Hunt) Hunt, was born 
in Marion Township, Hendricks Co., Ind., March 17, 1S20. He 
was reared on the home farm, remaining with his parents till about 
twentj-'five years of age. He was married in 1846 to Frances Jane, 
a native of Kentucky, daughter of John Bush, an early settler of 
this township. They have nine children — Eri, residing in the Ter- 
ritory of New Mexico; Mrs. Elizabeth Martin; Henry, on part of 
the home farm; John, in Brown County, Ind.; Mrs. Angeline 
Higgins; Perry, in tliis township; Rosa, at home; Clara, wife of 
Emory King, of Grant County, Ind. ; and Elmer, at home. Mrs. 
Hunt died July 13, 1874, aged forty-eight years. Mr. Hunt's home 
farm includes his father's homestead, and contains 39G acres, all on 
sections. He also owns a farm ofl60 acres on section 14, forty 
acres on section 12, and forty acres in another part of the county. 
Politically, Mr. Hunt is a Republican. His father, Asher Hunt, 
was born and reared in North Carolina, and in 17SS he married 
Jane Hunt, a distant relative. He settled in Sullivan County. Ind., 
in ISIS, where his wife died in 182S. He married again in that 
county, his second wife being Abigail Foster, and to this union 
was born one child — Mrs. Martha .Jane Ranford, who died in Illi- 
nois. After a residence of eighteen years in Sullivan County, M.-. ' 
Hunt came to this county in 1S36. He settled on section 2, this 
township, where he bought eighty acres of land, of which a few 
acres had been cleared and a cabin and log stable built. Mrs. 
Abigail Hunt died in this township in 1S46, and Mr. Hunt vvas 
again married to Mrs. Nancy (Brown) Wilson, widov/ of Thomi'.s 
Wilson. She died about ten years after her marriage. Mr. Hunt 
had eight children by his first marriage, of whom only three sur- 
vive — Mrs. Rhoda Johnson, of Sullivan County; Ithamar, our sub- 
ject, and Mrs. ^MelindaStuveuson. Mr. Hunt commenced life with 
little capital, but at one time owned 160 acres, which he acquired 
by his own industry and economy. He died on the homestead iu 
this county in 1S72. He was reared a Quaker. In politics he 
was a Republican. 

Anthony W. Kelly, son of William and Malinda Kelly, was 
born on the homestead where he now lives, Jan. 11, 1S35. He has 
always lived on the farm, which with the exception of forty-six 
acres, he now owns. • Iti addition to this he owns 120 acres; all is 
under a good state of cultivation. He is an enterprising, intelli- 
gent citizen, and has been successful in his chosen vocation. He 
was married May 2, 1858, to Euza Hays, a native of Marion Town- 



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HISTORY OB- HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



687 



ship, born June, 1837, dauo-hter of John Hays, an early settler of 
this township. Tliev have had six children, fonr of whom are liv- 
ing — Allen, John, William and Malinda. James Grant died a^'cd 
thi'ee years, and Oliarles Albert, aged one year. In politics 
Mr. Kelly is a Republican, and an ardent supporter of the princi- 
ples of the party. 

Wdliani Kelly was born in Greene County, Tenn., July 30, 

1809. In October, 1831, he accompanied his two married sisters, 
Mrs. Elizabeth Houston and Mrs.Mariraret Lemmino; and their hns- 
bands, to Hendricks County, and bou<rht 160 acres of Government 
land on section 17, Marion Township. In the fall of 1831, on ac- 
count of failino; health, he engrte'ed in the mercantile business at 
New Winchester, but did not regain his health, and died Sept. 28, 

1810. He was one of the most active and enterprising of the early 
settlers, and for some time served as Justice of the Peace. He was 
married March 13, 1832, to Malinda "West, a native of Wayne 
County, Ky., who came with her parents, Alexander and Sarah 
West, to Hendricks County in October, 1831, locating on section 
16, Marion Township, where her mother died in 1839. Her i'ather 
died in Missouri in ISGO. Mr. and Mrs. Kelly had a family of 
five children — Mrs. Sarah I. Tincher, Anthony W., Mrs. Margaret 
A. Hays, Mrs. Mary Hays (deceased), and William R. Mrs. Kelly 
was married Jane 23, 1853, to Stephen Stephenson, who died July 
13, 1875. She is still living en the homestead, on section 16, 
Marion Township, and is one of the few remaining old settlers of 
1831. 

J. O. Kennedy, general merchant at New Winchester, was born 
March 20, 1827, in Liberty Township, Hendricks Co., Ind., a son 
of Jacob Kennedy, one of the pioneers of this county. He has al- 
ways been a resident of this county, and in 1S71 he engaged in his 
present business at New Winchester. He was married to Melissa 
F. Roach, a native of Kentucky. They have two children — Ben- 
jamin F. and Nannie. Jacob Kennedy was born in Virginia in 
1797, and when a small boy removed with his parents to Wood 
ford County, Ky., where he was reared and married. His wife 
was Isabella Combs, a cousin of General Leslie Combs. They had' 
two children — Dr. L. H. Kenneily and our subject. He came to 
Hendricks County with his family in 1825, and settled in Liberty 
Township, remaining there aboiit fifteen years. Wlien he arrived 
in this county he had but §4, but by industry and economy he 
earned enough to buy a farm, and later bonght a f\irm in Guilford 



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6SS HISTOUV OF HENDEICKS COUNTV. 

Township, where he lived forty-five years. His wife died in 
Liberty Township, aged seventy-six years, since which he h;is 
made liis home witli his son in Danville. Pie is now eighty-eight 
years of age. Dr. L. II. Kennedy was born in Kentucky, July 10, 
1823, and came with his parents in October, 1825. He worked on 
a farm till twenty-fuur years of age, and helped clear a farm of 100 
acres. He began the study of medicine at Belleville in 184:7, with 
Dr. Moore, and graduated from Rush Medical College, Chicago, 
111., in 1855. He began his practice with Dr. Moore in 1850, re- 
maining with him about twenty years. He located in Danville in 
1869, where he has built up a good practice. 

Henry F. Kurtz, one of the pramiueut fartners of Marion Town- 
ship, resides on section 28, where he has 3i3 acres of valualjle 
land and one of the best residences in the township. In 1854 he 
bought eighty acres of unimproved land of James Hadley, and a 
few years later forty acres of cleared land of Dow Wright, and 
eighty acres of timber of William Bird, and since then the rest of 
his farm, wliich was only partially cleared. In addition to the 
homestead he owns an improved farsa of 123 aci-cs near New "Win- 
chester, and has given his son Jacob a farm of eighty acres adjoining 
the home. He is a thoroughly practieail farmer and has been success- 
ful in all his pursuits. He was borra in Nelson County, Ky., Feb. 
10, 1S2S, a son of Jacob and Allatia Kurtz, the fornrer a native of 
Kentucky, of Holland descent, born Dec. 22, 1790, and the latter 
a native of Maryland, born March 3, 1703. His parents settled in 
Putnam County, Ind., in the summer of 182S, and made that 
county their home till death. The fether died June 15, 1874, and 
the mother Ftb. 29, 1876. They reaned a large family of whom six 
are living — •William F., George W., Jacob II., Henry F., Mrs. 
Mary Allen and Mrs. Sarah A. Cassiday. Our subject was married 
Oct. 9, 1851, to Margaret L. Vairmico, a native of Hendricks 
County, born May 2, 1834, a daugLtedr of Lawrence and Caroline 
(Adams) Vannice, who settled in MauriLon Township in 1833. Her 
mother died Sept. 17, 1837, and her father is now living in Dan- 
ville. Mr. and Mrs. Kurt/ have si.vcbi'klrea — Mrs. Frances Under- 
"wpod, Jacob L., Mrs. Eliza Hadley, Mrs. Jennie Hadley, Charles 
and Oscar. The family a. e member's of the Cumberland Presliy- 
terian church. Mr. Kurtz, lik-^ his father, was originally a "Whig 
and now affiliates with the Repubiiciiii party. 

Jacob F. Knrtz was born in Floyd Township, Putnam Co., Ind., 
in 1833, a son of Jacob and AUutia Kurtz, who were pioneers of 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COCTUTY. 



6S9 



that coiintj', who emigrated from Kentucky in the year 1S2S. He 
was reared a farmer, which occupation he has always followed, liv- 
ing with his parents till their death, he and his wife caring for 
them in their last years. His father had been an invalid and 
walked on crutches for over thirty years. . He died at the advanced 
age of eighty-three years. His wife was an active woman till a 
year previous to her death at the age of eighty-two years, when 
she became as helpless as a little child. Oar subject then became 
owner of the homestead, on which he lived till 1S7S, a period of 
forty-five years. He was married Marcli 27, 1S.55, to Eliza Cas- 
sity, born jSTov. 19, 183S, a daughter of David H. and Susan 
Cassity. Her parents came from Kentucky and settled in Putnam 
County, Ind., in an early day. Her mother died, and her father 
afterward married Mrs. Sarah Ann (Kurtz) Graham, a sister of Mr. 
Kurtz. Mr. and Mrs. Kurtz have two children — Edwin M. and 
Laura Ellen. Edwin M. was born Sept. §0, 1856, and was mar- 
ried Sept. IS, ISS-i, to Mary Florence Somers, a native of Putnam 
County, born March 9, 1S59, daughter affWilliamO. and Mary 
Somers, of Kaiisas. Laura Ellen was bonii April 1-i, 1801, and 
was married Sept. 27, 1882, to Henry Underwood, a son of Joseph 
and Lucretia Underwood, of Putnam County. In 1882 Mr. Kurtz 
bouglit the Edmund Hadley homestead, one of the oldest places 
in that part of Hendricks Count}'. His bomesiead contains 173 
acres of well cultivated land, and his resiflence and farm buildings 
are good. Since his occupancy he has reirnodeled botli house and 
barn. Politically Mr. Kurtz is a Republican. He and his family 
are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. 

George Montgomery was born July 23, 1812, in North Cano- 
lina, a son of Samuel and Mary Mont«-omery, who were born, 
reared and married in the State of Nortili Carolina. His parents 
immigrated to Virginia in 1818, residing' there till 1836, when 
they came to Hendricks County, Ind., and settled in Lincoln 
Township. Their three youngest children came with them to this 
county— Anna and David now deceased,, and Tyra, now a resident 
of Mattoon, 111. Their son William setitled in Eandolph Countv, 
Ind.; James, another son, died in LincaEa Towusliip, and Ilobert 
now resides in Missouri. Thj fatht-r, Samuel Monlgomeryj died 
at his home in Lincoln Township, in ISTi. His widow died a few 
years later at the residence of her daug-'ater, Mrs. Anna Allman. 
George Montgomery, whose name heads this sketch, was married 
March 13, 1831, in Virginia, to ISTancy Sturman, born Feb. 27, 



-siV 



.'.15 .'. 



\ 



690 



HISTOfiY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



=w4 



ing in Taylor Couuty, 



iowii: 



Sainuel Thomas (deceased), ^'tlary 



Jane (deceased), and Tyra, born Dec. 9, 1S53, living on part of his 
father's farm. He was rrarried Aug. i, 1S7S, to Amanda E. Wil- 
son, who was born and reared in Putnam County, Ind. They 
have two cliildren — Maud Alice and Grace Ann. Our subject is a 
firm believer in the doctrines of the Baptist church. In politico 
he is a staunch Democrat. 

Harvey Munday was born in Mercer County, Ivy., Feb. 21, ISIO, 
a son of Henry and Nancy Munday. His father was born in Vir- 
ginia and died in Kentucky, aged seventy-tive years, and his mother, 
a native of Kentucky^ died in this township, at New Winchester, 
aged eighty-two years. In August, 1S33, Harvey Munday was 
married in his native county to Caroline Coghill, a native of the 
same county, born in ISlo, who died April 10, ISoi. Their chil- 
dren were — -Ann Mary, died at the age of three years; .John 11. 
and Thomas J., residents of this county; Joseph A. and James M. 
(twjns) enlisted in the Fifty-first Indiana Infantry, the former 
killed at the battle of Muifreesboro, Tenn., and the latter served 
nearly five years, and is now living in Kentucky; Benjamin F. and 
Eenben S,, living in Missouri; "William J., of this township, and 
George II., of Missouri. In October following his marriage Jlr. 
Munday moved to Hendricks County, Kving at Danville the first 



ISlo, a native of Virginia. In 1835 they settled near Plainfieh / f 
this county, and lived on rented land two years. In 1S37 the\ / 
purchased forty acres in Guilford Township, where they lived till/ 
1S40, when in the fall of that year they settled in their present', 
home on section 34, Marion Township, and which contains 360 
acres of valuable land. Mrs. Montgomery's death occurred April 
8i 18S1, since which the household has been in charge of her two 
eldest daughters — Julia and Hannah, and two more thorough, in- 
telligent and energetic housekeepers are seldom found. Mr. and 
Mrs. Montgomery had the following children— Julia, born March 
9,1835; Hannah, born Dec. 31,1838; Jonathan (deceased); James, 
born Dec. 14, 1840, and married Jan. 19, 1SG3, to Margaret F. 
Tharp, who died July 19, 1869, leaving three children — George B. 
McClellan, Louisa C. and Erasmus D. T. James Montgomery was 
again married to Sarah E. Baker, a native of Putnam Count}', bv 
whom ha has three children — Nancy Jane, William O. and Flor- 
ence May. He resides on part of his father's farm, and since the 
spring of 1SS2 he has been engaged in the manufacture of drain- 
age tile. The rest of Mr. Montgomery's family are — Harlen, resid- 



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HISTORY OF IIKNDRtCKS COUNTY. 



691 



few months. He v/as a man of limited means, but possessed good 
health and energy. He worked at the blacksmith's trade at Dan- 
ville till 1S3-J:. lie removed to New Majsville, Pntnatu County, 
in February, 1S:^J, and in the tall of 1843 bought a piece of land 
near the town, where he carried on farming in connection with his 
trade. He returned to this county, locating in his present home 
in the fall of 1847. His residence is on sections 17 and 18, and 
his farm, containing 160 acres, was brouglit from a forest to a well 
cultivated farm. Oct. 15, 1854, Mr. Munday married for his second 
wife Matilda Hankius, born in Shelby County, Ky., in 1820. She 
came with her parents to this county in 1839. Her father died at 
the home of Mr. Munday in 1803, and her mother died in Center 
Township, April 23, 18S5, at the advanced ageof ninety-six years. 
Mr. Munday has three children by his last marriage — -Mrs. Martha 
V. Yount, Mrs. Judith Ellen Graham, and "VVoodson, livin"' with 
his parents. In politics Mr. Munday is a Democrat. He has been 
a member of the regular Baptist church since 1839. 

William Bohhins, 21. D., v^&i born Jan. 16, 1S43, in Marion 
Township, Heiidricks Co., Ind. His parents, John and Lydia 
(Parsons) Pobbins, were among the pioneer settlers of this town- 
ship. He lived at home till his enlistment, Aug. 16, 1861 in 
Company B, Seventh Indiana Infantry. He was wounded in the 
first battle of Bull Run, on account of which he was .discharo-ed. 
and returned home. Eegainiug his strength he again went into 
the service and was commissioned Second Lieuteuant of Company 
I, Xinth Indiana Infantry. He was in the x\.nny of the Cumber- 
land, and in March, 1863, he was promoted to Captain of his com- 
pany. In the retreat of General Hood after jSTashville his regi- 
ment did gallant service, and also on many other occasions. He 
was honorably discliarged at the close of the war and returned 
home. He was married while home on furlough, Jan. 1, 1863, to 
Marcella Hamrick, born Dec. 4, 1845, and daughter of "William and 
Jane Hamrick, her fatlier a resident of Center Township, and her 
mother deceased. They have had three children— Cluarles M., 
born March 7, 1866; James B., born July 13, 1S67, and died Dec. 
ISj 1874, and Laura J., born April 13, 1869, and died March 10, 
1870. Dr. liobbius commence! the study of medicine with Dr. T. 
J. Adams, of 2>rorth Salem, in 1871, and in 1872 attended the 
Indiana Medical College at Indianapolis, and again attended in 
1879, receiving his diploma. He began his practice at Gaynor 
City, Mo., in 1873, and in 1875 returned to this county and lived 



7 






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692 HlSTOK'i' OF HENDIJICKS COUNTY. 

on his farm in Eel Eiver Township till ISTS. He then located at 
New Winchester and resumed his medical practice. Politically he 
is a radical Republican. He and his wife are members of the 
Christian church. Tlie Doctor is a member of Defiance Lod^e, 
No. 14S, I. 0. O. F., at Defiance, Mo. 

Willis Slave/is, section 19, Marion Township, is a native of 
Hendricks County, born in Eel River Township, Nov. 1, lS3o. 
His parents, James and Mary Siavens, were pioneers of Eel River 
Township, locating there in 1S2S, soon after their marriage. The 
motlier died in lSi6 and the father iu ISol, aged forty-four years. 
They had a family of nine children — Harvey, a member of the 
Fifty-first Indiana Infantry, died at Nashville, Tenn., in ISG:.'; 
Mrs. Nancy Dean, "Willis, Jesse, Milton, Mrs. MaryAVright, Will- 
iam, John and Reuben. Left orphans at an early age, the children 
were obliged to depend on themselves for maintenance, and Willis 
■worked as a farm hand till twenty years of age, and tlie next six 
years was employed as engineer in a saw-mill. He was married 
March 14, ISGS, to Mary A. Ragan, daughter of James and Lucy- 
Ragan. She was born Nov. 23, 1S4T, on the homestead of her 
parents, where she now lives. Her parents were natives of Ken- 
tucky and pioneer settlers of Marion Township. Her mother die 1 
June 1-i, 1871, aged forty-nine years, and her father Aug. 6, 1871, 
aged fifty years. Of a large family of children Mrs. Siavens is tho 
eldest, and the only daughter living. Five sons are living— John 
S., a physician of Avon; Zachariah, of North Salem; Aimer, of 
Nebraska; James B., of Richmond, Ind., and William IL, witli 
Mrs. Siavens. After his marriage Mr. Siavens settled on the Ra- 
gan homestead, and had the care of the family, and he and his wif j 
succeeded to the ownership of the i-esidence portion of the prop- 
erty. They have one child — Delia, bora May 11, 1870. Mr. Sia- 
vens enlisted Sept. 22, 1861, in Company A, Fifty-first Indiana 
Infantry, of which his brother Harvey was Lieutenant, and after 
serving nine months was discharged on account of ill-Iiealth. Jan. 
4, 18G4:, he again enlisted, and served in the IS'inth Cavalry 
till Aug. 28, 1865. In politics Mr. Siavens is a Republican. He 
and his wife are members of the Christian church. He is a mem- 
ber of North Salem Lodge No. 142, F. & A. M. 

James F. Tinder, son of Jeremiah and Kittie Tinder, was born 
in Marion Township, tliis county, May 19, 1S40. He lived at home 
till Feb. 22, 1866, when he was marrl-d to Martha C. Faught, a 
native of Eel River Township, and daughter of Jacob C. I'aiight, a 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



693 



deceased merchant of North Salem. 'Mr. and Mrs. Tinder have 
three children — Oscar, Delia and Kittle. Mr. Tinder settled on 
his present farm immediately after his marriage. The farm was 
formerly known as the William Pierson place, and now contains 
236 acres of land, all under a tiue state of cultivation, with good 
farm buildings. Mr. Tinder is active in all that tends to the gen- 
eral welfiire of his township. Re is energetic and enterprising and 
highly respected throughout the county. In politics he votes the 
Democratic ticket. 

Franhlin Underwood was born in Decatur County, Ind., March 
1, 1826, and was in his tenth year when his parents, John and 
Rebecca Underwood, settled in this township. He lived at home 
till his marriage, in the fall of ISoO, to Catherine Martin, a native 
of Shelby County, Ky., and daughter of 13enjamin Martin. Three 
children were born to them — Mrs. Rebecca Beckley, of this town- 
ship; Mrs. Sarah L. Christie, of Putnam County, and Clarissa, 
who died Sept. 21, 1867, in her thirteenth year. Mrs. Underwood 
died Aug. 13, 1S59, aged thirty-three years, aud Oct. 28, 1860, 
Mr. Underwood married Ellie Christie, born Aug. 31, 1832, in 
Shelby County, Ky., a daughter of TVilliara Christie, Sr. She 
came to this county with her parents, both now deceased, when 
she was two years of age. One son was born to this union — Mar- 
shall C, bprn in 1863, living at home. Mr. Underwood resides in 
section 31, where he has one of the finest farms in his neighbor- 
hood. His home farm contains -100 acres, the west half of which 
is in Putnam County. Pie also owns eighty acres in Putnam 
County, one and a half miles from his residence. In politics he 
affiliates with the Democratic party. He and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Regular Baptist church. 

John Undenoood, deceased, was a native of Shelby County, Ky., 
born in 1795. He was married in his native county to Rebecca 
Radford, a native of Yirginia, coming to Kentucky when a child. 
He came with his wife and six children to this township in tlie fall 
ot 1835, having previously lived in Decatur County, Ind., nine 
years after leiving Kentucky. Mr. Underwood devoted his atten- 
tion to the introduction of blue grass, and converting his lands 
into stock fanning, he being the first man in the township to drive 
fat stock to market to Indianapolis. He died May 'i>4-, 1861, ao-ed 
sixty-six years, his widow surviving him about six years. They 
were the parents of tlie following children— "William, deceased- 
Mrs. Charlotte McMurry, of Normal, HI.; Mrs. Elizabeth Carver, 
44 



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691 HISTOKY OF HENDR1CS3 COUNTY. 

of Putnam County, Ind.; Mrs. Catherine Darnell, deceased; Mrs. 
Sallj Sopor, of Hendricks Coiiutv, and Mrs. Ellen Bridges, 
deceased, the latter being the onlj one born in this countv. 
Mr. Underwood owned, at the time of his death, a farm of 325 
acres. . 

John F. Undericood is a native of Hendricks County, Ind., 
born in Marion Township, Fob. 20, 18-19, a son of William and 
Harriet L. Underwood, and grandson of John. Underwood, one of 
the early settlers of this township. William Underwood was born 
in Kentucky, in 1S23, and accompanied his father to Hendricks 
County. He was here married, March 20, 1847, to Harriet West, 
who was born April T, 1830, a daugkter of Isaac and Polly We ^t. 
They commenced housekeeping on section 10, Marion Township, 
and there mide a home, where he died in September, 1875. He 
had a farm of 700 acres and was one of the most prosperous citizciis 
of the county. The mother still lives on the homestead with her 
son, Obadiah. John F. is the eldest of their six children, the oth- 
ers being William, Mrs. Mary E. Higgins, Obadiah, Mrs. Angeli-ie 
Christie and Robert, all residents of Marion Townsliip. John F. 
Underwood was married Jan. 23, 1873, to Caroline F. Kurlz, 
daughter of Henry F. Kurtz. Thej have two children — Carrie 
and Lourie. In ISSO Mr. Underwo.ad bought what is known as 
the G. W. Turner farm, which contains 200 acres of improved land, 
located on section 27. In politics Mr. Underwood is a Democr;',t. 
He and his wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyteri m 
church. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, making its 
motto the rule of iiis life. He is a>ne of the most prominent a;id 
influential citizens of the township. 

Peter C. Yannice, one of the early settlers of this townsliij), was 
born in Mercer County, Ky. , July 17, 1801, and was married in 
that county Feb. 14, 1828, to Saralhi Ann Smith, born in Mercer 
County, Dec. 11, 1810. In 1831 tiiej came to this county and set- 
tled on section 30, Marion Townships bringing with them from j 
Kentucky two children— Louisiana., mow wife of Edoni 11. Had- i 
ley, and William H., a resident of Lucas County, Iowa. Kino 
children were born to them in this bowuship — Samuel N. and ilr?. j 
Joanna Allen, both of Lucas Comity, Iowa; Sarah, wife of Il(.>'. j 
W. T. Ferguson, of Morgan County, Ind.; Mrs. Amanda J. Trot- j 
ter, of Marion County, Iowa; Milton B., of this township; Janies ] 
R., died aged six years; Ellen, dieil aged three years; Henry S.. . 
died aged twelve years, and Ellen, wife of Rev. 0. C. Hawkins, ot i 



-^ 






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i 



HISTOKY OF HEJIDRtCKS COUNTT. 



695 



Lucas County, Iowa. Peter C. Vannice, in early days, was a Whig, 
but from the organization of the Republican party he has Tt)ted 
that ticket. Both he and wife are members of the Cumberland 
Presbyterian church, and are re3j)ected by all who know them. 
Our subject's parents were Peter and Debara-li (De Alotte) Yan- 
nice, natives of Xew Jersey, his father of IToUand and his 
mother of French Huguenot descent. His mother's ancestors 
were driven from France at the time of the massacre of St. Bar- 
tholomew. . ■ ■ 

, Jonathan Walton was born in "Washington County, Pa., Jan. 9, 
1837, a son of John and Eliza Walton, who were both natives of 
Pennsylvania. With their four sons they moved to Ripley County, 
Ind., in the summer of 1837, where the father died and was buried 
Jan. 9, 1845. His widow, some years later, married Stephen Gowin 
and to this union were born six children — Love J., deceased; Mrs. 
Adaline Slavins, of Kansas; Oliver and James B., residing in this 
township; Mrs. Cynthia Robbins, of Missouri, and ilrs. Anna 
Crose, of this townshi]i. The children by her former raarriacre 
were — Warren, of Ripley County; William, a member of the 
Ninety-ninth Indiana Infantry, died in the service; Amos, served 
in the Seventh Indiana Infantry, now living in Jladison County, 
Iowa, and Jonathan, our subject. The family moved to Hendricks 
County in cl853, locating on section 34, where Mr. Gowin died in 
the spring of 1880. His widow is living in this townshi]) with her 
youngest daughter, Mrs. Anna Crose. Jonathan Walton lived with 
his mother and step-father till his "marriage t'> Miss Cynthia Rob- 
bins, which occurred Oct. 9, 1859. After his marriage he made 
his home on section Si, on part of the John Robbins homestead. 
He has prospered in his agricultural pursuits, and now owns a 
farm of 188 acres, also a fine residence property in North Salem. 
He is a member of North Salem Lodge, No. 158, I. O. O. F., and 
politically he is a Republican. To Mr. and Mrs. Walton have 
been born three children — Emma C, their eldest, died at the age 
of eighteen months; John Gavin, born March, 1863, and Bertha, 
born in November, 1870. Mrs. Walton's grandparents came to 
this county in 1833. . Her father was bom in North Carolina, June 
16, 1809, and was there married in June, 18:29, to Lydii Parsons, 
who was born Dec. 27, 1808. They had eleven children, of whom 
six are living — Mrs. Mary Jones, of Eel River Township; Mrs. 
Martha Davis, same township; Mrs. Cynthia Walton, this town- 
ship; William, this township; Mrs. Su~an Robbins and Mrs. Jose- 



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696 



HISTORY OF HEXDRICKS COUNTY. 



plune Davis ot Eel Ei^er Township. Those deceased are-Xewtou 
Cathenne, Join, and Barnabas. John Robblns was a prJi 
nent cf.en of this county, and served satisfactorily as Coa ' 
Co,n,u:ss,oner several tern.s. His .death occurred March 5 
ISSl. H,s widow IS living on the old homestead with he,' 
on-in-law, Jonathan Walton, winch has been her home for fi • 
two years. •> 



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CHAPTER XIX. 



MIDDLE TOWNSHIP. 



DeSCEII'TION. SeTTLE>CEXT. PiTTSBORO. — BcSIXESS. — ClIUECHES, 

ETC. — Political Histoky. — Tow^'SHir Officials.- — Statistics. 
—Biographical. ' "_ .- ■■ '- 

Middle Township is bounded on tlic north bj Boone Connty, on 
the east by Brown and Lincoln townships, on the south by Lin- 
coln, "Washington and Center, knd on the west by Center and 
Union. It is very deficient in natural drainage, but easily drained 
by artificial means. It has no stream too large to be called a 
branch; its surface is the nearest a plain of any township in the 
county; its soil is for the most part very productive, and Indian 
corn is the staple; wheat and oats are, hov.-ever, very profitable 
crops. • . ■ 

first settlement. 

The first clearing in the township was ma^ia in 1S30 by Lemuel 
SIcBee, in the western part of the town of Pi'xtsboro. Within tliree 
years from the date of j\[r. McBee's settlement, tiie following well- 
known citizens settled in the central and sosithern portions of the 
township: Ed. Poynter, Elijali Thompson-. Adam Spicklemire, 
Stephen Hale, Samuel Hill, James Wells,, Jonas Lipe, John and 
Jacob Iloltsclaw, Aaron Spicklemire, Benjamin Davis and Heze- 
liiah Demick. In no part of Hendricks C'tJimty did the pioneers 
have a harder fight with primeval nature, ar endure more hard- 
ships, than in Middle Township. The forests were very heavy and 
the undergrowth of bushes almost impenetRuble. Tlie township 
was organized iu 1833. *Jame3 Parks was 6fee first Justice of the 
Peace, and Alfred Linebcrry taught the mrst school, in 1S35, on 
Samuel Hill's farm, for $10 per month. 

PITTSBORO. 

Pittsboro wa? laid out in lS3i by Simon T. Hadley and Will- 
iam Li Matlock. It was first called by Mr. Hadley, Pittsburg, 
and afterward changed to Pittsboro to have the name of the town 

(697; 



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oeen for tea yearc ;,, "■' v iOO laborei-^ P;., 

Afea & T>p_7, "^°"' '^^ery stablp- Ar r *'^- -^i'^'- Post- 

^'« P-e« Office, 'te°?"S'r "^ ^'^StCt « ? I"" 

'■'^'^i ^- HoaK-, 

^ EELIGlOcrs. 

^^e Christian nhu,^„7 
ganized Peb. 05 ii;r^\°^ "C'un-cb of God in n, • „ 

-ere Joseph Wei D^^"^^^-" ^ ^ -sf,J ^ ' Th'T 'T'' ^^ '^ 
«°d Asa Yeaeh r, """'^ ^^''^' John L Pa.l e ''' ^'^'■^^''^" 

BOn ^'^^^^^ ^-e been Rey. W ,W Tl " ^ " P^'^'^^P^ ^^'•"^■ 

^==StL£:ri!l°^'^ ^-^ ^-^ a socety , . 
^^^^^^^^===r— — — _ satiety here lor 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS OOUXTr. 



699 



some forty years. Their present frame church, the second used by 
them, was built in 1S6S, at a cost of §2,000. No regular services 
are held at present writing. Rev. Mr. Green, of Danville, held 
monthly services in the fall of ISSl. The membership is not 
large, the congregation being about 100. 



FIEST ELECTION. 

The poll-book of Middle Township for the presidential election 
of 1852 gives tlio names of 139 voters, whicli are here copied, as 
affordifig a very good list of the old settlers: Asa T. Iloadley, John 
Nelson,V. O. Parker, W. G. Parker, I. M. Candiff, I. C. Parker, 
G. L. Thompson, Parney Ball, Calloway iSTosIer, G. W. Firestone, 
William *B. McDonnell, James Pace, Lafjtjette J. Job, Boston 
"Woslen, Austin Pierson, L. Cannon Pointer, Edward Pointer, Al- 
fred Iluddleston, Perry 11. Darnell, Thomas S. Roberts, Joshua 
F. Hntchins, John A. Long, Thomas J. C. Sparks, Greenup Ken- 
nedy, Jeremiah Spicklemire, Joshua Kenne<1y, "William Williams, 
Edward Reynolds, Benjamin Xewman, Thomas Walker, James G. 
Iloadley, Eldred Huff, Jacob Gregg, John P. Foster, James Chad- 
wick, Thomas Gatson, Thomas C. Gatson, Flenry Cay wood, Adam 
Thompson, David Roy, Jonathan D. Parks, Augustus ISTewman, 
John L. Parker, John A. Gregg, William Crab, Henry Carter, 
Solomon Yeach, Richard Myers, Andrew J. Jordan, George Sliver, 
Noble Jenkins, Henry Hughs, Balaam Wells, Samuel Hill, Beverly 
J. Edwards, John Gregg, John Caywood, P»iiah Dillon, John Kitts, 
Benjamin G. Waters, Thomas Veach, George W. Jordan, William 
McCuitt, Evan Thompson, Harmon McCaslin, William J. Roberts, 
Jaraes A. Blair, Zachariah Geong, William A'. Jones, Abraham 
Spicklemire, Tiiomas Roy, Williatn J. Maj, Jacob Hughs, Simon 
Wells, William Wood, Asa Caywood, William J. Foster, William 
Selch, Stephen F. Hnddleston, John C. Cocbirau, Hugh Robinson, 
Raphael Smith, J. T. Pratt, William Job, IjsHiu McNally, Charles 
CofSn, Clark Benton, Thomas J. Weaver, Gordon Reynolds, Lewis 
Nosier, Asa Veach, David A. Jenkins, William Ray, William 
Thompson, William S. Walter, Samuel P. Pointer, William E. 
Walter, John W. Shepherd, Aaron Spicklemire, William Patter- 
son, Oliver Wells, Nelson Faught, Nath.a.niel Hilton, James M. 
Parker, Joseph Wells, Joseph Fanglit, Alexander F. Smith, Sier 
Thompson, William E. Newman, James W. Thompson, James 
W. Reynolds, Perry Newman, George J. Davis, Jonas Lipe, 
Thomas Richardson, Jaraes N. Spicklemire, William C. Gregg, 



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HISTORY OF HENDKICKS COUNTY. 



James W. Lout, George Faugbt, William Dillon, John CundiS, 
William Hale, Greenville Spicklemire, Aaron Y. Keith, Levi Bu- 
chanan, Nicholas Loller, Henry Lamb, Joseph Lyons, Jacob Hale, 
.William Gregg, J. M. Fronk, Benjamin Griffith, Thomas A. 
Blake, William D. Emmons, Lewis Holtsclaw, Alexander Adams, 
Oliver W. Hill and, James N. Lout. 



POLITICAL. 

In political -sentiment the majority in Middle Township has 
been successively Democratic, Whig, Democratic, Republican, and 
lastly Democratic. Following is the vote for President since 1844. 

180S— Ulj-sses S. Grant .'.1.54 30 

Horatio Seymour 12-1 

1872— Ulysses S. Grant lo6 30 

Horace Greeley 126 

Charles O'Conur 2 

1876— Samuel J. Tilden 203 4', 

Rutherford 13. Hayes. . .157 
P'eter Cooper 40 

18S0— Winfitld S. Hancock. . .223 60 

.James A. Garfield 163 

Jarues B. "Weaver 25 

1884— Grove r Cleveland 234 47 

James G. Blaine 177 

Benjamin F. Butler. .. . 18 



1844— James K. Polk 57 25 

Henry Clay 32 

1S4S— Lev,-is Cas_- 119 35 

Zachariah Taylor 84 

Martin Van Buren 8 

1853— V/lnfield Scott 70 3 

Franklin Pierce 67 

1S5G — James Buchanan 118 51 

John C.Fremont 07 

Millard Fillmore 4 

1860— Stephen A. Douglas 104 10 

Abrah.im Lincoln 94 

John C. Breckinridge. . 19 
John Bell..- 1 

1864— Abrahr.m Lincoln 110 17 

Geortre B. ilcClellan. . . 93 



OFFICIAL. 

a 

Those who have been justices, constables, trustees, clerks, treas- 
nrers and assessors of Middle Township are here enumerated, to- 
gether vrith the years in which they were respectively elected: 

Justices oj" the Peace: James Parks, ISSi; Archibald Alexander, 
1835; James William Hooper, 1837; David S. Buzzard, 1833; 
James William Hooper, 1813; David S. Bazzard, 181-3; Alexander 
Pollock, lSlo-'7; David . S. Buzzard, ISIS; Alexander Adams, 
1851; Jacob M. Duzan, 1851; Thomas A. Blake, 1855; Lewis 
Pearcy, 1857; Elias Leach, 1858; James M. Tout, 1861; James A. 
Blair, Oliver P. Peters and Balaam Wells, 1862; Nelson Faught, 
1865; B. Wells, 1866; Mahlon Thompsoa, 1867; B. G. Waters, 
1868; John B. Rainey, 1869; John P. Smith, 1870; William S. 
Marshland James M. Wills, 1S72; J. A.Jordan, 1874; James M. 
Wills and C. W. Edwards, 1876; Jacob M. Dusanne, 1878; J. B. 
Walters, 18S0; Marcus L. Marry, 1882; Isaac Waters, 1881. 

Constables: Larkin J. Dollarhide, 1833; Albert Thompson, 
1335; Elias Leach and Albert Thompson, 1838; Elias Leach and 



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HISTOKT OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



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Thomas J. Weaver, 1S39; Abram Spicldemire and Boston Nansler, 
lS4i; William McBee and William A. Long, 1845; Caleb Lamb 
and Solomon Adams, 1S46; Aaron V. Keith and Solomon Adams, 
1S4S; Aaron V. Keith and Solomon Adams,- 1849; William D. 
Amos and Solomon Adams, 1850; John Shepherd and William 
McCuitt, 1851; Elias Leach and Thomas D. j^ewinan, 1852; Ellas 
Leach, 1853; Clark L. Benton and Oliver W. Flill, 1854; Clark L. 
Benton and Austin Pierson, lS55-'6; Isaac B. Waters and William 
C. Gregg, 1857; Joseph M. McVey and William Gulley, 1S5S; 
Georgaway Snllivan and Oliver W. Hill, 1800; N. W. Doan and 
William Gulley, 1861; William J. Linton and William Gulley, 
1862; William J. Linton and Israel Hendriekson, 1863; Enoch W. 
King and Israel HeuJrickson, 1864; Jesse S. Painter 'and L. S. 
Watts, 1865; G. L. Thompson and L. S. Watts, 1866; G. L. 
Thompson and James Pearcy, 1867; William J". Liu ton and John 
P. Smith, 1868; E. F. Eaiuey and William H. Spalding, 1869; 
William H. Spalding and Alfred Waters, 1870; Alfred Waters 
and Matthew M. Adams, 1872; G. L. Thompson and J. A. Smith, 
1874; G. L. Thompson and Harvey Jones, 1876; William H. Spald- 
ing and James M. .Waters, 1878; William Spalding and Daniel 
Kennedy, ISSO; Hiram Huddleston and John Murry, 1882; Elijah 
Dickerson and Samuel McBee, 1884. 

Trustees: James jST. Tout, 1855; David Ray, 1856; James N. 
Tout, 1857; James A. Blair, 1858; John JST. Shirley, 1860-'2, Jonas 
Lipe, 1863; Silas Davidson, 1864; Amos 0. Weaver, 1865-'6; Will- 
iam G. Parker, 1867-'S; Lewis Tnornbrough, 1869; John N. 
Shirley, 1870-'2; H. Hoak, 1874; B. A. Acton, 1876; Daniel 
Feeley, 1878-'80; Austin Pierson, 1882 -'84. 

CleA:.}.- Clark L. Benton, 1855; Thomas A. Blake, 1856; 
Greenville ?{. Spicklemire, 1857; Elias Leaeh, 1858 (office abol- 
ished). 

Treasurers: Asa T. Ploadley, lS55-'7; John L. Shirley, 1858; 
(office abolislied). 

Assessors: Alfred Stanley, 1870; J. B. Walters, 1872; William 
C. Mitchell, 1874; George Brent, 1876-'8; Lee A. Lemmon, lS80-'2. 



oTA~ISTICS. 



The population of Middle To^7nship was in 1880, by the United 
States census, 1,82S. The following statistics of population, wealth 
and taxation are for 1S85: Acres of land assessed, 19,604.29; value 
of same, $461,843; value of improvements, §90,140; value of lots. 



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EIOGEAPHICAL. 

^' -^^-^3, a son of John R" „ i o ,"'-"^^"='^3 County, V» 
parents mo.ed to HendricH P ^'^''^ ^- ^"^I- In fsoo , ' 

^;;:^^^eg,..d„..edin^X.:^fX ^u' /^^^ ^^"^^^ S:: 
, he has bu.It up a ]a,..o practice FT '^''^ ^" Pittsboro whe^^o 

I Session and is reco^nT^ed bT 1 '' ' ^^osestudent of his m", 

I ;:^^e practitioners o;tX^--'^f''-o^ 

dncks Countj- iMedical Society tlf; ^.^ ^r"" '"'™'^^'- ^^ '^^^ Hen- 
Amezucan Medical Associat on' "'^^"^^^f ^^ioal Societ,^ and th 
corporation of Pittsboro, S^" "he o""T''^'^ ^^ ^^^^^ -^-^e t e 
He also owns a q-rterVectt „ lb V - "^ '' ^^'"'^l^i^ '-^^ 
^ble a tention to breedin.. Wo d d^a^;^" r' .^^^^^ ^-^n consider- 
deen An.us varieties, and was t t f "" -^^''^^^^-d ^"^ Aber- 

"^ Hendrick-s Uountv. Dr li I '! "' '' "'^™^*^°^ ''^^ pure breed ■ 
Alexander, danghte; of j;f f/^^,"^^-'-' ^^t. 10, 1872, to A 
dren--Ada, born May 13, /si .^d ?" "\ ^he,- have tuo chil 
I^'-- Bnll is a member of M ^'r ^'^^''^'^' ^^0''" April 19 19-0 

^^th. Christian ch^h:'"^ "^^^^'^ ^---%; a,rl'L;!,;i 
■f Letcher Carfp^ o 

^« ^ -ti.e of Mari;: SriVr^^''^^'"^^ ^^-^^'-^^^^ To.„s,,i,„ 
^====.=,-_____^^^^^on of John F. and i>iana 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUZSTY. 



JOB 



Carter. He is the second of six children, tlie others being Emma 
(deceased), William J., John II., Flora x\.. and Mary J. Fletcher 
Carter was i-eared on a farm, attending in his boyhood the common 
schools, and later the commercial departmerjt of Butler University, 
Indianapolis. He was married Dec. 25, 1S76, to xMary M. Apple- 
gate, daughter of Milton B. and Margaret Applegate. In the 
spring of 1S77 he settled on his present tarraof 100 acres in Mid- 
dle Township, where he is successfully engaged in his chosen 
vocation. lie is an enterprising young man, and one of the most 
influential and prosperous citizens of the township. He and his 
wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. They have 
two children — Wilbert and p]arl. 

Silas Davidson is a native of Hendricks County, born April T, 
1S39, a son of John and ]!^ancy Davidson^ natives of Kentucky. 
His parents were among the first settlers of Middle Township, 
and endured all the privations and hardships of pioneer life. They 
entered eighty acres of heavily timbered land, which they cleared 
and made their home till death. But tw-o of their five children 
are living — Silas and "William. Silas Davidson was reared and 
educated in his native county, remaining at home till after the 
breaking out of the war of the Kebellion. In August, ISGl, he 
enlisted in Company B, Seventh Indiana I&fanfry, and participated 
in the battles of Greenbriar, Winchester, Fi:>rt Republic, and others. 
He was wounded in the riglit foot, making- amputation at the ankle 
necessary. He was captured and sent to a Confederate hospital at 
Charlotteville, Ya., where he remained .t&rec months. He was 
then confined in Libby and other prisons a short time, when he 
was paroled and sent to Washington wP.iere he received his dis- 
charge in October, 1S62. He. was married March 26, 1S6S, to 
Martha Baker, daughter of Nathan Baker, of Center Township. 
To them have been born four children — Cerrie E.,Mary E., Orpha 
E. and Archibald F. Mr. Davidson is a member of Pittsboro 
Lodge, No. 312, I. O. 0. F. He has a ,:good farm of 106 acres 
and is a representative citizen of his town»lu,p. 

Daniel Feely was born in Niagara Connty, N. Y., Nov. 8, 181:3, 
a son of Martin and Mary (Co-x") Feely. He was reared in his na- 
tive county, and in the spring of lS6i came to Indiana and for 
four years was employed as a stave cuttvr in Allen County; then 
went to Indianapolis and in the tall of 1S69 removed to Boone 
County, whore he engaged in the manofacture of staves in com- 
pany with J. E. McKendry and Robert Bracken three years, when 



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^as beeu one of 1,0 7 f "^^^'^ ^ ^actorv in Pfff.u "^ ^'' 

-"^ "»*' a fine farm of ion ^ resides in Piff-.K, 

--0 this Le owns other a t'lrrV'^""'"-^ '^^^"- ^l^' 
«^ t!'e wealthiest citizens of ? ""' ''^"^^ ^°'^^- He is 
"^eans in flip ^ '^eoi oi the townshin and,-, 7'i. "^"^^ "s one 

Aip j™ ?r' "'!"■« ""Mher ,Wi,;- "? •^'™'» R- Tic 

'^f- Janjes R Wo7„ *'■''' 8- res^cpn^ ^f fi ■ 

.7 f'^^^ i^e remained several. '""'"^'^"^''•"ceCountv i\ 
m.r'p /^' •^'^^"'ered aLalf<.Prf " , '^^^ ^^^f'ers of Mfd- 

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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



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Hill has been twice married — first to Eebecca Hornaday, daugh- 
ter of Lewis and Rebecca Hornaday. To them were born sev- 
en children, five of whou^ are living — Oliver W., John C, 
Daniel F.. Mary J. and Eliza Z. The deceased are Samira A. 
and "William "W". Mrs. Hill died and Mr. Hill married Mrs. 
■ Catherine .(Hambleton) Clark, widow of Edmund Clark. In politics 
Mr. Hill is a Republican. 

Daniel F. Iloltsclaw, son of John and Ann Holtsclaw, is a na 
tive of Hendricks County, Ind., born Nov. 4, 1S43. He was 
reared to manhood in his native county, and April 17, 1S62, he 
was united in marriage with Miss Mary J. West, a daughter of 
William and Sarah "West, of this county, the former deceased. 
They have a family of five children, who^e names are — William 
C, Edward G., Lloyd C, Charles O. and Newton F. Mr. Holts- 
claw is the owner of a fine farm of about ninety-two acres all in a 
-good state of cultivation. He belongs to the Odd Fellows' Lodge 
at Pittsbdro, Lid. He is a member of the Christian church. In 
politics- he is a Republican. 

Marshall HoUscIom. a prominent farmer of Middle Townsliip, 
was born in Pulaski County, Ky., Oct. 25, 1833, a son of John and 
Annie Holtsclaw. In 1S31 his parents moved to Montgomery 
County, Ind., and thence in 1835 to Hendricks County, and set- 
tled near where our subject now lives. His father was married 
twice. By the first wife were born three children — Louis, John, 
and Francis J., and by the second, seven, five of whom are liv- 
ing — Marshall, Green L. , Daniel F., Surelda, and Mary A. Mar- 
shall was reared and educated in Hendricks County, remaining 
with his parents till manhood. He is one of the successful agri- 
culturists of the township, owning a good farm of 135 acres. He 
was maiTied in August, 1S51, to Elizabeth H. Stevens, of Parke 
County, Ind., and to them was born one child — ^Annie E. Mrs. 
Holtsclaw died July, 1857, and July 25, 1S66, Mr. Holtsclaw mar- 
ried Sallie A., daughter of William West. Three children have 
been born to them, but two of whom are living — Ora V. and Effie 
M. In April, ISGl, Mr. Holtsclaw enlisted in Company A, 
Seventh Indiana Infantry, in the three-months service, and en- 
gaged in the battles of Philippi, Laurel Hill, and Carrick's Ford, 
W. Va. In February, 18G2. he enlisted in' Com])any A, Fifty- 
third Infantry, and participated in many of the important engage- 
ments of the war, among others the siege of Corinth and Yicks- 
burT, and was wounded at Hatchie River. He was discharged in 



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HISTOr.Y OF HENDRICKS CODNTV. 



February, lS6i, and re-enlisted in the same company and regi- 
ment and participated in the Atlanta campaign. At Kenesaw 
Mountain he was wounded and was in the hospital at Rome, Ga., 
eight weeks. He joined his regiment and with them marched to 
tlie sea, and participated in tiie siege of Savannah and battle of 
Bentonville, iST. C. ; was present at the surrender of General John- 
ston; was commissioned Second Lieutenant for good and faithful 
service; received his final discharge at Louisville, Ky., in July, 
1865. In politics Mr. Holtselaw is a Republican. He and his 
wife are members of the Christian chfirch. 

A?nos Hoak, farmer and stock-raiserj Middle Township, was born 
in Lancaster County, Pa., Dec. 3, 1831, a son of Martin and Eliz- 
abeth Hoak, natives of Pennsylvania. He is the third of a family 
of eight children — Daniel, Henry, Amos, Hannah, Martha, Jona- 
than, Joseph and Isaac. He was reared on a farm in his native 
State, and in ISoi immigrated to Montgomery County, Ohio, 
where he engaged in the nursery business six years. In ISGO he 
came to Hendricks CDunty, Ind., and settled on a farm in Middle 
Township, whore he now has 100 acres of improved land. In 1875 
he formed a partnership with his brother Henry in the mercantile 
business at Pittsboro, the firm name being H. & A. Hoak. They 
continued in business till the fall of ISSO, when they sold out to 
Oliver W. Hill. Mr. Hoak has servci his township as Assessor 
four years. He is one of the successful and enterprising business 
men of the township, lending his infliTsnce to all worthy projects. 
He was married Dec- 24, 1861, to Margaret J. (McLeod) Hale, 
daughter of "William McLeod. They have had four children — Ida 
M., Nettie, Harry and William, deceaseiJ. Mr. Hoak has been a 
member of the Masonic and Odd Fellows'' orders for several years. 

£^nos C. Hornaday is a native of Hemslricks County, Ind., born 
Oct. 20, 1839, a son of Simon and Biza Hornaday. Simon 
Hornaday was a native of JSorth Carolinia, and when about eight- 
een years of age immigrated to Warren G(2»nnty, Ohio, and thence, 
a short time later, to Hendricks County, Ind., and entered forty 
acres of land in Liberty Township. He was one of the first set- 
tlers, and became one of the prominent >eitlzens of the county. He 
served as Commisiioner of Hendricks County six years. He was 
twice married; first, to Eliza Syntmeyer, by whom he had five 
children, three of whom are living — En-os C, Edom M. and Eliza- 
beth. His second wife was Martha Yolk., and to them were born 
three children — Elvira, Samantha and Eva. Mr. Hornadav died 



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HISTOBY OF HENDKtCKS COUNTS'. 



707 



in March, ISSO. Enos C. Ilornaday was reared in Hendricks 
Countj. His early education was obtained in the common schools, 
and later in the Wabash College, at Crawfordsville, Ind. "While 
at Crawfordsville the Rebellion broke out and the call was issued 
for volunteers for the three-months service, and in April, 1861, he 
enlisted in Company I, Eleventh Indiana Infantry. At the expi- 
ration of the three months he re-enlisted in the same comjxany for 
three years. He participated in many hard-fought battles, amon<^ 
them Fort Donelson, Shiloh, Yicksburg, Champion Hills and Jack- 
son. His regiment was first assigned to the Army of the Tennes- 
see, and later was transferred to the Army of the Gulf, "and finally 
to Sheridan's command, in the Shenandoah Valley, where he was 
discharged in Augn t, ISCl. He returned home and again assumed 
the responsibilities of a civilian. He has been prominently iden- 
tified with the interests of the county, and in 18S0 was elected 
County Treasurer, assuming the duties of his office in September, 
ISSl. He performed the duties of his office faithfully and effi- 
ciently two years, his residence daring this time being in Danville. 
His home in Middle Township is plea;aatly located, the farm con- 
taining seventy-three acres of cultivated land. Mr. Hornaday was 
married Feb. 13, 1879, to Viola C. Dillon, of Boo;ie County. They 
have two children — Herbert P., bora June 17, ISSO, and Erie E., 
born June 9, 188-3. Mr. and Mrs. Hornaday are members of the 
Christiafi church. 

John A. Hufford, one of the successful agriculturists of Middle 
Townsb/ip, is a natjive of Hendricks County, born in January, 
1834, a son of Joel and Louisa J. Hufford, who settled in this 
county in 1832. He is the second of si.K children, but two of whom 
beside himself are living — Gideon F. and David J. Adaline, 
"William N., and Amanda J . are deceased. John A. was reared on 
a farm, receiving a practical education in the common schools. He 
has been successful in his pursuits and now owns a cood farm of 
157^ acres. He was married Oct. 25, 185-5. to Julia A. Parker, 
daughter of "William O.Parker. To them were born three chil- 
dren— "William J., Charles, and Mary J. (deceased). Mrs. Hufford 
died and Mr. HuiTord subsequently married, in April, 1882, Mary 
Gentry, daughter of Harvey Gjntry. He is a member of the Bap- 
tist and his wife of the Ciiristian church. 

John IT. Uughes is a native of Hendricks County, Ind., born 
Sept. 8, 1815, a son of Henry and Margaret Hughes, early settlers 
of Middle Township, and here the father died in 1SC6. He was 



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708 HISTORY OF HENDRICES COUNTT. 

reared and educated in his native countj, and since reacliinor man- 
hood has given his attention to agriculture. He owns a good farm 
of sixty-six acres, his homo being one of the pleasantest in the 
township. He was married Nov. 10, IS69, to Susan C. Blair, a 
native of Plendricks County, born May 23, 1S52, daughter of 
James A. and xVmenia Blair. Four cliildren have been born to 
them — Harry E., Muratt W., Iva M. , and one deceased. 

LxutJier TF. Job was born in Putnam. County, Ind., Jan. 24, 1S36, 
a son of William and Mary Job. His parents were natives of 
North Carolina, and among the early settlers of Putnam County. 
They moved to Danville, Center Township, in 1S60, where they 
lived until 1879, then moved to Nebraska where the father died in 
September, ISSO. The mother died July 2S, 1885. They had a 
family of fourteen children, seven of whom are living — Perlina P., 
Luther W.. Noah W., Alfred P., Isaialj S., Nancy E. and James 
P. Three sons were soldiers in the war of the Rebellion. Noah 
W. was a member of Company B, Seveiith Indiana Infantry, and 
after serving two years and eight months was captured and incar- 
cerated in Libby and Andersonville prisons seven months. He 
was wounded twice, in tlie hip and in the forehead. Alfred P. 
served twelve months in the Fifty-first Indiana Infantry, and La- 
fayette (now deceased) served one year in Company B, Tenth 
Indiana Infantry. Luther W. Job was reared a farmer, and has 
always given his attention to agriculture. In 1859 he settled in 
the eastern part of Middle Township, where he now owns ninety- 
five acres of valuable land, well improved. He was married Sept. 
23, 185S, to Martha E. Junken, born Oct. 17, 1839, daughter of 
Noble and Jane Junken. Tliey have tw'o children — MoUie, now 
Mrs. J. B. Hale, born Sept. 3, 1859, and Eva, born Jlarch 8, 1873. 
Mr. Job is a member of Pittsboro Lodge, No. 342, I. O. 0. F. 
He and his wife are members of the Meitiiodist Episcopal church. 
Mrs. Job's parents were natives of Y"iiVinia, and among the 
early settlers of Wayne County. In IS'Sy they moved to Hen- 
dricks County, and settled in Middle Ta'svnship, where the father 
died Sept. 13, 1875. They reared a family of four children, of 
whom three are living — Moses II., Martha E. and John F. 

^Villiam A. Jones, one of the earliest settlers of Middle Town- !j 
ship, is a native of Kentucky, born May 31, 1812, a son of Allen |' 
and Elizabeth (Campbell) Jones. His parents came to Hendricks 
County in 1827, and here he grew to manhood. On attaining his h 
majority he entered f^rty acres of wild land, which he improved -y 

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BISTORT OF HENDKICKS COUNTY. 



709 



and to wliicb be has added till he now has a fine farm of 200 acres. 
He was married JNIay 2, 1S33, to Hannah E. Bray, and to them 
were born eight children, five of whom are living — Richard B., 
Allen E., Thomas B., William S. and Hannah. Mary, Elizabeth 
and Eboda are deceased. His wife died in September, 1S76, and 
in September, ISTS, be married Mary A. Wright, of Virginia. 
In politics Mr. Jones is a Democrat. He atfd his wife are mem- 
bers of the Baptist church. 

John A. Jordan, 5Q\\ of George W. and Tabitba Jordan, is a 
native of Plendricks County, born Nov. 3, 184:3. He is the young- 
est of five children, but four of whom are living, the others being 
William T., Susan xV. and Mary A. He was reared on bis father's 
farm, remaining at home until after the breaking out of the war 
of the Rebellion, when, in August, 1S62, he enlisted in defense of 
the Union and was assigned to Companj' H, Ninety-ninth Indiana 
Infantry. He participated in tlio battes at Vicksburg, Chatta- 
nooga, Knoxville, Dalton, Resaca, the Atlanta campaign and march 
to the sea, serving till June, 1S65. After his discharge he re- 
turned to his native county, and turned his attention to agriculture, 
at which he has ])rospeVed and now owns 105 acres of valuable 
land in the northern part of Middle Township. He was married 
Jan. 9, 1S70, to Amelia M. Dillon, of Boone Count}', Ind., and to 
them have been born four children, three of whom are living — 
Vietta J., born Sept. 21, 1S71; Ida B., May 16, 1873, and Carrie 
E. , Sept. 22, 1875. Mr. Jordan has served as Justice of the Peace 
four years. He is an active member of the Christian church and 
has been an Elder several years. 

Henry T. Kirh was born in Harrison County, Ohio, June 11, 
1842, a son of Vochiel and Susannah Kirk. In 1843 his parents 
moved to Noble County,'Ohio, and thence, ia 1S55, to Hendricks 
Cor.nty, Ind., and settled in Brownsburg, where his father died ia 
ISSO ai)d his mother in 1883. To tJietn were born nine children, 
but five of whom are living — Isaac, William, Van Buren, Sarab J. 
and Henry T. Our subject was reared a farmer, remaining at 
liome till his enlistment, in October, 1861, in the defense of the 
Union. He was assigned to Company A, Fifty-first Indiana In- 
fantry, Fourth Corps, Ar^ny of the Cumberland, and partici[:iated 
in the battles at Fort Donelson, Shiloh, C-orinth, Mnrlreesboro, 
Gallatin, Day's Gap, Crooked Creek, Cedar Mountain, Perryvillc, 
Franklin, Nashville, Overton Hills, Columbia and others of minor 
importance. He was discharged in Januarj, 1S61:, and immediately 
45 



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re-enlisted and served H]I n 

O^^t. 14 1S8K ,„ ,r December, 1S65 w 

uecea=ed. Ur. K j-t |^ ' "^^^ J-U-, Lou and Harrv TVr 

;- of Wil,ia,nson andVa , Vt ?^"^''^^-^' ^ •- Jan. 7 1S30 . 

in the Eleventh Indiana InAntrv f '.u ^P'^^' ^^^-I' he enlisted 

""^ '"f . ^" Clayton, Monrov^ " ^t ""'^- ^"^ ^^^'^ f^Hou d 
^ eated u. ^liddle Township, "Ce ?T" "' '''^ ''''' -''en ^ 
" al pursuits, and now o.n s a ' ^ ' ''°'' ^'^'''^"'ed a^ricu 

prominent members of H, A ' ■ """^ ^^J^JIey H Th 

-s reared in his n^ti/efo^^Sr ''^" ''''''''■ ^^^e, H^:,^''^' 

the district schools. In tlT f^l ''''^^'^S his ear] v edoc'aK 

ern Christian Univet if! /^^°'^ ^« ^"^^red the Yo . '" 

attended tili .June i^I^' , '' /-^ianapoJis. an nstJ ""'^' 

f- Indiana InfL'tr f\:':;,'^^ ^^^^ed in Com 3^^,'^ 

hattleofDalton, and'othe, P/'^'.^^'P'^ed i/i the sie^e ofV^', 'n^'" 

the Fourth Cor;s, of ^ iiM """^ '-P-^-ce. t .J^,"'?^ 'f ' 

to Tex., where'the, rett^^^f;^^- ^^'"^^ ^ P- t. :; 

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HISTORY OF HENDEICKS COrTRTr. 



711 



dangbter of William and Sallie Procter. To them have been born 
seven children, five of vvh^rn are living; — Oscar §., Aggie, Nettie, 
Ettie and an infant nnnaraed. Mr. Parker remained in Hendricks 
County a year after his marriage and then moved to Johnson 
County, Kas., where for about three years lie worked at the car- 
penter's trade. Thence to McPiierson, Ka^i., and was associated 
with "Wallace Gleasun in the drug business ei^ht months. In 187-t 
he returned to IIendrit;ks County, where he now has a good farm 
of eighty acres. Mr. Parker is a member of feiie Masonic fraternity. 

£^llis L. Parker was born in Middle Township, Hendricks Co., 
Ind., Feb. 10, IS t9, a son of John L. and Nancy Parker. He 
received the rudiments of his education in the -district schools of 
his native township, and in the fall of 1S63 entered the North- 
western Christiaa University (now Butler University), at Indianap- 
olis, where he remained a school year, and in 1S67 returned to the 
same school. After leaving school lie taught for a time and then 
turned his attention to agriculture, at which he has been success- 
ful, and now owns a good farm of eighty acres. Mr. Parker was 
married Nov. 21, 1S76, to Nancy Salmom, daughter of Kobert 
Salmon, of Lincoln Township. To them have been b^rn four 
children — Bruce, Mary, Maude and Claude. 

Henry R. Parker is, a native of IlendricLs County, born in Feb- 
ruary, 1S3G, a son of John L. and Nancy Parker, who settled in 
Middle Township in 1S:35, and here the father died in October, 
1875. Six of a family of thirteen children are living — John C. 
Jane, Henry P., Sarah, Wesley and Ellis H. Henry E. Parker was 
reared and educated in his native township. He is one of the most 
intelligent and thrifty farmers of the townsMp and has accumula- 
ted as a result of his industry and enterpri.-se 200 acres of valuable 
land. He was married Dec. 25, 1860, to A^aline Carter, daughter 
of Harlan and Esther Carter. They hare five children — John 
H., William C, Lurena, Richard and NaiiKcy E. Mr. and Mrs. 
Parker are members of the Ciiristian churclji_ 

William Patterson is a native of Moram^snth County, N. J. 
born May 27, 1818, a son of William and Rebecca Patterson. In 
1836 he accompanied his^ parents to Wayne County, Ind., and 
later to Hendricks County, locating in B'irown Township, where 

they both died. Three ot a f unily of eigl^t children are livin<; 

James, Catherine and William. William Patterson was reai'ed a 
farmer, receiving but a limited education. In 1851 he came to 
Hendricks County and settled in Middle Township, where he has 



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HISTOKV OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



since lived. lie has been industrious and frugal, and lias accinnu- 
lated a good property. His farm contains 160 acres of valuable 
land, and his improvements are among the best in the to^viiship. 
Mr. Patterson was married Oct. 4, 1S51, to Amelia Laulioi'n, 
daughter of Thomas Laiihorn, of Marion County, Ind. To them 
have been born eleven children, of whom seven are living — John 
W., Thomas J., Vinson, William II., Mary A., Ilebecca and Dora 
E. In politics Mr. Patterson is a Democrat. Hc'and his wife are 
members of the Baptist church. 

Austin Plerson, one of the leading citizens of Middle Town- 
ship, was born June 12, 1826, in Shelby County, Ky. He was a 
son of Williaiii and iSTancy Pierson, who were natives of Virginia. 
From Kentucky they came to Hendricks County, Ind., in 1S34, 
locating in Marion Township, where the father died. He was 
County Commissioner of this county. They were the parents of 
ten children, eight of whom survive — Augustus, Thomas, John, 
William, Austin, Sarah, Elizabeth and Nancy. Our subject was 
reared to manhood in this county, receiving but a limited educa- 
tion, and was here married, March *5, 1851, to Miss Mary J. Smith, 
of Hendricks County. Thuy have had a family of twelve children. 
Those living are — James M., Merecn, George B., Joseph M., Robert 
E., jSancy E., Sarah, Mary and Ann E. Henry, Harvey and Oliver 
are deceased. Mr. Pierson settled v/here he now resides, in the fall 
of 1851. He has met with success in his agricultural pursuits and is 
the owner of 160 acres of land. He is at present serving his sec- 
ond terra as Township Trustee. 

William Ray was born in Randolpli County, N. C, Feb. 14, 
1822, a son of Presley and Dica Ray. He was reared on a farm 
in his native county, receiving a coinEaon-school education. After 
reaching manhood he came to IlendriiEiis County, Ind., and was 
here married, in January, 1847, to Annie Osborn, daughter of 
Mathew and Jane Osborn, early setaHers of Hendricks County. 
After his marriage he settled in ME-iMIc Township, on the farm 
where he has since lived, which coataJns 12of acres of well culti- 
vated land. He has been energetic and enterprising, and is one of 
the prosperous farmers of the township. To jMr. and Mrs. Ray 
have been born twelve children, seven ol' whom are living — Charles 
F., Dica J., Presley E., Elijah, Mathaw C, Allison E. and William 
T. In politics Mr. Ray is a Republican. 

Tetmaney 31. ShojJ'iier was born in Orange, now Alamance, 
County, X. C, Sept. 10, 1835, a son of Frederick and Susan (Davi- 



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HISrOKY OF HENDEICKS COUNTY. 



713 



son) Shofiner. His father was twice married and had a family of 
nine children, of whom our subject is tlie only one living. lie was 
reared in his native State and there married, in August, 1853, Mary 
Kivett. To them were born eight children, hut six of whom are liv- 
ing—Joseph C, Robert P., William J., Eliza J., Sallio and Minnie: 
Mr. Shotlner was an uncompromising Union man during the war of 
theEebellion, and was fearless in expressing his loyal sentiments, 
and in 1S6S was chosen for two years a member of the North Caro- 
lina Legislature, representing the Tvventy-sixtli Senatorial District, 
and while tliere introduced the celebrated •' Slioff'ner Bill" for the 
suppression of the '^ Ku Klux ", and in the face of much opposition 
finally secured its passage. His sentiments naturallv incurred the 
enmity of the « I'Jan " vvlio several times laid their plans to kill 
him, but each time were unsuccessful in carrying tliem out. Deem- 
ing it unwise, on account of the feeling toward him, to remain in 
liis native State, in 1S70 he moved to Ilendricks County, Ind. Af- 
ter living in different parts of the county lie finallv located in the 
southern part of Middle Township, where be now^has a fine farm 
of eighty acres. He has taken an active interest in the atfairs of 
the county and State, and is one of Hendricks' most valued citizens. 
Alexander F. Smith was born in Henry County, Ky., Nov. 15, 
1S24, a son of James and Hannah Smith. In 1837 his parents 
came to Hendricks County, Ind., and settled in Center Township, 
where° they both died. They had a family of eight children— Rob- 
ert, Sarah, Alexander F., George, James D., Susan, Elizabeth 
and William. Tliree, Robert, George at.d William, are deceased. 
William was First Lieutenantof Company A, Fifty-third Indiana 
Infantry, in the war of the Rebellion, and was killed at Atlanta, ' 
Ga. Mr. Smith grew to manhood iu Center Township, and assisted 
his father i.i clearing and improving a frontier farm. In 1S55 he 
moved to Middle Township, and located oa the farm where he now 
lives. He owns 280 acres of choice laud, and is one of the most 
enterprising and influential citizens of the tovvnsbip. He was mar- 
ried Sept. 2S, 184S, to Nancy Worrell, a native of Virginia, i;orn 
N ov. 16, 1827, daughter of William and Patsey Worrell. To them 
was born one eon, James M., born July, 1S49. Mrs. Smith died 
Jan. 16, 1878. James M. v\as married Sept. 26, 1872, to Delilah 
Hollingsworth, who was born May 6, 1854, daughter of Samuel V. 
Hollingsworth, and has four children— Bernice A. , born Feb 6 
1875; Foster V., March 14, 1878; Irwin P., Feb. 23, 1880, and 
Charles P., April 9, 1884. He is the owner of 151 acres of fine 



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714 



HISTORY OF HENDEtCKS COaNTY. 



land, his residence being on the old liomestead with his father. 

Alfred Stanley, a prominent farmer and stock-raiser of Middle 
Township, is a native of Hendricks County, born March 31, 1S36. 
His parents, Isaac and Mary Stanley, were natives of JN'ortli Carolinu, 
and settled near Stilesville, this county, in an early day. Their 
family consisted of seven children, only two of whom, Alfred 
and Susan, are living. The deceased are- — John, Moses, Calvin, 
Thomas and Rachel. Alfred Stanley is one of the successful and 
enterprising farmers of Middle Townsliip. He has a fine farm of 
260 acres, and his iniprovenjents are unsurpassed in the county. 
He was marrieil Sept. 10, 1857, to Phccbe Plasters, daughter of 
William and Mary Plasters, early settlers of this county. They 
have a family of five children — Tillman H., George W., Mary M., j 
John M. and Franklin. Mr. Stanley has served as Assessor of 
Middle Township two years. He is a member of the Masonic and 
Odd Fellows fraternities. 

Lewis 2'kornbrughyiAS born Jan. 7, IS 13, and is a native of Ohio. 
His parents were William and EUzabetli Thornbrugh and were 
among the early settlers of Washington Township, Hendricks Co., 
Ind. Our subject was twice married, his first wife being Miss 
Annie Schengh. by whom he had five children — Mary £., Samuel, 
Angeline, Einiline and Mildred, the latter deceased. After tlie 
death of his first wife, Mr. Thornbrugts was married to A[rs. Fan- 
nie iSTash, widow of Richard iS^ash, of Brown Township, this 
county. To this union were born two children — Albert and John. 
Mr. Thornbrugh is the owner of 120 acres of land. He is a 
member of the Regular Baptist clrurch. 

Calvin Warrick was born in Rash County, Ind., Oct. 19, IS-iO, 
a son of Edward H. and Ruth Warrick, his father a native of 
Delaware and his mother of Virginia. In 1S15 his parents came 
to Hendricks County, Ind., and lived in Brown Township tilllS56, 
then moved to Middle Township, near Pisisboro, where the father 
died in October, ISGi. In ISSO the mctlier went to Nebraska 
where she still lives with one of her sorts. They had a family of 
eight children — Samuel, xlnn, Calvin, Amos, Esther E., Mary J., 
Hattie and Madora A. Cilvin Warrick was reared in Hendricks 
. County, remaining with his parents till manhood. In September, ;j 
1861, he enlisted in Company B, Sevent?! Indiana Infantry. His jj 
regiment was assigned to the Army of die Potomac, and partici- .! 
pated in niany of the most severe battles of the Eastern army, j \ 
among tliem being Greonbriar, Edinburg, Winchester, Gettysburg, . \ 



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HISTOKY OF HENDRICKS COtJXTT. 



715 



Antietam, second Bull Eun, and White Sulphur Springs, He 
was discharged in September, 1861, and upon his return home en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits. He now has a fine farm of 200 
acres, all well improved. Mr. Warrick was married in December, 
1865, to Evaliue Smith, daughter of Joel aad Susan Smith, early 
settlei"s of Hendricks CoutUy. To them have been born five chil- 
dren— Shiles M , William E., Oliver C, Edward H. and Mary M. 
In politics Mr. Warrick is a Republican. Re has served his town- 
ship as Assessor several terms. He and his wife are members of 
the Missionary Baptist church. 

George W. Wills was born in Montgomery Count,y, Ky., Jan. 
16, 1814, a son of Michael and Elizabctli Wills. When ho was 
an infant his father died, and when eighteen years of age he came 
with his mother and other members of the family to Hendricks 
County, Ind., and for a short time lived in Center Township, south 
ot Danville. He then bought land in Liberty Township, on 
which the present village of Clayton was built, where he lived 
about twenty years, when he returned to Center Townsliip, and in 
1862 settled in Middle Township, where he has since lived, his 
farm containing eighty acres of Valuable land. Mr. Wills was 
married in January, 1837, to Frances H. Mershon, daughter of 
Daniel and EfBe Mershon, early settlers of Hendricks County. To 
them have been born nine children, eight of whom are livings 
James M., Sylvester S., William F., Louisa J., Miriam A., 
Henry C, Simpson B. and Jesse T. Mrs. Wills died March 30, 
1881. Mr. Wills is a member of the Christian church. 

James JS[. TF/Z^s, of Pittsboro, was born Feb. 26, 1338, on the 
present site of the town of Clayton, in Hendricks County, when it 
was nothing but a wilderness, and lived there until ho was twenty 
years of age. He attended the disti-ict schools of that day; never 
attended but two terms of three months each of free school. 
Although with limited opportunities he qual'Sed himself to teach 
common schools and worked on the farm with his parents through 
the summer and taught school through the fall and winter until 
the war broke out, at $1.15 per day. ^"^g- ~, 1862, he enlisted as 
a private in Company C, Se'-entieth Indiana Infantry, and was 
mustered into the service Aug. 12. He followed all the varied 
fortunes of the regiment, serving gallantly till his discharge, 
June 8, 1865. After his discharge from t!ie army Mr. Wills 
went on the farm and worked throuorh the summer and tanght 
school in the fall and winter of 1865 and 1866, and on the 16th 






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716 



EISTOKT OF HENDKICKS COUNTY. 



day of -May, 1S67, was married to Miss Mary A. Dillon, of Pitts 
boro. In Marcli, 1S69, he moved to Pittsboro and engaged in the 
drug business with Amos C. Weaver until January, 1S80. In 
18S1 he engaged in the dry -goods business with A. C. AYeaver, 
continuing a year. In ISSO he bougnt a half interest in the tile 
works at Pittsboro, which he has since conducted. He makes a 
fine quality of tile, and ships a great proportion of it to Illinois. 
In 1872 he was elected Justice of the Peace and served until April, 
1877, when he was admitted to the Hendricks County bar to 
practice law. In Octoher, 1S7T, he was commissioned Xotary 
Public, and has served continually ever since to the entire satis- 
faction of all that had notarial work to do, both in fees and quality 
of work. On the 10th day of Jaiuiary, 1SS.5, through the influ- 
ence of Senator Benjamin Harrison, liis old regimental com- 
mander, he was appointed to a clerkship in the United States 
Eailway Mail Service from Pittsburg, Pa., to St. Louis, Mo., but 
on account of his wife's ill-health he declined to serve. June 6, 
1S85, the commissioners of Hendricks County appointed him 
as Justice of the Peace of Middle Township. In the spring of 
1882, he was a candidate before tlie Kepublican Nominating Con- 
vention for Recurder of Hendriclcs County, but was defeated by 
A. A. Parsons, the present worthy encumbent and a wounded 
soldier. Mr. Wills has two children — Ethel, born June 29, 1870, 
and Jewell, born Dec. 7, 1882. 







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CHAPTER XX. 



UNION TOWNSHIP. 



Description. — Pioxeek Settlement. — Lizton. — Business and 
CnuRcuES. — Political History. — Township Officials. — Statis- 
tics. — BlOGEAPniCAL. 

This towiisliip, ill the northern tier of towiiships, is bounded on 
the north by Boone County, on tlie east by Middle Township, on 
tiie soutli by Center, and on the west by Eel Piver. The surface 
of Union Township is generally level, but it has some rolling sur- 
tace in the southwest and northwest corners. It has the poorest 
natural drainage of any township in the county, but most of its 
surface is susceptible of easy artificial drainage. In the fertility of 
its soil it is unsurpassed by any other portion of the county. Corn 
is the leading production. Since the opening through it, in 1S69, 
of the I., B. & W. Railroad, its excellent timber has been the 
source of mucli prosperity. 

The, first settlement in the township was made on the farm 
which Mr. Yeiley lias since owned, by John Matlock and John 
Fowler, about the year 1S2S. Isaac Yeiley entered the land where 
Lizton stands, in 1S2S, but did not move to the settlement until 
1831. Among those wlio settled in the township before 183.5 are 
Archibald Alexander, James and William Leak and their sons, 
AYilliam Montgomery, John Pritchett, Claiborne Davis and the 
Plnmmers. Owing to the poor natural drainage, the bad condi- 
tion of the roads, and the very many inconveniences of this local- 
ity, the settlement grew very slowly until 1S40, at which date the 
cabins were very scattering, and the clearings very small. Since 
that tinae the development ot the country and the increase of pop- 
ulation has been rapid. 

One of the advantages of the pioneer was that the stock brought 
with them would live in the woods all winter and usually do well. 
This was especially so with swine, and soon after the arrival of the 
first settlers wild hogs became very abundant in the woods, and all 
those who had evei- had a hog to go astray — as what man had not? 

(717) 



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HISTORT OF HENDRICKS COONTY. 



—had a Lawful claim upon the common herd. In the autumn of 
the year, after the acorns and other mast began falling, these hogs 
became tat; and were hunted down by tlie settlers with dog and 
gun, like the bears and the deer. 

The settlers often canglit them in traps. "When desirable to 
capture them alive, this was always necessary, and was accom- 
plished by making a log pen so high that they could not jump over, 
and arranging a trap door, to which a string was fastened. Corn 
was then scattered in trails in different directions through the 
woods to entice the swine into the pen, when a man secreted high 
in a tree top would spring the trap and the swine were caught. 

As soon as enough persons could be got together to make a hear- 
ing, Gilbert Harney and .Jol)n Harris, of the Christian church, be- 
gan preaching in the settlement; and in 1837 Gilbert Harney 
organized, at the house of Archibald Alexander, a church, with 
Mr. Alexander, Joseph F. Lewis, Samuel C. Carrington and their 
wives, and a few others, as members. The present church was 
built about 1ST5. Rev. U. C. Brewer, of Danville, conducts ser- 
vices here the fourth Sunday of each month. The Methodist Epis- 
copal society date from 1533, when a class was formed at the house 
of William Montgomery, who was leader. Among the members 
were Mr. Plumraer, Sally Bargan, Claiborne Davis and John 
Pritchett. Tlie church is a half a mile south of Lizton. Services 
are held e\ery two weeks by Rev. Mr. Smith, of Jamestown. 

LIZTON", 

the only village in the township, was laid out by Jesse Veiley in 
1837, and named by him Xcw Elizabeth, in honor of Mrs. Veiley. 
The name v,-as contracted to Lizton when the postofhce was estab- 
lished. Its population is about 275. An Odd Fellows' lodge 
thrived here for some time, but is now defunct. Those now doing 
business at Lizton are comprised in the following list: 

T. P. Burk, physician; J. R. Dowden, dentist; J. M. Delany, 
grocer; A. H. Davis, druggist; Fowler ifc Bro., tile factory; M. M. 
Herbster, druggist; Joseph Haley, blacksmith; Mrs.Francis Hedge, 
millinery; 0. P. Johnson, physician; J. H. Kendall, wagon shop; 
D. B. Leak, Lizton Hotel; Osborn & Ross, grist-mill; "W. M. Os- 
born, gunsmith; D. A. Reynolds, jewelry; Shepherd & Logan, 
saw-mill; M. C. Shipp, general store; J. W. Thotnuson, Jr., gen- 
eral store; "W. C. Tharp, hardware; C. S. Tout, Postmaster and e.x- 
press- agent. 



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HISTOEY OF HENDRICKS COUNTT. 



719 



Lizton lias a fine school building, completed in ISSi, c\t a cost of 
$2,500. A six-inonths school is held here. J. W. Trotter is Prin- 
cipal, assisted by Lnella Sanders and one other teacher. ^ 



KA.INSTOWN 

is a station and postoSice in the eastern part of the town- 
ship. Tlie postoffice and onlj store is kept by J. D. King. 

FIKST ELECTIOX. 

The poll-book of this township for the presidential election iiv 
1852 gives the names of fiftj-one voters, whicii are here copied, as 
aflbrding a partial list of the old settlers of Union Township: 
Jackson Griffith, R. D. jSTorthcutt, Melzer Ward, William F. Dar- 
nell, James Leak, Benjamin G. lliatt, John Prichett, Claiborne 
Davidson, Tyra Stocker, Meredith Leach, Philip Stickelman, 
George Wilson, Solomon Adams, J. P. Lewis, William Northcutt, 
James Reed, E?;ekiel Davidsoii, Joseph Edwards, Parry Burk, E. 
Hutchins, James Adams, William Joseph, Thomas Northcutt, John 
A. Leach, Henry Lewis, Thom'as C. Piichett, Benjamin L. Rainy, 
Dr. Buzzard, John Gregory, R. S. McDaniel, James E. Montgom- 
ery, William Hines, James Dingemore, John D. Fear, William D. 
Lane, S. T. Lewi?, John D. Hiatt, William S. Johnson, Anderson 
Leach, Isaac Burnett, Samuel T. Scott, Thomas C. Parker, Larkin 
0. Eperson, Samuel Reynolds, Enos Leaclu, Leland Leak, John 
Nouringer, Francis A. Scott, Johnson Brookshire and J. H. 
Herrick. 

OFFICIAL. 

Following is a list of those who have served Union Township in 
an official capacity, together with the years in which they were 
respectively chosen: 

Justices of the Peace: James Tharpe, 1S*1; David S. Buzzard, 
1853; James Tharpe, 1855; David S. Biiz2r:urd, 1S5T; Abraham 
Hamilton, 1859; James Tharpe, 1860; Tlkamas B. Hall, 18G1; 
Molar McVey, 186i; Thomas B. Hall ani liEwrence Leak, I860; 
Jesse K. Johnson, 18G6-'7; Isaac Burnett, 1568; Thomas B. Hall, 
1869; Isaac Burnett, 1870; Thomas B. HaE£, 1872; Mizeal English, 
1874; Isaac Burnett, 1876; H. C. Ulen an,d Lafayette Daugherty, 
1880; E. P. Logan and John W. Northcutt, 1SS2. 

Constables: Benjamin Wells and SoloEion Adams, 1851; Le- 
mich Robb'ins and Solomon Adams, 1853; William Clark and 



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H15T0EY OF HENDItlCKS COUNTV. 



Thomas Northciitt, 1S53; Solomon Adams, ISoi; Park Brittaiti 
and James Heed, 1855; Jolin B. Rainey, lS5C-'7; John B. 
Eainey and James M. Cnndiff, 1858; John B. Rainey and Allen 
Hajden, 1859; John B. Rainey and John W. Hall, 1860; Solomon 
Adams and W. H. Richardson, 1861; W. J. Lovvry and Joiin B. 
Rainey, 1862; R. J. Pearce and William S. Abney, 1863; William 
F. Darnall and John Hal!, 1864; L. C. Northcutt and J. B. Leak, 
1S65; Leatider Tollen and John W. iSlorthcntt, 1866; Henry Leak 
and Leander Pollen, 1867; H. B.-Leak and G. L. Leak, ISiJS; 
Hickman Hall and Lewis C. Northcutt, 1869; William Pierce 
and J^ewis C. Northcutt, 1870; Alphens Bramble and David Du- 
gan, 1872; Frank Anders and Wiliiam Montgomery, 1874; James 
F. Andrews and William J. Scott, 1S76; Charles T. Bronaugh and 
J. W. Sliafer, 187S; Charles Tout and James Lyons. lS8ii; Henry 
B. Leak and Benjamin Harress, 1SS2; John Rutledge and Jolin 
Belcher, ISSl. 

Trustees: Landrum F. Leak, 1S5S; William Buzzard, 1859; John- 
son Yanarsdale, 1860; D. C. Lane, 1861; Johnson Vanarsdale, 
1862; Francis A. Scott, lS63-'4; James Shockley, ]S65-'7; James 
L. Leak, 1S6S; Johnson A'anarsdale, 1869; George W. Shirley, 
lS70-'2; William Brown, lS7*-'6; George W. Leak, 1878; James E. 
Scott,^18S0-'2; John T. R. Hooker, 1SS4. 

(Jlexk: Allen Hayden, 1838 (office abolished). 
. Treasure)': James L. Leak, 1858 (office abolished). 

Assessors: Jesse R. Johnson, 187»>, L. C. Northcutt. 1872; Will- 
iam C. Mitchell, 1874; James W. Wick, 1876; J. W. Hickman, 
1878; R. W. Blake,' 1880; James S. Jones, 1882. 



POLITIOiX. 



.Union Has given a substantial DcHnocratic majority at every im- 
portant election since it was organizoiS. Following is the vote for 
President since 1852: 



1852— Franklin Pierce 81 33 

WiaSeld Scoti 48 

18.-,(J— James Buchanan ICO 127 

Jolin C. Fremrnt 42 

18G0— Stephen A. Douglas. ..lO 80 

Abraham Lincoln 53 

John C. Breckinridge. . 24 
John Bell i 

18&4— Gef rge B. JlcCiellaa.. 112 45 
Abraham Lincoln 67 

18C8— Horatio Seymour 150 60 

Ulys3e3 S. Grant. .' 84 



1313— Horace Greeley 176 

Ulysses S. Grant 138 

IffTG-Samuel J. Tilden 187 

Rutherford B. Hayes... 109 
Peter Cooper 24 

ISaO— Winfield S. Hancock. .164 

James A. Garfield 124 

James B. Weaver 35 

18.S4— Grover Clevelacd 190 

James G. Blaine 140 

Benjamin F. Butler 19 

John P. St. John 2 



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HISTORY OF IIENDRIOKS COUNTY. 
STATISTICS. 



721 



By the censas of ISSO, the population of Union Township was 
1,545. Tlie following statistics of property and taxation are for 
1885: Acres of hind assessed, 15,074.96; value of same, $37S,77-1; 
value of improvements, §97,952; value of lots, $2,650; value of im- 
provements, $8,973; value of personalty, §156,341; total taxable 
wealth, $044,695; polls, 252; dogs, 139; State tax, $899.60; county 
tax, $1,960.45; township tax, $386.82; tuition tax, $965. 5S; special 
school tax, $1,997.10; road tax $1,289.40; endowment tax, $32.23; 
bridge tax, $644.70; total taxes, $9,001.32; delinquent taxes, $1,- 
364.99. 

BIOGRAl'fJICAL. 

John Bailey, son of Peter and Elizabetli Bailey, was born in 
Butler County, Ohio, Sept. 19, 1827. When he was six years old 
his parents moved to Shelby County, Ind, His father was twice 
married, and hf^s six children surviving by his first wife — Nicholas, 
Susan, John, Lydia, Henry and Absalom; and two children by his 
second wife — George F. and Saloma. Oar subject was reared to 
maturity in Shelby County, and was there married in October, 
1847, toCatl'.erine Endy, and to them were born four children — 
Elizabeth, Eve A., Marian, and Sarah (deceased). Mrs. Bailey 
died in January, 1856, and Mr. Bailey married for his second wife, 
Rebecca J. Reed i[i July, 1856. JSfine children were born to this 
union, seven now living — Mary M., George W., Peter N., Susan 
E., Minetta, Nora E. and Eddie. In 1862 ilr. Bailey came to 
Hendricks County and settled in Union Tcwnship, where he owns 
eighty acres of land, all of which is well cultivated. Politicallv 
Mr. Bailey is a Democrat. 

Robert TF. BlaJcewas born Dec. S, 1825, in Stokes County, N. 
C, a son of John and Elizabeth Blake. Has parents came to Put- 
nam County, Ind., about tlie year 1830, remaining there till 1S49J 
when they moved to Hendricks County and settled in Eel River 
Township, where the father died in April,, IS57. Robert W. Blake 
was reared to manhood on a farm amid th-a scenes of pioneer life. 
He has always followed the avocation of a farmer, and now owns 
ISO acres of land all of which is in a good istate of cultivation. He 
was married May 21, 1854, to Miss Saia?i F. Spears, who died in 
June, 1807, leaving two children — Benjaruin K. and Nareissa M. 
Mr. Blake married for his second wife. Miss Letie Ilarbeit, by 
whom he had two cluldren — George R. and Wilmetta (deceased). 



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HISTORY OF HENDKiCKS COUNTY. 



Mr. Blake settled in Union Township in tbe fall of 18.54. He and 
his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Bohert Bronaitgh, only son of Thomas and Cynthia Bronaugh, 
was born Kov. 8, 1819, in Lincolm County, Ky. When he was 
three years of age his mother died, after which his father was twice 
married. In 1S33 his father moved to Hendricks County, Ind., 
and made his home near New Wicchester for about fourteen years. 
He then moved to Missouri, where he died. Our subject accom- 
panied his father to Hendricks County, remaining here till 1S-J:2. 
He then returned to Kentucky, and there married Miss Mary Tay- 
lor. Eight children have been born to them, six of whom are liv- 
ing—Elizabeth C, George T., Charles T., Mary V., John W., and 
James T. \fter his marriage Mr. Bronaugh resided in Garrard 
County, Ky., till 1S63, when he returned to Hendi-icks Connty, 
In3., and in ISG-i settled on the place where he still resides, in 
Union Township, where he has 100 acres of well cultivated laud. 
Mr. Bronaugh is a member of the Odd Fellows order. 

William C. Dovjden was born June 13, 182G, in "Woodford 
County, Ky., a son of Thomas and Elizabeth Dowden, the former 
a native of Ohio and the latter of Virginia. In 1847 he came to 
Jefferson County, Ind., where he learned the stone-cutter's trade 
at which he worked for many years. In 1853 he went to Decatur 
County, where he was married Feb. 3, 1S59, to Miss Amanda J. 
Pearce. Five children have been born to them, two sons and three 
daughters — William W., James M., Sarah E., Ida A. and Annie. 
Annie is deceased. In the spring of 1882 Mr. Dowden removjd 
with his family to Hendricks County, locating in Union Townshi] 
where he owns eighty acres of well-improved land. He and his 
wife are members of the Christian cLnrch. 

Bexihen J. Foster, son of Joshua and Aletha (Johnson) Foster, 
was born in Butler County, OhiOjMarch 22,1836. His parents 
were natives of Virginia. They came to Indiana in 1837, and we.-e 
among the early settlers of Decattr C«unty. Of a family of nine 
children born to them only three surw e. The names of those liv- 
ing are — Nancy C, Joshua and Reuben J. Our subject wi.s 
reared to manliood in Decatur County, and in 1858 came to Hen- 
dricks County. In February, 1859, iie was married to Miss Mar- 
garet Gentry, who was born Jan. lo, 1842, a daughter of Martin 
and Elizabeth Gentry, early settlers of this county. Five children 
have been born to them — Sarah J., Isaac W., Pleasant D., Edgar 
T. and Iva M. They have also one adopted son — Robert C. Mr. 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTr. 



723 



Foster has a farm of 116 acres of well-cultivated land. He is a 
Democrat in politics. He and his wife are earnest members of the 
Regular Baptist church. 

StepJian Fowler, son of Eobert and Mary Fowler, is a native of 
Yorkshire, England, born Feb. 7, 1836. He received a fair educa- 
tion, attending school till he was fourteen vears old, when he took 
a pt'sition as wool'grader in a woolen factory, remaiain"- there till 
he was twenty-one years of age. In the spring of 1S57 he took 
passage from Liverpool, and after a five-weeks voyage, he landed 
in New "York. Shortly after his arrival he went to Pennsylvania, 
remaining there till lSo9, in which year he came to Marion County. 
After remaining there about a year he .moved to Hendricks 
County, and in lS6-i he located in his present residence near 
Rainstown. He is the owner of 222 acres of land which he has ac- 
quired by his own perseverance and industry. He was married in 
England, Sept. 12, 1S55, to Sarah Wise, daughter of John Wise 
of Yorkshire, England. They had a family of nine children, six 
now living— Cora A., born Aug. 30, 1857; Alfred, bom Au^-. 13 
1860; Fv .bert P., bornNov. 19, 1SG2; Louisa, born Sept. 13, lS6i; 
Margaret, born July 26, 1866, and John W., born May 17 1S6S. 
Three are deceased— ]\[ary, Hiram and George. Mr. Fowler's first 
wife died Oct. 1, 1875, and he was again married. April 12, 1876 
to Mrs. Josie E. Lincoln, widow cf the late George Lincoln. Mr. 
Fowler enlisted in February, 186f., in the One Hundred and Forty- 
eighth Indiana Infantry, in Company G, and was on guard duty 
principally, in Tennessee. He was honorably dischar^od in the 
following September. He is a member of the Odd Ft-llows 
order. 

John TF. French, soii of George W. and Elizabeth French, was 
born Jan. 10, 1840, and is a native of Miami Countv, Ohio. When 
he was thirteen years old his parents moved to Marion County, 
Ind.,with their family, remaining there several years, then removed 
to Boone County, Ind., where they still reside. They had a family 
of eleven childrc-n, nine of whom yet survive — Samuel L., Eliza, 
Nathan, .Mary A., George W., John W., BenjiminF., Edward A 
and Melissa J. The deceased are — Sarah and Hannah. In Octo- 
ber, 1862, Mr. French enlisted ii Company F, Tenth Indiana In- 
fantry, and participated in the engagements at Mills Sprino-s and 
Perryville. He was wounded at the farmer engagement, which 
disabled him for a short time, after which' he again joined his 
regiiiient and sirved till December, 1863, when he was discharo-ed. 



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HISTORV OF HENDEICKS COUNTY. 



Mr. French resides in the northern part of Union Township and is 
the owner of 310 acres of land. 

James II. Groover, one of the representative fanners of Union 
Township, was born May 27, 1819, in Bath County, Ky. He was 
a son of William E. and Ellen Groover, his mother dying when !ie 
was five years old! "While he was yet a boy his fatiier moved to 
Kash Count3-, Ind., remaining there several years. In the fall of 
1837 they removed to Hendricks County, and settled in [Jnit>n 
Township, where his father entered eighty acres of timbered land 
and here they endured the hardships and privations of a pioneer 
life. Our subject's educational advantages were rather limited, lie 
having to help his father on tlie farm. He has followed the avoca- 
tion of a frrmer all liis life, in which he has been quite successful, 
now owning 533 acres of land. Mr. Groover was married to Miss 
Nancy Hepdricks, and to them were born twelve children, of whom 
eight survive— John, James "W., Levi B., Ellis B., Edna A., Me- 
lissa, Emma M. and Francis M. 

J.sa i7«Ze is a native of North Carolina, born Au(^. 15, 1821, a 
son of Henry and Phcebe Hale. In 1825 his parents came to Hen- 
dricks County, Ind., and settled in Center Township, where they 
both died. Of the seven children born to them, four are livin^ — 

' CD 

Asa, Mary, Lucinda and John B. Asa Hale was reared in Hen- 
dricks County. He received a gt^od education and when a youno- 
man taught school a short time. He then engaged in farming, en- 
tering forty acres of land I'rom the Government. To this he has 
added till ho now owns 140 acres. Mr. Hale was married March 
18, 1847, to Lydia A. Coffin. To them were born two children- 
Milton H. and Joseph C. Mrs. Hale died Aug. 6, ISSl. Mr. 
Hale is a member of the society of Friends. In politics he is a 
Kepublican. 

Thotnas B. Mill was born in Boyle County, Ky., Dec. 30, 181S, 
a. son of Thomas and Lavina Hall, who came to Hendricks County, 
Ind., in 1844, and settled in Eel Eiver Township, where they both 
died. Eleven children were born to tl^em, eight of whom are liv- 
ing — Samuel, B., Tilatha, Adaline, Thomas B., Sarah, William, 
James and ('arroll K. Tiie deceased are— John, Merritt and Eliza- 
betli. Thomas B. Hal! accompanied his parents to Ilendrichs 
County, but soon after vetnrned to Kentucky and remained t'U 
1S50, when he came again to the connty and in the fall of IS."'! 
settled on section 30, Union Township, where he now h:is a fii\e 
farm of 100 acres. He was married Aug. 30, 1839, to Maria Hick- 



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COUNTY. 



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725 



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man, of Boyle County, Ky., and to thorn were born eight children, 
three of whom, Douglass, Bertha and Mary F., are living. Maria K. , 
Lavina, Cleopatra, John T. andKiektuan B. are deceased. Mrs. Hall 
died in September, 1S73, and in September, 1874, Mr. Hall married 
Mary F. (Tinder) Dodson, widow of John R. Dodson, of Hendricks 
County. Ml", and. Mrs. Hall are members of the Christian church. 
Ho has been a prominent citizen of the township and has served 
several years as Justice of the Peace. 

" William H. Hunt, deceased, was born April 12, 1818, in Flem- 
ing County, Ky., where he was reared to manhood. He came to 
Hendricks County, Ind., in an early day and was married to Miss 
Martha H. Blair. To them were born eight children, six of whom 
are living— John "W., Joseph C, Sarah H., Charles T., James B. 
and Henry "W. Mrs. Hunt died in August, 1S63, and in March, 
1868, Mr. Hnnt married Mrs. Mahala R. (Wren) Myers, a daughter 
of John B. Wren, and to this union were born two children — Na- 
poleon B. and Ira B. Mr. Hunt died in jSTovember, 1SS2. His 
widow resides on her farm in Union Township. She is a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mrs. Hunt was formerly 
married to Mr. Myers and to them were born four children, of 
whom only two — John B. and Louisa — are living. j\[r. Myers 
served with the Twelfth Kansas Volunteers during the late war, 
and died in April, 1862. 

James A. Johnson, deceased, was born in the year 1829, and 
was a native of Kentucky. When a youth he came with his par- 
ents, Edward and Mary A. Johnson, to Hendricks County, Ind. 
He was married Dec. 7, ISoS, to Miss Mary C. Davis, daughter 
of Jesse and Minerva Davis, of Eel Eiver Township, this county. 
To this union were born four children — Armada A., Ida M., Lin- 
coln C. and Charley E. Mr. Johnson died April 18,1880. He 
was an indulgent husband and an affectionate father, and was re- 
spected by all who knew him. His widow resides in the western 
part of Union Township, this county, and is the owner of a farm 
of fifty acres. She is a member of the Christian church. 

EUsha P. Jones is a native of Bartholomew County, Ind., born 
Jan. 18, ISJrl, a son of Aquilla and Harriet Jones. In his bovhood 
he accompanied his parents to Indianapolis, where he grew to 
manhood. His fatlier is the prusent Postmaster of Indianapolis. 
From 1862 till 1S6S he was engaged in the wholesale grocery busi- 
ness and in 1868 went to Columbus and in company with Mr. Gninn 
engaged in the clothing and dry-goods business about sixteen 
46 



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726 



HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY . 



months. He then lived at Carbon, Clay County, a few months, 
and from 1S71 till 1873 engaged in the retail grocery business at 
Indianapolis. He subsequently moved to Illinois, where he lost 
an extensive crop in the flood of 1S75. In the spring of 187G lie 
returned to Indiana and lived in Porter County till the fall of 1877 
when he came to Hendricks County and located in Union Town- 
ship. He has a fine farm of ISO acres and is one of the most enter- 
prising and prosperous citizens of the township. Mr. Jones was 
married Nov. 1, 1869, to Mary "Webb, of Indianapolis. They have 
two children— Harry C. and "Warren S. 

James M. Lea oh was born in Hendricks County, Ind., Feb. 9, 
183-1, and is a son of Enos and Elizabeth Leach, natives of Ken- 
tucky, the former deceased. They settled in Hendricks Courty, 
Ind., in Union Township, in the fall of 1S31, where the father entered 
200 acres of land. They had a family of seven children — Mt'ry, 
Luciuda, Sarah, Matilda, James M., Eliza J. and Margaret S. 
Sarah is deceased. Our subject was reared to manhood in this 
county, receiving but a rudimentary education. March 17, 1S59, 
he was married to.Miss Elizabeth IIamilton,daughter of Abraham 
Hamilton, of Hendricks County. Seven of the nine cliildrcn born 
to them are living — John E., "William L., Margaret C, Minnie J., 
Carrie E., James H. and Fannie E. Abraham S. and Herbert H. 
.are deceased. Mr. Leach is one of the leading agriculturists in 
Hendricks County. He has a good farm of 271 acres of land and 
has one of the finest residences in Union Township. He and his 
wife are members of the Christian church, of which he has served 
as Elder for several years. 

George W. Leah was born in Bracken County, Ky., Oct. IS, 
1S2S, a son of "William and Eliza Leak. In 1S33 his parents 
moved to Hendricks County, Ind., and settled in Union Town- 
ship, where his father entered a quart _r-section of land, making it 
their home till death. The father died Sept. 11, 1815, and the 
mother April 21, 1861. Five of a family of si.x childi-en are living 

Elizabeth, George "W., Thomas J., Harriett A. and Sarah J. 

Georo'C W. Leach has been identified with Hendricks County 
since five years of age, and has witnessed the developnient of ''he 
country, changing, as it has, from a wild uncultivated state to that 
of advanced civilization. He has always taken an interest in the 
welfare of his county, and has assisted in every way in his pover 
to atlvance her wealth and prosperity. He has a fine farm of 223 
acres which he has improved and nt)w has under cultivation. Mr. 



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HISTORY OF'HENUEICKS COUNTY. 



727 



Leak was married Jan. 10, 1850, to Sarah Leach, daughter of Enos 
Leach. To thein were 'bora six children, but three — Lucinda, 
James T. and Alonzo— are living. Matilda J., Elizabeth A. and 
Edward are deceased. Mrs. Leak died Feb. 3, 1S6S. In February, 
1S69, Mr. Leak married Ann Burnett, daughter of Isaac Burnett, 
formerly of Liztoh. They have had four children — Hattie, George, 
Bertha and Emma, the latter deceased. Mr. Leak has served his 
township two years as Trustee. He and his wife are members of 
the Christian church. 

Landrum Leah was born in Bracken County, Ky., Jan. 3, ISIS. 
In 1S3J: his parents, James and Elizabeth Leak, came to Hendricks 
County, and settled on a tract of heavily timbered land, near the 
present home of our subject, where they lived till their death. 
Landrum Leak was reared a farmer, receiving but a limited educa- 
tion. He is one of the enterprising and reliable agriculturists of 
Union Township, owning eighty acres of good land. He has served 
his township a year as Trustee. Mr. Leak was married in xVugust, 
ISiO, to Evalina Martin, daughter of James Martin. To them 
were born two children ; but one, James, is living. Mrs. Leak died 
in September, 1S45, and in April, 1S47. Mr. Leak married Sarah 
A. Leach, daughter of John and Nancy Leach. They have four 
children — E valine, William L., George B. and Joena. Mr. and 
Mrs. Leak are members of tiie Christian church. 

Leland Leah, deceased, was born in Bracken County, Ky., May 
3, 1S13, a sou of James and Elizabeth Leak, and brother of Land- 
rum Leak, a prominent farmer of Union Township. He was mar- 
ried Jan. 6, 1809, to Minerva Fear, who was born Dec. 10, 1820, a 
dauo-hter of John D. and Sarah Fear, early settlers of Eel Kiver 
Township, this county. To them were born two children— Sarah 
E. and John J. Mrs. Leak resides on the old homestead, in 
Union Township. She is one of the most esteemed citizens of 
the township, and an active member of the Cliristian church. 
Her parents were prominent among the pioneers of the county, 
experiencing all the privations and hardships incident to the early 
days of tlie township. Of the tv.'elve children born to them but 
four are living— Patsey, Sarah, Harriet and Minerva. 

Joseph 2L Mo Vey, deceased, was born Dec. 8, 1819, in Ken- 
tucky, and was a son of John and Sallie McVey. He was reared 
to manhood in liis native State, and was there married to Miss Mary 
J. Bradshaw, April 8, 1846, who was a daughter of Alexander and 
Jane Bradshaw, of Kentucky. This union has been blessed with 



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HISTORY OF HKNDUICKS COUNTY. 



seven children, as follows — Marion, Sallie, Frank C, Robert P., 
Rutli A., Joseph IM. and xlustin L. In ISoi Mr. McYej came 
with iiis family to ETendi-icks Comity, Ind., and resided for two 
years in Middle Township, wdien he returned to liis native State, 
remainini? tliere one year. He then lived a short time in Cass 
County, Mo., and in 1S5S returned to this county and settled in 
Union Township. Being a man of remarkable energy and indus- 
try he converted what was at the time of his settlement a swamp 
into a good yielding farm. He added to his original property from 
time to time until, at the time of his death, he owned 580 acres. 
For several years ho dealt quite extensively in stock, atid for about 
nineteen years was a partner in a large cotton press manufaeturino- 
establishment at Mobile, Ala. He served for a short time as Jus- 
tice of the Peace. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity. 
His death occurred Sept. 19, 1871. His widow resides on the old 
homestead, and is the owner of 100 acres of well-improved land. 

James E. Montgomery, a pioneer of Union Township, was bsrn 
in Morgan County, Ky., in May, 1S13. His parents, William and 
Sarah Montgomery, came to Hendricks County, Ind., in l.'!2S, 
settling in the woods, on the farmnow owned b}' our subject, where 
they experienced all the hardships and privations of pioneer life. 
James E. has followed agricultural pursuits from his youth, md 
^now owns eighty acres of land. He was married to Rebecca Tharp, 
who is now deceased. She was a daughter of the late John Tharp, , 
of this county. They were the piarents of seven children, of wh.om 
only two, John and Ella, survive. Mr. Montgomery is a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Anderson Odom is a native of Catawba Countj-, X. C, born 
March 29, 1S48, a son of Eli and Miciiel Odom. He was reared 
in his native State, and there married Jemima Shook. They have 
had six children, five of whom are living — William A., Ova S., 
John H., Simeon and Lillie. In March, 1875, Mr. Odom left 
North Carolina and moved to Indiana, locating in ilaiion 
County, where he lived till February, 1881, when he moved to 
Ilendricks County, and settled in the northern part of Union 
Township, where he owns a good farm of 120 acres. He is an en- 
terprising citizen and has assisted materially in the ijiiprovement 
of the laud in ids neighborhood. In politics he is a Democrat. 

David Oshorii, a pioneer of Union Township, was born in Vir- 
ginia, Feb. 11, 1812, a sot\ of Richard andRichel O.-born. Wiien 
he was a cliild his parents moved t ■- Guilford pounty, N. C, where 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



729 



they remained till the tall of lS3-i, when he accompanied them to 
Hendricks County, Ind. Tliej lived near Plaintield several years, 
and subsequently moved to Iowa, where they died. Ol a large 
family of children but five are living— David, William, Esther, 
Rebecca and Polly. David Osborn returned to North Carolina in 
1835, and married Abigail Newman, and soon after came again to 
Hendricks County, and in 1S3S located on the' farm on section 15, 
Union Township, where he has since lived. He owns 187 acres of 
valuable land, and his improvements are among the best in the 
county. He has taken an active interest in all public affairs, and 
has served his township as Trustee. In politics he is a Republi- 
can. Of the seven children born to his first marriage but four are 
living — "William, Abigail, Polly and John. His wife died and 
subsequently he married Elizabeth Wilson, daughter of William 
Wilson. They have one child — Lyda. Mr. and Mrs. Osborn are 
members of the Society of Friends. 

Aaron Overstreet, son of James and Susan Overstreet, was born 
Jan. 19, 1S26, in Casey County, Ky. His parents' family consisted 
of six children — Maria, John, Rebecca, James, Aaron and Parmelia. 
Aaron was reared to maturity in his native State and received but 
a limited education. He was married Dec. 21, 1850, to Miss Cath- 
erine Elder, and to them were born twelve children, nine of whom 
are living — Susan M., ,Fred. W. , John G., Martha J., Aaron S., 
Legrand F., Lilian G., Lee and Oliver P. In the spring of 1852 
Mr. Overstreet came to Hendricks County, and afrer living in sev- 
eral different parts of the county, finally settled in Union Town- 
ship, where he still resides and owns sixty-tliree acres of land. Iq 
August, 1SC2, he enlisted in Company G, Ninetv-ninth Indiana 
Infantry, and participated in the battles of Jacksonville, Chatta- 
nooga, the surrender of Vicksburg, the Atlanta campaign, and 
Sherman's march to the sea. He received an honorable discharge 
in August, 1865. In politics he is a Repcblican. He and his 
wife are members of the Christian church. 

Hiram RaAns, one of the enterprising- basiness men of Union 
Township, was born in October, 1824, m Fayette County, Ind. 
His parents, James and Elizabeth Rains, were natives of North 
Carolina, who settled in Marion County, Ind., in 182S, and re- 
mained there until their death. Our subject received a fair educa- 
tion, and Sept. 25, 1S51, he was raarrietl to Miss Surah Owens, a 
daughter of Benjamin and Esther Owens, of this county, the former 
being deceased. Tw') children have been born to them — Martha 



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HlSTOllY OF HENDKICKS COUNTY. 



A. and Flora. Flora is deceased. Mr. Rains besides bcinf; quite 
an exteusive landowner, has large lumber interests with his brother, 
Levi flains, in Tennessee. In 1870 became to Hendricks County, 
Ind., and tor many years was extensively engaged in tlie manufact- 
ure of building material, having in his employ at one time as many 
as thirty workmen. His works were at Rainstown, which place 
was called after its energetic founder. 

Moses H. liaiolings, a prominent farmer of Union Township, was 
boru April 26, 1S3S, in Garrard County, K.y.,,a son of William D. 
and Sarah M. Rawlings, the former a native of Maryland, and the 
latter of New Jersey, now deceased. His parents came to this 
county among the early settlei-s and entered a quarter-section of 
land. Of eight children born to tlicm five are living — "William 
E., Susan, Martha A., Mary and Moses H. The latter was eight 
years of age when his parents moved to Hendricks County and 
there he was reared to mianhood. ]!sov. 4, ISoS, he was married to 
Martha J. Leach, of this county, a daughter of Meredith Leach 
(deceased). To them have been born seven children of whom five 
are living — William D., James L., Grace B., Leticeand Elbert H. 
Mr. Rawlings is the owner of 330 acres of land. He is a member of' 
the Odd Fellows order, and in politics he is a Republican. He is 
identified with the .Metiiodist Episcojtal church. 

Simeon liichmond, deceased, was born in June, ISll, in Butler 
County, Ohio, and was a son of Jonathan and Barbara Richmond. 
He was reared to manhood in his native State, aud in November, 
1835, he was married to Nancy Linch, born July S, 1814-, a daugh- 
ter of Abram and Unity Linch, who were natives of Virginia. 
Eleven children were born to tliem, eight of whom are living — 
George T., Mary E., xVbram L., Jotsn H., Simeon B., Unity H., 
Nancy A. and William F. About the year 1850 Mr. and Mrs. 
Richmond came with their family to Decatur County, Ind., and 
there remained till the spring of 1865, when they moved to Hen- 
dricks County and settled in Unioa Township. Mr. Richmond 
died in November, 1883. He was a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, serving as C 1 ass-Laid er for several years. Mrs. 
Richmond is a member of the same cliurch. Siie still resides on 
the old homestead whicii coiitains sixty acres of land. 

Francis A. Scott, a native of Virginia, was born Dec. 13, 1816. 
His parents wore John and Elizabeth Scott, who came to Hendricks 
County and settled in Eel River Township in 1833. They wore 
the parents of twelve children, of whom five are living — Martha, 





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HISTOKY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



731 



Nancy, Francis A., Samncl T. and John. The subject of tliis 
pketcli was reared to manhood on a farm and received but a limited 
education. He has been a successful agriculturist, and at present 
is the owner of -100 acres of hmd. He was married Sept. 29, 
1S313, to iliss Melinda Montgomery, and to them were born eight 
children — ^Elizabetli, Sarah, Polly, Martha, William, John, James 
and Eliza (deceased)." Mrs. Scott died in October, 1863, and Jan. 
12, 1S6S, Mr. Scott was married to Miss Hannah Flummer, a 
daughter of Joseph Plummer, of Eel River Township. To this 
union was bom one child — Annie, now deceased. Mr. Scott 
located on his present farm in Union Townsfiip in 1861:. He has 
served his township as Trustee, lie is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

John ShooMey, deceased, was a native of Montgomery County, 
Ky., born Jan. 17, 1820. He was reared in his native State and 
when ayoung man his parents settled in Rusfi County, Ind. March 
16, 1810, he was married in Rash County to Miss Barbara Hilligoss. 
To them were born ten children, of whom only four are now livin'^ 
— William M., Jacob, Sarah and Indiana. The names of the 
deceased are — Anne, Joseph H., Francis M., Thomas J., James, 
and one who died in infancy, unnamed. Mr. Shockley settled in 
Union Township, on the farm where his widow still resides, in 
18.55. His tragic death which occurred in -July, 1878, is still fresh 
in the minds of our citizens. His death was caused by an explo- 
sion, while he was engaged in threshing grain in Eel River Town- 
ship, this county. . Mrs. Shockley is the owner of forty acres of 
land. She is a member of the Christian church. 

Joah Simmon? was born in Shelby County, Ind., June 7, 1831, 
a son of Augustus and Margaret Simmons. When he was nine 
years old his mother died and his father subsequently man-led 
Catherine Thompson. He was reared fa his native county, and 
was there married in February, 18-57, to Richel Sexton, a native 
of the same county. To them were born three children, but two 
of whom are living — Mary A. and Viola Mr. Simmons owns a 
pleasant home in Union Township, his finrm containing IDS acres 
of well-improved land. He in politics is a Republican. He and 
his wife are members of the Ch-istian church. Mr. Simmons was 
a soldier in the war of the Rebellion, serving from March till 
July,lS65, a mcmberof Company D, Thirty-third Indiana Infantry. 

Joshua S. Tharp, son of James and Mary Tharp, was born Xov. 
8, 183S, in Hendricks County, Ind. His parents were natives of 



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HENDEICKS COaNTY. 



Kentucky and early settlers of this county, coming hero in 1S29. 
His lather still resides in Center Township. Of their children 
eight are living-Stephen W., John, Eebecca, Joshua S., Alary E ' 
Sarah C, James T. and Lydia E. Joshua S. Tharp was reared to 
manhood on a farm, his education being obtained in the schools of 
his neighborhood. He has followed farming through life and now 
owns 120 acres of improved land where he resides, in Union Town- 
ship on which he located in 1S75. Aug. 31, 1860, he was married 
to Miss Mary J. Faussett, who died in March, 18Si. She was a 
daughter of Robert Faussett, who was formerly of Hendricks 
County, now of Nebraska. To Mr. and Mrs. Tharp were born ten 
children, seven now living— Isaac W., Arie O., William K, Cora 
K, Geneva, Zettie F. and Harry E. Those deceased are-Charles 
W., James W. and Mary J. Mr. Tharp is a member of the Ee-ular 
i^aptist church. Politically he is a Democrat. 

George W. Wheat, a san of James and Mary Wheat, was born 
March 27, 1823, in Warren County. Ohio, and was there reared 
to maturity. In the fall of 1S42 he located in Montgomery Countv 
Ind., remaining there till the fiill of 1862, when he settled in' 
Hendricks County and for many years engaged at the cooper's 
trade His first wife was Miss Mary E. Dorsey, of Baltimore, 
Md., by whom he had four children— Hannah E., Grant. James P 
and Sarah F. (deceased). He was subsequently married to Miss 
Euphama Davidson, of Eush County, Ind. Two children have 
been born to this union— William E. and Ernest. In February 
I860, Mr. Wheat joined Company C, Thirty-third Indiana Ee-'i- 
ment, and served five months, when he was discharged on account 
of disability. Mr. Wheat is the owner of sixty-six acres of land in 
Union Township. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. In politics he is a Eepublican. 




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■ CHAPTER XXI. 



WASfllNGTON TOWNSHIP. 



Description. — Early History. — Political History. — Official. — 
Population, Property, and Taxation. — Biographical. 

Washington Township is bounded on the north by Middle and 
Lincoln townships, on the east by Marion Count}', on tlie south by 
Guilford and Liberty townships, and on tlie west by Center. 
"White Lick runs across the west side of this township, and tiie 
East Fork touches the southeast corner. Along White Lick the 
land is rolling and fertile; the central and eastern portion of the 
township is very level, but not swampy. The prevailing timber 
vras beech and hickory, and the soil is mostly clay, and bettor 
adapted to the grasses than to the production of grain. 

In most portions of Washington Township, the production of 
good crops requires more labor than in any other township in the 
county. 

early history. 

The first settlement in Washington Township was made in the 
northeast corner, near Shiloh Church, by Eobert Wilson, Gideon 
Wilson and Elish Kise, in the year 1822. The next year Daniel 
Tryer, Aaron Homan, the Griggses, Joseph Fausett and others, 
came into the same neighborhood and in the same year, 1823, 
James Dunn, John Givens, Abner Dunn — for whom Abner's 
Creek, was named — and some others, settled on the west side of the 
township on Abner's Creek. James Dunn settled on the Isham 
Thompson place, on the Rockville road. Among those who came 
into the township within the next few years were David Cox, 
Alex. McCammock, Enoch Barlow and his sons Harvey and Harri- 
BOH, the Thornberrys, Hurons, Hnffords and Gossetts. 

This township was one of tlm four which was organized at the 
same time the county was, and received its name in honor of the 
"Father of his Country," at the suggestion of Aaron Homan, who 
was- the first Justice of the Peace in the township, and married the 

(733) 



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734 



HISTORY OF HENDEICKS COUNTy. 



second couple who were married in Hendricks Countj. Mr. 
Homati is still livincr. 

The hrst church organized in Washington Township was at the 
house of Robert Wilson, in 1S23. This is now the Shiloh Church, 
and it was the drst Methodist Episcopal church organization in the 
coun^ty, and the fourth one of any denomination. There are now 
in Washington Township three Methodist Episcopal churches— 
Shiloh and Wesley and Barlett's chapels— ana two Regular 
Baptist— Abner's Creek and Salem. The .Indianapolis &St. Louis 
Eailroad passes nearly through the center of the township, and the 
only postoffice in it is at the village of Avon, a station on this rail- 
road. 

FIRST ELECTION. 

The first general election was held Aug. 7, 1826, at tlie house of 
Daniel C. Hults, when eleven persons voted. These arc recorded 
on the poll-book as Sidney William?, D.miel C. Hults, James 
Merit, Joseph Runyon, Isaac Williamson, Daniel B. Tryer James 
Higginbotham, Joseph Philips, William S. Merrill, Robert' Wilson 
and John Triggs. For Congressman, Thomas H. Blake received 
nine votes, and RatlifF Boon, two; for Senator. Calvin Fletcher 
received nine and J. F. Polk, two; for Representative. Isaiah Drury 
received eight and John Sims, three; for Sheriff, Robert Cooper 
received eleven; and for Coroner, William S. Merrill received two. 

POLITICAL. 

Politically Washington was always Whig, and since the death of 
that party, Republican. It never gave a Democratic maiority 
except in 1832, which was before the name Wiiig was used by the 
followers of Hen.ry Clay. Following is the vote for President at 
each election: 



1833— Andrew JacksoD 27 15 

Henry Clay 12 

1814— ilenry Clay 21 6 

James K. Polk 15 

1848— Zach<iry Taylor 95 3 

Lewis Cass 93 

Martin Van Bursa. .. . IG 

1852— Wmfi^ld Scott 103 15 

Franklia Pierce 93 

Joha P. Hale 

1850— John C. Fremont 181 57 

James Buchanan 124 

18G0 — Abraham Lincoln .... ISO 9G 
Stephen A. Douglas. . . 93 
John C. Brtcki'nridge. 8 
John Bell ". . . 2 



1864 — ^Abraham Lincoln 

,o.„ George B.ilcClellan.. 
ISCa-Ulysse'sS. Graut 

nnratio Seymour 

1872— Uiysscs S. Grant 

Horace Greelev 

1876— Rutherford B. Hayes.. 

S-imuel J. Tilden 

Pe:er Cooper 

ISSO-^Jame-; A. GarricM 

Winfield S. Hrmcock. . 

.Jam;'3 B. Weiver. . . . 
ISSt— James G. Blaine 

Grower Cleveland 

Beiijanun F. Butler... 

John P. St. John .... 



184 

85 
201 
103 
201 
100 
207 
124 

9 
235 
118 

8 

220 

111 

13 

9 



99 

83 

101 



S3 



117 



109 



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HISTUKY OF HKNDEICK3 COCTNTr. 
• OFFICIAL. 



735 



We give here a list of those wlio have been chosen Justices, 
Constables, etc., in Washington Township, together with the years 
in which they were elected: 

Justices of the Peace: Young Em Kead Wilson, 1830; David 
Vestal, 1833; Payne Harding, 1835; Henry Miller, 1S3G; Samuel 
Barker, ISSt; Seth Huron, lS4:l-'47; Elisha Hornaday, 184^53; 
Seth Huron, 1855; Henderson Ferree, 1857; Seth Huron, 1859; 
Henderson Ferree, IS61; Seth Huron, 18G3; R. T. S. Cloud, 1865; 
J. W. Hardin, 1S6G; J. C. Ferree and Joel Zimmerman, 1868; D. 
U. Frazer, 1SG9; A. W. Gossett and Sam V. HoUingswortli, 1870; 
Barney Gofsett, 1872; Moses Williams, 1871; Barney Gossett and 
George Guthrie, 1876; AYilliam R. Barker, 1878; Barney Gossett 
and William C. Hadley,1880; Samuel H.jllingsworth, 1882; George 
P. Wilson and Seth T. Huron, 1881. 

Constables: William McCalmant and Samuel Shockley, 1832; 
Payne Harding and Samuel Barker, 1S33; Eli Watson and Thomas 
McLane, 1831; Eli Watson and Benjamin Mourning, 1835; AVill- 
iara McCaue and Samuel Barker, 1836; Willis JMiller and Eli Wat- 
son, 1837; William C. Kise and Scott Miller, 1838-'39; Joseph 
H. Gilbert and Richard Triggs, 1841; Commodore P. Williams 
and Eli Watson, 1845; Commodore P. Williams and Shadrach 
MorrisflS46; CommodoreP. Williams and Gilbert Palmer, 1848; 
Commodore P. Williams and Shadrach Morris, 1849; Commodore 
P. Williams and John W. Jordan, lS51--'52; James Y. McLain 
and Henry Johnson, 1853; Samuel Barker and Joseph W. Jourdain, 
1854; Samuel Barker, 1S55; Commodore P. Williams and Samuel 
Barker, 185G; David Hufford and William Brittain, 1857; Gran- 
ville Tolberr and William J. :Merritt, 185S; W. R. Barker and E. 
J. Caywood, 1859; William J. Merritt and William Barker, 1860; 
Barkley Moore and William Gilliland, 1S61; J. S. Wamsler and 
William Gossett, 1862; James T. Huron and R. Johnson, 1SG3; 
W. R. Barker and James T. Huron, 1 864; W. R. Barker and J. 
H. King, 1865; John. C. Ferree and Hira:n Hadley, 1866; Will- 
iam Gilliland and John Ferree, 1S67; J- H. King and C.P. Will- 
iams, 1S6S; M. B. Applcgate and Berryman Hooten, 1SG9; Henry 
Fitch and John W. McClain, 1870; P. H. Newland and Micliael' 
Euliss, 1872; Henry Spray and William R. Barker, 1874; William 
Parsons and William Barker, 1S76; William Parsons and 3[c- 
Kendree Smith, 1878; S. T. Huron and George Gray, ISSO; John 



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HISTOKV OF HKNDRICKS CODNTY. 



H. King and Ileury Spray, 1SS2; Daniel S. Barker and William 
Barker, ISSi. 

Trustees: Isaac II. Pierson, 1S56; Abrain Hoadlcj, 1857; D. F. 
Cox, 1S5S; B. A. Haron, 1S59-'6G; Enos Hadley, 18t;7-'69; James 
H. Cox, 1870-'7i; Clark Blair, 1876-'7S; L. W. Jenkins, 1880; 
Joseph Winings, lS82-'84. 

Clerics: James Campbell, 1856; J. M. Carter, 1857; John John- 
son, 1858 (office abolished). 

Treasurers: Walter T. Eoss, 1S5G; B. A. Huron, 1857'5S (office 
abolished). 

Assessors: A. J. Johnson, 1870; Thomas Gossett, 1872; Amos 
Hoak, 1874; Thomas Gossett, 1876-'7S; Joseph Winiugs, 1830; 
Zimri W. Cox, 18S2. 

STATISTICS. 

By the census of 1880, tlie population of Wasliington Township 
was 1, 502. The following statistics of wealth and taxation are for 
the year 1885: Acres of land assessed, 23,981.80; value of same, 
8629,155; vah;e of improvements, §148,536; value of personalty, 
8266,042; total taxable wealth, Sl,04E,733; polls, 281; dogs, 234; 
State tax, $1,392.95; county tax, $3,046.90; township tax, $626.24; 
tuition tax, 81.635.85; special school tax, $2,227.97; road tax, 
$2,609.35; endowment tax, $52.18; bridge tax, $1,043.71; total 
taxes, $14,888.40; delinquent taxes, ST17.S9. 

BI0GEAPHICA.L. 

Clark Blair, County Commissioner v.>f Hendricks County, Ind., 
was born near Stilesville, this county., March 25, 1836, a son of 
Lindfey and Rachel M. (Hodson) Blair. His father is one of the 
pioneers of this county, having come tram North Carolina with his 
father, liolomon Blair, in 1820. His mother also came at a very 
early date with her father, Jesse Hodson, settling near Amo, in 
Clay Township. Our subject was reared near and in Plainfield and 
received most of his education in the sciliools of that place. His 
father died when he was seventeen years old, and he being the eld- 
est son was obliged to superintend the fkrm. Previous to his father's 
death he clerked two years in the drng store of Craigheail &, Brown- 
ing, in Indianapolis, Ind., alter which, in- the full of 1852, he entered 
the PlainSeld Academy, remaining there till his father died. Jan. 
31, 1858, he was married to ilarian Sanders, daughter of Benjaniia 
and Lncinda Sanders, of Washington Township, who were among 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COCNTV. 



737 



the first families of tlie coniitj. His wife died in April, 1ST2, leav- 
ing tour children — Boiijaniin L., traveling salesman for a wholesale 
house in San Francisco, Cal. ; Willet B., a farmer in Washington 
Township; Eddie E. and Flora Alice, still at home. He was again 
married, in May, 1S73, to Miss Sarah M. Cox, of Guilford Town- 
ship, and to them have been born five cluldren — EfEo May, Geortre 
Porter, Mary E., Arthur A. and Ii;es S. After his first marriage 
he left his home and settled on a farm in "Washington Township, 
on which lie lived hut a short time, when he purchased tlie farm 
adjoining, where he has since followed a(?ricultural pursuits. In 
October, 1S76, he was elected a Trustee of Wasliington Township, 
which office he held by re-election two terms. In the fall of ISSO 
he was elected one of the Commissioners of this county and was 
re-elected to serve another term. Mr. Blair is a Master Mason and 
has served as Secretary of Bridgeport Lodgie, No. 1G2, A. F. & A 
M., two years. He is a member of tise Methodist Episcopal 
church, of which he has been Steward and Glass-Leader a number of 
years. His wife is a member of the societj of Friends. 

Henry Bradford-, one of the most protrtiinent farmers of Wash- 
ington Township, is a native of Hardy Csmnty, Va., born Oct. 19, 
1817, a son of George W. and Elizabeth. Bradford, also natives of 
Virginia. Roared on a farm in his native ssounty he had but limited 
educational advantages. In ISSSlie iaimig:ratcd to Clinton Countv, 
Ohio, wliere for some time he worked as a farm hand. Jan. 6, 1S42, 
he married Sarah Hawkins, born Dec. %% 1823, daughter of Jehu 
and Susannah Hawkins, the former a native of Soutli Carolina and 
the latter of Ohio. About 1850 Mr. Briudford left Clinton County 
and moved to Hendricks County, Ind.,. locating in Washington 
Township, where he now owns a fine fainm of 160 acres, all under 
cultivation. Commencing life in limited circumstances he has by 
his industry and strict integrity accumial-ated a competency and is' 
now one of the most prosperous citizens of the township. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Bradford have been born nine 'children — Susanna, born 
Oct. 8, 1842; Elizabeth A., born Julj 59, ISW, died Aug. 15, 
1865; Charity A., born June 24, lSi7^ died Sept. 7, 184-7; Mary 
J., bi-ra Oct. 3, 1848, died July 29, 1877; Layton M., born Oct. 
22, 1851; Isaac H., born Jan. 30, 1S54; Eii J., born Feb. 26,1856, 
died May 1, 1873; Jehu II.. horn Dec. 24, 1858; John II., born 
April 10, 1864. In politics Mr. Bradford is a Republican. He and 
his wife are members of the society of Friends. 

John Casaerly, farmer, Washington Township, is a native of 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 



County Galwaj, Ireland, born in July, 1S43, a son of Thomas and 
Mary Casserly. In 1S50 his father came to the [Jnitud States and 
located in Hendricks County, lud.. and in the spring of 1851 the 
mother with her two sous, John and Michael, followed him to 
this country. They settled in Washingtou Township and became 
prominently identified with its interests. John Casserly was 
reared in Washington Township and since reaching,, manhood has 
been numbered among the most enterprising and successful agri- 
culturists of the county. His fine farm of 100 acres shows "the 
result ot thrift and good management, and his form buildings are 
among the best in the township. Mr. Casserly was married in 
June, 1S61, to Ellen Mooney, daughter of Michael Mooney 
Eleven children have been born to them, but nine of whom are 
hving-Michaol, John, Mary, Thomas, Patrick, Martin, Lobina, 
Ellen and Timothy. Mr. Casserly and his family are members of 
the Catiiolic church. 

ZlmrL W. Cox was b.Tn Nov. 6, 1835, in Hendricks County 
Ind., a son of David F. ?,nd Elizabeth Cox. He was reared and 
educated in this county, remaining with his parents till manhood 
In August, 1S62, he enlisted in Company 1, Si.xty-third Indiana 
Infantry, and was assigned to the Army of the Cumberland. Ho 
participated in many hotly contested battles, some of the more 
important being Buzzard's Roost, Resaca, soige of Atlanta Nash- 
ville, Franklin and Spring Hill. He was discharged in July 
1865, and since his return home has given his attention to ao-ri- 
caltural pursuits. He now owns a good farm of seventy-one Ind 
a halt acres in Washington Township. He has served his town- 
ship four years as Assessor. Mr. Cox was married April 4 1872 
to Elizabeth R. Wyer, daughter of Philip Wyer. To them have 
been born three children-David F., Byron IS", and Charles £ 
The latter is deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Cox are members of the 
Christian church. He is a member of Virgil Lyon Post, No. 186, 
G. A. R. - 

Willis M. Davli, farmer, Washington Township, is a native of 
Hendricks County, Ind., born Jan. 27, ISil, a son of James and 
Ann Davis, natives of Kentucky and early settlers of Hendricks 
County. The mother died in Washington Township in 1863, and 
the father in 1880. Six of their nine children are living— Sarah, 
Lydia, Josephiiie, Thornton S., John H., and Willis M. °Our sub- 
iect was reared a farmer, receiving a common-schoo! education 
He has been successful in his pursuits and now owns a fine farm 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COITSTT. 739 

of 120 acres. He was married in September, 1864, to Mary E. 
John, who died in April, 1S67, leaving one child — Charles H., 
born in ISGO. In Febraary, 1S75, Mr. Da^is married Mary J. 
Larimore, of Marion County, lud., and to them have been born 
two children — Ellis L. and Vestal C. Mr. Davis is a member of 
the Odd Fellow's order, Lod,o;e No. 372. 

M/ichael A. Euliss is a native of North Carolina, born in Ala- 
mance County, August, 1841, a son of William and Nellie 
Euliss. He was reared in his native eoniiity, where he received 
but limited educational advantages. In LS70 he came to Hen- 
dricks County, Ind., and in 1S75 bought tfie farm where he has 
since lived, which contains 100 acres of gooci land, with a pleasant 
residence and good farm buildings. He was married Feb. 15, 1S75, 
to Mollie Hornaday, daughter of Isaiah aimd Elvira Hornaday. 
They have a family of four children — Evert I., Thomas V., Yir- 
giiiia D. and Carl. Mr. Euliss is a member of Brownsburg 
Lodge, F. & A. M. He and his wife are meirubers of the Christian 
church. In politics he is a Republican. 

Jesse Fausset, a prominent pioneer of Washington Township, 
was born in West Virginia, April 21, ISlf , a son of Charles and 
Jemima (Reed) Fausset, the former a native of Pennsylvania and 
the latter of Virginia. In 1S19 his parents moved to Franklin 
County, Ind., where he was reared and educated. His mother 
died Oct. .1, lS-45, and his father Nov. 21, 1878. They had a 
family of eight children — Robert, Jesse, Benjamin, Rebecca, 
Alpheus, Phcebe A., Isaac and Jacob. The two latter are deceased. 
Jesse Fausset was married Feb. 6, 1844, to Margaret J. Freelaiid, 
daughter of Thomas Freeland, of Franklin County. To them were 
born three children — Eliza J., born Jan. 23, 1845; Charlotte E., 
July 11, 1847, died xMay 7, 1860, and Framcis N., born Aug. 26, 
1851. Sept. 21, 1856, Jesse Fausset married Louisa Holtuti, 
daughter of Isaac Holton. His wife died Jan. 19, 1863, leaving 
one child— Jemima L., born Jan. 14, 1861. Oct. 24, 1SG7, he 
married Eh'zabeth VanAusdall, daughter of Silas Van Ausdall, of 
Butler County, Ohio. They have had three children — Charles S., 
born Dec. 8, 1SG9; James O., born Nov. 21, 1872, died April 7, 
1873, and Rebecci A., born Jan. 9, 1874, died Jan. 26, 1877. 
Jesse Fausset moved to Hendricks County in 1862, and settled in 
Washington Township, where he owns 115i acres'of cultivated 
land. In politics he is a Democrat. He and his wife are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



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740 HISTORY OF HENDRICKS COUNTY. 

George A. Gihhs, a pioneer of Washington Township, is a native 
of North Carolina, born Aug. 2, 1S22, a son of Thomas and 
Tabitha Gibbs, natives of Viro;inia. In 1S26 his parents moved 
to Morgan County, Ind., and in 1S30 to Hendricks County, and 
settled in Washington Township, where they both died. George 
A. is the only surviving member of a family of three children. He 
was' reared and educated in this county, and since attaining his 
majority has engaged in agricultural pursuits. He is a self-made 
man. Beginning life in limited circumstances he has accumulated 
a good property, now owning 270 acres of improved land. He 
was married Sept. 20, 18i2, to Louisa Hubbard, and to them have 
been born eleven children — Henry H., Melvin C, Andrew J., 
Eliza J., Mary E., Thomas A., William S., John H., Rosetta F., 
Lydia J. and DoUie A. In politics Mr. Gibbs is a Republican. 
He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal cliurch. 
He is a liberal supporter of his church and of all interests of 
benefit to his county. 

Henry JET. Gihhs is a native of Washington Township, Plendricks 
Co., Ind., born Feb. 12, 1845, the eldest son of George A. and 
Louisa (Hubbard) Gibbs. He was reared in his native township, 
v.-here he had but limited educational advantages. In August, 
1863, be enlisted in the war of the Rebellion, and served six 
months, principally in Tennessee and Kentucky. His vocation 
through life has been agriculture, at which he has been mainly 
successful. In ISSO he located on his present farm where he owns 
160 acres of valuable.land. Mr. Gibbs was married Jan. 16, 1S6S, 
to Elizabeth Van Trese. To them have been born nine children 
—Ella II., Charles E., Eflie M., George G., William C, Melvin 
C, Minnie, Ada and Grace. In politics Mr. Gibbs is a Republi- 
can. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

John W. Gladden was born in Marion County, Ind., March 1, 
1828, a son of William and Eve (iSTegley) Gladden. William (liad- 
den was a native of Pennsylvania, and when a child accompanied 
his parents to Maryland, where he was reared. When he was 
twenty-two years of age he came West and for thee years taught 
school in Butler County, Ohio. He then removed to Marion 
County, Ind., and entered 400 acres of land, which he improved, 
enduring all the hardships of pioneer life. After a life of usefulness 
he died Jan. 29,-lSS4, his v.dfe surviving him but one day. Tiiey 
were burled in the same grrive in Shiloh Methodist Cluirch Cenie- 



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HISTORY OF HENDRICKS OOtTNTT. 



741 



tery, in this township. Of ten children born to them, nine grow- 
to maturity, and six are still living — William N., John W., Alfred 
H., George L., Hannah O. and David F. Mr. Gladden was rec- 
ognized as one of the best mathematicians of Indiana, and was 
often called on to solve knotty problems. John "VV. Gladden was 
reared in his native county. In 1856 he moved* to Hendricks 
County, and settled in Washington Townsliip where he has since 
been successfully engaged in farming and dairying. He owns 
142 acres of land in Hendricks County, and thirt^'-seven acres in 
Marion County, itr. Gladden was married Jan. 25, 1849, to Mary 
McCslmert, daughter of Wilson and Lydfa McCalraert. They 
have had four children — Jane M., born Jtme 14, 1852; Alice C, 
Feb. 8, 1854; Margaret S., Nov. 9, 1855; and William A., Sep- 
tember, 1857. Mr. and Mrs. Gladden are membe'rs of the Method- 
ist Episcopal church. 

Barney Gossett is a native of Hendriel-s County, Ind., born 
Oct. 30, 1841, a son of Joseph and Hannah (Walton) Gossett, na- 
tives of North Carolina, who^accompanicd their parents to Hen- 
dricks County, in 1805. They were married in this county and 
settled a mile south of Avon, in Washingtcu Township, where the 
father died in 1S4S, and the mother in 1S6S. Of their five chil- 
dren, tliree are living — Nelson, Barney and Rachel E. After the 
father's death the mother married John Milton, by whom she iiad 
one child — John F. They endured many hardships and privations 
incident to pioneer life, but were industrious, energetic citizens, 
and respected by all who knew them. Barney was reared in his 
native. county, remaining with his mother till manhood. When 
the civil war broke out he enlisted in defense of the Union, in Sep- 
tember, 1861, in Company I, Seventh Indiana Infantry, and was- 
assigned to the Army of the Potomac. Ke participated in many 
severe engagements, some of the more important being Antietam, 
Gettysburg, Wilderness, Petersburg, secorsd Bull Run, Winches- 
ter, Fredericksburg and Greenbriar. He was honorably discharged 
in September, 1864. After his return home he engaged in ao-ri- 
cultiiral pursuits, and now has a fine fan-ti ^of 190 acres. He was 
married in June^ 1865, to Mary A. Richards, a native of Hen- 
dricks County, born November, 1841, daughter of Joseph and 
Abigail Kicliards, natives of Ohio, who settled in this county in 
1838. They have two children— Ella E., born Feb. 28, 1869,'and 
John B., Feb. 22, 1877. Mr. and Mrs. Gossett are members of 
the Methodist Episcopal cluirch. Mr. Gossett has served Wasli- 
47 



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742 



HISTORY OF IIENDKrCKS COUNTY. 



iugton Township as Justice of the Peace twelve years. He is a 
member of Yirgil II. Lyon Post, No. 186, G. A. K. 

Enos ITadley, liW influential and successful farmer and stock- 
raiser of Washington Township, is a native of Hendricks Countv, 
born near Plainfield, June 10, 1S25, a son of Jonathan and xVra 
Hadley. Hi^ parents came to Hendricks County in the fall ot 
1S23, and entered eighty acres of Government land, which they 
began to improve and make a home. They were prominent among 
the early settlers of the county, earnest members of the Christian 
church, and honored members of society. Their family consisted 
of nine children, but four of whom are living — Euos, Harlan, "Will- 
iam 0. and John V. Enos Hadley was reared on a frontier farm 
and was early inured to the hardships of the life of a pioneer. He' 
received a fair education for the early days, and taught several 
terms. Since leaving home he has been successful in his pursuits 
and now has a fine farm of ;>30 acres where he has lived since ISoO. 
He was married Nov. 14, 1850, to Susan Smith, a daughter of 
James and Hannah Smith, early settlers of Hendricks County, 
from Kentucky. To them have been born nine children — Jona- 
than S., Eliza E., James A., Horace E., Cassius C, Clara B., 
Eobert S., Enos W. and Lester P.; the latter is deceased. Mr. 
Hadley has served as Trustee of Washington Township three 
terms, and as Commissioner of Hendricks County one term. In 
polrtics he is a Republigan. He and his wife are members of the 
Christian church. 

Harlan Hadley is a native of Hendricks County, Ind., born in 
Guilford Township, Oct. 14, 1829, a son of Jonathan and Ara Had- 
ley. He was married June 6, 1S52, to Rebecca Oursler, and to 
.them were born four children — George W., Mary C, Alice and 
Ada (deceased). Mrs. Hadley died July 23, 1859, and Oct. 9, 
1860, Mr. Hadley married Mary A. Ross, who died July 26, 1875, 
leaving three children — Cora E., William and Charles. Nov. 1, 
1877, he married Mrs. Nancy (McCown) Talbott. They have two 
children — John M. and Harlan C. Mr. Hadley is a man of tine 
business ability and has accumulated a good property. He has a 
tina iarm of 800 acres under cultivation, and is one of the most 
extensive stock-raisers and lealers in Hendricks 'County. He also 
conducts a profitable livery business iii Plainfield, of which place 
he is one of the most substantial and respected citizens. Mr. Had- 
lev is a member of Lodge No. 2S7, F. & A. M. In politics he is 
a Republican. He and his wife are members of the Christian 
church. 



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HISTORY OF HENDKICKS COUNTY. 



743 



Albert A. UolUngsiuorth is a native of Hendricks County, Intl., 
born Dec. 7, 18-14, a son of Mersey N. and Mary A. Hollings- 
worth, his father a native of Ohio and his mother of Pennsylvania. 
There were twelve children in his father's family, nine of whom 
are living — Asbiiry S., Albert A., John T., SamuelJ., Mersey M., 
Maria L., Mary E., Sally A. and Emily J. Albert A. Ilollings 
worth was reared and educated in his native township. In July, 
1S63, he enlisted in the Fifty-fourth Indiana Infantry for three 
months, and was discharged the following September. In Febru- 
ary, 18G5, he enlisted in the One Hundred and Forty-eighth Indi- 
ana Infantry, and served till the close of the war. He was 
assigned duty at Columbia and Pulaski, Tenn. After liis return 
home he gave his attention to agricultural pursuits, at which he 
has been successful. In 1876 he located on Ins ])resent farm, 
where he owns 155 acres of valuable land, all under cultivation. 
April 13, 1809, he married Fidelia B. C. Towles, daughter of Rob- 
ert and Harriet A. Towles. To them have been born six children 
— Harriet A., Ira A., Albert A., Nettie M., and an Infant de- 
ceased. JMr. and Mrs. Hollingsworth are members of the Baptist 
church at Plaintield. 

Enos Hui'on, a prominent farmer of Washington Township, is 
a native of Warren County, Ohio, born Sept. 5, 1832, a son of Seth 
and Matilda (Ross) Huron. When he was an infant his parents 
moved to Hendricks Coifnty, Ind., and here be was reared and ed- 
ucated, attending the early subscription schools. Since attaining 
manhood he has devoted his attention to agricultural pursuits, and 
now owns 105 acres of valuable land, and his improvements are 
amono' the best in the township. He was married in November, 
1857, to Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Forkner. To them have 
been born eight children, five of whom are living — Louisa J., 
Rosella, Alva W., jSTancy M. and Sarah G. Lewis B., Mary A. 
and an infant are deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Huron have been prom- 
inently identified with the ^Methodist Episcopal church many 
years. He is a liberal supporter of all interests of benefit to his 
church,. or that tend toward the welfare of his county. 

Seth Huron, deceased, was born in Warren County, Ohio, May 
10, 1803, and died in Hendricks County, Ind., in July, 1S76. He 
was a son of Othniel and Bethiah Huron. lie remained with his 
parents till manhood, in his native county, where he wi'.s married 
to Matilda Ross. To them were born nine children — Mary E. , 
Martha J., Enos, Othniel, Eli, Seth J., Louisa, Ann and James T.; 



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HISTOKV OF HEXDKICK3 COUMT. 



tlie last two are deceased. Mrs. Huron died, and Aug. 30, 1S52, 
Mr. Huron married Mary McLane, daughter of Jarnes McLane, 
an early settler of Hendricks County. They had a family of six 
children, five of whom are living — Sarah D., Nancy M., William 
B., Hezekiah U. and Phoebe L. In 1832 Mr. Huron mov