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Full text of "The history of Henry County, Illinois : it's tax-payers and voters"

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SHABBONA 



The History 



Henry (^ounty, T 



OUNTY, LLINOIS, 



Its Tax- Payers and Voters; 



CONTAINING, ALSO, A 



BIOGRAPHICAL DIRECTORY: A CONDENSED HISTORY OF THE ST A TE ; MAP OF THE 

COUNTY; A BUSINESS DIRECTORY: AN ABSTRACT OF EVERY-DAY 

LAWS; WAR RECORD OF HENRY COUNTY : OFFICERS 

UF SOCIETIES, LODGES, ETC., ETC. 



CHICAGO: 

H. F. Kett & Co., 15 Lakeside Building. 

1877. 41 



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1877, by 

H. F. KETT & CO., 
In the office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington. 



Preface. 



But- few can realize the task involved in the publication of a work of this kind. 
We have to contend against ignorance, prejudice and selfishness. Ignorance of 
some people as to our objects, many refusing to give their names, for fear they 
will be used for some swindling purpose ; or their politics, lest it be used to 
their discredit; or how much property they own, fearing it is t(? increase their 
taxes. Prejudice of people who have subscribed through agents for publications^ 
and not having received what they expected, have forever thereafter sworn war- 
fare against all agents, without discriminating, or taking into consideration the 
absolute necessity of employing men under certain circumstances as the media 
between publisher and people. Selfishness by citizens who expect to have pub- 
lished, gratuitously, every thing they see fit to send us, which usually is of a per- 
sonal nature, or not relevant matter, and if published would be of no general 
interest, therefore we deem best to suppress it, thereby receiving their outspoken 
enmity. For this work we do not claim perfection ; that would be an impossi- 
bility. Most townships have been gone over thoroughly, but still there are 
undoubtedly errors, mostly in spelling names and in dates. We have several 
cases in Henry County where members of the same family spell their names in 
different ways, and a number of cases where the dates of births, of marriages, or 
when they came into the county, were improbable, and when brought to their 
notice, they had made a mistake generally of ten years in calculation. We give 
our agents the most positive instructions to be especially careful in getting 
names and dates, but ofttimes men are indifferent in, giving required information, 
and when met on the road, at the thrashing machine, or in the rain or cold, the 
information is given hurriedly or carelessly, and our agents are obliged to put it 
down as given them, and when copied, mistakes necessarily occur. 

We have endeavored to get the names of all tax-payers and voters. We have 
about 8,300 names, the vote being about 5,500, which shows we could not have 
missed many. In our History of the County we have endeavored to give an 
interesting, condensed and correct sketch. Our History of Illinois will give the 
reader some interesting and valuable historical facts. Our Laws should be 
carefully read by every business man and farmer; they contain invaluable infor- 
mation. In fact we have toiled long and at great expense, and have far exceeded 
ouVpromises to make every thing in these pages interesting and valuable, and 
all you could expect or wish, and in your criticisms, please to bear in mind that 
in gathering, compiling and publishing a volume of this kind, perfection would 
be an impossibility. 

We wish to extend our sincere and warmest thanks to the citizens of Henry 
County for their kind treatment, and for assistance rendered us in furnishing 
information for this work. They are too numerous to here name, but to the 
press and early settlers in particular we are grateful for their labors in aiding us 
to gather the material for the History of the County. The Cambridge Chronicle 
furnished us with its files of 1858 and 1859, which contained a series of articles 
by Dr. A. A. Dunn, its editor, on the early settlement of the county, and from 
them we have taken much of our early Historv. 

H F. Kett & Co. 



Contents. 



Constitution of United States 

County Officers 548 

County Scliools 547 

Electors of President and Vice- 
President, 1876 100 

Geology of Henry County 101 

Henry Co. Agricultu«al Society.. 555 
Henry Co. Infirmary 545 



Page. 

History of Illinois 13 

History of Henry Co lltj 

Morristown Colony 135 

"Wethersfleld Colony 137 

Bishop Hill Colony 145 

Geneseo Colony 507 

County Courts 151 

Sliabbona 1 52 

History of Towns : 

Atkinson 530 

Anna wan 528 



Page. 

Andover 452 

Annawan 396 

Atkinson 266 

Alba 237 

Burns 407 

Cambridge 282 



.256 



MISCELL A N ECUS. 

PAGE. 

Interest Table 82 

Miscellaneous Table 82 

Map of Henry County.. .Front Page. 
Officials of Societies, Lodges, etc.552 

Old Settlers' Meeting 556 

Population of Henry Counts 504 

Population of the United States.. 82 
Population of Fifty Principal 
Cities 82 



HlSTOKICAt. 

Page. 
History of Towns : 

Andover 524 

Alpha 540 

Cambridge 177 

Cleveland 531 

Colona 540 

Dayton 539 

Geneseo 507 

Galva 168 

Kewanee 155 

TOWNSHIP DIKECTOKY. 

Page. 

Cornwall 225 

Edford 275 

Giilva 347 

Geneseo 186 

Hanna 24 1 

Kewanee 415 

Lynn 388 

Loraine 320 



Population and Area of the U. S.. 83 
Population of Principal Cities in 

the World 83 

Population of Illinois 84 & 85 

Railroads 547 

Real and Personal Property 

Statement 549 

Too Lates and Changes 590 

Vote of Henry County 550 



Page. 

History of Towns : 

Lynn 562 

Morristown 130 

Nekoma 54I 

Orion 521 

Opheim 539 

Osco 532 

Oakley 539 

TJlah 562 

Woodhull 537 



Page. 

Munson 311 

Oxford 337 

Osco 467 

Phenix 231 

Wethersfleld 479 

Weller 490 

Western 370 

YorKtown 249 



BUSINESS DIKECTOKY. 

less Directory follows the townships in which they are located. 
ABSTKACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 



Bills of exchange and proi 
sorynotes 


Page. 
..." 45 

.::: 11 
:::: '^ 
:::: \l 
;::: 11 

.... 50 

;::: 11 
;;;: i 
:::: 11 

■-4I 
:;;'.423 

....143 
....343 


Adoption of children.. 
Surveyors and surveys 

Roads 

Drainage 

Damage from Trespass 
Landlord and Tenant. . 


Page. 

54 

54 

!!!!!.!!!! t? 

58 

60 


Forni 

Stickne 
Sannqu 
Sheare 
Sawyer 
Shabbo 
Smithe 
Tenney 
Willari 
Wilber 
Whitne 
Warne 
VV^elton 
Wilkin 
Wilson 

S. 
86th ] 

134th 
139th 
148th 

151st 
Miscell 

ies.. .. 


Page. 
f Articles of Agreement 67 

g'i?ifof°s^a!l.^.T!?^.^:!-- ^. 


Wills and estates! !!!! .;.'!!!.' ! 
Taxes.... 


Bonds 

Chattel Mortgage... 
Lease of Buildings. 
Landlord's Agreem 
Tenant's 

Notice Tenant to Qi 

Tenant's Notice to C 

Real Estate Mortg 

to Secure Money 

VParranty Deed 

Quitclaim Deed.... 

Release 

Form of Will 

Codicil 




County Courts 


'!!!!!!!!!! ei 




Marriedwomen 

Exemption from^orced sale 

Deeds aiid Mortgages'. '.'.'..".'. 

Weights and measures '.'.'.'.'.'. 

Millers 

Marks and brands 

Allan James M 


Definition of Commercial Terms 65 

Church Organization 79 

Suggestion to Persons purchas- 
ing Books by Subscription... 80 

Form of Blank Note 66 

Order 6b 

Bills of 'purchase'.!!!!'.'. 66 

PORTRAITS. 

Page. 

Hurd Lewis 493 

Hinmau J S 9.n:K 


Juit 73 

^''. 73 
.... 74 
.... 75 

!!!! ?? 

.... 79 
Page. 


Blish Sylvester'. ". '. '. '. '. '. '. '.'. '. '. '. '. '. 

ll^^Sn%y:::;;;;;:::;:;::: 
iSSili^john:::::::::::::: 

BellJ.D 

Beveridge P. H 


?^??^m!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 
■i:T?!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 

na Tit 

Geo. C 

i1^!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!' 

R M 


453 


Henderson Thomas G. 

Johnson Olot 

Kemerling Jacob.. 

KinerH. £ 

KinzieR. A 

ffil^T^.^'!!!!!!!! 




!.!!!i 

353 


y C.N 


^55, 




:'.::t4l 
213 






....37; 






!!!!!!!!:!{83 


son l!'g.!!!!!. !!!!!!!!' 
Geo. F. H 

nfantrj 

aneous 
Pas 


....29^ 


HoweJ. H 

Howard Sullivan 


Ridenour J. B 393 

Seaton B. W 243 

ENRY COUNTY VOLUNTEER 

33d^lnfantry..................!;^|| 

37th " 583 


!!!!i^i 


Graham's Incl. Cav. Co 

f^'^-'^''-^ 


H 

Page. 


Page. 


9th " 


....574 
....583 




581 


565 


!?^. :: !!!!!!!!!! 
gi^H " •!.!!!!!! 

75th ;■ 


! 579 

!:;583^|I 


572 


9th Infantry 

14th " 

17tli " 


::::it 


ii 


18th " ::::::;::::::;:: 


' '5H3 


582 


19th " 579 

CHURCHES OE HENRY CO. 




not mentioned in Town Histor 


e 541 



N 91 J. 




History of Illinois. 



The name of fliis beautiful Prairie State is derived from Illim, a 
Delaware word signifying Superior Men. It has a French termination, 
and is a symbol of how the two races — the French and the Indians — 
were intermixed during the early history of the country. 

The appellation was no doubt well applied to the primitive inhabit- 
ants of the soil whose prowess in savage warfare long withstood the 
combined attacks of the fierce Iroquois on the one side, and the no less 
savage and relentless Sacs and Foxes on the other. The Illinois were 
once a powerful confederacy, occupying the most beautiful and fertile 
region in the great Valley of the Mississippi, which their enemies coveted 
and struggled, long and hard to wrest from them. By the fortunes of 
war they were diminished in numbers, and finally destroyed. " Starved 
Rock,'" on the Illinois River, according to tradition, commemorates their 
last tragedy, where, it is said, the entire tribe starved rather than sur- 
render. 

EARLY DISCOVERIES. 

The first European discoveries iu Illinois date back over two hun- 
dred 3^ears. The}^ are a part of that movement which, from the begin- 
ning to the middle of the seventeenth century, brought the French 
Canadian missionaries and far traders into the Valley of the Mississippi, 
and which, at a later period, established the civil aftd ecclesiastical 
authority of France from the Gulf of St. Lawrence to the Gulf of Mexico, 
and from the foot-hills of the Alleghanies to the Rocky Mountains. 

The great river of the West had been discovered by DeSoto, the 
Spanish conqueror of Florida, three quarters of a century before the 
French founded Quebec in 1608, but the Spanish left the country a wil- 
derness, without further exploration or settlement within its borders, in 
which condition it remained until the Mississippi was discovered by the 
agents of the French Canadian government, Jolietand Marquette, in 1673. 
These renowned explorers were not the first white visitors to Illinois. 
In 1671 — two years in advance of them — came Nicholas Perrot to Chicago. 
He had been sent by Talon as an agent of the Canadian government to 
2 



14 HISTORY OF THE STATE OP ILLINOIS. 

call a great peace convention of Western Indians at Green Bay, prepara- 
tory to the movement for the discovery of the Mississippi. It was 
deemed a good stroke of policy to secure, as far as possible, the friend- 
ship and co-operation of the Indians, far and near, before venturing upon 
an enterprise which their hostility might render disastrous, and which 
their friendship and assistance would do so much to make successful ; 
and to this end Perrot was sent to call together in council the tribes 
throughout the Northwest, and to promise them the commerce and pro- 
tection of the French government. He accordingly arrived at Green 
Bay in 1671, and procuring an escort of Pottawattamies, proceeded in a 
bark canoe upon a visit to the Miamis, at Chicago. Perrot was there- 
fore the first European to set foot upon the soil of Illinois. 

Still there were others before Marquette. In 1672, the Jesuit mis- 
sionaries. Fathers Claude AUouez and Claude Dablon, bore the standard 
of the Cross from their mission at Green Bay through western Wisconsin 
and northern Illinois, visiting the Foxes on Fox River, and the Masquo- 
tines and Kickapoos at the mouth of the Milwaukee. These missionaries 
penetrated on the route afterwards followed by Marquette as far as the 
Kickapoo village at the head of Lake Winnebago, where Marquette, in 
his journey, secured guides across the portage to the Wisconsin. 

The oft-repeated story of Marquette and Joliet is well known. 
They were the agents employed by the Canadian government to discover 
the Mississippi. Marquette was a native of France, born in 1637, a 
Jesuit priest by education, and a man of simple faith and of great zeal and 
devotion in extending the Roman Catholic religion among the Indians. 
Arriving in Canada in 1666, he was sent as a missionary to the far 
Northwest, and, in 1668, founded a mission at Sault Ste. Marie. The 
following year he moved to La Pointe, in Lake Superior, where he 
instructed a branch of the Hurons till 1670, when he removed south, and 
founded the mission at St. Ignace, on the Straits of Mackinaw. Here 
he remained, devoting a portion of his time to the study of the Illinois 
language under "a native teacher who had accompanied him to the mission 
from La Pointe, till he was joined by Joliet in the Spring of 1673. By 
the way of Green Bay and the Fox and Wisconsin Rivers, they entered 
the Mississippi, which they explored to the mouth of the Arkansas, and 
returned by the way of the Illinois and Chicago Rivers to Lake Michigan. 

On his way up the Illinois, Marquette visited the great village of 
the Kaskaskias, near what is now Utica, in the county of LaSalle. The 
following year he returned and established among them the mission of 
the Immaculate Virgin Mary, which was the first Jesuit mission founded 
in Illinois and in the Mississippi Valley. The intervening winter he 
had spent in a hut which his companions erected on the Chicago River, a 
few leagues from its mouth. The founding of this mission was the last 



HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 15 

act of Marquette's life. He died in Michigan, on his way back to Green 
Bay, May 18, 1675. 

FIRST FRENCH OCCUPATION. 

The first French occupation of the territory now embraced in Illi- 
nois was effected by LaSalle in 1680, seven years after the time of Mar- 
quette and Joliet. LaSalle, having constructed a vessel, the " Griffin," 
above the falls of Niagara, which he sailed to Green. Bay, and having 
passed thence iii canoes to the mouth of the St. Joseph River, b}^ which 
and the Kankakee he reached the Illinois, in January, 1680, erected Fort 
Crevecoeur, at the lower end of Peoria Lake, where the city of Peoria is 
now situated. The place where this ancient fort stood may still be seen 
just below the outlet of Peoria Lake, It was destined, however, to a 
temporary existence. From this point, LaSalle determined to descend 
the Mississippi to its mouth, but did not accomplish this purpose till two 
years later — in 1682. Returning to Fort Frontenac for the purpose of 
getting materials with which to rig his vessel, he left the fort in charge of 
Touti, his lieutenant, who during his absence was driven off by the Iro- 
quois Indians. These savages had made a raid upon the settlement of 
the Illinois, and had left nothing in their track but ruin and desolation. 
Mr. Davidson, in his History of Illinois, gives ' the following graphic 
account of the picture that met the eyes of LaSalle and his companions 
on their return : 

" At the great town of the Illinois they were appalled at the scene 
which opened to their view. No hunter appeared to break its death-like 
silence with a salutatory whoop ot welcome. The plain on which the 
town had stood was now strewn with charred fragments of lodges, which 
had so recently swarmed with savage life and hilarity. To render more 
hideous the picture of desolation, large numbers of skulls had been 
placed on the upper extremities of lodge-poles which had escaped the 
devouring flames. In the midst of these horrors was the rude fort of 
the spoilers, rendered frightful by the same ghastly relics. A near 
approach showed that the graves had been robbed of their bodies, and 
swariUs of buzzards were discovered glutting their loathsome stomachs 
on the reeking corruption. To complete the work of destruction, the 
growing corn of the village had been cut down and burned, while the 
pits containing the products of previous years, had been rifled and their 
contents scattered with wanton waste. It was evident the suspected 
blow of the Iroquois had fallen with relentless fury." 

Touti had escaped LaSalle knew not whither. Passing down the 
lake in search of him and his men, LaSalle discovered that the fort had 
been destroyed, but the vessel which he had partly constructed was still 



16 HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

on the stocks and but slightly injured. After further fruitless search, 
failing to fiad Touti, he fastened to a tree a painting representing himself 
and party sitting in a canoe and bearing a pipe of peace, and to the paint- 
ing attached a letter addressed to Touti. 

Touti had escaped, and, after untold privations, taken shelter among 
.the Pottawattamies near Green Bay. These were friendly to the French. 
One of their old chiefs used to say, " There were but three great cap- 
tains in the world, himself, Touti and LaSalle." 

GENIUS OF LaSALLE. 

We must now return to LaSalle, whose exploits stand out in such 
bold relief. He Avas born in Rouen, France, in 1643. His father was 
wealthy, but he renounced his patrimony on entering a college of the 
Jesuits, from which he separated and came to Canada a poor man in 1666. 
The priests of St. Sulpice, among whom he had a brotlier, were then the 
proprietors of Montreal, the nucleus of which was a seminary or con- 
vent founded by that order. The Superior granted to LaSalle a large 
tract of land at LaChine, where he established himself in the fur trade. 
He was a man of daring genius, and outstripped all his competitors in 
exploits of travel and commerce with the Indians. In 1669, he visited 
the headquarters of the great Iroquois Confederacy, at Onondaga, in the 
heart of New York, and, obtaining guides, explored the Ohio River to 
the falls at Louisville. 

In order to understand the genius of LaSalle, it must be remembered 
that for many years prior to his time the missionaries and traders were 
obliged to make their way to the Northwest by the Ottawa River (of 
Canada) on account of the fierce hostility of the Iroquois along the lower 
lakes and Niagara River, which entirely closed this latter route to the 
Uoper Lakes. They carried on their commerce chiefly b}^ canoes, pad- 
dling them through the Ottawa to Lake Nipissing, carrying them across 
the portage to French River, and descending that to Lake Huron. This 
being the route by which they reached the Northwest, accounts for the 
fact that all the earliest Jesuit missions were established in the neighbor- 
hood of the Upper Lakes. LaSalle conceived the grand idea of opening 
the route by Niagara River and the Lower Lakes to Canadian commerce 
by sail vessels, connecting it with the navigation of the Mississippi, and 
thus opening a magnificent water communication from the Gulf of St. 
Lawrence to the Gulf of Mexico. This trulj^ grand and comprehensive 
purpose seems to have animated him in all his wonderful achievements 
and the matchless difficulties and hardships he surmounted. As the first 
step in the accomplishment of this object he established himself on Lake 
Ontario, and built and garrisoned Fort Frontenac, the site of the present 



HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 17 

city of Kingston, Canada. Here he obtained a grant of land from the 
French crown and a body of troops by which he beat back the invading 
Iroquois and cleared the passage to Niagara Falls. Having by this mas- 
terly stroke made it safe to attempt a hitherto untried expedition, his 
next step, as we have seen, was to advance to the Falls with all his 
outfit for building a ship with which to sail the lakes. He was success- 
ful in this undertaking, though his ultimate purpose was defeated by a 
strange combination of untoward circumstances. The Jesuits evidently 
hated LaSalle and plotted against him, because he had abandoned them 
and co-opera-ted with a rival order. The fur traders were also jealous of 
his superior success in opening new channels of commerce. At LaChine 
he had taken the trade of Lake Ontario, which but for his presence there 
would have gone to Quebec. While they were plodding with their bark 
canoes through the Ottawa he was constructing sailing vessels to com- 
mand the trade of the lakes and the Mississippi. These great plans 
excited the jealousy and envy of the small traders, introduced treason and 
revolt into the ranks of his own companions, and finally led to the foul 
assassination by which his great achievements were prematurely ended. 

In 1682, LaSalle, having completed his vessel at Peoria, descended 
the Mississippi to its confluence with the Gulf of Mexico. Erecting a 
standard on which he inscribed the arms of France, he took formal pos- 
session of the whole valley of the mighty river, in the name of Louis 
XIV., then reigning, in honor of whom he named the country Louisiana. 

LaSalle then went to France, was appointed Governor, and returned 
with a fleet and immigrants, for, the purpose of planting a colony in Illi- 
nois. They arrived in due time in the Gulf of Mexico, but failing to 
find the mouth of thp Mississippi, up which LaSalle intended to sail, his 
supply ship, with the immigrants, was driven ashore and wrecked ou 
Matagorda Bay. With the fragments of the vessel he constructed a 
stockade and rude huts on the shore for the protection of the immigrants, 
calling the post Fort St. Louis. He then made a trip into New Mexico, 
in search of silver mines, but, meeting with disappointment, returned to 
find his little colony reduced to forty souls. He then resolved to travel 
on foot to Illinois, and, starting with his companions, had reached the 
valley of the Colorado, near the mouth of Trinity river, when he was 
shot by_pne of his men. This occurred on the 19th of March, 1687. 

Dr. J. W. Foster remarks of him : " Thus fell, not far from the banks 
of the Trinity, Robert Cavalier de la Salle, one of the grandest charac- 
ters that ever figured in American history — a man capable of originating 
the vastest schemes, and endowed with a will and a judgment capable of 
carrying them to successful results. Had ample facilities been placed by 
the King of France at his disposal, the result of the colonization of this 
continent might have been far different from what we now behold." 



18 HISTORY OF THE STATE OP ILLINOIS. 



EARLY SETTLEMENTS. 

A temporary settlement was made at Fort St. Louis, or the old Kas- 
kaskia village, oa the Illinois River, in Avhat is now LaSalle County, in 
1682. In 1690, this was removed, with the mission connected with it, to 
Kaskaskia, on the river of that name, emptying into the lower Mississippi 
in St. Clair County. Cahokia was settled about the same time, or at 
least, both of these settlements began in the year 1690, though it is now 
pretty well settled that Cahokia is tlie older place, and ranks as the oldest 
permanent settlement in Illinois, as well as in the Mississippi Valley. 
The reason for the removal of the old Kaskaskia settlement and mission, 
was probably because the dangerous and difficult route by Lake Michigan 
and the Chicago portage had been almost abandoned, and travelers and 
traders passed down and up the Mississippi by the Fox and Wisconsin 
River route. They removed to the vicinity of the Mississippi in order 
to be in the line of travel from Canada to Louisiana, that is, the lower 
part of it, for it was all Louisiana then south of the lakes. 

During the period of French rule in Louisiana, the population prob- 
ably never exceeded ten thousand, including whites and blacks. Within 
that portion of it now included in Indiana, trading posts were established 
at the principal Miami villages which stood on the head waters of the 
Maumee, the Wea villages situated at Ouiatenon, on the Wabash, and 
the Piankeshaw villages at Post Vincennes ; all of which were probably 
visited by French traders and missionaries before the close of the seven- 
teenth century. 

In the vast territory claimed by the French, many settlements of 
considerable importance had sprung up. Biloxi, on Mobile Bay, had 
been founded by DTberville, in 1699 ; Antoine de Lamotte Cadillac had 
founded Detroit in 1701 ; and New Orleans had been founded by Bien- 
ville, under the auspices of the Mississippi Company, in 1718. In Illi- 
nois also, considerable settlements had been made, so that in 1730 they 
embraced one hundred and forty French families, about six hundred " con- 
verted Indians," and many traders and voyageurs. In that portion of the 
country, on the east side of the Mississippi, there were five distinct set- 
tlements, with their respective villages, viz. : Cahokia, near the mouth 
of Cahokia Creek and about five miles below the present city of St. 
Louis ; St. Philip, about forty-five miles below Cahokia, and four miles 
above Fort Chartres ; Fort Chartres, twelve miles above Kaskaskia ; 
Kaskaskia, situated on the Kaskaskia River, five miles above its conflu- 
ence with the Mississippi ; and Prairie du Rocher, near Fort Chartres. 
To these must be added St. Genevieve and St. Louis, on the west side 
of the Mississippi. These, with the exception of St. Louis, are among 



HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 19 

the oldest French towns in the Mississippi Valley. Kaskaskia, in its best 
days, was a town of some two or three thousand inhabitants. After it 
passed from tlie crown of France its population for many years did not 
exceed fifteen hundred. Under British rule, in 1773, the population had 
decreased to four hundred and fifty. As early as 1721, the Jesuits had 
established a college and a monastery in Kaskaskia. 

Fort Chartres was first built under the direction of the Mississippi 
Company, in 1718, by M. de Boisbraint, a military officer, under command 
of Bienville. It stood on the east bank of the Mississippi, about eighteen 
miles below Kaskaskia, and was for some time the headquarters of the 
military commandants of the district of Illinois. 

In the Centennial Oration of Dr. Fowler, delivered at Philadelphia, 
by appointment of Gov. Beveridge, we find some interesting facts with 
regard to the State of Illinois, which we appropriate in this history: 

In 1682 Illinois became a possession of the French crown, a depend- 
ency of Canada, and a part of Louisiana. In 1765 the English flag was 
run up on old Fort Chartres, and Illinois was counted among the treas- 
ures of Great Britain. 

In 1779 it was taken from the English by Col. George Rogers Clark. 
This man was resolute in nature, wise in council, prudent in policy, bold 
in action, and heroic in danger. Few men who have figured in the his- 
tory of America are more deserving than this colonel. Nothing short of 
first-class ability could have rescued Vincens and all Illinois from the 
English. And it is not possible to over-estimate the influence of this 
achievement upon the republic. In 1779 Illinois became a part of Vir- 
ginia. It was soon known as Illinois County. In 1784 Virginia ceded 
all this territory to the general government, to be cut into States, to be 
republican in form, with " the same right of sovereignty, freedom, and 
independence as the other States." 

In 1787 it was the object of the wisest and ablest legislation found 
in any merely human records. No man can study the secret history of 

THE "COMPACT OF 1787," 

and not feel that Providence was guiding with sleepless eye these unborn 
StatesT- The ordinance that on July 13, 1787, finally became the incor- 
porating act, has a most marvelous history. Jefferson had vainly tri4d 
to secure a system of government for the northwestern territory. He 
was an emancipationist of that day, and favored the exclusion of slavery 
from the territory Virginia had ceded to the general government; but 
the South voted him down as often as it came up. In 1787, as late as 
July 10, an organizing act without the anti-slavery clause was pending. 
This concession to the South was expected to carry it. Congress was in 



W HISTORY OP THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

session in New York Cit3^ On July 5, Rev. Dr. Manasseh Cutler, of 
Massachusetts, came into New York to lobby on the northwestern terri- 
tory. Everything seemed to fall into his hands. Events were ripe. 

The state of the public credit, the growing of Southern prejudice, 
the basis of his mission, his personal character, all combined to complete 
one of those sudden and marvelous revolutions of public sentiment that 
once in five or ten centuries are seen to sweep over a country like the 
breath of the Almighty. Cutler was a graduate of Yale — received his 
A.M. from Harvard, and his D.D. from Yale. He had studied and taken 
degrees in the three learned professions, medicine, law, and divinity. He 
had thus America's best indorsement. He had published a scientific 
examination of the plants of New England. His name stood second only 
to that of Franklin as a scientist in America. He was a courtly gentle- 
man of the old style, a man of commanding presence, and of inviting 
face. The Southern members said they had never seen such a gentleman 
in the North. He came representing a company that desired to purchase 
a tract of land now included in Ohio, for the purpose of planting a colony. 
It was a speculation. Government money was worth eighteen cents on 
the dollar. This Massachusetts company had collected enough to pur- 
chase 1,500,000 acres of land. Other speculators in New York made 
Dr. Cutler their agent (lobbyist). On the 12th he represented a demand 
for 5,500,000 acres. This would reduce the national debt. Jefferson 
and Virginia were regarded as authority concerning the land Virginia 
had just ceded. Jefferson's policy wanted to provide for the public credit, 
and this was a good opportunity to do something. 

Massachusetts then owned the territory of Maine, which she was 
crowding on the market. She was opposed to opening the northwestern 
region. This fired the zeal of Virginia. The South caught the inspira- 
tion, and all exalted Dr. Cutler. The English minister invited him to 
dine with some of the Southern gentlemen. He was the center of interest. 

The entire South rallied round him. Massachusetts could not vote 
against him, because many of the constituents of her members were 
interested personally in the western speculation. Thus Cutler, making 
friends with the South, and, doubtless, using all the arts of the lobby, 
was enabled to command the situation. True to deeper convictions, he 
dictated one of the most compact and finished documents of wise states- 
manship that has ever adorned any human law book. He borrowed from 
Jefferson the term " Articles of Compact," which, preceding tlie federal 
constitution, rose into the most sacred character. He then followed very 
closely the constitution of Massachusetts, adopted three years before. 
Its most marked points were : 

1. The exclusion of slavery from the territory forever. 

2. Provision for public schools, giving one township for a seminary, 



HISTORY OF THE STATE OP ILLINOIS. 21 

and every section numbered 16 in each township ; that is, one-thirty-sixth 
of all the land, for public schools. 

3. A provision prohibiting the adoption of any constitution or the 
enactment of any law that should nullify pre-existing contracts. 

Be it forever remembered that this compact declared that " Religion, 
morality, and knowledge being necessary to good government and the 
happiness of mankind, schools and the means of education shall always 
be encouraged." 

Dr. Cutler planted himself on this platform and would not yield. 
Giving his unqualified declaration that it was that or nothing — that unless 
they could make the land desirable they did not want it — he took his 
horse and buggy, and started for the constitutional convention in Phila- 
delphia. On July 13, 1787, the bill was put upon its passage, and was 
unanimously adopted, every Southern member voting for it, and only one 
man, Mr. Yates, of New York, voting against it. But as the States voted 
as States, Yates lost his vote, and the compact was put beyond repeal. 

Thus the great States of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan and Wis- 
consin — a vast empire, the heart of the great valley — were consecrated 
to freedom, intelligence, and honesty. Thus the great heart of the nation 
was prepared for a year and a day and an hour. In the light of these eighty- 
nine years I affirm that this act was the salvation of the republic and the 
destruction of slavery. Soon the South saw their great blunder, and 
tried to repeal the compact. In 1803 Congress referred it to a committee 
of which John Randolph was chairman. He reported that this ordinance 
was a compact, and opposed repeal. Thus it stood a rock, in the way 
©f the on-rushing sea of slavery. 

With all this timely aid it was, after all, a most desperate and pro- 
tracted struggle to keep the soil of Illinois sacred to freedom. It was 
the natural battle-field for the irrepressible conflict. In the southern end 
of the State slavery preceded the compact. It existed among the old 
French settlers, and was hard to eradicate. The southern part of the 
State was settled from the slave States, and this population brought their 
laws, customs, and institutions with them. A stream of population from 
the North poured into the northern part of the State. These sections 
misunderstood and hated each other perfectly. The Southerners regarded 
the Yankees as a skinning, tricky, penurious race of peddlers, filling the 
country with tinware, brass clocks, and wooden nutmegs. The North- 
erner thought of the Southerner as a lean, lank, lazy creature, burrowing 
in a hut, and rioting in whisky, dirt and ignorance. These causes aided 
in making the struggle long and bitter. So strong was the sympathy 
with slavery that, in spite of the ordinance of 1787, and in spite of the 
deed of cession, it was determined to allow the old French settlers to 
retain their slaves. Planters from the slave States might bring their 



22 HISTORY OF THT3 STATE OF ILLINOIS. 



if they would give them a chance to choose freedom or years 
of service and bondage for their children till they should become 
thirty years of age. If they chose freedom they must leave the State 
in sixty days or be sold as fugitives. Servants were whipped for offenses 
for which white men are fined. Each lash paid forty cents of the fine. A 
negro ten miles from home without a pass was whipped. These famous 
laws were imported from the slave States just as they imported laws for 
the inspection of flax and wool when there was neither in the State. 

These Black Laws are now wiped out. A vigorous effort was made 
to protect slavery in the State Constitution of 1817. It barely failed. 
It was renewed in 1825, when a convention was asked to make a new 
constitution. After a hard fight the convention was defeated. But 
slaves did not disappear from the census of the State until 1850. There 
were mobs and murders in the interest of slavery. Lovejoy was added 
to the list of martj-rs — a sort of first-fruits of that long life of immortal 
heroes who saw freedom as the one supreme desire of their souls, and 
were so enamored of her that they preferred to die rather than survive her. 

The population of 12,282 that occupied the territory in A.D. 1800, 
increased to 45,000 in A.D. 1818, when the State Constitution was 
adopted, and Illinois took her place in the Union, with a star on the flag 
and two votes in the Senate. 

Shadrach Bond was the first Governor, and in his first message he 
recommended the construction of the Illinois and Michigan Canal. 

The simple economy in those days is seen in the fact that the entire 
bill for stationery for the first Legislature was only $1.3.50. Yet this 
simple body actually enacted a very superior code. 

There was no money in the territory before the war of 1812. Deer 
skins and coon skins were the circulating medium. In 1821, the Legis- 
lature ordained a State Bank on the credit of the State. It issued notes 
in the likeness of bank bills. These notes were made a legal tender for 
every thing, and the bank was ordered to loan to the people $100 on per- 
sonal security, and more on mortgages. They actually passed a resolu- 
tion requesting the Secretary of the Treasury of the United States to 
receive these notes for land. The old French Lieutenant Governor, Col. 
Menard, put the resolution as follows: " Gentlemen of the Senate : It is 
moved and seconded dat de notes of dis bank be made land-office money. 
All in favor of dat motion say aye ; all against it say no. It is decided 
in de affirmative. Now, gentlemen, I bet you one hundred dollar he 
never be land-office money ! " Hard sense, like hard money, is always 
above par. 

This old Frenchman presents a fine figure up against the dark back- 
ground of most of his nation. They made no progress. They clung to 
their earliest and simplest implements. They never wore hats or caps. 



HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 23 

They pulled their blankets over their heads in the winter like the Indians, 
with whom they freely intermingled. 

Demagogism had an early development. One John Grammar (only 
in name), elected to the Territorial and State Legislatures of 1816 and 
1836, invented the policy of opposing every new thing, saying, " If it 
succeeds, no one will ask who voted against it. If it proves a failure, he 
could quote its record." In sharp contrast with Grammar was the char- 
acter of D. P. Cook, after whom the county containing Chicago was 
named. Such was his transparent integrity and remarkable ability that 
his will was almost the law of the State. In Congress, a young man, 
and from a poor State, he was made Chairman of the Ways and Means 
Committee. He was pre-eminent for standing by his committee, regard- 
less of consequences. It was his integrity that elected John Quincy 
Adams to the Presidency. There were four candidates in 1824:, Jackson, 
Clay, Crawford, and John Quincy Adams. There being no choice by the 
people, the election was thrown into the House. It was so balanced that 
it turned on his vote, and that he cast for Adams, electing him; then 
went home to face the wrath of the Jackson party in Illinois. It cost 
him all but character and greatness. It is a suggestive comment on the 
times, that there was no legal interest till 1830. It often reached 150 
per cent., usually 50 per cent. Then it was reduced to 12, and now to 
10 per cent. 

PHYSICAL FEATURES OF THE PRAIRIE STATE. 

In area the State^ has 55,410 square miles of territory. It is about 
150 miles wide and 400 miles long, stretching in latitude from Maine to 
North Carolina. It embraces wide variety of climate. It is tempered 
on the north by the great inland, saltless, tideless sea, which keeps the 
thermometer from either extreme. Being a table land, from 600 to 1,600 
feet above the level of the sea, one is prepared to find on the health 
maps, prepared by the general government, an almost clean and perfect 
record. In freedom from fever and malarial diseases and consumptions, 
the three deadly enemies of the American Saxon, Illinois, as a State, 
stands without a superior. She furnishes one of the essential conditions 
of a great people — sound bodies. I suspect that this fact lies back of 
that old Delaware word, Illini, superior men. 

The great battles of history that have been determinative of dynas- 
ties and destinies have been strategical battles, chiefly the question of 
position. Thermopylae has been the war-cry of freemen for twenty-four 
centuries. It only tells how much there may be in position. All this 
advantage belongs to Illinois. It is in the heart of the greatest valley in 
the world, the vast region between the mountains — a valley that could 



24 HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

feed mankind for one thousand years. It is well on toward the center of 
the continent. It is in the great temperate belt, in which have been 
found nearly all the aggressive civilizations of history. It has sixty-five 
miles of frontage on the head of the lake. With the Mississippi forming 
the western and southern boundary, with the Ohio running along the 
southeastern line, with the Illinois River and Canal dividing the State 
diagonally from the lake to the Lower Mississippi, and with the Rock and 
Wabasli Rivers furnishing altogether 2,000 miles of water-front, con- 
necting with, and running through, in all about 12,000 miles of navi- 
gable Avater. 

But this is not all. These waters are made most available by the 
fact that the lake and the State lie on the ridge running into the great 
valley from the east. Within cannon-shot of the lake the water runs 
away from the lake to the Gulf. The lake now empties at both ends, 
one into the Atlantic and one into the Gulf of Mexico. The lake thus 
seems to hang over the land. This makes the dockage most serviceable ; 
there are no steep banks to damage it. Both lake and river are made 
for use. 

The climate varies from Portland to Richmond ; it favors every pro- 
duct of the continent, including the tropics, with less than half a dozen 
exceptions. It produces every great nutriment of the Avorld except ban- 
anas and rice. It is hardly too much to say that it is the most productive 
spot known to civilization. With the soil full of bread and the earth full 
of minerals ; with an upper surface of food and an under layer of fuel ; 
with perfect natural drainage, and abundant springs and streams and 
navigable rivers ; half way between the forests of the North and the fruits 
of the South ; within a day's ride of the great deposits of iron, coal, cop- 
per, lead, and zinc ; containing and controlling the great grain, cattle, 
pork, and lumber markets of the world, it is not strange that Illinois has 
the advantage of position. 

This advantage has been supplemented by the character of the popu- 
lation. In the early days when Illinois was first admitted to the Union, 
her population were chiefl}'- from Kentucky and Virginia. But, in the 
conflict of ideas concerning slavery, a strong tide of emigration came in 
from the East, and soon changed this composition. In 1870 her non- 
native population were from colder soils. New York furnished 133,290 ; 
Ohio gave 162,623; Pennsylvania sent on 98,352; the entire South gave 
us only 206,734. In all her cities, and in all her German and Scandina- 
vian and other foreign colonies, Illinois has only about one-fifth of lier 
people of foreign birth. 



HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 25 



PROGRESS OF DEVELOPMENT. 

One of the greatest elements in the early development of Illinois is 
the Illinois and Michigan Canal, connecting the Illinois and Mississippi 
Rivers with the lakes. It was of the utmost importance to the State. 
It was recommended b}'- Gov. Bond, the first governor, in his first message. 
In 1821, the Legislature appropriated $10,000 for surveying the route. 
Two bright young engineers surveyed it, and estimated the cost at 
1600,000 or $700,000. It finally cost 18,000,000. In 1825, a law was 
passed to incorporate the Canal Company, but no stock was sold. In 
1826, upon the solicitation of Cook, Congress gave 800,000 acres of land 
on the line of the work. In 1828, another law — commissioners appointed, 
and work commenced with new survey and new estimates. In 1834—35, 
George Farquhar made an able report on the whole matter. This was, 
doubtless, the ablest report ever made to a western legislature, and it 
became the model for subsequent reports and action. From this the 
work went on till it was finished in 1848. It cost the State a large 
amount of money ; but it gave to the industries of the State an impetus 
that pushed it up into the first rank of greatness. It was not built as a 
speculation any more than a doctor is employed on a speculation. But 
it has paid into the Treasury of the State an average annual net sum of 
over 1111,000. 

Pending the construction of the canal, the land- and town-lot fever 
broke out in the State, in 1834-35. It took on the malignant type in 
Chicago, lifting the town up into a city. The disease spread over the 
entire State and adjoining States. It was ei^idemic. It cut up men's 
farms without regard to locality, and cut up the purses of the purchasers 
without regard to consequences. It is estimated that building lots enough 
were sold in Indiana alone to accommodate every citizen then in the 
United States. 

Towns and cities were exported to the Eastern market by the ship- 
load. There was no lack of buyers. Every up-ship came freighted with 
speculators and" their money. 

This distemper seized upon the Legislature in 1836-37, and left not 
one to tell the tale. They enacted a system of internal improvement 
without a parallel in the grandeur of its conception. They ordered the 
construction of 1,300 miles of railroad, crossing the State in all direc- 
tions. This was surpassed by the river and canal improvements. 
There were a few counties not touched by either railroad or river or 
canal, and those were to be comforted and compensated by the free dis- 
tribution of 1200,000 among them. To inflate this balloon beyond cre- 
dence it was ordered that work should be commenced on both ends of 



26 HISTORY OP THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

each of these railroads and rivers, and at each river-crossing, all at the 
same time. The api^ropriations for these vast improvements were over 
112,000,000, and commissioners were appointed to borrow the money on 
the credit of the State. Remember- that all this was in the early days of 
railroading, Avhen railroads were luxuries ; that the State had whole 
counties with scarcely a cabin ; and that the population of the State was 
less than 400,000, and you can form some idea of the vigor with which 
these brave men undertook the work of making a great State. In the 
light of history I am compelled to say that this was only a premature 
throb of the power that actually slumbered in the soil of the State. It 
was Hercules in the cradle. 

At this juncture the State Bank loaned its funds largely to Godfrey 
Oilman & Co., and to other leading houses, for the purpose of drawing 
trade from St. Louis to Alton. Soon they failed, and took down the 
bank with them. 

In 1840, all hope seemed gone. A population of 480,000 were loaded 
with a debt of $14,000,000. It had only six small cities, really only 
towns, namely : Chicago, Alton, Springfield, Quincy, Galena, Nauvoo. 
This debt was to be cared for when there was not a dollar in the treas- 
ury, and when the State had borrowed itself out of all credit, and when 
there was not good money enough in the hands of all the people to pay 
the interest of the debt for a single year. Yet, in the presence of all 
these difficulties, the young State steadily refused to repudiate. Gov. 
Ford took hold of the problem and solved it, bringing the State through 
in triumph. 

Having touched lightly upon some of the more distinctive points in 
the history of the development of Illinois, let us next briefly consider the 

MATERIAL RESOURCES OF THE STATE. 

It is a garden four hundred miles long and one hundred and fifty 
miles wide. Its soil is chiefly a black sandy loam, from six inches to 
sixty feet thick. On the American bottoms it has been cultivated for 
one hundred and fifty years without renewal. About the old French 
towns it has yielded corn for a century and a half without rest or help. 
It produces nearly everything green in the temperate and tropical zones. 
She leads all other States in the number of acres actually under plow. 
Her products from 25,000,000 of acres are incalculable. Her mineral 
wealth is scarcely second to her agricultural power. She has coal, iron, 
lead, copper, zinc, many varieties of building stone, fire clay, cuma clay, 
common brick clay, sand of all kinds, gravel, mineral paint — every thing 
needed for a high civilization. Left to herself, she has the elements of 
all greatness. The single item of coal is too vast for an appreciative 



HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 27 

handling in figures. We can handle it in general terms like algebraical 
signs, but long before we get up into the millions and billions the human 
mind drops down from comprehension to mere symbolic apprehension. 

When I tell you that nearly four-fifths of the entire State is under- 
laid with a deposit of coal more than forty feet thick on the average (now 
estimated, by recent surveys, at seventy feet thick), you can get some 
idea of its amount, as you do of the amount of the national debt. There 
it is ! 41,000 square miles — one vast mine into which you could put 
any of the States ; in which you could bury scores of European and 
ancient empires, and have room enough all round to work without know- 
ing that they had been sepulchered there. 

Put this vast coal-bed down by the other great coal deposits of the 
world, and its importance becomes manifest. Great Britain has 12,000 
square miles of coal; Spain, 3,000; France, 1,719 ; Belgium, 578 ; Illinois 
about twice as many square miles as all combined. Virginia has 20,000 
square miles; Pennsylvania, 16,000; Ohio, 12,000. Illinois has 41,000 
square miles. One-seventh of all the known coal on this continent is in 
Illinois. 

Could we sell the coal in this single State for one-seventh of one cent 
a ton it would pay the national debt. Converted into power, even with 
the wastage in our common engines, it would do more work than could 
be done by the entire race, beginning at Adam's wedding and working 
ten hours a day through all the centuries till the present time, and right 
on into the future at the same rate for the next 600,000 years. 

Great Britain uses enough mechanical power to-day to give to each 
•man, woman, and child in the kingdom the help and service of nineteen 
untiring servants. No wonder she has leisure and luxuries. No wonder 
the home of the common artisan has in it more luxuries than could be 
found in the palace of good old King Arthur. Think, if you can conceive 
of it, of the vast army of servants that slumber in the soil of Illinois, 
impatiently awaiting the call of Genius to come forth to minister to our 
comfort. 

At the present rate of consumption England's coal supply will be 
exhausted in 250years. When this is gone she must transfer her dominion 
either to the Indies, or to British America, which I would not resist ; or 
to som^-«ther people, which I would regret as a loss to civilization. 

COAL IS KING. 

At the same rate of consumption (which far exceeds our own) the 
deposit of coal in Illinois will last 120,000 years. And her kingdom shall 
be an everlasting kingdom. 

Let us turn now from this reserve power to the annual products of 



28 HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

the State. We shall not be humiliated in this field. Here we strike the 
secret of our national credit. Nature provides a market in the constant 
appetite of the race. Men must eat, and if we can furnish the provisions 
we can command the treasure. All that a man hath will he give for his 
life. 

According to the last census Illinois produced 30,000,000 of bushels 
of wheat. That is more wheat than was raised by any other State in the 
Union. She raised last year 130,000,000 of bushels of corn — twice as 
much as any other State, and one-sixth of all the corn raised in the United 
States. She harvested 2,747,000 tons of hay, nearly one-tenth of all the 
hay in the Republic. It is not generally appreciated, but it is true, that 
the ha}^ crop of the country is worth more than the cotton crop. The 
hay of Illinois equals the cotton of Louisiana. Go to Charleston, S. C, 
and see them peddling handfuls of hay or grass, almost as a curiosity, 
as we regard Chinese gods or the cryolite of Greenland ; drink your 
coffee and condensed milk ; and walk back from the coast for man}^ a 
league through the sand and burs till you get up into the better atmos- 
phere of the mountains, without seeing a waving meadow or a grazing 
herd ; then you will begin to appreciate the meadows of the Prairie State, 
where the grass often grows sixteen feet high. 

The value of her farm implements is |211, 000,000, and the value of 
her live stock is only second to the great State of New York. Last year 
she had 25,000,000 hogs, and packed 2,113,845, about one-half of all that 
were packed in the United States. This is no insignificant item. Pork 
is a growing demand of the old world. Since the laborers of Europe 
have gotten a taste of our bacon, and we have learned how to pack it dry 
in boxes, like dry goods, the world has become the market. 

The hog is on the march into the future. His nose is ordained to 
uncover the secrets of dominion, and his feet shall be guided by the star 
of empire. 

Illinois marketed $57,000,000 worth of slaughtered animals — more 
than any other State, and a seventh of all the States. 

Be patient with me, and pardon my pride, and I will give you a list 
of some of the things in which Illinois excels all other States. 

Depth and richness of soil ; per cent, of good ground ; acres of 
improved land ; large farms — some farms contain from 40,000 to 60,000 
acres of cultivated land, 40,000 acres of corn on a single farm ; number of 
farmers ; amount of wheat, corn, oats and honey produced ; value of ani- 
mals for slaughter ; number of hogs ; amount of pork ; number of horses 
— three times as many as Kentucky, the horse State. 

Illinois excels all other States in miles of railroads and in miles of 
postal service, and in money orders sold per annum, and in the amount of 
lumber sold in her markets. 



HISTORY OP THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 29 

Illinois is only second in many important matters. This sample list 
comprises a few of the more important : Permanent school fund (good 
for a young state) ; total income for educational purposes ; number of pub- 
lishers of books, maps, papers, etc.; value of farm products and imple- 
ments, and of live stock ; in tons of coal mined. 

The shipping of Illinois is only second to New York. Out of one 
port during the business hours of the season of navigation she sends forth 
a vessel every ten minutes. This does not include canal boats, which go 
one every five minutes. No wonder she is only second in number of 
bankers and brokers or in physicians and surgeons. 

She is third in colleges, teachers and schools ; cattle, lead, hay, 
flax, sorghum and beeswax. 

She is fourth in population, in children enrolled in public schools, in 
law schools, in butter, potatoes and carriages. 

She is fifth in value of real and personal property, in theological 
seminaries and colleges exclusively for women, in milk sold, and in boots 
and shoes manufactured, and in book-binding. 

She is only seventh in the production of wood, while she is the 
twelfth in area. Surely that is well done for the Prairie State. She now 
has much more wood and growing timber than she had thirty years ago. 

A few leading industries will justify emphasis. She manufactures 
$205,000,000 worth of goods, which places her well up toward New York 
and Pennsylvania. The number of her manufacturing establishments 
increased from 1860 to 1870, 300 per cent.; capital employed increased 350 
per cent., and the amount of product increased 400 per cent. She issued 
5,500,000 copies of commercial and financial newspapers — only second to 
New York. She has 6,759 miles cff railroad, thus leading all other States, 
worth $636,458,000, using 3,245 engines, and 67,712 cars, making a train 
long enough to cover one-tenth of the entire roads of the State. Her 
stations are only five* miles apart. She carried last ^'ear 15,795,000 passen- 
gers, an average of 36^ miles, or equal to taking hei entire population twice 
across the State. More than two-thirds of her land is within five miles of 
a railroad, and less than two per cent, is more than fifteen miles away. 

The State has a large financial interest in the Illinois Central railroad. 
The road was incorporated in 1850, and the State gave each alternate sec- 
tion fo]:^six miles on each side, and doubled the price of the remaining 
land, so keeping herself good. The road received 2,595,000 acres of land, 
and pays to the State one-seventh of the gross receipts. The State 
receives this year $350,000, and has received in all about 17,000,000. It 
is practically the people's road, and it has a most able and gentlemanly 
management. Add to this the annual receipts from the canal, $111,000, 
and a large per cent, of the State tax is provided for. 



30 HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 



THE RELIGION AND MORALS 



of the State keep step with her productions and growth. She was born 
of the missionary spirit. It was a minister who secured for her the ordi- 
nance of 1787, by which she has been saved from slavery, ignorance, and 
dishonesty. Rev. Mr. Wiley, pastor of a Scotch congregation in Randolph 
County, petitioned the Constitutional Convention of 1818 to recognize 
Jesus Christ as king, and the Scriptures as the only necessary guide and 
book of law. The convention did not act in the case, and the old Cove- 
nanters refused to accept citizenship. They never voted until 1824, when 
the slavery question was submitted to the people; then they all voted 
against it and cast the determining votes. Conscience has predominated 
whenever a great moral question has been submitted to the people. 

But little mob violence has ever been felt in the State. In 1817 
regulators disposed of a band of horse-thieves that infested the territory. 
The Mormon indignities finally awoke the same spirit. Alton was also 
the scene of a pro-slavery mob, in which Lovejoy was added to the list of 
martyrs. The moral sense of the people makes the law supreme, and gives 
to the State unruffled peace. 

With $22,300,000 in church property, and 4,298 church organizations, 
the State has that divine police, the sleepless patrol of moral ideas, that 
alone is able to secure perfect safety. Conscience takes the knife from 
the assassin's hand and the bludgeon from the grasp of the highwayman. 
We sleep in safety, not because we are behind bolts and bars — these only 
fence against the innocent ; not because a lone officer drowses on a distant 
corner of a street; not because a sheriff may call his posse from a remote 
part of the county ; but because conscience guards the very portals of the 
air and stirs in the deepest recesses of the public mind. This spirit issues 
within the State 9,500,000 copies of religious papers annually, and receives 
still more from witho'.i. Thus the crime of the State is only one-fourth 
that of New York and one-half that of Pennsylvania. 

Illinois never had but one duel between her own citizens. In Belle- 
ville, in 1820, Alphonso Stewart and William Bennett arranged to vindi- 
cate injured honor. The seconds agreed to make it a sham, and make 
them shoot blanks. Stewart was in the secret. Bennett mistrusted some- 
thing, and, unobserved, slipped a bullet into his gun and killed Stewart. 
He then fled the State. After two years he was caught, tried, convicted, 
and, in spite of friends and political aid, was hung. This fixed the code 
of honor on a Christian basis, and terminated its use in Illinois. 

The early preachers were ignorant men, who were accounted eloquent 
according to the strength of their voices. But they set the style for all 
public speakers. Lawyers and political speakers followed this rule. Gov. 



HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 31 

Ford says: "Nevertheless, these first preachers were of incalculable 
benefit to the country. They inculcated justice and morality. To them 
are we indebted for the first Christian character of the Protestant portion 
of the people." 

In education Illinois surpasses her material resources. The ordinance 
of 1787 consecrated one thirty -sixth of her soil to common schools, and 
the law of 1818, the first law that went upon her statutes, gave three per 
cent, of all the rest to 

EDUCATION INSTEAD OF HIGHWAYS. 

The old compact secures this interest forever, and by its yoking 
morality and intelligence it precludes the legal interference with the Bible 
in the public schools. With such a start it is natural that we should have 
11,050 schools, and that our illiteracy should be less than New York or 
Pennsylvania, and only about one-half of Massachusetts. We are not to 
blame for not having more than one-half as many idiots as the great 
States. These public schools soon made colleges inevitable. The first 
college, still flourishing, was started in Lebanon in 1828, by the M. E. 
church, and named after Bishop McKendree. Illinois College, at Jackson- 
ville, supported by the Presbyterians, followed in 1830. In 1832 the Bap- 
tists built Shurtleff College, at Alton. Then the Presbyterians built Knox 
College, at Galesburg, in 1838, and the Episcopalians built Jubilee College, 
at Peoria, in 1847. After these early years colleges have rained down. 
A settler could hardly encamp on the prairie but a college would spring 
up by his wagon. The State now has one very well endowed and equipped 
university, namely, the Northwestern University, at Evanston, with six 
colleges, ninety instructors, over 1,000 students, and $1,500,000 endow- 
ment. 

Rev. J. M. Peck was the first educated Protestant minister m tne 
State. He settled at Rock Spring, in St. Clair County, 1820, and left his 
impress on the State. Before 1837 only party papers were published, but 
Mr. Peck published a Gazetteer of Illinois. Soon after John Russell, of 
Bluffdale, published essays and tales showing genius. Judge James Hall 
published The IlUnois Monthly Magazine with great ability, and an annual 
called The Western Souvenir, which gave him an enviable fame all over the 
United States. From these beginnings Ilhnois has gone on till she has 
more vtJTumes in public libaaries even than Massachusetts, and of the 
44,500,000 volumes in all the public libraries of the United States, she 
has one-thirteenth. In newspapers she stands fourth. Her increase is 
marvelous. In 1850 she issued 5,000,000 copies; in 1860, 27,590,000 ; in 
1870, 113,140,000. In 1860 she had eighteen colleges and seminaries ; iu 
1870 she had eighty. That is a grand advance for the war decade. 

This brings us to a record unsurpassed in the history of any age, 



HISTORY OP THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 



THE WAR RECORD OF ILLINOIS. 

I hardly know where to begin, or how to advance, or what to say. I 
can at best give you only a broken synopsis of her deeds, and you must 
put them in the order of glory for yourself. Her sons have always been 
foremost on fields of danger. In 1832-33, at the call of Gov. Reynolds, 
her sons drove Blackhawk over the Mississippi. 

When the Mexican war came, in May, 1846, 8,370 men offered them- 
selves when only 8,720 could be accepted. The fields of Buena Vista and 
Vera Cruz, and the storming of Cerro Gordo, will carry the glory of Illinois 
soldiers along after the infamy of the cause they served has been forgotten. 
But it was reserved till our day for her sons to find a field and cause and. 
foemen that could fitly illustrate their spirit and heroism. Illinois put 
into her own regiments for the United States government 256,000 men, 
and into the army through other States enough to swell the number to 
290,000. This far exceeds all the soldiers of' the federal government in 
all the war of the revolution. Her total years of service were over 600,000. 
She enrolled men from eighteen to forty-five years of age when the law 
of Congress in 1864 — the test time — only asked for those from twenty to 
forty-five. Her enrollment was otherwise excessive. Her people wanted 
to go, and did not take the pains to correct the enrollment. Thus the 
basis of fixing the quota was too great, and then the quota itself, at least 
in the trying time, was far above any other State. 

Thus the demand on some counties, as Monroe, for example, took every 
able-bodied man in the county, and then did not have enough to fill the 
quota. Moreover, Illinois sent 20,844 men for ninety or one hundred days, 
for whom no credit was asked. When Mr. Lincoln's attention was called 
to the inequality of the quota compared with other States, he replied, 
" The country needs the sacrifice. We must put the whip on the free 
horse."" In .spite of all these disadvantages Illinois gave to the countiy 
73,000 years of service above all calls. With one-thirteenth of the popu- 
lation of the loyal States, she sent* regularly one-tenth of all the soldiers, 
and in the peril of the closing calls, when patriots were few and weary, 
she then sent one-eighth of all that were called for by her loved and hon- 
ored son in the white house. Her mothers and daughters went into the 
fields to raise the grain and keep the children together, while the fathers 
and older sons went to the harvest fields of the world. I knew a father 
and four sons who agreed that one of them must stay at home ; and they 
pulled straws from a stack to see who might go. The father was left. 
The next day he came into the camp, saying : " Mother says she can get 
the crops in, and I am going, too." I know large Methodist churches 
from which every male member went to the army. Do you want to know 



HISTORY OF THE STATE OP ILLINOIS. 33 

■what these heroes from Illinois did in the field ? Ask any soldier with a 
good record of his own, who is thus able to judge, and he will tell you 
that the Illinois men went in to win. It is common history that the greater 
victories were won in the West. When everything else looked dark Illi- 
nois was gaining victories all down the river, and dividing the confederacy. 
Sherman took with him on his great march forty-!ive regiments of Illinois 
infantry, three companies of artillery, and one company of cavalry. He 
could not avoid 

GOING TO THE SEA. 

If he had been killed, I doubt not the men would have gone right on. 
Lincoln answered all rumors of Sherman's defeat with, " It is impossible ; 
there is a mighty sight of fight in 100,000 Western men." Illinois soldiers 
brought home 300 battle-flags. The first United States flag that floated 
over Richmond was an Illinois flag. She sent messengers and nurses to 
every field and hospital, to care for her sick and wounded sons. She said, 
'• These suffering ones are my sons, and I will care for them." 

When individuals had given all, then cities and towns came forward 
with their credit to the extent of many millions, to aid these men and 
their families. 

Illinois gave the country the great general of the war — Ulysses S. 
Grant — since honored with two terms of the Presidency of the United 
States. 

One other name from Illinois comes up in all minds, embalmed in all 
hearts, that must have the supreme place in this story of our glory and 
of our nation's honor ; that name is Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois. 

Tlie analysis of Mr. Lincoln's character is difficult on account of its 
symmetry. 

In this age we look with admiration at his uncompromising honesty. 
And well we may, for this saved us. Thousands throughout the length 
and breadth of our country who knew him only as " Honest Old Abe," 
voted for him on that account ; and wisely did they choose, for no other 
man could have carried us through the fearful night of the war. When 
his plans were too vast for our comprehension, and his faith in the cause 
too sublime for our participation ; when it was all night about us, and all 
dread before us, and all sad and desolate behind us; when not one ray 
shone uptfn our cause ; when traitors were haughty and exultant at the 
South, and fierce and blasphemous at the North ; when the loyal men here 
seemed almost in the minority ; when the stoutest heart quailed, the bravest 
cheek paled ; when generals were defeating each other for place, and 
contractors were leeching out the very heart's blood of the prostrate 
republic : when every thing else had failed us, Ave looked at this calm, 
patient man standing like a rock in the storm, and said : " Mr. Lincoln 



34 HISTORY OF THE STATE OP ILLESTGIS. 

is honest, and we can trust him still." Holding to this single point with 
the energy of faith and despair we held together, and, under God, he 
brought us through to victory. 

His practical wisdom made him the wonder of all lands. With such 
certainty did Mr. Lincoln follow causes to their ultimate effects, that his 
foresight of contingencies seemed almost prophetic. 

He is radiant with all the great virtues, and his memory shall shed a 
glory upon this age that shall fill the eyes of men as they look into his- 
tory. Other men have excelled him in some point, but, taken at all 
points, all in all, he stands head and shoulders above every other man of 
6,000 years. An administrator, he saved the nation in the peiils of 
unparalleled civil war. A statesman, he justified his measures by their 
success. A philanthropist, he gave liberty to one race and salvation to 
another. A moralist, he bowed from the summit of human power to the 
foot of the Cross, azid became a Christian. A mediator, he exercised mercy 
under the most absolute abeyance to law. A leader, he was no partisan. 
A commander, he was untainted with blood. A ruler in desperate times, 
he was unsullied with crime. A man, he has left no word of passion, no 
thought of malice, no trick of craft, no act of jealousy, no purpose of 
selfish ambition. Thus perfected, without a model, and without a peer, 
he was dropped into these troubled years to adorn and embellish all that 
is good and all that is great in our humanity, and to present to all coming 
time the representative of the divine idea of free government. 

It is not too much to say that away down in the future, when the 
republic has fallen from its niche in the wall of time ; when the great 
war itself shall have faded out in the distance like a mist pn the horizon ; 
when the Anglo-Saxon language shall be spoken only by the tongue of 
the stranger ; then the generations looking this way shall see the great 
president as the supreme figure in this vortex of history 

CHICAGO. 

It is impossible in our brief space to give more than a meager sketch 
of such a city as Chicago, which is in itself the greatest marvel of the 
Prairie State. This mysterious, majestic, mighty city, born first of water, 
and next of fire ; sown in weakness, and raised in power ; planted among 
the willows of the marsh, and crowned with the glory of the mountains ; 
sleeping on the bosom of the prairie, and rocked on the bosom of the sea ; 
the youngest city of the world, and still the eye of the prairie, as Damas- 
cus, the oldest city of the world, is the eye of the desert. With a com- 
merce far exceeding that of Corinth on her isthmus, in the highway to 
the East; with the defenses of a continent piled around her by the thou- 
sand miles, making her far safer than Rome on the banks of the Tiber ; 



HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 35 

with schools eclipsing Alexandria and Athens ; with liberties moie con- 
spicuous than those of the old repablics ; with a heroism equal to the fii'st 
Ciii-thage, and with a sanctity scarcely second to that of Jerusalem — set 
your thoughts on all thi^, lifted into the eyes of all men by the miracle of 
its growth, illuminated by the flame of its fall, and transfigured by the 
divinity of its resurrection, and you will feel, as I do, the utter impossi- 
bility of compassing this subject as it deserves. Some impression of her 
importance is received from the shock her burning gave to the civilized 
world. 

When the doubt of her calamity was removed, and the horrid fact 
was accepted, there went a shudder over all cities, and a quiver over all 
lands. There was scarcely a town in the civilized world that did not 
shake on the brink of this opening chasm. The flames of our homes red- 
dened all skies. The city was set upon a hill, and could not be hid. All 
eyes were turned upon it. To have struggled and suffered amid the 
scenes of its fall is as distinguishing as to have fought at Thermopylae, or 
Salamis, or Hastings, or Waterloo, or Bunker Hill. 

Its calamity amazed the world, because it was felt to be the common 
property of mankind. 

The early history of the city is full of interest, just as the eavly his- 
torv of such a man as Washington or Lincoln becomes public property, 
and is cherished by every patriot. 

Starting with 560 acres in 1833, it embraced and occupied 23,000 
acres in 1869, and, having now a population of more than 500,000, it com- 
mands general attention. 

The first settler — Jean Baptiste Pointe au Sable, a mulatto from the 
West Indies — came and began trade with the Indians in 1796. John 
Kinzie became his successor in 1804, in which year Fort Dearborn was 
erected. 

A mere trading-post was kept here from that time till about the time 
of the Blackhawk war, in 1832. It was not tJie city. It was merely a 
cock crowing at midnight. The morning was not yet. In 1833 the set- 
tlement about the fort was incorporated as a town. The voters were 
divided on the propriety of such corporation, twelve votiiig for it and one 
against it. Four years later i\ was incorporated as a city, and embraced 
660 acres. 

Th^produce handled in this city is an iiidication of its power. Grain 
and flour were imported from the "East till as late as 1837. The first 
exportation by way of experiment was in 1839. Exports exceeded imports 
first in 1842. The Board of Trade was organized in 1848, but it was so 
weak that it needed nursing till 1855. Grain was purchased by the 
wagon-load in the street. 

I remember sitting with my father on a load of wheat, in the long 



6b HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

line of wao'ons along Lake street, while the buyers came and untied the 
bags, and examined the grain, and made their bids. That manner of 
business had to cease with the day of small things. Now our elevators 
will hold 15,000,000 bushels of grain. The cash value of the produce 
handled in a year is 1215,000,000, and the produce weighs 7,000,000 
tons or 700,000 car loads. This handles thirteen and a half ton each 
minute, all the year round. One tenth of all the wheat in the United 
States is handled in Chicago. Even as long ago as 1853 the receipts of 
grain in Chicago exceeded those of the goodly city of St. Louis, and in 
1854 the exports of grain, from Chicago exceeded those of New York and 
doubled those of St. Petersburg, Archangel, or Odessa, the largest grain. 
markets in Europe. 

The manufacturing interests of the city are not contemptible. In 
1873 manufactories employed 45,000 operatives ; in 1876, 60,000. The 
manufactured product in 1875 was worth $177,000,000. 

No estimate of the size and power of Chicago would be adequate 
that did not put large emphasis on the railroads. Before they came 
thundering along our streets canals were the hope of our country. But 
who ever thinks now of traveling, by canal packets ? In June, 1852, 
there were only forty miles of railroad connected with the city. The 
old Galena division of the Northwestern ran out to Elgin. But now, 
who can count the trains and measure the roads that seek a terminus or 
connection in this city ? The lake stretches away to the north, gathering 
in to this center all the harvests that might otherwise pass to the north 
of us. If you will take a map and look at the adjustment of railroads, 
you will see, first, that Chicago is the great railroad center of the world, 
as New York is the commercial city of this continent ; and, second, that 
the railroad lines form the iron spokes of a great wheel whose hub is 
this city. The lake furnishes the only break in the spokes, and this 
seems simply to have pushed a few spokes together on each shore. See 
the eighteen trunk lines, exclusive of eastern connections. 

Pass round the circle, and view their numbers and extent. There 
is the great Northwestern, with all its branches, one branch creeping 
along the lake shore, and so reaching to the north, into the Lake Superior 
regions, away to the right, and on to the Northern Pacific on the left, 
swinging around Green Bay for iron and copper and silver, twelve months 
in the year, and reaching out for the wealth of the great agricultural 
belt and isothermal line traversed b^ the Northern Pacific. Another 
branch, 'not so far north, feeling for the heart of the Badger State. 
Another pushing lower down the Mississippi — all these make many con- 
nections, and tapping all the vast wheat regions of Minnesota, Wisconsin, 
Iowa, and all the regions this side of sunset. There is that elegant road, 
the Chicago, Burlington & Qaincy, running out a goodly number of 



HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 37 

branches, and reaping the great fields this side of the Missouri River. 
I can only mention the Chicago, Alton & St. Louis, our Illinois Central, 
described elsewhere, and the Chicago & Rock Island. Further around 
we come to the lines connecting us with all the eastern cities. The 
Chicago, Indianapolis & St. Louis, the Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & 
Chicago, the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, and the Michigan Cen- 
tral and Great Western, give us many highways to the seaboard. Thus we 
reach the Mississippi at five points, from St. Paul to Cairo and the Gulf 
itself by two routes. We also reach Cincinnati and Baltimore, and Pitts- 
burgh and Philadelphia, and New York. North and south run the water 
courses of the lakes and the rivers, broken just enough at this point to 
make a pass. Through this, from east to west, run the long lines that 
stretch from ocean to ocean. 

This is the neck of the glass, and the golden sands of commerce 
must pass into our hands. Altogether we have more than 10,000 miles 
of railroad, directly tributary to this city, seeking to unload their wealth 
in our coffers. All these roads have come themselves by the infallible 
instinct of capital. Not a dollar was ever given by the city to secure 
one of them, and only a small per cent, of stock taken originally by her 
citizens, and that taken simply as an investment. Coming in the natural 
order of events, they will not be easily diverted. 

There is still another showing to all this. The connection between 
New York and San Francisco is by the middle route. This passes inevit- 
ably through Chicago. St. Louis wants the Southern Pacific or Kansas 
Pacific, and pushes it out through Denver, and so on up to Chej^enne. 
But before the road is fairly under way, the Chicago roads shove out to 
Kansas City, making even the Kansas Pacific a feeder, and actually leav- 
ing St. Louis out in the cold. It is not too much to expect that Dakota, 
Montana, and Washington Territory will find their great market in Chi- 
cago. 

But these are not all. Perhaps I had better notice here the ten or 
fifteen new roads that have just entered, or are just entering, our city. 
Their names are all, that is necessary to give. Chicago & St. Paul, look- 
ing up the Red River country to the British possessions ; the Chicago, 
Atlantic & Pacific ; the Chicago, Decatur & State Line ; the Baltimore & 
Ohio; the Chicago, Danville & Vincennes; the Chicago & LaSalle Rail- 
road ; the Chicago, Pittsburgh & Cincinnati ; the Chicago and Canada 
Southern ; the Chicago and Illinois River Railroad. These, with their 
connections, and with the new connections of the old roads, already in 
process of erection, give to Chicago not less than 10,000 miles of new 
tributaries from the richest land on the continent. Thus there Avill be 
added to the reserve power, to the capital within reach of this city, not 
less than $1,000,000,000. 



€58 HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

Add to all this transporting power the ships that sail one every nine 
minutes of the business hours of the season of navigation ; add, also, the 
canal boats that leave one every five minutes during the same time — and 
you will see something of the business of the city. 

THE COMMERCE OF THIS CITY 

has been leaping along to keep pace with the growth of the country 
around us. In 1852, our commerce reached the hopeful sum of 
#20,000,000. In 1870 it reached 1400,000,000. In 1871 it was pushed 
up above 1150,000,000. And in 187dit touched nearly double that. 

One-half of our imported goods come directly to Chicago. Grain 
enough is exported directly from our docks to the old world to employ a 
semi-weekly line of steamers of 3,000 tons capacity. This branch is 
not likely to be greatly developed. Even after the great Welland Canal 
is completed we shall have only fourteen feet of water. The great ocean 
vessels will continue to control the trade. 

The banking capital of Chicago is $24,431,000. Total exchange in 
1875, 1659,000,000. Her wholesale business in 1875 was 1294,000,000. 
The rate of taxes is less than in any other great city. 

The schools of Chicago are unsurpassed in America. Out of a popu- 
lation of 800,000 there were only 186 persons between the ages of six 
and twent3r-one unable to read. This is the best known record. 

In 1831 the mail system was condensed into a half-breed, who went 
on foot to Niles, Mich., once in two weeks, and brought back what papers 
and news he could find. As late as 1846 there was often only one mail 
a week. A post-ofi&ce was established in Chicago in 1833, and the post- 
master nailed up old boot-legs on one side of his shop to serve as boxes 
for the nabobs and-literary men. 

It is an interesting fact in the growth of the young city that in the 
active life of the business men of that day the mail matter has grown to 
a daily average of over 6,500 pounds. It speaks equally well for the 
intelligence of the people and the commercial importance of the place, 
that the mail matter distributed to the territory immediately tributai-y to 
Chicago is seven times greater than that distributed to the territory 
immediately tributary to St. Louis. 

The improvements that have characterized the city are as startling 
as the city itself. In 1831, Mark Beaubien established a ferry over the 
river, and put himself under bonds to carry all the citizens free for the 
privilege of charging strangers. Now there are twenty-four large bridges 
and two tunnels. 

In 1833 the government expended $30,000 on the harbor. Then 
commenced that series of manoeuvers with the river that has made it one 



HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 39 

of the world's curiosities. It used to wind around in the lower end of 
the town, and make its way rippling over the sand into the lake at the 
foot of Madison street. They took it up and put it down where it now 
is. It was a narrow stream, so narrow that even moderately small crafts 
had to go up through the willows and cat's tails to the point near Lake 
street bridge, and back up one of the branches to get room enough in 
which to turn around. 

In 1844 the quagmires in the streets were first pontooned by plank 
roads, which acted in wet weather as public squirt-guns. Keeping you 
out of the mud, they compromised by squirting the mud over you. The 
wooden-block pavements came to Chicago in 1857. In 1840 water was 
delivered by peddlers in carts or by hand. Then a twenty-five horse- 
power engine pushed it through hollow or bored logs along the streets 
till 1854, when it was introduced into the houses by new works. The 
first fire-engine was used in 1835, and the first steam fire-engine in 1859. 
Gas was utilized for lighting the city in 1850. The Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association was organized in 1858, and horse railroads carried them 
to their work in 1859. The museum was opened in 1863. The alarm 
telegraph adopted in 1864. The opera-house built in 1865. The city 
grew from 560 acres in 1833 to 23,000 in 1869. In 1834, the taxes 
amounted to $48.90, and the trustees of the town borrowed $60 more for 
opening and improving streets. In 1835, the legislature authorized a loan 
of •$ 2,000, and the treasurer and street commissioners resigned rather than 
plunge the town into such a gulf. 

Now the city embraces 36 square miles of territory, and has 30 miles 
of water front, besides the outside harbor of refuge, of 400 acres, inclosed 
by a crib sea-wall. One-third of the city has been raised up an average 
of eight feet, giving good pitch to the 263 miles of sewerage. The water 
of the city is above all competition. It is received through two tunnels 
extending to a crib in the lake two miles from shore. The closest analy- 
sis fails to detect any impurities, and, received 35 feet below the surface, 
it is always clear and cold. The first tunnel is five feet two inches in 
diameter and two milfes long, and can deliver 50,000,000 of gallons per 
day. The second tunnel is seven feet in diameter and six miles long, 
running four miles under the city, and can deliver 100,000,000 of gal- 
lons per day. This water is distributed through 410 miles of water- 
mains. 

The three grand engineering exploits of the city are : First, lifting 
the city up on jack-screws, whole squares at a time, without interrupting 
the business, thus giving us good drainage ; second, running the tunnels 
under the lake, giving us the best water in the world ; and third, the 
turning the current of the river in its own channel, delivering us from the 
old abominations, and making decency possible. They redound about 



40 HISTORY OF THE STATE OP ILLINOIS. 

equally to the credit of the engineering, to the energy of the people, and 
to the health of the city. 

That which really constitutes the city, its indescribable spirit, its soul, 
the way it lights up in every feature in the hour of action, has not been 
touched. In meeting strangers, one is often surprised how some homely 
women marry so well. Their forms are bad, their gait uneven and awk- 
ward, their complexion is dull, their features are misshapen and mismatch- 
ed, and when we see them there is no beauty that we should desire them. 
But when once they are aroused on some subject, they put on new pro- 
portions. They light up into great power. The real person comes out 
from its unseemly ambush, and captures us at will. They have power. 
They have ability to cause things to come to pass. We no longer wonder 
why they are in such high demand. So it is with our city. 

There is no grand scenery except the two seas, one of water, the 
other of prairie. Nevertheless, there is a spirit about it, a push, a breadth, 
a power, that soon makes it a place never to be forsaken. One soon 
ceases to believe in impossibilities. Balaams are the only prophets that are 
disappointed. The bottom that has been on the point of falling out has 
been there so long that it has grown fast. It can not fall out. It has all 
the capital of the world itching to get inside the corporation. 

The two great laws that govern the growth and size of cities are, 
first, the amount of territory for which they are the distributing and 
receiving points ; second, the number of medium or moderate dealers that 
do this distributing. Monopolists build up themselves, not the cities. 
They neither eat, wear, nor live in proportion to their business. Both 
these laws help Chicago. 

The tide of trade is eastward — not up or down the map, but across 
the map. The lake runs up a wingdam for 500 miles to gather in the 
business. Commerce can not ferry up there for seven months in the year, 
and the facilities for seven months can do the work for twelve. Then the 
great region west of us is nearly all good, productive land. Dropping 
south into the trail of St. Louis, you fall into vast deserts and rocky dis- 
tricts, useful in holding the world together. St. Louis and Cincinnati, 
instead of rivaling and hurting Chicago, are her greatest sureties of 
dominion. They are far enough away to give sea-room, — farther off than 
Paris is from London,— and yet they are near enough to prevent the 
springing up of any other great city between them. 

St. Louis will be helped by the opening of the Mississippi, but also 
hurt. That will put New Orleans on her feet, and with a railroad running 
over into Texas and so West, she will tap the streams that now crawl up 
the Texas and Missouri road. The current is East, not North, and a sea- 
port at New Orleans can not permanently help St. Louis. 

Chicago is in the field almost alone, to handle the wealth of one- 



HISTORY OP THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 41 

fourth of the territoiy of this great republic. This strip of seacoast 
divides its margins between Portland, Boston, New York, Philadelphia, 
Baltimore and Savannah, or some other great port to be created for the 
South in the next decade. But Chicago has a dozen empires casting their 
treasures into her lap. On a bed of coal that can run all the machinery 
of the world for 500 centuries ; in a garden that can feed the race by the 
thousand years; at the head of the lakes that give her a temperature as a 
summer resort equaled by no great city in the land ; with a climate that 
insures the health of her citizens ; surrounded by all the great deposits 
of natural wealth in mines aud forests and herds, Chicago is the wonder 
of to-day, and will be the city of the future. 

MASSACRE AT FORT DEARBORN. 

During the war of 1812, Fort Dearborn became the theater of stirring 
events. The garrison consisted of fifty-four men under command of 
Captain Nathan Heald, assisted by Lieutenant Helm (son-in-law of Mrs. 
Kinzie) and Ensign Ronan. Dr. Voorhees was surgeon. The only resi- 
dents at the post at that time were the wives of Captain Heald and Lieu- 
tenant Helm, and a few of the soldiers, Mr. Kinzie and his family, and 
a few Canadian voyageurs^ with their wives and children. The soldiers 
and Mr. Kinzie were on most friendly terms with the Pottawattamies 
and Winnebagos, the principal tribes around them, but they could not 
win them from their attachment to the British. 

One evening in April, 1812, Mr. Kinzie sat playing on his violin and 
his children were dancing to the music, when Mrs. Kinzie came rushing 
into the house, pale with terror, and exclaiming : " The Indians ! the 
Indians !"_" What ? Where?" eagerly inquired Mr. Kinzie. "Up 
at Lee's, killing and scalping," answered the frightened mother, who, 
when the alarm was given, was attending Mrs. Barnes (just confined) 
living not far off. Mr. Kinzie and his family crossed the river and took 
refuge in the fort, to which place Mrs. Barnes and her infant not a day 
old were safely conveyed. The rest of the inhabitants took shelter in the 
fort. This alarm w'as caused by a scalping party of Winnebagos, who 
hovered about the fort several days, when they disappeared, and for several 
weeks the inhabitants were undisturbed. 

On the 7th of August, 1812, General Hull, at Detroit, sent orders to 
Captain Heald to evacuate Fort Dearborn, and to distribute all the United 
States property to the Indians in the neighborhood — a most insane order. 
The Pottawattamie chief, who brought the dispatch, had more wisdom 
than the commanding general. He advised Captain Heald not to make 
the distribution. Said he : " Leave the fort and stores as they are, and 
let the Indians make distribution for themselves ; and while they are 
engaged in the business, the white people may escape to Fort Wayne." 



42 HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

■ Captain Heald held a council with the Indians on the afternoon of 
the 12th, in which his officers refused to join, for they had been informed 
that treachery was designed — that the Indians intended to murder the 
white people in the council, and then destroy those in the fort. Captain 
Heald, however, took the precaution to open a port-hole displaying a 
cannon pointing directly upon the council, and by that means saved 
his life. 

Mr. Kinzie, who knew the Indians well, begged Captain Heald not 
to confide in their promises, nor distribute the arms and munitions among 
them, for it would only put power into their hands to destroy the whites. 
Acting upon this advice, Heald resolved to withhold the munitions of 
war ; and on the night of the 13th, after the distribution of the other 
property had been made, the powder, ball and liquors were thrown into 
the river, the muskets broken up and destroyed. 

Black Partridge, a friendly chief, came to Captain Heald, and said: 
" Linden birds have been singing in my ears to-day: be careful on the 
march you are going to take," On that dark night vigilant Indians had 
crept near the fort and discovered the destruction of their promised booty 
going on within. The next morning the powder was seen floating on the 
surface of the river. The savages were exasperated and made loud com- 
plaints and threats. 

On the following day when preparations were making to leave the 
fort, and all the inmates were deeply impressed with a sense of impend- 
ing danger, Capt. Wells, an uncle of Mrs. Heald, was discovered upon 
the Indian trail among the sand-hills on the borders of the lake, nof far 
distant, with a band of mounted Miamis, of whose tribe he was chief, 
having been adopted by the famous Miami warrior. Little Turtle. When 
news of Hull's surrender reached Fort Wayne, he had started with this 
force to assist Heald in defending Port Dearborn. He was too late. 
Every means for its defense had been destroyed the night before, and 
arrangements were made for leaving the fort on the morning of the 15th. 

It was a warm bright morning in the middle of August. Indications 
were positive that the savages intended to murder the white people; and 
when they moved out of the southern gate of the fort, the march was 
like a funeral procession. The band, feeling the solemnity of the occa- 
sion, struck up the Dead March in Saul. 

Capt. Wells, who had blackened his face with gun-powder in token 
of his fate, took the lead with his band of Miamis, followed by Capt. 
Heald, with his wife by his side on horseback. Mr. Kinzie hoped by his 
personal influence to avert the impending blow, and therefore accompanied 
them, leaving his family in a boat in charge of a friendly Indian, to be 
taken to his trading station at the site of Niles, Michigan, in the event of 
his death. 



HISTORY OF THE STATE OP ILLINOIS. 43 

The procession moved slowly along the lake shore till they reached 
the sand-hills between the prairie and the beach, wiien the Pottawattamie 
escort, under the leadership of Blackbird, filed to the right, placing those 
hills between them and the white people. Wells, with his Miamis, had 
kept in the advance. They suddenly came rushing back. Wells exclaim- 
ing, " They are about to attack us; form instantly." These words were 
quickly followed by a storm of bullets, which came whistling over the 
little hills which the treacherous savages had made the covert for their 
murderous attack. The white troops charged upon the Indians, drove 
them back to the prairie, and then the battle was waged between fifty- 
four soldiers, twelve civilians and three or four women (the cowardly 
Miamis having fled at the outset) against five hundred Indian warriors. 
The white people, hopeless, resolved to sell their lives as dearly as possible. 
Ensign Ronan wielded his weapon vigorously, even after falling upon his 
knees weak from the loss of blood. Capt. Wells, who was by the side of 
his niece, Mrs. Heald, when the conflict began, behaved with the greatest 
coolness and courage. He said to her, " We have not the slightest chance 
for life. We must part to meet no more in this world. God bless you." 
And then he dashed forward. Seeing a young warrior, painted like a 
demon, climb into a wagon in which were twelve children, and tomahawk 
them all, he cried out, unmindful of his personal danger, " If that is your 
game, butchering women and children, I will kill too." He spurred his 
horse towards the Indian camp, where they had left their squaws and 
papooses, hotly pursued by swift-footed young warriors, who sent bullets 
whistling after him. One of these killed his horse and wounded him 
severely in the leg. With a yell the young braves rushed to make him 
their prisoner and reserve him for torture. He resolved not to be made 
a captive, and by the use of the most provoking epithets tried to induce 
them to kill him instantly. He called a fiery young chief a squaw, when 
the enraged warrior killed Wells instantly with his tomahawk, jumped 
upon his body, cut out his heart, and ate a portion of the warm morsel 
with savage delight ! 

In this fearful combat women bore a conspicuous part. Mrs. Heald 
was an excellent equestrian and an expert in the use of the rifle. She 
fought the savages bravelj', receiving several severe wounds. Though 
faint from the loss of blood, she managed to keep her saddle. A savage 
raised his tomahawk to kill her, when she looked him full in the face, 
and with a sweet smile and in a gentle voice said, in his own language, 
" Surely you will not kill a squaw ! " The arm of the savage fell, and 
the life of the heroic woman was saved. 

Mrs. Helm, the step-daughter of Mr. Kinzie, had an encounter with 
a stout Indian, who attempted to tomahawk her. Springing to one side, 
she received the glancing blow on her shoulder, and at the same instant 



44 HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

seized the savage round the neck with her arms and endeavored to get 
hokl of his scalping knife, which hung in a sheath at his breast. While 
she was thus struggling she was dragged from her antagonist by another 
powerful Indian, who bore her, iu spite of her struggles, to the margin 
of the lake and plunged her in. To her astonishment she was held by 
him so that she would not drown, and she soon perceived that she was 
in the hands of the friendly Black Partridge, who had saved her life. 

The wife of Sergeant Holt, a large and powerful woman, behaved as 
bravely as an Amazon. She rode a fine, high-spirited horse, which the 
Indians coveted, and several of them attacked her with the butts of their 
guns, for the purpose of dismounting her ; but she used the sword which 
sho had snatched from her disabled husband so skillfully that she foiled 
them ; and, suddenly wheeling her horse, she dashed over the prairie, 
followed by the savages shouting, "• The brave woman ! the brave woman ! 
Don't hurt her ! " They finally overtook her, and while she was fighting 
them in front, a powerful savage came up behind her, seized her by the 
neck and dragged her to the ground. Horse and woman were made 
captives. Mrs. Holt was a long time a captive among the Indians, but 
was afterwards ransomed. 

In this sharp conflict two-thirds of the white people were slain and 
wounded, and all their horses, baggage and provision were lost. Only 
twenty-eight straggling men now remained to fight five hundred Indians 
rendered furious b}^ the sight of blood. They succeeded in breaking 
through the ranks of the murderers and gaining a slight eminence on the 
jDrairie near the Oak Woods. The Indians did not pursue, but gathered 
on their flanks, while the chiefs held a consultation on the sand-hills, and 
showed signs of willingness to parley. It would have been madness on 
the part of the whites to renew the fight; and so Capt. Heald went for- 
ward and met Blackbird on the open prairie, where terms of surrender 
were soon agreed upon. It was arranged that the white people should 
give up their arms to Blackbird, and that the survivors should become 
prisoners of war, to be exchanged for ransoms as soon as practicable. 
With this understanding captives and captors started for the Indian 
camp near the fort, to which Mrs. Helm had been taken bleeding and 
suffering by Black Partridge, and had met her step-father and learned 
that her husband Avas safe. 

A new scene of horror was now opened at the Indian camp. The 
wounded, not being included in the terms of surrender, as it was inter- 
preted by the Indians, and the British general. Proctor, having offered a 
liberal bounty for American scalps, delivered at Maiden, nearly all the 
wounded men were killed and scalped, and the price of the trophies was 
afterwards paid by the British government. 



Abstract of Illinois State Laws. 



BILLS OF EXCHANGE AND PROMISSORY NOTES. 

No promissory note, check, draft, hill of exchange, order, or note, nego- 
tiable instrumeyit payable at sight, or on demand, or on presentment, shall 
be entitled to days of grace. All other bills of exchange, drafts or notes are 
entitled to three days of grace. All the above mentioned paper falling 
due on Sunday, New Years'' Day, the Fourth of July, Christmas, or any 
day appointed or recommended by the President of the United States or 
the G-overnor of the State as a day of fast or thanksgiving, shall be deemed 
as due on the day previous, and should two or more of these days come 
together, then such instrument shall be treated as due on the di'Aj previous 
to the 'first of said days. No defense can be made against a negotiable 
instrument (^assigned before due) in the hands of the assignee without 
notice, except fraud was used in obtaining the same. To hold an indorser, 
due diligence must be used by suit, in collecting of the maker, unless suit 
would have been unavailing. Notes payable to person named or to order, 
in order to absolutely transfer title, must be indorsed by the payee. Notes 
payable to beg^rer may be transferred by delivery, and when so payable 
every indorser thereon is held as a guarantor of payment unless otherwise 
expressed. 

In computing interest or discount on negotiable instruments, a month 
shall be considered a calendar month or tioelfth of a year, and for less 
than a month, a day shall be figured a thirtieth part of a month. Notes 
only bear interest when so expressed, but after due they draw the legal 
interest, even if not stated. 

INTEREST. 

The legal rate of interest is six per cent. Parties may agree in writ- 
ing on a rate not exceeding ten per cent. If a rate of interest greater 
than ten per cent, is contracted for, it works a forfeiture of the whole of 
said interest, and only the principal can be recovered. 

DESCENT. 

When 710 will is made, the property of a deceased person is distrib- 
uted as follows : 

^ 45 



46 ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 

First. To his or her children and their descendants in equal parts ; 
the descendants of the deceased child or grandchild, taking the share of 
their deceased parents in equal parts among them. 

Second. When there is wo child of the intestate, nor descendant of 
such child, and no widow or surviving husband, then to the parents, broth- 
ers or sisters of tlie deceased, and their descendants, in equal parts among 
them, allowing to each of the parents, if living, a child's pari, or to the 
survivor of them if one be dead, a double portion; and if there is no 
parent living, then to the brothers and sisters of the intestate, and their 
descendants. 

Third, When there is a widoiv or surviving husband, and 7io child or 
children, or descendants of a child or children of the intestate, then 
(after the payment of all just debts) one-half of the real estate and the 
whole of the personal estate shall descend to such widow or surviving hus- 
band as an absolute estate forever. 

Fourth. When there is a ividow or surviving husband, and also a child 
or children, or descendants of such child or children of the intestate, the 
widow or surviving husband shall receive as his or her absolute personal 
estate, one-third of all the personal estate of the intestate. 

Fifth. If there is no child of the intestate, or descendant of such 
child, and no parent, brother or sister, or descendant of such parent, 
brother or sister, and no widow or surviving husband, then such estate 
shall descend in equal parts to the next of kin to the intestate, in equal 
degree (computing by the rules of the civil law), and there shall be no 
representation among collaterals, except with the descendants of broth- 
ers and sisters of the intestate ; and in no case shall there be any distinc- 
tion between the kindred of the whole and the half blood. 

Sixth. If any intestate leaves a tvidow or surviving husband and no 
kindred, his or her estate shall descend to such tvidow or surviving husband. 

WILLS AND ESTATES OF DECEASED PERSONS. 

No exact form of words are necessary in order to make a will good at 
law. Every male person of the age of twenty-one years, and qy ex j female 
of the age of eighteen years, of sound mind and memory, can make a valid 
will ; it must be in writing, signed by the testator or by some one in his 
or her presence and by his or her direction, and attested by two or more 
credible witnesses. Care should be taken that the witnesses are not inter- 
ested in the will. Persons knowing themselves to have been named in the 
will or appointed executor, must within thirty days of the death of 
deceased cause the will to be proved and recorded in the proper county, 
or present it, and refuse to accept ; on failure to do so are liable to forfeit 
the sum of twenty dollars per month. Inventory to be made by executor 
or administrator within three months from date of letters testamentary or 



ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 47 

of adniinistration. Executors' and administrators' com.pensation not to 
exceed six per cent, on amount of personal estate, and three per cent, 
on money realized from real estate, with such additional allowance a? 
shall be reasonable for extra services. Appraisers'' compensation 12 pet 
day. 

Notice requiring all claims to be presented against the estate shall b^ 
given by the executor or administrator within six months of being quali- 
fied. Any person having a claim and not presenting it at the time fixed 
by said notice is required to have summons issued notifying the executor 
or administrator of his having filed his claim in court ; in such cases the 
costs have to be paid by the claimant. Claims should be filed within two 
years from the time administration is granted on an estate, as after that 
time they diVe forever barred^ unless other estate is found that was not in- 
ventoried. Married women, infants, persons insane, imprisoned or without 
the United States, in the employment of the United States, or of this 
State, have two years after their disabilities are removed to file claims. 

Claims are classified and paid out of the estate in the following manner : 

First. Funeral expenses. 

Second. The widow's aivard, if there is a widow ; or children if there 
are children, and no widoiv. 

Third. Expenses attending the last illness, not including physician's 
bill. 

Fourth. Debts due the common school or township fund. 

Fifth. All expenses of proving the will and taking out letters testa- 
mentary or administration, and settlement of the estate, and the physi- 
cian s bill in the last illness of deceased. 

Sixth. ^YvevQ t\ie deceased has received mojiej/ i?t irw-si for any pur- 
pose, his executor or administrator shall pay out of his estate the amount 
received and not accounted for. 

Seventh. All other debts and demands of whatsoever kind, without 
regard to quality or dignity, which shall be exhibited to the court within 
two years from the granting of letters. 

Aivard to Widow and Children, exclusive of debts and legacies or be- 
quests, except funeral expenses : 

First. The family pictures and wearing apparel, jewels and ornaments 
of herself and minor children. 

Second. School books and the family library of the value of $100. 

Third. One sewing machine. 

Fourth. Necessary beds, bedsteads and bedding for herself and family. 

Fifth. The stoves and pipe used in the family, with the necessary 
cooking utensils, or in case they have none, $50 in money. 

Sixth. Household and kitchen furniture to the. value of $100. 

Seventh. One milch cow and calf for every four members of her family. 



48 . ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 

Eighth. Two sheep for each member of her family, and the fleeces 
taken from the same, and one horse., saddle and bridle. 

Ninth. Provisions for herself and family for one year. 

Tenth. Food for the stock above specified for six months. 

Eleventh. Fuel for herself and family for three months. 

Twelfth. One hundred dollars worth of other joroperty suited to her 
condition in life, to be selected by the widow. 

The widow if she elects may have in lieu of the said award, the same 
personal property or money in place thereof as is or may be exempt from 
execution or attachment against the head of a family. 

TAXES. 

The owners of real and personal property, on the first day of May in 
each year, are liable for the taxes thereon. 

Assessments should be completed before the fourth Monday in June., 
at which time the town board of review meets to examine assessments, 
hear objections., and make such changes as ought to be made. The county 
board have also power to correct or change assessments. 

The tax books are placed in the hands of the town collector on or 
before tl:e tenth day of December, who retains them until the tenth day 
of March following, when he is required to return them to the county 
treasurer, who then collects all delinquent taxes. 

No costs accrue on real estate taxes till advertised, which takes place 
the first day of April, when three weeks' notice is required before judg- 
ment. Cost of advertising, twenty cents each tract of land, and ten cents 
each lot. 

Judgment is usually obtained at May term of County Court. Costs 
six cents each tract of land, and five cents each lot. Sale takes place in 
June. Costs in addition to those before mentioned, twenty-eight cents 
each tract of land, and twenty-seven cents each town lot. 

Real estate sold for taxes may be redeemed any time before the expi- 
ration of two years from the date of sale, by payment to the County Clerk 
of the amount for which it Avas sold and twenty-five per cent, thereon if 
redeemed within six months, fifty per cent, if between six and twelve 
months, if between twelve and eighteen months seventy-five per cent., 
and if between eighteen months and two years one hundred per cent., 
and in addition, all subsequent taxes paid by the purchaser, with ten per 
cent, interest thereon, also one dollar each tract if notice is given by the 
purchaser of the sale, and a fee of twenty-five cents to the clerk for his 
certificate. 

JURISDICTION OF COURTS. 

Justices have jurisdiction in all civil cases on contracts for the recovery 
of moneys for damages for injury to real property, or taking, detaining, or 



ABSTRACT OP ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 49 

injuring personal property ; for rent ; for all eases to recover damages done 
real or personal property by railroad companies, in actions of replevin^ and 
in actions for damages for fraud in the sale, purchase, or exchange of per- 
sonal property, when the amount claimed as due is not over f200. They 
have also jurisdiction in all cases for violation of the ordinances of cities^ 
towns or villages. A justice of the peace may orally order an officer or a 
private person to arrest any one committing or attempting to commit a 
criminal offense. He also upon complaint can issue his warrant for the 
arrest of any person accused of having committed a crime, and have him 
brought before him for examination. 

COUNTY COURTS 

Have jurisdiction in all matters of probate, settlement of estates of deceased 
persons, appointment of guardians and conservators, and settlement of 
their accounts ; all matters relating to apprentices ; proceedings for the 
collection of taxes and assessments, and in proceedings of executions, admin- 
istrators, guardians and conservators for the sale of real estate. In law 
cases they have concurrent jurisdiction with Circuit Courts in all cases 
where Justices of Peace now have when the amount claimed shall not 
exceed $500, and in all criminal offenses where the punishment is not impris- 
onment in the penitentiary or death, but no appeal is allowed from Justice 
of the Peace to County Courts. 

Circuit Courts — Have unlimited jurisdiction. 

LIMITATION OF ACTION. 

Accounts jive years. Notes and written contracts ten years. Judg- 
ments twenty years. Partial payments or new promise in writing, within 
or after said period, will revive the debt. Absence from the State deducted, 
and when the cause of action is barred by the law of another State, it has 
the same effect here. Slander and libel, one year. Personal injuries, two 
years. To recover land or make entry thereon, twenty years. Action to 
foreclose mortgage or ti'hst deed, or make a sale, within ten years. 

All persons in possession of land, and paying taxes for seven consecu- 
tive years, with color of title, and all persons paying taxes for seven con- 
secutive years, with color of title, on vacant land, shall be held to be the 
legal owners to the extent of their paper title. 

MARRIED WOMEN 

May sue and be sued. Husband and ivife not liable for each other s debts, 
either before or after marriage, but both are liable for expenses and edu- 
cation of the family. 



50 ABSTRACT OP ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 

She may contract the same as if unmarried, except that in a partner- 
ship business she can not, without consent of her husband, unless he has 
abandoned or deserted her, or is idiotic or insane, or confined in peniten- 
tiary ; she is entitled and can recover her own earnings, but neither hus- 
band nor wife is entitled to compensation for any services rendered for the 
other. At the death of the husband, in addition to widow's award, a 
married woman has a dower interest (one-third) in all real estate owned 
by her husband after their marriage, and which has not been released by 
her, and the husband has the same interest in the real estate of the wife 
at her death. 

EXEMPTIONS FROM FORCED SALE. 

Some worth $1,000, and the following Personal Property : Lot of ground 
and buildings thereon, occupied as a residence by the debtor, being a house- 
holder and having a family, to the value of $1,000. Exemption continues 
after the death of the householder for the benefit of widow and family, some 
one of them occupying the homestead until youngest child shall become 
twenty-one years of age, and until death of widow. There is no exemption 
from sale for taxes, assessments, debt or liability incurred for the purchase 
or improvement of said homestead. No release or waiver of exemption is 
valid, unless in writing, and subscribed by such householder and wife (if 
he have one), and acknowledged as conveyances of real estate are required 
to be acknowledged. The following articles of personal property owned 
by the debtor, are exempt from execution, writ of attachment, and distress 
for rent : Tlie necessary ivearing apparel of every person ; one sewing ma- 
chine ; the furniture, tools and implements necessary to carry on his trade or 
business, not exceeding $100 in value ; the implements or library of any 
professional man, not exceeding $100 in value ; materials and stock designed 
and procured/or carrying on his trade or business, and intended to be used 
or wrought therein, not exceeding $100 in value ; and also, when the debtor 
is the head of a family and resides with the same, necessary beds, bedsteads, 
and bedding, two stoves and pipe, necessary household furniture not exceeding 
m value $100, one cow, calf, two swine, one yoke of oxen, or two horses in lieu 
thereof, worth not exceeding $200, with the harness therefor, necessary pro- 
visions and fuel for the use of the family three months, and necessary food 
for the stock hereinbefore exempted for the same time ; the bibles, school 
books and family pictures ; the family library, cemetery lots, and rights of 
burial, and tombs for the repositories of the dead ; one hundred dollars'' 
worth of other property, suited to his condition in life, selected by the 
debtor. No perso7ial property is exempt from sale for the wages of laborers 
or servants. Wages of a laborer who is the head of a family can not be 
garnisheed, except the sum due him be in excess of $25. 



ABSTRACT OF ILLIjSTOIS STATE LAWS. 51 

DEEDS AND MORTGAGES. 

To he valid there must be a valid consideration. Special care sb.ould 
be taken to have them signed, sealed, delivered, and properly acknowl- 
edged, M^ith the proper seal attached. Witnesses are not required. Tlie 
acknowledgement must be made in this state, before Master in Chancery, 
Notary Public, United States Commissioner, Circuit or County Clerk, Justice 
of Peace, or any Court of Record having a seal, or any Judge, Justice, or 
Clerk of any such Court. When taken before a Notary Public, or United 
States Commissioner, the same shall be attested by his official seal, when 
taken before a Court or the Clerk thereof, the same shall be attested by 
the seal of such Court, and when taken before a Justice of the Peace resid- 
ing out of the county where the real estate to be conveyed lies, there shall 
be added a certificate of the County Clerk under his seal of office, that he 
was a Justice of the Peace in the county at the time of taking the same. 
A deed is good without such eertificace attached, but can not be used in 
evidence unless such a certificate is produced or otlier competent evidence 
introduced. Acknowledgements made out of the state must eitlier be 
executed according to the laws of this state, or there should be attached 
a certificate that it is in conformity with the laws of the state or country 
where executed. Where this is not done the same may be proved by any 
other legal way. Acknowledgments where the Homestead rights are to 
be waived must state as follows : "Including the release and waiver of 
the right of homestead." 

Notaries Public can take acknowledgements any wliere in the state. 

Sheriffs, ,ii authorized by the mortgagor of real or personal property 
in his mortgage, may sell the property mortgaged. 

In the case of the death of grantor or holder of the equity of redemp- 
tion of rear estate mortgaged, or conveyed by deed of trust where equity 
of redemption is waived, and it contains power of sale, must be foreclosed 
in the same manner as a common mortgage in court. 

ESTRAYS. 

Morses, mules, asses, neat cattle, swine, sheep, or goats found straying 
at any time during the year, in counties where such animals are not allowed 
to run at large, or between the last day of October and the 15th day of 
April in other counties, the oiuner thereof being unknown, may be taken up 
as estrays. 

No person not a householder in the county where estray is found can 
lawfully take up an estray, and then only upon or about his farm or place 
of residence. Estrays should not be used before advertised, except animals 
giving milk, which may be milked for their benefit. 



52 ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 

Notices must be posted up within five (5) days in three (3) of the 
most pubhc places in the town or precinct in which estray was found, giv- 
ing the residence of the taker up, and a particular description of the 
estray, its age, color, and marks natural and artificial, and stating before 
what justice of the peace in such town or precinct, and at what time, not 
less than ten (10) nor more than fifteen (15) days from the time of post- 
ing such notices, he will apply to have the estray appraised. 

A copy of such notice should be filed by the taker up with the totvn 
clerk, whose duty it is to enter the same at large, in a hook kept by him 
for that purpose. 

If the oivner of estray shall not have appeared and proved ownership, 
and taken the same away, first paying the taker up his reasonable charges 
for taking up, keeping, and advertising the same, the taker up shall appear 
before the justice of the peace mentioned in above mentioned notice, and 
make an affidavit as required by law. 

As the affidavit has to be made before the justice, and all other steps as 
to appraisement, etc., are before him, who is familiar therewith, they are 
therefore omitted here. 

Any person taking up an estray at any other place than about or 
upon his farm or residence, or without complying ivith the law, shall forfeit 
and pay a fine of ten dollars with costs. 

Ordinary diligence is required in taking care of estrays, but in case 
they die or get away the taker is not liable for the same. 

GAME. 

It is unlawful to hunt, kill or in any manner interfere ivith deer, wild 
turkey, prairie chicken, partridge or pheasants between the first day of Janu- 
ary and the fifteenth day of August ; or any quail, between the first day of 
January ?i\\dL the first day of October ; or any ivoodcock, between the first 
day of January and the first day of July ; or any ivild goose, duck, Wilson 
snipe hrandt, or other water fowl, between the fifteenth day of April and the 
fifteenth day of August, in each and every year. Penalty : Fine not less 
than $10 nor more than $25, and costs of suit, and shall stand committed 
to county jail until fine is paid, but not exceeding ten days. 

It is unlawful to hunt with gun, dog or net, within the inclosed grounds 
or lands of another, without permission. Penalty : Fine not less than $8 
and not exceeding |100, to be paid into school fund. 

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

Whenever any of the following articles shall be contracted for, or 
sold or delivered, and no special contract or agreement shall be made to 
the contrary, the weight per bushel shall be as follows, to-wit : 



ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 





Pounds. 




PoMtds. 


Stone Coal, - 


- 80 


Bnckwheat, - 


- 52 


Unslacked Lime, 


- 80 


Coarse Salt, 


- 50 


Corn in the ear. 


- 70 


Barley, - 


- 48 


Wheat, 


- 60 


Corn Meal, 


- 48 


Irish Potatoes, 


- 60 


Castor Beans, 


- 46 


White Beans, - 


- 60 


Timothy Seed, - 


- 45 


Clover Seed, - 


- 60 


Hemp Seed, - 


- 44 


Onions, - =. _ 


57 


Malt, - - - . 


- 38 


Shelled Corn, 


- b^ 


Dried Peaches, 


- 33 


Rye, - - - - 


- 56 


Oats, - - - - 


- 32 


Flax Seed, - 


- 56 


Dried Aj)ples, 


- 24 


Sweet Potatoes, - 


- 55 


Bran, - - - _ 


- 20 


Turnips, 


- 55 


Blue Grass Seed, - 


- 14 


Fine Salt, - 


- 55 


Hair (plastering), 


8 



Penalty for giving less than the above standard is double the amount 
of property wrongfully not given, and ten dollars addition thereto. 

MILLERS. 

The owner or occupant of every public grist mill in this state shall 
grind all grain brought to his mill in its turn. The toll for both steam 
and tvater mills, is, for grinding and bolting wheat, rye, or other grain, one 
eighth part; for grinding Indian corn, oats, harley and buckwheat not 
required to be bolted, one seventh part; for grinding malt, and chopping all 
kinds of grain, one eighth part. It is the duty of every miller when his 
mill is in repair, to aid and assist in loading and unloading all grain brought 
to hisn to be ground, and he is also required to keep an accurate half 
bushel measurje, and an accurate set of toll dishes or scales for Aveighing 
the grain. The jt?ena% for neglect or refusal to comply with the law is 
$5, to the use of any person to sue for the same, to be recovered before 
any justice- of the peace of the county where penalty is incurred. Millers 
are accountable for the safe keeping of all grain left in his mill for the 
purpose of being ground, with bags or casks containing same (except it 
results from unavoidable accidents), provided that such bags or casks are 
distinctly marked wit^i the initial letters of the owner's name. 



MARKS AND BRANDS. 

Owners of cattle, horses, 'hogs, sheep or goats may have one earmark 
and one brand, but which shall be different from his neighbor's, and may 
be recorded by the county clerk of the county in which such property is 
kept. The/ee for such record is fifteen cents. The record of such shall 
be open to examination free of charge. In cases of disputes as to marks 
or brands, such record is prima facie evidence. Owners of cattle, horses, 
hogs, sheep or goats that may have been branded by the former oivner^ 



54 ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 

may be re-branded in presence of one or more of bis neighbors, who shall 
certify to the facts of the marking or branding being done, when done, 
and in what brand or mark they were re-branded or re-marked, which 
certificate may also be recorded as before stated. 

ADOPTION OF CHILDREN. 

Children may be adopted by any resident of this state, by filing a 
petition in the Circnit or County Court of the county in which he resides, 
asking leave to do so, and if desired may ask that the name of the child 
be changed. Such petition, if made by a person having a husband or 
wife, will not be granted, unless the husband or Avife joins therein, as the 
adoption must be by them jointly. 

The petitioti shall state name, sex, and age of the child, and the new 
name, if it is desired to change the name. Also the name and residence 
of the parents of the child, if known, and of the guardian, if any, and 
whether the parents or guardians consent to the adoption. 

The court must find, before granting decree, that the parents of the 
child, or the survivors of them, have deserted his or her family or such 
child for one year next preceding the application, or if neither are living, 
the guardian ; if no guardian, the next of kin in this state capable of giving 
consent, has had notice of the presentation of the petition and consents 
to such adoption. If the child is of the age of fourteen years or upwards, 
the adoption can not be made without its consent. 

SURVEYORS AND SURVEYS. 

There is in every county elected a surveyor known as county sur- 
veyor, who has power to appoint deputies, for whose official acts he is 
responsible. It is the duty of the county surveyor, either by himself or 
his deputy, to make all surveys that he may be called upon to make within 
his county as soon as may be after application is made. The necessary 
chainmen and other assistance must be employed by the person requiring 
the same to be done, and to be bj^ him paid, unless otherwise agreed ; but 
the chainmen must be disinterested persons and approved by the surveyor 
and sworn by him to measure justly and impartially. 

The County Board in each county is required by law to provide a copy 
of the United States field notes and plats of their surveys of the lands 
in the county to be kept in the recorder's office subject to examination 
by the public, and the county surveyor is required to make his surveys 
in conformity to said notes, plats and the laws of the United States gov- 
erning such matters. The surveyor is also required to keep a record 
of all surveys made by him, which shall be subject to inspection by any 
one interested, and shall be delivered up to his successor in office. A 



ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 56 

certified copy of the said surveyor's record shall be i^rima facie evidence 
of its contents. 

The fees of county surveyors are six dollars per day. The county 
surveyor is also ex officio inspector of mines, and as such, assisted by some 
practical miner selected by him, shall once each year inspect all the 
mines in the county, for which they shall each receive such compensa- 
tion as may be fixed by the County Board, not exceeding $5 a day, to 
"be paid out of the county treasury. 

ROADS. 

Where practicable from the nature of the ground, persons traveling 
in any kind of vehicle, must turn to the right of the center of the road, so 
as to permit each carriage to pass without interfering with each other. 
The penalty/ for a violation of this provision is $5 for every offense, to 
be recovered by the parti/ injured ; but to recover, there must have 
occurred some injury to person or property resulting from the violation. 
The oivners of any carriage traveling upon any road in this State for the 
conveyance of passengers who shall employ or continue in his employment 
as driver any person who is addicted to drunkenness, or the excessive use of 
spiritous liquors, after he has had notice of the same, shall forfeit, at the 
rate of $5 per day, and if any driver Avhile actually engaged in driving 
any such carriage, shall be guilty of intoxication to such a degree as to 
endanger the safety of passengers, it shall be the duty of the owner, on 
receiving tvritten notice of the fa^t, signed by one of the passengers, and 
certified by him on oath, forthwith to discharge such driver. If such owner 
shall have such driver in his employ ivithin three months after such notice, 
he is liable for |5 per day for the time he shall keep said driver in his 
■employment after receiving such notice. 

Persons driving any carriage on any public highway are prohibited 
from running their horses upon any occasion under a penalty of a fine not 
exceeding $10, or imprisonment not exceeding sixty days, at the discre- 
tion of the court. Horses attached to any carriage used to convey passen- 
gers for hire must be properly hitched or the lines placed in the hands of 
some other person before the driver leaves them for any purpose. For 
violation of this provision each driver shall forfeit twenty dollars, to be 
recovered by action, to be commenced within six months. It is under- 
stood by the term carriage herein to mean any carriage or vehicle used 
for the transportation of passengers or goods or either of them. 

The commissioners of highways in the different tov/ns have the care 
and superintendence of highways and bridges therein. They have all 
the powers necessary to lay out, vacate, regulate and repair all roads? 
build and repair bridges, divide their respective towns into as many road 
districts as they shall think convenient. This is to be done annually, 



56 ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 

and ten days before the annual town meeting. In addition to the above, 
it is their duty to erect and keep in repair at the forks or crossing-phxce 
of the most important roads post and guide boards with plain inscrip- 
tions, giving directions and distances to the most noted places to which 
such road may lead; also to make provisions to prevent thistles, burdock, 
and cockle burrs, mustard, yellow dock, Indian mallow, and jessamine 
weed from seeding, and to extirpate the same as far as practicable, and 
to prevent all rank growth of vegetation on the public highways, so far 
as the same may obstruct public travel, and it is in their discretion to 
erect Avatering places for public use for watering teams at such points 
as may be deemed advisable. Every able-bodied male inhabitant, being 
above the age of twenty-one years, and under the age of fifty, excepting 
paupers, idiots, lunatics, trustees of schools and school directors, and such 
others as are exempt by law, is required to labor on highways in their 
respective road districts, not less than one or more than three days in 
each and every year. Three days' notice must be given by the overseer 
of the time and place he requires such road labor to be done. The labor 
must be performed in the road district in which the person resides. Any 
person may commute for such labor by paying at the rate of -$1.50 per 
day, if done within the three days' notice, but after that time the rate is 
$2 per day. 

Any person liable for work on highways who has been assessed two 
days or more and has not commuted, may be required to furnish team, oi 
a cart, wagon or plow, with a pair of horses or oxen and a man to manage 
them, for which he will be entitled to two days for each day's work. 
Eight hours is a day's work on the roads, and there is a penalty of twenty- 
five cents an hour against any person or substitute who shall neglect or 
refuse to perform. Any person remaining idle, or does not work faithfully 
or hinders others from doing so, forfeits to the town $2. 

Every person assessed and duly notified, who has not commuted and 
refuses or neglects to appear, shall forfeit to the town for everj/ day's 
refusal or neglect, the sum of $2 ; if he was required to furnish a team, 
carriage, man or implement, and neglects or refuses to comply, he is liable 
to the following fines : 

First. For wholly failing to comply, $4 each day. 

Second. For omitting to furnish a pair of horses or oxen, 11.50 each 
day. 

Third. For omitting to furnish a man to manage team, $2 each day. 

Fourth. For omitting to furnish a wagon, cart or plow, 75 cents 
each day. 

The Commissioners estimate and assess the highway labor and road 
tax. The road tax on real and personal property can not exceed forty 
cents on each hundred dollars' worth. The labor or road tax in villaoes. 



ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 57 

towns or cities, is paid over to the corporate authorities of such, for the 
improvement of streets, roads and bridges within their limits. Commis- 
sioners' compensation 11.50 per day. The Treasurer, who is one of their 
number, is entitled to 2 per cent, on all moneys he may receive and pay 
out. 

Overseers. Their duties are to repair and keep in order the high- 
ways in their districts ; to warn persons to work out their road tax at 
such time and place as they think proper ; to collect fines and commuta- 
tion money, and execute all lawful orders of the Commissioners of High- 
ways ; also make list, within sixteen days after their election, of the names 
of all inhabitants in his road district liable to work on highways. For 
refusal to perform any of his duties, he is liable to a fine of -$10. The 
compensation of overseers is $1.50 a day, the number of days to be 
audited by the Highway Commissioners. 

As all township and county officers are familiar with their duties, it 
is only intended to give the points of the law that the public should be 
familiar with. The manner of laying out, altering or vacating roads, etc., 
will not be here stated, as it would require more space than is contem- 
plated in a work of this kind. It is sufficient to state that, the first step 
is by petition, addressed to the Commissioners, setting out what is prayed 
for, giving the names of the owners of lands if known, if not known so 
state, over which the road is to pass, giving the general course, its place 
of beginning, and where it terminates. It requires not less than twelve 
freeholders residing within three miles of the road who shall sign the 
petition. Public roads must not be less than fifty feet wide, nor more 
than sixty feet wide. Roads not exceeding two miles in length, if peti- 
tioned for, may be laid out, not less than forty feet. Private roads 
for private and public use, may be laid out of the width of three rods, on 
petitibn of the person directly interested ; the damage occasioned thereby 
shall be paid by the premises benefited thereby, and before the road is 
opened. If not opened in two years, the order shall be considered 
rescinded. Commissioners in their discretion may permit persons who 
live on or have private roads, to work out their road tax thereon. Public 
roads must be opened in five days from date of filing order of location, 
or be deemed vacated. 

DRAINAGE. 

Whenever one or more owners or occupants of land desire to construct 
a drain or ditch across the land of others for agricultural or sanitary pur- 
poses, the proceedings are as follows : 

1st. File a petition with the derh of the town hoard of auditors in 
counties where there is township organization, or in counties not so 
organized with the clerk of the County Court, stating the necessity of the 



58 ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 

same, its starting point, route and terminus ; and if it sliall be deemed 
necessary for successful drainage that a levee or other work be constructed, 
a general description of the same shall be made. 

Id. After filing., two tveeks' notice must be given by posting notices 
in three of the most public places in such township through which the 
drain, ditch or other work is proposed to be constructed ; and also, by 
publishing a copy thereof in some newspaper published in the county in 
which petition is filed, at least once each week for two successive weeks. 
The notice must state when and before what board such petition is filed, 
the starting point, route, terminus and description of the proposed work. 
On receipt of the petition by the clerk of either board as before men- 
tioned, it is his duty to immediately give notice to the board of which he 
is clerk, of the fact, and that a meeting of the board will be held on a day 
to be fixed not later than sixty days after the filing of said petition, to 
consider the prayer of the same ; and it is further the duty of the clerk, 
to publish a notice of the filing of the petition and the meeting of the 
board to consider it, by posting the same in the three most public places 
in the township or county. On the hearing, all parties may contest the 
matter, and if it shall appear to the board that the work contemplated is 
necessary, or is useful for the drainage of the land for agricultural and 
sanitary purposes, they shall so find and shall file their petition in the 
County Court, reciting the original petition and stating their finding, and 
pray that the costs of the improvement be assessed, and for that purpose 
three commissioners be appointed to lay out and construct the work. The 
costs of the hearing before the town board is to be paid by the petitioners. 
After commissioners are appointed, they organize and proceed to examine 
the work ; and if they find the benefits greater than the cost and expense 
of the work, then it is their duty to have the surveyor's plans and speci- 
fications made, and when done report the same to the court, before which 
parties can be heard prior to confirmation. The commissioners are not 
confined to the route or plan of the petition, but may change the same. 
After report of commissioners is confirmed, then a jury assess the damages 
and benefits against the land damaged or benefited. 

As it is only contemplated in a work of this kind to give an abstract 
of the laws, and as the parties who have in charge the execution of the 
further proceedings are likely to be familiar with the requirements of the 
statute, the necessary details are not here inserted. 

PAUPERS. 

Every poor person who shall be unable to earn a livelihood in conse- 
quence of any bodily infirmity., idiocy, lunacy or unavoidable cause., shall 
be supported by the father, grand-father, mother, grand-mother, children, 
grand-children, brothers or sisters of such poor person, if they or either 



ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 59 

of them be of sufficient ability ; but if au)^ of such dependent class shall 
have become so from intemperance, or other had conduct, they shall not be 
entitled to support from any relation except parent or child. 

The children shall first be called on to support their parents, if they 
are able ; but if not, the parents of such poor person shall then be called 
on, if of sufficient ability ; and if there be no parents or children able, 
then the brothers and sisters of such dependent person shall be called 
upon ; and if there be no brothers or sisters of sufficient ability, the 
grand-children of such person shall next be called on ; and if they are 
not able, then the grand-parents. Married females, while their husbands 
live, shall not be liable to contribute for the support of their poor relations 
except out of their separate property. It is the duty of the state's 
(county) attorney, to make complaint to the County Court of his county 
against all the relatives of such paupers in this state liable to his support 
and prosecute the same. In ease the state's attorney neglects, or refuses, to 
complain in such cases, then it is the duty of the overseer of the poor to 
do so. The person called upon to contribute shall have at least ten days' 
notice of such application by summons. The court has the power to 
determine the kind of support, depending upon the circumstances of the 
parties, and may also order two or more of the different degrees to main- 
tain such poor person, and prescribe the proportion of each, according to 
their ability. The court may specify the time for which the relative shall 
contribute — in fact has control over the entire subject matter, with power 
to enforce its orders. Every count}^ (except those in which the poor are 
supported by the towns, and in such cases the towns are liable) is required 
to relieve and support all poor and indigent persons lawfully resident 
therein. Residence means the actual residence of the party, or the place 
where he was employed ; or in case he was in no employment, then it 
shall be the place Avhere he made his home. When any person becomes 
chargeable as a pauper in any county or town who did not reside at the 
commencement of six months immediately preceding his becoming so, 
but did at that time reside in some other county or town in this state, 
then the county or town, as the case may be, becomes liable for the expense 
of taking care of such person until removed, and it is the duty of the 
overseer to notify the proper authorities of the fact. If any person shall 
bring and leave any pauper in any county in this state where such pauper 
had no legal residence, knowing him to be such, he is liable to a fine of 
$100. In counties under township organization, the supervisors in each 
town are ex-officio overseers of the poor. The overseers of the poor act 
under the directions of the County Board in taking care of the poor and 
granting of temporary relief ; also, providing for non-resident persons not 
paupers who may be taken sick and not able to pay their way, and in case 
of death cause such person to be decently buried. 



60 ABSTRACT OP ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 

FENCES. 

In counties under township organization, the toivn assessor and com- 
missioner of highways are the fence-viewers in their respective towns. 
In other counties the County Board appoints three in each precinct annu- 
ally. A lawful fp.nce is four and one-half feet high, in good repair, con- 
sisting of rails, timber, boards, stone, hedges, or whatever the fence- 
viewers of the town or precinct where the same shall lie, shall consider 
equivalent thereto, but in counties under township organization the annual 
town meeting may establish any other kind of fence as such, or the County 
Board in other counties may do the same. Division fences shall be made 
and maintained in just proportion by the adjoining owners, except when 
the owner shall choose to let his land lie open, but after a division fence is 
built by agreement or otherwise, neither party can remove his part of such 
fence so long as he may crop or use such land for farm purposes, or without 
giving the other party one year's notice in writing of his intention to remove 
his portion. When any person shall enclose his land upon the enclosure 
of another, he shall refund the owner of the adjoining lands a just pro- 
portion of the value at that time of such fence. The value of fence and 
the just proportion to be paid or built and maintained by each is to be 
ascertained by two fence-viewers in the town or precinct. Such fence- 
viewers have power to settle all disputes between different owners as to 
fences built or to be built, as well as to repairs to be made. Each party 
chooses one of the viewers, but if the other party neglects, after eight 
days' notice in writing, to make his choice, then the other party may 
select both. It is sufficient to notify the tenant or party in possession, 
when the owner is not a resident of the town or precinct. The two 
fence-viewers chosen, after viewing the premises, shall hear the state- 
ments of the parties , in case they can't agree, they shall select another 
fence-viewer to act with them, and the decision of any two of them is 
final. The decision must be reduced to writing, and should plainly set 
out description of fence and all matters settled by them, and must be 
filed in the office of the town clerk in counties under township organiza- 
tion, and in other counties with the county clerk. 

Where any person is liable to contribute to the erection or the 
repairing of a division fence, neglects or refuses so to do, the party 
injured, after giving sixty days notice in writing when a fence is to be 
erected, or ten days when it is only repairs, may proceed to have the 
work done at the expense of the party whose duty it is to do it, to be 
recovered from him with costs of suit, and the party so neglecting shall 
also be liable to the party injured for all damages accruing from such 
neglect or refusal, to be determined by any two fence-viewers selected 
as before provided, the appraisement to be reduced to writing and signed. 



ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 61 

Where a person shall conclude to remove his part of a division ft^nce, 
and let his land lie open, and having given the year's notice required, the 
adjoining owner may cause the value of said fence to be ascertained by 
fence-viewers as before provided, and on payment or tender of the 
amount of such valuation to the owner, it shall prevent the removal. A 
party removing a division fence without notice is liable for the damages 
accruing thereby. 

Where a fence has been built on the land of another through mis- 
take, the owner may enter upon such premises and remove his fence and 
material within six months after the division line has been ascertained. 
Where the material to build such a fence has been taken from the land 
on which it was built, then before it can be removed, the person claiming 
must first pay for such material to the owner of the land from which it 
was taken, nor shall such a fence be removed at a time when the removal 
will throw open or expose the crops of the other party ; a reasonable 
time must be given beyond the .six months to remove crops. 

The compensation of fence-viewers is one dollar and fifty cents a 
day each, to be paid in the first instance by the party calling them, but 
in the end all expenses, including amount charged by the fence-viewers, 
must be paid equally by the parties, except in cases where a party neglects 
or refuses to make or maintain a just proportion of a division fence, when 
the party in default shall pay them. 

DAMAGES FROM TRESPASS. 

Where stock of any kind breaks into any person's enclosure, the 
fence being good and sufficient., the owner is liable for the damage done ; 
but where the damage is done by stock running at large., contrary to law, 
the owner is liable where there is not such a fence. Where stock is 
found trespassing on the enclosure of another as aforesaid, the owner oi 
occupier of the premises may take possession of such stock and keep the 
same until damages, with reasonable charges for keeping and feeding and 
all costs of suit, are paid. Any person taking or rescuing such stock so 
held without his consent, shall be liable to a fine of not less than three 
nor more than five dollars for each animal rescued, to be recovered by 
suit before a justice of the peace for the use of the school fund. Within 
twenty-four hours after taking such animal into his possession, the per- 
son taking it up must give notice of the fact to the owner, if known, or 
if unknown, notices must be posted in some public place near the premises. 

LANDLORD AND TENANT. 

The owner of lands, or his legal representatives, can sue for and 
recover rent therefor, in any of the following cases : 

First. When rent is due and in arrears on a lease for life or lives. 
5 



62 ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 

Second. When lands are held and occupied by any person without 
any special agreement for rent. 

Third. When j^ossession is obtained under an agreement, written 
or verbal, for the purchase of the premises and before deed given, the 
right to possession is terminated by forfeiture on con-compliance with the 
agreement, and possession is wrongfully refused or neglected to be given 
upon demand made in writing by the party entitled thereto. Provided 
that all payments made by the vendee or his representatives or assigns, 
may be set off against the rent. 

Fourth. When land has been sold upon a judgment or a decree of 
court, when the party to such judgment or decree, or person holding under 
him, wrongfully refuses, or neglects, to surrender j)ossession of the same,, 
after demand in writing by the person entitled to the possession. 

Fifth. When the lands have been sold upon a mortgage or trust 
deed, and the mortgagor or grantor or person holding under him, wrong- 
fully refuses or neglects to surrender possession of the same, after demand 
in. writing by the person entitled to the possession. 

If any tenant, or any person who shall come into possession from or 
under or by collusion with such tenant, shall willfully hold over any lands, 
etc., after the expiration the term of their lease, and after demand made 
in writing for the possession thereof, is liable to pay do-uhle rent. A 
tenancy from year to year requires sixty days notice in writing, to termi- 
nate the same at the end of the year ; such notice can be given at any 
time within four months preceding the last sixty days of the year. 

A tenancy by the month, or less than a year, where the tenant holds 
over Avithout an}- special agreement, the landlord ma}^ terminate the 
tenancy, by thirty days notice in writing. 

When rent is due, the landlord may serve a notice upon the tenant, 
stating that unless the rent is paid within not less than five days, his lease 
will be terminated ; if the rent is not paid, the landlord may consider the 
lease ended. When default is made in any of the terms of a lease, it 
shall not be necessary to give more than ten days notice to quit or of the 
termination of such tenancy ; and the same may be terminated on giving 
such notice to quit, at any time after such default in any of the terms of 
such lease ; which notice may be substantially in the following form, viz: 

To , You are hereb}^ notified that, in consequence of your default 

in (here insert the character of the default), of the premises now occupied 
by you, being etc. (here describe the premises), I have elected to deter- 
mine your lease, and you are hereby notified to quit and deliver up pos- 
session of the same to me within ten days of this date (dated, etc.) 

The above to be signed by the lessor or his agent, and no other notice 
or demand of possession or termination of such tenancy is necessary. 

Demand may be made, or notice served, by delivering a written or 



ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 63 

printed, or partly either, copy tliereof to the tenant, or leaving the same 
with some person above the age of twelve years residing on or in posses- 
sion of the premises ; and in case no one is in the actual possession of the 
said premises, then by posting the same on the premises. When the 
tenancy is for a certain time, and the term expires by the terms of the 
lease, the tenant is then bound to surrender possession, and no notice 
to quit or demand of possession is necessar3^ 

Distress for rent. — In all cases of distress for rent, the landlord, by 
himself, his agent or attorney, may seize for rent any personal property of 
his tenant that may be found in the county where the tenant resides ; the 
property of any other person, even if found on the premises, is not 
liable. 

An inventory of the property levied upon, with a statement of the 
amount of rent claimed, should be at once filed with some justice of the 
peace, if not over $200 ; and if above that sum, with the clerk of a court 
of record of competent jurisdiction. Property may be released, by the 
party executing a satisfactory bond for double the amount. 

The landlord may distrain for rent, any time within six months after 
the expiration of the term of the lease, or when terminated. 

When rent is payable wholly or in part, in specific articles of pro- 
perty, or products of the premises, or labor, the landlord may distrain for 
the value of the same. 

Landlords have a lien upon the crops grown or growing upon the 
demised premises for the rent thereof, and also for the faithful performance 
of the terms of the lease. 

In all cases where the premises rented shall be sub-let, or the lease 
assigned, the» landlord shall have the same right to enforce lien against 
such lessee or assignee, that he has against the tenant to whom the pre- 
mises were rented. 

When a tenant abandons or removes from the premises or any part 
thereof, the landlord, or his agent or attorney, may seize upon any grain 
or other crops grown or growing upon the premises, or part thereof so 
abandoned, whether the rent is due or not. If such grain, or other crops, 
or any part thereof, is not fully grown or matured, the landlord, or his 
agent or attorney, shall cause the same to be properly cultivated, harvested 
or gathered, and may sell the same, and from the proceeds pay all his 
labor, expenses and rent. The tenant may, before the sale of such pro- 
perty, redeem the same by tendering the rent and reasonable compensation 
for work done, or he may replevy the same. 

Exemption. — The same articles of personal property which are bylaw 
exempt from execution, except the crops as above stated, is also exempt 
from distress for rent. 



64 ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 



LIENS. 

Any person who shall by contract, express or implied, or partly both, 
with the owner of any lot or tract of land, furnish labor or material, or 
services as au arcliitect or superintendent, in building, altering, repairing 
or ornamenting any house or other building or appurtenance thereto on 
such lot, or upon any street or alley, and connected with such improve- 
ments, shall have a lien upon the whole of such lot or tract of land, and 
upon such house or building and appurtenances, for the amount due to 
him for such labor, material or services. If the contract is expressed, and 
the time for the completion of the work is beyond three years from the com- 
mencement thereof; or, if the time of payment is beyond one year from 
the time stipulated for the completion of the work, then no lien exists. 
If the contract is implied, then no lien exists, unless the work be done or 
material is furnished within one year from the commencement of the work 
or delivery of the materials. As between different creditors having liens, 
no preference is given to the one whose contract was first made ; but each 
shares pro-rata. Incumbrances existing on the lot or tract of the land at 
the t4me the contract is made, do not operate on the improvements, and 
are only preferred to the extent of the value of the land at the time of 
making the contract. The above lien can not be enforced unless suit is 
eommeiiced within six months after the last payment for labor or materials 
shall have become due and payable. Sub-contractors, mechanics, workmen 
and other persons furnishing any material, or performing any labor for a 
contractor as before specified, have a lien to the extent of the amount due 
the contractor at the time the following notice is served upon the owner 
of the land who made the contract: 

To , You are hereby notified, that I have been employed by 

(here state whether to labor or furnish material, and substantially the 
nature of the demand) upon your (here state in general terms description 
and situation of building), and that I shall hold the (building, or as the 
case may be), and your interest in the ground, liable for the amount that 

may (is or may become) due me on account thereof. Signature, 

Date, 

If there is a contract in writing between contractor and sub-contractor, 
a copy of it should be served with above notice, and said notice must be 
served within forty days from the completion of such sub-contract, if there 
is one ; if not, then from the time payment should have been made to the 
person performing the labor or furnishing the material. If the owner is 
not^a resident of the county, or can not be found therein, then the above 
notice must be filed with the clerk of the Circuit Court, with his fee, fifty 
cents, and a copy of said notice must be published in a newspaper pub- 
lished in the county, for four successive weeks. 



ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 65 

When the owner or agent is notified as above, he can retain any 
money due the contractor sufficient to pay such claim ; if more than one 
claim, and not enough to pay all, they are to be paid pro rata. 

The owner has the right to demand in writing, a statement of the 
contractor, of what he owes for labor, etc., from time to time as the work 
progresses, and on his failure to comply, forfeits to the owner |50 for 
every offense. 

The liens referred to cover any and all estates, whether in fee for 
life, for years, or any other interest which the owner may have. 

To enforce the lien of sub-contractors, suit must be commenced within 
three months from the time of the performance of the sub-contract, or 
during the work or furnishing materials. 

Hotel, inn and hoarding-house keepers, have a lien upon the baggage 
and other valuables of their guests or boarders, brought into such hotel, 
inn or boarding-house, by their guests or boarders, for the proper charges 
due from such guests or boarders for their accommodation, board and 
lodgings, and such extras as are furnished at their request. 

Stable-keepers and other persons have a lien upon the horses, car- 
riages and harness kept by them, for the proper charges due for the keep- 
ing thereof and expenses bestowed thereon at the request of the owner 
or the person having the possession of the same. 

Agisters (persons who take care of cattle belonging to others), and 
persons keeping, yarding, feeding or pasturing domestic animals, shall 
have a lien upon the animals agistered, kept, yarded or fed, for the proper 
charges due for such service. 

All persons who may furnish any railroad corporation in this state 
with fuel, ties, material, supplies or any other article or thing necessary 
for the construction, maintenance, operation or repair of its road by eon- 
tract, or may perform work or labor on the same, is entitled to be paid as 
part of the current expenses of the road, and have a lien upon all its pro- 
perty. Sub-contractors or laborers have also a lien. The conditions and 
limitations both as to contractors and sub-contractors, are about the same 
as herein stated as to general liens. 

DEFINITION OF COMMERCIAL TERMS. 

$ means dollars, being a contraction of U. S., which was formerly 

placed before any denomination of money, and meant, as it means now, 
United States Currency. 

£ means pounds, English money. 

@ stands for at or to. ft iov pound, and bbl. for barrel; '^ io^ per or 
by the. Thus, Butter sells at 20#30c f ft, and Flour at |8@12 ^ bbl. 

% for per cent and # for number. 

May 1.— Wheat sells at |1.20@1.25, "seller June." Seller June 

5 



66 ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 

means that the person who sells the wheat has the privilege of delivering 
it at any time during the month of June. 

Selling short, is contracting to deliver a certain amount of grain or 
stock, at a fixed price, within a certain length of time, when the seller 
has not the stock on hand. It is for the interest of the person selling 
"short," to depress the market as much as possible, in order that he may- 
buy and fill his contract at a profit. Hence the " shorts " are termed 
" bears." 

Buying long, is to contract to purchase a certain amount of grain or 
shares of stock at a fixed price, deliverable within a stipulated time, 
expecting to make a profit by the rise of prices. The "longs" are 
termed "bulls," as it is for their interest to "operate" so as to "toss" 
the prices upward as much as possible. 

NOTES. 

Form of note is legal, worded in the simplest way, so that the 
amount and time of payment are mentioned. 

1100. Chicago, 111., Sept. 15, 1876. 

Sixty days from date I promise to pay to E. F. Brown, 
or order, One Hundred dollars, for value received. 

L. D. LowRY. 
A note to be payable in any thing else than money needs only the 
facts substituted for money in the above form. 

ORDERS. 

Orders should be worded simply, thus : 

Mr. F. H. Coats: Chicago, Sept. 15, 1876. 

Please pay to H. Birdsall, Twenty-five dollars, and charge to 

F. D. SiLVA. 

RECEIPTS. 

Receipts should always state when received and what for, thus : 

1100. Chicago, Sept. 15, 1876. 

Received of J. W. Davis, One Hundred dollars, for services 
rendered in grading his lot in Fort Madison, on account. 

Thomas Brady. 
If receipt is in full it should be so stated. 

BILLS OF PURCHASE. 

W. N. Mason, Salem, Illinois, Sept. 15, 1876. 
Bought of A. A. Graham. 

4 Bushels of Seed Wheat, at $1.50 - - - - #6.00 

2 Seamless Sacks " .30 - - .60 

Received payment, $6.60 

A. A. Graham. 



ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 67 

ARTICLES OF AGREEMENT. 

An agreement is where one party promises to another to do a certain 
thing in a certain time for a stipulated sum. Good business men always 
reduce an agreement to writing, which nearly always saves misunder- 
standings and trouble. No particular form is necessary, but the facts must 
be clearly and explicitly stated, and there must, to make it valid, be a 
reasonable consideration. 

GENERAL FORM OF AGREEMENT. 

This Agreement, made the Second day of October, 1876, between 
John Jones, of Aurora, County of Kane, State of Illinois, of the first part, 
and Thomas Whiteside, of the same place, of the second part — 

WITNESSETH, that the said John Jones, in consideration of the agree- 
ment of the party of the second part, hereinafter contained, contracts and 
agrees to and with the said Thomas Whiteside, that he will deliver, in 
good and marketable condition, at the Village of Batavia, 111.., during the 
month of November, of this year. One Hundred Tons of Prairie Hay, in 
the following lots, and at the following specified times ; namely, twenty- 
five tons by the seventh of November, twenty-five tons additional by the 
fourteenth of the month, twenty -five tons more by the twenty-first, and 
the entire one hundred tons to be all delivered by the thirtieth of 
November. 

And the said Thomas Whiteside, in consideration of the prompt 
fulfillment of this contract, on the part of the party of the first part, 
contracts to and agrees Avith the said John Jones, to pay for said hay five 
dollars per ton, for each ton as soon as delivered. 

In case of failure of agreement by either of the parties hereto, it is 
hereby stipulated and agreed that the party so failing shall pay to the 
other, One Hundred Dollars, as fixed and settled damages. 

In witness whereof, we have hereunto set our hands the day and 
year first above written. John Jones, 

Thomas Whiteside. 

AGREEMENT WITH CLERK FOR SERVICES. 

This Agreement, made the first day of May, one thousand eight 
hundred and seventy-six, between Reuben Stone, of Chicago, County 
of Cook, State of Illinois, party of the first part, and George Barclay, of 
Englewood, County of Cook, State of Illinois, party of the second part — 

WITNESSETH, that Said George Barclay agrees faithfully and dili- 
gently to work as clerk and salesman for the said Reuben Stone, for 
and during the space of one year from the date hereof, should both 
live such length of time, without absenting himself from his occupation ; 



68 ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 

during which time he, the said Barclay, in the store of said Stone, of 
Chicago, will carefully and honestly attend, doing and performing all 
duties as clerk and salesman aforesaid, in accordance and in all respects 
as directed and desired by the said Stone. 

In consideration of which services, so to be rendered by the said 
Barclay, the said Stone agrees to pay to said Barclay the annual sum of 
one thousand dollars, payable in twelve equal monthly payments, each 
upon the last day of each month ; provided that all dues for days of 
absence from business by said Barclay, shall be deducted from the sum 
otherwise by the agreement due and payable by the said Stone to the said 
Barclay. 

Witness our hands. Reuben Stone. 

George Barclay. 

BILLS OF SALE. 

A bill of sale is a written agreement to another party, for a consider- 
ation to convey his right and interest in the personal property. The 
purchaser must take actual possession of the property. Juries have 
power to determine upon the fairness or unfairness of a bill of sale. 

COMMON FORM OF BILL OF SALE. 

Know all Men by this instrument, that I, Louis Clay, of Princeton, 
Illinois, of the first part, for and in consideration of Five Hundred 
and Ten dollars, to me paid by John Floyd, of the same place, of the 
second part, the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, have sold, and 
by this instrument do convey unto the said Floyd, party of the second 
part, his executors, administrators, and assigns, my undivided half of 
ten acres of corn, now growing on the farm of Thomas Tyrrell, in the 
town above mentioned ; one pair of horses, sixteen sheep, and five cows, 
belonging to me, and in my possession at the farm aforesaid ; to have and 
to hold the same unto the party of the second part, his executors and 
assigns, forever. And I d9, for myself and legal representatives, agree 
with the said party of the second part, and his legal representatives, to 
warrant and defend the sale of the afore-mentioned property and chattels 
unto the said party of the second part, and his legal representatives, 
against all and every person whatsoever. 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto affixed my hand, this tenth day 
of October, one thousand eight hundred and seventy-six. 

Louis Clay. 
BONDS. 

A bond is a written admission on the part of the maker in which he 
pledges a certain sum to another, at a certain time. 



ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 69 

COMMON FORM OF BOND. 

Know all Men by this instrument, that I, George Edgerton, of 
Watseka, Iroquois Count}^ State of Illinois, ara firmly bound unto Peter 
Kirchoff, of the place aforesaid, in the sum of five hundred dollars, to be 
paid to the said Peter Kirchoff, or his legal representatives ; to which 
payment, to be made, I bind myself, or my legal representatives, by this 
instrument. 

Sealed with my seal, and dated this second day of November, one 
thousand eight hundred and sixty-four. 

The condition of this bond is such that if I, George Edgerton, my 
heirs, administrators, or executors, shall promptly pay the sum of two 
hundred and fifty dollars in three equal annual payments from the date 
hereof, with annual interest, then the above obligation to be of no effect ; 
otherwise to be in full force and valid. 
Sealed and delivered in 

presence of George Edgerton. [l.s.] 

William Turner. 

CHATTEL MORTGAGES. 

A chattel mortgage is a mortgage on personal property for payment 
of a certain sum of money, to hold the property against debts of other 
creditors. The mortgage must describe the property, and must be 
acknowledged before a justice of the peace in the township or precinct 
where the mortgagee resides, and entered upon his docket, and must be 
recorded in the recorder's office of the county. 

GENERAL FORM OF CHATTEL MORTGAGE. 

This Indenture, made and entered into tliis first day of January, 
in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventy-five, 
between Theodore Lottinville, of the town of Geneseo in the County 
of Henry, and State of Illinois, party of the first part, and Paul Henshaw, 
of the same town, county, and State, party of the second part. 

Witnesseth, that the said party of the first part, for and in consider- 
ation of the sum of one thousand dollars, in hand paid, the receipt whereof 
is hereby acknowledged, does hereby grant, sell, convey, and confirm unto 
the said party of the second part, his heirs and assigns forever, all and 
singular the following described goods and chattels, to wit : 

Two three-year old roan-colored horses, one Burdett organ. No. 987, 
one Brussels carpet, 15x20 feet in size, one marble-top center table, one 
Home Comfort cooking stove. No. 8, one black walnut bureau with mirror 
attached, one set of parlor chairs (six in number), upholstered in green 
rep, with lounge corresponding with same in style and color of upholstery, 
now in possession of said Lottinville, at No. 4 Prairie Ave., Geneseo, 111.; 



70 ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 

Together with all and singular, the appurtenances thereunto belong- 
ing, or in any wise appertaining ; to have and to hold the above described 
goods and chattels, unto the said party of the second part, his heirs and 
assigns, forever. 

Provided, always, and these presents are upon this express condition, 
that if the said Theodore Lottinville, his heirs, executors, administrators, 
or assigns, shall, on or before the first day of January, A.D., one thousand 
eight hundred and seventy-six, pay, or cause to be paid, to the said Paul 
Ranslow, or his lawful attorney or attorneys, heirs, executors, adminis- 
trators, or assigns, the sum of One Thousand dollars, together with the 
interest that may accrue thereon, at the rate of ten per cent, per annum, 
from the first day of January, A.D. one thousand eight hundred and 
seventy-five, until paid, according to the tenor of one promissory note 
bearing even date herewith, for the payment of said sum of money, that 
then and from thenceforth, these presents, and everything herein con- 
tained, shall cease, and be null and void, anything herein contained to the 
contrary notwithstanding. 

Provided, also, that the said Theodore Lottinville may retain the 
possession of and have the use of said goods and chattels until the day 
of payment aforesaid ; and also, at his own expense, shall keep said goods 
and chattels; and also at the expiration of said time of payment, if said 
sum of money, together with the interest as aforesaid, shall not be paid, 
shall deliver up said goods and chattels, in good condition, to said Paul 
Ranslow, or his heirs, executors, administrators, or assigns. 

And provided, also, that if default in payment as aforesaid, by said 
party of the first part, shall be made, or if said party of the second part 
shall at any time before said promissory note becomes due, feel himself 
unsafe or insecure, that then the said party of the second part, or his 
attorney, agent, assigns, or heirs, executors, or administrators, shall have 
the right to take possession of said goods and chattels, wherever they 
may or can be found, and sell the same at public or private sale, to the 
highest bidder for cash in hand, after giving ten days' notice of the time 
and place of said sale, together with a description of the goods and chat- 
tels to be sold, by at least four advertisements, posted up in public places 
in the vicinity where said sale is to take place, and proceed to make the 
sum of money and interest promised as aforesaid, together with all reason- 
able costs, charges, and expenses in so doing ; and if there shall be any 
overplus, shall pay the same without delay to the said party of the first 
part, or his legal representatives. 

In testimony whereof, the said party of the first part has hereunto 
set his hand and affixed his seal, the day and year first above written. 
Signed, sealed and delivered in 

presence of Theodork Lottinville. [l.s.] 

Samuel J. Tilden. 



ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 71 



LEASE OF FARM AND BUILDINGS THEREON. 

This Indenture, made this second day of June, 1875, between David 
Patton of the Town of Bisbee, State of Illinois, of the first part, and John 
Doyle of the same place, of the second part, 

Witnesseth, that the said David Patton, for and in consideration of 
the covenants hereinafter mentioned and reserved, on the part of the said 
John Doyle, his executors, administrators, and assigns, to be paid, kept, 
and performed, hath let, and by these presents doth grant, demise, and 
let, unto the said John Doyle, his executors, administrators, and assigns, 
all that parcel of land situate in Bisbee aforesaid, bounded and described 
as follows, to wit : 

[Here describe the land.'\ 

Together with all the appurtenances appertaining thereto. To have 
and to hold the said premises, with appurtenances thereto belonging, unto 
the said Doyle, his executors, administrators, and assigns, for the term of 
five years, from the first day of October next following, at a yearly rent 
of Six Hundred dollars, to be paid in equal payments, semi-annually, as 
long as said buildings are in good tenantable condition. 

And the said Doyle, by these presents, covenants and agrees to pay 
all taxes and assessments, and keep in repair all hedges, ditches, rail, and 
other fences ; (the said David Patton, his heirs, assigns and administra- 
tors, to furnish all timber, brick, tile, and other materials necessary for 
such repairs.) 

Said Doyle further covenants and agrees to apply to said land, in a 
farmer-like manner, all manure and compost accumulating upon said 
farm, and cultivate all the arable land in a husbandlike manner, accord- 
ing to the usual custom among farmers in the neighborhood ; he also 
agrees to trim the hedges at a seasonable time, preventing injury from 
cattle to such hedges, and to all fruit and other trees on the said premises. 
That he will seed down with clover and timothy seed twenty acres yearly 
of arable land, ploughing the same number of acres each Spring of land 
now in grass, and hitherto unbroken. 

It is further agreed, that if the said Doyle shall fail to perform the 
whole or any one of the above mentioned covenants, then and in that 
case the said David Patton may declare this lease terminated, by giving 
three months' notice of the same, prior to the first of October of any 
year, and may distrain any part of the stock, goods, or chattels, or other 
property in possession of said Doyle, for sufficient to compensate for the 
non-performance of the above written covenants, the same to be deter- 
mined, and amounts so to be paid to be determined, by three arbitrators, 
chosen as follows : Each of the parties to this instrument to choose one, 



72 ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 

and the two so chosen to select a third ; the decision of said arbitrators 
to be final. 

In witness whereof, we have hereto set our hands and seals. 
Signed, sealed, and delivered 

in presence of David Patton. [l.s.] 

James Waldron. John Doyle. [l-s.] 

FORM OF LEASE OF A HOUSE. 

This Instrument, made the first day of October, 1875, witnesseth. 
that Amos Griest of Yorkville, County of Kendall, State of Illinois, hath 
rented from Aaron Young of Logansport aforesaid, the dwelling and lot 
No. 13 Ohio Street, situated in said City of Yorkville, for five years 
from the above, date, at the yearly rental of Three Hundred dollars, pay- 
able monthly, on the first day of each month, in advance, at the residence 
of said Aaron Young. 

At the expiration of said above mentioned term, the said Griest 
agrees to give the said Young peaceable possession of the said dwelling, 
in as good condition as when taken, ordinary wear and casualties excepted. 

In witness whereof, we place our hands and seals the day and year 
aforesaid. 

Signed, sealed and delivered Amos Griest. [l.s.] 

in presence of 

NiCKOLAS SCHUTZ, AARON YoUNG. [l.S.] 

Notary Public. 

LANDLORD'S AGREEMENT. 

This certifies that I have let and rented, this first day of January, 
1876, unto Jacob Schmidt, my house and lot, No. 15 Erie Street, in the 
City of Chicago, State of Illinois, and its appurtenances ; he to have the 
free and uninterrupted occupation thereof for one year from this date, at 
the yearly rental of Two Hundred dollars, to be paid monthly in advance ; 
rent to cease if destroyed by fire, or otherwise made untenantable. 

Peter Funk. 
TENANT'S AGREEMENT. 

This certifies that I have hired and taken from Peter Funk, his 
house and lot, No. 15 Erie Street, in the City of Chicago, State of Illi- 
nois, with appurtenances thereto belonging, for one year, to commence 
this day, at a yearly rental of Two Hundred dollars, to be paid monthly 
in advance ; unless said house becomes untenantable from fire or other 
causes, in which case rent ceases ; and I further agree to give and yield 
said premises one year from this first day of January 1876, in as good 
condition as now, ordinary wear and damage by the elements excepted. 

Given under my hand this day. Jacob Schmidt. 



ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 73 

NOTICE TO QUIT. 

To F. W. Arlen, 

Sir : Please observe that the term of one year, for which the house 
and land, situated at No. 6 Indiana Street, and now occupied by you, 
were rented to you, expired on the first day of October, 1875, and as I 
desire to repossess said premises, you are hereby requested and required 
to vacate the same. Respectfullv Yours, 

P. T. Barnum. 

Lincoln, Iseb., October 4, 1875. 

TENANT'S NOTICE OF LEAVING. 

Dear Sir : 

The premises I now occupy as your tenant, at No. 6 Indiana Street, 
I shall vacate on the first day of November, 1875. You will please take 
notice accordingly. 

Dated this tenth day of October, 1875. F. W. Arlen. 

To P. T. Barnum, Esq. 

REAL ESTATE MORTGAGE TO SECURE PAYMENT OF MONEY. 

This Indenture, made this sixteenth day of May, in the year of 
our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and seventy-two, between William 
Stocker, of Peoria, County of Peoria, and State of Illinois, and 011a, his 
wife, party of the first part, and Edward Singer, party of the second part. 

Whereas, the said party of the first part is justly indebted to the said 
party of tlie second part, in the sum of Two Thousand dollars, secured 
to be paid by two certain promissory notes (bearing even date herewith) 
the one due and payable at the Second National Bank in Peoria, Illinois, 
with interest, on the sixteenth day of May, in the year one thousand eight 
hundred and seventy-three ; the other due and payable at the Second 
National Bank at Peoria, 111., with interest, on the sixteenth day of May, 
in the year one thousand eight hundred and seventy-four. 

Now, therefore, this indenture witnesseth, that the said party of the 
first part, for the better securing the payment of the money aforesaid, 
with interest thereon, according to the tenor and effect of the said two 
promissory notes above mentioned ; and, also in consideration of the fur- 
ther sum of one dollar to them in hand paid by the said party of the sec- 
ond part, at the delivery of these presents, the receipt whereof is hereby 
acknowledged, have granted, bargained, sold, and conveyed, and by these 
presents do grant, bargain, sell, and convey, unto the said party of the 
second part, his heirs and assigns, forever, all that certain parcel of land, 
situate, etc. 

[Describing the premises.'] 

To have and to hold the same, together with all and singular the 
Tenements, Hereditaments, Privileges and Appurtenances thereunto 



74 . ABSTRACT OP ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 

belonging or in any wise appertaining. And also, all the estate, interest, 
and claim whatsoever, in law as well as in equity which the party of 
the first part have in and to the premises hereb}^ conveyed unto the said 
party of the second part, his heirs and assigns, and to their only proper 
use, benefit and behoof. And the said William Stocker, and 011a, his 
wife, party of the first part, hereby expressly waive, relinquish, release, 
and convey unto the said party of the second part, his heirs, executors, 
administrators, and assigns, all right, title, claim, interesl, and benefit 
whatever, in. and to the above described premises, and each and every 
part thereof, which is given b}'' or results from all laws of this state per- 
taining tQ the exemption of homesteads. 

Provided always, and these presents are upon this express condition, 
that if the said party of the first part, their heirs, executors, or adminis- 
trators, shall well and truly pay, or cause to be paid, to the said party of 
the second part, his heirs, executors, administrators, or assigns, the afore- 
said sums of money, with such interest thereon, at the time and in the 
manner specified in the above mentioned promissory notes, according to 
the true intent and meaning thereof, then in that case, these presents and 
every thing herein expressed, shall be absolutely null and void. 

In witness whereof, the said party of the first part hereunto set their 
hands and seals the day and year first above written. 
Signed, sealed and delivered in presence of 

James Whitehead, William Stocker. [l.s.] 

Fred. Samuels. Olla Stocker. [l.s.] 

WARRANTY DEED WITH COVENANTS. 

This Indenture, made this sixth day of April, in the year of our 
Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventy-two, between Henrj Best 
of Lawrence, County of Lawrence, State of Illinois, and Belle, his wife, 
of the first part, and Charles Pearson of the same place, of the second part, 

Witnesseth, that the said party of the first part, for and in consideration 
of the s'lm of Six Thousand dollars in hand paid by the said party of the 
second part, the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, have granted, 
bargained, and sold, and by these presents do grant, bargain, and sell, 
unto the said party of the second part, his heirs and assigns, all the fol- 
lowing described lot, piece, or parcel of land, situated in the City of Law- 
rence, in the County of Lawrence, and State of Illinois, to wit : 
[^Here describe the property.^ 

Together with all and singular the hereditaments and appurtenances 
thereunto belonging or in any wise appertaining, and the reversion and 
reversions, remainder and remainders, rents, issues, and profits thereof ; 
and all the estate, rignt, title, interest, claim, and demand whatsoever, of 
the said party of the nrst part, either in law or equity, of, in, and to the 



ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. . ' 75 

above bargained premises, with the hereditaments and appurtenances. 
To have and to hold the said premises above bargained and described, 
with the appurtenances, unto the said party of the second part, his heirs 
and assigns, forever. And the said Henry Best, and Belle, his wife, par- 
ties of the first part, hereby expressly waive, release, and relinquish unto 
the said party of the second part, his heirs, executors, administrators, and 
assigns, all right, title, claim, interest, and benefit whatever, in and to the 
above described premises, and each and every part thereof, wliich is given 
by or results from all laws of this state pertaining to the exemption of 
homesteads. 

And the said Henry Best, and Belle, his wife, party of the first 
part, for themselves and their heirs, executors, and administrators, do 
covenant, grant, bargain, and agree, to and with the said party of the 
second part, his heirs and assigns, that at the time of the ensealing and 
delivery of these presents they were well seized of the premises above 
conveyed, as of a good, sure, perfect, absolute, and indefeasible estate of 
inheritance in law, and in fee simple, and have good right, full power, 
and lawful authority to grant, bargain, sell, and convey the same, in 
manner and form aforesaid, and that the same are free and clear from all 
former and other grants, bargains, sales, liens, taxes, assessments, and 
encumbrances of what kind or nature soever ; and the above bargained 
premises in the quiet and peaceable possession of the said party of the 
second part, his heirs and assigns, against all and every person or persons 
lawfully claiming or to claim the whole or any part thereof, the said party 
of the first part shall and will warrant and forever defend. 

In testimony whereof, the said parties of the first part have hereunto 
set their hands and seals the day and year first above written. 
Signed, sealed and delivered 

in presence of Henry Best, [l.s.] 

Jerry Linklater. Belle Best. [l.s.] 

QUIT-CLAIM DEED. 

This Indenture, made the eighth day of June, in the year of our 
Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventy-four, between David Tour, 
of Piano, County of Kendall, State of Illinois, party of the first part, 
and Larry O'Brien, of the same place, party of the second part, 

Witnesseth, that the said party of the first part, for and in considera- 
tion of Nine Hundred dollars in hand paid by the said party of the sec- 
ond part, the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, and the said party 
of the second part forever released and discharged therefrom, has remised, 
released, sold, conveyed, and quit-claimed, and by these presents does 
remise, release, sell, convey, and quit-claim, unto the said party of the 
second part, his heirs and assigns, forever, all the right, title, interest, 



76 



ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 



claim, and demand, which the said party of the first part has in and to 
the following described lot, piece, or parcel of land, to wit : 
[Here describe the land.'] 

To have and to hold the same, together with all and singular the 
appurtenances and privileges thereunto belonging, or in any wise there- 
unto appertaining, and all the estate, right, title, interest, and claim 
whatever, of the said party of the first part, either in law or equity, to 
the only proper use, benefit, and behoof of the said party of the second 
part, his heirs and assigns forever. 

In witness whereof tlie said party of the first part hereunto set his 
hand and seal the day and year above written. 

Signed, sealed and delivered, David Tour. [l.s.I 

in presence of 
Thomas Ashley. 

The above forms of Deeds and Mortgage are such as have heretofore 
been generally used, but the following are much shorter, and are made 
equally valid by the laws of this state. 

WARRANTY DEED. 

The grantor (here insert name or names and place of residence), for 
and in consideration of (here insert consideration) in hand paid, coiweys 

desci bed rea estate (here insert description), situated in the County of 

m the btate of Illinois. -^ 

Dated this day of A. D. 18 . 

QUIT CLAIM DEED. 

Hpr.n?!''f ^'Tu*''' ^^'""-l '""'^'^ gi'antor's name or names and place of resi- 
dence).;or the consideration of (here insert consideration) convev and 
qu t-claim to (here insert grantee's name or names) all interest in the 
following described real estate (here insert description), situated in the 

County of m the State of Illinois. 

Dated this day of A. D. 18 . 

MORTGAGE. 

T]ie mortgagor (here insert name or names) mortgages and warrants 
to (here insert name or names of mortgagee or mortga|ees), to seluie the 
pavment of (here recite the nature and amount of indebtedness shiwW 
when cue and the rate of interest, and whether secured by note or other? 

sTua^'e din ^1 'r'"§' ^«T^^^ ''^^ '"'^'^ ^'^^'^ insert description thereof), 

situated in the County of m the State of Ilhnois. 

Dated this day of A. D. 18 . 

RELEASE. 

Know all Men by these presents, that I, Peter Ahlund, of Chicago, 
of the County of Cook, and State of Illinois, for and in consideration of 
One dollar, to me in hand paid, and for other good and valuable considera- 



ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 77 

tions, the receipt whereof is hereby confessed, do hereby grant, bargain, 
remise, convey, release, and quit-claim unto Joseph Carlin of Chicago, 
of the County of Cook, and State of Illinois, all the right, title, interest, 
claim, or demand whatsoever, I may have acquired in, through, or by a 
certain Indenture or Mortgage Deed, bearing date the second day of Jan- 
uary, A. D. 1871, and recorded in the Recorder's office of said county, 
in book A of Deeds, page 46, to the premises therein described, and which 
said Deed was made to secure one certain promissory note, bearing even 
date with said deed, for the sum of Three Hundred dollars. 

Witness my hand and seal, this second day of November, A. D. 1874. 

Peter Ahlund. [l.s.] 

State of Illinois, \ 

Cook County. j ' I, George Saxton, a Notary Public in 

and for said county, in the state aforesaid, do hereby 

certify that Peter Ahlund, personally known to me 

as the same person whose name is subscribed to the 

foregoing Release, appeared before me this day in 

[ ^^s^aI!'^ ] person, and acknowledged that he signed, sealed, and 

delivered the said instrument of writing as his free 

and voluntary act, for the uses and purposes therein 

set forth. 

Given under my hand and seal, this second day of 
November, A. D. 1874. 

George Saxton, N. P. 

GENERAL FORM OF WILL FOR REAL AND PERSONAL PROPERTY. 

I, Charles Mansfield, of the Town of Salem, County of Jackson, 
State of Illinois, being aware of the uncertainty of life, and in failing 
liealth, but of sound mind and memory, do make and declare this to be 
my last will and testament, in manner following, to wit: 

First. I give, devise and bequeath unto my oldest son, Sidney H. 
Mansfield, the sum of Two Thousand Dollars, of bank stock, now in the 
Third National Bank of Cincinnati, Ohio, and the farm owned by myself 
in the Town of Buskirk, consisting of one hundred and sixty acres, with 
all the houses, tenements, and improvements thereunto belonging ; to 
have and to hold unto my said son, his heirs and assigns, forever. 

Second. I give, devise and bequeath to each of my daughters, Anna 
Louise Mansfield and Ida Clara Mansfield, each Two Thousand dollars in 
bank stock, in the Third National Bank of Cincinnati, Ohio, and also each 
one quarter section of land, owned by myself, situated in the Town of 
Lake, Illinois, and recorded in my name in the Recorder's office in the 
county where such land is located. The north one hundred and sixty 
acres of said half section is devised to my eldest daughter, Anna Louise. 
6 



78 ABSTRACT OP ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 

Third. I give, devise and bequeath to my son, Frank Alfred Mans- 
field, Five shares of Railroad stock in the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, 
and my one hundred and sixty acres of land and saw mill thereon, situ- 
ated in Manistee, Michigan, with all the improvements and appurtenance& 
thereunto belonging, which said real estate is recorded in my name in the 
county where situated. 

Fourtli. I give to my wife, Victoria Elizabeth Mansfield, all my 
household furniture, goods, chattels, and personal property, about my 
home, not hitherto disposed of, including Eight Thousand dollars of bank 
stock in the Third National Bank of Cincinnati, Ohio, Fifteen shares in 
the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, and the free and unrestricted use, pos- 
session, and benefit of the home farm, so long as she may live, in lieu of 
dower, to which she is entitled by law ; said farm being ray present place 
of residence. 

Fifth. I bequeath to my invalid father, Elijah H. Mansfield, the 
income from rents of my store building at 145 Jackson Street, Chicago, 
Illinois, during the term of his natural life. Said building and land there- 
with to revert to my said sons and daughters in equal proportion,, upon 
the demise of my said father. 

Sixth. It is also my will "and desire that, at the death of my wife^ 
Victoria Elizabeth Mansfield, or at any time when she tnay arrange to* 
relinquish her life interest in the above mentioned homestead, the same 
may revert to my above named children, or to the lawful heirs of each. 

And lastly. I nominate and appoint as executors of this my last will 
and testament, my wife, Victoria Elizabeth Mansfield, and my eldest son, 
Sidney H. Mansfield. 

I further direct that my debts and necessary funeral expenses shad 
be paid from moneys now on deposit in the Savings Bank of Salem, the 
residue of such moneys to revert to my wife, Victoria Elizabeth Mansfield, 
for her use forever. 

In witness whereof, I, Charles Mansfield, to this my last will ami 
testament, have hereunto set my hand and seal, this fourth day of April,. 
eighteen hundred and seventy-two. 



Signed, sealed, and declared by Charles 1 
Mansfield, as and for his last will and 
testament, in the presence of us, who, 
at his request, and in his presence, and 
in the presence of each other, have sub- 
scribed our names hereunto as witnesses 
thereof. 

Peter A. Schenck, Sycamore, Ills.. 

Frank E. Dext, Salem, Ills. 



Charles Mansfield, [l.s.]; 



Charles Mansfield, [l.s.] 



ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 79 

CODICIL 

Whereas I, Charles Mansfield, did, on the fourth day of April, one 
thousand eight hundred and seventy-two, make my last will and testa- 
ment, I do now, by this writing, add this codicil to my said will, to be 
taken as a part thereof. 

Whereas, by the dispensation of Providence, my daughter, Anna 
Louise, has deceased November fifth, eighteen hundred and seventy-three, 
and whereas, a son has been born to me, which son is now christened 
Richard Albert Mansfield, I give and bequeath unto him my gold watch, 
and all right, interest, and title in lands and bank stock and chattels 
bequeathed to my deceased daughter, Anna Louise, in the body of this will. 

In witness whereof, I hereunto place my hand and seal, this tenth 
day of March, eighteen hundred and seventy-five. 

Signed, sealed, published, and declared to^ 

us by the testator, Charles Mansfield, as 

and for a codicil to be annexed to his 

last will and testament. And we, at 

his request, and in his presence, and in 

the presence of each other, have sub- 
scribed our names as witnesses thereto, 

at the date hereof. 
Frank E. Dent, Salem, Ills. 
John C. Shay, Salem, Ills. 



CHURCH ORGANIZATIONS 

May be legally made by electing or appointing^ according to the usages 
or customs of the body of which it is a part, at any meeting held for that 
purpose, two or more of its members as trustees, wardens or vestrymen, and 
may adopt a corporate name. The chairman or secretary of such meeting 
shall, as soon as possible, make and file in the office of the recorder of 
deeds of the county, an affidavit substantially in the following form : 

State of Illinois, 

County. 



ss. 



I, , do solemnly swear (or affirm, as the case may be), 

that at a meeting of the members of the (here insert the name of the 
church, society or congregation as known before organization), held at 

(here insert place of meeting), in the County of , and State of 

Illinois, on the day of , A.D. 18 — , for that purpose, the fol- 
lowing persons were elected (or appointed) [here insert their names~\ 
trustees, wardens, vestrymen, (or officers by whatever name they may 
choose to adopt, with powers similar to trustees) according to the rules 
and usages of sueb (church, society or conoregation), and said 



80 ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 

adopted as its corporate name (here insert name), and at' said meeting 
this affiant acted as (chairman or secretary, as the case may be). 

Subscribed and sworn to before me, this day of , A.D. 

IS — . Name of Affiant 

which affidavit must be recorded by the recorder, and shall be, or a certi- 
fied copy made by the recorder, received as evidence of such an incorpo- 
ration. 

JVo certificate of election after the first need be filed for record. 

The term of office of the trustees and the general government of the 
society can be determined by the rules or by-laws adopted. Failure to 
elect trustees at the time provided does not work a dissolution, but the 
old trustees hold over. A trustee or trustees may be removed, in the 
same manner by the society as elections are held by a meeting called for 
that purpose. The property of the society vests in the corporation. The 
corporation may hold, or acquire by purchase or otherwise, land not 
exceeding ten acres, for the purpose of the society. The trustees have 
the care, custody and control of the property of the corporation, and can, 
when directed by the society, erect houses or improvements, and repair 
and alter the same, and may also when so directed by the society, 
mortgage, encumber, sell and convey any real or personal estate belonging 
to the corporation, and make all proper contracts in the name of such 
corporation. But the}^ are prohibited by law from encumbering or inter- 
fering with any property so as to destroy the effect of any gift, grant, 
devise or bequest to the corporation ; but such gifts, grants, devises or 
bequests, must in all cases be used so as to carry out the object intended 
. by the persons making the same. Existing societies may organize in the 
manner herein set forth, and have all the advantages thereof. 

SUGGESTIONS TO THOSE PURCHASING BOOKS BY SUBSCRIPTION. 

The business of publishing books by subscription having so often been 
brought into disrepute by agents making representations and declarations 
not authorized by the publisher ; in order to prevent that as much as possi- 
ble, and that there may be more general knowledge of the relation such 
agents bear to their principal, and the law governing such cases, the fol- 
lowing statement is made : 

A subscription is in the nature of a contract of mutual promises, by 
which the subscriber agrees to pay a certain sum for the work described ; 
the consideration is concurrent that the publisher shall publish the book 
named, and deliver the same, for which the subscriber is to pay the price 
named. The nature and character of the work is described in the prospectus 
and by the sample shoivn. These should be carefully examined before sub- 
scribing, as they are the basis and consideration of the promise to pay, 



ABSTRACT OF Ii^LINOIS STATE LAWS. 81 

and not the too often exaggerated statements of the agents who is merely 
employed to solicit subscriptions, for which he is usually pa?c^ a commission 
for each subscriber, and has no authority to change or alter the conditions 
upon which the subscriptions are authorized to be made by the publisher. 
Should the agent assume to agree to make the subscription conditional or 
modify or change the agreement of the publisher, as set out by prospectus 
and sample, in order to bind the principal, the subscriber should see that 
sucli conditions or changes are stated over or in connection with his signa- 
ture, so that the publisher may have notice of the same. 

All persons making contracts in reference to matters of this kind, or 
any other business, should remember that the law as to written contracts is, 
that they can not be varied, altered or rescinded verbally, but if done at all, 
must be done in writing. It is therefore important that all persons contem- 
plating subscribing should distinctly understand that all talk before or after 
the subscription is made, is not admissible as evidence, and is no part of the 
contract. 

Persons employed to solicit subscriptions are known to the trade as 
canvassers. They are agents appointed to do a particular business in a 
prescribed mode, and have no authority to do it in any other way to the 
prejudice of their principal, nor can they bind their principal in any other 
matter. They cannot collect money, or agree that payment may be made 
in anything else but money. They can not extend tlie time of payment 
beyond the time of delivery, nor. bind their principal for the payment of 
expenses incurred in their buisness. 

Itivoidd save a great deal of trouble, and often serious loss, if persons, 
before signing their names to any subscription hook, or any written insti'u- 
ment, would examine carefully whatit is : if they c;iii not read themselves, 
should call on some one disinterest"ed who can. 



82 



MISCELLANEOUS LSTFOKMATION. 



INTEREST TABLE. 

A Simple Rule for Accurately Computing Interest at Any Given Per Cent, for 
Any Length of Time. 

Multiply the principal (amount of money at interest) by the iitne reduced to day-': : then 
divide this product by the quotient obtained by dividing 360 (the number of days in the interest 
year) by the per cent, of interest, and the quotient thus obtained will be the required interest. 
illustration. Solution. 

Require the interest of $462.50 for one month and eighteen days at $462 50 

6 per cent. An interest month is 30 days ; one month and eighteen days .48 

equal 48 days. $462.50 multiplied by .48 gives 222,0000; 360 divided 

by 6 (the per cent, of interest) gives 60, and $222.0000 divided by 60 370000 

will give you the exact interest, which is $3.70. If the rate of interest 6)36o\ 185 000 
in the above example were 12 per cent., we would divide the $222.0000 7T) *222 ooooCSft-^ "o 
by 30 (because 360 divided by 12 gives 30) ; if 4 per cent,, we would „ ' yvi-' 

divide by 90 ; if 8 per cent , by 45 ; and in like manner for any other 

per cent. 420 

420 



MISCELLANEOUS TABLE. 



00 



12 units, or things, l Dozen. 

12 dozen, i Gross. 

20 things, I Score. 
ig6 pounds, i Barrel of Flour. 
200 pounds, I Barrel of Pork. 



56 pounds, I Firkin of Butter.. 
24 sheets of paper, i Quire. 
20 quires paper I Ream. 

4 feet wide, 4 feet high, and 8 feet long, i Cord 
of Wood. 



POPULATION OF THE 
UNITED STATES. 



States axd Tekritorier. 


Total 
Population. 




484.471 




560;247 




537.454 




■ 12.5 015 


Florida 


187,748 


GeJJixia:. :::;;:::::::::::;:::::::::::::::::;: 




Illinois 


2 539 891 






Iowa . 


1 191 792 




.364399 




1 321 Oil 




726:915 


5Jti^?^Kd;:::::;;;;::::::::::::;.:;:::::::::: 

^fc^S.'.'"."::.\-:.'.V.-::::;;:;-:;;:::;:;;:; 


1,457,351 
l!l84:059 




439 706 




827:932 


Missouri 


1 721 295 






Nevada 


42 491 




318.300 




906 096 


Nlw'YorT."::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 






1 071 361 




2,665.260 
90 923 




pem,°yivania.::;;:-::;;:-;;:::;::::::::::::: 


3,521,791 
217 353 




705,606 

1,25S520 

818,579 

330 551 






Vermont 


Virginia 


1,225,163 

1,054:670 

38,113,253 

9,658 
39:864 
14,181 
131.700 


West Virginia 




Total States 

Arizona 

Colorada 


District of Columbia 






Utah 


86 786 






Wyoming 




Total Territories 


442 730 


Total United States 


38,555.983 



POPULATION OF FIFTY 
PRINCIPAL CITIES. 



Cities. 


Aggregate 
Population. 


NewYorlcN. Y 

Philadelphia, Pa • • • 

Brooklyn, N. Y 

St. Louis, Mo 


674:022 


Chicago, 111 


298 977 




267:354 




191 418 




New Orleans La 


San Francisco, Cal 


149:473 
105 0£9 


Washington, D. C 

Newark N. J 


Loiiisville, Ky 

Cleveland Oliio 


100,753 




86 076 


.Jersey City, N. J 




Milwaukee Wis 


71 440 




69422 






)^^^:s^'^y::::::::::::::::::::::::::::. 


53 180 


Ril^nnonS; v^;::::'::::::::::::::::::::::: 




New Haven, Conn 

Charleston, S. C 

Indiananolis Ind 


f^^ 


T"oy K.;.. . ::::::::':'':':;::':::::::: 














40 928 






Cambridge Mass 


39,634 


Hartford" Coun 




35 092 








S3 579 


Kansas City Mo 




Mobile Ala 


32 034 


Toledo' Ohio 






31 413 




31 274 




30 S41 




30 473 






Utica N. Y 


2f!'804 




23 323 






Lynn M.iss ' ' 


28 233 


Fall Rivei-, Mass 


26:766 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 



83 



POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES. 



staffs. 

Alabama 

Arkansas.. . 
California... 
Connecticut.. 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Illinois 

Indiana 



Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts. 

Michigan* .. 

Minnesota 



Missouri 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina. 

Ohio 

Oregon 



50,722 

53,198 

188,981 

4.674 

591368 
58,000 
55,410 
33,809 
55,045 
81,318 
37,600 
41,346 
31,176 
11,184 
7,800 
56,451 
8.3,531 
47,156 
65,350 
75,9fi5 
113,090 
9,380 
8.320 
47,000 
50,704 
39,964 
95,344 



Population. 



996, 
484. 
560, 
537, 
125, 
187, 
1,184, 
3,539, 



780, 

1,457. 

1,184 

439, 

837, 

1,731 

133, 

43, 

318 

906, 

4,382, 

1,071, 

2,665, 

90. 



260 
923 
Last Census of Michigan taken in 1874 



1,651,913 

1,334,03.1 

598,439 



466 
2,108 
5,904 
3,529 
3,160 
1,760 
1,133 
539 
871 



593 

'<90 

1.365 

4,470 

i.r~ 

3,740 
lo9 



Strifes. 
Pennsylvania... 
Rhode Island... 
South Carolina. 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Vermont 

Virginia 

West Virginia... 
Wisconsin 



Total States 

Territories. 

Arizona 

Color.ido 

Dakota 

JJist. of Columbia. 

Idaho 

Montana 

New Mexico 

Utah 

Washington 

Wyoming 



Tofnl Territories. 



46,000 
1,306 
29,385 
45,600 
237,504 
10,312 
40,904 
33,000 
53,934 



,950,17 



Population. 



3,531,791 
317,353 
705,606 

1,258,520 
818,579 
3 HO. 551 

1,23.5,163 
442.014 

1,054.670 



38,113,353 



Miles 
K. R. 

1873. 



.301 

„530 
865 
675 

,490 
485 

:.735 



375 
"498 



Aggregate of U. S.. 2,915,203 38,555,9831 60,853 

* Included in the Railroad Mileage of Maryland. 



PRINCIPAL COUNTRIES OF THE WORLD; 

I'OPULATION AND ArEA. 



COUNTKIBS. 


Population. 


Date of 
Census. 


Area in 
Souare 
iVIIIes. 


Inhabitants 

'°Miir' 


Capitals. 


Population. 




446,500 000 
336,817,108 
81,935,410 
38,935,600 

34,785,300 
31,817,100 
39,906,093 
37.439,931 
16.643,000 

5,000,000 
4:86l',400 

ISS 

2,669.100 
3,500,000 
3,000.000 

l',8l'8:500 

J;Io«o%^o%« 
\:tU:Z 

7181000 
600,000 
573.000 

350!oi)0 
136.000 

'tiro 


1871 
1871 

1870 

ii 

'1871 

III! 
11 

i? 

1870 

\lti 

1871 
1871 
1871 

1871 
1871 
1871 

1870 


3,741,846 
4,677,432 

160,207 
13! 680 

m-in 

15,992 

471.838 

^^ 

14;753 
19:353 

'kill 

9,576 
10;2b5 


119.3 

foi 

7.78 
178.7 
149.4 
232.8 
262.3 

IIU 

t07 
24.4 

■ io. 

44l:i 

165.9 
115.8 
290.9 

ii:l 
1.1 

241.4 
120.9 

34^:^ • 

1 

lit 
56. 

If 

80. 


Pekin 

London 

Ht. Petersburg 

Washington 




IJritish Empire 


3 251 800 






United States with Alaska. . . . 


109,199 




Vienna 


833 900 






Great Britain and Ireland. . . . 

Uerinan Empire 

Italy 


London 

nerlin 


3,251.800 
825.400 
244.484 




Madrid 


332 (lOi) 










Constantinople .... 




Mexico 


'210 300 




136 900 


Persia 


Teheran . . . 


120 000 




Brussels 

Munich 




IJavaria 


169 500 




224,063 


Holland 


Ha"-ue 


90 100 






45000 


Chili 


Santian-o 


115 400 




Berne .::: :■.:::::::: 


36000 




Lima... 






25'000 




Buenos Ayres 




Wurtemburg 


91 600 












47 000 












43 400 






40000 










Asuncion 


48 000 






30 000 


Liberia 


Monrovia 


3 000 




,Sal Salvador 

M^untua^"""^ 




Hayti.. 


20 000 








Monte°V.deo 






12 boo 




San Domingo 








Hawaii 


Hnnolnln 


7,633 



84 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 



POPULATION OF ILLINOIS, 
By Counties. 



COUNTIES. 



Adams 

Alexander. . 

Bond 

Boone 

Brown 

Bureau 

Calhoun . - . 

Carroll 

Cass 

Champaign _ 
Christian - . 

Clark 

Clay 

• Clinton 

Coles 

Cook 

Crawford 

Cumberland 
De Kalb._- 
De Witt... 

Douglas 

Du Page... 

Edgar 

Edwards 

Effingham. . 

Fayette 

Ford 

Franklin _ . . 

Fulton 

Gallatin ... 

Greene 

Grundy 

Hamilton . . 

Hancock 

Hardin 

Henderson _ 

Henry 

Iroquois 

Jackson 

Jasper 

Jefferson 

Jersey 

Jo Daviess. 
Johnson — 

Kane 

Kankakee. . 
Kendall ... 

Knox 

Lake 

La Salle 

Lawrencij.. 

Lee 

Livingston . 
Loijau . 



56362 
10564 
13152 
12942 
12205 
32415 
6562 
16705 
11580 
32737 
20363 
18719 
15875 
16285 
25235 
349966 

138S9 
12223 
23265 
14768 
13484 
16685 
21450 

7565 
15653 
1963S 

9103 
12652 
38291 
I "34 
20277 
14938 
13014 
35935 

5113 
12582 
35506 
25782 
19634 
11234 
17S64 
15054 
27820 
1124S 
39091 
24352 
12399 
39522 
2ior4 
60792 
12533 
27171 
31471 
23053 



41323 
4707 
9815 
11678 
9938 
26426 
5144 
11733 
11325 
14629 
10492 
14987 
9336 
10941 
14203 
144954 

115 

8311 
19086 
10820 

7140 
14701 
16925 

5454 

7816 
11189 

1979 

9393 
33338 

S05 
16093 
10379 

9915 
29061 

3759 

950 
20660 
1232 

9589 

8364 
12965 
12051 
27325 

9342 
30062 
15412 
13074 
28663 
18257 
48332 

9214 
17651 
11637 
14272 



26508 
2484 
6144 

7624 
719S 
8841 
3231 
4586 
7253 
2649 
3203 
9532 
4289 
5139 
9335 
43385 



3718! 
7540, 
5002 



92901 
10692 
3524; 
3799^ 
S075 



5681 

22508 
5448 

12429 
3023; 
6362 

14652 
28S7: 
4612J 
3807; 
41491 
5862^ 
3220! 
8109 
73541 

18604, 
41141 

I 6703 I 



7730. 
132791 

142261 

17815 
6121 
5-29S 
i553j 
5128! 



14476 
3313 
5060 
1705 
4183 
3367 
1741 
1023 
2981 
1475 
1878 
7453 
3228 
37X8 
9616 

10201 

4422 



1697 
3247 



3535 

8225! 
3070! 
i67sl. 
6328' 



12601 
1695 
3566 
1472 
5762 
4535 
61S0 
3626 
6501 



7060 
2634 
9348 
7092 
2035 
759 
2333 



:i86j. 
[39O1 
5124! 



3940 

755 



4071 
1649 



2704 



39451 2616 
9946} 4S3 

1378! 



1828! 
255? 



211T 
1596 



3668 



626 
2931 



=^23 
2999 



63 



3682; 4083 

13142! I84I:_. 

107601 7405 3155 

II95I 7674' 



1542 

691 



843 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 



85 



POPULATION OF ILLINOIS— Concluded. 



AGGREGATE. 



850. 1840. 1830. 



Macon 

Macoupin.. 

Madison 

Marion 

Marshall — 

Mason 

Massac 

McDonough 
Mc Henry .. 

McLean 

Menard 

Mercer 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Morgan 

Moultrie 

Ogle 

Peoria 

Perry 

Piatt 

Pike.. 

Pope 

Pulaski 

Putnam 

Randolpli... 
Richland _ .. 
Rock Island 

Saline 

Sangamon .. 

Schuyler 

Scott 

Shelby 

Stark'. 

St. Clair 

Stephenson., 

Tazewell 

Union 

Vermilion . _ 
Wabash ... 

Warren 

Washington 

Wayne 

White 

Whitesides . 

Will 

Williamson. 
Winnebago. 
Woodford . _ 

Total.. 



26481 
32726 
44131 
20622 
16950 
16184 
9581 
26509 
23762 
539S8 
11735 
18769 

12982 
253'4 
2S463 
103S5 
27492 
47540 
13723 
10953 
3070S 
11437 
8752 
62S0 
20859 
12803 
29783 
12714 
46352 
17419 
10530 
25476 
10751 

51068 
30608 
27903 
1651S 
30388 
8841 
23174 
17599 
19758 
16846 
27503 
43013 
17329 
29301 
18956 



13738 
24602 
31251 
12739 
13437 
10931 

6213 
20069 
22089 
28772 

9584 
15042 

12832 

13979 
22112 

6385 
2288S 
36601 
9552 
6127 

27249 
6742 
3943 
5587 

17205 
9711 

21005 
9331 

32274 

14684 
9069 

14613 
9004 

37694 
25112 
21470 

19800 
7313 
18336 
13731 
12223 
12403 
18737 
29321 
12205 
24491 
13282 



12355 
20441 
6720 
5180 
5921 
4092 
7616 
14978 
10163 
6349 
5246 

7679 
6277 

16064 
3234 

10020 

17547 
527S 
1606 

18819 
3975 
2265 
3924 

1 1079 
4012 
6937 
5588 

19228 

10573 
7914 
7807 
3710 

20180 
1 1666 
12052 
7615 
11492 
4690 
8176 
6953 
6825 
8925 
5361 
16703 
7216 
11773 
4415 



3039 
7926 
14433 
4742 
1849 



5308 
2578 
6565 
4431 
2352 

4481 
4490 
19547 



3479 
6153 
3222 



11728 
4094 



2131 
7944 



2610 



14716 
6972 
6215 
6659 
1573 

13631 
2800 
7221 
5524 
9303 
4240 
6739 
4810 
5133 
7919 
2514 

10167 
4457 
4609 



1990 
6221 
2125 



IV') 



2000 
2953 
12714 



('•) 



2396 
3316 



'•1310 
4429 



12960 
(^2959 



7078 



4716 
3239 
5836 
271 
308 
1675 
2553 
6ogi 



253980 



851470 476183 



€6 CONSTITD-TION OP THE UNITED STATES 



CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, 
AND ITS AMENDxMENTS. 

We, the people of the United States, in order to form a more perfect union, 
establish justice, insure domestic tranquillity, provide for the common 
defense, promote the general iv elf are, and secure the blessings of liberty 
to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution 
for the United States of America. \ 

Article I. 

Section 1, All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in 
a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and 
House of Representatives. 

Sec. 2. The House of Representatives shall be composed of mem- 
bers chosen every second year by the people of the several states, and the 
electors in each state shall have the qualifications requisite for electors of 
the most numerous branch of the State Legislature. 

No person shall be a representative who shall not have attained to the 
age of twenty-five years, and been seven years a citizen of the United 
States, and who shall not, when elected, be an inhabitant of that state in 
which he shall be chosen. 

Representatives and direct taxes shall be apportioned among the sev- 
eral states which may be included within this Union, according to their 
respective numbers, which shall be determined by adding to the whole 
number of free persons, including those bound to service for a term of 
years, and excluding Indians not taxed, three-fifths of all other persons. 
The actual enumeration shall be made within three years after the first 
meeting of the Congress of the United States, and within every subse- 
quent terra of ten years, in such manner as they shall by law direct. The 
numljer of Representatives shall not exceed one for every thirty thousand, 
but each state shall have at least one Representative ; and until such 
enumeration shall be made the State of New Hampshire shall be entitled 
to choose three, Massachusetts eight, Rhode Island and Providence Plan- 
tations one, Connecticut five. New York six. New Jersey four, Pennsylva- 
nia eight, Delaware one, Maryland six, Virginia ten, North Carolina five, 
and Georgia three. 

When vacancies happen in the representation from any state, the 
Executive authority thereof shall issue writs of election to fill such 
vacancies. 

The House of Representatives shall choose their Speaker and other 
officers, and shall have the sole power of impeachment. 

Sec. 3. The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two 
Senators from each state, chosen by the Legislature thereof for six years ; 
and each Senator shdll have one vote. 

Immediately after they shall be assembled in consequence of -the first 
election, they shall be divided as equally as may be into three classes. 
The seats of the Senators of the first class shall be vacated at the expira- 



AND ITS AMENDMENTS, 87 

tion of the second year, of the second class at the expiration of the fourth 
year, and of the third class at the expiration of the sixth year, so that 
one-third may be chosen every second year; and if vacancies happen by 
resicrnation or otherwise, during the recess of the Legislature of any state, 
the Executive thereof may make temporary appointments until the next 
meeting of the Legislature, which shall then fill such vacancies. 

No person shall be a Senator who shall not have attained to the age 
of thirty years and been nine years a citizen of the United States, and 
who shall not, when elected, be an inhabitant of that state for which he 

shall be chosen. , „ , -n. ■^ ^ j? i-i, 

The Vice-President of the United States shall be President of the 
Senate, but shall have no vote unless they be equally divided. _ 

The Senate shall choose their other officers, and also a President pra 
tempore, in the absence of the Vice-President, or when he shall exercise 
the office of President of the United States. 

The Senate shall have the sole power to try all impeachments. W hen 
sittino- for that purpose they shall be on oath or affirmation. When the 
President of the United States is tried the Chief Justice shall preside. 
And no person shall be convicted without the concurrence of two-thirds 
of the members present. i . ., ^i . 

Judgment, in cases of impeachment, shall not extend further than to 
removal from office, and disqualification to hold and enjoy any office of 
honor, trust, or profit under the United States ; but the party convicted 
shall nevertheless be liable and subject to indictment, trial, judgment, 
and punishment according to law. 

Sec. 4. The times, places and manner of holding elections tor ben- 
ators and Representatives shall be prescribed in each state by the Legis- 
lature thereof; but the Congress may at any time by law make or alter 
such regulations, except as to the places of choosing Senators. 

The Congress shall assemble at least once in every year, and such 
■ meeting shall be on the first Monday in December, unless they shall by 
law appoint a different day. - . ^ ' a 

Sec. 5. Each house shall be the judge of the election, returns, and 
qualifications of its own members, and a majority of each shall constitute 
a quorum to do business ; but a smaller number may adjourn Irom day to 
day, and may be authorized to compel the attendance of absent members 
in such manner and under such penalties as each house may provide. 

Each house may determine the rules of its proceedings, punish its 
members for disorderly behav_ior, and, with the concurrence of two-thirds, 
expel a member. ^- ^- 

Each house shall keep a jourital of its proceedings, and troni time to 
time publish the same, excepting such parts as may, in their judgment, 
require secrecy ; and the yeas and nays of the members of either house 
on any question shall, at the desire of one-fifth of those present, be entered 
on the journal. , 

Neither house, during the session of Congress, shall, without the 
consent of the other, adjourn for more than three days, nor to any other 
place than that in which the two houses shall be sitting. 

.■ .' Sec. 6. The Senators and Representatives shall receive a compen- 
sati-fe for their services, to be ascertained by law, and paid out ot the 
treasury of the United States. They shall in all cases, except treason, 



»» CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES 

felony, and breach of the peace, be privileged from arrest during their 
attendance at the session of their respective houses, and in going to and 
returning from the same ; and for any speech or debate in either house 
they shall not be questioned in any other place. 

No Senator or Representative shall, during the time for which he was 
elected, be appointed to any civil office under the authority of the United 
States, which shall have been created, or the emoluments whereof shall 
have been increased during such time ; and no person holding an}^ office 
under the United States, shall be a member of either house during his 
continuance in office. 

Sec. 7. All bills for raising revenue shall originate in the House of 
Representatives ; but the Senate may propose or concur with amendments 
as on other bills. 

Every bill which shall have passed the House of Representatives and 
the Senate, shall, before it becomes a law, be presented to the President 
of the United States ; if he approve he shall sign it ; but if not he shall 
return it, with his objections, to that house in which it shall have origi- 
nated, who shall enter the objections at large on their journal, and 
proceed to reconsider it. If, after such reconsideration two-thirds of that 
house shall agree to pass the bill, it shall be sent, together with the objec- 
tions, to the other house, by which it shall likewise be reconsidered, and if 
approved by two-thirds of that house, it shall become a law. But in all 
such cases the votes of both houses shall be determined by yeas and nays, 
and the names of the persons voting for and against the bill shall be entered 
on the journal of each house respectively. If any bill shall not be returned 
by the President within ten days (Sundays excepted), after it shall have 
been presented to him, the same shall be a law, in like manner as if he 
had signed it, unless the Congress, by their adjournment, prevent its 
return, in Avhich case it shall not be a law. 

Every order, resolution, or vote to which the concurrence of the 
Senate and House of Representatives may be necessary (except on a 
question of adjournment), shall be presented to the President of the 
United States, and before the same shall take effect shall be approved by 
him, or, being disapproved by him, shall be re-passed by two-thirds of 
the Senate and House of Representatives, according to the rules and lim- 
itations prescribed in the case of a bill. 

Sec. 8. The Congress shall have power — 

To lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts and excises, to pay the debts, 
and provide for the common defense and general welfare of the United 
States ; but all duties, imposts, and excises shall be uniform throughout 
the United States ; 

To borrow money on the credit of the United States ; 

To regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among the several 
States, and with the Indian tribes ; 

To establish a uniform rule of naturalization, and uniform laws on 
the subject of bankruptcies throughout the United States; 

To coin money, regulate the value thereof, and of foreign coin, and 
fix the standard of weights and measures ; 

To provide for the punishment of counterfeiting the securities and 
current coin of the United States; 

To establish post offices and post roads ; 



AND ITS AMENDMENTS. 89 

To promote the progress of sciences and useful arts, bj'^ securing,. 
for limited times, to authors and inventors, the exclusive right to their 
respective writings and discoveries ; 

To constitute tribunals inferior to the Supreme Court ; 

To define and punish piracies and felonies committed on the high 
seas, and offenses against the law of nations ; 

To declare war, grant letters of marque and reprisal, and make rules 
concerning captures on land and water ; 

To raise and support armies, but no appropriation of money to that 
use shall be for a longer term than two years ; 

To provide and maintain a navy ; 

To make rules for the government and regulation of the land and 
naval forces ; 

To provide for calling forth the militia to execute the laws of the 
Union, suppress insurrections, and repel invasions ; 

To provide for organizing, arming and disciplining the militia, and 
for governing such part of them as may be employed in tlie service of the 
United States, reserving to the states respectively the appointment of the 
officers, and the authority of training the militia according to the disci- 
pline prescribed by Congress ; 

To exercise legislation in all cases whatsoever over such district (not 
exceeding ten miles square) as may, by cession of particular states, and the 
acceptance of Congress, become the seat of the government of the United 
States, and to exercise like authority over all places purchased by the 
consent of thp Legislature of the state in which the same shall be, for 
the erection of forts, magazines, arsenals, dock yards, and other needful 
buildings ; and 

To make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying 
into execution the foregoing powers, and all other powers vested hj this 
Constitution in the government of the United States, or in any depart- 
ment or officer thereof. 

Sec. 9. The migration or importation of such persons as any of the 
states now existing shall think proper to admit, shall not be prohibited 
by the Congress prior to the year one thousand eight hundred and eight, 
but a tax or duty may be imposed on such importation, not exceeding ten 
dollars for each person. 

The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not be suspended, 
unless when in cases of rebellion or invasion the public safety may 
require it. 

No bill of attainder or ex post facto law shall be passed. 

No capitation or other direct tax shall be laid, unless in proportion 
to the census or enumeration hereinbefore directed to be taken. 

No tax or duty shall be laid on articles exported from any state. 

No preference shall be given by any regulation of commerce or rev- 
enue to the ports of one state over those of another ; nor shall vessels 
bound to or from one state be obliged to enter, clear, or pay duties in 
another. 

^' " No money shall be drawn from the Treasury, but in consequence of 
appropriations made by law; and a regular statement and account of 
the receipts and expeditures of all public money shall be published from 
time to time. 



90 CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES 

No title of nobility shall be granted by the United States : and no 
person holding any office of profit or trust under them, shall, without the- 
<3onsent of the Congress, accept of any present, emolument, office, or title 
of any kind Avhatever, from any king, prince, or foreign state. 

Sec. 10. No state shall enter into any treaty, alliance, or confeder- 
ation ; grant letters of marque and reprisal; coin money; emit bills of 
credit; make anything but gold and silver coin a tender in payment of 
debts ; pass any bill of attainder, ex post facto law, or law impairing the 
obligation of contracts, or grant any title of nobility. 

No state shall, without the consent of the Congress, lay any imposts 
or duties on imports or exports, except what may be absolutely necessary 
for executing its inspection laws, and the net produce of all duties and 
imposts laid b}^ any state on imports or exports, shall be for the use of the' 
Treasury of the United States ; and all such laws shall be subject to the 
revision and control of the Congress. 

No state shall, without the consent of Congress, lay any duty om 
tonnage, keep troops or ships of war in time of peace, enter into any 
agreement or compact with another state, or with a foreign power, or 
engage in war, unless actually invaded, or in such imminent danger as will 
not admit of delay. 

Article II. 

Section 1. The Executive power shall be vested in a President of 
the United States of America. He shall hold his office during the term 
of four years, and, together with the Vice-President chosen for the same 
term, be elected as follows: 

Each state shall appoint, in such manner as the Legislature thereof 
may direct, a number of Electors, equal to the whole number of Senators 
and Representatives to which the state may be entitled in the Congress ; 
but no Senator or Representative, or person holding an office of trust or 
profit under the United States, shall be appointed an Elector. 

[*The Electors shall meet in their respective states, and vote by 
ballot for two persons, of whom one at least shall not be an inhabitant of 
the same state with themselves. And they shall make a list of all the 
persons voted for, and of the number of votes for each ; which list they 
shall sign and certify, and transmit, sealed, to the seat of the government 
of the United States, directed to the President of the Senate. The Pres- 
ident of the Senate shall, in the presence of the Senate and House of Rep- 
resentatives, open all the certificates, and the votes shall then be counted. 
The person having the greatest number of votes shall be the President, 
if such number be a majority of the whole number of Electors appointed ; 
and if there be more than one who have such majority, and have an equal 
number of votes, then the House of Representatives shall immediately 
choose by ballot one of thein for President ; and if no person have a ma- 
jority, then from the five highest on the list the said House shall in like 
manner choose the President. But in choosing the President, the vote 
shall be taken by states, the representation from each state having one 
vote ; a quorum for this purpose shall consist of a member or members 
from two-thirds of the states, and a majority of all the states shall be 
necessary to a choice. In every case, after the choice of the President, 



" This clause between .brackets has been superseded and annulled by tbe Twelf th.amendment. *! 



AND ITS AMENDMENTS. 91 

the person having the greatest number of votes of the Electors shall be 
the Vice-President. But if there should remain two or more who have 
equal votes, the Senate shall choose from them by ballot the Vice-Presi- 
dent.] 

The Congress may determine the time of choosing the Electors, and 
the daj' on which they shall give their votes ; which day shall be the same 
throughout the United States. 

No person except a natural born citizen, or a citizen of the United 
States at the time of the adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible 
to the office of President ; neither shall any person be eligible to that 
office who shall not have attained the age of thirty-five years, and been 
fourteen years a resident within the United States. 

In case of the removal of the President from office, or of his death, 
resignation, or inability to discharge the powers and duties of the said 
office, the same shall devolve on the Vice-President, and the Congress 
may by law provide for the case of removal, death, resignation, or inabil- 
ity, both of the President and Vice-President, declaring what officer shall 
then act as President, and such officer shall act accordingly, until the dis- 
ability be removed, or a President shall be elected. 

The* President shall, at stated times, receive for his services a com- 
pensation which shall neither be increased nor diminished during the 
period fo/ which he shall have been elected, and he shall not receive 
within that period an}^ other emolument from the United States or au}^ of 
them. 

Before he enters on the execution of his office, he shall take the fol- 
lowing oath or affirmation : 

" I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the 
office of President of the United States, and will, to the best of my ability, 
preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution of the United States." 

Sec. 2. The President shall be commander in chief of the army and 
navy of the United States, and of the militia of the several states, when 
called into the actual service of the United States; he may require the 
opinion, in writing, of the principal officer in each of the executive 
departments, upon any subject relating to the duties of their respective 
offices, and he shall have power to grant reprieves and pardon for offenses 
against the United States, except in cases of impeachment. 

fie shall have power, by and with the advice and consent of the 
Senate, to make treaties, provided two-thirds of the Senators present con- 
cur; and he shall nominate, and by and with the advice of the Senate, 
shall lippoint ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls, judges of 
the Supreme Court, and all other officers of the United States whose 
appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be 
established by law ; but the Congress may by law vest the appointment 
of such inferior officers as they think proper in the President alone, in 
the courts of law, or in the heads of departments. 

The President shall have power to fill up all vacancies that may 
happen during the recess of the Senate, by granting commissions which 
shall expire at the end of their next sessioh. 

Sec. 3. He shall from time to time give to the Congress information 
of the state of the Union, and recommend to their consideration such mea- 
sures as he shall judge necessary and expedient ; he may on extraordinary 



■92 CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES 

■occasions convene both houses, or either of them, and in case of disagree- 
ment between them, with respect to the time of adjournment, he may- 
adjourn tliem to such time as he shall think proper ; he shall receive 
ambassadors and other public ministers ; he shall take care that the laws be 
faithfully executed, and shall commission all the officers of the United 
States. 

Sec. 4. The President, Vice-President, and all civil officers of the 
United States, shall be removed from office on impeachment for, and con- 
viction of, treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors. 

Article III. 

Section I. The judicial power of the United States shall be vested, 
in one Supreme Court, and such inferior courts as the Congress may from 
time to time ordain and establish. The Judges, both of the Supreme and 
inferior courts, shall hold their offices during good behavior, and shall, at 
stated times, receive for their services a compensation, which shall not be 
diminished during their continuance in office. 

Sec. 2. The judicial power shall extend to all cases, in law and 
■equity, arising under this Constitution, the laws of the United States, and 
treaties made, or which shall be made, under their authority^ to all eases 
affecting ambassadors, other public ministers, and consuls ; to««ll cases of 
admiralty and maritime jurisdiction ; to controversies to which the United 
States shall be a party ; to controversies between two or more states ; 
between a state and citizens of another state ; between citizens of differ- 
■ent states ; between citizens of the same state claiming lands under grants 
of different states, and between a state or the citizens thereof, and foreign 
states, citizens, or subjects. 

In all cases affecting ambassadors, other public ministers, and consuls, 
and those in which a state shall be a party, the Supreme Court shall have 
•original jurisdiction. 

In all the other cases before mentioned, the Supreme Court shall 
have appellate jurisdiction, both as to law and fact, with such exceptions 
.and under such regulations as the Congress shall make. 

The trial of all crimes, except in cases of impeachment, shall be by 
jury ; and such trial shall be held in the state where the said crimes shall 
have been committed ; but when not committed within an}^ state, the 
trial shall be at such place or places as the Congress may by law have 
directed. 

Sec. 3. _ Treason against the United States shall consist only in levy- 
ing war against them, or in adhering to their enemies, giving them aid 
and comfort. No person shall be convicted of treason unless on the tes- 
timony of two witnesses to the same overt act, or on confession in open 
court. 

The Congress shall have power to declare the punishment of treason, 
but no attainder of treason shall work corruption of blood, or forfeiture, 
■except during the life of the person attainted. 

Article IV. 

Section 1. Full faith and credit shall be given in each state to the 
public acts, records, and judicial proceedings of every other state. And 




^ foECEASEO) 

AN EARLYSETTLER OFWETHERSFIELD 



AND ITS AMENDMENTS, 95 

the Congress may, by general laws, prescribe the manner in which such 
acts, records, and proceedings shall be proved, and the effect thereof. 

Sec. 2. The citizens of each state shall be entitled to all privileges 
and immunities of citizens in the several states. 

A person charged in any state with treason, felony, or other crime, 
who shall flee from justice and be found in another state, shall, on demand 
of the executive authority of the state from which he fled, be delivered 
up, to be removed to the state having jurisdiction of the crime. 

No person held to service or labor in one state, under the laws thereof, 
escaping into another, shall, in consequence of any law or regulation 
therein, be discharged from such service or labor, but shall be delivered 
up on the claim of the party to whom such service or labor may be due. 

Sec. 3. New states may be admitted by the Congress into this Union ; 
but no new state shall be formed or erected within the jurisdiction of any 
other state ; nor any state be formed by the junction of two or more states, 
or parts of states, without the consent of the Legislatures of the states 
concerned, as well as of the Congress. 

The Congress shall have power to dispose of and make all needful 
rules and regulations respecting the territory or other property belonging 
to the United States ; and nothing in this Constitution shall be so construed 
as to prejudice any claims of the United States or of any particular state. 

Sec. 4. The United States shall guarantee to every state in this 
Union a republican form of government, and shall protect each of them 
against invasion, and on application of the Legislature, or of the Execu- 
tive (when the Legislature can not be convened), against domestic vio- 
lence. 

Article V. 

The Congress, whenever two-thirds of both houses shall deem it 
necessary, shall propose amendments to this Constitution, or, on the ap- 
plication of. the Legislatures of two-thirds of the several states, shall call 
a convention for proposing amendments, which, in either case, shall be 
valid to all intents and purposes as part of this Constitution, when rati- 
fied by the Legislatures of three fourths of the several states, or by con- 
ventions in three-fourths thereof, as the one or the other mode of ratifi- 
cation may be proposed by the Congress. Provided that no amendment 
which may be made prior to the year one thousand eight hundred and 
eight shall in any manner affect the first and fourth clauses in the ninth 
section of the first article ; and that no state, without its consent, shall 
be deprived of its equal suffrage in the Senate. 

Article VL 

All debts contracted and engagements entered into before the adop- 
tion of this Constitution shall be as valid against the United States under 
this Constitution as under the Confederation. 

This Constitution, and the laws of the United States which shall be 
made in pursuance thereof, and all treaties made, or which shall be made, 
under the authority of the United States, shall be the supreme law of the 
land; and the Judges in every state shall be bound thereby, anything in 
the Constitution or laws of any state to the contrary notwithstanding. 

The Senators and Representatives before mentioned, and the mem- 



96 



CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES 



bers of the several state Legislatuies, and all executive and judicial offi- 
cers, both of the United States and of the several states, shall be bound 
by oath or affirmation to support this Constitution ; but no religious test 
shall ever be required as a qualification to any office or public trust under 
the United States. 

Akticle VII. 

The ratification of the Conventions of nine states shall be sufficient 
for the establishment of this Constitution between the states so ratifying 
the same. 

Done in convention by the unanimous consent of the states present, the 
seventeenth day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand 
seven himdred and eighty-seven, and of the independence of the 
United States of America the twelfth. In witness whereof we have 
hereunto subscribed our names. 

GEO. WASHINGTON, 
Preside7it and Dei:>uty from Virginia. 



Nexv Hamjjshire. 
John Langdon, 
Nicholas Gilman. 

Massachusetts. 
Nathaniel Gorham, 
Rupus King. 

Connecticut. 
Wm. Sam'l Johnson, 
Roger Sherman. 



Delaware. 
Geo. Read, 
John Dickinson, 
Jaco. Broom, 
Gunning Bedford, Jr., 
Richard Bassett. 

Maryland. 
James M' Henry, 
Danl. Carroll, 
Dan. of St. Thos. Jenifer. 



Netv York, 
Alexander Hamilton. 

Neiv Jersey. 
WiL. Livingston, 
Wm. Paterson, 
David Brearley, 
Jona. Dayton. 



Virginia. 
John Blair, 
James Madison, Jr. 

North Carolina. 
Wm. Blount, 
Hu. Williamson, 
Rich'd Dobbs Spaight. 



Pennsylvania. 
B. Franklin, 
RoBT. Morris, 
Thos. Fitzsimons, 
James Wilson, 
Thos. Mifflin, 
Geo. Clymer, 
Jakbd Ingersoll, 
Gouv. Morris. 



South Carolina. 
J. Rutledge, 
Charles Pinckney, 
Chas. Cotesworth Pinckney, 
Pierce Butler. 

Georgia. 
William Few, 
Abr. Baldwin. 

WILLIAM JACKSON, Secretary. 



AND ITS AMENDMENTS. 97 



Articles in Addition to and Amendatory of the Constitution 
OP the United States op America. 

Proposed hy Congress and ratified by the Legislatures of the several states, 
pursuant to the fifth article of the original Constitution. 

Article I. 

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, 
or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of 
speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, 
and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. 

Article II. 

A well regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free 
state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed. 

Article III. 

No soldier shall, in time of peace, be quartered in any house without 
the consent of the owner, nor in time of war but in a manner to be pre- 
scribed by law. 

Article IV. 

The right of tlie people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, 
and effects against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be vio- 
lated ; and no warrants shall issue but upon probable cause, supported by 
oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched 
and the persons or things to be seized. 

Article V. 

No person shall be held to answer for a capital or otherwise infamous 
crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in 
cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the militia when in actual 
service in time of war or public danger ; nor shall any person be subject 
for the same offence to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb ; nor shall 
be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be 
deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor 
shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation. 

Article VI. 

In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a 
speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the state and district 
wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have 
been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and 
cause of the accusation ; to be confronted with the witnesses against him ; 
to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor; and to 
have the assistance of counsel for his defense. 

Article VII. 

In suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed 
twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact 



y» CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES 

tried by a jury shall be otherwise re-examined in any court of the United 
than accordino' to the rules of the common law. 



Article VIII. 

Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, 
nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted. 

Article IX. 

The enumeration, in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be 
construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people. 

Article X. 

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, 
nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, 
or to the people. 

Article XI. 

The judicial power of the United States shall not be construed to 
extend to any suit in law or equity commenced or prosecuted against one 
of the United States by citizens of another state, or by citizens or sub- 
jects of any foreign state. 

Article XII. 

The Electors shall meet in their respective states and vote by ballot 
for President and Vice-President, one of whom, at least, shall not be an 
inhabitant of the same state with themselves ; they shall name in their 
ballots the person to be voted for as president, and in distinct ballots the 
person voted for as Vice-President, and they shall make distinct lists of 
all persons voted for as President, and of all persons voted for as Vice- 
President, and of the number of votes for each, which list the}^ shall sign 
and certify, and transmit sealed to the seat of the government of the United 
States, directed to the President of the Senate. The President of the 
Senate shall, in presence of the Senate and House of Representatives, 
open all the certificates, and the votes shall then be counted. The person 
having the greatest number of votes for President shall be the President, 
if such number be a majority of the whole number of Electors appointed ; 
and if no person have such majority, then from the persons having the 
highest number not exceeding three on the list of those voted for as 
President, the House of Representatives shall choose immediately, by 
ballot, the President. But in choosing the President, the votes shall be 
taken by States, the representation from each state having one vote; a 
quorum for this purpose shall consist of a member or members from two- 
thirds of the states, and a majority of all the states shall be necessary to 
a choice. And if the House of Representatives shall not choose a Presi- 
dent whenever the right of choice shall devolve upon them, before the 
fourth day of March next following, then the Vice-President shall act as 
President, as in the case of the death or other constitutional disability of 
the President. The person having the greatest number of votes as Vice- 
President, shall be the Vice-President, if such nunjber be the majority 
of the whole number of electors appointed, and if no person have a major- 



AND ITS AMEISTDMBNTS. 99 

ity, then from the two highest numbers on the list, the Senate shall choose 
the Vice-President ; a quorum for the purpose shall consist of two-thirds 
of the whole number of Senators, and a majority of the whole number 
shall be necessary to a choice. But no person constitutionally ineligible 
to the office of President shall be eligible to that of Vice-President of the 
United States. 

Article XIII. 

Section 1. Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a 
punishment for crime, whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, 
shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their juris- 
diction. 

Sec. 2. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appro- 
priate legislation. 

Article XIV. 

Section 1. All persons born or naturalized in the United States and 
subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States, and 
of the state wherein they reside. No state shall make or enforce any law 
which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United 
States; nor shall any state deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, 
without due process of law, nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction 
the equal protection of the laws. 

Sec. 2. Representatives shall be appointed among the several states 
according to their respective numbers, counting the whole number of per- 
sons in each state, excluding Indians not taxed ; but when the right to 
vote at any election for the choice of Electors for President and Vice- 
President of the United States, Representatives in Congress, the execu- 
tive and judicial officers of a state, or the members of the Legislature 
thereof, is denied to any of the male inhabitants of such state, being 
twenty-one years of age and citizens of the United States, or in any way 
abridged except for participation in rebellion or other crimes, the basis of 
representation therein shall be reduced in the proportion which the num- 
ber of such male citizens shall bear to the whole number of male citizens 
twenty-one years of age in such state. 

Sec. 3. No person shall be a Senator or Representative in Congress, 
or Elector of President and Vice-President, or hold any office, civil or 
military, under the United States, or under any state, who, having previ- 
ously taken an oath as a Member of Congress, or as an officer of the 
United States, or as a member of any state Legislature, or as an execu- 
tive or judicial officer of any state to support the Constitution of the 
United States, shall have engaged in insurrection or rebellion against the 
same, or given aid or comfort to the enemies thereof. But Congress may, 
by a vote of two-thirds of each house, remove such disability. 

Sec. 4. The validity of the public debt of the United States author- 
ized by law, including debts incurred for payment of pensions and boun- 
ties for services in suppressing insurrection or rebellion, shall not be ques- 
tioned. But neither the United States nor any state shall pay any debt 
or obligation incurred in the aid of insurrection or rebellion against the 
United States, or an^ loss or emancipation of any slave, but such debts, 
obligations, and claims shall be held illegal and void. 



100 



CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES. 



Sec. 5. The Congress shall have power to enforce, by appropriate 
legislation, the provisions of this act. 

Article XV. 

Section 1. The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall 
not be denied or abridged by the United States, or by any state, on 
account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude. 

Sec. 2. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appro- 
priate legislation. 



ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT AND VICE-PRESIDENT. 
November 7, 1876. 



COUNTIES. 


1 


i 




'S 

i 


•5 


COUNTIES. 


2 .- = 


1|| 

ill 


11 


1 


II 

< 




\ut 

1416 

1145 
3679 

mi 

966 

III! 

1315 
4177 
3768 
304U 


fi 

\tn 

\m 

411 

1143 
2071 


41 


17 


.... 


Livingston 

LoQ:aii 

:M:Ic..m 

SJaliVJ;;;;'!;;:.-;;;.:.::: 


1.5.53 

1566 

u:n 

2952 
3465 
6363 
1115 
2209 

3069 
1245 

II 

m 

4851 

2069 
1140 
4708 

l^!o« 

4l| 

"M 
nil 

tin 


tin 
\tn 

?i 

4410 
1657 
1428 
1651 

nn 
El 

1383 
1316 
4040 
772 
459 

■ 

ii 

iff? 
tm 

§ 
nil 


3^^ 
135 

m 

518 
10 
90 

201 
95 

4i 
'11 


"8 




Alexander... . 






11 
183 
145 


1 


"ii 

••■3 

.... 
1 

9 

■■■3 
3 

■■"8 




Boone.. 








ISnieau 


■Mar nn 

Maishiill 

: i^l;:!^";!^':.::::::::;::: 

.McLean' 

i Menaid 

! Mei.'.-v 

Monrcn- 








Carroll 

Cass 

ChanipaiKn 


111| 1 
604 i ..^ 




Clark 


}i 
'It 
lif 


"w 




Clav 

(•linton 


"3 


s;:;^f,;ra 


Montijnniery 


■■■3 




Molmrie::::";::::;:;;:; 


DeKallj' 


Ogle 


8 






Douglas 


Pope 




Kr 






Piatt! 

Pike 




Edwanls .... 


4 






■■■9 
"4 




Favette 


n7 


Putnam 


14 

5i 

ell 
1?^ 

Ifi 

96 

11 
44 

d 

138 


■■2 






204 

1 

108 
770 


"2 






Franklin.. 


Richland 

Rock Island 

Saline 








(iallatin . 






Sangamon 

Schuyler 




Grundv 










iJifrr:.-: :■.:::; 






134 
106 








Henderson 






St Clair 






4 
14 


? 




i 


Iroqiiuis 

Jackson 


Tazewell 

Union 




Vermilion 

WahasM 




Jefferson 


Hit 
fin? 


mi 


647 

309 
141 

5ft 

1^5 


"12 
2 


'■■3 






Warren 

Washington 


^ 


Jo Daviess 




Johnson 

Kane 


Wayne 

White 


4821:::: 

469].... 

41:.... 
70 13 

237! 1 


'■■4 


Kendall 


Will 






"2 


1 










2 

4 


La .Salle 


Woodfortr 


Lawrence 


Total 


Lee 


375958 


257099 


16951 


130 


157 



GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF HENKY COUNTY. 101 



GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF ILLINOIS IN 1873 — HENRY 
COUNTY. 

BY HON. JAMES SHAW. 



GEOLOGICAL FORMATIONS. 

These consist of the usual Quarternary deposits, the lower Coal Measure 
series, and some low outcrops of the Hamilton and Niagara limestones. The 
geology of the county at first thought appears quite simple ; but the paucity of 
stone quarries, and workable outcrops, over most of the county, makes the 
problem more difficult than one would at first imagine. The best section I can 
construct will give the formations about as follows : 

Alluvial deposits and Drift clays 50 to 100 feet. 

Lower Coal Measures 250 to 300 " 

Hamilton (Devonian) limestone __ 20 " 

• Niagara or Le Clair limestone - 15 " 

In this section a very marked hiatus of Illinois rocks will be observed 
between the Hamilton limestone and the Coal Measures. 

Niagara Limestone. — In the bed of Rock River, where it first touches the 
northwestern boundaries of Henry County, and from thence about half way to 
Cleveland, the soft, fine-grained, yellowish Le Clair limestone shows itself, and 
is quarried during low stages of the river, at one place to a considerable extent. 
The Coal Measures at Aldrich's, and Johnson & Kent's coal mines, rest directly 
upon this member of the Niagara limestone. Except this limited outcrop in the 
banks and bed of Rock River, this formation can not be said to be developed in 
the county. At ordinary stages of water in that stream, the outcrop would 
hardly be detected. With the exception of a few encrinite stems, no fossils 
were noticed in it. 

Hainiltun Group. — On descending Rock River from the Niagara outcrops, 
just mentioned, the lower division of the Hamilton limestone is next discovered, 
commencing in the bed of the river about a mile and a half above Cleveland, 
and continuing as the river flows to the west line of the county, and thence 
west at intervals across Rock Island County. A short distance above Cleve- 
land, and two or three times below it, in a distance of three miles, a short axis 
of upheaval appears to extend from the river almost south across Rock River 
bottom, which is here three-fourths of a mile in width, and runs under the bluff 
line. At these places the Hamilton limestone comes to the surface of the 
ground, where the rains or little streams have removed a few feet of the top 
soil. These axes, or undulations, rise twenty-five or thirty feet above the low 
bottom land of Rock River. Between are depressions or troughs, filled with Coal 
Measure deposits. The heavy seam of coal, worked so extensively at Cleve- 
land, rests in one of these basins, and extends half way across Rock River, 
resting almost directly on the Hamilton limestone. The top of the axis spoken 
of above, east and west of the coal basin, is higher by several feet than the coal 
seam. Southward, however, the Coal Measures continue uninterrupted under 
the bluffs to Coal Valley, and the Minersville mines. 

These natural outcrops of the Hamilton limestone are massive and solid in 



102 GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF HENKY COUKTY. 

their structure. The stone breaks with a smooth conchoidal fracture, almost 
resembling polished marble. On fresh fractures the color is a beautiful bluish- 
white or pale dove color. A semi-transparent, splintery, horny appearance was 
noticed in some cases, on breaking a rock to pieces, with smart blows of the 
hammer. No fossils were observed. Indeed, the lower portion of this rock is 
almost devoid of organic remains. 

While making these observations, parties were engaged in boring an artesian 
well, two miles above Cleveland. Prospecting for petroleum and coal was the 
object of the boring. Any practical geologist could have told the proprietors 
that their hopes would not be realized, and that their labor and money was being 
foolishly expended. In connection, however, with the geology of this part of 
the county, they made an interesting hole in the ground, of which the follow- 
ing is the best section I could obtain : 

1. Black earth, alluvial deposit - 12 feet. 

2. Black and dark colored shales and slate .l8 " 

3. Dark limestone, cap rock of Cleveland coal 3 " 

4. Limestone (probably Hamilton and Niagara) 398 " 

5. Soft shale (probably Cincinnati group) 77 " 

At this depth the drill struck a sharp, hard rock with sandy grit in it. How 
much deeper this well was put down I have not ascertained. Another artesian 
well was put down, just north of Kewanee, to a depth of six hundred feet, in 
search of water, I believe. No accurate record of strata bored through was 
kept. Three hundred and fifty or four hundred feet of the bottom penetrated a 
hard light-colored limestone, being perhaps the same formations passed through 
in the lower part of the Cleveland well. This, however, is only conjecture. 



With the exception of the formations just described, the whole county is un- 
derlaid, below the usual drift deposits, by the lower Coal Measures. It is quite 
difficult to obtain a correct knowledge of the local extent of particular deposits, 
on account of the scarcity of outcrops. In other counties the railroads and 
the streams nearly always expose the upper rock formations, and give, in their 
cuts and banks, well marked outcrops. In Henry County, the railroads only 
afford a few clay cuts, not once exposing any rock formation. The river 
banks of Green and the Edwards, are, if possible, still more unfavorable for geo- 
logical examinations. Not once, so far as I know, do the banks or bends of these 
streams afford good outcrops of even the sandstones and limestones of the Coal 
Measures. Large portions of the county are utterly without stone quarries of 
any kind. In a few places fragmentary outcrops of rotten sandstone, or defec- 
tive shaly limestone, occur; and in a very few localities limestone or sandstone 
is quarried in abundance. I shall first speak of these outcrops, before attempt- 
ing to describe and trace the coal seams. 

Sandstone. — Overlying the lower coal and its roof of black shales and dark 
limestone, is a heavy deposit of coarse-grained sandstone. The rock is gritty, 
not very hard, of a creamy-brown or dirty-whitish color, and greatly resembles 
the sandstone deposit north of Morrison, except that the soapstone seams are 
wanting. Three miles below Cleveland, in the face of the river bluffs, but near 
their base, and at several places below or farther down the river, the outcrop is 
conspicuous, and has been quarried for local uses. The outcrops are partly 
hidden by talus ; but the sandstone at these localities seems to be from twenty 
to thirty feet thick. The same sandstone, on a line westward, outcrops heavily 
at Camden, at Hampton, and opposite the latter place in Iowa. At the latter 
place, some fine specimens of Lepidode?idron were found^ some years ago. The 
principal outcrops about Cleveland are on Sections 20 and 35 of Township 17, 




Major JAMES M. ALLAN, 
Geneseo. 



GEOLOGICAL SUKVEY OF HENRY COUNTY. 105 

Range i East. At Moline it also outcrops, and at Hampton, it covers a thin coal 
seam or trace of coal.* At Camden, the coal seems to be above the heaviest 
body of sandstone. At Hickory Grove there is a light sandstone outcrop, not 
very thick; stone poor quality; quarried by neighboring farmers. In the valley 
of Green River, up the latter valley, and into the bluffs of Mineral Creek about 
Minersville, the same bed of sandstone shows itself in several places. The 
outcrops here run from seven to twelve and twenty feet thick. On Section 3 in 
the Township of Munson, and not far from Cambridge, some poor sandstones 
are quarried. In the shaft of the Piatt Coal Company, just east of Kewanee, 
thirty feet of heavy sandstone was struck immediately overlaying the coal seam 
at the bottom of the shaft, but this bed is about a hundred feet below the 
surface. f In the vicinity of Red Oak Grove, a thin, rotten carboniferous sand- 
stone has been quarried by the farmers, and used for farm purposes. One well 
was walled with this material. The wall decayed or rotted down, and the well 
caved in after it had been in use for a series of years. On Section 20 on Spring 
Creek, in the To,wnship of Atkinson, there is a small stone quarry, but my notes 
on its characteristics have been misplaced or lost. 

These are the best tracings I have been able to make of this bed of sand- 
stone. Its place in the geological section of the county seems to be above the 
heavy, lower, workable seam of coal, some time:^ separated therefrom by shales 
and limestone, and some times appearing to rest almost directly on the coal. 
Its position is by no means constant, however. It is also almost unfossiliferous. 
A few tracings of Calamites and Lepidodendron were the only organic remains I 
could find in this deposit. 

Limestone of the Lower Coal. — The " cap rock " over some of the coal 
mines is a dark-colored, almost black, and some times shaly limestone, in which 
is frequently found a small and beautiful Proditctus. The coal seam at Aldrich's 
mine is overlaid by a thin stratum of shale, which is capped by a hard, blue, 
shelly limestone. This limestone is quarried in small quantities here, and sold 
at a high price to neighboring farmers. At Cleveland the coal seam is stripped 
of its superficial covering over several acres in extent. The limestone is 
more massive here, not quite so dark in color, and rests almost directly 
upon the coal. Hundreds of cords of it are stripped from the coal. The 
deposit is from one to two feet thick, and great quantities are sold at 
remunerative prices. Large numbers of the heavier stones thus quarried are 
to be used in the railroad bridge to be built across Rock River at this place. 
Immense slabs, more than a foot in thickness, obtained at the lower opening, 
are piled over an open space, ready to be transferred to the piers in the river. 
Some of these show signs of crumbling round the edges, as if the tooth of time 
had gnawed into their surface. We doubt whether they will prove entirely 
satisfactory for railroad masonry. Above this massive strata, and separated 
from it by from four to seven feet of shales and black, hardened carbonaceous 
mud, is another strata of lighter-colored, thin-bedded, shaly limestone, which is 
also corded up and sold for lighter masonry. The supply of stone thus obtained 
at these coal mines is very considerable. About Minersville the same limestone 
is found in connection with the coal seam, and a section here would be very 
similar to the Coal Valley section, e.xcept the sandstone above spoken of. 

Along the banks of Geneseo creek, a little south-west of the city of Gen- 
eseo, there is a very curious outcrop of stone, which has been worked to some 
extent in former years. The top of the stratum is a sandstone for about two 
feet in depth. It then gradually changes into a blue, compact, or dark-colored 

•WethinK Mr. Sliaw has here confounded two distinct beds of sandstone, that at Camden being below 
the main coal seam, instead of above it. The sandstone above the coal is a much more durable, and is penerally 
a harder rock than the bed lielow. A. H. W. 



106 GEOLOGICAL SUEVEY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

limestone, having a nodular or concretionary appearance. The whole rests on 
several feet of compact, hardened carbonaceous mud. But the most curious 
deposit in this interesting locality is a thin stratum of "cone in cone," outcrop- 
ping in the yellow clay, several feet above the top of the sandstone. The 
stratum is from two to four inches thick, has a woody or fibrous texture, the 
grain running vertical to the plane of stratification; on being dug from the 
ground it. falls into small blocks, having the appearance of wood split from a 
thin section of a large tree. In one or two of the low, rain-washed hills in 
that vicinity, I noticed this same outcrop, with no signs of the underlying 
rocks. Large quantities of this " cone in cone" have been gathered up for 
cabinets. Its resemblance to petrifactions of wood is very complete. 

The Coal Seams. — In the northwestern part of the county there is one 
heavy coal seam, well developed, and worked to a large extent. In the south- 
eastern part of tlie county, and extending up through its central portion, there 
are two seams, the lower of which is largely mined. Commencing with the 
former, and at the outcrop highest up Rock River, within the county limits, we 
find ourselves at Aldrich's mine, on Section 24, Township 18, Range 2 east. 
The coal is here about four feet six inches thick. It is overlaid by a few inches 
of dark shale, and this is in turn capped by the thin stratum of black limestone, 
spoken of above. A bed of ordinary fire clay lies under the coal. The mine 
is opened into the jjoint of a hill, up a wooded, romantic ravine, about one-half 
mile from Rock River, which here washes the base of the bluffs. A steam 
engine pumps out the water, and draws the coal cars up an inclined plane. The 
drift extends toward the south at a heavy dip near its opening. The mine has 
been worked for many years. The coal is a bright, moderately hard, thin- 
seamed coal, with carbonaceous clod between the seams, and vertical markings 
of carbonate of lime in the perpendicular openings. The following analysis 
shows its composition : 

Specific gravity I 261 

Loss in colving 43.1 

Total weiglit of coke -56-9 

lOO.O 

ANALYSIS. 

Moisture 6.0 •^ 

Volatile matters 37.I 

Carloon in coke -49-9 

Brown Ash 7.0 

lOO.O 

This analysis was made for the state by Mr. Pratten, I believe, and gives 
the general character of the coal in the northwestern part of the county. An 
approximate section at this coal mine gives about the following figures : 

Drift clays of bluffs, light color... ...50 to 70 feet. 

Dark, shelly limestone,. 2 " 

Shale and black slate 6 inches. 

Coal (No. 1) 4^ feet. 

Fire clay 10 " 

All above the water level of the river. 

Half a mile below Aldrich's mine is the drift of Messrs. Johnson & Kent. 
The upper part and outer edges of tlie seam here pass into a very solid, shining 
cannel coal, with smooth surface and conchoidal fracture. Messrs. Johnson & 
Kent believe the seam is not identical with the one worked at Aldricji's mine. 
The roof is of soapstone and shale, and there are some indications of two seams, 
ten or twelve feet apart, but approaching each other under the hill. There is, 



GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OP HENRY COUNTY. 107 

evidently, some local displacement here, and probably a local separation of the 
seam, such as is witnessed occasionally in working the Coal Valley seam. 

The next important workable locality is at Cleveland. Here, most of the 
coal is quarried, not iidiied. The surface deposits are stripped off, exposing the 
seam, which is from four and a half to five and a half feet thick. The quality 
of the coal is similar to that at Coal Valley, except that it is a little better. The 
ash is not so red, in fact it is almost white, and this is probably the better steam 
coal. 

SECTION AT CLEVELAND, FROM THE TOP OF ROCK RIVER BLUFFS. 

1. Bluff clays of the drift ...50 to 60 feet. 

2. Whitish-brown, coarse sandstone 20" 25 " 

3. Gravel bed of ochre color 2" 5 " 

4. Carbonaceous black shale 3 " 

5. Black limestone 2 " 

6. Coal seam .. 5 " 

7. Fireclay". ..12 " 

8. Hamilton limestone Bottom. 

Three or four mines are being worked in close proximity to each other. 
Taylor Williams has a steam engine in operation, and he both strips the seam 
and runs slanting drifts into it. Mr. Stokes and Mr. Jefferson Tnylor also mine 
to some extent. The basin or hollow, between the two uplifts of the Hamilton 
limestone, in which this Cleveland coal seam is found, is narrow at the place 
where the mines are worked, being only a 'i&'N hundred rods wide, and coming 
to almost a point in the bed of Rock River. The coal seam widens out towards 
the south, but becomes thin where it runs under the river bluffs. Still farther 
south, and about two and a half miles from the Cleveland coal quarries, is the 
Green River Valley, which intersects the Rock River Valley a few miles below. 
This Green River Valley, for several miles round Colona, is all undtrlaidby the 
Cleveland coal seam. The south slope of the bluff range between Rock River 
and Green River at this place, where prospected by borings, also shows the 
seam or traces of it, at many places. The same seam outcrops and is mined 
extensively on Mineral Creek farther south, and at Coal Valley, southwest a few 
miles. On the Green River bottom — the underlying rock — the cap of the 
coal seam is from seventeen to twenty feet below the surface. The seam at 
Cleveland furnishes one ton and a half of coal to the superficial square yard of 
its surface. The section there made will give a general idea of the Coal 
Measures on Mineral Creek, farther south, and for the rest of the northwestern 
part of the county. No two sections, of course, would be exactly alike ; but 
the resemblance would be-very marked. 

The superficial extent of coal lands, underlaid by this coal seam, extend- 
ing from Cleveland around by Mineral Creek, Minersville, Coal Valley, and 
Green River Valley, so far as now prospected, contains perhaps some forty 
thousand acres. On a railroad and coal land map, made by the chief engineer 
of the railroad about to be built along Rock River, some fourteen sections 
and parts of sections, are marked as underlaid by coal in Township 17, 
Range 2 East; in Township 17, Range i East, some twenty-two sections 
and parts of sections are similarly marked; in Township 17, Range i West, 
some ten sections and parts of sections, are marked as containing coal 
underneath ; in Township 16, Range i West, five or six sections are similiarly 
marked ; in the same township and range east, three sections are coal 
lands; in Township 18, Range 2 East, some ten more sections are supposed 
to be underlaid partially by coal. These east ranges are in Henry County ; the 
west ones are in Rock Island County. The Cleveland mines are in Township 
18, Range 2 East. Other sections will, no doubt, be found containing coal in 
this vicinity. Of course, all the above marked coal lands are not underlaid by 
heavy coal deposits. Wherever coal or its traces were detected by the 



108 GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

engineer in charge — -Mr. J. C. Abbott, to whom I am under many obligations, 
for favors extended — the same was marked coal lands on the map. My own 
personal examinations confirm the general correctness of this map. 

The following worked mines in this coal field should not be passed over 
without notice. On or between Sections 17 and 18, Township 17, Range 2 
East, Mr. Shepherd is successfully operating several shafts; on Section 22, 
Township 17, Range i East, Perry's mine is also now in successful operation ; 
Glen's mine, on Section 20, in the same town and range, and some mines on 
Section 21, Township 17, Range i East, now are or have been successfully 
worked. The seam is from four to six feet thick in this group of mines. It has 
an easterly dip, and appears to be lower at Shepherd's mines than at the mines 
of Mr. Perry. 

In one of these mines, where a drift is driven into the seam, the coal is 
separated into two bodies, the upper three feet thick, the lower two feet, sep- 
arated at the outcrop by seven feet of clay parting. These two parts of the 
seam approach each other under the hill, and unite in a distance of about six 
hundred feet. 

Shepherd's mines are located about two miles south of Green River Station, 
on the railroad. He is operating two shafts, and driving one drift mine. The 
shafts are sunk near the base of Mineral Creek bluffs. The roof here is stone, 
same as at Cleveland. The shafts are about sixty feet deep. The coal seam is 
thickest on bottom or low land, and thins when followed under the hills, same 
as at Cleveland. One shaft is operated by a steam engine, one by a gin; 
both have what the miners call a " sump" in the bottom, for convenience in lift- 
ing water out of the mines. The drift is an inclined plane, extending from the 
surface to the level of the coal. The heavy, overlaying sandstone is higher 
above the coal than at Cleveland. The shafts and drifts both extend into the 
same seam. The coal is supposed to be stronger and duller in color than 
that mined at Cleveland. In Shepherd's mines there is a black shale in places 
below the coal. 

At Minersville, the mining was all done by driving drifts into the seam 
from and near its outcrops. These mines are well worked out. Others may be 
found, when the demand for coal becomes greater. The competition, at the 
present time, between Cleveland and Minersville coal on the one hand, and 
Coal Valley coal on the other, is spirited. The latter has a little, and but little 
advantage, in the item of transportation to market. 

Perry's mines, almost adjoining the latter mines, still furnishes coal in pay- 
ing quantities. This mine is also reached by diifting into the coal seam. The 
most noticeable feature here is the basins or "horsebacks," filled witli a con- 
glomeration of nodular masses of clay and sulphuret of iron, which are charac- 
teristic of this mine. Some of them are several yards in extent. 

The seam under Green River and its valley, in the townships above named, 
contains a great deal of coal ; but the roof is poor. This has prevented its 
being strongly worked. 

From what has been said, it will now be seen that there is a large supply of 
coal stored away in the northwestern part of Henry County, for the present and 
for future generations. The mineral resources of this part of the county will 
not soon be exhausted, but will, as tliey now are, continue to be a source of 
wealth and material prosperity to the county. 

Another heavy coal deposit lies in the southeastern part of the county 
about Galva and Kewanee. Between this and the Cleveland and Mineral Creek 
mines, and over a diagonal strip across the county from the northwest to the 
southeast corner, which averages from ten to fifteen miles in width, coal has 
been found in many places. The seams, however, are thinner than at the two 
corners. Some of the shafts have been abandoned, and some never were worked 



GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF HENRY COUNTY. 109 

at all. I propose to briefly notice some of the coal mines discovered in this 
portion of the county, before describing the important coal mines about Galva 
and Kewanee. 

About one and a half miles northwest of deneseo, there is an abandoned 
shaft, where a coal seam from one and a half to three feet thick was found at a 
depth of about sixty feet. This, I believe, is the old Allen's mine. Indurated 
clay, limestone and sandstone were all penetrated in sinking the shaft. The 
coal was of good quality; bright iridescent in color ; hard, even fracture, and 
rhomboidal cleavage. The seam was considered too thin for profitable working. 

At Atkinson, the next station east of Geneseo, on the Rock Island and 
Chicago Railroad, the well dug to supply the large steam mill standing near the 
depot, passed through a seam of coal three feet thick, and twenty feet below the 
surface. One-half mile east of this well there is a shaft still worked, out of 
which has been taken_ about ten thousand bushels of coal. The seam is here 
three and one-half feet thick, and twenty-two feet below the surface, and is 
operated by a horse gin. There is in this locality a good slate roof over the 
coal, ten feet thick, and it is underlaid by a bed of fire clay. 

About four miles northwest of Cambridge, in the Township of Oscoe, Mr. 
A. A. Crane has put down a coal shaft, striking a seam from thirty-two to thirty- 
six inches thick, at a depth of eighty-seven feet. The seam appears to thin out 
towards the north and thicken towards the south. 

On the farm of Samuel Dixon, in Munson Township, eight miles east of 
Cambridge, coal is mined to some extent, the seam being the same as at Atkin- 
son, and twenty-four feet below the surface. Two miles south of Cambridge, 
a shaft was being put down, when I was there. A boring previously made was 
reported to have indicated coal, at a depth which I do not now remember. 

Coal is mined in this vicinity about Round Grove, equally distant east from 
Cambridge and north from Galva, and in considerable quantities. It is hauled 
in wagons to Cambridge and oVer the surrounding prairies, and thus finds a ready 
market at the mines. 

In a few more places over this broad strip of country between Cleveland 
and Kewanee, coal has been discovered ; but sufficient has been said to indi- 
cate the general character of the seams here mined. I come now to the most 
extensively worked locality in the county, and perhaps the heaviest deposit of 
coal within its limits. Galva and Kewanee, both in the southeastern corner of 
the county, but a few miles apart, are widely known as coal-mining localities ; 
but at the latter place the mines are worked to much the greatest extent. Five 
or six shafts are put down at- Galva, known as the shafts of Messrs. Knox & 
Co., Cummings, Johnson, Lindsey and Barnum. The following section, made 
at one of them, illustrates the character of all. They are in a group, within a 
radius of a mile or two, and are as much alike as coal shafts usually are, pene- 
trating the same seam, and put down near together through essentially the same 
formations and superficial deposits. ' 

SECTION OF GALV.A. CO.\L MINES. 

1. Yellowish drift clay 32 feet. 

2. Hard rock, bottom softer and sandy 12 " 

3. Soapstone, top light color, bottom dark color 14 " 

4. Black or dark colored slate 2 " 

5. Coal, with clay seams No. 6 4 " 

6. Fire clay, about 9 " 

The coal here is of good qt^ality, and similar to the Kewanee coal. Tlfe 
seam is probably identical with coal No. 6, of the general section of the Illinois 
Coal Measures. At Galva the clay and shale partings are not so well marked as 
at other points, and at some of the shafts indications of cannel coal may be 
seen along the top of the seam. 



110 GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

At Kewanee, much capital is employed in the coal mining business. Dur- 
ing the past year (1867) fifty-three thousand tons were raised here, of which 
thirty-two thousand were shipped on the Chicago, Burlington and Qiiincy Rail- 
road to various points, fourteen thousand were used by the railroad company, 
and seven thousand were used for home consumption in Kewanee and neighbor- 
hood. The revenue thence derived, amounted, during the year, to over one 
hundred and forty thousand dollars. The productive mines are within a radius 
of three miles north and east of the town. Within this small area, some eight 
shafts have been put down, and twenty drifts driven in. The shafts are sunk 
from the general level or face of the country; the drifts are driven upon the out- 
crops in some deep ravines, passing up from a good-sized brook three or four 
miles north of the town. The face of the country, among these mines, is rough, 
and covered with a scattering growth of barren oak timber. 

The shafts are operated by the following companies and individuals: The 
Piatt Coal Company, Messrs. Walker & Co., Breckens & King, McCartey & 
Kirby, K. Murchison, J. C. Bowerman, H. Martin, W. S. Carnly, and one or two 
others of less note. Of these the Piatt Coal Mining Company, whose mine 
embraces about one thousand acres of land, located one mile east of the village, 
does by far the largest business, and by some arrangement handles and markets 
all the cjal dug in all the mines in this vicinity. Their shaft is near the railroad 
track, and they have a very convenient mode of loading the coal into the cars. 
At the depot, there is also a large elevator-shaped building, used for the purpose 
of feeding passing locomotives with their supplies of coal. A section of these 
.lines, made at the Piatt Coal Company's shaft, is as follows : 

1. Soil, subsoil and yellow clay _ 5 feet. 

2. Oily looking quicksand 20 " 

3. Soapstone, light and dark color 25 •' 

4. Upper coal seam No. 7 , 2^2 "i 

5. Fire clay 10 " 

6. Soapstone ? " 

7. Sandstone, same as at Galva 30 " 

8. Middle coal seam No. 6 4^ " 

9. Alternating soapstone and sandstone 80 " 

10. Carbonaceous shales and coal traces (No. 4?) A few inches. 

The four and a half foot vein is the same as the Galva seam, and is, prob- 
ably, identical with the upper seam at La Salle, and with coal No. 6 of the 
general section of the State. The upper seam, some forty-two and a half feet 
above the lower, is perhaps No. 7 of the same section. The lower eighty feet 
of the foregoing section was prospected by boring an artesian well in the bottom 
of the Coal Company's shaft, and ought to be regarded with some doubt as to 
whether it shows correctly the indications of coal in the bottom. The bed of 
quicksand or shifting sand, No. 2 of above section, was struck near the depot, 
in a shaft now abandoned. 

The supply of coal at Kewanee and vicinity is very large, and will not 
become exhausted for many years. Newly discovered mines will replace those 
worked out, and the revenue derived frotn this deposit of mineral wealth will 
build Kewanee into a place of consequence. 

In Norwood's report upon Illinois coal, I find a description and analysis 
of cannel and bituminous coal, taken from the same seam, at a place then called 
" Serrell's Mine," which it may be well to insert, in this place, for convenience 
of reference : 

serrell's mine, kewanee. 

" Thickness of the bituminous portion of the bed, four feet, underlaid with fire clay. Coal 
bright and dull in alternating layers ; hard, compact fracture tolerably even. Contains thick 
seams of carbonate of lime, which cross each other at nearly right angles, causing the coal to 
break into slightly irregular cubes. Has sulphuret of iron disposed both horizontally and verti- 



GEOLOGICAL SUKVKY OF HENRY COUNTY. ^ 111 

cally. The layers of coal are thick and separated with carbonaceous clod. Coke very bright 
and good, but swells in coking. 

Specific gravity - 1.232 

Loss in coking 42.2 

Total weight of coke 57.8 

ANALYSIS. lOO.O 

Moisture _ 9.0 

Volatile matter _. 33.2 

Carbon in coke 52.8 

Ashes (gray)... ..^. 5.0 

lOO.O 

Carbon in the coal 52.2 

CANNEL COAL IN SAME SEAM. 

Thickness of the bed from eight inches to one foot ; overlaid with black slate ; underlaid 
with four feet of bituminous eoal. No analysis of this coal has yet been made ; but judging from 
its texture and general appearance, it does not differ from the Wataga cannel coal. The coal is 
dull, hard, compact ; fracture slightly conchoidal ; layers thick ; contains bright, yellow, vertical 
plates of sulphuret of iron." 

NOTE.-While engaged during the past Spring in examining tlie coal deposits of Rock Island, 1 was 
Induced to extend my examinations into Henry County, in part to confirm observations previously made in 
adjoining territory, and partly to satisfy myself as to the general development of our workable coal seams 
along the nortUwesiern confines of the Illinois coal field. 

Commencing at the northwest corner of the county, coal No. 1 of the Illinois River section is opened and 
worked at various points in tlie Iduffs of Rock and Green Rivers, as at Cleveland and near Colona, as shown by 
Mr. .Shaw, in the sections given on the preceding pages, and it presents the same general characters here as at 
Carbon Clift', Coal Valley, and other points in Rock Island County. It is overlaid by a peculiar dark-gray 
silicious limestone, and lis accompanying band of flint or chert, that enables anyone to identify it without 
difficulty. This seam is worked by the Messrs. Perry, at Briar Blutt, near Green River, in Henry County, by a 
tunnel driven into the hill side. The coal is somewhat variable in tliickness, and is sometimes cut off altogether 
by what the miners term a "horse-back." About loity feet below the coal the shaly limeslones of the 
Hamilton group outcrop but a short distance to the northward of the mines. A curious phenomenon was 
observed at these mines in a remarkable geode-like cavern or pocket, occurring partly in the coal, and extend- 
ing into theflre clay beneath. The cavity was ovate in shape, and about ten feet long by five feet in width and 
two or three feet in depth, and surrounded by a solid crust. The inclosed cavity was filled with water and gas, 
and when the pick broke through the crust an explosion followed like the firing of a blast. On breaking into 
the cavity it was found to be tliicklyset witli magnificent crystals of dogtooth calcite, from six to eighteen 
inches in lengtli, the points all directed towards tlie center of the cavity like the crystals on the inner surface 
of a geode. Unfortunately many of these fine crystals were broken up and destroyed in removing tliem ; but a 
few were preserved, and 1 was lortunate in securing some of them for the State Cabinet. 

On the S. W. qr. of Sec. 31, T. 17. R. 1, coal seam No. 2 has been o|jened near the top of the bluff and 
immediately under the bowlder clay. The coal is 18 inches thick, and is overlaid by four or five feet of clav 
sliale. forming but a poor roof. This was the first exjiosure of No. 2 that we met with in Henry County. The 
coal was underlaid by a few feet of fire clay and clay shale, and not sufficiently exposed to be accurately 
measured, whicli was followed by a bed of bluish-gray septaria two or three feet thick, exactly like that found 
below the Colchester coal in McUonough County. This coal appeared to be from 35 to lorty feet above No. 1 at 
this point. 

At the Mineral Creek mines I found coal No. 1 worked in a shaft sixty feet in depth, and sunk in the 
valley of a small creek, and about one hundred and fifty yards southeast of the shaft the same coal outcrops 
seventy-five feet above its level in the shaft. In a boring made at this point below the coal they reported 7 feet 
ol fire clay and 40 feet of shales, partly blue and partly gray, with a streak of coal from two to four inches thick 
about half way 10 the bottom. Some layers of sandstone, and one or more thin bands of iron ore, were passed 
tlirough towards the botton of the boring. 

At the Mancli-Cbunck mines, about six miles west of Geneseo, coal No. 1 is worked just above the level of 
the creek by tunneling into the hill along its outcrop. It is liere mncli thinner than it usually occurs in this 
part of tlie county, being reported as varying in thickness from two feet to tiiree feet six inches. No. 2 is found 
here outcropping about fony feet above No. 1. A tunnel has been run into It, and considerable coal taken out, 
though the seam is here only from twelve to fifteen inches in thickness. 

At Geneseo a coal seam crops out along the little run on the west side of the town, and is worked by Mr. 
Maynard in a shaft sunk from a higher level near the outcrop. The beds passed through in this shaft give the 
following section : 

Ft In. 
No. 1— Soil md duft cliv 20 

No. 2— H ud rock (piobibl; limestone) 1 3 

No. 3— Sm IsloiiL 5 

No. 4— Blue bh He i 

No. 5— Co il 03 

No. b-H uddiik shilt, b 

No. 7— H lid loik (concietion ') 4 

No. 8-CUv shile 01 hrt cUj 1 3 

No. 9— Blut Shalt, 10 

No. 10-Bl lok '•h lie 6 

No. 11-Loil 3 8 

This seam has a parting of dark shale of variable thickness, and I am inclined to regard it as No. 2, which 
is frequently separated by a shale parting. The coal is also a rather soft and light coal, more like No. S than 
any other, though it contains more pyrite here than is usually found in it at more soutliern localities. 

At Atkinson a coal seam about three feet in thickness has been opened on the eastern borders of ilie town, 
where it lies aiiout fifteen feet below the surface, and from this point in a soutliwesterly direction it outcrops 
along the Muffs of Spring Creek for a distance of about seven miles. Mowbray, Weatherspoon, Welch, 
Morrow, Shearer and Torpenning's mines are all on this outcrop. The coal aveiages about three feet in ihick- 
iiess, and has an excellent roof of liard, black slaty shale, passing npwaid Into a blue clay shale containing 
nodules of ironstone, and blue limestone. The roof shales are locally filled with Avicul opecten rectalaterarea 
and Jr'roductus muncatits. The nodules of limestone and clay ironstone contain I'rocluctus Praitenianus, 
Pleurotomaria percarinata, P. Montfortianus, Macroclieilus, and a. minute spiral shell liVie Polypliemopsis. I 
have no liesitatiou in referring this coal to No. 8 of the Illinois River section, and It shows a regularity iu the 



112 GEOLOGICAL SUKVEV OF HENRY COUNTY. 

Superficial Deposits. — The drift clays of Henry County run from ten to 
fifty or sixty feet in thickness. These are the common yellow and blue clays 
underlying the soil over most of our northern prairies. No fossils of any note 
have been discovered in these clays, so far as I know. No beds of coarse 
gravel were noticed; no drift copper or galena has been picked up in the 
county, as in some of the counties farther north. P'ew bowlders were observed 
lying over the prairies. In the valley of Green River, near its mouth, and in 
some of the ravines, an occasional bowlder may be found washed out of the 
denuded soil and clay. Indeed the Edwards and Green Rivers, in much of 
their courses, hardly show even fine pebbles along their banks. 

The alluvial deposits, however, are very marked in the Green River swamp 
lands, and in certain curious sand ridges and hills in the northeastern part of the 
county. No regular peat beds seem to exist in these swamps ; but the tough 
sward of many grasses and sedges scarcely prevent one from sinking into the 
oozy muck and black vegetable mud covering these fresh-water marshes. For 
some cause the peat mosses have not flourished here as in the Whiteside County 
sloughs; but a good illustration of the origin of the prairies, according to Pro- 
fessor I,esquereux's theory, may be seen almost anywhere along these Green 
River swamp lands. The sand hills of this swampy region present a more 
curious phenomenon still. Chains and curious-shaped round hills, fashioned 
into shapes fantastic, and gathered and piled up by the roving winds, extend in 
ridges and groups from Rock River to and among the Winnebago swamps 
proper, in Bureau and Lee Counties, and touch the northeastern portion of 
Henry. In the reports upon these latter counties more will be said upon these 
shifting and roving hills and chains of sand. 

ECONOMICAL GEOLOGY. 

Coal — From the foregoing pages a good idea will be obtained of the extent, 
quality, and accessibility of the coal deposits in this county. The supply of this 
useful mineral is not likely to soon become exhausted. As opened mines are 
worked out, new ones will be discovered. But a small portion of the productive 
coal seams underlying so large a part of the county, diagonally from its north- 
west to its southeast corner, has been properly or thoroughly prospected. 
Sources of wealth hidden away from the eyes of man are yet to be developed, 
and the coal of Henry County, for a long time to come, will furnish abundant 
supplies for home consumption, and a still more abundant supply for neighbor- 
ing markets. Such minerals as coal, iron, lime, and the like, which minister so 
largely to the economies, utilities and conveniences of life, are not only desir- 
able in and of themselves, but become sources of wealth and the highest 
material prosperity. Coal is second only to iron in every quality that can make 
it desirable. Especially in the prairie counties of Illinois, where fuel is scarce, 
coal, in even ordinary workable quantities, becomes of more than ordinary 
interest and value. As a steam producer for the lower Rock River valley, when 
all its manufacturing and milling facilities shall be developed, these coal fields 
bordering on the stream will obtain a new value. They will then be sought 
after eagerly and developed to their full extent. 

Stone. — The supply of building stone, as will liave already been surmised, 

aevelopmeiit of our workable coaJs along the northwestern borders of the coal iielcl that could hardly have 
been expected. The coal ol)tained from this seam has a tendency to split into thin lajers, with partings ot 
charcoal, and is a liarder coal tlian that obtained from No. 2, and quite uulilsi- tbal rioin cither of the lower 
seams. 

On Mud Creek, a few miles further past, auolhcr coal is said to outrro],, wliicli is i.inhalily No. 4 of the 
general section, and at Sheffield, Kewanee and <ialva, Nn. (i with its characteristir |i;Mi iii-nf ciayshale, isfound. 
thus completing the range of our most valuable coals, and showing their full dcv.loiauenl wilhin the limits of 
Henry County. The general trend of their outcrop is from northeast to soutlnv est, and the dip of the strata is 
to the southeastward, but at a very slight angle. In closing these brief notes on Henry County, I desire to 
acknowledge my obligations to A. AY. Perry, Esq., of Gcneseo, who placed himself and whatever conveyance 
w as required at my disposal, and kindly acted as both guide and commissary during my stay in the county. 




Major A. GOULD, 
Cambridge. 



GEOLOGICAL SUKVEY OF HENRY COUNTY. 115 

is quite limited. The cap rock over tlie Cleveland coal seam will furnish plenty 
of stone for cellars, wells, and ordinary mason work in that part of the county. 
Stone of a better quality can there also be quarried from the Hamilton lime- 
stone in and near the river. The supply of limestone at Aldrich's coal mine is 
small, but of good quality. The sandstone outcrops below Cleveland and on 
Mineral creek can also be made to furnish abundance of a sandstone that will 
be useful for many purposes The other outcrops and stone quarries in the 
county furnish only limited amounts of rather poor building stone. All the 
railroad towns now draw their supplies of stone from the quarries at Athens, 
Joliet, and other places in their vicinity, and will continue so to obtain them. 

Clays. — Great abundance of the usual drift clays can everywhere be 
obtained. These, with proper treatment, burn into a good article of common 
brick. 

Agriculture. — But the distinguished characteristics of this county are its 
coal deposits and agricultural resources. In the latter respect Henry County 
ranks among the best counties in the State. Its surface is mostly a high, roll- 
ing prairie ; its soil is good. The staple crops of Northern Illinois give abun- 
dant annual returns. Its population, its wealth, and its material resources are 
rapidly increasing. As a fruit county it also ranks among the first in this part 
of the State. The orchards around some of the older settled towns seem to do 
well; but fruit growing in the county has not received the attention its import- 
ance demands. Fruit growing and timber raising should both be looked after 
by the farmers of Henry County. 



History of Henry County. 



Speculation in Illinois .lands got fairly under way in 1835. It was 
in that year that Henry County was first visited by persons authorized to 
purchase large tracts of land for the l)enefit of certain companies. The 
county was then without an organization. The southern boundary was on 
the parallel 13 north of the base line, and its western boundary was upon 
the 4tli principal meridian. It extended five townships, or thirty miles, 
east, and north it reached to the 18th parallel north of the base line. Rock 
River entered the county on the north about midway from east to west, and 
formed its boundary on the northwest for about twenty miles, leaving it 
about midway of the fourth tier of townships. These boundaries have 
been retained ever since. It extends over no less than twenty-one 
entire townships of six miles square each, and four fractional townships 
aggregating a little less than three entire townships. The square miles 
foot up to about eight hundred and thirty, and the acres to nearly or 
quite 530,000. Of this number there were probably about 70,000 acres 
of timber land. Exclusive of the timber on Rock and Green Rivers there 
were a dozen distinct groves, besides a few clusters of trees dignified 
sometimes as groves. 

Red Oak, White Oak, Round Hickory, Sugar Tree, Big Barren, 
Richland, and a few smaller groves, were found in the southern portion 
of the county ; Shabane or Shabbona, Crocker's, Trading House, Eight 
Mile, and several other small groves, as well as the timber on the Green 
and Rock Rivers, in the northern. It will be remembered that a large 
share of what was called timber lands contained only here and there a 
tree. The northeastern part of the county contained swamp lands, which 
were at that time undesirable as an investment. The balance of the 
prairie, excepting a few hilly quarters, was of the most desirable quality 
for farming purposes. This was then the inviting prospect held up to 
the poor man looking for land for "actual settlement," and to the capi- 
talist for hypothetical settlement. 

Unfortunately for the growth and prosperity of the county, the latter 
class of settlers were the most numerous, very large portions of the best 
land in the county being taken up by them, and the poor man, tlie actual 
settler, was compelled to look elsewhere for a location. Many would not 
locate close to the colonies, on account of reports that the organization 
intended to swallow all outsiders who settled close to them. 

In the early settlement of this county, William Roberts, who after- 
wards lived at Andover, and moved thence to Texas and there died, resided, 
near Quincy, in Adams County. One night a prospector, who had been 
through this county, put up with Roberts. He said he couldn't stop in 



HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 117 

Henry County ; 'twas too full of colonies. Of course there was much mis- 
apprehension as to the character of those colonies. Henry County seems 
to have famished remarkable attraction for them — Andover, Wethers- 
field, Geneseo, Morristown, La Grange, in an earlier day, thus originated, 
and Bisliop Hill in a later. This last, however, differed from the others 
fundamentally. It required no accession from outsiders for support. The 
first mentioned five colonies had educational projects in view ; and three 
of them, viz. : Andover, Geneseo and Wethersfield, aimed at the dissem- 
ination of religious truth. The last named, or Bishop Hill Colony, was 
strictly a religious organization, the members of it coming directly from 
Sweden, and was the only one that obtained a legal existence. The 
modes by which the other colonies endeavored to build up their educa- 
tional and religious establishments, though not differing much one from 
another, will be delineated when treating of them separately. For the 
present it is sufficient to say that all of them had public property, the 
proceeds of which, in some form, were to be used to build their schools 
or colleges. These five settlement^ began their existence nearly at the 
same time, Andover having precedence chronologically ; then followed 
Geneseo, Morristown, Wethersfield, La Grange. 

Before the commencement of any of-these colonies, Uayton, near 
Rock River, had commenced. This is known as " Brandenburg's settle- 
ment," George Brandenburg being one of the earliest settlers. He laid 
off the town, and for a long time his house was the whole of Dayton. 
In those days there was a great amount of travel to the land office at 
Dixon, and some from Knoxville to Albany, on the Mississippi. Dayton 
was at the crossing of those roads, and Brandenburg's hotel was a central 
point of great interest. The popularity of the " Judge " attracted a host 
of customers, and out of pure regard for their comfort he erected another 
cabin by the side of the first, leaving a space for a hall between them, 
and covered the whole with one roof. That was then the most com- 
modious house of entertainment in all this region ; and an additional 
supply of furniture in the shape of beds, bedding and benches, with some 
other luxuries for the repose of the weary, made it a desideratum with 
.travelers to reach that commodious "tavern." 

About the time the Judge had got fairly under way, Caleb Pills- 
Ijur}', brother of George and Levi Pillsbury, at Andover, opened a public 
house, which contained one room below and a loft above. 

THE FIRST ENTRY 

Of land made in this county was on June H, 1835, N. .V 34, 18, 2. now Hanna 
Township, by Giles Williams. He is believed to have been a speculator, 
from the number of lots entered in his name in the following year. July 
7, 1835, Jas. W. Stephenson entered N. E. N. W. 10, 17, 1. Later in the 
same year many thousands of acres were entered, the New York Company 
alone entering some thirty thousand acres. Dr. Thomas Baker has the 
credit, generally, of building the first house in the county ; but that is a 
mistake, as James Glenn erected the first house. Dr. Baker's was the first 
family in the county. It is a little remarkable that a man of his temper- 
ament should have become a pioneer. He is said to have loved his ease 
exceedingly. Passing near a man who was making rails one warm day, 



118 HISTOEY OF HENRY COTJNTY. 

he begged him to stop his work till he could get by, as it hurt his feel- 
ings to see a man work in warm weather. He moved to Rock Island 
County some years ago, and thence to Missouri, and died there. 

In April, 1835, James Glenn settled on Section 20, in what is now 
Colona township, and erected a house thereon in the same month, and 
still resides on the same farm. At this time Dr. Baker and family, here- 
tofore mentioned, were living near him in a wagon. The next house was 
built at White Oak Grove by a man named Butler, who was bought out by 
the New York Company. The house is believed to have been the Company 
House, and if so, is still standing near the residence of Dan Moore. 
Butler is said to have been the first white man who planted and raised 
corn in the county. He sold out in the Fall of 1835, and is believed to 
have moved to Kansas. Washburne, an early settler and well known in 
the county, sowed the first wheat ; others, however, sowed wheat the 
same Fall. The first mill was at Andover, built in 1836-7, and the first 
" grist " for which toll was taken, after the bolt was put in, belonged to 
this same Washburne. He says that before the mill was running they 
got their samp by grating corn upon an old tin pail with holes punched 
in it, and meal in much the same way. This provender answered a good 
purpose where only "corn bread and common doings" were gotten up, 
unless too liberally supplied with blood from knuckles barked during the 
process of grating. Wheat bread and " chicken fixins " could be found 
more frequently in the cabins after the mill got into operation. In that 
day many early settlers began going to Spoon River, in Knox County, to 
get their meal. 

ORGANIZATION OF HENRY COUNTY. 

Henry County was under the jurisdiction of Knox County till its 
separate organization in 1837. The Legislature then met at Vandalia. 
Major James M. Allan took a horseback ride from Brandenburg's to 
Vandalia, via Knoxville, Peoria, Tremont and Springfield, a distance of 
some two hundred and fifty miles, for the purpose of getting an act 
passed organizing the county, in accordance with the wishes of its inhabi- 
tants. 

As the population increased the people demanded the organization 
of their count3% and an enabling act was passed March 2, 1837, when 
commissioners were appointed to locate and name a county seat. They 
were Francis Voris, of Peoria County ; Jonas Rawalt, of Fulton County, 
and Isaac Murphy, of Warren County. 

THE FIRST ELECTION 

Was held June 19th, 1837, at the house of George Brandenburg. 
There were to be elected three County Commissioners, Sheriff, Coroner, 
Surveyor, and Recorder. John P. Hanna, Charles Atkinson and R. R. 
Stewart were judges of election ; James -M. Allan and Arba M. Seymour 
clerks. As this was the first election we have no doubt but it will be of 
interest to many of our readers to know the names of all the candidates, 
and we here insert them, with the number of votes for each : 



HISTOKY OF HENRY COUNTY. 119 

For Commissioners. No. of votes. 

Ithamar Pillsbury, - - - 54 

Phillip K. Hanna, - - - - 55 

Joshua Browning, - - - 43 

Rufus Hubbard, - - - - 21 

Recorder. 

Joshua Harper, - - - 24 

Thos. R. Saunders, - - - - 22 

Eben Townsend, - - - 11 

Surveyor. 

Arba M. Se3aiiour, - - - - 58 

Sherif. 

Robt. McCullough, - - - - 31 

Stephen Marshall, . - _ 24 

Coroner. 

R. R. Stewart, - - - - 58 

We will give the entire list of voters in the order in which 
they voted : George Brandenburg, Samuel Sullivan, David Wiley, 
Washington B. Colbert, Samuel Withrow, John L. Smith, Thos. R. 
Saunders, Smith Bennett, John McLinn, Henry Sullivan, Jas. Withrow, 
Neely Withrow, George A. ( lolbert, Edward C. Hall, Preston Browning, 
Alfred Beck, George Tvler, George Goyer, Edward A. Mix, Thos. 
Miller, William Hite, Elisha Cone, CromAvell K. Bartlett, Wm. C. 
Bartlett, Wm. H. Hubbard, John Sullivan, Henry G. Little, Ithamar 
Pillsbury, Eben Townsend, Albert Jagger, Wm. S. Woolsey, Adrian 
Van Winkle, Alfred Ball, Thos. Glenn, Earl P. Aldridge, Stephen 
Marshall, Anthony Hunt, Solomon Penny, Caleb Pillsbury, Jesse 
Woolsey, Wm. Potts, Samuel Clark, Jerome Brittain, Eloenezer Wal- 
ters, Joshua Browning, Geo. McHenry, Robt. McCullough, Jas. P. 
Dodge, Wm. McNevin, Philip K. Hanna, Joshua Harper, Rufus Hub- 
bard, John P. Hanna, Chas. Atkinson, Roderick R. Stewart, Jas. jNI. 
Allan, Arba M. Seymour, Reuben Cone. Many of the gentlemen 
whose names appear in the foregoing list have figured somewhat promi- 
nently in the history of the county — not all officers, but before the pub- 
lic in some capacity. Philip K. Hanna and Geo. A. Colbert will be 
remembered as the earliest Methodist ministers in the county. Ithamar 
Pillsbury, the Christian gentleman and energetic agent, was the first 
Presbyterian minister. Jas. M. Allan has been one of the most prominent 
men in the history of Henry County. He was the first clerk of the county, 
and in all political, social, military and county seat matters of early 
days, he was the most prominent figure, and in later days is known as 
an energetic, esteemed and valuable citizen. Geo. Brandenburg figured 
as the first landlord of the county, and has been well and favorably 
known. Eben Townsend, an aged gentleman of large experience and 
observation, of will imperious, strong affections, manners blunt or bland, 
as circumstances seemed to require, figured in the affairs of Andover for 
many years, and was well known to most of the early settlers. R. R. 
Stewart, the impartial magistrate, an exact public officer, long controlled 
the first and best public house in Genesee. Henry G. Little has been 
called to serve his country in many positions of honor and trust. Jesse 



120 HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

Woolsey, the unobtrusive home man, and as the upright and trusty land- 
lord at Andover, he is known to a large share of the gentlemen who 
attended the early courts at Cambridge. Joshua Harper, the mild an.d 
courteous gentleman, correct business man and faithful legislator. 
We might go on in this style, but limits must be set. Indeed, not a few 
of the gentlemen whose names are recorded at that first election, have 
histories belonging to the county, which will appear as we progress. 

As before stated, the county was organized 19th June, 1837. On the 
27th of the same month the Commissioners met in Dayton at the house 
of Geo. Brandenburg, and after being duly qualified, the first County Com- 
missioners' Court for Henry County was opened. Jas. M. Allan was 
appointed Clerk. Robert McCullough was his security in the sum of 
•$1,000. Ithamar Pillsbury (one of the Commissioners) administered the 
oath of office to Mr. Allan, and the court was ready for business. Chas. 
Atkinson was appointed Treasurer, took the oath, and gave bonds 
according to law. Records do not state who his sureties were. The clerks 
and treasurers of counties up to this time were appointed by the Com- 
missioners, but by an act of the legislature, 7th February, 1837, those 
offices were made elective from and after the August election of 1837. 
Accordingly at that election (August 7, 1837), the people returned 
Mr. Allan to the Clerkship, and Mr. Atkinson was elected Treasurer. 
At the September term of the Commissioners' Court (September 4, 
1837), the Clerk gave bond in same amount as before, with Robt. Mc- 
Cullough and Jolm P. Hanna as suieties. No record is discovered of 
treasurer's bond or surety. 

The first recorded order of the coui-t was on June 27, 1837, authoriz- 
ing Charles Atkhison, John P. Hanna and Geo. Tyler to keep a ferry on 
Rock River at Cleveland. The second ordered that tlie tax on the above 
mentioned ferry be fixed at one dollar at id fifty cents. The Commissioners 
doubtless had an eye to a revenue when the}' charged that dollar and a 
half. June 4, 1838, this "tax" was raised to five dollars, and the party 
was authorized to work it out on the road under the direction of the 
Supervisor. One-half of one per cent, was fixed as the rate of tax- 
ation upon pleasure carriages, horses, cattle of every description, watches, 
Avagons, hogs, sheep. Mules, clocks, and other property that might be 
mentioned, went "•scot-free" it seems. A road tax of one dollar and 
twenty cents was placed upon each taxable quarter section of land. At a 
term of the Commissioners' Court, held Marcli 5, 1838, every legally able- 
bodied man was required to work on the road five days in a year. On 
application for a license to sell goods l)eing handed in, George Branden- 
burg, for the snug little sum of five dollars, was permitted to merchandise 
in Dayton. Later jn the day, on a similar application, Geo. Tyler was 
authorized to run an opposition establishment in Cleveland. These were 
the beginnings of the commercial enterprise of the county. On the 
second day of the court the county was divided into five road districts. 

No. 1, included townships 1%, 17, 18, N. 1 and 2 E. 
" 2, " " 14, 15, N. 1, 2 and 3 E. 

" 3, " " 14, 15, N. 4 and 5, E. 

" 4, " " 16, 17, N. or so much as is S. Green River 

3, 4, 5, E. 

" 5, " " 17, 18, or so much as is N. Green River 3, 

4, 5, E. 



FITSTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 121 

Supervisor of 1st District, John P. Hanna ; 2d, Albert Jagger ; 3d, 
John F. Willard; 4th, John C. Ward; 5th,Neel3^ Withrow. Here was a 
great extent of country for a hundred voters or thereabouts to supply 
with roads. Those now living in the localities mentioned can perceive 
at a glance the probable character of the roads then constructed. The 
sparseness of the population, however, made it unnecessary to go in direct 
lines as we do now, and advantage was taken of the lay of the ground, 
and thus ridges were followed and sloughs headed, which rendered the 
construction of many bridges, now needed, unnecessary. It must not be 
understood that road-viewers and surveyors laid out the roads on such 
circuitous routes. The truth is, the roads were " run '' more directlj^ from 
point to point, but the "• travel " had to make the circuit in order to avoid 
the sloughs that no labor which could then be spared could make 
passable, and thus the proverb " the longest way round is the shorte-ft 
way there," was literally verified. The first road ordered surveyed by 
the county was from Andover to Geneseo, thence to Rock River road at 
or near Joshua Browning's. C. K. Bartlett, A. M. Seymour and Joshua 
Browning were appointed viewers, and the road was to be laid without 
cost to the county. That rule was observed till June 6, 1838, when an 
order for the location of a road from Andover Mills in the direction of 
Peoria, was made at the expense of the county. The first appropriation 
for building was 150, to apply in part on a bridge across Green River, on 
road from Cleveland via Dayton to Andover, and in part on a bridge 
across same stream on the road from Geneseo to the junction of " Big 
Slough " with Rock River ; this was made March 5, 1838. The second 
appropriation was made June 4, 1838, of 110, for a bridge on Camp Creek 
on the road from Andover to Cleveland. The first road from Andover 
to Wethersfield was declared to be such, June 4, 1838. It is probable 
that most persons acquainted with the streams mentioned will know 
how such small sums could be of essential service in constructing bridges 
over them ; it is very doubtful if such small appropriations were really 
economical. Larger expenditures would undoubtedly have secured more 
durable structures ; but the problem was, Where was the money to 
come from? The justices' districts and the election precincts were each 
five in number, and the limits the same as the road districts. The 
increase of population, however, soon required alteration in all of 
them. By order of the court, on the second da}^ of the first term, 28tli 
June, the town of Dayton was designated as the place for holding 
elections in first district. From this it is to be supposed that the house of 
George Brandenburg was the toiim of Dayton. In the second district the 
Company House was selected for holding elections ; in the third the 
house of Henry G. Little; in the fourth the house of John C. Ward; and 
in the fifth the house of Joshua Browning. Before adjourning, the court 
ordered that the courts be held in the town of Dayton until the perma- 
nent seat of justice could be located, and proper buildings erected therein 
for their accommodation. 

In accordance with the Militia Law of the state, an election was 
held on the 12th of August, 1837, for the choice of an officer to take 
command of the Henry County battalion. James M. Allan was elected 
Major, and commissioned accordingly by the governor. 

At the regular term of the court, Sept. 4, 1837, after the qualifying 



122 HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

of the clerk and treasurer, an order was passed anthorizing the clerk to 
employ the surveyor to run the line between. Henry and Rock Island 
counties, to ascertain if a certain man who had perished of cold near the 
line of the counties in March, 1837, had really died in Rock Island County 
or in Henry. The man had some money and no knoAvn heirs, and Rock 
Island County claimed jurisdiction in the case and appropriated the 
money. The man really died in Henr}^ County. A lengthy litigation 
ensued, but all efforts to compel Rock Island to refund the money proved 
unavailing. The first Avrit of ad quod damnum — damages for locating a 
dam — was issued in behalf of Charles Oakley, through Joshua Harper, 
to enable said Oakley to build a dam across Green River on E. -J N. E. 
12, 17, 1, later known as Green River Mills, and burned in 1874. 
The second writ of ad quod damnum was also issued at this term of 
the court. It was to enable Ithamar Pillsbury to build a dam across 
the south fork of Edwards River on N.W. 18, 14, 3. A sawmill was soon 
after erected there. These were pot the first mills in the county ; 
those at Andover were in operation a couple of years before. It was 
at the close of this session of the court the first jurors were selected. 
But as there was no circuit court till the Spring of 1839, there was some 
change made in the list, and, indeed, upon examining the records of the 
circuit court, it was found that very few of those selected by the county 
court were empaneled. 

COUNTY SEAT. 

When the County of Henry was to have a seat of justice located, 
those possessing eligible points for such location did not fail to urge 
the great advantages of their several positions. The county seat of 
Henry County has been thrice located, and not- once was there aji 
approximation to unanimity of views and feelings in regard to the site. 
Twice were Commissioners appointed to locate a seat of justice, and 
once, upon petition, the legislature designated the point. The first 
location was unquestionably a tolerably wise one, if prospective consider- 
ations were to prevail in the decision. If the limits of the county were 
to be preserved intact, and the ^'. swamp lands " were to be drained so 
as to make them inhabitable, the Commissioners could not resist the 
conclusion that the site selected would be but little north of the center 
of population after a lapse of from twenty-five to fifty years. It was 
not far from the geographical csnter. The second location was made by 
a larger bonus being given by the owners of the town to the county 
than was offered at any other point. 

That selection was within six miles of the west line of the county, 
and but three miles from Rock River, the northwestern boundary of the 
count}*. The third point selecterl was designated by the legislature on 
petition of a majority of the voters of the county ; it is about four miles 
south and one mile west of the first location. As has been stated, the 
enabling act to organize the county appointed Commissioners to locate the 
county seat. The oath qualifying them to act, was administered October 
.3, 1837, by William McMurtry, of Henderson, Knox County, an acting 
Justice of the Peace and afterwards Lieutenant Governor of the state. 
Andover had just sprung into vigorous existence under the auspices of 
capitalists in New York, and was a prominent candidate. Xreneseo, having 




Hon. ANDREW CRAWFORD, 

Ex-State Senator. 

Chicago. 

Former Resident of Geneseo. 



HISTOET or HENEY COtTNTY. 125 

claims as to position, cTeliglitful situation and well-to-do citizens, was also 
in the field. Morristown, situated in a beautiful prairie, and having 
backing- in the shape of wealth, put in her claim. A little place on 
Spring Creek, southeast from Geneseo a few miles, known as Ford Town, 
asked to be noticed in the race for distinction. In the Summer of 1836, 
James M. Allan, being wide awake, saw at a glance that there must not 
only be a county seat, but that it ought to be located no great distance 
from the center. To ascertain how nearly in the center an eligible situa- 
tion could be obtained, he rode down to an established " corner," 
designated by a government tree in Spring Creek, and from that point, 
guided by a pocket compass, rode due west and counted the steps of his 
horse as he proceeded till he reached, as he supposed, section 17, 16, 3, 
some four or five miles from the starting point, in the midst of as beauti- 
ful prairie as nature has furnished. His figures did not deceive him. 
He afterwards bought S. E. 17, staked out a town, named it Richmond, 
and entered the lists for the seat of justice. 

The law. required the Commissioners to meet at the house of Dr. 
Baker and thence proceed to select a site. Another requirement of the 
law was that government land should be selected if equally eligible. At 
that time four-fifths of the land in the county was in the hands of the 
government. The Commissioners met as required, accompanied by a 
delegation from Andover. At Brandenburg's they met Major Allan 
who accompanied them to Geneseo. His point was well considered, 
the arguments pro and con. heard, and the party went out into the 
open prairie to Richmond, on nearly the highest ground in the vicinity, 
with no house within five miles or a tree within three miles. The 
site commanded an extended view of a splendid though nearly entirely 
unoccupied country. Upon examining a map of the county this point 
was seen, as before stated, near the geographical center, and what was 
there in the nature of the soil of the county to prevent its becoming 
the center of population ? Nothing, except the swamps in the northern 
part, and they would be drained and populated with inhabitants other 
than frogs in the course of fifty years. Allan offered 120 acres of the 
site to the county, and Richmond Avas the county seat. This decision of 
the Commissioners disappointed the calculations of Geneseo and Andover 
more perhaps than those of the other towns, for those places had been 
fairly under way, and it was supposed would soon have a heavy settle- 
ment around them. 

Andover certainly had no claims on the score of position, as it is just 
seven miles from the west line of the county, and but ten miles from the 
south line. Geneseo was more favorably situated as to geographical 
position, as the town is centrally located from east to west, though but 
nine miles from the northern boundary and six from Rock River, but it 
was clear if the county was to remain intact, she would be considerably 
north, not only of the geographical center, but of the center of popula- 
tion. This latter fact probably determined the action of the Commis- 
sioners. 

In all counties not bounding upon navigable streams it was usually 
supposed, at that early day, that the county town had a far better pros- 
pect for population and wealth than other towns. Hence the great 
struggle for location. But since the introduction of railroads eligible 



126 HISTOET OF HENET COUNTY. 

points for towns along their lines have led all other towns in the 
counties in the race for population and wealth, whether seats of justice 
or not. The great struggle among holders of town property has since 
been for railroads. Without them but little, with them a great deal, 
may be accomplished. 

To return to the Commissioners : they lodged at Andover that night, 
made out their bills against the county, presented them for pajanent, and 
left for their respective homes. They were qualified on the 8d, and pre- 
sented their bills on the 6th of October. Voris charged, for twelve days, 
$36.00 ; Raywalt charged, for ten days, $30.00 ; Murphy charged, for 
seven days, 121.00. 

It seems that Major Allan had a partner in this town speculation, for 
we find a deed made to the County Commissioners for land above specified 
by James M. Allan and Gilbert C. R. Mitchell, October 16, 1887. Allan 
and Mitchell made a deed for 120 acres on S. E. 17, 16, 3, to County 
Commissioners 16th of October, 1837. The day following. Commission- 
ers met to determine the plans and measures necessary to be adopted in 
relation to the county seat. The surveyor was directed to lay out and 
make plat of town, for which he was to have forty dollars. The entire 
quarter section was laid out, 40 acres for the Allan party, 120 for county, 
in lots 4 by 8 rods, with streets mostly six rods wide. Each party had a 
public square. " Three choice lots " were donated to George Harris, upon 
condition that he should build a public house sufficient for the accommo- 
dation of company by the first day of June next. He was also to have 
three other choice lots to be paid for in work. He put up the house with 
tolerable promptitude, but it will be seen in the sequel that it went down 
more promptly, and without his help. Sale of lots to come Wednesday 
in June, was advertised in Peoiia and Chicago, Canton and Galena 
papers. In the interval first-class lots were ordered to be sold for fifty 
dollars, second-class for twenty-five dollars ; one-third in hand, balance 
in six months. It was ordered that propositions for building a temporary 
court-house be received at the December term of this court — size 18 by 
24 feet, story and a half high. There are no records to show that 
"propositions" were made, but at that term, December, 1837, the clerk 
was directed to let the job to the lowest bidder. George Harris got the 
job, and in part built that and his own public house during the ensuing 
year. The latter was a frame, 36 by 40 feet, or about that size, two stories 
high, the best in the county at that time. At the June term, 1838, the 
Commissioners pledged the faith of the county that money received on 
sale of lots should be returned if the county seat should be moved. Sales 
were not numerous, and the clerk was authorized to sell to the best 
advantage he could for the interests of the county. In August, 1838, 
the term of office of the first Commissioners elected expired, and Marcus 
B. Osborn, Sylvester Blish and John P. Hanna were elected to succeed 
them. The legislature had passed an act during the preceding Winter 
requiring the boards to be elected in August, to draw lots which member 
should serve for three, which for two, and which for one jenv. Upon the 
lots being drawn, Osborn retained the office three years, Blish two, and 
Hanna one. At a special term of the court, 23d of October, 1838, 
George Brandenburg was allowed $12 for furnishing court-room one year. 
At the regular term, December 3, it was ordered that hereafter in all 



HISTORY OF HENRY COTJNTY. 127 

county elections the people shall assemble at the county seat to vote. 
The Commissioners, it would seem, were determined to have the people 
come to the county seat occasionally, at least. The voters in Richmond, 
at the August election, 1838, amounted to just seven, and perhaps the 
Commissioners hoped to cover up the feeble condition of the seat of jus- 
tice by compelling the people to vote at this point only. This order was 
repealed 17th of June following. It was during this term of the Court 
that it was ordered that the representative from this district be 
requested to inform the state legislature that this community, and Henry 
County particularly, has suffered very materially in consequence of there 
not being any circuit court held since its organization. It will be per- 
ceived at once that Henry County did suffer materially on that account, 
when we state that at the court held the Spring following there were 
just ten cases on the docket. One of them, however, was a criminal case, 
the principal in which, a counterfeiter, had to be guarded day and night, 
or else sent to another county to prison. In view of such cases it was 
ordered that propositions to build a jail be received January 1, 1839. On 
that day the proposals were all too high, and the court adjourned with- 
out making a contract. The next day, however, a bax-gain was struck 
with Geo. W. Harris, who was to have it completed by September 
following. It was never built. Circuit court was held in April, 1839 ; 
Thos. Foi'd, Judge ; James M. Allan, Clerk. The prisoner above referred 
to took a cliange of venue to Ogle County. Soon after the adjournment 
of court, while this and another prisoner were being kindly cared for at 
Mr. Harris' public house, by having their ankles ornamented with iron, 
and a keen lookout for them kept- by the family, the house caught fire 
and was soon in a blaze beyond control. The court-house was in close 
proximity, and the fire reaching it, the two buildings were destroyed. 
Soon after the alarm, the two prisoners went to the wood-pile, and with 
the ax relieved each other of their ornaments, and then bent all their 
energies to saving the movables in the house. Porter, the counterfeiter, 
who was a small man, attempted to take down the coats hanging in the 
bar-room. One of them, belonging to Abram Miller (of the Geneseo 
House now), he found he could not get off the hook without tearing the 
loop. This he tliought was a pity to do, and ran out to get a stool to stand 
on, so as to reach the hook. When he returned the coat was in a blaze. He 
succeeded, however, in carrying to a place of safety a small stand, in the 
drawer in which was the complimentary document which afterwards 
enabled a jury of twelve men to order him cared for at public expense in 
Alton for the term of one j^ear. Neither prisoner tried to escape. The 
court-house was not yet completed, and Harris wanted his pay as far as 
he had gone with it. This the Commissioners hesitated to grant, but 
ordered an election to be held upon that and other matters, so as to 
decide what was to be done. The result of the election was that Harris 
got $80 in addition to what he had received, and gave up the contracts 
for building both court-house and jail. The election took place July 9th, 
and the arrangement with the County Commissioners the day following. 
The town of Richmond, Avith the exception of the stable, having 
been reduced to ashes and " thin air,'" immediate steps for reconstructing 
the public buildings seemed imperative. All parties agreed as to the 
necessity of getting up new buildings, but the point '^t which they were 



128 HISTORY OF HENRY COin<rTY. 

to be erected was at once the subject of earnest dispute. Meetings were 
called at different points to discuss this, at that time, all-absorbing ques- 
tion. At a meeting held at a school-house on Rock River it was resolved 
that we are in favor of removing the county seat from its present loca-' 
tion. Then followed petition to the Commissioners' Court asking for a 
convention of the people to take action on this momentous affair. ' The 
entire document is brief and to the iDoint, and the insertion of the last 
resolution entire will doubtless be tolerated here, as it indicates the exist- 
ence of a very strong conservative and anti-progressive policy (to use no 
harsh terms) among the citizens of Rock River. It reads : 

" It is further resolved at this meeting, by an unanimous vote, that 
we concur with the majority of legal voters of the county (when they 
shall be taken) for the re-location of the county seat of said county ; and 
we farther disapprove of the minority remonstrating against any loca- 
tion that may be made by the majority. 

[Signed] Geo. Colbert, Chairmmi. 

Saturday, June 1, 1839. Geo. Tyler, Secretary." 

A meeting called at Andover, June 13th, to consider the same topic, 
memorialized the Commissioners to call a convention of the people to 
take the sense of the county on several topics of importance, among 
which are : 1st. The Revenue Law. 2d. The Internal Improvement 
System of this State. 3d. Adjusting tlie accounts of Geo. W. Harris. 
4th. The removal of the county seat. On the last named subject we 
suggest the following considerations in favor of a removal : 1st. There 
have been strong objections from the first to the present location ; that it 
is remote from timber ; that it is destitute of water power, of facilities 
for steam power ; that it is not on the direct route of travel ; the difficulty 
of obtaining suitable persons to hold office at the town of Richmond. 
This memorial was signed by fifteen citizens, among whom appear the 
names of I. Pillsbury, Wm. Ayers, Joseph Tillson, and others. 

The memorials were presented at the June term of the court, and an 
order passed recommending the people to convene at Geneseo " to com- 
pare views and consult on such matters of immediate importance to the 
county as may be then and there proposed." As stated before, the con- 
vention met 9th July. The court, on the 10th, passed an order for the 
settlement with Harris, as before noticed. The terms of the court subse- 
quent to the June term were held at Geneseo because houses were more 
plenty. The inhabitants of Richmond had been under the necessity of 
lodging in the stable, and the court held one session in the same building. 
At the December term, 1839, the court petitioned the legislature to 
legalize acts during the sessions at Geneseo, that officers might be per- 
mitted to hold their offices at their own houses to January 1, 1841, and 
that the courts might be directed to sit at Geneseo. At the session of 
the legislature of 1889-40, an act was passed re-locating the seat of jus- 
tice for the County of Henry, and Alexander Turnbull of Warren County, 
M. W. Conway of Rook Island County, and Harmon Brown of Knox 
County, were appointed Commissioners to locate and name the town. 
This matter was postponed by the Commissioners till after the August 
election of 1840, and then summarily disposed of. Andover does not 
appear to have struggled a second time for the location ; Geneseo and 



HISTORY OF ITENRY COUNTY. 129 

Morristown were the principal, if not the only, competitors. The popula- 
tion of the former place, iio less than its location, pointed to it as the 
inevitable seat of justice. This led to more confidence than liberality, if 
the opposite party can be relied upon, and Morristown overbid her 
largely for the coveted honor. Geneseo, it is stated, offered the county a 
respectable portion of the village, as a bonus, while Morristown, or 
Charles Oakley and Joshua Harper, Avho represented that interest, offered 
an entire quarter section, sixteen town lots and one thousand dollars in 
cash. This settled the matter, and Morristown was a seat of justice. The 
Geneseo party claim to have made a more liberal offer than did Oakley 
& Co., but the offer came after the Commissioners had made their decision. 

MAEKJAGES. 

The first marriage within the present limits of Henry County was 
that of James P. Dodge and Samantha Colbert, daughter of Rev. George 
A. Colbert, before the count/ was organized, Feb. 7, 1836. The license 
was issued from Knox County, where the record is also entered. 

The first recorded marriage in the county was that of Mr. Louis Hurd 
and Miss Caroline W. Little, of Wethersfielcl, August 22, 1837, Rev. Itha- 
mar Pillsbury officiating. That notable event seemed to inspire the 
reverend gentleman, for we find his marriage with Miss Caroline E. Miller 
of Andover, December 18, 1837, Rev. Enoch Mead officiating. December 
24, just six days after the Rev. Mr. and Mrs. Pillsbury's marriage, Wm. B. 
Goss of [Savannah, Jo Daviess County, was married by the aforesaid Rev. 
Ithamar Pillsbury, to Miss Ellen Baldwin of Cleveland. During the year 
1838, there were five marriages in the County ; in 1839 six marriages are 
recorded. This year Geneseo witnessed the first wedding within her 
limits : James M. Allan and Susannah D. Stewart were married by the 
Rev. Jairus Wilcox, March 6, 1839. In 1840 there were ten couples 
united. In this year Morristown enjoyed her first wedding in the persons 
of Mahlon Lloyd, Esq., and Miss Amelia L. Davenport, December 30. 
During 1841 there seemed to be a very sudden increase of marriages, 
there being twenty-two recorded, of whom James Knox, afterwards 
representative to Congress, found a wife in the person of Miss P. H. Blish 
of Wethersfield, January 20, 1841. In 1842 there were twenty-three 
marriages; in 1843 fifteen; in 1844 eighteen; in 1845 twenty-one; in 
1846 twenty-five ; in 1847 twenty-three ; and they gradually increased 
till 1851, when there were sixty-three marriages in the county. 

PHYSICIANS. 

The first physician was also the first settler, it is believed — Dr. Baker, 
who settled on Rock River in 1835. We have no extensive record of 
his ^sculapian performances. The presumption is, his well known lack of 
adipose material was a constitutional bar to active practice, and he was 
not much known as a physician. Dr. Maxwell, who settled on Rock 
River in what is now Phenix township, in the Winter 1836-7, is 
said to have been a man of another cast, possessing a great deal of activity 
and promptness ; he has been represented as an eminent physician, very 
complaisant and agreeable in personal address. Dr. Pomeroy came in 
1837. He had a very extensive practice, and is still rdilliaj; ia Gja3i3j, 



130 HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

an active and highly respected citizen. In 1845 Dr. S. T. Hume made 
his debut as physician of Henry County in Geneseo ; he is still a 
practicing physician in that place. About the year 1840, Dr. Geo. 
Shipman, a Homoeopathist, settled at Andover and built the house after- 
wards owned by Mr. Ayres ; he soon moved to Chicago. 



Fortunately for the people of all new countries, lawyers find little 
encouragement at first to settle among them. Henry County was no 
exception. We have no data for an account of lawyers at an earlier date 
than 1845, unless we include an early settler of LaGrange, who has since 
practiced in the courts of California, but who left no record of his legal 
performances — if there were any — in this region. Nearly all who are 
now in the county have either moved into it since 1850, or have been 
admitted to the bar since that time. Our earliest information of attor- 
neys in the county is connected with two brothers, Wm. H. and Samuel 
P. Brainard. They were young men of promise ; Samuel P. holding at 
one time the clerkship of the county and circuit courts. Neither the 
law nor the offices, singly or jointly, afforded that gentleman an income 
sufficient to satisfy him immediately or prospectively, and upon the break- 
ing out of the gold fever in 1848-9, he suffered from a lingering attack 
of it and appointed a deputy to fill his post, while he went to California 
for gold which he never got. Wm. H. also filled tlie office of clerk of 
the circuit court, and was ex-officio recorder. He was also school 
commissioner at a time when most of the school lands were sold, and sold 
for a large price, from which office he reaped a rich harvest. It is not 
possible to follow up the attorneys of the county individually and 
expect a narrative of them. 

MORRISTOWN. 

Among the provisions for the settlement of Morristown was one that 
a public house should be built out of the general fund, and that within a 
certain time (one year), each of the colonists should erect a dwelling- 
house upon his land. A very " considerable " building for those times 
was erected out of the funds proposed to be applied in that way, and a 
few, very few (three or four), dwelling-houses were built as per contract. 
The town plat was just one mile square ; large enough in all conscience, 
and if it could have been peopled the county would have been much the 
gainer. In the center of the plat was a public ground of 440 feet square. 
The lots were 45 feet front and varying in length from 155 to 270 feet. 

When the settlement first commenced the prospect seemed very fair 
for a rapid increase of population ; this was anticipated by a Mr. Crocker, 
who, just before the Morristown entry, had entered what is known as 
Crocker's Grove (sometimes called Brown's), as well as a large tract of 
prairie, all of which was near by the lands soon after entered by the New 
York Company and named Morristown. He had bought for the^ purpose 
of farming with an abundance of elbow room, and expressed his regrets 
that range for his cattle would so soon be limited by the improvements of 
that company. It turned out, however, that little or no improvement, 
beyond the few farms at first commenced, was made. 



HISTORY OF HENRY COUlSTTY. 181 

This, then, was the extent of the improvements in and abont Morris- 
town M^hen it was the county seat. It was in better condition to accommo- 
date courts, etc., than was Richmond at its inauguration as seat of justice 
for the county, and the public could look for better accommodations than 
at the last named point. But dissatiafaction with the location grew apace, 
and it was soon a fixed fact that a contest for the removal and a re-loca- 
tion of the county seat was unavoidable. In fact it began as soon as the 
decision of the Commissioners was known. As Geneseo was the only 
point that competed with Morristown for the honor conferred, it is 
natural to suppose that that was the point at which the great body of the 
disaffected would endeavor to establish their county town. But it was 
soon ascertained that there were several candidates lor that honor. General 
dissatisfaction prevailed on account of the location as it then stood ; four 
men out of five probably being anxious to remove it on account of the 
great distance to which they had to travel to attend courts. The site 
itself Avas delightful, and those principally interested in its property were 
enterprising, intelligent and popular. Other sites, however, equally as 
eligible for beauty and salubrity, and much more central, could be picked 
out of every third section in any of the more central townships ; and to 
one of these points the people determined to take it. 

The county courts were held at Geneseo till the Summer or Fall of 
1841. The first circuit court held in Morristown was in May, 1842, the 
last in May, 1844. As stated before, the legislature authorized the hold- 
ing of courts in Geneseo till suitable accommodations could be prepared at 
the county seat. The public house at Morristown was conveyed to the 
county, and a contract for "improving " it was made with David Gove 
and Nathaniel Walters, an order for seventy dollars being issued for their 
benefit December 9, 1840. On June 28, 1841, a contract was made with 
Thos. W. Corey and George Brandenburg, for the erection of the com- 
modious court-house, 18 by 24 feet, one and a half stories high, and also 
for the building of a jail, according to specifications and contract made 
with another party for building one at Richmond. The public house, 
now (then) the county house,was rented to Corey and Brandenburg for two 
years for the sum of one hundred dollars, they to furnish a suitable court- 
room for the use of all courts of the county during the two years, in 
which time they were to complete the public buildings. The court- 
house was built. The jail was a mere structure on paper ; the uncer- 
tainty of there being any use for it in that place causing the court to 
postpone its erection. 

The dissatisfaction with Morristown as the county town was so 
extreme that some of those who had been most determined to honor 
Geneseo with it, expressed a willingness to have it located at some other 
point than that of their choice, even at Sugar Tree Grove, rather than 
have it remain at Morristown. Commissioners had twice been appointed 
by the Legislature to locate a seat of justice for the county, and were 
sworn to study the interests, immediate and prospective, of the population 
in determining the site. The first selection it seems was a judicious one. 
But the people were dissatisfied with it, and a change was effected. The 
second was judicious or not, just as the parties might think. We can 
imagine no good reason for the choice save the liberal donation for the 
county. That it was liberal is certainly true, but the loss to which the 



132 HISTORY OF HEKB.Y COUNTY. 

citizens of the county would have been yearly subjected on account of 
the remoteness of the site from the center would have counterbalanced, 
four times over, the extra liberality of the enterprising proprietors of 
Morristown. This the people knew, and while determined to effect the 
removal of the county capital, they were very generally determined to 
designate the point at which it should be located. It is believed that this 
feeling of distrust in Commissioners possessed nearly ever}!- citizen of the 
county, and during the greater part of the agitation of the question no one 
proposed a resort to the old process ; the reasonableness of the demand 
for a removal was acquiesced in by the citizens of Morristown themselves. 
Indeed, Joshua Harper, one of the donors of the county, and principally 
interested in the prosperity of Morristown, was, in 1842, a candidate for 
the legislature, and if he had shown the least disposition to oppose the 
wishes of the people he could have got no support. He distinctly stated 
that if elected representative, and a majority of the voters of the county 
sent a petition for the county seat to be removed into the Winnebago 
swamps, into the swamps it should go. At least his influence should not 
prevent it. He Avas elected, and no man was ever more faithful to the 
interests of his constituents. 

Geneseo was the point to which the majority in the northern part of 
the county wished the seat of justice removed. A point near Sugar Tree 
Grove was selected by the southern. Some manoeuvering was resorted to 
to get an admission from opponents that a site on Section 7, 15, 3, was 
an eligible point for the location. All that was done, however, in the 
way of manoeuver was to get the admission before the name of the owner 
of the property should be known. The owner was Rev. Ithamar Pills- 
bury, of Andover. He was active in his efforts to secure the first location 
at Andover, but the position of J. M. Allan was too strong for him up to 
that time, and after there was feud between the two points Andover and 
Geneseo, and it was thought best by the Pillsbury party that he should 
not be known in the transaction till suitable admissions had been made 
by the other party. We have said the " Pillsbury party," but the prime 
•mover, the great laborer in behalf of the point near Sugar Tree Grove 
was Joseph Tillson, Esq. The "Judge," as he is usually called, was an 
early settler, and an active man in some important matters of the county. 
Canvassing for signatures to a petition locating the town near Sugar Tree 
Grove — at what is now Cambridge — progressed steadily, though with 
very variable results, as different localities were entered. The petition 
was drawn up in Wethersfield, by Col. Wells it is believed. John Kil- 
vington circulated it at Wethersfield, about Barren Grove, on Spring 
Creek, and obtained a few signatures in Geneseo, after which the Judge 
took charge of it. When it was ascertained that a majority of the voters 
of the county had signed the petition to have the county seat located on 
Section 7, 15, 8, a remonstrance was got up at Geneseo against the location, 
with a petition added that Commissioners be again appointed to locate a 
county seat. It is believed J. M. Allan, whose home was then at Geneseo, 
was the most active man in behalf of his locality. .The contest was 
warm. The Judge sent the petition north of Green River for signatures, 
and it was returned with a single additional name affixed. He took it 
himself, went over the same ground, and obtained forty signatures, 
Brandenburg leading off. He also re-canvassed the settlement at Andover. 




JOSEPH A. SAWYER, 
Geneseo. 



HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. l35 

The petition was sent to Oxford, where a friend promised to circulate and 
return it. The time for its reception arrived, but no petition came ; the 
Judge was in a flurry ; time was getting precious ; Wm. A. Ayers volun- 
teered to look up the missing paper, and get such signatures as had not 
been appended ; he found it shut up in a chest, where it had been placed 
for safe keeping, with a very few additional names on it. Mr. A. pushed 
the matter along, and without difl&culty obtained the signature of every 
man he met in that locality. It was extensively signed throughout the 
southern part of the county. A few residents on Spring Creek who 
signed the petition to locate at Cambridge, it is known, afterwards signed 
the remonstrance. 

The petition to have Cambridge the new seat of government of the 
county was forwarded to Colonel John Buford, of Rock Island, who then 
represented this district in the Senate. A bill was brought before the 
Senate re-locating the county seat of Henry County. It passed both 
houses on petition of a majority of the citizens of the county. 

The bill locating the county seat of Henry County was approved by 
the Governor February 21, 1843. It provided that the courts should be 
held at Morristown till accommodations should be provided at the new 
location. It also required the re-conveyance of all property that had been 
deeded to the county at Morristown, and the refunding of money donated. 

The difficulty of pleasing the citizens of Henry County in the 
location of their county town was a matter well known outside. The 
truth is, there was very little in the immediate vicinity of the location 
except a fine grove of timber to demonstrate the wisdom of fixing the 
seat of justice at that point. There was no house north of Sugar Tree 
Grove nearer than those immediately about Geneseo. West there were 
but two or three until within a mile of Andover. In the grove, and at 
the "East End,'' a settlement had fairly commenced. South of what is 
now the Town of Cambridge, Red Oak, nearly six miles distant, was the 
nearest settlement. There was no Bishop Hill Colony, no Galva, and no 
one in that township but James Bonham, at Hickory Grove, and two or 
three in the northeast corner of the town. A good settlement existed 
at Wethersfield and along Barren Grove in the southeast corner of the 
county ; but at Wethersfield an anti-Cambridge feeling existed to a small 
extent, which grew out of a desire of those malcontents, or the most of 
them, to be annexed to the County of Stark. At Oxford, in the south- 
east corner of the county, and about Richland Grove, west of Andover, 
a few families had collected. The settlement at Andover was one of the 
most flourishing in the county. Ten miles northwest was a cluster of 
three or four houses, and a respectable settlement a few miles further, on 
Rock River. All the settlements in the southern part of the county 
(except the slightest opposition at Wethersfield), favored the location, 
but how was a town to be built ? Men and money were required. There 
was but little immigration to the county or state, and where were 
numbers and dollars to be obtained, was the question of the hour. 

MORRISTOWN COLONY. 

In the Winter of 1835-'6, a notice was inserted in several of the 
New York city daily papers, calling a meeting of persons interested in West- 
ern colonization. This was held in Congress Hall, and at a subsequent 



136 HtSTOKY OF HENBT COUNTY. 

meeting to further consider this matter, a colony was formed and organ- 
ized under the name of the New York Colony. At these meetings some 
forty or fifty persons became members of the colony. Charles Oakley, 
Esq. (now deceased), once Fund Commissioner of the State of Illinois, 
took a leading part in all these transactions. He had been prospecting 
out West, and gave a glowing description of the wonderful " prairie coun- 
try." At the close of these meetings an agreement was drawn up and 
signed by the colonists, authorizing Charles Oakley and C. C. Wilcox 
(now of Chicago) as trustees, to proceed to Illinois and locate about a 
township of land in such part of the state as they might think for the 
best interest of the members of the colony ; the intention being to 
enter land somewhere near the Illinois River. But other parties having 
preceded them to the designed location, which was j^robably in Bureau 
County, near or upon the ground now occupied by the Providence Colony, 
they proceeded into Henry County, and selected their land in Townships 
16 and 17 — some 30 sections, nearly 20,000 acres. Every individual of 
the colony bound himself to erect within two years a house or building to 
cost some specified sum, about $200, on his land, and in case of neglect 
the land was to revert to the colonists, with, however, this unfortunate 
condition attached : That the colonists, through their trustees, had the 
privilege of taking the land from those parties failing to fulfill their part 
of the contract, and paying three dollars per acre for the same, or double 
the cost of tlieir land. Tlie result proved that four-fifths of the members 
preferred the hundred per cent, advance to the hardships of Western life, 
and did not build ; and ere two years passed the panic of 1837-'8 rendered 
the other parties unwilling or unable to fulfill their part. Oakley and 
Wilcox were to receive for their services twenty-five cents per acre for 
locating these lands, and for surveys and incidental expenses. When 
surveyed and the town laid out on some eligible spot near the center of 
the location, the lands and lots were to be put up at auction, and the 
colonists were to select their property — eight lots in town being distributed 
with each quarter section. The colonists were to bid for the preference 
or choice of lands and lots. At this distribution, which was in the Sum- 
mer or Autumn of 1836 (the lands were entered in June of that year), only 
a few persons were present. The majority of the colonists acted through - 
tlieir agents. There was paid as " preference money," for the choice of 
these lands, some $6,000 or $7,000, some paying as high as $100 for the 
choice of a quarter section. After the selection, the balance were dis- 
tributed b}'' the trustees at their discretion, each member getting the num- 
ber of acres for which he had paid. This preference money was to be 
held as trust, and appropriated for the benefit of the colonists as follows : 
First, to have a colony house built, in which the colonists could live until 
their residences could be erected ; this Avas to cost some $3,000. Second, 
to build a mill and school-house, or to be appropriated as the colonists 
might desire, or distributed among members. 

Few carae that season. Messrs. Oakley andC. C. Williams remained 
but a short time. The colony lands were surve} ed by Arba M. Seymour, 
the County Surveyor. A log house was erected in Morristown, and a 
colony house contracted for, and afterwards built. This was a fine large 
building two stories high, and well finished, the latter being done by R. 
R. Stewart, Esq., of Geneseo. This building was erected upon a lot 



HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 137 

owned by Chas. Oakley, Esq. It was afterwards sold by Col. Oakley to 
Joel Wells, whose widow now occupies it. A mill was also built upon 
Green River upon land owned by Charles Oakley. In the Fall of the year 
1?36 speculation was still high. Pre-emptions on farms on Rock River 
with small improvements were valued at -f 15 to 125 per acre. These 
prices were for lands in the vicinity of the timber, as prairie land was con- 
sidered worthless by western men. 

Joshua Harper, N. W. Washburne, Luke C. Sheldon, Chas. W. Dav- 
enport, Jr. and Tompkins were all of the original colonists that were 

here in 1836. In 1837, John Appleton and Chas. W. Davenport, Sr. and 
family came, and with them the venerable father of Mrs. Davenport and 
Thos. Fitch, who died at Morristown a few years after at the advanced 
age of 80 years. These people, with a few others, comprising in all about 
ten families, scattered over some ten miles of prairie, which constituted 
the settlement for some twelve or fourteen years. After that time, a new 
exodus from the East again sent an army westward of good, substantial 
citizens — a considerable number of whom settled on Morristown prairie, 
and made it what it now is — one 'of the best settlements in Henry County. 

THE WETHERSFIELD COLONY. 

The direct settlement of Henry County is largely attributed to the 
location of colonies. These were mainly from New England, and brought 
with them all their New England foresight, energy, and frugal tlirift ; 
and to the Wethersfield colony, possessing all these attributes, tlie 
present prosperity of this portion of the county may be traced. 

As has been noticed in these pages, Mr. Pillsbury, and his associates, 
Slaughter and Pike, were commissioned by the New York Association, in 
1835, to select a location for the ''Andover Colony." Upon the return 
of Mr. Pillsbury in the Fall of that year, he was written to by the Rev. 
Dr. Caleb J. Tenney, of Wethersfield, Connecticut, concerning the loca- 
tion of another colony in the region of country in which the lands of the 
Andover Colony were situated, and an interview requested. The result 
of this interview led the Doctor to project another colony, to be styled 
the " Wethersfield Colony," and to be located near the former. Dr. 
Tenney was an eminent divine, and well acquainted with the prominent 
men of that day who would be likely to favor an enterprise by which 
religion and free education might be successfully planted in the great 
Mississippi Valle3% and he addressed many of them in relation to this 
matter. These efforts led to a meeting in the Congregational Church at 
Wethersfield, some time in 4:he Autumn of 1835, the exact date of which 
can not now be obtained. Here the enterprise assumed a tangible shape, 
and at a subsequent meeting an organization was effected. As the names 
of the projectors of this enterprise will be of interest to many of the citi- 
zens of the county, and valuable as an item of history, they are here 
given. They were : Dr. Caleb J. Tenney, Selden Miner, Roger Wells, 
Martin Kellogg, John Francis, Chancey Coleman, Weltha Willard, Rev. 
John Marsh, Josliua Goodrich, George Wells, Horace Blaine, Henry Rob- 
bins, Col. Sylvester Blisli, Rev. Samuel Redel, William Butler, Rev. Ith- 
amar Pillsbury, Miles Adams, Elizur Goodrich, Samuel Galpin, E. Porter, 
Rev. Horace Hooker, William Tenney, George P, Shipmau, Russell H. 



138 HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

Nevins, Timothy Stillman, Allen Talcott, Rev. Geo. A. Calhoun, Francis 
Loomis, Edward Payson, D.D., Rev. Geo. Stebbins, Rev. John Wood- 
bridge, Gersham Buckley, Geo. Buckley, Gardner Spring, D.D., Merritt 
Butler, Osmond Harrison, Rev. Harvey Tolcott, Jeduthan and Jonathan 
Hubbard, Sullivan Howard. Geo. Richards, Jasper Gilbert, Rev. Alpha 
Miller, Nathan DeWolf, J. L. Belden, Nathan Kellev, Stephen Topliff, 
Dr. A. Welch, Geo. B. HoUey, Rev. Chancey Booth, Richard T. Haines, 
Rev. Ralph Emerson, Robert Gipson, and a few others whose names can- 
not now be obtained. 

This Company was styled the •' Connecticut Association." The 
stockholders resided at different points from Maine to New York, some 
of whom were quite wealth3% and others were very prominent in the 
religious world. The great temperance agent will be recognized in Rev. 
John Marsh, Dr. Payson was a distinguished Christian minister, and Rev. 
Gardner Spring was an eminent divine at the head of one of the most 
aristocratic Presbyterian churches in the nation. 

The stock of the company was fixed at •$250 per share, and entitled 
each shareholder to one hundred and sixty acres of prairie land, twenty 
acres of timber, and a town lot. During the winter of 1835-'6 one hun- 
dred shares were taken, and 125,000 paid into the treasury; In Febru- 
ary, 18-:)6, a "committee of purchase" was appointed, consisting of Rev. 
Ithamar Pillsbury, Col. Sylvester Blish and Elizur Goodrich. The first 
of these was selected on account of his having some experience in matters 
of this kind ; the second, on account of his energy and prompt business 
habits, and the third because he was a competent surveyor. 

The route of this committee was through Baltimore ; over the moun- 
tains to Wheeling ; down the Ohio River by steamboat to its junction 
with the Mississippi ; thence up that stream to the Illinois River ; up 
that to Peoria, and thence to Knoxville, Henderson Grove and Andover, 
at which latter place was a house or two, but no inhabitants, nor did any 
arrive until July following. Arriving here, neither feed nor horses could 
be obtained, and they were compelled to walk some twenty miles, over 
to " Barren Grove " — with only a deserted cabin on the way, in Sugar 
Tree Grove — along the south side of which they commenced to select the 
Company's land. Rev. Pillsbury and Col. Blish were sanguine of the 
future of Illinois, and, owing to the previous knowledge of the former, 
were not long in finding the "desired haven." The surve3^or did not 
partake of their unbounded confidence, and trudged around locating the 
selections they made, until they had, at different times, succeeded in 
selecting and entering ninety-nine quarter sections of land, in Townships 
14, R. 5 and 15, R. 5 — the first entry being made May 7, 1836. 

The purchase was made from the Government in the name of Good- 
rich and Blish, who deeded the land in trust, for the purposes of the asso- 
ciation, to Chester Bulkley, secretary and treasurer, who afterwards 
deeded to individual members, or to those who purchased of the company. 

The following Spring, March, 1837, an additional quarter section 
was added, making the entries a round hundred. This committee return- 
ing, another, consisting of Rev. Joseph Goodrich, John F. Willard and 
Henry G. Little, was appointed to survey and lay out a town plat, and 
to divide the timber land into twenty-acre lots. On November 11, 1836, 
Mr. Willard and Mr. Little reached the lands purchased by the company, 



HTSTOEY OF HENBY COUNTY. 139 

with the intention to at once lay out the town and the timher lots. They 
found in the grove, one and one-half miles northeast of tlie purchase, a 
cabin, and the family of Mr. John Kilvington. of Avhom mention is made 
in the early history of Kewanee. This afforded a home for the party. 
An effort was at once made to obtain the services of the county surveyor, 
who lived thirty miles distant, to. perform the task, but the attempt 
proved fruitless, as he could not accomplish it until the following Spring. 
They returned to French Grove, in Peoria County, where Mr. Little had 
taken a cabin, and secured the services of Surveyor Nelson Simons, well 
known to manv citizens of this county. The returning party consisted 
of John F. Wdlard, H. G. Little, Nelson Simons, William Wheeler, W. 
T. Little, Sullivan Howard and Simeon B. Stoddard, who reached, on 
foot, the purchase, on the evening of November 16, 1836. The two fol- 
lowing days were spent in surveying and locating the tracts. Toward 
the close of the second day the party, with the exception of Willard, who 
remained to build a cabin, started for '■'Fraker's Grove," twelve miles 
distant. As it was very misty the night was intensely dark, and they lost 
their way. By removing the glass from the face of their compass, so 
they could feel the hands on the face, they with great difficulty regained 
their course, and reached their destination about midnight. Awakening 
^ Old Man Dunbar," as he was called, from his slumbers, they were given 
food and shelter in the only cabin in this vicinity. 

Willard worked two weeks at his cabin, boarding at Mr. Kilvington's, 
some two miles distant. When he had completed it, in company with 
N. Butler and Joseph Goodrich, he "bached" it through the Winter. 
He hauled his hay from where Sheffield now stands, and obtained the 
greater portion of his corn in Peoria County. 

During the Spring of 1837, the services of the County Surveyor 
were obtained, the timber divided into twenty-acre lots, and the town of 
Wethersfield laid out. "• In the month of April," as now appears on the 
county records, the streets were laid out at right angles, and were six 
rods — ninety-nine feet — in width. The blocks contained four lots of two 
and one-half acres each, except those immediately on the public square 
designed for business lots, and containing one-fourth acre each. One 
block was set apart for a public square, and one for Academy and College 
purposes, but the former of these only appears on the town plat. Two 
lots, one on the east and one on the west, were set apart for cemetery 
purposes. It will be noticed this village was a counterpart of that of 
Andover. Counting from north to south the streets bore the names of 
North, Mill, Church, North Main, South Main, College and South streets. 
Running east and west they, were named East, Edwards, Dwight, Wil- 
lard, Tenney, Hollis, Payson and West streets. It will also be observed 
the names of divines entered largely into this list, Edwards and Dwight 
being in their day presidents of Yale College, and Tenney and Payson hav- 
ing a national reputation. 

John*F. Willard, as has been stated, erected the first cabin on the 
colony purchase. Sullivan Howard built a cottonwood board " shanty" 
in Fei3ruavy, 1S37. He wintered in French Grove, Peoria County, and 
hauled his lumber from EUisville on Spoon river, seventy miles distant. 
Henry G. Little, now living in Iowa, '' raised " a cabin in March. Wil- 
liam T. Little built another soon after. This latter was just eighteen by 



140 HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

twenty feet in dimensions, and, for some time, accommodated the family 
of his father, Abner B. Little, the two families comprising nine members. 
In June, the first birth in tliis colony occurred in this cabin, a daugh- 
ter being born to William T. She lived to maturitj', married, and removed 
to Vermont. 

Elisha R. Wolcott, and Caleb J. T. Little arrived in April, Evan 
Wheaton came in June, and C. B. Miner in July. In August, Colonel 
Sylvester Blish and his son William arrived with their families. They 
were better prepared than most settlers, and were the first to come 
through from Connecticut with teams. They stopped with H. G. Little 
on their arrival, and with his family rather filled his cabin. Shortly after 
this the first election was held in this precinct after its organization, the 
place of voting being Mr. Little's house. Selden Miner came in August. 
Luther C. Sleight some time that season. In the Summer of 1838 Francis 
Loomis came. John H. Wells and David Potter, whose family became 
somewhat prominent in the colony, came in October. This latter gentle- 
man planted the first orchard in the settlement, and raised the first fruit 
crop. Champlin Lrster moved in the Spring of 1839, Deacon Zenas 
Hotchkiss in the Summer. William T. Little, before mentioned, turned 
the first furrow on these prairies where now C. C. Blish resides. He Avas 
soon followed by others, and that season — 1837 — quite a " sod crop" was 
raised. — and mostly eaten by cattle. The project of building a steam 
grist and saw mill was agitated the first year of the settlement, and in 
1837 decisive steps were taken toward the accomplishment of this most 
necessary of conveniences. 

Abner B. Little, father of H. G. and C. J. T., came to Wethersfield 
in April, 1837. He was born at New Salem, N. H., in 1774, and married 
Nancy Tenney, of HoUis, N. H., Jan. 20, 1802. Thirteen children were 
born to them, ten of whom came to this county, and whose names appear 
elsewhere. Mrs Little died July 7, 1847, aged 66 years. Mr, Little, 
Sept. 8, 1863, aged 89 years. 

The food of the colonists was exceedingly coarse and rather scanty. 
Coffee, cornbread and pork — pork, cornbread and coffee, constituted the 
chief variety ; but what was lacking in quality was made up most 
abundantl)- in the amount consumed. The appetite of the frontiersman 
is not geneially so dainty as voracious. Excellent air and abundant exer- 
cise atoned for all tastes. The mill proved disastrous financially to the 
colony, involving it some $4,000 in debt, besides the amount paid on its 
completion, — 15,000. No one could be found to purchase such an incum- 
brance, and after various changes, it was sold to Jeduthan Hubbard for 
12,000, thereby making a clear lo;s of |7,000. It had been most bene- 
ficial, however, in supplying a dire necessity to all this countr}-. A 
most interesting incident occurred in its erection and continuance, Avhich 
the reader will find recorded in these pages in the chapter headed " In- 
teresting Events." 

As the indebtedness of the colony had to be met, but little more than 
eighty acres of prairie land was given to each stockholder in addition to 
the town lot and timber land. 

Out of the nearly sixty members of the association only four came 
personally to aid in the organization. These were Col. Blish, Francis 
Loomis, Sullivan Howard, and Charles Richards. Selden Miner was 



HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. . 141 

represented by two sons, and Gardner Spring, D.D., by one son. Rev. 
Ithamar Pillsbury was already at the head of the And over colony, where 
for many years he was the most prominent man in it. He was married here, 
Dec. 18, 1837, to Miss Caroline Miller. On August 22 previous he per- 
formed the first marriage ceremony in the colony ^also the first in the 
county), being the nuptials of Lewis Hurd and Caroline W. Little, a 
sister of Henry G. and W. T. Little. They are still residents of Weth- 
ersfield. James E. Carson opened a temporai-y store in the Winter of 
1839-'40, but suspended operations in less than one year. In the Spring 
of 1845, Garey E. Smith opened the first store proper. He was followed 
by Daniel McClure, who established his trade in 1849. The following 
year William Blish opened a stock of goods, and was followed by others 
in quick succession, when the advent of the railroad and the consequent 
opening of Kewanee, caused a general removal of all such commodities 
to that locality. 

The earliest school was taught by Parmelia Stewart, daughter of R. 
R. Stewart, of Geneseo. She is now Mrs. Dr. Hume of that city. She 
taught in what is properly known as the "Old Log Church." After- 
wards a school-house was built a little south of this latter building, and 
school was held there for a few years. The next move in this direction 
was the purchase of the old Baptist Church, which is still used. About 
ten or twelve years ago, a new edifice was constructed, and is now used 
in connection with the former, for educational purposes. 

THE CHURCHES. 

The Congregational Church. Although a number of the colonists 
were members of this religious faith in their former homes, it was not till 
October, 19, 1839, that they organized the church here. Previous to this 
time, however. Rev. Ithamar Pillsbury, of Andover, was employed to 
preach to them one fourth of his time, through a part of 1837, and to 
about November, 1838. He often walked from one charge to the other, 
and when the reader will recollect the entire absence of bridges, compel- 
ling him to wade or swim the streams, he will properly judge the labors 
of this man, and of his indefatigable industry. Rev. W. F. Vaill was 
sent here by the Connecticut Home Missionary Society, arriving at 
Wethersfield November 21, 1838. The following year, at the date men- 
tioned, the church was organized at the house of Col. John H. Wells, 
with fifteen members. They were : Rev. Joseph and Mrs. Goodrich, 
Rev. William Vaill, Nancy T. Little, Mrs. Rhoda Blish, John H. Wells, 
Mrs. Julia Wells, L. C. Sleight, Hosea and Mrs. Buckley, Deacon Zenas 
Hotchkiss and wife, Norman Butler and wife, and Francis Loomis. Rev. 
Vaill remained pastor some eight years. As has been stated, the meetings 
were held for some time in private residences; Col. Blish's being the 
largest, was often used for this purpose. Mrs. Blish is now the only one 
of the original fifteen who comprised the first members, now living in 
this vicinity. In the Summer of 1838, a log church Avas erected, and 
used until the year 1849, when a frame structure was built, which is yet 
standing. In 1851, a good parsonage was erected. On the organization 
of the Congregational Church in Kewanee, many of the members from 
Wethersfield united there, it being a more convenient location. Gradu- 



142 HISTORY OF HENEY COUNTY., 

ally almost all went there, until now but a small number remain, and. no 
regular service is maintained. Following the Rev. Vaill was Rev. Samuel 
Ordway, who remained about three years. He was succeeded by Rev. 
Darius Gore, who was pastor about the same length of time, when R. S. 
Thrall came, who preached one and a half years. Rev. W. T. Bartle 
was the next pastor, and preached for two years. After him was Rev. 
Thomas Snell, who remained one and a half years, and was succeeded by 
Rev. Robert Rudd, who filled the pulpit one year. The next was Rev. 
B. B. Parsons, who was installed pastor August 17, 1859, and remained 
in charge some time. He was followed by Rev. L. D. Pomeroy, whose 
pastorate extended over four years, and was succeeded by Rev. Rider, 
"who preachedsome two years. Rev. W. T. Bartle was again called, and 
preached for them one year. From that time the church began to decline, 
owing to the members uniting at Kewanee, and has sustained no regular 
ministry since. 

The Methodist Episcopal Church was organized in 1841. The 
meetings were held for some time in residences, and at other times in 
the school-house, until the year 1853. In 1851, a commodious house 
of worship was commenced, but not completed and occupied until 
1853. The formation of the society in Kewanee, with which man}- of 
this church united, caused a decline in the church here, and it was 
finally abandoned. 

The Baptist Church was organized at a council held September 28,' 
1843, by eight persons, viz : Elder Edward Otis, Charles B. Miner, Mary 
G. Miner, Edward Otis, Merrill Otis, Hileman Otis, and Hannah and 
Sarah Otis, united. The first three of these were from Connecticut, the 
remainder from Ohio. It was not until two years afterward that preach- 
ing was secured. During this time. Elders Otis, Jonathan Miner and 
others officiated. During the Summer of 1845, Elder Charles E. Tinker 
was secured to preach one Sunday in each month, and so continued for 
five years. The meetings wei-e sometimes held on the north side of Barren 
Grove, and at other times at the west end, in school-houses, and often in 
the open air. For the last two years of this man's labors the meetings 
were not held at Wethersfield, and this church ultimately became the 
Baptist Church at Annawan. Another church was established at 
Wethersfield, May 17, 1851, with eleven members. They were : Ezekiel 
Cole, Mrs. Maria Cole, John Ewing, Mrs. Keziah Ewing, Mrs. Jane White, 
Mrs. Susan Ellenwood, Mrs. Caroline Purviance, Mrs. Maria F. Miner, 
Charles B. Miner, Mrs. Mary A. Miner, and Austin Sykes. Of these, 
the last three named are members. 

In July, 1852, Elder J. M. Stickney commenced to preach for this 
charge, remaining but a short time. He was succeeded by J. S. Mahan, 
from Galesburg. They now numbered only nine members, but in 1854 
were greatly increased, over fifty uniting. Elder Mahan resigned in 1855, 
and was followed by Dr. J. M. Winn, who was succeeded the same year 
by Elder S. P. Ives. The following Summer, the members, by a majority 
vote, decided to remove their place of worship to Kewanee, and sold 
their unfinished brick church to the School Trustees of Wethersfield. 
From that time the congregation assumed the name of the First Baptist 
Church of Kewanee. Other churches were established in this colony, 
but they are now extinct, or the members are so few that no regular 




JOHN BLACKBURN (deceased), 
Kewanee. 



HISTOKY OF SENRY COUNTY. 145 

organization is sustained. As the colony is the source from which all 
the affluence, position and wealth of Kewanee were obtained, this ex- 
tended sketch is given it. Many pages could be filled with incidents 
connected with the early life of these people, but space forbids their 
insertion, save a few, which the reader will find in a chapter already 
referred to. 

BISHOP HILL COLONY. 

The founder of the colony at Bishop Hill was Mr. Eric Jansen, a 
man about thirty-five or forty years of age, and a native of Sweden. He 
was possessed of strong religious convictions, large social affections, and 
an active vigorous mind. He abjured the Lutheran faith, the almost uni- 
versal religion of his native country, and one which bore much the same 
relation to Sweden that the Established Churcli of England does to that 
kingdom. By precept and preaching he gathered about him some eleven 
hundred adherents to his belief. 

These met with great opposition from the Lutheran House of 
Bishops, and Mr. .Jansen and some of his more prominent followers were 
at times imprisoned. During one of his confinements in that place he 
was visited by two physicians, who would have adjudged him insane, had 
not an influential merchant been present and threatened them with full 
process of the law for this most unjust act. This merchant was a mem- 
ber of the Lutheran Church, but a man of large, liberal views, and pos- 
sessed with a strong love of liberty. 

Mr. Jansen persisted in his work for some three years or longer, 
when, the opposition becoming too strong, it was decided to emigrate to 
that land of liberty, America ; there to establish a colony and worship 
their God in their own way, and in their own belief. One of the prin- 
cipal tenets of their religion was that all things should Ije in common, 
so that no poor would go unprovided, or none suffer for lack of means. 
Among the first converts to this belief were a Mr. Hedine and a Mr. 
Olson, men of property, who gave freely of their wealth to aid those who 
were needy. 

A delegation of them visited King Oscar I, to obtain passports, hav- 
ing been refused these necessary papers by the proper authorities. The 
King told them he could not conflict with the authority of the House of 
Bishops, save to grant them the privilege of leaving the country should 
they desire. He gave the orders, and procuring the passports, the colony, 
numbering some eleven hundred persons, set sail in the Summer of 1846. 
They arrived in New York in October of that year, and the same month 
about seven hundred of them reached Bishop Hill, Henry County, Illi- 
nois, the remaining four hundred having gone to other localities. Many 
of this latter number were deceivers and impostors, having joined the 
colony for no other purpose than to get their passage paid ; the fund for 
this object having been a common one, and some had had their debts paid 
before leaving Fatherland. 

In order that Mr. .Tansen could come to America (he had preceded 
the colonists), he was compelled to escape into Norway, where, obtain- 
ing a passport under an assumed name, he succeeded in embarking on a 
vessel whose destination was New York. 

The year previous to the landing of the colony, a few persons had 



146 HISTORY OP HENRY COUNTY. 

been sent to America for the purpose of finding them a home. These 
had selected the present site of Bishop Hill, and when the emigrants 
arrived in New York they were met l\y Mr. Jansen, their acknowledged 
leader, and at once came to their new home. 

A brother of the Mr. Olson — Olef Olson — had been one of the party 
sent out the year previous, and had made a pretty thorough prospecting 
tour throughout the West, in tlie Spring of 1846, iiicluding the states of 
Illinois, Iowa and Wisconsin. He had written to many of his friends in 
Sweden advising them of the feasibility of the coming of the colony, and 
of the ease with which a home could be secured in the then western 
wilds. He purchased of the elder Piatt a farm at the east end of Red 
Oak Grove ; this being the first of any connected with the colony. 

After Mr. Jansen reached the United States, he sent word to the 
friends in Sweden to print, or get printed, some hymn books and other 
religious works for the use of the colony. This printing was very diffi- 
cult to obtain, as no printer would risk the fine attendant on such publi- 
cations. To obviate this difficulty a press was purchased, and with the 
aid of a practical printer, they did their Ovvn printing, 

Of the eleven hundred colonists who came in 1846, many sold their 
estates at a sacrifice, and were compelled to send an agent in after years 
to collect even this. 

The colonists settled at first along the south bank of the South Ed- 
ward Creek, a small, sluggish stream. The site was a most beautiful one, 
being sparsely covered with a small growth of oaks. Having neither 
material for building nor money with which to purchase it, they erected 
tents for their immediate protection. These proving inadequate, caves 
were excavated in the hillside, and in these rude habitations many of the 
colonists passed their first Winter in America. These were damp and 
unwholesome, and much of the mortality prevailing was due to them. 
While erecting tents for their own immediate accommodation, they were 
not forgetful of the worship of Almighty God, and erected a very large 
tent in which their meetings and Sabbath-schools were held. The hard- 
ships that followed the immediate settlement were more than many 
of the members had resolution to endure, and they left singly and 
in squads as their lack of faith and pressing wants seemed to require. 
On reaching their new home the funds of the society were nearly ex- 
hausted, and they had no credit. Notwithstanding this, provisions must 
be had for the year's consumption. Not a man, save a sailor, who had 
picked up a little English, could speak a word of that language. John 
Olson, who was gifted with the faculty of making intelligible signs, under- 
took to provide food, and succeeded tolerably well while the money 
lasted. They were expecting funds in the Spring in sufficient amounts 
to relieve all pressing and immediate wants. Mud caves soon gave place 
to houses constructed of unbaked brick and an occasional frame, but these 
residences were ver}^ inferior till 1849, when a four-story brick was 
erected, about 100 feet in length and 45 in breadth. The basement was 
intended for a dining-room and the upper part divided into rooms for 
families. In 1851 the building was extended 100 feet in length. It is 
still occupied by families of new comers, or by those unable to provide 
their own homes. 

A large frame building, the upper part designed for a church and 



HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 147 

the basement for families, was erected as early as 1849, the religious zeal 
of the colonists causing them to look after a house of worship before 
securing their personal comfort. This edifice is still occupied for the 
purposes for which it was erected. 

To the credit of the people it must be stated that the}' established 
an English school as early as January, 1847. A Presbyterian clergyman. 
Rev. Talbot, taught some thirty-five scholors in a mud cave, from Janu- 
ary to July. At times he was assisted by his daughter, Mrs. Pollock, 
afterwards the wife of Eric Jansen, and now his widow. Talbot taught 
the second school, and Nelson Simons, M. D,, was employed about one 
year as their third schoolmaster. 

While the imjDrovements in general were going on the colonists were 
not neglectful of orchards and the planting of the smaller fruits ; but it 
cannot b.e said that the yield of fruits so far has equaled their expecta- 
tions. Among the earlier branches of industry a brewery, for the manu- 
facture of small beer, was erected. This beverage is a common drink 
among the Swedes, and the manufacture commenced at an early day. 
About the year 1851 they erected a commodious brick brewery from 
which they manufactured some ten barrels of beer a day while in opera- 
tion. 

The progress of improvement was steady, and a grist-mill on a small 
scale was soon in operation on the Edwards Creek, at the Hill. Two 
saw-mills were also soon under way on the same stream. One of them 
they purchased. The construction of a steam grist-mill was commenced 
in 1849, under the direction of Eric Jansen, but not completed till after 
his death. 

The correct conduct of these people soon convinced those living near- 
est them that nothing was to be apprehended from them, as their creed 
was essentially harmless to all outsiders. And in the hour of need, the 
colonists found fast friends in the majority of those near them. By the 
year 1851 they had grown and strengthened, and had built a first-class 
steam flouring-mill, which turned out a large surplus of flour beyond the 
wants of the colon}-. 

They had opportunities of securing large quantities of wheat, receiv- 
ing sometimes one-third and at others one-half the crop for taking care of 
the balance. Flax was a staple with them for several years. From the 
crop of 1847 they manufactured 12,000 yards of linen or thereabouts, and 
sold the entire amount, as they had two oi- three years' supply of 
clothing on hand. In 1849 they sold 12,454 yards of linen and 4,129 
yards of carpeting. In 1850 they sold the crop of 1849: linen, 9,323 
yards; carpeting, 3,618 yards. In 1851 crop of 1850: linen, 28,322 
yards : carpeting, 3,237 yards. ^This was the largest product in any one 
year, and the amount gradually grew less till the year 1857, when they 
manufactured but little for sale. The aggregate amount of linen sold to 
1857 was 130,309 yards ; of carpeting, 22,569 yards. The carpeting 
was all coarse, being known as "rag" carpeting. The linen was much 
of it quite fine ; but the coarser kinds were the most in demand, and after 
the first year or two but little fine linen, except in the shape of table- 
cloths, was manufactured. These goods were sold for cash, or traded for 
other goods in demand at the Hill, as opportunity offered ; large quantities 
being peddled out over the country. 



148 HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

The spinning and weaving is done almost exclusively b}' the women, 
children of both sexes assisting at spooling, etc. In the early years, as 
looms and rooms in which to place them were scarce, the weavers were 
divided into squads or gangs, and the looms kept running night and day. 
Not a little of the prosperity of the colony is due to the bone and muscle 
of the women who labored through the summer in the fields as industri- 
ously as the men, and in the winter at the wheels — looms and other work 
carried on in doors. 

From living in such poor habitations at first, and from being unac- 
customed to the climate, great numbers sickened and died. Especially 
among the children was the mortality fearful. During the great cholera 
scourge of the years 1849, '50, '51 and '52, men would go to their work 
in the morning in good health, and die before the going down of the sun. 

From this cause, and the leaving of those in fear of the disease, the 
colony was at one time reduced to 414 souls. These survived the plague, 
and had the hardihood to remain. At the time Mr. Jansen was mur- 
dered, in May, 1850 (an account of which is given elsewhere), they were 
suffering from sickness, desertion, and death, and the fact that these had 
the fortitude to remain amid such a multplicity of discouragements, was 
proof conclusive of the earnestness of their conviction that they were 
called to suffer, and, if need be, to die in demonstrating the true method 
of Christian fellowship. In erecting the large luiildings for dwellings ; 
in the manufacture of cloth; in the erection of large mills ; in their fru- 
gal industry, and in their honest endeavors to promote their welfare spirit- 
ually and temporally, during all ihese trials of poverty, sickness, death, 
desertion, and strangers in a strange land, a lesson of commendable zeal 
may be learned, and an example of fortitude which has few equals in the 
history of Henry County. 

By the year 1853 or '54 affairs were brightening, and prospects grew 
better. Other emigrants came, other buildings were erected, and the 
hopes of the early colonists began to be realized. 

Brick buildings, capable of accommodating from eight to double that 
number of families, were at times erected. In these each family had one 
or more rooms. All worked together, and at meal time repaired to the 
large dining-rooms and partook of food provided for all. Each one was 
required to labor, and after receiving sufficient clothing and food from 
the pi'oducts, the remainder were used to purchase more land or build 
additional buildings. Human nature is the same in all ages and among 
all people, and here, as well as elsewhere, were those who would not per- 
form their share of the labor, or provide for the common good. By the 
year 1860, it was found that the theories of Mr. Jansen would not prevail 
in practical life, and a division occurred. 

By this year all the large brick buildings spoken of were erected. 
At this time the}' were divided into two parties, known as the Johnson 
(Jansen) and Olson parties. The former, being more numerous, obtained 
about two-thirds of the property ; the latter, the remainder. No serious 
difficulties arose from this division, and the individual affairs were con- 
ducted on the same plan heretofore pursued. 

The following year, the Olson party were divided into three divi- 
sions or parts, and the Johnson party made an individual distribution of 
their lands and town property. 



HISTORY OF FTENRY COUNTY. 149 

By this time it had been clearly demonstrated that it was better by 
far for all to be thrown upon an individual responsibility, and a distribu- 
tion on the following plan was made of all property belonging to this 
party : 

To every person, male or female, that had attained the age of 35 
years a full share of all lands, timber and town lots, and personal property 
was given. A full share consisted of 22 acres of land, one timber lot — 
nearly two acres — one town lot, and an equal part in all barns, horses, 
cattle, hogs, sheep or other domestic animals, and all farming implements 
and household utensils. All under this age received a share correspond- 
ing in amount and value to the age of the individual, no discrimination 
being shown to either sex. The smallest share was about eight acres of 
land, a correspondingly small town and timber lot. and part of the per- 
sonal property. Thus a man over 35 years of age, having a wife that age 
or over, and several children, would receive many acres of land and con- 
siderable property to manage. He held that of the wife and children 
simply in trust, the deeds to all the property being made in the name of 
the head of the family. 

This division is still maintained, and as a result of this, and thereb}^ 
each being thrown upon his own resources, active industry at once pre- 
vailed, the result of which may now be seen in well-tilled farms and com- 
modious dwellings. 

This same year, in April, the town was laid out by the trustees. Olef 
Johnson, Jonas Erickson, Swan Swanson, Jonas Olson, Jonas Kronberg, 
Olef Stenberg, and Jacob Jacobson. In 1861, the Olson party, being 
divided into three factions, continued to prosecute their labors under the 
colony system. One year's trial, however, convinced them of the results. 
These factions were known as Olson, Stonberg, and (Martin) Johnson 
divisions, which, at the close of the year 1861, divided their property to 
the individuals comprising each faction on the basis adopted by the John- 
son party in 1860. The shares were, however, not quite so large. Tlie 
large brick buildings are now principally owned by the old settlers. 

After the establishment of the colony the school-room was removed 
from the cave to any vacant room which could be utilized for that pur- 
pose. The school-room was therefore constantly changing until the erec- 
tion of the large frame building spoken of, when the upper room in it 
was occupied for a number of years. In the year 1858 or '59 the present 
school-house was erected. It contains four rooms for school purposes, 
and a library. Two teachers are now employed, who have been raised in 
the colony, and all exercises have always been conducted in the English 
language, showing the colony came to America to become her citizens. 

In the Fall of 1848, an adventurer named Root, the son of a wealthy 
Swede, of Stockholm, made his appearance at Bishop Hill, having been, 
as he asserted, just discharged from t^e army that had been operating in 
Mexico. Subsequent developments- 'however indicated his having been 
a fugitive from justice. Upon his arrfval at Bishop Hill he expressed a 
desire to become one of the fraternity, and as there seemed to be no 
reasonable objection, he was duly admitted. 

He soon after made a marriage contract with a cousin of Eric Jansen. 
the consummation of which was under special contract, to wit : that if 
Root should afterwards decide to leave the colony, he should go alone, 



150 HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

leaving the wife to enjoy in the colon}' all the rights and immunities of 
the establishment. 

He soon earned the reputation of being constitutionally opposed to 
labor of any kind, spending most of his time with a gun on his shoulder 
in the woods, and even this soon getting tiresome, he shortly left for parts 
unknown. His tyrannical treatment of his wife had, however, pretty 
thoroughly destroyed her affection for him, and she bore the separation 
with feelings more of joy than sorrow. 

After an absence of several months, during which time his wife gave 
birth to a son, he returned to the colony. It was some time before he 
called to see his wife, notwithstanding he was informed a son was waiting 
to greet him. Soon after taking up quarters with his wife, he proposed 
to have her leave the colony with him, to which she strongly objected, 
while he as persistently insisted upon hei going. Jansen sustained the 
objections, which exasperated Root to such an extent he exhibited to his 
wife a revolver and bowie knife, swearing vengeance on Jansen, and at 
other times threatening to use them on her or the babe. 

Matters proceeded in this manner some time, when, being unable to 
persuade her to accompany him peaceably, he determined on carrying off 
his wife by force, which he endeavored with the assistance of outside 
friends to accomplish in the following manner: Obtaining the services 
of a young man named Stanley, who belonged in Cambridge, he stationed 
him with a horse and buggy at a convenient distance from Mrs. Root's 
room, and while the community were at dinner. Root comjjelled her to 
enter the bugg}', and the trio drove rapidly away from the Hill, Mrs. Root 
being seated in the bottom of the buggy and covered up. Their proceed- 
ings being observed, they were soon hotly pursued and overtaken within 
two miles of their starting point, b}' a dozen of the l)rethren, who ordered 
them to stop. They were told distinctly if the woman wanted to leave, 
she could do so unmolested ; but if she wished to stay, they proposed to 
take her back. 

Root and Stanley, both being armed, kept their pursuers at bay, the 
woman meantime making manifest her desire to return by an effort to 
release herself from the coverings thrown over her. Root laid his pistol 
on the seat behind him, and endeavored to hold her down ; meanwhile 
one of tlie attacking party rushed up, and, seizing the weapon, carried it 
off. Stanley, seeing the six-shooter in the wrong hands, and his own 
being only a single-barrel, concluded it best to surrender, and the woman 
was allowed to leave the buggy and go with her friends. At this point 
Stanley disappears from public notice, except in a single instance some 
time after, when he distinguished himself by figuring as one of two parties 
(the other being the lady with whom he boarded) of whom a choice bit 
of scandal arose, which was finally settled by the infuriated husband of 
the aforesaid lady. Thwarted '^mjj^ purpose. Root had Jansen and oth- 
ers arrested for restraining the^HI'ty of his wife. She was subpoenaed 
as a witness, and the officer insi^^^ on her accompanying him at once, 
she assented with the belief she would soon have justice done her in the 
courts. The officer, however, had no legal authority to take this step ; 
but was carrying out a deeply-laid scheme of Root's to get possession of 
the woman, and succeeded in taking her to Cambridge, where she was 
confined in a room and denied all communication with her friends. Mr. 



HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 151 

S. P. Brainard, the Clerk of the Circuit and County Courts, took a most 
active part in excluding the friends, and much to tlieir disgust, as to them 
was he indebted for his election to office. 

A day later Root succeeded in abducting his wife the »er.ond time, 
and, taking lier in a buggy, despite her screams, drove to the Rock River 
settlement, and put up at the house of P. K. Hanna. 

From here Root took her to Davenport, thence to Chicago, where 
she had a sister living, who, knowing of Root's brutal treatment of his 
wife, soon communicated with the colonists, and they, in turn, offered 
the woman safe transit to her home in the colony if she desired it. Mrs. 
Root signifying her wish to return, was sent for by a party, who, with a 
team, took her back to Bishop Hill, which place she reached in safety ; 
thence she went to St. Louis, where she remained until all danger was 
past, when she returned to the colony, where she still lives. 

At the Ma}^ term of court in 1850, Root, being greatly exasperated 
at Jansen for his repeated efforts to induce his (Root's) wife to remain in 
the colony, shot Jansen in the court-house, just at the hour of adjourn- 
ment for dinner, Mr. Jansen expired in a few hours. Root was at once 
taken into custody, tried for murder, receiving a sentence of two or three 
years in the State Prison. He died shortly after its expiration. 

COUNTY COURTS. . 

The county seat was located at Richmond, Oct. 6, 1837. The first 
term of Circuit Court was held here by Hon. Thomas Ford, afterwards 
Governor of the state, on April 2, 18o9. In the month of June follow- 
ing the small frame court-house was burned, also a two-story house erect- 
ed by Harris. Steps were at once taken to remove the seat of justice 

to a more convenient locality, the citizens of Geneseo being most active 
in this move wishing to secure the prize for their own town. In this they 
were defeated, as the site selected was the Morristown Colony purchase. 
One term of court was, however, held at Geneseo on April 6, 1840, and 
two the following year. Court was removed to Morristown, and the first 
session held there on May 16, 1842 ; afterwards, on Sept. 26 ; on May 15, 
1843 ; on Sept. 25 ; and lastly, on May 24, 1844. 

The county seat was located at Cambridge in the early part of 1843 ; 
but no provision being made for holding courts there, they continued to 
meet at Morristown, where the court-house, a small unfinished frame 
building, was located. The citizens of Cambridge, desiring to make cer- 
tain of the seat of justice within their own limits, obtained permission 
from the county officers to remove this building to their town. It was 
granted, and the building removed in the Summer or Fall of 1843, 
Yet court did not come ; still continuing the county business at Morris- 
town two sessions in September and in May following. The court-house 
referred to was brought to Camluidge with ox teams, and placed on the 
southeast corner of what is now the College Square. Here courts were 
held until the erection of the present structure, which was completed 
and accepted July 8, 1845. It was erected by Sullivan Howard, one of 
the early settlers of Wethersfield, and cost about |3,000. The old wooden 
jail was begun in 1853, and completed the following year. 

The present court-house, a very commodious and comfortable build- 
ing in all its parts, was finished in 1866. In 1858 a small fire-proof 



152 HISTORY OF HBNEY COtJNTY. 

building was erected immediately west of the court-house, costiug about 
$10,000. It is used as the receptacle for all the county records, and as 
the offices of the county and circuit clerks, and that of the county treas- 
urer. It is intended to erect, as soon as practicable, probably during the 
coming year, a court-house suitable to the needs of the county, and one 
which will be an ornament to the energy and taste of the citizens. 

The first case tried in the Henry County Court before a jury, was an 
appeal case wherein Hiram Peavce was tried for "disturbing the peace 
and good order of a congregation assembled for divine worship, by pro- 
fane hmguage and disorderly and immoral conduct." He was found 
guilty and fined twenty dollars. 

In the old court-house, accommodation could hardly be had for the 
officers of the court, when they had to find room for the jury. This body 
often retired to the shadow of a near tree, or haj'-stack, and carried on 
their deliberations in commodious but rather undesirable quarters. 

To find lodging at first in Cambridge was almost an impossibility, and 
tended greatly to lessen the growth of that place. The members of the 
,bar would have to go to Andover, and to neighboring cabins for shelter 
and food. Pages could be filled with incidents illustrating the mode of 
administering justice which, though generally unhindered by legal forms, 
was sure. The first case in the present court-house was conducted by- 
Judge Jos. Tillson, now a resident of Cambridge, and who has been closely 
identified with all her interests. 

November, 1849, under the new constitution, a county judge (who 
was also probate) and two associates, styled county justices, were elected, 
to-wit: J. M. Allan, judge; Wm. Miller and John Piatt, associates. In 
1850, Allan was elected Representative to the General Assembly, and a 
special election for judge to fill the vacancy occasioned by his resigna- 
tion, resulted in the election of Joseph Tillson. In 1853, Stephen 
Palmer was elected judge, and Robert Getty and John Piatt, associates. 
In 1857, the township organization was effected, and the board of super- 
visors discharged the duties of the former court. 

SHABBONA. 

This celebrated Indian chief lived two years at Shabbona Grove, in 
this county. He was born at an Indian village on Kankakee River, about 
1775. While young, he was made chief of the band and went to Shab- 
bona Grove, now DeKalb Co., where they were found in the early settle- 
ment of this part of the state. During the War of 1812, Shabbona, with 
his warriors, joined Tecumseh ; was by his side when he fell, at the battle 
of the Thames. Shabbona, in 1827, by visiting every lodge of the Potta- 
wattamies, prevented them from participating in the Winnebago War. 
Shabbona was styled " the white man's friend" (through reproach) on 
account of his always being so friendly to the whites. In all the Indian 
wars of his day Shabbona exerted such influence that he prevented his 
own tribe and many other tribes from making or participating in wars 
against the whites, and often in times of war notified the settlers, and 
thereby saved their lives. The citizens of Ottawa bought him a tract of 
land above Seneca, Grundy Co., on Illinois River, on which they built 
a house and supplied him with means on which to live. He died July 
17, 1859, in his 84th year, and was buried at Morris. His squaw, 
Pokanoka, was drowned Nov. 30, 1864, and was buried by his side. 







PRES, l%T NATL. BANK 
KEWANEE 



HISTORY OE HENRY COtTNTY. 155 



KEWANEE. 



The traveler in 1853, had he passed from Dixon to Wethersfield, 
would have found where now stands Kewanee, a modest and well-tilled 
farm, the property of M. B. and J. P. Potter, on the Avest, and a broad, 
undulating prairie on the east, the division line being then a township 
road, and now known as Main Street. The unpretentious farm-house, 
now the residence of Harry Thompson, may still be seen by the curious, 
standing directly north of the building known as " Phillips Block." The 
first settlers of the land comprised in the township were John Kilvington, 
Robert Gonitis and Cornelius Bryan, who came in the Fall of 1836. In 

the month of February, previous, John King and Pierce made the 

first entries. They were followed by Goodrich and Blish, whose entries 
bear date May 7, 1836, and in July by Henry Kemerling. This same 
year twenty-one sections — 13,440 acres — were taken up by the Connecti- 
cut Association, and before 1850 almost every acre was entered. 

The advent of the C. B. & Q. R. R. in 1853 (then called the Military 
Tract R. R.) decided the location of the village. Strenuous efforts were 
made by the citizens of Wethersfield, one mile south, to secure the pas- 
sage of the railroad through their town. Owing to heavy grades and the 
crossing of a stream, involving a large extra expense, this was not acceded 
to by the company, and grading was commenced on the joroposed route. 
Enterprising citizens of that day saw the result, and quickly took advan- 
tage of the location to secure a town on the railroad. 

Nothing particularly noteworthy took place until the railroad depot 
was fixed on the northwest quarter of section 33. The company had at 
first decided to place it on the northeast quarter of section 32, but a de- 
fective title compelled a re -location. Matthew B. and J. P. Potter 
and Col. Blish owned the site. The former, afterseiling five acres of their 
quarter section to Geo. A. Morse and Silas Willard, traded the bal- 
ance to D wight Needham for iiis beautiful farm a little farther south. Mr. 
Needham at once sold to Capt. Sullivan Howard, Ralph A. Tenney — 
better known as " Ralph" — and Henry G. Little; and these gentlemen 
sold a quarter interest to Nelson Lny. Willard and Morse's tract lay on 
either side of the railroad, on Main street, and here they built a store and 
warehouse in 1853. This was known as the "Pioneer" store, and did a 
lucrative business for nearly twelve months without opposition. The 
building stood on the lot now occupied by the residence of Mr. Joseph 
O'Brien, and was, in 1863, destroyed by fire. 

On May 1, 1854, the town was laid out by the following named gen- 
tlemen : Sullivan Howard, Nelson Lay, H. G. Little, R. A. Tenney, Geo. 
A. Morse, and Sylvester Blish, all of whom, excepting Col. Blish, are still 
living. At that time all was life and activit3^ Wethersfield, which was 
then quite a thriving village, suffered in a very short time a loss of nearly 
all of her business houses, which were one by one put on wheels and 
moved to Kewanee. 

The survey was made by C. C. Blish, now President of the First 
National Bank. The streets were at right angles. The lots contained 
from one-quarter of an acre to four acres of land, according as they 

13 



156 HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

were more or less central. The streets were generally four rods wide, 
though Main street is one hundred feet in width. The first house erected 
on the town site was the Kewanee Hotel. It, was kept for some time by 
Tenney & Hutchins. In February, 1856, the present proprietor, Mr. E. 
V. Bronson, whose portrait appears elsewhere, purchased the property 
of R. A. Tenney, and for twenty-two years has successfully supplied 
the gastronomical needs of the public. ■ 

It was probably the intention of the founders of the town, that Main 
street should be the street, and in fact it was for some time. "• Phillips 
Block," the first store in the town proper was built thereon by Nelson 
Lay ; J. D. Schriver erected the old " Philadelphia Store " there ; Daven- 
port & Robinson their grocery (now Miles & Minnick's); Dr. Pinney had 
his drug store where now stands the Freewill Baptist Church, and on the 
corner next south was the dry -goods establishment of Aaron Cooper. A 
few buildings only were built on Tremont street, which was in wet weather 
very little short of a canal as far as navigation was concerned. Yet the 
hotel and the depot slowly and surely drew the trade center westward. 
C. N. Cutter erected, very early, the building now occupied by Bennison 
Bros., and which for many years was known as " Cutter's Hall," and con- 
sidered quite palatial in those days. Residences sprang up rapidly in all 
parts of the town, grain warehouses were built, and in eighteen months 
the town boasted of a population of 1,500, including Wethersfield. 

Some of the early merchants were Fitch & Skinner, whose drug 
store occupied the site of the present T. H. Phillips' brick block ; Joseph 
Montgomery, whose stock consisted of boots, shoes and clothing, and whose 
store occupied the site of that now used by James Barker; Mr. James 
S. Howard who erected the house now known as the McConnell House, 
and therein kept the first furniture store of Kewanee; and a hardware store 
which was built by Fred. Wild, the building now doing service as the shop 
of Mr. McConnell. All these were erected during the Summer and Autumn 
of 1854, or soon after. Contemporary with them was the residence of 
Mr.' Dwight Needham, which is now the property of Mrs. Martha Pratt. 
It was the first building of that character erected on the town plat. This 
same Autumn a warehouse was constructed by the Pratt Brothers. Two 
years after, in 1857, it was set on fire by one William Whiteford, and 
totally destroyed. He received a term of nine years in the penitentiary 
for his nefariousness. An elevator was also built by the railroad com- 
pany which is still used. When the town was laid out, the proprietors gave 
it the name of Berien, in compliment of Col. Berien, chief engineer of 
the railroad. He rather objected to this, however, and being asked to 
name the town, suggested " Kewanee," an Indian name, supposed to 
signify Prairie hen. This cognomen was readily accepted by the proprie- 
tors, and on Feb. 14, 1855, was legalized by a special act of the Legisla- 
ture. The post-office was established in 1854, and given the name of 
Kewanee. Col. Blish was appointed as incumbent of the office, who occu- 
pied a portion of the store of Otis & Pinney for the discharge of his 
duties. It will be remembered this building occupied the site of the Free- 
will Baptist Church. In the Fall of 1855, Col. Blish died, and Mr. R. A. 
Tenney, who, among other enterprising acts, erected the first brick resi- 
dence in town, now occupied by Dr. G. W. Fellows, succeeded him. 
Different administrations caused many changes to occur in this office. It 



HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 157 

is now held by Capt. N. H. Pratt, one of Kewanee's most estimable citi- 
zens, and the office ranks as third-class. 

The business interests of town have grown remarkably well. It is 
almost twenty-three years since the Phillips Block was erected, and now 
there are a large number of stores of all kinds ; shops of every descrip- 
tion, and artisans of all trades, whose different articles of commerce find 
ready sale in the town and surrounding country, and in some cases to 
other locaUties. 

The First National Bank was organized October 2b, 1870, with a 
capital of $75,000. The surplus is now il8,000, and the average daily 
deposits are over 1100,000. The officers are : Chas. C. Blish, President; 
S. W. Warner, Vice-President ; and C. S. Wentworth, Cashier. Messrs. 
D. L. and W. F. Wiley, President and Cashier of the First National 
Bank, at Galva, on January 1st, 1876. established the People's Bank. It 
is a private affair, well managed, and abundantly supplied with capital. 
Mr. H. L. Kellogg is Cashier. 

The success of any town depends largely on the manufacturing inter- 
ests therein and the ability to keep employed its citizens, thereby causing 
money to freely circulate within its own borders. Kewanee is very well 
supplied in this respect, having within her limits the O'Brien Manufac- 
tory, the Haxton Steam Heater Company, the Kewanee Manufacturing 
Establishment, and that of H. H. Perkins. The first mentioned of these 
was established in 1858, in Princeville, Peoria County, for the manufac- 
ture of carriages and wagons. They remained here until 1865, when 
they removed to Kewanee and continued tlieir manufacturing. January 
1, 1874, a stock company, with a capital of $75,000, was formed, and the 
facilities greatly increased. The O'Brien brothers are largely interested 
here, and hold the offices of president, secretary and treasurer. Mr. Jas. 
O'Brien is the first named officer, W. F. O'Brien the second, and Joseph 
T. the third. They employ about fifty men, and make, on an average, 
per day, two wagons, two carriages, and 100 harrows. These latter find 
ready sale throughout the entire Northwest. 

The second manufactory mentioned was organized in April, 1875, 
with a capital stock of 150,000. They make steam heaters, castings, and 
all classes of steam material. Their sales will aggregate $60,000 annually. 
About forty men are employed. W. E. Haxton is President, E. R. Kerr 
Secretary, and J. H. Pierce Treasurer. 

The Kewanee Manufacturing Company was organized January 12, 
1876, with a capital of $50,000. They are in good condition, capable of 
doing excellent work, and at reasonable prices. They employ constantly 
twenty-five hands, with a probable increase. Their specialties are : " Ke- 
wanee " windmills, " Orr's " sulky plow, and tlie "Centennial" harrow. 
In addition to these they do a large amount of extra job work. The officers 
are : C. C. Wilson, President, and Josiah Keeler, Secretary. Their im- 
plements find large sales through the West, and through some portions of 
Pennsylvania. 

Mr. H. H. Perkins is at present making a new-formed riding culti- 
vator. It has the quality of being capable of raising and lowering the 
shovels, of giving them a greater depth, and of a different slant, also of 
placing them nearly to, or far from th^ row of corn — all without stopping 
the team or leaving the seat. 



158 ' BnESTORY OF HEKKY COUNTY. 

y 

Mr. H. H. Bryan, who opened the first wagon shop in Kewanee, is 
still in business. Ho commenced his trade in Wethersfield, in 1850, and 
when Kewanee was incorporated he removed his shop to its present loca- 
tion, where he has since carried on a successful business, employing now 
from ten to fifteen men, and enjoying a trade aggregating $15,000 an- 
nually. 

Aside from these manufactories mentioned, the town supports a 
goodly number of shops of various kinds, Avliose products find a ready 
market in the immediate vicinity. 

There are thirteen churches and five public school buildings, includ- 
ing the high school. In 1874 the citizens of the town erected the building 
known as Library Hall. The upper story is used for a public hall, in 
which concerts, readings and lectures are given. The lower story is 
occupied by the oflfice of the Lathrop Coal and Mining Company (a notice 
of which is given in the geological description of the county), by the First 
National Bank, the office of the Express Company, and the office and 
rooms of the Library Association. This latter has a library of 1,300 vol- 
umes. It was opened to the public in the Spring of 1875. It is managed 
by a board of six directors, and is open to the public every evening, and 
on the afternoon of each Sunday. 

THE COAL INTERESTS. 

At Kewanee much capital is employed in the coal trade. The 
Lathrop Coal and Mining Company, whose principal banks are one and a 
half miles east of town, employ over 200 men, and ship annually lai-ge 
quantities of this mineral. The coal, which is of a superior quality, is 
reached at a depth of some 100 feet, and, by an ingenious contrivance, is 
easily loaded on the cars when brought to the surface. 

This company was organized in 1869, and they now represent a capi- 
tal of nearly •$ 400,000. The president of the company is Hon. Sidney 
Bartlett, of Boston, Mass. In addition to the shafts operated by this 
company, there are many others owned by private parties. 

Coal is found in paying quantities at almost any point between Galva 
and Kewanee, and is mined by many persons on their own T)roperty. The 
Geological Report of Henry County, made in 1873, by direction of the 
State Geologist, by Mr. James Shaw, contains many items of interest, 
and is well worth a careful perusal. 

THE CHURCHES. 

In Kewanee there are thirteen regularly organized churches. The 
oldest of these is the Congregational, whose organization was effected 
August 7, 1855, in a school house, now a grocery store. During the 
Winter previous, meetings were held in the Kewanee House and at a few 
private residences. The organizing council was presided over by Flavel 
Bascom, D.D. Forty-four persons united, many of whom had been 
members of the same religious body at Wethersfield. Their names were: 
Clarissa Bassett, Jane Botterill, Hosea Bulkley, Robert Cook, Martha R. 
Cook, Martha A. Cook, Mary A. Cook, Isabella Fell, Thomas D. Fitch, 
Harriet W. Fitch, J. Francis Goodiich, Sarah H. Goodrich, Elizabeth A. 
Hawks, Sullivan Howard, Elizabeth B. Howard, Horace M. Howard, 



HISTORY OF HENKT COIINTT. 159 

Mary E. Howard, Harriet L. Howard, James S. Howard, Martha How- 
ard, Martha A. Hooker, Nelson Lay, Mariette Lay, Fi-ances Lay, Hiram 
T. Lay, Mary Jane Lay, Lemuel B. Leonard, Sarah Patrick, Olive Lin- 
coln, Harvey W. Lincoln, Nancy E. Lincoln, Henry G. Little, Fidelia M. 
Little, Louisa S. Little, Mary M. Little, Francis Loomis, Fanny M. 
Loomis, Joseph R. Loomis, Ruth C. Pinney, Harriet N. Tenney, Joseph 

A. Talcott, Mary L. Talcott, Charlotte M. Talcott, Lucina Sykes. Of 
these persons, Sullivan Howard, Elizabetli Howard, Hiram T. Lay, Olive 
Lincoln, Ntmcy E Lincoln (now Mrs. Dr. Da}^, Ruth C. Pinney, Joseph 
A., Mary L. and Charlotte M. Talcott (now Mrs. T. P. Pierce), and Lu- 
cina Sykes are still members here. The rest have removed or gone to 
their reward. 

The church edifice was completed and dedicated March 11, 1858, 
having been built the year previous. It was very much enlarged and 
beautified in the year 1871. The Rev. Charles H. Pierce was preaching 
to the congregation at the time of organization, and remained until Jan- 
uary, 1858. He was succeeded, as the next pastor, by Mr. Charles C. 
Salter, who was ordained and installed April 20, 1859, and was regularly 
dismissed March 11, 1861. Rev. James M. Van Wagner w;is called to 
the pastorate of the church in February, 1864, installed June 6. He 
remained until April 6, 1868. Rev. James Tompkins was called June 1, 
1872, installed September 10, and is still filling the pulpit as pastor. Dur- 
ing the intervals between any of these pastorates the pulpit was filled by 
supplies. The congregation is now in a good condition. The member- 
ship is 239. The Sunday-school (Mr. O. H. Loomis, Superintendent,) 
has an attendance of 341. 

The Free Will Baptist Church was organized April 29, 1865, in the 
Protestant Methodist Church, with eleven members. The organization 
council consisted of Rev. S. Bartlett, Rev. H. J. Browne, and Rev. R. 
G. Broadfoot. The following is a list of the original membership: Rev. 
William Bonar, Mrs. Mary Ann Bonar, A. B. Palmer, Mrs. Mary Ann 
Palmer, D. W. Payne, Henry Malone, Mary Malone, S. W. Warner, A. 

B. Gurney, Caroline E. Gurney, and C. H. Gurney — eleven persons. 
Prior to the organization, services were held in the Swedish Methodist 
Church, in the southwest part of town, and next in the Protestant 
Methodist — now Free Methodist Church. They worshiped in this latter 
place until November, 1865, when they removed to Cutter's Hall, where 
they remained until January, 1866, when they again removed, this time to 
the Christian Church. This building is now a dwelling. Here they met 
for religious exercises until January 16, 1870, when they worshiped a few 
months again in Cutter's Hall. About May, 1869, they commenced the 
erection of their present claurch building. It was completed June 1, 
1870, when they immediately occupied it. It is a very comfortable struc- 
ture, and cost, including the lot, -f6,800. 

The pastors of this congregation have been the following named 
persons : Rev. William Bonar, from August 12, 1865, to March 7, 1867; 
Rev. O. D. Patch, from April 1, 1867, to March 1, 1874; Rev. J.J. Weage, 
from May 1, 1874, to May 1, 1875. At that time the present pastor, Rev. 
H. J. Browne, was called to the pastorate. The number of members is 
one hundred and two ; the Sunday-school has an attendance of about 



160 HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

sixty. The superintendent is Mr. H. Blanchard. Mr. A. B. Gurney, 
one of the original members, is clerk of the church. 

The Free Methodist Church was organized in a private residence in 
Wethersfield about the year 1866 or 1867. Meetings had been held for 
some time previous in tlie residences of different persons, and in the Swedish 
Methodist house of worship. Also in a store-room in Wethersfield. 
About the year 1870, they purchased their present cliurch edifice of the 
Protestant Metliodists, and have since occupied it. At the organization, 
some five or six persons were admitted as members. They have, at 
different times, enjoyed good seasons of revival, and now number some 
twenty-four or five members. The first minister was Rev. Jonathan 
Dick ; next. Rev. William Cooley, whose wife occasionally officiated at 
divine service. He was followed by J. G. Terrell, during whose ministry 
the church was purchased, at a cost of $1,000. Next, Rev. George 
Coffee, followed by Rev. W. W. Kelley : he by Rev. John Whiting; he 
by Rev. James Thaxter. wlien the present pastor, Rev. James Kelso, took 
charge. The Sunday-school, under the superintendence of Mrs. Robinson, 
numbers about twenty pupils. 

The Presbyterian ("!hurch was organized in the Baptist Ciiurch by 
the Rock Island Presbytery, March 26, 1872. A preliminary meeting- 
had been held to invite the Presbytery to this aetion in the house of S. 
M. Hurd, on February 21st previous. 

At the organization the following persons were received as members: 
Daniel and Mrs. Eunice Baldwin, William E. and Mrs. Sarah A. Haxton, 
R. A. and Mrs. L. Little, Jacob W. and Mrs. Hannah Jones, S. M. and 
Mrs. Emily Hurd, N. H. and Mrs. Lura, Blakely, Effie Blakely, Mrs. C. 
H. Graves, George H. Lincoln, George Kliner, Mrs. J. Powers, Mrs. P. 
Wright, Mrs. John Whiffen, Clark Bradish, William W. Winter, and 
Mrs. Virginia L. Winter, and Shanahaii. 

During the Summer the church was erected. Including the lot it 
cost 85,000. The Rev. N. D. Graves was pastor of the church about 
three years. Rev. Josiah Milligan, of Princeton, preached for them for 
some time, when the present pastor. Rev. J. D. Howey, was called. He 
has occupied the pulpit over one year. There are now eighty-six mem- 
bers, and a Sunday-school of one hundred scholars. 

The Baptist Church. On the 9th of May, 185t), it was decided by a 
vote of the members of the Baptist Church, at Wethersfield, to remove 
their place of holding services to Kewanee, a more desirable location. 
There were at that time over one hundred members. They worshiped 
for some time in diffei-ent halls, and in some of the other churches. On 
December 21, 1865, a building committee was appointed, and steps taken 
towards the erection of a suitable church-ed'fice. This was completed 
and occupied July 7, 1867, and cost, including the site, over -$8,000. 
There are now about two hundred and thirty-five members, and a Sunday- 
school of one hundred and fifteen scholars. The pastor is Rev. P. P. 
Shirley. 

The following is a list of the pastors of this church and their terms 
of service : At the removal Rev. S. P. Ives was pastor ; Rev. H. B. 
Foskett, from December, 1857, to August, 1862; Rev. J. La Grange, from 
October, 1862, to September, 1863 ; Rev. A. D. Freeman, from March, 
1864, to July same year ; Rev. William Storrs, from November, 1864, to 



HISTOKY OF HENRY COUNTY. 161 

May, 1865; Rev. A. Jones, from December 1, 1865, to March, 1867; 
Rev. K. W. Benton, from July, 1867, to July, 1872; Rev. Carlos Swift, 
from November, 1872, to June, 1874 : Rev. R. L. Colwell, from Septem- 
ber, 1874, to February, 1876, when the present pastor. Rev. P. P. Shirley, 
was called. The church is now in a flourishing condition, and enjoying 
evident signs of prosperity. 

The Methodist Episcopal Church at first met for some time in a 
school-house, about one mile east of Kewanee, in a hall over the store of 
J. D. Schriver, and in private houses. Some of the members had been 
connected with the same religious body in Wethersfield, but desirous of 
building up a church in Kewanee, came here to worship. They organ- 
ized a class of thirty persons December 15, 1855, in the school-house 
referred to ; being then under the pastoral care of Rev. J. O. Gilbert. 
The principal members were : A. Thornton, William King, J. Shipley, 
Erastus Johnson, W. S. Oliver, William Bowen, W. C. Kent, and John 
Schriver. 

The corner stone of their church was laid October 23, 1856. The 
day was made " one of gladness " by the members. In the stone the fol- 
lowing articles were deposited: A bible, hymn book, and description 
of the church ; a paper on which the following was written : " John 
Morley, Presiding Elder of Kewanee District, Peoria Conference, Illinois; 
Joseph O. Gilbert, pastor of Kewanee ; Arthur Thornton, William C. 
Kent, Erastus Johnson, Joshua Shipley, William S. Oliver, William 
Bowen and William King, Trustees. The first Methodist Church built 
in Kewanee, October 28, 1856. Number of inhabitants in town, 1,500." 
There were also placed in this stone two copies of the Keivanee Advertiser, 
one number of the Fourth of July preceding, which gave an account of 
a great celebration of that day ; one number of the Henry 'County Dial ; 
one number of the N. W. C. Advocate ; a copy of the Missionary Advocate ; 
a map of Kewanee, given by R. A. Tenney ; one fifty cent piece in silver; 
one ten cent piece ; one three cent piece, and one five cent piece. 

This building has become old and inadequate to the growing demands 
of the congregation, and during the coming Summer a new one will be 
constructed wliich will cost $10,000. The parsonage Avas purchased in 
1856. June following the organization of the church a Sunday-school 
was organized. There were sixty pupils in attendance. 

The pastors of this church have been Rev. J. O. Gilbert, from organ- 
ization until 1858; Rev. John Chandler, one year; Rev. E. Ransom, one 
year; Rev. J. S. Cummings, two years; Rev. W. P. Graves, one year. 
During his ministry the congregation became self-supporting. Rev. U. 
J. Giddings was next, remaining two years ; Rev. W. J. Beck, two years ; 
Rev. Benj. Applebee, two years ; Rev. John P. Brooks, one year ; Rev. M. 
P. Armstrong, one year ; Rev. G. W. Arnold, two years ; Rev. B. C. 
Dennis, two years; and Rev. G. W. Arnold, again two 3'ears, when the 
present pastor, Rev. M. Spui'lock, was assigned to the pulpit, and is now 
serving his first year. There are now three hundred and twenty mem- 
bers, and a Sunday-school of two hundred and fifty scholars. During 
the month of January, 1877, over eighty persons united with this church. 

The Protestant Episcopal — St. John's — Church. On Sunday, May 
13, 1855, a Protestant Episcopal Sunday-school was organized in the Ke- 
wanee House. This was the first religious organization in Kewanee, and 



162 HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

the school met the following Sunday for the first time at Odd Fellows 
Hall. There were twenty scholars, and R. P. Parrish was Superintend- 
ent. The first full Episcopal service, with sermon, was in the Summer 
following, by Rev. Porter, of Jubilee College. In October, Bishop White- 
house made a visitation, and held two services in the unfinished Methodist 
Protestant Church. During the Summer and Autumn of 1856, Rev. 
Philander Chase officiated occasionally in the same church. On the 13th 
of July, 1856, the church was organized, with the name of St. John's. 
The officers were R. P. Parrish, Senior Warden ; George A. Morse, Jun- 
ior Warden ; James B. Morse, J. H. Howe, H. L. Sloan, Geo. W. Foote, 
and E. V, Bronson, Vestrymen ; and L, D. Bishop, Clerk. The first 
rector was Rev. George E. Peters, who commenced his labors in 1857, 
and remained two years. A church edifice of the early English Gothic 
style of architecture was constructed in the Summer of 1857, finished in 
the Fall, and consecrated by Bishop Whitehouse, November 15, of the 
same year. It is quite a neat church, and cost about -$5,000. The first 
church-bell of the town was rung from the belfry of St. John's. 

The Primitive Methodist. The persons adhering to this faith met 
for some time, prior to their organization into a church, in Cutter's Hall 
and in the Methodist Episcopal Church. The organization was made in 
the Spring of 1865, and two years later, in the Autumn of 1867, tlie first 
board of trustees was chosen. The principal members then were Joseph 
Garland, John Bennison, John Bradbury, John Bamford, Moses Jones, 
William Bennison, and J. Breckon. The church edifice was erected in 
1873, at a cost of $2,000. The pastors of this church and their terms of 
service are as follows: Rev. J. Hewitt, May, 1865 to May, 1867; Rev. 
Chas. Dawson, 1867 to 1871; Rev. Thos. Butterwick, 1871 to 1873 ; Rev. 
William Jacks, Jr., 1873 to 1876, when the present pastor, Rev. Chas. 
Dawson, again assumed charge. There are now eighty members and a 
Sunday-school of eighty-seven scholars. 

The United Evangelical — St. Paul's — German Church. About ten 
years since, some of the German people living in this vicinity and pro- 
fessing belief in the doctrines of this religious body, organized a church. 
For a short time they met in a school-house, but at once commenced the 
erection of their present edifice. Nineteen persons united at the organ- 
ization — the pastor being Rev. Hilmer, Aylio remained about one year. 
Their church cost some -$2,500. They also own a very comfortable par- 
sonage. Rev. Hilmer was succeeded by Rev. Rein, who remained five 
years, when the present pastor, Rev. G. W. Reiger, was installed. The 
majority of the members — now about fifty — live in the country. The 
Sunday-school numbers some forty scholars. About one year ago another 
church was organized in the country, three miles northeast of Kewanee. 
It is for the accommodation of those living in that locality, has about thir- 
ty-five members, fifty Sunday-school scholars, and is under the pastorate 
of Rev. Reiger, who preaches there each alternate Sunday. 

The Church of the Latter Day Saints. The first meetings of this 
church were held at Amboy in 1859. An organization was effected here 
of probably one hundred members. From this place they were sent out 
to preach, and in 1862 effected the establishment of the church here. In 
1868, they erected their present church edifice, locating it nearly one mile 
north of town. Regular services are maintained here, the membership 




ALFRED W. PERRY, 
Geneseo. 



HISTOET OF TTENBT COUNTY. 165 

being one hundred and eighteen, with an average attendance of sixty at 
the Sunday-school. They are in no way connected with the Mormon 
doctrine, and do not believe in or practice- its teachings. The presiding 
elder of this branch is Thomas Charles. 

The Swedish Lutheran Church. Before their organization in 1869, 
the members composing this church met in private residences and in the 
Methodist Episcopal Churcli. The organization was made in September 
of that 3'ear, with about sixteen persons. In tlie Autumn of the follow- 
ing year they erected their present church-edifice, at a cost of nearly 
$3,000. There are now fifty-five members. The Sunday-school contains 
about twenty-five scholars. The first minister to this church was Rev. 
Lendholm, who remained but a short time. He was followed by Rev. 
N. Neurgren, who was pastor two j-ears. Tlie Rev. John Wingstrom, of 
Princeton, is the present pastor, having succeeded Rev. Neurgren. 

The Swedish Methodist Church was organized at an early day in the 
history of Kewanee. It is now, however, quite small, and does not sus- 
tain regular preaching. 

The Catholic — St. Mary's — Church was organized at the hou^e of 
Matthew Joyce, then occupying the site of the present church-building, 
in the early part of 1854. About thirty-five heads of families were ad- 
mitted to membership at this time. Some of the more prominent ones 
were Lawrence Hunt, Patrick Cavanaugh, Matthew Joyce, James Hunt 
(now deceased), James Gallagher, Thomas Caton, and Edward Hunt 
(now deceased). The following vear a church, eighteen by twenty-four 
feet in dimensions, was erected. It has since been remodeled and en- 
larged. The pastors of this church have been as follows : Fathers Lynch, 
O'Gara, Powers, Dulhunty, Duggan, Hannigan, Kilkernny, J. M. Ryan, 
and the present priest, Rev. John Ryan. The membership is now nearly 
eight hundred, but the reader will bear in mind that all members of a 
famil}' in tliis church are counted as members of the church from their 
earliest infancy. 

THE SCHOOLS. 

The first school in Kewanee was taught in a small frame building, 
built by George A. Morse, and donated by iiim for educational purposes. 
It stood nortli of the railroad tracks, on Main Street. School was held 
-here for a year or two, when this structure was removed farther into 
town, and placed on the lot now occupied by the east school-house, and 
afterwards removed to that now occupied by Parker & Merritt's store. The 
growth of the town demanding more room, the trustees rented a building 
of Mr. Austin Sykes, and a room in the upper story of Mr. Schriver's 
store. These were occupied till about 1858, when the building known 
as the East School-house was erected. This was occupied during the Win- 
ter of 1858. It contained two commodious rooms, and was ample for the 
demands at that time. The pioneer school-room was sold, and for some 
time was used as the office of the itenry County Dial ; afterwards 
removed, and occupied as a Christian Church, and is now a dwelling. In 
the year 1865, the East School-house having become entirely inadequate, 
steps were taken for the enlargement of this building and the erection of 
two others. Daring the vacation of 1866, the east building was enlarged 
to double its former capacity, and the two brick structures, known as 

14 



166 HISTORY OF HENRY COTTNTy. 

the North and West Schools, were determined upon. They were erected 
in 1867, and occupied January 1, 1868. Each contains two rooins. 'The 
schools were thoroughl}'- re-grrCded in 1866 by the superintendent, S. M. 
Etter, now State Superintendent of Public Instruction. Mr. Etter was 
principal here about three years, and laid the foundations of the grading 
of the schools now so successfully carried out by Mr. W. H. Russell, pres- 
ent superintendent. 

The brick buildings were erected by William C. Loomis, and cost 
the city about $6,000. In addition to these, the High School building, 
erected in 1856, and a one-room building, are occupied. This latter is 
called the Northville School. 

There are now six hundred and eighty pupils enrolled. The average 
daily attendance for January, 1877, was six hundred and twenty-one. 
They require the services of fourteen teachers, including the superintend- 
ent. Their names and positions are as follows : 

Mr. W. H." Russell, Superintendent. 

High School — ,Mr. E. S. Martin, Principal ; Miss Lillian D. Riley, 
Assistant. 

Grammar School — 1st room, Miss Anna Kellar ; 2d, Miss L. A. 
Searle. 

East Building — Intermediate, Miss A. A. Johnson, Miss Alice Bar- 
ker ; 2d Primary, Miss Esther Loomis ; 1st Primar}^ Florence Gamble. 

West Building — 2d Primary, Miss Lizzie Lewis; 1st Primary, Miss 
Frank Rockwell. 

North Building — 2d Primary, Miss S. Folsom ; 1st Primary, Miss 
Jennie Halline. 

Northville — Miss Mary Bradbury. 

The Board of Education consists of the following named gentlemen : 
S. T. Miles, President ; Adolph Maul, Secretary ; W. H. Day, W. W. 
Stevens, M. H. Hinsdale, Jas. C. Blish. 

The annual aggregate expense of the schools amounts to $10,000, 
which is abundantly repaid in the elevated tone of society, and tlie good 
morals attendant upon such an outlay of money. The appended sketch 
of the High School is from the pen of one of the pupils now connected 
therewith : 

" The High School was established in 1856. It grew out of a desire 
for a higher grade of education than 'the village schools afforded at that- 
day. After some exertion on behalf of each of the villages of Kewanee 
and Wethersfield, in the endeavor to secure its location in their midst, 
the matter was settled by locating the building on the dividing line 
between tliera. Mr. James Elliott donated two and a half acres for that 
purpose, and on this site the present building was erected. Only the 
upper story was completed ready for school purposes, the lower being 
used for lectures, lyceums, and a public hall. Among the prominent per- 
sons who lectured here were John'B. Gough and Horace Greeley. School 
was opened under the principalship of Rev. Mr. Waldo, who was assisted 
by Miss Atwood. At that time the school was furnished with rude pine 
desks and benches, reaching half across the room, making but three aisles. 
The oldest pupils occupied the rear row. Among the young ladies Avere : 
Lauia Pratt, now Mrs. Northrop; Lillie Bruns, now Mrs. Raymond ; 
Nellie Little, now Mrs. George Perkins; Libbie Cutter, Helen and Lucy 



HIStORY OF HENIIV (BOUNTY. 167 

Lyle, Fannie Lay, Ella Way, Addie Cheany, Lottie Taleott — the latter 
now Mrs. T. P. Pierce. 

" There being no sidewalks in earlier years, it was almost impossible 
in the winter to get to the school-house, and a large wagon was the gen- 
eral conveyance for the scholars. 

"At the close of the second year Mr. Waldo resigned. His succes- 
sor was Mr. Blodgett, who was assisted b}^ Miss Stocking. During his 
administration an exhibition was held, and from the fund raised the 
school-room was properly furnished. 

" Mr. Blodgett was succeeded by Mr. McPheran, who was succeeded 
by Mr, Bradford. Greek and Latin were among the higher studies of 
the school at this time, and' pupils were fitted for college. Mr. James K. 
Blish, a laAvyer of the town, went from this school to Ann Arbor. Mr. - 
E. B. Wight, the Wasliington correspondent for a Chicago paper, went 
from the academy to Chicago University. 

" Mr. Bradford was succeeded b}^ Mr. Tabor, who first graded the 
school, and arranged a course of study which he had printed. He was 
followed by Mr. Beckington, and he l)y Mr. Etter, present State Superin- 
tei'ident of Public Instruction. Mr. Etter was succeeded by Mr. Russell, 
the present superintendent. During Mr. Etter's administration eighty- 
three dollars had been raised at a school entertainment, with which to 
purchase books for a library. This fund was increased during Mr. Rus- 
sell's time in a similar manner. With this fund a library has been pur- 
chased. In September, 1870, the town of Kewanee purchased the inter- 
est of Wethersfield in the academy, and has since had entire control. 
Mr. Russell served a year or two as principal of the schools at Moline. 
During this interval Mr. Gray and a Mr. Carver acted as principals. 
Upon the latter's resignation Mr. Russell was again called, and is now 
superintendent of the Kewanee schools. Mr. E. S. Martin, in 1875, was 
appointed principal of the High School, which position he still retains. 
He is assisted by Miss Lillian D. Riley." 

THE PRESS. 

The first paper issued in Kewanee was the Henry County Dial. The 
citizens saw the necessity of a paper in their midst, and through the influ- 
ence of some of the more prominent ones, among whom were R. A. Ten- 
ney, H. G. Little, Nelson Lay, Geo. A. Morse and others, a subscription 
was raised, and the above mentioned paper purchased. 

It was brought to the town Friday, August 15, 1855, its advent being 
signaled by the firing of guns and the cheers of the populace. Mr. J. H. 
Howe had been secured as editor for one year. 

The buildings occupied for some time were the Phillips Block and 
the old school-house, the latter now a residence. It was continued until 
September 1-3, when Mr. C. Bassett, present editor of the Kewanee Inde- 
pendent, who had come hither at the solicitation of some of his friends, 
purchased the entire stock and fixtures. He was a practical printer, and 
assumed the business control, Mr. Howe remaining editor for the balance 
of the year. It was conducted in this way until June 12, 1856, when 
Mr. Bassett sold the office to Mr Howe and Mr. H. M. Patrick. These 
gentlemen conducted the paper until November 13, when Mr. Howe sold 
his interest to his partner, who associated Mr. O. White with himself as 



168 HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

editor, and under this management the paper was printed till January 8 
following, when Mr. White retired. Mr. Patrick carried on the paper 
about one year, when he sold the office to L. D. Bishop, who published 
the paper two or three years. J. E. Wheeler, one of the oi'iginal found- 
ers of the Chicago Tribune, had charge of the Dial from 1858 or 1859 till 
December 8, 1866 — the longest term of any one editor. He was a most 
estimable man, and one highly respected by the citizens of Kewanee. He 
was considered one of the ablest editors connected with the Dial, and 
died at his post. He purchased it, and leased the office to Mr. O. White, 
who again became editor. He also publislied a paper at Toulon, Stark 
County. He was succeeded in the editorial chair by Hiram Wyatt, who 
associated with himself Mr. Shurtleff during the campaign of 1868. Mr. 
Shurtleff was succeeded in a few months by Geo. W. Wilson, who pur- 
chased the office, thereby becoming editor and proprietor. He almost 
immediately sold to N. W. Fuller, wlio changed the name to the Kewanee 
Radical. He continued until May or June, 1870, when he failed, and 
the paper was discontinued. On July 1 following, the entire office and 
outfits were purcliased by Mr. C. Bassett, who again entered the sanctum. 
He started a weekly paper, calling it the Keivanee Advertiser. After six 
months lie changed the latter name to Indej^endent, and as such still issues 
an excellent county paper. He is the oldest editor in Kewanee, and has 
been a printer forty-four years. 

On January 1, 1856, Tenney, Hardy & Co. issued a monthly, called 
Te7ineij, Hardy cf Co.'s Advertiser, — published it one year and sold it to 
Mr. C. Bassett, who issued it as a monthly until December 13, 1863. 
The first copy of this paper is in possession of Mr. R. A. Tenney, now a 
resident of Chicago. 

July 4, previous to his discontinuing the Advertiser, Mr. Bassett 
commenced the publication of a weekly paper, called the Union Democrat. 
This he continued to publish until November 24, 1864, when lie discon- 
tinued it. April 26, 1866, he issued the first number of his weekly, called 
the Kewanee Advertiser, which he published until November 23, 1867. 

The Public ScJiool Messenger, a small, spriglitly paper, was com- 
menced in January, 1870, under the immediate control of the Superin- 
tendent of Schools, Mr. W. H. Russell, as editor. This Avas issued about 
two years, being published by Mr. Fuller one year, and C. Bassett the 
remainder of the time. 

The Keivanee Courier was established March 22, 1876, by Mr. C. N. 
Whitne3% who brought the material for the office from Princeton, Bureau 
County, where he had published the Herald for nearly five years preced- 
ing. Although established less than a year, the Courier has grown into 
a wide circulation, and is filled with advertising patronage. The Courier 
office is the only steam printing establishment in the county, and is well 
equipped with machinery and material. It is an eight-column quarto, 
and takes a leading position in local journalism in this part of the State. 

GALVA. 

The idea of building a town upon this site was first entertained in 
the year 1853. While Messrs. J. M. and Wm. L. Wiley were traveling 
from Peoria County to Rock Island in the Spring of that year, they were 
attracted by the beauty of the surrounding country, and halted their 



HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 169 

team on the ground that now forms College Park, across which the old 
trail led. Standing in their buggy and looking out upon the scene, one 
of them remarked to the other : " Let us buy the land and lay out a 
town." At this time there were only two or three buildings to be seen 
from that point, and the country around was one vast sea of prairie, over 
which the deer were still roaming at will. The land was shortly pur- 
chased by them, and, after negotiating with the C. B. & Q. Railroad 
Company a full year, they finally secured the location of a depot upon 
their purchase by donating tiie land now owned and occupied by the 
company in the center of the town. In the Fall of the year succeeding 
its purchase (1854), and about the time that the arrangement with the 
railroad company was effected, the town was laid out, in its present shape, 
by the gentlemen mentioned. The cars commenced running in December 
of the same year. 

After the depot was located the Messrs. Wiley purchased about fifty 
acres of land, on the south side of the town, from George Favr, and sub- 
sequently sold an undivided interest in a certain number of lots to the 
Bishop Hill Swedish Colony, then in their most prosperous days, and 
afterwards a large number of lots to Jacob Emery. Both of these 
parties gave their money and influence to forward the interests of the 
new town. 

Owing to the large purchases of the Swedish Colony in the new 
town, tiiey were granted the privilege of being its sponsors in baptism 
and bestowing upon it the name which it was to bear. Olof Johnson, 
one of the earliest settlers, accordingly christened it Gefle, the name of 
a populous town in Sweden. This name was afterward corrupted or 
anglicised to Galva, a name new and unheard of but corresponding as 
nearly' as possible to the Swedish name in pronunciation. 

The first house of the new town Avas built in the Fall of 1854, and is 
apart of the one formerl}^ belonging to John I. Bennett, and which is 
now owned b}^ A. J. Rockafellow and occupied by Mr. E. A. Lynd : it 
was built by the Bishop Hill Colony and was iisecl as a boarding house 
or hotel. The first store was built during the first Fall, and is the one 
now occupied by C. F. Bodinson as a grocery, between the two railroads 
and just south of and adjoining Smith & Smalley's Agricultural Ware- 
house. It was then occupied by George Farr, the Bishop Hill Colony 
and tlie Post-office. 

Col. E. Fuller was the first station agent appointed by the railroad 
company, and he continued to hold that position up to the time of his 
death, or very nearl\'. 

The Winter of 1854-5, following the completion of the railroad, was 
unusually mild and open, allowing out-of-door work to go on without 
interruption until 21st of January, when there occurred the severest snoAv 
storm ever known in this region, accompanied by a terrific wind. This 
resulted in blocking up the railroad and preventing the running of any 
trains for over two weeks. It was during this time, when the inhabitants 
of the new town were shut off from communication with the outside 
world, that the first child was born. Mr. and Mrs. David Emery were 
the happy parents, and they exclaimed : "Unto us a child is born, a girl 
is given, whose name shall be called Galva." 

The town having been laid out and a depot established in 1854, the 



170 HISTORY OF HBNTIY COUNTY, 

following season witnessed a rapid growth and qnite an influx of popu- 
lation, no less than seventy-five men having settled here before the great 
fire which occurred in November, 1855. Although the settlement of the 
town took place only about a score of years ago, the larger part of this 
number are gone — not dead, but, moved by the same restless spirit which 
impelled them to take up their abode here when the place was new, they 
have emigrated to other and newer towns. Only twenty-six of the original 
seventy-five still remain here — about one-third — while thirty-seven, or 
nearly one-half of them, are living in other localities. The list of dead 
numbers twelve, or about one-sixth of the pioneers of Galva. A part of 
these, however, i-emoved before their death, so that but a small fraction 
of the original settlers have found their long home in the quiet cemetery 
to the south of the town. 

When Dr. A. D. Babcock arrived here on the otli of May, 1855, 
there were already sixteen buildings in the place, twelve of which were 
dwelling-houses ; when Mr. Seeley arrived, on the 26th of September, 
the number of buildings had increased to thirt}', and carpenters were in 
great demand and all busily emploj-ed. 

It was during this season that the old brick warehouse, on Exchange 
Street, so recently devoted to the purpose of a new manufacturing com- 
pany, was built by the Bishop Hill Colony, and used for the storage of 
grain, pork, and broom-corn. The first hotel was also built then, by Mr. 
J. E. Wolever, occupying a portion of the lot where Mr. A. W. Albro 
now resides, on the corner of Main and Locust Streets. It was known 
as the " Galva House." 

The first surgical operation which Dr. Babcock was called upon to 
perform was for Augustus C. Bergman who was iniured while working 
on the railroad; the first death was that of Mr. O. P. Bigelow, who died 
on the 12th of September, 1855. The first male child born in the place 
was a son of Absalom Wood. The first fire occurred on or about the 8th 
of November, 1855, and originated in Dr. Babcock's drug store. It was 
caused by carrying a lighted lamp too near a barrel from which varnish 
had been drawn and which had been spilled upon the floor. 

The whole business portion of the new town was laid in ashes by 
this disaster, no less than six business firms being burned out. They 
were, first : Dr. A. D. Babcock, whose stock consisted of drugs, groceries, 
paints, oils, liquors and cigars ; second : A. M. Black, shoe shop and its 
contents; third: Hamlin, Beecher & Davis, dealers in hardware; fourth: 
A. J. Curtis, dealer in furniture ; fifth : Babcock & Clark, who do not 
appear to have had any stock of goods in the building at the time ; and 
sixth: Hurd & Driscoll, whose stock of dry goods were still in the boxes 
as received, not yet unpacked, and therefore easily saved by rolling them 
into the street. With this exception the building and its contents were 
a total loss, as there was no insurance upon either. 

At the time that the fire broke out, most of the citizens were in 
attendance at a railroad meeting then in progress at the school-house. 

Mr. D E. Jacobs was then living in the house now occupied b}' Mr. 
H. L. Dickenson, and which was the third dwelling-house built in Galva. 
His mother perceived the fire by the glow of light which shone in at the 
window, from the burning building, when her candle was accidentally put 
out, and sent him to apprise the citzens at the school-house. He rushed 



HISTORY OF FTBNRT COUNTY. 171 

to the door and informed them that the Wiley House was on fire, and in 
two minutes' time the speaker was left to talk to empty benches. 

On the night of the -Or.h of November, 1875, occurred the great fire 
which devastated the town, and laid almost all the business places, as Avell 
as many private residences, in ashes, inflicting almost as great a compar- 
itive injury upon Galva as the great fire in Chicago. More than forty 
places of business, with their contents, were swept away, and many 
citizens turned homeless and houseless out into the night. The morning- 
following was the gloomiest that had ever dawned upon the town, and 
men might well have been disheartened by seeing the fruits of years of 
toil blotted out of existence in a few hours. The fire was discovered a 
little after midnight, having originated in the Post-office, which was then 
kept in a wooden building just north of S. P. Johnson's store, on the site 
of his present tailor shop, or between the two buildings, which is a dis- 
puted question. If, as some allege, it was the work of an incendiary, he 
must have had the spirit of a fiend of the pit to have looked with satis- 
faction upon the work he did that night. A strong southerly wind pre- 
vailed at the time, and the flames soon caught upon the Mansard roof of 
Beck's block, upon the opposite side of Exchange Street, and then leaped 
acro&s to the north side of Main Street, leaving only charred ruins in its 
track. The three -story building of Mr. Beck's had just been newly 
roofed, and Music Hall, which occupied its upper story, furnished the 
finest assembly rooms between Galesburg and Chicago. 

THE BUSINESS AND SOCIAL INTERESTS. 

Galva is situated at the crossing of the Peoria, Rock Island and C.B. 
& Q.R.R., and contains a population of about thirty-live hundred. The 
business of the town is chiefly trade with the surrounding people, there 
being but two manufacturing establishments in the place. The older of 
these was established about the 3'ear 1848 by Thomas S. Guthrie, and is 
now carried on by his sons, William and Thomas. They are founders, and 
deal especially in engine and boiler material. A manufacturing company 
now occupy the brick building erected in the early life of Galva, and are 
engaged principal!}' in making windmills and farm machinery. 

The town supports a large number of stores, all well fitted up, and 
bearing a very neat appearance. 

The first bank was started by Claudius Jones about 1858 or '59. In 
1862 he sold to L. W. Beck, a merchant who carried on an exchange 
business until the First National Bank was organized in 1865. He was 
Cashier of this bank about nine months. Two or three years later he 
started another bank — a private institution. This he owned until the 
Spring of 1876, when he sold to the present proprietors, E. A. Lynd and 
L. M. Yocum, who are now engaged in a most successful business. The 
First National Bank was organized in 1865, the Wiley family, so early 
identified with the history of Galva, being the principal projectors. It 
has a capital of 850,000, and a surplus of' $30,000. Mr. D. L. Wiley is 
President, and W. F. Wiley, Cashier. 

The town is now entirely temperate, no license for the sale of spirit- 
uous liquors being given, and saloons are not allowed. 



172 HISTORY OF HE3?ET COUNTY. 



THE SCHOOLS. 



The schools are in an excellent condition, are held in tvv'o buildings 
knowii as the North and South buildings, and are under the able superin- 
tendence of j\Ir. E. E. Fitch. 

The fii'st school-house was built by the founders of the town, Messrs, 
J. M. and Wm. L. Wiley, near wliere Dr. A. C. Babcoek now resides, and 
was 12x20 feet in size. This building was also used as a church, and it 
was here that the first Baptist Church of Galva was formed, consisting 
of seven members, JNIrs. Thomas Gettj^ and Mr, Wm. L. Wiley being con- 
stituent members. The Congregational and Methodist Churches were 
also organized during the same year, 1855, and met in the same building. 
The Congregational Church was organized on the fifteenth of September, 
with thirteen members. 

The original school building on the north side of the railroad, known 
as the North School, was commenced during the Autumn of 1855, and 
was soon completed, the money being borrowed for that purpose, all in 
gold, J. M. Wiley, William L. Wiley and Geo. Farr giving a joint note 
therefor until a tax was levied and collected for the amount required. 
The building contained two rooms. These were afterwards divided into 
two rooms each, and in this manner the building was used until 187G. 
That year it was enlarged and remodeled, three rooms being added mak- 
ing a very commodious seven-room building. 

The South School building was erected in 1865. It originally con- 
sisted of one room, but that soon proving inadequate, in 1867 it was 
enlarged and remodeled and made a building of four rooms, and as such 
is still used. 

In the Galva schools there are now employed, including the Super- 
intendent, thirteen teachers, whose names and stations are as follows : 
E. E. Fitch, Superintendent; North School: Mrs. E.B.Humphreys, 
Principal; Niss Lucy Magu, Grammar; Miss Rebecca Watson, Inter- 
mediate ; Miss Frankie Smith, First Piim. ; Miss Mary Maddox, Miss 
Anna Gladding, Primary. South School: Miss S. B. Littlefield, Princi- 
pal; Miss Matilda Watson, 'Intermediate; Miss Anna E. Ayres, First 
Primary; Mrs. Emma J. Da}^ Miss .Jennie Dyson, Primar3\ There are 
about 260 pupils in the North School, and nearly 200 in the South, and a 
regular attendance of over 400. The annual outlay for educational pur- 
poses in the city is about 110,000. 

THE CHUKCHES. 

There are six congregations of religious worshipers. These occupy 
neat, commodious churches, and are in a very prosperous condition. 

The oldest religious organization in Galva is that of the Methodist 
Episcopal. It was organized June 26, 1855, in the school-house. Meet- 
ings had been held here to complete the organization, and for some time 
after. At this time tlie first Board of Trustees were elected. This Board 
consisted of the following persons : I^aac M. Witter, John T. Carran, 
Isaac E. Dennis, Amos Dennis, William Pierce, John B. Nixon, and Nor- 
man E. Pomeroy. They were the most active members then in the church, 
wliich in addition to these men, possessed but few members. In 1857 




Capt. OLOF JOHNSON (deceased), 
Galva. 



HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 175 

they erected their present house of worship, costing $3,000. Among the 
prominent ministers of the church have been the following divines : Rev. 
John Morey, who called the meeting held to organize ; Rev. W. P. 
Graves, Rev. A. D. McCool, Rev. A. H. Hepperley, Rev. G. W. Arnold and 
others. The present pastor, Rev. B. C. Dennis, is now serving his third 
year. The church is in a prosperous condition. The membership is over 
200, and an attendance of more than 100 scholars is regularly maintained 
in the Sunday-school. 

The Congregational Church was organized in the school-house, Sept. 
15, 1855. The constituent members were the following persons : George 
Farr, Rebecca Farr, Charlotte M. Cholette, George Fairlamb, William H. 
Fairlamb, Henry H. Parker, Mary Fairlamb, Hannah Carrigan, Thomas 
Harrison, M. E. Harrison, Elizabeth J. Hill, and George Hill, Jr. 

Rev. S. G. Wright was soon called to the pastorate o'f this congrega- 
tion, serving one-half his time. He remained until April, 1864, when he 
resigned. In November following Rev. R. B. Guild, the present pastor, 
was installed. From a membership of twelve, the church has grown to 
one hundred and fifty, and sustains a Sunday-school of nearly the same 
number of scholars. The congregation erected a church-edifice in the 
Autumn of 1856. . In 1866 this was sold to the Free Methodist Church, 
and the present commodious building erected. This latter was dedicated 
May 29, 1869, and cost about 112,000. 

The Swedish Methodist Episcopal Church was organized on the fifth 
of January, 1866, with fifteen members. Two years afterwards, they 
erected their present house of worship, costing $3,000. 

Their pastors have been as follows : Rev. A. J. Anderson, three 
years ; O. C. Simpson, one year ; A. P. Wigren, one year ; H. W. Eklund, 
one year; C. A. Wiren, two years; and A. T. Westergren, two years. 
Charles A. Stenholm is the present pastor. There are now 87 members, 
47 probationers, and 100 Sunday-school children. 

The Free Methodist Church. In the Autumn of 1866, seventeen 
persons, principally from the M. E. Church, formed themselves into a 
separate body, under the care of this church. For some time they met 
for worship at Mr. D. P. Reed's, one of the main members, and often at 
the residences of other members desirous of promoting the welfare of the 
church. In 1866, they purchased the Congregational Church, and have 
since occupied it. The membership is now about 20, sustaining a Sunday- 
school of 30 scholars. 

The first pastor of this church was Rev. D. W. Drake, who remained 
two vears. He has been succeeded by Rev. William Cooley, Rev. J. T. 
Terry, Rev. G. C. Coffee, Rev. W. W. Kelley, Rev. J. Whitney, Rev. 
James Thaxter, and the present pastor, Rev. James Kelso, who is also 
pastor at Kewanee. 

The Swedish Lutheran Church. The people professing this faith held 
meetings several years before effecting a regular church organization. 
This was accomplished in December, 1869, with forty-four members. In 
1873 they erected their present house of worship, a comfortable brick 
building, costing about $3,000. At present there are over 90 members, 
and a Sunday-school of about 40 scholars. 

The Rev. P. M. Sandquist was the fii'st pastor here. He was followed 
by Rev. N. Nordgren, who remained about one year, and he by Rev. A. 



176 HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

Lindholm, the present pastor. This latter lives at Altona, and is not 
often in Galva, the pulpit being generally supplied by students from the 
College at Rock Island. 

The First Baptist Church of Galva. The earliest meetings vpere 
held in the school-house. The first meeting for the transaction of busi- 
ness vi^as held in the school-house June 28, 1856, at which time the pre- 
liminary steps Avere taken to organize a Baptist church. The church was 
organized Aug. 14, 1855, the meeting being held in the school-house. The 
original members were : Wm. L. Wiley, and Mrs. Louise Wiley, from 
the Baptist Church, Saxton's River, Vt. ; H. D. Ward and Mrs Angelina 
Ward, from Canton, 111. ; J. M. Corson and Mrs. Ann D. Corson, from 
Brimfield, 111. ; Mrs. Margarett Bushnell, from LaFavette, 111. ; Mrs. Dor- 
atliy Getty, from Brimfield, 111. ; Henry H. Clark, from Alden, N. Y. : O. 
P. Bigelow, from Boston, Mass. 

The first church building was erected in 1856. It was located near 
the business center of the town,, and cost about $2,000. The second 
building, and the one which the church now occupy, was built 1867 and 
1868. It is located on the east side of, and fronting. College Park, and 
cost, carpets and bell included, about $25,000. Tlie bell in the tower 
of the present church building was also used in the old church, and rung 
for public service the first time Januarv 24, 1864. 

First pastor was Rev. M. H. Negus, from organization until Decem- 
ber, 1856 ; second. Rev. A. Gross, between two and three years; third. 
Rev. J. T. Westover, between two and three years ; fourth, Rev. J. D. 
Cole, D.D., about three vears ; fifth. Rev. L. D. Gowan, five years ; sixth, 
Rev. C. W. Clark, three years ; seventh, Rev. J. M. Coon, now in his 
third year. 

The present membership is a little over two hundred. 

Sabbath-school was organized in 1856 ; the number of scholars is 
about one liundred and fifty. 

The church is now free from debt, and expects to remain so, and is 
in a fiourishing condition. 

The Church of the Holy Communion (Episcopal). The first relig- 
ious meetings held in Galva were in a room in Union Block, 1866. About 
that time the Ladies' Church Aid Society was formed, and through their 
efforts a small church was built, called the " Hol)^ Communion " (Episco- 
pal). The building and lot cost a little over $800, and was erected on 
the northeast corner of Railroad Square, in the year 1868. Mr. and Mrs. 
Moore, Mr. and Mrs. Whipple, S. M. Etter and wife, Mrs. Somers, Mrs. 
Trowbridge, Mrs. McKane, C. J. Whipple, Mrs. Rednell, Mrs. Hoyt, L. 
P. Edson, were among the original members. Its pastors were Rev. Mr. 
Tifford, Rev. Dr. Floyd, Rev. Dr. S. Chase; also Rev. Mr. Russell, who 
officiated over two years ; C. J. Whipple, now rector at Manville, R. I. ; 
and S. M. Etter, superintendent of the State Schools, were both prominent 
in the religious affairs and doings of the church. The present member- 
ship is fourteen ; Sabbath-school scholars, twenty. 

THE PRESS. 

In 1857 a paper called the G-alva Watchman was started. This was 
published but a year or two, and probably discontinued. The Galva 
Union was started Dec. 5, 18( 2 by B. W. Seaton. Some time afterwards 



HISTORY OF HENRY COUKTY. 177 

it was controlled by Capt. Erick Johnson, and after that by John I. Ben- 
nett, proprietor, and J. M. Edson, editor. It was changed to the G-alva 
Republican, the first number of which was issued about October 1, 1867. 
At the same time the Illinois Swede was in circulation, being printed by 
the proprietors of the Republican, and suspended about the same time. 
On the 9th of Fel)ruary, 1872, the present paper, the Journal, was started 
by W. J. Ward, editor and proprietor. In April of 1873, he sold to his 
brother, F. P. Ward, who conducted the paper until March 20, 1874, when 
he sold the one half interest to J. J. Balch. In September, the latter's 
interest was purchased by the present editor, H. W. Young, who on the 
20th of February, 1876, purchased the share of F. P. Ward, and thus 
became sole owner. Mr. Young is now conducting a paper which is a 
credit to any town, having enlarged the Journal, and added many import- 
ant features. 

Present officials : — Pres., G.W. Butters; Sec, T. Atwood ; Treas., L. 
M. Young. Councilmen, Peter Herdien and Charles Williams. Police 
Marshal, E. F. Short. 

CAMBRIDGE. 

The land on which the town of Cambridge now stands was, prior to 
the year 1843, the property of Rev. Ithamar Pillsbury, so well known in 
the early history of the New York and New England Colonies finding 
homes in Henry County. As soon as the site received legislative sanc- 
tion — the act liaving passed that body February 21, 1843, — he deeded to 
the Board of County Commissioners, at a special meeting held on April 
19, 1843, the fractional parts of two forty-acre lots. These were at once 
accepted, and steps taken to lay oiit a town. A contract had been made 
between the county and Geo. Brandenburg and Corey for construct- 
ing a jail and court-house at Morristown. A small frame court-house was 
already built, but at this time was still unfinished, and Init little work 
had been done on the jail. By consent of these parties this contract was 
annulled, the settlement being left to Marcus B. Osborn, N. W. Wash- 
burn and Luke C. Sheldon, as referees. They gave their decision at the 
regular term of the court, held on the 6th of June following. This was 
to pay the contractors 1127.26, and keep the building. A day or two 
after the court met again, at the cabin commenced by J. Tillson and fin- 
ished by A. H. Showers, in Sugar Tree Grove, for the transaction of any 
l)usiness relating to the new town. 

On June 9th the Court proceeded to lay out the town of Cambridge — 
a name suggested l)y Judge Tillson — and ordered a sale of lots to take place 
on the 26th of the same month ; to which date it was adjourned. The 
town is laid out on two fractional quarters, N. W. and S. W. 7, 15, 3, 
some 36 acres on each. It has two public squares, which, including the 
streets, extend the breadth of the town from east to west. .They were 
recorded as Court Square (west) 20 by 40 rods, and College Square (east) 
20 rods square. The lots facing the squares were 10 by 20 rods, the 
others were 20 rods square, save two on the north end of town, which 
are 20 by 36, and the cemetery, which is 16 by 20 rods. 

On the 28th of June the Court met and '' appropriated fourteen dol- 
lars to Charles C. Blish for surveying town of Cambridge, one dollar and 



178 HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

fifty cents for services rendered at same time, and two dollars to Sullivan 
Howard for specifications and plan of a court-house." 

It was ordered that the Court proceed forthwith to the sale of lots in 
Cambridge, on the following terms : One-third to be paid in six months 
after date of sale ; one-third in twelve months, and the remainder in 
eighteen months ; and that purchasers liave the privilege of paying in 
building materials, on or before the 1st day of the September following. 
George McHenry, being in his place as auctioneer, a full board, and a 
good attendance of citizens, the sale proceeded. Twenty lots were sold 
on that occasion, aggregating the sum of $558. For the benefit of those 
interested, the list of purchasers and number of lot, and amount of sale, 
in the order in which they appear on record, are given : Joseph Tillson, 

I, mo ; John Russell, 4, $23 ; Joseph L. Perry, 7, $21 ; Jas. Roe, 12, $25 ; 
Albert Jagger, 3, $26 ; Wm. H. Lockwood, 14, $40 ; Lennan Thurston, 
13, $39; Thos. K. Thompson, 10, $26; Wm. A. Ayers, 18, $23; Jos. 
Tillson, 9, $15 ; Wm. H. Lockwood, 16, $39 ; Alex. Qua, 17, $33 ; Wm. 
H. Lockwood, 16, $31 ; Jas. Montgomery, 15, $35 ; Thos. K. Thompson, 
21, $15; Wm. Dawson, 5, $30; James M. Allan, 20, $40; John Jones, 

II, $30 ; Alexander Qua, 8, $21. There were thirteen purchasers, and 
out of that number but few are known to be living in the county or in 
the state. Qua lost his life in a stone quarry, one-half mile northeast of 
Cambridge, where he was crushed by a bank he had undermined. 

The growth of the town was not at all in proportion to the necessi- 
ties of some of the purchasers, and instead .of paying for their lots, either 
in materials or money, as tlie payments became due, several of them 
begged off, and their lots went back to the county. 

To effect a healthy growth in the new town, roads must be opened, 
post routes established through it, and a post-office in it, and public build- 
ings had to be erected and population invited. The sequel will show 
that many opposed to the growth of the place scarcely ceased to under- 
rate the locality and its facilities for a healthy growth, and the idea of 
settling in it or about it was often derided. A mail route leading from 
Wethersfield to Geneseo was established through the place, and for a 
while the few inhabitants enjoyed the luxury of a semi-weekly mail from 
Peoria. By some means the route was altered so as to leave Cambridge 
out. Previous to the change of route by the department, the carrier 
refused to go to Cambridge, but would throw out a bag of mail matter 
put up at Wethersfield expressly for Cambridge, at the " Corners," ten 
miles east of town. No office being there, a boy employed for the pur- 
pose would proceed at his leisure, pick up the bag and take it to its des- 
tination. More than once mail matter has been sent from Cambridge for 
the east and returned at the end of the week with other matter designed 
for Cambridge. Those who had important business to transact were 
afraid to mail their letters at the county town, because of the delays to 
which its mail was subjected. Many and unsuccessful were the efforts 
to have that route re-established through the village, nor till 1856 had 
the tardy justice of a tri-weekly mail from Geneseo to Kewanee been 
accorded to the county town. A weekly mail from Princeton, in Bureau 
County, to Millersburg or New Boston, on the Mississippi River, was the 
only one from which, for several years, news from the east could be 
obtained. A weekly mail rauuing from Rock Island to Cambridge was 



HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 179 

also established for the particular benefit of the settlements between the 
two places. For a short time, about the year 1853, a route was estab- 
lished from a point on the Illinois River, known as Lancaster, to Cam- 
bridge ; but it afforded no conveniences for any office on the route, and 
was soon discontinued. The mail to Rock Island was carried for many 
years by a Mr. Robinson, familiarly known as " Uncle Bobb3^" He was 
a very honest, trusty man, and made more money by attending to errands 
at Rock Island for his neighbors than by carrying the mail. 

The growth of the town was remarkable only for its slowness. The 
impression that the county seat would certainly and speedily be removed 
gave way with great difficulty. People were afraid to venture in, and 
but little improvement was made for several years. The county had a 
court-house, but it was unfinished and in Morristown. At that place 
courts were to be held till suitable arrangements could be made for their 
accommodation in Cambridge. They were then being held in the dwell- 
ing-house made over to the county by the proprietors of Morristown. It 
was argued by many citizens about Cambridge, among whom are found 
the names of Stackhouse, Hanan, Mascall, Cady, Osborn, Malcolm, and 
others, that the unfinished house might be moved to where it was 
wanted. These gentlemen made a proposition to the Court to the effect 
that if it would give them the house outright they would move it to 
Cambridge, finish it off, and furnish room in it for the use of the courts 
till the new court-house should be built. 

On the 5th of September,. 1843, the Court contracted with them to 
move the house to Cambridge, and to finish it, giving them ten dollars 
and the use of the house for schools and other public purposes when not 
wanted for courts, for the term of three years. The building was placed 
upon runners, and in two days hauled or moved, by ox teams, to Cam- 
bridge, a distance of more than twelve miles, and placed on southeast 
corner of College Square. Several terms of the county court and two 
terms of the circuit court were held in it — the first term of the latter 
in September, 1844. It was afterwards sold to the Messrs. Gaines, who 
put a small addition to it, and placing their families and a stock of dry 
goods and groceries in it, did a good business on a small scale for several 
years. 

On June 18, 1844, notice was given that a contract for building a 
court-house, according to a plan and specifications, drawn by John G. 
Wilcox (for which the Court paid him |22), would be let on the 29th of 
July following. A contract was made with Sullivan Howard, September 
8, 1844, and the building was completed and accepted July 28, 1845. 
From that time, at least for several years, the court-house was open for 
schools, lectures, debating societies, stump speeches, three-penny shows, 
class meetings, prayer meetings. Masonic meetings, singing and dancing 
schools (the benches were movable) and preaching. Presbyterians, Con- 
gregationalists, Methodists, Baptists and Universalists all worshiped 
there, often three of them in one day, at different hours. 

The first building erected in the new county seat was a small un- 
hewn log house, put up by John Russell — commonly known as " Lord 
John " — and was used by him for a blacksmith shop. For a short time 
after its completion, he occupied it as a dwelling, until he could erect a 
cabin for his family. This small structure was covered with "shakes " — 



180 HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

clap-boards — held down by weight poles, and stood on the site now occu- 
pied by Medbury's grocery ; his dwelling occupied the site of Mr. S. D. 
Alfred's present residence. 

Judge Tillson erected the second house in the town. It was a hewn 
log building, and many additions were made to it, as his wants required 
and means allowed. 

A log cabin was erected almost opposite the stable connected with 
the Cambridge House, by W. Augustus Ayres, the following Summer— 
1844. Here the Indian, known as John, was confined for the murder of 
a half-breed by name of Jim. " John" escaped from this insecure "jail" 
and joined his tribe, the Pottawattomies at Shalibona Grove. He was 
immediately followed by the officers, who, on coming to the camp, and 
addressing the chief, who was none other than the noted personage Shab- 
bona, inquired for "John" who killed "Jim." He was at once pointed 
out by Shabbona (this name was pronounced Shah-pan-nee, or Sh4-p4- 
nee, by the Pottawattomies), and again taken into custody. At the pre- 
liminary examination before Justice Tillson, he was committed for trial 
before the circuit court ; but the grand jury, failing to find a bill (they 
stood eleven for and (?) against), he was set at liberty. 

The first hotel built in town was erected by A. H. Showers, about 
the year 1848. He kept it for some time, and rented to others until 
it was finally converted into a residence, and as such is now the property 
of Michael McFadden. Mr. Showers, several years after, erected the 
present Cambridge House, which in 1856 he sold to A. and N. B. Gould, 
who added the third story. They kept it five years, and sold to James 
M. Wier, who in turn sold to Joshua Bushnell, about February, 18fi4. 
He enlarged it to its present capacity, and in Februar}', 1876, sold to the 
present proprietor, J. W. Hartzell. Mr. M. W. Thatcher was connected 
with this house about eight years as landlord. The Central House was 
built about 1857, by A. M. Randall. 

No manufactures exist in town, and not until the completion of the 
railway in 1871, did the town grow in a thriving manner. From that 
time good stores were erected, and a fine trade with the surrounding- 
farmers at once sprang into life. 

The project of having railroad connection with the eastern and west- 
ern markets was agitated by the more prominent citizens as early as I860. 
The object was again discussed in 1866, and more definite steps were 
taken. The Rock Island Railroad was opened in 1856 to the coal fields, 
and the citizens of Cambridge began an earnest effort to secure the con- 
tinuance of the road through their town. In 1867, Mr. Orin E. Page 
was sent by the citizens to procure a charter for the road, under the name 
of the Peoria and Rock Island Railway. This was accomplished, and 
subscription-books were immediately opened in the city of Peoria, in 
Galva, Cambridge, and at Osco and Weston. The city of Peoria sub- 
scribed $100,000, and the countv the same amount. The township of 
Galva, 150,000; Galva, $25,000 '; Cambridge, 150,000; and Osco and 
Weston, $30,000 each. By these figures, aggregating $385,000, it will be 
observed that the road was built mainly by municipal subscriptions. For 
all this outlay, the corporations were abundantly repaid in the increase of 
wealth and rapid development of the towns.. Cambi'idge, from a popu- 
lation of between four and five hundred in 1871, has grown to four times 



HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 



181 



that number, and, as a showing of the increase in trade,, the following 
exhibit of the number of car loads of produce shipped from this station 
during each month in 1876 is given : 





14 

\l 

24 
74 

95 
57 
61 
43 
37 
36 
84 

562 


i 

I 

4 
3 
3 
15 

18 

7 

27 
28 
18 

5 

2 

131 


1^. 
2 


1 


6 
I 


42 


3 




1 


■5 

1 


1 s 


I 


2 


hi 

I 
I 

2 

I 


59 
58. 
22 














March 


4 








April 


















2 


35 
103 
127 
69 
95 
97 
74 
6n 


May 


5 

2 
4 

I 

2 
17 














2 
2 
















Tulv 




12 
13 
13 

28 

144 








August 

September ... 












2 


2 






3 


4 




I 






I 
I 


8 
20 
























5 
17 












129 




6 


6 


I 


— 


2 


9 


7 




Total 


5 


928 





These tables only include shipments in carload lots. The shipments 
in smaller lots, if footed up, would swell the amounts of some sorts of 
produce considerably. A good many barrels of apples and bales of 
broom-corn have been shipped in lots less than car-loads, and some small 
lots of other items. The shipments of poultry by freight, in boxes and 
barrels, during the month of December, amount to 15,866 pounds ; while 
large quantities have also been sent by express. Butter and eggs are 
also shipped by both freight and express, and butter especially is sent off 
in large quantities by express. 

Comparing the shipments of the past year with those of previous 
years, reducing all to a uniform basis — the first three years ending Nov. 
30, and the last two ending Dec. 31, 1876 — the following is given : 





1876. 


1875. 


1874. 


1873. 


1872. 


Corn 

Oats 

Whe aV. '. - '. '. . '. '. \ '. '. .' ."'.".'.".!!'! _' _" ! 
Barley 


220,429 
90,062 
6,678 
2,200 
2,750 


170,289 
62,500 
6,426 
11,655 


100,957 

98,327 

5,312 

9,554 

389 


158,995 

94,277 

7,267 

11,728 

2,578 


231,187 

46,801 

11,857 

3,255 

4,555 




Total 


332,119 


250,870 


214,539 


274,795 


307,655 



LIVE STOCK AND OTHER PRODUCE. 





1876. 


1875. 


1874. 


1873- 


1872. 


Hogs.No 

Cattle,No 


7,200 
272 

200 


7,250 
112 


6,845 
318 


7,880 

185 

2 


5,545 
144 


Sheep, cars 

Broomcorn, tons 

Hay and Straw 








190 

120 

2,000 


166 
61 


5 

386 

2,450 


27 

356 

1,750 

978 


Potatoes, bu 




Apples, bu . _ 


666 











Prior to the completion of the railroad, Cambridge was considered a 
small inland town, with but little trade and few advantages. The sud- 



182 HISTORY OP HENRY COUNTY. 

deB increase of population, and the increase in wealth and in tiade has 
dispelled that idea, and to-day Cambridge bids fair to rival any town in 
the county. There are a number of fine brick business houses, one bank 
— a private institution, organized in November 1871 ; two or three good 
hotels, two weekly newspapers, excellent graded schools and six regular- 
ly organized churches, all of which have good houses of worship. 

CAMBRIDGE OFFICIALS. 

Pres., A. Gould ; Clerk, W. B. Dean ; Treas., F. B. Welton. Trus- 
tees, James Mascell, S. H. Patten, Sylvester Rockwell, T. G. Ayers, J. W. 
Stewart, A. Gould. 

THE PRESS. 

The first paper started in Cambridge, and the first in Henry County, 
issued its first number on Feb. 13, 1853. It was called the Henry County 
Gazette, and was edited by J. W. Eystra. This paper and all the material 
connected with the office were afterwards sold to the citizens of Kewanee, 
and removed to that place, where the name was changed to the Henry 
County Dial. The editor, Mr. Hyatt, soon after went to Geneseo, where 
he established the Geneseo Republic. About November, 1857, the press 
and materials in the Galva Watchman office were purchased and remov- 
ed to Cambridge by Judge Tillson, Dr. A. A. Dunn, V, M. Ayres, and 
H. W. Wells. Dr. Dunn was established as editor, and the name changed 
to the Chronicle. He remained until 1860 jn this place. That year. 
Patten and Denison leased the office and fixtures from the company, and 
continued Dr. Dunn as editor for one year, when Mr. Patten purchased 
Mr. Denison's interest, and (Dr. Dunn going to the army), assumed entire 
editorial control. He kept charge until 1866, when he was succeeded by 
Everett & Casson, who, on May 16, 1867, sold to the present editor and 
proprietor, Mr. George C. Smithe. He has now entire control, having 
purchased the office and all the material, and issues a paper which fully 
merits its name. 

The Prairie Chief was started in Galva in April, 1868, and for a time 
printed in the office of the Galva Union. In September of that year, 
Mr. F. B. Seaton purchased the office of the Stark County Democrat at 
Toulon, and removed to that place. He changed the name to Prairie 
Chief, and remained there till December, 1871, when he rented the office 
of the Cambridge Democrat, and removed to that place. This paper had 
been started and conducted by one Rock, who proved a most disreputable 
character. Immediately on Mr. Seaton taking chai'ge, a change was made, 
and an excellent weekly paper started. He changed the name to Prairie 
Chief, and although in a county largely Republican in politics, the paper 
has a large circulation. 

CAMBRIDGE DEMOCRAT. 

In the Spring of 1869, feeling the need of a Democratic paper cen- 
trally located in the county, S. P. Cady and I. G. Ayers commenced a 
correspondence with Mr. J. L. Rock of Chicago, commercial editor of the 
Chicago Times, with a view of establishing a Democratic paper in Cam- 
bridge, which resulted in receiving a proposition from Mr. Rock that if 




E. PAGE, 
Cambridge. 



HISTORY OP HENRY COUNTY. 185 

$1,500 was raised to purchase presses and material he would famish an 
equal amount, and would come and take charge of the paper, with the 
understanding that at the expiration of the year he was to have the mate- 
rial by refunding the |1,500 and 10 per cent. A meeting was called at 
the court-house, which was largely attended by the Democrats of this 
vicinity, and the proposition met with general favor. At this meeting 
$800 was subscribed, and. a committee appointed to raise the balance, 
which they succeeded in doing very soon. A committee was then sent 
to Chicago to superintend the purchase and shipment of presses, type, 
etc. In due time the material arrived, and was set up in the room over 
the harness shop of H. P. Hart, and July 28, 1869, the first issue of the 
Cambridge Democrat made its appearance, greatly to the satisfaction of 
its god-parents. The paper remained under the management of Mr. 
Rock but a short time. The 20th of November of the same year found 
him in such straitened circumstances that he was forced to dispose of 
the paper to Morrison Francis and R. Heber Hinman, who employed Mr, 
I. G. Ayers, then a law student with Mr. W. H. Shepard, to take charge 
of the editorial and financial management. Mr. Ayers continued the 
editor until Nov. 29, 1871, at which time Messrs. Francis & Hinman 
rented the office to Mr. B. W. Seaton, who removed the Prairie Chief 
from Toulon, Stark County, to this place, commenced and continues its 
issue here. 

THE CHURCHES. 

The Baptist Church was organized July 8, 1854, in the court-house. 
Prior to the organization, they met in this house for some time for religious 
exercises, and for a short time after. At the organization thirteen persons 
united, whose names are as follows : William Talbott, Mary Talbott, Aaron 
Talbott, Phebe Talbott, James M. Woodmansee, Clarrissa M. Woodman- 
see, John McFarland, Hanna McFarland, Emma Blackman, Laura Bishop, 
Harriett Daggett, Electa Davenport, and Eliza Ayers. This congregation' 
purchased the old school-house, which they used for a house of worship 
until the erection of their present commodious church. It cost about 
$10,000. They have in addition to this just completed a very comfortable 
parsonage, worth $2,100. 

The earliest pastor was Rev. F. Ketchman, who remained about one 
year. He was followed by Rev. W. W. Smith, who was pastor fourteen 
months. Then followed Rev. R. Edwards, one year; Rev.'G. D. Sim- 
mons, eighteen months; Rev. A. Edison, two years and four months; Rev. 
J. Shephard, six years; Rev. W. A. Velsher, two and one-half years, 
when the present pastor, Rev. J. Cairns, was installed. The membership 
is now 107, and the attendance at Sunday-school 130. The superinten- 
dent is William Talbott. 

The Disciples of Christ held meetings for some time in the court- 
house, in the Baptist Church, and in the school-house. About December 
18, 1859, they met at the court-house and effected an organization. At 
this meeting the following persons united : Samuel and Mrs. Ellen 
Horn, Mrs. A. E. Matthews, Ada B. Lobingier, Geo. Lobingier, G. W. 
Sroupe, William and Mrs. Martha McFarland, and Wilham Kirkland. 

On the 23d of January following, a permanent organization was 
made, with William Kirkland and G. W. Sroupe as elders, William Mc- 

15 J^or continuation of this History, see page 505. 



Biographical Directory. 



ABBREVIATIONS. 

Ind. Rep , Independent Republican. Meth i Methodist. 

Lib. Rep Liberal Republican. Cath Roman Catholic. 

Rep. - - Republican. Pres Presbyterian. 

Dem Democrat. Prest.. President. 

Ind Independent. P.O Post Office. 

Bapt Baptist. | Prop ,. Proprietor. 

Cong Congrcgat lonalist. Co County, 

Epis Episcopalian. Sec Section or Secretary. 

Evang Evangelist. Vol Volunteer. 

Adv Adventist. Unit Unitarian. 



GENESEO TOWNSHIP. 

A BRAMS NATHAN G. Geneseo; showman; Dem; from Ind. 

-^^ ADAMS J. Q. Rev. Geneseo; Rep; Meth; from Canada. 

ADAMS M. A. Geneseo. 

ALBER F. Mrs. Geneseo; Evang; from Germany. 

ALBORG PETER, Geneseo; laborer; Meth; from Sweden. 

ALBRECHT Mrs. widow, Geneseo; German Luth; from Germany. 

ALBERTSON CHARLES L. Geneseo. 
'ALDEEN P. A. Geneseo; shoemaker; Rep; from Sweden. 

ALLAN 31. JAMES, Geneseo; Retired Farmer; born in Sumner Co. Tenn. Nov. 23, 1814J 
came to Henry Co. 1836; wife was Susanna Stewart, born Jan. 28, 1819; married March 6. 
1839; has four children; Mr. Allan spent the Winter of 1836-7 at Vandalia, where the 
Legislature then met, and succeeded in getting Henry Co. set apart from Knox; he was also 
the first County and Circuit Clerk of Henry Co; has filled the office of County Judge; in 1850 
he was elected to State Legislature to assist in getting a charter for C. R. L & P. Railroad, 
and strange as it may seem, Mr. Allan informs us that it was a difficult matter to obtain, as 
the Governor and many of the leading men of the state were much afraid that a railroad con- 
structed in the vicinity of the canal would prove detrimental to the interests of the state. Mr. 
Allan also held the office of Provost Marshal in this district during a part of the war. Mrs. 
Allan had the honor of teaching the first school in the county. 

ALLAN WM. T. Geneseo; justice of peace; Ind; from Tenn. 

ALLEN ARTHUR, lives with father, Aug. Allen; Rep; Unit; from Mass. 

ALLEN AUG. Geneseo; restaurant; Rep; Unit; from R. Island. 

ALLEN C. Mrs. (widow), Geneseo; Spiritualist; from N. Y. 

ALLEN CHARLES, Geneseo; R. R. baggageman; Rep; Unit; from Mass. 

ALLEN M. M. resides with mother, Airs. C. Allen; Rep; Lib; born in this town. 

ALLEN ROBERT, P.O. Geneseo; farm hand with J. F. Smith; Dem; from N. Y. 

AMOS JOHN, Geneseo; mason; Rep; from England. 

ANDERSON A. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

ANDERSON A. F. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

ANDERSON CHAS. Geneseo; cabinet maker; Rep; Prot; from Sweden. . 

ANDERSON CHARLES, Geneseo; wagon maker; Rep; from Sweden. 



HENRY COUNTY: GENESEO TOWNSHIP. 187 

ANDERSON ERICK, Geneseo; cabinetmaker; Luth; from Sweden. 

ANDERSON JAMES, Sec. 14; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Ohio. 

ANDERSON JOHN, Geneseo; retired farmer; Rep; from Ohio. 

ANDERSON J. P. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Meth; from Sweden. 

ANDERSON L. D. Geneseo; dealer in pumps; Rep; from Ohio. 

ANDERSON PETER, Sec. i; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden; 80 acres. 

ANDERSON PETER, Sec. 12; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden; 120 acres. 

ANDERSON PETER, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

ANDERSON H. Mrs. Geneseo; from Sweden. 

ANDREE HERMAN, Sec. 9; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Luth; from Prussia. 

ANDREWS JAMES, Farmer. Sec. 7; P.O. Geneseo; born in Trumbull Co. Ohio, April 
3, 1830; came to Tazewell Co. in 1843, and to this county in 1854; Dem; owns 600 acres of 
land, valued at $24,000; wife was Marietta Campbell, born in St. Lawrence Co. N. Y., Jan. 
10, 1841; married March 26, 1S62; has seven children. 

ANTES H. T. Geneseo; physician and surgeon; Rep; Cong; from N. Y. 

ANTES R. H. Geneseo; Rep; Cong; from N. Y. 

APPLEBEE THOaiAS, Geneseo; Livery; born in LaSalle Co. 111. Dec. 2, 1853; came 
to county, 1872; Rep; married Miss Ida Bawlman; she was born in New York, June 17, 
1853, and married Feb. 14, 1872; two children; Mr. Applebee is one of the proprietors of the 
temperance billiard room. 

ARNETT JACOB, Geneseo; agricultural implements; Ind; Prot; from France. 

ARNETT S. J. Geneseo; merchant; Rep; Prot; from 111. 

ARNOLD G. W. Geneseo; minister M. E. church; Rep; West Virginia. ■ 

ARNOLD JOHN, Geneseo. 

ASH MICHAEL, Sec. 14; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from Pa. 

ASH LEWIS, Geneseo; laborer; Dem; Prot; from Mich. 

ASH WM. farm hand with C. B. Smith; Ind; from N. Y. 

ATKIN D. H. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Bapt; from Ct. 

ATKINSON J. T. Geneseo; retired farmer; Ind; Cong; from Mass. 

AYERS B. Geneseo; retired farmer; Rep; from Mass. 

"D ACK WM. Geneseo; shoemaker; Rep; Meth; from Sweden. 

^ BAILEY CHRIS. C, P.O. Geneseo; lives with John Churchill; Dem; from N. H. 

BAILEY JAS. M., P.O. Geneseo; lives with John Churchill; Dem; from N. H. 

BAILEY Z. C. Geneseo; blacksmith; Rep; Lib; from Vt. 

BAIRD WM. Geneseo; watchman; Dem; from Pa. 

BAKER E. Mrs. widow; Geneseo; Cath; from Germany. 

BAKER FREDERICK, Geneseo; painter; Rep; Meth; from England. 

BAKER JOS. Geneseo; tinner; Rep; Prot; born in Conn. 

BAKER NICOLAS, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Cath; from Germany. 

BAKER T. Geneseo; baker; Dem; Luth; from Germany. 

BAKER THOS. E. Geneseo; miller; Rep; Pres; from N. Y. 

BAKER FRED. Geneseo; painter; Meth; Rep; from Eng. 

BALL C. A. Geneseo; policeman; Dem; Prot; from Mass. 

BALL FRANK M. Geneseo; brakeman; Rep; Meth. 

BALL C. A. Jr. Geneseo; brakeman; Rep; Meth. 

BALL GEO. Geneseo; brakeman; Rep; Meth. 

BARKER JOHN, Geneseo; carpenter; Rep. 

BARBER EMORY, Geneseo; wagon maker; Rep; Unit. 

BARGE BENJ. F. Supt. of Geneseo City Schools and County Supt. of Schools; born in 
Concord, Middlesex Co. Mass. Feb. 2, 1834; came to this county, 1861; Rep; Bapt; owns 
house and lot; educated in public schools of Concord, Haverhill and Lowell; two years in 
Yale College; did not return after his father's death in 1852; taught in Mississippi and Louisi- 
ana from 1852 to 1861; spent one and a'half years in military service in Department of North- 
west, under Gen. Pope; farmed two years; taught six years in Cambridge, and now five years 
at Geneseo; married June, 1863 to Carrie W. Showers, of Cambridge, 111; she was born in 
Cambridge, June 2, 1841; has four children, Hattie, Cora, Jennie and Allie. 



188 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OP 

BARLTZ JOHN, Geneseo; brick maker; Rep; Luth; from Germany. 

BARNES EDGAR L. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; from N. Y. 

BARNES JOHN D. Geneseo; retired farmer; Rep; Meth; from Md. 

BARNHART CATHERINE Mrs. widow; Sec. 15; P.O. Geneseo; Evang; from Germany. 

BARTON ALBERT C. Geneseo; printer in News office, Ind; Prot; from N. Y. 

BARTON ANDREW, Sec. 29; P.O. Geneseo; farmer for H. C. Barton; Rep; born in N. Y. 

BARTON H. C. Sec. 29; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Cong; born in Vt; 121 acres.'' 

BARTON WM. G. Sec. 29; P.O. Geneseo; farmer for H. C. Barton; Rep; Cong; born in N.Y. 

BARTZ JOHN, Geneseo; laborer for Kendall & Kidder; Rep; Lruth; from Germany. 

BARGSTROM JOHN, P.O. Geneseo; farm hand with G. W. West; from Sweden. 

BATES J. W. Geneseo; laborer; Rep. 

BATES JOHN L. Geneseo; laborer. 

BAUER JACOB, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; German. 

BAUERMEISTER AUGUST, Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Germany. 

BAUMGAERTNER JOSEPH, Geneseo; carpenter; Rep; Meth; from Germany. 

BAXTER JOHN, Geneseo: retired; Rep; Meth; from Mass. 

BAYE GEORGE, Sec. 5; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Mich; 103 acres. 

BECK ANTHON, Geneseo; tailor with P. Schabelle; Rep; from Germany. 

BECK WM. Geneseo; shoemaker; Rep; Meth; from Sweden. 

BECKER NICHOLAS, Sec. 8; P.O. Geneseo; maltster for G. Geiser; born in France. 

BECKSTINE JOHN, Geneseo; molder; Rep; Luth; born Germany. 

BECKER FRED. Geneseo; baker; German. 

BEHMAN JOSEPH, Geneseo; laborer. 

BEINGENHEIMER ADAM, Geneseo; saloonkeeper; Dem. 

BELKNAP W. L. Geneseo; laborer. 

BELLENGER J. H. Geneseo; feed stable; Dem; from N. Y. 

BELLINGER JOHN H. Geneseo; livery and feed stable; Dem; born in Henry Co. 

BENDER CHRISTIAN, Geneseo; cabinet maker; Dem; Prot; from Germany. 

BENDER OTTO, Geneseo; laborer; German. 

BENEDICT THOS. N. Rev. Geneseo; Epis; from N. Y. 

BENNETT WM. G. Geneseo; laborer for McBroom & Wilson ; Rep; Prot; from Maine. 

BENNETT J. M. Geneseo; drayman; Rep; Meth. 

BENSINGER JOHN, P.O. Geneseo; with Moses Bensinger; from Ohio. 

BENSINGER MOSES, Sec. 3; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Evang; from Pa. 

BENSON NILS, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Luth; from Sweden; 40 acres. 

BERNER FERDINAND, Geneseo; boot and shoe merch't; Luth; German. 

BERGLAND JOHN, Geneseo; laborer. 

BEVERIDGE ANN Mrs. Geneseo; Rep; Cong; born in Scotland. 

BILLINGS HENRY, Sec. 28; P.O. Geneseo; laborer for E. A. Hunn; Dem; born in 111. 

BILLS L. Geneseo; retired farmer; Dem; Meth; from Vt. 

BILLS K. J. Geneseo; sewing mach. ag't; Dem; Meth. 

BITNER JAMES, Geneseo; laborer. 

BLACKISTONE WM. P. Geneseo; stockbreeder; Rep; Quaker; from Ohio. 

BLISS H. F. Farmer, Sec 31, P.O. Geneseo; born in New York, Oct. 13, 1809; came to 
this county in 1853; Rep; Meth; owns 120 acres of land, valued at $4,800; was Justice of 
Peace for two years; wife was Amy C. Briggs, born in Oneida Co. N. Y., March 5, 1810; 
married Nov. 18, 1830; four children, three boys and one girl, all now living. 

BLISS L. Geneseo; molder; Rep; born in 111. 

BLISS THOS. G. Geneseo; bridge builder; Rep; from Mass. 

BODA JOHN, Geneseo; teamster; Dem; Meth; from Ohio. 

BOICE R. D. Geneseo; hardware; Rep; from Pa. 

BOIS JOHN, Geneseo; carpenter; Rep; Prot; from Ohio. 

BOILE THOS. H. P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from Ireland. , 

BOLEEN JOHN, Geneseo; tailor; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

BOLEEN YOUNG, Geneseo, tailor; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 



HENRY COUNTY : GENESEO TOWNSHIP. 189 

BOLLEN F. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born in Henry Co. 

BOONE Miss, Geneseo; Epis; from Pa. 

BOWERS JACOB, Geneseo; cook; Dem; Prot; from Germany. 

BOYCE JOHN H. Geneseo; carpenter; Rep; from N. Y. 

BOYLE THOMAS H., P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland; 145 ac. $8,700. 

BRACKEN JAMES, Geneseo; painter; Rep; from Pa. 

BRADLEY JAMES, Geneseo; clerk; Dem; Cath; born Ireland. 

BRADLEY M. Geneseo; groceries; Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 

BRAWLEY W. H. retired farmer; Rep; from Ohio. 

BRAY JAS. Geneseo; laborer; Dem; Cath; born Ireland. 

BRAY THOS. Geneseo; salesman; Dem; Meth; from Ky. 

BRAY STEPHEN, Geneseo; laborer. 

BRADY SAMUEL, Geneseo; boarding-house; Rep; Bapt. 

BRAINARD W. G. Geneseo; windmill dealer; Rep; Unit. 

BREED GEORGE H. Sec. 29; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Cong; born in N. H.; 60 acres. 

BRENIZER CHARLES, Geneseo; laborer Kendall & Kidder; Rep; Prot; born in III. 

BRENIZER D. E. Geneseo; harness-maker; Rep; Prot; born 111. 

BRENIZER SAM'L. Geneseo; miller; Rep; Prot; from Pa. 

BRITTON OSCAR, Geneseo; teamster; Rep; from N.Y. 

BRIX D. Geneseo; bot. physician; Dem; Cath; from Italy. 

BROGLE THEODORE, Sec. 28; P.O. Geneseo; laborer for G. Geiser; born in Germany. 

BROPHY THOMAS, Geneseo; blacksmith; Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 

BROUGHAMER JACOB, Sec. 28; P.O. Geneseo; laborer for G. Geiser; born in Germany. 

BROUGHTON WILBER F. Geneseo; agriculture dealer; Rep; from Ohio. 

BROWN BELA, Geneseo; retired; Rep; Cong; from Vermont. 

BROWN FKEDERICK P. Retired Farmer, Geneseo; born in Onondaga Co. N.Y. 
Aug. 14, 1821; came to this county in 1852; Ind. Dem; owns 250 acres of land and house 
and lot, valued at $17,000; has been Mayor of the city two years; was Supervisor one year; 
was President for four years of the first Agricultural Society formed in the county; wife was 
Harriet M. Bennett, born in Onondaga Co. N.Y. Jan. 26, 1821; married Jan. 23, 1844; has 
six children. 

BROWN GEORGE A. Geneseo; hardware; Rep; from N.Y.; came to county 1854. 

BROWN R. Geneseo; carpenter; Rep; Meth; from N.Y. 

BROWN S. M. Sec. 22; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Ind; from N.Y.; 160 acres, $io,Goo. 

BROWN W. C. Geneseo; physician and surgeon; Rep; Cong; born Michigan. 

BROWN DANIEL, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Unit. 

BRUSH J. B. Geneseo; retired; Rep; born in N.Y. 

BRYAN JOHN M. Geneseo; laborer; Dem. 

BUBECK WM. L. Geneseo; boot and shoe store; Rep; Evang; from Germany. 

BUCHANAN J. M. Geneseo. 

BUCHY CHARLES, Geneseo; butcher; Dem; born in Germany. 

BUCKLES A. M. Mrs. Geneseo; widow of late J. S. Buckles; from N.Y. 

BUELL CHRISTIAN, Geneseo; manufacturer of cigars; Rep; Evang; from Germany. 

BURGEMAN JONAS, Sec. ii; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Sweden. 

BURGERT P. Geneseo; tailor; Dem; Cath; from Germany. 

BURGESON ANNA M. Mrs. Sec. 11 ; P.O. Geneseo; Luth; from Sweden; 40 acres. 

BURGSTON JOSEPH, Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

BURKE ADOLPH, Sec. 34; P.O. Geneseo; farmer, for E. Farwell; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

BURKLUND OTTO, Geneseo; clerk; Rep; born 111. 

BURLINGAME THOMAS J. Geneseo; veterinary surgeon; Dem; from R. I. 

BURNETT ISAAC, Geneseo; roadmaster C. R. I. &. P. R.R.; Dem; val. prop. $2,000. 

BUSHNELL CHARLES, Geneseo; laborer. 

BUTTERBROD JOHN, Geneseo; baker; Rep; Cath; from Germany. 



c 



AHILL DENNIS, Geneseo; railroad laborer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 
CANN JOHN, Geneseo; butcher; Dem; from England. 



190 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

CANN THOMAS, Geneseo; butcher; Dem; from Pa. 

CADY A. B. Farmer, Sec. 28; P.O. Geneseo; born in Henry Co. 111. July 8, 1845; Rep-^ 
Cong; owns 80 acres of land, valued at $4,500; wife was Ella J. French, born in Michigan, 
Oct. 14, 1851; married Oct. 30, 1871; two children, Guy M., born April 24, 1873; Walter F. 
born Jan. g, 1875. 

CADY HIKAM J. Farmer, Sec. 15; P.O. Geneseo; born in Genesee Co. N.Y. Nov. 15, 
1814; came to this county in 1837; Rep; Cong; owns 246 acres of land, valued at $20,000; 
wife was Mary E. Bartlett, born in Genesee Co. N.Y. March 8, 1824; married Oct. 19, 1841; 
has three children, Allen B., Carl M. and Nellie C. 

CAMERON CHARLES, Geneseo; railroad agent; Epis; from Scotland. 

CAMPBELL L. C. Geneseo; Justice of the Peace and Notary Public; born Malone, N.Y. " 
Oct. 16, 1816; came to county i860; Rep; married Sarah L. Wright, June 20, 1841; she was 
born in Ogdensburgh, N.Y. 1819; has two sons, Leonard W., who is general agent of Chi- 
cago, Michigan & Lake Shore R.R. and James C; one daughter, Fannie P.; has been Justice 
of the Peace ten years; Police Magistrate four years. 

CAXFIELD H. R. Geneseo; Dry Goods, Boots, Shoes and Carpets; born in Jackson Co. 
Iowa, Jan. 26, 1847; came to county 1875; Rep; Meth; wife was Mary Day, of same countyi 
born Aug. II, 1853; married July 23, 1873; has one child. May Inez; is a member of the 
firm of Chamberlain & Canfield, the largest dry goods store in the city; has a branch store 
at Tiskihva, 111. 

CARL H. M. Geneseo; harness-maker; Rep;'',from Germany. 

CARLSON CHAS. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

CARLSON OLAF, Sec. 23; P.O. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

CARMAN JEREMIAH, Sec. 24; P.O. Geneseo; farmer, on R. Garnett's farm; Rep; from N.Y 

CARPENTER L. N. B. Geneseo; retired farmer; Rep; born Vt. 

CARSE ADAM, Geneseo; teamster; Dem; Prot; from Ohio. 

CASH G. W. Geneseo; salesman; Rep; Prot; from Indiana. 

CASS LEWIS J. Geneseo; laborer; Dem; from Ohio. 

CASTELO MICPIAEL, Sec. 35; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland; 80 acres. 

CEDERLOF FRANZ, Geneseo; tailor; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

CHAMBERLIN B. H. Geneseo; dry goods merchant; Rep; Bapt; born III. 

CHAMBERLIN H. C. Mrs. Geneseo; born in Vt. 

CHAMBERLAIN NATHAjV V. Marble Finisher, Geneseo; born in Middletown, 
Logan Co. 111. Dec. 9, 1851; came to this county in 1866; Dem; Prot; wife was Miss Jennie 
Marlett; married Sept. 3, 1874; she was born Jan. 27, 1849; has one child, Allen D. 

CHAMBERLAIN SAMUEL, Stock Dealer, Geneseo; born in Worcester Co. Mass. 
April i6, 1820; came to Co. in 1S55; Rep; wife was Delliza Reynolds, born in same county, 
March 13, 1824; married Nov. 7, 1843; has one child, Dulcenia. Mr. Chamberlain is owner 
of the celebrated stallions Bashaw Drury, Estraba, and Scotch Giant. Bashaw Drury has 
made one-half mile in I;i2. 

CHAMBERLIN FRANKLIN, Geneseo; retired; Rep. 

CHERRY ANDREW, Geneseo; laborer; Dem; from Ohio. 

CHERRY JAS. Sec. 34, P.O. Geneseo; laborer for W. C. Rout; Rep; born in Pa. 

CHERRY SARAH Mrs. Geneseo; from Ohio; owns house and lot. 

CHERRY FRANK, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep. 

CHERRY JOHN, Geneseo. 

CHURCHILL JOHN, Sec. 25; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep, Prot; from Maine; 80 ac. $5,00Oi 

CLARK FRANK, P.O. Geneseo; farmer for J. Johnson; Bapt; born Pa. 

CLARK N. T. Geneseo; stonecutter; from N.Y. 

CLARY GARRETT, Geneseo; railroad watchman; Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 

CLASPILL JOHN W. Geneseo; porter to Geneseo House; Rep; from Ind. 

CLAYPOOL R. A. Geneseo; cooper; Dem; Meth; from Ind. 

CLEMENT JAS. Geneseo; blacksmith; Rep; fromN.H. 

CLIFFTON JOS. Geneseo; railroad carpenter; Rep; Prot; born in 111. 

CLOUSE GEO. N. Geneseo; clerk with J. Moderwell; Rep; from Ohio. 

CLOUSE ESLEY H. Geneseo; clerk with P. Taylor; Rep; born Bureau Co. 

CLOUSE SARAH Mrs. widow, Geneseo; Evang; from Pa. ' 

CLOUGH VICTOR W. Sec. 19, P.O. Geneseo; farmer with H. V. Clough; Rep; born in Vt. 



HENRY COUNTY: GENESEO TOWNSHIP. 191 

€LOUGH HAKVEY V". Farmer, Sec. 19, P.O. Geneseo; born in Bangor, N. Y. March 
20, 1S32; came to this county in 1857; Rep; owns 320 acres of land, valued at $24,000; wife 
was Sophia L, Hines, born in Brattleboro, Vt. July 20, 1839; married Jan. 26, 1855; seven 
boys, four now living : Victor W., born Jan. 20, 1856; Henry C. born May 23, 1S58; Frank, 
born Aug. ig, 1861; Llewellyn, born Feb. 22, 1874. 

COE A. T. Sec. 28, P.O. Geneseo; farmer for G. L. Coe; Rep; born Ohio. 

COE G. L. Sec. 28, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Cong; bornN.Y.; 80 acres. 

COLE CLINTON R. Geneseo; laborer with J. Goss; Rep; Unit; from Mass. 

COLE SETH, Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from Mass. 

COLE W. W. Geneseo; lawyer; Rep; Cong; born in 111. 

COLLINS JOHN, Sec, 26, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Cath; born Ireland; 80 ac. $4,000. 

COLLINS J. S. Sec. 23, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland; 160 ac. val. $8,000. 

COLLINS M. Geneseo; laborer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 

COLSON C. J. Geneseo; carpenter; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

COMBS JOHN L.Sec. 29, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Bapt; born in N.H.; 20 ac. val. $1,500. 

COOK J. T. Geneseo; homoeopathic physician; Rep; Cong; born Ohio. 

COOK W. P. Geneseo; express agent, also bookstore; Rep; N.Y. 

COOPER J. H. Geneseo; book store; Rep; from Vt. 

COOPER ARTHUR, Geneseo; painter; Rep. 

COOPER GEO. M. Geneseo; bookstore; Rep. 

COUGHLIN PAT. Geneseo; laborer; Dem; Cath; born Ireland. 

COUGHLIN PAT. Geneseo; laborer; Dem. 

■COX JOHN, Geneseo; painter; Rep; from N.Y. 

CRAGIN E. Geneseo; crockery, glass and silverwai-e; Rep; from N.H. 

CRAGIN E. A. Geneseo; dealer in crockery and glassware; Rep; from Mass. 

GRAIN GEO. Sec. 19, P.O. Geneseo; farmer for II. H. Grain; Dem; born in Conn. 

CRANE HARVEY, Geneseo; retired farmer; Dem; born in Conn. 

CRAWFORD HUGH, Geneseo; clerk; Rep; from Scotland. 

CRAWFORD JAS. Geneseo; engineer for Ott Bros.; Rep; Pres; from Scotland. 

CRAWFORD CYRUS, Geneseo; hostler; Dem. 

CRONK EDGAR, Geneseo; harness-maker; Rep; from N.Y. 

CRONIN HUGH, P.O. Geneseo; laborer for T. H. Boyle; Dem; Cath; from Pa. 

CROSS Mrs. Geneseo; Dem; born Ireland. 

CROUCH ROYAL G. Geneseo; mason; Rep; from Vt. 

CROGIN LEONARD, Geneseo; clerk; Rep. 

CRUM WAIT, Sec. 6; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from N. Y. 

CURLEY JOHN, Geneseo; laborer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 

CUSHLER CHARLES, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; German. 

Tn\AILY CHAS. Geneseo; laborer; Dem; from Vt. 

-"-^ DAILY WILLIAM, Geneseo; coal miner; Dem; born 111. 

DAILY CHARLES, Geneseo. 

DAINELSO GUSTOFF, Geneseo; laborer; Rep. 

DAHLQUIST JOHN, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Swede. 

DANFORD WILLIAM, Geneseo; retired; Rep; Pre.s; born Ireland. 

DANNENFELSER F. Geneseo; teamster; Rep; Prot; born 111. 

DANIELSON AUGUSTUS, Geneseo; laborer. 

DANNEFELSER FRED. Geneseo; retired; Rep; German. 

DASHEM JOHN, Sec. 2; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Pa; 130 acres. 

DAVIS CHARLES E. farm hand, with C. B. Smith; Dem; from Md. 

DAVIS HELEN M. wid; Sec. 26; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Cong; born Ohio; 127 acres. 

DAVIS H. H. Farmer and Soap Manufacturer; Sec. 22; P.O. Geneseo; born in Windham 

Co. Vt. Oct 5, 1S22; came to this Co. in 1853; I'ld; owns 80 acres, valued at $6,500. 
DAVIS H. M. Geneseo; painter; Rep; born 111. 
DAVIS JOHN, Sec. 19; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Meth; 40 acres. 



192 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

DAVIS IRA M. Farmer; Sec. 26; P.O. Geneseo; born in Fairfield, Me. June 3, 1804; came 
to this county in 1856; Rep; Christian; owns 40 acres, valued at $2,000; wife was Anna 
Allen, born in Fairfield, Me. July 21, 1804; five children, only one now living. 

DAVIS N. D. Sec. ig; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born in New York; 50 acres. 

DAVIS NOAH D. Geneseo; Photographer; Rep; Lib; from N. Y. 

DAVIS PAUL, Geneseo; retired; Rep; Spiritualist; from Vt. 

DAVIS WARD, Geneseo; retired farmer; Rep; Cong; from Mass. 

DAVIS & HAYWOOD, Geneseo; soap manufacturers. 

DAVIS A. L. Geneseo. 

DAVISON HORATIO, Sec. 31; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Cong; born N.Y.; 40 acres. 

DAVISON LARENZO, Sec. 32; P.O. Geneseo; Cong; born Vt; 80 acres. 

DAVISON THEODORE, Sec 32; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Cong; born Iowa. 

DAYS JAMES, Sec. 31; P.O. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; born Ohio. 

DEATS JOHN, Geneseo; laborer in Powell's lumber yard; Rep; Meth; from Germany. 

DEBREY JOHN A. Geneseo; butcher; Ind; Cath; from N. Y. 

DEDKICK JOHN, Geneseo; Merchant; born in Sweden, Dec. 4, 1837; came to Co. 1858; 
Rep; Unitarian; wife was F. M. Wilse, born in N. Y., Otsego Co. June 6, 1847; married 
June 13, 1870; has two boys and one girl; was in army three years; is a member of the firm 
of Dedrick & Lawrence. 

DEGRAFF H. Geneseo; carpenter; Rep; Pres. pref; from N. Y. 

DEGRAFF HENRY M. Geneseo; carpenter; Rep; from N. Y. 

DEITZ JOHN, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Meth; from Germany. 

DELANDER JOHN, Sec. 11; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden; 5 acres. 

DEMARANVILLE DANIEL, P.O. Geneseo; farm hand with J. Anderson; Rep. 

DEMING C. R. Geneseo; retired merchant; Ind; from Mass. 

DEMING HOWARD A. Sec. i; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Ohio; 160 acres. 

DEMING RICHARD M. Sec. 12; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Ohio; 40 acres. 

DENNIS JOHN, Geneseo. 

DENSMORE CHAS. W. Geneseo; engineer for Kendall & Kidder; Rep; Prot; from Me. 

DeRUE ED. Geneseo; saloon; Dem; Belgian. 

DEWEY HENRY F. Sec. 3; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Mass; 120 acres. 

DICKENS W. T. Geneseo; agricultural implements; Dem; from England. 

DIEDRICH: FREDERICK, Sec. 28; P.O. Geneseo; lab. for G. Stilz; Luth; born Germany. 

DOBBS ISAAC, Geneseo; engineer for H. Lawbaugh; Rep; Prot; from England. 

DOBBS JOSEPH, Geneseo; jeweler; Rep; Prot; from England. 

DODGE ALBERT, Geneseo; carpenter; from Mass. 

DODGE A. H., Geneseo; butcher; Dem; Prot; from Mass. 

DODGE CHAS., Geneseo; farmer; Meth; from Germany. 

DODGE HENRY A. Sec. 15; P.O. Geneseo; rents farm of L. Stimson; Ind; born Henry Co. 

DOHRER JOHN, Geneseo; barber; Rep; born 111. 

DOLAN ANNA Mrs. Geneseo; Cath; from Ireland. 

DOLLBURY SWAN, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

DONEFELTS FRED. Geneseo; retired; Evang; Germany. 

DORMAN FRED. Geneseo; butcher; Dem; Luth; from Germany. 

DOXEY NATPIAN, Geneseo; retired saloon keeper; Dem; born N. Y. 

DRAIN G. W. Geneseo; Saloon; born McDonough Co. 111. May 6, 1840; came to county 
i860; Dem; wife was Jessie F. Nye, born Bangor. Me. 1853; married Dec. 25, 1871; has two 
children; Mr. Drain is a member of the firm of Seibel & Co.; who are proprietors of the 
most elegantly furnished and costly rooms in the county. 

DRESSER J. F., Geneseo; book-keeper in First National Bank; Rep; from N. Y. 

DRUMM PETER J. Farmer, Sec. 9; P.O. Geneseo; born in Milwaukee, Wis. Dec. 3, 
1850; lived in South Bend, Ind. six years; in Plymouth, Ind. three years; in Story Co. Iowa, 
one year, and came to this county in'i86S; Dem; wife was Nancy Smith, born in Alleghany 
Co. Md. Feb. 2, 1852; married March 21, 1872; has three children. 

DUNCAN JAMES, Geneseo; soap maker; Rep; Meth; from Pa. 

DUNHAM CHAS. Sr., Geneseo; retired; Dem; born Mass. 




^^^KT^C^^C^^L*:^.,^,^ 



Geneseo. 



HENRY COTJNTY : GENESEO TOWNSHIP. 195 

DUNHAM CHARLES, Geneseo; Attorney at Law; born Berkshire Co. Mass. Jan. 24, 
1840; came to county in 1853; Dem; wife was Carrie L. Loring, born in Me. 1840; married 
April 9, 1S62; has one child, Edith; was admitted to the bar in 1862; read law and was ad- 
mitted to bar in this county. 

DUNHAM JOSEPH L. Geneseo; lawyer; Dem. 

DUNGEE FRANCIS, Geneseo. 

DUPUE HENRY F. Geneseo; laborer; Dem; German. 

T^ARL MORTIMER, Geneseo; auctioneer; Dem; from N. Y. 

^ EARNEST GEORGE, Sec 33; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Luth; born in Germany; 80 acres. 

EARL FRANK, Geneseo; clerk; Dem. 

EASTMAN SAMUEL W. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; 

ECHART THOS., Geneseo; laborer; Dem. 

ECKART THOMAS, Geneseo; Dem; from Germany. 

ECKERT WM. S. Geneseo; laborer; Dem; from Pa. 

ECKERT HENRY, Geneseo; laborer; Dem; German. 

EDBERG JOHN, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; from Sweden. 

EDGCOMB FRANK D. Sec 33; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Unitarian; Maine; 160 acres. 

EDIEN HENRY, P.O. Geneseo; farm hand with J. H. Smith; Dem; Luth; from Germany. 

EDWARDS BENJAMIN, Sec. 28; P.O. Geneseo; Rep; from Mass. 

EICKHOM AUGUST, Geneseo; tinsmith; Dem; Luth; from Germany. 

EMERY ARTEMUS, Geneseo; retired farmer; Rep; from Maine. 

EMERY F. D. Mrs. & CO. Geneseo; milliners. 

ENGDAHL JOHX, Geneseo; Merchant Tailor; born in Sweden, Nov. 27, 1834; came to 
county 1864; Rep; Luth; wife Anna' Anderson, born in Sweden, Oct. 20, 1844; married 
Aug. 24, 1864; has four children living: Emma H., Allmena, Martin N., Victoria E. 

ENTRIKIN J. C. Geneseo; stock dealer; Dem; from Pa. 

ERDMANN EMIL, Sec. 12; P.O. Geneseo; rents farm of M. Stewart; Meth; from Germany^ 

ERDMAN FREDERICK, Sec. 33; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Ind; Luth; from Germany. 

ERICKSON JOHN, Sec. 10; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; from Sweden; 40 acres. 

ERICKSON CHARLES, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Swede. 

ERICKSON AUGUST C. Geneseo; Rep; Swede. 

ERNST GEORGE, Geneseo; blacksmith; Dem; from Germany. 

ERNKE GUS. Geneseo; teamster; Luth; from Germany. 

ERTMAN FRED, Geneseo; bakery; Dem; born Germany. 

ERTZ JACOB, Geneseo; blacksmith; Dem; born Germany. 

ESBECK J. N. Geneseo. 

EWING R. S. Geneseo; portrait artist; Lib. Rep; from Ohio. 

"PARBER PAUL, Geneseo; liveryman; Rep; from N. J. 
^ FARBER WM. Sec. 6; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep. 
FARMERS' NATIONAL BANK, of Geneseo; organized in 1876; cash capital 

$50,000; surplus $2,000; Levi Waterman, President; E. C. Gilbert, Vice President; Jno. P. 

Stewart, Cashier; Directors: L. Waterman, E. C. Gilbert, Chas. Dunham, R. F. Steele, N. 

C. Howard, E. P. Van Valkengburg, R. Harrington, P. S. Schnabele, Thomas Nowers, Jr. 
FARRELL FRANK, Geneseo; painter; Dem; from Ohio. 
FARRELL RALPH, Geneseo; painter; Dem; born 111. 
FARRELL RALF D. Geneseo; painter; Dem; from Ohio. 
FAR WELL EDWIN, Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Bapt; from Mich. 
FAY OSMER W., Geneseo; pastor Congregational Church; Rep; born in N. H. 
FAY MOSES, Geneseo. 
FAY A. G. Geneseo; druggist; Dem. 
FEHLMAN GEO. Geneseo; shoemaker; Rep; German. 

FELGER I. S. Geneseo; dry goods, etc; Neutral; Meth; from Ohio. ^ 

FELSKI WM. Geneseo; laborer; Luth; from Germany. 
FERRIS CHARLES, Geneseo. 
16 



196 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

FIELD JAMES, Geneseo; engineer Kendall & Kidder; Rep; Prot. 

FIKST NATIONAL, BANK, of Geneseo; James McBroom, President; S. T. Hume: 
Vice-President; Hiram Wilson, Cashier; C. M. Morton, Assistant Cashier; Directors, 
George Wells, W. Sanford, George Wilson, Hiram Wilson, S. T. Hume, James McBroom, 
Henry Nourse; bank was organized in 1864; cash capital $100,000; present surplus $50,000. 

FISCHER AUGUST, Geneseo; blacksmith; Rep; from Germany. 

FISCHER JOHN, Geneseo; school teacher; Rep; from Germany. 

FISCHER CHARLES, Geneseo; furniture; Rep; German. 

FISHER CHARLES E. Geneseo; druggist; Rep; Bapt; from Mass. 

FISHEK H. V. Hardware; Geneseo; born at Wilkesbarre, Pa; came to this county in 
i86g; Rep; Prot; established the Henry County News at Geneseo, in 1874; member of 
the Common Council of the City of Geneseo during 1875 and 1876. 

FISHER S. A. Geneseo; hardware, with brother, H. V. Fisher; Ind; Prot; Wilkesbarre, Pa. 

FISHER W. G. Farmer, Sec. 25, P.O. Geneseo; born in Pa; came to this county in 1859; 
Ind; owns 80 acres; wife was Pallas Chambers, born in Indiana. 

FISHER WM. L. Geneseo; hardware; Dam; from Pa. 

FISK ORSON, Sec. 3; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from N. Y. 

FOGG C. W. Geneseo; coal dealer; Dem; from Maine. 

FONES DEWEY, Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Prot; from N. Y. 

FONES EDWARD, Geneseo; teamster; Dem; from N. Y. 

FONES JAMES, Geneseo; teamster; Dem; Prot; from N. Y. 

FONES JOHN, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Prot; from N. Y. 

FONES M. Geneseo; laborer; Dem; Prot; from N. Y. 

FONES FRANK, Geneseo; street commissioner; Rep. 

FORD HORACE C, P.O. Geneseo; with J. D. Ford; Rep; Meth; from Vt. 

FORD H. S. Geneseo; retired farmer; Rep; Cong; from Vt. 

FORD JULIUS D. Sec. 23; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Cong; from Vt; half of 260 acres. 

FORD J. D. P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep. 

FRANK JACOB, Geneseo; harness-maker; Ind; Luth; from Germany. 

FREDERICK A. A. Geneseo; laborer; Rep. 

FREEMAN J. A. P.O. Geneseo; stock raiser; Dem. 

FREEMAN JOHN, Geneseo; laborer; Dem; 

FREEMAN DWIGHT, Sec. 17; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Mass; 40 acres. 

FREEMAN PLINY, Geneseo; retired; Rep; Epis; born Mass. 

FRENCH GEORGE O. Sec. 27; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born in Mich; 112 acres. 

FRENCH LYDIA J. Mrs. widow; Geneseo; Quaker; from Pa; owns house and lot. 

FRENCH O. B. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sees. 27 and 36; P.O. Geneseo; Rep; Cong; 
born in Coventry, Tolland Co, Conn. April 27, 1811; came here in 1853; owns 90 acres, 
valued at $6,000; wife was Jane K. French, born in Meredith, Delaware Co. N. Y., Aug. 12, 
1816; married Oct. 30, l%^y. have had four children; those living are Sarah E., Geo. O. and 
Ella J.; John died. 

FREY JACOB P. Sec. 15; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Evang; from Germany; 10 acres. 

FREY LOUIS, Geneseo; rescaurant; Rep; Evang; from Germany. 

FRICK A. C. Geneseo; minister; Rep; Meth; born in 111. 

FRITZ AUG. Geneseo; Luth; from Germany. 

FRY PETER, Geneseo; saloon; Dem; Prot; from Germany. 

FULLERTON JOHN, Geneseo; Pres; from Ireland. 

FULTON FRANK, Geneseo; physician; Rep; from N. Y. 

FUNK C. Geneseo. 

/^AINES NELSON, Geneseo; retired merchant; Rep; Cong; from Mass. 
^-^ GALLIGAN J. Col. Geneseo; supt. of stock yards; Rep; from N. Y, 
GARNETT ROBT. Geneseo; retired farmer; Dem; Prot; from Pa. 
GARVEY M. Geneseo; laborer stock yards; Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 
GASTENER DAVID, Geneseo; laborer R. R.; Luth; from Germany. 
GEE P. E. P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep. 



HENRY COIJNTY: GENESEO TOWNSHIP. 197 

GEE BENJ. Geneseo; retired fanner; Rep; Meth; from N. Y. 

GEISER GEORGE, Sec. 28; P.O. Geneseo; brewer; Dem; born in Germany; 10 acres. 

GEORGE V. K. Geneseo; plow mnfg; Rep; Meth; from Pa. 

GERSTNER F. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Evang; from Germany. 

GERSTNER MICHAEL. Geneseo; laborer; Meth; from]Germany. 

GETTY A. M. Mrs. Geneseo; Cong; from Pa. 

GIBBS HENRY R. Geneseo; horse trainer; Rep. 

GIBBS Mrs. Geneseo; born N. Y. 

GIBSON JOSEPH, Geneseo; lightning rods; Rep; Prot; from N. Y. 

GIBSON HOWARD, Geneseo; conductor R.R.; Rep. 

GIERHART ALLEN, Geneseo. 

GIFFIN C. E. Geneseo; harness workman; Ind; from N. Y. 

GrlLBERT E. C. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 31; P.O. Geneseo; born in Ontario Cct 

N. v., Jan. 27, 1836, came to this county in 1857; Rep; Christian; owns 240 acres of land; 

wife was Florinda H. Beach, born in Ontario Co. N. Y. July 22, 1838; married Feb. 23, ^857; 

four children, all now living. 
GILVTAN DANIEL B. Geneseo; Rep; from Mass. >, 

GILROY PAT. Geneseo; laborer Dem. 

GLADMAN JOHN, Sec. 16; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Germany. 
GLADMAN JOSEPH, Geneseo; carpenter; Rep; Prot; from Ohio. 
GLAWE JOHN, Geneseo; R. R. laborer; Luth; from Germany. 
GLAWE WM. Geneseo; R. R. laborer; Dem; Luth; from Germany. 
GLEASON J. Geneseo; teamster; Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 
GLOVE WILLIAM, Geneseo. 
GODFREY OEO. F. Mason, Geneseo; born in Amherst, Mass. Oct. 25, 1S29; came to 

this town and county in 1854; Rep; Cong; owns residence, value $1,500; married Miss Emily 

Squires, at Brooklyn, N. Y., May 14, 1854; she was born in Belchertown, Mass. Nov. 9, 1832; 

have one son, Eddie F., born in this town Oct. 6, 185S. 
GODFREY WM. Geneseo; butcher; born Kent, England, Feb. 11, 1842; came to county 

1854; Rep; wife was Mira T. Goodman, born Pa., Feb. 8, 1847; married Sept. 10, 1868; has 

three children living; Mr. Godfrey was Lieut. 65th Reg. of I. V. I.; was transferred from the 

ii2th. 
GODFREY WM. B. Geneseo; retired; Rep; Pres; from Mass. 
GOEMBEL JACOB, Geneseo; retired farmer; Rep; Evang; from Germany. 
GOEMBEL HENRY, Sec. 15; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Kep; from Germany; 40 acres. 
GOEMBEL PETER O. Geneseo; carpenter; Rep; Prot; born in 111. 
GOEMBEL W. S. Geneseo: merchant; Rep; Prot; from 111. 
GOODELL LESTER, Geneseo; mason; Rep; Prot; from N. Y. 
GOODMAN J. S. Sec. 11, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Pa; 40 acres. 
GOODMAN DANIEL, Geneseo. 
GORETH SEBASTIAN. P.O. Geneseo; farm liand. 
GOSHORN G. W. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Pres; from Pa. 
GOSS CHARLES, Geneseo; Rep; from Mass. 
GOSS JOHN, Geneseo; lumber dealer; Rep; Unit; from Mass. 
GOSS JOHN W. Geneseo; clerk with J. Goss: Rep; Bapt; from Ky. 
GRANT J. D. Geneseo; Agricultural Implements; born Jefferson Co. N. Y. March 18, 

1827; came to Henry Co. 1857; Rep; Meth. Epis; wife was A. A. Carpenter, of same county, 

born May 31, 1833; married Jan. 29, 1851; has two children, J. DeLoss, Lisbia A.; Mr. 

Grant spent ten years farming in Edford; was their Collector for three years; was elected 

Mayor of Geneseo in 1S70, and served one year. 
GRANT J. D. Jr. Geneseo; agriculture warehouse; Rep; Meth; from N. Y. 
GRAVES C. S. Geneseo; druggist; Rep; from N.Y. 

GRAVES EMERY C. Geneseo; attorney at law; Rep; Meth; born in N.Y. 
GRAY JOHN, Geneseo; Harness, Saddle and Trunk Store; born in Danville, Pa. June 

4, 1837; came to county 1857; Dem; wife was Allie C, Drake, iiorn Ohio, Jan. 2$, 1852; 

married Oct. 26, 1875. 
GRAY SAMUEL P. Geneseo; night clerk hotel; Dem. 



198 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

GRAY WILLIAM B. Geneseo. 

GREENE A. H. Geneseo; furniture; Rep; Bapt; from N.Y. 

GREEN DANIEL B. Geneseo; blacksmith; Dem; from Conn. 

GREEN E. D. Geneseo; saloon; Dem; Cath; from Belgium. 

GREEN GEO., P.O. Geneseo; farm hand with J. Anderson; Ind. 

GREEN THOS. Geneseo; street commissioner; Rep; Cong, pref; from N.Y. 

GREEN WM. Geneseo; cooper; Rep; Prot; from Indiana. 

GREEN DANIEL B. Sen. Geneseo; retired; Rep. 

GREEN JAMES H. Geneseo." 

GREENE JOSEPH IS". Geneseo; Photographer; born Jefferson Co. Pa. March 6, 1826; 

came to county 1864; Dem; Cath; owns residence; wife was Susan E. Brown, of Scott Co. 

Iowa; married Nov. 23, 1862; has five children living. 
'GREENE M. A. Geneseo; furniture dealer; Rep; Bapt; born in 111. 
GREENE JOHN T. Geneseo. 

GRESSER F. E. Geneseo; retired farmer; Re;p; Piot; from Germany. 
GRESSER JOHN, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; born in Germany. 
GRIFFIN G. W. Geneseo. 

GRITEMANN JOHN, Geneseo; railroad shops; Luth; from Germany. 
GROSS FRANK, Geneseo; butcher. 
GRUBB JOHN, Geneseo; laborer; German. 
GUILD HENRY, Geneseo; retired farmer; Rep; Prot; from N.Y. 

TTALL E. Geneseo; clerk; Dem; from Mo. 

HALL J. G. Geneseo; hardware merchant; Rep; from S. C. 

HALL W. H. Geneseo; hardware merchant; Rep; born in 111. 

HALLSTEN JOHN, Geneseo; carpenter; Luth; from Sweden. 

HAMILTON T. F. Geneseo; foundry; Dem; Epis; born N.Y. 

HAMILTON CHARLES, Geneseo; student; Rep. 

HAMMOND JOSEPH, Geneseo; gunsmith; Rep; Unitarian; born Vt. 

HAMMOND FRANK, Geneseo. 

HAMMOND PETER, Geneseo; retired; born in Newton, Mass. April 9, 1776; Rep; 
Meth; he voted for Adams; he is the oldest Mason in the United States. Centennarian. 

HANDSPIKE PETER, Geneseo; cooper; Rep; from Germany. 

HANNA PETER, Geneseo; horse dealer; Dem. 

HANNA J. L. Geneseo; wool carder; Rep; Pres; from Ohio. 

HANNA JOHN R. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; born Henry Co. 

HANNAN MATTHEW, Sec. 25; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from Ireland. 

HANNAN PATRICK, Sec. 25; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; born in Ireland; 160 acres. 

HANNAN THOMAS, Sec. 25; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from Ireland; 160 acres. 

HANSON A. E. Geneseo; shoemaker; Rep; from Sweden. 

HANSON E. Geneseo; shoemaker; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

HARBAUGH FRANK, Geneseo; tinner; Rep; Prot; born in 111. 

HARBAUGH JOHN R. Geneseo; retired farmer; Rep; Meth; from Pa; 240 acres. 

HARBAUGH WM. Geneseo; merchant; Rep; Meth; from Ohio. 

HARDING F. Geneseo; molder. 

HARKER JOHN E. Geneseo; painter; Rep; Prot; from N.Y. 

HARKER THOS. R. Geneseo; book store; Rep; Unit; from N. J. 

HARMAN T. T., P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem. 

HARMS HENRY, Sec. 23; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Luth; from Germany; 80 acres. 

HARPER DAVID, Sec. 7; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; from England; 240 acres. 

HARPER JOSHUA, Geneseo; Farmer; born in Fairfax Co. Va. April 24, 1796; came to 
this county 1836; Dem; Cong; wife was Sarah M. Thomas, of Maine, born Aug. 9, 1807; 
married Oct. 15, 1838; Mr. Harper was the first Recorder and Probate Judge of Henry Co; 
was the first Representative of the county, served two terms; was a member of the Constitu- 
tional Convention in 1848, 



HENRY COUNTY: GENESEO TOWNSHIP. 199 

HARPER O. M. Geneseo; Rep; 

HARRINGTON E. W. Geneseo; carpenter; Prot; from Canada East. 

HARRINGTON F. R. Geneseo; billiard-hall; Rep;' born N.Y. 

HARRINGTON GEO. W. Geneseo; retired; from Mass. 

HARRINGTON J. L. Mrs. widow, Geneseo; Pres; born in 111. 

HARRINGTON M. T. P.O. Geneseo; retired farmer; Rep; Meth. 

HARRINGTOlSr R. Capt. was born in Hogansburg. Franklin Co. N.Y. Feb. i8, 1822; Rep; 
Lib. Mr. Harrington is a self-made man, having to care for himself at the early age of 12, 
besides doing much for the support of his parents. At the age of 16 he entered the regular 
army, in 1S37, and served five years under the command of Gen. Worth in the 8th Regular 
Infantry; was three years in the Florida war in Co. K, 8th U.S.I. He moved permanently 
to Geneseo in 1856; he served as captain of Co. B, gth I.V. Cavalry in the rebellion; he mar- 
ried Feb. 22, 1S45, at Massena, N.Y., Miss Martha Campbell, of Windsor Co. Vt.; she was 
born March 7, 1827; he has buried two children, an only daughter, Clara P., Jan. 8, 1865, 
and oldest son Wm. H., Oct. 31, 1868, who was, at the time of his death, the proprietor of 
the Harrington House, Geneseo; has three living children ; Henry G., Frank R., and Fred 
A'.; he is at present oie of the Directors of the Farmers' National Bank; is also President of 
the Geneseo Temperance Reform Club. By judicious management of himself and wife, he 
has a handsome competency for the remainder of life. His present business is real estate 
dealing and money loaning. The Capt. has one of the finest residences in Henry Co. 

HARRIS JAS. M. Geneseo; engineer railroad grain elevator; Rep; Meth; from Pa. 

HART WARREN, Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Canada. 

HARTLEY J. S. Geneseo; shoemaker; Ind; from Pa. 

HARTING WILLIAM, Geneseo; laborer; Rep. 

HARTSTONE FRED. Geneseo; barber; Dem; Prot; from England. 

HAUSBERGER PETER, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; German. 

HAUCK JACOB, Geneseo; clerk; Prot; from Pa. 

HAWKINS WiM. G. Geneseo; agricultural implements; Rep; from R.I. 

HAYWARD J. L. Geneseo; soap factory; Rep; from Mass. 

HAYES ANDREW, Geneseo; laborer; Rep. 

HEATH EDWARD D. Geneseo. 

HEFFLEFINGER MICHAEL, Sec. 14, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Ohio; 120 acres. 

HEGY F. A. Geneseo; blacksmith; Dem; born Ohio. 

HELLYER IZRI, Sec. 11, P.O. Geneseo; retired; Rep; Chris; from Pa; 80 acres. 

HENANDER ANDREW, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

HENNEY DANIEL, Sec. 16, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Evang; from Ohio; 406 acres. 

HENNEY JOS. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; U. Breth; from Ohio. 

HENRY JOSEPH, Geneseo. 

HENSHAW SAME. Geneseo; butcher; Dem; from N. Y. 

HENSHAW WM. Geneseo; carpenter; Rep; Epis; from N.Y. 

HENSHAW WM. Dr. Geneseo; physician; Dem; from N.Y. 

HERMES JOHN, Geneseo; cooper; Rep; Cath; from Germany. 

HERMAN H. Geneseo; clothier and brewer; Dem; from Germany. 

HERMAN" & WATERMA?^, Clothiers and Brewers, Geneseo; came to Co. in 1857; 
born in Germany. 

HICKOX WILLIAM, Geneseo; clerk; Rep; Bapt. 

HICKOX J. Geneseo; carpenter; Rep; Meth; from Conn. 

HIGGINS NEWMAN L. Geneseo; plasterer; Rep; from Vt. 

HILL E. B. Geneseo; laborer; Ind; born in Pa. 

HILLMER LOUIS, Geneseo; teamster; Dem; Luth; from Germany. 

HILLIER EZRA, Geneseo. 

HINMAN WILLIS, P.O. Geneseo; retired farmer; Rep; Epis. 

HINES WM. Sec. 22, P.O. Geneseo; millwright; Rep. 

HIPPLER CHAS. Geneseo; merchant; Dem; Cath; from Germany. 

HIRSCHFELGER ERNST, Geneseo. 

HITCHCOCK L. Geneseo; hardware; Rep; Meth; from N.Y. 

HOBBS THOMAS, Geneseo; coaaQcted with the Geneseo J?eJ>u5/lcy Rep. 



200 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

HOBBS GrEO. H. Journalist, Geneseo; born in Maine, May 25, 1824; came to this Co. 
in 1857; Rep; Bapt; owns house and lot, value $2,500; married to Miss Emeline W. Lewis, 
Feb. 26, 1852; one child; been editor of the Geneseo Republic continuously since Dec. 1858; 
is Postmaster, and has held the office over nine years. 

HODGKINS LINDLY, Sec. 22, P.O. Geneseo; soap-maker; from N.Y. 

HOEG CHARLFS, Geneseo; laborer. 

HOEFT AUGUST, Geneseo; harness maker; Dem; German. 

HOEFT HENRY, Geneseo; harness-maker; born in Germany. 

HOFFMAN GEO. Geneseo; saloon; Rep; Cath; from Mo. 

HOFFMAN LYDIA Mrs. widow, Geneseo; Evang; born in 111. 

HOF.STETTER MICHAEL, Sec. 19, P.O. Geneseo; laborer for H. V. Clough; born Germany, 

HOKINSON JOHN, Sec. 10, P.O. Geneseo; from Sweden. 

HOLBROOK J. S. Geneseo; carpenter; Rep; born in Maine. 

HOLDEN J. W. Geneseo. 

HOLLIET JOS. Sec. 28, P.O. Geneseo; gardener; Dem; Cath; born in Germany. 

HOLMES N. N. Geneseo; R R. bridge supt; Rep; Prot; from Pa. 

HOLMES P. Geneseo; county surveyor; Rep; Cong; from Conn. 

HOLTON S. S. Geneseo; painter; Rep; Pres; from N.Y. 

HOLTON FRANK, Geneseo; carpenter; Rep. 

HOOD JAS. O. Geneseo; laborer Kendall & Kidder; Rep; Prot; from Mass. 

HOOVER JOHN W. Farmer, Sec. 15, P.O. Geneseo; born in Blair Co. Penn. June I, 
i83i;came to this Co. in 1854; Rep; Meth. Epis; owns 182 acres o' land, valued at $15,000; 
wife was Rebecca Bollinger, born in .Stark Co. Ohio, May 26, 1835; married July 10, 1861; 
has one child, Matilda. 

HOPPIN"S H. I. Homceopathic Physician and Surgeon, Geneseo; born in Livingston Co. 
N.Y. Sept. 21, 1841; came to Co. 1874; Rep; wife was Annie M. Smith, of Poughkeepsie, 
N.Y., born Oct. 3, 1839; married Oct. 3, 1865; has one child, Delia B. Dr. Hoppins and 
wife are both graduated physicians of the Homoeopathic School at St. Louis; office at resi- 
dence; both have an extensive practice in Geneseo and vicinity. Mrs. Hoppins makes a 
specialty of diseases of women and children. 

HORTON FRANCIS L. Sec. 27, P.O. Geneseo; laborer for J. Rockwell; Rep; born in Vt. 

HOSFORD JAS. M. Geneseo; state agent of Home Ins. Co. of N.Y; Rep; Cong; from Mass. 

HOWELL A. Mrs. Geneseo; Cong; from N.Y. 

HOYT DANIEL, Sec. 5, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Ind; from N.H.; 80 acres. 

HOYT SYDNEY B., P.O. Geneseo; farmhand with his father, D. Hoyt; Ind. Rep; Henry Co. 

HOYT W. T. Geneseo; machinist; Rep; from Mass. 

HJELM CHAS. Geneseo; painter; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

HUBER FRANK, Geneseo; saloon keeper; Dem; German. 

HUESTIS J. Geneseo; carpenter; Rep; born in Nova Scotia. 

HUGHES J. Geneseo; engineer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 

HUIVIE S. T, Physician and Surgeon, Geneseo; born Monroe Co. N.Y. May 3, 1818; came 
to Co. 1S45: Rep; wife was Permelia T. Stewart, born June 7, 1822, in same county; married 
March ig, 1846; has one daughter, a Mrs. Taylor. Dr. Hume graduated at Berkshire Medi- 
cal College, Pittsfield, Mass. in 1846. He practiced nine years in Moline, 111. 

HUNN E. A. Sec. 28; P.O. Geneseo; farmer, for C. Smith; Dem; born in Mass. 

HUNN 1-iOYAL, P.O. Geneseo; farm hand with J. Anderson; Dem; from Indiana. 

HUNT C. Mrs. widow, Geneseo; German Meth; born in Germany. 

HUNT GARDNER, Geneseo; teamster; Rep; Cong; from Vt. 

HUNTINGTON ELISHA, Geneseo; foundry; Rep; born 111. 

HUNTINGTON N. B. Geneseo; retired; Rep; Cong; from Conn. 

HYDE A. K. Geneseo; molder; Dem; Adv; from Vt. 

TNGLIS JAMES, Geneseo; railroad stoker; Rep; from N. H. 

INGLIS JOHN, Geneseo; foreman bridges on C. R. I. & P. R.R.; Rep; from .Scotland. 
INGRAM WILLIAM, Sec. 29; P.O. Geneseo; laborer for E. A. Richmond. 
INGRAM HENRY, Geneseo. 
INGRAM ORRIS, Geneseo. 



HENRY COUNTY : GENESEO TOWNSHIP. 201 

IDE O. Mrs. Geneseo. 

IRVING N. S. Geneseo; hosiery manufacturer; Rep; from Mass. 

JACKSON JAMES, P.O. Geneseo; farmer, for Bliss; born in England. 
JAQUES W. C. Gene.seo; cooper; Ind; Univ; from Pa. 

JAQUES , Geneseo; student; Rep; Unit. 

JAQUES WILLIAM F. P.O. Geneseo; farmer. 

JARSON JOHN, Geneseo. 

JENKINS POLLY A. Mrs. P.O. Geneseo; Meth; from Va; farm of 82 ac. val. $4,900. 

JENNINGS GEO. Geneseo. 

JOHNSON ALFRED, Geneseo; teamster; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

JOHNSON ALFRED, Sec. 12; P.O. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

JOHNSON ANDREW, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden, 

JOHNSON ANDREW L. Sec. 11; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden; 20 ac. 

JOHNSON AUGUST, Geneseo; tailor; Rep; Luth; born in Sweden. 

JOHNSON CHAS. Geneseo; cabinet maker; Dem; Luth; from Sweden. 

JOHNSON D. A. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

JOHNSON JOHN, Geneseo; laborer; Luth; from Sweden. 

JOHNSON JOHN, Sec. ir; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden; 12 acres. 

JOHNSON JOHN P. Sec. 11; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden; 20 acres. 

JOHNSON JONAS, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Ind; Luth; born in Sweden; 143 acres. 

JOHNSON LARS, Sec. 12; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

JOHNSON LOUIS, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

JOHNSON NELS, Geneseo; R. R. laborer; Luth; from Sweden. 

JOHNSON N. P. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Meth; from Sweden. 

JOHNSON PETER G. Geneseo; shoemaker; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

JOHNSON PETER, Geneseo; painter; Rep: Luth; from Sweden. 

JOHNSON P. J. Geneseo; shoemaker; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

JOHNSON BRYANT D. Geneseo. 

JOHNSON ERASTUS, Geneseo. 

JOHNSON O. J. Geneseo. 

JOHNSON EDWARD F. Geneseo. 

JOHNSON CARL, Geneseo. 

JORDAN JOHN H. Sec. 23; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Ohio. 

TZ AISER ALBERT, Sec. 24; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Ind; from Ohio. 

-•^ KARL MARTIN, Geneseo; laborer for Kendall & Kidder; Rep; Luth; from Germany. 

KAPISCHKE LUDWIG, Geneseo; laborer; Dem. 

KELLY JAMES S. Geneseo; stock dealer; Dem; Pres; from Pa. 

KELLY PATRICK, Sec. 6; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 

KENAMAN CHAS. Geneseo; laborer; from Germany. 

KENDALL S. Geneseo; miller and grain dealer; Rep; Unit; from Mass. 

KIDDER W. L. Sec. 20; P.O. Geneseo; farmer and miller; Rep; Unit; born in Vt; 140 acres. 

KIDNY E. Geneseo; railroad carpenter. Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 

KILBY S. J. Mrs. widow; Geneseo; Prot; from Vt. 

KIMBEL CHARLES, Geneseo; wagon-maker; from Sweden. 

KIIVER HENRY L. Editor /Jen/y County News, Geneseo; born in Shafer's Valley, Perry 
Co. Pa. Feb. i, 1851; came to 111. in early life; educated at Farm Ridge Seminary, LaSalle Co.; 
commenced profession of journalist at the age of seventeen as a contributor to the Northwest- 
ei'n Advocate, of Chicago, afterwards to various Eastern literary periodicals; filled position 
of reporter on Chicago city papers some time; commenced the editorship of the Neivs at the 
age of twenty-three, which paper he still controls; Mr. Kiner has contributed various articles 
poetical and prose to prominent Eastern journals, some of which have received very favorable 
criticism from eminent literary writers, one a personal letter from the poet, Henry W, Long- 
fellow. 
KINEY J. O. Geneseo; city marshal; Rep; from Vt. 



202 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

KING MAYNARD, Sec. 27; P.O. Geneseo; with W. J- Rider; Ind; born in Mass. 

Kli^JNEY H. MAYNARD, Geneseo. 

KINSEY CYRUS, Geneseo; plow manufacturer; Rep; Cong; from Pa. 

KINSEY DANIEL S. Geneseo; book agent; Rep; Pres; from Pa. 

KINSEY CHESTER, Geneseo; book agent; Rep; Meth. 

KINSEY J. F. Geneseo; Dry Good's Merchant; born Rock Island, 111. Sept. 22, 1S47; Rep; 

Cong; wife was C. Eliza Stewart, bom Sept. 26, 1853; married Dec. 2, 1875; has lived in 

Geneseo twenty-one years. 
KINSEY N. C. Geneseo; merchant; Rep; Cong; born in 111. 
KINTLER JOHN, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; German. 
KINZIJE R. A. Geneseo; Music Dealer; born Wayne Co. Ohio, June 3, 1842; came to this 

county 1846; Rep; Meth; wife was Flora L. Williamson, born April 14, 1855; married Oct. 

22, 1S72; buried one child; Mr. Kinzie will sell music and musical instruments to suit the 

times; office in Freeman's Block; he is also a composer and teacher of music. 
KIPPING CHRISTIAN, Geneseo; laborer; from Germany. 
KIRKPATRICK, WILLIAM L. Geneseo; photographer; Rep; Unit. 
K LAV FAN DANL. Geneseo; laborer; Luth; from Germany. • 

KLEPSER JACOB, Sec. 33; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Meth; from Germany; 80 acres. 
KNOBLAUCH JOHN N. Geneseo; veterinary surgeon; Rep; from Germany. 
KNOBLOUGH J. N. Geneseo; veterinary surgeon; Rep; Meth. 
KOCH SIMON, Geneseo; R. R. clerk; Dem; Cath; from Germany. 
KOENIG D. JOHN, Geneseo; hotel-keeper; Dem; from Germany. 
KOENIG JOHN, Geneseo; hotel; Dem; Luth; from Germany. 

KOPISKE LUDWIG, Sec. 12; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Germany; 40 acres. 
KOPP CHRISTOPHER, Geneseo; superannuated minister; Rep; Evang; from Germany. 
KRANTZ JOHN Jr. Geneseo; hostler; Rep. 
KRANTZ JOHN, Geneseo; laborer; Dem; Cath; from Germany. 
KRAUSE PETER, Geneseo; laborer; Dem; Luth; from Germany. 
KUEBLER JOHN, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Evang; from Germany. 
KUNZ LEWIS, Rev. Geneseo; German Meth; born in Germany. 

T AGER G. Geneseo; tailor; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

-*-^ LAMBERT J. H. Geneseo; gunsmith; Rep; Bapt; from England. 

LAMBERT EPHRAIM, Geneseo; mason; Rep; from England. 

LAMBERT PHILLIP, Geneseo; painter; Rep; Bapt; from Iowa. 

LAMBERT WILLIAM B. Geneseo; painter; Rep; Meth; Eng. 

LAMBERT EDWARD, Geneseo; brick maker; Rep; Conn. 

LAMBERT PHIL. T. Geneseo; painter; Rep; Bapt. 

LAMBERT HENRY, Geneseo; cooper; Rep; Bapt. 

LAMBERT WILLIAM, Geneseo; brick maker; Rep; Meth. 

LANGRIDGE R. J. Rev. Geneseo; Bapt; from England. 

LARSON L. G, Geneseo; cabinet maker; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

LASALLE GODFREY, Geneseo; deputy sheriff; Rep; Prot; born in Canada. 

LASCH JOHN, Geneseo; laborer; Luth; from Germany. 

LATSON JOHN, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Prot; Swede. 

LATSON FRED. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Prot; Swede. 

LATSON A. R. Mrs. widow, Geneseo; Prot; from N. Y. 

LAWBAUGH GEORGE, Geneseo; in warehouse; Rep; born Ohio. 

LAWBAUGH G. W. Geneseo; feather renovator; Ind; born Ohio. 

LAWBAUGH HENRY, Grain Dealer; Geneseo; born in Tuscarawas Co. Ohio, Feb. 26, 
1836; came to this county March 23, 1854; Rep; Prot; married Miss Lizzie M. Machesney at 
New Alexander, Westmoreland Co. Pa. May 16, 1867, where she was born, March 4, 1836; 
has one son, Howard S., born in this town Dec. 20, 1870. 

LAWBAUGH JOSIAH, Geneseo; retired grocer; Rep; Meth; from Ohio. 

LAWBAUGH J. R. Geneseo; grocer; Ind. Rep; Meth; born in Ohio. 

LAWBAUGH WM. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Evang; born Ohio. 




LEWI S SHEARER 
Cornwall Township. 



HBNEY COUNTY: GENESEO TOWNSHIP. 205 

LAWBAUGH ALBERT, Geneseo; Rep; Meth. 

LAWRENCE H. F. P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; German. 

-LAWRENCE G-. W. Geneseo; Grocer; member of the firm of Dedrick & Lawrence; born 
in city of N.Y., Aug. 25, '28; came to this county in 1856; Rep; Cong; owns residence; wife 
was Catharine Munson, of New York City, born 1828; married April 5, 1855; has one child, 
E. Kate; served three years in the late war as Lieut, of Company J, 112th I. V. I. 

LAWLESS L. M. engineer at foundry; Rep; Prot; from Mass. 

LAWSON GUST. Sec. 11; P.O. Geneseo; rents farm of N. Wetherhall; Luth; from Sweden. 

LAWSON L. G. Geneseo; cabinet maker; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

LEDIG MICHEL, Geneseo; wagon maker; Ind; from Germany. 

LEE JAMES, Geneseo; laborer; Dem; Cath; born Ireland. 

LENSER FRED. Sec. 20; P.O. Geneseo; laborer for W. L. Kidder; Evang; born in Germany. 

LEVEN CHAS. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

LEWIS G. Mrs. Geneseo. 

LICTHSTIEN HENRY, Geneseo; butcher; Dem; from Germany. 

LilEBERKNECHT A. Printer, Geneseo; born in Germany on gth of May, 1836; came to 
this county in 1S57; Rep; Evang; owns house and lot, value $3,000; partner and business 
manager of the Republic since Nov. 1863. 

LIEBERKNECHT GEORGE, Geneseo; music dealer. 

LIEDKE AUGUST, Sec. 28; P.O. Geneseo; laborer for G. Geiser; born in Germany. 

LIKE D. C. Geneseo; carpenter and painter; Rep; from N. Y. 

LIKE JOHN, Geneseo; carpenter; Rep; from N. Y. 

LIMLE C. J. Geneseo; bakery; Rep; from Ohio. 

LINBERGE CHAS. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

LIIVIVELL CHARLES A. Farmer, Sec. 4; P.O. Geneseo; born in Jefferson Co. N. Y., 
Sept. 8, i82g; came to this county in 1844; Ind; owns 100 acres of land, valued $4,000; first 
wife was Nancy A. Allen; second wife was Mary D. Lenhart, born in Muskingum Co. Ohio, 
Nov. 16, 1845; married Feb. 22, 1866; has four children; has two children of first wife. 

LINNELL CHAS. R. Sec. 4; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Ind; from N. Y. 

LISCH JOHN, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Prot. 

LITTLE DANIEL, Sec. 29; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Cong; born in N, H.; 120 ac. $9,000. 

LITTLE J. A. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Cong; born in 111. 

LIVERMORE H. J. Sec. 20; P.O. Geneseo, farmer; Rep; Cong; born Vermont; 80 acres. 

LIVERMORE I. W. Geneseo; carpenter; Rep; Prot; from Mass. 

LODGE G. M. Geneseo; laborer; Rep. 

LOFSTEDT L. F. Sec. 19; P.O. Geneseo; farmer for J. Allen; Rep; born in Sweden. 

LOGEMANN GEO. R. Geneseo; merchant; Dem; Freethinker; from Germany. 

LOHMAN FRANK, Sec. 33; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Meth; born in Germany; 80 acres. 

LONG CHARLES, Geneseo; works on R. R.; Dem; Pres; from Ohio. 

LONG MICHAEL, P.O. Geneseo; farmer for F. Bolen; Dem; Meth; born in N. Y. 

LONG JOHN. Geneseo; shoemaker; Rep; Meth; German. 

LOOMIS GEORGE H. Sec. 33; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; born in Maine; wty^ acres. 

LOOMIS HENRY, Sec. 33; P.O. Geneseo; farmer with G. H. Loomis; born in Maine. 

LOOMIS MARSHALL, Sec. 24; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem. 

LOOMIS NATHAN A. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born in Maine. 

LORENZ CONRAD, Sec. 35; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Luth; from Germany; rents 80 acres. 

LUTHER ABRAM, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep. 

LUTHER GEO. Geneseo; drayman; Prot; from Germany. 

LUTHER DANIEL, Geneseo; retired; Rep; Meth; from Germany. 

LYON LYMAN, Sec. 17; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Conn. 

ly/r cARTHUR F. H. Justice of Peace and Notary Public; Dem; from Michigan. 
-'■*-'■ McAVOY RICHARD, Geneseo; R. R. employee; Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 
McBROOM JAMES, Geneseo; grain dlr. & prest. ist Natl. Bk; Rep; Unit; Welch. 
Mccarty DANL. R. R. section foreman; Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 
McCLELLAN J. WESLEY, Sec. 3; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from Ind; 84 acres. 
17 



206 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OP 

McCOLLAM ARCHIBALD, Geneseo; farmer; Dem; born Pa. 
McCONAUGHY WILLIAM, Geneseo; laborer; Dem; Cath. 
McCOWAN JNO. Geneseo; laborer; Dem; Cath. 
McCOY DANIEL, Geneseo; laborer; Dem; Cath. 

Mccracken Alexander, Rep; Disciple; from Ohio. 

McDADE CHARLES W. Geneseo; Rep; from Pa. 

McELHENNY D. L. Geneseo; laborer; Dem; Cath. 

McELHENNY M. H., P.O. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; 2 acres, $800. 

Mcelroy RICHARD, Geneseo; laborer; Dem; Cath. 

McFARLANE ANDREW, Geneseo; retired merchant; Ind; Spiritualist; from Ohio. 

McGOWAN WM. H. Geneseo; laborer; Dem; from Knox Co. 111. 

McGregor ARTHUR, Geneseo: blacksmith: Dem; Prot; from Iowa. 

McGregor lares, Geneseo; sewg. mach. seller; Dem. 

McHOSE SAML. Sec. 28, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born in Pa; 97 acres, $7,500. 

McILVAIN JAS. B. Sec. 29, P.O. Geneseo; farmer for J. G. Mcllvain; Rep; Cong; born Pa. 

McILVAIN JAS. G. Sec. 29, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Cong; born Pa; 107 acres. 

McLaughlin , Geneseo; laborer; Dem; Cath. 

McLEAN EDWARD, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Prot. 

McMORROW ANDREW, Geneseo; 'bus driver; Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 

McNULTY PETER, Geneseo; laborer; Dem; Cath; N.Y. 

McNULTY THOS. Geneseo; laborer; Dem; Cath; N.Y. 

McOWEN JOHN, Geneseo: laborer; Dem; Cath. 

McSHAN HUGH O'GARA, Geneseo, Catholic priest; from Ireland. 

McWAIN GEO. A. Geneseo; carpenter; Ind; N.Y. 

MACHESIS'EY r>AVTI> L. Physician and Surgeon, Geneseo; born in Greensburg, 
Westmoreland Co. Pa. Jan. 10, 1827; came lo this Co. in 1854; Rep; Prot; owns 125 acres 
of land, value $10,000; married Miss Martha E. Taylor in this town. May 2S, 1862; she was 
born in Wardsboro, Vt. March 23, 1S41; has one son living and one dead, A. Grant, born 
Feb. 7, 1864; Elmer D., born Aug. 26, 1868; died Jan. 24, 1872. 

MANINGTON JOHN, Geneseo; dentist. Rep; Cong; from Eng. 

MANVILLE HARRY, Geneseo; retired; Rep; Cong; from N.Y. 

MANVILLE RICHARD H. Geneseo; Rep; Prot. 

MARON CHRISTIE, Sec. 22, P.O. Geneseo; laborer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 

MARTIN C. H. Geneseo; soap manufacturer; Rep; Prot; from N.Y. 

MARTIN J. S. Geneseo; bridge carpenter; Rep; Meth; from Ind. 

MARTIN S. W. Geneseo; retired; Rep; Meth; from N.Y. 

MARTIN W. A. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Prot. 

MATHER A. G. Sec. 35, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Cong; from Ohio; So ac. val. $4,800. 

MATHER POMEROY, lives with father, A. G. Mather; Rep; Cong; born in Geneseo. 

MATSON A. JULIUS, Geneseo; stage driver; Rep; Meth. Epis; born Plenry Co. 

MATTES THEO. Geneseo; saloon; Dem; Cath; from Germany. 

MATZOLD AUGUST, Sec. 13, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Luth; from Germany; 80 acres. 

MAXWELL M. Mrs. widow, Geneseo; Prot; from Pa. 

MERTZ A. H. Sec. 30, P.O. Geneseo; farmer for E. Mertz; Rep; born 111. 

MERTZ EDWARD, Sec. 30, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Evang; born Pa; 80 acres. 

MEYER A. Geneseo; wagon-maker; Rep; Evang; born in France. 

MILLER ABRAM, Geneseo; prop, of Geneseo House; Rep; born Long Island. , 

MILLER J. ADAM, Sec. ro, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from Germany; 140 acres. 

MILLER B. C. Geneseo; lives with his father, Abram Miller; Rep; born III. 

MILLER GEO. H. with J. A. Miller; Dem; born Henry Co. 

MILLER IRA C. Geneseo; lives with his father, Abram Miller; tlep; born in 111. 

MILLER M. J. Rev. Geneseo; Unitarian clergyman; Rep; from Ohio. 

MILLER WM. Geneseo; retired; Rep; from N.Y. 

MITCHELL HORACE, Geneseo; works on railroad. 

MITCHELL J. H. Geneseo; duiggist; Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 



HENRY COUNTY: GENESEO TOWNSHIP. 207 

MODEKWELL E. C. Hon. Attorney at Law, Geneseo; born in Crawford Co. Ohio, 
March 6, 1S38; came to Co. 1866; Rep; wife was Fannie R. Watson, married at Fairmont, 
West Virginia, March, 1866; has four children. Mr. Moderwell graduated at Jefferson Col- 
lege, Penn., class of 1859; at Cincinnati Law School, i860; was Major of 12th Ohio Cavalry; 
is also member of the State Senate at the present time. 

MODERWELL J. B. Geneseo; druggist; Rep; Pres; from Ohio. 

MODERWELL JOHN, Geneseo; retired merchant; Rep; Pres; born in Pa. 

MOHR W. H. Geneseo; blacksmith; Dem; from N.Y. 

MONGER S. F. Geneseo; teamster; Rep: U. Brethren; from Vt. 

MONAHAN A. Geneseo; section man; Dem; Cath. 

MONESMITH HENRY, Geneseo; family grocery; Dem; Unit. 

MOORE C. L. Geneseo; cooper; Ind; Prot; from Ky. 

M.OKG-AN" A. Geneseo; formerly a farmer in Munson; born in Jefferson Co. N.Y. March 31, 
1824; came to Co. 1S53; Rep; wife was .Martha P. Tuttle, of Oneida Co. N. Y., born April 
29, 1820; married Aug. 4, 1844; has three children living. 

MORGAN PLINY W. Retired, Geneseo; born in Oneida Co. N.Y. June 30, 1802; came 
to Co. 1854; Rep; Pres; first wife was Hannah Porter, of Conn; married Oct. 1822; had four 
children, one living; she died Feb. 26, 1828; second wife, Ruey Hamilton, of N. Y.; married 
Aug. 4, 1S35; two children living. 

MORGAN HERBERT, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Prot. 

MORTON JAS. Geneseo; merchant; Dem; Prot; from Ohio. 

MORTON S. W. Geneseo; merchant; Dem; Prot; from Ohio. 

MORTON WM. Geneseo; merchant; Dem; from Ohio. 

MORTON CHARLES, Geneseo; asst. cashr. First Natl. Bank; Rep; Pres. 

MORRISY JNO. W. Geneseo; tinner; Dem; Cath; N.Y. 

MOSES H. W. Geneseo; manufacturer of vi'oodenware; Rep; Unit; from Maine. 

MOSHER CHAS. E. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Vt. 

MOSHER NAPOLEON, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Prot. 

MOWRY GEO. G. Geneseo; agricultural implements and live stock; Rep; Cong; from R.I. 

MUGNARD WILLIAM, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Prot. 

MULLIGAN ALBERT, Geneseo; laborer; Dem. 

MUNSON ALBERT S. Geneseo; carpenter; Dem; born N. Y. 

MUNSON H. J. Mrs. Geneseo, born N.Y. 

MIUVSON MERKITT, Retired, Geneseo; born Greene Co. N. Y. Oct. 7, 1805; came to 
Co. 1852; Democratic in politics; maintains the doctrine of individual and state sovereignty; 
Humanitarian and Freethinker in religion; his wife was Harriet Rice, of N. Y.; she died Jan. 
14; 1862; second wife was Mrs. Maria S. Mathews, of Oswego Co. N.Y., married March 2, 
1871. Mr. Munson was the original proprietor of the present business part of the town. The 
township of Munson, Henry Co. was named after him. He formerly adited the Geneseo 
Republic; it was then neutral in politics. He was the first President of Town Council; was 
Justice of the Peace many years. 

MUNSON SYLVINA Mrs. widow; Geneseo; Pres; Vt; house and lot. 

MUNSON L. N. Geneseo; Rep; Meth; N.Y. 

MURTEN N. W. Geneseo; laborer; Dem; Cath. 

MURPHY JOSEPH J. Sec. 24; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; F. Bapt; from Pa. 

MYERS FRED. Geneseo; tailor; Cath; from Denmark. 

MYHILL EMILY A. Mrs, Geneseo; Christian; from Vt; owns house and lot. 

IVT ARING M. Geneseo; farmer; Meth; from Germany. 

-"■^ NAYLOR ROBERT, Geneseo; laborer; Dem; from Ireland. 

NEGUS ADELIA, Mrs. Geneseo; Bapt; from N.Y. 

NEHLIG HENRY, Geneseo; railroad baggageman; Dem; Cath. 

NEHLIG M. Mrs. widow, Geneseo; Cath; from Germany. 

NEISWEIVDER WESLEY, City Marble Works, Geneseo; born in West Salem, Wayne 
Co. Ohio, March 30, 1841; came to this county in 1852; Rep; Prot; owns residence, value 
$1,500; wife was Miss Minerva Merriman, born in Henry Co. Ill, Feb, 24, 1841; her parents 
came to this county in 1835; married Aug. 22, 1862; has five children, 'William A., Solon A., 
Ellen, Kittie F. and Chas. G.; was member of Co. I, 112 111. V. I.; \vas prisoner eighteen 
months, in Libby, Andersonville, Charleston, and Florence, S, Q, 



208 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

NELSON A. Mrs, widow, Geneseo; Luth; from Sweden. 

NELSON CHAS. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

NELSON A. G. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Prot. 

NETH JNO. P. Geneseo; formerly grocer; Rep; Prot; German. 

NETSER JOHN, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Prot; from Ohio. 

NEWTON F. Geneseo; canvassing; Rep; from Wis. 

NISWENDER FRANK, Sec. i; P.O. Geneseo; rents farm of S. Stough; Rep; born Henry Co. 

NISWENDER L. Mrs. widow; Geneseo; Meth; born 111. 

NISWENDER WM. Sec.i; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Evang; from Pa; i6o acres. 

NOURSE HENRY, Geneseo; retired mercht; Rep; Cong; from Me. 

NORRIS H. N. Geneseo; laborer: Rep; Prot. 

/^'BRIAN JOHN, Geneseo; teamster; Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 

^^^ O'BRYAN A. P. Geneseo; foreman of water-works on railroad; Rep. 

O'BRYAN N. Geneseo; cooper; Dem; Cath; from Conn. 

O'CONNELL PAT. Geneseo; railroad section foreman; Dem; Cath; from Ireland, 

O'DAY PATRICK, Geneseo; retired farmer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 

ODWELDER PHILLIP, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; German. 

O'MARA M. Geneseo; railroad laborer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 

OBER C. P. Geneseo; printer; Rep; born Pa. 

OBERG WILLIAM R. Sec. 3; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; from Sweden. 

OFFEREE ABNER, resides with father, L. Offerle; clerk; Rep; German Evang; born 111. 

OFFEREE A. F. Geneseo; shoemaker; Dem; Prot; from Pa. 

OFFERLE G. J. Geneseo; boot and shoemaker; Dem; Prot; from France. 

OFFERLE L. Geneseo; merchant; Rep; German Evang; from France. 

OFFER LEE JNO. Geneseo; shoemaker; Rep; Evang; German. 

OLE HENRY, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; German. 

OLFSON OLBER G. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

OLMSTEAD HENRY, Geneseo; carpenter; Rep. 

OLMSTEAD DANIEL, Geneseo; carpenter; Rep; Prot. 

OLMSTEAD HENRY, Geneseo; merchant; Rep; Prot; from N.Y. 

OLSON GUS. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

OLSON JOHN, Geneseo; shoemaker; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

OLSON PETER, Geneseo; laborer; Rep;- Sweden. 

ORMISTON J. C. Geneseo; wind mill manufacturer; Rep; Prot; from Ohio. 

OTT ADOLPH,- Geneseo; harness-maker; Rep; Evang; born in 111. 

OTT A. H. Geneseo; retired merchant; Rep; Evang; born in 111. 

OTT CHRISTIAN, P.O. Peoria, 111; minister German Evang; from France. 

OTT EDWARD P. Geneseo; miller; Rep; Evang; born 111. 

OTT JOHN, Geneseo; shoemaker; Rep; German Evang; from Germany. 

OTT L. Mrs. widow; Geneseo; German Evang; born in this county. 

OTT M. U. Mrs. Geneseo; German Evang; from France; owns house and lot, val. $600. 

OTT PHILLIP, Geneseo; retired farmer; Rep; Evang; from France. 

OTT S. S. Geneseo; miller; Rep; Evang; born in 111. 

OTT SAM'L. Geneseo; dry goods; Rep; German Evang; born 111. 

OWEN RICHARD B. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born in Wales. 

OWEN W. H. Geneseo; retired; from N.Y. 

OWENS CLAUDUS, Geneseo; laborer; Dem; Irish. 

"DAESSLER E. Geneseo; saloon; Dem; Luth; from Germany. 

-*- PALMER J. W. Geneseo; blacksmith; Rep; Prot; from N. H. 

PALMER EDWARD. Geneseo; clerk; Rep; Unit; from 111. 

PARKER GEO. Sec. 22; P.O. Geneseo; farmer. 

PARKER M. P. Geneseo; blacksmith; Rep; Cong; from N. H. 



HENRY COUNTY: GENESEO TOWNSHIP. 209 

PATTERSON WM. Geneseo; painter; Rep; Prot; from Ohio. 

PATTERSON JNO. W. Geneseo; laborer; Prot. 

PATZER L. Geneseo; laborer; Evang; from Germany. 

PAUL MARVIN K. Sec. 8; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Lib; from Conn. 

PENCE H. H. P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Prot; from Ohio. 

PERHAM L W. Geneseo; drayman; Rep; Prot; from Vt. [ , 

PERRY CHARLES, Geneseo; propr. of coal mines; Rep; Cong; iMass. 

PERRY ALFRED, Geneseo; retired; from Mass; came to state 1S36. 

PERRIN H. A. Sec. 17; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Univ; from Mass; 75 acres. 

PERSONS NATHANIEL, Geneseo; Rep; from Mass. 1820. 

PETERSON ANDREW, Sec. 14; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Sweden; 64 acres. 

PETERSEN AUGUST, farmer, for Weston; born in Sweden. 

PETERSON GUST. Geneseo; laborer; Luth; from Sweden. 

PETERSON INGLEBAR Mrs. widow, Sec. 11; P.O. Geneseo; Luth; from Sweden; 18 aces. 

PETERSON JOHN, Sec. 12; P.O. Geneseo; rents farm of his brother; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

PETERSON JOHN, Geneseo; laborer; Luth; from Sweden. 

PETERSON JOHN R. Sec. 11; P.O. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden; 8 acres. 

PETERSON JONAS, Geneseo; blacksmith; Rep; Luth; Sweden. 

PETERSON NELS, Geneseo; blacksmith; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

PETERSON WILLIAM, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; from Sweden. 

PETHERBRIDGE GEO. Geneseo; teamster; Rep; Prot; from England. 

PETTIS IRVING S. Geneseo; school teacher; Rep; Pres ; from N. Y. 

PHILBROOK CHAS. Sec. 35; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Cong; from Maine; 62 ac. $1,430. 

PHILBROOK FRANCIS T., P.O. Geneseo; farmer, lives with father; Rep; Cong; from Mich. 

PHILLIPPO GEO. W. Geneseo; printer; Dem; born England. 

PHILLIPS J. T. P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Prot. 

PIEL GUS. Geneseo; cigar maker; Rep; from Sweden, 

PIERCE J. T. Rev. Geneseo; retired; Rep; Cong; from Mass. 

PL ATT JOS. Geneseo; laborer; Prot. 

PLUM NATHANIEL, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep. 

POMEROY ENOS, Geneseo; physician; Rep; Cong; from N. Y. 

POMEROY STEPHEN C. Sec. 22; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born Ohio; S3 acres. 

POMEROY JNO. P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Cong. 

POMEROY FRED. P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Cong. 

POPE L. C. Geneseo; wagon maker; Rep; Meth. 

PORTEL HENRY, Geneseo; barber; Dem; from Germany. 

PORTER GILES, Geneseo; Dem; from Ohio. 

PORTER H. D. Geneseo; printer in Republic office; Rep; Prot; born in 111. 

PORTER IRA, Geneseo; retired; Rep; from N.Y. 

PORTER H. Geneseo; barber; Dem; Prot; from Germany. 

POSTEL HENRY, Geneseo; barber; Dem; German. 

POWELL FRANCIS M. Geneseo; lumber dealer; Rep; Bapt; born 111. 

POWERS E. P. Geneseo; painter; Rep; Prot. 

PRATT WILLIAM, P.O. Geneseo; farm hand. 

PRIEBE WM. Geneseo; carpenter; Luth; from Germany. 

QUINN JAMES, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Prot; from N. Y. 
QUICK T. H. Sec. 32; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Meth; born in New Jersey; 24 ac. 
QUINN MICHAEL, Geneseo; dry goods mercht; Dem; Cath; Iowa. 

"D AADER L. Geneseo; shoemaker: Rep; Luth; from Germany. 
-"^ RADER DEDLIF, Geneseo; laborer; born in Germany. 
RADER J. T. P.O. Geneseo; farmer. 
RAHN GUST. Geneseo; laborer; Luth; from Germany. 



210 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

RAHN DAVID, Geneseo; laborer; Luth; from Germany. 

RAMSEY ALLEN J. Geneseo; grocer; Rep; born N. H. 

RAMSEY JAMES, Geneseo; grocer; Rep; Meth; from N. H. 

RAPP A. J. Geneseo; trader; Rep; Meth; born in this Co. 

RAPP J. D. Geneseo; retired; Rep; Prot; born in this Co. 

RAPP JOHN, Sen. Geneseo; retired farmer; Rep; Ger. Evang; from Germany. 

RAPP JOHN, Jr. Geneseo; retired merchant; Rep; Prot; from Pa. 

RAPP JACOB, Geneseo; retired farmer; Rep; Evang; from Prance. 

RAPP PHILLIP, Geneseo; trader; Rep; Meth. 

BASER ADAM H. City Marble Works, Geneseo; born in West Salem, Wayne Co. Ohio, 
Aug. 7, 1839; came to this county in 1852; Rep; Prot; owns house and two acre lot, value 
$2,500; was in the army in Co. K, ir2th Reg. I. V. I.; served three years; wife was Miss 
Catherine A. Fries, born Jan. 4, 1843, in Wayne Co. Ohio; married March 22, 1864; has five 
children living, one dead; Bertie A., Florance A., Lula, Ada and Jasin. 

RASER GEO. Geneseo; retired merchant; Rep; Meth; from Pa. 

RASER GEO. \N. Geneseo; clerk; Rep; Meth; from Ohio. 

RASER J. S. Geneseo; clerk; Rep; Meth; from Ohio. 

RASER JOHN, Geneseo; railroad conductor; Rep; born Ohio. 

RASER W. W. Geneseo; merchant; Rep; Meth; from Ohio. 

RATHMANN MARTIN, Geneseo; teamster; Dem; Prot; from Germany. 

REBUNG JNO. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; German. 

REDFELDT AUG. Geneseo; shoemaker; Evang; from Germany, 

REED NEWTON, Geneseo; carpenter; Rep; from Conn. 

REHBEIN FRED. Geneseo; laborer; Dem; Evang; from Germany. 

REHER GEO. Geneseo; R. R. laborer; Luth; from Germany. 

REHERD J. K., P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Pres; from Va; 160 acres, value $9,600. 

REHARD JNO. Geneseo; laborer. 

REINOEHL THEODORE K. Geneseo; tinner; Rep; born Pa. 

REMMELL GEORGE, Geneseo; retired; Dem; from Ohio. 

REMMINGTON W. A. Geneseo; bookkeeper at Stock Yards; Rep; Epis, 

RENSHAW JAS. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; born 111. 

RESSER J. G. Geneseo; river pilot; Dem; Luth; from Pa. 

RESSER M. W. Geneseo; hotel; Dem; Prot; from Pa. 

RESSER PHILLIP T., P.O. Geneseo; farmer with J. Dashem; Rep; from Pa. 

RICE DANIEL, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Prot. 

RICHARDS GEORGE, Sec. 33; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Pres; from Vt; 160 acres, $9,000. 

RICHARDSON LOUISA Mrs. Geneseo; born in N. Y. 

RICHMOND JOS. Geneseo; nurseryman; Rep; Cong; from Mass. 

RICHMOND EDWIN A. Sec. 29; P.O. Geneseo; nurseryman; Rep; born in Mass. 

RICHMOND FRANCIS C. Geneseo; lives with father, I. Richmond; Rep; born in 111. 

RICHMOND ISAIAH, Geneseo; nursery; Rep; Cong; from Mass. 

RICH DEXTER, Geneseo; lumberman; Dem; Epis; from Pa. 

RICKEL JEREMIAH H. Geneseo; drayman; Rep; from Ohio. 

RIDER WILSON J. Sec. 27; Geneseo; farmer; Ind; born in New York; 80 acres, $4,800. 

RIEG CAROLINE Mrs. M'idow; Evang; from Germany; owns house and lot. 

RIEGER FRED. Geneseo; carpenter; Rep: Meth; from Germany. 

KILEY CHARLES, Geneseo; Teacher; born Kno.x Co. III. Feb. 10, 1S4S; came to county 
1873; Dem; owns residence; wife was Hattie Dickinson, born Utica, N.Y., Nov. i, 1851; 
married April 6, 1S73; has one child, Helen A. 

RISTAU I. Geneseo; laborer; Luth; from Germany. 

RITTINGER WM. J. Geneseo; grocer; Ind; Luth; from Germany. 

ROBERTS DANIEL, Geneseo; retired farmer; Dem; from Ohio. 

ROBERTS JOHN, Geneseo; retired farmer; Rep; Meth; from Pa; owns house and lot. 

ROBERTS J. S. Geneseo; blacksmith; Rep; from Wales. 

ROBERTS H. E. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Prot. 



HENRY COUNTY: GENESEO TOWNSHIP. 211 

ROCKWELL J. C. Geneseo; hardware merchant; Rep; from N. H. 

ROCKWELL JOHN, Sec. 27; P.O. Geneseo; Ind; born in Vermont; 172 acres, $70 per acre. 

ROEDER LOUIS Geneseo; laborer; Rep; German. 

ROHWEDER TIMM. Geneseo; cooper; Ind; Prot; from Germany. 

ROLAND JOHN, P.O. Geneseo; farm hand with J. F. Smith; Rep; from Will Co. 

ROLL JOHN, Geneseo; laborer ; Luth; from Germany. 

ROONEY THOS. Geneseo; laborer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 

ROOT A. M. Geneseo; grain dealer; Rep; from N.Y. 

ROSENFIELD M. Geneseo; clerk; Ind; born Germany. 

ROSENSTONE N. P. Geneseo; mnfr. boots and shoes; Rep; from Sweden. 

ROUT W, C. Sec. 34; P. O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Epis; born in Eng; 160 acres. 

ROWEHDEN TIM. Geneseo; cooper; Rep; from Germany. 

RUBECK AUGUST, Sec. 17; P.O. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

RUBECK P. A. Geneseo; laborer; Prot; Swede. 

RUGGLES I. D. Geneseo; foundry; Rep; born in Mass. 

RUGGLES EDWIN A. Geneseo; clerk; Rep; Cong. 

RUMMELL M. Geneseo; music dealer; Ind; from Ohio. 

RUMMEL GEO. P.O. Geneseo; retired farmer; Dem; Prot. 

RUSSELL S. Geneseo; retired farmer; Rep; from Maine. 

RUXTON JAMES R. Sec. 34; P.O. Geneseo; farmer with W. Ruxton; Dem; Pres; Scotland. 

RUXTON ROBERT S. Sec. 34; P.O. Geneseo; farmer with W. Ruxton; Dem; Pres; Scotland. 

RUXTON WM. Sr. Sec. 34; P.O. Geneseo; farmer for Mrs. Spencer; Pres; born in Scotland. 

RUXTON WM. Jr. Sec. 34; P.O. Geneseo; farmer with W. Ruxton; Dem; Pres; Scotland. 

RYAN DANIEL, Geneseo; harness-maker; Dem; Cath; from 111. 

C AFFORD W. H. Sec. 30; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Pres; born in N.Y.; 56 acres. 

•^ SAGE JOHN, Geneseo; laborer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 

SAFSTROM ADOLPH, Geneseo; Dem. 

SALEM CATHARINE, Sec. 25; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Cath; 148 acres, $5,000. 

SALTO HENRY, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; German. 

SALTO JNO. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; German. 

SANBORN A. Geneseo; laborer; Rep. 

SANDGRER CHARLES, P.O. Geneseo; farm hand. 

SANFORD C. W. Geneseo; lives with his father; Rep; Cong. 

SANFORD WHITFIELD, Sec. 20; P.O. Geneseo; banker; Rep; Cong; from N.Y; 80 acres. 

SANTEE THOS. Geneseo; retired farmer; Dem; Prot; from Pa. 

SARGENT A. F. Geneseo; Carriage Maker; born in N. H. 1850; wife was Vienna T. 

Huson, born in Ohio, March 2, 1855; married Jan. 28, 1862; has one child, Edna B. 
SARGENT D. F. Geneseo; blacksmith; born Merrimac Co. N. H. May 23, 1825; came to 

county in 1853; Rep; Meth; wife was A. E. Dunning, born Addison Co. Vt. June, 1842; 

has seven children, three by first wife. 
SAUNDERS E. A. Geneseo; brickmaker; Rep; from Mass. 
SAWYER JOSEPH A. Geneseo; born in New Hampshire, April 10,1812; emigrated 

to Illinois in 1834 as a member of the Tremont Colony; has followed the mercantile business 

nearly all his life; moved to Hampton, Rock Island Co. in 1839, to Dayton, Henry Co. 

March, 1850, and to Geneseo in 1861; married ^Lirtha Richmond in 1835, who died in 1839; 

second wife, Lucy A. Wells, in 1850, who was among the earliest settlers in Henry Co. 

having removed from St. Lawrence Co. N. Y. in 1836; has had four children by first wife, 

all living; five by second wife, three living. 

SCHINDLER , Sec. 28; P.O. Geneseo; laborer for G. Geiser; born Germany. 

SCHILENT WM. Geneseo; laborer; Luth; from Germany. 

SCHILKY GOTLEIB, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Prot; German. 

SCHLINSON EARNEST, Sec. 35; P.O. Geneseo; farmer for B. Ward; born Germany. 

SCHMIDT HENRY, Geneseo; carpenter; Luth; from Germany. 

SCHMIDT EQUITY, Geneseo; laborer; German. 

SCHMIEDT R. Mrs. widow, Geneseo; Prot; from Pa. 



212 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OP 

SCHMITZ JNO. H. P.O. Geneseo; farm hand; Rep. 

SCHMOLL CHAS. Sec. 28; P.O. Geneseo; laborer for G. Geiser; Dem; born Germany. 
SCHNABELE LAWRENCE, Sec. 8; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; from Germany. 
SCHNABELE P. S. Geneseo; Merchant Tailor and Clothier; born in Germany, Dec. 24, 

1835; come to state 1841; came to county i860; Rep; belongs to Evangelical Association; 

wife was Amelia Willman, born in Prussia, Oct. 22, 1843; married Oct. 11, 1862; has six 

children, Jennie A. Ada M. Carrie M.Jerome P. Lenora F. and Presilla L.; has been Notary 

Public. 
SCHNABELE PHILLIP, Geneseo; retired; Rep; Prot; Germany. 
SCHRADTLING WILLIAM, Geneseo; gardener; Dem. 
SCHUCK I. J. Geneseo; grocer; Ind; Prot; born 111. 
SCHULENDORF JOHN, Geneseo; Rep; from Germany. 
SCHULKE G. Geneseo; laborer; Luth; from Germany, 
SCHUH MICHAEL, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Prot. 
SCHUREMAN J. F. Geneseo; peddler; Rep; Prot. 
SCHUMAKER JACOB, Geneseo; laborer. 

SCHWARCK CHAS. Geneseo; laborer; Dem; Bapt; from Germany. 
SEARL AMBROSE, Geneseo; dealer in pumps; Rep; born in 111. 
SEARLS MARY Mrs. Geneseo; Meth. 
SEDGLEY LEVI, Geneseo; retired from business; Lorn in York Co. Me. Oct. 18, 1812; 

came to this county 1855; Rep; wife was Martha Johnson, born April 14, 1812 ; died Feb. 

20, 1872; second wife was Serena B. Foss, born April i, 1828, in York Co. Me.; married 

Nov. 3, 1874; has three children by first marriage. 
SEDGLEY A. A. Geneseo; conductor R. R.; Rep; Unit. 
SEDGLEY BEN. L. Geneseo; clerk R.R. depot; Rep; Unit. 

SEFSTROM ADOLPH,Sec. i; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden; 20 acres. 
SEIBEL WM. Geneseo; saloon; Dem; Prot; from Germany. 
SEIBEL WM. Geneseo; bakery; Dem; from Germany. 

SELNER DANIEL, Sec. 31; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; United Breth; born Pa; 80 acres. 
SENGEWALD FRED. Geneseo; tailor; Rep; from Germany. 
SHAFER GEO. Geneseo; cooper; Rep; Prot. 
SHALE G. L. Geneseo; druggist; Rep; Prot; from Ohio, 

SHAUP SOLOMON, Sec. 5; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from Pa; 80 acres. 
SHAW BARTON, Geneseo; Rep; Bapt; from Vt. 
SHAW GEO. W. Geneseo; Attorney at Law; born in Providence, Rhode Island, Dec. 6, 

1831; came to county 1857; Rep; wife was Lucy Andrews, born Aug. 3, 1832, in Hartford, 

Conn; married May I, 1855; has five children. 
SHAW J. L. Geneseo; physician; Rep; Unit; from R. I. 

SHELLHAMMER DANIEL, Sec. 15; P.O. Geneseo; stage-driver; Rep; from Pa. 
SHEPARD R. L. Geneseo; stock dealer; Rep; from N.Y. 
SHEPPARD WM. M. Geneseo; mason; Rep; Epis; from Eng. 
SHERIFF SAME. Geneseo; carpenter; Rep; Meth; from Pa. 
SHNISTZ HENRY, Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Luth; from Germany. 
SHOEMAKER JACOB, Geneseo; laborer; Dem; Prot; from Germany. 
SHOUP SOLOMON, Geneseo; laborer; Germany. 
SHUCK JACOB, Geneseo; retired; Rep; Evang; Germany. 
SHULTZ ADOLPH, Sec. 13; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; from Germany; 80 acres. 
SICKLER ALBERT, Geneseo; butcher; Dem; Cath; born in Germany. 
SIMKINS JAS. Geneseo; laborer; Dem; from Ohio. 

SIMMONS BENJ. Geneseo; engineer for McBroom & Wilson; Rep; Prot; from N.Y. 
SIMMONS CHARLES, Geneseo; laborer; Rep. 

SINGLEMAN GEORGE E. Geneseo; retired manf; Ind; from Germany. 
SKOLD C. N. Geneseo; laborer; Dem. 

SMALL HENRY, Geneseo; shoemaker; Luth; from Germany. 
SMALL WM. F. Geneseo; mason; Rep; Pres; from Pa. 
SMITH A. M. laborer for W. J. Smith; Rep; Prot; born in 111. 




Capt. R. HARRINGTON, 
Geneseo. 



HENRY COUNTY : GENESEO TOWNSHIP. 



^16 



SMITH CHAUNCEY, Geneseo; retired; Rep; from Vt. 

SMITH CHAKLiJES B. Farmer and Stock Feeder, Sec. lo; P.O. Geneseo; born in Prussia, 
May 22, 1833; came to Allegany Co. Md. in iSt'O, and to this county in 1866; Ind; Rep; 
owns 640 acres of land, valued at $40,000; wife was Martha E. Warfield, born in Carrol Co. 
Md. Aug. 28, 1833; married Oct. 20. 1853; has six children. 

SMITH D. L. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Cong; from Canada. 

SMITH FREDERICK, Sec. 15; P.O. Geneseo; rents the M. F. Stimson farm; Dem; Luth. 

SMITH HENRY, Sec. 5; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from England. 

SMITH JOHN F. Sec. 13; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Kane Co. Ill; 192 acres. 

SMITH JOHN H. Farmer and Stock Feeder, Sec. 16; P.O. Geneseo; born in Prussia, 
Nov. 17, 1820; came to Somerset Co. Pa. in 1841, and to this county in 1852; Ind. Dem; 
Evang; owns 640 acres of land, valued at $40,000; wife was Anna Meais, born in Alleghany 
Co. Pa. Nov. 5, 1826; married Nov. 24, 1849; has four children, Anna Elizabeth, Nancy, 
Mary Ellen, and John H., Jr. 

SMITH J. S. Geneseo; Painter and Broom Maker; born Franklin Co. Vt. Dec. 13, 1842; 
came to Co. 1856; Rep; Bapt; wife was Sophia E. Hawley, born in Ohio, 1842; married Feb. 
20, 1861; has three children. 

SMITH JOHN T. Geneseo; finisher; Ind; Cath; from Canada. 

SMITH NATHANIEL, Rev. Geneseo; Rep; Cong; from Vt. 

SMITH NATHAN S. Sec. 29; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Meth; born in Ohio; 60 ac. $5,000. 

SMITH RODNEY R. Sec. 28; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Bapt; 15 acres. 

SltllTH W. A. Geneseo; student of law and stenographer; Rep; born 111. 

SMITH WILLIAM, Geneseo; attorney at law; Rep; born in Palmer, Mass. 

SMITH WM. J. Veterinary Surgeon, Geneseo; born in Jefferson Co. Tenn. May 31, 1820; 
moved to Joliet, 111. in 1835, and to this county in 1866; Rep; Meth; studied and practiced 
Veterinary Surgery in Joliet about twelve years; in 1 S48 joined R. R. Conference of the M. E. 
Church; was in active work eighteen years; in 1866 ook a superannuated relation and settled 
in Galva; removed to Kansas in 1871; returned to this town in 1875; married Miss Lydia 
Harrington at Joliet, 111. June 19, 1845; has three sons and three daughters. 

SMOLL HENRY, Geneseo; laborer on R.R.; Dem. 

SMOLL CHARLES, Geneseo; laborer on R.R.; Dem, 

SNIFF P. H. Geneseo; miller; Ind; from Pa. 

SNOW LYMAN, Geneseo; retired; Rep; Cong; from Mass; came to Co. 1840. 

SOMMERS F. Geneseo; teamster; Rep; Evang; from Germany. 

SPAFFORD SAMUEL, Geneseo; cattle dealer; Rep; born X.Y. 

SPENCER Mrs. widow; P.O. Geneseo; Meth; from Vt. 

SPRECKER JOHN, Sec. 15; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Ind; Luth; from Germany. 

SPRAKEN J NO. Geneseo; laborer; Dem. 

STAFFORD I. A. Geneseo; engineer; Prot; from N.Y 

STAFFORD JOS. F. Geneseo; carpenter; Rep; Prot; from N.Y. 

STAFFORD ISAAC, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Prot. 

STAFFORD W. H. P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Prot. 

STAFFORD F. B. Geneseo; R.R. employe; Dem; Prot. 

STAHL CHAS. F. Sec. 34; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Ind; Luth; from Germany; 170 ac. $8,500. 

STAHL HENRY J., P.O. Geneseo; lives with father, C. F. Stahl; Ind; Luth; born Geneseo Tp, 

STALEEN P. A. Geneseo; dealer in boots and shoes; Rep; Unit; from Sweden. 

STAMBERGER GEO. Geneseo; farmer; Evang; from Germany. 

STAMM MARTIN, Geneseo; minister Evang. Assoc; Rep; from Switzerland. 

STAMM GEO. J. Geneseo; Dem; German. 

STATES T. K. Sec. 22; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born in N.Y.; 80 acres, $7,000. 

STEAD A. J. Rev. Geneseo; Rep; Pres; from Pa. 

STEADMAN L. M. Mrs. widow; Geneseo; Prot; from Ohio. 

STEELE K. F. Geneseo; Real Estate Dealer and Insurance Agent; born in Hillsborough 
Co. N. H., Jan. 10, 1831; came to county 1857; Rep; wife was Anna E. Hardy, born in same 
county, May, 1833; has one child, Abbie F.; Mr. Steele is serving his third term as Mayor of 
the City of Geneseo; was Commissary Sergeant in 112th I.V. I.; has been Justice of the Peace 
eight years; was Postmaster two years. 

18 



216 VOTEES AND TAXPAYERS OF 

STEERE JOB, Geneseo; building mover; Dem; Prot; from R. I. 

STEERE W. S. P.O. Geneseo; tinner; Rep; Prot; from R. I. 

STEFFEN HENRY, Geneseo; laborer; from Germany. 

STEIN FKED. Geneseo; Watchmaker and Jeweler, also Dealer in Sewing Machines; born 
in Germany, June 20, 1841; came to county i860; Ind; wife was Mary Zimmerman, born in 
Germany 1845; married Sept. 5, 1867; has four children; was in army four years. 

STEIN SAMUEL, Geneseo; saloon; Dem; from Germany. 

STEBZER CHARLES, Sec. i; P.O. Geneseo; rents farm of S. Stough; Dem; from Germany. 

STEPHENSON STEPH. Sec. 17; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

STEWART E. M. Geneseo; lumber dealer; Ind. Rep; Cong; from N.Y. 

STEWART I. N. Geneseo; grocer; Rep; Cong; from N.Y. 

STEWART J. P. Geneseo; cashier of Farmers' National Bank; Rep; from N.Y. 

STEWART MARGARET Mrs. Sec. 12; P.O. Geneseo; from Pa; 160 acres. 

STEWART RICHARD, Geneseo; stonecutter; Rep; Meth; from England. 

STEWART WM. Sec. 12; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Penn. 

STEWART W. J. lives with father, E. M. Stewart; Rep; Cong; born 111. 

STIEBEL HENRY, Clothing Merchant, Geneseo; born in Germany, Sept. 11, 1838; 
came to this country in 1854, and to this county in 1S65; Dem; Israelite ; owns house and 
lot, value $2,500; married Miss Jennie May at Cincinnati, Ohio, March 16, 1870; she was 
born in Germany, Sept. 15, 1851; has two children, Julia, horn Jan. 11, 1871, and David, 
born Feb. 27, 1S73, both in this town. 

STILES JAMES, Geneseo; Rep; born in New Jersey. 

STILZ GOTTLIEB, Sec. 28; P.O Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Luth; born Germany; 81 acres. 

STILES SAML. Geneseo; peddler; Rep; Meth; from N. J. 

STILES RUFUS H. Geneseo; canvasser; Rep; Prot. 

STIMSON LIBERTY, Farmer, Sec. 15; P.O. Geneseo; born in Middlesex Co. Mass. 
Feb. g, 1807; came to Bureau Co. in 1836, and to this county in 1837; Dem; owns 181 acres 
of land, valued at $11,000; first wife was Leah Clark, of Bureau Co; second wife was 
Remembrance Evans; third wife was Hannah E. Evans, born in Washington Co. July 4, 
1826; married Feb. 12, i86g. 

.STOKES C. W. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from Minn, 

STOKES JNO. W. P.O. Geoeseo; farm hand; Dem. 

STOUGH JONAS, Geneseo; gardener; Rep; Christian; born in Penn. 

STROM B. S. Mrs. widow, Geneseo; carpet weaver; Meth, from Sweden. 

STROUSE SAML. Geneseo; carpenter; Rep; Prot; from Ohio. 

STUKEE CHARLES, Geneseo; brickmaker; Dem; Cath; from Germany. 

STUKEE HENRY, Geneseo; blacksmith; Dem; Cath; from Germany. 

STURMAN LEWIS C. Geneseo; laborer; Dem; from Ohio. 

SWANSEN ANDREW, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Meth; from Sweden. 

SWEENEY J. M. Geneseo; furniture dealer; Rep; Meth; from Vt. 

SWENEY C. E. Geneseo; livery stable; Dem; from Ohio. 

SWENEY PAUL A. Geneseo; livery stable; Dem; from Ohio. 

SWANK JNO. Geneseo; laborer. 

'T^AVLOR J. W. Mrs. owns residence; Cong. 

TAMME L. Geneseo; tailor; Luth; from Germany. 
TAMME FRED. Geneseo; cigar-maker; Ind; Luth; from Pa. 
TAYLOR A. Geneseo; retired; Dem; from Vt. 
TAYLOR P. H. Geneseo; grocer; Rep; Cong; born in Vt. 
TAYLOR E. Geneseo. 

TAYLOR THOMAS, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Prot. 
TEE ALBERT, Geneseo; clerk; Rep; Prot; born in 111. 
TELL WM. Geneseo; trapper; Dem; Luth; from Germany. 
TETTER PHILIP, Geneseo; laborer; Dem; born Illinois. 

THAYER C. L. Geneseo; telegraph operator; Dem; Prot; from N.Y. 

THAYER WARREN, Geneseo; retired farmer; Rep; Prot; from Mass. 



HEXRY COUNTY : GENESEO TOWNSHIP. 217 

THOMAS JAMES, Geneseo; hostler; Dem. 

THOMAS H. Geneseo; butter and eggs dealer; Rep; Cong; from Me. 

THOMAS JOEL A. Geneseo; Painter; born in Henry Co. Ill, Jan. 12, 1844; Rep; Meth; 

wife was Agnes Harrington, born June 26, 1853; married Sept. I, 1870; has two children; 

was in army; Mr. Thomas does all kinds of house, sign and carriage painting. 
THOMAS WALTER, Geneseo; toy store; from N.V. 
THOMPSON H. L. Geneseo; carpenter; Rep; Cong; from N.Y. 

THOMPSON WM. H. Sec. 12; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from Ireland; 160 acres. 
THOMPSON PHILANDER, Geneseo; warehouse laborer; Rep; Meth. 
THOMPSON W. H. P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Prot. 
THORN WM. Geneseo; retired; Rep. 
TIFT FRANK R. Geneseo; blacksmith; Rep; from Ohio. 
TILLEMANN E. Geneseo; blacksmith; Rep; Cath; from Belgium. 
TILTON J. C. Geneseo; mnfr. of jewelry; Rep; from N. H, 
TILTON N. G. Geneseo; picture frame dealer; Rep; from N. H. 
TILTON S. A. Mrs. Geneseo; from N. H. 

TIMMERMAN FRANKLIN P. P.O. Geneseo; farm hand with W. Young; Ind; from N.Y. 
TITUS JOHN, Geneseo; blacksmith; Dem; Cath; from Germany. 
TOLINE CHARLES, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Swede. 
TOPPING WM. J. Geneseo; farmer; born Canada. 
TORNOW J. G. Geneseo; laborer; Dem. 
TORANCE A. M. Geneseo; laborer; Dem; Cath. 
TOWERS J. F. Geneseo; works on railroad; Dem; from Canada. 
TOWXLEY ROBERT F. Wagon and Carriage Mannfacturer, Geneseo; born in Wayne 

Co. Mich. July 12, 1838; came to this county in 1838; Rep; Lib; owns residence and other 

real estate, value $3,000; was private in Co. H, igth Regiment I. V. I. (Chicago Zouaves); 

married Miss Mary Santee in this county, April 6, 1871; she is a native of Pa; has one 

son, Arthur A. born in this town April 27, 1874. 
TOWSLEE S. C. Geneseo; salesman; Rep; born in Ohio. 
TUFTS JOHN, Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from Me. 
TUFTS J. C. Geneseo; clerk; Rep; Cong. 
TURNER GEO. Geneseo; carpenter; Rep. 
TUTTLE O. A. Geneseo; clerk; Rep; from N.Y. 
TUTTLE DANIEL, Geneseo; retired; Rep; Meth. 
TWIGG ROBERT, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; 80 acres. 



U 



NBIN JACOB, laborer; Dem; Luth; from Germany. 



WAN ORSDALL JOHN, Sec. i; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; U. Breth; from Ohio; 60 acres. 
^ VERECKE JOHN, Geneseo; R.R. shop; Dem; Cath; from Holland. 

VANSICKLE ED. P.O. Geneseo; farm laborer; Rep; Prot. 

VAIV VALKENBURG E. P. Geneseo; Merchant; born in Herkimer Co. N. Y. July 
3, 1832; Rep; Cong: wife was Lucy A. Smith, born Herkimer Co. N.Y. Feb. 13, 1834; mar- 
ried March 18, 1856; has six children, Minnie A. Edward P. William S. Fannie H., J. 
Weber, Louisa M. 

VAN WIIVKLE ADRIAN, Shipper of Hay and Straw, Geneseo; born in Essex Co. N. 
Y. July 17, 1809; came to Franklin Co. 111. in 1821, and to this county in 1837; Rep; owns 
town property valued at $6,000; wife was Margery Taylor, born in Champaign Co. Ohio, July 
31, 1816; married Nov. i, 1837; has four children. 

VOSS PATRICK, Sec. 7; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 

VOGLE,JNO. A. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; German. 

^ITAEIS ANDREW, Geneseo; laborer; Luth; from Germany. 

WAGGONER HENRY, P.O. Geneseo; farm hand with J. Waggoner; from Germany. 
WAGGONER JOHN, Sec. 14; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Evang; from Germany; 80 acres. 
WAHL FRED, Geneseo; blacksmith; Luth; from Germany. 



218 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

WAIT GEOKGE E. Jiulg-e, Geneseo; Attorn ey-at-Law; born in Windham Co. Vt.; 
came to this county 1S55; Rep; married Hattie N. Wells, of Conn. May g, 1859; has three 
daughters, Hattie M. Laura N. and Ruth; Judge Wait graduated at Wesleyan University, 
Conn. Class of '54; was elected first Mayor of Geneseo, was re-elected; held the office of 
County Judge for six years; he also was commissioned Collector by Governor Yates early in 
1864; he was a member of the Constitutional Convention that framed the Constitution of 
1870; has been member State Central Committee; went to Springfield and procured the 
charter of Geneseo. 

WAITE O. C. Mrs. Geneseo; Cong; from N. Y. 

WALDO S. H. Geneseo; teacher of Geneseo select school; Rep; Pres; from Conn. 

WALKER GEO. miller for Ott Bros; Rep; Prot; from England. 

WALIN Mrs. Geneseo; Luth; from Sweden. 

WALSTON CHARLES, Geneseo; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

WALTZ MAT. Geneseo; carpenter; Ind; Evang; from Germany. 

WARD M. M. Mrs. Geneseo; Cong; from Ohio. 

WARD P. S. Geneseo; retired farmer; Rep; Cong; from Conn. 

WARD THOS Sec. 18; P.O. Geneseo; farm hand with J. Harper; from Eng. 

WARE JOEL. P.O. Geneseo; retired farmer; Rep; Cong; from N. H.; owns 20 ac; val. $2,000. 

WARNER JOHN, Geneseo; carpenter; Evang; from Canada. 

WARRANT MICHAEL, Geneseo; laborer; Cath; Ireland. 

WARREN JAMES, Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 

WARREN WM. P.O. Geneseo; carpenter; Pres; from Eng; 3 acres, $1,300. 

WATERMAN LEVI, Geneseo; clothier and brewer; Dem; from Germany. 

WAUBEIN ROBERT, P.O. Geneseo; farm laborer. 

WAY E. M. Geneseo; soap factory; Rep; Meth; from Conn. 

WEBB SAMUEL, Geneseo; coml. trav; Rep; Cong; from Me. 

WEDIN S. A. Geneseo; shoemaker; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

WEEKS JOS. Geneseo; laborer; Cath; German. 

WEGREEN JOHN, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

WEGREN JOHN, Geneseo; blacksmith; from Sweden. 

WEIGANT GEO. Sec. 30; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Luth; born in Germany; 80 acres. 

WEIMER ISRAEL, P.O. Geneseo; farmer: with Wm. Weimer; Dem; from Pa. 

WEIMER SAMUEL, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem. 

WEIMER WILLIAM, Farmer; Sec. 2; P.O. Geneseo; born in Westmoreland Co. Pa. 
May 29, 1837; came to this county in 1852; Dem; U. Breth; owns 510 acres of land, valued 
at $16,000; wife was Susanna Heller, born in Loraine Tp. Henry Co. April 24, 1844; mar- 
ried Oct. 30, 1862; has seven children. 

WEINREICH B. Mrs. widow; Geneseo; Luth; from Germany. 

WEINKICH WILLIAM, Farmer; Sec. 30; P.O. Geneseo; born in Germany March 7, 
1828; came to this county in 1855; Rep; Meth; owns 160 acres of land; married Gustina 
Kipping in 1852; she was born in Germany Dec. 19, 1830; ten children; nine living, viz.: 
Emma, born Nov. 23, 1852; Clara, March 7, 1858; Christina, March 10, i860; Frederick, 
June 15, 1862; William, Nov. 4, 1S64; Matilda, July 3, 1S67; Edward, May 20, 1869; Char- 
ley, Nov. 14, 1871; and Herman, Sept. 11, 1875, all born in Illinois except Emma, who was 
born in St. Louis, Mo. 

WEISE PETER, Geneseo; laborer; Cath; German. 

WEITZ CONRAD, Geneseo, carpenter; Rep; Luth; from Germany. 

WELCH FRANK, P.O. Geneseo; farmhand; Rep. 

WELLS GEO. S. Geneseo; Retired Farmer; born in Windham Co. Vt. Oct. 27, 1834; 
came to this county 1855; Rep; married Ellen P. Stewart, of Livingston Co. N. Y. Oct. 4, 
1859; she was born Feb. 29, 1840; has one child, Fred Bertie, born Nov. 22, 1872. Mr. 
Wells is son of Governor John S. Wells, of N. H. who was U. S. Senator during Pierce's 
administration. 

WELLS GEO. V. Geneseo; photographer; Dem; from Mo. 

WELLS I. R. Geneseo; Physician and Surgeon; born in Gallatin Co. 111. Feb. iS, 1820; came 
to this county in 1850; Dem; wife was Jane Graham, of N. Y.; married July, 1858; has four 
children by first wife. Dr. Wells was supervisor in 1857 and 1858- has also been president of 
School BDard for four years; he was president of Iowa ,^nd Nortltern 111. Medical Associa- 
tion in 1872. The Dr. is a graduate of the University of N Y 



HENRY COUNTY : GENESEO TOWNSHIP. 219 

WELL EDWARD, Geneseo; laborer; Dem; Luth; from Germany. 

WELLS GEO. Geneseo; retired merchant; Rep; born in Mass. 

WELLS J. E. Geneseo; druggist; Dem; born 111. 

WELLS R. J. Geneseo; insurance agent; Rep; Cong; born 111. 

WELTON M. Geneseo; fireman; Rep; Epis. 

WELTON MARVIN, P.O. Geneseo; laborer. 

WEST GEO. W. Geneseo; farmer and stock dealer; Rep; from N. Y. 

WESTERBLO ANDREW, Sec. 5; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Meth; from Sweden. 

WESTERBLO AUGUST, P.O. Geneseo; with Andrew Westerblo; Rep; from Sweden. 

WESTERGREN CHARLES, Geneseo; carpenter; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

WESTON A. A. Geneseo; born Me. 

WESTON FRANK, Geneseo; Rep; from 111. 

WESTON THOMAS, Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born Pa. 

WHEATON GEO. M. Geneseo; blacksmith; Rep; from N. Y. 

WHEELER E. P. Geneseo; jeweler; Ind; from N. Y. 

WHITCOM'B WILLIAM, Geneseo; Rep; from Vt. 

WHITE ALBERT H. Geneseo; tinner; Rep; Prot; from N. Y. 

.WHITE B. Geneseo; mason; Rep; from Conn. 

WHITE HENRY, Geneseo; hunter; Rep; Epis; born Eng. 

WHITE HENRY, Geneseo; laborer; Dem. 

WHITNEY JACKSON, Geneseo; constable; Dem; born N, Y. 

WICKS JOSEPH, Sec. 19; P.O. Geneseo; lab. for G. Grain; Rep; born N. Y. city. 

WIDDERQUIST LUDWIG, P.O. Geneseo; farmer. 

WIDENHIFT HERMAN, P.O. Geneseo, farm hand with J. H. Smith; Evang; from Germany 

WIDENHOEFT JULIUS, Geneseo; tailor; from Germany. 

WIDEN HOFT MATES, Geneseo; Luth; from Germany. 

WIDNER ABEL, P.O. Geneseo; works farm for R. A. Jenkins; Dem. Meth; from Iowa. 

WIEDENHOEFT G. M. Geneseo; from Germany. 

WIENEKE CHRIST. Geneseo; laborer; German. 

WIGAN GEO. P.O. Geneseo; retired farmer; Luth; from Germany. 

WIGAND A. P.O. Geneseo; farm laborer. 

WIGREAN ANDREW J. Geneseo; laborer; from Sweden. 

WILCOX GEO. A. Geneseo; lives with his father; Rep; Cong. 

WILCOX ROYAL M. P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Cong. 

WILDMAN FRANK, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; born in Ohio. 

WILL FRANK, Geneseo; carpenter; Rep; Pres; born in Virginia. 

WILL EDWARD, Geneseo; carpenter; Rep. 

WILLS JNO. Geneseo; carpenter; Rep; Prot. 

WILLS T. J. Geneseo; carpenter; Rep; Prot. 
WILLIAMS F. M., P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Cong. 
WILLIAMS H. C. Geneseo; laborer; Rep. 

WILSON ABNER, Sec. 30; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Meth; born N.J.; 240 acres. 
WILSON GEORGE, Sec. 32; P.O. Geneseo; farmer with W. Wilson; Rep; born in N.J. 
WILSON GEORGE, Geneseo; banker; Rep; N.Y. 
WILSON HIRAM, Geneseo; banker; Rep; from N.Y. 

WILSON I. N. Geneseo; grain dealer, firm of McB. & W.; Rep; Pres; from N.Y. 
WILSOX JOSEPH W. Farmer, Sec. 31; P.O. Geneseo; born in New Jersey, July 10, 
1846- came to this county in 1861; Rep; Meth; owns 80 acres of land, valued at $4,800; 
wife was Georgie L. Wood, born in Vermont, July 8, 1848; married Sept. 9, 1867; two chil- 
dren, Cora and Minnie both living. 
WIL.SOIS' WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 32; P.O. Geneseo; born in New Jersey, July 5, 1816; 
came to this county in 1S61; Rep; Pres; owns So acres of land, valued at $6,000; wife was 
Charloite Martindale, born in New Jersey, Feb. 16, 1817; married June 11, 1842; four chil- 
dren, all now living. 
WINDISCH WM. Geneseo; shoemaker; Dem; Luth; from Germany. 



220 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

WINTISCH HENRY, Geneseo; saloon; Dem; Prot; from Germany. 

WITHROW AMARIAH, P.O. Geneseo; with Wm. VVinthrow; Rep; born Henry Co. 

WITHROW JOHN M., P.O. Geneseo; farmer with Wm. Withrow; Rep; born Henry Co. 

WITHROW SOLON J. Geneseo; clerk; Rep; Meth; born in Henry Co. 

WITHROW WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 17; P.O. Geneseo; horn in White Co. III. Nov. 

2, 1823; came to this county in 1846; Rep; Meth; owns five acres of land, valued at $1,500; 

served two years in the army, in the War of the Rebellion; wife was S. Caroline May, born 

in White Co. 111. July 5, 1S17; married Maich 21, 1847; has five children. 
WITTICH JNO. H. P.O. Geneseo; farm laborer; Dem; German. 
WOLCOTT M. F. Geneseo; mercht. at Briar Bluff; Rep; Cong. 
WOLCOTT HOMER, Geneseo; retired farmer; Rep; born Mass. 
WOLF JACOB, Sec. 16; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Evang; from Germany. 
WOOD A. Sec. 33; P.O. Geneseo; farmer for E. Farwell; Rep; born in N.Y. 
WOOD ALBERT, P.O. Geneseo; with R. M. Deming; Rep; from Ohio. 
WOOD E. A. Geneseo; stock dealer; born in Windsor Co. Vt. Sept. 24, 1S23; came to this 

county in 1858; wife was Eliza A. Davis, born in Windsor Co. Vt. Feb. 2, 1830; married in 

November, 1850; has two children, Flora M. and Harry E. 
WOOD F. L. P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Prot. 
WOOD HENRY, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Prot. 
WOODRUFF Mrs. Geneseo; Cong; from Ohio. 
WOODRUFF G. C. Rev. Geneseo; pastor of Meth. Church at Annawan; born in Essex 

Co. N.Y. Dec. 16, 1807; came to county in 1855; Rep; wife was Pauline Danforth, born in 

Franklin Co. N.Y. March 7, 1813; married in August, 1832; has three children living; 

buried two; has been Presiding Elder eight years; has preached forty-eight years. 
WOODRUFF HARVEY, Geneseo; carpenter; Dem; Prot; from N.Y. 

WOODRUFF HARVEY, Jr. Geneseo; "laborer for Kendall & Kidder; Dem; Prot; from Wis. 
WOODRUFF LEROY E. Geneseo; ice dealer; Rep; Meth; from N.Y. 
WOODRUFF PLEASANT, Geneseo; carpenter; Dem; Prot; bom in Illinois. 
WOODRUFF L. B. Geneseo; restaurant; Dem; Bapt. 
WOODRUFF SIMON, Geneseo; laborer; Dem. 
WORRALL PETER, Geneseo; Railroad Contractor; born in Cheshire, Eng. Jan. 28, 

1826; came to this county in 1857; Ind; Epis; wife was Maria Clark, of same place, born 

May II, 1828; married Dec. 11, 1850; has three children, Anne M., Telia, and James C. 
WORTHINGTON DAVID, Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Prot; from Ohio. 

WORTHINGTON HENRY C. Sec. 31; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; born in Pa; 100 ac. 
WYATT THOMAS, Geneseo; coal digger; Rep; Epis. 
WYCKOFF CLIIVTOIV, Farmer, Sec. 22; P.O. Geneseo; born in New York City; came 

to this county in 1845; Rep; his father, R. T. Wyckoff, left N.Y. in 1844, and arrived in 

this county in the Spring of 1845; was pjst-master in 1S46; died in Geneseo, in September 

of 1846. 
WYNES G. L. Geneseo; clerk for Rosenstone; Dem; Cath; from Ohio. 
WYNES G. S. Geneseo; foreman in shoe store; Dem; Cath; from Ohio. 

AT'OUELLS AMOS, Geneseo; blacksmith; Rep; born Pa. 

YOUNG ADAM, P.O. Geneseo; farmer for F. Bolen; Dem; from Indiana. 

YOUNG R. T. Geneseo; grain and lumber dealer; Dem; from N.Y. 

YOUNGS CHAS. Geneseo; retired; Rep; Epis; from N.Y. 

YOUNG WALTER, Sec. 22; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from N.Y.; 81 acres. 

YOUNGS HENRY, Geneseo; Capitalist; born in N.Y. City, Aug. I, 1839, and resided 
there till he came to Henry Co. in 1859; Rep; Cong; wife was Marion A. Hart, born in 
Jefferson Co. N.Y. Jan. 2, 1847; married March i, 1869; has three children — Agnes May, 
born Feb. 26, 1870;" Henry, born Dec. 26, 1871; Jessie Blanch, born Oct. 16, 1873; served 
four years in I.V.I. 

YOUNGS OLIVER, Retired Farmer; P.O. Geneseo; born in Goshen, Orange Co. N. Y. 
Nov. 16, 1842; came to county 1S56; Rep; Epis; owns 4>^ acres in town, value $5,000; 
wife was AUie F. Kidder; married Sept. 21, 1869; three children living. 

YOUNKER JOEL B. Geneseo; retired; Dem; from Pa. 

YOUNKER PLINKNEY L. P.O. Geneseo; farmer. 



HENRY COTTNTY: GENESEO TOWNSHIP. 221 

y ABEL HERMANN, P.O. Geneseo; farm hand with C. B.Smith; from Germany. 
^ ZIMMERMAN DAN'L F. furniture dealer; Dem; Prot; from Germany. 
ZIMMERMAN GOTTLOB, Geneseo; wagon-maker; Rep; Luth; from Germany. 
ZIMMERS ELIAS, Sec. ii; P.O. Geneseo; rents farm of Hellyer; Rep; from Whiteside Co. 



Business Directory. 



GENESEO. 

Applebee Thomas, Livery Stable. 

Campbell L. C. Justice of the Peace, and Notary Public. 

Chamberlln & Canfield, (Successors to J. F. Corle,) Dry Goods, Carpets, 
Notions, Hats, Caps, Boots, Shoes, Dressmaking and Millinery. 

Chamberlain Sam. Owner of the imported Norman French Stallions " Estraba" 
and "Bashaw Drury," and the Canadian Stallion "Scotch Giant." Horses 
bought and sold for cash or on commission. 

Christian & Kiner, Publishers and Proprietors Henry Comity News. 

Davis & Hayward, Soap Manufacturers. 

Dedrick & Lawrence Dealers in Staple and Fancy Groceries. 

Drain G. W. & Co. Saloon and Billiard Hall. 

Dunham Charles, Attorney at Law. 

Engdahl Jno. Merchant Tailor. 

Farmers' National Bank, Organized in 1876. Cash Capital $50,000, Surplus 
$2,000. Levi Waterman, Prest., E. C. Gilbert, Vice Brest., Jno. P. Stew- 
art, Cashier ; Directors, Levi Waterman, E. C. Gilbert, Chas. Dunham, R. 
F. Steele, N. C. Howard, E. P. Van Valkenburg, R. Harrington, P. S. 
Schnabele, Thos. Nowers, Jr. 

First National Bank, Jas. McBroom, Prest.; S. T. Hume, Vice Prest.; Hiram 
Wilson, Cashier; C. M. Morton, Asst. Cashier; Directors, Geo Wells, W. 
Sanford, Geo. Wilson, Hiram Wilson, S. T. Hume, Jas. McBroom, Henry 
Nourse. Bank was organized 1864. Cash Capital, $100,000 ; present 
Surplus, 150,000. 

Fisher Bros. Hardware. 

Geisser G. & Co. Props. National Brewery. 

Godfrey Geo. F. Mason. 

Godfrey Wm. & Co. City Meat Market. 

Grant J. D. & Son, Agricultural Warehouse and Seed Store. Agents for the 

most approved Farm Machinery manufactured. 
Gray Jno. Manfr. and Dealer in Harness, Saddles, Collars, Bridles, Curry 

Combs, Brushes, Whips, Blankets, Nets, Trunks, Valises, etc. 
Greene Jas. Photographer, Negatives retained for future use. 
Herman & Waterman, Clothiers and Brewers 
Hobbs & Liberknecht, Publishers Geneseo Republic. 
Hoppins Henry I. M. D., Physician and Surgeon. Acute and Chronic Diseases, 

both sexes, successfully treated. 



222 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

Hoppins Annie M. Mrs. M. D., Special attention to Diseases of Women and Chil- 
dren, Medical and Surgical. City or Country calls promptly answered. 

HumeS. T. Physician and Surgeon. 

Kinzie R. A. Music Dealer. Keeps Pianos and Organs of the best and most 
celebrated makes continually on hand. A full line of Guitars, Violins, 
Accordeons, Strings, Sheet Music, Music Books, sold for cash and on easy 
time. Pianos tuned, Organs repaired, and satisfaction guaranteed. Piano 
and Organ repairs furnished to order. All orders promptly attended to. 
Address, R. A. Kinzie, P. O. Box, 37 Geneseo, 111. 

Lawbaugh Henry, Grain Dealer. 

Machesney David L. Physician and Surgeon. 

IVIoderwei! E. C. Attorney and Counselor at Law. 

Baser & Neiswender, City Marble Works. 

Sargent D. F. & Son, Manufacturers of fine Buggies and Carriages. Repairing, 
Painting, Trimming, etc., done promptly and reasonably. We use none 
but the best material. 

Schnabele P. S. Merchant Tailor, Clothier, etc. Notary Public, Emigrant and 
Insurance Agent. 

Shaw Geo. W. Attorney at Law. Furnishes Abstracts of Titles to Real Estate. 

Smith J. S. Painter and Broom Maker. 

Smith Wm. J. Veterinary Surgeon. 

Steele R. F. Real Estate, Collector and Insurance Agent. 

Stein Fred. Dealer in Watches, Jewelry and Silverware. Agent for the new 
Wilson Shuttle Sewing Machine. 

Steibel Henry, Clothing. 

Thomas Joel H. House, Sign and Carriage Painting. 
Townley Robt. F. Wagon and Carrriage Manufactiirer. 
Van Valkenburg & Kinsey, Dealers in Dry Goods. 
Van Winkle Adrian, Shipper of Hay and Straw. 
Wait Geo. E. Attorney and Counselor at Law. 
Wells I. R. Physician and Surgeon. 
Wood E. A. Stock Dealer. 
Worrall Peter, Railroad Contractor. 




^>^^ 



HENRY L. KINER, 

Editor of Henry County News, 

Geneseo. 



HENRY COUNTY : CORNWALL TOWNSHIP. 225 



CORNWALL TOWNSHIP. 

A BY JOHN, Sec. 9; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for J. Wells; Ind; Meth; born Pa. 
'^^ AFFOLTER FREDERICK, Sec. 24; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Ind; from Switzerland. 
ALLEN JOHN, Sec. 29; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for W.Allen; Rep; Pres; born Ireland. 
ALLEN S. C. Sec. 9; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for J. Novvers; Dem; Meth; born Virginia. 
ALLEN WILLIAM, Sec. 29; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Pres; born Ireland. 
ANDERSON JOHN, Sec. 33; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for M. Orr; Luth; born Sweden. 
ANDERSON MICHAEL, Sec. 16; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for John Fleming; Dem; Cath; Eng. 
ANDERSON THOMAS, P.O. Atkinson; farmer for James Orr; Pres; born England. 
ARMSTRONG GEORGE, Sec. 21; P.O. Atkinson; farmer with H. Armstrong; Rep; Bapt; Pa. 
ARMSTRONG HUGH, Sec. 21; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Pres; Ireland; 280 acres. 
ATWELL HENRY, Sec. 15; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for S. McConoughey; from England. 

"P ALLARD ROYAL B. Sec. 33; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for J. Clark; Rep; Meth; born Canada. 
^ BECKER GEORGE, Sec. 28; P.O. Atkinson; lab. for M. Orr. 

BEIVEDICT A. J. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 15; P.O. Atkinson; born in Addison 
Co., Vt., Oct. 4, 1838; came lo this Co. in 1852; Rep; owns 160 acres of land, valued at 
$8,000; wife was Margaret J. Dickey, born in Kentucky, June 21, 1838; was married Oct. 
4, 1861. One child, a girl, blessed their union. 

BENEDICT C. R. Sec. 33; P.O. Atkinson; grocer;. Ind. 

BENEDICT DOLLY, widow; Sec. 15; P.O. Atkinson; Cong; born Vermont. 

BENEDICT E. F. Sec. 27; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Ind; from Vermont; 160 acres. 

BENEDICT GEO. W. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 15; P.O. Atkinson; born in Corn- 
wall, Vt., Oct. 14, 1836; came to this Co. in 1852; Rep; owns 165 acres land, valued at 
$10,000; was Town Clerk for several years; served nearly three ysars in II2th 111. Infantry; 
was honorably discharged; married Lydia A. Btown May 25, 1869; two children, boy and 
girl; Elijah B., his father, was County .Surveyor for years; died May 6, 1876. 

BENEDICT H. G. Sec. 27; P.O. Atkinson; teacher; Ind; from Illinois. 

BENSON HARVEY L. Sec. 18; P.O. Gencseo; farmer for L. Shearer; Dem; born lUinuis. 

BENSON JOHN, Sec. 33; P.O. Atkinson; lab. for M. Orr; Luth; from Sweden. 

BLACK JEROME, Sec. 14; farmer; Rep; Christian; born Ohio; 240 acres. 

BLAIR JOHN, Sec. 14; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for M. Blair; Dem; from Pa. 

BLAIR MARGARET, widow; Sec. 14; P.O. Atkinson; Meth; from Ireland; 80 acres. 

BOIGEGRAIN CHAS. A. Sec. 18; P.O. Geneseo; farmer for L. Shearer; Ind; Cath; born Ohio. 

BOLEN N. C. Sec. 30; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Bapt; born Ohio; 80 acres. 

BRADFORD WILLIAM W, Sec. i; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Free Meth; born Indiana. 

BRASEL E S. Sec. 36; P.O. Kewanee; farmer for J. Lawson; Dem; born Illinois. 

BRAU JOHN, Sec. l3;P.O. Atkinson; farmer for C. Jacobson; Rep; from Germany. 

BRISTOL SAMUEL, Sec. 7, P.O. Cambridge; miner; Rep; Meth; born 111. 

BROADBENT ROBERT, Sec. 24, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; from England; 240 acres. 

BUKGET SILAS, Farmer, Sec. 29, P.O. Atkinson; born in Indiana, July 2, 1840; came 
to this county in 1852;' Rep; owns 320 acres of land, valued at $20,000; wife was Mary Orr, 
born in Ireland, May 2, 1843, married in Oct. 1850; eight children, six boys and two girls, 
seven living. 

/^ALLENDER ISAAC, Sec. 21, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Pres; from Ky.; 80 acres. 
^ CALLENDER S. A. wife of I. Callender, Sec. 21, P.O. Atkinson; Pres; from Mass.; 160 ac. 
CASTEEL, ALEXANDER, Farmer, Sec. 27, P.O. Atkinson; born in Bedford Co. Pa. 

Feb. 3, 1849; came to this county in 1861; Rep; owns 80 acres of land, valued at $5,000; 

wife was Christina Orr, born in Lancaster Co. Pa. Aug. 25, 1850, married Nov. 2, 1870; two 

children, Johnnie and Mary, Mary only is now living. 
CASTEEL JOHN H. Sec. 30, P.O. Atkinson; lab. for N. C. Bolen; Rep; born Maryland. 
19 



2^6 - VOTERS And taxpayers oj* 

CLARK MATTHEW, P.O. Atkinson; farmer for D. T. Dickey; Rep; from England. 
CLEMENT JOHN, Sec. 25, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; Meth; born Canada; 80 acres. 
CLEMENT ROBERT, with J. Clement, Sec. 25, P.O. Neponset; Ind; Epis; born Ireland. 
COLD MARGARET, Wid. Sec. 10, P.O.Atkinson; Meth; born 111; 12 acres. 
COLLIXS PETER, Farmer, Sec. 3, P.O. Atkinson; born in Belgium in May, 1831; came 

to this county in 1S57; Cath; married Monika Vonaker in Sept. 1866, in Belgium; three 

children, all of whom are living. 
CONNELL BERNARD, Sec. 25, P.O. Kewanee; farmer for D. Maloney; Dem; Cath; Ireland. 
COX JONATHAN, Sec. 16, P.O. Atkinson; farmer for Levi Fronk; Dem; Bapt; born 111. 
CRAWFORD ARCHIBALP, Sec, 28, P.O. Atkinson; lab, for M, Orr; Rep; born N.Y, 

"r\ARLrN FRANK, Sec, 4, P.O, Atkinson; farmer for T, J, Trekell; Rep; from N.Y. 
^ DEMARANVILLE LORIN, Sec. 4, P.O. Atkinson; farmer for T. J. Trekell; Rep; Mass. 
DeSMIT peter. Sec. 25, P.O. Annawan; farmer for J. Schwab; Cath; born Holland. 
DICKEY DAVID T. Sec, 27, P,0. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Bapt; from Ky.; 240 acres, 
/-J DICKEY S, H. Sec. 24, P.O, Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Pres; from Ky; 365 acres, 
DICKEY W, C, Sec, 26, P,0, Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Pres; from Ky; 160 acres. 
DONT JOSEPH, Sec. 20, P.O. Atkinson; lab. for S. Burget; Rep. 
DOTY CHAS. E. Sec. 16, P.O. Atkinson; farmer for C. H. Doty; Ind; Spir; born 111. 
DOTY CHAS. H. Sec. 16, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Ind; Spir; born Vt,; 80 acres, 
DUGDALE GEORGE, Sec, 8, P,0, Atkinson; farmer; Dem; Meth; born Eng.; 200 acres. 
DUPREE HENRY F, Sec. 16, P.O. Atkinson; farmer for W. R, Lewis; Dem; born Ger. 

"PMERY JONATHAN, Sec. 30, P.O.Atkinson; farmer; Rep. 

"CpARNAM JOHN S. Sec. 16, P.O, Atkinson; farmer; Rep; born N.H,; 220 acres, 
^ FEBER CHRISTOF, Sec. 23, P.O. Atkinson; farmer for D. Ketchum; form Switzerland. 
FERGUSOIV GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 31- P,0, Cambridge; born in Ireland, in May, 

l8lg; came to this county in 1854; Rep; Bapt; owns 400 acres of land, valued at $20,000; 

wife was Ann Hall, born in Ireland, in March, 1819; married Dec, 31, 1844; nine children, 

four boys and five girls, seven now living. 
FERGUSON JAMES, Sec. 3; P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Rep; from Pa. 
FIELD JAMES, Sec 2; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Meth; born England; 160 acres. 
FIELD WILLIAM, Farmer; P.O. Atkinson; born in England, Sept. 20, 1848; came to 

this county in 1874; wife was Mary Larkin, born in England, Jan. 16, 1S46; married Feb. 

17, 1873; two children, boy and girl. 
FLANNIGAN JOHN, Sec. 34; P.O. Atkinson; blacksmith; Ind. 
FLEMING JOHN, Sec. 28; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Pies; born Pa. 
FLE.MING WILLIAM ALBERT, Sec. 28; P.O.Atkinson; teacher; Rep; born Pa. 
FORD EDWARD, Sec. 3; P.O. Atkinson; brickmaker. 
FOSTER JOHjST P. Farmer, Sec. 5; P.O. Atkinson; born in Kentucky, May 11, 1815; 

came to this county in 1838; Rep; owns 120 acres of land, valued at $6,000; wife was Harriet 

Browning, born in 111. Jan 23, 1829; married Jan. 25, 1844; nine children blessed their union. 

six of whom are now living. 
FOY J. W. Farmer, Sec. 13; P.O, Atkinson; born in Centre Co, Pa, Oct. i, 1844; came to 

this county in 1870; Ind; Meth; owns 128 acres of land, valued at $6,400; is now Justice 

of the Peace; wife was N. A. Tate, born in Blair Co. Pa. Sept. 18, 1847; married Nov. ig, 

1869. 
FOY LAWRENCE B. Sec, 9; P,0, Atkinson; farmer for J, Wells; Rep; born Pa. 
FRONK CYRUS S, Sec, 8; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for J. Murphy; Rep; Bapt; born III. 
FRONK LEVI, Sec. 16; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Bapt; from Pa; 160 acres. 
FRY ABRAM, Farmer, Sec. 9; P.O. Atkinson; born in Lincoln Co. Ohio, June 6, 1807; 

came to this county in 1855; Rep; Cong; owns 173 acres of land, valued at $9,000; Mr. Fry 

was one of the earliest settlers; came to Bureau Co. in 1835; wife was Margaret Loughrey, 

born in Pa. Aug. 14, iSii; married Sept. I, 1831; eleven children, seven boys and four girls, 

blessed their union, seven of whom are now living; two sons, Abram and Joel, served in the 

army, and Joel died in the service at Summerset, Ky. 



HENRY COUNTY: CORNWALL TOWNSHIP. 227 

FRY CHARLES W. Sec. 9; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for A. Fry; Rep; from 111. 
FRY JAMES, Sec. 14; P.O.Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Meth; from III; So acres. 
FRY LEMUEL, Sec. 9; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for A. Fry; Rep; born 111. 

/^ALLAGHER JAMES, Sec. 18; P. O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; Cath; born Ireland. 

^ GALLAGHER JAMES, Sec. 17; P.O.Atkinson; farmer; 80 acres. 

GASH EDWARD, Sec. 24; P.O. Annawan; farmer for G. Winter; born Eng. 

GRIER CHAS. Sec. 31; P.O. Cambridge; laborer for J. Grier; Rep; Epis; born Ireland. 

GRIER JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 31; P.O. Cambridge; born in Ireland in 1S34; came to this 
county in 1851; Rep; Bapt; owns 160 acres of land, valued at $8,000; wife was Emily Jen- 
kins, born in Virginia, April 7, 1850; four children, two boys and two girls, all now living. 

GRIER WILLIAM, Sec. 32; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Pres; born Ireland; 240 acres. 

GUMMER JOHN, Sec. 31; P.O. Cambridge; laborer for J. Long; Dem; born Virginia. 

GUTHRIE JAMES, Sec. 12; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; born Ohio; 2 acres. 

IT ALL JAMES, Sec. 8; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Pres; born Ireland; 166 acres. 
-•^ HASSELBERG GUSTAVUS, Sec. 25; P.O. Annawan; farmer for J. Schwab; Luth. 
HARDIXG GEO. A. Farmer, Sec. 10; P.O. Atkinson; born in England, June. 1827; 

came to this county in 1858; Rep; Prot; owns 80 acres, valued at $4,000; married Georgina 

Negus in August, 1851. 
HAYDEN CHARLES, Sec. 27; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for D. T. Dickey; Rep; from Mass. 
HENRY B. F. Sec. 26; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Bapt; from Pa; 380 acres. 
HICKS MILO, Sec. 28; P.O. Atkinson; laborer for J. Fleming; Dem; born N. Y; 
HILL G. R. Sec. 5; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for J. Frank; Dem; Christian; born Va. 
HOIT JOHN, Sec. 3; P.O.Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Prot; born New Hampshire; 80 acres. 
HULL J. H. Sec. 32; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; born 111. 
HULL W. C. Sec. 32; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; born Pa; 80 acres. 
HUNT LEWIS E. Sec. 25; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Pres; born N. Y.; 125 acres. 

TRVIN WILLIAM, P.O.Atkinson; farmer for M. Orr; Pres; born Ireland. 

JACOBSON CHARLES, Sec. 13; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for T. K. Robinson; Dem; Luth. 
JACOBSON CHARLES, Jr. Sec. 13; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for C. Jacobson; Dem; Luth. 
JENKINS W. L. Sec. 32; P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Dem; Bapt; born Va; 80 acres. 
JOHNSON ANDREW, Sec. 34; P.O.Atkinson; farmer for S. Dickey; Luth; from Sweden. 
JOHNSON GEORGE, Sec. 36; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Bapt; from Ohio; 160 acres. 
JOHNSON GUS. Sec. 34; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for S. Dickey; Luth; from Sweden. 
JONES DAVID, Sec. 28; P.O. Atkinson; laborer for J. Orr. 

r^EPLER SAMUEL, Sec. 12; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for J. Kepler; Ind; born 111. 

■'^ KETCHUM DANIEL, Sec. 23; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; from Ohio; 320 acres. 

KAISER FREDERICK, Farmer, Sec. 11; P.O. Atkinson; born in Switzerland, Oct. 23, 

1827; came to this county in 1853; Rep; owns 440 acres of land, valued at $22,000; Mr. 

Kaiser has been engaged in Stock Raising for the past fifteen years; small at first, but now 

quite extensively. 
KEPIiER JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 12; P O. Atkinson; born in Juniata Co., Pa., June 9, 

1810; came to this county in 1845; Dem; U. Brethren; owns 80 acres of land, valued at 

$4,000; wife was Julia Ann Stimeling, born in Juniata Co., Pa., Jan. 16, 1819: married in 

January, 1836; eleven children; seven of them are now living; his eldest son, Jerome, served 

three years in the 112th III. Infantry. 
KIRKENDALL WILLIAM, Sec. 34; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; Meth; from Ohio; 120 ac. 

T ANE ELIJAH, Sec. 27; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for M. Orr; Rep; Meth; from 111. 

-'-' LANE THOMAS, Sec. 6; P.O. Geneseo; farmer for W. Barnes; Dem; born England. 

LATSON EDWARD, Sec. 7; P.O. Geneseo; miner; Rep; Meth. 

LATTIMER HARRIET, widow. Sec. 12; P.O.Atkinson; from New York; 334: acres. 

LATTIMER JOHN, Sec. 11; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for F. Kaiser; Rep; born 111. 



228 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

< 

LAWSON JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 36; P.O. Kewanee; born in Ireland, March 12, 1824; came 
to this county in 1854; Ind; Adventist; owns 240 acres of land, valued at $12,000; wife was 
Jane E. Phillips, born in New York, May 14, 1825: married Nov. 25, 1847; eight children, 
five boys and three girls, all living. 

LAWSON JOHN H. Sec. 36, P.O. Kewaneee; farmer for J. Lawson; Ind; Chris; born 111. 

LEHMAN ALBERT, Sec. 35, P.O. Kewanee, farmer; Ind; Luth; born Ger; 160 acres. 

LEWIS ABRAM, P.O. Atkinson, farmer; Ddm; born 111. 

LEWIS JOHN, Sec. 20, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dam; Bapt; born Pa. 

LEWIS JOHN U. Sec. 20. P.O. Atkinson; farmer for J. Lewis; Dem; Bapt; born 111. 

LEWIS JOHN W. Sec. 19, P.O.Atkinson; farmer for S. Lewis; Rep; Bapt; born 111. 

LEWIS SAMUEL, Sec. 19, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Bapt; born Pa.; 200 acres. 

LEWIS SAMUEL A., P.O. Atkinson; farmer for J. Lewis; Ind; born 111. 

LEWIS W. F. Sec. 7, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Ind; Bapt; born Ohio; 100 acres. 

LEWIS W. R. Sec. 16, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Bapt; (rom Ohio; 120 acres. 

L(IN'I>WALL JOHN', Miner, Sec. 7, P.O. Geneseo; born in Sweden, April 9, 1851; came 
to this county in 1867; Rep; Luth. 

LOHR JACOB D. Sec. 29, P.O. Atkinson; farmer for J. Peterson; Rep; born Va. 

LONG CH.\RLES M. Sec. 16, P.O. Atkinson; farmer for F.Weston; Dem; born Va. 

LONG- JACOB, Farmer, Sec. 31, P.O. Cambridge; born in Maryland March 6, 1808; came 
to this county in 1S57; Dem; owns 156 acres of land, valued at $55 per acre; wife was Nancy 
Ryan, born in Virginia in Jan. l8n, married Sept. 5, 1832; ten children, seven boys and 
three girls, eight now living, and also twenty-nine grandchildren. 

IX/TcCONOUGHEY E. B. Sec. 15, P.O. Atkinson; farmer for S. McConoughey; Rep; from 111. 

^^^ McCULLOH B. T. Sec. 34, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; from 111. 

McCOXOUGHEY S. Mrs. Farming. Sec. 15, P.O. Atkinson; born in Hinsdale, N.H. 
June I, 1811; came to this county in 1849; Cong; owns 160 acres of land, valued at $10,000; 
wid. of E. H. McConoughey, who came to this county in 1841, born in Mass. Jan. I, 1808, 
m.irried .March 7, 1849; mother of four children, only one child, a son, now living; taught 
the High School in O.xford. 

McGINITY PETER, Sec. 7, P.O. Geneseo; miner; Dem; Cath; born Ireland. 

MAGLI JOHN, Sec. 23, P.O. Atkinson; farmer for S. Schwab; Dem; Pres; from Switzerland. 

MALONEY DANIEL, Sec. 12, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; Cath; born Ireland; 260 acres. • 

MARTINSON BENJAMIN, Sec. 26, P.O. Atkinson; farmer for W. C. Dickey; from Sweden. 

MITCHELL JAMES W. Sec. 5, P.O. Atkinson; farmer for H. Yarger; Dem; from N.Y. 

MOFFATT FRANCIS I. Rev. Sec. 28, P.O. Atkinson; pastor Pres. church; Rep; born Pa. 

MUKLNS JOSEPH W. Farmer, Sec. 15, P.O. Atkinson; born in Virginia in 1820; came 
to this county in 1S44; Dem; owns 80 acres of land; married Mary Ellinwood in Washing- 
ton Co. Ohio, Nov. 16, 1S41; five children blessed their union, four of whom are now living. 
Mrs. M. was born in Washington Co. Ohio, Sept. 7, 1823. 

MURPHY A. F. Sec. 8, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Bapt; born Pa.; 298 acres. 

MURPHV JOHN Sr. Sec. 8, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Bapt; born Ohio. 

MURPHY JOHN Jr. Farmer, Sec. 8, P.O. Atkinson; born in Beaver Co. Pa. Dec. 31, 
1831; came to this county in 1854; Rep; Bapt; owns 180 acres of land, valued at $9,000; 
wife was Mary H. Fronk, born in Juniata Co. Pa. April 24, 1840, married Mar. ri, 1858; 
three children blessed their union, all of whom are now living. 

MURPHY THOMAS, Sec. 34, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Bapt; from III. 

XTICHOLS A, H. Sec. 35, P.O. Atkinson; farmer for J. H. Nichols; Rep; Meth; from 111. 

NICHOLS WINFIELD, Sec. 35. P.O. Atkinson; farmer for Z.S. Nichols; Rep; from N.J. 

NICHOLS Z. S. Sec. 35; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for J. H. Nichols; Rep; from New Jersey. 

NICKERSON JOHN, Sec. i; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Ind; born New York; 80 acres. 

NOWERS GEORGE, Sec. 9; P.O.Atkinson; farmer for J. Orr; Dem; Epis; born England. 

NOWERS GEORGE W. Sec. 9; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for J. Orr; Dem; Epis; born England. 

1VOWER8 JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 9; P.O. Atkinson; born in Oneida Co., N.Y., Aug. 7, 
1847; came to this Co. in 1856; Dem; owns 189 acres of land, valued at $9,000; was Com- 
missioner of Highways three years. 

NOWERS JOHN, Sec. 22; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for J. Sears; from England. 



HENRY COUNTY: CORNWALL TOWNSHIP. 229 

/^RR J. C. Sec. 28; P.O. Atkinson; farmer with M. Orr; Rep; born Illinois. 

^-^ ORR JAMES, Jr., Sec. 29; P.O. Atkinson; farmer with J. Orr; Rep; Pres; born Illinois. 

OKR JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 29; P.O Atkinson; born in Ireland on March 19, l8og; came 
to this county in 1S53; Rep; Pres; owns 440 acres of land, valued at $26,400; wife was Mary 
Shields; married March 2, 1845; five children, two boys and three girls; four now living. 

ORR JOSEPH, Sec. 28; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Ind; Meth; born Ireland; 240 acres. 

OKR MATTHEW, Farmer, Sec. 28; P.O. Atkinson; born in Ireland, May 14, 1S08; came 
to this county in 1847; Rep; Epis; owns 723^ acres of land, valued at $60 per acre; is now 
School Trustee; wife was Susannah Crawford, born in Ireland; married in Oclober, 1S4C; 
six children, five now living. 

ORR WILLIAM, Sec. 29; P.O. Atkinson; farmer with ]. Orr; Rep, Pres; born Pa. 

OLSON LARS, P.O. Atkinson; farmer for Jonathan Emery; Pres; born Sweden. 

OVERMIRE CHARLES, Sec. 36; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for P. Overmire; Cath; born Belgium. 

OVEr^lMIRE PETER, Sec. 36; P.O.Atkinson; farmer; Cath; born Belgium; 120 acres. 

■pARKER JAMES, Sec. i; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Cong; born England; 340 acres. 

^ PARKER ROBERT, Sec. i; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for J. Parker; Rep; Cong; England. 

PERKINSON EDWARD, Sec. 17; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; Cath; born Ireland; 80 ac. 

PORTER E. J. Sec. 4; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for W. Porter; Ind; Ind; born Illinois. 

PORTER DANIEL, Sec. 4; P.O.Atkinson; farmer for W. Porter; Ind; Ind; born Illinois. 

PORTER WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 4; P.O. Atkinson; born in Westmoreland Co.," Pa., 
Sept. 15, 1S15; came to this county in 1842; Ind; Ind; owns 300 acres land, valued at 
$l8,ooo; wife was Eleanor Hamilton, born in Westmoreland Co., Pa., Feb. 16, 18 18; mar- 
ried May 5, 1840; eleven childien, six boys and five girls, eight of whom are now living; two 
girls, Ella and Josie, are teaching; his son, William C, served in the army. 

UICKSTRAUTHER, Sec. 17; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for F. Weston; Dem; Bapt; Indiana. 



Q 



"D AISNER JOHN, Sec. 34; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Germany; 200 acres. 

''^ RANKIN DAVID, Sec. 15; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for S. McConoughey; Cong. 
REESE WALTER, Sec. 4; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for W. Porter; Ind; Bapt; from N.Y. 
RICHARDSON E. C. Sec. 32; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Meth; born Illinois; 80 acres. 
RICHARDSON S. H. Sec. 32; farmer; Rep; Meth; born Conn. 

RILEY JAMES, Sec. 11; P.O.Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Free Meth; born Ohio; 240 acres. 
ROBINSON JOSHUA, Sec.^; P.O. Atkinson; farm hand; Dem; from Iowa. 
ROBINSON THOMAS, Sec. 4; P.O. Atkin.son; miner; born England. 
ROBINSON, W. H. Sec. 6; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for H. Yarger; Rep; born 111. 
ROGERS CHAS. Sec. 30; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Ind; born Virginia; 120 acres. 
ROGERS GEORGE, Sec. 35; P.O. Kewanee; farmer for H. S. Rogers; Dem; Pres; born Ohio. 
ROGERS H. S. Sec. 35; P.O. Kewanee; farmer; Dem; Pres; born Ohio; 120 acres. 
ROMIG FANNY, wid. of G. Romig, Sec. 36; P.O. Annawan; Pres; born Pa; und. int. in 160 ac. 
ROMIGr JOHN, Farmer; Sec. 36; P.O. Annawan; born in Tuscarawas Co. Ohio; came to 
this Co. in 1S54; Rep; Bap; owns 40 acres of land and und. interest in 160 acres; served 
three years in 27th 111. Infantry. 
RONDEMA JOHN, Sec. 27; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for A. Casteel; Cath; from Holland. 
ROPER WILLIAM, Sec. 7; P.O. Geneseo; miner; born Germany. 

C AUBACH JACOB, Sec. 5; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for A. S. Tiffany; Luth; born Germany. 

•^ SAVAGE THOMAS, Sec. iS; P.O. Geneseo; farmer for L. Shearer; Epis; born Ireland. 

SCHWAB FERDINAND, Sec. 13; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for S. Schwab; Dem; Pres. 

SCHWAB JOHN, Sec. 25; P.O. Annawan; fanner; Ind; Lib; born Switzerland. 

SCHWAB SAMUEL, Farmer, Sec. 23; P.O. Atkinson; born in Switzerland, Dec. 25, 
1820; came to this county in 1S56; Dem; Pres; owns 275 acres of land, valued at $11,000; 
was in the army in Switzerland, from 1840 to 1848; wife was Elizabeth Magli, born in Swit- 
zerland in 1817; married in May, 1852; two children. 

SEARS JOHjV, Farmer, Sec. 22; P.O. Atkinson; born in Litchfield Co. Conn. May 20, 
1818; came to this county in 1856; Rep; owns 400 acres of land, valued at $24,000; wife 
was Mary W. Jewett, born in Litchfield Co. Conn. May 6, 1832; married Sept. 17, 1856; six 
children — three boys and three girls, all now living. 



230 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

SHRECK GRIFFITH, Sec. 19; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; born Ohio. 

SHEAKEK LEWIS, Farmer and Stock Raiser; Sec. 18; P.O. Geneseo; born in New 
York, Oct. 6, 1817; came to this county in 1850; Rep; Christian; owns 694 acres of land; 
wife was Parmelia Burdet; four children. 

SIDERS WM. M. Sec. 5; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; from Ohio; 160 acres. 

SLICK ISAAC, Sec. 12; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; Univ; born Pa. 

SLICK JOHN, Sec. 12; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for I. Slick; Dem; from Pa. 

SMITH WM. Sec. 12; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for G. Wilkinson; Dem; Epis; born Pa. 

SOUERS JOHN, Sec. 7; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; born Germany; 240 acres. 

SQUTHWORTH COUCH, Sec. 6; P.O.Atkinson; farmer for J. South worth; Ind; born 111. 

SOUTHWOKTH JAMES, Sec. 6; P.O. Atkinson; born in Erie, Pa. Sept. 4, 1823; 
came to this county in 1S37; Ind; Meth; owns 23] acres of land, valued at $13,000; has 
been Commissioner of Highways for past 12 years; veteran of the Mexican War; wife was 
E. C. Hanna, who was born in White Co. 111. Nov. 15, 1827; married Feb. 19, 1850; four 
children, all of whom are now living. 

STEIN JOHN, Sec. 4; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for R. Wolever; Cath; born Belgium. 

SWANSON IMAN, Sec. 4; P.O.Atkinson; farmer for W. Porter; Luth; from Sweden. 

T^OTMAN A. M. Rev. Sec. 29; P.O. Atkinson; Pastor Bapt. Church; Rep; born N. Y. 
■'• TOWER.SON SWAN, Sec. 33; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for J. Clark; Rep; Luth; Sweden. 

TAYLOR JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 8; P.O. Atkinson; born in New Hampshire Aug. 16, 1821; 
came to this county in 1837; Dem; owns 160 acres of land, valued at $10,000; wife was 
Elizabeth Ogden, who was born in Pa. Feb. 5, 1831; married in Nov. 1849; eight children, 
five boy> and ihree girls, si.\ are now living. 

TKEKELL THOMAS J. Farmer, Sec. 4; P.O. Atkinson; born in Tippecanoe Co. Ind., 
Sept. 30, 1S31; came to this county in 1846; Rep; owns 760 acres of land, valued at $35,000; 
came to Stark Co. in 1S36; wife was Lydia Wolever, born in New Jersey Feb. 22, 1839; mar- 
ried Sept. 24, 1855; four children, three boys and one girl, three now living, one boy is dead. 

TUCKER LOUIS, P.O. Atkinson; farmer for J. H. Clark; Rep; Meth; born England. 

TULLY JOHN J. Sec. 24; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; born Pa. 

TULLY SARAH I. wife of J. J. Tully; Sec. 24; born 111; 120 acres. 

A 7" AN DE WOESTYNE PETER, Sec. 9; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for J. Nowers; Cath. 
^ VERSLESCH HARKY, Sec. 14; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for H. R. Dunbar; Cath. 
VESTREINE PETER, Sec. 9; P.O. Atkinson; lab. for J. Nowers; Cath; born Belgium. 
VON DE ROSSESTYNE PETER, Sec. 36; P.O. Atkinson; laborer; Cath; born Belgium. 
VONHECK FERDINAND, Sec. 13; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for R. Broadbent; Cath. 

\^7ACHS JACOB, Sec. 13: P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; Pres; from Switzerland; 200 acres. 
* '' WACHS JOHN, Sec. 13; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for J. Wachs; Dem; Pres. 

WAHLERT FRED. Sec. 2; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for A. C. Burrall; Dem; Luth; born Germany. 

WAHLERT GEORGE, Sec. 14; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for H. R. Dunbar; from Germany. 

W.A.LKER ALEXANDER, Sec. 16; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Pres; born Scotland; 80 ac. 

WALKER HARRY, Sec. 19; P.O. Atkinson; laborer for S. Lewis; Rep; born Pa. 

WELLS JOSEPH, Sec. 9; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; born England; 200 acres. 

WIGANT H. H. Sec. 19; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; born Mich. 

WILKINSON GEORGE, Sec. 12; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; born Rhode Island; 100 acres. 

WINTER GEO. Sec. 24; P.O., Atkinson; farmer; Rep; born England. 

WOLEVER ROBT. W. Farmer, Sec. 4; P.O. Atkinson; born in Peoria Co. 111., Nov. 
23, 1844; came to this county in 1852; Rep; owns property valued at $2,000; served three 
years and four month-; in tne 57th 111. Infantry; wife was Roena Foster, born in Henry Co. 
111., Aug. 15, 1S48; married Sept. 24, 186S; lour children, one by former marriage, all now- 
living. 

WOOD RICHARD, Sec. 10; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; born England; 200 acres. 

WOOD WILLIAM R. Sec. 10; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; born Ohio; 120 acres. 

WOODAUD SAMUEL, Sec. 31; farmer for J. Long; Dem; born Virginia. 

WRIGHT HENRY, Sec. 22; P.O. Atkinson; farmer for J. Sears; Rep; from N.Y. 

WYATT THOMAS, Prop, of Coal Mine; resides at Geneseo, and owns coal mine in Sec. 
7, Cornwall Tp; born in England March 25. 1831; came to this county in 1863; Rep; Epis; 
owns property valued at $2,000; wife was Emma Wallace; married Aug. 16, 1857; has one 
child, a girL 



HENRY COUNTY: PHENIX TOWNSHLP. 231 



PHENIX TOWNSHIP. 

A DAMS DANIEL, Sec. 22; P. O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep.; born 111. 

^^^ ALDRICH HENRY S. Sec. 30; farmer; Dem; 120 acres; ist white child born Henry Co. 

ALDKICH EARL P. Farmer; Sec. 30; P.O. Geneseo; born in Providence Co., R. I. 
Jan. 15, 1810; came to this county in 1835; Ind. Dem.; owns 327 acres of land valued at 
$17,000: was the first settler in the Township of Phenix, and at that time there were only four 
residents in the county; wife was Caroline Omel, born in Wayne Co. Ind. June 29, i8i6; 
married Sept 27, 1S32; has five children, Henry S., Marshall M., Phila Nora C, Perry, and 
Silas W. Henry S. was the first white child born in the county, Mrs. E. P. Aldrich manu- 
factured the first cloth made in the county, consisting of about 75 yards, in 1836. 

ALDRICH S. W. Sec. 31; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; born in Henry Co; 115 acres. 

ANDERSON ELIAKIM, Sec. 21; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; born Henry Co; }4 of 506 ac. 

ANDERSON ISAAC L., Sec. 20; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; born 111; >/ of 506 acres. 

ANDERSON JOHN W., Sec. 2; farmer with A. Rapp; Rep; M. E.; born Henry Co; 40 acres. 

ANDERSON K. Mrs. Sec. 22; P.O. Geneseo; M. E.; from Ohio; 80 acres. 

ANDERSON WM. C. Sec. 21; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from N. J. 

ARXETT GEORGE, Farmer; Sec. 11; P.O. Sharon; born in Warren Co. Pa. June 6, 
1833; came to this county in 1838; Rep; owns 640 acres of land valued at $20,000; wife was 
Margaret Seiben, born in Germany Nov. 2, 1841; married Nov. 15, 1857; has five children. 

T) ARGE ALVIN W. Sec. 20; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; born in Henry Co. 

-^ BEERS E. P. Sec. 14; with E. W. Schellhammer; retired; Rep; from N. J. 

BARGE DAVID B. Farmer; Sec. 28; P.O. Geneseo; born in Armstrong Co. Pa. May 3, 
1827; lived in Wayne Co. Ohio 14 years, and came to this county in 1847; Dem; owiis 620 
acres of land, valued at $30,000; was assessor one year; wife was Eliza M. Aldrich, born in 
Pickaway County, Ohio, May 7, 1828; married April6, 1851; has two children, Alvin W. and 
Alice C. 

BENDER LOUIS, Pink Prairie, P.O. Geneseo; blacksmith; Cath; born 111. 

BLAIR ALBERT, Sec. 25; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; U. Breth; born Henry Co. 

BLAIR ALFRED, Sec. 25; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep. U. Breth; from Pa. 

BLAIR PATRICK, Sec. 25; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep. 

BONSCHER LUTHER, Sec. 3; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Cath; from Baden; ^ of 210 acres. 

BROWN THOMAS M. Sec. 28, P. O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Ky; i6o acres. 

BRITTIAN JAS. E. Sec. 11; P.O. Sharon; farmer; Rep; born 111; 50 acres. 

BROWNING JOHN F. Sec. 28; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born Henry Co. 

BROWNING JOSHUA, Sec. 29; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born Henry Co. 

BROWING S. Mrs. Pink Prairie; post-mistress; M. E.; from Ohio; 10 acres.. 

BUCH MUELLER DANIEL, Sec. g; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Cath; Germany; 400 acres. 

BUCHMUELLER JOSEPH, with D. Buchmueller; Dem; Cath; born Henry Co. 

BUTZER ADAM, Sec. i; P.O. Sharon; farmer; Dem; born Henry Co; 240 acres. 

BUTZER JACOB F. Farmer; Sec. 4; P.O. Geneseo; born in Germany Jan. 16, 1831; 
came to this county in 1837; Dem; Evang; is one of the oldest settlers of the county; owns 
1,000 acres of land, valued at $20,000; is Justice of the Peace; wife was Fredrika Him- 
melman, born in Germany July 4, 1S50; married July 3, 1870; has seven children of first wife, 
and two of second wife. 

BYERS J. E. Sec. 22; P. O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born 111. 

/^AMPBELL A. P, Sec. 30; P.O. Geneseo; fanner; Dem; from N. Y. 

^ CARLSON PETER, Sec. 28; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; from Sweden. 

CARSE JOHN, Sec. 33; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from Ohio. 

CARSE WM. Sec. 33; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from Ireland; 160 acres. 

CIMMEL CASPER, Sec. 21; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from Germany. 

COE BYRON N. Sec, 31; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from N. Y.; 160 acres. 



232 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OE 

COLE GEO. Sec. 20; P.O. Geneseo; farm hand; from Wis. 
COULSON JOHN, Sec. 21; P,0. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from England. 
CRILE A. F. Sec. 24; P.O. Pink Prairie; farm hand; born Henry Co. 
CRILE JOHN H. Sec. 24; P.O. Pink Prairie; farmer; from Ohio; 40 acres. 

"T^ANNENFELSER W. Sec. 29; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from 111; 100 acres. 

^-^ DARIN JOHN J. Sec. 26; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; born Pa; 360 acres. 

DASHAM J. A. farm hand with Wm. Dasham; Dem; born Henry Co. 

DASHAM JACOB, P.O. Sharon; farm hand with M. Obrecht; Rep; Evang; from Pa. 

DASHAM WM. Sec. 25; P.O. Pink Prairie; farmer; Dem; from Pa; 120 acres. 

DAVIS G. L. Sec. 8; P.O. Geneseo; butcher; Rep; from Mass. 

DAVIES JAMES L,. Farmer, Sec. 30; P.O. Geneseo; born in Wales, March, 1826; came 
to this county in 1S57; Dem; owns 333 acres of land, valued at $15,000; wife was Phila Nora 
Aldrich, born in Phenix, Henry Co., April 6, 1841; married Sept. 6, i860; has two children, 
Caroline Olivia, and E. Percy. 

DOROWITTSCH MORITS, Sec. 34; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Cath; from Germany. 

DIENER HENRY J. Sec. 21; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Bavaria. 

DIRK MICHAEL, Sec. 35; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from Ohio. 

DUN'LAP ADAM, Farmer, Sec. 28; P.O. Geneseo; born in Wayne Co., Ohio, Dec. iS, 
1833; came to this county in 1854; Dem; owns 80 acres of land, valued at $4,000; is Justice 
of the Peace; was Assessor three years; enlisted in 1862 in Il2th I. V. I., and served three 
years; wife wa^ Malinda Batlett, born in Onondaga Co., N. Y., May 26, 1813; married 
Aug. 10, 1865. 

T^BERSOLE ABRAHAM, Sec. i; P.O.Sharon; farmer; Dem; Dunkard; from Pa; 155 ac. 
-*-' EVANS FREEMAN, Sec. 23; P.O. Pink Prairie; farmer; Rep; born Henry Co. 
EVANS GEORGE, Sec. 21; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Ind; born Henry Co; 70 acres. 
EVANS LYDIA Mrs. Sec. 23; P.O. Pink Prairie; farmer; from Pa; 260 acres. 
EVANS THOMAS, Sec. 20; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born in Henry Co; 153 acres. 

"PPARLY E. ADOLPHUS, Sec. 28; P.O. Geneseo; farmhand; Dem; from Ohio. 
-^ FRIES GEORGE, Sec. 26; P.O. Geneseo; retired; Rep; Evang; from Pa. 
FRIES JOHN, Sec. 24; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Evang; from Pa. 
FRIES MICHAEL, Sec. 27; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; U. Breth; from Pa. 
FRITTS NELSON, P.O. Sharon; farmer with U. B. Fritts; Rep; born Henry Co. 
FRITTS USUAL B. Sec. 12; P.O. Sharon; farmer; Rep; from Pa; 71 acres. 
FRITTS WILLIAM B. Sec. i; P.O.Sharon; farmer; Rep; born Henry Co; 80 acres. 
FULLER DEXTER, Sec. 22; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem. 

/^ALLIGEN THOMAS, laborer with J. F. Butzer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 

^^ GRAEF GUSTAVUS, Sec. 20; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Evang; from Saxony. 

GRAFF LEWIS, Sec. 24; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from Ohio. 

TT ANDMAR WM. Sec. 32; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Canada. 

^^ HANNA ALEX. Sec. 31; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from Pa; 80 acres. 

HARTMANN C. Sec. 20; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Cath; born Bavaria. 

HICKOX P. Mrs. Sec. 29; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; 56 acres. 

HINES SUSAN Mrs. Sec. 26; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Evang; from Ohio; 140 acres. 

HOLMES JOHN, Sec. 21; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from N. Y. 

TMEL JOHN H. Sec. 31; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born in Henry Co. 

T ENKINS EMORY M., P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Ind; from N. Y. 

J JOHNSON FREDRICK, Sec. 29; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; from Sweden; 40 acres. 
JOHNSON JOHN, Sec. 31; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Sweden. 
JOHNSON O. A. Sec. 21; P.O. Geneseo; farm hand; Rep; S. Luth; from N. Y. 
JOHNSON SWEN E. Sec. 21; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; S. Luth; from Sweden; 100 acres. 




GEO. C. SMITHE. 
Editor of Chronicle, Cambridge. 



HENEY COUNTY : fHENlX TOWNSHIP. 235 

JOLES GEORGE W. Sec. ii; P.O.Sharon; farmer; Rep. 
JOLES ISAAC P. Sec. ii; P.O. Sharon; farmer; Rep. 

TT'AUFF DAVID, Sec. 27; P.O. Geneseo; farm hand; Dem; from Pa. 

-•^ KAUF DAVID, farm hand with H. G. Randall; Rep; from Conn. 

KICKSEY FRED. Sec. i; P.O. Sharon; farmer; Ind; from Prussia. 

KNAPPER AUGUSTUS S. Sec. 17; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Ind; born Whiteside Co. 

KNAPPER GOTTLIEB, Sec. 16; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Evang; from Germany; 178 ac. 

KNAPPER LUDWIG, P.O. Geneseo; with G. Knapper; Rep; born Henry Co. 

KOPP JOSEPH, Sec. 33; ^^.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Evang; born 111. 

KOPP LEVI, Sec. 33; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born 111. 

KOPP SIMON, Sec. 33; P.O, Geneseo; farm hand; Rep; Evang; born 111. 

KRANTZ JOHN, P.O. Geneseo; blacksmith Pink Prairie; Dem; Cath; from Prussia. 

KREPS CHRISTIAN, Sec. 35; P.O. Geneseo; farm hand; Rep; from Ohio. 

KREPS FRED. Sec. 35; P.O. Geneseo; farm hand; Rep; from Ohio. 

KREPS JOHN, Sec. 35;' P.O. Gene.seo; farmer; Rep; from Ohio. 

T AUDERBAUGH EMANUEL, Sec. 21; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from Pa. 

^ LAUDERBAUGH THOMAS, Sec. 27; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from Pa; 115 acres. 

LATSON FAYETTE, Sec. 36; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from Ind. 

LEACH JOSEPH, Sec. 1; P.O. Sharon; farmer; Dem; Meth. Epis; from N.Y; 87 acres. 

LESSER PHILLIP, Sec. 25; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from Germany. 

LIEBERKIVECHT ADAM Jr. Farmer and Teacher, Sec. 27; P.O. Geneseo; born in 
Pittsburgh, Pa., July 2, 1838; came to this county in 1865; Rep; U. Breth; is Township Clerk; 
enlisted Aug. 22, 1862, in the 22d Iowa V. I.; was in service three years; was in the battles 
of Pleasant Hill and Black River, and was wounded at the siege of Vicksburg; wife was 
Eliza E. Tallman, born in Ohio Dec. I, 1846; married July 4, 1865; has four children. 

LODGE JOSEPH A. Sec. 21; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born Henry Co. 

LONG JOHN, Sec. 3; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Cath; from Baden; 105 acres. 

lyi cELLISTER FRANKLIN F. farm hand with H. G. Randall; Rep; from Vermont. 

^^^ McHENRY DANIEL B. Sec. 35; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep, Meth. Epis; born 111. 

McHENRY FRANCIS A. Sec. 27; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; born 111; 120 acres. 

McHENRY G. W. Sec. 14; P.O. Pink Prairie; farmer; Rep; Meth. Epis; from Ky; 390 acres. 

McHENRY GEORGE, Sec 14; P.O. Pink Prairie; farmer; American Reform; Meth. Epis. 

McHENRY JOSEPH B. Sec. 22; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; born 111; 80 acres. 

McHENRY MYRON E. Sec. 35; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born in Henry Co. 

McHENRY THOMAS J. Sec. 14; P.O. Pink Prairie; Rep; Meth. Epis; born 111. 

McNALL GEORGE A. P.O. Geneseo; farm hand with A. Ocobock; Rep; Meth. Epis. 

MAHAN J. L. Sec. 32; P.O. Gene.seo; farmer; Dem; from Pa; 120 acres. 

MATHIS JACOB, Sec. 12; P.O. Sharon: farmer; Rep; from Germany. 

MATHIS JOHN, Sec. 12; P.O. Sharon; farmer; Rep; from Germany. 

MATSON BENJ. M; Sec. 12. P.O. Sharon; farmer; Rep; Meth. Epis; from N.Y; 260 acres. 

MAUCH JOHN, Sec. 3; P.O. Sharon; farmer; Cath; from Germany. 

MERRIMAN GILBERT, Sec. 34; farmer; Dem; born in Henry Co. 

MEKKIMAN WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 34; P.O. Geneseo; born in Detroit, Mich., Dec. 

25, 1832; came to this county in 1838; Dem; owns 200 acres of land valued at $10,000; has 

been Commissioner of Highways two years; wife was Margaret Carse, born Sept. 10, 1838; 

married April 22, i860; has six children; came to this township when there were but six 

families here, and has lived here ever since. 
MILLER JOSEPH, Sec. 35; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Ohio. 
MOSSMAN GEORGE L., P.O. Geneseo; farmhand with J. Sprinkle; Rep; born 111. 

"XTISWENDER JOHN, Sec. 35; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Evang; from Ohio. 
-'■^ NISWENDER SOLO MAN, Sec. 35; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Evang; from Pa. 
20 



236 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OB* 

/^COBOCK ALONZO, P.O. Geneseo; farm hand with A. J. Reis; Dem; from N.Y. 

^^ OGDEN JOHN, Sec. 32; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from Pa; 240 acres. 

OBRECHT J. MICHAEL, Farmer, Sec. 12; P.O. Sharon; born in Germany Jan. 23, 
1836; came 10 this county in 1864; Rep; Evang; owns 243 acres of land, valued at $8,000; 
has been Deputy Sheriff in Kankakee Co; has been Township Clerk; lived one year in Buf- 
falo, N.Y., twelve years in Cook Co. 111. and ten years in Kankakee Co; wife was Sarah M. 
Byers, born in Berks Co. Pa. Dec. 30, 1830; married Jan. 17, 1861; has four children. 

"DAINTER VVM. Sec. 22; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Pa; 290 acres. 

PAUL ADAM J. Sec. 26; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Ohio; 80 acres. 
PAUL GEO. Sec. 35; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Cath; horn Ohio. 
PHELPS ABRAM G. Sec. 35; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; U. Breth; born 111. 
PHELPS ALFRED, Sec. 35; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from Pa; 100 acres. 
PINGREE S. K. Sec. 21; P.O. Geneseo; retired; Dem; Meth. Epis; from Maine. 
PIXXELL JOSEPH A. Farmer, Sec. 23; P.O. Pink Prairie; born in Trimble Co. Ky. 

Nov. 15, 1823; came to Bureau Co. in 1843, and to this county in 1848; Dem;' Meth. Epis; 

owns 210 acres of land, valued at $10,500; wife was Malinda Beaton, maiden name was 

Malinda Williams, liorn in Putnam Co. Nov. 6, 1830; married March 28, 1855; have four 

children. 
PINNELL R. I, Sec. 22; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; born Henry Co; 80 acres. 
POST WM. H. Rev. Sec. 36; P.O. Geneseo; pastor U. Breth; Rep. 
POTTER JOHN H., P.O. Sharon; farm hand with J. Leach; Rep; from N.Y. 

O AHN JOHN, Sec. 29; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Luth; from Prussia. 

-'^ RAPP AARON, Sec. 25; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Evang; Whiteside Co; 280 acres. 

KAl^DAJLL, HUGH G. Farmer, Sec. 23; P.O. Pink Prairie; born in Orange Co. Vt. June 
I, 1833; came to this county in 1874; Rep; owns one-third of 1,200 acres of land, valued at 
$30,000; first wife was Eliza J. Renfrew; second wife was Eliza Painter, born in Henry Co. 
April 27, 1856; married Aug. 10, 1876; has one child of first wife. 

RASER FRANK, Sec 27; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Evang; from Ohio. 

RASER JOHN, Sec. 26; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born in Henry Co. 

RASER SOLOMON S. Sec. 26; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Evang; from Pa; 160 acres. 

REIGHARD JAMES, Sec. 25; P.O. Geneseo; laborer; from Ohio. 

REILLEY JOHN, Sec. 16; P.O. Geneseo; farmer and miner; Dem; Cath; born 111. 

REILLEY M. Mrs. Sec. 16; P.O. Geneseo; Cath; from Ireland; 120 acres. 

REIS ADAM J. Sec. 16; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Whiteside Co; 440 acres. 

RICKEL MICHAEL S. Sec. 26; P.O. Geneseo; physician; Rep; from Pa. 

RIEHLE GEORGE, Sec. 26; P.O. Geneseo, Pink Prairie; farmer; Rep; Evang; from Germany. 

RIELY JA.MES, Sec. 21; P.O. Geneseo; coal miner; Dem; Cath; 111. 

RESSER MOSES, Sec. 31; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from Pa; 400 acres. 

ROBERTS JOHN J. Sec. 15; P.O. Pink Prairie; farmer; Rep; Meth. Epis; from Ohio. 

KOWE GEORGE MSf. Farmer, Sec. 6; P.O. Geneseo; born in Steuben Co. N.Y. May 
20, 1825; came to this county in 1851; Rep; owns 600 acres of land, valued at $12,000; was 
Commissioner of Highways three years; wife was Julia A. Kempster; born in Oneida Co. 
N.Y. Aug. 25, 1826; married Feb. 22, 1850; has two children, Viola M. and Edith E. 

C AND LEWIS, Sec. 25; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Evang; Germany; 180 acres. 
•^ SAND OBED. Sec. 33; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born Henry Co. 
SANDERS B. Sec. ig; P.O. Geneseo; retired; Dem; from N. J. 
SANDERS E. Sec. 21; P.O. Geneseo; laborer; Dem; born 111. 
SANDERS WM. Sec. 9; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from N. J.; 20 acres. 
SANTEE J. WESLEY, Sec. 27; P.O. Geneseo; farm hand; Dem; from Pa. 
SANTEE THOMAS, Sec. 23; P.O. Pink Prairie: farmer; Dem; from Pa; 93 acres. 
SANTEE W. Sec. 23; Pink Prairie; farmer; Dem; Meth. Epis; from Pa; 40 acres. 
SCHELLHAMMER G. W. Sec. 14; P.O. Sharon; carpenter; Rep; from Pa. 
SCHELLHAMMER R. F. Mrs. Sec. 14; P.O. Sharon; from Pa; 55 acres. 
SHELLING C. J. Sec. 22; P.O. Geneseo; farmhand; Rep; W. Meth; from Germany. 
SHOEMAKER ADAM, Sec. 21; P.O. Geneseo; engineer; Dem; from Germany. 



HENRY COUNTY: ALBA TOWNSHIP. 237 

SHOEMAKER DANIEL, Sec. 31; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Ind. 
SHOEMAKER JACOB, Sec. 21; P.O. Geneseo; coal miner; Dem; from Germany. 
SHOEMAKER JOHN, Sec. 4; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Germany. 
SHOEMAKER M. Sec. 25; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Bavaria; 200 acres. 
SIEBEN VALEIVTIIVE, Farmer, Sec. 3; P.O. Geneseo; born in Germany, Oct. 14, 1838; 

came to this county in 1853; Rep; owns 560 acres of land, valued at $11,200; is Commis. 

sioner of Highways; wife was Caroline Butzer, born in Phenix, Henry Co. Nov. 10, 1838; 

married July 10, i860; has five children. 
SPRINKLE JONATHAN, Sec. 8, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Meth; from Ohio; 287 acres. 
SPRINKLE JOSEPH, Sec. 17, P.O.Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Meth; from Maryland; 56 acres. 
SNIVELY ANDREW, Sec. 17, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Ind; Meth; from Germany. 

T^AYLOR FRANK S. farm hand with his father, S. S. Taylor; Rep; Meth; born Henry Co. 
-•- TAYLOR SAM'L S. Sec. i; P.O. Sharon; farmer and postmaster; Rep; Meth. from N.Y. 
TIBBS JOSEPH, Sec. 32; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; born 111; 80 acres. 
THOMAS A. M. Sec. 14; P.O. Pink Prairie; laborer; Rep; from Ohio; 10 acres. 

^\17"ALLHLEIM BARNHART, Sec. 8; farmer; from Germany. 
^^ WATSON JOHN, Sec. 21; P.O.Geneseo; coal miner; Dem; from Ohio. 

WEIMER JOSEPH, Sec. 21; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; propr. of coal mine; Dem; from Pa. 

WEIMER LEONARD, Sec. 21; P.O. Geneseo; coal miner; Dem; from Pa. 

WEIMER S. S. Sec. 21; P.O. Geneseo; coal miner; Dem; from Pa. 

WHITE GEORGE, fahii hand with G. W. Rowe; Rep; born 111. 

WIDGER MYRON, Sec. 21; P.O. Geneseo; laborer; Dem; from N.Y. 

WITHROW AMAKIAH, Farmer, Sec. 23; P.O. Pink Prairie; born in White Co. 111. 
May 4, 1831; came to this county in August, 1835; Rep; Meth; owns 75 acres of land, val- 
ued at $4,000; wife was Mary J. Huston, born in Licking Co. Ohio, Oct. 6, 1832; married 
Aug. 8, 1856; has four children — William H., Lechea A., Lucinda E., and Jerome S.; was 
one of the earliest settlers in the county. 

WITHROW JAMES H., P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem. 

WITHROW JAMES H. Sec. 30; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born White Co. Ill; 160 acres. 



Y 



OUNG MARCUS L. with his father, F. W. Young; Dem; Meth; born Henry Co. 



YOUNG- FELIX W. Farmer, Sec. 17; P.O. Geneseo; born in Trigg Co. Ky. Jan. 3, 1822; 
came to Sangamon Co. in 1828; came to this county in 1840; Dem; Meth; owns 300 acres 
of land, valued at $6,000; wife was Nancy J. Lindsey, born in McLean Co. 111. April 14, 
1839; married Oct. 7, 1859; has eight children. 



A 



ALBA TOWNSHIP. 

CKERMAN CASPAR, Sec. 16; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Dem; Luth; born Germany. 
ALLEN JOHN, P.O. Annawan; farmer; lives on Cornelius Dwyer's farm; Dem; Ind. 

"D AKER W. T. Sec. 34; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Cong; from Maine. 

^ BARBER MYRON, Sec. 14; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; born N.Y.; 80 ac. $1,600. 

BLAKE B. R. Sec. 12; P.O. Annawan; laborer; Dem; Ind. 

BOND G. W. Sec. 12; P.O. Sheffield; farmer. 

BOND JOSEPH, Sec. 24; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Ind. 

BOND LEWIS, Sec. 24; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Ind; born III; 40 acres, $250. 

BUCKLEY ISAAC, Sec. 12; P.O. Annawan; Dem; born Indiana. 

BUCKLEY LUTHREN, Sec. 12; P.O. Annawan; Re; ■ born 111. 

r^AIN CELIA J. Mrs. Sec. 15; P.O. Annawan; Meth; born Ohio; 6 acres, $200. 
^ CAIN MILTON, Sec. 14; P.O. Annawan; renter; Dem; Ind; born 111. 
CAUGHEY EDWIN, Sec. 12; P.O. Sheffield; Dem; born Ohio; 40 acres, $600. 



238 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

CAUGHEY HOLBERT, Sec. 22; P.O. Anniwan; hunter; Dem; Ind; born Ohio. 
CAUGHEY SAMUEL, Sec. 2; P.O. Annawan; Rep; Ind; born Indiana. 

COLLINS ALONZO, Sec. 27; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Dem; Ind; born Ohio; 160 ac. $4,000. 
■ CONKLIN NORMAN, P.O. Annawan; laborer, works for Chas. Vaughn; Rep; Ind; from N.Y. 

"|n\ALY THOMAS, Sec. 24; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Ind; Ind; born Ireland; 93 ac. $930. 

-'-^ DEVENNY CHAS. lives with his mother. Sec. 12; P.O. Annawan; Rep; Ind; born 111. 

DEVENNY n.WID, lives with his mother on Sec. 12; P.O. Annawan; Rep; Ind; born 111. 

DEVENNY ELIZABETH Mrs. Sec. 12; P.O. Annawan; Ind; born Ohio; 40 acres, $600. 

DWYER CORNELIUS, Farmer, Sec. 33; P.O. Annawan; born in Tipperary County, 
Ireland, in May, 1S19; came to New York in July, 1848, and to Springfield, Illinois, in 1857, 
and to this county in i860; wife was Mary Hayes, born in Tipperary County, Ireland, in the 
Fall of 1822; married Jan. g, 1851; six children; two boys and two girls living ; two boys 
deceased. 

DWYER JAMES, Sec. 25; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Dem; Cath; born Ireland; 160 ac. $2,400. 

"C^VANS W. N. Sec. 22; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Ind; from Moline, 111. 

T7OSTER JAMES A. Sec. 27; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Pres; born N. J.; 80 ac. $4,000. 

-*- FREDERICK JA.COB, Sec. 33; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Cath; born Sweden; 80 ac. 

FOSTER LYDIA Mrs. Sec. 34; P.O. Annawan; born in Sussex County, N. J., Aug. 17, 
1808; came to this couaty in 1865; Pres; 80 acres, $4,000; her first husband was Freeman 
Swayze, born in Sussex County, N. J., Sept. 28, l8o3; married Oct. I, 1829; died April 6, 
1837; second husband was Wm. R. Foster, who was born in New Jersey, Dec. 29, 1815; 
married Nov. 5, 1S43; died Oct. 25, 1S74; three boys and one girl by first husband; three 
boys and one girl by second husband. 

FRANDENRADER JOHN, Sec. 22; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Dem; Luth; born Germany. 

FRITCH M. Sec. 6; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Dem; Luth; born Germany. 

/^ILBREITH JAMES, Sec. 30; P.O.Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Cong; born Ireland; 440 ac. 



VJ 



GOEMBLE C. C. Sec. i; P.O. Annawan; farmer, lives on his father's farm; Rep; Ind. 



GOEMBLE Z. T. Sec. i; P.O. Annawan; farmer, lives on father's farm; Rep; Ind; born 111. 

TTALL WM. Sec. 20; P.O.Atkinson; renter; Rep; Pres; born Ireland. 

-'^ HARRITT M. A., P.O. Annawan; rents Mr. Richmonds' place; Rep; Ind; 320. 

HAYES CORNELIUS, Farmer, Sec. 21, P.O. Annawan; born in Tipperary Co., 
Ireland, March I, 1832; came to this Co. March 4, i860; Dem; Cath; owns 490 acres, val. 
$2,250; town prop. $3,000; landed in N.Y. 27th Nov. 1852; lived there 5 years; came to 
Springfield, Ills. 1857, and to this Co. i860; lived here since; held the office of Assessor 8 
years, and holds the office of T. Treas. the second term; Com. Highways 9 years; wife was 
Miss M. J. Smith, born in Antrim Co. Ireland, Feb. 24, 1851; married Dec. i, 1872. 

HISERODT LEE, Sec. 26; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Dem; Ind; born N.Y; 80 acres, $1,600. 

HOUCH MICHAEL, Sec. 2; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Luth; born Germany; 160 acres. 

HULSL.ANDER ISAAC, Sec 19; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Ind; Ind; born N.Y; 400 ac. $14,000. 

TRVIN JOHN, Sec. 7; P.O.Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Pres; born Ireland; 80 acres. 
JORDAN WM. P.O. Annawan; laborer; Dem; Cath; born Ireland. 

T/'ELSEY W. E. Sec. 31; P.O. Annawan; wks his father's farm; Rep; Big Church; from Conn. 

-•^ KENNEDY JOHN, Sec. 21; P.O. Atkinson; renter; Cath; born Ireland. 

KRAMER BERNHARD, Farmer; Sec. 19; P.O. Atkinson; born in Germany, June ig, 
1826; came from Germany to Bureau Co. in 1852; afterward lived in Marshall Co. and set- 
tled in this Co. in 1870; Dem; Luth; 240 acres, val. $8,400; wife was Eve Lippilt, born in 
Germany, Dec. 22, 1822; married Aug. 9, 1855; five children — two boys, Beinhard Jr., Frank, 
and two girls, Maria and Mary Kramer, living. 

T EHMANN ALBERT, Sec. 22; P.O. Annawan; renter; Rep; Luth; born Germany. 
^ LEHMANN ERNST, Sec. 22; P.O. Annawan; renter; Rep; Luth; born Germany. 
LUCKHART MARY Mrs. Sec. i; P.O. Annawan; Luth; born Germany; 120 acres, $2,400. 



HENRY COUNTY: ALBA TOWNSHIP. 239 

TV /TcCULLOUGH DAVID, Sec. 34; P.O. Annawan; rents Mr. Dow's farm; Rep; Ind. 

''■*-*- McCULLOUGH FRANKLIN, lives with his father; P.O. Annawan; Rep; Ind; N.Y. 

McCLEXN'AlS' DAVID, Farmer; Sec. 9; P.O. Annawan; born in Niagara Co. N.Y.. 
Sept. 5, 1S20; came to this Co. 1855; Ind. in religion; 167 acres, $3,340; held the office of 
School Director five years; holds the offices of Pathmaster and Overseer of the Poor; wife 
was Mrs. Lucinda Call, who was born in Canada, Nov. 22, 1826; married Aug. 29, 1844; 
died Dec. 29, 1S60; four children — one boy and two girls living; John McClennan Jr. was 
born in Kendall Co. 111. July 14, 1849; lives with his father. 

McDERMAND THOMAS, Sec. 16; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Bapt; born Can; 160 acres. 

McNeill JAMES, Sec 21; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Dem; Ind; born Ireland; 540 ac. $13,500. 

MAPES T. Sec. 2; P.O. Annawan; farmer. 

MOON JOHN, Sec. 32; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Ind; born England; 80 acres, $3,200. 

MURRY DAVID, Sec. 16; P.O. Annawan; renter; Dem; Cath. 



O 



'BRIEN JOHN, Sec. 32; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Cath; born Ireland; 80 acres, $1,200. 
OVERBAKER LEO, Sec. 32; P.O. Annawan; renter; Dem; Luth; born Germany. 



pRITCHARD DAVID, works for Samuel Pritchard; Cong; from Co. Down, Ireland. 

*■ PRITCH.\RD HUGH W. lives with his father; Rep; Cong; from Co. Down, Ireland. 

PKITCHARD HEXKY Sr. Farmer; Sec. 29; P.O. Atkinson; born in Co. Down, Ire- 
land, in i8l6; came to this Co. May 5, 1S65; Rep; Cong; 320 acres, val. $16,000; first wife was 
Mary Warnock, born in Co. Down, Ireland, in 1816, June 16; married in 1S36; died April 
14, 1845; second wife was Mary Boyd, born in Co. Down, Ireland, 1826; married in Sept. 
1845; ten children — three girls, seven boys; Alexander Pritchard lives in Iowa, Alice Pritch- 
ard lives in Ireland, Mary J. Pritchard lives in Yorktown, Sarah Pritchard lives vvdth her 
father. 

PKITCHARD HEiSTRY Jr. Farmer, Sec. 20; P.O. Atkinson; born in Co. Down, Ire- 
land, March 21, 1843; came to this Co. in 1864; Rep; Pres; 2S0 acres val. $5,600; wife was 
Miss Eliza Irvin, born in Co. Down, Ireland, 1846, Feb. 20; married Dec. 25, 1867; four 
children — two boys, Henry and John; two girls, Sarah J. and Mary W. 

PRITCHARD JAMES J. Sec. 30; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Cong; born Ireland; 400 ac. 

PRITCHARD JOHN, lives with Samuel Pritchard; carpenter; Cong; from Co. Down, Ireland. 

PRITCHARD ROBT. L. lives with his father; Rep; Cong; from Co. Down, Ireland. 

PRITCHARD SAMUEL, Sec. 8; P.O. Atkinson; renter; Rep; Pres; born Ireland. 

PRITCHARD SAMUEL, Farmer, Sec. 30; P.O. Atkinson; born in Co. Down. Ireland, 
Feb. 18, 1842; came to this county in 1858; Rep; Cong; 320 acres, $8,000; was in the 126th 
Reg. Co. H, I. V. I., Col. Richmond, in the i6th Army Corps, Gen. Hurlbut, until the fall of 
Vicksburg, then in the 7th Army Corps, Gen, Steele; was at the siege of Vicksburg and bat- 
tles of Humboldt and Little Rock; enlisted Aug. 9, 1S62, discharged Aug. 2, 1865, wife was 
Miss Alice Pritchard, born in Co. Down, Ireland, June 22, 1844; married Dec. 3, 1868; five 
children, three boys, one girl; Mrs. Pntchard's father and mother, who were born in Co. 
Down, Ireland, came to this county May, 1868, and are living with them. 

PRITCHARD WM. Farmer, Sec. 30; P.O. Atkinson; born in Co. Down, Ireland, Sept. 
26, 1836; came to Rock Island in 1S58, and to Western Tp. in i860, and to Alba in 1864; 
lived here since; holds the office of School Director; Rep; Cong; 240 acres, val. $12,000; 
wife was Miss Ellen Walker, born in Co. Down, Ireland, Feb. 1835; married Oct. 28, 1857; 
two children, one girl living, one girl deceased. 

PUTNAM J. L. Sec. 34; P.O. Annawan; rents D. W. Wilson's farm; Rep; Cong; born Vt. 

"p ICHMOND A. D. Sec. 15; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Ind; born N.Y.; 60 ac. $300. 

-^ RICHMOND Z. Sec. 15; P.O; Annawan; farmer; Rep; Prot; from Mass; 135 acres. 

RICHMOND HEIVRY J. rents Wennergren's farm. Sec. 28; P.O. Annawan; born in 
Schuyler Co. N.Y. Nov. 29, 1843; came to this county 1854; Rep; was enrolled the 12th of 
Aug. 1862, in Co. A^ 112th Reg. I. V. I. Capt. Dow, 3d brigade, 3d division, 23d Army 
Corps, Gen. .Schofield, Military Division of the Mississippi, under .Sherman, was at the battles 
of Campbell Station, Knoxville, Bean Station, Kelly's Ford, where he was wounded, at 
Resaca, Atlanta, Columbia, Franklin, Nashville, Wilmington, and many skirmishes; dis- 
charged June 20, 1865; went to Iowa in 1865, came back in 1874; wife was Mary C. Mc- 
Cullough, born in Philadelphia, June 3, 1851; married Dec. 8, 1874; one girl, Anna Elenore, 
born Nov. 27, 1875. 

ROBINSON W. L. Sec. 21; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Ind; born Indiana; 360 ac. $12,600. 



240 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OP 

BOCKAFELLOW E. M. Farmer, Sec. 32; P.O. Atkinson; born in New York, Jan. 13, 
1S50; came to this county in 1868; Rep; Ind; 160 acres, val. $6,400; his mother, Mrs. 
Christian Roclcafellow, lives on the farm with liim. 

ROCKAFELLOW JAMES H. Sec; 32; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Ind; born N.Y. 

C ALZMAN ERNST, Sec. i; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Luth; born Germany; 265 ac. $5,300. 

•^ S.MITH J. P. Sec. 24; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Ind; born Ireland; 160 acres, $2,400. 

SEBIjE ELI, Farmer, Sec. 15; P.O. Annawan; born in Chester Co. Pa. Feb. 6, 1S24; came 
to this county March, 1872; lived in Morrow Co. Ohio, from 1853 'o 1856, and in Bureau 
Co. 111. from 1856 to 1872; holds the offices of Justice of the Peace and School Director; 
Dem; Bapt; 200 acres, val. $5,000; wife was Miss Eliza McCreary, who was born in Ohio, 
June 24, 1S32; married Feb. 20, 1856, died Dec. 19, 1868; five children, two boys and two 
girls living. 

SMITH JOSEPH, Farmer, Sec. 24; P.O. Annawan; born in Pa. April 4, 1825; came to 
this couaty March 28, 1866; was in the Mexican War, in the 2d Reg. Pa. Vol. I. Co. E, under 
Gen. Patterson, and afterward Gen. Quitman, in the division under Scott; was at the taking 
of Vera Cruz, and the battles of Cerra-Gordo and Chepultepec; mustered out at Pittsburgh, 
Pa. July 15, 1848; was commissioned 2d lieutenant Co. H, 67th Reg. Pa. V. I. Jan. 16, 1862, 
under Col. J. F. Staunton, in the Army of the Potomac; was taken prisoner at the battle 
near Winchester, June 15, 1863; was in Libby prison eleven months, at Macon, Ga. three 
months; was taken with 600 officers and placed under fire, at Charleston two months, Co- 
lumbia four months, and then to Charlotte, N. C; was exchanged at Wilmington, N. C, 
and discharged at Annapolis, Md. March g, 1865; holds the office of School Director; Rep; 
Ind; 160 acres, $2,400; wife was Eliza J. Schall, born in Pa. July 7, 1835; married April 24, 
185 1; seven children, two girls and one boy living; H. C. Smith lives in Pa. 

SMITH B. Sec. 4; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Dem; Cath; born France; 311 acres, $6,220. 

SMITH WM. lives with his father; P.O. Annawan; Dem; Caih; born Pa.' 

STAGNER LEWIS, Sec 27; P.O. Annawan; renter; Rep; Ind; from Ohio. 

STENHOFF ISAAC, Sec. 2; P.O. Annawan; Dem; Ind; born Canada. 

STOVER DANIEL, Sec. i; P.O. Annawan; farmer; born 111; 90 acres, $2,250. 

SWAYZE C. F. Farmer, Sec. 34; P.O. Annawan; born in Warren Co. N. J. Sept. 6, 1836; 
came to this county July I, 1856; Rep; Ind; first wife was Ardelia Dunham, born in Savoy, 
Berkshire Co., Ma-^s., Feb. 14, 1841; married April 2, 1864, died May 13, 1865; by first wife 
one child, Ethel Swayze, born April 17, 1865, died Aug. 24, 1865; second wife was Isabella Lamb, 
born in Galashiels, Scotl ind, Aug. I, 1843; married Jan. 12, 1873; two children, one boy 
was born and died Jan. 23, 1874; Ella B. born Jan. 11, 1875. 

SWIGER A. H. Sec. 16; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Ind; born Ohio; 120 acres, $3,600. 

T^ONKINSON CHARLES, Sec. l; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Ind; born England; 120 acres. 

TONKIIVSON JOHX, Farmer; Sec. i; P.O. Annawan; born in Norton, England (York- 
shire), July 4, 1S50; came to this county in 186?; Rep; Ind; owns 120 acres, value $2,400; 
wife was Lydia Almira Widrig, born in Yorktown, Henry Co. 111., Dec. 10, 1853; married 
Nov. 18, 1869; three children, one boy and two girls. 

VAUGHIS' BEN J. W. Farmer, Sec. 28; P.O. Annawan; born in Chemung Co. N. Y., 
Aug. 16, 1827; moved from N. Y. to Aurora, Kane Co. III.; lived there two years, and in 
Kendall Co. three years; came to this county in 1858; held the offices of Constable, Col- 
lector, Commissioner of Highways, School Director, etc.; wife was Caroline Conklin, born 
in Saratoga Co. N. Y., March 17, 1833; married Aug. 23, 1S48; six children, three boys and 
three girls; owns 260 acres, value $8,oco. 

VAUGHN C. M. Farmer, Sec. 28; P.O. Annawan; born in Chemung Co. N. Y., Sept. 15, 
1848; came to this county in 1859; R^P'. ^""^I owns 140 acres, value $4,900; holds the office 
of Town Clerk, Collector and School Trustee; wife was Miss Alice M. Giles, who was born 
ill Franklin, Johnson Co. Indiana, Jan. 20, 1847; married March 28, 1872; three children, 
two girls living. 

AliTARNOCK JOSEPH A. lives with his father; P.O. Atkinson; Rep; Meth; born N. J. 
WILSEY WM. Sec. 12; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; born N.Y; 150 acres, $3,750. 
WRIGHT AMOS, Sec. 12; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Ind; Adv; born Ohio; 150 acres, $4,500. 
WRIGHT ZACHARIAH, lives with his father; farmer; Rep; born Ohio. 



HENRY COUNTY: HANNA TOWNSHIP. 241 

WARNOCK JAMES, Farmer and Painter; Sec. 33; P.O. Annawan; born in County 
Down, Ireland, March 26, 1834; came to this county April 4, 1873; Rep; Pres; 120 acres, 
$3,600; was enrolled as private April 16, 1861, in Co. A, 29th Reg. Pa. Vol. I.; promoted 
July I to Third Sergeant; at the first battle of Winchester to Second Sergeant; July 10, 1S62, 
at Williamsport, iMd., to First Serg-ant, and at Gettysburg, July 4, 1863,10 Sergeant Major; 
received his discharge, and commissioned Second Lieutenant the same day; received the 
commission July 26, and was mustered in Sept. 5, 1863; was in the battles of Ball's Bluif, 
Winchester, Antietam, Chancellorville, Gettysburg, Wahatchi, Lookout Mt., Missionary 
Ridge and Ringgold, Ga.; resigned April 9, 1864; wife was Sarah B. Moreland, born in County 
Down, Ireland, March r, 1837; married Sept. 14, 1S59; five children, two boys and two girls 
living, one girl deceased. 

WARNOCK PETER W. Farmer, Florist and Gardener; Sec. 29; P.O. Atkinson; born, 
in County Down, Ireland, Feb. 19, 1829; came to Burlington, N. J., in 1846; was there four 
years, in Philadelphia two years, and Camden five years; came to this county July I, 1857; 
held the offices of Justice of the Peace, School Trustee and Collector; wife was Elizabeth A. 
Castles, born in N. Y. City Aug. 20, 1836; married, Feb. 22, 1854; nine children, six boys 
and two giris living, one boy deceased; Rep; Meth; 240 acres, value $7,200. 

WENNERGREN JOHN F. Farmer, Sec. 28; P.O. Annawan; born in Goteborg, Swe- 
den, July 25, 1822; Rep; Luth; 120 acres, $4,800; he started from Sweden Jan. I, 1851, 
landed in New Orleans April 5, 1851; took a steamer April 12 and came to Peru, 111., and 
by canal boat to Chicago, where he bought a team, which he drove to Henry Co., entered 
his land at the Dixon land office in June, 1851, where he has lived since; was School 
Director. 

V ALLANDER H. D. Mrs. Sec. 27; P.O. Annawan; Luth; born Sweden; 200 acres, $6,000. 
^ ZALLANDER J. P. Sec. 27; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 



HANNA TOWNSHIP. 

A DAMS JAS., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Dem; born England. 
-'^ ADAMS JOHN, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Dem; born 111. 
AGUE CLINTON, P.O. Geneseo; miner; Rep; born Ohio; wife, one child. 
AGUE HORACE, P.O. Geneseo; miner; Rep; born Ohio. 

AGUE JAMES, Sec. 35, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born Ohio; owns 53 acres, val. $2,120. 
AGUE WILSON, P.O. Geneseo; farm laborer; Rep; born Ohio. 
AGUSTAFSON CHAS., PO. Cleveland; miner; Rep; born Sweden. 

ALDRICH DANE. Sec. 25, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; born 111.; owns 220 acres, val. $8,800. 
ALDRICH M. M. Proprietor of the Aldrich Bros, coal mines, Sec. 24, P.O. Geneseo; born 

in Henry Co. 111. in 1838; Dem. The Co. owns 87 acres of coal land. Married Harriet S. 

Richmond, of 111. in 1862; three children — Marshall Madora, Robt. Edmund Lee, and Earl 

Percy. 
ALDRICH WM. Sec. 25, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; born 111.; owns 40 acres, val. $1,600. 
ALOENE A,, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Dem; born Sweden. 
ANDERSEN CHAS., P.O.Cleveland; miner; Dem; born Sweden. 
ANDERSON J., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep; born Sweden. 
ANDERSON JOHN, P.O.Cleveland; miner; Dem; born Sweden. 
ANDERSON PET., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep; born Sweden. 
ARNOLD JOHN, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Dem; born Germany. 

"DAILEY JAMES, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Dem; born England. 

^ BARNES L. G. Sec. 2, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born Ohio; owns 280 ac. val. $11,200. 

BEARDSLEY O. Sec. 26; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; born N. J.; 8 acres, value $400. 

BECK FREDRICK, P.O. Cleveland; butcher; Dem. 

BECK JOHN, P.O.Cleveland; miner; Dem; born Sweden. 

BEESER J. H., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Dem; Meth; born 111. 

BELL GILBERT, P.O. Cleveland; farmer; rents of Mr. Crull; Dem; born Canada. 

BENSON JOHN, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Dem; born Ireland. 

BENNETT W. J., P.O. Cleveland; miller; Dem; born N. Y. city. 



242 VOTEKS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

BERNARD JAMES, Sec. 36: P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; 10 acres, valued $500. 
BERNARD OSCAR, Sec. i; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born Henry Co; 80 acrs. val. $3,200. 
BER:N"AKD WM. Farmer; rents of Mrs. Miller 40 acres; Sec. 35; P.O. Geneseo; born in 

111. in 1S45; Rep; was Town Clerk six years. Collector one year. School Director three years; 

was in the 139th I. V. I. as private; honorably discharged; married Josephine Fuller, of 111. 

in 1867; two cfiildren. 
BITNER J., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Dem; born N. Y. 
BLIXT L. M., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep. 
BOLTON J., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep. 
BOLTON W. H., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep. 

BOLTON W. J., P.O. Cleveland; laborer; Rep; horn N. Y.; wife, three children. 
BRADY G. Sec. 36; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born Ohio; 81 acres, valued at $3,240. 
BRANNON, D. J., P.O. Cleveland; millwright and engineer; Dem; Meth. 
BEARER JAMES, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep. 

BROKRO JOHN, Sec. 32; P.O. Cleveland; farmer and stock raiser; born N. J.; Dem; Meth. 
BROWN CHAS. P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep. 
BRUER JOHN, P.O.Cleveland; miner; Rep; born Germany. 
BURNS JAS., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Dem; born Ireland. 

BURTON J. M. Sec. 35; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; born 111; owns 40 acres, val. $1,600. 
BUSE CHAS. P.O. Cleveland; carpenter; Dem; owns two houses and lots, value $6,000. 

/^ALSON SWAN, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Dem; born Sweden. 

^ CAMPBELL S. P , P.O. Cleveland; gen. sup't Williams' coal bank; Rep. 

CARSE THOMAS, Sec. 32; P.O. Cleveland; farmer, with Mrs. Sarah Spade; Dem. 

CASE D. M. Sec. 2; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born N. Y.; 164 acres, value $6,500. 

CHERRY ALEX., P.O. Geneseo; farmer, with father; Rep. 

CHERRY ROBERT, Farmer and Stock Raiser; Sec. 26; P.O. Geneseo; born in Frank- 
lin Co. Ohio, 1825; came to Henry Co. in 1838; Dem; owns 354 acres of land, valued at 
$14,160; married Mary Ann Van Winkle of 111. in 1849; ^^^ children — James Henry, Robert 
Alexander, Alwilda Jane, Alice Luella, Lillie Lorenteen. 

CHURCH ROBT., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep; born England. 

CLARK HENRY, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep. 

CLARK J., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep. 

COLBET A. A., P.O. Geneseo; laborer; Dem; born 111. 

COLBERT JAMES D. Sec. 25; P.O. Geneseo; farmer, rents 80 acrs. of mother; Dem; born 111. 

COLLIS GEO. Sec. 34; P.O. Cleveland; farmer; Rep; born Englan ; owns 116 ac. val. $4,640. 

COE C. Sec. i; P.O. Geneseo; farmer, rents of M. Poddleford; Rep. 

CONRAD HENRY, Sec. 34; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; owns 37 acres, value $1,480. 

COOK J. W., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep; born 111. 

COZARD T. P., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep; born III. 

CRUL. BENGMAIV, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 32; P.O. Cleveland; born in Pa. in 
1820; came to Henry Co. in 1850; Rep; Meth; owns 107 acres land, value $5,350; married 
Mary Ann Bay, of Ohio, in 1847; four children; Sam'l A., Wm. David, Clara Jane, and 
Marcus Lafayette. 

CRULL M. L., P.O.Cleveland; farm renter; Rep; born 111. 

CRULL SAMUEL A. Carpenter; Sec. 31; P.O. Cleveland; born in Indiana in 1848; came 
to Henry Co. in 1859; Rep; Meth; owns house and lot in town; married Barbara Kiefer, of 
111. in 1872; one boy, Wm. Albert. 

CRULL WM. D., P.O. Cleveland; farm renter; Rep; Meth; born Ohio. 

CUNNINGHAM WM. Sec. 25; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; born Ireland; 80 acres, $3,200. 

TRAVIS A. F. Sec. 4; P.O. Green River; farmer; Rep; born N.Y.; 80 acres; value $3,200. 
■*-^ DAWSON G. W. Sec. 3; P.O. Cleveland; farmer; Rep; born Ind; 20 acres, val. $800. 
DETTERMAN L. H. Sec. 36; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born Pa; 47 acres, value $1,880. 
DESANO W. H., P.O. Cleveland; miller; Dem; born Pa; wife, one child. 




B. W. SEATON, 
Editor Prairie Chief, Cambridge. 



HENRY COUNTY: HANNA TOWNSHIP. 245 

"PGAN JOHN, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Dem; born Ireland. 

-^ EICKLER JANE Mrs. Sec. 26; P.O. Geneseo; owns 20 acres, value $800. 

EDWARDS E. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 34; P.O. Cleveland; born in Wales in 1819; 
came to Henry Co. in 1856; Rep; owns Slj4 acres land, value $4,000; was School Director 
three years; married Sarah J. Bellard, of Ohio, in 1844; ine children- -Elizabeth, Cynthia 
Ann, Alice Jane, Olive M., Wm. Tayler, Frank Ellsworth, John Franklin, Chas. Fremont, 
Albert. 

ELLINSWORTH J. H., P.O.Cleveland; farmer; Dem; Meth; born Maryland; two lots. 

ELLINGSWORTH WM., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Dem; born Pa. 

EMRIGH PET., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep. 

ERWIIS" GILBERT, Farmer, Sec. 3; P.O. Cleveland; born in Pa. in 1830; came to Henry' 
Co. in 1859; Rep; Meth; owns 65 acres land, value $2,600; is Assessor, has been four ytars; 
married twice; first wife, Nancy Hotchkiss, of Pa. in 1850; one child; second wife was Mary 
J. Dawson, of Ohio, married 1855; three children; Edwin Gilbert, Rosie Mary, Fannie L., 
Nannie Elizabeth. 

"PARBER J. W., P.O. Geneseo; farmer, rents of M. Cherry; Rep; born 111. 

FIDLES A. Sec. 26; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born Germany; 80 acres, val. $3,000. 

FIEDLER JAMES C. P.O. Cleveland; farmer, rents of P. K. Hanna; Rep; born 111. 

FOGARTY MARTIN, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Dem; born Ireland. 

FOWLER WM., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep. 

FOX MICHAEL, P.O. Cleveland; miner; born Scotland; wife, four children. 

FOX OWEN, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep; born England. 

FREEMAN A. M., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep. 

FREEMAN ALONZO W., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep; born Iowa; wife, two children. 

FULLER C. W. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 35; P.O. Geneseo; born in N. Y. in 1825: 
came to Henry Co. in 1834; Rep; owns 360 acres land, value $14,400; was Assessor one year; 
Commissioner of Highways three years; married Kezia Rowe, of N. Y., in 1846, for first 
wife; four children; married Catherine Brady, of Pa. in 1858, for second wife; five children. 

FULLER HENRY C, P.O. Geneseo; farmer with father, C. W. F.; Rep; born 111. 

FULLER S., P.O. Geneseo; retired farmer; Dem; born Connecticut in 1791. 

/^LYNN JOHN, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Dem; born Ireland. 

^ GORDON JAS., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep; born England. 

GORE GEO. D. Sec. 4; P.O. Cleveland; farmer; born New Hampshire; owns 80 acres, $3,200. 

GOTTSCHE JOHIV JACOB. Farmer, Sec. 3; P.O. Geneseo; born in Germany in 
1814; came to Henry Co. in i860; Rep; Luth; owns 240 acres of land, value $7,200; married 
Katharina Korb, of Germany, in 1858; four children, John Jacob, Henry, Kattie Lizzie and 
Anna Maggie. 

GREASER G., P.O. Cleveland; stonemason; Dem; Luth; Germany; two lots and house. 

GREASER HERMAN, P.O. Cleveland; farm laborer; Dem; Luth; born Germany. 

GREVES C, P.O. Cleveland; ferryman; Rep; Meth. Epis, born Germany. 

GREVES C, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep; born Germany. 

GRIFFIN C, P.O. Cleveland; Prop. Cleveland House; Rep; born England. 

GUEST HENRY, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep. 

TT AGELEN GUST., P.O. Cleveland; boot and shoemaker; born Sweden; not a voter. 

■^ HALL THOS. P.O. Cleveland; engineer; Rep; born England. 

HALL THOMAS, Constable, P.O. Cleveland; born in Madison Co. N. Y., in l8l2; came 
to Henry Co. in 1865; Rep; owns house and lot in town, value $500; has been Constable 
eight years. City Marshal and Chief of Police seven years; married Abby Johnson, of Conn, 
in 1833; three boys, James T., Albert W. and Manvill S. 

HAND HENRY, Sec. 32; P.O. Cleveland; farmer; Rep; Meth; owns 153 acres, value $6,100. 

HAN'N'A H. N. Farmer and Stock Dealer, Sec. 32; P.O. Cleveland; born in Henry Co. Ill, 
in 1841; Rep; Meth; owns 160 acres of land, value $6,400; is Tax Collector, has been four 
years; was School Director two years; married Mrs. jane E. Hill, of Ohio, in 1862; one girl, 
name Lillian Florence. 
21 



246 VOTERS AND TAXPAYEKS Oi' 

HANNA P. K. Kev. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 32; P O. Cleveland; born in Ky. in 
iSlo; came to Henry Co. in 1835; Rep; Meth. Epis; owns 450 acres land, value $r8,ooo; was 
licensed to preach by the l\I. E. Church in 1829; and assisted in organizing most of the early 
religious societies of this and Rock Island Counties; at the organization of Henry County 
WIS chosen County Commissioner; also chosen several times Supervisor of Geneseo and 
Hanna Townships, and was chosen Representative of the 46th District of III. in 1868; mar- 
ried for third wife Mrs. S. M. Fiedler, of Geneseo, 111., in 1857; is the father of twelve chil- 
dren. 

HANSEN NEILS, P.O. Cleveland; mason; Dem; Luth; born Denmark; owns house and lots. 

HASS H. Sec. 2b; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; born Germany; owns 20 acres, value $1,000. 

HASS HENRY, P.O. Geneseo; miner; Dem; born Germany, 

HASS HERMAN, P.O. Geneseo; miner; Dem; born Germany; married. 

HAY THOS. R., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep. 

HAYDEN JAS., P.O.Cleveland; miner; Rep. 

HAYWOOD JOHN, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep; born England. 

HENNINGER J. F. Sec. 34, P.O. Geneseo; fanner; Rep; born Ohio; 80 acres, value $1,600. 

HIGBEE C. P., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep; born 111. 

HILL GEO. W., P.O. Cleveland; merchant; Rep; born Ohio; house, store, etc., $3,300. 

HILL LOUIS, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep; born 111. 

HILL MILTON, P.O. Cleveland; merchant; Rep; born Ohio; house, store, etc., $3,300. 

HILL THOS. Sec. 6; P.O. Cleveland; farmer; Rep; Meth; born Ohio; 200 acres, $8,000. 

HILLIS JOHN, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep; Pres; Ireland; wife, three children. 

HOWALD HENRY, P.O.Cleveland; miner; Dem; Luth; born Germany; wife. 

HUEBNEK CHKISTOPH, Farmer, Sec. 4; P.O. Cleveland; born in Germany in 1825; 
came to Henry Co. in 1868; Rep; Luth; owns 60 acres land, val. $2,400; married Miss Eli- 
zabeth Elze, iif Germany, in 1854; two children, Henry and Augusta. 

HUGHES ROBT., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep; born Wales. 

HULL E., P.O.Cleveland; miner; Dem. 

HULL E. J., P.O.Cleveland; miner; Dem. 

HUVALDT HENRY, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep; born Germany. 

TRVIN J. C, P.O.Cleveland; merchant; Rep; born 111; wife, one child. 

-'- INGHAM JUSTIN, Sec. 3; P.O. Geneseo; farmer, rents of C. W. Davenport; Rep. 

IRVIN W. J., P.O.Cleveland; merchant; Rep; born 111; wife, one child. 

IRVIN WM., P.O.Cleveland; merchant; Rep; Luth; born Pa; owns 420 acres, val. $16,800. 

JACKSON THOMAS, Sec. 5; rents of Mrs. Hanna; born England; 80 acres, val. $3,200. 
JACKSON THOS. C, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep; born England. 
JACOBSON GEO., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep; born Sweden. 
JACOBSON PETER, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep; Luth. 
JACOBSON THOS., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep; born Sweden. 
JANNSEN VOLENTINE, P.O.Cleveland; teamster; Dem; Luth; born Germany. 
JOHNSON GUSTAV, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Dem; born Sweden. 

T/'EITH W. P., P.O.Cleveland; druggist; Rep; born Ohio. 

-'^ KERR T. W., Sec 34; P.O. Cleveland; farmer; Rep; born Pa; owns 80 ac. val. $3,200. 

KING ED., P.O. Geneseo; miner; Dem; born N. J. 

KIRCHNER CHAS. Sec. 3; P.O. Cleveland; farmer; Dem; Cath; born Germany; owns 180 ac. 

KIRCHXEK CARL J. Farmer, Sec. 3; P.O. Cleveland: born in Germany in 1830; came 

to Henry Co. in 1855; Dem; Cath; owns 180 acres land, val, $5,400; married Maggie Mock, 

of Germany, in 1853; five children, Mary Elizabeth, Catharine Josephine, Rosie Lena, Carl 

Henry and George Andrew. 
KNOKK ERASMUS, Farmer, Sec. 5; P.O. Green River, born in Germany in 1824; came 

to Henry Co. in 1869; Dem; Meth; owns 80 acres land, val. $5,000; married Mrs. Amelia 

Buchholz, of Germany, in 1863; two boys, Henry and Charles. 



L 



ADAIL JOHN, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Dem; born Ireland. 

LAVERRY D. Sec. 36; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Cath; born Ireland; 260 acres. 



HENKY COUNTY : HANNA TOWNSHIP. 247. 

LEHMAN GEO., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Dem; born Germany. 

LEWIS M. J., P.O. Cleveland; laborer; Rep; born N.Y. 

LILLIS PAT. .Sec. 32; P.O.Cleveland; farmer; Dem; Cath; born Ireland; owns 160 acres. 

LUBRICK C. Sec. 6; P.O Cleveland; farmer; Germany; owns 79 acres, val. $3,160, 

LUMBURG FRANK. P.O.' Cleveland; miner; Rep; born Sweden. 

LYMAN MIKE, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Dem; born L-eland. 

TV /TcANDREWS ED., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Dem; born Ireland. 

^^^ McDON.\LD S. B., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep. 

MADISON JAMES, Sec. 6; P.O. Cleveland; farmer, rents of T. Hill; Rep; born in Denmark. 

MEER THOS., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep. 

MORTON C. T. Sec. 27, P.O. Cleveland; farmer; Rep; born N. Y.; 90 acres, val. $2,700. 

MILEN E., P.O. Cleveland; engineer at Williams' coal mines; Rep; born England. 

MILEN JOHN, P.O. Cleveland; bank boss at Williams' coal mines; Rep; born England. 

MILLER A. Mrs. Sec. 35, P.O. Geneseo; 40 acres, val. $1,600. 

MILLER J. A., P.O. Cleveland; teamster; Rep; born Pa; wife and one child. 

MILLER J., P.O. Cleveland; laborer; Rep; born Ohio; wife and two children. 

MILLER JOHN, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep. 

"NTESBIT WM., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Dem. 

-'■^ NORDBURG ALEX., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Dem; born Sweden. 
NORDBURG JOHN, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Dem; born Sweden. 
NOORTHEN NICTER, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Dem; born Sweden. 

/^LMSTEED F. P., P.O. Cleveland; principal public school; Rep; born in Ills. 
^^ O'NEIL JOHN, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Dem, born Canada. 

pALMER H. S., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Dem; born America. 

-*- PALMER W. E. Sec. i, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born N. Y.; 40 acres, val. $1,600. 

PADDELFORD JAMES H. Farmer and Stock Dealer, Sec. 4, P.O. Cleveland; born 
in Grafton Co. New Hampshire, in 1828; came to Henry Co. in 1837; Dem; Meth; owns 
796 acres land, value $32,000; has served as Assessor, Collector, Supervisor and Town 
Clerk; married Rachel D. Hanna, of Henry Co. Ills, in 1857; six children, three boys and 
three girls. 

PANGHN C. S., P.O. Geneseo; miner; Rep; born Pa; wife and one child. 

PETERSON JOHN, Sec. ■\4, P.O. Cleveland; farmer; Rep; Luth; born .Sweden; 160 acres. 

PEACOCK MARTIN, P.O.Cleveland; miner; Rep; born England. 

PETERSON MONS, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep; born Sweden. 

PETERSON P., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Dem; born Sweden. 

PFAFF G. Sec. 3, P.O. Cleveland; farmer; born Germany; 86)^ acres, val. $3,440. 

PORTER GEO., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep; born England. 

PUGH JOHN, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep; born Wales. 



Q 



UILLIN JOHN, P.O. Cleveland; farmer, rents of Shaffer six acres; Dem; born Indiana. 



"D ASK CHAS., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Dem; born Ills. 

-'^ RATHGEBER LOUIS, P.O. Cleveland; carpenter; owns house and lot, val. $500. 

REMINSON GEO. W., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep;. born Ills. 

RENNISOR GEO., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep; born England. 

RICHARDSON JOSEPH, P.O.Cleveland; miner; Dem; born England. 

RICHARDSON WM., P.O.Cleveland; miner; Dem; born England. 

ROGERS JAS., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Dem; born Ireland. 

RUSSER N. Sec. l, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; bom Pa; 100 acres, val. $4,000. 

OALE J. H., P.O. Cleveland; physician and surgeon; Rep; born Indiana; owns two lots. 
^ SCHUBER CHRIST., P.O.Cleveland; miner; Rep; born Germany. 



248 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

SAWYER J. A. Jr. (of the firm of J. A. & A. Sawyer), Postmaster and General Mer- 
chant, P.O. Cleveland; born in Rock Island Co. Ills, in 1845; came to Henry Co. in 1850; 
Rep; Meth- has been Postmaster eight years; Treasurer of the Corporation of Cleveland 
three years. 

SEAKLES JOHN, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 28, P.O. Cleveland; born in Ohio in 
1804; came to Henry Co. in 1858; Rep; he owns 279 acres land, val. $g,ooo; married Agnes 
Owens, of Ireland, in 1858; eight children, names: John Clinton, James, Truman, William, 
Margaret, Clarissa, Mary, Bell. 

SHAFFER WM. Sec, 5, P.O. Cleveland; farmer; Rep; Meth; born Ohio; 320 ac. val. $2,800. 

SHIMBRICK CHRIS., P.O.Cleveland; miner; Rep; born Germany. 

SHUE JOHN, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep; born Germany. 

SMITH E. E. Sec. 27, P.O. Cleveland; farmer, rents of C. T. Morton; Dem; born England. 

SMITH J. J. Sec. 28, P.O. Cleveland; farmer; Dem; born Pa.; owns 60 acres, val. $2,400. 

SNELLER JOS. Mrs. Sec. 3, P.O. Cleveland; 86>/2 acres, val. $3,440. 

SPRAY J., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep; born England. 

SQUARES BENJ. M., P.O. Geneseo; mechanic; Rep; born Pa. 

SQUARES M. H., P.O. Geneseo; mechanic; Rep; born N.Y. 

STAFFORD J., P.O. Geneseo; engineer for Aldrich Bro's. coal shaft; Dem. 

STANBRO Z. D. Sec. 35, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born N.Y.; 40 acres, val. $1,600. 

STOKES WM. D. Sec. 6, P.O. Cleveland; farmer, rents; Rep; born White Co. Ill; 94 ac. $3,000. 

STONE J., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep. 

STOKZ G. JACOB. Dealer in Grain and Saloon Keeper, Cleveland; born in Germany in 
1840; came to Henry Co. in 1869; Dem; Luth; owns three houses and lots, val. $2,700; owns 
a four-ton Victor scales where all farmers can weigh their produce, grain, etc.; married 
Friederika Pfaff, of Germany, in 1873; two children, George Jacob and Anna Regina. 

SWAN B. P., P.O. Cleveland; miller; Dem; born N.Y; wife, three children. 

SWANSON JOHN, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep; born Sweden. 

SWANSON WM., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Dem; born Sweden. 

T^ALCOTT WM. H. Sec. 25, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born Rock Island; 79 ac. in estate. 
TIMM H. Sec. 2, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born Germany; owns 80 acres, val. $3,200. 

TAYLOR H, R. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. g, P.O. Green River; born in White Co. 
111. in 18 i2; came to Henry Co. in 1845; Rep; owns 280 acres land, val. $1 1,200; was in gth 
I. V. Cav. Co. A, as private one year; married Mary Ann Porter, of Rock Island Co. 111. 
1855; six children, Mary Idella, Wm. Harrison, Geo. Hudson, Fred. Lincoln, John Jefferson, 
and Danl. Arthur. Held office Town Clerk one year, and Commissioner three years. 

THOBURNI THOS.. P.O.Cleveland; miner; Rep; England. 

THOMPSON H. A., P.O. Geneseo; foreman; Dem; born Ohio. 

THOMPSON L., P.O. Geneseo; miner; Rep; born N.Y. 

THOMPSON WM., P.O. Geneseo; miner; Rep; born Ohio. 

TREAT LYMAN, P.O.Cleveland; miner; Dem; born. Ohio; wife, two children. 

Al rACHTEL P. Sec, 2, P.O. Cleveland; farmer;'Dem; Cath; born Germany; 160 ac. $6,400. 
^* WALLES WM., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep. 
WALSH DANL., P.O. Cleveland; tailor; Rep; Meth. Epis; born Ireland; owns house, two lots. 
WALTHER FRED, P.O. Cleveland; farmer, rents; Rep; Luth; born Germany. 
WARNER JOHN, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Dem. 
WARREN G. W., P.O. Cleveland; butcher; Rep; wife, four children. 
WEAVER L., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep. 

WHITTED FRANK M., P.O. Cleveland; farmer with father, W. Whitted; Rep; born 111. 
WHITTED J. C, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep; born Indiana; wife, three children. 
WHITTED M. W. Sec. 33; farmer, rents of father, W. W.; Rep; born 111. 
WHITTED WILEY, Sec. 33, P.O. Cleveland; farmer and stock raiser; Rep; born Ind; 250 ac. 
WHITTED WM., P.O. Cleveland; retired farmer; Rep; born N. C. in 1793. 
WHITTED WM. P. Sec. 33, P.O. Cleveland; farmer with father, Wiley Whitted; Rep; 111. 
WILCOX JAMES. P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep; born England. 
WILLIAMS G. Sec. 35, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born N.Y; owns 40 ac. val. $1,600. 



HENBY COUNTY: YOKKTOWN TOWNSHIP. 249 

WILLIAMS O., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep. 

WILLIAMS WM. S., P.O. Geneseo; boss boarding-house; Aldrich Bro's. mines; Rep. 
WITHROW JOHN W. Sec. I, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born in 111; 240 ac. val. $9,600. 
WOODELL LOUIS, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep. 

Business Directory. 

HANNA TOWNSHIP. 

Aldrich Bros. Proprietors Coal Mines, Sec. 24, P.O. Geneseo. 

CLEVELAND. 

Crull Saml. A. Carpenter. 

Sawyer J. A. & A. Dealers in Gen'l Merchandise. 

Storz G. Jacob, Dealer in Grain, &c. Prop. Saloon. 



YORKTOWN TOWNSHIP. 

ANDERSON CHRISTIAN, Sec, 7; P-O. Jefferson Corners; farmer; Rep; born Denmark. 
ATKINSON C. H. Sec. 7; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Ind; born Vermont; 1,640 acres. 

BALLOU CHAS. Sec. 35; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Luth; born Germany; 80 acres. 
BEACHEL JOHN, Sec. 19; P.O. Prophetstovvn; farmer; Dem; Cath; born Germany. 
B4.UER ADAM, Farmer; Sec. 25; P.O. Annawan; born in Bavaria Germany, S^ept 23, 
isfs came to this county in 1864; Rep; Evang; 160 acres, $4800; holds the office of School 
Director- wife was Elizabeth Fey. born in Darmstadt, Oct. 26, 1829; married Oct. 29, 1850, 
the children are, Henry, born April 20, 1857, died Sept 23. 1858; Samuel, born I eb 20, 
1859, died Feb. 18, 1861; Elizabeth, born July 8, 1862; Emma, born Jan. 26, 1865, Louisa, 
born Aug. 29, 1867. 

BEACHEL LEWIS, Sec. 17; P.O. Leon; farmer; Dem; Cath; born Germany; 160 ac. $6,400. 

BERGE CHAS. Sec' 35; P.O.' Annawan; farmer; Rep; Meth; from Germany; 120 ac. $3,000. 

BLAKE ARTHUR, Sec. 26; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Ind; born 111; 40 acres, $r,ooo. 

BLAKE A. Mrs. Sec. 26; P.O. Annawan; 31 acres; $800. 

BRA-N-TS EFE, Farmer; Sec. 13; P.O. Prophetstown; born in Arle, Hanover. Germany, 
July 31 1829- came from Germany to Peoria, 111., in 1848: lived there 17 years.and to this 
county in 1865; lived here since; Rep; Evang; 320 acres, $9,000; his wife was Petje Campen, 
born in Arle, Hanover, Germany, July 26, 1832; married Oct. 10. 1S52; eleven children, 
four boys and four girls living, three have died. 

BRANT JOHN, Sec. 15; P.O. Annawan; renter; Rep; Evang; born 111. 

BRAUER JACOB, Sec. 25; P.O. Yorktown; rents Dillon's place; Rep; born Germany. 

BROWN E. K. Sec. 13; P.O. Yorktown; farmer; Rep; Ind; born Maryland; 240 acres, $2,400. 

BROWN J. W. Sec. 13; P.O. Yorktowi; lives with his father; Rep; born 111. 

BROWN MILTON, Sec. 23; P.O. Yorktown; farmer; Rep; Ind; born Indiana. 

BUCKLEY JOHN R. Sec. 26; P.O. Annawan; renter; Rep; Ind; born Indiana. 

BUCKLEY R. K. Sec. 26; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; born Ind; 40 acres. 

BUNKER JOHN, Sec. i; P.O. Yorktown; renter; Dem; Ind; from N. Y. 

BUNKER WM. Sec. i; P.O. Yorktown; farmer; Dem; Ind; born N.Y; 130 acres, $4,000. 

BURROUGHS CARLOS, Sec. 3; P.O. Leon; farmer; Rep; Ind; born Cattaraugus, N.Y; 80 ac. 

CHERRY IRENA Mrs. wife of L. Cherry; Dem; Freewill Bapt; born 111. 
CHERRY LAWRENCE, Sec. 3; P.O. Leon; farmer; Dem; Ind; from Ohio. 
CLEMENTZ SAMUEL, Sec. 9; P.O. Leon; Dem; Cath; born Germany; 161 acres, $6,000. 



250 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

CLEMENTS K. K. Farmer; Sec. 17; P.O. Annawan; born in Alsace, Germany, March 27, 
1839; Dem; Cath; 160 acres, $4,000; was in the 151st I.V.I; enlisted Feb. 6, 1865, in the 
Army of the Cumberland, under Thomas; discharged June 11, l856; held the offices of 
School Director and Deputy Sherift'; wife was Julia Ann Egart, born in Alsace, Germany, 
Dec. iS, 1843; married Dec. 3, 1863; children are: Chas. R., born July 27, 1864, died March 
8, 1866; Robt. C. born Jan. 10, 1865; Amelia, born Nov. 25, 1866; Julia, born Oct. 7, 1868; 
Lydia, born Jan. 15, 1871; Tracy, born Jan. 18, 1873; Sarah, born Dec. 23, 1875; Geo. H, 
born Jan. 2, 1877; came to this county April 23, 1854. 

COUNTRYMAN A. Sec. 20; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Evang; born N.Y; 320 ac. $8,000. 

COUNTRYMAN CONRAD, Sec. 31; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Evang; born N.Y; 116 ac. 

COUNTRYMAN HENRY Sr. Sec. 28; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Evang; born N.Y. 

COUNTRYMAN HENRY Jr. Sec. 28; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Evang; born 111. 

CUMMINGS HIRAM, Sec. 2; P.O. Yorktown; farmer; Dem; Ind; born Conn; 160 acres. 

T^AHL JOHN, Sec. 35; P.O. Annawan; renter; Rep; born Sweden. 

^ DEMOTT J. F. Sec. 7; P.O. Prophetstown; renter on Atkinson's; Rep; Ind; born N.Y. 

DILLON THOMAS, Sec. 25; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Dem; Cath; born Ireland; 130 acres. 

"PGERT MICHAEL, Sec. l6; P.O. Leon; farmer; Dem; Cath; born Alsace, France;' 354 ac. 

"PEHLMAN E. Sec. 30; P.O. Annawan; teacher; Rep; Evang; born 111. 

FEHLMAN G. Sec. 30; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Evang; from Germany; ig6 ac. 

FEY HENRY, lives with Adam Bauer; Rep; born Germany. 

FEY ERNST, lives with his father; Rep; born Germany. 

FISHER HENRY, works for J. J. Wolf; Rep; born Germany. 

FORWARD LEWIS, Farmer, Sec. 3; P.O. Leon, Whiteside Co; born in Onondaga Co. 
N.Y. Nov. 13, 1852; Dem; Ind; 40 acres, $1,400; came from New York to Prophetstown 
in 1865, lived there seven years, and in Fairfield, Bureau Co. four years, and to this county 
in 1876; wife was Estelle Sabin, born in Prophetstown, 111. Ocl. 30, 1857; married Sept. 9, 
1874; one child, Frank L. Forward, born May 11, 1876. 

/'^^ EER L. D. Sec. 6; P.O. Prophetstown; farmer, Rep; 1,640 acres, $32,800. 

^-^ GOEMBEL EDWARD, Sec. 22; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Evang; born 111. 

GOBLE TESTER, Farmer, Sec. 13; P.O. Yorktown; born in Rock Island Co. 111. Feb. 
26, 1838; came to this county in 1851; Rep; Ind; 12S acres, $4,480; wife"' was Philena 
Hrowii, born Jan. 22, 1843; married Nov. 23, 1856; six children, two boys and three girls 
living; enlisted Aug. 12, 1862, in the 112th Reg. 1. V. I. Co. A, Capt. Dow, 23d Army Corps, 
under Gen. Schofield; was taken prisoner at Knoxville, Tenn. Nov. 23, 1863; was at Rich- 
mond one and one-half months, Belle Isle one month, Andersonvilie five months twenty 
days, and at Florence until taken to Wilmington, where he was paroled about the 1st of 
March 1865; ducharged June 2, 1865. 

GOEMBLE S. Sec 30; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Evang; burn 111; 194 acres, $4,800. 

GREENWOOD GEORGE, Sec. 25; P.O. Yorktown; farmer; Rep; born Wis; 40 ac. $400. 

GREENWOOD JOHN, Sec. 36; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; from Eng; 320 ac. $6,400. 

GREENWOOD JOSEPH, Sec. 36; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; from England. 

GROSS JOHN, Sec. 31; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Dem; Cath; born Germany: 367 ac. 

GROSS WM. lives with his father, Sec. 31; P.O Annawan; Dem; Cath; born 111. 

TT AFER JOHN, Sec. 11; P.O. Yorktown; farmer; Rep; Evang; born Pa; 80 ac. $1,600. 

-^^ HILGER FREDEKICK F. Sec. 14; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Evang; born Germ. 

HILGER PETER, Sec. 14; P.O. Annawan; Rep; Evang; born Germany. 

HIXON H. Sec. l; P.O. Yorktown; renter; Rep; Ind; born Michigan. 

HOLZINGER GEORGE, Sec. 20; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Evang; born Germany. 

HOLZINGER MARTIN, Sec. 12; P.O. Yorktown; farmer; Rep; Evang; born Germany. 

HOUCH NICHOLAS, Sec. 36; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Prot; from Germany. 

JA(,)UET ELIZABETH Mrs. Sec. 21; P.O. Annawan; Evang; born Germany; 80 acres. 
JAQUET F. Sec. 23; P.O. Annawan; rents Brants' farm; Rep; Evang; born Germany. 
JAQUET HENRY, hves with his mother; P.O. Annawan; Rep; Evang; born 111. 
JAQUET JOHN, P.O. Annawan; rents his mother's farm; Rep; Evang; born 111. 



HENRY COUNTY: Y0RS:T0WN TOWNSHIP. 251 

TT'ILLMER ELIAS, Sec. 2; P.O. Yorktown; reiiiei; Rep; Ind; born N.Y. 

-^ KNOLL NICOLAUS, works for John Wolf; Rep; Cath; born Bavaria, Germany. 
KURFISS CHAS. Sec. 24; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Evang; from Germany; 200 acre.';. 
KURFISS JOHN, lives with his father; Rep; Evang; born 111. 

T AH^L'\NN FREDERICK, Sec. 34; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Evang; born Germany. 

^ L.ANE BENJ. Sec. i; P.O. Yorktown; farmer; Rep; Free Meth; born N.Y.; 152 acres. 

LAXE G. W. F.vrmer, Sec. l; P.O. Yorktown; born in Marbletown, Ulster Co. N.Y. June 
2g, 18 10; came 10 this county in May, 1854; Rep; Univ; 127 acres, $5,080; wife was Elmina 
Granger, born in Washington Co. N.Y. Sept. g, 1812; married Sept. 11, 1833; four children 
— two girls and one boy living; held the offices of Highway Commissioner and Town 
Treasurer. 

LANE G. W. Jr. Sec. 12; P.O. Yorktown; farmer; Rep; Free Meth; from Michigan. 

LANE LEVI, Sec. i; P.O. Yorktown; farmer; Rep; Ind; born Ulster Co. N.Y; 120 ac, $4,000. 

LANE M. F. Sec. i; P.O. Yorktown; farmer; Rep; Ind; born Cayuga Co. N.Y. 

liAXE W. W. Farmer, S?c. i; P.O. Yorktown; born in Shandaken, Ulster Co. N.Y. Jan. 
18, 1853; Rep; Ind; 93 acre=, $3,255; wife was Ella A. Montgomery, born in Farmington, 
Fultoh Co. 111. Aug. I, 1856; married Sept. 3, 1876. Wm. Lane, his father, was born in 
Ulster Co. N.Y. Feb. 3, 1831; enlisted in the 12th Conn. Reg. V. I. Oct. 8, 1864; was taken 
prisoner at the battle of Newbern, N. C. April I, 1865; was confined in Libby about one 
month; was then paroled, and came home, vv^here he died June i, 1865. 

LANDWEHR D. Sec. 32; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Evang; born Germany; 300 ac. $4,500. 

L.ANDWEHR WM. lives with his father; Rep;^Evang; born 111. 

LEHMANN LAWRENCE, Sec. 17; P.O. Prophetstown; Rep; Evang; born 111; 160 ac. $3,600. 

LEHMANN WM. lives with his brother; P.O. Prophetstown; Rep; Evang; born 111. 

LISK JOSEPH, Sec. 5; P.O. Prophetstown; renter on Geer's farm; Rep; born 111. 

LUTHER JOHN, Sec. 27; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep: Evang; born N.Y; 98 acres.' 

LUTHER PETER. Sec. 15; P.O. Leon; farmer; Rep; Evang; born Germany: 80 acres. 

IX/r AGENHEIMER GEORGE, Sec. 22; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Evang; born Germany. 

^^^ MARKLE JOHN, Sec. i; P.O. Yorktown; farmer; Rep; born Ulster Co. N.Y; 33 acres. 

M.\THIS AUGUSTUS, Sec. 9; P.O. Prophetstown; farmer; Rep; Evang; born Gar; 123 acres. 

MATHIS A. P. lives with his father; farmer; Rep; Evang; born 111. 

MATHIS E. O. lives with his father; teacher; Rep; Evang; born [11. 

MATHIS J. Sec. 11; P.O. Y'orktown; farmer; Rep; Evang; born Germany. 

M.\THIS PHILLIP, Sec. 16; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Evang; born France; 295 acres. 

MATHIS WM. Sec. 21; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Evang; born France; 160 acres. 

MILLER DANIEL, Sec. 31; P.O. Annawan; teacher; Rep; Evang; born 111. 

MILLER JACOB, lives with his father; Rep; Evang; born 111. 

MINCH HENRY, Sec. 27; P.O. Annawan; works father's farm; Rep; Evang; born 111'. 

MINCH JOHN, Sec. 27; P.O. Annawan; renter; Rep; Evang; born 111. 

MYERS ANDREW, Sec. 22; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Evang; born Germany; 120 acres. 

MYERS JEREMIAH, Sec. 34; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Ind; born Pa; 200 acres, $7,000. 

MYERS WM. Sec. 22; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Evang; born 111. 

/^TT GEO. J. Sec. 20; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Evang; born Germany. 

OTT CASPAR, Sec. 21; P.O. Prophetstown; farmer; Rep; Evang; born Pa; 160 acres. 

OTT ALBERT J. Farmer, Sec. 21; P.O. Annawan; born in Desplaines, Cook Co. 111. 
Feb. 14, 1850; came to this county in 1854; moved from Iowa to Jewel Co. Kansas, in 1871; 
back to Iowa in 1S73, and to Henry Co. in 1874; Rep; Evang; held the offices of School 
Director and Pathmaster; wife was Margaret Graham, born in Boone Co. Iowa, May 21, 
1853; married July 27. 1871; three children, Martha A. born in Jewel Co. Kansas, Dec. 27, 
1872; Ida O. in Iowa, Oct. 24, 1873; George D. HI. Dec. 22, 1874. 

OTT EMIEL, Sec. 20, P.O. Annawan; cane-maker; Rep; Evang; born Alsace, Germany. 

OTT JACOB, Sec. 20, P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Evag; born Alsace, France; 167 ac. $5,845. 

OTT JOHN, lives with Jacob Ott; Rep; Evang; born Lake Co. Til. 

OTT PHILLIP, Sec. 20, P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Evang; born Germany. 



252 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

OTT REUBEN, lives with his father; Rep; Evaiig; born 111. 

OTTO W. F., P.O. Annavvan; works for Mr. Clementz; Dem; Luth; boin Germany. 

piERCE EZRA, Sec. 3, P.O. Leon farmer; Rep; U. B.; born N.Y.; no acres, $3,000. 

"P APP JACOB, Sec. 22, P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Evang; born 111.; 80 acres, $640. 

■^ RICHARDS JOHN, Sec. 3, P.O. Leon, W. Co. ; farmer; Rep; Ind; Cattaraugus Co. N.Y. 

KICHAKDS LEONARD H, Farmer, Sec. 3, P.O. Leon; born in Cattaraugus Co. N. 
Y., April II, 1836; came to this Co. in 1S70; Rep; M. Epis; 80 acres, $2,500; wife was Hor- 
tentia Sabin, born in Portage Co. Ohio, Sept. 7, 1843, married Sept. 26, 1861; two children, 
Otis W. born July 18, 1866, Estella M. born Oct. 8, 1872. Enlisted Aug. 14, 1862, in the 
75th Reg. Co.D, I. V. I.; was Corporal, Capt. McMoore's Co. under G. H. Thomas; was in 
about sixteen engagements, some of which are Buzzards' Roost, Resaca, Kenesaw Mt., Look- 
out Mt., Missionary Ridge, and Nashville; .was unhealthy during the first year, but in active 
service until discharged, which was June 12, 1865. 

RICHARDS LYMAN, Sec. 10, P.O. Leon, Whiteside Co.; farmer; Rep; Meth; born N.Y. 

RINGLE CHAS. Sec. 3, P.O. Leon; former; Rep; Evang; born Germany. 

RINGLE H. J. lives with his father; Rep; Evang; born N.Y. 

RINGLE JOHN, Sec. 35, P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Evang; born Germany; 325 acres. 

ROCKENBACH C. Sec. 23, P.O. Annawan ; farmer; Rep; Evang; from Germany; 80 ac. $2,500. 

O ANDS LOUIS, Sec. 19, P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Evang; from Germany; g6 ac. $2000. 
'--^ SCHAFER ADAM, Sec. 28, P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Evang; born Germany. 

SCHMITT GEORGE, Sec. 20, P.O. Annawan; farmer; Cath; born Germany; 80 ac. $3,000. 

SCHMITT J. lives with Geo. Schm^tt; farmer; Dem; Cath; born Germany; 160 acres, $2,400. 

SCHM'iTT JOSEPH, Sec. 20, P.O. Prophetstown; farmer; Dem; Cath; born Germany; 135 ac 

SCHINLEBER FRED. Sec. 27, P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Evang; born Germany; 63 ac 

SCHMITT THEOPHILUS, Farmer, Sec 3, P.O. Leon; born in Helsingheim, Alsace 
Germany, July 8. 1839; came to this Co. in 1866; Dem; Cath; 347 acres, $10,410; held the 
offices of School Director and Pathmaster; wife was Magdalena Clementz, born in Wittis- 
heim, Alsace, Germany, Julv 16, 1841, married March 15, 1866; children are Edward W 
born Dec. 31, 1867, Amelia J. born May I, 1868, Sarah L. born Oct. 13, l86g, died Sept. 24, 
1873, Johanna M. born Apnl 13, 1871, August A. born Aug. 20, 1872, Ella N. born March 
7, 1874, Geo PI. born June 9. 1875. 

SEYLLER CONRAD, Farmer, Sec. 10, P.O. Leon, Whiteside Co.; born in Wittis- 
heim, Alsace, Germany, Nov. 19, 1840; came from France in 1855, his wife in 1845. to Na- 
perville. 111., to this Co. March 8, 1S56; wife was Josephine Clementz, born in Wittisheim, 
Germany, March 19, 1840, married June 24, 1862; eight children, three girls and three boys 
living: Cath; 320 acres, $9,600. 

SHERE JOHN, Sec. 13, P.O. Yorktown; farmer; Rep; born England. 

SHERE WM. E. Sec. 13, P.O. Yorktown; renter; Rep; Ind; born N.Y. 

SITTLER a. lives with his father, P.O. Annawan; Dem; Cath; born Germany. 

SITTLER JOHN, Sec. 32, P.O. Annawan; farmer; Dem; Cath; born Germany; 127 ac. $1,270. 

SMITH ADAM, Sec. 15, P.O. Prophetstown; farmer; Rep; Evang; born Germany; 160 acres. 

SNELL M. Sec. 32, P.O. Annawan; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Germany; 40 acres, $400. 

SOLilDAY ANDREW, Farmer, Sec. 31, P.O. Annawan; born in Sunthausen, Alsace, Ger- 
many, Jan. 7, 1830; came to this Co. Feb. 23, 1854; Rep; Evang; 266 acres, $6,650; is School 
Director; has been Constable, Assessor, and Highway Commissioner; wife was'Mary Baker, 
born in Wairen Co. Pa. April I, 1840, married June 14, 1856. The children are Mary E. born 
April 2, i8cS, Jacob E., Aug. 10, 1861, Andrew J.. March 16, 1865, Esther E., March 28, 
1867, Ida S., May 25, 1871, Hannah A., Feb. 7, 1874. 

STOWELL LiYMAN, Farmer, Sec. 10; P.O. Leon. Whiteside Co ; born in Harpersville, 
Browne Co., N.Y.. Feb. 19, 1810; came from there to Illinois in 1836; lived in Prophetstown 
II years; came to this Co. in 1849; was the first settler in this Township; has lived here 
most of the time since; Rep; Meth. Epis; held the offices of Justice of the Peace and Town 
Clerk; was the first Collector; 177 acres, value $7,965; wife was Sarah Leach, born in 
Johnsburg, Warren Co., N.Y., June 2, 1814; married May 14, 1843; four children, one boy 
and three girls; Wilbur F. Stowell, Jr., born here Aug. 16, 1853; his wife was Lydia Luther, 
born here May 30, 1852; married Oct. 20, 1874; one child, Nettie Bell, born July 24, 1875; 
Rep; Ind. 




C.N.Whitney 

EDITOR &■ PROPRIETOR 
KEWANEE courier: 



HENRY COUNTY: YORKTOWN TOWNSHIP. 255 

SPAETH FRED, Sec. 32; P.O. Annawan; renter; Rep; Evang; born Germany. 

SPAETH FRED, Jr., lives with his father; Rep; Evang; born Germany. 

SPAETH JACOB, lives with his father; Re v, Evang; born Germany. 

STOEHR EMIEL, lives with his father; Rep; Evang; born Germany. 

STOEHR JACOB, Sec. 24; P.O. Yorktown; farmer; Rep; Evang; Germany; 120 ac. val. $3,000. 

TBAUTWEIN F. Farmer, Sec. 32; P.O. Annawan; born in Baldenheim, Alsace, Germany, 
Dec. 17, iSig; came from France to Cook Co., III., in 1S52; lived there five years, in White- 
side Co. three years, and in this Co. since i860; Rep; Evang; 114 acres, val. $4,560; second 
wife was Mary Riely, born in Rusterding, Alsace, Germany, March 28, 1824; married Feb. 
19, i860; the children are August, by first wife, born in Germany Oct. 12, 1851; George, 
March 6, 1861; Edward, March 13, 1863; Emma, Jan. 19, 1866; Ferdmand, June 21,1868. 

URBAN CHRISTIAN, Sec. 4; P.O. Leon; farmer; Rep; Luth; France; 140 ac; $4,900. 
URBAN DANIEL, lives with his father; Evang; born Illinois. 
URBAN LORENTZ, Sec. 22; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Evang; Germany; 100 acres, $3,500. 

ArEEBER L. Sec. 12; P O. Yorktown; farmer; Dem; Luth; from Sweden; 80 ac; $2,400. 
V VETTER CHARLES, P.O. Annawan; rents Urban'sfarm; Evang; born Germany. 

VETTEK MICHAEL,, Farmer, Sec. 11; P.O. Yorktown; born in Baden, Germany, 
March 9, 1829; came from Germany in 1847 to Pennsylvania; lived there seven years; in 
Whiteside Co. seven years; to this Co. in 1S61; Rep; Luth; 200 acres, $4,000; holds the 
office of School Director; wife was Mary A. Hafer, born in Reading, Pa., June 5, 1832; 
married April 11, 1S65; three children; Catherine E., born Jan. 22, 1866; John, born I'eb. 
14, 1867; Minnie, born April 13, 1S71. 

ATI nilTTEMORE JOHN, Sec. 10; P.O. Leon; blacksmith; Dem; Cath; born Germany. 
^^ WIDERHOLD ADAM, rents Mrs. Cartwright's farm; Rep; Evang; born Germany. 

WAIVEGER MATHIAS, Farmer, Sec. 2; P.O. Leon; born in Kuhnheim, Alsace, Ger- 
many, Dec. 3, 1846; came to this Co. in 1867; Ind; End; 120 acres, $4,200; holds the office 
of Pathmaster; first wife was Sophia Gottschalk, born Sept. 26, 1848; married Jan. 21, 187c; 
died Dec. 18, 1873; second wife was Mrs. Esther Hummel, born in Havana, Mason Co., 
111., May, 1848; married June 16, 1874; children are Elsina, born Sept. 16, 1S66; William, 
born Jan. 22, 1871; Matilda, born Feb. 13, 1872. 

WILDMAN C. M. Sec. 4; P.O. Leon; farmer; Rep; Ind; born Ohio; 80 acres, $2,000. 

WILDMAN GEORGE, Sec. 4; P.O. Leon; farmer; Rep; Ind; 120 acres. 

WILDMAN S. L. Sec 3; P.O. Leon; rents Green's farm; Rep; Ind; bom Ohio. 

WINCHELL EDWARD, Sec. 12; P.O. Yorktown; farmer; born New York; 120 acres. 

WOLF BERNHART, Sec. 30; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Evang; born Germany; 200 ac. 

WOLF J. J. Sec. 33; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; ind; born Germany; 1,100 acres; $22,000. 

WOLF JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 29; P.O. Annawan; born in Nideraula, Hesse, Germany, 
March 18, 1822; came to this Co, in 1856; Rep; Evang; 300 acres, $6,000; held the office of 
School Trustee; wife was Catharine Holzinger, born in B.aden, Germany, Jan. 31, 1842; mar- 
ried July 5, 1858; the children are: Henry, born Oct. 3, 1859, died Dec. 28, 1869; Adam, 
born Nov. 28, i860; George, Oct. 31, 1862; Louisa A., Feb. 13, 1865; Elizabeth, Nov. 6, 
1867; Martin, May 27, 1870; John, July 5, 1873; Frederick, March 15, 1876. 

WOODWORTH E. H. Sec 10; P.O. Leon; farmer; Rep; Ind; born N.Y.; 16 acres, $480. 

WOODWORTH HILON, Sec 10; P.O. Leon; farmer; Rep; Meth; born N.Y.; 27 acres,-$8io. 

^ACKLEY JOHN, Sec 9; P.O.Leon; farmer; Dem; Cath; born Germany. 

■^INSER N. Sec. 35; P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Evang; born Germany; 80 acres, $1,800. 



^56 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OE 



COLONA TOWNSHIP. 

A LLEN DANL. P., Briar Bluff; foreman at Perry & Co. coal shaft; Rep; born Wales. 

-^^ ALLEN JOHN, P.O. Briar Bluff; miner; Rep; born Wales. 

A?fDERSON HENKY C. Farmer, Sec. 26, P.O. Briar Bluff; born in Crawford Co. Pa. 
in 1846; came to Henry Co. 1S61; was in the 126th I. V. T., Co. H, three years; honorably 
discharged; married Mrs. Ann Pugh, of 111. in 1873; four children; Rep; 40 acres, val. $1,600. 

"D ANGTSON JOHN, P.O. Orion; farmer, rents of M. Stewart; Rep; born Sweden. 

BAUM E. J. Sec. 13, P.O. Green River; farmer; Dem; born in N.Y.; owns 80 ac. $3,200. 

BARTLETT HIRAM C. Station Agt. of C.R.T. & P.R.R., P.O. Green River; born 111. 
in 1836; came to Henry Co. in 1867; Dem; owns house, lot, etc.; was Justice of Peace one 
year; went into the ist Wis. Cavalry as private Co. H, promoted to Sergeant, honorably dis- 
charged; has been Station Agt. one year; married Eliza E. EUingsworth, of III. in i860; two 
children. 

BAUM CHAS. Farmer. Sec. 2, P.O. Colona; born Jefferson Co. N.Y. 1840; came to Henry 
Co. 1846; Rep. The estate owns 407 acres land, val. $12,000. Served as Collector two 
years. Town Clerk two years; was private Co. K, 112th I. V. I. two years; promoted to Ser- 
geant one year, honorably discharged; married Angeline Meer, of 111. in 1867, who died in 
1874; three children, two boys, one girl. 

BAUM FRANKLIN, Sec. 13, P.O. Green River; farmer, works 137 ac. of est.; Rep; born N.Y. 

BAUM JUSTIN P., P.O. Green River; farmer with father, E.J. Baum; Dem; born N.Y. 

BECHT ANTON, Wagon-maker and Blacksmith, Colona; born in Germany, 1830; came 
to Henry Co. 1858; Dem; Cath; owns dwelling-house, shop, etc., val. $1,600; was School 
Director five years; married Miss Antonie Beck, of Germany, in 1855; has five children; two 
boys, three girls. 

BELL, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 2, P.O. Colona; born England 1834; came to Henry Co- 
1856; Dem; U. Presbyterian; owns 140 acres, val. $5,000; was formerly a merchant; married 
Miss Sarah Fisher, of Pa. in i860; six children, four boys and two girls. 

BENNETT STERLING-, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 23, P.O. Colona; born in Pa. 
1830; came to Henry Co. in 1856; Rep; Meth; owns 160 acres land, val. $8,000; was School 
Director four years; married Elizabeth Washburn, of Springfield, Mass. in 1857; six chil- 
dren — Olive Ashley, Mary Lizzie, Winfield Scott, Nathan W. Washburn, Francis Sterling, 
and Herbert. 

BERGE A. Sec. 35, P.O. Cleveland; farmer; Rep; born in Pa.; owns 20 acres, val. $800. 

BERRMAKER PETER, Sec. 30, P.O. Coal Valley; farmer; Dem; Cath; born France; 120 ac. 

BAILEY D. O., P.O. Colona; blacksmith. Green River; Dem; Luth; born Ohio. 

BOYLAN JOHN, Sec. 26, P.O. Briar Bluff; farmer; Dem; Cath; Ireland; 80 ac. val. $3,000. 

BOYLAN PAT., P.O. Briar Bluff; farmer and miner; Dem; born Ireland. 

BRANDENBURGH F. M., P.O. Green River; carpenter; Dem; born Ohio. 

BRANDENBURGH GEO. Retired Farmer, Sec. i, P.O. Green River; born in Fred- 
erick Co. Md. July 28, 1799: came to Henry Co. in 1835; Dem; Univ; owns 30 acres, val. 
$2,000; was Judge of Elections twenty years. School Director eight years; married Elizabeth 
Thompson, of Ohio, in 1815, for first wife; two children; married Mrs. Phebe Wells, of 
Cleveland, 111. in 1843 for second wife. 

BROWN GEO. Merchant, Colona; born in England in 1831; came to Henry Co. in 1856; 
Rep; U. P.; owns store and lot, merchandise, etc., valued at $5,500; was Town Clerk four 
years; married Margaret Bell, of England, in 1871; one child, Maggie. 

BRUER JOHN, Sec. i; P.O. Cleveland; farmer; Rep; Luth; born Germany; 40 acres, $1,600. 

BUIC E., P.O. Green River; farm laborer; Dem; born South Carolina. 

BURG ANDREW, Sec. 35; P.O. Cleveland; farmer and miner; Dem; Luth; born Sweden. 

BURROWS ROBERT, P.O. Colona; farm laborer for Baum; Rep; born England. 



c 



ASEY MICHAEL, Sec. 14; P.O. Green River; farmer; Dem; Cath; born Ireland; 40 ac. 
CASPARI JOHN, Sec. 15; P.O. Colona; farmer; Dem; born Germany; 77 acres, $3,000. 



HENRY COUNTY: COLONA TOWNSHIP. 257 

CHAMBERS AISTDREW J. Farmer, Sec. 2; P.O. Colona; born in Madison Co., Ohio, 
in 1834; came to Henry Co. in 1856; Dem; U. Pres; owns 80 acres land, value $3,000; was 
Collector one year, Constable four years; married Phoebe O. Wyman, of Summit Co., Ohio, 
in 1859; five children, two boys and three girls; Geo. Ray, Andrew Jackson, Harriet May, 
Elizabeth Estella, Emma Laura. 

CHAMBERS LAFAYETTE, Carpenter, Sec. 11; P.O. Colona; born in Madison Co.. 
Ohio, in 1835; came to Henry Co. in l86g; Rep; U. Pres; owns house and two lots; was 
private in Co. A, 4tli Iowa Cavalry three years; honorably discharged; married Miss Sarah 
C. Hearn, of Warren Co., Ohio, in 1866; two children, Evalina May, and Lawrence Sylvester. 

CHRIST A., P.O. Green River; saloon; Rep; born in Pa. 

CADIGAN MORRIS, Sec. 15; P.O. Briar Bluff; Farmer; Dem; Cath; born Ireland. 

COLSON M. A., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

COLVIN JENNINGS D., P.O. Dunlap; farm laborer; Dem; born Indiana. 

COLVIN" LUTHER K. Farmer, Sec. 28; P.O. Briar Bluff; born in Kentucky in 1821; 
came to Henry Co. in 1856; Rep; owns 80 acres land, value $3,200; was Justice of the 
Peace eight years. Assessor three years, Highway Commissioner twelve years; married Miss 
Amanda J. Sharp, of Adams Co., 111., in 1849; five children, three boys and two girls. 

COMSTOCK HEXKY S. Principal Public School, Colona; born in Oswego Co., N.Y., 
in 1831; came to Henry Co. in 1856; Rep; owns farm, house and lot in Cambridge, value 
$4,000; personal prop, notes, $4,000; held office of Town Clerk seven years. School Trustee 
four years, Couiity Superintendent of Schools four years; was 2d Lieut, in Co. I, ri2th I.V.I, 
one year; honorably dis-harged; Principal of High School, Colona, four years; married Em- 
ma G. Terpening, of N.Y., in 1859; three children, John Josiah, Winnifred, and Mary 
Elizabeth. 

COOK JAMES, P.O. Briar Bluff; miner; Rep; born England. 

CORNWALL S. H. Miss, Telegraph Operator and Agt. R. R. I. & St. L. R.R., Briar Bluff; la. 

COZAD THOMAS P. Miner; P.O. Cleveland; born in Mercer Co. Pa. in 1831; came to 
Henry Co. in 1866; Rep; Meth; was President of the Board of Trustees of the Corporation 
one year; Treasurer one year; married Jane Jones, of Pa., in 1854; eight children, five boys 
and three giils. 

CRAIG JAMES, Sec. 32; P.O. Sunny Hill; farmer; Dem; Scotland; 106 acres, val. $4,500. 

CRAIG JAMES, Sec. 32; P.O. Coal Valley; farmer; Dem; 106 acres, value $4,240. 

CURRY MICHAEL, P.O. Coal Valley; miner; Dem; Cath; Ireland; wife and five children. 

"pvAVIS ALBERT, P.O. Briar Bluff; engineer; Dem; born N.Y. 

•*-^ DAVIS THOS. P.O. Briar Bluff; miner; Rep; Wales; wife and three children. 

DAY COLVIN, Sec. 27; P.O. Colona; farmer; Rep; born Pa; rents 80 acres of J. Moderwell. 

DEEM B. L., P.O. Cleveland; carpenter; Dem; Cath; born N. Y. 

DEEM JACOB L. Farmer and Carpenter, Sec. 36, Range i,Tp. 18; P.O. Cleveland; born 
in Germany, 1830; came to Henry Co. 1S58; Dem; Cath; owns 125 acres land, val. $5,000; 
was Assessor five years ; Police Magistrate three years ; School Director eight years ; was 
President of the Board of Trustees three years; married Miss Mary Ann Sherman, of 
Germany, in 1853; seven children, five boys and two girls. 

DELANY BENJ., P.O. Colona; section boss for C. R. I. & P. R.R; Rep; Cath; born Ireland. 

DILLEN DAVID, P.O. Briar Bluff; farmer; born Ireland; owns 160 acres, val. $6,400. 

DILLEY THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 27, P.O. Colona; born in Virginia in 1834; came to 
Henry Co. in 1865; Rep; Meth; owns 276 acres land, val. $11,000; married Mrs. Mary Buck, 
of Ills, for first wife; married Caroline McDaniels, of Ills, in 1876, for second; three chil- 
dren, Minnie May, William Thomas, and Bertie Wesley. 

DILLIN WM. T. Sec 12, P.O. Green River; farmer; Rep; born N. Y.; owns 180 acres, $7,000. 

DILLON Z. Sec. 35, P.O. Cleveland; farmer, rents of widow Hill; Rep; Meth; born Ohio. 

DIX DAVID, P.O. Briar Bluff; miner; Rep; born England. 

DOPLER J. Green River; saloon; Rep; born in Pa. 

DOUGLAS JOHN, P.O. Coal Valley; laborer; Dem. 

DUFFY PAT, P.O. Briar Bluff; miner; Dem; Cath; born Ireland. 

DUNLAP C. H., P.O. Colona; mason; Dem; born in N. Y. 

DURMA:N':N' frank W. Farmer, P.O. Coal Valley; Sec. 28; born in Ills, in 1847; 
came to Henry Co. in 1864; Dem; Bapt; owns 160 acres land, val. $6,500; married Josephine 
B. Davis, of Ills, in 1870; three boys, Burt Clair, Louie Alvin, and Ray. 

DURMANN JOHN L., P.O. Coal Valley; farmer, with father, J. W.; Dem; born Ills. 



258 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

DURMANIV JOSEPH, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 33, P.O. Coal Valley; born in 
Germany in 1S13; came to Henry Co. 1865; Dera: owns 320 acres land, val. $12,500; was 
School Director seven years; married Amanda Killing, of Germany, in 1844; five children, 
four boys and one girl. 

DURMANN JOSEPH, P.O. Coal Valley; farmer, with father, J. W.; Dam; born Ills. 

"P LLINGSWORTH WM. Sec. 36, P.O. Cleveland; farmer; Dem; owns 76 acres, val. $3,200" 
^ ESSEX WM. Sec. 33, P.O. Coal Valley; farmer, rents 160 acres; Rep; born Ills. 
EGAN JOHN, Sec. 11, P.O. Colona: farmer; Rep; born Tenn; 104 acres, val. $4,000. 
ELUNG-SWOKTH JOSEPHUS S. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 10, P.O. Colona; 

born Maryland in 1S45; came to Henry Co. 1863; Rep; Meth; owns 333 acres, val. $10,000; 

was Tax Collector one year; married iVIrs. Mary Hanna, widow of Robt. N. of Ills, in 1870, 

with two chddren, Maud Frances and Frederick Newton; has two children since marriage, 

Young Joseph and Robert Wm. 

"pERRY JOHN, P.O. Briar Bluff"; miner; Rep; born England; wife and six children. 
-*- FINESSY JAMES, Sec. 14. P.O. Colona; farmer; Dem; Cath; born Ireland; 80 acres. 
FRANCIS CALVIN, P.O. Briar Bluff; rents farm of M. Colvin; Dem; Bapt; born Ills. 

/^ ALES C. W. Briar Bluff; book-keeper for Perry cS; Co.; Dem; born in Ills. 

^-^ GARLAND GEO. W. Sec. 33, P.O. Coal Valley; farmer; Rep; born Pa.; 80 acres; $14,000; 

GIBBOXS JOHX, Farmer, Sec. 14, P.O. Briar Bluff; born in Ireland in 1826; came to 
Henry Co. 1857; Dem; Cath; owns 77 acres land val. $3,500; was School Director five 
years; married Bridget McDermott, of Ireland first wife, and Johanna Magher, of Ireland, 
for second wife; six children. 

GLENN JACOB, Sec. 32; P.O. Coal Valley; retired farmer, Rep; Quaker; born in Ky. 

GLiENX JAMES, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 20; P.O. Briar lUuff; born in Fayette 
Co., Ky., in 1811; came to Henry Co., in 1835; Rep; owns 350 acres land, value $14,000; 
married Nancy C. Kincaid, of Green Co., 111., in 1836; six children; four boys and two 
girls. 

GrLENlS; JOHN", Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 20; P.O. Briar Bhiff ; born in Henry Co., 
III., 1841; Rep; owns 217 acres land, value $9,000; was School Director three years; School 
Trustee four years; vi^as Sergeant in the 140th I. V. I., Co. G.; honorably discharged; mar- 
ried Miss Susan Reynolds, of Illinois, in 1865; two children. Record Reynolds, and Nellie 
Viola. 

GLENN T. W. Sec. 32; P.O. Coal Valley; farmer, works father's farm; Rep; born Ohio. 

GLENN" WM. N". Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 31; P.O. Coal Valley; born in Henry Co. 
111., in 1838; Rep; owns 2S5 acres land, value $14,000; married Miss Ellen Reynolds, of 
Henry Co. 111. in 1862; one boy, James Nazro. 

GRANT DAVID, P.O. Coal Valley; miner; Rep; Meth; born Scotland. 

GRASSAU ANDREW, Colona; boot and shoe maker; Rep; U. Pres; born in Germany. 

GREENWALT JOHN, Colona; teamster; Dem; Meth; born Pa. 

GUINTY D. Sec, 30; P.O. Coal Valley; farmer; Dem; Cath; born Ireland; 280 ac. val. $10,000. 

T "T ALL A. Sec. 36; P.O. Cleveland; miner and farmer; Rep; born in Pa; 80 acres, $3,500. 

HANNA L. W., P.O. Green River; merchant; Rep; born 111; wife, six children. 
HALL ALBERT "W. Farmer, Sec. 18; P.O. Cleveland; born in Pa. 1844; came to Henry 

Co. in l366; Rep; owns 80 acres of land, value $3,200; married Miss Harriet Anderson, of 

Henry Co. 111. in 1870; one girl, named Abby Martha. 
HAYWOOD JOHN, P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep; born England. 
HILL H. A., P.O. Green River; farm laborer; Dem; born Ohio. 
HILL L. E., P.O. Green River; farm laborer; Rep; Meth; born Ohio. 

HILL SAM'L, Sec. 13; P.O. Green River; farmer; Dem; Meth; born Ohio; 80 ac. val. $4,000. 
HILL THOS. R., P.O. Green River; farmer with father, S. Hill; Dem; born Ohio. 
HILLIER GEO. Sec. 19; P.O. Coal Valley; farmer and miner; Dem; born Canada; 61 acres. 
HODGES SHELDON, Sec. 21; P.O. Briar Bluff; farmer; rents of father, Thomas; Dem. 
HODGES THOMAS, Sec. 21; P.O. Briar Bluff; farmer; Dem; bom in Scotland; 280 acres. 
HOLDSWORTH HENRY, P.O. Briar Bluff ; miner; Rep; born England; wife; five children. 
HORNECKER JACOB, Sec. 36; P.O. Green River: farmer; Rep; owns 80 acres, value $3,200. 



HENRY COUNTY: COLONA TOWNSHIP. 259 

HOWARD D. P. General Merchant. Colona; born in St. Lawrence Co. N. Y. 1823; came 
to Henry Co. 1851; Dem; owns store, merchandise, etc. value $3,000; was Deputy Postmaster 
three years; Constable four years; now Justice of Peace; married Lucretia M. Wells, of 111. 
in [853, for first wife; one girl; married Melissa Walsh, of 111. 1S73, for second wife; two 
boys. 

HUBER B. Sec. 36; P.O. Colona; farmer; Dem; owns 80 acres, value $3,200. 

HUMBERSTONE CHAS. L. Colona; engineer; Dem; born Pa. 

HUJSiT JOHN", Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 20; P.O. Briar Bluff; born in Henry Co. 111., 
in 1842; Rep; owns 104 acres of land, value $5,000; was School Director two years; married 
Miss Caroline A. Garland of Peoria Co. 111., in 1868; one boy, James. 

HUNTER C. Sec. 36; P.O. Coal Valley; farmer; Dem; born Germany; owns 80 acres, $3,200. 

JOHNSON C. W. Sec. 34; P.O. Orion: farmer; Rep; Luth; born Sweden; owns 40 acres. 
JOHNSON J. M., P.O. Colona; laborer; Rep; Pre?; born Ohio. 

T7' ANE JOHN, Sec. 3; P.O. Colona; farmer; Dem; Cath; born Ireland; owns So acres, $3,000. 

-^ KANE PAT. P.O. Colona; miner; Dem; Cath; born Ireland. 

KARNE MICHAEL, P.O. Briar Bluff; works for R. R. I. & St. L. R. R.; Dem; born England. 

KEEHNEL J. Colona; boot and shoemaker; Rep; born Germany. 

KERNES WM. Sec. 23; P.O. Briar Bluff; farmer, rents of Perry & Co; Rep; born England. 

KERR SAMUEL, P.O. Coal Valley; laborer for Mr. Durmann-; Rep; born Ireland. 

KERSHAW JAS. WM. P.O. Briar Blufl; farmer, rents of father, Wm. Kershaw; born Eng. 

KERSHAW WM. Sec. 15; P.O. Briar Bluff; farmer and miner; born England; 43 acres, $1,600. 

KERWIN JAMES, Sec. 34; P.O. Briar Bluff; farmer; Dem; Cath; born N.Y; 160 acres, $6,500. 

KIBLER JOHN, P.O. Colona and Green River; blacksmith; Dem; born Ohio. 

KIDD A. Sec. 12; P.O. Green River; farmer and miner; Dem; born England; wife and one child. 

KIME GEO. P.O. Colona; laborer; Rep; born N.Y. 

KIME JACOB, C. R. I. & P. R. R. Switchman; Colona; born in Seneca Co. N. Y., in 
1827; came to Henry Co. in 1865; Dem; owns house and two lots in Sec. 11, value $700; has 
been switchman for the C. R. I. & P. R. R. Co. three years; married Miss Sarah Gouger, of 
Seneca Co. N. Y., in 1S47. 

KING AID A. J. Sec. 26; P.O. Briar Blufif; farmer; Rep; born 111; owns 120 acres, value $3,000. 

KllVCAID GEO. W. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 16; P.O. Briar Bluff; born in 111. in 
1820; came to Henry Co. in 1836; Rep; owns 375 acres of land, value $ig,ooo; married 
Louisa C. Smith, of Ohio, in 1S42; seven children by first wife; second wife was Mary A. 
Walker, of Mo., in 1857; one child. 

KIRKPATRICK JAMES H., P.O. Colona; rents farm of Warren estate; Dem; born Ind. 

KLATTENHOFF JOHN, Sec. ii; P.O. Colona; farmer; Rep; owns 30 acres, value $1,200. 

KLATTENHOFF JOHN H. Sec. 14; P.O. Green River; farmer; Dem; Luth; born Germany. 

T AFFERTY EDWARD, P.O. Briar Bluff; miner; Dem; Cath; born Ireland. 

^ LALLY THOS. P.O. Briar Bluff; miner; Dem; Cath; born Ireland. 

LANDBERG F., P.O. Cleveland; miner; Rep; Luth; born Pa. 

LEWIS JOHN M. Sec. 12; P.O. Green River; farmer; Rep; born Wales; owns 40 acres, $1,600. 

LIMB WM. P.O. Briar Bluff; miner; Rep; born England. 

LIXXELL K. E. Farmer, Sec. i, Range i.Tp. 17; P.O. Cleveland; born in Jefferson Co. N.Y., 
in 1S32; came to Henry Co. in 1844; Rep; Meth; owns 40 acres of land, value $1,600; was 
School Director eight years; married Miss Sarah Taylor, of 111., in 1857; two girls, Lucy and 
Mary. 

LIST CHRIST, P.O. Briar Bluff; miner; Dem; Cath; born Germany; wife, three children. 

LIST CHRIST, P.O. Green River; farmer, rents; Rep. 

IV/rcCOLLOUGH JOHN, P.O. Colona; farmer, rents of the Baum estate; Dem. 
^^^ McCULLOUGH JOHN A., P.O. Colona; farmer, rents of Chas. Baum; Dem; Penn. 
McCAKlV PETER, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 30; P.O. Coal Valley; born Ireland in 

1828; came to Henry Co. in 1861; Dem; Cath; owns 102 acres of land, val. $5,000; married 

Miss Catharine Dixon, of Ireland, in 1861; six children. 
McDERMOT PAT, Colona; laborer; Dem; Cath; born in Ohio. 



260 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OP 

McDonald S. B., P.O. Green River; engineer, Rep; born Penn; wife, two children. 

McGONIGAL A. Farmer with his father, W. A.; Rep. 

JMcGONAGIL ALFORD H., P.O. Colona; farmer with father, Wm.; Rep; U. Pres; N.Y. 

McGONAGIL WM. Sec. 26, P.O. Colona; farmer; Rep; U. Pres; born Ireland; 480 acres. 

McHENDRY WM. M., P.O.Green River; mason; Rep; Meth; born Pa. 

McWHIlVIVEY JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 32; P.O. Sunny Hill; born in Ireland, 1824; came 
to Henry Co. in 1S54; Rep; U. Pres; owns 53 acres of land, value $2,500; was School Direc- 
tor eight years; married Margaret Craig, of Wigtonshire, Scotland, in 1857; four children — 
two boys and two girls. 

MAHLSTEDT D. M. Sec. 13, P.O. Green River; farmer; Rep; Luth; born Ger; 97 acres. 

MABSHALiL AUSTIIV H. Farmer and Stock Raiser; Sec. 29, P.O. Colona; born in 
Mass. 1842; came to Henry Co. the same year; Dem; Meth; owns 80 acres of land, value 
$4,000; serving as School Trustee and Justice of Peace at present; was in the l6th I.V.I., 
Co. C, as private; honorably discharged; married Barbara A. Evans, of III. in 1865; one girl. 
A coal vein, 26 inches thiclc, is on this farm. 

MIDDLETON J. Sec. 35, P.O. Cleveland; farmer; born England; 80 ac. val. $3,200. 

MILLER MICHAEL, Farmer, Sec. i; R. i, Tp. 17; P.O. Cleveland; born in Ohio in 1840, 
came to Henry Co. in 1861; Rep; owns 80 acres of land, value $3,000; was in the 15th I.V.I. 
Co. E, as private; honorably discharged; married Mary Reser, of Ohio, in 1864; four chil- 
dren — one boy, three girls. 

MILLER THOMPSON, P.O.Cleveland; miner; Rep; born in Penn. 

MODERWELL ROBT. Sec. 27, P.O. Colona; farmer, works father's farm; Rep; U. Pres. 

MONTGOMERY J. H. Sec. 35, P.O. Colona; farmer; Rep; born in Ireland; 120 acres. 

MORTONSON CHRISTIAN, P.O. Briar Bluff; works for R.R.I. & St.L.R.R.; Rep; Pres. 

MUM MA JOHN N. Sec. 35, P.O. Cleveland; farmer, rents of Widow Hill; Rep; born Ohio. 

MURRY MAXWELL, Sec. 26, P.O. Briar Bluff; farmer; Rep; born III; owns 40 acres. 

MYERS A. Pastor of Methodist Church, Colona; born in North Carolina, 1824; came to 
Henry Co. 1876; Rep; Meth; served as Captain Co. B, iiith I.V.T. eleven months; honor- 
ably discharged; was member of the .Southern Illinois Conference nine years; pastor of the 
Methodist Church, Kansas, five years; removed to 111; preached at Methodist Churdi in New 
Windsor in 1876; removed to Colona; has charge Methodist Church, Colona, Cleveland, 
Green River, and Warrens; married Miss Sarah E. Pollard, of Tennessee, in 1842. 

XTELSON CHAS. O. Sec. 29, P.O. Coal Valley; farmer, rents of N. Washburn; Rep. 

'NY'E ]S"ATHA]S" T. Carpenter, Colona; born in Portland, Maine, in 1850; came to Henry 
Co. 1853; Rep; married Miss Ella E. Cardwell, of Jefferson Co. N. Y. in 1872; one boy, 
Othello Ellsworth. 

/~\'BRIEN MATHEW, P.O. Cleveland; blacksmith; Rep; Cath; born Ireland. 

^-^ O'DAY Pat, P.O. Briar Bluff; miner; Dem; Cath; born Ireland; wife; five children. 

O'BRIEIN" THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 11, RO. Colona; born in Ireland, in 1820; came to 
Henry Co. in 1866; Dem; Cath; owns 40 acres land, val. $t,6oo; married Mary Ann O'Con- 
nors, of Ireland, in 1853; three children — John, Thomas, and Matthew. 

OTTO JACOB HEXRY, Farmer, Sec. I, P.O. Colona; born in Germany, 1822; came 
to Henry Co. in 1874; Dem; Luth; 243 J^ acres land, val. $12,000; married Cecelia Cristina 
Freberg of Sweden, in 1849; three chddren — Josephine Magdaline, Martin Peter, Fritz 
Theodore. 

pATTERSON JAMES, RO. Briar BlufiT; laborer; Dem; Cath; born Ireland; wife; four chil. 
PEACOCIC MARTIN, Sec. 13, P.O. Green River; farmer; Rep; born in England; 80 ac. 

PARK & HILLIER, Proprietors of the P. & H. Coal Mines; Sec. ig; P.O. Coal Valley; 
Hillier was born in England; Park in Scotland; Dems; Meth. and Pres; Park married Char- 
lotte Hillier, of England; seven children; Hillier married Flora McDonald, of Scotland, in 
1845; six children. 

PERRY CHARLES, Proprietor and Manager of Briar Bluff Coal Mines; P.O. Briar 
Bluff; born in Berkshire Co. Mass, in 1833; came to Henry Co. in 1854; Rep; Cong; owns 
1,480 acres land; married Miss Fannie A. Smith, of Little Falls, N.Y. in 1871; one girl — 
Meta C. 

PHILLIPS WM. Sec. 29, P.O. Coal Valley; farmer; rents 160 acres of brother; Rep. 



HENRY COUNTY: COLONA TOWNSHIP. 261 

PLUMMER BENJ. F., P.O. Green River; laborer; Rep; born Indiana; wife; three children. 

POMEROY AMASA, P.O. Colona; butcher; Rep; born in Canada. 

POMEROY GEO., Colona; druggist; Rep; Meth; born N.Y. 

PORTER GEO., P.O. Cleveland; miner and farmer; Rep; born in Pennsylvania. 

PUKDY GEO. E. Blacksmith; Colona; born in Putnam Co. N.Y. in 1838; came to Henry 
Co. in 1869; Rep; was private in Co. G. the I20th N.Y. V. I. si.x months; honorably dis- 
charged; married Miss Ruth Vannosdall, of Dutchess Co. N.Y. in 1863; one girl, Jessie. 

"P ATGAN JOHN, Sec. 14, P.O. Briar Bluff; farmer; Dem; Cath; born Ireland; 120 acres. 
^^ RE.\B JNO. M., P.O. Colona; farm laborer; Dem; born Pa. 
REAB MILFORD, P.O. Colona; farm laborer; Dem. 
REAB WILLIS A., P.O. Colona; farm laborer; Dem; born Pa. 
REAB WM., P.O. Colona; farm laborer; Dem. 

REESE THOMAS, Sec, 29, P.O. Coal Valley; farmer; Rep; born Wales; 160 acres, val. $8,000. 
REESE T. W. Sec. 10, P.O. Colona; butcher and farmer; Rep; born N.Y; 160 ac. val. $5,000. 
RICHARDSON HENRY, P.O. Colona; farm laborer; Rep; born Ireland. 
RICHARDSON THOMAS C, P.O. Colona; farmer; works his mother's farm; Rep; 80 acres. 
ROGERS E., P.O. Colona; Sec. 35, P.O. Colona; farmer; Rep; born Indiana; 160 ac. $6,400. 

CCROGGEN GEO. P.O. Coal Valley; miner; Dem; Cath; born Ireland. 

SEHUGE I. Sec. 36; P.O. Cleveland; farmer; Dem; Cath; born in Ger; 142 acres, $5,600. 

SALE R. K. Physician, Sec. i; P.O. Colona; born in Green Co. Ohio, 1834; came to this 
county in 1862; Rep; owns 18 acres of land; house, buildings, etc. valued at $3,000; gradu- 
ated at the Iowa Medical College in 1855-6; married Miss Annette Barnard, of Rock Co. 
Wis. in Feb. 1S53; three children living, named Max Hunter, John and Jessie. 

SCHOEHFEK GEO. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 30; P.O. Coal Valley; born in Ger- 
many in 1S19; came to Henry Co. in 1863, Dem; owns 80 acres land, val. $4,000; married 
Miss Caroline Stenninger, of Switzerland, in 1846; four children, Peter, George, Charles, 
Caroline. 

SHARP LOUIS, Sec. 35; P.O. Colona; farmer; Dem; born N.Y; owns 80 acres, val. $3,200. 

SHARP NORMAN, Retired Mechanic, Colona; born Windham Co. Vt. 1809; came to 
Henry Co. 1856; Dem; owns 200 acres, val. $8,000; was Postmaster six years. Assessor one 
year. Justice of the Peace twelve years; married Elizabeth Getman, of Herkimer Co. N.Y. 
in 1830; six children, three boys and three girls. 

SHARP WM. J. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 33; P.O. Coal Valley; born in Hawkins 
Co. Tenn.in 1S30, came to Henry Co. in 1854; Dem; Meth; owns 160 acres land, val. $8,000; 
married Miss Anna B. Bollman, of 111. in 1859; seven children, five girls and two boys. 

SIMMONS FRANK H. Colona, carpenter; Rep; born N.Y. 

SIMPKINS S. A., P.O. Green River; teamster; Dem; born Ohio. 

SIVERLY GEO. A. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 34; P.O. Colona; born in Pa. in 1820; 
came to Rock Island, 1839; came to this place 1847; Rep; owns 160 acres, val. $6,500; was 
School Director and Treasurer eight years. Collector eight years, and Assessor four years; 
Supervisor one year; married Martha T. Kincaid. of Green Co. 111. in 1847; six children, 
two boys, four girls. 

SIVERLY WALLACE, Sec. 35; P.O. Colona; farmer, rents 40 ac. G. Siverly; Rep; born 111. 

SKINNER WM. P.O. Colona; farmer and butcher; Rep. 

SKINNER WM. P.O. Colona; farm laborer; Rep; born in 111. 

SMITH JACOB, Merchant, Colona; born in England, 1S27; came to Henry Co. in 1856; 
Dem; owns store and mdse. etc. val. $5,000; married Miss Ann Smith, of England, in 185 1. 

SMITH RUFUS A. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 11; P.O. Colona; born in Franklin 
Co. Maine, 1836; came to Henry Co. 1856; Rep; owns 410 acres land, val. $12,300; has 
been Express Agt. and Station Agt. of C. R.I. & P. R.R. thirteen years. Postmaster ten 
years, Supervisor three years; married Miss Hattie F. Hanna, of 111. in 1861; four chil- 
dren, two boys and two girls. 

STAFFORD B. I. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 24; P.O. Green River; born in Rut- 
land Co. Vt. in 1822; came to Henry Co. in 1859; Rep; owns 720 acres land, val. at $29,000; 
married Miss Cornelia U. Holden, of Vt. in 1844; three boys, Palmer, Joseph I. and 
Jonas H. 

SMITH SHERMAN B. Colona; butcher; Rep; Meth; born in N.Y. 



262 VOTERS "AND TAXPAYERS OF 

STAFFORD CHAS. P.O. Green River; farmer, rents of Thos. Delany, 60 ac; born Germany. 
STAFFORD JONAS H. Farmer, Sec 24; P.O. Green River; born Vt. in 1^49; came to 

Henry Co. in 1859; Rep; married Miss Ella Francis, of 111. in 1876. 
STAFFORD JOSEPH I. Farmer. Sec. 24; P.O. Green River; born in Vt. in 1848; 

came to Henry Co. in 1859; Rep; married Miss Eolia Cook, of Vt. in 1874; one girl, name 
Cornelia Ursula. • 

STAFFORD PALMER, Farmer. Sec. 24; P.O. Green River; born in Vt, in 1846; came 
to Henry Co. in 1859; Rep; married Mariam L. Gilbert, of 111. in 1870; two children, Bet- 
sey Ursula and Benjamin Osmyn. 

STEWART A. Sec. 28; P.O. Briar Bluff; farmer; Rep; born Ireland; 190 acres, val. $7,000. 

STEWART E. B., P.O. Colona; farms with father, P.C; Dem; born Iowa. 

STEWART F. M. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 36; P.O. Colona; born in Henry Co., 
111., in 1846; Dem; owns 160 acres land, value $6,500; has served as Collector two years; 
was in the 148th I.V.I., Co. G, as private; honorably discharged; married Miss Carrie M. 
Edwards, of Henry Co., 111., in 1873; two boys, Henry Porter, Ralph Edwards. 

STEWART PETER C. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 26; P.O. Colona; born in Pa. in 
1818; came to Plenry Co. in 1840; Dem; owns 570 acres land, value $23,000; married Eliza 
Jane Piatt, of Illinois, in 1845; five children, Frances Marion, William, Edward B., Miles, 
and Eliza Ellen. 

STEWART ROBT. Sec. 28; P.O. Briar Bluff; farmer; Rep; born Ireland; 160 acres, $6,000. 

SUMNER T. M., P.O. Green River; black.smith; Dem; born Illinois. 

SUMMERSOlSr ROBT. Farmer and Miner, Sec. 30; P.O. Coal Valley; born in England 
in 1818; came to Henry Co. in 1863; Rep; owns 61 acres land, with a good paying coal 
bank on it; married Miss Anna Richardson, of England, in 1840; five children. 



T 

V 



OMPKINS SAM'L, Colona; tinsmith; Dem; born Canada. 

TRACY PAT., P.O. Briar Bluff; laborer; Dem; Cath; born Ireland. 

EESTROM C. Y. Sec. 34; P. O. Orion; farmer; Rep; Luth; born Sweden; 40 acres, $i,6oO; 



"Vl BARREN FRED, P.O. Colona; farmer; lives with father, J. Warren; Rep; born N.Y. 
* *^ WARREN HENRY A. Sec. 27; P.O. Colona; farmer; Rep; Meth; born N.Y. 

^WAIiKER MARTHA A. Mr.S. Widow of Wm. L. Walker; farming, Sec. 31; P.O. 
Coal Valley; he was born in Ohio in 1828; came to Henry Co. in 1852; Rep; U. Pres; 
owns 174 acres land, value $9,000; Mr. W. enliste in the I26th I.V.I, as private; promoted 
to 1st Sergeant; died in the army in 1864; four children-, two boys and two g rls. 

WALKER WM. N. P.O. Coal Valley; farms with his mother, Mrs. Martha A.; Rep; U. 
Pres; born in Illinois in 1857. 

WARREN IRVING, P.O. Colona; farmer; lives with father, J. W.; Rep; born N.Y. 

WARREJSr JEREMIAH, Farmer, Sec. 27; P.O. Colona; born in Dutchess Co., N.Y., 
in 1804; came to Flenry Co. in 1857; Rep; Meth; owns 80 acres land, value $3,500; was 
School Director ihree years; married Miss Rebecca M. Monfoort, of N.Y., in 1828; nine 
children, seven boys and two girls. 

WARREN CHAS. S., P.O. Colona; farmer with father, J. Warren; Rep; born N.Y. 

WARREN SAM'L M. Sec. 25; P.O. Green River; farmer; Rep; Meth; born N.Y.; 160 acres. 

WASHBURN HENRY, Farmer and Stock Raiser. Sec. 32; P.O. Coal Valley; born in 
Henry Co., 111., in 1840; Dem; Meth; owns 159 acres land, value $7,000; is Road Commis- 
sioner and School Director; mirried Zebulme Bailey, of Illinois, in 1863; two children, 
Charles Abisha and Clarissa Isabelle. 

WEED SAMUEL H. Pastor Presbyterian Church, Colona; born in Indiana in 1843; came 
to Henry Co. in 1866; owns 20 acres land, house and four lots; value $2,200; graduated at 
Indiana State University in 1864; enlisted in the 133d Indiana V.I. as private, four months; 
honorably discharged; graduated at the United Presbyterian Theological Seminary of the 
Northwest, at Monmouth, 111., in 1867; organized the U. P. Church of Colona in 1867; or- 
dained November, 1867, at Davenport, Iowa; pastor nf Colona U. P. Church from 1869 to 
1876; also pastor of Pleasant Unity U. P. Church since 1874; married Miss Mary J. David- 
son, of Illinois, in i86g; four children, two girls and two boys; Rep. 

WILES CHAS., P.O. Green River; laborer; Rep; born England. 

WILLIAMS E., P.O. Briar Bluff; miner; Rep; born Wales. 

WILLIAMSON JACOB, P.O. Briar Bluff; miner; Rep; born Pa. 




\ 



R. A.Teimn ey 

CHICA GO 
EARLY SETTLER OF HENRY CO. AND L/\TE OF KEWAN EE 



HENRY COtTNTY: COLONA TOWNSHIP. 265 

WILLIAMS WM. A. Farmer, Sec. 29, P.O. Coal Valley; born in Wales in 1813; came to 
Henry Co. in 1864; Rep; Cong; owns 160 acres land, val. $6,000; married Miss Harriet 
Andrew,";, of Wales, in 1840; has eight children, three boys and five girls. 

WITTER WM. H. Teacher, Colona; born 111. 1848; came to Henry Co. 1875; Rep; 
Metli; graduated at Hedding College, Abingdon, III. 1873; married Tillie M. Bestor, of 
Knox Co. 111. in 1873; one girl, Mary. 

WYNES S. IS'. Farmer, rents of mother-in-law, Mrs. Walker, P.O. Coal Valley; born in 
Ohio in 1847; came to Henry Co. in 1867; Dem; Meth; married Miss Anna M. Walker, of 
111. in 1871; one child. 

WONENKEN HENRY, P.O. Coal Valley; laborer; Rep; born Pa. 

^ YONSON SWAN, P.O. Green River; farmer; Rep; Bapt; born Sweden; rents 240 acres. 
YOUNG J., P.O. Briar Bluff; laborer; Rep; born England. 



Business Directory. 
colona village and township. 

Becht Anton, Wagon Maker and Blacksmith. 

Brown Geo. Dealer in Dry Goods, Groceries, Notions, Boots, Shoes, Hats and 
a full assortment of General Merchandise. 

Chambers Lafayette, Carpenter. 

Howard D. P. Dealer in Dry Goods, Groceries, Hardwire, Grain and Produce. 

Purdy Geo. E. Blacksmith. 

Park & Hillier, Proprietors Coal Mine, Sec. 19, P.O. Coal Valley. 

Sale R. R. Physician. 

Smith Jacob, Dealer in Dry Goods, Groceries, &c. 

BRIAR HILL. 

Perry Chas. Proprietor and Manager Briar Bluff Coal Mines. 



266 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 



ATKINSON TOWNSHIP. 

A DATR JOHN G. Sec. 24, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; U. Pres; from Ireland. 

-^ ALFRED C. B. Atkinson; book-keeper; Rep: from Vt. 

ALLEN A. C. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Bapt; from N.Y. 

ALLEN" G. G. Farmer, Sec. 28. P.O. Atkinson; born in Essex Co. N.Y. Sept. 30, 1826; 
came to this county in 1855; Rep; F. Bapt; owns 80 acres of land, valued at $3,500; wife 
was Ann Eliza Treat, born in Cayuga Co. N.Y. March 24, 1827; married Feb. 15, 1849; has 
one child. 

ALLEN S. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Meth; from N.Y; 133 acres. 

ALLEN S. B. Sec. 21, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Meth; from N.Y; 80 acres. 

ANDERSON A. Sec. 5, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; from Sweden; 40 acres. 

ANDERSON CHAS. Sec. 14, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

ANDERSON L. D. Atkinson, carpenter; Rep; from Maine. 

ARMSTRONG L. Atkinson; laborer; Rep; from N.Y. 

T) ABB ITT E. Atkinson; Rep; from N.Y. 

^ BARRETT A. Sec. 15, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Meth; from N. H; 80 acres. 

BARTO O. D. Atkinson; mason; Dem. 

BASS HENKY, Farmer, Sec. 14, P.O. Atkinson; born in Windham, Conn. Nov. 24, 1817; 
came to this county in 1853; Rep; Meth; first wife was Mary Crandall, born in Conn; sec- 
ond wife was Mary J. Clark, born in Ireland, June 4, 1836; married first, March g, 1854; 
second, March 2, 1876; has four children; 160 acres, val. $7,200. 

BAXTER W. T. Sec. 17, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from N.Y; 166 acres. 

BEARDSLEY JOHN, Sec. 19, P'.O. Geneseo; farmer on F. Somers' farm; Rep; from Ohio. 

BELLAHvS WM. Atkinson; harness-maker; Lib; from England. 

BELLEN O., Sec. 27; laborer on Nowers Bros, farm; Cath; Belgium. 

BENTLEY JOHN, Sec. 16, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; from England. 

BENTLEY WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 3, P.O. Geneseo; born in England, Dec. 15, 1830; 
came to this county in 1858; Rep; owns 158 acres of land, valued at $5,500; wife was Jane 
Blackley, born in England, Sept. 18, 1834; married Oct. 16, 1853; has eight children. 

BENTON A. Sec. 16, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Chris; from Ohio; 120 acres. 

BENTOY BENJ. Sec. 17, P. O. Atkinson; farmer; from Belgium. 

BERGHAGD PETER, Sec. 23, P.O. Atkinson; farmer, W.T. Mussey's farm; Cath; Belgium. 

BESSEE ROBERT M. Farmer, Sec. 17, P.O. Geneseo; born in Erie Co. N.Y. Dec. 2, 
1838; came to this county in 1862; Rep; Meth; owns 280 acres of land, valued at $13,000; 
was Commissioner of Highways three years; wife was Orlinda Maria Porter, born in Huron 
Co. Ohio, Dec. 8, 1842: married Feb. 16, 1865; has three children. 

BIGGS ELIJAH, Sec. 16, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Indiana; 80 acres. 

BIGGS JOHN, Sec. 14. P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; from Indiana. 

BIGGS W. H. lives with E. Biggs; Rep; from Indiana. 

BILLS J. A. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; Meth; from Vt. 

BILLS OSCAR A. Atkinson; Rep; Meth; from Vt. 

BLOOM J. J. Atkinson; tinner; Dem; Meth; from Pa. 

BOLLEN GEORGE, Proprietor of coal mine; Sec. 32, P.O. Atkinson; born in Sharon, 
111, Nov. 24, 1847; Rep; Meth; wife was Ella Loomis, born 1852; married May 16, 1870; 
has four children. 

BOLLEN JOHN, Sec. 30, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Meth; from Ohio; 80 acres. 

BOLLEN T. Sec. 32, P. O. Geneseo; miner; Rep; born 111. 

BOOMER H. E., P.O. Atkinson; lives with H. Boomer; Rep; from N.Y. 

BOOMER HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 28; P.O. Atkinson; born in Jefferson Co., N.Y., July . 
23. 1826; came to this Co. in 1862; Rep; owns 249 acres land, valued at $13,600; wife was 
Julia Wood, born in Jefferson Co., N.Y., Aug. 10, 1828; has four children, Emma, Herbert, 
Gertie, and Jay. 



HENRY COUNTY : ATKINSON TOWNSHIP. 26t 

BOUWHUtS ATSTTHOXY, Grocer, Atkinson; born in Holland, Dec. 25, 1820; came to 
this Co. in 1865; Dem; Cath; owns town property and 80 acres of land, valued at $6,600; 
wife was Demphena Hendricks, born in 1823; married in 1865; has three children. 

BROOKS J. P. Sec. 34, Atkinson; farmer; Dem; from N.Y.; 40 acres. 

BROWN JOHN M. Farmer, Atkinson; born in Knox Co., Ohio, Feb. 13, 1832; came to 
this Co. in 1858; Dem; is Supervisor of the Township, and Justice of the Peace; wife was 
R. J. Barnes, born in Fairfield Co., Conn., Sept. 27, 1831; married Sept. 18, i860; has two 
children, Nellie and Jennie. 

BUGHNER L. Sec. it; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; from Canada. 

BUGNER L. Sec. 11; P.O. Atkinson; works for J. M. Brown; Dem; from Canada. 

BURN R. A. Sec. 20; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Meth; from Ohio. 

BURN R. B. Sec. 20; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from N.Y. 

BUTLER MARTIN, Sec. rg; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from England; 80 acres. 

/^^AIN J. B. Teacher, Atkinson; Meth; from Canada. 

^ CANN WM. Wagon-maker, Atkinson; Dem; from Pa. 

CARLBERG C. A. Blacksmith, Atkinson; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

CLIFTON A. E. Teamster, Atkinson; Rep; Meth; from Peoria, 111. 

CORYN DESRY, Sec. 36; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Cath; from Belgium. 

COULSON JOHN, Sec. 4; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden; 160 acres. 

COULTER W. M. Carpenter, Atkinson; Rep; from Pa. 

CRANE A. C. Sec. 16; P.O. Geneseo; farmer on H. B. Cole's farm; Rep; from N.Y. 

CRANE BRUCE, P.O. Geneseo; works for A. C. Crane; Rep; from N.Y. 

CRANE DAN, Sec 17; P.O. Geneseo; carpenter; Rep; from N.Y. 

CRANE SCOTT, Sec. 17; P.O. Geneseo; carpenter; Rep; from N.Y. 

CROOK ASA, Farmer, Sec. 18; P.O. Geneseo; born in Erie Co. N.Y. Jan. 27, 1827; came 
to this county in 1844; Rep; owns 220 acres of land, valued at $12,000; came to 111. May 
27, 1834, with his father, Asa Crook, Sen., who settled at Prophetstown, Whiteside Co., at 
that time, and was the first settler there; their nearest neighbors were then at Davenport, 
Iowa, and at Dixon, 111.; wife was Lucy A. Cole, born in Erie Co., N.Y., March, 24, 1830; 
married Jan. l, 1852; has six children. 

CROOK C. H. Sec. 18; P.O. Geneseo; laborer; Dem; from Vt. 

CROOK J. T. lives with Asa Crook; Rep; born Henry Co. 

CROOK N. M. Sec. 18; teacher; lives with Asa Crook; Rep; born Henry Co. 

CROUCH WALTER J. Farmer, Sec. 27; P.O. Atkinson; born in England, May 5, 1849; 
came to this county in 1S67; Rep. 

"pVEBATTS JOSEPH, Carpenter; Cath; from Belgium. 

^-^ DeBOUD C. Sec. 27; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Cath; from Belgium; 40 acres. 

DEAN JOHN H. Grain Dealer, Atkinson; born N. H. Feb. 26, 1822; came to Co. 1859; 

Rep; Lib. Prot; wife was Nora H. Gould; married in 1857; has two children. 
DEFRIES T. Peddler, Atkinson; Dem; from Germany. 
DEMOTT H. M. Carpenter, Atkinson; Rep; from N.Y. 

DeMARANVILLE C. H. Sec. 23; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Meth; from N.Y. 
DICKINSON D. J. Shoemaker, Atkinson; Dem; from Ky. 

DILLAPLAIN I. Sec. 16; P.O. Atkinson; farmer on R. M. Bessee's farm; Rep; from Ohio. 
DONAHO P. Sec. 6; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland; 120 acres. 
DOTY W. I. Sec. 3; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; from Vt; 120 acres. 
DOUBLO LEO, Sec. 36; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Belgium. 
DREHMER H. Sec. 10; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; from Canada. 
DUNCAN S. M. Sec. 21; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; from 111. 

"PARL H. CLAY, Atkinson; clerk; Rep; from Conn. 
^ ENGLISH JOHN, Atkinson; clerk; Rep; from Ohio. 
ERICKSON A. Sec. 31; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Luth; from Sweden. 
EVANS S., P.O. Atkinson; farmer on T. D. Trekell's farm; Dem; from N.Y. 
EVERETT EDWIN, Atkinson; merchant; Rep; born in 111. 



268 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

T7ITCKEE JOHN, Atkinson; carpenter; Dem; from Pa. 

-^ FLETCHER C. T. Sec. 33; P.O. Atkinson; miner; Dem; from N.Y. 

FEKKIiN" WELLS, Station Agent and Grain Dealer, Atkinson; born in Grand De Tour, 

Ogle Co. 111. Oct. 30, 1848; came to this county in 1866; Rep; owns house and lot, value 

$1,200. 
FOLLETT A. H. Atkinson; sexton; Rep; Cong; from N.Y. 
FONES ALONZO, Sec. 18; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born 111. 
FONES C. Sec. 17; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from N.Y. 
FONES HENRY, Sec. 18; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; U. B.; from N.Y. 
FORVANNER BRUNO, Sec. 25; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Cath; from Belgium. 
FRITZSCHE C. F. Sec. 26; P.O.Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Saxony; 120 acres. 
FRONK JOHIV H. Harness Maker, Atkinson; born in Juniata Co. Pa. Dec. 25, 1853; 

came to this county in 1855; Rep; Meth. 

/^ ABRIELSON ANDREW, Sec. 13; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Luth; from Sweden. 

^^ GALBKAITH WM. Sec. ii; P.O.Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Pres; from Scotland; 200 ac. 

GARDNER G. W. Sec. 32; P.O. Geneseo; mmer; Rep; from N.Y. 

GRAHAM WILLIAM E. Miner, Sec. 32; P.O. Atkinson; born in Rock Island Co. 111. 

July 30, 1852; came to county, 1865; wife was Mary A. Peters, born in 1852; married Jan. I, 

1872; has two children. 
GREEN A. H. Rev. minister of Free Meth; Rep; from Pa. 
GREEN LYMAN, Atkinson; Rep; from N.Y. 

GREEN W. A., P.O. Geneseo; farmer on A. H. Green's farm; Rep; F. Meth; from N.Y. 
GREZER F. E. Sec. 10; P.O.Atkinson: farmer; Luth; from Prussia; 80 acres. 
GRIFFIN JOHN A. Rev. Atkinson; Cong, minister; Rep; born in 111. 
GRUBB FRANK, Sec. 16; P.O. Atkinson; laborer; Dem; from Ohio. 
GRUBB J. A. Sec. 16; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; from Va. 
GIBSON JOB, Sec. 15; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; from N.Y.; 80 acres. 
GIERHART C. G. Farmer, Sec. 6; P.O. Geneseo; born in Richland Co. Ohio, April 17. 

1824; came to this county in 1854; Dem; U. B.; owns 270 acres of land, valued at $10,800; 

is Justice of the Peace and Highway Commissioner; enlisted, June, 1846, in 3d Ohio Vols. 

and served thirteen months in the Mexican War; served as ist Lieut, in Il2th 111. Vol. for 

seven months in the war of the rebellion; wife was Sarah A. Gray, born in Columbia Co. Pa. 

Dec. 29, 1832; has six children. 
GILES W. A. Sec. 33; P.O. Atkinson; coal miner; Rep; from 111. 
GIPE GEO. Atkinson; laborer; Dem; from Pa. 
GIPE JACOB, Atkinson; laborer; Dem; from Pa. 

TT AMAN FRANK, Sec. 27; farmer on Nowers Bros.' farm; Cath; from Belgium. 

HEIFFNER P. E., P.O. Geneseo; works for G. L. Kriefbaum; Dem; from Ohio. 

HEAD M. H. Farmer, Sec. 34; P.O. Atkinson; born in Pembroke, N. H., March 24, 1813; 
came to this county in 1859; Rep; owns 40 acres of land, valued at $5,000; wife was Sophia 
Bates, born Nov. 28, 1815; married in 1838; has three children. 

HELLER R. Sec. 20; P.O. Geneseo; laborer; Ind; from Pa. 

HILL T. B., Atkinson; blacksmith; Rep; from Vt. 

HOLKE GUST. Sec. 17; P.O. Geneseo; laborer; Ind; Luth; from Prussia. 

HOWARD J. D. Sec. 14; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; from N.Y. 

HUBERT THOLEN, Atkinson; Cath. priest; from Holland. 

HULL A., Atkinson; Rep; from Pa. 

HULL Z. T., Atkinson; laborer; Rep; 111. 

HUJVTER DAIVIEL O. Grocer, Atkinson; born in Cortland Co. N.Y. June 28, 1823; 
came to this county in 1867; Rep; Meth; owns house and lot, valued at $800; has been Po- 
lice Magistrate four years; enlisted Aug. 13, 1862, in the 93d 111. Volunteers, and served ten 
months; wife was Margaret R. Pickard, born in Livingston Co. N.Y. Sept, 20, 1840; married 
Sept 12. 1857; has six children. 

IRVINE H. M. Sec. 2; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; from Ind. 

IRVINE PERRY, Sec. 3; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; from Pa; 80 acres. 



HENRY COUNTY: ATKINSON TOWNSHIP. 269 

JAMES JOHN, Atkinson; Dem; from Pa. 
JENKINS J. Sec. 32; P.O. Atkinson; miner; Rep; from Wales. 
JENKINS R. W. Sec. 32; P.O. Atkinson; miner; Rep; from Wales. 
JOHNSON G. Sec. 32'; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 
JOHNSON G. Sec. 8; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Sweden; 80 acres. 
JOHNSON JOHN, Sec. 18; P.O. Geneseo; laborer; Dem; from Ireland. 
JOHNSON JOHN, Sec. 35; P.O.Atkinson; farmer; from Canada. 
JOHNSON NILS, Sec. 18; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Meth; from Sweden. 
JOHNSON ROBERT, Sec. 26; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Ind. Rep; from Ireland. 

T/'AISER JOHN, Sec. ig; P.O. Geneseo; farmer: Dem; 160 acres. 

KAISER J. A., P.O. Geneseo; farmer, works for J. S. Kaiser; Ind; from Ohio. 
KAY JAMES, Propr. Coal Mine and Farmer, Sec. 33; P.O. Atkinson; born in England, 

June 20, 1837; came to this county in 1873; Rep; owns 40 acres of land, valued at $3,000; 

wife was Agnes I. Cowen, born Sept. 4, 1845 in Canada; married March 25, 1861; has six 

children. 
KENDRICK J. N., Atkinson; teamster; Rep; from Ohio. 

KENNEDY CHAS. Sec. 7; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland; 80 acres. 
KIRKENDALL ARCHIBALD, Farmer, Sec. 19; P.O. Geneseo; born in Wayne Co. 

Ohio, Jan. 29, 1839; came to this county in 1865; Dem; owns 80 acres of land, valued at 

$4,000; wife was E. S. Zeprnick, born in Ohio, June 28, 1844; has one child. 
KRIEFBAUM G. L. Sec. 30; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from Ohio; 154 acres. 
KROPF JOHN, Sec. 10; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; Luth; from Germany; 140 acres. 
KROPF P., P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; Luth; from Germany; 40 acres. 
KUEHL C. Atkinson; store; Dem; from Prussia. 

T AMBERT A. S. Sec. 32; P.O. Geneseo; brickmaker; Rep; 111. 

^ LAMBERT EDWARD, P.O. Geneseo; brickmaker; Rep; from England. 

LAMBERT EPHRAIM, P.O. Geneseo; brickmaker; Rep; from England. 

LARSON A. Sec. 8; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; from Sweden. 

LAWBAUGH E., Atkinson; grain dealer; Rep; Bapt; from Ohio. 

LEE BATES J., Atkinson; works for L. Lee Bates; Dem; Cath; from Belgium. 

LEE BATES LOUIS, Atkinson; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Belgium. 

LEAVANS JACOB, Sec. 26; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Cath; from Belgium. 

LECLERQ B. Sec. 36; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Belgium. 

LECLERQ R., Atkinson; saloon; Dem; Cath; from Belgium. 

LEDUE WA. Sec. 14; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; from Vt. 

LEEPS E. Y. works for A. H. Palmer; Dem; from Prussia. 

LEWIS WM. Sec, 11, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; from Pa. 

LITTLE H. CSec. 32, P.O. Atkinson; miner; Rep; Ills. 

LITTLE M. Sec. 31, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; from N.Y. 

LITTLE R. W. Sec. 31, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; from N.Y.; 160 acres. 

LOWES WM. Sec. 32, P.O. Atkinson; proprietor coal mine; Rep; from England. 

LOYD BRYAN, Atkinson; blacksmith; Meth. Epis; from Canada. 

LUCAS ELI R. Atkinson; mason; Rep; U. B.; from Pa. 

LUCAS GEO. Atkinson; painter; Rep; from Ohio. 

LUCAS J. H. Sec. 5, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; from Ohio; 80 acres. 

LUCKET F. C. Sec. 33, P.O. Atkinson; proprietor of coal mine and farmer; Dem; England. 

LYON H. L. Atkinson; merchant; Rep; from N. Y. 

LYON R. B. Sec. 35, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; from N. Y.; 200 acres. 

l\/rcKIBBON H. Sec. 32, P.O. Geneseo; miner; Dem; Cath; born Scotland. 
-'-*-'- McKIBBON W. A. Sec. 33, P.O. Geneseo; miner; Dem; from Maryland. 
McLOUGHLIN C. Sec. 4, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 
McNAMEE JAS. Sec. 33, P.O. Atkinson; works from J. K. Trekell; Rep; from N.Y. 
McQUEENY J. Sec. 30, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 



270 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

MADDEN L. S. Atkinson; sexton; Rep; Meth. Epis; from Maryland. 

MANKINS L. D. Atkinson; teamster; Dem; from Ohio. 

MANKIJSrS OTIS W. Farmer, Sec. 21, P.O. Atkinson; born in Washington Co. Ohio, 
Aug. 31, 1842; came to this county in 1854; Dem; owns 80 acres of -land, valued at $3,200 
wife was Charlotte R. Doty, born March 28, 1847; in Henry Co. Ills.; married Aug. 2g, 1867; 
has two children. 

MAY ARCH. Sec. 32, P.O. Atkinson; miner; Rep; Pres; from Scotland. 

MEAD HENRY, Sec. ig, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; from England. 

MEAGHER E. Sec. 5, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland; 160 acres. 

MEERSMON E. Atkinson; peddler; Dem; Cath; from Belgium. 

MILAK ROBERT W. Carpenter, Atkinson; born in Somerset Co. Pa. July 29, 1824; 
came to this county in 1855; Rep; owns 80 acres of land and a house and lot, valued at 
$4,200; wife was Rebecca Knisely, born in Tuscarawas Co. Ohio, Sept. 25, 1831; married 
July 8, 1849; has four children. 

MILL JOHN, Sec. 13, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; from Sweden. 

MILLER FRED, Sec. 18, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; from Saxony; 40 acres. 

MORIARTY S. Sec. 4; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland; 120 acres. 

MORRISON W. H. Atkinson; Rep; from N.Y. 

MOWBRAY JOHN, Brickmaker, Sec. 32, P.O. Atkinson; born in Durham Co. England, 
Aug. I, 1841; came to this county in 1869; Rep; Meth. Epis; wife was Elizabeth Lowes, 
bom in 1839, in England; married 1863; has four children. 

MOYER HENRY, Atkinson; farmer; Rep; from Indiana. 

MOSSEY W. A. Farmer, Atkinson; born in Rutland Co. Vermont, June 22, 1839; came 
to this county in 1868; Rep; owns 160 acres of land, valued at $5,000; enlisted Sept. 1862, 
in 1 2th Vt. Vols, and served nine months; wile was Louisa Nowers; she was born in Oneida 
Co. New York, May 2, 1845; married March 31, 1868; has two children. 

MYERS JACOB, Farmer, Atkinson; born in Franklin Co. Pa. Oct. 14, 1831; came to this 
county in 1855; Rep; owns 400 acres of land, valued at $20,000; first wife was EHen Fritz, 
married Nov. I, 1855; had three children; second wife was Mary J. Algar; she had two 
children by first husband, and married Mr. Myers, Feb. 10, 1867. 

IVr EAL A. L., Atkinson; teamster; Rep; born 111. 

NEAL EDWIN, Atkinson; section boss; Dem; Meth. Epis; born in 111. 

NICKERSON W. R. Sec. 25; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; from N.Y.; 80 acres. 

NOWERS JOHN T. Atkinson; merchant; Rep; from N.Y. 

NOWERS THOS. Atkinson; Rep; Epis; from England. 

]S"OWERS THOMAS Jr. Merchant, Atkinson; born in Oneida Co. N.Y. on the 12th 
Feb 1834; came to this county in 1S56; Rep; owns real e tate valued at $7,500; was Super- 
visor six years; wife was -larah A. Mussey, born in Rutland Co. Vt. Sept. 15, 1834; married 
Nov. 18, 1861; has one child, Kate F. 

NOWERS WM. Atkinson; merchant; Dem; from N.Y. 

/^GDEN B. C. Sec. 21; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; III; interest in 160 acres. 

^-^ OGDEN DAVID, Atkinson; Dem; from Ky. 

OGDEN W. H. Atkinson; coal miner; Dem; born in 111. 

OTTERMAN J; W. Rev. Atkinson; Meth. Epis. minister; Rep; from Pa. 

OUGH WM. Atkinson; wagon-maker; Dem; from England. 

pALM JOHN, Sec. 35; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem. 

^ PALMER H. A. Sec. 4; P.O.Atkinson; farmer; Dem; from N.Y. ; 160 acres. 

PARKS A. Sec. 33; P.O. Atkinson; coal miner; Rep; from Scotland. 

PARKS E. Sec. 33; P.O. Atkinson; coal miner; Rep; from Scotland. 

PARRISH NELS P. Sec. 29; P.O.Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

PARRTSH N. P. J. Sec. 28; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Luth; from Sweden; 80 acres. 

PARRISH SWAN, Atkinson; shoemaker; Luth; Sweden. 

PARSONS A. Atkinson; Rep; U. Breth; from Conn. 

PAYNE GEO. Sec. 19; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; from England. 

PENWELL J. N. Sec. 18; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born 111; 80 acres. 

PETERsON A. N. Sec. 8; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Meth. Epis; from Sweden; 200 acres. 



HENRY COtTNTY: ATKINSON TOWNSHIP. 271 

PICKARD L. Atkinson; street commissioner; Rep; Meth. Epis; from N.Y.. 

PIERSON J. C. Farmer, Sec. 34; P.O. Atkinson; born in Knox Co. Ohio, May 10. 1836; 
came to this county in 1867; Rep; owns 80 acres of land, valued at $6,000; is Trustee of the 
village; enlisted in 1864 in the 146th 111. Vol; wife was Maria H. Pickard, born Nov. 30, 
1839; married March 4, 1862; has one child. 

PROOST C. Atkinson; shoemaker; Cath; from Belgium. 

"D ICE A. C. Sec. 7; P.O. Geneseo; farmer, on C. G. Gierhart's farm; Rep; from N.Y. 

■'^ ROBINSON R. Sec. 32; P.O. Atkinson; miner; Rep; from England. 

KA^FT JOHN, Shoemaker, Atkinson; born in Prussia, Dec. 25, 1829; came to this county 
in 1861; Rep; Cong; owns house and lot and shop, value $5,000; wife was Mary E. Romig, 
born in Ohio, April 14, 1S37; married June 2g, 1865; has three children, Hattie, John and 
William. 

ROBINSON THOS. Sec. 32; P.O. Atkinson; miner; Rep; from England. 

C AMMONS A. J. Atkinson; carpenter; Rep; from Ky. 

•^ SAMMONS T. Atkinsoii; clerk; Rep; from Indiana. 

SAMMONS WM. Atkinson; laborer; from Indiana. 

SCHATTEMAN LEO, Atkinson; nurseryman; Dem; Cath; from Belgium. 

SCHUTTEN HENRY, Atkinson; laborer; Dem; Cath; from Holland. 

SCHWE]Sr]S"I]SrGER ANDREW, Farmer, Sec. 6; P.O. Geneseo; born in Wurtem- 

burg, July I, 1826; came to this county in 1866; Rep; Evang; owns 133 acres of land, valued 

at $6,000; wife was Lavina Bloom, born in Pa. June 2, 1832; married Sept. 2, 1851; has six 

children. 
SMITH J. W. Atkinson; blacksmith; Rep; from Ohio. 
SMITH W. M., M.D. Physician, Atkiason; born in Belmont Co. Ohio, June 7, 1842; came 

to this county in 1856; Rep; Cong; owns house and lot, valued at $1,800; enlisted Sept. 21, 

1861, in the 42d 111. Vol. and served three years and nine months; was at the battles of 

Farmington and Chickamauga; wife was Viola M. Ferrin, born Feb. 4, 1846; married Dec. 

15, 1870; has two children. 
SOUTHWORTH DEWITT C. Atkinson; prop, hotel; Dem; Meth; 111. 
SOUTHWORTH HIRAM, Proprietor Hotel, Atkinson; born in Chautauqua Co. N.Y. 

June 20, 1821; came to this Co. in 1837; has been Commissioner of Highways four years; 

wife was Melissa Dewitt, born in Wayne Co. Mich. May 11, 1822; married July 20, 1842; has 

two children; Dem; owns house and lot, val. $3,300. 
STARK A. Sec 32, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 
STARK ANDREW, Sec, 32, P.O. Atkinson; farmer. 
STEELE J.. Sec. 10, P.O.Atkinson; farmer; from Saxony; 100 acres. 
STEIDENS G. J. Sec. 3, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; Luth; from Saxony. 
STEINER G. W. Sec. 33, P.O. Atkinson; miner; Dem; from Pa. 
STEINER J. Sec. 33, P.O. Atkinson; miner; Dem; from Pa. 

STEMBERGER H. Sec. 10, P.dl^ Atkinson; farmer; Rep; from Germany; 120 acres. 
STRALEY JOHN, Atkinson; stoves and tinware; Rep; Meth. Epis; from Germany. 
STRYKER D. P. Sec. 23, P.O. Atkinson; Rep; from N. Y. 
SUHR E. Sec. 27; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Cath; from Prussia; 120 acres. 
SWANSON A. P. Sec. 7, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 
SWANSON A. P. Sec. 5, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden; 80 acres. 
SWANSON J., P.O. Annawan; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 
SYLER C. Sec. 2, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; 312 acres. 

'T^ABER J. Atkinson; engineer; Rep; Meth. Epis; from N.Y. 

TASSELL JOHN, Sec. 14, P.O. A kinson; farmer; U. Brethren; from England. 
TICKLE MILTON, Sec. 28, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep. 
TAYLOR J. S. Sec. 33, P.O. Atkinson; miner; Dem; Henry Co. 
TIFT H. Sec. 17, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from Conn; 40 acres. 
TREKELL JOHIV K. Farmer, Sec. 33, P.O. Atkinson; born in Tippecanoe Co. Ind. 

July 20, 1834; came to this Co. in 1836; Rep; owns 325 acres of land, valued at $20,000; 

was Commissioner of Highways five years; wife was Theresa Walters, born March 3, 1845 

in Tuscarawas Co. Ohio; married Feb. 13, i860; has three children. 



272 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

TRECKLE M. Sec. 28, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; 150 acres. 
TROVINS J. M. Atkinson; teacher; Dem; Bapt; from Pa. 
TOSLAND SAML. Sec. 15, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; from England. 

WAN DEN HEMEL S. Sec. 28, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Holland. 

* VERCRUISSE PETER, Sec. 24; P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Cath; from Belgium. 
VARHAAKA A. Sec. 17, P.O. Atkinson; farmer on E. Burrall's farm; Rep; Cath; Belgium. 

"Xl WALTERS A. R. Atkinsop; farmer; Rep; from Ohio. 

*^ WALTERS CHAS. rf. Sec. 34, P.O. Atkinson; lives with D. Walters; Rep; 111. 
WAGAK W. "W. Farmer, Sec. 31, P.O. Atkinson; born in Yates Co. N. Y. Dec. 16, 1827; 

came to this Co. in 1865; Rep; Bapt; owns 160 acres of land, valued at $8,000; wife was 

Lucina R. M. Gilbert; has seven children. 
WALTERS D. Sec. 34, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Rep; Meth. Epis; from Ohio. 
WANDEL JOHN, Sec. 29, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Cath; from Belgium. 
WARD JOS. Sec. 31, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Meth. Epis; from England; 150 acres. 
WATSON E. B. Atkinson; meat market; Dem; from N.Y. 

WEIRMOUTH W. W. Sec. 32, P.O. Atkinson; prop, coal mine; from England. 
WELCH B. F. Sec. 32, P.O. Atkinson; farmer, lives with Z. Welch; from Ohio. 
WELCH J. Sec. 28, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; from Pa; 70 acres. 
WELCH THOS. Atkins n; farmer; Dem; from Pa; 160 acres. 
WELCH Z. Sec. 32, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Meth. Epis; from Pa; 120 acres. 
WELLS Z. J. Atkinson; restaurant; Dem; from Ohio. 

WETERHOLL NILS, Sec. 29, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 
WILLIAMS FRED. Sec. 33, P.O. Atkinson; coal miner; Rep; from Maine. 
WISELY J. J. Atkinson; restaurant; Dem; from Penn. 

WITHERSPOON R. M. Sec. 32, P.O. Atkinson; farmer and coal miher; Rep; from Scotland. 
WOLF S. N. Atkinson; carpenter; Dem; Dunkard; from Pa. 
WO^sTDERLY DAXIEL W. Carpenter, Atkinson; born in Cumberland Co. Pa., May 

27, 1833; came to this Co. in 1857; Rep; Meth. Epis; owns house and lot, valued at $1,800; 

is Township Treasurer; enlisted Sept. 1864, in the 47th 111. V.I. and served eleven months; 

wife was Clarinda Walters, born in Ohio, May 22, 1841; married June 28, i860; has four 

children. 
WONDERLY J. W. Sec. 25, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; from Pa; 160 acres. 
WOOD A. W. Sec. 15, P.O.Atkinson; farmer; Rep; from Mass, 80 acres. 
WOOD F. L. Sec. 33, P.O. Atkinson; miner; Rep; from Conn. 
WOOD H. P. Atkinson; store; Rep; from 111. 

^7"ARGER BENJ. Sec. 32, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; from Ohio; 40 acres. 
^ YARGER H. Sec. 32, P.O. Atkinson; farmer; Dem; j^m Ohio. 



Business Dirfxtory. 
atkinson village and township. 

Bollen Bros. Proprietors Welch Coal Bank, Sec. 32, P.O. Atkinson. 

Bouwhuis Anthony, Groceries and Crockery. 

Brown Jno. M. Justice of the Peace. 

Ferrin Wells, Grain Dealer and Agt. C. R. I. & P. R. R. 

Fronk Jno. H. Harness Maker. 

Hunter Daniel 0. Groceries and Queensware. 

Kay Jas. Prop. Coal Mine, Sec. ^s, P.O. Atkinson. 

Milar Robt. W. Carpenter. 





COUNTY TREA SURER 
EDFORD TOWNSHJP 



HENRY COUNTY : EDFOKD TOWNSHIP. 276 

Mowbray & Co. Manfrs. Common and Fine Brick; Coal Miners, Sec. 32, P.O. 

Atkinson. 
NowerS Bros. Dry Goods, Groceries, Hardware, Agricultural Implements, 

Lumber and Building Material. 
Ranft Jno. Mnfr. Boots and Shoes. 
Smith W. M., M. D. Physican and Surgeon. 
Southworth & Son, Prop. Hotel. 
Wonderly Danl. W. Carpenter and Joiner. 



EDFOKD TOWNSHIP. 

A DDICKS GEO. lives with father, G. Addicks, P.O. Geneseo; Rep; Meth; from 111. 
^^ ADDICKS GERHARD, Sec. 25, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Meth; from Germany. 
ALDRICH FRANK, lives with Elias Hart, P.O. Geneseo; farmer. 
ALLEN EDSON, lives with Elias Hart, P.O. Geneseo, farmer; Rep; Meth; from N.Y. 
ALLSHOUS S. Sec. 22, P.O. Geneseo; carpenter; Rep; Church of God; from Pa; owns 12 ac. 
ANDREWS AUSTIN, lives with G. A. Carter, P.O. Geneseo; rents 80 acres in Osco; Rep. 
ASDALE SAM, P.O. Green River; coal miner, works for J. S. Lord. 

AUSTIN FRED'K. Sec. 26, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Meth; from N.Y; owns 120 ac. $7,200. 
AUSTIN WM. Sec. 23, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Cong; from N.Y; 135 acres. 

"D AILEY J. H. Sec. 11, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Denmark; 37 acres, val. $850 
BARNARD F. H, Sec. 32, P.O. Geneseo; coal operator; Rep; Unit; from Mass. 

BECK JOHN, P.O. Green River; coal miner, works for J. S. Lord. 

BEURENS HENRY, Sec. 16, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Luth; from Germany; So acres, $3,200. 

BEHRENS JULIUS, Sec. 27, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Luth; from Germany; owns 80 acres. 

BELLINGER A. Sec. 22, P.O. GenesLo; farmer; Dem; from N.Y'; owns 119 acres. 

BERGSTROM AUGUST, lives with L. VV. Hoit, P.O Geneseo; Luth; from Sweden. 

BERNHARD JOHN, P.O. Geneseo; works for Mrs. Doolittte; Luth; from Denmark. 

BIGGS W. C. Sec. 25, P O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Meth; from W. Va; owns 80 ac. val. $4,800. 

BILLS CHARLOTTE L. Mrs. Farm, Sec. 21, P.O. Geneseo; born in Loraine, Jef- 
ferson Co. N.Y. April 16, 1S37; came to this Co. in 1856; Meth; owns 242 acres, val. $12,000. 
widow of Ora A. Bills, who was boin in Jamaica, Windham Co. Vt. Aug. 12, 1S32, died April 
2.1870; were married Jan. 27, 1857, at Edford, Henry Co; have three children, Geo. A., 
Clarence M. and Carrie I., all living with mother. 

BILLS GEO. A. lives with mother, C. L. Bills. P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Meth; from 111. 

BILLS HENRY, Sec. 27, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Church of God; from Vt;o\vns 120 acres. 

BILLS M. A. Sec. 22, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Church of God; from Vt; owns 160 acres. 

BLANK J. lives with mother, Sec. 34, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Evangelical German; from Prussia. 

BLIVEN LYMAN L. Sec. 16, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Ind; owns 120 ac. $4,800. 

BOESEE FRED. Sec. 20; coal miner; rents 40 acres of G. Bushnell; Dem; Luth; Germany. 

BOLTON SAML. Sec. 13, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Prot; owns 5 acres. 

BOYDEN CHAS. D. Sec. 17, P.O. Green River; farmer, rents 80 ac. of E. P. Boyden; Rep; 111. 

BOYDEN JOHN D. Sec. 17, P.O. Green River; farmer, rents 80 ac. of E. P. Boyden; Rep; Mass. 

BRIX JOHN, Sec. 16; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Austria; 80 acres, val. $3,200. 

BROWN A. G. lives with Mrs. F. Smith; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Pres; from Mass. 

BROWN JOHN, P.O. Green River; coal miner; works for J. S. Lord. 

BROWN JOHN, P.O. Green River; coal miner; works for Downs & Wilson. 

BROWN RANSSLER, Sec. 9; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Prot; from N. Y.; rents 70 acres. 

BUCHANAN BENJ. lives with father, H. G. Buchanan; P.O. Morristown; Dem; born 111. 

BUCHANAN H. G. Sec. 28; P.O. Morristown; farmer; Dem; from Md; wife owns 240 acres. 
24 - 



276 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

BUCHANAN JOHN M. lives with father, H. G. Buchanan; P.O. Morristown; Dem; from Pa. 

BUCHANAN THOS. P. lives with father, H. G. Buchanan; P.O. Morristown; Dem; from Pa. 

BUCHOLZ HENRY, P.O. Green River; coal miner; works for J. S. Lord. 

BUCHOLZ WM. P.O. Green River; coal miner; works for J. S. Lord. 

BUCKLEY THOMAS. P.O. Green River; coal miner; works for J. S. Lord. 

BURNS LARRY, P.O. Green River; coal miner; from Ireland. 

BURNS PATRICK, Sec, 20; P.O. Green River; fanner; Dem; from Ireland; owns 160 acres. 

CALHOUN ALECK, P.O. Green River; coal miner; works for J. S. Lord. 
CARTER GEO. A. Sec. 34; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Ohio; owns 240 acres. 

CASERY JAS., P.O. Green River; coal miner; works for J. S. Lord. 

CAVANAGH, JAS., P.O. Green River; coal miner; works for J. S. Lord. 

CHISANOSKE JOS., Sec. 33; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Prussia; owns 60 acres. 

CHRISMAN, J. R., P.O. Morristown; farmer; Rep; Bapt; from Ky. 

CLAVONT JOHN, P.O. Green River; coal miner; works for J. S. Lord. 

CLEVER WM. Sec. 28; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Luth; from Germany; owns 160 acres. 

COOK L. Sec. 29, P.O. Geneseo, farmer; Dem; Luth, from Germany; owns 120 acres. 

COURT MORITZ, Sec. 36; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Luth; from Germany. 

COURTHOUSE FRITZ, P.O. Green River; coal miner; works for J. S. Lord. 

CRAWFORD MOSES, Farmer; Sec. 31; P.O.Green River; born in Penn. in 1830; came 
to Henry Co. in 1864; Rep; owns 2S0 acres land, val. $12,000; married Barbara Baduner, 
of Penn. in 1851; three boys, John Clarjc, Samuel Harvey, Wm. Ewing. 

CRAWFORD L. H. lives with father, M. Crawford; P.O. Green River; Rep; German Luth. 

CURTIS ROBERT, P.O. Green River; coal miner; works for J. S. Lord. 

CUSHMAN SYLVESTER, Sec. 4, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Cong; from Vt; 160 acres. 

DAVIS CHAS., P.O. Green River; coal miner; works for J. S. Lord. 
DAVIS HENRY, P.O. Green River; coal miner; works for J. S. Lord. 

DAVIS JAS., P.O. Green River; coal miner; works for J. S. Lord. 

DAVIS THOMAS, Sees. 23-24, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; rents 125 acres of D. L. Machesney; Rep. 

DAVIS WM. Green River; coal miner; works for Downs & Wilson. 

DENNIS DANL. C. Sec. 16, P.O. Geneseo; fanner; Rep; Church of God; from Conn; 50 ac. 

DILENBECK M. H. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 23, P.O. Geneseo; born in Leroy, 
Jefferson Co. N.Y. March 6, 1840; came to this county in June, 1855; Rep; Meih; owns 
115 acres, val. $7,000; wife was Sarah C. Spickler, born in Lancaster Co. Pa. April 26, 1843; 
came here April 28, 1S56; married Jan. 7, 1864; have had three children, all living: Albert 
Courlland, born March 7, 1865; Elvin Francis, born Aug. 22, 1871; and Minnie V., April 
22, 1876; was in I12th Regt. I. V. I.; have been School Director eight years. 

l>ILENBECIv S. S. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 22, P.O. Geneseo; born in Jefferson 
Co. N.Y. April 6, 1845; came to this county in 1855; Rep; Church of God; owns 160 acres, 
val. $7,000; wife was Genieve L. .Seaton, born Bureau Co. 111. Sept. 8, 1850; married Dec. 
25, 1868; have had three children — one living, Chauncy Burdett; those deceased, Otis W. 
and Arthur A.; all born on homestead. 

DILENBECK W. Sec. 26, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Meth; from N Y; 200 acres, $12,000. 

DOLLBERRY L. Mrs. Sec. 16, P.O. Geneseo; from Sweden; 42 acres, val. $1,680. 

DOOLITTLE A. R. Sec. 14, P.O. Geneseo; Rep; Church of God; from Vt; ti5 acres. 

DOOLITTLE P. Mrs. Farmer, Sec. 14. P.O. Geneseo; born in Jamaica, Vt. May 11, 
1823; came to this county in i860; Cong; owns 200 acres, val. $10,000; widow of E. S. 
Doolittle, who was born May 21, l8l8, at Townsend, Vt; died Feb. ig, 1862; had two chil- 
dren, Ancephas and Edward B., the latter born April 24, 1854, at Jamaica, Vt; he manages 
the farm. 

DOWNS ROBERT, Coal Operator, Green River; born in Delaware, Kent Co. Oct. 30, 
1840; came to this county in 1875; Dem; Prot; wife was Mary Shirill, born in Grant Co. 
Wis. [uly 19, 1S45; married Aug. 14, 1865; have three children, Edwin Ellsworth, Sybil, 
and Jessie; was in Ordnance Dept. 15th Army Corps; Mr. D. works two mines, in connec- 
tion with partner, in Sees. 17 and 18. 

DUCKET JAS., P.O. Green River; coal miner; works for J. S. Lord. 

DUFF GEO. Sec. 36, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from Pa; 80 acres, $4,800. 



HENBT county: BDFORD TOWNSHIP. 277 

DUFF WM., P.O. Geneseo; farmer; lives with father, G. Duff; Dem; from Pa; owns 40 acres. 
DUSENBERY ALFRED, Sec. 32, P.O. Green River; farmer; owns 80 .ncre.s. 
DUSENBERY F. Sec. 32. P.O. Green River; farmer; owns 160 acres. 

T^DWARDS JOHN, Sec. 33, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Meth; from N.Y; owi.s 160 acres. 

^ ELLINGSWORTH JOHN L. Sec. 19, P.O. Green River; farmer; rents 160 acres. 

EliLiISOX EDWARD T. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sees. 24, 25, and 31, in Geneseo 
Tp.; P.O. Geneseo; born in Chester, Windsor Co. Vt. Jan. 10, 1828; came to this county in 
1854; Rep; Cong; owns 240 acres, val. $14,400; wife was Eleanor Carpenter, born Ply- 
mouth, Windsor Co.Vt. Nov. 12, 1845; married Aug. 7, 1864, at Geneseo; have had five chil- 
dren, three living, Sherman J., Homer E., and Ursula S.; those dead, Emma and Stella. 

ERTMAN JOHN, Sec. 20, P.O. Green River; farmer; Luth; from Germany; owns 60 acres. 

ERTMAN L. Sec. 33, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Luth; from Germany; owns so acres. 

ERTMOND A. Sec. 29; P.O. Morristov^fn; farmer; Dem; Luth; from Germany; 40 acres. 

ERNST JACOB, Sec. 35; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Luth; from Germany; 160 acres.- 

ERNST JOHN, lives with father, J. Ernst; P.O. Geneseo; Rep; Luth; from Germany. 

ERNST WM. lives with father, J. Ernst; P.O. Geneseo; Rep; Luth; from Germany. 

EWALD DAVID, Sec. 28; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Luth; from Germany; 20 acres. 

■pARR WASHINGTON, P.O. Green River; coal miner; Dem; Prot; from N.Y. 

FIEDLER ADAM, P.O. Geneseo; farmer and blacksmith; Dem; Cath; from Germany. 
FIRCH DAVID, Sec. 29; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; farmer; Dem; Luth; from Germany; 120 ac. 
FIRCH JULIUS, Sec. 32; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Luth; from Germany; 60 acres. 
FIRCH LEOPOLD, Sec. 33; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Luth; from Germany; 80 acres. 
FLAGG N. H. Sec. 23; P.O. Geneseo; carpenter; Rep; Prot; from Mass; 25 acres. 
FREES HENRY, Sec. 21; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Luth; from Illinois. 

/^EE JEREMIAH, Sec. 26; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Meth; from N.Y.; 120 acres. 

^^ GENRICH CHAS. Sec. 34; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Luth; from Germany; 20 acres. 

GENRICH FRED, Sec. 34; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Luth; from Germany; 60 acres. 

GEKXANT ADAM, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 19; P.O. Green River; born in Ger- 
many, Aug. 23, 1845; came to this county in 1863; Dem; Luth; owns 200 acres of land, val. 
$8,000; wife was Mary Frels, born in Rock Island Co., 111., April 15, 1S47; married Feb. 
28, 1865; has had five children, Margaret and Emma, deceased; Henry, Millie and George, 
living. 

GIBBONS MICHAEL, P.O. Green River; coal miner for Downs & Wilson; Dem; Henry Co. 

GILBERT O. A. Sec. 17; P.O. Green River; farmer; Rep; Prot; from N.Y.; 320 acres,$i6,ooo. 

GILBERT MORTY, Sec. iS; P.O. Green River; farmer; Rep; Prot; rents 92 acres. 

GILROY PATRICK, P.O. Gene.seo; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland; rents 80 acres. 

GUENTHER EMANUEL P. Sec. 28; P.O. Geneseo; pastor of German Church; from Germany. 

TT ARRIS W. T. Sec. 16; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Church of God; from Indiana. 

■*^ HARTELIAS, Sec. 23; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Meth. Epis; from N.Y.; 160 ac. 

HENDER HENRY, Sec. 21; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Luth; from Germany; rents 80 acres. 

HENRY CHAS., P.O. Green River; coal miner; works for J. S. Lord. 

HERBISON G. W., P.O. Geneseo; farmer; lives with John Edwards; Dem; from Pa. 

HILL. THOMAS C. Member of the firm of Hill Bros., Groceries, Dry Goods, Boots, 
Shoes, and Clothing, Green River; born in Williams Co. Ohio, April I, 1848; came to this 
county in 1849; R^p; Meth; owns share in store, value $1,200; was in 9th Reg. Ills. Cav., 
Co. C. 

HILL WARREN E. Proprietor Drug Store, Green River. 

HINTZ J. Sec. 34, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Evangelical German; from Prussia; owns 40 acres. 

HIRT JOHN, P.O. Geneseo; laborer, lives with G. Addicks; Rep; Meth; from Germany. 

HOFFSTETTER E. Sec. 22; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Germany; 109 acres. 

HOHENBOKEIS" GEO. D. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 31, P.O. Morristown ; born 
in Oldenburg, Germany, Jan. 14, 1837; came to America in 1858; came to this ccunly in 
1865; Luth; ovins 260 acres of land, val. $11,700; wife was Henrietta C. Fisch, born in 
Prussia, April 16, 1845; married Jan. 28, 1869, at Geneseo, Henry Co. Ills.; have had three 
children, Emma Margaret, Ida Amanda and John Frederick. 



278 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

HOIT L. W. Sec. 24, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Bapt; from N. H.; 244 acres. 

HOLITZ ADAM, Sec. 28, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Germany; owns 80 acres. 

HOLKE JULIUS, Sec. 35; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Luth; from Germany; owns 80 acres. 

HOLSINGER JACOB, Sec. 16, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Germany; 40 acres. 

HORR J. B. Sec. 26, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Cong; owns 60 acres. 

HOWARD A. G. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 22, P.O. Geneseo; born in Windham 

Co. Vermont, Oct. 4 1851; came to this county in 1866; Rep; Bapt; operates farm for 

mother, who owns 80 acres, value $4,800; wife was Huda E. Holcomb, born in New York, 

Oct. 3, 1855; married March 8, 1875, at Geneseo, Henry Co. Ills.; was elected Collector in 

1876. 
HOWARD J. F. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 15, P.O. Geneseo; born in Windham Co. 

Vermont, Aug. 31, 1S47; came to this county in 1866; Rep; Meth; owns 146 acres of land, 

value $4,500; wife was Luella .S. Ewing, born in Windham Co. Vermont, Aug. 2g, 1850. 

married March I, 1871; have had three children; those living are Stella, Ella and Eva. 
HOWARD NATHAN C. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 15, P.O. Geneseo; born in 

Jamaica, Windham Co. Vermont, Oct. 7, 1833; came to this county Oct. 12, 1854; Rep; Meth; 

owns 165 acres, value $10,000; wife was Martha C. Dilenbeck, born in Jefferson Co. N. Y. 

April I, 1841; married Aug. 21, 1861; have had two children, Willard Edward and Leeland 

Chauncy. 
HUGHES JERRY, P.O. Green River; coal miner; works for J. S. Lord. 
HUNT WM. H. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 14, P.O. Geneseo; born in Edford Tp. 

Henry Co. Ills. April 6, 1850; Rep; Meth; owns 120 acres, value $4,800; wife was Lydia 

A. Gee, born in Grant Co. Wisconsin, Nov. 7, 1852; married Dec. 28, 1871; have one child, 

William R. 
HUSHMAN JOHN, P.O. Green River; coal miner, works for J. S. Lord. 

JAMES JOHN, Sec. 15, P.O. Geneseo; farmer, rents 80 acres of Chauncy Howard; Dem; 
from Ohio. 

TZING J AS., P.O. Geneseo; farmer, works for G. A. Carter; Rep. 

-•^ KINGSBURY NATHANIEL. Sec. 13, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Meth; from N.Y. 

KIDDER WALTER, Farmer and Stock Rai.ser,Sec. 26, P.O. Geneseo; born in Vermont 

in 1824; came to Henry County in 1856; Rep; Cong; owns 80 acres of land, value $4,000; 

has been Justice of Peace twenty years; married Harriet F. Brown, of New Hampshire, 

in 1846; two children, Almeda Frances, Rosa Ann. 
KNEELEY MICHAEL, P.O. Green River; coal miner, works for J. S. Lord. 
KOPISKIE J. Sec. 32, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Luth; from Germany; owns 140 acres. 
KORTHALS F. Sec. 20, P.O. Green River; farmer, lives with mother, Mrs. K; Luth; Germany. 

T EWIS PETER, P.O. Green River; coal miner, works for J. S. Lord. 

LEWIS ACE, P.O. Green River; coal miner, works for Downs & Wilson. 

LARSON PETER, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 10, P.O. Geneseo; born near Gotten- 
burg, Sweden, Dec. 2, 1822; came to this state in 1852, and county in 1854; Rep; Luth; 
owns 80 acres, val. $2,000; wife was Mary Ann Swedenborg, born in Nora, Sweden, Oct. 17. 
1833; came to Henry Co. Geneseo, July 9, 1854; married Sept. 2, 1854; have had five 
children, those living are Laura Sophia, Dora Matilda Charlotte, Emily Augusta, Mary 
Silme Oliva; Jennie Wilhelmine Josephine, dead; Mr. L. was in 14th Reg. 2 Cav. Co. C, 
two years and ten months. 

LORD JOHN S. Coal Operator, Green River. 

LYON ALVIN M. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. II; P.O. Geneseo; born in Tolland Co. 
Conn. July 4, 1843; came to this county in 1850; Ind; Prot; owns 80 acres, val. $2,800; wife 
was Achsach Adams, born in Schuyler Co. 111. Oct. 9, 1847; married Oct. 1870, at Geneseo, 
Henry Co. Ill; have had two children, Robert and Amy L. 

TX/TcELROY JOHN, Green River; coal miner; Dem; from Louisiana. 

^^^ McFADGEN ROBT. P.O. Green River; coal miner, works in Lord's mine. 
McILVANE ALEX. P.O. Geneseo; works for E. T. Ellison; Rep; Cong; from Pa. 
McNAUGHTEN M. D., P.O. Green River; coal miner, works for Downs & Wilson; Rep. 
MAGERKERT AUGUST, Sec. 17- P.O. Greeii Kiver; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Germany. 



HENRY COUNTY: BDFOBD TOWNSHIP. 279 

MARSHALL. JOS. J. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 25; P.O. Geneseo; born in Elk 
Grove, Cook Co. 111. March 11, 1848: came to this county in 1875; Rep; owns 80 acres, val. 
$4,800; wife was Mary J. Scott, born in Windsor Co. Vt. May 28, 1848; mrrried Dec. 25, 
1871, at Maine, Cook Co; have had three children, all living, Elbert L. born Sept. 28, 1872; 
Burdett C. March 6. 1874; Oracle M. born Oct. 2, 1875. 

MEER ISAAC W. Sec. 18; P.O. Green River; coal miner and f.irmer, rents 30 ac. of F. Baum. 

MEER JOHN, Green River; stock herder; Dem; Prot; from Pa. 

MEER JOS. P.O. Green River; farmer, rents So acres. 

MILLER ALBERT, P.O. Geneseo; farmer, lives with G. Miller; Evang; from Germany. 

MILLER GUSTAV, P.O. Geneseo; farmer, rents 80 acres; Dem; Evang; from Germany. 

MILLER HERMANN, P.O. Green River; coal miner, works for J. S. Lord. 

MURRY MARION, P.O. Green River; coal miner, works for J. S. Lord. 

MUZZY EDSOJ^, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sees. 10 and 15; P.O. Geneseo; born in Ja- 
maica, Windham Co, Vt. April 24, 1832; came to this county Jan. 24, 1866; Rep; Cong; 
owns 142 acres, val. $6,000; wife was Martha A. Rand, born in Townsend, Windham Co. Vt. 
July 15, 1836; married April 28, 1858; have had two children, Fred E. and Alice P. 

"VTEWTON WM. P.O. Green River; coal miner for J. S. Lord. 

^^ NEWMAN JOHN, Sec. 16; P.O. Geneseo; farmer, Luth; from Prussia; owns 80 acres. 

NICLOY LOUIS, P.O. Geneseo; farmer, rents 80 acres of T. Green; Luth; from Prussia. 

/^HME WM., P.O. Geneseo; works for R. B. Paul; Luth; from Germany. 

^-^ OUGH JAMES, Sec. 18; P.O.Green River; farmer, rents 184 ac. of J. Harper: Rep; Prot. 

OLLSOX ANDREW P. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 10; P.O. Geneseo; born in 
Yonby, Sweden, July 15, 1837; came to this county Oct. 1854; Rep; Prot; owns 92 acres, 
val. $2,760; wife was Lucinda Nesbaum, born in Wabash Co. Ind. Dec. 25, 1846; married 
March 28, 1S67, at Rock Island, 111; have had five children, Daniel Grant, Chas. Augustus, 
Louis Andrew, Holly Stanton, Richard H.; Mr. O. was in 4th Regt. I. Cav. Co. M; has been 
Pathmaster one year. 

OUGH JNO. C. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sees. 19 and 20; P.O. Green River; born in 
Bureau Co. 111. Aug. 15, 1855; came to this county in 1861; Rep; rents 100 acres of land, 
val. $4,500; wife was Mary Delany, born in Rock Island Co. Dec. 25, 1856; have one child, 
Daniel Lewis. 

OUGH RICHARD, Sec. 19; P.O. Green River; farmer; Rep; Epis; from England; 100 acres. 

OUGH RICHARD, lives with father, R. Ough, P.O. Green River; Rep; from England. 

pALMER FRANK, Sec. 18; P.O. Green River; farmer; rents 60 acres of S. Sheppard. 

-'■ PARPART JULIUS,- Sec. 27; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Evang. German; from Prussia. 

PAUL E. J. lives with father, J. Paul; P.O. Geneseo; Dem; from Mass. 

PAUL LIBERTY, Farmer ?.nd Stock Raiser, Sees. 12 and 13; P.O. Geneseo; born in 
Union, Tolland Co. Conn. Nov. 16, 1824; came to this county in 1856; Lib; Prot; owns 260 
acres, val. $14,300; wife was Hannah M. Keyes, born in Ashford, Windham Co. Conn. May 
26. 1826; married 1850; have had two children. Earnest J. and Sumner, who live with their 
father, on the homestead; Mr. Paul is the son of Capt. Chauncy Paul, of Union, Tolland Co. 
Conn. 

PAUL R. B. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 14; P.O. Geneseo; born in Union, Tolland Co. 
Conn. June 5, 1823; came to this county in 1856; Rep; Prot; owns 287 acres, val. $14,350; 
wife was Ann E. Kinney, born in LInion, Tolland Co. Conn. April l, 1831; married March 
1852; at Union; have had three children, one living, Addie J.; two dead, Chauncey B. and 
Emma J. • 

PAUL SUMNER, lives with father, L. Paul; P.O. Geneseo; Dem; from Mass. 

PERRIN A. D. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 12; P.O. Geneseo; born in Webster, Mass. 
Oct, 7, 1843; came to this county in 1855; Rep; Cong; owns 160 acres, val. $4,800; first 
wife was Mary Hale, born in N.Y.; married March 24, 1870, died April 11, 1875; had two 
children, Henry A., born Jan. 11, 1871; Wm. S., born Dec. 21, 1872; second wife was Ade- 
line E. Thompson, born in Bureau Co. 111. Feb. 20, 1S43; married Feb. 23, 1876. 

PERSHING JOS., P.O. Green River; harness-maker; Rep; Meth; from Pa; prop. $1,500. 

PERSHING WM. Green River; harness-maker; Rep; Meth; from Pa; owns house and lot. 

PINKERTON MATTHEW, P.O. Green River; retired farmer; Rep; from Pa. 

PIPAL GEO., P.O, Green River; worlis for Wm. Smith; Dem, Luth; from Germany. 



280 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

PITTS GEO., P.O. Green River; coal miner, works for J. S. Lord. 

POBANZ r. A. Sec. 20; P.O. Green River; farmer; Luth; from Germany; 88 acres. 

POBANZ FERDINAND, P.O. Genesee; farmer, lives with father, F. Pobanz, Rep; Ev. Luth. 

POBANZ FRED. Sec. 34; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Evang. German; from Prussia. 

POBANZ FRED. Jr. P.O. Geneseo: farmer, lives with father, F. Pobanz; Rep; Evang. Ger. 

POBANZ GUSTAVE, P.O. Geneseo; farmer, lives with father, F. Pobanz; Rep; Evang. Ger. 

POBANZ GEORGE, Sec. 27; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Evang. German; from Prussia. 

POBANZ WM., P.O. Geneseo; farmer, lives with father, F. Pobanz; Rep; Evang. German. 

POBANZ Mrs. Sec. 34; P.O. Geneseo; Luth; from Germany; owns 20 acres. 

POLSON C. M. Sec. 23; P.O. Geneseo; farmer, rents 160 acres of G. S. Wells; Rep; Meth. 

POLSON SPENCER, lives with C. M. Poison, P.O. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Luth; Sweden. 

POTTIGER D.VNIEL, P.O. Geneseo; works for H.Bill; Church of God; from Pa. 

PUGH CHAS. Green River; potter; Rep; from Iowa. 

PUGH THOMAS, Green River; coal miner; Rep. 

T) AHN DAVID, Sec. 33, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Germany; 20 acres. 

REATMAN , Sec. 20, P.O. Green River; laborer; Luth; from Germany. 

REMINGTON C. C. Sec. 24, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Cong; from Mass; owns 76 ac. $5,000. 
RISTAU JULIUS, Sec. 27, P.O. Geneseo; farmer. Dem; Evan. Ger; from Prussia; owns 80 ac. 
ROBERTS WM., P.O. Green River; coal miner, works for Downs & Wilson. 
ROHRBACH CHRISTOPHER, Sec. 20, P.O.Green River; farmer; Luth; from Germany. 
RUNDLEMAN FRITZ, P.O. Green River; coal miner, works for J. S. Lord. 

OCHEIDEL GEO. Sec. 28, P.O. Geneseo; farmer, rents Jno. Altman; Luth; from Germany. 
^~^ SCMICHEL J. Sec. 33, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Luth; from Germany; owns 70 acres. 
SCHKADER GEO. H. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 15, P.O. Geneseo; born in 

Oldenburg, Germany, Oct. 19, 1834; came to Rock Island Co. in 1852 and Henry Co. in 

1864; Dem; Luth; owns 240 acres of land, val. $9,600; wife was W. C. Weigand, born in 

Prussia, Oct. 5, 1840, married Jan. 13, 1859; have five children living, Etta, Martha, John, 

Chas., Minnie. 
SCOTT LOUISA Mrs. Sec. 24, P.O. Geneseo; farming; Meth; from N.H; owns 160 ac. $9,600. 
SCOTT WALTER A., P.O. Geneseo; farmer, operates farm of mother, Louisa Scott; Rep; Meth. 
SHAFER MINOR, P.O. Morristown; works for E. A. South; Rep; Bapt; from W. Va. 
SHERILL ED., P.O. Green River; coal miner, foreman in Downs & Wilson's bank; Dem. 
SIMMONS WM., P.O. Green River; coal miner, works for Downs & Wilson. 
SMITPI F. Mrs. Sec. 26, P.O. Geneseo; farm; Cong; from Ohio; owns 80 acres, val. $4,800. 
SMITH L. K., lives with mother, Mrs. F. Smith, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Unit; from Ohio. 
SMITH WM. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 31, P.O. Green River; born in Lippe, Prussia, 

Nov. 10, 1822; came to this Co. in 1851; Dem; Luth; owns 1,191 acres of land, val. $41,250; 

wife was Caroline Ammert, born in Bavaria, Germany, Oct. 13, 1824, married April 19, 1849; 

have had eight children; those living are, Margaret, Anna; John F., Carolina, and Emma. 
SOUTH E. A. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 32, P.O. Morristown; born in Green Co. Pa. 

Feb. 27, 1827; came to this Co. in 1864; Dem; Bapt; owns 380 acres of land, val. $19,000; 

first wife was Sarah E. Long, born in Green Co. Pa. Dec. 13, 1833, died Dec. 4, 1865; had 

four children, Mary Ann, L. G. Swan, Dora Frances, Plummer W.; second wife was Mary 

S. Somers, born Fayette Co. Pa. Aug. 26, 1841; three children, Sarah E., Guy Allen, deceased, 

and baby unnamed. 
STUR JOHN, Sec. 17, P.O. Green River; farmer; Luth; from 111; owns 80 acres. 
SULLIVAN FRANK, lives with father, M. T. -Sullivan. P.O. Green River; Rep; from Mich. 
SUIiLiIVAN MYKON T. Farmer and Stock Raiser; Sees. 7, 8, 18; P.O. Green River; 

born N. Y., Ontario Co., Aug. 3, 1825; came to this Co. in 1870; Rep; rents 600 acres, val. 

$30,000; wife was Estra M.' McKebey; married July 4, 1844, at Bristol, Ontario Co. N. Y.; 

have had seven children; those living, Maria, Sarah, William, Myron, Frank, Jennie E. and 

Charlotte; those dead, William and John; was in nth Reg. Mich. V. I., and then 1st Reg. 

Engineer Mechanics. 
SULLIVAN SAMUEL, lives with father, M. T. Sullivan; P.O. Green River; Rep; from N.Y. 
SULLIVAN WM. lives with father, M. T. Sullivan; P.O. Green River; farmer; Rep; from N. Y. 



t ■ 



HENRY COUNTY: EDFORD TOWNSHIP. 281 

SUMNER T. P. Farmer and Carpenter; Sec. 17; P.O. Green River; born in Conn, in 1813; 
came to Henry Co. in 1851; Dem; owns 160 acres, val. $6,000; served as carpenter in the I. 
Pioneer Corps six months; married Hannah E. Goodrich, of N. Y., in 1835; seven children, 
four boys, three girls. 

'T^AYLOR ALBERT P. Sec. 23; P.O. Geneseo; school teacher; in Flagg's house; Rep; Bapt. 

TEMPLIN , Sec. 34; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Lutheran; from Germany. 

THOIVIAS HANK, P.O. Green River; coal miner; works for J. S. Lord. 

THOMAS HENRY, P.O. Green River; coal miner; works for Downs & Wilson. 

THOMAS JOHN. P.O. Green River; coal miner; works for J. S. Lord. 

THOMAS JOHN, P.O. Green River; coal miner; works for Downs & Wilson. 

THOMPSON PATRICK, P.O. Green River; coal miner; works for J. S. Lord. 

TISCH AUGUST, P.O. Green River; coal miner; works for J. S. Lord. 

TUFTS JOHN, Sec. 25; P.O. Gene.seo; farmer; Rep; Cong; from Vt; 160 acres; val. $9,600. 

\ X rAGLE HARTMAN, Sec. 35; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Germany; 160 acres. 

^^ WALKER DAVID, P.O. Green River: coal miner; works for Downs & Wilson. 

WATSON WM., P.O Green River; coal miner; works for Downs & Wilson. 

WEAVER JACOB, Farmer and Stock Raiser; Sec. 36; P.O. Geneseo; born in Bavaria, 
Germany, Sept. 22, i82g; came to Penn. in IS36, then to Rock Island Co. in 1838, to Henry 
Co. in 1869; Rep; Lutheran; owns 160 acres, value $g.6oo; wife was Mary Weigand, born 
Germany, Saxony, Jan. 31, 1830; married Dec. 17, 1850, at Hampton, Rock Island Co; have 
had three children, one dead, Martha Caroline, those living, Margaret C. and John J. 

WEIDLEIN GEORGE, lives with father, John Weidlein; P.O. Mornstown; Dem; Luth. 

WEIDLEIIS" JOHN, Farmer and Stock Raiser; P.O. Morristown; born in Bavaria, Ger- 
many, Jan. 17, 1812; came to this county in 1851; Dem; Lutheran; owns 320 acres of land, 
valued $17,600; wife was Elenora C. Ammert, born in Bavaria, Germany, Feb. 2, 1820; mar- 
ried March 11, 1839, in Bedford Co., Penn; have 1 ad twelve children; those living are, An- 
drew, born April 16, 1840, Philip, born Dec. 23, 1841, Lewis, born May 4. 1846, Jacob, born 
Feb. 17, 1850, George, born Sept. 25, 1S54, Edward, born May 20, 1856, Caroline, born 
March 29, 1859, Valentine, born Sept. 7, 1863. 

WEIGAND HENRY, Sec. 35; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Luth; from Germany; rents 80 acres. 

WEINRICH CHARLES, Sec. 35; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Germany. 

WEINRICH ERNST, with C. .Veinrich; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Germany. 

WENDT HENRY, Sec. 32; P.O. Morristown; farmer; Dem; Luth; from 111; 80 ac. in Sec. 20. 

WERTFAM C, P.O. Green River, works for O. A. Gilbert; Luth; from Germany. 

WEST WM., P.O. Green River; coal miner, works for Downs & Wilson. 

WILDERMUTH C. Sec. 15, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Germany; 80 acres. 

WILSON FRANK, Sec. 21, P.O. Geneseo; farmer, rents 200 ac. of J. Wilson; Rep; Prot;N.H. 

WILSON GARRETT A. Coal Operator, residence coal banks Sec. 17; P.O. Green 
River; born in LaSalle Co. 111. Sept. t2, 1848; came to this Co. in 1S64; Rep; works coal 
banks with partner, R. Downs, in Sees. 17-18; wife was Emily Christy, born in Wayne Co. 
Iowa, Jan. 13, 1852; married Sept. 3, 1871; has two children: Clare Waldo, and Elsie L.; 
was in 9th 111. Cav. Co. B. 

WILSON JOEL, Sec. 21, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Prot; N. H.; owns 200 acres. 

WILSON WM. W. Sec. 17, P.O. Green River; farmer, rents 80 ac. of T. P. Sumner; Dem. 

WISYAHN CHAS. Sec. 37. P.O. Geneseo; farmer, rents 100 acres; Evang. German; Prussia. 

WOOD BEDER, P.O.Green River; lives with father, W. Wood; Rep; Prot; from 111. 

WOOD DANIEL, P.O. Green River; lives with father, W. Wood: Rep; Prot; from 111. 

WOOD DAVID, P.O. Green River; lives with father, W. Wood; Rep; Prot; from 111. 

WOOD WELLINGTON, Sec. 17 and 20, P.O. Green River; farmer; Rep; Prot; Irom N. Y. 

WYNAL CHAS., P.O. Geneseo: lives with W. Dilenbeck; Rep; Luth; from Germany. 



Y 



ONKE FRED, Sec. 33, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Germany; 60 acres. 



VOTT5RS ANi) TAXPAYERS OP 



Business Dirfxtory. 



GREEN KIVEK. 



Downs & Wilson, Coal Operators; Mines on Sees. 17 and 18. 
Hill Bros. Dry Goods, Groceries, Boots, Shoes, Clothing, &c. 

Hill Warren E. Druggist. 

Lord Jno. S. Coal Operator. 



CAMBRIDGE TOWNSHIP. 

A LFRED S. D, Cambridge; merchant; Rep; Bapt; born Vt. 

'^*- ALLBRIGHT A., P.O. Ulah; lumber; Rep; Meth; born N.Y, 

ALDRIDGE JOHN M. Sec. 30, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Dem; Lib; bom Ind; 78 ac. land. 

ALLEN W. R. Cambridge; photographer; Rep; Chri.s. church; born 111. 

ALTSCHULER SIMON, Cambridge; clothing and furnsg. goods; Ind; Lib; born Germany. 

AMBROSE THOMAS, Cambridge; works R.R; Uem; Cath; born Ireland. 

AMMERMAN J. R. Cambridge; wheelrighl; Rep; Lib; born Pa. 

AMMERMAN WILLIA.VI, Cambridge; carpenter; Rep; Lib; born Ohio. 

ANDERSO s A. L. Sec. 21, P.O. Ulah; farmer, rents of Mrs. Longshore; Rep; Luth; Sweden. 

ANDERSON E. Sec. 30; farmer; Ind; Luth; born Sweden; 80 acres land. 

.ANDERSON H. R Cambridge; farmer; Dem; Meth; born Ky. 

ANDERSON HANS, Sec. 27, P.O. Ulah; farmer; Rep; Meth; born Sweden; 77 acres' land. 

ANDERSON O. Sec. 34,. P.O. Ulah; farmer; Rep; Meth; born Sweden; 80 acres land. 

ANDERSON P. B. Cambridge; merchant tailor; Rep; Meth; born Sweden. 

ANDERSON S. Sec. 5; farmer; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

ANDERSON WILLIAM J. Cambridge; clerk; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

ARNOLD C. B. Sec. 29; P.O. Ulah; farmer; Rep; Bapt; born Vt; 160 acres land. 

ATCHISON M. Sec. 22; laborer; Rep; Pres; born Ireland. 

ATKINSON JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 23, P.O. Ulah; born in County Derry, Ireland, May 
19, 1836; Rep; Pres; owns 80 acres land, value $4,000; lived in Ireland nineteen years; came 
to this country 1855; lived in Philadelphia five years; came to Kevvanee, Henry Co. in 1861, 
lived there fifteen years; worked nine years and four months for Mr. Willard, Nurseryman; 
has held office Roadmaster; married Miss Nancy McAdoo Feb. 3, 1858; she was born County 
Donegal, Ireland; have eight children, six girls, two boys; lost one daughter. 

AXELSON A. Sec. 14, P.O. Cambridge; farmer, rents R. Mascall's farm; Rep; Luth. 

AXELSON A. M. Sec. 14, P.O. Cambridge; farmer, rents R. Mascall's farm; Rep; Luth; Sweden. 

AXELSON FRANK, Sec. 14, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

AYRES A. D. Cambridge; clerk; Rep; Bapt. pref; born Henry Co. Ill, 

AVERS A. S. Mrs. Widow, Cambridge; Pres; born in New York City. 

AYKES JAMES E. Merchant, Cambridge; born in town of Andover, Henry Co. July 22, 
1844. He has lived in this county thirty-two years, except three years when he lived in State 
Kentucky. He has been in the business of Dry Goods, Groceries and Clothing, firm of 
.■\yres & Weir, for past five years. He was in the army in 112th Reg. 111. Infantry, and was 
in twenty-six general engagements. He has two children, one daughter and one son. 

AYRES THOMAS G. Attorney, Cambridge; born Henry Co. 111. May 7, 1842. He has 
lived in this state, in Henry County, for thirty-four years, except three or four years, when 
he lived in State Kentucky; he has practiced his profession here about five years; he has held 
office one of Trustees of this town for past five years; Dem; Lib. He married Miss Priscilla 
A. Davenport Sept. 21, 1871; she was born in Cambridge. Henry Co; they have one child, 
son, Bertram Seymour, born Sept. 27, 1872. 



B 



ALL G. W. Cambridge; dairy business; Rep; Meth. pref; born N.Y. 

BEACH J. H. Dr. Cambridge; dentist; Ind; Epis. pref; born Pittsburg, Pa. 







GEO. F. H. WILSON, 
Cambridge. 



HENRY COUNTY: CAMBRIDGE TOWNSHIP, 285 

BALL OLiIVEK, Livery Stable, Cambridge; born Cortland Co. N.Y. April 23, 1835; Rep; 
Lib; value property $15,000. He lived in New York State about twenty-one years, and 
came to this state, in Henry Co., in 1856, and has lived here over twenty years, except two 
years in Minnesota. Is engaged in the Livery Business here, firm O. Ball & Son. Married 
Miss Mary Jane Brown Aug. 24, 1856; she was from Cortland Co. N.Y., born April 23, 1838; 
they have three children, two sons and one daughter. 

BASON JOHN J. Farmer, Sec. 25, P.O. Cambridge; born in Washington Co. Pa. Feb. 11, 
1836; Dem; Bapt. pref; owns 150 acres land, value $7,500; lived in Pennsylvania ten years; 
removed to Peoria Co. 111. and lived there about fourteen years, and came to Henry Co. and 
has lived here seventeen years. Has held office School Director. Married Miss Eve Cath- 
erine Gabler Nov. 27, 1855; she was born in Germany, July 20, 1828; they have two children, 
daughters; Sarah Elizabeth, born May 5. 1857, Lucy, born May 2, i860. 

BEARDSLEY E. Cambridge; surveyor; Rep; Infidel; born N.Y. 

BECKEK GrEOKGE, Lumber and Grain Dealer, P.O. Ulah, Sec. 21; born Jefferson Co; 
N.Y. Dec. 6, 1839; Rep; Meth; value property $1,500; lived in New York State about twen- 
ty-eight years; came to this state and county in May, 1S68, and has lived here nine years, and 
is engaged in Grain and Lumber Business. Was in the army, enlisted Aug. 11, 1862, in the 
lOth New York Artillery, and participated in every battle in which iSth army corps was en- 
gaged, from Cold Harbor to surrender of Gen. Lee at Appomattox. He holds office Post- 
master this town; married Miss Alice E. Howe Dec. 5, i860; she was born in Antwerp, 
Jefferson Co. N.Y. Oct. 7, 1845; have three children, Katie Alice, George Leslie, Frank Elmer; 
lost three children. 

BELKNAP W. S. Cambridge; salesman; Dem; Lib; born Orange Co. N.Y. 

BENSON A. Sec. 15, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; renter; Rep; Lib; born Sweden. 

BENSON JOHN, Cambridge; tailor; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

BENSON LAKS, Farmer, Sec. 15, P.O. Cambridge; born in Sweden Aug. 13, 1826; 'Rep; 
Lib; owns 174 acres land, value $9,000. He lived in Sweden twenty-eight years, and came 
to this country in 1854; arrived in Moline, Rock Island Co. Aug. 19, 1854; came to Henry 
Co. March 14, i860, and has lived here sixteen years; his father living in Sweden; his brother 
lives in this town and county. 

BEVERIDGE PETER H. Treasurer Henry Co., P.O. Cambridge; born Aberdeen. 
Scotland, Feb. 21, 1834; came to this country in 1839; came to Ashland, Ohio, and lived 
there fourteen years. He lived in Scott Co. Iowa, three years; came to this state, Henry 
County, in 1856, and has lived here over twenty years. He has held office Supervisor; was 
President Agricultural Society for ten years; he was elected treasurer of Henry Co. in 1873, 
and re-elected in 1875; Rep; Cong; owns farm 320 acres, value $19,200, owns farm i6o acres 
Nebraska, vakie $1,920, total, $21,120. He married Miss Eliza L. Carter Oct. 25, 1859; she 
was born Ashland, Ohio, March 17, 1.837, she died Feb. 2, 1875; they had five children, three 
sons, two daughters. 

BLOMBEY JOHN, Cambridge; cigar-maker; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

BLUMBEY OLOFF, Cambridge; shoemaker; Rep; Bapt; born Sweden. 

BOBBETT HANNAH E. Mrs." widow, Cambridge; Cong; born Ohio; property $3,000. 

BOON JOHN, Sec. 23, P.O. Ulah; farmer, rents farm R. Mascall; Rep; Meth. 

BOWEN S. F. Cambridge; clerk; Rep; Meth; born Philadelphia, Pa. 

BOWEN W. S. Sec. 21, P.O. Ulah; clerk; Ind; Meth; born Pa. 

BOWEN WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec, 22, P.O. Ulah; born in Philadelphia, Pa. Oct. 28, 
1824; Ind; Meth; owns 160 acres land, value $g,6oo; lived in Philadelphia about thirty years; 
removed to Kewanee, Henry Co. in 1854; was in the army, Co. G, 112th Reg. 111. Infantry; 
acted as Hospital Steward; served three years and honorably discharged; has held office 
Justice Peace for eight years and School Director many years. Is engaged in Grain and 
Lumber business, and is Freight and Ticket Agent P. & R. I. R. R. at this place; married 
Caroline Starkey, of Philadelphia, 1848; she died 1861; married Mrs. Mary E. Appleman, 
of Columbia Co. Pa. Aug. 12, 1862; have seven children, five sons, two daughters. 

BOYD A. H. Cambridge; laborer; Rep; Lib; born Ohio. 

BOYD JAMES M. Cambridge; works in lumber yard; Rep; Lib; born Ohio. 

BOYD SAMUEL G. Merchant Tailor, Cambridge; born in Lewis County, Ky. April 
25, 1815; Rep; Univ; value property, $2,000; lived in Ky. three or four years and removed 
to Ohio in 1819; lived in that state about thirty-eight years; came to this state, Cambridge, 
Henry County, 1859, and has lived here seventeen years; has held office School Director; 
married Miss Eliza Young, Sept. 20, 1838; she died in May, 1874; then married Mrs. F. M. 
Newton, formerly F. M. Putnam, from Vermont, March 18, 1875; he had six children by 
first wife, three sons and three daughters; has lost three children. 

BOYD ROBERT, Sec. 9, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Dem; Lib; 240 acres. 
25 



286 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

BO YD JOHJ^, Farmer and Teamster, Cambridge; born in Bucks Co. Penn. Nov. 6, 1835; 
Rep; Epis; value property $1,000; he lived in Penn. about twenty-five years, then came to 
Henry Co. Illinois, in 1852; has lived here twenty-four years; was in the army, Co. C, Tl2th 
Reg. Ills. Infantry; he was in a number of severe battles, and was honorably discharged; he 
married Miss Emily W. Welton, Nov. 25, 1858; she was born April 17, 1836; they have 
three children, two girls and one boy; have lost three children. 

BRINKERHOFF AUGUSTUS W. Cambridge; lives with father; Rep; Meth; born 111. 

BRINKERHOFF CHARLES E. Cambridge; lives with father; Rep; Meth; born N. Y. 

BKINKHOFF D. Farmer, Sec. 24, P.O. Ulah; born Hanover, Germany, Sept. 18, 1826; 
Ind; Luth; owns 400 acres land, 240 acres in town of Cambridge, 160 acres in town of 
Burns, value $24,000; lived in Germany about twenty years, and came to this country in 
1846; lived in New York State two years; went to California in 1849; came to this state and 
county in 1855, and has lived here twenty-one years; he has held office School Director; 
married Miss Sarah Jane Stackhouse in Dec. 1855; she was from New York State; they have 
five children, one son and four daughters; lost one son. 

BRIlSrKEKHOFF JAMES D. Ice Dealer, Cambridge; born in New York City, March 
17, 1825; he lived there about three years; lived in Hackensack, New Jersey, sixteen years; 
went to sea on whaling expedition for two years, and sailed around the world, returned to 
New York for four years; he came to this state, in Knox Co. in 1S53, and has lived in this 
county twelve years; he has held office of Justice of Peace for seven years, and School 
Director for eight years; Rep; Meth; value property, $2,000; married Miss Margaret A. 
Williams, March 31, 1846; she was born in New York City Sept. 8, 1826; they have five 
children, four sons and one daughter; have lost three sons. 

BRISTOL ELIZABETH Mrs. widow; Sec. 9, P.O. Cambridge; Meth; born Canada; 40 acres- 

BRISTOL SAMUEL, Sec. 9, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Dem; Meth; born Ills. 

BRITTAN W. W. Cambridge; clerk Cambridge House; Dem; Pres. pref; born New Jersey. 

BROBERG SWAN, Cambridge; cigarmaker, Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

BROOKS JOSEPH A. Sec. 21; farmer, renter; Rep; Meth; born Pa. 

BROWN CAROLINE Mrs. Sec. 14; P.O. Cambridge; born Pa; 20 acres. 

BRUCE H. Cambridge; wagon-maker; Lib; born Virginia. 

BRUCE M. Cambridge; carpenter; Dem; Lib; born Virginia. 

BRUCE W. S. Cambridge; carpenter; Dem; Hard Shell Bapt. pref; born Virginia. 

BRYAN JOHX L. Physician and Surgeon, Cambridge; born Wayne Co. Ky. Oct. 3, 1829; 
Rep; Bapt; value property $5,000; he lived in State of Kentucky twenty-five years, then 
removed to Indiana and was there six years; upon the breaking out of the war he was com- 
missioned surgeon of the 26th Missouri Reg. Infantry and served in the field two years, and 
then had charge rnilitary hospital of eruptive diseases in City Louisville for one year and 
five months; he has practiced his profession in this county about seven years; he married 
Miss Hannah M. Deitz of Blue Lick, Indiana, Oct. 13, 1857; they have five sons. 

BUKG-ESS EKASTUS J. Proprietor Burgess House, Cambridge; born in Jefferson Co. 
New York, Feby. 12, 1811; he lived in New York State about fourteen years; he went to 
Michigan in 1825; large part of people were Indians; he carried the mail from Detroit to 
Pontiac, and from there to Mt. Clemens; for nine miles no white person, only Indian cabins; 
he lived in Ohio about six years. Rep; Cong; he married Miss Lucena M. Hunt, April 13, 
1833; she was from Trumbull Co. Ohio, was born Nov. 15, 1815; they have had six children, 
three sons and three daughters; have lost two sons and two daughters. 

BURMAN C. Cambridge; shoemaker. Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

BURNDLIN P. B. Sec. 16, P.O. Ulah; farmer, rents Dixon's farm; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

BURNS S. Cambridge; works for Dennick; Rep; Cong; born Pa. 

BYERLY N., P.O. Cambridge; blacksmith; Rep; Lib; born Pa. 

/'^AHON O. Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Cong; born Ohio; val. property $1,600. 

^ CALHOUN ROBERT G. Cambridge; laborer; Rep; Lib; born Ireland. 

CADY L. S. Farmer, Sec. 11, P.O. Cambridge; born in Cuba, Allegany Co. New York, 
June 22, 1826; Dem; Lib; owns 50 acres land, value $2,500; he lived in New Yoi-k State 
ten years; lived in Canada four years; came to this county and state in 1840, and has lived 
here over thirty-six years; one ot earliest settlers; he has counted one hundred deer at one 
time here on the prairie; plenty of wolves around here then; has held office of Road Com- 
missioner and School Director; married Anna Mascall, Dec. 20, 1848; she was from Pa.; 
have seven children; lost one. 



HENRY COUNTY: CAMBBIDGB TOWNSHIP. 287 

CADY S. W. E. Farmer, Sec. 2, P.O. Cambridge; born in Virginia, Jan. 13, 1847; Rep; 
Lib; owns 160 acres land, val. $6,400; removed from Virginia at early age to this state and 
County, in 1849; lived in Cambridge eleven years, and has lived in this county twenty-seven 
years; one of early settlers; only two houses on road from Cambridge to Geneseo; married 
Miss Sarah F. Johnson, Feb. 26, 1871; she was from Boone Co. Indiana, born Oct. 22, 1841; 
they have three children, two boys and one girl; lost two children. 

CAMERY DAVID, Cambridge; carpenter; Dem; Lib; born Virginia. 

iZlAIRNES JAMES, Cambridge; clergyman; Rep; Bapt; born in Scotland; came to U. S. 1849. 

CARLSON C. A. Cambridge; sewing machine agent; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

CARLSEN C. M. Sec. 23, P.O. Ulah; farmer; Ind; Second Adventist; born Sweden. 

CARLSON JOHN, Sec. 26, P.O. Bishop Hill; farmer; Rep; Meth; born Sweden; 40 acres. 

CARLSON PETER, Sec. 11, P.O. Cambridge; farmer, rents of J. Mascall; Rep; Luth. 

CARSTENS ANDREW, Cambridge; bakery and confectionery; Dem; Luth; born Europe. 

CARTER CHARLES A. Cambridge; painter; Rep; Lib; born Ills. 

CHAMBERLAIN E. Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Epis; born 111. 

CHAMBERLAIN J. S. Rev. Cambridge; pastor Episcopal Church; Rep; born Buffalo. 

CHAMBERLAIN PHIL. C. Cambridge; law student; Rep; Epis; born 111. 

CHAPMAN JOHN W. Cambridge; wagon-maker; Rep; Bapt. pref; born Indiana. 

CHERRY E. Cambridge; laborer; Lib; Bapt. 

CHERRY JAMES, Sec. 8, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Ind; Bapt; born Ohio. 

CHILBERG N.G.Cambridge; clerk; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

CHILLBURG HENRY H. Cambridge; druggist; Rep; Swedish Luth; born Iowa. 

CHILLBERG S. J. Cambridge; clerk for Ayers & Weir; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

CHURCH R. Cambridge; blacksmith; Rep; Lib; born N. Y. 

CIjARK Gr. M. Watchmaker and Jeweler, Cambridge; born Bedfoi-d Co. Penn. Aug. 241 
1840; came to county 1855; Rep; Bapt; residence second house south of depot. 

CLARK J AS. Cambridge; works railroad; Rep; Bapt; born Ireland. 

CLARK JAS. Cambridge; Dem; Meth; born Pa. 

CLARK JAMES H. Retired Farmer, Cambridge; born in Bedford Co. Penn. June 24, 
1828; Rep; Meth; owns 560 acres of land, three houses and lots, value $33,000. He was a 
potter by trade, and lived in State of Pennsylvania about 21 years, and came to Knox Co. 
111. in 1849; lived thereabout eight years; worked in pottery business one year in Peoria Co; 
came to this Co. March 19, 1857, and has lived here nineteen years; most all vacant land, 
and only few houses when he came; he married Mrs. Lucinda Clark, formCrly Miss Lucinda 
Wigant, Feb. 19, i86g; she was born in Wood Co., Ohio, April 11, 1828. 

CLARK JOHN, P.O. Cambridge; farmer, rents J. Mascall's farm; Rep; Lib. 

CLiAKK SCOTTO, Farmer, Sec. 30, P.O. Cambridge; born Madison Co. N.Y., March 19, 
1851; Rep; Meth; owns 160 acres land, value $8,000; lived in New York State about thirty- 
three years; removed to this state and to this Co. in 1854, and has lived here twenty-two 
years; has held office of School Director and Road-master; married Miss Lucy A. Olcott, 
May I, 1S45; she was born Jan. 21, 1S25; she died May 23, 1849; o^i^ child; married Har- 
riet A. Leason, of Madison Co. N.Y. Sept. 6, 1849; she was born March 2, 1826; have five 
children, daughters. 

CLINE P. W. Cambridge; carpenter; Rep; Lib; born Va. 

COBB J. L. Cambridge; laborer; Rep; Lib; born Pa. 

COBB J. S. Cambridge; blacksmith; Rep; Bapt; born Mass. 

COCHREIV JAMES S. Fartner, Sec. 4, P.O. Cambridge; born in Knox Co. Ohio, March 
10, 1836; Dem; Lib; owns 75 acres land, value $3,750; he lived in Ohio about twelve years; 
came to this state in Fayette Co. 1849; came to this Co. in 1852, and has lived here twenty- 
four years; only two houses on road between here and Geneseo; married Miss Nancy Cooper, 
Dec. 17, 1863; she was born in Parke Co. Ind., Jan. 30, 1841, and was brought up in this state; 
they have three children, two daughters and one son; has lost one son. 

COLDY T. H. Sec. 32, P.O. Bishop Hill; farmer; Dem; Meth; born 111; 80 acres land. 

COLLINS WM.Sec. 21, P.O. Ulah; laborer; Dem; Lib. 

COMBS EDWARD, Cambridge; works elevator; Rep; Lib; born N.Y. 

COMBS EDWARD F. Cambridge; engineer; Rep; Lib; born N.Y. 
COMBS FRED L. Cambridge; Chronicle office; Rep; Lib; born N.Y. 
COMBS W. A. Cambridge; railroad agent; Rep; Lib; born N.Y, 



288 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OP 

CONDIT JOHN, Sec. 6, P.O. Cambridge; laborer; Dem; Lib. 

CONNELL JOHN, Sec. 23, P.O. Ulah; farmer; Dem; Cath; born Ireland; 40 acres land. 

CONNELL PAT. Sec. 23, P.O. Ulah; farmer; Dem; Cath; born Ireland; 40 acres land. 

CONVERSE JAMES A. Furniture Store, Cambridge; born in Susquehanna Co. Penn. 
Aug. 14, 1836; Ind; Pres; value of property $6,000. He removed to Rhode Island at an 
early age; lived there nine years; came to this state, Henry Co. in 1846, and has lived here 
over thirty years; one of the earliest settlers; they carried the mail from Chicago to Rock 
Island on horseback; he was engaged in farming and stock raising for twenty years, and has 
carted wheat to Rock Island and sold it at 24 cents a bushel; has been engaged in furniture 
business here nine years; he married Miss Maria S. Penny, Dec. 12, i860; she was from 
Long Island, N.Y.; they have four children, two boys and two girls. 

COOK F. A. Brick Manufacturer, Cambridge; born in Wethersfield, Henry Co. 111. Nov. 8, 
1842; Rep; Lib; value property $10,000; lived in Kewanee for some years, and came to 
Cambridge in 1870; has been engaged in manufacturing brick for the past twelve years; was 
in the army, 7th Missouri Regiment, Co. I; was wounded in siege of Vicksburg, May 20, 
1863; was in many severe battles; married Miss Mary A. Demoro, Oct. 24, 1867; she was 
from Kewanee, this county; have had one child, daughter, born March 12, 1872; she died 
July 24, 1872. 

CORBY PAT. Cambridge; works on railroad; Dem; Cath; born Ireland. 

COX BENJ. Sec. 21; farmer, rents of Perkins; Dem;1Lib; born 111. 

CROUCH JOHN, Cambridge; billiard-hall; Rep; Bapt; born Pa. 

CUFF WM. A. Cambridge; carpenter; Lib; Bapt; born Va. 

CURRIN BERNARD, Farmer, Cambridge; born in Ireland in June, 1839; Dem; Cath; 
value of property, 156 acres of land, $10,000; he lived in Ireland fifteen years, and came to 
this country 1854, and has lived 22 years in this Co. and state; his parents live in Ire- 
land; he has one brother and one sister living at Orion in this Co. 

CURTIS O. B. Sec. 33, P.O. Ulah; farmer; Rep; Meth; born Pa; 80 acres land. 

CUTTIGAN EDWARD, Cambridge; works on railroad; Dem; Cath; born Indiana. 

"PjAHLBERG F. O. Cambridge; , clerk; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

-L^ DAVENPORT C. E. Cambridge; lives with father; Rep; Lib; born 111. 

DALRYMPLE WILLIAM L. Deputy Clerk, P.O. Cambridge; born in KnoxXo. 
Ohio, April 7, 1827; he lived in State of Ohio 25 years, and came to this state, in Henry Co. 
and has lived here over 23 years; only two houses between Cambridge and Orion at that 
time; he has held office of Clerk of Circuit Court, also Treasurer of Henry Co; has held the 
office of Justice of the Peace for the past 16 years; holds office of Coroner; Rep; Bapt; val. 
of property $2,000; married Miss Adelia M. Seeley, Nov. 15, 1856; she was from Niagara 
Co. N.Y.; they have four children, two sons and two daughters. 

DAVENPORT J. T. Cambridge; blacksmith; Rep; Lib; born 111. 

DAVENPORT THOS. F. Farmer, Cambridge; born in Stamford, Conn. Feb. 6, 1820; 
Rep; Lib; value of property $5,000; lived in Connecticut eight years; lived in New York 
city until fifteen years old, then removed to Morristown, Henry Co. with the colony in 1837, 
and has resided in this Co. about 40 years; one of the few resident settlers that was here at 
that time; the nearest house south of his father's was twelve miles distant. The Indians had 
not left the county; their camps were on the creeks. Has been engaged in farming, mercan- 
tile and milling business; built first store, and sold the first goods ever sold in this town; was 
in the army. First Lieut. Co. H, 112th Reg. I.V.I enlisted asprivate; was Brigade Commissary 
and also Quartermaster; has held office of Clerk, Sheriff, and Treasurer of Henry Co., also 
was appointed Assessor of Internal Revenue of Henry Co.; married Miss Elizabeth Lloyd, 
of Bucks Co. Pa. June 22, 1848; she was born Jan. 31, 1822; they have three children, two 
daughters and one son; lost two sons. 

DAVIS EDWARD, Cambridge; carpenter; Rep; Cong; born South Wales. 

DAVIS W. M. Sec. 34, P.O. Ulah; farmer; Dem; Meth; born Ohio; 160 acres land. 

DEAN D. E. Cambridge; hardware; Dem; Lib; born N.Y. 

DEAN E. S. Sec. 25, P.O. Ulah; farmer; Rep; Bapt; born Vt; 240 acres land. 

DEAN H. A. Cambridge; tinner; Dem; Epis; born N.Y. 

DEAN W. B. Cambridge; hardware. Rep; Bapt. pref; born N.Y. 

DECKER ELISHA T., P.O. Cambridge; lives with father; J. Mascall owns farm; Rep: Lib; 111. 

DECKER S. M. Sec. 26, P.O. Ulah; farmer; B. Connell owns farm; Rep; Meth; born N.J. 

DECKER SAMUEL, Cambridge; barber; Rep; Latter Day Saint; born Henry Co. 111. 

DECKER WM. M. lives with father, Sec. 22, P.O. Ulah; Rep; Meth; born N.J. 



HENRY COUNTY: CAMBRIDGE TOWNSHIP. 289 

DECKER JAMES, Farmer, Sec. ii, P.O. Cambridge; born in Bradford Co. Penn. Feb. 
7, 1817; lived in Pennsylvania about fourteen years; removed to Ohio, lived there six years; 
came to this state in 1837, to Pike Co; came to this Co. in 1841, and has lived here over 35 
years; one of the earliest settlers; only very few here at that time; has carted his wheat to 
Chicago and sold it for 50 cents a bushel and sold pork at $2 a cwt; married Sarah Edwards, 
of Missouri, in 183S; she died in 1866; he then married Mrs. Emeline Randall, formerly 
Emeline Stackhouse, Oct. 25, 1867; she was from Bradford Co. Penn., born June 20, 1825; 
they have eight children, five sons and three daughters; have lost one son; Rep; Lib; owns 
190 acres of land, val. $10,000. 

DECKER J. W. Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Meth. pref; born 111. 

DECKER JOHN" I, Farmer, Sec. 23, P.O. Ulah; born in New York city, Feb. 15, 1815; 
Rep; Meth; owns 80 acres of land, value $4,000; he is a cabinet and pianoforte maker by 
trade, and lived in New York city 2^ years; lived in Hudson Co. N. J. 16 years; removed to 
Henry Co. 111. and has lived here 21 years; married Miss Abigail D. E. Kline, Dec. 16, 
1830; she was born in Cincinnati, and was brought up in New York city; they have seven 
children, five sons, two daughters; lost three children. 

DECKER W. P.Cambridge; police officer; Rep; Lib; born Henry Co. 111. 

DENGLE A. Sec. 5; farmer; Dem; Lib; born Germany. 

DENGLE JOHN H. Cambridge; lives with father; Dem; Lib; born N.Y. 

DENNISON A. Cambridge; mason; Rep; Cong; born N.Y. 

DEXTER TV ALTER M. Farmer, Sec. 32; P.O. Ulah; born in Piscataquis Co. Maine, 
Dec. 19, 1831; "Rep; Bapt; owns 160 acres land, value $9,600; lived in Maine about twenty- 
three years, then went to California and was there six years; came to Stark Co. this State and 
lived there twelve years; came to this county in 1874; has held office of School Director in 
Stark Co; holds same office here; married Miss Alida Jane Bennett, Nov. 24, 1862; she was 
born in Pennsylvania and brought up in Stark Co. Ill; they have four children, one boy and 
three girls. 

DICKENSON S. F. Rev. Cambridge; pastor Cong. Church; Rep; born Williamstown, Mass. 

DIDDY CHARLES, lives with father. Sec. 9; P.O.Cambridge; Dem; Lib; born Ohio; 40 ac. 

DIDDY WM. Sec. 9; P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Dem; Lib; born N.Y.; 80 acres land. 

DIESCH THEODORE, Farmer, Sec. 3; P.O. Cambridge; born in Prussia, Germany, 
Jan. 25, 1832; Dem; Cath; 40 acres land, value $2,000; lived in Germany twenty-two years, 
and came tothis country in 1854; lived in New York State two years; came to Moline this 
state in 1856, lived four years; came to this county i860; has lived here sixteen years; mar- 
ried Miss Mary Schmooll, Feb. 25, 1862; she was born in Germany, March 12, 1842; they 
have three children, one boy and two girls; lost one girl. 

DINNICK C. S. Cambridge; retired; Rep; Liberal; born Ohio. 

DINNICK L. F. Cambridge; farmer; Dem; Lib; born 111. 

DIXON JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 32; P.O. Ulah; born Westmoreland Co. England, April 
14, 1823; Ind; Epis. pref; owns 200 acres land, value $12,000; lived in England about 
twenty-nine years, and came to this country in 1852; came to this county and state same 
year, and has lived here about twenty-five years — one of the earliest settlers, all prairie heie 
when he came; has held office of School Director and Road-master; married Miss Matilda 
Burndlin, Sept. 3, 1869; she was born in Sweden, May 16, 1844; have four children, one son 
and three daughters. 

DONDLEY JOHN, Cambridge; works on railroad; Dem; Lib; born Ireland. 

DUNLAP A. J. Cambridge; canvasser; Dem; Christian; born Ohio. 

DUNLAP G. W. Cambridge; physician; Dem; Christian; born Ohio. 

■pATON J. A. Cambridge; carpenter; Rep; Lib; born 111. 

-"-^ ECKSTROUM E., P.O. Ulah; farmer, rents of Morris; Rep; Meth. 

EHRMANN JACOB, Cambridge; tinner; Rep; Luth; born Germany. 

ELLENWOOD A. Cambridge; blacksmith; Dem; Bapt. 

ELLIOTT JOHN, Sec. 12; Cambridge; works for Mrs. Jennings; Dem; Pres; born England. 

ELM JOHN, Sec. 24; P.O. Ulah; farmer; Rep; Meth; born Sweden; 80 acres land. 

EliSE CHAS. Farmer, Sec. 17; P.O. Cambridge; born in England, Feb. 14, 1824; Rep; Lib; 
owns 170 acres, val. $10,000; came to this country at an early age, and lived in Pa. eleven 
years, and came to this state and county in 1839, and has lived here thirty-eight years — one 
of the few early settlers now living, who came that time; used to take him a week to go to 
mill, carted his grain to Chicago, 150 miles; only one small frame tavern in Chicago then; 
has held office of School Director and Road-master; married Miss Mary S. Vincent, in Feb. 
1850; she was from N.Y. State; have eight children, four sons and four daughters. 



290 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

ELSE SARAH F. Mrs. Sec. 4; Cambridge; widow; Bapt. pref; born Va; 40 acres land. 

ELiSTOlS" JACOB W. Farmer, Sec. 5; P.O. Cambridge; born in Tioga Co. N.Y. March 
19, 1827; Dam; Lib; owns 120 acres land, value $6,000; lived in N.Y. State about twenty- 
four years; came to this state in 1851; lived in Knox Co; came to this town and county in 
1853, 3-nd has lived here over twenty-three years; only one farm under fence on road between 
here and Geneseo at that time, and only one house standing on north side of the Grove; 
married Miss Abbie Benson, Dec. 25, 1847; she was born in Green Brier Co. Va. Nov. 27, 
1831; she was brought up in Knox Co. Ill; have five children, three sons, two daughters; 
lost one daughter, 

ELSTON LUTHER, lives with father, Sec. 5; P.O. Cambridge; Dem; Lib; born 111. 

ENSTROM Q. P. Cambridge; wagon-maker; Rep; Lib; born Sweden. 

ENGSTROM P. Sec. 33; P.O. Ulah; farmer; Rep; Adv; born Sweden; 80 acres land. 

ERICKSON C. M. Cambridge; tailor; Rep; Lib; born Sweden. 

ERICKSON E. Sec. 31; P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Luth; born Sweden; 40 acres land. 

TTJ^ERGUSON J. Sec. 6; P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Bapt. pref; born Canada; 142 acres. 
FICKLING J. Sec. 13; P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Ind; Lib; born England; 160 acres. 

FIERCE WILSOX, Farmer, Sec. 33; P.O. Ulah; born Athens Co. Ohio, Aug. 24, 1823; 
Rep; U. Breth; owns 160 acres, value $9,600; blacksmith by trade; lived in Ohio seven 
years, and removed to Indiana in 1830; lived there nineteen years; came to Knox Co. 111. in 
1849, and came to Henry Co. in 1862; has lived here fourteen years; has held office of Com- 
missioner of Highways in Knox Co. when it was first organized; olso Overseer'of Poor; mar- 
ried three times : first to Rebecca B. Grubbs, of Ohio, July 16, 1846; she died May 16, 1849; 
two children; married Charlotte Gibbs, of Athens Co. Ohio, Nov. 20, 1 850; she died Aug. 3, 
1871; had eleven children; married Phietta Biggerstaff, of Athens Co. Ohio, March 11, 1872; 
they have one child, Wilson L. D. Fierce, born June 20, 1875. 

FICKLING E. A.,- P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Lib; born 111. 

FliAGG ELIJAH A. Cambridge; born in Middlesex Co. Mass. July 29, 1816; Rep; Cong; 
value property $1,000; lived in the State of Mass. thirty-nine years, and then removed to 
Town Cambridge, Henry Co. State Illinois, April 13, 1855, and has lived here twenty-two 
years; he married Miss Lois H. Chapman, April 4, 1839; she was from Pepperell, Mass; they 
have three children, one son and two daughters; lost two children. 

FLAGGr WM. E. Marble Yard, Cambridge; born in Boston, Nov. 26, 1852; Rep; Lib; he 
lived in Boston two years and then removed to this state and county in 1854, and has lived 
here twenty-two years; he has been engaged in the marble business for the past six years and 
has the only marble yard in Cambridge; his father and mother reside in this town. 

FLANSBURG ARTHUR H. Sec. 26; P.O. Ulah; farmer; Rep; Lib; born N.Y. 

FLANSBURG JOHN D. Sec. 26; P.O. Ulah; farmer; Rep; Lib; born N.Y. 

FLANSBURG WILLIAM, Sec. 26; P.O. Ulah; farmer; Rep; Free-will Bapt; born N.Y. 

FOLLETT JOHN M. Center St., North of Fire Proof; Dealer in Agricultural Imple- 
ments, Cambridge; born in Essex Co., N. Y. March 18, 1832; moved to Galesburg, 111. 
1837; came to Henry County, 1852; took part in Kansas war under Jim Lane, 1856; mar- 
ried to Miss H. B. Hill, in Galesburg, III., July 9, 1857; enlisted at Cambridge, 111. in Co. 
H, 33d I.V.I. Sept. ig, 1861; re-enlisted at Indianola, Texas, in Co. H, 33d Infantry Illinois 
Veteran Volunteers, Jan. 1, 1864; served during the war as private, 2d Sergt, 1st Sergt, and 
2nd Lieut; discharged at Vicksburg, Miss., Nov. 24, 1865; has a wife and four children, 
all living; Ind; Infidel. 

FORT D. Cambridge; works for Mrs. Jennings; Rep; Lib. 

FREDERICKS NELSE, Farmer, Sec. 9; Cambridge; born in Denmark, Oct. 26, 1844; 
Rep; Luth; owns 80 acres land, val. $4,000; lived in Denmark about eighteen years and came 
to this country in 1862; came to Moline this state same year; came to Cambridge, Henry Co. 
1864; is wagon-maker by trade, and carried on the business seven years in Cambridge; mar- 
ried Louise Samuels, Nov. 5, 1864; she was born in Moline, Rock Island Co; they have two 
children, Lizzie Corinne and Cora. 

FULNER SYLVESTER, Cambridge; street commissioner; Dem; Bapt; born Pa. 

/^ ARRISON G. G. Cambridge; Central Hotel; Rep; Lib; born Ind. 
^ GARRISON MILTON, Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Pres; born Tenn, 
GARRISON W. H. Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Meth; born Indiana. 



HENRY COUNTY: CAMBEIDGB TOWNSHIP. 291 

G-AINES ELiBEKT H. Lumber Dealer, Cambridge; born in Cambridge, Henry Co. 111. 

Jan. 10, 1852; he has lived in this county for the past twenty-four years, except one year, 
when he lived in Pike Co. in this state, and a short time in Chicago; he is of the firm of 
Stewart & Gaines, Dealers in Lumber and all kinds of Building Material, for the past five 
years; Rep; Cong, pref; he married Miss Fanny B. Page, Oct. 3, 1876; she was born in Dixon, 
111. Oct. 21, 1857. 

GIBBS P. Sec. 21; P.O. Ulah; blacksmith and farmer; Dem; Meth; born Ohio. 

GIBBS W., P.O. Ulah; farmer, rents of S. B. Arnold; Rep; Meth; born Ohio. 

GILLILAND LEVI S., Cambridge; printer; Rep; Pres; born Pa. 

GLASS XEAL, Blacksmith; Cambridge; born in Paisley, Scotland, Jan. i, 1847; Rep; Epis; 
value of property $3,000; lived in Scotland about nine years, then removed to the "Giant's 
Causeway," in the North of Ireland; came to this country March I, 1867; came to Cam- 
bridge, this county, same year, and has been engaged in blacksmithing and carriage work; 
is Junior Warden in Masonic Lodge; married Miss Eliza Macurdy; she was born North of 
Ireland. 

McGLINCHEY JAMES, Sec. 21; P.O. Ulah; farmer; Dem; Cath; born Ireland; 80 acres. 

GOODLEYAINGEK, Farmer; Sec. 17; P.O.Cambridge; born in Lincolnshire, Eng., Sept. 
30, 1821; Rep; Meth; owns 200 acres land, value $10,000; he lived in England twenty-nine 
years, and came to this country in 1850; lived in Ohio six years, and came to 111., to this 
town and county in 1857, and has lived here about twenty years; only four houses around 
here when he came; married Miss Mary White, Oct. I, 1851; she was born Lincolnshire, 
England, July 24, 1827; they have three children, one daughter and two sons. 

GOODRICH GEOKGE Cambridge; Jeweler and Billiard Room; born in Madison Co. 
N. v., Dec. ig, 1829; he lived in New York State about twenty-one years, then went to 
California and was there about seventeen years, returned to this State 1868, and has lived 
here five years; is engaged in jewelry business, and has the largest billiard room in town; he 
has two sisters living in this town; Rep; Lib. 

GORDEIVIEK JACOB W. Cambridge; Mason; born in Ulster Co., N.Y., Nov. 30, 
1827; Rep; Lib; he lived in State of New York twenty-eight years, and removed to this 
town, Henry Co., 111., in Dec, 1855, and has lived here over twenty-one years; one of early 
settlers; he holds office of Township Collector of this township; he married Miss Harriet L. 
Middaugh, Jan. 14, 1854; she was from Bradford Co., Pa., and born March 16, 1836; they 
have had two children, Fred B., born Oct. 8, 1857, Emma, born Sept. 14, i860, and died 
April 12, 1862. 

GORDON JOSEP. W., Sec. 11; P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Cady, owner; Rep; Lib; born 111. 

GOUCHER R. M., Cambridge; jeweler; 'Ind; Lib; born South Bend, Ind. 

GOULD DAN, Cambridge; butcher; Rep; Meth. pref; born N. H. 

GOULD F. C, Cambridge; merchant; Rep; Lib; born N. H. 

GOULD LYFE Y. Cambridge; butcher and market; Rep; Meth. pref; born N. H. 

GOULD MAJOR A, Grain and Stock Dealer, Cambridge; born in Piermont, N.H., June 
6, 1823; Rep; Lib; he lived in New Hampshire about 33 years, then removed to this State, 
in Henry county, in April, 1856, and has resided here over twenty years; he has held the 
office of Supervisor of this town; he was elected Clerk of the Circuit Court in i860, and re- 
elected in 1864; he is President of the Board of Trustees of this town; he married Miss Har- 
riet N. Burnap, Aug. 31, 1S45; she was from Thetford, Vt., born April 10, 1825; they have 
had two children, one son and one daughter. 

GOULD N. B. Cambridge; retired; born in Grafton Co., N. H., March 31, 1828; Rep; Lib; 
he lived in the State of New Hampshire twenty-three years, and removed to Moline, in this 
State in April, 1851; came to Cambridge, Henry Co., in May, 1856, and has lived here over 
twenty-three years; one of the early settlers; he has held the office of Supervisor of town of 
Cambridge for nine years; married Miss Mary Jane Jennings, Nov. 24, 1849; she was from 
Peoria Co., and was born Nov. 14, 1838; they have two children, daughters, Nellie L., born 
Oct. 20, 1863, Katie M., born Nov. 29, 1865. 

GRUEY C. Q., Cambridge; Prof High School; Rep; Bapt. pref; born Ohio. 

TT ADEN A., Sec. 34; P.O. Ulah; farmer; Rep; Adventist; born Sweden; 40 acres. 
HAGG A., Cambridge; laborer; Luth; born Sweden. 

HAGIN DAIV, Cambridge; merchant; born in Tompkins Co.,N.Y., Feb. 12, 1842; he lived 
in New York State for twenty-nine years, and came to the State of Illinois and to Henry Co 
in March, 1874; he is of the firm of Gould & Hagin, Grocery and Crockery Dealers; he was 
in the army tliree years in the logth Reg. N. Y. Inf , and was in every engagement f'rom the 
battle of the Wilderness to surrender of Gen. Lee; has held office of Collector in Tompkins 
Co., N.Y.; Rep; Lib; married Miss Dovia Owens, from Warren Co., Pa., Aug. 17, 1868; they 
have two children, sons, Fred Eugene, Frank Gordon. 



292 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

HAGIIS" JOHX B. Grain and Stock Dealer, Cambridge; born in Tompkins Co., N.Y., 
April 25, 1818; Rep; Lib; value of property $15,000; he lived in New York State about 
thirty-six years, when he removed to Jones Co., State of Iowa, and lived there one year, 
and came to Geneseo, State of Illinois, in 1855, and has resided in this county over twenty- 
one years; he was elected Sheriff of Henry County in 1862, was Postmaster in this town from 
1864 to 1870, when he was again elected Sheriff of Henry Co; he was elected Supervisor of 
town of Cambridge in 1876; he has been in grain and stock business for the past six years; 
he married Miss Sarah J. Seeley, June 24, 1855; she was born State of Illinois, and born July 
8, 1838; they have four children, one son and three daughters. 

HALL HA]N"]VAH, Mrs. Widow, Sec. 29; P.O. Cambridge; born in Yorkshire, England, 
Sept. 22, 1822; Epis; owns 80 acres land, value $4,000; she lived in England twenty-seven 
years, and came to this country in 1849; came to this State and lived in Peoria nine years; 
came to this county in 1858, and has lived here nineteen years; she married George Hall, 
Nov. 3, 1844; he was born Yorkshire, England, Sept. 30, 1819; died Sept. 7, 1869; she has 
three children, daughters, two at home and one in Nebraska; her only son died Dec. 16, i860. 

HALL J. H. Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Lib; born Maine; 87^ acres, val. $7,500. 

HALLG-KEIV OSCAK, farmer; Sec. 32; P.O. Cambridge; born Sweden, Nov. 28, 1847; 
Rep; Swedish Luth; owns 160 acres land, value $9,600; lived in Sweden about twenty-three 
years, and came to this country 1S70; came to this State and county same year, and has lived 
here since, except three years he lived in Knox Co., Ill; his mother, four sisters and three 
brothers reside with him. 

HAMILTON OTTO S. Restaurant; Cambridge; born in Sweden, Sept. 2, 1844; Rep; 
Lib; value of property $x,500; he lived in Sweden for twenty-four years, and came to this 
country in 1868; came to this state the same year, and has lived here nine years; he married 
Miss Sallie J. Rishel, Oct. 10, i86g; she was born in Pa; they have two chiMren, one daugh- 
ter and one son. 

HAMMOND GEO. Cambridge; harness maker; Ind; Meth; born N.Y. 

HAMMOND GEORGE R. Cambridge; harness maker; Dem; Lib; born N( York. 

HAND JNO. P. Attorney at Law, Cambridge; born in Hanna To\yiiship, Henry Co. 
Nov. 10, 1850; he has lived in this county twenty-six years, except aboutf five years, when 
he resided in 0%le County, and one year in Kansas; he has practiced his profession here for 
the past eighteen months, and is associated with Col. A. R. Mock; Rep; Lib; he married 
Miss Libbie Brayton, Oct. 26, 1871; she was born in Mt. Morris, Ogle Co. 111., Feb. 12, 
1849; they have one child, a son, Frederick Henry Hand, born April 28, 1874. 

HANES N. E. Cambridge; teacher; Rep; Bapt; born Indiana. 

HANSON PETER, Sec. 27; P.O. Ulah; farmer; Rep; Adv; born Sweden; 39 acres land. 

HANSON P., P.O. Ulah; lives with father; Rep; Adventist; born 111. 

HARRIS C. H. Sec. 15; P.O. Cambridge; photographer; Rep; Bapt; born New York. 

HARRIS GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 15; P.O. Cambridge; born in Steuben Co. N.Y. Sept. 
28, 1817; Rep; Bapt; owns 120 acres land, value $9,000; lived in N. Y. State about twenty- 
eight years; moved to Penn., and lived there about eight years; came to this state and 
county in 1853, and has lived here twenty-three years; one of early settlers; only few houses 
here at that time; married Miss Mary M. Ellsworth, Sept. 12, 1841; she was from Chemung 
Co. N.Y; they have five children, three sons and two daughters; lost one son. 

HARRISON B. Cambridge; retired; Rep; Meth; born Pa. 

HARRISON F. A. Cambridge; merchant; Rep; Lib; born Ohio. 

HART H. P. Cambridge; harness maker; Rep; Meth; born New York. 

HARTZELL JOHN W. Proprietor Cambridge House; born in Scott Co. Iowa, Oct. 14, 
1839; RfiP'. Cong; value property $7,500; lived in Iowa about eight years, and came to Mo- 
line, in this state, in 1847; lived there about eighteen years, and came to this county in 1876; 
he is proprietor of the Cambridge House, the oldest hotel in town; he has held office of 
Supervisor of Moline; he married Miss Lizzie M. Watt, of Moline, this state, Dec. 25, i860. 

HAYDEN G. H. Cambridge; Rep; Meth. 

HELBERG P. Sec. 27; P.O. Ulah; farmer; Ind; Luth; born Sweden; 80 acres land. 

HENDERSON HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 27; P.O. Ulah; born Morgan Co. 111. April 
28, 1853; Rep; Meth; owns 160 acres land, value $9,600; lived in Morgan Co. about four- 
teen years, and remoyed to Henry Co., and has lived here nine years; married Miss Belle 
Sowerby, March 5, 1874; she was born in Philadelphia, Pa. Nov. 5, 1854; they have two 
children: a son, Norris Arthur, Dec. 19, 1S74; a daughter. May, April 24, 1876. 

HITCHCOCK W. L. Cambridge; hardware; Rep; Bapt. pref. 

HINMAN ELLIOTT Cambridge; lumber; Dem; Lib; born Henry Co. 111. 




FRANK G. WELTON, 
County Clerk, Cambridge. 



HENRY COUNTY: CAMBRIDGE TOWNSHIP. 296 

TTT"N""lVr A "N" JXJIilXJS S. Judge of Henry County Court, Cambridge; born in Canton, 
Hartford, Co. Conn. June i6, 1823; he lived in State of Conn, twelve years, then moved to 
Portage Co. Ohio, and lived there about sixteen years; came to this state, in Henry Co. in 
1851, and has lived here over twenty-five years; one of the early settlers, and the only law- 
yer now living in Henry Co. that was here when he came; he held office Swamp Land Com- 
missioner for long time, also Justice of the Peace and Master in Chancery Circuit Court for 
eighteen years; he has been County Judge of this county for eleven years — elected in 1865; 
Rep; Lib; married Miss Mary E. Westlake, Nov. 27, 1849; she was from Stark Co. Ohio; 
they have five children, two sons and three daughters; lost one daughter. 

HOBIiEY THOS. H. Farmer, Sec. 25; P.O. Ulah; born in Brooklyn, N. Y. Jan. 3, 1846; 
Rep; Bapt; owns 120 acres land, $6,000; he lived in Brooklyn, N. Y. about twenty-three 
years; was in employ Penn. R.R. Co., Star Union Fast Freight Line; removed to Illinois, 
Henry Co. in 1869; has lived here eight years; has held office Constable; his mother and 
sister are living with him; his brother, A. R. Hobley, owns 40 acres in Sec 25. 

HOEPFNER C. Cambridge; shoemaker; Rep; Meth; born Germany. 

HOLLENGUEST AUGUSTUS, Cambridge; laborer; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

HONE HENRY, P.O. Ulah; farmer; Ind; Meth; born New York. 

HOOVER D. Cambridge; works elevator; Rep; Lib; born Pa. 

HORN S. Cambridge; retired; Dem; Christian; born Mason Co. Ky. 

HULIN B. I. Cambridge; wheelwright; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

T MAN I. H. Cambridge; laborer; Dem; Bapt. pref; born Pa. 
■^ IMAN M. E. Mrs. Cambridge; dress-maker; Bapt; born Pa; property $2,000. 
INGRAM EUGENE, P.O. Sharon; works for W. Arnett; Rep; born Henry Co. 
IRWIN THOMAS, P.O. Bishop Hill; farmer; Dem; Lib; born Ireland. 

JACKSON ROBERT, Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Cong; born Ireland. 
JACKSON WILLIAM B. Cambridge; harness-maker; Rep; Cong; born N. J. 

JENNINGS SUSAN H. Mrs. Sec. 12, Cambridge P.O.; born in Pickaway Co. Ohio, 
Aug. 20, 1813: Presb. pref; owns 1,200 acres of land, valued at $75,000; she lived in State of 
Ohio twenty-two years; came to State of 111. and lived in Peoria Co. thirteen years; she 
came to this town and county in 1847, and has lived here about thirty years; one of earliest 
settlers; she married Levi Jennings, March 6, 1836; he was born in Virginia, March 10, 
1794, and was brought up in Ohio; she has three children, two daughters and one son; has 
lost one daughter. 

JOHNSON A. Cambridge; laborer; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

JOHNSON A. C. Sec. 22; laborer; Rep; Meth; born Sweden. 

JOHNSON ANDREW, Sec. 25, P.O. Bishop Hill; farmer; Dem; Lib; born Sweden; 40 acres. 

JOHNSON AUGUSTUS, Sec. 9, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

JOHNSON C. Mrs. widow. Sec. 34, P.O. Ulah; Meth; born Sweden. 

JOHNSON C. G. Sec. 29, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; rents of J. Nord; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

JOHNSON C. J. Cambridge; laborer; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

JOHNSON DAVID, Sec. 18, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Dem; Cong; born Ireland; ill acres. 

JOHNSON GUSTAV A. Farmer, Sec. 36, P.O. Bishop Hill; born Sweden, Oct. 2, 1818; 
Ind; Lib; owns 160 acres of land, valued at $8,000; lived in Sweden thirty years; came to 
this country in 1848; came to Knox Co. 111. same year; lived in Minnesota nine years, and 
has lived in this town and county fourteen years; married Anna Nelson, in Aug. 1850; she 
was born in Sweden, Dec. 28, 1826; they have seven children, four sons and three daughters; 
lost three daughters. 

JOHNSON JAMES, Cambridge; harness-maker; Rep; Cong; born Denmark. 

JOHNSON JAMES, Sec. 36, P.O. Ulah; farmer; Rep; Meth; born Ohio; 160 acres. 

JOHNSON JAMES, Sec. 8, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; lives with father; Dem; Cong; 30 acres. 

JOHNSON JAS. P. Cambridge; harness-maker; Rep; Luth; born Denmark. 

JOHNSON J. P. Sec. 11. P.O. Cambridge; farmer; rents Linber's farm; Rep^; Luth; Sweden. 

JOHNSON OLOF, Sec 34, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Ind; Meth; born Sweden; 120 acres. 

JOHNSON PETER, Cambridge; laborer; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

JOHNSON S. Sec. 27, P.O. Ulah; farmer; Rep; Luth; born Sweden; 38 acres. 



296 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

JULIAN ALEXANDER, Sec. 35, P.O. Ulah; lives with father; Rep; Meth; born Ohio. 

JULIAN BENJ. Sec. 35, P.O. Ulah; farmer; Rep; Meth; born Ohio; 155 acres. 

JULIAN CYRUS A. Sec. 27, P.O. Ulah; farmer; Rep; Luth; born Ohio. 

JULIAN HENRY, Sec. 22, P.O. Ulah; farmer; Rep; Bapt; born Ohio. 

JULIAN ROBT. Sec. 36, P.O. Ulah; farmer; rents Bason's farm; Dem; Lib; born Ohio. 

rULIAN S.. P.O. Ulah; farmer; rents of Decker; Rep; Bapt; born Ohio. 

ly'ANE T. Sec. 17, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Dem; Cath; born Ireland; 140 acres. 
KEAGY J AS. Cambridge; merchant; Dem; Christian; born Pa. 

KEEP FRANK, Sec. 5, P.O. Cambridge; laborer; Rep; Meth; born Pa. 

KEESLER J. W. Cambridge; carpenter; Dem; Lib; born N.J. 

KEESLEB PETEK MUNSON, Carpenter; Cambridge; born in Passaic Co. New 
Jersey, April 28, 1838; lived in New Jersey about twenty-two years; came to this State, 
Henry Co. l86g, and has been engaged in business here seven years; was in the army, 42d 
Regt. 111. Infantry; was in number of battles. Stone River, Atlanta, and to Nashville; he 
married Miss Mary Elizabeth Story, Aug. 28, 1866; she was from Passaic Co. New Jersey, 
March 22, 1849; they have five children, four sons and one daughter; Rep; Lib. 

KERNS JACOB, Sec. 4, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Dem; Lib; born Pa; 94 acres. 

KING F. L. Cambridge; Dem; Meth; born Mass. 

KINSEY J. C. Cambridge; druggist; Dem; Lib; born Ohio. 

KIRKPATRICK JOS. Cambridge; shoemaker; Rep; Lib; born Pa. 

KLINE F. S. Cambridge; tinner; Rep; Meth; born Pa. 

KURTZ THOS. Cambridge; laborer; Dem; Lib; born Pa. 

T AGERLEF FRANK, Cambridge; harness-maker; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

^ LARSON FRED, Sec. 6, P.O. Cambridge; laborer for Ripley; Dem; Meth; born Sweden. 

LAFFEKTX AJfDKEW B. Livery Stable, Cambridge; born in Armstrong Co. Pa. 
March 29, 1840; Rep; Cong; he lived in Pennsylvania about sixteen years, and removed to 
this State in Spring, 1856; came to Rock Island; came to Henry Co. same year, and has 
lived in this county over twenty years; was in the army, 112th Regt. 111. Infantry, with Gen. 
Sherman; was wounded at battle Knoxville; was in seventeen severe battles, the last one 
being battle Franklin; he married Miss Amanda M. Lafferty, Dec. 27, 1866; she was from 
Pennsylvania; they have three children, two daughters and one son; have lost one son, Ber- 
tie, died Jan. 11, 1877. 

LARSON LEWIS, Sec. 23, P.O. Ulah; farmer; Rep; Meth; born Sweden; 203 acres. 

L/ABSOIV NEIiSE, Farmer, Sec. 9, P.O. Cambridge; born in Sweden, Feb. 14, 1839; Rep; 
Luth; owns 80 acres of land, valued at $3,500; he lived in Sweden about thirty-two years, 
and came to this country in 1871; came to State of Illinois same year, to Princeton; came 
to Kevvanee, Henry Co. and has also lived in Kansas and Missouri one year; married Annie 
C. Choneng, March 18, 1875; she was born in Sweden, and came to this country in 1871. 

LARSON PETER, Cambridge; laborer; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

LAY GEO. D. Cambridge; law student; Dem; Lib; born Mich. 

LINBERG JOHN, Cambridge; clerk: Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

LIND CHAS. E. Cambridge; clerk; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

EIND CHABLES E. Billiard Room, Cambridge; born in Sweden, Jan. 3, 1851; Rep; 
Luth; value property $1,500; he came to this country in 1652; came to State Illinois, Henry 
Co. same year, and has lived here twenty-five years; has been engaged in business with A. 
M. Nord, Billiard Room, for past three years; he has one sister here, and two sisters and 
one brother in Iroquois Co. 111. 

LOHR J. W. Sec. 10, P.O. Cambridge; school teacher; Ind; Lib; born Ohio. 

LONGSHORE JULIA A. Mrs. Cambridge; Lib; born Harrison Co. Ky; 200 ac. $10,000. 

LONGSHORE THOMAS A., P.O. Cambridge; Rep; Lib; born Indiana. 

LOWRY R. F. Cambridge; physician; Rep; Lib; born Erie, Pa. 

LUNDQUIST AXEE. A. Druggist, Cambridge; born in Sweden April 20, 1850; Rep; 
Swedenborgian; value property $2,000; he lived in Sweden sixteen years, and came to this 
country in 1866; came to Knox Co. this state, in 1867; lived there one year, then traveled 
for several years all over this country; came to this county in 1871, and has engaged in Drug 
business here, firm Wolyn & Lundquist, doing large business. His mother resides with him. 



HENRY COUNTY : CAMBRroGB TOWNSHIP. 297 

LUNDEEN M. Sec. 33, P.O. Ulah, farmer; Meth; born Sweden; 80 acres land. 
LUNDEEN SWAN, lives with father, Sec. 33, P.O. Ulah; Ind; Meth; born Sweden; 20 acres 
LYMAN M. J. Cambridge; physician; Rep; Cong; born Troy, N.Y. 

"]\ /TcADOO DANIEL, Sec. 23, P.O. Ulah; laborer; Rep; Cong; born Pa. 
^^^ McELHANEY WILLIAM, Cambridge; retired; Rep; Lib; born Ohio. 

McCAHOlV ROBERT, Farmer, Sec. 8, P.O. Cambridge; born Ireland Aug. 18, 1839, 
Dem; Pres; 240 acres, value property $18,000; came to this country in 1849; lived in Pa. 
four or five years; came to this state about 1854; came to this county in 1857, and has lived 
here nineteen years; has held office School Director and Roadmaster; married Miss Mary 
Wilkey Feb. 17, 1862; she was born in Ireland in March, 1838; they have three children, 
two boys and one girl; lost one daughter. 

McFADDEN M. Cambridge; merchant; Dem; Cath; born Ireland. 

McFARLAND JOHN, Cambridge; retired; Dem; Church Christ; born Pa. 

McFARLAXD ROBERT, Retired Farmer, Cambridge; born in Lancaster Co. Pa. 
March 25, 1809; Dem; Bapt; value prop. $20,000. He lived in State Pa. about twenty 
years; learned his trade of clothing and carding; removed to Ohio in 1829, and lived there 
about twenty-five years; came to Plenry Co. 111. in June, 1857, and has resided here about 
twenty years; married Miss Susannah Kinsey March 18, 1830; she was born in Chester Co. 
Pa. April 22, 1809; she died Aug. i, 1874; they had nine children, six sons, three daughters; 
lost three sons and two daughters. 

McG-RATH GEO. W. Farmer, Sec. 9, P.O. Cambridge; born six miles south Glasgow, 
Scotland, June 6, 1S12; Ind; Lib; value of property $1000; came to this country at an early 
age; lived in Maine and Ohio twenty years; came to Henry County, this state, Oct, 3, 1837; 
lived here over twenty-nine years; he could name and locate every resident in Henry Co. for 
a long time; he has helped 107 persons since he came here; has held office of School Director; 
was in the Mexican War, in gth Ohio Reg., and was wounded; was in 33d Reg. LV.I., was 
wounded at Big River Bridge and Pilot Knob; was honorably discharged; married Laura J. 
Cady, May 19, 1847, she was born in New York State, July 9, 1S26; have six children. 

McHUGH JAMES, Sec. 17, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Dem; Cath; born Ireland; 160 ac. land. 

MclSTAY SAMUEL, H. Farmer, Sec. 19, P.O. Cambridge; born Green Co. Pa. May 30, 
1822; Dem; Free Thinker; owns 240 acres land, value $24,000; lived in State Pa. about 
thirty-two years; removed to this state, Henry Co. in 1854; has lived here about twenty- 
three years, one of early settlers; served seven years in military; was appointed Aug. 3, 1842, 
Capt. in 184th Reg. of Militia of Pa., 2d Brigade, 14th Div., served three years; was elected 
and commissioned Major 1st Battallion, 6th Reg., 2d Brigade, July 4, 1846, and served four 
years; married Hester Johnson Dec. 26, 1843; she died Dec. 28, 1855; second wife was Mrs. 
Sarah Lewis; third wife was Matilda Lawrence; married Miss Mary Seeley, of Peoria Co. 
Aug. 8, 1875; she was born March 30, 1853; have had ten children, the youngest is Samuel 
Albertis McNay; lost four children. 

McNAY S. P. lives with father, Sec. 19, P.O. Cambridge; Dem; Lib; born 111. 

McPARTLIN HUGH, Cambridge; works on R.R; Dem; Cath; born Rock Island. 

McPARLIN JAMES, Cambridge; laborer; Dem; Cath; born Ireland. 

MALCOLM CHARLES, Sec. 16, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Free Relig; born 111; 170 ac. 

MALLOY JOHN, Cambridge; Meth; born Pa. 

MALLORY L. Sec. 24, P.O. Ulah; farmer; Dem; Meth; born Wis; 61 acres land. 

MARSTON D. B. Cambridge; carpenter; Dem; Lib. born Maine. 

MARSTOIV IRA D. Attorney, Cambridge; born in York Co. Maine, April 30, 1838; he 
lived in State Maine seventeen years; moved to this state, in Henry Co. in 1855, and has 
lived here twenty-one years. He associated himself with Judge Hinman in 1870, and has 
practiced his profession here for past six years; was in the army in 42d 111. Reg. Western 
Army; was in number of battles; was disabled in front Corinth, and honorably discharged; 
Rep; Lib; value property $2,500. He married Miss C. L. Weir May 14, 1861; she was born 
in this county and state Nov. l, 1841; they have four children, two sons and two daughters. 

MARTIN SAMUEL., Farmer, Sec. 16, P.O. Cambridge; born Canada Feb. 22, 1831; Rep; 
Meth; owns 40 acres land, value $2,000; came to this country at an early age; came to this 
state 1836, lived in Peoria Co. twenty-five years; came to this county 1858; has lived here 
sixteen years; married Mrs. Isabella Martin July 16, 1871; she was from Mich; they have 
four children, three sons, one daughter. 

MARTIN F. M. Cambridge; jeweler; Dem; Free Thinker; born Ky. 



5jy» VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OP 

MARTIN D. Prof. Proprietor Central Hotel, Cambridge; born in Canada Sept. 15, 1830; 
came to this country at an early age; came to city Peoria, this state, and lived there eighteen 
years. He traveled as Magician and Ventriloquist in California, Oregon, Nevada, Mexico, 
Sandv>rich Islands, and British Columbia, for over eighteen years. He held office in Califor- 
nia and Nevada; was appointed County Commissioner by Gov. Nye, of Nevada; was Express 
Agt. for three years; was Secy, and President of the Florredian Gold and Silver Mining Co., 
also Tax Collector and Federal Auctioneer. He is now Proprietor and Manager of Central 
Hotel, also of farm 200 acres Ij4 miles east of Cambridge; Rep; Lib; value prop. $23,000; 
married Miss Clara Bixler, of Sandusky, Ohio, in Nannomi, British Columbia, April 8, 1867; 
they have two children, one son and one daughter. 

MASCALL J. P. Sec. 11, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Dem; Lib; born 111. 

MASCALiL JAMES, Stock Dealer, Cambridge; born in East Kent, England, Jan. 29, 
1814; he came to this country in 1831; lived in Pennsylvania about eight years; came to this 
state, in Henry Co. in 1839, and is one of the oldest settlers; there was only one cabin in 
distance of thirty miles on the State Road that time. He used to cart grain to Chicago, 
taking ten and twelve days for the trip, and get forty cents to fifty cents per bushel for wheat. 
It took him thirty days to drive his hogs to Chicago and return, and the price would range 
from $1 per hog to $1.25 to $3 per hundred pounds, and take it mostly in store pay; there 
were no houses here that time. He was merchant here in this town twelve to fifteen years. 
Has held office School Director, and holds office Town Trustee; married Miss Mary A. Lilly 
April 4, 1848; she was from Florence, Oneida Co. N.Y; they have had seven children, two 
sons, five daughters; lost two danghters; Rep; Lib; value of properly $25,000. 

MASCALL, JOHN K. Farmer, Sec. 12; P.O. Cambridge; born in Cambridge, Henry Co. 
July 16, 1851; Ind; Lib; value property $1,000; has lived in this town and county for 25 
years; one of the early native-born settlers of this town; married Miss Hattie Strohecker, 
Nov. 12, 1873; she was from state of Pa. and born July 13, 1856; has one child, a daughter, 
Clara Blanche, born July 17, 1875. 

MASCALL RICHARD, Retired, Cambridge; born in East Kent, England, Feb. I, 1812; 
Dem; Lib; value prop. $25,000; came to this country in 1829; settled in Pa.; was married 
June 14, 1832, to Abigail Elston, from Bradford Co., Pa., born June 21, 1S14; they came to 
Stark Co., Illinois, in Spring of 1837; came to Henry Co. in 1840, and has lived here over 
36 years; he hauled the first pole brought into Cambridge; has carted his wheat to Chicago; 
has carted his wheat to Peoria, and has gone to seven places before he could get 50 cents on 
his load of wheat to pay for his lodging; sold his wheat for 25 cents a bushel in trade; has 
sold his hogs at $1.00 each, large and small; his wife died April 8, 1872; he married Miss 
Mary Jane Heaps Aug. 18, 1874, in Annawan Township; she was born in Adams Co. this 
state. May 28, 1846; has three children, two daughters and one son; has lost five children. 

MATHEWS A. E. Mrs. Cambridge; widow; Christian; born in Pa; property, $1,500. 

MATSON F. E. Farmer, Sec. 5; P.O. Cambridge; born in Phenix Township, Henry Co. 
111. Feb. 7, 1850; Rep; Meth; owns 80 acres land, value $4,800; has lived in this county 27 
years; one of the early native settlers; lived in Phenix Township 24 years; came to this town 
in 1873; taught school four years in this county; married Miss Malissa F. Morse Nov. 13, 
1872; she was born in Ashtabula Co. Ohio, Nov. 21, 1850; she taught school five years in this 
county; has one daughter, Lizella Alzina, born June 29, 1876. 

MATTISON L. F., P.O. Bishop Hill; farmer; Rep; Bapt; born Sweden; 80 acres land. 

MEDBURRY H. Cambridge; grocer; Rep; Cong, pref; born N.Y. 

MERRICK S WILLIAM, Sec. 23; P.O. Ulah; laborer; Rep; Bapt; born Pa. 

MIDDAUGH DANIEL, Cambridge; Rep; Bapt; born on Delaware River. 

MIDDAUGH JAMES P. Cambridge; mason; Rep; Lib; born Pa. 

MILLAG-E JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 25; P.O. Ulah; born in Vermillion Co. 111. July 28, 1825; 
Rep; Lib; owns 80 acres land, value $4,000; lived in Crawford, Putnam, and Peoria Coun- 
ties a number of years, and came to this town and county in 1854; has lived here 23 years 
and has lived in this state 51 years; one of the oldest native-born settlers in the state; has 
held offices of School Director and Roadmaster; married Miss Mary Bason, of Pa. in 1849; 
she died in 1861; six children; married Miss Elizabeth Bason in 1862; she was born in Pa; 
five children, lost six. 

MILLS JAMES M. Farmer, Cambridge; born in Erie Co. Pa. Feb. 23, 1840; Dem; Lib; 
lived in Pa. five years; moved to Ohio and lived there eight years; came to this state in July> 
1853, and has lived in the state 23 years; he was in the army, was Sergeant of Co. H, I2th 
Reg. Ills. Infantry, western army, with Sherman; was in battle of Ft. Donelson, Shiloh, 
Corinth, and Bentonville; married Miss Susan D. Rickards April 25, 1865; she was born in 
Iowa, Nov. 17, 1846; has five children, three girls and two boys. 

MILLER C. Cambridge; butter and eggs; Rep; Lib; bom N.Y. 

MILLER H. B. Cambridge; Rep; Lib; born N.Y. 



HENRY COUNTY: CAMBRIDGE TOWNSHIP. 299 

MINTON J. H. Cambridge; carriage maker; Rep; Christian; born Illinois. 

MITCHELL D. B. Cambridge; horseman; Rep; Universalist; born N.Y. 

MOCK ANTHONY K. Attorney, Cambridge; born in Randolph Co. Indiana, June 5, 
1836; he lived in Indiana nineteen years, and then came to this state, in Henry Co. in 1855, 
and has lived here nineteen years; he was in the army, enlisted as private, and won his pro- 
motion to Lt. Col. gth Ills. Cavalry, western army; he held the office of District Attorney 
for Rock Island and Henry Counties from 1868 to 1872; he has held position of Chairman 
of Henry Co. Republican Committee for the past six years; he married Miss Mary Jane Ves- 
tal Dec. 7, 1865; she was from Logansport, Indiana, born Feb. 10, 1839; has three children, 
two sons and one daughter; Rep; Lib. 

MODEN JOHN, Sec. 27; P.O. Ulah; farmer; Rep; Meth; born Sweden; 77 acres land. 

MOLLENHOFF J. P. Cambridge; clerk; Rep; Luth; born Illinois. 

MOKEY GEO. M. Kev. Pastor M.E. Church, Cambridge; born in Huron Co. Ohio. 
July 25, 1835; Rep; Meth; lived in Ohio two years, and removed to Fulton Co. Illinois and 
lived there about 21 years; he entered the ministry of the Meth. Church in the Fall of 1858, 
at Bloomington, 111., and has been engaged in the work for nineteen years without losing a 
single Sabbath; married Miss Louise E. Wright Sept. i, 1858; she was born in Ohio in 1837, 
has five children, three daughters and two sons, and has lost four children. 

MORKIS CHAS. A. Farmer, Sec. 21; P.O. Ulah; born in Allegany Co. N. Y. Feb. 28, 
i82g; Rep; Meth; owns 193 acres land, value $11,580; he was brought up in Livingston Co. 
and lived in N.Y, state 34 years; removed to this state in 1863; lived two years in DuPage 
Co; came to this county in 1S65; has lived here twelve years; has held office of Road Com- 
missioner and Township Trustee; has taught school winters for 25 years, except one or two 
winters; married Miss Edna A. Warner March 26, 1863; she was born in Wayne Co. N.Y. 
Dec. 26, 1837; has one child, a daughter, Helen C. Morris, born May 24, 1868. 

MORRISON A. M. Sec. 33; P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Rep; United Breth; born 111. 

MORRISON L. Sec. 19; P.O. Cambridge; works for Stratton; Rep; Meth. pref; born Pa. 

MORSE A., P.O. Cambridge; teacher; Rep; Meth; born Illinois. 

MORSE E. H. Farmer, Sec. 6, Cambridge; born in Trumbull Co. Ohio, July 28, 1826; 
Rep; Meth; value of property $8,700; he lived in state of Ohio about 27 years, and came 
to this state, Henry Co. in March, 1854, and has lived here about 23 years; one of earliest 
settlers; walked from Cambridge to Rock Island; only three houses on road at that time; has 
been Roadmaster; was member of building committee first Meth. Church built in Cam- 
bridge; married Miss Margaret Reed Jan. 22, 1850; she was born March 23, 1826; has had 
five children, three sons and two daughters; has lost one son. 

MORSE J. H. Farmer, Sec. 5; P.O. Cambridge; born in Ohio, Trumbull Co. March 3, 
1853; Rep; Meth; owns 80 acres land, value $4,000; lived in state of Ohio two years, and 
came to state of Illinois, town of Cambridge, Henry Co. in 1855, and has lived in this Co. 
22 years; his father and mother are among the early settlers, and are now living in this town. 

MORSE S. B. Dr. Cambridge; physician; Dem; Meth; born Ohio. 

MUNSON N. Sec. 15; P.O.Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Luth; born Sweden; 100 acres land. 

MYJLCHREEST WM. Farmer, Sec 29; P.O.Cambridge; born Isle of Man Feb. 18, 1847; 
Rep; Lib; owns 80 acres land, value $4,000; he came to this country in 1865; came to War- 
ren Co. 111. same year; lived there five years; came to Henry Co in 1870, and has lived here 
since; married Miss Rebecca L. Foster Feb. 15, 1873; she was born and brought up in Knox 
Co. 111. 

"VT ELSON A. farmer, rents of Grippen; Rep; Meth. 

■'•^ NELSON JAMES, Sec. 19, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Dem; Cong; born Pa.; 128 acres. 

NELSON JOHN, Cambridge; laborer; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

NELSON LEWIS, Cambridge; works on railroad; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

NELSON ROBERT, Sec. 18, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Dem; Cong; born Ireland; 200 acres. 

NELSSON CARL, Cambridge; photographer; Dem; Luth; born Sweden. 

NEWTON JOHN, Cambridge; laborer; Rep; Meth; born England. 

NICHOLS J. B. Cambridge; stock dealer; Ind; Lib; born Ma'ss. 

NICHOLS J. W. Cambridge; clerk Central Hotel; Rep; Lib; born New Jersey. 

NILSON EDWARD F. Cambridge; clothing clerk; Rep; Univ; born Baltic Sea. 

NORD J. Sec. 29, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Luth; born Sweden; 160 acres. 

NORD WILLIAM, Cambridge; shoemaker; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

NORDINE O., P.O. Ulah; farmer, rents of J. E. Stoneberg; born Sweden. 



300 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OP 

NORSTEDT O. B. Sec. 25, P.O. Bishop Hill; farmer; Dem; 2d Adventist; born Sweden. 
NYE A. M. Mrs. widow; Cambridge; Cong; born Mass; val. property $600. 

/^LESON J. P. Sec. 31; farmer, rents of J. Becker; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

^^ OLIVER J. H. Cambridge; laborer; Rep; Lib; born Ohio. 

OLIVER JAMES H. Cambridge; works for Mr. Lafferty; Rep; Meth. 

OLMSTED A. Mrs. Cambridge; Cong; born N. Y. 

OLSEN GUS. Sec. 28, P.O. Ulah; laborer; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

OWENS THOMAS J. Sec. 34, P.O. Ulah; farmer, rents of S. B. Arnold; Rep; Lib; born N.Y. 

"pALMER E. Mrs. Cambridge; millinery; Bapt; born New York; val. property $2,500. 

^ PALMER JAMES H. Cambridge; studying law with Mock & Hand; Dem; Lib. 

PAGE OKKI^N" E. Attorney, Cambridge; born in North Madison, New Haven County- 
Conn. Dec. 19, 1817; he lived in Conn, about thirteen years; he moved to Portage Co. Ohio, 
in 1830, and lived there nineteen years; lived in Michigan, also in California for three years; 
came to this state in 1856, and to Henry County in 1859, and has lived here since; Rep; Lib; 
he has held office Clerk this Township ten years; was Police Magistrate twelve years; 
has held the office of Supervisor one term; was Director of Peoria & R. I. R. R. nine 
years, and Vice-President same R.R. Co. two years; he has traveled on foot the whole 
length of that R.R. from Peoria to Rock Island, more than once, in securing location anr' 
estaljlishing the road, which he succeeded in doing; married Miss Mary A. Dean, May 15, 
1855; she was from Mt. Morris, Livingston Co. N.Y.; they have two children — daughters. 

PARKS M. H. Mrs. widow; Cambridge; Cong; born Ohio; val. prop. $1,500. 

PATTEIS" L,EWIS H. Clerk Circuit Court, Cambridge; born town of Meredith, New 
Hampshire, Aug. 16, 1834; Rep; Lib; value property $2,500; he lived in State of New 
Hampshire about twenty-two years, and came to Toulon, this state, in 1856, and to this Co. in 
1857, and has resided here nineteen years; he published the Henry County Chronicle here 
for five years; he holds office Clerk Circuit Court, Henry County, appointed in 1871, elected 
in 1872, and re-elected in 1876. 

PATTERSON S. Sec. 21, P.O. Cambridge; laborer; Dem; Pres; born Ireland. 

PIERCE D, M.Cambridge; restaurant; Dem; Meth. pref; born N.Y. 

PERKINS L. B. Sec. 8, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Lib; born N. Y. 200 acres. 

PERKINS S. W. Farmer, Sec, 8, P.O. Cambridge; born Orleans County. N. Y. May 27, 
1824; Rep; Lib; owns 104 acres land, value $6,240; lived in New York State twenty-five 
years; went to Falls Church, Fairfax County, Virginia, lived there twelve years, and being a 
Union man was obliged to leave during the Rebellion; came to Geneseo, Henry County, Ills, 
and lived there eleven years; lived four years in Bureau Co.; returned and has lived two 
years in this town; was elected Justice of Peace in Bureau Co.; married Miss Mary Jane 
Smith, Jan. 17, 1850; she was born in Monroe County, New York, Jan. 13, 1826; they have 
six children, two sons and four daughters. 

PETERSON ANDREW J. farmer; Rep; born Sweden; 80 acres. 

PETERSON CARL A.Cambridge; clerk for Ayers & Weir; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

PETERSON JOHN, Sec. 26, P.O. Ulah; farmer; Rep; Luth; born Sweden; 38 acres. 

PETERSON JOSEPH, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Meth; born Sweden. 

PETTEYS ROBERT L. Farmer, Sec. 26, P.O. Bishop Hill; born Montgomery County, 
N. Y, May 23, 1807; Dem; Lib; owns 160 acres land, value $9,600; lived in New York State 
about forty-four years, and removed to Illinois June 2, 1851; lived in Kane County three 
years; came to this county in 1854, and has lived here twenty-two years; only two houses in 
sight when he came; has held office of School Director for sixteen years; married Miss 
Emily Ladd, March 4, 1835; she was born in Montgomery County, N.Y. June 27, 1815; 
have seven children, four daughters and three sons; lost four children. 

PETTEYS S. P. Cambridge; constable; Dem; Lib; born New York. 

PETTEYS GEORGE, Cambridge; Rep; Lib; born Ohio. 

PETTEYS GEORGE H. lives with father; Dem; Lib; born 111. 

PETTEYS H. J. lives with father; Dem; Lib; born New York. 

PHILLIPS GrEO. B. Farmer, Sec. 18; P.O. Cambridge; born Tioga Co. N. Y. Jan. 12, 
1823; Rep; Cong; owns 140 acres land, value $14,000; he lived in State N.Y. about twenty- 
eight years; lived in Virginia about five years, and removed to Henry Co. 111. in 1856, and 
has lived here over twenty years; has held office Town Trustee; has taught school N.Y. and 
Virginia, and taught school and music in this county; married Miss Sarah C. Benedict, May 
12, 1851; she was born Cayuga Co. N.Y. Feb. 15, 1830; they have eight children, two sons 
and six daughters, 



HENRY COUNTY: CAMBRIDGE TOWNSHIP. SOl 

PHELPS CHARLES, Cambridge; clerk for Medbury; Rep; Bapt. 

PIERCE J. P. Cambridge; restaurant; Rep; Lib; born Tennessee. 

PIERCE RICHARD, Cambridge; laborer; Rep; Lib; born England. 

1*IEKCE SIIiAS, Carpenter, Cambridge; born in Davenport, Delaware Co. N.Y. Sept. 2I» 
1812; Dem; Bapt; value property $5,000; lived in New York State about forty-one years; re- 
moved to this state, Cambridge, Henry Co. in May 1853, and has lived here about twenty- 
four years; one of the early settlers; has held office Town Trustee; he married Miss Linda 
Gaines, Sept. i, 1832; she was born in Conn. Aug, 15, 1813; they have three children, one 
son and two daughters; lost three daughters. 

PIHLSTROM N. Cambridge; carpenter; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

PRATT EL.IHU A. Farmer, Sec. 20; P.O. Cambridge; born Vinton Co. Ohio, June 25, 
1841; Rep; U. Brethren; owns 320 acres land, value $19,200; he lived in State of Ohio 
about fourteen years; came to Knox Co. this state in 1855; lived there six years; was in 
army — Co. A, jgth Reg. 111. Infantry; was in battles Pea Ridge, Chickamauga, and number of 
others; was honorably discharged; came to this county in 1875; married Miss Lucinda A. 
Maxey; Feb. i, 1866; she was born in Knox Co. 111. May 25, 1840; they have four children, 
three sons, one daughter. 



Q 



UIRK THOMAS, Sec. 29; P.O. Ulah; farmer, rents of S. B. Arnold; Ind; Meth; Isle of Man. 



"D ANDALL S. B. Cambridge; express agent; Rep; Epis; born Vermont. 

-•-^ REED G. M. Cambridge; carpenter; Dem; Meth. pref; born Ohio. 

KAYMOXD K. C Physician, Cambridge; born in Chenango Co. N. Y. Jan. 24, 1825; 
Rep; Universalist; value property $5,000; he removed to Pa. at an early age, and lived there 
twenty-four years; came to this state and county in 1853, and has lived here twenty-four 
years; one of the early settlers; he took academic course at Westfield, N. Y., and read 
Medicine under Dr. Spencer of the same place, and graduated at the Eclectic Medical Col- 
lege of Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1849; came to 111. in 1853; had charge of Public Schools at 
Cambridge for four years; was elected to office Superintendent Public Schools of Henry Co. 
in 1855; married Miss Catharine Austin, of Pa. April 4, 1850, she died Sept. 16, 1857; mar- 
ried Miss Lizzie Dunbar, of Ky. July 9, 1862; she died June 27, 1869; has two children, 
daughters, Lena K. Raymond and Lizzie D. 

REINBERG PETER, Cambridge; carpenter; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

REPLEY A. Sec. 6; P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Dem; Meth; born Ohio; 106 acres land. 

RICHARDSON E. D. Cambridge; postmaster; bookkpr. Henry Co. bank; Rep; Bapt; born Vt. 

RIDEOUT CHARLES E. P.O. Ulah; merchant; Rep; Meth; born Maine. 

RIDEOUT WILLIAM, P.O. Ulah; merchant; Rep; Meth; born Maine. 

RIKER WILLIAM, Cambridge; carpenter; Rep; Meth; born New Jersey. 

RISHEL J. Cambridge; hardware; Rep; Meth; born Pa. 

KISHELi P. S. Attorney, Cambridge; Rep; Lib; removed to Cambridge, 111. June, 1866, 
from Bloomsburg, Pa. where he resided for a number of years; was admitted as an Attorney 
in 1862; was married to Miss Nellie L. Thomas, March 18, 1863; she was a resident of 
Bloomsburg, Pa; have one child, Maggie L. Rishel; has practiced his profession since 1862; 
was a soldier in the late war, under Col. Brisban; at present holds office of Police Magis- 
trate of the town of Cambridge, and now is practicing his profession as an Attorney at Cam- 
bridge, 111. 

ROBBIIVS JACOB B. Farmer, Sec. 27; P.O. Ulah; born Monmouth Co. N. J. Nov. 25, 
1832; Rep; Lib; owns 40 acres land, val. $2,000; lived in New Jersey about twenty-four 
years, and came to this state in 1856; was in army three years — Co. K, 78th Reg. 111. In- 
fantry; was in battle Chickamauga, Mission Ridge, Lookout Mountain, with Sherman to the 
sea; was honorably discharged; came to this county inl87i; holds office School Director and 
Pathmaster; married Adeline E. Foster, Jan. I, 1868; she was born in Ohio, April 26, 1835; 
they have four children, two boys and two girls. 

ROBERTS E. S. Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Infidel; born Maine. 

ROBINSON BRAYTON, Farmer, Sec. 4; P.O. Cambridge; born in Camden, Oneida 
Co. N. Y. June 13, 1826; Rep; Lib; owns 60 acres land, $2,500; he lived in State New 
York about thirty-eight years, and came to Henry Co., State of Illinois, in 1864, and has 
resided here since; he married Miss Ellen Finch, April 17, 1849; she was born in England, 
in 1832; she came to this country in 1838; they have two children, one son, B. Sylvester, 
Jan. 4, 1853; one daughter, Harriet E., May 24, 1856. 

ROCKWELL S. Cambridge; blacksmith; Rep; Meth; born Indiana. 



302 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

ROGERS J. W. See. 26; P.O. Ulah; lives with father; Rep; Free Thinker; born Ohio. 

ROGERS JACOB. Sec. 23; P.O. Ulah; farmer; Rep; Frewill Bapt; born 111. 

KOGEKS JACOB G-. Farmer, Sec. 26, P.O. Ulah; born Tuscarawas Co. Ohio, July i, 
1831; Rep; Freewill Bapt; value of property $1,000; lived in Ohio 25 years, then removed 
to this Co. and state in 1856, and has lived here 20 years; has held office of Township 
Assessor and Pathmaster; he married Harriet S. Davidson, Sep. 10, 1850; she was born in 
Harrison Co. Ohio, Sept. 30, 1S32; they have eleven children, seven sons and four daugh- 
ters. 

ROGERS JOSEPH, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Bapt. pref; born Ohio. 

ROGERS T. B. Sec. 26, P.O. Ulah; lives with father; Rep; Lib; born Ohio. 

ROOT A. M. Cambridge; grain and milling business; Ind; Lib; born N.Y. 

ROSENQUIST CARL, Cambridge; works on railroad; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

ROWE A. N. Sec. 21, P.O. Ulah; laborer; Rep; Lib; born 111. 

KUNDSTKtJM J. C Furniture Dealer, Cambridge; born in Sweden, Nov. 4, 1841; he 
lived in Sweden 24 years, and came to this country in 1865; came to State of HI. same year, 
and lived in Galesburg nine years; came to Cambridge, Henry Co. in 1876, and is engaged 
in the manufacture and selling of furniture; Rep; Bapt; value of property $3,000; he married 
Miss G. Lenburg, May 5, 1865; she died May 16, 1868; married Miss Emily G. Anderson, 
of Galesburg, Oct. 8, 1870; have three children, two boys and one girl. 

RUXTON A. H. Sec. 4, P.O. Geneseo; farmer for John Walker; Rep; Pres; born Scotland. 

CANBURN W. G. Cambridge; harness-maker; Dem; Lib; born 111. 

"^ SAND FRANK A. Cambridge: tailor; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

SADLER ROBERT H. Carpenter and Builder, Cambridge; born in Indiana Co. Penn. 
Dec. 22, 1833; Rep; Meth; value of property $1,800; he lived in Penn. about 21 years, and 
came to this state, in Henry Co. in 1855, and has lived here 21 years; one of early settlers; he 
was in the army in the 19th Reg. 111. Infantry under Col. J. B. Turchin; was discharged on 
account of disability; has been engaged in carpenter and building business here for the past 
eight years; he married Miss Maggie Fronk, Aug. 31, 1871; she was born in Juniata county, 
Penn. Sept. 14, 1848; has three children. 

STACKHOUSE J. P. Cambridge; restaurant; Rep; Lib; born Pa. 

STONEY HENRY, Cambridge; carpet-weaver; Rep; Meth; born N.J. 

SCHMIDT JOS. Cambridge; billiard-room; Dem; Lib; born Germany. 

SCHMIDT JOSEPH, Billiard Room, Cambridge; born in Wurtemberg, Germany, Nov. 
28, 1843; Dem; Lib; value of property $2,000; he lived in Germany about 15 years, and 
came to this country in 1858; came to Geneseo, in this county, same year, and has lived here 
over 18 years; he lived in Geneseo a number of years, and has been in business here two and 
a half years; he married Miss Jennie Ramler in Nov. 1869, she was born in this county. 

SCHMIDT WM. Cambridge; saloon-keeper; Dem; Luth; born Germany. 

SCHUMACHER J. H. Farmer, Sec. 28; P.O. Ulah; born Germany, Aug. 23, 1820; Ind; 
Luth; owns 200 acres land, value $12,000; lived in Germany nineteen years; sailed on the 
ocean; went to Australia; crossed the ocean to this country five times; served in Grand-duke's 
army of Oldenburg, Germany, and came to this country in 1846; came to this state same year; 
came to this county in 1851, one of the early settlers; holds office of School Director and 
Pathmaster; married Anna Carrie Grammer, June 6, 1848; she was born in kingdom of Han- 
over, Jan. I, 1826; have five children; lost four. 

SCOVILLE L. Sec. 31, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Meth. pref; born Conn; 80 acres land. 

SCOTT J. W. Farmer, Sec. 30, P.O. Cambridge; born Geauga Co. Ohio, Oct. 27, 1825; 
Rep; Pres; owns 108 acres of land, value $6,480; lived in Ohio about 27 years; removed to 
111. in 1852; was engaged in steamboating on the Mississippi river and tributaries from 1S52 
to 1866 as mate and captain; was in government service four years, was in naval service; was 
captain of Government Transport; was with Gen. Banks' expedition up Red River, and with 
Gen. Sherman behind Vicksburg, and at battle of Pittsburg Landing; returned to this Co. 
in 1866; has held office of Township Assessor two terms; married Mrs. Margaret Dill, for- 
merly Margaret Martin, of Tennessee, in Oct. 1864; she had two children. 

SCOTT ROBERT J. Farmer, Sec. 19, P.O. Cambridge; born Rappahannock Co. Va. Aug. 
14, 1847; Dem; Meth; owns 78 acres, value $3,120; lived in Virginia eight years, and came 
to this state, Henry Co. in 1855, and has lived here about 22 years, except short time in Iowa 
and Missouri; married Miss Olivia Danger, July 13, 187I; she was from Richland Co. Ohio, 
born Jan. 25, 1854; she came to this state in 1859; lived in Fulton Co; went to Ohio, and 
returned here in 1871. 




Judge JULIUS S. HINMAN, 
County Judge, Cambridge. 



HENRY COUNTY: CAMBRIDGE TOWNSHIP. 305 

SCOTT WM. Sec. 13, P.O. Cambridge; farmer, renter of J. Mascall; Dem; Lib; born Va. 

SEATON BEXJAMIN W. Publisher Pra/; ?V Chief, Cambridge; born in England, Jan. 
13, 1825, and came to this country in 1830; settled in tjtica, N. Y., and lived there about 
19 year^; came to State of Illinois in 1850; studied law in the office of the late Samuel 
Beardsley, of New York; entered the office in 1846, and remained until 1850; engaging in 
the printing business in Chicago, he did not enter the profession; lived in Chicago, and pub- 
lished the Daily Argus; sold out the paper to the Democratic Press in 1852; went to Prairie 
City, in McDonough Co. in 1857, and published the Prairie City Chronicle o^\& year, and 
came to this Co. in 1858; settled in Kewanee; published the Galva Unio7i for two years; 
lived on farm in Wethersfield four years; started the Prairie Chief in 1868; removed to 
Toulon same year, and removed to this town in 1871; Dem; Epis; value of property $3,000; 
married Miss Julia E. Bond in Utica, N.Y. Dec. 30, 1849; they have seven children, four 
sons, three daughters; have lost three sons. 

SEDEGREN CHAS. Cambridge; shoemaker; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

SHAFEK H. A, Carpenter and Builder, Cambridge; born in Franklin, Center Co. Penn. 
Jan. II, 1833; Rep; Lib; value of property $1,000; they lived in Penn. about 40 years; he 
was a gunsmith by trade; came to Cambridge, Henry Co. in 1874; married Miss Sarah Jane 
Miller, July 4, 1863; she was from Venango Co. Penn; they have two children, one son and 
one daughter; have lost one son. 

SHALLENBERGER THOS. M. Cambridge; attorney; Dem; Lib; born Stark Co. 111. 

SHANNON J. E. Sec. 13, P.O. Cambridge; Rep; Pres. pref; born Pa. 

SHEPARD CHAS. Cambridge; cooper; Dem; Lib; born 111. 

SHEPAKD WILLIAM H. Attorney, Cambridge; born in Norfolk, St. Lawrence Co. 
N. Y. Sept. 18, 1836; he removed to Franklin Co. Vt. at an early age, and lived there about 
24 years; he came to Cambridge, Henry Co. this state, Oct. 14, 1861, and has practiced his 
profession for 15 years; Rep; Lib; value of property He was twice elected Super- 
intendent of Common Schools at Fairfax, Franklin Co. Vt., the first time when 21 years old; 
he represented this county and County of Rock Island, being the 21st Senatorial District, in 
the State Senate of Illinois; was elected in 1872; he married Miss Mary Jackson, Nov. 29, 
1862; she was from Westford, Vt. born Jan. 30, 1840; they have one child, son, William H. 
Shepard, Jr. born May 13, 1865. 

SHERDEEN L. E. Sec. 28, P.O. Ulah; farmer; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

SHOEMAKER N. F. Cambridge; bakery and confectionery; Ind; Luth; born Europe. 

SHRECK JESSE, P.O. Ulah; farmer; Dem; Christian Union; born Ohio; 100 acres land. 

SICKLEK ROBERT, Butcher, Cambridge; born Germany, March 28, 1850; Dem; Lib; 
he lived in Germany eighteen years, and came to this country in 1868; lived in Geneseo five 
years; engaged in butchering business and has been in same business here about three years; 
married Miss Caroline Shumaker, of Pink Prairie, March 5, 1874; she was born May 5, 1856, 
they have two children — one daughter, Jeanette, born Jan. 23, 1875; one son, born Jan. 19, 
1876. 

SMITHE GEO. C. Publisher Henry Co. Chronicle, Cambridge; born in Onondaga Co. 
N.Y. July 28, 1838; he lived in New York State about twenty-five years; came to this stale 
and county in 1867; was in the army, in the 35th Reg. N.Y. Infantry, under Gen. McLellan; 
he was mustered out as Regimental Commissary; Rep; Cong, pref; value property $6,000; 
he married Miss Josephine C. Combs, Sept. 14, 1864; she was born in Cazenovia, N.Y.June 
6, 1842; they have one child, daughter, Clara Louise, born Oct. 16, 1866. 

SMITH RICHARD, Cambridge, clerk; Rep; Cong, pref; born Ohio. 

SNELL ALFRED, Cambridge; barber; Rep; Lib; born Ohio. 

SODERBERG PETER, Sec. 27; P.O. Ulah; farmer; Rep; Luth; born Sweden; 60 acres. 

SROUFE GrEO. W. Carpenter, Cambridge; born in Ohio, Oct. i, 1826, and lived in that 
State about twenty years, then removed to Kentucky and lived there about eleven years; 
came to Cambridge, Henry Co. in 1857, and has lived here twenty years; one of the early 
settlers; was in the army three years; enlisted Aug. 12, 1862, and was elected Capt. Co. H, 
Ii2th Reg. 111. Infantry; was wounded before Atlanta, Aug. 6, 1864; he was elected Sheriff 
of Henry Co. in the Fall of 1866; was ordained minister of the Church of Christ, Feb. 16, 
1868; Rep; Christian; married Miss Elizabeth P. Sroufe, Nov. 21, 1850; she was born in 
Mason Co. Ky. Sept. 22, 1826; they have had six sons and one daughter, and have lost three 
sons and one daughter. 

SPEGEL FRED. Sec. 36; Bishop Hill; farmer; Rep; Lib; born Germany; 80 acres land. 

SPENCER JAMES, Cambridge; engineer; Rep; Meth; born Pa. 

SPROUSE GEORGE F. lives with father, Sec. 31; P.O. Cambridge; Dem; Meth; bom Mo. 

27 



306 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OP 

SPKOUSE BENJAMIN, Farmer, Sec. 31; P.O. Cambridge; born Augusta Co. Va. June 
6, 1817; Dem; Meth. pref; owns 80 acres land, value $4,000; lived in Virginia about thirty- 
four years; removed to this state and county in 1851, and has lived here twenty-five years; 
holds office of Roadmaster; early settler; married Melinda Matheny, from Rockingham Co. 
Va; she died Dec. 30, 1874; has two children, sons, and lost one son. 

STACKHOUSE CHARLES, Sec. 10; P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Ind; Lib; born Pa; 187 ac. 

STACKHOUSE WM. Farmer, Sec. 14; P.O. Cambridge; born in Burlington, Vt. Feb. 9, 
1814; Ind; Spiritualist; owns 160 acres land, value $g,6oo; removed to Pa. at an early 
age, and lived there twenty-one years; came to this state and county in 1839, and has lived 
here on this farm thirty-seven years; one of the few early settlers now living; he broke the 
first prairie in this township; has carted his wheat to Chicago, 150 miles, and sold it for 44 
cents per bushel; sold his pork for $1.25 per cwt; had to go to the Mississippi River to mill; 
has held office of School Director; married Miss Abigail Congdon, March 2, 1837; she was 
born in Wallingford, Vt. June 23, 1820; they have five sons and lost ten children. 

STEEL SAMUEL, Cambridge; druggist; Dem; Meth; born Ky. 

STEINBAUGH WILLIAM, Ulah; laborer; Rep; Lib; born 111. 

STEPHENS JOHN M. Farmer, Sec. 26; P.O. Ulah; born in Knox Co. 111. Nov. 30, 
1840; Rep; Meth; owns 80 acres land, value $5,000; lived in Knox Co. about twenty-one 
yeas; lived in Stark Co. seven years; came to Henry Co. in 1868; has lived here eight years; 
married Miss Martha Jane Brooks, Dec. 13, 1863; she was born in the State of Indiana, 
Dec. 18, 1845; they have four children, two daughters and two sons; lost one son. 

STEWART JAMES W. Lumber Dealer, Cambridge; born in Geneseo, Henry Co. 111. 
on July 4, 1849; he has resided in this county twenty-seven years; was in the army, in the 
139th 111. Infantry, Western Army, at Cairo, Columbus and Memphis; he has been in busi- 
ness here for the past five years; firm of Stewart & Gaines, Lumber and Building Material; 
Rep; Cong, pref; he married Miss Julia E. Gaines, April 29, 1868; she was from Geneseo, 
Henry Co. Ill, and born March 21, 1848; they have three children, all sons; has held office 
of Town Trustee the last three years. 

STOREY THEO. Cambridge; carpenter; Rep; Meth. pref; born N. J. 

STRAIGHT H. L. Cambridge; stock buyer; Rep; Lib; born Indiana. 

STRATTON D. G. Sec. 19; P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Dem; Lib; born Ohio; 160 acres land. 

STRATTON T. J. Cambridge; Rep; Lib; born Ohio. 

STURGES LEVICK, Cambridge; shoemaker; Rep; Latter Day Saint; born Philadelphia, Pa. 

STRUM E. Sec. 33; P.O. Ulah; farmer; Rep; Lib; born 111. 

STRUM OLIF, Sec. 33; P.O. Ulah; farmer; Rep; Adv; born Sweden; 40 acres land. 

STURM PETER, Sec. 14; P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Ind; Meth; born Ohio; 78 acres land. 

SUTTON WM. H. Farmer, Sec. i; P.O.Cambridge; born in Ulster Co. N.Y. Sept. 30, 
1837; Rep; Lib; lived in New York State about eighteen years, except two years in Michi- 
gan; came to this state and county in 1856; has lived in this county twenty-one years; rents 
farm of 400 acres of N. B. Gould; he married Miss Maggie Nichols, Oct. 4, 1864; she was 
born in Sussex Co. N. J. Dec. 28, [844; they have two children : Ida N. born Sept. 30, 1870; 
Ralph Henry, born Nov. 14, 1872. 

SWANSON A. J, Cambridge; clerk; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

SWANSON JOHN H. Cambridge; clerk; Rep; Meth; born Sweden. 

SWANSON SWAN E. Cambridge; law student; Rep; Lib; born Sweden. 

^ALBOT A. G. W. Cambridge; laborer; Dem; Lib; born 111. 
-*- TALBOT E. H., P.O. Cambridge; lives with father; Sec. 16; Dem; Bapt; born 111. 

TALBOT GENETTE Mrs. widow; Sec. 16; P.O. Cambridge; born Otsego Co. N. 
Y. April 12, 1828; Lib; owns 78 acres land, value $4,000; she lived in New York State 
about eighteen years; removed to this State and county in Oct. 1846, and has lived here over 
thirty years; one of the oldest settlers; she married John Talbot in July, 1836; he was from 
State of New York; he died Oct. 8, 1867; she has five children, one son and four daughters; 
has lost five children. 

TALBOT STEPHEN, Farmer; Sec. 16; P.O. Cambridge; born Otsego Co. N.Y. Dec. 
II, 1820; Ind; Lib; 80 acres land, value $5,000; lived in New York State twenty-four years, 
and removed to this state and county in 1844, and has lived here over thirty-two years; one 
of earliest settlers, no houses on prairie at that time; was in the army, in 112th Reg.- 111. Inf 
under Gen. Sherman; he married Dency Tary, Jan. I, 1845; she was born Otsego Co. N.Y. 
Dec. 3, 1828; they have eight children, five sons and three daughters; lost two daughters. 

TALBOT W. Cambridge; laborer; Rep; Bapt; born 111. 



HENRY COUNTY ; CAMBRIDGE TOWNSHIP. 307 

TALBOT WM. Farmer; Sec. i6; P.O. Cambridge; born in Otsego, N.Y. March 13, iSig; 
Dem; Rapt; owns 100 acres land, value $7,500; he lived in New York State twenty-five 
years, and removed to this state and county in 1844; was forty-five days coming by team; 
has lived here over thirty-two years; one of few earliest settlers now living; only Judge Till- 
son, W. A. Ayres and John Russell living in Cambridge then; has held the office of School 
Trustee twelve years, has been School Director twenty-eight years. Justice of the Peace eight 
years; he was the first member of the Baptist church in Cambridge; married Miss Mary 
Terry March 7, 1840; she was born Otsego Co. N.Y. July 6, 1822; they have nine children, 
six sons and three daughters; lost three sons. 

TALLIAFEARO ROBERT, Cambridge; laborer; Lib; Bapt; born Va. 

TALLIAFEARO WM. Cambridge; laborer; Lib; Lib; born Va. 

TAR BOX H. A. Cambridge; laborer; Rep; Lib; born Mass. 

TAR BOX NELSON, Cambridge; restaurant; Rep; Lib; born Mass. 

TARBOX NELSON Jr. Cambridge; mason; Rep; Meth; born Mass. 

TATTEKSHALL B. ,F. Farmer, Sec. 25; P.O. Ulah; born in Loudon Co. Va. June 6, 
1817; Rep; Freewill Bapt; owns 80 acres land, value $5,000; lived in Virginia eight years; 
lived in Ohio fourteen years; came to this State, Peoria County, 1839; lived there seventeen 
years; came to Henry Co. 1856, has lived here twenty years; has held office School Director 
and Roadmaster; married Barbara Isgrigg, of Ohio, in 1837; she died March 19, 1852; had 
six children; married Lucinda Jenkins March 13, 1853; she was born Frederick Co., Va., 
March 17, 1 824; have four children. 

TATTERSHALL JOHN W. lives with father; P.O. Ulah; Rep; Freewill Bapt. 

TEE WM. Cambridge; miller; Dem; Ind; born Eng. 

TEE WM. B. Cambridge; miller; Ind; Ind; born Isle of Wight, Eng. 

TENNEY L. L. Sec. 8; P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Ind; Uniy; born 111. 

TEISTNEY JOSEPH P. Farmer; Sec. 8; P.O. Cambridge; born Hillsboro Co. N. H. 
Aug. 14, 1808; Ind; Lib; value of property $2,000; he lived in New Hampshire about twen- 
ty-eight, years; removed to this state in 1837, to Mercer Co., and lived there about thirty- 
eight years; one of the earliest settlers; there was not a house within thirty-six miles east of 
him at that time; built first house on prairie; he held the office of Justice of the Peace for 
four years; his grandfather was captain in Revolutionary war; he married Miss Almira 
Merryman April 4, 1839; she was born in Maine, March 15, 1815; she died Jan. 22, 1863; 
has five children, and lost five children. 

TERRY THOMAS, Cambridge; laborer; Rep; Lib; born Mass. 

THATCHER MOSES W. Proprietor Thatcher House, Cambridge; born Norfolk Co. 
Mass. Nov. 22, 1823; he lived in Mass. about fifteen years; went to Pa. in 1838. ived there 
about three years; lived in New York State ten years, and lived in Ohio four years; he came 
to this state and county in 1854, and has lived here twenty-two years; Rep; Lib; value of 
property $5,000; he held the office of Justice of the Peace for eight years; has held the office 
of Town Assessor and School Trustee; married Miss Rosina Terpenning Feb. 8, 1849; she 
was born in Cortland Co. N.Y.; they have six children, five daughters and one son; have lost 
one son. 

THOMAS H. C. Cambridge; poultryman; Rep; Lib; born Maine. 

THOMAS JACOB, Sec. 30; laborer; Ind; Lib; born Ind. 

THOMAS M. Mrs. Sec. 30; widow; P.O. Cambridge; Luth; born Pa. 

THOMPSON JAMES, Farmer; Sec. 31; P.O.Cambridge; born Fountain Co. Ind. July 
17,1827; Dem; Christian Union; owns 172 acres, value $7,500; lived in Ind. nine years, and 
moved to Knox Co. 111. July 12, 1836, lived there fifteen years; came to this county in 1851, 
and has lived here twenty-five years, except four years in Knox Co; has held the offices of 
Supervisor, Road Commissioner, School Trustee and School Director; married Miss Adaline 
W. Capps Nov. 3, 1850; she was from Vermillion Co. Ind. born Jan. r, 1731; they have five 
children, one son and four daughters; lost two children. 

TILLSOjST JOSEPH Jiulg'e, P.O. Cambridge; born Wrentham, Norfolk Co. Mass- 
March II, 1801; he lived in State of Mass. about thirty-five years, and removed to this state 
in 1836, and came to this county in 1837, and has lived here thirty-nine years; one of the ear- 
liest settlers; there was no one living in this township at that time; he was so conversant 
with the county in 1842 and 1843 that he could name and locate every resident in the county; 
he was Probate Justice of the Peace; he was elected Judge of Henry-County; he held office 
of County Surveyor, and also held office of Assessor; Rep; Cong; married Miss Julia Ann 
Rogers, of New York City, in 1842; she died Jan. 15, 1870; he married Columbia A. Dunn 
of Augusta, Ga. in 1874; he has three children, two sons and one daughter; one daughter 
died in infancy. 



308 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

TOMLINSON CHARLES, Cambridge; wagon maker; Rep; Bapt; born Maine. 
TOMPKINS SPENCER. Cambridge; attorney; Ind; Epis. pref; born 111. 

T T PHAM G. A., P.O. Cambridge; Sec. lo; farmer; Rep; Lib; born N.Y.; loo acres land. 

■XTAN BRUNT J. W. Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Lib; born N.Y. 
^ VALENTINE O. V. Cambridge; grain elevator; Dem; Bapt; born Pa. 

VA]V]S"ICJE WILLIAM J. Sheriff Henry Co. Cambridge; born in Montgomery Co. Ind- 
Feb. 17, 1838; he lived in State Ind. fourteen years, and came to this state to Henry Co. in 
1852, and has lived here over 24 years; one of the early settlers; he has held office of Town 
Clerk and Assessor of Weller Township, in this county; he was elected Sheriff of Henry 
County, in 1874, and re-elected in 1876; Rep; Pres; he married Miss Nellie R. Boland, Dec. 
24, 1866; she was born in St. Lawrence Co. N.Y. Jan. 24, 1844; they have two children, one 
son, William J. Vannice, jr. born Oct. 27, 1874, and one daughter, Emma E. Vannice, born 
Jan. 5, 1870. Mr. Vannice taught school ten years. 

VAUGHAN E. A. Cambridge; blacksmith; Rep; Lib; born Vt. 

VIXCEIVT M. L. Farmer, Sec. 15, P.O.Cambridge; born in Cattaraugus Co. N.Y. Jan. 28, 
1836; Rep; Lib; owns 80 acres of land, valued at $4,000; he removed to this State, to Henry 
County, 1843, and has lived here thirty-three years: one of the earliest settlers; only one or 
two cabins in this town at that time; was in the army, in Co. C, II2th Regt. 111. Infantry; 
was in battles Knoxville, Resaca, Atlanta, and others, and was wounded at Kelly's Ford; 
married Miss Martha Clark, at Cambridge, March 23, 1866; she was born Fulton Co. Oct. 
21, 1849; they have five children, four boys and one girl. 

V^TATERMAN D. Cambridge; Rep; Lib; born Pa. 
* * WATSON DAVID, Sec. 15; P.O. Cambridge; farmer for A. Malcom; Rep; Lib. 

WALiKEK A. B. Carriage Painter, Cambridge; born in Westmoreland Co. Pa. June 16, 
1849; he removed to this State at an early age; came to this state, Henry County, in 1851; 
and has lived here ever since; Rep; Lib; he married Miss Anna E. Scoville, Dec. 23, 1874, 
she was from this state; they have one child, little girl, Lucia Isabell Walker, born Nov, 27, 
1875. 

WALKER DAVID, Farmer, Sec. 3, P.O. Cambridge; born in Aberdeen, Scotland, April 
30, 1829; Rep; Pres; owns 160 acres of land, valued at $6,400; he lived in Scotland thirty- 
nine years, and came to this country in July, 1868; came to State 111. to this county, same 
year, and has lived here nine years; married Miss Barbara Couper, June 6, 1853; she was 
born in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, May 6, 1832; they have six children, three sons and three 
daughters; lost one son. 

WALSH THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 10, P.O. Cambridge; born North of Ireland, in 1841; 
Rep; Li^; owns 157 acres of land, valued at $8,000; he lived in Ireland about ten years; 
came to this country 185 1 ; lived in N.Y. City five years; lived in N.Y. State seven years; 
came to this state and county in 1864; has lived here twelve years; he married Miss Melinda 
Funk, Feb. 12, 1865; she was from Virginia; they have six children, three sons and three 
daughters; lost one son. 

WEIR JAS. I. Merchant, Cambridge; born Pa; Rep; Lib. 

WELCH M. Sec. 27, P.O. Ulah; farmer; Dem; Lib; born Ireland; 39 acres. 

WELCH S. Cambridge; laborer; Rep; Bapt. pref; born N.Y. 

WELTON A. Cambridge; lumber; Rep; Christian; born 111. 

WELTON FKAIVK G. County Clerk; P.O. Cambridge; born New Haven, Conn. April 
14, 1843; he lived in State Conn, eight years, and came to this State, Henry County, Town 
of Cambridge, in 1851, and has lived here over twenty-five years; one of the early settlers; 
he holds office of County Clerk; was elected in 1869, and re-elected in 1873; he was in the 
army, in 42d 111. Infantry; he lost his right leg at Dallas, Ga. in Sherman's Atlanta cam- 
paign; was also shot four times in one day; Rep; Lib; married Miss Mary Ella Clark, 
April 30, 1866; she was from Rockford, 111; they have five children, two sons and three 
daughters. 

WELTOlSr STREET C. Lumber Merchant, Cambridge; born in Litchfield Co. Conn. Sept- 
8, 1816; Dem; Epis; value property, $10,000; he lived in State Conn, about twenty-one 
years; then taught school in New Jersey for five years; he came to this state about 1844, and 
has lived in this county about twenty-nine years; one of the earliest settlers; only few per- 
sons here now that were here when he came; he has held office of Assessor of this town, and 
was School Director for twelve years; he married Miss Adeline Smith, of Orange, N. J; she 
was born March 20, 1824; they have one child, son, Alanson Welton; lost one son. 



HENRY COUNTY: CAMBRIDGE TOWNSHIP. 309 

WELTON A. Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Epis. 

WELTON ALBERT, Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Epis; born Conn. 

WERBECH E. Cambridge; nursery and florist; Ind; Lib; born Germany. 

WESTLAKE S. Sec. lo, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Lib; born Ohio; 80 acres. 

WESTONBEY CHAS. Cambridge; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

WHEELER CHAS. R. Banker; Cambridge; born Ohio; Rep. 

WHITE HEXRY, Hardware Merchant, Cambridge; born Washington Co. N.Y. July 17, 
1836; Rep. Bapt; lived in State New York about twenty-nine years, and came to Geneseo, 
111. in Spring 1867, and has lived here about ten years; he has been engaged in business of 
Hardware, Stoves, and Agricultural Implements for past five years; married Miss Harriet E. 
Sims, Oct. 4, 1871; she was from Cazenovia, N.Y. Feb. 12, 1842; they have one child, little 
girl, Katie L. White, born May 13, 1875; lost one son, Frank J- born Jan. 18, 1873; died 
July 29, 1873. 

WHITMAN E. Cambridge; retired; Rep; Bapt; born Maine. 

WHITMAN EDWIN M. Cambridge; teacher; Rep; Bapt. pref; born Ohio. 

WHITMAN SAMUEL, Cambridge; laborer; Dem; Lib; born Pa. 

WHITNEY C. Cambridge; shoemaker; Rep; Lib; born N.Y. 

WIER H. M. Cambridge; merchant; Rep; Cong, pref; born Pa. 

WILKEY HUG-H, Farmer, Sec. 3; P.O. Cambridge; born Ireland, May I, 1812; Dem; 
Lib; owns So acres land, value $4,000; he lived in Ireland and Scotland twenty-one years; 
came to this country in 1834; lived in Kentucky and New Orleans six years; came to this 
state and county in 1853, and has lived here twenty-four years; one of the early settlers; has 
held office of Roadmaster; married Colly Ann Ousley, in the Fall of 1857; she was born 
in Virginia and brought up in Ohio; she had four children; they have two children. 

WIIiltEY JOHN, Merchant, Cambridge; born in Ireland, Sept. 28, 1844; Rep; Pres. 
pref; he came to this country in 1850; lived in Mercer Co. Pa. six years; came to this town, 
Henry Co. 111. in 1856, and has lived here over twenty years; he commenced business here 
in 1863, with but very little; has been here thirteen years, and now has the largest store in 
Henry Co; ' rm consists of Wilkey & Harrison, Dry Goods, Groceries, Clothing, Boots and 
Shoes; he is also engaged in stock and grain business with Mr. James Mascall; his parents 
are now living in town of Osco, this county. 

WILKINSON W. S. Cambridge; marble cutter; Rep; Spiritualist; born N.Y. 

WILSON G. F. H. Retired; Cambridge; born Litchfield, Conn., Feb. 18, 1816; Ind; Lib; 
value of property $2000; removed to New York State when two years old, lived there six- 
teen years; came to State of Illinois 1834, to Peoria County, the place where the city of 
Peoria stands was called Fort Clark; lived there sixteen years; came to this county in 1850; 
has lived here twenty-six years; has lived in state forty-three years in June; city of Chicago 
was only known as Fort Dearborn at that time; has held office Constable and Deputy Sheriff 
fourteen years; married Lydia Adkins in Oct. 1S37; she was from Plymouth Hollow, Conn., 
born in 1820; have five children, three daughters and two sons. 

WINTERS S. Cambridge; butcher; Rep; Lib; born 111. 

WOLYN A. G. Cambridge; druggist; Rep; Swedish Luth; born Sweden. 

WOOD W. C. Cambridge; Rep; Cong, pref; born Vt. 

WORTHINGTON C. E. Cambridge; clerk; Rep; Bapt; born Ohio. 

WORTHINGTON THOS. J. Retired, Cambridge; born Bucks Co. Pa. Nov. 29, 1810; 
Dem; Bapt; val. property $12,000; lived in Pa. about twenty-three years; lived in State of Ohio 
about thirty-two years; engaged in farming, and Carpenter and Builder; removed to this 
state and county in 1865; married Miss E. A. Freeman, in Columbus, Ohio, in Feb. 1842; 
she was born in the State of New York; they have seven children; three sons, four daugh- 
ters; lost two sons in the army, one in West Va. and one in Murfreesboro, Tenn. 

WRIGHT WILLIAM, Cambridge; laborer; Rep; Lib; born England. 

WRIGHT EDWARD, Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Lib; born England. 

V/'OUNG JACOB, Cambridge; bakery and restaurant; Luth; born Germany. 
* YORK CHARLES E. lives with father. Sec. 18; P.O. Cambridge; Rep; Lib; born 111. 
YOUNGGREN CLARENCE A. Farmer, Sec. 23; P.O. Ulah; born in Sweden, July 

4, 1848; Ind; Meth; value property $500; lived in Sweden twenty years, and came to this 

country June, 1868; came to this state and county same year, and has lived here nine years; 

attended high school, and learned English before coming here; is acquainted with English, 

German, French and Latin languages; rents farm of C. M. Carlson. 
YORK J. F. Sec. 18; P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Lib; born N.Y.; 40 acres land. 



310 



VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 



lEGLER P., P.O. Cambridge; butcher; Dem; Cath; born Germany. 
ZIMMERMAN W. H. Cambridge; retired; Rep; Luth; born Pa. 



Business Directory. 



CAMBRIDGE CITY. 

AyerS^&*}Wier, Dealers in Dry Goods 
and General Merchandise. 

AyerS ThoS. G. Attorney at Law. 

Ball Oliver, Livery and Boarding 
Stable. 

Beveridge Peter H. County Treastirer. 

Boyd Sam'l G. Merchant Tailor. 

Brinkerhoff Jas. D. ice Dealer. 

Bryan Jno. L. Physician and Surgeon. 

Clark G. M. Watchmaker and Jeweler. 

Converse Jas. A. Dealer and Manu- 
facturer Furniture, 

Cook F. A. Brick Manufacturer. 

Dalrymple Wm. L. Deputy Co. Clerk. 

Flagg Wm. E. Marble Works. 

Follett Jno. M. Agricultural Imple- 
ments and Farm Machinery. 

Glass Neal, Blacksmith and Carriage 
Works. 

Goodrich ^Geo. Jeweler and Billiard 
Room. 

Gordenier Jacob W. Mason and Con- 
tractor. 

Gould & Hagin, Dealers Groceries, 
Provisions, Confectionery, Crock- 
ery and Glassware. 

Hagin & Gould, Dealers in Grain and 
Stock. 

Hamilton Otto S. Restaurant and Con- 
fectionery. 

Hartzwell- Jno. W. Prop. " CaiTibridge 

House." 
Hinman J. S. County Judge. 
Keesler P. M. Carpenter and Builder. 

LafFerty Andrew B. Livery and 

Boardmg Stable. 
Lind Chas. E. Billiard Room. 
Martin Prof D. Prop. " Central Hotel." 



Mock & Hand, Attorneys at Law. 

Page Orrin E. Attorney at Law. 

Patten L. H; Clerk circuit Court. 

Pierce Silas, Carpenter and Builder. 

Raymond R. C. Physician. 

Rishel & ThompkinS, Attorneys at 
Law. 

Rundstrum J. C. Dealer and Manu- 
facturer Furniture. 

Sadler Robt. H. Carpenter and Builder. 

Seaton Benj. W. Publisher Prairie 
Chief. 

Shafer H. A. Carpenter and Builder. 

Shephard & Marston, Attorneys at 
Law. 

Schmidt Jos. Billiard Room. 
Sickler Robt. & Bro. xVIeat Market. 
Smithe Geo. C. Publisher Henry Co. 

Chronicle. 
SrOUfe Geo. W. Carpenter and Builder. 
Stewart & Gaines, Dealers in Lumber. 
Thatcher M. W. Prop. " Thatcher 

House." 

Vannice W. J. Sheriff. 

Welton Frank G County Clerk. 

Welton & Hinman, Dealers in Lumber. 

Wheeler Chas. R. Henry Co. Bank. 

WhitefHenry & Co. Dealers in Hard- 
ware, Stoves, Tinware, Cutlery, 
Agricultural Implements, &c. 

Wilkey & Harrison, Dry Goods, Gro- 
ceries, Clothing, Boots and Shoes. 

Wolyn & Lundquist, Druggists and 
Apothecaries. 

VILLAGE OF ULAH. 

Becker Geo. Dealer in Lumber and 

Grain. Postmaster. 
Bowen Wm. Dealer in Lumber and 

Grain. Agent P. & R. I. R. R. 



HENRY COUNTY : MUNSON TOWNSHIP. 311 



MUNSON TOWNSHIP. 

A BY D. Sec. 2, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Lib; born Ohio; owns 80 acres. 

"^ ABY C. B. Sec. 10, P.O. Geneseo; tenant; Dem; Lib; from 111. 

ACKLAND CHAS. Sec. 36, P.O. Cambridge; tenant Taylor est; Luth; born Sweden. 

ADAMS M. W. Sec. 22, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Lib; from Maine; 160 acres. 

.\LLEN C. P. Miss, Sec. 29, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; born in N.Y. 

AliLEN" KOYCE, Farmer, Sec. 20, P.O. Cambridge; born in Camden, Oneida Co. N.Y. 
June 16, 1817; came to this county in 1852; Rep; Lib; owns 235 acres of land, valued at 
$12,000; has been School Treasurer since the township was organized, and is Supervisor; 
married Miss Sarah E. Wilson at Trivoli, Peoria Co. 111. May 19, 1S46; she was born in 
Camden, Oneida Co. N.Y. Sept. 1S24; has seven children, Maria E., born March 10, 1847, 
Maggie S., born Jan. 12, 1850, Julia R., born Tan. 12, 1852, Carrie C, born May 29, 1854, 
Percy W., born Aug. 17, 1856, Royce Jr., born "May 17, 1S64, Birdie S., born Nov. 8, 1867; 
is breeder of Durham cattle. 

ANDERSdN A. S. Sec. 36, P.O. Geneseo; tenant on Greenlee farm; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

ANDERSON G. Sec. 30, P.O. Cambridge; tenant, rents of E. Crane; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

ANDERSON NELSON, Sec. 3; tenant, rents of I. 8. Holbrook; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

ATTWATEK ELISHA, Farmer, Sec. 19, P.O. Cambridge; born in New Haven, Conn. 
Dec. 18, 1810; came to this county in 1840; Rep; Lib; owns 208 acres of land, val. $12,500; 
was 2d Lieut. Co. H, 112th I. V. I; married Miss Margaret Wright at Harrisburg, Pa. May 
iS, 1838, where she was born Feb. 28, 1821; have eleven children, Eli B., born April 10, 
1839, Thos. J., Oct. 15, 1841, Geo. W., Aug. lo, 1843, John A., Sept. 19, 1845, Elanora, Sept. 
23, 1S48, Wm. C, June 5, 1850, Mary E., Sept. 25, 1852, Robt. W., Sept. 5, 1854, Emma, 
Oct. 5, 1856, Douglas, Dec. 6, 1858, Frank, Oct. 15, i860. 

ATTWATER ROBT. Sec. 19, P.O. Cambridge; farmer on father's farm; Rep; Lib; born 111. 

ATTWATER WM. C. Sec. 19, P.O. Cambridge; farmer on father's farm; Rep; Lib; born 111. 

ATWOOD WM. H. Sec. t8, Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Chris; from N.Y. 

AYKES BUEIVOS, Farmer, Sec. 25, P.O. Geneseo; born in Chester, Hampden Co. Mass. 
Jan. 17, 1810; came to this county in 1853; Rep; Lib; owns 480 acres of land, val. $30,000; 
married Miss Sarah Osborne at Chester, Geauga Co. O.; she is a native of New Haven, Conn., 
born Sept. 2, 1816; have seven children living, lost four: Sheldon H., born April 23, 1835, 
at Lake Co. O.; Orlander B., July 26, 1836; Geo. W., Jan. 6, 1839, in Defiance, O., died Oct. 
16, 1839, Defiance, O.; Saml. P., May 16, 1842; Mary A., Nov. 22, 1840, died Nov. 25, 1840; 
Ester E., May 14, 1845; Roderick W., April 26, 1847, all Defiance, O.; Ransom O., Oct. 24, 
1852, Bureau Co. 111.; Azoline E., Aug. 24, 1854, Henry Co. 111., died Aug. 27, 1854, Henry 
Co. 111.; John C. F., Aug. 26, 1856, Henry Co. Ill; Helen E., Sept. 3, 1859, died Oct. 13, 
1863. Is one of the oldest settlers in Henry Co. 

AYRES RANSOM O. resides with father, B. Ayres, Sec. 25; farmer; Rep; Lib; born in 111. 

AYRES R. W. Sec. 25; tenant on B. Ayres' farm; Rep; Lib; from Ohio. 

OALL E. G. Sec. 30, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Ind; Lib; from N.Y; owns 121 acres. 

BANKS I., P.O. Geneseo; miner for John Tracy; Dem; from Scotland. 
BALL LEWIS H. Farmer, Sec. 14, P.O. Geneseo; born in Cortland Co. N.Y. on May 31, 

1847; came to this county in 1865; Rep; Lib; owns 82 acres of land, val. $4,000; married 
Miss Jennie A. Hoffstatter March 24, 1873, in Orient, Adair Co. Iowa; she is a native of 
Milton, Wayne Co. O., born May 31, 1849; have two children, Mehala, born Jan. 2, 1875, 
and L. Milo, born Aug. 17, 1876, in Munson, Henry Co. 111. 

BARNES J. A. Sec. 8, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Lib; from Maryland; owns 160 acres. 

BARNES W. L. Sec. 1, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Lib; from N.Y; owns 400 acres. 

BENSER R. Sec. 29, P.O. Cambridge; tenant, rents of C. A. Benser; Rep; Pres; from Pa. 

BOLING A. T. Sec. 32, P.O. Cambridge; tenant, rents of Mrs. Elston; Rep; Lib. 

BOLING JOHN, Sec. 32, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Lib; from Ky; owns 168 acres. 

BRISTOL J. H. Sec. 10, P.O. Geneseo; tenant; Dem. 



312 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

BRISTOL M. B. Sec. 35, P.O. Cambridge; tenant Taylor estate; Ind; Lib; born N.Y. 

BRUNK I. W. Sec. 25; works for R. W. Ayres; Dem; Meth; from Va. 

BURCHFIELD B. F. Sec. 17, P.O. Genesee; farmer; Dem; Pres. 

BUNGIE F. Sec. 20, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Prussia. 

BUSENBARK DAVID N. Farmer, Sec. ig, P.O. Cambridge; born in Butler Co. Ohio, 
March 23, 1819; came to this county in i860; Rep; Lib; owns 240 acres of land, valued 
at $18,000; married Miss Mary Ann Smith, in Butler Co. Ohio, May 7, 1846; she was born 
in same Co. July 9, 1822; have six children, George S. born in Butler Co. Ohio, Oct. 8, 1848; 
John, born May 31, 1851; Robt. born July 25, 1853; Katie, born July 7, 1856; Emma M. 
born Nov. 5, 1859; Mary M. born April 6, 1867, in Munson, Henry County, 111.; improved 
the farm he now resides on. 

BUSENBARK READI1VG-, Farmer, Sec. 17, P.O. Geneseo; born in Butler Co. Ohio, 
Dec. 28, 1821; came to this county in 1855; Rep; Christian; owns 84 acres of land, valued 
at $8,400; married Miss Mary Cornthwaite, at Butler Co. Ohio, Jan. 13, 1848; she was born 
June 21, 1828, in Butler Co. Ohio. 

I'.USENBARK ROBT. Sec. 17, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Lib; from Ohio; owns 83 acres. 

/^ASTEEL W. P. Sec. 25, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Dem; Bapt; from Pa.; owns 140 acres. 

^ CLARK WM. Sec. 13, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Meth; from Ohio; 80 acres. 

CADY D. Sec. 15, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Meth; from 111. 

CADY E. W. Farmer, Sec. 15, P.O. Geneseo; born in Genesee Co. N.Y. July 2; 1820; came 
to this county in 1849; Ind. Rep; MetK; owns 160 acres of land, value $7,000; married Miss 
Metilda Hicks, in Wheeling, Va. May 4, 1844; she was born Dec. 2^, 1819, in Marshall Co. 
Virginia; has six children, Sarah J. born March 19, 1845; S. W. E. born Jan. 13, 1848, in 
Va.; David D. born July 10, 1850; Charlotte L. b rn July 29, 1S53; Charles C. born Jan. 29, 
1856; Laura A. born April 17, 1858; all in Cambridge, Henry County, 111. 

CLAYPOOL WM. Sec. 26; P.O. Geneseo; tenant, rents of E. W. Cady; Dem; Meth; from Va- 

COCHREN G. W. Sec. 31, P.O. Cambridge; tenant, rents of Mrs. Steward; Lib; from Ohio. 

CRAMER E. Sec. 36, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Dem; Meth; from Ohio. 

CRAWFORD JOHN W. Farmer, Sec. 19, P.O. Cambridge; born in Bowling Green, 
Warren County, Ky, Sept. 18, 1828; came to this county in 1851; Dem; Pres; owns 160 
acres of land, value $9,600; is Justice of Peace; married Miss Mary E. Snyder, in Abingdon, 
111. Aug. 14, 185 1, who died Nov. 3, 1863; married Miss Julia E. Morrow, June 14, 1864; 
both born in Warren Co. Ohio; has three children by first and four by second wife; Elizabeth 
H. born May 12, 1852; Ida J. born Dec. 2, 1854, Clara A. born June 17, 1857; Mary E. 
born Oct. 2, 1865; Minnie M. born Oct. 11, 1867; Arthur J. born April 11, 1874; John W. 
born Oct. 31, 1875; is breeder of Poland, China and Berkshire hogs. 

CUMMINGS M. V. Sec. 4, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Lib. Rep; Lib; born Maine; 80 acres. 

"pvIXON H., P.O. Cambridge; lives with mother, Mrs. M. L. Dixon; Rep. Meth. 

-^ DIXON J., P.O. Cambridge; lives with mother, Mrs. M. L. Dixon; Rep; Meth. , 
DIXON M. L. Mrs. widow, Sec. 35, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Meth; from Maine; 240 acres. 
DOUGLAS J. A. Sec. 17, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Ind; Lib. 
DOYLE PATRICK, Sec. 13, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Lib; from Pa; owns 120 acres. 

"PELDT A. P. M. Sec. 31; tenant; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

^ FIELD H. Sec. 18, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Christian; born N. H. 

FIELD L. Sec. 18, P.O. Cambridge; tenant, rents of Mrs. Petty; Dem; Lib. 

FLEET E. O. Sec. 10, P.O. Geneseo; resides with father, J. M. Fleet; Rep; Lib; from N.Y. 

FLEET J. M. Sec. 10, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Lib; from N. Y.; 160 ac. val. $9,000. 

FONES WM. Sec. 7, P.O. Geneseo; tenant of Mrs. Liken; Rep; Lib. 

FOX JOHIS" D. Farmer, Sec. 10, P.O. Geneseo; born in Center Harbor, Belknap Co. N.H. 
Oct. 5, 1829; came to this Co. in 1858; Rep; Prot; went round the Horn to California in 
1847; remained there seven years; returned in 1857, and in the Autumn came to Rock Island, 
111., where he was married Oct. 13, 1S58, to Miss Hannah O. Thomas, with whom he had 
been acquainted from boyhood; the same year he settled on the farm where he now resides; 
he has held various town offices, and for three successive years was Chairman of the County 
Board; is now serving his second term in the lower house of the State Legislature; has one 
son, Geo. B. born Oct. 17, 1865. 




LYMAN K. WILKINSON, 
Munson Township. 



HENRY COUNTY: MUNSON TOWNSHIP. 315 

FUNKHOUSEK JACOB, Farmer, Sec. 31, P.O. Cambridge; born in N. Sewickly Tp., 
Beaver County, Pa., November 18, 1820; Rep; Meth; owns 190 acres (160 acres Cambridge, 
30 acres Munson) of land, value $12,350; lived in state of Pennsylvania about 45 years, and 
removed to Town of Cambridge, Henry Co., 111., in March, 1865, and has lived here 12 
years; has held office of Assessor of Town of Sewickly, Beaver Co., Pa., also Collector same 
township; married Hannah M. Baldwin, December 13, 1849; she was from Chenango, Law- 
rence County, Pa., and was born October 17, 1828; they have seven children, five daughters 
and two sons, and lost two sons. 

/"^ANT J. Sec. 31, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Meth; from Ohio; owns 80 acres, $5,000. 

^-^ GARVEY C. Sec. 35, P.O. Cambridge; tenant on Taylor estate; Rep; Lib; from Ohio. 

G-AKKISOIV KOBT. M. Farmer, Sec. 35, P.O. Cambridge; born in Parke Co. Ind., on 
April 10, 1833; came to this Co. in 1850; Rep; Lib; owns 160 acres of land, value $6,500; 
married Miss Mary E. Cochren, Oct. 9, 1856, in this township; she was born in Knox Co. 
Ohio, April I, 1838; have three children : Mary Jane, born Jan. 13; 1861; Frank M., Nov. 
13, 1S66; Effie B., June 18, 1870; all in this Tp. ' 

GEISSINGER J. Sec, 13, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Christian; from Ohio; owns 80 acres. 

GILBERT N. C. Farmer, Sec. 5, P.O. Geneseo; born in Ontario Co. N. Y. Feb. 10, 1834; 
came to this Co. in 1855; Rep; Lib; owns 233 acres of land, val. $18,000; married Miss 
Francelia Amsden, Geneseo, 111., Aug. 9, i860; she was born in Rochester, N. Y. Oct. 7, 
1840; has three children, one son and two daughters, H. Mark, May and Lora; is breeder of 
Chester white hogs; located where he now resides in i860; has made the farm what it now 
is from entirely new land. 

GILLET GARDNER, lives with son-in-law, G. Rowe, Sec. 6, P.O. Geneseo; born Mass. 1791. 

GILLESPIE WM. Sec. 16, P.O Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Meth; N. Y.; 82 ac. val. $4,000. 

GRADERT WM. Sec. 13, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Luth; born Germany; owns 80 acres. 

GREENLEE J. Sec. 36; farmer; Rep; Pres; from Va; owns 320 acres. 

GREISER E. Sec. 14, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Luth; from Germany; owns 40 acres. 

T_T ADLEY J. Sec. ig, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Epis; from Eng; owns 158 acres. 

■•^ HADLEY J. W. resides with father, Sec. 19, P.O. Cambridge; Rep; Epis; from N.Y. 

HAMILTON A. A. Sec. 21: farmer, rents of G. A. Wood; Rep; Meth; from Pa. 

HAMILTON J. K. resides with brother on Sec. 9; farmer; Rep; Pres; from Pa. 

HAMILTON R. W. Sec. 9, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Pres; from Pa; 40 ac. val. $2,400. 

HARRIS E. W. Sec. 21, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Lib; from Ohio; owns 165 acres. 

HARTSHORN J. Sec. 27, P.O. Cambridge; coal miner for Wm. H. Terpening. 

HENDERSON A. Sec. 18, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; boards with J. Henderson; from Ind. 160 ac. 

HENDERSON JAS. Sec. 18, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Meth; from Indiana. 

HENDERSON O. S. Sec. 18, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Lib; from Indiana. 

HIGGINS G. S. Sec. 32, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Lib; born N.Y. 

HILiLi JOHN D. Farmer, Sec. 8, P.O. Geneseo; born in Rappahannock Co. Va. March 19, 
1843; came to this Co. in 1855; Dem; owns 76 acres of land, value $4,500; was in the 
army, and participated in twenty different battles; his command was Co. C, II 2th Reg. 
I.V.I.; was color bearer eighteen months; served about three years, and honorably dis- 
charged in 1865; married Miss Esther E. Ayres, Sept. 20, 1868, in Munson, 111; she was born 
in Hicksville, Defiance Co. Ohio, May 14, 1847. 

HILL PHILLIP, Sec. 24; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; lives with brother, Wm.T. Hill; Dem; born Va. 

HILL PHILLIP D. P.O. Geneseo; lives with father, W. T. Hill; Dem; Christian; born Va. 

HILL WM. T. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 24; P.O. Geneseo; born in Rappahannock 
Co, Va. April 10, 1821; came to this county in 1855; Dem; Christian; owns 280 acres land, 
val. $14,000; married Miss Elizabeth Lockhart, of same place, March 30, 1841; born Jan. 
13, 1821; they have fourteen children: Wm. J., born Jan. 15, 1842, Rappahannock Co., Va; 
John D., March 19, 1843, Rappahannock Co., Va; Geo. R., Aug. 13, 1844, Rappahannock 
Co., Va; Sarah E., Aug. 5, 1846, Rockingham Co., Va; Edward L., April 24, 1849, Rocking- 
ham Co., Va; Rachel V., April 27, 1851, Augusta Co., Va; Mary E., Sept. 7, 1852, Augusta 
Co., Va; Phillip D., June 17, 1854, Augusta Co., Va; Amantha V., Feb. 7, 1857, Henry Co., 
Ill; James N., Sept. 17, 1858, Henry Co., Ill; Emma P., July 18, i860; Henry Co. Ill; 
Stephen R., Sept. 27, 1862, Henry Co., Ill; Estella L., April 9, 1865, Henry Co., Ill; Wm. J . 
was killed near Big Shanty, Ga., June 17, 1864. 

HOOS P. Mrs. Sec. 35; P.O. Cambridge; widow, farmer; born Pa. 

HUNTER GEO. Sec. 25; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Pres; from O; owns 140 acres, $8,000. 
28 



316 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

HUNTER I. M. H. Sec 25; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Pres; from O; owns 180 ac. $10,800. 
HUTCHINSON ROBT. Sec. 27; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Pres; owns 350 ac; from Pa. 
HUTCHINSON WM. Sec. 15; P.O. Geneseo; tenant; Rep. 

T NGLES H. J. Sec. 20; P.O. Geneseo; farm hand for Chas. E. Pettit; Rep; from Wis. 

JACKSON G. D. Sec. 30; P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Dem; Bapt; from Pa. 
JACKSON J. Sec. 27; P.O. Cambridge; miner for Wm. H. Terpening; Ind; Meth; Eng. 
JACKSON RICHARD, P.O. Cambridge; works for John Boling; Rep; from Mo. 
JAMISON J. Sec. 27; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Lib; owns 160 acres; from Conn. 
JOHNSON P. G. Sec. 4; P.O. Geneseo; tenant, rents of Mrs. Weston; Rep; Luth; Sweden. 
JOHNSON NELS, Sec. 14; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 
JONES D. L. Sec. 15; P.O. Geneseo; tenant of E. W. Cady; Rep; from Indiana. 

TT'EYSER JAMES, Sec. 29; P.O. Cambridge; tenant, rents of Miss C. P. Allen; Rep; Pres. 

KOUGH R. Mrs. Sec. 31; P.O. Cambridge; widow, farmer; Pres; born Pa; 80 acres. 
KUHL H. Sec. 10; farmer; Luth; from Germany; owns 160 acres, val. $10,000. 

T ANE J. Sec. i; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Epis; from England; 200 acres. 

^ LARSON A. Sec. 12; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 

LAY S. H. Sec. 32; P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Dem; Lib; 168 acres, val. $7,500. 

LEMUEL J. Sec. 33; P.O. Geneseo; farmer, rents of Geo. Walker; Luth; from Germany. 

LIKEN PORTER, Sec. 7; P.O. Geneseo; rents of father, T. Liken; Rep; Pres. 

LIKEN THOS. Sec. 5; P.O. Geneseo; Rep; Pres; from Pa; owns 620 acres. 

LOMIS B. Sec. 9; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Universalist; from N. Y; 122 acres, val. $g,ooo. 

LOMIS M. A. Mrs. Sec. 9; P.O. Geneseo; born Maine; owns 80 acres, $5,500. 

LOMIS S. J. Sec. 9; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Ind. Dem; Lib; from Maine. 

LONG J. H. Sec. 25; P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Dem; Lib; from Va; owns 160 acres, val. $8,000. 

LONGSHORE ANDREW M. Farmer, Sec. 32; RO. Cambridge; born in Randolph Co. 
Ind. Oct. 6, 1844, Rep; Lib; value property $6,400; lived in State Indiana about eleven years, 
came to State Illinois, Henry Co. in 1855, and has lived here twenty-one years; only two 
houses on road to Geneseo from here, when he came; was in the army as Brigade Teamster 
about eighteen months; married Miss Mary N. Hawk, Dec. 5, 1867; she was from Guernsey 
Co. Ohio, born Jan. 15, 1845; they have one child, daughter, Emma Mabel, born Dec. 
21, 1868. 

LONKS SNYDER, Sec. 34, P.O. Cambridge; tenant Morris estate; from N.Y. 

LOUN — , Sec. 34, P.O. Cambridge; tenant Edwards estate. 

LUNGREN L. E. Sec. 30, P.O. Cambridge; tenant; rents of Mr. Attwater; Rep; Luth. 

"|\ /TcAVOY A. Sec. 2; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Lib; born Pa; 320 acres, val. $18,000. 

-'■*-*■ McCAFFERTY C. Sec. i, P.O. Geneseo; rents of W. L. Barnes; Dem; Cath; Ireland. 

McCartney JAMES, Sec. i6, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Meth; from Ohio; 40 acres. 

MCCARTNEY JONAS, lives with his father, Jas. McCartney; Rep; from Ohio. 

McDOUGAL FRED, Sec. 35, P.O. Cambridge; tenant on Taylor est; Rep; Lib; from N.Y. 

McNAMARA T. Sec. 12, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Cath; born Ireland; 30 acres. 

MASCH HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 30, P.O. Cambridge; born in Germany, Dec. 30, 1843; 
came to this county in 1871; Luth; owns go acres of land, valued at $5,500; married Miss 
Mary Wendland, in Andover, 111. June ri, 1873; she was born in Germany, Aug. 15, 1844; 
has two children — Clara, born April 12, 1874; William, born March 4, 1876. 

MELVIN F. S., P.O. Geneseo; lives with father, G. T. M.; Rep; Lib; born N. H. 

MELVIN G. T. Sec. 11, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Lib; from Me; 80 acres. 

MERRILL D. P. Sec. 21, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Ind. Rep; Cong; from N.Y; 560 acres. 

METCALF H. K., P.O. Geneseo; bds. with J. B. Terpening; min. Meth Ch; Rep; from Wis. 

MICKEL II. Sec. 14, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Luth; from Germany; 80 acres. 

MOCK J. Sec. 31, P.O. Cambridge; tenant; rents of A. R. Mock; Rep; Lib; from Ohio. 

MOCK T. M., P.O. Cambridge; resides with J. Mock; Rep; from Indiana. 

MORLEY R. Sec. 26, P.O. Geneseo; miner. 



HENRY COUNTY : MTJNSON TOWNSHIP. 317 

MORRIS G. Sec. 22, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Lib; from Pa. 

MORRIS M. A. Mrs. widow, Sec. 34, P.O. Cambridge; born Pa. 

MORRIS WM. Sec. 33, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Lib; from Pa. 

MURPHY S. J. Sec. 23, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Christian; born Pa; 80 acres. 

"\JELSON C. Sec. 14, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Lib; born Sweden; 200 acres. 
-'-^ NELSON N. Sec. 3, P.O. Geneseo; tenant; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 
NEWMAN CHAS. Sec. 30, P.O. Cambridge; lives with father; Rep; Luth; born Sweden. 
NEWMAN E. Sec. 30, P.O. Cambridge; rents of E. Crane; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

ORTON" BKAINARD J. Farmer and Stock Breeder, Sec. 28, P.O. Cambridge; born in 
Oneida Co. N.Y. March 17, 1831; came to this county in 1856; Rep; Lib; owns 165 acres 
of land, valued at $10,000; is breeder of Poland-China hogs; his pigs have won twenty-four 
premiums at the 111. State Fairs, in the years of 1873, 1874, 1875, and 1876, and most all 
first premiums; has won sweepstakes on boar or sow for the last four years; young stock for 
sale; married Miss Eliza R. Tuttle, at Trivoli, Peoria Co. 111. Oct. 10, 1852, who was born 
in Oswego Co. N.Y. July 14, 1833; have six children, Alice L. born Trivoli, 111. July 17, 
1854; Edith A. born Dec. 30, 1856; Frank B. March 3, 1859; Hattie M. July I, i860; Mary 
A. July 5, 1^66; and Roy L. July 27, 1873; all in Munson, 111; first wife died Aug. 13, 1875; 
married Mrs. Amorit M.Bates, at Mil. Wis. Sept. 10, 1876; born in Oswego Co. N.Y.April g, 
1836; she has one son, Frank B. Stone, born March 6, 1858. 

pATTEN GEO. Sec. 33, P.O. Cambridge; tenant; rents of Wm. Morris; Dem; Meth. 

^ PATTEN J. Sec. 29, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Pres; from Pa; 50 acres. 

PATTEN S. Sec. 26; P.O. Cambridge; tenant; Rep; from Pa. 

PEISTER THOS. Sec. 14; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Pres; from N.Y. 

PETERSON JOHN, Sec. 10; P.O. Geneseo; tenant; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

PETTIT CHARLES E. Farmer, Sec. 20; P.O. Cambridge; born in North East, Erie Co. 
Pa. July 7, 1834; came to this county in 1864; Rep; Lib; owns 120 acres of land, value 
$6,000; was in the army, Co. E, 8th I. V. I.; married Miss Ellen M. Wickwire, at Trivoli, 
Peoria Co. 111. Feb. 17, 1863, where she was born Feb. 27, 1838; has three children living; 
lost one, James M. born Feb. 19, 1866, died Sept. 26, 1867; Guy V. born July 17, i863; 
Harry R. born 8ept. 27, 1872; Inez G. born July 24, 1874 — all in Munson, Henry Co. 111. 

PETTYS E. Mrs. Sec. 18; P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Lib; from N.Y.; owns 60 acres. 

"D ARIDAN JOHN, Sec. 28; P.O. Cambridge; farmer, Dem; Cath; from Ireland; owns iioac. 
REBECK J. Sec. 25; tenant on Freeman's farm; Luth; from Sweden. 

REDUS JOHN, Sec. 2; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Ind; Luth; born Germany; 120 acres. 

REED H. F. Sec. 5; P.O. Geneseo; laborer for N. C. Gilbert; Rep; Lib; fro:i' Pa. 

RINGLE JAMES, Sec. 7; P.O. Geneseo; faimer; Ind. Dem; Lib; owns 165 acres, val. $8,000. 

ROBB F. Sec. 8; P.O. Geneseo; farmer, resides with brother; Dem; Pres; from Pa. 

ROBE JOHN, Sec. 8; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Prot; from Pa; owns 84 acres. 

ROBINSON ALVIN, Sec. 20; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Ind; Lib; from Maine. 

ROBINSON C. A. Sec. 18; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Lib; from Maine. 

ROBINSON S. Sec. 28; P.O. Cambridge; farmer. 

ROBINSON W. L. Sec. 23; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Meth; born Ohio; 80 acres. 

ROWE F. T. lives with father, G. Rowe, Sec. 6; P.O. Geneseo; Rep; born 111. 

ROWE GARDNER, Farmer, Sec. 6; P.O. Geneseo; born in Greece, Monroe Co. N.Y. 
June 30, 1820; came to this county in 1S60; Rep; Meth; owns 125 acres of land, value 
$10,000; married Miss Harriet E. Gillet, in Peoria Co. 111. Nov. 12, 1843; she was born in 
Chatham, Columbia Co. N.Y. March 20, 1821; have four children, three sons and one daugh- 
ter : Franklin F., Mary L., Leander M. and Herbert E.; made the farm he resides on since 
i860 from wild prairie. 

ROWE L. M. lives with father, G. Rowe, Sec. 6; P.O. Geneseo; Rep; born 111. 

RUPERT CHARLES, Farmer, Sec. 13; P.O, Geneseo; born in Holmes Co. Ohio, Nov. 
5, 1834; came to this county in 1856; Rep; Christian; owns lOO acres of land, value $5,500; 
married Miss Sarah J. Brandon, in this county, Nov. 19, 1859, who was born in Indianapolis, 
Ind. Aug. I, 1840, and came to this county with parents in 1852; have three children living, 
lost one; Nellie M. born Oct. 5, 1861; Marietta, born Dec. 28, 1865, died May 9, 1866; 
Lilian May, born Dec. 13, 1868, and Clyde A. born Aug. 8, 1876, all in this county. 



318 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

OAMUELSON J- A. Sec. 12; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Luth; born Sweden; owns 30 ac. 

■^ SANDQUIST E. Sec. 23; tenant; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

SCOTT O. Sec. 34; P.O. Cambridge; tenant on Mascall's farm; Rep; Lib; from 111. 

SELLS A. H. Farmer, Sec. 31; P.O. Cambridge; born in Licking Co., Ohio, Feb. 21, 1S46; 
Rep; Meth; owns 50 acres of land, value $3,500; lived Ohio three years, and moved to Li- 
diana in 1849, lived there thirteen years; was in the army; enlisted in the 130th Reg. Ind. 
Infantry, Co. E., was in thirteen general engagements and was slightly wounded in Georgia, 
and was honorably discharged; came to this state and county in 1868; married Miss Alice 
Funkhouser, October 27, 1870; she was born in Pulaski Township, Beaver County, Pa., 
February 7, 1852; two children, Frank Wesley, born October 27, 187 1; Emma S., born 
December 23, 1873. 

SEMLEY D. B. Sec. 28; P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Dem; Lib; from Pa; owns 80 acres. 

SMALL T. H. Sec. 8; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Cong; from Pa; owns 90 acres. 

SMITH CHARLES, Farmer, Sec. 4; P.O. Geneseo; born in Oxford Co. Maine, Aug. 2, 
1806; came to this county in 1851; Ind. Greenbacker; Lib; owns 80 acres of land, value 
$5,000; has been twice married : first wife, Miss Ellice F. Adams; she was born at Oxford, 
Maine, May 13, 1811, died June 6, 1840; had one son, Charles E.; married Miss Annah Jor- 
dan, June 26, 1848; she was born Feb. 17, 1811, in Elizabeth, Maine; has one child, Eveline 
C. born Nov. 5, 1849, in Penobscot Co. Maine. 

SMITH M. R. Sec. 27; P.O. Cambridge; tenant of Mr. Terpening; Ind; Lib; born N.Y. 

SNOW B. F. Sec. 8; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Lib; from Ohio. 

SNOW E. J. Sec. 8; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Lib; from N.Y.; 80 acres. 

STAHL F. Sec. 13; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Luth; born Germany; owns 80 acres. 

STANDER H. Sec. 2; laborer; boards with I. Redus; Dem; Luth; born Germany. 

STEWART S. A. Sec. 18; rents of Thos. Liken; P.O. Geneseo; Ind; Bapt. 

STOWE HEZEKIAH, Sec. 3; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Lib; from Me; 160 acres. 

SWAIN WM. H. Sec. 23; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Bapt; from Mass; owns 80 acres. 

'T^ERPENING M. C. Sec. 14; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Ind. Rep; Lib; from Iowa. 
-*- TOOLE A. O. Sec. 33; rents of Wm. Morris; Dem; from Ireland. 

TASSEEL GEO. F. Farmer; Sec. 8; P.O. Geneseo; born in England March 11, 1844; 
came to this Co. in 1868; Rep; Lib; farm 86 acres, owned by Est. of J. Liken; value $5,000; 
married Mrs. Mahala Liken Oct. 9, 1869; she was born in Wayne Co. Ohio I^'eb. 22, 1833, 
and married John K. Liken June 28, 1848, who was in the army about two years, and taken 
prisoner Sept. 1863 at Athens, Tenn., confined in Andersonville prison, where he died of 
starvation Aug. 19, 1864; he left two children, Clement, who died Jan. 3, 1875, and Willie, 
born Dec. 7, 1856; Mrs. Tassell has one child by second husband, Nellie E. born March 5, 
1871. Breeder of Berkshire swine. 

TASSELL G-EORGE S. Farmer; Sec. 8; P.O. Geneseo; born in England March 11, 
1846; came to this county in 1868; Rep; owns 80 acres of land valued at $5,000; wife was 
Mahala Hoffman, born in Ohio in 1840; married Oct. 9, 1869; has one child. 

THOMAS B. H. Farmer; Sec. 4; P.O. Geneseo; born in Mt. Vernon, Kennebec Co. Me. 
Oct. 17, 1812; came to this Co. in 1870; Rep; Meth; owns 80 acres of land, valued $6,000; 
was member of Assembly in Maine in 1867; married Miss Sophia C. Melvin in town of Read- 
field, Kennebec Co. Me. May 29, 1838, where she was born Feb. 13, 1813; have four chil- 
dren living, and lost one son; Henry C. born July 14, 1842; Helen M. born May 28, 1846; 
Augusta S. born Sept. 8, 1850; Eva J. born June 7, 1853; Melvin B. born Aug. 31, 1859, 
died Aug. 10, 1867. 

TERPElSriNG GEO. A. Farmer; Sec. 23; P.O. Geneseo; born in Virgil, Cortland Co- 
N.Y. on March 15, 1845; came to this Co. in 1854; Ind. Rep; Lib; owns 87 acres of land, 
value $7,000; married Mrs. M. A. Rees, in this Co. March 6, 1867, born in Brownsville, Ind. 
July 22, 1843; has had three children by present union ; Elmer A. born June 23, 1868; Adel- 
bert R. Nov. 21, 1870, died Jan 2, 1875; Effie A. Oct. 16, 1876, all in this Co.; Mrs. T. had 
two children by former marriage, Emma A. Rees, born Sept. 20, 1862; and Wm. R. Rees, 
July 25, 1864, died March 25, 1865, in this Co. 

TERPENING JOSIAH B. Farmer and Stock Breeder; Sec. 11; P.O. Geneseo; born 
in Virgil, Cortland Co. N.Y. on Dec. 13, 1815; came to this Co. in 1854; Rep; Meth; owns 
300 acres of land, value $18,000; has served as Justice of the Peace in this township; mar- 
ried Miss Elizabeth Cronkhite Nov. 18, 1837; present wife was Mrs. Catherine Calhoun, 
married Dec. 27, 1867; has seven children by first marriage; Henry A. born April 23, 1839, 
resides in Denver, Col.; Mary E., May 5, 1841, died April 27, 1842; Emma G. Feb. 5, 1843; 
George A. March 15, 1845; Sarah R. March 30, 1848; Frank W. Sept. 30, 1853, died March 
20, 1854; Willie R, Aug. 2, 1858; by second marriage, Grace M. Sept. I, 1868. 



HENRY COUNTY: MUNSON TOWNSHIP. 319 

TERPENING WM. H. Farmer; Sec. 27; P.O. Geneseo; born in Virgil, Cortland Co. 
N.Y. on April 22, 1818; came to this Co. in 1851; Ind; Lib; owns 363 acres of land, value 
$25,000; was married to Miss Eliza Ann Mason, at Brownsville, Union Co. Ind. June 18, 
1839; she is a native of Cincinnati, O. born May 4, 1S16; have ten children living; lost one: 
Martha A. born July 13, X841; Missouri A. July 22, 1843; Geo. A. May 12, 1845, at Browns- 
ville, Ind; Clinton W. Feb. 14, 1847; Francis A. Feb. 28 1849, at Connersville, Fayette Co. 
Ind.; Melissa A. April 6, 1851, Knox Co. 111.; Minnie A. Nov. 8, 1853, Henry Co. 111.; 
Marion C. Jan. 25, 1856; Chas. S. Dec. 30, 1857, Union Co. Iowa; Mary E. May 17, 1864, 
Henry Co. 111. 

TRACY HENRY, lives with his father, John Tracy; P.O. Geneseo; Dem ; Cath. 

TRACY JOHN, Sec. 28; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland; owns 120 acres. 

TRACY RICHARD, lives with father, John Tracy; P.O. Geneseo; Dem. Cath. 

T TPSON B. L. Sec. i; P.O. Geneseo; works for W. L. Barnes; Rep; Meth; born Ohio. 
^ UPSON P. B. Sec. 11; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Meth; born Ohio; 100 acres; $4,500. 
UPSON R. A. Sec. ix, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Cong; born Conn. 

^rAN WINKLE I. Sec. 2; tenant, rents of A. McAvoy; Rep; Lib; born Pa. 

VAN HOUSEN CHARLES, Farmer, Sec. 14, P.O. Gene.seo; born Lexington, Green 
County, N.Y. Jan. 6, 1824; came to this county in 1862; Dem; Christian; owns 82 acres of 
land, value $5,000; married Miss Elizabeth Smith, in Prattsville, Green County, N.Y. Nov. 
17, 1847, by the Rev. Mr. Wycoff, where she was born, Aug, 3, 1831; have five children, 
Hezekiah E. born May 13, 1850, in Lexington, N. Y.; Arlington W. born Oct. 29, 1858, at 
Tonica, III; Romain N. born Oct. 27, 1.860, Tonica, 111.; Lora A. born July 29, 1863, 
Munson, 111.; Iretus C. born Aug. 12, 1868, in Munson, 111. 

VAIL SIDNEY, Farmer, Sec. 27, P.O. Geneseo; born in Goshen, Orange County, N. Y. 
April 28, 1824; came to this county in 1856; Rep; Pres. pref; owns 80 acres of land, value 
$4,000; married Miss Ruth Ann Bennett, at Beloit, Wisconsin, Aug. 9, 1853; she was born 
at Bolivar, Tuscarawas Co. Ohio, July 18, 1834; has five children living and lost one; Edgar, 
born April 22, 1854, died Jan. 5, 1865; Charles, born Feb. 5, 1856; Clarence, born April 27, 
1862; Sarah Manie, born Jan. 20, 1866; Eva Blanche, born May 5, 1870, and Fannie Jane, 
born Nov. 25, 1875. 

"\'X rALKER GEO; Sec. 16, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Lib; from Scotland; 120 acres. 
*^ WALKER JOHN, Sec. 9, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Lib; from Scotland; 160 acres. 

WALKER WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. g, P.O. Geneseo; born in Aberdeen, Scotland, Aug. 
1836; came to America, May, 1854; to this county in 1857; Rep; Lib; owns 80 acres of land, 
value $4,000; is a bachelor; came to this county some years in advance of a family of brothers, 
who have all settled in Henry Co. and are all farmers; his brother James, who came to this 
country with him, was killed by a runaway team, in Johnson Co. Iowa, Sept. 5, 1872. 

WARD B. Sec. i, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Meth. pref; from England; owns 80 acres. 

WETMORE P. Sec; 31, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; owns 40 acres. 

WHEATON MARCUS G-. Farmer, Sec. 17, P.O. Geneseo; born in Bridgwater, Wash- 
tenaw Co. Michigan, Jan. 3. 1836; came to this county in 1858; Dem; Lib; owns 168 acres 
of land, valued at $11,000; married Miss Artemiotia Algeo, Feb. 19, 1868, at Fentonville, 
Genesee Co. Michigan, where she was born, March 20, 1S46; have two children, Lemuel A. 
born Oct. 7, 1870; John E. born Feb. 11, 1875; purchased farm now resides on March i, 
1876. 

WILKINS J. Sec. 7, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Ind; Lib. 

WILKINSON LYMAN J. Warden Henry Co. Infirmary, Sec. 21, P.O. Geneseo; born 
in Tioga County, Pa. Aug. 17, 1833; came to this county in 1872; Ind; Epis; was 1st Lieut. 
Co. E, 93d I. V. I. in War of the Rebellion; was in several engagements, and grand siege of 
Vicksburg, Miss.; married Miss Emeline Stevens, March 31, 1853; she is a native of Canter- 
bury, N. H. born Jan. 26, 1835; they have three sons, Geo. T. born Oct. 23, 1856, at Buda, 
111.; Willis L. born Sept. 21, 1861, at Tiskilwa, 111. and Birt H. born Aug. 25, 1867, at 
Tiskilwa, 111. 

WILLIAMSON RICHARD, Sec. 6, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Meth; from Ohio. 

WILLIAMSON C. J. Sec. 6, P.O. Geneseo; tenant, rents of father, R. Williamson; Rep; Lib. 

WILSON JOHN, Sec. 30; lives with father, S. Wilson; Rep; Pres; from Pa. 

WILSON N. Sec. 6, P.O. Geneseo; tenant, rents of F. Liken; Dem; Lib; from Pa. 

WILSON SAM'L, Sec. 30, P.O.Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Pres; from Ireland. 



320 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OP 

WILSON GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 5, P.O. Geneseo; born in Penn. Township, Allegheny 
County, Pa. May 22, 1823; came to this county in 1868; Dem; Lib; owns 160 acres of land, 
value $r 1,000; married Miss Matilda J. Duff, Dec. 7, 1843, in Penn Township, Pa.; she was 
born Nov. 2g, 1 823, in Penn Township, Pa.; have had eight children, lost two by death; 
Mary A. born Aug. 2g, 1844; Newton, born Aug. 7, 1846; Harvey, born Jan. 14, 1849, died 
July 18, 1854; Martha, born Nov. 6, 1851; Robt. born May 28, 1854; Wm. D. born May 8, 
1859; Geo. B. McClellan, born Feb. 24, 1864. 

WILSON SAM'L, Jr. Sec. 30; lives with father, S. Wilson; Rep; Pres; from Pa. 

WOOD A. Sec. 31, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Meth; born Ireland. 

WOOD GEORGE W. Farmer, Sec. 27, P.O. Geneseo; born in Addison, Steuben Co- 
N.Y. Nov. 27, 1834; came to this county in 1862; Rep; Lib; owns 160 acres of land, valued 
at $10,000; served as Justice of the Peace the first eight years; married Miss Mary Hoff- 
statter, March 7, 1865, at Mason, Cass Co. Michigan; she was born at Milton, Wayne Co. 
Ohio, Sept. 30, 1840; have two children living; lost one, Wm. D. born March 17, 1869, died 
April 8, 1869; Clara M. born Feb. 11, 1870; Geo. L. born Oct. 27, 1876, all in Munson, 111.; 
parents moved to Pa. in 1835; moved to Michigan in 1838, and Mr. W. came to 111. in 1862, 
and settled where he now resides. 

WOOD H. D. Sec. 29, P.O. Cambridge; farmer; Rep; Unitarian; born Mich; 160 acres. 

WOODRUFF J. B. Sec. 3, P.O. Geneseo; tenant of Mrs. Lomis; Dem; Lib; born N.Y. 



Y 



OUNG JAMES, Sec. 17; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Ind; Lib; born Scotland. 
YOUNG THOS. Sec. 16, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Ind; Lib; from Scotland. 



LORAINE TOWNSHIP. 

A DAMS JAS., P.O. Geneseo; works for H. H. Joles; Rep; United Breth; from N.Y. 

■^^ ANDERSON P. Sec. 12, P.O. Prophetstown; farmer; Rep; from Denmark; 40 acres. 

ARNETT CHAS., P.O. Sharon; lives with J. Arnett; Rep; born Henry Co. 

ARNETT JOS. Sec. 6, P.O. Sharon; farmer; Rep; from France; 400 acres, val. $16,000. 

ARIVETT SAMUEL, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 5, P.O. Spring Hill, Whiteside Co; 
born in Warren, Warren Co. Pa. July 6, 1836; came to this county in May, 1837; Rep; owns 
186 acres of land, val. at $7,500; wife was Catherine Urick, born in Whiteside Co. Aug. 10, 
1846; married Nov. 15, 1863, at Spring Hill; have had five children, Annie C, David W., 
Solomon E., Libbie L., and Geo. Wm. 

ARXETT WILLIAM, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 6, P.O. Sharon; born in Warren, 
Warren Co. Pa. May 3, 1831; came to this county in 1837; Rep; owns 372 acres of land, 
valued at 15,000; wife was Ann Maria Britton, born in Phenix Tp. Henry Co. Aug. 10, 1839; 
married Jan. 30, 1859; died Dec. 20, 1876; had five children — Elsie, Emma, Nettie, Eva, 
and Wm. Leonard; Mr. A. is a breeder of thoroughbred horses and short-horn cattle. 

"DEERS DAVID, Sec 29, P.O. Geneseo; fanner; rents 80 acres; born Loraine Tp. 

^ BEERS ELIZABETH, Sec. 29, P.O. Geneseo; farm; from N.J; 135 acres, val. $6,000. 

BEERS FRANK, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; lives with L. Norton; Rep; born Henry Co. 

BEERS G. F. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 32, P.O. Geneseo; born in Essex Co. N.J. 
Oct. II, 1824; came to this county Nov. 1839; P-ep; United Breth; owns 385 acres of land, 
valued at $14,500; wife was Mary E. Roberts, born in Guernsey Co. Ohio, March 4, 1829; 
married April 16, 1846, at Henry Co. Loraine Tp; have had four children — Permelia, Eliza- 
beth, Sylvia, and David, all living. 

BEREMAN A. L. Sec. 11, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Ohio; 170 acres, val. $4,250. 

BLAIR ABIGAIL Mrs. Farm; Sec. 31, P.O. Geneseo; born in St. John, N.B. Sept. 
18, 1812; came to this county in 1838; Meth; owns 370 acres of land, valued at $10,000; 
widow of Asa Blair, born in Ontario Co. N.Y. June 6, 1810; married Sept. 24, 1835, at 
Wayne Co. Ohio, Milton Tp; have six children — Marilla. Nancy, Albert, Sinclair, Annie, 
John; two dead, Hiram and Elizabeth; Sinclair and John manage the farm. 

BLAIR JOHN, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; with S. Blair; Rep; born Henry Co. 

BLAIR SINCLAIR, Sec. 31, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; born Henry Co. 

BLUMQUIST A. Sec. 15, P.O. Spring Hill; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden; 60 acres. 

BOLLEN JOHN, Sec. 19, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Meth; from Ohio; 195 ac. val. $5,850. 



HENRY COUNTY: LORAINB TOWNSHIP. 321 

BOLLEN THOS. Sec. 7, P.O.Sharon; farmer; Dem; Meth; from Ohio; 280 acres, $12,000. 
BOLLEN WASHINGTON, Sec. 7, P.O. Sharon; farmer; Dem, born Henry Co. 
BOOTH C. E., P.O. Prophetstown; farmer; lives with J. Runnels; Rep; from 111. 
BRUNKEY EDWARD, Sec. 8, P.O. Spring Hill; farmer; Evang; from Germany; 40 acres. 

CHAMBERLIN E. R. Sec. 29, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; rents 80 acres; Rep. 
CHRISTIAN FRED, Sec. i, P.O. Prophetstown; farmer; rents 233 acres; Denmark. 
CLEMMENS GEO., P.O. Prophetstown; lives with G. Hafferly; Cath; from Germany. 
CLIFTON M. Sec. 10, P.O. Prophetstown; farmer; Rep; from Indiana; 19 acres. 
COLEMAN CHAS. W. Sec. 13, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from N.Y; 140 ac. val. $4,200. 
CROSIER JNO. B., P.O. Sharon; lives with Wm. Crosier; Rep; born 111. 
CROSIER WM. F. Sec. 7, P.O. Sharon; farmer; Rep; U. Breth; from N.Y; 164 ac. $5,740. 

"p^REHMER J. H. Sec. 22, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; lives with P. Drehmer; Rep; Evang. 

-L^ DREHMER J. W., P.O. Geneseo; lives with P. Drehmer; Rep; Evang; from Cook Co. 

DREHMER PETER, Sec. 22, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Evang; from Germany; 150 acres. 

DONOVAN JAS., P.O. Atkinson; works for H. H. Haaff; Dem; Cath; from Pa. 

DOWER PETER, Sec. 19, P.O. Pink Prairie; farmer; Dem; Evang; from Germany; 116 ac. 

DOYLE MICHAEL, Sec. 32, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; from Pa. 

DURKIN THOS., P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland; 80 acres. 

GAGSTATTER CHAS., P.O. Spring Hill; pastor Evang. Ch; Rep; from Germany. 
GERMAN WM., P.O. Geneseo; lives with O. Ingram; Rep; Meth. E; from N.J. 
GROVES CHARLOTTE Mrs, Sec. 32, P.O. Geneseo; farm; Luth; from Sweden; 120 acres. 
GROVES JOHN, Sec. 32, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; born Henry Co. 

TTAFFERLY GEO. Sec. 11, P.O. Prophetstown; farmer; Cath; from Germany; 120 acres. 

-^ HARVEY T. D. Sec. 11, P.O. Geneseo; laborer; Rep; Free Meth; 5 acres. 

HAAFF HEMAN" H. Farmer and Stock Raiser; residence in Heman's Grove, Sec. 35, 
P.O. Atkinson; born in Middlebury, Vt. Oct. 20, 1833; came to this county in August, 1874; 
Rep; Bapt; owns 5,000 acres lying in Loraine, Atkinson, Yorktown, and Alba Tps; wife 
was Evelyn L. Currier, born in Wyoming Co. N.Y. Aug. 6, 1840; married Oct. I, 1863, at 
Buffalo, N.Y; Mr. H. was a practicing attorney, in Chicago, from 1858 until his removal to 
this place; prior to that time, for a number of years, Principal of a seminary in western N. 
Y; educated at Madison University, and also a graduate of the State and National Law 
School, at Poughkeepsie, N.Y. 

HANSON H. Sec. 12, P.O. Prophetstown; farmer; Rep; from Denmark; 30 acres. 

HANSON H. J. Sec. 12, P.O. Prophetstown; farmer; Rep; Denmark; 40 acres. 

HANSON J. Sec. 12, P.O. Prophetstown; farmer; from Denmark; owns 20 acres. 

HEIGLE JOHN, Sec. 14, P.O. Geneseo; farmer, rents 3 acres of C. Coleman. 

HELLER ABRAHAM, Sec. 9, P.O. Spring Hill; farmer; Rep; Meth; from Pa; 160 acres. 

HELLER DAVID, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sees. 4, 5, P.O. Spring Hill, Whiteside Co; 
born in Lehigh Co. Pa. March 2, 1814; came to this county in 1837; Rep; Evang; owns 600 
acres, val. $21,000; wife was Catherine Arnett, born in Germany April 27, 1822, married at 
Rock Island March 10, 1829; have had nine children; those living, Louis, Levenis, Susan, 
Solomon, Samuel, Simon W., and Mary Ellen; those dead, Caroline and Lavina. Mr. H. 
was one of the first settlers in Henry Co. 

HELLER LAVENIS, Sec. 8, P.O. Spring Hill; farmer, rents 155 ac; Rep; Evang; Henry Co. 

HELLER LOUIS, Sec. 5, P.O. Spring Hill; farmer; Rep; Evang. Ger; born Henry Co; 40 ac. 

HELLER SAMUEL, lives with father, D. Heller, P.O. Spring Hill; Rep; Evang. Ger; HenryCo. 

HELLER SIMEON, Sec. 4, P.O. Spring Hill; farmer; Rep; Evang; from Pa; 201 acres. 

HUDSON DAVID, Sec. 12, P.O. Prophetstown; farmer; Dem; from N.Y; 118 ac. val. $4,200. 

INGRAM ORIN, Sec. 31, P.O. Geneseo; farmer, rents 120 ac; Rep; U. B; from N.Y. 

JOHNSON CHAS. Sec. 32, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden; 80 acres. 
JOHNSON FRED. Sec. 18, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden; 40 ac. 
JOHNSON WM. Sec. 3I* P.O. Geneseo; farmer, rents 60 ac; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 



322 ^ VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

JOHNSON , P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

JOLES H. A., P.O. Geneseo; works for H. H. Joles; Rep; U.B; from Pa. 

JOLES H. H. Sec. 23, P.O. Geneseo; farmer, rents 1200 ac; Rep; U. B; from Pa. 

JONES JOHN F. Sec. 13, P.O. Prophetstown; farmer; Rep; Metli; owns 58 ac. 

JONES J. W. lives with J. F. Jones, P.O. Prophetstown; Rep; Meth. 

JONES JOHN, Sec. 14, P.O. Prophetstown; farmer; Dem; Free Meth; from Ohio; 46 ac. 

TV^EEFER JAS., P.O. Prophetstown; farmer, Rep; Free Meth; from Ohio; 80 ac. 

■"^ KEEPER JNO. Sec. 12, P.O. Prophetstown; farmer; Rep; owns ro acres. 

KEENER WM. Sec. 12, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Cath; from Germany; owns 80 ac. 

KEMMIS ADELINE Mrs. Sec. 10, P.O. Geneseo; farm; from N.Y; 400 ac. 

KEMMIS QUINCY, P.O. Geneseo; farmer for mother, A. Kemmis; Rep; born Loraine Tp. 

KEMIS WM. H. Sec. 10, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Free Meth; from N.Y; 130 ac. 

T ANGDON MILO, Sec. 13, P.O. Prophetstown; farmer; Dem; from Mass. 
^ LARSON CARL, Sec. 29, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Meth. Epis; from Sweden; 160 ac. 
LEAVENWORTH L. B. Sec. 12, P.O. Prophetstown; farmer; Rep; Free Meth; from Vt. 
LININGER F. Sec. 15, P.O. Spring Hill; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Germany. 
LININGER FRANK, Sec. 15, P.O. Spring Hill; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Germany. 
LININGER JOS. Sec. 15, P.O. Spring Hill; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Germany. 
LUCAS JAS. Sec. 34, P.O. Atkinson; farmer, rents 300 acres; Meth; from Ohio. 

IX/riLLER JACOB, Sec. 10, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; U. B; from Ohio; 80 ac. 
^^^ MYERS JACOB, Sec. 10, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; U. B; from Pa. 
McLOUGtHJLIjST THOMAS F. Farmer and Miner, Sec. 32, P.O. Geneseo; born in 
Scotland July 8, 1848; came to this county in 1862; Dem; owns 120 acres of land, valued 
at $4,000. 
MYERS SUSAN, Sec. 10, P.O. Geneseo; from Tenn; owns 26 acres. 

INJORTON JAY, lives with L. Norton, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from N.Y. 

-'-^ NORTON LORENZO, Sec. 31, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Meih; from N.Y; 80 ac. 

r~\BERLE J. Sec. 14, P.O. Jefferson Cor; farmer; Rep; Cath; 80 ac. 

^-^ OFFEREE EDWIN, Sec. 15; P.O. Geneseo; rents 100 ac; Rep; U. B; from Pa. 

pAPINDICK L. Sec. 24, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Evang; from Germany; 172 ac. 

-'- PETERSON H. P. Sec. 11, P.O. Prophetstown; farmer; from Denmark; owns 35 ac. 
PETERSON PETER, Sec. 34, P.O. Atkinson; farmer, rents; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 
PLUMER CLEMENT, Sec. 14, P.O. Prophetstown; farmer; Rep; Adventist; from Ind; 4oac. 
PLUMER JOHN, lives with father, C. Plumer, P.O. Prophetstown; Rep; from Yorktown. 
PROUDFORD H. L. works for H. H. Haaff; Ind; Bapt; from Can. 

"D APP ABRAHAM, Sec. 2, P.O. Spring Hill; farmer; Rep; Evang; from Whiteside Co. 111. 
-*^ RESSER LEANDER, Sec. 33, P.O, Geneseo; farmer, rents 120 ac; born Henry Co. 
RIEGER FERDINAND, lives with Jos. Arnett, P.O. Spring Hill; Rep; U. B; born Henry Co. 
RINK JOSEPH, Sec. 21, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Cath; from France; 240 acres. 
ROBERTS FRANK A., P.O. Gene.seo; farmer; Rep; born Henry Co. 
ROBERTS GEO. R., P.O. Geneseo; farmer, for Mrs. Beers; Rep; U. Br^^th; from Ohio. 
ROBERTS HARRY, P.O. Geneseo; farmer, for Mrs. Kemmis; Rep; Pres; from 111. 
ROBERTS GEO. W., P.O. Geneseo; farmer, for Mrs. Beers; Rep; born Henry Co. 
ROBERTS NELSON, Sec. 14; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; U. Breth; fxom 111; 120 acres. 
ROBERTS WESLEY, Sec. 14; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Henry Co; 40 acres. 
ROOS GEO. Sec. 8; P.O. Spring Hill; farmer; Rep; from Germany; owns 80 acres. 
ROOS MARY A. Sec. 17; P.O. Spring Hill; farm; from Germany; 220 acres. 
ROOS PHILLIP, Sec. 14; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Evang; frftm 111, gj acres. 




R. A. KINZIE, 
Geneseo. 



HENRY COUNTY : LOEAINE TOWNSHIP. 325 

KOOS MARTIN, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 17; P.O. Spring Hill, Whiteside Co; 
born in Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, Sept. 22, 1816; came to this county in 1840; Rep; 
Evang; owns 380 acres, value $11,500; first wife was Emeline Lehmann, born in France, 
June, 1822; died 1855; five children : Martin, Phillip, Sarah, Rebecca and Sallie; second 
wife was Barbara Knapper, born in Wurtemburg, Germany, Nov. 4, 1830: married March 6, 
1856; had ten children; those living: Wm., Louisa, Christina, David, Geo. F., Samuel W., 
Hattie, Lydia M., Benj. H. and Marcilla E ; Daniel died. 

ROSE JACOB, Sec. 17; P.O. Spring Hill; farmer; Rep; Evang; from Germany; 240 acres. 

ROSE PHILIP, lives with Jacob Rose; P.O. Spring Hill; Rep; Evang; from Germany. 

RUNNELS JOS. Sec. 12; P.O. Prophetstown; farmer; Rep; from England; owns 20 acres. 

C AND BARNY, lives with father, H. Sand; P.O. Geneseo; Rep; born 111. 

■^ SAND CASPAR, Sec. 15; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Meth; from Germany; 80 acres. 

SAND DAVID, lives with father, P. Sand; P.O. Geneseo; born Loraine Tp. 

SAND HENRY, Sec. 21; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Meth; from Germany; 160 acres. 

SAND HENRY, P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Germany; 120 acres, val. $3,600. 

SAND JOS. lives with father, P. Sand; P.O. Geneseo; Dem; born Loraine Tp. 

SAND PHELIX, Sec. 28; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; U. Breth; born Loraine Tp; rents 80 ac. 

SAND PHILLIP, Sec. 21; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; from Germany; 560 ac. val. $19,600. 

SAND SAM'L. Sec. 3; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Evang; from 111; rents 150 acres. 

SAIVTEE MARTIN", Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 7; P.O. Sharon; born in Luzerne Co. 
Pa. Aug. 3, 1822; came to this county in 1869; Dem; Pres ; owns 89 acres, val. $3,560; 
wife was Mary Henry, born in Luzerne Co. Pa. May 29, 1S29; married Jan. 23. 1849, at 
Wyoming Co. Pa; have had ten children; those living : Martha A., Alvira A., Almina H., 
Ellen J., Milton R., Malinda C, Walter J., Charles C. and Martin H.; one dead, Rosana. 

SARTER JOS. Sec. 15; P.O. Spring Hill; laborer; Dem; Cath; from Germany; owns 40 ac. 

SCHRINER J. Sec. 22; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Germany; 130 acres. 

SEIBEN JOHN, Sec. 3; P.O. Spring Hill; farmer; Rep; Evang; from Germany; 265 acres. 

SHOUP NEWTON, P.O. Sharon; farmer, for Mrs. Thomas; Rep; Meth; from Ohio. 

SHOWERMAN MARSHAL, lives with C. Coleman; P.O. Prophetstown; Rep; from N.Y. 

SLOOVER ED., P.O. Sharon; works for W. Arnett; Rep; from N.Y. 

SMITH ANDREW, Sec. 21; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Cath; from Germany; owns 240 ac. 

SMITH J. R. Sec. 13; P.O. Prophetstown; farmer; from 111; rents 120 acres. 

SMITH MATTHEW, lives with A. Smith; P.O. Geneseo; Rep; Cath; from Germany. 

SOLLARS FRANK, lives with J. Sollars; P.O. Prophetstown; Rep; Free Meth; from Stark Co. 

SOLLARS J. Sec. 11; P.O. Prophetstown; farmer; Rep; Free Meth; from Ohio; 40 acres. 

SOLLARS WESLEY J., P.O. Geneseo; farmer, lives with N. Roberts; Rep. 

SOMERS ED. Sec. i; P.O. Prophetstown; farmer; rents 90 acres. 

SOMERS GEO. Sec. 8; P.O. Spring Hill; farmer; Rep; Evang; from Pa; 320 acres. 

SOMERS H. G. lives with G. F. Beers; P.O. Geneseo; Rep; Evang. German; born Henry Co. 

SOMERS JACOB, lives with G. Somers; P.O. Spring Hill; Rep; Evang; born Henry Co. 

SOMERS PETER, Sec. i; P. O. Prophetstown; farmer, lives with Ed. Somers. 

SOMERS PHILLIP, lives with G. Somers; P.O. Spring Hill; Rep; Evang; born Henry Co. 

SYLER JOHN, Sec. 28; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Cath; from Germanv; 200 acres. 

T^HOMAS R. A. Mrs. Sec. 7; P.O. Sharon; farm, 91 acres. 

-*■ THOMAS TITUS, Sec. 31; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; U. Breth; from 111; rents 69ac. 
TRINKLE JOSEPH, Sec. 27; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Cath; from Germany; 160 acres. 
TRINKLE WM. Sec. 27; P. O. Geneseo; farmer; Cath; from Germany. 

RICK JACOB, lives with father, R. Urick; P.O. Spring Hill; Rep; Meth; born Henry Co 
URICK RUDOLPH, Sec. 9; P.O. Spring Hill; farmer; Rep; Meth; born Switzerland. 

A rOGL JOHN, P.O. Sharon; farmer; Cath; from Germany; rents iii acres. 
^ VOGL JOS. lives with J. Vogl: P.O. Sharon; farmer; from Germany. 

■\VrALTZER CHAS. Sec. 29; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Bapt; from Germany; 80 acres. 

WEAVER HENRY, Sec. 16; P.O. Spring Hill; farmer; Rep; Evang; from Germany. 



U 



326 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

WEAVER JACOB, Sec. 17; P.O. Spring Hill; farmer; Rep; Evang. Church; from Germany. 
WEAVER PHILLIP, lives with J. Weaver; P.O. Spring Hill; Rep. Evang; from Germany 
WILLEY W. Sec. 18; P.O. Sharon; farmer; Rep; U. Breth; from Ohio; owns 40 acres. 
WIRT BARNHARD, Sec. 13; P.O. Prophetstown; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Germany. 
WIRT JACOB, Sec. 13; P.O. Prophetstown; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Germany; 160 acres. 
WIRT JOHN, lives with J, Wirt; P.O. Prophetstown; Cath; Dem; from Germany. 
WIRTH JACOB, P.O. Spring Hill; farmer, for Mrs. Roos; Rep; Evang; born Henry Co. 
WOLSON A. F. Sec. 14; P.O. Geneseo; farmer; Rep; Meth; from Vt: 80 acres. 



CLOVER TOWNSHIP. 

A BBOT T. Sec. 24, P.O. Necoma; Rep; from Pa; 120 acres, value $4,800. 
-^^ ABRAMSON S. P. Sec. 22, P.O. Woodhull; rents of H. Stickney; Rep; from Sweden. 
ANDERSON ANDREW G. Sec. 21. P.O. Woodhull; rents of G. A. Wood; from Sweden. 
ANDERSON C. Sec. 21, P.O. Woodhull; rents of G. A. Wood; from Sweden. 
ANDERSON C. Sec. 13, P.O. Necoma; rents B. Peck's farm; from Sweden. 
ANDERSON G. Sec. 26, P.O. Woodhull; rents of L. Litton; from Sweden. 
ANDERSON VICTOR, Sec. 14, P.O. Woodhull; rents W. C. Peck's place; from Sweden. 
ANDREWS L. Sec. 23, P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from N.Y; no acres, value $4,400. 
ARNOLD W. H. Sec. 17, P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from N.Y; 80 acres, value $3,500. 
AT WOOD G. W. Woodhull; justice of the peace; Rep; born Vt. 

T3 AKER A. B. Woodhull; blacksmith; Rep; from Pa. 

^ BALCH D. W. Sec. 29, P.O. Woodhull; works Mrs. Batch's place: Rep; from Ohio. 

BALCH E. Mrs. Sec. 29, P.O. Woodhull; from Ohio; 40 acres, value $2,800. 

BANKSON S. B. Sec. 10, P.O. Andover; Rep; from Sweden; 40 acres, value $2,000. 

BARMAN JOS. Sec. 15, P.O. Woodhull; rents of A. C. Brown; Dem; from Ohio. 

BEACH SETPI, P.O. Woodhull; carriage painter; Dem; from Mich. 

BEELS R. F. Sec. 35, P.O. Oneida; Rep; from Ohio; 180 acres, val. $9,000. 

BELL CHAS. Woodhull; artist; Dem; from Pa. 

BELL J. D. Merchant, Woodhull; born in New Albany, Ind., Oct. 22, 1836; came to this 
Co. in the Fall of '66; has family, one daughter; wife was Miss H. M. Derby, born in Lock- 
port, N.Y. June 26, 1849; married Aug. 8, 1865; value estate $45,000; Rep; Meth. 

BELL T. F. Woodhull; clerk; Rep; from Indiana. 

BORMAN L. Mrs. Sec. 4, P.O. Woodhull; Christian; from Va; 80 acres, val. $3,200. 

BORMAN T. Sec. 4, P.O. Woodhull; Dem; from Ohio. 

BOWLIN M. C. Rev. Woodhull; pastor M. E. Church; Rep; from Pa. 

BROOKS WM. C. Sec. 3, P.O. Woodhull; lives with I. B. Curry; Rep; from Ind. 

BROWN A. C. Sec. 16, P.O. Woodhull; Dem; from Pa; has 410 acres, val. $24,600. 

BROWN JOHN, Sec. 23, P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from Eng; h&s 120 acres, val. $5,600. 

BROWN SARAH Mrs. Sec. 26, P.O. Woodhull; from Mass; 80 acres, value $4,000. 

BROWN WM. Sec. 17, P.O. Woodhull; rents of A. Brown; Dem; from Pa. 

BUGBEE C. C. Sec. 34, P.O. Woodhull; rents of G. A. Richards; Rep; from 111, 

BUNCE CHAS., M.D. Woodhull; physician; Rep; from Mass. 

BURGESS ALFRED, Farmer, Sec. 16, P.O. Woodhull; born in Wales of Engli.sh 
parentage, June 16, 1819; left Wales in Nov. 1835; came to the U.S. and to New York with 
his parents, and stayed there until the following May, then removed to Washington County, 
Penn; re 1 ained there eight years, and then removed to Washington Co. Ohio, and remained 
there 22 years, then came to this Co. and settled on the place he now lives ; has family, four 
children; Harriet, Samuel B., Caroline, and Alice; was married Feb. 18, 1846, to Perthena 
Lang, has 200 acres, value $12,000; Rep. 

BURGESS CURTIS, Sec. 17, P.O. Woodhull; lives with his father; Rep; from Ohio. 

BURGESS SAML. Sec. 17, P.O. Woodhull; lives on A. Burgess' place; Rep; from Ohio. 



HENRY COUNTY: CLOVER TOWNSHIP. 327 

BURGESS THOS. Sec. 17, P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from England; 160 acres, val. $9,600. 
BYERS EDWARD, Sec. 4, P.O. Woodhull; lives on his mother's place; Dem; from Ohio. 
BYERS J. Sec. 10, P.O. Woodhull; Dem; from Ohio; 40 acres, value $2,000. 
BYERS JAS. W. Sec. 5, P.O. Woodhull; lives with his mother; Ind; Ohio. 
BYERS SARAH A. Sec. 5, P.O. Woodhull; from Ohio; 60 acres, value $2,400. 
BYERS SUSAN, Sec. 4, P.O. Woodhull; from Ohio; 42 acres, value $2,100. 

/^ALLAGHAN D. R. Sec. 9, P.O. Woodhull; works the S. D. Taylor place; Ind; from Ohio. 

^ CARLSON JOHN, Sec. 25, P.O. Necoma; works R. Jones' farm; from Sweden. 

CARLSON LEANDER, Sec. 7, P.O. Woodhull; rents A, Calkins' place; from Sweden. 

CARNES A. Sec. 14, P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from Ohio; 60 acres, value $2,400. 

CARNES J. B.Sec. 25, P.O. Woodhull; rents of R. F. Beels; Rep; from Ohio. 

CHILSON JOS. Sec. 29, P.O. Woodhull; works for T. J. Howell; from Ohio. 

CLARK G. M. Woodhull; watchmaker; Rep; from Ohio. 

CLARK JASON, Woodhull; retired; Dem; from Conn. 

CLARK W. T. Sec. 33, P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from Ohio; has 240 acres, val. $14,400. 

CLELLAND J. M. Sec. 25, P.O. Necoma; Rep; from Ohio; 80 acres, value $4,000. 

COCHRAN WM. N. Sec. 31, P.O. Woodhull; works for Isaac Stickney; Rep; from Indiana. 

CONANT REUBEN, Sec. 33, P-O. Woodhull; rents of G. A. Richards; Rep; from Ohio. 

CONE ELIZA W. Mrs. Sec. 34, P.O. Woodhull; lives with Mr. L. Fay; from Vt; has 160 ac. 

CORDER EDWARD, Woodhull; laborer; Dem; born 111. 

CORDER FRANK, Woodhull; shoemaker; Dem; born 111. 

COX I. M. Woodhull; builder and contractor; Dem; from N. J. 

COX JOHIV W. Woodhull; Traveling Agent for D. M. Osborn & Co. Auburn, N.Y; born 
in Rock Island Co. 111. March 19, 1845; came to this county when very young; has family 
two children, Winefred, born Aug. 27, 1872, and Nellie, born Dec. 9, 1873; wife was Miss 
Mary Wagner, married Feb. 28, 1871; Rep; served two years in the late war in Co. C, II2th 
111. Vol; belongs lo Masonic Lodge No. — . 

CRAWFORD HENRY, Sec. 9, P.O. Woodhull; rents J. Bergar's place; Rep; from Ohio. 

CRAWFORD J. W. Woodhull; pastor Pres. Church; Rep; from Ind. 

C-RAWFOKD THOS. H. Sec 10, Farmer, P.O. Woodhull; born near Marietta, Va. 
Feb. 19, 1822; came to this Co. in the Fall of i860, and settled in this Tp; has four children, 
Henry, Rebecca, Susan M., and Martha E.; wife was Sarah J. Hamilton, born in Guernsey 
Co. Ohio, Jan. 7, 1830, married Feb. 28, 1S50; has 87 acres, value $4,000; Rep; Meth. 

CURKY I. B. Sec. 3, P.O. Woodhull, Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in Augusta Co. Va. 
June TO, 1827; came to this state and settled in Knox Co. in 1849; came to this Co. in Feb. 
i860; has family six children, Samuel L, Sophia G., Morey J., David V., Stella N., and Wil- 
liam; wife was Miss Mary Van Gilder, born in Hancock Co. Ind. Jan. 6, 1832, married Feb. 
2, 1850; has 160 acres, value $8,000; Ind; both members M. E. Church. 

CURRY S. I. Sec. 10, P.O. Woodhull; rents of D. Whitmore; Dem; from 111. 

"r\AILEY E. C. Woodhull; carpenter; Rep; from Pa. 

■*-^ DANIELSON C. A. Sec. 4, P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from Sweden; 80 ac. val. $3,200. 

DAY CHAS. D. Sec. 32, P.O. Woodhull; rents of S. H. Ferris; Rep; from 111. 

DERBY FLETCHER, Woodhull; clerk; Rep; from 111. 

DOYLE JAMES, P.O. Woodhull, Sec. ig. Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in Cooksville, 

near Toronto, Canada, Jan. 20, 1836; came to this Co. in the Summer of 1859; ^^^ family 

three sons, Charley,-'Willis, and Arthur J.; wife was Harriet Mitchell, born in Fulton Co. 111. 

Dec. 23, 1843, married March i, 1864; has 180 acres, value $13,500; is Commissioner of 

Highways; Rep. 

"PASON ANDREW, Woodhull; retired; Rep; from Sweden. 

^ EDGERTON CLARK E. lives with his father. Sec. 6, P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from 111. 

EDGERTOIS" S. E. Sec. 6, P.O. Woodhull, Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in Essex Co. 
N.Y. Nov. 6, 1818; came to this state and located in Galesburg in April, 1838, and removed 
to this Co. and settled on the place he now lives in May, 1855; has family four children, 
Mary L.. Ethel A., Ida L., and Clark E.; wife was Miss Martha L. Belding, 1 oin in Wind- 
sor Co. Vt. May 2, 1822, married April 6, 1842; has 105 acres, value $7,350; Rep. 



328 VOTERS AMD TAXPAYERS OV 

EIKER G. B. Woodhull; merchant; Dem; from Pa. 

EIKSTET SAMUEL, Sec. 15, P.O. Woodhull; from Sweden; 80 ac. val. $3,200. 

ELDER WALKER, Woodhull; engineer; Dem; from Pa. 

ELDER WM. Woodhull; laborer; Dem; from Pa. 

ELLIOTT LEWIS J. Sec. 2S, P.O. Woodhull; rents of W. H. Simmons; Rep; from Ohio. 

ELLIOTT Z. Sec. 23, P.O. Woodhull; Dem; from Ohio; 240 ac. val. $12,000. 

EPPERSON J. W. Woodhull; hardware merchant; Rep. 

T^ARRAR B. A. Sec. 24, P.O. Necoma; Dem; from Ohio;po ac. val. $3,600. 
FARRELL J. H. Woodhull; physician and surgeon; Dem; from Pa. 

FARRER W. B. Woodhull; carpenter; Dem; from Ohio. ^ 

FAY LUCIUS, P.O. Woodhull, Sec. 34, Farmer; born in Rockingham, Windham Co. Vt 
Oct, 5,. 1824; came to this Co. in Dec. 1853, and is among the oldest settlers; has family five 
children, Frank T., Mary A., Geo., Ida, Charley; wife was Miss Emeline Cone, from the 
same place, born Sept. 16, 1833, married Feb. 28. 1855; has 40 acres, value $2,000; Rep. 

FERN CHAS. Woodhull; blacksmith; Rep; born Ind. 

FERN HENRY, Woodhull; painter; Rep; from Indiana. 

FLICKINGER W. A. Woodhull; works for W. A. Eraser; Rep; from Pa. 

FORGY ALLEN T. lives with father. Sec. 8; P.O. Woodhull; Dem; from 111. 

FORG Y PHEBE Mrs. P.O. Woodhull; Sec. 8; widow of Newton Forgy, who was born 
in Morrow Co. Ohio, Feb. 17, 1828, and settled in this county in 1852; he died Nov. 14, 
l8t)8; left family of three children, Warren W., Thursa J-, and Sallie E.; Mrs. Forgy's 
maiden name was Phebe Taylor, born in Northumberland Co. Pa. Jan. 20, 1833; they were 
married Dec. 25, 1853; he left an estate of 120 acres, value $7,200; Mrs. F. has 40 acres 
where she lives, value $2,400; Christian Union. 

FOBGY WM. P.O. Woodhull; Sec. 8; Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in Morrow Co. Ohio, 
May 27, 1826; came to this county April, 1853, and is among the oldest settlers; has family 
of five children, Allen T., Nellie J., Ralph J., Wm. Henry and Robert J.; wife was Miss 
Eve Moody, born in the same place, Feb. 14, 1830; married Feb. 22, 1854; has 400 acres, 
value $24,000; was Supervisor three terms and held other town offices; Ind; both members 
of the Meth. Epis Church. 

FOSTER ALFRED, Sec. 29; P.O. Woodhull; farmer; Rep; from N.Y. 

FOSTER A. J. lives with Mrs. Byers, Sec. 5; P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from Mo. 

FOSTER A P. Sec. 29; P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from N.Y.; 129 acres, value $10,000. 

FRASER WM. A. Woodhull; dealer in grain and broom-corn; Rep; from Conn. 

/^ AMBLE W. O. Woodhull; harness-maker; Dem; from Pa. 

^ GAMBLE W. N. Woodhull; harness-maker; Dem; from Pa. 

GREENO L. W. Woodhull; works for F. L. Hough; Rep; from N.Y. 

GOODELL B. H. Woodhull; Prop. Woodhull Livery Stable; born in Galesburg, Knox 
Co. 111. Dec. 28, 1846; has family of three children, Gertrude G., born Aug. 2, 1868; Lilian 
A., born Aug. 20, 1S72; Pearl, born July 22, 1875; wife was Miss Josephine B. Hill, born in 
Athens Co. Ohio, Feb. 15; 1849; married Aug. 21, 1867, at Quincy, 111; value estate $7,000; 
Rep; served two years in the late rebellion, in Co. C, loth 111. Inf. 

GRANBERG ANDREW, Sec. 28; P.O. Woodhull; rents of H. E. Houghton; from Sweden. 

GRENBERG JOHN, Sec. 26; P.O. Woodhull; rents of H. E. Houghton; from Sweden. 

T_J ALE S. B., P.O. Woodhull; teamster, Rep; from Ohio. 

■•^ HALL A. A., P.O. Woodhull; mason; Rep; from N.Y. 

HALL JOHN, Woodhull; lather; Rep; from Sweden. 

HALL M. D., P.O. Woodhull; mason; Rep; from N.Y. 

HALSENE J. Sec. 13; P.O. Necoma; Rep; from Sweden; 160 acres, val. $6,400. 

HAYDEN A. R. Sec. 25; P.O. Necoma; Rep; from Ky; has 160 acres, val. $9 600. 

HAYDEN HENRY, lives with his father. Sec. 25; P.O. Necoma; Rep; from 111. 

HEDBLOOM JOHN, Sec. 25; P.O. Necoma; rents of W. Sidebottom; Rep; from Sweden. 

HENDERSON STEWARD, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 28; P.O. Woodhull; born 
in Erie Co. Pa. March 11, 1812; came to this county in March, 1874; has family of five chil- 
dren, Elizabeth A., Catherine B., Mary A., Thos. S. M., Steward A. B.; wife was Eliza A. 
Ramsy, born in Fayette Co. May 27, 1824; married Aug. 3, 1845; has 140 acres, value 
$7,500; Rep. 



HENRY COUNTY: CLOVER TOWNSHIP. 329 

HILLER M. Sec. lo; P.O. Woodhull; school teacher; Rep; from Ohio; 40 ac. val. $2000. 
HORN J. W., P.O. Woodhull; retired; Rep; from England; owns 160 acres on Sec. 30. 
HILLERY HERMAN, Sec. 24; P.O. Necoma; rents of A. Maile; Rep; from 111. 
HOUGH F. L. Woodhull; grain dealer; Rep; from 111. 

HOUGHTON CHAS. E. Sec. 35; P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from Vt; So acres, val. $4,000. 
HOUGHTON FRED. J. Sec. 33; P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from 111; has 80 ac. val. $5,000, 
HOUGrHTOlS' HEIVRY E. Farmer and Stock Raiser; Sec. 28; P.O. Woodhull; born 

in Windsor Co. Vt. June 16, 1849; came to this county in 1852; single; has 320 acres, value 

$19,200; Rep. 
HOUGHTON L. C. Sec. 20; P.O. Woodhull; station agent; Rep; from New England; 80 ac. 
HOUGHTON LUCY E. Sec. 33; P.O. Woodhull; from Vt; 80 acres, val. $7,000. 
HOUGHTON T. Mrs. Sec. 35; P.O. Woodhull; from Vt; has 80 acres, val. $4,000. 
HOWELL S. W. Woodhull; carpenter; Rep; from L. I. 
HOWELiLi T, J. Farmer and Stock Raiser; Sec. 29; P.O. Woodhull; came to this county 

in the Fall of 1856, and built the first house in Woodhull: he was born in Orange Co. N.Y. 

May 7, 1823; has family, one daughter, Carrie, and son, Schuyler P.; wife was Matilda C. 

Post, from the same place, born July 30, 1828; married Nov. 22, 1855; has 350 acres, value 

$23,500; Rep; was School Trustee; both members of the Pres. Church. 

JACKSON J. W. Sec. 26; P.O. Woodhull; Dem; from Ohio; has 80 ac. val. $3,600. 
JACOBSON JOHN, Sec. 36; P.O. Necoma; rents of P. N. Nelson; Rep; from Sweden.' 
JOHNSON C. A. Sec. 27; P.O. Woodhull; from Sweden; 80 acres, val. $4,800. 
JOHNSON C. G. Sec. 30; P.O. Woodhull; rents of J. W. Horn; Rep; from Sweden. 
JOHNSON JOHN, lives on S. H. Ferris' farm, Sec. 32; P.O. Woodhull; from Sweden. 
JOHNSON LEWIS, Sec. i; P.O. Cambridge; rents of A. A. Reed; from Sweden. 
JOHNSON MARSHALL H. lives with his father, Sec. 33; P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from Mass. 
JOHNSON OLUF, Sec. 14; P.O. Necoma; rents of P. Waxell; Rep; from Sweden. 
JOHNSOIV S. W. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 33; P.O. Woodhull; born in Windsor 
Co. Vt. Jan. 27, 1813; came to this county in the Spring of 1858, and settled in this town- 
.ship; has family of three children, Marshall H., Ida W., Ruth A.; wife was Miss Elizabeth 
A. Holman, born in Worcester Co. Mass. Oct. i, 1821; married Dec. 15, 1841; has 160 ac. 
value $10,000; Rep; 

T7' APPLE G. W. lives with R. F. Richardson, Sec. 3; P.O. Woodhull; Dem; from Ohio. 

-•^ K APPLE JOHN, lives with his father. Sec. 3; P.O. Woodhull; Dem; from 111. 

KAPPLE PHILIP, Sec. 3; P.O. Woodhull; Dem; from Ohio; 40 acres, value $2,000. 

KELLOGG J. E. Woodhull; farmer; Rep; from Mass. 

KEPPLE T. Sec. 15; P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from Ohio; rents of A. Shattuck. 

KIRKLAND WILLIAM, Sec. 5; P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from Ohio; has 360 acres, value $18,000. 

KIRKLAND WILLIAM P. lives with his father; Sec. 5; P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from Ohio. 

KUFUS H. A. Woodhull; merchant; from St. Louis. 

T AIRD S. J. Woodhull; butcher; Dem; from Pa. 

^-^ LAIRD THOS. Woodhull; butcher; Dem; from Pa. 

liAGERGRElV AUGUSTUS, Woodhull; clerk for J. D. Bell since 1868; born in 
Reaby, near Grenna, Sweden, June 13, '47; came to the U. S. in the Fall of '66, and to 
this Co. in '68; single; Rep; Luth; member of Masonic Lodge, No. 502. 

LARSON N. F. Sec. 3; P.O. Woodhull; from Sweden; 40 acres, value $1,600. 

LARSON G. A. Sec. 13; P.O. Woodhull; rents of Mrs. Peck; from Sweden. 

LARSON OLUF, Sec. 6, P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from Sweden; 80 acres, value $4,800. 

LEEK AUGUSTUS, Sec. 18; lives with his father; P.O. Woodhull; Dem; from 111. 

LEEK B. F. Sec. 18; P.O. Woodhull; rents of W. Forgy; Dem; from 111. 

LEIST C. Sec. 2; P.O. Cambridge; Dem; from Germany, 120 acres, value $4,800. 

LINDELOFF A. Woodhull; boot and shoe maker; Rep; from Sweden. 

LINDGREN J. P. Sec. 14; P.O. Woodhull; rents of H. W. Hoffman; from Sweden. 

LOVELY NELSON, Sec. 35; P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from Mass; has 120 acres, value $4,800. 

LOWRY N. H., M.D., Woodhull; Physician; Rep. 

LUNGRAIN AUGUST, Sec. 5; P.O. Woodhull; rents of W. Cornell; Rep; from Sweden. 



330 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OP 

TX /r cCONNELL CATHERINE, Sec. 8; P.O. Woodhull; from Pa; 200 acres, value $9,000. 

^^^ McCONNELL Wm. M. lives with his mother; Sec. 8; P.O. Woodhull; Dem; from Pa. 

McCLUlSTG GEO. H. Sec. 31; Farmer and Collector; P.O. Woodhull; born in Lancaster 
Co. Penn., March 14, '44; came to the State and settled at Victoria, Knox Co. in 1855; came 
to this Co. in March, 1867, and settled in this township; has family, five children : Mary E., 
Emma J., Arvilla D., Stella S. and Nellie; wife was Miss Diantha Merritt; born in Medina 
Co. Ohio, Aug. 18, '33; married Sept. 11, '65; is Collector and Road Commissioner; served 
three years in the late war, in company K, 83d Ills. Vol; Rep. 

McCONNELL J. A. P.O. Woodhull; Sec. 7; Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in Juniata Co. 
Penn, June 25, '42; came to this Co. April g, '57, and is among the oldest settlers; has family, 
five children living, Frank, Lottie, Russell, Minnie and Willie; one dead. May, by first 
wife, who was Maggie Stitt, born in Franklin Co. Penn. May 25, '41; married Nov. 10, '64; 
she died April 13, '74; he married again to Mary M. Connor, of Page Co, Iowa, May 10, '76; 
has 195 acres, value $12,050; Dem. 

McCONNELL THOS. S. P.O. Woodhull; Sec. 18; Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in 
Juniata Co. Penn. April 16, '37; came to this Co. April 9, '57, and is among the oldest settlers; 
has family of five children living, S. M., Annie C, Herbert, Porter and' Thomas; Horace and 
Willie, dead; wife was Miss Margaret Miller; born in Franklin Co. Penn. Sept. 27, '35; 
married Feb. i, '59; has 332 acres, value $24,900. Mr. M. has, without exception, the finest 
barn in the County; Dem. 

McCORMICK JOHN, Woodhull; shoemaker; Rep; from Pa. 

McHOSE JOSEPH J. P.O. Woodhull; Editor and Publisher of the Woodhull Enterprise; 
born in Geneseo, this Co. July 3, 1859; single; came to Woodhull in 1876, and bought the 
Reporter, and in Jan. 1877, enlarged it to a seven col. folio; running one page in the 
interest of Alpha. 

McHOSE W. E. Woodhull; attorney at law; Rep; born Pa. 

McQUEEN DANIEL, P.O. Woodhull; Sec. 9; Farmer; born in Canandaigua, N.Y. Aug. 
8, 1S04; came to this Co. April 12, '52, and settled in this township, and is among the oldest 
settlers; no family; has two grand children living with him, Geo. H. and John McQueen; wife 
was Julana Brown; born in N. Y. State Nov. 2, 1813; married Nov. 8, 1827; has 277 acres, 
value $13,850; Rep; both members of the M. E. Church. 

McQUEEN DAN'L. P. Sec. 9, P.O. Woodhull; lives with D. McQueen; Rep; from Ohio. 

MAGNEK K. H. Woodhull; Editor Woodhull Enterprise; born in Mitchell, Lawrence 
Co. Indiana, Feb. 17, 1849; left there and came to this state in 1851, and settled in Edgar 
Co; remained three years, and then removed to Coles Co. Ill; remained there two years, 
then removed to Douglas Co. where he remained until he was fifteen years of age; he then 
entered the army, and served seventeen months; came to this county in 1872; has family, one 
son, Harry E. born May 5, 1875; wife was Miss Alice Dayhuff, born in Orange Co. Ind. Jan. 
16, 1851; married Nov. 14, 1872; Rep. 

MAHER ALEXANDER, Sec. 21, P.O. Woodhull; Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in 
Westerlow, Albany Co. N.Y. Nov. 21, 1825; came to this county in the Spring of 1859; has 
family four children, Thomas P., Charles, Laura A. and Jennie A; wife was Lucia A. Hough- 
ton, born in Grafton, Windham Co. Vt. March 2, 1843; married April 23, 1862; has 160 
acres, valued at $8,000; Rep. 

MALCOLM J. H. Sec. 3, P.O. Woodhull; from Sweden; 62 acres, $2,000. 

MARSH O., P.O. Woodhull; harness-maker; Rep; from Ohio. 

MASLIN G. T. Woodhull; proprietor Maslin House; Rep; from Maryland. 

MAUCK PHILIP, Sec. 24, P.O. Necoma; Dem; from Indiana; 80 acres, $5,200. 

MATTISON SWAN, Sec. 34, Woodhull; rents of I. Stickney; from Sweden. 

MILLER JOS. Woodhull; section boss; Dem; from Germany. 

MILLER McK. Woodhull; attorney; Rep; from Ohio. 

MITCHELL ABEL, Woodhull; Hardware Merchant; born in Galesburg Tp. Knox Co. 
111. Sept. 8, 1843; came to this county in Jan. 1869; has family; one daughter, Jessie, born 
March 26, 1871; wife was Miss Alice Wyman, born in Onondaga Co. N.Y. March 7, 1847; 
married Jan. 5, 1869; has 80 acres on Sec. 24, Oxford Tp. and has discovered a four-foot 
vein of coal, and is about to sink a shaft, which will be a grand thing for the village of Wood- 
hull; is School Treasurer of Clover Tp; Rep. 

MONROE A. Sec. 20, P.O. Woodhull; from Scotland; 160 acres. $10,400. 

MOODY DAN, Farmer, Sec. 20, P.O. Woodhull; born in Morrow Co. Ohio, April 25, 1832; 
came to this county in the Fall of 1870; has family six children, Maggie E., William J., Ida 
A., John F., Hattie, and Laura M.; wife was Abby Wescott, born in Marion Co. Ohio, Oct. 
27, 1838; married Nov. 27, 1864; lives on his father's place; 100 acres, value $5,000; Dem. 



HENRY COUNTY: CLOVER TOWNSHIP. 331 

MOODY EATON, Sec. 6, P.O. Woodhull; rents of W. Forgy; Dem; from Ohio. 
MOODY JOHN, Sec. 20, P.O. Woodhull; Dem; from Pa; 100 acres, $5,000. 
MOODY N. Sec. 17, P.O. Woodhull; Dem; from Ohio; 80 acres, $4,800. 
MORTIS JOS. Woodhull; tinner; Rep; from N.Y. 

MORTSOLF JACOB, Sec. 13, P.O. Necoma; Dem; from Ohio; 120 acres, $4,000. 
MOSHER S. Sec. 24, P.O. Necoma; Rep; from N.Y; 140 acres, $7,000. 
MUGGRAGE S. G. Woodhull; principal high school; Dem; from Ohio. 
MURRAY JOHN, Woodhull; laborer; Dem; from Ireland. 

"NTEASTRUM CHAS. Sec. 8,#.0. Woodhull; rents N. Forgy estate; from Sweden. 
-'■^ NEELEY S. W. Woodhull; book-keeper. Rep; from Pa. 
NELSON C. Sec. 21, P.O. Woodhull; rents C. G. Anderson's place; from Sweden. 
NELSON CHAS. Sec. 10, P.O. Woodhull; rents the J. B. Gebbany farm; from Sweden. 
NELSON N. P. Sec. 18, P.O. Woodhull; works for J. W. Shetler; Rep; from Sweden. 
NELSON P. N. Sec. 25, P.O. Necoma; Rep; from Sweden; 240 acres, $12,000. 
NEWMAN J. H. Sec. 23, P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from N.Y; 100 acres, $5,000. 
NODINE MALCOM, Sec. 2, P.O. Woodhull; Dem; from Sweden; 120 acres, $4,800. 

/~\LSON CHAS. Sec. 34, P.O. Woodhull; rents of I. Stickney; from Sweden. 
^^ OLSON M. F. Woodhull; merchant; Rep; from Sweden. 
OLSON OLUF, Woodhull; restaurant; Rep; from Sweden. 

OLSON OLOF, Sec. 20, P.O. Woodhull; rents of S. Bergers; Rep; from Sweden. 
OLSON PETER, Sec. 32, P.O. Woodhull; from Sweden; 80 acres, $4,500. 
OSBORN ELICK, Sec. 9, P.O. Woodhull; lives with his father; Dem. 
OSBORN STEPHEN, Sec. 9, P.O. Woodhull; rents of O. P. Taylor; ©em. 
OSBORN WM. Sec. 10, P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from Ohio; 40 acres, $2,000. 
OSTRUM L. W. Woodhull; groceries; Rep; from N.Y. 
OSTROM MORGAN, Woodhull; groceries; Rep; from N.Y. 

pALMET SWAN, Sec. 11, P.O. Woodhull; from Sweden; 80 acres, $3,200. 

^ PADEN ISAAC Jr. Woodhull; laborer; Rep; from 111. 

PAYDEN CHARLEY, Woodhull; mason; Rep; from 111. 

PAYTON WM. Postmaster, Woodhull; born in Butler Co. Ohio, April 29, 1812; came to 
this Co. in 1854; has family nine children living, three dead; wife was Mary Ann Hamilton, 
born in Ky. March 12, 1817; married Dec. 3, 1833; value estate $3,000; Rep; Meth; was 
Justice of the Peace, and held other town offices. 

PECK W. Sec. 13. P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from Ohio; 40 acres, $1,600. 

PEREGOY G. W. Sec. 10, P.O. Woodhull; school teacher; Rep; from Ohio; 90 acres, $5,400. 

PERKINS ALBERT, Woodhull; laborer; Rep; from Ohio. 

PETERSON AARON, Sec. 29; P.O. Woodhull; works for T. J. Howell; from Sweden. 

PETERSON JOHN E. Sec. 33; P.O. Woodhull; rents of S. W. Johnson; from Sweden, 

PETERSON SWAN, Sec. 15; P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from Sweden; 80 acres, value $3,200. 

PLUNKET MARTIN, Sec. 32; P.O. Woodhull; broom-maker; Dem; from Missouri. 

"D ACKLEY W. B., P.O. Woodhull; school teacher; Dem; from South Carolina. 

-•^ RAFFERTY TIMOTHY, Sec. 34; P.O.Woodhull; Dem; rents of F. Buttler; from Ireland. 

RAYLEY MILO, Woodhull; carpenter; Rep; born Mass. 

REED ALBERT. Sec. i; P.O. Cambridge; lives with his father; Dem; from 111. 

REED A. A., P.O. Cambridge; Sec. 12, Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in Litchfield Co. 
Ct., July 21, 1821; came to this state, and settled in Knox Co. in 1840, and remained there 
until 1850, and then came here, and is among the oldest settlers; has family of six children— 
Geo. F., Albert M., Willis A., Lewis C, Chas. M. and Minnie A.; wife was Mary A. Cook, 
born in town of Hadley, Mass., Feb. 7, 1830; married March 31, 1852; has 360 acres, value 
$14,400; Dem. 

REED GEO. F. Sec. i; P.O. Cambridge; lives on his father's place; Dem; born 111. 

REEVES A. R. Sec. 23;.P.O. Necoma; lives with his father; Rep; from Ind. 



332 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

REEVE G. Sec. 23; P.O. Necoma; Rep; from Ky< has 280 acres, value $11,200.] 

REEVE W. H. Sec. 23; P.O. Necoma; lives with his father; Rep; from Ind. 

RICHARDS G. A. Sec. 33, Farmer; P.O. Woodhull; born in Windham Co. Vt., March 10, 
1833; came to this county in the Spring of 1855, and is among the oldest settlers; has family 
of two children, Minnie A. and Arthur; wife was Miss M. A. Clark, born in Ohio, 1843; 
married in 1861; has 120 acres, value $9,000; was Assessor and Collector two terms; Rep; 
Meth. 

RICHARDS W., Woodhull; tinner; Rep; from England. 

RICHARDSON R. F. Sec. 3; P.O. Woodhull; Dem; from Pa; 40 acres, value $2,000. 

RICHTMYER ABRAM, Woodhull; Attorney at Law; born -in Schoharie Co. N. Y., 
March 11, 1842; came to this county November, 1869; had family of two children, Jeremiah, 
born Jan. 28, 1872; Grace, born Oct. 2^, 1874; wife was Mary Burton, born in the same place 
February, 1840; married July 4, 1867; Dem. 

RIDE]S"OUR JOHLN" B. Woodhull; Lumber Merchant; born in Westmoreland Co. Pa., 
May 2, 1823; came to this county in the Fall of 1853, and is among the oldest settlers; has 
family of two sons and one daughter; wife was Miss Loys Payton, from Blackford Co. In- 
diana; born Dec. 30, 1837; Mr. R. served three years and nine months in the late Rebellion, 
in Co. A, 55th 111. Vol.; has been Justice of the Peace, Assessor, and held other Township 
ofEces; value estate, $2,600; Rep; Meth. 

ROOT ALBERT O. Sec. 17; P.O. Woodhull; lives with his father; Rep; from 111. 

ROOT WILLIAM E. Sec. 17; P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from Ohio; has 160 acres, value $10,000. 

ROUNDS C. Sec. 29; P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from 111; has 80 acres, value $5,200. 

RUXDSTROM S. C. Woodhull; Furniture Dealer; born in Christianstad, Sweden, Aug. 
9, 1848; came to the U. S. and to Galesburg the 7th of September, 1867, and remained there 
three years, then removed to Woodhull and went into the furniture business; no family; 
wife was Ida M. Walline, from Sweden; married March 29, 1876; value estate, $3,000; Rep; 
belongs to the I. O. O. F., Clover Lodge 383. 

QAGE CHAS. W., Woodhull; bakery and confectionery; Dem; froin 111. 

'--^ SEDERBURG FRANK, Sec. 20; P.O. Woodhull; rents A. Monroe; from Sweden. 

SAXNQUIST CHAS. G. Woodhull; Barber; born Deiderhult, Sweden, July 5, 1853; left 
there and came to the U. S., and to Chicago Sept. 13, 1865; then went to Lake Co. Indiana, 
and remained there two years, and then removed to Altona, this state, and remained there 
until 1872, and then came to Woodhull; single; Rep; Luth. 

SANISTQUIST PETRUS M. Woodhull; Pastor Swedish Lutheran Church; born in Osk- 
arhamn, Sweden, June 8, 1835; came to America in the Fall of 1865, and to Woodhull in the 
Fall of 1871, and took charge of the above named church; has family of one daughter living, 
one son dead; has one adopted son; wife was Miss Ida J. Sandell, from Flireryd, Sweden, 
born Aug. 22, 1844; married June 8, 1866; Rep. 

SEIBERT JOHN, Woodhull; restaurant; Ind; from Pa. 

SEVER JOSEPH, Sec. 15, P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from Ohio; 150 ac. val. $8,250. 

SEYMOUR R. Sec. 35, P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from Va; 40 ac. val. $2,000. 

SHACKLEE A. Mrs. Sec. 11, P.O. Woodhull; from Ohio; 60 ac. val. $2,400. 

SHACKLEE W. W. Sec. 14, P.O. Woodhull; Dem; from Ohio; 20 ac. val. $500. 

SHATTUCK A. F. Sec. 15, P.O. Woodhull; Rep; Ohio; 176 ac. val. $10,050. 

SHATTUCK JOHN, Sec. 16, P.O. Woodhull; rents of A. Shattuck; Rep; from Ohio. 

SHERMEN A. Sec. 34, P.O. Woodhull; rents of Mrs. E. Cone; Rep; from 111. 

SHERWOOD ELIAS, Woodhull; carpenter; Rep; from N.Y. 

SHETLER JOHN W., P.O. Woodhull, Sec. _ 18, ' Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in 
Franklin Co. Pa. July 13, 1840; came to this Co. in March, l856; has family three children, 
Edith -May, William Elmer, and Fred C; wife was Miss Nancy J. Knox, born in Juniata 
Co. Pa. June 24, 1851, married March 11, l86g; has 239 acres, value 815,535; Dem. 

SHIjVN" HIRAM, P.O. Woodhull, Sec. 7, Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in Harrison Co. 
West Va. Sept. ig, 1800; left-Va. and settled in Fulton Co. 111. in April, 1834, remained there 
eight years and then removed to Knox Co. and remained there twelve years, and then re- 
nioved to Mercer Co. this state, and remained there ten years, and then came to this Co; has 
family ten children living, three dead; wife was Dorcas Shinn, born in the same place Jan. 
5, i8or, married Feb. 28, 1819; has 100 acres, value $6,000; Rep. 

SHINN L. B. lives with his father. Sec. 7, P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from 111. 








Clover Township, 



HENRY COUNTY: CLOVER TOWNSHIP. 335 

SIMMONS WM. H. P.O. Woodhull, Sec. 28, Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in Bristol 
Co. Mass. Jan. 4, 1816; came to this Co. April, 1855, and settled in Kewanee and remained 
there five years, and then came to this Tp; has family five children, Mary E., Eugenie M., 
Alice L., married; Evelinda A. and Horace F., single; wife was Mary A. Briggs, born in the 
same place, Sept. 2, 1817, married Dec. 9, 1838; has 175 acres, value of estate $20,000; Dem. 
SKINNER A. A. Woodhull; prop. Skinner's Hotel; Rep; from Pa. 

SLATER CHRISTOPHER, Sec. 22, P.O. Woodhull; rents of James Slater; Dem; from Ohio. 
SLATER G. J. Sec. 3, P.O. Woodhull; Dem; from Ohio; 130 ac. val. $6,500. 
SLATER JAMES, Sec. 15, P.O. Woodhull; Dem; from Pa; 160 ac. val. $8,000. 
SLATER JOS. Sec. 22, P.O. Woodhull; rents of Z. Elliott; Dem; from Ohio. 
SLAWSON li. W. P.O. Woodhull, Sec. 19, Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in Albany Co. 
N.Y. Aug. I, 1838; came to this Co. in 1859, and settled in this Tp; has family three children, 
Horace, Solon W. and Luella; has one adopted son, Chas.; wife was Wilhelmina Houghton, 
born in Windham Co. Vt. April 27, 1846, married Dec. 25, 1866; has 160 acres, value $ro,- 
400; Rep. 
SMITH NATHAN T. Sec. 36, P.O. Galva; works H. Jones' farm; Rep; from Ohio. 
SPRATT JAMES, Sec. 31, P.O. Woodhull; rents of Isaac Stickney; from England. 
SPROUSE JOHN, Woodhull; farmer; Dem; from Va. 

STEPHENS I. Sec. 23. P.O. Woodhull; Dem; from Ohio; 80 ac. val. $3,600. 
STEPHENS W. M. Sec. 23, P.O. Woodhull; rents of I. Stephens; Dem; from Ohio. 
STEPHENSON GILBERT, lives with his father, Sec. 6, P.O. Andover; Rep; from 111. 
STEPHENSOIS' STEPHEN, Sec. 6, Farmer and Stock Raiser, P.O. Andover; bora in 
Lynchapin, Sweden, Sept. 23, 1822; came to the U. S. and this Co. in Aug. 1852, and is 
among the oldest settlers; has family seven children, John A., Gust. O., August G., Frank 
A., Henry A., Charles A. and Eddie N.; wife was Mary Johnson, from the same place, born 
Sept. 22, 1821, married in 1847; has 5361^^ acres, value $26,800; Rep; Luth; has four chil- 
dren dead, two sons and two daughters. 
STICKNEY ALFRED, P.O. Woodhull, Sec. 20, Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in 
Windham Co. Vt. July 3, 1840; came to this Co. in the Spring of 1853, and is among the 
oldest settlers; has family one daughter, Carrie Alice, born April 16, 1875; wife was Miss 
Eugenia Simmons, born in Columbia Co. Ohio, Oct. 8, 1845, married April 13, 1870: has 
300 acres, value $15,000; Rep. 
STICKNEY CARRIE W. Miss, Res. and P.O. Ontario, Knox Co. 111.; daughter of 
the late Henry Stickney, who was born in Grafton, Vt. Jan. 29, 1807; he located in this Co. 
in April, 1852; he died Nov. 16, 1866, being one of the oldest settlers in the Co; Mrs. Stick- 
ney was Miss M. A. Wood, born in Rindge, N.H. Feb. 22, 1810; they were married June 20, 
1837; he left an estate of 935 acres, value $50,000; Miss Carrie was born in this Co. Oct. 6, 
1856; she has 250 acres on Sec. 27, value $15,000; she resides with her mother in Ontario, 
Knox Co. 111. 
STICKNEY H. P.O. Woodhull; born in Middlesex Co. Mass. Nov. 7, 1S38; came to this 

county April, 1853; not married; has 240 acres on Sec. 22, valued at $12,000; Rep. 
STICKNEY ISAAC, Sec. 31, P.O. Woodhull; Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in Graf- 
ton, Windham, Co. Vt. May i, 1814; came to this county in the Spring of 1867; Mr. S. is 
the most extensive farmer in the town; has family four children, Arthur W., Mary E., Sallie 
E. and Isaac F.; wife was Miss Eliza Wass, born in Nottinghamshire, England, Jan. 8, 1834; 
married Jan. 21, 1864; has 891 acres, valued at $67,125; Rep. 
STICKNEY WILLIAM C. Sec. 27, P.O. Woodhull; Farmer and Stock Raiser; born 
in Cambridgeport, Mass. Sept. 6, 1846; came to this Co. in April, 1853, ^"d is among the 
oldest settlers; has a family two children, William Wood, born March 15, 1871; Mary Grace, 
born Aug. 15. 1874; wife was Miss Ida A. Clark, born in Milford, New Haven Co. Conn. 
Jan. I, 1848; married April 13, 1870; has 178 acres, valued at $13,450; is Supervisor, and 
held other town offices; Rep. 
STIEFEL F. Sec. i, P.O. Cambridge; from Germany; 240 acres, $12,000. 
STIERS JAMES, Woodhull; laborer; Rep; from Ohio. 
STIERS OSCAR, Woodhull; buicher; Dem; from Ohio. 
STIERS WM. Woodhull; butcher; Dem; from Ohio. 
STITT GEO. W. Woodhull; stock dealer; Dem; from Pa. 

SWANSON ALEXANDER, Sec. 28, P.O. Woodhull; rents of H. E. Houghton; Sweden. 
SWANSON C. A. Sec. 18, P.O. Woodhull; rents of J. Shetler; Rep; from Sweden. 
SWANSON JOHN E. Woodhull; tailor; Rep; from Sweden. 

30 



336 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

SWANSON WM; Sec. i; P.O. Cambridge; rents W. Poppy's place; from Sweden. 
SWARD A. Woodhull; section boss; Rep; born Sweden. 

T^ALBOTT W. K., P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from N.Y. 
-*■ TAYLOR B. Woodhull; blacksmith; Rep; from Ohio. 

TAYLOR D. Sec. 13, P.O. Necoma; Rep; from Ireland; 60 acres, $2,400. 

TAYLOR D. P. Woodhull; physician and surgeon; Dem; from Pa. 

TAYLOR MICHAEL, Sec. 9, P.O. Woodhull; lives with his son; Dem; from Pa. 

TAYLOR O. P. Sec. 9, P.O. Woodhull; Dem; from Pa; 320 acres, $19,200. 

TEMPLETON WM., P.O. Woodhull; farmer; Rep; Meth; from Indiana. 

THAYER II. Sec. 32; P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from N.Y; 80 acres, $4,000. 

THAYER M. S. Sec. 36, P.O. Oneida; Rep; from N. Y; 100 acres, $5,000. 

THOMPSON B. B. Woodhull; mason; Rep; from Scotland. 

THORP JAMES, Sec. 26, P.O. Necoma; lives on the J. Thorp estate. Rep; from Indiana. 

TOWER JULIUS, Woodhull; police magistrate; Rep; from Vt. 

TUKNEK L. W. Sec. 29, P.O. Woodhull; Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in Orange Co. 
N.Y. May 31, 1829; came to this county in the Fall of 1861, and settled in this Tp; has fam- 
ily, one son, Lucius A. born in Miami Co. Ohio, April 6, 1857; wife was Julia A. Shute, from 
Washington Co. Ohio, born July 10, 1822; married Sept. 21, 1853; has 120 acres, valued at 
$7,800; Rep; is also School Trustee. 

VANNICE A. P. Woodhull; Restaurant; born in Crawfordsville, Indiana, Jan. 8, 1845; 
came to this county in 1852; has family, one son, E. I. born Oct. 3, 1871; wife was Miss So- 
phia Errett, born in Allegheny, Pa. Aug. 1844; value of estate, $800; Rep. 

ATI rALGREN P. Sec. 4, P.O. Andover; from Sweden; 22 acres; $880. 
^^ WALTON JAS. Woodhull; hardware merchant; Rep; from England. 

WEBURG P. Sec. 13, P.O. Necoma; Rep; from Sweden; 80 acres, $3,000. 

WEIR A. M. Woodhull; druggist; Dem; from 111. 

WEIR J. Sec. 16, P.O. Woodhull; Dem; from Ohio; 80 acres, $4,000. 

WEIR J. Sec. 26, P.O. Woodhull; Dem; from Ohio; 160 acres, $8,000. 

WEIR JAMES, Woodhull; druggist; Dem; from 111. 

WENNERSTKUM CHAS. F. Woodhull; Clerk for J. D. Bell; born in Nye, near 
Hoetlanda, Sweden, July 29, 1852; came to the U.S. in June, 1870, and to this county in 
1874; single; Rep; Meth; is a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellows Lodges. 

WEST N. Sec. 32, P.O. Woodhull; rents of S. H. Ferris; Rep; from 111. 

WHITE THOS., P.O. Woodhull; retired; Rep; from England. 

WHITMORE D. Woodhull; retired; Dem; from Ohio; 224 acres, $ri,20o. 

WHITMORE JOHN, Woodhull; retired; lives with D. Whitmore; Dem; from Pa. 

WHITNEY G. W. Sec. i8, P.O. Woodhull; rents of W. Root; Rep; from Ohio. 

WHITNEY N. C. Sec. 8, P.O. Woodhull; Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in Washington 
Co. Ohio, May 14, 1834; came to this state and to Boone Co. in 1855, and remained there 
eighteen months, then removed to this county, and settled in this Tp; has family seven chil- 
dren, John T., Lafayette, Marietta, Cora C, N. Franklin, Willie T. and Hattie Gertrude; 
one dead, Mary E.; wife was Catherine Shiers, born in Philadelphia, Sept. 31, 1836; married 
Feb. 27, 1859; has 120 acres, value $7,200; Rep. 

WHITNEY WILLIAM, Sec. 17, P.O.Woodhull; Farmer; born in Town Waterford, Wash- 
ington Co. Ohio, May 13, 1823; came to the state and to DeKalb Co. in 1852; remained there 
six months, and then removed to Winnebago Co; remained there three years, and then came 
to this county, and settled in this Tp; has family three children, Geo. W., Sarah A. and 
Chas. E.; wife was Jane Cheffy, born in Va. June 18, 1821 ; married Feb. 15, 1844; has three 
children dead, Charlotte, Mary E. and Wm. R.; has 80 acres, value $4,800; Rep; Meth. 

WIDNEY A. E. Woodhull; clerk; Dem; from Pa. 

WILEY SOLON W. Woodhull; banker; Rep; from 111. 

WILKINS CHAS., P.O. Woodhull; constable; Rep; from Pa. 

WILKINS JOHN, Woodhull; carpenter; Rep; from Pa. 

WILKINS WM. Woodhull; carpenter; Rep; from Pa. 



HENRY COUNTY : OXFORD TOWNSHIP. 337 



WILLIS J. W. Woodhull; physician; Ind; from N.Y. 
WOODS JOS. Woodhull; painter; Dem; from Pa. 

7'UVER ISAAC, P.O. Woodhull; retired; Ind; from Pa. 



Business Directory. 



WOODHULL. 

Bell J. D. Dealer in Staple and Fancy Dry Goods, Ready Made Clothing, Hats, 
Caps, Boots, Shoes, Millinery and Straw Goods. 

Goodell B. H. Livery, Feed and Sale Stable. 

McHose J. J. Editor and Publisher Woodhull Enterprise. This office has 
recently been fitted up with New Type, Presses, etc., and has facilities for 
turning out all kinds of Job Work from a visiting card to a mammoth 
poster, with neatness and dispatch. Job Work done in colors if desired. 

Mitchell Abel, Dealer in Hardware, Stoves, and Farm Machinery. 

Richtmyer Abram, Attorney at Law and Collection Agent. 

RldenOUr JnO. B. Lumber Dealer. 

Rundstrom S. C. Manufacturer and Dealer in Furniture of every description. 

Sannquist Chas. G. Barber and Hair Dresser. Hair Cutting, Shaving and 
Shampooing done in the best style. Woodhull Bath House in connection. 

Vannice A. P. Dealer in Canned Goods, Tobacco, Cigars, Oysters, etc. 



OXFORD TOWNSHIP. 

A BRAHAMSON CHAS. Sec. 2; P.O. Woodhull; Rep; Luth; from Sweden; 120 acres. 

^^ ABRAHAMSON N. P. lives with his father, Sec. 2; P.O. Woodhull; Rep; Luth. 

ABRAHAMSON JST. A. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 2; P.O. Woodhull; born in Swe- 
den, March 4, 1825; came to the United States and to this county in i860; has family of 
seven children, Nelson P., Ameny, Sonoro, Emmet, John, Nancy and Tilda; wife was Mary 
Nelson, from same place; has 326 acres, value $16,300; Rep; Luth. 

ADMUN A. J. Sec. 13; P.O. Woodhull; farmer; Luth; from Sweden; has 60 ac. val. $3,000. 

ANDERSON JOHN, lives with his father, Sec. 5; P.O. New Windsor; farmer; Rep; Sweden. 

ANDERSON JOHN, Sec. 9; P.O. Alpha; farmer, rents of C. J. Samuelson; Rep; Luth. 

ANDERSON JOHN, Sec. 17, P.O. New Windsor; farmer; works for A. P. Talk; Rep; Luth. 

ANDERSON J. H. Sec. 9; P.O. Alpha; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden; 300 ac. val. $18,000. 

ANDERSON NELS, Sec. 5; P.O. New Windsor; farmer; Rep; Meth; from Sweden; 189 ac. 

r> ACHUS ARCHIBALD, lives with his father, Sec. 30; P.O. Oxford; laborer; Rep; born 111. 
•-* BARTON T. J. Alpha; hotel proprietor; Ind; Pres; from Pa, 

BACHUS JAMJES, Farmer; Sec. 30; P.O. Oxford; born in Gallia Co. Ohio, Oct. 14, 
1823; left there and came to this county in October, 1845, and is among the oldest settlers, 
there being very few when he came; has family of seven children living, one dead; has been 
married twice; first wife was Mary James, born in Pa. May 22; 1824; married May 22, 1846; 
she died Dec. 20, 1875; married again to Nancy C. Maxey, born in Hardin Co. Ky. March 29, 
1846; married May 31, 1876; has II9 acres, value $8,330; Rep; Meth; has been School 
Trustee for twenty-three years. 

BARTON WM., P.O. Alpha; laborer; Dem; from Pa. 

BANKSON OLUF, Sec. 21; P.O. Alpha; farmer, rents of W. D. Fleharty; Luth; from Germ'y. 

BEERS F. C. Sec. 19; P.O. Oxford; farmer, works for S. B. Shumway; Rep; from Ohio. 



338 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OP 

BERGSTROM PETER, Sec. 26; P.O. Woodhull; farmer, works for Jos. Laird; Rep. 

BESTOR JOHN G. lives with his father, Sec. 18; P.O. New Windsor; Rep; from Conn. 

BESTOR T. J. Sec. 18; P.O. New Windsor; Rep; from Conn; has 5 acres; val. estate $1,200. 

BILLINGS JOHN, Sec. 29; P.O. Alpha; farmer; Ind; from N.Y.; has 240 acres, val. $16,800. 

BIRQUIST C. Sec. 11; P.O. Woodhull; Rep; Luth; from Sweden; 80 acres, val. $4,000. 

BLADE JOHN M. Sec. 16; P.O. Alpha; Rep; Luth; from Sweden; has 200 ac. val. $12,000. 

BLAIR D. R., P.O. Alpha; farmer; Rep; born 111. 

BLAIR WM. Alpha; retired; Rep; from Nova Scotia. 

BLOOM FKANK, Farmer and Stock Raiser; Sec. l; P.O. Woodhull; born in Sweden, 
Oct. 8, 1834; came to the United States and to this county in the Spring of 1865; has three 
children, Charley M., Silma and John Oscar; wife was Hannah Johnson, from the same 
place, born May 23, 1847; married in the Spring of 1865; has 100 acres, val. $5,300; Rep; 
Luth. 

BRABERG PETER, Sec. 7; P.O. New Windsor; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden; 80 ac. 

BRIDGER T. W. Sec. 18; P.O. New Windsor; farmer; Rep; from N.Y.; has 170 acres. 

BRIGGS AUGUSTUS, Sec. 20; P.O. New Windsor; farmer, rents of G. W. Briggs; Ind. 

BRIGGS A. M. Sec. 4; P.O. Alpha; farmer, lives on his mother's place; Rep; Bapt; born 111. 

BRIGGS G. W. Sec. 31; P.O. Oxford; farmer; Rep; from N.Y.; has 260 acres, val. $10,000. 

BRIGGS G. W. Jr. Sec. 20; P.O. New Windsor; farmer, rents of G. W. Briggs; Rep; born 111. 

BRIGGS RANSOM, P.O. Oxford; laborer; Rep; born 111. 

BRYANT GILBERT, Sec. 19; P.O. New Windsor; farmer, lives with his father; Rep; born 111. 

BRYANT J. S. Sec. 19; P.O. New Windsor; farmer; Rep; from N. H.; 141 ac. val. $8,460. 

BOYD WM. S. Sec. 23; P.O. Alpha; farmer, rents of John Laird; Rep; from Pa. 

BOYD WM. Y. Sec. 14; P.O. Alpha; farmer, rents of Anson Calkins: Rep; from Pa. 

BUNDY A. C. Sec. 29; P.O. Alpha; farmer; Ind; from N.Y.; 40 acres, value $2,800. 

BUNDY EDWIN, P.O. Alpha; Sec. 28; Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in Otsego Co. 
N.Y., May 5, 1823; left there and removed to Oakland Co. Michigan, in the Spring of 1844, 
and remained there eight years, and then came to this county in the Spring of 1852; has 
family, nine children living: Rovilla C, Addella L., Urania M., Lelia L., Erskine J., Flo- 
rence G., May E., Gertrude T., and Bessie A.; two dead, Alasco E. and Harriet E.; wife 
was Sillinda L. Wilber, born in Madison Co. N. Y., Nov. 3, 1S24; married Feb. 22, 1844; 
has 160 acres, value $11,200; Ind; Supervisor one term. 

/'"^ADY J. F. Sec. 25: P.O. Woodhull; farmer; Rep; from Wis; 76 acres, value $5,300. 

^ CALKINS ALLEN, Sec. 23; P.O. Woodhull; farmer, rents of John Laird; Rep; from 111. 

CALKIIVS AlVSOlV, P.O. Alpha; Sec. 21; Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in Austerlitz, 
Columbia Co. N. Y., Nov. 14, 1818; came to the state and county and settled on the place 
where he now lives in June, 1841, there being but a few families in the town when he came; 
has family, five children: Mira P., Mary E., James B., John F., and Winfield C; wife was 
Miss H. Griffin, born in Berkshire Co. Mass; married April 20, 1847; has 397 acres, value 
$23,800; Rep; Assessor one term. 

CALKIN'S IRVING L. Sec. 22; P.O. Alpha; Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in Columbia 
Co. N. Y., April 20, 1855; came to this county with his parents the same year; has family, 
one daughter, Rena May, born Oct. 31, 1876; wife was Mary E. McQuiston, born in West- 
moreland Co. Pa. Aug. 29, 1858; married Aug. 25, 1875; Mr. C. works the A. A. Calkins 
estate of 200 acres, value $8,000; Rep; Bapt. 

CALKINS J. B. Sec. 22; P.O. Alpha; farmer, lives on his father's place; Rep; from 111. 

COLSON CHAS. Sec. 33; P.O. Alpha; rents of R. D. Timberlake; Dem; from Sweden. 

CAMPBELL W. O. P.O. Woodhull; Sec. 23; Farmer; born in Franklin Co. Pa. March 
8, 1838; came to the state and county in the Spring of 1866; in the Fall of 1866 removed to 
McLean Co. and remained there four years and six months, and then returned to this county; 
has family of six children, Lawrence N., Emma, Nellie M., John W,, Minnie M., and Nannie 
D.; wife was Theresa N. Hammond, born in Franklin Co. Pa. May 4, 1844; married Nov. 
II, 1863; both members of the Presbyterian Church; is Supervisor; Rep. 

CARLSON PETER, Sec. 29; P.O. Windsor; rents of Saml. Pritchard; Ind; from Sweden. 

CARR WM. Oxford; carpenter; Rep; from Pa. 

CHAMBERLAIN AMSEY, Sec. 29; P.O. New Windsor; farmer; Dem; from Ohio. 

CHAMBERLAIN LEANDER, Sec. 32; P.O. Alpha; farmer; lives on father's place; Rep; Ohio. 

CHARLSTON J. F. Sec. 11; P.O. Woodhull; farmer; Luth; from Sweden, 160 ac. val. $8,500. 



HENKY COUNTY: OXFORD TOWNSHIP. 339 

CLAY S. H. Sec. 35; P.O. Woodhull; lives with his father; Dem; from 111. 

CLAY W. L. Sec. 35; P.O. Woodhull; farmer; Dem; from Vt; 320 acres, value $ig,2oo. 

CLOSS JOHN, Sec. 12; P.O. Woodhull; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden; i6oac.val. $8,000. 

CLOSS L. A. Sec. 12; P.O. Woodhull; farmer; lives with his father; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

COLE A. B. P.O. Alpha; Sec. 28; Retired; born in Chenango Co. N. Y., April 13, 1806; 
left there and came to this county and settled in this township, Jan. E839, ^iid is among the 
oldest settlers, there being but six voters in the township when he came; has family, four 
children; wife was Augusta Briggs, born in Worcester Co. Mass. Nov. 22, 1804; married Nov. 
24, 1831; has 40 acres, value $3,000; has been County Commissioner one term, Assessor 
one term, and held other town offices; Dem; Bapt. 

COLE F. C. Sec. 28; P.O. Alpha; farmer; Dem; from N. Y.; 160 acres; value $10,000. 

COX JULIA ETTA Mrs. P.O. Alpha; Sec. 16; widow of John W. Cox, who was born 
in Wayne Co. Indiana, Jan. 12, 1807; settled in this county in the Spring of 1849; he died 
March 2, 1869, being one of the oldest settlers in the county; left family of five children, 
Eliza, Joseph F., John W., Saml. K., and Eorald S.; Mrs. C.'s maiden name was Julia Etta. 
Williamson, born in Jefferson Co. Ky. April 22, 1812; has 124 acres, value $10,000; Meth. 

COX J. F. P.O. Alpha; Sec. 20; Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in Rock Island Co. 111. 
Jan. 16, 1840; came to this county in 1850, and is among the oldest settlers; has family, four 
children living, Wilhelmina G., Elmer S., Clinton and Walter K.; one dead, Carlton F.; 
wife was Jane W. Sutton, born in Canada, Dec. 31, 1843; married Dec. 6, 1864; has 160 
acres, value $10,000; Rep; member of Masonic Lodge, No. 367. 

COX J. N. Oxford; school teacher; Rep; born 111. 

COX K. K. Retired, P.O. Oxford; born in what is now called Wayne Co. Ind. near Rich- 
mond, Aug. 29, 1805; left there and removed to Tippecanoe Co. Ind. in 1824, ana remained 
there until the Spring of '37; then removed to Mercer Co. this state, just across the line in 
Rivola Tp., at that time there being but three families in the Tp; he remained there until 
1864, then removed here, his former home being but three-quarters of a mile from where he 
now lives; has family, five children living, four dead; been married twice; first wife was 
Sarah L. Epperson, born in Tennessee, 1S09; married Dec. 13, 1832; she died Feb. 4, 1864; 
married again to Susan Morford, born in Penn. Sept. I, 1801; married Aug. 3, 1865; has 
been Justice of the Peace 24 years; two terms as County Commissioner; two terms as Super- 
visor, and held other town offices; Rep; Bapt. 

COX SAML. Sec. 16, P.O. Alpha; farmer, lives with his mother; Rep; born 111. 

CREE BARBRA, Sec. 13, P.O. Woodhull; farmer; Rep; from Ohio; 80 acres, val. $4,000. 

T~\ANIELSON AUGUST, Sec. 8, P.O. New Windsor; farmer, rents of S. Skalberg; Rep. 

■'-^ DOUGLASS S. S. Sec. 34, P.O. Woodhull; lives with his father; Dem; from III. 

DOUGLASS S. S. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 34, P.O. Woodhull; born in Greene Co. 
Ky. June 18, 1820; came to the state in 1834, and settled in Lawrence Co. 111. and remained 
there six years, then removed to Crawford Co. Ind.; remained there two years, and then 
removed to Sangamon Co. 111. and remained there until 1852, and then came here; has fam- 
ily, eight children living, two dead; has been married three times; first wife was Mary A. 
Bullock; second, Annie Glenon; third was Margaret C. Warner; has 320 acres, value $16,000; 
has 160 acres in Iowa; Dem. 

DROWN S. Sec. 32, P.O. Alpha; farmer; Rep; from Pa; 50 acres, value $3,000. 

"PCKLAND A. Alpha; carpenter; Ind; from Sweden. 

^ ELDER S. C. Sec. 14, P.O. Woodhull; farmer, rents of W. M. Roush; Dem; from Pa. 

EPPERSON SAMUEL, Merchant, Alpha; born in Indiana, July 5, 1830, and removed 
to Estill Co. Ky. the same year with his parents, and remained there until 1848, and then 
came to Rio Tp. Knox Co. and remained there until Feb. 1876, and then came to Alpha and 
went into the mercantile business; has family, four children living : Josephene, Wm. H., 
Elizabeth H. and John E.; Samuel A. deceased; wife was Sarah A. Epperson, born in Ind. 
Oct. 24, 1824; has 80 acres on Sec. 33; value estate, $6,000; Ind; United Brethren; mem- 
ber Masonic Lodge, No. 367. 

EPPERSON WM. Alpha; laborer; Ind; born 111. 

EVITTS R. B., P.O. Oxford; farmer; Rep; from Pa. 



F 



ALK J. A. Sec. 16, P.O. New Windsor; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden; 160 acres. 
FALL JOHN, Sec. 10, P.O. Alpha; farmer, rents of C. F. Peterson; Rep; Luth; Sweden. 



340 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

FALiK A. P. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 17, P.O. New Windsor; born in the State of 
Colmer, Sweden, July 27, 1838; left there and came to this Co. in 1854, and commenced 
working by the month, and now has the best improved fai-m in the Tp; has family one daugh- 
ter living, ReginaO.; two sons dead; wife was Margaret C. Peterson, born in Sweden, June 
8, 1848; married Feb. 14, 1867; has S65 2-3 acres all under cultivation, value $56,225; Ind; 
Luth. 

FALK JOHlSr F. Farmer, Sec. 17, P.O. New Windsor; born in Sweden, Jan. 24, 1850; left 
there with his parents and came to the U.S. and to Mercer Co. in 1854; came here shortly 
after; has family, three children ; Edward F., Ludrick T. and Hilda Josephene; wife was 
Caroline S. Johnson, from Sweden, born March 25, 1848; married April 7, 1870; value of 
estate $5,000; Ind; Swedish Luth. 

FARUM JOHN A. Sec. 25, P.O. Woodhull; farmer, rents of P. Welch; Rep; Luth; Sweden. 

FLSHEL JACOB, Sec. 23, P.O. Woodhull; farmer, works for W. O. Campbell; Rep; from Pa. 

FLEHARTV W. S. Sec. 18, P.O. New Windsor, farmer; Ind; from 111; 267 ac. val. $16,020. 

FRENELE ISAAC,. Alpha; laborer; Rep; from 111. 

FRENELE O. Alpha; carpenter; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

/^AMBEL H. Alpha; laborer; Ind; born 111. 

^ GOFORTH T. H. Sec. 32, P.O. Alpha; farmer, rents of Mrs. P. Underwood; Rep; Tenn. 

GAMBLE S. A. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 24, P.O. Woodhull; born in Dry Run, 
Franklin Co. Penn. July 21, 1838; came to this Co. in the Fall of '57; has family, four chil- 
dren : Fannie, Fred E., Willie M. and Nonnie D.; wife was Miss Annie E. Widney, born 
in Spring Run, Franklin Co. April 17, 1840; married April 17, 1865; died March 5, 1876; has 
140 acres, value $8,400; Dem; Pres. 

GAMBLE T. W, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 24, P.O. Woodhull; born in Perry Co. 
Penn. April 19, 1830; came to the state and settled at Abingdon, Knox Co. in the Fall of 
'55; remained there two years, and then came to this Co; has family, eight children : Bell 
N., Annetta, Ariminta M., Nellie T., Kate M., Carrie L., Lloyd E. and Myrtle; wife was 
Margaret C. Elder, born in Dry Run, Franklin Co. Penn. March 15, 1835; married Sept. 21, 
1853; has 160 acres, val. $9,600; Dem; Pres. 

GRANT A. W. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 17, P.O. New Windsor; born in Smoen, 
Sweden. Aug. 7, 1840; came to the U.S. and to Galesburg in Aug. 1864, and remained there 
until 1874, and then came to this Co; has family, three children : Maten W., Adolph A. and 
Edwin N.; wife was Christine M. Peterson, from the same place, born Oct. 22, 1842; mar- 
ried April 3, 1869; has 213^ acres, value $16,500; Rep; Luth. 

GUSTISON NELSE, Sec. 23, P.O. Woodhull; rents of S. Pritchard; from Sweden. 

IT AMMOND W. T. Sec. 18, P.O. New Windsor; farmer; Rep; from Maine; has 55 acres. 

^ HARKNESS A. J. Sec. 32, P.O. Alpha; farmer, lives with his father; Ind; from Ohio. 

HAKK?iES8 D . D. Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 32, P.O. Alpha; born in Cayuga Co. 
N.Y. April 14, 1819; left there in 1835, and removed to Sandusky Co. Ohio, and remained 
there until 1855, 3-"^ then came to this Co.; has family, six children : Delivan, Arthur J., 
Jennie. Eva, Prescott, and Laura; wife was Amanda Alexander, born m Herkimer Co. N.Y. 
July 27, 22; married June 24, 1846; has 140 acres, value $9,800; was School Director. 

HARKNESS DELIVAN, Sec. 32, P.O. Alpha; farmer, lives with his father; Ind; from Ohio. 

HARTGROVE WM. Oxford; blacksmith; Ind; from Pa. 

HAWKINSON E. Sec. 36, P.O. Woodhull; farmer; Rep; from Sweden; 90 ac. val. $5,400. 

HAWKINSON N. Sec. 36, P.O. Woodhull; farmer; Rep; from Sweden; 70 acres, val. $4,200. 

HAYES ELNOR, Alpha; blacksmith; Ind; from Pa. 

HENDERSON JOHN, Sec. 15, P.O. Alpha; farmer; Rep; from Pa; 240 ac. val. $14,400. 

HENDRICKS S. A. Alpha; restaurant: Rep; born 111. 

HERBERT T. M. Sec. 18, P.O. New Windsor; attorney at law; Rep; from Ohio. 

HKiLEY H. Sec. 31, P.O. Oxford; farmer; Rep; from Ohio; 40 acres, val. $1,600. 

HILL CYRUS, Sec. 18, P.O. New Windsor; farmer; Rep; Meth; from Pa. 

HILLER J. B. Sec. 24, P.O. Woodhull; mechanic; Rep; Bapt; from N.Y. has iiyi acres. 

HO AG J. B. Notary Public and Collecting Agent, Alpha; born in Rensselaer Co. N. Y., 
Sept. 1817; left New York and came to the state and Co. in 1839; has family, four children : 
Lyman J., Ira G., Mary O., and Chas. S.; has been married four times; first wife was Sarah 
Collins, from Ohio; second was Rosetta Hammond, from Maine; third was Ruth Tompkins, 
from N. Y; fourth was Mary Hodgens, from West Va; value estate $2,500; Ind; served 
three terms as Justice of the Peace, and held other town offices. 



HENRY COUNTY: OXFORD TOWNSHIP. 341 

HOLSTROM N. P. Sec. ri; P.O.Woodhull; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden; I20 ac. val. $6,000. 
HOOGNER JOHN, Sec 6; P.O. New Windsor; farmer; Rep; Meth; from Sweden, has 251 acres. 
HOWELL CHAUNCY, Sec. 25; P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from Orange Co. N.Y.; has 360 acres. 
HOWELL GEO. DEWITT, lives with his father; Sec. 25; P.O. •Woodhull; Rep; from N.Y. 
HOWELL SAMUEL P. lives with his father; Sec. 25; P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from N.Y. 

JAYNES JOHN, Sec. 27; P.O. Alpha; farmer; Rep; from Pa; has 38 acres, value $3,000. 
JOHNSON A. Sec. 8; P.O. New Windsor, farmer; Rep; Meth; from Sweden; has 80 acres. 

JOHNSON ANDRO, Sec. 4; P.O. New Windsor; rents of A. P. Peterson; farmer; Luth; Sweden. 

JOHNSON GUST. Sec. 3; P.O. Woodhull; rents of Peter Peterson; farmer; Rep; from Sweden. 

JOHNSON JOHN, Sec. 31; P.O. Oxford; rents of W. Hartgrove; farmer; from Norway. 

JOHNSON JOHN, Sec. 5; P.O. New Windsor; rents of G. Johnson; farmer; Luth; from Sweden. 

JOHNSON" JONAS, P.O. New Windsor; Sec. 8; Farmer; born in Westyertland, Sweden, 
Oct. 2, 1827; came to N. Y. in 1864; left there and came to Genesee, this Co. in 1865, and 
in 1866 removed to Moline, Rock Island Co. and remained there until 1874, then came here; 
has family, four children living, three dead; wife was Hannah Johnson, born in the same 
place, March 13, 1833; married June, 1855; has 80 acres, value $4,000; Rep; Luth. 

JOHNSON J. A. lives with his father; Sec. 8; P.O. New Windsor; farmer; Rep; Luth; Sweden. 

JOHNSON J. G. Sec. 4; P.O. Opheim; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden; 122 acres, val. $6,500. 

JOHNSOiv J. M. P.O. Alpha; Sec. 27; Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in Clark Co. Ind. 
Jan. 22, 1827, came to the State and to the Co. in the Spring of 1859; has family five children, 
J. W., Francis O., Emma, Augusta J. and Martha; wife was Miss Sarah Davis, born in 
Middletown, Ct. Dec. 30, 1840; married May 15, 1862; has 52 acres, value $4,160; Dem; both 
members of the M. E. Church. 

JOHNSON P. Sec. 2; P. O. Woodhull; Rep; Luth; from Sweden; 68 acres, value $4,080. 

JOHNSON S. A. Sec. 11; P.O. Woodhull; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden; 80 ac. val. $4,000. 

JOHNSON S. G., P.O. Alpha; carpenter; Rep; from Sweden. 

JONES O. Sec. 7; P.O. Windsor; Rep; from Canada; has ,155 acres, value $10,850. 

T/-ELLEY TIMOTHY, P.O. Alpha; laborer; Ind; Cath; from Ireland. 

-•^ KENNEDY A. T. lives on J. E. Kennedy's farm; Sec. 21; P.O. Alpha; farmer; Dem; 111. 
KENNEDY J. E. Sec. 21; P.O. Alpha; farmer; Dem; Pres; from Pa; has 180 ac. val. $10,800. 
KERR VALENTINE, Sec. 15; P.O. Alpha; farmer; Rep; from Pa; has 200 acres, val. $12,000. 
KINTER JOHN, Sec. 23; P.O. Alpha; farmer; works for John Taze; Ind; from Pa. 

T AWSON A., Alpha; post master; Rep; from Sweden. 

^-^ LEWIS J. C, P.O. Alpha; Baptist Clergman; Ind; born in 111. 

LAIRD JOSEPH, P.O. Woodhull; Sec. 26; Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in Franklin 
Co. Penn, Nov. 11, 1812; came to this State and settled in Pike Co. in the Fall of 1856; 
remained there 6 yrs. and then came to this Co; hasjfamily five children, Margaret E., Minerva 
J., Catherine M., Samuel J. and Thos. A.; wife was Sarah A. Adams, born in Perry Co. Pa. 
in 1814; married March 8, 1838, she died Dec. 31, 1855; married again Sept. 13, 1863, to 
Mrs. Charlotte Growe; born in Granville, Mass. April 4, 1823; has 80 acres, value $4,800; 
Dem; Pres. 

LiEET LOKEN, P.O. Alpha; Grain Dealer; born near Quebec, Canada, Nov. 9, 1830; came 
to the U.S. in 1851, and to the State in 1855, and to the Co. in 1868; has family three children, 
Avery E., Minnie A. and Daisy B.; wife was Miss Mary F. Newton; born in Acworth, N. H. 
Nov. 7, 1835; married in Nov. 1855; Rep. 

LEWIS J. C, P.O. Alpha; baptist clergyman; Ind;' born in 111. 

LINDBERG S. Sec. 3; P.O. Opheim; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden; has 144 ac. val. $7,200. 

LINDER JOHN, Sec. 6; P.O. New Windsor; farmer; rents of J. Hoogner; Rep; Luth; Sweden. 

LINQUIST P. M. Sec. 13; P.O. Woodull; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden: 160 ac. $8,000. 

LINN NATHAN, Sec. 7; P.O. New Windsor; farmer, lives on I. Wilcox place; Dem; Ohio. 

LOCKWOOD A. C. Sec. 30; P.O. Oxford; farmer; Ind; Bapt; born 111; 80 acres, val. $4,500. 

LOQUIST J., Alpha; laborer; Rep; from Sweden. 

LUTTRELL C. C. Sec. 19; P.O. New Windsor; farmer; Ind; from Tenn; no acres, $7,700. 

lyrcGLAUGHLAN L. P.O. Oxford; Rep; farmer; from Pa. 

MCLAUGHLIN S. S. Sec. 30; P.O. Oxford; farmer; Rep; from Pa; 85 acres, $5,950. 



342 VOTEES AND TAXPAYERS OF 

McCUKDY A. H. Sec. 22; Farmer; P.O. Alpha; born in Westmoreland Co. Pa. Sept. 27, 
1826; came to this county in the Spring of 1864, and settled in this Tp.; has family of five 
children: Margaret J., Annie C, John, Samuel, and Clyde; wife was Martha Taze, from 
same place, born Aug. 1823; married in June, 1852; has 74 acres, value $5,000; Rep; both 
members of the Baptist Church. 

McDEKMOTT JOHN", Sec. 26; P.O. Woodhull; Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in the 
County Tyrone, Ireland, May 10, 1847; came to the U. S. and to N. Y. in 1853; remained 
there until l8'58, and then came to this county; has family four children: Peter, John, Mary 
A., and Ellen; wife was Mary A. Fall, from the same place; married Feb. l, 1853; has 320 
acres, value $20,000; Dem; Cath. 

McQUISTON SAML. Sec. 28; P.O. Alpha; farmer, works for F. C. Cole; Dem; from Pa. 

McVITTY JOHN, Sec. 27 P.O. Woodhull; farmer, works for James Stitt; Ind; from Pa. 

MAYER C. A., Alpha; butcher; Dem; from Germany. 

MEA.D HARVEY, Sec. 19; P.O. Oxford; farmer, rents of C. C. Luttrell; Rep; from N. Y. 

MOLTHOP D. O., Alpha; carriage maker and blacksmith; Ind; from Pa. 

MORS PETER, Sec. 5; P.O. New Windsor; farmer, rents of S. Skalberg; Rep; Luth; Sweden. 

MUNSON AUGUST, Sec. 18; P.O. New Windsor; farmer, works for W. S. Fleharty; Ind. 

TVTELSON LEWIS, Sec. 6; P.O. New Windsor; farmer; Rep; Meth; from Sweden; 68 acres, 
-'-^ NEWMAN C. A., Alpha; butcher; Dem; born 111. 
NORGREN C. E., Alpha; druggist; Dem; from Sweden. 

/^AK PETER, Sec, 4; P.O. Alpha; farmer, rents of Gustus Johnson; Luth; from Sweden. 
^-^ OCEAN CHAS. Sec. 9; P.O. New Windsor; farmer, rents of C. J. Samuelson; Rep. 
OLSON N. P. Sec. 3; P.O. Alpha; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden; 160 acres, val. $8,000. 
OLSON S. T. Sec. 12; P.O. Woodhull; farmer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden; 160 acres. 
.OVERSTREET H. S. Sec. 36; P.O. Woodhull; farmer; Dem; born 111; 120 acres, val. $8,400. 
OVERSTREET MITCHEAL E. Sec. 36; P.O. Woodhull; Rep; Pres; Ky; roo ac. $7,500. 
OVERSTREET ROBT. J. Sec. 36; P.O. Woodhull; Rep; born 111; 100 acres, val. $7,500. 

pALME PETER, Sec. 11; P.O. Alpha; farmer, rents of L. M. Nelson; Luth; from Sweden. 
PALM WM. Sec. 20; P.O. New Windsor; farmer, rents of A. P. Falk; Luth; Sweden. 

PATTERSON F. Sec. 15; P.O. Alpha; farmer; Rep; from Mass; 80 acres, value $5,000. 

PATTERSON O. H. Sec. 28; P.O. Alpha; farmer; Ind; Bapt; from N. Y; 156 acres, $9,360. 

PERSING W. Sec. 24; P.O. Woodhull; farmer; Dem; Pres; from Pa; 40 acres, value $1,800. 

PETERSON C. Sec. i; P.O. Woodhull; farmer; Luth; from Sweden; 120 acres, $6,000. 

PETERSON JOHN, Sec. 21; P.O. Alpha; farmer, rents of A. P. Falk; Rep; Luth; Sweden. 

PETERSON LARS, Sec. 5; P.O. New Windsor; farmer; Rep; Meth; Sweden; 240 ac. $11,000. 

PETERSON N. P. Sec. 12; P.O. Woodhull; farmer; Rep; Luth; Sweden; 240 ac, $12,000. 

PETERSON PETER, Sec. 4; P.O. Opheim; farmer; Rep; Meth; Sweden; 275 ac. $13,750. 

PIPER HENRY, Oxford; school teacher; Rep; born 111. 

POPE E. S. Oxford; school teacher; Rep; born Wis. 

POPLETT FRAXK, Alpha; Merchant; born in Knox Co. 111. May 28, 1851; came to 
this county Feb. 8, 1S75; has family; two children living, Ella L., born Jan. 12, 1875; Mary 
A., born Aug. 19, 1876; Hattie, born July 10, 1873, died Aug. 11, 1873; wife was Miss Laura 
L. Rowe, born in Knox Co. Feb. 22, '49; married July 3, 1872; value of estate $3,000; Ind. 

PORTER GEORGE, Alpha; harness-maker; from Scotland. 

PRITCHARD SAML. Sec. 25; P.O. Woodhull; farmer; Dem; from N. Y. 

REHN A. Sec. 5; P.O. New Windsor; Rep; from Sweden; 70 acres, value $3,500. 

REHN JOHN, Sec. 5; P.O. New Windsor; farmer, lives with his father; Rep; from Sweden. 

REYNOLDS W. T., Alpha; laborer; Ind; from 111. 

ROBERTS H. H. Sec. 17; P.O. New Windsor; farmer; Dem; from Pa; igS ac. val. $11,880, 

ROBERTS HENRY, Alpha; livery stable; Rep; from 111. 

ROWE J. L., P.O. Alpha; lumber dealer; Ind; born 111. 

ROWE THOS. L., Alpha; hardware and groceries; Ind; born 111. 

RUSK HIRAM, Sec. 29; P.O. Alpha; farmer; Dem; from Missouri; 40 acres, value $2,580. 

RUTLEDGE SAMUEL, Sec. 34; P.O. Alpha; Dem; from Pa; rents of R. D. Timberlake. 




J. D. BELL. 
Woodhull. 



HEimV COTTNTY: OXFOUD TOWNSHIP. 345 

SCHWAKZ C, Alpha; shoemaker; Dem; from Germany. 
SEIBERT STEWART, Sec. 13; P.O. Woodhull; farmer; Dem; from Pa. 

SETTERDAHL AUGUST, Sec. 19; P.O. New Windsor; farmer; Rep; Luih; from Sweden. 

SEXTON A. G., Alpha; carriage maker and blacksmith; Ind; from Pa. 

SEXTON H. H., P.O. Alpha; physician and surgeon; Ind; from Pa. 

SEXTON MILES H., P.O. Alpha; farmer; Ind; from Illinois. 

SHAFLEE \VM. Sec. 28; P.O. Alpha; farmer; Dem; Meth; from Ohio; 40 acres, val. $2,800. 

SHINN H. G. P.O. New Windsor; Sec. 20; Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in Harrison 
County, W. Va. Jan. I, 1S34; came to this connty in the Spring of 1S65; has family of three 
children, Frank II., Libbie E., and Nellie; wife was Hannah 1^. Henderson; born in Fayette 
County, Pa. Jan. 22, 1841; married March 10, 1S68; has 201 acres, value $14, ceo; Ind; one 
child dead, Bertie. 

SHINN M. H. P.O. Alpha; Sec. 22; Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in Harrison County, 
Western Va. Nov. 5, 1821; left Va. in the Spring of 1S34, and settled in Canton, Fulton 
County, Illinois, and remained there until 1842, and then removed to Knox County, and 
remained there until 1855, then came here; has family four children living — Silva A., Genette 
E., Carroll A., and Bertha P.; Mrs. Shinn's maiden name was Paulina H. Pease, born in 
Starksborough, Addison Co. Vt. Feb. 19. 1S28; married July 9, 1S48; has 247 acres, value 
$14,820; Ind. 

SHUBACK AUGUST, Sec. 34; P.O. Alpha; Ind; from Sweden; rents of R. D. Timberlake, 

SHUMWAY S. B. Sec. 30; P.O. New Windsor; Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in Brad- 
ford County, Pa. April 15, 1822; left there and came to this state, and settled in Lee County, 
in 1844, remained there two years, then removed to Galesburg, Knox County, remained there 
four years, was off and on in California four years, and settled in Hepry County in the Fall 
of 1853; has family four sons and three daughters; wife was Miss Lydia J. Streeter, born in 
Illinois, October, 1835; married Feb. 28, 1854; has 421 acres, value $21,000; was Supervisor 
seven years. Assessor two terms, and held oiher town oflices; Ind; Cong. 

SKALBERG S. Sec. 6; P.O. New Windsor; Rep; Luth; from Sweden; 600 ac. val. $30,000. 

SKINNER GRAHAM, Alpha; restaurant; Rep; from Pa. 

SKINNER JOS. B. Sec. 24; P.O. Woodhull; Farmer; born in Jackson Hall, Franklin Co. 
Pa. Nov. 2, 1852; came to this county in the Spring of 1870; no family; wife was Miss Bell 
N. Gamble, born in Abingdon, Knox County, Illinois, April 13, 1S56; married Feb. 6, 1877; 
value of estate $500; Dem; both members of the Presbyterian «hurch. 

SLUYTER H. O. Sec. 24; P.O. Woodhull; carpenter; Rep; from N. Y; 26 acres, value $3,000. . 

SNYDER WM. A. Sec. 13; P.O. Woodhull; Rep; from Ohio; lives with Barbra Cree. 

SPIVEY ELIAS, Sec. 16; P.O. Alpha; Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in Montgomery 
County, Indiana, Feb 15, 1836; came to this county December, 1866; has family five chil- 
ren; Ida L., Edward D.. John C., Morris E., and James M; wife was Sarah M. 01in,born iii 
Trumbull County. Ohio, Feb. 27, 183S; married Dec. 22, 1S59; has i6o acres, value $9,600; 
Dem. 

SPIVEY J. R. Sec. 18; P.O. New Windsor; farmer; Dem; from Ind; 80 acres, value $5,600. 

STARBOARD PEENIA Mrs. Sec. 3; P.O. Alpha; Bapt; from N. Y; ifio acres, value $8,000. 

STITT JAMES, Sec. 27; P.O. Woodhull; farmer; Rep; Meth; from Pa; 160 acres, val. $9,600. 

STONEBURG JOHN, Sec. 16; P.O. Alpha; farmer; from Sweden; rents of John Henderson. 

STONEBURG JOHN, Alpha; mason; Ind; from Sweden. 

SWANSON AUGUST, Sec i; P.O. W^oodhull; Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in Vena, 
Sweden, April 22, 1S41; came to the United States, and to this county in the Fall of 1857; 
has family seven children : Frans J., Carl A., Adolph A., Mary M., Sarah A., Geo^ A., and 
Emily; wife was Miss Matilda Johnson, born in Estergelen, Sweden, April 22, 1841; married 
Jan. 24, 1862; has 210 acres, value $10,500; Rep; Luth. 

SWANSON FRANK, Sec. 23; P.O. Woodhull; farmer; Ind; from Sweden; works for J. Widney. 

'T'AUKSLEY J. P.O. Alpha; station agent C. B. & Q. R.R; Dem; from Va, 
-*■ TAZE JOHN, Sec. 23, P.O. Alpha; farmer; Ind; from Pa; 240 acres, $14,400. 

TAYIiOR W. C. Sec. 29; P.O. New Windsor; Farmer; born in Colchester County, Nova 
Scotia, Jan. I, 1826; came to the state, and settled in Knox County, in 1S40; left there and 
came to this county in 1863; has family four children living, Jacob E., C. W., Harriet A., 
and Frederick B.; four children dead, Eunice, Ziremba, Martha, and Thomas; wife was 
Maria E. Parkins, born in Gallia County, Ohio, April 9, 1829; married Nov. 7, 1847; has 80 
acres, value $8,000; Rep: Meth. 

31 



346 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

TAZE WM. Sec. 28, P.O. Alpha; farmer; Ind; from Pa; 194 acres, $9,700. 

THOMAS J. R. Sec. 30, P.O. Oxford; farmer; Rep; from Pa; 40 acres, $2,000. 

TILDEN J. F. Sec. 35, P.O. Woodhull; farmer; lives with father; Rep; from Vt. 

TILDEN J. H. Sec. 35, P.O. Woodhull; farmer; lives on father's place; Rep; from Vt. 

TILDEN O. E. Sec. 35, P.O. Woodhull; farmer; Rep; from Vt; 240 acres, $12,000. 

TIMBERLAKE GEO. Sec. 33, P.O. Alpha; lives with father; Dem; born 111. 

TIMBEKLAKE JOS. Sec. 34, P.O. Alpha; lives on father's place; Dem; born 111. 

TIMBERLAKE R. D. Sec. 33. P-0. Alpha; Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in Green 
Co. Ky. Dec. 17, 1807; left Ky. i 1833, and removed to Sangamon Co. Ill; remained there 
four years, then removed to this county, and settled on the place he now lives in the Fall of 
1837, at that time there being but one man in the Tp., Almeron Underwood; has family nine 
children living, four dead; Mr. T. is the most extensive farmer in the town; has farm of 920 
acres, most all of which is under cultivation; Mrs. T.'s maiden nane was Jemima Simms, 
born in Barren Co. Ky. Aug. 25, l8ii; married Nov. 13, 1S34; value of estate, $46,000; 
Dem. 

TIMBERLAKE WM. Sec. 33, P.O. Alpha; lives on father's place; Dem; from 111. 

UNDERWOOD A. D. Sec. 33, P.O. Alpha; Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in Henry 
Co. Oxford Tp. 111. Dec. 11, 1839, and is among the oldest settlers; has a family, two chil- 
dren, Hester P. born Nov. 18, 1871; Bruce A. born Oct. i, 1874; wife was Miss Ellen L. 
Sinden, born in LaSalle Co. 111. May 27, 1849; married March 31, 1870; has 160 acres, 
value $11,200; Assessor one term, and is Justice of the Peace; Rep. 

UNDERWOOD MILTON, Sec. 31, P.O. Alpha; Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in 
Tecumseh, Lenawee Co. Michigan, Oct. 29, 1 831; left there and canr.e to this county and 
settled in this Tp. March, 1837, he and his brother being the two oldest settlers in the 
Tp; has family three children, Elvin J., Eli D. and Elias M.; wife was Miss L. L. Arnold, 
born in Cattaraugus Co. N.Y. March ir, 1838; married June 11, 1856; has 303 acres, value 
$15,150; Rep. 



V 



ANHORN JOHN, P.O. Oxford; laborer; Rep; from Ohio. 

VALLINE ANDREW, Sec. 9, P.O. Alpha; farmer; renter; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 



■XirALLINE N. P. Sec. 13,* P.O. Woodhull; farmer; Luth; from Sweden; 240 acres, $12,000. 
^* WARNER W. W., P.O. Alpha; school teacher; Ind; born 111. 

WEIBLE JOHN, Sec. 26, P.O. Woodhull; rents of Jno. Taze; Ind; from Pa. 

WELCH JAMES, Sec. 26, P.O. Woodhull; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland; 80 ac. $4,000. 

WELCH JAS.. P.O. Alpha: laborer; Ind; Cath; from Ireland. 

WELCH NICHOLAS, Alpha; section boss; Ind; Cath; from Ireland. 

WELCH P. Sec. 26, P.O. Woodhull; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland; 320 acres, $16,000. 

WESTLAND MARY C. Sec. 13, P.O. Woodhull; Luth; from Sweden; 100 acres, $5,000. 

WIDNEY JOHN A. Sec. 23, P.O. Woodhull; Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in Frank- 
lin Co. Pa. March 27, 1840; came to this state in 1855, and settled in Mount Carroll, and 
resided there three years; then removed to this county in the Spring of 1858; has family of 
four children, Stella B., Bertie G., Grace E. and Leo E.; wife was Sarah A. Gillette, born in 
Sullivan Co. N.Y. March 7, 1841; married Oct. 26, 1865; has 160 acres in Iowa, and 160 in 
Nebraska; served three years in the late war, in Co. D, 112th 111. Vols; Tax Collector one 
term; Ind; both members M. E. Church. 

WIDNEY MARGARET, Sec. 23. P.O. Woodhull; Meth; from Pa; 120 acres. $7,200. 

WILBER MARTHA S. Sec. 29, P.O. Alpha; Widow of the Tate Robert M. Wilber, who 
was born in Rhode Island May 9, 1798; he came to this state and settled in Warren Co. in 
1838, and remained there until 1849; then came to this county and settled on the place she 
now lives; he left family thirteen children; two were killed in the late war; Mrs. W.'s 
maiden name was Martha Cleveland, born in Grafton Co. N. H. Oct. 4, 1815; has 160 acres, 
value $10,000; Bapt; Mr. W. was a Baptist clergyman. 

WILBER R. P. Sec. 29, P.O. Alpha; farmer; lives with mother; Ind; born 111. 

WILCOX I. Sec. 7, P.O. New Windsor; farmer; Rep; from 111; 351 acres, $24,570. 

WILLIAMS JOHN, Sec. 31, P.O. Alpha; farmer; works for M. Underwood; Rep; from Ky. 

WILSON GEO. W. Sec. 14, P.O. Alpha; lives with father; Dem; born 111. 

WILSON HIRAM C. Sec. 14, P.O. Alpha; lives with father; Dem; from Ohio. 



HENBY OOLTNTY : GALVA TOWNSHIP. 347 

WILSON S. J. Sec. 14, P.O. Alpha; Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in the town of Carmi- 
chaels, Green Co. Pa. March I, 1815; left there in March, 1845, and went to Adams Co. 
Ohio, and remained there until Nov. I846; then removed to Highland Co. Ohio, and 
remained there until the following March; then removed to Cuba, Clinton Co. and then to this 
county in 1854; has family of ten children, Hiram, Geo., Martha, Stephen, Alfred, Elmore, 
Crawford, Lee, Forest, and Margaret; wife was Mary Wright, born in Clinton Co. Ohio, 
June g, 1851; married Dec. 12. 1S50; has 160 acres, value $IO,0OO; Dem. 

WOODS R. L. Sec. 24, P.O. Woodhull; Farmer and Stock Raiser; born in Jackson, Perry 
Co. Pa. Feb. 22, 1834; came to LaSalle Co. in May, 1856, and remained there until 1858, 
and then returned to Pa; came to this county in March, 1869; has family of four children, 
Carrie L., Josie W., Maggie B. and Laura May; wife was Miss S. A. Gamble, born in the 
same place, Jan. 18, 1835; married Feb. 22, i860; has I33j^ acres, value $10,000; Dem; 
both members ot the Pres. Church. 

WYMAN F. D. Sec. 24, P.O. Woodhull; works for A. Mitchell; Rep; from N.Y. 

WYMAN P. L. Sec. 24, P.O. Woodhull; lives on A. Mitchell's farm; Rep; from N.Y. 

T'UCK DANIEL, Sec. 27, P.O. Alpha; farmer; Rep; from Pa; 108 acres, $7,560. 

Business Directory. 

ALPHA. 

Epperson Sani'l. Dealer in Dry Goods, Groceries, Clothing, &c. 
Hoag J. B. Notary Public and Collecting Agent. 
Leet Loren, Grain Dealer. 

Rowe & Poplett, Dealers in Groceries, Hardware, Glassware, Queensware, 
Boots, Shoes, Pumps. Produce taken in exchange for goods. 

OXFORD TOWNSHIP. 

Bundy Edwin, Farmer and Stock Raiser. Poland and China Hogs a specialty. 
Sec. 28, P. O. Alpha. 



GALVA TOWNSHIP. 

A LBRO A. W., Galva; groceries; Rep; Prot; from N. Y; owns 45 acres coal land. 

-^^ ALBRO JOHN, Galva; laborer; Meth. 

ABY ALEXANDER, Farmer. Sec. 25, P.O. Galva; born in Richland Co. Ohio, April 9. 
1830; came to county 1855; Rep; owns 160 acres of land, valued at $g.6oo; wife was Mal- 
vina Stanton, born in Rochester, N.Y. March i, 1826; married Feb. r8, 1850; has had nine 
children, four living, and five dead; seven boys, and two girls; was School Director from 
1868 to 1877. 

ALBRO LOUISA Mrs. wid. of Durias; Galva; from N.Y. 

ALBRO SAMUEL T. Galva; clerk; Rep; Prot; from Knox Co. 

ALDERMAN JAS. Galva; Dem; from N.Y. 

ALDERMAN M. B. Galva; laborer; Rep; from Knox Co. 

ALDERMAN O. J. Sr. Galva; teamster; Rep; Prot; from Pa. 

ALDERMAN O. J. Jr. Galva; laborer; Rep; from Pa. 

ALEXANDER J. H. Galva; carpenter; Rep; Bapt; from N.Y. 

ALLEN A. E. Galva; harness-maker; Rep; from Geneseo Co. 111. 

ALLEN WM. J. Galva; teamster; Dem; Prot; from N.Y. 

ALINE ERICK, Sec. 3, P.O. Galva; farmer; from Sweden; owns 80 acres, 

ANDERSON A. Galva; laborer; Luih; from Sweden. 

ANDERSON ALEX. Galva; clerk; Rep; Meth; from Sweden. 



348 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

ANDERSON ANDREW, Sec. 7, P.O. Galva; farmer; iiid; from Sweden; owns 105 acres. 

ANDERSON ANDREW Jr. Sec. 7, P.O. Galva; farmer; lives wiih father; Ind; from Sweden. 

.ANDERSON ANDREW, Sec. 10, P.O. G.xlva; farmer; Rep; Prot; from Sweden; 68 acres. 

ANDERSON ANDREW, Sec. 4, P.O. Galva; lab. on J. N. Morgan's farm; from Sweden. 

ANDERSON AUGUST, Galva; laborer; Rep; Meth; from Sweden. 

ANDERSON A. B. Galva; boots and shoes; Dem; Meili; from Sweden. 

ANDERSON A. P. Galva; dry goods; Rep; Prot; from Sweden. 

ANDERSON B. Galva; hotel; Rep; from N.J. 

ANDERSON JNO. Sec. 7, P.O. Galva; farmer; lives with father; Ind; from Sweden. 

ANDERSON PETER E Galva; laborer; Dem; Prot; from Sweden. 

ANDERSON P. G. Galva; clerk; Prot; from Sweden. 

ANDERSON SQUIRE, Galva; farmer; Rep; Prot; from N.Y. 

ANDERSON SWAN, Galva; laborer; from Sweden. 

ANDERSON W. Galva; laborer; Rep; Bapt; from Miss. 

ANDREWS JOHN H. Grocer; Galva; born in Fabius, Onondaga Co. N.Y. July 30, 
1837; came to this county April 12, 1872; Rep; Bapt; val. prop. $2,000; lived in Fabius un- 
til he was fourteen years old, and moved to Newark, N.J. Aug. 1S51; lived there twenty-one 
years, and then came to this county April, 1S72. -> 

ARNOLD W. Sec. 32, P.O. Galva; farmer; Prot; owns 80 acres. 

ARSON S. L. Galva; clerk; Rep; Freewill Meth; from Norway. 

ARVIDSON CHAS. Galva; teamster; Rep; Meth; from Sweden. 

ATWOOD H. T. Sec. 14, P.O. Galva; farmer; Dem; Prot; from Marshall Co. Ill; 120 acres. 

ATWOOD J. R. Galva; merchant; Dem; Meth; from Marshall Co. 111. 

ATWOOD TIMOTHY, Galva; merchant; Prot; from N.Y. 

AYRES A. J. Galva; clerk; Rep; Bapt; born Henry Co. 

AYRES JAS. A. Galva; farmer; Rep; Prot; born in Co. 

AYRES JNO. A. P.O. Galva; farmer; Rep; Bapt; from N.Y. 

AYRES V. M. Galva; Rep; B pt; from Conn. 

TIABBITT J. Galva; groceries; Rep; Prot; from Fulton Co. 111. 

BABCOCK A. C, M.D. Galva; physician and surgeon; Rep; Prot; owns 134 acres. 

BABCOCK E. D., M.D. Galva; phpsician and surgeon; Rep; Bapt; from N.Y; owns 144 acres. 

BACLEAN ANDREW, Galva; painter; Luth; from Sweden. 

BAILEY IRA A. Galva; miller; Rep; Bapt; from N.Y. 

BAILEY R. F. Galva; dry goods; Rep; from Vt. 

BAILEY T. M. Galva; agt. U.S. Ex. Co. and P. & R. I. R.R.; Rep; Prot; from Ohio. 

BAKER S. B. Sec. 16, P.O. Galva; farmer; Dem; Bapt; rents of father, E. Baker, 160 acres. 

BANGSON S. Galva; tailor; Rep; Luth; from- Sweden. 

BARBER D C. Galva; laborer; Rep; Prot; from Mass. 

BARLOW G. Galva; tailor; Rep Luth; from Sweden. 

BARTON JNO. Galva; laborer; Dem; Prot. 

BARTRAM SAMPSON, Sec. 4; P.O. Galva; farmer; Rep; Meth; from England; 80 acres. 

BARTRAM WM. H. Sec. 4, P.O. Galva; farmer; lives with father; Rep; Meth; from Ohio. 

BAUCHMAN PI. E. Galva; broom-maker; Rep. Prot; from Ohio. 

BECKSTROM A., P.O. Galva; lumber; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

BELL ROBT. G. Galva; yard-master C.B. & Q.R.R.; Rep; Prot; from Mercer Co. 

BERG M. C. Galva; shoemaker; Meth; from Sweden. 

BENNETT C. E. Galva; hotel; Prot; from N.Y. 

BERRY I. Galva; farmer; Dem; Prot; from N.Y. 

BEST J. F. Galva; harness manufacturer; Rep; Meth; from Pa. 

BEVIER LEWIS H. Galva; teaming; Rep; Prot; from Stark Co. 

BIGELOW H. Attorney at Law and U.S. Commissioner, Galva; born in Leroy, Genesee 
Co. N. Y. Feb. 23, 1829; came to Co. in 1856; Rep; Prot; wife was Anna B. Davidson, born 
in East Jeffrey, N.H., Feb. I, 1836; married Nov. 20,1855; has one child, Clara S. born 
Sept. 2, 1865; was State's Attorney 6ih Circuit of 111. from i860 to 1864. 



HENRY COUNTY: GALVA TOWNSHIP. 349 

BLAIR EDWARD D. Farmer, Sec. i, P.O. Kewanee; born iu I'eoria, Peoria Co. 111. 
Dec. i6, 1837; came to Co. 1851; Ind; owns 160 acres of land, value $12,000; wife was Annie 
Shue, born in Deposit, Broome Co. N.Y. Nov. 19, 1S41; married March 7, 1865; has three 
children, one boy and two girls. 

BIGELOW MARY Mrs. (wid. ofjno. A.) Galva; Prot; from N.Y. 

BLAIR HENRY T. Sec. i, P.O. Kewanee; farmer, lives with brother; Prot; from Peoria Co. 

BLAIR J. F. Sec. I, P.O. Kewanee; farmer; Dem; Prot; from Va; owns 135 ac. val. $9,450. 

BLALOCK WM. Galva; salesman; Prot. 

BODINSON CARL F. Grocer, Galva; born in Soderhamn, Sweden, June 29, 1846; came 
to U. S. Aug. 1865; came to Henry Co. same year; Dem; wife was Louisa W. Dahlgren, 
born in Knox Co. 111. .\pril 9, 1852; married Dec. 28, 1S70; has three children, all boys. 

BOGGS E. Galva; laborer; Rep; Prot; from Ohio. 

BOGGS G. K. Galva; telegraph operator; Rep; Prot; from Ohio. 

BOOSTROM ANDREW, Galva; laborer; Luth; from Sweden. 

BOOSTROM ISAAC, Brick Manufacturer, Galva; born in Ocklebo, Gestrickland. Sweden, 
July 22, 1833; came to U.S. 1857; came to Co. 1S64; Rep; Prot; wife was Annie Mattson, 
born Ocklebo, Gestrickland, Sweden, Aug. 15, 1S42; married Nov. 18, 1S65; has two chil. 
dren. 

BOOSTROM JONAS, lives with mother on Sec. 24, P.O. Galva; Prot; from Sweden. 

BOOSTROM JNO. Galva; laborer; Rep; Prot; from Sweden. 

BOOSTROM L. Mrs. Sec. 24, P.O. Galva; Prot; from Sweden; owns 71 acres, val. $4,260. 

BOOSTROM OLOF, Galva; laborer; Luth; from Sweden. 

BOYANTON W. J. Galva; conductor C.B. & Q.R.R; Rep; from Mich. 

BOYD RANDOLPH, Galva; salesman; Rep; from Pa. 

BOURK A. Galva; laborer; from Sweden. 

BOURK N. Galva; laborer; Luth; from Sweden, 

BRIDSON J. Galva; laborer; Dem; from Isle of Man. 

BRITTON CHAS. Galva; iron fence builder; Prot; J"rom Mich. 

BRITTON J. Galva; boarding-house; Prot; from Mich. 

BROLIN O. Sec. 7, P.O. Bishop Hill; farmer; Iird; owns 30 acres, value $1,200; from Sweden. 

BROOT C. M. Galva; farmer; Rep; Meth; from Ohio. 

BROWN E. C. Galva; insurance agent; Rep; Bapt; from Conn; owns 80 acres, val. $5,000. 

BROWN MARIAN, Galva; painter; Rep; Prot. 

BROWNELL J. W. Galva; car repairer C.B. & Q.R.R; Rep; Cong; from N.Y. 

BROWISTLEE THOS. Dry Goods Dealer, also Farmer, Galva; born in Pollockshaws, 

Renfrewshire, Scotland, Sep. 18, ; came to U. S; Aug. 1849; came to Henry Co. March, 

1853; Rep; Cong; owns 320 acres land; first wife was Sarah McDonnell, born near Skye 
Highlands Scotland, 1822; married July 13, 1843, died Dec. — , 1849; second wife was 
Elizabeth Coupland, born in Yorkshire, England, July 30, 1834; married in Peoria, Aug. 26, 
1852; seven children living, one dead; has three children by first wife. 

BRUCE OLIVER J. Farmer, Sec. 26, P.O. Galva; born in Townsend, Windham Co. 
Vermont, Feb. 15, 1847; wife was Mary Addie Davidson, born in East Jeffrey, N. H., June 
8, 1845; married Nov. 2, 1871. 

BRYAN FRANK, Galva; laborer; Dem; Calh; from Ireland. 

BRYAN R. T. lives on Sec. 13, P.O. Galva; laborer; Dem; Prot; from Ky. 

BULKELEY HENRY D. Galva; carpenter; Dem; Univ; from N.Y. 

BURG C. Sec. 17, P.O. Galva; farmer, rents of P. O. Krans; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

BURNETT E. A. Galva; laborer; Rep; Prot; born Galva Tp. 

BURNETT S. Sec. 29, P.O. Galva; farmer; Rep; Bapt; from Pa; owns 158 ac. val. $12,000. 

BURT G. P. Galva; carpenter; Rep; Bapt; from Vt. 

BUTLER J. Galva; flour and feed; Prot; from Ohio. 

BUTTERS G. W. Galva; agricultural implements; Rep; Meth; from Me. 

/^ALESTER JAS. Sec. 14, P.O. Galva; farmer, rents of J.Cromier; Prot; from Isle of Man. 
^ CALHOUN ANDREW, Sec. 5, P.O. Galva; farmer; Dem; Pres; from Ireland; 400 ac. 
CALHOUN .\NDR.EvV G. Uves with fxther See. 5, P.O. Galva; Dem; from Philadelphia, 
CALHOUN JAS. Galva; laborer; Pres; from Ireland. 



350 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

CARLSON ALFRED, Galva; laborer; Dem; Luth; from Sweden. 

CARSON DANIEL, Galva; Prot; from Sweden. 

CARTER GEO. B. Galva; farmer; Rep; Prot; from Stark Co. 

CARTER WESLEY C. Galva; salesman; Rep; Prot; from Ohio. 

CARTER WM. Galva; carpenter; Rep; Meth; from Ohio. 

CHAPMAN M. C. Galva; Secy. Galva Mfg. Co; Rep; Prot; from England. 

CHAPMAN M. T. Galva; Supt. Galva Mfg. Co; Dem; Univ; from England. 

CHERRY SAMUEL, Galva; broom-mal<er; Rep; Prot; from Pa. 

CHOLLETT FRANCIS, Galva; carpenter; Rep; Prot; from N.Y. 

CHOLLETT J. Galva; carpenter; Rep; Prot; from N.Y. 

CHURCH B. Galva; clerk; Dem; Prot; from Stark Co. 

CHURCH NORMAN W. Galva; farmer; Dem; Prot; from N.Y. 

CHURCHILL CHAS Galva; carpenter; Rep; Prot; from Ohio. 

CLARK C. F. Galva; clerk; Rep: from Mich. 

CLARK C. M., M.D., Galva; physician and surgeon; Rep; Prot; from N.Y. 

CLEOSON I. Galva; laborer; Luth; from Sweden. 

CLUCAS JAS. Sec. 36, P.O. Galva; farmer, rents of I. A. Bailey; Rep; Meth; from Isle of Man. 

COLIilEK JNO. L. Barber, Galva; born in Shotley Bridge, Co. Durham, Eng. Oct. 23, 
1849; came to U. S. Aug. 1851; came to Co. 1874; Dem; Epis; wife was Anna Ulrici, born 
in Milwaukee, Wis., Feb, 28, 1S57, married in Rockford, 111., June 16, 1873; has two chil- 
dren. 

CONKLIN MARY E. Mrs. wid. of Stephen A., P.O. Galva; Bapt; from L.I. 

COOK WM. Sec. 28, P.O. Galva; lab. on J. T. Tood's farm; Dem; Prot; from England. 

COON J. M. Rev. Galva; minister Bapt. church; Rep; from Pana, 111. 

COOPER ROBT. Galva; teamster; Rep; from Peoria, 111. 

COOPER R. P. Galva; teaming; Rep; Chris; from Ky; owns 160 acres in Iowa. 

CORDER R. Galva; tinner; Rep; Meth; from Knox Co. 111. 

COSTELO PHILIP, Galva; laborer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 

COSTEN CHAS. Galva; laborer; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

COUPLAND JOS. Galva; farmer; Rep; Epis; from England; owns 136 acres land. 

CRABB JNO. G^lva; laundry; Rep; from Ky. 

CRAMER E. S. Sec. 26, P.O. Galva; farmer, rents of W. E. Cummings; Dem; from Pa. 

CRAWFORD F. J. Galva; clerk; Rep; Cong; from N.Y. 

CRAWFORD W. B. Galva; meat market; Rep; from N.Y; owns 80 acres land. 

CRIMMINS MICHAEL, Galva; laborer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 

CRISMAN DANIEL, Galva; farmer; Dem; Prot; from Pa. 

CRISMAN DAVID. Galva; mason; Dem; from Pa. 

CRISMAN J. E. Galva; carpenter; Dem; from Pa. 

CRISMAN WM. H. Galva; carpenter; Dem; Prot; from Pa. 

CRIST LOUIS, Sec. 32, P.O. Galva; farmer; Meth; from Sweden. 

CROMIEN JAS. Sec. 24, P.O. Galva; farmer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland; owns 280 ac. land. 

CURTISS F. J. Galva; furniture and undertaker; Rep; Prot; from N.Y. 

r^AHGRIN ALFRED, Galva; farmer; Dem; Prot; from Knox Co. 

-*-^ DANIELS TIMOTHY, Sec. 12, P.O. Kewanee; farmer; from Wales; 80 ac. $5,200. 

DAVIDSON SARAH A. Mrs. lives with H. Bigelow, Galva; Bapt; from N.H. 

DAVIS A. W. Galva; carpenter; Rep; from Vt. 

DAVIS CHAS. E. Hardware and Stoves, Galva; born Rockingham, Vermont, Oct. 19, 

1835; came to this Co. in 1855; wife was Jeannie V. Wight, born in Lowell, Mass. Nov. 25, 

1837, married Sept. 24, 1861. 
DAVIS EDWARD, Sec. 3, P.O. Kewanee; farmer; Rep; Meth; from Pa; owns Soac. $4,800. 
DAVIS E. A. Galva; clerk; Dem; Spir; from Vt. 
DAVIS JNO. F. Galva; sewing machine agt; Rep; Bapt; from Vt. 
DAVIS JOS. Galva; farmer; Rep; Prot; from Vt. 
DAVIS R. H. Galva; brakeman; Rep; Prot; from Fulton Co, 111. 



HEimT COTTKTT: OAT.VA TOWNSTTTP. Rill 

DAY EMMA Mrs. wid. of Jno. Galva; Bapt; from Stark Co. 

DAY JNO. B. Galva; flour; Rep; Bapt; from N.H. 

DEEM ADAM, Sec. 15, P.O. Galva; farmer; Rep; Prot; from Ohio; owns 160 ac. land, $11,200. 

DEEM CATHERINE Mrs. wid. of A. C. Sec. 15, P.O. Galva; Meth; from Ohio; 320 ac. $22,400. 

DEEM S. V. Sec. 22, P.O. Galva; farmer; Rep; from Ohio; owns 120 ac. land, val. $6,500. 

DENNIS B. C. Rev. Galva; minister M. E. church; Rep; from Ohio. 

DETRICK J. N. Galva; retired farmer; Dem; Pres; from Pa. 

DICKINSON C. V. Galva; planing-mill; Rep; Prot; from N.Y. 

DICKINSON H. L. Galva; carpenter and builder; Rep; Prot; from N.J. 

DICKINSON J. S. Galva; carpenter; Rep; Prot; from N.Y. 

DONEGAN MICHAEL, Galva; laborer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 

DONNELLY B. Galva; tailor; Rep; Cong; from Ireland. 

DORR B. M. Galva; jeweler and musical instruments; Ind; Univ; from Bureau Co. 

DOW JNO. Galva; wagon maker; Prot. 

DOW L. Galva; laborer; Dem; Prot; from Ohio. 

DRAIN SAMUEL. Galva; laborer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 

DUNCAN W. L., P.O Galva; baggage express agt. Galva; Rep; Prot; from Pa. 

DWIRE ELLIS, Galva; teamster; Rep; Prot; from Ohio. 

DWYER WM. Galva; carpenter; Rep; Prot; born 111. 

DYSON E. K. Galva; clerk; Rep; from Ohio. 

DYSON J. W. Galva; wagon maker; Rep; Cong; from Eng. 

■p ISELE CHAS; Galva; jeweler; Dem; Prot; from Germany. 
EK L. P. Galva; druggist; Rep; Meth; from Sweden. 

EDSON LEONARD P. Broom Manufacturing, Galva; P.O. Galva; born in Westmore- 
land, Cheshire Co. N. H. Feb. 20, 1812; came to county 1856; Rep; Epis; wife was Jane J. 
Balou, born in Westmoreland, Cheshire Co. N. H. .A.pril 17, 1817; married Aug. 4, 1834; 
has seven children. 

ELDRIDGE B, S. Galva; stock raiser; Rep; Cong; from Mass; owns 175 acres in Henry Co. 

ELDRIDGE SAMUEL, P.O. Galva; farmer; Rep; Cong; from Mass. 

ELFORS PETER, Sec. 31; P.O. Galva; farmer; Luth; from Sweden; owns 40 ac. val. $2,400. 

ELKINS SAMUEL, Galva; laborer; Rep; Bapt; from S. Wales 

ELKINS THOS. Galva; laborer; Rep; Bapt; from Eng. 

ELLIS F. M. Galva; cabinet maker; Dem; Bapt; from Ky. 

ELLSWORTH LOUIS, Galva; barber; Rep; Prot. 

ELMORE FRED. Sec. 16; P.O. Galva; rents of Mrs. H. G. Whipple; Rep; Second Advt. 

EMERY HANNAH Mrs. Widow of Henry, Galva; P.O. Galva; born in Westmore- 
land Co. Pa. Nov. 3, 1814; came to county i860; Christian; owns 80 acres of land; her 
first husband, Frederick W. Emery (brother to Henry), was born in Mercer Co. Pa. July 5, 
1808; married Hannah Gaffney Feb. 22, 1833; died at West Jersey, Stark Co. 111., Oct I, 
1846; her second husband, Henry Emery, was born in Northumberland Co. Pa. Jan. 7, 1802; 
came to county April, 1856; married Feb. 22, i860; died Nov. 17, 1875. 

EMERY JACOB, Sec. 22; P.O. Galva; farmer, lives with son-in-law; Rep; Spiritualist; from Pa. 

EMERY JNO. Galva; carpenter; Rep; from Ohio. 

EMERY J. P. Galva; carpenter; Dem; Prot; from Stark Co. 

EMERY MICHAEL; Sec. 26; P.O. Galva; farmer; Rep; Prot; from Stark Co. 111. 

EMERY O. P. Galva; justice of the peace and insurance agt; Rep; Prot; from Fulton Co. 111. 

ENGLE ERICK, Galva; laborer; from Sweden. 

ENGLISH THOS. Sec. 4; P.O. Galva; farmer, rents of H. Baker; Rep; Prot; from Pa. 

ENGSTRAND J. M. Galva; boots and shoes; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

ERICKSON E. Sec. 18; P.O. Bishop Hill; farmer Advt; from Sweden; owns 38 ac. val. $1,700. 

ERICKSON HANS, Galva; farmer; Prot; from Sweden. 

ERICKSON J. Jr. Galva; cigar manufacturer; Rep; Prot; from Henry Co. 

ERICKSON JNO. Galva; shoemaker; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 
ERICKSON JOS. Galva; farmer; Rep; Prot; born in county. 

ERICKSON MARGARET Mrs. P.O. Galva; widow of Jonat; Meth; from Sweden. 



852 voTTCns and taxtaykks of 

ERICKSON L. Sec. 6; P.O. Bishop Hill; farmer; from SweHen; owns 60 acres, val. $3,000. 

ERICKSON O. E. Galva; clerk; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

ERICKSON P. Sec. 7; P.O. Bi.shop Hill; farmer; Prot; from. Sweden; owns 76 ac. val. $3,800. 

ERRETT E. A. Mrs. P.O. Galva; widow of J. W.; Christian; from Vermont. 

EVANS ELIZABETH Mrs. P.O. Galva; from Fulton Co. 

EVANS JNO. Galva; coal dealer; Rep; Meth; from Wales. 

EVERETT J. H. Sec. 25; P.O. Galva; farmer; Dem; Prot; from Conn; owns 80 ac. val. $5,200. 

EVERETT R. F. Sec. 25; P.O. Galva; farmer; Rep; Cong; owns 240 ac. val. $16,800. 

"PABER F. Sec. 10; P.O. Galva; farmer; Prot'; from Luxemberg; owns 160 ac. val. $8,000. 

^ FARR EDWARD W. Galva; laborer; Rep; Prot; born Tp. 

FARRELL DANIEL, Galva; laborer; Rep; Cath. 

FARRELL JAS. Galva; laborer; Dem. 

FIELD SOLOMON, Patent Medicine Manufacturer, Galva; born in Ferrisburgh, Addi- 
son Co. Vt. April 21, 1S17; came to county April 7, 1863; Rep; owns 300 acres land in 
Kansas; wife was Phebe N. Carter, born in Salisbury, Addison Co. Vt. Jan. 13, 1816; mar- 
ried April 26, 1835; has had seven children, five dead, and two living — girls. 

FINLEY J. L. Galva; grocer and hardware; Rep; Prot; from Stark Co. 

FISHER J. B. Galva; physician; from Prussia. 

FITCH E. E. Galva; school teacher; Rep; Prot; from Iowa. 

FLANSBURGH NELSON, Galva; postal elk. C.B. & Q. R.R; Rep; Prot; from N. Y. 

FORD B. P. Galva; clerk; Rep; Bapt; from Galesburg, 111. 

FORD DYER, Galva; dry goods; Rep; Cong; from N. Y. 

FORD M. M. Galva; dry goods; Rep; Cong; owns 1370 acres land; from N. Y. 

FOSTER GEO. Galva; carpenter; Dem; Christian; from Pa. 

FOSTER G. L. Galva; carpenter; Rep; Prot; from N.J. 

FOSTER JNO. Galva; Policeman; Rep; Prot. 

FOWLER JNO. C. Galva; butcher; Rep; from Michigan. 

FOWLER MARTIN, Galva; laborer; Dem; Prot; from Mich. 

FOX JAS. Galva; laborer; born Ills. 

FRAZIER ROBISON, Sec. 24, P.O. Galva; farmer; Rep; Christian; owns 118 acres. 

FREED J. HENRY, Sec. 14, P.O. Galva; farmer, lives with father; Rep; Prot; from Ills. 

FREED JNO. Sec. 14, P.O. Galva; farmer; Rep; Prot; from Pa; owns 160 acres; $8000. 

FKrSK EKIC P. Clerk, Galva; born in Ofranaker, Helsingland, Sweden, March 3, 1847; 
came to United States, 1867; came to county same year; Rep; Meth; value prop. $1000; 
wife was Catharina A. Stoneberg, born in Ofranaker, Helsingland, Sweden, Jan. 18, 1846; 
married April 6, 1872; has one child, Edward J. born June 2, 1875. also one dead. 

F RUSH BURG J. Galva; laborer; Meth; from Sweden. 

FURGASON E. Galva; butcher; Dem; Prot; from Mich. 

r^ADQUIST PETER, Galva; laborer; Meth; from Sweden. 

^ GALDBRANSON LARS, Galva; lab rer; Rep; Meth; from Norway. 

GASTER JAS. Galva; grocer; Meth; from Pa. 

GOLDEN L. J. Mrs. Galva; dress-maker, Prot; from Michigan. 

GOODMAN S. P:. Galva; teamster; Rep; Prot; from Ky. 

GOODWIN JOS. Galva; brickmaker; Rep; from England. 

GOOLD SYLVESTER, P.O. Galva; farmer; Rep; Meth; from Vt. 

GRAHAM JNO. Galva; laborer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 

GRANT I. Galva; meat market; Dem; from Lafayette. Ills. 

GREEN ALLON, Galva; laborer; Prot; from Mo. 

GREEN JNO. Galva; bricklayer; Dem; from Lawrence Co. Ills. 

GREEN S. H., P.O. Galva; farmer; Dem; Prot; from Pa. 

GRIIFITH ARCHIBALD, Galva; laborer; Rep; Epis; from Ireland. 

GROSS FREEMAN, Galva; farmer; Dent; Bapt; from N.Y; owns 350 acres, val. $21,000. 

GROSS J, C. Galva; cooper; Rep; Prot; from N. Y. 







Rev. ROBERT M. WILBER (deceased), 
Oxford Township. 



HENET COUNTY: GALVA TQ-WNSHIP. 355 

GROVE W. A., M.D. Galva; physician and surgeon; Dem; Prot. 

GRUBB F. Galva; telegraph operator; Prot. 

GRUBB ISAAC E. Galva; carpenter; Rep; Prot; from Philadelphia, Pa. 

GUILD R. B. Rev. Galva; Minister Cong. Church; Rep; Cong; from Vermont. 

GUISLESPEY B. Mrs. Galva; Cath; from Ireland. 

GUISTERSON A. Galva; laborer; Luth; from Sweden. 

GUSBERG A. Galva; blacksmith; Dem; Prot; from Sweden. 

GUTHRIE BROTHERS, Foundry, Machinists, Engine and Boiler Makers, and Deal- 
ers in Machinery Supplies, Agricultural Machinery. Repairing solicited, also general 
machine jobbing, Galva, Henry Co. 111. 

GUTHRIE WM. Galva; foundry and machine shop; Dem; Meth; from England. 

TTADSALL ISAAC D. Sec. 4, P. O. Galva; laborer; rents of M. Mehaffy; Ind. Prot; Pa. 

■*^ HALL C. W. L. R. Galva; carpenter; Rep; Prot. 

HALL NANCY E. Mrs. widow of William; Galva; Meth; from Ohio. 

HALSTROOM J. Galva; laborer; Meth; from Sweden. 

HAMMOND F. N. Galva; grain and broom corn; Rep; Cong; from Ohio; owns 80 acres. 

HANLON A. O. Galva; laborer; Dem; Cath; from Ireland. 

HANSON LOUIS, Galva; laborer; Rep; Meth; from Sweden. 

HANSON PETER, Galva; laborer; Luth; from Sweden. 

HAPTONSTALL SAMUEL, Galva; engineer; Rep; from Mo. 

HAPTONSTALL S. W. Galva; clerk; Rep; Prot; from Knox Co. 111. 

HARNER D. Galva; laborer; Dem; Cath; from Wyoming, Ills. 

HARRISON A. D., P.O. Galva; farmer; Rep; Prot; from Ills. 

HARRIS D. Galva; carpenter; Rep; Cong; from Mass. 

HARRIS W. Galva; butcher; Rep; Prot; from Ohio. 

HART THOS. Farmer, Sec. 2; P.O. Kewanee; born in East Church, Isle of Sheppey, 

England, Oct. 9, 1822; came to United States Aug. 19, 1851; came to this county in 1855; 

Rep; Bapt; owns 106 acres land, value $10,000; wife was Matilda Terry, born in Milton, 

England, Sept. i, 1827; married Jan. 16, 1847, died May 9, 1876; have had five children; 

three dead and two living. 
HART WM. Galva; tinner; Rep; Prot; from Germany. 
HASS C. Galva; baker; Rep; Meth; from Germany. 

HAWARD O. G. Sec. 15, P.O. Galva; farmer, rents of N. S. Palmer; Rep; Meth; from Ohio. 
HAWKS HENRY, Galva; farmer; Rep; Prot; from N.Y. 

HEADLUND E. Sec. 19, P.O. Galva; farmer; Dem; Luth; from Sweden; owns 152 acres. 
HEDBERG JONAS, Farmer, Sec. 7; P.O. Bishop Hill; born in Sweden, Jan. 13, 1828; 

Rep; Meth. pref ; owns 425^ acres of land, value $2,500; lived in Sweden about eighteen 

years; came to this country 1847; came to this state and county to Bishop Hill, June 4, 1847; 

has lived here thirty years; has held office Corporation Trustee, Bishop Hill three years; 

married Catharine Anderson. December, 1849; she was born in Sweden, 1831; have one child, 

daughter, Caroline Hedberg, born Nov. 21, 1856. 
HEDLAND PETER, Farmer, Sec. 7; P.O. Bishop Hill; born in Sweden, Feb. 2[. 1840; 

came to this county in 1S51; Rep; Meth. pref; owns 115 acres of land, value $6,000; he 

lived in Sweden ten years; came to this country in 1850; came to this state and Henry Co. 

Bishop Hill same year, and he has lived here twenty-six years; lived in Colony ten years; 

married Anna Anderson. June 22, 1867; she was born Sweden in 1837; have three children, 

one boy and two girls: Peter Edwin, Laura Angeline, Ellis Hedland. 
HEDSTROM J. Galva; laborer; Luth; from Sweden. 

HEMPSTEAD FRED. P.O. Galva; engineer; Rep; Prot; from N.Y. city. 
HEMPSTEAD O. A. Galva; groceries; Rep; Bapt; L.I. 
HENDERSON DAVIO W. Stock Dealer; P.O. Galva; born in Morgan Co. 111. Feb. 

I, 1839; lived in Morgan Co. up to 1864, and then went to the mines in Montana and Idaho 

Territories in 1864, and remained three years, and then emigrated to Henry Co. in 1867; 

Rep; wife was Annie E. Jewett, born in Morgan Co. 111. Oct. 21, 1842; married Jan. 9, 1868; 

has three children, one boy and two girls. 
HENDERSON ELIZABETH P. Mrs., widow of Wm., P.O. Galva; Meth; from Ky. 
HENDRICKS ANDREW, Galva; carpet weaver; Luth; from Sweden. 
32 



356 VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS OF 

HEBNER HENRY, Sec. 2; P.O. Kewanee; farmer; Freewill Bapt; from Germany; Tnd; 80 ac. 

HERBNER HERMAN, Sec. 13; P.O. Galva; farmer; Rep; Freewill Bapt; from Germany. 

HERBNER PETER, Sec. 13; P.O. Galva; farmer; Rep; Freewill Bapt; from Germany. 

HERDIEN PETER, Galva; furniture; Rep; Meth; from Sweden. 

HIEN H.C. Galva; butcher; Dem; Prot; born 111. 

HIGGINS H. Galva; grain dealer; Dem; from N. Y. 

HILL S. Galva; engineer; from Eng. 

HILLBURGJNO. Galva; lab; Luth; from Sweden. 

HINICH G. W. Galva; dentist; Rep; Prot; from Penn. 

HOFFMAN ABRAM, Sec. 13; P.O. Kewanee; farmer; Dem; Prot; from Pa. owns 320 acres. 

HOFFMAN GEO. Sec. 11; P.O. Galva; farmer; Dem; U. Breth; from Pa; owns 40 acres. 

HOFFMAN M. Sec. 11; P.O. Galva; farmer; U. Breth; from Pa; owns 40 acres; val. $2,000. 

HOLMES D. E. Galva; lumber; Rep; Cong; from Conn. 

HOLMES JAS. Galva; Rep; from Ohio; Street Commissioner. 

HOLMES PHCEBE, Mrs. wid. of Asel, P.O. Galva; Bapt; from N.Y. 

HOPKINS N. Mrs. wid. of E., Sec. 12; P.O. Kewanee; Freewill Bapt; from N,Y.; 80 acres. 

HONGERFORD LEVI, P.O. Galva; farmer; Rep; Bapt; from Ohio; owns 15 acres. 

HOUGH JNO. Galva; stock dealer; Rep; from Pa. 

HOUGH GEO. W. Galva; grain dealer; Rep; Prot; from Pa. 

HOUGH WM. S. Galva; grain dealer; Rep; Bapt. from Pa. 

HOULE T. E. Sec. 24; P.O. Galva; farmer; Rep; Pres; from Eng; owns 240 acres; $14,800. 

HOWATER CHAS. Sec. 36; farmer; rents of I. A. Bailey; Rep; Free Meth. 

HOYT JULIA Mrs., Galva; Prot; from Ohio. 

HOYT S. S. Galva; hardware; Rep; Bapt; from Ohio. 

HUNT HENRY, Galva; butcher; Dem; Prot; from Eng. 

HUNTER A. S. Galva; farmer; Rep; Meth; from Ohio. 

HUNTER JAS. B. Sec. 2i; P.O. Galva; farmer; Rep; Prot; from Ohio; rents of R. Rowley. 

HURD THEODORE F. Galva; merchant; Rep; Meth; from N. J. 

HURD T. F. Galva; clerk; Rep; Meth; from N. J. 

HURLBUT F. A. Sec. 6; P.O. Galva; farmer; Kep; from N. H.; owns 192 acres; val. $13,400. 

HUSTED AL.L.EIS', Farmer; Sec. 30; P.O. Galva; born in Starkborough, Addison Co., Vt., 
July 22, 1804; came to county 1S52; Dem; Spiritualist; owns 50 acres land, val. $2,500; first 
wife was Lois Tarbel, born in Stanfordville, Dutchess Co., N. Y., Dec. 24, 1799, married 
Feb. 21, 1824, died May 22, 1865; sec nd wife was Caroline Littell, born in Tazewell Co., 
Ind., Feb. 11, 1836, married Aug. 26, 1865; has had five children, four living and one dead, 
one by first, and four by second wife. 

HUSTED EZEKIEL, Farmer; Sec. 30; P.O. Galva; born in Starksborough, Vt., March 
24, 1815; came to county 1854; Rep; Spiritualist; owns 120 acres land, val. $8,400; wife 
was Amanda Salisbury, born in Monkton, Vt., March 3, i8i2, married April 30, 1835; has 
had eight children, five living and three dead; has been Justice of the Peace three years. 

HUSTED S. Sec. 30; P.O. Galva; farmer; from Vt. 

HUTCHINSON WM. Galva; lab; Prot. 

T VES C. S. Galva; farmer; Bapt; from Stark Co., Ind; owns 40 acres. 
■'■ IVES MARY, Mrs., wid. of Henry T., Galva; Bapt; from N.Y. 

JACKMAN B. A. Mrs., wid. of J. W., Galva; Prot; from Pa. 
JACKMAN EDWIN A., Galva; mason; Dem; Prot; from Pa. 
JACKMAN ELLIOTT W., Galva; mason; Dem; Prot; from Pa. 
JARVIS S. G., Galva; groceries; Rep; Meth; from Knox Co., 111. 
JARVIS GEO., Galva; lab; Epis; from Eng. 

JAR VIS HARRIET E., Mrs., wid. of Jno. S.. P.O. Galva; Prot; from 111. 
JARVIS SAMUEL G. Grocery; Galva; born in Suffolk Co., Long Island, N. Y., Dec. 

5, 1829; came to county 1868; Rep; Meth; wife was Mariette Dean, born in Greene Co., N. 

Y., Nov. 3, 1832, married Feb. 28, 1857; has had eight children, three dead and five living; 

was private in Co. K, gth 111. Cavalry — enlisted Oct. 12, 1862, discharged Oct. 15, 1864. 



HENBY county: galva towkship. 357 

JEWELL CHAS., Galva; lab; Vp; Prot; from Ohio. 

JEWELL C. G., P.O. Galva; farmer; Dem; Swedenborgian; from N.H.; owns 146 ac; $8,760. 

JETTIBURG PETER, Galva; lab; Luth; from Sweden. 

JEWELL ROBERT, P.O. Galva; farmer; Rep; Meth; from Pa. 

JEWELL WM. R. Sec. 31; farmer; rents of father; P.O. Galva; Dem; from Will Co. 

JOHNSON ALBERT, Sec. 11; P.O. Galva; rents of H. Nance; Rep; Luth; from Sweden. 

JOHNSON ANDREW, Galva; laborer; Luth; from Sweden. 

JOHNSON CHRISTINA Mrs. wid. of Olof; P.O. Galva; Prot; from Sweden. 

JOHNSON JNO. Galva; laborer; Meth; from Sweden. 

JOHNSON JNO. Galva; laborer; Prot; from Sweden. 

JOHNSON JNO. Sec. 16, P.O. Galva; farmer; Rep; Prot; from Ireland; owns 160 acres. 

JOHNSON LOUIS, Galva; laborer; Rep; Meth; from Sweden. 

JOHNSON L. W. Galva; harness-maker; Dem; from Stark Co. 

JOHNSON OLOF, Galva; laborer; Luth; from Sweden. 

JOHNSON OLOF, Sec. 24, P.O. Galva; farmer; rents of Mrs. Mack; Prot; from Sweden. 

JOHNSON O. K. Galva; laborer; Luth; from Sweden. 

JOHNSON PETER, Sec. 36, P.O. Galva; farmer; rents of W. L. Wiley; Luth; from Sweden. 

JOHNSON P. H. Galva; laborer; Luth; from Sweden. 

JOHNSON SAM'L. A. Galva; laborer; Luth; from Sweden. 

JOHNSON SWAN, Galva; laborer; Luth; from Sweden. 

JOHN"SON SWAlSr P. Tailor; Galva; born in Hvena, Sweden, Feb. 13, 1838; came to 
U. S. Aug. 1857; came direct to county; Rep; Prot; wife was Mary Christine, born in 
Kroxhult Crestata, Sweden, March 8, 1840; came to U. S. 1854; married Dec. 19, 1864; has 
three children; was private in Co. D, 17th Ills. Infantry; was taken prisoner at Holly Springs, 
Miss., Dec. 20, 1S62. 

JOHNSON TAYLOR, Sec. 16, P.O. Gal