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Full text of "History of the Illinois Central Railroad Company and representative employes; a history of the growth and development of one of the leading arteries of transportation in the United States, from inception to its present mammoth proportions, together with the biographies of many of the men who have been and are identified with the varied interests of the Illinois Central Railroad"

OF THE 

U N I VER.5ITY 
OF ILLINOIS 



385.4 



ItUNOIS HISTORICAL SURVR 



Ifl 



*^OT^M!^^^^W^BE 




ILLINOIS CENTRAL STATION, CHICAGO. 




HISTORY OF THE 

Illinois Central Railroad Company 



AND 



REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 




A HISTORY OF THE GROWTH AND DEVELOP- 
MENT OF ONE OF THE LEADING AR- 
TERIES OF TRANSPORTATION IN 
THE UNITED STATES, 

From Inception to its Present Mammoth Proportions, 

TOGETHER WITH THE 

BIOGRAPHIES OF MANY OF THE MEN WHO 

HAVE BEEN AND ARE IDENTIFIED WITH 

THE VARIED INTERESTS OF THE 

ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD. 



ILLUSTRATED. 




RAILROAD HISTORICAL COMPANY, 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS. 

1900. 




PREFACE. 



DN ISSUING the History of the Illinois Central Railroad Company, the publishers, according 
to custom, desire to give expression of a few words of explanation regarding the work. In 
compiling a history of a railroad we were treading unknown paths which might lead to suc- 
cess or failure as it met with the favor, or the reverse, of the army of operatives to whom 
we looked for encouragement. We are happy to announce that those to whom we appealed for 
support have looked with favor upon our enterprise and have accorded us a liberal and hearty sup- 
port for which we extend our sincere thanks. 

We are under especial obligations to Mr. William K. Ackerman for his generous permission 
^ to use his excellent "Sketch of the Illinois Central Railroad Company," which is as complete and 
authentic as a work of this character can well be. No better commentary op his effort can be 
< made than that appearing in the Railway Age at the time the work was first issued, which says : 

,., "Mr. W. K. Ackerman, for many years president of the Illinois Central Railroad Company 

and for nearly thirty-two years connected with that corporation in various capacities, has availed 

> himself of his well earned leisure to prepare an extremely interesting brochure which he entitles, 

'Historical Sketch of the Illinois Central Railroad; together with a brief biographical record of 

its incorporators and some of its early officers.' No man living is so competent as Mr. 

Ackerman to chronicle the early and latter days of this great enterprise, whose inception dates as 
far back as 1835 An admirable feature of the work is the entire absence of censorious- 
ness or the indication of personal feeling on the part of the writer against any of the numerous 
officials with whom he was associated during his long career, or of his successors whose adminis- 
tration he might possibly be tempted to criticise. On the other hand, a kindly and appreciative 
spirit marks the reference to the numerous officers of the company who are specially named, and 
some of the sketches of persons both living and dead are extremely interesting." 

We desire to return thanks to the chief officials of the various railway orders for their court- 
esy in assisting us to compile creditable sketches of the orders over which they preside. E. E. 
Clark, Grand Chief Conductor of the O. R. C.; Mrs. J. H. Moore, Grand President of the L. A. of 
O. R. C.; F. P. Sargent, Grand Master of the B. of L. F.; Mrs. Georgie M. Sargent, Grand Presi- 
dent of the L. S. of B. of L. F.; Mrs. Ray Watterson, Grand Mistress of L. A. of B. R. T.; C. H. 
Salmons, Editor B. of L. E. Monthly Journal; Mrs. W. A. Murdock, Grand President, and Mrs. 
^ Harry St. Clair, Grand Secretary of the G. I. A. to B. of. L. E. have given us their hearty co- 
operation. 

We desire, too, to extend our thanks to the many officials and army of operatives of the Illi- 
nois Central for their generous patronage, without which our efforts would have been in vain. To 
them is due what credit there may be for the success of the work, for without it only a dismal fail- 
ure would have ensued. We realize that there are many whose names should appear within our 
pages that do not, but owing to indifference at the time our representative called or absence at re- 
peated endeavors to secure an interview the facts could not be obtained and of necessity must 
be omitted. 

We have spared no effort nor expense to make this volume the most superbly illustrated 
work of its kind ever issued from an American press and have endeavored to raise and hold the 
biographical section up to the high literary standard set by the historian. 

Trusting that a generous and discriminating public will give due credit for the excellencies 
of our efforts and judge lightly that wherein we may have fallen below the standard we had set, 
\vc place in its hands the fruit of our endeavor a History of the Illinois Central Railroad Company, 
with biographical sketches of the men who have made it. 

THE PUBLISHERS. 






TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



PART I. 

CHAPTER I. 
HISTORY OF THE ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY. 

CHAPTER II. 
HISTORICAL BIOGRAPHIES. 

CHAPTER III. 
PRESIDENTS OF ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY. 

CHAPTER IV. 
MILEAGE AND EQUIPMENT OF ROAD. 

CHAPTER V. 
PERSONNEL OF THE MANAGEMENT OF THE ROAD. 



PART II. 

BIOGRAPHICAL. 



PART III. 

RAILROAD FRATERNITIES. 



PART IV. 

MISCELLANEOUS MATTER. 



HISTORY OF THE 
ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY, 

BY W. K. ACKERMAN. 



DN undertaking a brief sketch of the origin 
of the Illinois Central Railroad, it is nec- 
essary to refer somewhat in detail to the 
correspondence of two men closely identi- 
fied with its early progress, and whose names 
stand out prominently in the history of the 
state ; I need hardly say that these are the Hon. 
Sidney Breese and the Hon. Stephen A. Douglas. 
In writing upon the subject, if one were to con- 
fine himself to the contentions indulged in by 
these two gentlemen, for the credit of either 
originating or advocating the scheme, consider- 
able time and space would have to be given up 
in the endeavor to reconcile their respective 
claims. From the most careful examination 
made of the correspondence that passed be- 
tween them upon the subject, it does not ap- 
pear, however, that either of these gentlemen 
actually originated the plan of a central road ; 
indeed Judge Douglas lays no positive claim 
to this, but Judge Breese, in his letter to the 
Illinois Slate Register, Dec. 23, 1850, says: "I 
must have the credit of it, for I originated it in 
1835." And in his famous letter to Judge 
Douglas, written Jan. 25, 1851, to the latter at 
Washington, -while in the senate, he says, "I 
claim to have first projected this great road in 
my letter of October, 1835," meaning his 
letter to Judge John York Sawyer of Oct. 16, 
1835. But even in this letter, he gives credit 



for the plan to "an intelligent friend in Bond 
county," who was William S. Waite of Green- 
ville, and who proved himself an ardent sup- 
porter of the road until its final completion. 
These claims of Judge Breese are referred to 
by Judge Douglas in a somewhat sarcastic as 
well as a facetious manner in the voluminous 
correspondence* which was carried on during 
1850 and 1851, but the latter modestly abstains 
from claiming any connection with the measure 
until December, 1843 the year in which he 
entered the house of representatives and the 
same year in which Judge Breese entered the 
senate or any exclusive credit for the consum- 
mation of the scheme. What Judge Breese did 
claim, was undoubtedly true, viz: that he had 
"said and written" more in favor of the plan 
than anyone else, and for this he was entitled 
to great credit. 

The daily Illinois State Register of Dec. 19, 
1850, published an article, quoted from the 
Benton Standard, stating that Judge Breese 
favored what was known as the "Holbrook 
charter," to which particular reference will be 
made hereafter. This stirred Judge Breese to 
a reply in which he stated that he was in favor 
of accepting the release of the Cairo company 
on condition that their rights were to be re- 

* "Early Illinois Railroads. By W. K. Ackerman, 
Chicago, 1884," 






12 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



spected. In the same letter, he claimed that 
he was entitled to the credit of the whole 
scheme of a central road, having "originated it 
in 1835." The editor of the Register, while 
willing to accord him all due credit, reminds 
him that the efforts of Senators Douglas and 
Shields, and Representatives Wentworth, Mc- 
Clernand, Richardson, Bissell, Young, and 
Harris, must not be overlooked : that they all 
did their duty and were deserving of praise. 
On Jan. 5, 1851, Senator Douglas replied to 
Judge Breese in the columns of the State Reg- 
ister, assuring him that no injustice was in- 
tended to be done him, and reminding him of 
the fact that when the people of Chicago 
tendered him and Gen. Shields a complimentary 
dinner for the part they had taken in procuring 
the grant of land from the general government, 
they modestly declined it, and in their letter 
declining the honor awarded the principal merit 
to their colleagues. 

To go back of the claims of both of these 
distinguished gentlemen, I suppose it is an 
historical fact that although Judge Breese 
brought the plan prominently before the people 
of the state by newspaper publications and 
letters to prominent men, still the credit of 
originating it really belongs to Lieut. Gov. 
Alexander M. Jenkins when in the state senate 
in 1832.* This was three years before the in- 
telligent friend from Bond county whispered in 
Judge Breese's ear. Senator Jenkins' plan 
was to build the road from Cairo to Peru. 
Judge Breese's plan contemplated a line from 
Cairo to Galena, but when the plan was fully 
developed, Judge Douglas wrote Chicago as 
the northeastern terminus. Judge Breese said 
that the reason for this was because Judge 
Douglas had been investing in Chicago real 
estate and on that account wanted the road 
extended to that point. This was an unfair 
imputation, but a natural one, for Judge Breese 
to make, because his plan of a central road 
which was a local one, did not contemplate a 

* One year after the first act relating to the con- 
struction of railways was passed by the general assem- 
bly of the State of Illinois, Jan. 28, 1831. 



branch to Chicago. Many opposed the enter- 
prise in the central part of the state, fearing 
that a north and south line would divert traffic 
that that section might derive from an east and 
west line through the state. It must be borne 
in mind, that the prevailing idea at that time 
was to have the products of Illinois shipped to 
the south via Cairo and the Mississippi river; 
but Judge Douglas, who took a broader view 
'of the enterprise, saw the necessity of connect- 
ing the lakes with the Mississippi, and the St. 
Lawrence with the Gulf of Mexico, as well as 
a connection at Chicago with the various rail- 
ways then projected or in process of construc- 
tion from the principal cities of the east, so 
that the measure would commend itself to con- 
gress as a national work tending to benefit the 
whole country and not a local enterprise for the 
particular benefit of the state of Illinois. Only 
in this way could the votes of the members of 
congress from Pennsylvania, New York, New 
England and other portions of the Union be 
secured, as they did not of course favor any 
proposition having for its tendency the diver- 
sion of trade from the upper Mississippi toward 
Mobile alone. 

Judge Breese was named as an incorporator 
in the first charter granted by the state in 1836 
for a central road and having taken so deep an 
interest in the subject, he felt a commendable 
pride in the ultimate success of the measure. 
He was naturally jealous of his position in the 
matter, hence he could not brook a younger 
and more active rival. But he was entirely too 
sensitive in supposing that Judge Douglas had 
not properly recognized his early efforts in the 
matter. This feeling he describes in one of his 
letters to Douglas, in which he says, "In the 
outset, I will candidly confess that, upon the 
subject of the Illinois Central Railroad, with all 
its concomitants, I am very sensitive, the more 
especially since I thought I had discovered a 
studious endeavor on your part and on the part 
of those with whom you have acted, to conceal 
from the public my agency in bringing the 
measure into favor and in opening the way for 
successful legislation in regard to it. In none 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



13 



of your speeches and letters you, and others 
who have enjoyed your confidence, have made 
and written, has there been the least allusion 
to the part I have acted in the matter, nor in 
any of the papers in the state, supposed to be 
under your influence. Seeing this, and believ- 
ing there was a concerted effort to appropriate 
to yourselves, exclusively, honors to which I 
knew you were not entitled, I deem it my duty, 
for the truth of history, to assert my claim, and 
in doing so, have been compelled, much against 
my will, to speak of myself and of my acts in 
regard to it. My whole life will show that it 
is the first time I have ever exposed myself to 
the charge of egotism, and under the influence 
which actuated me, I may have claimed too 
much." 

The first act incorporating an Illinois Cen- 
tral Railroad company was passed by the legis- 
lature of the state of Illinois, January 18, 1836. 
It was a special charter and granted many valu- 
able privileges. It contemplated rail communi- 
cation only as far north as the Illinois and 
Michigan Canal. The scheme proved an utter 
failure. 

Under the internal-improvement act passed 
Feb.i 27, 1837, its construction was undertaken 
by the state, without success, as there was 
neither credit to ensure, or capital to complete 
it. The appropriation under this act, $3,500,- 
000, was in any event totally inadequate. 

The Cairo City & Canal company was in- 
corporated March 4, 1837. It was authorized 
to hold real estate in Alexander county, but 
more particularly the tract of land incorporated 
as the city of Cairo. They were to proceed to 
lay it off into lots for a town to be known as 
the city of Cairo ; they were also empowered 
to construct dykes, canals, levees and embank- 
ments for the security and preservation of said 
city ; also to construct a canal to unite with 
Cache river, and to use water for a canal run- 
ning to and through the city. Reference to 
this scheme is made in order to show in a 
gradual way the origin and progress of the 
Illinois Central Railroad ; its connection with 
the canal company was only incidental, Darius 



B. Holbrook, who afterward figured conspicu- 
ously in the effort to obtain a charter for a 
central road having been connected with the 
canal company. 

Five years later, March 6, 1843, the state 
having abandoned the attempt to build any 
more railroads, the legislature incorporated the 
Great Western Railway company. This was 
known as the "Holbrook charter," so frequently 
referred to in the correspondence between 
Judge Breese* and Judge Douglas. This char- 
ter contemplated a "pre-emption right" only, to 
Holbrook and his associates, in which the state 
was to have no interest, instead of a direct 
grant of land to the state. This company was 
to consist of the president and directors of the 
Cairo City & Canal Company, and the board of 
directors were to be chosen by that company. 

The road was to be commenced as previ- 
ously contemplated at the mouth of the Ohio 
river, and was to run in about the same direc- 
tion via Vandalia, Shelbyville, Decatur and 
Bloomington, and to the same objective point, 
the Illinois and Michigan canal. Rates of toll 
were to be established by the directors. The 
company was authorized to issue bonds, which 
were to be countersigned by the president and 
treasurer of the Cairo City & Canal Company. 
Section 14 provided that whenever the whole 
indebtedness of the company was paid and 
liquidated then the legislature should have 
power to alter and amend the charter as the 
public good should require. 

An estimate was to be made by a person 
appointed by the governor of the value of the 
work already done by the state, under the 
internal-improvement act of Feb. 27, 1837, and 
this was to be paid for by the newly-organized 
company at any time during the progress of the 
work. When all the obligations of the com- 
pany were paid, then the railroad company was 
thereafter to forever pay the state, annually, as 
a consideration for granting the charter, one- 
fourth of the net annual income, after the share- 

* Judge Breese was elected to the United States 
senate, Dec. 18, 1842, for full term commencing 
March 4, 1843. 



14 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



if? 



: 
::. 



-'. -~i ' 
' 




AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



15 



holders had received in any one year twelve 
per cent on their investment ; and the act ex- 
pressly provided that no legislature should at 
any time so reduce the tolls as to produce less 
than twelve per cent per annum net to the 
shareholders. 

The Great Western Railway company, after 
spending large sums of money in doing work 
which eventually inured to the benefit of the 
state, became insolvent, and this third attempt 
to build a central road proved a signal failure. 
On March 3, 1845, its charter was repealed by 
a special act, passed for that purpose. 

That Judge Breese favored what was 
known as the Holbrook charter is shown by 
the fact that on Dec. 27, 1843, he presented in 
the house of representatives a memorial of the 
Great Western Railway company, praying the 
right of pre-emption for Holbrook and his 
associates to a portion of the public lands over 
which the proposed road was to be constructed. 
Judge Douglas, who was in the house of repre- 
sentatives at this time, declined to give this 
bill his support, very properly insisting that 
whatever grant was made should be conferred 
directly upon the State of Illinois, and not 
upon an irresponsible private corporation that 
he did not believe would carry out the project, 
and which he stigmatized as a "stupendous 
private speculation to enable the Cairo com- 
pany to sell their chartered privileges in Eng- 
land." This opposition of Judge Douglas was 
probably what first excited the hostility of 
Judge Breese toward him. Judge Breese re-, 
fused to coincide with the views expressed by 
Judge Douglas, and the bill failed of passage. 
His reason for wishing the pre-emption to run 
to a private corporation was, because he had no 
faitli 'in tlie ability of the state to complete the 
7, <>;/>. This was quite natural considering the 
fact that they had so signally failed in all pre- 
vious efforts to build the road. At the next 
session on Dec. 12, 1844, in deference to the 
views expressed by Judge Douglas, Judge 
Breese introduced a bill which substituted the 
words state of Illinois for the Holbrook com- 
pany, as the party to whom the pre-emption 



right was to pass; but he appears to have given 
it a luke-warm support and it did not pass. At 
the next session, Jan. 15, 1846, Judge Breese 
reported another bill to grant to the state of 
Illinois certain alternate sections of the public 
lands to aid in the construction of the Northern 
Cross and Illinois Central Railroads in Illinois, 
but it does not appear that he ever moved to 
take up this bill. At the next session, Dec. 17, 
1846, still another bill was introduced by Judge 
Breese, covering a right of way and a pre- 
emption right. It omitted the donations to the 
state, but permitted it to purchase the lands at 
a dollar and a quarter per acre upon the con- 
dition that it would build a railroad through 
them. This bill failed also. 

In these various efforts, it would appear 
that Judge Breese was in favor of granting pre- 
emption rights only, and a right of way, either 
to a private corporation or to the state. Judge 
Douglas, on the other hand, insisted that an 
absolute donation to the state should be made. 
This was one of the principal points of differ- 
ence between them. Judge Douglas stated to 
Judge Breese that if he would consent to this 
change he would allow him to take all the 
credit. Another point of difference was in 
regard to the terminus at Chicago. It is evi- 
dent that Judge Douglas particularly favored 
this plan, regardless of whether the road was 
built to Dubuque or not. And indeed the 
eastern members also favored this plan be- 
cause it contemplated a connection with the 
lakes ; the line from Cairo to Galena being 
regarded in the East as a sectional scheme, 
calculated to throw the trade upon the Gulf of 
Mexico at the expense of the cities on the lakes 
and the Atlantic seaboard. 

Judge Breese, on the other hand, did not 
favor Chicago, as he freely admits. He says 
in one of his letters: "You will recollect that 
my bills, all of them, established the roads on 
the routes defined by our internal-improvement 
system of 1836 and 1837, on which the state 
had expended such large sums of money ; and 
that fact was a strong argument, as I thought, 
in my report. In 1847, you made choice of 



16 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



Chicago as your home, and, as I understood, 
purchased a large amount of property there. 
Now neither of my bills touched Chicago ; they 
confined the roads to the old routes the Ill- 
inois Central Road, as then understood, from 
Cairo, by Vandalia, Shelby ville, Decatur, Bloom- 
ington, Peru and Dixon to Galena. A new 
light broke in upon you when, in conjunction 
with Mr. Butterfield and others interested in 
Chicago, a great movement was set on foot to 
disturb my plans and to change the route of 
the Illinois Central Railroad, so as to make it 
run to Chicago and thence to Galena. You can 
not have forgotten how much surprised I was 
when you informed me of your intention, after 
you had taken your seat, in December 1847, 
to bring forward this proposition, how earnest- 
ly I urged upon you, while admitting the im- 
portance of the change, an adherence to the old 
plan." 

On Feb. 10, 1849, the charter of the Great 
Western Railway was renewed by the legisla- 
ture of Illinois, to take effect April 13, 1849, 
the grant running as in the first act, to the 
"president and directors of the Cairo City & 
Canal Company," with certain others to be 
associated with them, but under the name and 
style of the "Great Western Railway." Among 
the names of the associate directors will be 
found those of Justin Butterfield, John B. 
Turner, Mark Skinner and Henry Corwith. 
The new board was reinstated with all the 
powers and privileges contained in the first act, 
the act repealing the charter to the contrary 
notwithstanding. Many additional and valuable 
privileges were conveyed by the state, includ- 
ing a grant of the right of way and of all the 
work and surveying done at the expense of the 
state. The new company was to expend at 
least one hundred thousand dollars within three 
years, and two hundred thousand dollars in 
each year thereafter until the line was com- 
pleted from the city of Cairo to the city of 
Chicago. 

The governor of the state was to hold in 
trust, for the benefit of the company, whatever 
lands might be donated by the general govern- 



ment to the State of Illinois to aid in the con- 
struction of the road, anticipating, as it were, 
the action of the general government, the 
question of a land-grant having already been 
freely discussed in congress. 

Simultaneous with this, Judge Breese, from 
the committee on public lands of which he 
was chairman during the last four years of his 
term as senator reported the following bill in 
the United States senate, February 1, 1849 : 

"A bill to grant the right of way across 
the public lands and to dispose of said land in 
aid of the several states in the construction of 
railroads and canals. 

Be H enacted by the senate and house of 
representatives of the United States of America in 
congress assembled, That whenever any state in 
which public land is situated have, or shall 
authorize the construction of any railroad or 
canal, and the route of the same shall have 
been surveyed and returned to the secretary of 
the treasury, the right of way on said route, so 
far as the same is situated on the public land, be 
and the same is hereby granted for said purpose; 
and also the right to take stone and timber and 
materials for said erection on any of the public 
land adjacent, so long as said land is unsold ; 
and the land for the space of one hundred feet 
on each side of the middle of said route shall 
be and remain for that purpose, so long as said 
canal or railroad is sustained. 

"SECTION 3. And it is further enacted, 
That when the survey of said route shall have 
been returned to the secretary of the treasury, 
he shall, at the request of the governor of said 
state, reserve from public sale all or so much of 
the public lands within ten miles of said route, as 
said governor, by direction of the legislature of 
said state, shall request, and the same shall be re- 
tained for said state, and shall be sold and con- 
veyed to said state or to whoever said state shall 
direct, at and for ihc minimum price per acre, in 
such quantities and at such times as said state 
shall desire, in aid of said construction. Provided 
nevertheless, that said route shall be so surveyed 
and returned, and said land so reserved, within 
three years from the passing of this law ; and 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



17 



POPLAR STREET STATION', MEMPHIS, TENN. 




ILLINOIS CENTRAL DEPOT, COR. MAIN AND CALHOUN STREETS, 
MEMPHIS, TENN. 



18 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



all of said land not actually so purchased and paid 
lor by said state, within ten years from the pass- 
ing of this act, shall be subject to sale and 
private entry in the same manner as if the same 
had not been reserved. And provided further. 
that this shall not extend to any land but such 
as is subject to private sale at one dollar and 
twenty-five cents per acre: and nothing in this 
act contained shall be so construed as to grant 
to any state such right of pre-emption to any land 
heretofore set apart or reserved for schools, 
nor to any public land which may have been 
reserved by the United States for military or 
other public purposes, nor to mineral lands, 
nor to any to which a right of pre-emption may 
previously have been acquired by any person 
or persons." This bill passed the senate, 
February 13, 1849 was presented in the house 
by Jacob Collamer from Vermont but met 
with considerable opposition, and failed of pass- 
age there. This bill also, it will be noticed, 
contemplated only a pre-emption of lands. 

As far back as 1848, Senator Douglas had 
introduced a bill in the United States senate, 
granting alternate sections of the public land 
to the state of Illinois to aid in the construction 
of a railroad from Cairo to Galena with a branch 
to Chicago. This bill was reported from the 
senate committee on public lands of which Sid- 
ney Breese of Illinois was chairman. It was 
subsequently taken up and early in May was 
passed by the senate. The representatives in 
the house from Illinois all gave it their cordial 
support, but toward the close of the session it 
was laid on the table by a small majority. At 
the next session, 1848-9, Douglas again intro- 
duced his bill in the senate, but before any 
action was had in that body, the Illinois repre- 
sentatives in the house had succeeded in having 
the bill of the last session restored to its place 
on the calendar; but congress adjourned with- 
out any further action on the bill by the house. 

In December 1849, Douglas, with his col- 
league, Gen. James Shields, who had succeeded 
Breese, and the Illinois delegation in the house 
matured a bill looking to the construction of 
the Illinois Central Road and its Chicago branch. 



That bill, which all the Illinois members had a 
voice in framing, was introduced in the senate 
by Douglas in January 1850. During its pend- 
ence in the senate, besides receiving the support 
of the Illinois senators, it was advocated by 
Henry Clay, William H. Seward, John C. Cal- 
houn, William H. King, Thomas H. Benton 
and Gen. Lewis Cass. 

While the bill was pending, the Cairo City 
& Canal Company induced the legislature of 
Illinois to pass a measure ceding to that com- 
pany all lands that might at any time be granted 
by congress to the state, to aid in the construc- 
tion of the Illinois Central Railroad. Senator 
Douglas was still unwilling that the grant 
should pass to a private corporation direct, and 
finally induced Darius B. Holbrook of Cairo, 
111., the president of the Cairo City & Canal 
Company to release to the state of Illinois all 
the rights of that company, which he did, ex- 
ecuting on Dec. 24, 1849, on behalf of his com- 
pany as president, a full release and surrender 
to the state of Illinois of what was known as 
the Holbrook charter with all the rights and 
privileges therein contained ; in accordance with 
which, the legislature on Dec. 17, 1851, passed 
an act accepting this release and repealing all 
the acts which they had before granted to this 
company Jan. 16, 1836, March 6, 1843 and 
Feb. 10, 1849. 

Judge Douglas in his letter to Judge Breese 
of March 13, 1851, well says: "I can well con- 
ceive that it might prove better for Mr. Hol- 
brook and his partners, and more effectual for 
their schemes of speculation for them to have 
had a pre-emption than for the state to have 
had a grant ; but I apprehend that you will find 
it difficult to convince any citizen of Illinois 
who was not a partner in the speculation, that 
it was better for tlie state not to have tlic lands 
t/ian to /tare them, or to he required to pay a dollar 
and a quarter an acre (or them, instead of receiv- 
ing them for nothing under the act of last session . 

The same act accepted the act of congress 
of Sept. 20, 1850, granting the lands to the 
state of Illinois to aid in the construction of a 
railroad from Chicago to Mobile. The Mobile 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



\ ( >hio Railroad was not however fully com- 
pleted from Columbus, Kentucky, to Cairo, 
until 1874. In 1872, the Illinois Central Rail- 
road company extended its aid to the Mississippi 
Central Railroad company, and that line was 
extended from Jackson, Tennessee, to Fillmore, 
a point nearly opposite Cairo; and thus for the 
first time was completed an all rail communica- 
tion from the lakes to the Gulf of Mexico. 

The bill making a grant of lands to the 
states of Illinois, Mississippi and Alabama, 
passed the United States senate on May 2, 1850, 
by a vote of 26. to 14, and was passed in the 
house on Sept. 17, 1850, by a vote of 101 to 
7.S. Mobile was inserted as the objective point 
by Thomas Childs, Jr., of New York, who was 
at that time largely interested in the Mobile & 
Ohio Railroad company. 

Hon. John Wentworth, in his "Congression- 
al Reminiscences," gives an interesting account 
of the proceedings attending the passage of this 
bill in the house and the state of Illinois is 
largely indebted to him for the efforts he put 
forward in that direction but the claim that he 
once owned one-fourth of the capital of the 
Illinois Central Railroad company, must be 
regarded as an extravagance of speech. Hon. 
George Ashmun of the Springfield district, 
Mass., and a friend of Daniel Webster, distin- 
guished himself among the non-resident sup- 
porters of the bill. It was largely through his 
influence in the house that the bill was passed. 
On their return to Illinois at the close of the 
session, Judge Douglas and Gen. Shields were 
tendered a public dinner by the citizens of Chi- 
cago in consideration of their services in obtain- 
ing the passage of this act. In declining the 
honor, they modestly awarded to their colleagues 
in the house the full measure of credit for having 
successfully carried the bill through to comple- 
tion. John S. Wright of Chicago, worked 
most faithfully to secure the land-grant from 
congress to aid in the construction of the Cen- 
tral Road. He wrote and had printed and dis- 
tributed at his own expense, circulars stating 
briefly the necessity of the road to the welfare 
of the nation, and six thousand copies of peti- 



tions to congress urging the passage of the act. 
These petitions were prepared in three different 
forms, so as to meet the wishes of the South, 
the East and the state of Illinois, and set forth 
the advantages to be gained by each section. 
At that time, such documents were mailed free 
to postmasters, and he kept a clerk busy for 
weeks sending these to every postmaster be- 
tween the lakes and the Gulf. The requests to 
the postmasters to get signers and forward the 
petitions to their congressmen were promptly 
attended to, and the petitions came in by thou- 
sands, and had much influence with members. 
Wright also went to Washington and spent* 
considerable time laboring for the passage of 
the bill ; he also published a pamphlet in which 
he took the ground that the grant was of such 
immense value, it should go direct to the state 
and that it should hold the lands and build the 
road from the proceeds of their sale. He wrote: 
"the state would be everlastingly dishonored if 
the legislature did not devise laws to build the 
road, and disenthrall the state of its enormous 
debt besides, out of the avails of this land grant. 
The suggestion was not altogether unfeasible, 
but it is exceedingly doubtful whether the state 
could have carried out the project as success- 
fully as a private corporation ; judging retro- 
spectively, it is fair to presume that it would 
have made another and signal failure in such 
an attempt. 

On Sept. 20, 1850, the act passed by the 
thirty-first congress, on the 17th of that month, 
was approved, "granting the right of way and 
making a grant of lands to the states of Illinois, 
Mississippi and Alabama, in aid of the con- 
struction of a railroad from the southern termi- 
nus of the Illinois and Michigan Canal to a 
point at or near the junction of the Ohio and 
Mississippi rivers, Cairo, with a branch of the 
same to Chicago, and another ria the town of 
Galena to Dubuque in the state of Iowa." Gov. 
William H. Bissell, afterward a solicitor of the 
company, was in the house at the time this act 
was passed. This was accomplished after 



cago 



Address of Augustine W. Wright before the Chi- 
Historical Society. 



' 



20 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



repeated attempts had been made, beginning 
in the year 1843, under the leadership of Sidney 
Breese. George W. Jones, senator from Iowa, 
suggested the amendment providing for the 
termination at Dubuque. 

In order to aid in the continuation of this 
road from the mouth of the Ohio river to 
Mobile, similar rights were conferred upon the 
states of Alabama and Mississippi. Mobile 
was the objective point on the south, and the 
Mobile & Ohio Railroad participated in the 
advantages of the grant, receiving its share of 
the public lands through the states of Alabama 
and Mississippi. The evident design was to 
promote traffic, particularly in food products 



Central Railroad company afterward accepted 
payment for such lands from actual settlers at 
the government price. The act further provided 
that the construction of the road should be com- 
menced at Cairo on the south, and at the Illi- 
nois and Michigan Canal on the north, simul- 
taneously, and continued from each of said 
points until completed, after which the branches 
to Chicago and Dubuque, Iowa, were to be 
extended. The provision, as to the extension 
to Dubuque, was a singular one to apply to a 
road that depended upon the state of Illinois for 
its charter it assumed that a bridge was to be 
constructed across the Mississippi river between 
Dunleith and Dubuque connecting the two 





First check used by the baggage department. Exact size. 



from Chicago and the Northwest and cotton 
from the Gulf states to the South and to Europe 
tvV? Mobile, but the shallowness of the water in 
Mobile Bay and the consequent expense of 
lighterage and of other charges was an insuper- 
able objection to foreign shipments via that 
point, and to this extent, the plan of connecting 
the lakes with the gulf was a failure. The con- 
struction of the jetties at the mouth of the 
Mississippi river, at a later date, placed New 
Orleans in a more favorable position. Besides 
the immense traffic carried to that point by rail, 
a large quantity of corn is shipped to the latter 
city in barges from St. Louis for trans-shipment 
abroad. The grant of lands referred to was to 
cover alternate sections in even numbers within 
six miles, if vacant lands to this extent could 
be found; if not, then within fifteen miles. All 
pre-emption rights were to be respected, and in 
accordance with this provision, the Illinois 



states, but made no requirement as to its con- 
struction. In point of fact, this bridge was not 
built until nineteen years after in 1869 thir- 
teen years after the railroad was completed, 
and then under a separate charter.")" Fifteen 
years after its completion, the railroad company 
acquired a controlling interest in it, thus fully 
perfecting the original design of a continuous 
railway from Cairo to Dubuque.* 

t The Dunleith & Dubuque Bridge Company. 

* October 13, 1867, the Illinois Central Railroad 
company leased the Dubuque & Sioux City Railroad 
extending from Dubuque to Iowa Falls, a distance of 
143 miles, for twenty years with privilege of taking the 
same in perpetuity. The lease included the Cedar 
Falls & Minnesota Railroad extending from Waverly 
north to Mona, a distance of 75 'j miles. A year later, 
it leased, upon the same terms, the Iowa Falls & Sioux 
City Railroad extending from Iowa Falls to Sioux City, 
a distance of 184 miles. In 1887 it constructed the 
Cherokee & Dakota Railroad from Onawa to Sioux 
Falls, a distance of 155)4 miles, and the Cedar Rapids 
& Chicago Railroad from Manchester to Cedar Rapids, 
42 miles. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



The grant of land was to apply to the main 
road and branches, respectively, in quantities 
corresponding to the length of each, and only 
to be disposed of as the work progressed. All 
lands that had been previously granted to the 
state in aid of the Illinois and Michigan Canal 
were to be reserved from the operations of the 




Baggage check used by the Illinois Central 
for many years. 

act, and the price of these was to be increased 
to double the minimum price of government 
lands. So that one effect of the grant was to 
immediately enhance the value of the canal 
lands. 

The grant from the United States govern- 
ment was to go direct to the state of Illinois 



for the purpose named. The railroad and 
branches when completed were to remain a 
"public highway" for the use of the government, 
free from toll or other charge upon the trans- 
portation of any property or troops of the 
United States. That is to say the use of the 
road bed should be allowed the government, 
but the railroad companies should not be obliged 
to furnish equipment and men to handle the 
business. Consequently it was mutually agreed, 




Present check used by the Illinois Central baggage 
department. 

that the government should be entitled to a 
reduction of thirty-three and one-third per cent 
from the regular tariff rates on all transporta- 
tion conducted for their account, this percent- 
age representing the value of the use of the 
highway or road bed. The United States 
mails were also to be transported over the road 
for such compensation as congress might direct. 
In case the road was not completed within ten 
years, the state of Illinois was to be required 
to pay back to the United States the amount 
which it might have received upon the sale of 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



any part of the lands and to reconvey any lands 
unsold. 

In a small and dimly-lighted room at No. 1 
Hanover Street, a little narrow street leading 
out of Wall Street, in the city of New York in 
the early spring of the year 1851, there met a 
number of gentlemen who were known in law 
as the incorporators of the Illinois Central 
Railroad company. It was no new scheme that 
they met to consider, but an old one they were 
about to revive. In entering upon this great 
work, they were not indulging in mere specula- 
tion or experiment; many of them had been 
connected with other successful enterprises and 
this experience helped them to form a proper 
judgment in the prosecution of the work they 
were about tp undertake. Probably no body of 
incorporators, or directors as they afterward 
became, was ever imbued with more earnest 
determination, confident reliance, pride of 
undertaking, and honesty of purpose. And it 
may be added that no corporate body was ever 
formed that was composed of men of more 
indomitable energy, integrity of character, 
business capacity, sagacity and foresight. 
They were men who lived and moved in the 
healthy atmosphere of commercial probity and 
stood high in the estimation of their fellow- 
men. In social life, their established reputa- 
tions gave them a standing among men that 
could not be disputed. In the prosecution of 
their trust, the interest of the shareholders 
they represented was regarded as identical with 
their own. The shareholders in turn appreci- 
ated this and whatever mistakes were made 
were promptly overlooked. This feeling of 
mutual confidence strengthened the hands of 
the board in all they undertook and gave char- 
acter to the enterprise abroad. The enterprise 
upon which they pinned their faith, they pro- 
moted and sustained to a large extent with 
their private fortunes. It is true that they had 
much to stimulate them in their efforts a 
promise of two million and a-half of acres of 
beautiful, rich and fertile prairie land was no 
mean incentive to urge them on. Yet it cer- 
tainly required no little amount of courage to 



take up a project that had already been thrc-j 
times attempted, twice by organized corpora- 
tions and once by the state of Illinois, each 
time with the same result disastrous failure. 
But in this instance, whatever might be their 
fate as individual investors, the benefit to be 
conferred upon the state of Illinois by the suc- 
cessful accomplishment of the work would not 
be less marked. When the dark days of the 
panic of 1857 overshadowed them, they might 
have abandoned their trusts and sold their re- 
spective interests for what they would bring, 
but this would have been to them a poor sub- 
stitution for the realization of their plans, and 
such an idea does not seem to have entered 
their minds. They knew, moreover, that there 
were those who had been induced to invest 
their money in the enterprise because their 
names had been identified with it, and they felt 
that they were resting under a moral obligation 
to save these from pecuniary loss if possible. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE LAND DEPARTMENT. 

All the requirements of the act of incor- 
poration having been complied with, the deed 
conveying the lands from the state of Illinois 
to the Illinois Central Railroad company was 
executed March 24, 1851, by his excellency 
Augustus C. French, governor of the state. 
Simultaneously with the delivery of the deed, 
a deed of trust was executed by the president 
of the company to Morris Ketchum, John 
Moore and Samuel D. Lockwood, conveying 
to them, in trust, all the lands granted by the 
government of the United States under the act 
of congress referred to, and all the other prop- 
erty of the company, as security to the state 
for the faithful performance of work to be 
undertaken, and to secure the bonds to be 
issued. This was an important trust and it was 
of the utmost importance to the interests of 
the state that it should be confided to those 
who would wisely and faithfully administer it 
on its behalf, and probably not in the whole 
state of Illinois could there have been found 
two more fit persons for this purpose than John 
Moore and Samuel D. Lockwood. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



23 



The state had the appointment of two 
trustees of the lands and the railroad company 
one; the latter selected Morris Ketchum of the 
banking-house of Ketchum, Rogers and Bement 
of New York, who was also the second treas- 
urer of the company. He was a brother to 
Hiram Ketchum, the celebrated lawyer. Mr. 
Edward Bement of the same banking-house 
being the first treasurer elected. Mr. Ketchum 
was also connected with the locomotive works 
of Rogers, Ketchum and Grosvenor of Pater- 
son, New Jersey, who supplied the first one 
hundred locomotives used by the company ; he 
was also interested in the New York & New 
Haven Railroad company, and was the author 
of the plan of raising money on "preferred 
stock," the first issue of which was made by 
that company during Mr. Ketchum's connection 
with it. It was a clever device invented to 
enable railway companies to raise money with- 
out increasing their mortgage debt, and, while 
at the same time it apparently weakened, it did 
not necessarily impair the value of the common 
stock. The land-commissioners have been 
John C. Dodge, who took part in the platting 
and selection of the lands; John Wilson, 
formerly land-commissioner of the general 
land-office, Washington; John W. Foster, 
author of the "Mound Builders," and other ar- 
chaeological works ; Chas. M. Dupuy, Walter 
M. Phillips, John B. Calhoun and Peter Daggy; 
L. P. Morehouse is the present incumbent. 
His long and faithful service in the engineering 
department was rewarded by his appointment 
as land-commissioner. Mr. Daggy, though re- 
tired as commissioner upon a liberal pension, 
still continues to act as secretary of the land 
department. 

Of the lands entrusted to them, the soil 
for the most part was of a rich, black, deep 
mould, of unsurpassed fertility, capable of 
producing in the greatest abundance wheat, 
rye, corn, oats and fruits and vegetables of all 
kinds. But, with all their productiveness, the 
quarries and mineral wealth had remained com- 
paratively unsettled and uncultivated until this 
road was constructed, and would have continued 



so in all probability for many years to come, 
but for the facilities of travel and transportation 
furnished by it. These lands had been in the 
market subject to private entry for a third of a 
century at a mere nominal value, and yet in 
very few instances were purchasers found for 
them. Remote from markets, without facilities 
for transportation, and with roads almost im- 
passable, the cost of handling the products of 
the lands to a market, and the time employed 
therein, amounted almost to as much as the 
value of the land. 

The total grant of land to the state of Illi- 
nois was 2,594,115 acres which were donated 
to the company, being at the rate of 3700 acres 
per mile. The grant of lands referred to was 
not, strictly speaking, the first act of congress 
making a grant of lands directly and specifically 
to aid railroad building, but was among the 
first in importance. Of the land donated by 
the state to the Illinois Central Railroad com- 
pany, 107,614 acres were first conveyed to pre- 
emption claimants. Gov. Joel A. Matteson, in 
his inaugural message to the eighteenth general 
assembly, convened Jan. 3, 1853, referring to 
this, says: "I have not heard that any settler 
upon the company's land has had occasion to 
complain, but, on the contrary, when the time 
by law had passed for proving pre-emptions 
upon the company's land by the settler upon 
the lands, the company took no advantage and 
allowed the lands to be entered on proof being 
made, the same as if directed by law. This 
course pursued in, can not fail to awaken in 
the minds of the people of this state strong 
feelings of reciprocal good-will." The rapid 
settlement of the railroad lands stimulated the 
sale of the government lands, alternate sections, 
which for years had been in market, but re- 
mained unsold, though for a considerable time 
they could have been obtained with land- 
warrants at about one-half the government 
price. After the location of the Illinois Cen- 
tral Railroad, a large portion of them were 
immediately sold for from $2.50 to $5 an acre, 
and the line of the road began to fill up with 
hardy and enterprising settlers, enabling the 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 




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AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



25 



government to elose its land-offices. Up to 
January 1, 1890, of the lands donated to the 
company, 2,456,829 acres had been disposed of 
to about 30,000 actual settlers, yielding $28,- 
742,002.93. The population of the state when 
the grant was made was 851,470. The popula- 
tion of Chicago was less than 40,000. By the 
recent census (1900) it is found to be nearly 
2,000,000. 

The landed interest seemed for a time to 
be regarded as of greater importance and value 
than the railroad itself. Said a member of the 
English Parliament the Hon. Lawrence Hey- 
worth of Liverpool who visited Illinois in 
1856, and went over the line of railway shortly 
after its completion, "This is not a railway 
company; it is a land company," and so im- 
pressed -was he with the future value of the 
lands, that he went back to New York and gave 
his bankers a cartf-blanchc to purchase all the 
Illinois Central Railroad company's shares that 
were offered for sale, and they did not stop 
purchasing until they had acquired for his 
account an interest amounting to over $1,000,- 
000. I mention this to show how pleasing a 
picture the beautiful open prairies of our state 
presented to the eye of a foreigner at that time, 
and what a deep impression they made upon 
his mind. But Mr. Heyworth failed to reap 
pecuniary advantage from his investment, for 
the reason that, like the projectors already 
referred to, he had anticipated too much. The 
country indeed made the railroad, but the rail- 
road did not respond quickly enough in making 
the country. The promise of the enormous 
traffic, that it was believed these lands would 
supply to the railway, was not fulfilled soon 
enough to yield sufficient revenue to meet the 
early matured interest on the debt. The esti- 
mates and predictions made by the friends of 
the road told a flattering tale of wealth, and 
indeed they were all realized, but not within 
the time expected. The difficulty was that 
these rich promises pre-supposed a larger emi- 
gration to the state and a more rapid settlement 
upon the lands than could possibly take place 
within the time specified. The cry went out to 



the farmers of England, Germany, vSweden, 
Norway, Holland, and other countries, at the 
cost of many thousands of dollars, to come 
over and settle in this new and beautiful coun- 
try, but for a time it was scarcely heeded. 
Special agents were employed to go to these 
countries to explain the advantages of settling 
in our state, and pamphlets printed in their 
respective languages, describing the attractive- 
ness of the country and the fertility of its soil, 
were scattered broadcast over Europe. The 
dismal failure of Morris Birkbeck and others to 
establish English colonies in Illinois was still 
fresh in the minds of many of the English 
farmers, and, with few exceptions, they could 
not be induced to leave the mother country. 
The kind words spoken of Illinois by Birkbeck 
in his "Letters from Illinois," and "Notes on a 
Journey to America," both published in 1818, 
were savagely attacked by other Englishmen 
who warned their countrymen not to be deluded 
by his statements. Later on, however, many 
Scandinavians, Poles and a few Germans and 
Russians, found their way over and located 
upon these lands, but for the most part they 
were settled by people from the adjoining, and 
older eastern states, who were perhaps better 
qualified to judge of their resources and could 
cultivate them to greater advantage. 

MEMORIAL FOR CHARTER. 
On January 15, 1851, Governor Augustus 
C. French sent a communication to the house 
of representatives transmitting a memorial of 
which the following is a copy :* 

*Although this was the only plan for the comple- 
tion of the road submitted to the legislature, another 
plan was seriously agitated by some of the leading men 
in 'the state in conjunction with certain men in New 
York, who had figured considerably in Illinois matters, 
and a bill was prepared in accordance therewith. The 
design was to have the state virtually control the road, 
and one of the provisions of the bill was that the stock 
should be made a basis for banking under any law 
establishing a general system of banking. There were 
other curious provisions which are interesting as show- 
ing the condition of things at that time, and especially 
the opinions of men as to the best means of raising 
millions of money by a bankrupt state. The press of 
the state discountenanced the project and favored giv- 
ing the lands to actual settlers. The bill for this pro- 
ject may be found in the Chicago Daily Democrat of 
January 11, 1851, 



26 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



" To tlie honorable the senators and representatives 

of the people of the state of Illinois in general 

assembly convened: 

"The memorial of Robert Schuyler, George 
Griswold, Gouverneur Morris, Jonathan Sturges, 
Thomas W. Ludlow and John F. A. Sanford of 
the city of New York; and of David A. Neal, 
Franklin Haven and Robert Rantoul, Jr., of the 
city of Boston and vicinity, respectfully repre- 
sents : 

"That, having examined and considered an 
act of congress of the United States, whereby 
land is donated by the United States for the 
purpose of insuring the construction of a rail- 
road from Cairo, at the mouth of the Ohio river, 
to Galena and the northwestern angle of the 
state of Illinois, with a branch extending to 
Chicago on Lake Michigan, on certain con- 
ditions, therein expressed ; and, having exam- 
ined also the resources of the tract of country 
through which it is proposed that the said rail- 
road shall pass, and the amount of cost, and 
the space of time necessary for constructing the 
same, the subscribers propose to form a com- 
pany, with such others as they may associate 
with them, including among their number per- 
sons of large experience in the construction of 
several of the principal railroads of the United 
States, and of means and credit sufficient to 
place beyond doubt their ability to perform 
what they hereinafter propose, make the follow- 
ing offer to the state of Illinois for their con- 
sideration : 

"The company so formed by the subscribers 
will, under the authority and direction of the 
state of Illinois, fully and faithfully perform 
the several conditions, and execute the trusts, 
in the said act of congress contained. And will 
build a railroad with branches between the ter- 
mini set forth in said act, with a single track, 
and complete the same, ready for the transpor- 
tation of merchandise and passengers, on or 
before the fourth day of July, which will be in 
the year of our Lord, eighteen hundred and 
fifty-four. And the said railroad shall be, in 
all respects, as well and thoroughly built as 
the railroad running from Boston to Albany, 



with such improvements thereon as experience 
has shown to be desirable and expedient, and 
shall be equipped in a manner suitable to the 
business to be accommodated thereby. And 
the said company, from and after the comple- 
tion of the said road, will pay to the state of 

Illinois, annually, * per cent of the gross 

earnings of the said railroad, without deduction 
or charge for expenses, or for any other matter 
or cause ; provided, that the state of Illinois 
will grant to the subscribers a charter of incor- 
poration, with terms mutually advantageous 
with powers and limitations, as they, in their 
wisdom, may think fit, as shall be accepted by 
said company, and as will sufficiently remuner- 
ate the subscribers for their care, labor and 
expenditure in that behalf incurred,' and will 
enable them to avail themselves of the lands 
donated by the said act to raise the funds, or 
some portion of the funds, necessary for the 
construction and equipment of said railroad. 
"ROBERT SCHUYLER, 
GEORGE GRISWOLD, 
GOUVERNEUR MORRIS, 

of Morrisania, 
FRANKLIN HAVEN, 
DAV. A. NEAL, 
ROBERT RANTOUL, JR., 
JONA. STURGES, 
THOS. W. LUDLOW, 
JOHN F. A. SANFORD. 
"December 28, 1850." 

It was laid on the table and ordered to be 
printed. 

On January 14, 1851, Asahel Gridley intro- 
duced in the senate a bill for an "act to incor- 
porate the Illinois Central Railroad company," 
which was referred to the committee oh internal 
improvements. After various decisions and 
references from day to day, James L." I). 
Morrison, on February 5, following, offered a 
substitute for the original bill, to which various 
amendments were offered, and, on the next 
day, February 6, it was finally passed in the 
senate by a vote of 23 to 2. Four clays later 

* John \Ventworth said that it was proposed to (ill 
this in ten per cent but that he opposed it. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



27 



February 10, 1851, it passed the house of repre- 
sentatives by a vote of 72 to 2. The final pas- 
sage of the bill was celebrated in Chicago by 
the firing of cannon and other demonstrations 
in honor of the event. That clause in the char- 
ter making the governor of the state an r.v- 
oiliiio officer was suggested by John Went- 
worth. 

The incorporators named were, George 
Griswold, Franklin Haven, David A Neal, 
Jonathan Sturges, Joseph W. Alsop, Robert 
Rantoul, Jr., John F. A. Sanford, Leroy M. 
Wiley, Robt. Schuyler, Henry Grinnell, William 
H. Aspimvall, Thomas W. Ludlow and Gou- 
verneur Morris. The four last named never 
took a very active part in the affairs of the 
company. Of the others who formed a part of 
the first board of directors, the most active and 
prominent were Messrs. Sturges, Alsop, Gris- 
wold, Neal and Sanford. 

The act was accepted by the company, 
March 19, 1851. The charter was a special one, 
and in its bearing upon the future welfare and 
prosperity of the state, probably the most im- 
portant it ever granted. It conferred as was 
supposed at the time valuable privileges, al- 
though it exacted unusual benefits in return. 
Among the privileges granted were those con- 
tained in the eighth section, which -authorized 
the board of directors to establish such rates of 
toll for the conveyance of persons and property 
as they should, from time to time, determine. 
A singular provision in relation to this right to 
fix rates was, that it was to be governed by the 
by-laws of the company. The language of the 
charter is, "as they shall from time to time by 
their by-laws determine." Ordinarily, the ob- 
ject of a by-law is to serve as a regulation of a 
society or corporation in a manner agreed upon 
by the members, but, as rates of transportation 
are necessarily frequently changed, to make 
them valid and binding in this particular case, 
would necessitate as frequent a change of the 
by-laws, and as this could only be done by the 
board of directors, it would require an assembl- 
ing of that body so often as to practically make 
it a freight and passenger department of the 



company. Had any one of the corporators 
supposed for a moment, that the day would 
ever come when this right to fix rates would be 
questioned, and that the highest court in the 
land would decide that the police power of the 
state must override the right to fix rates, it is 
very doubtful whether the charter would have 
been accepted at the time it was, and the road 
would not probably have been constructed for 
many years after. 

The work of constructing 700 consecutive 
miles of railroad was about to be commenced. 
Although overshadowed by more modern 
achievements, it was a gigantic undertaking 
for that day, and not a few of those who had 
witnessed previous failures, believed that a 
similar fate awaited this. The mortgage upon 
2,000,000 acres of the lands and the property of 
the company, to secure an issue of construc- 
tion bonds amounting to $17,000,000, was exe- 
cuted September 13, 1851. Of these, $5,000,000 
were negotiated in London, and such was the 
confidence reposed in the directory of the com- 
pany that the bonds were eagerly taken up at a 
premium before construction work was fairly 
commenced. The bonds carried with them the 
right to subscribe to the share capital in the 
proportion of ten shares to each bond, and as 
the outlook for the shares was very promising 
at the time, this proved a very popular feature. 
At this time, the bonds of the state of Illinois 
were selling at a large discount, so that in the 
Eastern states confidence in any Illinois project 
was too limited to command any financial aid 
in that direction. At this time and for many 
years after, foreign capital was sought to carry 
out all the leading enterprises in the West. 

Among the first and largest expenditures 
made were those for procuring the right of way 
into the city of Chicago. This difficult task 
was entrusted to James F. Joy and Mason Bray- 
man. General Brayman wrote me on Novem- 
ber 14, 1890, as follows: "My relation to the 
projectors of the Illinois Central Railroad began 
in the autumn of 1850. My retainer as their 
professional adviser dates November 10, 1850. 
The history of the company so far as 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



relates to Illinois, and especially to Chicago, 
during the contention for entrance on the Lake 
Front was almost dramatic in its incidents." 

On June 14, 1852 (Walter Smith Gurnee, 
being then mayor of the city) an ordinance was 
procured from the common council of- the city 
of Chicago, granting permission to the company 
"to lay down, construct and maintain within 
the limits of the city, and along the margin of 
the lake within and adjacent to the same, a 
railroad with one or more tracks." This ordin- 
ance was confirmed by an agreement entered 
into between the railroad company and the city 



by purchase and through condemnation pro- 
ceedings. The company afterward acquired by 
purchase most of the riparian rights pertaining 
to the lands. 

On March 22, 1851, the board of directors 
by a unanimous resolution appointed Roswell 
B. Mason of Bridgeport, Conn., engineer-in- 
chief with jurisdiction over the entire line. No 
person could have been selected better qualified 
for the work. Mr. Mason was born Sept. 19, 
1805, in the town of New Hartford, Oneida 
county, New York. In 1822-3 he was in the 
engineering department of the Erie Canal ; in 




THE LARGEST LOCOMOTIVE IN THE WORLD. 

GENERAL DIMENSIONS: Cylinders, 23 inches- in Diameter x 30 inch stroke. Driving wheels, 57 inches in Dia- 
meter. Boiler, front end, 82 inches in Diameter. Weight on drivers, 193,200 pounds; weight on trucks, 39,000 
pounds; total weight, 232,200 pounds. Tender, loaded, 132,700 pounds. 



of Chicago March 28, 1853. Lands for depot 
purposes, north of Randolph street, were ac- 
quired by purchase from the United States 
government and from private owners,* and the 
right of way south of Park Row was obtained 

* Various and persistent attempts have been made 
by different parties representing the heirs of Jean 
Baptiste Beaubien, Mark Noble and others, to get 
possession of the lands in fractional southwest quarter 
of section 10, extending north and south of Randolph 
street . 

April 5, 1872, under a special act of congress, 
there was issued to Thos. B. Valentine and wife, of 
San Francisco, scrip for about 13,000 acres of land, in 
pieces of forty acres each, in consideration of their 
having quitclaimed to the United States a similar quan- 
tity of land in the county of Sonoma, near the city of 
San Francisco, to which Valentine had acquired some 
title. These lands were included in what was known 



as the "Miranda Grant" (granted in 1844 to Juan 
Miranda, and from whom Valentine had received his 
title) , which the government had inadvertently disposed 
of. 

The scrip received from the government was 
locatable on any public lands (not mineral) unappro- 
priated and unoccupied. October 18, 1875, Valentine 
filed a claim in the land-office at Springfield, 111., on 
fractional section 10, claiming that it was public land 
and that he was entitled to a patent therefor. This 
was the first location attempted on the company's 
depot-grounds under "Valentine Scrip." Feb. 12, 
1878, he applied to the commissioner of the general 
land-office for a patent; the application was allowed, 
and the patent ordered to be issued. An appeal was 
taken by the city of Chicago (which claimed an interest 
in a portion of the ground) to the secretary of the 
interior, Hon. Carl Schurz. February 28, 1879, the 
secretary reversed the decision of the commissioner, on 
the ground that no part of section 10 was "public land" 
upon which scrip of such character could be located ; 
that it could only be located upon "lands that are in a 
state of nature." 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



1824 was assistant engineer on the Schuylkill 
Canal ; in 1825 was assistant engineer on the 
Morris Canal and until 1831, when he took 
charge of part of the Pennsylvania Canal. In 
1833 he became superintendent of the Morris 
Canal, and left it in 1837, when he became 
chief engineer of the Housatonic Railroad, and 
held that position and that of superintendent 
until 1848. From 1848-51 he was chief engi- 
neer, and superintendent of the New York & 
New Haven Railroad. 

He commenced his journey to Illinois on 
May 14, 1851, accompanied by a corps of engi- 
neers. Their route west was as follows : by 
steamer from New York to Albany, thence by 
railroad to Buffalo, by steamer from Buffalo 
across Lake Erie to Detroit, by railroad thence 
to New Buffalo on the east side of Lake Mich- 
igan the Michigan Central Railroad, at that 
time, being completed only to this point and 
thence by steamer to Chicago ; arriving through 
in about five days. A few days after his 
arrival, he organized several surveying parties, 
divided the line into working divisions and 
appointed over each a competent division 
engineer, the work being apportioned as fol- 
lows: 

N. B. Porter, from Chicago to Rantoul. 

L. W. Ashley, from Rantoul to Mattoon. 

C. Floyd Jones, from Mattoon to Main- 
Line Junction, and north of Centralia and 
the main line from Ramsey's Creek to 
Richview. 

Arthur S. Ormsby, from Richview to Cairo. 

H. B. Plant, from Ramsey's Creek to 
Bloomington. 

Timothy B. Blackstone, from Bloomington 
to Eldena. 

B. B. Provost, from Eldena to Dunleith. 

B. G. Roots had charge of surveying 
parties between the Big-Muddy river and 
the Ohio & Mississippi Railroad. 

Nearly all the important bridges on the 
line were constructed by Stone & Boomer, 
bridge builders, of Chicago. 

Shortly after Col. Mason's arrival in Chi- 
cago, he was joined by Mr. John B. Calhoun 



of Bridgeport, Conn., who had been connected 
with the Housatonic Railroad company, and 
who took charge of the accounts and finances. 
Col. Mason, writing of him several years after, 
says: "He was a competent, faithful and reli- 
able man." Mr. Calhoun remained in the ser- 
vice of the company for many years and became 
its land-commissioner. He was a genial and 
courteous gentleman, unpretentious and thor- 
oughly honest, and a man of such an ingenuous 
nature that he despised anything like deception. 
Millions of dollars passed through his hands 
during the work of construction without the 
loss of a cent to the company. Very heavy 
settlements had to be made with contractors 
during the progress of the work, and most of 
these were made by Mr. Calhoun personally, 
in the capacity of paymaster. As currency 
was scarce in the state and most of that in cir- 
culation was practically irredeemable, it was 
necessary to send to the eastern banks to pro- 
cure a monthly supply. In this way the notes 
of many of the Hartford banks were put in 
circulation along the line; but as these banks 
all redeemed in specie, it was not long before 
they found their way back for redemption. 

Mr. Calhoun named almost all the stations 
that were opened for business on the road after 
its completion. The names are mostly of Indian 
origin, but a few were named in a peculiar 
manner. "Tolono," for example, was con- 
structed by placing the vowel o thrice repeated, 
and alternating arbitrarily with the three conso- 
nants which the word contains, producing a 
name sufficiently unique. 

On March 16, 1853, in addition to his other 
duties, Mr. Mason was charged with the care 
of the transportation' department of the com- 
pany's road, covering such portions of the line 
as were completed and in operation, with addi- 
tional title of general-superintendent, and in 
March 1855 additional executive powers were 
granted him in Illinois. 

In the early prosecution of the work, great 
difficulty was experienced in procuring laborers; 
the country through which the line was surveyed 
was of course entirely unsettled. Southerly 



30 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



from Chicago for about 130 miles, it \v;is an 
almost unbroken prairie, inhabited only by deer, 
wolves and other wild animals, with no settle- 
ment in view. There were not half a dozen 
places on the entire line of sufficient import- 
ance to be known on the map of the state ; so 
that men had to be brought a great distance to 
do the work and they had to be cared for along 
the line. Indeed with the exception of LaSalle 
and Galena on the main line, and Jonesboro in 
southern Illinois near the line, there were no 
places of importance along the proposed route. 
Nearly 80,000 tons of iron rails of a superior 
quality had been purchased in England by 
Capt. David A. Neal, the vice-president, and 
these began to arrive early in 1852. There 
were no rail-mills of importance in this country 
at that time. The cost of the rails purchased 
ranged from $38.50 to $43.50 per ton, f. o. b., at 
Wales or Liverpool. These rails were for the 
most part exceptionally good in quality, and 
some of them were in track for thirty years ; a 
much longer period than the steel rails now 
manufactured will last under ordinary traffic. 
Considerable portion of the line was located 
and construction was well under way by the 
fall of 1851. Maps and profiles were prepared 
and these were deposited with the commissioner 
of the general land-office at Washington, as 
required by law, in February 1852. The final 
approval of location and selection of lands was 
secured a month later. The last contract was 
let Oct. 13, 1852. In May 1853 the first portion 
of the road from LaSalle to Bloomington, 61 
miles, was put in operation, a temporary 
bridge was erected over the Illinois river, and 
cars were hauled to the top of the bluff with 
ropes and chains by means of a stationary 
engine. In July 1854, 128 miles of the Chicago 
branch from Chicago to Urbana were finished 
and trains were running. A few years after- 
ward the company donated $50,000 toward the 
construction of the industrial college at this 
point, now known as the Illinois University. 
In November of the same year the communi- 
cation from Freeport to Galena was completed. 
In the same month for the first time, passen- 



gers were carried from Chicago to Cairo ria 
Chicago & Mississippi Railroad to St. Louis, 
thence east by the Ohio & Mississippi Railroad 
to Sandoval on the main line of the Illinois 
Central Railroad, from which point the road 
was then open to Cairo, a distance of 118 
miles. 

The writer was a passenger on the first 
train that passed through southern Illinois to 
Cairo and remembers well how the "Egyptians" 
turned out to witness the novel sight, to them, 
of a locomotive engine and train of cars. They 
lined the track on both sides at every station, 
the men dressed in their snuff-colored jeans, 
and the women with gaudy-colored calicoes, 
check-aprons and big sun-bonnets. They stood 
dumb with .amazement. Many of them looked 
as though they had come out "between the 
shakes" of fever and ague. 

When the road was located not a single 
railroad track crossed the right of way between 
Chicago and Cairo, a distance of 365 miles. 
The first work put under contract was that por- 
tion of the line extending from Chicago to 
what was then known as Calumet Station, now 
called Kensington. This was done in order to 
enable the Michigan Central trains to enter the 
city, and that company made a temporary loan 
to the Illinois Central Company to enable the 
latter to complete this fourteen miles more 
promptly. Their first train passed over this 
new track on May 20, 1852, running north as 
far as Thirteenth street, where a temporary 
passenger depot was constructed and which 
was used for nearly a year thereafter. The 
road from about Sixteenth street to Randolph 
street was afterward constructed upon piles 
driven in the bed of the lake, and this piling 
was maintained until shortly after the great 
fire of 1871, when the right of way was filled 
with debris from the fire. 

The line into Chicago was originally located 
through section 10, T. 39, N. R. 14, east of 3d 
p. m., to t/if Cln'eaffo river, so that north of 
Randolph street it passed through a portion of 
Fort Dearborn addition then owned by the 
United States government. The map showing 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



the location \v;is Hied in the general land-office 
at Washington, the local land-office at Spring- 
field and in the registry of deeds for Cook 
county. The company claimed a right of way 
through section 10, north of Randolph street, 
under the act of congress of Aug. 4, 1852, 
entitled, "An act to grant the right of way to 
all rail and plank roads and macadamized turn- 
pikes passing through the public lands belong- 
ing to the United States incorporated by any 
of the states." That act gave such a right for 
ten years after its passage. The company, 
however, acquired the right of way through 
section 10, from the United States government 
by purchase on Oct. 14, 1852, at a cost of $45,- 
000 which was then a very high price. After- 
ward the railroad company brought suit against 
the United States for the repayment of the 
moneys paid for the land acquired in Fort Dear- 
born addition, on the ground that the act of 
congress applied to the lands reserved by the 
government for military purposes as well as 
other public lands, but the court of claims 
decided adversely to the railroad company. 

The Baltimore & Ohio Railroad did not 
enter the city over the Illinois Central tracks 
until Nov. 17, 1874. 

That portion of the "main line," as it was 
called between Cairo and LaSalle, a distance 
of 300.99 miles, was completed Jan. 8, 1855. 

With its southern terminal in close proxim- 
ity to Dixie's land, the road offered ready 
means of escape for slaves, of which many 
were not slow to avail themselves whenever 
the opportunity offered. This they did by 
crossing the river at Bird's Point, Kentucky, to 
Cairo, and secreting themselves.in freight cars 
or under passenger coaches just prior to their 
departure for the north. When discovered, if 
the conductor of the train happened to be friend- 
ly to the slave, his escape was winked at, but 
in a few instances they were returned to their 
masters, under the law as it existed at that 
time.* 

Up to Oct. 29, 1889, the transfers of freight 
and passengers between the north end of the 

* Fugitive-slave law, repealed June 13, 1864. 



New Orleans line and the Illinois Central at 
Cairo, were made by transfer steamers which 
conveyed the cars from one point to another, 
but on this date the Cairo bridge was opened 
for traffic, forming a continuous rail route from 
Chicago to New Orleans, a distance of 938 
miles. The length of the bridge is 3 miles and 
4,720 feet, and its cost to date has been about 
$2,700,000, which will be further increased by 
expenditures in the way of filling approaches 
and of additional tracks. 

The Galena branch, LaSalle to Dunleith, a 
distance of 146.73 miles, was completed June 
12, 1855. 

The city of Galena in 1850 lay principally 
on the north bank of the river, and had in that 
year a population of 6000 ; the whole population 
of Jo Daviess county was only 18,600. The 
road was located at first on the south side, 
because of very hostile opposition on the part 
of the people of Galena, to the extension of 
the line across the river, owing to a fear that 
their trade would be injured, which at that time 
was quite large. After the bridge was con- 
structed across the river by the railway com- 
pany, one of the old settlers sat at the south 
end and swore that he would shoot the first 
engineer who attempted to cross ; a little kindly 
persuasion on the part of some of the more 
conservative citizens induced him to retract 
this oath. 

Some idea of the value and magnitude of 
the business of the city may be gathered from 
the following table of exports for 1851 : 



Lead, 

Flour, - 

Barley, 

Pork, 

Lard, 

Bacon, 

Butter, 

Eggs, 

Hides and skins, 

Horses, 

Cattle, 

Lumber, 

Shingles, 



33,082,190 pounds, 

value $1,417,151. 
39,385 barrels. 
42,731 bushels. 
3,185 barrels. 
125,000 pounds. 
312,568 pounds. 
87,618 pounds. 
- 22,880 dozen. 
9,326 

800 head. 
1,500 head. 
5,085,684 feet. 
- 2,470,000 bundles. 



32 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 




W 
x 



CO 

Ct, 



K 

o 



K 

B 



o 
is 

W 



W 

> 

W 
- 



K 





AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



33 



The town was laid out in 1827 and incor- 
porated as a city in 1839. 

The fear, as to constructing a railway 
through the city, was certainly well founded, 
for the completion of the road to Dunleith 
now called East Dubuque 17 miles north, 
proved almost the ruin of Galena as a business 
centre ; the trade being transferred to Dubuque. 
The road from Galena to Dunleith was opened 
Monday, June 11, 1855; and the first passenger 
train passed through on that day. No railways 
were at this time constructed from Dubuque 
west, and all the merchandise for the upper 
Mississippi and the northwest was transferred 
to steamers at Dunleith, where large and sub- 
stantial stone warehouses were erected to 
receive and store it. This gave for the time 
being quite an impetus to the place ; the price 
of city lots rapidly advanced; a fine, large 
hotel, called the "Argyle House," which many 
old Illinoisans remember well, was erected by 
Frederick S. Jesup, a banker of Dubuque, 
besides many stores and dwellings. 

A connection with Chicago at Freeport was 
made by using the tracks of the Galena & Chi- 
cago Union Railroad, which, in 1864 became a 
part of the Northwestern Railway system. 
When the Chicago & Iowa Railroad was built 
in 1872, from Aurora to Forreston on the main 
line, its tracks were used and the arrangement 
via Freeport discontinued. The Chicago branch 
between Chicago and the junction with the 
main line, a distance of 249.78 miles, was com- 
pleted September 26, 1856.* Sections of the 
different divisions were operated as fast as 
completed. 

On Saturday, September 27, 1856, Col. 
Roswell B. Mason, engineer-in-chief, having 
been notified that the last rail was laid on the 
705.5 miles of road and that the construction of 
the Illinois Central Railroad commenced Decem- 
ber 25, 1851, was an accomplished fact, im- 
mediately sent a dispatch to the board of direct- 

*The original plan was to have the Chicago branch 
leave the main line at a point between Decatur and 
Vandalia. 



ors in New York informing them of the circum- 
stance. 

Shortly after he tendered his resignation 
to the board and it was reluctantly accepted. 
In 1861 he was appointed comptroller of the 
land-department and retained that position 
until 1867. In 1865 he was appointed by the 
state legislature one of the members of the 
Chicago board of public works to superintend 
the lowering of the summit of the Illinois and 
Michigan Canal. In 1869 he was elected mayor 
of the city of Chicago, and held that office at 
the time of the great fire, Oct. 9, 1871. 

In 1857 what was known as the Peoria & 
Oquawka Railroad was constructed from Gil- 
man on the Chicago branch to El Paso on the 
main line, thus forming a connection between 
these two important divisions. The Oilman, 
Clinton & Springfield Railroad, connecting- the 
branch with the capital of the state, was opened 
for business on December 3, 1871. 

The early estimates as to the cost of con- 
struction of the Illinois Central Railroad proved 
erroneous: it was supposed that the proceeds 
of the $17,000,000 of mortgage debt created, 
secured by 2,000,000 acres of land, would be 
amply sufficient to construct the road, and that, 
immediately upon its completion, the traffic 
offering would yield sufficient revenue to pay 
the interest on the bonds issued so that no 
large contribution from share capital would be 
necessary ; but this proved a disappointment, 
and it was found necessary to call in not only 
the entire amount of the share capital, but to 
.increase the capital, all of which was paid up 
in full. The charter provided that the capital 
stock should be $1,000,000, which might be 
increased from time to time to any sum not 
exceeding the entire amount expended on 
account of the road. The capital was fixed at 
$17,000,000, corresponding to the amount of 
the mortgage debt, but this has been gradually 
increased to meet the necessities of the com- 
pany. It is now $60,000,000. The dependence 
placed upon the value of the lands granted also 
proved a disappointment. The entire proceeds 
of these, so far as received, during the construe- 



34 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



tion of the line and until its completion were 
not sufficient to make up the deficiency in in- 
terest on the funded debt. 

To refer again to the clause in the charter 
of the company requiring the payment of a tax 
of seven per cent on the gross earnings, its 
great importance to the state may be better 
understood when it is stated that, up to April 
30, 1899, no less than the enormous sum of 
$17,652,930.00 has been paid into the state 
treasury under this requirement. It may not 
be uninteresting to the tax-payers of Illinois to 
show what this sum practically represents in 
assets of the State. In a recent report prepared 
by Hon. C. W. Pavey, state auditor for the 
United States census department, the value of 
public buildings owned by the state is shown as 
follows : 

State-house, Springfield, $4,000,000 

Northern Insane Hospital, Elgin, 535,000 

Eastern Insane Hospital, Kankakee, - 1,211,000 

Central Insane Hospital, Jacksonville, - 800,000 

Southern Insane Hospital, Anna, - 643,000 
Institution, Deaf and Dumb, Jacksonville, 385,000 

Institution for the Blind, Jacksonville, 171,000 

Asylum for Feeble-Minded, Lincoln, 182,000 

Soldiers' Orphans' Home, Normal, 148,000 
Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary, Chicago, 84,000 

State Reform School, Pontiac, 220,000 

Soldiers and Sailors' Home, Quincy, 235,000 

Northern Penitentiary, Joliet, - 1,500,000 

Southern Penitentiary, Chester, 750,000 

Normal University, Normal, 250,000 

Illinois University, Urbana, 270,000 

Southern University, Carbondale, 200,000 

Executive Mansion, Springfield, - 50,000 

Supreme Court, Ottawa, - 50,000 

Supreme Court, Mount Vernon, - - 55,000 

State-Arsenal, Springfield, 15,000" 

$11,754,000 

In the constitution of 1870, the following 
reference is made to the payment of this tax : 
"No contract, obligation or liability whatever, 
of the Illinois Central. Railroad company to pay 
any money into the state treasury, nor any lien 
of the state upon, or right to tax property of, 
said company in accordance with the provisions 
of the charter of said company, approved 
February 10, in the year of our Lord 1851, 



shall ever be released, suspended, modified, 
altered, remittee! or in any manner diminished 
or impaired by legislative or other authority ; ' 
and all moneys derived from said company, 
after the paying of the State debt, shall be 
appropriated and set apart for the payment of 
the ordinary expenses of the state government, 

and for no other purpose whatever." 

The act of 1869, known as the Lake Front 
act, contains this clause: "This act shall not 
be construed nor have the effect to release the 
Illinois Central Railroad company from the 
payment into the treasury of the state of Illi- 
nois of the per centum on the gross or total 
proceeds, receipts or incomes derived from 
said road and branches stipulated in the charter 
of said company." 

The year 1861 was a memorable one in the 
history of the Illinois Central Railroad. Ten 

i years had elapsed since its charter was obtained. 
The road was fully completed and thoroughly 
equipped, but the results of operating it were 
disappointing. In April of that year, the gov- 
ernment placed a force of troops at Cairo. 
Communication with the south being prohib- 
ited, the through business was cut off, and the 
interests of the company suffered for a time 
both in the loss of traffic and the failure of the 
farmers to pay for their lands. To add to the 
difficulty, the bank issues in Illinois were large- 
ly based upon the securities of the southern 
states. The overthrow of this currency caused 
the withdrawal of $12,000,000 of paper from 
circulation with great loss to the holders. The 
tax payable to the state upon the gross earnings 
was, at that time, payable in gold, and the 
company was obliged to pay a premium of 
twenty-five per cent for a draft on New York, 
payable in coin. As .the farmers indebted to 
the company could not meet the payments due 
on 'their lands in cash, the land-department 
adopted the alternative of accepting pay from 
them in corn, with which their cribs were over- 
flowing. Commencing August 1, in that year, 
there were received 1,860,000 bushels of corn 
for lands, and a large quantity was received in 
the following year. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



35 



With the necessities growing out of the 
war, sorghum, or Chinese sugar cane, began to 
be successfully cultivated in Illinois in 1861, 
and about 1,500,000 gallons of syrup were pro- 
duced. Cotton was also raised to a consider- 
able extent in southern Illinois, the price of 
that staple having reached one dollar per pound. 
Many of the settlers on the company's lands in 



hay and oat crops of 1861-2 were unusually 
good, and the prices of these products advanced. 
The demand from the south, though not of the 
character looked for, was very great, and all 
the corn, oats and hay that could be transported 
to Cairo, found a ready purchaser at extraordi- 
narily high prices in the person of Uncle Sam's 
quartermaster. Corn sold at one time at $1.50 




COURTESY OF WATERLOO COURIER ' 



WATEKPOWER DAM AT WATERLOO, IOWA. 



southern Illinois were from the south, and 
were, therefore, familiar with the cultivation 
of both these products. 

The loss of the southern traffic was soon 
compensated for in the extraordinary impetus 
given to every branch of business by the equip- 
ment and movement of the vast number of 
men placed in the field. It is estimated that in 
Illinois alone that year 65,000 men were with- 
drawn from the ordinary occupations of civil 
life to engage in warlike pursuits. The corn, 



per bushel at Cairo and hay and oats were cor- 
respondingly high. 

The offerings of freight were beyond the 
carrying capacity of the line : and traffic was 
tendered at various points, with a certainty that 
it could not be moved, in order that claims for 
damages for refusal to receive might be made. 
Several hundred thousand dollars were paid 
out on this account. The movements of troops 
and munitions of war were so large that at 
times whole regiments had to be transported in 



36 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



freight cars. It was no uncommon thing for 
the passenger department to receive an order 
to move 10,000 troops at a few hours' notice. 
From this time on the revenues of the line were 
immense and the interest on the bonded debt 
of the company was no longer a source of 
anxiety to those who had stood by it so heroic- 
ally through the struggles of the preceding 
decade. The first dividend on the shares, two 
per cent, was earned and paid that year, six 
years after the completion of the line. 

The road was placed at the service of the 
government, which at times had practical pos- 
session, and the number of troops transported 
over it was very large, as was also the quantity 
of munitions of war and stores. Most of the 
Illinois, Minnesota and Wisconsin troops were 
sent south via Cairo. The first detachment of 
Illinois volunteer troops, under orders of 
Governor Richard Yates and in command of 
Brig-Gen. Swift of Chicago, was carried south 
in April, 1861. It was rumored that the con- 
federates intended an attack on some of the 
bridges on the road south of Centralia, and 
these men were sent there to defend them. 
Such was the haste with which they were dis- 
patched, that most of them were unprovided 
with arms. For these and many other bodies 
of troops forwarded, the company did not wait 
to obtain proper requisitions from the state, 
and consequently no compensation was allowed 
for the service. A large sum of money due 
from the state remains unpaid to this day. 
Free transportation was given during the war 
for all supplies forwarded to the sick and 
wounded in the hospitals in the south. During 
the war, not only slaves and refugees from the 
south, but deserters from the southern army, 
and, I am sorry to add, a few from the Union 
army escaped by crossing the river at Cairo. 

The demands upon the road-bed and rolling 
stock of the company, from 1861 to 1865, were 
so heavy that at the close of the war, the track 
had been so overtaxed as to be in an almost 
unsafe condition, and it was restored only after 
many years of labor and the expenditure of 
large sums of money. 



Many of the Union officers and privates, 
previous to the war, occupied positions in the 
service of the Illinois Central Railroad com- 
pany. Among them were : 

N! Maj.-Gen. George B. McClellan was engi- 
neer-in-chief in 1856 and vice-president in 1857- 
9. The financial resources of the company at 
this time were quite limited, so that the posi- 
tion proved a most trying one to fill. In that 
year the company was compelled temporarily 
to make an assignment of its property, and the 
then Capt. McClellan was appointed one of the 
assignees. This trust he administered with 
great faithfulness. He was courageous tinder 
difficulties, exceedingly tender-hearted, just and 
considerate in his treatment of those placed 
under him, and was beloved by all with whom 
he came in contact. He had charge of Chicago 
Harbor in 1843 and superintended the removal 
of the sand-bar across the Chicago river. 

'J Maj.-Gen. Ambrose Everett Burnside was 
cashier of the land-department in Chicago and 
treasurer of the company. He was a director 
of the company from 1865 to 1868. Upon the 
breaking out of the war in 1861, he was called 
by Gov. Sprague of Rhode Island to take 
charge of the state troops, and from the 
colonelcy of the First Rhode Island Regiment 
he rapidly rose to the rank of major-general. 
His distinguished services in North Carolina 
caused him to be promoted to the chief place 
in command of the army of the Potomac. He 
afterward served his state many years and 
until his death as United States senator. 

/ Maj.-Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks was resident 
director in Chicago from September 1860 to 
June 1861. He left this post to enter the 
army. 

i Brig. -Gen. Thomas E. G. Ransom was 
station agent at Farina, a small station in 
southern Illinois, at the time the war broke 
out. He lived, fought and died a brave man, 
every inch a soldier. I last saw him alive in 
his tent at Bird's Point, in May 1861. He was 
anxious to be ordered to the front. 

Brig. -Gen. Mason Brayman was one of the 
solicitors of the company. He did good service 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



37 



for the company during its early organization 
and was instrumental in securing most of its 
right of way. 

Brig. -Gen. John Basil Turchin, colonel of 
the Nineteenth Illinois Volunteers and author 
of "Chickamauga," 1889, was engaged in the 
land-department. He induced a large number 
of his countrymen to settle upon the lands of 
the company near Radom station. 

\J Brig. -Gen. H. L. Robinson, for whom 
President Lincoln showed some friendship, was 
a conductor on one of the suburban trains. He 
rose to the position of colonel and quarter- 
master. 

Col. John B. Wyman, colonel of the Thir- 
teenth Illinois Volunteers, lived at Amboy; 
was division superintendent of the north divi- 
sion ; he was killed at Chickasaw Bayou, Dec. 
27, 1862. 

Col. David Stuart was one of the solicitors 
of the company. 

Lieut. Wm. DeWolf was engaged in the 
land-department. He died June 2, 1862, from 
injuries received at the fight at Williamsburg, 
Va., May 4, in that year. 

^Maj. Joseph Kirkland, for some time 
auditor of the company, entered the volunteer 
service in 1861, in the first levy of troops. He 
served faithfully and gallantly as private, lieu- 
tenant, captain and major, successively, and 
was with Gen. McClellan in his Virginia cam- 
paign and remained in the service until 1863. 

Col. James T. Tucker, who was aid to 
Gen. Banks while the latter was in charge at 
New Orleans, was an assistant-treasurer of 
the company. He was commissioned by Gov. 
Richard Yates in 1861. He was a most gener- 
ous-hearted young man, and every one who 
met "Jimmy" Tucker learned to love him. 
After the war he was the company's general 
southern agent at New Orleans, which position 
he filled most acceptably. He died in that city 
April 15, 1874. 

Sergt. Charles W. Everett, of Battery A, 
Chicago Light Artillery, had been employed in 
the land-department ; he received a fatal wound 



at the battle of Belmont, Ky., and was brought 
to his home at Woodlawn and died there. It 
was my privilege to watch with him during his 
last night on earth. 

- Irving W. Carson, the celebrated scout 
who served in the army of the Potomac, had 
been conductor on the Hyde Park train, and 
was killed while serving under Gen. Grant at 
Vicksburg. 

There were hosts of others, principally 
privates, but many of whom rendered meritor- 
ious service, that enlisted from the ranks of 
the Illinois Central Railroad. In truth, during 
the early part of the war, enlistments by the 
employes were so numerous that it was difficult 
to find men to take their places. 

LAKE FRONT ACT OF 1869. 

I suppose a history of the Illinois Central 
Railroad, however brief or condensed, would 
be incomplete without a reference to the lake 
front act. It will perhaps be a revelation to 
many to learn that the Illinois Central Railroad 
company was not the first in the field in the 
effort to acquire the lake front, and it will per- 
haps be a matter of interest to many to learn 
just how the plan originated. As far back as 
1866, an organization known as the Chicago 
Harbor Improvement Company, and which was 
composed of many of the leading citizens of 
Chicago, attempted to obtain from the legisla- 
ture of the state of Illinois certain rights which 
can be more clearly defined and understood by 
certain articles of agreement entered into by 
those interested in it, which were as follows: 

CHICAGO HARBOR AND IMPROVEMENT COM- 
PANY. 

"Articles of agreement and association 
made and entered into by and between the re- 
spective subscribers hereto, each with the other, 
for the uses and objects and upon the declara- 
tions herein contained and stated. 

"First: It is hereby declared to be the 
object of this association to secure by legisla- 
tive, and other grants, franchises, immunities, 
easements and privileges, the right to create, 



38 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 




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AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



39 



fill in, construct, build, dredge, excavate and 
dig out, own and possess, lands, piers, wharves, 
breakwaters, sea-walls, canals, slips, docks, 
warehouses, elevators, stores and buildings of 
every name and description, within and upon, 
and off from the limits, or any part thereof, 
now covered by the waters of Lake Michigan, 
or the Chicago river, lying and situated opposite 
and east of fractional sections 22 and 15 and that 
portion of fractional section 10 lying south of 
the Chicago river, in township 39, north range 
14, east of the third principal meridian, within 
one mile of the shore of said lake, or within so 
much and such part of said limits as may be 
feasible and expedient, and therein and there- 
upon, to create, fill in, construct, build, dredge, 
excavate and dig out, own and possess, lands, 
piers, wharves, breakwaters, sea-walls, canals, 
slips, docks, warehouses, elevators, stores, and 
buildings of every name and description, and 
do all and singular, such other work and per- 
form such other acts as may be necessary to be 
done to carry out and effectuate the object and 
ends of this association. 

"Second: This association shall be known 
and called 'The Chicago Harbor Improvement 
Company.' 

"Third: The officers of the association 
shall consist of a president, vice-president, 
treasurer, secretary and an executive committee 
composed of five members of the association, 
to be chosen by the association. ' Said officers 
and executive committee to hold office during 
the pleasure of the association. The duties of 
the executive committee shall be to obtain the 
legislation, grants, franchises, immunities and 
easements mentioned in the first section of 
these articles. 

"Fourth: All grants, franchises, immuni- 
ties and easements obtained by the association 
shall run to individuals composing said associa- 
tion, and shall be owned and possessed by the 
several members thereof in equal undivided 
pro-rata proportions ; and each member thereof 
shall have the right, upon the organization of 
any corporation under and by virtue of such 
grants or franchises, to subscribe for and re- 



ceive an equal proportion with each and every 
other member chereof of the capital stock of 
such corporation. 

"Filth: It is hereby agreed by and be- 
tween the parties hereto, that each member 
hereof is liable for and hereby promises to pay 
to the treasurer hereof his equal pro-rata pro- 
portion of all assessments made to defray the 
expenses incident to the obtaining of the legis- 
lation, grants, franchises and easements afore- 
said. 

"Sixth: All assessments under article 
fifth shall be made by the association at a meet- 
ing called by the secretary thereof by written 
or printed notice to each member thereof, such 
notice specifying the time, place and purpose 
for which such meeting is called. For the pur- 
pose of this section, one-half of the members 
of said association shall constitute a quorum, 
and a majority vote of such quorum shall be 
sufficient to create a valid assessment. 

"Seventh: Any member of the association 
failing to pay each and every assessment made 
against him in accordance with sections fifth 
and sixth after notice and demand by the 
treasurer shall forfeit to said association all 
interests in -its grants, franchises, immunities 
and easements, and may by resolution be de- 
clared expelled therefrom. 

"Chicago, March 10, 1866, A. D." 

The organization that sought to obtain this 
franchise was composed of many of the leading 
citizens of Chicago, but they were governed by 
selfish motives, and could give nothing in 
return it is even doubtful whether they would 
have carried out their scheme. They failed to 
procure the privileges they sought to obtain, 
and at the next session, in 1869, the legislature 
conferred similar rights upon the railroad com- 
pany by the passage of an act of which the 
following is a copy : 

LAKE FRONT ACT. 

"An act in relation to a portion of the sub- 
merged lands and lake-park grounds, lying on 
and adjacent to the shore of Lake Michigan, on 
the eastern frontage of the city of Chicago. 



40 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



"SECTION 1. Be it enacted by the people of 
the state of Illinois, represented in the General 
Assembly, That all right, title and interest of 
the state of Illinois in and to so much of frac- 
tional section 15, township 39, range 14, east 
of the third principal meridian, in the city of 
Chicago, county of Cook and state of Illinois, 
as is situated east of Michigan Avenue and 
north of Park Row, and south of the south line 
of Monroe street, and west of a line running 
parallel with, and four hundred feet east -of the 
west line of said Michigan Avenue being a 
strip of land four hundred feet in width, includ- 
ing said avenue along the shore of Lake Mich- 
igan, and partially submerged by the waters of 
said lake are hereby granted, in fee, to the 
said city of Chicago, with full power and au- 
thority to sell and convey all of said tract east 
of said avenue, leaving said avenue ninety feet 
in width, in such manner and upon such terms 
as the common council of said city may, by 
ordinance provide : Provided, that no sale or 
conveyance of said property, or any part there- 
of, shall be valid unless the same be approved 
by a vote of not less than three-fourths of all 
the aldermen elect. 

"SECTION 2. The proceeds of the sale of 
any and all of said lands shall be set aside, and 
shall constitute a fund, to be designated as the 
"park fund" of the said city of Chicago, and 
said fund shall be equitably distributed by the 
common council between the south division, 
the west division and the north division of the 
said city, upon the basis of the assessed value 
of the taxable real estate of each of said divis- 
ions, and shall be applied to the purchase and 
improvement, in each of said divisions, or in 
the vicinity thereof, of a public park, or parks 
and for no other purpose whatsoever. 

"SECTION 3. The right of the Illinois 
Central Railroad company, under the grant 
from the state in its charter, which said grant 
constitutes a part of the consideration for 
which the said company pays to the state at 
least seven per cent of its gross earnings, and 
under and by virtue of its appropriation, occu- 
pancy, use and control, and the riparian owner- 



ship incident to such grant, appropriation, 
occupancy, use and control in and to the lands 
submerged or otherwise lying east of the said 
line running parallel with, and four hundred 
feet east of the west line of Michigan Avenue, 
in fractional sections 10 and 15, township and 
range as aforesaid, is hereby confirmed, and all 
the right and title of the state of Illinois, in 
and to the submerged lands constituting the 
bed of Lake Michigan, and lying east of the 
tracks and breakwater of the Illinois Central 
Railroad company, for the distance of one mile, 
and between the south line of the south pier 
extending eastwardly, and a line extended east- 
ward from the south line of lot twenty-one, 
south of and near to the round-house and 
machine-shops of said company, in the south 
division of the said city of Chicago, are hereby 
granted, in fee, to the said Illinois Central 
Railroad company, its successors and assigns : 
Provided, however, that the fee to said lands 
shall be held by said company in perpetuity, 
and that the said company shall not have the 
power to grant, sell or convey the fee to the 
same ; and that all gross receipts from use, 
profits, leases, or otherwise of said lands, or 
the improvements thereon, or that may hereafter 
be made thereon, shall form a part of the gross 
proceeds, receipts and income of the said Ill- 
inois Central Railroad company, upon which 
said company shall forever pay into the state 
treasury, semi-annually, the per centum pro- 
vided for in its charter, in accordance with the 
requirements of said charter : And provided, 
also, That nothing herein contained shall au- 
thorize obstructions to the Chicago harbor, or 
impair the public right of navigation ; nor shall 
this act be construed to exempt the Illinois 
Central Railroad company, its lessees or assigns, 
from any act of the general assembly which 
may be hereafter passed regulating the rates of 
wharfage and dockage to be charged in said 
harbor: And provided, further, That any of 
the lands hereby granted to the Illinois Central 
Railroad and the improvements now, or which 
may hereafter be, on the same, which shall 
hereafter be leased bv said Illinois Central 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



41 



Railroad company to any person or corporation, 
or which may hereafter be occupied by any per- 
son or corporation other than the said Illinois 
Central Railroad company, shall not, during 
the continuance of such leasehold estate, or of 
such occupancy, be exempt from municipal or 
other taxation. 

"SECTION 4. All the right and title of the 
state of Illinois, in and to the lands, submerged 
or otherwise, lying north of the south line of 
Monroe street, and south of the south line of 
Randolph street, and between the east line of 



provided for in the charter of said company 
shall forever be paid in conformity with the 
requirements of said charter. 

"SECTION 5. In consideration of the grant 
to the said Illinois Central, Chicago, Burling- 
ton & Quincy and Michigan Central Railroad 
companies of the land a's aforesaid, said com- 
panies are hereby required to pay to the said 
city of Chicago, the sum of $800,000, to be 
paid in the following manner, viz: $200,000 
within three months, from and after the passage 
of this act, $200,000 within six months from 




PHOTOGRAPH BY A. W. ADAMS, WATERLOO, IOWA. 



A representative of the type of Freight Engines used on the West End of the Illinois Central. 



Michigan avenue, and the track and roadway of 
the Illinois Central Railroad company, and 
constituting parts of fractional sections 10 and 
15, in said township 39, as aforesaid, are here- 
by granted, in fee, to the Illinois Central Rail- 
road company, the Chicago, Burlington & 
Quincy Railroad company, and the Michigan 
Central Railroad company, their successors and 
assigns, for the erection thereon of a passenger 
depot, and for such other purposes as the busi- 
ness of said company may require, Provided, 
That upon all gross receipts of the Illinois 
Central Railroad company from leases of its 
interest in said grounds or improvements there- 
on or other uses of the same, the per centum 



and after the passage of this act; $200,000 
within nine months from and after the passage 
of this act, $200,000 within twelve months from 
and after the passage of this act; which said sums 
shall be placed in the park fund of the said city 
of Chicago, and shall be distributed in like man- 
ner as is hereinbefore provided for the distri- 
bution of the other funds which may be ob- 
tained by said city from the sale of the lands 
conveyed to it by this act. 

"SECTION 6. The common council of the 
said city of Chicago is hereby authorized and 
empowered to quitclaim and release to the said 
Illinois Central Railroad company, the Chicago, 
Burlington & Quincy Railroad company, and 



42 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



the Michigan Central Railroad company, any 
and all claim and interest in and upon any and 
all of said land north of the south line of 
Monroe street, as aforesaid, which the said city 
may have by virtue of any expenditures and im- 
provements thereon or otherwise, and in case the 
said common council shall neglect or refuse 
thus to quitclaim and release to the said com- 
panies, as aforesaid, within four months from 
and after the passage of this act, then the said 
companies shall be discharged from all obliga- 
tion to pay the balance remaining unpaid to 
said city. 

"SECTION 7. 'The grants to the Illinois 
Central Railroad company contained in this act 
are hereby declared to be upon the express 
condition that said Illinois Central Railroad 
company shall perpetually pay into the treasury 
of the state of Illinois the per centum on the 
gross or total proceeds, receipts or income 
derived from said road and branches stipulated 
in its charter, and also the per centum on the 
gross receipts of said company reserved in this 
act. 

"SECTION 8. This act shall be a public 
act and in force from and after its passage." 

This act was accepted by the board of 
directors of the Illinois Central Railroad com- 
pany July 16, 1870, and the secretary of state 
advised accordingly. 

This bill was returned to the house of 
representatives April 14, 1869, by Gov. John M. 
Palmer without his approval. The reasons 
given for the veto were that the consideration 
for the grant was insufficient that the rights 
that were confirmed to the railroad company 
were too vaguely enumerated that the act was 
not, in his judgment, coupled with such restric- 
tions as would protect the rights of the state 
that the act did not require the Illinois Central 
Railroad company to place improvements on 
the submerged lands that the price named for 
the three blocks of land between Randolph and 
Monroe streets intended to be used for a 
passenger depot $800,000 was below the 
market value. 



On April 16, 1869, however, the act was 
passed in the house over the governor's veto 
by a vote of 52 to 31, and in the senate by a 
vote of 14 to 11. A careful examination of the 
act will show that, although the railroad com- 
pany was to receive an extraordinary grant, the 
interests of the state at least were very well 
guarded. The railroad company could not part 
with the fee, and were obligated to pay perpet- 
ually to the state upon all gross income derived 
from the property the same percentage that 
they pay on the gross earnings of their railway, 
7 per cent; also taxes to the city of Chicago 
upon any of the lands acquired under the grant, 
that might be leased to other parties. There 
was also a provision in the act that the general 
assembly should reserve power to regulate the 
rates for dockage. The view taken by many 
senators and representatives who voted for this 
measure was, that the state was simply utilizing 
its interest in the submerged lands by constitut- 
ing them a source of permanent income to it 
and incidentally to the city of Chicago. The 
ownership of docks by municipalities has never 
proved very profitable, and their construction 
and maintenance have been fruitful sources of 
corruption. It is possible, therefore, that what 
was regarded by some, at that time, as a tre- 
mendous "steal" might have proved a large 
and permanent benefit to the city and to the 
state. 

The construction of piers at that time 
would have afforded splendid facilities for the 
shipping interest of Chicago, and a strong 
effort was made to induce the Michigan avenue 
property owners to consent to their erection, 
but many of them owning comfortable and 
costly homes were reluctant to surrender them 
to the demands of business, and relinquish 
rights which they had acquired under original 
purchase, as well as under a special act of the 
legislature of the state of Illinois, passed in 
1863 which is as follows : 

"The state of Illinois, by its canal com- 
missioners, having declared that the public 
ground east of said lots should forever remain 
open and vacant, neither the common council 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



43 



of the city of Chicago nor any other authority, 
shall ever have the power to permit encroach- 
ments thereon without the assent of all the per- 
sons owning lots or land on said street or 
avenue." 

The great need of the city of Chicago is 
increased dockage ; the accommodation offered 
by those on the Chicago river and its branches 
is entirely inadequate to the wants of a great 
city of nearly 2,000,000 inhabitants. The loss 
of time and great expense to which vessels are 
subjected by reason of being compelled to pass 
through the numerous bridges spanning the 
Chicago river are very great, and have inflicted 
incalculable injury upon the shipping interest 
of the port of Chicago, while the delay caused 
by the opening and closing of the bridges has 
also proved a serious inconvenience and loss to 
her citizens. With each section of the city now 
supplied with a park, and some of them but 
partially completed, the necessity for an addi- 
tional one in the business portion of the city, 
and which can only be created at great expense, 
does not seem as pressing or important as the 
construction of additional docks, which the city 
under its charter has the right to construct. 

On July 3, 1871, with a view of preventing 
encroachments upon the shore of the lake, cer- 
tain proceedings were commenced by the United 
States by information filed in the United States 
circuit court and a temporary injunction was 
obtained. A year later, a stipulation was 
entered into between the railroad company and 
the war department upon the recommendation 
of the engineer officers of the United States 
government, establishing certain dock lines on 
the east, to which point, those authorized, 
should be allowed to construct piers. 

Two years later, April 15, 1873, the follow- 
ing act was passed: "An act to repeal an act 
entitled 'An act in relation to a portion of the 
submerged lands and Lake Park grounds, lying 
on and adjacent to the shore of Lake Michigan, 
on the eastern frontage of the city of Chicago ; 
in force April 16, 1869.' 

"SECTION 1. Be it enacted by the people of 
the state of Illinois represented in the general 



assembly, That the act entitled 'An act in re- 
lation to a portion of the submerged lands and 
Lake Park grounds, lying on and adjacent to 
the shore of Lake Michigan, on the eastern 
frontage of the city of Chicago ; in force April 
16, 1869,' be and the same is hereby repealed." 

The subsequent litigation growing out of 
the passage of these various acts culminated in 
the decision rendered by Judges Harlan and H. 
W. Blodgett, February 23, 1888, in the United 
States circuit court. This decision confirmed 
to the Illinois Central Railroad company its 
title to all lands held by it north of Randolph 
street and also all its rights as riparian owner 
south of Park Row. As to the distance be- 
tween Park Row and Randolph street, the fol- 
lowing extract, from the opinion referred to, 
will perhaps give the reader a clearer view of 
the decision rendered by the court : 

"Upon the whole case, we are of opinion 
that the effect of the repealing act of 1873 was 
to withdraw from the railroad company as well 
the grant of the submerged lands described in 
the third section of the act of 1869, as the 
additional powers therein conferred upon it, by 
implication, to engage in the business of con- 
structing and maintaining wharves, piers and 
docks, for the benefit of comierce and naviga- 
tion generally, and not in the prosecution of 
its business as defined and limited by its 
original charter; saving to the company the 
right to hold and use, as part of its way ground, 
or right of way, the small part of the submerged 
lands, outside of its breakwater of 1869, be- 
tween Monroe and Washington streets, ex- 
tended eastwardly, which was reclaimed pre- 
sumably upon the faith of the act of 1869 from 
the lake in 1873. Such appeal was attended 
with the further result, that while the city of 
Chicago may, under its charter, preserve the 
harbor, prevent obstructions being placed 
therein, and make wharves and slips, at the 
ends of streets, the exercise of those powers, 
and the whole subject of the development or 
improvement of the harbor by a system of 
wharves, docks, piers and other structures, is 
with the state, subject only to the paramount 



44 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



authority of the United States under the power 
of congress to regulate commerce." 

An appeal to the United States supreme 
court may be taken by any one of the parties 
interested, viz: the Illinois Central Railroad 
company, the city of Chicago, or the s'tate of 
Illinois, at any time within two years after 
entry of decree Sept. 24, 1888. 

VISIT OF FOREIGN DELEGATES. 

The year 1876 brought new misfortunes to 
the affairs of the company. Restrictive legis- 
lation in Iowa, of the most aggressive character, 
compelled a large reduction in local tariff rates 



fierce trunk-line war between the Baltimore & 
Ohio Railroad and the Vanderbilt lines, and in 
which the Pennsylvania Central was necessarily 
involved. It was largely a struggle for suprem- 
acy between cities, but much personal bitter- 
ness was also engendered. Mr. Garrett boasted 
of his shorter line to the seaport and his cheap 
fuel, and made his demands accordingly. Mr. 
Vanderbilt pointed to his curveless and grade- 
less four-track line as more than an equivalent. 
The battle waxed sore. Freight was moved 
for some time at rates below the cost of carry- 
ing. Practically, at Chicago, both of these 
systems entered into competition with the lakes 




UNION PASSENGER STATION USED BY THE ILLINOIS CENTRAL AT Siorx CITY, IOWA. 



on the lines in that state, and, incidentally, on 
all through traffic to and from all points within 
the state. The difficulty was aggravated by a 
loss of revenue consequent upon a failure of 
crops both in Iowa and Illinois. Added to 
this, there had been a large number of new 
lines constructed throughout the west, but par- 
ticularly in the states of Illinois and Iowa, for 
which there was no remunerative traffic. The 
division of the limited traffic over so many 
lines was, as Mr. Wilson G. Hunt aptly ex- 
pressed it, like giving "one bone to two dogs." 
Competition became very sharp and rates were 
forced so low that many of the weaker lines 
were driven into bankruptcy. 

The crowning folly of this dark year in 
railroad history was the inauguration of the 



and canal. The result was a loss, and both 
sides, weary of the fray, came out of it with 
largely exhausted resources. The introduction 
of larger grain-carrying vessels on the lakes, 
and the reduction of tolls on the Erie Canal, 
soon proved to the trunk-lines the folly of 
attempting to compete with water-carriage. 
The effect upon all the weaker east and west 
lines was most disastrous they were compelled 
to carry freight from all junction points south 
of Chicago at the same rates as prevailed at 
Chicago. This, of course, seriously affected 
the operations of the Illinois Central Railroad, 
as it deprived them of the haul to Chicago. 
The result was that their traffic, at all the junc- 
tion points in Illinois, was confined to short 
hauls between the stations, changing, in fact, 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



45 



the entire working of this part of the line by 
reducing it to a local business. This division 
of traffic, with the loss of the long haul to Chi- 
cago which had for so many years proved so 
certain and profitable a source of income to the 
company proved very injurious to its revenue. 

The unsatisfactory condition of the affairs 
of the company which, however, reflected in 
no degree fairly upon the management, being 
due entirely to circumstances over which they 
had no control produced a feeling of restless- 
ness among the foreign holders of its shares 
who coxild not so well appreciate the conditions 
which led to it as those on this side of the 
Atlantic ocean. 

The average shareholder will rest in sub- 
lime contentment and with a confidence born 
rather of calm indifference than of intellectual 
comprehension, regarding the affairs of his 
company, so long as other brains are working 
out successful results for his benefit. He will 
saunter into the treasurer's office semi-annually 
or qiiarterly, if notified, scrawl his name on the 
dividend-book in a more or less legible style, 
receive his check in silence or perhaps with a 
little growl, and saunter out again, scarcely 
troubling himself to inquire whether his divi- 
dend is earned or only paid. But woe be to the 
luckless wight of an official, who, through an 
error of judgment or unforeseen circumstances, 
fails to accomplish all that he attempted in the 
way of cash returns, even though he be fortified 
with the aforesaid shareholder's proxy. A 
shareholder's meeting is a tame affair with the 
shareholders with dividend checks in their 
pockets absent ; but a meeting of shareholders 
to consider ways and means will soon resolve 
itself into a warring demonstration. So, in 
this case, this temporary check to the com- 
pany's prosperity happily apparent rather than 
real was first felt on this side of the water 
where the circumstances of the case were better 
understood, and its effect was soon discounted. 
London and Amsterdam slowly responded to 
the shock. 

A meeting was held in London on January 
26, 1877, to consider existing difficulties, which 



was presided over by Sir John Rose, and at 
which were present a large number of English 
shareholders, and representatives of the admin- 
istration office for American railroad securities 
in Amsterdam, at which some unnecessary 
denunciation was indulged in. Their action, 
however, resulted in the sensible conclusion 
to appoint a joint-committee to select delegates 
to proceed to New York, to confer with the 
directors and to examine into the financial con- 
dition of the company, and then to visit Illinois 
and the south to make a critical examination of 
the company's property and report upon its 
condition and resources. Captain Douglas 
Galton was appointed on behalf of the English 
shareholders, and H. de Marez Oyens on behalf 
of the Dutch shareholders. They sailed for 
New York and held a series of lengthy and 
very satisfactory conferences with the directors, 
resulting in a complete dissipation of the un- 
founded fears which had been entertained. 
They then proceeded to Illinois and went over 
the entire line with the officers of the company, 
making a very thorough and critical examina- 
tion of the property and of its assets. As a 
result of their inspection, they prepared and 
submitted to their respective bodies of share- 
holders, April 27, 1877 three months after their 
appointment a very elaborate report covering 
the conclusions at which they had arrived and 
giving their reasons in detail. It was in all 
respects highly complimentary to the directors 
and officers of the company, and justly so, and 
most reassuring to the shareholders. In this 
report, they made various suggestions, which, 
if carried into effect would, in their judgment, 
prove advantageous to the interests of the com- 
pany. Stringent economies were introduced 
into the operations of the line, and the recom- 
mendations of the delegates were, so far as 
circumstances would permit, carried out. The 
price of Illinois Central Railroad shares, which 
had fallen to forty cents on the dollar, rapidly 
recovered. 

The office of president had been vacant 
since July 1876, at which time Mr. John M. 
Douglas resigned, and on October 17, 1877, the 



46 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



writer, who had filled the office of vice-presi- 
dent and had been acting president, was elected 
to fill the vacancy, which position he held until 
August 15, 1883, afterward again serving as 
vice-president until January 1, 1884, at which 
time he retired from the service. 

The year 1877 gave promise of better 
things for the railways of Illinois. The corn 
crop of that year in this state amounted to 
about 270,000,000 bushels and the wheat crop 
was about 32,500,000 bushels. The price of 
iron and steel declined to a very low point, and 
railway supplies were correspondingly low. In 
Iowa the indications of public sentiment toward 
railways were, temporarily, somewhat more 
favorable, as the effects of injudicious legisla- 
tion on the interests of the state were begin- 
ning to be felt by the people. The unwise and 
restrictive laws, which had been passed, began 
to cripple the railways and forbid further in- 
vestments of capital and this had its effect 
upon the legislature of the state. 

RIOTS OF JULY 1877. 

The dark spot in railway history this year 
was the inauguration of the great railway strike 
which occurred in July. "Railway strikes at- 
tended by riots were at that time in progress in 
several of the states, but the first demonstration 
in Chicago was at a mass meeting of working- 
men, so called, held Monday evening, July 23, 
at the corner of Madison and Market streets, at 
which there were about 5000 people present. 
The first indication of mob violence occurred 
next morning, Tuesday, when a mob of men 
and boys, armed with clubs and sticks, moved 
down South Canal street, compelling all work- 
men in the lumber-yards and factories to quit 
work. They were dispersed by the police but 
later on in the day another mob collected near 
Remington's gun-store on State street. This 
was dispersed also by the police. In the after- 
noon mobs congregated in different parts of 
the city. The first actual violence occurred on 
Wednesday, when the rioters began driving 
men from their work and destroying property 
in the lumber district, and massed a large force 



near McCormick's reaper factory on Blue Island 
avenue. A second mob congregated at Van 
Buren street bridge and still another in the 
vicinity of the Illinois Central elevators. This 
latter was most effectually dispersed by the 
police under Lieut. Bell and Sergt. Brennan, 
who dealt with the leaders in the most summary 
manner. Before noon several outbreaks oc- 
curred in various parts of the city and the street 
cars were compelled to stop running. At the 
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy freight depot, 
five rioters were shot dead. That evening the 
rioters raided a gun store and appropriated the 
stock. Thursday morning, 26th, the rioters 
were massed in the vicinity of the 16th street 
viaduct and several sanguinary conflicts took 
place. At noon the rioting culminated and the 
police, who were greatly exhausted from their 
efforts of the four previous days, were no 
longer able to cope with the rioters, and it was 
found necessary to order out the military. The 
first and second regiments reported for duty; 
two six-pound guns and two companies of 
cavalry were also brought into service. These 
troops were stationed in different parts of the 
city and had a quieting effect upon the surging 
crowd, but in one instance they were obliged 
to fire upon the rioters. By Monday, July 31, 
the riot was practically at an end. Owing to 
the prompt measures resorted to and the effi- 
ciency of both the police and the military, the 
city of Chicago happily escaped with small 
loss."* 

The whole demonstration had none of the 
elements of a strike, the men were simply in- 
timidated and feared to go to work. The prop- 
erty of the Illinois Central Railroad, as was 
that of many others, was imperilled by the 
action of lawless mobs that visited the freight 
yards and shops of the company and ordered 
the engineers to stop moving trains and men to 
quit work. These demonstrations were made 
in most instances by men not connected with 
the railroads. Almost all the Illinois Central 
men took a stand and gave proof of their loyal- 
ty and devotion to the company against the 
* "History of Chicago," by A. T. Andreas, 1885. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



47 



rioters, and assisted in preserving the property 
of the company. Indeed, it is greatly to the 
credit of the men to record the fact that, during 
this trying ordeal, the company suffered no 
loss whatever beyond detention of traffic. All 
of its rolling stock was removed to a place of 
safety, south of the city. 

A company of militia was organized by 
volunteers from the different departments of 



Oliver A. Berry, and other faithful men, at that 
time in the service of the company. 

In 1878 a contract was entered into with 
the Pullman Palace Car Company for the use of 
their sleeping cars. Previous to this the com- 
pany had constructed and used its own sleeping 
cars. For a number of years after the road 
was constructed it was not regarded as a pas- 
senger line. Indeed, it is very doubtful whether 




COURTESY J. R. L'LLY 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL LOCOMOTIVE No. 942. 



the service, muskets were purchased for their 
use and Col. James Noquet, chief draughtsman, 
was placed in command of the force which was 
placed on duty in the freight yard. Many of 
the men had fought in the Union army, and 
Col. Noquet had been a soldier in the French 
army and had led troops against a mob in the 
city of Paris. These facts being made known 
were sufficient to deter the rioters from com- 
mitting depredations. Col. Noquet was as- 
sisted by Thomas J. Tustin, William Wilkinson, 



the passenger receipts were sufficient to pay 
the expenses of keeping up this branch of the 
traffic. It had no through connections of im- 
portance, but after the acquisition of the south- 
ern lines leading to New Orleans and to other 
important points in the south, the character of 
the business of the line was materially changed 
and it gradually began to take its place among 
the first-class passenger lines of the country, 
and it became necessary to devote greater at- 
tention to this class of traffic. The introduc- 



48 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



tion of the elegant coaches of the Pullman 
Company greatly improved the service of the 
company, a fact which the travelling public 
were not slow to appreciate. 

May 26, 1880, ground was broken for the 
construction of the works of the Pullman Palace 
Car Company on land adjoining the Illinois 
Central tracks, about one mile north of Kensing- 
ton station. The establishment of this model 
manufacturing town of Pullman upon the road, 
at so convenient a distance from the city, gave 
an immense impetus to the suburban traffic 
which, though carried on for many years, had 
not, up to this time, proved very profitable. 

In 1879 the company constructed a bridge 
across the Chicago river under authority con- 
tained in an ordinance which had been passed 
many years before, Dec. 1, 1862, entitled "an 
ordinance approving the plans for a bridge to 
be erected by the Illinois Central Railroad 
company across the Chicago river." This con- 
nected its depot grounds on the south side with 
the lands of the Chicago Canal & Dock Com- 
pany on the north side. The construction of 
this bridge added immensely to the facilities of 
the road, enabling it to reach important con- 
nections on the north side, theretofore only 
reached by the circuitous route afforded by the 
St. Charles Air-line crossing at Sixteenth 
street. 

In 1880 the Kankakee & Southwestern 
Road, a branch line running southwest from 
Otto, was extended to a junction with the north- 
ern division at Minonk, thus giving an inde- 
pendent connection between that division and 
the Chicago branch. 

Steel rails were purchased this year to 
complete in steel the entire original line, and 
when laid soon demonstrated that the most re- 
munerative employment of capital in a railway 
is in perfecting its condition. 

In 1881 a brick elevator, with a capacity of 
600,000 bushels, was erected at Cairo; and in 
Chicago two new docks, and the substantial 
iron viaduct at the foot of Randolph street 
were completed. In the following year addi- 
tional terminal facilities were provided by the 



construction of additional tracks from the Chi- 
cago yards south, which provided two tracks 
for freight trains, two tracks for passenger 
trains, and allowed two tracks to be devoted 
entirely to suburban business, giving the road 
the finest and safest entrance into a great city 
possessed by any railway in the world. 

In 1883 the South Chicago Railroad was 
completed which afforded a double track con- 
nection, about five miles in length, with this 
important manufacturing town and added large- 
ly to the suburban traffic. 

RAILWAY COMMUNICATION WITH THE SOUTH. 

For many years after the completion of 
the Illinois Central Railroad, the directors 
made repeated attempts to carry out the origi- 
nal intention, as contemplated in the act of 
congress granting the public lands to the three 
states, by effecting an all rail communication 
with the Gulf of Mexico. Traffic to and from 
the south was gradually increasing; and tran- 
shipment of produce and merchandise at Cairo 
by ferry to Columbus, Kentucky, a distance of 
twenty miles, there connecting with the Mobile 
& Ohio Railroad, was attended with both un- 
necessary delay and expense. Accordingly in 
1872, a contract was entered into with the lines 
that were then known as the Mississippi Cen- 
tral Railroad, 232 miles in length, and New 
Orleans, Jackson & Great Northern Railway, 
206 miles in length which were operated under 
one management providing for the extension 
of the former line from Jackson, Tennessee, to 
a point opposite Cairo, a distance of 108 miles, 
and for a mutual interchange of traffic. Under 
this contract, the Illinois Central Company was 
to invest annually, one-eighth of its earnings 
from traffic to and from those lines, in their 
consolidated mortgage bonds to the extent of 
$100,000 per annum for ten years. This con- 
tract was afterward modified to the extent of 
an engagement to purchase outright $200,000 
of these bonds at par, annually, to the extent 
of $6,000,000 in all. This was done in order to 
enable the two southern lines to negotiate the 
bonds so as to procure the necessary means to 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



49 



construct the new intermediate road and make 
certain necessary improvements. The Miss- 
issippi Central road was extended to Cairo 
work being completed so that it was opened 
for traffic December 24, 1873. This supplied a 
most important link in the direct chain from 
Chicago to New Orleans, a distance of 913 
miles. 

The Illinois Central Railroad company sub- 
sequently exchanged $5,000,000 of its five per 
cent bonds for the same amount of the seven 
per cent, southern bonds with the engagement 
to purchase attached, thus practically taking up 
its own obligation with a bond bearing a re- 
duced rate of interest. 

The opening of an, all-rail route to the 
south had the effect of largely diverting traffic 
from the Mississippi river; but the southern 
roads had scarcely recovered from their im- 
poverished condition following the close of the 
war, and, lacking the means to properly equip 
and maintain them, they were not in a situation 
to handle the large traffic offering. Steel rails 
were selling at nearly $100 a ton at this time, 
and many other articles of railway supplies 
were correspondingly high. Added to this, the 
financial panic of 1873 affected all railway enter- 
prises throughout the country, so that this and 
the year following were years of unusual de- 
pression; the results of the particular arrange- 
ments referred to did not therefore immediately 
prove as satisfactory as was expected. 

In 1876 the roads between New Orleans 
and Cairo defaulted on their interest, and on 
March 10, in that year, both lines were placed 
in the hands of a receiver. Forclosure proceed- 
ings followed, and as a result, the Illinois Cen- 
tral Railroad company became, after about two 
years of litigation, practically the owner of 
both lines, under purchase, and the name of the 
company owning the consolidated New Orleans 
line was changed to the Chicago, St. Louis & 
New Orleans Railroad company. It was 
thought by many, who were unfamiliar with 
the resources? of the south, that the additional 
obligation assumed by the Illinois Central Rail- 
road company would prove an onerous burden, 

4 



and, for the time being, it had the effect of de- 
pressing the market-price of its shares. After 
the Illinois Central company obtained full con- 
trol of the two lines, it completed their restora- 
tion to the standard of first-class railways, and 
then what was feared at one time might prove 
a serious burden to the Illinois Central Railroad 
company became in reality the best paying por- 
tion of the line. 

The remainder of the story can best be 
told by producing verbatim the report of Mr. 
William H. Osborn, chairman of the executive 
committee, who, through all these trying years, 
never lost faith in the ultimate success of the 
undertaking, and to whose sagacity and fore- 
sight, aided by the indomitable energy of Mr. 
James C. Clarke, who was in charge of the 
lines, and the remarkable legal ability displayed 
by Judge James Fentress, now the general 
solicitor of the company, maybe attributed the 
very satisfactory termination reached. This 
report contains an epitome of the entire trans- 
action and is as follows: 

Report of Mr. William H. Osborn, chair- 
man of the Chicago, St. Louis & New Orleans 
Railroad Company: 

"NEW YORK, Dec. 30, 1882. 

"To THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE ILLINOIS 
CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY : 

"Gentlemen: This railway, consisting of 548 
miles of main track, 31 miles of branches, with 1(X> 
locomotives, 2,241 cars, and all other property and 
rights attached to it, with $1,000,000, five per cent, 
1951 bonds, $125,000, six per cent bonds and $623,043. 70 
in cash will be surrendered to you on the first proximo, 
in pursuance of the lease of this property to the Illinois 
Central Railroad company, dated June 13, 1882, thus 
completing your system with a well finished railroad 
and plant from the lakes to New Orleans. 

"The Hon. Stephen A. Douglas introduced in the 
senate of the United States in 1848, a bill 'granting to 
the state of Illinois the right of way and donation of 
public lands for making a railroad to connect the 
waters of the upper and lower Mississippi with the 
chain of lakes at Chicago." This motion resulted in 
the granting of lands to Illinois and similar grants to 
Mississippi and Alabama in order to effect the comple- 
tion of this important connection. 

"It was the subject of earnest debate in the senate 
in 1850 and was supported by Senators Lewis Cass of 



50 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 






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AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



SI 



Michigan, Henry Clay of Kentucky and William H. 
Seward of New York. The latter gentleman, speaking 
of the proposed railroad, said: 'I regard this work as 
a great national enterprise a great national thorough- 
fare.' The bill, after the advocacy of these distin- 
guished statesman, passed the senate by a vote of 
nearly two to one. 

"In 1851 the state of Illinois accepted a proposal 
to build the road, made to it by a prominent body of 
New York and Boston gentlemen, all of whom, with 
but two exceptions, have passed away. 

"The act of the general assembly of Illinois, ap- 
proved Feb. 10, 1851, constituted your present corpora- 
tion. Most of the directors named in the charter 
became the active managers of the company, and, 
before the Illinois Central Road was completed, the 
directors communicated with those of the Mobile & 
Ohio Road, and upon several occasions endeavored to 
promote the completion of that line to Cairo; but the 
Mobile & Ohio Road did not reach Cairo until a recent 
period. The public events which arrested the progress 
of the country for so many years left the railroads 
south of the Ohio river in the most dilapidated and 
ruinous condition. There was no railway communica- 
tion from Cairo south until 1874. 

"Previous to your line reaching Cairo, the products 
of Louisiana were shipped by steamboats to St. Louis, 
trans-shipped up the Illinois river by smaller steam- 
boats, trans-shipped again to canal-boats, and reached 
Chicago by the Michigan Canal. These three transfers 
caused a delay of a month or six weeks. The grain 
and provisions, which were so indispensable to the 
south, were sent in the same circuitous way. Later on 
this traffic was connected with your road at Cairo but 
in a very unsatisfactory manner, as most of the com- 
merce upon the lower Mississippi was destined for St. 
Louis and Cincinnati; Cairo was not of sufficient im- 
portance to command exclusive lines of boats upon the 
river. Moreover, this river communication was often- 
times very expensive; the frequent transfers required 
expensive packing of provisions; grain was sent in 
bags; and upon the north-bound freight, chiefly sugar 
and molasses, the waste and shrinkage was serious. It 
is a singular fact that the rates of rail transportation 
to-day from New Orleans to Chicago, and from Chi- 
cago south, are not equivalent to the loss by shrinkage 
and waste upon the sugar and molasses in former 
times, or to the cost of packing the provisions sent 
south, which is not now required under the present 
modes of shipment by rail. Thus the producer is 
brought close to the consumer at least expense. It is 
a moderate estimate to say that the prices of provisions 
and grain, hay and other products of the north, now 
ruling in the south, are lessened one-third by the ad- 
vantage of the present rail communication. 



"The Illinois Central directors, in 1872, unanimous- 
ly agreed to advance about $5,000,000 toward the ex- 
tension of the .Mississippi Central Road to Cairo, and 
to the improvement of the Jackson Road to New- 
Orleans. It is not pleasant to waste words upon the 
failure in the expectations of the company. These ad- 
vances at one time appeared to be lost through the 
failure of the southern lines to pay the interest upon 
the bonds purchased. It may be well to remember 
that in February 187G, the board of directors were will- 
ing to take the control of the property burdened with 
a debt of $18,372,834, with an annual interest charge 
of $1,404,655.97, and to spend $2,000,000 additional in 
the necessary improvement to the property. Negotia- 
tions to this end failed, and foreclosure proceedings 
were commenced by filing a bill in the federal courts 
in the spring of 1870. These proceedings terminated 
happily in 1877, and the two roads were purchased 
that year in behalf of the bondholders on equal terms 
the Illinois Central holding a majority of the bonds 
in default. The legal steps in the foreclosure were 
directed by the Hon. John A. Campbell and the Hon. 
.lames Emott. and later, by the Hon. Jas. Fentress of 
New Orleans. Suffice it to say that, under the counsel 
of these eminent lawyers, we have not had to retrace 
our steps in any one instance. Repeated legislation 
was required from all four of the southern states, and 
ordinances from the city of New Orleans and other 
municipalities, all of which were obtained promptly 
and honestly. The desire of the southern people to 
have a first-class railroad was expressed through the 
governors of the states and the legislatures, who gave 
every assistance which could consistently be granted. 
This new company is now constituted a corporation in 
perpetuity with the right to lease other roads or to 
lease its own road to the Illinois Central Company. 
The acts, deeds and papers have been carefully 
examined. Your possession of this property is as 
absolute as if the original charters had been granted 
to the Illinois Central Railroad Company directly. 

"I have, therefore, the satisfaction of concluding 
the active existence of this corporation which has had 
only five years of duration. Your road constitutes the 
most important north and south trunk line in the 
world. The traffic is chiefly in the interchange of 
commodities, the exclusive growth of the south for 
commodities grown in the north, and is of indispens- 
able necessity to a population of six or eight millions 
of people. The location of the line is so direct that 
this traffic is perhaps less open to competition than 
that of any other line on this continent. 

"Soon after the appointment of receivers in 1876, 
I induced those gentlemen to appoint Mr. James C. 
Clarke the general manager of both lines. It required 
the whole term of the receiverships to catch up with 
arrears. The employes were unpaid for several months; 



LIBRARY 



ILLIM 



52 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



there were not fifty tons of spare rails upon the road; 
no supplies in the machine shops; no fuel on hand. 
The demoralization of unpaid employes is always dan- 
gerous, leads to accidents, puts the lives of all the 
passengers in peril and causes the death of some. 
There was a fatality attending these lines at that time. 
The route was avoided; many travelers preferred to 
take their chance upon the river rather than face the 
dangers of the track. Mr. Clarke had not the power 
to restore order and discipline to the management of 
this property until the termination of the receiverships, 
January 1, 1878. From that date full control of the 
working of the line has rested upon him. Knowing 
him for many years, his experience, his perfect integ- 
rity, his thoroughness in every detail of railroad con- 
struction and management, I have never interposed 
my comparatively imperfect knowledge of railway 
affairs. 

"Mr. Clarke has rebuilt this line from its ashes. 
At the machine shops were piles of broken cars; and 
the remnants of locomotive boilers, which had been 
exploded for years, were still maintained on the books 
of the company as engines. The bridges all required 
renewing; the ties were rotten and defective. From 
this confusion Mr. Clarke now delivers to you a well 
constructed and equipped railroad. 35 engines and 
1200 cars have been built in the shops of the company; 
2\}/i miles of bridging have been built; 3,'i miles of 
open trestle-work have been rilled up with solid em- 
bankments; 1,341,500 new cross-ties have been put in, 
equal to 2,080 ties per mile on this whole road and 
side tracks. The road has been extended 3 ,'-2 miles to 
East Cairo; a spur line of 12 miles to Lexington is 
nearly completed; the passenger equipment renewed 
and doubled; the wooden truss bridges replaced with 
iron; every bar of iron has been taken from the track, 
which is now laid entirely with steel; 200 miles of track 
ballasted with stone or gravel, and over 100 miles of 
the road have been fenced. It was indispensable to 
change the gauge, adopting the standard gauge of the 
north, which of course required the change of all the 
motive power and rolling stock. This has been done. 
The side tracks were insufficient 15 miles of new side 
track have been added, the shops furnished with new 
machinery sufficient for the repair and construction of 
engines and cars at both of the principal machine 
shops; new shops have been built at Jackson, Tenn. 
The improvements to the road render it safe; the trains 
are now running from New Orleans to Chicago, about 
the same distance as from New York to Chicago, at 
about the same speed. Passengers going to St. Louis 
were formerly two nights and one day on the road; 
they are now taken through in twenty-nine hours. 
The station grounds on the river bank at New Orleans 
were insufficient; large and valuable property has been 
purchased, and a freight station, which accommodates 



the West Indian and Mediterranean freight business, 
built near the river front. 

"These betterments, which have cost about $5,000, - 
000, have been paid for out of the earnings of the 
property. The road is not overlaid with debt to cor- 
respond to these outlays. On the contrary, its im- 
proved condition and the increase of traffic benefitted 
the credit of the corporation to such an extent that it 
has been practicable to issue and sell five per cent 
bonds to take up the older issues of six's, seven's and 
eight's. In this way the interest charge upon the prop- 
erty, which is intrinsically worth $5,000,000 more than 
it was in 1876, has been actually reduced $370,505.97 
per annum and its debt from $18,372,834 to $17,000,000. 

"The services of Judge Fentress in arranging and 
settling the many legal complications which cumbered 
and afflicted this railway and in securing the legislation 
affecting its powers for all time, though not as con- 
spicuous to the eye as those of Mr. Clarke, have been 
equally valuable and of as much permanent import- 
ance. Annexed to this statement is an exhibit of the 
legislation in the several states. 

"The company has no engagements with other 
railway corporations excepting those for the construc- 
tion of the two lines in Mississippi, which have been 
entered into under your direction and by your author- 
ity. Its recent contract with the Western Union Tele- 
graph Company is open to revision at short periods, 
and the engagement with the Pullman Southern Car 
Company can be terminated at the option of the~com- 
pany in 1884. It is free from floating debt and free 
from litigation. 

"You take this productive property with a surplus 
in hand and with all the powers necessary for its future 
management. You now own $5,000,000 of the five per 
cent bonds, for which there is no immediate use as the 
requirements of the southern line upon capital account 
are drawing to a close and can readily be met from 
the earnings of the property. I therefore beg to sug- 
gest to your consideration the cancellation of this $5,- 
000,000 of bonds, thus reducing the debt to $13,000,000, 
upon which the interest charge will eventually be 
$650,000. This reduction of interest charge will enable 
you to pay larger dividends upon the $10,000,000 of 
stock now the property of your shareholders. This 
step will reduce your entire fixed charges to about 
$1,350,000 on 1525 miles of railway. 

"For the next thirteen years you have no debt to 
provide for. $2,500,000 of your bonds fall due in 1895. 
It seems unwise to hold $5,000,000 of your own executed 
obligations available at any moment. The experience 
of nearly thirty years strengthens my impression that 
prosperity leading to unwise expenditures is often- 
times as dangerous as adverse crops, with consequent 
loss of traffic affecting income. The specific for 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



53 



accuracy in accounts and economy in expenditures 
appears to be to take all expenses including construc- 
tion out of income and divide the surplus only. 

"I beg to refer to you the annexed exhibits and 
reports. 

"In retiring from this trust, I have every reason to 
believe that the New Orleans division of the Illinois 
Central is in charge of zealous, faithful and experienced 
men. W. H. OSBORN, Chairman." 

Report of Mr. James C. Clarke, general 
manager of the Chicago, St. Louis &- New Or- 
leans Railroad Company: 



Railroad Company now the lessee of this railroad 
treats of the work which has been done on track, 
building bridges, engines, cars, ballasting, fencing, 
depot grounds, side tracks, shops machinery, steel 
rails, change of gauge, etc., etc., in a general way. 
It is therefore, considered unnecessary to refer again 
to them. At the close of the year 1877, there were 60 
miles of steel rails on the track. On December 31, 
1882, the whole main track, 548 miles, is laid in steel 
rails. 

"REDUCTION OF GRADES BETWEEN JACKSON, TENN., 
AND CANTON. The maximum of grades on this por- 
tion of the road has been reduced from 60 feet per 




ILLINOIS CENTRAL STATION AT NEW ORLEANS. 



"NEW ORLEANS, LA., January i, 1883. 

"To THE SHAREHOLDERS OF THE CHICAGO, ST. Louis AND 
NEW ORLEANS RAILROAD Co. 

Gentlemen : I was elected vice-president and 
general manager of this company in January 1878. 
At that time, the equipment of the road in motive 
power and rolling stock consisted of 80 locomotives 
and 1240 cars. At the present time, this company 
has 106 locomotives and 2242 cars of all kinds. Many 
of the engines anJ cars on the schedule in 1878 have 
been rebuilt and renewed, some were condemned 
as unsafe for future use. n of the old engines were 
sold, their capacity to draw heavy trains being too 
light for profitable use. 

"The report of the chairman of our board, dated 
December, 30, to the directors of the Illinois Central 



mile to a maximum of 40 feet per mile, few exceeding 
35 feet per mile. 

"This has enabled our engines to draw over this 
portion of the road six to eight loaded cars more per 
train than the engines of the same class were able 
to do before the grades were reduced, thus largely 
reducing the expenses in train' service by increasing the 
earnings per train. 

"The portion of the line between Jackson, Tenn., 
and East Cairo, no miles, has some grades of 52 
feet or more per mile. It was constructed with these 
grades. Evidently the question of economy in operat- 
ing the lines as a channel of commerce was not con- 
sidered in adopting such grades. I recommend to 
the lessee to reduce these grades to a maximum of 
40 feet per mile. The work may be done gradually, 
and the outlay spread over a series of years. I am 



54 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



sure it will pay to reduce the grades on this portion of 
the road. 

"In these times of low rates for transportation 
service, nothing is more conducive to economy in 
operating a railroad than low grades, steel rails, a 
well-ballasted track, large engines, and slow speed ' 
of heavy freight trains. 

"CAPITAL ACCOUNT There is at present nothing 
to call for any immediate large outlay of money. 

"It is proposed to build four combined brick, 
freight and passenger stations on the line during the 
coming year, costing in all about $15.000, and to re- 
vise and remodel the freight-houses and yards and 
tracks at the levee station in New Orleans, to adapt 
them to handle the business with less force and ex- 
pense than we now incur. The increased facility and 
decreased expenses in transacting business at this 
station will compensate for the outlay to be made. 

"MOTIVE POWER. The present equipment of en- 
gines seems to be sufficient for the wants of the road 
until the business shall increase to require more power. 

"BALLASTING I recommend to the lessee the 
continuance of this important matter, gradually, as 
we have heretofore done during the summer months 
when the traffic is light and the engines and cars can 
be spared from service to transport it. 

"FENCING. This necessary precaution to avoid 
accidents and prevent paying damages for stock in- 
jured or killed, which, in the past five years, has 
amounted to upward of $60,000, should be gradually 
pursued until the whole line is enclosed. 

"MACHINE-SHOPS. MACHINERY, AND TOOLS. The 
present condition of this plant and its location is all 
that will be required on this line until its business and 
traffic shall be increased fifty per cent more than it 
now is. 

"STEEL RAILS. It will be necessary to buy 150 
to 200 tons per year to make frogs and switches and 
provide for those, now in track, which may be broken 
or rendered unfit for use by reason of accidents. 

"LABOR. During the past five years, this company 
has employed a large amount of unskilled labor, con- 
sisting chiefly of negroes. My experience with this 
class of labor has been very satisfactory. When in- 
telligently directed, properly treated, and justly dealt 
with, there is no better laborer than the negro to 
br found among any race w the world. They are 
peculiarly fitted for labor in semi-tropical climates, 
and by nature cheerful, obedient, kind, imitative, and 
contented. They are fast learning that "freedom" 
means honesty, industry, and intelligence. They are 
now a valuable laboring population, and each year, 
as they acquire education, they will become better 
citizens. They should be justly dealt with and treated 
with the respect due all honest laborer*. 



"CAPITAL REQUIRED FOR FUTURE IMPROVEMENTS. 
From the past five years' experience. I feel I am jus- 
tified in saying that this property, managed as we 
have no doubt it will be, will furnish the funds to 
make the betterments and improvements that may be 
necessary, as well as to provide for the fixed charges 
and rentals. 

"The Illinois Central Railroad Company has, to- 
day, assumed the control and management of this 
property as lessee. Hereafter its earnings and ex- 
penses will appear in the accounts of that company, 
under the head of the 'Southern division of the Illi- 
nois Central Railroad Company.' 

"CONCLUSION. As you are aware, the managers 
of this property, during these past five years, have 
made no published report. All our receipts, during 
these five years, have been applied to the operating 
expenses, and reconstruction, and to the interest on 
the prior liens, styled the first and second mortgage 
bonds. I have not endeavored to draw a nice distinc- 
tion between operating expenses and construction ac- 
count. After providing for the interest on the prior 
liens, I have used the remainder of the money in 
rebuilding this road. It is now in such a condition 
that I feel it safe to say that it can be maintained and 
steadily improved at about sixty per cent of its gross 
earnings. The gross earnings, during the past five 
years, have been as follows : 

1878 $2,842.434.15 

1879 3.357,305.00 

1880 3,716,902.42 

1881 4,059,151.40 

1882. 3,820,996.83 



A yearly average of $3.559,357-96 

"The report of the chairman of the board referred 
to gives the result of our stewardship of your proper- 
ty. 

"With a sense of gratitude to officers and em- 
ployes in every grade of the service for their zeal, 
anxiety, and devotion at all times to promote the 
company's interest, and the cheerful co-operation and 
aid rendered to me in the management, I desire to 
place my aknowledgements on the records of the com- 
pany. 

Respectfully, 

JAMES C. CLARKE, General Manager. 

This report was submitted to a meeting of 
the board of directors, held January 17, 1883, 
and the following preamble and resolutions 
were adopted : 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



55 



[Extract from the minutes:] 

"The report of Mr. William H. Osborn, chair- 
man of the Chicago, St. Louis & New Orleans Rail- 
road Company, addressed to this board under date of 
December 30, 1882. accompanied by the report of the 
Hon. James Fentress, general solicitor, addressed to 
him, under date of December 8, 1882; and, also, the 
report of Mr. James C. Clarke, general manager of 
the Chicago, St. Louis & New Orleans Railroad Com- 
pany, addressed to the shareholders of that company, 
under date of January I, 1883, having been submitted 
and read, it was, on motion of Mr. Webster, duly 
seconded, 

"Resolved, That these reports be accepted by this 
board, printed, and a copy thereof transmitted to 
each shareholder of the Illinois Central Railroad Com- 
pany, and to each holder of the leased line stock' cer- 
tificates issued against the shares of the Chicago. St. 
Louis & New Orleans Railroad Company. 

"That this board desires to express and place on 
record its high appreciation of the wisdom, zeal, and 
unflagging fidelity with which Mr. Osborn, Mr. Clarke, 
and Mr. Fentress, and every other officer whose work 
has come under the observation of this board, have 
conducted the affairs of the Chicago, St. Louis & 
New Orleans Company since the property was placed 
in their hands. And the president of the Illinois Cen- 
tral Company is hereby directed to express to those 
officers of the Chicago, St. Louis & New Orleans 
Company the thanks of this board for the gratifying 
results which their labors have done so much to ac- 
complish." 

The following, moved by Mr. Elliott, and duly 
seconded, was also adopted : 

"In view of these highly satisfactory reports, the 
board deems it desirable to call the attention of the 
Illinois Central shareholders specifically to the in- 
creased value of their property resulting from the in- 
telligent and unwearied efforts of the officers who have 
been charged with the care and development of the 
Southern line ; therefore, be it 

"Resolved, That the board recommends to the 
shareholders, at their next annual meeting, to take 
such action as they may deem best to express their 
appreciation of the results thus far obtained and their 
recognition of the services rendered." 

In obedience to the request of the board of 
directors, the president addressed letters to 
Mr. Osborn, Judge Fentress, and Mr. Clarke, 
expressing- the thanks of the board, of which 
the following' are copies: 



"ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY, 
PRESIDENT'S OFFICE. 

CHICAGO, January 24, 1883. 
"WILLIAM H. OSBORN, Esq., New York: 

"My Dear Sir: At a meeting of the board of di- 
rectors of the Illinois Central Railroad Company, held 
on the I7th instant, your teport to them, dated December 
30, 1882, was submitted, read, ordered to be printed, 
and copies mailed to each shareholder and leased-line 
certificate holder of the Illinois Central Railroad Com- 
pany. 

"The following resolution was offered by Mr. 
Sidney Webster, duly seconded, and passed unani- 
mously : 

"Resolved, That these reports be accepted by this 
board, printed, and a copy thereof transmitted to each 
shareholder of the Illinois Central Company and to 
each holder of the leased line stock certificates, issued 
against the shares of the Chicago, St. Louis & New 
Orleans Railroad Company that this board desires 
to express and place on record its high appreciation 
of the wisdom, zeal, and unflagging fidelity with which 
Mr. Osborn, Mr. Clarke, and Mr. Fentress, and every 
other officer whose work has come under the observa- 
tion of the board, have conducted the affairs of the 
Chicago, St. Louis & New Orleans Company since the 
property was placed in their hands. And the president 
of the Illinois Central is hereby directed to express 
to those officers of the Chicago, St. Louis & New 
Orleans Company the thanks of this board for the 
gratifying results which their labors have done so 
much to accomplish." 

"Also the following, offered by Mr. John Elliott : 

"In view of these highly satisfactory reports, the 
board deems it desirable to call the attention of the 
Illinois Central shareholders specifically to the in- 
creased value of their property resulting from the in- 
telligent and unwearied efforts of the officers who 
have been charged with the care and development of 
the Southern line ; therefore, be it 

"Resolved, That the board recommends to the 
shareholders at their next annual meeting to take such 
action as they may deem best to express their appre- 
ciation of the results thus obtained and their recogni- 
tion of the services rendered. 

"I do not know that I can add anything that will 
emphasize more distinctly the sincere gratification felt 
by the board on the completion of your work and I fear 
that I shall but feebly convey to you the proper expres- 
sion of their feeling. Remembering, as I do, the physi- 
cal condition of the Chicago, St.Louis & New Orleans 
Railroad six years ago. and the complicated state of 
its finances and affairs generally, the work which you 



56 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



have just completed seems to me the most remarkable 
exhibition of energy, skill, and untiring perseverance, 
ever recorded in the history of railroad management. 
Words fail me to properly express the appreciation 
which I am sure every member of the board of direc- 
tors of the Illinois Central Railroad Company feels 
in reference to the prominent part you have .taken in 
rescuing this property and in protecting the interests 
of the Illinois Central shareholders. This work has 
been to you at times one of great discouragement as 
well as intense anxiety; but the grand result accom- 
plished, now commanding the attention of those in- 
terested with you, will, I am sure, compensate you for 
your labors and call out from the shareholders a more 
earnest expression of approval than has yet been given. 



the management of the Illinois Central property for a 
period of over a quarter of a century. 

"I remain, with great respect, 
Yours very truly, 

WM. K. ACKERMAM, President." 

"ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY, 
PRESIDENT'S OFFICE. 

CHICAGO, January 24, 1883. 

"HoN. JAMES FENTRESS, New Orleans : 

"My Dear Sir: At a meeting of the board of 
directors of the Illinois Central Railroad Company, 



>. 




COURTESY S. 0. HORTON, DURANT, MI98. 



Effects of a collission with a $10 cow. 



Even without this, i am sure that the eminent satis- 
faction you wiM enjoy arising from the conscientious 
application of your energies in developing and bring- 
ing to a successful conclusion so arduous a work as 
you have been charged with, would of itself amply 
repay you for the harassing cares which have sur- 
rounded you in its prosecution. 

"Permit me, in conclusion, to express to you my 
own sense of the great obligation under which you 
have placed us, and to express the hope that, although 
iii the future you may not be engaged in the active 
management of the line, yet that we may be favored 
from time to time with your kind co-operation, and 
may have the benefit of your long experience, gained in 



held on the I7th instant, the very able and comprehen- 
sive report prepared by you as solicitor general of the 
Chicago, St. Louis & New Orleans Railroad Company, 
and addressed to the chairman of the executive commit- 
tee of that company, covering a period of five years past 
and giving a synopsis of the legislation obtained dur- 
ing your management of the legal department during 
that time, was laid before the board, together with the 
reports of the chairman and general manager. They 
were read in full, accepted by the board, ordered to be 
printed, and copies thereof sent to each shareholder 
and to each leased line certificate holder of the com- 
pany. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



57 



"The following resolutions were offered by Messrs. 
Webster and Elliott, duly seconded, and passed unani- 
mously : 

[Same preamble and resolutions as contained in 
letter to Mr. William H. Osborn.] 

"From the foregoing, it will be seen that it is 
made my pleasant duty to convey to you the thanks of 
the board, as expressed in the above resolutions, which 
I take great pleasure in doing. There was but a single 
expression on the part of all the members of the board 
and that was one of full appreciation of the very able 
manner in which you have conducted the legal business 
of the Chicago, St. Louis & New Orleans Railroad 
Company since that line first came into the possession 
or under the control of the Illinois Central Railroad 
Company. The management of the department, over 
which you have so successfully presided during the 
past five years, has been eminently satisfactory, and 
the board feel that there is due to you an expression 
of the high sense of obligation under which you have 
placed the shareholders of the company for the very 
happy results that you have obtained. 

"Desiring to add my own personal congratula- 
tions and good wishes, and trusting that our future 
relations will be as pleasant and harmonious as they 
have been in the past, 

"I remain, with great respect, 
Yours very truly, 
WM. K. ACKERMAN, President." 

"ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY, 
PRESIDENT'S OFFICE. 

CHICAGO, January 24, 1883. 

"JAMES C. CLARKE, Esq., New Orleans : 

"My Dear Sir: At a meeting of the board of 
directors of the Illinois Central Railroad Company, 
held on the I7th instant, the report prepared by you 
dated January I, 1883, and addressed to the sharehol- 
ders of the Chicago, St. Louis & New Orleans Rail- 
road Company, was submitted, read, ordered to be 
printed, and copies thereof mailed to each shareholder 
of the Illinois Central Railroad Company. 

"The following resolutions were offered by Messrs. 
Webster and Elliott, duly seconded, and passed unani- 
mously : 

[Same pre-imble and resolutions as contained in 
letter to Mr. William H. Osborn.] 

"From the foregoing, it will be seen that it is 
made my duty to express to you, as one of the officers 
of the Chicago, St. Louis & New Orleans Railroad 
Company, the thanks of the board for the efforts put 
forward by you during the past five years and which 



have resulted in bringing this property to its present 
very satisfactory condition. Although the board of 
directors have now by formal resolution more particu- 
larly called the attention of the shareholders to your 
efforts in accomplishing so desirable a result, yet I am 
sure that, during all the time you have been so en- 
gaged, they have never ceased to feel how great was the 
obligation under which you had placed them. Of my 
own personal knowledge, I know full well with what 
difficulties you have had to contend and the many ad- 
verse circumstances with which you have been sur- 
rounded. In 1874, I passed over the line of road which 
you have practically rebuilt. Comparing my recollec- 
tions at that time with its present condition, I can bet- 
ter and more fully appreciate what work you have 
accomplished. The Chicago, St. Louis & New Orleans 
Railroad from this time on becomes a part and parcel 
of the old line, which it has been the good fortune of 
both of us to serve for so many years together. I 
sincerely trust that our relations, personal and 
official, will be as pleasant and cordial in the future 
as they have been in the past. Believe me, dear Mr. 
Clarke, yours very sincerely, 

WM. K. ACKERMAN, President." 

In addition to the reports made by Mr. Os- 
born and Mr. Clarke, was one furnished by 
Judge James Fentress, then of Bolivar, Ten- 
nessee, giving a concise statement of the legal 
history of the case. He, with Hon. John A. 
Campbell of New Orleans ex-attorney-general 
of the United States and at one time one of the 
justices of the United-States supreme court 
had been most active in the management of 
the company's legal affairs of the South, and 
with consummate skill had been instrumental 
in bringing them to a successful result. Both 
Judge Campbell and Judge Fentress owing 
to their great ability and thorough familiarity 
with the laws of Tennessee, Mississippi and 
Louisiana, the latter unusually, complex were 
enabled to render most valuable services in ex- 
pediting settlements of complicated legal ques- 
tions. Judge Fentress is now the general- 
attorney of the company, resident in Chicago, 
having succeeded Mr. Benjamin F. Ayer, who 
held that position for many years and is now 
the general-counsel of the company. The law 
department of the company has always been 
maintained at a high standard, and among its 
legal advisers, in past years, may be found the 



58 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



names of James F. Joy, Hiram Ketchum, Will- 
iam Tracy, Wm. Curtis Noyes, Daniel Lord, 
Charles O'Connor, Judge Ebenezer Lane,* 
Judge James Emmott, Melville W. Fuller, the 
present chief-justice of the United States ; W. 
C. Goudy, Senator William B. Allison, Lyman 
Trumbull, and John N. Jewett. 

Among' those prominently identified with 
the history of the road we mention the follow- 
ing: 

Edward Turner Jeffery who was born in 
Liverpool, England, procured employment as 
an office boy with Samuel J. Hayes, superinten- 
dent of machinery of the Illinois Central Rail- 
road in October 1856. He was afterward 
placed for a while in the tin and copper shops, 
and then served as an apprentice in the machine 
shop, cultivating what might be regarded as 
an hereditary fondness for the craft of the ma- 
chinist. He then entered the department of 
mechanical drawing, and, after he had mastered 
this science, he was at the age of twenty 
put in charge of this department, and was also 
made secretary to the superintendent of ma- 
chinery, and had charge of all new work done 
ii> the shops and foundry. From February I, 
1871, to May 4, 1877, he was assistant-superin- 
tendent of machinery, and on that date he was 
appointed general superintendent of the road 

*Ebenezer Lane, jurist, was born in North Hamp- 
ton, Massachusetts, December 17, 1793, and died in 
Sandusky, Ohio, June 13, 1866. He was graduated 
at Harvard in 1811. studied law under the guidance of 
his uncle, Matthew Griswold of Lyme, Connecticut, 
in 1814, and was admitted to the bar. After practis- 
ing for three years in Connecticut, he removed to 
Ohio and settled in Norwalk, Huron county. He be- 
came judge of the court of common pleas in 1824, 
and from 1837 until 1845 was judge of the supreme 
court of Ohio. After his retirement from the bench, 
he resumed his profession and was afterward engaged 
in various relations with western railroads. Decem- 
ber 6, 1855, he was elected resident-director of the 
Illinois Central Railroad Company, and was their 
legal adviser for three years. He withdrew from ac- 
tive employment in 1859. His ability and experience 
rendered his advice wise and trustworthy. Like 
Rufus Choate, Horace Greeley, and some other great 
nuii. he never learned to write legibly. 



serving as such until December 15, 1885, when 
Ivj was appointed general manager of the entire 
line a rare promotion for one of his age, the 
more so when we consider his humble begin- 
nings. He resigned as general manager in 
1889. 

His own advancement, step by step, was 
fairly won without favoritism or solicitation, but 
solely on the ground of merit and fitness. His 
experience not only added to his capacity as a 
railroad manager, but it likewise broadened his 
mind and enlarged his heart and sympathies for 
every honest wage-worker, especially for the 
young apprentice in the shops. His official 
career, in the Illinois Central Railroad Company, 
was singularly successful throughout. His par- 
ticular strength lay in his thorough adaptation 
to the company's service and to every branch of 
it in which he served, as well as in his great 
industry and energy. (See biography in Part 
II.) 

It was my good fortune, during the seven 
important years of my connection with the com- 
pany, as its executive, to have so able a man 
with me, and one so loyal alike to me and to the 
company as was Edward T. Jeffery. He was 
skillful, energetic, systematic, and economical ; 
and, in all he undertook, he worked with an 
intelligent comprehension of the duty in hand. 
.V harmonious feeling was maintained among 
the employes, and their devotion to him was 
something rarely witnessed in corporate opera- 
tions. 

The seven years, heretofore referred to, 
were the most prosperous ones in the history 
of the company. Many important additions 
and improvements were made to the property 
during this time, and, as the engineering de- 
partment had been abolished Mr. Leverett 
II. Clarke, chief-engineer, having resigned after 
a faithful service of twenty-five years and 
the construction account had been closed, the 
planning and superintending of these new works 
devolved largely upon the general superinten- 
dent. The gross earnings were increased, the 
operation expenses were kept at a very low per- 
u-ntage, while at the same time, the physical 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



59 



condition of the property was fully maintained 
and large additions were made to its rolling 
stock. 

Joseph !". Tucker was born in Saco, Maine, 
September 2<). 1835. He entered the service 
oi" the company September 15, 1856, and re- 
mained until 1884. Five of these twenty-eight 
years were spent as ticket agent, ten as genera! 
freight agent, two as general superintendent, and 
nearly nine as traffic manager. 



that had certain of the freight agents in former 
years adopted such honorable and conservative 
principles in the prosecution of their business, 
it is more than probable that the railway interests 
of this country would have suffered less than they 
have at the hands of legislatures. Many a time 
at meetings and in conventions, did Mr. Tucker 
warn these railroad managers and freight agents 
a- to what would be the result of their doubtful 
dealings. His words were not always heeded. 




PHOTO LOANED BY E. H. GERRY, CHICAGO. 



A representative of the locomotives used by the Illinois Central, in the Chicago suburban service. 



From the foregoing, it will be seen that his 
education in the traffic department was thorough 
and the lessons he gained there taught him that 
earnings for his road meant more than gather- 
ing a large volume of profitless business for self- 
glorification. The "rate per ton per mile" was 
his ever present thought and he aimed to se- 
cure such a rate as would produce a reasonable 
net result of profit. In this matter, he was a 
wholesome example to many in similar posi- 
tions and they might have studied with advan- 
tage his conservative course. It is safe to assert 



and when the storm came it swept into bank- 
ruptcy the properties managed by the reckless 
or ignorant men who had withstood him. 

There is another thing about "Joe" Tucker 
that is pleasant to record and that is the esteem 
i 1 .! which he was always held by the shippers 
over his line as well as by the craft of traffic 
ipanagers. It was always said of him that his 
word was as good as his bond, and so it was. 
The shippers used to say that if he declined to 
make concessions, he could always give a good 
reason for the ground he took and that the re- 



60 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



iusal was always made in such a kind spirit 
that, although they might feel disappointed, they 
could not go away offended. And in his re- 
lations to other lines, it required no cast-iron 
compact of any association of traffic managers 
to bind him to an agreement as to maintenance 
of rates. It was this spirit of fairness and in- 
tegrity that made and kept him host of friends 
both among freight men and shippers. 

His management of the traffic business of 
the Illinois Central Railroad Company extended 
through some very troublous times, particular- 
ly during the period when railroad commis- 
sioners were sometimes appointed not so much 
for their fitness as for political reward. When 
these men got on the wrong track and attempted 
to make unreasonable reductions, it was difficult 
to reason them out of it, for they were dealing) 
with a subject concerning which they were pro- 
foundly ignorant, and were governed more by 
prejudice, and passion, than by sound sense and 
sober judgment. But Mr. Tucker's arguments 
before the board of railroad and warehouse com- 
missioners, evincing as they did a thorough 
mastery of the subject and delivered with such 
fairmindedness and honest precision, were us- 
ually listened to with respectful attention and 
often carried conviction to his hearers; and, in 
one instance at least aided by some sugges- 
tions from his brother officers he prevailed 
upon the members of the board actually to re- 
call a schedule of tariff rates which they had 
ordered to take effect within a few days. He 
proved clearly to the minds of the commissioners 
that the practical effect of an enforcement of the 
schedule would be a confiscation of railway 
property and that it would also operate to the 
disadvantage of the public. 

John C. Welling was born near Trenton, 
New Jersey, on February 24, 1840, and received 
his education in that city. In 1858 he went in- 
to business at Titusville, New Jersey, remained 
there until 1861, when he was appointed clerk- 
to John W. Newell, paymaster of the United 
States army. He was in the government ser- 
vice until August 1866, and then entered the 
service of the Ironton Railroad and Mining Com- 



pany, whose mines were located near Allentown. 
Pa., and owned by Robert Lennox Kennedy of 
New York. He afterward served as Mr. Ken- 
nedy's private secretary until 1874, when he en- 
tered the service of the I. C. Railroad Com- 
pany in the financial department in New York. 
September i, 1874, he removed to Chicago to 
take the position of assistant treasurer. Two 
years later, he was appointed auditor. His title 
was afterward changed to general auditor and 
then to comptroller, a title more nearly corre- 
sponding to the duties performed, his office be- 
ing charged with the supervision of all accounts 
of the company. He was later elected vice- 
president, which position he retains at the pres- 
ent time. 

Personally, Mr. Welling is held in very 
high estimation by the board of directors, by 
every brother officer, and by all the employes of 
the road, especially by the young men serving 
immediately under him, who find in him not 
only an example of good life but a kind and help- 
ful counsellor. 

Benjamin Franklin Ayer was born in 
Kingston, Rockingham county, New Hamp- 
shire, April 22, 1825. His family is one of the 
oldest in New England, he was descended in the 
eighth generation from John Ayer, who had 
settled in Haverhill, Mass., in 1645. After 
preparing himself at the Albany, New York, 
Academy, Mr. Ayer entered Dartmouth College 
where he was graduated in the year 1846. He 
afterward attended the Dana Law School of 
Harvard College to perfect himself for the pro- 
fession of the law. In July 1849, he was ad- 
mitted to the bar and practised in Manchester, 
New Hampshire being endowed with natural 
abilities for the profesion, he soon made a high 
reputation. He was elected to the legislature 
in 1853. In 1854 he was appointed prosecut- 
ing attorney for Hillsborough county, New 
Hampshire, and held that office until his removal 
to Chicago in 1857. He was admitted to the 
bar of Illinois on May I5th of the same year, and 
he as rapidly rose in the regard of our people 
and of the profession as lie had in his Eastern 
home. In 1861 he was appointed corporation 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



IU 



counsel and served as such five years, during . 
which time, he prepared the revised charter of 
Chicago in 1863. He was afterward of the law 
firm of Beckwith, Ayer and Kales. When 
Judge Corydon Beckwith withdrew to accept 
the general solicitorship of the Chicago & Alton 
Railroad Company, the firm was continued by 
Ayer and Kales. In 1876 he was tendered the 
position of general solicitor of the Illinois Cen- 
tral Railroad Company. Prior to this, he had 
devoted his attention to corporation and railroad 
law and had distinguished himself in this class 
of legal practice. He accepted the offer of the 
Illinois Central Railroad, gave up all other prac- 
tice, and has since devoted himself to the legal 
department of this company. He was elected 
a director of the company, April 25th, 1877, 
which position he still holds. In 1890 his title 
was changed to that of general counsel. Mr. 
Ayer was for several years president of the 
Western Railroad Association, which was or- 
ganized many years since to pass upon the vali- 
dity of patents affecting railways and which in- 
cludes in its membership all the leading railways 
of the West. 

Timothy B. Blackstone, late president of 
the Chicago & Alton Railway, was one of the 
division engineers who assisted Col. R. B. Mason 
in surveying, locating and constructing the line 
of the road and was with him from May 1851, 
to December 1855. 

Mr. Marvin Hughitt was born in August 
1837, and may be said to have begun his railroad 
experience with the Chicago & Alton Railroad 
in 1856, in the capacity of superintendent of 
telegraph and train dispatcher. He entered the 
service of the Illinois Central Railroad Company 
in 1862, and occupied the positions of superin- 
tendent of telegraph, train dispatcher, assistant 
general superintendent, and general superinten- 
dent, successively. He was appointed general 
superintendent in 1866 succeeding W. R. 
Arthur, who had held that position for about 
seven years and remained in that position un- 
til 1870. The period of his connection with the 
company was a somewhat trying one. It was 
during the stormy days of the rebellion, when 



the railway service was a hard field to occupy. 
The demoralization incident to the war seemed 
to permeate every part of the line and unfortu- 
nately it was not confined to the subordinates. 
Many of the men in the different departments 
having enlisted in the army, their places had to 
be supplied by new and inexperienced hands. 
Perfect discipline was practically impossible. 
The earnings of the line were very large, but 
all supplies and materials had to be bought at 
war prices. The equipment, both in quantity 
and quality, was inadequate to the demands up- 
on it, and these demands were all the more diffi- 
cult to meet with an unballasted road-bed upon 
a prairie soil. These disadvantages, particular- 
ly at time when the resources of the road were 
greatly overtaxed, required about as much hero- 
ism as any that was displayed on the field of 
battle, and reflected great credit upon those who 
could bring good results out of such compara- 
tively disordered conditions, and Mr. Hughitt 
was well entitled to a share of this credit. 

For awhile, the United States government 
hesitated about making payments to the com- 
pany for transportation of troops and munitions 
of war. Hon. Elihu B. Washburne, then a 
member of congress from Illinois, took the 
ground that the company was obliged under its 
charter to carry them free. If congress adopted 
this view, it meant bankruptcy for the road. 
The matter was very thoroughly discussed and 
exhaustively examined by congress, and a con- 
clusion was reached in exact accordance with 
the charter that the road-bed should remain 
open a "public highway" free for the transpor- 
tation of troops and war materials for the 
government; but that the company was not ex- 
pected to furnish equipment, supplies and men 
free. 

The year after the close of the war, 1866, 
there was a large decline in the passenger traffic 
consequent upon the discontinuance of hostili- 
ties. The south had been desolated by the war, 
its labor system was disorganized and its in- 
dustries were not yet reconstructed, so that its 
impoverished people were unable to purchase 
much. The southern states not taking their 



62 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 




x 

A, 



CJ 
x 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



usual supply of food from the north, traffic in 
that direction decreased. The road-bed and 
equipment, owing to the heavy traffic of the five 
years preceding, were greatly deteriorated and 
this called for large expenditures in the way of 
reconstruction, sadly affecting net results. 

October i, 1867, the Dubuque & Sioux 
City Railroad was leased ; but all the traffic at 
1 hmleith had to he transported across the river 
to Dubuque by ferry. This year the construc- 
tion of the Dunleith and Dubuque bridge was 
commenced, but it was not opened for business 
until January i, 1869. In 1869 the corn crop 
in central Illinois was a failure. 54 miles of 
Cedar Falls & Minnesota and 49 miles of the 
Jowa Falls & Sioux City railroads were con- 
structed this year but both lines the former 
to Mona and the later to Sioux City were 
not completed until the following year. In 
1869 the Iowa system reached the total length 
of 402 miles. 

In 1870 an arrangement was made with the 
Ijelleville & Southern Illinois Railroad for run- 
ning through trains between Cairo and St. 
Louis. 

In 1871 Mr. Hughitt was succeeded as 
general superintendent by Mr. Abram Mitchell 
having resigned to accept the position of assist 
ant general manager of the Chicago, Milwaukee 
& St. Paul Raihvav. In the same vear, he be 



emne superintendent of the Pullman Palace Car 
Com pan\'. In February 1872, his connection 
with the Chicago & Northwestern Railway com- 
menced, in which company he held with great 
credit to himself and to the material prosperity 
of said company the various positions of super- 
intendent, general manager, and second vice- 
president, and finally rose to the presidency. 

The present managers of the Illinois Cen- 
tral Railroad Company have a goodly heritage. 
'1 hey have emulated the example of their pre- 
decessors in carrying along a work born in in- 
tegrity of purpose and prosecuted with heroism 
under every conceivable adversity to a success- 
ful completion. 

The construction of the Illinois Central 
marked a new era in the history of the 
slate of Illinois, an era in which it could turn 
from the mortification of broken pledges, and 
despair of insolvencey, to the bright realiza- 
tion of restored credit at home and abroad. 
Well has the state profited by its sad experience, 
"internal improvement" need be no longer 
dreamily indulged in as a joyful anticipation of 
childish fancy for it is now being worked 
out to its fullest completion. Well may its 
sons rejoice, and let them not forget to honor 
the memory of those who filled important parts 
in the work of construction and commercial 
progress. 




CHAPTER II. 



HISTORICAL BIOGRAPHIES. 



HISTORICAL BIOGRAPHIES. 



Among: those who were most prominent in bringing to a successful termination the organization and 
early development of the Illinois Central Railroad, we mention the following: 



JONATHAN STURGES was one of the 
incorporators of the company, and a 
director from February 10, 1851 to May 
28, 1862; he was again elected, May 17, 
1868, and held the office until the time of his 
death, Nov. 28, 1874. He was also acting-presi- 
dent at one time. In the management of this prop- 
erty, he applied the same rules of commercial in- 
tegrity that were employed in his own business. 
In the days of its sorest trials, Mr. Sturges 
proved the main-stay of the Illinois Central Rail- 
road, and in the time of its greatest financial 
depression when the price of its shares declined, 
his great fear was that some who had been in- 
duced to purchase them, owing to his official re- 
lation with the company, might suffer loss. Mr. 
Sturges was born at Southport, Ct., March 24, 
1802. He was one of the honored merchants 
of the city of New York. His business-house 
was established about 1834 and was then Reed 
and Sturges ; afterward it became Reed, Hemp- 
stead and Sturges, and later Sturges, Bennett 
and Company, wholesale grocers at No. 125 
Front street. He was elected a member of the 
Chamber of Commerce, July i, 1834, and was 
elected its vice-president in 1863, and retired 
from that office in 1867. The following is an 
extract from a letter addressed to Mr. Sturges 
by his brother merchants, Dec. 30, 1867, on the 
occasion of his retiring from business and invit- 
ing him to meet them at dinner : "Your life among 
uj. of nearly half a century in the same locality 
in Front Street, we can truly say has been such 
as commends itself to every one both old and 



young, who regard that which is -true, just, and 
noble, in mercantile character." * * * * 

On December 3, 1874, the directors of the 
Chamber of Commerce ordered the following 
minute to be entered upon their record : 

"In 1868, Mr. Sturges retired from active 
business with an ample fortune and a reputation 
for probity and honor which is better than earth- 
ly riches. He had come to be regarded as the 
foremost man in the tea and coffee trades which 
he had followed for so many years, and was 
recognized as a wise counsellor, and a warm 
and steadfast friend. The good example which 
he lived doubtless did much to impart to the 
whole body of traders, of which his house was 
a conspicuous member, that character for integ- 
rity and upright dealing which it has always 
borne which it still maintains. * * * Mr. 
Sturges was a promoter of many important un- 
dertakings, as well as an able coadjutor in all, 
and in the discharge of his various and responsi- 
ble duties, he was always governed by a recti- 
tude of purpose and unswerving fidelity to his 
trust. Good sense and a sound judgment were 
the distinguishing characteristics of his great 
worth in all corporate bodies. As one of the 
founders and directors of the Bank of Commerce, 
as director and acting-president of the Illinois 
Central Railroad Company, as one of the pro- 
prietors and directors of the New York and New 
Haven Railroad Company, and as vice-president 
of this association, he was widely known and 
held in high regard. Nor was it in the walks 
of business, in the counting room, and in the 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



exchange, that he was chiefly honored and be- 
loved he was a recognized patron of art. In 
the church, he manifested the virtues of a Chris- 
tian ; in society, the unostentatious attributes of 
a gentleman ; in the service of his country, the 
devoted zeal of a true patriot ; as a citizen, the 
love of the philanthropist, never forgetti'ng his 
obligations to the poor, the sick, and the crippled, 
but extending to all the benefactions of a warm 
heart and of an open hand. The homage we 
paid to the good man when living we desire to 
perpetuate in hallowed memories, and to this end 



being signed by the officers of the chamber." He 
died in the city of New York, November 28, 
1874. 




York. 



EORGE GRISWOLD was of the firm 
of N. L. and G. Griswold who occupied 
a rough-granite store at No. 71 and 
72 South street in the city of New 

This building was a fitting emblem of 



the standing and credit of the house. They 




COURTESY B. A 0. R'Y. 



THE HERCULES" 1837. 

This was the first locomotive in the world with equalizing frames and levels. 
See article Transportation Advancement. 



we inscribe on our minutes the sentiments that 
are graven on our hearts of gratitude for this 
life of uncommon beauty, of sincere sorrow for 
our own great loss, and of our sympathy for the 
family of the bereaved to whom it is ordered 
that a copy of the foregoing be transmitted after 



were egaged in the China trade, sailing the good 
ship Panama, and did a very large business, sel- 
ling Canton goods, teas, etc. J. N. A. Griswold, 
son of George Griswold, who in 1855 became 
president of the Illinois Central Railroad com- 
pany, was sent as super-cargo on the Panama to 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



69 



China, and resided there for many years. Mr. 
Griswold came to New York from Lyme, Conn., 
in 1794, and in 1796 the house was established. 
In those early years, the merchants ruled the city, 
and participation in politics was regarded not 
only as honorable but as an imperative duty. 
He made an excellent presiding officer at politi- 
cal or popular meetings for any purpose. He 
was always ready to promote the interests of the 
city and added largely to its prosperity in his 
day. He had many noble traits of character, 
and more than one young merchant owed his 
success to the help and counsel Mr. Griswold 
afforded. Although well advanced in years at 
the time, he took part in the organization of the 
Illinois Central Railroad company, in 1851, he 
was a man of such wonderful energy for his 
years and possessed of such remarkable will 
power, that many of the younger men engaged 
with him in this important work, found it no 
small task to keep up with his movements. He 
was "a director in the Bank of America for many 
years, and was also interested in many institu- 
tions of a public character in the city of New 
York. He was a member of the Presbyterian 
church, attending Dr. Pott's church. He died 
in New York, September 18, 1859, in the old 
homestead which he had occupied for so many 
years at No. 9 Washington Square. 



LEROY M. WILEY was born in Han- 
cock county, Georgia, on October 30, 
1794. His father was born in South 
Carolina, and his mother in Mecklen- 
burgh county, North Carolina; they were both 
of Scotch-Irish descent and were among the 
early settlers in Hancock county, Georgia. 
About the year 1807, they removed to Baldwin 
county and resided on a farm near Milledgeville, 
which had been made the capital of the state. 
Here his father died, leaving his widowed mother 
with seven children with limited means to fight 
the battle of life alone and to provide for their 



support and education. Under these circum- 
stances, Leroy the eldest son, then only fifteen 
years of age, was placed in a dry-goods store 
in Milledgeville to earn his living and make his 
way in the world. With a limited education, 
by industry and integrity, faithfulness and close 
application to business, he soon gained the con- 
fidence of all those with whom he came in con- 
tact and laid the foundation for his success in 
life. 

Upon his arrival at manhood, Mr. Wiley 
entered into business with Thos. W. Baxter, 
who had married his eldest sister, under the 
name of Wiley and Baxter, and for many years 
this firm continued in Milledgeville doing a 
large and profitable business. After the settle- 
ment of Macon, they opened an additional store 
in that city where they were equally successful. 
In 1832 the firm was dissolved, Baxter mov- 
ing to Macon, and Wiley went to Charleston, 
S. C, at the invitation of the Messrs. Parish 
of New York and became associated in business 
with them under the firm name of L. M. Wiley, 
Parish and Company in Charleston, and Parish 
and Company in New York. They did a large 
and lucrative business extending throughout the 
Southern States, and thus Mr. Wiley became one 
of the leading merchants of the South and a man 
of wealth. After the retirement of the Messrs. 
Parish from business, Mr. Wiley removed to 
New York and became the head of the house 
under the name of L. M. Wiley and Company, 
and afterward as a special partner in the firm of 
W. G. Lane and Company, continuing in business 
until 1854. 

In the winter of 1853, he was called on an 
urgent engagement to St. Louis, and through 
the exposure of that journey, then partly made 
by stage-coaches, and from general overwork, 
he had a slight attack of paralvsis, and at the 
earnest solicitation of his friends and relatives, 
he retired from all mercantile pursuits. From 
this time, he devoted his time and energies to 
the management of his large estate and to various 
enterprises in which he was engaged. He estab- 
lished a large flour-mill and iron-works on the 
Etowah River near Cartersville, Ga., and became 



70 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



interested with others in various railroad com- 
panies, and these, together with his plantation 
interests, occupied his time. He was one of 
the original corporators and directors of the 
Illinois Central Railroad Company from 1851 
64. He was also a director and largely inter- 
ested in the Great-Western Railroad Company 
of Illinois, afterward the Toledo, Wabash & 
Western Railroad Company. At the commence- 



York, resumed his old quarters at the Astor 
House, and engaged again in the various railroad 
enterprises in which he was interested. The 
board of directors of the Illinois Central Railroad 
Company, out of respect to Mr. Wiley and in 
recognition of his valuable services to the 
company during its early organization, again 
elected him a director. May 29, 1867, which 
office he held until the time of his death. 




COURTESY B. A 0. R'Y. 



THE "ATLANTIC." 1832. 

This is the first of the "Grasshopper" class, and is the oldest American locomotive in existence. 

See article Transportation Advancement. 



ment of the war, influenced by education, associ- 
ation, and sentiment, he removed South to 
protect his interests and to cast his lot with his 
brothers and sisters, and remained quietly at 
his plantation near Eufaula, Ala., which hence- 
forth became his home. During his absence 
South, his seat in the board was declared vacant. 
May 19, 1864, on account of absenteeism. After 
the restoration of peace, he returned to New 



Mr. Wiley was a man of fine physique and 
indomitable energy and a gentleman of the old 
school. He was scrupulously honorable and just 
in all his transactions, never seemed to know 
what fatigue was, and his invincible will power 
was felt among his subordinates in all the ram- 
ifications of his extensive business. In society, 
he was courteous and polite, and among his 
relatives, he was exceedingly kind and generous. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



71 



His three sisters were all left widows with large 
families, and two of them without means. 
The families of these two he supported, and 
educated their children, and all of his nieces he 
educated, giving them the very best advantages 
the country afforded. At the commencement 
of the war, he had by his own exertions and 
without entering into any speculations, accumu- 
lated a fortune estimated at two millions of 
dollars, at a time when millionaires were not 
so plentiful as they now are. During that un- 
fortunate struggle, much of his property was 
greatly depreciated in value, and this, together 
with the effects of emancipation, swept away 
one-half of his estate, which, when he died, was 
valued to be about one million of dollars. Having 
never married, he gave his entire property to his 
three sisters and the children of his deceased 
brothers. In January 1868, Mr. Wiley, while 
on his journey from Georgia to New York, was 
again attacked by disease of the brain, and his 
friends, finding him in this condition, removed 
him to the home of Mr. Gresham, who had 
married his niece, in Macon, Ga. But he did 
not improve, and was carried to Welanee the 
name he gave to his beautiful home in 
Alabama and there, under the tender care of 
his sisters and nieces, he quietly passed away, 
April 16, 1868, and his body lies at rest in 
Macon, by the side of his mother. 




OBERT RANTOUL, JR. was an 
American statesman, born in Beverly, 
Mass., August 13, 1805. He was 
graduated at Harvard College in 1826 
and was admitted to the Essex bar in 1827. In 
1837 he was appointed a member of the Massa- 
chusetts board of education. In 1838 he re- 
moved to Boston, and in 1843 was appointed 
by President Tyler collector of that port, and in 
1845 United States district attorney for Massa- 
chusetts. Hiram Ketchum a celebrated lawyer 
of New York, and an intimate personal friend 



of Daniel Webster, and who strenuously advo- 
cated his nomination to the presidency, suggested 
the latter's name as a fit person to draft the char- 
ter of the Illinois Central Railroad, but Webster 
could not give it attention and named Rantoul, 
who did most of the work at his Boston office. 
Hon. George White, now judge of probate for 
Norfolk County, was then a student in Rantoul's 
office, and copied out the first draft in his hand- 
writing. Probably Ketchum aided Rantoul in 
formulating the charter; there were, however, 
radical changes made in it before its final passage, 
which Mr. Rantoul personally superintended in 
Springfield. By a coincidence, while thus en- 
gaged, he was elected by the Massachusetts legis- 
lature to serve out Daniel Webster's term in 
the United States senate, which had been tem- 
porarily filled by Robert C. Winthrop under an 
appointment of the governor, entering the senate. 
February 22, 1851, twelve days after the Illi- 
nois Central Railway charter was passed. He 
wrote to his son on taking his seat a letter in 
which occurs this passage "I arrived this fore- 
noon from St. Louis, my mission to Illinois has 
been completely successful. I have obtained a 
charter which the western senators here call 
worth five or six millions. This however is 
to be ascertained by the result of the experiment." 
After Mr. Rantoul's services of a few weeks 
in the senate, he was succeeded by Charles 
Sumner for the long term. He was elected to 
the house of representatives the same year, 1851, 
for the first time, and died before his term ex- 
pired, August 7, 1852. 

Said his historian : ''Of the great men who 
in 1852 were summoned to "put on immortality," 
Robert Rantoul, Jr., in all the elements of moral 
worth, intellectual activity, practical usefulness, 
and beneficence to mankind, was one of the 
greatest. His life was a scene of incessant labor 
in the cause of liberty, justice, and humanity. 
Of every subject to which he directed his 
attention gaining with unparalleled . facility a 
profound knowledge, a thorough mastery, he de- 
voted his acquirements with honest and inflexable 
purpose to advance the welfare of society; yet 
lie sounded no trumpet before" him. His manners 



72 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



were gentle, quiet, and unostentatious. * * * 
Few men have been called from the scenes of 
American civil life whose death caused more 
unaffected sorrow and tender grief." 

One of the laudable acts of his life was the 
effort he made for the abolition of capital punish- 
ment and his report is still one of the standard 
authorities on the subject. In politics, Mr. Ran- 
tou! was a democrat and an earnest advocate 



but he was unsuccessful. When in 1863, Ran- 
toul's son the present mayor of Salem, Mass., 
was introduced to President Lincoln at the White 
House, the latter referred to this fact and ac- 
knowledged he did all he could to stop it, but 
added with a laugh and slapping his lank thighs, 
"Your father beat me, he beat me!" 

Rantoul was the author of an interesting 
pamphlet entitled : "Letter on the value of the 




COURTESY B. A O. R'Y. 



THE "MT. CLARE." 1845. 
Named after the oldest railroad shops in the world. See article Transportation Advancement. 



of free-trade. He defended the first fugitive 
slave arrested in Massachusetts under the act 
of 1850. 

At the time application was made to the 
legislature of Illinois for the Illinois Central Rail- 
road charter, there . were certain Western capi- 
talists who desired to secure it, as they did not 
wish the project to go to Eastern capitalists. 
Abraham Lincoln was employed on their behalf 



public lands of Illinois" which he wrote in 1850. 
It was an inquiry as to the prospective value of 
lands in Illinois and an examination of the con- 
siderations which would probably influence the 
settlement of the state. In this pamphlet, he com- 
pared the lands of our state with those of the 
older states and .showed how the latter had been 
affected in value by railway construction. The 
pamphlet teems with valuable statistical infonna- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



73 



tion, and we quote extensively from it. At that 
time, 1850, it appears that the unsold lands in 
Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, were as follows : 

Ohio, containing 25,576,960 acres, had unsold 367,742 
Indiana, " 21,637,760 " " " 1,511,266 
Illinois, " 35,459,200 ' 11,449,471 

He estimated that eleven million acres of land 
not taken up in Illinois would supply a popula- 
tion of little more than four hundred thousand 
persons with twenty-eight acres each, and pre- 
dicted that this increase at the ordinary rate 
would occur in six or s'even years, and that if 
the rate of increase should not be checked, five 
hundred and sixty-five thousand persons would 
be added to the population in eight years, and 
nine hundred and five thousand in twelve years, 
this at the ordinary rate. He then went on to 
show what, in his belief, would be the effect of 
the settlement of the Illinois Central Railroad 
lands, and estimated the following increases in 
population by land districts : 

District. Rate of increase. Pop, I860 

yuincy and Chicago, 66% per cent, 525,225 

Dixon, Danville and Vandalia, 240 " 640,009 

Other five, 80 " 633,620 

1,798,854 

His estimate was very nearly reached. The 
population of our State in 1850 was 851,470 and 
in ten years, 1860, it had reached 1,711,951. 

Referring to the debt of Illinois and its 
effect upon emigration to that State, he says : 

"During the last ten years, Illinois has la- 
bored under a debt of a magnitude absolutely 
overwhelming, when compared with her re- 
sources at the commencement of that period. 
She had then before her a very gloomy alterna- 
tive. If she endeavored to meet even the in- 
terest of her obligations, she would be crushed 
under the weight of an intolerable taxation, from 
which her most able and enterprising citizens 
would have fled into other states. If she aban- 
doned the effort in despair of the possibility of 
success, then she must suffer all the consequences 
of the total loss of credit consequent on her bank- 
ruptcy. In neither case, did it seem to be prob- 
able that her public works could be made avail- 
able toward the discharge of .the debt incurred 



for them or aid to develop the resources of the 
State. Why should an emigrant from the old 
world, or from the states, with the broad valley 
of the Mississippi open before him where to 
choose, voluntarily assume a full share of these 
embarrassments by becoming a citizen of Illinois? 
The answer which the emigrants have given to 
this question may be seen in the settlement of 
Wisconsin which state, with a colder climate and 
harder soil than Illinois, has added to her popu- 
lation more than eight hundred and eighty per 
cent in the last ten years a progress unpre- 
cedented in the history of the world in any agri- 
cultural community. 

"Ten years ago, Illinois, borne down with 
debt, had not only not a mile of railroad, or canal, 
or plank road, in operation within her borders, 
but no reasonable plan had been agreed upon 
by which she could hope to diminish her debt, 
discharge her interest, or acquire facilities of 
communication. She has now her canal debt 
rapidly approaching toward extinction, revenues 
sufficient in a very short time to discharge her 
whole interest without increasing the rate of 
taxation, one hundred miles of canal, and a still 
geater length of railroad in highly profitable 
operation, with plank roads in great numbers 
paying dividends large enough to insure the ear- 
ly construction of several thousand miles more. 
Not only so but she has before her the certainty 
that she will be supplied with more than twelve 
hundred, perhaps it may be safely said, more 
than fifteen hundred miles of railroad in the 
next five or six years ; and channels are already 
constructed to convey her products, transported 
to her borders on these railroads, through Michi- 
gan, Indiana, and the Eastern states, to the sea- 
board and abroad. If, paralyzed as she was for 
the last ten years, her growth was at about the 
same rate as that of Michigan, having less than 
half as dense a population, with her railroads and 
her lake borders and her steamboats ; about the 
same as that of Missouri with only two-thirds as 
dense a population, and with the Queen Citv of 
the Great River in her centre receiving the whole 
current of emigration up the Mississippi ; about 
the same numerically as that of Wisconsin and 



74 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



Iowa together, these two starting with a hundred 
thousand square miles of land unoccupied, whol- 
ly unencumbered with debt and accessible from 
the lake and from the river why should she 
not, in her present healthy condition, her limbs 
unshackled and her pathway free before her, ad- 
vance with the step of a giant refreshed, toward 
her natural position among the first in popula- 
tion, power, and wealth of the North American 



is not worth so much as a bushel of corn costing 
twenty cents which can be carried for tea cents 
to the same market and sold for the same price 
of thirty-six cents. A saving of twenty cents 
per bushel on the transportation of your corn 
is the saving of ten dollars on the crop of an acre 
reckoned at fifty bushels ; and this sum is twen- 
ty per cent interest on a first cost of fifty dollars 
per acre. It will be better economy, therefore, 




COURTESY B. A O. F.-Y. 



THE "DRAGON." 1848. 
This is one of the oldest examples of the Baldwin Locomotive Works extant. See article Locomotive Advancement. 



confederacy of states? * * But, it may be 
asked, will not a larger portion of the additional 
population coming into the valley of the Missis- 
sippi, diverge into the new states and so be drawn 
off from Illinois? 

Certainly not to the inaccessible portions 
of those states - because a bushel of corn cost- 
ing six cents which can be carried for thirty cents 
to a market where it will sell for thirty-six cents, 



taking the article of corn as a criterion, to buy 
land in the south part of the Danville district at 
fifty dollars per acre, when the prices by compe- 
tition for it shall have been raised so high, and 
you have a double-track railroad within twelve 
miles of your farm, than it would have been 
to buy the same land at a dollar and a quarter 
per acre when there was no practicable outlet 
for your produce. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



75 



"Corn was carried during the summer from 
a point several miles above the mouth of the Illi- 
nois River down to the Illinois, thence up that 
river to the canal, thence to Chicago, and thence 
to New York, and there sold at a profit. Corn 
was not low in Illinois last summer, but in New 
York is was considerably lower than the average 
of the last four years. Corn will go to market 
cheaper from the lands in the Danville district 
on the line of the Chicago branch of the Central 
road than from the point of shipment on the 
Mississippi first referred to. Corn is so cheap 
and bulky that all other agricultural produce 
may be carried much further on the railroad 
without too great an addition to its price. All 
produce for which a market can be found at the 
seaboard will bear the cost of transportation from 
Illinois. 

"Xor need we be alarmed at the vast amounts 
of produce which these unsettled tracts are capa- 
ble of yielding. The Northwest never received 
so great an accession to its population in any 
equal period as in the last five years ; the emigra- 
tion from foreign countries, most of which passes 
to the Northwest, having risen to 299,610 in 1849. 
and to 315,333 in 1850, instead of less than 
50,000 a year as it was formerly. Yet with this 
unparalleled increase of laborers cultivating the 
richest soil of the world, with the new avenues 
to market that have been opened during that 
time, all pouring to the seaboard the surplus of 
a succession of bountiful harvests in quantities 
unheard of before, and at much lower freights 
than before, the supply has not kept pace with 
the demand as is shown by the fact that agricul- 
tural products, almost without exception, have 
borne much higher prices during the last four 
years than during the four next preceding. The 
following are the average prices of the whole 
quantities of some of the principal articles ex- 
ported from the United States during the two 
periods : 

Flour, 1843-4-5-6, $4.79 1847-8-9-50, $5.77 
Wheat, " " .96V l - 2S ^ 

Corn, " " .55 -71>4 

'The prices of pork and other animal pro- 
ducts differ also in about the same proportion. 



The difference extends also to southern products, 
so that labor will not be diverted at the South 
from their peculiar staples, to wheat, corn, pork, 
and the articles which now employ Northwestern 
labor. The prices were : 

Cotton, 1843-4-5-0, $ .068728 1847-S-9-50, $ .08417 
Rice, " " 17.66 22.24 

Tobacco, " " 52.1.5 59.47 

''Stimulated by this rise of prices, the ex- 
ports of the last four years exceeded those of the 
four years previous in vegetable food and the 
products of animals alone by about one hundred 
millions of dollars in the total : 

The animal products, exported from 1843-46 

inclusive, were valued at - - - $24,153,331 
And the vegetable food at 47,335,438 

Making an aggregate of $71,488,769 

"But, during the period from 1847-50 in- 
clusive, the exports of animal products 
were about doubled and amounted to $ 47,354,655 

The vegetable food was more than doubled 

being 123,720,738 

Total - - $171,075,393 

Subtract amount for previous four years, 71,488,769 

$ 99,586,624 

"The demand for Northwestern products 
for exportation is, however, far from being the 
only dependence of the producer. The home 
demand increases and must continue to increase 
in a ratio even greater than the foreign demand. 
As the country grows richer, a larger proportion 
of its population is withdrawn from agricultural 
pursuits to be employed in manufactures and 
mining, and in fhe management of internal ex- 
changes and transportation, and foreign naviga- 
tion and commerce. All these persons ceasing 
to grow their own food and consuming freely, 
since, taken as a whole, they have ample means 
to purchase, create a continually expanding de- 
mand, which for the last five years at least, has 
not been overtaken by the supply. This progress 
in this country is far beyond that of any other 
part of the world in the rapidity with which it 
proceeds. This communication would extend to 
too great a length if I should collect all the ele- 
ments which would be necessary to judge ac- 
curatelv how fast this change goes on. But for 



76 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



the present purpose and with a view to contrast 
the multitudes of men devoted now to other than 
agricultural pursuits with the small numbers of 
a time not far distant, let us compare a few par- 
ticulars of the years 1830 and 1850. 

In the year 1830, the anthracite coal sent to 
market from the mines of Pennsylvania was less 
than 175,000 tons. In 1850, it was about twenty 
times that amount. In 1830, the iron produced 
in the United States was about 165,000 tons or 



"The instruments of transportation compare 
as follows after an interval of twenty years only : 



Miles of canal in operation, 
Miles of railroad in operation, 
Miles of railroad in construction, 
Tons of shipping, 1 

Tons of shipping built in the 

year - - - - 
Number of steamers built in 

last five years - 



1830 

1,277 

73 

338 

191,776 



1850 

3,698 

8,779 

11,000 

3,535,454 



58,094 272.218 



196 



965 




COURTESY B A 0. R'Y. 



THE "PERKINS." 

The first of the type of heavy ten-wheel locomotives. See article Transportation Advancement. 



about as much as Great Britain produced in 1800. 
In 1850, the United States produced about four 
times as much as in 1830 or about the same 
quantity that Great Britain produced in 1830. 
The cotton manufacturers in the United States 
consumed in 1830, 45,000,000 of pounds of raw 
material ; in 1850, 270,000,000 of pounds or six 
times as great a quantity. 



"The imports of the year 1830 were $70,- 
876,920, but in 1850 they had risen to $178,138,- 
318. This increased purchase of course took off 
increased quantities of products to pay for it. 
The imports in the four years ending with 1830 
were $313,363,339 ; for the four years ending with 
1850, they were $627,519,323, while the exports 
for four years ending in 1830 were $300,797,692, 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



77 



and for the four years ending in 1850, they were 
$610,339,598. The imports having doubled in 
twenty years, the exports have doubled also. 
Has the whole demand, both domestic and for- 
eign taken together, been sufficient to keep up 
the prices of the surplus products of the North- 
west, as compared with the prices of manufac- 
tured and imported articles which the farmer 
purchases with the disposable portion of his crop? 
The answer to this question determines whether 
the inducements to settle in the Northwest are 
gaining strength ; for it is the amount which his 
surplus 'Mill purcliase that determines the ques- 
tion whether the fanner will grow rich or poor. 

"If we compare the four years with the four 
preceding, we shall find: i. That goods 
manufactured in the Eastern States have become 
much cheaper. 2. That imported articles have 
grown cheaper. 3. That agricultural products 
command much higher prices than before. 4. 
That the cost of transporting agricultural pro- 
duce from the West to the seaboard, and manu- 
factured and imported articles from the seaboard 
to the West has been materially diminished and 
i". likely to be still more so. 

"Each of these four changes is of vast im- 
portance to the settlers on public lands, and their 
combined influence has caused wealth to pour 
in like a flood into those sections of the North- 
west having convenient access to the markets 
of the world. Of the effect of this tribute of 
wealth upon the accumulations of those com- 
munities who receive it, I give as an instance, 
that the wealth of the thirteen northern counties 
of Illinois was six times as great in 1849 as it has 
been nine years before in 1840, as follows. 

Population and valuation of the thirteen 
counties on the line of the Chicago & Galena 
Railroad in 1840 and 1849 : 

L-OI-STIES POP. 1840 1850 VAL. 1840 VAL. 1849 

Jo Daviess, 6,180 18,767 383,715 2,785,225 

Stephenson, 2,800 11,666 125,485 837,685 

Winnebas<o, 4,609 11,731 222,630 1,564,617 

McHenry. 2,578 15,800 88,930 1,545,277 

Lake, 2,634 14,134 95,385 1,222,088 

DeKalb, 1,697 7,544 66,945 720,108 

Kane, 6,551 16,242 289,565 1,442,001 

DuPage, - 3,535 9,290 196,290 943,503 



Cook, - 
Boone, - - 
Kendall, 
Carroll, 
Ogle. - 


10,201 
1,705 
new 
1,023 
3,479 


43,280 
7,627 
7,730 

4,58(1 
10,020 


1,864,205 
55,990 


7,617,102 
717,292 
1,205,739 
370,372 
971,230 


85,345 

175,555 



46,992 178,417 3,630,040 21,942,239 

Population in 1840, 46,992. Valuation, 
$3.630,040; per head, $77.25. 

Population in 1850, 178,417, by United 
States census. 

Deduct 15,000, increase 1849 to 1850. 

Population in 1849, 1 ^>3,4 1 7- Valuation, 
$21,942,239; per head, $134.27." 

The town of "Rantoul" 114 miles south of 
Chicago was named after him. 



JOHN F. A. SANFORD was an incorpora- 
tor of the Illinois Central Railroad com- 
pany and one of its directors from Feb. 
10, 1851 to March 18, 1857; he was of 
the firm of Pierre Chouteau, Jr. and Company, 
extensive traders in furs and other commodities 
with the far-northwest country they had ware- 
houses in St. Louis and New York. Chouteau 
was also a director of the company from 1857 to 
1860. He was born in St. Louis, Jan. 19, 1789. 
He was of French extraction, his father and 
uncle, Auguste, were the founders of the city 
of St. Louis and gave > it its name; they were 
both born in New Orleans. Pierre was at first 
a clerk with his father and uncle, who were then 
largely engaged in the fur trade with the Indians, 
but soon entered into business for himself. May 
i, 1813, Berthold and Chouteau opened their new 
firm in St. Louis with a general stock of mer- 
chandise. This was the origin and foundation 
of what afterward, by the addition of two new 
partners John P. Cabenne and Bernard Pratte, 
Sr. with their added capital, became the great 
and wealthy "American Fur Company" to trade 
with the Indian tribes on the Upper Missouri; 
and which for many years almost monopolized 
the fur trade of the upper country and acquired 



78 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



large wealth. Following the Indians as they 
receded from point to point, Chouteau established 
himself at different points on the Missouri river 
and finally at Fort Benton, Montana, at the head 
of navigation of the Missouri river. In 1806, 
he visited Dubuqne to trade with the Sacs and 
Foxes, ascending and descending the river in 
canoes. He also followed the Indians as they 
receded up the Osage river, and up the Missis- 



U the Falls of St. Anthony, and northwestward 
to the Blackfeet country ; monopolizing the fur 
trade of the entire region east of the Rocky 
Mountains and also controlling the trade of Santa 
Fe in New Mexico. This business necessitated 
the employment of a large amount of capital, 
and large transactions in the Eastern cities were 
carried on, so that Chouteau was finally obliged 
to take up his residence in New York ; but he 




THE FIRST PASSENGER "MOGUL." 
WINAN'S "CAMEL-BACK" IN BACKGROUND TO RIGHT. 

The "600" was regarded as representative of the highest type of American locomotive twenty-five years ago. 

See' article^Transportation Advancement. 



sippi from Keokuk to St. Paul, having trading 
posts all along the rivers. In 1834, he and his 
associates purchased the interest of John Jacob 
Astor in the American Fur Company, and in 
1839 they formed the trading company which, 
under the firm name of P. Chouteau, Jr. and 
Company, extended its operations southward as 
far as the Cross Timbers in Texas, northward 



afterward returned to St. Louis. In 1808, act- 
ing under the instructions of Governor Lewis, he 
concluded an important treaty with the Osages 
fixing the boundary between them and the 
whites. In 1819 he was a member of the con- 
vention which framed the first constitution for 
the state of Missouri, but with this exception, 
he never engaged in politics. Both Chouteau 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



70 



and Sanford were exceedingly just in their deal- 
ings with the Indians, and by this means gained 
their confidence and were enabled to carry on 
their trading with them amicably, and through 
these transactions amassed a large fortune. 
Chouteau died in St. Louis on Sept. 8, 1865. 
Fort Pierre, 1300 miles above St. Louis on the 
west bank of the river, was named in compli- 
ment to Pierre Chonteau. 

Owing to his generous treatment of the In- 
dians and the great confidence placed in him by 
them, Sanford was appointed by the United 
States government Indian-agent for the Man- 
dans, Rickarees, Minatarees, Crows, Kniste- 
neaux, Assineboin, and Blackfeet tribes, and 
made frequent trips up the Missouri and went 
among the Indian tribes, and his very presence 
among these hostile people always restored con- 
fidence and courage. The speech of Ha-wan- 
je-tah the one horn, a Sioux chief,* will serve 
to show the estimation in which Major Sanford 
was held by them : 

"My father, I am glad to see you here to- 
day : my heart is always glad to see my father 
when he comes our Great Father who sends 
him here is very rich and we are poor. Our 
friend who is on your right hand meaning 
Pierre Chouteau we all know is very rich and 
we have heard that he owns the great medicine- 
canoe. He is a good man and a friend to the 
red man. My father, I hope you will have pity 
on us, we are very poor." After these words, 
he took off his beautiful war-eagle head-dress, 
his shirt and leggings, his necklace of grizzly 
bear's claws, and his moccasins, and tying them 
together, laid them gracefully down at the feet 
of Major Sanford as a present. Major Sanford 
made a short speech in reply, thanking him for 
the valuable present which he had made him, 
and for the very polite and impressive manner 
in which it had been done, and sent to the steamer 
for a quantity of tobacco and other presents 
which were given to him in return. 

He frequently visited Washington with 
representatives of these different tribes ; an amus- 



228. 



* "Catlin's North American Indians," Vol. 1, page 



ing and interesting story is told also by Catlin 
of a young Assineboin, Wi-jun-jon the pigeon's 
egg head, who was selected by Maj. Sanford 
to represent his tribe in a delegation which visited 
Washington City under his charge in the winter 
of 1832. With Major Sanford, the Assineboin, 
together with representatives of several others 
of those Northwestern tribes descended the Mis- 
souri river on their way to Washington in a 
Mackinac boat from the mouth of the Yellow 
Stone. Wi-jun-jon and another of his tribe, at 
the first approach to the civilized settlements, 
commenced a register of the white men's houses 
or cabins by cutting a notch foe each on the side 
of a pipe stem, in order to be able to show when 
they got home how many white men's houses 
they saw on the journey : as the cabins increased 
in numbers, they soon found their pipe stem 
filled with marks, and they determined to put 
the rest of them on the handle of a war-club 
which was soon marked all over likewise. At 
length while the boat was moored at the shore, 
Wi-jun-jon and his companion stepped into the 
bushes and cut a long stick upon which they 
afterward attempted to copy the notches from 
the pipe-steam and club, but the cabins increased 
so in number that they, after consulting a little, 
pitched their sticks overboard. Wi-jun-jon was 
absent a year on his trip to Washington and when 
he returned to his tribe with Major Sanford, 
he was decked in a full suit of colonel's uniform 
which had been presented to him in Washing- 
ton. He wore with it a beaver hat and a blue 
umbrella. Catlin frequently accompanied Maj. 
Sanford in his visits to the different Indian tribes 
and in this way procured the interesting views 
and 'portraits with which his works are illus- 
trated ; and to the correctness of which Major 
Sanford certifies. It took about three months 
for a steamboat to reach the mouth of the Yel- 
low Stone from St. Louis. The steamer, Yel- 
low Stone, on her first trip up .the Missouri, had 
Catlin and Sanford on board. As she approached 
the Mandan village, she fired a salute of twenty 
guns, which caused great alarm among the In- 
dians. When they stepped aboard they met, 
to their great surprise and delight, their old 



80 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



friend Major Sanford, their agent, and this put 
an end to all their fears. Mr. Sanford married 
Miss Emilie, the daughter of Chouteau. He was 
a genial gentleman of polished and graceful 
manners, and of fearless nature, which mani- 
fested itself either when driving a spirited horse 
or facing an hostile savage. The cares and 
anxieties of the immense business transacted by 
his firm, but largely devolving upon him, 
weighed heavily upon his mind, and at last it 
succumbed to the strain. He died in New York 
in 1857, much beloved and respected by all who 
were brought into commercial or social relations 
with him. 



to purchase large tracts of land, "they both be- 
ing in affluent circumstances." Whilst Richard 
was living in New York, a son was born to him, 
in 1672, and called Lewis, after his uncle. "Six 
months after this child's birth" so runs the 
old record - "the father, Richard, died, and in 
a few weeks the mother also died, and this child, 
the sole one of the family and name at that 
period in this country, was left at nurse among 
strangers at Harlem." Such part of young 
Lewis' papers and other property as had escaped 
the pillage of servants and soldiers was placed 
by the Dutch then in possession of New- 
York under the care and management of some 




PHOTOGRAPH LOANED BY GEORGE E. PETERS. CHICAGO. 



The present type of switch engine used by the Illinois Central R'y Co. 




OUVERNEUR MORRIS of Morrisa- 
nia, was the only child of Gouverneur 
Morris and Anne Cary Randolph, 
and was born at Morrisania, New 
York, on February 9, 1813. 

The earliest record of the Morris family in 
America dates from about the time of the 
Restoration, 1660, when Colonel Lewis Morris, 
having played a bold and daring part in opposi- 
tion to King Charles, being then in the Island 
of Barbadoes, and thinking it imprudent to re- 
turn to England, directed his thoughts and 
aspirations toward America. Accordingly, he 
sent his brother Richard to New York empowered 



of the principal inhabitants, and a guardian was 
appointed for the infant. When New York was 
restored to the British in 1674, Lewis Morris, Sr., 
came from the Barbadoes, took charge of his 
nephew, and settled upon his lands in New 
Jersey, improving at the same time his estate 
in Westchester Co., which by the royal patent 
of 1676 was called the lordship or manor of 
Morrisania. Before leaving Barbadoes, Lewis 
Morris, Sr. had unfortunately married a woman 
of low extraction and bad conduct whom he 
brought with him to America. During Morris' 
last illness, this woman destroyed all the family 
papers she could lay her hands on, and so re- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



81 



modelled his will as to leave herself and one 
P.ichley, her accomplice, the whole personal es- 
tate and all the negroes and silver. The fraud, 
however, was so evident that when young Lewis 
came of age, some years after his uncle's death, 
the legislature gave him possession of the 
estate as his uncle's heir-at-law. Lewis Morris 
married Isabella Graham, a near relative of the 
Marquis of Mont rose, by whom he had fifteen 
children, of whom five daughters and two sons 
survived him. At different times, he held the 
offices of chief justice of New York and New 
Jersey, state councillor and acting governor in 
1731 and governor of New Jersey in 1738. 

In the quaint old family record kept by 
himself, Lewis Morris says : "I begin the year 
the 25th of March. I was born at Tintern in 
New Jersey in 1698, Sept. 23, and I was married 
by Wm. Vesey [the first rector of Trinity 
Church] on March 17, 1723, to Mrs Sarah 
Staats." The issue of this marriage was three 
sons and one daughter. Lewis, the eldest son, 
was "born the 8th day of April 1726." He was 
afterward one of the signers of the Declaration 
of American Independence. Sarah Staats, the 
first wife of Lewis Morris, died in 1731, and 
Morris married, November 3, 1846, "Mrs. Sarah 
Gouverneur," and the issue of this marriage 
was four daughters and one son Gouverneur, 
who was born on January 30, 1752, and who 
played so distinguished a part in the struggle 
for American freedom and in the formation of 
the constitution, and who, during the stormy 
days of the revolution in France, stoutly main- 
tained the integrity of his government in the 
fulfilment of his duties as accredited minister 
to the' French court. In the autumn of 1798, 
Gouverneur Morris returned to America after 
an absence of ten years, and rebuilt the house at 
Morrisania in which he had been born, and,/ 
which having been within the enemy's lines 
during the revolution, had seen so many stormy 
days. In 1809 Gouverneur Morris married Miss 
Anne Gary Randolph, the daughter of Thos. 
Mann Randolph, Esquire, of .Tuckahoe, Virginia, 
and in 1816 Morris died, leaving to her the care 

6 



of his son and also of his estates, in which she 
was to have a life interest. 

Morrisania was far removed during the 
early part of the century from the busy parts of 
New York city, and communication was only 
easy by means of the family carriage. Occa- 
sional trips into town and rare journeys not 
comfortable and often dangerous through New 
\ork state to Jefferson County to inspect lands 
called the "Morris tract," lying along the St. 
Lawrence River seem to have been the principal 
breaks in the life of of young Gouverneur, who 
with only the companionship of his mother, and 
occupied by the various interests connected with 
his farm, grew to man's estate. On May 28, 
1837, Mrs. Morris died and Morris became 
possessed of his father's estates and responsi- 
bilities. After Mrs. Morris' death, the house 
at Morrisania was closed for some years and 
during this period Morris mingled somewhat 
in the society of New York and among his 
numerous kinsfolk. 

-i The extensive field for men of intelligence 
and enterprise which was opened by the project- 
ing and building of railways, early attracted Mor- 
ris' attention ; he foresaw the great effect they 
would have in helping to build up and develop the 
varied interests of the whole country, and there- 
fore devoted himself earnestly to the work. His 
first effort in this field was in connection with the 
New York & Harlem Railroad. The company 
had by herculean efforts completed the road in 
1838 from the city hall to Harlem, I25th street, 
in the course of which it had blasted its way 
through many deep rock cuttings, and had per- 
formed the wonderful feat, for that early day, 
of driving a tunnel of several hundred feet in 
length through the rock at Yorkville hill, and 
had built a long and high viaduct across the 
Harlem flats at great expense. The road was 
made a double track and had cost so much that the 
company found its finances completely exhausted 
on reaching this point, as also were its powers 
to proceed further under its charter. About 
this time, 1838, another company was chartered 
by the legislature of the State of New York, 
called the New York & Albany Railroad Com- 



82 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



pany, empowered to build a road from New 
York to Albany. Gouverneur Morris and other 
gentlemen interested in the Harlem road, con- 
ceived and carried out the idea of purchasing this 
charter and consolidating it with the Harlem, 
which being accomplished, opened the way for 
extending the Harlem railroad beyond the 
Harlem River. Railroads were then in their 
infancy and people were timid about investing 



H. Morris. Morris had the satisfaction of see- 
ing the completion of this extention and its 
opening for business in 1841. From this time 
forward for many years, he acted as a director 
in the company, taking a very active part in con- 
ducting its affairs, and at one time held the 
office of vice-president. He exerted himself in 
having the road extended from time to time Un- 
til it reached its final completion in 1852, by a 




THE LAST OF THE "CAMEL-BACK" TYPE. 



money in them so that it seemed probable that 
the extention would have to be abandoned. In 
this emergency, Morris came forward and per- 
sonally supplied the means with which to extend 
the road as far as Williamsbridge in Westchester 
County, about seven miles, making use of the 
railway bridge built for wagon travel across the 
Harlem River at the head of Fourth avenue, 
that bridge being owned by Gouverneur Morris 
and his cousins Gerard W. Morris and William 



connection with the Boston & Albany Road at 
Chatham Four Corners in Columbia county, New 
York, one hundred and thirty miles from the 
city. The last fifty miles of the road from Dover 
Plains to Chatham Corners called the "Albany 
extension" were built in 1851-2 by Morris in 
partnership with George L. Schuyler and Sidney 
G. Miller as chief contractors. Seeing the im- 
portance to the Harlem Railroad of having a 
connection with deep water tide at its southern 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



83 



terminus, Morris undertook and completed in 
1850 the construction of the Port Morris branch 
road from a point near the Melrose station on 
the main line to a point on the East river oppo- 
site Flushing Bay, including the building of 
ample wharf accommodations for large vessels. 
This road was built upon Morris' own lands and 
with money supplied entirely by himself. He 
was one of the incorporators of the Illinois Cen- 
tral Railroad company and a director from the 
date of its incorporation to August 4, 1854. 

In 1850, with George Barker and others, 
Morris built the Vermont Valley Railroad, twen- 
ty-two miles long, from Brattleboro to Bellows 
Falls on the Connecticut river. He became a 
director in the company and subsequently was 
chosen president. His career as a railway pro- 
jector and builder ended when he retired from 
the presidency of the Vermont Valley Road about 
1879. Morris, in 1852, commenced to build the 
Treverton & Susquehanna Railroad in Pennsyl- 
vania. This road, sixteen miles long, including 
a very long bridge over the Susquehanna river, 
was a most difficult work, requiring much time 
and care in its execution. It was, however, very 
satisfactorily completed in 1855. Associated 
with George L. Schuyler, J. S. Stranahan, Josiah 
W. Baker, Charles G. Case, and Sidney G. Miller, 
Morris entered into contract with the Albany & 
Susquehanna Railroad Company in 1853, to build 
its road from Albany to Binghamton in Broome 
county on the Erie Railway, a distance of one 
hundred and forty miles. The work was com- 
menced soon after the contract was signed, and 
the grading was quite far advanced when, in 
1854, a difference of opinion arising between the 
company and the contractors, work was stopped, 
the contractors considering themselves justified 
in abandoning it. As early as 1839, Morris be- 
came persuaded that the progress of railways 
through the country could not be arrested by 
the timidity of persons unwilling to put their 
money in them, and to a number of gentlemen 
averse to subscribing for the completion of the 
New York & Albany road, he plainly stated 
this conviction. "Gentlemen," said he, "it makes 
no difference how dilatory you are in the matter, 



within thirty years there will be steam communi- 
cation from Boston pierhead to the Pacific." 
The less far-seeing among this group of gentle- 
men were inclined to treat the prediction as a 
flight of the imagination, but many of them lived 
to see the prophecy fulfilled, for, exactly thirty 
years and four months after it was made the last 
spike was driven in the Pacific Railway. 

In February 1842, Mr. Morris married his 
cousin, Miss Martha Jefferson Cary, of Virginia, 
and by her had ten children of whom five survive 
him. Mrs. Morris died in 1873, and in 1876, 
Mr. Morris married his cousin, Miss Anna Mor- 
ris. After his second marriage, he lived quietly 
at Pelham, where he died after a long illness, 
August 20, 1888, aged seventy-five years. 

The period of one hundred and thirty-eight 
years covered by the lives of the two men, father 
and son, was one of vast interest to the civilized 
world. It embraced the American revolution for 
independence, the revolution in France for liber- 
ty, the development of the far-reaching power 
of the press, the perfecting of the locomotive- 
engine which has opened up the immense re- 
sources of America, and the unfolding of the 
amazing power of the electric telegraph. With 
keen intelligence, the two Morrises, father and 
son, conceived and prophesied the development 
of their country, and each, in his generation, 
labored earnestly for its advancement. 

Mr. Morris was a man of powerful physi- 
que, had a robust and generous nature, and pos- 
sessed broad views regarding matters of public 
policy. He was somewhat negligent of his per- 
sonal appearance, but with commendable pride, 
he always signed his name "Gouverneur Morris 
of Morrisania."* 



FRANKLIN HAVEN was born May 30, 
1804. When the Merchants Bank of 
Boston was incorporated in 1831, Mr. 
Haven accepted the office of cashier. 
He was elected, 1836, its president, which office 
he continued to hold until Jan. 1884, having 

* "Gouverneur Morris," by Anne Cary Morris, 
Genealogical and Biographical Kecord, January, 1889. 



84 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



served the institution in the two capacities for 
over half a century. At the time of his resigna- 
tion, he was succeeded by his son Franklin 
Haven, Jr. He continued a director, however, 
until March 1885, when he resigned that position 
and was succeeded by Abbott Lawrence. 

In 1838, he was appointed pension agent 
for New England and held that office seventeen 
years. He was also appointed sub-treasurer at 



recognition of his services. Mr. Haven is a gen- 
tleman of striking features, tall and erect, of 
courtly bearing and possessed of great dignity 
of manner as well as kindly feeling, and is per- 
fectly upright in all his business relations. 
Among the people of New England and especial- 
ly among the bankers and merchants, none stand 
higher in the estimation of their fellowmen than 
he. 




A "CAMEL BACK." 



Boston in 1849 an ^ resigned in 1853, but at the 
request of President Pierce continued a year lon- 
ger. As chairman of the commission on public 
lands of the state in 1859, an d many years sub- 
sequent, he had much to do with the growth and 
development of the city of Boston over what is 
known as the Back Bay, now the most beautiful 
part of the city. He enjoyed the acquaintance 
and esteem of Daniel Webster, and after his 
death and that of his son Fletcher, became guar- 
dian of Fletcher's children. He was an incor- 
porator of the Illinois Central Railroad Company 
and a director from Feb. 10, 1851 to May 28, 
1862, and gave much of his valuable time to the 
affairs of the company. As he resided in Bos- 
ton, he was obliged to make a journey to New 
York each time he attended a board-meeting, 
which he did with frequency. When he retired 
from the directory, the board made a handsome 



JOSEPH W. ALSOP was for many years 
of the firm of Alsop and Chauncey of 
New York, formerly Alsop, Wetmore 
and Cryder, one of the greatest of New 
York's old mercantile houses. The Alsops trace 
back their ancestry to Richard Alsop, who was 
lord mayor of Dublin in 1597. Joseph W. Al- 
sop was descended from one of the oldest fami- 
lies in Connecticut, which had settled at Middle- 
town before the revolution, early in the eigh- 
teenth century ; Middletown being at that time 
a commercial seaport doing more business than 
New Haven and Hartford combined. 

Joseph W. Alsop was born in Middletown, 
November 22, 1804. He received a common- 
school education. At the age of fifteen, he en- 
tered the commission-house, of which his father 
was senior partner, as clerk. The house then 
commanded a large share of the West-Indian 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



85 



and South-American trade, and in the capacity 
of agent, Alsop made several voyages to Santa 
Cruz and other commercial ports. 

He came to New York in 1824, and soon 
thereafter began business in his own name. 
Branches of the house of Alsop and Company 
were established on the western coast of South 
America, where they are still conducted under 
the same firm-name and where they now, almost 
alone, maintain the repute of American com- 
merce in fields from which it has been driven by 
our own stupid legislation. In 1842, on the re- 
turn of Henry Chauncey at that time one of 
our first merchants from South America, the 
firm of Alsop and Chauncey was formed. The 
partnership continued until the death of Chaun- 
cey about fifteen years ago. Shortly before the 
discovery of gold in California, William H. As- 
pinwall, in connection with the old house of How- 
land and Aspinwall, started a line of steamships 
to run in connection with the Panama R. R. In 
both of these enterprises, the New York branch 
of Alsop and Chauncey took a prominent part. 
Aspinwall, upon whom the principal labor of 
establishing the railroad devolved, subsequent- 
ly said that had it not been for the sagacity, in- 
tegrity and capital of Alsop's firm, the road would 
not have been finished. Besides the firm of 
Howland and Aspinwall, John L. Stephens, 
Gouverneur Campbell, Joseph W. Riley, Edward 
Bartlett, and Samuel Comstock, were associated 
with Alsop in the Panama enterprise, several of 
whom were successively connected with the 
house of Alsop and Chauncey, and all of whom 
were familiar with the Southern coast and with 
the wants of commerce, and who understood 
the usefulness of this road to American trade. 

Mr. Alsop was the first president of the 
Ohio & Mississippi Railroad, and was receiver 
of it for ten years and retired in favor of Gen. 
George B. McClellan. He was one of the in- 
corporators of the Illinois Central Railroad Com- 
pany and a director from February 10, 1851 to 
May 27, 1863. He was a director of the Sea- 
men's Savings Bank and was its treasurer for 
many years, and was also director of the 
Woman's and St. Luke's hospitals. Mr. Alsop 



had not been actively engaged in business for 
about seven years at the time of his death, 1878, 
but had remained in the city during the winter 
and at the old homestead in Middletown during 
the summer. 

Mr. Alsop was always a warm friend to the 
deserving poor, and young men of principle and 
integrity who got into business embarrassment, 
he helped, often at great inconvenience to him- 
self. He always declined to accept any political 
office. He was an earnest friend to the demo- 
cratic party, but never permitted his political 
principles to influence or disturb his social rela- 
tions. He died at his residence, No. 32 West 
Washington Place, New York City, February 
26, 1878. He left a wife and one son, Dr. Joseph 
W. Alsop of Middletown, Connecticut. He was 
an exceedingly conscientious and upright man, 
and died as he had lived, deeply loved and re- 
spected. His remains were taken by special 
train to his native town for burial. The funeral 
services in New York were conducted by Dr. 
Eaton and Dr. John Cotton Smith, and at 
Middletown, Bishop Williams officiated. Thus 
passed away one of the greatest of New York's 
old merchants. 




APT. DAVID AUGUSTUS NEAL, 
the first vice-president of the Illinois 
Central Railroad Company, was one 
of the incorporators of the company 
and a member of the board of directors from 
February 10, 1851 to March 19, 1856. He was 
born at Salem, Mass., in June 1793 ; his life was 
an exceedingly eventful one. He received a 
thorough elementary education and left school 
early. At the age of twenty-two, he made his 
first voyage to Calcutta as super-cargo in the 
brig Alexander, a small craft of two hundred and 
fifty tons burthen, owned by himself and his 
father. In 1817 he made a voyage to Batavia, 
a city of Java the capital of the Dutch posses- 
sions in the East Indies, in command of the 
same vessel. This voyage he always said was 



86 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



without doubt the first voyage ever navigated 
on tee-total principles. As he had come to the 
command of his vessel, as the phrase is "through 
the cabin window," that is to say through the cir- 
cumstance of part ownership and without the 
rough discipline, delay, and experience of the 
lower grades of service, his crew at once began 
to presume upon this fact and to test his quality. 
When a few days out, the men sent back, by one 
of their number, the usual allowance of grog 
which had been served, stating that if they could 



Halifax, in July 1814, he sailed in a transport, 
one of a fleet convoyed by the Goliath, Capt. 
Maitland, for Dartmoor prison in England. 
While in the fogs of the Grand Banks of New 
Foimdland, he took part in an attempt to get pos- 
session of the transport, was severely wounded 
and had his hand dressed by Surgeon Barry 
O'Meara of the Goliath, who, soon after, joined 
C'apt. Maitland on the Bellcrophon, going with 
him to St. Helena in charge of the captured 
Bonaparte. Surgeon O'Meara afterward wrote 




ILLINOIS CENTRAL LOCOMOTIVE No. 383. 



not have more, they would not have any. The 
young captain took them at their word, directed 
the ship's steward to "cut off the tap," and navi- 
gated his brig without further trouble. His com- 
ment was, "the rum came home safe and so did 
the men." 

During the war with Great Britain in 1812, 
he embarked in privateering and met with con- 
siderable success. In May 1814, he was cap- 
tured and taken to Halifax, where he spent his 
freedom birthday in a Britis* prison. From 



a famous memoir of the Emperor. Capt. Neal 
carried with him the evidence of this attempted 
escape until his dying day. He was released 
from Dartmoor by the treaty of peace of 1815. 
Later, he was a shipmaster in the merchant ser- 
vice and commanded ships until the summer of 
1826, making several voyages to the Mediterra- 
nean, the East and West Indies, South America ; 
and incidentally visiting a great deal of the in- 
teresting scenery and a great many of the his- 
torical spots in Europe and Asia. He was an 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



87 



observant traveller and gained much valuable 
knowledge in his trips abroad. These were sin- 
gularly free from disaster with the exception of 
one trip to Sumatra, undertaken in 1818, where 
his crew fell sick and some died. Failing to 
ship fresh hands there, he made the best of his 
way around the Cape of Good Hope to the is- 
land of Saint Helena in hopes of a supply of 
provisions, medicines, and able bodied men. But 
here Napoleon was a prisoner, and access to the 
harbor was so jealously guarded that he suc- 
ceeded in obtaining nothing but supplies for his 
depleted medicine-chest. He returned from 
this place with his vessel in charge of himself, 
one old sailor, and two chinamen, they being 
the only able bodied seamen on board. In this 
miserable condition, he at last, reached the coast 
of Virginia in the tempestuous January of 1820 
with his remnant of a crew on short allowance 
and here he suffered total shipwreck in sight of 
the lights of Cape Hatteras. The shore, being 
white with snow, had misled them as to distance. 
Capt. Neal made his way to Norfolk and Balti- 
more, where having settled the disastrous voy- 
age with his owners, he took passage for Phila- 
delphia, early in March, in a government mail- 
wagon. 

On retiring from the sea, he became a com- 
mercial partner in the house of Neal and Sons, 
which was founded by his father, an old revolu- 
tionary veteran, privateersman, and prisoner of 
war, and finally became head of that house on 
the retirement of Capt. Neal, Sr. He became 
president of the Eastern Railroad of Massachu- 
setts in 1841, when it was extending its lines 
from Massachusetts into New Hampshire and 
Maine, and subsequently took charge also of 
the Reading Railroad of Pennsylvania, the affairs 
of which were much disordered and which was 
then in control of Eastern bankers. Both of 
these positions he resigned in 1851 to become 
vice-president of the Illinois Central Railroad 
Company, of which he was one of the original 
incorporators and in which he held a large pe- 
cuniary interest. He remained in that position 
four years. He was director for five years until 
1856. In 1851, he visited Illinois and went over 



the proposed route with Col. Roswell B. Mason, 
was very favorably impressed with the country, 
and made a very elaborate report to the board 
of directors on the value . of lands and on the 
resources and probable amount of traffic that 
would be controlled by the line when completed. 
He also paid considerable attention to the organi- 
zation of the land department and to the platting 
and selling of the lands which had been donated 
to the company. During the period of the con- 
struction of the road, he made two trips to Eu- 
rope, spending a considerable portion of his time 
in Liverpool, where he purchased about 80,000 
tons of iron rails of a most excellent quality 56 
pounds to the yard.* In London, he took part 
in the negotiation of the first issue of sterling 
bonds made by the company. They were sold 
at a premium. 

Capt. Neal was a man of robust nature, of 
indomitable energy and of great physical endur- 
ance. In his religious views, he was perhaps 
inclined to be somewhat heterodox, or, even 
skeptical ; he was brought up in the midst of 
tendencies and influences which may have been 
intensified by his early acquaintance with orien- 
tal life and thought, of which in his autobiogra- 
phy, left in manuscript, he writes most under- 
standing!)'. Capt. Neal never held political 
office of any kind. He died at Salem, Massachu- 
setts, in August 1861. 




ILLIAM H. ASPINWALL, one of 
the incorporators of the company, 
was born in New York, December 
16, 1807; he was a nephew of Gard- 
ner G. Howland, and, at an early age, he entered 
the old shipping house of Gardner G. and 

* The receiving and forwarding of these rails was 
entrusted to a commission-house established in New 
York in 1852, under the firm name of Clark & Jesup, 
being composed of Charles G. Clark and Morris K. 
Jesup. This was the inception of the present firm of 
Crerar, Adams & Co. (John McGregor Adams, Edward 
S. Shepherd), extensive manufacturers of railway 
supplies, Chicago, whose senior partner, John Crerar, 
recently died, leaving such a munificent sum to the 
city for a public library, and other liberal bequests. 



88 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



Samuel S. Howland, and was taken into the firm 
in 1832. In 1837 the new firm of Howland and 
Aspinwall was established. This house had the 
largest Pacific-coast trade of any firm in New 
York, besides doing an extensive business with 
the East and West Indies, England, and the 
Mediterranean. Shortly after the discovery of 
gold in California, he retired from the active 
management of the firm and secured the contract 
for a line of mail-steamers to run from the Isth- 



enterprises, Mr. Aspinwall was eminently suc- 
cessful and he held the office of president of 
the company for many years. He founded the 
city of Aspinwall, at the eastern terminus of the 
railway. Besides his brief connection with the 
Illinois Central Railroad, Mr. Aspinwall was in- 
terested in the construction of the Ohio & Mis- 
sissippi R. R., extending from Cincinnati to St. 
Louis. This was built as a broad-gauge road, 
but afterward changed to the standard gauge. 




ILLINOIS CENTRAL LOCOMOTIVE No. 638. 



mus of Panama to San Francisco, Cal. This 
line was established under the name of the Pa- 
cific-Mail Steamship Company. He and his 
associates also organized the Panama Railroad 
Company, and constructed its road. In aid of 
its construction they received a liberal conces- 
sion from the government of New Granada. 
Owing to the unhealthy climate of the country 
through which the line passed, the construction 
proved an expensive work, but after many diffi- 
culties the road was completed and opened for 
business February 17, 1855. In both of these 



Mr. Aspinwall traveled much in the last twenty 
years of his life, and being a liberal patron of the 
fine arts, made an important collection of paint- 
ings. These were sold by his family in 1886. 
Mr. Aspinwall was a man of fine presence, a 
courteous gentleman, an earnest Christian, and 
justly ranked as one of New York's great mer- 
chant-princes ; he was remarkable for his gen- 
erosity and his lenience to the debtors of his 
house. He died in his native city, January 18, 
1875, in the sixty-eighth year of his age. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



89 




k HOMAS WILLIAM LUDLOW, a son 
of Thomas Lucllow and Mary Ludlow, 
was born in his father's house, on the 
northeast corner of Garden street (now 
Exchange Place) and Broadway, New York, on 
June 14, 1795. He was a great-grand-son of the 
founder of the New York family of Ludlow, 
Gabriel (arrived in New York, 1694), who came 
of the old English stock to which belonged the 
republican general. Sir Edmund Ludlow, and the 
great Puritan statesman and jurist, Roger Lud- 
low of Massachusetts and Connecticut. Thomas 
W. Ludlow graduated with credit from Columbia 
College in the class of 1811, and served as a trus- 
tee of his alma mater from 1833 to 1836. After 
graduating he read law with Martin Wilkins. 
In 1825 he went to England with his cousin, 
Frances Mary Ludlow, wife of Philip Thomas 
and mother of Ludlow Thomas, in connection 
with her claim to the Harison succession, then in 
the English courts, and was successful. How- 
ever, he soon withdrew from general practice of 
his profession. His brother-in-law, Gulian Lud- 
low, recommended him, toward the close of his 
active life, to his family connections of the great 
banking-house of Crommelin of Amsterdam, and 
to his English correspondents as well, and for 
many years Mr. T. W. Ludlow had charge of 
their important commission business in America, 
and conducted it so much to their satisfaction 
that, upon his retirement, the Crommelins sent 
him a large sum of money, with which he pro- 
cured, as a souvenir, a splendid service of plate. 
For the account of the Dutch house, Mr. Ludlow 
had much to do with a loan of the District 
of Columbia, an affair of considerable importance 
at that time. He represented also the Holland 
Land Company, and was at one time instrumental 
in saving the interests of his clients, which were . 
menaced by an adverse sentiment in congress. 

From early manhood, Mr. Ludlow's mental 
grasp of the prospects and promises of the 
country, which was then almost wholly unde- 
veloped, was remarkably comprehensive, and 
with bis immediate associates, many of them at 
that time or since distinguished in the fields of 
public or of private affairs, he took an active 



part in the inception of a number of business 
enterprises which have continued to be highly 
prosperous, and have several of them contributed 
not a little to the national progress. Thus he 
became one of the incorporators of the Illinois 
Central Railroad Company, February 10, 1851, 
and was a director of that company from Feb. 
10, 1851, to August 25, 1854. He was the first 
president of the Panama Railroad Company ; 
a director of the New York Life Insurance Co. ; 
and one of the founders of the New York Life 
Insurance and Trust Company. Of the last 
corporation, Mr. Ludlow served as vice-president 
up to the time of his death. This corporation 
has been managed so well that the shares ori- 
ginally issued at $100 now sell for $700. 

Mr. Ludlow married, in 1828, Frances 
Wickham Morris, a beautiful and accomplished 
daughter of Robert Morris of Fordham (Mor- 
risania), and established a charming home in 
the then fashionable quarter of the Fifth ward 
of the city, at the southeast corner of Varick and 
Laight streets, Hudson Square, opposite St. 
John's Park, which is now the site of the freight 
station of the New York Central Railroad. Soon 
afterward he acquired a large tract of property 
south of Yonkers, adjoining the new station of 
the Hudson River Road which bears his name, 
Ludlow. 

Mr. Ludlow died at his country-seat, 
Cottage Lawn, Yonkers, New York, July 17, 
1878, leaving behind him the memory of a 
thoroughly just, upright, liberal, and temperate 
life. 




ENRY GRINNELL was born in New 
Bedford, Massachusetts, in 1800, was 
graduated at New Bedford Academy 
in 1818, and during the same year 
became clerk in a commission house in Pine St., 
New York. In 1825 he was made a member of 
the firm of Fish and Grinnell, afterward Grinnell, 
Minturn and Company. He was much interested 
in geography, and especially in Arctic explo- 
ration, and in 1850 at his own expense, fitted. out 



90 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



an expedition to search for Sir John Franklin, 
from whom nothing had been heard in five years. 
The expedition sailed from New York in May 
1850, under command of Lieut. E. J. DeHaven, 
with Dr. Elisha Kent Kane (whose second 
cousin, Elias Kent Kane, was a senator from 
Illinois) as surgeon and naturalist. It dis- 
covered land in latitude 75 2^ 2i x \ which was 
named Grinnell Land an island north of Corn- 



graphical Society in 1852-3, and a vice president 
from 1854-72. His daughter, Sylvia, married 
Admiral Ruxton of the British navy, and in 1886, 
presented to that society a crayon portrait of 
her father framed in wood taken from the 
Resolute. Mr. Grinnell was also one of the 
merchant princes of New York and died in that 
city, June 30, 1874, universally loved and re- 
spected. 




Illinois Central bridge over the Missouri River between Council Bluffs and Om,aha. Double track 17 ft. above 
high water 1707 ft. long span 520 ft., the longest in the world. 



wallis Island which should not be confounded 
with the better known Grinnell Land bordering 
on the frozen sea. In 1853, in conjunction with 
George Peabody, he spent $50,000 in the equip- 
ment of the second Franklin search expedition, 
.giving it also his personal supervision. This 
expedition was placed in charge of Dr. Kane, 
and the government bore part of its expenses. 
Mr. Grinnell also contributed freely to the Hayes 
expedition of 1860, and to the "Polaris" expe- 
dition of 1871. He was one of the original in- 
corporators of the Illinois Central Railroad Co., 
and named in the charter; but, as he was about 
retiring from active business at the time the 
company was being organized, his connection 
with it was brief. Throughout life, he was 
an earnest advocate of the interests of sailors. 
He was the first president of the American Geo- 



JOHN MOORE was an Englishman by 
birth, having been born at Grantham, 
Lincolnshire, September 8th, 1793. Up 
to his fourteenth year, he attended the 
common school and all his subsequent education 
was obtained without a teacher. He often 
studied while at his work at his trade as a wheel- 
wright, to which he was apprenticed at an early 
age. In 1817 he sailed for America. He settled 
first in Virginia but remained there but a short 
time, when he removed to Harrison, Hamilton 
County, Ohio ; here he worked at his trade ; 
March 9, 1820, he married a Kentucky lady, a 
Mrs. Misner. They had a family of eight chil- 
dren. In October 1830 he moved to McLean 
County, 111., and settled on a farm at Randolph 
Grove. There he entered forty acres of land and 
afterward purchased considerable more land, and 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



91 



did some farming. He also worked at his trade ; 
and here he endured the privations to which all 
the early settlers were subjected. In 1831 he was 
elected a justice of the peace, this being the first 
office he held. In 1835 he was elected to the 
legislature, which then held its. sessions at 
Vandalia. In 1839 he was elected to the senate 
of the State and in 1840 he was elected lieutenant 
governor; this office he held up to 1846. At the 
close of his term, at the outbreak of the Mexican 
War, he enlisted as a private in the 4th Regi- 
ment of Illinois Volunteers, which he had been 
active in forming, and was almost immediately 
chosen lieutenant colonel ; he bravely and honor- 
ably served during that war and participated in 
several engagements Cerro Gordo, Rio Grande, 
and Vera Cruz. When he returned from the 
Mexican War, the State of Illinois presented him 
with a sword to show its appreciation of his 
distinguished services. In 1848 he was appointed 
state treasurer by Governor French, to fill the 
vacancy caused by the death of Milton Carpenter. 
At the expiration of the term in 1850, he was 
elected to hold the same office and was reelected 
in 1852. In 1854 he was again a candidate, but 
was defeated on account of an absurd prejudice 
which sprang up at that time against foreigners. 
In 1853 Mr. Moore was appointed by Governor 
Matteson to settle the difficulty between the 
State of Illinois and the firm of Thompson & 
Foreman, growing out of a contract by which that 
firm was to deliver to the State of Illinois a cer- 
tain amount of railroad iron. This difficulty was 
arranged by Mr. Moore to the entire satisfaction 
of all parties. He was appointed one of the 
trustees of the Illinois Central Railroad Company 
in 1851, and held that position up to the time of 
his death in 1866. 

Mr. Moore was nearly six feet in height 
and heavily built ; his shoulders were broad, and 
his carriage erect and his complexion ruddy. His 
health was remarkably good, and this doubtless 
contributed to his cheerful, happy disposition. 
He was a man of great natural force of character 
and an honest man, and was familiarly known 
throughout the State as " Honest John Moore." 
The State of Illinois never had a more faithful 



guardian of her interests. His power of memory 
and of conversation was wonderful. He was a 
fine presiding officer and the chair of the senate 
has never been filled by a more accomplished 
parliamentarian. His death, which occurred at 
Boston, September 23, 1866, was the result' of a 
surgical operation performed upon his eyes for 
cataract. His remains were interred in the old 
burying ground at Randolph Grove.* 



JUDGE SAMUEL DRAKE LOCKWOOD 
was born at Poundridge, Westchester 
county, New York, August 2, 1789; 
when quite young, his father died, leav- 
ing his mother with three small children and 
with but slender means of support; by this 
event, Samuel's plans for a liberal education 
were broken up and he was thrown upon his own 
resources. At twelve years of age, he spent 
a few months at a private school in New Jersey, 
where he says of himself, "I acquired some 
knowledge of arithmetic and enough of Latin 
to be able to decline a few nouns and conjugate 
a few verbs." Lessons in arithmetic were given 
orally and written out by the pupils. In 1803 he 
went to live with his mother's brother, Francis 
Drake, a lawyer of Waterford, New York, where 
he remained as a law student until February 
1811, when he was licensed to practise law and 
opened an office in Batavia, New York. It may 
be said of Judge Lockwood as was said of John 
Quincy Adams, that he never had a boyhood. 
In early years, he met the stern realities of life 
which left no time for boyish or manly sports 
and, as a consequence, he had no relish for such 
things. But he was preeminently a home man, 
in full sympathy with everything that would 
increase the happiness of home, and bring en- 
joyment to the family circle. The first four 
years of his professional life was a hard struggle 
with disease and pecuniary embarrassment. In 

* "Good Old Times in McLean County, Illinois," 
by Dr. E. Dnis, Bloomington, 1874, 



92 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



a new country, he found the legal profession 
well filled and in it some men of reputation and 
experience able to absorb all the business. 

On March 12, 1813, however, he was ap- 
pointed master in chancery by Gov. Tompkins, 
a circumstance which, as he wrote at the time, 
enabled him, with his. other practice, to support 
himself decently and to pay the debts he had con- 
tracted before he got into business. This period 
included the war time, when everything was 



for Illinois, reaching Shawneetown, December 
20. He made the journey in company with 
William H. Brown and others on a flat-boat down 
the Alleghany and Ohio rivers. From Shaw- 
neetown, Lockwood and Brown made the trip 
to Kaskaskia, a distance of 120 miles, on foot 
and arrived December 26 ; entire strangers to the 
country. On their way, they were met by two 
young men bound for the same place. These 
were Thomas Mather and Sidney Breese, both 




ILLINOIS CENTRAL LOCOMOTIVE "1156." 



depressed to the lowest point. Judge Lockwood 
naturally diffident and retiring, feeble in physical 
constitution, with a tendency to self-depreciation, 
and far separated from all family friends, must 
have passed through many trials, and his final 
success is an evidence of that sterling worth of 
character with which in after life he was univer- 
sally credited. From a letter to his mother, 
written in May 1815, we learn that he remained 
in Batavia about a year, then removed to Auburn 
in that year and practiced law with George B. 
Throop until the fall of 1818, when he started 



from New York. Judge Lockwood remained 
in Kaskaskia a year, and then removed to Carmi, 
spending a year there. In 1821, at the second 
session of the legislature held at Vandalia, he 
was elected attorney general. This election to 
office necessitated his removal to Edwardsville. 
In 1822 Governor Coles appointed him secretary 
of state, but in the same year, President Monroe 
appointed him receiver of public moneys at 
Edwardsville and he accepted the latter position. 
In 1823 he was appointed an agent of the board 
of canal commissioners. In 1824 he was elected 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



93 



associate justice of the supreme court, and in 
1824-5, assisted in a revision of the criminal code 
of the state which, with a few amendments, 
has continued in force ever since. He remained 
on the bench until the adoption of the new state 
constitution in 1848. Judge Lock wood was 
therefore a resident of Illinois from 1818 to 1874, 
and for over fifty years was in public service, 
holding during that period, under state and 
national appointment, the following positions 
of trust and responsibility, attorney general, 
secretary of state, receiver of public moneys in 
the Edwardsville land-office, associate justice of 
the supreme court. He was state trustee of the 
I. C. Railroad from the organization of that 
company until his death in 1874, and was charter 
trustee in each of the state institutions estab- 
lished for the benefit of the insane, deaf and 
dumb, and blind. 

This brief outline indicates something of 
Judge Lockwood's standing in the state, some- 
thing of the esteem with which he was regarded 
by his fellow-citizens, and something of the in- 
fluence he must have exerted in that period of 
our State history, when a few of our good and 
wise men were laying the foundations of those 
civil, social, and educational institutions, which 
have secured for us our present prosperity and 
are a standing proof of the wisdom and fidelity 
of the great men into whose labor we have 
entered. 




,OSWELL B. MASON, chief engineer 
of the Illinois Central from 1851 to 
to 1856, was born in New Hartford, 
Oneida county, New York, Septem- 
ber 19, 1805, and died in Chicago, January i, 
1892. He was reared on a farm and attended 
the district schools until the age of sixteen. In 
the summer of 1821 our subject's father took a 
contract to furnish stone for a section of the 



Erie Canal, and the boy was set to work hauling 
stone. It was here he met Edward F. Gay, 
assistant engineer of the canal, who offered him 
ii position of rodman for the engineering party, 
and he remained with Gay until the completion 
of the Erie Canal. In the spring of 1824 he 
joined the engineering party that was engaged 
in the construction of the Schuylkill Canal, but 
on account of sickness was compelled to return 
home in August of that year. In the spring of 
1825 he joined his old employers on the Morris 
Canal in New Jersey. Here Mr. Gay resigned 
his position as assistant chief engineer, and our 
subject was given his place. He was engaged 
on this work for six years, the latter part of the 
time as chief engineer and superintendent of the 
canal. He was engaged on various canals in 
New Jersey and the east until the spring of 
1837, when he became interested in the surveys 
of the Housatonic railroad, one of the largest 
of the early railroads. During the follow- 
ing fourteen years he served as engineer and 
superintendent of the railroad, making his head- 
quarters at Bridgeport, Conn. 

In the spring of 1851 he came west and took 
charge of the construction of the Illinois Central 
railroad, which he completed in October 1856. 
He then resigned his position as chief engineer 
and was engaged in the construction of other 
roads in Iowa, Illinois and Minnesota until the 
spring of 1861, when he was appointed comptrol- 
ler of the land department of the Illinois Central 
Railroad and retained this position until August 
1867. He then took charge of the Dubuque 
bridge which was completed in December 1868. 
In November 1869, he was elected mayor of 
Chicago and it was during his administration 
that the great Chicago fire occurred. In 1873 
he was appointed one of the trustees of the Illi- 
nois Industrial University and held that position 
ten years. He was an important factor in the 
early growth and development of our present 
svstem of railroads. 



CHAPTER III. 



PRESIDENTS OF THE 
ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY. 



PRESIDENTS OF THE 
ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY. 



Robert Schuyler ................................................... March 19, 1851 to July 11, 18S3. 

William P. Burrall, ................................................ July 28, 1853 to Nov. 23, 1854. 

John N. A. Griswold ............................................... Jan. 10, 1855 to Dec. 1, 1855. 

Wm. Henry Osborn ............................................... Dec. 1, 1855 to July 11, 1865. 

John M. Douglas .................................................. July 11, 1865 to March 14, 1871. 

John Newell, ..................................................... April 14, 1871 to Sept. 11, 1874. 

Wilson G. Hunt ................................................... Sept. 11, 1874 to Jan. 28, 1875. 

John M. Douglas, . . . .............................................. Jan. 28, 1875 to July 17, 1876. 

Wm. K. Ackerman, ............................................... Oct. 17, 1877 to Aug. 18, 1883. 

James C. Clarke, ................................................. Aug. 18, 1883 to May 18, 1887. 

Stuyvesant Fish, .................................................. May 18, 1887. 




( OBERT SCHUYLER, first president of 
the Illinois Central Railroad Company, 
was a grandson of General Philip 
Schuyler of revolutionary fame; he 
served from March 19, 1851, to July 3, 1854. He 
became interested in Illinois railways through 
the purchase of the finished portion, 24 miles, of 
the Northern Cross Railroad from Jacksonville 
to Meredosia, the first railroad constructed in 
the State. It was sold at public sale, April 26, 
1847, ar >d purchased by Nicholas H. Ridgely of 
Springfield, who soon after, through the nego- 
tiations of Thomas Mather of the same city, sold 
it to a construction company organized in New 
York in which Schuyler was interested. Its 
name was changed to the "Sangamon & Morgan 
Railroad" and it was rebuilt, work being com- 
pleted July 22, 1849. 

The record of Robert Schuyler in his con- 
nection with American railways is an interesting, 
but a sad one, to dwell upon. He was a pioneer 
in American railway construction and justly 
deserved the title of the first railroad king. He 
was at one time the president of five railways, 
viz. the New York & New Haven, the Harlem, 



the Illinois Central, the Rensalaer & Saratoga, 
and the Sangamon & Morgan, and these various 
positions he held up to a certain period with great 
credit to himself. He was a man of unusual 
business ability, aided by a sound judgment and 
a liberal education. In his devotion to duty, he 
was no less remarkable ; though broken in health, 
he was frequently found laboring in his private 
rooms until an early hour in the morning in a 
conscientious effort to serve the best interests 
of his share-holders. His versatility of mind 
enabled him to accomplish great results in a 
short space of time. He was a man of keen 
perceptions, clear and comprehensive views, and 
these constituted him a wise counsellor. His 
unaffected dignity, courteous bearing, and refined 
manner, commanded the respect of all who knew 
him, and these included many eminent persons 
of his day. Such qualities lent a peculiar charm 
to his office and station, and gave him the 
presence of an American gentleman. There was 
a provision in the charter of one of the railroad 
companies with which he was connected that 
required its completion within a certain time 
under a penalty of forfiture. In an effort to 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



complete it within the specified time, as was 
supposed, he in an evil moment of his mistaken 
ztal, resorted to very questionable measures, 
which in the end proved his down-fall. In addi- 
tion to holding the office of president of the New 
York & New Haven Railroad Company, he was 
the transfer agent of that company. At that 
time, the share certificates of railways were not 
countet signed as they now are; consequently 
there was nothing to prevent irregularities. 
Transfer agents had it in their power at that time 



ture of the State of New York, familiarly known 
as the "Schuyler Act," making the over-issue 
of capital stock in that state a felony ; for up 
to this time there was no statute covering such 
a breach of trust. A final examination of the 
books of the New Haven company and a return 
of all certificates showed that there had been an 
over-issue of the stock of that company amount- 
ing to about $2,000,000. The discovery was 
made by mere accident. Schuyler was taken ill 
on June 29, 1854, and remained away from his 




COURTESY A. H. RALPH, VICKSBURG, MISS. 



"The Freight Conductor En Route." 



to over-issue the shares of a railway, and it 
was done in this instance. The first irregular 
issue was made in Oct. 1853, and others followed 
until the irregularity was discovered, July 3, 1854. 
This occurrence resulted in the action that was 
afterward taken by the New York stock ex- 
change, requiring that all certificates be signed 
by two officers of a company, and registered 
and countersigned by a third disinterested par- 
ty, which must be a banking or trust company. 
This has proved a wholesome check upon similar 
dishonest transactions. It also resulted in the 
passage of a special law, in 1855, by the legisla- 



office until July 3rd; the vice-president, Mr. 
Worthen, being called in to act as transfer agent, 
the fraud was discovered by the presentation of 
some of the spurious certificates issued by Schuy- 
ler. The case, which was brought by the holders 
of these irregular certificates, many of whom 
claimed to be innocent holders, was continued in 
the courts for ten years, but finally resulted in a 
decision in the New York court of appeals, in 
1864, against the railroad company, which com- 
pelled it to reimburse every holder the value of 
his shares. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



Schuyler, in his pride and ambition to suc- 
ceed, and lacking the moral courage to acknowl- 
edge his needs and mistakes, fell into the fatal 
blunder which brought ruin to his reputation, 
sorrow to his friends, disgrace to his family- 
name, and disaster for the time being to the 
financial world. Flattered by apparent success 
deficient in caution failing properly to 
measure his resources and withal, lacking the 
principle with which he had been credited, he 
dissipated large sums of money in an attempt 
to resuscitate failing properties. In an effort 
to retrieve himself, he committed this terrible 
wrong. However questionable his procedure, 
or reprehensible his conduct may appear to the 
minds of those unfamiliar with all the circum- 
stances of the case, a careful investigation into 
his conduct shows that he was at least in part 
actuated by unselfish motives. It does not appear 
that he took advantage of his position merely 
to enrich himself. The trust imposed in him was 
unlimited, and the burden laid upon him very 
great ; but there is a limit to human accomplish- 
ment, and there ought to be a limit to the 
responsibility laid upon human intellect. If 
there is not, those who impose excessive burdens 
in hopes of obtaining impossible results, should 
at least be willing to share in the responsibility, 
and to accept the outcome with resignation. In 
this instance, the zeal to promote the interest 
of one corporation tempted him to draw tem- 
porarily, as he no doubt regarded it upon the 
resources of another. The redeeming feature 
of the case laid in the fact that, when the trans- 
action was laid open, he did not attempt to 
palliate his offence and meet his accusers with 
brazen effrontery. His sense of personal honor 
was so shocked, and his mortification so great, 
that he could not face his friends, and hence 
his flight to a strange land, to find relief in death. 
He fled the country from Quebec in a stray 
vessel : had he been a polished villain instead of 
a blunderer, he might have covered his tracks. 
But he had not studied the art of fraud, and so 
he put a very honest construction upon his own 
dishonesty. He attempted too much for his day, 
and failed. Many have gone further since and 



succeeded, as the world counts success. But 
his was not a day of "trusts," when transactions 
quite as dishonest, and involving many more 
millions, can be so deftly hidden as to defy dis- 
covery. The world might indeed say that 
his sin partially lay in the fact of his being found 
out. The subtleties of finance had defeated him, 
because in his blindness he could not see his peril 
ir time to be warned ; and so, in the meridian 
of an otherwise bright and extraordinary career, 
his light went out. A life was extinguished 
that could not well be spared at that juncture 
from the railway world. He died in a foreign 
land, poor and friendless ; the concealed worm 
had fed upon him, until he was wrecked mentally 
and physically, and he became the mere shadow 
of his former self. 




ILLIAM PORTER BURRALL was 
the second president of the Illinois 
Central Railroad Company, having 
succeeded Mr. Schuyler under whom 
he had acted as vice-president. He was born 
in Canaan, Conn., September 18, 1806; died at 
Hartford, Conn., March 3, 1874. His father, 
William Morgan Burrall, was a lawyer by pro- 
fession, a graduate of Yale, a prominent member 
of the bar of Litchfield county, Conn., an associate 
judge of the county court from 1829-36, and 
after that, chief judge for ten years. His an- 
cestors were among the original settlers of the 
town of Canaan, and his mother, Elizabeth 
Morgan, was a member of the well known 
Hartford family of that name. William P. 
I'.urrall's mother was Abigail Porter Stoddard, 
a descendant of the Porter and Stoddard families 
of Salisbury, Conn., both of them prominent 
in the early history of the town and state. 

Mr. Burrall was graduated at Yale College 
in 1826, among his classmates being President 
Sturtevant and Elizur Wright; he studied law 
at the Litchfield law-school ; also in the office of 
the late Chief Justice Church, where he was 
associated as a law student with O. S. Seymour, 



loo 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



late chief Justice, and was admitted to the bar 
of Litchfield county in 1829. He practiced law 
in his native town until October 1839, when he 
removed to Bridgeport, Conn., to accept the 
presidency of the Housatonic Railroad, which 
position he held for fifteen years. This railroad 
had just become an accomplished fact by the 
exertions of Alfred Bishop, a gentleman of great 
energy and personal power, father of Hon. W. 
D. Bishop. Mr. Burrall was called from its 



views were broad and generous. He favored no 
mean or stingy policies. He held in just esti- 
mate the rights and responsibilities of railroad 
companies, believing that the true secret of suc- 
cess in railroad management is found in fair and 
courteous treatment of the traveling and trading 
public. He desired the best, safest, and quickest 
accommodation for all patrons of his roads. He 
withheld no proper information from his stock- 
holders. He kept his promises and asked of 




FHOTO LOANED BY MRS. C. K DIXON, CHEROKEE, IOWA. 



CENTRIFUGAL SNOW PLOW OWNED BY THE ILLINOIS CENTRAL R'Y Co. 



management to the Illinois Central Railroad 
Company as treasurer, and became president. 
He was afterward connected with the New York 
& New Haven Company as vice-president, then 
with the Hartford & New Haven as vice-president 
and president, and finally was made vice-pres- 
ident of the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
at the consolidation of the companies. He was 
several times a member of the house of repre- 
sentatives and also filled the position of state 
senator. 

In his business relations, Mr. Burrall was 
a man of singular honesty and accuracy. His 



those with whom he came in contact that they 
should keep theirs. He was faithful to every 
trust reposed in him. As a draughtsman of 
railroad contracts, he had no superior in the 
country. There was no ambiguity in the lan- 
guage he employed ; every sentence was so clearly- 
expressed as to leave no room for doubt as to 
its meaning. 

As a citizen, he favored honesty and truth 
in all public matters. The stain of corruption 
never was upon his hands in his extensive deal- 
ings with legislatures, courts, and commissions. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



101 



In the sphere of private life, Mr. Burrall's 
course was usually charming. Courteous, un- 
obtrusive, pure, gentle, tender-hearted as a child, 
he kept a "peaceful tenor" in all his dealings 
with his associates. He was benevolent, but 
his benevolence was unostentatious. He was 
courageous, but his courage was always tempered 
with consideration for others. His word was 
as sacred as if sealed as a covenant. 

Into the privacy of domestic grief we may 
not enter, but we may say that Mr. Burrall's 
large family found in his affectionate heart a 
faithful response in all the tenderest relations 
of life, and that his sudden death sundered many 
sacred cords. Such a life as his was an honor 
and a blessing to our common nature, and the 
cpmmunity in which he lived mourned his loss 
with no common grief. One of his daughters 
is the wife of Henry H. Anderson, a prominent 
lawyer in the city of New York. 

The revelation of the Schuyler incident 
shocked the confidence of the financial world 
and placed under suspicion every enterprise with 
which he had been connected. The unfortunate 
affair happened at a critical time in the history 
of the Illinois Central Railroad Company. On 
the day following the disaster, Mr. W. H. Osborn 
was called to the council of the board of directors 
and he was afterward (Aug. n, 1854), elected 
a member. On Dec. i, 1855, he was elected 
president of the company. He entered with 
remarkable energy upon the work of restoring 
confidence to this great enterprise. A resume 
of his services to the company and incidentally 
to the State, is given below. 




JOHN N. A. GRISWOLD, third president 
of the Illinois Central Railroad Com- 
pany, served the corporation in that ca- 
pacity from January 10, 1855 to Decem- 
ber i, 1855. 



ILLIAM HENRY OSBORN, was 
born in Salem, Mass., Dec. 21, 1820, 
and received a high school educa- 
tion in that venerable New England 
town. Shortly after leaving school, he entered 
the counting room of the old East India house 
of Peele, Hubbe 1 ! and Company, founded by 
J. Willard Peele, engaged in the East India 
trade. After remaining there a while, he was 
sent to Manilla, (under the auspices of Stephen 
C. Phillips who was a member of the house), 
to represent the business at that place. He re- 
sided there several years, and afterward became 
the head of the firm and engaged in business 
on his own account. He traveled extensively 
in Europe and on his return to the United States 
in 1853, took up his residence in the city of 
New York, where he shortly after married the 
daughter of that most estimable man and up- 
right merchant, Jonathan Sturges, the senior 
member of the firm of Sturges, Bennett and Co., 
at that time one of the largest mercantile houses 
in the city of New York. Mr. Sturges was one 
of the incorporators of the Illinois Central Rail- 
road Company, and had unbounded faith in the 
future development of the State of Illinois. He, 
in company with other men of large means and 
reputation, had entered with great energy upon 
the work of constructing the Illinois Central 
Road upon a sound financial basis. The high 
character of the men engaged in the work of 
reviving a scheme that was destined to prove 
of such great advantage to the State, inspired 
confidence both at home and abroad. But the 
undertaking proved to be a more formidable one 
than even the minds of those sagacious men 
had calculated upon. 

In 1854 while the work of construction was 
well under way, it became apparent that much 
larger expenditures would be required than had 
been estimated, and to carry it through to a 
successful completion more vigorous measures 
must be adopted. Up to the end of 1854, only 
300 miles of the whole 704 miles to be built were 
completed and these in detached portions, so 
that they were operated at great disadvantage 
and cost, and the entire amount of net earnings 



102 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



derived from their operation for the last half 
of the year was, as appears by one of the early 
reports of the company, only $149,744.16. While 
the road was earning so little, the interest ac- 
count on the bonded debt, already incurred, was 
rolling up so heavily as to threaten to engulf the 
whole enterprise. To add to the "paucity of 
events," the crops of Illinois in this year, 1854, 
were almost a total failure, checking the sale of 
lands which had been donated to the company, 



earnestly demanded. It was therefore necessary 
at this critical juncture, to find immediately some 
one who could go to the scene of active operations 
in Illinois and personally superintend the closing 
up of the gaps between the unfinished portions of 
the line, as economically and as expeditiouslv 
as possible, so that it could be placed in a tho- 
roughly equipped condition to earn money for 
the shareholders. At that time, the demand for 
men of such capacity was beginning to be felt 




COURTESY JOHN H. WILSON. 

ILLINOIS CENTRAL DEPOT AT FREEPORT, ILL. 



as well as diminishing the amount of collections 
for those already sold. To add to the compli- 
cation of affairs, the "Schuyler fraud" over- 
issue of the stock of the New York & New 
Haven Railroad Company was made public July 
3. 1854, and completely unsettled business affairs, 
making it almost impossible to negotiate railway 
securities, however good. The directory, though 
composed of men of such high standing in the 
community, were all residents -of the Eastern 
States, and they could not give that close per- 
sonal attention to the affairs of the company 
which its peculiar condition at that time so 



all over the country, but in no instance was it 
more urgent than in the case of the Illinois 
Central Railroad Company. In this dark hour 
for those who had ventured so largely and with 
such sanguine expectations upon this first land- 
grant project, (and which threatened for a 
while to prove even more disastrous than had 
other successive attempts that had been made 
to construct a road through the center of the 
State), Mr. Osborn was called to the command, 
and took up for a time his residence in Chicago. 
It was a herculean task imposed upon him and 
one which would have daunted almost any other 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



103 



man. The people of the State of Illinois have 
never known what a debt of gratitude they owe 
to Mr. Osborn for his successful effort in sav- 
ing the road to the State. It is perhaps no 
exaggeration to say, that if it had not been for 
the extraordinary exertions made by him at that 
time, the road would not have been brought to 
a successful completion, certainly not within the 
time it was, for, if foreclosure proceedings had 
been instituted then, it is extremely doubtful 
whether any new corporation which might have 
been formed would have been willing to accept 
the onerous conditions imposed by the original 
charter; and so in this way the essential ad- 
vantage in the matter of tax on gross earnings 
would have been lost to the State. 

Even after the ordeal of 1854 had been safe- 
ly passed and the company's financial condition 
greatly improved by the successful negotiation 
by Mr. Osborn of a temporary loan of three mil- 
lions of dollars, new and unlooked for difficulties 
arose. The income of the road had scarcely be- 
come sufficient to pay its running expenses, for 
the country along its line had not sufficiently 
developed to yield an adequate traffic for its sup- 
port when the panic of October 1857, with all 
its disastrous accompaniments, swept over the 
country. Mr. Osborn had sailed for Europe, a 
month previous. The financial skies were com- 
paratively clear when he left, but on Oct. 9th, all 
the banks in New York, with the exception of 
the Chemical Bank, and most of those through- 
out the country, suspended specie payment. The 
wheels of commerce became clogged, and dis- 
trust everywhere so prevailed that it was impos- 
sible to negotiate a sterling bill at any rate of ex- 
change. At this time, Mr. Osborn was in Lon- 
don in conference with English bankers with a 
view of placing the finances of the company on a 
more substantial footing. This he would have 
undoubtedly succeeded in accomplishing at once, 
but for the circumstances referred to. The sud- 
denly changed condition of affairs compelled his 
immediate return to this country. The Atlantic 
cable was not in operation at that time, and on 
his arrival at Sandy Hook, he was startled to 



read in the New York papers an announcement 
by the treasurer of the company in these words : 

"OFFICE ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD Co., 
NEW YORK, October 9th, 1857. 

"The Directors of THE ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAIL- 
ROAD COMPANY are under the painful necessity of 
announcing that, notwithstanding the most strenuous 
exertions to avert such a result, the company is forced 
to suspend payment. 

"The existing derangement in the financial affairs 
of the country surprised the company with a large 
floating debt incurred for the completion and equip- 
ment of the road. To provide for its payment when 
the usual credits became unavailable, an assessment of 
ten dollars per share was promptly made, and upon 
this side of the Atlantic, largely paid in advance, 
enabling the company to meet its engagements in 
September. The installments upon the stock held 
abroad, have been in rapid progress of payment, but 
the negotiation of the bills of exchange drawn against 
them, difficult at first, has at length become impos- 
sible. 

"All other and usual modes of raising money are 
'well known to be entirely unavailable. It would be in 
*: vain at this time to call in another installment on the 
stock; "fcs the same difficulties which prevent the realiz- 
ing of the proceeds of the one already called, in season 
to meet the accruing obligations of the company, 
would attach to any other immediate assessment. 

"The directors have therefore yielded to the stern 
necessity of the case reluctantly, but with a clear con- 
viction that the true interests of both creditors and 
stockholders would be promoted by the legal steps 
which, under the advice of able counsel, have been 
taken to secure their respective rights. 

"The coupons due on the construction bonds, 
October 1, have been paid to a large extent, and a 
provision has been made to receive the balance out- 
standing in payment of unpaid installments, if desired 
by the holder. No serious inconvenience will probably 
result therefrom. 

"All possible exertions will be used to pay off 
every liability without unnecessary delay; and to re- 
lieve the company from its present embarrassment. 

"As this has not risen from any difficulties intrinsic 
in the enterprise, but from the extraordinary condition 
of the money market, the directors see therein no cause 
to abate the confidence they have heretofore felt and 
expressed in the value of the road and the lands of the 

company. 

By order of the Board, 

J. N. PERKINS, Treasurer." 



104 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



The coupons falling due on the large bonded 
debt then outstanding, were being presented by 
anxious holders, and, to satisfy these and to 
prevent further complication, Mr. Osborn upon 
his personal responsibility for the credit of the 
company was entirely exhausted negotiated 
loans to a large extent from banks and indi- 
viduals, and with the proceeds paid the coupons 
and held them until the company was able to 
redeem them. He then provided a plan for the 
re-establishment of the company's credit by the 
issue of a new loan of about $5,000,000. From 



came connected with the Illinois Central Rail- 
road Company in 1854, it had a bonded debt of 
nearly $20,000,000, and a floating debt in addi- 
tion of $2,500,000, as shown by the annual re- 
port of that year, and the future of the enter- 
prise was an unsolved problem. When he retired 
from active participation in its affairs in 1877, 
its bonded debt was $10,508,000, the road was 
and had long been paying regular dividends, and 
it had a large amount of assets on hand available 
for any contingency. During the frequent visits 
of Mr. Osborn on the other side, he had occasion 




PHOTOGRAPH BY A. W. ADAM6. WATERLOO, IOWA. 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL LOCOMOTIVE No. 223. 



the proceeds all the outstanding, floating in- 
debtedness of the company was paid in full, prin- 
cipal and interest, the assignees discharged, and 
the business of the company placed once more 
in the hands of its officers. 

The restoration of the company to full credit 
had a very favorable effect upon all American 
securities abroad, and made the Illinois Central 
Railroad the most prominent American corpora- 
tion in the eyes of English capitalists, and, 
increasing public confidence in it, materially 
strengthened other companies of a similar kind. 
It was the turning point in the affairs of the com- 
pany, and from that time on,. it enjoyed an un- 
broken era of prosperity. When Mr. Osborn be- 



to consult with the large shareholders of the com- 
pany, and in this way, he formed the acquaintance 
of many prominent English bankers and states- 
men. Among these was Richard Cobden, who 
had first visited Illinois in 1855, and passed over 
a portion of the proposed line and who, when 
he saw the beautiful prairie and examined its 
fertile soil, became an enthusiast as to the pro- 
spective value of the property ; so much so, that 
he invested nearly all his money in it. Morley, 
in his life of Cobden, refers to a visit made by 
Mr. Osborn to the great premier in 1858, whom 
he found in a perturbed state of mind regarding 
his holding of Illinois Central shares, and whom 
he aided with his friendly counsel. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



105 



In 1858, the troubles of the previous year 
were aggravated by another failure of the crops. 
This bore heavily upon the new settlers on the 
company's lands, most of whom had made only 
their first payment. The result was that many 
of them became so impoverished in their re- 
sources that they were almost objects of charity. 
Not a few were entirely destitute of the neces- 
saries of life. Private contributions of tea, 
coffee, sugar and provisions were made by the 
directors of the company and sent to various 
points on the line to relieve cases of actual suffer- 
ing. From 1861 on, owing to the great develop- 
ment of the resources of the country and the 
consequent rapid settlement of the company's 
lands, regular dividends were paid on its shares. 
Mr. Osborn occupied the position of president 
of the company from December i, 1855 to July 
u, 1865, and was a director from August 
n, 1854 to May 30, 1877, so that he practically 
continued in the management of the company's 
affairs for twenty-two years, a management that 
was characterized by prudence and conservatism 
remarkable skill and executive ability, firm and 
unceasing devotion to the interests of the com- 
pany, indomitable will and courage, and, above 
all, strict integrity of purpose. 



JOHN M. DOUGLAS served as the fifth 
president and again as the eighth presi- 
dent of the Illinois Central. Mr. Doug- 
las was born at Plattsburg, Clinton coun- 
ty. New York, August 22, 1819. His maternal 
grandfather, Elijah Weaver, was a second lieu- 
tenant in the revoluntionary war, and his father, 
Congdon Douglas, served in the war of 1812 
and fought at the battle of Plattsburg. At the 
age of seventeen, John M. Douglas entered the 
law-office of Sweatland and Beckwith, at Platts- 
burg, and read law for three years. He then 
came west and settled in Galena, Illinois. He 
was admitted to the bar in 1841 and opened a 
law-office in that city. His first employment by 



the company was to secure right of way through 
Galena, where he was in practice with R. H. 
McClellan. In 1856, he came to Chicago, and, 
in 1857, was appointed one of the solicitors of the 
Illinois Central road, David Stuart being the 
other. It never had a more faithful servant 
than he. Cautious and conservative in tempera- 
ment, many were the breakers avoided by his 
wise counsel. Litigation pregnant with danger, 
he made it a rule to settle ; but where he believed 
the law and the evidence to be on his client's 
side, or where he believed there was a principle 
worth contending for, he would contest, general- 
ly with success, a case to the end. Knotty prob- 
lems, such as frequently encompass the opera- 
tions of a railway, he studied out with untiring 
zeal. 

Mr. Douglas was a director of the company 
from May 29, 1861, to May 22, 1872, and from 
January 15, 1875, to July 17, 1876. On July 
n, 1865, he was elected president of the com- 
pany and served until March 14, 1871. He con- 
tinued in the service as general-solicitor and, on 
January 28, 1875, was again elected president, 
serving until July 17, 1876, when he retired per- 
manently from the service. His presidential 
terms covered important periods in the history 
of the road, and, in the course of his manage- 
ment, he encountered many difficult problems in 
dealing with which he displayed sterling quali- 
ties of mind, and in the solution of which he 
was eminently successful. 

In 1881, he was appointed by Judge Thomas 
Drummond, receiver of the Ohio & Mississippi 
Railway Company, the affairs of which he 
managed with scrupulous fidelity to the owners 
of the property. Mr. Douglas died March 26, 
1891. He married Amanda Marshall, of Platts- 
burg, New York, and left three children, Helen. 
Anna and John Marshall. He was a democrat 
in politics but never took a very active part in 
political life. He made it a rule of his official 
life never to write a letter concerning any im- 
portant matter of business, which he could bet- 
ter explain in person, apparently following the 
advice of Sidney Smith, "that it was better to 
walk six miles than to write six lines." Diffi- 



106 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



dent and retiring in disposition and exceeding- 
ly reticent in manner, he was often misunder- 
stood. The labors of the best part of his life 
were with singular devotion given to the interests 
of the Illinois Central Railway Company and it 
is pleasant to know that they were appreciated.- 



that the supreme court of the state declared it 
unconstitutional. But, in the mean time, it in- 
flicted untold hardships upon the railways of the 
state, and, owing to its peculiar geographical 
position, none suffered worse than the Illinois 
Central Railroad. On more than one occasion, 




COURTESY MRS. C, K. DIXON, CHEROKEE, IOWA. 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL STATION FT. DODGE, IOWA. 



'OHN NEWELL, sixth president of the 
Illinois Central was elected April 14, 
1871. As far back as 1855, Mr. Newell 
was division engineer on the main line. 
His knowledge of engineering and his experience 
in that profession served him well when he re- 
turned to the service of the company. During 
his presidency, he encountered a larger propor- 
tion of trials than ordinarily fall to the lot of the 
railway manager. They might be summed up 
chiefly in three words grangerism, fire and 
panic. 

In 1871, the legislature enacted the first 
granger law, which proved so odious in its terms 



lawless mobs undertook to dictate how the trains 
should be run on the road. If there is any one 
thing that the average railway manager especial- 
ly rebels against, it is to have outsiders interfere 
with the running of his trains. The good sense 
of the people soon prevailed, and another law, 
not so objectional in its provisions, was passed 
two years after. 

The great Chicago fire, of October 8th and 
Qth, 1871,- destroyed a very large amount of the 
company's property, including its freight houses 
with all the valuable goods stored in them ; also, 
one of the large grain-elevators with its con- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



107 



tents,* and the commodious passenger depot. 
These severe losses almost paralyzed for the time 
being the business of the road. As entrance to 
the company's grounds in Chicago was complete- 
ly obstructed, it was impossible to receive or 
forward freight. The company's money loss by 
the fire was about $300,000. This, fortunately, 
was largely covered by insurance in a reliable 
company the Liverpool and London and Globe 
of London which promptly paid its obligation 
in full. 

In 1873 a financial panic swept over the 
country with all its concomitant evils, rendering 
successful administration of railroad affairs a 
matter of no ordinary difficulty. The business 
of the country was greatly unsettled and prices 
of produce fell to a very low point. Corn sold 
on the board of trade, Chicago, in June of that 
year, as low as 27 cents, and, owing to the diver- 
sion of grain carrying vessels to the ore trade 
then quite active, it was difficult to make charters. 
The consequence was that the company's eleva- 
tors were soon filled and the movement of this 
class of traffic in the direction of Chicago was al- 
most suspended. The company was compelled 
to pay exorbitant lake and canal rates in order 
to relieve their elevators ; and, in some instances, 
as high as 33 cents per bushel was paid on wheat 
to New York vessel owners naturally taking 
advantage of the situation. 

Mr. Newell, during all these and other vari- 
ous trials, proved himself equal to every emer- 
gency ; and the affairs of the company during 
his connection with its management, April 14, 
1871 to September n, 1874, were administered 
with fidelity and on his part with an unflinching 
adherence to what he believed to be for the best 

* The other elevator was saved through a fortunate 
circumstance. There happened to be loaded on a flat- 
car in the freight yard a steam fire-engine, which had 
been ordered from an eastern manufacturer for Beloit, 
Wisconsin. The man in charge of it volunteered to 
assist in unloading it and putting it in position for 
service, and, by taking suction from the lake, a well 
directed stream was applied to the huge building just 
as the flames began to lick up the belting inside the 
door. The engine, which had done such valuable ser- 
vice, was purchased by Messrs. J. and E. Buckingham, 
the lessees of the elevators. 



interests of the shareholders. In 1883 Mr. 
Newell was elected president of the Lake Shore 
& Michigan Southern Railway and continued 
as such until his death in 1894. 






ILSON G. HUNT served as the 
seventh president of the Illinois 
Central Railway from September 
11, 1874, to January 28, 1875. 





M. K. ACKERMAN ninth presi- 
dent of the Illinois Central Rail- 
way. (See biography and portrait 
in part two.) 



JAMES C. CLARKE tenth president of the 
Illinois Central Railway was born in 
Montgomery county, Maryland, March 
4, 1824. Like several other Illinois Cen- 
tral workers among whom may be mentioned 
John H. Done, Samuel J. Hayes, John C. Jacobs 
and Charles C. Berry he commenced his rail- 
way life on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad ; he 
entered its service in 1844, and was first engaged 
in the road department and then entered the ma- 
chinery department as a fireman ; after the usual 
term of service as such, he was appointed a loco- 
motive engineer. During this term of ser- 
vice, he ran the old engine "Arabian," which 
was on exhibition in Chicago in 1883 and which 
i;; now used as a switch engine in the yard of 
Mt. Clare shops, Baltimore. In 1855 at the 
instance of Mr. John H. Done, who had been 
master of transportation on the Baltimore & 



108 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



Ohio Railroad and was called to a similar posi- 
tion on the Illinois Central Railroad Mr. 
Clarke accepted the position 08 division super- 
intendent of the main line with headquarters at 
Amboy, Illinois. 

Matters were then in a demoralized condi- 
tion on that division and insubordination existed 
among the men. Mr. Clarke, coming among 
them a stranger, did not meet with a very hos- 



ment of his future course. It did not take them 
long to find out who "that fellow Clarke" was, 
for, on the succeeding day, on the occasion of the 
first revolt, every man in the .shops was dis- 
charged and the shops were closed to await the 
arrival of fresh men. 

One year afterward, he was appointed 
general superintendent, and, upon the death of 
Mr. Done which sad event occurred through 




ILLINOIS CENTRAL STATION AT CHEROKEE, IOWA. 



pitable reception. He tells an amusing story of 
conversation had in his hearing between some 
of the men, around the big stove in the depot hotel 
on the night of his arrival, about "that fellow 
Clarke" who, they had heard, was coming over to 
Amboy to straighten things out. As he had not 
registered his correct name on the hotel book, he 
enjoyed not only the conversation with its boasts 
and threats, but, by joining in it, he was enabled 
to obtain some valuable points for the govern- 



an accident at Hyde Park he was elected to 
succeed the latter as master of transportation. 
He remained in the service at that time for three 
years 1856-1859, and then resigned to accept 
a position as general superintendent on the 
Northern Central Railroad, where he remained 
three years 1859-1862. 

While in charge of the road in the early 
part of the war, the task of conducting Presi- 
dent Lincoln in safety from Harrisburg to Wash- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



109 



ington, prior to his first inauguration, devolved 
upon him. A few years before, Mr. Lincoln had 
been one of the attorneys of the Illinois Central 
company. This was during Mr. Clarke's early 
connection with the road ; and, upon this memor- 
able trip, their former pleasant acquaintance was 
renewed. Shortly afterward, Mr. Clarke retired 
to his farm near Frederick, Maryland, where he 
was alternately visited by portions of the federal 
and confederate armies, and was occasionally 
asked to drink to the success of each side, a con- 
dition of things that rendered farming in that 
locality a somewhat dubious occupation. 

After the close of the war, he engaged in the 
iron business at the Ashland furnaces in 1862- 
1870. He was then elected president of the 
Chesapeake & Ohio Canal Company, and, for 
the first time in sixteen years, he made this canal 
self-sustaining and paid off in two years more 
than $600,000 of its preference debts from its 
net earnings. He remained in charge .of this 
property for two years 1870 to 1872. Mr. 
Clarke was then elected vice-president and 
general manager of the Erie Railway Company, 
while that road was still suffering from the evil 
effects of the Fisk management. Here he proved 
himself faithful among the faithless ; his savings 
at the spigots were numerous and effective but 
were sadly offset by waste at the bungs. 

Mr. Clarke was familiar with the use and 
purposes of the locomotive engine and all ligiti- 
mate railroad machinery, but the operations of 
a small printing press quite baffled him. One 
day, there was submitted to him a mysterious 
voucher for $50,000 for his approval. All the 
explanation vouchsafed for the proposed pay- 
ment was that it was "for legal services;" Mr. 
Clarke shortly after signed his name, not to the 
aforesaid voucher, but to a letter pf resignation, 
after a service of two years 1872 to 1874. 

In 1874 he returned to the Illinois Central 
service as general manager 1874 to 1877 



and took a very active part in the reorganization 
and reconstruction of the roads which had been 
acquired south of Cairo and which have been 
hereinbefore referred to in detail. He became 
vice-president and general manager 1877 to 

1883 and president 1883 to 1888 of these 

dependent lines successively. He was also 
vice-president of the Illinois Central Railroad 
Company, and in August 1883, became presi- 
dent. This position he held until May i8th, 
1887. He resigned as director, December 21, 
1887. 

Mr. Clarke's record as a railroad manager 
would fill a respectable sized volume of itself. 
He is a man of indomitable energy, unswerving 
integrity, and is possessed of great versatility. 
His power of adaptation to adverse circumstances 
and conditions is something remarkable. He has 
a wonderful capacity for dealing with men, and 
his tact and discretion in this particular have 
saved many thousands of dollars to the com- 
panies he has served. 

It has been said that on the occasion of a 
strike on one of his roads, a "grievance commit- 
tee" of locomotive engineers, who visited him, 
were put in such good humor that they forgot 
what they came for. Having been a Knight 
of the Footboard himself, he knew how to sym- 
pathize with this class, and he could enter into 
their feelings and grant all reasonable requests; 
but, at the same time, he could, in his clever way, 
point a lesson when he believed they were wrong. 



TUYVESANT FISH, the eleventh and 
present president of the Illinois Cen- 
tral Railroad Company was elected 
May 1 8, 1887. (For biography and 
portrait see part two.) 




110 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



DIRECTORS OF THE 
ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY, 

WITH DATE OF THEIR ELECTION. 
1851-1890. 



Jonathan Sturges, 


February 10, 1851. 


George Griswold, - 


February 10, 1851. 


Gouverneur Morris, - - 


February 10, 1851. 


David A. Neal, 


February 10, 1851. 


John F. A. San ford, - - 


February 10, 1851. 


Franklin Haven, - - - 


February 10, 1851. 


Leroy M. Wiley, - - - 


February 10, 1851. 


Robert Rantoul, Jr. - 


February 10, 1851. 


Henry Grinnell, - - - - 


February 10, 1851. 


Thomas W. Ludlow, - 


February 10, 1851. 


Joseph W. Alsop, - 


February 10, 1851. 


Gov. Augustus C. French, 


February 10, 1851. 


Robert Schuyler, 


February 10, 1851. 



The foregoing, with the governor of Illi- 
nois, constituted the first board of directors; the 
following named were afterward elected : 



Morris Ketchum, 
William P. Bun-all, - 
Gov. Joel A. Matteson, - 
J. Newton Perkins, - - 
Wiliam H. Osborn, 
Frederick C. Gebhard, - 
J. N. A. Griswold, 
James F. Joy, - - - - 
Thomas E. Walker, - - 
Ebenezer Lane, - - - 
Gov. William H. Bissell, 
Abram S. Hewitt, 
Pierre Chouteau. Jr., 
Gustavus W. Smith, 
William Tracy, - - - 
Gov. Richard Yates, 
Nathaniel P. Banks, - - 
John M. Douglas, - - 
James C. Fargo, - - 
William R. Arthur, - 
H. H. Hunnewell, - - 
Edwin H. Sheldon, 
James Caird, - - - - 



April 15, 1851. 

- March 16, 1853. 

- January I, 1852. 
August II, 1854. 
August 11, 1854. 
October 24, 1854. 

December 5, 1854. 

March 21, 1854. 

- November 7, 1855. 

December 6, 1855. 

January I, 1856. 

March 19, 1856. 

March 18, 1857. 

December 12, 1857. 

- April 12, 1859. 

- January I, 1860. 
September 6, 1860. 

May 29, 1861. 
May 28, 1862. 

May 28, 1862. 
May 28, 1862. 

May 28, 1862. 
May 27, 1863. 



Cunningham Borthwick, 
Gov. Richard J. Oglesby, 
Henry Chauncey, - - 
Wilson G. Hunt, 
Ambrose E. Burnside, 
R. Daniel Wolterbeek, 
Gov. John M. Palmer, - 
George Bliss, - - - . 
J. Pierpont Morgan, 
Louis A. Von Hoffman, 
John Newell, - - - 
Lucien Tilton, 
William H. Gebhard, 
William K. Ackerman, 
Gov. John L. Beveridge, 
L. V. F. Randolph, 
Abram R. Van Nest, - 
Frederick Sturges, - 
Constantine Menelas, - 
Gov. Shelby M. Cullom, 
A. G. Dulman, 
Stuyvesant Fish, - - 
Benjamin F. Ayer, - - 
James C. Clarke, 
John Elliott, 
W. Bayard Cutting, - - 
Sidney Webster, 
Gov. John M. Hamilton, 
Edward H. Harriman, - 
Gov. Richard J. Oglesby, 
Walther Luttgen, 
Robert Goelet, 
S. Van Rensalaer Cruger 
William Waldorf Astor, 
Oliver Harriman, 
Levi P. Morton. - - - 
John W. Auchincloss, 
Gov. Joseph W. Fifer, 
J. C. Welling, 
Charles M. Da Costa, 
George Bliss, 



May 27, 1863. 

January I, 1864. 

May 25, 1864. 

June 14, 1864. 

- May 31, 1865. 

December 13, 1865. 

- January I, 1868. 

May 27, 1868. 

May 31, 1871. 

May 31, 1871. 

May 31, 1871. 

May 31, 1871. 

May 31, 1871. 

May 29, 1872. 

- January I, 1873. 
January 28, 1873. 

- January 26, 1875. 
October 26, 1875. 

December 15, 1875. 

- January I, 1876. 

- March 16, 1877. 

- March 16, 1877. 

April 25, 1877. 

May 30, 1877. 

- - May 30, 1877. 

- - May 28, 1879. 

April 19, 1882. 

February 6, 1883. 

- - May 30, 1883. 
2d term, Jan. I, 1884. 

March 12, 1884. 

March 12, 1884. 

, March 12, 1884. 

- March n, 1885. 

March 10, 1886. 

March 10, 1886. 

May 3, 1888. 

January I, 1889. 

- March 9, 1889. 
March 13, 1889. 
March 13, 1889. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



Ill 



In 1889 the fiscal year was changed to corre- 
spond with that of the national government. A 
report of six months business was reported and 
the election changed from March to September. 
Since that time the following have been elected, 
their term of office expiring as given below : 

Expiring 1890. Oliver Harriman, George 
Bliss, John Elliott 

Expiring 1891. Stuyvesant Fish, Edward 
H. Harriman, William Waldorf Astor. 

Expiring 1892. S. Van Rensalaer Cruger, 
Charles A. Peabody, Jr., Norman Ream, Gov. 
Joseph W. Fifer. 

Expiring 1893. Benjamin F. Ayer, Wal- 
ther Luttgen, John W. Auchincloss. 

Expiring 1894. Oliver Harriman, John W. 
Doane, Charles M. Beach. 

Expiring 1895. Stuyvesant Fish, Edward 
H. Harriman, John Jacob Astor. 



Expiring 1896. S. Van Rensalaer Cruger, 
Charles A. Peabody, John C. Welling, Gov. John 
P. Altgeld. 

Expiring 1897. Benjamin F. Ayer, Wal- 
ther Luttgen, John W. Auchincloss. 

Expiring 1898. Oliver Harriman, John W, 
Doane, Charles M. Beach. 

Expiring 1899. Stuyvesant Fish, Edward 
H. Harriman, John Jacob Astor. 

Expiring 1900. Charles A. Peabody, Jr., 
John C. Welling, W. Morton Grinnell, Gov. John 
R. Tanner. 

Expiring 1901. Benjamin F. Ayer, Wal- 
ther Luttgen, John W. Auchincloss. 

Expiring 1902. John W. Doane, Charles 
M. Beach, James D. W. Cutting. 

Expiring 1903. Stuyvesant Fish, Edward 
II. Harriman, John Jacob Astor. 




CHAPTER IV. 



MILEAGE AND EQUIPMENT OF THE ILLINOIS 
CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY. 



MILEAGE AND EQUIPMENT OF THE ILLINOIS CENTRAL 

RAILROAD COMPANY. 

From the original Road of 705.50 Miles it has Grown to its Present Magnificent Proportions of 

5,454.53 Miles. 



NORTHERN LINES. 

MILES. 

East Dubuque to Main Line Junction.. 340. 77 
Chicago to Cairo, Illinois 364.73 

South Chicago Branch. 

Parkside to South Chicago 4.63 

Blue Island Railroad. 
Kensington to Blue Island 3.96 

Mound City Railroad. 
Mound City Junction to Mound City. . . 2.87 

Kankakee & Southwestern. 

Otto to Normal Junction 79.43 

Kempton Junction to Kankakee June. . 41.80 
Buckingham to Tracy 10.00 

Gilman, Clinton & Springfield Railroad. 
Oilman to Springfield 111.47 

Rantoul Railroad. 

West Lebanon, Ind., to LeRoy, 111 74.40 

Chicago, Havana & Western Railroad. 

Havana to Champaign 100.58 

White Heath to Decatur 31.04 

Chicago, Madison & Northern Railroad. 

Freeport, 111., to Madison, Wis 61.59 

Cedarville June., 111., toDodgeville.Wis. 57.36 
Freeport to Clark Street, Chicago 112.14 

Chicago & Texas Railroad. 
Johnston City to East Cape Girardeau. 73.00 
Mobile Junction to Garrison Shaft 2.00 

St. Louis, Indianapolis & Eastern R. R. 
Switz City, Ind., to Effingham, 111 88.51 

St. Louis A. & T. H. Railroad. 

East St. Louis to Eldorado 121.00 

Belleville to East Carondelet 17.30 

Pinckneyville to Brooklyn 98.43 

Harrison to Murphysboro 2.31 

Belleville to East St. Louis 14.40 

St. Louis, Peoria & Northern Railway. 
Springfield to East St. Louis 97.59 

Total Northern Lines. . 1911.31 



WESTERN LINES. 

Dubuque & Sioux City Railroad. 

Dubuque to Sioux City 326.58 

Onawa, la., 'to Sioux Falls, S. D 153.23 

Cedar Rapids to Manchester 41.74 

Cedar Falls June, to Minnesota State 
Line 75.58 

Stacy ville Railroad. 

Lyle, Minn., to Stacyville 7.66 

Omaha Division. 

Tara to Council Bluffs. . . . . 131.02 



Total Western Lines. 



735.81 



SOUTHERN LINES. 

Chicago, St. Louis & New Orleans R. R. 

Cairo, 111., to Canton, Miss 341.03 

Canton to New Orleans 206.76 

Memphis Division. 

Grenada, Miss , to Memphis, Tenn 100.00 

Durant, Miss., to Kosciusco, Miss 17.20 

Louisville Division. 

Memphis, Tenn., to Louisville, Ky. ...398.12 
Owensboro, Ky., to Horse Branch, Ky. 42.16 
Evansville, Ind., to Hopkinsville, Ky.. 129.12 
Morganfield, Ky., to Uniontown, Ky.. 7.59 
DeKoven, Ky. , to Ohio River 2.00 

Hodgenville & Elizabethtown Railroad.. 11.10 

Troy & Tiptonville Railroad. 
Moffat to Troy, Tenn 4.60 

Canton, Aberdeen & Nashville Railroad. 
Aberdeen to Kosciusco, Miss 89.06 



Total Southern Lines. 



Total of all lines . 



1,348.74 
3,995.86 



116 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



SUMMARY. 

MILES. 

On June 30, 1900, there were in operation, 

Of first main track 3,995.86 

Of second and additional main tracks 248.17 



Total of main tracks 4,244.03 

Of passing and side tracks, including yard 
tracks 1,209.50 



Total tracks of all kinds 5,453.53 

This mileage is exclusive of the railroad 
owned and operated by the Yazoo & Mississippi 
Valley Railroad Company. 

YAZOO & MISSISSIPPI VALLEY RAILROAD COM- 
PANY. 

The following extract from the report of the 
President of the Board of Directors of the Y. & 
M. V. Railroad Company, for the year ending 
June 30, 1900, shows the mileage operated by 
that company: 

"The number of miles of railroad operated 
by the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley Railroad 
Company throughout the past year has been 
1,000.68." 

Statement of the number of miles of railroad 
operated by the I. C. Railroad Company 
and also the number of miles of railroad 
operated by the Y. & M. V. Railroad Com- 
pany, respectively, in various states on 
June 30, 1900. 



STATES. 


MILKS OF 1 


LAILROAD IN 
JUNK 30, 190( 


OPERATION 

. 




I. C. R. R. 
CO. 


Y. &M. V. 
R. R. CO. 


BOTH 
COMPANIES. 


Illinois 


1 769 47 




1 769 47 


South Dakota . 
Minnesota 
Iowa 


14.95 
11.40 
712 19 




14.95 
11.40 
712 19 


Wisconsin 
Indiana . . . 


91.31 
45 17 




91.31 
45 17 


Kentucky. . . . 


506 28 




506 28 


Tennessee 
Mississippi .... 
Louisiana 
Alabama 


252.38 
497.13 
87.74 
7 84 


13.11 

817.37 
170.20 


265.49 
1,314.50 

257.94 
7 84 










Total 


3 995 86 


1 000 68 


4 996 54 











On September 20, 1850, Congress made the 
first grant of public lands to aid in the construc- 
tion of a line of railroad. This grant to Illinois 
was subsequently transferred to the Illinois Cen- 
tral, which was chartered February 10, 1851, 
to run from LaSalle, the terminus of the Illinois 
and Michigan Canal, north to the Mississppi 
river, opposite Dubuque, la., and south to Cairo, 
with a branch to Chicago. There were 2,594,- 
1 1 5 acres included in this grant. 

The first engineering party was organized 
at Chicago, May 21, 1851, and began the survey 
of the Chicago division. ' The whole line was 
surveyed and located before the end of the year. 

The first contract for grading was made 
March 15, 1852, for that part of the line between 
Chicago and . Calumet, a distance of fourteen 
miles. It was completed May 24, 1852, to let 
the Michigan Central into the city, making con- 
nection between Chicago and Detroit. The con- 
tracts for grading divisions i, 2, 6, 8, 9, 10 were 
let in June 1852, while those for grading divi- 
sions 3, 4, 5, 7, n, 12 were let October 14, 1852. 

The following lines were opened for traffic 
at the times specified below : 



Chicago to Kensington 14 miles. 

Bloomington to Tonica 50 " . 

Kensington to Kankakee.... 42 " . . 

Tonica to Mendota 25 " . 

Freeport to Nora 20.75 " . 

Clinton to Bloomington 22 " . 

Kankakee to Ludlow 52 " . 

Ludlow to Champaign 21 " . 

Nora to Apple River 10 " . 

Decatur to Clinton 21.50 " . 

Apple River to Council Hill. 13 " . 

Cairo to Sandoval 118.50 " . 

Mendota to Amboy 16 " . 

Sandoval to Decatur 86.25 " . 

Freeport to Amboy 47.50 " . 

Council Hill to E. Dubuque. 25.22 " . 

Champaign to Mattoon 43.50 " . 

Mattoon to Main Line June. 77.28 " . 



May 

May 

July 

Nov. 

Jan. 

Mar. 

May 

July 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

June 

June 

Sept. 



24, 1852 
16, 1853 
11, 1853 
14, 1853 
6, 1854 

14, 1854 
13, 1854 

24, 1854 
11, 1854 
18, 1854 
28, 1854 
22, 1854 
27, 1854 

6, 1855 

15, 1855 
11, 1855 

25, 1855 
27, 1856 



The conservatism, which marked the early 
operations of the company, later gave way to 
very active progress. Large expenditures have 
been made in the construction and acquisition of 
lines, as well as for additional equipment and for 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



117 



other property. Among the more important 
works carried out we mention the following : 

The South Chicago Railroad (4.76 miles) 
was completed, affording a double track connec- 
tion with this important manufacturing town. 

The Chicago, Madison & Northern railroad 
was begun in 1886 and the first trains began 
running in August 1888. It was turned over to 
the Illinois Central January i, 1889. 



to acquire the line in Illinois. The Illinois Cen- 
tral railroad secured a clear title to this road in 
January 1887, and increased it from a narrow 
gauge to a standard gauge in 1888. 

In 1877 the Oilman, Clinton & Springfield 
railroad was organized under the name of the 
Chicago & Springfield railroad and leased to the 
Illinois Central for fifty years, operations be- 
ginning January i, 1878. 




PHOTO LOANED BY A. DILLON, CHEROKEE, |OW. 



A partial view of the Coon River trestle on the Omaha division,. 1500 ft. long and 65 ft. high, 

one of the largest in the world. 



The Chicago, Havana & Western railroad, 
130 miles in length, was acquired in 1887, under 
foreclosure proceedings. 

The Havana, Rantoul & Eastern railroad, 
West Lebanon, Indiana, to LeRoy, 111., (74.40 
miles long) was chartered October 10, 1873, and 
opened in 1881, being purchased in May of that 
year by the Wabash. Went into the hands of a 
receiver with the Wabash in May 29, 1884; de- 
faulted on interest June I, 1885, and sold under 
foreclosure in October 1886, being purchased 
by the Illinois Central and two new companies 
organized, the Lebanon & Western to acquire 
the road in Indiana and the Leroy and Eastern 



Between the years 1878 and 1883 the Kanka- 
kee & Southwestern railroad, 131.26 miles, was 
constructed and added. 

The Indiana & Illinois Southern railroad, 
extending from Switz City, Ind., to Effingham, 
Illinois, a distance of 88.51 miles, was acquired 
by the Illinois Central in 1899, under foreclosure 
sale and since January i, 190x3, has been operated 
by the Illinois Central as the Effingham district. 

April i, 1896, the Illinois Central leased 
the St. Louis, Alton & Terre Haute Railroad 
for 99 years from October i, 1895, and the 
Belleville & Southern Illinois Railroad, carrying 
leases of six small roads. 



118 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



The 13 miles of track constructed in 1885. 
by the Chicago, Burlington & Northern Railroad, 
on the company's right of way between East 
Dubuque and Portage curve under condem- 
nation proceedings, was purchased in 1888, and 
an arrangement made permitting the Chicago, 
Burlington & Northern Railroad to use it at a 
fixed rental. 

Control of the Dunleith an Dubuque bridge, 
the construction of which was begun in 1867 
and opened for business January i, 1869, was 
secured in 1888 by the purchase of all the stock 
of that company, and the Chicago, St. Paul 
& Kansas City Railroad and the Chicago, 
Burlington & Northern Railroad became par- 
ticipants in its use as joint tenants. 

The control of the Dubuque & Sioux City 
Railroad 143 miles and the Iowa Falls & 
Sioux City Railroad 183 miles was obtained 
through the purchase of the securities of those 
companies in 1887. 

Between the years 1881 and 1888, the Illi- 
nois Central built, or had built in its interests, 
in Iowa, the Cherokee & Dakota Railroad, ex- 
tending from Cherokee, Iowa, northwesterly to 
Sioux Falls, South Dakota, and from Cherokee, 
southwesterly to Onawa, a distance of 155.58 
miles. 

Also the Cedar Rapids & Chicago Railroad, 
extending from Manchester to Cedar Rapids, 
Iowa, a distance of 41.85 miles. 

In 1899 the Omaha division, extending 
from Tara, Iowa, to Council Bluffs, la., (131.02 
miles) was completed. 

The Cedar Falls & Minnesota Railroad was 
purchased at foreclosure sale June i, 1896. 

The Chicago, St. Louis & New Orleans 
Railroad was formed November 8, 1877, by the 
consolidation of the New Orleans, Jackson & 
Northern and Central Mississippi Railroads. 
The former road was chartered as the New 
Orleans, Jackson & Great Northern Railroad, 
April 22, 1852, and opened from New Orleans 
to Canton, Miss., (206 miles) in 1859. It was 
sold under foreclosure March 17, 1877, and re- 
organized as the New Orleans, Jackson & 
Northern, May 12, 1877. The Mississippi 



Central Railroad was chartered by the states of 
Mississippi and Tennessee in 1852, and was 
opened from Canton, Miss., to Jackson, Tenn., 
in 1860, and extended to the Ohio river opposite 
Cairo in 1873, making a line 343 miles long. It 
was sold under foreclosure August 23, 1877, 
and reorganized as the Central Mississippi 
River Railroad, November 5, 1877. June 13, 
1882, the Chicago, St. Louis & New Orleans 
Railroad was leased by the Illinois Central for 
400 years, and assumed control of the same Jan. 
i, 1883- 

On September 15, 1897, the owners of the 
Chesapeake, Ohio & Southwestern, Owensboro, 
Falls of Rough & Green River and the Short 
Route Terminal of Louisville, deeded the same 
to the Chicago, St. Louis & New Orleans Rail- 
road. Later they were simultaneously mort- 
gaged to the Illinois Central and leased for 99 
years from July I, 1897. 

The Ohio Valley Railroad was sold under 
foreclosure July 13, 1897, and bid in for the 
stockholders. On August i, 1897, the Illinois 
Central began to operate the road as "agents for 
the owners." 

The Chicago & Texas Railroad was secured 
and is operated under a 25 year lease from Octo- 
ber I, 1897. The extension from East Cape 
Girardeau to Gale, a distance of five miles, was 
completed June 30, 1898. 

The bridge across the Ohio river at Cairo 
was built to obviate the delays incident to the 
ferry transfer. 

In 1892 the Illinois Central secured control 
of the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley Railroad by 
purchasing all the securities for $5,000,000 cash 
and $20,000,000 in bonds. In October 1892 the 
Louisville, New Orleans & Texas Railroad and 
the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley Railroad were 
consolidated and since November i, 1892, have 
been operated by the Yazoo & Mississippi 
Valley Railroad. 

The Litchfield division, 97.59 miles in length, 
formerly owned by the St. Louis, Peoria & 
Northern Railway Co., was leased by the Illinois 
Central from December i, 1899. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



119 



On August I, 1900, the Illinois Central as- 
sumed control, by purchase, of the Peoria, 
Decatur & Evansville Railway, (254 miles). 



Statement showing the number of engines 
owned by the I. C. Railroad Company for 
the year ending June 30, 1900, and the 
years in which they were built: 

WHEN BUILT. NO. 

During years ending Dec. 31, 1854 to 1856 inclusive. 2 

" 31, 1867 to 1871 " 6 

" 31, 1872 to 1876 " 16 

" 31, 1877 to 1881 " 44 

year ended " 31,1882 24 

" 31, 1883 26 

" 31, 1884 26 

" 31, 1885 14 

" 31, 1886 42 

" 31, 1887 54 

" 31, 1888 63 

6 mos. ended June 30, 1889 8 

" year ended " 30,1890 43 

" 30, 1891 99 

" 30, 1892 52 

" 30, 1893 55 

" 30, 1894 52 

' 30, 1895 23 

" 30, 1896 45 

30, 1897 25 

30, 1898 21 

, " " " " 30, 1899 26 

! " 30, 1900 47 



Total 813 



Number and classification of cars for year end- 
ing June 30, 1900. 

PASSENGER CARS. 

Passenger and Chair Cars 388 

Smoking Cars 64 

Cafe Dining Cars 10 

Buffet Library Cars 8 

Baggage and Smoking Cars 21 

Mail and Express Cars 7 

Baggage and Express Cars 92 

Baggage, Mail and Express Cars 34 



Postal Cars 
Postal Cars (Joint) 

Pay Cars 

Business Cars 

Instruction Cars. . . 

Old Cars 

Test Car 



35 
3 
2 

10 
1 

20 
1 



FREIGHT CARS. 

Box Cars 16,873 

Coal Cars 10,671 

Stock Cars 1,179 

Fruit Cars 822 

Refrigerator Cars 1,078 

Flat Cars 1,816 

Caboose Cars 530 



Total. 



32,969 



WORK CARS. 

Pile Drivers 

Steam Shovels 

Derrick Cars 

Tool Cars 

Ballast and Construction Cars 

Hart Ditcher 

Scale Cars 

Snow Excavator 

Water Cars 

Dirt Levelers 

Shop Cars 



11 

9 

19 

33 

359 

1 

2 

1 

2 

2 

2 



Total. 



441 



Total of all Cars 34,106 



Statement of revenue freight cars, and their ca- 
pacity in tons, June 30, 1900. 



CLASS OF CARS. NUMBER. 

Box 16,873 

Stock 1,179 

Fruit 822 

Refrigerator 1,078 

Coal 10,671 

Flat 1,816 



CAPACITY 

460,611 
28,038 
17,019 
28,390 

309,382 
55,305 



Total 32,439 898,745 

Average per Car 27.7 



Statement of number, classification and tractive 
power of engines. 



Total. 



696 



CLASS OF ENGINES. 


Year ending June 30, 1900. 


NUMBER. 


TRACTIVE POWER 
IN TONS. 




119 
33 

180 
271 
170 
39 
1 


361,136 
73,535 
651,423 
919,018 
423,027 
178,161 
8,472 




10-wheel 




8-wheel 




12-wheel 


Total 


813 


2,614,772 
3,216 


Average per Engine. . . 



120 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



REVENUE PER MILE OPERATED. 

Statement, showing the receipts per mile operated, the Illinois Central system in comparison 
with that of all other railroads in the United States. 



YEARS ENDED 
JUNE 30. 


ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD. 


ALL THE RAILROADS IN THE 
UNITED STATES. 


AVERAGE NO. 
OF MILES 
OPERATED. 


GROSS RECEIPTS 
FROM OPERATION. 


GROSS RECEIPTS 
PER MILE 
OPERATED. 


NUMBER OF 
MILES 
OPERATED. 


GROSS RECEIPTS 
PER MILE 
OPERATED. 


1890 


2,875 
2,875 
2,883 
2,888 
2,888 
2,888 
3,067 
3,130 
3,775 
3,671 
3,845 


$16,452,022 
17,881,555 
19,291,760 
20,095,191 
20,657,464 
19,056,994 
22,002,842 
22,110,937 
27,317,820 
28,114,690 
32,611,967 


$5,722 

6,220 
6,692 
6,958 
7,153 
6,599 
7,174 
7,064 
7,237 
7,659 
8,482 


156,404 
161,275 
162,397 
169,780 
175,691 
177,746 
181,983 
183,284 
184,648 
187,535 


$6,725 

6,800 
7,213 
7,190 
6,109 
6,050 
6,320 
6,122 
6,755 
7,005 


1891 


1892 


1893 


1894 


1895 


1896 


1897 


1898 


1899 


*1900 





* The figures for all the roads for the year ended June 30, 1900, are not as yet obtainable, but in that year 
the gross receipts per mile of the Illinois Central Railroad showed a further increase of $823. 



CHARACTER AND WEIGHT OF RAILS USED BY 
THE ILLINOIS CENTRAL. 

All the main tracks and all of the side tracks, 
excepting 31.66 miles, are laid with steel rails 

The average weight of rails in the main 
tracks is 69.41 pounds per yard, or 109.08 tons 
to the mile of single track. 

Exclusive of the rails in 1,209,50 miles of 
side tracks, the total weight of all the rails in the 
main tracks on June 30, 1900, was 462,960 tons, 
an increase over the previous year of 46,839 tons. 

Of the new mileage taken over during the 
past year, the Omaha division, 131.02 miles, and 
the second track from Oilman to Otto, 21 miles, 
are laid with new 85 pound rails. 



The lightest rails in the main tracks weigh 
50 pounds to the yard, and the heaviest weigh 
100 pounds. 

There are laid with rails weigh- 
ing less than 60 pounds 355-6 1 miles 

With 60 pound rails 1,223.79 miles 

With rails weighing from 60 to 

70 pounds 593- miles 

With 75 pound rails 1,578.42 miles 

With 85 pound rails 489.13 miles 

With 100 pound rails 4.08 miles 



Total of main tracks 4,244.03 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



121 



THE "LINCOLN CAR.' 




COURTESY "RAILWAY AGE" AND UNION PACIFIC R. R. 

This car was in the Union Pacific exhibit, Transportation Building, 
at the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, held at Omaha, 
Neb., in 1898. It was built to meet President Lincoln's ideas, at the 
Military Car Shops, Alexandria, Va., in 1864. 

It is iron-clad, armor plate being set between the inner and outer 
walls to make it bullet proof. 

The largest of the compartments was the President's study. In it 
was the long sofa, which at night, was adjusted into a bed for Mr. Lincoln. 

The President generally used this car, and in it his remains were 
taken to Springfield for interment. 

The car was purchased by the Union Pacific in 1866, and is still the 
property of that company. 



CHAPTER V. 



PERSONNEL OF THE MANAGEMENT OF 

THE ROAD, 



PERSONNEL OF THE MANAGEMENT OF THE ROAD. 



Directors : 

His Excellency JOHN R. TANNER, Governor of Illi- 
nois, Ex OfKcio. 
B. F. AYER, 

JOHN W. AUCHINCLOSS, 
JOHN JACOB ASTOR, 
CHARLES M. BEACH, 
W. MORTON GRINNELL, 
J. W. DOANE, 
STUYVESANT FISH, 
EDWARD H. HARRIMAN, 
WALTHER LUTTGEN, 
CHARLES A. PEABODY, JR., 
JOHN C. WELLING, 
J. D. W. CUTTING. 



STUYVESANT FISH, President New York 

JOHN C. WELLING, Vice-President Chicago 

J. T. HARAHAN, Second Vice-President. .. .Chicago 

A. G. HACKSTAFF, Secretary New York 

WM. G. BRUEN, Assist. Secretary Chicago 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 

B. F. AYER, General Counsel Chicago 

JAMES FENTRESS, General Attorney Chicago 

J. M. DICKINSON, General Solictor Chicago 

SIDNEY F. ANDREWS, Asst. General Solici- 
tor Chicago 

ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT. 

F. FAIRMAN, Auditor of Freight Receipts. ..Chicago 
M. D. ROYER, Assistant Auditor of Freight 

Receipts Chicago 

A. D. JOSLIN, Auditor of Passenger Receipts. Chicago 
CON. F. KREBS, Auditor of Disbursements. .Chicago 
W. S. PINNEY, Chief Traveling Auditor Chicago 

C. C. WHITNEY, Traveling Auditor Chicago 

WALTER NEWELL, Traveling Auditor Chicago 

W. R. COMSTOCK, Traveling Auditor Chicago 

D. E. WOODS, Traveling Auditor Chicago 



W. D. BRENT, Traveling Auditor, Water Valley, Miss. 

C. B. WEST, Traveling Auditor Paducah, Ky. 

MAURICE REIS, Traveling Auditor of Expen- 
ditures Chicago 

TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 

E. T. H. GIBSON, Treasurer New York 

J. F. TITUS, Local Treasurer Chicago 

R. S. CHARLES, Local Treasurer New Orleans 

H. D. WARNER, Paymaster Chicago 

L. B. BUTTS, Assistant Paymaster Chicago 

R. S. CHARLES, JR., Assist. Paymaster. .New Orleans 



E. P. SKENE, Land Commissioner Chicago 

W. L. TARBET, Tax Commissioner Chicago 

L. P. MOREHOUSE, Custodian of Deeds. .. .Chicago 

OPERATING DEPARTMENT. 

J. F. WALLACE, Assistant Second Vice-Presi- 
dent Chicago 

A. W. SULLIVAN, General Superintendent. . .Chicago 

DAVID SLOAN, Chief Engineer '..Chicago 

L T. MOORE, Consulting Engineer Chicago 

WM. RENSHAW, Superintendent of Machin- 
ery Chicago 

JOSEPH BUKER, Assistant Superintendent of 

Machinery Chicago 

W. H. V. ROSING, Assistant Superintendent of 

Machinery Chicago 

J. W. HIGGINS, Superintendent of Transpor- 
tation Chicago 

J. G. HARTIGAN, Asst. Gen. Supt. Northern 

and Western Lines Chicago 

M. GILLEAS, Assistant General Superinten- 
dent Southern Lines Memphis 

W. J. GILLINGHAM, JR., Signal Engineer. . .Chicago 
H. W. PARKHURST, Engineer of Bridges. .Chicago 

F. T. BACON, Architect Chicago 

O. J. TRAVIS, Superintendent of Bridges. . .Chicago 

T. S. LEAKE, Master Carpenter Chicago 

M. MILLER, Gen'l Foreman of Water Works. Chicago 
M. D. NELON, Supt. of Floating Equipment. .. .Cairo 

G. M. DUGAN, Superintendent of Telegraph . Chicago 



126 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



C. F. ANNETT, Asst. Supt. of Telegraph .... Chicago 

L. L. LOSEY, Chief Claim Agent Chicago 

C. A. BECK, General Purchasing Agent Chicago 

A. J. SIMPSON, Stationer Chicago 

GEO. P. MURRAY, Chief Special Agent Chicago 

G. W. HATTER, Fuel Agent Chicago 

FRED. SCHLINKERT, Supervisor of Scales. Central* 
JOHN MONOHAN, Supervisor Fire Ex- 
tinguishers Burnside, 111. 



HUNTER C. LEAKE, General Agent. .. .New Orleans 
C. F. PARKER, General Agent St. Louis 

TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT. 

T. J. HUDSON, Traffic Manager Chicago 

M. C. MARKHAM, Assistant Traffic Manager. Chicago 
A. H. HANSON, General Passenger Agent. . .Chicago 
C. A. KNISKERN, Assistant General Passenger 

Agent Chicago 

S. G. HATCH, Assist. Gen'l Passenger Agent. .Chicago 
J F. MERRY, Assist. Gen'l Passenger 

Agent Dubuque, Iowa 

WM. ALFRED KELLOND, Assistant 

General Passenger Agent .' .Louisville, Ky. 

JOHN A. SCOTT, Division Passenger 

Agent Memphis, Tenn. 

C. C. McCARTY, Division Passenger Agent.. St. Louis 
F. W. HARLOW, Division Passenger Ag't. .Cincinnati 
WM. MURRAY, Div. Passenger Agent.. New Orleans 

W. H. BRILL, District Passenger Agent Omaha 

W. E. KEEPERS, General Freight Agent, 

Northern and Western Lines Chicago 

W. R. BASCOM, First Assistant Gen'l Freight 

Agent, Northern and Western Lines Chicago 

J. R. PEACHY, Assistant General Freight Ag't, 

Northern and Western Lines Chicago 

ROBT. KIRKLAND, Assistant Gen'l Freight 

Agent, Northern and Western Lines Chicago 

GEO. W. BECKER, Assistant General Freight 

Agent St. Louis 

J. S. WEITZELL, Assistant General Freight 

Agent Omaha 

F. W. BOWES, General Freight Agent, 

Southern Lines Louisville 

W. M. RHETT, General Freight Agent.. .New Orleans 
C. C. CAMERON, Asst. Gen'l Freight Agent, 

Southern Lines Louisville 



W. L. SMITH, Assist. General Freight Agent, 

Southern Lines Memphis 

F. H. HARWOOD, Assistant General Freight 

Agent Evansville 

R F. REYNOLDS, Division Freight Agent, 

Southern Lines New Orleans 

HENRY BALDWIN, Foreign Freight Ag't 

New Orleans 

SLATER & REID, European Agents, 

No. 44 Chapel street Liverpool, Eng. 

W. D. HURLBUT, General Coal Agent Chicago 

J. A. OSBORN, General Baggage Agent Chicago 

W. A. ELDREDGE, Freight Claim Agent Chicago 

A. P. FARRINGTON, Assistant Freight Claim 

Agent Chicago 

GEO. C. POWER, Industrial Commissioner. . .Chicago 
W. D. MURRAY, Supt. Hotel Service Chicago 

LIST OF DIVISION SUPERINTENDENTS. 

H. McCOURT, Chicago Division Chicago, 111. 

J. C. DAILEY, St. Louis Division Carbondale, 111. 

H. BAKER, Amboy Division Clinton, 111. 

D. S. BAILEY, Springfield Division Clinton, 111. 

H. U. WALLACE, Freeport Division. .. .Freeport, 111. 
F B. HARRIMAN, Dubuque Division. .. .Dubuque, la. 

C. K. DIXON, Cherokee Division Cherokee, la. 

G A. CLARK, Omaha Division Council Bluffs, la. 

W. S. KING, Mississippi Division Jackson, Tenn. 

J. B. KEMP, Aberdeen Division Durant, Miss. 

O. M. DUNN, Louisiana Division. .. .New Orleans, La. 

A. PHILBRICK, Memphis Division Memphis, Tenn. 

W. J. HARAHAN, Louisville Division. Louisville, Ky. 

Y. & M. V. R. R. CO. 

A. A. SHARP, Vicksburg Division. .. .Memphis, Tenn. 
A. J. GREIF, New Orleans Division. .Vicksburg, Miss. 

LIST OF MASTER MECHANICS. 

J W. LUTTRELL Burnside, 111. 

J H. POLLARD Centralia, 111. 

J. G. NEUDORFER Water Valley. Miss. 

L. L. DAWSON, McComb, Miss. 

M. S. CURLEY, Memphis, Tenn. 

T F. BARTON, Paducah, Ky. 

G. J. HATZ East St. Louis, 111. 

J. H. BANNERMAN, Clinton, 111. 

E. O. DANA Freeport, 111. 

T. W. PLACE Waterloo, la. 

C. LINSTROM, (Y. & M. V. R. R.) .Vicksburg, Miss. 



PART II. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 




STUVVESANT FISH. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 




TUYVESANT FISH, president of the 
Illinois Central Railroad Company 
was born in New York City, June 24, 
1851, and was educated at Coumbia 
College. He entered the service of the Illinois 
Central Railroad Company, October i, 1871, as 
clerk in the financial office in New York, where he 
remained until June 20, 1872, when he was ap- 
pointed secretary to President Newell, in Chica- 
go, and served in that capacity until October 
30, 1872. On November i, 1872, he left the ser- 
vice of the company to accept a position with the 
banking house of Morton, Bliss & Co., of New 
York, and later became identified with their Lon- 
don house, Morton, Rose & Co., remaining there 
until December 31, 1874, when he returned to 
New York to become the managing clerk of the 
house, holding their power of attorney, and re- 
mained with them until March 15, 1877. From 
December 14, 1876, to March 6, 1879, he was a 
member of the New York stock exchange. On 
the 1 6th of March, 1877, he was elected a direc- 
tor of the Illinois Central Railroad Company, 
and was appointed treasurer and agent for the 
purchasing committee of the New Orleans, Jack- 
son & Great Northern railroad, and served as 
such until November 8, 1877, when he was elect- 
ed secretary of the Chicago, St. Louis & New 
Orleans Railroad Company, and was thus em- 
ployed until he was elevated to the vice-presi- 
dency in March 1882. On January 7, 1883, he 
was elected second vice-president of the Illinois 
Central Railroad Company, serving as such until 



April 2, 1884, when he was elected vice-president, 
in which position he was retained until May 14, 
1887, at which date he succeeded James C. 
Clarke as president of the Illinois Central Rail- 
road Company. 

Up to a decade ago the Illinois Central had 
the unpleasant reputation of being perhaps the 
worst regulated and slovenly of the large Amer- 
can railway companies. The ruling spirit in all 
that has been done since that time toward placing 
it in its present enviable position has been Stuy- 
vesant Fish, of whom a portrait is given here- 
with. In addition to his position in the railroad 
world, he is also prominent in social and public 
affairs, especially in New York. 




EORGE NIMAN, conductor on the 
Illinois Central Railroad, Amboy divi- 
sion, is the son of George and Anna 
Niman. The father, who was a car- 
penter by occupation, died in 1896. One son, 
Louis, is a railroad employe, residing in Wil- 
mette, 111. 

Our subject was born November 26, 1868, 
at Polo, 111., and was educated in the public 
schools of his native town. In 1889 he en- 
tered the service of the I. C. R. R. on the Amboy 
division, as brakeman, where he served four 
months, and was transferred to the Freeport div- 



132 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



ision, serving on that branch for two years in 
the same capacity, then returned to the Amboy 
division where he has since remained, having 
been promoted to the position of conductor, Aug- 
ust 31, 1899. April 23, 1899, Mr. Niman was 
married to Miss Bertha L. Palmer, a native of 
Amboy, and daughter of Walter M. Palmer, an 
engineer of the I. C. R. R., now residing in Free- 
port. Mr. Niman is a Protestant in his religious 
belief. He is a member of the B. of R. T., and 
a Democrat in politics. 



JOHN.R. GORMAN, passenger conductor 
between Dubuque and Fort Dodge, be^ 
gan work for the Illinois Central company 
in November, 1878. Prior to this, how- 
ever, he served as a brakeman on the Oil Creek & 
Allegheny River Railroad for about two years. 
He entered the employ of the Illinois Central 
at Fort Dodge as a brakeman, with a run between 
that city and Sioux City. In 1880 he was pro- 
moted to the position of freight conductor on the 
same division, and in 1884 was promoted to the 
passenger service and transferred to the Lyle 
branch where he had charge of a mixed train for 
six or seven years. He was then transferred to 
Dubuque and for a time worked between that city 
and Fort Dodge. Later he worked on the Cedar 
Rapids branch for four years, and May n, 1899, 
he was again located at Dubuque and has since 
had charge of a passenger train between that city 
and Fort Dodge. 

Mr. Gorman was born July 24, 1855, in 
Salamanca, New York, a son of John Gorman, 
of Medina, New York, who helped to lay the 
Oil Creek & Allegheny River Railroad, and 
was superintendent of construction of that 
line for some time. Our subject was married at 
Orchard, Iowa, to Miss M. E. Wright, of that 
city, and two children, Avilla and John C., have 
been born to them. Socially Mr. Gorman is a 
member of Division 93, O. R. C., of Fort Dodge, 
Howland Lodge No. 274, A. O. U. W., of Water- 



loo ; Knights of Pythias, at Fort Dodge, and the 
Elks at Waterloo. He has been very successful 
since being on the road, has never met with ser- 
ious accident, and is very popular among his fel- 
low workmen. 




L. WARD, conductor at Waterloo, 
began his railroad career as a brake- 
man on the Illinois Central Railroad 
at Fort Dodge, in October, 1883, 
running both ways out of that city for six months. 
Following this short service, came a lay-off of 
about three months, after which he was at work 
again for about two months. Mr. Ward then se- 
cured a position with the Chicago, Milwaukee & 
St. Paul company as brakeman between Oxford 
and Jackson Junction until September 1885, 
when he returned to Waterloo, where he has 
since made his home and found work with the 
Illinois Central company. For twenty-three 
months he served as a brakeman, running out of 
Waterloo, and in August, 1887, he received his 
promotion to the office of conductor. As a 
brakeman, Mr. Ward served under the follow- 
ing conductors : Harry McCort, Tim Sullivan, 
John Gorman, F. Welker, and W. Laird ; and 
while running out from Waterloo, he worked 
under William Barr, E. W. Sornborger, D. Cot- 
ter and G. R. Turner. Mr. Ward's first work in 
the capacity of conductor was between Waterloo 
and Dubuque, where he spent six years. He 
then spent several years running both ways out 
of Waterloo, but for the past two years and a half 
he has had charge of a way freight train between 
Waterloo and Dubuque. 

Mr. Ward was born at Strawberry Point, 
Clayton county, Iowa, a son of Giles and Caroline 
(Godfrey) Ward, the former a native of New 
York, and the latter of Bigfoot Prairie, Wis. 
The father migrated to Iowa in 1849, when there 
was not a railroad in the state, and for a portion 
of the journey, at least, the " foot route " was the 
best accommodation that the traveling public en- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



133 



joyed. He bought a tract of land for which he 
paid gold, and then for a time was engaged in 
rafting from the pineries. He then returned to 
his farm where he was engaged in agriculture 
for a period of forty years. He is now spending 
his declining years in retirement at Strawberry 
Point. The mother died in March 1877. In 
1887, Mr. G. L. Ward, the subject of this history, 
returned to his boyhood home for a life com- 
panion whom he found in the person of Miss 
Elsie Noble and they are the parents of two sons, 
E. Wayne and Giles L. Socially he affiliates 
with Division No. 67, O. R. C. of Waterloo, and 
also Howland Lodge No. 274, A. O. U. W. Mr. 
Ward is now serving the first named lodge in 
the capacity of assistant chief. 



-.**-,'*.**-.**.**-,** 



PRED B. TAYLOR, engineer on the Illi- 
nois Central Railroad, Freeport divi- 
sion, was born in Gibson, Steuben Co., 
N. Y., October 26, 1869. His father, 
William L. Taylor, deceased, was a carpenter and 
shipbuilder, and served for many years as justice 
of the peace and constable. He married Frances 
E. Lyon, who is now living in Freeport. One 
son, Burt H., is in the employ of the I. C. R. R. 
as fireman. 

Our subject, Fred B. Taylor, was educated 
in the public schools of Freeport. At the age of 
fifteen he entered the shops of the Henney Buggy 
Co. and learned the trade of coachsmith, remain- 
ing in the employ of the company for six years. 
He then went to Oklahoma as one of the "Boom- 
ers" and took up a claim which he held two years, 
then sold and returned to Freeport and worked 
for the Woodmanse Co. for one year. On the 
1 4th of August, 1892, he entered the service of the 
I. C. R. R. as fireman on the Freeport division, 
and served in that capacity until December 1 1 , 
1897, when he was promoted to the right side. 
On the 25th of January, 1893, Mr. Taylor mar- 



ried Miss Clara C. Seifertt, of Freeport, who was 
born February 22, 1870. To them two children 
have been born: Clarice C., born June I, 1894, 
and Charles F., born September 28, 1896. Mr. 
Taylor is a member of Union Lodge No. 138, B. 
of L. F., Racine Division 27, B. of L. E., and 
Rinaldo Lodge No. 97, K. of P. In his political 
views he is independent. 



JW. MULLAN, freight engineer on the 
Illinois Central Railroad, Omaha divi- 
Q sion, first began his railroad service as 
brakeman at Waterloo, August 1880, 
and served for about fifteen months under Con- 
ductor McCabe and others between Waterloo and 
Dubuque. He then worked for the American 
Express Co. for a time, first in the office at Water- 
loo, and later as expressman on the train between 
Waterloo and Lyle. He began firing for the I. 
C. R. R. in November 1883, working between 
Waterloo and Sioux City, and was promoted to 
engineer in September 1887, running first in the 
Waterloo yards for three months, and later ran 
as extra over all the branches of the Iowa divi- 
sion. In 1894 he was given a regular run be- 
tween Ft. Dodge and Waterloo, was then in the 
construction service on the Omaha division, and 
now has a passenger run between Ft. Dodge and 
Omaha. 

Mr. Mullan is a native of Waterloo, Iowa, 
and a son of Charles Mullan, a surveyor and far- 
mer, who died at his home near Waterloo in 1874. 
His widow, America (Virden) Mullan, now lives 
in Waterloo. Our subject has one brother, H. 
C., who is a passenger conductor on the I. C. R. 
R. between Ft. Dodge and Sioux City. Mr. Mul- 
lan was married in 1882 to Miss Emma Thomas, 
of Waterloo, and has two sons, Fred and Alva. 
He is a member of B. of L. E., Waterloo Divi- 
sion 114, K. of P. No. 89, and the Royal Arca- 
num, of Waterloo. He is a popular railroad man 
and has never met with anv serious accidents. 



134 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 




ENRY LUSCOMBE, engineer on the 
Frecport division of the Illinois Central 
Railroad, is a native of Devonshire, 
England, where he was born November 
26, 1852. His parents, Henry and Susan Lus- 
combe, still reside in England where his father is 
engaged in farming. 

The subject of this sketch had the advantages 
of a liberal education in the public and private 
schools of Devonshire, finishing later at Dart- 
mouth College. In 1872 he came to the United 
States, locating in Amboy where he was em- 
ployed in various ways until in 1873, when he ac- 
cepted a position as helper in a boiler shop of 
the I. C. R. R. at Amboy. After a few months, 
in the autumn of 1873, he began firing on the road 
and remained in that position until 1880, when he 
left the road and went to farming, which occupa- 
tion he followed fo'r three years. The next three 
years were spent at his old home in Devonshire, 
when he returned to Amboy, re-entered the em- 1 
ploy of the I. C. R. R., and in 1888 was promoted 
to the right side where he is now engaged, hav- 
ing a passenger run on the Freeport division. On 
the Qth of October, 1879, Mr Luscombe was mar- 
ried to Miss Netta New, who was born in Galena, 
Illinois, January 30, 1859. They have one son, 
Thomas N., born July 26, 1886, who is attending 
the public school at Freeport. The family are 
communicants in the Protestant Episcopal church. 
Mr. Luscombe is a member of the B. of L. E. 
and the Masonic fraternity, and is a Republican 
in politics. 



C. NORMAN, station agent at 
r<\ Winthrop, Iowa, began work for the 
\\ Illinois Central company in the summer 

of 1 88 1, in the capacity of clerk for C. 
H. Dodd, then agent at the same station in which 
our subject is now located. He was there em- 
ployed about eight months and then went to 
Cherokee to perform the duties of operator at 
that station one winter. From there he went to 



Independence and there served two years as 
operator and two months as agent, ancl Septem- 
ber 20, 1884, lie was transferred to his present 
position at Winthrop. Mr. Norman was born in 
Ohio, July I4th, 1860, a son of N. V. and Mary 
(Taylor) Norman, both of whom are of English 
birth. They came to America and settled in 
Ohio in 1850, and moved from there with their 
family to Winthrop, Iowa, and are still making 
that their home. In 1886, our subject was united 
in marriage to Miss Gelia Adams, of Indepen- 
dence, Iowa, and two children, Milton B. and 
Winfred B., have been born to them. Socially 
Mr. Norman affiliates with the Blue Lodge, No. 
542 of the Masonic fraternity. He has been 
quite successful in his railroad career, having 
risen to an enviable position by his faithfulness 
and enterprise in spite of the fact that he was 
reared a farmer. 






M. HOLLAND, station agent at Jesup, 
Iowa, began working for the Illinois 
Central Railroad company April I3th, 
1892, as station agent at Peosta in Du- 
buque county, and from there went to Mason- 
ville, and on December I2th, 1899, was trans- 
ferred to his present position at Jesup. He 
learned the duties that pertain to a station agent 
at Floyd, Iowa, in the fall of 1891, under Mrs. 
Martin, who was then agent at that place. 

During the earlier years of his life, Mr. 
Holland worked on a farm in the vicinity of 
Floyd, the place of his birth. He is a son of 
Cain and Mary (Sullivan) Holland, both of 
whom are natives of Ireland. The parents came 
to America in 1865 and located at Floyd, Iowa. 
For twenty-five years he served the Illinois Cen- 
tral company in the capacity of a section fore- 
man but is now living in retirement in the village 
of Floyd. They have ten children besides the 
one whose name heads this article, namely : 
Timothy, a milk dealer in Chicago; Dennis, a 
farmer near Floyd, Iowa; Edward, at home; 




AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



135 



Nellie, wife of Thomas Silver, of Dearfield.Ia. ; 
May, wife of M. McParland; Kate, a school 
teacher, but is still making her home with her 
parents ; and Sarah, Annie, Hannah and Lizzie, 
all of whom are still under the parental roof. Mr. 
Holland is a member of the Catholic church at 
Masonville. He is very popular among the 
young men of the Illinois Central employes and 
enjoys the respect and esteem of all. 






Charles, a florist at Cedar Falls, Iowa; Ray, an 
operator for the Illinois Central company at Earl- 
ville, Iowa, and Winnie, Richard and Ruth who 
who are still making their home with their pa- 
rents. Mr. Simons has an excellent record with 
the railroad company, a good name among his 
fellow workmen, and commands the respect of all 
who know him. Besides his position with the 
railroad company, Mr. Simons has a valuable 
farm of forty-five acres of highly improved land 
near Delaware. 




J. SIMONS, station agent at Dela- 
ware, Iowa, began work for the Illi- 
n i s Central company at Earlville, 
Iowa, October, 1871, where he learned 
the duties pertaining to the care of a station 
while working under the direction of C. J. 
Steever, who had charge of the station six 
months after our subject began working there 
and was then succeeded by F. E. Monger who 
held the position eighteen months. From Octo- 
ber, 1873, until December, 1876, Mr. Simons 
had charge of the station at Delaware, Iowa, and 
was then transferred to Webster City, remaining 
there two years. On account of failing health, 
Mr. Simons was then obliged to leave the road 
for six years, and when he again returned to the 
company for employment he was placed in charge 
of the station at Delaware. Six months later he 
was transferred to Hammond, La., and was agent 
there for two years. In January, 1887, Mr. 
Simons was transferred to his present position 
and for the third time assumed the control of the 
Delaware station. 

Mr. Simons was born in North Royalton, O., 
a son of George and Sarah (Short) Simons, both 
of whom were natives of England. When he 
was but ten years of age, he moved with his pa- 
rents to Iowa and settled on a farm near Delaware 
and subsequently the mother died in their western 
home. The father died in England. In 1875 
our subject was married to Miss Lucretia Boone, 
of Delaware, and of the five children that have 
been born to them we have the following record : 




ENRY ROONEY, yard master at Du- 
buque, began railroading in this city 
in 1871, in the capacity of freight 
trucker in the freight house. During 
the following year, however, he began as switch- 
man and pursued this vocation until 1876 when he 
was promoted to the position of night yardmaster. 
Four years later he became general yardmaster, 
and in 1883 resigned his position and went to 
Marshalltown and served the Iowa Central com- 
pany in the capacity of switchman for half a 
year. From there Mr. Rooney went to St. Cloud, 
Minn., entered the employ of the Great Northern 
Railroad, and during the month that he was con- 
nected with the company made one trip to Fergus 
Falls as brakeman. Mr. Rooney then returned to 
Iowa, and during the following eight months was 
switchman at Cedar Rapids for the Burlington, 
Cedar Rapids & Northern Railroad. From 
there he went to Waterloo and took charge of 
the Illinois Central yards one year, after which 
he spent six months as brakeman, running out 
from Dubuque in a chain gang. Since then Mr. 
Rooney has been yardmaster in Dubuque, chang- 
ing only in 1896 from the night service to the 
office of general yardmaster. 

The gentleman whose name appears at the 
head of this article, is a native of the city in 
which he now makes his home, and first opened 
his eyes to the light of day December 5, 1855. 
He is a son of Charles Rooney, a volunteer of the 



136 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



Civil war, who, after the close of hostilities in 
the South, enlisted in the regular service and 
spent many years with the government troops 
on the plains. He died at the Soldiers' Home 
in Wisconsin, May 29, 1878. The subject of 
our sketch was married in Dubuque to Miss Rose 
O'Hare, and they are the parents of two children, 
Arthur and Mary. Mr. Rooney is a member of 
the Ancient Order of United Workmen and also 
of the Foresters, of Dubuque. During his rail- 
road career, Mr. Rooney has received but one 
slight injury by falline from a moving train in 
the yards. 





D. BURHYTE, an engineer, Illinois 
Central Railroad, Freeport division, 
residing in East Dubuque, 111., was 
born in Jamestown, Wisconsin, April 
14, 1863. 

His parents were C. T. and Adelaide (Col- 
lins) Burhyte. His father, a horse dealer by 
occupation, died February 1899; his mother hav- 
ing died in 1871. Their family of four children 
were named as follows : Elizabeth R., married 
L. P. Boynton and lives in Pasadena, California; 
A. D., subject of this sketch ; John P., residing 
in Iowa; Jacob G., an electrician, resides in Chi- 
cago. 

Our subject received his education in the 
public schools of East Dubuque, where he after- 
ward learned the trade of moulder and remained 
in that business for three years. He then followed 
the occupation of teaming four or five years, 
working at railroad construction. October 4, 
1887, he entered the service of the I. C. R. R. as 
a fireman, running between Dubuque and Amboy, 
and on the I5th of January, 1891, was promoted 
to the position of engineer, and is now running in 
that capacity between Dubuque and Chicago. 

Mr. Burhyte is a member of the Methodist 
church. Socially he is connected with the Ma- 
sonic order, the Knights of Pythias, and the 
Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers. He is 
a Republican in politics. 



'ILLIAM KURTH, a machinist in 
the Waterloo round house, is a 
native of the city of Cologne, Ger- 
many, born December 6th, 1859. 
He began life on his own responsibility as a rail- 
road employe in the town of Essen, in his native 
country, and later spent six months in the Krupp 
gun works. His first experience as a machinist 
was in government roads, and later worked in 
the shops of the Haskell locomotive works at 
Essen. In 1882 Mr. Kurth came to America, 
sailing from Antwerp in the "Big John," and 
upon landing on this side of the Atlantic, came 
directly to Waterloo and worked four weeks on 
a farm before he could secure a position in 
which he could ply his trade. He then worked 
four months in Robinson's factory, and February 
4, 1883, he entered the employ of the Illinois Cen- 
tral company as a machinist and worked in the 
shops eight years. Subsequently he served as a 
laborer in the round house a year and a half, and 
in 1893 was promoted to gang boss of the round 
house. 

August n, 1883, Mr. Kurth was married at 
Eagle Center, Iowa, to Miss 'Lizzie Braum, and 
their wedded life has been blessed by the pres- 
ence of a family of eight children, whose names 
in the order of their birth are as follows : Min- 
nie, Pauline, Harry, Fred, Louis, Gertrude, Clara 
and Walter. Socially Mr. Kurth is identified 
with Rowland Lodge No. 274, A. O. U. W. 



FRANK G. WAGNER, foreman of the 
blacksmith shop at Waterloo, was born 
in Dubuque, Iowa, his natal day being 
July 7, 1857. He began learning his 
trade at Belle vue, Iowa, in 1871, and served an 
apprenticeship of three years. He then opened 
a shop at Dubuque and conducted the same 
about six months, after which he spent three 
months in the employ of the Novelty Iron Works. 
Mr. Wagner then worked for a short time in 
the shops at Earlville, Iowa, and from there came 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



137 



to Waterloo, September 13, 1886, and entered the 
employ of the Illinois Central company, and since 
August i, 1894, has served in the capacity of 
foreman of the blacksmith shop. 

The estimable lady who presides over the 
household affairs of Mr. Wagner, bore the maid- 
en name of Miss Annie Evans. They were mar- 
ried in Springbrook, Iowa, and their wedded life 
has been blessed by the advent of a family of 
eight children, whose names in the order of their 
birth are as follows : Maggie, Sophie, Frances, 
Henry, Minnie, Cecelia, Lauretta and Louise. 
Mr. Wagner is a member of Rowland Lodge No. 
274, Ancient Order of United Workmen. 




HARLES H. MCCARTHY, conductor 
on the Illinois Central Railroad, who 
has been in the employ of the company 
since twelve years of age, began in Ep- 
worth, Iowa, as water-boy, and was thus em- 
ployed three years. He then began working on 
the section at Epworth, and at the end of four 
years was made section foreman, retaining that 
position for two years. He then engaged in the 
grocery business in Epworth for one year, and 
then took charge of the Cherokee gravel pit as 
foreman for the Illinois Central, remaining in 
charge about five months. He then became 
a brakeman on the Illinois Central for one year 
and nine months, and then began as conductor. 
Since 1889 he has been in the freight service on 
the Cherokee division, running between Sioux 
City and Fort Dodge. 

Our subject was born in Epworth, Iowa, 
November 20, 1866, son of Florence, better 
known as "Flerry," McCarthy, who was section 
foreman of the Illinois Central for thirty-five 
years, but is now retired and resides in Epworth. 
Our subject had two brothers in the service. 
Thomas O. is a conductor on Waterloo division 
of the Illinois Central, and John M. was a brake- 
man on the Illinois Central at the time he was 
killed at Manchester, Iowa, in 1883. 



Mr. McCarthy married Mary A. Lennon, of 
Farley, la., and they nave two children, Charles 
Eugene, and John Morris. Our subject is a 
member of the B. of R. T., and is master of the 
lodge. He also holds membership in the A. O. 
U. W., also Catholic Order of Foresters, all of 
Fort Dodge. He is a consistent member of the 
Sacred Heart Catholic church of Ft. Dodge. His 
residence is at No. 1210 Sixth avenue, south. 



UGENE DAILEY, train master at 
Waterloo, Iowa, is another of those 
men who, though they had none of 
this world's goods for a capital with 
which to start in life, are endowed with suffi- 
cient enterprise and tact to soon place themselves 
among the leading business men of the communi- 
ty no matter how lowly their first position. Mr. 
Dailey began his railroad career as a messenger 
boy at Ackley, Iowa, in August, 1878, and while 
in that capacity, learned telegraphy. In Febru- 
ary, 1880, he succeeded in securing a position as 
operator at Webster City, Iowa, and about two 
months later became the day operator at Iowa 
Falls. Subsequently Mr. Dailey, at different 
times filled various positions for the Illinois 
Central company, being transferred from one 
place to another and steadily promoted until he 
reached his present position. In August, 1880, 
he was made day operator at Cherokee ; in March 
of the following year was sent to Ackley ; and in 
August, 1882, was sent to Waterloo to accept a 
position in the office of the train despatcher. In 
February, 1883, he was made train despatcher at 
Fort Dodge; in March, 1885, chief train de- 
spatcher of the Waterloo and Mona district with 
his headquarters at Waterloo; in October, 1889, 
when the offices of train master and train de- 
spatcher were moved to Dubuque, Mr. Dailey 
was sent to the last named city in the capacity of 
chief train despatcher. In November, 1894, the 
offices were returned to Waterloo, and at this 
time, Mr. Dailey was appointed the first " trick " 



138 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



dcspatcher of the Dubuque division, and April 
1 5th, 1898, he became train master of the Dubu- 
que division, the position which he still holds. 

February 4th, 1891, Mr. Dailey was married 
at Dubuque, to Miss Jennie Phelan, and to this 
congenial union has been born a bright, interest- 
ing little family of three children upon whom 
they have seen fit to bestow the following names : 
Joseph Raphael, Eugene Louis and Lois Mer- 
riam. Mr. Dailey is identified with Lodge No. 
290, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
of Waterloo, and Knights of Pythias, No. 89, 
of Waterloo. 




.HARLES H. DJNSMOOR is noted as 
one of the steadiest men in the employ 
of the Illinois Central. He is an en- 
gineer in the freight service on the 
Cherokee division. For sixteen years Mr. Duns- 
moor has been in the employ of the I. C., and dur- 
ing the past six years has not been absent from 
duty for a single day, an enviable record. He 
entered the service of the I. C. as a fireman, at 
Waterloo, Iowa, serving three years under En- 
gineers O. D. Gray, W. F. Hall and Al. Girard. 
His ability was recognized by the company, and 
on September 13, 1887, he was promoted to en- 
gineer on the Waterloo division, where he served 
two years. Coming to the Cherokee division in 
1889, he has since remained there in the freight 
service between Cherokee and Sioux City. He is 
one of the most careful employes on the road, and 
has, during his entire service with the company, 
never been in the slightest wreck. 

Mr. Dunsmoor was born in Boston, Mass., 
in September, 1851, and is a son of Thomas 
Dunsmoor, now a prosperous farmer in Clayton 
Co., Iowa. Our subject was married to Miss 
Phoebe L. Sargent, and they have a fine family of 
six children, four sons and two daughters, viz : 
Lulu, Nellor, Theo, Dennis, Charles and Earl. 
He is connected socially with No. 226 B. of L. E., 
of Fort Dodge, and resides at Cherokee, where 
he has a pretty cottage near his work. 



JOHN H. FOX is a well and favorably 
known engineer in the freight service of 
the Illinois Central, his run being on the 
Cherokee division. He has been con- 
nected with the I. C. for twenty years, commenc- 
ing at Waterloo, Iowa, in 1880, as fireman. Af- 
ter working there for nearly two years he went to 
Dubuque, and was promoted to engineer and 
given charge of Engine No. 78 on the Dubuque 
division of the I. C. He held this position for 
four years, when he was sent to Cherokee, and 
has since been identified with that division. He 
has never been in a wreck, and sustained only one 
slight injury during his career on the road. 

Our subject was born in Canada on June 
17, 1852, and acquired his first knowledge of 
railroad work there, on the Great Western R. R. 
John Fox, the father of our subject, was a mer- 
chant, and resided in Canada, but made his home 
with his son, John H., for two years prior to 
his death, at the age of eighty-one years. His 
mother survives, being seventy-three, years of 
age, and makes her home with her daughter. 
Mr. Fox was married to Miss Annie McDonald, 
and they have had four children, of whom two 
survive, vtz : Wilbur B., a fireman in the service 
of the I. C., and John Jr., who is in the drug bus- 
iness, both residing in Cherokee. Socially he 
is connected with No. 226, B. of L. E., of Fort 
Dodge. 




W. FAIRBURN, engineer at Water- 
loo, Iowa, began his railroad career 
with the Illinois Central company 
March I7th, 1882, filing his ap- 
plication at Waterloo, but did his first work 
in the yards at Dubuque, where he was engaged 
until June I3th, of the same year. He then re- 
turned to Waterloo, where he was employed un- 
der James McCullen for a short time on the main 
line. Later he got a regular engine, No 143, 
which he had for about a year with Engineer J. 
Battell, and later, was on with different men, 
among them, Charles Baldwin, with whom he 



JjM 




WILLIAM K. ACKKRMAN. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



141 



ran between Waterloo and Sioux City. Mr. Fair- 
burn then spent one year on a passenger engine 
between Waterloo and Sioux City, and subse- 
quently between Waterloo and Lyle. He then 
spent seven years on a freight run, after which he 
was again put on the passenger service and spent 
eight months with G. Martin on the " Clipper " 
run. July 7th, 1892, Mr. Fairburn was set up 
to engineer, took charge of a switch engine in 
the Waterloo yards for a short time, and then 
went on to the road in charge of engine No. 
1301, on the Lyle branch. After spending one 
winter on that branch, he ran extra out of Water- 
loo for some time, but finally went back to his 
old run on the Lyle branch. 

Mr. Fairburn was born in Janesville, Iowa, 
and made his home under the parental roof un- 
til he entered the employ of the Illlinois Central 
Railroad company, but moved to Waterloo with 
his family in 1882. He was married in 1879 *o 
Miss Mary Pound, also of Janesville, Iowa, and 
their home has been blessed by the presence of a 
family of three children, whose names in the 
order of their birth are Mabel L., Blanche L. 
and Lula May. In the social circles of Water- 
loo, our subject is identified with Division 114, 
B. of L. E. and Howland Lodge No 274, A. O. 
U. W. He has been very successful as a railroad 
man, having spent about eighteen years on the 
road without experiencing an accident and in- 
cidentally laying aside portions of his earnings 
until in 1887, he secured for himself and his 
family a beautiful residence at 216 Logan Ave., 
where he is now making his home. 




'ILLIAM K. ACKERMAN, who 
served as president of the Illinois 
Central Railroad from October 17, 
1877, to August 18, 1883, was born 
in New York City, January 20, 1832. His pa- 
ternal ancestor, David Ackerman, who arrived 
in New York, September 2, 1662, from Amster- 
dam, was the first of that name to settle in this 
country. 



W. K. Ackerman was educated in the Me- 
chanics Society school, in -New York, afterwards 
attending the high school. He entered the em- 
ploy of the Illinois Central Railroad Company 
May 28, 1852, as an office clerk in the financial 
department in New York, from which position 
he was gradually piomoted to secretary and 
treasurer respectively. On September 30, 1860, 
he was transferred to Chicago, occupying va- 
rious positions, among them being the general 
auditorship. July 17, 1876, he was elected vice- 
president, and October 17, 1877, was elevated to 
the presidency of the company, succeeding John 
M. Douglas. This position he held until Au- 
gust 18, 1883, when he resigned in favor of 
James C. Clarke. 

In the annual report of 1877, his election 
was referred to in the following manner : 

"Your directors have had the pleasure to 
elect Mr. William K. Ackerman to the presi- 
dency of this company, a position which he has 
earned by twenty-five years of faithful service." 
Upon his retiring from the presidency, the board 
passed the following resolution : 

"Resolved, that this board having assented 
to the suggestions contained in the letter of Pres- 
ident Ackerman to the directors, dated July 18, 
1883, desires to place on record its unqualified 
approbation of the integrity, ability, fidelity, zeal 
and success with which he has throughout his 
entire time of office, discharged the responsible 
duties thereof ; and the secretary is hereby di- 
rected to transmit to Mr. Ackerman a copy of 
this resolution." This was on August 18, 1883, 
at which time he was again elected vice-presi- 
dent, holding the position until December 31, 
1883, when he finally resigned from the com- 
pany. 

Mr. Ackerman was also a director of the 
company from 1874 to 1884, and a trustee of 
their construction mortgage bonds for many 
years. On the 5th of August, 1883, the New 
York Times published the following article : 

"One event of the week deserving notice, 
is the retirement of Mr. Ackerman from the 
presidency of the Illinois Central Railroad Com- 
pany after thirty-one years service. This com- 



142 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



pany and its excellent management have been 
spoken of before. To President Ackerman is 
largely due the credit. He leaves the company 
after having placed it foremost among the rail- 
road properties of the United States, its securi- 
ties considered second only to government "bonds, 
its reputation such that it is referred to as one 
of the model corporations of the country. The 
history of President Ackerman's management 
shows that \ye have men, who with great oppor- 
tunities and abundant excuse to enrich themselves 
at the expense of their trust, yet administer that 
trust with soundest sagacity and the highest in- 
tegrity, making one of the bright spots in a record 
of corporate abuses for which the country is now 
paying some of the penalities." 






EORGE P. TURNER, foreman of the 
paint shops at Waterloo, was born at 
Concord, N. H., February 13, 1833. 
He learned his trade in the railroad 
shops of the town of his nativity, beginning at 
the age of eighteen years. There he spent five 
years and then went to the Connecticut & Pas- 
sumpsic Rivers Railroad shops at St. Johnsbury, 
Vt, where he spent seven years as foreman. 
December 26, 1864, he began work for the Du- 
buque & Sioux City Railroad in the shops at Du- 
buque as foreman of the painting department. 
When the Illinois Central company leased the 
line in 1867, he continued in service as the fore- 
man in the same department, and in 1870, when 
the shops were moved to Waterloo, he was con- 
tinued in the same position. 

Mr. Turner was married at Manchester, N. 
H., in February, 1853, to Miss Susan F. Sweet 
and they have reared a family of five daughters, 
whose names in the order of their birth are as 
follows: Ella F., Hattie H., Mary R., Ida E. 
and Carrie A. Mr. Turner is a member of the 
Waterloo Lodge No. 105, F. & A. M. Tabernacle 
Chapter No. 52. 




T. MORAN, road supervisor at Water- 
loo, is one of the Illinois Central com- 
Q pany's pioneer employes. He began 
his railroad career in New York state 
on the New York & New Haven Railroad as a 
track laborer, and assisted in the construction of 
that road. Later, from 1848 to 1854, he worked 
in the same capacity for the New York & Har- 
lem R. R., being located at -Towner Station and 
Paterson, New York. The man who was per- 
forming the duties of roadmaster at Freeport, 
111., for the Illinois Central company at that time, 
Mr. J. S. Rogers, was a friend of Mr. Moran and 
it was through his influence that our subject 
came west and entered the employ of the Illinois 
Central company at Freeport in 1854. There he 
was employed as extra foreman for six months, 
after which he had charge of a section at Apple 
River for fourteen years, doing section work and 
helping to build side tracks. October I3th, 
1867, Mr. Moran was transferred to Waterloo 
to accept the position of road supervisor, had 
charge of the track from Waterloo to Dyersville 
for a time and then was transferred to that por- 
tion between Waterloo and Iowa Falls. In 1877, 
C. F. & M. branch was given to his supervision, 
and this he still retains, also having charge of 
the track between Independence and Waterloo. 

Mr. Moran was born in Bally mahon, Long- 
ford county, Ireland, in 1830, a son of Edward 
and Margaret Moran. Our subject was married 
the I4th of June, 1852, in Brooklyn, N. Y., 
to Miss Hannah Hayes, a native of Limerick, 
Ireland, and of the six children that have been 
born to them we have the following record : Ella, 
wife of P. F'. Doherty, of Dubuque, Iowa ; Char- 
lie, at Kansas City, Mo. ; Hannah, wife of Joseph 
F. Gunn of Denver, Colo. ; Fred, at home ; Mar- 
tha, a Sister of Charity at Davenport, Iowa ; and 
Christopher, a telegraph operator at the Chicago 
Board of Trade. Our subject has never given 
attention to any other line of work except rail- 
road track work ; this he has thoroughly learned. 
For more than fifty years he has devoted his en- 
tire attention to railroad track work and the Illi- 
nois Central company is to be congratulated on 
securing and retaining so competent a man for 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



143 



the position of railroad supervisor. He is very 
popular among the railroad employes in the com- 
munity in which he lives and is held in high es- 
teem by all who know him. 



LEWIS P. NELSON, better known as 
" Lew," is an engineer on the extra list 
of the Illinois Central. He has been 
in the employ of the I. C. for nine years 
beginning on the Cherokee division, as a fireman, 
with the well-known engineer, Sam Chapman. 
He held this position for seven years with credit, 
and was then transferred to the Clinton division 
of the I. C., working there only a few months. 
Returning to Cherokee, he was promoted Sep- 
tember 17, 1897, to engineer, and since that time 
has been running extra on that division. He 
has been in one or two small wrecks, but was 
never injured. Our subject is a Canadian by 
birth, and is now thirty years of age. He has 
one brother, W. C. Nelson, who is a fireman on 
the North-Western R. R. His father, a mill- 
wright by trade, resides in Cherokee. Mr. Nel- 
son was married to Miss F. F. King, of Chicago, 
January i, 1896, and their union has been blessed 
by a bright little daughter, Marie. He is con- 
nected with B. of L. F. No. 79, of Cherokee, and 
also with the A. O. U. W. of Cherokee. 




EORGE M. CROWNOVER, general 
foreman at the shops at Waterloo, 
was born at McVeytown, Pa., Septem- 
ber 26th, 1863, and spent his early 
boyhood in the place of his nativity. In 1877 he 
came west with his parents, and at the age of 
seventeen years began learning the machinist's 
trade at the Waterloo shops under Mr. Place, 
serving an apprenticeship of four years or from 
April 4th, 1881, until April 4th, 1885. In 1887, 



he was appointed foreman of the round house at 
Clinton, 111., but after spending five years there, 
returned to Waterloo and assumed charge of 
the air brake department which occupied his at- 
tention thirteen months. May 1st, 1893, our 
subject was appointed foreman of the machine 
shops and held this position until October 1895, 
when he was appointed to the office of general 
foreman at Waterloo. 

Mr. Crownover has been twice married. His 
first wife bore the maiden name of Miss Catherine 
F. Deady and became his wife September 8th, 
1887, at Waterloo. One daughter, Ethel, was 
born to this union. His present wife formerly 
Miss Martha M. Magee, was wedded to him 
October loth, 1893, at Mitchell, Ontario. This 
union, also, has been blessed by the advent of 
one daughter, Edna. Mr. Crownover is a mem- 
ber of Waterloo Lodge No. 105, A. F. & A. M., 
and is Junior Warden at the present time. He 
is also Venerable Counsel of Waterloo Lodge 
No. 2059, M. W. of A. Mr. Crownover is a 
member of the Tribe of Ben Hur. His father, 
Benson Crownover, taught school in Iowa un- 
til his superannuation, and is now living in re- 
tirement at Hudson, Iowa. 



PRANK EVANS, engineer, has been 
with the Illinois Central company for 
twelve years, beginning at Waterloo, 
Iowa, as fireman with Engineer A. M. 
Place. He was thus employed about seven years 
and then promoted to engineer, running a switch 
engine in the yards at Fort Dodge. Since then 
has had charge of freight engine No. 808 on the 
run between Fort Dodge and Sioux City, Iowa. 
For three months in 1898 he ran an engine on the 
Yazoo & Mississippi Valley division out of New 
Orleans. 

Our subject was born in Claremont, Iowa, 
October I7th, 1866, a son of Robert Evans, who 
is a tailor by trade, now residing in West Union, 
Iowa. Our subject has one brother (Lewis) who 



144 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



is train-man for the Great Northern Railroad 
company. Mr. Evans married Miss Bertha 
Willey, of Mount Ayer, Iowa, and they have one 
child, Rowena. He is a member of the B. of 
L. F. No. 222, B. of L. E. No. 226, and I. O. O. 
F. No. 85, of Fort Dodge. Both he and his 
wife are members of the M. E. church. 



JF. MULKERN, engineer at Waterloo, 
Iowa, began his railroad career in the 
Q winter of 1880, at Waterloo, working 
first under Engineer Wood. He was 
next with F. A. Hill between Waterloo and Sioux 
City and also between Waterloo and Fort Dodge. 
He was placed in charge of the lever and throttle 
in October 1883, and began work in that capacity 
in the yards at Dubuque, where he was engaged 
about a year and then went to Fort Dodge until 
1885. At the last named date, he went to Water 
Valley and Jackson, Tenn., remained there two 
months, returned to the Dubuque yards for about 
three months, then back to Water Valley for two 
months, and then returned to his home in Water- 
loo and entered the employ of the Chicago 
Great Western Railroad company. Four weeks 
later, he severed his connection with the last 
named company and again began work for the 
Illinois Central in 1887, running between Water- 
loo and Sioux City and also between Waterloo 
and Dubuque. 

Mr. Mul.kern was born in Dubuque, Decem- 
ber 27, 1862, a son of Hon. M. B. Mulkern, a 
native of Ireland. The father migrated to 
America in 1848, and located in Dubuque where 
he was known for many years as one of the lead- 
ing attorneys of that city. He was state senator 
in 1870 and '71. His wife was a daughter of 
John C. Regan, and is now making her home in 
Dubuque. They were the parents of a family 
of five children, of whom we have the following 
record : Rachael, J. F., the subject of this sketch, 
James A., Daniel and M. B. Jr. J. F. Mulkern, 
whose name appears at the head of this article, 
was married October 12, 1887, to Miss Josephene 



Murry, of Independence, la., and the following 
children have been born to them : J. Frank, 
Raphiel V., John H. and M. Alice. Mrs. Mul- 
kern's father, Simon Murry, was a constructor 
for the Illinois Central company and built a great 
deal of their road. He fell from a bridge at 
Cedar Falls, Iowa, and was injured while at work 
in that place. He died in 1888. 

Socially our subject affiliates with Division 
No. 1 14, B. of L. E. ; with Howland Lodge No. 
274, A. O. U. W., and also the Royal Arcanum, 
all of Waterloo. He has been a very successful 
railroad man, as is evidenced by the above record 
and also by the fact that he has performed his 
duty with such care and system that he has 
avoided the accidents that so many run into, and 
has never received the slightest injury since he 
has been on the road. 




M. FLICKINGER is an engineer in 
the freight service on the Ft. Dodge 
and Omaha division of the Illinois 
Central. He first entered the ser- 
vice of the I. C. in 1886, at Waterloo, Iowa, as 
fireman, running on different divisions of the 
road until 1892, when he was promoted to en- 
gineer after passing a creditable examination. 
He was then placed in charge of Engine No. 
1376, running between Cherokee, la., and Sioux 
Falls, South Dakota. Our subject first worked 
with the B. & M. R. R. as brakeman and served 
also on the Union Pacific with the civil engineer- 
ing corps, for nearly three years. He was for 
a time connected with the O. & B. R. R. and with 
the Vicksburg & New Orleans division of the I. 
C. In February 1899, he returned to Cherokee, 
and was assigned to the Ft. Dodge & Omaha 
division. 

Mr. Flickinger was married to Miss Jessie 
Lawless, and they have four bright children, viz : 
Geneva, Glenn, Wayne and Claude. He is a 
member of B. of L. E. No. 226, of Fort Dodge, 
Iowa. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



145 



A. TAYLOR, engineer, has been with 
the Illinois Central company ten 
years. He began as fireman in 1889 
on Engine No. 196, and was engaged 
in that capacity for about seven years. On 
November 19, 1896, he was promoted to engineer 
and took charge of engine No. 1398, and ran 
same in the switch yards at Fort Dodge until 
December i, 1897, when he began running on 
the road, and has since pulled both freight and 
passenger trains. 

He is a native of Dane county, Wisconsin, 
born December 19, 1861, a son of Thomas G. 
Taylor, who is a farmer, and now resides on a 
farm in Dane county. Our subject married 
Miss Catherine P>owen, of Sioux City. He is 
very systematic and keeps a record of every trip 
he makes on the road. Mr. Taylor is a member 
of I. O. O. F. Lodge No. 85, of Fort Dodge, 
also of the B. of L. F. No. 222, of Fort Dodge. 
He resides at No. 526 Fourth avenue, south. 



=x^DWARD P. LISCHER, engineer on 
the Illinois Central Railroad, Amboy 
division, was born in Chicago, March 
29, 1867, whilst his parents were on 
their way to Iowa. His father, Andrew Lischer, 
is a farmer living in Griswold, Iowa, and his 
mother, Catherine (Leffler) Lischer, died in 1886. 
Edward P. Lischer was educated in Colum- 
bus City, Iowa. He learned the shoe maker's 
trade at which he worked eight years, and in 
November 1891 entered the service of the St. 
Joseph Terminal Railway association as a wiper, 
remaining in that position one year, and then be- 
came a fireman, in which capacity he served until 
January 19, 1895. Mr. Lischer then removed 
to Clinton, 111., where he engaged as fireman on 
the Amboy division of the Illinois Central Rail- 
road, serving in that position until November 
8, 1896, when he was licensed to run as engineer 
and is still handling the throttle for the same 
company. 




Mr. Lischer was married on the first day of 
August, 1880, to Miss Rose Atchison, of Colum- 
bus City, Iowa. Mrs. Lischer died in March 
1895, leaving two children, Florence M. and 
Nancy B. Mr. Lischer is socially connected 
with the B. of L. F. and B. of L. E., and in his 
political views is independent. 

jtjtjtjtjjt 

|HARLES E. JONES, engineer on the 
Freeport division, Illinois Central Rail- 
road, is a native of the Keystone state 
and was born May II, 1865 in Rock- 
ville, Dauphin county. His parents, William L. 
and Elizabeth (Vallence) Jones, reside in Pa- 
ducah, Kentucky, where his father is in charge of 
a Baptist church. 

Our subject attended the schools of Mechan- 
icsburg and Middletown, Pa., and Cape May 
Court House, N. J., and at the age of thirteen 
entered the printing office of R. H. Thomas, at 
Mechanicsburg, and served as a printer for six 
months. When fifteen years of age he learned 
the blacksmith's trade at Cape May Court House, 
and followed this occupation for fifteen years at 
Pottsville, Pa., Philadelphia, and elsewhere. In 
1884 he came west and located for a time in Do- 
ver, 111., following his trade of expert horse-shoer 
there and in various other towns in the state. In 
1894 Mr. Jones removed to Freeport where he 
followed blacksmithing until October 20, 1895, 
and on the nth of November following, entered 
the service of the I. C. R. R. as fireman on the 
Freeport division and remained in that position 
until July 22, 1899, when he was promoted to 
the right side. 

Mr. Jones was married July 6, 1885, to Miss 
Elizabeth Hubbard, of Dover, 111. Mrs. Jones 
was born at Sheffield, 111., October 23, 1868. She 
is the mother of three interesting children : 
Frances V., born July 7, 1886; Marguerita 
Catherine, born February 27, 1888; Charles V., 
born April 25, 1890. Mr. Jones with his family 
attends the First Baptist church of Freeport. He 
is a member of the B. of L. F., and votes the Re- 
publican ticket. 



146 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 




i ( mXELIUS B. DEBOLT, is an engineer 
in the yards of the Illinois Central at 
Cherokee, running also as an extra. 
He entered the service of the I. C. 
in 1890, as bridgeman, then for several years as 
fireman, and in 1897 was promoted to engineer. 
He has charge of a switch engine in the yards 
at Cherokee, and also runs as an extra when 
called upon. His first experience at railroad 
work was acquired on the B. C. R. & N. R. R., 
with which he served ten years as bridgeman 
and carpenter, resigning to accept a similar 
position with the I. C. Our subject was born at 
Juda, Green county, Wisconsin, December i, 
1862. His father is now a resident of Clarks- 
ville, Iowa. Mr. DeBolt was married to Miss 
Martha Miller, and they have two children. 
Gladys and Henry B. Mr. DeBolt is a member 
of B. of L. F. No. 79, and is also connected with 
the Masonic and K. of P. lodges in Cherokee, his 
home town. 




W. McFARLANE, station agent 
at Waterloo, Iowa, began work 
Q for the Illinois Central company 
in the capacity of car tapper, but 
soon after secured a position in the freight 
house. His next situation was that of night 
ticket clerk, which he retained for two years, and 
was then appointed bill clerk for one year. In 
1890 Mr. McFarlane became the cashier at 
Waterloo, and in January, 1893, he left that 
position for that of station agent at Cedar Falls, 
which he retained until April 1894. At the last 
named date he returned to Waterloo to assume 
the responsibilities of the position he still holds, 
that of station agent. Previous to entering the 
employ of the Illinois Central company, however, 
Mr. McFarlane was a contractor in Waterloo for 
about ten years. Our subject is a son of Alex, 
and Jane E. McFarlane, the former a native of 
Scotland and the latter of London. The family 
located in Waterloo in 1857, where the father 



has for many years been a contractor. W. W. 
McFarlane, whose name appears at the head of 
this article, was married May 18, 1882, to Miss 
Emma J. Moss, of Anamosa, Iowa, and their 
wedded life has been blessed by the advent of 
three children, as follows : Edward, Arthur, 
and Carrie. In the social circles of Waterloo, 
Mr. McFarlane is identified with Howland Lodge 
No. 274, A. O. U. W., also Helmet Lodge K. of 
P. and the National Union. He has also always 
taken an active interest in all local, political and 
school matters, being now a member of the 
East Waterloo school board, and was a member 
of the city council during the past four years. 
He is very popular among the railroad employes 
and is widely known as one of Waterloo's sub- 
stantial citizens. 



EWIS ALBRIGHT, engineer on freight 
engine, has been with the Illinois Cen- 
tral company since August 29, 1883. 
He began as fireman and worked at 
same until October 17, 1887; was then examined 
and promoted to engineer and took charge of En- 
gine No. 195, working in the yards awhile and 
then began in road service, which he continued 
until January 28, 1900, when he was promoted 
to the passenger service on the Omaha division, 
running between Fort Dodge and Omaha. 

He was born in Sangamon county, Illinois, 
September 8, 1859, a son f August Albright, 
deceased, who was a fanner in that county for 
many years. Mr. Albright has one brother, a 
carpenter in the Illinois Central shops at Water- 
loo, Iowa. Our subject married Miss Millie 
Viers, of Manson, Iowa, who is the mother of 
three children, Ear], deceased, Ella and Raymond. 
He was never injured and has never lost a day's 
work since he began with the company. He is 
a member of the B. of L. E. No. 226, Olive 
Lodge No. 85, I .O. O. F., of Fort Dodge, and 
Wahkonse Encampment No. 53. Both he and 
his wife belong to the Daughters of Rebecca. 
He resides at 610 Fifth avenue, south. 




AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



147 




SCAR E. ADAMS, switch engineer 
at Fort Dodge, Iowa, has been with 
the Illinois Central company since 
March I3th, 1880. He began as 
a switchman in the yards at Fort Dodge, 
where he worked one year and four months and 
he then began as fireman with Engineer H. W. 
Harrington running between Waterloo and Sioux 
City. He was next employed as fireman in the 
switch yards at Fort Dodge one year, and then 
became hostler in the shops for one year. He 
then fired on switch engine No. 149 in the yards 
at Fort Dodge until October 12, 1885, when he 
was examined and promoted to engineer and 
took charge of his present engine, switching in 
the yards at Fort Dodge. 

Mr. Adams was born in Rutland county, 
Vermont, on May 4, 1851, a son of George L. 
Adams, a carpenter by trade, who died in the war 
on May 24, 1862. Our subject had one brother, 
who was brakeman on the Wisconsin Central rail- 
road and who was killed while working for that 
company. 

Our subject married Miss Carrie A. Bunnell, 
of New York state, and is the father of three 
children, Charles R., Bessie L., and Carlyle. He 
has been in several accidents and at one time 
was on his engine on the Lizzard bridge when it 
went down, but he has fortunately escaped in- 
jury. 

He is a member of the B. of L. E. No. 226 
of Fort Dodge, and now resides at No. 826, 
Eighth Avenue, North, Fort Dodge, Iowa. 




iHARLES D. GREIG is a well known 
engineer on the Cherokee divi- 
sion of the Illinois Central, having 
charge of Engine No. 1324, between 
Sioux Falls, S. D., and Onawa, Iowa. He "be- 
came identified with the I. C. on September 14, 
1875, as engineer on the Cherokee division, 
where he worked until 1887, during which year 
he was appointed to his present run, and has 



since remained there. Our subject acquired his 
first knowledge of railroad work, in 1869, on 
the Delaware & Lackawanna R. R. at Scranton. 
Pennsylvania, where he worked as fireman for 
two years. He was then examined for promo- 
tion to engineer, and passing the examination 
with credit, took a position on the Danbury & 
Norwalk R. R. in Connecticut. After serving 
that company for two years, he came west to 
Fort Dodge, Iowa, and immediately entered the 
service of the I. C. His record on the road has 
been satisfactory in every respect, never during 
his years of service having had a wreck. 
Mr. Greig was born at Nunda, New York, in 
1851, and was married to Miss Lois Chapman 
of Illinois. They have four children, three 
daughters and one son, viz: Cressa, Helen, Stella 
and George. He is a member of B. of L. E. No. 
226, of Fort Dodge, and has his home at Chero- 
kee, Iowa. 




R. COOLEY, conductor at Waterloo, 
began his railroad career with the Illi- 
Q nois Central company at Dubuque, 
August i, 1886, as a brakeman. His 
first run was under Thomas Quinlan, for whom 
he set brakes eight months on a passenger train. 
Later he served on the " Clipper " run for about 
five months under conductor Jenness and later 
under Thomas Quinlan again and under different 
ones between Waterloo and Dubuque for about 
six months. Sickness then took Mr. Cooley off 
the road for a time and when he was again able 
to resume his work, he was given a run on a 
passenger train between Dubuque and Lyle un- 
der John Dougherty for a time, then spent one 
year as baggageman between Waterloo and Sioux 
City and then worked on a freight train on the 
east end under different men until he was pro- 
moted to conductor in the fall of 1892. Mr. 
Cooley's first work as conductor was also on the 
east end for a time, and then spent several years 
running both ways out of Waterloo. His present 
run is between Waterloo and Lyle. 



148 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



Mr. Cooley was born in Lorain county, 
Ohio, a son of Newell B. and Emeline (Cooper) 
Cooley, both of whom were also natives of Ohio. 
The parents always made their home in the state 
of their nativity, the mother still residing near 
Oberlin, but the father died in 1897. Our sub- 
ject located in Waterloo, Iowa, in 1888, and four 
years later he was married to Miss Annie C. 
Mathias, of Dubuque, who has since shared his 
Waterloo home. To this union has been born 
one child who bears the name of Marion M. Mr. 
Cooley is a member of Division No. 67, O. R. 
C. and also of Lodge No. 89, K. of P., both of 
Waterloo. He has been very successful since be- 
ing in the employ of the railroad company, his 
career has been free from accidents and up to 
the present time he has a clear record. 






in 1878 and located in Jesup; lived there about 
twenty months and then returned to his home in 
Vermont. In 1880 he again removed to Iowa 
and entered the employ of the Illinois Central 
Railroad company. In 1887 he was united in 
marriage to Miss Myrtle Staunton, of Waterloo, 
Iowa, and two children, Harry and Leonore, 
have been born to them. Mr. Robbins has been 
quite successful since locating in Iowa. He en- 
tered the employ of the railroad company without 
any capital whatever, and has gradually worked 
himself up to a good position. Besides this, by 
careful management and economy, he has been 
laying aside something for a rainy day, until he 
is now in possession of considerable Waterloo 
real estate, the rent of which adds materially to 
his monthly income. Socially he affiliates with 
Division No. 114, B. of L. E., and also the Blue 
Lodge and Chapter of the Masonic fraternity at 
Waterloo. 




ROBBINS, engineer at Waterloo, 
Iowa, began his railroad career April 
L Q 6th, 1882, as a wiper in the Illinois 
Central round house at Waterloo. 
August 2gth, of the same year, he began as 
fireman between Waterloo and Fort Dodge un- 
der Engineer James McNeil, working there one 
year, and then spent four years with Engineer 
Martin. During the winter of 1886 and '87, he 
went on a switch engine, and on August 
20, 1889, he crossed the cab and has since had 
charge of the levers. For a time he was in 
charge of a switch engine,. then ran extra out of 
Dubuque one winter, then seven weeks on the 
Cherokee & Dakota, later on the line between 
Waterloo and Fort Dodge, then spent the follow- 
ing summer at the head of a construction train, 
but since that time has been employed on a regu- 
lar run, changing only in 1899 when he was trans- 
ferred to a passenger run. 

Mr. Robbins was born in Elmore, Vt, a son 
of Truman and Betsey E. (Preston) Robbins, 
both natives of Vermont and always made their 
home in that state. The father died in 1864 and 
the mother in 1875. Our ? abject came to Iowa 




'ILLIAM J. HAVILAND, engineer 
for the Illinois Cenral, has been 
connected with the road since Oc- 
tober 1890, when he began firing. 
In 1896 he was promoted to engineer and since 
that time has had charge of the engine. 

He is the son of William Henry Havilancl, 
formerly a farmer in Bremer county, Iowa, but 
who is now deceased. Our subject is a native of 
Rock county, Wisconsin, and was born February 
23, 1868. The only railroad man in the family, 
he came to Waterloo in 1890, and shortly after 
secured a place in the operating department. 

Mr. Havilancl married Miss Ella Barnard, 
of Cherokee, Iowa, and they now reside at Fort 
Dodge. For three months he worked on the 
Yazoo & Mississippi Valley branch of the Illinois 
Central, and then returned to Iowa and has since 
been running out of Fort Dodge. He is a mem- 
ber of the B. of L. E. No. 226 and the B. of L. 
!". Xo. 222, of Fort Dodge, also of Waukanzee 
Lodge I. O. O. F. of Fort Dodge. He has a 
beautiful home at 1325 Fourth avenue, south. 





EDWARD T. JEFFERY. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



151 



COWARD TURNER JEFFERY, presi- 
dent of the Denver & Rio Grande 
Railroad Company, was born in Liver- 
pool, England, on April 6, 1843. He 
is a son of William S. and Jane (McMullen) 
Jeffery, of English descent, although his father 
was born at Greenock-on-the-Clyde, in Scotland, 
and his mother at Downpatrick, in Ireland. 
The senior Mr. Jeffery followed the sea, and 
when not engaged in his nautical avocation, re- 
sided in the cities of Liverpool, Portsmouth and 
Woolwich, in the order named, until his death, 
which occurred when Edward was six years of 
age. In 1850 the family emigrated to America, 
and settled first in Wheeling, West Virginia. 
Here the following six years of Edward's boy- 
hood were passed in minor occupations and in 
gaining the rudiments of an education. He was 
but thirteen when the family removed to Chica- 
go, in 1856, and in September of that year he 
entered the employ of the Illinois Central Rail- 
road Company, probably not dreaming of the 
distinction that awaited him as the future super- 
intendent and manager of that great corporation. 
His ambition at that early day did not extend be- 
yond reaping the rewards of faithful and honest 
work in the humbler duties of his calling. He 
entered the office of Samuel J. Hayes, superin- 
tendent of machinery, where he was employed as 
general errand and chore boy for about two 
months, when he was put to work in the tin and 
coppersmith shops, where he served three or four 
months, and then entered the machine shops of 
the company to learn the trade of a machinist. 
He served in this latter capacity until July 5, 
1858, when he was given a place by Mr. Hayes 
in the department of mechanical drawing. From 
this time, encouraged by the warm heart and 
good counsel of Mr. Hayes, he developed the 
ambition to fit himself for the complete mastery 
of both the science and the art of mechanical 
drawing and engineering. He entered upon a 
course of systematic studies which he continued 
for ten years, with such marked results that the 
privilege was accorded him of alternating study 
with his work as his duties permitted and he 
might feel inclined. At the age of eighteen he 



was on the rolls of the company as one of the 
regular mechanical draughtsmen. At twenty 
he was placed in full charge of the department 
of mechanical drawing. It is worthy of notice 
here that young Jeffery, at this early stage of 
his career, had perceived and applied in his own 
self-training the principle now advocated by the 
most advanced educators, viz : that of combining 
the labor of the hand and the brain, the work- 
shop and the study in the attainment of an edu- 
cation that shall meet the practical demands of 
an industrial calling. In this Mr. Jeffery an- 
ticipated most of our polytechnic and manual- 
training schools by the force of his own original 
mind. It does not appear that he took any sug- 
gestions from any of these schools or their 
founders. He continued his work and studies 
with such profit that at the age of twenty-five 
he was in possession of the entire range of 
sciences adapted to the highest efficiency in his 
occupation, and had also gained a wide breadth 
of general culture. Few men can be found 
whose talents or acquirements are more versa- 
tile than his. At the time he was placed over the 
department of mechanical drawing he was also 
made private secretary to the superintendent of 
machinery. At the age of twenty-eight he was 
appointed assistant superintendent of machinery, 
by John Newell, then president of the Illinois 
Central Railroad Company. Mr. Newell was 
thoroughly acquainted with Mr. Jeffery's capa- 
bilities, and being a typical self-made railroad 
man was not slow to open the way for promotion 
to deserving and energetic employes. During 
the six years of his service in this position, Mr. 
Jeffery was one of the most active and efficient 
officers of the road. His long experience com- 
bined with his practical work and study, had not 
only rendered him familiar with the mechanical 
departments in all their branches and details, but 
he had also acquired much knowledge of general 
railroad operations and management. Accord- 
ingly, in 1877, he was appointed to the office of 
general superintendent of the entire Illinois Cen- 
tral Railroad system. He held this responsible 
position until January i, 1885, at which time he 
was appointed general manager of all the de- 



10 



152 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



partments of the rpad, a position which he held 
till he resigned, in September 1889, for the pur- 
pose of obtaining needed rest, after so long and 
arduous service in the interests of the company. 
While he may be called a self-made man in the 
best sense of that phrase, yet the company was 
liberal in the recognition of his genius and in' 
affording him a fair opportunity for its develop- 
ment. Thus from an office boy he rose by suc- 
cessive stages to the management of a great cor- 
poration, and every promotion he received was 
fully earned by hard and faithful work, and was 
conferred upon him unsolicited. In 1885, when 
the international railway congress was held at' 
Brussels, he was the representative in that body 
of the Illinois Central Railroad Company, and 
the only American delegate present. In his 
younger days he was president for several years 
of the Young Men's Literary Society, of Chi- 
cago, an institution which did much to foster a 
literary spirit among a large number of citizens, 
and which carried on its roll of membership some 
of the brightest young men of the city. He was 
a frequent though anonymous writer in prose 
and verse, and several of his poems were very 
generally copied by the press of the country. 
The following lines written and published by 
him more than a quarter of a century ago have 
been reprinted from time to time : 

OUR DUTY. 

The heart that is sad where a heart should be light, 

Or false where a heart should be true, 
Let us guide through the darkness obscuring the light, 
And point to the future eternal and bright, 
And teach it to dare and to do. 

The soul that is darkened by passion and crime 

Let us win from its idols of clay, 
And lead to the heroes and sages sublime, 
Whose names are inscribed on the records of time, 

Unfading. Immortals are they! 

Let us fight for the right, though the struggle be long, 

With firm and unswerving desire. 
Let us manfully battle oppression and wrong, 
With hearts that are earnest and trusty and strong ; 

With God and the truth to inspire. 



Let Us dare to be noble men, nature's own pride, 

And dare to be true to each other. 
For the earth is a homestead so fruitful and wide, 
We can live, we can love, we can toil side by side, 

And each unto all be a brother. 

Mr. Jeffery is a prominent member of the 
American Railroad Master Mechanics' Associa- 
tion, a member of the Chicago, Iroquois and 
Calumet Clubs, being vice-president of the latter, 
and belongs to the Masonic fraternity. Socially 
as well as intellectually he is held in high repute. 
In his political affiliations he is democratic, but 
takes no active part in political affairs. The 
three principal ideas which governed Mr. Jeffery 
in his official railroad career were : First, to es- 
tablish mutual confidence and kindly relations 
between the corporation and its employes. Sec- 
ond, to gain the respect of the general public, and 
bring about a clearer and more intelligent com- 
prehension of the relations between the people 
and the carriers, and of their obligations to each 
other. Third, to so conduct corporate affairs as 
to secure and retain the confidence of investors 
and the financial world. It is believed by those 
who are qualified to judge, that he met with a 
large measure of success in carrying out these 
ideas. With the people and with working men, 
Mr. Jeffery has always been in close fellowship, 
and few men have been capable of exerting a 
stronger influence over railway employes. One 
instance may be cited. Soon after the strike oc- 
curred on the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy 
road, in 1888, and a general tie-up on all the 
roads of the country was threatened, he was re- 
quested by a few conservative labor men to use 
his influence with those who favored a general 
strike, a large mass-meeting of whom were in 
session in Turner Hall, on Twelfth street, ready 
to take radical action in the matter of a general 
suspension of work which would have been dis- 
astrous to all the industrial, commercial and fi- 
nancial interests of the country. Mr. Jeffery 
met the excited multitude, gained their attention, 
addressed them for over two hours, and by his 
powerful and conciliatory arguments succeeded 
in averting the impending disaster. For this 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



153 



timely service he received public recognition and 
many letters of congratulation and thanks from 
the leading merchants and business men of the 
country. As soon as it was known that he had 
resigned his position in the Illinois Central Rail- 
road Company, Mr. Jeffery was selected by the 
mayor and leading citizens interested in pro- 
moting the World's Columbian Expostion, to 
visit the Exposition in Paris, study it and make a 
report upon it, and at the same time to promote, 
as far as practicable, the claims of Chicago as 
the site of the Columbian Exposition. He went 
to Paris and was entirely successful in his mis- 
sion, remaining in that city a sufficient length of 
time to gather and condense a vast amount of 
invaluable information respecting the Paris Ex- 
position, which he published in one of the ablest 
and most concise reports ever prepared upon that 
subject. This report furnished all the data 
which have been so freely used by the directors 
and officers of the Columbian Exposition. It 
was published in London and has been translated 
into the French and other European languages. 
Mr. Jeffery declined to accept any compensation 
for these and other services in connection with 
the Exposition. Upon the organization of the 
directory, Mr. Jeffery was chosen a member of 
the board. He was strongly urged to accept at 
a high salary, the position of director general, 
but he refused the honor. He also declined to 
have his name used as a candidate for the pres- 
idency of the board of directors, to fill the va- 
cancy caused by the resignation of Mr. Lyman 
J. Gage. He was for a year and a half chairman 
of the committee on grounds and buildings, and 
was in every way efficient and influential in or- 
ganizing and constructing the great interna- 
tional exposition of 1892-3, giving his time and 
energies to it without pay. Chicago is very 
much indebted to his influence for securing the 
location of the enterprise in this city. In Jan- 
uary 1890, he was sent to Washington, and made 
an unanswerable argument before the Senate of 
the United States in behalf of Chicago as the 
site for the Exposition. Mr. Jeffery is a close 
student, a fluent writer, and a ready speaker. 
He has delivered various addresses on transpor- 



tation and other public questions before state 
legislatures, municipal councils, boards of state 
and inter-state railroad commissions and other 
bodies, which rank among the best literature of 
their class. For nearly a year and a half he was 
connected with a new enterprise having in view 
the construction of large locomotive works in 
the city of Chicago. Many of the leading citi- 
zens were associated with him in the undertaking 
and he accepted the presidency of a company 
which was organized for the purpose stated. It 
was natural, however, that his inclinations and 
the associations and habits of life formed 
through thirty-three years of continuous railway 
service would lead him to return to his old pro- 
fession. Many lucrative offers were made to 
him by railway companies after he retired from 
the Illinois Central road, but all were declined 
until October 1891, when he accepted his present 
distinguished position as president of the Den- 
ver & Rio Grande railway, with headquarters at 
Denver, Colo., where he now resides. The cir- 
cumstances under which this important change 
in Mr. Jeffery 's affairs was made, were as fol- 
lows: Having been solicited in September 1891, 
to act as arbitrator in a controversy at Denver, 
he, while there in that capacity, was proffered 
by the directors of the Denver & Rio Grande, 
the presidency of that road, and with such a 
warmth and heartiness that he accepted it. 
When this became known in Chicago, the press 
of the city were unanimous in expressions of 
sincere regret at the loss the community was to 
sustain at the removal of so valuable and popu- 
lar a man, though at the same time rejoicing at 
his new and deserved honors. The following 
editorial, which appeared in one of the leading 
papers, is typical of the many that voiced the 
public sentiment : 

"The Denver & Rio Grande Railway Company is 
to be congratulated on securing for the difficult office 
of president and general manager, so able and amiable 
a man as E. T. Jeffery. The city of Denver is happy 
in the accession of a good citizen. But Chicago, though 
extending its felicitations to the fortunate company, 
and the no less fortunate city, can not let the occasion 
pass without an expression of regret at the loss we 
experience in Denver's gain. Mr. Jeffery has lived in 



154 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



Chicago from boyhood. Here he made that wonderful 
race from the workshop to the general superinten- 
dency of a great railroad. In all stages of advance- 
ment he has been found more than equal to the re- 
sponsibilities of his position, and a loyal and patriotic 
citizen. Mr. Jeffery's public spirit has best been illus- 
trated by his services to the Columbian Fair. As a 
member of the directors and especially as chairman 
of the vastly important committee on grounds and 
buildings, he has been alert, indefatigable, invaluable. 
It is no disparagement to the other members of the 
directory to say that Mr. Jeffery has led them all in 
value of his services, bestowed freely and with no 
other motive than an admirable public spirit. It will 
not be easy to fill the place Mr. Jeffery will leave va- 
cant, it will be harder still to efface the traces which his 
master mind has left on the records of the fair." 

Mr. Jeffery was married April 2, 1877, to 
Miss Virgina O. Clarke, of Frederick, Mary- 
land. They have two children : James Clarke 
and Edna Turner, aged thirteen and eleven years 
respectively. 

Mr. Jeffery's career in the West has been a 
marked success. The railway of which he is at 
the head consists of 1,900 miles, located almost 
wholly in the state of Colorado, reaching all the 
principal mining, agricultural and commercial 
points of the state. Deep canons, elevated 
mountain passes, sharp curves and heavy grades 
are the features of this remarkable railway. His 
administration of its affairs for the past seven 
years has been most wonderful in its results. 
Out of the greatest business depressions, ag- 
gravated by the unprecedented fall in the mar- 
ket value of silver, of which metal that state is 
so noted a producer, and amidst other disturb- 
ances of trade and commerce that have occurred, 
and surrounded by bankrupt railways, the Den- 
ver & Rio Grande has emerged unscathed, with 
a financial record stronger than at any time in 
its history. Since he took up his residence in 
Colorado, Mr. Jeffery has been a factor, and a 
potent one, in all those affairs which go to pro- 
mote the welfare of its citizens and its material 
progress. He is a representative man in the 
broadest sense of the term. His unprecedented 
clear and right perception of things, and his in- 
fluence for peace and harmony have been ex- 
erted with good results in trying circumstances 



affecting the welfare of her citizens, and particu- 
larly between employers and employes he has 
been instrumental in bringing about a better un- 
derstanding between them, a higher regard for 
the rights of each other, and confidence based 
upon the mutuality of their interests. In all 
movements for the good of the community he 
has taken an active part since he has been in 
Colorado, and his eloquence on many occasions 
has encouraged public enterprise and aided 
charity. 



JP. REECE, conductor on the Amboy 
division of the Illinois Central Rail- 
Q road, first saw the light in Columbus 
Junction, Iowa, July 28, 1866. He 
is the son of William and Mary (Colton) Reece, 
who died October I4th, 1899, an d Novmber I5th, 
1892, respectively. He attended the schools 
of Columbus Junction, and at the age of nineteen 
went to Colorado and drove a team for about two 
years. He then entered the service of the Denver 
& South Park R. R. Co. as brakeman, remaining 
in that position for three years, then served in 
the same capacity with the Denver & Rio Grande 
six months, the Colorado Central six months, 
and with the B. C. R. & N. a short time, after 
which he went to Rock Island and was employed 
by the Chicago & Rock Island company as a 
switchman about eight months, served the C. M. 
& St. P. as yardmaster at VanHorn, Iowa, six 
months, then returned to the B. C. R. & N. 
where he remained about six months. On the 
22nd of October, 1893, Mr. Reece moved to Am- 
boy, and entered the service of the I. C. R. R. as 
a brakeman, and in July 1895, was promoted to 
conductor, which position he retains at the present 
time, having removed in 1894 to Freeport where 
he now resides. 

Mr. Reece was married June i, 1892, to 
Miss Jessie May Sissley, of Burlington, Iowa. 
She was born in Walker, Iowa, August 28, 1871. 
He is a member of the O. R. C. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



155 




IDNEY D. BRISTOW is an engineer 
in the freight service of the Illinois 
Central, on the Cherokee division. He 
entered the service of the company 
October i, 1888, as fireman on a switch engine 
in the yards at Cherokee, and was with many of 
the old engineers on this division. Some years 
after coming to the I. C. he was promoted to 
engineer taking charge of a switch engine in the 
Cherokee yards and serving there for two years. 
He was then appointed to the regular run which 
he now holds. During his service, he has never 
had a member of his crew injured in any way, a 
record of which he is justly proud. Mr. Bristow 
was born at Ontario, Canada, June 9, 1867. His 
father, Isaac Bristow, resides with him and has 
charge of the store house for the I. C. Socially, 
our subject is connected with B. of L. E. No. 226, 
of Fort Dodge, and is also a member of B. of 
L. F. and A. O. U. W. of Cherokee. 




F. CAREY, passenger engineer, Illi- 
nois Central Railroad, began in the 
iO serv i ce f the company in 1865, in 
the Dubuque offices, where he re- 
mained for two years under J. T. Farley, and 
also worked in the freight house about two years 
under W. F- Blake. March 9, 1869, he was 
placed in the Dubuque yards where he served 
the company until 1874. At that time he went 
on the road as fireman and in the fall of 1879 
was licensed to handle the throttle and lever, run- 
ning for sixteen months in the Dubuque yards 
under T. W. Place, and later worked on different 
branches of the system until 1885 when he was 
given a run between Dubuque and Waterloo. 
April q, 1898 he was promoted to passenger en- 
gineer, and now runs between Dubuque and 
Waterloo. 

Mr. Carey married Mary F. Case, of Du- 
buque, and to them have been born nine children, 
six of whom are deceased. Those living are Jos- 
eph, George and Laona. Mr. Carey is a native of 



Vermont, while Mrs. Carey was born in Flint, 
Michigan. Mr. Carey is a member of B. of L. 
E. No. 114, K. of P. No. 89, A. O. U. W. No. 
274, and the Foresters. He has been successful 
in his railroad career, and is popular with his 
employers and the patrons of the road. 




I HARLES F. HILDRETH, former agent 
of the Illinois Central Railroad at Free- 
port, 111., is a native of the Green 
Mountain state and was born in Ben- 
nington county, October 15, 1861. His father, 
Jerone D. Hildreth, who was engaged in the 
manufacture of cotton goods, died in 1891, while 
his mother, formerly Miss Eliza M. Turner, is 
living at the age of sixty-nine years. 

Our subject attended the public schools of 
New England and Ontario, Canada, and after 
two years in the Academy of Prattville, Ala., 
at the age of fifteen, he began work in the cot- 
ton factory at that place, of which his father was 
superintendent, and later was employed in 
the cotton mills at Cottondale, Alabama. When 
eighteen years of age Mr. Hildreth studied tele- 
graphy, and served the Chicago, Pekin & South- 
western R. R. (now a part of the Santa Fe 
system) as station agent at Groveland, 111., four 
months and at Morton, 111., for sixteen months. 
He then entered the employ of the I. C. R. R. 
as night operator at Ackley, Iowa, remaining 
there one month and at LeMars, Iowa, three 
months. He was then made ticket agent and 
served in that capacity at South Park, near Chi- 
cago, for two months, Heyworth, two weeks, 
Patoka, three and one-half years, and then took 
charge of the ticket office at Decatur for the I. 
C. R. R., the Illinois Midland (now Vandalia) 
and the P. D. & E. for a period of nine months, 
after which he acted as joint agent at El Paso 
for the I. C. and T. P. & W. railroads a little 
more than three years, then went to Pana where 
he remained as I. C. freight agent about sixteen 
months. In September 1891, Mr. Hildreth came 



156 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



to Freeport as freight agent for the I. C. R. R., 
and in July 1892, severed his connection with the 
railroad and is now in the real estate and insur- 
ance husiness and is likewise interested in the 
manufacture of paper boxes. 

On the 28th of August, 1889, Mr. Hildreth 
was united in marriage with Miss Nellie P. 
McLafferty, of Hutchinson, Kansas, but whose 
life till within a few months of her marriage was 
spent at El Paso, 111. 

Mrs. Hildreth received a liberal education at 
the State Normal School at Normal, 111., and 
taught school a number of years. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hildreth have no children. They are members 
of the First Presbyterian church, and Mr. Hil- 
dreth is a staunch Republican in politics. 






OP. ESTEY, engineer at Waterloo, be- 
gan firing for the Illinois Central 
11 lAO company September 26, 1886. Pre- 
vious to this, however, he had worked 
in the Waterloo shops from April to September 
of the same year before there was an opening for 
him on the road. His first run was between 
Waterloo and Fort Dodge, and the first engineer 
under whom he served was A. C. DuBois. After 
a service of ten months on a freight engine, Mr. 
Estey was promoted to a passenger run and 
served three years under L. Smith. August 17, 
1890, he was set up to engineer, worked one year 
in the yards at Waterloo, then on the main line, 
running east, west and north out of Waterloo, 
covering every portion of the Iowa division, un- 
til 1897, and since then has had a regular run 
between Waterloo and Fort Dodge. The record 
f Mr. Estey's railroad career is not dotted 1>\ 
a single accident. 

The subject of this sketch is a son of Charles 
and Sylvia (Peck) Estey, both of Vermont. In 
1885 he went to Nebraska for the purpose of 
visiting his sister a short time, but on his return 
he stopped in Waterloo and was there married 



in 1887 and has since made his home there. The 
estimable lady of Mr. Estey's choice was known 
in her girlhood as Miss Nellie Armbruster and 
her native city is Galena, 111. This union has 
been blessed by the presence of a son, Fred. 

Mr. Estey is a member of the following fra- 
ternities : Division No. 114 B. of L. E., Lodge 
No. 274 A. O. U. W. and the Blue Lodge, No. 
105, of the Masonic fraternity, all of Waterloo. 




AVID L. CHEVALIER, a prominent 
engineer, residing in Fort Dodge, be- 
gan with the Illinois Central November 
3, 1889, as fireman. He engaged in 
firing seven years and on' November 1896, was 
promoted to engineer, and since that time he has 
had charge of an engine running between Sioux 
City and Fort Dodge. 

He is a native of Dubuque, Iowa, born De- 
cember 23, 1867, a son of David L. Chevalier 
who was one of the oldest engineers on the Illi- 
nois Central and used to run a passenger engine 
between Dubuque and Waterloo. He is now a 
farmer and resides in South Dakota. 

Our subject comes from an old and promi- 
nent railroad family, two of his brothers being 
in the service, one an engineer on the Chicago, 
St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha railroad, living 
in Sioux City, Iowa, and the other a fireman on 
the Illinois Central. An uncle, H. L. Chevalier, 
(see sketch elsewhere in this volume) is an en- 
gineer on the Illinois Central ; another uncle, H. 
Girard, deceased, was an engineer on the Illinois 
Central for thirty-eight years ; and a cousin, A. 
E. Girard, (see sketch on another page of this 
work) is an engineer on the Freeport division of 
the Illinois Central. Our subject has been in 
several small wrecks but. never injured. He is 
a member of Division No. 222, B. of L. F., Divi- 
sion Xo. 226, B. of L. E. and the Royal Arca- 
num, all of Fort Dodge. Mr. Chevalier married 
Miss Dean Cronenberger, of Fort Dodge, and 
they reside at No. 603, Third avenue, south. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



157 



LE. ROPER, better known as "Lee," en- 
gineer for the Illinois Central at Fort 
Q Dodge, has been with the company 
since 1887. He first worked with the 
Iowa Telephone Co. for some time and then be- 
gan as fireman for the Illinois Central and 
worked in that position until 1895, when he was 
promoted to engineer and began work in freight 
service running between Fort Dodge and Sioux 
City. Mr. Roper is a native of Fond du Lac, 
Wisconsin, and is a son of Samuel E. Roper, who 
was a railroad man and was yardmaster at Fort 
Dodge for the Illinois Central for nineteen years, 
at the end of which time he went to Eagle Grove, 
Iowa, where he is now engaged in business. A 
second son was "caller" on the Illinois Cen- 
tral at Fort Dodge, where he died at the age of 
nineteen years. 

Our subject married Miss Mary Riffenberry, 
of Fort Dodge, and they have become the pa- 
rents of four children, Letha, Ionia, Antia and 
Horatio. Since his marriage he has always lived 
in Fort Dodge, and he now resides at 603 Sec- 
ond avenue, where he now has a neat and com- 
fortable home. 

Mr. Roper is a member of the B. of L. E., 
No. 226, of Fort Dodge. He has never been in 
any wrecks, although he was injured once, caus- 
ing him the loss of two weeks' time. He is well 
and favorably known along the line. 




HARLES L. SMITH, an engineer of 
Fort Dodge, began with the Illinois 
Central in 1889 as fireman, and worked 
at that seven years, when he was then 
promoted to engineer. He is a native of Fort 
Dodge, Iowa, and a son of Loring W. and Caro- 
line (Gardner) Smith. The father was a farmer 
near Fort Dodge, where he died in 1891. Our 
subject was educated in the common and high 
schools of Fort Dodge, and then began railroad- 
ing under H. M. Rhodes, engineer, and fired 



for him until he was promoted. His engine at 
present is No. 1511, and his run is from Fort 
Dodge to Sioux City. Mr. Smith is a member of 
the B. of L. E. No. 226, and also belongs to the 
Royal Arcanum of Fort Dodge. 

He resides at 1216 'Fifth avenue, south, 
where he has recently built a neat cottage home. 



JOHN DOHERTY, a retired passenger 
conductor on the Illinois Central Rail- 
road, at Dubuque, Iowa, began work on 
this road as a clerk in the freight depot 
at Cedar Falls under W. B. Boss. He was thus 
engaged three years and a half from the spring 
of 1 86 1, and then started as brakeman under S. 
A. Wolcott, running west out of Dubuque, and 
for about eight months ran to Cedar Falls. Af- 
ter being promoted to the position of conductor, 
he worked between Dubuque and Fort Dodge 
about twelve years, running the first night pas- 
senger train west of Dubuque, then worked be- 
tween Dubuque and Lyle, and later returned to 
the main line, making an aggregate of twenty- 
seven years of service for the Illinois Central 
Railroad. Mr. Doherty has left a splendid 
record on the company's books, for he has never 
met with serious accident, and an injury of any 
kind has never been inflicted upon himself. 

Mr. Doherty was born near Dublin, Ireland, 
and at the age of eight years came to America 
with his parents and located in Dubuque, Iowa. 
One of his brothers, G. F. Doherty, was also a 
conductor on the Illinois Central for several 
years. In May 1869, our subject was united in 
marriage to Miss Mary J. Redfern, of Bedford 
county. Pa. Since retiring from the road Mr. 
Doherty engaged in the wholesale liquor busi- 
ness for two years in Dubuque, and since then has 
been dealing quite extensively in western lands 
and Dubuque real estate. He is well known in 
Dubuque and portions of the West, and enjoys 
the confidence and respect of all who know him. 



158 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



JOHN WILLIAM HANSON, yard fore- 
man at Fort Dodge, has been in the em- 
ploy of the company twenty-two years, 
beginning in 1878 on the section as a 
laborer. He worked at the same six months and 
then was " wiper" in the round house at Fort 
Dodge for two years, and for one year was en- 
gaged in car repairing in the round house. He 
then served as switchman in the yards at Fort 
Dodge until 1885, when he was made yard fore- 
man and has since continued in that position. 
Mr. Hanson is a native of Christiania, Norway, 
born September 14, 1854, a son of John Hanson, 
who is a carpenter by trade and resides at Fergus 
Falls, Minn. Our subject married Miss Bridget 
Daily, who has borne him four children, Mary, 
Eddie, now in the employ of he Illinois Central, 
Georgia and Bernidetta. Mr. Hanson has been 
in several wrecks and was twice injured, once 
in jumping from the train and was also caught 
in a "frog" and injured badly. He is a charter 
member of the A. O. U. W. of Fort Dodge, and 
a charter member also of the B. of R. T. of Fort 
Dodge, Lodge No. 171. He now owns a nice 
residence at No. 603 Fourth avenue, and is a 
respected citizen and railroad man of Fort Dodge, 
Iowa. 




'ILLIAM Z. WRIGHT is one of the 
old and respected employes of the 
Illinois Central. He entered the 
service of the company at Fort 
Dodge, Iowa, on September 9, 1869, as fireman, 
with Engineer Col. Thomas. He remained in 
this position three years, and during the follow- 
ing five years ran an engine between Waterloo 
and Sioux City. He was then made foreman of 
the round house where he served about ten years, 
retiring to accept the position of train master at 
Fort Dodge, where he spent the greater part of 
1885. He then returned to his former position as 
foreman of the engine house, but in 1887 was 
transferred to Cherokee and given a regular run 
in the passenger service between Cherokee and 



Sioux Falls, South Dakota, which he still holds. 
Mr. Wright is a native of Willoughby, O., 
where he was born June 7, 1850. He has an 
amiable wife and an interesting family of three 
daughters, viz : May, Bertha and Kittie. ,He 
is quite prominent in railroad circles socially, 
being a member of B. of L. E. No. 226, of Fort 
Dodge, for twenty-five years, and for ten years 
Chief of the lodge ; is also a member of Cherokee 
Lodge No. 307, A. F. & A. M., and A. O. U. W. 
No. 197. He resides in Cherokee, and there is 
not a better known man all over the Iowa division 
of the Illinois Central. 




JOYCE, conductor at Waterloo, be- 
gan his railroad career as a section 
hand at Cedar Falls in 1880, and was 
engaged in that line of work for two 
years. Subsequently he had charge of the 
freight and baggage rooms at the same city for 
four years and then began as a brakeman between 
Waterloo and Fort Dodge and served at different 
times under the following conductors : Ed. Spear, 
Henry Mullan, J. Keeler, and his brother, T. M. 
Joyce. Mr. Joyce was a brakeman for twenty- 
three months and in the fall of 1887, he was pro- 
moted to the position of conductor and for sev- 
eral years thereafter he ran trains out of Waterloo 
both east and west on the main line and also north 
on the branch. At present he is running a con- 
struction train out of Waterloo. Mr. Joyce has 
been very successful as a railroad employe, hav- 
ing given his employers satisfaction from the very 
start as is attested by the unusually short time it 
required for him to attain the position of conduc- 
tor. His entire career has also been without re- 
ceiving the slightest injury. 

Mr. Joyce was born in Forreston, 111., a son 
of Michael and Margaret Joyce, both natives of 
Ireland. The father, also was an employe of 
the Illinois Central company, having served on 
the section for thirty years. He was killed at 
Waterloo, in the year 1869, but the mother is 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



161 



still living and is making her home at Cedar Falls, 
Iowa. Three of their sons, besides the one whose 
name appears at the head of this article, are rail- 
road employes : T. M. Joyce, a conductor on the 
Illinois Central at Waterloo; J. Joyce, a passen- 
ger conductor on the Sioux City & Northern 
Railroad ; and P. F. Joyce, yardmaster at Fort 
Dodge. Our subject was married at Fort Dodge, 
in 1892, to Miss Ella Harrington, of that city 
and their home has been made happy by the pres- 
ence of three children whose names in the order 
of their birth are Earl, John and Myrtle. Mr. 
Joyce holds a membership in Lodge No. 67, O. R. 
C. and also in Lodge No. 274, A. O. U. W. both 
of Waterloo. 



JAMES D. PLACE, the clerk of the oil 
room at the shops and round house at 
Waterloo, Iowa, ranks among the oldest 
men in the employ of the Illinois Central 
Railroad. He was born in the town of Acworth, 
Sullivan county, N. H., his natal day being Aug. 
17, 1830. He received a common school edu- 
cation in his native county and was engaged 
principally in farming until he began railroad- 
ing at the early age of twenty years, and has 
pursued that vocation almost continuously ever 
since. His first experience was with the 
Northern Railroad of New Hampshire, now a 
part of the Boston & Maine System, in 1851, 
serving as fireman on an engine named " Frank- 
lin " under Engineer James Blaisedell, now de- 
ceased, and later fired the engine "Blackwater" 
under James Bachelder, also deceased. In those 
days it did not tak so long to become an engineer 
as it does now, and ten months after he entered 
the service of the railroad, Mr. Place was given 
charge of the " Shaker Engine." 

After spending two and a half years with 
the Northern Railroad of New Hampshire, Mr. 
Place came west and began work for the Illinois 
Central company, in August 1853, running en- 
gine No. 9 on construction work from Chicago 



to Kankakee before the bridge at the latter place 
was built. November 6, 1853, he was trans- 
ferred to Freeport. 111., with engine No. 13, and 
at that time the track was not laid as far north as 
Lena, neither was the road graded south of 
Freeport, and only ten miles of track was laid 
on the northern division. 

January i, 1854, a train ran into Warren, 
and in September, of the same year the first train 
was run as far west as Scales Mound. October 
3ist, the first regular train ran into Galena; 
Rensselaer Smith was engineer of the engine, 
No. 2, and Conductor William Thayer in charge 
of the train ; and the first regular train out of 
Galena to points farther east was one day later 
drawn by engine No. 45, with the subject of 
our sketch at the levers and Conductor O. B. Wy- 
Tian in charge. Mr. Place also took the first pas- 
senger train into Dunleith (now East Dubuque) 
with engine No. 37, on the I2th day of June, 
1855, with L. P. Pettibone, conductor, in charge 
of the train. Even at this time there were but 
two regular passenger trains running each way 
out of Freeport. In the spring of 1856, Mr. 
Place severed his connection with the Illinois 
Central company and spent six months in the em- 
ploy of the Chicago & Galena Union Rail- 
road, and spent two months in Minnesota, 
and then returned to the Central road and 
for a time plied between Amboy and Dunleith. 
In June 1857, he went south, but after spend- 
ing a few months on the Memphis & Charleston 
line, he returned to Amboy and for two years 
did no railroad work. In 1859, however, he 
secured a position on the Dubuque & Sioux City 
Railroad, running between Dubuque and Cedar 
Falls, and was thus employed until the summer 
of 1862. 

August 14, 1862, Mr. Place enlisted in com- 
pany F, Seventy-fifth Illinois Volunteer Infan- 
try, and served under Buell, Rosecrans, Sher- 
man and lastly under " Pap " Thomas, partici- 
pating in the following battles : Perryville, Stone 
River, Chickamauga, Pine Mountain, Kennesaw 
Mountain, New Hope Church, Atlanta, Look- 
out Mountain. Missionary Ridge, Franklin, 
Tenn., and several other minor engagements. 



162 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



He was mustered out at Nashville, June 12, 1865, 
and was paid off in Chicago, June 3Oth, follow- 
ing. 

After the close of the war, Mr. Place re- 
turned to the Illinois Central company and ap- 
plied for a situation, and was given charge of an 
engine on the Chicago division running between 
Chicago and Champaign, but later was trans- 
ferred to run between Centralia and Cairo. Dur- 
ing this time he was caught in a collision at 
Hanging Rock, two miles north of Makanda, 
March 8, 1866, in which he lost his right leg 
and was laid up for about a year. As soon as 
he was able to resume his duties, he was given 
charge of an engine to run between Chicago and 
Kankakee, 111., for a short time, and then went 
to Iowa and took charge of an engine running 
between Waterloo and Mona until January 7, 
1894. During this year Mr. Place retired from 
the road after an engine service of over forty 
years, and was placed in charge of the oil room 
at the shops and round house at Waterloo, the 
position he still holds. Socially he affiliates 
with Division No. 114, B. of L. E., of Waterloo, 
and Robert Anderson Post No. 68, G. A. R. 






ANIEL J. REARDON, conductor on 
the Illinois Central, Freeport division, 
is a native of Freeport, where he was 
born August 20, 1871. His parents. 
Jerry and Mary (Flanagan) Reardon, are resi- 
dents of Freeport, of which place his father is 
now city treasurer. 

Our subject was a student in St. Mary's 
parochial school until March 1885, when he en- 
tered the U. S. mail service at Freeport and re- 
mained in that position for three years ; served as 
clerk for a period of eight months in the German 
Insurance office; then acted as time keeper in 
the office of E. O. Dana, master mechanic of the 
I. C. R. R., eight months. At this time he en- 
tered the service of the C. M. & St. P. R. R. as 
brakeman, and after two years experience began 




work for the I. C. R. R. in the same capacity, 
where he remained until September 1899, when 
his faithful service was rewarded by promotion 
to conductor, which position he now holds. 

June 23, 1897, Mr. Reardon was married to 
Miss Sarah Wolf, of Freeport, who was born in 
Lena, October 27, 1875. This union has been 
blest with one son, Martin, born June 18, 1899. 
Mr. Reardon is Catholic in his religious views, 
is a Democrat in politics, and is socially connected 
with the B. of R. T. 




G. FLANAGAN, train despatcher 
for the Illinois Central Railroad, 
L Q Freeport, 111., was born in Freeport, 
November 10, 1865. His father, 
James Flanagan, was born in County Limerick, 
Ireland, in 1812, and while in his native country, 
worked on a farm. He was married Feb. 20, 
1844, to Honora Hayes, also a native of Ireland, 
and born April 24, 1824. He came with his 
family to America, landing at New York July 4, 
1851, and located in Binghamton, N. Y., where 
he worked for his brother-in-law, Martin Hayes, 
who was supervisor on the Erie railroad. In 
1857 he moved to Freeport and entered the ser- 
vice of the I. C. R. R. as section foreman, and re- 
mained in that position until he resigned in 1885. 
He died December 28, 1891, his wife having pre- 
ceded him January 6, 1889. James Flanagan, 
by his industry and thrift, had acquired consider- 
able property. He bought eight lots in Freeport, 
and erected the house on the corner of Float and 
Winnesheik streets, where our subject was born, 
and subsequently built the fine brick house in 
which subject now resides. 

M. (1. Flanagan attended the public schools 
of Freeport, and in 1881 entered the employ of 
the C. M. & St. P. R. R. as an operator which 
position he retained for about four years, and 
also served as train despatcher at Racine, Wis- 
consin, and Aberdeen, S. Dakota, for three and 
one-half years. He left the C. M. & St. P. R. R. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



163 



and came to Freeport, securing a position with 
the I. C. R. R. as telegraph operator and extra 
despatches In 1891 he was appointed train de- 
spatcher which position he still retains. On the 
231x1 of November, 1892, Mr. Flanagan was mar- 
ried to Miss Mary Scanlan, of Freeport. She 
was horn December 24, 1866, and died December 
25, 1893, .leaving twins, Mary and Margaret, 
horn December 12, 1893. Mr. Flanagan is a 
Catholic, and a member of the Catholic Order of 
Foresters. He also belongs to the M. W. A., 
is a member of the Train Despatchers' Associa- 
tion of America, and is a Democrat in politics. 



T. GREGORY, freight engineer on 
Illinois Central Railroad, at Water- 
loo, Iowa, entered the service of the 
I. C. R. R. at Waterloo, December 
1884, as fireman on the main line, making his 
first trip with Engineer Bruce. He then fired a 
short time for J. Griffin between Waterloo and 
Sioux City, two years for J. D. Place on passen- 
ger engine between Waterloo and Lyle, and later 
for other engineers, and was then promoted to 
engineer July 1888, having previously run a 
switch engine for about eight months. His first 
work as engineer was in the Waterloo, Cherokee 
and Dubuque yards. In 1889 he ran between 
Centralia and Cairo from May to September, 
then returned to Waterloo and ran in the con- 
struction service on the Cherokee division for a 
short time, and after running extra on the Iowa 
lines was given his present run from Waterloo to 
Ft. Dodge in 1895. 

Mr. Gregory was born in Pittsford, N. Y., 
of which state his parents, Daniel and Emily 
(Tefft) Gregory, were natives. Mr. Gregory 
married Miss Jennie White, of Manchester, la., 
and has one son, Lorenzo E. \Yhile firing, in 
the spring of 1885, Mr. Gregory had a very nar- 
row e?cape from death. The engine was struck 
at Lizzard Tank by a double header train, and he 
was knocked off the water tank, caught under the 
train, and dragged for some distance, which laid 



him up for about two months. Since handling 
the throttle he has been so fortunate as to escape 
further accidents. He is a member of the B. of 
L. E., Division No. 114, and the Masonic Lodge 
No. 105, both of Waterloo. 




J. FAIRBURN, passenger engineer 
at Waterloo, Iowa, began his railroad 
career at Fort Dodge, Iowa, August 
24, 1880, in the capacity of fireman 
for the Illinois Central company. After spend- 
ing eight months at Fort Dodge, Mr. Fairburn 
worked on the main line as an extra for some 
time. His first regular run was under L. Smith 
on Engine No. 150, running on the " West 
End," where he was employed for about a year 
and then worked on a passenger engine with 
Henry Colburn between Waterloo and Sioux 
City for a time. Subsequently he served as 
hostler at Fort Dodge for two winters, and then 
fired for C. W. Baldwin on the "West End" on 
a passenger engine two years. December 18, 
1885, Mr. Fairburn was set up to engineer, 
worked in the yards at Waterloo for a short time, 
and then on the main line as an extra, running 
over all parts of the Iowa division until it was 
divisioned off. His sphere was then limited to 
that portion of the line that lies between Water- 
loo and Fort Dodge, and in 1898 he was pro- 
moted to his present position on the right side of 
a passenger engine running on the same division. 
Throughout his entire career as a railroad em- 
ploye, Mr. Fairburn has not met with serious ac- 
cident. 

Mr. Fairburn was born sixteen miles north 
of the city in which he now makes his home, the 
son of Robert and Elizabeth (Churchill) Fair- 
burn, the former a native of England and the lat- 
ter of Michigan. The father was a carpenter 
by occupation and worked for the Illinois Central 
company for twenty-three years, repairing de- 
pots, etc., along the entire line. Our subject 
was married in 1882, at Jancsville, Iowa, to Miss 



164 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



Fannie Loveland. In the social circles of Water- 
loo, he affiliates with Division No. 114, B. of L. 
F., Blue Lodge No. 105, A. F. & A. M., and 
Rowland Lodge No. 274, A. O. U. W. 

Mr. Fairburn has always been a hard work- 
ing man, is thorough and systematic in his work, 
and has been very successful in life. He is 
known as a man whose moral character is above 
reproach, and he commands the respect and es- 
teem of all who have the pleasure of his acquain- 
tance 




ICHARD WILLIAM ORMSBY, pas- 
senger engineer on the Illinois Cen- 
tral Railroad, Freeport division, one 
of the old reliable engineers, entered 
the service of. the company as a machinist in the 
Weldon shops, in Chicago, in 1871, remaining 
in that position until May 1874, when he began 
firing on the Chicago division, but after one year 
in that position he returned to the shops and fol- 
lowed his trade for two years. He then began 
firing again, and in August 1878 was promoted 
to engineer and ran on the Chicago division until 
September 1887, since which time he has been on 
the Freeport division. 

Mr. Ormsby is a Canadian by birth, and was 
the first white child born in Collingwood, Ontario, 
where he first saw the light May 3, 1854. His 
father, Richard Ormsby, a carpenter and con- 
tractor by occupation, was born in Belfast, Ire- 
land. In early life he came to America and lo- 
cated in Meaford, Ontario, but later removed 
to North Platte, Nebraska, where he died in Feb- 
ruary 1869. His wife, who was Hannah J. 
Vail, was born in Owen Sound, Ontario, in No- 
vember 1822, and is now living at Orfordville, 
Wisconsin. 

Our subject, who early developed mechanical 
genius, when but thirteen years of age began run- 
ning a small stationary engine at Meaford, On- 
tario, but after eighteen months service, he moved 
with his parents in October 1868 to North Platte, 



where he went to work for the U. P. R. R. as 
an apprentice in the North Platte shops, and re- 
mained until April 1870, when he came to Chi- 
cago and svas employed by H. Petrie & Son, man- 
ufacturers of stationary engines, with whom he 
remained until October 9, 1871, when the plant 
was destroyed by the great fire, in which the fam- 
ily lost all their household and personal effects. 
It was at this time that Mr. Ormsby entered the 
service of the I. C. R. R. as before stated. 

On the 25th of November, 1875, Mr. Ormsby 
was married to Miss Margaret E. Kenney, of 
Chicago, who was born January 15, 1854. Their 
union has been blest with six children : Kath- 
erine, born November 15, 1876, was educated at 
the Hanen and Coleman school, of Chicago, and 
is now bookkeeper for the American Wall Paper 
Co. of that city; William J., born January 17, 
1879, is a machinist's apprentice at the Burnsicle 
shops, Chicago; Nellie, born August 1884, is at- 
tending the Hyde Park high school in Chicago ; 
May E., born October 18, 1886, is attending the 
Madison Ave. school, Chicago; Richard, born 
June 25, 1889; Irene, born Nov. 28, 1894. Mr 
Ormsby is one of the charter members of World's 
Fair Lodge No. 382, K. P., and also belongs to 
the B. of L. E. in which he is at present chairman 
of the Grievance Committee, Division 27, and 
was formerly Chief of Division No. 10 for two 
years. He is a Protestant in religion, and a Re- 
publican in politics. 




O. FERN, an engineer on the Omaha 
division, began working for the Illi- 
n i s Central company at Waterloo, 
Iowa, December 24, 1887, as a fire- 
man on the main line. He served two months 
under J. M. DuBois and later under different 
men. He worked on the Cedar Rapids branch 
for eleven months and for three years he fired 
for T. W. Place between Waterloo and Dubuque. 
In the fall of 1895 Mr. Fern was given charge 
of a freight engine, worked in the Waterloo 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



165 



yards for a short time and also in the yards at 
Dubuque, and since then has made his home in 
Waterloo, serving as an extra, running east, west 
and north. 

Mr. Eern was born in Dubuque, Iowa, a 
son of John and Elizabeth S. Fern, both of Eng- 
land. The parents emigrated from the land of 
their nativity to America in an early day and lo- 
cated in Dubuque where the father worked in 
a smelter. They are the parents of three sons 
besides the subject of this sketch, who are em- 
ployes of the Illinois Central Railroad : Frank, 
an engineer on the Cedar Rapids branch ; Rob- 
ert, an engineer at Waterloo, and Leo E., a brake- 
man at Waterloo. 

Mr. C. O. Fern, the gentleman whose name 
appears at the head of this article, made his home 
with his parents at Dubuque until 1887, when he 
entered the employ of the railroad company and 
located in Waterloo. About two years after he 
was united in marriage to Miss Cora Banton, of 
Farley, Iowa. In social circles Mr. Fern is iden- 
tified with Cedar Valley Division No. 30, B. of 
L. F., of Waterloo, and also the A. O. U. W., 
No. 274, of Waterloo. Our subject is very suc- 
cessful as a railroad man, commanding alike the 
esteem and confidence of his employers and fel- 
low workmen, and throughout his entire career 
has never been injured in any way. 




O. MILLER, conductor at Waterloo, 
Iowa, began his railroad career with 
Q the Illinois Central company at Fort 
Dodge, in September 1881, where he 
worked three months in the freight house before 
he went on the line. In August 1882, he secured 
a position as brakeman between Waterloo and 
Fort Dodge on a passenger train under the con- 
trol of Conductor B. Merrill, worked one week 
and then made one trip on a freight train under 
W. N. Barr. He then broke on a freight run 
from Waterloo to Charles City as extra, and then 



broke for three months under G. R. Turner on a 
mixed train between Waterloo and Lyle. Mr. 
Miller was then appointed baggageman on the 
mixed train between Waterloo and Lyle, under 
Ed. Parker, and retained that position about a 
year and eight months. He then returned to the 
Waterloo and Dubuque division and broke for 
different conductors until 1886, when he received 
his promotion to the office of freight conductor. 
Mr. Miller's first experience in charge of a train 
was between Waterloo and Dubuque. Then, after 
running extras for about a year he was given a 
regular crew between Waterloo and Dubuque. 
Again he was placed in charge of extra trains, 
both freight and passenger, and his work took him 
over all of the Dubuque division, but for the past 
two years, his run has been from Dubuque to Ft. 
Dodge. 

Mr. Miller was born in Ingersoll, Canada, 
in the year 1857, a son of William H. and Helen 
(Ervine) Miller, the latter a native of Scotland 
and the former of German descent. They came 
west in 1864 to Michigan, thirty miles north of 
Detroit, made that their home for two years and 
a half, and then moved to Buchanan county. 
Iowa, near Independence, on a farm. Our sub- 
ject made his home with his parents until he at- 
tained his majority. He worked for a time in 
the hospital at Independence, and afterward at- 
tended the commercial college at Keokuk until 
he secured a situation with the Illinois Central 
Railroad company and located in Waterloo. In 
September 1882, he was united in marriage at 
Independence, to Miss Annie E. Williamson, and 
three children have been born to them : George 
Ervine, John Paul and Regina A. Socially Mr. 
Miller affiliates with the Division No. 67, of 
Waterloo; Waterloo Lodge No. 105 of the Ma- 
sonic fraternity ; and also the A. O. U. W. Lodge 
No. 274 of Waterloo. He has a good education, 
is pleasant to meet and is held in high esteem by 
all who have the pleasure of his acquaintance. 
In his railroad career, Mr. Miller has been very 
successful, performing his duties to the satisfac- 
tion of his employers and has never been injured 
in any way. 



166 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COM PA XV 



JF. VAN RENSSELAER was born at 
Xew Brunswick, New Jersey, August 
Q 1 8, 1875. He is of old Holland stock, 
his ancestors having settled in the val- 
ley .of the Hudson in 1640 and the names of their 
descendents make a large family tree". Mr. 
Van Rensselaer entered the railroad service in 
May 1890, when but fifteen years of age, secur- 
ing a place with the Fort Worth & Rio Grande 
R. R. in Texas, in the accounting department, 
in which he continued until May, 1893. On that 
date he secured a position as chief clerk in the 
offices of the joint car association of Fort Worth 
Railways, where he was employed until June 20, 
1896, when he was appointed general clerk in 
the office of the second vice president of the Illi- 
nois Central at Chicago, serving in that capaci- 
ty until November 2, 1898. Transferred to 
Evansville, Indiana, he was appointed chief clerk 
to the assistant superintendent at that point serv- 
ing until March 14, 1900, when he was appointed 
traveling freight and passenger agent for the line 
with headquarters at Denver. It is a position of 
greater responsibility than is usually entrusted to 
one of his age. but Mr. Van Rensselaer has in 
past positions proven himself worthy of trust im- 
posed in him by the management of the Illinois 
Central sstem. 




'ILLIAM F. HALL, one of the old- 
est engineers employed by the Ill- 
inois Central company, began work 
for this company March 4, 1870, 
in the shops at Dubuque, Iowa. He was born 
in Danville, Canada, June 27, 1840, and is a son 
of Enoch Hall, who was a native of Massachu- 
setts. He was a lumberman and farmer through 
life, coming to Canada and later to Wisconsin, 
where he died. Our subject's first railroad work 
was on the Milwaukee & Prairie du Chien Rail- 
road, where he worked as engineer from 1862 
to 1870. He then began on the Illinois Central 
and for the past twenty-seven years has occupied 
the right side of the cab, now having a passenger 



run between Fort Dodge and Sioux City, Iowa, 
and makes three trips a week. He has been in 
several wrecks, but no one was ever seriously 
injured. 

William F. Hall married Miss Carrie Bron- 
son, of New York state, -and they have become 
the parents of eight children, two of whom are 
deceased. Those living are as follows : Edward 
M., who is a painter , of Fort Dodge ; Ida May ; 
William F. Jr., is in the employ of the Chicago, 
St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railroad at 
Sioux City, Iowa ; Charles B. is general secretary 
of the Y. M. C. A. at Sioux City; Fred A. is tel- 
egraph operator for the Western Union at Fort 
Dodge, Iowa, and Bessie. Those deceased are 
William and Harry J. The family has a pleas- 
ant home at No. 313 S. Seventh street, Fort 
Dodge. 

Socially Mr. Hall is a member of Division 
No. 226, B. of L. E., and also of Blue Lodge No. 
in, A. F. & A. M., both of Fort Dodge. He 
is justly numbered among the prominent and 
representative engineers on the Illinois Central 
Railroad. 



LEWIS C. FOOTE, passenger engineer 
at Cedar Rapids, Iowa, began his rail- 
road career on the Southern Minnesota 
Railroad, running out of La Crosse, 
Wis., beginning in the year 1865. He worked 
for a time as fireman and later as engineer on 
this line, and subsequently moved to Chicago and 
served the Chicago & Eastern Illinois company 
in the capacity of engineer. In March 1873, he 
moved to Dubuque, Iowa, and the Illinois Central 
company placed him at the head of one of their 
freight trains between that city and Waterloo, 
and retained him in that position for fifteen years. 
At that time Mr. Foote was promoted to the 
passenger service and for the following ten years 
he held a position at the head of the "Clipper." 
In April 1898, he was transferred to the Cedar 
Rapids branch, where he has since been employed 
in the passenger service. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



167 



Mr. Foote was born at Brookfield, Fairfield 
count}-, Conn., and moved from thence to the 
west in 1865. In 1869 he was married in La 
Crosse, Wis., to Miss Genevieve Foster, of 
Hokah, Minn., and two children have been born 
to them, namely : Eugene, a switchman at 
Cedar Rapids, and Edna, who is still making her 
home with her parents. Socially Mr. Foote 
affiliates with the following secret fraternities : 
Division No. 114, B. of L. E., of Waterloo; he 
first joined this fraternity in Minnesota but later 
had his membership transferred to Waterloo. 
Also a member of Rowland Lodge No. 274, A. 
O. U. W., Blue Lodge No. 105 of the Masonic 
fraternity, and the Tabernacle No. 125. Mr. 
Foote has been on the road for a great many 
years, and with the exception of a few years at 
the beginning of his career, he has had the lever 
and throttle in his own hands, yet his record is 
almost entirely free from wrecks, he having never 
received the slightest injury. 






T7 OHN L. WOLFE, conductor on the Am- 
boy division of the Illinois Central Rail- 
road, was born December 8, 1863, in 
Mishawaka, Indiana, whence the fam- 
ily removed to Freeport in 1865, and thence to 
Lena in 1868, but later returned to Freeport, 
where the parents, John and Theresa Wolfe, now 
reside, the former engaged in the cooper's trade. 
John L. Wolfe attended the public schools of 
Lena, but at an early age learned his father's 
trade and worked at the bench for eight years. 
In 1883 he entered the service of the I. C. R. R. 
as brakeman on the Amboy division, but after a 
few months' service returned to his trade which 
he followed until the fall of 1885, when he re- 
entered the employ of the railroad. In the fall 
of 1886 he was promoted to the position of con- 
ductor, and September 1898 was made an extra 
passenger conductor, and the following August 
was given a regular passenger run on the Amboy 
division, where he is still engaged in the faithful 



discharge of his duties. Mr. Wolfe was married, 
January n, 1888, to Miss Florence New, of Du- 
buque, Iowa, formerly of Galena, 111., where she 
was born November 15, 1864, and where she re- 
ceived her education in the public schools of that 
city. To Mr. and Mrs. Wolfe have been born 
two children; Mary T., born October 29, 1888, 
and Cecelia O., born November 29, 1897. Mr. 
Wolfe belongs to the O. R. C., is a member of 
the Catholic church, and is independent in his 
political views. 




ARTIN HILL, conductor on the Am- 
boy division of the Illinois Central 
Railroad, was born in Prophetstown, 
111., October 22, 1876. His father, 
George Hill, is foreman of the bridge building 
department of the I. C. R. R., at Chicago, and 
his mother, Ella May (Gould), is a relative of 
Jay Gould the great financier of New York. 

Martin Hill was educated at the public 
schools of LaSalle, graduating from the high 
school in 1891, after which he attended the State 
Normal at Normal, 111., for two terms. In 1892 
he began working for the Illinois Zinc Co., at 
Peru, 111., where he remained about one year. 
At this time the family removed to Chicago and 
Martin was employed in bridge work on the I. 
C. R. R. under his father, a little more than a 
year. In 1894 he went to Kansas City, Mo., 
and after visiting a large number of the western 
cities, he returned to Chicago, again entering the 
bridge building department of the I. C. R. R. 
January 7, 1897, he began braking on the Amboy 
division, and was promoted to conductor August 
12, 1899. 

On the 6th of August, 1897, Mr. Hill was 
united in marriage with Miss Bertha Gainer, of 
Lake Zurich, 111., where she was born November 
5, 1876. To them has been born one child, 
Walter E., born June 22, 1898. Mr. Hill is a 
Protestant in religious faith. He is a member 
of the B. of R. T. No. 115, and is independent 
in politics. 



168 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



JR. (iRIFFIN, an engineer running out 
of Waterloo, Iowa, began his railroad 
Q career with the Illinois Central com- 
pany August 30, 1879, as a fireman un- 
der D. R. Gould on a freight run between Water- 
loo and Dubuque. He was set up ta engineer 
September 14, 1882, beginning work in this ca- 
pacity in the yards at Dubuque where he was re- 
tained until January, 1883. He was then given 
a freight run between Waterloo and Sioux City 
until 1887, when he was transferred to the Water- 
loo and Dubuque division, and February 27, 1899, 
was promoted to his present position as passen- 
ger engineer on the same division. 

Mr. Griffin was born in Saxeville township, 
Waushara county, Wisconsin, where his father, 
John Griffin was engaged in agricultural pursuits. 
In 1896, our subject was united in marriage to 
Miss Dora Whitney of Waterloo. Socially he 
affiliates with the Division No. 114, B. of L. E. 
at Waterloo, A. O. U. W. No. 274, of Waterloo, 
and the Elks, No. 290, also of Waterloo. Mr. 
Griffin has been quite successful in his railroad 
career, has never met with serious accident and 
from his salary has built for himself and his com- 
panion a very comfortable home at 221 High 
street, which was completed in 1891. 



New York City. In 1872 he entered upon his 
railroad career as assistant ticket agent in the 
office of the Michigan Central R. R. at Chicago, 
remaining there three years, when he gave up 
office work and accepted a position as locomotive 
fireman, which he retained for one year and ten 
months, and was then promoted to engineer. Af- 
ter nine years in that capacity, Mr. Griffith left 
the service of the company to engage in a simi- 
lar position with the C. B. &. N. R. R., where he 
remained two years and three months, and then 
left voluntarily to enter the service of the I. C. 
R. R. , Jan. n, 1888, as engineer, where he has 
served continuously ever since, and is now run- 
ning the Sioux City Express between Chicago 
and Dubuque. 

On the igth of August, 1874, Mr. Griffith 
was married to Miss Mariette E. Markham, of 
Michigan City, Ind., She was born in Monroe, 
Michigan, April 19, 1856. Mr. and Mrs. Griffith 
have two promising children : Edmund L., born 
November 12, 1878, is attending the dental de- 
partment of the Northwestern University at 
Chicago, and will graduate in 1902; Nellie M., 
born December 9, 1882, is a member of the Free- 
port high school class of 1901. Mr. Griffith is 
connected with the Masonic fraternity, Blue 
Lodge, the Royal Arcanum, and the B. of L. E. 
He is a Protestant in religion and politically is 
a member of the Republican party. 




M. GRIFFITH, engineer on the 
Illinois Central Railroad, Freeport 
division, was born in St. Joseph, 
Michigan, February 9, 1855. His 
father, Edmund L. Griffith, who was engaged 
in merchandising,- died when our subject was 
but a child, and the mother, Hannah C. (Stinson) 
died May 29, 1899. 

R. M. Griffith attended the public schools of 
Niles, Michigan, and the Preparatory Depart- 
ment also of Albion College. He began his busi- 
ness life while still a lad as clerk in a grocery 
store, where he remained one year, and spent 
one year in the office of a banker and broker in 




W. BOSTON, engineer running out 
of Waterloo, began his railroad 
O career August 28, 1887, in the capa- 
city of fireman on a switch engine in 
the Illinois Central yards at the city in which 
he makes his home. About a month later he 
was given a freight run between Waterloo and 
Dubuque under J. F. Mulkern, which he retained 
for four years. He then worked about five 
months on the left side of a passenger engine 
under Engineer L. Smith, and in March 1893, 




JAMES W. LUTTRELL. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



171 



was set up to engineer. The following five 
months were spent in the yards at Dubuque, but 
he has since been in Waterloo, running east, west 
and north out of that city, and has run on every 
portion of the Iowa division of the Illinois Cen- 
tral railroad. 

Mr. Boston was born in Waterloo, Iowa, 
the only child of J. C. and Sarah (Collins) Bos- 
ton, the former a native of Bangor, Me., and the 
latter of Brentonwood, N. H. The parents moved 
to Iowa in 1854, and settled on a farm four and 
a half miles west of Waterloo, and made that 
their home until 1875. In 1876 they moved to 
Indian Territory, where the father is engaged in 
the fruit business. Mr. Boston was married in 
Waterloo in 1883, to Miss Ellen Coyne, also a 
native of that city, and they have become the pa- 
rents of a family of three children, Sadie, Mabel, 
and Lewellyn. In the social circles of Waterloo, 
Mr. Boston is identified with the Cedar Valley 
Lodge No. 30, B. of L. F., Blackhawk Lodge 
No. 72, I. O. O. F., and Lodge No. 274 A. O. 
U. W. The record of his railroad career is not 
dotted with a single accident. 



JAMES W. LUTTRELL, master mechanic 
at the Burnside shops, Chicago, began 
railroad work as an apprentice machinist 
in the shops of the Norfolk & Western 
Railroad at Lynchburg, Va., in 1868, and served 
two years. Immediately upon completing his 
apprenticeship he secured a position on the road 
as fireman, and in 1871 he became engineer and 
served in that capacity on that road fourteen 
months. From there he went to Denison, Ohio, 
and worked for the Pan Handle company a short 
time in the shops at that place. Subsequently 
Mr. Luttrell worked as engineer for the St. 
Louis & Southeastern Railroad company eight 
months, and in the same capacity for the Eliza- 
bethtown & Paducah Railroad three years, then 
three years as engineer for the Louisville & 
Nahville, then for a time a general foreman of 
that company's shops at Pensacola Junction, and 

31 



September i, 1881, he became master mechanic 
of the Louisville, Cincinnati & Lexington divi- 
sion of the Louisville & Nashville Railroad. 
September i, 1886, he resigned his position for 
the position of superintendent of machinery of 
the western division of the Newport News & 
Mississippi Valley Railroad, and October 10, 
1891, resigned the latter for the position of mas- 
ter mechanic of the Mississippi division of the 
Illinois Central Railroad at Water Valley, Miss. 
He remained at this place fourteen months and 
was then transferred to Chicago, January i, 
1893, and was placed in charge of the machinery 
in the capacity of master mechanic at that place, 
January i, 1896, the Chicago shops were re- 
moved to Burnside, and since that date Mr. Lutt- 
rell has had charge of the locomotive and car 
department. 

Mr. Luttrell was born in Washington Co., 
Virginia. He was married in Hardin county, 
Ky., to Miss Susan Lucretia Allen. To this 
union was born one child, Lewis Mattison, who 
died at the age of fourteen months. 

Mr. Luttrell is a Mason of high degree and 
holds membership in the following lodges : Pres- 
ton Lodge No. 281, King Solomon Chapter No. 
1 8, Louisville Council No. 6, DeMolay Comman- 
dry No. 12, Grand Consistory of Kentucky, 
Thirty-second Degree, all of Louisville, Ky., and 
also the the Medina Temple, Mystic Shrine, of 
Chicago. Mr. Luttrell's father, John M. Lutt- 
rell, was an employe of the Norfolk & Western 
Railroad prior to the Civil war. On the out- 
break of hostilities, he enlisted in the Thirty- 
seventh Virginia Infantry under " Stonewall " 
Jackson, and died in the army after the battle 
of Antietam. 



M. TAYLOR, foreman at the Du- 
buque shops, began his railroad 
L Q career with the Illinois Central Rail- 
road in the fall of 1871, at Clinton, 
111., where he served as a machinist for one year. 
Subsequently he worked seven years in the 




172 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



Springfield shops, and in 1884, came to Dubuque 
as foreman. Ten years later, he went to Fort 
Dodge, where he had charge of the Illinois Cen- 
tral shops two years ; then at Champaign one 
year, at Centralia seven months, at Cherokee, 
Iowa, four months : after which he returned to 
Dubuque to accept his present position. 

Mr. Taylor was born in Albany, N. Y., a 
son of John and Sarah Taylor. The father for 
several years held a position in the State House 
at the capital city of New York, in the Bank de- 
partment. He and his companion are now both 
dead. Our subject, prior to entering the em- 
ploy of the railroad company, was engaged in the 
laundry business at St. Louis for about six 
months. He was married at Centralia, 111., to 
Miss Mary E. Barney, of Boston, Mass., and one 
child, Lula, has blessed their home. Socially Mr. 
Taylor affiliates with the Ancient Order of 
L T nited Workmen. His life has been an exam- 
ple of faithfulness and has won the perfect con- 
fidence of his employers as well as the unfeigned 
respect and esteem of those with whom he comes 
in contact. 



time worked on the Mississippi division twice and 
the Y. & M. V. for about three months, and then 
returned to Iowa division at Ft. Dodge and ran 
Engine 809 until the winter of 1898. He then took 
charge of Engine 813 until he was transferred 
to the Omaha division. Mr. Haines is a native 
of Dubuque, Iowa, was born May 24, 1862, a 
son of Charles G. and Harriet (Andrews) 
Haines. The father was a farmer through life 
and is now retired, living in Deadwood, South 
Dakota. Our subject married Miss Minta Jones, 
of Mineral Point, Wisconsin, and to them was 
born one son, Frederick A., who died January 
18, 1900, at the age of seven and one-half years. 
They reside at 1027 First avenue, Fort Dodge. 
Mr. Haines is a member of the B. of L. E., 
Division No. 226, of Fort Dodge, also of the 
A. O. U. W. of Fort Dodge, and the Masonic 
order. Mr. Haines has never been injured in any- 
way, having fortunately been in very few wrecks. 




G. HAINES' first work with the Ill- 
inois Central company was in 1881, 
L Q when he began as fireman, remain- 
ing on the left side until the fall of 
1885, when he was promoted and took charge of 
Engine No. 152. In June 1887, he quit the Illi- 
nois Central and began work with the Fremont. 
Elkhorn & Missouri Valley Railroad, and worked 
as engineer until February 1891, when he re- 
turned to the Illinois Central at Fort Dodge. In 
November 1891 he went on a regular run between 
Fort Dodge and Sioux City, but later was as- 
signed to other divisions, such as Springfield, and 
also on the Chicago division, and returned in 1892 
and worked here at Fort Dodge until July 1893, 
on Fort Dodge and Sioux City. He then re- 
turned to the Chicago division and worked on 
World's Fair trains until November i, 1893, and 
then returned to Fort Dodge. He has since that 




F. GATES, who has been an engineer 
with the Illinois Central company for 
seventeen years, first began his rail- 
roading at Peoria, 111., on the I. B. & 
W. R. R. as fireman, where he worked one year 
and then fired on the Wabash railroad two years. 
He then went to Waterloo, Iowa, and began as 
fireman with the Illinois Central company and 
worked all over the Iowa divisions of the com- 
pany. Two years later he was promoted to en- 
gineer and has held that position with the com- 
pany ever since. 

He is a native of Lake county, Ohio, and was 
born in September 1847. His father was Lor- 
ison Gates, who was a minister in the Christian 
church, but he now resides on a farm in Benton 
county, Iowa. Our subject has one brother who 
is an engineer on the T. P. & W. Railroad, re- 
siding at Peoria, Illinois. 

In August 1871, our subject married Miss 
Olive A. Woodley, of Medina county, O., and 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



173 



they have the following children : Clyde A., 
Frederick L., Lena E., Alice L., Edna Ethel and 
Ralph L. 

Mr. Gates now has a night run on the pas- 
senger train called " The Flyer," between Fort 
Dodge and Sioux City. He has been in one 
wreck at Bushnell, 111., on the Wabash Railroad, 
but he was never seriously injured in any way. 
He has lived in Fort Dodge for the past twelve 
years, is a member of the B. of L. E., Division 
Xo. 226, of Fort Dodge, also the Royal Arcanum, 
of Fort Dodge. He is an old and very prominent 
engineer on the line, and now resides at No. 
1013 Fourth avenue, south, Fort Dodge, Iowa. 



an enviable one. He is one of the best informed 
men on the entire system and enjoys the confi- 
dence and esteem of a large circle of warm 
friends. 




ILLIAM R. POLMYER, accountant 
at Dubuque, began work for the 
Illinois Central company April 19, 
1874. Subsequently he served un- 
der different men, including General Superin- 
tendent Jeffery, J. C. Welling, vice-president of 
the road, and others, and has served in the ca- 
pacity of bookkeeper, keeper of the mileage books, 
clerk and accountant on construction work, and 
office clerk at different times until April 11, 1881, 
when he was appointed to his present position as 
accountant in the office at Dubuque, and during 
that time was also connected with the construc- 
tion of the C. & D. R. R. 

Mr. Polmyer was born in Baltimore, Md., 
and is of English and Dutch parentage. He has 
been married twice; his present wife was Miss 
Celia Lorez, of Dubuque, Iowa. During the 
early years of his manhood, Mr. Polmyer served 
in the United States Navy. Socially he affiliates 
with the Masonic fraternity, Home Lodge No. 
508, of Chicago, of which he is a life member, 
and is also connected with the Knights of Pythias, 
holding his membership in Orient Lodge No. 
210, Dubuque, la. Mr. Polmyer's life has been 
an example of faithfulness, and his record since 
entering the employ of the railroad company is 




M. FERN, engineer at Waterloo, la., 
began his railroad career with the 111- 
Q inois Central company in the capacity 
of a fireman at Waterloo, December 
r886. At first he worked on a switch engine in 
the Waterloo yards under Harvey Jacoby, after 
which he was employed on extra trains out of 
that city. Later he fired two years on a freight 
engine for Charles Wahl, then four months on 
a passenger engine under D. R. Gould between 
Waterloo and Dubuque, then for John Mullan 
about a year on the middle division, then for 
F. H. Stearn about a year on the east end, and 
September 23, 1895, he was examined and was 
promoted to engineer October 12 of the same 
year. Upon taking his place on the right side of 
the cab, Mr. Fern spent one week in the Waterloo 
yards on a switch engine, and then worked in 
the Dubuque yards from October 19 until Jan- 
uary 1 6 of the following year, and then returned 
to the Waterloo yards. He spent the following 
summer as an extra, and from March 1898, un- 
til August i of the same year, he was fireman 
under George Martin between Waterloo and Du- 
buque. In fact the most of his railroad work has 
been done between these two cities. 

Mr. Fern is a native of Dubuque county, 
Iowa. In 1886, at the time he entered the em- 
ploy of the Illinois Central company, he located 
in Waterloo, and about five years later he won 
the heart and hand of Miss Carrie Stewart, of 
Traer, Iowa, who has since shared his Waterloo 
home. In the social circles of Waterloo our sub- 
ject is identified with Division 114, B. of L. E., 
and Rowland Lodge No. 274, A. O. U. W. Mr. 
Fern is a son of John and Elizabeth Fern, both 
natives of England. The father came to Ameri- 
ca in 1830, when he was ten years of age. Be- 



174 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



tween the years of 1834 and 1877, he lived in 
Iowa, but from the last named date until his 
death, which occurred in 1889, he made his home 
in Hazel Green, Wis. He established the Hazel 
Green smelter and operated it in partnership with 
Mr. Simpson, under the firm name of -Fern & 
Simpson, for four years. Mr. and Mrs. Fern 
were the parents of a family of six children, of 
whom we have the following record : William, 
deceased; Ellen, deceased; Lillie, wife of E. M. 
Staly, a carpenter of Waterloo; Frank, an en- 
gineer; R. M., the subject of this sketch; Leo, a 
brakeman at Waterloo. The mother died in 

1875- 




D. McKINLEY, engineer, who has 
been with the Illinois Central com- 
Q pany twelve years, first began as 
fireman. Four years later he was 
promoted to engineer, beginning on the Cherokee 
division and is now running in freight service on 
Engine No. 802 on the above division. He had 
worked on the Minneapolis & St. Louis Railroad 
for some time before coming on the Illinois Cen- 
tral. 

Our subject is a son of Gilbert J. and Mary 
(McDougall) McKinley, both of Scotland, where 
the former was a farmer. He moved to this 
country and settled in Wisconsin, engaging in 
farming there. He later moved to Milwaukee 
and now resides there retired. The mother is 
deceased. They had thirteen children, seven girls 
and six boys, four of the latter becoming engi- 
neers. One is now an engineer for the Chicago & 
North-Western Railroad, running between Chi- 
cago and Harrington. Another is engineer on 
the Santa Fe Railroad, and another was engineer 
on the Great Northern Railroad but is now de- 
ceased. Mr. McKinley married Miss Mary C. 
Sommers, of Berkeley, Iowa, and they have three 
children, Geneveve, Lionel and Harrold. Mr. 
McKinley now runs between Fort Dodge and 
Sioux City. He is a member of the B. of L. E. 
of Fort Dodge, No. 226, also a member of the 




Masonic order of Fort Dodge. The family re- 
sides at No. 1230 Fourth avenue, south, at Fort 
Dodge, Iowa. 

ENRY A. SMITH, engineer at Waterloo, 
Iowa, began his railroad career on the 
Illinois Central Railroad at Waterloo, 
in January, 1886. He first served as 
fireman under John Rix for about five months, 
when he was laid off on account of a decline in 
business, and he went to Independence to work- 
in a hospital where he had previously been em- 
ployed. Three months later, however, he was 
called back to the road and for the following two 
years and a half he stood at the left side of a 
freight engine, working under M. F. Carey. Sub- 
sequently Mr. Smith served the Illinois Central 
company on different runs and in the order given 
below : With Engineer J. D. Place on the Lyle 
branch three months ; then helped as hostler for 
a short time ; then as engineer of a switch engine 
in the Dubuque yards ; then fired on freight en- 
gine during one summer and fall, and lastly on 
a passenger engine under H. A. Knowlton be- 
tween Waterloo and Dubuque. 

January i, 1890, Mr. Smith was given a 
seat on the right side of the engine, and since then 
his work has been even more widely distributed 
than was his work in the capacity of fireman. He 
began in the yards at Waterloo and from there 
was sent to the Dubuque yards; from there to 
Champaign ; then to Centralia about two months ; 
then to Cherokee on construction work for nearly 
four months ; then to Waterloo for a short time ; 
then to Clinton, 111., for one winter; returned to 
Waterloo for a short time ; then to Freeport ; in 
1892 was in Clinton, 111., Champaign, and Cen- 
tralia, until May ; then home for a short time ; 
back to the Chicago division ; then again to 
Waterloo to work as fireman for a short time; 
then as engineer again on the Cedar Rapids 
branch ; was in Chicago during the World's 
Fair ; then to Centralia ; back to Waterloo and ran 
extra until he got a regular run on Engine No. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



175 



500, running out of Waterloo. His work is 
mostly west from that city, but is still making 
an occasional extra trip to various parts of the 
Illinois Central system. He has made two trips 
to Mississippi, one to Water Valley and one to 
Canton, and has made a trip to Jackson, Tenn. 

Mr. Smith was born in Iowa, about five miles 
from Independence, a son of Joseph L. and Car- 
oline L. (Wheeler) Smith, who migrated to the 
agricultural districts of Iowa from the East in 
1858. The father died in 1884, but the mother 
is still living. Our subject first located in Water- 
loo in 1886, the year he entered the employ of 
the railroad company. He was married Decem- 
ber 25, 1892, to Miss Rose E. Baum, a native of 
the city of Waterloo, and a daughter of S. H. 
and Amelia (VanSchoick) Baum, and their home 
has been blessed by the presence of a daughter, 
Pauline Marie. Mrs. Smith's father is a stone 
mason by trade. Socially our subject is a mem- 
ber of Division No. 114, B. of L. E., and also of 
Howland Lodge No. 274, A. O. U. W., both of 
Waterloo. 




ILAS B. MABEY, conductor on the Am- 
boy division of the Illinois Central 
Railroad, was born in Albany county, 
New York, August 19, 1850. His 
father, Stephen Mabey, a minister in the Ad- 
ventist church, is now living in Nebraska at the 
age of seventy-two years. His mother, Lucy 
(Teats) Mabey, died in Genesee county, New 
York, in 1856. The family came west in 1862 
and located at LaSalle, 111., but a year later re- 
moved to Amboy. Our subject was educated in 
the schools of Albany county, N. Y., and at Lee 
Center and Amboy, 111. At the age of sixteen 
he began the carpenter's trade at which he re- 
mained about six years, and at the age of twenty- 
three commenced preaching for the Advent de- 
nomination, engaging in the active work of the 
church until 1880, when he gave it up on account 
of failing health. He then entered the service of 
the I. C. R. R. at Amboy as a freight brakeman, 



running between Amboy and Clinton, and on the 
25th of November, 1881, was promoted to con- 
ductor. In 1882 he took leave of absence and 
went to Dakota where he remained six months, 
and in the fall of that year returned to the I. C. 
R. R., working for the road during the busy sea- 
sons but still retaining his home in Dakota. In 
1886 he began regular work for the company 
and has been in its constant employ to the pres- 
ent time, having run mixed trains between Am- 
boy and Clinton, and also served as extra passen- 
ger conductor. 

In 1870 Air. Mabey was married to Miss 
Mary Crocker, of Amboy, now deceased. He 
was united in marriage a second time to Miss 
Pauline Le Derer, of Freeport. Mr. Mabey has 
no children. He has been a member of the Ma- 
sonic fraternity, and also of the O. R. C., since 
1882, and is an Adventist Christian in religion. 



JT. TAIT, claim agent for the Illinois 
Central Railroad, located at Dubuque, 
Q began his railroad career at Amboy, 111., 
October 12, 1868, at the age of eighteen 
years. He began as car accountant and served 
as such until June 1873, wh,en he was apponted 
chief clerk at Amboy under J. C. Jacobs, and 
remained there until July, 1892, when he was ap- 
pointed claim agent and took up his abode in Du- 
buque, Iowa. Mr. Tait is very industrious, 
thorough and systematic in his work and has 
acquired a high reputation of faithfulness and 
fidelity to his employers. 

Mr. Tait was married at DeKalb, 111., Sept. 
24, 1873, to Miss Emma A. Bundy, of that city, 
and two sons, William P. and Walter H., have 
been born to them. Socially our subject affili- 
ates with the Masonic fraternity, holding his 
membership in the Amboy Lodge No. 178; and 
also the Elks of Dubuque. He has a very wide 
acquaintance, as his line of work requires, and in 
whatever community he has been called he has 
never failed to make a circle of friends. 



176 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 




1LLIAM ALDERMAN, engineer at 
Waterloo, began working for the 
Illinois Central company at Water- 
loo, November 9, 1887, running on 
the main line for a short time under Engineer 
Peter Girard on engine No. 148. Soon after, 
however, he was transferred to a passenger run 
on the Lyle branch with engineer Dave Roby, 
and later spent eighteen months with H. Knowl- 
ton, between Waterloo and Dubuque. Mr. Al- 
derman was placed in charge of the lever and 
throttle November 14, 1891, and did his first 
work in that capacity in the yards at Waterloo, 
where he spent about six months. He then went 
on the main line at the head of a construction 
train for a time, then spent a part of one summer 
as an extra on all lines running out of Chicago. 
He then spent a part of one winter running out 
of Champaign, one winter out of Water Valley, 
Miss., and one winter out of Jackson, Tenn. 

Mr. Alderman was born in Janesville, Wis. 
During the early years of his manhood, he was 
engaged in various lines of work, and before en- 
tering the employ of the Illinois Central com- 
pany, he was fireman for the Northern Pacific 
Railroad company between Fargo and Bismark, 
N. Dak., for a short time. He came to Waterloo 
in 1887, was married the same year to Miss Ida 
M. Roebuck, of that city, and two children, Eddie 
and Lora, have been born to them. Mr Alder- 
man affiliates, fraternally, with the Division No. 
114 P>. of L. E. and Lodge No. 274, A. O. U. W., 
both of Waterloo. He is a man of ability, care- 
ful and thorough about his work and through- 
out his railroad career has never met with seri- 
ous accident. 




A. BRYANT, general foreman at 
Fort Dodge, Iowa, is a very prom- 
inent and well-known employe of 
the Illinois Central company. He 
began his work with the company July 5, 1881, as 
fireman, which position he held until October 30, 
1882, when he was promoted to engineer and took 



charge of a switch engine in the yards at LeMars. 
Here he worked until December i, 1882, and then 
was sent to Sioux City, Iowa, where he was pro- 
moted to foreman of shops and held that posi- 
tion until November 1889. He was then sent to 
Fort Dodge to take charge of the shops and has 
been general foreman of the same ever since. 

Mr. Bryant is a native of Battle Creek, 
Michigan, born November 28, 1852, and is a son 
of James Bryant, who was a farmer in Michigan 
and died there in 1892. Mr. Bryant is a grad- 
uate of the University of Michigan. Our sub- 
ject married Miss Clara Mentor, of Fort Dodge, 
Iowa, a daughter of Wilson H. Mentor, who was 
the second station agent at Fort Dodge for the 
Illinois Central company. He was engaged by 
the Illinois Central company there for three years 
and then moved to Newell, Iowa, where he is 
running the Stevens House, near the Illinois Cen- 
tral depot, it being the only hotel in the town. 

Our subject and wife are the parents of four 
children : James, Helen, Alan and Dorris. Mr. 
Bryant is a member of Lodge No. 306, Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks, of Fort Dodge, 
also the A. O. U. W. of Fort Dodge. He is one 
of the best known master workmen of the western 
branch of the Illinois Central. He now resides 
at No. 1216 Fourth avenue, south, Fort Dodge, 
Iowa. 




ENRY L. CHEVALIER, passenger en- 
gineer on the Illinois Central Railroad, 
Waterloo division, one of the oldest and 
most experienced engineers on the road, 
began in the service of the company June 9, 1864, 
at Dubuque, where he worked as engine wiper in 
the shops until March 15, 1865, then fired one 
and one-half years in the Dubuque yards, and two 
years on the main line, and was then promoted to 
engineer August 15, 1868. His experience as 
engineer has been varied. From 1867 until Sep- 
tember 1872, he ran on the main line between 
Dubuque and Waterloo, on the St. Louis & 
South-eastern R. R., from October i, 1872, to 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



177 



.March 1873, on the C. X. & W. R. R., Peninsular 
division, from May i, 1873, to August 15, 1874, 
and on the 2Oth of August, 1874, returned to 
the I. C. R. R. In March 1875, he located in 
Waterloo and from there ran a freight engine 
until 1893, since which time he has been in pas- 
senger service, running principally on the Cedar 
Falls and Minnesota branch, but has at times 
served on all branches of the road. 

Henry Chevalier was born in Moutier, 
Switzerland, and came to America with his 
parents D. L. and Cecil (Jeraux) Chevalier, both 
natives of Switzerland. He worked in a glass 
factory before coming to the U. S. On his ar- 
rival in 1853, he located in Ft Wayne, Indiana. 
He was a blacksmith by trade. In 1873 our sub- 
ject was married in Dubuque to Sarah A. Bid- 
dolph, of that city, by whom he has two sons, 
Lester William and Roy John. Mr. Chevalier 
is a member of the B. of L. E. No. 1 14, Waterloo 
Division, in which he has been Chief Engineer 
two years and has held other offices, and belongs 
to Black Hawk Lodge No. 72, I. O. O. F., of 
Waterloo, and the Encampment. He has always 
been strictly attentive to duty, and in his twenty- 
seven years service has never had a lay off, 
and has had no accidents. 



gineer and has since run principally on the Lyle 
branch. From December 1887 to March 1888, 
he was in the employ of the Wabash R. R. and 
ran between Moberly and St. Louis and to Kan- 
sas City. 

Our subject was born in Oxford, N. Y., 
whence he removed while a small boy with his 
father, Joseph S. Hackett, and located in Inde- 
pendence, Iowa. He learned blacksmithing un- 
der George Wilcox, at Otterville, Iowa, when 
young, and worked at the trade eleven years. 
Our subject had one brother, W. L., who was 
fireman on the I. C. R. R. for two years, and a 
brother in Muscatine, Iowa, who is a veterinary 
surgeon. 

Mr. Hackett was married in his native town, 
October 6, 1875, to Hattie M. Slocum, of the 
same place. Mrs. Hackett is the mother of five 
children, Flora, Ardell and Lettie, living, and 
Duane and Hazel, deceased. Mr. Hackett is a 
member of the B. of L. E,, Waterloo Division 
No. 1 14, and has held the office of F. A. E., and 
also belongs to the A. O. U. W., No. 274, of 
Waterloo. During his eighteen years of service 
he has had no accidents. 




W. HACKETT, passenger engineer 
on Illinois Central Railroad, entered 
the service of the company at Water- 
loo, Iowa, as fireman, March 17, 
1882, firing on the main line between Waterloo 
and Dubuque under B. F. Fox for nine months, 
and for H. E. Camp on a passenger engine two 
years. In the fall of 1885 he was promoted to 
the right side and worked in the Dubuque yards 
until February 1886, and in the Fort Dodge yards 
until April i, at which time he was set back to 
fireman until July when he returned to his old 
position, running on the Lyle branch the follow- 
ing winter and then on the main line until August 
1897, when he was promoted to passenger en- 




'ILLIAM N. BARR, passenger con- 
ductor, Illinois Central Railroad, at 
Waterloo, Iowa, began as brakeman 
in October 1878 on Mona branch, 
braking for Conductor B. Merrill one year, and 
one year for different ones, then served between 
Waterloo and Fort Dodge, and on the Cedar 
Rapids branch. In July 1880 he was promoted 
to conductor, running on the Lyle branch nearly 
five months, and on the main line and branches 
on the " Clipper " run for four years, and was 
promoted to passenger conductor in June 1891, 
since then he has run extra passenger. 

William N. Barr was born in West Chester. 
Chester county, Pennsylvania, and is the son of 
William and Elizabeth (Evans) Barr, natives of 
the Keystone state. The father, a blacksmith by 



178 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



trade, died in 1855, our subject being but a small 
boy at the time. After the death of her husband 
the mother, accompanied by her son, William, 
who was the only child, came to Cedar county 
where they lived a short time, then returned to 
Pennsylvania. She died in 1897 at Waterloo. 

Mr. Barr has always been a lover of fine 
horses and in early life drove on the tracks at 
Waterloo, Dubuque, Minneapolis, St. Paul and 
all the towns in the northwest. Of the noted 
horses, he has driven, among others, Harry Kim- 
ball with a- mark of 2 132, Whalebone, 2 129, Kit- 
tie Strattan, 2:29^, Sleepy Bill, 2:26, Fear Not, 
2 :29 and Dread 2 135. He now owns a black 
mare, Ritta, with a record of 2 :26, and Tom Cur- 
tis a promising colt by Manager, and also keeps 
a fine driving team. Mr. Barr was married in 
1890 to Miss Myrtie Hunt of Independence, la., 
and has one daughter, Bessie M. He has been 
successful in every undertaking, and has accumu- 
lated not a little of this world's goods, owning his 
home at 317 E. Eleventh St. which he built in 
1898, and other valuable real estate in Waterloo. 
He is a well known and popular conductor. 




EORGE H. ARMSTRONG, engineer 
on the Amboy division of the Illinois 
Central Railroad, is a native of Amboy, 
where he was born February 26, 1872. 
He is the son of Alexander Armstrong, an en- 
gineer of the I. C. R. R. for about twenty-five 
years, who now resides in Amboy, and Edith 
(Allison) who died in 1876. 

After the death of his mother our subject 
went to Iroquois, Canada, where he attended 
school until eighteen years of age, when he re- 
turned to Amboy, and after attending college at 
Dixon for a time, entered the service of the I. 
C. R. R. as clerk, doing night work in the depot 
at Amboy for a period of thirteen months. On 
the twenty-sixth of June, 1893, he began run- 
ning on the Amboy division as fireman, in which 
position he remained until 1896, when he was 



promoted to the right side, retaining that posi- 
tion to date. 

Mr. Armstrong was married September 25, 
1895, to Miss Rena H. Klein, who was born in 
Amboy, April 14, 1872. Mrs. Armstrong re- 
ceived her education in the public schools. Mr. 
Armstrong is a member of the B. of L. F., at- 
tends the Protestant Episcopal church, and is 
independent in politics. 



H. SHULL, passenger conductor on 
the Ilinois Central Railroad, Water- 
loo division, began his railroad ex- 
perience, which has been varied and 
extensive, with the Illinois Central as brakeman 
at Amboy, under Trainmaster Rosebow, J. C. 
Jacobs, Supt, and Conductor G. Finch for one 
year running between Amboy and Wapello, with 
Conductor Gardner about six months. He then 
entered the services of the C. B. &. Q. R. R. 
where he was switchman four years, and yard- 
master and switchman at Galesburg for four 
years. He then served the T. P. & W. Railroad 
as conductor for a short time, the C. 
& N. W. Railroad as a brakeman six 
months, the B. C. R. & N. R. R. for four years 
as conductor, brakeman, baggageman, express- 
man, and U. S. mail agent, and the C. B. &. Q. 
R. R. as brakeman and switchman for one year. 
In 1877 he returned to the I. C. R. R. and after 
braking about three months was promoted to 
conductor, running from Waterloo to Fort Dodge 
and Cherokee and return for one year, a way 
freight between Fort Dodge and Waterloo about 
two years, and a stock, train for seven years. He 
was promoted to passenger engineer in 1887, 
making his first trip on an excursion train to 
Sioux City. He then ran extra on the main line 
and all the branches for three years, and for the 
past eight years has had a regular run between 
Waterloo and Dubuque. 

Our subject was born in Philadelphia, and 
is the son of Fred A. Shull, a native of the Key- 




JOHN F. JARVIS. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



181 



stone state, who removed to Rutland, 111., where 
he engaged in farming, and subsequently moved 
to Fort Dodge where he died in 1892. In early 
life, about 1840, he was a conductor in West Vir- 
ginia. His widow, whose maiden name was 
Sarah M. Barger, now resides in Waterloo. One 
son, Fred A., has been in the service of the C. 
B. & Q. R. R. as passenger and freight conduc- 
tor at Galesburg, 111., for thirty years. 

Mr. Shull was married at Fort Dodge to 
Miss Viola A. Hartman, of that city. They are 
the parents of four children : E. H. Jr., Grace 
V., Mabel and Florence. Mr. Shull is a member 
of the O. R. C., Division No. 93, and A. O. U. 
W. No. 274, of Fort Dodge, and the K. P. No. 
89, of Waterloo. In his many years of railroad- 
ing Mr. Shull has not been injured so as to be 
laid up for any length of time, but has had a 
great many narrow escapes. 



nOHN F. JARVIS is one of the most promi- 
nent and well known passenger engineers 
CvL) on the Louisiana division of the Illinois 
Central. His first knowledge of railroad 
work was acquired in the shops of the I. C. at 
McComb City, Miss., where he served an appren- 
ticeship of four years. He then went to Mar- 
shall, Texas, and was for two years in the service 
of the Texas Pacific R. R. as a fireman, and for 
a short time worked in the same capacity on the 
International R. R. out of Palestine, Texas. 
Summoned to his home at McComb City, on 
account of the death of a sister, he decided to 
remain and began work in 1880 as fireman on 
the Louisiana division of the I. C., under Engi- 
neer Henderson Wallace. One year's service 
in this branch found him capable of taking charge 
of an engine, and he was accordingly promoted 
to the freight service where he continued until 
July 2, 1895, when he was promoted to the pas- 
se'nger service, and is at present employed there. 
He was injured in a rear-end collision, which 
occurred on October 19, 1899, and was for two 




months incapacitated for work. This was the 
only serious wreck of his railroad career. Mr. 
Jarvis was born on January 14, 1857, at Rock 
Island, Illinois, and is the son of C. C. and Eliza- 
beth Jarvis, both now living retired at McComb 
City. He was married to Miss Susie Zealy, of 
Jackson, Miss., their union being blessed by four 
children, viz : Mabel, Frankie, Elmarie, and 
Quinn. Mr. Jarvis is connected with the Elks 
organization, and is also a member of Myrtle 
Lodge No. 136, Knights of Pythias, both of 
McComb City. He has a beautiful home on 
Broadway, in the latter city, where his genial 
qualities and long residence has won for him the 1 
esteem of its best citizens. 



jtjtjtjtjtjt 



"ILLIAM WADDINGTON, one of 
the oldest conductors in the service 
of the Illinois Central, is a native of 
old England, his birth having oc- 
curred in Yorkshire. His father, Joseph Wad- 
dington, was one of the earliest employes of the 
road, having worked two years on the construc- 
tion train at the time the road was built. After 
it was turned over to the operative department 
he was appointed switchman at Nora, and held 
that position some fifteen years. During this 
period he had charge of the water supply at War- 
ren when horse power was used to fill the tank. 
In 1860 he was seriously injured by falling be- 
tween some moving cars, breaking his hip and 
receiving other severe injuries. He lived to a 
good old age, passing away in 1888, leaving a 
wife who still resides at the old home at Nora. 
Of their children two sons survive, William and 
Joseph, a baggageman running between Chicago 
and Dubuque. 

William Waddington began his railroad 
career at Warren in 1860 having charge of the 
water supply there for two years. In 1862 a 
place was found for him as brakeman running 
between Dunleith and Freeport, first under M. 
G. Mills and later Thomas Snow, Homer Graves 



182 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



and other old time conductors. September 5, 
1865. he was placed in charge of a train in the 
freight service between Dunleith and Amboy, 
and for fifteen years held the same run. In 
1880 he was promoted to the passenger service 
and ran between Amboy and Forreston and Free- 
port some six years, and for three years between 
LaSalle and Dubuque and later on the Dubuque- 
Chicago run. The only serious accident that 
ever occurred to Mr. Waddington happened 
at Council Hill, Illinois, on the twenty-ninth of 
July 1898. While his train was waiting there on 
a siding for passing trains he stepped off the front 
end of his train and the view down the track be- 
ing obscured by escaping steam he did not see 
nor hear the swift moving train and was in con- 
sequence struck by the engine losing his right 
leg below the knee and suffering a severe mang- 
ling of the other in the driving wheels. So 
severe were the injuries that Mr. Waddington 
has not yet been able to resume his duties al- 
though his old place is waiting for him as soon 
as he has fully recovered. Accident and death 
are always contingents of railroad life and it 
is good fortune that this occurrence was not 
worse than it was. 

Mr. Waddington first married Miss Elsa 
Consauls, a native of Pennsylvania, who died in 
1882, having borne seven children as follows: 
Bessie (deceased), Sadie, Burt, William, Hollis, 
Nina (deceased) and Merril. Of a second mar- 
riage, to Miss Ida Foster of Dubuque, one child 
has been born, Lorain. In 1870 Mr. Wadding- 
ton purchased his present home at East Dubuque 
and made all the subsequent improvements. It 
is a home where whole-souled hospitality is dis- 
pensed. 

The reminiscences of one that has been so 
long in the service of one employer can not fail 
to be of interest and many of the experiences of 
early railroading related to the younger genera- 
tion seem almost incredible so great have been 
the improvements in the science of railroading 
in the last three decades. Mr. Waddington was 
in charge of the train that hauled the first stone 
for the railroad bridge at Dubuque and has had 



the honor of running from time to time the offi- 
cial trains and specials carrying nearly every 
officer of the road. Jovial and hearty, William 
Waddington is one of the best known and best 
liked operatives on all the lines of the great sys- 
tem, not only by the officials under whom he 
works but by a large contingent of the traveling 
public who have been patrons of the road for 
vears. 



PRANK E. FERN, engineer at Cedar 
Rapids, Iowa, began work for the Illi- 
nois Central Railroad company in Sep- 
tember 1883, as a fireman, living in 
Waterloo and running between Dubuque and Ft. 
Dodge. His first engine was No. 79, and this 
he retained continuously for two years, but later 
he worked on different ones. In August 1887, 
he was placed in charge of the levers and con- 
tinued on the same run for five years after his 
promotion, but later ran only between Waterloo 
and Dubuque. In April 1889, Mr. Fern was 
transferred to the Cedar Rapids branch and has 
since had charge of an engine between Cedar 
Rapids and Manchester. 

Mr. Fern was married in East Dubuque in 
1890, to Miss Belle S. Fox, of that city, and Sep- 
tember 6, 1891, they were made happy by the ar- 
rival of a daughter whom they saw fit to name 
Marjorie. Mr. Fern is a member of Division 
Xo. 114, B. of L. E., also Howland Lodge No. 
274 A. O. U. W., Blue Lodge No. 105, and Chap- 
ter No. 54, of the Masonic fraternity, all of 
Waterloo. Mr. Fern has been a very successful 
engineer, having kept his record entirely free 
from serious accidents, and has never received 
the slightest injury since he has been on the road. 
He is very popular among his fellow workmen, 
and enjoys the confidence and esteem of a large 
circle of warm friends. A brief history of the 
family of which our subject is a member will be 
found in the sketch of R. M. Fern on another 
page of this volume. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



183 



LEO MEINZER, residing at 618 Fifth 
avenue, south, Fort Dodge, Iowa, an 
engineer on the Illinois Central, first be- 
gan with the company in 1878 as fire- 
man. Four and a half years later was promoted 
to engineer, and since that time he has been run- 
ning an engine on the Illinois Central road. 

Mr. Meinzer, a native of Racine, Wisconsin, 
was born Nov. 18, 1853. His father, Michael 
Meinzer, was a farmer in Wisconsin, but in 1862 
removed to Iowa, where he died in 1874. Our 
subject had two brothers, Augustus and Charles, 
who were engineers on the Chicago & Eastern 
Illinois R. R. 

On Nov. 3, 1880, our subject married Miss 
Carrie Widman, of Waterloo, and they have be- 
come the parents of five children, Gus, Annie, 
Eddie, Albert and Grace. 

Our subject began with this company at 
Waterloo, Iowa, on the Dubuque division, on 
which he ran until 1886, when he moved to Sioux 
City, Iowa, and began in freight service between 
Fort Dodge and Sioux City. He has since been 
on that division with the exception of three years 
when he was not in the employ of the company. 

Mr. Meinzer now has a passenger run be- 
tween Fort Dodge and Omaha. He is a member 
of the B. of L. E. of Fort Dodge, No. 226. 




t HILIP R. GRIFFIN, freight and extra 
passenger engineer on Illinois Central 
R. R., Iowa division, started in the ser- 
vice at Waterloo, October 21, 1879, as 
fireman on the main line, and fired under O. D. 
Gray two years and under Jim Wheeler eleven 
months, between Waterloo and Sioux City. He 
was promoted to the right side September 9, 1882, 
and worked alternately on the main line and in 
the yards until 1887 when he was given a freight 
run between Waterloo and Dubuque, which he 
has retained for the past eleven years. 

Philip R. Griffin was born in Saxeville, Wis. 
His parents were. John and Jane (Layton) Grif- 



fin, both of English nativity. Their family con- 
sisted of seven children : Martha married H. A. 
Dewey, of Poysippi, Wis.; William died in 1874; 
John R. is an I. C. R. R. engineer at Waterloo; 
Philip R. ; Charles H., living in Dakota, was fire- 
man on the I. C. R. R. five years; George A., a 
farmer, lives in Wisconsin ; Belle is the wife of 
Peter Johnson and lives in Saxeville, Wis. Philip 
lived at home until twenty-one years of age, when 
he entered the service of the I. C. R. R. 

Mr. Griffin married Lettie Wescott, of Poy- 
sippi, Wis., a native of the Green Mountain state. 
Of this union three children were born : Willie, 
Lotna and Philip. Mr. Griffin is a member of 
the B. of L. E., Waterloo Division No. 114, Ma- 
sonic Lodge No. 105, and Howland Lodge No. 
274, A. O. U. W., of Waterloo. 



LUCIAN SMITH, passenger engineer on 
the Waterloo division of the Illinois 
Central Railroad, was born in Cleve- 
land, Ohio, and is the son of Daniel and 
Celia (McFarland) Smith. His father was a 
farmer in Lorain county, Ohio. In early life our 
subject was newsboy on the Cleveland & Toledo 
R. R. for nearly four years, then lived with an 
uncle on a farm west of Cleveland four years, 
after which time he came to Iowa to visit a broth- 
er living near Dubuque, with whom he remained 
a short time, then went to work for the I. C. R. 
R. He began firing at Dubuque June 10, 1868, 
and after two years in that service between Du- 
buque and Iowa Falls he was promoted to engi- 
neer, July 20, 1870, ran a switch engine in the 
Waterloo yards three months, and freight engine 
between Dubuque and Waterloo until 1883, when 
he was promoted to passenger service, running 
from Waterloo to Sioux City until the division 
was divided, and since that time runs between 
Waterloo and Ft. Dodge. 

Mr. Smith was married in Dubuque in 1879 
to Miss Lena Forrest, of that city. In 1883 he 
located in Waterloo and built a home on the cor- 



184 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



ner of Lime and E. Fourth streets, which he re- 
cently removed to another lot and replaced by 
a beautiful new house which he now occupies. 
He is a member of the B. of L. E. No. 114, 
Waterloo Division, Waterloo Lodge No. 105, of 
the Masonic fraternity, A. O. U. W. No. 274, 
and B. P. O. E., all of Waterloo. Mr. Smith 
has been fortunate in his railroad career, and is 
a highly respected citizen of the city of Water- 
loo. 




ERNARD COYLE, former section boss 
on the Illinois Central Railroad, Free- 
port, 111., and one of the pioneer work- 
men of the road, was born in County 
Caven, Ireland, in 1830. He is the son of James 
and Rose (Smith) Coyle, the father a farmer by 
occupation. 

The subject of this sketch received his ed- 
ucation in Ireland, and came to the United States 
in 1850, locating in New York, and worked in a 
brick yard at Haverstraw in that state for two 
years. In 1853 he moved to Chicago where he 
entered the service of the I. C. R. R. as section 
boss, and laid the first rails on that road between 
Chicago and Champaign. In August 1854, he 
was removed to Clinton and also laid the first 
rails on that branch of the road from Clinton 
bridge to Decatur, then continuing southward, 
laid the track to Ramsey, after which he was giv- 
en a section twenty miles north of Cairo where he 
remained until April 1855. He then went to 
Freeport and took charge of a gravel pit for six 
months, then to East Dubuque, and worked on 
a fill where the present passenger station stands, 
and was then sent to the Amboy section where he 
remained until the spring of 1856, when he re- 
turned to Freeport and took charge of the gravel 
pit for the summer. In the fall of that year he 
was made section foreman at Forreston where he 
remained twenty-two years. In 1880 Mr. Coyle 
severed his connection with the I. C. R .R. and 
joined the forces of the C. M. & St. P. as a track 
layer, and laid track on different sections, spend- 



ing five years in said service. He then returned 
to the I. C. R. R., took charge of the gravel pit 
one summer, and in the fall went to Cherokee, 
Iowa, where he had charge of one hundred men 
in the supply yard. Mr. Coyle, now feeling that 
his many years of active work would justify a 
life of leisure, returned to Freeport where he 
purchased a comfortable home in the city, and has 
since lived retired. He also owns two farms 
near Freeport. 

In 1860 Mr. Coyle was married to Miss 
Ellen Matthews, of Freeport, and has a family of 
five children, as follows : James was a car in- 
spector for the I. C. R. R., and was fatally in- 
jured in the service in 1894; Thomas is an en- 
gineer in the service of the I. C. R. R. on the 
Amboy division ; Michael is a conductor on the 
C. M. & St. P. R. R. ; John is attending the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, and is now in the last year 
of the law course ; Emma is the wife of P. J. 
Lonergan, supervisor of the I. C. R. R. at Free- 
port. Mr. Coyle is a devoted Catholic and in 
his political views is a Democrat. He is a man 
of strong moral integrity and sound constitution, 
and proudly states that he never entered a saloon 
for a drink, never used tobacco in any form' and 
never took a dose of medicine. 



J SULLIVAN, supervisor of the road at 
Manchester, Iowa, began work for the 
Q Illinois Central Railroad company, 
July 6, 1893, at Epworth, la., where he 
had charge of section No. 5 for two years and 
nine months. From there he was transferred, 
November i, 1896, to his present position at Man- 
chester where he has since had charge of sections 
No. 14 and 15 of the eighth division. 

Mr. Sullivan did his first work at Van Horn, 
Iowa, where he was section foreman for the Chi- 
cago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad company 
for a year and a half. Later he had charge of 
a section for about three years at Green Moun- 
tain for the Diagonal Railroad, and also had 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



185 



charge of the Oskaloosa yards one year. Mr. 
Sullivan then worked for the Chicago & North- 
Western Railroad at Jefferson, la., about twelve 
years, doing extra work during summer seasons 
and section work during winter, and then entered 
the employ of the Illinois Central company. 

Our subject was born in Jackson county, la., 
not far from Dubuque, a son of Patrick and Mary 
(Cosgrove) Sullivan, and one of his brothers is 
now in Dubuque .where he is engaged in bridge 
building. Our subject was married in Mason- 
ville, la., in 1880, to Miss Katie Gushing, of that 
city, and to this union have been born five chil- 
dren whose names appear below in the order of 
their birth : Harry, Nellie, Rosie, Irene and 
Leo. Mr. Sullivan is a member of the M. W. 
of A. He is a railroad man in the truest sense 
of the word, for his earliest and only employment 
has been on the railroad, and he has been very 
successful since being with the Illinois Central. 




ILLIAM G. PLUMB, of Freeport, is 
a scion of old New England stock, 
his father, Henry C. Plumb, having 
been born in the green hills of Ver- 
mont. He was a carpenter and builder in Massa- 
chusetts, but at the outbreak of the war he left 
everything and enlisted almost at the first call. 
He contracted fever in the south and died of the 
malady somewhere in South Carolina. The 
mother, Eliza S. Graves, was a native of North 
Leverett, Massachusetts, and died in 1876. Our 
subject was born at Bernardstown, Vermont, 
December I2th, 1857, ar >d attended school at 
North Leverett until the age of sixteen, working 
on neighboring farms during the summer months, 
and earning his board and schooling during the 
winter months, for he had to care for himself 
after his thirteenth year. He was thus employed 
until he came west in 1878. Sojourning for a 
time in Indiana, he came to Illinois, working for 
a time on a fruit farm near Pontiac. Coming to 
Amboy he secured a position as brakeman on the 



Amboy division, and two years later was placed 
in charge of a train. Amboy was his place of 
residence until April 1896, when he moved to 
Freeport and has been a resident of that city 
since. 

Mr. Plumb was married in Amboy October 
29, 1893, to Mrs. Minnie Wood, a native of 
Ross Grove, Illinois. By a former marriage 
Mrs. Plumb became the mother of one daughter, 
Anna Wood Plumb. Mr. Plumb is an indepen- 
dent Republican in politics. 




G. SEARLES, freight conductor at 
Waterloo, Iowa, started his railroad 
L Q career as a brakeman in February 
1883, at the city in which he now 
makes his home, under Trainmaster J. E. Mc- 
Neil, with a run between Waterloo and Dubuque. 
He subsequently served under Frank O'Connor, 
J. Quirk and others, until 1887, when he was 
placed in charge of a train. His first work as 
a conductor was between Waterloo and Dubuque, 
but was soon after sent to Cherokee to do con- 
struction work on the branches that start from 
that place, and was thus engaged about four 
months. Subsequently he had control of a train 
between Fort Dodge and Sioux City until 1890; 
then between Waterloo and Dubuque until 1896; 
then for a short time between Waterloo and Fort 
Dodge, after which he returned to the Dubuque 
and Waterloo division until 1898. Since the last 
named date, Mr. Searles has been employed on 
(he branch between Waterloo and Lyle. He has 
now been employed on all of the divisions of the 
Illinois Central company's lines which have a 
terminus at Waterloo. 

Mr. Searles was born in Laporte county, In- 
djana, March 12, 1865, a son of J. W. and Mary 
(Masters) Searles, both of Pennsylvania. The 
father's occupation was that of carpenter and 
builder. He died in the year 1884, about five 
jears later than the death of his wife. Our sub- 
ject made his home with his parents until he en- 



186 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



tered the employ of the railroad company in 1883. 
when he located in Waterloo. During the pre- 
ceding year he was united in marriage to Miss 
Susie Deaver, of Dubuque, and two children, 
Hildred and Willie, bless their home. Mr. 
Searles is another of those fortunate ones who 
have never received an injury in the service of the 
lailroad company, and he has never lost a day on 
the account of physical disability. Socially he 
is connected with the O. R. C, Division No. 67, 
of Waterloo, anil also with the Tribe of Ben Hur. 



PRED H. STEARNS, engineer at Water- 
loo, Iowa, started his railroad career 
with the Illinois Central company as a 
fireman in the city in which he now 
makes his home, in 1880. His first run was be- 
tween Waterloo and Lyle, under Engineer Sam 
Kear, his second between Waterloo and Dubuque, 
where he worked for six months under Engineer 
Ben Fox; the next on engine No. 148 on the 
"West End," serving about a year under Arthur 
Mooney ; the next was on engine No. 146, on the 
Lyle branch, where he served six months under 
his father, E. Stearns, whose sketch appears on 
another page of this volume. Mr. Stearns then 
worked as a brakeman for about five months on 
the "Middle Division" and "West End," was pro 
moted to conductor and had charge of a train on 
the "West End" for six months. 

Mr. Stearns then discontinued his service on 
the Illinois Central Railroad and entered the em- 
ploy of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & 
Omaha company, and after performing the duties 
of conductor for them for five months, he spent 
another five months as brakeman for the Mis- 
souri Pacific Railway company. Mr. Stearns 
then worked six months for the International & 
Great Northern Railroad at Palestine, in the ca- 
pacity of brakeman, after which he returned to 
Waterloo and again entered the employ of the 
Illinois Central company who, after he had spent 



another year as fireman, promoted him in August 
1887, to his present position of engineer on the 
Dubuque division. Although Mr. Stearns be- 
gan working on the railroad at the very early age 
of seventeen years, and has devoted himself ex- 
clusively to that vocation, he has never had the 
misfortune to meet with an accident of any kind, 
and has never been unable to respond to the call 
of duty. 

Our subject was married in 1889 to Miss 
Bertha Schreiber, of Dubuque. Socially he affil- 
iates with the B. of L. E., Division No. 114, of 
Waterloo, and in fact nearly all of the secret fra- 
ternities of that city. He is very prominent in 
social circles and among the railroad men, and 
enjoys the respect and esteem of all who have 
the pleasure of his acquaintance. 




R. GOULD, passenger engineer at 
Waterloo, Iowa, began work for the 
Q Illinois Central company November 
2, 1872, at Waterloo, on a run be- 
tween that city and Dubuque, where he served 
as freight engineer until 1884. At this time he 
was promoted to a passenger run between Water- 
loo and Sioux City, but incidentally doing some 
freight work on the same division until 1888, 
but since that time, his place has been at the 
right side of a passenger engine running between 
the city he makes his home and Fort Dodge. 

Mr. Gould's first railroad experience was in 
the capacity of fireman in 1866, when he was but 
seventeen years of age. At this time he was run- 
ning out of Troy, N. Y., on the Troy & Boston 
Railroad, now known as the Fitchburg Line. 
After three years of experience he was promoted 
to the position of engineer and worked between 
Troy and Adams, Mass., and Rutland, Vt., un- 
til 1872. Then after serving the Chicago, Du- 
buque & Minnesota Railway company one sum- 
mer, running out of Dubuque, Iowa, he entered 
the employ of the Illinois Central company. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



187 



During his entire career as a railway employe, 
Mr. Gould has never received injury of so seri- 
ous a character as to render him unfit for service, 
nor has he ever been the cause of the injury of 
his fellow workmen. 

The subject of this sketch is a native of 
Cavendish, Vermont, and a son of R. D. Gould 
who was a conductor on the Rutland and Bur- 
lington division of the Rutland Railroad from 
uS48 to 1856, and later moved to St. Louis, Mo., 
and worked for a time on the St. Louis, Alton & 
Terre Haute R. R. He died in St. Louis in 
1857, leaving one son besides the one whose 
name appears at the head of this article, who was 
a railroad employe for a time. 

Mr. Gould's companion in the journey of 
life was known, prior to her marriage, as Miss 
Elizabeth R. Palmer, and is a native of Troy, 
N. Y. To this congenial union have been born 
two sons, Harry R., who is still making his home 
with his parents, and Freddie, who died in 1895. 
Socially Mr. Gould is identified with the B. of L. 
E., Division No. 114, of Waterloo, has been an 
office holder of that lodge and is one of its wide- 
awake and enterprising members. He also holds 
a membership in the A. O. U. W. at Waterloo. 



P. McCUNE, engineer at Waterloo, 
Iowa, began his railroad career in the 
capacity of call boy for the Chicago 
& Northwestern Railroad at Belle 
1 Maine, Iowa, and was thus engaged eight months. 
Then, after spending about two months in the 
shops, he began firing on the quarry engine, 
spending one summer there, and was transferred 
to the local run between Belle Plaine and Boone. 
Two and half years later Mr. McCune was set 
up to engineer, spending his first eleven months 
on the right side of the engine in the upper and 
lower yards at Belle Plaine, and then spent a 
year running between the last named city and 
Boone. 



Mr. McCune then severed his connection 
with the Chicago & Northwestern company and 
began as fireman for the Illinois Central company, 
running out of Cherokee. January 13, 1887, 
he moved to Waterloo, and began firing under 
Engineer James McNiel between the last named 
city and Eort Dodge, and held this place from 
January to April. Next he was sent to Chero- 
kee where he spent about two years firing on the 
" North Branch ", running to Sioux Falls, S. 
Dak. Mr. McCune's next position was on the 
left side of a passenger engine running from 
Cherokee to Onawa. Four months later, or in 
1891, he became an engineer. Mr. McCune is 
now in charge of an engine running between 
Waterloo and Fort Dodge. 

The subject of our sketch was born in Frank- 
lin-county, Pa., a son of J. V. McCune and Esther 
Alexandria, both of whom were natives of Penn- 
sylvania. The father was a contractor and 
builder by occupation, and moved to Dubuque, 
Iowa, in 1856, where he died in February, 1898, 
about a year later than the death of his com- 
panion. Three of their sons, besides the one 
whose name appears at the head of this article, 
were railroad employes, R. K. McCune, is an en- 
gineer on the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad 
at What Cheer, la., J. M. is train despatcher at 
Lajunta, Colorado, for the Atchison, Topeka & 
Santa Fe Railroad company, and Carson C, who 
served as a freight conductor, was killed eleven 
miles west of Lajunta, Colorado. Mr. E. P. 
McCune, our subject, made his home with his 
parents until he entered the service of the railroad 
company. He was married in Paris, Texas, to a 
young lady of that place who bore the maiden 
name of Alice North, and their home has been 
made happy by the presence of a family of the 
following children, Edna, Arthur, Beulah, Harold 
and Nina. Socially Mr. McCune affiliates with 
the B. of L. E., Lodge 226, at Fort Dodge. In 
his railroad career he has never had the misfor- 
tune to receive an injury of any kind nor to cause 
the injury of one of his fellow workmen, and 
his career has ben exceptionally free from ac- 
cidents. 



188 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 




T. KILLORAN, conductor on the 
Illinois Central Railroad, Amboy 
division, was born in LaSalle, 111., 
October 13, 1877, and is the son 
of Thomas and Mary (Ryan) Killoran, both of 
whom are now living in Lostant, 111., his father 
a prominent grain merchant of that place. 

Our subject a bright and energetic young 
man, was educated in the Brother's school at 
LaSalle, and graduated at a very early age from 
the high school at Lostant. In 1893 he went to 
Streator and worked in the carpet store of D. 
Heenan & Co. for a few months. He then took 
a teacher's examination, securing a first grade 
certificate, but preferring the active employment 
of out-door life he declined an offer of a school, 
and entered the service of the I. ,C. R. R. as a 
brakeman where he remained for three months, 
then resigned the position and taught school at 
Lostant for several months, and also worked at 
telegraphy for some time. Returning to the ser- 
vice of the road, Mr. Killoran served as freight 
and passenger brakeman until August 31, 1898, 
when he was promoted to conductor and remains 
in that position to date, the youngest conductor 
in the employ of the company, having been ap- 
pointed before he had attained his majority. He 
is a member of the O. of R. C, a Democrat in 
politics, and a communicant in the Catholic 
church. 




March i, 



E. CAMP, passenger engineer at 
Waterloo, and third engineer on the 
Iowa division of the Illinois Central 
Railroad, started as a railroad man, 
1866, on the Dubuque & Sioux City 
R. R. at Dubuque as a fireman, and fired two 
years under J. P. Farley, Sup't, S. A. Wolcott, 
Trainmaster, and T. W. Place, Master Mechanic, 
running between Dubuque and Iowa Falls, and 
was also in the construction service between 
Ackley and Iowa Falls in 1866, and helped to 
build that road. He was promoted to engineer 



May 9, 1868, has run on all the Iowa lines, and 
has been on the Dubuque division for thirty-one 
years. He was promoted to passenger engineer, 
April 1878, since which time, with the exception 
of thirteen months, from October 16, 1890, to 
November 17, 1891, when he served as general 
foreman in the Waterloo shops, he has been in 
the passenger service. 

Mr. Camp was born in Euclid, Ohio, May 
19, 1845, and is the son of John H. and Ruth 
Mary (Baldwin) Camp, natives of Canon, Conn., 
and New York, respectively. The father, who 
was a cooper, millwright and farmer by occupa- 
tion, spent the greater part of his life in Ohio, 
where he died in 1850. They had a family of 
eight children : Frances C. married William Pal- 
mer; Elizabeth lives in Ohio; Dudley B., de- 
ceased, was a marine engineer; Pulaski S. is 
farming at Everett, Mich. ; Anna Eliza died in 
Long Island ; William M. is one of the oldest 
engineers on the I. C. R. R., Springfield division; 
H. E. ; Seth C. is a printer and works on the 
Northwestern Miller, a magazine published in 
Minneapolis. After the death of Mr. Camp, 
Mrs. Camp was married a second time to R. B. 
Marsh, of Port Hope, Canada West, who died 
in Oregon. Mrs. Camp died at Mexico, Mo., 
in 1878. 

H. E. Camp remained at home until sixteen 
years of age, when he enlisted, June 6, 1861, in 
Company A, 24th Ohio Vol. Inf., but was dis- 
charged in August 1862 for disability. In Janu- 
ary 1864 he re-enlisted in the 37th N. Y. Vol. 
Inf. and served until the close of the war, taking 
part in many battles and skirmishes without re- 
ceiving -a wound, and was discharged May 16, 
1865. Shortly after the close of the war he went 
to work on the railroad as before stated. In 
1878 he located in Waterloo, having lived previ- 
ous to that time in Dubuque. 

Mr. Camp. was married at Glen Cove, Long 
Island, February 21, 1870, to Jeanette T. Camp- 
bell of that place. To them have been born two 
children : Mary J. married W. J. Smith, of Water- 
loo, Iowa, manager of the Iowa Telephone Co. ; 
Jessie E. is still at home. Mr. Camp is a mem- 




JOHN I. HOUSEAL. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



191 



her of the I>. of L. E., Waterloo Division No. 
114, in which he has held all the offices and is 
now Secretary of Insurance ; Harmony Lodge 
No. 2, I. C). O. F., of Dubuque, since 1869; A. 
(.). U. W. No. 274 of Waterloo. In his career 
as a railroad man, Mr. Camp has been very suc- 
cessful, having never been injured or injured 
others during his many years of service. He is 
well known all over the system and well liked 
by all. 



JOHN I. HOUSEAL, a popular and promi- 
nent passenger engineer on the Yazoo 
& Mississippi Valley R. R., entered the 
service of the Illinois Central in 1893. 
His railroad career began on the Columbia & 
Greenville R. R., where he was for two years 
a fireman. Resigning his position he retired 
from the road and entered the employ of a mer- 
cantile house in Newberry, S. C., and later was 
a clerk in the sheriff's office there. He was then 
made chief of police of Newberry, and held that 
position until 1875. In the latter year, after an 
absence of seven years from railroad work, he 
went to the Alabama & Vicksburg R. R. as fire- 
man, where after five months service he was pro- 
moted to engineer and remained eight years on 
that road, and on the Alabama division of the 
East Tennessee, Virginia & Georgia R. R. He 
returned to Vicksburg as engineer on the Ala- 
bama & Vicksburg R. R., remaining there six 
months. In 1883, he entered the service of the 
old Louisville, New Orleans & Texas R. R. (now 
the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley R. R.) which was 
absorbed by the I. C. R. R. in 1893. Receiving 
the appointment of foreman in the railroad shops 
at Memphis, in 1884, he accepted and held the 
position one year, but returned to the road where 
he remained until 1887. He was appointed fore- 
man at Memphis for the second time and re- 
mained there four and one half years, afterward 
returning to his former work as engineer, and 
has since been in the regular service with the 



exception of three years spent as traveling en- 
gineer. His present run is on engine No. 15 in 
the passenger service between Memphis and Rol- 
ling Fork, Miss. His career embraces a period 
of twenty-five years of railroad work, during 
which time he was only in one wreck, being 
slightly burned. He has never had a collision, 
and no railroad property in his care has ever been 
. damaged. He is the oldest engineer in the em- 
ploy of the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley R. R. 
and highly esteemed by the company. He was 
offered a position in the service for some months 
before he accepted. Mr. Houseal is a native of 
Newberry, S. C., where he was born January 
26, 1845. Hi s father, William W. Houseal was 
sheriff and auditor of that county, and also en- 
gaged in merchandising. He died in 1889, and 
is survived by his wife who resides at Newberry 
and is seventy-eight years of age. Two brothers 
of our subject are professional men of that place, 
one an editor and another a doctor. Another 
brother is engaged in farming in Cedartown, 
Ga. 

Mr. Houseal received a college education in 
his native city, and on January i, 1863, enlisted 
in Company F, South Carolina Regulars, under 
Col. L. M. Keitt, and Captain John M. Kinard, 
of the Confederate army. His company fought 
at Fort Sumter, and was at the siege of Charles- 
ton in 1863. He served in General Lee's army 
in the campaign of 1864, at Richmond, Va. ; at 
the battle of the Wilderness, second battle of 
Cold Harbor, and siege of Petersburg. He was 
then transferred to Gen. Early's command, and 
fought Sheridan at Cedar Creek, Va. He was 
then transferred back to Richmond, and finally 
to South Carolina, and met Sherman on his 
march through Georgia. He surrendered with 
his company in 1865, at Salisbury, N. C. His 
career as a soldier, like his career as a railroad 
man, was a fortunate one, never being wounded 
nor compelled to go to the hospital. Mr. Houseal 
married Miss Augusta G. Addy, of Newberry, 
S. C., and to them eight children have been born, 
of whom four survive. They are : J. Fred, an 
engineer in the I. C. service ; E. B. ; M. B., and 
Iva, the latter three at home. His deceased 



12 



192 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



children are Frank I., William W., Ouida and 
an infant. 

Mr. Houseal is a member of the Masonic 
fraternity, Knights of Pythias and Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. He and his wife are 
members of the Baptist church, in Memphis, 
where they reside at No. 180 Florida avenue in 
a beautiful home, and where their excellent qual- 
ities have gained for them a warm place in the 
hearts of a large circle of friends. 



Mr. Van Vleck was married in January 1883, 
to Miss Mary Heyer, of Waterloo, Iowa, by 
whom he has three children : Myrtle Irene, Mil- 
dred Mae and Charles Matthew. Mr. Van 
Yleck has been very successful as a railroad man. 
has never been injured and never laid up. He 
is a great hunter, and has a case of fine guns 
and has won some fine medals. He is very 
well known and is one of the popular young con- 
ductors of the Illinois Central system. He is a 
member of the O. of R. C. No. 67, and the Ma- 
sonic F>lue Lodge, No. 105, both of Waterloo. 



LAWRENCE VAN VLECK,. passenger 
conductor on the Waterloo division of 
the Illinois Central Railroad, entered 
the service Tune 27, 1879, at Waterloo, 
as a brakeman under Matthew Bankson, his first 
run being on No. 13 to Dubuque for a short time ; 
was on the Pool run two months, and one and 
one-half years on a passenger run. He then ran 
with George Clinger and J. H. Keepers for a 
time, and for four months was on the local and 
way freight with Conductor Quinlan. In 1881 
he was promoted to conductor and ran extra 
about four years when he was given a regular 
run between Waterloo and Dubuque, and also 
ran for three months on the west end, and was 
then promoted to extra passenger conductor. In 
January 1897, he took a regular passenger run, 
and now runs to Dubuque, Fort Dodge and Lyle. 
Lawrence Van Vleck was born in Grant 
county, Wisconsin, near Dubuque. He is the 
son of Matthew and Chloe M. (Clark) Van 
Meek, of Syracuse, New York. His father was 
the owner of three packet lines on the Erie 
canal while residing in New York, and after mov- 
ing to Wisconsin he patented a spring bed which 
he manufactured quite extensively. He died in 
1873. The family numbered seven children: 
Helen lives in .New York state; Henry was 
brakeman and baggageman for the I. C. R. R., 
and died in 1890 ; George ; Rose ; Orab, deceased : 
Lawrence and Carrie. 



JM. DuBOIS, passenger engineer on Illi- 
nois Central Railroad, Iowa division, 
Q began his life on the road October 10, 
1870, at the early age of seventeen 
years, as a brakeman, first under Fred Hill and 
later with Jack Shipman, and was baggageman 
for Thomas Sanders one year between Waterloo 
and Sioux City. In 1873 he started as fireman, 
running between Waterloo and Dubuque about a 
year, and later from Waterloo to Sioux City, 
firing for Engineer Kingsbury a short time, and 
Bill Hale three and one-half years, for James 
Palmer one year, and afterward for different 
ones. He was promoted in the fall of 1879, and 
ran engine No. 153 in the Dubuque yards, but 
later was given freight engine No. 141, running 
between Waterloo and Sioux City, and has since 
run nearly all the engines stationed in Waterloo. 
He ran a freight between Waterloo and Dubuque 
one year, and in 1887 was promoted to the pas- 
senger service and now runs between Dubuque 
and Fort Dodge. 

Mr. DuBois was born in Tompkins county. 
N. Y., and is the son of Uriah DuBois, also of 
the Empire state, who came west and located 
seven miles north of Waterloo, on a farm, in 
1855. Our subject had one brother, Arthur C., 
who was killed on the I. C. R. R. at Abingdon, 
Iowa, in the fall of 1889, by his engine going 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



193 



through a bridge that was being repaired. He 
had been in the service of the road for about 
fifteen years. Mr. DuBois is a member of the 
1). of L. E., Waterloo Division No. 114; A. F. 
& A. M. No. 105, and A. O. U. W. No. 274, of 
Waterloo. He has made many of the fast runs 
out of Waterloo, and has been very successful 
in his experience, never having been injured or 
caused injury to others on his trains, 




T. PIMM is the well-known engineer 
in charge of the "Brookhaven Local," 
Q running between McComb City and 
Brookhaven, Mississippi, in which ca- 
pacity he has served since 1893. In point of age 
he bears the distinction of being the oldest engin- 
eer in the employ of the Illinois Central in the 
South, being now in his sixty-sixth year. At 
the age of twelve years our subject began life 
on his own account, working as an engine wiper 
lor the B. &. O. Railroad at Frederick City, 
Maryland. He also served as fireman on the 
same road, and for a short time as freight con- 
ductor, and in May 1852, being then only eight- 
een years of age, was promoted to engineer, serv- 
ing the same company as such for several years. 

In 1871 he decided to retire from railroad 
life, and, going to Parkersburg, W. Va., obtained 
a position as superintendent of an extensive oil 
business, conducted by William W. Hartness, an 
oil producer of that locality. After a number of 
years in this work, our subject went to Lexing- 
ton, Mississippi, and entered the service of the 
Illinois Central a,s engineer. He then came to 
McComb City, taking charge of a bridge train, 
and running all over the Louisiana division of 
the I. C. until in 1893, when he was promoted to 
his present position. 

Mr. Pimm was born in Frederick City, Md., 
December 15. 1834, and is a son of John Pimm, 
a farmer of that vicinity, now deceased. John 
I'innn Jr., a brother, was an engineer on the 



Western Maryland Railroad, and was killed in 
an accident on that road. 

Our subject was. married in early manhood 
to Miss Mary Norton, of Virginia, who died in 
1898. Nine children were born to them, viz: 
James, a machinist residing at Wilmington, Del. ; 
William, a machinist in the employ of the I. C. at 
the McComb City shops; Nannie, residing in 
Philadelphia; Nora, at home; John, an engineer 
in the service of the I. C. at Canton, Mississippi ; 
Harry, a machinist in McComb City; Frank, an 
employe of the Baldwin Locomotive Works in 
Philadelphia ; Maggie, residing with her father, 
and Bernard, a prescription druggist in McComb 
City. 

Socially Mr. Pimm is connected with the 
Catholic Knights of America, being a member in 
good standing for the last twenty years. He is 
also a member of Division No. 196, B. of L. E.. 
of McComb City, where he resides in a beautiful 
home of his own, and of which city he is a useful 
and valued citizen. 




( ENJAMIN F. FOX, a very prominent 
and one of the oldest engineers on the 
road, has been in the employ of the 
Illinois Central company since 1868. 
He began in the car shops at Dubuque, Iowa, 
and worked there under Foreman D. B. Smith 
until 1869. He then began as fireman on the 
Waterloo and Iowa Falls division and worked 
there for one and a half years. In 1870 he be- 
gan firing on an engine between Waterloo and 
Sioux City, and then in 1872 was promoted to 
engineer, running a freight train between Du- 
buque and Sioux City until 1882, when he was 
promoted to passenger engineer and since that 
time he has run passenger train between Fort 
Dodge and Sioux City. He is now, in point of 
service, the fourth oldest engineer in Fort Dodge. 
He is a son of Calvin P. Fox, who was a 
machinist by trade and worked at that until his 
death at Dubuque, Iowa. Our subject had one 



194 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



brother who was a fireman on the Illinois Central 
and L'nion Pacific railroads. He was killed at 
Sedalia, Missouri, in 1876, while in the employ of 
the company as a traveling engineer. 

In 1867 Mr. Fox married Miss Mary F. 
Smith, of Connecticut, a daughter of D. B. Smith 
who was foreman of the shops for the Illinois 
Central. Our subject and wife have two chil- 
dren, Avis L. and Orphia. Mr. Fox has never 
been injured in a wreck nor has he ever been the 
cause of an injury to any of his fellow men. He 
has been a member of the B. of L. E. for twenty 
years, and is now a member of Lodge No. 226, 
of Fort Dodge. He now resides at 808 Second 
Ave., south, Fort Dodge, Iowa. 




C. CALKINS, engineer at Waterloo, 
Iowa, began his railroad career in 
'O September 1885, at Fort Dodge, in 
the capacity of fireman for the Illi- 
nois Central company. He first worked on a 
switch engine in the yards for a time, and for a 
short time thereafter was employed on extra 
trains, and was then promoted to the passenger 
service, running between Waterloo and Sioux 
City with Engineer Baldwin for two years. Sub- 
sequently Mr. Calkins worked on a switch engine 
in the Dubuque yards until October 1889, when 
he crossed the cab and has since had a seat on 
the right side of the engine. His first work in 
the capacity of engineer was in the Dubuque 
yards, and then for a time his work was distrib- 
uted over the entire Iowa division. In 1891 Mr. 
Calkins had a run between Champaign and Cen- 
tralia, 111., after which he returned to the Iowa 
division for a short time. In the spring of 1892 
he went south, but soon returned to Waterloo ; 
from thence he went to the Chicago and Cham- 
paign division, and in the fall of 1892 returned to 
to Waterloo where he has since made his home. 
Mr. Calkins was born in Amboy, 111., a son 
of Henry G. Calkins, who has been an Illinois 
Central engineer since 1862. He is now making 



his home in Freeport, 111., and is ranked among 
the oldest of the company's employes. Our 
subject also has a brother, Frank W., who is an 
engineer between Freeport and Clinton, 111. Mr. 
Calkins was married in Dubuque in 1896, to Miss 
Anna Hayes, of that city. He has been a very 
successful railroad man and is known to be a 
skillful engineer. 



JOHN G. DUGAN, one of the most popular 
conductors and known from Chicago to 
New Orleans, was born in Lockport, 
Niagara county, New York, June 20, 
1847. His father was Hugh Dugan, who was a 
successful business man in Buffalo and afterward 
retired on a farm, dying when our subject was 
a small boy. Several years after his father's 
death our subject's mother married a Mr. Kol- 
lymer, going to Cleveland, Ohio, to live. Our 
subject worked at various occupations and at the 
time the Civil war broke out, he enlisted in Com- 
pany D, 84th Ohio. Serving' out his enlisted 
period he received an honorable discharge and 
entered the service of the Adams Express Co. 
as messenger between Louisville, Kentucky and 
Nashville, Tennessee. He was a trusted em- 
ploye of this company for eighteen years, serv- 
ing in various capacities as messenger and assis- 
tant cashier, afterward having entire charge of 
a large scope of territory. On the night of July 
29, 1869, while messenger, he had a serious mis- 
fortune happen while on train going from Mem- 
phis to Louisville. The train went through a 
bridge at Budds Creek. This was one of the 
most serious railroad accidents of the time, as 
the entire train was burned up and many passen- 
gers perished. Being a short distance from a 
meeting point a crew of another train saw the 
light and came to the rescue. They took blankets 
from the sleeping cars and wrapping them 
around themselves, went into flames of the wreck 
and rescued many of the passengers. Among 
them was Mr. Dugan who had been thrown un- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



195 



cler the car. Our subject was so badly burned 
and injured that the doctors gave him up to 
die as he lay on the depot platform at Clarksville. 
An old German named Wenzler living at that 
place, and who had been educated in Germany^ 
determined to save our subject if possible. No- 
ticing signs of life he sent for a tub of hot water, 
into which he placed our subject, even going so 
far as to suck great clots of blood out of subject's 
throat from which he removed several handfuls. 
The German then had Mr. Dugan removed to his 
house where he faithfully nursed him six months, 
having six and eight doctors at various times, 
his condition being so serious, and at one time 
he was given up to die and a coffin and suit of 
clothes, were made for him. Mr. Dugan often 
laughs when he thinks of the coffin as he saw it 
many times afterward, it being sold in 1894 by 
the company back to the maker, while the suit of 
clothes disappeared. 

The doctors at one time decided to remove 
Mr. Dugan's eyes, his head being in a deplorable 
condition. Mr. Dugan was helpless and could 
not raise his hand against them, but he told them 
if they did, and he recovered he would kill every- 
one of them, as he preferred dying to loosing his 
eyes. They put off the operation and Mr. Dugan 
recovered, but a leech injured a cord of the right 
eye when our subject was helpless, which caused 
the iris to turn back. The express company and 
railroad company did everything possible for him 
and when lie had fully recovered he went back 
to the express company as general agent's clerk, 
serving up to 1880, when he left the service and 
engaged in the commission business in Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, building up a large business, 
making many friends. Through the unfaithful- 
ness of persons supposed to be his friends he lost 
a large amount of bills and closed out his busi- 
ness and entered the service of the C. O. & S. 
W. Having friends on the road he made but 
few trips as brakeman, when he was given charge 
of a freight train, ran this four years and was 
then promoted to passenger conductor, running 
between Louisville and Paducah. 



His present run is between Louisville and 
Fulton, being one of the best runs on the divi- 
sion. Mr. Dugan has had a remarkably success- 
ful railroad career, having had no serious acci- 
dents or injuries while running a train. He 
never had any passengers injured, the only per- 
son ever hurt on our subject's train was mail 
clerk Myers, who was slightly injured by the car 
leaving the track. 

Our subject is courteous, accommodating, 
always looking out for the comfort of his passen- 
gers and he has hosts of friends. Mr. Dugan 
married Miss Vollmer, of Louisville, Kentucky, 
and has four children, George John, a lumber 
inspector ; Frank Wenzler, who served as lumber 
inspector of Louisville, now lumber inspector at 
Memphis; Miss Ella Pauline, an accomplished 
young lady, and Albert, a graduate of the Louis- 
ville schools. 

Our subject is a member of the O. R. C. 
Monon Division, No. 89, having filled the princi- 
pal chairs and served on many of the committees. 
Was also one of the organizers of the Knights of 
Honor, of Louisville. He has a fine residence 
on West Broadwav. 



JD. HARRELL, an engineer in the pas- 
senger service on the Louisiana divi- 
O sion of the Illinois Central, is an old 
and trusted employe of the road. His 
connection with the I. C. dates ^from July n, 
1878, when he was employed as fireman on a 
steam shovel at' Chatawa, Mississippi. He re- 
mainded there only three months when he went 
to McComb City, where he worked for some 
time in the shops of the company at that point. 
Later he was appointed locomotive fireman, hav- 
ing served two years as fireman, he was on Oc- 
tober 28, 1880, examined for promotion to en- 
gineer, and passing the examination with credit, 
was given a position in that capacity on the 
Louisiana division of the road. In 1891 he was 
promoted to the passenger service, and has since 



196 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



remained there having a regular run between 
Canton, Mississippi, and New Orleans. He has 
never had a serious wreck, or been in any way 
injured on the road. 

Mr. Harrell is a native of Greensboro, Ala- 
bama, the date of his birth being September 14, 
1860. He is the son of James D. Harrell, who 
was a carpenter and builder by trade, also a suc- 
cessful farmer. Mr. Harrell, Sr. departed this 
life in 1895, at the advanced age of eighty-seven 
years. Three brothers of our subject, now all de- 
ceased, were former employes of the I. C. Wil- 
liam C. was a bridge foreman, John A., a carpen- 
ter, and Wesley M. was for a time supervisor of 
bridges and buildings. 

Mr. Harrell married Miss Mamie Long, of 
Kenner, Louisiana. Two children have been 
born to them: James M., born August 7, 1895, 
and Mae, born August 3, 1898. 

The family reside in a beautiful home in the 
south-east part of McComb City, besides 
which Mr. Harrell is the owner of several other 
pieces of valuable property. Division No. 196, 

B. of L. E. claims him as a member, he having 
just been elected secretary of the Division. 

Mr. Harrell kindly furnished the Histori- 
cal Company with a short sketch of the Lodge 
which is as follows : 

" Magnolia Division No. 196, B. of L. E., 
was organized by F. L. Waldron. on October 
23, 1882, with the following charter members : 

C. Lindstrom, W. B. Baldwin, Harry Thompson, 
George Deaton, P. Hannon, J. C. Purdy, F. G. 
Wheelock, F. Burrow, H. Bowen, John Dietz. 
William Hight, W. D. Mitchell', and Hennison 
Wallace. The Division now has seventy-eight 
members, with the following officers : |. D. 
Harrell, Secretary: E. R. Harlan, Chief Engi- 
neer ; B. E. Harrell, First Engineer ; William 
Munn, Second Engineer ; Thomas McCosker, 
Second Assistant Engineer: C. W. Harrell, 
Third Assistant Engineer ; Leon Ford, Guide ; 
J. R. Lilly, Chaplain ; J. R. Smith, Journal Agent : 
J. D. Harrell, Insurance Agent, and delegate to 
the General Board 'of Adjustment ; William 
I 'evens, ( )fficer of Law &c. ; and H. Bowen, dele- 
gate to the International Convention. 




SCAR D. GRAY is an engineer in the 
freight service of the Illinois Central 
in the Cherokee district of the Iowa 
division. He entered the service of 
the I. C. in January 1873 as fireman, and has re- 
mained with the company ever since. His first 
experience in railroad work was between the 
years of 1852 and 1856, when he worked as fire- 
man on the old Galena & Chicago Union R. R. 
He retired from the service of that company and 
at once entered the employ of the I. C. On com- 
ing to this company he was for nearly five 
years fireman for T. W. Place, now master me- 
chanic, receiving a well-merited promotion in 
1877 to engineer, and took a regular run between 
Waterloo and Sioux City. During his service 
he has been in a number of small wrecks, in one 
of which he was injured. He is now in charge 
of freight engine No. 814, running on the Chero- 
kee division. 

Mr. Gray was born April 6, 1834, in Chau- 
tauqua county. New York, and is married. His 
wife, formerly Miss Adeline Conley, being a na- 
tive of Canada. He is socially connected with 
B. of L. E. No. 226, and also of the Elks organ- 
ization of Fort Dodge. 



J WILLIAM MEYER, engineer on the 
Illinois Central, Freeport division, en- 
Q tered the service of the company No- 
vember 8, 1 887, as a fireman on the Am- 
boy division, and after some four years' service 
was licensed to handle the throttle and lever June 
1 6. 1 80 1, since which time he has served in that 
capacity, now running on the Freeport division. 

Our subject is a native of Hull, England, 
where he first saw the light October 22, 1865. 
Two years later the family came to the United 
States and located in Chicago, where they re- 
mained but eight months, then removed to Dixon, 
111., where the parents, Julius and Rosine (Oyler) 
Meyer, still reside, the father following the tail- 
or's trade. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES.- 



197 



J. William Meyer attended the Dixon 
schools, and during his boyhood and early man- 
hood worked on a farm near his home. On the 
1 7th of January, 1889, he was married to Miss 
Addie F. Walker, of Amboy, 111. Mrs. Meyer 
was born in Sublette, June 28, 1868. By her 
union with Mr. Meyer she is the mother of one 
child Myrtle M., born December i, 1890. So- 
cially Mr. Meyer affiliates with the Masonic fra- 
ternity, and also belongs to the B. of L. E. In 
his religious views he is a Protestant, and is a 
Republican in politics. 



C., being engaged as pumper at the station at 
Frinear, Louisiana. 

Miss Mattie E. Hammond, of McComb City, 
Mississippi, became the wife of our subject. She 
is the daughter of H. R. Hammond, now de- 
ceased, who was for twenty-two years, an engi- 
neer in the service of the I. C. at the water-works, 
and was also supervisor of the pumping service. 
To this marriage two children have been born, 
Harry and Vivian. 

Socially Mr. Muller is connected with the 
Order of Maccabees, and is a member of Divi- 
sion No. 367, O. R. C. of McComb. He has a 
comfortable home in East McComb, and is a 
highly respected citizen. 



JG. MULLER, a well known conductor 
in the freight service of the Ilinois Cen- 
Q tral, on the Louisiana division, dates 
his connection with the road from 1890. 
Previous to becoming identified with the I. C. 
he had been employed for two years, first as fire- 
man and later as a brakeman, on the New Or- 
leans, Spanish Fort & Lake Railroad. He then 
engaged in farming in Alabama, which he fol- 
lowed two years, and the three years following 
was employed as a fireman on a Mississippi river 
steamer. In 1890 he entered the employ of the 
Illinois Central at McComb City, as brakeman, 
and served three years. Owing to a small wreck 
which occurred that year, he retired from the 
service and went to the Southern Pacific at New 
Orleans, as hostler and night engineer. After 
a two years'service with that road, he went to the 
shops at Gulf port, Louisiana, where he worked 
for a period of eighteen months. In 1898, he 
was re-instated by the I. C. and resumed work 
as brakeman, and after fourteen months spent 
in that branch of the service, was promoted to 
conductor in the freight service, and given a 
regular run between Canton, Miss .and New Or- 
leans. 

Mr. Muller is a native of New Orleans where 
lie was born on February 22, 1866. His father, 
Mathias Muller, is a valued employe of the I. 




ICHARD MORGAN, trainmaster of the 
Grenada district, was born at New- 
castle, Ireland, November 15, 1856. 
His parents emigrated to the States in 
the spring of 1858, sojourning at Cumberland, 
Maryland, and at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, be- 
fore settling at Nashville, Tennesee. Here in 
public and private schools the boy received his 
education until 1867, when he began his railroad 
career, lad though he was, as tool carrier on the 
Louisville & Nashville road on what is now the 
Henderson division. Soon he secured a some- 
what easier situation, that of news-boy, running 
between Nashville and Guthrie, Kentucky, about 
a year. His next move was to become bridge 
watchman at Red River, near Adams, Tennessee. 
A year later he was given a place with the bridge 
carpenters, and a year later became brakeman 
running between Nashville and Henderson. Pro- 
motion came within a twelve-month, and he was 
given charge of the construction train and later 
a freight run, receiving a final promotion and 
placed in charge of a passenger train which he 
ran for one year before resigning and entering 
the service of the Illinois Midland as conductor 
of the work train, which he ran some five months 



198 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



before going east to accept a position on the New 
York & New England road with a freight run be- 
tween Boston and Hartford. A year later he 
secured a place as conductor on a construction 
train on the Denver & Rio Grande, for, a year, 
and went from there to the Cotton Belt road in 
Texas on a work train until the road became 
bankrupt some seven months later. An opening 
being offered him on the road where he served 
his apprenticeship, he accepted and served as 
freight and passenger conductor some three years, 
and then started in as extra freight conductor for 
the Chesapeake, Ohio & South-Western, soon re- 
ceiving a promotion to extra passenger conduc- 
tor, and later was made trainmaster at Memphis, 
from which place he was transferred to Paducah 
and later to Louisville, Ky. September 16, 1893, 
he was made superintendent of the main line 
and branches, with headquarters at Paducah. 
When the road became a part of the Illinois Cen- 
tral system on July 31, 1896, Mr. Morgan was 
assigned his present position with headquarters 
in Memphis. 

May 31, 1878, he was married to Miss El- 
leanor A. Kane, of Logan county, Ky. They 
are members of the Catholic church. In his 
political views Mr. Morgan affiliates with the 
Republican party, and socially is a member of 
the Elks. His career refutes the old saying that 
a rolling stone gathers no moss, or is the ex- 
ception that proves the rule In the many 
changes of employers he encountered, he gathered 
an experience that ripened and fitted him for the 
higher positions that came after positions that 
he might not have been competent to fill had the 
varied experience been lacking. 



JOHN J. McNAMARA, a popular conduc- 
tor in the freight service of the Illinois 
Central, on the Louisiana division, en- 
tered the service of the I. C. in 1891. His 
railroad career began in 1882, on the Chicago, 
Burlington Ouincy R. P.. at Beardstown, Illi- 



nois, where he served as brakeman for two and 
one half years, and afterward as conductor for 
five years. He then went west to Pocatello. Ida- 
ho, where he was for two years with the Union 
Pacific R. R. as conductor. Going from there 
to Birmingham, Alabama, he was for a short 
time with the Georgia Pacific R. R., and in 1891 
became identified with the Illinois Central at 
McComh City, Mississippi, where he has since re- 
mained in the freight service of the road on the 
Louisiana division. 

Mr. McNamara is a native of Sublette, Illi- 
nois, where he was born October 20, 1864, and 
is a son of Daniel McNamara, now retired, and 
living at Rock Falls, Illinois, but who for many 
years was connected with the Chicago, Burling- 
ton & Quincy and Illinois Central roads as sec- 
tion foreman. Miss Katie McCoster, of Canton, 
Mississippi, became the wife of Mr. McNamara, 
and they are the parents of two children, Bessie 
and Ellen. Mr. McNamara belongs to the Ma- 
sonic fraternity, the Knights of Pythias, and Di- 
vision No. 367 O. R. C., of McComb City, where 
he has a fine home on Broadway. . He is regarded 
among the officers of the I. C. as a very careful 
and steady man, and his fellow citizens respect 
him for his integrity and progressive qualities. 

jtjtjtjtjtjt 



J' NORTH ABBOTT, a well-known con- 
ductor in the freight service on the Lou- 
Q isiana division of the Illinois Central 
between Canton, Mississippi, and New 
Orleans, entered the employ of the company in 
1872 at the age of seventeen. He was first em- 
ployed as bill clerk and later as rate clerk in the 
outward freight office at New Orleans, under 
Major E. A. Burke, who was then freight agent. 
Occupying this clerkship until 1878, he then 
resigned to accept a position at court, where 
he was engaged for the succeeding four years. 
He then returned to the employ of the Illi- 
nois Central in 1886, and entered the service 
of the company at McComb City, Mississippi, 




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AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



201 



as a conductor on the Louisiana division of the 
road, which position he holds at the present 
time. For the past six years he has had charge 
of the summer fruit trains out of New Orleans. 

Mr. Abbott is a native of Natchez, Missis- 
sippi, where he was born October 31, 1854, and 
is a son of John and Sarah J. Abbott, both still 
living and leading a retired life in the city of 
New Orleans, at the ripe old age of seventy-six 
and seventy-four respectively. John Abbott was 
a commercial salesman by occupation, well and 
favorably known throughout the state of Mis- 
sissippi. He was in later years in the newspaper 
business, being connected with the Item and the 
States, New Orleans publications. 

On November 12, 1877, J. North Abbott 
was united in marriage to Miss Clara Vienne, 
a daughter of Francis A. Vienne, a cotton mer- 
chant of New Orleans. Four children have been 
born to them, viz : Marga B., Alene M., Dr. 
C-W-M., and Clara Louise. In his social con- 
nections Mr. Abbott is a member of Division No. 
367, O. R. C., of McComb City, of which he is 
now Chairman, and has been the representative 
of the Division for four years. He was a char- 
ter member of the Young Men's Gymnastic Club 
of New Orleans, and is connected with Lodge 
No. 68, Knights of Pythias, of New Orleans. 
Mr. Abbott resides with his family in a beautiful 
and commodious residence in East McComb 
City, of which place he is an energetic and pro- 
gressive citizen. 




L. HAYES is an engineer in the pas- 
senger service of the Illinois Central, 
Q his run being between Champaign and 
Centralia. His father, Patrick Hayes, 
entered the service of the Illinois Central in 1864, 
as a section man at Champaign, working after- 
ward in the shops as a laborer until December 
I, 1895, without suspension or discharge. On 
the latter date, after a life of well-spent labor, 



he retired on account of ill-health, and died one 
year later, December i, 1896. Our subject was 
born in Lowell, Mass., in 1860, and came to 
Champaign in 1864. He entered the employ of 
the Illinois Central as fireman in 1878 on the 
Champaign section of the Chicago division, ser- 
ving six months in the freight, and four and 
one-half years in the passenger service. On 
February 13, 1883, he was examined by E. T. 
Jeffery and Henry Schlacks, and passing the ex- 
amination was promoted to engineer, taking a 
passenger run in 1893. Mr. Hayes is a charter 
member of B. of L. F., and also a member of 
Division No. 24, B. of L. E., of Centralia. May 
20, 1885, he was married to Miss Margaret Cof- 
fee, of Champaign. They have had four chil- 
dren, Gertrude and Minnie, deceased, and Wil- 
liam Bertram and Margaret Loretta. In politics 
he is a Democrat. Both are members of St. 
Mary's Catholic church, of Champaign. 



JGRANEY is an engineer in the passen- 
ger service of the Illinois Central, run- 
Q ning between Champaign and Centralia. 
He was born in Bristol, Conn., January 
T, 1854, a son of John and Kate (Naughton) 
Graney, natives of County Galway, Ireland. He 
entered the service of the Illinois Central as fire- 
man in 1871, when only a youth of seventeen. 
He was promoted to engineer October 5, 1877, 
and in 1892 took charge of engine No. 968 in 
the passenger service on the Champaign section 
of the Chicago division. Mr. Graney was mar- 
ried to Miss Minnie F. Hayes, November 10, 
1880. She is the daughter of Patrick and Mary 
(Quirk) Hayes, and was born in Lowell, Mass., 
February 19. 1858. They have no children. 
Both are communicants of St. Mary's Catholic 
church in Champaign, and he is a member of 
the Father Matthew Total Abstinence Society, 
of which he has been a member for twenty-five 
years. The fathers of Mr. and Mrs. Graney 
were both in the employ of the I. C. R. R. for 



202 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



thirty-five years, and only retired when old age 
compelled them, and during all this time neither 
of them were ever discharged or laid off. Mr. 
Graney is connected with Division No. 24. U. 
of L. E., of Centralia. 




ILLIAM H. BARTLETT, a popular, 
hustling young agent at Owensboro, 
the son of William H. Bartlett, is 
a native of Tennessee, where he re- 
ceived his education. At the age of seventeen 
he worked in a store where he learned telegraph 
operating, remaining in this store seven months. 
He then began work for the L. & N. at Browns- 
ville, Tenn'essee, where he remained two years 
as operator, then was in Supt. Dunn's office at 
Memphis for three months. Then he entered 
the service of the C. O. & S. W. as operator and 
ticket agent. In 1891 he went to Greenville, and 
in 1892 to Grand River, a boomed town, as agent. 
Tn 1894 he went to Eddyville, remaining until 
1896, when he was transferred to Central City. 
One year after this he again changed and took 
up his work at Princeton, and yet a year later 
was again transferred to Owensboro to succeed 
Agent Stovall, of Louisville. Our subject has a 
number of men in his department, his assistants 
being J. P. Van Meter, chief clerk and cashier, 
F. X. Pottinger, bill clerk, ticket seller and opera- 
tor, and George Arnold, warehouse man. 

Owensboro is a city of great business enter- 
prises. The yard has two and a half miles of 
side track, and the freight house is far too small 
for the amount of business transacted. Mr. 
Bartlett has continued the good work begun by 
Mr. Stovall and has doubled the business in the 
last year. The principal shipments from this 
town are tobacco, carriages, wagons, feed, whis- 
key, cellulose, a preparation made from the pith 
of corn stalks, which is used in battle ships, ex- 
ports of 1,000,000 tons expected in the year 1900, 
also large shipments of woolen goods, brick and 
tile, There are seven thousand bogheads 



of tobacco to be shipped in the year 1900, 
besides the large shipments of flour. Mr. Bart- 
lett has a great deal of competition, there being 
the L. & N., the L. H. & St. L. railroads and the 
Ohio river, all having good agents. Our subject 
acts as commercial agent in connection with the 
duties of local freight agent, and much of his 
success lies in his being very accommodating to 
his patrons and his pleasant manners and his 
square dealing have also done much for him in 
his work. He is a temperate man, attends strict- 
ly to his business during the day and spends his 
evenings at home when not engaged at his office. 
Mr. Bartlett married a daughter of M. W. Brown 
and has one child, Leonard B. He is a member 
of the A. O. U. W. and resides at 210 E. Fifth 
street, Owensboro, Kentucky. 




L. PRICE, a conductor on the Louis- 
iana division of the Illinois Central, 
in the freight department, dates his 
connection with the company from 
1894. His first knowledge of railroad work was 
acquired on the Louisville & Nashville R. R. 
where he worked as a brakeman for three years 
out of Birmingham, Alabama. He was after- 
ward for three years with the Nashville & Chat- 
tanooga R. R. as brakeman and extra, conductor 
but returned to the Louisville & Nashville where, 
after six months service as brakeman he was pro- 
moted to conductor. The latter position he held 
for nine years, having charge of a run out of 
Birmingham. 

In 1894 he became identified with the I. C. 
at McComb City, Mississippi, as a brakeman, 
serving for six months. He was then sent to 
Jackson, Mississippi, as yardmaster for the I. C., 
which position he held for two years, and in 
1897 returned to the road service as a conductor 
on the Louisiana division of the road, and has 
since remained there. He was in a collision at 
Johnston's Station, Miss., and also at Brook- 
haven, but in both escaped injury. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



203 



Mr. Price is a native of Coffee county, Tenn., 
his birth occurring on December 23, 1864. James 
I Vice, his father, now deceased, was a prominent 
attorney at Manchester, Tenn., and well known 
throughout the state. Mr. Price has two broth- 
ers who reside at his old home in Tennessee, one 
of them a physician by profession, and the other 
a farmer. ( )ur subject was united in marriage 
to Mrs. Annie Wilson, a native of Tennessee, 
by whom he has one son, James Ernest, a prom- 
ising boy. The Knights of Maccabees and O. 
R. ('. of McComb City, claim him as a valued 
member. A man of genial disposition, and- a 
faithful employe, he is held in high esteem by 
the officials of the road and his fellow employes. 




Central. 



ILUAM T. COLMESN1LL, the 
popular passenger conductor, is the 
oldest man in active service on the 
Evansville district of the Illinois 
Around the family of which he is a 
descendant, is woven a romance as interesting as 
any tale of fiction. 

Gabriel de Colmesnill, a native of France, 
enjoyed the title of Marquis while under his na- 
tive flag. When a young man he settled in the 
island of Hayti, and acquired several large plan- 
tations, some in the valley of the Antobomic, and 
the home plantation in the mountains near St. 
Marks, on which he raised large quantities of 
sugar, cotton, coffee and indigo. During an up- 
rising of the blacks at the close of the last cen- 
tury, the Marquis was beseiged on his planta- 
tion that had been fortified by his faithful slaves. 
When carried by storm his wife and two sons and 
(laughters perished, while he himself was severely 
wounded and carried by his servants to a place of 
safety in St. Marks. Here he chartered a vessel 
belonging to Stephen Girard, and loaded it with 
coffee and indigo. Just prior to sailing there 
appeared a couple of his slaves who had with 
them his infant son that they had rescued and car- 
ried to the mountains. This was John D. Colmes- 



nill, father of the subject of this sketch. The 
Marquis landed at Philadelphia and, selling his 
cargo to Girard, purchased a plantation at Lam- 
berton, New Jersey, where most of his old slaves 
joined him. Finding the climate too severe for 
them, he removed in '800 to Georgia, purchasing 
a large plantation near Savannah, where he 
raised cotton and vegetables for the city market. 
Here John D. Colmesnill was reared and at the 
age of sixteen, after two years in the academy at 
Athens, Georgia, he entered the mercantile es- 
tablishment of Robert and John Baldwin as ship- 
ping clerk. The following year he was made 
super-cargo on one of their trading vessels and 
sent on several voyages to the West India islands. 
During one of these trips he landed at Hayti 
to recover the family plate that his ' father had 
buried between two mahogany trees at his moun- 
tain home. Together with what was buried for 
the neighbors there were two tons of the precious 
metal which he packed into some four hundred 
fifty bags of coffee he was buying for that pur- 
pose, and started with it to the coast. Some one 
proved traitor and informed the authorities at 
Port an Prince, so the young treasure hunter 
was compelled to make his escape in an open boat 
to Jamaica, and return to the states poorer by 
the value of the silver and the coffee. After 
leaving the sea Mr. Colmesnill went into business 
at Fashington, Georgia, where he was when his 
father died, directing in his will that his slaves be 
set free, and that the grown ones be given fifty 
dollars each and the young ones thirty. As the 
laws of Georgia did not permit the freeing of 
slaves, he had to work the plantation a year to 
secure funds enough to carry out the provisions 
of the will by moving them north before manu- 
mitting them. This he did, although it was a tax 
on his own resources. A few years after he sold 
his possessions and moved with what slaves had 
been purchased in Georgia to Kentucky, where 
he spent the remainder of his days. During the 
days of his service as super-cargo, an attempt was 
made to smuggle a part of the cargo of flour 
through the port at Havana. Being detected, 
Mr. Colmesnill, along with the captain of the ves- 
sel, was arrested and cast into the Moro castle, 



204 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



and confined in a dungeon below the level of the 
sea. After thirty-one days in darkness the Cap- 
tain General chanced to visit the dungeons and 
was appealed to for mercy. Learning the name 
of the young man he enquired of his father, asked 
his size, appearance, birth-place, and place of ed- 
ucation. It was an old schoolmate who had been 
in college of Lorenz, in the Pyrenees, with him 
years before. The prisoner was released, taken 
to the palace of Don Vivas, and nursed through 
a spell of fever contracted while in the damp 
dungeon under the sea. At Louisville he entered 
into trade and became the largest merchant in 
the city, with a trade extending to the mouth of 
the Mississippi. At one time when the firm with 
which he was connected failed, Mr. Colmesnill 
refused to take advantage of the bankruptcy laws, 
but paid dollar for dollar on over a quarter of a 
million. During the administration of James 
Guthrie as secretary of the treasury, Mr. Colmes- 
nill was agent of the department in the most con- 
fidential relations, handling millions of the na- 
tion's revenue. In 1833 he purchased a beautiful 
country seat near the city, where he lived until 
the northern soldiers despoiled it of its beauti- 
ful grove during the war, when he moved to the 
city to spend his declining days. He was born 
July 31, 1787, and died July 30, 1871. In 1815 
he married Miss Honore, who lived but a few 
years. In 1826 he married Sarah Courtnie Tay- 
lor, daughter of Major Edmond Taylor, of the 
U. S. A. 

W. T. Colmesnill was born in Bullet county, 
Kentucky, and received his education in the pub- 
lic, schools of Louisville and at St. Mary's Col- 
lege. When the war broke out he moved to Mis- 
souri, and being a large boy for his age was ar- 
rested many times for not entering the service. 
Tiring of this annoyance he entered the railroad 
service of the Louisville & Nashville Railroad, 
on the Beardstown branch, as brakeman and bag- 
gageman a short time, when he was promoted to 
freight conductor, running a mixed train until 
1873, and for a year following had charge of the 
work train and the iron train on the Richmond 
branch. In 1874 he engaged with the Elizabeth- 
town & Paducah road under the superintendency 



of Dan Whitcomb, running a local between Cen- 
tral City and Paducah. At that time there was 
no telegraph on the road, and trains ran by the 
card. The night of March 28, 1875, the train 
went through the bridge at Poplar Creek, the 
caboose with seven men aboard fell forty feet into 
ten feet of water. Not until after rescuing for- 
mer Governor Anderson and seeing that all were 
safe, did Mr. Colmesnill realize that he had bro- 
ken an arm, shattered a leg, ribs fractured and 
severe cuts about the head. After his recovery 
he resumed his place again, but soon abandoned 
it. to manage the large farms of D. R. Burbanks 
for three years. When fully recovered he again 
entered upon a railroad career, this time in Texas. 
For a time he ran a passenger train and then 
had charge of a train on construction, and in one 
capacity or another helped construct seven hun- 
dred miles of road in the Lone Star state, includ- 
ing the three hundred miles of track laying for 
the Texas Pacific through an unsettled wilder- 
ness. Returning to Kentucky he entered the ser- 
vice of the Ohio Valley line, under construction 
by General Manager Kelsey, running a work 
train, remaining in the service of the road under 
the subsequent changes of management. Dur- 
ing all the years of his railroad service Mr. 
Colmesnill has never had a passenger lose his 
life although in the incident above related there 
was a narrow escape. 

Mr. Colmesnill married Miss Fanny Taylor, 
a daughter of Dr. Thomas Taylor, a prominent 
physician of Henderson county, and one of the 
early settlers there. Of his two sons, Thomas H., 
the elder, attends the Kentucky Military Acad- 
emy, where he is considered by his instructors 
one of the brightest students ever in the school. 
His address at the age of eight to the convention 
of ex-Confederate soldiers at Nashville, awak- 
ened the greatest enthusiasm. The second son 
is Charles Anderson, attending the public school. 
Mr. Colmesnill is a member of the Monon Div- 
ision. O. R. C., and of the Blue Lodge, Chapter 
and Commandery of the Masonic order. In his 
stately bearing he shows descent from the old 
cavaliers, and his jovial nature makes him a typ- 
ical railroad man of the highest type. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



205 



JC. LOMAX, a widely known and pop- 
ular conductor in the freight service of 
Q the Illinois Central, on the Louisiana 
division, received his initial training on 
that division and has since remained there. Be- 
ginning as brakeman in August 1889, he worked 
in that capacity for one and a half years, when 
he was found worthy of promotion to conductor 
and given charge of a regular run. A man of 
capability and faithful services, his future should 
be a bright one. He has seen some small acci- 
dents, but has escaped serious injury. 

Mr. Lomax is a native of Hazelhurst, Miss., 
where he was born on May 3rd, 1860. Jesse 
Lomax, an extensive farmer of that state, now 
deceased, was his father. Mr. Lomax married 
Miss Katie Easley, of McComb City, and three 
children are the result of their union, viz : 
Blanche, Maude, and Madge O. He affiliates 
socially with Division No. 367, O. of R. C., of 
McComb City, where he resides with his family 
in a nice home in the southern part of the city. 



Mr. Kennedy is a native of Crab Orchard, 
Kentucky, the date of his birth being August i, 
1869. Matthew Kennedy Sr., his father, an ex- 
tensive railroad contractor, was for many years 
connected with the Alabama & Chattanooga Rail- 
road, the Louisville & Nashville, and also assisted 
in the construction of the I. C. He is now liv- 
ing at New Orleans, enjoying the fruits of a 
well spent and industrious life. William Ken- 
nedy, a brother of our subject, was a railway 
conductor, and was killed while in the employ 
of the Little Rock & Fort Smith R. R. Mr. 
Kennedy's estimable wife was a Miss Wise, of 
Alabama, by whom he has three children, Lois, 
Maud Wise, and Mary Chapel. He affiliates so- 
cially with the Maccabees, and is secretary of 
Division No. 367 O. R. C., of McComb City. He 
has a pleasant home on Front street, and is con- 
sidered a worthy and energetic citizen of that 
place. 




ATTHEW KENNEDY is a popular 
freight conductor in the service of the 
Illinois Central, having a run between 
Canton, Mississippi, and New Or- 
leans. His first experience at railroad work was 
acquired at Birmingham, Alabama^where he was 
in the employ of the Louisville & Nashville Rail- 
road as a brakeman. In 1888 he was promoted 
to conductor in the freight service of that road, 
and served as such between Decatur and Mont- 
gomery, Alabama, and between Decatur and Bir- 
mingham. He left the employ of that road in 
1892, and was for a time with the Fort Scott & 
Memphis R. R. as brakeman, and from the latter 
road went to the San Antonio & Aransas Pass 
Railroad as brakeman and conductor. He en- 
tered the service of the I. C. in 1894, beginning 
as a brakeman, and in 1895 was promoted to 
conductor in the freight service on the Louisiana 
division, where he has since remained. 




^OBERT C. McKAY, a prominent en- 
gineer on the Vicksburg division of 
the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley R. R., 
was born in Jackson, Tennessee, Sep- 
tember 23, 1874. John S. McKay, his father, 
was an engineer on the Mississippi Central R. R. 
for many years. He was also master mechanic 
at Jackson, and was superintendent of the div- 
ision between Canton, Mississippi, and Cairo, Il- 
linois. His railroad career embraced a period of 
thirty-two years. He died in 1895 while acting 
as traveling engineer for the Y. & M. V. division 
of the J. C. R. R., and is survived by his wife, 
Lucy (Cady) McKay, who is a resident of Mem- 
phis. Robert C. McKay attended the public 
schools of Memphis until fourteen years old, 
when he entered the employ of the Buyers and 
Factors Compress company, at Memphis, where 
he worked two years. In January 1890, he be- 
came identified with the Illinois Central as an ap- 
prentice in the machine shops at Memphis, under 
Master Mechanic Jones Ramsey, and served a 
full term of four years there. Remaining there 



206 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



one year longer, in April 1895 he went to Vicks- 
burg, Mississippi, and worked there in the shops 
of the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley R. R. until 
November of that year. He then entered the 
road service of the I. C. as fireman on locomotive 
No. 48, with Engineer Joseph O'Leary, between 
Memphis, Tennessee, and Vicksburg, Mississippi. 
He remained in that branch of the service until 
promoted to engineer in October 1897, where he 
is at the present time employed, having charge 
of engine No. 35 on the Yicksburg division. Mr. 
McKay was reared in the Presbyterian faith, 
and in his political views is a supporter of demo- 
cratic principles. He is a young- man of ability, 
and is a valued employe of the company. 



THOMAS ALLEN BANKS JR., the pop- 
ular agent at Princeton, Kentucky, was 
born at Springfield, January 17, 1869. 
His father was a well known conductor 
for many years on the Louisville & Nashville 
road. The subject of this brief sketch left school 
at the early age of fifteen to study telegraphy, 
and in 1885 was given a place at Rives, Tennes- 
see, remaining at that station two years as bill 
clerk. He was next assigned work at Ripley, 
and from there at Dyersburg for a short time. 
The following four years he served as agent at 
Kattawa, Ky., and was transferred from there 
to Evansville, Indiana, as operator. January 7, 
180,9, he was assigned his present position as 
agent at Princeton. This is one of the important 
points on the Louisville division, requiring the 
assistance of six clerks, operators and assistants, 
besides a number of porters and a matron. In 
addition to his duties as station agent Mr. Banks 
acts as yard master and has charge of several 
miles of tracks and forty-eight switches. Being 
a junction point large quantities of baggage are 
handled, averaging five thousand pieces a month. 
In addition to a large express business, the sta- 
tion sends out each year several thousands hogs- 
heads of tobacco, large quantities of castings, 



lime, limestone, brick, cattle, hogs, sheep, poultry 
and produce. With a seminary in the town, a 
large passenger traffic centers in the place. To 
manage all this properly requires a man of alert. 
pushing business qualifications. Mr. Banks mar- 
ried Miss Mattie, a daughter of Mr. William 
Shrvock, of Newton, Illinois. 



DH. MARTIN, a popular and well-known 
engineer in the passenger service of the 
Q Illinois Central, became identified with the 
company in 1883. In September of that 
year he entered the service of the I. C. as fireman 
on the New Orleans division, with Engineer John 
Hines. He remained in that branch of the ser- 
vice until 1887, when on examination he was 
found proficient and was promoted to engineer 
in the freight service, and given charge of a run 
between Canton, Mississippi, and New Orleans, 
Louisiana, continuing there until his promotion 
to the passenger service, and has since continued 
in that capacity on the Louisiana division, where 
he is known as a careful and painstaking employe. 

His experience in railroad work has been de- 
void of serious accidents, and although he has 
been in some small wrecks, was never injured. 
He has charge at present of the largest' engine 
in the McComb City shops. 

Mr. Martin was born in Franklin county, 
Tennessee, March 5. 1865, and is a son of Wil- 
liam W. Martin, formerly a blacksmith in the 
employ of the Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis 
R. R., who is now retired and living at Decherd, 
Tennessee. Edward H. Martin, a b'rother, now 
residing in Kentucky, was for some time con- 
nected with the I. C. as bookkeeper in the store- 
room of the company at McComb City, and was 
also for several years chief clerk to the master 
mechanic there. 

The lady who became Mr. Martin's wife 
was formerly Miss Julia Hanford, whose father, 
A. W. Hanford, now deceased, was proprietor of 
the popular Hanford Hotel, of McComb City. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



207 



Their union has been blessed by one child, Hugh 
deary, a fine boy. Mr. Martin belongs to the 
Elks organization, and also to the B. of L. E., 
of McComb City, where he and his estimable 
family reside at the Han ford Hotel. 




young. 



cHENRY HIXON, local freight agent 
at Evansville, was born December n, 
1867, at Union Point, Georgia, but 
moved to Russellville when quite 
and received his education there. His 
first experience in railroading was at Russellville 
as baggage and freight clerk for the L. & N. 
He worked here a short time when he accepted 
a. position with the N. N. & M. V. road at Prince- 
ton, Kentucky, and continued in the clerical de- 
partment until January i, 1894, when he was pro- 
moted to agent at Uniontown, Kentucky. March 
loth, -following, he was made agent for the Ohio 
Valley Railway at Princeton, Kentucky, where 
he was employed at the time the road was ab- 
sorbed by the Illinois Central and on the trans- 
fer became chief clerk at Princeton. He re- 
mained here until January 5, 1899, when he was 
appointed agent at Morganfield, Ky., remaining 
there until May 3, 1899, when he was appointed 
local freight agent at Evansville, Ind. He now 
has as his assistants E. F. Coon, chief clerk, H. 

E. Fritz, warehouse foreman, W. C. Mitchell, 

F. Bock, W. T. Coxin, all of whom are clerks in 
the office, and H. Ross who is the yard clerk, be- 
sides five or six porters. This is a very impor- 
tant office, as besides the Illinois Central there 
is a great deal of transferring for the E. & T. H., 
the E. & L, L. E. & St. Louis, P. D. & E., and 
the L. & N. The principal commodities handled 
at this place are tobacco, cotton, pig iron, hay 
and grain, furniture, stoves, plows, etc. Evans- 
ville has many manufacturing industries and the 
Illinois Central business is gradually increasing, 
lumng had an increase of eighty-three thousand 
dollars in receipts in 1899. Mr. Hixon is a man 
who is not afraid of work as his accounts will 



show. He assumes a large part of the work him- 
self, and thereby reduced the office expense one 
thousand dollars during the year 1899. Mention 
should be made that most of the freight handled 
is in less than car load lots, which makes a greater 
amount of work. The freight house is much too 
small for the business and a new one is contem- 
plated. 

Mr. Hixon married a Miss Tully of Ken- 
tucky, and has three children, McHenry Jr., Tul- 
ly, and an infant. He is very popular and a 
man who has a bright future. 




ENRY C. EICH, general foreman at 
Louisville is a native of Chicago, where 
his father, Peter Eich, was a shoe mer- 
chant. Our subject commenced rail- 
roading in Chicago in the year 1882, as an office 
boy in the auditor's office. He worked in this 
capacity three months, and then entered the 
Weldon shops an apprentice under William Ren- 
shaw, master-mechanic, serving four years. He 
afterward left the shops to learn mechanical 
drawing, leaving his position to take one at less 
wages, being anxious to learn. He worked in 
the drafting department six months, applying 
himself closely and on account of his merit he 
was appointed instructor of the Illinois Central 
drafting school at McComb City, Miss., remain- 
ing there one year and a half. 'January i, 1893, 
he was appointed foreman at Rantoul, 111., and 
remained there three months, later served as gang 
foreman at the Burnside shops. He continued 
in this place until May i, 1898, when he was pro- 
moted to general foreman at Freeport, Illinois, 
remained there until March 20, 1899, at which 
time he was transferred as general foreman at 
Champaign. He continued in this capacity thir- 
ty days, and on the first of May 1899, he was 
transferred to Louisville, his present position. 

Our subject has at present one hundred men 
in his department, the round house foreman be- 
ing John McDerrmott ; chief clerk, H. M. Miles. 



208 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



His territory comprises Louisville, Owensboro 
and the Hodgenville and Elizabetlitown districts. 
He has fine new shops, fifty by fifty feet, a boiler 
room, fifty by twenty-five, new fifteen stall round 
house, all modern style. T. M. Baughn is the 
car foreman, and there is a large amount of work- 
done here. 

Mr, Eich is a young man who is steadily 
rising and has had quick promotions on account 
of his merit. He married Miss M. Steinert and 
resides at 1527 Maple street, Louisville. He be- 
longs to the Forresters Court, Chicago, also to 
the Railway and Telegraph Political League of 
Illinois. 




C. JARVIS, a retired passenger en- 
gineer, ex-mayor and extensive real- 
estate owner of McComb City, Mis- 
sissippi, is one of the oldest and best 
known men on the Illinois Central Railroad. Mr. 
Jarvis was born in Rockbridge county, Virginia, 
November 24, 1832, where he received a practi- 
cal education in the common schools. In 1853. 
at the age of twenty-one, he made a successful 
trip to California, and returning to "the states" 
went to Elkhart, Indiana, and from there in 1860 
to Chicago, Illinois. He there secured a posi- 
tion as fireman on the Chicago & Rock Island 
R. R. and received promotion to engineer in 1862. 
After a short service as engineer on that road, 
he went to Memphis, Tennessee, and was in the 
employ of the government as engineer on mili- 
tary railroads until the surrender. During that 
time he ran on every road in the state of Ten- 
nessee. 

In 1865 he went to New Orleans, and was 
for one year with the New Orleans, Jackson & 
Great Northern R. R. as engineer, but returned 
to Memphis and for a time was with the Memphis 
& Ohio road. He then went to Rock Island, 
where his family resided, and entered the employ 
of the Chicago & North-Western R. R. on the 
Iowa division, where he had charge of a con- 
struction train for six months. In 1867 he first 



became connected with the Illinois Central, work- 
ing for seven months in the freight service on 
the Chicago division. 

Leaving the 1. C. he went to the L'nion Pa- 
cific R. R. at Cheyenne, Wyoming, and after 
working there in the freight service, was ap- 
pointed traveling engineer for that road between 
Rollins Springs and Bryan, Wyoming, occupying 
the latter position until May 12, 1868. He then 
resigned and went to Chicago, and the next 
year was spent in recreation. In October 1869, 
he went to Water Valley, Miss., entering the 
employ of the Mississippi Central (now the I. 
C.) where he was for two months, finally re- 
turning to the old New Orleans, Jackson & 
Great Northern (now the I. C.), and for one 
year was in the freight service between New Or- 
leans and Canton, Miss. Promotion to the pas- 
senger service followed in September 1870, and 
from that date until July 23, 1895, he was on the 
Louisiana division of the road, when he retired 
to private life. 

Mr. Jarvis has a fund of experience of early 
railroad days on the I. C. He was engineer on 
the road when water had to be dipped with a 
cup to fill the tender, in order to make a ten mile 
run between Summit and Magnolia, Miss. He 
made what was considered at that time a very- 
fast run on one of the old engines, No. 262, the 
first extension front engine on the Louisiana di- 
vision. The engine had a five foot wheel, and 
a cylinder 15 by 24. On this engine he covered 
the distance between McComb City and New Or- 
leans, a distance of one hundred and five miles, 
in one hour and fifty-nine minutes, a remarkable 
run for those days. 

Mr. Jarvis married Miss Elizabeth Sare, of 
Covington, Kentucky. They have two children, 
both railroad men: J. F., a passenger engineer 
on the I. C. at McComb City, and Samuel, an 
engineer on the Kansas City, Memphis & Bir- 
mingham R. R. Mr. Jarvis is one of the honored 
and substantial citizens of McComb City. He 
served as mayor during the years 1896, '97 and 
'98, his administration being a highly successful 
one. 




C. H. MOORE. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



211 




H. MOORE, attorney for the Illinois 
Central residing at Clinton, 111., was 
born at Kirtland, Lake county, Ohio, 
on October 26, 1817, about twenty 
rods south of the famous Mormon temple situ- 
ated there. He attended the Kirtland Academy 
during the summer and in winter was employed 
in teaching. Going to Pekin, 111., in May 1839, 
he assumed charge of a school, and between 
whiles read law with Bailey & Wilmot, leading 
attorneys of that city. At the July term of court 
1841, he successfully passed a rigid examination 
in open court, in company with two other stu- 
dents and was admitted to the bar. By a curious 
error our subject is reported in the second or 
third volume of Scammon's reports as "residence 
not given.'' 

Mr. Moore arrived at Clinton in August 
1841, opened an office and has successfully prac- 
ticed his profession in that city ever since. He 
was the speaker of the day on the occasion 
of the laying of the corner stone of the new Illi- 
nois Central Depot at Clinton and has been one 
of the attorneys for the Illinois Central R. R. 
company since 1852, and obtained its right of 
way through Dewitt county for it. The profes- 
sion of the law has always had with Mr. Moore 
a powerful rival, that of buying and improving 
land. His success in life marks the career of 
a shrewd business man as well as a prosperous 
attorney, and speaks for itself. 




LRERT E. BROAS, the well and fa- 
vorably known conductor in charge of 
the '' Hammond Local " on the Louisi- 
ana division of the Illinois Central, 
began railroad life when a boy. His first work 
was as messenger hoy for the Louisville & Nash- 
ville R. R. under Mr. Dunn and Mr. Harahan, 
both now officials of the Illinois Central. He 
followed other pursuits in early life, but for a 
short time only, as railroad work had for him 
an irresistible charm. Going to McComb City 



in 1887, he began at once as brakeman on the 
Louisiana division, and after a faithful service 
of nearly two years, was promoted to conductor 
in the freight service. At the present time he 
has the local run between McComb City, Missis- 
sippi, and Hammond, Louisiana, making the trip 
on alternate days. 

Mr. Broas was born in New Orleans, on 
October 31, 1866. His father, now deceased, 
was a prominent contractor in his clay. He was 
married to Miss Ollie McLaurine, who departed 
this life in 1899. One child, also deceased, was 
born to them. Of the social organizations, Mr. 
Broas claims membership with the Masonic or- 
der, (Blue Lodge,) Order of Elks, Order of the 
Eastern Star, and Division No. 367, Order of 
Railway Conductors, all of McComb City. He 
has a pleasant home on South street in that city, 
where he resides with his mother. 




L. ARM I STEAD, a rising young con- 
ductor in the freight department of 
the Illinois Central, on the Louisiana 
division, has been with the company 
since 1895. He acquired his first knowledge of 
railroad work, on the New Orleans & North- 
Eastern R. R. where he served for five years as 
fireman. Following this, he was for one year in 
the employ of the Buffalo, Rochester & Pitts- 
burg R. R. as flagmaji and brakeman. In Sep- 
tember 1895, he became connected with the Illi- 
nois Central, at McComb City, Mississippi, as 
switchman in the yards there, and was for two 
years employed at that work. He then served as 
brakeman for eleven months, followed by pro- 
motion to his present position as conductor in the 
freight service. His career with the I. C. has 
been devoid of accidents of any kind. 

Mr. Armistead was born in Meridian, Mis- 
sissippi, on April 27, 1870. He is a son of J. J. 
Armistead, now living a retired life in New Or- 
leans, but who was for many years connected 
with a firm of contractors who took large con- 



212 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 




tracts in building the Vicksburg & Meridian and 
I. C. Railroads. A brother of our subject, Jabe 
Armistead, is now chief dispatcher of the New 
Orleans & North-Eastern R. R. 

Mr. Armistead belongs to the Order of Elks, 
and Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen, ui Me 
Comb City, and is a member of Faith Lodge No. 
200, B. of L. F. of Meridian, Mississippi. He 
is unmarried, and resides at McComb City, mak- 
ing his home with Conductor S. M. Reames of 
that place. 

jt.lM.fM** 



AMUEL H. BREWER, a prominent en- 
gineer in the freight service of the Illi- 
nois Central, on the Louisiana division, 
entered the service of the company in 
January 1895. He was first employed in the 
yards of the I. C. at New Orleans as a switch en- 
gineer, and then went to McComb City, Mis- 
sissippi, and took a position as engineer in the 
freight service, where he has since remained, and 
is appreciated as a careful and steady employe. 
His first knowledge of the work was acquired 
on the Western & Atlantic R. R. where he began 
service in 1870 as a wood passer. After one 
year at that work, he was promoted to fireman, 
serving as such for the following three years, 
when he was examined and promoted to engineer. 
In 1877 he entered the employ of the Nashville, 
Chattanooga & St. Louis R. R., where he re- 
mained until 1880, and was then for three months 
engineer with the Alabama & Chattanooga R. R. 
Returning to the Western & Atlantic R. R., he 
worked there for a short time when he went to 
Savannah, Georgia, and was in the employ of 
the "Plant System" until 1887. The intervening 
three years between 1887 and 1890 were spent 
on the Northern Georgia R. R., when he went to 
Water Valley, Mississippi, and worked for three 
months as engineer on the Mississippi division 
of the I. C. Deciding to try agricultural pur- 
suits, he left the road and was engaged in that 
line until 1895, when he became identified with 
the I. C. at New Orleans. 



Mr. Brewer was born at Adairsville, Bar- 
tow county, Georgia, in August 1855. Peter W. 
Brewer, his father, deceased, was an experienced 
railroad man, and was a machinist and engineer 
in the Baldwin locomotive works at Philadelphia. 
He was also at various times connected as en- 
gineer with the Philadelphia & Reading R. R., 
the Illinois Central, the Western & Atlantic, and 
the East Tennessee, Virginia & Georgia R. R. 
A brother of our subject is a hostler in the round 
house of the I. C. at McComb City. 

Mr. Brewer married Miss Ella Jennings, 
a native of Georgia. They are the parents of 
three children, viz : Milton, Bessie and Maurice. 
Socially he is connected with Division No. 196, 
B. of L. E., and also with the Modern Woodmen 
of the World.. He has recently erected a pretty 
cottage home in East McComb City, where he 
resides, and is a popular citizen. 




k RANK J. ZANONE, store keeper of the 
Memphis division, is a native of Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, where he was reared 
and attended school. After four years 
in the fire insurance business at Louisville, with 
his father, he entered the service of the Louis- 
ville & Nashville Railroad as clerk in the Audi- 
tor's office at Louisville, and three years later 
went into the mechanical department at Louis- 
ville where he remained two years. Returning 
to the insurance business he was engaged two 
years, and in September 1898 entered the service 
of the Illinois Central road at Memphis as store- 
keeper, where he is at present engaged. The 
parents of our subject, J. A. and Alice (John- 
son) Zanone reside at Louisville, where the 
father is a leading real estate dealer 

Mr. Zanone was married January 19, 1894, 
to Miss Ida Cook in the rites of the Catholic 
church to which they both belong. A son, Ar- 
thur, was born June 29, 1897. Mr. Zanone is 
a Democrat in politics. He is a competent ac- 
countant and his integrity is such that he merits 
the fullest confidence of his employers. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



213 



"7 UTHER BURNS, a conductor in the 
freight service on the Louisiana divi- 
Lx-y sion of the Illinois Central, entered the 
employ of the road in 1882 as brake- 
man, at McComb City, Mississippi. He was em- 
ployed in that capacity until June 1893, when he 
went to North Dakota, and engaged in brick- 
making. Returning to McComb City, he re- 
sumed work on the T. C. working as brakeman, 
switchman and finally as yardmaster, at that 
place. In 1894, he went to Minnesota, and for 
a year followed farming in that state, and in 
Xorth and South Dakota. He then returned to 
Vicksburg, Mississippi, and worked on the I. 
C. as brakeman, between that city and New Or- 
leans. After successively working as brakeman, 
switchman and yardmaster for the I. C. on the 
Louisiana division, he was on November 7, 1898, 
promoted to conductor in the freight service, 
where he now has a regular run. His railroad 
career has been free from accidents. 

Mr. Burns was born May 21, 1861, in Lin- 
coln county, Mississippi, and is a son of 
Joseph Burns, contractor and builder, who 
died at Jackson, Mississippi, in 1871. Mr. Burns 
was united in marriage to Miss Nannie Quin, of 
McComb City, and they have one child, Alice 
Eugene. He is connected with Division No. 
367, O. R. C., and with Pearl Lodge, Division 
No. 264, O. R. T., both of McComb City. 




EORGE F. MULLINIX, a popular 
conductor on the pay car on the Louis- 
ville division, is a native of Yorktown, 
Pa., his father being W. H. Mullinix, 
an did conductor on the Baltimore & Ohio system, 
having been with the road through the war. Our 
subject remembers often hauling soldiers to the 
south and riding on his father's train. His fath- 
er died in 1870, and his mother passed away in 
the year 1809. He has a brother who is at pres- 
ent an engineer on the L. & N., and a second 
brother who is a train dispatcher on the Southern 



road, and a third brother passenger conductor 
on the same road. They are all getting along 
nicely and have been very successful in the work- 
day are doing. 

Our subject commenced his railroad service 
driving a team for a contractor on the C. Mt. V. 
& C. road at the age of sixteen years, and at the 
age of eighteen he was a coach hand on the B. 
& O., his duties being to collect tickets ; at that 
time a coach was connected to the fast freight. 
In the fall of 1877 our subject left the B. & O. 
and entered the service of the L. & N.- as a brake- 
man. He remained in this capacity up to 1879 
when he was promoted to conductor, running a 
local freight train between Louisville and Knox- 
ville until 1883, when he accepted a place running 
a freight on the C. O. & S. W. under Superinten- 
dent Frasher. He continued here up to 1887 
and then went to the Cincinnati Southern where 
he worked until 1889, at which time he took a 
place on the K. C. Ft. S. & M., and ran between 
Thayer and West Memphis. Returning to the 
Cincinnati Southern he ran a train two years, 
after which he entered the service of the C. O. 
& S. W. on a freight. He has at present a pre- 
ferred run on a freight train, and is conductor 
of the pay train, which place he has had for six 
years. Mr. Mullinix has had the best of success, 
and in his long service he has not yet lost a trip. 
He is a member of Monon Division No. 89, O. 
R. C., of Louisville, Ky. 



JOHN A. JONES, an engineer in the 
freight service of the Illinois Central, 
on the Louisiana division, entered the 
employ of the company in 1883, at the 
age of fifteen, as steam-handle boy in the I. C. 
blacksmith shops at McComb City. He was af- 
terward a general helper, and for a time had 
charge of a bolt machine in the same shops. An 
interval of two months was then spent in the 
blacksmith shops of the Southern Pacific R. R., 
when he returned to the Illinois Central black- 



214 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



smith shops for six months, then served as brake- 
man for one year. The following year was 
spent at Albuquerque, New Mexico, in the em- 
ploy of the Santa Fe R. R. and from there to 
Annistbn, Alabama, where he worked for the U. 
S. car works, at that point for ten months. In 
November 1893 he returned to the service of the 
I. C. as a fireman, at which he was employed 
until September 1896. On the latter date he took 
charge of a switch engine in the yards at Canton, 
Miss., but soon returned to his former position 
as fireman, -serving for the next eighteen months 
in that capacity. Passing a highly creditable ex- 
amination in February 1899, he was promoted 
to engineer on the main line, being given his 
present run between Canton, Miss., and New Or- 
leans, on Engine No. 730. He is proud of the 
fact that in his entire railroad career he has never 
had an accident of any kind. 

Mr. Jones was born on April 30, 1868, at 
Summit, Miss. His father, James M. Jones, is 
engaged in farming in the vicinity of McComb 
City. A brother was for some time an engineer 
on the Louisiana division of the I. C. He is a 
member of Division No. 196, B. of L. E., and 
Division No. 411, P>. of L. F., of McComb City, 
and is also connected with Knights of Pythias 
Lodge No. 46, of Anniston, Alabama. Mr. Jones 
is unmarried and makes his home with Engineer 
Bacot, in East McComb City. 



JESSE D. PETTINGILL, passenger en- 
gineer on the Louisville division of the 
Illinois Central, was born in Wayne 
county, Michigan, a son of W. A. Pet- 
tingill, a farmer of that county. 

Our subject commenced his railroading on 
the Michigan Central, working a short time, 
when he went to the Flint & Pere Marquette 
railroad, working out of Saginaw for thirteen 
months. Our subject next came to Kentucky 
in 1882 and entered the service of the C. O. & 
S. W. as brakeman, running out of Elizabeth- 



town. In 1883 he began firing and fired up to 
1887 when he was given engine No. 562, a ten 
wheel Cook, on a freight between Louisville and 
Central City and Paducah. Our subject ran 
freight up to 1896 when he was promoted to 
passenger service. Mr. Pettingill has been very 
successful as a railroad man. 

Our subject married Miss Mamie Turner, of 
Elizabethtown, Kentucky, and he resides at 522 
Breckenridge street, Louisville. He is a mem- 
ber of the B. of L. E. and of Preston Lodge, 
No. 281, A. F. & A. M. of Louisville, Ky. 



JD. McMURTRIE, a popular passenger 
conductor on the Vicksburg division of 
Q the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley R. R., 
was born in Harrisburg, Can., March 
18, 1864. Mr. McMurtrie is of Scotch descent. 
His father, Mathew A., was a native <5f Scotland, 
but emigrated to Canada when a young man, and 
was for many years connected with the Great 
Western R. R. as agent and telegrapher. He 
departed this life in 1882. The mother of our 
subject was, before her marriage, Miss McKen- 
zie, a name honorably connected with the history 
of Scotland. The subject of this sketch received 
his early training in the schools of Cass City, 
Michigan, where he made his home with an un- 
cle. At the age of fifteen he began railroad life 
on the Pontiac, Oxford & Port Austin R. R. as 
an engine wiper in the round house at Pontiac, 
Michigan. After one year there he entered the 
road service as fireman between Pontiac and 
Cassville, a distance of one hundred miles, re- 
maining there one year. He then returned to 
the round house at Pontiac as hostler, working 
there three months. His next employment was 
as brakeman on the Missouri Pacific R. R. be- 
tween St. Louis and DeSoto, Missouri, where he 
worked six months, and from there went to 
\ icksburg, Miss., where lie entered the employ 
ot the Louisville, New Orleans & Texas R. R. 
(now the Y. & M. V. R. R.), as brakeman and 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



215 



baggageman between Leland and Allen, Miss. 
After filling the latter position for one year he 
was promoted to conductor on the local, between 
Memphis, Tennessee, and Cleveland, Mississippi, 
and in 1897 was promoted to the passenger 
service. Mr. McMurtrie affiliates with the Ma- 
sonic order, Order of Elks, and O. R. C. He 
attends the Presbyterian church, and prefers to 
be independent in politics. 



JOHN L. McGUIRE, the oldest engineer 
on the Memphis division in active ser- 
vice, has had an eventful life, full of 
experiences that have seldom ever be- 
fallen a human being. His railroad experience 
began at the early age of fifteen as helper to 
C. C. Jarvis, a machinist on the Nashville & 
Northwestern, serving three years. He then ac- 
cepted a place with the New Orleans & Ohio 
railroad, working on the section. It was while 
thus employed that a severe and peculiar acci- 
dent occurred to him. During a trip of the con- 
struction train he slipped and fell under the mov- 
ing car sustaining severe injuries. With his 
spinal column dislocated, his breast crushed in, 
several ribs broken, his head injured and a badly 
damaged foot, he was gathered up for dead and 
no one supposed that he would survive for more 
than a few hours. Little was done for him at 
first by the surgeons, because it was thought use- 
less, but when it was seen that his wonderful 
vitality was keeping him alive, proper attention 
was given him and after a confinement of eleven 
months to his bed he was able to set his foot on 
the ground again. As soon as able to work he 
was given a place as brakeman on the road then 
known as the New Orleans & Ohio Railroad un- 
der the presidency of Mr. Fate Flourney. 

Railroading on the line at that time was 
primitive in the extreme. There was but one 
train with a crew of six men, the engineer, fire- 
man, conductor and three brakemen. There was 
between Paducah and Union City, but one train 



a day each way six days a week, and on Sunday 
the engineer repaired his engine, the fireman 
polished the bright parts and the brakemen 
scrubbed the coaches. After the completion of 
the road to Rives in 1871, there was an additional 
train put on, a local freight, and more like 
modern railroad principles instituted. 

Mr. McGuire did not long remain a brake- 
man, and when the first new engine, the " H. 
Norton," was brought onto the line he was given 
. the place of fireman under the instruction of en- 
gineer B. F. Adams, the first engineer on the 
road. In 1873 when the business of the road 
increased so that an additional engine became 
necessary, Mr. McGuire was promoted and 
placed in charge, and was assigned to the pile- 
driver service when that was put on, serving here 
for a year and a half. 

On January 27, 1875, occurred the second 
exciting experience in our subject's career. Driv- 
ing a Baldwin engine that had been built for the 
government during the war, drawing the pay 
car over the line, Boaz station had been reached 
on the return trip about five o'clock in the eve- 
ning. While standing on the track, without a 
moment's warning, the boiler exploded, landing 
parts of the plates a quarter of a mile away and" 
the smoke stack four hundred yards from the 
scene. Mr. McGuire was standing on the deck 
at the time and escaped with three fractures of 
his right leg, a split ankle and serious cuts from 
flying glass, one piece nearly severing the jugular 
vein. With no telegraph to summon a surgeon, 
Mr. McGuire lay on the platform while the super- 
intendent walked five miles to get a' handcar to 
go to Paducah for help, returning about eleven 
o'clock. After patching him up the best that 
could be done there, the patient was removed to 
Paducah and for another long period of eight 
months was confined to his room. 

As soon as able to resume his duties, Mr. 
McGuire was given a run between Paducah and 
Fulton, pulling a coal train, and June 20, 1876, 
he was assigned to a passenger run to Newbern, 
Dryersburg and Covington successively as the 
road was completed to those points. In the 



216 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



month of August, 1882, when the above named 
road was completed to Memphis, it was a gala 
day, a public celebration being held. A train of 
six coaches with the mayor and city council left 
Paducah, with our subject at the throttle, and at 
Rialto met the officials of the road and celebrated 
the event of the completion by driving the golden 
spike. On the opening of the road Mr. McGuire 
was given his present run in the fast passenger 
service between Paducah and Memphis on a 
Baldwin engine Xo. 554. During the inter- 
vening years many large and extensive improve- 
ments have been made. From a rough, uneven 
road-bed with heavy grades, under the succeed- 
ing management a fine road bed with gravel bal- 
last has been built, the grades reduced, new 
trestles put in, and new station buildings erected. 
During the earlier years of the operation of the 
road the old " chair rail " was used, and a train 
load was not more than seven cars. Up to 1883 
the engines in vogue on this line were the -old 
wood burners and the first air brake was installed 
in 1879. The passenger coaches were small and 
the upholstering meagre, while in case of an 
emergency rush benches were fastened to flat cars 
to accommodate the crowds. Twenty miles an 
hour was the schedule time while now nearly 
twice the speed is required with numerous stops 
on the way. 

In 1883 a third thrilling incident occurred 
in the life of the subject of this sketch. While 
running a fast passenger train approaching a 
sharp reverse curve, the engine struck a box car 
that had got out of the siding and was spinning 
along the down grade at the rate of fifty miles an 
hour. Although the engine was turned over 
and rolled into the ditch in a demolished condi- 
tion, and the baggage car telescoped as far as 
the boiler, Mr. McGuire emerged with his life 
though somewhat bruised. He has had thrilling 
experiences with floods, one notable instance be- 
ing on February 18, 1884, when he brought the 
last train into Paducah before traffic was sus- 
pended, running part of the time in ten to twenty 
inches of water until the water reached the fire 
box and the mail and passengers had to be trans- 



ferred in boats some six miles to the landing. 

Hugh McGuire, father of our subject, had 
also an unusual career. As a lad he was a wit- 
ness of the battle of Waterloo, and well remem- 
bers seeing the Iron Duke. Shipping in a ves- 
sel for America in 1820, he was shipwrecked on 
the coast of New Brunswick, rescued and landed 
at St. Johns. Not frightened by his experience 
here, he shipped as a sailor and for a number of 
years followed the sea, and later served on ves- 
sels plying the great lakes. It was while engaged 
here that he met at Erie the woman who became 
his wife, and, leaving the water, he learned stone 
cutting, and after the birth of our subject moved 
to Tennessee. 

Born at Erie and reared in Tennessee, John 
L. McGuire's marriage occurred at Paducah, 
Miss Jane Jones, a native of Georgia, being the 
woman of his choice. To them have been born 
four children : Margaret E., wife of Mr. John 
Gossett ; Mabel Maude ; John Norman, clerking 
for the Scott Hardware Company, and Mamie, 
still in school, and all residing in Paducah. 

Mr. McGuire has been unusually prominent 
in social orders. He is a charter member of the 
local division of the B. of L. E., and served 
seven years in the presiding chair. He served 
as chairman of the General Adjustment Commit- 
tee, which at one time held a session of twenty- 
two days in Chicago. He takes a prominent part 
in the insurance department of the order and at 
the present time is serving as secretary of that 
body. For eight years he represented the en- 
gineers on the board of trustees of the Paducah 
hospital, and was an active worker in securing 
the establishment of the institution, one of the 
most complete of its kind in the country. He is 
a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity, 
holding membership in Blue Lodge No. 449, 
Chapter No. 30, and in the Consistory, with 
which he has been affiliated for fifteen years. 

Mr. McGuire has demonstrated his finan- 
cial ability in securing a handsome home in the 
city of Paducah, and a fine farm a short distance 
from town, which is now very much enhanced 
in value, owing to the location of the Union de- 
pot within a short distance of it. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



217 



During a long and exceedingly eventful ca- 
reer, " Old Dad McGuire " has never received 
a mark of demerit and has nothing to which to 
look back with regret. His career has been one 
in which his children may take pardonable pride, 
and a railroad record to which younger members 
of the craft may turn for inspiration. It is a 
pleasure and an honor to anyone to have called 
him friend. Up to June I, 1900, Mr. McGuire 
has covered 1,200,000 miles in the passenger 
service. 




CAMPBELL, the capable train de- 
spatcher for the Illinois Central in 
Memphis, Tennessee, is a Canadian 
by birth, and of Scotch ancestry. He 
was born in Elgin county, Ontario, February 24, 
1864. His parents, A. and Catherine (Taylor) 
Campbell, were farmers of that place ; both are 
now deceased, the former in 1893 anc l tne latter 
in 1877. The Campbell family settled in Canada 
in 1833. Angus Campbell, a brother of our sub- 
ject, residing at Shreveport, Louisiana, is an en- 
gineer in the service of the Kansas City, Pitts- 
burg & Gulf R. R. The subject of this sketch 
received his early training in the public schools 
of Avon, Ontario, working on a farm at inter- 
vals until 1878. In that year he commenced 
work in a saw-mill where he remained three 
years. He began railroad life in 1880 on the 
Michigan Central Railroad at Taylor, Ontario, 
as pumper at a gravel pit, taking up the study of 
telegraphy at the same time. In 1882 he was a 
competent operator, and was employed in thai 
line at various points until April 1884, when he 
went to North Dakota for a change of climate, 
remaining there until November of that year. 
He then returned to the service of the Michigan 
Central as operator at Comber, Ontario, holding 
that position until July 27. 1885, when he re- 
signed to enter the employ of the Milwaukee, 
Lake Shore & Western R. R. He was with the 
latter road as operator until August 14, 1886, 
when he was called to Ashland, Wisconsin, and 



promoted to train despatcher, occupying that po- 
sition until July 1892. On August 6, 1892, 
he became identified with the Northern Pacific 
R. R. as train despatcher at Dickinson, North 
Dakota, where he remained until December i, 
1893, when the Missouri and Yellowstone di- 
visions were consolidated, with headquarters at 
Glendive, Montana, to which place he was trans- 
ferred and remained there until December 18, 
1898. 

On the latter date he resigned to accept his 
present position with the Illinois Central. Jan- 
uary 26, 1895, Miss Mary Agnes Gillespie, of 
Glendive, Montana, became the wife of Mr. 
Campbell. She was born at Wheeling, West 
Virginia, February 8, 1873. Two children are 
the result of their union : Archibald A., born 
November 20, 1896, and Grace C, born Sep- 
tember 11, 1898. Mr. Campbell belongs to the 
Knights of Pythias and Knights of Maccabees. 
His religious connection is with the Presbyterian 
church, and in politics he votes with the Demo- 
cratic party. 




HARLES L. JORDAN, a conductor in 
the freight service of the Yazoo & Mis- 
sissippi Valley R. R. on the Vicksburg 
division, was born in Macon, Tennes- 
see, December 18, 1871. His parents were C. 
W. and Caroline (Boswell) Jordan, respected 
farmers, both now deceased; the former in 1899, 
and the latter in 1882. The grandfather of our 
subject. Rev. T. L. Boswell, was a prominent 
Methodist minister and for many years a presid- 
ing elder. Mr. Jordan attended the public 
schools of Oakland, Tennessee, and began life 
as a newsboy on the Tennessee Midland R. R., 
running between Memphis and Perryville, Ten- 
nessee, where he remained about eight months. 
He then came to the Louisville, New Orleans & 
Texas R. R. (now the Yazoo & Mississippi Val- 
ley R. R.), and was a newsboy there between 
Memphis and Vicksburg. He then secured a 
position as flagman on a passenger train, and 



218 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



after three months service, not being of age, had 
to give up his position. He returned to his for- 
mer position on the Louisville & Nashville R. R., 
running between Memphis and Bowling Green, 
Kentucky. Returning to the Louisville, New 
Orleans & Texas R. R., he was employed there 
as flagman and baggageman for one year, and 
was also flagman in the freight service of the 
road. In October 1896, he was promoted to con- 
ductor, and is now in the freight service between 
Memphis and Vicksburg, where he is a worthy 
and capable employe. Miss Mary F. Perkins, 
of Memphis, became the wife of Mr. Jordan on 
July 8th, 1895. Socially he is connected with the 
O. R. C. The Methodist church finds in Mr. 
and Mrs. Jordan valued members. Politically 
he is a Democrat. P>eing essentially a self-made 
man, Mr. Jordan may well be proud of his suc- 
cess in life. 




F. MIXON is a popular engineer in 
the freight service on the Louisiana 
Q division of the Illinois Central. He 
first became connected with the I. 
C. in 1889 as a car-repairer in the shops of the 
company at McComb City, and was later trans- 
ferred to the carpenter shops, working until 1891. 
He then embarked in the livery business at Mag- 
nolia, Mississippi, but remained there only one 
year, when he returned to McComb City and for 
a time clerked in a large mercantile house there. 
On October 16, 1895, he re-entered the ser- 
vice of the I. C., as fireman on engine No. 718, 
with Engineer Ed Forclish. Serving in this ca- 
pacity until September 16, 1899, he was then 
examined and promoted to engineer in the freight 
service, between McComb City and New Orleans, 
which position he is filling at the present time 
with eminent satisfaction. 

Mr. Mixon is a native of McComb City, 
having been born September i, 1871. His 
father. Abner J. Mixon, is a mechanic in the 
shops there, and is a valued employe of the 
company. 



Our subject married Miss Alice Andrews, 
of McComb City, and they have one child, Wil- 
liam Bernard, a fine boy. Socially he is con- 
nected with Division No. 411, B. of L. F. and 
is also a member of Myrtle Lodge, No. 36, 
Knights of Pythias. In religious views both he 
and his wife are adherents of the Baptist faith. 
They reside in a pretty and well-furnished home 
on Fourth street, in McComb City, where Mr. 
Mixon is a useful and popular citizen. 




T. HOSKINS, a conductor in the 
freight service of the Illinois Cen- 
Q tral on the Grenada district of the 
Memphis division, was born in 
Louisville, Kentucky, November 8, 1856. His 
parents were C. W. and Susan (Williams) Hos- 
kins, both deceased. Mr. Hoskins Sr. being a 
fanner, the early life of our subject was spent 
like that of most fanners' sons, working on the 
farm and attending school. He was educated in 
the public and private schools of Corydon, Ken- 
tucky, and was occupied with rural pursuits until 
reaching manhood. At the age of twenty-two 
he went to Louisville, Kentucky, and there be- 
gan his railroad career in the shops of the Pa- 
ducah & Elizabethtown R. R., working until the 
road was sold. He then went to the St. Louis 
& South-Eastern R. R. (L. & N.), securing a 
position as brakeman between Nashville, Tennes- 
see, and Henderson, Kentucky, when after a 
short service, he was appointed yard master at 
Earlington, Kentucky. He occupied the latter 
position about eighteen months, when he was 
promoted to conductor in the freight service, and 
afterward in the passenger department, between 
Nashville and St. Louis. He resigned in 1886 
to embark in the grocery business in St. Louis, 
and was in business there for one year when he 
sold out and went to Memphis. He there be- 
came identified with the Illinois Central, work- 
ing first in the yards, then as brakeman, and fi- 
nally as conductor. He is very acceptably filling 




ELI W. PERKINS. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



the latter position at the present time, being in 
charge of a run between Memphis, Tennessee, 
and Grenada, Mississippi. When a young man 
of twenty-four, Mr. Hoskins married Miss Bet- 
tie Henton of Sedalia, Missouri, a lady of excel- 
lent qualities of mind and heart, who died in 
1882. Two children were born to them, viz: 
Minnie, the wife of M. H. McLean, and Charles, 
a flagman in the I. C. service, all residing at 
Memphis. Mr. Hoskins belongs to the Masonic 
order, and the O. R. C. He is a Methodist in 
belief and a Democrat in politics. 



and in 1896 he was changed to the Daylight 
Special, with engine No. 905. On Decoration 
Day, 1885, engine No. 119 blew up with him at 
Wildwood, and our subject received injuries 
which came near costing him his life; as it was 
he escaped with five months' confinement in a 
hospital. Mr. Perkins is a member of Division 
No. 10, B. of L. E., of which he was former sec- 
retary of insurance, and is also a member of 
Blue Lodge No. 508, A. F. & A. M., of Chicago. 
He married Miss Lizzie Downes, of Wells, 
Minn., and has two children, Eli W. Jr., who 
is a great favorite among the railroad boys, and 
Miss Clara. 




LI W. PERKINS, a representative loco- 
motive engineer on the Illinois Central, 
is a native of Bath, Maine. In 1876 
he became a fireman on the New York 
& New England Railway, of Massachusetts, in 
freight service, running from Boston to Hart- 
ford, Conn., remaining here one year, at the end 
of which time he was promoted to the passenger 
service where he fired two years. He was then 
promoted to engineer and pulled freight on the 
same road for one year and eight months when 
he resigned .and went to Albuquerque, N. M., 
and accepted a position there as a freight en- 
gineer on the Atlantic & Pacific Railroad. This 
was in the early days of railroading in that coun- 
try and the above road was just being con- 
structed. He had only been there seven months 
when smallpox broke out and he left and came 
north. His next position was pulling freight on 
the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad at 
Wells, Minn., remaining there one year when he 
resigned and on February 2, 1883, he began his 
services with the Illinois Central pulling freight 
with engine No. 170 on the Chicago division, 
and remained in that service until January 1892, 
when he was promoted to passenger engineer; 
his first regular run was pulling what was then 
called the Riverview Hotel train. During 1893 
his run was extended to Champaign and in Sep- 
tember he began pulling the Diamond Special, 




GUIS J. FASS, chief clerk at the Illi- 
nois Central freight office at Louisville, 
Kentucky, was born in Louisville in 
1873. His father is Frank Pass, a sta- 
tionary engineer, who resides in Louisville. His 
mother died when he was but thirteen years of 
age. 

Our subject received his education in the 
public schools. Leaving school at the age of 
fifteen, he went to work in a wall paper store, 
remained there a short time and August 15, 1890, 
he entered the service of the C. O. & S. W. in 
the stationery department, working there one 
year, and was then promoted to a position in the 
auditor's office in which department he held va- 
rious positions, until February 1896, when he 
went into a local freight office as revising clerk 
where he remained until August 1896, when he 
was appointed assistant chief clerk, and in Aug- 
ust 1898, he was appointed chief clerk of the local 
freight office to succeed L. T. Nash. 

Mr. Fass is but twenty-seven years of age, 
and holds a very responsible position, having 
nineteen clerks under him in the various depart- 
ments, with a stenographer. He is a bright, 
successful young railroad man, and in his ser- 
vice so far has had rapid promotions. He re- 
sides at 1624 W. Market street, Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, 



222 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



JOHN G. JONES, a highly popular con- 
ductor in the passenger service of the 
Yazoo & Mississippi Valley R. R. on the 
Vicksburg division, was born in Jeffer- 
son county, Mississippi, August 26, 1869, and 
is the son of Eli R. and Mary L. (West) Jones, 
residing in Harriston, Mississippi. Eli R. Jones 
is a lawyer by profession, and a man of promi- 
nence in his district, having twice represented 
its citizens in the legislature. John G. Jones, 
attended the public schools of Fayette, Missis- 
sippi, and in 1885, at the age of sixteen, took a 
contract to carry the U. S. mails, between Har- 
riston and Union Church, Mississippi, a distance 
of twenty miles. He was in the government ser- 
vice nearly a year, when he decided to enter rail- 
road life, and entered the service of what is 
now a part of the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley 
R. R. as a bridge carpenter. After working for 
two months, he was appointed assistant foreman 
of a construction gang, and held that position 
six months. Receiving an offer from the Pa- 
cific Express Company, to act as their' agent at 
Harriston, he accepted, but remained there but 
a short time. He then entered the service of 
the Louisville, New Orleans & Texas R. R. as 
express messenger, between Leland and Glen Al- 
len, Mississippi, where after a service of two 
years, he became baggage master on the same 
run, occupying the latter position until the spring 
of 1889. About that time, he became identified 
with the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley R. R. as 
brakeman on the New Orleans division, between 
Vicksburg and New Orleans, and in Septem- 
ber of that year, was promoted to conductor in 
the freight service of that road. 

In 1891 he was given charge of a mixed 
train between Leland and Arkansas City, and 
in 1896 took charge of the local freight between 
Memphis and Clarksdale Mississippi. In 1897 
he had a through freight run, and acted also as 
extra passenger conductor, and in September 
1898, was promoted to conductor in the passenger 
service, where he has since remained, having a 
run between Memphis, Tennessee, and Vicks- 
burg. Mississippi. On October 3. 1893, Mr. 
Jones was united in marriage to Miss Euphemia 



Melchior, of Rosedale, Mississippi, her native 
place. They are the parents of three fine chil- 
dren, Evelyn, born December i, 1894, John M., 
born January i, 1897, anc l Charles, born April 
25, 1900. Mr. Jones is connected socially, with 
Masonic Lodge No. 206, Royal Arch Chapter, 
Delta Commandery No. 16, and Alchymia Shrine. 
and Greenville Lodge No. 148, B. P. O. E. of 
Greenville, Mississippi, also the O. R. C. of 
Memphis. 

His family attend the Hernando Street 
Methodist church of Memphis. In his political 
views Mr. Jones is a Democrat. Mr. Jones dis- 
charges his duties in such a manner as to win 
the confidence of his employers, and the good 
will and respect of the traveling public. As a 
citizen he stands high in the city of Memphis, 
where he resides in a nice home on McLamorc 
street. 




gms, 



jHAKLES J. QUIGGINS, freight agent 
at Elizabethtown, Kentucky, first saw 
the light of day in Elizabethtown in 
1868. His father was C. W. Quig- 
a merchant of Elizabethtown. At this 
place our subject received his early education, 
and afterwards learned the printer's trade, after 
which he. entered the service of the L. & N. 
Railroad around the station at Elizabethtown, 
learning telegraph operating. In 1888 he began 
his occupation as operator with Agent C. G. 
Wintersmith, remaining there seven years, until 
1895, when he began working for the C. O. & 
S. W. as operator, afterward serving as relief 
agent. In the year 1895 he was made agent to 
succeed F. G. Corlev, now county clerk of Har- 
clin county. Our subject's assistants are H. W. 
Mahall, chief clerk and operator; Ben Skees, 
freight clerk : and A. M. Ramey, warehouse man. 
At this station there is a Postal Telegraph, and 
our subject is the American Express agent. 

Elizabethtown is the seat of Hardin county, 
and has a population of three thousand people. 
It was at one time the site of the Paducah & Eliz- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



223 



abethtown shops, which employed five hundred 
men. The station shipments are fruit and they 
have large shipments of peaches ; also horses, 
mules, grains and flour. Mr. Quiggins does a 
great deal of soliciting and through his tireless 
efforts has increased the business of the station 
in a great measure, making it necessary to en- 
large the freight house to twice its former . ca- 
pacity, and it is now too small. Our subject is 
a great worker, and has much opposition on the 
L. & N., but he is a young man who is sure to 
advance in the work he has to do. He married 
Miss Stark, a daughter of J. W. Stark, of Coles- 
burg, Kentucky, and has two small children. 
He belongs to the Blue Lodge, A. F. & A. M., 
and also the K. of P. of Elizabethtown. He is 
now living on Main street, Elizabethtown, Ken- 
. tucky. 




1CHAEL J. KEIRCE, a popular pas- 
senger conductor, was -born in Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, in January 1863. 
His father was an old railroad man 
who worked on the construction of the B. & O. 
He died in 1891, while the mother died in Janu- 
ary 1899. 

Our subject began railroad life when twen- 
ty-two years of age as brakeman on a work train 
on the Ohio Valley Railroad between Henderson 
and Morganfield, in 1886. He continued as 
brakeman eighteen months and was then given 
charge of a local freight train for two years, when 
he was promoted to the passenger service July 
25, 1889. During all these years he has escaped 
personal injury. 

Mr. Keirce has noticed the great civilizing 
influence of the railroad in the people along his 
own run. When the road first ran through, the 
old people went bare-footed, now they are well 
dressed and live in better houses. He has also 
seen many thriving towns spring up. Our sub- 
ject belongs to Howell division No. 381, O. R. 
C., in which he has been Assistant Chief, and 
has also held various other offices. He is at 



present chairman of the Local Grievance Board. 
He is also a member of Lodge No. 343, A. O. 
t". W., at Evansville, Indiana. Mr. Keirce mar- 
ried Miss Glen, of Louisville, and they have a 
daughter, Miss Nellie. Three children died 
when very young. 




ENJAMIN T. LAWRENCE, a popular 
conductor in the passenger service on 
the New Orleans division of the Ya- 
zoo & Mississippi Valley R. R., is a 
native of Ohio county, Kentucky, born April 2, 
1859. His parents, Jonathan and Margaret E. 
(Coates) Lawrence, were respected farmers of 
that county, and departed this life in 1872 and 
1873 respectively. Mr. Lawrence attended the 
schools of his native county, assisting in the work 
on his father's farm, and at the age of thirteen 
began life as a clerk and followed other pursuits 
until nineteen years old. He then entered rail- 
road life on the Elizabethtown & Paducah R. R., 
assisting in constructing a telegraph line be- 
tween Central City and Paducah, six months be- 
ing occupied in that work. He was next em- 
ployed as a brakeman on that road between the 
same points, and held the position for eighteen 
months. In the meantime the road had acquired 
control of a branch between Cecelia and Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, and Mr. Lawrence was promot- 
ed to conductor in the freight service on that 
branch, and ran between Louisville and Central 
City. Soon after the road was known as the 
Chesapeake, Ohio & South-Western R. R. (now 
part of the I. C. system), and he remained with 
the new company until 1883. He then went to 
Texas, securing a position as brakeman with the 
Missouri Pacific R. R., serving afterward as 
yard master at Victoria, Texas, for the New 
York, Texas & Mexican R. R. Becoming ser- 
iously ill about this time, he was obliged to 
go to a hospital, where he remained several 
months, and upon his recovery went north to 
Brazil, Indiana. He there entered the employ 
of the Chicago & Indiana Coal Company as a 



224 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



conductor between Brazil and Fairbanks, hold- 
ing that position two years. In 1887 he went to 
.Memphis, Tennessee, and from that city to New 
Orleans, where he became identified with the 
Yazoo & Mississippi Valley R. R. as a_ conduc- 
tor in the freight service between Memphis and 
Vicksburg. After eight months successful work 
in that service he was promoted to the extra pas- 
senger service, and in September 1892 was again 
promoted to the regular passenger service, and 
is now in charge of a run between New Orleans 
and Vicksburg. On September 17, 1894, Mr. 
Lawrence was married to Miss Elizabeth G. Mc- 
Gregor, who was born in Vicksburg, Mississippi, 
September 19, 1875, and educated in the schools 
of New Orleans, Louisiana, and Seattle, Wash- 
ington. Thomas Gordon Lawrence, born July 
14, 1895, is the result of their union. Mr. Law- 
rence is a member of Vicksburg Division No. 
231, O. R. C. Politically he is a staunch Demo- 
crat. Mr. Lawrence finds time during his leis- 
ure moments to cultivate his taste for fine lit- 
erature, being especially fond of historical works 
and the higher English writings. He is a very 
popular man on the road, and his friends in his 
home city of New Orleans are many and sincere. 




'ILLIAM GARNER BEANLAND, 
a popular conductor in the freight 
service on the Vicksburg division 
of the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley 
R. R., is a native of Batesville, Mississippi, 
where he was born February 21, 1871. He is 
a son of Dr. E. D. and Elizabeth (Archibald) 
Beanland. Dr. Beanland was a medical prac- 
titioner of thirty-nine years standing in the south 
and was for many years a member of the state 
board of health in Mississippi. He departed 
this life on March 28, 1897. His wife was of 
Scotch lineage, but born in Mississippi. She re- 
sides at Batesville. 

Mr. Beanland graduated from the Batesville 
high school in June 1890, and in December of 



that year entered the service of the United States 
Express company as a messenger on the Louis- 
ville & Nashville R. R. between Anniston and 
Gadsden, Alabama, serving until 1895, when he 
was appointed a conductor in the freight service 
of that road and on the same run. He held the 
position of conductor until April 1897, when he 
resigned to embark in the hotel business at Tal- 
ladega Springs, a health resort of note in Ala- 
bama. He conducted the hotel until January 
1898, when he disposed of it and went to Mem- 
phis and secured the position of chief clerk for 
the American Express company, where he re- 
mained until December 1898. Entering the em- 
ploy of the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley R. R. 
on that date as conductor in the freight service, 
between Memphis and Vicksburg, he has since 
successfully filled that position. On the 2ist of 
April, 1897, Mr. Beanland married Miss Stella 
Onderdonk, a native of Brooksburg, Ind., but 
residing at Calera, Alabama. She is a popular 
lady of fine musical attainments. They have one 
child, Dorothy, born September 14, 1898. 

Socially our subject is connected with the 
Knights of Pythias, also the Uniform Rank, 
of Gadsden, Alabama. He is also a member 
of the Modern Woodmen of the World, and of 
the O. R. C. In religious affairs his family 
united with the Presbyterian church, but Mrs. 
P>eanland is a member of the Episcopal church. 
Politically he is a Democrat. 




C. HALL is a popular engineer in 
the freight service on the Louis- 
Q iana division of the Illinois Cen- 
tral. He entered the service of 
the I. C. in 1897 as engineer, and was at once 
given charge of a run between Canton, Missis- 
sippi, and New Orleans, which he still holds. 
His first knowledge of railroad work was ac- 
quired on the L. & N. R. R., where he worked in 
1889 as brakeman. After eighteen months ser- 
vice with that road he went to the Georgia Pa- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



225 



cific R. R. as fireman, at which he served five 
years, being then promoted to engineer. As en- 
gineer he worked with that company for three 
years, or until 1897, when he came to the I. C. 
Mr. Hall was horn in Florence, Alabama, 
November 8, 1866, his father, George W. Hall, 
now deceased, having been a prominent farmer 
of that vicinity. A brother of our subject, Jos- 
eph J. Hall, is an employe of the I. C., being a 
brakeman, and residing at McComb City. W. 
C. Hall was united in marriage to Miss Yolande 
Kennedy, and they are the parents of two fine 
children. Socially he is a member of Division 
Xo. 196, B. of L. E., and he and his estimable 
wife are attendants of the Methodist church in 
East McComb City, where they reside in a com- 
fortable home. 



JOHN HARPER, foreman of the foundry 
at the shops of the Illinois Central at 
McComb City, Mississippi, is an old and 
faithful employe of the company, re- 
spected alike by the officials of the road and his 
fellow-employes. When the N. O. J. & G. N. 
R. R. was bought by the I. C., he was with the 
former, and has remained with the latter ever 
since, having lost only one month during, his en- 
tire service. 

Born in the city of Belfast, Ireland, on Feb. 
2, 1835, Mr. Harper emigrated to America in 
1858, and landing in New York City, at once 
found employment at his trade, that of a moul- 
der. He afterward went west to Chicago. Illi- 
nois, working there for a time, and from that 
city to Ottawa, in the same state, as foreman in 
a foundry. From the latter place he went to 
La Salle, Illinois, where he worked at his trade 
for three years. He then went to New Orleans 
and was with the N. O. J. & G. N. R. R. in the 
warehouse there, and was also a fireman on the 
old engine " The Creole." He then found em- 
ployment at his trade in that city, and in 1861 
went to Selma, Alabama, where he remained one 
vear. From Selma he went to Athens, Georgia, 



working there at his trade until 1867, when he 
returned to New Orleans, and re-entered the ser- 
vice of the N. O. J. & G. N. R. R. 

In 1872 Mr. Harper took up his residence in 
McComb City, and was appointed foreman of 
the foundry in the I. C. shops which position he 
holds at the present time. Since becoming iden- 
tified with the I. C. he has worked satisfactorily 
under eleven master mechanics. Eighteen men 
are at present under his supervision. 

Mr. Harper was married in New Orleans, 
to Miss Eliza Anne Healy, and they are the pa- 
rents of an interesting family of five children, 
viz : Sidney J. who occupies the position of day- 
foreman of the 1. C. round-house, at McComb 
City ; Sarah, wife of Mr. Livingstone, an I. C. 
engineer ; Matthew, employed in a mercantile 
house; Rachel, who is at home, and Robert, a 
machinist in the I. C. shops. 

Socially our subject is connected with Ma- 
sonic Lodge No. 382, of McComb City, and is 
a life-member of Concord Chapter of New Or- 
leans. He is also a Knight of Honor, which or- 
ganization he joined in 1878. 

In his religious views he is liberal, but in- 
clined toward the principles of Free-thought. 

Mr. Harper is one of the substantial citizens 
of McComb City, owning a comfortable home on 
Railroad avenue, besides much other valuable 
property. 



J WESLEY BROWN, a popular young 
conductor on the Louisiana division of 
Q the Illinois Central, acquired his first 
knowledge of railroad work on the 
Mobile & Ohio R. R. He was in the employ of 
that road as brakeman for three years, with 
headquarters at Meridian, Mississippi. Going to 
McComb City in February 1896, he entered the 
service of the I. C. as brakeman on the Louisiana 
division of the road, and in November 1899 was 
promoted to conductor in the freight service, 
which position he now holds. He has been in a 
few small wrecks, and was once injured and tin- 



226 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



able to work for a few weeks. Mr. Brown was 
born at Lockhart, Mississippi, on February 7, 
1872. J. Wesley Brown Sr., his father, deceased, 
was a prominent farmer and planter of that place. 
Of the social orders Mr. Brown belongs to Di- 
vision No. 264 B. of R. T., and is also a member 
of the K. O. T. M., of McComb City, where he 
makes his home. 




AVID C. MORTHLAND, who holds 
the responsible position of general 
yardmaster for the Illinois Central at 
Memphis, Tennessee, was born in 
Cleveland, Ohio, November 24, 1866. He is a 
son of Abraham and Louise (Whitacre) Morth- 
land, the latter having died in 1869. Mr. Morth- 
land Sr. is a conductor in the service of the 
Pennsylvania R. R., residing at Alliance, Ohio. 
Our subject attended the public schools of Al- 
liance and Steubenville, Ohio, and in 1881 served 
on the Pennsylvania R. R. as water-boy on a 
work train ; soon he became a brakeman on the 
same train. He was in that service about one 
year, when transferred to Steubenville as switch- 
man in the yards of that place, and from the lat- 
ter work went as brakeman on the local freight, 
between Steubenville and Dennison, Ohio, re- 
maining in that capacity about four months. He 
resigned from the road to engage in business at 
Orrville, Ohio, and was in the -mercantile line 
there until January 1886, when he entered the 
service of the Chesapeake, Ohio & South Western 
R. R. at Paducah, Kentucky, as brakeman. 
Early in 1887 he was promoted to conductor, 
and soon afterward to yardmaster, at Memphis. 
In March 1894, he went to the Cotton Belt R. 
R. at Commerce, Texas, as conductor in the 
freight service and extra passenger, and re- 
mained with that road two years. He then re- 
turned to the T. C. at Memphis, and was ap- 
pointed general yardmaster at that place, retain- 
ing the position and satisfactorily filling it at 
the present time. The entire yards of the Illi- 



nois Central and the Yazoo & Missisippi Valley 
R. R. at Memphis, are under his supervision. 

Mr. Morthlancl was on December 27, 1887, 
united in marriage to Miss Mollie Foley, of 
Memphis, who was born in that city October 
12. 1868. They are the parents of two children, 
Margaret and Mary ; the former's birth occuring 
in 1890. and the latter's in 1893. Of the social 
orders, Mr. Morthland belongs to the O. R. C., 
Knights and Ladies of Honor, and the Masonic 
organization. His family attend the Catholic 
church. In politics he is a staunch Democrat. 




L. MUNN, a well-known engineer 
in the freight service of the Illi- 
Q nois Central, on the Louisiana 
division, was born in Kendall- 
ville, Ind., March 19, 1870, but was reared and 
educated at Big Rapids, Mich. He is the son 
of Rev. Charles A. and Anna (McLain) Munn, 
the former a native of Ohio and the latter of 
Pittsburg, Pa., both of whom are now residing 
at Fresno, Cal., where Mr. Munn is the pastor 
of a Presbyterian church. Charles B., a brother 
of our subject, was a valued employe of the I. C. 
and lost his life in a wreck near New Orleans in 
1892. 

W. L. Munn acquired a good education in 
the common schools of his native city, and at 
the age of fifteen began to learn the trade of a 
printer in the office of The Current, at Big Rap- 
ids. From there he went to Muskegon, Mich., 
and was employed on the Morning Nnvs and 
Chronicle, and later on the Inland Printer. 
of Chicago. Compelled to seek more active em- 
ployment on account of failing health, he went 
south to Jackson, Miss., and on October 19, 
1890, secured a position as fireman on the Yazoo 
branch of the I. C. with Engineer E. Fordish. 
Four months later he went to McComb City, 
Miss., and entered the service of the company 
there as fireman on the Louisiana division under 
Engineers Ford and Burke. He was engaged 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



227 



in that branch of the service three years, and 
in 1893 was examined and received his creden- 
tials as locomotive engineer. On January 21, 
1894, he took charge of Engine No. 1338, in the 
freight service, and has since been employed on 
the Louisiana division in that capacity. He now 
has charge of a regular run on engine No. 717. 
He has never been injured, although in two acci- 
dents, in both of which his engine was over- 
turned. 

Mr. Munn was married to Miss Charlotte 
\V. Waring, of Liberty, Miss., and they have one 
child, Charles Thomas, a fine boy. He is con- 
nected with Division No. 196, B. of L. E., of 
McComb City, and during his old printing days, 
to which he looks back with pleasure and satis- 
faction, was a member of the Typographical 
Union. Mr. Munn resides with his family in a 
pretty home in the western part of McComb 
City, and takes an active interest in the affairs 
of the town. 




O. WHITE, a well-known conduc- 
tor in the freight service of the 
Yazoo & Mississippi Valley R. R. 
on the Vicksburg division, was 
born May 13, 1866, in Tate county, Mississippi. 
His parents, T. B. and Virginia (Jennings) 
White, are now residents of Memphis, Tennes- 
see. Mr. White received his educational train- 
ing in the public schools of Senatobia, Missis- 
sippi, and at Oxford in that state. At the age 
of seventeen he entered a general store at Sena- 
tobia as salesman, working there for about nine 
months, and acquiring a knowledge of mercan- 
tile life. Going to Memphis, he became connec- 
ted with F. .Ozane in the stove and mantle busi- 
ness, but after one year went tp the dry goods 
firm of Hunter Bros., and was for six years in 
their employ. In 1891 he entered the service of 
the Kansas City, Memphis & Birmingham R. R. 
as fireman and engineer, between Memphis and 
Birmingham, and was in the employ of that 
company for three years. Returning to his for- 



mer position with Hunter Bros., of Memphis, he 
remained there nine months and again entered 
railroad life as fireman on the Yazoo & Missis- 
sippi Valley R. R. He resigned after a short 
service, and for the next year was a stationary 
engineer in the employ of the Memphis Compress 
Company. 

He then returned to the Y. & M. V. R. R. 
as flagman on the Vicksburg division, and after 
three years service as flagman was promoted to 
conductor, and is now in that branch of the ser- 
vice, giving eminent satisfaction. Mr. White 
was, on April 25, 1897, united to Miss Mamie 
Kerr, of Byhalia, Mississippi, a native of Tate 
county, born July 30, 1874, and a very estimable 
lady. He is a member of the O. R. C., and of 
the Odd Fellows. Mr. and Mrs. White are 
members of the Baptist church. In politics he 
votes with the Democratic party 



OARRY C. BENWELL, a rising young 
conductor in the Grenada district, 
j_l ]\ Memphis division, of the Illinois Cen- 
tral, entered the service of the com- 
pany in February 1895 as store-keeper at the 
Memphis round-house. He was employed there 
until May 12, 1896, when he became a flagman 
on a passenger train between Memphis and Can- 
ton, Mississippi. He soon afterward secured 
a position as brakeman in the freight service, 
and on May 12, 1899, was promoted to conductor 
on the same division, where he still remains. Mr. 
Benwell was born in Canton, Mississippi, No- 
vember 25, 1875. His parents were Harry R. 
C. and Medora (Wood) Benwell, the latter liv- 
ing in Memphis. Mr. Benwell Sr. was chan- 
cery clerk of Madison county, Mississippi, and 
died of yellow fever in 1878. The early train- 
ing of our subject was acquired in a private 
school in his native city. In 1892, he was ap- 
pointed a page in the Mississippi state legisla- 
ture and served through two sessions. In 1893 
he entered the drug business, and remained in 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



that line until his connection with the I. C. in 
1895. Mr. Benwell is a Catholic in faith, and 
a Democrat in politics. He is a young man of 
fine abilities, destined to make his mark in any 
line where he may decide to operate. He is 
one of the youngest conductors in the' service of 
the Illinois Central road. 



JOHN MULVIN, familiarly known as 
"Trilby," began his railroad career 
in 1877, on the Paducah & Memphis 
Railroad as a wiper under foreman G. 
M. Taylor. October i, 1879, he began firing 
and occupied the left side of the engine three 
years when he was promoted, running through 
freight to Memphis. In 1888 he went to the 
Louisville, New Orleans & Texas, now the 
Yazoo & Mississippi Valley branch of the Illinois 
Central road. He remained there from 1888 
to 1891, running in passenger and freight ser- 
vice all over the line. It was during his service 
on this line that Mr. Mulvin was injured in a 
rear end collision at Hollywood, running a spe- 
cial train. With no flag out, he struck the local, 
going at the rate of thirty miles an hour. The 
engine was demolished, the caboose and ten cars 
wrecked, and he was laid up one year with two 
broken ankles and numerous bruises 

In 1894 he went to the Chesapeake, Ohio & 
Southwestern Railroad and was given a freight 
run between Paducah and Louisville, and in 
1895, when the division was divided, he was 
given a run between Paducah and Central City. 
Our subject's present engine is a new Brooks, 
No. 21, and his fireman is W. Evitti. 

Our subject was born in Paducah, his father 
James Mulvin. who was at one time a fireman 
on the C. O. & S. W., died July, 1890. Our 
subject has a brother, James, who runs out of 
Memphis. Mr. John Mulvin married Molly 
Rock and has three children, John, James and 
Kate, at school. He resides in a comfortable 
home on Broadway, Paducah. 



LEON FORD is a well-known engineer 
in the freight service of the Illinois 
Central on the Louisiana division. His 
connection with the I. C. dates from 
1892, when he began as engine- wiper in the 
round-house at McComb City, under Master 
Mechanic William B. McKenna. He worked 
in this capacity for two years, when he received 
an appointment as fireman with engineer Charles 
J. Swett. Following the occupation of fireman 
for a period of three and one half years, he was 
examined for promotion to engineer, in which 
he was successful, and since then has held a 
regular run in the service between Canton, Mis- 
sissippi, and New Orleans. 

Mr. Ford was born in Sumter county, Ala- 
bama, on October 17, 1873, and is a son of Leon 
E. and Jennie (Eskridge) Ford, both deceased. 
Leon E. Ford, the father of our subject, was the 
inventor of the Ford-Whitworth car-coupler, 
and was for many years in the employ of the I. 
C. as a conductor. He also helped in the con- 
struction of the M. & O. R. R. 

Mr. Ford, of this sketch, was married dur- 
ing the present year (1900) to Miss Ella Har- 
rell, of Osyka, Mississippi. They reside at 
present, with Engineer and Mrs. Long, in the 
south-west part of McComb City. Sociallv Mr. 
Ford is connected with Division No. 196, B. of 
L. E. of which he was recentlv elected Guide. 



BEN HERRING, the popular young 
cashier at the local freight office at 
Louisville, Kentucky, is a native of 

Paducah, having been born there in 
the year 1874. His father was Rowland Her- 
ring. Our subject was educated in the common 
schools until the age of sixteen, when he entered 
the office of the Paducah, Tennessee & Alabama 
Railroad where he worked sixteen months, and 
then he accepted a position as clerk in the mas- 
ter mechanic's office of the C. O. & S. W. at Pa- 
ducah. He was then promoted to time keeper 




THOMAS F. SHANNON. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



231 



and later appointed clerk at the Paducah freight 
office. 

Mr. Herring was next transferred to Louis- 
ville as clerk in the freight office, and was soon 
promoted to cashier to succeed W. J. Rye. His 
promotions have been rapid, and he has great 
responsibility, as there are large sums of money 
to handle. His office force consists of two clerks. 
Mr. Herring is well up in Masonry, being a 
member of the Plain City Lodge No. 449, at Pa- 
ducah, Kentucky. He resides at 1719 West Jef- 
ferson street. 



F. SHANNON, foreman in 

U charge of the Illinois Central shops at 
Cherokee, Iowa, entered the service of 
the company at Dubuque, Iowa, in 
September 1868, as a locomotive fireman. At 
that time wood was used as fuel, and it was on 
one of the old wood burners, engine No. 160, in 
charge of Engineer Moses Arquetti, that he 
made his first trip between Dubuque and Charles 
City. He continued in this service for two years, 
when he was appointed engine dispatcher at Du- 
buque, and from the latter position was trans- 
ferred to Ft. Dodge, Iowa. For a period of 
nine months he was in charge of two engine 
houses at the latter city, running switch engines 
and moving trains in the yards there. He was 
then promoted to engineer in the freight service, 
and worked in the yards at Waterloo and Du- 
buque for about one year, when he was trans- 
ferred to the regular road service. His first 
trip in this branch of the service was made in 
the spring of 1872, on engine No. 51, passenger 
train No. 4, from Dubuque to Waterloo. He 
continued in the freight service until 1883, when 
by right of seniority he received a regular pas- 
senger run between Waterloo and Sioux City. 
Remaining in that branch of the service until 
May ist, 1888, he was then promoted to the po- 
sition of trainmaster at Ft. Dodge, where he 
served until May ist, 1891, when at his own re- 
quest he was transferred to Cherokee and took 



charge of the Sioux Falls and Onawa districts 
as trainmaster, holding that position until Sep- 
tember ist, 1893, when the office was abolished. 
He was then assigned to his present position. 
During the seventeen years that Mr. Shannon 
served as engineer, he was remarkably success- 
ful, never having had a wreck or collision of 
any kind, nor so much as being off the track. 

He was never dismissed or suspended, a 
record of which any railroad man might be just- 
ly proud. Always disposed to be conservative, 
he took an active part in the settlement of dif- 
ficulties between the company and the engineers. 
He was elected assistant general chairman of 
the General Grievance Committee of the I. C. 
system at Centralia, in 1887, which position he 
occupied during the great strike on the Chicago, 
Burlington & Quincy road in 1888. Believing 
that the I. C. was in no way responsible for the 
trouble which prevailed, he used his efforts in 
breaking up the boycott against the latter road, 
and was eminently successful. Mr. Shannon 
has taken an active part in politics since 1876. 
He is a strong Republican, and has the faculty 
of making friends among the prominent men of 
his party. During the administration of Gov- 
ernor Larrabee he was appointed Special Aid- 
de-Camp, with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. 
At the present time he is being urged by his 
friends to become a candidate for the legislature, 
but for business reasons he is obliged to decline. 
During the fall and winter of 1887 and 1888, 
Mr. Shannon organized what is known as the 
legislative 1x>ard (an organization of railway em- 
ployes) for the purpose of defeating the two- 
cent fare bill, and also for the purpose of taking 
issue with the legislature on other matters per- 
taining to the interests of railway employes. It 
was generally conceded that the defeat of the 
two-cent fare bill was due to the influence of 
this organization. 

Mr. Shannon was born in Ireland on Jan- 
uary 6, 1845, and with his parents emigrated to 
America in 1850, settling in Grant county, Wis- 
consin, from whence in 1856 they removed to 
Fayette county, Iowa. In 1871 he was married 
to Miss Annie E. Kirby, in Dubuque, and they 



232 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



have three sons : Kirby E. and Herbert J., both 
in the employ of the Illinois Central, and George 
F., who is attending school. In 1863, during 
the Civil war, Mr. Shannon enlisted as a private 
in the Ninth Iowa Cavalry, under Col. M. M. 
Trumbull, and was honorably discharged at Da- 
venport, Iowa, in February 1866. Socially he 
is connected with Division No. 226, B. of L. E., 
of Ft. Dodge, and is also a member of the Grand 
Army of the Republic at Waterloo, Iowa. 



=x^DGAR F. STOVALL, freight agent at 
the Illinois Central's extensive depots 
at Louisville, Kentucky, was born in 
McNairy county, Tennessee December 
18, 1865. ' His father, Dr. W. W. Stovall, a 
well known physician who practiced medicine 
in McNairy and the adjoining counties fifty 
years, died at the age of seventy-eight years. 
The mother lives with her daughter at Bethel 
Springs. 

Our subject received his education in the 
country schools and worked on a farm up to the 
age of nineteen years when he became a clerk 
in his brother's store and studied telegraphy at 
odd times. In 1887, he entered the service of the 
Mobile & Ohio railroad as operator at Jackson, 
Tennessee, worked four months, when he was 
transferred to Cairo, Illinois, as operator. He 
worked here five months and then went to East 
St. Louis as copying operator in the despatcher's 
office. He left the despatcher's office to accept 
a position as agent's operator at E. St. Louis, 
worked eight months and was made revising 
clerk, occupied this position two years and a 
half and was then promoted to cashier. He re- 
tained this office a few months, when he was 
offered a position with the C. O. & S. W., at 
Memphis, Tennessee, acting as cashier, was 
afterward chief clerk and in January 1896, was 
appointed agent at Paducah, Kentucky. In 
August 1897, he was transferred to Owensboro, 
Kentucky, as agent, and in August 1898, he was 



again transferred to Louisville as agent to suc- 
ceed G. T. Fuller. Mr. Stovall's ability has been 
recognized as his rapid promotion will show. 

A fair idea of Mr. Stovall's responsibility 
may be formed when considering his office force 
numbering twenty-three office clerks, eleven 
ware-house clerks and forty laborers. Mr. 
Stovall has entire charge of the three freight 
depots at Louisville, and his assistants are Mr. 
Klinger at Fourteenth and Kentucky streets, L. 
J. Fass, chief clerk, and Ben Herring, cashier, 
Mr. Gunther, assistant agent at First Street: 
station. Mr. Stovall also has charge of the 
freight of the Louisville, Henderson & St. Louis, 
and Louisville, Evansville & St. Louis roads. 
Louisville's freight house was at one time an old 
tobacco warehouse remodelled. Now there is a 
new house at the corner of Twelfth and Rowan, 
probably the most modern in the country, being 
seven hundred feet long and having scales be- 
fore each door. The receiving house across the 
track is probably one of the best in the city. 

Mr. Stovall is a popular member of the Elks, 
belonging to Paducah Lodge No. 217, also of 
the Concatinated Order of Hop Hoos. He re- 
sides at 1719 West Jefferson street, Louisville, 
Kentucky. 



A. LONG, a popular and high- 

Uly esteemed engineer in the freight ser- 
. vice on the Louisiana division of the 
I. C., entered the service of the com- 
pany about ten years ago at McComb City, as a 
locomotive fireman, with Engineer Clark Bagley. 
He was for several years in this branch of the 
service, and on examination was found capable, 
and promoted to engineer, since which he has 
had a regular run in the freight service between 
Canton, Mississippi, and New Orleans. 

Mr. Long was born at Kenner, Louisiana, 
October i, 1868. His father, now deceased, was 
a merchant of that place. Judge Henry Jacob 
Long, a brother, who died in 1899, was a promi- 
nent citizen of Jefferson Parish, in the same 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



233 



state, and was for many years assessor of the 
parish. 

Mr. Long was united in marriage to Miss 
Mollie Ford, of McComb City, wher,e they re- 
side in a pretty home on Michigan avenue. In 
his social connections he affiliates with the K. of 
i'., and Division No. 196, B. of L. E., of his 
home city. 




ARRY W. BLADES, local freight and 
ticket agent at Henderson, Kentucky, 
was born in the state of Illinois. His 
ancestors are of Scotch descent, and on 
coming to this country settled in Virginia. The 
grandfather came to the Blue Grass region and 
later settled in Illinois. The father is a promi- 
nent citizen of McLeansboro, Illinois, having 
held all offices from mayor dowrr. Our subject 
received his education in the common schools 
and college, and on completing his course went 
in the grocery business as clerk. At the age of 
eighteen he secured work on the L. & N. road as 
brakeman between Evansville and St. Louis. He 
learned telegraphy and was soon made extra op- 
erator, supplying stations all over the road. He 
quit telegraphing and began firing on the same 
road. Shortly after he went to the Ohio Valley 
road in the same capacity. He then worked a 
while at Morganfield as operator, and later at 
Princeton and Northville ; then went to the Pa- 
ducah shops and began his service there as oper- 
ator, from which he was transferred to the su- 
perintendent's office. He was next appointed 
agent at Kuttawa, Kentucky, and afterwards left 
for Memphis where he served as baggage agent 
and assistant ticket agent. 

In 1893 he was sent to Sturgis as freight 
and ticket agent, at which place he remained six 
full years, performing a large amount of work. 
August TO, 1899, he was appointed freight and 
ticket agent at Henderson to succeed G. H. 
Waltz. Mr. Blades is becoming very popular 
with the commercial public and is making a 
grand showing, as he has two rival roads to con- 



tend with. Besides his duties at the station he 
acts as commercial agent around the city and 
does a great amount of soliciting. Through his 
accommodating ways he has built up a large in- 
crease. Mr. Blades has as his office force, chief 
clerk, E. B. Caldwell ; ticket clerk and cashier, 
Walter Albritten ; W. G. Hancock, day operator 
and bill clerk; George Hixon, night operator; 
W. G. Hammond, yard clerk ; L. L. Long, check 
clerk, and Van Miller, messenger. 

Henderson's principal shipments are tobac- 
co, grain (three elevators), cotton goods, woolen 
goods, whiskey, furniture, and canned goods. 
Tobacco shipments often reach 15,000 hogsheads 
a year. Henderson has fourteen tobacco steme- 
ries, two distilleries, brewery, cotton mill, woolen 
mill, furniture factory, and a canning factory. 
Mr. Blades married Miss Green, daughter of 
W". H. Green, ex-representative of Kuttawa, Ky., 
who now conducts a hotel. Our subject has one 
child, a boy of four years of age. Besides his 
duties as agent Mr. Blades acts as yard master, 
and is a man capable of a great amount of work. 




F. WHEELER, an efficient and pop- 
ular conductor on the Memphis divi- 
' Q sion of the Illinois Central, in the 
Fulton district, is a native of Ken- 
tucky, and was born in Graves county, Septem- 
ber 18, 1857. He is the son of Benjamin and 
Martha (Pegram) Wheeler, the former a mill- 
wright by trade, who died on April 25, 1899, 
and the latter resides in Martin, Tennessee. Mr. 
Wheeler acquired his education privately, and 
moved with his family in 1873 to Weakly coun- 
ty, Tennessee. At the age of eighteen he began 
working at the carpenter trade, and remained at 
that work three years. When twenty-one he en- 
tered the employ of the Mobile & Ohio R. R. as 
a brakeman between Okalona, Mississippi, and 
Columbia, Kentucky, where, after fourteen 
months service as brakeman, he was promoted to 
conductor in the freight department. He was in 



234 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



that branch of the service four years when pro- 
moted to the passenger service, serving two years 
in the latter capacity. He then severed his con- 
nection with that road and spent two years in 
various pursuits. His next railroad work was 
on the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley R. R. as con- 
ductor in the freight service between Vicksburg 
and New Orleans, when after one year's service 
he went to Memphis to the Chesapeake, Ohio & 
South-Western R. R. (now the I. C.), in the 
freight service between Paducah and Memphis. 
After ten years' faithful work he was, on Decem- 
ber 24, 1896, promoted to the passenger service, 
where he is at present employed, and is consid- 
ered an efficient and capable official. Mr. Wheel- 
er married Miss Grace Myers, of Covington, 
Tennessee, July 23, 1895, and they have one 
child, Martha C, born July 15, 1896. Socially 
Mr. Wheeler is a member of the Masonic frater- 
nity, and of the O. R. C. He is an adherent 
of the Methodist church, and in politics is a 
staunch Democrat. 




C. HAYNIE is an engineer in the 
freight service, on the Louisiana 
Q division of the I. C. He en- 
tered the service of the I. C. in 
1887, 'as fireman under engineer C. L. Smith. 
Serving in the capacity of fireman for three 
years, he was then examined and promoted to 
engineer, being immediately placed in the freight 
service on a regular run between Canton, Mis- 
sissippi, and New Orleans. 

His first experience in railroad work, was 
acquired in the shops of the A. T. & S. F. R. R. 
at Galveston, Texas, where, after a short ser- 
vice, he obtained a position as fireman on the 
road, and two years later, was promoted to en- 
gineer. He remained with the Sante Fe until 
1887, when he entered the employ of I. C. and 
has been with the latter road to the present 
time. 

Mr. Haynie was born on March 15, 1863, 
in Washington county, Texas. His father, John 



A. Haynie, now deceased, was an extensive cot- 
ton buyer, and well-known throughout the 
South. 

The subject of this sketch, was married at 
Houston, Texas, to Miss Paralee Mount, of New 
Orleans, whose father, William S. Mount, was 
engaged in the banking business there. To this 
marriage, four sons were born, Kell and Homer 
are living, and at home, and William and Wal- 
ter, are dead. Mr. Haynie has a commodious 
home on Minnesota avenue, one of the best resi- 
dence portions of McComb City. 




C. CAMERON, a freight conductor 
on the Memphis division of the Illi- 
Q nois Central, is a native of Ononda- 
ga county, New York, born Septem- 
ber 25, 1851. He is the son of Alden and Mar- 
garet (Guillies) Cameron, of whom the latter 
survives, and is residing in Scranton, Pennsyl- 
vania. Alden Cameron, who died in 1898, was 
a graduate of the medical department of the 
Abbey College, of Boston, Massachusetts, but 
followed agricultural pursuits. The subject of 
this sketch attended the common schools of his 
native place, afterward taking a college course 
at the Monroe Collegiate Institute, working on 
his father's farm during vacations. In 1870 he 
began railroad life on the Syracuse & Northern 
R. R. as brakeman in the passenger service be- 
tween Syracuse and Sandy Creek, in New York 
State, remaining in that position about eight 
months. He then went to Michigan and worked 
on the Michigan Central R. R. as fireman be- 
tween Detroit and Jackson, occupying that posi- 
tion three months, when he became a brakeman 
on the same road between Michigan City and 
Pentwater. After spending a winter in the pin- 
eries of that state, he went to Meadville, Pennsyl- 
vania, and secured a position as brakeman on the 
Atlantic & Great Western (now the Erie Rail- 
road), and from June 1873 to July 14, 1878, was 
in that branch of the service on that road, a 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



235 



period of five years. He was then promoted to 
conductor and remained with the road until June 
1 88 1. From 1881 until November 25, 1885, he 
\vas a conductor in the service of the Louisville 
& Nashville R. R., and resigned to go to Colo- 
rado on account of ill health of his wife. 

In that state he remained two years in the 
employ of the Denver & Rio Grande R. R., and 
then returned to New York, and from there went 
to Kentucky. A short period was spent with the 
Louisville & Nashville as brakeman, when he 
entered the service of the Chesapeake & Ohio 
R. R. (now the Illinois Central), and from that 
time has been with the latter road in his present 
capacity between Memphis and Paducah. On 
November 13, 1878, Mr. Cameron was united in 
marriage to Miss Eliza Nicholson, of Meadville, 
Pennsylvania, and they have one son, Robert A., 
an employe of the I. C. at Memphis. Mr. Cam- 
eron has also two stepsons, James L. and Wil- 
liam Walters, both connected with the I. C. Mr. 
Cameron is a member of the Masonic fraternity. 
His family attends the Methodist church, and 
in politics he is a Democrat. He is noted as a 
careful and prudent employe, and has had a 
highly successful railroad career, having no ac- 
cidents of any consequence, and losing no rolling 
stock under his care. Mrs. Cameron died Feb- 
ruary 5, 1886. He was married a second time, 
June 23, 1889, to Mrs. Nannie Walters, of Fay- 
ette Co., Tenn., who is the mother of the two 
stepsons above mentioned. 




,DWARD DONOGHUE is the well- 
known supervisor of track and trains 
on the tenth section, Rantoul district, 
of the Illinois Central. He became 
identified with the I. C. in 1853 as a laborer on 
the Chicago division, working northward from 
Cairo, 111. He remained on that division for 
several years, and on the acquisition of the 
Springfield division by the I. C. he came north 
to the latter place, remaining there until 1880, 



when he went to Centralia as supervisor of tracks 
on the Chicago division. From Centralia he 
was transferred and in 1887 came to Rantoul, 
111., to take charge of the reconstruction of that 
division, changing the road from a narrow to a 
broad gauge. He has since remained at Rantoul 
and fills his present responsible position with sat- 
isfaction. 

Mr. Donoghue was born near Dublin, Ire- 
land, August 15, 1829, but came to America in 
March 1846, becoming a resident of Illinois in 
January 1847, which state he has ever since made 
his home. 




3, 1861. 



J. JACOWAY, a popular conductor 
on the Memphis division of the Illi- 
Q nois Central, is a native of Dallas, 
Texas, his birth occurring August 
His parents were John A. and Lucy A. 
(Holland) Jacoway, both deceased. Mr. Jaco- 
way Sr. was a railroad contractor, and had 
charge of the reconstruction of the Selma, Rome 
& Dalton R. R. after the Civil war. Our sub- 
ject was educated in the state university of Fay- 
etteville, Arkansas, working on his father's farm 
during his vacations. After graduating he en- 
tered the office of the Dardanelle Post, at Dar- 
danelle, Arkansas, where he served one year as 
a printer. He then studied civil engineering 
and was later engaged in the house and sign 
painting business. Compelled to abandon the 
latter work on account of his health, he entered 
the service of the Memphis & Charleston R. R., 
on March 10, 1877, as a news agent, between 
Memphis and Chattanooga. One year later he 
went to the Mississippi & Tennessee R. R. (now 
part of the I. C.) as a brakeman, and afterward 
was employed as a baggageman on that road. 
In 1881 he was promoted to conductor between 
Memphis and Grenada, and held that position 
ten years, or until 1891. In the latter year he 
went to the Newport News & Mississippi Valley 
R. R. as receiving clerk in the freight department 
of that road, serving there one year. He then 



236 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



declined positions as conductor with the Mem- 
phis & Little Rock R. R., and Nashville & Chat- 
tanooga R. R. respectively, to enter the employ 
of the St. Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern R. 
R., but remained there only two weeks. In 1893 
he went to the Chesapeake & Ohio ro'ad (now 
part of the I. C.) as conductor in the freight ser- 
vice, soon after being promoted to the passenger 
service, where he has since remained, having a 
regular run between Cairo, Illinois, and Mem- 
phis, Tennessee. Mr. Jacoway was, on May 14, 
1890, united to Miss Mary H. Campbell, of Sen- 
atobia, Mississippi, but a native of Memphis. 
She was born at the latter city July nth, 1871, 
and educated in Ward's Seminary at Nashville, 
and is a lady of fine attainments. They have a 
bright little daughter, Mamie E., born June 13, 
1894. Mr. Jacoway is a Scottish Rite Mason, 
Knight of Pythias, and is connected with the O. 
R. C. and the Hoo Hoos. His family are ac- 
tive members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
In politics he votes with the Democratic party. 



JOSEPH H. MULHALL, a popular young 
freight conductor on the Louisville div- 
ision of the Illinois Central, was born in 
Hardin county, Kentucky. His father, 
Thomas K. Mulhall, who was a farmer, still re- 
sides at Grayson Springs where John H. received 
his early education. Our subject began working 
in a tobacco house and later worked in a dry 
goods store. In 1887 he secured a place on the 
C. O. & S. W. Railroad in track service, and in 
1888 commenced in train service, running out 
of Louisville, braking in the passenger service 
with Conductor Connors. He was later pro- 
moted to baggageman and worked at this five 
years when in June 1896 he was promoted to 
freight conductor, running between Louisville 
and Central City. Our subject has at present a 
preferred run between Louisville and Paducah 
on caboose 98,481. He has never suffered any 
serious mishaps, but in 1889 he fell from a car 



and sprained his ankle, falling with such force 
as to bend a switch rod, and was laid up for three 
weeks. Mr. Mulhall is very well liked by his 
men, and is noted for telling very droll stories. 
He belongs to Monon Division No. 89, O. R. C. 
He resides at 1114 W. Broadway, Louisville, 
Kentuck. 



"J-[xiHOMAS D. RUFFIN, a conductor in 

Uthe passenger service on the Memphis 
division of the Illinois Central, in the 
Fulton district, was born at Jackson, 
Tennessee, April 16, 1863. His parents were 
Robert J.-ancl Melissa (Williamson) Ruffiii. 
Mr. Ruffin Sr. is a carpenter by trade, and re- 
sides in Jackson. His wife departed this life 
January 25, 1895. The immediate family of 
our subject included a brother, William R. Ruf- 
fin, an engineer in the service of the I. C. on the 
Mississippi division, and three sisters, Mrs. J. 
G. Carter, Mrs. E. B. Curtis, and Miss Mary D. 
Ruffin, all residing in Jackson, Tennessee. Af- 
ter attending the public schools of Jackson un- 
til thirteen years of age, Thomas D. Ruffin be- 
came an apprentice at the carpenter trade, under 
his father, and worked at that trade until Decem- 
ber 24, 1880. He then secured a position with 
the Mobile & Ohio R. R. as brakeman, between 
Columbus, Kentucky, and Tupelo, Mississippi, 
where he worked about two years, and was then 
promoted to conductor in the freight service of 
the road. He remained with that company un- 
til December 1883, when he entered the service 
of the Illinois Central as conductor in the freight 
service on the Mississippi division, between 
Jackson, Tennessee, and Canton, Mississippi. 
On June 6, 1890, he resigned and went to the 
Chesapeake, Ohio & South-Western R. R. (now 
part of the I. C. system) as conductor in the 
freight department between Paducah, Kentucky, 
and Memphis, Tennessee. He was soon given 
an extra passenger run, and in 1892 was given 
a regular passenger run where he continues at 
the present time. On December 26, 1895, Miss 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



237 



Minnie Markette, of Water Valley, Mississippi, 
became the wife of Mr. Ruffin. Of the social 
orders Mr. Ruffin is a thirty-second degree Ma- 
son, a Knight Templar, an Elk and a Mystic 
Shriner. He is Assistant Chief of Division No. 
175, O. R. C, and was a charter member of No. 
217, of Paducah. His family attends the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, and politically he is a 
strong advocate of the principles of Democracy. 



baggage handled per month is sixteen thousand. 
Besides taking charge of this force Mr. Jordan 
looks after the large amount of writing and office 
work which demands his attention. He is well 
liked by the traveling public, always having a 
courteous answer for the many questions asked. 
Mr. Jordan married Miss Emma Warrington, 
of Covington, Kentucky, and resides at 320 E. 
Jacob street, Louisville. 




EORGE JORDAN, the popular and ac- 
commodating baggage agent of the 
Union depot at Louisville, Kentucky, 
first saw the light of day at Cincinna- 
ti, Ohio, March 5, 1873. His father was George 
W. Jordan, who died when George was a small 
boy, leaving him in care of an aunt. The boy 
received his education in Cincinnati, but left 
school at fourteen years of age and entered a 
machine shop to learn the machinist trade. He 
worked a short time and then went to Nashville, 
Tennessee, and learned the trade of stone carv- 
ing, working there at his trade five years, after 
which he went to Cincinnati and carved stone 
two years. 

He then left the stone business to enter rail- 
road service with the Illinois Central Railroad at 
Louisville in the baggage room. He then went 
into the Union depot at Louisville as checkman. 
Here through strict attention to his business, he 
won the esteem of his employers, and October 2, 
1898, he was promoted to baggage agent to suc- 
ceed Michael Carroll. The responsibility up- 
on Mr. Jordan is great. Besides handling the 
extensive business of the Illinois Central, he 
looks after baggage of the six other roads run- 
ning into the depot. They are B. & O. S. W., 
Louisville, Henderson & St. Louis, Big Four, 
Southern Railway, C. & O., Louisville, Evans- 
ville & St. Louis. 

Mr. Jordan's large force consists of fourteen 
baggage porters, four mail porters and two 
checkmen. The average number of pieces of 




,OBERT A. GODWIN, the accommodat- 
ing city ticket agent for the Illinois 
Central at Memphis, Tennessee, was 
born in that city on April nth, 1876. 
He is a son of John R. and Mary Francis (Mul- 
lins) Godwin, both well and favorably known 
residents of Memphis. Mr. Godwin Sr. was a 
cotton merchant. He was a member of the state 
legislature in 1893, and was also a representa- 
tive to the national Democratic convention that 
nominated Cleveland. He held the responsible 
office of president of the Mercantile Bank for 
ten years, of which he was the original organizer. 
Mr. Godwin and his estimable wife are now liv- 
ing a retired life in Memphis. 

Robert A. Godwin, the subject of this 
sketch, was educated in private schools in his na- 
tive city until sixteen years of age, when he en- 
tered the University of Virginia. After apply- 
ing himself for two years he was compelled, on 
account of poor health, to leave college. He 
spent a year on his father's farm recuperating, 
and then took a position on the Commercial Ap- 
peal, as a reporter, and worked there six months. 
He then went to the I. C. ticket office as assistant 
ticket agent in Memphis, occupying that position 
fourteen months, when he was promoted to city 
ticket agent, a position he now holds and is fil- 
ling with the greatest satisfaction to all con- 
cerned. Mr. Godwin is a member of the Hoo 
Hoos, an organization of a social character. His 
family attends the Methodist Episcopal church. 
In politics he is a staunch Democrat. 



238 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



nAMES C. GUNTHER, the agent at the 
First Street station, Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, was born in Louisville July 10, 
1871. His father is Sebastian Gunther, 
who has been connected with the Louisville po- 
lice department for thirty years, and is- at pres- 
ent assistant chief of police. Our subject left 
school when but fourteen years of age, beginning 
as messenger boy in the C. O. & S. W. local 
freight office, remained there one year and four 
months, when he was made bill clerk, held va- 
rious other clerkships, and was then made cash- 
ier at Twelfth and Rowan street office, which 
position he had three and a half years. Octo- 
ber 15, 1895, he came to the First Street station 
as agent, and his station is one of importance as 
freight is transferred here to many other roads, 
among them the B. & O., S. W., Monon, Louis- 
ville, Evansville & St. Louis. Our subject's of- 
fice force are Mr. August Goudex, bill clerk, 
L. C. Rose, platform clerk, J. S. Malburn, plat- 
form foreman, and M. Brann, clerk, besides six 
truckmen, one yard clerk, Joseph McHugh. 

Mr. Gunther married Miss L. E. Liter, a 
popular Louisville lady. He belongs to the Blue 
Lodge and Chapter of the Masonic order, and 
the Red Men. He is very popular with the pa- 
trons of the road as well as with all his associates 
in the service. 




AMUEL M. REAMES, a conductor in 
the freight service on the Louisiana 
division of the Illinois Central, began 
life on his own account when only six- 
teen years of age. His first work was on the 
Yazoo & Mississippi Valley R. R. (now the I. C. 
R. R.) where he was employed as a brakeman 
between Vicksburg and New Orleans. When 
but nineteen years old he was promoted to con- 
ductor, and was in the freight service of that 
road until 1890. He then went to New Orleans 
and worked in the yards of the New Orleans & 
North Eastern Railroad until 1893. In the lat- 
ter year, he was appointed yardmaster for the 



Illinois Central, at McComb City, Mississippi, 
holding that position for eighteen months, and 
on Feb. i, 1897, was promoted to conductor on 
the Louisiana division where he is at the present 
time. Mr. Reames was born at Baton Rouge, 
Louisiana, September 2, 1866, and is a son of 
William P. and Eliza Reames. Mr. Reames, Sr. 
now deceased, was a carpenter by trade, and a 
highly respected man. Robert S., a brother of 
our subject, is a conductor on the Illinois Cen- 
tral having a run out of Vicksburg. Samuel 
M. Reames married Miss Flora Packwood, a 
native of Louisiana, and with her occupies a 
nice home in the western part of McComb City. 
He is a valued and faithful employe of the com- 
pany, possessing many excellencies of character, 
which command the esteem of his fellow-men. 




R. HARLAN, is an engineer in the 
freight service on the Louisiana di- 
'O v ' s ' on f tne Illinois Central. His 
first experience at railroad work was 
acquired in 1884, on the St. Louis & San Francis- 
co R. R., where he was employed at Springfield, 
Missouri, as a fireman. He was afterward trans- 
ferred to the Texas division of that road, and it 
was while there that he was examined for, and 
received promotion to engineer. Leaving that 
road in 1893, he went to New Orleans, and in 
October of that year entered the service of the 
Illinois Central as an engineer on the New Or- 
leans Terminal. In 1895 he was transferred to 
McComb City, Mississippi, and has since had 
charge of a run in the freight service on the 
Louisiana division of that road. 

During the year 1898 he had charge of the 
pay car, and was injured in a small wreck on the 
Grenada division. He was also in a serious 
wreck on the Louisiana division in 1896. 

Mr. Harlan was born in Kosciusko, Indiana, 
on October 2, 1864. His father, George W. 
Harlan, is a substantial farmer now residing in 
Oklahoma. The union of Mr. Harlan and Miss 




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W 

W 
o 



Q 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



Rosa Brooks, of Pittsburg, Kansas, has been a 
very happy one, and they are the parents of two 
fine children , Marie and Robert. Of the social 
orders Mr. Harlan is connected with the Ma- 
sonic fraternity, and with Division No. 196, B. 
of L. E. of McComb City, of which he is at 
the present time Chief. He resides in East Mc- 
Comb City, where he has a nice home. 




AVID J. CULTON is a well known en- 
gineer in the passenger service on the 
Sioux Falls division of the Illinois 
Central, and is one of the old and re- 
spected employes of the company. He entered 
the service of the I. C. in 1866, as an engine 
wiper in the round house at Dunleith, 111., when 
that place was a great central point of the com- 
pany. He was soon promoted to fireman and 
worked as such until 1876, when he was trans- 
ferred to Dubuque, Iowa, and given charge of an 
engine on what was then known as the Iowa 
division of the I. C. In 1881 he removed to 
Waterloo, Iowa, and was given a regular run on 
the western division of the road. He came to 
Cherokee in 1887, when the Sioux Falls division 
was being built, and was in charge of the engine 
which laid all the rails on the new division. The 
completion of this line was made under more than 
ordinary difficulties, as the rails were laid in 
a terriffic blizzard of wind, cold and snow, the 
thermometer registering twenty degrees below 
zero, still the men worked with a will, and at 
ii -.20 P. M., December 19, 1887, the last spike 
was driven in the presence of the governor of 
the territory of Dakota, Mayor Norton, of Sioux 
Falls, Mr. E. T. Jeffery, Mr. Tucker, Mr. Dixon, 
and other officials of the company. He also ran 
the first train over that division, a mixed one, 
after which he was given a regular run in the 
passenger service of that branch of the road, 
which he still holds. Our subject is a native of 
northern Ireland, and was born in 1851. His 



father, William Culton, now deceased, was also 
in the service of the I. C. on the section and in 
the round house, both at Dunleith, 111., and Du- 
buque, and a brother, James Culton, residing at 
Bloomington, 111., is now traveling freight agent 
for the company. Mr. Culton has been twice 
married. His first wife was Miss Esther Girard, 
who died, and later he was united to Mrs. Mary 
Hull. , They have one child, Elva. Both he and 
his wife are prominent members of the Congre- 
gational church, of Cherokee. He is a member 
of Division No. 226, B. of L. E., at Ft. Dodge, 
and was a delegate from Division No. 114, of 
Waterloo, to the convention at Pittsburg, Pa. 
He is also connected with the Masonic order, 
Knights Templar, and A. O. U. W., of Chero- 
kee, where he resides in a fine home on Elm 
street. Mr. Culton has never been in a wreck 
during his long career as a railroad man, and 
his rise in his chosen work marks him as a man 
of sterling worth and energy. Since writing the 
above Mr. Culton had the honor to make the 
first trip over the Ft. Dodge & Omaha R. R. 
This was made November i, 1899, from Council 
Bluffs, leaving there at 7 145 A. M. on that date, 
arriving at Ft. Dodge at 6:20 P. M., with Vice- 
President Wallace's business car. 




AVID McKELLIP, one of the most 
prominent engineers on the west end 
of the Central, has had a railroad ex- 
perience extending over more than 
forty years. He was born on his father's farm 
near Bradford, Vt., September 3, 1841. His 
father, Stephen McKellip, moved later to New 
Hampshire, where he passed his last days. Three 
of his other sons chose a railroad career. S. 
Horace, after learning the science of engineering 
on the Grand Trunk, then ran for a number of 
years on the lines of the Chicago, Milwaukee & 
St. Paul, later settled on the Pacific coast, and 
has for the last twenty years run an engine on 



212 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



the narrow gauge road there, residing at Antioch, 
Cal. Daniel, deceased, was, during the latter 
years of his life, on one of the roads running out 
of San Francisco. Elbridge L. is master me- 
chanic for the Southern Pacific at Carlin, Nev. 
David McKellip began his railroad career as 
fireman on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul 
line (then the Chicago & Prairie du Chien Rail- 
road), in 1859, and in a short time was promoted 
and given an engine running between Milwaukee 
and Janesville. On the outbreak of the Civil 
war, he answered his country's call for volun- 
teers and enlisted on August 3, 1862, in Company 
D, 24th Wisconsin Infantry, under Captain Phil- 
brick and Col. Larabee. After passing through 
nearly three years of campaigning, during which 
he participated in sixteen hard fought battles, 
he was discharged at Nashville, Tenn., June 25, 
1865, having been fortunate enough to escape 
wound or injury. On his return from the war 
he was given his old place and soon after pro- 
moted and assigned to a run on the Milwaukee- 
Janesville line. Resigning, he went to Waterloo, 
Iowa, and on August 26, 1871, was engaged on 
the line where he has since been engaged. For 
a number of years he was in the freight service, 
but the latter years he has had a passenger run 
between Fort Dodge and Sioux City on engine 
No. 1304. During the forty years of life on 
the rail, he has never been injured from accident. 
Mr. McKellip was married in March 1866, 
at Waukesha, Wis.,to Miss Eliza Rifford, to 
whom three children have been born : Mary B. ; 
Arthur an engineer on the Southern Pacific road 
at Ogden, Utah ; .and Robert D., at home 
On the organization of the B. of L. E., Mr. 
McKellip became a member in 1866, and at 
present is a member of Division No. 226, of Ft. 
Dodge. He is a member of the Royal Arcanum, 
and a charter member of the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen, of Ft. Dodge. He is enrolled 
as a member of Fort Donaldson Post No. 236, 
G. A. R., of Ft. Dodge. He is one o'f the veteran 
operatives on the west end, and one of the great- 
est favorites of the older line of railroad men. 
He has a pleasant home at 444 South Eighth 
street, Ft. Dodge. 



YINCENT E. OGDEN, better known as 
"Colonel Ogden," yardmaster at Ev- 
ansville, Indiana, was born in Jefferson 
county, Indiana, in 1847. At the age 
of thirteen years he entered the service of the 
J. M. & I. Railroad as train boy, served a few 
months, when he ran away and joined the army 
in 1862, in the 49th U. S. Infantry. He served 
in quartermaster's department and was in sev- 
eral engagements, served all through the war 
and received an honorable discharge. He then 
entered the service of the J. M. & I. Railroad 
where he remained fourteen years, then worked 
for the Short Line fourteen months and the 
Belt Line one year, the Air Line two years and 
finally served as conductor and yardmaster for 
the E. & T. H. seven years. In 1893 he began 
on the Ohio Valley Railroad as switchman and 
night yardmaster, remained here four years when 
he became day yardmaster. 




O. DAHL, one of the many citizens 
of foreign birth that have crossed the 
L Q ocean to find a home in the states, 
was born in Sweden, October 9, 1871, 
and came with his parents to America two years 
later. The family first resided at Green Bay, 
Wisconsin, but later moved to Memphis where 
the father entered the lumbering business. After 
attending the Memphis schools he assisted his 
father several years and for three years was en- 
gaged in farming and then entered the employ of 
the Georgia Pacific Railroad, now a part of the 
Southern system, working in the bridge depart- 
ment eleven months. After five years running 
a saw mill for his father he went to Grenada, 
Mississippi, working in a planing mill two years 
before beginning work as night clerk in the 
freight office of the Illinois Central at that place. 
Remaining in the office some eleven months, he 
was employed coaling engines about three 
months, and then secured a place as brakeman 
running between Memphis and Grenada. After 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



243 



attaining proficiency he was promoted to freight 
conductor on the same run and April 4, 1899, 
received a further advance to extra passenger 
conductor, and is in line for a regular run. On 
February 17, 1895, Mr. Dahl was married to 
Miss Annette McCormack, of Torrance, Missis- 
sippi. Their one child, Alvin K., was born 
January 6, 1896. Mr. Dahl is a member of the 
Memphis Division, No. 175, O. R. C. In re- 
ligion he is of the Lutheran faith and a Democrat 
in politics. Although still a young man, Mr. 
Dahl has made rapid progress in the operation 
of railroads, especially when it is considered 
that he did not enter the service as a boy as most 
railroad men have done. 




'ILLIAM P. BONDS, the capable and 
energetic train dispatcher, for the 
Illinois Central at McComb City, 
Mississippi, has been connected with 
the company since 1874. He was in that year 
appointed telegraph operator, at Frenier station, 
Louisiana, where he worked for ten months, and 
afterward at various small stations on the I. C. 
in a similar capacity, until 1876. In the latter 
year he was appointed agent for' the company 
at Bogue Chitto, Mississippi, remaining there 
until 1884. He then went to McComb City as 
assistant train dispatcher, and from there was 
sent to Yazoo City as the first station agent for 
the I. C. at that place. A service of eight months 
at Yazoo City was followed by a transfer to 
Vicksburg, where he acted as train dispatcher, 
thence in 1889 to McComb City, where he has 
since been employed as a dispatcher, under Chief 
W. L. Oakley. 

Mr. Bonds was born near Liberty, Mississip- 
pi, on September 13, 1857, where his father P. 
B. Bonds, deceased, was an extensive farmer, 
and spent most of his life. 

Miss Ella Wilson, of Summit, Miss., became 
the wife of Mr. Bonds, in 1880, and they are the 
parents of three children, viz; William, John, 



and Eugenia. Mr. Bonds affiliates with the Ma- 
sonic order, the Knights of Pythias, and the 
Knights of Honor. He and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church, and 
take an active interest in church matters. He 
is at present a member of the board of stewards 
of the church in McComb City, where he has a 
beautiful home, and is a substantial and progres- 
sive citizen. 



JT. DONOVAN, began his railroad 
career in 1877 as a clerk in the shops. 
O He was afterward made time-keeper, 
at the same time doing station work. 
He was next transferred to the auditor's office 
of the Memphis, Paducah & Northern in 1880 
and in 1884, was made commercial agent of the 
Chesapeake, Ohio & Southwestern at Paducah. 
When the Illinois Central took the road, the 
office was abolished and Mr. Donovan was made 
agent at Paducah and given charge of both 
freight and passenger departments. 

Paducah is one of the most important 
stations on the Louisville division of the Illinois 
Central, being the terminus of the St. Louis, 
Memphis & Louisville divisions. It is the 
natural gate-way of the great undeveloped fer- 
tile valley of the Tennessee and Cumberland 
rivers. Year after year opens up new markets 
for her manufactures and trades. Paducah is 
the second city in business importance in the state 
of Kentucky, having a population of over twen- 
ty-one thousand, has fine business college, good 
schools and twenty-three churches, and does a 
larger volume of jobbing business than any city 
in the country in proportion to the population. 
It is distinctively a jobbing city, and its trade 
extends in an ever increasing circle. Over two 
hundred and fifty traveling men are sent out 
of the city, fifty being employed in lumber and 
tobacco trades. The annual shipment from 
Paducah amounts to 325,000,000 pounds. 

Mr. Donovan has an office force of seven- 
teen men, A. R, Meyers, chief clerk, W. G. 



244 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



Street, cashier, J. C. Frazer, ticket clerk, and W. 
A. Flowers, baggage agent. 

Our subject was born in Paducah. His 
father, John Donovan, was a drayman, and died 
in 1891. Our subject began work at the age of 
thirteen years as clerk in a candy store, next in 
a book store, and then worked in a real estate 
office from which he entered the railroad service. 

Mr. Donovan married Miss Katie O'Brien, 
of Paducah, and has four children ; Richard, 
Frank, John and Katherine at school. He is 
a member of Lodge No. 217, Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, of Paducah ; Knights 
of Columbus ; Louisville Lodge, Catholic Knights 
of America; Catholic Mutual Benefit Associa- 
tion and the Concatinated Order of Hoo Hoos. 
He has a home on the corner of Sixth and Clark 
streets, where he enjoys the comforts of a happy 
home and the fruits of a successful career. 



he remained one year before being promoted 
and given a local freight run on the same divis- 
ion. On the transfer of Superintendent J. B. 
Kemp to the Memphis division, Mr. Kibler was 
transferred also, and given a freight run between 
Memphis and Grenada, Mississippi. After six 
years in the service here he was promoted to the 
passenger service where he has since been em- 
ployed. On the i8th of October, 1893, Mr. Kib- 
ler was married to Miss Ora H. Carlton, a native 
of Sardis, Mississippi. Their only child, John 
H. Jr., was born January 17, 1896. Mr. Kibler 
is a member of the Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica, the Masonic fraternity, and the O. R. C. 
He is a Democrat, and with his wife is a member 
of the Methodist church. 



JOHN H. KIBLER, a passenger conductor 
on the Grenada district, was born in 
Rockingham county, Virginia, Novem- 
ber 10, 1859. His father, Joseph W. 
Kibler, was a mill-wright in Rockingham county 
and died in 1900, while the mother who was Miss 
Eliza A. Beard, died in 1872. John H. Kibler 
enjoyed good educational privileges having at- 
tended the schools of Rockingham county and 
the Shenandoah Seminary at Dayton, Virginia. 
For a few years he worked on a farm and then as 
a coach smith some three years before leaving his 
native state. Journeying to Shannon, Missis- 
sippi, he secured a clerkship, remaining two years 
before taking a similar position at Aberdeen, 
where he remained three years longer. In 1884 
he secured a place with the Illinois Central and 
began his service as brakeman on a passenger 
train, running between Aberdeen and Lexing- 
ton, Mississipi, under Conductor R. N. Colqu- 
houn, former superintendent of the Mississippi 
Central road. December 5, 1884, he was trans- 
ferred to the baggage department and a year 
later was returned to the former position where 




S. MILLER, a popular passenger con- 
ductor on the Louisville division of 
'Q the Illinois Central Railroad, is a na- 
tive of New York/ His father was 
George W. Miller, one of the brightest of New 
York's lawyers, whose career was cut short by 
an early death at the age of thirty-eight years, 
leaving a young wife and our subject, who was 
then but a small boy. 

After receiving a common school educa- 
tion Mr. Miller began to earn his own living 
and assisted his mother. He entered the service 
of the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad company 
as water boy at the age of sixteen, worked one 
year at this when he took up train service as a 
freight brakeman, and at the age of eighteen 
was promoted. Running a train as conductor 
with great success for several years, he resigned 
to accept a position with the Cincinnati Southern 
as conductor, remaining here one year. He re- 
signed again, and entered the service of the 
North-Western, served for one year and then en- 
tered the employ of the C. O. & S. W. in 1890 
as a freight conductor, serving successfully as 
his record will show. In 1897 he was promoted 
to a regular passenger run. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



245 



Mr. Miller is very affable and is already 
one of the most popular men on the road. He 
runs on trains No. 221 and 231, and 201 south, 
and 204, 222 and 232 north, running between 
Louisville and Fulton, Kentucky. During his 
connection with the Illinois Central and C. O. 
& S. W., Mr. Miller's career has been free from 
accidents and he has a remarkably clean record. 
His only injury in railroad life was while with 
the North-Western road. He had a head end 
collision and was thrown out of the caboose, re- 
ceived a bad cut above the eye, narrowly escaping 
death and being laid up four months. 

Mr. Miller married Miss Julia States, of 
Danville, Ky., a popular young lady. Mr. Mil- 
ler is an active member of Monon Division No. 
89, O. R. C., having been offered many offices 
which he declined. He resides at Hotel Vic- 
toria, corner Tenth and Broadway, Louisville, 
Kentucky. 



JW. DODGE, chief clerk in the office of 
the division superintendent at Mem- 
O phis, is a native of Grant county, Wis- 
consin, born July 29, 1856. He is a 
son of Jeremiah E. and Rachel M. (Ashley) 
Dodge, the latter a member of the Ashley fam- 
ily of Susquehanna county, Pennsylvania, who 
were originally from Vermont. Jeremiah E. 
Dodge was a native of New York state and one 
of the best known lawyers of Wisconsin. He 
was a Harvard student, taking up law as a 
special course, Chief Justice Storey occupying 
the chair of that department. He was appointed 
adjutant general of the territory prior to the ad- 
mission of Wisconsin to statehood, and served 
in each branch of the legislature of the state sev- 
eral terms. Mr. Dodge, the subject of this 
sketch, was educated in the public schools of 
his native county and in the Lancaster Institute. 
In 1875 he was appointed engrossing clerk of 
the senate of Wisconsin, serving one term. In 
May he entered the service of the Lehigh Valley 
Railroad, and at his own request was started at 



the foot of the ladder, that he might learn all 
the details of railway work. He served first as 
check clerk in the local freight office at Mauch 
Chunk, later as baggage master and night tel- 
egraph operator. In 1876 he was appointed tick- 
et agent at Mauch Chunk, resigning the 
following spring to return to Wisconsin to set- 
tle his father's estate. In May of that year he 
re-entered the service of the Lehigh Valley road 
as clerk in the car record office, and the follow- 
ing year was appointed rate clerk of the general 
freight office, where he remained until he re- 
signed to enter the service of the Illinois Central. 
May i, 1880, Mr. Dodge entered upon his duties 
as clerk to division superintendent C. A. Beck, 
at Centralia, 111., and about three months later 
was made chief clerk in the same office. Here 
he remained with Mr. Beck and his successor, 
Mr. T. J. Hudson, after the removal of the 
office to Cairo until 1883. When the Central took 
charge of the Chicago, St. Louis & New Orleans 
R. R., Mr. Dodge was selected by Mr. E. T. 
Jeffery, then general superintendent, to accom- 
pany him in taking stock of the road and witness 
the transfer. On the completion of that duty 
Mr. Dodge was appointed assistant agent at 
Cairo, remaining as assistant and acting as agent 
until July 1887, in the meanwhile acting part of 
the time as traveling freight agent. On the 
above date he was appointed chief clerk to Mr. 
Beck, and his successor Mr. A. W. Sullivan 
with whom he remained until failing health 
compelled him to resign April i, 1890. For 
two months prior to this time he was as- 
signed to the special service of investigating the 
transportation systems of various railroads, 
which carried him as far west as the Pacific 
coast. Returning to his desk it was soon found 
that he had returned to his labors too soon, and 
he was compelled to seek less confining work 
or a different climate. Being favorably im- 
pressed with the region of Puget Sound, he re- 
signed and accepted a position as secretary of 
the Chamber of Commerce at Seattle, retaining 
that position four years, resigning to engage in 
lumbering. In January 1896 he returned to the 



240 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



service of the Central as clerk in the office of 
Mr. Wm. Renshaw, superintendent of 'machin- 
ery, and later as chief clerk in the storeroom at 
Burnside shops. April i, 1897, he was appoint- 
ed chief clerk in the office of the superintendent 
at Memphis, where he has been employed since. 

Mr. Dodge's marriage to Miss Mary E. Mc- 
Mullin, daughter of John and Catherine (Nagle) 
McMullin, occurred at Mauch Chunk, October 
14, 1879. The children born to them are as fol- 
lows : Marguerite, Mary E., Roccena, Eliza- 
beth, Jeremiah E., John W. Jr., and Ruth. 

The members of the family are communi- 
cants of the Protestant Episcopal church. Mr. 
Dodge is a Republican in politics, and has taken 
quite a prominent part in the active workings 
of the party. He was president of the Illinois 
Central Railroad Sound Money Club of Illinois, 
in 1896, and was the spokesman of the delega- 
tion of Railway Men's Sound Money Clubs dur- 
ing their visit to Canton, Ohio, during that cam- 
paign, delivering the address to Major McKin- 
ley. For proficiency and thoroughness in his 
chosen calling, few equal Mr. Dodge on the en- 
tire system. Beginning at the bottom of the lad- 
der he has made himself familiar with every de- 
tail of clerical work, and has fitted himself for 
higher honors when the vacancy that is awaiting 
him shall occur. 



PRESTON A. SIGHTS, second clerk in 
the office of the roadmaster at Mem- 
phis, has had a very short but very 
promising railroad career. Born and 
reared at Henderson, Kentucky, he graduated 
from the high school and immediately after took 
a commercial course in Lockyear's Business Col- 
lege, at Evansville, Ind., graduating in December 
1897. Assisting his father, A. B. Sights, in his 
business, coal dealing, for a few months, he se- 
cured a position in the office of the assistant su- 
perintendent of the Louisville division of the Ill- 
inois Central road at Henderson, removing with 
the office in October to Evansville and remaining 



in the service there until March 25, 1899. Se- 
curing a situation in the employ of a railroad 
contractor, he was there engaged until July 25, 
1899, as bookkeeper, when he resigned to become 
yard clerk in the yards of the Illinois Central at 
Evansville. October 28 following, he was trans- 
ferred to Memphis and made second clerk in 
the roadmaster's office, which position he is at 
present filling. Mr. Sights is a member of the 
Methodist church and of the social order Knights 
of the Maccabees. 




'ILLIAM GREEN HANCOCK, the 
chief operator at Henderson, Ken- 
tucky, began his railroad career at 
a very early age. Born at Green- 
ville, Ky., October 21, 1868, he received his ed- 
ucation in the Kentucky common schools, and 
while yet a youth learned the art of telegraphy. 
At the early age of sixteen years he entered the 
service of the Louisville & Nashville as night 
operator at Slaughters, Ky., and from there was 
sent to Casky, where he remained two years as 
operator and agent. He was stationed succes- 
sively at Crofton, Slaughters and Nortonville, 
where he remained fourteen months as operator 
and relief agent. In 1890 he entered the service 
of the Chesapeake, Ohio & South-Western as 
operator at Covington, Tenn., and from there 
was transferred to Fulton, Ky., as night operator. 
From here he filled successively the offices at 
Paducah Junction, St. Charles, Kuttawa, Fre- 
donia, Rives and Princeton, where he served as 
operator and bill clerk. In 1898 he was assigned 
to the office at Henderson as operator, bill clerk 
and assistant ticket agent. Being at the termin- 
us of the Evansville district, the position is one 
requiring close application to business, and is 
one of no little responsibility. Mr. Hancock 
married Miss Ramage, and has one son living, 
M. Rice, and a son deceased, Costello, who died 
at the age of four years. Mr. Hancock is a 
member of the Tribe of Ben Hur, Court No. 3, 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



247 



of Henderson, Ky. In all the positions in 
which he has been placed, Mr. Hancock has met 
the expectations of his employers and merited the 
promotions that from time to time he has re- 
ceived. 




JOSEPH J. BORNSCHEIN was born in 
Louisville, Kentucky, January 17, 1866. 
His father, F. J. Bornschein, is now de- 
ceased, while his mother resides in Louis- 
ville with her daughter. Our subject was edu- 
cated in the Louisville high school, afterward 
taking a thorough business course. He was 
with Pratt & Co. three years, as book-keeper, 
becoming an expert accountant and is very sys- 
tematic in his work. He is also an inventor, 
having invented and patented a metal bicycle 
support, hat pin, and metal plating that is more 
durable than nickel plate. 

Mr. Bornschein, commenced railroading in 
September 1886, on the Chesapeake, Ohio & 
Southwestern, firing freight and passenger, and 
in July 1889, he was promoted to a switch en- 
gine in the Paducah yards. July 23, 1890, he 
was given a road engine and ran on a through 
freight to Memphis. He has, at present, a pre- 
ferred run between the same points, and drives 
a new Brooks engine, No. 28. Our subject has 
a remarkably good record, not having had any 
accidents or injuries. Mr. Bornschein married 
Miss LeBlanc, the daughter of Dr. J. W. Le 
Blanc, who was a very prominent physician. 
They have one child, Clifford Louis, at school. 
Our subject is a progressive, up-to-date man, 
a great reader and also a musician, his instru- 
ment being the mandolin. He is a member of 
Division No. 225, B. of L .E., and is at present 
Secretary and Treasurer of the Lodge, having 
held the office during the years, 1890, 1893, 1894, 
and 1899. He also belongs to the Knights of 
the Maccabees, Griffin Tent, No. 47, and Blue 
Lodge No. 449, Paducah, Chapter No. 30 and 
Commandery No. u, A. F. & A. M. He has al- 
so taken the thirty-two degrees of the Consis- 
tory of the Scottish Rite Masonry. 



MBROSE E. MERCER, a popular Illi- 
nois Central freight engineer, began 
his railroad career in 1885 as a fireman 
on the C. O. & S. W., now the Louis- 
ville division of the Illinois Central, with En- 
gineer N. Hudson, now of Memphis, Tenn. Our 
subject fired both freight and passenger engines 
until 1888, when he was promoted to engineer 
and given a McQueen engine, No. 79, running 
extra all over the Louisville division. Our sub- 
ject at present has a preferred run between Pa- 
ducah and Central City, on engine No. 252, with 
Fireman Jos. Stanfield. He has had several 
good firemen promoted from his engine, and he 
has a fine record as an engineer. 

Mr. Mercer was born in Pennsylvania. 
His father is William Mercer, a practical miner, 
who came to the coal fields of Pennsylvania 
from England, opening up several important 
mines. In 1872 he opened up mines at Mercer, 
Ky. Afterward the Emporia mine was opened 
in 1878, he being the proprietor of both of these 
mining properties. He later came to Paducah 
and engaged in the coal business, being one of 
the leading coal dealers of the city for seven 
years. He is now retired and living with his 
son, a religious and highly respected citizen. 
Our subject worked in the coal mines in various 
capacities five years, and is considered an expert 
miner. He has a brother, Thomas Mercer, who 
is an old engineer running between Memphis and 
Cairo, being one of the oldest and best known 
men on the road. 

Mr. Mercer married Miss Mary Campbell, 
and has four children, three boys and one girl, 
Harry and Robert William, at school, Katie 
Belle and Leland, who have not yet attained the 
school age. Our subject is a member of Div- 
ision No. 225 B. of L. E., and Division No. 
238, B. of L. F. He is also a member of the 
Plain City Lodge No. 449, A. F. & A. M. He 
built a fine residence in 1891 at 633 S. Thirteenth 
street, where he enjoys, when off duty, the com- 
forts of a happy home. Mr. Mercer is a man of 
temperate habits, who has succeeded by his own 
efforts and character. 



248 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 




SHEAHAN, roadmaster on the Mem- 
phis division of the Illinois Central, 
Q with headquarters at Memphis, Ten- 
nessee, was born at Moro, 111., No- 
vember 27, 1858. His parents, respected resi- 
dents of Bath, Illinois, were Dennis and Esther 
(Walter) Sheahan. Mr. Sheahan Sr., who de- 
parted this life in 1881, was a native of Limerick 
county, Ireland, and had been in railroad service 
about thirty years as section foreman. He 
served in that capacity at Bath ; Illinois, for the 
Chicago, Peoria & St. Louis R. R. (formerly 
the Peoria, Pekin & Jacksonville R. R. ) for many 
years. Our subject attended the public schools 
of Bath, and worked, when a boy, on a farm. 
At the age of fourteen he began railroad life 
as a section hand under his father, on the Peoria, 
Pekin & Jacksonville Railroad and was with him 
eight years. He was then appointed section fore- 
man at Hollis, Illinois, and was soon afterward 
sent to Peoria, Illinois, where he was placed in 
charge of a section, which embraced the Peoria 
yards. He held that position two years, and 
was then transferred to Havana, Illinois, in a 
similar position, remaining there five months. 
He then took charge of a surfacing gang, on the 
Peoria & Farmington R. R., and was two months 
later promoted to foreman of track-laying at 
Peoria. Serving there three months in that ca- 
pacity, he was promoted to assistant roadmaster, 
where he was engaged for one year, when the 
road was extended to Keithsburg, Illinois, and 
the name changed to the Iowa Central. He was 
then appointed roadmaster, with headquarters 
at Monmouth, Illinois, and was there for three 
years, when division headquarters were changed 
to Keithsburg, Illinois, to which point he was 
transferred. The division was afterward ex- 
tended to Oskaloosa, Iowa, and Mr. Sheahan had 
charge of 192 miles of track and the last four 
months with that company he was road and train- 
master. He remained with the Iowa Central un- 
til 1893, when he entered the service of the Illi- 
nois Central as supervisor of the second divi- 
sion, at Champaign, Illinois, where his jurisdic- 
tion extended over 116 miles. He held that 



position two years, and was then transferred to 
the fifth division, with headquarters at Kankakee, 
Illinois, and remained there one year, when he 
was sent to Clinton, Illinois, as roadmaster of the 
Springfield division. He occupied that position 
seven months, when he resigned to go to the 
Elgin, Joliet & Eastern R. R. as roadmaster, 
with headquarters at Joliet, Illinois. He was 
with the. latter road about one year, when he 
returned to the I. C. service, as supervisor of 
the seventh division, with headquarters at Mur- 
physboro, Illinois, and remained there eighteen 
months. He was then promoted to his present 
position as roadmaster of the Memphis division, 
which embraces 265 miles of main line between 
Fulton, Kentucky, and Grenada, Mississippi. 

On the gth of June, 1881, Mr. Sheahan was 
married to Miss Mary T. Donahue, of Peoria. 
Illinois, where she was born, June 7, 1861. 
Both Mr. Sheahan and his estimable wife are 
devoted members of the Catholic church. He 
is connected with the Catholic Order of Fores- 
ters. In politics he is a Democrat. From a 
humble beginning, Mr. Sheahan has, by his un- 
tiring industry and energy, reached a position 
of prominence, carrying with it the complete 
confidence of the officials of the road, and the 
good will and esteem of the many employes un- 
der his jurisdiction. 




M. BRANNER, chief clerk in the 
office of the roadmaster at Memphis, 
O although a young man, has made 
rapid progress in the service he has 
chosen to make his vocation in life. Born at 
Arcola, 111., December i, 1879, he was reared 
and educated at Jackson, Tenn., whither the fam- 
ily removed during his early childhood. His 
father, M. F. Branner, an extensive contractor 
during his active business career, died in 1892. 
The mother, whose maiden name was Rachel 
Becton, resides in Jackson, Tenn. Mr. Branner 
began his railroad career in the spring of 1895 
as clerk in the office of the superintendent at 




ARTHUR HARMS. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



251 



Jackson, remaining about eighteen months, 
when he was transferred to the trainmaster's 
office, serving there six months. Promoted to 
second clerk in the roadmaster's office, he served 
with such credit to himself that in February 1899 
he was transferred to Memphis and made chief 
clerk to the roadinaster there, which position he 
is holding at the present time. Mr. Branner 
was reared in the Presbyterian faith and is in- 
dependent in politics. Few young men with in- 
fluential friends to help them make as rapid rise 
in any calling as has been made by the subject of 
this sketch. By his own merit he has won pro- 
motions in a short time that it has taken others 
years to win. 




RTHUR HARMS, a well-known engi- 
neer in the freight and passenger ser- 
vice on the Louisiana division of the 
Illinois Central, was born at New Or- 
leans, January 4, 1858. Henry Harms, his 
father, was for a long time connected with the 
N. O. J. & G. N. R. R. in the bridge construction 
department of that road. When but a young 
lad of sixteen years, the subject of this sketch 
began his railroad career in the car department 
of the I. C. shops at McComb City, Miss., and 
on October 12, 1884, was given a position as 
fireman, on engine No. 318, with G. Nelson 
as engineer, and A. Butterworth as conductor. 
In 1886 he was promoted to engineer, being em- 
ployed on a switch engine until 1888. He was 
then given a regular run in the freight service, 
and finally in the passenger service, where he is 
at present employed, in charge of engine No. 
720, with John Rayford, who has been with him 
for six years, as fireman. Mr. Harms had a 
narrow escape from death on December 22, 1892, 
caused by a " lap order ". While running at a 
speed of forty miles an hour, with a heavy train 
of freight, his engine collided with an extra 
freight on a curve near Gallman, demolishing 
both engines. Seeing the great danger which 
threatened him, Mr. Harms jumped as the en- 
is 



gines met, and received a painful injury in his 
knee, which for some time incapacitated him for 
duty. This wreck was considered the most dis- 
astrous that ever happened on the Louisiana divi- 
sion of the road. 

On March 25, 1896, Mr. Harms was united 
in mariage to Miss Kace McNeal, a popular lady 
of Wesson, Miss. He has just completed and 
occupies one of the finest residences in McComb 
City, many of the features being of his own de- 
sign. This elegant home which is appropriately 
furnished, is located in the most aristocratic sec- 
tion of the city, on a high eminence, surrounded 
by a grove of beautiful shade trees, and stands 
as a monument to the pluck and energy of a poor 
boy, who, to use his own language, began life 
with less than "two-bits." Mr. Harms holds 
membership in Division No. 196, B. of L. E. 
in which he has held various offices. 



=\\UGENE B. CALDWELL, chief clerk 
in the offices at Henderson, Kentucky, 
holds an unusually responsible position 
for one of his age. Born at Austin, 
Tennessee, in 1875, after attending the common 
schools until 1891, he entered the employ of the 
Southern Railroad at Lawrenceburg, Kentucky, 
as messenger boy, making himself useful as 
clerk, and was soon promoted to bill clerk and 
later to chief clerk. From Lawrenceburg he 
was transferred to Paducah Junction as assist- 
ant agent, and from there to Hopkinsville as 
chief clerk, where he remained five months. He 
was then assigned to duty at Henderson as chief 
clerk, being held accountable for the work of 
the two assistants under his charge. It is un- 
usual for one of his years to have attained so 
responsible a position. He is quick and accurate 
and thoroughly reliable, which accounts for his 
rapid rise. Mr. Caldwell was married to Miss 
Lula Ausenbaugh, of Hopkinsville. Their home 
is at present at Henderson. 



252 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 




T. ERTCKSON is a popular young 
conductor on the Louisiana division 
of the Illinois Central, in the freight 
department. Beginning in 1892 at 
Canton, as a fireman on the Mississippi division 
of the I. C. with Engineer Wilder, he was for 
two years in that branch of the service. He 
then went to the Louisiana division, and until 
1899 was engaged as a brakeman, and in the lat- 
ter year was promoted to conductor in the freight 
service, where he has since remained. He has 
been in a few small wrecks while on the road, 
the most serious being at Hazelhurst, Missis- 
sippi, in which several were injured. He, how- 
ever, was fortunate in escaping. 

Miss Leila C. Hemphill, of McComb City, 
became the wife of Mr. Erickson. She is a 
daughter of Mrs. Amelia Hemphill, the propri- 
etress of a boarding house in that city, a very 
popular stopping place with the employes of the 
I. C. Mr. and Mrs. Erickson's marriage has 
been blessed by a bright little daughter, Maude, 
born April 14, 1894. Mr. Erickson is connected 
with Myrtle Lodge No. 36, Knights of Pythias, 
and is also a member of Division No. 264, B. of 
R. T. of McComb City. He has a comfortable 
home on Broadway and is a useful and progres- 
sive citizen of that cit. 



THEODORE MORENO JR., chief clerk 
in the local freight offices at Memphis, 
was born at Tougalo, Georgia, Decem- 
ber i6th, 1872, and educated in the 
schools of Gainesville, Georgia. While quite a 
lad he began for himself as cash-boy in a large 
store in Gainesville, and two years later was 
given a clerkship in the same establishment 
where he remained four years. In 1891 on com- 
ing to Memphis, he entered the service of the 
Louisville, New Orleans & Texas Railroad as 
clerk in the auditor's office, and a year later was 
transferred to the local freight office where he 
was employed at the time the road was absorbed 
by the Central in 1892. Under the new man- 
agement he became report clerk in 1894, and was 



successively promoted to rate revising clerk. 
night chief clerk, station accountant, and in Aug- 
ust 1897 became cashier, and six months later 
chief clerk in the freight department, where he 
is at present employed. Theodore Moreno Sr. 
is a civil engineer, now retired, who served many 
years in the employ of the Atlanta & Charlotte 
Railroad. He married Miss Virginia Anderson, 
a native of Florida. They are members of the 
Episcopal church, in which their son was reared. 
Mr. Moreno is a Democrat in politics. He is 
accurate and quick at figures and his integrity 
is of the strictest kind, winning for him the con- 
fidence of his superiors in the service. 




EORGE B. McCOY, train despatcher 
at Memphis, was born at West Point, 
Kentucky, April 23, 1856, and re- 
ceived his education at the famous 
Military Institute at Lexington. Having learned 
telegraphy, in 1876 he accepted a position with 
the Ohio River Telegraph company, and shortly 
after joined the force of the Pacific & Atlantic 
Telegraph company, both of Louisville. Hav- 
ing a taste for railroading, in 1877 he secured a 
position as sleepingcar conductor, running out 
of New Orleans until the following year, when 
the service was abandoned on account of the 
prevalence of the yellow fever. Being offered 
a position by G. M. Dugan, superintendent of 
telegraph, in the service of the Illinois Central, 
he accepted in December 1878, and filled the 
position of operator and chief clerk in East 
Cairo, Kentucky, two years. Transferred to the 
despatcher's office at Jackson, Tennessee, he re- 
mained but a short time, then was assigned as 
despatcher to accompany the construction force 
during the building of the Canton, Aberdeen & 
Nashville road, and remained at Aberdeen as de- 
spatcher until 1888. When the Illinois Central 
bought the Mississippi & Tennessee Railroad 
and created the Memphis division, he was trans- 
ferred to Memphis and made one of the despatch- 
ers there, which position he has since filled to 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



253 



the satisfaction of his employers. Mr. McCoy 
is a son of Bernard McCoy, deceased, formerly 
a merchant at West Point. The mother, Ann 
E. Withers in maidenhood, survives him. 

The marriage of Mr. McCoy occurred Jan- 
nan- 3, 1889. at Aberdeen, Mississippi, the home 
of the bride, Miss Madie E. Montgomery, a 
native of that place, born October i8th, 1878. 
Their only child, Harry Bernard, was born at 
Memphis, November 25, 1893. The family be- 
long to the Methodist church, south, and Mr. 
McCoy to the Royal Arcanum. In politics he 
lias been a lifelong Democrat. 




read. 



, OBERT S. ALFORD, an energetic and 
popular employe of the Illinois Cen- 
tral, is a conductor in the freight ser- 
vice on the Louisiana division of the 
At the age of ten years he was employed 
as messenger and errand boy at the depot in 
Johnstons, Miss., where he remained for five 
years. Being a thrifty lad, he accumulated suf- 
ficient funds during those five years to give him 
a college course of three years at Holmesville, 
-Mississippi, where he acquired a good practical 
education. At the age of twenty-one he went to 
McComb City and again entered the service of 
the I. C. as a brakeman on the Louisiana divis- 
ion, in which branch of the service he was em- 
ployed until October 1890. He was then pro- 
moted to conductor, and has since had a regular 
run between McComb City and Canton. In a 
serious wreck, a head end collision which oc- 
curred on March 8th, 1891, at Martinsville, 
Mississippi, he was injured, and for nine months 
incapacitated for work. 

Mr. A 1 ford was born on a farm near Johns- 
tons, Mississippi, where his father, Leandor R. 
Alford, still resides on the old homestead. In the 
paternal family there were three sons beside the 
subject of this sketch, Barney and Harvey, who 
are at home, and Monroe, a teacher in the pub- 
lic schools near his home. Mr. Alford belongs 
to the Knights of Maccabees, Knights of Pyth- 




ias, and O. R. C. of McComb City, where he 
makes his home with Conductor Erickson. 

jtjtjtjtjtjt 

]. LAWRENCE, a prominent and 
highly popular conductor, in the pas- 
senger service of the Yazoo & Missis- 
sippi Valley R. R., with headquarters 
at Memphis, Tenn. was born in Hartford, Ky., 
on June 12, 1865, and is a son of H. J. and Eliza- 
beth (Coates) Lawrence, both deceased. The 
educational training of our subject was acquired 
in the public schools of his native place, and at 
South Carrollton College, in Calhoun county, 
Ky. At the age of eighteen, he began railroad 
life, as a student of telegraphy at Caneyville, 
Ky., on the Chesapeake, Ohio & South Western 
R. R. (now the Illinois Central) and was soon 
afterward given the position of night operator 
at that point, where he remained eighteen months. 
He was then sent to Trimble, Tenn., as agent 
and operator, remaining there about the same 
length of time, and was then transferred to 
Obion, Tenn., holding a similar position there 
for three years. Desiring a change of climate, 
he resigned and went to Texas, and was ap- 
pointed agent and operator for the San Antonio 
& Aransas Pass R. R. at Driscoll, in that state, 
and after four months service was transferred 
to Corpus Christi as bill clerk in the local freight 
office, occupying that position eight months. He 
next went to Memphis, Tenn., and entered the 
road service of the Louisville, New Orleans & 
Texas R. R. (now the Yazoo & Mississippi Val- 
ley R. R.) as a brakeman between Memphis and 
Vicksburg, and after a service of one year was, 
on December 18, 1891, promoted to conductor 
in the freight service on the same run. He held 
the latter position until September 7, 1897, when 
he was discharged for failing to clear passenger 
trains according to the rules and regulations 
then existing. He then entered the service of 
the Missouri, Kansas & Texas R. R. as a brake- 
man, between Houston and Hillsboro, Texas, 
remaining there four months. While switching 
in the yards at Taylor, Texas, he lost two fingers 



254 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



of his right hand, which caused him to remain 
in the hospital for three months. Upon recov- 
ery he resumed his work as brakeman, being 
promoted to conductor on September i, 1898, 
and working three months. He was then re- 
instated in his former position and rights on the 
Yazoo & Mississippi Valley R. R., and was in 
the freight service until February 8, 1899, when 
he was promoted to the passenger service and 
given a regular run on the Vicksburg division, 
between Memphis and Vicksburg, where he is 
now serving successfully, and one of the most 
popular conductors on that division. Mr. Law- 
rence is a member of Vicksburg Division, No. 
231, O. R. C. His family attend the Christian 
church, and politically he is a strong Democrat. 




NDREW J. FRALEY, freight engineer, 
a trusty employe of the Illinois Central, 
began his railroad career in 1876 on 
the Eastern Kentucky Railroad as fire- 
man, working a short time. He then went on 
the Lexington division of the Chesapeake & 
Ohio Railroad where he fired five years, four 
years of this time being in passenger service. 
He next worked on the Cincinnati Southern road 
and the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton line some 
six months and an equal period on the Alabama 
Great Southern Railroad. 

Coming to Paducah he fired one year be- 
tween Padncah and Louisville when he was pro- 
moted to engineer and took charge of engine 
No. 50. From 1887 to August 7, 1890, he was 
in this employ and then resigned, returning to 
the service of the Chesapeake & Ohio, remain-- 
ing until February 1893, when he came back to 
Paducah and has been running since in the 
freight service with a seat in the cab of a Brooks 
engine, No. 22, with Thomas Mullen firing. 

Our subject has a good record, having re- 
ceived no severe injury. He had a very close 
call July 13, 1898; while moving at the rate of 
thirty miles struck an extra freight train at Gar- 
rison Creek trestle and he jumped. The trestle 



was thirty feet high and Mr. Fraley rolled thir- 
ty feet, but escaped death and was out of service 
only a few days with his injuries. Thirty-six 
cars were wrecked and both engines demolished. 

Our subject was born in Virginia, a son of 
Mr. Boone Fraley, farmer, now dead, as is the 
mother who passed away in early life. Our sub- 
ject has had to earn his own living since his 
childhood, and he is a self-made man. 

Mr. Fraley married Miss Rindenbrugh, and 
has five children : Mary, Orville, William R., 
Freddie and Jeanette. He is an active member 
of Division No. 225, B. of L. E., having joined 
the Order in 1887. His genial nature has made 
him a host of warm friends from one end of the 
line to the other. 




J. SHEA, the efficient foreman of 
the blacksmith shops of the Illi- 
Q nois Central at McComb City, 
.Mississippi, began work in the 
shops at the age of fifteen years. After serving 
an apprenticeship, he remained in the shops un- 
til 1889, when he went to Vicksburg, Mississippi, 
and was employed in the Louisville, New Or- 
leans & Texas Railroad blacksmith shops at that 
place for about fifteen months. Returning to 
the shops at McComb City, he was for seven 
years in charge of what is known as the "first 
fire," when he was promoted to foreman of the 
shops, and has held that position ever since. He 
now has charge of thirty-two men, and his de- 
partment is kept very busy. His long incum- 
bency as foreman, and the capable manner in 
which he handles his force, show him to be a 
man of marked ability. 

Mr. Shea was born at Binghamton, New 
York, on March 3Oth, 1867, and is the son of 
John Shea, who was a section foreman in the 
service of the I. C. for twenty years, and who 
died at Canton, Mississippi, while in the employ 
of that road. Mr. Shea married Miss Cecelia 
Daigle, of Natchez, Mississippi, and resides with 
his estimable wife in a fine home in the western 
part of McComb City. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



255 



R. WHEELER, city pas- 
senger and ticket agent of the Illinois 
Central at Evansville, Indiana , was 
born at Union Springs, New York, a 
son of B. D. Wheeler, a tanner by trade. Our 
subject received his education in the New York 
public schools until seventeen years of age, when 
he went to Seymour, Indiana, and was employed 
in a general store. His first railroading was in 
Vincennes, Indiana, on the Ohio & Mississippi 
Railroad in the local freight office as clerk, and 
then went into the mechanical department as 
clerk in the master mechanic's office, after which 
he went into the ticket office at the union depot in 
Vincennes, where he remained six years as tick- 
et agent. He was then made traveling freight 
and passenger agent under G. J. Grammer, who 
.is now with the Lake Shore road. Later he be- 
came general baggage agent of the Mackey sys- 
tem. When the roads were separated he went 
with the Ohio Valley Railroad as chief clerk in 
the general freight and passenger office, and 
when the road was absorbed by the Illinois Cen- 
tral he was made city passenger and ticket agent 
with headquarters at 200 Main street, Evans- 
ville, Indiana. Mr. Wheeler married a daughter 
of Henry Grady, of Tiffin, Ohio, and has three 
children: Charles S., Florence E., and Fred- 
erick R. Jr. Our subject belongs to the National 
Union, a railroad insurance order. He is a 
pleasant and accommodating agent, and holds a 
very responsible position. 




L. WRAY, a conductor in the 
freight department of the Yazoo 
& Mississippi Valley R. R. on the 
Vicksburg division, was born in 
Popes, Miss., September 23, 1874, and is the son 
of Elijah S. and Sallie A. (Collins) Wray, both 
deceased. After attending the schools of his 
native place until fourteen years of age, Mr. 
Wray began life as a clerk in a grocery store at 
Huntington, Miss., and one year later (1889) 
went to the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley R. R. 



as a newsboy, where he was employed four years 
and ran on the entire system between New Or- 
leans and Memphis. He then worked in the 
same capacity on the Chesapeake & Ohio R. R., 
and the Kansas City, Memphis & Birmingham 
R. R. successively, remaining in constant service 
until twenty-one years old. He then became a 
flagman on the Y. & M. V. R. R., between Mem- 
phis and Vicksburg where he served six months, 
being then transferred in a like capacity to the 
local freight between Memphis and Clarksdale. 
He was then promoted to brakeman in the 
freight service between Coahoma and Rolling 
Fork, Miss., and later was transferred in a sim- 
ilar position to a through freight between Mem- 
phis and Vicksburg. He retained the latter po- 
sition until March 23, 1898, when his services 
were rewarded by promotion to conductor on 
a through freight on the same run, where he is 
now serving with eminent satisfaction. 

Mr. Wray is a member of the Baptist church 
and is a strong Democrat politically. 




D. COBOURN, chief clerk in the 
trainmaster's office at Memphis, 
Q was born in Winchester, Virginia, 
March 23rd, 1867, and attended 
both public and private schools of his native 
place. His father, William F. Cobourn, was an 
employe of the Illinois Central, and lost his life 
by accident on duty as a lineman between Brad- 
ford and Greenfield, Tennessee, November 17, 
1885. The mother, Lucy E. Cobourn, nee 
Drake, resides at Fulton, Kentucky. 

At the age of twenty-two Mr. Cobourn be- 
came a clerk in a dry goods store at Fulton, 
where he remained about two years, when he se- 
cured a position as clerk with the Mobile & 
Ohio road at Rives, Tennessee. About three 
years after his entrance into the service of that 
road, the financial depression caused the reduc- 
tion of the force, and for a time he was idle, but 
on the revival of business he was reinstated and 
assigned to duty at Cairo where he remained 



256 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



about one year, and was then transferred to 
Union City, Tennessee. About a year later lie 
was transferred to the offices at St. Louis, where 
he remained but a short time before being re- 
turned to the office at Cairo. In 1896 he re- 
signed and accepted a place in the office of the 
Illinois Central at Fulton, Kentucky, and No- 
vember 17, 1897, lie was transferred to Mem- 
phis,, to the trainmaster's office, and made chief 
clerk, which position he still holds. Mr. Co- 
bourn is a member of the Protestant Episcopal 
church, and affiliates with the Knights of Pyth- 
ias. Politically he is a Democrat. 




ILLIAM GARDNER, an engineer 
in the freight service of the Illinois 
Central, on the Louisiana division, 
has been connected with the road 
since 1894. Beginning as a carpenter with a 
" bridge gang ", he remained at that work only 
a few months, when he decided to return to 
school. In 1895 he went to McComb City, 
Mississippi, and entered the road service of the 
I. C. as fireman on the Louisiana division, with 
Engineer Charles Gilmore. After a faithful ser- 
vice of four years and eight months in that 
branch of the service, he was examined for pro- 
motion to engineer, in which he was highly suc- 
cessful, and was given charge of engine No. 
1135 on the Manifest run on the south end of 
the Louisiana division. He was there only a 
short time when he took charge of a regular 
run in the freight department. He has never 
been in a wreck during his service on the road. 

Mr. Gardner was born at Summit, Miss., 
March 28, 1873. His father, William S. Gard- 
ner, was a farmer of Liberty, Miss. Both pa- 
rents of our subject died in the prime of life. A 
sister. Alma Lee Gardner, became the wife of 
Charles N. McKnight, who is also an employe of 
the I. C. 

Mr. Gardner was for three years a student 
at the A. and M. College of Mississippi, and 
while there was a member of the Lee Guards, 



a military organization. He was married to 
Miss Almeta H. Hemphill, of Byram, Miss. A 
lovely little daughter, Eugenia Belle, has blessed 
their union. Socially Mr. Gardner is a member 
of the Modern Woodmen of America, Protective 
Knights of America, and B. of L. F. He is 
a charter member of Ensign Lodge No. 411, 
acting as a member of the Grievance Committee, 
and is at present a delegate to the convention of 
the Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen, to be 
held at Des Moines, Iowa, during the present 
year (1900). He resides in a pretty home in 
the western part of McComb City, and is a 
highly respected citizen of that community. 




'ILLIAM R. WILKINSON is of old 
Virginia stock. His father, William 
Wilkinson, was killed in the civil 
war and his mother is since deceased. 
Our subject's brother, P. B. Wilkinson, is a 
passenger conductor running out of Jackson, 
haying been conductor since 1874. He has an- 
other brother, J. J. Wilkinson, who is a success- 
ful business man at Morristown. 

Our subject began his railroad service as a 
brakeman on the main line of the Illinois Central 
and was promoted to conductor in 1878, having 
served less than one year in the former position. 
Mr. Wilkinson ran between Water Valley and 
Jackson, Miss., up to 1883, after which time he 
went to the narrow gauge road. He worked 
there five or six years and in 1891 came back to 
the main line and remained there up to 1895 
when he came to Paducah as conductor. Our 
subject's present run is a preferred one out of 
Paducah on caboose 98491. He has a remark- 
ably clean record, not having had any accidents 
or injuries. He is also a thorough business man 
and one who is well-liked. 

Mr. Wilkinson married Miss Tebbets. He 
is a member of Division No. 290, O. R. C. and 
is at present Senior Conductor of the Lodge. 
He is also a prominent Mason, being a member 
of the Paducah Lodge No. 127. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



257 




LLEN J. JORGENSON, was born in 
Florence, Indiana. His father, N. 
Jorgenson, was an insurance man, who 
engaged in that business in Henderson. 
Our subject, the trusty and successful dispatcher, 
commenced railroad service at Henderson as op- 
erator, served several years and was next made 
agent. Afterwards he was "trick" dispatcher at 
Earlington, Ky., for eight years, and then came 
to Paducah in the same capacity, serving ten 
years when he was made agent and afterward 
chief dispatcher. He has two train dispatchers, 
W. L. Bennett and J. B. Alvey, also two opera- 
tors, R. Foster and W. O. Rodgers, in the office 
under his charge. 

Mr. Jorgenson married a daughter of Dr. 
G. Davis, and has one child, Susie, a young miss 
at school. Our subject is a Mason, belonging 
to Plain City Lodge No. 449. His home is at 
Paducah. 




.OBERT DAWES, a good natured 
freight conductor on the Louisville di- 
vision of the Illinois Central, is a na- 
tive of Stanford, Kentucky. His 
father, A. Dawes, was a liveryman in Ken- 
tucky, but afterwards moved to Missouri. Our 
subject learned telegraphing and in 1879 entered 
the service of the Missouri Pacific as operator, 
but in 1880 he went to New Mexico as a tele- 
graph operator on the Santa Fe. Soon after he 
came back to the Missouri Pacific as conductor 
and dispatcher, and from 1884 to 1887 he worked 
on the construction through western Kansas and 
Colorado. After the completion of the road he 
secured a place on the Denver & Rio Grande, 
at Pueblo. His next position was at Clarendon, 
Texas, where he spent one year as dispatcher. 
During the next four years he was in the employ 
of the Santa Fe as conductor. After this he 
left the road and engaged in the restaurant bus- 
iness for six months. In 1894 he came to the 
C. O. & S. W., working at Paducah two years 
as conductor. His present run is a preferred 



one between Paducah and Louisville. He has 
never been injured, but he has had varied ex- 
periences. He is considered a thorough railroad 
man. 

In 1884 Mr. Dawes married a lady of West 
Virginia, and they have six children : Ethel, 
Lillian, Bernie, Robert, Morgan and Palmer. 
He resides at Louisville. 



JOHN A. SCOTT, division passenger agent 
for the Illinois Central at Memphis, 
Tenn., was born in that city on Novem- 
ber ist, 1865. He was educated in the 
public schools of his native city, and also took 
a business course at the Robertson Business Col- 
lege there. Mr. Scott began his railroad career 
at Memphis in September 1880, as clerk in the 
office of J. T. Harahan, superintendent of the 
Louisville & Nashville R. R., and was, in 1882, 
assigned to the city ticket office of that road, as 
assistant ticket agent. In 1884 he was promoted 
to city passenger agent, and in 1888 succeeded 
to the city ticket agency for the Louisville & 
Nashville, Illinois Central, and Little Rock & 
Memphis roads. In 1891 he was made district 
passenger agent for the Louisville & Nashville, 
with headquarters at Memphis, and resigned in 
September 1893 to accept the position of general 
agent of the passenger department, at Memphis, 
for the Kansas City, Fort Scott & Memphis R. 
R., and the Kansas City, Memphis & Birming- 
ham R. R. He left the service, of those roads 
to take his present position with the Illinois Cen- 
tral. Mr. Scott's jurisdiction covers the Yazoo 
& Mississippi Valley R. R., and all branches 
between Memphis, Tenn., and Baton Rouge, La. ; 
and the Illinois Central from Paducah, Ky., to 
Cairo. 111., and to Grenada, Miss., including also 
the main line of the I. C. between Fulton and 
Grenada, and reporting to the assistant general 
passenger agent at Louisville, Ky. 

He is an official of splendid executive abil- 
ity, courteous and obliging in all his relations 
with the public, and ever vigilant and ambitious 



258 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



to guard the interests of the I. C. road and pro- 
mote its prosperity, and is justly popular with 
all with whom he is brought in contact. 




,RANK WINTERS, a young freight 
engineer on the Louisville division of 
the Illinois Central, began September 
1888, firing with Engineer Haywood 
between Paducah and Memphis. He was pro- 
moted to engineer in 1895, having run a switch 
engine one year. Our subject ran both north 
and south out of Paducah, when he was given 
his present run on the north end between Padu- 
cah and Central City. He has a fine Brooks en- 
gine of the newest type, and has a good record. 

Mr. Winters was born in Ripley, Ohio. 
His father, a cigar manufacturer, died when our 
subject was quite small. Of the leading social 
orders Mr. Winters is a prominent member. In 
the Masonic bodies he affiliates with Blue Lodge 
No. 449, the Chapter No. 30, and the Command- 
ery No. n, while the Odd Fellows and the Red 
Men claim his allegiance. He is also a member 
of Division No. 225, B. of L. E., of Paducah. 
Although one of the younger engineers he has 
attained a proficiency and interest in his work 
that will advance him as fast as there are open- 
ings at the top for progressive young men. 




ILLIAM SPEAR FORSYTHE, 
a passenger conductor on the Lou- 
isville division of the Illinois Cen- 
tral, is a native of New Concord, 
Ohio, having been born there in December 1859. 
His father was J .V. Forsythe, a tanner by trade, 
who died in 1881. He moved to Kansas and our 
subject was educated there. He left school when 
he was fourteen years of age, working at various 
occupations until at the age of eighteen, when 
he entered the train service of the Missouri Pa- 



cific as brakeman, and was promoted to conduc- 
tor on that road. In 1891 he came to the C. O. 
& S. W. and was given a freight train, and ran 
an extra passenger between Central City and 
Paducah. Our subject's present run is a through 
passenger between Louisville and Fulton. He 
has a fine record. 

Our subject married Miss Brady, of Osa- 
watomie, Kansas, and has two daughters, Helen 
and Ethel. Mr. Forsythe is a member of Mo- 
non Division No. 89, O. R. C., of Louisville ; 
also belongs to Lodge No. 184, K. of P., and the 
I. O. O. F., both of Osawatomie, Kansas. Our 
subject resides at Louisville. 




RANT O. LORD, is a popular conduc- 
tor in the freight service of the Illi- 
nois Central Railroad on the Louisi- 
ana division. He was born in Berks 
county, Pa., on September igth, 1869, and is 
the son of John R. and Mary L. Lord, both na- 
tives of Pennsylvania. 

John R. Lord was for a time employed on 
the Middle division of the Pennsylvania Railroad 
as a clerk, and later as a conductor. He was 
also connected with the Philadelphia & Reading 
road, but in 1881 went to Nebraska where he 
engaged in merchandising and stock buying. He 
remained at that business until removing to 
Hammond, Miss., where he is now living retired. 
Grant O. Lord entered the service of the 
Illinois Central at Hammond, Miss., in 1888, as 
a brakeman on the Louisiana division of the 
road, and in 1890 was promoted to conductor in 
the freight service. He occupied the latter posi- 
tion until 1893, when he resigned to engage in 
the saw-mill business at Hammond, La., but re- 
mained at that work only one year. Returning 
to the service of the I. C. he resumed his former 
position, and has since had a regular run in the 
freight service on the Louisiana division. Dur- 
ing his career with the road, he has been in two 
wrecks, the most serious of which was between 




JAMES M. HOKKINS. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



261 



Gallman and Crystal Springs, Miss., in 1892, 
and another at South Port. In the latter a large 
amount of stock was killed. He was fortunate 
in escaping injury, especially in the first wreck, 
which was a head end collision. 

Mr. Lord was married to Miss Enos, of 
Summit, Miss., and they have a bright daughter, 
Margaret F. 

He affiliates with the Masonic order, and 
is also a member of Division No. 367, O. R. C. 
at McComb City, where he resides in a comfort- 
able home. 



JAMES M. HOSKINS, a prominent en- 
gineer in the freight service on the Lou- 
isiana division of the Illinois Central, 
was born in Brookhaven, Miss., in No- 
vember 1857. His father and grandfather were 
extensive railroad contractors and lumbermen. 
In 1879 the father built, under contract, twenty- 
five miles of the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley R. 
R., from Vicksburg to Big Black River. He 
also built the road from Holly Springs to Mem- 
phis. In 1880 he constructed the Hoskins 
branch, and sold it to the Illinois Central in 1891. 
The Gulf & Ship Island R. R. and the Brook- 
haven branch were built under their supervision. 
Mr. Hoskins Sr. organized the Hoskins Battery, 
during the Civil war, and served during the en- 
tire war, from 1861 to 1865. They were noted 
for bravery, and always found in the thickest of 
the fight. He died in Jackson, Miss., during the 
yellow fever epidemic in 1898, his wife dying 
in 1890. Three of his sons, brothers of our 
subject, attained military distinction during the 
Spanish-American war. Samuel W. was lieu- 
tenant of Company H, First Miss. Vol. ; G. C., a 
West Point man, was major of the Second Miss., 
and W., a lieutenant in the Third Miss. Regt. 
Another, Jones H., was a private in Co. H, 
First Miss. The maternal grandfather of our 
subject, Mr Whitworth, was a very wealthy man, 
a Methodist preacher, and donated a female col- 
lege named after him, in Brookhaven, Miss., to 
the Methodist conference. 



The subject of this sketch began life as a 
bookkeeper for his father in the lumber business, 
who had all the penitentiary labor of the state, 
besides many others, his crew sometimes reach- 
ing 1,500 men. It was his duty also to look 
after the machinery, etc., and in 1891, when he 
entered the service of the Illinois Central, his 
experience at engineering was such that it was 
not necessary for him to spend any time as fire- 
man. He has since been in the regular employ 
of the I. C. company, and has at present a run be- 
tween McComb City and Canton, on engine No. 
723. He has graduated several firemen from his 
engine, among them L. Jenkins, W Graves and 
Leon Ford, all successful engineers. Mr. Hos- 
kins had one very serious head end collision, in 
which Engineer Quinn, of the other engine, and 
a very popular man, lost his life, and our subject 
had a close call. The accident happened on a 
curve, and many theories were advanced as to 
the cause, but Mr. Hoskins and his crew were 
exonerated. Miss Maggie Towns, of Brook- 
haven, Miss., became the wife of Mr. Hoskins, 
. and they have three children living : James, a 
bright boy, at college in Bay St. Louis, Miss. ; 
Sherwood Towns, aged seven ; and Milton La 
Hargue, aged five. Jacob W. died when a small 
child. Mr. Hoskins built a fine residence in 1896, 
constructed from his own designs ; it is finished 
in hard wood, and has all modern conveniences. 
Mr. Hoskins has been connected with the B. of 
L. E. since 1891, having served as chairman of 
the Grievance board, and was also a delegate to 
the Legislative board. He vigorously opposed 
the Cox bill at the last state session. He is a 
member of the Masonic Lodge, No. 241, the 
Knights of Honor and the Knights of Pythias, of 
Brookhaven, and of Elks Lodge No. 268, of Mc- 
Comb City. 

Mr. Hoskins is devoted to manly sports. He 
has a fine driving horse, and a promising colt by 
Tug Wilkes. He also has some fine dogs and 
is very fond of hunting, making frequent trips 
during the season with Dr. Doepp, I. C. surgeon, 
of Chicago, and A. L. Barker, a lumberman of 
Wisconsin. He is an expert shot, and has taken 
several prizes at tournaments. In a state drill 



262 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



at Jackson, he tied for first honors. He is a 
member of the Brookhaven Gun Club, and is 
now one of the twenty charter members organiz- 
ing the McComb City Sportsman's Club, which 
will be incorporated for the purpose of protecting 
game and fish, and enjoying the pleasures 
thereof. Mr. Hoskins is closely identified with 
the interests of McComb City, where he is an 
influential and respected citizen. 



JACOB W. BOONE, a prominent young 
employe of the Illinois Central, is a con- 
ductor in the freight service of the road 
on the Louisiana division. In early life 
Mr. Boone learned the trade of a printer, and 
still retains membership in the Typographical 
Union. Deciding to embark in railroad life, he 
entered the service of the Kansas City, Watkins 
& Gulf R. R. at Lake Charles, La., as a fireman, 
serving thirteen months. He then went to Mc- 
Comb City in 1891, and at once became identi- 
fied with the I. C., working first as fireman and 
later as brakeman on the Louisiana division, 
until 1897. In the latter year he received a 
well merited promotion to conductor, and has 
since held that position. He has been fortunate 
in escaping injury during his service, and has 
never been in a wreck. 

Brookhaven, Miss., is the birthplace of our 
subject, and the date of his birth is August 3rd, 
1871. He is the third son of Rev. Robert J. and 
Tomaesia A. (Stanard) Boone, both of whom 
reside at Summit, Miss., where Mr. Boone Sr. 
has charge of a congregation of the Baptist 
church. 

Mr. and Mrs. Boone Sr. were the parents of 
four sons, viz : Henry, formerly a conductor on 
the I. C. but now with the Kansas City, Fort 
Scott & Memphis road ; Jacob W., our subject ; 
Charles, who although only a young man of 
eighteen years, has reached a degree of promi- 
nence not easily attained at his age. Educated 



in the public schools of Brookhaven, Miss., 
Charles soon won his way into the State Uni- 
versity, and from there went to the Military 
Academy at Annapolis, Md. At the outbreak of 
the Spanish-American war he enlisted in the 
United States Navy, serving through the war 
and received special mention for bravery at the 
battle of Santiago. Having enlisted without the 
consent of his parents, their first knowledge of 
his action being gleaned from the newspaper ac- 
counts of his bravery, they requested and ob- 
tained his discharge from the government, upon 
which he enlisted on a British vessel and went 
to England. Showing his honorable discharge 
from the United States authorities, he was at 
once given a position in the English navy, and 
is now quartermaster on an English ship, on the 
African waters. The fourth son is Oscar, who 
resides with his parents. Rev. and Mrs. Boone 
believed in education, and gave their sons all the 
advantages their circumstances would permit. 
Jacob W. Boone, our subject, belongs to the Ma- 
sonic order, and is a member of the Blue Lodge 
No. 241, of Brookhaven, Miss. He is also a 
member of Lodge No. 204, I. O. O. F. Of the 
railroad social organizations he claims member- 
ship with Division No. 367, O. R. C., Division 
No. 264, B. R. T. of McComb City. Being a 
young man of pleasing manners, and an employe 
noted for carefulness and steady habits, Mr. 
Boone has a bright future before him. 




EGINALD DUVALL, probably the 
youngest man running an engine on 
the Memphis division, was born in 
Lyon county, Ky. His father, F. M. 
Duvall, died in 1888, leaving our subject to sup- 
port his mother and two sisters and a brother. 
He educated his two sisters who are now married 
and living at New York and New Orleans, re- 
spectively. He was himself a great student and 
has a fine collection of standard books which he 
thoroughly studied. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



263 



Mr. Duvall commenced his railroading in 
1888 as caller, which place he retained one year, 
then worked as fireman for F. Humphrey on a 
freight run out of Paducah up to 1893, when he 
went on a passenger engine on which he fired 
twenty months and was then, at the age of twen- 
ty, set up to engineer. His first run as engineer 
was to the St. Charles coal mines, and he ran on 
the north end three years. His present run is a 
through freight between Paducah and Memphis 
on a McQueen engine Xo. 370. He has run 
every style of engine, and has had several nar- 
row escapes from injury. At one time while 
firing on the train known as the " cannon ball " 
they struck cross ties on the track and were 
ditched. August 3, 1895, he had a peculiar ex- 
perience : while coming into the yard he had his 
engine turned completely over through an old 
colored woman who was wandering around the 
yard and in some way stepped on the switch and 
turned it ; fortunately no one was injured. 

Our subject is a member of Division No. 
225, B. of L. E., at Paducah, also belongs to 
Division No. 238, B. of L. F. He owns a home 
at 1234 Jefferson street. 




I ARL F. SWANSON, a popular engineer 
on the Louisville division, began his 
railroad career in 1878 as a bridge car- 
penter, at which he worked until June 
1879. when he was taken sick. September 15, 
following he was re-employed watching an en- 
gine at Covington and in 1882 went to Memphis 
as " hostler " in the round-house remaining in 
that position until 1884, when he began firing 
on engine No. 54. In 1887 he was promoted to 
engineer, first running a switch engine at Mem- 
phis five years. He next ran a freight engine 
between Paducah and Memphis until assigned 
his present run, a preferred run between Pa- 
ducah and Central City. Our subject is one 
of the most faithful men in the service, hav- 
ing never missed a call, always on time and 
never suspended and is considered one of the 



most thorough engineers on the road. He 
is a son of Andrews Swanson and was born in 
Sweden, coming to America in 1877. Our sub- 
ject has a brother who is foreman in the Illinois 
car shops at Paducah, a man of many years' ex- 
perience in railroad construction. 

Mr. Swanson married Miss R. Stokes of 
Memphis. He is a member of Division No. 
225, B. of L. E., and a charter member of the 
B. of L. F. having held all the offices in the lat- 
ter order. He is also a member of the Masonic 
fraternity affiliating with Plain City Lodge No. 
449, and of Ingleside Lodge, I. O. O. F. 

Our subject has made several fast runs for 
which he has received special mention. One in 
particular was in 1894, taking a theatre party 
forty-five miles in fifty-five minutes. He is held 
in high esteem by his superiors and his col- 
leagues. 




A. DRISCOLL, chief clerk in the road- 
master's office at Louisville, was born 
in 1866 at Jeffersonville, Ind. He re- 
ceived his education in the public 
and the parochial schools of that city, and after- 
ward took a course in the Bryant & Stratton 
business college. His father, David Driscoll, 
was for a long time connected with the Penn- 
sylvania system, having charge of the store de- 
partment at Jeffersonville. 

Our subject entered the service of the Penn- 
sylvania company in Superintendent E. W. Me 
Kenna's office and worked for that company thir- 
teen years, under five different superintendents, 
in local freight, transportation and road depart- 
ments. In March 1896, he began working for 
the C. O. & S. W. as chief clerk to General Super- 
intendent F. D. Thompson, and in August 1896 
as accountant in Superintendent W. J. Hara- 
han's office, serving in this capacity two years 
when he was made superintendent's chief clerk. 
Here he continued for six months and was 
afterwards transferred to chief clerk in roadmas- 
ter's office to succeed C. B. Wintersmith, who is 



264 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



now at Memphis. Our subject has a very re- 
sponsible position, as the roadmaster's depart- 
ment often reaches three thousand men, includ- 
ing- section men and carpenters. Besides this 
he has to look after a large number of rails, ties, 
lumber (rough and dressed), gravel, fence, wire, 
posts, brick and tank materials, also attends to 
the general detail of engineer's actions, besides 
the immense amount of correspondence in re- 
gard to labor and materials. Mr. DriscolFs 
position is a bonded one as he often pays a large 
number of men in busy season, and in addition 
prepares leases. He has a stenographer and 
several assistants. Mr. Driscoll belongs to the 
Elks Lodge, No. 362, being instrumental in se- 
curing the charter of the Lodge. He resides 
with his parents at Jeffersonville, Indiana. 




EORGE C. DEAN, a popular engineer 
on the Memphis division of the Illi- 
nois Central began his railroad career 
in 1879 as a brakeman on the East 
Broad Top Railroad. He served as brakeman 
and fireman up to 1887 when he entered the ser- 
vice of the C. B. & Q., working one year in the 
Chicago yards, after which he entered the em- 
ploy of the Illinois Central at Memphis, begin- 
ning as engine cooler. At that time the engineers 
and men were a tough lot and our subject soon 
got to the top of the list being temperate and in- 
dustrious. September 3, 1889 Mr. Dean came to 
Paducah and was given an engine on a gravel 
run, and various other runs, up to the time of 
his promotion to his present preferred run be- 
tween Paducah and Memphis. Our subject's 
present engine is No. 33, a Rogers of the newest 
type, and his fireman is J. G. Sands. 

Our subject has a remarkably good record, 
having had no serious accidents to damage 
property to the extent of fifty dollars and has 
had no serious injury to himself. 

Mr. Dean was born in Clarion county, 
Penn., but his father now resides at Newburn, 
Tenn., whither he removed a number of years 



ago. He has had the misfortune to have two 
brothers killed in the service. Edward, a fire- 
man, a bright young man while firing for En- 
gineer Pat Grogan, in going into Wingo struck 
an open switch and was crushed between the 
baggage car and tender, being instantly killed. 
Mr. Dean's mother received two thousand dol- 
lars from the railroad company. Engineer 
Grogan was severely injured about the head and 
limbs. Our subject's brother Harry was killed 
while braking, falling between the cars. He 
was a bright young man and a favorite with all 
his colleagues. 

Mr. Dean married Miss Rhea and has one 
child, Mabel, a bright miss at school. He is a 
member of Division No. 225, B. of L. E., of 
Paducah, having served as an official of the 
order, also a member of Blue Lodge No. 449, 
A. F. & A. M. and the Knights of Golden Cross 
of Paducah. 

Our subject has made several fast runs and 
received special mention for the same from the 
officials. His record is a creditable one of 
which he may take a pardonable pride. 



DWARD W. CRUTCHFIELD, one of 
the younger engineers of the Central's 
army of operatives, is a native of old 
Kentucky, having first seen the light 
of day in the town of Wingo. His father, J. 
R. Crutchfield, is one of the leading farmers of 
the county in which he resides. At the early age 
of sixteen our subject started out for himself se- 
curing a place as fireman on the Chesapeake, 
Ohio & Southwestern in 1892. After six years 
service on the left side of the cab, the last fifteen 
months in the passenger service, he was ex- 
amined and set up in the operating department 
being assigned to a freight run between Paducah 
and Memphis. Like many railroad men that 
ride at the front end of a train our subject has 
had many narrow escapes, the most notable one, 
perhaps, occurring April 30, 1897, while he was 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



265 



firing in the passenger service, in which the en- 
gine was ditched but all aboard escaped. Mr. 
Crutchfield's marriage at Paducah, to Miss Lucy 
Saunders has been brightened by the arrival of 
one child Kathalen, by name. Their pleasant 
home is at No. 1249 Tremble street, Paducah. 



JJ. TRACEY, engineer on the Amboy 
division of the Illinois Central Railroad, 
O was born in Wapella, 111., January 3, 
1864. He entered the employ of the 
Illinois Central Railroad at the age of fifteen 
as section man, and afterward served as engine 
wiper in round house and shops for two years, 
then went on the road as extra fireman. In 1889 
he was promoted to engineer and was given a 
run from Clinton to Centralia, where he served 
until April 24, 1898, at which time he was trans- 
ferred to his present run on a freight from Clin- 
ton to East St. Louis. During the ten years 
service Mr. Tracey has made a remarkably clean 
record, and stands high in the regard of his em- 
ployers. In 1888, Mr. Tracey was united in 
marriage with Miss Tilly Oberst, to whom have 
been born four children: two daughters, Ella 
May and Sarah are living; one son and one 
daughter, are deceased. Mr. Tracey is a mem- 
ber of the B. of L. E. No. 315. 



O. DANA, master mechanic on Free- 
port and Amboy divisions of the Illi- 
nois Central Railroad, entered the 
service of the I. C. R. R. as fireman 
on the Chicago division in 1860, and was pro- 
moted to engineer in 1864, serving in that position 
on the Chicago division until 1888, and incident- 
ally filled the position of round-house foreman 
and general foreman at the Weldon shops. At 
that time, 1888, he was transferred to the Free- 
port division and ran a locomotive in the con- 



struction service one year, and was then given 
the first service as passenger conductor on the 
new Freeport division where he ran one month, 
when he was promoted to master mechanic at 
Freeport. His territory has been extended un- 
til he now is master mechanic over the Freeport 
and Amboy districts, having under his charge 
four hundred sixty-four miles of track. 

Mr. Dana was born in Cobbleskill, New 
York, in 1841. He was married in 1865 to Miss 
Sarah E. Holland, and has three children : Esther 
G. is supervisor of drawing in the public schools 
of Freeport; Edgar W. was chief clerk in his 
father's office, but is now general foreman in 
the. shops at Council Bluffs ; Bert E. is store- 
keeper for his father at office. Mr. Dana is al- 
derman of the second ward of Freeport, and is 
a member of the Masonic fraternity. 




A. DAVIS, freight conductor of 
the Evansville district of the Illi- 
Q nois Central road, is a man of 
much railroad experience, and 
comes of a railroad family. He is a native of 
Madison, New Hampshire, but at the age of 
three years his parents removed to Boston. His 
father, Augustus Davis, who died at the age of 
thirty-one, was at one time conductor on the Bos- 
ton & Maine road and resided at Reading, Mass. 
Our subject had other relatives who were en- 
gaged in the railroad business, his uncle, John 
Stone, at one time was an old engineer on the 
Boston & Maine and ran the old engine so well 
known in the past around Boston, called "Mys- 
tic." At the age of fourteen years our subject 
began his railroad career as water boy on a pas- 
senger train, and later served in various capaci- 
ties. Later he worked in the Chicago & Alton 
yards at Chicago, from which he was appointed 
general yardmaster of the Chicago & North- 
Western. In 1890 he commenced service for 
the Illinois Central as freight conductor. He 
served until 1898, when he came to the Evans- 



266 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



ville district of the Illinois Central as freight 
conductor, where he is now employed. Mr. 
Davis is an experienced railroad man. He mar- 
ried Miss K. W. Stowe, of Chicago, and resides 
on Second street, Henderson, Ky. He is a mem- 
ber of Division No. 381 O. R. C., of Howell, 
Indiana. 



JESSE D. WILLIAMS, ex-passenger con- 
ductor, Amboy division, Illinois Cen- 
tral Railroad. The father of our sub- 
ject, G. W. Williams, a farmer, died in 
February 1863, while in the service of the n6th 
111. Vol. Inf. The mother, Rhoda J.(Hughey) 
died October 30, 1894, from la grippe, aged six- 
ty-one years, six months. Our subject was born 
in Macon county, 111., January 9, 1852. His ed- 
ucation was received in the schools of Macon 
and Marion counties. In 1867 he entered the 
service of the I. C. R. R. at Centralia, as brake- 
man on a passenger train between Centralia and 
Amboy. He served as brakeman, baggageman 
and freight brakeman for four years, then be 
came a freight conductor in December 187 f, 
and retained that position for twenty-two years. 
He was then promoted to passenger conductor, 
and remained in that position until August 1899, 
when he left the employ of the company and 
removed to a farm near Patoka, 111., where he 
is engaged in farming. 

On the gth of January, 1876, Mr. Williams 
was married to Miss Elizabeth Ashton, of Cen- 
tralia, daughter of James Ashton, a farmer, now 
deceased. Mrs. Williams was born January 14, 
1849. Her union with Mr. Williams has beer. 
blest with four children : Jesse D. Jr., born 
December 10, 1879, is driving delivery wagon 
for Walton Nephews, of Freeport ; Lula J., born 
April 23, 1883, is in the high school of Freeport; 
Bessie May, born September 8, 1889; Pearl D., 
born June 22, 1890. The family attends the 
First Methodist Episcopal church as members. 
Mr. Williams is a member of the K. of P., 
O. of R. C., and is also a Knight Templar. In 
politics he is a Republican. 



JERRY W. HOLLAND is a conductor on 
the Amboy division of the Illinois Cen- 
tral. He entered the service of the com- 
pany in 1893, as brakeman on the Clin- 
ton district of the Amboy division, his first run 
being with Conductor John Clarke. The ef- 
ficiency of our subject was rewarded by promo- 
tion on August 7, 1899, on which date he was 
made a conductor. The parents of our subject 
were Allen and Elizabeth Holland, who were 
both natives of Kentucky, but both are now de- 
ceased. J. W. Holland was born in Fayette 
county, 111., April 18, 1867, and was married in 
1893 to Miss Laura Cruse, who is a daughter 
of Job and Arminta Cruse, natives of Illinois. 
Mr. and Mrs. Holland are the parents of two 
children, a son and a daughter, viz : Bruce 
Tyler and Nellie Marie. 



H. HARWOOD, assistant general 

r freight agent at Evansville, Ind., was 
born in Chicago, January 15, 1863, and 
is a son of Theron D. Harwood, a 
prominent manufacturer. The subject of this 
sketch was educated in the public schools of 
Chicago, and at the age of fourteen entered the 
mercantile business in which he was engaged 
ten years. He commenced railroading in Au- 
gust 1887, on the Chicago, Kansas & Nebraska 
railroad, working on the construction of the road 
to Denver with Resident Engineer Dubois. In 
April 1888, he entered the service of the Illinois 
Central, in Chicago, in the local freight office, 
filling various positions until 1890 when he was 
promoted to rate clerk in the general offices in 
Chicago. In June 1893, he was made contracting 
freight agent in Chicago ; and held this position 
nine months when he became traveling freight 
agent, with his headquarters at Pittsburg, Penn. 
He was afterwards made commercial agent and 
I une i, 1896, was transferred to Cincinnati. 
Ohio. December 20, 1899, he wa promoted to 
assistant general freight agent, at Evansville, 
to succeed J. S. Weitzell who was transferred to 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



267 



Omaha, Neb., with territory extending over the 
Evansville district of the Louisville division. 

Mr. Harwood married a daughter of J. T. 
and Theresa Herring, of Topeka, Kansas, and 
makes his home in Evansville. He is a young, 
bright, hustling railroad man as his rapid pro- 
motions indicate. 




EORGE A. LINCOLN, freight engi- 
neer on the Louisville division, began 
his railroad career in 1869 with the 
New York, New Haven & Hartford 
road, _where he learned the machinist's trade, 
working three years, after which he began fir- 
ing. After a short time here he was offered a 
fine position as fireman, which he accepted, on 
the Peoria division of the Indiana, Bloomington 
& Western Railroad, in which service he was 
promoted to engineer in 1874, remaining with 
that road up to 1879. He then tried to quit 
railroading, running a stationary engine in Mon- 
tana six months, but returned to railroading in 
the service of the Big Four, then the Chicago, 
St. Louis & Indianapolis Railroad, remaining 
one year. After this he came to the Chesapeake, 
Ohio & South-Western as engineer in 1890, run- 
ning between Paducah and Memphis. During 
our subject's thirty years' experience he has 
never received even a scratch, and has been suc- 
cessful in his railroad career. He is of old Con- 
necticut stock. His father, Albert Lincoln, a 
banker, died in 1887. Our subject's people set- 
tled in the United States about the time of the 
landing of the Mayflower, his grandfather be- 
ing a Revolutionary veteran. As a family they 
have all enjoyed superior educational advan- 
tages, and most of the kin are professional men. 
Mr. Lincoln married Miss Batey Fowler and 
has two children, Albert G., who holds a fine 
position with the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, be- 
ing superintendent of circulation. He has the 
credit of making a wonderful increase in the cir- 
culation of that paper, having doubled the pa- 



tronage. The daughter, Miss Edna, is a highly 
accomplished young lady. 

Mr. Lincoln is a member of Division No. 
225, B. of L. E., and was a charter member of 
the Firemen's organization fifteen years. Mr. 
Lincoln is one of the prosperous citizens of the 
little city in which he resides, and he helped im- 
prove it by acquiring a nice home on Broadway. 



JW. DIETRICK, local freight agent at 
Omaha, Nebraska, for the Illinois Cen- 
Q tral Railroad company, was born in 
Cedarville, Stephenson county, Illinois, 
May 20, 1861. His father, William S. Dietrick, 
was a native of Monroe Co., Pa., and was born 
in 1826. He was a farmer through life and died 
September 22, 1897. The father's great-grand- 
father came from Germany ; he was a Protes- 
tant. The mother of our subject, Sarah E. 
(Ohl) Dietrick, was a native of Clinton Co., 
Pa., and is now living in Raymond, Iowa. There 
are four children, namely : J. W., our subject ; 
Charles H., station agent for the I. C. R. R. at 
Carbon, Iowa, is married and has two children : 
Frank B., bookkeeper in First National bank, at 
Waterloo, Iowa, a former employe of the I. C". 
R. R., married ; Cleora B., single, resides at 
home. 

J. W. Dietrick was educated in the common 
schools of Raymond, Iowa. He clerked in a 
store and assisted his father on the farm until 
nearly seventeen years of age, when on Jan. i, 
1878, he entered a telegraph office and learned 
telegraphy. June 15, 1880, he became station 
agent at Epworth, Iowa, for the I. C. R. R., re- 
mained there until March 1881 ; then went to 
Alden, Iowa, as station agent until June 1881, 
thence to Storm Lake, Iowa, as clerk and oper- 
ator; Jan. 1882 was sent to Earlville, Iowa, as 
agent, until Nov. 1883 ; then employed as oper- 
ator and relief agent until April 1884; until Sept. 
1884, was agent at Winthrop, Iowa; then served 
as operator in train dispatcher's office at Water- 



268 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



loo, Iowa, until Dec. 1884; then appointed agent 
at Independence, Iowa, and in Oct. 1887, was 
transferred to Ft. Dodge, Iowa, as agent; in 
Sept. 1888, returned to Waterloo as agent, where 
he remained until April 2., 1894; was then sent 
to Dubuque as local freight agent, and on March 
15, 1898, was appointed train master at Free- 
port, 111., and on Dec. 15, 1899, appointed local 
freight agent at Omaha, Neb. 

Dec. 10, 1885, Mr. Dietrick was united in 
marriage with Miss Minnie, daughter of Dr. M. 
A. Chamberlain, of Winthrop, Iowa. She was 
born April 23, 1865, at Dakota, Minn., and was 
educated at Northfield, Minn. She died Sept. 
6, 1896, at Glendora, Cal., and was buried at 
Independence, Iowa, Sept. 12, 1896. She left 
two children, Eloise May, born August 28, 1890, 
and Marion Elizabeth, born May 8, 1893. Oct. 
26, 1898, Mr. Dietrick was married to Miss 
Lavina E. Jackson, daughter of Ralph E. Jack- 
son, of Dubuque, Iowa. She was bbrn Oct. 30, 
1871. They have one son, Ralph Jackson born 
Aug. 18, 1899. Socially Mr. Dietrick ranks 
high in the Masonic fraternity, being a member 
of Mosaic Lodge No. 125, of Dubuque, la.; 
Dubuque Chapter No. 3, Dubuque, la. ; Siloam 
Commandery No. 3, of Dubuque, la. ; Elkohir 
Temple, Mystic Shrine, Cedar Rapids, la., and 
is also a member of the Protective Order of 
Elks, Dubuque Lodge No. 267, Dubuque, la. 
In politics he votes the Democratic ticket. His 
family attends the Congregational church. 



LEWIS RICHTER is the night foreman 
of the Illinois Central at the Cham- 
paign round-house. He entered the 
service of the company March I3th, 
1876, as messenger at the telegraph office at 
Champaign. In 1878, at the age of seventeen, 
Mr. Richter apprenticed himself in the machine 
shops, and after working there thirteen months 
commenced his work as locomotive fireman, serv- 
ing in that capacity until April 1894. Though 
well qualified for promotion to engineer he was 



prevented from taking such a position on account 
of defective eye-sight. His present situation 
was tendered him on May I, 1895, in which he 
is giving perfect satisfaction. 

Our subject is a resident, and has spent 
most of his life in his native city, Champaign, 
where he was born October 4, 1861. He was 
married October 23, 1887, to Miss Mary Hazen- 
brook, who was born in Champaign December 
9, 1862. They have one child, a promising son, 
Frank. He is a member of Centralia Lodge No. 
37, B. of L. F., of which he was a charter mem- 
ber. 




RANK RICHTER is a conducter in the 
freight service, Champaign district, of 
the Illinois Central. He entered the 
service of the Illinois Central as 
brakeman in 1889, making his first trip with 
Harry Levernway as conductor, on the local. 
He was promoted to conductor December 27, 
1895. William Riqhter, the father of our sub- 
ject, was a faithful employe of the Illinois Cen- 
tral for over twenty-five years, holding the re- 
sponsible position of foreman in the car depart- 
ment. Mr. Richter Sr. retired in 1894. 

Our subject was born at Champaign, 111., 
in 1868, and continues to reside there, owning a 
substantial home. Socially he is connected with 
O. R. C. No. 112, of Centralia. April 29, 1890, 
Mr. Richter married Miss Emma O'Briant, of 
Centralia. They have two sons, Ole and Bertie, 
both attending school. 




'ILLIAM A. CONWELL is one of 
the best known men in the service of 
the Illinois Central, having begun 
as messenger boy at the age of nine 
years at Clinton, Illinois. In 1891, at the age 
of twenty-two years, he took a position as 
brakeman on the Clinton district of the Amboy 
division, filling the position with satisfaction, 
and in August 1898 received a well merited 




EPHRAIM McILWAIN. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



271 



promotion to conductor. He is now in the 
freight service of the Illinois Central, running 
between Clinton and Centralia. 

Our subject was born at Cedar Rapids, la., 
September 27, 1869, and on February 4, 1891, 
was united in marriage to Miss Mary A. Dun- 
ham, of Waynesville, 111. A promising son, 
Monte D., is' the offspring of the union. Mr. 
Conwell is a member of B. of R. T., State Cen- 
ter Lodge No. 41, and is also an honorary mem- 
ber of the Clinton fire department. 



=x^PHRAIM McILWAIN is a native of 
Washington county, Alabama, having 
been born fifty miles north of Mobile. 
He commenced railroading on the M. 
& O. Railroad at Whistler, Ala., in 1859, as a car 
repairer, serving as such for some time and then 
enlisted in the Confederate army, and served 
eighteen months under General Lee, the greater 
part of the time as orderly to General Lee. Dur- 
ing his service he was at -the first and second 
battle of Manasses, Leesburg, Malvern Hill, 
Seven Pines, and around Richmond. He left 
them at Leesburg, Va., when they crossed into 
Maryland, being honorably discharged, as he 
was under age. He then returned to the M. & 
O., as a fireman between Whistler and Mobile, 
but at the end of seven months re-enlisted at 
Mobile in the marine service and was sent to 
Charleston, S. C, and afterward stationed seven 
miles below Richmond as a member of the ma- 
rine corps under Captain Lee, brother of Gen. 
Robert E. Lee. He continued in that service 
and was captured at Sailor's Creek, Va., seven 
days prior to Lee's surrender, and was taken to 
Washington, D. C., landing there the day after 
Lincoln's assassination, and was put in the old 
capitol prison. Then he was sent to the Elmira, 
N. Y., prison, and remained there four months, 
when he was discharged and sent home. He 
came to Jackson, Tenn., and began in the shops 
of the M. & O. as carpenter and continued one 

10 



year, then worked on construction of bridges be- 
tween Humboldt and Jackson, and Was in that de- 
partment about seven months. He was then 
brakeman on the M. & O. six. months and was 
then promoted to baggage and ran baggage cars 
one year, again promoted to freight conductor 
and began running f-eight between Jackson, 
Tenn., and Columbus, Ky. He continued as 
freight and extra passenger conductor twelve 
years, was then brakeman on passenger train on 
the old Mississippi Central, now the Illinois Cen- 
tral, one year. He then went to the New Or- 
leans & North-Eastern railroad as foreman of 
grading between Meridian, Miss., and New Or- 
leans, and continued there about five months, 
then made foreman of -construction train three 
months, and then to the Mississippi Valley road 
near Vicksburg as section foreman for about a 
month, next into the extra repair gang for the 
same road a month, and was then appointed gen- 
eral foreman of raising the track near Vicks- 
burg. He was next on construction train from 
Clarksdale, Miss., to New Orleans, and so con- 
tinued one year and then came to the Illinois 
Central at Jackson, Tenn., and began running 
freight in December 1885, serving in that po- 
sition on the Jackson district four years. At 
the end of that time he was promoted to the pas- 
senger service and has continued in the same to 
the present time, having a run between Jackson, 
Tenn., and Canton and Grenada, Miss. 

Mr. Mcllwain's first marriage united him 
with Miss Cozart, sister of James Cozart, travel- 
ing engineer of the M. & O. Railroad. She died 
in September 1885. To this union was born 
eight children, five of whom died in infancy and 
childhood. Those living are Harry E., a resi- 
dent of Memphis, Tenn., where he is a boiler 
maker and inspector of engines in the shops of 
the Southern railroad ; he is married and has 
three children. Willie Belle married John F. 
Price, foreman in the I. C. shops at Water Val- 
ley, Miss., they have one daughter. Arthur C., 
now in the north. 

In February 1887, our subject was united 
in marriage with Miss Douglas, of Water Val- 
ley, Miss., and unto them have been born three 



272 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



children, viz: Nettie Eva, born December 5, 
1887, died March 2, 1892. Those living are 
Shirley Wiggins, born June 2, 1893, and Eugene 
Franklin, born January 16, 1896. Our subject 
is the owner of fine property at the corner of 
Grand and Highland avenues, in Jackson, Tenn. 
In a railroad career covering more than forty- 
one years, fifteen of which have been spent with 
the I. C., Mr. Mcllwain has been very success- 
ful, never having been seriously injured. He is 
a member of Jackson Division No. 149, O. R. 
C., of Jackson, Tenn. 



JR. HUTCHISON, conductor at Water- 
loo, Iowa, began work for the Illinois 
Q Central company in 1886, as a brake- 
man on the Lyle branch. After work- 
ing there one year, he was transferred to the main 
line as an extra and worked on all parts of the 
Iowa division for a short time, and was then 
promoted to the office of conductor, making his 
first run in this capacity between Waterloo and 
Dubuque. Subsequently he ran east and west 
out of Waterloo, but was soon afterward given 
a regular run on the Lyle branch to which 
he is still devoting his time with the exception 
of an occassional extra trip on a passenger train. 
Mr. Hutchison was born in Boston, Mass., 
a son of J. R. and Ellen Jane Hutchison, who 
moved to Boston from England. Our subject 
came to Iowa, upon leaving the parental roof, 
and located first in Dubuque and worked for 
a while for the Illinois Central company at 
that time. He then went to Minneapolis and 
worked in the yards of the Chicago, Milwaukee 
& St. Paul Railroad for a short time, from there 
went to Austin, and from thence to southern Min- 
nesota and spent a year in the employ of the Chi- 
cago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad in that 
part of the state. Mr. Hutchison next had a run 
between Austin and Minneapolis, but was soon 
promoted to conductor on the same line and was 
thus engaged six years. Subsequently he con- 



ducted a passenger train between Mason City and 
Austin, then from Mason City to Sanborn, and 
when he left this run, he severed his connection 
with the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul company 
and secured a position with the Chicago & North- 
western company as a brakeman at Eagle Grove. 
Soon after, he secured a position with the Bur- 
lington, Cedar Rapids & Northern Railroad, and 
after spending about two months on this line, he 
came to Waterloo and has since found employ- 
ment with the Illinois Central company. Mr. 
Hutchison was married at Independence, Iowa, 
to Miss Anna L. King, a native of Syracuse, N. 
Y., and their wedded life has been blessed by the 
presence of a family of three children whose 
names in the order of their birth are Harry S., 
Richard L. and Madeline Z. Socially our sub- 
ject affiliates with Lodge No. 67, O. R. C. and 
Howland Lodge No. 274, A. O. II W., both of 
Waterloo. He is a thorough railroad man, is 
careful and systematic about his work and 
throughout his career has never received the 
slightest injury from a railroad accident. 




OBERT TAYLOR, engineer on the Illi- 
nois Central Railroad, Amboy division, 
entered the service of the Illinois Cen- 
tral railroad at Waterloo, Iowa, on the 
Iowa division, in the fall of 1885 as a fireman, 
and made his first run under Engineer McNeil. 
In 1887 he was transferred to Clinton and fired 
for Jim Miller, who is still on the road, until 
November 1888, when he was promoted to the 
right side and is running in the Clinton district 
of the Amboy division. Mr. Taylor is a native 
of Toronto, Canada, where he was born in July 
1858. He was married to Miss Louise Kohl, 
of Centralia, in 1898, and has one son. Mr. 
Taylor is socially connected with the B. of L. 
E., Clinton Division No. 315, and the I. Q. O. 
F., Wapaukonica Lodge No. 38, of Toledo, 
Ohio. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



273 




W. DIETRECH entered the service 
of the Illinois Central as an appren- 
tice blacksmith in Centralia, serving 
in that capacity nineteen months, af- 
ter which he worked in the car department, 
thence to the water department at Centralia. 
From the latter place he was transferred to Chi- 
cago as assistant foreman in 1894, serving with 
fidelity for three years. He then came to Clin- 
ton, February 27, 1898, as water foreman of the 
Amboy division, which position he still holds. 
Mr. Dietrech is a native of Centralia, Illinois, 
having been born there on November 17, 1872. 
Socially he is connected with Deer Park Camp, 
No. 41, M. W. A., of LaSalle, Illinois. 




"ILLIAM W. EARNIST, conductor 
on the Illinois Central Railroad, Am- 
boy division, was born in Greene, 
Butler county, Iowa, April 5, 1874. 
He is the son of Abram S. and Maggie L. 
(Northfoss) Earnist, both living. The father, 
who is also a conductor on the Amboy division 
of the I. C. R. R., resides in Freeport. 

William W. Earnist was educated in the 
schools of Iowa, Minnesota, and Nebraska. He 
learned the printing trade in Brainerd, Minn., 
and received fifty cents a week as wages. He 
worked at his trade in South Dakota for one 
year, then went to Greene, Iowa, where he 
served for three months as foreman in a print- 
ing office. In July, 1894, he went to Amboy 
and entered the service of the I. C. R. R. in the 
shops at that place, but after a short time was 
given the position of night caller which he re- 
tained for three months. In the autumn of 1894 
he came to Freeport, where, after clerking for 
the winter in a meat market, in February of the 
following year he re-entered the service of the 
I. C. R. R. this time as a brakeman, making his 
first run February gth. He served in that posi- 
tion until August 31, 1898, when he was pro- 
moted to conductor, which position he now oc- 
cupies. 



July 17, 1897, Mr. Earnist was united in 
marriage with Miss Lena S. Halen of Freeport. 
She was born in Auburn, N. Y., Oct. 28, 1869, 
and came with her parents to Freeport in 1873. 
Mr. Earnist is a Republican in politics, and so- 
cially is a member of the B. of R. T. 




J. McKILLOP, one of the most 
trusted and honorable engineers in 
_ the service of the Illinois Central, 

is a native of St. Thomas, Canada. 
His first experience in railroading was on the 
Canada Southern division of the Michigan Cen- 
tral at St. Thomas, as fireman on the road in the 
freight service in 1884. He continued in this 
position for four years and three months, when 
he was promoted to engineer in the road service 
where he remained until Oct. 16, 1892, when he 
severed his connection with the Michigan Cen- 
tral, came to Chicago, and accepted a position 
on the Illinois Central. His first engine was 
No. 1373, which was in the switch service. His 
next engine was No. 114. It was at this time 
that the switchmen were having their troubles, 
and our subject had many very unpleasant ex- 
periences which tried his courage, but they soon 
found that he was there to run his engine accord- 
ing to orders, regardless of their threats, and 
after several attempts to make him give, in to 
their demands they left him severely alone. 
He continued in the yard service about two 
weeks and was then given engine No. 857, with 
which he made several trips on the road, pulling 
through freight. During the summer of '93 he 
was in the suburban service, beginning May i 
and running until Nov. 15, when he was given 
No. 332 in regular freight service and contin- 
ued until Nov. 4, 1894, and then took engine 
No. 301 which he had for some time. It was at 
this juncture that the big A. W. R. strike began, 
the men going out June 26, 1894, including con- 
ductors, brakemen, and firemen, also a great 
many engineers who were in sympathy. The 
history of this strike is well known. 



274 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



No one man figured therein more promin- 
ently than did our subject. Taking the first 
train from the Randolph St. yards through the 
terminal was an experience he will never forget. 
Many times his life was threatened. On his en- 
gine rode Mr. W. R. Head, together with other 
officials on the train. His crew was a green one, 
and that he did get through was due entirely to 
his own preseverance and undaunted courage. 
At Kensington, rocks were fired at him. After 
the trouble was settled he ran No. 301, with 
exception of five months, until Oct. '98, when he 
took No. 318 and ran her until May 19, 1899. 
On that date, owing to the drunken condition of 
another engineer, he had a head end collision 
with train No. 62, he being on train No. 83, 
which was a very bad accident. Subject was not 
even suspended. 

In March 1895, Mr. McKillop married Car- 
rie Ely of Champaign, by whom he has one 
child, Jennie. He is a member of the B. of L. 
E. No. 10, of Chicago, and also belongs to B. 
of L. F. Charity Lodge at St. Thomas. He is 
a man of considerable means and owns fine 
property in Champaign. Mr. McKillop received 
the first certificate for air brakes issued to a 
freight engineer. 




E. REDUS, a conductor in the 
freight service of the Illinois Cen- 
Q tral, entered the employment of 
the company in 1888 as a fireman, 
serving in that capacity for about seven months. 
He was then appointed switchman, holding that 
position for a term of eighteen months or more, 
after which he was offered a position as brake- 
man on the Central district of the St. Louis divi- 
sion, which he accepted. His faithful services 
were appreciated by the company, and recognized 
by his promotion to conductor on August 29, 
1897, which position he fills with credit to him- 
self and with satisfaction to the company. Mr. 
Redus is identified with Division No. 112 O. R. 
C. with headquarters at Centralia, his native 



city. He was born in the latter place May 3, 
1870. For so young a man he has made great 
progress, and a bright prospect seems to be 
in store for him. 




S. OWEN, engineer on the Amboy 
division, Illinois Central Railroad, has 
L Q spent his entire service in the employ 
of the I. C. R. R., which he entered 
as a fireman on the Amboy division, Clinton dis- 
trict, January 24, 1887, remaining in that posi- 
tion until September 17, 1891, when his services 
were rewarded by promotion to engineer, in 
which capacity he is now running on the Clinton 
district, Amboy division. 

Mr. Owen was born in McLean county, Illi- 
nois, November 6, 1862,. He was married No- 
vember 9, 1892, to Miss Sophie Touve, and has 
one daughter, Bertha Virginia. Mr. Owen is a 
member of the B. of L. E., Clinton Division No. 
315, and also of DeWitt Lodge A. F. & A. M. 
No. 84, Goodbrake Chapter No. 59, and Eminent 
Commandery No. 66, all of Clinton. 




HARLES B. CRAIG, conductor on the 
Illinois Central, Freeport division, was 
born in West Point township, Stephen- 
son county, Illinois, March 28, 1873, 
and is the son of Roswell and Lucinda ( Harring- 
ton) Craig, the father a farmer living in West 
Point township. 

Charles B. Craig received his education in 
the schools of his native town, working on the 
farm in summer and attending school in winter. 
His first business position was that of night clerk 
in a hotel at Sioux City, Iowa, which he filled 
for five years. He entered the service of the 
Sioux City & Northern R. R. in 1889, as engine 
wiper, and at the end of three months he became 
a locomotive fireman on the same road, remain- 
ing in that position eighteen months. He then 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



275 



came to Freeport and accepted a position as 
brakeman on the I. C. R. R. in which capacity he 
remained until October 12, 1898, when he was 
promoted to conductor and is now serving in 
that capacity. Mr. Craig is a member of the 
Presbyterian church, and is a young man of good 
habits and sterling qualities. He is a member 
of the I. O. O. F. and the B. of R. T. His poli- 
tical views are democratic. 




TTO R. MCCLELLAND who is at 

present the oldest man on the list out- 
side of a preferred run, entered the 
service of the Illinois Central as a 
brakeman on the local in 1889, under 
Conductor B. C. Michaels. He was promoted 
to conductor in 1895, an d is now in the freight 
service between Clinton and Centralia. 

Mr. McClelland was born near the city of 
Centralia, Illinois, on August 16, 1869, and is 
a member of Weldon Spring Lodge No. 400, 
O. R. C. of Clinton, and K. P. No. 26, of that 
city. 




ETER A. MUHR, conductor, Illinois 
Central Railroad, Freeport division, 
was born in Freeport, Illinois, Febru- 
ary 3, 1864, and is a son of Matthias 
Hubert and Regina (Wimmer) Muhr. The 
father was a blacksmith, and died in 1889, the 
mother is still living. One, son, William G. 
Muhr, is employed by the I. C. R. R. Co., as a 
switchman in the Freeport yards. 

Peter Muhr received his education in the 
public schools of Freeport, and also in the Sis- 
ter's school of the same city. At the age of thir- 
teen he began doing farm work, in which calling 
he remained for three years. He was employed 
in a glucose factory for a time, and then learned 
the moulder's trade with Mr. Frank Taggart of 
Freeport. In 1890 he began railroading with 
the I, C. R. R., as a brakeman on the Freeport 



division, and continued in that position until 
promoted to conductor in September 1895, where 
he is now serving. June 30, 1898, Mr. Muhr 
was married to Miss Maggie Deimer, of Ackley, 
Iowa. She is a native of Freeport, and was 
born April i, 1875. She was educated in the 
schools of Ackley. They have one son, Roy 
Peter B. Muhr, born April 10, 1899. Mr - Muhr 
has been in several railroad accidents and has 
suffered from fractured limbs, but notwithstand- 
ing this, is a man of splendid physique and fine 
constitution. He is a member of the Catholic 
church. He belongs to the O. R. C., and is in- 
dependent in politics. 



JAMES C. MARTIN, foreman painter at 
the Illinois Central shops at Paducah, 
Kentucky, began to learn the painter's 
trade, October i, 1861, at the age of 
fourteen years. February 24, 1872, he entered 
the employ of Mr. LeGros in the L. & N. shops 
at Louisville. He next went to sign and house 
painting on his own account. In 1880 he entered 
the employ of the Paducah & Elizabethtown 
Railroad as foreman of paint department at 
Elizabethtown, Ky., and in September 1884 came 
to Paducah to take charge of paint department 
of the Newport News & Mississippi Valley 
Railroad, which was absorbed by the I. C. in 
1896. Mr. Martin's crew often numbers from 
twenty-eight to thirty men, all first class coach 
and engine painters. 

Our subject was born in Louisville, Ky., 
November 7, 1847. His father, W. S. Martin, 
died when James was a small lad. That Mr. 
Martin was thrown upon his own resources his 
record wiH show. Our subject is self-educated 
and a self-made .man, highly respected by all 
who know him. Mr. Martin was married to 
Mary E. Shepard, and has two children, W. F., 
cashier in the freight department at Paducah, 
and R. S., holding a responsible position as' 
bookkeeper of a large wholesale grocery house. 



276 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



The family resides in a fine house which was 
built by Mr. Martin on Harrison street, Paducah. 
Our subject has been a member of Ingleside 
Lodge No. 195, I. O. O. F., of Paducah, for 
thirty years, and has filled all the official chairs. 
He also belongs to Friendship Lodge A: O. U. 
W., and is a member of the master car painters' 
association, having attended their national con- 
vention for ten years. Mr. Martin is a very pro- 
gressive and energetic craftsman, and keeps 
abreast of the times in all that pertains to the 
trade of which he is a worthy representative. 
His long term of service with his present em- 
ployers bespeaks the estimate they place on his 
services. 




COWARD LAWLESS, general foreman 
of the Illinois Central machine shops 
at Freeport, 111., is a native of that 
city, his birth having occurred April 
20, 1868. His father, Thomas Lawless, who 
was a native of Ireland, died in Freeport January 
22, 1895, while the mother, whose maiden name 
was Rose Carey, is still a resident of that city. 
Of their five children the following is the record : 
Julia, deceased ; Edward, the subject of this 
sketch; John, a barber of Freeport; Mary, wife 
of Winfield Allen ; Thomas F., a journalist on 
the staff of the Freeport Daily Democrat. 

Edward Lawless received his education in 
St. Mary's parochial school in Freeport, and at 
the age of fourteen began work in the shops of 
the Freeport Machine Company, remaining with 
them until June 25, 1890. At that time he en- 
tered the shops of the Illinois Central at Free- 
port, and in May, less than two years after, was 
advanced to the assistant foremanship of the 
shops, and June i, 1899, became the chief in 
charge of the shops as foreman. His ability as 
a machinist as well as his executive ability and 
skill in managing men under him, recommended 
him for preferment. Mr. Lawless was married 
November 28, 1893, to Miss Nellie Brennan, of 
Freeport. She was born June 24, 1869. They 



are the parents of two children, Edward, born 
November 26, 1894, and Mary, born June 9, 
1898, and died July 22, 1898. Mr. Lawless is 
a member of the Catholic church, St. Mary's 
congregation, and in politics is a lifelong Dem- 
ocrat. He is well liked by those under his 
authority, and stands well in the city where he 
makes his home. 



\ r-v^RANK WARD, conductor on Freeport 
1=^ division, Illinois Central Railroad, was 
J 1 born in Galena, Illinois, November i, 

1867. His father, Patrick Ward, is a 
policeman in Galena. Both parents are living. 
They have three sons : John, a brakeman on 
the I. C. R. R. ; Thomas, an operator on the C. 
& X. W. R. R., and Frank. Our subject was edu- 
cated in the public schools of his native town. 
At the age of twenty-one he entered the service 
of the I. C. R. R., Freeport division, as brake- 
man, and filled the position up to October 1895, 
when he was promoted to conductor. He is a 
worthy young man of steady, sober and indus- 
trious habits, and stands high in the regard of 
his associates. He is a member of the O. R. T. 
In his religious views he is a Catholic, and 
politically a Democrat. 

jtjtjtjtjtjt 



k D. HEGLER is a native of Jackson 
countv, Illinois. He entered service 
on what was termed the Cairo Short 
Line March 2, 1886, as a bridge work- 
man and continued two years. Then he began 
as freight brakeman for Conductor Joe White, 
later on through freight with W. A. Dale be- 
tween DuQuoin and East St. Louis, and so con- 
tinued until March 1890, when he was promoted 
and ran extra until October, when, on account 
of his mother's illness he was off the road fifteen 
months, and on his return took charge of yard 
engine at Pinckneyville, 111., from July 17 to 




AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



277 



Dec. 4, and then went back to braking. Feb. 19, 
1892, he got a regular run between Pinckney- 
ville and Brooklyn. February 1898 he got local 
between Carbondale and Brooklyn and has the 
same now. Mr. Hegler married Miss Julia 
House, and to them have been born four chil- 
dren, Bessie, deceased, Fred, Edna and Bert. 



January 5, 1888, with Miss Jennie Belle, daugh- 
ter of Francis and Caroline (Beidleman) Belle, 
and has four daughters : Myrtle, Bessie, Grace 
and Mazie. Mr. Lawrence is a member of the 
B. of L. E., Clinton Division No. 315. The 
father of Mrs. Lawrence is now stationary en- 
gineer at Metal Wheel Works, Havana, 111. 




A. DEVENY is a conductor in the 
passenger service of the Illinois 
Q Central, his run being on the St. 
Louis division. He entered the 
service in 1878 on the Springfield division as 
brakeman. Coming to Centralia in 1881, and 
accepting a similar position, he was promoted in 
the spring of 1882 to conductor. A record of 
ten years at this branch of the service, together 
with a faithful record, won for him in 1892 his 
present position. Mr. Deveny is an Indianian by 
birth. Socially he is connected with Division 
No. 112, O. R. C., of Centralia. 




JR. LAWRENCE, engineer on the Ha- 
vana line, Illinois Central Railroad, 
Q entered railroad service with the Wa- 
bash R. R., where he was employed 
about six months. He entered the service of the 
I. C. R. R. Sept. 9, '87, as fireman on the Spring- 
field division, but in a short time was transferred 
at his own request to the Havana line. His first 
run was made with Charles Foot, it being Mr. 
Foot's first run as engineer. Mr. Lawrence was 
promoted to engineer January 22, 1891, and has 
since run on the Havana line, with the excep- 
tion of a short time during which he operated 
a switch engine in Clinton yard on the Spring- 
field division, and now has charge of an accom- 
modation freight, engine No. 896. 

Mr. Lawrence was born in Havana, 111., 
August 19, 1862. a son of Jacob and Priscilla 
(Lane) Lawrence. He was united in marriage 



EORGE S. ROUGHT, conductor on 
the St. Louis division of the Illinois 
Central Railroad, is one of its well- 
known employes, having entered the 
service February 22, 1888, as brakeman on a 
suburban passenger train in Chicago. Serving 
for a time as extra passenger brakeman and 
baggageman, he resigned and went to Centralia, 
securing a situation as brakeman in the freight 
service in September 1892. His services were 
recognized by promotion to conductor October 
i, 1899. 

Mr. Rought comes of sturdy English stock, 
having been born in Hull, England, in 1868. He 
was united in marriage on October 24, 1894, to 
a daughter of Conrad Bills, who was for many 
years in the employ of the I. C. as a painter. Mr. 
Bills was one of the best known citizens of Cen- 
tralia, being one of the earliest settlers, and serv- 
ing his city for a number of terms as alderman. 
His death, which occurred May 22, 1891, was 
deeply regretted by his fellow citizens. Socially 
the subject of this sketch is connected with E. 
T. Jeffery Lodge No. 412, B. of R. T., of Cen- 
tralia. 



FJ. DICKE, a young freight engineer 
on the Memphis division of the Illi- 
O nois Central, began his railroad ca- 
reer at the age of nineteen in the 
shops at Paducah, working one year and eight 
months, and then served as fireman until 1893, 
when he was promoted to engineer and assigned 
to engine No. 566 in the freight service, running 



278 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



between Paclucah and Memphis. Our subject 
has a fine record, not having had any accidents 
or injuries. 

Mr. Dicke was born in Paducah, and his 
father was F. J. Dicke, a respected citizen of Pa- 
ducah, who died in 1881. Our subject began to 
earn his own living when quite young, which 
has developed him into a sober and industrious 
man. He is a successful horseman and takes 
great pride in several good roadsters which he 
owns. He also has an interest in the grocery 
firm of Dicke Brothers, one of the largest gro- 
cery houses in Paducah. He is a member of 
Plain City Lodge No. 238, A. F. & A. M., and 
Lodge No. 217, Benevolent and Patriotic Order 
of Elks. Of the railway orders he belongs to 
the B. of L. F., and Division No. 225, B. of L. 
E., of Paducah. 



JOHN JOHNSON, engineer on the Illi- 
nois Central, Amboy division, was born 
in London, England, February 19, 1858. 
He is the son of John and Mary (Lynch) 
Johnson. The latter is now living in Bloom- 
ington, 111. The father, a sailor, came to the 
United States in 1871, and located in Blooming- 
ton, 111., where he died in 1887. They were the 
parents of three children : Our subject ; Wil- 
liam, a carpenter, resides in Bloomington ; Mary, 
married to Edward Colton, who is now de- 
ceased, resides in Bloomington. John Johnson 
was educated in the public schools of London,' 
coming to this country with his parents in 1871. 
At the age of fifteen he began driving a team for 
the Cox Milling Co., of Bloomington, and re- 
mained in their employ two years. In April 
1877 he entered the service of the C. & A. R. R. 
as fireman, and remained in that position until 
1889, when he was promoted to engineer. He 
remained in the service of the C. & A. company 
until the spring of 1896, then entered the ser- 
vice of the I. C. R. R. as engineer, which position 
he still holds and is running on the Amboy div- 
ision. In 1883 he married Miss Bridget Dixon, 



of Bloomington. She died in 1889, leaving three 
children: John, born in 1884; Charles, born in 
1886; Stella, born in 1888. All are attending 
school. Mr. Johnson is a Catholic. Socially 
he is a member of the B. of L. E., and politically 
he is a Democrat. 



JAMES H. CRAIG, former conductor on 
the Illinois Central Railroad, is the son 
of Roswell and Lucinda (Harrington) 
Craig, and was born December 3, 1866, 
on his father's farm in West Point township, 
where his youth was spent, assisting on the farm 
in summer, and attending school in winter. Oc- 
tober 14, 1885, he entered the service of the I. 
C. R. R. at Amboy, 111., as a brakeman, and re- 
mained in that position for three years. He 
then resigned and went to Sioux City, Iowa 
where he served the C. M. & St. P. R. R. 
as brakeman two years, and as conductor one 
year. Being offered a position as conductor on 
the Sioux City Rapid Transit Ry., he accepted, 
and remained with the company until October 
1891. In November of that year he returned to 
Freeport and re-entered the service of the I. C. 
R. R. in December, as a brakeman, and remained 
in that position until 1894, when he went to the 
C. & N. W. R. R. at Eagle Grove, Iowa, as 
brakeman. After eighteen months service with 
that road, he resigned and turned his attention 
to farming for one year. He then went to 
Dubuque, and on the 25th of October, 1898, was 
given employment by the C. & G. N. R. R., and 
remained in that position until July 29, 1899, 
when he received injuries in a derailing switch 
wire which caused him to resign his position. 
Mr. Craig was united in marriage, February 13, 
1893, with Miss Minnie Armagost, by whom he 
has three children : Iva May, born November 
25, 1893; J. Harold, born November 22, 1895; 
Russell R., born April 3, 1899. Mr. Craig is 
a member of the Presbyterian church. Socially 
he is connected with the A. O. U. W. In poli- 
tics he affiliates with the Democratic party. 




ALBERT A. SHARP. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



281 



LBERT A. SHARP, superintendent of 
//_i \ the Vicksburg division of the Yazoo 
/[ \\ & Mississippi Valley R. R., with head- 
quarters at Memphis, Tenn., was born 
near Atlanta, Georgia, February 14, 1844. He 
is a son of William and Mary Hackett Sharp, 
the latter living in Atlanta, at the age of seventy- 
five years, while the former, a contractor by oc- 
cupation, was killed in the army at Olustee, Fla., 
in 1863. Mr. Sharp was educated in the public 
schools of Atlanta, and at the age of sixteen 
enlisted in the Seventh regiment, Georgia Vol- 
unteers, Confederate army, serving there dur- 
ing the entire war, and being wounded three 
times. He was made a lieutenant in 1863, and 
was wounded and captured at the battle of 
Knoxville, and compelled to use crutches for 
thirteen months. He was also wounded at the 
first battle of Bull Run and at the battle of An- 
tietam. He was captured and released on parole, 
and eleven weeks afterward was exchanged. 
Thirty days later he again enlisted, and was de- 
tailed on a division battalion of sharpshooters. 
Before the battle of Knoxville he had been drill- 
master of the sharp-shooters, for two years, and 
holds a medal for proficiency in that branch of 
the service. 

In -February 1866, Mr. Sharp entered the 
service of the Western & Atlantic R. R. (now 
part of the N. C. & St. L.) as a brakeman, be- 
tween Atlanta, Ga., and Chattanooga, Tenn. He 
worked with that company as brakeman and 
baggagemaster until October 1868, when he ac- 
cepted a position as conductor in the freight ser- 
vice of the Edgefield & Kentucky and Evans- 
ville, Henderson & Nashville R. R., between 
Hopkinsville, Ky., and Nashville, Tenn., that 
road being then under the management of John 
B. Brownlovv and General Boyle, of Kentucky. 
He was resigned and accepted service on the 
Louisville & Nashville R. R. as conductor in the 
freight service, at Bowling Green, Ky., but was 
obliged to relinquish the position and go to Flor- 
ida on account of throat trouble. On learning 
of the opening of the Macon & Brunswick R. 
R., he applied to George H. Hazelhurst, presi- 
dent of the road, and was appointed a conductor 



in the passenger service of that road. In 1871 
he was promoted to master of transportation, 
with headquarters at Macon, and in 1872 was 
again obliged to go to Florida for his previous 
ailment. In 1873 ne returned to the service of 
the same road, accepting his former run as con- 
ductor, and serving through the yellow fever 
epidemic of 1876. His health being broken 
down, he was sent by the management . of the 
road to Chicago, as solicitor, where he remained 
two years. He was recalled to Macon, Ga., and 
promoted to the position of general freight and 
passenger agent, which he held until the road 
was built from Macon to Rome, Ga., and pur- 
chased by the East Tennessee, Virginia & Geor- 
gia system. Mr. Ogden then became general 
freight and passenger agent of the entire road, 
and our subject was made master of transporta- 
tion in the same division of which he had been 
general freight and passenger agent. He was 
connected with that road for thirteen years with- 
out losing a day. In October 1882, he was of- 
fered the position of superintendent of construc- 
tion on the Louisville, New Orleans & Texas R. 
R. (now the Y. & M. V. R. R.) and after iW 
completion took charge of the transportation of 
the entire road between Memphis and New Or- 
leans, and with the exception of eight months 
has had continuous charge of that department 
on one or the other divisions of the road. 

On June I4th, 1870, Mr. Sharp was united 
in marriage to Miss Annie Holtzclaw, of Ack- 
worth, Ga., a native of Alabama, born Nov. 2, 
1847. Mr. and Mrs. Sharp have a family of 
four children: Annie, born May 2, 1879, well 
educated and residing at home ; Mary Lou, born 
October 8, 1880, who received a college course 
of four years, also at home ; Earl Hackett, born 
August 23, 1885, attending the high school at 
Rock Hill, S. C., and John Boyd, born Novem- 
ber 7, 1892, who is being educated privately at 
home. Mr. Sharp is a Mason, Knight Templar, 
Knight of Pythias, an Odd Fellow and an Elk. 
He and his family are members of the Baptist 
church, of which they are liberal supporters, and 
active workers. In politics he votes with the 
national Republican party. As an officer of the 



'282 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



Illinois Central, and as a citizen of Memphis, 
Mr. Sharp merits the highest praise of his fel- 
low citizens. 




'ILLIAM H. ASHLEY JR., is a na- 
tive of Carbondale, Illinois. He be- 
gan in 1897 for the C. & E. I as a 
brakeman between St. Elmo, Illi- 
nois and Marion, Illinois, on local freight and 
continued three months, and then went in the 
yards at Marion as switchman for eight months. 
He then became brakeman on the Merchandise 
Express between St. Elmo and Rossville, Illi- 
nois. In August 1898, he came to the Illinois 
Central as brakeman between Carbondale and 
Johnston City on local freight for Alonzo Tem- 
ple. In August 1899, he was promoted to con- 
ductor and is running the Johnston City local. 
Mr. Ashley married Miss Emma Gill, of Marion, 
Illinois. His father, William Ashley, came to 
Carbondale in 1867 as station agent, and held the 
position twenty-seven years, then resigned, re- 
fusing a position as traveling freight agent, and 
he is now interested in banking in that city. 



LEE W. ALBRIGHT, Chief Train Dis- 
patcher of the Illinois Central Railroad 
at Freeport, was born in Canton, 111., 
March 4, 1864. His father, J. B. E. 
Albright, a physician, was born in Berks Co., 
Pa., Aug. 7, 1820, and came to Illinois in 1849 
settling in Canton, where he died Sept. 13, 1886. 
The mother, whose maiden name was Catharine 
Cline, was born in Rockingham Co., Va., Dec. 
29, 1827. She is now living in Freeport. The 
family consisted of five children Emma G. 
died at ten years of age ; R. Belle, living in Free- 
port ; Lewis P. died at the age of four years ; 
Carrie V. died at the age of thirteen ; and L. W., 
our subject. 

Mr. Albright was educated in the public 
schools of Forreston, 111., and at the age of seven- 
teen he learned telegraphy at Forreston, In 



1 88 1 he secured the position of night operator 
at Lee, on the C. B. & Q. R. R. where he re- 
mained a few months then went to Forreston 
as night operator on the I. C. R. R. In 1887 he 
was made train dispatcher at Amboy, 111., but 
after two months, was assigned to Freeport. 
After one year he was sent to Rockford in the 
same capacity and in 1891 was returned to Free- 
port where he has remained to the present date. 
April 28, 1891 Mr. Albright was married to 
Miss Rose Frances Zapf, daughter of Edward 
and Elizabeth Zapf, of Freeport. Mrs. Albright 
was born Sept. 9, 1867 and was educated in the 
Freeport schools. They have three children : 
Donald Z., born Feb. 22, 1895 ; Kenneth C., born 
April 26, 1896; Alfred Lee born July 23, 1899. 
Mr. and Mrs. Albright attend the Presbyterian 
church. Mr. Albright is a member of the 
Masons, Excelsior Lodge, Chapter and Com- 
mandery No. 7, of Freeport, and belongs to the 
Modern Woodmen of America. In politics he 
is a Democrat. 




JAMES LONERGAN, former super- 
visor of the Illinois Central, Twelfth 
Q section, Sixth division, is a native of 
Ireland, and was born in Waterford, 
October 15, 1861. John Lonergan, his father, 
emigrated to America in 1865, and located in 
Eldena, Lee county, Illinois, where he was sec- 
tion man on the I. C. R. R. He died in 1884 
at the age of 84 years. The mother, Mary 
(Tamel) Lonergan, is living in Freeport. Their 
sons, John and George, are section foreman on 
the I. C. R. R., the former at Polo, 111., the lat- 
ter at Rockford. 

P. James Lonergan attended the public 
schools of Eldena, also the Sister's school at 
Dixon, 111. At the age of fifteen he began work 
for the I. C. R. R. at Dixon, barking posts, which 
he did for a few months, then in 1877, began 
working on the section and remained there about 
two and one-half years. He then worked for 
the C. &. N. W. R. R. at Clinton, Iowa, as a 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



283 



stonemason until the fall of 1882, when he went 
to Buffalo, N. Y., and was track walker in the 
Buffalo yards of the L. S. & M. S. R. R. until 
March 1883. In April of that year he was ap- 
pointed section foreman on the I. C. R. R. at 
Woosung, 111., where he remained until Decem- 
ber 1884, when he was transferred to the Free- 
port yards, in which position he remained until 
August 1886, being at that time transferred to 
the C. M. & N. R. R. as track layer and foreman 
of construction. In the fall of 1887 he was ap- 
pointed supervisor of the twelfth section, sixth 
division, with headquarters at Freeport. In 
1900 Mr. Lonergan resigned his position, and 
now owns a grocery store in Freeport. 

October 4, 1893, Mr. Lonergan was married 
to Miss Emma Coyle, daughter of Bernard Coyle, 
of Freeport, an old employe of the I. C. R. R. 
She was born in 1869. They have one child, 
James Leo, born January n, 1895. Mr. Loner- 
gan and wife are members of the Catholic church. 
Mr. Lonergan is independent in his political 
opinions. 



JG.' TAYLOR, passenger engineer on the 
Amboy division of the Illinois Central 
O Railroad, began his experience in rail- 
road work in the shops of the Northern 
R. R. of Canada. He entered the service of the 
I. C. R. R., September I, 1865, as a fireman on 
the Cairo district, and was promoted to engineer 
September I, 1867, running an engine on the 
Cairo district one year, then ran a freight engine 
on what is now the Clinton district, from Cen- 
tralia to Clinton, until 1884, when he was trans- 
fered to passenger engineer and now runs engine 
No. 1301 on the Clinton district, Amboy divi- 
sion. Mr. Taylor's service has been noticeable 
for his carefulness and freedom from accidents. 
He has never had a collision, either front or rear. 
Mr. Taylor was born in Brockville, Ontario, 
Canada, in December 1842. In 1871, he was 
married to Miss Cordwell, by whom he has had 
two children. His son George served for a time 
as machinist in the Clinton shops, had fired an 



engine, and while serving as brakeman was killed 
in an accident at the Wabash crossing, near 
Springfield, in April 1898. The second son, Joe, 
resides with his parents. Mr. Taylor owns a 
pleasant home on E. Main St., Clinton, where he 
resides. He has been a member of the B. of 
L. E. since 1868, and is also a member of Clinton 
Lodge, No. 25, K. of P. 




G. HAWKS, conductor on Illinois 
Central Railroad, Amboy division, 
t Q has spent his entire life in the railroad 
service, and has been peculiarly for- 
tunate in his career. He is the son of George 
W. and Roxana B. (Wood) Hawks. The father 
served in the war of the Rebellion as a private 
in Co. E, 113 111. Vol. Inf., was color bearer, and 
was discharged on account of wounds in Febru- 
ary 1863. He was a minister of the M. E. 
Church, Rock River conference and died Octo- 
ber 30, 1890. The mother died January 5, 
1888. 

H. G. Hawks received a common school 
education in the schools of Palatine, Cook county, 
111., attended school in winter and working on 
the farm summers. January 14, 1878, he entered 
the service of the Racine & Southwestern R. R. 
Co., as a brakeman and remained in the employ 
of that company one year. He then went to the 
C. & N. W R. R. as a brakeman, and after four 
years in that capacity was promoted to conduc- 
tor in 1881. He left the C. & N. W. in 1883, 
and was in the employ of the C. B. & N. R. R., 
as conductor, for two years. He then served 
the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba R. R. four 
years as conductor, after which, in 1889, he en- 
tered the service of the I. C. R. R. and is now 
running on the Amboy division. 

On the 27th of March, 1879, Mr. Hawks 
was married to Miss Ada B. Parker, of Kingston, 
111. who was born in Shelbyville, Indiana, August 
4. 1857. Mrs. Hawks is the mother of two 
daughters: Myrtle, born in Kingston, January 
3, 1881, will graduate from the Freeport high 



284 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



school in 1900; Lulu, born in Chicago, October 
7, 1884, is in the Freeport high school. The 
family attends the First M. E. church. Mr. 
Hawks is a member of the Masonic fraternity, 
the Foresters, and the O. of R. C. He is inde- 
pendent in his political views. 




J 



Jtjtjtjtjtjt 

P. GOSSETT is a conductor on the 
Springfield division of the Illinois Cen- 
Q tral, from Champaign to Clinton, and 
Champaign to Decatur, Havana line. 
He entered the service of the Illinois Central as 
brakeman on the Champaign district in 1868, 
serving in that capacity for two years. He then 
entered the employ of the Indiana, Bloomington 
& Western Railroad as brakeman and was soon 
promoted to conductor. When the latter line 
was acquired by the Illinois Central he retained 
his position. 

Mr. Gossett was born in Highland county, 
Ohio, his parents, Levi and Isabell (Shield) 
Gossett, being natives of the same county. The 
father was a potter by trade. Both the parents 
were members of the M. E. church. They passed 
away the same year, the father dying in Febru- 
ary 1894, in Sedgwick, Kansas, and the mother 
died the following June in Longview, Texas. 

J. P. Gossett was married in 1874 to Miss 
M. L. Carnahan, of Blanchester, Ohio, whose 
parents, John and Margaret (Crosson) Carna- 
han, were natives of the same state, where the 
father was a merchant. The mother died when 
Mrs. Gossett was only five years of age, but her 
father survived until 1885. They were both 
members of the Universalist church, -with which 
denomination Mrs. Gossett is also identified. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Gossett have been born two 
daughters, namely, Cora E., now the wife of 
Earl Sabin, of Champaign, and Pearl, at home. 
Our subject is a member of Division No. i, O. 
R. C., of Chicago, but became identified with the 
order at Peoria, Illinois, in 1871, when in the 
employ of the Indiana, Bloomington & Western 
Railroad, 



ICHAEL DONOVAN is supervisor 
of track, third section, second division 
of the Illinois Central, and it may 
be said of him, that he grew up with 
the company, as he never worked at any other 
occupation, nor with any other railroad company. 
He is a son of John Donovan, who was for thirty- 
five years a faithful employe of the I. C., a con- 
siderable portion of the time as section foreman. 
Michael Donovan was born in a house on the 
I. C. right of way, south of Effingham in 1864, 
and entered the service of the company as a work- 
man under his father in 1878. He was made 
foreman of a fence gang in 1881, and has served 
as foreman of fence, section, or extra gang ever 
since. He was for six years permanently at 
Watson, 111.; as section foreman, and for four 
more years held the same position during the 
winter months, taking charge of an extra gang 
of men during the summer. On October I, 1899, 
he received the well-merited promotion to super- 
visor of track. 

Mr. Donovan is one of the substantial citi- 
zens of Effingham, Illinois, and is unmarried. 




B. WALKER, agent of the Central 
at Patoka, 111., is a native of Jackson, 
Q Ohio, born February 25, 1860. Two 
years later his parents moved to a 
farm near Patoka where Mr. Walker was 
reared, attending the common schools until the 
age of twenty. His father, Joseph Walker, was 
born on Grant's birthday, 1822, near Pittsburg, 
and learned the carpenter's and wheelwright's 
trades. During the Mexican war he worked on 
the wagons that were to transport the munitions 
of war, and again during the Civil war he was 
similarly employed. He married Miss Josephine 
Miles, a native of Webster county, Ohio. Her 
father had been a furnace man in Virginia. 

At the age of twenty Mr. Walker began the 
stud}- of telegraphy and the routine of station 
work at Vernon under the instruction of A. G. 
Lowe. In February 1881, he was appointed 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



285 



agent at Vernon station and remained there until 
transferred to Patoka, June 12, 1886, under the 
superintendency of Mr. J. C. Jacobs, holding 
that assignment to the present time. Mr. Walker 
was first married to Miss Nora Jackson, April 
8, 1885, and of this marriage three children were 
born: Frank, Ross and Ruth. Mrs. Walker 
died May 30, 1893, when Mr. Walker's mother 
came to keep house for him and hold the little 
family together. His second marriage was to 
Miss May Taylor, of Newton, 111., occurring 
August 9, 1899. She is a lady of fine education, 
having presided as principal of the Newton 
schools for several years. The family resides in 
Patoka, where by good management Mr. Walker 
has accumulated a comfortable competency, own- 
ing a farm one mile from Patoka. He is a mem- 
ber of the Masonic fraternity, holding member- 
ship with the Blue lodge at Patoka and the 
Chapter at Centralia. The family attends the 
Methodist church. 



and Cairo. He came to Freeport in 1887, since 
which time he has been running on a passenger 
engine. 

On the nth of February, 1876, Mr. Palmer 
was united in marriage with Miss Hattie Albina 
Sanford, of Jackson, Mich. Her father, O. N. 
Sanford, a painter, died in 1871. Her mother, 
Ann (Carter), died in 1883. Mrs. Palmer was 
born Dec. 2, 18,57, an d was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of Jackson, Mich. Her union with 
our subject has been blessed with five children : 
Frederick A., born March 14, 1878, a machinist 
in the employ of the I. C. R. R., is single and 
living at home; E. S., born May 30, 1881, is at- 
tending the grammar school in Freeport; D. R., 
born July 30, 1885, is a student in the Freeport 
high school ; James J., born Jan. 15, 1887, attend- 
ing school, and Gladys M., born March 10, 1891. 
The family attends the English Lutheran church 
of Freeport. Mr. Palmer is a Mason, a member 
of the I. O. of M. A., and also of the B. of L. E. 
He is a Republican in politics. 



D. PALMER, engineer on the Illinois 
Central Railroad, was born at Jack- 
son, Mich., November 25, 1853. He 
is the son of D. R. Palmer, a black- 
smith by trade, who lived in Jackson, Mich., 
where he died in 1896. The mother, Abigail 
(Wilmouth) Palmer, lives with subject. The 
only daughter, Ada, was the wife of George O. 
Dickinson, and lived in Jackson, Mich., at the 
time of her death in 1895. 

E. D. Palmer was educated in the public 
schools of Jackson, Mich. In 1874 he entered 
the service of the Michigan Central R. R. as a 
fireman, and continued in that position for three 
years and six months, when he was promoted 
to engineer, running a freight engine between 
Jackson and Saginaw, where he remained one 
year, then ran on the Detroit, Milwaukee & 
Grand Haven for two years, after which he en- 
tered the service of the Illinois Central and lo- 
cated in Chicago, running on the Chicago divi- 
sion a short time when he was transferred to 
the Centralia division and ran between Centralia 




HARLES McFERSON, conductor on 
the Amboy division of the Illinois Cen- 
tral Railroad, was born at Tonica, 111., 
March 31, 1871. His father, George 
A. McFerson, is an undertaker residing in Ton- 
ica, 111. His mother, whose maiden name was 
Maria Underbill, died in 1880. Charles Mc- 
Ferson attended the public schools of Tonica, 
after which he served an apprenticeship with his 
father in the undertaking business. He then 
opened an establishment in Ambia, Ind., where 
he followed the business of an undertaker for 
about three months, then sold out, came back 
to Illinois, and accepted a position as brakeman 
on the Amboy division of the I. C. R. R., where 
he remained until the time of his promotion to 
conductor, which occurred in 1898. He removed 
to Freeport in September 1899. Mr. McFerson 
was united in marriage, June 23, 1895, with Miss 
Sophie Westmeyer, of Tonica. She was born 
in Peru, 111., January 16, 1874, but removed to 



286 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



Tonica where she received her education in the 
public schools of that place. Mr. and Mrs. Mc- 
Ferson are members of the M. E. church. Mr. 
McFerson belongs to the Order of Foresters and 
the B. of R. T. He is a Republican in politics. 




N. WAKEFIELD is one of the well 
known conductors in the freight ser- 
L Q vice of the Illinois Central, his run 
being in the Centralia district on the 
St. Louis division. He first entered the service 
of the I. C. in 1888, working in the shops at Du 
Quoin, 111., where he served four years. In 
1892 he began his work as brakeman in the cen- 
tral district, and his efficiency was rewarded by 
promotion to conductor on December 25, 1896. 
He was married December 23, 1892, at DuQuoin, 
111., to Miss Ada Weeks, daughter of William 
and Elizabeth Weeks. Mr. and Mrs. Wakefield 
have one daughter, Irene. Mr. Wakefield was 
born in Macon county, Tenn., July n, 1869. He 
is a member of Division No. 112 O. R. C., of 
Centralia. 



THOMAS N. CRAIG, conductor on the 
Amboy division, Illinois Central Rail- 
road, was born at Waddams Grove, 
111., September 6, 1869. He is the son 
of Roswell Craig, a farmer, and Lucinda (Har- 
rington) Craig, both of whom are living. 

Our subject, during his boyhood, worked on 
the farm in summer and attended school in West 
Point township in winter. When seventeen 
years of age he went to Sioux City, Iowa, and 
was employed as a hotel clerk for five years, then 
went to Chicago and worked in the Demming 
Hotel for three months. He then came to Free- 
port,'and on April 9, 1893, entered the service of 
the I. C. R. R. as a brakeman. August 22, 1894, 
he resigned his position on the road and went 
to Bridgewater, S. Dak., where he remained one 
year engaged in farming. The next year was 



spent in farming at Oakland, Tenn., after which 
he went to Two Harbors, Minn., and secured a 
position as brakeman on the Duluth & Iron 
Range R. R., where he remained seven months, 
then returned to Freeport and re-entered the 
service of the I. C. R. R. as brakeman, contin- 
uing in that position until August 26, 1899, when 
he was promoted to conductor, in which capacity 
he is now employed on the Amboy division. 

On the 22nd day of June, 1897, Mr. Craig 
was married to Miss May Armagost, of Wad- 
dams Grove. She was born June 2, 1876. They 
have one child, Ima, born March 3, 1899. Mr. 
Craig and his estimable wife are members of the 
First Presbyterian church of Freeport. Mr. 
Craig is socially connected with the B. of R. T., 
I. O. O. F., and the Knights of Pythias. In 
politics he is a Democrat. 




L. HOOPER is one of the represent- 
ative conductors on the Centralia dis- 
trict of the Illinois Central, having 
entered the service of that road in 
1884 as brakeman on the local from Centralia to 
Cairo, with Conductor Charles Protz. He was 
for five years in the freight and passenger service 
of the company as brakeman and baggageman, 
and in 1889 received promotion to conductor. 
He has had his present run since 1893. 

The subject of this sketch is a native of 
Richview, 111., having been born there March 22, 
1865, to the union of A. C. and Eliza (Maxey) 
Hooper, natives of Tennessee and Illinois re- 
spectively. The father is deceased, but the 
mother is still living. Mr. Hooper was married 
September 29, 1891, to Miss Gertrude Stebbins, 
a daughter of Rev. George and Sarah ( But- 
trick) Stebbins. Mr. and Mrs. Hooper have 
one son living, Allen Lorrene, who is attending 
school. Socially our subject is a member of 
Division No. 112, O. R. C., of Centralia. He 
is an energetic and progressive citizen of Cen- 
tralia, and owns a substantial home on Hamin 
Boulevard. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



287 




V. HOPKINS, conductor on the 
Illinois Central Railroad, Amboy 
Q division, is a native of Illinois, 
and was born in Morris, July 8, 
1877. His parents, Michael and Ellen (Burke) 
Hopkins, are living in LaSalle, 111. One son, 
James, is a train man in the service of the I. C. 
R. R., at LaSalle. W. V. Hopkins was educated 
in St. Patrick's school of LaSalle. He began 
working as a brick-maker and learned the busi- 
ness in all its branches, and remained at the 
business five years. In October 1897, he en- 
tered the service of the I. C. R. R. as a freight 
brakeman on the Amboy division, and remained 
in that position until August 12, 1899, when he 
was promoted to the position of conductor, 
which he now occupies. Mr. Hopkins is a 
Catholic. He is a Democrat in politics, and is 
connected socially with the B. of R. T. He is a 
young man of energy, and bids fair to rise in 
his chosen calling. 




I HARLES REED, conductor on the Illi- 
nois Central railroad, Amboy division, 
was born October 17, 1876, at Amboy, 
111. Fred Reed, his father, was for- 
merly a conductor on the I. C. R. R., and now re- 
sides in Chicago. His mother, Annie (Ash) 
Reed, is also living. One son, George, is a sten- 
ographer in the office of Mr. Keepers, general 
freight agent at Chicago. 

Our subject, Charles Reed, was educated 
in the public schools of his native town, and at 
the age of sixteen he began driving an oil wagon 
at Amboy, and remained in that position three 
years. In 1895 he entered the service of the I. 
C. R. R. as a brakeman, and was promoted 
October i, 1898, to the position of conductor, 
and is now running in the freight service. On 
the 28th day of March, 1898, Mr. Reed was 
united in marriage with Miss Flora Jeffrey, of 
Freeport. She was born in Manhattan, Kan., 
November 15, 1875, and her education was ac- 
quired in the public schools of Galena, 111. By 



this union Mrs. Reed is the mother of one child, 
Frank G., born February 28, 1899. The fami- 
ly attends the Second Presbyterian church of 
Freeport. Mr. Reed is a member of the B. of 
R. T. His political views are democratic. 




EORGE GRANGER ranks as one of 
the oldest men in the service of the 
Illinois Central, having begun work 
on the road as a fireman on the 
Champaign division in September 1858. He was 
promoted to engineer in 1861 and for many years 
served in the freight service, entering the reg- 
ular passenger service in 1884, in charge of en- 
gine No. 965, and is still identified with that 
branch of the service. 

Mr. Granger was born in Williamson, 
Wayne county, New York, November 5, 1837, 
and is a son of George and Mary Granger, na- 
tives of England, who removed to Michigan 
froni New York state when our subject was 
very young. He attended the schools of his lo- 
cality until sixteen years of age, and remained 
on the farm until he was twenty-one, assisting 
his mother, his father having died when he was 
but seven years old. He left home coming di- 
rect to Champaign, where he arrived June 20, 
1858, and engaged with the Illinois Central the 
following September. 

On May 26, 1870, Mr. Granger was united 
in marriage to Mrs. Sarah C. (Ball) Rowe, who 
was born July 29, 1844, in Ithaca, New York, 
and is a daughter of Charles E. and Harriet H. 
Ball. To our subject and wife were born two 
sons : Guy D. and George E. Socially he is 
a member of Centralia Lodge No. 24, B. of L. 
E., having been initiated before the lodge was 
divided into sections. In politics he is a stal- 
wart Republican. Mrs. Granger is a member of 
the Congregational church. Industrious and 
careful, Mr. Granger is counted as one of the 
substantial citizens of Champaign, and owns a 
fine residence in that citv. 



288 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



JAMES H. PURSLEY, engineer on the 
Clinton division, is a native of the Prai- 
rie State, his birth occurring at Sublette, 
in Lee county, December 19, 1858. He 
was early thrown upon his own resources and at 
the age of twelve went to the country to 
work on a farm. Here he remained three years, 
attending school when he could, employing his 
evenings studying, by which he secured as good 
an education as boys that had better advantages 
in school. At the age of fifteen he was appren- 
ticed to Mr. Edward Lewis to learn the wagon- 
maker's trade, but finding the dust and confine- 
ment detrimental to his health, he was forced to 
discontinue and seek employment again in the 
country. In 1880 he secured a position as brake- 
man on the Illinois Central, and eighteen months 
later was given a place on an engine firing, under 
the jurisdiction of J. B. Edams, then master 
mechanic. When duly qualified he was exam- 
ined and transferred to the right side of an en- 
gine, and has been continually engaged in that 
capacity ever since, having made a good record 
for efficiency and carefulness that holds him 
well in the estimation of the officials of the 
road. 

Mr. Pursley is a son of John and Sophia 
(Frink) Pursley, natives of Binghampton, 
Mass., who emigrated to Illinois when it was a 
comparatively new country. Of their four sons 
and two daughters, all living in Kansas, except 
our subject, and are engaged in farming, whither 
the mother went to make her home after the 
death of her husband. She is now deceased. 

Our subject was married in Amboy, July 
4, 1879, to Miss Alice Petticrew, daughter of 
David and Margaret (Roof) Petticrew, natives 
of Indiana and Ohio, respectively. The father 
is deceased, but the mother is still living. Mr. 
and Mrs. Pursley are the parents of two daugh- 
ters, Carrie and Ethel, graduates of the Amboy 
public schools.' 

Mr. Pursley's residence was at Amboy until 
the redistricting of the road in 1888, when he 
moved with his family to Clinton, his present 
home. He was a member of the Amboy Lodge 
No. 35, B. of L. F., and on his promotion be- 



came a member of Amboy Division No. 72, B. of 
L. E. Mr. Pursley is a man who has made his 
own way since boyhood, and what he is and what 
he has are the result of his own efforts. 




B. WILLARD is an engineer in the 
passenger service, Centralia district, 
L Q of the St. Louis division, of the Illi- 
nois Central. Beginning as a fire- 
man on the Central District in 1876 he was pro- 
moted, in 1880, to engineer in the freight service. 
During his term as fireman he worked on the 
main line, from Centralia to Clinton for two 
years. After serving in the passenger service 
as extra engineer during 1891 and 1892, he was 
given charge of a regular passenger engine in 

1893. 

Our subject is a native of Indiana, but came 
to the city of Salem, 111., at an early age. On 
April 4, 1879, he was united in marriage to Miss 
M. Louise Allen, at Centralia, 111. and to them 
have been born five children, viz : Frederick W., 
James M., Richard A., Brooks and Charles T. 
He is a member of B. of L. E., No. 24 of Cen- 
tralia, 111., also prominent in A. F. & A. M. cir- 
cles. Mr. Willard has a most estimable family 
and a commodious home in that city. 




EORGE E. WAUGH, conductor on 
the Freeport division of the Illinois 
Central Railroad, entered the service 
of the road on the Amboy division as 
freight brakeman, January 29, 1880, making his 
first run with D. Zeek as conductor. He was 
changed to passenger brakeman and baggage- 
master, and in 1886 was promoted to conductor 
on the Amboy division. In 1889 he was trans- 
ferred to Freeport division and located in Chi- 
cago, where he handled trains for the races at 
Washington Park and Hawthorne for four 
years, and also had charge of the Hawthorne 




GEORGE M. BECKER. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



291 



freight yards. In 1894 he came to Freeport as 
conductor on the Freeport division, and in 1896 
took his present run on No. 93 and No. 94, local, 
to Dubuque. 

Mr. Waugh was born in Washington, 
Tazewell county, 111., in 1859, and. is the son of 
J. C. and Susan (Zaners) Waugh, of Wichita, 
Kansas. In 1892 he married Emma Morris, by 
whom he has two children, Bernice and Buda. 
Mr. Waugh is Chief Conductor of the O. of R. 
C., No. 235, of Freeport, and is a member of 
Rinaldo Lodge No. 98, K. of P., of Freeport. 



railroad men. They are George, our subject; 
Henry, section foreman on the I. C. near Kenner, 
La., Joseph, supervisor of tracks on the Wilson 
district, of the I. C., and William A., supervisor 
of tracks for the I. C. between Memphis and 
Dyersburg, Tenn. 

George M. Becker, our subject, married 
Miss Catherine Schneckerberger, and three chil- 
dren have been born to them, viz: William A., 
Walter, and Lena. He resides in Vicksburg, 
Miss., and is a valued citizen. Having risen 
from the ranks to his present responsible position, 
indicates him as an employe of sterling worth 
and an efficient railroad man. 




EORGE M. BECKER, roadmaster of 
the fifteenth division of the Illinois 
Central, entered the service of the 
company as a laborer on the section 
at Kenner, Louisiana, at the age of seven- 
teen. From a laborer he was promoted to sec- 
tion foreman, after four years work in the former 
capacity. As a section foreman he was employed 
six years on the road, and resigned to accept a 
similar position with the Louisville, New Orleans' 
& Texas R. R. He was with the latter road 
when it was absorbed by the Illinois Central, 
and was then appointed supervisor of tracks 
on the Wilson district, which position he held 
two years. He was then transferred to Baton 
Rouge, La., as supervisor of tracks on the New 
Orleans district, remaining on that district four 
years. In June 1897, he was sent to Jackson, 
Miss., as supervisor of tracks and trains of the 
Natchez district, and in August 1900 was pro- 
moted to his present position. Mr. Becker is 
a native of Kenner, Louisiana, where he was 
born on July 29th, 1857, and is the son of 
George and Francis (Armbrtister) Becker, both 
natives of Germany, who emigrated to America 
and settled in the South. Mr. Becker Sr. is one 
of the oldest living employes of the Illinois Cen- 
tral, having been connected with the road for 
over thirty-five years as section foreman, and is 
now living retired at Kenner. In the parental 
family there were four sons, all of whom became 

17 



JOHN J. SHAUGHNESSY, who is an 
engineer on the Illinois Central, was 
born in Amboy, Illinois, April 27, 1869. 
His father, P. H. Shaughnessy, is a na- 
tive of Limerick, Ireland, and came to this 
country when a boy, locating in Montreal, Can- 
ada, where he engaged in farming in that vicin- 
ity for a few years, then came to the United 
States at the age of twenty-five and located in 
Freeport, where he engaged in teaming for a 
number of years. He was employed by the I. C. 
R. R. for about thirty-five years as foreman in 
coal shed, watchman, etc. He now resides in 
Amboy, 111. His wife, Nora (Matthews) 
Shaughnessy, also a native of Limerick, came to 
Freeport when young. She is the mother of 
seven children : Mary is married to John Flan- 
agan, and resides on a farm six miles south of 
Dixon, 111., and has three children ; Anna, wife of 
Thomas Monahan, died in 1897, leaving two 
children ; John J., subject ; William, a railroad 
conductor; Elizabeth died at the age of twenty- 
two; Daniel is a boiler maker in the I. C. shops 
in Chicago; and Frank in school. 

John J. Shaughnessy was educated in the 
public schools of Amboy. In 1887 he entered 
the freight office of the Illinois Central at Amboy 
as a clerk, where he remained four years, then 
began firing on a freight engine on the Amboy 



292 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



division. After four years in this position he 
was promoted to the position of engineer in 
August 1895, and now runs from Freeport to 
Clinton, 111. He has never lost time on account 
of sickness or accident. Mr. Shaughnessy is 
a member of the Catholic church. In politics he 
is a Democrat. Socially he is connected with 
the B. of L. E. 




]. McDONALD, conductor, Amboy 
division, Illinois Central Railroad, 
was born in Johnstown, Pa., April 
4, 1873. His father, John J., a sailor, 
and his mother, Margaret (Balentine), both died 
when our subject was quite young. He received 
his education in the parochial school of the Catho- 
lic church in LaSalle, 111., and began working in 
the glass works at Ottawa, when a boy, remain- 
ing there about eighteen months. He then 
worked for Zimmerman Brothers at the Opera 
House in LaSalle for three years, then spent 
about two years in the parochial house at LaSalle, 
after which he entered the service of the I. C. 
R. R. at Freeport in 1895, as a brakeman, and 
remained in that position until August 3, 1898, 
when he was promoted to his present position of 
conductor. Mr. McDonald is a member of the 
Catholic church. Socially he belongs to the B. 
of R. T. and the O. of R. C. He is independent 
in his political views. 



JAMES H. LEWIS is the well-known con- 
ductor on the "local" in the Centralia 
district of the Illinois Central, with 
which road he became identified in 1881 as 
brakeman, being promoted to conductor in the 
freight service in 1888. He was appointed to 
his present run in 1897, previous to which he 
was on the fast "Manifest" freight for three 
years. 

Mr. Lewis is a native of Allentown, Penn., 
where he was born February 7, 1861, but came 



west to St. Clair county, Illinois, at the age of 
seven years, and since 1875 has been a resident 
of Centralia. The parents of our subject were 
Thomas F. and Eliza J. (Deiter) Lewis, natives 
of Pennsylvania, the former of whom is de- 
ceased, while the latter is now making her home 
in Irvington, 111. On October 13, 1883, James 
H. Lewis was united in marriage with Miss 
Belle R. Fouts, who is a daughter of David and 
Elizabeth (Gudgel) Fouts, of Indiana. To our 
subject and wife have been born four children, 
three daughters and one son, viz : Prue C., 
Mollie F., Hazel, and Benjamin Harrison. The 
family resides in a commodious home on the 
Boulevard. Socially Mr. Lewis is connected 
with " E. T. J." Lodge No. 412, B. of R. T., of 
Centralia. 



DSAAC GOODWIN, conductor on the Am- 
boy division of the Illinois Central Rail- 
road, was born in LaSalle county, 111., 
December 19, 1856. His father, Godfrey 
Goodwin, is a farmer living at Tonica, LaSalle 
county, 111. His mother, prior to her marriage, 
was Miss Julia A. Acker. Isaac Goodwin at- 
tended school at Tonica and worked on his 
father's farm until sixteen years of age. At that 
age he entered the service of the Chicago & 
Paducah Railroad as a brakeman, and remained 
in the service of the company two years. He 
then entered the shops of the Piano Manufactur- 
ing Co., at Piano, 111., where he remained two 
and one-half years, after which he returned to 
railroading and was brakeman on the C. B. 
& Q. about two years. After three years of farm 
life, Mr. Goodwin entered the service of the I. 
C. R. R. as a brakeman, holding the position 
until 1896, when he was appointed conductor 
and remains in that capacity to the present time. 
On November 20, 1895, Mr. Goodwin was 
united in marriage with Miss Mary Allen, of 
Freeport. She was born March 31, 1873, at 
Amboy, where she graduated from the high 
school in 1889. She taught school in Lee 
county for five years. Of this union three chil- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



293 



dren have been born : Mar}-, born September 
23, 1896; Allen, born October 15, 1897; God- 
frey, born February 20, 1899. Mr. Goodwin 
is a Democrat in politics, and a member of the 
B. of R. T. 




USTIN HALL, engineer on Amboy divi- 
sion, Illinois Central Railroad, entered 
the service of the Illinois Central rail- 
road as a fireman on the Springfield 
division, in 1884, was promoted to engineer in 
1892 and commenced running on the extra list 
in the Clinton district. He is now in the freight 
service on the Amboy division, Clinton district, 
and stands first in line of promotion to passen- 
ger engineer. Mr. Hall has been remarkably 
successful in his career as engineer, owing to 
the careful handling of his lever and strict at- 
tention to orders. 

Mr. Hall was born in DeWitt county, Illi- 
nois, June 19, 1858, and was married October 2, 
1876, to Miss Lyda Langford, to whom have been 
born two sons and one daughter, Lawrence H., 
Albert and Ollie. Mr. Hall is a member of the 
B. of L. E., Clinton Division No. 315. 




ICHAEL CURRAN, conductor on the 
Amboy division, Illinois Central Rail- 
road, was born in LaSalle, Illinois. 
April 22, 1870 and is the son of 
David and Ellen (Carroll) Curran, both living 
in LaSalle. His father has been an employe of 
the I. C. R. R. for many years, and his four sons 
are all railroad employes. 

Michael Curran received his education in 
the public schools of LaSalle. At the age of 
seventeen he began his active career as a mail 
carrier to business firms, also acting as messen- 
ger, which occupation he followed for three 
years. May 27, 1890 he entered the service of 
the I. C. R. R.-as a freight brakeman on the Am- 
boy division where he remained until November 




Marion. 



19, 1890. On the 1 8th of December of that same 
year he began switching in the LaSalle yards, 
but after a short time returned to braking on 
the Amboy division. October 15, 1895 he was 
promoted to freight conductor where he served 
for two years, was yardmaster at LaSalle for 
three months, then returned to the position of 
freight conductor which he still retains. Mr. 
Curran is a member of the Catholic church. So- 
cially he is connected with the O. of R. C. In 
his political views he is a Democrat, 

****** 

T. GHENT, engineer at Carbondale, 
111., began his railroad career on the 
Shawneetown & Carbondale Railroad 
as a fireman between Carbondale and 
In 1880, he crossed the cab and for 
two years had charge of the levers. In 1885, he 
began working for the Illinois Central company 
at Carbondale, and for two years was a fireman 
on a freight engine between Centralia and 
Mounds, and then served on a passenger engine 
on the same division two months. His first en- 
gine was No. 234, with " Bill " Platt, engineer, 
and the next was No. 188, on which he served 
under " Hank " McMullen. In the fall of 1887, 
Mr. Ghent was promoted to a seat on the right 
side of the engine, and since that date has at 
different times been employed on nearly all of 
the Illinois Central lines in the southern part of 
Illinois. He began as an engineer on a switch 
engine in the Centralia yards and then for a 
time had charge of an engine between Centralia 
and Cairo. At different times he has been sta- 
tioned at Pinckneyville and ran both ways out 
of that city, but since February 1898, he has been 
stationed at Carbondale and held a position at 
the head of a train between that city and Brook- 
lyn. 

Mr. Ghent was born in Chatham count}-, 
Tenn., not far from the city of Nashville. He 
was married December 4, 1887, at Cairo, 111., 
to Mrs. Lou L. Mahaffey, nee Owen, of Carbon- 
dale, 111., and they have become the parents of 



294 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



two children, Harry and Bulah. By her first 
marriage Mrs. Ghent has one daughter, Edyth 
Mahaffey. Mr. Ghent is one of those fortunate 
ones who always seem to escape unharmed from 
whatever calamity may overtake them. He 
has experienced three head end collisions', two in 
1886 and one on June 5, 1891, but has never 
been injured while at work on the railroad. So- 
cially Mr. Ghent affiliates with Division No. 5 12 
B. of L. E. of East St. Louis. Mrs. Ghent is a 
member of the Eastern Star Lodge at Pinckney- 
ville, 111. 



duty. He is a member of the Order of Foresters, 
and is democratic in his political views. Mr. 
Clancy was married to Miss E. I. Sadler, step- 
daughter of Wm. Rieger, Nov. 21, 1899. 




ANIEL F. CLANCY, brakeman on the 
Amboy division of the Illinois Central 
Railroad, was born in Lena, 111., Janu- 
ary 17, 1878. He is the son of Martin 
and Catherine (Sweeney) Clancy, who now make 
their home in Freeport. The father is a former 
employe of the I. C. R. R. They have reared a 
family of nine children all of whom are living. 
Hannah, married Daniel Marker and resides in 
Freeport; James, a painter by occupation, lives 
in Pearl City ; John, a butcher, resides in Free- 
port; Thomas is a physician residing in Nora, 
111., Mary, wife of Daniel McNeil, resides in 
Belvidere, 111., Martin resides in Freeport and is 
blacksmith ; William makes his home in Freeport 
and is a fireman on the I. C. R. R. ; Daniel F., 
subject of this sketch ; Nora resides in Evans- 
ville, Ind., the wife of Louis Schlauch. 

Daniel F. Clancy was educated in St. Mary's 
parochial school at Freeport. In 1893 he ac- 
cepted a position as call boy for the I. C. R. R. at 
Freeport where he remained two years, was then 
employed in numbering cars in the Freeport yard 
six months, after which he became switch tender 
for about five months, and was switchman six 
months, being then promoted to assistant yard- 
master. In February 1899 he began braking on 
freight trains on the Amboy division in which 
position he still remains. 

Mr. Clancy was born and reared in the 
Catholic faith in which he is now a communicant, 
and which has instilled in him a strong sense of 




rlLLIAM L. MAINE, engineer on the 
Illinois Central Railroad, is a native 
of the Empire State, and was born in 
Broome county, November 22, 1839. 
He is the son of Perry J. and Olive (Miller) 
Maine. The former, a miller by trade, died 
January 4, 1900, at Amboy at the advanced age 
of eighty-five years and two months ; the latter 
died in 1896, aged seventy-four years. 

When our subject was six years of age the 
family moved to Connecticut, and later when he 
was fourteen came west, locating at Amboy, 111. 
Here he completed his education, commenced in 
the district schools of Connecticut. At the age 
of eighteen, he arranged with his father to be 
allowed his time, and went into the coal and de- 
livery business in Amboy, which he followed for 
two years. About this time he became interested 
in the mining business in the Great West, and 
in 1859 started for Pike's Peak, but went as far 
as Kansas and then returned to Amboy, bought 
back his old business and continued in it for three 
years. In 1863 he entered the service of the I. 
C. R. R. as a fireman on the Amboy division. 
At the end of ten months he was given an engine 
in the Amboy yards, where he remained twenty 
months and was then given a regular run as an 
engineer on the Amboy division, January i, 1866. 
From this time until 1871, he ran a freight en- 
gine and was then given a passenger run. Dur- 
ing his long service of thirty-six years Mr. Maine 
has never caused an injury to a passenger or em- 
ploye, a record few can parallel. 

Mr. Maine was united in marriage, June 12, 
1860, to Miss Harriet A. Santee a native of the 
state of Pennsylvania. At the time of their mar- 
riage Mrs. Maine resided in Missouri, and Mr. 
Maine drove 450 miles in going after and return- 
ing home with his wife. Mrs. Maine was born 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



295 



March 3, 1843. By her union with Mr. Maine, 
she is the mother of four living children : Corne- 
lius W. is a farmer living near Amboy; May 
Belle is the wife of Gilbert Finch and resides in 
Amboy ; Anna E. married W. S. Jenkins and re- 
sides in Clebtirne, Texas; Florence V. is still 
at home with her parents. Mr. Maine, with his 
family, attends the Adventist church. He is a 
member of the Masonic fraternity, and also of 
the B. of L. E. Mr. Maine is prominent in rail- 
road circles, having been President of the Free- 
port R. R. Sound Money League in 1896, and 
is also President of the R. R. Employes and Tele- 
graph Operator's League. While in Amboy he 
was alderman for eleven years. Mr. Maine is 
a man of remarkable health and vigorous con- 
stitution, having required the doctor's services 
but once during his entire life. He is a Repub- 
lican in politics. 




W. EAGLESON, engineer at Car- 
bondale, 111., began his railroad 
Q career at the age of sixteen years, 
at East St. Louis, where he 
served as an apprentice for a year and a half in 
the shops of the Cairo Short Line, beginning in 
1879. He then went to Springfield, Ohio, to 
the shops of the Ohio Southern Railroad, fin- 
ished his trade in 1882, and then secured a posi- 
tion as fireman on the Ohio Southern Railroad 
in the passenger and freight service between 
Springfield and Jackson. In the spring of 1884 
he was given a seat on the right side of the en- 
gine, and his first run in the capacity of engineer 
was between Bainbridge and Springfield, and in 
October 1888, he began work for the Northern 
Pacific Railroad between Mandan, N. Dak., and 
Glendive, Montana, and retained that position 
until the spring of 1894. Mr. Eagleson's next 
position was with the Bluff line at St. Louis, 
Mo., and the next between St. Elmo and Marion, 
111., of the Chicago & Eastern Illinois. At the 
last named place he was one of the oldest em- 
ployes on the line, helped build the road, and 



stood at the head of one of its passenger trains 
for two years. Severing his connection with that 
company in 1897, Mr. Eagleson entered the em- 
ploy of the C. & T. Railroad, now a part of the 
Illinois Central system, and located at Murphys- 
boro, 111., and in July of the following year, 
moved to Carbondale to accept his present po- 
sition. His run is on the Johnson City branch, 
is eighteen miles in length, and his engine 
draws the local freight and coal train. 

Mr. Eagleson was born in Chillicothe, O. 
He was married at Washington Court House, 
of that state, to Miss Nettie Howland, a native 
of the same place, and two children, Ruth and 
Helen, have been born to them. Socially our 
subject affiliates with Division No. 512, B. of 
L. E., East St. Louis ; the Masonic fraternity, 
Dickinson Lodge No. 32, of Dickinson, N. Dak., 
and also Columbian Chapter No. n, R. A. M. 
Mr. Eagleson is a man of marked ability, and in 
whatever line of work or business enterprise he 
has ventured, he has met with success. His 
railroad career has been free from serious ac- 
cidents, and from his earnings has built for him- 
self and his family a very comfortable home in 
Carbondale. 



' AMES DARDIS is an engineer in the 
freight service in the Centralia district, 
St. Louis division, of the Illinois Central. 
He entered the service of the I. C. as 
fireman on the St. Louis division in 1891, serving 
first as fireman on a switch engine at DuQuoin, 
111., and later in the same capacity from Centra- 
lia to Mounds. Strict attention to duty was re- 
warded January 25, 1896, by his promotion to 
engineer. 

Mr. Dardis was born in Troy, New York, 
. and his first experience in railroading was ac- 
quired on the Fitchburg Railroad. Leaving the 
employ of the latter company in 1891, he came 
west and at once entered the service of the I. 
C. where he is considered a careful and pains- 
taking employe. He is connected with B. of 
L. E. No. 24, of Centralia, in which city he re- 



296 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



sides with his estimable family. His wife, prior 
to her marriage, was Miss Minnie Burns. They 
have three daughters, Pauline L., Zera M. and 
Freda M. 



JB. ANDRUSS, conductor on the Am- 
boy division, Illinois Central Railroad, 
Q has been in the service for a number 
of years. His grand-parents emi- 
grated to Illinois from Massachusetts at an 
early day. Jay L. Andruss, his father, was a 
farmer through life, and died in 1864. His 
mother, Ellen (Adams) Andruss, is also de- 
ceased. The family consisted of four children : 
Lee, a salesman living in Wheaton, 111. ; William, 
who will be mentioned more at length elsewhere 
in this sketch ; Robert, station agent at Plain- 
field for the E. J. & E. ; and our subject. 

J. B. Andruss was born in Amboy, 111., 
August 16, 1863. His education was acquired 
in the public schools of Binghamton. When 
quite young he worked on a farm for about two 
years, then drove a delivery wagon at Amboy 
for another year. November 25, 1882, he en- 
tered the service of the I. C. R. R. as freight 
brakeman, running between Amboy and Du- 
buque, in which position he remained for eigh- 
teen months. At this time he received an injury 
to his hand and was made passenger brakeman, 
also serving at times as baggage master. In 
December 1885, he was promoted to freight con- 
ductor, which position he retained until 1887, 
when he severed his connection with the I. C. 
R. R., and entered the service of the C. & N. W. 
R. R. at Belle Plaine, Iowa, as freight brake- 
man and switchman, remaining there about three 
months when he was re-instated in the I. C. R. 
R. and promoted to extra passenger conductor 
in 1896, and in 1899 was made passenger con-, 
ductor, running on the Amboy division. On 
the ist of January, 1884, he married Miss Alice 
Binnes, of Amboy. She died in November 1894. 
October 8, 1896, he was married to Miss Carrie 
Benham, of Elgin. Mrs. Andruss was born 
September 7, 1867. She was educated in the 



public schools of Elgin, also taking a course in 
bookkeeping, and was bookkeeper in the service 
of a large publishing company for many years. 
Mr. Andruss is the father of one child, Maud 
E., born April 13, 1885, who is attending the 
public schools of Freeport. Mr. Andruss, with 
his estimable wife, is a member of the First 
Presbyterian church. He is a member of the 
O. R. C. and likewise belongs to the Masonic 
fraternity. In his political views he is a Demo- 
crat. 

William Andruss, brother of our subject, 
was born May 3, 1859. He was educated in 
the public schools of Binghamton, 111. His 
early life was spent on a farm, and at the age of 
twenty-one he entered the service of the I. C. 
R. R. as freight brakeman on the Amboy divi- 
sion where he remained two years, and was then 
sent to Waterloo, Iowa, in the same capacity. 
He was promoted to conductor in 1883, and re- 
mained in the service of the company until June 
1898, when he entered the service of the C. 
G. W. R. R. 

In 1877 ne was united in marriage with 
Miss C. Shew, of Amboy. by whom he has two 
children, Jay and Charles. 




T. CUNNINGHAM is one of the -old 
and well-known engineers in the 
L Q freight service on the St. Louis divi- 
sion of the Illinois Central. He en- 
tered the service of the. I. C. in 1869 as a fireman, 
working on both the Centralia and Wapella dis- 
tricts. In 1873 he was promoted to engineer, 
serving three years. Deciding to embark in 
business, he asked for and obtained a leave of 
absence, and during his first five years in business 
often ran as an " extra." In 1887 ne again be- 
came an extra, and three years after disposed of 
his business and resumed the occupation of a 
regular engineer, thus proving that there is an 
irresistable charm in railroad work. Mr. Cun- 
ningham was born in Marion county, Illinois. 
He is a member of B. of L. E. No. 24, and is 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



297 



president of the Railroad branch of the Y. M. 
C. A. at Centralia. Our subject became a mem- 
ber of the Baptist church in 1876 and was super- 
intendent of the sabbath school for nine years in 




succession. 



HARLES BURGESS is a well-known 
conductor in the employ of the Illinois 
Central. He began as brakeman on 
July 1 6, 1884, and received his promo- 
tion to conductor July 16, 1889. He is at pres- 
ent in the freight service of the Illinois Central, 
having charge of a preferred run from Cham- 
paign to Centralia. 

Our subject is a native of Mattoon, 111. He 
is one of the substantial citizens of Champaign, 
and owns a fine home on the corner of Neil and 
Green streets in that city. Socially Mr. Burgess 
is connected with Division No. 112, O. R. C., 
of Centralia, Illinois. 



telegraphy, and familiarized himself with rail- 
road station work. After six months in the 
apprenticeship he became ticket clerk for the I. 
C. R. R. at Grand Crossing remaining there six 
months, and was then made assistant ticket 
agent at the Twenty-second Street station where 
he remained four years. The next five years 
were spent at Thirty-ninth Street as agent. In 
1891 he was given his present position of ticket 
agent at Freeport. September 14, 1887, Mr. 
Rowley was united in marriage with Miss Susie 
E. Wandell, of Battle Creek, Mich. She was 
born January 21, 1864. By this union Mrs. 
Rowley is the mother of two children, Leon E., 
born August 24, 1888, and Irma May, born 
December 27, 1892. The family are regular at- 
tendants of the First Presbyterian church. Mr. 
Rowley is a member of the Knights of Pythias 
Subordinate and Endowment, and the M. W. A. 
In his political views he is a Republican. 




W. ROWLEY, ticket agent for the 
Illinois Central Railroad at Freeport, 
111., may truly be called a "railroad 
man," having been born at the sta- 
tion where his father resided at that time, 'midst 
the rumble of wheels and the scream of whistles, 
in the town of Loda, 111., November 14, 1864, 
and his whole life has been spent in railroad 
work. His father, O. F. Rowley, who was sta- 
tion agent at Loda for twenty-five years, died in 
1874; his wife, whose maiden name was Phoebe 
L. Wood, is still living in Freeport. Of their 
family of five children, two only are living: 
Belle, wife of C. E. Harwood, whose home is 
in Chicago, and our subject, second and fourth 
in order of birth respectively. Those deceased 
are Orlando ; Elipha, married to E. L. Valen- 
tine, died in 1897; and Frank, who died in 1892. 
H. W. Rowley was educated in the public 
schools of Loda, and at the age of seventeen be- 
gan work for the I. C. R. R. as a student of 




AM HANSON, engineer at Carbondale, 
111., began his railroad career as a 
wiper and helper in the round house 
at Pinckneyville, 111. September 21, 
1891, he secured a position as fireman at that 
place, running between there and East St. Louis 
and also south to Paducah, firing for five years 
under Engineer George Adams. His first reg- 
ular engine was No. 19, and later he used Nos. 
23 and 341. September 9, 1898, Mr. Hanson 
was set up to engineer, working first in the 
Brooklyn yards on a switch engine from* Septem- 
ber 1 1 of that year until February of the follow- 
ing year, and then went to Pinckneyville where 
he had a run between that place and East St. 
Louis, and also south to Brooklyn. April 9, 
1899, he came to Carbondale and for a time ran 
extra out of that city, but now has charge of 
the night switch engine. 

Mr. Hanson was born in Rockwood, 111. In 
1862 he was married at Tamaroa, 111., to Miss 
Nettie Vaughn, of that place, and they have be- 
come the parents of a family of four children. 



298 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



whose names in the order of their birth are as 
follows: Eva, Worth, Ruby and Sam. Social- 
ly Mr. Hanson affiliates with Division No. 217, 
B. of L. E., of Pinckneyville. He has never 
received an injury since he has been on the road, 
has made a marked success as an engineer, and 
is very popular among his fellow workmen. 




1833. 



'ILLIAM L. BEALS, conductor on 
the Illinois Central Railroad, Amboy 
division, is a native of the state of 
Maine, and was born at Leeds, July 
He is the son of George and Elmira 
J. (Luce) Beals. His father, who spent his 
life in tilling the soil, was born March 27, 1804, 
and died November 16, 1883. The mother was 
born October 12, 1809, and died November 4, 
1860. Our subject is the oldest and the last 
survivor of the family of four children. Those 
deceased are: Amos, born May 6, 1835, a fire- 
man of the I. C. R. R., was killed by the explo- 
sion of engine No. 51, at Pana, 111., November 
4, 1864; Emily, born March 8, 1840, died July 
27, 1842; Roscoe L., born July 5, 1847, died 
February 16, 1852. 

William L. Beals received his early educa- 
tion in the schools of Leeds, where his boyhood 
was spent in assisting his father on the farm. 
In 1853, at the age of twenty, he entered the ser- 
vice of the A. R. R. as a watchman, serving 
six months. In 1854, May ist, he came west, 
and at Bloomington, 111., entered the service of 
the I. O. R. R. as a brakeman under George C. 
Newton, conductor, remaining in that position 
about two years, then served as baggageman for 
seven years. At this time he left the railroad 
and engaged in business in Warren, 111., for two 
years, and was also American Express messen- 
ger for several months. He then returned to 
the I. C. R. R. and held the position of freight 
conductor for twelve years, after which time he 
was appointed passenger conductor on the Am- 
boy division where he is serving at the present 
time. In 1863, while in the service, he met with 



a serious accident, and was taken up and carried 
nine miles, supposed to be dead. On the 3ist 
of March, 1862, he was married to Miss Elvira 
M. Wheeler, also a native of Leeds. She is 
the daughter of Abram Wheeler, a farmer, who 
was born May 27, 1800, and died February 12, 
1869. Her mother, who was Mahala Mitchell, 
was born January 23, 1809, and died April 19, 
1899. Mrs. Beals was born January 26, 1835. 
Her union with Mr. Beals has been blest with 
one son, Mirtal S., born July 4, 1871. He was 
educated in the public schools of Freeport and 
the business college at Dixon. For seven years 
he has been stenographer in the office of traffic 
manager of the I. C. R. R. in Chicago. Mr. 
Beals is the last of the forty charter members 
who organized the Conductors' Brotherhood, 
Amboy Division No. i. In Masonic circles he 
has taken the thirty-second degree, and is a mem- 
ber of Blue Lodge No. 278, of Warren, and is 
also a member of the O. R. C. of Freeport. In 
politics he is a Republican. The family attend 
the First Presbyterian church. 



JAMES P. DOOLEY, passenger conductor 
on the Amboy division, was born in Am- 
boy, 111., February 26, 1868. His father, 
James Dooley, formerly in the employ 
of the Illinois Central at Amboy, is now living at 
Dixon. The mother, Katherine (Cramer) 
Dooley, is deceased. They were the parents of 
four children, as follows: James P.; John H., 
mail carrier in San Francisco, was formerly ser- 
geant in the First Regiment, regular infantry, 
and saw service in Cuba, taking part in the 
battle of San Juan Hill. He served eight years 
in the First and Seventeenth regiments, and took 
part in the Indian trouble at Pine Ridge. The 
two remaining members of the family are Nellie 
and Katie, who are still under the parental roof. 
James P. Dooley was educated in the public 
schools of Amboy, and in that city learned the 
tinning trade, where he worked at it for some 
three and a half years. July 21, 1887, he entered 




u 




W ' 

o 

HH 

w 



C/3 

Q 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



301 



the service of the I. C. R. R. as a freight brake- 
man, running on the Amboy division until the 
2ist of November, 1891, when he was promoted 
to freight conductor. This he held until Aug- 
ust 27, 1899, when he was made a regular pas- 
senger conductor on the same division. Mr. 
Dooley is a Catholic by faith, and a Democrat 
in politics. He has for some years been a mem- 
ber of the O. R. C. 




'ILLIAM F. FLUCK is an engineer 
on the Champaign district of the Illi- 
nois Central, and comes of railroad 
stock. His father, Martin Fluck, 
was an engineer on the Chicago division for sev- 
eral years at the time of the war, serving also as 
night foreman at Champaign for a term of ten 
years. He retired on account of ill-health in 
1897, and died in 1898. Our subject entered 
the service of the I. C. in 1879 as a fireman on 
the Champaign division. He was promoted to 
engineer in 1886, and worked in the freight ser- 
vice until August 1899, when he was promoted 
to the passenger service. During his term in 
the freight service, he was for four years on the 
local. Mr. Fluck was born at Champaign, 111., 
October 2, 1860, and was a resident of Chicago 
at the time of the big fire in 1871, but is again 
a citizen of his native city. On April 28, 
1886, Mr. Fluck was married to Miss Jennie 
Miller, who was born February 8, 1865, in 
Taylorsville, Indiana, and is the daughter of 
Joseph B. and Mary J. (DeShay) Miller. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Fluck have been born two 
daughters, Nina Mae, born March 17, 1889, 
who is now attending school and studying music, 
in both of which she is very proficient, and Jessie 
Orilla, who died at the age of three years, one 
month and nine days. Mr. Fluck has one 
brother and five sisters living, viz : Martin J., 
chief clerk in the master mechanic's office of the 
Big Four, in Urbana; Augusta, stenographer in 
the same office ; Amelia, who is the wife of Frank 
H. Moore, an engineer on the Illinois Central ; 



Emma, Dara and Rosa, at home. The mother 
of this family departed this life May 27, 1899, 
the father having preceded her to his final home 
February 12, 1898. Mr. Fluck is a member of 
Division No. 24, B. of L. E. 




S. WEIGEL is a conductor in the 
freight service in the Champaign 
district of the Illinois Central. He 
entered the service of the company 
as a switchman in the Champaign yards in 1889, 
and on May 28, 1891, was made brakeman on 
the Champaign district. Strict attention to duty 
soon won promotion, and on November 12, 1892, 
he was made a conductor, at present having a 
local run from Champaign to Centralia. Mr. 
Weigel was born at Danville, 111., December 6, 
1868, and there received his education, coming 
to Champaign in 1888. June 10, 1891, he was 
married to Miss Emma Lange, of Champaign. 
They have one son, Harold.- Our subject is a 
member of the O. R. C., of Centralia, and B. of 
R. T., of Champaign. 




,ORNELIUS J. SULLIVAN, mechanic 
in the Illinois Central shops at Free- 
port, was born in Clinton, 111., May 
27, 1874. His father, F. Sullivan, a 
former employe of the I. C. R. R., died January 
27, 1896. His mother, Catherine Sullivan, is 
now living at Clinton. They have reared a fam- 
ily of nine children, namely : John, a business 
man in Chicago; Daniel, living in Memphis, 
Tenn., is timber inspector for the I. C. R. R. Co. ; 
Edward, a former employe of the I. C. R. R., 
lives in Clinton ; Mortimer is engaged in busi- 
ness in Chicago; Floy, living in Clinton, is a 
boiler maker for the I. C. R. R. ; Mary, living in 
Clinton ; Cornelius ; Margaret, a dressmaker in 
Clinton ; Honora, also living in Clinton. Corne- 
lius J. Sullivan attended the Clinton schools until 



302 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



the age of nineteen, when he entered the shops of 
the I. C. R. R. at Clinton, where he served an 
apprenticeship of three years. In 1894 he was 
assigned to service in the Burnside shops in Chi- 
cago, as a boiler maker, and remained there until 
October 9, 1898. On the 9th of December, the 
same year, he began work in the shops at Free- 
port, where he still remains. In his religious 
belief Mr. Sullivan is a Catholic, and politically 
he is a Democrat. He is a young man of ster- 
ling qualities, and is energetic to a marked de- 
gree. 



THOMAS A. KYLE, engineer on the Illi- 
nois Central Railroad, Freeport divi- 
sion, was born February i5th, 1849. 
His father, John Kyle, was a ship- 
builder and sailor, and navigated between Eng- 
land and the United States. He died at an 
early age. His wife, Georgina (Boland) Kyle, 
is still living in England. 

Our subject was educated in the schools of 
England. He began life as a sailor, sailing be- 
tween Liverpool and the United States, also mak- 
ing trips to the West Indies and South America. 
At the age of seventeen he emigrated to the 
United States, remained in New York City for 
about a year, then came west and located in 
Whitesicle county, 111., where he worked on a 
farm for three years. At this time he went to 
Aurora and entered the service of the C. B. & 
Q. R. R. as fireman, and at the end of three years 
and six months, in 1873, was promoted to en- 
gineer, in which capacity he remained until Feb- 
ruary, 1888. He then left the employ of the 
C. B. & Q. R. R. and in September of that year 
entered the service of the I. C. R. R., and came to 
Freeport and worked until January 1889, when 
he abandoned railroading for a year, during 
which time he was engaged in the dray and ex- 
press business in Aurora. Then entering the 
service of the B. & O. R. R. as engineer, he re- 
mained with them one year and seven months, 
then took leave of absence and came back to his 
old position with the I, C- R. R., which he still 



retains. Mr. Kyle was married on the 22nd of 
December, 1870, to Miss Mary B. Elliott, of 
Kewanee, 111. Mrs. Kyle was born March 7, 
1853. As a result of this union they have four 
children: Walter E., born March 8, 1871, is an 
engineer in the service of the I. C. R. R., and re- 
sides with his parents ; Ralph H., born Sept. 8, 
1874, is a fireman on a passenger train on the I. 
C. R. R. ; Grace, born November 30, 1879, was 
educated in the schools of Aurora, and is 
a graduate of the Harlowe Business College of 
Freeport; Gertrude, born October 9, 1882, at- 
tended the public schools of Aurora. Mr. Kyle 
is liberal in his religious views. Socially he is 
a Royal Arch Mason, and belongs to the B. of 
L. E., and O. of E. S. He is a Republican in 
politics. 




xOBERT PETRIE, engineer, Illinois 
Central Railroad, Freeport division, is 
__ _ a native of Herkimer, N. Y., where he 
was born January 15, 1853. His 
father, Julius E. Petrie, who was an employe of 
the C. B. & Q. R. R., died July 4, 1872. His 
mother, formerly Mary Keating, died in 1877. 
Our subject was the oldest of four children, 
having one brother and two sisters, as follows : 
Edwin, an employe of the Santa Fe R. R. in 
Arizona; Nettie, married to Mr. Blanchard, re- 
sides in Aurora, 111. ; Annie, wife of Mr. M. 
O'Mailia, lives in Knightstowri, Ind. 

Robert Petrie attended school in Aurora, 
to which place the family emigrated in 1857. 
At the age of fifteen he began working in a 
brickyard, but after a short time, August 12, 
1868, entered the service of the C. B. & Q. R. R. 
as an engine wiper at Aurora, and served in 
that position until September i, 1870, when he 
began firing on an engine. January n, 1877, 
he was promoted to the position of engineer and 
remained with the said company until .the 28th 
day of February, 1888. August 23, 1888, he 
entered the service of the I. C. R. R. at Freeport, 
and was assigned a freight run from Freeport 
to Chicago, and afterwards was given a run be- 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



303 



tween Chicago and Dubuque. On July i, 1899, 
he was assigned to a passenger run between 
Freeport and Dodgeville, Wis., which position 
he still retains. 

On the 22nd day of July, 1879, Mr. Petrie 
was married to Miss Sarah A. Cunningham, of 
Aurora, 111., who was born Nov. 17, 1857. By 
her union with Mr. Petrie she is the mother of 
nine children: Katherine A., born May 8, 1880; 
is a milliner and resides with her parents ; Joseph 
R., born Dec. 8, 1881, is employed in the I. C. 
R. R. shops at Freeport; Lillian N., born Dec. 
26, 1883, and Robert E., born March 6, 1885, 
are both attending the Freeport schools ; Annie 
N. E., born Nov. 26, 1887; Harry, born Aug. 23, 
1889; Eddie, born Dec. 4, 1891; John, born 
March 31, 1895; Lois, deceased, born March 8, 
1899. Mr. Petrie is socially connected with the 
B. of L. E. and the A. O. tJ. W. In politics he 
affiliates with the Republican party. 





G. SPENCE, is an engineer in the 
freight service of the St. Louis 
Q division of the Illinois Central. 
He entered the service of the com- 
pany on January 18, 1887, as fireman on the old 
switch engine "One Spot," with Bob Jennings as 
engineer. His first trip as fireman was on en- 
gine No. 232, F. P. Morse, engineer, after which 
he was given a permanent position as fireman on 
No. 235, with W. G. Welden, now traveling en- 
gineer of the St. Louis division of the I. C. He 
was promoted to engineer in October 1889, tak- 
ing charge of No. 235, the same engine on which 
he had done most of his firing. 

Mr. Spence, who is a native of Indiana 
county, Penn., was married to Miss Mildred 
Bicknell, April 23, 1890. She is a daughter of 
Samuel G. and Fanny Bicknell. The father was 
an engineer for about thirty-eight years, most of 
the time on the I. C., and is now retired. Mr. 
Spence owns a comfortable home on South Elm 
street, in Centralia. Socially he is connected 
with B. of L. E. No. 24, of that city. 



EORGE W. FARNUM, conductor on 
Freeport division of the Illinois Cen- 
tral, residing at Madison, Wis., was 
born in Pottsville, Pa., July 31, 1856. 
His parents removed to Freeport while he was 
young and his education was received in the pub- 
lic schools of that city. During school days he 
worked in summer in a brickyard and attended 
school in winter. He worked in a machine shop 
at Freeport for two years, then worked a few 
months for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul 
on the section. December 6, 1874, he entered 
the service of the I. C. R. R. as assistant in freight 
office where he remained until July 4, 1875, when 
he began working in the yards as switchman, 
remaining in that position until 1886; then went 
on gravel train as conductor during the summer 
of that year. In November 1886 he took a regu- 
lar freight train on the road between Amboy 
and Dubuque, running until June 1887, when he 
was transferred to the construction train on the 
Madison line. On the 2ist of December, 1887, 
he went back on the main line running a freight 
until February 27, 1888, then took construction 
work again, this time between Freeport and Chi- 
cago, until August 1888, then ran a regular 
freight between Freeport and Chicago until No- 
vember 6, 1888, and from that time until June 
1 8, 1891, took a freight run between Madison 
and Freeport. At that time he was given the 
milk run from Freeport to Chicago which he 
retained up to March 15, 1892, then took the 
Dodgeville passenger run for two months, since 
which time he has been on a passenger train 
running between Freeport and Madison. Dur- 
ing these twenty-five years of service Mr. Farnum 
has met with no accidents on the road, has never 
been suspended nor even reprimanded, has never 
missed a pay nor has he ever laid off four weeks. 
On the 26th of October, 1881, Mr. Farnuin 
was united in marriage with Miss Josephine Sul- 
livan, of Lena, 111. They have six children 
Agnes, Isabella, Clement, George, Mark, and 
Regina. Mr. Farnum is a member of the Catho- 
lic church. Socially he belongs to the O. of R. 
C., K. of P., and the M, W, of A., and political- 
ly is a Democrat, 



304 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



JOHN A. ABRELL, conductor on the Am- 
boy division of the Illinois Central Rail- 
road, first entered the employ of the Illi- 
nois Central Railroad as switchman at 
Pana, 111., July 16, 1891, and after two years in 
that capacity he was made baggageman on the 
Diamond Special from Chicago to St. Louis. He 
then began braking on the Clinton district of 
the Amboy division, and on the 29th of Decem- 
ber, 1896, was promoted to conductor. 

Mr. Abrell was born March 24, 1872, at 
Osage Mission, Kansas, and was married to Miss 
Laura Jones, of Salem, 111., October 1898. They 
have one son, Donald. He is a member of 
State Center Lodge No. 400, O. R. C, and is 
likewise connected with the Masonic order. 




,RVILLE W. BROWN, station agent 
at Centralia, is a native of Irvington, 
Illinois, born February 20, 1869. He 
began railroad work as operator at 
Irvington in 1886, and when competent to man- 
age a station served as extra operator and station 
agent at various points along the line of the Cen- 
tralia district of the Chicago division until 1888, 
when he was appointed to serve at Dubois from 
which place he was transferred to Anna in 1892. 
Three years later he was transferred to DuQuoin, 
and to Centralia in August 1899, and placed in 
charge of freight and passenger business. 

The father of our subject, W. H. Brown, 
is a native of Princeton, New Jersey, and, learn- 
ing the carpenter's trade, secured employment 
in the bridge and building department of the Cen- 
tral for whom he worked many years. He was 
also in the employ of the Louisville & Nashville 
for a time and also the Montgomery & Prattville 
road. He is now living in well earned retire- 
ment at Irvington, having passed his allotted 
three score and ten. His wife, a native of Ports- 
mouth, Ohio, has passed the three score mile- 
stone of life. 

Mr. Brown was married February 23, 1890, 
to Miss Minnie E. Strauss, to whom four chil- 



dren have been born. The first died in infancy 
unnamed, Delos H., Orin O., and Zula May. 

Mr. Brown has achieved what he is and has 
solely by his own efforts, and by his close at- 
tention to the duties of his office has merited the 
confidence of his employers. He is a member of 
Hiawatha Lodge No. 291, I. O. O. F., also 
member of Anna Encampment No. 69, both of 
Anna, 111., and member of Centralia Lodge No. 
201, A. F. & A. M. 



NDREW S. HART, Illinois Central 
_ Railroad conductor, on the Freeport 

/[ ]\ division, was born in Crawford coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania, March 14, 1854. 
His father, Amos H. Hart, was a farmer, 
and died in 1877, aged forty-eight years. His 
mother, Cornelia W. (Foster) Hart is now liv- 
ing in Allegan county, Mich., at the age of six- 
ty-nine years. The family consists of three chil- 
dren : Andrew S., our subject, George A., a con- 
ductor on the I. C. R. R., resides in Chicago; 
Mary C. married Frank A. Allen, a train bag- 
gageman on the I. C. R. R., and resides in Chi- 
cago. The family moved from Pennsylvania to 
Plainwell, Mich., in 1869. Our subject attended 
school in Edinboro and Plainwell during the win- 
ter months, and in summer worked on his 
father's farm. January 3, 1870, he entered the 
service of the G. R. & I. R. R. as freight brake- 
man between Kalamazoo and Big Rapids, re- 
maining in that position nine months. He 
served as brakeman on a passenger train four 
months, and as baggageman one year, and then 
at the age of nineteen, was appointed freight 
conductor, being the youngest conductor, so far 
as statistics indicate, that was ever given a posi- 
tion of so much importance. On the i6th of 
June, 1879, he left the service of the railroad, 
and worked on a farm a shor-t time. July 29, 
1875 he entered the service of the I. C. R R. as 
a switchman at Chicago; in 1879 went to firing 
in the general service; in May 1882 took the posi- 
tion of freight conductor on the Chicago division ; 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



305 



January i, 1886, was appointed trainmaster of 
the Rantoul division with headquarters at Ran- 
toul, 111., where he remained until May i, 1888, 
when he was employed in various capacities un- 
til August 1888, when he was transferred to the 
C. M. & N., and was made a passenger conduc- 
tor, running between Chicago and Freeport, 
afterwards running to Dubuque, Iowa. In 1897, 
on ac'count of failing health, he temporarily re- 
linquished active service and went to Arizona 
for the benefit of his health. At the end of seven 
months he returned partially restored, and was 
given his former run, but found the work was 
too exacting and in June 1898, was given a pas- 
senger run between Freeport, 111., and Dodge- 
ville, Wis., which he still retains. August 18, 
1874, Mr. Hart was united in marriage with 
Miss Mary E. Kimball of Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Mrs. Hart was born Feb. 19, 1855. Her union 
with Mr. Hart was blessed with two children : 
Herbert E., born Aug. 8, 1876, is a fireman in 
the I.C. R. R. yards at Freeport ; Harry E., born 
Sept. 9, 1878, is bookkeeper for the DeMund 
Lumber Co., of Phoenix, Ari. March 15, 1899, 
Mr. Hart married Miss Elizabeth R. Allen, of 
Manchester, Iowa. She was born June 25, 1858. 
Mr. Hart is a member of Apollo Commandery 
No. i of Chicago, K. of P. No. 219 of Chicago, 
and likewise belongs to the O. of R C., Chicago 
No. i. In his religious views he is a Methodist. 
He is a Republican in politics. 




ENRY A. BALL, engineer on Clinton 
district, Amboy division of the Illinois 
Central Railroad, became identified 
with the Illinois Central Railroad Aug- 
ust 10, 1888, in the position of fireman on the 
Clinton district, where he remained until Feb- 
ruary n, 1892, at which time he was promoted 
to the right side, and took a regular run the fol- 
lowing December, being assigned to engine No. 
511. He is now in the freight service between 
Clinton and Centralia, and has been on his pres- 



ent engine, No. 445, three years. He has been 
very lucky, as well as capable in his experience, 
having never made out a personal injury report 
while in service. 

Mr. Ball was born May 12, 1855, in Canton, 
Ohio, within two blocks of the place where Maj. 
McKinley resided at the time of his election to 
the presidency. On the I2th of May, 1875, Mr. 
Ball was married to Miss Frances Braucher, and 
has one son and one daughter. He is a mem- 
ber of the B. of L. E., No. 315, and is likewise 
connected with Plantagenet Lodge No. 25, K. 
of P., of Clinton. 



M 



D. HOWARD, general foreman for 
the Illinois Central at Champaign, 
HI- is an honored employe of the road. 
He was born in the village of LeRoy, 
McLean county, 111., June 26, 1859. After com- 
pleting the course of study in the public schools 
of that town he entered the University of Illinois 
at Champaign, taking a three years' course in 
mechanical engineering. It was while a student 
at the university in 1880, that our subject first 
entered the service of the I. C. in the shops at 
Champaign. After working some months he 
returned to school, leaving again to accept a 
position as assistant chief civil engineer on the 
Fort Scott & Wichita R. R. He served in this 
capacity for nine months during which period 
over one hundred miles of the road were located 
and laid out. The road changing hands, our sub- 
ject returned to the employ of the I. C. as fireman 
under R. D. Davis. He was promoted to en- 
gineer in February 1883, serving in the freight 
and passenger service until September 1899, 
when he was appointed general foreman at 
Champaign, with a clear record of nineteen years 
on a locomotive. 

Mr. Howard is a man of excellent qualities 
and keen intellect, honored and respected by his 
fellow-citizens, as is shown by the fact that he is 
serving his sixth year as a member of the Cham- 
paign city council, representing the fourth ward. 



306 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 




ARION MCCLELLAND, conductor 

on the Amboy division of the Illinois 
Central Railroad, entered the service 
of the road as brakeman on the Clin- 
ton district of the Amboy division, September 
9, 1888, and was promoted to conductor Novem- 
ber 20, 1892, serving as extra for a time, and in 
1896 took a regular run in the freight service, 
running from Clinton to Centralia, where he is 
still employed. 

Mr. McClelland is a native of Centralia, 
where he was born in 1865. He is a member of 
Division No. 112, O. R. C., Plantagenet Lodge 
No. 25, K. of P., and is a Mason in high stand- 
ing, being connected with DeWit Lodge No. 84, 
A. F. & A. M., Goodbrake Chapter No. 59, and 
Commandery No. 66, all of Clinton, Illinois. 




M. FAGG, Illinois Central Railroad 
passenger conductor, Amboy division, 
is a native of McLean county, 111., 
where he was born November 8, 1857. 
His father, Thomas Fagg, a farmer who is now 
living in Washington county, Neb., at the age 
of eighty-two years, was born in Loudoun coun- 
ty, Va. The mother, Susan (Westcott), is liv- 
ing, aged seventy-eight. Her father was a na- 
tive of England and came to the U. S. in early 
life. Our subject is one of a family of seven chil- 
dren : Mary E. married A. C. Miller and resides 
in Forreston, 111. ; Vina married S. M. Adams 
and lives in Washington county, Neb. ; William 

B. is a blacksmith and wagonmaker in Birming- 
ham, Iowa; Clarence W. is a wagonmaker in 
Washington county, Neb.; T. M., our subject; 
Frank M. resides in Washington county, Neb. ; 
Charles E., farmer, lives in Washington county, 
Neb. 

After attending the public schools in McLean 
county, T. M. Fagg worked on a farm for some 
years, and in 1880, entered the service of the I. 

C. R. R. as freight brakeman. He served two 
years in that capacity and was then made freight 
conductor which position he held for sixteen 



years. In 1898 he was promoted to passenger 
conductor and is now running on the Amboy 
division between Freeport and Centralia. He is 
a member of the O. of R. C. ; the I. C. Lodge 
of Masons No. 178; Freeport Chapter No. 23; 
Freeport Commandery No. 7, and Cherry Camp 
No. 64, M. W. of A. Politically he is a Repub- 
lican. 

Mr. Fagg was married on the 29th of April, 
1884, to Miss Mollie Boylan, of Blooming- 
ton. She was born August 9, 1861. They have 
two children : Delia M., born Sept. 8, 1885, is at- 
tending the Freeport high school; Lillian F., 
born October 16, 1891, is also in school 



JOHN E. HARRINGTON, conductor on 
the Illinois Central Railroad, Freeport 
division, was born in Waukesha, Wis., 
November 21, 1864. He is the son of 
Michael and Mary (Mulhern) Harrington, in 
whose family are seven children. The father is 
a railroad man. Our subject was educated in 
the public and parish schools of Waukesha. At 
the age of sixteen he became water boy on the 
N. W. R. R., and remained in that position for 
one summer, then went to the Grand Pacific at 
Chicago, where he remained three years, then 
worked for the Rock Island R. R. for two and 
one-half years as passenger brakeman. In 1889 
he entered the service of the I. C. R. R. as freight 
brakeman and worked in that capacity until July 
i, 1891, when he was promoted to conductor, 
which position he still holds. June 17, 1896, 
Mr. Harrington was united in marriage with 
Miss Mary, daughter of Patrick Grant, deceased, 
and Jennie (Hughes) Grant. Mrs. Harrington 
was born in Freeport, 111., September 4, 1874, 
and was educated in the public and parochial 
schools of that city. Mr. and Mrs. Harrington 
have one child, John Grant, born March 15, 
1898. They are members of the Catholic church. 
Mr. Harrington belongs to the Improved Order 
of Red Men, and O. of R. C., and politically 
is a staunch Democrat. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



307 




P. FREEMAN, conductor on the 
Springfield division of the Illinois 
Central Railroad, had his first railroad 
experience in the employ of the Bluff 
Line, which he entered as brakeman in October 
1888, running from Springfield to Alton. In 
1889 he entered the service of the Illinois Central 
Railroad, acted as brakeman on the Springfield 
division one year, and was promoted to conduc- 
tor in 1890 and is now in the freight service on 
that division. 

Mr. Freeman, who is a son of Walter and 
Sally (Short) Freeman, who were natives of 
Virginia, was born at Culpepper Court House, 
Virginia, in 1862, and was united in marriage 
with Miss Eleanor Chapman in 1885. She is 
a daughter of Stephen G. and Sarah (Oder) 
Chapman, natives of Indiana and Kentucky, re- 
spectively. Mr. and Mrs. Freeman have one 
daughter, Delia B. Mr. Freeman is a member 
of the M. W. A., No. 333, of Springfield, III, 
and the O. R. C., No. 400, of Clinton. 




ENRY LUDWIG, one of the younger 
of the Central engineers, was born in 
Dunleith, now East Dubuque, Illinois, 
March 28, 1873. He attended the 
schools of his native place until the age of six- 
teen, and then began earning his own way, se- 
curing a position with a confectionery company 
in the city at the other end of the big bridge. 
Here for four and a half years he worked faith- 
fully, meanwhile attending the night school in 
the Bayless Business College, fitting himself for 
a higher position in the world. Coming to 
Freeport he secured employment in the machin- 
ery department of the Illinois Central shops, se- 
curing, six months later, a seat in the left side of 
a locomotive, September 23, 1893. October 14, 
1899, he was examined and promoted to engineer 
and started in with fair prospects of a long and 
useful career at the throttle and lever. 

Mr. Ludwig is an only child of Henry and 
Magdalena (Fiene) Ludwig. The father, for 



many years a grocer of Dunleith, was born in 
Germany, May 19, 1848, and died at Dubuque 
December 17, 1893. The mother, also a native 
German, was born August 15, 1848, and died 
on her fortieth birthday in Dubuque. 

Mr. Ludwig was married in Dubuque June 
12, 1895, to Miss Lucy G. Taulty, of that city. 
Two children have been born to them, Maylou, a 
daughter, born April 12, 1896, and Harry, born 
June 20, 1897. Our subject is a member of 
Union Lodge No. 138, B. of L. F., and of the 
fraternal order A. O. U. W., at Elmhurst, 111. 



M. STUART, who is a conductor on 
I p~>\ the Illinois Central Railroad, Amboy 
j [ o division, was born in Normal, 111., 
September 21, 1867. His parents, 
C. M. and Catherine (Stevens) Stuart, are both 
deceased. The family came from Kentucky in 
1860, and located in Normal. There are six 
children, our subject being the youngest. Mary 
married D. B. Little, assistant auditor of the 
I. I. & I. R. R., Kankakee, 111.; George M. is 
a passenger conductor on the C. & A. R. R. ; 
Alpha is principal of the Jefferson school in 
Bloomington, 111. ; Alice married Milvin Stine 
and resides near Saybrook, 111. ; Lee is manager 
of the Electric Light & Power Co. at Normal. 

Our subject was educated at the State 
Normal, graduating in 1886, and also took a 
complete course in Evergreen City Business Col- 
lege. He then accepted a position in the At- 
lanta National bank, at Atlanta, 111.,, where he 
remained for four years, resigning to organize 
the Waynesville bank, of which he was cashier 
for three years. Giving up this position, he en- 
tered the employ of the C. & A. Railroad as 
brakeman, where he remained two years, then 
worked three months for the K. C. & P. R. R. 
in the same capacity, and was then offered the 
position of night ticket clerk at Shreveport, La., 
where he remained one year. In 1898, on ac- 
count of the yellow fever epidemic, he left the 
south and came to the I. C. R. R. at Blooming- 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



ton, August 16, 1898, and was made freight 
brakeman. On the 3ist of August, 1899, he was 
promoted to freight conductor on the Amboy 
division, which position he still retains. Mr. 
Stuart was married on the 28th of April, 1891, 
to Miss Ella M. Lambert, of Atlanta, 111. She 
was born May 15, 1868. Mr. and Mrs. Stuart 
attend the Christian church. Mr. Stuart is a 
Mason, and also belongs to the B. R. T. In 
politics he votes the Republican ticket. 





I. TAYLOR, a conductor in the 
freight service of the Illinois 
Q Central, received his first intro- 
duction to railroad life as brake- 
man on the Short Line division of the L. & N. 
R. R. out of Louisville, Ky., commencing his 
career in September 1887, and working two 
years. He then took a position as brakeman on 
the A. T. & S. F., remaining with that company 
eighteen months, after which he transferred to 
the L. E. & St. L. out of Louisville, Ky. From 
the latter place he was sent to the L. S. R. R., 
serving six months as brakeman, and at the end 
of that period was promoted to conductor and 
transferred to the Marion route, where he re- 
mained until September 3, 1892. After working 
for a short time on the M. P. R. R., and the 
Terminal Association of St. Louis, he entered 
the service of the I. C. as brakeman on the 
Springfield division. On January 23, 1894, he 
was sent to the South end and promoted to con- 
ductor December 15, 1896. Mr. Taylor is a na- 
tive of Shelbyville, Shelby county, Ky., his birth 
occurring Oct. 22, 1865. On February 21, 1899, 
he was married at Mt. Vernon, Mo., to Miss 
Lydia Jones, whose father was a prominent 
druggist of that city, but is now deceased. So- 
cially he is connected with DeWitt Lodge F. & 
A. M. No. 84, O. R. C. No. 112, of Centralia, 
111., Goodbrake Chapter No. 59, and Clinton 
Commandery No. 66, of Clinton, 111. 



E. GILLEN is an engineer in the 
passenger service of the Illinois Cen- 
tral on the Chicago division. He 
entered the service of the company 
as fireman on a switch engine in the Champaign 
yards in 1884. In November 1887 he was pro- 
moted to engineer, serving first in the freight 
service until September 10, 1899. On this date 
he entered the passenger service, taking charge 
of engine No. 965, and filling the vacancy made 
by the promotion of H. D. Howard to general 
foreman. During his service as fireman he was 
for two years with R. D. Davis, traveling engi- 
neer of the Illinois Central. 

Mr. Gillen, who is a native of Champaign, 
having been born there in 1860, married Miss 
Georgeama Jones, who was born February 16, 
1873, to H. W. and Olie Jones, natives of In- 
diana. Mr. and Mrs. Gillen have one daughter, 
Ruth Leone, born May 22, 1899. 




L DWARD CURTIN, who is a freight 
conductor on the Freeport division of 
the Illinois Central Railroad, is the 
son of Michael Curtin, a native of Ire- 
land, who came to the U. S. in early life and 
located near Aurora, 111. He is a farmer, and is 
now living at the age of eighty years. The 
mother of our subject, Ellen (Hennessey), is 
also living. 

Edward Curtin was born in Aurora, 111., 
where he received his education. At the age of 
twenty-one he entered the service of the I. C. 
R. R. at Freeport as a freight brakeman, running 
between Chicago and Dubuque. In November 
1895, he was promoted to freight conductor, 
which position he now holds. November 23, 
1893, Mr. Curtin was married to Miss Effie G. 
Bradford, who was born in Dubuque, Iowa, 
September 12, 1875. She is the daughter of 
Charles Bradford, who has been switch tender 
for the I. C. R. R. at Dubuque for many years. 
Mr. Curtin is a member of the Catholic church. 
He belongs to the O. of R. C. and in his political 
views is independent. 




F. H. SCHERMERHORN. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



311 



FH. SCHERMERHORN, formerly em- 
ployed as locomotive engineer on the 
Q Illinois Central Railroad, and resid- 
ing in Freeport, 111., was born in Lex- 
ington, Greene county, New York, Aug. 6, 1852. 
He is the eldest son of Rev. P. V. and Lydia A. 
(Williams) Schermerhorn, the former a minister 
in the M. E. church, having died in 1898, while 
the latter is still living in Stamford, Delaware 
county, New York. Their family consisted of 
nine children, of whom five are living. Abram, 
a brother of our subject, formerly an engineer 
in the employ of the I. C. railroad, lives in Free- 
port, Illinois. 

F. H. Schermerhorn was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of eastern New York. At the age of 
fourteen years he entered the high school of 
Albany, from which he graduated at the age of 
eighteen. He then entered the Albany Medi- 
cal & Surgical Institute, where he remained 
eighteen months, when on account of impaired 
health he was forced to abandon the idea of be- 
coming a surgeon, and after traveling in the west 
for several months, accepted a position in the 
freight office of the N. Y. C. & H. R. railroad at 
Athens, N. Y. It was during his stay at Athens 
that the Merchants Dispatch Transportation Co. 
was organized under the management of the 
Yanderbilts, and he had the honor of billing the 
first car load of freight ever shipped by that or- 
ganization. He came west and located at Am- 
boy, 111., August 9, 1873, and entered the service 
of the I. C. September 22, 1873, as a locomotive 
fireman on the north division between Amboy 
and Dunleith, where he remained until December . 
3, 1879, when he was promoted to the right side 
and retained that position until 1893 when he 
left the employ of the company. 

Mr. Schermerhorn was married February 
22, 1873, to Miss Rena R. Johnson, of Jewett, 
X. Y., a very amiable and accomplished lady of 
strong religious sentiments and high moral 
character, uniting with the M. E. church early 
in life. She was born April 13, 1849. Of the 
three children born to this union, two are living, 
viz : John Guy, born in 1878, and Esther Belle, 
born in 1887. 

18 



Our subject was a charter member of Am- 
boy Lodge No. 35, B. of L. F., and when pro-> 
moted joined Amboy Division, No. 72, B. of 
L. E., in which he always took an active interest 
and was chairman of the Grievance committee 
at the time he left the service. In 1888 he was 
elected a member of the Legislative committee, 
from the Amboy district, and spent the following 
winter in Springfield, 111., promoting legislation 
in the interest of railroad men. He is a mem- 
ber of Excelsior Lodge No. 97, A. F. & A. M. 
and of Amboy Chapter, No. 194, R. A. M. In 
politics he affiliates with the Republican party. 



JOHN R. ROSEBRUGH, former agent of 
the Illinois Central at Freeport. The 
family of our subject is of Scotch origin, 
his grandfather having been a Scotch 
Presbyterian minister. His father, John Rose- 
brugh, was the first white child born in Grove- 
land, Livingston county, New York. He was a 
farmer by occupation, and also held many of- 
ficial positions, dying at the age of seventy-nine 
years. 

J. R. Rosebrugh, also a native of the Empire 
State, was born in Groveland, Livingston- Co., 
January 5, 1829. He was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of New York, and at the Temple Hill 
Academy in Geneseo, New York, and at the age 
of seventeen he began teaching school in the 
district where Senator Charles H. Carroll re- 
sided. In the spring of 1848 he went to Te- 
cumseh, Mich., and taught in a branch of the 
University at that place for three years. He 
then embarked in the general merchandise busi- 
ness in the same town and remained in the busi- 
ness two years. Coming to Freeport September 
10, 1856, he entered the service of the I. C. R. R. 
as cashier and held the position for one year, 
when he was appointed station agent, having 
charge of passenger and freight business, and re- 
mained there until 1865, when he went to Amboy 
and served as clerk in the office of Mr. Jacobs, 
superintendent of the Amboy division, for a few 



312 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



months. At this time Mr. Rosebrugh severed 
his connection with the I. C. R. R., and accepted 
a posjtion with Wicker, -Meckling & Co., railroad 
contractors, with whom he remained about one 
year, then went to Sioux City, Iowa, and assisted 
in opening the books and starting the passenger 
and freight departments in that place which en- 
gaged him nine months. He was then employed 
in Chicago by Miner T. Ames & Co., coal mer- 
chants, remaining with them about six months, 
then became assistant manager of the Otto Gas 
Engine Co., which position he retained for two 
years. He then went to Ann Arbor, Mich., and 
took charge of the management of the hospital 
as steward, where he remained seven years. In 
1888 he came to Freeport and purchased the 
Palace Livery, which business still occupies his 
attention. November 8, 1852, Mr. Rosebrugh 
was married to Miss Julia E. Taylor, of Tecum- 
seh, Mich. They have one son, Henry P., ,born 
July 31, 1854. He was for twelve years em- 
ployed as brakeman and conductor of the I. C. 
R. R., and is now associated with his father in 
business. Mr. Rosebrugh is a member of the 
Episcopal church, and also belongs to the Ma- 
sonic and Odd Fellow fraternities. In politics 
he is a Democrat, and is now alderman of the 
second ward of Freeport. He has often been 
solicited to allow his name to be used in connec- 
tion with political positions, but has uniformly 
declined. 




ARVEY C. REEP, began his railroad 
career August 18, 1889, as baggagemas- 
ter with Conductor William Beadles. 
He then went' into freight service in the 
Paducah yards as switchman, until 1894 when he 
was appointed general yardrhaster, serving two 
years when he went on the road" 'as conductor, 
running a local freight betwen 'Paducah and 
Newbern. Our subject has a remarkably good 
record, having had no accidents to himself -or 
his train. His father was A. H. Reep, who died 
in 1894. Mr. Reep married Miss Lizzie Clark, of 
Youngstown, Ohio, and has a bright boy Clyde, 



who is attending school. He is a member of the 
Paducah Division of the Order of Railway Con- 
ductors, in which he has filled some of the offi- 
cial chairs. He is prominent in the Masonic or- 
der, holding membership in the Blue lodge. 
Chapter, Commandery and Shrine. He also 
affiliates with the " Best People On Earth " 
known to the outer world as the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. Mr. Reep's home is 
at No. 440 South Sixth street, Paducah, Ky. 



JOHN HAYS WILSON, depot master of 
the Illinois Central Railroad at Free- 
port, was born in Union county, Pa., 
June 8, 1837. H' s grandfather, Hugh 
Wilson, was one of the judges of the U. S. dis- 
trict court. His father, also Hugh Wilson, a 
tanner and fanner, was born in Union county, 
Pa., in 1792, and died in 1873. His mother, 
Jane (Foster), died in April 1879. 

John H. Wilson was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of his native county and took an 
academic course of three years at Mifflinburg 
Academy. He assisted on his father's farm until 
1857, when the family emigrated to Freeport, then 
a town of about 6,000 inhabitants. Here he taught 
school one term, and then secured a position with 
the I. C. R. R. as clerk in the superintendent's 
office at Amboy. He 1 remained in that position 
thirteen months, when he took a position in the 
train service and served five years in that capacity. 
He then began making up trains at Amboy, 
later clerked in the office at Decatur, and then 
returned to Amboy and became one of the yard- 
masters. January 21, 1870, he lost his right arm 
in the service of the company, after which he 
came to Freeport and learned to write with his 
left hand. He is now a splendid penman, and 
a model of neatness. In 1871 he became yard- 
master of Freeport yards and retained that po- 
sition for sixteen years, and in 1887 was made 
car accountant, which position he held until 
1890, when the new depot was erected in Free- 
port and he was made depot master, where he 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



313 



still serves, attending upon twenty-seven passen- 
ger trains daily, from 6 130 A. M. to 7 :oo P. M. 
His service for the I. C. R. R. has always been 
pleasant. Mr. Wilson's household is made up 
of himself and two sisters, Mary and Martha. 
The latter has taught school in Freeport for 
eighteen years. Of the family, eight are living: 
six in Freeport and two in Pennsylvania. Mr. 
Wilson is a Prohibitionist, and was one of the 
founders of Centennial Lodge of Good Templars 
in 1876, and first Chaplain; assisted in organiz- 
ing the Independent Order of Mutual Aid in 
1879, and has been connected with all the tem- 
perance organizations. He is a member of the 
A. O. U. W., and one of the charter members of 
John H. Adclams Lodge. The family are mem- 
bers of the First Presbyterian church of Free- 
port. 




E. BANKS, a conductor running 
between Centralia and Clinton, 
Q was born in Kansas September 8, 
1857. Owing to peculiar circum- 
stances he does not know in what county he first 
saw the light. His birth occurred during the 
troublous border warfare in which the father 
was taken prisoner by one of the factions the day 
the boy was born, and the fright killed the 
mother the same day. Escaping from his cap- 
tors . the father returned, and taking what was 
left of his little family, returned to Indiana to 
make them a home. On the outbreak of the war 
he enlisted, and fell in battle near Nashville, 
Tenn., the birthplace of himself and wife. 

Mr. Banks grew up without a parent's care, 
living on the farm until attaining his majority, 
attending the country schools. His first expe- 
rience in railroad work was when he joined the 
force of the Illinois Central at Centralia, August 
15, 1886, as brakeman under the instruction of 
Conductor W. Cone, running to Clinton. In 
January 1890 he was promoted, and most of the 
time since he : has been in charge of a way freight 
between the two cities above named. 

Mr. Banks was first married at Brownton, 



Jackson county, Indiana, to Miss Anna Apple- 
gate. Of their five children two are living, 
Walter and Eva. His second marriage was 
with Miss Anna Gassier, a native of Centralia, 
and a daughter of John M. and Mary Magda- 
lene (Hockenyas) Gassier, German settlers of 
that city. Of the second marriage one child was 
born, Cleona. Mr. Banks is a careful and 
painstaking operative, enjoying the confidence 
of his superiors. 



THOMAS J. McKEE, conductor, living 
at Centralia, was born a few miles south 
of Carlyle, 111., September 23, 1855, 
and is the son of J. A. McKee, of 
Fleming county, Ky., and Mary B. Huey. At 
the age of eleven his parents moved with him to 
Centralia where he attended the winter schools 
and worked on fruit farms in the summer. In 
1873 he secured a place as brakeman on the Illi- 
nois Central under Conductor J. D. Williams 
on a local freight between Centralia and Wapel- 
la. Early in 1880 he was examined and promoted 
to conductor running extra until his resignation 
in November of that year. For the next three 
years he was employed mostly in the southwest. 
Worked a short time as car repairer at Little 
Rock, going from there to Fort Worth, Texas, 
engaging in construction work on the Missouri, 
Kansas & Texas and was soon in charge of the 
" front " train the one that carried material 
to the front. Leaving that road he secured work 
on the Texas Pacific between Fort Worth and 
Beard, Texas. After that he worked at various 
points as switchman and yardmaster for several 
roads as the traffic made a demand for men. 
Returning east he secured work for a time in 
the Twenty-first St. yards of the Terminal com- 
pany at St. Louis, and after another sojourn in 
Texas secured work at New Orleans in the yards 
on the New Orleans & North Eastern road be- 
ing soon promoted to night yardmaster. Janu- 
ary 10, 1884, he re-entered the service of the 
Central at Centralia braking under Charles Pratz 



314 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



on the way freight between Centralia and Cairo, 
and seven months later he was promoted and 
given a train, the way freight. In 1891 was 
promoted to the passenger service having at the 
present time a regular run between Centralia 
and Cairo. 

Mrs. McKee, who is a daughter of Henry 
and Barbara (Nullet) Hutchmacher was born 
in New Orleans. Of the five children born to 
Mr. and Mrs. McKee four are living. They are 
F. Edna, Thomas P., Charles E., Amos F., and 
James R. deceased.. , . . . 

Mr. McKee is one of the most popular con- 
ductors on the line. 



JOHN A. HOGAN, one of the younger 
engineers of the Central system, comes of 
railroad stock. His father, Patrick 
Hogan, emigrated from the Emerald 
Isle when a young man, and made his way to 
the west, securing work with the Illinois Central 
with which company he remained many years. 
For a long period he served as train baggage- 
man and later was employed in the boiler room 
of the shops at Amboy where he worked until 
the shops were removed to other points. He 
still resides at Amboy retired from active labor. 
He married Eliza Lowrey, who bore him eight 
children, two sons and six daughters. 

John A. Hogan was born at Amboy, March 
17, 1870, and was reared in his native place, at- 
tending the public schools until the age of fif- 
teen. At that age he entered the boiler shops, 
where his father was employed, as a boiler 
maker apprentice, remaining three years before 
starting out to see the world. He traveled to 
Denver to accept a position in the shops of the 
Union Pacific R. R. We next find him at 
Topeka, Kans., in the employ of the A. T. & S. 
F. and from that point he journeyed to Missouri 
Valley, Iowa, entering the employ of the F. E. 
& M. V. R. R. which he served seven months 
and was transferred to their shops at Chadron, 
Nebraska, on the Black Hills division, remain- 



ing in the west six months. Returning to his 
native state he secured work with the C. & A. 
at Bloomington, where he was employed until 
January 7, 1892, at which time he accepted a 
place as fireman on the Illinois Central. Until 
1898 he served on the left side of the engine and 
after a thorough examination was thereupon 
licensed to sit on the other side of the cab. Mr. 
Hogan is a thorough, careful man in his craft 
and will in time win the recognition of his 
superiors. He is a member of the Union Lodge 
No. 138, B. of L. F. His present home is in 
Freeport. 




KNOWLES, a passenger conduc- 
tor on the Central, has been in 
Q the service since October 16, 1880, 
having begun braking on the 
Springfield division, between Springfield an'd 
Gilrnan, under freight conductor E. Clifford, 
where he remained until February 1884. He 
was then transferred to the Amboy division be- 
tween Clinton and Centralia, under James Mc- 
Hugh, and was promoted to freight conductor 
on the same division in October 1887, and given 
the through "Manifest" run between Clinton 
and St. Louis over the tracks of the Big Four, 
and held that position until April igth, 1897. 
August 4, 1897, he was promoted to the passen- 
ger service and given his present run between 
Freeport and Centralia. 

Mr. Knowles was born at Terre Haute, In- 
diana, March 4, 1862, and removed when a small 
lad with his parents to Shelby county near the 
county seat, when about ten years of age ; he be- 
gan his railroad career at the age of eighteen. 
His schooling was secured in the public schools. 
The father, Daniel Knowles, is a native of New 
York state ; the mother, Lydia Anderson, died 
young, leaving a family of five children, three of 
whom are still alive. Mr. Knowles was married 
November n, 1891, to Miss Minnie L. Lillord, 
a native of Clinton, Illinois. He is a member 
of the O. R. C. and O. R. T. at Clinton, Illinois, 



- AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



315 




C. MITCHELL, conductor on the 
Freeport division of the Illinois 
Q Central, was born in Elgin, 111., 
May 23, 1869. His parents, 
William and Mary (Dedrick) Mitchell, reside in 
Elgin, 111., where his father is engaged in mer- 
chandising. Their family consists of three chil- 
dren. W. C. ; Ada, forewoman in a garment 
factory in Aurora, and Henry, a school boy. 

W. C. Mitchell received his education in 
Fort Scott, Kansas. He worked on a farm for 
his father, and at the age of eighteen entered the 
service of the St. Louis & San Francisco R. R, 
company as brakeman, running between Anthony 
and Beaumont, Kansas, for two years. He then 
came to Freeport and commenced braking for 
the I. C. R. R., and in 1898 was promoted to 
conductor on Freeport division where he is now 
running. He has only lost six weeks of service 
on account of disability. Mr. Mitchell was mar- 
ried on the 7th of October, 1893, to Miss Sophie 
Kline, of Elgin. She was born May 24, 1872; 
and was educated in the schools of Elgin. Her 
father is a carpenter. Mr. and Mrs. Mhchell 
have one child, Gladys, born December 19, 1894. 
The family are Methodists. 



THOMAS CAREY, road supervTsOr, 
Sixth division of the Illinois Central 
Railroad, was born in Watertowji, N. 
Y., February 25, 1859. His father, 
James Carey, who came to the 'U. S. in early 
life, is now living retired in Scales Mound, 111. 
He was section foreman for the I. C. R. R. for 
thirty years.- The mother, whose maiden name 
was Margaret Quinn, is still living. They have 
two children, James, a section foreman of the 
I. C. R. R. at Scales Mound, and Thomas. 

Thomas Carey was educated in the district 
schools of Scales Mound, and at the age of thir- 
teen he began working on the section with his 
father on the I. C. R. R., attending school in 
winter and working on the road in summer for 
three vears. He then worked in a stone quarry 



one year, and farmed for one season. At the 
age of nineteen he returned to work on the sec- 
tion for some months, then went to braking on 
freight which he did for three months. In May 
1 88 1 he was appointed section foreman at East 
Dubuque. He remained as section foreman 
and was foreman of construction for eighteen 
years, then was appointed supervisor of thir- 
teenth section, Sixth division, with headquarters 
at Freeport, Sept. 6, 1898. On the 23rd of June, 
1885, Mr; Carey was married to Miss Alice Mc- 
Donnell, who was born May 17, 1864, in Du- 
buque, Iowa. They have four children : J. 
Donald, born May 28, 1889; John J., born Octo- 
ber I,- 1891; Loretta, born September 8, 1893; 
Corena M., born September 12, 1895. Mr. 
Carey is a member of the Catholic church. So- 
cially he belongs to K. of P., also Endowment 
Rank, and C. O. F. He is independent in. pol- 
itics. 



JOSEPH A. BLACKMAN, one of ;the 
veteran engineers of the Central system, 
is of foreign birth. His father, John 
Blackman, was a native of England 
where he learned the blacksmith's trade. Coming 
to America with his family in 1852 he settled 
first at Windham, Ohio, and six years later 
moved to Dixon, Illinois, and engaged in farm- 
ing. Here he died July 17, 1885. His wife, 
Martha Cooper, was born at Hilgate, Norfolk, 
England, August 12, 1821, and died near Dixon, 
January 13, 1899. She was a woman of great 
natural refinement. At the time of her death 
there were of her children, five sons and three 
daughters living. 

Jos. A. Blackman was born at Oxlode Down- 
ham, Isfe of Ely, Cambridgeshire, England, June 
21, 1845. Most of his schooling was secured 
during the six years the family lived in Ohio. 
On coming to Illinois he worked on the farm un- 
til attaining his majority in 1866 when he secured 
a position as fireman on the Central. Septem- 
ber 10, 1873. Mr. Blackman was considered pro- 
ficient enough to manage an engine and was 



316 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



promoted to the rank of engineer and placed 
in that service on the road where he has main- 
tained his position ever since with credit to him- 
self and satisfaction to his employers. 

Mr. Blackman was married December 22, 
1873 to Miss Agnes Blocher, of Amboy, and to 
them have been born four children as follows : 
Henry J., born October 6, 1874, died September 
22, 1884; Georgia A., born May 29, 1882, died 
aged six days; Estelle Alice, born September 
16, 1886; Ruth Agnes, born August 13, 1889. 

Mr. Blackman was one of the first to become 
identified with the B. of L. E. having held mem- 
bership many years with the Amboy Division, 
No. 72, joining the order in 1875. He is identi- 
fied with the Masonic fraternity, affiliating with 
the Illinois Central Lodge No. 178 of Amboy. 
Mr. Blackman is popular with his fellow engi- 
neers and stands well with his employers. 



JL. MAX FIELD, a veteran conductor on 
the Central at Centralia, was born at 
Q Rome, now Dix, in Jefferson county, 
Illinois, June 7, 1853, the eldest of a 
family of twelve children all of whom are living. 
Mr. Maxfield began railroading at the age of 
twenty at the bottom of the ladder. For a few 
days he worked on the section in the Centralia 
yards under Chris. Davis, and was then 
set to work shoveling coal onto the en- 
gines in the yards at what was to him then good 
wages, a dollar and a quarter a day. When he 
was promoted to brakeman by trainmaster J. 
W. Seymour, on the run between Centralia and 
Cairo, at a dollar and seventy-three cents a day, 
he thought he was drawing munificent wages. 
After three years twisting brakes, Mr. Maxfield 
was surprised one evening to be ordered to UHin 
to take charge of a wrecking train and clear up 
a wreck.. From that time on he was in charge of 
a train having his monthly wages increased from 
sixty-six the first to seventy-five dollars the third 
year. After about four years in the freight ser- 
vice between Centralia and Cairo he resigned 



February 9, 1881 and did not re-enter the ser- 
vice until August 27, 1886, when he was given a 
run between Centralia and Champaign and has 
been regularly in that service since, excepting 
some ninety days when there was sickness in his 
family. During all his service he has not suf- 
fered a suspension nor received a demerit mark, 
and the two wrecks in which he has been in- 
volved have been chargeable to others and not 
to him. 

Mr. Maxfield was married to Miss Hattie 
Morrison. Her mother was born in Gilford 
county, North Carolina. Her brother, James 
K. Morrison, was for many years an em- 
ploye of the Central, and has been engaged 
the past seven years as passenger conductor in 
the service of the Minneapolis & St. Louis line 
below St. Paul. Mr. Maxfield's parents, John 
and Charlotte Maxfield, now reside at Farina, 
Illinois. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Maxfield ten children have 
been born, of whom Charles E., the eldest, is 
now braking on the Champaign division of the 
Central ; Caryol, now Mrs. Maddox ; Ida B., 
James L., C. Harold, Clinton C., Earnest R., 
George W., Marion M., and Raymond V. 




W. NALL, a conductor in the freight 
service of the Illinois Central on the 
Louisiana division, was born in New 
Orleans in 1868. He is a son of 
Mick Nail, well known all over the I. C. system, 
having been in active service for forty years, and 
is now a conductor on the Clarksdale branch. 

Mr. Nail entered the service of the Illinois 
Central in 1888, as operator at Arcola, Miss., 
where he worked eight months. He then en- 
tered the train service as brakeman, and had only 
been there a short time when he received notice 
from J. M. Turner, superintendent, who had 
been observing him closely and noticed his adapt- 
ability, to take the examination for conductor. 
Having successfully passed the examination, he 
was, on October 27111, 1891, placed in charge of 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



317 



the local freight with Engineer C. J. Swett, and 
has since served there satisfactorily. Mr. Nail's 
career on the road has been successful. He has 
had a few minor accidents, but none -of conse- 
quence. Socially he is connected with Division 
No. 367, O. R. C., of McComb City, of which he 
served as Chief for one year. Mr. Nail is mar- 
ried and has two children, Rosemond Inez, aged 
five years, and Lawrence Alton, aged two. He 
is a popular man on the road, and is recognized 
by the officials as a valued employe. 




TEPHEN Q. FORD is an engineer in 
the passenger service on the Louisi- 
ana division of the Illinois Central. 
He entered the service of the road on 
August I, 1876, as a wiper in the round-house 
at McComb City, serving as such for two months, 
and afterward working in a boiler shop. In 
1878 he obtained a position as fireman with En- 
gineer James Greener, but in July of that year 
resigned on account of the prevalence of yellow 
fever. Returning to McComb City in May 1879, 
he was re-employed as fireman, and remained in 
that capacity until promoted to engineer. On 
promotion he was given charge of a switch en- 
gine, and later was with a construction train. 
In 1882, he went for a period of five months to 
the Southern Pacific R. R. running a switch en- 
gine during that time, but returned to the I. C. 
and remained for a short time at McComb City 
as engineer in the yards there. He then went 
back to the Southern Pacific, and was subsequent- 
ly employed as switchman and night yardmaster 
by the Santa Fe R. R. at Rosenberg, Texas. 

Remaining in the latter company, four 
months he took a position as engineer on the 
Texas Pacific R. R. and afterward on the Inter- 
national & Great Northern R. R. where he served 
five months. He then returned to McComb 
City, Miss., and re-entered the service of the I. 
C. as fireman, and after a year was promoted to 
engineer in the freight service. In January 1900, 



he was again promoted to engineer in the passen- 
ger service, since which time he has had a regu- 
lar run on engine No. 389, between Canton, 
Miss., and New Orleans. 

Our subject was born in Sumpter county, 
Ala., on August 6, 1859, and. is the son of Dr. 
D. U. and Elizabeth A. (Wilson) Ford. Dr. 
Ford was a prominent physician, and served as 
physician and surgeon for the A. & C. Railroad. 
Both parents are now deceased. 

Mr. Ford was married to Miss Edith M. 
De Chantal, a native of Canada, but residing in 
New Orleans, and they have the following 
children, viz : Herbert, Donald, Adele, Maud, 
Charles, Stephen and Estelle. 

Socially, our subject is a member of Magno- 
lia Division No. 196, B. of L. E., of McComb 
City; where he resides, and is well and favorably 
known among the employes of the Illinois Cen- 
tral. 




ICHAEL KELLY, an experienced and 
popular engineer on the Memphis 
division, began his railroad career in 
1869 on the Paducah & Memphis 
R. R., serving as fireman until promoted to en- 
gineer in 1879, when he was given engine No. 
3, a Rogers, in the switch and freight service. 
Soon after he went on the road and was given 
engine No. 28, a Baldwin, pulling the pile 
driver, and was in this service fourteen years 
along the whole line between Louisville and 
Memphis. He was then transferred to the 
freight department and at present has a "pre- 
ferred" run between Paducah and Memphis 
During his long experience he has pulled the 
throttle of every make of engine produced in 
America, including the old time wood burner, 
common to the early days of railroading. 

Our subject has turned out many good en- 
gineers who fired for him, among them J. Mul- 
vin and W. Yates. Mr. Kelly has never been 
injured in his thirty years of experience, a piece 
of good fortune vouchsafed only a few who have 
spent so many years of life "on the rail." 



318 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



Mr. Kelly is a temperate, whole-hearted 
man, and is held in highest esteem by everybody. 
He was born in Ireland, and came to America 
with his parents when he was six months of age, 
and has worked his own way up. Our subject 
married Miss Mary Erbin, of Mayfield, Ky., 
January 1877, and they have seven chidren liv- 
ing and two dead. Those living are Kate, grad- 
uated from Paducah high school, Johnny, Nora, 
Mary, Berchal, Michael and Martin. Johnny 
is employed by the Illinois Central as night 
caller. Mr. Kelly is a charter member of Divi- 
sion No. 225, B. of L. E., Paducah, Ky., in which 
he has held all the official chairs, and is also a 
member of Lodge No. 26, of Knights of Pythias, 
of Paducah, as well as the Catholic Knights. 
He is a man of a very strong will and sterling 
character. There is one incident in his life that 
needs special mention. During his early career 
Mr. Kelly was on too intimate terms with the 
liquor habit, and it was predicted by everybody 
that he would die a drunkard, in spite of the 
persuasions of others and his wife's earnest pray- 
ers. About fifteen years ago Mr. Kelly went 
into a saloon and ordered a glass of whiskey. 
Just as he was about to raise the glass to his 
lips he resolved to make a new start. He put 
the full glass down on the bar and left the room, 
and has never tasted liquor since. His iron will 
has saved him. 




,HARLES W. HARRELL, a popular 
young engineer in the freight service 
of the Illinois Central on the Louis- 
iana division, is a native of New Or- 
leans, La. At the age of seventeen Mr. Harrell 
became identified with the I. C. at McComb City, 
as a locomotive fireman, in which capacity he 
was employed, first in the freight and later in the 
passenger service, serving two years in the lat- 
ter department. On October I2th, 1894, he was 
promoted to engineer and given charge of engine 
No. 708. He has been on different parts of the 
system during his connection with the road, and 



is at present on the north end of the Louisiana 
division. Mr. Harrell married Miss Tucker, of 
McComb City, Miss., and their union has been 
blessed by one child. He is a member of Divi- 
sion No. 411, B. of L. F., and of Division No. 
196, B. of L. E. Mr. Harrell is a young man 
of great capability, attention to duty being his 
strong point, and his career has been a very suc- 
cessful one, devoid of accidents or injury. He 
has a fine record and is in line for promotion. 




ATRICK H. GEARY is one of the oldest 
and most prominent engineers in the 
service of the Illinois Central. With 
the exception of twenty-six days, ser- 
vice with the Southern Pacific R. R'. lie liafe been 
connected with the I. C. since April I, 1866. 

Mr. Geary as his name implies, is a native of 
the Emerald Isle. He was born at Queenstown, 
Ireland, March 21, 1841, and is one of eight chil- 
dren born to Michael J. and Mary Geary. Mr. 
Geary Sr. was a contractor in the old country, 
and coming to America in 1856, took up his resi- 
dence in the city of New Orleans, but departed 
this life during the same year. On the death 
of her husband Mrs. Geary returned to Ireland, 
where she died in 1874. 

Mr. Geary was educated in the common 
schools of his native city in Ireland, and was fif- 
teen years of age when his parents came to this 
country. He held various positions in the city 
of New Orleans until the outbreak of the civil 
war, when, in 1861, he enlisted in Company E, 
First Louisiana Volunteers, under Col. Vincent 
and Brig. Gen. Blanchard. His company was 
in the seven days fight at Richmond, and also in 
numerous other engagements, but he was never 
injured. He was discharged at Richmond in 
1863, and returned to New Orleans. In 1866 he 
entered the employ of the New Orleans, Jackson 
& Great Northern R. R. (now the I. C. R. R.) 
as fireman, working in that capacity until 1869, 
when he was promoted to engineer in the freight 
service. He remained in the latter branch of 




ALLEN G. CROCKETT. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



321 



the service for two years, when he was promoted 
to the passenger service, where he is now em- 
ployed on engine No. 1175, between Canton, 
Miss., and Xew Orleans. During his long rail- 
road career Mr. Geary has had but two accidents, 
one in 1870, when the boiler of his engine ex- 
ploded, and the other in 1873 when his engine 
was overturned. In neither accident was any 
one injured. His relations with his superiors 
have always been of the most pleasant nature, 
he appreciating the many favors the company 
has shown him, and the company, in turn, fully 
cognizant that in him they have a faithful and 
trusted employe. 

Mr. Geary was married to Miss Margaret 
Herbert, of New Orleans, and of the four chil- 
dren born to them only one survives, Nellie, wife 
of W. R. Caston, cashier of the McComb City 
bank. Mr. Geary is one of the prosperous and 
honored citizens of McComb City, residing in 
a fine home on North Delaware avenue. He is 
popular with all, and with none more so than the 
officials of the Illinois Central Railroad. 



LLEN G. CROCKETT, a highly es- 
_ teemed passenger conductor on the 

l\ J_\ Louisville division of the Illinois Cen- 
tral, was born in Marion Co., Kentucky, 
His father was James G. Crockett, who died at 
the age of seventy-three in the year, 1898, and 
was a relative of the famous originator of the 
saying, " Be sure you're right, then go ahead." 
His mother is still enjoying the blessings of life. 
Our subject left school when he was ten years of 
age, and began train service on the L. & N. rail- 
road, being given charge of a freight train in 
1878, serving in freight and passenger service 
for twelve years on this road. He resigned to 
accept a position as conductor on the C. O. & S. 
W. under Trainmaster James Ross. He ran a 
freight train out of Louisville four years, when 
he was promoted to passenger service which po- 
sition he has held since 1894. Mr Crockett has 
been very successful, in fact one of the luckiest 



railroad men on the road, never having any acci- 
dents or injury. He is a member of Monon 
Division No. 89, O. R. C., being chairman of 
the Grievance board for the entire Louisville 
division. During his term of office he has had 
several good measures put through for the bene- 
fit of the men. It was partly through his efforts 
that the Greenland pay system was adopted by 
the Illinois Central Railroad. Mr. Crockett 
stayed with the committee three weeks until it 
was put through. The Monon Division should 
be complimented for having so able a representa- 
tive. Mr. Crockett is a progressive, successful 
railroad man. He resides at 1410 W. Broad- 
way, Louisville, Ky. 



-T OT ALONZO LOUTZENHISER, one 
of the most popular conductors on the 
Louisiana division of the Illinois Cen- 
tral, was born at Champaign, III, in 
1863, and is a son of Alonzo and Eliza (Weir). 
Loutzenhiser. Mr. Loutzenhiser Sr. came of 
old German stock. His ancestors had been ex- 
iled from Germany for political reasons, and emi- 
grated to America, settling in Susquehanna Co., 
Pa. He was in his youth, a great athlete, at one 
time making a running jump of twenty-one and 
one-half feet. He was employed as a driver on 
a canal boat, when fourteen years old, and the 
captains of the different boats were in the habit 
of pitting their boys against each other when 
they met. Alonzo Loutzenhiser was the cham- 
pion of his section, and once walked four- 
teen miles with his captain to take part in a 
"mill." He afterward left Pennsylvania and 
moved to Illinois, where he engaged in the tailor- 
ing business. He is a veteran of the Mexican 
and Civil wars, serving in the latter as lieutenant 
of Company F, I25th Illinois Cavalry, having 
two horses shot from under him. He also 
served fourteen years as deputy sheriff of his 
county. 

The mother of our subject was of Scotch 
descent, received her education at Andover Fe- 



322 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



male Seminary, at Andover, Mass., and was a 
woman of fine literary attainments. 

The subject of this sketch was reared in 
the city of Danville, 111., where he attended and 
graduated from the high school. He then be- 
gan the study of medicine at Rush Medical Col- 
lege, from which he graduated with honors. Cir- 
cumstances, however, prevented him from prac- 
ticing. He began railroad work in 1883 as a 
news agent on the C. B. & Q. R. R. between 
Rock Island and St. Louis, where he served only 
a few weeks, when his money was stolen and he 
lost his position. He then applied to P. H. 
Houlihan, now superintendent of the Hannibal 
& St. Joe R. R., and after a great deal of per- 
sistent effort, secured a position as brakeman in 
the passenger service of that road. After hav- 
ing served fourteen months as passenger brake- 
man, he entered the freight service. He was 
employed in that capacity only six weeks when 
promoted to conductor. He remained with the 
C. B. & Q. road until 1889, when he went to the 
Chicago & Eastern Illinois R. R. at Danville, 
and was with that company about five months. 
He then went to Chicago and took a six months' 
course at the Chicago College of Pharmacy, re- 
ceiving a certificate, and established himself at 
Kewana, Ind., where his mother bought him a 
drug store. 

He managed it successfully for about a year, 
but sold out and returned to railroad work. Go- 
ing to Champaign, 111., he entered the service of 
the Illinois Central, and served in that district 
as brakeman for two years, making occasional 
trips as conductor. During the World's Fair 
he was made train dispatcher of the World's Fair 
service, serving with credit. His next position 
was as conductor on a suburban express out of 
Chicago, where he worked two years, and later 
was for eleven months in the freight service on 
the Chicago division. He then went to McComb 
City, where after a short service as brakeman, 
he was promoted to conductor, and has been 
serving in that capacity on the Louisiana division 
for the past two years. 

Mr. Loutzenhiser was married in 1893 at 
Waukegan, 111., and has three children : Mae, 



born in 1894, Claire, born in 1896, and Annie 
Louise, born in 1898. He belongs to Scotia 
Lodge No. 272, Knights of Pythias, of Chicago, 
and is a member of Division No. 367, O. R. C., 
of McComb City, where he resides. He is a 
man of fine literary tastes, a contributor to the 
O. R. C. Journal, and is also a finished musician, 
having composed several pieces of merit. Being 
a well read man, a fluent conversationalist, well 
posted on current topics, and a man of easy man- 
ners and great affability, Mr. Loutzenhiser has 
gained innumerable friends in the south, and 
his circle grows larger every day. 



JA. WALKER, an engineer in the freight 
department of the Illinois Central, be- 
Q gan life as a "hustler" in the I. C. shops 
at Aberdeen, Miss. After a service of 
three and one-half years there, he went as fire- 
man on the Lexington branch of the road, and 
worked there for four and one-half years. In 
1893 he went to McComb City, and after spend- 
ing two years as fireman on the Louisiana divi- 
sion, was examined and promoted to engineer, 
and has since had a regular run on that division. 
He has been fortunate in escaping injury and 
wrecks during his service. Mr. Walker is a 
native of Aberdeen, Miss., his birth occurring 
on January roth, 1865. James W. Walker, the 
father of our subject, residing at Aberdeen, 
Miss., was born in Ireland, but came to America 
at the age of sixteen years. He was a shoe- 
maker by trade, but was also engaged in mer- 
chandising and farming. He is an active poli- 
tician, always ready to take part in the issues of 
the day. 

J. A. Walker was united in marriage to 
Miss Rosa McCaskill, of Aberdeen, Miss. They 
have two children, John and Alexander. So- 
cially he is connected with Division No. 196, B. 
of L. E., of McComb City, where he has a com- 
fortable home on Broadway, and of which place 
he is a valued citizen. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



323 




"ILLIAM F. ROGERS,* a young 
freight engineer on the Evansville 
district of the Illinois Central, was 
born in Rockport, Iml., January 4, 
In 1890 he entered the service of the Ohio 
Valley Railroad watching engines at Princeton, 
and in 1892 hegan firing an engine, being pro- 
moted to engineer December 15, 1897. He had 
a mishap on his first trip, running into an L. & 
N. switch engine in Henderson. The L. & N. 
man was at fault, being on the Illinois Central 
joint track and had no flag or signal out. Our 
subject's engine was demolished, and although 
he stuck to his engine, applying the brakes, he 
escaped injury. He now has a freight run on 
the Evansville district. He is a bright, careful 
engineer, and makes his home with his mother 
at Henderson. He belongs to Division No. 410, 
B. of L. E., and Division No. 317, B. of L. F. 




"ILLIAM C. LOWRY, a prominent 
engineer on the Vicksburg division 
of the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley 
R. R., has been an employe of the 
company since 1887. He began his career in 
the track department of the Natchez, Jackson & 
Columbus R. R., but remained there only a short 
time, going to the Alabama & Vicksburg R. R. 
Leaving the service of the latter road, he entered 
the employ of the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley 
R. R. as fireman with Engineer Rials, and re- 
mained with him for six months. He then fired 
two years with J. H. McGuire and was then pro- 
moted to engineer, and after serving three 
months as a hostler, was given charge of a switch 
engine in the yards at -Vicksburg. He occupied 
that position only one week when transferred 
to the regular freight service between Vicks- 
burg and New Orleans, and has since remained 
there, having charge at the present time of en- 
gine No. 64 on the Vicksburg division. Mr. 
Lowry was in a serious wreck on the Grenada 
division in 1897, in which the fireman was in- 
jured. He has had good success since being on 



the road, never meeting with any injuries. Mr. 
Lowry was born in Mobile, Ala., on March 12, 
1873. His father, John B. Lowry, who is a car- 
penter and a farmer, now resides at Terry, Miss, 
(jeorge H. Lowry, a brother of our subject, was 
formerly an employe in the I. C. shops at Vicks- 
burg, but is now in the train service of the South- 
ern Pacific R. R. Mr. Lowry was a charter 
member of Division No. 460, B. of L. F., and is 
now connected with Division No. 281, B. of L. 
E., of Vicksburg. He is a popular employe of 
the road and ranks high. Being quite a young 
man, from the progress he has made, his pros- 
pects look exceedingly bright. Our subject is 
what may be called a self-made man. 




M. DUNN, superintendent of the 
Louisiana division of the Illinois 
Q Central, residing at New Orleans, 
began his railroad career in 1864, as 
warehouseman at Brimfield, Ind., for the Lake 
Shore & Michigan Southern R. R. Acquiring 
a thorough knowledge of telegraphy, he was for 
a number of years employed as agent and opera- 
tor at various places. His first position was at 
Sylvania, Ohio, during the years 1869 and 1870, 
from which place he went to White Pigeon, 
Mich., remaining there until 1872. Entering 
the service of the L. & N. R. R. in November of 
that year, he was appointed agent at Shepherds- 
ville, Ky., and in March 1874, was promoted to 
a similar position at Pulaski, Tenn. In Novem- 
ber 1880, he was sent to Owensboro, Ky., as 
general agent for the O. & N. R. R. (owned by 
the L. & N.) and was later, in 1881, tendered 
the position of master of trains, for the New Or- 
leans division, with headquarters at Mobile, Ala. 
In September 1883 he again received promotion, 
being appointed superintendent of the O. & N. 
division, with Russellville, Ky., as headquarters. 
Remaining in the latter position until January 
i, 1884, he was transferred to Memphis as super- 
intendent of the Memphis division, and in Sep- 
tember j 886 was offered and accepted the posi- 



324 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



tion of superintendent of Southern lines of the 
Illinois Central, at New Orleans. This position 
being finally abolished by the company in 1894, 
he was then appointed superintendent of the 
Louisiana division, and New Orleans terminals, 
which position he is now filling. The life of 
Mr. Dunn, has been a particularly active one, 
and faithfulness in the discharge of his duty has 
characterized his entire career. 




'ILLIAM FLETCHER, an engineer 
in the freight service of the Yazoo 
& Mississippi Valley R. R., began 
his career on the road in 1890, at 
Vicksburg, Miss., as a fireman, with Engineer 
McLaughlin. He was examined for promotion 
in 1895, and passing a highly creditable examina- 
tion, was given charge of an engine. He has 
since served the company in that capacity be- 
tween Vicksburg, Miss., and Wilson, La., on 
engine No. 93, where he is doing good work. 
His ten years connection with the road as fireman 
and engineer has been free from accidents or 
injury. Mr. Fletcher was born December 28, 
1867, at Jackson, Miss., where his father, John 
Fletcher, deceased, was a farmer. Socially he 
is identified with Division No. 281, B. of L. E., 
of Vicksburg. His home is in that city, where 
he enjoys a wide acquaintance, his many good 
qualities gaining for him the good will of all. 
As a railroad man he is competent and careful, 
and is a rising young man on the road. 




D. JONES, a well-known and pop- 
ular engineer in the passenger 
service of the Illinois -Central, is 
one of the oldest employes on the 
road. He entered the service of the I. C. in 
1858, when only a lad of fifteen. His first work 
was at Tickfaw, La., where he was in charge of 
the water station for several months. He then 



worked as engine wiper at Jackson, Miss., and 
at New Orleans, and while in the latter city be- 
gan an apprenticeship in the 1. C. shops there. 

At the outbreak of the war of the secession, 
our subject enlisted in the New Orleans Light 
Guards, First Louisiana Volunteers, under Col. 
Vincent and Captains Dean and Willard. This 
company saw service in the seven days fight 
at Richmond. He also served for a time with 
Gen. Jackson. On June 25th, 1863, Mr. Jones 
was wounded in the leg and was for six months 
confined in a hospital at Richmond, Va. On his 
recovery he entered the cavalry, under Capt. 
Harry Gilmore, doing duty for one year, and in 
1865 was in the hospital at Charlottesville, Va., 
at the time of Lee's surrender. 

Returning to New Orleans, our subject re- 
sumed work in the shops of the I. C., where he 
remained until July 1870, leaving the shops to 
assume a position as fireman on the road. He 
worked at this only a few weeks, when he re- 
ceived promotion to -engineer in the freight ser- 
vice, between Canton, Miss., and New Orleans, 
which position he held until 1871. In the lat- 
ter year he entered the service of the Southern 
Pacific, remaining with that company two years. 
The following four years were spent in the ser- 
vice of the Texas Pacific R. R., and New Orleans 
& Mobile R. R., and in 1877 he returned to Mc- 
Comb City, Miss., and re-entering the employ 
of the I. C. worked as engineer in the freight 
service, until 1885, when he received promotion 
to the passenger service, between Canton, Miss., 
and New Orleans, which position he still holds. 

Mr. Jones was born May 2, 1844, at Charles- 
ton, S. C., and is a son of Edward J. and Cath- 
erine M. Jones, of that city. Edward J. Jones 
was for many years superintendent of the ship- 
yards at Savannah, Ga. He was a contractor 
on the N. O. J. & G. N. R. R., and was for twenty 
years roadmaster for- the I. C., then known as 
the N. O. J. & G. N. R. R. Meeting with an ac- 
cident he was obliged to retire from the active 
service, and later died at McComb City. 

The original of this sketch was twice mar- 
ried. His first wife was Miss Harriet M. Chis- 
holm, of Charleston, S. C., who departed this life 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



325 



in 1882, leaving four children: Harriet, Sam- 
uel, Burton and Edward. In 1883 Mr. Jones 
was united to Miss Emma A. Burtus, of Bayou 
Sarah, La., and they are the parents of four chil- 
dren : Archie, Jessie, Florence and Ruth. 

Being- one of the oldest men in the service of 
the I .C., Mr. Jones is very well known and pop- 
ular in railroad circles. He has presented the 
Historical Company a time-card of the I. C., 
used on the Louisiana division in 1866, which 
appears elsewhere in this work. Socially he is 
a member of the Knights of Honor, of McComb 
City,, where he resides in a fine home on Vir- 
ginia avenue. 



G. WHEELOCK is an old and faith- 

rful employe of the Illinois Central, 
O having been in the service of the road 
since 1876. His first experience at 
railroad work was acquired in 1866, on the C. 
& A. R. R. in the state of Illinois, where he was 
employed as fireman on the Chicago division 
of that road. After a service of four years with 
that company as fireman and engineer, he went 
to the St. L. I. M. & S. R. R., working there for 
two years as engineer. He then went to the L. 
& N. R. R. remaining one year with that com- 
pany. He was next employed, for a year, on 
the E. P. & S. W. R. R. (now the I. C.) at Eliza- 
bethtown, Ky. Coming to McComb City in 1876, 
he entered the service of the I. C. as an engineer 
in the freight department, and after a faithful 
record of twelve years in that branch of the ser- 
vice, was promoted to the passenger department 
of the road, where he is now employed. He is 
in charge of a regular run between Canton, Miss., 
and McComb City, Miss. Since being connected 
with the I. C. he has been in two wrecks, escap- 
ing injury each time. 

Mr. Wheelock is a native of Yates county, 
New York, his birth occuring there October 10, 
1846. His father was Elias Wheelock, the prcn 
prietor of extensive woolen mills there, but who 
moved to Illinois and later to Missouri, where 



he died at the advanced age of eighty-nine years. 
E. G. Wheelock, was married in New Orleans, 
to Miss Sarah E. Hanrahan, who departed this 
life May 24, 1894, leaving five children: Warren 
O., Arthur N., Nellie, Louise, and Gladys. He 
is connected with, and is a charter member of, 
Division No. 196, B. of L. E., and is also a mem- 
ber of Lodge No. 36, K. of P., of McComb City, 
where he resides in a comfortable home on Mag- 
nolia street, and of which city he is a popular 
and useful citizen. 



PA. C. FERGUSON, trainmaster on 
the New Orleans division of the Ya- 
Q zoo & Mississippi Valley R. R., with 
headquarters at Vicksburg, Miss., is 
a native of that state, born November 13, 1861. 
His parents were Carroll and Lucinda (Patrick) 
Ferguson, the former a cotton merchant, died in 
1866, and the latter is still living, and resides in 
the state of Louisiana. 

Mr. Ferguson received his early training 
in the schools of Burnsville, Miss., and at the 
age of sixteen studied telegraphy. He was as- 
signed to duty as operator at Corinth, Miss., on 
the Memphis & Charleston R. R., where he had 
previously served a short time as fireman, and in 
the shops of the company at Memphis. After 
working for two years at Corinth, he entered 
the service of the Illinois Central at Winona, 
Miss., as telegrapher, working there seven 
months, and at various other places on the road 
for a short time. In 1880 he was called to the 
general office at New Orleans, remaining there 
until April i, 1881. He then went to Houston, 
Texas, securing a position in the office of the su- 
perintendent of the International & Great Nor- 
thern R. R. at that point, and worked there until 
June 1881. From Houston he went to Colum- 
bus, Texas, and there took a position in the office 
of the chief dispatcher for the Galveston, Harris- 
burg & San Antonio R. R., where he was occu- 
pied until October 1881. He then returned to 
Houston and entered the employ of the Texas 



326 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



& New Orleans R. R. as train dispatcher, serv- 
ing until November 1882, and from that road on 
the latter date to the Houston, East & West 
Texas R. R. as superintendent of telegraphy and 
chief dispatcher, with Houston as headquarters. 
Later he returned to the Texas & New Orleans 
R. R. as train dispatcher. In October 1883 that 
road was absorbed by the Southern Pacific, and 
Mr. Ferguson became chief dispatcher under the 
new management in June 1885, and held that 
position until January 1888. He was then chief 
dispatcher successively for the Gulf, Colorado 
& Santa Fe R. R. at Galveston, for one year, and 
the Texas Pacific R. R. at Marshall, Texas, for 
one year. In 1890 he became identified with the 
Louisville, New Orleans & Texas R. R. as train 
dispatcher at Vicksburg, Miss., and on October 
1st, 1891, was promoted to chief dispatcher, hold- 
ing the latter position until his promotion to 
trainmaster, on October 1st, 1899. His juris- 
diction extends from Vicksburg to Wilson, La. 
Mr. Ferguson is a member of Lodge No. 
65, K.of P., of Houston, Texas. He is a Metho- 
dist in belief, and a Democrat in politics. The 
wide experience Mr. Ferguson has had, together 
with his natural aptitude, mark him as a man 
well fitted for his chosen vocation. His many 
excellencies of character win for him the regard 
of all with whom business or social relations 
bring him in contact. 



JAMES ASHTON, popular conductor of 
the Illinois Central, residing in McComb 
City, Miss., is the son of James and 
Lydia (Conway) Ashton, and was born 
March 17, 1856, in New Orleans, where he was 
reared and educated. In 1868, at the age of 
twelve years, he commenced his railroad career 
as a newsboy on the New Orleans, Opelousas & 
Great Western Railroad (now a part of the 
Southern Pacific Railway System), with his 
father, who was employed as baggageman. Our 
subject remained in this position until the road 
was absorbed by the Southern Pacific, when he 



was offered a position as passenger brakeman, 
which he accepted ; but at the expiration of one 
year he was transferred to the freight service 
in the same capacity, remaining there but nine 
months when he was given charge of a bag- 
gage car. This position he occupied fourteen 
months when he was placed in charge of a freight 
train as conductor and continued in that capaci- 
ty for the following ten years. He was then as- 
signed to a regular passenger run and remained 
there for nine years. After a satisfactory ser- 
vice of nineteen years as conductor, he was made 
general instructor and examiner of the employes 
on' standard rules, and was retained in this posi- 
tion for six years. He is recognized as authori- 
ty on all rules pertaining to train service. Feel- 
ing that he had earned a rest, Mr. Ashton re- 
signed from the service and for the next seven 
months traveled all over the western part of the 
United States for recreation. Returning to New 
Orleans he decided not to again engage in rail- 
roading, but his desire and the influence of his 
old associates getting the better of him, he again 
embarked in his first calling. He then presented 
his past record and made application for a posi- 
tion as brakeman to Mr. R. H. Dwyer, trainmas- 
ter of the Illinois Central, at McComb City. 
This position he was readily given and held for 
eleven days when he was promoted to conductor 
in the freight service, where he is at present en- 
gaged. 

Mr. Ashton is a member of Division No. 
367, O. R. C. of McComb City, though he became 
identified with the order seventeen years ago 
when he joined Division No. 7, O. R. C. of 
Houston, Texas. He has served as Chief Con- 
ductor of Cresent City Division, No. 108, of New 
Orleans, which is conceded to be one of the 
largest and most prosperous divisions south of 
the Ohio river. 

Mr. Ashton has been remarkably success- 
ful, never having had a single accident in his 
railroad career of thirty-two years. He has been 
importuned a number of times by the young rail- 
road men of the Illinois Central railroad to start 
a class of instructions, but has refrained from do- 
ing so on account of it interfering with his other 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



327 



business. He has never been known to turn a 
deaf ear to any aspirant, and is always ready 
ajul willing to counsel and advise young men 
as to the sure and proper course to pursue to at- 
tain success. Mr. Ashton feels that he owes 
much of his success as a railroad man to Mr. W. 
F. Owen, superintendent of the Southern Paci- 
fic, at New Orleans, who took great interest and 
pleasure in giving him useful information and in 
elevating him to his present high standing. 
Honesty, sobriety, vigilance and fidelity has been 
his motto through his long and useful railroad 
career. 




F. BAKER is a native of Lexing- 
ton, Ky., and his father, William 
Q A. Baker, still resides in that city. 
Mr. Baker, who is now freight 
conductor on the Memphis division, began in 1887 
as a brak eman, and in 1889 he was promoted to 
conductor in the freight service. In 1893 he went 
to the Southern Pacific, working as freight con- 
ductor until 1895, when he came to Paducah to 
work for the Illinois Central. He now has a pre- 
ferred run between Paducah and Memphis, and 
he is very successful in his work. Mr. Baker mar- 
ried Miss Devney, of Evansville, Ind., and. has 
one child, a boy three years of age. Our sub- 
ject belongs to Division No. 290, O. R. C. 




L. McCLURE, supervisor of 
bridges and buildings on the Ya- 
zoo & Mississippi Valley R. R., 
wkh headquarters at Leland, 
Miss., was born near Londonderry, Ireland, on 
Oct. 16, 1847. His parents were John and Mary 
(Logan) McClure, farmers; the former departed 
this life on Aug. 14, 1888, and the latter on Jan. 7, 
1889. Mr. McClure arrived in America in 1867, 
and settled in Nashville, Tenn. He there en- 
tered the service of the Louisville & Nashville 



R. R. as a carpenter, and remained with the com- 
pany until 1879. He then went to Louisville, 
and took charge of a force of forty-three men 
engaged in the construction of a bridge being 
built by the Ohio River Bridge company, across 
the Ohio river at that point, and was occupied 
there as superintendent until the work was com- 
pleted, a term of two years and ten months. He 
then entered the service of the Louisville Bridge 
& Iron company, as superintendent of construc- 
tion, remaining with that company until August 
22, 1872, during which period he superintended 
the construction of a bridge on the Owensboro 
& Russellville Railroad at Livermore, Ky., cross- 
ing the Gum river. He also constructed the 
Louisville & Nashville bridge at Danville, Tenn., 
the total length of the latter being about 1939 
feet, consisting of eight spans of 208 feet each, 
and a draw of 275 feet. On the completion of 
that work Mr. McClure was offered, and ac- 
cepted, the position of superintendent of bridges 
and buildings for the Louisville & Nashville R. 
R., and during his incumbency reconstructed 
nearly all bridges between Nashville, Tenn., 
and Decatur, Ala. In 1879, he was transferred 
to the Henderson division of the St. Louis & 
South-Eastern R. R. with headquarters at Hop- 
kinsville, Ky., where he was engaged in construc- 
tion until September 15, 1881. He then retired 
from railroad work, and went into the business 
of contracting and building at Hopkinsville, re- 
maining in that work until August 1890. On 
that date he entered the service of the Louisville, 
New Orleans & Texas R. R. (now the Yazoo & 
Mississippi Valley R. R.) as supervisor of bridges 
and buildings, with headquarters at Vicksburg, 
Miss. For convenience he has been located at 
different points on the system, and has his office 
at the present time in Leland. Since being con- 
nected with the road, Mr. McClure has given 
the highest degree of satisfaction, being a man 
who thoroughly understands his business, the 
long experience in which has so completely quali- 
fied him for his position. In 1877 Mr. McClure 
was joined in matrimony to Miss Maria E. Cab- 
ler, of Columbia, Tenn., but a native of Nashville. 
Six children have been born to them, viz : John 



328 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



W., aped twenty-one, chief bookkeeper for Tan- 
ger & (Company, of Memphis, Tenn. ; Bessie Lee, 
aged eighteen ; Eugene A., aged seventeen ; Man- 
aged fourteen ; George, aged five ; and Robert 
B. aged one year. Mr. McClure is a Master 
Mason, being connected with Memphis Lodge 
No. 118. His family attend the Methodist 
church. Politically he is a democrat. 




in 1888. 



J. McLAUGHLIN, a competent and 
popular engineer in the employ of the 
Yazoo & Mississippi Valley R. R., 
entered the service of the company 
His first experience at railroad work, 
was acquired on the Richmond & Danville, (Va.) 
R. R. where he was for a time employed as 
fireman, and later was promoted to engineer. 
Coming to Vicksburg he at once secured a posi- 
tion as fireman on the Yazoo & Mississippi Val- 
ley R. R., and in 1890 was given a regular run 
in the freight service as engineer on the Vicks- 
burg division, and has since remained there in 
charge of engine No. 79: On December 6, 1892, 
his hand was caught in the drive wheel of his 
engine, and he lost four fingers. This is the on- 
ly injury he has sustained during his railroad 
career. Mr. McLaughlin is a native of Ireland, 
born in County Derry, on June 18, 1865. He is 
connected with Division No. 281, B. of L. E., 
of Vicksburg, where he makes his home, and 
has a large circle of acquaintances and friends. 




, OBERT BRENNAX, a popular young 
engineer in the freight service of the 
Yazoo & Mississippi Valley R. R., has 
been with the company since Septem- 
ber 1 8, 1896. He was first employed as a fire- 
man on the Tennessee Midland R. R. (now the 
Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis R. R.) where 
he served two months. Going to Memphis, he 
became identified with the Yazoo & Mississippi 



\ alley R. R. as fireman, and three and one-half 
years service in that capacity was followed by 
promotion to engineer. He was then placed in 
charge of engine No. 82 and has since remained 
in the freight service of that road. He has at 
present a regular run on engine No. 275, between 
Memphis and Vicksburg. Mr. Brennan was 
born in Nashville, Tenn., on May i, 1870, and 
is a son of Cornelius Brennan deceased, who 
was a blacksmith in the employ of the Nashville, 
Chattanooga & St. Louis R. R. Miss Annie 
Lappin of Cincinnati, Ohio, became the wife of 
Mr. Brennan, and they have established a com- 
fortable home, at No. 158 Florida avenue, in 
the city of Memphis, where they have a large 
circle of friends and acquaintances. 




^ATRICK WHALEN, general yardmaster 
of the Illinois Central at McComb City, 
has had a railroad experience extend- 
ing over more than twenty years. He 
first began with the Central at Centralia as brake- 
man in 1879 and two years later was made con- 
ductor, running between Cairo and Centralia, 
which position he held for thirteen years, when 
he was made yardmaster at Centralia. One year 
later he accepted a position as conductor on the 
Cairo Short Line and was thus engaged when 
the road was absorbed by the Central. He was 
shortly after transferred to Belleville where he 
served as yardmaster and conductor some six- 
teen months and for a like period in the yards 
at Jackson; Miss., when on February 9, 1897, 
he was placed in charge of the yards at McComb, 
his present assignment. He is well versed in 
the duties of conductor and yardmaster, manag- 
ing efficiently the force under his charge. He is 
a member of McComb City Division No. 367, O. 
R. C. In all the years of his railway experience 
Mr. Whalen has been involved in but one wreck, 
that of a construction train, and came out of 
that without injury. He is well liked by all 
under his authority and holds the confidence of 
his superiors. 




o 

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AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



331 



I | ^\ B. RUGG, who resides in Ft. Dodge, 

riowa, has been an engineer for twelve 
O years, and a fireman for four years. 
His first work was with the old St. 
Louis Railroad, where he worked in the trans- 
portation department for two and a half years. 
He then began with the Illinois Central as a 
fireman, which position he held for four years, 
and in September 1887 was promoted to engineer, 
his first charge being engine No. 197. He now 
runs engine No. 810, and has sat on the right 
side of it since 1890. His run is between Fort 
Dodge and Cherokee and Sioux City. 

Mr. Rugg, a native of Shelburne Falls, 
Mass., was born Oct. 22, 1858. He is a son of Joel 
Rugg, who is a tanner and shoemaker by trade, 
and who resides in Iowa county, Iowa. Our 
subject married Miss Kate Kennedy, of Chero- 
kee, Iowa, and they have two children, Marie 
and Ruth. He is a member of Division No. 
226, B. of L. E., and the A. O. U. W., both of 
Fort Dodge, Iowa. He was never in any wrecks 
of any kind, and never injured. The family res- 
idence is at No. 324 North Seventh street, Fort 
Dodge, Iowa. 




,HARLES W. GARDNER, engineer, 
has been with the Illinois Central since 
February 1882. He first began work 
with the company as fireman, and three 
and a half years later was promoted to engineer. 
Mr. Gardner had worked for the Chicago & 
North- Western Railroad before joining the Illi- 
nois Central company. He is a native of Lake 
county, Ohio, and a son of John Gardner, a 
farmer, who in early days was a tanner and boot 
and shoe maker, and who came to Fort Dodge, 
Iowa, many years ago, and died there. Our 
subject married Miss A. D. Stevens, of Humbolt, 
Iowa, who has borne three children : Francis ; 
John J., who since June 1899 has been in the em- 
ploy of the I. C. R. R. as fireman on the Omaha 
division ; and Gertrude. Mr. Gardner now runs 
engine No. 910, between Fort Dodge and 

19 



Sioux City. He is a member of Division No. 
226, B. of L. E., of Fort Dodge, also the Masonic 
order and the A. O. U. W. Our subject's only 
wreck was a head end collision, in which he had 
a shoulder dislocated. Mr Gardner is very promi- 
nent in railroad circles, and is now secretary 
of the committee of adjustment, and was chair- 
man of the same during the trouble of 1894. He 
owns a finely furnished residence at No. 1205 
Fifth avenue, south, Fort Dodge, Iowa. 




B. CURLEY was born in Alta- 
mont, Garnett county, Md. His 
Q father, Thomas Curley, died in 
1892, being an old railroad man, 
having served as section foreman on various 
roads for many years. Mr. Curley was educated 
in Ohio county, Ky., and at the Catholic Brothers 
school in Louisville. He commenced work on 
the railroad at the age of fifteen, driving a cart. 
He next carried water and then worked on the 
section, and in various positions until August 
1878, when he began on the Paducah & Eliza- 
bethtown Railroad as brakeman, in which place 
he served eleven months. Following this he 
served as fireman two years and ten months and 
was then given an engine on the Elizabethtown 
& Paducah R. R., remaining until 1883, when 
he secured a place on the L. & N. as engineer. 
In 1884 he came back to the C. O. & S. W. R. R., 
running freight and passenger, and has since re- 
mained in that service. His present run is be- 
tween Louisville and Paducah in passenger ser- 
vice. 

Our subject is considered one of the Illinois 
Central's best engineers. May 9, 1896, with thir- 
teen loaded freight cars and engine No. 603, 
he made the run from Central City to Louisville, 
one hundred twenty-seven miles, in three hours 
and thirty five minutes, which has never been 
equalled. Mr. Curley has never been seriously 
injured in his long service on the road. In 1894 
at the time of the strike, he had been on a vaca- 
tion, came back and took an engine, not knowing 



332 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



of the strike. Somebody threw a switch and the 
engine was thrown on the side and cars piled up. 
Our subject is a member of L. E. Graves 
Lodge No. 485, B. of L. E., of Louisville, being 
First Assistant Chief, also a member of the 
Catholic Knights of America, to which lodge he 
has belonged since 1883. Mr. Curley is a jolly, 
goodnatured man, a man of honor and one who 
is well liked by the community. He married 
Miss Dooley, of Elizabethtown, who is a daugh- 
ter of J. Dooley, who has been section foreman 
on the L. & N. for the period of seventeen years. 
Our subject has a nice, comfortable home in 
Louisville. - . 




G. NELSON is an engineer in the 
passenger service on the Louisiana 
Q division of the Illinois Central, hav- 
ing a regular run between Canton, 
Miss., and New Orleans. He entered the service 
of the I. C. in 1880, at McComb City, as a coal 
heaver, working as such for two months. He 
was then given employment in the shops at that 
place, remaining there four years, when he re- 
ceived an appointment as locomotive fireman, 
at which he worked eight months. On Septem- 
ber 13, 1883, after passing a creditable examin- 
ation, he was promoted to engineer in the freight 
service, continuing there until August 1st, 1898, 
when he was promoted to the passenger service. 
His entire career as a railroad man has been 
spent on the Louisiana division of the I. C., with 
the exception of two months in 1890, which were 
passed in the state of Illinois working on the 
Champaign division of the road. He has been 
in two wrecks while in the employ of the I. C., 
the second and most serious of which occurred 
on March I ith, 1892. It was caused by the over- 
turning of his engine. In this wreck the fireman 
lost his life, and our subject was so badly injured 
that he was obliged to retire from active service 
for sixteen months. 

Mr. Nelson is a native of Sweden, where 
he was born October 2, 1863. Olaf Nelson, his 



father, was a carpenter by trade, and emigrated 
to America in 1873, settling in Water Valley, 
Miss. He returned to Sweden in 1875 to bring 
his family to this country, and is now living a 
retired life at McComb City. A _brother of Mr. 
Nelson, Frederic M., is a cabinet-maker em- 
ployed in the shops of the I. C. in the latter city. 
The union of Mr. Nelson and Miss Mattie 
Traylor took place at McComb City, and resulted 
in the birth of three children : John P., born 
June 25, 1883 ; Ruby V., born in 1886, and Ed- 
win W., born in 1894. Mr. Nelson is a progres- 
sive and prominent resident of East McComb 
City, where he owns a comfortable home, be- 
sides considerable other property. He is con- 
nected socially with Division No. 196, B. of L. 
E., of his home city. 




'ILLIAM L. OAKLEY, chief train 
dispatcher at McComb City, Miss., 
was born at Evansville, Ind., Aug. 24, 
1858. His father, W. H. Oakley, 
graduated from the Kentucky Military Institute, 
as a civil engineer, in 1853, and shortly after laid 
out the Vincennes & Terre Haute R. R., serving 
as division engineer at the age of twenty. He was 
employed successively on the Evansville & In- 
dianapolis, and the "Big Four" line between 
Marshall, 111., and Vincennes, Ind. After the 
war he served for a time as cashier and pay- 
master on the Vincennes & Cairo line, since 
which time he has not been identified with rail- 
road work. He married Maria L. Conant, in 
April 1857, at Evansville, where he has continued 
to reside most of the time since that event. 

William L. Oakley after his schooling had 
been secured in the schools of his native town, 
began his railroad career in 1874 as news agent, 
and in half a year was promoted to brakeman 
between Cairo and Vincennes, at which he was 
engaged some eighteen months. Having in the 
meantime studied telegraphy, he was competent 
to take advantage of an opening in that depart- 
ment on the St. Louis & South-Eastern, and after 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



333 



the road was absorbed by the Nashville, Chatta- 
nooga & St. Louis he was promoted to train 
dispatcher and was again promoted to chief in 
that department when the Louisville & Nash- 
ville came into possession of the road. He was 
filling this position January i, 1888, when he ac- 
cepted an offer of train dispatcher at Cairo for 
the Illinois Central, and remained at that point 
until October 7, 1892, when he was transferred 
to the Louisiana division with headquarters at 
McComb, and promoted to chief dispatcher. 
Since that date he has been acceptably filling the 
position. 

The marriage of Mr. Oakley occurred at 
McLeansboro, 111., July n, 1882, Miss Ora Sul- 
lenger linking her fortunes with his at that time. 
Four children have been born to them : Marie ; 
Harry, a student of mechanical draughting ; Lela 
B. and William N. J. H. Oakley, a brother, has 
been in the United States marine service for a 
period of seven years, being at present stationed 
at Queenstown, Ireland. Mr. Oakley is a mem- 
ber of Evansville Lodge No. 136, K. of P., and 
of the American Train Dispatchers' Association. 
Mr. Oakley has never failed in his trust, and by 
his careful administration of his official duties 
has merited the continued confidence of his em- 
ployers. 




'ILLIAM A. TAYLOR, the highly 
popular young man who holds the 
responsible position of train dis- 
patcher for the Illinois Central at 
McComb City, Miss., was born at Morristown, 
Tenn., in 1875. He began his railroad career 
in 1893, on the East Tennessee & Georgia R. 
R. (now the Southern R. R.), and from that 
year until coming to the I. C. was at various sta- 
tions along that road as telegraph operator. En- 
tering the service of the Illinois Central, in the 
office at Water Valley, Miss., he was soon pro- 
moted to dispatcher, and is now on "third trick" 
from midnight until 8 A. M. Mr. Taylor served 
his country during the Spanish American war, 
being a member of Company G, 2nd Miss. Vol. 



He was honorably discharged on December 24, 
1898. He is a member of Elks Lodge No. 268, 
of McComb City, and of the K. of P., of Water 
Valley. For a young man, Mr. Taylor has been 
eminently successful in life. He is of jovial na- 
ture, and to come in contact with him, means 
the laying aside of all care, . and enjoying the 
present. 



JOHN M. McCANN, one of the prominent 
conductors on the Paducah district of 
the Illinois Central, has a preferred run 
between Paducah and Louisville. Our 
subject's railroad life began at South Louisville, 
on the L. & N., where he was employed a short 
time in transferring cars, then for seven months 
was switching in the yards, being transferred to 
the road where he broke for three years, at the 
end of which time he went to the Short Line as 
switchman and brakeman, remaining one year 
and eight months. After the L. & N. took 
charge of the Short Line, he quit braking and 
for nearly three years fired on the road. He 
then went back to braking and at the end of 
eleven months was promoted, in 1884, to freight 
conductor, running freights for the following 
four years, when he was given a passenger run 
between Louisville and Cincinnati and Louisville 
and Lexington, holding this position for three 
years. Tiring of railroad work he quit the road 
and embarked in business in Louisville, but not 
meeting with the success he deserved, at the end 
of four years returned to railroading, going to 
the Air Line as brakeman, but at the end of six 
weeks was laid off on account of slack business. 
He then went on the Louisville Southern as 
brakeman, was afterwards put in the yards as 
foreman of an engine, and part of the time acted 
as extra night yardmaster, but on account of a 
misunderstanding left the Louisville Southern 
and returned to the Air Line as brakeman, with 
a promise of promotion, which shortly followed, 
and he remained with this road for three years, 
when he came to Paducah and took his present 



334 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



run. In his varied and interesting railroad ca- 
reer our subject never had a serious accident, 
never burnt a journal off, was never injured, 
and was never laid off. 

John M. McCann was born May 24, 1859, 
in Henry county, Ky., but was educated in Louis- 
ville, and on May 24, 1881, was married to Miss 
Mattie L. Hook, of Louisville. They are the 
parents of four interesting children, as follows: 
Alma E., who is bookkeeper and stenographer 
for the Tennessee Telephone Co., of Paducah; 
Frank E., who is attending the high school ; Em- 
ery L. is a vocalist of considerable note, and is 
very highly spoken of by those who have heard 
her sing ; and Cleo W., a graduate of the schools 
of Paducah. Socially Mr. McCann is a member 
of Abraham Lodge No. 8, A. F. & A. M., of 
Louisville, also of Wingo Division No. 290, O. 
R. C, of Paducah, in which lodge he has held 
nearly every office, and in 1899 served as Chief 
of the Division. Throughout his long railroad 
career Mr. McCann has been successful, and 
there is no better known or more popular conduc- 
tor on the Louisville division than the subject of 
this sketch. 




, OBERT E. ADDKISON accountant for 
the Illinois Central at Jackson, Miss., 
entered the service of the company in 
August 1894, as a brakeman between 
Jackson and Natchez. Serving as a brakeman 
until December of that year, he occupied the posi- 
tion of bill clerk at Natchez from that date until 
March 1897. He next served as ticket clerk 
in the same city until April 1898, and as day clerk 
at Holly Springs, Miss., until July 1898, when 
he was appointed manifest clerk in the freight 
department of the I. C. at Jackson, Miss., which 
he occupied until April i, 1900, when he was pro- 
moted to accountant. Mr. Addkison was born 
on August 28, 1874, in Jackson, Miss., where 
his father, Andrew J. Addkison, a farmer, still 
resides. David E. Addkison, agent for the 
American Express company at Jackson, is a 
brother of our subject. Miss Emma C. Muller 



became the wife of our subject, and one child, 
Andrew Joseph, is the result of their union. 
They reside in a comfortable home on Pearl 
street, in Jackson, where they have a large circle 
of acquaintances and friends. 



JOHN E. LAWTON, a conductor in the 
freight service of the Yazoo & Missis- 
sippi Valley R R. on the New Orleans 
division, with headquarters at Wilson, 
La., is a native of Chesterfield county, West Va., 
where he was born on July i8th, 1854. Dr. 
Richard Lawton, his father, was a physician who 
moved to middle Tennessee during the childhood 
of our subject, and practiced his profession there 
until his death in 1878. He was followed to the 
grave by his wife, Phoebe (Winfell) Lawton, 
who died in 1888. John E. Lawton attended 
the schools of Tipton county, Tenn., and spent 
his boyhood days on a farm, his father hav- 
ing a plantation. At the age of nineteen he 
began running a market wagon in the city of 
Memphis, and remained at that business a year. 
He then worked for five months in the shops of 
the Memphis & Charleston R. R., and on June 
22nd, 1874, began his active road career as a 
fireman, between Memphis and Chattanooga, 
where he served three years. Promotion to 
engineer followed, in which capacity he served 
only two months, when, on account of slack busi- 
ness he returned to his former work of fireman, 
and continued there for six months. He then 
took charge of an engine, and was for six years 
in the freight and passenger service of the road, 
when in April 1884 he resigned. He then en- 
tered the service of the Louisville, New Orleans 
& Texas R. R. (now the Yazoo & Mississippi 
Valley R. R.), at New Orleans, as engineer in 
the passenger service of that road, under John 
Bradley, superintendent, John A. Grant, builder 
of the road, and J. M. Edwards, manager. He 
held that position four and one-half years, re- 
turning at the end of that period to the Memphis 
& Charleston R. R., but remained only two 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



335 



months, when he again returned to the Louis- 
ville, New Orleans & Texas R. R. His former 
position with this road was in the passenger ser- 
vice, but on account of the long run, and having 
his home at Wilson, La., he, on his return, went 
as engineer in the freight service, and was in that 
hranch of the service until November ist, 1889. 
On the latter date he was appointed foreman of 
motive power at Wilson, and held that position 
until December 25, 1892. He then resigned from 
the road, and retired from active duty, until 
August 5, 1893, when he entered the employ of 
the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley R. R. as a con- 
ductor in the freight service of the road, between 
Wilson and Vicksburg, where he is now em- 
ployed. The marriage of Mr. Lawton and Miss 
Susan B., daughter of Col. W. R. Patton, of 
Hunts ville, Ala., occurred on January 17, 1878. 
Their union was blessed by three sons : William 
P., chief clerk in the office of the trainmaster, 
at Wilson ; John E. Jr., and Lee H., attending 
school. Mr. Lawton is a member of Division 
No. 231, O. R. C, of Vicksburg, Knights of 
Pythias, and Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
His family are attendants at the Presbyterian 
church, and politically he affiliates with the Dem- 
ocracy. Mr. Lawton has a subtantial home at 
Wilson, La., of which place he is a progressive 
and worthy citizen. 



JOHN H. FUQUA, a competent and 
trusted engineer on the Louisiana divi- 
sion of the Illinois Central, was born in 
1865, at Shelby ville, Tenn. Having been 
left an orphan at an early age, he was obliged 
to make his own way in life, from youth. He 
determined on a railroad career, and found his 
first employment in the shops of the Louisville 
& Nashville R. R. at Birmingham, Ala. Desir- 
ing active service on the road, he obtained a 
position as fireman on the Alabama Great South- 
ern R. R., where he soon found promotion to 
switch engineer. He then went to the L. & N. 
R. R. as engineer out of Birmingham. In 1898 



he entered the service of the I. C. as engineer, 
where he is now successfully serving. He is 
in charge of engine No. 749, I. C. build. 

Mr. Fuqua had a narrow escape from death 
while on the Louisville & Nashville R. R., by 
the derailment of the engine. His engineer, 
James McKay, the largest engineer in the coun- 
try at that time, weighing over four hundred 
pounds, being too heavy to jump, was scalded to 
death. Of the social organizations, Mr. Fuqua 
affiliates with Division No. 196, B. of L. E., of 
McComb City. His railroad career covers a pe- 
riod of seventeen years of successful work, and 
in McComb City, where he makes his home, he is 
highly respected. 




LLEN C. MARTIN, general foreman 
of the car department, is a native of 
Covington, La., born July 14, 1851. 
He lived under the parental roof until 
the age of twenty, and learned his trade under 
his father's instruction. Coming to McComb 
he worked at his trade for a time, and in April 
1874 secured a place in the shops of the New Or- 
leans, Jackson & Great Northern Railroad. Af- 
ter the road was purchased by the Central, Mr. 
Martin was retained on the force, and on Feb- 
ruary i, 1883, was made foreman of the passen- 
ger shops, where he was employed six and a 
half years. After a few months in charge of 
the car shops at New Orleans, he was ordered 
back to McComb December i, 1889, and for five 
years was in charge of the freight shops. Since 
1894 he has been in full charge of all the wood- 
working departments, which have grown to large 
proportions. 

Mr. Martin was married at McComb in 
November 1873, to Miss Emily Easley, and they 
have a family of five sons : Albert A. and Warie 
W. are machinists in the shops at McComb ; Ed- 
ward E. is an apprentice in the boiler shops, 
while Robert C. and Archie H. are still in school. 
Mr. Martin is far advanced in the Masonic 
order, holding membership in Blue Lodge No. 



336 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



382, at McComb, Chapter No. 90, at Summit, 
and St. Cyr Commandery No. 5, at Water Val- 
ley. He is also a member of the Knights of 
Honor at McComb. The family are communi- 
cants of the Episcopal church. Mr. Martin is 
a man well versed in his craft in all its branches, 
and has as well excellent executive ability, being 
able to get the most possible out of a given num- 
ber of men without friction. 




R. OLIVER B. QUIN, district surgeon 
of the Illinois Central at McComb 
City, Miss., is a native of Holmesville, 
of that state, his birth occuring Decem- 
ber 6, 1857. After finishing the course of the 
high school at Summit, whither his parents had 
removed, he began the study of his profession 
under the tutelage of his father, Dr. D. H. Quin. 
The latter attended lectures in the University 
of Pennsylvania, after a course in the literary 
department of Kenyon college at Cambridge, 
Ohio. After reading under his father's instruc- 
tion, Oliver B. Quin attended the medical de- 
partment of the University of Louisiana, now the 
Tulane University, graduating in 1879. He im- 
mediately located at McComb City and has been 
in constant practice here ever since. In 1886, 
after the death of Dr. C. Hoover, then surgeon 
of the Illinois Central at this point, Dr. Quin 
being recognized as the leading surgeon there, 
was offered the vacant position, which he ac- 
cepted. Owing to the large number of employes 
in the extensive shops and the large number 
of operatives resident at McComb, the official 
practice reaches many hundred cases every year. 
Dr. Quin's jurisdiction extends from Hazelhurst, 
Miss., to Amite City, La. 

The marriage of Dr. Quin occurred at Vicks- 
burg, Miss., December 9, 1880, Miss Sophie 
Clark becoming his wife. To them have been 
born four children Madge, Mary, Ella and 
Oliver Benton Jr. 

Dr. Quin served several terms as selectman 
of the city,' and then at the earnest solicitations 



of his friends, accepted the nomination of mayor 
and was repeatedly elected to that office, serving 
in that capacity at the present time. He is a 
member of the state board of health and has been 
prominent in the financial interests of the city, 
having served as director of the bank established 
in the city. He is active in any movement to 
establish new enterprises in the vicinity where 
he resides and in the state as well. 

The secret orders have received from Dr. 
Quin a cordial support. He is a member of the 
McComb Lodge of Masons No. 382, the Summit 
Chapter, No. 90, Jackson Commandery No. i, 
and Hamasa Temple of the Mystic Shrine at 
Meridian, Miss., Myrtle Lodge, K. of P., No. 36, 
Good Will Lodge No. 104, I. O. O. F. and Me 
Comb City Lodge No. 268, of the Elks. He is 
a member of the American Medical Association 
and the Mississippi State Medical Association. 

Dr. Quin is a man of broad views, a typi- 
cal representative of the new and progressive 
south, and one whose character leaves its impress 
on the locality where he has made his home. He 
is a man of culture and refinement, a true son 
of the old south. As a citizen and practitioner 
none stand higher than Dr. Quin. 




L EORGE H. FOSTER, a well known 
engineer in the freight service of the 
Yazoo & Mississippi Valley R. R., has 
been ten years in the service of the 
company. He acquired his first knowledge of 
railroad work on the Denver & Rio Grande R. 
R., where he was employed four years as a fire- 
man, between Pueblo and Salida, Colo. He 
then served for two years in the same capacity 
on the Alabama & Southern R. R., and in 1889 
came to Vicksburg, entering the employ of the 
Yazoo & Mississippi Valley R. R. After work- 
ing six weeks as fireman, he was promoted to 
engineer, and has since been employed all over 
the road and its branches. He is at present on a 
uvular run in the freight service on engine 
No. 94, between Vicksburg and New Orleans. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



337 



His career on the road has been highly success- 
ful. Mr. Foster was born in Chattanooga, Tenn., 
on November ist, 1861. His parents, George 
D. and Rachael (Rogers) Foster, were respected 
residents of that city, where Mr. Foster Sr. fol- 
lowed the occupation of a carpenter, and was a 
large property owner. Both are now deceased. 
Mr. Foster married Miss Minnie Hoskins, of 
Brookhaven, Miss., and with her resides on Bel- 
mont avenue, in Vicksburg. Of the social or- 
ders Mr. Foster belongs to Division No. 281, 
B. of L. E., of his home city. Politically he is a 
Democrat, but looks to the qualifications of the 
man more than to party. 



JFRED HOUSEAL, a young engineer 
running as an extra in the freight ser- 
Q vice of the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley 
R. R. has been with the company since 
1891. Beginning as a fireman on the Louisville, 
New Orleans & Texas R. R. (now the Y. & M. 
V. R. R.) with Engineer Duffy, he served there 
for two years, when he resigned and entered 
the University of Tennessee, where he pursued 
his studies for one year. In 1891 he returned 
to the same road and engaged in the same work, 
serving one year, when he was promoted to en- 
gineer in the yards at Memphis. He occupied 
the latter position for two years, and in 1896 re- 
turned to firing for one year. In 1897 he was 
examined and promoted to engineer, and was 
in the freight service for seven months between 
Memphis and Vicksburg. Losing his position 
through an accident, he went to his old home in 
South Carolina, where he remained one year, 
and in September 1898, returned to Memphis. 
A month later he went on the road as fireman be- 
tween Vicksburg and New Orleans, and in March 
1899, agrm took the examination and was pro- 
moted to engineer, since which he has been an 
extra between Memphis, Vicksburg and New Or- 
leans. Mr. Houseal was born at Newberry, S. 
C, on January i, 1874. A sketch of John I., 
his father, will be found elsewhere in this book. 



On August 17, 1899, he was united in marriage 
to Miss Daisy Law, a native of Tracy City, 
Tenn., but a resident of Memphis at the time of 
her marriage. She is a daughter of P. S. Law, 
an engineer on the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley 
R. R. Mrs. Houseal is a member of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church. They reside at No. 16, 
Barton avenue, in Memphis. 




E. STUFFLEBEAM, chief clerk in 
the office of the roadmaster, for the 
Yazoo & Mississippi Valley R. R. at 
Vicksburg, Miss., was born in White 
Hall, Washington county, New York, on Octo- 
ber 26, 1871. W. G. and Olna A. (Mosher) 
Stufnebeam, are his parents, now residing in 
Idaho, where the former is an extensive ranch 
owner and stockman. Mr. Stufflebeam attended 
the schools of his native place, and at the age of 
thirteen moved with his parents to Idaho, where 
he continued at school four years longer. In 
1888 he entered the Ogden Military Academy, 
at Ogden, Utah, remaining there three years, 
and taking a full classical course. His business 
education was acquired at Coleman's business 
college, in Newark, N. J., after which he re- 
turned to Idaho and became associated with his 
father, and remained there until 1897. He came 
to Vicksburg, Miss., in that year, securing a clerk- 
ship in the office of B. E. Mosher, roadmaster 
of the New Orleans division of the Y. & M. V. 
R. R., and occupied that position until promoted 
to chief clerk, on October 20, 1898. He holds 
the latter position at the present time, and is 
filling it in a very acceptable manner, being well 
endowed with the natural talents necessary to 
make a success of his work. 

On January 3, 1893, Mr. Stufflebeam was 
united to Miss Helen J., daughter of George and 
Helen J. Osborn, of Troy, N. Y. This estim- 
able and accomplished lady, who possessed those 
virtues which make a lovely and lovable charac- 
ter, departed this life on May 27, 1899, deeply 



338 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



mourned by the many friends who knew and 
esteemed her. 

Socially, Mr. Stufflebeam belongs to the 
Modern Woodmen of the World. He was reared 
in the Presbyterian faith, and in politics is united 
with the Democratic party. 



LANCE L. DAWSON, master mechanic 
of the shops at McComb City, Miss., 
has had nearly twenty years experience 
in railroad operation. He is a native of 
London, England, his birth occurring February 
5, 1863. His father, Lance Dawson, emigrated 
with his family to the States about 1869, and 
after a short sojourn in Chicago, secured employ- 
ment in the shops of the Central at Champaign 
as a machinist. Here the son attended school, 
and when of sufficient age secured a place as 
apprentice to the machinist trade in the shops 
near his father. Mr. Dawson began his appren- 
ticeship in February 1880, and after three years 
in the shops at Champaign, served two years in 
the Weldon shops at Chicago. After his term 
as apprentice he returned to Champaign working 
as a journeyman until January i, 1887, when he 
was appointed foreman of the Champaign and 
Havana line, serving one year. Until January 
i, 1889, he was again at work in the shops in 
Champaign, and was on that date transferred to 
Rantoul, as foreman of that branch, with juris- 
diction over the road from LeRoy to West Leba- 
non, Ind. December i, 1890, he was appointed 
night foreman of the Weldon shops at Chicago, 
and July I, 1891, was sent to Champaign as as- 
sistant foreman of the shops there, being pro- 
moted to the foremanship the first of May fol- 
lowing. For nearly five years he was in charge 
of the Champaign shops, and January 20, 1897, 
he was transferred to Louisville, and promoted 
to general foreman. From May 20, 1898, to 
December 1st, following, he served as master 
mechanic at the Memphis shops, and since the 
latter date has served as master mechanic at the 
shops at McComb. Mr. Dawson has instituted 



many improvements in the shops during his in- 
cumbency at McComb. He instituted an air- 
brake instruction room in the round house ; 
erected separate shops for overhauling pumps ; 
built an air engine and equipment for hoisting 
iron to the furnace of the foundry ; built a series 
of bins for the assortment of scrap iron, and by 
saving out hundreds of pounds of supplies that 
were in good condition, saved that amount of 
new supplies, while the waste iron not fit for use 
is on a level of the cars on which it is to be 
loaded, thus saving much time and labor in get- 
ting it aboard ; had the paint and blacksmith 
shops each extended thirty feet; installed an air 
hoist in the ice house ; also an air hoist for load- 
ing and unloading car wheels; built an air 
driven hammer for straightening bolts which had 
been done by hand prior to that time ; besides 
numerous other minor improvements in various 
departments under his jurisdiction. 

Mr. Dawson was married at Rantoul, 111., 
July 2, 1895, to Miss Harriet Connor, to whom 
has been born a daughter, Marjorie. Of the so- 
cial orders, of which Mr. Dawson is a member, 
may be mentioned the Knights of Pythias, at 
Rantoul, the Court of Honor, at Champaign, and 
the National Union, at Louisville. As a pro- 
gressive, energetic official, Mr. Dawson holds 
high rank. Inventive, ingenious, and of excel- 
lent executive ability, it is no secret why he has 
succeeded in rising above many who started out 
before him with better prospects than his. 



JAMES McINTYRE, a well known en- 
gineer in the freight service of the Ili- 
nois Central, on the Louisiana division, 
entered the service of the Louisville, 
New Orleans & Texas Railroad (now the 
Yazoo & Mississippi Valley R. R.), on February 
1 8th, 1888. His first work was as an apprentice 
in the shops at New Orleans, but he worked 
there only four months when he decided to go 
to the regular road service. Securing a posi- 
tion as fireman, he served in that capacity until 




WILLIAM F. THOMAS. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



341 



September 1895, when he was promoted to en- 
gineer, and appointed to a regular run in the 
freight service between Vicksburg and New Or- 
leans. In 1899 ne was transferred to McComb 
City, and has since remained there. Mr. Mc- 
Intyre was born in Kenner, La., on August 9th, 
1865. His father was George Mclntyre Sr., a 
former employe of the I. C., well and favorably 
known. Socially our subject is connected with 
Division No. 196, B. of L. E., of McComb City. 
He is considered a careful and painstaking em- 
ploye, and is very popular. 




'ILLIAM F. THOMAS, one of the 
oldest and most highly esteemed en- 
gineers in the passenger service on 
the Aberdeen division of the Illinois 
Central, is a native of Baton Rouge, La., but 
with his parents moved to Rome, Ga., where he 
was reared and educated. Our subject, who has 
seen thirty-five years of active railroad service, 
began his career in September 1865, in the me- 
chanical department of the Western Atlantic 
Railroad, where he worked seventeen months. 
He then went to the Memphis & Chattanooga 
Railroad in the construction service, and in Sep- 
tember 1868 was promoted to the passenger ser- 
vice and placed in charge of the "Gov. Patton," 
a wood burner. While in the fast passenger 
service of this road, Mr. Thomas was given an 
engine which seven men. had failed to run, but 
his superior knowledge of mechanics enabled him 
to remedy the trouble and successfully operate 
it. In 1879 Mr. Thomas resigned his position 
with the intention of retiring to farm life, and 
for two years followed that occupation in Geor- 
gia, but a longing for his old work on the road 
caused him to again enter railroad life. In 1881 
he entered the service of the Selma, Rome & 
Dalton Railroad, between Selma, Ala., and Rome 
and Cleveland, Tenn. He resigned from the 
latter road to accept a position with the Illinois 
Central, where he began service on July 2, 1882. 
He commenced work at Water Valley, Miss., 



under Master Mechanic White, where, on ac- 
count of his superior knowledge of construction, 
he was placed in charge of a work train, remain- 
ing there from the beginning of the work on that 
division until its completion. During that time 
he had charge of a large force of men. Mr. 
Thomas is considered an expert on track con- 
struction, and is noted for his fine connections on 
switch work. Old engineers say they can tell 
his work on account of its smoothness. About 
the time of the completion of the Aberdeen divi- 
sion, the railroad found it necessary to secure a 
supply of water of their own, as up to that time 
they had been getting water from the Aberdeen 
Compress. Accordingly they sunk an artesian 
well 347 feet deep, and four inches in diameter, 
which threw out mud and water combined, and 
refused to clear up. Officials 'from Chicago and 
other points went to Aberdeen to try and remedy 
the trouble, as they must have water that was 
free from mud. They seemed unable to remedy 
the defect, until, at the request of Mr. Kemp, 
the division superintendent, Mr. Thomas sug- 
gested that if they would raise the pipe and take 
off one section, the water would clear itself in 
a short time, as the space between the bottom of 
the well and the end of the pipe would then be 
so great that the force of the water could not 
raise the mud to the pipe. This was done and 
the result was entirely satisfactory. 

When the Aberdeen division was completed 
our subject was placed in charge of the first pas- 
senger engine on the division, and has since re- 
mained in that branch of the service, with the 
greatest success. Mr. Thomas ran engine No. 
1,417 two hundred twenty-five thousand miles 
with but one general repair, and this engine was 
in the yard service at Durant one year with a 
mileage of twenty-five thousand miles and the 
valve steam packing was never repaired. During 
this mileage the piston packing was repaired one 
time. This packing was composed of one brass 
and two lead rings, with the old style hump 
gland. The gland was never tightened when the 
steam was on the boiler so the rings could expand, 
which is the life of all metallic packing. The 
swab on these rods was renewed every thirty 



342 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



days. This is the best mileage Mr. Thomas ever 
made with metal packing, and Mr. McKenna, 
foreman of the Durant shops, says it is the great- 
est mileage he ever heard of. Mr. Franklin, 
foreman at Jackson, Tenn., repaired this engine. 
Mr. Thomas carries in his seat box in the en- 
gine a device of his own for holding the balance 
valve in case of working steam only on one side, 
it taking about thirty minutes to disconnect and 
get ready to move engine and train. The en- 
gine above referred to was in the passenger ser- 
vice on the Aberdeen division, and during round 
trips of 216 miles would only burn four tons of 
coal. No derailment occurred during this mile- 
age. Mr. Thomas has had some very narrow 
escapes. His closest call was in 1889 while tak- 
ing a theatrical troop on a special from Aberdeen 
to Jackson, Miss. He was supposed to have a 
clear track, but when within a mile of Canton, 
while going at a high speed, he collided with an 
engine in charge of E. Redmond, who was in- 
stantly killed. Both engines were badly dam- 
aged, but Mr. Thomas escaped injury, which was 
considered miraculous. He has turned out 
many fine engineers, among them D. Longinotti, 
Sam Culley, and others, who are successful men 
on the road. The Galena Oil company pre- 
sented to Mr. Thomas a fine patent oiling can 
made of nickel, with patent spring and in three 
sections, for using less oil than any engineer on 
the Mississippi and Aberdeen divisions. His 
name is beautifully engraved on the can. He 
keeps this can in his parlor to show his friends 
and kindred that he is the most economical en- 
gineer on the above divisions. 

Miss Ellen C. Murchison, of Rome, Ga., be- 
came the wife of our subject, and they have be- 
come the parents of three children, all of whom 
have received the benefits of a college education. 
One of the daughters is now musical instructor 
in the public schools of Durant. The son, 
Oscar W., received his education in the Missis- 
sippi Mechanical College, at Starkville, and is a 
fine draughtsman. He is now a locomotive fire- 
man on the Aberdeen division. Mrs. Thomas is 
a niece of the late Gov. Murchison, of Texas, 
and a great niece of Sir Roderick Murchison. 



Several brothers of our subject are successful 
railroad men. 

Mr. Thomas and his family are active mem- 
bers of the Methodist church, in which he has 
served many years as warden. He is a deeply 
religious man, a thorough Christian and very 
benevolent, having given largely to charities. He 
is a man who deeply believes in the intervention 
of Providence to protect him from harm, and 
when asked to make a particularly hard run, al- 
ways replies, "If God is willing." The first 
words of Bishop C. B. Galoway, when he comes 
to Durant, are: "How is Mr. Thomas," show- 
ing the high estimation in which he is held by 
that dignitary. Mr. Thomas is also prominent 
in Masonic circles, and is a member of the 
Knights of Honor. Being a great reader and 
student, our subject keeps abreast of the times 
in his work, and now ranks one of the three high- 
est in the list of the Illinois Central employes. 
He is a substantial citizen of Durant, owning 
considerable property, and is a man of whom the 
city may well feel proud. 




'ILLIAM T. STEWART, a rising 
young engineer in the service of the 
Illinois Central on the Louisiana di- 
vision, was born on April 24, 1871, 
at Canton, Miss. His connection with the road 
dates from 1891, when he began work as fireman, 
in the freight, and was afterward employed in 
the passenger service. On November 15, 1895, 
he was promoted to engineer, and given a regu- 
lar run between McConib City, Miss., and New 
Orleans. He has charge at present, of mogul 
engine No. 757, with J. D. Harrell as fireman. 
His brother, Howard Stewart, is also in the em- 
ploy of the I. C. as fireman. The wife of Mr. 
Stewart, was formerly Miss Addie Heisser, 
whose father was for a long time connected with 
the I. C. as foreman of the car-repairing depart- 
ment in the extensive shops of the company, at 
Vicksburg, Miss. They are the parents of two 
bright children, Rachael and Clara F. Mr. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



343 



Stewart is a popular member of Division No. 
196, B. of L. E., and is also connected with Can- 
ton Lodge, No. 74, K. of P. and B. P. O. E. 
Lodge, No. 1 68, of McComb City. Being 
a young man possessed of more than ordinary 
ability and a great student of mechanics, keeping 
abreast of the times, Mr. Stewart's future should 
be a bright one. 



THOMAS A. MOORE, a popular conduc- 
tor on the Louisiana division of the 
Illinois Central, is a native of Missis- 
sippi, and a son of G. W. Moore who 
resides at East McComb. In early life, Mr. 
Moore learned the trade of a baker and confec- 
tioner, becoming an expert in that line. He 
traveled extensively in the west and southwest, 
and has had a varied experience, especially while 
roughing it in the uncivilized districts through 
which he traveled. He began his railroad career 
on the Southern Pacific R. R. at Vermillionville, 
La., and was afterward employed on a steamboat 
at Gal'veston, Texas. He returned to the train 
service of the Southern Pacific, working eight 
months, and resigned to take a position with W. 
N. Monroe, a contractor, engaged in road con- 
struction. He then went to Mexico, with Major 
Thiel, and in 1882 returned to civilization, enter- 
ing the employ of the Texas & Mexican R. R. 
where he was for fourteen months in charge of 
a powder house. His next occupation, was as 
driver on a San Antonio street car and afterward 
joined a circus as head tent man. While in 
this employment, he was severely injured, in a 
railroad collision on the Wabash R. R., and was 
laid up for some time in the Marine hospital 
at Cairo. 

In 1884 he entered the employ of the Louis- 
ville, New Orleans & Texas Railroad, but re- 
mained only a short time, then working for vari- 
ous other roads in Texas until December 24, 1891, 
when he entered the service of the I. C. as a 
hrakcman out of McComb City. In 1894 he was 
promoted to conductor on the Canton district, 



and is now in charge of a through freight, on 
the Louisiana division, on caboose No. 98245, 
with A. L. Wright and E. B. Thomas as his crew. 
His career on the I. C. has been successful, hav- 
ing no injuries or accidents. 

Mr. Moore is a member of Division No. 
108, O. R. C., of New Orleans, Goodwill Lodge 
No. 104, of McComb City, A. F. and A. M. No. 
382, Eastern Star Lodge No. 4 and Myrtle 
Lodge, No. 36, K. of P., of McComb City. Mr. 
Moore was about to depart for the Transvaal 
when he met and married his wife, who is a 
daughter John S. Erickson, of Canton, Miss. 
They have two fine boys. The family resides in 
a pleasant home on Broadway, in McComb 
City. Mr. Moore is a very pleasant man to meet, 
entertaining and full of interesting anecdotes 
relative to his extensive travels. He is a popu- 
lar citizen of his community and ranks high as 
an employe of the Illinois Central company. 




AURICE S. WEBB is probably the 
youngest conductor on the Louisiana 
division of the Illinois Central, and a 
rising railroad man. He was born in 
1876, at Jackson, Miss., and is not yet twenty-four 
y^ars of age. J. A. Webb, his father, was for 
twenty-five years a valued employe and official 
of the I. C., and held the responsible position of 
general freight agent at Jackson, when appointed 
secretary of the board of railway commissioners 
for the state of Mississippi, with offices in the 
capital at Jackson. M. S. Webb began his rail- 
road career when a mere boy, in 1884, with the 
determination to make a success. He began as 
messenger boy at the Jackson office where he 
acquired a knowledge of telegraphy, and was 
on the Valley road as agent and operator at 
Longwood, Miss. He resigned that position, 
returned to Jackson, and entered the freight 
office there, serving successively as bill clerk, 
cashier, and chief clerk. He went from Jack- 
son to Memphis, and was in the service of the 
I. C, there, He next went to the C. L. & M, 



344 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



Railroad as baggageman and expressman. In 
1897 he entered the train service of the I. C. at 
McComh City, Miss., and was in a short time 
promoted to conductor. 

Mr. Webb married a daughter of Captain 
Hoskins, one of the most prominent, and wealthy 
citizens of Brookhaven, Miss. One child was 
born to them, which died in infancy. Of the 
social organizations Mr. Webb is a member of Di- 
vision No. 367, O. R. C., and Division No. 264, 
B. of R. T., also belongs to Pearl Lodge, K. of P., 
of McComb City. For so young a man Mr. Webb 
has made great progress, and being active and 
alert the future has much in store for him. 




E. MOSHER, roadmaster on the 
Fifteenth division of the Yazoo & 
Mississippi Valley R. R. was born 
in White Hall, Washington county, 
New York, on October 29, 1857, and is a son of 
Benjamin O. and Mary C. (Perry) Mosher. 
Benjamin O. Mosher was a tanner by trade, and 
served during the war of the rebellion, from 
1861 to 1865, as captain of Co. B. 22nd Regiment, 
New York Volunteer Infantry. He is living in 
Oxon Hill, Maryland, while his wife departed 
this life in 1859. The subject of this sketch, 
attended the schools of his native town, and en- 
tered life as an employe on a steamboat, plying 
between New York City and Montreal, Canada, 
working about two years in that capacity. De- 
ciding on railroad life, in 1879 he entered the 
service of the Cincinnati Northern R. R. as a fore- 
man and conductor, between Cincinnati and Le- 
banon, Ohio. After a two years service on that 
road, he went to the New York, West Shore & 
Buffalo R. R., doing similar work, and remain- 
ing there two years. During the construction 
period of the Louisville, New Orleans & Texas 
R. R. (now the Y. & M. V. R. R.) he secured 
a position as foreman on that road, afterward 
serving as conductor and roadmaster, with head- 
quarters at Baton Rouge, La., and was in the em- 
ploy of the road until 1889. In the latter- year 



he became identified with the Texas Pacific R. 
R. as roadmaster, with Marshall, Texas, as head- 
quarters, and held that position until 1892. He 
was in that year appointed supervisor, at Vicks- 
burg, Miss., for the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley 
R. R., acting as such until 1897 when he was 
transferred to the Natchez division as supervi- 
sor of track and trains. One month later he was 
appointed to his present position as roadmaster 
of the Fifteenth division. Under his supervision 
are 386 miles of main line and branches, forty- 
seven sections, four track supervisors, and one 
bridge supervisor. 

On April I, 1880, Mr. Mosher and Miss Mag- 
gie Simmons, of Ethel, La., were united in mar- 
riage, and three children came to bless their 
home : Carrie, Olive, and William, when the wife 
and mother, who was a most estimable woman, 
was called hence on February 12, 1894. Mr. 
Mosher was united to his present wife on August 
18, 1898. This lady was, before her maarriage, 
Miss Rein, of LaPlace, La. One son, George, 
has been born to them. Socially, Mr. Mosher 
is a Knight of Pythias. His family attends the 
Catholic church, and in politics he is a Demo- 
crat. Mr. Mosher's time is absorbed in attend- 
ing to, and discharging his duties, which he does 
with that fidelity which has won for him the es- 
teem of his superior and the good will of the em- 
ployes of the road under his supervision. 




HARLES B. SMITH, an engineer in 
the yards of the Illinois Central at 
Memphis, Tenn., was born in Erie, 
Penn., April 22nd, 1866. Merrick 
Smith, deceased, his father, was a railroad man, 
holding the position of yardmaster for the Erie 
system at Erie, Penn., and was at one time, in 
the same position with the Canada Southern R. 
R. at St. Thomas, and at Windsor, Ontario. Mr. 
Smith acquired his early experience in railroad 
work, on the Canada Southern R. R. in 1881, 
in the round-house at Amherstburg, Ontario, 
where he was employed one and one-half years. 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



345 



He then went on that road, continuing there un- 
til November 1893, when he went to Chicago as 
hostler in the I. C. round-house. His work in 
Chicago embraced a period of over two years, 
after which he was transferred to Memphis, and 
given charge of engine No. 799, in the yards, 
which position he continues to occupy. Mr. 
Smith is a Knight of Pythias, and is also a mem- 
ber of the B. of L. F., of St. Thomas, Ont. He! 
was raised in the Presbyterian faith, and in poli- 
tics is devoted to the principles of the Democra- 
tic party. 




D. BURROUS, an engineer in the 
freight service of the Illinois Central 
Q on the Louisiana division, is a man of 
great experience, having traveled ex- 
tensively and worked for a number of railroads. 
His first work was on the New York & Erie R. 
R. as fireman, between Port Jervis and Jersey 
City, and he was afterward, in 1880, on the 
Pennsylvania R. R. in the fast passenger service 
between Philadelphia and Jersey City. He then 
went to the Jersey Central R. R., where he was 
employed three months as fireman. Drifting to 
the south, Mr. Burrous was next actively en- 
gaged in the lumber districts of Louisiana and 
Florida, having previously spent several seasons 
in the Minnesota lumber camps where he ac- 
quired a thorough knowledge of preparing lum- 
ber for the market. During his leisure hours he 
made a study of engineering, and was for a short 
time on a steamboat on the Alabama river as en- 
gineer, but quit that to enter the service of the 
East Tennessee, Virginia & Georgia R. R. In 
1893 he became identified with the Southern Pa- 
cific R. R., serving as fireman there for eleven 
months, ard from that road went to Central 
America, where he worked as engineer on freight 
and passenger trains. Mr. Burrous entered the 
service of the Illinois Central in 1895 as switch 
engineer on the New Orleans terminals, under 
Master Mechanic Baldwin. He was soon pro- 
moted to the regular road service, and was sent 



to McComb City, having since had a regular run 
on the Louisiana division on engine No. 726. 
Mr. Burrous is a native of Tennessee. His pa- 
rents now reside in Michigan, near Detroit. 

He is a member of Division No. 196, B. of 
L. E., of McComb City, and is also connected 
with the Masonic fraternity, the Independent Or- 
der of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias. 
He is married and is the father of four children. 
In his travels he has been very observing, is a 
fluent talker, and tells many interesting accounts 
of his adventures. While in Central America 
he made many exploring trips, mastering the 
Spanish and native languages. He is also con- 
'versant with the French language. When Pres- 
ident Garfield was shot in Washington, Mr. Bur- 
rous was in the depot, and with the other spec- 
tators was shut up there until the crime was fast- 
ened on the assassin. Mr. Burrous is a self- 
made man, having had to make his own living 
since he was old enough to work, and his know- 
ledge of books has been acquired by self culture, 
which, with his extensive travels, has made him 
a well posted man. He is of a splendid phys- 
ique, affable and courteous, and has a large circle 
of genuine freinds. 



JT. PAUL, the capable trainmaster of the 
Terminal district for the Illinois Cen- 
Q tral in the city of New Orleans, was 
born near Maryville, Tenn., October 
31, 1854. James A. Paul, his father was a far- 
mer, and served during the Civil war as a lieuten- 
ant in Thomas' brigade. He is still living at 
Huntsville, Ala. His wife, who was Miss Susan 
J. Parks before her marriage, died in 1870. In 
1866 the family of our subject moved from Ten- 
nessee to where Mr. Paul received his early 
training, and also afterward attended the schools 
of Mossey Creek, Tenn. From the age of nine 
to eighteen, he worked on his father's farm in 
summer and attended school in winter. At the 
age of eighteen he secured a position as clerk in 
a general store in Huntsville, Ala., where he re- 



346 



ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD COMPANY 



mained one season, returning to the farm for a 
time, and later went to Wilson's Point, La., as 
manager for the firm of Meyer & Bradford. He 
was taken sick in 1875, returned home, and in 
March 1876 worked his father's farm on his .own 
account until 1879. In the spring of that year 
Mr. Paul went to Oregon and led the life of a 
cow-boy until November of that year. He 
reached Cheyenne with a drove of cattle, and de- 
ciding to return to civilization, came to Hunts- 
ville, Ala., and in December 1879 entered the 
service of the Memphis & Charleston R. R. His 
first work was as brakeman between Memphis 
and Chattanooga. On December ist, 1880, he 
was promoted to conductor in the freight service, 
where he remained until August n, 1884, when 
he severed his connection with the road. He 
then became identified with the Louisville, New 
Orleans & Texas R. R. (now the Yazoo & Mis- 
sissippi Valley R. R.), serving as conductor on 
freight and work trains until November 1884, 
when he was promoted to the passenger service. 
He held a passenger run between New Orleans 
and Vicksburg from 1884 to 1887, when he was 
transferred to the Vicksburg division, remaining 
on the latter division until April 15, 1888. He 
then went to the Texas & Pacific R. R. as yard- 
master at New Orleans, occupying that position 
until September 15, of that year, when he re- 
turned to his former position with the L. N. O. 
& T. R. R. On November 20, 1888, Mr. Paul 
was appointed general yardmaster at Vicksburg, 
Miss., remaining there until March 1st, 1890. 
He then returned to the train service as a passen- 
ger conductor on the Vicksburg division and 
in September 1890, was appointed trainmaster 
between Vicksburg and Memphis, with head- 
quarters at the latter city. On September ist, 
1895, he was transferred to New Orleans, to his 
present position, where his ability is recognized 
by the able manner in which he is discharging 
his duties. Mr. Paul was, on March 3rd, 1876, 
united in marriage to Miss Carrie V. Roper, of 
Madison county, Ala., where she was born June 
17, 1855. The children which blessed their union 
are, Edgar A., born May i, 1877, a stenographer 
for the local freight agent, New Orleans; May 



E. born April 7, 1879, who received her finishing 
education at Oxford Female College; Susie R. 
born in September 1881 ; Elinor G. born in Sep- 
tember, 1887; John T. born in July, 1892; James 
W. born in March, 1895; and Samuel H. born 
July 30, 1899. 

Mr. Paul is a member of the Masonic Or- 
der, (Blue Lodge), and is also connected with 
Division No. 231, O. R. C., of Vicksburg. He 
and his family are adherents of the Methodist 
church, and in politics he votes with the Demo- 
cratic party. 




A. LEWIS, a prominent conductor in 
the passenger service on the Louisi- 
'Q ana division of the Illinois Central, 
residing in New Orleans, was born 
January 26, 1854, in Pike county, Miss. Lem- 
uel Lewis, his father, now living at New Or- 
leans, was for some time deputy sheriff of that 
county, and served during the Civil war in Com- 
pany A, 33rd Miss. Regt. His mother, whose 
maiden name was Pamelia Rodgers, departed 
this life in 1876. Mr. Lewis was educated in 
the public schools of Mississippi, and in 1873 
went to Brazos county, Texas, and was there en- 
gaged in farming for a year. The next year 
(1874) he entered the service of the Interna- 
tional & Great Northern R. R., and soon after- 
ward was employed with a bridge gang on that 
road. In March of that year he returned to? 
Mississippi, and worked in a brick yard owned 
by his father, and the farming season of 1875 
was spent on a cotton plantation. September 
1876 marked his first connection with the Illi- 
nois Central, or, as the road was then called, the 
New Orleans, Chicago & St. Louis Railroad. 
Beginning as a brakeman between Canton and 
McComb City, Miss., he worked in that capacity 
until December ist, 1878. He was promoted on 
the latter date to conductor in the freight ser- 
vice on the same division, and occupied that po- 
sition until February 1879. Slack condition of 
business caused him to lose the position and re- 
turn to his former occupation of brakeman, at 



AND REPRESENTATIVE EMPLOYES. 



347 



which he was employed until 1880. He was 
then given a regular run as conductor, and re- 
mained at that work until 1884, with the excep- 
tion of a few months spent at McComb City as 
yardmaster. From 1884 to 1890 he was a con- 
ductor in the freight and an extra in the passen- 
ger service, excepting a part of 1886, when he 
was yardmaster at New Orleans. In 1890 he 
received promotion to the passenger service and 
has been there continuously to the present time- 
In October 1874, Mr. Lewis married Miss 
Eliza Lard, who resided in Brookhaven, Miss., 
but is a native of Louisiana. They have three 
children : Lexie, the wife of J. K. Dunn, of 
Jackson, Tenn. ; Sammelia, wife of Dr. G. W. 
Robertson, of Magnolia, Miss., and Lelia, re- 
siding at home. Mr. Lewis is a member of Cres- 
cent City Division No. 108, O. R. C., and of 
Alpha Home Lodge No. 72, A. F. & A