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Full text of "History of Isaac P. Carter family and their descendants"

ac 

929.2 

C24503C 

1616306 



REYNOLDS H'PTORICAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 




3 1833 01206 0221 



HISTORY OF 



ISAAC P, CARTER FAMILY 



AND THEIR DESCENDANTS 



COMPILED BY HIS GRANDSON 



HOWARD CARTER 



I 

[ WASHIMGTOX, IOWA, 

[ GAZECTTE PKINT. 



1€1S306 



PREFACE. 

This little book is dedicated to the descendants of Isaac P. 
and Joanna (Gay) Carter in the hope that in the future some 
one who is more capable will take it up and write a more com- 
plete history of the family than I have been able to do. 

I have written several letters in my endeavor to find out 
who our ancestors were, and where they came from, and have 
only succeeded in getting the names of my great grand -parents, 
Edward Carter and Estlier Powers. In getting the names and 
date of birth, marriage and death of others, 1 have been depend- 
ant on other friends, and I am very thankful to them for their 
services; and while there may be some mistakes, and some of 
the history came from father to son, in the main I am satisfied 
that it is very near correct. 

Isaac P. Carter and his children spent their lives in a new 
country with but little of this world's goods and 1 have tried to 
sliovv- the conditions of life that surrounded them and the hard- 
. ships and inconveniences of that life with only the bare neces- 
saries of life; and especially the labor the female portion had to 
perform in preparing food and clothing for the family and the 
poor chance they h.ad for an education and religious instructions. 

HOWARD CARTER. 



INTRODUCTION 



Edward Carter. 

For some years 1 have desired a better account and history 
of the Carter family and to know where our ancestors came 
from and their nationality. It is the belief of some of us that 
we are descendants of Robert Carter, whose name is engraved 
on the Plymouth Rock monument. There is no record of the 
family tliat far back that I can find. R\y great grand -father's 
name was Edward Carter, of English descent. I have no record 
cf his birth, marriage or death. 

My great grand -mother's name was Esther Powers, Scotch- 
Irish descent, where or when born I failed to fmd out. The best 
accounts I have say that they were residents of Mollis, N. H., 
and in all probability were married there and moved to the 
District of Maine where their children grew up and married. Of 
the children born to this union I have the name of my grand- 
father, Isaac P., born April 27, 1770, he being the only one of 
tlie family that went west and settled in Ohio. Jonathan, 
Thomas and John of Waldo county; Edward of Etna, and Susan 
who married a Cunningham of Belmont, all lived and died in tlie 
District of Maine. 

Robie, of the next generation, and Martha E., his wife, 
daughter of Green Carter, came to Illinois about 1862, and after 
staying there some years went to White Sulphur Springs, Mont., 
where they died. Others of the family went to Montana and 
engaged in cattle raising, but 1 do not know their names. 

My great grand -parents on my grand -mother's side were 
David Gay and Thankful Howard of English descent. 1 have 
no date of their births, marriage or deaths. They were residents 
of Nova Scotia and married there. They came to the District of 
Maine about the time of the Revolutionary War, where their 
children grew up and married. My grand-mother, Joanna Gay, 
and one of her brothers came to Ohio about 1815 and lived there 
the rest of their lives. Others of the family staid in the District 
of Maine, so far as 1 know. 

We have reason to believe that our ancestors were religious 
Pv'ople of the New England Puritan stock. The children of Isaac 
P. Carter attest to that fact, for they were noble, hard-working 
men and women. All engaged in farming, clearing and improv- 
tnj^ a new country and laid a grjod foimdatlon upon v.'hich future 
i'enerations might build. 



CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 



(FIRST GENERATION.) 



Isaac P, Carter. 

Isaac P., son of Edward and Esther (Powers) Carter was 
born April 27, 1770, at Mollis, N. H. Died Sept. 18, 1826, 

Muskingum county, Ohio. 

1 know nothing of his early life, but suppose the family 
moved to the District of Maine previous to 1793, as we find 
them there at that time. 

Joanna, daughter of David and Thankful (Howard) Gay, 
born in Nova Scotia, January 14, 1771, of English descent. Died 
April 22, 1841, Zanesville, Ohio. She came with the family in 
early life to the District of Maine where she grew up to woman- 
hood and was married to Isaac P. Carter, July 3, 1793. They 
settled near Northport, Waldo county, and engaged in clearing 
out a heavily timbered country, farming part of the time and 
getting out timber for shipbuilding, with an occasional trip along 
the coast. To this union four sons and five daughters were 
born, viz: 

Howard, July 28, 1794, Northport, Waldo county, Maine; 
died June 16, 1796, Northport, Waldo county, Maine. 

Joanna, Sept. 13, 1795, Northport, Waldo county, Maine; 
died Dec, 14, 1885, Montville, Waldo county, Maine. 

Isaac Gay, Sept. 6, 1797, Northport, Waldo county, Maine; 
died Jan. 29, 1869, Mathews, Grant county, Ind. 

Olive, Oct. 18, 1799, Northport, Waldo county, Maine; 
died Sept. i9, I844, Wheeling, Delaware county, Indiana. 

Martha, Nov. 6, I8O2, Northport, Waldo county, Maine, 
died Feb. 7, 1855, Palo, Linn county, Iowa. 

Samuel Hillman, Mar. 10, 1808, Northport, Waldo co., Maine; 
died May 18, 1838, Grant county, Ind. 

Thankful, April I3, 1810, Northport, Waldo county, Maine; 
died May 15, 1862, Palo. Linn county, Iowa. 

Esther Ann July 1, I8I4, Northport, Waldo coounty, Maine ; 
died June 20, 1865, West Lima, Richland county, Wis. 

David Gay, Dec. 20, 1817, Columbus, Franklin co., Ohio; 
died Oct. 1, ISSO, West Lima, Richland county, Wis. 

1 have no way to fmd out about the family life while in the 
District of Maine, only what father told us. The winters v/ere 
long and the snow was deep. It had to be tramped down to 



FIRST GENERATION. 



make the road so they could travel, and to do this teams of oxen 
were out in the snow and packed it down until the road was as 
high as the fences and then the snow blew off to the sea. Perhaps 
the rigorous winters and the poor farming country had some- 
thing to do in causing them to leave that country for a more 
congenial climate. In 1815, the family consisting of fatlier, 
mother and six children, started for Ohio, leaving one child 
(Joanna) married in Maine. There were no railroads nor suit- 
able waterways to travel upon at that time. The only way was 
to go vv'ith teams und wagons, so the trip occupied about all of 
one summer. He said that after crossing the mountains in 
Penhsylvania they came to the Allegheny river where lumber 
was rafted dov/n to the Ohio river and on down to Cincinnati, 
so they got their horses, wagons and family on a raft and helped 
run it to Marietta, Ohio. Here they got off and went northwest 
to Perry county. After a short stay there they went to Franklin 
county. While there, father helped to lay out the town of 
Columbus. The state bought the land and the town was laid 
out in the woods. A few years after they went to Muskingum 
county, where they located on land and cleared it up for a home. 
The experience of a new country was their lot and their children 
got but very little schooling and none of the comforts of life 
that are enjoyed by their grand-children. 

They v/ere members of the Baptist church and the children 
were taught to love and serve the Lord. Some of them held to 
the Baptist belief through life, while others went to the M. E. 
and other churches, but ail were good Christian citizens as their 
children in future generations show. 



CARTER FA.VvILY HISTORY. 



(SECOND GENERATION.) 



Joanna {^Carter) (Foster) Carter. 

Joanna, first daughter of Isaac P. and Joanna (Gay) Carter, 
was born Sept. 13, 1795, at Northport, Waldo county, Maine; 
died Dec. 14, 1885, at Montvilie, VVaklo county, Maine. 

What is now the state of Maine was at this date called the 
District of Maine and was governed by the laws of New Hamp- 
shire. It was of course a new country and a great many were 
engaged in getting out timber for shipbuilding. Not being a 
good country fur farming, potatoes and rlsh were a good part of 
their diet. 

Here she spent her childhood and youthful days and being 
the oldest of the family, she had but little of the pleasures of 
childhood or youth ; but a great deal of hard work fell to her lot. 
At an early age she worked away from home to make a living 
and thought best to marry and have a home of her own. She 
was married Sept. 28, 1812, to Thomas D. Foster, a widower 
with four children. He was born Oct. 8, 1782, at Bristol, Maine; 
died Julv 30, 1835. at Montvilie, Waldo county, Maine. I cannot 
find the names of his parents nor his nativity. 

Twelve children were born to them: 

Robert M.. June 23. 1813, Montvilie. Waldo county, Maine 
died July 17. 1834, Montvilie, Wai^o county, Maine. 

Esther C, Sept. 17, 1814, Montvilie, Waldo county, Maine 
died Oct. 31, 1889, Montvilie, Waldo county, Maine. 

Ann C, Nov. 17, 1S16, Montvilie, Waldo county, Maine 
died Oct. 13, 1848, New York City, New York. 

Eliza J., July 20, 1818, Montvilie, Waldo county, Maine 
died Oct. 16 1852. Belfast, Waldo county, Maine. 

Thomas D., June 6, 1820, Montvilie, Waldo county, Maine 
died June 27, 1820, Montvilie, Waldo county, Maine. 

Ebenczer, May 7, 1821, Montvilie, Waido county, Maine 
died Oct. 25. 1861, Montvilie, Waldo county, Maine. 

Sarah G., Aug. 6, 1823, Montvilie, Waldo county, Maine 
died Aug. 13, 1825, Montvilie, Waldo county, Maine. 

Isaac H., April 5, 1826. Montvilie, V/aldo county. Maine 
died Sept. 18, 1826, Montvilie, Waldo coounty, Maine. 



SECOND GENERATION. 



Thomas A.. Feb. 20, 1827. Montville, Waldo county, Maine; 
died Nov. 27, 1S96. (Place not known.) 

Olive P., Dec. 31, 1830. Wontville, Waldo county, Maine; 
died Aug. 27, 1847, Montville, Waldo county, Maine. 

Arthur C, Nov. 19, 1833, Montville, Waldo county, Maine; 
died Oct. 15, 1858, Montville, Waldo county, Maine. 

Joanna A., May 21, 1835, Montville, Waldo county, Maine; 
died Oct. 1, 1835, Montville, Waldo county, Maine. 

They lived in Montville and here their children were horn, 
and here he died, leaving a large family for the widow to care 
for. She was the only one of the family that did not go to 

Oliio. 

She married her cousin, Green Carter, Sept. 30, 1838, a 
widower with four children, born Aug. 24, 1798, Northport, 
Waldo county, Maine; died March 1, 1877, Montville, Waldo 
county, Maine. To this union one child was born, Ira Frank, 
Oct. 17, 1839, Montville, Waldo county, Maine; died May 20, 
1898, Belfast, Waldo county, Maine. 

In 1840 hir brother Isaac went to visit her from Indiana, 
tlie only one of the family that went back to Maine on a visit. 
It was slow traveling then compared to the present. Only 100 
miles by railroad. Steamboat from Cleveland, Ohio, to Buffalo, 
N. Y. Canals, stage coaches and horse back for the rest of the 
trip which took about all summer. Letters at that time cost 25 
cents postage payable by the receiver, and but few letters were 
sent. He did not know she was married, so both of them were 
surprised. 

In 1854 both of them visited Indiana vWiere most of her 
brothers and sisters lived, and it was 'a visit highly appreciated 
by all of us. When Ira was born she was mother and step- 
mother of twenty- one children. 

During the thirty- nine years of their married life their 
children grew up and got homes of their own, leaving them some 
years by themselves which were spent very pleasantly. One 
of her grandsons in speaking of the last years of their lives, says 
tliat "he was a lovable old man and very kind to my grand- 
mother. A man of honor, enjoying the confidence and respect 
of the community in which they lived." Of her he says that 
"she was one of God's choicest productions." She lived and 
died in Waldo county. After keeping house sixty -five years, 



CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 



she was very loath to quit, but as none of her relatives could 
come and live with lier. she went and lived with one of her 
grandsons. She was a very pious woman of the Baptist faith 
and the writer well remembers the kind instructions and loving 
letters that he received from her. When she died, he felt that 
he had lost a dear aunt indeed. May God help us to follow 
Jesus as she did and do good work for the Master. 



Isaac Gay Carter. 

Isaac Gay, second son of Isaac P. and Joanna (Gay) 
Carter was born Sept, 6 1797, Northport, Waldo county, Mnine; 
died Jan. 29, 1869, Matthews, Grant county, Ind. 

He with his father's family came to Ohio when he was 
about eighteen years old and settled in Perry county. Here he 
became acquainted with Harriet, fourth daughter of Joshua and 
Sarah (Chapman) Josselyn of English descent, born June 9, 
1802, in Waldo county, Maine; died April 1, 1863, Matthews, 
Grant county, Ind. She came to Ohio with her father's family 
in 1817. Moving was then done in wagons drawn by horses. 
They settled in Perry county where she was married to Isaac G. 
Carter, Dec. 16, 1819. To this union ten children were born: 

Edward, Nov. 16, 1820, Zanesville, Muskingum co., Ohio; 
died Nov. 16, 1820, Zanesville, Muskingum co., Ohio. 

Ira Josselyn, March 15, 1822, Zanesville, Muskingum co., O., 
died March 21, 1899, Matthews, Grant county, Ind. 

Howard, April 7, 1825, Zanesville, Muskingum county, O. 
died 19 , 

Joseph Aug. 2, 1828, Zanesville, Muskingum county, O. ; 
died Feb. 1, 1901, Griswold, Cass county, Iowa. 

Elijah, Nov. 28, 1830, Zanesville, Muskingum co., Ohio: 
died , 19 ■-. 

John Hooper, Nov. 25, 1832, Zanesville, Muskingum co., O. 
died 19 , 

Albert, May 2, 1835, Zanesville, Muskingum county, Ohio. 
died May 13, 1837, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana. 

Lewis, July 13, 1839, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana, 
died April 13, 1902, Matttiews, Grant county, Indiana. 

Oliver Perry, May 11, 1842, Matthews, Grant county, Ind., 
died July 13, 1871, Matthew^, Grant county, Indiana. 




Isaac G. Carter. 



SECOND GENERATION. 



Alfred, Sept. 15, 1844, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana, 
died Oct. 19, 1844, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana. 

After their marriage they moved to Zanesville where he 
engaged in making brick and buikling houses in that new town. 
And although they had but Httle of this world's goods, in 1830 
they bought a farm of 106 acres seven miles west of Zanesville 
and engaged in farming. In 1834 they sold their farm and that 
fall went on horseback in company with others to northern 
Ohio in search of a place to make a home, but not finding any- 
thing to suit them they went on to Indiana and bought land in 
the southeast part of Grant county, paying $200 for 111 acres 
and entering 160 acres at $1.25 per acre. It was all heavily 
timbered land consisting of oak, walnut, sugar t.^ee, elm, beech, 
hickory, ash,. poplar, spice brush and other kinds of timber and 
brush. In April 1835 he, with his two oldest sons, Ira and 
Howard went to the land — two hundred miles — a trip of ten 
days and put up a cabin eighteen feet square, put a roof on it, 
hewed puncheons and put in a floor, chinked the cracks, but 
did not get a chimney built nor any mortar in the cracks. They 
deadened some timber, rented some land, and raised some corn, 
then went back to Ohio. In September of that year they put 
all their beloiTgings on two two-horse wagons and moved to their 
new home on the bank of the Mississinewa river. The family 
then consisted of the father, mother and six boys, the oldest a 
little over thirteen years and the youngest four months. Two 
cows were driven to the new home, which were very useful to 
the family. 

The clearing of the land, all green timber, in a country sub- 
ject to fever and ague, was a hard job; but by hard work they 
had ten acres fenced and partially cleared so that they put it in 
corn the next spring. But there was so much green timber left 
on the land that the crop did not amount to much. The writer 
well remembers of going to mill seven to ten miles with a sack of 
corn on a horse and he on top of it. Starting early in the morn- 
ing — first there got his ground first — and many times we went 
home without it and back after it another day. 

The chief diet was corn prepared in different ways, and pork 
with occasionally some game; in short, "hog and hominy." In 
1842 they moved into a brick house they put up that year and 
fir.islied it off the next year, glad to get out of the cabin. The 



10 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

first cooking stove they owned was bought in 1845 and was a 
good one in the way of cooking. The boys only got to go to 
school three months in the year, and the older ones did not study 
grammar any, yet five of the seven that grew to manhood taught 
school. Religiously Mr. Carter was raised in the Baptist faith, 
but some years after their marriage he joined the M. E. church 
which she joined while quite young, and they lived to see their 
seven boys that grew up members of the church and good, honest 
citizens. No preachers among them nor any to hold important 
offices in state or county, but many of the school and township 
offices. 

OUve {.Carter) Heal. 

Olive, second daughter of Isaac P. and Joanna (Gay) Car- 
ter, waib born Oct. 18, 1799, Northport, Waldo county, Maine, 
died Sept. 19, 1844, Wheeling, Delaware county, Indiana. 

Her childhood days were spent in the bleak, cold climate of 
the District of Maine. In 1815 she, with her parents, came to 
Ohio, stopping first in Perry county. After a short stay there 
they moved to Franklin couhty, then to Muskingum countv. Her 
young womanhood being spent in the above named counties, she 
sharing the hardships and privations of a new country v/ith the 
rest of the family, and being the oldest girl at home she was de- 
prived of what little school there was, for parents am.ong the 
common people did not think it necessary for a girl to have any 
education, exc-pt to spell, read and write. But being an apt 
scholar and a woman of good sense, in spite of all the difficulties 
that surrounded her, she wrote a memoir of her life, which her 
brother finished after her death, and one of her sons rewrote, in- 
tending to have it published, but did not get it done, and the 
manuscript was destroyed v/hen his house burned. 

William Heal, son of David Heal, a native of France, was 
born Oct. 29, 1791, District of Maine, died April 16, 1847, Dela- 
ware county, Indiana. 

At nine years of age he went to live with Ephraim Fletcher, 
where he grew to manhood. He went as a substitute for Mr. 
Fletcher's son, who was drafted in the war of 1812. After he 
was discharged he enlisted in the regular army and seivt-d tiiree 
years Soon after he was discharged from the army he went to 



SECOND GENEKATION. 1^1 



Oliio, walking all the way, and was married to Olive Carter, 
Dlc. 24, 1818. Muskingum county. Ohio. To this union nine 
children were born, six sons and three daughters: 

Sarah Joanna, March 30, 1820, Muskingum county, Ohio; 
died Sept. 17, 1898, Lansing, Mich. 

Isaac C, December 22, 1821, Muskingum county, Ohio; 
died July 28, 1822, Muskingum county, Ohio. 

David, Nov. 5, 1823, Zanesville, Muskingum county, Ohio; 
died Oct. 23, 1904, Delaware county, Indiana. 

Martha, March 4, 1826, Zanesville, Muskingum county O.; 
died Feb. 8, 1847, Rock Island, Illinois. 

James M., July 20, 1828, Muskingum county/ Ohio; 
died April 19, 1886, Grant county, Indiana. 

John Wilson, Feb. 12, 1831. Delaware county, Indiana; 
died 19 . 

William, Feb. 19, 1832, Wheeling. Delaware county, Ind.; 
died March 19, 1900, Viola. Richland county, Wisconsin. 

Harriet, April 3, 1833, Wheeling, Delaware county, Indiana; 
died Oct. 28, 1886, Marion, Grant county, Indiana. 

Ephraim Fletcher, March 28, 1838, Delaware county, Ind.; 
died Dec. 15, 1844, Delaware county, Indiana. 

The first years of their married life were spent in Muskingum 
county, Ohio. A part of the time he and his brother-in-law, 
Isaac G. Carter, were engaged in making brick and building 
houses in Zanesville, and other work incidental to clearing up 
and improving a new country. 

In 1829 they with their family of four children moved to 
Indiana and settled in the northeast part of Delaware county on 
the Mississinewa river, a new country, heavily timbered, plenty 
of fever and ague, but neighbors scarce. Deer and other wild 
animals were plenty and ^ome Indians on hand for neighbors. 
It was no small job to clear out a farm. 

They builded their cabin on high land above a beautiful 
spring of water. The bottom land appeared the most attractive 
for farming purposes and the first clearing was done there and, 
as they were just getting started and a beautiful piece of corn 
growing, a heavy rain fell July 3, 1834, and raised the river so 
that it spoiled all the corn on the bottom land which was a great 
loss to them. But he was not one to get entirely discouraged, 



12 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

so while the water covered so much of their cleared land he went 
to work clearing up the high land. 

They had one of the best sugar camps in the country and 
the writer well remembers the good times he had in occasionally 
helping at the sugar camp and eating sugar. He was a man 
without any education, but he saw the necessity of it, and before 
there were any schools they opened their house and she taught 
her own and her neighbors' children what she could. The first 
school house built in their neighborhood was built on their land 
and the boys made good use of it so that three of them taught in 
the common schools of the country. 

I have no words to describe the labor and sacrifice of this 
noble couple, especially the mother, who had the spinning and 
weaving to do to clothe htr family. Their house was always 
open to all that came and he was always ready to attend the 
sick. 

The missionaries of the M. E. church always found a home 
there and meetings were held in their house until a log church 
was built on land adjoining theirs and called Olive Branch, in 
her honor. The church is now gone and they lie buried on land 
that they gave for a cemetery adjoining the church lot; but the 
memory of their good deeds is still cherished by all that knew 
them. 



Martha {Carter) Jobes. 

Martha, third daughter of Isaac P. and Joanna (Gay) Carter, 
was born Nov. 6, 1802, iNorthport, Waldo county, Maine; d-'ed 
May 18, 1855 Palo, Linn county, Iowa. 

She with her parents and family came to Ohio the year she 
was thirteen years oldand endured all the hardships of the new 
country to which they came. It was like making a home in the 
wilderness when they commenced to make a home in Muskingum 
county, Ohio; but they succeeded by hard work. 

The clothing worn was mostly home spun and was made by 
the female portion of the family, and the girls learned all the 
business of raising and preparing the flax for the loom and weaving 
it into linen for sheets and wearing apparel. The wool v/as carded 
by hand, and spun by the girls and woven into jeans and linsey 
for the boys and flannel for the girls. A garment made of this 



SECOND GENERATION. 13 

fkind of goods and sewed with tlax thread of their own make was 
of some service and lasted a long time. She was married Dec. 
T , 1S23, to William Jobes. (The records of the family were de- 
•stroyed by fire in Linn county, Iowa, and some of the following 
i-dates are only approximately correct.) Of his parentage, or when 
'or where born, I have nothing farther than that the family came- 
from Virginia. He died about 1846 at Wheeling, Delaware county, 
f. Indiana. No children were born to this union. They lived in 
Muskingum county, Ohio, nine or ten years and then moved to 
Delaware county, Indiana, bought some land and made them a 
\ home in the new country. While he was clearing out a farm 
\ she kept the loom going supplying goods for the neighbors and 
friends. Farming not suiting him, they sold out their farm and 
1 went to Wheeling, a small town nearby, and he engaged in 
: freighting to Cincinnati, in which business he was engaged at 
the time of his death. Soon after his death she moved to Grant 
I county near where her brother Isaac lived. 

She married John Lewis the winter of 1848, a widower and 
old acquaintance, and went with him to his home in Linn county, 
Iowa, in a wagon that winter. He was a noble man, a leader in 
the Methodist church, and did what he could to make her last 
days pleasant and happy. She was one of God's noble women, 
and although she had no children to bless her memory, many of 
her nephews and nieces remember her kindness to them and she 
will not be forgotten while they live. 

Religiously she was strong in the Baptist faith in which she 
was raised. They are now both gone, he living a few years 
longer than she, and we trust will meet again in the resurrection 
of the just. 

t Samuel Hiilman Carter. 

Saoiuel Hiilman, third son of Isaac P. and Joanna (Gay) 
Carter, born March 10, 1808, Northport, Waldo county, Maine; 
died May 18, 1838, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana. 

The year he v/as seven years old he came with his parents 
and family to Ohio, stopping first at Marietta. After a few years 
spent in looking for a suitable place to locate they took up a 
piece of unimproved land in Muskingum county. Here he grtv/ 
to manhood, sharing the privations and hardships with the rest 
of the family of making a home in the woods, which was a hard 



14 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 



job. He had a very poor chance to go to scliool and got bat 
I'ttle education or church privileges. In the twentieth year of 
his age he was married to Martha Jobes, Sept. 9, 1827, Zanes- 
ville, Muskingum county, Ohio. I cannot fmd out the names or 
nativity of her parents, only the Jobes family came from Vir- 
ginia. She was born Feb. 8, 1811, in Virginia; died Aug. 8, 
1834, Zanesville, Muskingum county, Ohio, To this union three 
children were born: 

William, Nov. 24, 1828, Zanesville, Muskingum county, O.; 
died April 4, 1888, Mt. Pleasant, Henry county, Iowa. 

Isaac J., Aug. 27, 1830, Zanesville, Muskingum county, O.; 
died July 1, 1897, Elwood, Madison county, Indiana. 

Asa, Sept. 26, 1832, Zanesville, Muskingum county, Ohio; 
died 19 . 

They settled near the home of his parents and fixed them a 
good home, but that dread disease, consumption, fastened on 
this beautiful young mother and she was soon called to leave her 
husband and boys for others to care for. He got a widow lady 
and her daughter to move into the house and care for them a 
while; but as that was not very satisfactory he sought another 
companion and was married to Mary Owings, April 25, 1835, 
daughter of Richard and iNancy Owings, English descent, born 
July 26, 1814, (place not known) died April 28, 1891, Grant 
county, Indiana. To this union two children were born: 

Richard, March 6, 1836, Zanesville, Muskingum county, O.; 
died March 5, 1837, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana. 

Joanna, July 23, 1837, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 . 

In the fall of 1836 they moved to Grant county, Indiana, 
and lived that winter in a house he rented of his brother Isaac. 
The next spring they put up a house on land of their own, ex- 
pecting to clear out a farm, but consumption was fastened upon 
him before he left Ohio. It affected his throat so that he could 
not speak except in a whisper the most of the time he was in 
Indiana. He died May 18, 1838, leaving her to care for four 
children, with but little cleared land and nothing to help them 
but what they earned and raised. But she faithfully did the 
best she could till she married Mason Brown, Nov. 15, 1844, by 
whom she hau five children and lived to a good old age, loved 
and respected by all who knew her. 



t 



SECOND GENERATION. 15 

The boys went with other friends and relatives to live and 
prew to manhood, good, honest men and citizens of the country. 
Isaac went to the army daring the Civil War and did good service 
for his country till he was honorably discharged at the close of 
the war. 

Mr. Carter and wife joined the AA. E. church soon after they 
came to Indiana, and he lived faithful to his Master the few 
months he was permitted to live, and dying left good evidence of 
eternal life through Jesus his Lord. 

Mr. Brown made no profession of religion and she, having a 
poor chance to attend church, soon lost her identity v/ith the M. 
E, church, but held to the faith of the Baptist church, in v/hich 
doctrine she was raised. She was a good woman, a faithful 
mother, and her children honor and bless her name. 



Thankful [Carter) Uewett) Blackburn. 

^ Thankful, fourth daughter of Isaac P. and Joanna (Gay) 

Carter, born April 13, 1810, Northport, Waldo county, Maine; 
died Mvay 15, 1862, Palo, Linn county, Iowa. 

She with her parents and family came from Maine to Ohio 
in 1815, settling first in Perry county, but soon after they got 
land in Muskingum county and made them a home. There she 
grew to womanhood, in a heavily timbered country where it was 
hard to get the necessaries of life, and the hardships of a new 
country were her lot. Church and school privileges were not 
good, and she got but little education. 

Nathan Jewett, son of Amos Jewett, place of birth and date 
\ not known, died Jan. 1, 1829, Muskingum countv, Ohio. 

He was married to Thankful Carter, Dec. 21, 1825, in Mus- 
kingum county, Ohio. To them two children were born: 

Isaac Thomas, Nov. 13, 1826, Muskingum county, Ohio; 
died March 29, 1896, Washington county, Ohio. 

Samuel Hillman, June 11, 1828, Muskingum county, Ohio; 
died Jan. 31, 1877, Morgan county, Ohio. 

Nov. 2, 1831, she married James Blackburn, son of Jofeph 
Blackburn, of Pennsylvania. Born May 8, 1808, Pennsylvania, 
died Dec. 20, 1876, Palo, Linn county, Iowa. To this union ten 
children were born: 

Joanna, September 7, 1832, zMorgan county, Ohio; 
died 18 . 



16 CARTER FAiNAlLY HISTORY. 



Joseph, June 5, 1834, Muskingum county, Ohio; 
died March 5, 1835, iWuskingum county, Ohio. 

David C, February 7, 1836, Muskingum county, Ohio; 
died 19—. 

Rebecca C, March 10, 1838, Muskingum county, Ohio; 
died 19 . 

Martha Ann, September 19, 1840, Muskingum county. Ohio; 
died 19 . 

Thankful Samantha, March 20, 1843, Morgan county, Ohio; 
died 19 

Margaret Jane, January 12, 1846, Morgan county, Ohio; 
died 19 

Zacheus Taylor, November 21, 1848, Morgan county, Ohio; 
died 19 

John WilHam, April 19, 1852, Palo, Linn county, Iowa; 
died 19 

Olive H., September 24, 1854, Palo, Linn county, Iowa; 
died 19 . 

The most of their first years of married life was spent in 
Muskingum county, but in 1841 they bought land in the north- 
east part of Morgan county and engaged in clearing and farming 
in a very hilly, heavily timbered country. It was no small job 
to make a farm and get a living. There were no cooking stoves 
at this time, and the cooking was all done on an open fire. 
Their clothing wa^ home-made, and the spinning of wool, flax 
and tow, and the weaving of it into cloth and making it into gar- 
ments kept the women and girls busy, and all engaged in this 
Important business. In the fall of 1849 they sold all their pos- 
sessions in Ohio and moved to Iowa, going by water down the 
Muskingum and Ohio rivers to Cairo, and up the Mississippi to 
Muscatine. There were no railroads then in this part of Iowa, 
so they hired teams to take them to her sister, Martha, twelve 
miles above Cedar Rapids, on the Cedar river, arriving there 
Nov. 10. Here they found a home with her sister and her noble 
husband (John Lewis) for the winter. They were financially 
broke, so Mr. Lewis furnished the provisions for the family, 
which consisted of father, mother and seven children whirh 
were thankfully received, and they in return for the kindness 
did what work they could for him during the winter. In the spring 
they moved on a farm and WL-nt to farming. Prosperity followed 



SECOND GENERATION. 17 

their labors and before many years passed they had a farm of their 
own. After her death he married a widow, with whom he spent 
the rest of his life. No children were born to this union and the 
others soon grew to manhood and womanhood and went to 
homes of th ir own. leaving the old folks alone. They were 
members of the Methodist church, and the instruction given to 
tlie children brought most, if not all, of them into the same 
church. 

Samuel Hiilman Jewett was a preacher in the Free iViethodist 
church. 



Esther Ann [Carter) Smith. 

Esther Ann, fifth daughter of Isaac P. and Joanna (Gay) 
Carter, was born July 1, 1814, at Northport, Waldo county, 
Maine, died June 20, 1865, West Lima, Richland county, Wis- 
consin. 

She was the youngest of the family when they moved from 
Maine to Ohio. Her childhood and youthful days were spent 
with the family, she sharing all the hardships or making a home 
in a new country, seven miles west of Zanesville. But being 
raised in a new country did not keep her from getting marrried, 
and before she was eighteen years old was married to Matthew 
R. Smith, May 24, 1832, Muskingum county, Ohio. He was the 
son of William and Catherine (Smith) Smith, born Oct. 4, 1809, 
in Washington county, Pennsylvania, died Dec. 1, 1883, in 
Tennessee. His father was born in Wales, his mother in Ireland. 
To this union fourteen children were born: 

Isaac, April 8, 1833, Zanesville, Muskingum county, Ohio; 
died 19 

Martha, Nov. 15, 1834, Wheeling, Delaware county, Ind.; 
died - 19 

John, Nov. 7, 1836, Wheeling, Delaware, county, Indiana; 
died 19 

Mary Ann, Nov. 22, 1838, Wheeling, Delaware county, Ind.; 
died 19 

Melinda Jane, Jan. 6, 1841, Wheeling, Delaware co. Ind.; 
died Dec. 20, 1868, West Lima, Richland county, Wis. 

George Wash., Mar. 3, 1843, Wheeling, Delaware co., Ind.; 
died 19 



18 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

David C, June 26, 1845, Wheeling, Delaware co., Ind.; 
died 19 

Amanda Caroline, Dec. 7,1847, Wheeling, Delaware co. Ind. ; 
died 19 

Joseph Lewis, Aug. 26, 1849, Wheeling, Delaware co. Ird.; 
died 19 

Lucetta, Nov. 24, 1851, Wheeling, Delaware county, Ind ; 
died June 13, 1881, West Lima, Richland county. Wis. 

Wm. Melvin, Jan. 16, 1854, Wheeling, Delaware co., Ind.; 
died May 18, 1864, Wheeling, Delaware county, Indiana. 

Sarah Joanna, May 7, 1856, Wheeling, Dtlavv^are co., Ind.; 
died June 27, 1856, Wheeling, Delaware county, Indiana. 

Olive, June 10, 1857, Wheeling, Delaware county, Indiana; 
died June 10, 1857, \Vheeling, Delaware county, Indiana. 

Esther Ellen, July 27, 1858, Wheeling, Delaware co., Ind.; 
died 19 . 

The first two years of their married life was spent in Mus- 
kingum county, near the homestead, but during the year 1834 
they moved to Indiana and bought land all heavily timbered in 
Delaware county and put up a small cabin for a home. The 
country was very level, and as the clearing was often finished 
in the spring of the year it was a difficult job to burn the brush 
and logs on account of their water- soakeo condition, and the 
crop did not amount to much where there was so much green 
timber left standing on the ground. But by renting some cleared 
land a few miles away and clearing their's as fast as they could, 
they succeeded in making a living, if the food was of the coarsest 
quality. No fruit except what grew wild, so crab-apples were 
at a premium for sauce and dried pumplcins and pumpkin butter 
was a good thing for winter time and there v/as usually an 
ample supply of that kind of goods on hand. During the thirty- 
one years they lived in Indiana they added more land to their 
first purchase, and cleared out a farm., put them up a good frame 
hou^e and barn, and the children grew up and some of them 
married. No shoe stores to buy shoes at, but the leather was 
bought or hides tanned into leather, and the shoemaker often 
came to the house to make the shoes, and such shoes v/ere of 
some service and lasted till spring, but sometimes the shoemaker 
did not get around till Christmas to make slioes for the bare feet. 
Wolves in Indiana were called timber wolves and were larger 



SECOND GENEKATION. 19 

.md more ferocious than the prairie wolves of Iowa or the coyotes 
west of the Missouri river, and often during the night they would 
run tlie dog to the door and the dog and wolves would make the 
night hideous with their barking and howling, making t^le mother 
fearful for the safety of herself and children. 

In 1864 they sold the farm and in the spring of 1865 moved 
in a wagon, camping out by the way, to Wisconsin and settled 
near West Lima, Richland county. In June, 1865, the v/ife and 
mother died. The children, except Martha, moved to Wisconsin 
and were with h r at the time of her death. The next year he 
married a widow lady and the family moved to Fancy Creek, 
near Richland Center. The children grew up and by the help 
of the father all got homes of their own, which some of them sold 
and went to Iowa, but the most of them stayed in Wisconsin. 
In the year of 1883, he moved with his family of five children 
(four living, one dead by his second wife) to Tennessee, where 
he died and was buried December 1, 1883. They were both 
raised in the Baptist faith. He never made a public profession 
of a Christian life, but she v/as one of God's noble Christian 
mother's and did what she could to instruct the children to love 
and serve the Lord and a good part of them follow the mother's 
Christian example and all are good citizens. 



David Gay Carter. 

David Gay, fourth son of Isaac P. and Joanna (Gay) 
Carter, was born Dec. 20, 1817, in Columbus, Franklin county, 
Ohio; died Oct. 1, 1880, West Lima, Richland county, Wis. 

In his childhood he, with his parents, moved to Muskingum 
county, where they settled on an unimproved piece of land to 
make them a home and here he grew to manhood. Church and 
school privileges were not good and his chance for an education 
very limited, but making the best use of what he had, he got as 
goou an education as the country afforded. He became acquaint- 
ed with Ruhamah Bayles, daughter of Aden and Sarah Bayles, 
born May 12, 1818, in Frederick county, Virginia, 
died April 8, 1905, . West Lima, Wis. 

They were married June 24, 1841, in Muskingum county. 
To this union six children were born: 

William Harrison- April 19, 1842, Muskingum county, Ohio; 
died Feb. 5, 1879, West Lima, Richland county, Wisconsin. 



20 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

Samuel Hillman, Nov. 18, 1843, Muskingum county, Ohio 
died 19 

George, March 17, 1847, Upland, Grant county, Indiana 
died 19 

Calvin, June 21, 1848, Upland, Grant county, Indiana 
died 19 

Sarah Adeline, July 4, 1850, Upland, Grant county, Indiana 
died Oct. 29. 1888, V/est L-ma, Wis. 

Alonzo Theodore, Feb. 7, 1853, Upland, Grant county, Ind. 
died 19 

Thej' lived a few years in Muskingum county, Ohio, but 
thinking they could do better farther west, in the fall of 1844, 
they moved to Grant county, Indiana. Here he bought a partly 
improved farm of eighty acres and fixed it up for a home, but the 
restless spirit which so many Americans possess, caused him to 
sell that farm, and in the spring of 1856 he started west again, 
with the intention of settling in southern Wisconsin, near 
Brodhead, but not finding anything to suit them they went to 
Linn county, Iowa. He then went to Muihaska county looking 
for a home and on his way back to Linn county, bought a farm 
in Keokuk county, near Sigourney. to which he moved his family 
in June, 1856. Not being satisfied with that place, in the fall 
of 1858, they traded that farm for land in Marshal county, 
Indiana. Went back to their old home in Grant county and 
stayed with friends till the next spring, when they moved to 
their farm in Marshal county and fixed it up for a home, and 
lived there till the :5pring of 1865. They went again to Wiscon- 
sin and bought land near West Lima, Richland county. This 
moving was all done in wagons and was a tiresome job, but the 
restless spirit of American life urged them on to find something 
better and give their childrt-n a better chance for making a living. 

There were some improvements on this land, and by clear- 
ing out more of it and putting up a better building they soon had 
a pleasant, convenient home, and being better satisfied the chil- 
dren almost all settled near the old home which they own yet. 
She is living with her son, George, a widower, where she has a 
pleasant home, beloved by all who know her for her loving, 
gentle, forgiving disposition. He was a good man, a good neigh- 
bor, conscientious in all his dealings with his fcllowmen, a firm 
believer in the doctrines of the Baptist church to which he was 
very much attached, and he with iiis kind, amiable wife made a 
pleasant home for their children, which they loved very much. 



THIRD GENERATION. 21 

(THIRD GENERATION.) 

Ira Josselyn Carter. 

Ira Josselyn, second son of Isaac G. and Harriet (Josselyn) 
Carter, (son of Isaac P. Carter) was born March 15, 1822, 
Zanesvllle, Muskingum county, Ohio, died March 21, 1899, 
Matthews, Grant county, Indiana. 

The first years of his life were spent in the county of his 
birth, most of the time on a farm, seven miles west of Zanes- 
vilie. The spring he was thirteen years old he came with his 
fa'her to Grant county, Indiana, where his father had bought 
land, all heavily timbered. His father rented some cleared land 
and he helped to tend a crop of corn and put up a cabin in the 
wood--- and deaden some timber on his father's land. They went 
back to Ohio in July, and in September the family moved to the 
cabin in the woods. His young manhood was spent in clearing 
and farming among the trees, stumps and roots, and many a 
time he got a lick on the shin by a broken root while following 
the plow. The breaking plows were made of cast iron and did 
not scour very well. 

After the ground was plowed, they took one horse to a big 
shovel plow and furrowed it out one way. Then one man fur- 
rowed the other way, one man dropped the corn and three or 
four boys with hoes covered it up. Eight acres was a good day's 
work. No harrowing was done, and after the corn was up big 
enough to plow, the same plow was used on that rough, cloddy 
ground, going two or three times in a row with two or three fol- 
lowing to uncover and hoe the corn. No one thought of raising 
corn without hoeing it. 

1 will give you a description of clearing the first ten acres on 
his father's farm in Grant county, Indiana. The timber was 
thick and all sizes from brush to trees one hundred feet high. 
What a man cound span with one hand at breast high and under 
Were grubs, and it took a man three or four days to grub an 
acre. This brush was then piled in heaps, and the small timber 
to about one foot through cut down, the brush all being piled 
together and burnt. Enough of the timber that split well was 
made into rails to fence the field. The fallen trees and other 
^tuff was then cut into lengths of about twelve feet, ready for 



22 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

piling to burn. This was our work in the winter, in the spring 
the log rolling was done, a job on which the neighbors helped. 
A team of oxen or horses with five or six men with handspikes 
made a good gang for rolling logs. The burning of the heaps, 
consisting of logs wet and partly rotten, filled in with the green 
poles, was no easy job. All the chunks were picked off the 
ground to get the fire "stated and it required close attention to 
get them burned up. 

The standing timber was girdled and left to die. Oak trees 
would die the first year, beech, sugar trees and white elm would 
come out in leaf for two or three years. 

We went in among the stumps and standing timber to plow 
and raise corn. Birds and ground squirrels took some of it as 
soon as it wa^ through the ground and as soon as it was in roast- 
ing ear the blackbirds, squirrels and raccoons would get a part of 
it, leaving but little for the farmer. In the course of three or 
four years the timber left would get dry and be cut down and the 
clearing finished, except the stumps, which lasted several years, 
walnut being the last to go. 

No pastures being fenced, the cows and horses were turned 
out in the woods with a good bell on and the farmer had to go 
for his horses before he commenced work in the morning. Ira 
had his full share of that to do and many a mosquito bite he got 
while listening for the bell. The fall after he became of age he 
visited the scenes of his childhood, coming back in the spring of 
1844, after spending the winter with relat'ves there. Most of 
the trip was made on foot. 

July 25, 1844, he was married to Eliza Ann Corn, third 
daughter of Joseph and Nancy (Sade) Corn. Mr. Corn was of 
Scotch descent and came from the state of Georgia. Miss Sade 
was of English descent and came from Kentucky. 

Eliza Ann Corn was born June 5, 1825, Rush county? Ind.; 
died 19 

She came with her parents and family to Grant county 
when she was about twelve years old, where she grew to 
womanhood. They lived in a very level, heavily timbered coun- 
try, full of slashes where the water could not run away on ac- 
count of the timber and logs and dried up there, causing plenty 
of fever and ?gue. 

The trip from her hom.e to his father's home after the v/ed- 



THIRD GENERATION. 23 

ding was made on horseback, the bride and groom going before 
and other couples following about four rods apart to keep from 
splashing mud and water on those before when going through 
the slashes, where the water was knee deep to to the horses in 
places. 

To this union eleven children were born: 

Permelia Jane, Sept. 24, 1845, Matthews, Grant co., Ind. ; 
died Feb. 19, 1846, Matthews, Grant co., Ina. 

Harriet Catharine, Nov. 6, 1^46, Matthews, Grant co., Ind.; 
died Aug. 9, 1854, Matthews, Grant co., Ind. 

Gilbert, Nov. 12, 1848, Matthews, Grant co., Ind.; 
died Sept. 16, 1849, Matthews, Grant :o., Ind. 

Joseph Newton, July 24, 1850, Matthews, Grant co,, Ind.; 
died 19 

Olive, Dec. 19, 1852, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 

Levi Lewis, April 13, 1855, Matthews, Grant co., Ind.; 
died 19 

Mary Elvira, Oct. 2, 1857, Matthews, Grant co., Ind.; 
died 19 

Isaac Lyman, Oct. 30, 1860, Matthews, Grant co., Ind.; 
died . 19 . 

Selina Doretha, Feb. 10, 1862, Matthews, Grant co., Ind.; 
died Nov. 21, 1879, Matthews, Grant co., Ind. 

Jerusha, Jan. 18, 1866, Matthews, Grant county, Ind.; 
died 19 

Anna Augusta, Sept. 26, 1868, Matthews, Grant co., Ind.; 
died 19 

His father helped him to eighty acres of land worth two 
hundred dollars. They put up a log house and went to work to 
clear out a farm, which was no small job. After working on the 
land a few years they sold it and bought eighty acres nearby 
that was better improved. They built them a good house and 
barn and she lives there yet. After he came to Indiana his 
residence was within two miles of the homestead all of the time 
and at his death he was the oldest continual resident of the 
township. He was a good citizen, teaching school part oi the 
time. He was justice of the peace for several years. He v/as 



24 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 



appointed postmaster of Trask postoffice Oct. L 1865, and held 
the office continually for twenty -seven years and gave it up 
when he felt too old to attend to it. He took an active part in 
the improvement of the country and schools which were very 
much better than he enjoyed. At his death he and his children 
owned most of the old homestead. The childten are good 
citizens and all live near the old home. 

His parents were members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church and early in life he united with that church. His wife 
was born of parents that held to the Baptist church. After their 
marriage she united with the Methodist church with him and 
when the time came to build a church in the neighborhood they 
donated to the church a lot for that purpose, besides helping in 
other ways with the church building. Their children hold to the 
Methodist church, but with the exception of one have not taken 
a decided stand by church relationship, but are good neighbors 
and honest citizens. 



Howard Carter. 



Howard, third son of Isaac G. and Harriet (Joselyn) Carter 
(son of Isaae P. Carter) was born April 7, 1825, Zanesville, 
Muskingum county, Ohio, died /TfV^ ^j 19 ^ 7. 

I was born in the east part of the county, but at my first 
recollection we were living on a farm seven miles west of Zanes- 
ville. We had plenty of apples on the farm and among the 
incidents of my early life I remem.ber helping to gather the 
apples and hauling them in my little wagon and helping to make 
cider. We pounded the apples in a large trough and pressed 
them in a wooden press — and how I liked the cider. 

In 1834 father sold that farm and went to Indiana and 
bought land in Grant county. The next spring i was ten years 
old and in company with father and my elder brother went to 
the land in wagons — one two-horse and one one-horse. On 
this trip I first saw a friction match, and also a new country, 
bad roads and rough corduroy bridges. We went back to Ohio 
in July and in September 1835, the family, consisting of father, 
mother and six boys, moved to the land and into the unfinished 
cabin in the woods. When I look hack to this time 1 know that 
1 did not realize the work and difficulties that were before us in 




Howard Carter. 



THIRD GENERATION. 25 



making a farm in that heavily timbered country. We had no 
school to go to that winter, but we all had axes and had the 
privilege of cutting and piling as much brush as we wanted to, 
and this was the start of the second decade of my life. My time 
lill I was of age was spent in this hard work and farming among 
the trees, stumps and roots, of which work 1 did my full share. 
1 went to school about three months during the year to 
what 1 now think was a ver>' poor school in which spelling, 
reading, writing, and arithmetic were all that were taught. 
During my school days I never saw a girl study arithmetic and 
but one pupil study grammar and that for a single term. 

During the thirty years I lived in Indiana fever and ague 
was a very common complaint, always worse in the fall of the 
year and often some one would have an occasional attack of it 
during the winter which we called wintering the ague. But in 
spite of the hardships of a new country, we had our chopping 
and quilting parties when the boys would chop and pile brush to 
help some neighbor v/ith h=s clearing and the girls would uo some 
quilting, ending with a social party at night which all enjoyed. 
Log rollings and house raisings also brought us together, adding 
to the enjoyments of life. 

After 1 was of age I visited the scenes of my childhood in 
Ohio, going in a wagon as there were no railroads then. I look 
back to that visit and think of the country cousin visiting his 
cousin in town and 1 was that country cousin. 

About 1847 I commenced to run a threshing machine which 
father and a neighbor bought for one hundred and twenty-five 
dollars. It was a four horse power machine and our outfit con- 
sisted of two men, four hordes and tv/o wagons on which the 
machine was loaded when we moved it. Two hundred bushels 
of wheat was a good day's work. The machine did not clean 
the grain. The straw was raked off with hand rakes as it came 
from the machine and the grain piled up on the barn tloor, chaff 
and all, or put in rail pen-, the cracks being stopped with straw. 
It was cleaned afterwards with fanning mills made for that pur- 
pose and we did not know hov/ many bushels we had threshed 
till it was cleaned up and the farmer made report. This was 
about the first threshing done by machinery in that country, and 
the first in some neighborhoods. Men, women and children 
came to see the threshing machine run. 



26 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

Father helped me to eighty acres of heavily timbered land 
worth two hundred dollars, which I commenced to improve, but 
having a chance to sell it at an advance, I sold it and bought 
another eighty acres for $900 in a better location with a house 
and stable on it and some cleared land. I boarded with a neigh- 
bor and farmed the land one year, but thought best to have a 
housekeeper, and was married to Eleanor Lyon, Feb. 18, 1851, 
a neighbor girl, second daughter of James and Nancy (Slater) 
Lyon, born Jan. 22, 1831, Morgan county, Ohio, died Nov. 24, 
1870, Mt. Pleasant, Henry county, Iowa. The Lyon family 
were natives of Virginia, English descent. We went to house- 
keeping a few weeks after we v/ere married, and to this union 
nine children were born: 

Nancy Mahala, Jan. 24, 1852, Matthews? Grant county, Ind.; 
died 19 

Sarah Jane, July 1, 1853, Matthews, Grant county, Ind.; 
died 19 

Harriet Joanna, Mar. 3, 1855, Matthews, Grant county, Ind.; 
died Nov. 27, 1870, Mt. Pleasant, Heniy county, Iowa. 

*Leroy Perry, Feb. 4, 1857, Matthews, Grant county, Ind,; 
died 19 

Rhoda Caroline, Nov. 6, 1858, Matthews, Grant county, Ind. ; 
died 19 

Mary Alice, Oct. 12, 1860, Matthews, Grant county, Ind.; 
died 19 

William Elvin, Oct. 12, 1862, Matthews, Grant co., Ind.; 
died May 1, 1887, Mt. Pleasant. Henry county, Iowa. 

George Henry, April 8, 1865, Matthews, Grant co., Ind.; 
died 19 

Eva Isadora, July 25, 1867, Mt. Pleasant, Henry co., la.; 
died 19 . 

We improved the farm by remodeling the house and putting 
up a good barn, cleared out more of the land and put in ditches 
to drain it and bought another eighty acres joining it. A good 
school house was put up on the farm and the children had a 
good chance for schooling, and Sunday school and preaching in 
the school house. But having the ague so much of the time in 
the family, 1 wanted to go to a healthier country. So we sold 
the farm in 1864 for $4000 and started west, seeking a place for 



THIRD GENERATION. 27 



a home. Not finding anything in Illinois to suit me, 1 went on 
to Henry county, Iowa, and bought 160 acres of unimproved 
prairie land paying $1600 for it. 

In the latter part of May, 1865, we started to move to our 
land in Iowa— two wagons, four horses, a family of eight chil- 
dren, camping out by the way— a trip of about three weeks. We 
found kind friends to meet us here and moved a house I had 
bought onto the land and built a temporary addition to it to ac- 
commodate us. I hired a man to break out forty aces of the 
land but it was too late to raise a crop that year. It took one 
and three-fourths of a mile of fencing to fence the land, four 
board fence, about 20,000 feet of fencing lumber and two thous- 
and feet to build a stable and wagon shed. The summer was 
spent in fencing and other improvements. That fall and winter 
I got up material to build a house, which we built the next year, 
costing $1500 and moved into it in Sept. 1866, well satisfied with 
our move as we were in a better and healthier country and had 
better society, schools and church privileges. Financially, ! was 
not a success in life, but I raised my family on the land I owned 
and the increase in the value of land has put me ahead <?ome as, 
1 sold ihe farm in 1904 for $12,000, and it was clear of debt. 

Feb. 12, 1888, I was married to Mrs. Martha (Smith) Lewis 
and went and lived with her on the Lewis farm in Washington 
county till they sold it in 1894. We then went to Washington 
where we now live. We have a cow, some chickens and a good 
garden, making plenty of work for old people, and are very well 
satisfied with our condition in life. 

My parents, as well as those of the wife of my youth, were 
members of the Methodist church, and early in life we joined the 
church and the fourteen years we lived in Indiana our house was 
a home for the preachers of that church. Preaching and Sunday 
school was held in the school house on the farm and we did 
what we could for the cause of the Master, both there and in 
Iowa, where we moved and 1 thank God that I was permitted to 
see all of my children in early life decide to serve the Lord. 

In 1872 1 was permitted to hear the doctrine of the Second 

coming of the Lord preached and a thorough searching of God's 

l word convinced me of the truthfulness of the doctrine, but as 

there was no church near by tliat name, I never became identi- 



s- 



28 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 



fied with it and after my marriage to Mrs. Lewis 1 became 
identified with the (Old) Christian church to which she belonged. 

Joseph Carter. 

Joseph, fourth son of Isaac G. and Harriet (Josselyn) Carter 
(son of Isaac P. Carter) was born Aug. 2, 1828, Zanesville, 
Muskingum county, Ohio, died Feb. 10, 1901, Griswold, Cass 
county, Iowa. When seven years old, he with his father, 
mother and five brothers moved in wagons to Grant county, 
Indiana, and as the mother in a family of boys needed some 
help about the house he helped her during his boyhood days 
more than any of the rest of the boys which took some of the 
hard work of clearing up the farm off of him. But as he got old- 
er he did his part of the work at clearing and farming among the 
roots and stumps. He was a stout young man, always ready 
and willing to do his share of the work, and engage in the ball 
games and other sports of his school days and as better teachers 
were employed we had better schools and he got to study gram- 
mar and other studies that made him a better scholar than his 
older brothers. He taught several terms of school in the winter 
very successfully. The winter after he became of age he 
went to Ohio to visit the scenes of his childhood and relatives 
there. The trip was made on horseback. After he came back 
in the spring he w-mt to work at the carpenter trade working 
for a contractor for two years when he and his cousin, James 
Heal, went to work at the business together, taking the respon- 
sibility of contracting and putting up some strong, durable build- 
ings. 

A description of the first barn they put up will be of interest 
to some in the prairie country. It was fifty- eight feet long, 
twenty-two feet wide, with a shed ten feet wide on one side, 
sills twelve inches square and part of them the whole length of 
one tree; sleepers were made of trees about a foot through 
hewed on one side. The posts were eighteen feet long and ten 
inches square. The plates on top of posts were made of hickory 
trees the whole length and v/ere ten inches square. Most of the 
ties were eight inches square. This timber was all hewed out. 
The braces were sawed four inches square and a part of the ties 
were four inches square. 



THIRD GENERATION. 29 

r^ Tlie timber in the shed part was most all eight inches 
I square and the rafters were made of poles hewed on one side, 
' The roof was made of oak wood shingles, thirty inches long, 
■ riven out and shaved by hand. Weather boarding was all hard 
[ \v(H3d, five-eighths of an inch thick. It took some timber and 
Ncinie work to build such a barn as that. 

Rhoda Mahala Parrell, daughter of Enoch and Esther 
(Sappington) Parrell, born July 16, 1834, Pike county, Ohio; 
liicd 19 

Mr. Parrell was born in Virginia, Miss Sappington in Ohio; 
When but a child she came with her parents to Grant count3^ 
Indiana, and there she grew to womanhood where the forest had 
to be cleared away to make a comfortable hom.e. Her mother 
t was a tailoress and made coats for the neighbor boys to help 
support the family. She made the best use of the schools she 
could and had a fair education for the times. 

Joseph Carter and Rhoda Mahala Parrell were married Nov. 
?A, 1853, Grant county, Ind. To this union four children were 
born: 

Lyman Orlando, Oct. 13, 1854, Grant county, Indiana; 
died Nov, , 1854, Matthews, Grant county, Ind. 

Enoch Norman, Oct. , 1855, Grant county, Indiana; 
died Aug. , 1859, Brodhead, Green county, Wisconsin. 

Sylvania Caroline, April 10, 1858, Brodhead, Wisconsin; 
died Feb. 19, 1882, Traill county. North Dakota. 

Walter, April 3, 1867, Brodhead, Green county, Wisconsin ; 
died 19 

His father helped him to eighty acres of land but he pre- 
ferred working at his trade to clearing out a farm, so they sold 
out and in the spring of 1856, moved in wagons to Brodhead, 
Wis. Here they bought property and he worked at his trade 
and also learned the cooper trade. But he was not satisfied to 
live in town and in Feb. 1880, they packed their goods and put 
all on the cars and moved to Griswold, Cass county, Iowa, 
v.iiere he had bought some land which they improved and soon 
had them a comfortable home in the country. The daughter 
niarried and went to Traill county, North Dakota, where she 
died, leaving a young babe which the grandma went and got 
with the intention of raising, but it soon passed over with its 
rnotljer leaving only one child (Waller) who is now married and 



30 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 



has two children. He lives in Wahpeton, S. Dakota, -.vhere he 
has a good position in a bank. 

In Feb., 1864, Joseph Carter enlisted in the army thinking 
that all able-bodied men would have to go before the war closed, 
but it closed before he got into active service. He went east 
and was present at the grand review of soldiers at Washington 
at the close of the war, glad to get off so soon. 

They were good, honest citizens, loved and respected by 
their neighbors and all that had dealings with them. Raised by 
Methodist parents, early in life they became members of that 
church and were earnest, devoted workers in the Master's 
vineyard. But while in Wisconsin they heard the comJng of 
the Lord and kindred doctrines preached and accepted that 
doctrine, as the First Day Adventists preach it, fully believing 
that whether they lived 'till the Lord came or not, they would 
have a home in the renewed earth when He did come. 



Elijah Carter. 



Elijah, fifth son of Isaac G. and Harriet (Josselyn) Carter, 
son of Isaac P. Carter, was born Nov. 28, 1830, in Muskingum 
county, Ohio, about seven miles west of Zanesville, 
died, ,19 

He, v/ith his father's family, came to Jeffer- 
son township. Grant county, Indiana, in September, 
1835, when he was about five years old, and settled in the 
thick woods on the western bank of the beautiful Mississinewa 
river. In his boyhood days he took part with his father's 
family in clearing up a large and beautiful farm. On the 
7th day of April, 1850, he went to Marion, Grant county, 
Indiana, to learn the blacksmith trade with one Daniel Malotte. 
After working at his trade in Marion for about two and a-half 
years, he set up a shop of his own in the fall of 1852 on the 
southwest corner of his father's farm and on the state road 
leading from Marion to Muncie. About July 1, 1852, he was 
made postmaster of Trask postofFice, Grant county, Ind. His 
salary or rather his per cent for keeping the postoffke was on 
an average about $1.00 per month or $12.00 per year. He was 
postmaster during the civil v/ar and until Sept. 30, 1865,. when 
his brother Ira took charge of the postoffice. 



i THIRD GENERATION. 31 
f 

[ In 1853 he became acquainted with Miss iWary Jane Coate, 

I i>i EngHsh and German descent. She was the first born 
daughter oi William and Rachel Coate, and was born Jan. 26, 
1839, in Jonesboro, Grant county, Ind.; 
died , 19 . 

History says she was the first white chilci known to have 
been born in the city limits of Jonesboro. In the fall of 1854, 
she with her father's family moved to Springville, Lynn county, 
luwa, going all the way in a wagon drawn by two yoke of oxen. 

Elijah Carter and Mary Jane Coate were married April 26, 
lS55j in Marion, Lynn county, Iowa, by a Methodist minister 
by the name of Rufus Ricker. To this union v>'ere born three 
children, two sons and one daughter: 

George Bowers, April 23. 1856, Grant county, Indiana; 
died May 1, 1856, Grant county, Indiana. 

Rufus Ricker, May 10, 1857, Grant county, Indiana; 
died May 10, 1857, Grant county, Indiana. 

Lutitia Virginia, April 12, 1858, Grant county, Indiana; 
died Oct. 18, 1884, North Manchester, Wabash county, Indiana. 

They lived a little more than ten years in Jefferson twp., 
Grant county, Indiana, when being dissatisfied with a shop in 
the country they moved to Jonesboro, Grant county, Indiana, in 
November, 1865, and bought them a home where they are still 
(1905) living, and he working at his trade. 

When he opened a shop of his own, blacksmiths made all 
their horseshoes and horseshoe nails, often working after night 
to do it; but now they buy them ready made and the black- 
smiths do not know how to make a shoe or nail. 

Elijah Carter was a very kind man, scarely ever getting out 
of humor and would suffer loss rather than have any difficulty 
with anyone. To meet and get acquainted with him was to 
respect him for his sterling character. Born and raised in the 
Methodist church, in his early years he joined that church and 
through life was a consistent member of that faith. Mrs. Carter 
was raised in the Friends church and the characteristics of that 
people were shown in her actions through life. After their 
Jiuirriage she united with the Methodist church and being good 
singers, and she an orgsnist, they helped very much in the 
church service. Her daughter learned music from her mother 



32 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 



and took charge of the organ, releasing her mother from that 
work. 

With but one grandchild and one great grandchild of their 
posterity aUve, they are living alone, beloved and respected 
by all. 

John Hooper Carter. 

John Hooper, sixth son of Isaac G. and Harriet (Josselyn) 
Carter, (son of Isaac P. Carter) was born Nov. 25, 1832, Zanes- 
ville, Muskingum county, Ohio; died , 19 

The fall he was three years old, he with his parents and 
family moved to Grant county, Indiana, where they had a cabin 
on the bank of the Mississenewa river. A large portion of one 
end was cut out for a fire-place, the hearth, jambs and back- 
wall were made of moist clay well pounded down, the chimney 
of split sticks laid in mortar made of the same clay, puncheon 
floor made of split timber hewed on one side, split boards for a 
door and two holes in the wall for windows. They built a good 
brick house, two stories high, and moved into it late in the fall of 
1843, and from that time on had a very comfortable home. 

He remained with his father and mother till he was twenty- 
five years old, helping to clear out the farm and cultivate the 
same. At the age of twenty-two he went to Ohio and visited 
the scenes of his childhood and saw the log house in which he 
was born. He taught school two winters, a three months term, 
receiving $20 per month and board yourself, or board around 
among the scholars. 

Bathsheba Johnson, daughter of Gabriel and Nancy John- 
son, was born April I4, 1834, , Tuscarawas county, Ohio; 
died April 19, 1866, St. Joe, Champaign co., Illinois. Her parents 
were born in the United States. She came with them to Grant 
county, Indiana, in 1836, where she grew to womanhood. Her 
father settled on a public road and kept tavern where movers 
in wagons were entertained on their way to their new homes. 
A new country does not always b'ing good society, but as a 
general thing the settlers are kind and ready to help each other 
in time of need. 

The schooling she got was in the first school house built in 
the neighborhood where the children did not get a very good 
education. 



':■ 



l , THIRD GENERATION. 33: 

Jolin Hooper Carter and Bathsheba Johnson were married 
I March 16, 1858, Grant county, Indiana. 

To this union two children were born: 

Isadora Aurelia, Dec. 28, 1858, Matthews, Grant co., Ind.; 
died June 20, 1865, St. Joe, Champaign county, Illinois. 

Alisworth Thinandus, Nov. 14, 1861, Grant county, Ind.; 
died 19 

In 1856 he bought a farm near the homestead and com- 
menced to improve it and to this place he brought his bride, soon 
after they were married and began housekeeping. They lived 
on this farm 'till 1864; when they rented it out, sold off their 
personal property and moved on the cars to Brodhead, Wis., 
to try his luck. The next spring they moved to St. Joe, 111., 
and he worked at the carpenter trade and also kept a grocery. 
Here their daughter died in June, 1865. Soon after her death 
they moved into a part of the store building he had built at Burr 
Oak Grove. 

The next spring the wife and mother died, leaving him 
with his boy not five years old. He took the child to Indiana 
and left him with his brother Lewis and v/ent back to Illinois. 
After trading off his store goods he returned to Indiana where he 
Went into the same business near his old home. 

In about eighteen months he traded this stock for a farm 
and the farm for a stock of goods in New Cumberland, Grant 
county, Indiana, where he had a stock of general merchadise 
for over thirty years and had the postoffice eighteen years. He 
was township trustee for several years and tried for the 
nomination for county treasurer, but failed to get it and that 
ended his political career. 

While he was keeping store in New Cumberland (now 
Matthews] he felt the need of a housekeeper. 

Lizzie Barnhouse, daughter of Henry and Matilda (Evins) 
Barnhouse. was born May 7, 1849, West Virginia; 
died 19 . 

When about six years old her father and mother died, 
leaving her an orphan indeed, A kind aunt took her to Grant 
County, Ind., where she had a good home in good society and 
grew to womanhood. 

John Hooper Carter and Lizzie Barnhouse were married 



34 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

Oct. 18, 1871, Matthews, Grant county, Ind. To this union 
one child was born: 

Zora, December 19, 1883, iMatthews, Grant county, Ind.; 
died , 19 

They went to housekeeping in his house and had a very pleas- 
ant home until they sold out and moved to A'luncie to have a bet- 
ter chance to educate their daughter in music. He turned his 
attention to improving the town where he had put up some good 
buildings. He also had some property in Hartford City and the 
gas wells at Matthews. He now has a store in Fowlerton where 
he is doing a good business. 

Mr. Carter is a good man, an honorable citizen and one who 
has done much for those about him. He and his first wife were 
brought up by Methodist parents and early in life joined that 
church, she at twelve years old. He joined at a meeting in his 
father's barn. The regular preaching service at that time was 
held in his father's house as there was no church or school house 
in the neighborhood in which to hold meetings. 

Miss Barnhouse joined the Presbyterian church before she 
was married and is still a faithful member of that denomination. 
They are good people and have many friends that love and re- 
spect them for the good they have done and are still doing. 



Lewis Carter. 

Lewis, eighth son of Isaac G. and Harriet (Josselyn) Car- 
ter, (son of Isaac P. Carter) was born July 13, 1839, Matthews, 
Grant county, Ind.; died April 13, 1902, Matthews, Grant 
county, ind. His early life was spent on the farm with 
his parents and brothers. Several of them being older than he 
■was, he did not have the hard heavy work to do that they did 
and being of a very pleasant disposition he enjoyed his boyhood 
very well, being a friend and friendly to all. 

The schools of the country had improved greatly during the 
passing years. He attended regularly and received the best ed- 
ucation they afforded. He taught school for a time and was a 
successful teacher. 

In his young manhood he enjoyed the sports of the times, 
one of which was to see who could jump the farthest at three 
jumps. He did not allow any one to beat him at that sport and 
would hardly take time to eat if any jumping was going on. 



161630*; 



s 



k 



THIRD GENERATIONf-'-'-^^-* '•''"-•> 35 

Rachel McKever, daughter of Moses and Sarah (Moore) Mc- 
Keveer, was born July 13, 1840, Matthews, Grant county, Ind.; 
I died June 21, 1SS4, Matthews, Grant county, Ind. Her parents 
came from Virginia and were of Scotch descent. Lewis Carter 
and Rachel McKever were married April 24, 1862, Matthews, 
Grant county, Ind. To this union two sons were born: 

Charley Simpson, Oct. 25, 1856, Matthews, Grant co. ,lnd; 
died 19 

Milo Otis T., Nov. 12, 1869, Matthews, Grant county, Ind.; 
died 19 

^ They were bornon farms that joined and grew up together, 

attending church, school and places of amusement and plea- 
sure together and were lovers all their lives, making a hap- 
py marriage. They went to housekeeping near the home- 
stead. His mother died the next April and they moved to the 
home farm, where they lived until after his father's death; when 
he bought a part of the farm and lived there several years; but 
fmancial embarrassment caused them to sell out and after that 
they lived on rented land. 

After she died, he kept house with his boys until July 29, 
1886, when he was married to Miss Mary Louisa 
Sargent, born May 31, 1850, in Green county, Ohio; 
died, , 19 

She was the second child of Rev. David and Eliza C.(Babb) 
Sargent. Rev. and Mrs. Sargent were natives of Virginia. To 
this union two children were born: 

Oren Ray, June 7, 1887, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 

Rachel Vada, June 16, 1888, Matthews, Grant county, Ind.; 
died 19 

They went to housekeeping near Matthews and and their 
residence ever since has been in or near that town, where she 
and h(5r children now live. During his life he was a few times 
out of the state; but his residence was all of his life within five 
miles of the place where he v/as born. 

Mr. Carter and both wives were raised by Christian parents 
and in early life professed religion and joined the Methodist 
church. They were faithful workers in the Lord's vineyard. He 
was a good singer and an earnest worker for the Master and was 
able to help both church and Sunday school with his singing and 



36 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

teaching;. He lived to see the companion of his youth die happy 
in the Lord with full hope of immortality and eternal life and the 
companion of his age lived to see him pass to the beyond, as he 
lived, always happy in the Lord. She and his children miss a 
kind and loving husband and father and we all mourn the loss of 
one of the most upright, conscientious and devoted Christian 
men. 



Oliver Perry Carter. 

Oliver Perry, ninth son of Isaac G. and Harriet (Josselyn) 
Carter, (son of Isaac P. Carter) v/as born May 8, 1842, iViat- 
thews. Grant county, Ind.; died July 13, 1871, Matthewsj Grant 
county, Ind. 

He was the youngest of a family of seven boys that grew to 
manhood on the home farm. The farm was now cleared out and 
the stumps and roots mostly gone, and there were better plows 
and tools on the farm. The scythe and hand rake had given 
place to the mower and revolving hay rake. The grain cradle 
was gone and the reaper that the grain was raked off of by hand 
diu the cutting of the grain. Hand corn planters with v/hich a 
man could plant six to eight acres a day, after it had been marked 
out both ways had supersed the dropping by hand and covering 
with the hoe. The one horse double shovel plow was taking the 
place of the big shovel plow and the ground was put in better 
condition with the harrow so that the hoeing of corn was going 
out of date. These are some of the things that had come to us 
in the last twenty years as an improvement in the mode of 
farming. ^ - 

But with all of this there was plenty of vv'ork to do and Oli- 
ver Perry Carter always did his share, helping his mother with 
her work about the house when he could. 

As the country improved there were better schools and the 
surroundings were more pleasant than those his older brothers 
enjoyed. The old log school house was abandoned and a good 
frame building twenty-four feet square, three windows on each 
side, good seats with desks had taken its place. School v/as 
taught both winter and summer; grammar and history, studied 
by both boys and girls, was taught and it was thought by some a 
good tiling to give the girls a good education, which was a great 



THIRD GENERATION. 37 

change in fifteen years. 

Matilda McKever, daughter of Moses and Sarah [Moore] Mc- 
Kever was born April 1, 1S4S, Matthews, Grant, county, Ind.; 
died 19 

The McKevers were from Virginia, Scotch descent. 

Oliver P. Carter and Matilda McKever were married April 
30, 1866, iViatthews, Grant county, Ind. No children were born 
to this union. They were born on adjoining farms, attended the 
same church and schools all of their school days, getting a good 
education for the times and living so near each other, they were 
together in the parties and socials of the neighborhood during 
their single lives. 

The few years of their married lives vv^ere spent at or near 
the homestead and they were never very far from there. He was 
afflicted with consumption a good part of the time, so that he 
could not do much hard work; but was always patient, knowing 
that his time in this world was short. A loving wife, a kind 
brother and a sister-in-law attended on him during his sickness; 
but the call came and he had to go. 

Raised by religious parents, they early joined the Methodist 
church and were faithful to the Master all their lives. 

A few years after his death she married Lewis Littler, son 
of Sarah J. Heal and Joel Littler by whom she has three chil- 
dren. They moved to Anderson, Madison county, Ind., where 
they had a pleasant home, he working at the carpenter trade. A 
few months ago death again deprived her of a kind and loving 
husband, leaving her a widow again. Soon after her husband's 
death she went to Oregon to live with her children where she 
will be cared for. She is a woman who is worthy of their care. 

The Old Log School House. 

The following by Elijah Carter is a description of the first 
Jchool house built in the school district where he lived in Jeffer- 
son township. Grant county, Indiana, and where he and his 
brothers attended school every winter commencing December, 
1838, and ending March, 1850. It v/as built in the v/oods with 
no public road near it, the pupils coming to it in every direction 
along paths through the woods. Three months school in the win- 
ter and two short terms of summer school paid for by subscription 



38 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

were taught in this house. The winter of 1850 and 1851 the 
school was taught in a vacant dwelling house and by the next 
winter a good frame school house was built with upright windows 
and plenty of them. Good seats with desks for two were then 
provided. 

DESCRIPTION. 

The old school house was built of round logs, and after be- 
ing built, it was scutched or hewn down on the inside. The 
cracks between the logs were chinked and then daubed with clay 
or common mud and clapboards nailed over the cracks on the in- 
side only. It had what was called a puncheon floor. The house 
was, I think, 18 by 20 feet in size, the long way being east and 
west. It contained three windows in all. One window in the 
north side, one in the south side and one in the west end. The 
north and south windows each contained 24 panes of glass 8 by 
10. The west window had 18 panes of glass of the same size. 
The long way of the windows was horizontal instead of upright. 
At the north window was placed a plank or shelf 18 or 20 inches 
wide which extended the full length of the building, the outer 
edge being a little the lowest. At the south window was placed a 
similar shelf which extended from the southwest corner of the 
room to about a foot or 18 inches east of the east end of the south 
window. These were called writing desks and were used for 
that purpose, and on these the pupils threw the most of their 
wraps and luncheon. A rough bench about 12 feet long and two 
and a half feet high with four legs and no back, was placed at 
each of these desks upon which the pupils sat when writing. 
The west window had no desk and served only to give light. All 
the seats, except one, were simply puncheons or slabs with four 
legs to them and no backs. One bench 8 or 10 feet long was 
made out of plank, and had a back to it. It was made expressly 
for the girls. This bench was furnished by Moses McKever.who 
had three or four little girls. 

In the east end of the house was the large fire place and the 
door. The door was made of plank and swung back in the south 
east corner of the room on wooden hinges. It also had a wooden 
latch, lifted from the outside by a latch string. The fireplace 
was large enough to take in a back log about six feet lon?7 and the 
jambs and back vvall were built of moistened clay, well ham- 



THIRD GENERATION. 39 

mered with the end of a "Negro maul" to make them solid. The 
hearth was also made of moistened clay, well hammered and 
lasted a long time. It had a clapboard roof with knees and 
weight-poles. The house, at the time it was buih, stood on land 
that belonged to Nathan Lewis and was just south of Thomas 
Dean's farm. 



David Heal. 



David, second son of Olive Carter and William Heal, 
(daughter of Isaac P. Carter) was born Nov. 5, 1823, Mus- 
kingum county, Ohio; died Oct. 23, 1904, Wheeling, Delaware 
county, Ind. 

His childhood days were spent in the county of his birth with- 
out any permanent home. In the fall of 1829 he, with his par- 
ents, moved to Delaware countv, Ind., where his father entered 
government land at $1.25 per acre. Their house, a cabin, was 
built on the bank of the Mississinewa river. They had few 
neighbors and part of them were friendly Indians. In this home 
he grew to manhood, having all the diiliculties of a new country 
to contend with. His first school in Indiana was taught by his 
mother in their own house. Before he v/as of age a school house 
was built at one corner of the farm and a Methodist church at 
another, both log buildings. He got a good education for the 
times and taught several terms of schod. 

The spring of 1835 his uncle, Isaac Carter, and two boys 
about his age came from Ohio to India&a to raise a crop of corn 
and make some improvement on land he had bought. They 
made their home at his house the few inronths they stayed and the 
friendship that sprang up between the boys while hoeing corn, 
hunting and fishing along the river was genuine and as the fam- 
ily moved to the country the next fai:l, it was permanent and 
lasting-, adding very much to the pleasi^es of his young manhood 
days. 

Ann Caroline Rigdon, daughter of Eli and Sarah T. (Dick- 
son) Rigdon, was born May 24, 1831, Guvrnsey county, Ohio; 
died Jan. 7, 1878, Wheeling, Delaware county, Ind., English de- 
scent. 

She came with her parents to Indiana when she was three 
years old. Her father settled on Lick creek and put up a mill 



40 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

which was a very primitive affair, yet many went to it with a 
sack of corn on a horse to get it ground into meal. Here her 
girlhood days were spent, going to school but very little and hav- 
ing an occasional turn of the ague as the fall of the year came 
around. 

David Heal and Ann Caroline Rigdon were married May 21, 
1846, Wheeling, Ind. To this union two children were born: 

George Eugene, Nov. 13, 1853, Delaware county, Indiana; 
died 19 

Ann Lacy, Sept. 11, 1856, Wheeling, Delaware county, Ind.; 
died 19 

They went to housekeeping in a house on the farm. The 
next year his father died and in the settlement of the estate, the 
farm was divided among the heirs. He bought some of the 
shares that joined his and put up a hewed log house and as time 
passed on he built a good frame house and barn and made other 
improvements to make a pleasant home. He had a part of the 
sugar camp and made sugar while he was able and usually had a 
bowl of it on the table while he lived. His home after he came 
to Indiana in 1829, until his death Oct. 23, 1904, was all of the 
time on the same farm. 

He traveled some and saw other parts of the United States, 
and one time went to the state of Maine to see his father's peo- 
ple; but he soon got tired of traveling and visiting and came home 
to rest. His visits were always very short. He was 'Justice of 
the Peace several years and held other township offices. He was 
a Republican in politics, always taking part in elections, anxious 
for the betterment of the country and society. His friends were 
always welcome to his house and home and yet his actions to- 
wards them would make those not acquainted with him think he 
was a very selfish man ; but he was not. He was at home and 
he wanted others to feel at home with him without any trouble 
to him. He was a very honest, upright man, never in debt to 
bother him; had a little farm, well tilled, a comfortable home and 
did not bother himself to add to his possessions, but enjoyed what 
he had to the fullest extent. His son married soon after his 
mother's death and moved into the house with him and he and 
his faithful wife remained with him and cared for him the rest of 
his life. He enjoyed smoking very well and for many yearo he 
had a room warmed and lighted by gas in the old house where 



?■ 



THIRD GENERATION. 41 

Ik- It'ft a gas jet burning day and night so as to be handy. He 
h.aJ torch lights to burn gas out in the yard, but thinking that 
wasteful of gas he had them taken down. 

Theirs was a happy marriage; they were faithful and true 
to each other and obedient children made a happy family. Her 
parents were Baptists; but she went with him to the Methodist 
church which he joined in early life and continued a faithful 
member of the same all his life, serving as circuit steward a part 
of the time. They had no enemies and were loved and honored 
by all. 



William Carter, 

William, first son of Samuel Hillman and Martha (Jobes) 
Carter, (son of Isaac P. Carter) was born Nov. 24, 1828, Zanes- 
ville, Muskingum county, Ohio; died April 4, 1888, Mt. Pleas- 
ant, Henry county, Iowa. 

His childhood days were spent near where he was born ; but 
in the fall of 1836 he with his parents and family went to Grant 
county, Ind. Here his father bought land and commenced to im- 
[- prove it; but having weak lungs, he fell a victim to consumption 
before William was ten years old. He was the oldest of four chil- 
dren and with his stepmother was left to make a living in the 
woods with but little cleared land, and you may be sure they 
had a tough time of it even in spite of the help of very kind 
neighbors. The stepmother was a hard worker and good manager 
so they got along very well for the chance they had. 

His stepmother married again after a little over six years of 
widowhood and he went and lived with a neighbor. 

Jemima Jane Hillyard, first daughter of Jacob and Martha 
(Eviston) Hillyard, was born Jan. 15, 1834, Guernsey co.,Ohio; 
died , 19 , German descent. 

She moved with her parents and family to Delaware county, 
!nd., when she was twelve years old and being the oldest girl in 
the family the mother needed her very badly to help about the 
household duties and to care for the children, so she did not get 
to go to school very much and is a very poor scholar. 

William Carter and Jemima Jane Hillyard were married 
Sept. 15, 1850, Delaware county, Indiana, To this union three 
daughters v/ere born : 



42 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

Martha Ann, Oct. 26, 1852, Matthews, Grant county, Ind.; 
died 19 

Emily Jane, May 17, 1854, Matthews, Grant county, Ind.; 
died 19 

Olive May, March 27, 1866, Henry county, Iowa; 
died 19 

He bought his stepmother's interest in the home farm and 
went to housekeeping in the old house. They did very well 
while they stayed here? and acquired some property; but thinking 
they could do better farther west they sold out in 1855 and in the 
spring of 1856 he and his uncle David and families started in 
wagons for Brodhead, Wisconsin. 

Not finding anything there to suit them they went on to 
Linn county, Iowa, and stopped with relatives there until he and 
his uncle made a tour to Mahaska county, hunting a place to lo- 
cate. On their way back his uncle bought a farm and the crop 
partly put in near Sigourney, in Keokuk county. They all went 
to this farm and that fall he v/ent to Henry county and bought 
eighty acres of unimproved prairie land paying $1,600 for it. In 
February, 1857, they moved to Henry county and put them up a 
good frame house as soon as possible. He traded his horses for 
oxen and went to breaking prairie and improving the farm. The 
posts he got near Trenton and had to haul them nine miles and 
with an ox team it was a busy day's work to get a load. He 
hauled his fire wood from the same place and the lumber from 
Mit. Pleasant to build a four board fence, white oak posts and 
pine lumber. His money did not come from Indiana as soon as 
he expected and after he got the material on the ground for the 
fence, he could not get $3.00 to buy a keg of nails to put it up 
with. These difficulties were very trying on the new settler. 
Other difficulties of the close times were to get something to eat 
and wear. His wife and a neighbor woman went to town to- 
gether with a little trade and both wanted calico for a dress and 
as they did not have enough to get two dress patterns, she let 
the other woman have her money to get her a dress; she wait- 
ing until another time for hers. It was by the very closest liv- 
ing at this time that they saved their land which afterwards made 
them such a beautiful farm and home. A few years of close liv- 
ing and then the Civil war came on. Money was plentiful, 
so in 1S65 they put up a good barn, leaving the prairie stable cov- 



t 



THIRD GENERATION. 43 

ered with slough grass to go down and not manyyears after they 
put up a better house with cellar under it and had a very con- 
venient farm and home which he enjoyed to the fullest extent. 
He was not anxious to add to it; but helped their children, as 
they left home, to homes of their own and theirs was a pleasant 
family. 

They were members of the Methodist church. In 1872 they 
heard the doctrine of the First Day Adventists preached and ac- 
cepted it as Bible truth and lived the same, the children follow- 
ing the parents. He was a man of an upright character whose 
word was as good as his bond. 

When she sold her interest in the homestead to her son-in- 
law, she reserved a room in the house for her own use where she 
now lives. She is a woman who has been kind to others and 
done much to help the sick and needy and many bless her name 
for the kindness they received from her. 



Asa Carter. 

Asa, third son of Samuel Hillman and Martha (Jobes) Carter 
(son of Isaac P. Carter) was born Sept. 26, 1332, Muskingum co.,0. ; 
died 19 

His mother died before he was two years old. His father 
^ married in the course of another year. When four years old he 
went with his father and family to Grant county, Indiana. They 
settled ill a heavily timbered country and before there wa«5 much 
improvement made. The father died, leaving the stepmother 
and four children to make a living, with but little cleared land 
and but little per-:onal property. She was a hard workin womang, 
a good manager and they succeeded very well, two of the boys be- 
ing older than he. The stepmother married again when he was 
about twelve years old and he went and lived with an uncle for a 
few years, when he quit the farm and went to Marion and 
learned the wagon maker trade. 

Agnes Thomas, daughter of Lewis and Lydia Thomas, v/as 
born Nov. 11, 1826, Orange county, Ind.; died March 14, 1869, 
Fairmount, Indiana, Welch descent. 

Asa Carter and Agnes Thomas were married April 27, 1852> 
Marion, Grant county, Ind. To this union seven children were 
born : 



44 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

Lewis Hillman, July 21» 1853, Grant county, Indiana; 
died, , 19 

Nathan Q., Aug. 8, 1855, Grant county, Ind.; died May, 
1865, Salem, Lee county, Iowa. 

William, Aug. 8, 1857, in Missouri; died, March, 1859, Mis- 
rouri. 

Quincy, August 8, 1857, Missouri; died, Aug. 8, 1857, Mis- 
souri. 

Isaac N., October 20, 1860, Henry county, Iowa; 
died 19 

Jemima L., Jan. 8, 1863, Henry county, Iowa; died De- 
cember , 1890, Grant county, Ind. 

John A., January 22, 1865, Salem, Lee county, Iowa; 
died 19 

They settled near the homestead in Grant county, Indiana, 
and he worked at his trade about four years, when he packed up 
and went to northern Missouri for a few years and then to Iowa, 
where his brother lived in Henry county. Soon after he got 
them a home in the north part of Lee county, a few miles south 
of Salem, in a good neighborhood of the Friends. 

He made a loom that he thought would m.ake him a fortune 
and sold out and went to Indiana where he thought he could sell 
them. He only made one loom and found out that it was a fail- 
ure. Yet he was always contented with what he had and ex- 
pecting something better. They settled in Fairmount and as he 
was a good workman he got plenty of work and soon had a nice 
little home. Here the wife and mother died and he soon felt the 
need of a woman to keep the family together. 

Jane McCully, daughter of Wilson and Christine (Sweeney) 
McCully,was born July 28, 1833, in Pennsylvania, German descent: 
died 19 

Asa Carter and Jane McCully were married Sept. 9, 1869, 
Fairmount, Indiana. To this union three children were born: 

Robert B., August 4, 1870, Fairmount, Indiana: 
died 19 

Harmom E., December 7, 1875, Fairmount, Indiana: 
died 19 

Kett, December 15, 1878, Fairmount, Indiana: 
died 19 

They settled in Fairmount and as she was a prudent, saving 



THIRD GENERATION. 45 

\ housekeeper and saved what they got, they soon had things 

'] more comfortable about them and a good home. 

f He worked at his trade or anything in the wood work line 

that was needed to be done and part of the time at gardening for 
the factory hands. He was a singular man, always contented 
with what he had and expecting something better in the near 

: future and willing to help or divide with the needy. Agnes was 
a member of the Friends churcli and remained in the church all 
of her life, never worrying or complaining about the things of this 
life. Lewis Hillman, their son, was a successful preacher of the 
Wesleyan Methodist church, his labors causing many to com- 

i mence a Christian life. Jane, I knew but little about and yet I 
know that she was faithful to a mother's duties and is honored 
for what she has done. 



Joanna (Blackburn) Lewis. 

Joanna, first daughter of Thankful (Carter] [Jewett) 
and James Blackburn [daughter of Isaac P. Carter,] 
was born September 7, 1832, Morgan county, Ohio; 
died ■ 19 . 

The first seventeen years of her life were spent in Morgan 
and Muskingum counties and and as her parents were in limited 
circumstances, she did not have an easy time in her young days. 
The work of housekeeping fell heavily on her and she also early 
learned to run a spinning wheel and work a loom. Owing to the 
busy cares of life and the poor schools of the times she got but 
little education. When she went to church, she walked along 
the poorest kind of roads or perhaps by-paths over the hills, 
through the woods. 

In the fall of 1849 she with her parents and family went to 
Linn county, Iowa, the trip being made on the rivers via 
Marietta, Cincinnati, Ohio, Cairo, Illinois, and Muscatine, 
Iowa, and in wagons to Palo on the Cedar river above 
Cedar Rapids. They arrived at their destination on the 
10th of November, tired and worn out and some them 
sick. She shared the hospitalities of a kind aunt and uncle 
during the winter. Finding plenty of work to do in a better 
country with better surroundings life to her appeared more real 



46 CARTER FA.WILY HISTORY. 

and pleasant, with the privilege of attending school where better 
teachers were employed. 

William Lewis, first son of John and Elizabeth (Dewey) 
Lewis, natives of Ohio, was born August 10, 1S26, Aluskingum 
county, Ohio; died Jan. 2, 1880, Palo, Linn county, Iowa. 

When about ten years old he came with his parents to Indi- 
ana and settled in Blackford county, v/here his father put up a log 
building for a mill house. The stone for doing the grinding was 
one of the hardest kind of boulders or niggerheads which he got 
near the iWississinewa river. In this mill he ground both corn and 
wheat. The bolt for bolting the flour was turned by hand. They 
lived here only a few years when they went to Iowa and settled 
on the Cedar river in what is now Linn county, twelve miles 
above Cedar Rapids, taking a claim before it was surveyed and 
buying it when it came into market. In this new country he 
-Spent his young manhood days. 

Joanna Blackburn and William Lewis were married Nov. 21, 
1852, Palo, Linn county, Iowa. To this union five children v/ere 
born: 

John Dewey, August 18, 1854, Palo, Linn county, Iowa; 
died March 2, 1893 Palo, Linn county, Iowa. 

Thankful Elizabeth, Feb. 1, 1856, Palo, Linn county, Iowa; 
died 19 

Minerva Esther, Nov. 3, 1859, Palo, Lynn county, Iowa; 
died April 2, 1863, Palo Linn county, Iowa. 

Charles Wesley, October 20. 1862, Linn county, Iowa; 
died 19 

Lucy Ellen, January 30, 1867, Palo, Linn county, Iowa; 
died March 14, 1867, Palo, Lino county, Iowa. 

A short time after they were married he with others went to 
Texas to look at the country in viev/ of settling there; he was 
gone six months and came home v/ell satisfied to stay in Iowa. 
They put up a cabin on land he had entered of the government, 
partly timber and partly prairie, and went to work to make a 
farm. Prosperity followed their labors and as the years passed 
on they built them a good barn and a two story house and liad 
them a very comfortable home and a profitable farm. The barn 
was struck by lightning and burned down causing considerable 
loss, but not seriously affecting their business or prosperity. 

Here their children were born and grev/ up, got married and 



THIRD GENERATION. 47 

settled on farms nearby. The country improved as they grew 
up and they soon had many of the comforts of Hfe they did not 
enjoy in their younger days. . Scliools were better and more 
months taught in the year. 

They were raised by Methodist parents and early in life they 
joined that church and were laithfuUy devoted to the cause of the 
Master by their means "and service in church. And when the 
time came to build a church in the neighborhood they cheerfully 
donated the land for the purpose, besides helping in every way 
as much as they could. She has now passed her threescore and 
ten years; but the cause of the Lord and her love for the wel- 
fare of others lies near her heart and the iniluence of her loving, 
Christian life is a help to the community where she lives and 
they are glad to have her with them. Her home is v/ith her 
daughter, Thankful E. Eaheart, on a farm that joins the home- 
stead. 



David C Blackburn. 

David C, second son of Thankful (Carter) (Jewett) 
and James Blackburn (daughter of Isaac P. Carter) was 
born February 7, 1836, Muskingum county, Ohio; 
died 19 

His boyhood days were spent in Muskingum and Morgan 
counties. In the fourteenth year of his age he went with his 
parents, taking the rivers for a route to Muscatine, Iowa, and in 
wagons to Palo a few miles above Cedar Rapids on the Cedar 
river, v^here his parents located and went to work in earnest 
to make a living. Prosperity followed their labors and they 
soon had a comfortable home and here he grew to manhood in a 
better country with better schools and pleasanter surroundings 
than they had in Ohio. 

Elizabeth Richards, first daughter of Daniel and Sarah Ann 
(Lewis) Richards was born May 8, 1842, Palo, Linn county, Iowa; 
died 19 

Her parents were of German descent. At the time of her 
birth her parents had settled on land that the government had 
not surveyed yet; but when it was surveyed and came into mar- 
ket her father bought the land that made them a beautiful farm 



48 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 



and here she grew to womanhood in a new country with its many 
drawbacks and poor schools in a large family. She was the 
oldest girl and no doubt the mother found plenty of work for her 
to do which she cheerfully and faithfully did while she stayed 
with them. It was a very fertile country, part prairie and part 
timber and it was not very long until they had plenty about them 
and good neighbors. 

David C. BUckburn and Elizabeth Richards were married 
May 17, 1860, Palo, Linn county, Iowa. 

To this union four children were born: 

Clarence, February 21, 1861, Palo, Linn county, Iowa; died 
Nov. 2, 1862, Palo, Linn county, Iowa. 

Harriet, May 20, 1864, Palo, Linn county, Iowa; 
died 19 

Sarah Vienna, November 12, 1865, Linn county, Iowa; 
died 19 

Richard Harry, February 14, 1872, Palo, Linn county, Iowa; 
died 19 

They went to housekeeping near her father's farm and lived 
there eighteen years, but thinking a farm in the west would be 
better for them they went to Nebraska in 1878 and took a home- 
stead in the Platte River valley near Lowell, in Kearney county. 
Here they had some things to discourage them. Their land proved 
to be of a very poor quality and crops failed on account of dry 
weather and damage by hail storm. They had a hard time to 
get the necessaries of life and thinking they could do better rent- 
ing, they left the homestead and lived on rented land for several 
years, the girls having some hay land in the valley to which they 
attended. 

They now have a fruit farm, eleven miles from Kearney, 
where they are doing well. 

The children are grown up and married and have homes of 
their own, leaving them in the home alone. They were ail raised 
by the strict rules of the Methodist Episcopal church and joined 
the church in early life, she being converted at fourteen 
years of age and has faithfully served the Master ever 
since, always thanking and praising God for the blessings 
of this life they enjoy and the hopes of eternal life when 
Jesus comes to take his ransomed ones home. 



THIRD GENERATION. 49 



Martha {Smith) (Lewis) Carter. 

Martha, first daughter of Esther Ann Carter and Mathew R. 
nith (diuighter of Isaac P. Carter) was born Novem- 
-r 15, 1834, VVheehng, Delaware county, Indiana; 
ed, , 19 

The writer fust saw her in iVvay, 1835, when her parents 
/ed in a small, lov/ log cabin they built the winter before in the 
oods. They had just commenced to clear out a farm in a 
)untry where neighbors were scarce and far between, but plenty 
deer and other wild game. She, being the oldest girl of a 
rge family, there was always plenty of work for her to do. 
lie men were always busy at the clearing and farming so 
at they did not help the women, but let them do the milking 
nd spin and weave the most of the clothing they wore, 
booking was all done on an open fire in a place in the wall fixed 
jr a fireplace. Tallow candles or some lard in a saucer fur- 
ished all the light they had except the fire light. 

She very well remembers the first dress that was bought for 
er, made of calico, and she felt proud of it, having worn home- 
lade goods before tiiis event. The first school she attended was 
mile from home. The land was very level and often nearly cov- 
red with water. A school house was built near them when she 
as ten years old. That made things some better, but her edu- 
ation was very limited. She and another girl tried to study 
rithmetic, but as it was not popular gave it up in a few days 
nd that is all of that study by girls she saw in her school days 
nd very little study of grammar by any one. 

In these surroundings she grew to womanhood and enjoyed 
er young life very well, not knowing there was anything bet- 
rr for any one. Horseback riding on a farm horse, or walking 
.'as the way she went from place to place and most of it was 
one on foot. 

Jesse Lewis, fourth son of William and Dorothy (Hedrick) 
.ewis, German descent, was born Nov. 23r 1832, Ross county, 
)hio; died Dec. 15, 1877, Washington county, Iowa. He with 
lis parents came to Indiana when he v/as ten years old and set- 
ied near where the Smiths lived so his surroundings v/ere very 
nuch like theirs. It v.'as not all v/ork and no play; the young 



50 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

folks had their parties and gatherings and enjoyed themselves as 
well as young people do now. 

Martha Smith and Jesse Lewis were married March 3, 1854, 
Wheeling, Delaware county, Ind. To this union eleven children 
were born: 

Amanda Olive, April 9, 1855, Delaware county, Ind.; died 
July 29, 1885, Washington? Washington county, Iowa. 

Mathew Wharton, Aug. 6, 1856, Delav/are county, Indiana; 
died 19 

Thomas Jefferson, Oct. 14, 1858, Wheeling, Delaware co., Ind; 
died 19 

Melvin Pete, Nov. 30, 1860, Wheeling, Delaware county, Ind; 
died 19 

George Elmer, Aug. 24, 1862, Delaware county, Indiana; 
died 19 

_ Allen. August 15, 1864, Wheeling, Delaware county, Ind.; 
died Feb. 17, 1865, Washington county, Iowa. 

Samuel Cocklin, Aug. 16, 1867, Washington county, Iowa; 
died , 19 

Clark Abbott, June 24, 1869. Washington county, Iowa; 
died Sept. 23, 1889, Washington county, Iowa. 

James Wesley, May 27, 1871, Washington county, Iowa; 
died 19 

Kate Emily, April 21, 1873, Washington county, Iowa; died 
April 16, 1891, Washington county, Iowa. 

Allie Esta, April 30, 1865, Washington county, Iowa; 
died 19 

Her father gave her two hundred dollars with which they 
bought forty acres of land, going some in debt. The first im- 
provement on this land was the cutting of logs for a cabin. They 
moved on the land that fall and he worked away from home at 
the carpenter trade the next year. 

- She also got of her father a cow and other things for house- 
keeping to the amount of sixty dollars worth. Bought a cooking 
stove and some other things (second hand) and went into a small 
cabin to live. 

A description of this stove may be interesting. It was 
among the first sold in that country and was called a step stove. 
In front low down was the firebox for wood, over the fire were 
two holes for cooking, a little higher up and back were two more 



THIRD GENERATION. 51 



holes and the oven for baking was a drum in the pipe. It 
was a good stove for that day. 

They sold that land and bought a piece better improved. 
Prosperity followed their labors and they gained some property. 
in 1864 they sold out in Indiana and the next spring went to 
Washington county, Iowa, arriving there the first of June. Their 
moving outfit consisted of one two horse wagon, one colt that 
was led. In the party were the father and mother and six chil- 
dren, camping out by the way. 

Here they bought one hundred and twenty acres of land 
with improvements on it, but did not get possession until the 
next fall. They lived that summer in a house nearby, he work- 
ing at his trade. 

The boys were soon large enough to do the farming and he 
worked at his trade most of the time. In a few years they put 
up a good barn and house, besides other improvements and did a 
good part in builaing a church on the farm. They bought other 
land and at his death in 1877, they had four hundred acres of 
land. The property was left for her to run until the children 
were all of age and she and the boys ran it very successfully. 
Chopping and hauling wood in the winter helped them out, so 
that they had the four hundred acres of land clear of debt and 
plenty of personal property when the estate was settled in 1894. 

Some of the children had married and gone into other busi- 
ness and none of them wanted to farm, so they sold the farm 
taking property in Washington as part pay, which she took at 
the settlement and v/here she now lives with Howard Carter, 
whom she married Feb. 12, 1888, free from the hard work that 
fell to her lot all of her life. The fireplace has given way to the 
furnace, the cooking stove to the beautiful steel range, tallow 
candles to kerosene lamp, gas or electric lights. Ready made 
.clothing has crowded the spinning wheeF and loom to the attic 
and yet with all of these good improvements at hand, people are 
no happier nor do they enjoy life any better than they did fifty 
or sixty years ago. 

They were members of the (Old) Christian church and their 
children all joined that church and were baptized in early life. 
They are now scattered and away from the church of their choice 
and some of them joined other churches for a church home and 
are doing good work in the cause of the Master wherever they are. 



52 CARTER FA.N\ILY HISTORY. 

She is the happy mother of six sons and one daughter, who 
are sood Christian citizens with no bad habits. 



Mary Ann (Smith) Poorman. 

h\ary Ann, second daugliter of Esther Ann Carter and 
Mathew R, Smith, (daughter of Isaac P. Carter) was born 
November 22, 183S, Wheeling, Delaware county, Indiana; 
died 19 

She was born in a farm house and here she grew to woman- 
hood. She knew something of the work of making a farm in a 
woodland country. Theirs was a busy place. Sheep were raised 
along with other stock and the spinning of the wool and weaving 
it into cloth for the family was the work of the girls and women. 
She was strong in the arm and quick on foot and could spin two 
dozen cuts (two days' work) a day for weeks at a time and help 
milk the cows tvvice a day and not get tired. 

In the spring of 1865 she went with the family to Vernon 
county, Wis. Constant work and short terms of school made 
her careless about attending when there was school and conse- 
quently her education v/as very limited. 

Isaac Decatur Poorman, son of Jacob N. and Eliza Poorman, 
was born September 30, 1843, Delaware county, Indiana; 
died 19 

His early life v/as spent at school and on the farm and in 
1861 he accompanied his parents to Vernon county, VVisconsin, 
where he worked for his father clearing up a farm; but he was 
anxious to join the army and as soon as he was old enough, No- 
vember 27, 1863, he enlisted in the Second Wisconsin Cavalry, 
Company G, and served his country until he was discharged in 
November, 1865, at Horton, Texas, and returned home. New 
Years, 1866. 

"Mary Ann Smith and Isaac Decatur Poorman were married 
October 31, 1867, Richland Center, Vt'is. 

To this union five children were born: 

Rosetta >\\ay, August 17, 1868, Vc-rnon county. Wis.; died 
May 10, 1894, near Chicago, Illinois. 

Almeda, March 28, 1870, Vv^est Lima, Vernon county. Wis. ; 
died 19 



THIRD GENERATION. 53 



Elza Bird, Sept. 26, 1873, West Lima, Vernon county, Wis. ; 
died 19 

Alma Bertha, Sept. 26, 1873, West Lima, Vernon county, Wis.; 
died 19 

Mathew Ludlow, February 21, 1879, Vernon county, Wis.: 
died 19 

They built a cabin on land he owned and went to improving 
it. It was all heavily timbered, it took work and time to get a 
farm so that they could raise stock and grain profitably. There 
were a great many hooppoles in the v/oods and the cutting and 
hauling of them to market at Lone Rock, forty miles, and later 
to Ricliland Center, twenty miles, was a business that brought 
them some money. While he was engaged in hauling, there 
v.'as no weather too cold for him to go, even if it was thirty de- 
grees [or more] below zero. She was quick at cooking as she 
was at spinning in her younger days and the many hands they 
had about them while engaged in the hooppole business had to 
hurry if they got their hors- s fed and harnessed before she rang 
the bell for breakfast. 

The hooppole business is a thing of the past, and the farm 
is now a good place to raise stock and grain. The children are 
mostly married and gone. They are not doing so much work, 
but enjoy the fruits of their labor, conscious that in their busy 
life they have done thei' part in the improvement of the country 
and helped to make the surroundings better for those that follow. 
Neither of them made a public profession of a Christian life, but 
they are good citizens of the country. 



Malinda Jane {Smithy Burt. 

Malinda Jane, third daughter of Esther Ann Carter and 
Mathew R. Smith (daughter of Isaac P. Carter) was born Jan. 
: 6, 1841, Wheeling, Delaware county, Indiana; died Dec. 20, 
' 1868, West Lima, Wis. 

She grew up at the home of her parents, engaged with the 
duties of the farm and household work of a farm and hers was a 
busy life with many of the pleasures and attractions that come 
to busy young people in the country home. 

William Burt, son of Ebenezer and Elizabeth Burt, was born 
about 1840, in Ohio; died In 1903, West Lima, Wis. 



54 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

He came to Indiana with his parents during his minority and 
helped his father in improving the farm. 

Melinda Jane Smith and William Burt were married Oct. 6, 
1861, Wheeling, Delaware county, Indiana. To this union three 
children were born : 

Lillie Ann, August 22, 1862, Delaware county, Indiana; 
died 19 

Emma, February 25, 1864, Wheeling, Delaware county, Ind. ; 
died 19 

Charles Merideth, May 23, 1866, Vernon county, Wisconsin ; 
died 19 

They went to housekeeping near the home farm and en- 
gaged in clearing land and farming. During the civil war he en- 
listed in the army as a recruit and went out to do service for his 
country; but not being able to stand the exposure of army life, he 
was discharged and sent home in about three months. They 
then sold out and in 1864, moved to Vernon county, Wisconsin. 
He bought land near West Lima and went to work to improve 
a farm and as clearing land is a hard job, it is best to turn in 
everything that will make a little money to help along. So the 
hooppoles were cut and hauled to market, the sugar trees were 
tapped every spring and sugar made and as he was one of the 
best sugarmakers in the country, the sugar that Bill Burt made 
always found a ready market which helped to furnish the neces- 
saries of life while the clearing was going on. By careful living 
and close attention to business they soon had a comfortable home. 
The wife and mother dying, left him in a bad fix with three 
small children; but he married again and kept the children to- 
gether until they were grown up, when he gave them their part 
of the land purchased with the money they got of her father and 
two of her children live on it. 



David Carter Smith. 

David Carter, fourth son of Esther Ann Carter and 
Mathew R. Smith (daughter of Isaac P. Carter) v/as born 
January 26, 1845, Wheeling, Delaware county, Indiana; 
died 19 

He spent the first twenty years of his life on the farm where 
he was born, helping to clear up and improve a farm and his lot 



THIRD GENERATION. 55 



ras like others of his age in that country, hard work and not 
luch play. Sc-hools were improvin;^^ but he did not get a very 
[nod education. In the spring of 1865 he with the family went 
o Vernon county, Wisconsin, and settled on a farm where his 
nother died June 20, 1865. After he became of age he went to 
vork on some land that his father helped him to buy in the north 
5art of Richland county near West Lima. This land was heavily 
imbered and part of it hilly and rocky. 

Mary Elizabeth Smalley, daughter of Thomas and Cynthia 
[Calhoon) Smalley, Scotch-Irish descent, was born Oct. 15,1852, 
Logansport, Ind. ; died Oct. 16, 1902, Readstown, Vernon county, 
Wisconsin. 

She with her parents came to Richland county, Wisconsin, 
:n 1857, where she spent her girlhood days which ended too soon 
by marrying young and going to housekeeping. 

David Carter Smith and Mary Elizabeth Smalley were mar- 
ried Dec. 15, 1867, West Lima, Wis. To this union ten children 
were born: 

Jesse Lewisj Feb. 17, 1869, West Lima, RichIandcounty,Wis. 
Hied , 19 

Orville Elberson, February 20, 1871, Richland county, Wis. 
died 19 

; Leonard Melvin, December 31, 1872, Richland county, Wis. 
|died 19 

Cora Ellen, September 22, 1874, Rkhland county, Wis. 
died 19 

Effie Caldona, January 30, 1877, Rkhland county, Wis. 
died 19 

Arthur Travis, December 30, 1878, Richland county. Wis. 
died, ,19 

Bertie, Feb. 17, 1881, West Lima, Rkhland county. Wis. 
died March 11, 1881, West Lima, Richland county, Wis. 

Eugene Merideth, Oct. 27, 1882, Richland county, V/is. 
died 19 

Clarence Leroy, March 7, 1888, Richland county. Wis. 
died 19 

HoUie Marvin, April 25, 1890, Richland county. Wis. 
died 19 

They went to housekeeping in a room in her father's house 



56 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 



until they got a cabin put up on their own land, near a beautiful 
spring of water and a running brook and here all of their children 
were born. 

They sold their farm about 1897 and bought another near 
Readstown in Vernon county, and moved to it and here the wife 
and mother died. His daughter, Effie, and her husband moved their 
family into the house to care for him and the children and have 
now bought the farm. Most of the children are now old enough 
to care for themselves. He and the youngest are making their 
home with Orville at Bloomington, 111., 1905. The facilities for 
schooling were good and all got a fair education, the oldest 
studying for a doctor. Another went to high school and attended 
college one year then quifand got married and went to farming, 
teaching school in the winter and was a successful teacher. 

He was raised by a good Missionary Baptist mother and she 
by devoted members of the Disciple church which she joined in 
early life. He is a very kind dispositioned man of sterling char- 
acter, but never publicly professed religion. She was one of 
God's noble women, always kind and loving and theirs was a 
pleasant family. Some of the children are members of the 
church and earnest workers in the Master's vineyard. 

Amanda Caroline [Smith] Hyatt. 

Amanda Caroline fourth daughter of Esther Ann Carter and 
Mathew R. Smith (daughter of Isaac P. Carter), was born 
December 7, 1847, Wheeling, Delaware county, Indiana: 

died 19 

Her childhood days and youthful years were spent on the 
farm where she was born, helping about the farm and farm 
home, taking part in milking the cows and making butter, also 
spinning flax and wool for the family clothing. 

In the eighteenth year of her age her father thought best on 
account of the failing health of her mother to move to Richland 
county, Wis., which they did in the spring of 1865, the wife and 
mother dying a few weeks after they arrived. 

The ties of home being severed she began teaching school, 
which business she followed for three years. 

Valentine Gilbert Hyatt, son of Alfred King and Christiana 
(Clark)HyattwasbornDec. 29, 1848, Delphi, Carroll county, Ind: 
died 19 



THIRD GENERATION. 57 

Mr. Hyatt was of Welch and French descent, Miss Clark was 
of Irish and German descent. The year he was six years old he 
; came with his parents to Richland county, Wis. The country 
was almost in its native state and mostly timbered land and he 
helped to improve the farm, surrounded with all the disadvan- 
tages of a new country, 

Amanda Caroline Smith and Valentine Gilbert Hyatt were 
married Dec. 20. 186S, Richland county, Wis. 

To this union twelve children were born : 

Willma Alice, October 4, 1869, West Lima, Wisconsin 
died 19 

Florence Alpha, December 16, 1870, Richland Center, Wis. 
died 19 

Alfred Mathcw, Dec. 12, 1872, Richland Center, Wisconsin 
died Feb. 18, 1878, Richland Center, Wis. 

Christiana Amanda, Dec. 5, 1874, Sauk county, Wisconsin 
died 19 

Samuel Wesley, June 5, 1876,Reedsburg, Sauk county, Wis 
died 19 

Esther Olive, Nov. 5, 1878, Richland Center, Wisconsin 
died 19 . 

Clark Isaac, April 30, 1880, Richland Center, Wisconsin 
died 19 

Mollie Selena, August 2, 1881, Richland Center, Wisconsin 
died 19 

Martha Amelia, March 26, 1883, Richland Center, Wisconsin 
died 19 

Ada Louisa, August 18, 1884, Richland Center, Wisconsin 
died 19 

Mae K,, May 20, 1886, Farnsworth, Lane county, Kansas 
died 19 

Valgntine Glenn, September 20, 1890, Farnsworth, Kansas 
died 19 

They first settled in Richland county and their residence the 
: first eighteen years of their married life svas in that county, ex- 
cept five years at Reedsburg, Sauk county. Financially they 
were not very successful and among the losses v/as their house 
by fire one bitter cold night with the mercury twenty degrees 
below zero, they barely escaping with their lives. He had car- 



58 CARTI£R FAMILY HISTORY. 

ried some of the children out in their bed and fortunately a man 
came along in a sled and took them to a neighbor's, but not un- 
til his feet were badly frozen. 

In 1886 he went to Lane county, Kansas, and took a home- 
stead, she going with the family early the next spring. The 
goods were packed and shipped on the railroad and all going ( y 
the same conveyance to Grainfield, Gove county, forty miles 
north of their homestead. He had a dugout prepared for them 
and they went to it in wagons. A large family in a very small 
room and their fuel, the buffalo chips of the plains, made things 
look discouraging. 

Dry weather and poor crops made it a harder place to get the 
necessaries of life than her mother and grandparents had iii the 
woods where they had to do the spinning and weaving to clothe 
the family. The girls worked in the tavern at Dighton and one 
of them went to teaching school and the boys herded cattle and 
all went to help support the family. They stayed on the home- 
stead until they proved up and got the deed for the land and 
then went to Pueblo, Colorado. He and part of the family hav- 
ing gone on before, she and others went the fall of 1891. Here 
was one of the most trying times of their lives. They could not 
get a house and had to live in a tent, boarded up at the sides, but 
with a tent roof on it. The children took the measles, two of 
them were bad, she procured m.edicine and doctored ihem herself 
and through the blessings of God they all got well, strong and 
hearty. The next spring they rented a house and she went to 
keeping boarders. He got work as manager of a brickyard at 
good wages and they got some start this year. Then they rented 
the Smelter hotel and boarded the men that worked in the 
smelter, having as many as seventy men part of the time. They 
ran the hotel about six years and she did most of the cooking and 
managing, the children and a little hired help doing the rest. 
The children wanted her to quit the hotel and as some of them 
were married and others had positions and good wages, they 
bought her a house and lot and she moved into it the fall of 1899. 
After a few weeks she was very well satisfied with the change 
and has since taken things easy and this January, 1905, she is 
at Tabasco, Colorado, where he has a job at twenty dollars per 
week. They have two small rooms and she does the cooking for 
them and they enjoy the fruits of iheir labors. 



THIRD GENERATION. 59 

He is a man of no bad habits, always kind to his family and 
rot the highest wages when he worked, always looking for some- 
hing better. He has done considerable prospecting in the moun- 
ains for the precious metals and spent many days digging for 
hem, but as yet has not found anything satisfactory, but still 
lolds a claim in the mountains of New Mexico. He was raised 
)y parents that were members of theWesleyan Methodist church, 
)ut never made a profession of religion. 

She is one of God's noble women, raised by a Missionary 
Baptist mother. She taught her children to love and serve the 
^ord. She is proud of them and they thank God for such a 
nother and bless her name. 



Joseph Lewis Smith. 

Joseph Lewis, fifth son of Esther Ann Carter and 
Mathew R. Smith (daughter of Isaac P. Carter), was born 
August 26, 1849, Wheeling, Delaware county, Indiana; 
died, ,19 

His childhood and boyhood days were spent on the home 
farm in a large family where all were kest busy at work, the boys 
clearing and farming. Sometimes the girls helped in the clear- 
ing in order to get the necessaries of life. Three months in the 
year was about all he got to go to school and as boys went bare- 
footed in the summer, he did not go to Sunday school very much. 
In the spring of 1865 he with his parents moved to Wisconsin 
and settled in Vernon county, near West Lima. This was a new 
country, heavily timbered and very hilly; but the many beauti- 
ful springs of water induced settlers to take it up and improve it. 
The family moved to Fancy Creek, Richland county, he going 
along and helping his father until he became of age. 

Caroline Delilah Peckham, daughter of Levi and Mary (Clarck) 
Peckham, English descent, was born Aug. 7, 1850, Galio co., O; 
died 19 

She with the family moved to Richland county, Wisconsin, 
when she was sixteen years old. Her parents were farmers so 
she was raised on a farm. 

Joseph L. Smith and Caroline D. Peckham were married 
Dec. 15, 1870, Richland county. Wis. To this union nine chil- 
dren were born : 



60 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

Levi Mathew, Oct. 24, 1871, Richland county, Wis.; died 
Sept. 23, 1872, Fancy Creek, Wis. 

Mary Louie, May 26, 1873, Richland county, Wis.; died 
May 23, 18S7, Keota, Iowa. 

Martha Ellen, July 31, 1875, Richland county, Wisconsin; 
died 19 

John Leonard, March 5, 1878, Washington county, Iowa; 

died 19 

Lester Orr, July 15, 1880, Washington county, Iowa; 
died 19 

Ira Jordon, August 9, 1884, Washington county, Iowa; 
died , 19 

Alva Bunker, March 14, 1886, Washington county, Iowa, 
died 19 . 

Alta Verne, March 10, 1889, Washington county, Iowa: 
died 19 

Clark Anson, April 28, 1893, Washington county, Iowa: 
died 19 

His father helped him to buy some land on Fancy creek 
and they put up a cabin and went to work to improve it, but hilly, 
rough, stony land was hard to make into a farm. The beautiful 
land of Iowa attracted his attention, so he sold out and moved to 
Washington county, September, 1876. They settled on a rented 
farm north of West Chester in Washington county, buying a small 
tract nearby. In 1886 they bought a farm adjoining Keota on 
the east where they lived about eleven years. Part of that time 
he was a partner in the grain and lumber business in Keota. In 
1897 he traded for a farm on Skunk river twelve miles south of 
Keota, getting about two acres for one of his prairie land. The 
next trade was for land in South Dakota, but he concluded he 
did not like that and did not move there, but traded it for a good 
farm in Audrain county, Mo. This he moved to in November, 
1902. This was a good farm in a good country, but land specu- 
tors got about him and persuaded him to trade for timber land 
ninety miles south of St. Louis, Mo. Some difficulty arose about 
the location which they settled by him taking a farm in Iron 
county, Mo., where they now live and like the country very well. 

Her parents were members of the United Brethren church, 
which she joined in her youth. He was raised by a Missionary 
Baptist mother, but joined the church with his wife. Nut living 



THIRD GENERATION. 61 



near the church of their choice, they did not attend as often as 
t!iey would like to have done, but they were loyal to the church, 
the church paper being a regular visitor in their home. A good 
neighbor and an upright man, he has done much good in the 
world and their children are following them in the church and 
doing work for the Master. 

Lucetta [Smith] Jordan. 

Lucetta, fifth daughter of Esther Ann Carter and Mathew R. 
Smith (daughter of Isaac P. Carter) was born Nov. 24, 1851, 
Wheeling, Delaware county, Indiana; died June 13, 1881, West 
Lima, Richland county, Wis. The first fourteen years of her 
life were spent at her home in Indiana and as the country im- 
proved the comforts of life increased and the schools improved. 
In the fifteenth year of her age she went with her parents to 
Vernon county, Wisconsin. Here she grew to womanhood in a 
new country, but the spinning wheel and loom were left in 
Indiana and she did network at that business as her older sisters 
had done. The necessaries of life were more easily procured, 
leaving more time for attending school. 

Wesley Smith Jordon, son of Timothy Shane and Martha 
Jane (Babb) Jordon, was born Nov, 29, 1850, Delaware co., Ind. ; 
died 19 

His parents were natives of the United States. He came 
with his parents to Vernon county. Wis., and followed the occu- 
pation of his father, hdping him on the farm and in the clearing 
and cutting hooppoles. 

Lucetta Smith and Wesley Smith Jordon were married July 
4, 1871, West Lima, Wis. To this union two sons were bo'-n: 
Loyal Grafton, February 14, 1875. Vernon county, Wis.; 
died 19 

Mathew Shane, July 29, 1879, Vernon county, Wisconsin; 
died - 19 . 

They settled near West Lima, on land he owned which they 
cleared up and farmed and by economical living soon 'had a 
comfortable home where she spent her short married life. 

After she died he took the children to his mother, who cared 
for them until he married Miss Marshall, who was a good house- 
keeper and all a good stepmother could be to the boys, who re- 
spect her as they should. He v/as raised by members of the 



62 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

Disciple church, she in the Baptist faith, but neither of them 
made a public profession of religion. They were kind, obliging 
neighbors, good, honorable citizens, loved and respected by ail 
with whom they associated. 



John Smith. 

John, second son of Esther Ann Carter and Mathew 
R. Smith (daughter of Isaac P. Carter), was 
born November 7, 1836, Wheeling, Delaware county, Indiana; 
died 19 

Born in a small log ca! in in the woods with barely the nec- 
essaries of life, he grew up to be a stout, hearty boy, enjoying 
life with his brothers and sisters. 

In the twelfth year of his age, he with the rest of the fam- 
ily, took the whooping cough which was followed by lung fever 
which was very hard on him, but from which his body recovered 
and he grew to be a large, stout man, but his mind never recov- 
ered. He went to school, but could not learn, nor was he ever 
able to comprehend the duties of life. He would work part of the 
time and take an interest in the work, acting as manager of the 
whole business and so they all got along with him with but very 
little trouble. But in business matters he was incompetent and 
was constantly guarded. 

His father left him and his property in the hands of his 
brother-in-law, Isaac D. Poorman and his faithful wife, with 
whom he lived twenty- nine years and was well and faithfully 
cared for. As he grew older he would at times think some one 
was trying to harm him in the night and hearing of a home for 
the feeble minded at Viroqua they took him there on trial and lie 
liked the place and people so well he is there yet (now over four 
years). He talks about the cattle and hogs as if he owned the 
whole thing and it could not be run without him and all are glad 
that he is contented and happy. 

Esther Ellen (Smith) Getty. 

Esther Ellen, eighth daughter of Esther Ann Carter and 
Matthew R. Smith (daughter of Isaac P. Carter), was born 
July 27, 1858, Wheeling, Delaware county, Indiana; 
died 19 

The year she was seven years old she moved with her par- 
ents and family to Wisconsin and located near West Lima in a 



THIRD GENERATION. 63 



small cabin in a woodland country, where her mother died a few 
weeks later, leaving her in the care of sisters and brothers. Her 
father married again and she went to live with him in his home 
on Fancy creek, Richland county, staying with him until August, 
1868, when she went to live with her sister, Mary Ann, who now 
had a good home and to whose care she had been given by her 
mother before her death. Here she did her share of the house- 
hold duties and attended good schools where she got a fair edu- 
cation. 

In 1874 she went to Reedsburg, Sauk county, and attended 
high school one year, but failing health compelled her to return 
to her home with her sister, after which she made two visits to 
Iowa, where her sister, Martha, lived, one time slaying over a 
year. She was a jolly, lively girl, enjoying life to the full with 
her many friends. 

James Edward Getty, fourth son of Joseph and 
Elizabeth (McClannahan) Getty, was born October 
10, 1858, West Lima, Richland county, Wisconsin; 
died 19 . 

He was of Irish and Scotch -Irish descent. He grew to man- 
hood on the farm on which he was born and engaged in all the 
work of clearing up a farm in a timbered country and farming in 
his boyhood and mature years. His schooling was not neglected 
and he got a good common school education and was well posted 
on current events. After his father's death, he bought the other 
heirs' interest in the home farm and lived on it with his mother. 

Esther Ellen Smith and James Edward Getty were married 
March 17, 1888, West Lima, Richland county, Wis. One child 
v/as born to this union: 

Leland George, March 12, 1893, Richland county, Wis.; 
died 19 

They went to housekeeping on his farm and engaged in 

[farming and stock raising in earnest. Prosperity has followed 

their labors and they now have a good, well furnished house and 

a good farm for sheep raising and dairying in which business 

they are now engaged. 

She was raised in the Baptist faith, but in later life her as- 
sociations were with the Disciples and she united in church fel- 
lowship with them, and is well satisfied with her church iiome. 
He was raised in the Methodist belief to which doctrine he holds, 



w 



64 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 



but never united with any church. In his reading he has not 
neglected the Bible and has a good understanding of it, which he 
freely imparts to others. They are good citizens, always willing 
to help the needy, and the instruction of his mother is carried 
out and no hungry person is turned away empty from their door. 

George Carter. 

George, third son of David Gay and Ruhamah 
(Bayles) Carter [son of Isaac P. Carter], was born 
March 17, 1847, Upland, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 

In the tenth year of his age he accompanied his parents in 
their move to Iowa and afterwards to Richland county, Wiscon- 
sin, in 1865. He remained with his parents helping to improve 
the farm until he was of age, when he commenced to improve a 
farm of his own on land near the homestead. He got a very 
good education for the times and his surroundmgs were pleasant, 
but most of the time he lived in a new country where the timber 
had to be cleared away to make a farm and he had plenty of 
hard work to do while growing up. 

Mary Ann Farmer, daughter of John and Mary [Bell] Far- 
mer, was born Nov. 17, 1849, Columbia county, Ohio; died 
Sept. 22, 1897,Wakeeney, Trego county, Kan. Mr. Farmer was 
a native of Maryland, Miss Bell of Pennsylvania. I have no date 
of the time she came to Wisconsin, but find her here a grown 
girl in Richland county in 1870, living with her parents. 

George Carter and Mary Ann Farmer were married Oct. 8, 
1879, Viroqua, Wis. No children were born to this union. 

They went to houseeping on the farm in Richland county. 
Wis., where he had a house for that purpose where! they 
remained until the fall of 1884, when they rented the farm and 
October 20th, started in a wagon camping out by the way, to 
Kansas and spent about one year traveling most of the time in 
Kansas and Nebraska. 

In the fall of 1885 they took us a homestead in Trego county, 
Kansas. He took great pains to improve this land, first living in 
a sod house, but ten years after built a ntrat little frame house 
close to the sod house which they thought was the safest place 
in case of a storm or tornado. They planted hedge, fruit and 



THIRD GENERATION. 65 

forest trees only to see them stunted or die. Some years they 
had fair crops, but too many failures to be successful farming. 
Prairie fires came very close to them and she took what little 
water and milk they had and with a mop wet the dry grass and 
saved their buildings. 

He kept the homestead about sixteen years and sold it for 
$1,200, not a financial success. She died in the fall of 1897, 
when he took her remains back to Wisconsin for burial. 

They were making arrangements for both to go to Califor- 
nia when she was taken sick and her dying was a severe shock 
on him. After the burial he went back to Kansas, settled up his 
business and went to California to attend to some interests he 
had in a fruit lot, but not liking the situation he sold out and 
went to Oregon to visit his \ rother, spending about a year before 
he got back to Wisconsin, where he and his mother have since 
been living together. She is now very helpless and gets the 
needed attention from him and a granddaughter who lives with 
them. 

He wa= raised in the Baptist faith to which he holds. His 
wife united with the Methodist Episcopal church when about 
twenty-five years old and remained a faithful Christian woman 
through life. Theirs was a happy marriage and they enjoyed 
life together. 



Sarah Adeline {Carter) Looker. 

Sarah Adeline, only daughter of David Gay and Ruhamah 
(Bayles) Carter (son of Isaac P. Carter), was born July 4, 1850, 
Upland, Grant county, Ind.; died Oct. 29, 1888, West Lima, 
Richland county, Wis. 

She was the only girl of the family and was the pet and yet 
was not a spoiled child, being of such a pleasant disposition. The 
year she was six, she went with her parents and family to Iowa 
and afterwards went with them in their various moves until they 
settled in Richland county, Wis., the year she was fifteen years 
old. The spinning of flax and wool was a thing of the past in 
farm houses, so she did not learn that business, but busied her- 
self with household duties and going to school, where she had a 
chance to get a good education. 



66 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 



Skyles Woodburn Looker, seventh son of Ed- 
mond . Burke and Martha (Russell) Looker, was born 
May ' 10, 1847, Cumberland county, Pennsylvania; 

died 19 

Mr. Looker was of English, Miss Russell of German descent. 
At the age of four years, he with his parents moved to Fulton 
county, Ohio, where he grew up. He was so anxious to join 
the army during the Civil war, that he enlisted twice, but was 
not permitted to go on account of his age. After he was of age 
he went to Kansas to see the country; also worked on a farm in 
Indiana and in the lumber camps of Michigan. 

The spring of 1870 he came to Richland county, Wisconsin, 
and engaged in clearing and improving the country. 

Sarah Adeline Carter and Skyles Woodburn Looker were 
married Nov. 26, 1874, Richland county, Wisconsin. To this 
union seven children were born: 

Ruhamah Arvilla, Nov. 27, 1875, Richland county, Wis. ; 

died . 19 

Melvern Dennis, August 15, 1877, Richland county, V/is. ; 

died 19 

Amelia Frances. July 21, 1879, Richland county, Wis.; 

died 19 

Lorena Alice, April 4, 1881, Richland county, Wisconsin; 

died 19 . 

Roscoe Clark, October 4, 1884, Richland county, Wis. ; 

died 19 

Lottie, November 1, 1887, Richland county. Wisconsin; 

died 19 

Lillie, November 1, 1887, Richland county, Wisconsin; 

died, . 19 

He bought a farm in the tov/n of Bloom and built a fine 
house which was a home in every sense of the word and they 
lived a pleasant happy family until the death of the wife and 
mother, leaving him with the little ones which was sorrow in- 
deed. He hired a woman to come and help care for the children 
so that he could keep them together, but found it difficult to keep 
a hired woman, he married Adella Outland July 4, 1889. It 
was a difficult undertaking for her to take care of a large fam- 
ily of small children, but seeing their need, her love for them 
constrained her to do it and she faithfully did her part by them 



THIRD GENERATION. 67 



and they cherish the memory of a hard working, kind hearted, 
well meaning woman who taught them to cook and do the house- 
• work, fitting them for the duties of life. She was not permitted 
to live long and enjoy tlie fruits of her labor, dying Oct. 7, 1902. 
The girls were then able to go on with the work and keep house 
for their father. Mr. and Mrs. Looker united with the Methodist 
church soon after their marriage. He is a man of good charac- 
ter, honest in all his dealings with his fellowmen and accumu- 
lated property so they had a good living. She was a good girl, 
a kind woman, a loving wife and mother and a faithful servant 
of the Master. 

Calvin Carter. 

Calvin, fourth son of David Gay and Ruhamah 
(Bayles) Carter (son of Isaac P. Carter), was born 
June 21, 1848, Upland, Grant cojnty, Indiana; 
died 19 

The year he was eight years old the family moved to Iowa 
and he was with the family a dutiful son when they settled in 
Richland county, Wis., near West Lima, the year he was seven- 
teen. His work was farming and helping to improve the coun- 
try. He attended school faithfully and got a very good educa- 
tion for the times. 

Eliza H. Guthrie, daughter of James Guthrie, was born Oct. 
22, 1851; died Dec. 26, 18S9, Vernon county, Wis. (i failed to 
fmd out her mother's name or where she v/as born or their na- 
tivity. 

Calvin Carter and Eliza H. Guthrie were married during the 
year 1874, Richland county. Wis. To tjiis union five children 
were born : 

Marion Carter, March 28, 1876, Richland county, Wisconsin ; 
died 19 . 

Elsie H,, January 21, 1879, Richland county, Wisconsin; 
died 19 

Lulu May, September 15, 1881, Vernon county, Wisconsin; 
died 19 

Loyal David, March 10, 1886, Vernon county, Wisconsin; 
died 19 

Josie, September 18, 1887, Vernon county, Wisconsin; 
died 19 



68 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

They first settled near the homestead and farmed on the 
home farm and for a few years had the care of his mother. 
About 1885 he bought land in Vernon county, north of West 
Lima and moved on it and improved a farm. After the wife and 
mother died he and the children kept house and kept the children 
together until they grew up. Some of them are now married. 
He now has a home in Clarke county and his youngest daughter 
is keeping house for him. He is a very modest man, having but 
little to say, living in love and charity with all his neighbors, 
always ready to help the needy, honest and upright in all his 
dealings. 

He was raised in the Baptist faith, but her religious belief is 
not known to the writer. 



Alonzo Theodore Carter. 

Alonzo Thecdore, fifth son of David Gay and Ruhamah 
(Bayles) Carter (son of Isaac P. Carter], was born 
February 7, 1853, Upland, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 

In his childhood and boyhood days he was with the family 
in their different moves until 1865, when they settled in Rich- 
land county, Wis., near West Lima. Here he grew to manhood, 
working on the farm and attending good schools. He got a very 
good education. Entering politics, he made an unsuccessful run 
for one of the county offices, 

Sarah Geneve Hamilton, daughter of Peter 
and Bridget Hamilton, [natives of Ireland] was born 
December 23, 1856, Troy, Walworth county, Wisconsin; 
died 19 

She came with her parents to Richland county, Wisconsin, 
during her minority, her parents settling on a farm near Richland 
Center, where she grew to womanhood, surrounded with such 
pleasures, enjoyments, school and church privileges as a new 
country affords. 

Theodore Alonzo Carter and Sarah Geneve Hamilton were 
married Nov. 24, 1881, Richland county. Wis. To this union 
four children were born: 

David Gay, October 8, 1882, Richland county, Wisconsin; 
died Feb. , 1887, Richland county. Wis. 



THIRD GENERATION. 69 



George Thomas, May 27, 1884, Richland county, Wisconsin; 
ied 19 

John Runyan, Sept. 1886, Richland county, Wisconsin; 
ied 19 

Frederick Gay, Feb. 28, 1888, Richland county, Wisconsin; 
iied 19 

They settled on the homestead and engaged in farming, and 
cmained there about ten years, living in the house with his 
nother part of the time, when they moved to Chicago, Illinois. 
4e engaged in mercantile business, she at housework, sewing 
tnd sending the cliildren to school. They stayed in the city 
about ten years when they moved back to Wisconsin and are 
now living on the homstead and engaged in farming. He was 
raised in the Baptist faith, but I do not know that he ever joined 
any church. She was raised in the Roman Catholic church and 
remained a faithful member of that church. 



/^ 



70 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 
Nancy Mahala {Carter) Snell. 

Nancy Mahala, first daughter of Howard and Eleanor (Lyon) 
Carter (son of Isaac G. Carter, son of Isaac P. Carter), was 
born Jan. 24, 1852, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 . 

Her childhood days were spent on the farm where she was 
born with plenty of work to do. As she was the oldest of the 
family the housework and the care of the children fell heavily on 
her. There was a school house clos- by, where she attended 
school. In the fourteenth year of her age, she went with her 
parents to Henry county, Iowa, a nice prairie country, where they 
soon had a good furm and a comfortable home in good society, 
with good school and church privileges. 

Her mother had a loom and she became an expert carpet 
weaver. The weaving of other goods had passed, away and the 
time had come that most parents thought girls ought to have a 
good education which she got in the common schools, but her 
school days were cut short by the death of her mother in 1870, 
when it fell to her lot to take care of the house and younger chil- 
dren, the youngest being three years old. This she faithfully 
did until others got large enough to take charge of the house and 
let her go to Howe's Normal school at Mt. Pleasant and prepare 
herself for teaching in the public schools, in which business she 
was engaged the most of the time until she was married. Board- 
ing most of the time at home, she had the oversight of the other 
children all the time. 

William Henry Snell, son of Henry and Emmeline Clark 
Snell, was born January 10, 1840, ' Dearborn county, Indiana; 

died 19 

His parents were natives of the United States. His early 
lifQ.was spent where he was born until 1843, when his parents 
moved to Bureau county, Illinois, where he grew to manhood, 
going to school and working on a farm. He also learned the wagon 
maker trade and worked at it several years. In 1861 he was 
married to Clarissa Atwood. Three children were born to them: 

Timothy Eugene, September 29, 1863, Bureau county, Ills.; 
died Feb. 21, 1865, Bureau county. Ills. 

Clara Augusta. August 31, 1866, Bureau county. Ills.; died 
Jan. 18, 1882^ Henry county, Iowa. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 71 



Austin Henry, June 24, 1871, Bureau county, Illinois; • 
died 19 . 

He moved his family to Henry county, Iowa, in 1875 and 
■settled on a farm near Swedesburg. Herethe wife and mother 
died. He took her back to Illinois for burial and left the children 
there to be taken care of and came back and worked on the farm. 
Nancy Mahala Carter and William Henry Snell were married 
November 20. 1879, Mt. Pleasant, Iowa. To them one child was 

born : , 

Ralph Howard, October 8 18^, Stuttgart, Arkansas; 

died 19 

She taught school in Washington county the winter after 
they were married and he went back to Illinois and stayed until 
the next March, when he came back to Iowa and they went to 
housekeeping on his farm east of Swedesburg. They improved 
the farm by putting in tile and erecting a good barn. Prosperity 
followed their labors and they soon had plenty about them ; but 
he thought he would like to live in a warmer climate, so late 
in the fall he and his brother-in-law, George H. Carter, 
started with a team and carriage to go to St. Charles, Louisiana.- 
When they arrived at Keokuk they got all on a steamboat and 
went to Memphis, Tenn., getting off on the west side of the 
river they drove to Stuttgart, Arkansas, where he traded the 
team for a farm and came back to Iowa. The next winter he 
made a trip to St. Charles and another to Arkansas and came 
home satisfied that Arkansas was the place to go and they moved 
there in January, 1890. The moving w*s done ! y loading a car 
with horses, farming utensils and household goods, a man going 
along to take care of the horses. Five years residence satisfied 
them that this was a poor country for farming and they 
traded their place for land in Nebraska and July 27, 1897, 
they started with two mule teams to move to Holt county, 
Nebraska. One of the mules died a few days after they 
started; they got shafts for the buggy and went on, camping 
out by the way. The trip occupied forty- five days. They 
arrived at their new home among entire strangers and moved 
into a house that for sometime had been occupied by a very 
trifling lot of renters that had but few neighbors. Nothing better 
was expected from Arkansas, so the neighbors still kept away. 
His hand got sore v/ith v/hat the doctors called a frog felon and 



72 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 



was so bad that she had to dress it every hour for several weeks. 
It laid him up ail winter and when farming time came, she had 
to help him about hitching up the team and to do other work. 
During the spring and summer they went to church and became 
acquainted with a better class of people and soon had plenty of 
good neighbors. 

He was raised by a devoted Christian mother who instructed 
her cliildren in the way of life and salvation. Her parents were 
Methodists and early In life she united with that church and was 
a devoted Christian girl. When twenty years old she heard the 
coming of the Lord preached by the First Day Adventists and, 
being convinced that it was Bible truth, she accepted it with all 
her heart. This led her to study the Bible for more light, v/nich 
led to a-d-eper work of grace in the heart and a better knowledge 
of His Word, which she could readily communicate to others. 

In the Sunday school she is an exceptionally good teacher 
for the little children. In all her life she has been an earnest 
teacher in the Sunday school whenever she could attend. She is 
now a member of the Christian Advent church and doing good 
work for the Master and many thank the Lord for the good in- 
struction they received from her. 



Sarah Jane {Carter) Seberg. 

Sarah Jane^ second daughter of Howard and Eleanor (Lyon) 
Carter (son of Isaac G. Carter, son of Isaac P. Carter), was 
born July 1, 1853, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 

Her childhood days were spent on the farm where she was 
born, going to school and enjoyiKg other duties and pleasures of 
children. In the eighth year of her age she went with the fam- 
ily to Mt. Pleasant, Henry county, Iowa, where she grew to wom- 
anhood on a farm that her father was improving on prairie land. 
Ready made clothing had crowded the spinning wheel and loom 
to the attic. The kerosene lamp had taken the place of the tal- 
low candle, but as yet no organ had got into this home, where 
there was plenty of v/ork and vocal music, which with going to 
school in better schools and longer terms than we had in Indi- 
ana, occupied the time of the children as they were growing up. 

John Seberg, first son of Andrew P. and Mary E. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 73 

Seberg, was born May 11, 1847, Sweden, Europe; 
died 19 

He came to the United States in his childhood days with the 
family and settled in Jefferson county? Iowa, in 1S57. A few 
years later they moved to Henry county where he became ac- 
quainted with his future wife. He enlisted in the army at 
Quincy, March 8 1865, Company H, Twenty-eighth Illinois In- 
fantry and although very young he served until after the close of 
the war, being discharged March 8, 1866, at Brownsville, Texas. 

Sarah Jane Carter and John Seberg were married Sept. 18, 
1870, Mt. Pleasant, Henry county, Iowa. To this union ten 
children were born: 

Mamie Eleanor, December 21, 1871, Henderson county? III., 
died 19 

Mattie Jane, April 7, 1875, Henderson county, Illinois; 
died 19 . 

Hattie Grace, May 23, 1877, Henry county Iowa; 
died 19 

Lewis Alfred, August 29, 1879, Henry county, Iowa; 
died 19 

Harlan Clyde, November 16, 1881, Henry county, Iowa; 
died June 15, 1882, Mt. Pleasant, Henry county, Iowa. 

Henry Earl, May 19, 1883, Henry county, Iowa; 

died 19 . - 

Maud Willhemina, March 26, 1890, Kearney county. Neb.; 
died August 16, 1896, Kearney county, Neb. 

Mabel Arsina, March 26, 1890, Kearney county, Neb. ; died 
July 13, 1890, Kearney county, Neb. 

Effel May, April 19, 1892, Kearney county, Neb.; died Au- 
gust 1, 1892, Kearney county, Neb. 

Andrew, Sept. 26, 1894, Kearney county Neb.; died Sept. 
26, 1894, Kearney county. Neb. 

They went to housekeeping in the neighborhood where they 
were married. In the fall of 1871 they moved to Henderson 
county, Illinois, and engaged in farming and feeding cattle for 
another man. The spring of 1876 they moved back to Henry 
county, Iowa, and went to farming. 

He and his brother-in-law, Leroy P. Carter, bought an eight 
horse power separator thrashing machine and ran it vury sue- 



74 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

cessfully while they stayed in Iowa, but that was hard work both 
on men and horses. January, 1884, they moved to Kearney 
county, Nebraska, setth"ng near Axtel. They farmed with varied 
success, part of the time doing a big business on a large farm 
and part of the time pretty hard up for a living. 

They remained in Kearney county about sixteen years, when 
they moved to Franklin county, where he had bought a quarter 
section of unimproved land a few miles south of Upland. This 
they have improved by building a good house and barn and other 
improvements for comfort and have 70 acres in cultivation where 
they now live in comfort, anxious to have their friends visit them 
as they are all alone, the children married, or away from home, 
or at school. 

She was raised by Methodist parents and early in life united 
with the church. His parents were members of the Lutheran 
church, but he united with the Methodist people before they were 
married and they are still members of that church and doing what 
they can to help others to a better life. One of their sons is 
now at school, studying in view of entering the ministry. 



Leroy Perry Carter. 

Leroy Perry, first son of Hovvard and Eleanor (Lyon) Car- 
ter (son of Isaac G. Career, son of Isaac P. Carter), was 
born February 4, 1857,' Matthews, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 . 

His childhood days were spent on the farm with his parents 
and as there was a good frame school house on the farm he at- 
tended school as soon as he was old enough to go. The year he 
was eight years old he went wiLJn the family to Mount Pleasant, 
Henry county, Iowa, moving in w.igons, camping out by the way. 
Here he grew to manhood on a prairie farm. As soon as he was 
old enough he took a team and assisted in plov/ing and harrow- 
ing and was not bothered with stum.ps and roots as his father 
was when he commenced to plow. A school house stood nearby 
where he attended school. Later he went to Mt. Pleasant to 
school and received a good education for a farmer's boy. 

After he was of age. his father helped him and his brother- 
in-law to get an eight horse power separator threshing machine 
which they ran for a few years very successfully. Getting tired 



f 







Leroy P. Carter. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 75 



' of farm work he took a notion to railroad work and after learning 
! telegraphy by working a year or more in Chicago and elsewhere, 
[ he went to Minnesota to follow his chosen profession. The win- 
l ter was coming on and he being in ratiier poor health, he con- 
[ eluded to try outdoor work for the winter. Securing work as a 
teamster, he hauled and delivered wood in St. Paul during the 
winter of 1882 and 1883. The winter was a very severe one, 

■ but the outdoor work proved to be very beneficial to his health 
and in the spring he secured work on the St. Paul and Duluth 
railroad, first as extra man, then in St. Paul as night operator 
tile summer of 1883. He went to Hinkk-y in the fall as night 

■ operator, but was soon advanced to day work as operator and 
later to car clerk which position he held until Jan. 1, 1887, when 
he went to Sandstone Junction to take the agency there, staying 
there until May, 1888, when he was sent to Sandstone as agent. 
This office was discontinued in May, 189!0. He was then sent to 
Barnum where he remained a little over six years. 

Margaret Frances MacKenzie was born Jan. 21, 1863, Dal- 
; housie.T Mountain. Pictou county. Nova Scotia; died Nov. 2, 1900, 
Duluth, Minnesota. 

Her father was born in Scotland. Her mother was the 
daughter of Scotch parents. They were among the first to set- 
tle in this mountainous country, covered with hemlock and spruce 
and here is where she spent her young life. She attended the 
district school, walking about two miles to the school house and 
was prominent in the literary society, also a loyal member of the 
Good Templars. In c-onversation she was witty and had an an- 
swer for every one and her pleasant way of speaking made 
friends of all she associated with. 

When about seventeen years old her mother was stricken 
with inflamatory rheumatism which left her a cripple all her life. 
For two years the daughter laid aside the joys of young people 
and was the constant companion of a helpless mother and only 
when the latter could get about did she relax her vigils. The 
family looked on her as an angel of merq/. A few years later, at 
the death of an older sister, she took ch.T.rge of her five helpless 
children, taking care of them and taking the two youngest to 
their father, v/ho had moved to Sandstone, Minnesota. There 
she met the railroad agent, who became her future husband. 
During her visit here, they frequently met and got better ac- 
quainted and afterwards corresponded. 



76 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

In 1889 she went east, after spending one summer visitin;: 
her sister. She stopped at Boston, Mass., where she was em- 
ployed by M's. Hemminway, a woman of wealth whose kind 
deeds of philanthropy are known far and near. Her busine^ib 
was to attend to and repair the clothing when it cante from the 
laundry and put it away and help in the dining room, especially 
when they had a large company for dinner. While she was here 
the time was set for their marriage in July, 1892. 

Leroy Perry Carter and Margaret Frances MacKenzie were 
married July 5, 1892, Boston, Massachusetts. To this union one 
child was born : 

Howard Alexander, Sept. 25, 1895, Barnum, Minnesota; 
died 1 

They went to her home in Nova Scotia on a visit and al- 
though some of her friends had tried to dissuade her from marry- 
ing a Yankee, they were kindly received. After a visit there 
they left for Minnesota, via Boston, New York City, Philadel- 
phia, Baltimore and Washington City, then west visiting his 
friends in Indiana and Iowa (his old home), then on to Barnum, 
Minnesota, where he took up the work he had laid down six 
weeks earlier. 

They went to housekeeping in the depot up stairs and had 
been there a little over two years when the terrible Minnesota 
forest fires of Sept. 1, 1894, occurred in which several small towns 
were burned and a vast scope of the country burned over. The 
small town of Sandstone wjs among them. Her brother-in- 
law, Mr. Gunn and family, lived there and saved themselves by 
going to the river and remaining in the water from five to ten P. 
M. In the morning everything that would burn was in ashes. 
The potatoes and onions were roasted in the ground. Part of the 
family came to their home the next day, nearly naked, to be 
dressed and cared for. A\r, Gunn took the typhoid fever and she 
and his daughter cared for him through the fever. The girl took 
it and after several weeks' sickness died and thus this noble 
woman was called to care for her sister's girl, whom she cared 
for when her sister died. 

In September, 1896, Mr. Carter was sent to Twentieth Ave- 
nue station in Duluth, where he worked until the station was 
discontinued in 1901. He worked as extra man at Rush City 
and Harris until March, 1902, vvhen he was sent to Forest Lake, 



FOURTH GENERATION. 77 

where he is now located, 1905. Me has seen the road he has 
worked for so long taken in by the Northern Pacific and he with 
it and is the oldest man in time of service (except two) on his 
division of the road. He has seen other rnen in both high and 
low position come and go, yet he still has his office and plenty 
of work to do. 

Their married life was one of continued happiness and they 
were always conted with what they had. She made two trips 
to her Nova Scotia home and in 1899, when her mother died, 
he accompanied her home. The severe strain on her nerves 
during her mother's sickness from which she never fully recov- 
ered, left her in a bad condition to ward off an attack of typhoid 
fever which soon ended in her death. She was fully conscious 
and calling her husband to her, calmly gave him instructions 
about raising her boy and made arrangements about the funeral 
and burial, selecting the place in Hickory Grove cemetery, Henry 
county, Iowa, by the side of his mother. All of her instructions 
were can ied out. 

After the burial his sister, Alice^ went back to Duluth with 
him to keep house and help care for the boy and they have lived 
together ever since and get along nicely. 

He was raised by Methodist parents and early in life mani- 
fested a desire for the better life and later by his devotion to 
Sunday school and church work. She was raised by strict Pres- 
byterians, who always have their children study the shorter cat- 
echism. Their diet as children was plain and simple, consisting 
mostly of "oatmeal and souse." They both engaged in church 
and Sunday school Vv'ork in the Presbyterian church, the few 
years she lived. She now rests from her labors and her good 
works follow her. He is now superintendent of the Sunday 
school at Forest Lake and took an active part in building a church 
in that town which is now completed. 



Rhoda Caroline {Carter) Tallman. 

Rhoda Caroline, fourth daughter of Howard and Eleanor 
(Lyon) Carter (son of Isaac G. Carter, son of Isaac P. Carter), 
was born Nov. 6, 1858, AAatthews, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 . ■ 

In the seventh year of her age she with her parents and 
family moved in wagons, camping out by the way, to Henry 



78 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 



county, Iowa, where they settled on a piece of raw prairie land 
in a small house and commenced to make a farm by hiring forty 
acres broken out. The next year they put up a nice cottage and 
moved into it in September, 1866. Here she grew to woman- 
hood, in good society with plenty of the comforts of life. They 
had good schools about seven months in the year where all the 
necessary branches were taught to both boys and girls alike and 
at a suitable age she attended a select school at Mt. Pleasant and 
qualified herself for teaching. She taught several terms in the 
public schools of the county to the satisfaction of the school 

board. 

She and her younger sisters had charge of the housework 
while their older sister, Nsncy, went to Mt. Pleasant to school to 
qualify herself for teaching and while she was away teaching. 
This work was done to the satisfaction of her brothers and sis- 
ters, her father often v/ashing the supper dishes that they might 
attend the literary society. 

Frank Carroll Tallman, second son of Benjamin and Mary 
Jane(Carroll)TaHman, was born July 17,1860, Henry county,Ia. ; 

died 19 

Mr. and Mrs. Tallman were of German descent. Frank grew 
to manhood in the neighborhood where he was born, helping his 
father on the farm and attending the country schools, church and 
Sunday school, where his future wife did and so were acquainted 

in their youth. 

Rhoda Caroline Carter and Frank Carroll Tallman were 
maried Oct. 20, 1881, Mt. Pleasant, Henry county, Iowa. To 
this union six children were born: 

Pearl Carter, August 22, 1882, Henry county. Iowa; 

died 19 

Ralph Benjamin, Nov. 1, 1884, Osborne county, Kansas; 

died 19 

Lucy Ethel, Oct. 5, 1887, Downs, Osborne county, Kansas; 

died 19 

Glenn Howard, November 11, 1889, Henry county, Iowa; 

died 19 

Mabel Eleanor, September 26, 1896, Henry county, Iowa; 

died 19 

Versa Mae, May 5, 1898, Henry county, lov/a; 

died 19 



FOURTH GENERATION. 79 



Soon after their majriage they went Burlington and he went 
work for the railroad as car cleaner, night work, but not liking 
he business they came back to Henry county and rented a farm 
Ind engaged in farming. The fall of 1882 they went to Osborne 
bunty, Kansas, and engaged in farming, remaining there five 
lears with rather poor success, losing their entire crop of smal' 
grain and most of their corn by a hail storm the last of June, 
1888. 

Tired and disgusted with Kansas, she came back to Iowa in 
September on a visit, while he in company with others went west 
as far as Washington looking for a place to make a home, but 
Inot finding any that suited him he came back to Iowa, arriving in 
December and the next spring went to farming with varied suc- 
cess. The winter of 1901 he traded for an interest in a livery 
barn in New London and moved a part of their household goods 
there, leaving part in the house they moved from which caught 
fire and burned up all of their goods as well as those of the fam- 
ily that lived in the house, the latter escaping in their night 
clothes. This was a very serious loss to them, they then having 
a family of six children. The livery business did not prove a 
success in his hands, so they sold out and went to Mt. Pleasant 
in 1902, getting a house just outside the corporation where they 
now live. He works at the carpenter trade in the summer and 
in winter works with a bridge gang on the railroad. The two 
oldest boys have good places to work, the younger ones going to 
school and working what they can during vacation. They are 
making a good living. 

She was raised by Methodist parents and early in life took a 
decided stand in the cause of the Master and has done what she 
could in His service. While at New London she thought best to 
unite with the Disciple church, to which she now belongs and is 
earnestly engaged in church and Sunday school work. Her daugh- 
ter has also joined the church and her mother is pleased to have 
her engaged in the good work for others. She is a very modest 
woman who sees the work that ought to be done and regrets her 
inability to do it both in the family and church, yet she knows 
that the Master is with her and trusts he will not let her feeble 
efforts fail. He was raised by Christian parents, but never made 
any profession of religion. 



80 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

Mary Alice Carter. 

Mary Alice, fifth daughter of Howard and Eleanor (Lyon) 
Carter (son of Isaac G. Carter, son of Isaac P. Carter), was 
born October 12, 1860, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 

In the fifth year of her age she went with the family to 
Henry county, Iowa, where her parents settled on a piece of 
prairie land and soon had a pleasant home. Here she grew to 
womanhood, surrounded with the comforts of life, in good soci- 
ety, with good school and church privileges and received an edu- 
cation qualifying her to teach in the public schools of the county. 
But she prefered dress -making to teaching and went and learned 
that trade. 

Her mother died when she was two years old, after which 
the work and care of the house was done by the girls. The 
older ones being married or teaching, she took charge of the 
house in 1880. 

In January, 1881, her father brought a maiden aunt of his, 
helpless with age, to be cared for which added to the cares and 
household duties, her part of which was well and faithfully done 
the few months the aunt lived. 

Her father married in 1888 and went to live on his wife's 
farm, leaving his farm in charge of her and her brother, George, 
which they worked until her brother married in 1894. She still 
made her home there, but worked for her married sisters, helping 
them in making clothing and other things needful. Always 
cheerful and independent, the things of this life did not bother 
her, the most of her work and earnings being donated to those 
in need or given in presents to her nieces and nephews or where 
it would add to the happiness of others. 

Her sister-in-law died in November, 1900, leaving her 
brother, Leroy, with a boy five years old to be cared for. She 
went home with him to Duluth, Minnesota, to keep house for 
him and help care for the boy and is with him still at Forest 
Lake, Minn. In early life she united with the Methodist church 
and is a devoted Christian woman. There is no church of her 
early choice at Forest Lake and she has formed a churchhome with 
the Presbyterian people, helping them all she can. The minis- 
ter is boarding with her and all are doing what they can to make 
the church a power for good in that beautiful little town on the 
bank of Forest Lake? twenty -five miles north of St. Paul. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 81 



George Henry Carter. 

George Henry, third son of Howard and Eleanor (Lyon) 

Carter [son of Isaac G. Carter, son of Isaac P. Carter] was 

:)orn April S, 1865, Matthews. Grant county, hidiana; 

iied 19 

When six weeks old his parents started to move to Henry 
county, Iowa, in wagons, a trip of three weeks, camping out by 
the way. The trip did not hurt him in the least and he ar- 
rived in Iowa well, hearty and getting fat. Here he grew to 
manhood in good society in a good, healthy country, working on 
the farm and going to school enough to occupy his time. Im- 
provement in the mode of farming and tools to faim with made 
it possible for one man to do more farm work than several could 
do years ago. Gang or sulky plows with three or four horses to 
the plow, harrows sixteen to twenty feet wide, drawn by four or 
five horses, self-dropping cornplanters, harvesters that bind the 
grain and leave the sheaves in bunches, are some of the things 
that have come to us in the past few years that make it possible 
for one man to raise a great deal of grain. He and his sister, 
Alice, had the management of the home farm for six years, during 
which time he did the farming and ran a threshing machine, 
buying a complete steam threshing outfit and fixed up a feed mill 
to grind corn and cliop feed. The number of threshing machines 
in the country soon did the work with but little financial profit to 
mathine owners. 

Allie May Jacobs, daughter of Joseph Lawson and Rachel 
Annie (Carl) Jacobs, was born July 18,1869, Henry county, la.; 
died 19 

She grew to womanhood on the farm where she was born 
and being among the oldest of a large family, mostly girls, she 
saw the necessity of preparing herself for the duties of life be- 
sides the work in the house and on the farm. She, therefore, 
studied hard in the country school and got well advanced in her 
studies. She then went to Mt. Pleasant and attended a training 
school for teachers until she was competent to teach in the pub- 
lic school of the county, which business she followed three or 
four years very successfully. 

George Henry Carter and Allie May Jacobs were married 



82 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 



March 28, 1894, Mt. Pleasant, Henry county, Iowa. No children 
were born to this union. 

He took her to his home on his father's farm where he was 
engaged in farming, threshing grain in its season and grinding 
chopped feed for the neighbors during the winter. The fall of 
1895 he bought a grain elevator at Pekin, Jefferson county, Iowa, 
made a public sale and sold off what property he did not want in 
his new business and moved to Pekin the last of November and 
engaged in the grain, seed, coal and tile business. The business 
being new to him he made some mistakes at the start, but get- 
ting better acquainted with the business and gaining the confi- 
dence of the people, he built up a profitable trade. In January, 
1904, he entered into partnership with I. M. Lewis and in con- 
nection with the elevator they have a store of general merchan- 
dise, farm implements, wagons and buggies and are doing a good 
business. 

His wife has done her part well by keeping boarders most of 
the time and traveling men make their house their stopping 
place. She also busied herself raising chickens and has helped 
to pay for the home they now have. 

He was raised in a family of Christian people and in his 
youth united with the Methodist church. Her parents held to 
the Baptist faith, but she is now a member of the church with 
him and they are doing what they can to help others to a better 
life. 

Eva Isadora [Carter) Anderson. 

Eva Isadora, sixth daughter of Howard and Eleanor 
[Lyon] Carter [son of Isaac G. Garter, son of Isaac P. Car- 
ter], was born July 25, 1867, Mt. Pleasant, Henry county, Iowa; 
died 19 

She grew up on the farm where she was born, where she 
had plenty of exercise, but was not required to work very hard. 
The society was good and she had plenty of room to romp and 
play. The organ had taken the place of the spinning wheel of 
former days and the girls were taught to play which they some- 
times reluctantly did, but not in this case. She got a good edu- 
cation in the country schools and then went to Mt. Pleasant to 
qualify herself for teaching, but did not teach. 

Alfred Henry Andtrson, sixth son of John and Sarah 



FOURTH GENERATION. 83 



[Sprague Anderson, was born Apr. 1, 1859, Henry county, Iowa; 
died 19 

During his minority his parents, natives of the United States, 
resided in Henry and Washington counties, he staying with them 
until they went to Kansas in 1883. He wori<ed by the month 
part of the time and later at putting in tile drains at which he 
was a skilled hand. His surroundings were good and he con- 
tracted no bad habits. 

Eva Isadora Carter and Alfred Henry Anderson were married 
Jan. 4, 1888, Mt. Pleasant, Henry county, Iowa. To this union 
five children were born : 

John, Feb. 12, 1889, Mount Pleasant, Henry county, Iowa; 
died Feb. 12, 1889, Mt. Pleasant, Henry county, Iowa. 

Clarke Leslie, May 10, 1891, Cowley county, Kansas; 
died 19 

Hazel Dove, December 7, 1894, Cowley county, Kansas; 
died 19 

Floyd Manly, November 28, 1899, Henry county, Iowa; 
died 19 

Kenneth Dale, September 13, 1904, Henry county, Iowa; 
died 19 

They lived in the house on the Carter farm and helped to 
farm the home place for two years. In February, 1890, they 
went to Cowley county, Kansas, where he had land. This mov- 
ing was not done in wagons, but horses, wagons, farming uten- 
sils and household goods were put in a car and taken by rail, 
one man going with it to attend to the horses, the family going 
on ihe passenger train; a quick way to move; but costing more 
money. Here he engaged in farming; but finding Kansas a poor 
country for the business they sold out and in September, 1895, 
moved in company with other families in wagons, camping out 
by the way to the old home in Henry county, Iowa. 

The- home farm was for rent and they moved into the house 
that winter and ran the place successfully for eight years, when 
the farm was sold and as they had no house on their own land 
they rented a place joining the home farm and moved on it> 

where they now live. 

They attend the Methodist church which she joined in her 
youth. She is devoted to the cause of the Master. He never 
made any profession of religion; but is a kind, moral man, will- 
ing to help others in the duties of life. 



84 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 



Joseph Newton Carter. 

Joseph Newton, second son of Ira Josselyn and Eliza Ann 
(Corn) Carter, (son of Isaac G. Carter, son of Isaac P. Car- 
ter), was born July 24, 1850, Matthews, Grant county, Ind.; 
died 19 

Born in a farm house, he grew to manhood on a farm at 
which work his young manhood was spent. The trees were 
most all gone on the farm land and stumps and roots rotting and 
going very rapidly, it was not so annoying to plow as it was 
some years earlier. Dropping corn by hand had given way to 
the hand planter. The double shovel plow with one horse to 
draw it, was far better than the big shovel plow that we used 
some years before. The hoe was not used to raise corn and the 
grain cradle and scythe for cutting grain and grass were among 
the things of the past. 

Nancy Jane Patterson, daughter of William and Phoebe 
(Gard) Patterson, was born June 21, 1851, Blackford county, Ind.; 
died 19 

The place of her father's birth is not known. Her mother 
was born in Ohio. 

A girl born and living on a farm with the best surroundings 
has plenty of hard work to do. They had the cows to milk in 
her day, besides taking care of the milk and making butter, but 
these things brought out the best that was in them and prepared 
them for the future duties of life which they were to occupy. 

Joseph Newton Carter and Nancy Jane Patterson were mar- 
ried Sept. 21, 1871, Blackford county, Indiana. To this union 
eight children were born: 

Irena Velletta, Aug. 18, 1872, Matthews,Grant county, Ind. 
died 19 

Maleva Lillian, April 21, 1874, Grant county, Indiana 
died 19 

Laura Belle, Dec. 19, 1875, Matthews, Grant county, Ind. 
died 19 

Stella Lutitia, Nov. 14, 1878, Matthews, Grant county, Ind. 

died 19 

Arthur Orlando, Apr. 2, 1881, Matthews, Grant county, Ind. 

died 19 

Joseph, Sept. 14, 1885, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana 
died Sept. 14, 1885, Matthews, Grant county, Ind. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 85 



Bertlia Annetta, March 15> 1887, Grant county, Indiana; 
fiied 19 

Minta May, April 13, 1889, Matthews, Grant county, Ind.; 
lied, 19 . . 

They went to housekeeping on a farm near his father's 
louse and did some farming and later he started a tile factory 
md made drain tile for a few years and also worked at the 
:arpenter trade. Getting tired of the tile business, they got 
)roperty in Upland and he devoted his time to working at the 
arpenter trade. His son, Arthur O., works in a glass fac- 
ory and is a glass blower by trade. 

His parents were members of the Methodist Episcopal 
:hurch, to the doctrines of which he holds. She is a mem.ber of 
he Christian church and four of the girls are members and while 
ill of the family are good honest citizens, 1 am glad that some of 
hem are willing to acknowledge Jesus as Lord and Master. 



Olive {Carter) Kibbey. 

Olive, third daughter of Ira Josselyn and Eliza Ann (Corn) 
Darter (son of Isaac G. Carter, son of Isaac P. Carter], was 
)orn December 19, 1852, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana; 
lied 19 

She grew up to womanhood in the neighborhood where she 
vas born in a busy home where there was plenty to do. The 
nother was still using the loom, but the spinning wheels were a 
iiing of the past and she did not learn to spin wool or flax to 
nake clothing for the family. But the time had come that par- 
nts wanted their girls to have as good an education as the boys 
and that required a great deal of time at the school house which 
was about forty rods from her home, giving her a good chance to 
go to school, of which she was quick to take advantage. 

Joiin Ephraim Kibbey, son of Jonah and Rebecca [Garrison] 
Kibbey, was born May 25, 1850, Clinton county, Ohio; died 
Aug, 24, 1904, Matthews, Grant county, Ind. His parents were 
born in Ohio. 

He was the ,ion of a farmer and he grew up accustomed to 
the work on a farm and came with the family in 1870 to Grant 
"ounty, Indiana, where his father purchased a good farm and 
-ngaged in farming. 



86 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 



Olive Carter and John Ephraim Kibbey were married Jan. 
1, 1873, Matthews, Grant county, Ind. Tojhem ten children 
were born: 

Clarence Albert, November 29, 1873. Grant county, Indiana- 
died 19 . 

Erret Osmer, Aug. 4, 1875, Matthews, Grant county, Ind • 
died 19 

Clinton J., Aug. 5, 1877, Grant county, Ind.; died April 14, 
1882, Matthews, Grant county, Ind. 

Ira Ephraim, Oct. 11, 1879, Matthews, Grant county Ind • 

died 19 . » •. 

Charles Preston, January 21, 1882, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 

Holland Clayton, October 9, 1883, Grant county, Indiana- 
died 19 . 

Cora Avis, Nov. 6, 1885, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana- 
died 19 . 

Bessie Ann, Jan. 1, 1889, Matthews, Grant county.Ind. ; died 
Feb. 12, 1889, Matthews, Grant county, Ind. 

John Ray, March 4, 1894, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana - 
died 19 

Carrie Emectia, October 15, 1896, Grant county Indiana - 
died 19 

They built a house on his father's land and went to house- 
keeping there, helping to farm his father's place. After the 
death of his father in 1892, they moved into the house on the 
homestead where their children grew up. Some of them are 
now married and have homes of their own, while she is left on 
the homestead with a part of the family. 

He was a man of business, a great worker, always anxious 
for the improvement of the country and for anything to benefit 
jsociety or schools. When the road was graded and graveled he 
took some of the bridge contracts that were difficult to perform, 
which he did to the satisfaction of the county. 

She had the care of a large family and was a kind, gentle 
mother and did what she could to raise them to be good citizens 
and to honor their father and mother. All of them^are settling 
near the homestead. 

The Kibbey family were Metliodists in belief, but none of 



FOURTH GENERATION. 87 



them were church members. She is a good woman, but not a 
member of church. 



Levi Lewis Carter. 

Levi Lewis, third son of Ira Josselyn and EHza Ann (Corn) 
Carter [son of Isaac G. Carter, son of Isaac P. Carter], was 
born April 13, 1855, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 

He grew to manhood where he was born, working on a farm 
that was most all cleared out and the stumps gone, so that he 
was not annoyed with stumps and roots as his father was while 
plowing in his young manhood days. They had good society 
and a good school house nearby, where he attended school and 
received a fair education for the country schools. 

Mary Amanda Slater, daugher of William and Mary Tacy 
(Marks) Slater, was born May 5,1858, Matthews, Grantco., ind.; 
died , 19 

Her parents were natives of the United States. She grew 
up in the township where she was born in a home where there 
were plenty of this world's goods to supply the necessaries and 
comforts that make a happy life. But there is always plenty of 
hard work to do on a farm, which with going to school, kept all . 
busy while growing up. 

Levi Lewis Carter and Mary Amanda Slater were married 
Oct. 1, 1882, Grant county, Indiana. To this union one child 
was born: 

Dora Ethel, May 24, 1884, Delaware county, Indiana; 

died 19 

Soon after thir marriage, they visited some of her relatives 
in western Illinois and his uncle and family in Iowa, Mt. Pleasant, 
Henry county, which was a very pleasant surprise and unex- 
pected visit and was enjoyed by all concerned. 

After their return to Indiana they bought a farm in Wash- 
ington township, Delaware county, which they improved with 
new buildings and in other ways where they now have a fme 
grain and stock farm in a good country, with gravel roads and so 
far away from any large town that the professional hunter with 
his gun and dogs scarcely ever visits them.. 

In religious belief he holds to the doctrine of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, but never became a member. She united with 



88 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

the Methodist church in her youth and follows the example of her 
parents by remaining in the church through life, doing what she 
can for the Master, both by precept and example. 



Mary Elvira (Carter) {Hardy) Hiatt. 

Mary Elvira, fourth daughter of Ira Josselyn and Eliza Ann 
(Corn) Carter, (son of Isaac G. Carter, son of Isaac P. Car- 
ter), was born Oct. 2, 1857, Matthews, Grant county, Ind.; 
died 19 

She grew up at her home on a farm where she had the nec- 
essaries of life and many of the comforts in a good comfortable 
house, where the mother taught her girls to do the work about 
the house in such a way that they might become good house- 
keepers and take care of themselves. School and Sunday school 
were held close to her home which she attended and profited 
thereby. 

Noah Hardy, son of Otha and Jane (Dawden) Hardy, was 
born Sept. 13, 1850, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana; died 
Jan. 26, 1887, Grant county, Indiana. His father was burn in 
Ohio. 

He grew to manhood in the neighborhood where he was born 
on a farm and was a farmer by occupation. He had the privi- 
leges of the country school and got a fair education. 

Mary Elvira Carter and Noah Hardy were married Feb. 2, 
1874, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana. To this union three 
boys were born: 

Orville Perry, Aug. 1, 1877, Matthews, Grant connty, Ind.; 
died 19 

Walter Scott, Dec. 12, 1879, Matthews, Grant county, Ind.; 
died 19 

Hiram, Nov. 4, 1881, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 

His father helped him t a piece of land heavily timbered 
which they improved and made them a home where their children 
were born and where he died. She remained on the farm and 
by the help of kind friends and the boys she kept them together 
and made a living. 

Elmer Ellsworth Hiatt, son of Amos and Savanna (Dillon) 
Hiatt, was born February 27, 1862, Delaware county, Indiana; 
died 19 



FOURTH GENERATION. 89 



His parents were born in Highland county, Ohio. 

He grew to manhood near where he was born. A boy on a 
farm has plenty to do and many of the comforts of life fall to 
his lot while attending to the duties of farm life. 

Mary Elvira Carter Hardy and Elmer Ellsworth Hiattwere 
married Nov. 11, 1892, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana. To 
this union no children were born. 

They rented the farm and went to Fairmount to live and 
care for his aged mother where the writer saw them in 1896 in a 
comfortable house, her boys making their home there and work- 
ing in the glass factory or going to school. 

In religious belief they all were instructed in the Methodist 
Episcopal church, but I do not know whether they were workers 
in the church or not and would like to be better informed on this 
point. 



Isaac Lyman Carter. 

Isaac Lyman, fourth son of Ira Josselyn and Eliza Ann 
(Corn) Carter [son of Isaac G. G arter, son of Isaac P. Car 
ter], was born Oct. 30, 1860, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 

He was raised on the farm where he was born and under the 
care of his parents learned the business and duties of a boy on a 
farm. The corn was planted with planters, either by hand or 
horse power, two rows at a time. The hoe was no longer used 
in the cornfield. The ground was put m good order by harrovv^- 
ing and rolling? so that the hoe was not needed. Grain was 
sown by seeders drawn by horses and had largely supplanted 
hand sowing and was cut and bound by harvesters and put in 
bunches for shocking, doing away with the grain cradle and 
binding by hand. The mower and horse rake had taken the 
place of the scythe and hand rake which enabled a man to do a 
great deal more farming than one could do a few years ago. 

Mary Nancy Wilcoxon, daughter of John and Mary (Wil- 
liams) VVilcoxon, was born August 29? 1858, Delaware county, 
Indiana; died Jan. 19, 1900, Matthews, Grant county, Ind. Her 
parents were natives of the United States. 

Her childhood and youthful days were spent in Indiana, 



90 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

which is a very level country. Long ditches have been dug to 
carry off the surplus water, with the result that fever and ague 
are not a common thing as they were some years ago and on that 
account it is a desirable country in which to live. 

Isaac Lyman Carter and Mary Nancy Wilcoxon were mar- 
ried Oct. 2, 1884, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana. To this 
union six children were born: 

Glen G., Aug. 15, 1885, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 

Alwilda Blanch, Feb. 18, 1887. Grant county, Ind.; died 
May 24, 1888, Matthews, Grant county, Ind. 

Ira Emery, Nov. 17, 1888, Matthews, Grant county. Indiana; 
died 19 

John Burrel, July 22, 1890, Matthews, Grant county, Ind.; 
died 19 

Asa Gilbert, May 24, 1894, Matthews, Grant county, Ind.; 
'died 19 

Mary Ann, Oct 13, 1896, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 

They made their home with his parents for a while as he 
was farming on his father's farm, but afterwards in a house 
nearby where he could attend to the farm and stock. After his 
father's death in 1899 they moved into the house with his mother, 
where she helped to care for the children after their mother died. 
Margaret Ann Fitch, daughter of John Linder and Sarah Ann 
[Wiley] Fitch, was born Feb. 26, 1869, Marion county, Indiana; 
died 19 

Her father was born in Kentucky and her mother in Indiana. 
Isaac Lyman Carter and Margaret Ann Fitch were married 
Dec. 31, 1903, Grant county, Ind. To this union one child was 
born. 

Louis Harold, Sept. 10, 1904, Matthews, Grant county, Ind.; 
died 19 

He took his new wife to his house on the homestead where 
they are now living. All three of the above named parents were 
born of religious parents of the Methodist Episcopal church and 
whether they are all members of church or not I cannot say, but 
suppose their intentions are good for a better life and trust they 
are doing what they can in the cause of the Master by helping 
others in the way of salvation, through Jesus our Lord. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 91 



Jenisha {Carter) Crouse. 

Jerusha, sixth daughter of Ira Josselyn and EHzaAnn (Corn) 
Carter (son of Isaac G, Carter, son of Isaac P. Carter], was 
born January IS, 1S66, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 

She was one of a large family born in a country home and 
grew to womanhood on a farm and lier's was a busy life as there 
was always plenty to keep idle hands busy. Good society, good 
school and church privileges, with pleasant surroundings makes 
a good place for boys and girls to grow up and become good, hon- 
orable citizens. 

John Reuben Crouse, son of William Hampton and 
Nancy (Allen) Crouse, was born July 22, 1865j Indiana; 
died 19 

His grandfather was German, his grandmother French, his 
mother English descent. I have no account of his young life, 
but suppose he was a farmer's son and came to Grant county 
during his young manhood days where he met his future wife. 

Jerusha Carter and John Reuben Crouse were married Feb. 
2, 1889, Matthews, Grant county, Ind. To this union five chil- 
dren were born: 

William, November 5, 1889, Matthews, Grant county, Ind.; 
died Nov. 5, 1889, Matthews, Grant county, Ind. 

Ira Josselyn, March 6, 1892, Alexandria, Indiana; 
died 19 

Zora Avus, March 29, 1894, Matthews, Grant county, Ind; 
died 19 

Clyde Bryan, December 1, 1896, Fairmount, Indiana; 
died 19 

Nancy Ann, May 18, 1899, Fairmount, Indiana; 
died 19 

As far as I know their residence has all of the time been on 
a farm and he engaged in farming where the writer saw them in 
1896, when he visited them near Fairmount and all of the time 
in Grant county except the few years they were at Alexandria in 
Madison county. 

She was raised by Methodist parents and holds to the doc- 
trine of that church. His parents were members of the Baptist 
church to which doctrine he holds. 



92 ( CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 



Amy Augusta (Carter) Helms. 

Amy Augusta, seventli daughter of IraJosselyn and Eliza Ann 
(Corn) Carter, (son of Isaac G. Carter, son of Isaac P. Car- 
ter), was born Sept. 26, 1868, Matthews, Grant county, Ind.; 
died 19 

She was the youngest of a large family and perhaps not re- 
quired to do as much work as her older sisters did, yet the mother 
took good care not to have her spoiled. She grew up in the 
house on the farm where she was born and had every chance to 
make a noble woman that a kind family, good society, school and 
church privileges afforded and she improved the opportunity. 

Wilbert Alvin Helms, son of James Finley and Nancy Jane 
[Williams] Helms, was born July 1, 1864, Wayne county, Ind.; 
died , 19 , 

His parents were also born in Wayne county, Indiana. I do 
not know the time he came to Grant county nor anything about 
his young life, but suppose his father was a farmer and he grew 
up a farmer and came to Grant county some time in the eighties. 

Amy Augusta Carter and Wilbert Alvin Helms were married 
Sept. 29, 1888, Matthev/s, Grant county, Indiana. To this union 
six children were born : 

Glide Elbert, July 15, 1889, Matthews, Grant county, Ind.; 
died 19 

Orie Dale, August 15, 1892, Matthews, Grant county, Ind.; 
died 19 

Carter Luteller, Oct. 12, 1894, Matthews, Grant county.Ind. ; 
died, 19 

Nancy Ann, Feb. 17, 1897, Matthews, Grant county, Ind.; 
died Sept. 28, 1899, Matthews, Grant county, Ind. 

Amy Ivalou, Sept. 26, 1899, Matthews, Grant county, Ind.; 
died 19 

Lloyd Alvin, Jan. 1902, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 

They went to housekeeping in the neighborhood near her 
father's home soon after they were married and have lived there 
ever since, good honest citizens beloved by their neighbors. 

They were brought up in Christian homes and are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church and are doing what tliey can 
to let their light shine that others may see the way of life and 
acknowledge Jesus as their Savior. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 93 



/ Lutitia Virginia {Carter) Kilgore. 

^hnWWz. Virginia, daughter of Elijah and Mary Jane (Coate) 
barter, [son of Isaac G. Carter, son of Isaac P. Carter,] was 
born April 12, 1858, Grant county, Ind. ; died Oct. 18,1884, 
North A\anchester, Ind. 

She was possessed of a very mild, gentle and loving disposi- 
:ion and was therefore much beloved by every person who really 
<iiew her and being what might be termed a natural musician, 
»vas able at the age of two years to sing many tunes by note and 
laving captured or gained a correct knowledge of the musical 
scale, she could apply the notes correctly to any tune she had 
earned. In her youthful days she was one of the finest and best 
soprano singers, her voice being extremely clear and penetrating. 
She could always be heard no matter how many were singing 
mih her. She was organist for the Methodist Episcopal church 
it Jonesboro for a number of years and the chorister was known 
:o remark that when she presided over the organ the music was 
sure to be all right. She was a musical prodigy in learning 
:o play the organ so correctly at so early an age and by far ex- 
:elled any other of the family in her musical attainment in her 
:hildhood. 

Marshal D. Kilgore, of English descent, was born June 
12, 1852> Port Washington, Tuscarawas county, Ohio; 
3ied 19 

Lutitia Virginia Carter and Marshal D. Kilgore were married 
\pril 3, 1878, Jonesboro, Grant count3^ Indiana. To this union 
ihree daughters were born : 

Zella Verne, March 27, 1879, Marion, Grant county, Ind.; 
lied Feb. 15, 1901, Jonesboro, Grant county, Ind. 

Maggie May, Dec. 28, 1880, Wabash, Wabash county, Ind.; 
lied " 19 

Metta Marie, Nov. 18, 1883, Wabash county, Ind. ; died 
Sept. 15, 1897, Jonesboro, Grant county, Ind. 

Before he was married he learned to run a railroad engine, 
)ut after their marriage he ran stationary engines at Marion, 
A^abash and North Manchester where they v/ere living when she 
lied. 

■ After her death he gave their three children to her father 



94 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

and mother, who took care of them until they were nearly grown. 
two of them dyuig at their home with their grandparents in 
Jonesboro, Indiana. While tlie cliildren were growing up he had 
a watchful care for them, helping freely with his means to their 
support and visiting them as often as he could. He went west 
to get work and wanting one of them to keep house for him, 
Maggie May left Jonesboro, July 24, 1897, for Butte, Montana 
for that purpose and nearly five years later was married to John 
P. Dunston, April 8, 1902, Butte, Silver Bow county, Montana. 
They have one child, A^argaret, born January 24, 1903, a very 
bright and promising daughter. Maggie May and her child are 
the only living descendants of Elijah and Mary Jane Carter and 
it was a great pleasure for the old folks to spend six weeks at 
their home in Montana last summer. 

Lutitia Virginia Carter was a good Methodist girl and woman. 
His religious belief is not known to the writer. 



Ellsivorth Thinandus Carter. 

Ellsworth Thinandus, first son of John Hooper and Bath- 
sheba (Johnson) Carter (son of Isaac G. Carter, son of Isaac 
P. Carter], was born Nov. 14, 1861, Matthews, Grant co., Ind.; 
died 19 

In 1864 he witii his parents moved by railroad to Brodhead, 
Wisconsin, and the next spring to St. Joe, Champaign county, 
Illinois, where his mother died April 19, 1866. His father took 
him back to Indiana and he got a good home with his uncle 
Lewis until his father married and took him to his home in 
Matthews, where his father was keeping a general store and he 
got a good home. He did not like the work in the store very 
v/ell but busied himself with other work during his school days 
and then went to work on a farm. 

Edna Craw, first daughter of Richard and Margaret [Watson] 
Craw.was born Dec.l2,1869,Wheeling,Delaware county, Indiana; 
died 19 

She was a farmer's daughter and her childhood and youthful 
days were spent near v/here she was born. There were many 
things to make work easier to perform than in pioneer days, yet 
the young people were busy at work and sciiool preparing them- 
selves for the duties and business of life. 

Ellsworth Thinandus Carter and Edna Craw v/ere married 



FOURTH GENERATION. 95 

Feb. 4, 1887, Wheeling, Delaware county, Indiana. To this 
union five children were bo/n: 

Beulah M., Nov. 4, 1887, Wheeling, Delaware county, Ind.; 
died 19 

Lottie L., Nov. 22, 1889, Wheeling, Delaware county, Ind.; 
died 19 

John Richard, Aug. 11, 1892, Wheeling, Delaware county, Ind. ; 
died 19 

Marie N., Jan. 1, 1897, Wheeling, Delaware county, Ind.; 
died 19 

Watson, Nov. 22, 1902, Wheeling, Delaware county, Ind.; 
died 19 

They settled on a farm near where she was born that their 
parents helped them to buy and engaged in farming and stock 
raising. Prosperity followed their labors and they now have a 
well stocked and improved farm. 

They were raised by Christian parents and were regular at- 
tendants at church and Sunday school and early in life united 
with the Methodist Episcopal church and are earnest workers for 
the good of others in the cause of Jesus, Who has done so much 
for them. 



Charley Simpson Carter. 

Charley Simpson, first son of Lewis and Rachel (McKever) 
Carter (son of Isaac G. Carter, son of Isaac P. Carter), was 
born October 25, 1866, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 

He was the son of a farmer, born and raised on a farm, help- 
ing his father at the farm work. His home was a pleasant one, 
where he was permitted to attend church and Sunday school with 
his parents and his surroundings such as make a pleasant life. 
His education was secured in the common schools of the country 
where he was taught the branches that fitted him for the ordi- 
nary duties of life. 

Mary Lavina Benbow, daughter of Adam Henry 
and Catharine [Gibson] Benbow, was born March 
15, 1870, Muncie* Delaware county, Indiana; 

died 19 

Her ancestors are traced back to English, Irish, German and 
Welch. 



96 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 



Her home all her life has been in the counties of Delaware 
and Grant, where she went to schopl what she could and after 
she was fourteen years old she worked as a domestic in a neigh- 
bor's family during the summer and went to school during the 
winter term and was working in Grant county the six months 
prior to her marriage, which work qualified her for the duties of 
a farmer's wife. 

Charley Simpson Carter and Mary Lavina Benbow were 
married August 17, 1892, Matthews, Grant county, Ind. To this 
union five children were born: 

Zoma Vaughn, Oct. 1. 1893, Wheeling, Delaware co., Ind • 
died 19 . > ■> 

Hazel Zelma, Dec. 13, 1895, Matthews, Grant county, ind • 
died 19 . 

Enid Delphine, Sept. 7, 1897,Gaston, Delaware county, Ind • 
died 19 

Gertrude Marie, Dec. 9, 1899,Matthews, Grant county, ind • 
died 19 

Gladys, June 2, 1902, A\atthews, Grant county, Indiana; 
died Dec. 16, 1902, Matthews, Grant county, Ind. 

They settled on a farm and worked at farming until 1899, 
when on account of high rent of land he quit farming and went 
to work for the railroad, v/orking there five years, the last year 
acting as track foreman on a section. They now live in Mat- 
thews and he has em.ployment in a hardware store. 

He was raised by Methodist parents and early in life united 
with that church. Her parents were members of the United 
Brethren church and she was a good Christian girl and nov/ be- 
longs to the i\Aethodist Episcopal church and in Sunday school 
and church work they are helping themselves and others to a 
better life. 



Milo Otis T. Carter. 

Milo Otis T., second son of Lewis and Rachel (McKever) 
Carter, (son of Isaac G. Carter, son of Isaac P. Carter), 
was born Nov. 12, 1869, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana-' 
died 19 . 

He was born and grew to manhood on a farm. The ground 
being nearly clear of stumps and roots it was much pleasanter 
work than it v/as some years ago. His was a very pleasant 



FOURTH GENERATION. 97 



home, where he enjoyed life and its pleasures as well as any of 
his associates. A good part of his time was spent in school, 
preparing for the duties of life. 

In March, 1891, he went to Mt. Pleasant, Henry county, la., 
and helped his cousin, George Carter, that year at farm work, 
returning to his Indiana home in March, 1892. He spent two 
years in Indiana and during the time attended the World's Fair 
at Chicago in October, 1893. 

In March, 1894, he went to Santa Paula, California, and 
worked on a ranch three years. But he wanted something bet- 
ter than that and went to San Francisco and attended college, 
taking a six months' course in electrical engineering, after which 
he went to Los Angeles and engaged as motorman on the street 
railway. 

In August, 1899, he went back to Santa Paula and bought a 
small ranch and renting more land went to ranching in earnest 
for himself. 

Mary Edna Dundas, first daughter of Chas.Dwight and Letitia 
[Day]Dundas was born Oct. 26, 1872, Auburn, Nemeha, Co., Neb. ; 
died 19 

Her young life was spent in Nebraska in studies and other 
duties of life and thinking the occupation of nurse was a good 
business for a young woman, she prepared herself for that busi- 
ness and went to Pomona, California, in June, 1896, to practice 
her chosen profession and it was at Santa Paula that she first 
met her future husband. 

Milo Otis T. Carter and A\aiy Edna Dundas were married 
Nov. 22, 1899, Pomona, California. One child was born to this 
this union: 

Venice Olinda, March 19, 1901, Santa Paula, California; 
died 19 

They went to housekeeping on the ranch and their first year 
on the ranch they raised and marketed $2,000.00 worth of lima 
beans, In July, 1901, they purchased the Santa Paula bakery 
and confectiona-y store and continued in that business until 
March, 1904, when they sold out and fitted up a camp wagon and 
on May 10th they started overland ''seeing California" and after 
driving over five hundred miles they settled on a ranch near 
Modesto, Stanislaus county, California, and are engaged in the 
poultry and dairy business, glad to have a home. 



98 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

His parents were members of the Methodist Episcopal church 
and Sunday school and early in life he united with the church 
and was an earnest worker in the Master's cause in his early 
manhood days and we suppose he took his religion with him to 
California and is still engaged in church work. We know noth- 
ing of her parents, but feel confident that a girl who would 
choose the profession of nurse was rightly brought up and anx- 
ous to help suffering humanity and we hope will do much good 
in the world in her chosen profession. 



George Eugene Heal. 

George Eugene, son of David and Ann Caroline [Rigdon] 
Heal, ( son of Olive Carter, daughterof Isaac P. Carter), was 
born Nov. 13, 1S53, Wheeling,, Delaware county, Indiana; 
died 19 

- He grew up on the farm where he was born where there 
were plenty of the comforts of life. He was the only son of kind 
and indulgent parents, whose aim was to show their children 
that they loved them. His young days were spent in going to 
school and in work on the farm and his home life was pleasant, 
which he appreciated very much. 

Mary Ida Fergus, daughter of Warren and Nancy Jane 
Fergus, was born December 6, 1861, Page county, Iowa; 
died 19 

Her father was born in Indiana. She came with her parents 
during the first year of her age to Indiana, where they settled on 
a farm in Grant county. Here she grew to womanhood, sur- 
rounded with plenty of the comforts of life, good society, good 
schools and church privileges. 

George Eugene Heal and A\ary Ida Fergus were married 
April 14, 1878, Grant county, Ind. To this union two children 
were born: 

Caroline Jane, April 11, 1884, Delaware county, Indiana; 
died 19 

Alma Merle, October 20, 1893, Delaware county, Indiana; 
died 19 

They went to housekeeping in his father's house, David 
Heal being a widower at the time. The son in speaking of his 
residence there says: "My wife and I have cared for him twenty 
six years. I have never lived without him and I only lacked a 



FOURTH GENERATION. 99 

few days of fifty-one years old when he died." His occupation 
has always been farming and he still lives on the farm, a kind 
and obliging neighbor and a good citizen. 

Raised by Methodist parents they are attached to that church 
and will be remembered for the good they have done. 



Ann Lacy (Heal) ll^atson. 

Ann Lacy, daughter of David and Ann Caroline (Rigdon) 
Heal (son of Olive Carter, daughter of Isaac P. Carter), 
was born September 11, 1856, Delaware county, Indiana; 
died 19 . 

She grev/ up in a home on the farm where she was born 
with plenty of the comforts of life about her and yet nothing ex- 
travagant, v/here parents and children had love and confidence 
in each other and where all did their part of the work cheerfully 
and faithfuly. She attended school and got a good common 
school education. Theirs was a very pleasant home. 

Rensalier B. Watson, son of John and Harriet (Adsit) 
Watson, was born March 15, 1854, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 

He was born and raised on a farm where he grew to man- 
hood attending to the work incident to farming and raising stock. 
The hard work of clearing out a farm is past and he knew but 
little about grubbing and clearing, but still the duties of life call 
for vigilance and industry to make a success in life even if we do 
not have to do the same kind of work that the pioneers did. 

Ann Lacy Heal and Rensalier Watson were married Nov. 1, 
1879, Wheeling, Delaware county, Indiana. 

They went to housekeeping on a farm near his old home. 
Starting out with well strong bodies and plenty to commence with 
they soon had a comfortable home. Her father had been taking 
care of Mr. Bouy, a bachelor, for some years, but getting old he 
wanted them to take him which they did while he lived, a job 
which required care and attention which they faithfully performed 
and which service he promptly paid for every few months taking 
a receipt therefor. 

Religiously they were both raised by prominent members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church to which doctrine they still hold 
and I trust are doing good work for the Master. 



100 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

Martha Ann (Carter) Montgomery. 

Martha Ann, first daughter of William and Jemima Jane 
(Hillyard) Carter, (son of Samuel Hillman Carter, son of Isaac 
P. Carter), was born Oct. 26, 1852, Matthews, Grant Co., Ind.; 
died 19 

In 1856, she with her parents moved in wagons to Keokuk 
county, Iowa, and after staying there until February of 1857, 
they moved to Henry county, where her father bought prairie 
land for a home. Here she grew to womanhood and learned 
somethmg of the labor of making a home on the prairie, often 
helping her father at the farm work. 

Eliphalet Cozad Montgomery, son of John Walker and Mary 
L. (Cozad) Montgomery, was born July 11, 1844, Mercer Co., Pa. ; 
died 19 

His parents were natives of the United States. He grew up 
on a farm and farming was his occupation. .When about eigh- 
teen years old, he came with his parents to Illinois and engaged 
in raising hedge plants. The spring of 1866 they moved to 
Henry county, Iowa, and engaged extensively in raising hedge 
plants for four years. 

Martha Ann Carter and Eliphalet Cozad Montgomery were 
married Nov, 15, 1870, Mt. Pleasant, Henry county, Iowa. To 
them eight children were born: 

Willie, Oct. 29, 1871, Mt. Pleasant, Henry county, Iowa; 
died Nov. 3, 1871j Mt. Pleasant, Henry county, Iowa. 

Jestin Irvine, April 14, 1873, Henry county, Iowa; died Jan. 
27, 1876, Mt. Pleasant, Henry county, Iowa, 

Lulu Bell, May 14, 1875, Henry county, Iowa; 
died 19 

Archer Emett, January 31, 1878, Henry county, Iowa; 
died 19 

Ralph Eveston, January 23, 1880, Henry county, Iowa; 
-died 19 

Mima Lucinda, April 10, 1884, Henry county, Iowa; 
died 19 . 

William Walker, December 26, 1889, Henry county, Iowa; 
died 19 

Emma Mildred, March 13, 1893, Henry county, Iowa; 
died 19 



FOURTH GENERATION. 101 

After their marriage, they went to the west part of the state 
where he worked that fall and winter, coming back in the spring. 
Her father helped them to get a home where they were soon 
pleasantly located with good neighbors, good school and church 
privileges and where their children were born. About 1895 they 
sold their nice prairie farm and bought a place four miles west 
of Mt. Pleasant, where they are near a church and school house 
and have a well fixed, comfortable home. 

Lulu Bell taught in the common schools of the county most 
of the time for nine years, failing health causing her to quit 
teaching. She is now married and has a comfortable home. 
Archer E. and Ralph E. are both married. The former has had a 
good position at the County Infirmary the past three years. 
Ralph has a nice position with the Western Wheel Scraper Com- 
pany at Aurora, Illinois. Mima L. graduated in the country 
school when fifteen years of age, when on account of her moth- 
er's failing health she had to quit her studies and tak^ charge of 
the work at home, which she cheerfully and faithfully did for two 
years, when her mother's health permitted her to return to her 
studies and she is now in the Academy at Mt. Pleasant, prepar- 
ing herself for teaching. The two youngest are at home with 
the old folks. 

, He was raised by United Presbyterian parents and instructed 
in the rules of that church and before their marriage he united 
with the Methodist church, but did not instruct his children as 
faithfully in the way of life as he had been. She was brought 
up by Methodist parents and afterwards embraced the faith of the 
First Day Adventists to which she strongly holds. All honor to 
a noble Christian mother who has raised a large family and 
taught them their duty to their Savior and as far as any of them 
have failed to honor their parents and serve the God their mother 
served, so far have they failed of making the best of their lives 
for whicti they will have to give an account to God. 



Emily Jane {Carter) McConnell. 

Emily Jane, second daughter of William and Jemima Jane 
[Hillyard] Carter, (son of Samuel Hillman Carter, son of Jsaac 
P.Carter), born May 17, 1854, Matthews, Grant county, Ind.; 

When two years old, she with her parents, went to Henry 



102 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

county, losva, where they settled on prairie land to make a farm 
and where she grew up with the country in a good neighborhoij. 
enjoying the advantages of good schools and pleasant surround- 
ings. As the housework did not need her services, she help-jJ 
on the farm and could husk fifty bushels of corn as quickly as 
her father could, 

Randolph D. McConnt-ll, son of Alexander and Elizabeth 
Tallman McConnell, was born April 22, 1851, Ciarington,Oh;o; 
died 19 

His parents were natives of the United States. He cam^' 
with them when he was four years old to Henry county, Iowa, 
where they settled on prairie land that was rapidly filling up with 
a good class of citizens. Here he grew up with the country, Vv'itli 
surroundings calculated to make noble men of the boys. 

Emily Jane Carter and Randolph D. McConnell were mar- 
ried Sept. 25, 1872, Mt. Pleasant, Henry county, Iowa. 

One child was born to this union: 

William Alexander, October 31, 1878, Henry county, Iowa; 
died October 31, 1878, Mt. Pleasant, Henry county, Iowa. 

They settled on a farm joining her father's and for over 
twenty years the three sisters and families lived in homes not 
half a mile from the homestead, a contented happy family; but 
now one lives four miles west of Mt. Pleasant, one on the home- 
stead farm and this family in Mt. Pleasant. All have plenty to 
supply them with the comforts of life and they live to enjoy it. 

She was raised by Methodist parents and he was brought up 
under the influence of Methodism and during their married life 
have been engaged in the work of the church. Since moving to 
Mt. Pleasant they have attended the Disciple Christian church 
and while not so actively engaged in church work as they were 
before they went to town, are conscientious Christian citizens. 



Olive May {Carter) Anderson. 

Olive May, third daughter of William and Jemima Jane 
(Hillyard) Carter, (son of Samuel Hillman Carter, son of Isaac 
P. Carter), was born March 27, 1866,Mt.Pleasant,Henry Co., la.; 
died 19 

She grew to womanhood on the farm where she was born 
and was taught to do the work about the house and farm as girls 



FOURTH GENERATION. 103 

should be that are intended for useful women in the country. 
There was plenty in the home and the family lived to enjoy it 
without any bluster to get more and she had the privilege of at- 
tending a good country school all her school days in a neighbor- 
hood of kind Christian people. 

James Leonidas Anderson, fifth son of John and Sarah (Sprague) 
Anderson.was born March 25, lS57,\\t. Pleasant, Henry Co., Iowa; 
died 19 

The Andersons were born in the United United States. His 
early life was spent in the counties of Henry and Washington on 
the farm and his occupation was farming. His surroundings 
were good and he received a good common school education. 

Olive May Carter and James Leonidas Anderson were mar- 
ried Nov. 14. 18S3, Mt. Pleasant, Henry county, Iowa. To this 
union three sons were born: 

Hillman, Sept. 22, 1886, A\t. Pleasant, Henry county, Iowa; 
died Sept. 22, 1886, Mt. Pleasant, Henry county, Iowa. 

Jesse William, Sept. 6, 1889, Mt. Pleasant, Flenry Co., Iowa; 
died 19 

Guy Lester, Aug. 9, 1891, Mt. Pleasant, Henry county, Iowa; 
died 19 

They went to housekeeping on her father's farm in a house 
that was provided for that purpose in which they lived and did 
the farming from year to year, her father not being able to do 
much work. After his death in 1888 they bought the other heirs 
interests in the farm and had all except two rooms that her 
mother has to live in and all the family get along very nicely to- 
gether. 

Her parents are Methodists. She is a professor of religion, 
but declines uniting with the church until he goes with her. He 
is friendly to the Methodists and attends church with her. He is 
an honest man, a good neighbor, who never has any difficulty 
with those with whom he has dealings. 



Thankful Elizabeth {Lewis) Eaheart. 

Thankful Elizabeth, daughter of Joanna Blackburn and 
William Lewis(daughter of Thankful Carter, daughter of Isaac P. 
Carter), was born February 1, 1856, Palo, Linn county, Iowa; 
died 19 



104 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

The farm on which she was born was prairie and timber land 
that her parents were improving and she grew to womanhood in 
a new country. But it does not take as long to improve land of 
this kind as it does in heavily timbered land and when she was 
grown up they had a good house and barn and a well improved 
farm with plenty around them to make them comfortable. Ready 
made clothing had done away with the spinning and weaving in 
the family and instead of that work she went to school, where all 
of the necessary branches were taught to prepare one to teach in 
the common schools of the country and music was not neglected 
as there was an organ in most of the houses. 

Sylvester Eaheart, son of John and Elizabeth (Stephenson) 
Eaheart, was born May 27, 1848, LaPorte county, Indiana; 
died 19 

His mother died when he was a baby and his uncle took him 
to raise and brought him to Linn county, Iowa, when he was a 
small boy, where he grew to manhood in a good country that wss 
rapidly improving and where the chances for an industrious 
young man were good to get land for a home and he embraced 
the opportunity. 

Thankful Elizabeth Lewis and Sylvester Eaheart were mar- 
ried April 4, 1875, Palo, Linn county, Iowa. One child was born 
to them. 

Elmer Y., February 10, 1876, Palo, Linn county, Iowa; 
died 19 

They are living on a part of her homestead farm and have a 
good home with plenty about them to make a comfortable living. 
Her mother is living with them where she expects to spend her 
days in their pleasant home. 

They both united with the 'Methodist Episcopal church in 
their youthful days and are yet in that church, earnest workers 
in Sunday school and church, doing what they can for the Mas- 
ter by helping others to a better life. 



Amanda Olive {Lewis) Beenblossom. 

Amanda Olive, first daughter of Martha Smith and Jesse 
Lewis, (daughter of Esther Ann Carter, daughter of Isaac P. 
Carter), was born April 9, 1855, Wheeling, Delaware county, 
Indiana; died July 29, 1885, Washington county, Iowa. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 105 



The spring she was ten years old she with her parents and 
family moved in a wagon, camping out by the way to Washing- 
ton county, Iowa, where they had bought a farm five miles south 
of Washington. The farm was partly improved, but the build- 
ing of a new house and barn and clearing the brush and wood off 
of the land made plenty of work for all of them of which she did 
her full share. 

Before she was of age she learned to cut and make the chil- 
dren's clothes while the mother was busy at other duties of the 
home which suited her better, occasionally weaving a web of 
cloth or carpet for the family. There was a school house on the 
farm, where she attended attended school, but the many cares of 
life prevented her from attending regularly enough to get a good 
education. 

Perry Beenblossom, son of Nelson and Clarrisa (Jacobs) 
Beenblosoom, was born Feb. 29, 1856, Washington county, Iowa; 
died 19 

His parents were natives of the-United States. He grew to 
manhood in the neighborhood where he was born, attending 
church and school and the amusements of their young single life 
with his future wife. In large families with the care and expense 
of food and clothing and with the desire to lay up something for 
them in the future, the schooling is sometimes neglected, as was 
the case with these families, but their learning made good citi- 
zens of them and they made their way to financial success. 

Amanda Olive Lewis and Perry Beenblossom were married 
August 22, 1880, Washington county, Iowa. To them two chil- 
dren were born: 

Harry Alva, October 5, 1881, Washington county, Iowa; 
died 19 

Annie Maud, May 19, 1884, Washington county, Iowa; 
died 19 

They went to housekeeping on a farm that joined the home- 
stead and engaged in farming, remaining there two,years, when 
they went to an eighty acre farm that they had purchased on the 
prairie a few miles southwest of Ainsworth, paying what was 
then called a high price for it, but it is now worth three times as 
much and although they went in debt for it he paid it out in good 
time and now has a well improved farm. She was not permit- 



106 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 



ted to stay very long with him to help him in his pleasant home, 
as consumption took her away ere five years of married life was 
passed. One of his sisters that stayed with them during her 
sickness, took charge of the house and the six or seven years he 
was a widower, took care of the children for him so that they had 
a good home. He married A^iss Elizabeth Stewart, of Benton 
county, who took charge of the house and was a good stepmother 
to the children, teaching them to do the work about the house 
and poultry yard, as she was a woman that worked hard and 
took care of what they had. One of the children is now married 
and the other in Chicago, a stenographer in a business house, an 
occupation which she likes to work at and the old folks have the 
house and farm to themselves. 

Their parents were members of the [Old] Christian church 
and they grew up attending church and school together, both 
uniting with the church in their youth and were faithful attend- 
ants at church and Sunday school always ready to do their 
part. She was one of God's noble women, beloved and honored 
by those who knew her and her children bless God for a good 
mother. After his second marriage he and his wife attended the 
Methodist Episcopal church in Washington, uniting with that 
church. 



Matthew Wharton Lewis. 

Matthew Wharton, first son of Martha Smith and Jesse 
Lewis, (daughter of Esther Ann Carter, daughter of Isaac P. Car- 
ter), was born August 6, 1856, Wheeling, Delaware county, Ind.; 
died 19 

His boyhood days were spent near the place of his birth, 
among the trees, brush and logs. In the spring of 1865 he ac- 
companied his parents and family in their move in a wagon, 
camping out by the way, to their new home in Washington county, 
Iowa, five miles south of Washington. His father was a carpen- 
ter by trade and while working away from home left the work of 
the farm to his boys and he, being the oldest, the most of it fell 
on him and this was the work he was engaged in while he grew 
to manhood and so busy was he at the work that he did not go 
to school except during the winter and only received a limited 
education. After the death of his father in 1877, he and his 
mother had full control of the farm and stock which they ran 



I FOURTH GENERATION. 107 

] __ — 

• very successfully by hard work, cutting and hauling wood to 

,i town during the winter for ten years to help out. 

I Mary Lurena Amspoker daughter of David Lyon and Sarah Jane 

J (Nelson) Amspoker, was born Sept. 15, 1862, Washington Co., la.; 

I died 19 

5 Her father was improving a farm, on the prairie while she 

>| was growing up and she was taught to do work about a farm 

•| house. She was a close student in the country schools and by 

I attending school in Washington qualified herself to teach in the 

I public schools of the county, which she did for three years very 

1 satisfactori!}^, 

I Matthew Wharton Lewis and Mary Lurena Amspoker were 

~ married Jan. 21, 1887, Washington county, Iowa. To this union 

jj four children were born: 

I Lulu May, Nov. 21, 1887, Grainfield, Gove county, Kansas; 

1 died 19 

I Myrle, Nov. 22, 1890, Grainfield, Gove county, Kan.; died 

I August 7, 1892, Grainfield, Gove county, Kan. 

I Otis Matthew, Sept. 11, 1892, Grainfield, Gove county, Kan. ; 

I died 19 

I Martha Vera, Oct. 31, 1894, Grainfield, Gove county, Kan.; 

I died April 9, 1899, Grainfield, Gove county, Kan. 

^ Soon after they were married they went to Grainfield, Gove 

I county, Kansas. They built a small house on their land south of 

I Grainfield and intended to engage in farming. Neighbors were 

i very scarce and it was too lonely for them there so they 

% moved the house and all there was in it to Grainfield and he 

I 

Ji engaged in repairing wagons, pumps, etc., and added to his bus- 

I iness pumps and farm implements for sale and doing an occa- 

1 sional job of carpenter work. Later they bought the grain ele- 

I vator with wind mill to grind chop feed and engaged in the grain, 

I feed, flour and coal trade. Trading his land for a stock of dry 

1 goods, they engaged in store keeping, adding a stock of grocer- 

1 ies. The store and elevator made too much work for him. and 

I she attended the store most of the time. After a few years they 

isold the store and later their dwelling with the intention of going 
into business at Roann, Indiana, but the climate did not agree 

^ v/ith him and after spending one winter, most of the time under 

I .the doctor's care, he thought he would have better health in Kan- 

i' sas and went back to Grainfield and built them a nice cottage 



108 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

and fixed up for comfortable living. She was very anxious to 
locate in Indiana or Iowa, hoping to have better society to raise 
their children in, but on account of his failing health went back 
to Kansas and is glad that he has good health again. 

His parents were members of the (Old) Christian church. 
Her's were United Presbyterians. They both united with the 
church of their parents in their youthful days. Not finding any 
church of their choice in Grainfield, they attended the churches 
there, mostly the Methodist Episcopal and have been and are 
now devoted workers in Sunday school and church work, doing 
what they can to make those they associate with better men 
and women and are rejoiced to see several of them unite with the 
church the past winter which they hope will be a help to them 
in the church work which fell heavily upon them. 



Thomas Jefferson Lewis. 

Thomas Jefferson, second son of Martha Smith and Jesse 
Lewis, (daughter of Esther Ann Carter, daughter of Isaac P. 
Carter), was born Oct. 14, 1858,Wheeling, Delaware county, Ind.; 
died 19 

In the seventh year of his age he moved with his parents to 
Washington county, Iowa. Here he grew to manhod on a busy 
farm where the boys had a team and plow as soon as they were 
able to manage one. Attending school only during the winter, 
did not give him a very good education, but he makes good use 
of what he has as he is passing through life. After he was of 
age, he helped during the winter to cut and haul wood to the 
town of Washington, a business that they engaged in and that 
brought them considerable money besides clearing the land. 

Rosa E.Beenblossom, daughter of Abraham and Mary(Sparr) 
Beenblossom, was born March 26, 1863, Washington county, la.; 
died 19 

She grew to womanhood in the neighborhood where she was 
born, in good society of religious people and where she could at- 
tend school and church and enjoy privileges that many were de- 
prived of some years ago. Her mother dying, she and her sister 
had charge of the housework for a few years. 

Thomas Jefferson Lewis and Rosa E. Beenblossom were 
married Feb. 27, 1883, Washington county, Iowa. To this union 
four children were born: 



FOURTH GENERATION. 109 



DoUie Arvista, August 8, 1884, Washington county. Iowa- 
died 19 . 

Daisy Grace, June 21, 1886, Washington county, Iowa; 
died 19 

Jesse Lloyd, Nov. 18, 1888, Washington 'county, Iowa; 
died 19 . 

Maggie Edna, Oct. 23, 1894,Ainsworth,Washington Co., la.; 
died 19 

They went to housekeeping on a farm in Oregon township, 
Washington county, and engaged in farming with good success 
and remained there seven years, when they rented the farm and 
moved to Ainsworth where they had bought an elevator and en- 
gaged in the grain, coal and tile business. Later his brothers 
entered into partnership with him and they took in the lumber 
business and had a good trade until in 1899 they sold out and he 
went to Roann, Wabash county, Indiana, Jan. 1, 1900. 

There he bought an elevator and again engaged in the same 
business and also furnished building material, partly from native 
timber as they have a saw mill and buy timber and saw it into 
lumber, his brother, S. C, joining in the business in 1903. 

Their parents were members of the [Old] Christian church 
with which they united in early life and were faithful attendants 
at tne services of tne church and Sunday school while near 
enough to attend. While at Ainsworth they were too far away 
to attend the church of their choice and attended the Methodist 
Episcopal church and became members of the same, their chil- 
dren uniting with them. This noble family are doing good work 
in the Master's vineyard and something better is hoped for and 
expected of them in the future. 



Melvin Peat Lewis. 



Melvin Peat, third son of Martha Smith and Jesse Lewis, 
(daughter of Esther Ann Carter, daughter of Isaac P. Carter), 
was born Nov. 30, 1860, Wheeling, Delaware county, Indiana; 
died 19 

In the fifth year of his age he came with his parents and 
family to Washington Co., la., where they settled on a farm five 
miles south of Washington. Here he grev/ to manhood and grew 
up with the country. There were great improvements in farm- 
ing as v/ell as other things in his boyhood days. In a large fam- 



110 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

ily, mostly boys, it fell to his lot to help the mother in her work 
more than any of the others and she was very sorry to have to 
give him up when he hired out and went away from home to 
work, but she hired a girl and quit depending on boys for help in 
the house. 

Florence Luetta Hardin, daughter of Marcus Aus- 
tin and Margaret Elizabeth [Willson] Hardin, was 
born April 1, 1864, Sussex county. New Jersey; 
died 19 

Her parents were natives of the United States. She came 
with her parents when a little girl to Washington county, Iowa, 
where they settled on a farm in the east part of the county, near 
Ainsworth. Here she grew to womanhood, the only girl in a 
family of boys and so pleasant was her disposition that she was 
the pet of the family. A good student in school, she received a 
good common school education. 

Melvin Peat Lewis and Florence Luetta Hardin were married 
December 25, 1884, Washington county, Iowa. To them five 
children were born: 

Ethel Olive, December 21, 1885, Washington county, Iowa; 
died , 19 , 

Lillian Effie, September 26, 1887, Washington county, Iowa; 
died 19 

Floyd Hardin, April 19, 1890, Washington county, Iowa; 
died 19 

June 21, 1894, Ainsworth, Iowa; 

April 2, 1900, Oskaloosa, Iowa; 

They settled on a farm near Ainsworth and engaged in farm- 
ing and by good management and hard work made a success of 
it. But thinking some other business would suit them better, 
they sold off their stock and farming tools and moved to Ains- 
worth, September, 1892, and in company with his brother, T. J., 
they bought an elevator and engaged in the grain and lumber 
business. They remained there until 1899, when on account of 
close competition they sold out and went to Oskaloosa and built a 
transfer warehouse and went to handling farm machinery in com- 
pany with his brother, James, and later put in a large stock of 
wagons, buggies, pumps and general farm machinery and are do- 



Merlyn 


Evan, 


died, 


19 


Stanley 


Jarrell, 


died 


19 



FOURTH GENERATION. Ill 



ing a profitable business. They have not neglected the educa- 
tion of. their children. Their oldest daughter is now in Burling- 
ton, attending Elliott's Business College, studying bookkeeping, 
short hand and type writing. 

His parents were members of the (Old) Christian church, 
with which he united early in life and he still holds his member- 
ship in that church, but as no church of his choice is near him 
he attends other churches and helps to support them. Her par- 
ents were Baptists with which church she united in early life and 
still remains faithful to her church duties. They are good honest 
Christian citizens, doing what they can in the Master's vineyard 
and helping others to a better life. 



George Elmer Lewis. 

George Elmer, fourth son of Martha Smith and Jesse 
Lewis, (daughter of Esther Ann Carter, daughter of Isaac P. 
Carter), was born Aug. 24, 1862,Wheeling,Delav/are county, Ind. ; 
died 19 

He was born on a farm and when three years old came with 
his parents to Washington county, Iowa, and settled on a farm 
where he grew to manhood in good society with good school and 
church privileges, engaged in farming and other employment that 
made good honest men of the boys. For six years he had 
the management of the farm and stock for his mother which was 
done to the satisfaction of all concerned. 

Hattie Anna Heal, daughter of William and Mary (Burt) 
Heal, was born Feb. 22, 1869, Richland county, Wisconsin; died 
Oct. 7, 1894, Keota, Keokuk county, Iowa. 

She was not a strong child and grew up to be a delicate lit- 
tle woman, but very ambitious and willing to do her part at home 
or at school. Quick to learn and willing to impart to others what 
she knew, as soon as she was old enough, she went to teaching 
in the public schools of the county where she was born, but the 
work was too hard for her delicate body and she had to quit and 
go at other work. 

George Elmer Lewis and Hattie Anna Heal were married 
Jan. 13, 1892, Richland county, Wisconsin. One child was born 
to them : 



112 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

Carl, January 14, 1893, Washington county, Iowa; died 
September 21, 1893, Richland county, Wisconsin, while on a 
visit to her father's home. 

They lived on his mother's farm and attended to the busi- 
ness of the farm two years when he sold his share of the stock 
and went to Keota, taking a partnership in lumber and grain bus- 
iness for eleven years. Here his wife died in less than a year, 
which was a sad stroke for him and during his stay there fire at 
two different times destroyed a part of their property, but still 
they came out some ahead. 

Daisy B. Ritchey, daughter of Edward M. and Ellen (Hen- 
kle) Ritchey, was born April 22, 1877, Keota, Keokuk Co., Iowa; 
died 19 

She grew to womanhood in the town where she was born in 
a pleasaiit home. Helping her mother and attending school oc- 
cupied the time of her single life. 

George Elmer Lewis and Daisy B. Ritchey were married 
Jan. 3, 1898, Keota, Keokuk county, Iowa. To this union three 
children were born: 

Hubert Henkle, Oct. 25, 1898, Keota, Keokuk county, Iowa; 
died 19 

Eva Lucille, June 21, 1900, Keota, Keokuk county, Iowa; 
died 19 

Raymond Donald, Jan. 15, 1902, Keota, Keokuk county, la.; 
died 19 

They built them a good up-to-date house near her father's^ 
finishing it off with hot air heat, bath room and electric lights 
and went to housekeeping in it. In March, 1904, they sold their 
grain and lumber business in Keota, and he went to Bloomington, 
Illinois, and bought an elevator with feed mill attached and is 
now engaged in grinding and selling grain, feed, flour, and rneaU 
by wholesale and retail. He took possession of the business 
there in June, 1904, and in September moved his family there, 
after renting his fme house for a year and renting a house in 
Bloomington to live in. 

He was raised in the (01d)Chr!stian church and early in life 
united with it. Hattie was a member of the Disciple church, but 
joined with him after their marriage. She was a loving devoted 
Christian woman, always seeking and helping the young people 
to a better life. Daisy was raised by Baptist parents, but as 



FOURTH GENERATION. 113 

there was no church of his choice in Keota, he joined the Disci- 
ple church and became a firm believer in their doctrines, an earn- 
est worker in church and Sunday school and is a man looked up 
to for good example and advice. 



Samuel Cocklin Lewis, 

Samuel Cocklin, sixth son of Martha Smith and Jesse 
Lewis, (daughter of Esther Ann Carter, daughter of Isaac P. 
Carter), was born August 16. 1867, Washington county, Iowa; 
died 19 

He grew to manhood on the farm where he was born and the 
work of far;^ng attending to the stock with the cutting of brush 
and wood for the market kept all all hands busy when they were 
not attending school which was not neglected. After he was of 
age he attended Elliott's Business College at Burlington and 
graduated in bookkeeping and business course and came home 
spoiled for a farmer, and worked for a while in the bank at 
Ainsworth until something better came to hand. 

Martha Elizabeth Bradford, daughter of Miles 
and Emma Curby [Cole] Bradford, was born 
May 13, 1870, Washington county, Iowa; 

died 19 

She grew to womanhood in the neighborhood where she was 
born with pleasant surroundings and other things that tend to 
develop a noble character in a girl and fit her for the duties of 
life and her training was very useful to her in the near future. 
Her mother dying when she was about eighteen years old, cut 
her school days short, she taking charge of the housekeeping and 
with the gathering and canning of fruit and berries she worked 
very hard, but at entirely different kind of work from what her 
grandmothers did with the spinning wheel and loom and making 
clothing for the family. 

Samuel Cocklin Lewis and Martha Elizabeth Bradford were 
married Feb. 17, 1892, Washington county, Iowa. To them 
three daughters were born: 

Hazel May, October 9, 1893, Ainsworth, Iowa; 
died 19 

Myra Emma, August 23, 1896, Ainsworth, Iowa; died Feb. 3, 
1902, West Chester, Washington county, Iowa. 



114 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 



Mildred Lorena, April 3, 1904, Roann, Wabash county, Ind.; 
died 19 

They went to housekeeping a few days after they were mar- 
ried in a house near Ainsworth and later traded it for a house in 
town. He worked for a while in the bank and afterwards bought 
a one-third interest in the grain and lumber business with his 
brothers and continued in business there until the fall of 1898 
when they sold out and he bought one-half interest in a general 
store at West Chester and engaged in storekeeping. In August, 
1902, they sold their store and went to Roann, Wabash county, 
Ind., and bought a half interest in a grain and lumber business 
with his brother, the firm name being T. J. Lewis & Brother. 
He is a hard working man, a good manager and they have a large 
and profitable business. Last year they built them a good com- 
fortable house and now have a pleasant home. 

He was raised in the (Old) Christian church and early in 
life became a member thereof. She was a devoted Methodist 
from her youth and after they got away from their home church 
he cast his lot with the Methodist and they are both earnest de- 
voted workers in church and Sunday school. 



James Wesley Lewis. 

James Wesley, eighth son of Martha Smiith and Jesse Lewis, 
(daughter of Esther Ann Carter, daughter of Isaac P. Carter), 
was born May 27, 1871, Washington, county, Iowa; 
died 19 . 

He was born in a farm house and grew to manhood on the 
farm where he was born working at farming. He had a good 
chance to attend school and received a fair common school edu- 
cation. When about twenty years old, he went to Burlington 
and attended Elliott's Business College, graduating in a business 
course in the spring of 1892, when he went to Grainfield, Kan- 
sas, and worked with his brother in the grain and implement 
business until June, 1893,when he sold out and returned to Iowa 
and engaged in farm work. 

Loie Ann Hopping, daughter of Jeremiah and Elizabeth Ann 
[Snyder] Hopping.was born April 15,1872,WashingtonCo.,Iowa; 
died 19 

She grew to womanhood on the farm where she was born 



FOURTH GENERATION. 115 

surrounded with such comforts of life as tended to make her con- 
tented and happy, attending the schools of the country and had 
an organ in the home to cheer the lonely hours. 

James Wesley Lewis and Loie Ann Hopping were married 
March 13, 1894, Washington county, Iowa. 

They went to housekeeping on the homestead farm and en- 
gaged in farming. The spring of 1895 they went to West Ches- 
ter, where he entered into partnership with R. C. Ferguson and 
ran a store of general merchandise very successfully for five 
years. Their next move was to Oskaloosa where he and his 
brother built a transfer warehouse and repair shop for threshing 
machines and other farm machinery. Later they bought hard- 
ware and handle all kinds of farm machinery with buggies, 
pumps and windmills. 

He was raised by parents that belonged to the (Old) Chris- 
tian church with which church he united in his youth. Her par- 
ents were Methodists. After he got away from the church of his 
youth, he cast his lot with tlie Methodists and they are loyal 
members of that church and doing good work for the Master. 



A Hie Est a Lewis. 

Allie Esta, third daughter of Martha Smith and Jesse Lewis, 
(daughter of Esther Ann Carter, daughter of Isaac P. Carter), 
was born April 30, 1875, Washington county, Iowa; 
died , 19 

She grew to womanhood on the farm where she was born, 
but being a delicate child she did not make a strong girl or 
woman and was favored on account of her not being strong. In 
the spring of 1892 she went to Gove county, Kansas, hoping a 
change of climate would be beneficial to her health, her mother 
and stepfather going the next September to stay with her until 
the next spring, when they fitted up a wagon and camping outfit 
and drove to Pueblo, Colo., and after visiting Manitou and other 
places returned to Grainfield about the middle of June, tired and 
disgusted with traveling that way in the dust and wind which 
hurt her eyes, they being weak and sore. 

The prospect for a crop was so poor that her brother sold out 
his interest in the elevator and loading a car with his and his 
mother's stuff went back to Iowa, she going at the same time. 
She had been afflicted with sore eyes for a year and had doctored 



116 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

them with the local doctors and had been kept out of school and 
when her mother got back to Iowa in September, 1893, her eyes 
were in bad shape. She went to Chicago and was treated by a 
lady doctor for seven weeks and came home to continue the 
treatment, which she did all winter, without any cure. The 
summer of 1894 she was under the treatment ]of Dr. Lynn of 
Mt. Pleasant, making several trips to his office across the 
country without any good results. 

In April, 1895, she went to Oskaloosa and took treatment of 
Dr. Lukens which was of a heroic nature, causing great pain and 
blindness for a few days. She did not stay very long and came 
home with glasses to help her out. About a year after this one 
of her fellow patients at Oskaloosa wrote that he had been cured 
by Dr. West at Allerton and urged her to try him, which she 
finally consented to do and after a short treatment which was 
not severe, she felt satisfied she was better and came back 
to take treatment at home with good results. She was under 
his care for some years and got well. She was anxious for an 
education, but was so long out of school and not strong 
bodily, she could not make a success at school. But by per- 
sistent study at home she has a fair knowledge of bookkeeping, 
short hand and type writing. She has learned dressmaking and 
worked at it for some years, but cannot stand that work very 
well. She thinks she has failed in the business of life, be- 
cause so many things were against her, but we know that what 
was done was neatly and well done. 

She is now at Bloomington, Illinois, helping her brother and 
cousin as bookkeeper in the grain, flour, feed and meal business. 

She is a member of the (Old) Christian church and has been 
since her girlhood days and has always been a devoted servant 
of the Master, 



Martha Ellen {Smith) H^eekley, 

Martha Ellen, second daughter of Joseph Lewis and Caro- 
line (Peckham) Smith, (son of Esther Ann Carter, daughter of 
Isaac P.Carter), was born July 31, '1875, Richland county, Wis.; 
died 19 

She came to Iowa with her parents when about one year old 
and they located near West Chester and a few years later on a 



FOURTH GENERATION. 117 

farm just east of Keota, where she grew to womanhood in good 
society and in a pleasant home. 

Lewis Orr Weekly, son of Solomon and Minnie (Coleman) 
Weekley, was born July 18, 1871, in Illinois. His parents were 
natives of United States. 

He came with his parents to Iowa when quite young, where 
they located on a farm near Keota in a good country with good 
society, and good schools in which he grew to manhood working 
away from home a part of the time and taking care of himself 
and learned to take care of his earnings. 

Martha Ellen Smith and Lewis Orr Weekley were married 
Feb. 23, 1893, Washington county, Iowa. To this union four 
children were born : 

Howard Douglas, Sept. 4, 1895, Washington county, Iowa; 
died 19 . 

Edna Blanch, August 26, 1896, Washington county, Iowa; 
died 19 

Ethel May, July 25, 1898> Washington county, Iowa; 
died , 19 

Belva Verne, June 27, 1902, Washington county, Iowa; 
died 19 

They first located near the homestead and their residence 
has all the time since their marriage been in Washington county 
and he engaged in farming. 

They were both raised by Christian parents, members of the 
United Brethren church with which church they early in life 
united and are faithful, honest Christian citizens. 



118 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 



FIFTH GEN5RAT10N. 

The names used in this generation will be the names of the 
great grandchildren of Isaac G. Carter and the geneology will 
only be run back to him. 



Howard Alexander Carter. 

Howard Alexander, only child of Leroy P. and Margaret 
Frances (MacKenzie) Carter, (son of Howard Carter, son of 
Isaac G. Carter), was born September 25, 1895, Barnum, Minn.; 
died 19 

His mother took him on a visit to the home of her birth in 
Nova Scotia while a baby and at the death of his mother in 1900 
his father brought him to her funeral and burial at Hickory 
Grove, Mt. Pleasant, Henry county, Iowa. 

His Aunt Alice went back to Minnesota to keep house for his 
father and he has had a good home and care since his mother's 
death. They are now living at Forest Lake where his father is 
station agent for the railroad. He attends both day and Sunday 
school and is receiving instruction that we trust will make a good 
Christian citizen of him. 



Mamie Eleanor [Seberg] Husband. 

Mamie Eleanor, first daughter of Sarah Jane Carter and 
John Seberg, [daughter of Howard Carter, son of Isaac G. Car- 
ter], was born December 21, 1871, Henderson county, Illinois; 
died 19 

A few years after her birth her parents moved to Henry 
county, Iowa, and in January, 1884, they moved to Kearney, 
Nebraska, where they had rented a large farm and here she grew 
to womanhood in a new country on the plains. She worked 
away from home as a domestic part of the time and did not re- 
ceive a very good education. 

John Riley Husband, son of John S. and Nancy H. [Jordan) 
Husband, was born December 5, 1860, Taylor county, Iowa; 
died 19 . 

He is of German descent. 

When quite young he moved with his parents to Rooks 
county, Kansas.where he grew to manhood and learned the trade 



k^ 



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i?-^ft'^,fti<fc--j^>a:tefcxML^'^'-!^iSiay»A'fe!«^^ 




. Howard A, Carter. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 119 

of pk sterer and cistern builder and was engaged at that business 
in Nt braska wh^n he met the girl who became his future wife. 

v\amie Eleanor Seberg and John Riley Husband were mar- 
ried Ian. 9, 1894, Kearney county, Neb. To this union four chil- 
dren were born: 

Lula Albertie, May 25, 1895, Rooks county, Kansas; 
died 19 

John Vernon, October 27, 1896, Rooks county, Kansas; 
died 19 

Gracie Jane, August 1, 1898, Rooks county, Kansas; 
died 19 

Nancy May, January 17, 1901, Harlan county, Nebraska; 
died 19 

They went to houskeeping in Rooks county, Kansas, and 
after living there five years they moved to Harlan, Nebraska, 
afterwards to Kearney county. He farmed and worked at his 
trade part of the time. They now live in Alma, Neb., where 
they have a pleasant home and he ib busy building houses in 
that little town. 

She is a devoted Christian woman, a member of the .Metho- 
dist church. He has never made a public profession of Chris- 
tianity, but talks and and acts very favorably to the teachings of 
the Bible. 



Matiie Jane [Seberg) Christiansen. 

Mattie Jane, second daughter of Sarah Jane Carter and 
John Seberg, (daughter of Howard Carter, son of Isaac G. Car- 
ter), was born April 7, 1875, Henderson county, Illinois; 
died 19 

She was brought to Henry counly, Iowa, while a baby and 
after a few years taken to Kearney county Nebraska, where she 
grew to womanhood. And although the days are passed when 
the girls and women spun the wool and flax and wove the cloth 
to make the family clothing, her home was not the home of the 
greatest plenty and in her young womanhood she worked as a 
domestic to clothe herself and yet this work prepares girls for 
good housekepers if their education is neglected on account of it 
which is often the case. 

Charley P. Christiansen, son of Andrew C. and Marie P. (Fred- 



120 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

erickson)Christlanson,was born Oct. 12,1871, Kenosha Co., Wis. ; 
died . 19 . 

His parents were natives of Denmark, Europe. He came to 
Kearney county, Neb., during tlie seventh year of his age where 
he grew to manhood in a country that was just settling up and 
sod houses were a very common thing as well as stables covered 
with the grass that grew on the plains. Only the necessaries 
of life with plenty of ha;d work and little schooling made him a 
good farmer. 

Mattie Jane Seberg and Charley P. Christiansen were mar- 
ried July 9, 1892, Kearney county, Nebraska. To this union 
three children were born: 

Raymond Levi, Sept. 12, 1893, Kearney county, Nebraska; 
died 19 . 

Nettie Lenora, Sept. 1, 1900, Kearney county, Nebraska; 
died 19 

Pearl Mae, May 16, 1903, Kearney couhty, Nebraska; 
died 19 

They went to housekeeping in Minden where he engaged in 
the livery business, but not making a success of it they sold out 
and went to farming and now have a good place well stocked and 
plenty about them to enJDy the blessings of life. 

She was raised by Methodist parents. His parents were 
Baptists and some time after their marriage they united with the 
Baptist church and are devoted Christian workers in the Mas- 
ter's vineyard. 

Hattie Grace (Seberg) Christiansen. 

Hattie Grace, third daughter .of Sarah Jane Carter and John 
Seberg, (daughter of Howard Carter, son of Isaac G. Carter), 
was born May 23, 1877, Mount Pleasant, Henry county, Iowa; 
digd 19 

In the seventh year of her age she went with her parents to 
Kearney county, Nebraska, where she grew to womanhood work- 
ing away from home part of the time to provide herself with 
clothing. The society in this new country was very good, but 
school privileges were too meager for a girl to get a good edu- 
cation. 

Frank Christiansen, son of Andrew C. and AUrie P. (Fred- 



' FIFTH GENERATION. 121 

erickson(Christiansen,wasborn March 27,1879,KearneyCo.,Neb. ; 
died, 19 

He is of Danish descent. 

He grew to manhood near where he was born, working on a 
farm in very good society and attended school as much of the 
time as he couki. 

Hattie Grace Seberg and Frank Christiansen were married 
April 4, 1900, Kearney county, Nebraska. Two children were 
born to this union: 

Hazel Newetta, Jan. 1, 1902, Kearney county, Nebraska; 
died 19 

Viola Marie, May 22, 1904, Kearney county, Nebraska; 
died 19 

They went to housekeeping on the homestead farm where 
they have a pleasant home and are engaged in farming and rais- 
ing stock. 

She was raised by Methodist parents. His parents were 
Baptists and since their marriage they have united with the Bap- 
tist church with the intention of bettering their own condition, 
and that they may help others to a better life. 



Lewis Alfred Seberg. 

Lewis Alfred, first son of Sarah Jane Carter and John Seberg, 
[daughter of Howard Carter, son of Isaac G. Carter], was 
born August 29, 1879, Mount Pleasant, Henry county, Iowa; 
died 19 

In the fifth year of his age he went with his parents and 
family to Kearney county, Nebraska, where they settled on a 
rented farm and while he was growing up they lived in four dif- 
ferent places in the county and part of the time on a large new 
farm in a sod house. Work was always plenty, but the accom- 
modations for a pleasant farm life were not good and the chance 
for a schooling very poor. He is now engaged as manager of the 
Farmers elevator at Upland, Franklin county. A man beloved on 
account of his pleasant disposition and honest, upright character 
he has the confidence of all who know him. He is a Methodist in 
belief but has not publicly acknowledged Jesus as his Savior. 

Henry Earl Seberg. 

Henry Earl, third son of Sarah Jane Carter and John Seberg 



122 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

[daughter of Howard Carter, son of Isaac G. Carter], was 
born May 19, 1883, Mount Pleasant, Henry county, Iowa; 
died 19 

In the first year of his age his parents moved on the raihoad 
to Kearney county, Nebraska, where he grew to manhood in a 
home where there were none of the extra comforts of hfe and 
where there was a poor chance to get an education, but his desire 
for good education was strong and he did the best he could in 
the common schools. During his minority he was permitted to 
work away from home part of the time and he saved his money 
with the intention of attending college and is now in his first year 
at Lincoln in college. 

Iti early life he united with the Methodist Episcopal church 
and has been faithful in his church work, hoping that he may be 
better qualified for service as he expects to fit himself for the 
ministry. 



Irena Velletta (Carter) Wright 

Irena Velletia, first daughter of Joseph Newton and Nancy 
Jane (Patterson) Carter, son of Ira J. Carter, son of Isaac G. 
Carter), was born August 18, 1872, Matthews, Grant Co., Ind.; 
died 19 

She grew up in the county where she was born and while 
she enjoyed many of the comforts of life, yet she had to work 
for a living, but was not deprived of the school privileges of the 
country which were good. 

Cornelius Maimer Wright, son of Lorenzo Dow and Mary 
(McWilliamson)Wright,was born March 6, 1871, Clinton Co.. O.; 
died 19 . 

They are natives of the United States. 

He came to Indiana during his minority and settled on a farm 
in Blackford county. 

Irena Velletta Carter and Cornelius Maimer Wright were 
married July 2, 1891, Grant county, Indiana. To this union five 
children were born: 

Jessie E., March 16, 1893, Blackford county, Indiana; 
died 19 

Clarence Clinton, March 8, 1898, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 



FIFTH GENERATION. 123 

Gracie Gertrude, October 21, 1899, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 

Johnnie Alfred, January 4, 1901, Grant county, Indiana; 
died August 20, 1901, Grant county, Indiana. 

Bessie May, August 20, 1903, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 

Since their marriage they have lived the most of tlie time 
near the homestead. They now live in town where they own a 
house and lot and he works at the carpenter trade. 

She was raised in the Methodist faith and joined the church 
while young. His parents were Baptists and he holds to that 
belief. 

Malevia Lillian {Carter) Wilcoxon. 

Malevia Lillian, second daughter of Joseph Newton and 
NancyJane (Patterson) Carter, sonof Ira J. Carter, son of Isaac 
G. Carter), was born April 27, 1874, Grant county, Indiana; 
died , 19 . 

Her childhood and youthful days were spent in the county 
where she was born and the busy cares of life and schooling oc- 
cupied her time, under circumstances that taught her the duty of 
honest labor to make a living. 

Zachary Taylor Wilcoxon, son of John and Mary (Williams) 
Wilcoxon, was born March 8, 1871, Delaware county, Indiana; 
died 19 

His parents were natives of Ohio. 

His young life was spent near where he was born, living on 
a farm in a good country with good schools and society, that 
brings out noble manhood. 

Malevia Lillian Carter and Zachary Taylor Wilcoxon were 
married Feb. 20, 1895, Grant county, Indiana. To this union 
three children were born: 

Alva Carl, March 1, 1896, Matthews, Grant county, Ind.; 
died- 19 

-Clarence Wilmer, January 13, 1898, Grant county, Ind.; 
died 19 

George Lloyd. Dec. 5, 1903, Matthews, Grant county, Ind. ; 
died 19 

Since their m.arriage. they have lived on a farm near the 
homestead and engaged in farming.which is a good business, but 
one that requires diligent labor to make it successful. 



124 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 



She was raised under the influence of Methodism and is a 
member of that church. His parents held to the Methodist doc- 
trine, but 1 do not know as he ever united with any church. 

Laura Belle {Carter) Harris. 

Laura Belle, third daughter of Joseph Newton and Nancy- 
Jane (Patterson) Carter, (son of Ira J. Carter, son of Isaac 
G. Carter), was born Dec. 12, 1875, Matthews, Grant Co., Ind.; 
died 19 

She grew up in a home where there was not the greatest 
plenty of the comforts of life. She was taught that it required 
diligent study and labor to get a comfortable living in the world 
where there is so much competition. 

Samuel Monroe Harris, son of George Washington and Sarah 
D. Hollis Harris, was born Jan. 20, 1874, Hamilton Co., Neb. ; 
died 19 

He came to Indiana during his minority where he met Miss 
Carter, who became his future wife. 

Laura Belle Carter and Samuel Monroe Harris were married 
Nov. 21, 1892, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana. To this union 
five children were born: 

Paul Leander, April 18, 1894, Matthews, Grant Co., Ind.; 
died 19 

Alma Cecil, Sept. 22, 1896, Matthews, Grant county, Ind.; 
died 19 

Eva May, April 12, 1898, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 

Joseph Truman, Sept. 22, 1899, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 

Nancy Belle, December 28, 1902, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 

I regret that I have not the information as to where they 
have lived and their occupation since their marriage, but as I do 
not have it I will let it pass as well as some others. At present 
his occupation is that of a teamster. In church belief they are 
Methodists. 

Stella Lutitia [Carter) Lynch. 

Stella Lutitia, fourth daughter of Joseph Newton and Nancy 
Jane (Patterson) Carter, (son of Ira J. Carter, son of Isaac G. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 125 



Carter), was born Nov. 14, 1878, Matthews, Grant county, ind. 
died 19 

She grew to womanhood in the county where slie was born. 
She was taujzht to work and saw the need of it to make a living. 
She also attended school and received a good common school ed- 
ucation. 

Charles Daniel L\nJi, son of Edward Washington and Mary 
Lucas Lynch v\'a> bom August 17, 1871- Miama county, Ind.; 
died 19 

His parents were natives of the Unitfd States. 

His home was in Indiana during his minority where he grew 
up in good society and with opportunities to make a good and 
useful citizen. 

Stella Lutitia Carter and Charles Daniel Lynch were mar- 
ried Dec. 24, 1896, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana. Two 
children were born to this union: 

Roy Edward, June 8, 1899, Grant county. Ind.; died June 
16, 1899, Matthews, Grant county, Ind. 

Chester Lloyd, June 1, 1901, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 

They settled on a farm and engaged in farming and stock 
raising and now have thier own country home. 

They are Methodists in belief and 1 hope they are workers 
in the Master's vineyard. 



Arthur Arlando Carter. 



Arthur Arlando, first son of Joseph Newton and Nancy Jane 
(Patterson) Carter, (son of Ira J. Carter, son of Isaac G. 
Carter,) was born April 2, 1881, Matthews, Grant county, Ind.; 
died 19 

His life has mostly been spent in the county where he was 
born going to school and helping his father what he could. The 
many"glass factories of the country give an opportunity for boys 
to get employment and he has worked at the business until he 
has the trade well learned. 



Clarence Albert Kibbey. 



■ Clarence Albert, first son of Olive Carter and John Ephraim 
Kibbey, [daughter of Ira J. Carter, son of Isaac G. Carter], was 



i 



126 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 



born November 29, 1873, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 

He grew to manhood on the farm where he was born and he 
still lives on the home place with his mother. His life being 
spent at farm work and his opportunities good he has made a 
success of the business. He attends the Methodist church. 

Erret Osmer Kibhey. 

Erret Osmer, second son of Olive Carter and John Ephraim 
Kibbey, (daughter of Ira J. Carter, son of Isaac G. Carter), 
was born August 4, 1875, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 

He grew up on the farm, attending to the work that boys 
generally do who live in the country where there is plenty of 
room to romp aiid play as well as work with good schools where 
all can get a fair education. 

Sarah Catharine Throckmorton daughter of Benj. and Mary 
Eliza (Teeters) Throckmorton.was born May 17, 1875, Pike Co. ,0; 
died 19 . 

Her parents were natives of Ohio. 

Born in Ohio her girlhood was spent there. Coming to 
Indiana before she was grown to womanhood, she had pleasant 
surroundings and the necessary comforts of life. 

Erret Osmer Kibbey and Sarah Catharine Throckmorton 
were married Dec. 25, 1901, Grant county, Indiana. One child 
was born to this union : 

Lloyd T., October 11, 1902, Matthews, Grant county, Ind.; 
died 19 

They first settled near his home on a farm, but later bought 
a place near Fairmount where they have a good home and are 
farming and raising stock. 

He is a Methodist in belief, but not a member of that church 
while she belongs to that organization. 

Ira Ephraim Kibbey. 

Ira Ephraim, fourth son of Olive Carter and John Ephraim 
Kibbey, [daughter of Ira J. Carter, son of Isaac G. Carter), 
was born October 11, 1879, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 

He was the son of a farmer and has made that his life work 



FIFTH GENERATION. 127 

and with the improved michinery makes it a more pleasant oc- 
cupation than in former years. 

Maud Carmin, daughter of Phuna and Nora (Kirkwood) 
Carmin, was born October 4, 1884, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 

Her young life was spent near where she was born. She 
had the necessaries of Hfe and they tend to make useful women 
of the girls. 

Ira Ephraim Kihbey and Maud Carmin were married Oct. 16. 
1901, Grant county, Indiana. 

They own a farm near the homestead where they are en- 
gaged in raising grain and stock. They hold to the doctrines of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Charles Preston Kihbey. 

Charles Preston, fifth son of Olive Carter and John Ephraim 
Kibbey, [daughter of Ira J. Carter, son of Isaac G. Garter,] was 
born January 21, 1882, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana; 
died , 19 

The boys all appear to like their home and he with others is 
helping with the farming and stock on the home place. He 
is a good honest, hard working boy and attends meetings at the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 

Orville Perry Hardy. 

Orville Perry, first son of Mary Elvira Carter and Noah 
Hardy, (daughter of Ira J. Carter, son of Isaac G. Carter), 
was born August 1, 1877, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 

His young life was spent on the farm where he was born. 
His father died before he was ten years old, leaving the mother 
with three boys and he being the oldest the work fell heavily on 
him and his mother, but they got along by the aid of kind friends. 

Flay Caroline Heinbaugh, daughter of David N. and Eliza Jane 
(Carpenter) Heinbaugh, was born Aug. 25, 1881, Grant Co.,Ind.; 
died 19 

Her parents were born in the United States. Her young life 
was spent in a well improved country with good schools, good 
society and the necessary comforts of life to make a girl con- 
tented and happy. 



128 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

Orville Perry Hardy and Flay Caroline Heinbau^ili wt-re 
married Dec. 20, 1899, Grant county, Indiana. One child was 
born to them: 

Eva Jane December 7, 1900, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 

Their residence has always been Grant county. They now 
own a good home in Fairmount and he is working at the tele- 
phone busines and is doing well. 

His religious instruction was Methodist, and she was raised 
in the Friends church. 



Walter Scott Hardy. 

Walter Scott, second son of Mary Elvira Carter and Noah 
Hardy, (daughter of Ira J. Carter, son of Isaac G. Carter), was 
born December 12, 1879, Matthews, Grant county, Indiana; 
died 19 

His life has been spent near the place of his birth where he 
has the privileges of good schools and other things to help him 
to form a good character. The writer knows but little about 
him, but expects the best at all times. He is now at Fair- 
mount and employed on the telephone line. 



Maggie May {Kilgore) Dunstan. 

Maggie May, second daughter of Lutitia Virginia Carter 
and Marshall D. Kilgore, (daughter of Elijah Carter, son of Isaac 
G. Carter), was born Dec. 28, 1880, Wabash county, Indiana; 
died 19 

Her mother died when she was a small girl and she and her 
sisters were taken to her grandparents, Elijah Carter and wife, 
in Jonesboro where she was well cared for and giew to 
womanhood. In the seventeenth year of her age she went to 
Butte, Montana, to keep house for her father and there she met 
her future husband. 

John Pickens Dunstan, son of Thomas Henry and Anna 
Pickens Dunstan, was born August 1, 1879, Butte, Montana; 
died 19 

His parents were English descent. He grew up in that wild 
mountainous country and I know nothing about what he followed 
for an occupation. 

Maggie May Kilgore and John Pickens Dunstan were mar- 
lied April 8, 1902, Butte, Montana. One child was born to them : 



FIFTH GENERATION. 129 

Margaret Lutitia, January 24, 1903, Butte, Montana; 
died 19 

They are living in Butte at present. 

in her young days she was a regular attendant of church 
and Sunday school and we trust the instruction there received 
is being carried with her through life by a devoted Christian 
woman. 

Pearl Carter Tallman. 

Pearl Carter, first son of Rhoda Caroline Carter and Frank 
Carroll Tallman, (daughter of Howard Carter, son of Isaac G. 
Carter), was born Aug. 22, 1882, Mt. Pleasant, Henry Co., la.; 
died 19 

His parents took him to Osborne county, Kansas, where he 
spent a few years of his young life, returning to Iowa the fall of 
1888, wh.ere he grew to manhood working on a farm and attend- 
ing school what time he could. He now makes his home at his 
father's and is working with a gang of hands on the telegraph 
line of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy railroad. 

Ralph Benjamin Tallman. 

Ralph Benjamin, second son of Rhoda Caroline Carter and 
Frank Carroll Tallman, (daughter of Howard Carter, son of Isaac 
G. Carter,) was born November 1, 1884, Osborne county, Kan.; 
died 19 

In the fourth year of his age he with his parents and family 
moved to Henry county, Iowa, where he has resided ever since, 
working on a farm most of the time and a short time in a livery 
barn in New London. He now makes his home with his parents 
at Mt. Pleasant and is working at carpentering with the inten- 
tion of learning the trade. He did not get a very good education. 

Lucy Ethel Tallman. 

Lucy Ethel, first daughter of Rhoda Caroline Carter and 
Frank Carroll Tallman, [daughter of Howard Carter, son of Isaac 
G. Carter , was born October 15, 18S7,Osborn county, Kansas; 
died 19 fS. 

She came to Iowa when about one year old, her parents set- 
tling in Henry county near Mount Pleasant. Here she grew to 
womanhood surrounned by such things as tended to make useful 
women of the girls. She had an organ in the home that she was 



130 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 

taught to play. There were good schools all of th^.- lime which 
she made use of. She is now in a training school at Mt. Pleas- 
ant preparing herself for a teacher. 

Sne was instructed by a Godly Christian mother with whom 
she went to church and Sunday school. They are both members 
of the Disciple Christian church at Mt. Pleasant and doing good 
work for the Master. 



Glenn Howard Tallman. 

Glenn Howard, third son of Caroline Carter and Frank Car- 
roll Tallman, (daughter of Howard Carter, son of Isaac G. Car- 
ter), was born Nov. 1, 1889, Mt, Pleasant, Henry county, Iowa; 
died 19 

His life has mostly been spent on a farm the past few years 
in the vicinity of Mt. Pleasant. He is quite a reader for a boy, 
an earnest student and is now attending school in town with the 
determination of getting a good education. 



CARTER FAMILY HISTORY 131 



PORTRAIT INDEX. 



Names of Pictures. 



SECOND GENERATION 



Isaac G. Carter, Facing Page 8. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Howard Carter, Facing Page 24. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

Leroy Carter, Facing Page 74. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

Howard A. Carter, Facing Page 118. 



132 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY. 



INDEX. 

FIRST GENERATION'. 

Isaac P. Carter 4 

SECOND GENER.\TION. 

Joanna (Carter) (Foster) Carter : 5 

Isaac Gay Carter g 

Olive (Carter) Heal 10 

Martha (Carter) Jobes 17 

Samuel Hillman Carter 13 

Thankful (Carter) (Jewett) Blackburn 15 

Esther Ann (Carter) Smith ---17 

David Gay Carter 19 

THIRD GENERATION. 

Ira Josselyn Carter • _,2l 

Howard Carter 24 

Joseph Carter 28 

Elijah Carter 30 

John Hooper Carter --7>2 

Lewis Carter 34 

Oliver Perry Carter 35 

Old School House ..37 

David Heal 39 

William Carter 41 

Asa Carter 43 

Joanna (Blackburn) Lewis 45 

David C. Blackburn 47 

Martha (Smith) (Lewis) Carter 49 

Mary Ann (Smith) Poorman 52 

Melinda Jane (Smith) Burt 53 

David Carter Smith 54 

Amanda Caroline (Smith) Hyatt 56 

Joseph Lewis Smith 59 

Lucetta (Smith) Jordon 51 

John Smith 52 

Esther Ellen (Smith) Getty ---62 

George Carter 54 

Sarah Adeline [Carter] Looker 55 

Calvin Carter -. 67 

Alonzo Theodore Carter 68 



GARTER FAMILY HISTORY 133 



FOURTH GENERATION. 

Nancy Mahala (Carter) Snell 70 

Sarah Jane (Carter) Seberg- 72 

Leroy Perry Carter 74 

Rhoda Caroline (Carter) Taliman tj 

Mary Alice Carter gO 

George Henry Carter gj 

Eva Isadora (Carter) Anderson g2 

Joseph Newton Carter g4 

Olive (Carter) Kibbey - g5 

Levi Lewis Carter g7 

Mary Elvira (Carter) (Hardy) Hiatt gg 

Isaac Lyman Carter -- gg 

Jerusha ( Carter ( Crouse — • .q\ 

Amy Augusta (Carter) Helm 92 

^-Lutitia Virginia (Carter) Kilgore 93 

"Ellsworth Thinandus Carter- 94 

Qharley Simpson Carter-- - - 95 

Milo Otis T. Carter-- - 95 

George Eugene Heal - 9g 

^nn Lacy Heal Watson-- 99 

Martha Ann (Carter) Montgomery 100 

Emily Jane (Carter) McOonnell 101 

Olive May (Carter) Anderson-- .102 

Thankful Elizabeth (Lewis) Eaheart 103 

Amanda Olive (Lewis) Beenblossom--- 104 

Matthew Wharton Lewis 106 

Thomas Jefferson Lewis - lOg 

Mel vin Peat Lewis IO9 

George Elmer Lewis -- — HI 

Samuel Cocklin Lewis-- II3 

James Wesley Lewis -- 114 

Allie Esta Lewis 1 1 5 

Martha Ellen [Smith] Weekly- - 117 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

Howard Alexander Carter Hg 

Mamie Eleanor (Seberg) Husband Hg 

MattieJane (Seberg) Christiansen - II9 

Hattie Grace [Seberg] Christiansen 120 



134 CARTER FAMILY HISTORY 

Lewis Alfred Seberg 121 

Henry Earl Seberg 121 

Irene Velletta (Carter) Wright 122 

Maleva Lillian (Carter) Wilcoxon 123 

Laura Belle (Carter) Harris --124 

Stella Lutitia (Carter) Lynch 124 

Arthur Arlando Carter 125 

Clarence Albert Kibbey 125. 

Erret Osmer Kibbey 126 

Ira Ephraim Kibbey 126 

Charles Preston Kibbey 127 

Orville Peiry Hardy , 127 

Walter Scott Hardy ---128 

Maggie May (Kilgore) Dunstan -- .128 

Pearl [Carter Tallman — 129 

Ralph Benjamin Tallman - 129 

Lucy Ethel Tallman - - 129 

Glenn Howard Tallman _ 130 



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