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Full text of "A history of the Juniata Valley and its people;"

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NYPL RESEARCH LIBRARIES 



3 3433 08044016 1 



3 



A HISTORY 



OF THE 



JUNIATA VALLEY 



AND ITS PEOPLE 



UNDER THE EDITORIAL SUPERVISION OF 



JOHN W. JORDAN, LL.D. 

Librarian of Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 



VOLUME II 



ILLUSTRATE P. 
■. • -•..•••• 



NEW YORK 
LEWIS HISTORICAL PUBLISHING COMPANY 
1913 , 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLiG LIBRARY 

ASTOR, LENOX AND 

1 U fv M'lUNOAl IONS- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 497 

the peace for about the same time. In 1876 he was elected to the Penn- 
sylvania legislature, and in 1878 re-elected, serving in all four years. He 
was a prominent member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
of the Grand Army of the Republic, holding the principal offices in both 
organizations. He was a Democrat in politics and both he and his wife 
were members of the Presbyterian church. 

Doctor Hunter married Sarah A. McClain, born in Huntingdon . 

county, Pennsylvania, January 16, 1848, died in Fulton county, May 24, 
1890, daughter of James McClain, a farmer of Trough Creek valley, 
Huntingdon county, a large land owner, and son of Jesse McClain, an 
early settler of Trough Creek valley. James McClain later moved to 
Wells Valley in Fulton county, where he died about 1895, leaving three 
children: Walter, a farmer of Nebraska; Sarah A., married Dr. Robert 
I. Hunter; and Mary (deceased) married John Stunkard. Children of 
Dr. Robert Irvin and Sarah A. (McClain) Hunter: i. John Russell, 
born in W'dh Valley, Fulton county, Pennsylvania, February 6, 1868, 
graduate of Medico-Chirurgical College, Philadelphia, M. D., 1893, now 
practicing in Lewistown. He married, September 25, 1895, Mary C. 
Wishart; two children: John R. and Donald. 2. Mary J., married H. H. 
Bridenstine and resides in Everett, Pennsylvania. 3. Alice Meta, mar- 
ried Dr. G. A. R. McClain and resides at Mount L^nion, Pennsylvania. 
4. Robert Mc, D. D. S., now practicing at Huntingdon, Pennsylvania; 
unmarried. 5. William Scott, of whom further. 

(Ill) Dr. William Scott Hunter, youngest son of Dr. Robert Irvin 
and Sarah A. (McClain) Hunter, was born in Fulton county, Pennsyl- ^^,^ : 
vania. August 3, 1881. He prepared in the public schools, and later at- ' I 

tended Juniata College. He chose the profession of dentistry, and after 
a course at Philadelphia Dental Colle^^e, Philadelphia, was graduated D. 
D. S., class of 1903. He pi:a,<:t;ifie"a i>le );e3r':att-:54xton, Bedford county, 
Pennsylvania, then moved to Rp,e(Jsy]lle,'\\;here he is now located in suc- 
cessful practice. He is a memJJer Jfjf-ihe-^^jLasonic order, belonging to 
Lewistown Lodge, No. ?t>T„ :Fi:e;e-.^ijd/.Acc6j|?ted Masons; Lewistown 
Chapter. No. 186, JRoyal Arcfe■.ija6»hs■:■Tie^v^stown Commandery, No. -• 

26, Knights Tf^jnplar and is also an Odd Fellow. He is a Republican in 
politics^^,^sfTi3 both he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian 
chuj:idTT 

Dr. Hunter married. May 10. 191 1, Esther I'riscilla Taylor, 



498 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

born in Reedsville, Pennsylvania. Dr. Hunter resides on Logan street, 
, Reedsville, where he jjurchased a home in 1912. 

/ Mrs. Hunter is a daughter of William H. and Rhoda G. (Henry) 

Taylor, granddaughter of Henry (2) and Priscilla A. (Kyle) Taylor, 
great-granddaughter of Henry (i) and Priscilla (Turbett) Taylor, and 
a descendant of Robert Taylor, who came to the Kishacoquillas valley 
from Pine Ford, Swatara creek, Dauphin county, when that region 
formed part of Lancaster county. He took out a warrant for several 
thousand acres of land, much of which is owned by members of the 
family. Robert Taylor had five sons : William, Robert, John and 
Matthew, the latter being the great-great-grandfather of Esther Pris- 
cilla (Taylor) Hunter. Henry (2) Taylor was a life-long farmer of 
Brown township, where he was born November 24, 1835. He was 
married ( first) October 8, 1850, to Priscilla Ann Kyle, who died January 
31, 1869. 

William H., son of Henry (2) Taylor, was born on the Taylor 
homestead, September 29, 1851. He was educated in the public school 
\ and Kishacoquilla Seminary, finishing at Airy View Academy, Port 

Royal, Pennsylvania. He taught school for a time, then began mercan- 
tile business in Reedsville, but the confinement of indoors told on his 
health, and he turned to a farmer's life. In 1879 he began his resi- 
dence at Reedsville, where he has since resided. He has been prom- 
inent in public and business life for many years, and is one of the sub- 
stantial and most highly regarded men of his county. He was one of 
the organizers of the Reedsville National Bank; was a member of the 
first board of directors and is the present vice-president. He is also a 
director of the Farmers' National Bank, at Belleville, and of the Milroy 
Banking Company. In _i8go_he was elected commissioner of Miftlin 
county, and in 1893 was'rc-felWt-edTiiy.a lairg?r majority than at first. He 
is a Republican in politic^.aad'.U'ith .he and his wife members of the 
Reedsville Presbyterian ChVtr/:;l3.\.':^e":married, December 16, 1875, 
Rhoda G., daughter of Ji',dgfe:j6htr Slid: Rhoda (Taylor) Henry. Judge 
Henry died on his eightieth birlKdaj'-stTrriving all btJt five of his thirteen 
children. Mrs. Rhoda G. (Henry) Taylor died March ^. 19". Chil- 
dren: Ralph H., born February 15, 1879: Kyle McFarlane^"Eebruary 
26, 1885; Esther Priscilla, January 13, 1888, wife of Dr. WilliamScott 
Hunter. 




,/yyi/ /yypA.^i^-LA-^ — ■ 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 499 

The American ancestor of the Warners of Belleville and 
WARNER Reedsville, Pennsylvania, was Joseph Warner, born in 

England, November 29, 1745, a resident of Gloucester- 
shire, where he was a large landowner. He came to Pennsylvania in 
1768, settling after his marriage in Cumra township, Berks county. On 
March i, 1774, he was married by the Rev. David Fober to Barbara 
Grove, born in Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, November i, 1743. 
Children : Mary, John, Elizabeth, Joseph, Jacob. 

(II) Joseph (2), son of Joseph (i) and Barbara (Grove) Warner, 
was born in Cumra township, Berks county, Pennsylvania, May 27, 
1784. He was a farmer by occupation, and a Democrat in politics. He 
was married in Reading, Pennsylvania, by the Rev. \\'illiam Booas, 
June 22, 1806, to Susanna Will. Children: Hannah, born ALirch 8, 
1807; Susanna, February 20, 1808; Elizabeth, April 24, iSoj; Harriet, 
June 25, 1810; Elisha, mentioned below; Mary, May 10, 1813; Cath- 
arine, June 19, 1815; Barbara, April 2, 1817; Levi, December 24, 1818; 
Joseph, May 29, 1823. 

(III) Elisha, son of Joseph (2) and Susanna (Will) Warner, was 
born in Cumra township, Berks county, Pennsylvania, October 6, 181 1, 
died February 10, 1892. He was a carpenter by trade, which occupa- 
tion he followed in connection with farming, and was a Democrat in 
politics. He married, in Reading, Pennsylvania, by Rev. ]\Iiller, Cath- 
arine Matz, born in Cumra township, Berks county, PennsyKania, 
May 10, 1815. Children: Owen M., born February 7, 1842; Elizahelh 
Heiney, August 11, 1843; James Matz, mentioned below; Mary Annie, 
June 6, 1849; Obadiah M., May 22, 1853; John Franklin, December 
II, 1855. 

(IV) James Matz, son of Elisha and Catharine (]\Iatz) Warner, 
was born in Cumra township, Berks county, Pennsylvania, August 7, 
1845. He received a good common school education, having attended 
the Spohn school in Spring township, Berks county, Pennsylvania, at 
which school he taught two short terms. His boyhood was spent on the 
farm and in the grist mill. In 1871 he removed to McClure, Snyder 
county, Pennsylvania, and worked on a lumber operation until 1876, 
and during that year and the following he operated in Maryland, and in 
1878-79 at Blairs Mills, Pennsylvania. Returning to McCIure he again 
operated until 1883, when he moved to the Kishacoquillas Valley, Mifflin 



6;?"?n 1 



500 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

county, Pennsylvania, and engaged in farming, conducting his operations 
upon one of the farms then owned by A. W. Campbell. From that place 
he moved to near Menno, on the farm of D. M. Contner, from which 
place he moved to the Haughawout farm, where he lived one year, 
going from there to the farm of Henry P. Taylor, where he lived for 
nineteen years, moving from there to his late home, near Belleville. 
During the latter years of his life he devoted a part of his time to lum- 
bering, associating himself with Joseph Kelley, of Reedsville, Penn- 
sylvania, and later with D. S. Peachey, of Menno, Pennsylvania. Dur- 
ing the last summer of his life he purchased the house of Solomon 
A. Zook. to which place he had expected to move in the near future, 
retiring from the farming business, but expecting to continue in the 
lumber business. As a business man he was very careful, his ability 
being unquestioned, and he was a man of strong convictions, quiet and 
unassuming in his manner, honest in his dealings with men and kindly 
disposed toward all. He assisted in the organization of the Farmers' 
National Bank, of Belleville, of which institution he was a stockholder, 
and also in the organization of the Co-operative Creamery, of which he 
was a stockholder. He was always a staunch Democrat and creditably 
represented his part}' in county and township offices, serving for three 
years as county auditor, nine years as a school director, four years as 
a road supervisor, also in several minor township offices. He was con- 
firmed in St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church, of Sinking Springs, 
Pennsylvania, December lo, 1864; family confirmed in St. John's Luth- 
eran Church, of Belleville. He was a member of the Junior Order of 
United American Mechanics; Knights of Pythias; Kishacoquillas Castle, 
No. 160, Knights of the Golden Eagle, of which he was a charter 
member and a past officer; Belleville Lodge, No. 302, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, of which he was past noble grand, and several 
years secretary; McVeytown Lodge, No. 376, Free and Accepted 
Masons, of which he was a past master; Harrisburg Consistory, 
Sovereign Princes of the Royal Secret, thirty-second degree, Ancient 
Accepted Scottish Rite, N. M. J. U. S. A. 

Mr. Warner married, at Bannerville, Snyder county, Pennsylvania, 
in 1873, the ceremony being performed by Rev. W. R. Weind, Anna 
Mary Mattern, born in West Beaver township, Snyder county, Pennsyl- 
vania, August 30, 1856, daughter of John Jacob and Margaret Jane 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 501 

(Stull) Mattern, the former of whom was a teacher and cobbler, served 
for several years as county commissioner of Snyder county and as 
director of the poor, and in a number of other township offices. The 
following is a copy of his discharge from the L'nited States army: 

"To all whom it may concern : Know ye, That John Jacob Mattern 
a Private of Captain Lewis C. Edmonds, Company (I) 184th Regiment 
of Pennsylvania Volunteers, who was enrolled on the 27lh day of 
August one thousand eight hundred and 64 to serve one year or during 
the war, is hereby discharged from the service of the United States, this 
2nd day of June 1865 at Munsons Hill, Va., by reason of G. O. Hdqurs. 
A. of P. C. S. 1865 (No objection to his being re-enlisted is known to 
exist) Said John J. Mattern was born in Lehigh Co., in the State of 
Pennsylvania is 41 years of age, 5 feet nine inches high Dark complexion 
Blue eyes Dark hair, and by occupation, when enrolled a shoe maker. 
Given at Baileys Cross Roads, Va., this 2nd day of June 1865. Juhn 
H. Stover Colonel commanding the Regt. ps. This sentence will 
be erased should there be anything in the conduct or physical condi- 
tion of the soldier rendering him unfit for the Army (A. G. O. No. 99) 
H. V. Russel Capt. loth N. T. and A. C. M. 2 Div. 2 A. C. Harris- 
burg, June 8 1865. Paid in full, R. A. Haggerty Pay Mas. U. S. A. 
Oath of Identity John Jacob Mattern of the township of West Beaver 
County of Snyder in the State of Penna on the 27 day of January 
in the year one thousand eight hundred and eighty personally appeared 
before me the undersigned a Justice of the Peace for the County and 
State above mentioned John Jacob Mattern, who being duly sworn 
according to law, declares that he is the identical John Jacob Mattern 
who was a private in the company commanded by Captain L. C. Ed- 
mond in the regiment 184 commanded b)- John H. Stover that he en- 
listed on the 27 day of August 1864 for the term of one year and was 
discharged at Munsons Hill, Va.. on the 2d day of June 1865, G. O. 
H. D. qrs. A. of P. C. S. 1865 J. J. Mattern sworn and subscribed to 
before me the day and year above written. N. B. Middleswarth. J. P. 
I certify that before whom the al)ove affidavit purports to have been 
made is a Justice of the Peace duly authorized to administer oaths, 
and that the above is his signature. In witness whereof, I have hereunto 
set mv hand and affixed my official seal this 27 day of Jan. A. D. 1880. 
at Middleburg, State of Penn'a, County nf Snyder, J. G. Crousc, Clerk 
of the Common Pleas and Proth'y. Filed Jan. 27, 1880 at 10:30 a. m. 
Recorded Jan. 27, 1880." 

Children of Mr. and Mrs. Mattern: Miranda, Howard Wilson, Sarah 
Luemma, Cloyd Henry, Anna Mary, Isaac Westley, Alice May, Lizzie 



502 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Elvesta. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Warner: i. Sherman Preston, of 
whom further. 2. Sadie Maude, born December 7, 1876; married 
WilHam Milton Reigle, a locomotive engineer, a son of David and Sarah 
Reigle; children: Marie May, Charles Milton, Helen Maude, Esther 
Juniata, Anna Elizabeth, Stella Catharine, Frederic Rupp. 3. Frank 
Wilson of whom further. 4. Roy Embrose, born January 6, 188 1 ; a 
machinist by occupation ; married Rhoda Estella, daughter of Franklin 
and Adda Strunk ; children : Mary Lourane, James Franklin, John Scott, 
Sherman Preston. 5. Bruce Mattern, born May 10, 1884; ^ locomotive 
fireman by occupation ; married Jessie Devall, daughter of Sankey and 
Amanda IMcColm ; children : Margaret Ethel, Kathleen Lucile. 6. Arthur 
Stull, born January 9, 1886; a graduate of the Belleville high school, 
class of 1905; engaged in the banking business; unmarried. 7. Minnie 
May, born August 15, 1888; a graduate of the Belleville high school, 
class of 1906; married Paul L. Civitts, a farmer, and son of Wilson and 
Mary Civitts; children: Camilla May, Wilson Warner. 

Mr. Warner died January 23, 1913, at Mifflinburg, Pennsylvania, to 
which place he had gone on a matter of business. His remains were 
taken to his late residence, near Belleville, where the funeral services 
were conducted by Rev. A. H. Spangler, D. D., of Yeagertown, an inti- 
mate friend of the deceased, assisted by Rev. C. S. Bottiger, of Belle- 
ville. Interment was made in Lutheran cemetery above Belleville, where 
the services concluded with the Masonic and Odd Fellowship cere- 
monies. 

(V) Sherman Preston, son of James Matz and Anna Mary (Mat- 
tern) Warner, was born at McClure, Snyder county, Pennsylvania, De- 
cember 10, 1873. He was educated in the public schools of the Kisha- 
coquillas Valley, and at the age of sixteen years entered the employ of 
the Pennsylvania railroad. After two years on the Sunbury division 
he was promoted to a clerkship at the Lewistown station. Thence to 
various points on the road and in responsible positions until 1900, when 
he was appointed agent at Reedsville, also junction agent for the Penn- 
sylvania and the Kishacoquillas Valley railroads. He is secretary of the 
Mifflin County Jewelry Company; was eight years school director of 
Brown township: is a Democrat in politics, and both he and his wife are 
members of the Lutheran church. He is a member of Lewistown 
Lodge, No. 203, F. and A. M. He married, October 18, 1899, Mar- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 503 

garet Bricker, born in Lewistown, daughter of M. M. Bricker, the 
present sheriff of Mififlin county. 

(V) Frank Wilson, second son of James Matz and Anna Mary 
(Mattern) Warner, was born in Bellwood, Pennsylvania, October 8, 
1878. He was educated in the public schools, Reedsville Academy and 
Millersville State Normal, a graduate of the latter, class of 1899. He 
taught for two years, the second year as principal of Belleville high 
school. From the spring of 1901, until December, 1902, he was engaged 
in the freight department of the Pennsylvania railroad at Pittsburgh. 
On January i, 1903, he entered the employ of the Reedsville National 
Bank as clerk, and in the spring of that year was appointed assistant 
cashier of the Belleville Deposit Bank. He continued in this position 
until the autumn of 191 1, when he was elected cashier of the newly 
organized Farmer's National Bank, of which he was one of the incor- 
porators, beginning the duties of cashier in January, 19 12. He is treas- 
urer of the Belleville Co-operative Creamery Company (which he also 
assisted to organize) ; is treasurer, supervisor and clerk of Union town- 
ship. He is a Democrat in politics; a member of Lewistown Lodge, No. 
203, F. and A. M., and both he and his wife are members of the 
Lutheran church. Mr. Warner married, September 6, 1904, Nellie 
E. Dolbeer, born in Ohio, daughter of Rev. W. H. and Eliza 
Euxine (Walters) Dolbeer, born in Ohio, but now living at Beaver 
Springs, Snyder county, Pennsylvania. Children: Frank Wilson (2), 
born February 20. 1907; Dudley Dolbeer, December 31, 1910; Curtis 
Wayne, August 14, 1912. 



The earliest record of this family is in Snyder county, 
HELFRICK Pennsylvania, where Joseph Helfrick was a well-to-do 
aericulturalist, the owner of two farms. He was a 
member of the Reformed church, married and left issue. 

(II) Willoughby. son of Joseph Helfrick, was born in Snyder 
county. Pennsylvania. He has followed farming all his life in Union, 
Snyder and Mifflin counties, moving to the latter county in 1877, and 
settling at Paintersville. where he purchased a farm of sixty acres on 
which he now resides. He is a Republican in politics, and both he and 
his wife are members of the Lutheran church. He married Susan S. 
Miller, born in Union county, died in 1908, daughter of Joseph Miller, 



504 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

a land-owning farmer of Union county; children: Samuel, a United 
States mail carrier, at Laurelton, Pennsylvania; Susan S., married Will- 
oughby Helfrick ; Eliza, married John Stover, whom she survives, a resi- 
dent of Paintersville, Pennsylvania; another deceased. Children of 
Willoughby Helfrick: i. Annie E., married Samuel Hunt, of Lewis- 
town; children: Elsie, Susanna, Esther and Joella. 2. Albert C. 

(Ill) Albert C, only son of Willoughby and Susan S. (Miller) Hel- 
frick, was born in Paintersville, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, August 11, 
1877. He was educated in the public schools and Lock Haven State 
Normal School. He taught two terms, then entered Eastman's Busi- 
ness College at Poughkeepsie, New York, whence he was graduated, 
class of 1898. He then entered the employ of H. C. Jackson, a general 
merchant of Lewistown, but soon afterward became clerk in the banking 
house of William Russell & Son. In 1900 he was appointed cashier of 
the newly organized Belleville National Bank, and became a resident of 
Belleville. The Belleville National Bank is one of the well-managed, 
prosperous national banks of the county, and is the only national bank 
in Mifflin county that is listed by the United States government on its 
"Roll of Honor," and stands twenty-seventh on the "Roll of Honor" 
list in the United States, and third in the list of Pennsylvania national 
banks, and having a capital of less than $50,000. In this connection it is 
interesting to know that the foremost bank on that "Roll" is also in 
Pennsylvania, the First National Bank of Uniontown. Mr. Helfrick 
is a Republican in politics, and both he and his wife are members of the 
Presbyterian church. He is also a member of the Masonic order, be- 
longing to McVeytown Lodge, No. 376, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons; also to Belleville Lodge, No. 302, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows; the Rebekahs, No. 427; the Patriotic Order of Sons of Amer- 
ica, and the Patrons of Husbandry. He married (first) in 1904, Lenore 
Gibboney, who died in 1908, daughter of William M. Gibboney, of 
Belleville. Children: Eugene G. and Marlin W. He married (second) 
in 1912, Rachel, daughter of Levi and Rebecca Esh. 



The first record found of the Hana waits is of 
HANAWALT Henry, who on October 31, 1785, warranted three 
hundred acres of land in what is now Oliver town- 
ship, Mifflin county, and on November 21, 1792, patented another tract 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 505 

of one hundred acres. Henry Hanawalt, died in 1794, leaving two sons, 
George and John. 

(II) George, son of Henry Hanawalt, in company with his brother 
John, purchased in April, 1802, a tract of land in what is now Wayne 
township, of the heirs of James Ross. John Hanawalt moved to that 
purchase, but George remained at the home farm. They continued their 
partnership until April, 1821, when they divided the property, but each 
seemed satisfied with the land they were living on, so George kept the 
homestead and John the Ross purchase, in \\'ayne township. John died 
in 1829, George in 1832. He served in the revolution, and a relic of that 
conflict is still preserved by his great-grandson, Daniel A. Hanawalt. in 
the form of a firearm, the barrel of which was part of the musket car- 
ried by his sire, when a soldier in the revolutionary army. George Han- 
awalt left a widow, Catherine, and children : Margaret, married Hugh 
McKee; Ann, married Leopold; Susanna; Joseph, of whom further; 
James. 

(III) Joseph, son of George and Catherine Hanawalt, was born in 
Oliver township, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, where he also spent his 
after life. He was a prosperous farmer and both he and his wife Mary 
were members of the German Baptist church, he being a minister. He 
left male issue including a son, John S. 

(IV) John S., son of Joseph and Mary Hanawalt, was born in Oliver 
township, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, May 20, 1840, died in the same 
township May i, 1883. He attended the public .schools and spent his 
early life at the home farm. After his marriage he bought a tract of 
one hundred acres of partly cleared land, and thereon spent his after life. 
He finished the clearing, erected many improvements and brought his 
land to a point of high fertility. He was a member of the German Bap- 
tist church, and a minister of the branch known as The Brethren, as was 
his father and father-in-law. In political faith he was a Democrat, and 
served several terms as school director. He married Nancy Snowberger, 
born in New Enterprise, Pennsylvania, August 3, 1842, later moved to 
McVeytown, where she was married. She survives her husband, has 
never remarried and now resides at the Oliver township farm, to which 
she moved in early married life. She is a daughter of Daniel Snow- 
berger ,a prosperous farmer of Bedford county, Pennsylvania, and a 
member of the German church (The Brethren) ; he had several children, 



5o6 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

one of them Theodore, a soldier of the Lhiion army, was killed at the 
battle of Antietam. Children of John S. Hanawalt: i. Christie Ann, 
married Fred J. Sunderland, and lives in Wayne township. 2. Catherine, 
married George White, and lives at Burnham. 3. Mary Elizabeth, mar- 
ried Henry Rhodes, whom she survives, a resident of Alberta, Canada. 
4. Ira. drowned at the age of two years. 5. Joseph Rothrock, married 
Effie Rujiert and resides at McVeytown, a teacher in the public schools. 
6. Daniel Abraham, of whom further. 7. Charles B., married Bessie 
Bailey and resides at Falls Creek, Pennsylvania, principal of schools. 8. 
John Miller, married Essie Strawser and farms the homestead. 9. Wil- 
liam H., married Phoebe Kirk and resides in Oliver township, a farmer. 
10. Ada Margaret, married Robert Strawser, a farmer of Oliver town- 
ship. 

(V) Daniel Abraham, son of John S. and Nancy (Snowberger) 
Hanawalt, was born near McVeytown, Oliver township, Mifflin county, 
Pennsylvania, June 30, 1873. He obtained his early education at the 
Pine Grove public school, later entering Juniata College, whence he was 
graduated from the business department, then taking the normal English' 
course. After teaching school in Brown township for six years, Mr. 
Hanawalt located in Belleville in 1903, having been appointed station 
agent for the Kishacoquillas Valley railroad, a position he yet occupies. 
He is a Republican in politics, served six years as school director, and is 
now secretary of the Belleville board. In MahalYey he served as borough 
director. He is a member of The Brethren church, his wife a member of 
the Presbyterian church. 

He married, in December. 1903. Katherine Cummins, born in Brown 
township, daughter of James T. Cummins, of an old county family. 
Children: Emogene B., born May 2, 1906; James Milton, October 15, 
1908; Robert Campbell, September 4, 19 12. 



In 1796 Christian Spangler was listed among the "tax- 
SPANGLER ables" of Quemahoning township, Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania. He married and had issue, including a 
son Abraham. 

(II) Abraham, son of Christian Spangler. was a wealthy farmer of 
Somerset county, Pennsylvania, owning between three and four hundred 
acres of land, much of it in timber. He spent his life in lumbering and 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 507 

farming on his own land. He married Margaret, daughter of Captain 
Daniel Stoy, who came from Ireland to Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, 
thence to Somerset county, with the earlier settlers of the northern part 
of Somerset county. He became the owner of a large amount of land, 
his first settlement being the present site of Stoystown, of which he is 
considered the founder. While he devoted some time to the primitive 
agriculture of pioneer days, he was at first more of a hunter tiian 
farmer. Tradition has it that during Indian troubles he was compelled 
more than once to leave his mountain home and take refuge at Fort Bed- 
ford; also that he killed an Indian from the door of his cabin, which was 
afterward burned b\' the savages. It is quite certain that he was a man 
of good standing and in 1783 was assessor for Ouemahoning township. 
At a much later period he served several terms in the Pennsylvania leg- 
islature. He served in the revolutionary war and held the rank of cap- 
tain, his company being known as "Stoy's Riflemen." His wife, a Miss 
Higgins, was born in county Down, Ireland, as was their daughter Mar- 
garet, but she was married to Abraham Spangler in Somerset. They 
were the parents of fourteen children, all of whom grew to mature 
years, the last survivor, Franklin, dying in Somerset county, at Shanks- 
ville, in 191 2, aged ninety-three years. 

(Ill) Daniel, son of Abraham and Margaret (Stoy) Spangler, was 
born in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, about 18 18, He grew up a 
farmer, but later became a contractor, a business he followed all his life. 
He also owned and operated a farm in Somerset county, and there died 
February 14, 1898. Both he and his wife were reared in the Lutheran 
church, but after marriage, there being no church of that denomination 
near their home, they became members of the United Brethren church. 
In political faith. Mr. Spangler was a Democrat and filled many town- 
ship offices. He married Sophia Myers, born in Somerset county. Oc- 
tober 6, 1 82 1, who survives him, now residing in Shanksville. Somerset 
countv. aged ninety-two years. She is a daughter of Conrad and Mar- 
garet (Lowrie-Harris) Myers, the latter a daughter of Captain Francis 
Lowrie, an officer of the revolutionary war. Captain Lowrie was born 
in Ireland of Scotch-Irish parents, as was Margaret Lowrie, his daugh- 
ter. They came to America together, settling in Somerset county, where 
she married (first) a Mr. Harris and (second) Conrad Myers. She had 
issue by both, but none are living, except Mrs. Sophia (Myers) Spang- 



:> 



o8 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 



ler, of previous mention. Children of Daniel and Sophia (Myers) 
Spangler : i. Died unnamed. 2. Catherine, unmarried, and lives in 
Shanksville, Pennsylvania. 3. John, died in 1906, a veteran of the civil 
war. He never applied for a pension, although serving under two en- 
listments: First, in Company D, 133d Regiment; second, in Company 
H, 187th Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. 4. Wilson B., 
enlisted at the age of fourteen years in the Ninety-first Regiment Penn- 
sylvania Volunteer Infantry, served throughout the war, then enlisted in 
the regular United States army, served with General Crook in his In- 
dian campaign, and there contracted a disease which proved fatal in 
1873. 5. Rev. Alexander Hamilton, of whom further. 6. Conrad, died 
about 1905, a merchant of Shanksville, Pennsylvania. 7. Nelson, died in 
Johnstown, Pennsylvania. 8. Rev. Wesley H., a minister of the United 
Brethren church at Phillipsburg, Pennsylvania. 9. Margaret, resides in 
Shanksville, Pennsylvania. 

(IV) Rev. Alexander Hamilton Spangler, son of Daniel and Sophia 
(Myers) Spangler, was born in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, Feb- 
ruary 16, 1852. He was educated in the public schools and at Wooster 
University, Wooster, Ohio, whence he was graduated, class of 1873. 
He then began the study of law at New Bloomfield, Perry county, Penn- 
sylvania, and was admitted to the bar. In 1885 he began the study o^ 
Divinity, entered Union Theological Seminary, and was there graduated, 
class of 1888, and was ordained a minister of the Lutheran church. 
He began ministerial work as pastor of the church at New Bloomfield, 
Perry county, Pennsylvania, remaining there four years. He was pastor 
at Middleburg, Snyder county, two years, thence to Port Royal, Juniata 
county, eleven years and in 1893 was called to the Lutheran church at 
Yeagertown, where he has been located ever since that date. He is an 
educated Christian gentleman, and preaches by his daily life and ex- 
ample as eloquently of the beauties of the Christian life as from his 
pulpit, at regular services. He is beloved by his people and has exerted 
an influence for great good in his community. He is also interested in 
the development and material welfare of Yeagertown as well as in the 
spiritual uplift. He is vice-president of the Saxton Coal Company; a 
director of Saxton Vitrified Brick Company and has accumulated prop- 
erty consisting of town lots and houses. He is a life member of Mifflin- 
town Lodge, No. 324, Free and Accepted Masons and a life member of 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 509 

the Patriotic Order, Sons of America, Philadelphia Lodge, No. 734. 
In political faith he is a Democrat, is active in public affairs and often 
presides over party conventions and meetings. In 1906 Rev. Spangler 
toured continental Europe and the Holy Land, visiting the principal 
points of historical interest and many of the more inaccessible localities, 
using the form of locomotion most available in the desert places, the 
donkey. 

He married (first) April 20, 1874, Cynthia Penrod, born in Somer- 
set county, died January 23, 1905, daughter of John and Lydia (Bell) 
Penrod. Children: i. Marion, died in infancy. 2. Herschel K., edu- 
cated at Port Royal Academy, now a journalist of Pittsburgh ; he mar- 
ried Margaret Johnston. 3. Wilson P., graduate of Philadelphia College 
of Pharmacy, died aged twenty-one years. 4. Thaddeus S., educated at 
Susquehanna University, now pattern clerk of the Standard Steel Works 
Company; married Gertrude Craig. 5. Luther Stoy, graduate of the 
Theological School of Susquehanna University, class of June, 1913, 
now pastor of the Lutheran church at Pine Grove Mills, Center county, 
Pennsylvania. Rev. Spangler married (second) January 28, 1906, Ger- 
trude M. Shannon, who was born in Middleburg, Pennsylvania, and 
who died without issue, April 2, 19 12, daughter of Joseph and Mary 
Shannon. 



Joseph Henderson McClintic, of Belleville, Pennsyl- 
McCLINTIC vania, is of Scotch-Irish descent, a strong combina- 
tion found in many of the foremost public men of the 
United States. The McClintic family is widely scattered over this 
country, and there are many of the name to be found in every state of 
the Union. 

(I) James McClintic, the first of the family in America, landed on 
the inhospitable shores of the New World previous to the revolutionary 
war. He was a farmer and followed that pursuit, going to Pennsylvania. 
He took up land, cleared and cultivated it. After the "Boston Tea 
Party" he gave encouragement to the cause of the colonists, and in 1776, 
when the various colonies called for volunteers, he threw his fortunes 
in with the continental army raised in Pennsylvania and went to join 
General George Washington. He served throughout the eight years, 
suffering untold hardships. He was in all of the battles of that region of 



5IO HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Pennsylvania. At the close of the war he returned to Pennsylvania and 
settled in Decatur township, Mifflin county, and there died. , 

(II) James (2), son of the revolutionary hero, James (i) Mc- 
Clintic, was born in Pennsylvania, there lived and died on a farm. 
He was probably born in Mifflin county, though of that there is no posi- 
tive record. He married Margaret Lee, a daughter of another revolu- 
tionary patriot. They went to Decatur township where he took up wild 
land, cleared and cultivated it, building thereon a house of logs. Here 
both he and his wife died. They were the parents of twelve sons, who 
scattered to the four corners of the United States, and from whom 
sprang many of the name. They were: Andrew, John, James, of whom 
further; and nine other boys. Margaret Lee was born in England, and 
came to America with her parents when she was a mere baby. Her 
parents located in eastern Pennsylvania, and later went to Mifflin county, 
where she married James McClintic. Her father joined the army of 
the revolution, remaining with it during the entire war. 

(III) James (3), son of James (2) and Margaret (Lee) McClintic, 
was born in Decatur township in 1816, and died near Belleville in 1S61. 
He married Catherine Isenberg, born April 21, 182 1, near AUensville, 
Pennsylvania, died January 4, 1896, daughter of David and Catherine 
(Steele) Isenberg, and old-time residents of AUensville. David Isenberg 
was a farmer; after his second marriage he went west and settled in In- 
diana and there died. He was the father of five children by his first wife 
and two by the last. Catherine (Isenberg) McClintic was a child of the 
first marriage. James McClintic and his wife Catherine were membeq; 
of the Lutheran church. He was a Republican and served as school 
director, besides holding other minor county offices. Children: i. A 
daughter, died unnamed. 2. Joseph Henderson, of whom further. 3. 
David Rolandus, is on the police force of Tyrone, Pennsylvania. 4. 
James Evander, died aged nine years. 5. George Vance, lives in Okla- 
homa City, in mercantile business. 6. John Davis, in Union township ; 
is proprietor of Valley View Poultry Farm. 7. Margaret Ann, widow 
of Dr. Henry C. Walker, lives in Lewistown. 8. Martin Luther, un- 
married ; is shipping clerk for Susquehanna Coal Company. 9. Sarah 
Elizabeth, wife of George F. Stackpole, editor of the Lezvistozvn Gazette. 

(IV) Joseph Henderson, son of James (3) and Catherine (Isen- 
berg) McClintic, was born June 23, 1846, in Union township, Mifflin 



HISTORY OF THE JUNL\TA VALLEY 



;ii 



county, Pennsylvania. He was reared un his father's farm and re- 
ceived his preparatory education in the common schools of the town- 
ship. At the outbreak of the civil war he enlisted, December _', 1S62, 
in Company B, Nineteenth United States Regulars, and served for nine 
months. He was promoted to first lieutenant and transferred south of 
Washington city to drill negro troops. He remained there four months. 
Next he did staff duty around Washington. During this service he was 
at Gettysburg, the last two days of that historic battle. He resigned 
from the army April 8, 1864, and reenlisted in the summer in Company 
A, Seventeenth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and served through 
the rest of the 1864 campaign in the Shenandoah \'alley, Virginia, and 
other portions of the state. He saw much active service ; was at Harper's 
Ferry, Berryville, \\'inchester. Fisher's Hill and Cedar Creek. He 
was slightly wounded in the leg at Monocacy, in the side at Winchester, 
in the neck at Berryville, and at Cedar Creek, October 19, 1864, his left 
leg was taken off by grape shot. He lay three days and nights on the 
field in this condition. He was at last moved to a hospital in Balti- 
more and, having a sound constitution, soon recovered. He was placed 
in charge, as lieutenant, of the invalid corps to guard the hospital until 
the cessation of hostilities. After the close of the war he returned home 
to Pennsylvania for a time. He attended school in Baltimore and at 
Reading, Pennsylvania. He taught one term in Berks county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and then began farming on a small scale in Union townsiiip. wliere 
he lived until 1906. He erected a comfortalole home in Belleville, where 
he has since resided. He does general farming with great success. He 
is a Republican in politics, and that party has conferred many deserved 
honors upon him. He was elected to the Pennsylvania legislature in 
1891, and reelected in 1893. serving the people faithfully four years in 
the capacity of representative to the state general assembly. During tiie 
time of his incumbency of the office he introduced the bill that gave 
medals to the First Defenders, or Logan's Guards. He served as chair- 
man of pensions and gratuities committee, was a member of appropria- 
tions committee, counties and townships committee and compare bills 
committee. He is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic and 
has been commander of his post for the past fifteen years, there being 
only ten members left of the local post. Both he and his wife are de- 
vout members of the Lutheran church. 



512 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

He married, January i, 1868, Libbie Markley, from near Lewistown, 
daughter of Henry and Harriet (Bair) Markley. Mrs. Markley was 
born in Baltimore and he in southeastern Pennsylvania. Each came with 
parents to MifHin county, and here met and married ; both were Luther- 
ans. He died at the age of seventy-four and she died May 29, 1895. 
Children of Mr. and Mrs. McClintic : i. Mary Minerva, born March 13, 
1869; married Ezra T. Ealy and they live on the farm of Mr. McClintic; 
they have one daughter, Allegra Josephine. 2. Margaret May, born No- 
vember 6, 1873 ; married Professor James F. Wills, superintendent of 
schools of Mifflin county ; they have four children : Margaret Rachel, 
Mary Jane Elizabeth, Nellie Allegra and James Henderson. 3. Marian 
Markley, born May 26, 1894; a student in Belleville high school. 



Although of English antecedents, George Adam Gard- 
GARDNER ner, the founder of this branch of the Gardner family in 
the United States, came from Holland. He settled 
prior to the revolution in what is now Montgomery county, Pennsyl- 
vania, near Philadelphia, and with his son John served in the revolu- 
tionary army, fighting at Germantown. He married and left sons, John 
and George Adam, also two daughters. He moved later in life to 
Lancaster county, where he died. 

(11) George Adam (2), son of George Adam (i) Gardner, was 
born in Montgomery county, Pennsylvania. His elder brother, John, 
fought at the battle of Germantown and later moved west, settling in 
Ohio. George Adam accompanied his father to Lancaster county, later 
lived near Harrisburg, and finally, about the year 1800, moved to the 
Kishacociuillas Valley, settling in Armagh township, where he engaged 
in farming. About the year 1836 or 2)7 he moved to Venango, Penn- 
sylvania, where he bought a farm of one hundred and sixty acres on 
which he lived until his death in September, 1855, at the age of ninety- 
two years. He was an ardent Democrat, and during the "Whiskey In- 
surrection" served with the government forces under General Lee. He 
was educated in German onl}', having no knowledge of the written Eng- 
lish language. He was a member of the Lutheran church and a man 
of good standing. He married, about 1793, a Miss Kearns. Children: 
I. John, lived in Mifflin county until after the death of his first wife, then 
settled at La Harpe, Hancock county, Illinois, where he was concerned 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 513 

in the movement that drove the Mormons from Ilhnois; he died aged 
about eighty-one years; he married (first) a Miss Wihiams, (second) 
Mrs. Jane Stone. 2. Sophia, remained with her father until his death; 
she never married. 3. Abram, of whom further. 4. Christina, married 
Alexander Orr, a farmer of Decatur township, where both died. 5. 
Mary, married Samuel Huston, lived in Venango county, Pennsylvania, 
where both died and are buried at Mickleville. 6. George, married Betsy 
O'Neil and had thirteen children; he was a farmer of Venango county. 
7. Thomas Kearns, died in Venango county; was a farmer; he married 
(first) a Miss Jolly, (second) a Miss Donaldson, who died leaving a 
daughter, after which he married a third time. 8. Catherine, married 
Samuel Bushey, a farmer of Venango county, where both died. 

(Ill) Abram, son of George Adam (2) Gardner, was born in Lykens 
Valley, near Harrisburg. Pennsylvania, in 1805, died in Columbiana 
county, Ohio, in December, 1863. He attended public school, and 
moved with his parents to Mifflin county, where he married and lived 
until 1855, engaged in laboring and farming near Reedsville. After his 
family was grown he moved to Columbiana county, Ohio, and there 
purchased a farm of one hundred and thirty-three acres on which he 
lived until his death in his fifty-ninth year and is there buried. During 
the Mexican war he offered his services as a volunteer, but was rejected. 
He was a strong Democrat, held several local offices, and was a devoted 
member of the Presbyterian church. He married Nancy, born in tiie 
Wyoming Valley, died about 1867, daughter of John and Jeaimette 
(Williams) Huston, both born in Ireland, of land owning families. 
After their marriage they came to Pennsylvania, finally settling in Mifflin 
county, where both died in Brown township. He is described as a small 
man but "stout and sturdy." Both were members of the "Seceder" 
church, as was their daughter Nancy. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Hus- 
ton: I. Letitia, married Allen McAlevy, a son of General McAlevy, of 
McAlevy's Fort; they moved to Illinois, where both died. 2. Nancy, 
married Abram Gardner. 3. Ann, married James Estill and died in 
Columbiana county, Ohio. 4. Thomas, lived and died in Stone Valley, 
Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. 5. Mary, married Benjamin Cres- 
well and both died in Stone Valley. Children of Abram and Nancy 
Gardner: i. James H., died in Venango county, Pennsylvania; was a 
carpenter; married Harriet Kerns and left issue. 2. George, lived and 



514 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

died in 191 1 in Mifflin county; was a farmer; married Nancy Aultz and 
left issue. 3. Catherine, married Edward Garside; died in Ohio. 4. 
John, married in Lewistown, Pennsylvania, but died in Ohio. 5. Wil- 
liam C, of whom further. 6. Levi, a farmer and stock raiser, died in 
Ohio; married Lucinda Camp. 7. Jane, married a Mr. Kern and died 
within a year after her marriage. 

(IV) William C, son of Abrani and Nancy (Huston) Gardner, was 
born at Barrville, Brown township, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, Sep- 
tember 22, 1835. He attended school at the old "Back Mountain"' 
school house, and a term at Tuscarora Academy under Professor J. H. 
Shoemaker, which was interrupted by the removel of the family to 
Ohio. After a few years in Ohio spent in farming, he returned to his 
native county and during the winter terms taught school. He then took 
a course at Millersville State Normal, whence he was graduated in class 
of 1862. He left there with other students and enlisted in Company E, 
One Hundred and Twenty-second Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Infantry, serving nine months under Captain (Professor) A. R. Byerly, 
seeing hard service with the Army of the Potomac, taking part in the 
bloody battles, Second Bull Run, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. 
He served out his term of enlistment and was honorably discharged, May 
17. 1863, and then returned to Mifflin county. He again taught in the 
public schools of that county, then for four years was principal of the 
high schools at Gardner and La Harpe, Illinois. He again returned 
to Mifflin county, where for several years he taught in public schools and 
was principal of Stone Valley Academy in Huntingdon county. In 
1875 he was elected superintendent of instruction for Mifflin county, 
serving one term of three years. After his term of office expired he 
returned to his profession and taught continuously until 1895, when 
he retired with an enviable record as an educator of youth. In 1900 
he was elected justice of the peace, an office he yet holds through suc- 
cessive reelections. In this office he is more the peacemaker than the 
magistrate, settling all cases possible without recourse to the law. His 
long years spent in the different school rooms of the county, and as 
county superintendent, brought him in contact with so many people of 
all ages that he is perhaps the best known man in the entire county. 
His life has been a useful one, but the results of the good seed sown, the 
encouraging words dropped, can never be known, but all over this broad 




Jr^ U. ^a/r^^^^^^^<LM 




HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 515 

land are men and women who can trace their success in hfe to the wise 
counsel and encouragement of the "Village schoolmaster." In his latter 
years many such instances have been revealed to him and surely they 
must be a rich recompense for his many years of unselfish effort to help 
others the better to fight life's battles. He is a Democrat in politics, 
and a member of the Presbyterian church, which he has served as 
trustee. 

He married (first) September 22, 1865, Alartha Jane iMcL'lure. born 
in Juniata county, daughter of Duffield AlcClure. She died December 9, 
1871, leaving a daughter Edith, born July 31, 1866. now a graduate 
nurse of Hartford, Connecticut; a member of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution and unmarried. He married (second) September 
22, 1875, Margaret Ann, daughter of Thomas Jefferson and Margaret 
(Fleming) Wilson, both born in MifHin county of the old and well 
known county family of that name. Children: 2. Xancy Margaret, 
born December 19, 1882; graduate of Belleville high school and Grove 
City College, now assistant principal of. the former school. 3. Anna 
Wilson, born August 11. 1885; graduate of Belleville higli school and 
an attendant of Grove City College; she is now a teacher in the public 
schools. 

Special mention should be made of special work done by Professor 
Gardner. In 1847 he first joined a Presbyterian Sunday school and has 
ever since taken an active interest in that department of church work. 
He graduated from pupil to teacher very earl\- and as teacher and suiier- 
intendent has been continuously in service for over half a century. He 
is yet in the work, and every Sunday teaches the International Bible 
lesson in two Sunday schools in Belleville, the Presbyterian and the 
Methodist. Recently his long length of service in Sunday school work 
was recognized by the Pennsylvania Sunday School Society by the pre- 
sentation to him of a suitable medal. Truly his has been a wonderfully 
full life and no man can measure the harvest. 



Joseph Hartzler Byler, of Belleville, Pennsylvania, a Swiss 

BYLER by direct descent and a born and bred American in the 

truest sense of the word, comes from honorable people on 

both the paternal and the distaff side. Both the Byler an-l Hartzler 

families are reckoned among the most substantial in Pennsylvania, and 



5i6 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

have contributed their quota to the wealth, prosperity and upbuilding of 
the state. 

(I) Rev. John Byler, among the first of the name born in the 
United States, was of straight Swiss descent. The family lived for 
hundreds of years in an Alpine valley in the homes that they inherited 
from their sturdy progenitors. He was born in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, 
when that country was yet young. He moved to Mifflin county, Penn- 
sylvania, and settled near Allensville, in Menno township. He died 
there and was the first adult male to be buried in the Amish Mennonite 
cemetery, near Allensville. He followed farming as an occupation and 
was a bishop of high standing in the Amish Mennonite church. He 
was one of the prominent men of his township and was known far and 
wide for the exceeding fairness of his judgment. He accumulated con- 
siderable property, among it being a farm now owned by Joseph Kanagy. 

(II) Joseph, son of Bishop John Byler, of the Amish Mennonite 
church, was born, reared and married in Allensville. He married Marv 
Lantz. a daughter of a neighbor of the same faith as himself. After 
their marriage he purchased the interest of the other heirs in his father's 
farm and lived there for some time. Later he bought a farm near 
Coldwater, L^nion township, and there he died at a good old age. He 
followed agriculture as a life pursuit, making it bring him good re- 
sults. He lived a quiet, uneventful life, devoted to his faith and the 
Amish ]\Iennonite church ; a good neighbor, a staunch friend command- 
ing the respect of all coming in contact with him. He was an active 
supporter of the Republican party, especially locally, though never hold- 
ing office. Children: Elizabeth, Leah, John L., of whom further; 
Joseph, Benjamin, Solomon, Jonathan, David, Isaac, Eli, Mary and 
Samuel. David, Eli and Samuel live in Mifflin county, and Mary, the 
wife of David Blank, lives in Lancaster. 

fill) John L., son of Joseph and Mary (Lantz) Byler, was born in 
Mifflin county, in 1827. He married Elizabeth Hartzler, born in 1826, 
in Mifflin county, and lived after marriage for five years in Union 
county (see Hartzler line). John L. moved next to Mifflin county, 
where he purchased a small farm in LTnion township. He died here, 
October 23, 1866, at the age of thirty-nine, of creeping paralysis. Both 
he and his wife were members of the Amish Mennonite church, of that 
localitv. His wife married a second time, becoming the wife of Chris- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 517 

tian Zook, and after his death moved to Goshen. Indiana, where she 
makes her home with her daughter, Eri. Children: i. Eh. hves near 
Newton, Kansas, where lie farms. 2. Eri, widow of Rufus Voder, 
makes her home at Goshen, Indiana. 3. Joseph Hartzler, of whom 
further. 4. Christian, lives in Champaign county, Ohio, a farmer and 
a minister of the Mennonite church. 5. :\Iary, married Joseph E. Hartz- 
ler, and lives in Cass county, Missouri. 6. Hannah, married Samuel 
Plank, now living in Goshen, Indiana. 7. John, in mercantile business 
in Newton, Kansas. 

(IV) Joseph Hartzler, son of John L. and Elizabeth (Hartzler) 
Byler, was bom August 7, 1853, in Kishacoquillas valley. Union town- 
ship, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania. Like his forbears, he is of that 
hardy Swiss stock that long since has taken deep and permanent root 
in American soil. The familv has flourished and grown strong in num- 
bers, in importance and in this world's goods. He was educated in the 
public schools of the township and was reared in the free life of the 
farm. W^hen quite a boy he went to live with an uncle at Allensville, 
where he attended the village school. Leaving school he selected farm- 
ing as his occupation. After some years on the farm of his father-in- 
law, David J. Zook, he bought the Byler homestead of twenty- four 
acres, and there lived twenty years, doing general farming. For the 
past twenty-eight years he has been a minister of the Amish Mennonite 
church, having success in his ministerial work. He is held in high es- 
teem by not only those of his own faith, but all those who know him. 
He is a devout man, but broad minded and kindly, and commands the 
respect and love of his associates. He is a Republican in politics, work- 
ing in a quiet way for the ticket, but he has never aspired to oFtice and 
has never held any. He married (first) January 3, 1878, Nancy Zook, 
a native of Mifflin county, daughter of David J. Zook. like himself a 
devout inember of the Amish Mennonite church. She died March 7, 
1907. Children: i. Lydia A., married Jacob A. Hartzler. and died in 
June, 1909, leaving four children: Carrie, John. Maud and Anna L. 
2. John Ira, lives in Toronto, Canada, where he has charge of a Men- 
nonite mission church ; married Amanda Froyer ; three children : Harold, 
Orpha and John. 3. Carrie E., married John Yoder; lives near Belle- 
ville, Pennsylvania; children: Paul and Elma. 4. David, died in infancy. 
5. Sadie, attends Bible school in Toronto, Canada. 6. Joseph, at home. 



5i8 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

7. Titus, died aged four years. 8. Ida Ruth. 9. Naomi. He married 
(second) February 11. 1909, Mrs. Elizabeth Spicher, a native of Mif- 
flin county, daughter of John Zook. In all of Mifflin county there is 
no one who is more highly respected than Mr. Byler, and his family 
stands for sobriety, honor and right living. 

(The Hartzler Line). 

On the distaif side Mr. Byler descends from an honest, hard work- 
ing, conscientious family of men and women. His maternal grand- 
parents were Christian Hartzler and his wife, Elizabeth Kauttman, who 
were among the early settlers of Union township, where he lived and died 
on the farm that he owned for years. Both belonged to the Amish Men- 
nonite church, and they were God-fearing, law-abiding citizens of Penn- 
sylvania. Christian Hartzler was of direct Swiss descent, the family 
coming from near the line, which is largely German. His wife was of 
pure German extraction, and came from the large family of Kauffmans 
scattered the length and breadth of Germany. Their children were : 
Hannah, Nancy, Sarah, Samuel, Lydia, Elizabeth (see Byler III), Eri, 
who married Jacob Detweiler and makes her home in the south ; Fannie 
and John. 



William Vollmer, of Burnham, Pennsylvania, exempli- 
VOLLMER fies to a marked degree what energy, perseverance and 

well directed ambition will accomplish. He is of that 
all-conquering strain that time and circumstances never daunt, German- 
American. Since the year 1837 the Vollmers have added to the wealth, 
energy and greatness of the United States, bringing from the Father- 
land indomitable will and a determination to succeed, which in the end 
bring desired results. 

(I) Henry Vollmer, father of William Vollmer, was born in 1816, 
at Gemmershein-on-the-Rliine, Germany, of good, honest, well-to-do 
parents, who had long made their home in that romantic part of the 
Fatherland. At the age of twenty-one, in 1837, the spirit of adven- 
turous youth and enterprise induced him to try his fortunes in the United 
States, and he crossed the Atlantic, landing at New York. Later he went 
to Philadelphia, where he located, securing employment with the J. and 
J. P. Steiner & Company, a large mercantile house of that city. From 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 519 

an humble employee he rose to one position after another, later being 
admitted as one of the firm, and remained with Steiner & Company 
until they closed their business for two years during the civil war. 
In the meantime he had married Louise Steiner, born in Philadelphia, in 
1824. but like himself of German parentage. They lived in comfortable 
circumstances and reared a family. After the closing of Steiner & 
Company, Mr. Volhner entered business for himself, having with him 
his two sons, at No. i Bank street. Philadelphia. The business greatly 
prospered for several years and was increasing in every way until the 
panic of 1873, when like so many other firms many established much 
longer than his, he was forced to close. He retired to private life, 
lived quietly, and died in Philadelphia in 1905. His wife died in 1895. 
He was a staunch Republican and worked for the party, but neither 
held nor aspired to oftice. Children: i. Emma, married I. L. Register; 
living in Ardmore. Pennsylvania. 2. Henry, deceased. 3. Ida, died in 
infancy. 4. Amanda, died in infancy. 5. Phillip, a representative of the 
Lawrence Cement Company, of Philadelphia. 6. William, of whom 
further. 

(II) William, sixth and youngest child of Henry and Louise 
(Steiner) Vollmer, was born in Philadelphia, April 24, 1861. He re- 
ceived his preparatory education in the public schools of the city, finally 
entering the Philadelphia Polytechnic School, where he threw himself 
heart and soul into the prescribed course. Owing to financial circum- 
stances he was compelled to forego the pleasure of graduating, and left 
school one year previous to that anticipated event. He entered at once 
the employ of the Baldwin Locomotive Works, of Philadelphia. He 
gave all of his spare time to the study of machinery, increasing his 
knowledge thereby. For eleven years he was an integral part of the 
vast works, and identified himself in every way with its interests. .\t 
the end of that time the company, recognizing merit, ability and loyalty, 
rewarded him by making him assistant superintendent, a position he held 
with credit to himself and the satisfaction of the company until October 
17, 1910, when he was offered and accepted the place of superintendent 
of the Standard Steel Works, at Burnham, Pennsylvania. He holds 
that position at the present time. 

Mr. Vollmer employes three thousand men, and the products turned 
out for a large and ever increasing market are, steel castings, tires, 



520 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

rolled wheels, springs, iron and malleable castings. The output is 
shipped to the four quarters of the United States, Japan and the British 
colonies. The plant is running to its fullest capacity, and the demand 
for its products exceeds the supply. This has largely been accomplished 
through the broad constructive talent and farsightedness of Mr. Voll- 
mer, his quick appreciation of events and his ability to adapt himself, and 
the business which he superintends, to them. He is an extremely modest 
man, unassuming, but in a quiet and supremely effective way he has 
advanced the efficiency of his numerous employees to a standard that is 
rarely equalled, and never surpassed, in similar works. He is not ag- 
gressive in the ordinary sense, only progressive, and has risen to the 
topmost rung of his chosen business, in which he has been engaged un- 
remittingly for thirty-five years. He is persevering, mastering every 
detail, however minute or dull ; is conservative, prompt, decisive and 
cool, with a determination to succeed that in the end generally makes 
for success. He maintains no elaborate suite of offices with flunkies to 
guard the doors, but is in the main room of the general office. He is 
always willing and pleased to listen to the humblest of the employees 
of the works, thus evincing his spirit of true American democracy and 
his inherited German love of justice. The keynote of his character is a 
desire to see everyone get "a square deal," and the motive of all his 
actions is to produce results. He married, in 1891, Gwenllian Hunt, 
born at Catasauqua, Pennsylvania, a daughter of Joshua Hunt, a mem- 
ber of a family of English descent, long established in America, the 
progenitor of which came over in colonial days. Mrs. Vollmer's ma- 
ternal grandfather, David Thomas, was the pioneer manufacturer of 
pig iron from anthracite coal, and is called the father of that special 
industry, carried on at Catasauqua, Pennsylvania. Children: i. Roger 
H., a bright student in the department of agricultural engineering in the 
Pennsylvania State College. 2. William S., attending the Culver (In- 
diana) Military School. 



Robert and Hannah Pennell settled in Middletown 
PENNELL township, now Delaware county, as early as 1686 and 

are the founders of the Pennells of Chester and Dela- 
ware counties, and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They came from Boul- 
derton, in Nottinghamshire, England, bringinga certificate from "Friends 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 521 

at Ffulbeck", issued the third day of the fifth month, 1O84, ii> eoiijuuc- 
tion with Thomas Garrett, Hugh Rodnell, Henry Pennell and Richard 
Parker "with their wives and children intending to transfer themselves 
beyond the seas into East Jersey in America". 

A John Pennell was in this country as early as 1689, residing in the 
vicinity of Darby and then a young man. In 1703 he married Marv 
Morgan, of Dublin Monthly Meeting, and settled in Concord township. 
But little is known of John, but Mary, his wife, became eminent as a 
minister among Friends. She was born in Radnorshire, Wales, was edu- 
cated in the Church of England, but at the age of thirteen years, she 
became convinced of the truth of the doctrines of the Quakers. When 
sixteen years of age she came to Pennsylvania and soon afterward 
united with the Friends Society, becoming a minister in I/JJ. and 
traveled extensively in the exercise of her holy calling, visiting the New 
England colonies and once going to Great Britain and Ireland. 

Robert Pennell in 1687 was appointed constable of IMiddlctnwn town- 
ship and was a farmer in fairly good circumstances. His wife llaiuiali 
died in 171 1, aged seventy-one years, he surviving her several years, 
until 1728. Children: Hannah, married John Sharpless. of Ridley; 
Joseph, married Alice, daughter of William Garrett, of Darby: Ann, 
married Benjamin Mendenhall, of Concord ; and William, married Mary, 
daughter of Thomas and I\Iary Mercer, of Thornburg. From Robert 
and Hannah Pennell sprang Isaac Pennell, born in Delaware county, died 
in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was a member of the Society of 
Friends in good standing, as was his wife Jane. Children: John, died 
in Harrisburg; Joseph, of whom further: Sarah, married William Hat- 
ton, whom she survives, a resident of Philadelphia ; Mary, married Wil- 
liam Hinkson and died in Philadelphia. 

(II) Joseph, son of Isaac and Jane Pennell, was born in Philadelphia 
in 1832, died in Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania, February 19, 1904. and 
was brought to Mifflintown for interment. He was educated in the 
Friends School in Philadelphia, and prior to his marriage came to Mif- 
flintown in the employ of the Pennsylvania railroad. He entered mer- 
cantile life in Mifflintown after his marriage and continued without in- 
termission until 1900, being at the time of his retirement one of the 
oldest merchants in the borough. He was an honorable, energetic and 
prosperous business man, and while not strict in his views, was a Quaker 



522 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

by birthright and incHnation. He belonged to the Masonic order and 
was a man well liked and most highly respected. A Republican in poli- 
tics, he never sought or accepted public office. He married in Mifflin- 
town, Rebecca Mickey, born in Perry county, Pennsylvania, in 1839, 
daughter of Frank M. and Elizabeth (Souders) Mickey, both born in 
Perry county. Frank M. Mickey was a supervisor of the Pennsylvania 
railroad and early located in Mifflintown, where he was a captain of the 
military company, a member of the Lutheran church and a Republican ; 
children : Rebecca, married Joseph Pennell, whom she survives, a resi- 
dent of Pittsburgh; Lewis, a veteran of the civil war, resides in Balti- 
more, Maryland ; Jacob, died in Shamokin, Pennsylvania ; Ann, mar- 
ried George Anderson and resides in Altoona, Pennsylvania; John, now 
living retired in Mifflin, Pennsylvania: Robert, now residing at Alexan- 
dria, Pennsylvania, in the employ of the Pennsylvania railroad ; Kate, 
died unmarried. Children of Joseph and Rebecca (Mickey) Pennell: 
Frank M. M., of whom further; William, now cashier of the Postal 
Telegraph Company at Pittsburgh ; Amy, married Thomas Evans and 
resides in Avalon, Pennsylvania; Clarence, who is now in the employ 
of the Pennsylvania railroad, and is residing at Wilkinsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

(Ill) Frank M. M., eldest son of Joseph and Rebecca (Mickey) Pen- 
nell, was born in Mifflintown, Pennsylvania, February 28, 1862. He was 
educated in the public schools of the borough, then entered Millersville 
State Normal School, whence he was graduated, class of 1882. After 
teaching in the public school one year, he began the study of law, read- 
ing under the preceptorship of Louis E. Atkinson, an eminent lawyer, 
and was admitted to the Juniata county bar in 1885. Although entitled 
to practice, he desired still deeper knowledge of the law and he entered 
Albany Law School, Albany, New York, one of the very oldest and 
best law schools in the United States, from whence he was graduated 
LL.B., class of 1886. Returning to Mifflintown, he entered into .partner- 
ship with his former instructor in the law, and as Atkinson & Pennell, 
they conducted a successful general practice in county, state and federal 
courts of the district, until Mr. Atkinson's death in 19 10. Since then 
Mr. Pennell has conducted business alone. The firm was among the 
leaders at the county bar and bore a reputation for honorable, upright 
dealing, coupled with a legal learning and skill that attracted the best 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 523 

class of business. The offices are yet retained in Mifflintown, where Mr. 
Pennell conducts his legal business upon the same high plane of honor 
and efficiency. He has few outside interests, the law being to him a 
jealous mistress and to his profession he gives the best of his learning 
and talent. He has banking interests in the Juniata Valley National 
Bank and is a director of the Mifflintown and Patterson Water compa- 
nies. He was one of the charter members of the Pennsylvania State 
Bar Association and also secretary of the Juniata Bar Association. In 
politics he is a Republican and from 1887 to 1890 was the elected dis- 
trict attorney of Juniata county. He is solicitor for the fiftii district of 
the Pennsylvania railroad, and occupies a similar position with the 
Tuscarora Valley railroad. 

He married, December 28, 1887. Ida, daughter of James and Mary 
(Ewing) McCauley, of Mifflintown: children: Rebecca, died aged four 
years; Edred J., born December 29. 1890, graduate of Mifflintown high 
school and Gettysburg College, class of 19 12, now a student at the 
University of Pennsylvania. The family are attendants of the Presby- 
terian church, Mr. Pennell being a member of the Mifflintown congre- 
gation. 



The Neelys are first mentioned in Juniata Valley records 
NEELY in 1773, in Lack township, Juniata county, tax lists. They 

are of the Scotch-Irish stock so potent and so prominent 
among the "makers" of Pennsylvania and, as one writer states, "the 
race that never bred a Tory." The emigrant came from county Lon- 
donderry. Ireland, prior to the year 1750. 

(I) The first record obtainable is of William Neely. whose boyhood 
was spent near the present town of Roxbury, Franklin county, Penn- 
sylvania. He had a brother, Robert Neely, two years younger, who 
was stolen by the Indians about 1750, being then five years of age. He 
was reared by the tribe which captured him, taught their ways, adopted 
and given an Indian maid for his wife. The following letter written by 
Colonel James Perry, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, a cousin of William 
Neely and of the captured boy (the original of which is now in the 
possession of Margaret J. Neely, of Galveston, Indiana), furnished the 
information which led to the identification of Robert Neely as the cap- 
tive: 



524 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

"Pittsburgh, Oct. 22, 1805. 
"Dear Cousin : 

"Tho' you and I are so nearly related. I do not know that ever a 
hne passed from you to me or from me to you. I have often Tho't 
that it could not be for want of friendship or natural afifection, as I con- 
ceive we are both possessed of it. I would rather impute it to thought- 
less negligence. I came to live in this place last spring, to keep store. 
I, perhaps, may continue some time. My family, a number of girls, are 
grown up, three of them married. My two sons are now beginning to 
be able to do business for me. This day William Cinney called on me, 
on his return home. He told me you were anxious to hear from your 
brother, Robert, which I do not in the least doubt. I have, a few weeks 
since, received information of him. I had often heard of such a person, 
somewhere near the lakes. After I came to this place last spring, I 
heard of him on Buffalo Creek, about five miles from the Lake and 
eighteen above Niagara. I wrote a few lines to him, to know whether 
he was the same Robert Neely, which I suspected he was. and received 
an answer from Mr. Granger, Indian Agent, informing me he was the 
same. I had not given him any account of his friends until I was cer- 
tain he was the person. A copy of Mr. Granger's letter you have, as 
follows : 

" 'Buffalo Creek, Aug. 13, 1805. 

" 'Sir: Your letter to Robert Neely, dated April 21, was lately put 
into my hands. There is no doubt but the person, by the name of Rob- 
ert Neely, living with the Seneca Indians, about five miles from this 
place, is the person whom you inquire for. He has often mentioned to 
me the place where he was taken and some circumstances respecting 
his family, which correspond with your description. Previous to read- 
ing your letter to him, he was questioned on the subject. He said he 
lived near Connocogeague Creek, that be went with his uncle. Perry, 
to feed cattle, that his uncle was killed by the Indians and he was taken ; 
that his father and mother were dead, that he had a sister and he thinks 
he had a brother. Robert does not appear to have a perfect recollection 
of his family relations, but says he believes you are his cousin. He has 
mentioned to a person here that his father used to make whiskey. He 
is a man of about sixty years and his looks indicate living a long time 
with the Indians. He has imbibed their habits. He is very honest and 
industrious and gets a good living in their way. He still retains his 
native language, but speaks the Indian tongue better. He was very 
glad to hear from you, and requests me to write to you for a more par- 
ticular account of his family; says he thought his relations were all 
dead. He does not recollect anything about Braddock's defeat. 
" 'I am Sir, your obedient humble serv't, 

" 'Erastus Granger, Agent of Indian Affairs.' 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 



.■>-o 



" 'Col. James Perry. 

"I have written to him as particular account of his friends as I could 
collect. I have never heard anything of your sister, Mary, since she 
went to Virginia, so that I could give very little account of her. I wrote 
to him that I thought you or some of your sons would go and see him 
as soon as you heard where he was. 

"I am, dear cousin, with respect. 

"Your humble serv't, 
"Mr. William Neely. James Perry." 

James Neely, son of William Neely, upon the knowledge contained 
in this letter, visited his uncle and tried by every inducement to bring 
him back to his family, but in vain. Devoted to his squaw, and inured 
to the life of the red men, neither the ties of blood nor the attractions 
of civilized life had any power over him. 

Early in life William Neely settled in Lack township, Juniata county, 
purchasing a tract of land from the Indians, which he cleared and im- 
proved, there residing until his death. The farm was held in the Neely 
name one hundred years until 1873; later it became the property of 
Robert Robinson. Air. Neely was a Presbyterian, a prominent member 
of the church of that faith at Waterloo, Juniata county. He married 
Sarah Harvey, of Path Valley, Franklin county, and had issue: i. 
John, of whom further. 2. William, married, in 1802, on the same day 
as his brother John, a sister of his brother's bride, Miss McFeaters, and 
died two weeks after his marriage. 3. James, married Martha McCon- 
nell and had two daughters: Mary, died in July, 1866, and Eliza, married 
Robert Alexander, moved to Wooster, Ohio, where she died. 4. Nancy. 
died in infancy. 

(II) John, eldest son of William Neely, was born in Lack town- 
ship, Juniata county, Pennsylvania, June 20, 1774, died August 5, 1846. 
He also became a farmer, purchasing a tract of land in Tuscarora town- 
ship, same county, on which he resided until his death. He married 
Margaret McFeaters, in 1802. and reared a large family. Siie died 
July 24, 1845. Children: i. William (2), died in Juniata county, No- 
vember 10, 1872: married Mary McConnell, January 30, 1834; she died 
July 14, 1864; children: Margaret Jane, of Galveston, Indiana; Thomas 
McConnell, of Greenfield, Adair county. Indiana; John Harvey, of Nor- 
wich, Page county, Iowa; Mary Adelene, married Joseph Gray, of Gal- 



526 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

veston, Indiana; Rachel Lucinda, married Peter Sassanian of Kokomo, 
Indiana; Nancy Anna, married Samuel McCulloch, of Shenandoah, 
Iowa. 2. James, married Margaret Alexander and moved to Ohio, 
where he died without issue. 3. Mary, died January 5, 1881 ; married 
William I. Patterson, died August 24, 1846; children: Robert H., de- 
ceased, a farmer of Tuscarora township, Juniata county; Oliver J., 
moved to Shenandoah, Iowa; Nancy, married William I. McCulloch and 
moved to Shenandoah. 4. John (2), of whom further. 5. Robert Har- 
vey, died March 30, 1887; married Rachel Beale; children; James H., 
Charles, Ella F., and Mary P., died August 29, 18S9. 6. Sarah, died 
November 7, 1883; married John McCoy and left three sons and three 
daughters, residing in Ohio; children: Margaret Ann, John Neely, Wil- 
liam Kennedy, David, Mary, Ellen. 

(Ill) John (2), fourth child of John (i) and Margaret (Mc- 
Featers) Neely, was born in Tuscarora township, Juniata county, Penn- 
sylvania, June 6, 18 14. From the age of three until his death at nearly 
four score years, he lived on the old homestead, one of the most pro- 
ductive and beautiful farms in the township. He attended the sub- 
scription schools, where his thirst for knowledge and studious habits 
enabled him to acquire a good education in spite of their limited ad- 
vantages. He became a prosperous farmer, his energy, industry and 
diligent business methods enabling him to acquire a competence. He 
was liberal in the education of his children, and his every thought was 
to equip them for lives of usefulness. His devotion to his family and 
to his church were ruling characteristics, and to further their interests 
he spared not himself. As the Neelys had been for generations, he was 
a Presbyterian, belonging to the Middle Tuscarora Church. He died 
at his farm in Tuscarora township, May 30, 1892, aged seventy-seven 
years, eleven months and twenty-five days. 

He married, January 13, 1853, Margaret Jane Ewing, born in Perry 
county, Pennsylvania, November 20, 1831, who survives him (1913), 
their married life extending over a period of nearly forty years. Chil- 
dren: I. William A. K., married Azile M. Burchfield, of Mifflintown, 
and moved to Wayne, Nebraska. 2. Virginia M., died November, 1910. 
3. James M., died September 6, 1862. 4. J. Howard (twin of James 
M.), of whom further. 3. Anson Gilroy, died August 15, 1862. 6. S. 
Arminia, married L. A. Bower and resides in Denver, Colorado. 7. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 527 

Peorus A., now a farmer on the old homestead; married (first) Annie 
Robinson, (second) Mrs. Margaret (Speer) McCulloch, widow of 
George McCulloch. 8. Rev. David T., a minister of the Presbyterian 
church, now of Baltimore, Maryland ; married Sarah Shelley. 9. Dr. 
Edgar C, a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, now a practising 
physician of Newville, Pennsylvania; married Mary Dougherty. 

(IV) J. Howard, fourth child and third son of John (J) and Mar- 
garet J. (Ewing) Neely, was born at the old homestead, Tuscarora 
township, Juniata county, Pennsylvania, September 7, 1858. -\fter a 
course in the public school, he entered Millersville State Normal School, 
in Lancaster county, whence he was graduated, class of 1879. ^^ ^'^^n 
took a preparatory course at Airy View and Tuscarora academies, en- 
tered Princeton L'niversity, whence he was graduated with degree of 
Bachelor of Arts, class of 1884. and three years later the degree of Mas- 
ter of Arts was conferred upon him. This study was not continuous, as 
an interval of some years occurred between his normal and academic 
course, during which he was engaged in teaching, and in 1879 and 1880 
he was principal of the Hummelstown, Dauphin county, schools. After 
graduation from Princeton he resumed teaching, holding positions in 
Airy View and Mifflintown academies. During that jjeriod he rbegan 
the study of law under the instruction of Alfred J. I'atterson. ot Miftlin- 
town. He continued legal study under Mr. Patterson until his admission 
to the Juniata county bar, August 26, 1886, then became liis partner. 
practising as Patterson & Neely until 1892. In 1890 Mr. Neely was 
elected district attorney for Juniata county, serving three years. In 
1892 the partnership existing as Patterson & Neely was dissolved and 
since the dissolution Mr. Neely has practised alone in Miftlinlown. He 
is devoted to his profession and gives to the business entrusted inm his 
entire time and energy. He is a Democrat in politics, as was his 
father, and has always taken an active interest in public affairs. He is 
a member of Union Lodge, No. 324. Free and Accepted Masons; New- 
port Chapter, No. 238, Royal Arch Masons; Lewistown Coniinandery. 
No. 26, Knights Templar, and in Scottish Rite Masonry, thirty-second 
degree, belongs to Harrisburg Consistory. In religious faiil) he is a 
Presbyterian, both he and his wife belonging to the Mifflintown Presby- 
terian church. ^ 

Mr. Neely married, December 31, 1891. Ella K.. daughter of W il- 



528 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

liam and Jennie E. (Hamlin) Banks, of Mifflintown. Cliildren : Lucien 
Banks, born March 3, 1893, died November 29, 1893; J. Howard (2), 
born November 22, 1894, now a student at Princeton University, class of 
1916; William Hamlin, born February 2, 1896, a graduate at Harrisburg 
Academy, class of 1913; Helen, born December 27, 1899; Margaret 
Banks and Elizabeth Banks, twins, born September 21, 1902. 



Although the emigrant ancestor of the Pomeroys of 
POMEROY Port Royal, Pennsylvania, came to this country from 

Liverpool, England, where the family had been seated 
for several generations, he traced to French ancestry. The family was 
originally a noble one of France, the name Pomeroy signifying "Royal 
Apple". They were Protestants and, at the time of the massacre of St. 
Bartholomew, one of the family was apprised of his danger by the 
daughter of a French nol^leman, in whose family he was teaching, and 
succeeded in making his escape to Ireland. Later the young lady 
joined him and they married, rearing a family, some of whose descend- 
ants became merchants and business men of Liverpool, England. 

(I) From this branch came Thomas Pomeroy, a merchant of mod- 
erate means, located in Liverpool, who about 1730 converted his prop- 
erty into cash and came to America, settling near the present village 
of Roxbury, in Franklin county, Pennsylvania. He purchased and 
cleared a farm, and died about 1770, leaving a widow Margaret, and 
eight children. She died 1777. His sons were: Thomas (2), of whom 
further ; John, George and Samuel ; all except Thomas moving west. 

(II) Thomas (2), son of Thomas (i), the settler, and Margaret 
Pomeroy, was born in Lurgan township, Franklin county, Pennsylvania, 
1733, and so far as known was the first white child born in that town- 
ship. He became a prosperous farmer, remaining on the old homestead 
near Roxbury, of which he was the owner. He was a man of prom- 
inence and endured all the dangers and horrors of life on the frontier, 
losing his wife and two children at the hands of the Indians. He lived 
on the homestead all his life, and was a man of standing in his com- 
munity. He married a Miss Reynolds who, as stated, was murdered 
by the Indians, together with two of her children. A son who survi\ed 
was Thomas (3). 

(III) Hon. Thomas (3) Pomeroy, son of Thomas (2) Pomeroy, 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 529 

was born near Roxbury, Franklin county, Pennsylvania, July 11, 1801, 
died January 13, 1871. He had a limited public school education, but 
was of superior mind and by reading, self study and observation became 
well informed and prominent. He grew up at the home farm, but 
quite early in life was apprenticed to his uncle, William Reynolds, who 
taught him the art of tanning leather. After completing his years of 
service as an apprentice, he engaged in the same business for himself at 
Roxbury, later engaging in mercantile business and in lumbering. He 
invested his profits in timber lands near the North mountains, and also 
in farms near Roxbury, becoming one of the substantial men of the 
day and neighborhood. In 1844 he was elected commissioner of Frank- 
lin county, discharging the duties of that office with such credit that 
in 185 1 he was elected associate county judge. He is described as a 
man "of popular manners, of unbending integrity, of considerable en- 
ergy of character and ardently attached to the fortunes of the Whig 
party". His record in private and public life was an honorable one and 
wherever known he was highly respected. 

He married, March 18, 1832, Mary Ann, born May 30, 181 1, second 
daughter of Colonel Stephen W^ilson. In 1879 she moved to Shippens- 
burg, Pennsylvania, where she died in 1882. They were the parents of 
nine children, of whom William Culbertson Pomeroy was the youngest. 
Andrew A., fourth son of Hon. Thomas Pomeroy, was born and reared 
in Roxbury. He was an Abolitionist from his youth, and so outspoken 
was he that he was known as the "Young Abolitionist", He enlisted 
August 9. 1862. in Company H, 126th Pennsylvania Volunter Infantry, 
and except for a period of sickness following the battle of Antietam, was 
in active service until his death at the battle of White Oak Road, March 
31, 1865. He was wounded, previously, in the battle of Chancellorsville, 
May 3. 1863. Lender a second enlistment he was a private of Company 
I, 198th Pennsylvania Volunteers: was promoted first lieutenant, Sep- 
tember 14, 1864, and held that rank at his death. A brother of Lieu- 
tenant Pomeroy was a captain of the same regiment ; Stephen W. Pom- 
eroy and his brother John were both ministers of the Gospel. The Grand 
Army Post at Roxbury is named the Lieutenant A. A. Pomeroy Post, 
No. 295, in honor of the brave lieutenant. 

(IV) Hon. William Culbertson Pomeroy, son of Hon. Thomas (3) 
and Mary Ann (Wilson) Pomeroy. was born at Roxbury. Franklin 



530 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

county, Pennsylvania, November 24, 1S51 ; died of pneumonia contracted 
while on duty in the house of representatives, at Harrisburg, February 
21, 1907. 

He attended the public schools and worked in his father's 
store in boyhood, entering Tuscarora Academy at Academia, in Juniata 
county, when nineteen years of age, and thence was graduated in 1873. 
Later he supplemented the practical business experience gained in his 
father's store in youth, by a course in a business college. He began his 
banking career as clerk in the Juniata Valley Bank, at Mifflintown, and 
in 1876 was transferred to a branch of that bank located at Port Royal. 
He was appointed cashier of the branch bank, a position he filled until 
1894. In the latter year he was prominently connected with the organi- 
zation of the Port Royal Bank, under the firm name of Pomeroy & Com- 
pany, an institution of which he was one of the first board of directors 
and the first cashier. He had a long and honorable career as a banker ; 
was a director of the Juniata Valley Bank of Mifflintown, and of the 
First National Bank of Middleburg, Snyder county, Pennsylvania, and 
an official of the Port Royal Bank until his death. He was prominent 
in organizing the First National Bank of New Bloomfield and was 
president at his death. He was an executive manager of high ability, 
was accurate and exact in every transaction, was a thorough master of 
the laws governing finance and gave to the safeguarding of the invest- 
ments of his depositors most scrupulous surveillance. His long, hon- 
orable and successful career won him a place among the leading men of 
the Juniata Valley, where his memory is warmly cherished. 

He was a lifelong member of the Republican party and a potent 
factor in establishing the principles of that party in the Juniata Valley. 
He served in various township ofTlces, and in 1882 was elected to the 
house of representatives, being one of the youngest members of that 
body, and was again elected, serving in 1904-06, performing his duties 
with fidelity and devotion to principle. 

He married, March 20, 1879, Ellen B.. daughter of Dr. E. D. Craw- 
ford, of Mifflintown, Pennsylvania, a prominent physician, a man of 
education and intellectuality, state senator of Pennsylvania, and of the 
highest character in professional, public and private life. Mrs. Pom- 
eroy survives her husband and now resides in Port Royal. Children : 
Marv Wilson, married Norman B. Kurzenknabe. and resides at No. loio 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 531 

North Third street, Harrisburg; Darwin Crawford, of whom further; 
Gertrude Murray, Ellen Culbertson and PameHa Jackson. 

(V) Darwin Crawford, only son of Hon. William Culbertson and 
Ellen B. (Crawford) Pomeroy, was born at Port Royal, Pennsylvania, 
January 13 1883. He was educated in public schools there, prepared 
for and entered Lafayette College, whence he was graduated, electrical 
engineer, class of 1905. He at once entered the employ of the West- 
inghouse Electrical & Manufacturing Company, of Pittsburgh, and in 
1906 was transferred to special work in the city of Baltimore, remain- 
ing there until the death of his father in 1907. when he resigned to 
assume the duties of executor and administrator of the Pomeroy estate. 
In 1907 he was elected assistant cashier of the Port Royal Bank and in 
January, 191 1, was advanced to the responsible position of cashier, 
which he most capably fills at this date, 191 3. He is also a manager of 
the Port Royal Gas Company, and has other varied business interests. 
His college fraternity is Phi Delta Theta (Lafayette), and both he 
and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church of Port Royal. 

He married, April 11, 1912, Esther Clarkson Russell, a descendant of 
James Russell, the early settler near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 1750. 
His son, Alexander, married May McPherson and had a son William, 
who was a prominent early banker of Lewistown, Pennsylvania, his be- 
ing at one time the only bank between Flarrisburg and \\'illiamsport. 
He married Mary Grace Mayer and their son, George Louis Russell, 
now president of the Belleville National Bank, was for many years his 
father's partner in banking. He married Anna Leah Brisbin, and their 
fourth child, Esther Clarkson Russell, born May 16. 1887, married 
Darwin C. Pomeroy. 



Samuel Gilbert Beaver, of Port Royal, Pennsylvania, 
BEAVER descends in a direct line from good German stock. The 
family has been established in America one hundred and 
seventy-three years, and has added to the material progress and social 
and religious advancement of the state of Pennsylvania. The family 
has always been noted, even from the earliest times, for its honesty, 
sobriety, keen sense of justice toward its fellowmen, as well as its deep 
religious convictions and wide philanthropy. 

(I) George Beaver, the great-great-great-grandfather of Samuel Gil- 



532 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

bert Beaver, emigrated from Germany in 1740. He probably landed 
at New York, and after looking around the new country finally decided 
to cast his lot with the settlers of Pennsylvania. He located among the 
pioneers of Chester county, purchased land, cleared and cultivated it and 
erected on it a comfortable house of unhewn logs, and here installed his 
family some years later. He took part in all of the Indian wars of that 
locality, and they were many, and proved the worth of his musket to 
the early settlers. He was appointed as one of the watch to keep an 
espionage on the red men, and so well did he perform his duty that he 
came to be regarded by the Indians as something supernatural and with 
an uncanny prescience of their plans. At the call to arms in 1776, 
though somewhat advanced in years, he enlisted in the continental army 
and fought under General Anthony Wayne, who always led his men where 
the danger was greatest. With him were five of his sons, two of whom 
were mere lads, and who lost their lives in defense of the independence 
of their country. At the cessation of hostilities he returned to his farm 
and again took up the peaceful vocation of farming. He died on the 
land that he first bought and is there buried. He married a native 
of Pennsylvania, it is thought, though her name is unknown. Chil- 
dren: I. George, of whom further. 2. Jacob. 3. Abraham. 4. Han- 
nah, married a Mr. Rosenberger, of Lebanon, Pennsylvania. 5. Hon- 
deter, killed in the revolution. 6. Benjamin, lost his life in the war of 
the revolution. 

(II) George (2), son of George (i) Beaver, the revolutionary war 
patriot, and himself a soldier in the same war, was born May i, 1755, 
in Chester county, Pennsylvania. He was a member of a corps of 
rangers organized for the purpose of protecting the scattered pioneer 
families from the Indians. He was a farmer and helped reclaim from 
the wilderness the fertile acres which he cleared, cultivated and on which 
he built a house of logs. He married Catherine Keefer, the daughter of 
a neighbor. Children: i. Peter, of whom further. 2. Mary, married 
a Mr. Gudekuntz. 3. Samuel, died in South America. 4. Hannah, mar- 
ried a Mr. Gudekuntz, the son of a neighbor. 5. Betsy, married a Mr. 
Edwards. 6. Peggy, married a Mr. Gudekuntz. 7. George, died in 
Shippensburg, Pennsylvania, in 1868. 8. Sarah, married a Mr. De- 
laney. g. David. Three daughters, names unknown. 

(III) Rev. Peter Beaver, son of George (2) and Catherine (Keefer) 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 533 

Beaver, was born December 25, 1782, in Lebanon county, Pennsylvania. 
He was educated in the common schools of the day, and engaged in 
farming. Feeling a call to preach he was ordained at Elkton, Mary- 
land, by Bishop Asbury of the Methodist Episcopal church. He preached 
many years in both English and German in order that the English 
speaking as well as the German speaking members of his congregation 
might have the full benefit of the Gospel. He engaged in the mercantile 
business in Pfoutz Valley, where he died August 25, 1849, greatly 
mourned by his congregation, neighbors and friends. He married Eliza- 
beth Gilbert, who died before him. She was of an English family that 
had long been established in America, and was a woman of great piety 
as well as physical courage. She was in every way a fit helpmeet for 
the pioneer preacher. Children: I. George, of whom further. 2. Sam- 
uel, born 1804, died March 20, 1834; married Maria Lehman. 3. 
Jacob, married Eliza Adams: died 1840. 4. Jesse, born March 8, 1810, 
died December 9, 1892 : married Mary Ann Schwartz. 5. Thomas, born 
November 16, 1814, died in Danville, May 16, 1891. 6. Peter, born 
June 28, 1816, died June 13, 1890; married (first) a Miss Simonton; 
(second) Mrs. Elliott. 7. Sarah, born November 25, 1817, died in 
Ohio, September 13, 1892; married Aaron Nevins. 8. Eliza F., born in 
1818. 9. Catherine, born June 25, 1819; married Rev. Archibald Green- 
lee. 10. Mary, born November 22, 1820; married Henry Miller. 11. 
Elmira, born May 9, 1839, died December 13, 1859. 12. Amanda, de- 
ceased. 13. Lydia, deceased. 

(IV) George (3), son of Rev. Peter and Elizabeth (Gilbert) Beaver, 
was born in Lebanon county, Pennsylvania, September 24, 1802, died 
December 31, 1878. He was educated in the public schools in the county. 
He learned the tanner's trade at Stumpstown. He conducted business in 
Pfoutz Valley, Perry county, for some time. In 1830 he purchased the 
farm that his son Samuel afterward owned and tilled. He was a Demo- 
crat until 1854, when he affiliated himself with the Know Nothing party, 
and later became a Republican, to which he was allied at the time of his 
death. He at one time conducted an independent Democratic journal, 
afterwards it became the Republican People's Advocate and Press. He 
was a popular politician in his early days and served in the state legisla- 
ture, having been elected in 184 1 on the Democratic ticket. He served 
as county commissioner in 1833-34 and was urged to accept it a third 



534 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

time, but declined. He married, April 15, 1827, Maria Catherine Long, 
daughter of Jonathan Long. They were both members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and were generous in their support of it. Children: 
I. Mary Ann, deceased. 2. Elizabeth, deceased; married George M. 
Brubaker. 3. Samuel Long, of whom further. 4. Sarah Catherine, 
deceased. 5. Sophia, married D. M. Rickabaugh; died in 1912. 6. 
Peter, deceased. 7. George E. 8. Ellen Jane, married Uriah Shuman, 
deceased. 

(V) Samuel Long, son of George (3) and Maria Catherine (Long) 
Beaver, was born March 2, 183 1, died January, 1910. He was born in 
an old log house on the farm he owned at time of his death, and which 
is known far and wide as the Beaver homestead. When he was fifteen 
years old he helped to carry the brick for the house which supplanted the 
old log house. He was educated in the common schools of the county, 
which were held for only three months of the year, and his attendance 
was curtailed by his having to leave before the session was finished to 
work on the farm. He remained at home until he was twenty-one when 
he was engaged as salesman in the store of his brother-in-law, at Millers- 
burg, Dauphin county, Pennsylvania. After his marriage he lived on the 
home farm for three years, and then bought one hundred fertile acres in 
Perry Valley, which he cultivated for twelve years, bringing it to a high 
state of productiveness. He was a Republican and held the political 
offices of county auditor and school director. He was connected with the 
Methodist Episcopal church, but at the time of his death was a member 
of the United Brethren church. He contriljuted generously to the cause 
of religion and benevolence throughout his lifetime. After the death 
of his wife he moved to Millerstown and there lived the remainder of 
his life, retired. During the civil war he was drafted for service. l)ut 
after a medical examination at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, was rejected. He 
was one of the most highly respected citizens of his town, county and 
state, and was universally regretted at his death. He married, June 12, 
1862. Mary Eliza Kipp, born at Milroy. Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, 
October i. 1838, daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth (Harmon") Kipp (see 
Kipp II). Children: r. Thomas K., born January 8, 1864; was first a 
farmer and is now merchant at Academia, Juniata county. Pennsylvania; 
married Fannie Seiber, of McAlisterville, Pennsylvania. 2. William A., 
born May 5. 1865; married Emma Troutman, of Greenwood township. 





-e^^yV-e^fy^ 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 535 

Perry county, Pennsylvania; he is a farmer at Academia. 3. Laura, 
born November 22., 1866; married Lewis Zeigler, deceased. 4. George 
E., bom June 10, 1868; married Jennie McLain; lives on homestead. 5. 
Jennie, born May 25, 1871, died in infancy. 6. Samuel Gilbert, of whom 
further. 7. Bessie, born August i, 1875, died in infancy. 8. Mary Ella, 
born November 2, 1877; married Harvey L. Ulsh. 9. Elizabeth, born 
December i, 1880; married Isaac N. Rinehart; lives at Farmer City, 
Illinois. 10. Minnie C., born August 8, 1884; lives in Millerstown. 
(VI) Samuel Gilbert, son of Samuel Long and Mary Eliza (Kipp) 
Beaver, was born in Perry county, Pennsylvania, August 6, 1873. He 
was educated in the common schools of the county and at Juniata Col- 
lege, where he made a record as a student. Leaving college he was en- 
gaged as salesman by his brother,. Thomas K., at Academia, from Oc- 
tober 2, 1894. until 1905. He became ambitious to branch out for him- 
self, and in 1905 established a general store at Mexico, Pennsylvania, 
and remained there two years. He moved to Port Royal in 1907 and 
established a department store with a stock of about six thousand dol- 
lars. By keen insight, a close and careful management, a desire to 
please his patrons of all classes and kinds, he has succeeded in more 
than doubling his capital invested in the business. He is eminently a 
successful business man and a live wire in his town, commanding alike 
the respect and admiration of his fellow townsmen. In politics he is a 
Republican, and has been school director for three years. He is one of 
the substantial, thorough-going men of his community, and it is confi- 
dently predicted of him that his past successes will be duplicated in the 
future. He is a member of the Lutheran church, while his wife's affil- 
iations are with the Presbyterians. He married. May 17, 1895, Laura 
Jane Seiber, a native of Juniata county, daughter of Abraham and Hen- 
rietta Seiber. Children : Paul Seiber, Mary Henrietta, Chester Lloyd, 
Margaretta, died in infancy. 

(The Kipp Line). 
Holland contributed the Kipps toward the building up of America. 
The immigrant progenitor of the Pennsylvania family of that name 
most probably came direct from Amsterdam and settled in New York 
state with other Hollanders. There he lived, married, reared a large 
familv and died. One of his descendants was Peter, of whom further. 



536 . HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

(I) Peter Kipp was of straight Dutch descent. He was born in 
the state of New York, but came to Pennsylvania when a young man. 
The records of the war department show that he enhsted January i. 
1777, in the continental army, served as sergeant in the Sixth Com- 
pany, Captain Fleming's artillery, and he held the rank of corporal. 
His name was on the rolls until June 10, 1783. At the close of the- 
revolutionary war Peter Kipp went to Bucks Valley, Perry county, 
Pennsylvania. He married Margaret Finton, of the Valley, and settled 
there. He was a tailor and plied his vocation as a journeyman from 
house to house, as was customary in those days. Later he settled in 
Greenwood township, and died, about 1827. Margaret, his wife, sur- 
vived him and died in Delaware township in 1840, having been a pen- 
sioner of the United States government as widow of a revolutionary 
soldier. Children: i. Peter, a farmer; settled in Perry county, moved 
later to Juniata county, and there died. 2. Isaac, a miller; died in 
Juniata county. 3. William, a wagon maker; settled and died in Millers- 
town, Pennsylvania. 4. Jacob, of whom further. 5. John, wagon 
maker; located in Center county, later at Newport, Pennsylvania, and 
there died. 6. Margaret, married a Mr. Parsons ; settled in Bucks Val- 
ley, where both died. 

(II) Jacob, son of Peter and Margaret (Finton) Kipp, was born 
in Bucks Valley, Perry county, Pennsylvania, February 6, 1S06. He 
was educated in subscription schools and was adjudged an excellent 
scholar for those times. He taught two terms, after which he learned 
wagon making with John Shull at Millerstown, Pennsylvania. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth Harmon and after marriage moved to Milroy, Mifflin 
county, where he followed his trade for twelve years, and for three 
farmed. In 1851 he moved to Greenwood township, where he farmed 
for ten years, and then farmed in Tuscarora towuship for five years. 
In 1866 he returned to Greenwood township and purchased the Daniel 
Kauffman farm near the Wardville postoffice, on which his father died, 
and where he later died, March 10, 1896, at the age of ninety. His 
wife died some years previous. He served in several township offices 
with great credit to himself and benefit to the township. He was a 
highly intelligent and progressive man and wielded a great influence for 
good m the community. Children: i. Margaret, died young at Milroy. 
2. William, born at Milroy, August 12, 1836; lives in Millerstown. 3. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 537 

Alary Eliza, born at Milroy, October i, 1S38; married, June 12, 1862, 
Samuel Long Beaver, born March 2, 1831, died January, 1910 (see 
Beaver V). 4. J. Calvin, lives at Millerstown. 5. James M., a farmer 
6. Sarah Jane, married J. Kohler Peck, of Snyder county. 7. J. Har- 
mon, a farmer in Greenwood township. 



The Shelley and Gingrich families were early in Lan- 
SHELLEY caster county, the Gingrich tracing to David and Anna 

Gingrich, whose son David (2), born Alarch 18, 1791, 
died July 24, 1858, was the ancestor of Christian Gingrich, the father of 
Catherine Gingrich, wife of Henry Shelley and grandmother of Dr. 
Amos W. Shelley, of Port Royal. Pennsylvania. The Shelleys are of 
German descent, three brothers of the name having settled in Lancaster, 
Pennsylvania, at an early date, coming from Germany. 

(I) This record begins with Henry Shelley, born in 181 5. came to 
Juniata county, Pennsj'lvania, when a young man, married and settled 
at East Salem, Delaware township, where he followed farming. He 
was also a minister of the Mennonite church and a man of usefulness. 
He married Catherine Gingrich, also of German descent, born in 
Juniata county. She was a daughter of Christian and Nancy (Musser I 
Gingrich, both members of the Mennonite church, he a blacksmith and 
farmer, formerly from near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, later moved to 
Thompsontown, Juniata county, where he purchased and cleared a farm 
of two hundred acres and there both he and his wife died, leaving an 
only child, Catherine. Henry Shelley and wife lived on the Gingrich 
homestead, which she inherited and there both died, he in 1850. Chil- 
dren: Henry, died in infancy; Jacob, died in infancy; Nancy, married 
William Benner and both died near Evandale; Susan, married Samuel 
E. Warner of Juniata county, Pennsylvania, whom she survives, a resi- 
dent of Evandale; Christian G., died 1904, a farmer near the old home- 
stead; Samuel M., died at Norristown, Pennsylvania, December 19, 
1881, a school furniture agent; Isaac, died aged fifteen years; John H., 
now a railroad employee of Michigan City. Indiana; Amos W., of whom 
further. 

(II) Dr. Amos W. Shelley, youngest son and ninth child of Henry 
and Catherine (Gingrich) Shelley, was born at East Salem, Juniata 
county, Pennsylvania, July 26, 1850. He attended the public schools 



538 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

of the township until he was fourteen years of age, then for another 
year the McAlisterville school. During the winter of 1866-1867 and 
1868 he taught school, and in 1869 entered the State Normal School at 
Bloomsburg, continuing two years. The winter of 1871 he taught 
school at Gallion, Ohio, and then decided to prepare for the profession 
of medicine. He was successful as a teacher, although young, but gave 
promise of attaining distinction had he remained at that profession. 
In the spring of 1872 he began the study of medicine under Dr. H. R. 
Kelley, of Gallion, then entered the medical department of the University 
of Michigan at Ann Arbor, attending lectures there for one year. In 1873 
he entered Bellevue Hospital Medical College (New York), whence he 
was graduated M. D., March i, 1874. In April of the same year he 
began the practice of his profession, locating at Port Royal and forming 
a partnership with Dr. G. M. Graham. This association continued two 
years, when Dr. Shelley withdrew and established in practice at Harris- 
burg, Pennsylvania, remaining eight months. He then returned to Port 
Royal and resumed practice and is now ( 1913) the oldest medical prac- 
titioner in Juniata county, in point of years of continuous practice. 
His practice has always been general in character, embracing both medi- 
cine and surgery. He has always had a large practice and is well 
known for his skill in both diagnosis and treatment. He is a member 
of the State Medical and Juniata County Medical societies, well known 
and honored in both. He has always borne his full share of public re- 
sponsibility and in town and church has labored for the cause of morality 
and education. For many years he was a member of the Port Royal 
board of school directors and in the Presbyterian church has been for 
many years an elder. He is a member of the United States board of 
pension examiners, in which he has served sixteen years. In political 
faith he is a Republican, but supports principles and chooses men of 
character for his candidates, rather than those of a particular party. 
His life has been spent in the service of his community and there his 
long period of usefulness is recognized and fully appreciated. He is 
a member of the Masonic order, belonging to Union Lodge, No. 324, 
Free and Accepted Masons, Mifflintown; Newport Chapter, No. 238. 
Royal Arch Masons; Lewistown Commandery, No. 26, Knights Tem- 
plar, and Zembo Temple, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, at Harrisburg. 
Dr. Shellev married, at Port Royal, in December, 1874, Annie M., 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 539 

daughter of Samuel L. and Sarah (Davis) Herr, of Juniata county. 
Children : Sarah H., married Rev. David T. Neely, a minister of the 
Presbyterian church, now of Baltimore, Maryland; Gertrude May, died 
in infancy; Edith, died in infancy; Mary M., married James L. Stewart, 
now a contractor of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania; J. Warren, died August 
15, 1907, a graduate of Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, served 
seven years as interne of the Pottsville Hospital; Anna M., a graduate 
of Wilson College, now residing in Port Royal; Penrose H., graduate 
of Bucknell College, and of Jeft'erson Medical College, Philadelphia, 
served as interne for eighteen months in Philadelphia General Hos- 
pital, now a practicing physician of Hublersburg, Pennsylvania, married 
Mabel Pickering, of Philadelphia. 



The Furmans came to Lewistcwn from Northumberland 
FURMAN county. Pennsylvania. Isaac Furman, grandfather of 

Scott Furman, of Lewistown, was a blacksmith, later a 
clothing merchant of Sunbury. He died in 1910, his wife Elizabeth 
preceding him to the grave. Among their children was a son, Nathan F. 

(II) Nathan F.. son of Isaac and Elizabeth Furman, was born in 
Irish Valley, Northumberland county, Pennsylvania. He obtained a 
good education and early entered mercantile life; later established a 
general furniture and house furnishing business at Sunbury, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he conducted a prosperous business and now lives retired. 
He is a Republican in politics and a member of the Lutheran church. 
He married Sarah Waldsmith, deceased, also a native of Northumber- 
land county. Children : Herbert I. ; Scott, of whom further; Annie E. ; 
Belle, and Jerome. 

(III) Scott, son of Nathan F. and Sarah (Waldsmith) Furman, was 
born in Sunbury, Pennsylvania, October 12, 1876. He is a graduate 
of Sunbury high school, then learned the plumbing trade, and in 1899 
came to Lewistown and there entered the employ of W. B. Bratton, 
as plumber, continuing with him until 1905, when he formed a partner- 
ship and established in the plumbing and heating business in Lewistown, 
under the firm name of Furman & Oles. He is well established, has a 
good business and resides at No. 20 Chestnut street. Mr. Furman en- 
listed in 1898 in Company E. Twelfth Regiment Pennsylvania Troops, 
serving until the close of the Spanish-.Ameriean war. He is a Republican 



540 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

in politics, and both he and his wife are attendants of the Presbyterian 
church. 

He married, June i6, 1907, Nettie Rountree, of Lewistown, daughter 
of WilHam Rountree, deceased, a pioneer of Mififlin county . 



The early records of the Sheary family lead to Lancaster 
SHEARY county, Pennsylvania, to George Sheary, born in that 

county, but later a pioneer of Union county, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he followed his trade of tailor and cultivated a farm near 
Mifflinburg. He and his wife, Fannie Young, were both members of 
the Lutheran church. Of their thirteen children all are living except 
one. George Sheary died aged eighty-one years, his wife at the age of 
seventy-nine years. 

(II) Samuel F., son of George and Fannie (Young) Sheary, was 
born in Lewisburg, Union county, Pennsylvania, 1840. He was well 
educated and learned his father's trade of tailor. Later he located at 
Peen's Creek, where he taught school and was postmaster for eighteen 
years. He is a Republican in politics and a member of the Lutheran 
church, also of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He married Eva 
Hartman, born in Snyder county, Pennsylvania, in 1844, daughter 
of Jacob Hartman, an early settler and farmer of Snyder county, and 
his wife, Rachael Yeisley, also a native of Snyder county. Children 
of Samuel F. Sheary: Albert, deceased; Ellen; George W., mentioned be- 
low, and Jennie. 

(III) George W., son of Samuel F. and Eva (Hartman) Sheary, 
was born in Snyder county, Pennsylvania, November 2, 1872. He at- 
tended the public schools, obtaining a good public school education. 
He learned the carpenter's trade and in 1898 settled in Lewistown, 
Pennsylvania, where he followed his trade until 1894. becoming a well 
known, prosperous and reliable contractor and builder. In 1904 he 
established a hardware business at No. 28 Valley street, moved in 1905 
to No. 37 Valley street, and in 1908 to his present location at No. 50 
Valley street. He built his present commodious store in 1907 and there 
conducts a prosperous business. He has his home on Pennybaker ave- 
nue, and has other residence properties in Lewistown. Mr. Sheary be- 
gan in a small way, but has worked his own way to a secure position in 
the business world, of which he is an honored, respected member. He 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 541 

is a Republican in politics, a member of the Lewistown Board of Trade, 
and belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Modern 
Woodmen of America. In religious faith he is of the Evangelical 
church. 

He married. November 3, 1896, Minnie Grace, daughter of Christian 
Stine. Child, George William Jr., born May 9, 1904. 



The branch of the Dipple family in the United States 
DIPPLE descends from George H. Dipple, who lived and died in 
Germany, leaving male issue. 

(II) John H., son of George H. Dipple, was born in Germany, died 
in Lewistown. Pennsylvania, in 1872. He was well educated, served 
his time in the German army, and was a potter by trade. After com- 
ing to the United States he settled, in 1852, in Lewistown and there 
engaged in the manufacture of pottery until his death. He was a Re- 
publican in politics and a Lutheran in religion. He married, in Lewis- 
town, Margaret Peters : she was born in Germany, died in Lewistown in 
1902. Children: George, deceased; John H., deceased; Margaret; An- 
nie; Andrew G. C, of whom further; Ida; Viola, deceased: and Charles. 

(III) Andrew G. C, son of John H. and Margaret (Peters) Dipple, 
was born in Newton Hamilton, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, Octo- 
ber 13. i860. He was educated in the public school of Lewistown, 
and grew up with an intimate knowledge of the pottery business from 
boyhood. He worked with his father until the death of the latter, when 
his son, John H. Jr., continued the business for his mother. In 1902 
Mrs. Dipple died and the business was continued by J. H. Dipple Jr. 
until 1906. when .\ndrew G. C. Dipple became sole owner and so con- 
tinues. Thoroughly understanding every detail of his business, Mr. 
Dipple has successfully continued the plant established by his father 
and has gained an enviable reputation in the trade. His energy and 
careful business methods have brought the deserved reward, and he is 
ranked among the substantial men of his town. Since a boy Mr. Dipple 
has been devoted to music, and in his sixteenth year became a member 
of the Lewistown band, in which he still retains membership and an 
active interest. He belongs to the Patriotic Order of Sons of America, 
the National Protective Legion, and is a member of the Evangelical 
church. 



542 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

He married, December 20, 1888, Alary A. Lawyer, of Wagner, 
Pennsylvania. Children : Herman A., Alary, Dora and John. 



Parks Murtiff, of Lewistown, Pennsylvania, is lineally 
AIURTIFF descended from a German family of the same name, the 

members of which have for centuries made their homes 
near Stuttgart, Germany, where they were, and are, farmers and me- 
chanics, that class of people most approved by the German Kaiser. The 
first of the name to come to the United States was George, of whom 
further. 

(I) George A^urtiff was born in Germany and emigrated to the 
United States when quite young, landing in New York. Later he found 
his way to Pennsylvania and located in Adams county, where he followed 
the family pursuit of farming, as he had done in the Fatherland. He 
purchased land between Bendersville and Idaville and there settled, lived 

and died. He married Alargaret , a native of Pennsylvania, but 

probably of German descent. They both died on the Murtiff farm. 
Among his children was Emanuel, of whom further. 

(II) Emanuel, son of George and Alargaret Alurtiff, was born in 
1827, in Adams county. Pennsylvania. He married Ad!ary Jane Shuff, 
born in 1830, in Adams county, daughter of George and Rebecca Shuff; 
George Shuff was a blacksmith and was known far and wide as a master 
of his trade. After marriage Emanuel Alurtiff went to Alexico, Juniata 
county. Pennsylvania, and attended a lock on the Juniata canal for about 
eighteen years, becoming known, and favorably so, to the travelling pub- 
lic. In 1889 he gave up the position that he had so long and faithfully 
held and moved to Lewistown, Alifflin comity, and made his home with 
his son, Parks, until the final summons came in 1909. He was ever a 
staunch Democrat, voting the straight ticket. Both he and his wife were 
devout members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Children : Parks, 
of whom further; Anne and Cora. 

(III) Parks, son of Emanuel and Mary Jane (Shuff) Murtiff, was 
born in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, August 21, 1858. He was reared on 
the banks of the Juniata canal, where he early imbibed broad and helpful 
views of life, which have stood him in good stead m his subsequent 
dealing with mankind. 

Mr. Murtiff received his education in the common schools 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 543 

of that section. Leaving school while yet a youth he began driving a 
canal boat. His first venture in that occupation was the canal boat "The 
Delaware," of Mifflintown, under Captain William Sellers; and Mr. 
Murtiff made the first trip on the "J. S. Grabill Jr.," of Mifflintown, 
under Captain D. S. Louder, on her maiden voyage. As the years 
passed he became, successively, steerer and then captain. He purchased 
a canal boat, the "Manbeck and Nelson," named for the large and im- 
portant firm of Manbeck & Nelson, grain and coal dealers of Mifflintown, 
which is still engaged in the same business. He afterward sold the 
"Manbeck and Nelson" at a profit. November 12, 1889. he engaged in 
the hotel business at McVej'town, taking over the Mansion House, in 
which enterprise he was successful, knowing exactly how to please the 
public. This he retained for six years and built up a large patronage 
by his courteous treatment of the public and his genial manners. He 
went to Lewistown and was proprietor of the Miller House for three 
years. He took over the Central Hotel and remodeled that hostelry, 
making it one of the most comfortable ones in the place. May i, 1905, 
he purchased the St. Charles Hotel, in Lewistown, and has since been its 
proprietor, establishing an enviable name for himself as a boniface and 
making his house one of the best known in that section. Besides the 
St. Charles Hotel he owns a fine farm in Mifflin county. He is a Demo- 
crat and has always worked for the party, but has never held nor asked 
for office. He is a member in high standing of the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks ; and of the fraternal Order of Eagles, as well as 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He married in October, 1887, 
Margaret Carpenter, of Lewistown, daughter of Byron and Maria D. 
(McAllister) Carpenter, of Lewistown, (see Carpenter line). Children: 
Esther, married John Hassen and has one child, John Parks: Margue- 
rite, Parks, Jr., and Byron. 

(The Carpenter Line). 
Gabriel Carpenter, grandfather of Margaret (Carpenter) Murtiff, 
was born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and came from an English 
family of that name, the immigrant of which crossed the x^tlantic about 
1664. He married Mary Pines, who was born in Perry county, Penn- 
sylvania, December 25, 1809, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Miller) 
Pines. Gabriel Carpenter and his wife moved to Juniata county and 



544 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

lived in various places, his vocation, that of teamster, making change 
of residence necessary frequently. He died in Reward, Perry county, 
and his wife died August 4, 1892. Children: i. Jacob, deceased. 2. 
John, deceased. 3. Gabriel, deceased. 4. Byron, of whom further. 
5. Giles, lives in Braddock, Pennsylvania, a blacksmith ; he married 
Catherine Louder. Their children : Floyd, Florence, Nellie, Harry and 
Earl. 6. Elizabeth, deceased. 7. Susan, deceased. 8. Mary, married 
(first) Charles Thompson and by him was the mother of four children: 
Nancy, Martha, Andrew C. and Annie. She married (second) Enoch 
Castine. and the children by this marriage are : Edward, Harry and 
John. 9. Matilda, deceased. 

Byron Carpenter, son of Gabriel and Mary (Pines) Carpenter, was 
born February 23, 1843, ^^ Juniata county, Pennsylvania. He mar- 
ried, April 14, 1865, Maria D. McAllister, born in Huntingdon county, 
October 2. 1843, ^ daughter of Samuel and Rachel (Brannen) McAllis- 
ter. Samuel McAllister, father of Maria D. (McAllister) Carpenter and 
grandfather of Margaret (Carpenter) MurtifT, was born in 1806, in 
Lancaster county. Pennsylvania. He married Rachel Brannen, born in 
Maryland, in 1802. He was the son of Gresham and Nancy (Bryan) 
McAllister. Children: i. Jane. 2. Rebecca. 3. Eliza. 4. William. 5. 
Sarah Ann. 6. Margaret Ellen. 7. Maria D., married Byron Carpenter 
(see above). 8. Samuel. Samuel McAllister died in 1861, and his wife, 
Rachel (Brannen) died in 1892. Rachel (Brannen) McAllister, wife of 
Samuel McAllister, was a daughter of William and Mary (Gladden) 
Brannen. He was born in Franklin, and she in Scotland, and they were 
married in Franklin county, Pennsylvania. They both died in Franklin 
county. 

Byron Carpenter was reared in McVeytown, and was educated in the 
public schools of Mifflin county, and moved to Lewistown when a young 
man. During the civil war, February, 1862, he enlisted in Company F, 
107th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and served until the cessation 
of hostilities. He was with his regiment in the three days' battle at 
Gettysburg, and saw active service during the years of his enlistment. At 
the close of the war he returned to Lewistown and worked in Furnace 
from 1866 to 1877. For thirty-six years he has been sexton of the 
Lewistown Methodist Episcopal church and cemetery. He is a staunch 
Republican, and with his wife, is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 545 

church. They have one daughter, Margaret, born September 12, 1866, 
married Parks Murtiff. (See Alurtitf III). 



The Headings, of Lewistown, Pennsylvania, trace to 
HEADINGS the early settlement of Allensville, Menno township, 
Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, where several branches 
of the family were early settlers. Philip Headings built a grist mill in 
Menno township, in 1827, which he operated until 1834. This mill 
passed through the hands of several owners until 1865, when it again 
came into the possession of a descendant of Philip, one William Head- 
ings, who owned it until 1872, when he sold it to William Mateer. 

(I) Isaac Headings was born in Allensville, Pennsylvania, and there 
grew to manhood. He married, and for a year farmed at Allensville, 
then purchased a farm near Milroy, and there engaged in farming for 
thirteen years. He then bought a tract of about five hundred acres at 
Honey Creek station, and there lived for twenty-one years, farming and 
lumbering, clearing the greater part of his tract. He then retired to 
Reedsville. where he purchased a home and lived the remainder of his 
life. He was a Democrat in politics, and for thirteen years was a school 
director and supervisor. Both he and his wife were members of the 
Lutheran church. He married Maria Metz, daughter of a miller and 
justice of the peace of Mill Creek, Pennsylvania. Children of Isaac 
Headings: i. Jacob, died in youth. 2. John, died unmarried, aged 
twentv-seven years. 3. Robert, married Florence Alexander, and is a 
farmer near Milroy, Pennsylvania. 4. Samuel, now a farmer near Sig- 
lersville, Pennsylvania: married (first) Priscilla Byler, (second) Miss 
Yocum. 5. Oliver, now a general merchant at Milroy, Pennsylvania. 
6. Dr. Isaac, a practicing physician of McAllistersville, Pennsylvania. 7. 
Amy, married W. J. McNilt, a fruit farmer, near Milroy. 8. James, 
married Rhoda Beatty, and farms the old homestead. 9. Marshall, a 
druggist, lives in Pittsburgh (South Side). 10. Prestie M., of whom 
further. 11. Rhoda, married Daniel Smith and resides at Williamsport, 
Pennsylvania. 12. Harry, now proprietor of a general store at Reeds- 
ville, unmarried. 13 and 14, died in infancy. 

(II) Prestie M., son of Isaac and Maria (Metz) Headings, was born 
on the farm, near Honey Creek station, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, 
October 19, 1876. He was educated in the public schools of Milroy, and 



546 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

at Millersville State Normal, and taught for two years after leaving the 
normal. He then entered Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, whence he 
was graduated 1901. After receiving his diploma he was employed as 
a registered pharmacist in the drug store of H. M. Andress, at Home- 
stead, Pennsylvania, for two years, and for the succeeding two years oc- 
cupied the same position with A. C. Hyde, at New Castle. Pennsylvania. 
On January i, 1905, Mr. Headings purchased from the heirs, the drug 
store of G. C. Dippery, in the Harris Block, on East Market street, Lew- 
istown, and for two years conducted a successful drug business at that 
location. He then moved to the Will Lind building, now owned by the 
Methodist Episcopal church, remaining there four years. He then pur- 
chased of A. C. Mayes, his present store at the Five Points or Fountain 
Square, where he has a handsomely equipped, well-stocked and well- 
patronized store, with a varied line of cut glass, china, drugs, confec- 
tionery, fine stationery, fountain — in short, a modern drug store. He is 
also interested in the American Druggists Syndicate, a wholesale manu- 
facturing and jobbing drug association. He is a Democrat in politics, a 
member of the Masonic order, and of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. Both he and his wife are members of the Lutheran church. 

He married, in June, 1900, Estella Hayes, born in Pittsburgh, Penn- 
sylvania, daughter of L. O. Hayes, a retired coal dealer, of Pittsburgh. 
Children : Isabel, Louis and Gladys. 



The father of Rev. George Joseph was Benjamin Joseph, 
JOSEPH of England, an early manufacturer of iron nails. He 
lived and died in England, married Selina Monn, and 
reared a family of six children. 

Rev. George Joseph was born in England, March 7. 1846. He was 
educated in the public school and worked with his father until he 
reached legal age. In 1866 he came to the United States, arriving April 
21, and locating at Scranton, Pennsylvania. He prepared for the min- 
istry of the Evangelical Association, now the United Evangelical church. 
His first pastorate was at Liberty, Tioga county, Pennsylvania, where he 
was located two years. 1876 to 1878. He served several churches in 
Pennsylvania, and in 1894 was called to the pastorate of Grace Church, 
in Lewistown, serving that congregation four years. Here his health 
failed and he was compelled to abandon his holy calling. Since his re- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 547 

tiremeiit, Rev. Joseph has resided in Lewistown and has engaged in the 
real estate business. He has erected several residences on Shaw avenue 
and other streets, and contributed his full share to the progress of Lewis- 
town. He has always, however, retained as great an interest in the re- 
ligious welfare of the borough as when in the active ministry, and has 
at present charge of Trinity Mission in the sixth ward. He is a Re- 
publican in politics, and in 1910 was supervisor of the census in eight 
Pennsylvania counties. He has also served as chairman of the Alit^in 
county Republican committee. 

He married in 1872, Agnes Gilmore, of Blossburg. Tioga county, 
Pennsylvania, daughter of William and Ann (Bonner) Gilmore, both 
born in Scotland, and early settlers of Tioga county, both deceased. 
Children of Rev. George and Agnes (Gilmore) Joseph: \\'illiam. born 
March 22, 1874, died August 11, 1874; Annie, born July 20, 1875, d'ed 
September 13, 1892; Samuel, born June 30, 1877; Benjamin P., May 
17. 1879; Lydia W., July 21, 1882; George L., January 5. 1884; Sadie 
M.. January 27, 1886: Grace. September 20, 1889. 

The Wollners, of Lewistown, Pennsylvania, are of 
WOLLNER Austrian ancestry, descendants of Jacob and Anna 

(Friedman) Wollner, born in Austria, where they 
were educated, grew to adult age and married. Jacob was born in 1842, 
his wife in 1846. In 1868 they emigrated, landing in New York City, but 
the following year settling in Zanesville, Ohio. He was engaged there 
as a huckster until 1885, and accumulated sufficient capital to return to 
New York and engage in the manufacture of hosiery. He remained in 
New York two years, then returned to Zanesville, established a mer- 
cantile business, which he conducted successfully until his death in May, 
1906. He was a Republican in politics, and an Orthodox Jew in re- 
ligion. His widow yet survives. Children: M. Joseph; Ben, of whom 
further; Henry, Alexander, David, married, November 7, 1912, Mary 
M. Sherman ; Sarah, deceased ; Paul ; Isador, deceased ; Bessie D. ; H. 
Blanche and Louis. 

(II) Ben, second son of Jacob and Anna (Friedman) Wollner, was 
born in New York City, July 12, 1868. His early life was spent in 
Zanesville, Ohio, where he was educated, following various kinds of 
work, until 1888, when he became interested in hides, and thoroughly 



548 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

learned the business of selecting, grading and buying hides used in mak- 
ing leather. He worked in Zanesville for seven years, and traveled out 
of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, as a hide buyer four years. He became an 
expert in his judgment on equality and value of hides, and was so well 
informed as to the condition of trade that in 1901 he availed himself 
of an opportunity to engage in business for himself. He formed a part- 
nership with his brother, David, and they began business in the Ouigley 
Warehouse, on Water street, Lewistown, as dealers in hides, wool and 
tallow. They began in a small way, but prosperity attended them, and 
in 1902 they moved to enlarged cjuarters on West Hale street, their pres- 
ent location. David Wollner is the inside man, and in charge of the 
Lewistown business, while Ben W^ollner is buyer and traveling salesman. 
They do an extensive business, and rank with the substantial business 
men of their town. Both are Progressive Republicans, and Reformed 
Jews in religion. The senior member of the firm is unmarried. 



This family descends from German ancestors, the 
NIGHTHART first to arrive in the United States being John F. 
Nighthart, born in Germany, July 29, 1820. He 
was well educated, a fine linguist, speaking seven difi^erent languages 
fluently. He was a coach trimmer and saddler by trade. He came to 
the L^nited States when a 3'oung man, and settled in Lewistown, Penn- 
sylvania, where he died May 3, 1874. On February 18, 1865, he enlisted 
in Company C. Seventy-eighth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, and 
served until September 11, 1865, when he was honorably discharged. 
He married Catherine E. Peters, born in Germany, February 3, 1830, 
came to the United States unmarried, and died in Lewistown, October 
15, 1905, surviving her husband thirty-one years. She was a member of 
the Presbyterian church. Children: John H., born May 10, 1852, died 
November i, 1906; William, living in Lewistown; Mary Ellen; Charles, 
of whom further ; John L. ; Frank. 

dl) Charles, son of John F. and Catherine E. (Peters) Nighthart, 
was born in Lewistown, Pennsylvania, April 21, i860. He attended the 
public schools, and later learned the trade of printer. Subsequently he 
entered the employ of the Standard Steel Company, and is a worker in 
the hammer shop at the Steel ^^'orks. For the past twenty-six years he 
has been a Ijreeder of fine poultr\-. specializing in Buff and \Miite Leg- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 549 

horns and White Orphingtons, his pens containing prize winners at 
pouhry shows. Mr. Nighthart is a Republican in poHtics, and a member 
of the Lutheran church. He is a member of Lewistown Lodge, No. 
203, Ancient Free and Accepted ]\Iasons. He married, in 1882, at Lew- 
istown, Sarah Rebecca Grove, born in Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, 
daughter of George and Catherine (Decker) Grove, of Snyder countyi 
later of Lewistown, wh'^re Mr. Grove died at an advanced age, May 29, 
1905, his wife passing away in 191 1, aged seventy-seven years. Chil- 
dren of Mr. and Mrs. Nighthart: George Edward, born July 13, 1884; 
Charlotte May, March 10, 1888; Lester Abbott, May 14, 1890. The 
family home is at No. 318 Valley street, Lewistown. 

Andrew Mayes, a farmer, of Center county, Pennsylvania, 
MAYES died April 8. 1827. He married Annie Shaw, who died 

January 28, 1831. Children: i. Elizabeth, born May 15, 
1788. 2. James, of whom further. 3. William, born March 16, 1792, 
died October 5, 1838. 4. Andrew, born October 7, 1797, died February 
8, 1856. 5. Matthew T., born July 19, 1803, died August 31, 1845; 
married Martha Ewing; their daughter, Eliza A., married, September 
15, 1864, George Washington Soult, who died October 3, 1882. 

(II) James, eldest son of Andrew and Annie (Shaw) Mayes, was 
born in Center county, Pennsylvania, November 20, 1789. died Feb- 
ruary 4, 1829, meeting his death by an accident with a team and sled. 
He married Elizabeth Nagle and left issue, including a son, Thomas. 

(III) Thomas, son of James and Elizabeth (Nagle) ]\Iayes, was 
born in Center county, Pennsylvania, about 181 5, and died in Lewistown, 
Pennsylvania. He grew to manhood in Center county, but when a 
young man settled in Lewistown, where he was engaged in stock deal- 
ing and farming, and was proprietor of a hotel. He was a Democrat in 
politics, a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellows orders, and both lie 
and his wife were members of the Lutheran church. 

He married Mary Ann Snell, born in Reading, Pennsylvania, died in 
Lewistown. Children: i. Annie, married Oliver C. Chesney, whom she 
survives. 2. Albert C, of whom further. 3. Ella M., married. April 23, 
1867, David Pratt, who was born in Sheffield, Massachusetts, September 
20, 1842, son of Martin and Harriet (Buck) Pratt, both born in Massa- 
chusetts, he in 1795, she in 1801. Martin Pratt and wife moved to 



S50 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Litchfield, Connecticut, where he died December i8, 185 1, and she died 
there February 19, 1880, leaving four children, all now deceased. David 
Pratt located in Lewistown in 1869, and was a traveling salesman for his 
brothers. Harry and Riley Pratt, wholesale notions. Afterward he 
traveled for a Philadelphia firm, but retired later on account of his 
health, and died in 1907. He was a Republican in politics, a member of 
lodge, chapter and commandery of the Masonic order, and a Shriner 
of Lulu Temple. Philadelphia. He was also a member of the Red Men, 
Knights of the Golden Circle, and the Royal Arcanum, of Philadelphia. 
Both he and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Children of David and Ella M. (Mayes) Pratt: i. Albert, of Roanoke. 
Virginia, ii. Clarence B.. of Lewistown. iii. Leila Mayes, deceased, iv. 
Bertha May. of Lewistown, a member of the Eastern Star and Daugh- 
ters of Rebekah. v. Mary Willa ; married Seward Campbell, of Buffalo, 
New York, and has Henry Albert and Edward Pratt. 4. John B., died 
aged eighteen years. 5. Elizabeth, married a Mr. Mitchell and resides 
in Salem, Kansas. 6. Benjamin F.. died in infancy. 7. Laura, died in 
November, 1908, married Benjamin Pawling, of Lewistown. 

(IV) Albert C. son of Thomas and Mary Ann (Snell) Mayes, was 
born in Lewistown. Pennsylvania. September 7. 1844. He was educated 
in the public schools and Lewistown Academy, working for his father at 
the hotel during his earlier years. Later he became a traveling salesman 
for Hood. Eonbright & Company, corner of Eleventh and Market 
streets, Philadelphia, continuing for twenty-five years in that em- 
ploy, a verv capable and successful salesman. He then retired from 
"the road" and for five years was proprietor of the National Hotel in 
Lewistown. He then engaged in the real estate business in Lewistown, 
extending his lines gradually and doing a large business in \\'ashington. 
D. C. and New York City, where he yet owns property. He also owns 
two farms at Siglersville. Miiflin county, and a beautiful home at No. 22 
Brown street. Lewistown. where he now resides, retired from active 
business. He is a Democrat in politics, and a member of the Masonic 
and Odd Fellows orders of Lewistown. 

Mr. T^Iayes married (first) in March, 1865, Mary Swain, of Lewis- 
town, who died in 1868, leaving a son. Thomas E., now a druggist of 
Middletown, Pennsylvania. He married (second) Willa J. Smith, born 
in Siglersville. Pennsylvania, October 12, 1847. daughter of William and 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 551 

Jane (Brown) Smith, born near Siglersville, where they owned a farm 
and both died, he in 1847, she in 1868; both members of the Presbyte- 
rian church. Jane Brown was a descendant of the early Brown family 
of Mifflin county, and a daughter of Judge John Brown. Child of Al- 
bert C. Mayes by his second wife, William Smith Mayes, now a steam- 
fitter and plumber of Lewistown. 



In 1738, when a large number of Scotch-Irish Presbyte- 
McKEE rians came to Pennsylvania, there were several by the name 

McKee, who settled near Lancaster, Pennsylvania. They 
later separated, some going to Virginia, others going to Western Penn- 
sylvania and the far west, others remaining and settling in what is now 
Cumberland county, near Carlisle. One of these was Andrew (i), the 
ancestor of Strode M. McKee, of Lewistown. The first of this branch 
in the Juniata Valley was Andrew McKee, of the second generation in 
Pennsylvania. He was born and lived in Cumberland county until after 
the revolutionary war, in which he served. 

(II) Andrew (2), son of Andrew (i) McKee, was born in 1721. He 
served in the revolution and in his latter years left Cumberland county 
and came to the Juniata Valley, where he had one hundred and fifteen 
acres warranted to him December 9, 1784, lying in Granville township, 
Mifflin county, Pennsylvania. One hundred years later this farm was 
yet in the family, and owned by Harvey McKee. Andrew (2) married 
and had sons: Robert, of whom further; Thomas and Andrew (3). 
Andrew (3) was born May 29, 1780, died December 6, 1849. I"^^ set- 
tled in Charlotteville, Alberniarle county, Virginia, married Martha Can- 
non, born January 7. 1774. died September 13, 1829, and their son Rob- 
ert, born August i, 1810, died March 11, 1893. 

(III) Robert, son of Andrew (2) McKee, was born at Carlisle, Cum- 
berland county, Pennsylvania, July 15, 1775, and died April 13, 1845. 
When he came to Mifflin county he rode on horseback, following an In- 
dian trail, Lewistown at that time being a settlement consisting of four 
log houses. After his marriage he settled in Ferguson valley, two and a 
half miles northeast from Strode's Mills, where he followed his trade of 
blacksmith and became the owner of three farms. He married, July 5, 
1810, Orpha Strode, born April 30. 1787, died September 22, 1876. 
Children: I. Andrew, born May i, 181 1, died December 30, 1905; mar- 



552 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

ried Applebaugh. 2. Catherine, born February 7, 1813, died in In- 
diana in 1855; married Robert Rothrock. 3. Robert Anderson, born 
April 29, 1815, died in July, 1898; married Annie Comfort. 4. Mary, 
born January 8, 1818, died in June, 1909, married Ashley Pierce. 5. 
Hannah, born July 31, 1820; married Johnson Sigler. 6. J. Strode, of 
whom further. 7. Thomas Means, born July 12, 1825, died June 3, 1826. 
8. Isaac Harvey, born September 8, 1827, died January 23, 1904; mar- 
ried Jane McKee. 

(IV) J. Strode, son of Robert and Orpha (Strode) McKee, was born 
in Ferguson Valley, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, December 21, 1822, 
died in October, 1909. He attended the public school and grew to man- 
hood at the home farm, which later he inherited, passing his entire ac- 
tive life at the old McKee homestead. In his later years he lived in 
Lewistown, where he died. He was a Democrat, and both he and his 
wife were members of the Presbyterian church. He married, August 14, 
1 86 1, Lucy Amelia McKee, born in Center county, Pennsylvania, Oc- 
tober zy, 1839, died November 7, 1905, daughter of Samuel and Jane 
(McKinney) McKee. Samuel McKee was born in the year 1800. died 
in November, 1867. He married, June 7, 182 1, Jane McKinney, born 
in October, 1802, died in Lewistown, Pennsylvania, July 19, 1887. They 
resided in the Nittany valley, Center county, Pennsylvania ; he was a 
farmer. Children of Samuel and Jane (McKinney) McKee: i. Sarah 
Taylor, born May 14, 1822, died February 24, 1825. 2. Betsey, born 
November 13, 1824, died February 3, 1825. 3. Eliza, born January 18, 
1826, deceased ; married John McKee. 4. Rachel, born February 24, 
1828, deceased; married James Martin. 5. William, born September 17, 
1831, deceased; married Rebecca Fritz. 6. Jane, born July 2, 1834, died 
April 4, 1904; married Harvey McKee. 7. Caroline, born May 26, 1837, 

died in 1857; married Hannawalt. 8. Lucy Amelia, of previous 

mention, married J. Strode McKee. 9. John Luther, born March 22, 
1846; went west and was never after heard from. Children of J. Strode 
and Lucy A. (McKee) McKee: i. Samuel Bruce, born July 6, 1863, 
deceased. 2. Strode McKinney, of whom further. 3. Hattie Blanche, 
born March 19, 1869, killed at Lewistown Junction by a train of cars, 
February 2, 1903. 

(V) Strode McKinney, son of J. Strode and Lucy Amelia (McKee) 
McKee, was born in Ferguson valley, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, July 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 553 

3, 1867. He was educated in the public school of the valley, Levvistown 
high school and Lewistown Academy. He engaged in farming until 
1904, then moved to Lewistown and in 1910 was appointed rural mail 
carrier. He owns the homestead farm in Ferguson valley, also the 
dwellings at No. 209 West Market street, and No. 126 Valley street, in 
Lewistown. In politics he is a Democrat, and is a member of the Patri- 
otic Order Sons of America. 

He married, November 15, 1892, Ella May Davis, born in Perry 
county, Pennsylvania, February 2, 1867, daughter of Luke and Ann 
(Clark) Davis. Luke Davis was born in Walker township, Juniata 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1838, son of Judah and Charlotte Davis, who 
came to Juniata county, from Berks county, Pennsylvania, by wagon. 
Luke Davis served three years in the war between the states, and now 
resides with his children, Mrs. Ella May McKee and son Ross, the latter 
a train despatcher at Altoona for the Pennsylvania railroad. Ann 
(Clark) Davis, mother of Mrs. McKee, died March 3, 1906; she was a 
daughter of Thomas and Ann (Runibaughj Clark, pioneers of Bloom- 
field, Perry county. Children of Strode McKinney and Ella May 
(Davis) McKee: i. Helen Davis, born June 13, 1893. 2. Robert Lee, 
born October 22, 1894. 3. Charles Davis, January 14, 1896. 4. Joseph 
Andrew, January 25, 1899. 5. Mary Catherine, May 21, 1900. 6. Sam- 
uel Strode, April 30, 1905. The family residence is at No. 209 West 
Market street, Lewistown 



The Foltz family, of Lewistown, Pennsylvania, trace de- 
FOLTZ scent from Joseph M. Foltz, born in Germany, who came to 

the United States with his wife, settling in Lancaster 
county, Pennsylvania, where he engaged in farming until his death. 

(II) William, son of Joseph M. Foltz, was born in Lancaster county. 
Pennsylvania, in 1819, died in 1906, at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. He 
followed farming with his father in early life, then learned the carpen- 
ter's trade which he followed several years. He then became an em- 
ployee of the Pennsylvania railroad, continuing with that corporation 
until his death. He was a Democrat in politics, and an attendant of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, of which his wife was a member. He was 
a member of the Masonic order, belonging to Robert Burns Lodge, at 
Harrisburg, and also to Dauphin Lodge, No. 160, Independent Order of 



554 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Odd Fellows. He married Frances Atwood Sprout, born in Lancaster 
county in 1822, died in 1902, daughter of Joseph Sprout, an early settler 
of Elizabethtown, Lancaster county. Children: Elizabeth, deceased; 
William; Joseph M., of whom further; Charles, John, Augustus and 
Frank : five others dying in infancy. 

(Ill) Joseph M., son of William and Frances A. (Sprout) Foltz, 
was born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, October 31, 1847. He was edu- 
cated in the public school, finishing at Harrisburg high school, after 
which he entered the employ of the Pennsylvania railroad as passenger 
brakeman, continuing in the employ of that corporation thirty years, 
and located from 1871 until 1895 ^^ Lewistown. In the latter year he 
retired from the railroad and engaged in the coal lousiness in the Alle- 
gheny Valley, continuing until 1902, when he returned to Lewistown. 
He there engaged in business until 1907, when he retired and now re- 
sides at No. 211 West Market street. He is a Democrat in politics, and 
has served as borough councilman, president of council and chief bur- 
gess, now (1913) holding the latter office, his term expiring January, 
1 9 14. Mr. Foltz and his family attend the Presbyterian church. 

He married, in 1875, at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Alfarata Logan 
Smith, born in Lewistown in 1849, '" the house in which the family 
now resides; died there January 21, 1901. She was the daughter of 
Joseph R. Smith, who died in 1909, aged ninety years. He had a brother 
Roswell Smith, who died aged ninety-three years, and two sisters who 
lived to be over eighty years of age. Children: i. Robert P., married 
Lena Jennings and resides in Pittsburgh; children: Virginia and Joseph 
M. (2). 2. Mary Jane, died in 1878, aged three months. 



The great-grandfather of the Bricker family, of Lewis- 
BRICKER town, was born in Germany, and on coming to the 

United States settled in Center county, Pennsylvania. 
He married in Germany and was accompanied to this country by his 
wife. 

(Ill) John Bricker, grandson of the einigrant, spent most of his 
life in Center county, Pennsylvania, where he followed his trade of shoe- 
maker, later liecoming a farmer. He lived retired at Boalsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, the latter years of his life. He was a Republican in politics 
and a member of the Lutheran church. He married Rosanna Condo, 





/aU^Mjeyr— 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 555 

and both are deceased. Children: Emma; Mitchell, of whom further; 
Laird, deceased ; Scott, deceased ; Lizzie, deceased. 

(IV) Mitchell, son of John and Rosanna (Condo) Bricker, was born 
in Center county, Pennsylvania, September 17, 1854. He attended the 
public school and Boalsburg Academy, and after finishing his school life, 
learned the trade of coachsmith under the instruction of Robert Mont- 
gomery, beginning in 1872, the date of his coming to Lewistown. In 
1877 he began the manufacture of buggies and wagons, continuing in 
successful business for eighteen years, then selling out. He was vari- 
ously engaged for several years until 1903, when he was elected sherifif 
of Mifflin county, serving with credit a full term of three years. For the 
succeeding two years he was collector of taxes for the borough of Lewis-- 
town; in 1912 was appointed chief deputy sheriff under Sheriff Allen 
Fultz. and on the death of the latter was appointed by the governor to 
fill the office until the next general election. Mr. Bricker was elected 
coroner of Mifflin county, and served with credit for a term of three 
years. He was one of the organizers of the ]\Iifflin County Jewelry Com- 
pany, of Lewistown. and has served as a director since organization. 
The family home is at No. 41 Chestnut street, which Mr. Bricker has 
purchased. He is a Republican in politics, and has always taken an ac- 
tive interest in public affairs. He belongs to the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks and the Knights of the Golden Eagle, both lodges 
located in Lewistown. 

He married. December 22, 1875, Sarah, daughter of Henry Has- 
singer, deceased, of Lewistown, who came there from Snyder county, 
Pennsylvania. Children: i. Margaret, married Sherman Warner, sta- 
tion agent at Reedsville, Pennsylvania. 2. Delia, died in 1913, aged 22 
years. 3. Emma, married Lyman Marks, of Lewistown, and has a 
daughter, Sarah. 



Peter Loudenslager, deceased, was born in Se- 
LOUDENSLAGER linsgrove, Pennsylvania, October i, 1820, died 

in Lewistown, December 5, 1896, son of 
George Loudenslager, an early settler of Selinsgrove. Peter Louden- 
slager attended the public school and grew to manhood at Selinsgrove, 
where he learned the shoemaker's trade. Later he moved to Perry 
county, thence to Millerstown, Perry county, where he married, and in 



556 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

1857, settled ill Lewistown, where he followed his trade until death. 
He was a man of industry, and by his excellent qualities won the regard 
of all who knew him. He was a Republican in politics, and a member 
of the Lutheran church. 

He married in 1844, Maria Rumbaugh (Rev. Boyer officiating), of 
Millerstown, who joined the church at Millerstown at the age of fifteen 
years. She is the daughter of Ulrich and Anna Maria (Limperd) Rum- 
baugh, both born in Pennsylvania, of German parentage. Ulrich Rum- 
baugh was a farmer of Perry county, where he died in 1870. His wife 
died in 1828. They had eight children, of whom Maria, widow of Peter 
Loudenslager is the only survivor. She resides at No. 138 West Market 
street, Lewistown. Children of Peter and Maria Loudenslager: i. A 
daughter, died in infancy. 2. Theodore, now residing in Lewistown, a 
shoemaker; married Harriet Blett; they have ten children. 3. Ellen, 
married Robert Riden, deceased, and has four children. 4. David 
Crawford, died, aged five years. 5. William Luther, died, aged 18 
months. 6. Ida, married John Eyster, whom she survives, and has five 
children. 7. Margaret N., married Kirk McClintic, of Mifflintown, a 
merchant; one child. 8. Anna, married George Knepp, of Maywood, 
Missouri; two children. 9. Miriam R., married Robert Calvin Orr, of 
Lewistown, a dry goods clerk ; one child. 



This is a corrupted form of the Irish surname Ultz, but in 
ULSH the Juniata Valley family, Ulsh seems to be the prevailing 
spelling and pronounciation. The founder of this branch 
was John Ulsh, who was born in Centerville, Union county, Pennsylva- 
nia, and was a son of George Ulsh, who was born of Scotch-Irish par- 
entage. He married Judith Bruce, and they had five children, four 
daughters and one son, John being the son's name. John settled in Sny- 
der county, where he was a cabinetmaker, and spent the balance of his 
life in that county, dying in Beavertown, where he is buried. Hannah 
Ulsh is buried at Yeagertown, Pennsylvania ; they were both Lutherans. 
He married Hannah Nitze, and ten children blessed their union, four 
sons and six daughters, of these John Ulsh is the father of E. E. Ulsh. 
dl) John (2), son of John (i) Ulsh, was born in what is now Sny- 
der county, Pennsylvania, in 1848, and since 1886 has been a resident 
of South Main street, Lewistown. He grew to manhood in Snyder 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 557 

county, and attended the public schools and learned the tanner's trade. 
Later he became a stonemason. He located when a young man in Fer- 
guson's Valley, Mifflin county, lived there for several years, then en- 
tered the employ of the Logan Iron & Steel Company, of Burnham, with 
which he is yet connected. He is a Democrat in politics and a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. He married Susan, daughter of 
John Price, who came early to ]\Iifflin county, later moving to the state 
of Missouri, where he died. Children : Harry, killed in a railroad ac- 
cident ; Hosea, Cora B., Elmer E., of whom further; Clarence, twin of 
Elmer E. 

(Ill) Elmer E., son of John (2) and Susan (Price) Ulsh, was born 
in Ferguson's valley, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, March 26, 1875. He 
attended the public schools of the valley until 1886, when his parents 
moved to Lewistown, where he finished his studies in the public schools. 
He became an expert carpenter and since 19CK) has been engaged success- 
fully as a contractor and builder in Lewistown. In 1903 he located his 
residence at No. 21 Depot street, which he still owns, and in 191 1 erected 
his present place of business at No. 9 Montgomery avenue. He has es- 
tablished an excellent reputation as an honorable, capable builder, and is 
held in high esteem as a man and neighbor. He is a Democrat in politics 
and is now serving a term of six years as school director, to which he 
was elected in 1912. He is a member of the board of trade, and uses 
his influence to further all movements for the public good. His fra- 
ternity is the Improved Order of Red Men. In religious faith he is 
Methodist Episcopal as is also his family. 

He married, in 1902, Mary Ella, born in Newport, Perry county. 
Pennsylvania, daughter of Thomas White, who came to Lewistown in 
1891, now residing at No. 23 Depot street. Children: Thomas J., born 
March 11, 1908; Grace Elizabeth, April 12, 1909. 



The Ricketts family, of Lewistown, came to Mifflin 

RICKETTS from Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, where Joseph, 

grandfather of James D. Ricketts, was an early settler 

and farmer. He married, reared a family and both he and his wife, after 

long and useful lives, died in Huntingdon county. 

(II) David, son of Joseph Ricketts, was born in Huntingdon county, 
August 13, 1802. died in 1877. He was a farmer of Hill Valley all his 



558 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

life, prosperous and respected. He was a Democrat in politics, and a 
member of the Episcopal church. He married Mary Bentz, born in 
Huntingdon county, November 27, 1812, of German descent, a member 
of the German Baptist church (Dunkard), died in 1894. Children: 
Ann, married W. D. Colabine, of Mill Creek, Pennsylvania; Martin, de- 
ceased; James D., of whom further; William, deceased. 

(Ill) James D., son of David and Mary (Bentz) Ricketts, was born 
in Shirleysburg, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, March 9, 1849. He 
attended the public school, and until he was fourteen years of age, 
worked on the farm. In his fourteenth year he began working with a 
section gang on the Pennsylvania railroad, and spent his subsequent life 
in the employ of that company. From track laborer he was advanced 
to fireman, and in September, 1873, was promoted to engineer, a posi- 
tion he still holds. For forty years he has run between Sunbury and 
Lewistown, twenty-five years of which time he has been in the passenger 
service. In December, 1872, he moved his residence to Lewistown, and 
in 1890 purchased his present residence at No. 213 West Market street. 
In politics Mr. Ricketts is a Democrat, and in religious faith a Presbyte- 
rian. In 1886 he became a member of the Brotherhood of Locomotive 
Engineers. 

He married, September 17, 1878, Ella E. Postlethwaite, born in New- 
ton Hamilton, Pennsylvania, June 28, 1852, daughter of Samuel D. and 
Eleanor W^ (Van Dyke) Postlethwaite. Child: Alice, married P. S. 
Smith, and resides at Lewistown ; four children : Eleanor, Dallas, Karl 
K. and Eugene. 

Samuel D. Postlethwaite, born November 27, 181 1, in Newton Ham- 
ilton, was a son of Thomas Irwin Postlethwaite, born in Lancaster 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1779, son of John Postlethwaite. born in Lan- 
caster county, 1736, married (first) Hannah W^right, and in 1789, settled 
in Mifflin county, Pennsylvania. The father of John was Postle- 
thwaite, an early settler of Lancaster county, who kept a house of public 
entertainment, and in 1729, at his house, known as Postlethwaite Tavern, 
was held the first court in Lancaster county under the Crown. Thomas 
Irwin Postlethwaite, born in Lancaster, was an early settler of Miffiin 
county, where he was a prominent, influential and prosperous farmer. 
He served in the state legislature and in other public positions. He mar- 
ried Nancy Drake. Children: Thomas, Samuel D., William. Jackson, 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 559 

Eliza, Jane, John and David. Samuel D. Postlethwaite was a cab- 
inetmaker by trade, later a farmer, until his death, November 2j, 1892. 
He was a faithful member of the Presbyterian church, and in politics a 
Democrat. He married, December 15, 1840, Eleanor \\\ Van Dyke, 
born in Paradise, Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, January 29, 
1823, died March 6. 1906. Children of Samuel D. Postlethwaite: 
I. Thomas, a Union soldier, killed at the battle of Fredericksburg. 2. 
Lambert. 3. Mary Jane, married Marion Van Courte; three children: 
Elmer, Mary and Mabel. 4. Porter, died when a young man. 5. Ella 
E., wife of James D. Ricketts. 6. Alice A., married W. S. Caldwell. 7. 
Charles B., married and lives in Kansas. 8. John M. 9. Samuel H. 

Harry B. Stroup, of Yeagertown, Pennsylvania, descends 
STROUP from a family that has for many generations lived in this 

state. The Stroup family was among the pioneers of 
Derry township. Phillip and William Stroup were the first warrantees, 
and one of their descendants in Mifflin county was John Stroup, father 
of Martin Luther, and grandfather of Harry B. Stroup. 

(II) John Stroup was born in November, 1793. He was a farmer 
by occupation, and worked with his father for years, subsequently rent- 
ing a farm in Mifflin county. Inheriting a portion of the farm of his 
father in Decatur township, he purchased the remainder from the other 
heirs and made improvements on it. He engaged in stock dealing for 
years, and in the dual occupation was successful. He married, in 18 17, 
Margaret, daughter of Michael and Catherine (Bowersox) Bair, who 
were born in York county, Pennsylvania, of German extraction. Chil- 
dren : I. William, born November 9, 1817. 2. Catherine, born May 
16, 1819; married Henry Bridge. 3. John, born November 3, 1821, died 
3'oung. 4. Elizabeth, born October 2, 1823, died young. 5. Margaret, 
born September 17, 1S24; married Frederick Griminger. 6. Sarah Hen- 
rietta, born December 30, 1828, married Jacob Rothrock, of Illinois, 7, 
Sophia K. 8. Mary, born November 21, 1832, died young. 9. Susan H. 
10. Martin Luther, of whom further. 11. David Albert. 12. John Levi. 
13. Lucinda, born December 18, 1842, married Jacob Strayer, of In- 
diana. 

(III) Martin Luther, son of John and Margaret (Bair) Stroup, was 
born March i, 1837, in Decatur township, and was educated in the pub- 



56o HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

lie schools of the day. He assisted his father on the farm, then he 
rented one and farmed alone. After his father died and he received his 
patrimony he purchased a farm in the same township, sold it and 
bought another in Derry township. He is a farmer of recognized ability, 
a good neighbor and a progressive citizen. He is a Democrat, a prom- 
inent member of the Lutheran church in Decatur, and has served as dea- 
con for years. He is an active worker in the Sunday school, retaining all 
of his youthful interest in it and church work. He married, October .5, 
1857, Caroline, daughter of Jacob W. and Mary Miller, of Schuylkill 
county, Pennsylvania. Caroline (Miller) Stroup was born in 1829, and 
comes from an excellent family of straight English descent. Children: 
I. John Miller. 2. Sarah Ann. 3. Katie J., married Clinton B. Silkman 
and resides in Scranton, Pennsylvania. 4. Jacob Warner. 5. Harry 
Bridge, of whom further. 6. Frank Murry. 

(IV) Harry Bridge, son of Martin Luther and Caroline (Miller) 
Stroup, was born in Decatur township, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, 
September 5, 1869. He was reared on the farm of his father, and was 
educated in the public school of the township and at Lewistown high 
school. He lived on the old homestead until 1898, when he accepted a 
position with Logan & Company, Incorporated, as general clerk, and has 
held that place since. He is a Democrat, following the traditions of the 
family. He is also a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
at Lewistown. 



The American progenitor of this branch of the Harper 
HARPER family, John Harper, was born in county Tyrone, Ire- 
land. He there grew to manhood, married, and in 1866 
came to the LInited States, settling in Morris county, New Jersey. He 
there worked in the iron mines and learned the stone mason's trade, 
continuing until May, 1876, when he moved to Philadelphia. He there 
followed the building business for nine years, then lived retired for the 
fifteen years preceding his death in July, 1900. He was a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, and in both Ireland and the United 
States belonged to the Order of Orangemen. He married Jane Orr, born 
in Ireland, died February 7, 1913. Children: i. Sarah, married S. C. 
Honey and resides in Newark, New Jersey. 2. Died in infancy. 3. 
David, resides in Newark, New Jersey. 4. Robert E., died at Burnham, 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 561 

July 4, 191 1. 5. Joseph, died in Newark, New Jersey. 6. Andrew, re- 
sides in Newark. 7. Augustus, of whom further. 8. Samuel, resides in 
Philadelphia. 9. William H., resides in Philadelphia. 10. Jane, married 
Howard Pierson and resides in Philadelphia. 11. Minnie W., married 
Robert Wooler, and resides in Philadelphia. 

(II) Augustus, son of John and Jane (Orr) Harper, was born in 
Morris county. New Jersey, June 6. 1868. He attended the public 
schools there until he was eight years of age, when his parents moved to 
Philadelphia, where his education was finished in the public schools of 
that city. He began business life as a worker in the Baldwin Locomotive 
Works in Philadelphia, remaining ten years, and becoming familiar 
with steel working in various forms. In August, 1898, he moved to 
Burnham, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, where he entered the employ of 
the Standard Steel Works Company, in the hammer department, and 
there continues. He is a member of the Masonic order, belonsrine to 
Lewistown Lodge, No. 203, Free and Accepted Masons; Lewistown 
Chapter. No. 186, Royal Arch Masons: Lewistown Commandery, No. 
26, Knights Templar, and Jaffa Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine, of Altoona. Pennsylvania. He also belongs to 
lodge and encampment of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and to 
the Knights of the Golden Eagle. 

Mr. Harper married, October 19, 1890, Amelia A. Inman, born in 
Nova Scotia, Canada, daughter of Charles and Margaret (Oldroyd) In- 
man, both borri in England, settling in Nova Scotia about 1862, where 
Charles Inman, a mining engineer, died December 18, 1875. After his 
death the widow and children returned to England, remaining two years, 
but came again to Nova Scotia, and in 1880 came to the United States, 
settling in Philadelphia, where the widow, Margaret Inman. died Jan- 
uary 17, 1900. Children of Charles and Margaret Inman: Mark, Wil- 
liam A., Roland. Eugene and Adelaide, all deceased; George Scarlett, 
resides in Philadelphia: John, deceased; Amelia A., wife of Augustus 
Harper: and Hannah B.. married Mahlon George Place, and resides in 
Philadelphia. Children of Augustus and .Amelia A. (Inman) Harper: 
I. Harold I., married Edith Duck. 2. Ira O. 3. Augustus Orr, died 
May 26. 1902, aged nine years. 4. Charles Raymond. 5. Amelia A. 
The family residence at No. 103 Main street, Burnham, was erected by 
Mr. Harper during the summer of 1900. 



562 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

The emigrant ancestor of Dr. Benjamin Rush Kohler 
KOHLER was a German, Hving in Switzerland, from whence, with 

wife and children, he sailed for America. John M. Koh- 
ler, the German emigrant, landed with his children in Philadelphia, his 
wife having died at sea. From Philadelphia the family moved to Read- 
ing, thence to Middletown, Pennsylvania, where the father worked at his 
trade, weaving, for a short time, then moved to Lewistown, Pennsylva- 
nia, about the year 1828, and there died. 

(II) Henry, son of John M. Kohler, was born in Switzerland and 
came to the United States with his father in 1807. He became a weaver, 
learning that trade with his father, whom he accompanied to Lewistown 
in 1828. He continued at his trade in Lewistown for seven years, mov- 
ing to Milroy in 1835, and for a time worked there as a weaver. He 
then became a merchant, continuing several years, then moved to Center 
county, Pennsylvania, where he purchased a small farm and lived for 
about twenty years. He lived retired in Milroy until his death, No- 
vember 9, 1887. He married Mary Wolfley, who bore him thirteen 
children, four of whom died in early childhood: i. John. 2. Jacob, 
born March 14, 1832, a manufacturer of carpets and a merchant, now 
living retired in Reedsville. He was elected associate judge of Mitflin 
county in 1885, serving five years; in 1892 he was elected justice of the 
peace. During the war between the states he was second lieutenant of 
Company K, 205th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers. He married 
Susan I. Crosthwaite, daughter of Richard, and granddaughter of John 
Crosthwaite, who came from Ireland. 3. Susan, now living in Milroy, 
unmarried. 4. William F., deceased, married Sarah Kemmerer. 5. 
Frederick S., of whom further. 6. James, died in the army during the 
civil war, aged twenty-two years. 7. Jane, married John Wolf and re- 
sides at Potter's Mills. 8. Matilda, married John O. Stover. 9. Amelia, 
now living in Milroy, unmarried. 

(III) Dr. Frederick S. Kohler, son of Henry and Mary (Wolfley) 
Kohler. was born in Milroy, Pennsylvania, December 18, 1836, died in 
Nampa, Idaho, January i, 1908. He attended the pul)lic schools, studied 
medicine and in i860 was graduated M. D. from the Eclectic Medical 
College of Pennsylvania. During the civil war he was commissioned as- 
sistant surgeon of the Twenty-first Regiment Pennsylvania Cavalry, 
serving from February 18, 1863, until mustered out July 8, 1865. After 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 563 

the war he located in Reedsville, Pennsylvania, remaining for twelve 
years. In 1873 he took a special course and was graduated from the 
Medical College of Ohio, at Cincinnati, Ohio, and for several years was 
located in Vevay, Indiana. He later practiced in Morgan, Utah, moving 
in August, 1887, to Nampa, Idaho, where he practiced until his death. 
January i, 1908. He was a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and the Knights of Pythias. He married Sarah A. Carson, born 
December 17, 1841, died December 11, 1866. Her parents died when 
she was young, leaving her to the care of her uncle, John Carson, of 
Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, who later moved to Wisconsin and there 
died. She was a member of the Presbyterian church. Children: Dr. 
William H., of whom further; Benjamin Rush, of whom further. 

(IV) Dr. William H. Kohler, elder son of Dr. Frederick S. and 
Sarah A. (Carson) Kohler, was born in Reedsville, Mifflin county, 
Pennsylvania, December 19, 1863. He was deprived of a mother's care 
when three years of age, his childhood being spent with relatives in 
Philadelphia and Center county, Pennsylvania. He spent his life until 
his nineteenth year mainly in Center county, where he received a good 
public school education, and for two years worked at farming. His' 
ambition was for his father's profession, and that goal was kept con- 
stantly in view, until finally attained. He attended Pennsylvania State 
College, then spent two years at Western Reserve University, Cleveland, 
Ohio, in the medical department. In the autumn of 1886 he entered Jef- 
ferson Medical College, at Philadelphia, whence he was graduated with 
honors, receiving the degree of M. D., April 4, 1887. He located in Mil- 
roy, Pennsylvania, the following June, and there became well estab- 
lished as a skillful, honorable physician. His standing among the 
brethren of the profession is of the highest, and in the hearts of his 
people there is no rival. His skill, unfailing cheerfulness and pleasing 
manner have won him a standing and a regard that is only gained by the 
country doctor and only by him, through years of association, "con- 
fidence being a plant of slow growth," but after taking root, being wa- 
tered by the tears of sorrow and blossoming in the sunshine of joy, de- 
velops a tree of such strength that only death can destroy. For over a 
quarter of a century Dr. Kohler has gone in and out of the homes of 
his community, and whether he brings joy or sorrow is the beloved phy- 
sician, whom all trust and honor. Dr. Kohler is surgeon for the Cambria 



564 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Steel Company at their quarries, which are located at Naginey, Penn- 
sylvania. He is a member of the MifHin County Medical Society; the 
Knights of the Golden Eagle, and Commandery of the Loyal Legion of 
Pennsylvania. In political faith he is a Republican ; in religious faith a 
Presbyterian. 

Dr. Kohler married, April 4, 1894, Harriet Elizabeth Bunnell, born 
September 21, 1874, second child and eldest daughter of William Cyrus 
and Sarah Jane (Brown) Bunnell, of Lewistown, and granddaughter of 
William Usual Bunnell, an early Scotch-Irish settler of Crawford county, 
Pennsylvania, a farmer and land owner, and his wife, Harriet (Mc- 
Clure) Bunnell, also granddaughter (maternal) of Hon. James M. 
Brown, twice elected to the Pennsylvania legislature. Children of Wil- 
liam C^rus and Sarah Jane Bunnell, who were married November 11, 
1868: James Brown; Harriet E., married Dr. William H. Kohler; Edna 
Delia ; Weaker Irwin and Fanny Cyrus. William Cyrus Brown resided 
on a farm nead Siglerville, Pennsylvania, until his removal to Milroy, but 
he was engaged for thirty-five years as proprietor of a music store in 
Lewistown. Children of Dr. William H. and Harriet Elizabeth Koh- 
ler: Sarah, born February 7, 1896; Mary, April 4, 1898. 

(IV) Dr. Benjamin Rush Kohler, younger son of Dr. Frederick S. 
and Sarah A. (Carson) Kohler, was born in Reedsville, Mifflin county, 
Pennsylvania. September 7, 1865. He was educated in the public schools 
and at the academy in Ghent, Kentucky, where he prepared for college. 
He accompanied the family to Utah, reading medicine under his father 
for two years. He entered the medical department of Western Reserve 
University, at Cleveland, Ohio, in 1883, whence he was graduated M. D., 
February 25. 1885. He then returned to his native town, and there be- 
gan the general practice of his profession. .\s the years have passed 
Dr. Kohler has grown with his practice, taking front rank among the 
leaders of his profession. Ever the student, he has kept pace with all 
modern discovery and through his many articles in the medical journals 
has greatly aided the onward march of medical science. His skill and 
learning are of more than local fame. He is a censor of the Medico- 
Chirurgical College, elected by the trustees of that institution May 30, 
1896. His specialty is diseases of children, and it is on this branch of 
medical practice that he has written many articles for professional jour- 
nals, and made the object of special study and investigation. He is a 





ccA. 



y 



'O^^/^ 



HISTORY OF THE JUXIATA VALLEY 565 



member of the hospital staff of the township poor farm; member of the 
American Medical Association and of the state and county medical so- 
cieties, he also belongs to the Masonic fraternit}-, Lewistown Lodge, No. 
203. The family are all members of the Presbyterian church. 

Dr. Kohler married, November 27, 1888, Mary A. Smith, born in 
Belleville, Pennsylvania, daughter of William T. and Phoebe A. (Foltz) 
Smith. William Smith, for many years a school teacher and farmer of 
the Kishacoquillas \'alley, died August 2j, 1890. His wife died in 1910, 
leaving children, besides Mrs. Kohler: Catherine; Sarah, married Har- 
rison Manbeck; Margaret, married William Sankey; George; Matilda, 
married John W. Brindel; Jennie, married Elmer Young; William. The 
only child of Dr. Kohler, Frank E., born February 13, 1891, is now a 
student of medicine at Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia. 



The paternal American ancestor of this famil_\- was 
MECHTLEY Isaac Mechtley, born in Germany, came to the United 

States when young and settled in Snyder county, 
Pennsylvania, where he died a farmer. He marrried Catherine Bobb, 
who also died in Snyder county. They had two children : Henry and 
Isaac. 

(II) Henry, son of Isaac and Catherine (Bobb) Mechtley, was born 
in Snyder county, Pennsylvania, in 1830. died at Emporia, Kansas, in 
1888. He was a bricklayer by trade, and became a well-known contrac- 
tor, operating in Juniata, Mifflin, Center and Clinton counties. He built 
the Lutheran church at East Waterford, Pennsylvania, and on that build- 
ing his son Willard laid his first brick. In 1878 he left Pennsylvania and 
settled in Emporia, Kansas, where he took up land and continued his 
contracting business until his death in 1888. In religious faith he was 
a member of the Reformed church, and in politics a Democrat. He mar- 
ried Lydia Keller, born in Clinton county, Pennsylvania, February 6, 
1835, who survives him, a resident of Emporia, Kansas. She is a daugh- 
ter of Jacob Keller, a pioneer of Clinton county, Pennsylvania. Chil- 
dren : Adeline; Willard, of whom further; Mary C, deceased; Sarah 
Jane, deceased; John E., deceased; Henry A.; Caroline; Amelia, de- 
ceased; James; Wilson, twin of James, deceased; Margaret; Ellen M.; 
Minnie, deceased ; Gertrude, deceased ; Emma. 

(III) Willard, son of Henry and Lydia (Keller) Mechtley, was born 



566 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

in Troxelville. Snyder county, Pennsylvania, March 5, 1855. He at- 
tended the public school until he was twelve years of age, then began 
learning bricklaying with his father, only attending winter sessions after 
that age. He became an expert mechanic, and continued with his father 
until reaching legal age. He then began contracting the erection of 
buildings, and has so continued until the present time, having gained an 
enviable reputation as a builder in the counties of Snyder, Center, Clin- 
ton, Mifflin and Juniata. In Center county alone he has erected thirteen 
churches, and was the contractor on the First Church at Rebersburg. 
In 1902 he located in Lewistown, where he has erected many buildings, 
and added greatly to the enterprise of that borough. Many of the 
buildings erected he owns, while others have been built under contract 
for others. Of late years he has confined his building operations to 
Lewistown. In politics he is a Democrat, and in religious faith a mem- 
ber of the Reformed church. The family home is at No. 169 Panne- 
baker avenue, Lewistown, on which avenue Mr. Mechtley owns six other 
residences. 

He married, in 1880, Sarah Jane Helfrich, of Beaver Springs. Sny- 
der county, Pennsylvania. Children: i. Bessie, married Edward H. 
Derr, D. D. S., and resides in Lewistown. 2. Mary Lydia, married 
Frank Felker : children : Mae and Frank M. 3. Carrie A., married W. 
E. Bailey : child : Paul Edward. 



The Shirey family came to Lewistown, Pennsylvania, 
SHIREY from the State of Ohio, where Henry Shirey, the grand- 
father of John Shirey, lived and died. On the maternal 
side they descend from Samuel Aurand, a pioneer of Snyder county. 
Pennsylvania, who died and is buried at Beaver Springs. He and his 
wife, Catherine Valentine, came to Snyder county in 1812, settling on a 
tract of wild land that they cleared and improved, he also working at 
his trade of blacksmith, having his shop on his farm. Of the ten chil- 
dren of Samuel Aurand. none are living. 

fll) John, son of Henry Shirey, was born in Ohio in 181 5, died in 
Snyder county in 1864. He was a tanner by trade, also cultivated a 
farm in Snyder county. He was a Democrat in politics and a member 
of the Reformed church. He married Catherine, born in Snyder county, 
Pennsylvania, January i, 1812, died in November, 1903, eldest daughter 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 567 

of Samuel Aurand ; she had brothers and sisters : Henry, EHas, Enoch, 
Samuel, Isaac, Sarah, Rebecca, Lucy M. and Elizabeth. Children of 
John and Catherine Shirey : Lucinda, deceased ; Kate, deceased ; Eliza- 
beth, deceased; Mollie, of Preston, Iowa; Joseph, of Dry Valley, Mif- 
flin county; Isaac, of Snyder county; Samuel, of Beaver Springs, Snyder 
county; John, of whom further; Sarah and Sallie (twins), both died in 
infancy. 

(Ill J John (2j, son of John (i) and Catherine (Aurand) Shirey, 
was born in Snyder county, Pennsylvania, at Beaver Springs, April 6, 
1856. He attended the public schools and spent his early life engaged in 
farming. He then worked for two years on the railroad, then in a coal 
yard, then again at farming near Beaver Springs, continuing in Snyder 
county until 1880. He then located in Mifflin county, where he was a 
prosperous farmer until 1904, when he moved to his present residence in 
Derry township, managing his farm property from there. He is the 
owner of three good farms in Mifflin county, and also invested largely in 
the erection of double houses in both borough and township. He built 
six houses of this kind in Lewistown and eight in Derry township, with 
his own residence at No. 218 Electric avenue, Lewistown. Mr. Shirey 
has prospered through his great energy, wise foresight and quick percep- 
tion of values. He has won success and as his energy is boundless he will 
continue to advance. He devotes his entire time at present to the care of 
his farms and residence property, all of which are productive. He is a 
Democrat in politics, and a member of St. John's Lutheran Church, of 
Lewistown, as is also his family. 

He married, December 19, 1878, Mary Alice Herbster, born at Bea- 
vertown, Snyder county, November 20, 1858, daughter of Philip Herb- 
ster, born 1824, in Snyder county, died in 1906, and his wife Malinda 
Kline, born in 1832 at Beavertown, and granddaughter of Gabriel Herb- 
ster, a pioneer of Snyder county, and of George Kline, of Beavertown. 
Children of Philip and Malinda Herbster : Ammon, Jacob, George and 
Amelia, twins; Mary Alice, wife of John (2) Shirey; James; John; Wil- 
liam, deceased; and Vernon. The mother of these children is yet living 
in her eighty-first year. Children of John and Mary Alice Shirey: i. 
Effie, born July 21, 1880, died in 1886. 2. Homer Nelson, born July 28, 
1882, now a farmer at Strode Mills; married Nettie Kline and has: 
Mary, Annie, Mildred and Dorothy S. 3. Mollie Amelia, born March 



568 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

31, 1887; married Walter Starr, of Lewistown. 4. Lester Lee, born 
July I, 1889, now a farmer three miles below Lewistown; married Mary 
Klose and has : John, Leonard and Catherine. 5. Beatrice Ellen, born 
October 9, 1891, resides at home. 



Calvin Gray, of Lewistown, Pennsylvania, is of pure Scotch 
GRAY lineage, his emigrant ancestors coming to America from 
Scotland about 1784, or thereabouts. They landed in New 
York, and afterward drifted into Pennsylvania. 

(I) James Gray was born in Scotland, and there married his wife, 
Elizabeth, and together they crossed the Atlantic, landing in New York. 
From there he moved to Juniata county, Pennsylvania, before 1800. He 
located with his family in Lack township, Juniata county, and began 
farming. He moved in 181 5 on the farm on which he died later, at the 
age of eighty-eight; his wife also died at the age of eighty-eight. 
Among their children was Joseph, of whom further. 

(II) Joseph, son of the Scotch emigrants, James and Elizabeth Gray, 
was born on the Gray farm in Beal township, Juniata county, Pennsylva- 
nia, in 1808, and died in the same township October 27, 1898, aged 
ninety years. 

He was reared on the Gray farm, and educated in the com- 
mon schools of Beal township, but being of a studious turn of mind he 
absorbed more than most boys of his age. and opportunities from the 
fount of knowledge. Leaving school he at first farmed and afterward 
turned his attention to school teaching, which pursuit he followed suc- 
cessfully for over thirty years, in conjunction with his farming. He 
purchased the Gray homestead on which his father first settled in Beal 
township, and here reared his large family. He was a Democrat, and 
was elected on that ticket to the office of tax collector. He married 
(first) Elizabeth Harris, of Concord, Franklin county. Children; 
James H., Martha, William, John B., Thomas. Joseph B., Alexander C, 
Robert, James H.. William, died young. James H., William, John, 
Thomas and Joseph were in the civil war, James H. being wounded in 
the battle of Chancellorsville. Joseph Gray married (second) Leah Bar- 
ton, born in Beal town.ship in 1828, died in 1899. a daughter of James 
and Hannah (Grim) Barton, pioneers in Juniata county. He was a na- 
tive of Pennsylvania and she of Ireland ; he died at the age of forty-five, 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 569 

and she lived to be ninety-four. Children of Joseph and Leah (Barton) 
Gray: Samuel, deceased; Nancy Elizabeth; Harvey B. ; George Wash- 
ington, deceased; Calvin, of whom further; Mary, twin of Calvin; Re- 
becca Ellen; David, died in infancy; Alice Christina, deceased; Howard 
David, deceased ; Jesse Franklin. 

(Ill) Calvin, son of Joseph and Leah (Barton) Gray, was born No- 
vember 23, 1857, in Lack township, Juniata county, Pennsylvania, on 
the Gray homestead, and there passed twenty-four years. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools of the time. At the age of twenty-four he 
moved to Shirleysburg, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, and farmed 
four years. He then moved to Richland county, Ohio, where he en- 
gaged in farm work for two years. His next move was to McKean 
county, Pennsylvania. Here he became a tanner, and remained at that 
occupation for ten years, then was employed by the Prudential Insurance 
Company one year as agent ; at the e.xpiration of that time he went to Al- 
toona, in October, 1899, and accepted a position as motorman on the 
Logan Valley traction road. On June 3, 1900, he went to Lewistown, 
and since that time has been motorman on the Lewistown & Reedsville 
electric road. In 1894 he erected a residence on Walnut street, and in 
19 10 he also erected one at the corner of Valley and Walnut streets, 
Lewistown, where he has since resided. He is a Democrat, and was a 
member of the borough coimtil of McKean county, and has for the past 
four years been a member of the Lewistown borough council. He is 
a member of Lodge No. 203, of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, of 
Lewistown. 

He married, December 29, 1887, Mary E. Crouse, born in Juniata 
county, in 1864, a daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth (Roher) Crouse, 
early settlers in Juniata county. Mrs. Crouse is the sister of Rev. Abra- 
ham Roher, a noted minister. Mr. and Mrs. Gray have no children, but 
adopted a son. Guy E. Gray, born September 27, 1891, educated in the 
public and Lewistown high school, clerks in Logan Iron & Steel Com- 
pany. 



The emigrant Miller, in this branch of that numerous 
MILLER family, came to Pennsylvania from Germany, settling in 
Berks county. He later settled near Freeburg, Washing- 
ton township, Snyder county, where he built a mill that was long known 



570 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

as Miller's Mill. Among his children were sons: John, Samuel and 
George. 

(II) John Miller, son of the emigrant, grew to manhood in Berks 
country, and there married, coming thence to Snyder county, where he 
was a farmer and miller. His brother, Samuel, was a pioneer of the 
Buiifalo Valley, while George settled at Selinsgrove, owning one of the 
first farms in that section, and one yet owned in the family. John Miller 
married Christianna Chamberlain, a descendant of Colonel William 
Chamberlain, born in New Jersey, September 25, 1736, served in the 
revolutionary war; married four wives, the last August 16, 1794; had 
twenty-three children, fifteen of whom were born in New Jersey. John 
Miller and his wife both died in Washington township, Snyder county, 
leaving issue. 

(III) Captain Lewis Miller, son of John and Christianna (Cham- 
berlain) Miller, was born in Washington township, Snyder county, 
Pennsylvania, died in Snyder county, Pennsylvania. He learned the car- 
penter's trade, also was a millwright, which trade he followed until the 
outbreak of the civil war, when he enlistetd in the One Hundred and 
Thirty-first Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, served three years, and 
attaining the rank of captain, succeeding Captain Ryan. He was a gal- 
lant soldier, won his promotion by actual field service, and after the war 
returned to peaceful pursuits, rounding out a full and complete life. He 
married Sarah Stalnecker, who died in 1910. Children: Harvey, died in 
infancy; Kate, deceased; John H., of whom further; Jemima, married 
William Moyer, of Snyder county. 

(IV) John H., son of Captain Lewis and Sarah (Stalnecker) Miller, 
was born in Washington township, Snyder county, Pennsylvania, May 
22, 1868. He was educated in the public school and grew to manhood on 
the farm owned by his father, and operated by him in addition to his 
trade of carpenter and millwright. He traveled for about three years in 
early life, visited twenty-two states, including California, attaining his 
twenty-first birthday in that state. After about three years of travel he 
returned home, and for six years cultivated the home farm for his 
father. He then bought a farm in Oliver township, Mifflin county, 
which he worked with such success that he is now the owner of five 
farms in Mifflin county, with sand bank and clay pits at Burnham, and 
three saw mills — one at Burnham, two in Huntingdon county. He also 



HISTORY OF THE J U XI AT A VALLEY 571 

is engaged in contracting and has other business interests. Since 1906 
he has resided in Lewistown, managing his large interests from that cen- 
tral point. He was one of tlie organizers of the Ferguson Valley In- 
surance Company, and assisted in promoting the telephone company in 
that valley. He employs about one hundred men to carry on his different 
operations, and in his lumbering operations is associated with Henry E. 
Knepp under the firm name of Miller & Knepp. In politics he is a Re- 
publican, but has never accepted public office, being entirely satisfied with 
a business career. 

He married, in 1891, Alice Hare, born in Snyder county, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1872, daughter of Perry Hare, now deceased. Children: 
Harvey Henry, Daniel Lewis, George, Sarah, Jay. 



William Grant Smith, of Belleville, Mifflin county, Pennsyl- 
SMITH vania, comes from the widely scattered Smith family that 
has branches in every state in the Union. The name of his 
immigrant forbear is lost, but he is known to have drifted into Pennsyl- 
vania about 1723. On the colonial records of that period appear the 
names of several Smiths. Some were Indian fighters, others did garri- 
son duty, still others were with the Royal Americans when they met and 
fought Lord Montcalm, the French general. Some manned the block 
houses, while others tilled the fields as a few companions stood guard, 
watching for the red men to rush upon them from the forest. Of such 
sturdy and heroic stock is the Smith family of Pennsylvania. 

(I) John Smith, the first of the name of whom there is any definite 
knowledge, had English forbears, as his name indicates. He was born 
in Pennsylvania, possibly in Union township, and he and his wife were 
for many years regarded as its prominent citizens. They both died and 
are buried in Union township. Among his children was William T., of 
whom further. 

(II) William T., son of John Smith, was born in Union township 
and received his education in the common schools of that time. Dis- 
continuing school while yet young he became a laborer and was a farm 
hand for years. In politics he was a Republican, and in religion a 
member of the Lutheran church. He married Phoebe Fultz, also of 
Union township, daughter of Joseph Fultz, a neighboring farmer. Chil- 
dren: I. John, died in infancy. 2. Kate, died young. 3. Sadie, mar- 



572 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

ried Henry Manbeck of Belleville; one child, Ralph. 4. Maggie, mar- 
ried W. A. Sankey and has two children : Carrie, deceased, and Foster. 
5. George, making his home in Belleville. 6. Matilda, married John 
Brindle, of Belleville, both are deceased; children: Charles, at West 
Point, New York, in L'nited States army ; Melvin, a machinist in Colum- 
bus, Ohio. 7. Jennie, wife of Elmer Young, of Bondville, Champaign 
county, Illinois ; children : Helen and Warren. 8. Mary, married Dr. 
B. R. Kohler; one son, Frank. 9. William Grant, of whom further. 
10. Josephine, died young. 

(Ill) William Grant, son of William T. and Phoebe (Fultz) Smith, 
was born August 23, 1870, in Union township, Mifflin county, Pennsyl- 
vania. He was reared in the township and received his education in 
the public schools. Leaving school he engaged in fence building, and 
continued in that occupation for twenty-one years, making a record for 
himself by the thoroughness of his work. On February 27, 1912, he 
opened a hardware business in a house that he himself had erected. In 
one year he has established a prosperous and ever growing business, 
handling the best class of hardware in all its lines. He owns his own 
home, one of the prettiest of the town. In politics he is a Republican, 
always giving his franchise to that party; he is a member of the 
Patriotic Order Sons of America, and of the Lutheran church. 

He married in November, 1898, Mary Bennett, of Belleville, daugh- 
ter of Nelson and Clara Jane Bennett, of Belleville ; the father is de- 
ceased and the mother is living in Belleville. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have 
one child : Marian, born November 26, 1899, a student at school. 



The first official record of the Sterretts in the Juniata 
STERRETT Valley is of Ralph Sterrett, who took up one hundred 

and forty acres in Beale township, Juniata county, 
July 27, 1762. He was an Indian trader and at home in the woods most 
anywhere. The run that crosses hereby was known as Sterretts Run. 
He came to the valley from Lancaster county and dealt in squatter 
claims. He sold the tract previously mentioned, March 25, 1764. his 
wife Martha joining with him in the sale. 

(II) William, son of Ralph and Martha Sterrett, who is said to have 
been the first white child born west of the Tuscarora mountains, was 
born at Bingham Fort. He was part owner of a forge on Licking creek 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 5-3 

and once sheriff of Mifflin county. He married and had a son WiUiam. 

(III) WilHam (2), son of W'ilham (i) Sterrett, was born Januarv 
25, 1801, in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. His parents were for a 
time residents of Lancaster county, setthng in Juniata county in 1807. 
William (2) Sterrett became a farmer, continuing in Juniata county 
until his death, January 25, 1889. He married. January 8, 1835, Rachel 
Thompson, born in Juniata county, Pennsylvania, August 25, 1801, died 
several years before her husband. Children : John Thompson, born July 
16, 1836; James, June 10, 1838: William N., of whom further; Robert, 
February 14, 1842. 

(IV) William North, third son of William and Rachel (Thompson) 
Sterrett, was born in Juniata county March 21, 1840, died Januarv 22, 
1912. He was educated in the public school and resided at the home- 
stead farm, later owning a farm set off from the original Sterrett farm. 
a large tract located in Milford township, Juniata county. He was a very 
successful farmer, continuing in active management of his own acres 
until 1905. when he retired and moved to Mifflintown, locating there on 
April /th of that year. During eight A'cars of his life he was engaged 
in mercantile business at Patterson, Pennsylvania, but continued his resi- 
dence at the farm. He was a Republican in politics, served as county 
commissioner and associate judge of Juniata county, also filling many 
township offices. He was a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and both he and his wife belonged to the Presbyterian church. 
He was a man of upright character, energetic in business, but rendering 
to every man his just due. Quiet and unobtrusive, yet firm and decided 
in his opinions and convictions, he won the regard of his fellow men and 
left behind him an honored name. 

He married. April 27, 187 1, Jane E. Black, born in New Bloomfield, 
Perry county. Pennsylvania, February 16. 1845, daughter of Thomas 
and Margaret (Zimmerman) Black, born in Perry county, where Thomas 
Black died comparatively young. Margaret, his wife died in i8gi, aged 
eighty-two years. Children of William N. and Jane E. (Black) Ster- 
rett, all born at the farm in Juniata county: i. W'illiam E.. born Feb- 
ruary 2. 1872; he was educated in Mifflintown high school and Pitts- 
burgh Business College, and is now a clerk in the employ of the Pennsyl- 
vania railroad offices at Denholm. 2. Samuel Thomas, born .August \Ck 
1875, educated in Mifflintown high school, now a fanner on the old home- 



574 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

stead ; he married Norma Ernest and has children : Harold Earl, Samuel 
Glenn, James Fay, Anna Elizabeth, and Edgar Ernest, twin of Anna E. 
3. James Thompson, born September 17, 1884, educated in Mifflintown 
high school and Pierces' Business College, now assistant cashier of the 
Juniata Valley Bank ; he married Alma Robinson. 4. Edgar Black, born 
June 26, 1888, educated in Port Royal high school and Bank's Business 
College of Philadelphia, now a bookkeeper in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 



William Luck, of Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, had for his 
LUCK forbears in America, honest, upright Germans, the first of 

whom came from the I<\ntherland in the latter part of the 
seventeenth century, settling, as did so many of his compatriots, in Penn- 
sylvania. From him descended Isaac Luck, of whom further. 

Isaac Luck was born in Snyder county, Pennsylvania, his father be- 
ing one of the pioneer settlers of the county, and is buried at Salem 
Church. Isaac was a farmer, taking up wild land, clearing and culti- 
vating it, and erecting on it a comfortable house for his family. He 
was much respected by his neighbors, and died at the age of ninety-four. 
He married Susan Ritter, daughter of a German family of that name, 
who were also pioneer settlers in Snyder county. She died at the age 
of eighty-seven. They were members of the Lutheran church. He 
was first a Whig and then a Republican, voting the latter ticket when 
he was a very old man. Children: i. Joel, now aged eighty-nine. 2. 
Elizabeth, deceased. 3. Maria, deceased. 4. Annie, deceased. 5. Sam- 
uel, deceased. 6. Benjamin, deceased. 7. Samuel, twin of Benjamin, 
deceased. 8. Sarah. 9. Charles. 10. Lydia, deceased. 11. William, of 
whom further. 13. Daughter, died in infancy. 14. A daughter, died in 
infancy. 

William Luck, son of Isaac and Susan (Ritter) Luck, was born, 
April I, 1843, '" Snyder county, Pennsylvania. He received his educa- 
tion in the common schools of the county. On leaving school he engaged 
in carpentry, and in 1890 came to Mifflin county and now owns property 
on Main street of Mifflintown. He enlisted for service in the civil war, 
in September, 1864, in Company D, 208th Pennsylvania Volunteer In- 
fantry, serving until the close of the war in 1865. He was in several 
battles, one of them being at Petersburg. Virginia, and another at Fort 
Steadman. He was with his regiment during the entire time of his en- 



HISTORY OF THE JUXIATA VALLEY 



.1/0 



listment. He is a meml^er of the Grand Army of the Republic. Wilson 
Post, No. 134, and is also a member of the Lutheran church. In politics 
he is a Republican. 

He married (first) in 1870, Rachel Ewig, who died in 1S82: he 
married (second) in 1883, Eliza Yeakly, who died in November, 191 1, 
daughter of John Yeakly, a pioneer of Juniata Valley. Children by 
first marriage : i. Harry, born in Snyder county in 1873 ; married Myra 
Dimm ; he is in the marble and granite business in Lewistown. Pennsyl- 
vania; one child, Edgar. 2. Claude, born 1875, in Snyder county: was 
employed for some time in Elkhart, Lidiana, living at Edwardsburg, 
Alichigan; he married Cora Corner. 3. Ord Isaac, born 1878, killed by 
electricity in 19 12, at South Bend, Indiana, while foreman of repair 
work; he married Sadie Smith, of Indiana; children: Veloise and Ruth. 
There were no children by the last marriage of William Luck. 

Barbara Yoder, widow, whose husband died on the pas- 
YODER sage and was buried at sea, had nine children, all of whom 

she brought with her to Pennsylvania, eight sons and one 
daughter, all born in Switzerland. They arrived in Pennsylvania prior 
to 1727, settling in what is now Oley township, Berks county, one of 
the first Amish Mennonite families that came to Pennsylvania. One of 
her sons, Yost Yoder, with his brother Hans pushed forward beyond 
the Oley Hills, and finally settled on the Manatawney near the '"planta- 
tion" of Johannes Keim. 

(II) Yost Yoder was one of the most active of the early frontiers- 
men of Pennsylvania, his chief occupation being hunting and trapping, 
although he also cleared and cultivated a "plantation". The Yoder 
Bible, brought by the family, dated 1530, was printed during the lifetime 
of Martin Luther and was held by the family as late as i860. It is de- 
scribed as a fine specimen of the output of the German press of that day, 
had few illustrations and the texts were not arranged in verses. It was 
held as a priceless treasure by the early family and was as a "lamp to 
their feet" in their flight to America. Yost Yoder married and had 
issue: Johannes, born 1718, died April 7, 1812, married Catherine 
Lyster in 1745 and lived with her sixty-six years; Jacob, of whom 
further; Samuel, settled on a plantation half a mile from Pleasantville, 
Berks county, which he received from his father; a daughter, married 



576 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Lazareth Weidner. There was another son, David ; and four daughters 
of Yost Yoder who cannot be named with certainty. 

(III) David, son of Yost Yoder and grandson of Barbara Yoder, 
was born in 1735 in Berks county, Pennsylvania. He removed to the 
west side of the Schuylkill and became a farmer and saddler. He en- 
listed November 6, 1757, in the provincial service of the state of Penn- 
sylvania and was saddler for three years in Captain Nicholas Weather- 
holt's company, stationed in Heidleburg township, Northampton. He 
also served in the revolution as private in Peter Nagle's company and 
later in Captain Charles Gobin's company, Sixth Berks County Militia, 
Colonel Joseph Heister commanding, August 10 to September 9, 1780. 
He married (first) Mary Keim ; (second) Catherine Blank, daughter of 
John, son of Hans Blank, born in Switzerland and his wife Magdalene. 
Among the children of David Yoder was a son Yost, of whom further 
below. 

(IV) Yost (2), son of David Yoder, was born about the year 1800 
in Berks county, Pennsylvania. He moved to the Juniata Valley, set- 
tling in Union township, Mifflin county, became a wealthy farmer and 
large land owner of that township and there died. He married Catherine 
Zook, also of an old Amish Mennonite family, coming from Switzer- 
land. Among their children was a son, Christ Z. 

(V) Christ Z., son of Yost and Catherine (Zook) Yoder, was born 
in Union township, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, about 1830, and is 
now living retired in Belleville, Pennsylvania. He became a farmer 
of Union township, owning a farm of seventy acres. Later he became 
a tanner, continuing in that business until his retirement. Both he and 
his wife belong to the Amish Mennonite church; he is a Republican in 
politics. He married Annie McGonigal. Children: i. Elizabeth, died 
in infancv. 2. Yost, a farmer of Union township. 3. Levi M., of whom 
further. 4. John, of Goshen, Indiana. 5. Joseph W., a professor in 
music and a farm owner near Philadelphia ; unmarried. 

(VI) Levi M., son of Christ Z. and Annie (McGonigal) Yoder, was 
born in Union township, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, January 10, 1863. 
He obtained his education in the public school and grew to manhood 
at the home farm. He taught school in his earlier life, also learned the 
carpenter's trade and worked at that occupation for about fifteen 
vears during the summer months, teaching in the winter. In 1896 he 






/Tt^-^^-V 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 577 

began the manufacture of carpets at Belleville in a very small way, being 
the entire working force himself. He has prospered and expanded until 
he has a large plant employing one hundred people, much of the filling 
being prepared by outside families. All his factory buildings were 
erected by himself or under his supervision, as was also a fine residence 
on Chestnut street. He does a prosperous manufacturing business, his 
goods having an established reputation and much in demand. He has 
also become heavily interested in local real estate, owns about one hun- 
dred and fifty lots at Highland Park, also a tract of thirty-five acres 
adjoining Belleville, laid out in lots for manufacturing and residence 
sites, known as the "L. M. Yoder Addition". He has also erected several 
modern dwellings and has given an impetus to building operations in 
Belleville by his energy and enterprise. He is also interested in the auto- 
mobile business, having a garage in Belleville thirty-two by one hundrd 
and five feet. He is a capable, energetic man of business, and varied as 
are his interests, he is easily master of every detail and always the master 
of every situation occurring in any department of his affairs. He is a 
Progressive Republican, but has never sought or accepted public office. 
He is a member of the Amish Mennonite church and in all things an 
honorable, upright Christian gentleman. 

He married in 1885, Annie Hartzler, born in Menno township, Mif- 
flin county, daughter of Menno S. Hartzler and his wife Mary King, 
now of Menno township. Children: i. Lena, graduate of Belleville 
high school, attended Goshen College, now a student at Defiance, Ohio, 
taking a course in domestic science. 2. Nellie, married John Detweiter, 
of Belleville. 3. Chester, educated at Belleville high school and Goshen 
College and has been assistant secretary of the Young Men's Christian 
Association work at Burnham. 4. Trella, now a student at Belleville high 
school, class of 1913. 5. Harry, at home. 6. Dorothy, at home. 



The ancestor of the Pennsylvania families of Pan- 
PANNEBAKER nebecker, Pannebaker, Pennybaker and Penny- 
packer, was Hendrick Pannebecker, a Dutch pa- 
troon. He founded a family that includes a governor of Pennsylvania, 
a state senator of Virginia, a major-general of Pennsylvania, a state 
treasurer of Tennessee, a state agent of Kentucky, and sent into the 
Union anny during the war between the states two generals, four 



578 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

colonels, twenty-two other commissioned officers and many privates, 
including in all one himdred and forty-eight men. 

Hendrick (sometimes called Heinrich) Pannebecker was born in the 
village of Flomborn, on the Rhine, not far from the city of Worms, 
March 21, 1674; although born in Germany, he was of Dutch lineage, 
his ancestors having moved from Holland to Flomborn, a village of five 
hundred souls, a large proportion of them being named Pannebecker. 
The name is of Dutch origin, signifying "a maker of titles". The exact 
date of his coming to Pennsylvania is not known, but it was soon after 
the first thirteen Dutch and German families had founded the settle- 
ment at Germantown. The first record of him is of his marriage at 
Germantown in 1699 to Eve Umstat, daughter of Hans Peter and Bar- 
bara Umstat, who arrived on the "Francis and Dorothy" from Crefield in 
1685. In 1702 he settled on a tract of two hundred acres purchased 
from Matthias Van Bebber in the deed dated December 25, 1702, to 
which he added two hundred and four acres in 1708. He spoke fluently 
the three languages of his community, Dutch, German and English; was 
a competent surveyor and wrote deeds and other legal papers in both 
German and English. For the Penns he surveyed the manors of Mana- 
tawney, Gilberts and others, also laying out most of the roads in that 
part of Philadelphia county, now constituting the county of Montgomery. 
He became a large land owner, holding title to four thousand seven hun- 
dred and seventy-two acres and was a prominent figure in his com- 
munity. He was the spokesman for his countrymen in all matters with 
the proprietory and provincial government and is referred to in a num- 
ber of recorded instruments as "gentleman". He died April 4, 1754, his 
large estate being divided among his children. His wife Eve was a 
granddaughter of Nicholas Umstat, who died at Crefield on the Rhine, 
October 4, 1682. Her father, Hans Peter Umstat, came with his wife 
Barbara and three children, Johannes, Eve and Margaret, settling in 
Germantown. The Umstats brought with them from Crefield, a German 
Bible, published at Heidelberg in I5>.3, which has been owned in the 
family since 1652. Children of Hendrick and Eve Pannebecker: i. 
Martha, born June 15, 1700, died in September, 1761 ; married Anthony 
Van der Sluys (Vanderclise) and their son Henry was later sheriff of 
Berks county, a surveyor and conveyancer in the neighborhood of Perki- 
omen and Skippack. 2. Adolph, born 1708, died in May, 1789, like his 



HISTORY OF THE JUXIATA VALLEY 579 

four brothers he was a miller, lived and died in Limerick township. 3. 
Peter, of whom further. 4. John, born August 27, 1713. died June 14, 
1784; married Annette Keyser, and became the ancestor of United States 
Senator Isaac S. Pennypacker, of Virginia. 5. Jacob, born 1715, died 
May 27, 1752; he married Margaret, daughter of Matthias and Barbara 
Sellen Tyson and granddaughter of Cornelius Tyson, who was born 
at Crefield, Germany, in 1652 and came to Germantown with his wife 
Margaret and several children. Jacob became the ancestor of ex-Gover- 
nor Samuel W. Pennypacker. 6. Henry, born 1717, died I\Iay 31, 1792; 
married Rebecca Kuster, also of a prominent early Germantown family. 
7. Barbara, born in 1720, married Cornelius Tyson. 8. Susanna, mar- 
ried Peter Keyser and lived in Worcester township, now Montgomery 
county. 

(II) Peter, son of Hendrick and Eve (Umstat) Pannebecker, was 
born in Bebbers township, Philadelphia county. He was a miller by 
trade, associated with his brothers, marketing their product in Phila- 
delphia. He was born March 8, 1710, died June 28, 1770. He married 
Elizabeth Keyser, of a prominent Germantown family. He is the ances- 
tor of many descendants in eastern Pennsylvania and the Juniata Valley, 
bearing the name Pennypacker and Pannybaker. 

(III) A son of Peter Pannebecker settled in Bucks county, where 
he lived and died a miller, operating a mill at a point long known as 
Pannebecker Mills, which at one period in the war was used by Washing- 
ton as a headquarters building. He married and had a son, William. 

(IV) William Pannebaker, grandson of Peter and Elizabeth (Key- 
ser) Pannebecker, was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, in 1772, 
died in Fermanagh township, Juniata county, Pennsylvania, about 1852. 
He was but a young boy during the revolution, but remembered the 
wounded men being brought in and laid on the kitchen floor, he after- 
ward helping to clear away the blood that flowed over the floor. He 
came to Fermanagh township in 181 1 and until 1830 operated a saw mill. 
He also owned land which he cleared and cultivated. He married his 
cousin, Elizabeth Pannebecker, their descendants spelling the name (as 
on the tombstone) Pannybaker. She was born in Bucks county in 1778, 
died in Fermanagh township, July 27, 1864. Children: Benjamin, Wil- 
liam, Jonas, Moses, Joseph, of whom further; and Hannah, who died 
in Illinois. 



58o HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

(V) Joseph, son of William and Elizabeth Pannebaker, was born in 
Bucks county, Pennsylvania, in 1808, died in 1853. He was brought to 
Fermanagh township, Juniata county, in 181 1, and there passed his 
life as a farmer. He was a Whig in politics and a member of the 
German Baptist church (Dunkard) ; his wife was a Lutheran. He 
married Magdelene Wert, born in Union county, Pennsylvania, in 1805, 
died in Fermanagh township in 1846. Children: Philip, deceased; Ann 
Eliza, married John G. Hackenberger, of Juniata county; Daniel, of 
whom further; Mary, deceased; Joseph; Rebecca, deceased; Moses and 
John. 

(VI) Daniel, son of Joseph and Magdalene (Wert) Pannebaker, 
was born in Fermanagh township, Juniata county, Pennsylvania, No- 
vember J3, 1834. He attended public school and assisted at the home 
farm until nineteen years of age. He then began learning the black- 
smith's trade. After finishing his years of apprenticeship he located in 
Mifflintown. where he conducted a shop until about 1897, when he en- 
gaged in the hardware business, retiring in 191 1. He has been success- 
ful in business and is highly respected in his community. He was a 
Democrat in politics until 1897, since which date he has acted with the 
Republican party. In 1862 he enlisted in Company I, 126th Regiment, 
Pennsylvania Infantry, serving nine months. In 1864 he reenlisted in 
Company E, lOist Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry, and served until 
the close of the war between the states, receiving an honorable discharge. 
He is a member of Lieutenant D. FI. Wilson Post, No. 134, Grand Army 
of the Republic and of Mifflintown Lodge, No. 131, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. 

He married. May 13, 1856, Mary Ann Whitmer, born in Northum- 
berland county, Pennsylvania. December 26. 1836, daughter of Benjamin 
and Lydia (Michael) Whitmer, of that county, who came to Juniata 
county about 1848. They settled first in Walker township, later in 
Fermanagh, both dying at the home of their daughter, Mrs. Daniel 
Pannebaker, in Mifflintown. On May 13, 1906, Mr. and Mrs. Panne- 
baker celebrated the golden anniversary of their wedding and besides 
the felicitations of their many friends, were also remembered with many 
substantial tokens of the love and esteem in which they are held. Seven 
years have elapsed since the celebration and both are yet in good health. 
with many years of useful life before them, should such be the Divine 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 581 

Will. Children of Daniel and Mary Ann (Whitmer) Pannebaker: i. 
Juniata Mabel, married James W. Wagner of Mifflintown, who was 
killed in a railroad wreck at Clover Creek :\Iay 5, 1906. 2. Harry, edu- 
cated in Mifflintown high school, now living in Pueblo, Colorado, a 
telegraph operator. He married Jennie Graham; children: Ralph, de- 
ceased; Mary, deceased; Roy, Ethel and Daniel. 3. Cloyd P.. educated 
in the public schools; married Harriet Lingenfelter ; children: Whitmcr. 
deceased ; Mildred, deceased ; Mary and Juniata. 4. Ella May, residing 
with her parents. 5. Lydia Elizabeth, married H. P. Kelley of New- 
port, Pennsylvania, and has a son, Whitmer Henry. 6. Charles A., edu- 
cated in the public schools ; married Efifie Gilbert and has a son. George 
Gilbert. 7. Myrven D., educated in public schools; married Jessie :\Ic- 
Gregor; children: Charles, Myrven and Frederick M. 



This name, originally Berge. was brought to Pennsylvania 
BERGEY about the year 1717 and belongs to an exceedingly large 

and prominent family. They carry on their roll five thou- 
sand names of Berge}s and Bergey descendants, scattered over many 
states, while the annual reunions of the family are largely attended. 

The emigrant ancestor, John Ulrich Berge, came from Saxony, 
Germany, about the year 171 7, settling in Sal ford township, Montgomery 
county, Pennsylvania, where he purchased a farm of two hundred and 
fifty acres, March 16. 1726. In 1760 he was road supervisor of the 
township. In 1738 he was one of the charter members organizing 
Salford Mennonite Church, as was his wife, Anna Mary Berge, who 
bore him eleven children. Children: John; Michael, never married; 
Isaac ; Samuel ; Elizabeth ; Mary, never married ; Christian, of whom 
further; Abraham; Anna; Fronca ; Salome (or Sarah). John I'lrich 
Berge made his will November 9, 1762, and it was probated December 
II, 1762. His descendants spell the name Berky, Bergey, Bergy and 
Berge. 

(II) Christian Bergey, the fifth son of John LTlrich Berge. came 
into the possession of his father's farm, after several years, and there 
died. He was a soldier of the revolution, his name being found on the 
"depreciation pay-roll". His wife was named Mary, and among their 
children was Samuel. 

(III) Samuel, son of Christian Bergey (as this branch spells the 



582 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

name J, was born in Franconia township, Montgomery county, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he grew to manhood. About 1833 he moved to Juniata 
county, purchasing a farm in Fayette township, containing one hun- 
dred and fifty acres and there resided until death. He married and had 
issue: Jacob, died in Philadelphia; Enos, of whom further; Samuel, 
died in Mifflintown; Maria, married Jacob Shelley, a Mennonite minister; 
Susan, married Jacob Tretz ; Lizzie, married a Mr. Rickenbaugh ; Cath- 
erine, married Jacob Shafer, and now resides on North Second street, 
Philadelphia, aged eighty-six years; Sarah, married (first) Jacob Stine, 
(second) Porter Fink and died in Philadelphia; Phianna, married 
Michael Shirk, lived and died in Fayette township. 

(IV) Enos, son of Samuel Bergey, was born in Montgomery county, 
Pennsylvania, in 1821, coming to Juniata county when a boy of about 
twelve years, with his parents. He grew to manhood at the home farm 
and after his marriage purchased a farm in Fayette township. Later 
he lived on his own farm in Fermanagh township, then purchased the 
Jericho Mills property, including a farm of two hundred acres, where 
he resided until his death in 18S0. His widow, now a woman of ninety 
years, never remarried and still resides at the old home in very good 
health. Mr. Bergey was a Republican in politics, and both he and his 
wife were members of the Mennonite church. 

He married Nancy Seiber, born in or near Mifilin, Pennsylvania, in 
1822. Children: i. William, at Richfield, Pennsylvania, in 191 1; a 
farmer and a Mennonite minister. 2. Mary, married Abraham Kurtz 
and resides in Thompsontown, Pennsylvania. 3. Lizzie, married Martin 
Mumma, of Dauphin, but lived near Williams Grove, in Cumberland 
county, where she died leaving two children. 4. John, of whom further. 
5. Samuel, now a ranchman living at Los Angeles, California. 6. Sarah, 
died in infancy. 7. David, died aged twenty years. 8. Annie, married 
Frank Metrick and resides in Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Nancy (Seiber) Bergey, the mother of these children, is a 
daughter of John and Mary (Sausman) Seiber, and a granddaughter 
of Christian Seiber, who settled in Juniata county in 1792, near Mif- 
flintown, on a farm of two hundred acres, which is still owned by his 
descendants. He there erected the brick house now standing on the 
farm. Mary Sausman was a daughter of John Sausman, an early settler 
of Juniata county, whose pack of mastififs often ran at night with their 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 583 

master to drive wolves away. John and Mary Seiber were both Men- 
nonites, Hving quiet, honorable lives, he dying comparatively young, she 
living to the extreme age of ninety-three j^ears. Children: i. Nancy, 
widow of Enos Bergey (of previous mention). 2. Christian, died in In- 
diana, aged eighty years. 3. Elizabeth, married Samuel Funk, whom 
she survives, a resident of Van Dyke, Pennsylvania, aged eighty-eight 
years. Their son, David Funk, M. D., resides in Harrisburg. 4. Solo- 
mon, lived and died, aged seventy years, at his farm near Mifflintown. 
5. Barbara, married Rev. John Price and died near Yeagertown in Fergu- 
son Valley. 6. Mary, married John Bashore and died in Fayette town- 
ship, near McAlisterville. 7. Sarah, married Daniel Mertz and resides 
in White county. Indiana. 8. John, resides in Mifflintown, aged seventy- 
four years. 9. Joseph, now residing near McAlisterville. 10. Enoch, 
died in Indiana. 11. David, resides in Mifflin county, aged about sixty- 
eight years. Two other children, Samuel and Catherine, both died in 
infancy. 

(V) John, son of Enos and Nancy (Seiber) Bergey, was born in 
Monroe township, Juniata county, Pennsylvania, November i, 1852. He 
was educated in the public school and grew to manhood at the home 
farm. He followed farming and milling, but his principal business until 
1883 was live stock dealing, shipping from Mifflintown to distant mar- 
kets. He continued in this business until October, 1883, when he estab- 
lished in the livery business in Mifflintown, and in 1900 purchased the 
large storehouse of the Sulofif \\'arehouse Company, remodeling and 
converting it into a modern livery barn. He established the "bus" line 
in 1889 and still continues that branch of his business. His business 
demands a constantly ready stable of about twenty horses to meet daily 
demands, and has a well patronized successful livery. Mr. Bergey is 
a Republican in politics and has served on the borough council. 

He married, in 1879, Sarah Haldeman, born in Juniata county, Penn- 
sylvania, daughter of Abraham and Catherine Haldeman. Children : r. 
Boyd, now a successful druggist, of Reading, Pennsylvania; married 
Ethel Gephart. of Iowa, and has sons, Taylor and John. 2. Carl, edu- 
cated at Dickinson College; was a clerk in a trust company at Reading 
for three years, then for a time a traveling salesman, now at home, his 
father's assistant. 3. Roy, married Mary Haller and resides at Mifflin- 
town, a civil engineer in the employ of the state ; child, Robert. 4. Paul, 



584 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

married Ruth Taylor and resides in Mifflintown; a clerk in the office of 
the Standard Steel Works at Burnham; child, Paul (2). 



The genealogy of the North family of the Juniata Valley 
NORTH is traced in this country to Roger (2) North, born in Ire- 
land, a son of Caleb North, lord lieutenant of Ireland, 

married Jane Eckerly, and grandson of Roger ( i ) North, of New Castle, 

West Heath, Ireland. 

(III) Roger (2) North was born in Ireland; married Ann Rambo 
and, prior to the year 1753, was a resident of the city of Philadelphia. 
He had a son Caleb (2). 

(IV) Colonel Caleb (2) North, son of Roger (2) and Ann ( Rambo) 
North, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1753, died in Coven- 
try, Pennsylvania, in 1840. He was a brave officer of the revolution. 
He was with Washington at the "crossing of the Delaware" ; fought 
throughout the war, rising to the rank of colonel in the Pennsylvania 
line. He was president of the Society of the Cincinnati, and in 1819 
sheriff of Philadelphia county. He married Lydia North and left issue. 

(V) William, son of Colonel Caleb (2) North, was born in Phila- 
delphia. He married and had issue: James, of whom further: Caleb, 
a tanner of Millerstown, Perry county. Pennsylvania ; Joshua, a soldier 
of the war of 1812, and a tanner of Millerstown; Rebecca, married Dr. 
Ezra Doty, of Juniata county. 

(VI) James, son of William North, with his brothers, Caleb and 
Joshua, established a tannery at Millerstown, Perry county, Pennsyl- 
vania, continuing there until about the year 1800, when James with- 
drew and located at Thompsontown, in Juniata (then Cumberland) 
county, Pennsylvania. He there established a tannery which he operated 
for many years. He was a justice of the peace, then an office of great 
importance (practically a judgeship), served for ma%[y years, and was 
prominent in local affairs, being a man of intelligence above the average. 
He was a member of the Presbyterian church and a man of strictly re- 
ligious life. He died in February, 1828. 

He married Rachel, daughter of Francis Jordan, of Millerstown, 
who died in 1872. Children : Thomas, died at Richfield, Juniata county, 
a tannery owner: Lewis, died in Hamilton county, Ohio, a carpenter 
and undertaker; Caleb, died at Atchison, Kansas, moving west at an 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 585 

earl}' day, a school teacher; Sarah, married a Mr. Postlethwaite, of 
Alifflin county; Euphenia, married Philip Strouse, of Mexico, Juniata 
county; Hannah W. ; James (2), of whom further; Amos J., died at 
Atchison, Kansas, a miller; Rebecca, married Colonel John Bryner, of 
Peoria, Illinois; Eliza B., married David \\'itherow, also of Peoria. 

(VII) James (2), son of James (i) and Rachel (Jordan) North, 
was born at Thompsontown, Juniata county, Pennsylvania, November 6, 
1 81 9. He was educated in subscription schools, earning the money 
himself to pay for his tuition. He was employed by Robert Thompson 
at light work on the farm and so well was ;\Ir. Thompson pleased with 
his work as a boy that he gave him work on his canal boats. pa_\ing him 
five dollars monthly. As boy and young man he was frugal and ere 
long was himself owner and captain of a boat, plying the waters of the 
canal. In January, 1836, the Thompsons placed him in charge of a 
branch store at Newton Hamilton, where he worked for his board and 
clothing, but gaining a valuable business experience ; then for a few years 
received a salary of one hundred dollars yearly, finally was admitted as 
a partner. He continued in business until 1844, when his partner died 
and the business was closed up. Mr. North then moved to a tract of 
one hundred and twenty acres of wild land in Juniata county, the patri- 
mony of his wife. This he partly cleared and worked until 1847. when 
he entered the employ of the Pennsylvania railroad, connected with the 
engineering corps. When the road was opened he was appointed agent 
at Millerstown, remaining one year. He was then transferred to Mif- 
flin Station (Patterson), where he was freight and ticket agent, also 
agent for the Adams Express Company. When the telegraph line was 
extended west of Plarrisburg, he was the assistant of H. Jones Brooks 
and was the first telegraph operator on the line. During the early ex- 
istence of the railroad, in order to win business, he established a store 
and purchased all products of the region brought to him, including poles, 
grain, etc., dealing also in coal and lumber. He was the instructor in 
telegraphy of many young men, some of whom later became well known 
and prominent operators. Among his pupils were: David Strouse. who 
became superintendent of the military telegraph lines of the L^nited States 
government under Colonel Thomas A. Scott, and D. Homer Bates, later 
vice-president of the Tradesman's National Bank of New York. Mr. 
North remained in the employ of the Pennsylvania railroad thirty-five 



586 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

years, then resigned and was succeeded by his son, Washington S. He 
was a prominent factor in the development of the region that was opened 
up by the coming of the railroad. He was one of the founders of the 
town of Patterson and its first burgess, served on the borough school 
board, and when the postofBce was established in 1853 was appointed 
postmaster, holding until 1861. Until the year i860, Mr. North was an 
active ^^ hig, but with the passing of that party he became a Democrat 
and ever afterward supported that party. In 1884 he was elected a 
member of the lower house of the state legislature, and later was a clerk 
in the office of the secretary of the commonwealth, resigning in 1895. 
He was also one of the early bank organizers of the Juniata Valley, 
assisting in 1852 in organizing the Lewistown Bank as a state bank, also 
serving as director. He was associated with R. M. Spear in the LTnion 
Bank of Huntingdon; was for a time president of the Juniata Valley 
Bank of Mifflintown, and an organizer, also director, of the Farmer's 
Bank of Harrisburg. He was also a large owner of real estate, his 
holdings at one time totaling sixteen hundred acres. He was a member 
and trustee of the Presbyterian church for many years, and at one 
time was active in the Masonic order. He died in 1898, aged seventy- 
nine years. He was a strong character and an important factor in the 
development and progress of the Juniata Valley. 

He married, November 12, 1840, Susanna Matilda Strouse, who died 
in 1896, daughter of David Strouse. Children: Caleb C, cashier of 
the Columbia National Bank of Washington, D. C. ; Washington S., of 
whom further; Rebecca, married P. W. Crider, of the firm of Crider & 
Jackson, bankers and merchants of Bellefonte, Pennsylvania; Herman 
H., attorney-at-law and ex-member of the legislature, of Bradford, Penn- 
sylvania : Mary M., married George Jacobs, whom she survives, a resi- 
dent of Philadelphia. 

(VIII) Washington Strouse, second son of James (2) and Susanna 
Matilda (Strouse) North, was born in Turbett township, Juniata county, 
October 29, 1847. He was educated in the public schools. Port Royal 
Academy and Eastman's Business College, a graduate of the latter in 
1865. During his school years he was his father's assistant in the ware- 
house at Patterson, and after graduation returned, and until 1884 was so 
employed. In the latter year he succeeded his father as station agent 
at Patterson, for the Pennsylvania railroad, continuing until the year 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 587 

1900 — a period of service as boy and man, with the railroad, covering 
thirty-six years, thirty of which he was his father's assistant, but vir- 
tually carrying for many of these years the full burden of responsibility 
of the agency. He had kept the coal and lumber business, begun in 
early years by James North, in operation and so largely had the business 
increased that in 1900 he was compelled to resign his railroad position. 
He has since devoted himself exclusively to this and his other private 
affairs. His coal and lumber business is a retail one, well established 
and prosperous. He is president of the Juniata Company, a corporation 
formed to furnish light and power (electric) to the towns of lliffim and 
Mifflintown. He also has a farm of one hundred and twenty-five acres, 
which he operates, a part of the estate of his father, who prior to his 
death had disposed of all of his sixteen hundred acres, except two farms. 
Mr. North is a Democrat in politics and has held every borough office 
except that of poor director. In 1893 he was elected treasurer of 
Juniata county, serving three years. In religious faith he is a Presby- 
terian, as is his wife. 

He married, January 19, 1869, Olivia Jacobs, born in Juniata county, 
died December 24, 1907, daughter of George and Sarah (Christy) 
Jacobs, both of old Juniata Valley families. Children : i. James Cloyd, 
now his father's assistant in business; he married Elizabeth C. GrubJj 
and has Olivia. Elizabeth and James. 2. Nellie Olivia, married John J. 
(2) Patterson, an attorney-at-law and resides at Mifflintown; children: 
John J. (3), Lucretia and Olivia. 3. Mary Edith, resides at the family 
home in MifHin. 



The Kaufifmans of Mifflintown, Pennsylvania, de- 

KAUFFMAN scend from Jacob Kaufifman, of Germany, born 1737. 

whose birth date is found written in a "Book of 

Martyrs'", yet treasured as an heirloom in the family. Among his seven 

children was a son Jacob, of whom further. 

(II) Jacob (2). son of Jacob (i) Kaufifman, born October 28, 1766, 
married and had a son Jacob, of whom further. 

(III) Jacob (3), son of Jacob (2) Kauffman. was born in Juniata 
county. Pennsylvania, in 1798, there grew to manhood, lived and died. 
After his marriage he purchased a partly cleared tract of one hundred 
acres in Walker township which he finished clearing and cultivated until 



588 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

his death. He built a good residence of brick, which yet stands in good 
condition, and a large barn which was destroyed by fire in the fall of 
1888 and rebuilt in 1889. He married Sarah Anna Kurtz, also born in 
Juniata county, a Mennonite. Children: Jonas, of whom further; 
Phoebe, married David Hertzler, and lived at Port Royal, Pennsyl- 
vania, both deceased ; Isaac, a lifelong farmer of Walker township, his 
farm lying along the "pike", married and both deceased; Sarah, married 
John Arnold, and moved to Michigan, where both died ; Kurtz, deceased, 
was a farmer near Mifflintown; Mary and Jacob, died in infancy. 

(IV) Jonas, son of Jacob (3) and Sarah Anna (Kurtz) Kauffman, 
was born in Walker township, Juniata county, Pennsylvania, in 1826, 
died in 1898. He grew to manhood at the home farm and obtained an 
education in the public schools. After reaching man's estate he engaged 
in mercantile business in his native neighborhood, later moving to 
Logansport, Indiana, where he engaged as a merchant. After the death 
of his father he bought the interest of the other heirs and became the 
owner of the homestead farm upon which he resided until his death. He 
was a prosperous farmer and a man of high character, a member of the 
Mennonite church and in all things upright and conscientious. He was 
a Republican in politics and served as collector of taxes for Walker 
township. He married, in 1853, Eliza, daughter of David and Anna 
(Shellenberger) Moist. David Moist owned a fine farm in his native 
township of Fermanagh, a plain, unassuming and good man ; a member 
of the River Brethren. His wife Anna, born near McAlisterville, bore 
him eight children and died at the great age of ninety-six years. Chil- 
dren of Jonas and Eliza (Moist) Kauffman: i. Harvey, now a farmer 
of Colorado, unmarried. 2. Banks W., born in Walker township, Juniata 
county, Pennsylvania, August 22, 1857; educated in the public schools, 
and until 1887 a farmer; he then became a salesman of agricultural im- 
plements, later of musical instruments and sewing machines, continuing 
until 1895, when he organized the firm of Kauffman S: Harley and be- 
gan the manufacture of carpets in Mifflintown, where he is now success- 
fully established ; he married Elizabeth, daughter of John and ]Mary 
(Graybill) Shelley, of Fayette township, and has children: Rosie May, 
Jonas Boyd, Ray Shelley and Mary; Banks W. Kauffman is a Republi- 
can, and both he and his wife are members of the Lutheran church. 3. 
Sarah A., married Dr. Frank Books and has: Blanche, married Charles 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 589 

Alberti, and resides in Colorado; Edwin, married Flossie Bramble, and 
also lives in Colorado. 4. Eliza Jennie, married William Harley, asso- 
ciate judge of Juniata county, living in Mifflintown; children: Lola, 
Edna, Harold. 5. Lincoln, manager of the homestead farm where he 
also maintains and operates a dairy; he married Annie Kurtz, daughter 
of Abraham and Mary (Bergy) Kurtz, of Kurtz Valley; children: 
Ethel, deceased ; Lincoln, Rosco, Mary, Kurtz, Grace, Nora, George. 6. 
Mary E., deceased; married Samuel Hetrick and lived in Lancaster, 
Pennsylvania; two children: Hazel and Grace. 7. Isabella, married 
David Seiber, farmer, and resides at Locust Run; six children: Mildred, 
Edwin, Banks, Beulah, Catherine, Stanley. 



This branch of the Kyle family came to the Juniata Valley 
KYLE from Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, Moses Kyle being the 

first settler. He was one of a family of eleven born in Ly- 
coming county, where he grew to manhood. He settled in Juniata county 
where he purchased a tract of three hundred acres, which he cleared 
and cultivated. On his farm he built a stone house in which his chil- 
dren were born. His wife Sarah bore him three children: John Thomp- 
son, deceased, a lawyer of Princeton, Illinois; Watson, died in infancy; 
James, of whom further. 

(II) James, son of Moses and Sarah Kyle, was born in Walker 
township, Juniata county, Pennsylvania. He purchased his brother's 
share of the homestead and there lived his entire life. He sold a part of 
the original tract of three hundred acres, retaining one hundred and 
sixty acres, which he cultivated successfully. During the civil war he 
was drafted into the military service of the United States, but furnished 
a substitute. He was a Democrat in politics, and both he and his wife 
were members of the Lutheran church. He married Mary E. Wike. of 
Walker township, her father a farmer and land owner. She had two 
sisters: Elizabeth, who married Joseph Barker, of Altoona, Pennsyl- 
vania: and Rebecca, who married Henry Diven, of Harrisburg. Chil- 
dren of James Kyle: i. Rebecca, deceased; married G. M. Diven; chil- 
dren : William, David Kyle, Mary. 2. Clara Belle, died aged sixteen 
years. 3. John Thompson, died aged eighteen years. 4. Annie, deceased ; 
married David Sieber; left no issue. 5. Watson, died in infancy. 6. 
James William, of whom further. 



590 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

(III) James William, son of James and Mary E. (Wike) Kyle, 
was born on the farm he now owns in Walker township, Juniata county, 
Pennsylvania, February 14, 1875. He was educated in the public schools 
and Airy View Academy. Later he spent two years in Muncie, Indiana, 
working in the Malleable Iron Works. Returning home he purchased 
the homestead in Walker township, where he yet resides. He is one of 
the successful farmers of his town; has remodeled the house; added new 
building and greatly improved the property in many ways. He conducts 
general farming operations in connection with stock raising. In poli- 
tics Mr. Kyle is a Democrat and in 1909 was elected collector of taxes 
for Walker township and is yet in office. He is a member of the Patriotic 
Order Sons of America, and both he and his wife belong to the Presby- 
terian church. 

He married, January 20, 1897, Mary Elizabeth Sieber, born Novem- 
ber 16, 1865, in Fayette township, Pennsylvania, daughter of David 
and Anna Elizabeth (Witmer) Sieber, both old Juniata Valley families. 
Children; James; William, and Doyle Sieber Kyle. 

(The Sieber Line). 

Mary Elizabeth (Sieber) Kyle was born November 16, 1865, in 
Fayette township, Juniata county, Pennsylvania, a descendant of Chris- 
tian Sieber, born in Berks county, Pennsylvania, in 1801, came to Far- 
managh township, Juniata county, in 1813, where he became a prosper- 
ous farmer. 

(II) David, eighth of the thirteen children of Christian Sieber, was 
born in Fermanagh township, January 13, 1824, and there grew to 
manhood. He married, in Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, February 22, 
1848, Anna Elizabeth Witmer and settled in Fayette township, where he 
owned the John Y. Shelley farm near McAlisterville. This he sold, again 
bought and sold finally, owning a farm of two hundred acres one- 
half mile below Mexico, where he died October 8, 1891. His wife died 
May 22, 1889. Both were members of the Mennonite church. Children : 
I. Addison R., born March 10, 1850; now resides in Harrisburg. 2. 
Louisa F., born November 9, 1852; resides in Mexico, Pennsylvania, 
unmarried. 3. Clara Belle, born August 16, 1855; married Tunis Vos- 
burg and resides in Mexico. 4. Henry O., born May i, 1858; now re- 
siding in Mexico. 5. Daughter, born in April, i860, died unnamed. 6. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 591 

David C, born November 15, 1861 ; resides at Locust Run; a farmer. 

7. Mary E., born November 16, 1865; married James William Kyle. 

8. Banks J., born March 9, 1868, died aged eighteen months. 

(The Witmer Line). 

Anna Elizabeth Witmer, born January 16, 1827, wife of David Sieber 
and mother of Mary Elizabeth (Sieber) Kyle, was a descendant of John 
Witmer, born in Switzerland in 1687, arrived in Philadelphia in 1716, 
and settled four miles west of the present city of Lancaster, where he 
died in January, 1728. His wife Catherine, born in 1690, died in 1760. 
Their first two children were born in Switzerland, the third in Pennsyl- 
vania : Elizabeth, born 1712; Michael, 1714; Barbara, 1717. 

(II) Michael, son of John Witmer, "the emigrant", died in 1789. 
He became very wealthy, married Anna Long and left each of his five 
children a generous property. Children: John, born 1750, died 18 17; 
Herman, born 1753: Abraham, born 1756; Anna, born 1760, died 1831 ; 
Mary, born 1763, died 1788. 

(III) John, eldest son of Michael and Anna (Long) Witmer, grew 
to manhood at the farm near Lancaster, where he became a miller. He 
early came to Juniata county, where he built a mill and engraved on a 
stone in its walls the date of its erection. He owned land inherited from 
his father, lying on the west side of the Susquehanna river in what is 
now the northeastern corner of Juniata county, containing two hundred 
and thirty-two acres, also owning one hundred and fifty acres in Snyder 
county. He served as a private in Captain Philip Beck's company. Third 
Battalion Lancaster Count}^ Militia in 1781. He married and had issue: 
Abraham, born 1780, died in 1829 ; Anna, bom in 1782 ; Barbara, born in 
1784, died in 1828; Fannie, born in 1786; Henry, born in 1788, died in 
1866; Jacob, born in 1790, died in 1847; Mary, born in 1792, died in 
1829; John, born in 1793, died in 1829; Magdalene; Elizabeth. 

From the revolutionary soldier, John Witmer, descended Anna Eliza- 
beth Witmer, wife of David Sieber and mother of Mary Elizabeth Sieber, 
wife of James William Kyle. 



This name, Schneider in German, was first found in 

SNYDER Pennsylvania in official lists under date of September 15. 

1728, when Matheis and Christian landed from the same 



592 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

ship, coming- from Germany. Under the anglicized speUing, Snyder is 
found on lists of September i8, 1727. While many retain the German 
spelling, the form Snyder is almost as freely used, although in the lists 
of those landing in the province there were one hundred and fifty-three 
Schneiders and but thirty-seven Snyders. However, this proportion 
would not hold good in latter days. The founder of this branch was 
Anthony Snyder, who was born at Knippenburgh, near Oppenheim, 
Germany, arrived in Pennsylvania in 1748 and settled in Lancaster. 

(I) A descendant of Anthony was Henry Harrison Snyder, born 
in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, where he lived and died. He mar- 
ried Anna Staley born in Lancaster county of Irish parentage. Among 
his children was Jacob S., mentioned below. 

(II) Jacob S., son of Henry Harrison and Anna (Staley) Snyder, 
was born in Lancaster county in 1817, died in 1903. He learned the 
carpenter's trade, later became an undertaker and located at Reams- 
town, Lancaster county. He was a Lutheran in religion, and a Republi- 
can in politics. He married Anna Bridegam, born in Lancaster county 
in 181 5, daughter of Henry and Sarah Bridegam, both of Lancaster 
county, all members of the Reformed church. Children: i. Henry 
Harrison, who died in 191 1, aged seventy-one years. He was a lieuten- 
ant in the civil war, serving from the first call to the final surrender in 
Company L, Seventh Regiment Cavalry, and once for a term of five 
days was acting captain of his company. 2. Jacob A., died in 1864, one 
of the victims of the Salisbury (North Carolina) prison pen, after hav- 
ing been held a prisoner at Libby Prison in Richmond. He was a private 
of the Fifty-fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. 3. Wil- 
liam F., of whom further. 4. Anna, married John Mumma, of Lancaster 
county. 5. Sarah, married Charles Tole, of Lancaster City. 6. Mary 
Elizabeth, married Scott Groff, of Lancaster county, whom she survives. 
7. Susan Rebecca, married Charles Witmeyer, of Lancaster county. 

(III) William Franklin, son of Jacob S. and Anna (Bridegam) 
Snyder, was born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, November 16, 
1845. He was educated in the public schools and at a suitable age went 
to Tamaqua, Pennsylvania, to learn the trade of chairmaker, serving 
one and a half years, then enlisted, although his term had not expired. 
He enlisted, in 1863, in Company E, Twenty-seventh Regiment Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteer Infantry, serving six months, then returned home and 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 593 

for a time again worked at his trade. In 1864 he enlisted in Captain 
A. B. Sanno's independent cavalry company, serving one hundred 
days, receiving honorable discharge, September 16, 1864. On September 
17, or the next day, reenlisted in Company I, Ninth Regiment Pennsyl- 
vania Cavalry, for one year, serving until the close of the war. He 
was with Sherman in his march from "Atlanta to the sea" and witnessed 
the surrender of General Johnston's army. After the war he finished 
learning his trade and worked in Lancaster until 1867, then located in 
Mififlintown, where he was married a year later. In January, 1868, 
he began the manufacture of chairs for his own account, his father-in- 
law, Mr. Sandoe, conducting an undertaking establishment. He con- 
tinued thus until 1878, then purchased ]\Ir. Sandoe's interest and has 
since conducted the undertaking business in Mifflintown alone, selling out 
his chair manufacturing to his son, D. L. Snyder, in 1909. He con- 
tinued his undertaking business imtil February i, 1913, when he .sold 
that department to his son, D. L. Snyder, and retired. He has been 
very successful in business, built a fine store building in 1909, and now 
lives in a residence he erected in 1901. During the years he spent in 
undertaking he conducted the funerals of three thousand one hundred 
and thirty-four persons, his business extending over a large expanse of 
territory surrounding Mifflintown. He is a Progressive in politics and 
has served as member of the borough council. Both he and his wife are 
members of the ilethodist Episcopal church, Mr. Snyder having been 
a member forty-seven years, active and useful. He belongs to .D. H. 
Wilson Post, No. 134, Grand Army of the Republic; has been an Odd 
Fellow for forty-three years, first joining Lodge No. 131, now a mem- 
ber of Lodge No. 911. He has filled all the official chairs in the local 
lodge and in 1876 was representative to the Grand Lodge of Pennsyl- 
vania, sitting in Philadelphia. 

He married, December 24, 1867, Isabella, daughter of Anthony 
Sandoe, an early settler in Mifflintown. locating there in 1840, and died 
in 1905: he married Rebecca Coder, who died in Mifflintown in 1897. 
Anthony Sandoe was in the undertaking business in Mifflintown until 
1878, when he sold out to his son-in-law William F. Snyder. Children 
of Mr. and Mrs. Snyder: i. Rebecca, born 1870; married Cooper 
Moorehead of Newport, Perry county, Pennsylvania ; children : Isabella 
and Miriam. 2. Mary E., Iwrn 1873; married William Frasier. of Lin- 



594 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

coin, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. 3. David Lewis, born August 11, 
1882; now his father's successor in the furniture and undertaking busi- 
ness; married Frances Gouchenour and has a son, William Franklin (2). 



For nearly one hundred years the Hayes family has been 
HAYES prominent in the Kishacoquillas valley, the original settler 

in this branch being John Hayes. He was the son of An- 
drew and Jane (Alcorn) Hayes, both born in county Armagh, Ireland, 
who prior to the revolution came to this country, settling in Lancaster 
county, Pennsylvania. Andrew and Jane (Alcorn) Hayes had nine 
children: Robert, Thomas, Edward, Andrew, John, of whom further; 
Frank, William, Henry, Sarah and one who died young. 

(II) John, son of Andrew and Jane (Alcorn) Hayes, was born in 
Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, March 6, 1797. He grew to manhood 
in his native county, attended the public schools, worked at farming and 
learned the plasterer's trade, serving a regular apprenticeship. He fol- 
lowed his trade for a time in Center county, Pennsylvania, but in 1824 
moved to Mifflin county. He worked in that county for thirty years, 
becoming well known as a master of his trade and a reliable con- 
tractor. In 1854 he purchased the farm upon which he resided, and 
there died, March 14, 1888, aged ninety-one years, a worthy, respected 
citizen. John Hayes married Jane, born March 11, 1803. daughter of 
John Alexander, of Scotch parentage, whose ancestors lived in the 
vicinity of Sterling, Scotland, She was a consistent member of the 
Presbyterian church and died January 10, 1883. Children: William, 
born July 2, 1825, died in 1838; Henry, born November 3, 1826: John, 
of whom further; Francis, born March i, 1830, died in 1866; Josiah, 
born April i, 1833 ; Jane Ann, born July 19, 1838, died in 1843 I William 
James, born October 20, 1843, ^ farmer, married, May 14, 1890, Emily 
Bigelow. 

(III) John (2), son of John (i) and Jane (Alexander) Hayes, was 
born in Brown township, Mifflin county, near the famous "Logan 
Spring", July 9, 1828, died at his home three and a half miles west of 
Reedsville, March 23, 1887. He grew to manhood in his native town- 
ship and attended the public schools, remaining there until the age of 
twenty- four years. In 1852 in company with his brother Henry, he made 
a journey to California, via the Isthmus, remaining until 1839, but dur- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 595 

ing that period made a visit home. In 1S59 he returned to :\lililin county, 
married and located in Reedsville, where he owned a farm of one hun- 
dred and eighty-five acres. This he improved by the addition of new 
buildings and there carried on general farming until 1870. He then 
retired to a small tract of six acres, three and a half miles west of 
Reedsville. where in 1830 his father, John (i) Hayes, had built a home. 
There John (2) Hayes lived until his death in 1S87. He was a Demo- 
crat in politics and an attendant of the Presbyterian church. 

He married Rebecca J. Reed, born in Brown township, Mififlin county, 
March 5, 1838, died at sea, December 14, 1910, while returning from 
Yokohoma, Japan, to San Francisco. Her body was returned to her 
native town, Reedsville, where she and her husband sleep in East Kisha- 
coquillas Presbyterian Cemetery; she having been a member of that 
church all her life. She was a daughter of Abner Reed and his second 
wife, Rhoda McKinney, and granddaughter of James and Jane (Ogleby) 
Reed. James Reed, with his half-brother, William Brown, were the 
first white settlers in the Kishacoquillas valley. Children of John (2) 
and Rebecca J. Hayes: Jane Alexander, died agen ten months; Rhoda 
McKinney, now residing in Broom township, at the old home; J. Frank; 
Abner Reed, now an attorney of Lewistown, married Lucy Parker, of 
Washington, D. C. ; Ann Williamson, now living in Oakland, California. 



Harry C. Smith, of Lewistown, Pennsylvania, descends 
SMITH from a family that has long been established in Juniata 

Valley, Pennsylvania. For several generations they have 
been numbered among the most progressive citizens of the valley, and 
have been justly held in high esteem by the public. 

(I) Jacob Smith, the grandfather of Harry C. Smith, passed his 
entire business life in Lewistown. L-pon the completion of the Penn- 
sylvania canal as far west as Lewistown in 1829, and then to the foot 
of the Allegheny Mountains two years later, among other young men 
of energy and enterprise attracted to Lewistown as a location for busi- 
ness were the twin brothers, Jacob and Henry Smith, who came to the 
growing borough from York, Pennsylvania. In May, 1832, they estab- 
lished a coachmaking business, making a specialty of coaches, doctors' 
gigs. Dearborn wagons and sleighs. The business thrived wonderfully, 
and the firm turned out the best line of goods then on the market in 



596 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

that region. The same year these twins and partners in business traveled 
back to York together on a special errand, as is learned from the fol- 
lowing notice copied from a Lewistown paper : 

"July 5, 1832, at York, Pennsylvania, by Reverend Mr. Clough, 
Henry Smith, of Lewistown, Pennsylvania, to Miss Rachael Fahs. At 
the same time and place, by Reverend Mr. Zeigler, Jacob Smith, of 
Lewistown, to Miss Elizabeth S. Welsh, of York, Penn." 

Arriving in Lewistown with their brides on the canal packet-boat, 
business and family afifairs were at once united, Henry taking charge of 
the painting and leather branch, and Jacob of the wood and iron work. 
The location of the business was the site of the present home of Mrs. 
Maggie McCoy, widow of General Thomas F. McCoy, and children, 
on North Main street; the ground in front now occupied by the resi- 
dence being used as a yard for vehicles awaiting repair. The wooden 
building now in the rear part of the McCoy property was the workshop, 
which stood on a line with the alley. This property, valuable for busi- 
ness or residence purposes, was owned by Jacob, who later in 1841, 
erected the brick residence, which at that time was considered the linest 
dwelling in the town. April i, 1833, by mutual consent, the firm of 
Smith Brothers was dissolved, each continuing in the same line of busi- 
ness for himself. A few years later Henry moved to Huntingdon. 
Pennsvlvania ; later returning to Lewistown to open a grocery and follow 
sign painting. Some time in the decade of the forties Jacob Smith 
moved from his former location on North Main street to a property 
he purchased a few doors farther north, the site now occupied by Mrs. 
Frank E. Mann. Here he carried on coachmaking until the summer of 
1849, when he sold the business to John Clarke, a practical coachmaker, 
who soon moved the plant to North Brown street, near Market, where 
Henrv Zerbe was associated as a partner. A few years after its intro- 
duction into this country Jacob Smith studied and took up the discovery 
of Daguerre in a practical way, and opened the first permanent gallery 
for practising the art of "taking pictures" in Lewistown. He erected 
a large building for the purpose adjoining his home on the site of the 
Mann residence, spoken of above. In this calling, which was in after 
years superseded by photography, he was succeeded by his son, James 
W. Smith, who for many years was the leading photographic artist in 
the town. To Jacob and Elizabeth Susan (Welsh) Smith were born twq 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 597 

children: James Welsh, of whom further; Emma Jane, who died Oc- 
tober 9, 1850, at the age of seven years and a few months. Elizabeth 
Susan (Welsh) Smith died in Lewistown, November 19, i860, aged 
fifty-two years, one month and twenty-five days. Jacob Smith married 
(second) Margaret Markley, of Lewistown. February 19. 1863. One 
daughter was the fruit of this union, Matilda, who married Grant Bur- 
lew. 

(II) James Welsh, son of Jacob and Elizabeth Susan (Welsh) Smith, 
was born in Lewistown, Pennsylvania, probably in 1833, ^^^^ Novem- 
ber 10, 1891. He married Annie Comfort, daughter of an old Penn- 
sylvania family, a native of Lewistown. He succeeded to his father's 
photographic business and was for many years the leading photographer 
of Lewistown. He possessed the true artistic instinct, and the posing. 
of his subject was copied universally. He was a civil war veteran, serving 
his country faithfully and loyally during the time of stress. He enlisted 
first on the nine months' call. July, 1862. in the One Hundred and Thirty- 
first Regiment. Company D, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and 
served his full enlistment. Being honorably discharged he returned 
to Lewistown. took up the broken threads of life and again began his 
photographic work. He reenlisted February 5, 1865, in Company C, 
Eighteenth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, as a musician, to serve 
until the close of the war. He v.-as mustered out June 7, 1865, at 
Nashville, Tennessee. Again he returned home to reenter the photo- 
graphic business. One child only was born to James Welsh and Annie 
(Comfort) Smith: Harry Comfort, of whom further. 

(III) Harry Comfort, son of James Welsh and Annie (Comfort) 
Smith, was born in Lewistown, Pennsylvania. July 31. 1868. He was 
educated in the public schools of Lewistown and on leaving them he 
engaged as clerk for a firm in Pennfield. Pennsylvania, for a few months. 
From December 14, 1887. to July 6. 1904. he was employed by the 
Pennsylvania railroad. Leaving this company he entered the employ 
of the Pennsylvania Glass Sand Company as assistant bookkeeper, re- 
maining in that position until the organization of the Pennsylvania 
Pulverizing Company, an affiliated concern, and has remained with this 
company until the present time (1913). He is a Democrat in politics 
and served one term as clerk of the city council, at the time the sewage 
system and the present system of arc lights were installed. He is a 



598 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

member of the Presbyterian church and is treasurer of the same. Mr. 
Smith is unmarried. 



Dyson Fisher, of Burnham, Pennsylvania, is an example 
FISHER of what a progressive man, though foreign born, may ac- 
complish in the United States by close application and a 
determination to succeed in business in whatever line he may choose. 
Born in England, reared in the conservative manner of the subjects 
of that country, living there until he had reached adult age, he came to 
this country to confront new ideals, new labor conditions and a foreign 
people. That he succeeded goes without saying. 

(I) William Fisher, grandfather of Dyson Fisher, was a native 
of Denby Dale, England. He was a farmer, farming the land as his 
ancestors had done before him for countless generations. Children: i. 
Luke, of whom further. 2. Seth, lives in Denby Dale. 3. William, lives 
in Sheffield, England. 4. Ellen, deceased. 5. Christiana, lives in Denbv 
Dale. 6. Christopher, lives in Bradford, England. 

(II) Luke, oldest son of William Fisher, of Denby Dale, England, 
was born in Denby Dale, and there grew up and married his wife, Marv 
Lockwood, daughter of William Lockwood, a farmer and native of 
Denby Dale. W^illiam Lockwood had children : Ann. a widow, living 
in Denby Dale; Eliza; Mary, mother of Dyson Fisher; James. After 
the marriage of Luke Fisher and Mary Lockwood they moved to Brad- 
ford, England, where he was engaged in the textile industry and fol- 
lowed that until his death, in Bradford, at the age of fifty-six. His 
wife died in Bradford, aged fifty-four. He was a Conservative in poli- 
tics and both he and his wife were communicants of the Church of 
England. Children: i. Walter, died in 1912, in England. 2. Ellen, 
widow of Thomas Pickard, of Bradford. 3. Clara, died aged twenty- 
one, unmarried. 4. Dyson, of whom further. 5. Albert, died aged 
seven. 

(III) Dyson, son of Luke and Mary (Lockwood) Fisher, was born 
in Bradford, England, June 21, 1862. He received his education in 
the public schools of Bradford. On leaving school, while yet a youth, 
he entered the Boiling Iron Works, of Bradford, to learn steel making, 
and remained with the company for nine years. In 1882 he came to 
the United States imbued with tiie idea of more rapid advancement than 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 599 

he could hope for in his native country. He located at Logan, now 
Burnham, Pennsylvania, the seat of the Logan Iron & Steel Works, 
and has made his home there since. He at once entered the employ 
of the Standard Steel Works, in the hammer shop department, working 
with a vim and energy for which he is known. In two or three years 
he entered the boring mills department, in which department he has 
remained. From 1894 until 1909 he was general foreman of the depart- 
ment. He then resigned and has since done contracting in the same 
department. Through thrift and business acumen he has been able to 
accumulate a nice property in Burnham. He has erected a large double 
house, one side of which serves for his home, while the other he .rents. 
He has become a naturalized citizen of the United States; is a Republi- 
can in politics, and has been school director of Derry township. Both 
he and his wife are members of the Episcopal church. He is a Knight of 
Pythias in high standing, a Knight of Malta, and a member of the Free 
and Accepted Masons, at Lewistown; Lewistown Chapter, Lewistown 
Commandery, and also the Harrisburg Consistory and the Harrisburg 
Council. 

He married, July 16, 1881, Edith Emily Shackleton, born in Brad- 
ford, England, daughter of George and Dinah Shackleton, both de- 
ceased ; Mrs. Fisher is also deceased. One child, a daughter, Minnie, 
married Calvin Crownover, born in Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, son 
of Samuel Irvin Crownover. Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Crownover have one 
son, Dyson Lockwood. 



The Baker family came to the Juniata Valley from eastern 
BAKER Pennsylvania, settling in Union county, thence to Snyder 

county, where John Baker owned a small farm and lived 
until his removal with his son Daniel to Mifflin county. There he died, 
September 29, 1871, aged eighty-eight years, three months and nine 
days. He married (second) Margaret Reitz, who bore him nine chil- 
dren. By a first wife he had two, and by a third wife one child. Both 
John and Margaret Baker were members of the Lutheran church: their 
children were: Daniel, of whom further: Frederick, died in Mifflin 
county: David, died in Snyder county; John, died aged twenty-one 
years: Absalom, died aged twenty-two years; Sophia, married George 
Roath and died in Iowa; Sarah, married George Harmon and died in 



6oo HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Ohio; Mary, married a Mr. Harpster and died in Iowa; Elizabeth, mar- 
ried Daniel Freese and died in Michigan. 

(II) Daniel, son of John and Margaret (Reitz) Baker, was born in 
Snyder county, Pennsylvania, October 25, 1817, died in Mifflin county, 
December 24, 1881. He grew to manhood in Snyder county, remaining 
on the farm until his marriage, when he moved to Mifflin county, settling 
first in Oliver township. He remained there seven years ; then moved 
to Granville township, thence to Armagh township, finally settling in 
Derry township, where in 1865 he bought a farm of two hundred acres. 
He was an industrious, upright farmer, a Republican in politics and 
both he and his wife members of the Lutheran church, but later in life 
became Presbyterians. 

Daniel Baker married, January 2, 1841, Susanna Ritter, who 
died September 19, 1898, aged seventy-eight years, eight months and 
thirteen days. She was the daughter of Henry Ritter. born in Pennsyl- 
vania, of German descent, a farmer and land owner of Snyder county. 
He married Magdalena Brouse, who bore him children : Henry, George, 
Jacob, Samuel, Sarah, Sophia, Kate, Susanna and Mary. Both Henry 
and Magdalena Ritter were members of the Lutheran church. Children 
of Daniel and Susanna (Ritter) Baker: Susanna, died voung; Sophia, de- 
ceased, married William R. Treaster, who now lives in Kansas ; Sarah, 
deceased, married Joseph Shirey, of Derry township: Joseph, of whom 
further ; Catherine, married Andrew Weader and lives in Snyder county ; 
Martha, died in infancy; Mary Margaret, deceased, married Jacob Rich- 
ards, a minister of the German Baptist church; H. Albert, married Sally 
VVorley and lives in Juniata county. 

(III) Joseph, son of Daniel and Susanna (Ritter) Baker, was born 
in Snyder county, Pennsylvania, May 12, 1850. He was three years 
of age when his parents moved to Mifflin county, where he was edu- 
cated in the public schools. He remained at the home farm with his 
father and after the death of the latter, bought out the other heirs and 
became sole owner of the two hundred-acre farm in Derry township. 
He continued there a successful farmer until the spring of 1907, when 
he bought a small tract of fourteen acres at Vira and there lives retired 
from active labor, but cultivating his small farm. He is a Republican in 
politics and served as supervisor of Derry township for several years. 
For many years Mr. Baker has been a pillar of the Presbyterian church, 
holding the office of elder. He has led an active, useful life and holds 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 6oi 

the respect of his community as an honorable, upright man. his life 
being one of usefulness. 

He married, November 17, 1870, Mary A. Burkheimer, born July 
30, 1845, iri Center county, Pennsylvania, daughter of John and Jane 
Ellen (McKinney) Burkheimer, both deceased. John Burkheimer, a 
blacksmith, was born in Center county and died there in 1846. Ellen, 
his widow, married (second) William Hawlk and died in 1864 in Mif- 
flin county, also her native county. Children of John Burkheimer: One 
died in infancy; William L., an attorney, now living in Kohoka, Mis- 
souri; John E., a minister of the Free Methodist Episcopal church, now 
living in Venango, Pennsylvania; Mary A., wife of Joseph Baker. Chil- 
dren of Joseph and Mary A. (Burkheimer) Baker: An infant, died un- 
named; Mary Margaret, died in infancy; Thomas Vernor, died in in- 
fancy; Elizabeth, died in infancy; Susanna Frances, living at home; 
Daniel B., died aged four years; Nellie J., married William Baker and 
died July 9, 1900. 



The Kyle family, of Reedsville, Pennsylvania, herein re- 
KYLE corded, descends from John Kyle, who came to Pennsylvania 
from the town Lorrademore, in the south of Ireland. He 
located in Lancaster county, there married and about 1775, with wife 
and child, came on horseback to the Kishacoquillas Valley, locating in 
what is now Brown township, Mifflin county. He warranted about four 
hundred acres of land on which he built a cabin at the foot of Back 
mountain, where he cleared, farmed and lived until his death, dividing 
his property between his sons. Joseph and Crawford. Both he and his 
wife were Presbvterians. organizers and charter members of the East 
Kishacoquillas Presbyterian Church of Reedsville. His wife was a 
Miss Crawford, who bore him three children: i. Margaret, married 
Hamilton Kyle (not a relative), who died in Sun King Valley, Blair 
county, Pennsylvania; she died in Brown township, Mififiin county; their 
only son was killed by a kicking horse, while a young man. but their six 
daughters all married and have many descendants in Blair county. 2. 
Crawford, of whom further. 3. Joseph, born 1781, inherited the east- 
ern half of the homestead, became a prosperous farmer and a prominent 
man in church and state. He served in many township and county 
offices; was a member of the state legislature and on February 25, 1845, 



602 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

was commissioned associate judge of Mifflin county. He was an elder 
of the Presbyterian church and of upright, manly character. He mar- 
ried (first) Mary, daughter of John Brisbin, (second) Jeannette McFar- 
lane, of Armagh township, Mifflin county. Issue by both wives. 

(II) Crawford, son of John Kyle, the immigrant, was born in Lan- 
caster county, Pennsylvania, in 1774, died in Brown township, March 
8, 1842. He inherited the west half of the homestead farm and there 
lived, labored and died, prosperous and contented. He was a member 
of the Presbyterian church and a man held in high esteem for his up- 
right, industrious life. He married (first) Mrs. Ann (Taylor) Mc- 
Nitt, (second) Jane (Mcllhenny) Black. Children by first wife: Mary, 
born February 10, 1800; Jane, July 25, 1801 ; John, April 19, 1803; 
Joseph, January, 1805, died young; Rhoda, April 22, 1809; Margaret, 
February i, 1812; Samuel, August 4, 1814; Joseph, of whom further; 
James, October 24, 1818; Jean; Rhoda, Samuel and Janie, died in in- 
fancy. Child of second wife: Matilda, married James Wilson. 

(III) Joseph, son of Crawford Kyle and his first wife, Mrs. Ann 
(Taylor-McNitt) Kyle, was born in Brown township, Mit^in county, 
Pennsylvania, January 12, 1816, died in November, 1879. He was 
educated in the subscription school of his locality and grew to man- 
hood, his father's farm assistant. After the death of the latter he pur- 
chased the interest of the other heirs in the homestead farm and became 
its sole owner. There he passed his entire life, and bequeathed to his 
son the farm first owned by his grandfather (1775), and now by the 
widow of his son, William Barr Kyle. He was a Democrat in politics, 
and a member of the Presbyterian church. He married, April 17, 1843, 
Elizabeth, daughter of William and Jane (Davis) Barr. Children: i. 
Crawford, born March 13, 1844, died August 12, 1845. 2. William 
Barr, of whom further. 3. Allen Taylor, born August 26, 1848, died 
1889; married Elizabeth Reed Mitchell, who survives him, residing on 
the old Mitchell farm in Brown township. 4. Jennie Elizabeth, married 
Rev. John C. Oliver, formerly of Spruce Creek, Center county, now of 
Irwin, Pennsylvania. 

(IV) William Barr, son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Barr) Kyle, was 
born on the Brown township homestead, July 14, 1846, died in Reeds- 
ville, Pennsylvania, October 31, 1909. He was educated in the public 
school, Kishacoquillas Academy, which he entered when he was fifteen 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 603 

years of age, and Tuscarora Academy, at Academia, Pennsylvania. He 
grew to manhood at the homestead, which was his home until his mar- 
riage, after which he worked the old Norris farm, which his father had 
purchased. Six years later he moved to the Kyle homestead, which he 
purchased after the death of his brother Allen T., and there resided until 
1903, when he moved to Reedsville and lived a retired life until his 
death in 1909. He was the fourth generation to own and cultivate the 
homestead farm and under his skillful management it was made a very 
productive property. He was deeply interested in his calling and used 
all modern aids to success. He was an active member of the local grange. 
Patrons of Husbandry; a faithful member of the Presbyterian church 
from 1896 until his death, and was an elder for fourteen years. He was a 
Democrat in politics, and a willing worker in any enterprise for the 
betterment of his community. He married, December 19, 1876, Mary 
Taylor, born November 13, 1845, i" the Kishacoquillas Valley, daugh- 
ter of John and Rhoda (Taylor) Henry. Children: i. A son, died un- 
named. 2. Rhoda Taylor, born January 18, 1883; educated at Wilson 
College, and resides with her mother in Reedsville. 3. Joseph Reed, 
born April 21, 1885, died August 23, 1902; educated at Reedsville high 
school. 

Mrs. Mary T. (Henry) Kyle is a granddaughter of William and 
Nancy (Beatty) Henry, both born in Londonderry, Ireland, coming to 
America in 1770 in the same ship, but unmarried. Three brothers of 
William Henry came with him, this family being related to the Patrick 
Henry family of Virginia. One brother settled in the west, one in the 
south, William and another brother locating in Lancaster county, Penn- 
sylvania. There William married, and about 1790 moved to Mifflin 
county, where he bought a tract of land in Brown township. He cleared 
and improved his farm and there resided until his death in 1822, leaving 
a widow and family. He was an elder of the Presbyterian church and 
a man of excellent character. Children : James, died aged twenty years ; 
John, see forward ; William, a soldier of the war of 1812, died in Brown 
township, leaving a son William; Reljecca, married Abner Reed (see 
McNitt-Reed family sketch); Margaret, married Rev. James Sterrett; 
Lily, married James McFarlane ; Francis, never married. 

John, son of William and Nancy (Beatty) Henry, was born in Lan- 
caster county, Pennsylvania, November 17, 1783, and was a boy of 



6o4 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

about seven years when his parents came to Mifflin county, where he 
grew to manhood and, April 29, 1824, married Rhoda Taylor, born in 
Union township, Mifflin county, November 16, 1804. They settled on 
a nearby farm in Brown township, which he purchased, containing about 
one hundred and seventy-five acres, where they resided continuously 
until death. Both were members of the Presbyterian church ; he was an 
influential Democrat and associate judge of Mifflin county. He died 
November 17, 1867, she died April 23, 1868. They had thirteen chil- 
dren: I. James Beatty, died in Reedsville, leaving a son, John Thomp- 
son, now living in Birmingham, Alabama. 2. Samuel Williamson, died 
in San Francisco, in June, 1912. 3. William, died in infancy. 4. John, 
deceased; married Rebecca L. Garver and left a daughter, now Mrs. 
Lee Homer McNitt. 5. Francis, died July i, 1889. 6. William, died in 
South America in 1869. 7. Davis, now residing in Reedsville. 8. 
Robert P., died in Brown township, February 19, 1863. 9. Elizabeth 
Davis, died in 1883 ; married General John P. Taylor. 10. Joseph, died 
at the home farm in 1872. 11. Nancy Jane, married John R. Garver, 
and lives at Kishacoquillas, Pennsylvania. 12. Mary Taylor, married 
William Barr Kyle, whom she survives a resident of Reedsville (see 
Kyle IV). 13. Rhoda Garver, married William H. Taylor and resided 
near Reedsville until her death, in 191 1. 

Rhoda (Taylor) Henry, wife of John Henry, was a descendant of 
Robert Taylor, who was the original owner of a tract of about three 
thousand acres. His son, Henry Taylor, married Rhoda Williamson, of 
the Cumberland Valley, Pennsylvania, and had children : Robert ; Samuel 
W., see forward ; Matthew, Henry, Joseph, David, Marv. Ann, Jane and 
Rhoda. 

Samuel W. Taylor was born November 6, 1778. He learned the 
trade of fuller and until his marriage worked in his father's mills, 
commonly known as Taylor's Woolen Mills. After marriage he began 
farming, an occupation he followed all his after active years. He died 
aged eighty-four years. He married, about 1802, Elizabeth, daughter 
of John and Elizabeth (Foster) Davis; she died at the age of eighty 
years. Children: i. Rhoda, born November 16, 1804 (of previous 
mention), married John Henry. 2. Catherine, born October 10, i8c6, 
married Francis McClure. 3. Henry P., born February 19. 1809. 4. 
John D., born November 17, 181 1. 5. Samuel W. (2), February 25, 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 605 

1816. 6. James I., June 19, 1818. 7. Robert M. 8. Elizabeth Jane, 
married Matthew Taylor. 

Since the death of her husband, Mrs. Mary T. (Henry) Kyle has 
continued her residence at Reedsville, where she is attended by her only 
child, Miss Rhoda Taylor Kyle. Both are members of the Presbyterian 
church and interested in the church and social life of their town. 



The Freed family was founded in America by Paul Freed, 
FREED born in Bavaria, Germany, emigrated to this country in 

1752, settling in Bucks county, Pennsylvania. He became 
a large landowner and left a posterity of hardy, self-reliant men, who 
are yet found in Richland and Milford townships, besides those who 
have gone out into other parts of the state and nation. 

(II) Jacob, son of Paul Freed, became a landowner and prosperous 
farmer of Bucks county, married and left male issue. 

(III) Abraham, son of Jacob Freed, was a native of Bucks county. 
later settling in Freeburg, Snyder county, where he partly cleared a farm, 
on which he resided until his death. He and all his brothers were mem- 
bers of the Mennonite church, that having been the family religion from 
the first generation. He married and reared a family of six children, 
two sons and four daughters, the latter intermarrying with the Delp, 
Motz, Miser and Schnee families. Abraham, the second son, lived and 
died on the old Snyder county homestead. 

(IV) Jacob, eldest son of Abraham Freed, was born in Snyder 
county, Pennsylvania, March 10, 181 1, died July 30, 1895. He grew to 
manhood at the homestead farm, married in 1837, then moved to Bea- 
vertown, Pennsylvania, where he established a tannery, continuing in 
successful business for many years. Finally he retired, and until his 
death, was out of all active business. He was also a landowner, and a 
stockholder in Selinsgrove National Bank. He was a Whig, later a Re- 
publican, holding several township offices. Both he and his wife were 
members of the Lutheran church, he having abandoned the Mennonite 
faith of his fathers. He married, in 1837, Susan Ritzman. born Sep- 
tember 22, 1822, in Snyder county, Pennsylvania, died February 25, 
1893, daughter of John and Catherine Ritzman, early settlers at Cramer, 
Snyder county. John Ritzman was a miller, owning his own mill prop- 
erty, also a large farm on which he resided until his death. He had si.x 



6o6 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

children, all except Susan and Henry moved to Ohio, where they died. 
Children of Jacob and Susan (Ritzman) Freed: Amelia, born Decem- 
ber 8, 1839, married Joseph Dreese and resides in Dayton, Ohio; Henry,' 
born March i, 1843, died about 1889; Edward, born March i, 1844, now 
living retired at Beavertown, Pennsylvania; Mary, born January i, 1847, 
married Alfred Smith and resides in Beavertown; Jacob, born March 11, 
1849, resides at Beavertown; Nathan, born October i, 185 1, resides at 
Burnham, Pennsylvania; Susan, born October 28, 1853, married Robert 
Feese, whom she survives, a resident of Beavertown; John, born Sep- 
tember 12, 1859, resides in Williamsport, Pennsylvania; S. Lincoln, born 
February 7, 1861, died 1912; William Ritzman, of whom further; two 
other children died in infancy. 

(V) William Ritzman, twelfth child of Jacob and Susan (Ritzman) 
Freed, was born in Beavertown, Snyder county, Pennsylvania, April 25, 
1863. He was educated in the public school and grew to manhood at 
the home farm. At age of twenty years he entered mercantile life as 
clerk in a general store continuing eight years. He thoroughly mastered 
the details of merchandising and, about 1891, located in Siglerville, where 
he bought out a general store, and successfully conducted business for six 
years. He then sold out and purchased a farm of one hundred and 
fifty acres in Mifflin county, which he cultivated for five years. He then 
located in Lewistown, where he established a general mercantile busi- 
ness at the corner of Pine and Shaw streets, where he has a good store 
building, well stocked. He is a Republican in politics and both he and 
his wife are members of the Lutheran church. He belongs to the Patri- 
otic Order Sons of America and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
of Milroy. 

He married, May 10, 1892, Ellie B. Ingram, born in Mifflin county, 
daughter of Augustus M. and Elizabeth (Sigler) Ingram, and grand- 
daughter of James and Martha (Cottle) Ingram. Elizabeth Sigler was a 
daughter of George (3) and Sarah (Townsend) Sigler, and a grand- 
daughter of George (2) Sigler, born in New Jersey, February 17, 1762, 
came to Pennsylvania with his father, also George Sigler, and when a 
boy was captured by the Indians, carried to Canada and held in cap- 
tivity for over a year. He finally returned to his home, married and 
built the "stone house" in which his son George lived, a prosperous far- 
mer. 

A complete account of the capture and captivity of George Sigler 




^M^^C.£.£^' 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 607 

(2) will be found in this work. Air. and Mrs. Freed have no 
children. 



The McKinleys of Ireland descend from Mac Duff, 
McKINLEY Thane of Fife, Scotland, whose killing of Macbeth, 
December 5, 1056, formed a theme for Shakespeare's 
pen, his "Macbeth" containing the oft quoted lines : 

"Lay on Macduff, 
"And damn'd be he that first cries, 'Hold, enough' !" 

Through twenty-one generations in Scotland the descent traces to 
Findlay, killed at the battle of Pinkie, 1547, while bearing the royal 
banner of Scotland. He had four sons, who took the name of Maclnla. 
In the twenty-sixth generation "James the Trooper" settled in Ireland 
(1690) and was the ancestor of most of the Irish McKinleys. His son, 
David McKinley, "the weaver", born about 1705, came to America, set- 
tling in Chanceford township, York county, Pennsylvania, prior to 1745. 
From him sprang the McKinleys of York county and the Juniata Valley, 
and W^liam McKinley, twenty-fifth president of the United States. 
From York this branch settled in Juniata county, where the grand- 
parents of George W. McKinley, of Burnham, lived and died. 

(II) Alexander McKinley, was born in Juniata county, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he married Mary Meloy, also born in Juniata county. He 
was reared a farmer and always followed that occupation. He was a 
Republican in politics and a man of excellent reputation. Children : 
William, deceased; James, deceased; Mary, died in infancy; John, died 
in infancy; George W., of whom further; Lucinda, deceased; Lemuel 
and Samuel B. 

(III) George W., son of Alexander and Mary (Meloy) McKinley, 
was born in Tuscarora township, Juniata county, Pennsylvania, July 22, 
1833. He was educated in the public school, and earl}- in life began 
learning the carpenter's trade, and later added to his activities a knowl- 
edge of the plasterer's trade. In connection with his trades he followed 
farming, and on March 17, 1886, settled on a farm at McVeytown, 
where he remained four years. He then settled in Newtown, where for 
twelve years he was in the employ of the Standard Steel Works Com- 
pany. He is now living retired in Newtown, a well respected citizen. He 



6o8 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

is a Republican in politics and for five years served as assessor of Derry 
township. In religious faith he is a Methodist. 

He married, in 1856, Mary E. Logan, born in Franklin county, 
Pennsylvania, near Dry Run, June 22, 1844, daughter of John Logan, 
an early settler of Franklin county. Children: Samuel, Lottie, Harry, 
Wilson, Xettie and Jolin, died in infanc}'. 



One of the substantial, honorable families of Penn- 
PRETTYLEAF sylvania is that of the Prettyleaf, to which belongs 
John Calvin Prettyleaf, of Lewistown, Mifflin 
county. The original immigrant of the family came direct from Ger- 
many, landing in New York and later going into Pennsylvania. 

(I) Jacob Prettyleaf, the immigrant, came from Germany, year 
unknown, with the hope of bettering his fortunes in a new and repuljli- 
can country. He settled in Derry township and there worked as a day 
laborer, knowing little English and willing to do whatsoever came to 
his hand. He married Rebecca Parcley, a native of Pennsylvania, and 
they were the parents of six children, one of whom was William, of 
whom further. Jacob Prettyleaf prospered in his new home and sur- 
roundings and at his death left quite a good estate. He was a Lutheran, 
and he and his wife are interred in the Lutheran cemetery at Lewis- 
town. 

(II) William, son of Jacob and Rebecca (Parcley) Prettyleaf, was 
born in Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, in 1829, and grew up there. He 
began farming immediately on leaving school. Later he purchased thirty 
acres of land just without the borough limits, it having since been in- 
corporated, and there he lived and died in 1900. He was a Republican 
and held minor local ofifices under the party. He and his wife were 
members of the Lutheran church. He married Elizabeth Forsythe, born 
in Pennsylvania in 1833, died in 1902, daughter of Matthew and Mar- 
garet (Kane) Forsythe; Mr. Forsythe was born in Ireland and came to 
America when quite young; his wife was a native of Pennsylvania, de- 
scending from an old and long-established family of Pennsylvania; he 
settled first in Decatur township and later came to Mifflin; they were 
the parents of seven children. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Prettyleaf: i. 
John Calvin, of whom further. 2. William, was killed in a railroad acci- 
dent in 1898. 3. Sarah, married J. P. Bradford, of Ferguson Valley. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 609 

4. Martha, married James Dunn. 5. Mollie, married Joseph Lighter, 
Hving on Valley street, Lewistown. 6. Annie, married Rush Russler. 

(III) John Calvin, son of William and Elizabeth (Forsythe) Pretty- 
leaf, was born in Derry township. May 18, 1853. He received his 
preparatory education in the Lewistown public school, then attended 
the Lewistown Academy, finishing at the local Normal. Leaving school 
he engaged in teaching and continued at that vocation for twenty-two 
years, during which time he built up a notable reputation for himself as 
an educator. In 1900 he gave up pedagogy and opened a grocery store 
and a coal yard in Lewistown, since which time he has devoted him- 
self to these enterprises. He has over $10,000 invested in the business 
and employs seven clerks, and the business is growing by leaps and 
bounds. He owns one hundred and seventy desirable acres within the 
borough limit, which is also increasing in value with each year. He is 
a Republican, but has never held or asked for office. He has been a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Pythias for thirty years, ranking high in its 
councils. He is a member of the Lutheran church. He married, in 
1878, MaVtha Martz, daughter of Amos and Sarah (Ort) Martz. Chil- 
dren: I. Maurice E., of whom further. 2. John Calvin Jr., married 
Harriet Bogenreif, of Mifflinburg, Pennsylvania; one child, Jean. 3. 
Grace, married Harry Goss ; two children : Mabel and Nerr Bryson. 4. 
Sarah, married Charles R. Hoffmann. 

(IV) Maurice E., son of John Calvin and Martha (Martz) Pretty- 
leaf, was born November 7, 1878. He was educated in the Lewistown 
public, high school and academy. For eleven years he and his brother, 
John Calvin Jr., assisted their father in the mercantile business, Maurice 
E. being manager. In 191 1 Maurice E. bought a store on South Main 
street. No. 102, where he is now doing a remarkably good business. He 
is a Republican in politics, and attends the Lutheran church. He mar- 
ried, June 10, 1901, Laura J. Paul, of Lewistown, daughter of William 
Paul, of Lewistown. They have two children: Maurice Elbert and 
Francis Paul. 

Jacob Martz, grandfather of Martha (Martz) Prettyleaf, came from 
Germany and located in Pennsylvania where there were many of his 
countrymen. He was the father of several children, among them being 
Amos. Amos Martz, son of Jacob Martz, was born in 1818, in Juniata 
county, Pennsylvania. He married Sarah Ort, who was also of German 



6io HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

descent. Amos was a carriage maker, and later moved to Lewistown 
where he established himself in that business in the fifties, conducting 
it until his death in 1881. His wife, Sarah, died in 1906. He was a 
Democrat, and they were both members of the Lutheran church. Chil- 
dren : Alonzo, Eliphas, Cloyd, Robert ; Joseph, deceased ; James ; Mar- 
tha, married John Calvin Prettyleaf, in 1878. 



C. S. Brindel, general merchant, established in Burn- 
BRINDEL ham, Pennsylvania, in 1909, descends from Abraham 

Brindel, born in Germany. He settled first in Berks 
county, Pennsylvania, about the year 1800, later moved to Lancaster 
county, subsequently returned to Berks county where he died at an ad- 
vanced age near Adamstown. Children: John, of whom further; 
Daniel, Isaac, Elizabeth, and two other daughters. 

(II) John, son of Abraham Brindel, grew to manhood in Lancas- 
ter county, Pennsylvania, receiving the limited schooling allotted the 
farmer boy of that day. He worked on his father's farm until his mar- 
riage, then moved to Mifflin county, locating in what is now Union 
township. About 1825 he bought a tract of wild land, built a log house 
and shop and began working at his trade of cooper. Later he moved 
to Belleville, where he purchased land adjacent to the present hotel, 
erected a house and shop and there successfully followed his trade until 
his retirement a few years prior to his death. He was a Democrat 
in politics, held several township offices, maintained an active interest 
in public affairs and was a highly esteemed citizen. He was a faithful 
member and an official of the Lutheran church at INIechanicsville, a 
church he was largely instrumental in organizing. He died in 1882, aged 
about eighty years. He married Mary Umbarger, born in 1801, died 
1885, daughter of John Umbarger. Children: i. Cynthia, accidentally 
drowned aged three years. 2. Catherine, died in infancy. 3. Benjamin, 
married Nancy Mateer, and died August 24, 1896, leaving four chil- 
dren. 4. Richard, born July 17. 1829; married Catherine Taylor; eleven 
children. 5. Josiah, married Sarah Hafford : five children. 6. John W., 
of whom further. 7. Mary Elizabeth, married R. E. Wills. 

(III) John W., son of John and Mary (Umbarger) Brindel, was 
born in Union township. Union county, Pennsylvania, in 1834, now re- 
siding in Granville, Pennsylvania. He spent all of his active life in 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 6ii 

agricultural pursuits and now lives retired. He married Nancy Ritten- 
house, who died in 1907. Children: i. Elwood, now a broker in New 
York City. 2. Mary, died 1908; married George Kimberly, of McVey- 
town, Pennsylvania. 3. Charles S., of whom further. 4. Jennie, mar- 
ried Adam Kauffman; resides in Granville, Pennsylvania. 5. George, 
resides at Lewistown Junction. 6. Harry, resides at Alexander, Pennsyl- 
vania. 7. William, resides in Granville. 8. John, resides in Altoona. 
9. Robert, of Tiffin, Ohio. 10. Warren, of Granville, Pennsylvania. 

(IV) Charles S., son of John W. and Nancy (Rittenhouse) Brindel, 
was born in Mifflin, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, November i, 1861. 
He was educated in the public schools, and followed farming nine years 
in early life, then five years as a steel worker. He then learned the 
milling business, locating at Maitland, Pennsylvania, continuing success- 
fully until 1909, when he located in Burnham, Pennsylvania, where he 
established the mercantile business of C. S. Brindel. He owns the 
building which he occupies and is well established in a profitable business, 
handling#the usual stock of a general country store. Mr. Brindel is a 
capable, energetic, honorable business man, and has in his son an efficient 
clerk. He is a Democrat in politics and in Maitland served as super- 
visor. He is an active member of the Methodist Episcopal church and 
interested in all good works. He married Mae Howenstein, born in 
Newport, Pennsylvania, in 1867, daughter of William and Lucy Howen- 
stein, both deceased. 

(V) William A. H., only child of Charles S. and Mae (Howenstein) 
Brindel, was born in Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, near Lewistown, Sep- 
tember 25, 1889. He was educated in the public school of Maitland, 
Pittsburgh high school and Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport. In 1909 
he entered the employ of his father, C. S. Brindel, at Burnham, Penn- 
sylvania, and is so connected at this date ( 1913). He is a young man of 
sterling business qualities and takes a deep interest in all that pertains 
to the welfare of his town. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church; Lewistown Lodge, No. 187, Independent Order of Odd Fellows; 
Kappa Delta Phi (Dickinson). He is a Democrat in politics. 



The Croziers are of Scotch-Irish descent, their ancestors 

CROZIER early settlers in Juniata county, where Armstrong Cro- 

zier was born. He grew to manhood on the farm. 



6i2 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

learned the mason's trade and was the owner of one hundred and eighty- 
seven acres of improved land in Beale township. He was also a pros- 
perous farmer. He was inlluential in his community, a Democrat in poli- 
tics and held the olifice of supervisor. Both he and his wife were mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian church. He married, at Lost Creek, Juniata 
county, Pennsylvania, Sarah, daughter of Richard Bell, of Fermanagh 
township. She died at Johnstown, Beale township, Juniata county, sur- 
viving her husband, who died there on January 28, 1847. Children: 
Melinda, died in childhood; Elizabeth, married William Olds; Benjamin 
F., of whom further; James H., moved west; Mary C, married D. B. 
McWilliams. 

(II) Benjamin F., son of Armstrong and Sarah (Bell) Crozier, was 
born in Beale township, Juniata county, Pennsylvania, August 25, 1834, 
died October 13, 1904, at Walnut, Pennsylvania. He worked at the 
home farm and attended public school until his father's death, when 
he was thirteen years of age. He then was compelled to leave school 
and, as the eldest son, take, as far as possible, the management of the 
farm. He continued at home until i860, when he bought of Calvin 
Stewart a farm of fifteen acres in Beale township. He improved his 
purchase, but sold the following year and returned to the old home- 
stead, continuing until 1864, when he moved to Johnstown in the same 
township. In the fall of the year he enlisted at Harrisburg in Company 
E, Xinth Regiment Pennsylvania Cavalry. He served under General 
Sherman and was with him in the famous march from "Atlanta to the 
Sea". He escaped all injury and was only confined in the hospital once 
and that for only a few days. He was honorably discharged at the close 
of the war. He then returned to Beale township and, purchasing the 
Jacob Doughman farm, resumed agricultural operations. He sold his 
farm a few years later and located in the village of Walnut, Juniata 
county, learned the saddler's trade and established there a harness and 
hardware making business that he successfully conducted until his retire- 
ment. In i>S()o lie was elected justice of the peace and held that 
office until his death. He was a conscientious, fair-minded justice, few 
appeals ever Ijeing taken from his decisions and none were ever reversed. 
.\tter the appointment of his son as postmaster at Walnut, Mr. Crozier 
acted as deputy postmaster. He was well known and highly respected 
wherever known and was held in universal respect and honor. He was 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 613 

a devoted member of the Presbyterian church, taught a class in the Sun- 
day school (Sunday school superintendent undenominational) a line of 
Christian work that always interested him. He was an ardent Democrat, 
taking active part in town affairs. He was a faithful son, a good soldier, 
an honest official and an upright citizen. 

He married, in Beale township, ]\Iarch 16, 1858, Mary A., daughter 
of Daniel and Catherine Fry, one of a family of nine children. She was 
born in Millerstown, Perry county, Pennsylvania, April 9, 1829, died 
October 5, 1894. She was a devoted member of the Lutheran church and 
beloved by all for her piety and benevolence. Children: Nevin P., 
moved west; Mowry L., deceased, of Port Royal, Pennsylvania; Benja- 
min F., of whom further. 

(Ill) Benjamin F. (2), son of Benjamin F. (i) and Mary A. (Fry) 
Crozier, was born in Beale township, Juniata county, Pennsylvania, 
September 16, 1866. He obtained a good education in the public schools 
and at Tuscarora Academy. He taught school for sometime : was then a 
clerk, later a traveling salesman, continuing "on the road" three years. 
He resided in Walnut, and during President Cleveland's second admin- 
istration was appointed postmaster of that village, his father acting as 
deputy. In 1900 he entered the employ of the Standard Steel Works 
Company as timekeeper, and in 191 1 established a mercantile business at 
Burnham, which is managed by his son. Mr. Crozier is a man of ability 
and in every position in which he has been placed has acquitted himself 
with credit. He is a member of Lewistown Lodge, No. 187. Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows; Lewistown Eyrie, Fraternal Order of Eagles; 
Lewistown Lodge, Loyal Order of Moose; and Lewistown Lodge of 
Owls. In political faith he is a Democrat. His residence is on Fifth 
avenue, Burnham, which he owns, and he has now under construc- 
tion a large store building to accommodate his growing mercantile 
business. 

He married, in 1892, Clara D. Showalter, born in Berks county, 
Pennsylvania, in 1861, daughter of Jacob and Sarah Showalter, the 
former dying in Berks county, the latter in Burnham in 1904. The only 
child of Benjamin F. and Clara D. Crozier is: Eldred G., born May 18, 
1893; educated in the public schools, graduate of Burnham high school, 
class of 1910, now (1913) manager of the mercantile business estab- 
lished by his father in 191 1. 



6 14 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

The Mitchell family of Pennsylvania, of which Elder 
MITCHELL C. Mitchell, of Derry township, Mifflin county, is a 

member, has long been prominent in that section of the 
state, and is accounted one of the most solid and honorable in Pennsyl- 
vania. 

The first member of the family to come from England was probably 
Robert Mitchell, who landed in Massachusetts about 1664, from one 
of the small and infrequent sailing vessels that touched the shores of 
the New World. He married the daughter of a neighbor. Daniel Elliott, 
and by her had a large family. His sons and his sons' sons wandered to 
different provinces, one of them at least eventually making his home in 
Pennsylvania. That they did their patriotic duty by their country dur- 
ing the revolutionary war is proven by the roster of the various com- 
panies furnished by the colonies. Several Mitchells were among the 
soldiers of the Sixtieth Royal Americans who fought General Montcalm, 
his French soldiers and Indian allies near the lakes. Also the lists of 
the civil war veterans show that the Mitchell family was well repre- 
sented, both north and south, throughout the entire time of the historic 
struggle. 

(I) William Mitchell was one of the early pioneers in Mifflin county, 
settling east of Milroy or Perrysville. He was a farmer and a landed 
proprietor, a man of great importance in that section of the state. He 
was known far and wide for his abundant hospitality. Among his 
numerous children was Samuel, of whom further. 

(II) Samuel, son of William Mitchell, was born on his father's farm 
in Mifflin county, near Milroy. He was. like his father, a farmer, and 
was an extensive land owner. He was for years prominent in the social, 
religious and political life of his section. He married Margaret (Carna- 
han) Hosey. a daughter of an old family long established in Westmore- 
land county. She was the widow of Daniel Hosey, and settled in Mifflin 
county with him after their marriage. After her marriage with Samuel 
Mitchell they located in Derry township on a farm, and here their chil- 
dren were born. They lived quiet, retired, useful lives, were good 
neighbors and friends, always generously extending a helping hand to 
those less fortunate than themselves. They were devout members of 
the Presbyterian church. Children, i. Rosanna, born July 10, 1812; 
married William Sigler; moved to Ohio and there died. 2. William, 



THE NEW YOHK 

PUBLIC UBRARY 





'fy^^^.^^^r// 



' ^-lyi"- Historical Fub. Co. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 615 

born April 2, 1814, died aged eighteen. 3. Mary, born July 18, 1816; 
married Robert Stewart; both died in Derry township. 4. Samuel, of 
whom further. 5. John McDowell, born September 21, 182 1, died 
August 2, 18S9, in Derry township; married Martha Sharp McNitt, of 
Siglerville, who still survives him ; he was one of the substantial men 
of the township, highly respected and greatly esteemed. 

(III) Samuel {2), son of Samuel (i) and Margaret (Carnahan- 
Hosey) Mitchell, was born November 2, 18 18, on the old homestead 
in Derry township, died January 14, 1899. He married Margaret G. 
McNitt, born July 19, 1828, a member of an old and important family of 
that part of the state. She died June 26, 191 1. After marriage they 
lived on the Mitchell homestead in Derry township. His father dying, 
he and his brother, John McDowell, purchased the interests of the heirs, 
modernized the buildings, erected others and brought the land under a 
high state of cultivation. They were members of the Presbyterian 
church, liberally supporting it, he being treasurer of the same. He was 
a Democrat in politics and served as poor director for three years, 
school director nine years, and supervisor. Children: i. Nancy, mar- 
ried J. S. McNitt; lives near Milroy. 2. Mary, married (first) Adam 
Koons, of Newville, Pennsylvania; (second) A. Brown Cummins; lives 
in Lewistown (1913). 3. Elder C, of whom further. 4. John Brown, 
lives at 19 East Third street, Lewistown; is a farmer by occupation; 
he married Rachel Sterrett. 3. Martha Ellen, who died at the age of 
nine months. 

(IV) Elder C. son of Samuel (2) and Margaret G. (McNitt) 
Mitchell, was born on an adjoining farm to his present residence in 
Derry township, June 29, 1853. He was given all the educational ad- 
vantages afforded by the public schools of the township and Airy View 
Academy, and was reared on the homestead. On leaving school he 
began farming, and came to his present home, the one adjoining his 
father's, to be with an uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. John McDowell 
Mitchell. At the death of his uncle he inherited, co-jointly with his 
aunt, the farm. His aunt is still living with her husband's nephew, and 
is one of the brightest of women for her advanced years. She takes a 
vivid interest in things outside her home life and is still active in 
social and religious matters. Mr. Mitchell does general farming and 
stock breeding. He organized and is president of the Dry Valley Tele- 



6i6 HISTORY OF THE JUXIATA VALLEY 

phone Company, and is also trustee and treasurer of the Little Valley 
Presbyterian Church. 

He married, April 23, 1896, Frances Anna Cummins, born January 
15, 1858, at McAlevys Fort, the fourth daughter of Sterrett and Agnes 
(McNitt) Cummins, of an old and distinguished family, whose lineage 
runs back to colonial days. One son has been born to Elder C. and 
Frances Anna (Cummins) Mitchell, Samuel Cummins, born May 29, 

1897- ^___^ 

Early in the colonial days three brothers by the name of 
STEWART Stewart came from Scotland and settled in America, 

William, James and John. One at least of these 
brothers settled in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, and had a son 
William, born in Cumberland county, who settled in the Tuscarora val- 
ley. He took up land on Tuscarora creek, at which place he met a tragic 
death, having been killed by the Indians while searching for his horses 
that had strayed. From him came Joseph Stewart, of the third genera- 
tion, one of the sturdy pioneers of his day, an energetic, progressive 
man. He was a farmer of the Big Valley, returning late in life and set- 
tling at Burnham, in Derry township. He married Sarah Creswell, and 
both are buried in the Methodist cemetery at Vira, Pennsylvania. Chil- 
dren : I. Robert, born in the Kishacoquillas valley, October 31, 1818, 
died October 28, 1856; married Mary Mitchell. 2. Thomas Miller, of 
whom further. 3. Jane, twin of Thomas M., married Peter Webner. 4. 
Rebecca, married James Riden. 5. Mary, married Peter Albright and 
moved to Red Cloud, Nebraska 6. Elijah, married Anna Belle Van 
Arden and moved to Red Cloud, where he died. 7. Sarah, married 
Isaac Price. 8. Ann, married John McGee. 9. Samuel, married Mary 
Albright, and lived in Yeagertown. 

(IV) Thomas Miller, son of Joseph and Sarah (Creswell) Stewart, 
was born in the Kishacoquillas valley, near Reedsville, Mifflin county, 
Pennsylvania, August i, 1821, and died in Burnham, Pennsylvania, in 
1908. He grew to manhood on the home farm, attended the public 
school and early in life began work at the iron furnaces in Mifflin and 
Center counties. Later he moved to Blair county, Pennsylvania, where 
he worked at the Bald Eagle Furnaces until 1868, then returned to 
Mifflin county, where he spent the balance of his life. He was a Repub- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 617 

lican in politics and both he and his wife were members of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church. He married Ann Taylor, born in Center county, 
Pennsylvania, near Stormstown, May 2-], 1827, died at Burnham, June 
7, 1905. She was the daughter of Nathan Taylor, an early settler of 
Cumberland county, who died in Center county, Pennsylvania. Chil- 
dren of Thomas Miller Stewart: i. Nathan, of whom further. 2. Joseph, 
born October 18, 1850. 3. Samuel, January 28, 1852. 4. Sarah, No- 
vember 9, 1854. 5. Robert, December i, 1856. 6. Thomas J., Novem- 
ber 14, 1859. 7. Mary E., October 18, 1861. 8. William T., November 
3, 1863. 9. Lemuel, December 14, 1865, died in infancy. 10. Henry, 
June 21, 1867, deceased. 11. Emma A., January 27, 1870. 12. Charles 
F., November 11, 1879. 

(V) Nathan, eldest of the twelve children of Thomas Miller and 
Ann (Taylor) Stewart, was born at Bald Eagle Furnaces. Blair county, 
Pennsylvania, August 5, 1848. He attended the public schools and lived 
in Blair county until 1868, when the family returned to Mifflin county. 
He worked at the iron furnaces in Blair county and on January i, 1872, 
entered the employ of the Standard Steel Company at Burnham. where 
he is yet in active service. He thoroughly understands his part in the 
manufacture of iron and steel and is a most reliable workman. He 
built his present residence at No. 107 Newton street in 188 1. and is 
now serving his fourth successive term as justice of the peace. He 
joined Lewistown Lodge, No. 97, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
in 1872, and in 187 1 was made a member of the Juniata Lodge, No. 270, 
Knights of Pythias, holding membership in both lodges at the present 
date (1913). He is a Republican in politics and is a consistent member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. He has taken active part in the 
affairs of his town since becoming a taxpayer and is held in highest re- 
spect by his townsmen. 

He married, October 26, 1871, Elizabeth Starr, born in Lancaster 
county, Pennsylvania, at Spring Grove Forge, April 3, 185 1, daughter 
of James Winfield and Lydia (Glass) Starr, born in Lancaster county, 
came to Newtown, Pennsylvania, during the war, where both died. 
He was a farmer, a Democrat, and both were members of the Lutheran 
church. Their children : Elizabeth, of previous mention : Susan, Ellen, 
John Winfield; George W., deceased; James Buchanan; Thomas J., de- 
ceased; Mary E., deceased; and two who died in infancy. Children of 



6i8 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Nathan and Elizabeth (Starr) Stewart: i. Agnes, deceased. 2. James 
Thomas, married Jennie Wilson; no issue. 3. Nathan Winfield, married 
Minnie Nearhoof : children: Frank G., Ernest R., James R., Kenneth W., 
Elizabeth and an infant, deceased. 4. Beulah, married Owen Swisher; 
children : Nathan Stewart, lone Grace. 5. Nellie Dawn. 6. Susan Starr. 



This family came to Burnham, Pennsylvania, in 1862, from 
STARR Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, where James W. Starr was 

born February 26, 1824. He was a farmer all his life and 
for thirty-four years lived in Mifflin county. He died in Burnham, 
September 8, 1896. His wife, Lydia Glass, born in Lancaster county, 
Pennsylvania, April 11, 1829, died in Burnham December 11, 1895. 
Children: Elizabeth, Susan, Ellen, John W., George VV., deceased; 
James B., of whom further; Thomas J., deceased; Mary E., deceased; 
and two died in infancy. Both parents were members of the Lutheran 
church and he was a Democrat in politics. 

James B., son of James W. and Lydia (Glass) Starr, was born in 
Lancaster county. Pennsylvania, at Spring Grove, August 24, 1861. One 
year later his parents moved to Burnham, Mifflin county; his early life 
was spent on the Derry township farm, and his education obtained in 
the public school. He entered the employ of the Standard Steel Works 
at the age of seventeen years and for thirty-four years has been a work- 
man in the hammer shop for that corporation, a record of faithful, 
continuous service hard to duplicate. In politics he is a Democrat and 
in religious faith a Lutheran. 

He married. January 22, 1882, Margaret Shannon, born in Tyrone, 
Pennsylvania. September 20, 1868, died in Burnham, October 4, 1903. 
Children: i. Harry Walter, born October 19, 1886: married Mollie 
Shirey; no children. 2. Myra Lorinda, born December i, 1888, died 
May 27, 1890. 3. Hazel May, born June 11, 1891 ; married Lloyd W. 
Kell; one child. James J. 4. Alfred Clair, October 3, 1894. 5. Irma 
Elizabeth, March 13, 1897. 



Two brothers, John and Christian Fretz, with a third 
FRETZ brother (name unknown and who died on the voyage) emi- 
grated from near the city of Manheim, in the Grand Duchy 
of Baden. Germany, formerly known as the Palatinate or Rhenish Prus- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 619 

sia. They were of German origin, spoke and wrote the German language, 
and were connected with a distinctly German church, the Mennonite. 
They probably came between the years 1710 and 1720, although the 
exact date is not known. Christian Fretz settled at what is now known 
as Heaney's run in Tinicum township, Bucks county, Pennsylvania, but 
where John settled first is not known. He is first found definitely lo- 
cated in Plumstead. now Bedminster township, Bucks county, on what 
is yet known as the old Fretz homestead, situated about one mile north- 
east of Bedminsterville and yet owned in the Fretz name. This home- 
stead, originally containing two hundred and thirty acres, was bought 
by John Fretz in 1737 or 1738, and cost him one hundred and six pounds. 
It was improved, but on all sides surrounded by wild timber land. Here 
John Fretz lived and plied his trade, weaving, in connection with farm- 
ing. He was known as "Weaver" John, and little is known of him 
further than stated and the additional facts following. He was one of 
the committee in 1741 to form the new township of Bedminster, setting 
it of? from Plumstead. He was a Mennonite and worshipped at the old 
log church at Deep Run, Bucks county, which stood for a full century. 
He died in 1772, his will, dated January 29 of that year, was probated 
March 3, following. He divided his property between his wife and 
children, stipulating, however, that his son Christian should have the 
homestead and pay therefor eight hundred pounds, which indicates that 
either property had greatly advanced in value, or that large additions 
had been made to its area, one hundred and six pounds being the pur- 
chase price in 1737. "Weaver" John was twice married, but his wives' 
surnames have not been preserved. His first wife, Barbara, bore him 
five children; his second wife, Maria, bore him three. If there were 
other children, they died young. Children in order of birth: John, 
Jacob, Christian, Abraham. Elizabeth, Mark, Henry, of whom further; 
Barbara. 

(II) Henry, son of "Weaver" John Fretz and his second wife Maria 
Fretz, was born in Bedminster. Bucks county, Pennsylvania, November 
II, 1755. and died there May 30, 1831. He lived on a farm in Bedmin- 
ster township, three miles west of Bedminsterville, later owned by his 
son-in-law, Joseph Wister. He was a shoemaker and followed his 
trade in connection with farming. He was widely known as "Shoe- 
maker" Henry and it is said that his funeral was so largely attended 



620 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

that several calves were killed and prepared for the funeral dinner and 
that over one hundred carriages formed the funeral procession. Both 
he and his wife were members of the Deep Run Mennonite Church and 
are buried in the churchyard. He married Barbara Oberholtzer, born 
October lo, 1757, died August 10, 1834. Children: i. Mary, died 
Ai)ril 10, 1827, the second wife of William Godshalk. 2. Jacob, died in 
Ohio without issue. 3. John, of whom further. 4. Mark, married a 
Miss Wisner and left issue. 5. Esther, born October 19, 1790, died 
March 28, 1865; married Christian Cayman and left issue. 6. Henry, 
married Susan Godshalk. 7. Jonas, married Elizabeth Alderfer and left 
issue. 8. Abraham, born May 19, 1793, died April 23, 1875; married 
Susanna Bergy; he was a regularly ordained minister of the Mennonite 
church and from 1743 until 1775 faithfully served that church. 10. 
David, born October 12, 1801, died August 5, 1869; married Mary 
Engleman; no male issue. 

(III) John, son of "Shoemaker" Henry and Barbara (Oberholtzer) 
Fretz, was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, January 5, 1784, died 
February 25, 1843. ^^ was a farmer and drover and lived on a farm 
on the Durham road, about one mile north of Gardenville. It is the 
"Old homestead" of this branch, and for over a century has been in 
the Fretz family. He and his family were members of the Mennonite 
church and faithful to their obligations. He married, x\ugust 16, 1808, 
Susana Haldeman, born February 2, 1783, died April 14, 1875, aged 
ninety years two months and twelve days. Children: i. Tobias, born 
July 4, 1809, married Elizabeth Overholt and left two sons. 2. Henry, 
born August 10, 1810, married Mary Fretz and left five sons. 3. Mary. 
4. Jonas, of whom further. 5. John, born November 27. 1817, married 
Sarah Leatherman and had six sons. 6. Elias, born June i, 1820, died 
.April I, 1882; married (first) Catherine Gotwalls, married (second) 
I'lizabcth Leatherman and left three sons by second wife. 7. Sarah, 
burn January 4, 1826, married Daniel Gotwalls and left issue. 8. Susan, 
born August 20, 1828, married Thomas Shelly. 

(IV) Jonas, son of John and Susana (Haldeman) Fretz, was born 
in Bucks county, July 7, 1815. He was a merchant of North Wales and 
Lumlierville, Pennsylvania, for many years and a large land owner. He 
moved from Lumberville to North Wales, where he lived a retired life. 
He was a Mennonite in religion and a most capable and shrewd live- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 621 

headed business man. He married, September 28, 1841, Mary Ann 
Stover, who died November 3, 1883, a descendant of an old Bucks 
county family. Children: Amanda C, born October 9, 1844, married 
in 1875, J. Fennel Berger, a merchant at North Wales, Pennsylvania; 
both were members of the Presbyterian church; children: Mary A. and 
Henry J. 2. Harvey, of whom further. 3. Anna Malinda, born De- 
cember 8, 1847, died March 16, 1852. 4. Susanna, born March 13, 1855, 
died March 23, 1855. 

(V) Harvey, son of Jonas and Mary Ann (Stover) Fretz, was born 
in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, November 18, 1846, died in Lahaska, 
Bucks county. He was educated, grew to manhood, and married in Bucks 
county, then moved to Philadelphia, where he was a manufacturer of 
brooms, brushes, wooden and willow ware. His factory was located on 
Water street, but later at No. 717 Second street, where he transacted a 
large and profitable business. In 1902 he retired and returned to his na- 
tive county where he died. He was a man of splendid business qualities, 
ranking high in the commercial world. Both he and his wife were 
members of the Presbyterian church. He married in 1868, Mary P. 
Price, who survives him, a resident of Abington, Pennsylvania. She 
is the daughter of John N. and Christiana (Polk) Price, old residents 
of Doylestown. Pennsylvania, and both members of the Presbyterian 
church. Children: Beatty, died in the Union army; Samuel, of Doyles- 
town, a veteran of the civil war; Edwin, of Doylestown, a veteran of 
the civil war; Sidney, married Joseph Matthews; Mary P., widow of 
Harvey Fretz. Children of Harvey and Mary P. (Price) Fretz: i. 
Christiana, married Harry R. Clinger and died at Milton, Pennsylvania. 
2. Jonas Harvey, of whom further. 3. Edgar B., now residing at Abing- 
ton, Pennsylvania. 

(VI) Jonas Harvey, eldest son of Harvey and Mary P. (Price) 
Fretz, was born at Lumberville, Bucks county, Pennsylvania, April 9, 
1871. He was educated in the public schools of Philadelphia, finishing 
in the high school. He then entered his father's employ and for several 
years was associated with him in the Philadelphia factory. After the 
death of his father he took a course at the Philadelphia College of Em- 
balming and then spent three years with Oliver H. Bair in the under- 
taking business. 

In February, 1905, he located in Lewistown, Pennsylvania, as assist- 



622 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

ant to \V. H. Felix, the local undertaker and his father-in-law. After 
the death of Mr. Felix, Mr. Fretz purchased the business from the estate 
and has continued it successfully until the present date (1913). His 
mortuary rooms and funeral equipment are complete and modern in 
every detail, and Mr. Fretz is thorough master of the embalmer's art. 
He is a Republican in politics and belongs to the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows; Knights of Pythias; Patriotic Order Sons of x\merica, and 
both he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church. 

He married in November, 1896, Cartie, daughter of W. H. and Sarah 
(Robins) Felix, of Lewistown. Child: Sarah Felix. 



Otis H. Snook, of Reedsville, Pennsylvania, is one of the 
SNOOK live business men of the town. He descends from English 
stock that was first planted in New Jersey and which, fol- 
lowing the trend of the times, drifted into Pennsylvania. 

(I) The first of the name in Pennsylvania was John Snook, who 
came from New Jersey, settled west of Beaver Springs, in Snyder 
county, and there died. Among his children was Phillip, of whom fur- 
ther. 

(II) Phillip Snook, son of John Snook, of New Jersey, was born in 
New Jersey and reared in that state, and in Snyder county, Pennsylva- 
nia. He was a farmer and followed that vocation until his death. He 
was a Republican in politics, and was a member of the German Reformed 
church. He married Elizabeth, daughter of Anthony Peters, an early 
settler in Mifflin county, and they reared a large family. Children : John 
P., deceased; Jackson, deceased; William; Amos, deceased; Joseph; 
Lydia, deceased; Sarah; Mary, deceased; Edward, of whom further; 
Isaac, deceased ; Wilson, deceased ; Francis, deceased. 

(III) Edward, son of Phillip and Elizabeth (Peters) Snook, was 
born February 22, 1848, in Mifflin county. He was brought up on the 
farm and educated in New Lancaster, Mifflin county. When eighteen 
years old he moved to St. Joseph county, Michigan, where he entered 
school in Colon township. He returned to Mifflin county for a short 
time, then went again to Michigan, where he worked for Eli Wagner, on 
his farm, and for Richards & Shearer in their stove plant. He then went 
to Kent county for a short time, and again returned to Mifflin county, 
Pennsylvania. Six years after his marriage he moved to St. Joseph 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 623 

county, Michigan, and located at Colon, where he remained eight years. 
He returned to Mifflin county at the expiration of that time and farmed 
with great success until 1905, when he established a meat market and 
butcher's business in Reedsville, where he has since remained, and where 
he has accumulated property. In 1871 he married Emma L. Worrell, of 
Chester county, Pennsylvania, a daughter of Benjamin F. and Catherine 
Worrell, who came from Chester county to Mifflin county in the sixties 
and settled at Mt. Rock. Mrs. Snook died January 5, 1912. Children: 
Orville C, Elizabeth, Mary; Otis H., of whom further; Belle, Effie, 
Anna, Grace, Frank. 

(IV) Otis H., son of Edward and Emma L. (Worrell) Snook, was 
born August 31, 1876, in Anna township, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania. 
He was educated in the public schools in the townships of Pennsylvania 
and Michigan, and in the towns in which his parents lived during his 
school days. He became associated in 1905 with his father in the meat 
business in Reedsville, and has succeeded in establishing a remunerative 
patronage. He married, June 23, 1903, Laura Catherine Fisher, born in 
Mifflin county, a daughter of the late Herman Fisher, a former well- 
known citizen of the county. Children: i. Edward, born March 12, 
1904. 2. Otis Reed, born February 23, 1907. 3. Franklin Worrell, born 
August 29, 191 1. 



The first representative of this family in Belleville was Wil- 
UTTS son S. ( i ) Utts, who came when a young man. He was 

born in 1822, died 1871. He was a tinner by trade, and in 
Belleville erected a suitable building and established a hardware store 
that he successfully conducted until his death. He was a man of enter- 
prise, a good workman and prosecuted his tinning and hardware 
business with vigor. In political faith he was a Republican, in religion a 
Presbyterian. He married Margaret Hampson, born in Huntingdon 
county in 1826, died in Belleville in 1871. Children: Sylvester, de- 
ceased; Hampson, deceased; Ella, deceased; Milford; Warner; Nettie, 
deceased; Thomas, deceased; Ollie ; Margaret; Wilson S., of whom 
further. 

(II) Wilson S. (2). youngest child of Wilson S. (i) and Margaret 
(Hampson) Utts, was born in Belleville, Pennsylvania, April 13, 1867. 
He attended the public schools and learned the tinner's trade with his 
brother Hampson, who succeeded their father in business. Hampson 



624 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Utts died March 30, 19 12, but for eight years prior to his death had re- 
tired from business. In 1905 l:e sold out to Wilson S. Utts, who still 
conducts a tinning and hardware business in the same store erected by 
his father. He also succeeded to the ownership of the homestead, and 
has prospered in all his undertakings. He thoroughly understands the 
technical detail of his business, is a master workman and a capable, hon- 
orable business man. He is a Republican in politics, a member of the 
Presbyterian church, and of Belleville Lodge, No. 302, Independent Or- 
der of Odd Fellows. 

Air. L'tts married, April i, 1892, Olive Finkle, of Belleville, daughter 
of Samuel and JNIargaret Finkle. 



Thomas Jefferson White, of Lewistown, Pennsylvania, de- 

WHITE scends from the English family of the same name that for 

centuries has lived in the south of England. The first of 

the name to reach the shores of the New World was Andrew, who was 

among the passengers of the "Planter" in 1674. He located in New 

Hampshire, and his sons and sons' sons drifted into Pennsylvania. 

(I) Joseph White, the first of the name of whom the Pennsylvania 
branch have any definite record, was a native of Chester county. He 
married Mary Faddis, also of an old English family. He was a black- 
smith by trade, and an inventor. He invented the old iron bar plow- 
share, and for many years he and his sons manufactured them by hand. 
At his death his sons continued in the business, though not as a company. 
He was a staunch Whig, always voting with that party, and died aljout 
1852. Children: George Washington, of whom further; Jefferson, Re- 
becca, James, Joseph, Isaac, Lewis, Hannah, John, Robert ; all of them 
are dead. 

(II j George Washington, son of Joseph and Mary (Faddis) White, 
was born in Chester county, in 1804, died in 1874, in Pennsylvania. His 
education was gained in the common schools of Chester countv. He en- 
gaged with his father in the smithy and assisted him in the manufactur- 
ing of plows. He lived near Downingtown, Pennsylvania, very nearly 
all of his adult life. He was first a Whig, and afterward a Republican. 

Like the rest of his family, he was reared a Quaker, while his wife 
was a member of the Baptist church. He married Esther A. Richardson, 
daughter of a neighboring farmer. Children: i. Joseph, deceased. 2. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 625 

Julia Ann, wife of James Miller, of Coatesville, Chester county. 3. 
James, was a civil war veteran. He, with two brothers, were members 
of the I92d Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and after serving four 
months he was discharged. James had previously served as first sergeant 
in the 49th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. 4. Lewis, was also in the 
civil war. He was in Carlisle when the barracks were burned, and was 
dispatch carrier. He lives in Parkersburg, Chester county. 5. Isaac 
was a member of the I92d Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. 6. Thomas 
Jefferson, of whom further. 7. Rebecca, deceased. 8. Susannah, de- 
ceased. 9. Mary E., living in Pennsylvania. 10. Ella, married Frank 
Bernard, of Chester county. 

(Ill) Thomas Jefferson, son of George W. and Esther A. (Richard- 
son) White, was born September 17, 1848, in Chester county, near 
Downingtown. He received his education in the common schools, after 
which, he learned the blacksmith's trade by working in the smithy of his 
father. He remained here one year, then went to Downingtown, where 
he stayed a year : from thence moved to Newport, Pennsylvania, and 
then to Decatur, Illinois, where he remained over two years. He then 
went back to Newport, Pennsylvania, and purchased the blacksmith shop 
of his former employer, and ran it for twenty years. In 1898 he moved 
to Lewistown, and established a coach manufacturing plant in partner- 
ship with J. H. Zinn. In 1904 he sold his half interest to Mr. Zinn, and 
engaged with the Standard Steel Company. He owns three houses on 
Montgomery avenue, and lives in his own home on Depot street. At the 
beginning of the civil war he enlisted in the I92d Pennsylvania Volun- 
teer Infantry, and served four months. He is a Republican and a mem- 
ber of Colonel Huling Post, No. 176, of the Grand Army of the Re- 
public. 

He married, June 29, 1872, Eliza Ann Bair, born November 15, 1847, 
in Buck's Valley. Perry county, Pennsylvania, daughter of Jacob and 
Eliza (Baskin) Bair. Both he and his wife are members of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. Children: i. Carrie Gertrude, born August 29, 
1873, died April 27, 1895 ; married Paul Rider Hombach. 2. Mary Ella, 
born March 4, 1875; married Elmer Ulsh. 3., 4. and 5. Fannie L., 
Annie L. and Laura (triplets), born .^pril 11, 1877, and died in infancy. 

Jacob Bair, father of Eliza Ann (Bair) White, was born in Buck's 
Valley, Perry county, September 29, 1823. He married, August 8, 1844, 



626 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Eliza Baskin, born August lo, 1825, also in Perry county. He died in 
July, 1876, and his wife died in March, 1905. They were among the 
old and highly respected residents of that section. Children: i. Sarah 
Jane. 2. Eliza Ann, wife of Thomas Jefiferson White (see White III). 
3. Catherine Louisa. 4- Lucy Elizabeth. 5. Margaret Lucinda. 6. 
Jacob Resler. 7. Samuel Elias. 8. Agnes Minerva. 9. Clara Cecilia. 
10. Mary Ellen. 

The earliest record found of this Laub family is of Jacob 
LAUB Laub, of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, a soldier of the 
civil war, who died in the service, then past the age of usual 
military service. Three of his sons also served in the Union army with 
their father: George, killed at Antietam : Jacob, who now resides in 
Shasta county, California; and Henry Harrison, of whom further. 
Jacob married Elizabeth Dietrich, also born in Lancaster county, daugh- 
ter of Jacob Dietrich, who in 1844 came by packet on the canal to 
Thompson's Lock, near Thompsontown, Juniata county, and there set- 
tled. The Laubs had also moved from Lancaster county, and near by 
the great-grandfather of Henry H. Laub, Jacob Dietrich, had a mill. It 
was also from Juniata county that Jacob Laub enlisted, although he met 
and married Elizabeth Dietrich in Lancaster county. 

(II) Henry Harrison, son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Dietrich) Laub, 
was born in Hinkleton, near New Holland, Lancaster county, Pennsyl- 
vania, January 10. 1840. He was quite young when his parents moved 
to Juniata county, where he was educated in the public school and at 
McAlisterville Academy. He learned the carpenter's trade, and was a 
successful contractor of Snyder county until about 1885, when he became 
a fruit farmer of Snyder county. He had been a resident of that county 
from about i860, going there with the intention of teaching school, but 
giving up that profession and enlisting in April, 1862, in Company H, 
149th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, serving three years and re- 
ceiving honorable discharge at the close of the war. At the battle of 
Antietam he was wounded, but soon recovered and rejoined his regi- 
ment. He then returned to Snyder, where he is engaged in fruit farm- 
ing. He is a Republican in politics, and a member of the Reformed 
church. He married Louisa Shout, born at Beaver Springs, Snyder 
county, February 26, 1844, died in December, 1910, daughter of Adam 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 627 

and Sarah (Howell) Shout; Adam Shout was a cooper of Snyder 
county, combining light farming; owning a good farm three miles west 
of Beaver Springs, where both he and his wife died. Sarah Howell, 
wife of Adam Shout, was a daughter of Jacob Howell, of Beavertown, 
Snyder county, who died there aged eighty years. Children of Henry 
Harrison Laub: Henry Harrison (2), of whom further; Sarah Jane, 
George Albert, Jacob Adam, twin of George A. ; Elizabeth Isophine and 
Grace. 

(Ill) Henry Harrison Jr.. eldest son of Henry Harrison and Louisa 
(Shout) Laub, was born at Beaver Springs, West Beaver township, Sny- 
der county, Pennsylvania, December 27, 1862. He was educated in the 
public schools and early in life learned telegraphy. He became thor- 
oughly proficient, and on March 23, 1883, was appointed operator at Mc- 
Clure, Snyder county, Pennsylvania. He continued there until Decem- 
ber 26, 1884, when he was transferred to Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania, re- 
maining there until February, 1 886 ; three months later he was appointed 
operator and clerk in the Pennsylvania railroad station at Lewistown, 
remaining until July i, 1889, when he was appointed station agent at 
Reedsville for the Pennsylvania railroad, continuing in that position un- 
til October i, 1897. On the latter date he was appointed railroad station 
agent at Lewistown which position he now holds. The station is an im- 
portant one and, under his direction, Mr. Laub has twenty-one men em- 
ployed in the passenger, freight and baggage departments. He is a 
member of the Lewistown Board of Trade; of the board of trustees of 
the Lewistown Hospital; of the Masonic Association; of the Lewistown 
Market House Company, of which he is treasurer; of the State Horticul- 
tural Association; secretary of the Mifflin County Horticultural and Ag- 
ricultural Association; member of the board and treasurer of Lewistown 
school district; and president of the Mifflin County Jewelry Company. 
He served seven years as secretary of the local board of health; four 
years as secretary to the chairman of the Mifflin County Republican Com- 
mittee; was elected to the Republican State convention in 1906; and is at 
present a member of the Republican standing committee of Mifflin 
county. He is a Republican in politics, and both he and his wife are 
members of the Presbyterian church. He is a member of the Masonic 
order, belonging to Lewistown Lodge, No. 203, Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons; Lewistown Chapter, No. 186, Royal Arch Masons, and Lewis- 



628 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

town Commandery, No. 26, Knights Templar. He also belongs to the 
Royal Arcanum. 

He married, April 15, 1891, Sarah Olive Knepp, born at McVeytown, 
Mifflin county, Pennsylvania. Child: Anna Louisa, born November 4, 
1896. 

This branch of the Orr family in the United States descends 
ORR from Alexander Orr, born in county Antrim, Ireland, from 

whence he emigrated to the United States in boyhood. He 
found a home in Decatur township, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, there 
grew to mature years and married Catherine Gardner, of Scotch descent. 
After his marriage Alexander Orr purchased a farm in the township, 
prospered there, and reared his family of four children. He was a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian church, as was his wife, both being active church 
workers. Children : Mary Jane, married Andrew Cubbison, both de- 
ceased ; Catherine, married George Kearns, and resides in Lewistown; 
George, deceased ; William Allen, of whom further. 

(II ) William Allen, son of Alexander and Catherine (Gardner) Orr, 
was born in Decatur township, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, in 1838, 
died in Ohio while on a visit to that state. He was a man of education, a 
prosperous farmer and prominent in public affairs. He was elected 
county commissioner of Mifflin county; county auditor, and for many 
years was justice of the peace. He was a Democrat in politics. His 
home was the old Orr farm, he having purchased the interests of the 
other heirs. He married Martha Orwig, born in Union county, Pennsyl- 
vania, removing to Mifflin county in girlhood. Children: Allen Alex- 
ander, of whom further; Mary Grace, married G. E. Smith, and lives in 
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. 

(III) Allen .\lexander, only son of William Allen and Martha (Or- 
wig) Orr, was born in Decatur township, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, 
December 10. 1864. He was educated in the public schools, Bloomsburg 
State Normal School and Williamsport Business College. During this 
period he had also taught in the public schools five years. In 1890 he 
located in Lewistown, where he established his present insurance agency, 
now one of the oldest and largest in the borough. Besides representing 
some eighteen of the representative home and foreign lire insurance com- 
panies, Mr. Orr conducts a real estate business. He is a Democrat in 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 629 

politics, and since coming to Lewistown, has been active and prominent 
in county politics. He is president of the school board ; served six years 
as chairman of the Democratic county committee; was secretary of the 
borough council six years; county treasurer, 1903-04-05; served six 
years as justice of the peace; in 1913 was commissioned postmaster at 
Lewistown, Pennsylvania. In 1912 he was the delegate to the Demo- 
cratic national convention at Baltimore, which nominated W'oodrow 
Wilson for president. In the long fight for a candidate at that conven- 
tion the Pennsylvania delegate was a tower of strength to the Wilson 
cause, voting for him solidly until victory was theirs, at the end of the 
forty-sixth ballot. Mr. Orr is a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and is a man of integrity, ability and influence. 

He married, in June, 1898, Mary A., born in Lewistown, Pennsylva- 
nia, daughter of John and Elizabeth Spratt, formerly of Philadelphia. 
They have one child: Allen Alexander Jr., born July 20, 1899. 



John \V. Kearns, of Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, had 
KEARNS for his emigrant progenitor John Kearns, of Germany, 

who came to this country while yet it was in its swaddling 
clothes. It is thought that he first located in New York state, afterward 
joining some of his countrymen in Pennsylvania, where he became a 
farmer and owned a large tract of land. Among his children was John 
W., of whom further. 

(II) John W., son of John Kearns, of Germany, was an early and 
prominent resident of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. He moved from 
there to Mifflin county while it was yet in its infancy, purchased a 
large tract of land in Decatur township, cleared a portion of it, cul- 
tivated it and there lived with his family until his death. He was 
one of the progressive men of the day and was largely instrumental 
in introducing modern (for that time) methods of local government. 
He married Elizabeth Stroup, like himself of sturdy German origin, and 
she proved herself a worthy helpmeet in every way. They were both 
members of the Presbyterian church, rearing their children in that creed 
with great strictness. Children, all of whom are dead: Margaret, mar- 
ried Mr. Hoover; Thomas; Sophia, married Mr. Preston; Sarah, mar- 
ried Mr. Townsend ; Phillip S. ; John \V. ; Joseph ; Elias Calvin, of whom 
further. 



630 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

(III) Elias Calvin, son of John W. and Elizabeth (Stroup) Kearns, 
was born February 17, 1839, in Decatur township, Mifflin county, Penn- 
sylvania, died August 13, 18S8, in Derry township, the same county. He 
was educated in the common schools of the time, and on leaving he began 
farming. He married and located in Derry township, Mifflin county, 
buying one hundred and eighty acres, and here lived until his death, a 
prosperous, highly esteemed citizen of the county. Like his forbears he 
was a member of the Presbyterian church, as was his wife, and in that 
faith reared his children. He was a staunch Democrat, advocating and 
supporting actively the principles of the party ; and was elected through 
it to many of the local offices, in which he served faithfully and for 
the good of the township. He was poor director for some time, doing 
all in his power to alleviate the distress of the county charges. He was 
greatly mourned at his death. He married Nancy J. Sieber, born July 
25, 1844, in Juniata county, died in Derr}^ township, April 4, 1905, a 
daughter of a German family long established in Juniata county. Chil- 
dren : I. Samuel C, born March 26, 1866, died October 22, 1878, in an 
accident. 2. John W., of whom further. 3. George E., a postal clerk; 
lives on Logan street, Lewistown. 4. Nancy Elizabeth, unmarried ; lives 
with her brother Charles. 5. Anna Gertrude, married R. L. Howe, and 
lives in Philadelphia. 6. Charles, unmarried ; a farmer near Lewistown, 
and is also employed by the Standard Steel Works. 

(IV) John William Kearns, of Lewistown, Mifflin county, Pennsyl- 
vania, son of Elias Calvin and Nancy J. (Sieber) Kearns, was born No- 
vember 14, 1867, in Derry townslaip, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, east 
of Lewistown. He was educated in the common schools of the town- 
ship and at the Lewistown Academy. On leaving school he engaged in 
farming, with great success. In 1895 he bought, in Derry township, 
ninety-three acres, and there lived until 1910, when he purchased, in the 
same township, one hundred and forty-one acres, moved to it, still re- 
taining the first farm and cultivating both. He does general farming 
while making a specialty of potatoes, which he harvests for the market. 
Ten acres arc devoted to this particular branch of agriculture, and from 
it lie realizes liandsomely. Naturally he is a member of the Presbyterian 
ciuirch. as is his wife. He is a Democrat in politics and has served as 
school director, Mr. Kearns not only farms successfully, but is inter- 
ested in real estate to some extent and owns two houses and lots in Lewis- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 631 

town, on Walnut street, which he rents, the value of which have in- 
creased with each year. He married, November 6, 1896, Mary Beaver, 
born in Perry county, Pennsylvania, a daughter of George E. and Eliza- 
beth Beaver, of Perry county, where they rank as prominent members of 
the county. Children: George Edwin, Paul William, Edith Margaret, 
Elias Calvin, Hugh Beaver. 



Miss Mary Hoofnogle, a highly esteemed resident 
HOOFNOGLE of Reedsville, is the daughter of George Hoofnogle, 

born in Berks county, Pennsylvania, in 1795, died 
near Vandyke, Juniata county, Pennsylvania, 1877. He grew to man- 
hood in Berks county, learned the mason's trade, and while still a 
young man moved to Snyder county, establishing his home near Beaver 
Springs, where he married. Later he moved to near Vandyke, Juniata 
county, where he worked at his trade until incapacitated by age, lived 
retired for several years and died. He married Catherine Gleckner, 
born in Union county, Pennsylvania, died in 1845, leaving five chil- 
dren. Mr. Hoofnogle never again married, living a widower for 
thirty-two years. Children: i. Sarah, married Wilson Dellett; lived 
in Milroy, Pennsylvania, where she died in 1906. 2. Rebecca, mar- 
ried George Smith, whom she survives, a resident of Juniata county. 3. 
Melinda, married Louis Rousch ; resides at McClure, Pennsylvania. 4. 
Catherine, married William Horner; resides at Center Hall, Pennsylva- 
nia. 5. Mary, now living in Reedsville, Pennsylvania. 

(II) Mary, youngest daughter of George and Catherine (Gleckner) 
Hoofnogle, was born near Vandyke, Juniata county, Pennsylvania, in 
1841. Her mother dying in 1845, the child Mary was taken by a kind 
family, with whom she was reared and educated. On arriving at wom- 
anhood she became housekeeper for Robert Taylor, remaining in that 
position until his death in 1896. In that year she moved to Reedsville, 
Pennsylvania, which is yet her home. She is a member of the Presby- 
terian church, and is held in high esteem by her many friends. Miss 
Hoofnogle, many years ago, in memory of the kindness shown herself 
when a motherless child adopted a young girl, Elizabeth Shafer, on 
whom she has lavished a mother's love and care and to whose children 
she is indeed the typical, fond and indulgent grandmother. Miss Shafer 
married Harry Smith, and now resides in Akron, Ohio, with their chil- 



632 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

dren: Hazel, Robert, Mildred, Leroy and Luella, twins; Mabel G., 
Harry S. 



Robert Taylor, the emigrant ancestor of the Taylor fam- 
TAYLOR ily of Pennsylvania, and also in New England, landed 
from a small sailing vessel at New York, about 1680. 
There he remained until after his marriage with the daughter of another 
emigrant. He moved with his family to the western part of the province 
of New York, near the Pennsylvania line, and there settled. At that 
time it was one of the most dangerous portions of the province of New 
York, as the Indians were always on the warpath and made living in the 
wilderness a hazardous experiment. Mr. Taylor remained on the clear- 
ing that he made and on which he erected a semi-block house, tilled his 
land, fought his neighbors, the Indians, and reared his family. Later 
his grandsons migrated to Pennsylvania and there established themselves. 
Taylor is one of the notable names of the United States. One of the 
name has been its president; several have filled the gubernatorial chairs; 
many have sat upon the bench as chief justices; others have served in the 
army and navy, and still others have been plain, honorable citizens, bear- 
ing their share of the burdens of the great Republic which their progen- 
itors helped to make. 

(I) Robert Taylor, a direct descendant of the tirst Robert Taylor, 
and the colonial progenitor of the Taylor family of Mifflin county, Penn- 
sylvania, took out warrants in 1754 for a tract containing three thou- 
sand acres of land, part of which is still in possession of the family, in 
Mifflin county, as it is now known. He was one of the dominating fac- 
tors in the upbuilding of that part of the colony of Pennsylvania. He 
cleared a portion of the land of its forest growth, erected substantial and 
protective log houses on it, and here lived and reared his family. Among 
his children was Matthew, of whom further. 

(II) Matthew, son of Robert Taylor, was born and reared on the ex- 
tensive Taylor homestead in Mifflin county, Pennsylvania. He was edu- 
cated in the common schools, at that time held in log houses. He also 
farmed on the homestead. He was a soldier of the revolution, and again 
offered his services to his country in the war of 1812. He married Mrs. 
Sarah (Sample) Mayes, a widow, by whom he had four sons: Robert, 
John, Henry, of whom further; Sample. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 633 

(III) Henry, son of Matthew and Sarah (Sample-Mayes) Taylor, 
was born on the Taylor homestead, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania. He 
was educated in the common schools of the township, and began farming 
on reaching his majority. He married (first) Ann McNitt; (second) 
Rosanna McFarlane; (third) Priscilla Turbett. Children by third mar- 
riage: I. Sarah Jane, married Samuel Laird, of Juniata county. 2. 
Anna, married James Kyle. 3. Henry, of whom further. 4. Priscilla, 
married William Thompson, of Center county. 5. Alatthew B., married 
Eliza Jane Means. 6. James, married Nancy Hughes. 

(IV) Henry (2), son on Henry (i) and Priscilla (Turbett) Taylor, 
was born November 25, 1825, on the Taylor homestead at the head of 
Tea creek, Brown township, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, died February 
22, 1905. He was educated in the township schools, and at the Tus- 
carora Academy, and at the age of twenty-five began farming for him- 
self. He was one of the most successful farmers of his section, and in 
1884 bought the J. Ferren Mann place. He retired twenty years before 
his death from active participation in the business world. He was a Re- 
publican, advocating the principles of that party in all national issues. 
He was a zealous member of the Presbyterian church, and a liberal- 
minded, public-spirited man, co-operating with his fellow citizens in all 
laudable ways for promoting the public good. He married (first) Pris- 
cilla Ann Kyle. Children: i. William Henry, married Rhoda Henry. 
2. Joseph Charles, married Lula Spear; resides in Albany, Texas. 3. 
James, married Elizabeth Taylor. Henry Taylor married (second) 
Mary Ann (Jack) Johnson, widow of James Johnson. She was born near 
New Holland, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, January 9, 1834, daugh- 
ter of James and Ann Eliza ( De Haven) Jack. She married (first) 
James Johnson, November 30, 1854, and lived in Center county until her 
marriage (the second time) to Henry Taylor, January 15, 1874. They 
had one child, George De Haven, of whom further. Mrs. Taylor was 
the daughter, as has been said, of James and Ann Eliza (De Haven) 
Jack. He was the grandson of James Jack, who came from Belfast, 
Ireland, to America to colonial days, settled in Pennsylvania, and there 
lived and died. His name appears on the church record at Brandy wine 
Manor, Chester county, in 1756; he was a farmer. His son Adam was 
born in Chester county, Pennsylvania, and died in Warren county, Ohio. 
Among his children was James, who was born in 1806, in Chester 



634 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

county, Pennsylvania, and there grew up. While yet a young man he 
moved to Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, near New Holland. He was a 
wheelwright by trade, but later farmed in various places, among them 
being Center county. He married Ann Eliza De Haven, a member of 
an old family of that part of the state. They had one child, Mary Ann 
(Jack) Taylor. In their old age they moved to the home of their daugh- 
ter. He died in 1886 and his wife in 1878. They were both members 
of the Presbyterian church. 

(V) George De Haven, son of Henry (2) and Mary Ann (Jack- 
Johnson) Taylor, was born February 21, 1876, near Reedsville, Pennsyl- 
vania. He received his preparatory education in the public schools and 
finished at the State College, supplementing his education with a me- 
chanical course. Leaving school he was employed by the Standard Steel 
Works at Burnham, Pennsylvania, where he remained for seven years. 
Leaving the company he went to Albany, Texas, with his brother, Joseph 
Charles Taylor. At the expiration of two years he returned to Pennsyl- 
vania and formed a partnership with H. Gottschalk for the manufacture 
of baker's machinery. They began in a small way at Burnham, but the 
business increased to such proportions that at the end of a year they de- 
cided to enlarge it and moved to Reedsville for that purpose. They pur- 
chased the old opera house on the Honey creek road, a building fifty by 
one hundred and seventy-five feet, and installed their machinery. The 
increase in their output was wonderful, but it did not keep pace with 
the demand. They now employ from eight to twelve men, and their 
products are special machinery, dough mixers and pan filling machines. 
Their products find ready markets all over the world, in Australia as 
well as England. Their establishment is one of phenomenal growth and 
they are adding special and new inventions all the while, all of which 
are patented. The factory is up-to-date in equipment and the machinery 
ordered is made and changed to suit the conditions and individual re- 
quirements of their patrons. They take the greatest precautions in fill- 
ing orders, and are expeditious as circumstances will permit. The busi- 
ness grew to such proportions that it was incorporated in April, 1909, 
with II. Gottschalk as president, and George De Haven Taylor as secre- 
tary and treasurer, with the stock held and controlled by Messrs. Gott- 
schalk and Taylor. Mr. Taylor adheres to the Republican party, giving it 
his vote and influence. He and his wife are members of the Presbyterian 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 635 

church, and he of Lewistown Lodge, No. 203, Free and Accepted 
Masons. 

He married, June 30, 1902, Mary Ella Gilmore, born in Wellington, 
Kansas, daughter of F. H. and Mary S. Gilmore, prominent people in 
Kansas. Mr. and Mrs. Taylor have no children. 



The Shumaker family, of Mifflin county, Pennsylva- 
SHUMAKER nia, is evidently of German origin, and they have in- 
herited the endurance, loyalty, industry and patriot- 
ism which characterize the natives of Germany. The name was probably 
spelled Schuhmacher in the mother country, and a slight change has an- 
glicized it. They have borne their share bravely in all the trials and 
troubles which have fallen to the lot of this country, since the earliest 
member of the family made his home here. The grandfather of John 
A. Shumaker was in active service during the revolutionary war, giv- 
ing not alone his time and services, but generously of his means to fur- 
ther the cause of American liberty. His team wagon was driven by him 
from place to place during that memorable struggle, and was always to 
be found where it could be of the greatest service. 

(II) Daniel Shumaker, son of the preceding, was born in 1814, and 
died in April, 1885. He married Sarah Ann Bailey, who was born in 
1 81 7, and died in September, 1891. They are both interred in the Pres- 
byterian cemetery at Reedsville, Pennsylvania. They had children: 
Mary E., married Jeremiah Slagle, and has five children; John A., see 
forward; Anna L., married Joseph Forsyth, and has two children; Mat- 
thew T.. married, and removed to Kansas, where he died; Charles D., re- 
moved first to Iowa, then to Springfield, Missouri, where he died, leav- 
ing a widow and one child, a daughter; Samuel, died in Iowa; James, a 
farmer in Brown township; \^'illiam. also of Brown township, married 
Rebecca Maybin. 

(III) John A., eldest son and second child of Daniel and Sarah Ann 
(Bailey) Shumaker, was born near Lewistown, Mifflin county. Pennsyl- 
vania, November 28, 1841. The public schools of his native township 
gave him the means of acquiring a satisfactory education, and when this 
had been completed he assisted his father in the cultivation of the home- 
stead farm. With the exception of twelve months he was thus occupied, 
during this short period his employment being on another farm. He was 



636 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

one of the earliest to enlist in the service of his country upon the out- 
break of the civil war, and his patriotism and personal bravery are 
worthy of an extended record. Enlisting August 15, 1861, he became 
a member of Company H, Forty-ninth Regiment Pennsylvania Volun- 
teers, Captain Ralph L. Maclay. The many forced marches and fatigue 
duty this company was called upon to endure proved the individual 
worth of its members. The battles in which Mr. Shumaker was engaged 
were as follows: Yorktown, Williamsburg, Goldens Farm, Savage Sta- 
tion, Malvern Hill, White Oak Swamp, second battle of Bull Run and 
Antietam. 

At the battle of Goldens Farm, Mr. Shumaker earned espe- 
cial distinction. There had been a call for two volunteers for especially 
perilous work and Mr. Shumaker volunteered, providing a certain com- 
rade would accompany him. Colonel Irwin, of the regiment, happened 
to be present on this occasion and was a witness of the brave devotion of 
Mr. Shumaker. Not long afterward, at White Oak Swamp, Mr. Shu- 
maker again had an opportunity to earn distinction. The Union forces 
had had uninterrupted fighting for four days in succession, and in addi- 
tion to this were exhausted by long marches. They were overtaken while 
on the march by General "Stonewall" Jackson, and were in an open field, 
hemmed in by their wagon trains and artillery, when the rebel general 
opened fire upon them with a large and well conditioned force. There 
was almost a panic among the men, who had suffered so greatly from 
loss of rest and exposure, and the ofiicers were practically helpless and 
would have lost control completely were it not for a few cool-headed ones 
among the rank and file. Promuient among these was Mr. Shumaker 
who, as his captain was not on hand at the time, succeeded in rallying the 
scattered members of his company in so effective a manner that it at- 
tracted the attention of Colonel Irwin, who was passing near by. He at 
once declared that bravery of so high an order well merited a commis- 
sion, and he would see that it was reported in the proper quarters. This 
was never done, as Colonel Irwin was wounded very shortly afterward, 
and Mr. Shumaker having been sent to a hospital on sick leave, the mat- 
ter was never taken up. By the time Mr. Shumaker returned to the 
army his regiment had been consolidated with another. He never took 
any steps to claim any reward for the arduous and dangerous duty he 
had so gallantly performed, although he was very justly entitled to one. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 637 

At the battle of the Wilderness Mr. Shumaker was in the front rank 
and, while repelling an attack of cavalry, his gun was struck by a ball 
which glanced downward and wounded him in the leg, while the recoil 
of the gun against his head threw him to the ground. At Cold Harbor, 
June I. 1864, a musket ball inflicted a wound in his left arm and thus 
ended his active military service. He was honorably discharged Oc- 
tober 24, 1864. 

Upon his return to Mifflin county, he commenced to farm on shares 
with Crawford Kyle in Brown township, and three years later purchased 
land in the same township, cultivating it alone for a further period of 
three years. During the next nine years he was engaged in cultivating 
rented ground, and amassed a considerable fortune by this proceeding. 
In 1883 he purchased the homestead of eighty acres near Milroy, Penn- 
sylvania, and has made many improvements on this piece of property. 
He lived on this homestead until 1899, when he removed to Milroy and 
there erected two houses and engaged in the harness business with which 
he is still identified. He is active in the public ai¥airs of the community, 
and is a man of influence in the councils of the Republican party. His 
religious connections are with the Congregational church at Milroy. He 
is an active member of the Colonel Hulings Post, No. 176, Grand Army 
of the Republic, at Lewistown, Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Shumaker married, March 12, 1867, Sarah Ann, second daughter 
of Isaac and Elizabeth (Peters) Witman. and granddaughter of John 
and Eva (Hile) Witman, whose children were: Isaac, mentioned above, 
and Catherine, who married Jesse W. Horton. Mr. and Mrs. Shumaker 
have had children : i. and 2. Grace and Bessie, twins, who died in child- 
hood. 3. Boyd, died at the age of eighteen years. 4. Elsie, married 
John Krotzer, and has five children : Bertha, Boyd, Blaine, Estella and 
Bartley. 5. Mary B., married Archie Grove, and has one child, Lorena. 
6. Margaret, attending school at Berea, Kentucky, where she is taking a 
six-vear course, will be a graduate in the class of 1914. 



The Witman family has been identified with the agri- 
WITMAN cultural and other interests of the state of Pennsylva- 
nia for very many years, the progenitors of the family, 

the great-grandparents of Lewis Elwood Witman, having come to this 

country from the hardy little country of Switzerland. 



638 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

(I) Washington Witman was a large land owner in Schuylkill 
county, Pennsylvania, where he was engaged in farming the greater part 
of his life. He attained the advanced age of eighty years and, in addi- 
tion to devoting time to agriculture, he conducted a well known hotel for 
the greater part of his life. He was a staunch supporter of the princi- 
ples of the Whig party until the birth of the Republican party, when 
he gave his allegiance to the latter. In religious faith he and his wife 
were members of the Evangelical church. He married and had children : 
John, who was also a farmer, died in Hamburg, Pennsylvania ; Cyrus, 
for many years followed boating on the Schuylkill canal, and is now 
living in retirement; Henry, see forward; Washington Jr., who served 
with honor during the civil war; Charles H., spent his entire Hfe in 
Schuylkill county, where he was in business as a merchant and grocer; 
William, a hotel and restaurant proprietor in Schuylkill county; a daugh- 
ter. 

(II) Henry, son of Washington Witman, was born in Schuylkill 
county, Pennsylvania. His death was caused by drowning on a very 
dark night in the canal. For some years he was engaged in farm labors, 
but abandoned them in favor of the life of a boatman on the canal, and it 
was while in discharge of these duties that his accidental death occurred. 
His residence in Schuylkill county was considered a very fine one. He 
married in Schuylkill county, Amelia, daughter of Gabriel and Margaret 
Krohn, of Philadelphia. Mr. Krohn had been a sailor for many years, 
and died at the age of eighty-two. Mr. Witman was a staunch Republi- 
can in political matters, and he and his wife were members of the Evan- 
gelical church. They had children: i. Joanna Margaret, born in 1857; 
married Robert Garth, who is employed in Philadelphia, and they have 
a number of children. 2. Lewis Elwood, see forward. 3. Edward De- 
catur, born in August, i860; lives in Philadelphia, where he is engaged 
in the tea and spice business ; married Annie Karcher, and they have 
one daughter. 4. Gabriella, born in 1862 ; married Ephraini Sherman, a 
barber in Lebanon, Pennsylvania. 5. William Henry, born in 1864, lives 
in Philadelphia; was formerly engaged in farming, and is now in the 
dairy business; married (first) Laura Bartlett, (second) Amy Wager. 
6. Elmira, born in 1866; married Thomas Long, a stone cutter of Phila- 
delphia. 

(Ill) Lewis Elwood, eldest son and second child of Henry and 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 639 

Amelia (Krohn) Witman, was born in Schuylkill Haven, Schuylkill 
county, Pennsylvania, April 11, 1858. He was educated in the district 
school of his native county, but this education was a very limited one. 
In many respects Mr. Witman may be considered a self-educated man, 
as he has never lost an opportunity of acc^uiring useful knowledge, and 
his keen powers of observation have been a great and decided advantage 
to him. 

From his earliest youth he was bright and wide-awake and the 
varied occupations in which he has been engaged were of material 
assistance to him in the acquisition of knowledge. In his early manhood 
he was engaged for a period of four years as a driver for a boat on the 
canal, but finding the occupation becoming monotonous after a time, he 
sought and found employment in the woolen mills. He made a special 
study of that branch connected with the dyeing of the materials, and 
learned the intricacies of this in every detail. He then established him- 
self independently in the dyeing business, with which he has now been 
connected in a very successful manner for thirty years. He removed 
from Philadelphia to Milroy, in 1904, and has since that time resided 
there. He has three acres of ground around his residence, and during 
the past three years has made a specialty of raising chickens. He is 
esteemed by his townsmen as a good citizen, casting his vote for the 
Republican party. He and his wife are members of the IMethodist 
Episcopal church, and he is also a member of the Order of American 
Mechanics, of Philadelphia. 

Mr. \\'itman married, September i, 1880, Mary Ann, born April 
4, i860, daughter of Francis and Harriet (Winterbottom) Garth, both 
natives of England, who came to the United States in 1845. Mr. Garth 
was a hand mule spinner who made his home in Philadelphia, where he 
died November 18, 1909, his wife having died June 7, of the same year. 
Mr. and Mrs. Witman have had children: i. Frank Elwood, born 
June 7, 1883; is a dyer in Groveville, New Jersey; married Mary Field- 
ing, and has two children, Grace E. and Frank E. 2. Russell Garth, 
born May 10, 1886; is now studying medicine in Philadelphia; married 
(first) Esther B. Erhart, who died September 29, 1908; he married 
(second) Margaret Kohler, of Philadelphia; his only child, Russell 
Garth Jr., born May i, 1907, is being raised by Mr. and Mrs. Witman. 
3. Ross Henry, born October 19, 1890, died December 21, 1892. 



640 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

The name Lynn is one well known in both Scotland and 
LYNN Ireland and was anciently borne by a distinctive Scotch fam- 
ily. A branch settled in the North of Ireland, from whence 
in 1870 came Samuel Lynn and his wife. Mary E. Dougal. They were 
both born in the North of Ireland and on coming to the United States 
settled in Milton, Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, where he died 
in 1900, she in 1907. Both were members of the Presbyterian church 
and he was a Republican in political faith. Children: James D., of 
whom further; George F., Samuel, Mary, John, Annie, Arthur and 
Norris; all living. 

(II) James D., eldest son of Samuel and Mary E. (Dougal) Lynn, 
was born in the North of Ireland March 31, 1862. He was eight years 
of age when his parents came to Milton, Pennsylvania, where he was 
educated, finishing in the high school. He began business life as a 
clerk in the store of N. A. Dougal, at Milton, remaining one and a half 
years. In 1879 he entered the employ of Spencer L. Finney, of Milton, 
continuing until 1893. He was with Somerville & Company, of Wind- 
burne, Clearfield county, until 1905. For the next six years he was em- 
ployed in different stores in Jersey Shore, Phillipsburg and Ehrenfeld, 
Pennsylvania, coming to Burnham in 191 1, as manager of Logan & Com- 
pany (incorporated) Stores, a position he now holds. He is a progressive 
Republican, and while in Windburne served for four years as school 
director. He belongs to the Masonic order, holding membership in 
Moshannon Lodge, No. 391, Free and Accepted Masons. He married 
in April, 1891, Minnie A. Trego, born in Milton, Pennsylvania. Chil- 
dren : John. Robert, Mary, Minnie, Harry and Edward. 

This particular branch of the Smith family has been domi- 
SMITH ciled in the state of Pennsylvania for three generations, 

where they have left their impress upon business and social 
life. They came from Germany, where the name was originally spelled 
Schmidt, but became anglicized in the course of years. 

(I) Daniel Smith was born in Germany and came to the LTnited 
States after his marriage. He decided upon Miller township as his place 
of residence, and it was there that his death occurred. In his native 
country he had been a traveling shoemaker, and he pursued that calling 
after his arrival here. In addition to this occupation he engaged in 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 641 

farming, having acquired by purchase a considerable amount of land. 
He and his wife were members of the Lutheran church. Of their thirteen 
children the following names are on record : William, Daniel, Jacob, 
John, Henry, Kate, Peggy and Charles K., mentioned below. 

(II) Charles K., youngest child of Daniel Smith, was born in Perry 
county, Pennsylvania, in May, 1827. For a time he was engaged in 
farming, then commenced the manufacture of bricks, being the pioneer 
in that field of industry in Perry county. Subsequently he purchased a 
farm of two hundred and sixty-seven acres, which he cultivated until 
his death in 1899. He was a staunch Democrat in political matters, and 
a devout member of the German Reformed church. Mr. Smith married 
Angeline C, daughter of Jacob Sheibley, a farmer and large land owner 
near Bridgeport, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Smith was bom in Perry county, 
Pennsylvania, May 7, 1837, and died May 26, 1913. They had chil- 
dren: Carrie, who died at the age of fourteen years; Annie, Sallie and 
Minnie, who died in infancy; Jacob, living in Newport, married Ocilla 
Stephens, is a land owner and engaged in farming; Singer J., men- 
tioned below. 

(III) Singer J., son of Charles K. and Angeline C. (Sheibley) 
Smith, was born in Miller township, Perry county, Pennsylvania, Decem- 
ber 27, 1868. The common schools of Newport, Pennsylvania, fur- 
nished his education until he had attained the age of ten years, and he 
was then obliged to remove to the farm with his parents and bear his 
share in its cultivation until he was eighteen years of age. Then until 
his thirty-first year he was in the employ of others, also at farming work 
until 1899, when he came to Newport where he purchased a butcher 
shop, remaining thus employed for three years, after which he clerked 
in a hotel ; then he purchased a wholesale liquor establishment which he 
carried on for three years. In 191 1 he came to Mifflin and bought his 
present hotel. It is a large hotel and well equipped for the purpose 
for which it was intended. The cuisine is of the best and the service 
unexceptionable, and it has a reputation which is far more than a merely 
local one. Mr. Smith has also been engaged in building operations, and 
erected the first complete flat which was constructed in Perry county. 
He is greatly interested in whatever concerns the welfare of his town, 
state or the country at large, and is earnest in his support of Demo- 
cratic principles. He is a regular attendant at the Reformed church, 



642 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

while his wife is a member of the Episcopahan denomination. His fra- 
ternal affiliations consist of membership in Newport Lodge, No. 102, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of Newport. 

Air. Smith married, March 2, 1905, Nora, daughter of Arthur 
Priestley. Mrs. Smith was born in England, and came to this country 
at the age of eighteen years. 



Elliot Groninger, of Port Royal, Juniata county, 
GRONINGER Pennsylvania, descends on the paternal side from 

good Dutch stock which has long been planted in 
this country. Many of the name fought with the Continentals in their 
war of independence with the English, and some of them left a bril- 
liant record. They also established records as Indian fighters, and 
were among the first to be called on for defense of the wilderness block- 
houses, which were erected in nearly every settlement for the protection 
of the women and children. 

(I) John Daniel Groninger came direct from Holland in the small 
sailing vessel, the "Marbourgh", and landed at Philadelphia September 
23, 1741. He established himself soon thereafter as a farmer, taking 
up wild land, clearing and improving it, building thereon houses for his 
family. He was successful in all his ventures and when he died, in 
Berks county, Pennsylvania, in 1786. he left quite a large estate. Among 
his children was Leonard S., of whom further. 

(II) Leonard S., son of John Daniel Groninger, was born in 1758, 
on his father's farm. His meager education was obtained at such schools 
as the times afforded. He was a farmer by occupation and died on his 
farm in Milford township, Juniata county, Pennsylvania, where he had 
spent most of his life. Fle was a soldier of the revolution as well as an 
Indian scout. In 1780. previous to his coming to Milford township, he 
was on a hunting and scouting expedition when he was surprised and 
taken captive by the Indians. He was held by them for two years, and 
at last succeeding in making his escape, he found his way through the 
almost impenetral)le forests to his home. He lived a long and useful 
life, dying in 1831. He married, in 1788, Barbara May, the daughter 
of a neighbor. Children: Leonard Jr.; Henry; George, married Miss 
Martin; Jacob, of whom further; Margaret, married John Hench ; 
Susannah, married John Wisehaupt; Mary, married Jacob Kepner. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 643 

(III) Jacob, son of Leonard S. and Barbara (May) Groninger, was 
born March 6, 1799. died in 1892, in Mil ford township, where he was 
born and reared. Necessarily his education was b'mited to the ad- 
vantages offered by the schools of that day, and on leaving them he 
entered the occupation of farming. He took up two hundred virgin 
acres in the forest, cleared, erected buildings on it and cultivated it, 
putting in corn and such crops as the time and seasons permitted. He 
was unusually successful, and at his death left a nice estate. He was a 
staunch Presbyterian, supporting his church generously, and was a good 
man, friend and neighbor, which meant much more in those days of 
isolation from human companionship than it does today. He married 

(first) Nancy Hench, who died in 1831 ; married (second) Sidney Wil- 
son, born March 14, 18 14, died July 3, 1892. Children by first mar- 
riage: John, who was twice married; Mary Ann, married Abram Car- 
liaugh ; Barbara, married Stewart T. Turbett ; Elizabeth, married Jesse 
Reynolds ; Leonard, of whom further ; Jacob, marri-ed ]\Iargaret Jacobs ; 
Orrin, married Malinda Jacobs; Henry, married Mary Jacobs. Children 
by second marriage : Wilson, married Elizabeth Notestine : Han- 
nah J., married D. K. Sulofif; George, married Amanda Rhine; 
Samuel, married Elizabeth Galbraith ; William, married Catherine 
Ritzman; Benjamin, married Matilda Kepner; Euphemia, married 
John G. Hertzler: James, married .Mice Hertzler; ]\Iatilda, married 
Jonas K. Hertzler. 

(IV) Leonard, son of Jacob and Nancy (Hench) Groninger, was 
born in Milford township, Juniata county, on the Groninger homestead. 
He was educated in the common schools of the township, and engaged 
in farming while yet a youth. He purchased land in ]\Iilford township 
after his marriage and lived on it until his death, which occurred in 1905. 
He was an active worker in the Lutheran church, of which he was a 
member, as was his wife. He advocated the principles of the Republican 
party, and voted with it since it was organized in 1857-59. He married 
Margaret, a daughter of William Reynolds, a long time resident of 
Fermanagh township, a farmer and land owner. Mr. Reynolds was 
one of the prosperous and prominent men of his section, and had a 
notable military record. His children were: Mar>', married Enoch 
Horning; Jesse, married Betsey Groninger; Robert, married Miss Robin- 
son; George, was a civil war veteran, died unmarried; Margaret, mar- 



644 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

ried Leonard Groninger, and died in 1902. Children of Leonard and 
Margaret (Reynolds) Groninger. i. Stewart, a locomotive engineer, 
killed in an accident ; married Rosa Shaffner. 2. Mary, married Everitt 
Meloy, a farmer of Milford township, both deceased. 3. John, married 
Anna Beale ; he is a telegraph lineman at Reading, Pennsylvania. 4. 
Elliot, of whom further. 5. Jacob, died on reaching majority. 6. 
George, married Laura Weildman ; he is a farmer in Milford township. 
7. Jesse, married Gertrude Arbagast. 

(V) Elliot, son of Leonard and Margaret (Reynolds) Groninger, 
was born February 12, 1856, in Milford township, Juniata county, Penn- 
sylvania. He received a common school education in the township, and 
on leaving school began farming with his father. He moved to his pres- 
ent home in 1889, which was known as the Professor Wilson place, near 
Port Royal, and has one hundred acres in a high state of productiveness. 
He does general farming and stock raising, the dual occupation netting 
handsome sums each year. He is a Republican, was associate judge 
from 1906 to 191 1, and has held other minor offices. He is a member of 
the Lutheran church, while his wife attends the Presbyterian. He mar- 
ried Mary, daughter of John and Mary (Hamilton) McLaughlin, the 
latter agent for several fire insurance companies in Turbett township. 
Children of Mr. and Mrs. Groninger: i. Homer, born in 1885 ; graduate 
of West Point Military Academy, in 1908; at present serving in the 
Fifth Cavalry, \J. S. A. 2. Stoey, born in 1889; a teacher. 3. Hugh, 
born in 1892; a student in State College. 4. Sarah, born in 1894: at 
home with parents. 



George D. Herrington, of Mifflin county, Penn- 
HERRINGTON sylvania, descends on the paternal side from hon- 
orable English stock, and on the distaff side from 
thrifty German people, a happy combination, as has been proven on many 
occasions and in many American families. 

(I) Daniel Herrington. the grandfather of George D. Herrington, 
was born in Pennsylvania. His forbears probably came to this country 
in the early part of 1700, as there are many of the name in the New Eng- 
land states who claim early emigrants from England about that time. 
Daniel passed his entire life in his native state, spending most of it in the 
Juniata Valley. He married a native of the valley. Children: i. 



HISTORY OF THE JLWTATA X'ALLEY 645 

Hiram, was a laborer in Juniata Valley. 2. Reuben, of whom further. 
3. James, a drayman at the Osceola Alills. 

(II) Reuben, son of Daniel Herrington, was born in Juniata Valley, 
June II, 1830, and was killed in a sand mine, November 11, 1873. He 
was a farmer in early life and a boatman on the Juniata canal, afterward 
engaging with the railroad. At the outbreak of hostilities between the 
north and south he enlisted in a Pennsylvania company and served out 
the time of his enlistment. He was a Democrat, taking an active inter- 
est in all political questions, and was a member of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church. He married (first) Mary Davis, December 16, 1851; she 
died August 4, 1854. He married (second) Catherine Minehart. born 
November 16, 1832, in Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, died March 6, 
1900. daughter of John and ]^Iary (Lyons) Alinehart. Children by first 
marriage : i. James Horace, born October 22, 1852 ; a farmer in Texas. 
2. ]\Iary. died in infancy. Children by second marriage: 3. John, born 
July 14. 1861 ; owns a steam laundry in Lewistown; married Susie 
Hochenberry. 4. Sarah H., born July 16, 1863, died aged fourteen. 5. 
Mary E., born April 10. 1865; married Peter Lower, an axe grinder at 
Yeagertown. 6. Rachel Annie, born December 6, 1867; married Henry 
Knepp; lives at Lima, Ohio. 7. Elbertha A., born January 27, 1870, 
died aged seven. 8. George D., of whom further. 9. Reuben Alfonzo, 
born March i. 1874, died in infancy. John and Mary (Lyons) Mine- 
hart came from Butler county to ^lifflin county with their family, and 
he took up land in Granville township, about two hundred acres. He 
cleared and improved it and he and his wife died on it, he at the age 
of seventy-two and she eighty-six. The\- were members of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church, and were highly respected in the community. 
They both were God-fearing and law-abiding members of society, and 
reared their children to be such. Children: William; Catherine, mar- 
ried Reuben Herrington ; Ard. 

(III) George D., son of Reuben and Catherine (Minehart) Herring- 
ton, was born June 4. 1872, in Granville township, Mifflin county, Penn- 
sylvania. He received his education in the common schools of the 
township, and as a young man engaged with the various farmers of the 
township and with his brother. In 1900 he established a milk dairy 
business, which he has since followed with great success. In 1906 he 
bought one hundred and forty acres of land five miles from Lewistown, 



646 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

and has brouglit ihcm up to a high state of productiveness. He does 
general farming and stock raising. He gives his franchise to the Demo- 
cratic party, and has done so since reaching his majority, but has never 
held nor aspired to office. He, with his wife, attends the Baptist church, 
of which she is a member. 

He married. :\Iarch 2. 1897, jMary E., daughter of Ellis and Tillie 
(Rittenhou.se) Donahey, the former a prominent farmer of Granville 
townshii). Mrs. Herrington died July i, 1912. Children: i. Wilbur, 
born October 24. 1899. 2. Matilda Catherine, born September 22, 1900. 
3. George Walker, born September i, 1905. 4. Ethel May, born July 2y, 
1907. 5. Horace Reuben, born March 24, 1909. 6. Mary Donahey, 
born June 2. 1912, died in infancy. 

\\'illiam J. Crissman. of Lewistown, Mifflin county, 

CRISSMAX Pennsylvania, must be classed by learned ethnologists 

as a true American, in that he descends from three of 

the different races that have combined to produce the American nation of 

to-day, the English, Irish and German. 

(I) Adam Crissman, the forbear of the Crissman family in Pennsyl- 
vania, was born in Lower Pennsylvania while it was yet a province 
of England. He was a farmer and reared his family on the first clear- 
ing that he made after his marriage. An Adam Crissman is named as 
one of the soldiers from Pennsylvania that enlisted in the continental 
army, and it is more than probable that it was he. He was the father 
of a large family, and among his sons was John, of whom further. 

(II) John, son of Adam Crissman, was born in Lancaster county, 
Pennsylvania, on the farm of his father. He was a farmer and a land 
owner, and at one time had under cultivation one hundred and twenty 
acres. He also possessed valuable timber lands in Havice Vallev. He 
married Elizabeth Rothrock, born in Dauphin county, daughter of a 
prominent German family in that community. Immediately after mar- 
riage they came to Mifflin count}- and settled near Siglerville, where 
they soon became identified with the social and religious life of that 
section. Both were members at one time of the German Reformed 
church, but later in life affiliated with the Presbyterian. Children: 
I. Adam, died in Clearfield county: was a bookkeeper and later a pros- 
perous merchant : married Sarah Hudson. 2. George W., a farmer of 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 647 

Armagh township ; married (first) Ehzabeth Longwell ; (second) Louise 
Wagner. 3. Lavina, married Frederick Havice, a farmer of Armagh 
township. 4. Margaret, married Christian Brown, a farmer of Armagh 
township. 5. Ehzabeth, married Thomas Longwell, a carpenter and con- 
tractor of Siglerville. 6. John M., of whom further. 7. Susannah, 
married \V. H. Glass, a prominent educator and a civil war veteran, 
member of the Grand Army of the Republic. 

(Ill) John M., son of John and Elizabeth ( Rothrock) Crissman, was 
born December 5, 1834, near Siglerville, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, 
died March 7, 1902, at Siglerville. He farmed during his entire life in 
Armagh township, and owned a large place on which he erected sub- 
stantial houses and reared his family of ten children. He was a staunch 
Republican as soon as that party came into existence, supporting it and 
working for it. He was honored by his neighbors with many township 
offices. He and his wife were members of the Presbyterian church, 
of which he was an elder for twenty-five years. He advocated at all 
times the greatest good to the greatest number, and there was no ques- 
tion of public policy that did not have his approval when it was for the 
benefit of the public. He married Mary J. Aitkens, born May 9, 1840, 
in Mifflin county, near Siglerville, died June 4, 1905, at the home of her 
daughter, Mrs. John A. Esh. She was the daughter of William and 
Eliza (Close) Aitkens. Mr. Crissman was widely mourned at his death. 
as his township offices and generosity had brought him in close contact 
with many people of the township. Children, i. William J., of whom 
further. 2. Hallie Elizabeth, born March 20, i860; married W. G. Ram- 
sey, a farmer of Armagh township: she is deceased. 3. Ada J., born 
December 17, 1861 ; married A. F. McClintic, a gentleman farmer and 
merchant. 4. James Mead, born August 23, 1863; a farmer and later 
a mail route carrier; married the widow of Samuel M. Brown. 5. 
Samuel Rush, born April 20, 1865, died in infancy. 6. Edward Bruce, 
born January 28, 1867. died March 25, 1913; married (first) Jennie 
Sailor; (second) Margaret Esh. 7. Minnie May, born October 30, 
1868; married T. W. Lawver, an educator and farmer of Milroy; she 
is deceased. 8. Walter Clark, born September 28, 1871 ; a school teacher 
and farmer; married Rhoda Sample. 9. Bertha, born September 26, 
1873; married John A. Esh, a farmer of Armagh township. 10. Mary 
M., born October 8, 1878, deceased; married Clyde Stull. 



648 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

(IV) William J., son of John M. and Islary J. (Aitkens) Crissman, 
was born August 26, 1858. in Armagh township, Mifflin county, Penn- 
sylvania, on the Crissman homestead. He received his preparatory edu- 
cation in the public school of the township, finishing at the Milroy high 
school. Being the eldest of a large family of children he considered it 
his dutv to remain on the farm with his father, and did so until he 
reached the age of twenty-eight. In 1904 Mr. Crissman moved from his 
one hundred and forty-one-acre farm in Granville township to Lewis- 
town and established a meat market, supplying it largely from his own 
farm, where he makes a specialty of stock raising for his market. Since 
the establishment of the business it has grown wonderfully, assisted, 
not onlv by the demand for excellent meats, but also by the courte- 
ous and fair treatment of the public. Both he and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian church, and like his father he votes with the 
Republican party, but has never held nor asked for office. He is re- 
garded as one of the substantial, progressive business men of Lewis- 
town. He married, December 28, 1887, Juniata J., daughter of Lemuel 
A. and Margareta (Koons) Kepner, of German descent and prominent 
people of Turbett township. Juniata county, where Mr. Kepner had a 
large farm. 

(The .\itkens Line). 
The -\itkens family, long established in Pennsylvania, is of Scotch- 
Irish descent. William Aitkens came from Scotland in 1742, and settled 
in Pennsylvania. His son, William, also located in Pennsylvania. John, 
the son of William, was born in Lancaster county, but moved to an ad- 
joining county on reaching his majority. William, son of John, lived 
and died near Siglerville, Mifflin county. He was a Republican and a 
member of the Presbyterian church. He was a farmer during the 
greater part of his life, and erected on his farm a smithy that was largely 
patronized by the community as well as the farmers in adjoining town- 
ships. He married (first) Eliza Close, daughter of Mr. Close, of Eng- 
lish extraction; married (second) Maria Jones, of Clearfield county. 
Children by first marriage: i. Thomas, a farmer; married Susannah 
Crissman, the widow of W. H. Glass. 2. Mary J., married John M. 
Crissman (see Crissman III). 3. Samuel D., a mail carrier and farmer 
in Armagh township, lives on Aitkens homestead; married Maggie 
Adams. 4. .\(la J., married Wilson W. Nale, a farmer of Center county 



HISTORY OF THE JUXIATA VALLEY 649 

and later of Armagh township. Children by second marriage: 5. Sarah, 
married Charles J. Ehrenfield, a farmer and land owner of Armagh 
township. 6. Maggie B., married S. H. Crissman. 7. Martha, married 
A. B. Cummings, a farmer of Armagh township. 



Simon E. Hess, the el^cient yard conductor for the Pennsyl- 
HESS vania railroad at Marysville, is a son of Henry E. and Mary 
Jane (Eppler) Hess. Henry E. Hess was born in 1841, has 
been a railroad man for many years and is now train master for the 
Pennsylvania railroad, stationed at Baltimore, Maryland. He is a 
Democrat in politics, has held several offices local in character and is a 
member of the Knights of Pythias. He married Mary Jane Eppler, 
born in 1852 in East Pennsboro township, Cumberland county. Pennsyl- 
vania, daughter of Simon G. and Catherine (Hebisonj Eppler and grand- 
daughter of John Eppler and his wife, a Miss Garver. John Eppler was 
a farmer and land owner of Perry county, later moving to the town of 
Marysville where he lived retired until his death. He left issue, among 
whom were: Simon G. (see forward); Herman; Reuben; Solomon; 
Aaron; Leah, married David Brightall ; Susan, married Jacob Zang. 

Simon G. Eppler was born December 31, 1831, on an island in the 
Susquehanna river, just below Harrisburg in Londonderry township, 
Dauphin county, died in Marysville, Pennsylvania, October 5, 1899. He 
was a railroad engineer for many years at Marysville, but in later life 
opened a shoe store there. He was a Republican in politics and both he 
and his wife were members of the Church of God. 

He married Catherine Hebison, born in East Pennsboro township, 
Cumberland county, November 22, 1830, died December 5. 191 1; chil- 
dren: Mary Jane, born June 12, 1852, married Henry E. Hess (of pre- 
vious mention) ; Aaron H., born April 3, 1857, died aged eight years; 
Sarah Ann, born August 29, 1858, married Philip Zimmerman, a mer- 
chant of Highspire, Dauphin county; Catherine, born January 29, i860, 
never married. Children of Henry E. and Mary Jane Hess: Catherine, 
residing at home; Simon E., of whom further; Lily, married James Sib- 
bits and resides in Baltimore; .\nna, resides in Baltimore; Mary, mar- 
ried Lindsay Pettit and resides in Washington, D. C. ; George, now an 
electrical engineer in Altoona, Pennsylvania. 

(II) Simon E., eldest son of Henry E. and Mary Jane (Eppler) 



650 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Hess, was born in Marysville, Perry county, Pennsylvania, September 7, 
1875. He was educated in the public schools and at the age of eighteen 
years entered the employ of the Pennsylvania railroad as clerk at the 
Marysville station. Later he entered the train service as brakeman, 
winning promotion to his present position of yard conductor at Marys- 
ville. He is a member of the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen; the 
Patriotic Order Sons of America ; the Knights of Pythias and both he 
and his wife are members of the Lutheran church. 

He married in 1897 Cora, daughter of John and Mary (Freed) 
Hippie, he a farmer of Rye township. Mary Freed was a daughter of 
Joseph and Sarah Freed, natives of York county, Pennsylvania, later 
resided on their farm in Perry county. Children of John and Mary 
(Freed) Hippie: Arbie E., married Delia Colyer (?) ; Sarah, married 
James White: Nettie, unmarried; Walter, unmarried; Richard, mar- 
ried Anna Bell Eppley; Cora, married Simon E. Hess, of previous men- 
tion: children: Miriam, born April 30, 1899; Theodore, February 4, 
1909. 

This branch of the McLaughlin family was 
McLAL'(jHLIN founded in Pennsylvania by Hugh McLaughlin, 

born in Ireland, who settled in Lancaster on first 
coming to America. The date of his coming to Juniata county is fixed 
at 1793 or 1794, by deeds and land transfers. His lands were in Turbett 
township and there he lived until death. He married in Ireland and 
brought a family to this country with him. 

(II) James, son of Hugh McLaughlin, was born in Ireland and came 
to Pennsylvania with his father at the age of fourteen years. He moved 
to Juniata county, married and settled on the homestead farm in Turbett 
township, where his after life was spent. During the war of 1812 he 
raised a company, and was always active and useful in town affairs. 
He was one of the prime movers in locating the old Mount Hope school- 
house and was given the honor of bestowing upon it a name. He was a 
Democrat in politics. He married Elizabeth Swyler, born in Germany, 
hut came to this country when a girl. Children : John, died in Juniata 
county, a farmer and insurance agent : Mary, married Joseph Steager 
and died in Indiana: James (2), of whom further; EHzabeth, married 
George DcX'auIt and died in Illinois; Jane, married William Hench and 





->d'' /7v c>clcL.^^^^^X<^ 




HISTORY OF THE JUXIATA VALLEY 651 

died in Turbett township ; Margaret, married Michael DeVault and died 
in IlHnois ; Frank, died in Turbett township ; Hugh, died aged seventeen 
years; Samuel, died in Spruce Hill township, formerly Turbett. 

(HI) James (2), son of James (i) and Elizabeth (Swyler) Mc- 
Laughlin, was born in Turbett township, Juniata county, Pennsylvania, 
March 4, 1817, died in the same township, March 15, 1901. He re- 
mained at the home farm until his marriage, then in 1850 purchased a 
farm to which he added until he had one hundred acres of fertile, well 
cultivated land. From 1876 until 1879 he was a commissioner of 
Juniata county, elected as a Democrat. He was a man of high character 
and held in universal esteem. He married (first) Mary Wharton, who 
bore him three children, now all deceased: William K., Rebecca J., mar- 
ried Elias Arbogast; Edward P., died in South Dakota. He married 
(second) Elizabeth Irvine, born in Perry county, January 2, 1821, died 
in Turbett township, February 15, 1901, daughter of William and Sarah 
(Milligan) Irvine. Her parents were both born in Saville township. 
Perry county, where William Irvine followed his trade of blacksmith 
until his death, aged forty years. His widow never remarrying, died 
aged sixty-nine years. Both were members of the Presbyterian church; 
their children were : James, died in Perry county, a farmer ; Jane, died 
unmarried; Elizabeth, married James (2) McLaughlin; Sarah, died 
unmarried ; John, is living in Virginia, aged eighty years. Children of 
James (2) and Elizabeth (Irvine) McLaughlin: John, died aged three 
years; James Scott, of whom further; Sarah Ann, married D. B. McWil- 
liams, a worker in the Standard Steel Works, at Burnham, Pennsyl- 
vania, also their residence. 

(IV) James Scott, only son of James (2) and Elizabeth (Irvine) 
McLaughlin, was born on the farm which he now owns in Turbett town- 
ship, Juniata county, Pennsylvania, November 29, 1859. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools and Airy View Academy, and has always 
lived on the homestead farm. There his youth was spent as his father'^ 
assistant, later he purchased the interests of the other heirs and has 
since added adjoining acres. He has erected a new residence on the 
property and otherwise enhanced its value. Mr. McLaughlin was one 
of the principal organizers of the People's National Bank of Mifflin and 
was chosen its first president, an office he has most ably filled. He is 
also the owner of a grist mill at old Port Royal, and interested in other 



65-' HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

business enterprises. He is a Democrat in politics, and both he and his 
wife are members of the Presbyterian church and the Patrons of Hus- 
bandry. Mr. McLaughlin is a fine type of the business farmer, loves 
the soil, and the associations clinging around the old home farm have 
always held him closely. 

He married, December 22, 1886, Blanche M. Caldwell, born at White 
Deer, Clinton county, Pennsylvania, daughter of Joseph and Mary (Mil- 
liken) Caldwell, who both died in Milton, Pennsylvania. Children: 
Tames I., a miller of Missouri, but a plumber by trade; Mary C, mar- 
ried Charles Finnefrock and resides in Mifflintown; Grace E., residing 
at home; Paul E., a student at Port Royal high school. 

The Creightons of Burnham, Pennsylvania, are of 
CREIGHTON English descent paternally, their forbears being early 
settlers in the Juniata Valley. William Creighton 
came to Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, at an early date, settling first in 
Decatur township, later in Derry township, at the present town of Burn- 
ham, where he died, aged eighty-eight years. He was a shoemaker and 
an auctioneer, successful in all his undertakings and a man much re- 
spected. He owned forty acres of land in Derry township, half of which 
was later sold to the Standard Steel Works, the balance yet remaining 
in the family. He was a Republican in politics and a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. He married Elizabeth Jacobs, 
who died in 1873. Children: Abraham, Samuel, Amanda, Mary 
Jane, Lsaac Thompson, of whom further; William. Elizabeth and Mar- 
garet. 

(II) Isaac Thompson, son of William and Elizabeth (Jacobs) 
Creighton, was born in Decatur township, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, 
in 1843, died August 5, 1902, in Derry township, same county. He 
grew to manhood in the latter township, was educated in the public 
school and Wright jjrivate school, later learning the carpenter's trade. 
He followed his trade for many years, and was also for several years 
employed at the Standard Steel Works. He was a Republican in poli- 
tics, and both he and his wife were members of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church. He was a man of industry and integrity, holding the respect 
of his community. 

He married, December 31, 1872, Lucinda Herbster, born in Snyder 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 653 

county, March 15, 1847, daughter of Gabriel and Hannah (Young) 
Herbster. He was born in Snyder county, died in Snyder county; she 
was born in Decatur township, Mifflin county, and died in Snyder county 
in 1854. Children of Gabriel and Hannah Herbster: William, a veteran 
of the civil war, deceased; Thomas, a veteran, now living in Snyder 
county ; Priscilla, married Samuel Bottorff, of Downs, Kansas ; Amanda, 
married Samuel Chestnut, of DuBois, Pennsylvania; Lucinda, married 
Isaac T. Creighton, whom she survives, a resident of Burnham, Penn- 
sylvania ; Hiram, Nathaniel, deceased; Jacob, deceased. Children of 
Isaac T. and Lucinda (Herbster) Creighton: i. Emma Elizabeth, born 
November i, 1873 ; married Mitchell Barr, of Yeagertown, Pennsylvania, 
now a foreman at the Standard Steel Works; children: Edward Creigh- 
ton, Rosemond Lucinda and Kenneth SheatTer. 2. William Andrew, 
born 1876, educated in the public school and Williamsport Seminary, 
formerly a merchant, now with the Standard Steel Works. He married 
Rose L. Willett, of Burnham and has children : Doris Bywater, Averial 
and William Edger. 3. Edward Roy, born 1879, educated in the public 
school, learned the molder's trade, later that of machinist, which he now 
follows. He married Albertina Smith. 



The Gibboneys, of Belleville, Pennsylvania, are of 
GIBBONEY Welsh origin, the emigrant settling in Bucks county, 
Pennsylvania, prior to the revolution, in which his sons 
bore a part. The founder of the family in the Juniata Valley was Alex- 
ander ( I ) Gibboney, born in Bucks county, where he became a manu- 
facturer of cloth. He served in the commissary department of the con- 
tinental army, and later settled in Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, where 
he had a small farm of thirty acres near Belleville, then called Green- 
wood. There he built the first woLilen mill ever erected in that section, 
operated it for many years, and died at the age of eighty-two years. 
He was a Democrat in politics, active and enterprising in business, and 
of high standing in his community. He married a Miss Garver, born in 
Berks county, of German parentage. They were both members of the 
Presbyterian church, and are buried in the Presbyterian cemetery at 
Belleville. Children: i. Davis. 2. Alexander (2), of whom further. 
3. James, for one term sherifif of Mifflin county, elected 1833, and for 
two terms prothonotary, first elected 1839; he married Annie Horrell, 



654 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

who lived to be ninety-one years of age. 4. Benjamin. 5. Jemima. 6. 
Sarah. 

(II) Alexander (2), son of Alexander (i) Gibboney, was educated 
in the subscription schools of his section, Mifflin county, and assisted 
his father in the woolen mill near Belleville, and later became a manufac- 
turer of woolen goods. He was an active, energetic man and con- 
tinued in prosperous business until his death. He was a Democrat and 
took an active interest in public affairs. He married Elizabeth Alexan- 
der, born in Kishacoquillas Valley, and with her iiusband belonged to 
the Presbyterian church. He reared a family including a son, Albert 
G., see forward. 

(III) Albert G., son of Alexander (2) Gibboney, was born near 
Belleville, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, August 25, 1818, died April 2, 
1887. He was educated in the public school and Levvistown Academy, 
but all his life was a student and pursued a course of wide reading. 
He worked with his father in the woolen mill until he was twenty-one, 
then followed farming until 1861, in Union township, then established 
the first drug store in Belleville, in partnership with his brother. Dr. 
Samuel Gibboney, continuing there in successful business all his re- 
maining years. He was a leading member of a debating society, deeply 
interested in nature study, and a regular correspondent for the news- 
papers of his section. In politics he was a Democrat, serving for twenty- 
five years as school director. He was deeply interested in all progres- 
sive movements in his town, and a faithful member of the Presbyterian 
church. 

He married Penninah, daughter of John Morrison, a farmer. Chil- 
dren: I. Howard Eugene, married Mary Steeley. 2. Elizabeth Alex- 
ander. 3. Granville M., born August 7, 1847. a merchant of Reeds- 
villei married Marian Cordelia Bell; two children, Albert and Irene. 4. 
William Morrison, of whom further. 5. Charles Bowers, married Jen- 
nie Brindle. 6. Samuel Rush, a druggist of Salina, Kansas, unmarried. 
7. -Albert Victor, died aged five years. 8. Kate Morrison, died aged 
four years. 9. Thomas Sherman, married Margaret Fultz. 

(IV) William Morrison, son of Albert G. and Penninah (Morri- 
son) Gibboney, was born on the Gibboney homestead, near Belleville. 
Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, August 17, 1852. He was educated in 
the public school of Belleville, and began business life as a clerk in his 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 655 

father's drug store, going from there to a similar position in a drug store 
at Roaring Springs, Blair county, Pennsylvania. He spent a year in 
the drug business in South Bend, then returned to Belleville, succeeding 
his father in business at the death of the latter, continuing until 1895, 
when he sold his interest. He took an active part in the organization of 
the Kishacoquillas Valley railroad, and served as treasurer during its 
construction. In the year 1900 he was chosen auditor of the railroad, 
a position he yet holds. He has prospered in business and is one of 
the substantial, respected men of his town. He is an elder of the Belle- 
ville Presbyterian Church, and in political faith is a Democrat, serving 
as postmaster from 1884 to 1892. 

He married, in 1881, Letitia Strayer, born at Port Royal, Pennsyl- 
vania, died May i, 1905, daughter of George and Susan Strayer. He 
married (second) in 1907, Mrs. Amelia Hassinger, of Milroy. Chil- 
dren by tirst marriage: i. Leonore, born in 1883. deceased: married 
A. C. Helfrick. 2. Hazel S., born August 4, 1888: now a student at 
Millersville State Normal. 3. Albert G. (2), born July 17, 1893; grad- 
uate of Belleville High School, class of 1909, and post-graduate 1910; 
he is a druggist in Belleville in the store his father repurchased in 1912. 



Samuel Wills, the first recorded ancestor of this family in 
WILLS America, was one of the very earliest settlers in Kishaco- 
quillas valley, where he located in about the year 1780, two 
miles and a half south of Belleville, Pennsylvania. He was of Scotch- 
Irish descent, living a quiet and industrious life, and deporting himself in 
every respect as a worthy and most respectable citizen. He acquired a 
considerable amount of land and cultivated a farm which was a very 
large one for those days, and which at his death was divided among his 
several sons. A part of this original tract is still owned by a Wills, a 
great-grandson. He died on the homestead in 1799, and was buried in 
the old Kishacoquillas cemetery three miles west of Belleville. His 
wife was Miss Martha Brown, a sister of Judge William Brown, who 
was, like himself, a staunch member of the Presbyterian church and of 
Scotch-Irish descent. 

(II) James Wills, son of Samuel and Martha (Brown) Wills, was 
born on his father's farm in Kishacoquillas valley near Belleville, where 
he grew to maturity. He was, like his father, a cultivator of the soil; 



65G HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

and inherited the homestead where he resided until his death in 1845. 
His share of the paternal property after the division, was three hundred 
and sixty acres; and this was divided at his death among his three 
surviving sons, one hundred and twenty acres to each. He married 
Rachel Jackson, who was born at McAlevys Fort in Huntingdon county, 
and had eight children : Joseph Jackson, sold his share of the homestead 
and died in Iowa; Samuel Brown, lived and died on his share; William 
John, died in childhood; James Thomas, of further mention; Margaret, 
deceased, wife of John \V. Wilson; Mary, deceased, wife of William 
John Fleming; Alartha, deceased, wife of John Fleming Wilson; Rachel, 
deceased, wife of Samuel McKinney Fleming. 

(III) James Thomas Wills, son of James and Rachel (Jackson) 
Wills, was born December 14, 1834, on the old Wills homestead, where 
he passed his entire life, dying there May 2, 1900. He was a prominent 
man in the community in which he lived, being a member of the Repub- 
lican party and serving in various township offices, supervisor, school 
director and as assessor for a period of nine years. He was also a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian church which he served as trustee for many 
years. On February i, 1866, he was married to Mary Jane Fleming, 
who was born on the old Fleming homestead midway between Belle- 
ville and Allensville, September 11, 1845, and died September 21, 1900. 
She was a member of the Presbyterian church; and was the daughter 
of James and Eliza B. (Wills) Fleming (see Fleming Family). Mr. 
and Mrs. Wills had one son, James Fleming, of further mention. 

(IV) James Fleming Wills, son of James Thomas and Mary Jane 
(Fleming) Wills, was born at Belleville, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, 
October 12, 1871. His education was acquired in the common schools 
and at Indiana State Normal School, where he graduated in 1894. Mr. 
Wills had, however, taught school two years prior to his graduation; 
and at the close of his school work at Indiana, resumed his occupation 
of teacher, devoting ten more years to this career in the common 
schools. He was principal of the Belleville High School for six years, 
and for one year was principal at Allensville. So satisfactory had been 
his career as teacher that in May, 1905, he was elected superintendent of 
the schools of Mifflin county, being reelected in 1908 to fill the same posi- 
tion, and again reelected in 191 1. He was the first official in the county 
to be twice reelected to this position, and enjoyed the highest confidence 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 657 

and esteem of his fellow citizens for the fine educational work which he 
achieved. Mr. Wills is a member of the Presbyterian church as all of 
his forefathers have been, and to which his wife also belongs. He is 
a member of the session in said church. Mrs. Wills, to whom he was 
married on October 10, 1895, was Miss Margaret May McClintic, a 
native of Belleville and daughter of Mr. Joseph H. McClintic, a sketch 
of whom appears elsewhere in this work. Mr. Wills owns the old 
family homestead and has also a comfortable home in Belleville. He 
and his wife have four children: Margaret Rachel, born October 13, 
1898; Mary Elizabeth Jane, November 25, 1900; Nellie Allegra, October 
I, 1903; James Henderson, August 29, 1904. 

(The Fleming Family). 

(I) The Fleming family in Pennsylvania is a very large one, having 
many collateral lines in descent from the original ancestor. The progeni- 
tor of the line under consideration was Robert Fleming, who located 
in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, in about the year 1700. He married 
the daughter of John Welch, whose wife was a daughter of John Knox, 
the Scotch apostle of Calvinism. They had a son, William, mentioned 
below. 

(II) William Fleming, son of Robert Fleming, removed to Chester 
county while yet a young man, and resided near the place where 
Henry Wilson's house now stands. He married Mrs. Elizabeth (Wil- 
son) Gettys, who lies buried in the old West Kishacoquillas Presbyterian 
cemeter}'. After the death of his wife he moved further west, and may 
have settled in Armstrong county; but this is not certain. Among his 
sons was Joseph, of further mention. 

(III) Joseph Fleming, son of William and Elizabeth Fleming, was 
born in Chester county, Pennsylvania, and came early to Mifflin county, 
probably with his father. He did not go west with his father, but set- 
tled in Menno township where he followed farming all his life. His 
wife was Elizabeth Martin, daughter of John Martin, a soldier of the 
revolutionary war, who fought at Paoli under General Wayne in 1777, 
and was killed there. Among the children of Joseph Fleming were 
James, of further mention ; John. Martin, Joseph, Margaret, Elizabeth, 
and Ann, who died at the age of eleven years. 

(IV) James Fleming, son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Martin) Flem- 



658 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

ing was born probablv in Menno township, where he grew to maturity 
and became a farmer and land owner. He was a Democrat and a prom- 
inent man in his party in the township and county, servmg one term 
as county commissioner and leaving a record for good administration. 
He was a member of the Presbyterian church, as was also his wife, who 
was Miss Eliza B. Wills before her marriage. They had six children : 
Samuel M., died on the farm in Menno township; Elizabeth, deceased, 
married Henry S. Wilson; Joseph Henderson, a Presbyterian minister, 
died in Franklin county; John Martin, retired farmer, living in Belle- 
ville; Mary Jane, married to James Thomas Wills (see Wills III); 
James R., a merchant of Belleville. 

This name was introduced in Pennsylvania by German 
YEAGER emigrants from the Valley of the Rhine, who came be- 
tween the years 1710 and 1765. They settled in what 
was then Philadelphia county, but now included within the limits of 
Montgomery county. They had numerous descendants and in the revo- 
lutionary records of Pennsylvania, the names of Adam, Christian, 
Christopher, Andrew, Matthew, Casper, George, Frederick. Peter and 
John Yeager appear as brave soldiers in the war of independence. Of 
these Andrew is the progenitor of the line herein recorded. 

(II) Andrew Yeager, who married Anna Barbara Schuster of 
Lachen, near Heidelberg. Germany, in 1755, was one of the earliest set- 
tlers in Lykens Valley and his name appears as one of the earliest set- 
tlers of the Lykens Valley. He served in the revolution under three 
enlistments. In 1776 he was a member of Captain Albright Deibler's 
company of Associators and was at the battles of Trenton and Prince- 
ton; in 1779, a private of Captain John Rutherford's company, and in 
1 78 1 served in Captain Martin Weaver's company. He married and 
left issue. 

(III) John, son of Andrew Yeager, "the Patriot", was born in Mont- 
gomery county, Pennsylvania, February 19, 1767, died February 19, 
1835, the sixty-eighth anniversary of his birth. He purchased three 
hundred acres in the Lykens Valley and is said to have built the first 
bank barn in the valley. He was baptized and confirmed in the Re- 
formed church and bis funeral services were conducted by Rev. Isaac 
Gerhart, of that church, who chose for his text on that occasion a quota- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNL\TA VALLEY 659 

tion from Isaiah 57-2: "He shall rest hi peace". John Yeager married, 
July I, 1788, Catherine Rau, also of German descent. Children: si.x 
sons and three daughters. 

(IV) Jacob, son of John and Catherine (Rau) Yeager, was born in 
Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, March 11, 1793. He was a soldier of 
the war of 1812, and later moved to Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, where 
the village of Yeagertown is named in his honor. He purchased 'an old 
flouring mill there in 1842 which stood until 1857, then was torn down, 
and after being rebuilt was operated by Jeremiah M., a son and later 
by Jesse Arin, a grandson of the founder of the family at Yeagertown. 
Jacob Yeager was also a farmer and a man of considerable inventive 
genius. He patented in 1830 a mold board for a plow that came into 
universal use in the United States. He married, in 1815, Mrs. Susanna 
Fisher, daughter of George and Barbara (Hoffman) Buffington, who 
bore him eight children. Susanna Bufiington was a lineal descendant of 
Richard Buffington, born in Great Marlow, Buckinghamshire, England, 
1654, and came to the United States, where, according to a statement 
made in the Pennsylvania Gasette (published in Philadelphia, for week 
ending July 5, 1739), his eldest son was the first English child born in 
the province of Pennsylvania. Susanna was a daughter of George Buf- 
fington, a soldier of the revolution and the founder of the Buffington 
family in the Lykens Valley. He married, September 2, 1782, Barbara, 
born in Berks county, Pennsylvania, May 31, 1763, daughter of Peter 
Hoffman, born in Germany, 1709, and came to this country in 1739 on 
the ship "Robert and Alice". 

(V) Jeremiah M., youngest of the eight children of Jacob and 
Susanna (Buffington) Yeager, was born in Dauphin county, Pennsyl- 
vania, March 26, 1832, died in Yeagertown, Mifflin county, Pennsyl- 
vania, December 30, 1906. He attended the public schools, but when a 
boy of ten years began working in his father's flour mill at Yeager- 
town. He continued in the milling business, and when the old mill, that 
had stood for over sixty years was torn down in 1859, and a new mill 
erected, Jeremiah M. Yeager was its proprietor and his own "head 
miller". He seems to have had a patriotic milling force, for during the 
war between the states five of his assistant millers left him to enlist in 
the Union army. Mr. Yeager continued in the milling business many 
years, prospered and built up a large business. He was quiet and unob- 



66o HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

trusive in manner, yet forceful, and of such upright character that his 
name stood as a synonym for probity, sobriety, charity and honorable 
dealing. The business he inherited from his father he passed on to his 
son, greatly enlarged, but, better still, he left a name unsullied and 
ranking in the commercial world among the best. He married (first) 
Mary J., daughter of William Creighton of Scotch and Welsh ancestry. 
She was Ijc^rn in Derry township in that part now included in Yeager- 
town, died March 22, 1873, aged 38. He married (second) December 
22, 1874. ^Irs. Anna Maria (Mann) Brisbin, daughter of William (2), 
founder of the Mann axe and tool works near Lewistown, Pennsylvania. 
The only living child of the second marriage is Bertha M., who married 
Charles .A.. Rice of Reedsville. Children of first marriage: i. William 
J., now a member of Spanogle Yeager Milling Company of Reedsville 
and Lewistown. Pennsylvania: married. May 20, 1880, Almira Spa- 
nogle; children: Andrew J., Mary Edith and William J. (2). 2. Rev. 
James Martin, D. D., graduate of Wesleyan University, Middletown, 
Connecticut, minister of the Methodist Episcopal church, president of 
Drew Ladies' Seminary, 1891 to 1899; member of Pennsylvania House 
of Assembly in 1907-8: a preacher, orator, educator and lecturer of 
national fame, now residing in Lewistown, Pennsylvania. In 1907 he 
was appointed by President Roosevelt Lhiited States marshal for the 
Middle District of Pennsylvania, which office he still holds (1913). He 
married, October 13, 1886, Emma McElroy, of Rhinebeck, New York; 
children : James Creighton and Marion. 3. Jesse Orin, of whom further. 
(VI) Jesse Orin, youngest son of Jeremiah M. Yeager and his first 
wife, Mary J. Creighton, was born in Yeagertown, Pennsylvania, May 
II, 1864. He was educated in the public schools, Lewistown Academy 
and Dickinson Seminary (Williamsport, Pa.), whence he was graduated 
B. S.. class of 1883. He supplemented his classical education by a 
course at Eastman's Business College, Poughkeepsie, New York, whence 
he was graduated in 1884, then returned to Yeagertown and entered 
the milling business with his father. He was made manager of the mills, 
his father's weight of years gladly yielding the burdens of business to 
the younger man. The history of the Yeager mills so long in the fam- 
ily is an interesting one. The original mill erected in 1776 was bought 
l)y Jacob Yeager in 1S42, rebuilt by him in 1857 and operated by Jere- 
miah M. until succeeded by his son; rebuilt in 1892 and the roller 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 66i 

process of flour manufacture installed, and since then remodelled and 
modern machinery erected as new inventions came into use. Originally 
a flour and grist mill, the output now is entirely whole wheat flour, 
which is shipped all over the United States, being the only mill in 
Pennsylvania entirely devoted to the manufacture of whole wheat flour. 
The capacity is seventy-five barrels daily, employing from ten to fifteen 
men. In 1886 Mr. Yeager added to his milling business a coal and 
lumber yard and later a complete line of building materials. In 1908 
he installed an electric power plant in Yeagertown, with a capacity of 
from three hundred to four hundred kilowatts daily, which has been 
furnished to the Penn Central Light & Power Company under con- 
tract. The plant is one of the most modern in the state and so per- 
fectly appointed that for the past year (1913) not an hour has been 
lost. Mr. Yeager is a director of the Citizens" National Bank and 
secretary of the board; director of the Lewistown and Reedsville Water 
Company, and interested in several other corporate enterprises. He is a 
progressive, capable man of affairs, and possesses the entire confidence 
of his business associates. He is a Republican in politics and has served 
as supervisor of Derry township. Both he and his wife are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. The family home is at Yeager- 
town. He is a member of the Knights of the Golden Eagle and the 
Patriotic Order Sons of America. 

He married June 21, 1892, Josephine L. Case, of Denver, Colorado, 
daughter of Charles H. and Susannah (Madden) Case, of an old New 
England family. 



This family is of German origin, John Keister and his 
KEISTER wife Lydia, natives of Germany, having come to this 

country somewhere about the beginning of the last cen- 
tury and settled in Lancaster or Cumberland county, Pennsylvania. 
They remained in the place of their first location for awhile, removing 
subsequently to Union county, where Mr. Keister followed the vocation 
of farming for many years. 

(II) Levi Keister, son of John and Lydia Keister, was born in the 
year 1808, in LInion county, where his parents made their permanent 
home after arriving in America, settling in Pennsylvania. He became 
a miller, locating at Doyles Mills, in Juniata county, removing afterward 



662 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

to Lewistown, where he continued this occupation. With the idea of 
improving his fortunes and bettering his trade he again moved, locating 
successively at Oakland Mills and Caymans Mills, and finally took up 
his permanent residence in Mexico, Pennsylvania, where he entered the 
service of the Pennsylvania railway, in which he remained until his 
death, in May. 1S57. In his political affiliations Mr. Keister was an old 
time Whig. He was a member of the Presbyterian church, as was also 
his wife, to whom he was married while in Juniata county. She was a 
Miss Susanna Cooper before her marriage, and was born in Tuscarora 
valley, in the year 1817, dying in 1877, twenty years after the death of 
her husband. She was a daughter of John and Abigail (Okeson) 
Cooper, and was of mingled English and Dutch descent, her father hav- 
ing been of English ancestry and her mother's people having come from 
Holland. After their marriage they made their home in Tuscarora 
valley, where Mr. Cooper became a farmer, owning his land, which he 
cultivated with much profit for a number of years, the former dying in 
Mexico, Pennsylvania, and the latter at Port Royal. They belonged to 
the Baptist and Presbyterian churches. Six children were born to them : 
Thomas, died a few years ago at Paw Paw, West Virginia : John, died 
in boyhood; Samuel, died in Port Royal; William, died in Cumberland, 
Maryland ; Mary Jane, married William Hoopes, now deceased ; Susanna, 
became Mrs. Keister. 

Mr. and Mrs. Keister had seven children : John, killed on an engine 
in the service of the Pennsylvania railway, March 5, 1876; Catherine, 
a school teacher, died unmarried in the fall of 1909, aged sixty-seven 
years; .\ll)ert, died young; William, died young; Joseph and Samuel A., 
twins, the former being engineer at the round house in Harrisburg, and 
the latter mentioned further. 

(Ill) Samuel Albertson Keister, son of Levi and Susanna (Cooper) 
Keister, and twin brother of Joseph Keister, was born January 19, 1854, 
in Lost Creek Valley, near Mc.\listerville, Juniata county. He attended 
the pul)lic schools of the county until the age of seventeen years, when 
he entered business life as a fireman on the Pennsylvania railroad, re- 
maining in this capacity for ten years. While a fireman he let the first 
dijjpcr down on the Pennsylvania railway to take water while the train 
was running. P>eing injiu-ed in the performance of his duties as fire- 
man on the road, he was promoted to tlie rank of engineer, and left 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 663 

the railway service altogether in 1904 to go into business on his own ac- 
count at Port Royal. Here he built a store in which he carried on a 
general merchandise business, making a specialty of produce. He owns 
a fine brick property. He has been very successful in his various indus- 
tries, and is esteemed one of the most prominent citizens in the com- 
munity. In politics Mr. Keister is a Republican, and so highly is he 
regarded among his fellow citizens that he has been called upon to serve 
as a member of the town council. He is a member of the Presbyterian 
church, as is also his wife, who was a Miss Mary McManigil ; they were 
married October 24, 1893. 

Mrs. Keister is a native of Huntingdon county, having been born 
May 14, 1854, daughter of John and Jennie (Rudy) McManigil, natives 
also of Huntingdon county. Mr. McManigil was a hotel keeper at 
various localities in the state — at Bellefonte, Center county, then at 
Petersburg. Huntingdon county, and finally at Port Royal, Juniata 
county. Here he retired from business, and died January 12, 1887, his 
wife surviving him and dying March 9, 1903. Mr. McManigil had also 
at one period of his life been a dealer in cattle and horses. His parents, 
William and Lydia (McClellan) McManigil, of Scotch descent, were 
also natives of Huntingdon county, their parents having been early set- 
tlers of the county and dying there. Mr. and Mrs. McManigil had four 
children: Mary, became Mrs. Keister; Lucretia, married J. Emery 
Fleisher and lives at Newport, Pennsylvania; William and John, both 
died at Port Royal. Mrs. Keister's maternal grandparents, Henry and 
Martha Rudy, were also natives of Huntingdon county; Mr. Rudy was 
a farmer, having lived and died in that county. His father had been 
a soldier in the revolutionary war. Mr. and Mrs. Samuel A. Keister 
have no children. 



The first McNitt settlement in Pennsylvania was 
McNITT-REED in Cumberland county, near Carlisle, where five 

McNitt brothers, John. Alexander, Robert. Wil- 
liam and James McNitt. settled at comparatively an early day. They 
were Scotchmen and came direct from their native land to Pennsylvania. 
In 1755 they, with the exception of James, journeyed to what is now 
Mifflin county, where each brother selecting a tract, settled thereon. 
Their farms, averaging about two hundred acres each, were in Armagh 



664 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

township and warrants were issued to all, September 8, 1755. Each 
brother built, cleared and improved his land, and all remained thereon 
until death, except James, who went west and was never after heard 
from. All married and left descendants, who now occupy these original 
McNitt farms. From the branch herein described springs John McNitt, 
perhaps the eldest of the brothers, who married Mary Brown, of Cum- 
berland Valley, Pennsylvania, and left sons, including: i. John, who 
served with Commodore Perry in the war of 1812 and was engaged in 
the memorable battle on Lake Erie. A medal awarded him by Congress 
is now in the possession of the family. He died in Illinois, without leav- 
ing any children. 2. Robert, married Sarah Glasgow. 3. Alexander 
Brown, of whom further. John (i) McNitt and his sons were men 
of strength and endurance and lived lives of toil and hardship, as is 
ever the pioneer's lot, but did their full share in establishing an orderly 
community. They helped erect schools, churches and other evidences 
of a civilized people and at death bequeathed an honored name to their 
posterity. 

(II) Alexander Brown, son of John McNitt, inherited the old home- 
stead, upon which, after 1800, he erected a substantial stone dwelling 
that is yet used as a residence by his descendants. He was an industrious, 
prosperous farmer, and bore his part in subduing the forest and bringing 
prosperity to his section. He married Nancy Sterrett, born in Armagh 
township, daughter of David and Elizabeth Hannah Sterrett. Children : 
I. Elizabeth Hannah, married Samuel Sharp and moved to Logansport, 
Indiana, where both died. 2. Mary Jane, married John McNitt, son of 
her uncle Robert McNitt and his wife Sarah Glasgow. They lived and 
died on the homestead he settled upon, near Salem Church. 3. Sarah, 
married Robert Ross and lived at Spring Mills, Center county, where 
both died. 4. Brown, married Vesta Marston, lived and died on a farm, 
adjoining his father's, now owned by his son John A. McNitt. 5. Mar- 
garet Glass, married Samuel I. Mitchell and both died on their farm 
near Vira, now owned by their son John Mitchell. 6. John (see sketch 
below). 7. David Sterrett, made his home with his brother John and 
there died; unmarried. 8. Agnes, married Sterrett Cummins and both 
died in Stone Valley, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. 9. Catherine 
Ann, married Robert Cummins, lived in Stone Valley, but died in Reeds- 
ville. 10. Martha, married John i\Iitchell. and lives in Dry Valley, the 



THE NEW YORK 

PUBUC UBRARY 



MTOn, LtMVK MM 




^<l^M^7u:^^ 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 665 

only survivor of this family of eleven. 11. Alexander Brown, of whom 
further. 

(Ill) Alexander Brown (2), youngest child of Alexander Brown 
(i) and Nancy (Sterrett) McNitt, was born in the stone house on the 
homestead erected by his father in Armagh township, ]\Iifflin county, 
Pennsylvania, November 28, 1S37, and died August 30, 1900, in Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. He obtained his education in the public schools 
of the township and became a prosperous farmer. After the death of 
his father he bought out the other heirs and became sole owner of the 
homestead to which he added materially by the purchase of adjoining 
acres. He also owned other lands in the township and had considerable 
real estate in Center county. He was a thoroughly upright and capable 
business man, but steadily refused all offers to enter into large business 
enterprises, always remaining a farmer and conducted all his business 
alone. He was noted for his honorable, upright dealing and was held 
in highest esteem. He was a Republican in politics, but beyond local 
offices, had no desire for public life, and although a devoted, active 
member of the East Kishacoquillas and later ]\Iilroy Presbyterian 
Church, would not accejit the office of elder, modestly asserting he did 
not think he was a suitable person to hold that position. He married, 
December 21, 1865, Sarah Reed, who survives him (see Reed line). 
Children: i. Abner. died aged three years. 2. David Sterrett (see 
sketch following). 3. Nancy Margaret, resides with her mother. 4. 
Andrew Reed, graduate of Bucknell L'niversity, class of 1891, and of 
Princeton University, class of 1895, department of electric engineering, 
now a lumberman, residing in Bellefonte, Pennsylvania : unmarried. 
5. Rhoda McKinney, educated at Bucknell University, resides with her 
mother. 6. Alexander Brown, died in infancy. 7. Alexander Brown, 
educated at i\lillersville State Normal school and now resides on the 
old homestead. He married Edna Elizabeth Close and has : Eleanor 
Frances, Catherine, Elizabeth, Alexander Brown and Anna Grace. 8. 
Mary Taylor, educated at Millersville State Normal School, married 
Rev. William E. Steckel, a minister of the Presbyterian church and re- 
sides in Doylestown, Pennsylvania ; child : Sarah Elizabeth. 9. Oglebv 
James, educated at Bucknell L'niversity, now a quarry operator and 
resides with his mother in Reedsville, Pennsylvania; unmarried. 10. 
Robert Cummins, educated at Norristown (Pennsylvania) Academv and 



666 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

J'ierce Business College, at Philadelphia, resides at home and is engaged 
in lumbering enterprises in ^Maryland ; unmarried. ii. John Reed, 

died in infancy. 

In 1906 Mrs. Sarah (Reed). McNitt, with her unmarried children, 
moved to Reedsville, Pennsylvania, where she erected a substantial brick 
residence on Alain street, which is now her home. This residence stands 
on land which was sold by her father, Abner Reed, in 1839 and after a 
lapse of sixty-seven years returned to his daughter. Mrs. McNitt and 
her daughters arc memljers of the Milroy Presbyterian Church. 

(The Reed Line). 
The coming of the Reed family to Juniata Valley was coincident with 
that of the McNitts, 1755, although the American ancestor, James Reed, 
first visited the valley in 1751, but did not long remain. James Reed, of 
Scotch ancestry and perhaps born in Scotland, came to the Kishacoquillas 
valley about 1751, and about one year later he was accompanied by his 
half-brother William Brown, who held a commission as justice of the 
peace from the English crown. They are said to have been the first 
white settlers in the valley, which they thoroughly explored before 
choosing a location and fixing a permanent residence. He met the 
famous Indian chief. Logan, at a point now known as Logan Spring. 
about one mile north of Reedsville. and formed a lasting friendship. 
James Reed returned eastward in the fall, locating at Carlisle, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he married Jane Ogleby and the following spring returned 
to the Kishacoquillas valley, where their son James was born during 
the summer, the first white child born in the valley. William Brown. 
who afterward became Judge Brown, gave his name to Brown town- 
shij). in which James Reed took up government land with others. The 
Indians gave signs of hostility toward the few whites in the valley and. 
acting on the advice of Chief Logan. James Reed and others returned 
to Carlisle, remaining there until 1755. when he returned to the valley 
and had land patented to him in Brown township in 1755. consisting of 
live hundred acres, on which the town of Reedsville now stands. He 
cleared and improved his land, but always lived in Reedsville, his home 
being about in the center of the present town. He was one of the 
signers to a call lUr the first church built in the valley, now known as 
East Kisliaco(iuillas Presbyterian Church. The first church was built 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 667 

of logs and at the early services held there the men came armed with 
their rifles, as the Indians were still hostile. The log church was suc- 
ceeded by one built of stone, then one of brick and finally the congrega- 
tion built in Reedsville, where the church is now located. In all the 
plans for improvement and upbuilding his community, James Reed bore 
a prominent part and his long life of eighty years was filled with good 
deeds. He died in 1803, and is buried in Church Hill Cemetery. Chil- 
dren: I. James, the first white child born in the Kishacoquillas valley, 
lived and died near Reedsville, a farmer. He married Nancy Milroy. 
2. Mary, married John Thompson and died in New York. 3. W'illiam. 
married Abigail Kerr and died in Ohio. 4. Sarah, married Henry 
Steely, and both spent their lives on their farm at the east end of the 
valley. 5. Thomas, moved to New York state, where he died. He 
married Margaret Van Houten. 6. Andrew, married Hannah Conklin 
and also died in New York. 7. Alexander, lived and died in Reedsville, 
as did his wife Jane. 8. John, died in infancy. 9. Joseph, died in Reeds- 
ville after 1840, aged twenty-seven years; unmarried. 10. John, died 
aged thirty-four years ; made his home with his brother Abner. 1 1. Jane, 
died young. 12. Abner, of whom further. 

(II) Abner, twelfth child of James and Jane (Ogleby) Reed, was 
born October i, 1787, died October 13, 1855. He was educated in the 
public schools, which then existed in his neighborhood and passed his 
entire active years engaged in agriculture. He became possessed of a 
large amount of improved and unimproved land and to the development 
of his estate he devoted his life. He lived in Reedsville many years, but 
spent the last ten years of his life on his back mountain farm. Both he 
and his wife were devoted Presbyterians and liberal supporters of the 
East Kishacoquillas Church. He married (first) Rebecca Henry Brown, 
who died in 1826. leaving three children: i. Joseph, died in 1861. 2. 
Nancy Margaret, married Abner Thompson and had children : Mary, 
John, Ella, Walter and Edward. 3. Alexander, a farmer, married Mary 
L. Taylor, lived and died in Reedsville. Abner Reed married (second) 
Rhoda, daughter of John and Mary (Taylor) McKinney, and widow of 
John Brown. By her first husband she had a son who died in infancy 
and a daughter Mary (Polly) Ann Brown, who married Samuel W. 
Taylor and had a daughter, Rhoda McKinney Taylor. After being 
widowed a second time Mrs. Rhoda ( McKinney-Brown ) Reed lived 



668 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

with her children until her death in 1877, at the home of her daughter, 
Mrs. "Polly" Ann Taylor. Children of Abner Reed and his second wife : 
I. John, now president of the Reedsville National Bank and of the 
Farmer •$ National Bank of Belleville. He married Elizabeth Taylor; 
children: Henry Taylor and Rhoda M. 2. Andrew, graduate of Dart- 
mouth College, a lawyer of Lewistown until his death at the home of 
his sister, Rebecca; unmarried. 3. Ogleby James, a farmer of part of 
the homestead until his death in Reedsville. He married Agnes Jane 
Cummins; children: John Milton, Mary Brown, Anna Cummins and 
James Andrew. 4. Rebecca Jane, died on shipboard en route from Japan 
to America and is buried in Reedsville. She married John (2) Hayes, 
of Brown township; children: Jane A., died young; Rhoda M., John 
Francis, A. Reed and Anna W. 5. Sarah, of previous mention, educated 
in the public schools, Ercildoun Seminary, at Coatesville, Pennsylvania, 
and Kishacocjuillas Seminary. She married Alexander Brown McNitt, 
whom she survives, a resident of Reedsville (see iMcNitt III). 



(Ill) John McNitt, son and sixth child of Alexander 
McNITT Brown McNitt (q. v.) and Nancy (Sterrett) McNitt, was 
born at Siglerville, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, February 
7, 1824, died near Reedsville, Pennsylvania, December 9, 1900. He was 
educated in the public schools near Siglerville and grew to manhood at 
the home farm. After his marriage he purchased a farm of two hundred 
acres in Brown township, Mifflin county, near Reedsville, where his 
after life was spent. He was an energetic, capable business man, a 
worthy descendant of his Scotch paternal ancestor, John (i) McNitt, 
the founder of this branch of the McNitt family in the Kishacoquillas 
valley. Both he and his wife were members of the East Kishacoquillas 
Presbyterian Church, and in political faith he was a Republican, hold- 
ing several township offices. Fle married in December, 1858, Nancy 
Martha Cuniniings, born February 19, 1837, died November 18, 1907. 
Slie was the daughter of Colonel William Cummings, an old resident of 
the Kishacoquillas valley, whose farm was near the center of the vallev. 
The Cummings family descends from William (i) Cummings. of 
Scotch-Irish i)arentage, who came to America during the latter part of 
the eighteenth century, settling first in Lancaster county and later came 
to MifHin county, where he purchased three hundred and sixtv-four acres, 



'''HE NEwTorT 

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HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 669 



b 



on which he built a cooper shop and followed his trade. Both he and hi 
wife Sarah died on the farm. They had children: James, Robert, 
Charles. Margaret, William and David, the latter of whom died 
young. 

Col. William Cummings was a prominent farmer, a very religious 
man and a leader in the Seceder Church. 

Children of John and Nancy Martha (Cummings) McNitt: i. 
Agnes Young, born October 31, 1859, educated in Kishacoquillas 
Seminary, lived many years on the home farm and now resides on 
Walnut street, Reedsville, Pennsylvania. 2. William Alexander, 
born June 12, 1861, a farmer and stock raiser at Cedar Hill. He 
married Margaret Utts, born January 5, 1865; children: i. Plum- 
mer Elder, born March 23, 1883, married Mary Heim. ii. June 
Estella, born June 15, 1887. iii. Blaine Hampson, December i, 1889. 
iv. Helen Cummings, September 22, 1892, married Banks Seiber. v. 
Hazel Margaret, September 23, 1896. vi. John Stewart, May 27, 1898. 
vii. William, died in infancy. 3. Jane McElheney, born January 7, 1863, 
died May 30, 1865. 4. Martha Alice, born January 26, 1865; married 
Rush Alexander Gibboney, a woolen manufacturer of Cedar Hill. Chil- 
dren : i. Ora Jeannette, born May 2, 1888. ii. An infant, died unnamed, 
iii. Dell Harrison, died in infancy, iv. Stella Webb, May 4, 1891. 5. 
Rhoda Henry, born September 30, 1866, married (first) Foster Taylor, 
who died September 10, 1900; married (second) Daniel Snyder and 
moved to Ohio. Children by first marriage : Mabel Cummings, born 
May 27, 1891 ; Robert Williamson, 1893. 6. Janet McElheney, born De- 
cember 6, 1867, married Wilson Maxwell and resides in Logansport, 
Indiana. 7. Sarah Cummings, born May 15, 1869, resides in Reedsville, 
Pennsylvania. 8. Margaret Mitchell, born January 16, 1871, resides 
with her sisters in Reedsville. 9. David Homer, born June 23, 1872, a 
farmer near the old homestead ; married Rhoda Henry. Children : 
John Henry, born January 9, 1899: Earl Cummings, December 28, 
1901 ; Carver Milliken, October 7, 1910. 10. Laura, born February 25, 
1874, married, February 23, 1898, Dr. Cassius Wilson and resides in 
Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, ri. John Arthur, born October 5, 
1876, a farmer near the McNitt homestead. He married Anna Elizabeth 
Creighton; children: John Creighton, born May 8, 1904; Paul Eugene, 
born March i, 191 1, died November 20, 191 1. 



670 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

(IV) David Sterrett McNitt, second son of Alexander 
McNITT Brown (2) McNitt (q. v.). and Sarah (Reed) McNitt, 
was born near Siglerville, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, 
December 6, 1868, died January 25, 1913, from the resuU of an accident 
at the (juarries of the National Limestone Company, at Shraders, Penn- 
sylvania. He was educated in the public schools, Lewistown Academy 
and new Bloomfield Academy and spent the years preceding his marriage 
engaged in farnnng. After marriage he purchased a farm of two hun- 
dred acres near Siglerville, where he resided for fourteen years. In 1898 
he became interested in the lumber business, operating alone in Mitiflin and 
Center counties and at various points in Central Pennsylvania until 
1902, wlien he admitted his brother, Andrew Reed McNitt, to a partner- 
ship and in 1903, formed with E. M. Huyett, the McNitt, Huyett Lum- 
ber Company, which yet continues, operating chiefly in Center county, 
their own stores, mills and railroads. In 1907 Mr. McNitt moved his 
residence to Lewistown and in 1909 was one of the organizers of the 
Juniata Lumber Company, the firm consisting of H. C. Hower, R. C. 
McNitt and the McNitt, Huyett Lumbe. Company.. The mills and tim- 
ber land of this company being locat^ at Midlothian, Maryland. He 
also became interested in and was a director of the Maryland Lumber 
Company, located at Denmar, Pocahontas county. West Virginia. This 
company owns seventeen thousand acres of timber land and manufac- 
tures one hundred thousand feet of lumber daily, employing two hun- 
dred and twentv-five men. He also was president of the Dana Lumber 
Company of Lombard, Powell county, Kentucky. While his initial en- 
terprises, and perhaps his most important, were connected with the manu- 
facture of lumber, he also acquired important connections with other 
large corporations and firms. He was president of the Lewistown Foun- 
dry & Machine Company; director of the Citizens National Bank of 
Lewistown; director of the Sunbury Bridge Company: the Sunbury 
.\musenient Company; the Sunbury and Selinsgrove Electric Railway 
Company and was largely interested in the National Limestone Com- 
pany witli quarries at Naginey, near Milroy. Although one of the most 
active influential business men of his county, Mr. McNitt was not a man 
of one idea or purpose. He recognized his duties as a citizen and his 
oljligations to his fellow men, neglecting nothing in the way of duty, 
nor the welfare of his communitv. He was chairman of the executive 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 671 

committee of the Lewistown board of trade, an elder and trustee of the 
Lewistovvn Presbyterian church, a teacher in the Sunday school and a 
member of the pubhc morals committee of the Mitfiin County Inter- 
Church Federation. In pohtical faith he was a Republican, but never 
sought public office. He rose to a leading position in the business world 
by honorable, energetic effort and his success was fairly earned. His 
nature was sympathetic and generous, responding to every call from 
those less fortunate than himself, but in a quiet, unostentatious way that 
efifectually concealed his many benefactions. Mr. McNitt was a great 
church worker and when the new church edifice was erected he con- 
tributed very liberally to the fund and in other ways assisted in clearing 
the indebtedness. Viewed from whatever point, the short life of Mr. 
McNitt was a successful one and worthy of emulation. 

David Sterrett McNitt married, December 22, 1892, Catherine Ann 
Cummins, of McAlevys Fort, daughter of Sterrett and Agnes Cummins, 
who survives him. a resident of Lewistown. Sterrett Cummins was a 
son of Robert and Mary (Sterrett) Cummins, and grandson of William 
and Sarah Cummins. William Cummins, of Scotch-Irish ancestry, came 
to this country prior to the year 1800 and settled in Lancaster county, 
Pennsylvania. He was a cooper by trade and after moving to the 
Kishacoquillas valley, followed his trade in connection with farming, 
having a shop on his farm. He prospered and in addition to his home 
farm of three himdred and sixty-four acres owned a large tract in 
Huntingdon county, Jackson township, on which he placed his son Rob- 
ert as manager. Robert Cummins was also a successful farmer and an 
elder of the United Presbyterian church of Jackson township. He died 
May 27, 1858, aged about seventy-three. He married Mary, daughter 
of David Sterrett, who died aged seventy-two years. Children : Rev. 
Cyrus, married Nancy Collins; William David, died young; Samuel, 
died young; James, died aged thirty-two years; Elizabeth, died aged 
twenty-two years; Sarah, married George W. Porter; Samuel, married 
Catherine Smith; Nancy, married John A. Wilson; Sterrett, of previous 
mention, married Agnes McNitt ; Jane, married Ebenezer Magill. Chil- 
dren of Sterrett and Agnes Cummins: Mary Alice, born May 24, 1853 
Nancy Martha, September 17. 1854; Elizabeth Jane, January 22, 1856 
Frances Anna, January 15, 1858; Margaret Magill, August 30, 1859 
Mila McNitt, March 12, 1861 ; Robert Alexander, March 14, 1863 



672 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Sarah Armetta, December 12, 1864; Catherine Ann, December 9, 1868. 
married David Sterrett McNitt; Adolphus McNitt, January 2, 1870: 
Cora, February i, 1871 ; and three children died in infancy. Children 
of David Sterrett and Catherine Ann (Cummins) McNitt: i. Sarah 
Reed, born April 17, 1894, now a student at college in New Wilmington, 
Pennsylvania. 2. Allen Cummins, born October 17, 1895, now a student 
at preparatory school. 3. Alexander Brown, died aged three years. 4- 
Berenice, died aged 20 months. 5. David Sterrett, born December 22, 
1904. 6. Frances Anna, born September 21, 1909. 

The family of Arnolds have long been settled in Penn- 
ARNOLD sylvania. They originalh' came from England, and 

many of the name are widely scattered over the United 
States. Thomas Arnold was among the early land owners in Perry 
county, Pennsylvania. He was born in Perry county, Pennsylvania, 
in 1806. He married Mary Folk, daughter of John Folk, of MifBin 
county: she was born in ^^lifflin county, in 18 10. He eventually moved 
to Mifflin county, where he lived for forty years, dying at the age of 
eighty-three. Among his children was George, of whom further. 

(II) George Arnold, son of Thomas and Mary (Folk) Arnold, was 
born in Perry county in 1836, died in 1898. He married Elizabeth, 
daughter of John Will, who was born in Germany and came to Mifflin 
county, where he died. Elizabeth (Will) Arnold was born in 1847 and 
died in 1889. George Arnold received his education in the common 
schools and was brought up on the farm. He was a Democrat, voting 
with and working for the party; and l>nth he and his wife were devout 
members of the Lutheran church. Children: Isaac; Amanda; Daniel J.. 
of whom further ; John T. ; Anna : Margaret E. ; George H. 

(III) Daniel J., son of George and Elizabeth (Will) Arnold, was 
born October 5. 1867, in Mifflin county. He received his education in 
the common schools. On leaving school he farmed, then turned his 
attention to railroading. In 1889 he secured a position as brakeman on 
the Pennsylvania road. He was made fireman and worked at this for 
some time. In i8g8 he was ])romoted to the engineer's place on the 
locomotive, which he has held ever since. Fie has accumulated quite a 
handsome property by economy and wise investment. In 1903 he built 
a handsome residence at 23 North Grand street, Lewistown, where he 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 673 

now resides. He also built nine other houses, seven of them he still 
owns, including a double one at Lewistown Junction, all of which he 
rents. He is a Democrat and a prominent member of the Brotherhood 
of Locomotive Engineers and Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He 
married, November 7, 1889, Mary Kitting, daughter of John and Mar- 
garet (Yearick) Kitting; she was born April 12, 1872, in Lewistown, 
Pennsylvania. Children: Grace, born October 27, 1890; Ruth. No- 
vember 19, 1893; Grant, March 30, 1895. 

(The Kitting Line). 

Abraham Kitting and his wife, Mary (East) Kitting, were born 
in Reading, Pennsylvania, there grew up, were educated and married. 
After marriage they moved to Lewistown, and he was a painter and 
chairmaker. He established a large chair factory on Valley street, in 
Lewistown. and superintended it until his death in 1892. He was suc- 
cessful in his business ventures and accumulated much property. He 
was a staunch Democrat, and was a member of the city council, and a 
devout member of the Lutheran church. Children : Kate, married John 
A. Loque, now dead; William, married Sallie Mathers, dead; John, of 
whom further; Charles, a cigar manufacturer; Abraham, cigar manu- 
facturer on Chestnut street, married Sophia Bossinger; Mollie, dead, 
married Frank Wearam; Maggie, died unmarried. 

John Kitting, son of Abraham and Mary (East) Kitting, was a 
cabinetmaker and painter; much of his cabinet work is to be found in 
Lewistown to-day, where it is greatly prized because of its beauty of 
finish. He was a Democrat, and a member of the Lutheran church. 
He married Margaret Yearick and to them were born six children : 
Mary, wife of D. J. Arnold (see above); Harry; Annie; Margaret, 
dead ; Elizabeth ; John. 



Benjamin Sharp, of Belleville, Pennsylvania, descends on 
SHARP the paternal side from hardy English, and on the distafif 

side from sturdy German stock — a combination that has 
made great the state of Pennsylvania, and has forged it to the front rank 
in the sisterhood of states of the Union. They were of that important 
class of citizens so necessary to the stability and upbuilding of any 
nation — farmers ; and they have performed their duty well in the main- 



674 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

taining of their section of the country. His forefathers from the first 
immigrant, Benjamin, landing in 1732, were farmers, and he remains 
one to-day. The Sharps for generations have played their part in Penn- 
sylvania, where the original American ancestor migrated after landing. 
They were detailed to watch the Indians, and were appointed to garrison 
duty; a Sharp was in the war of the English against the French, and 
there were many of them in the revolutionary war. Taken all in all it is 
a fine record for an American family to have. 

(I) Peter Sharp is the first of the immediate family of whom there 
is any definite record. He was born about 1752, and enlisted in the Con- 
tinental army in 1776. He was in many battles, and was at Valley 

Forge with Washington. He married Gertrude , probably of 

German descent, as several of the children bore German names, notably 
that of Christian. They settled at Back Mountain, where he was a 
small farmer. He took up wild land, cleared and tilled it, and built 
thereon a substantial house of logs, and there reared a large family 
under many difiiculties. The Indians were still troublesome and he was 
away from home in the war for years, during which time his heroic 
wife and small sons carried on the farm, provided for the family, and 
gave assistance to less fortunate neighbors and contributed to the revo- 
lutionary cause. He was a good, honest, upright man, and a patriot. 
He was highly esteemed by his neighbors. Among his sons was Chris- 
tian, of whom further. 

(II) Christian Sharp, son of Peter and Gertrude Sharp, was born 
at Back Mountain, in an humble log house. His father, as has been 
said, was of English descent, and his mother German, for reasons given 
above, the specific one being his own name. He received the minimum 
of education at the district school that was held only three months in 
the year, and if the parents of the children were hurried with the work 
of the farm, dairy or house, the children remained away to assist. 
Naturally his education was limited. He married Magdalena, daughter 
of Jacob and Catherine Zook, old time German settlers at Front Moun- 
tain. They were both members of the Amish Mennonite church at 
Front Mountain. Jacob Zook was a wealthy farmer, and lived and died 
at Front Mountain, where his large family of children grew to adult 
age. Christian Sharp owned twenty acres of highly productive land in 
Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, and there lived and died. He was a 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 675 

weaver by trade and kept a shop during middle age. He was an ardent 
Republican, and though working indefatigably for the ticket he never 
aspired to office. With his wife he was a member of the Amish Men- 
nonite church. He died about 1866, and his wife survived him until 
1900. Children: i. Benjamin, of whom further. 2. Catherine, mar- 
ried Samuel Gluck ; lives in Belleville. 3. Gideon, deceased. 4. Barbara, 
deceased; married Christian Kanagy. 5. Jacob, deceased. 6. Christian, 
lives in Milroy, Pennsylvania. 

(Ill) Benjamin Sharp, son of Christian and Magdalena (Zook) 
Sharp, was born at Front Mountain, January 28. 1844. He was edu- 
cated in the schools of the home township and at Ore Bank school. He 
was reared on the farm of his father and remained with him on the 
farm after leaving school until he was grown. In February, 1872, he 
married Barbara E. Peachey, daughter of Jacob Peachey, a farmer and 
old resident of the county. After marriage he purchased a farm of 
eighty acres in L'nion township, liut later sold fourteen acres. He lived 
there until 1904, when he erected a pretty home in Belleville, or "Mid- 
dletown", as it is called, and has remained there since. He does a 
general and successful farming. In politics he is a staunch Republican, 
always voting the straight ticket, but has never aspired to nor held an 
office. He and his wife are members of the Peachey church, giving 
generously toward its support. Children: i. Died in infancy. 2. Reu- 
ben, died aged four and a half years. 3. Annie, died aged twenty-one, 
of consumption. 



Christian D. Druckenmiller, of Lewistown 
DRUCKENMILLER Junction, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, is an 

able representative of a thrifty American 
family of Pennsylvania. The family is a well known one in Center 
county ; for centuries it has lived near the Rhine, in Germany, and there 
many of its members still make their home. 

(I) Peter Druckenmiller, the progenitor of the Druckenmiller fam- 
ily of Pennsylvania, was born in Center county and came to Snyder 
county while yet a youth, about 1800. Later he located in Center county. 
His wife, Katie Eddinger, was born in this county and there grew up. 
Her parents were of German origin, and were the second generation in 
America. Peter married Katie Eddinger in Center county, moved to 



6/6 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Snyder county, and by dint of economy and thrift succeeded, with the aid 
of his wife, in saving enough to buy a farm, on which they Hved and 
eventually died. Both were members of the German Lutheran church. 
Children: i. Michael. 2. John, killed while serving in the civil war, as 
was also Peter. 3. Peter. 4. Harvey. 5. Katie. 6. Adaline. 7. Jere- 
miah. All but Michael born in Snyder county. 

(II) Michael, first son of Peter and Katie (Eddinger) Druckenmil- 
ler, was born in 1834 in Center county, and is living in Mifflin county, 
Decatur township. He received his meager education in the schools of 
the township, and on leaving school he engaged in the blacksmith's 
trade, and established a smithy near his home in Decatur township. He 
is one of the best known and most thoroughly useful men in that part 
of the county, and is highly respected. He is a Democrat, voting 
the straight ticket, taking in it an active interest, even in his late years. 
He attends the Lutheran church with his wife and family. He mar- 
ried Rosana Frane, born April 12, 1836, in Mifflin county, a daughter 
of Christian Frane, who was born in Dauphin county, and came with 
his wife, Catharine Bishop, also born in Dauphin county, to Mifflin 
county about 181 2, and located in Decatur township, where he was for 
many years a farmer and land owner. He died at the age of ninety, 
while his wife died while yet a }-oung woman. He married (second) 
Betsy Hunt, widow of John Hunt. Children of Christian Frane by first 
marriage: i. Anna, married George Reigle, a farmer in Decatur town- 
ship. 2. Rosana, married Michael Druckenmiller. 3. George, a farmer 
in Decatur township, and a soldier in the civil war : married Liba \\^ide- 
meyer. Children of Michael and Rosana (Frane) Druckenmiller: i. 
Christian D., of whom further. 2. Matthew George, born February 7, 
1858, a workman in Burnham; married Nettie Yetter. 3. William, born 
July I, 1859. a farmer in Derry township: married Maggie Marx. 4. 
Peter Franklin, born December 5, 1862; a farmer in Decatur township; 
married Sarah Knepp. 5. Margaret, born April 12, 1865: married 
Kirkland Stump, a railway employee. 

(III) C"hristian D., eldest son of Michael and Rosana (Frane) 
Druckenmiller. was born Feliruary 16, 1856, in Snyder county, Pennsvl- 
vania. He received his limited education, such as was afforded by the 
school facilities of that day, in the township, leaving it at an early age 
to enter the arena of life as a farmer. At first he worked as a laborer, 



HISTORY OF THE JUXIATA VALLEY 677 

gradually rising until he owned his own farm, and at the present time 
has a valuable body of land, consisting of two hundred and seventy-six 
acres, under a high state of cultivation. He followed farming for six 
year, after which time he moved to Lewistown Junction and became a 
trusted employee of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, until 1906 
when he accepted a position with the Jackson Supply Company. He 
has invested his earnings in four houses and lots at the Junction, one of 
which he occupies, renting the other three. Like his father before him, 
he is a staunch Democrat, supporting the party on all occasions. He is 
a member of the fraternal organization, the Owls, of Lewistown, in 
which he stands high. He has been employed by various corporations 
since reaching adult age and after giving up farming. He married, 
February 21, 1884, Amanda Arnold, born in Mifflin county, April 12, 
1866, a daughter of George and Elizabeth (Wills) Arnold, of a family 
long established in that part of the state. To Mr. and Mrs. Druckenmil- 
ler were born: i. Jay William, born June 23. 1889: a steel molder at 
the Standard Steel \\'orks. He is a Democrat and is a member of the 
Fraternal Order of Eagles and of the Owls, both lodges located in 
Lewistown. He married, August 5, 1910, Mary E. Brown, daughter of 
James and Clara Brown. They have one child, Ruth \^, born July 6, 
191 1. 2. Anna Margaret, born July 8, 1891 : educated in the public 
schools; unmarried. 3. Christian D. Jr., born July 10, 1894. 4. Russel, 
born March 3, 1900. 



The Mussers are of Swiss-German descent and came to 
MUSSER the Juniata Valley from Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. 

Their first settlement was in what is now Perry county, 
where the father, Samuel Musser, of Burnham, was born. 

( I ) William Musser was born in Perry county, Pennsylvania, Janu- 
ary 31, 1800. He grew to manhood in his native county, and there 
learned the miller's trade. In 1825 he moved to Spring Mills, Center 
county, Pennsylvania, where he operated a mill, and prior to 1845 moved 
to Jackson township, Huntingdon county, where he owned and cultivated 
a farm, also owned and operated a grist mill at McAlevy's Fort until his 
death in 1866. He and his wife were members of the Methodist Epi.s- 
copal church. He married Eliza E. Mayes, born in Dauphin county, 
Pennsylvania, in March, 1807, died 1885. Children: Elias, Mary Ann, 



678 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Sarah, Ellen and Elizabeth, all deceased; Samuel, of whom further; Cor- 
dilla, living: Nancy Jane and Mahala, both deceased; James Hall, a 
veteran of the civil war, serving in the Forty-fifth Regiment, Volunteer 
Infantry, now an attorney of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania; John Bush, 
killed in 1864 in the six days' fight in the battles of the Wilderness, a 
private of the One Hundred and Tenth Regiment Pennsylvania Volun- 
teer Infantry. 

(IT) Samuel, son of William and Eliza E. (Mayes) Musser, was 
born in Jackson township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, December 
II, 1835. He attended the public school of the township, and later 
learned the trade of millwright, which he followed for many years in 
the counties of the Juniata Valley. In 1859 he erected a mill for Jere- 
miah Yeager at Freedom Forge, near what is now Burnham, and in 
18S2 returned to that neighborhood and purchased the Isaac Price farm, 
on which Burnham partly is built. He sold twenty-two acres of his farm 
to the Burnham Land Improvement Company, and has also disposed of 
many building lots to private individuals. A part of the farm is also 
within the limits of Birch Hill cemetery. Mr. Musser is a director of 
the Lewistown Trust Company and also interested in the Reedsville 
National Bank. He has been very successful and has real estate interests 
other than those mentioned. He is interested in farming and stock 
raising, and is rated as one of the enterprising and substantial men of 
his town. He is a Republican in politics, and an ardent temperance 
advocate. He was the "No License Candidate" for associate judge of 
Mifflin county in one campaign and only failed of an election by sixty 
votes. He helped create the anti-liquor sentiment that in igo8 placed 
Mifflin county in the "No License" column which gives him more satis- 
faction than holding office. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias, 
the Patriotic Order Sons of America and of the temperance societies of 
the county. 

He married, July 4, 1865, Harriet Amanda Creighton, born near 
Burnham, daughter of William Creighton, an early settler of Mifflin 
county, and an influential citizen, who died in 1891. Two of his sons. 
Rev. Abraham and Rev. Samuel Creighton, are prominent ministers of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. Children: (i) James Ira, of whom 
further; (2) Scwell Asbury, now a merchant of Harrisburg, Pennsyl- 
vania; (3) Frank M., a pharmacist with the Millard Drug Company of 





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lUU^-^-t^ 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 679 

Philadelphia; (4) William C, his father's business assistant; (5) Mary, 
deceased; (6) An infant daughter, died unnamed. The mother of these 
children died June 6, 1901. 

(Ill) James Ira, son of Samuel and Harriet Amanda (Creighton) 
Musser, was born in Yeagertown, Pennsylvania, June 6, 1866. He was 
educated in public schools and Bloomfield Academy. For about two 
years he was connected with William Mann, Jr., & Company, and in 
1885 became an employee of the Standard Steel Works, in a clerical 
capacity, continuing until the present time (1913). He is a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, and a Republican in politics. He is a 
member of Lewiston Lodge, No. 203, Free and Accepted Masons; Lew- 
iston Chapter, No. 186, Royal Arch Masons; Lewiston Commandery, 
No. 26, Knights Templar; Harrisburg Consistory, Ancient Accepted 
Scottish Rite. 

He married, August 22, 1889, Minnie E. Lewis, of Burnham, Penn- 
sylvania, daughter of George W. and Mary (Ott) Lewis, the former 
deceased and the latter now living; Mr. Lewis was one of the organ- 
izers of the Logan Iron and Steel Company, connected with it for many 
years. Child of Mr. and Mrs. Musser: Lewis J. 



This family came to the Juniata Valley in 181 3 from 
SIEBER Berks county, Pennsylvania, where Christian Sieber was 

born in 1801. He came to Juniata county with his par- 
ents in 1813, and became a well-to-do farmer of Fermanagh township, 
owning two hundred acres of good land. He married and had issue : 
Christian, John, Samuel, Jonas, of whom further; Solomon, Daniel, 
Abraham, David, married Mary Elizabeth Witmer; William, Joseph. 
Mary, Catherine and Elizabeth. These children all married and had 
families ranging in size from two to thirteen. 

(II) Jonas, fourth son of Christian Sieber, was born in Fermanagh 
township, Juniata county, Pennsylvania, and died in Walker township, 
in the same county. He owned a farm of one hundred acres in Walker 
township, there married, lived and died. Both he and his wife were 
members of the Baptist church. He married (first) Lydia Funk, also 
born in Juniata county, died in Walker township. Children: Samuel 
Funk, of whom further; William, now living in Missouri; Lucien, last 
known to have been living in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, a butcher; 



68o HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Sarah, married Peter Mertz, moved to Indiana, where both died. Jonas 
Sieber married (second) Barbara Kauffman. Children: Gideon, now a 
farmer of Juniata county; EHzabeth, married Edward Beaver and lives 
in Foutzs Valley; Mary, married a Mr. McCauley and moved west; 
Eliza, married Samuel Click and lives in Walker township; Cora, died 
in 1907, married George Heckman. 

(Ill) Samuel Funk, eldest son of Jonas Sieber and his first wife, 
Lydia (Funk) Sieber, was born in Walker township, Juniata county, 
Pennsylvania, November 16, 1834. He was educated in the public 
schools and grew to manhood at the home farm. After his marriage, in 
1862, he bought a farm of one hundred and fifty acres in his native 
township, which he cultivated successfully until i8y8, when he moved 
to Van Wert, where he resided until his death in August, 1909. He was 
a Republican in politics, serving Walker township as school director. 
Both he and his wife were members of the Presbyterian church. He 
married, February 13, 1862, Susanna Miller, born in Snyder county, 
Pennsylvania, who survives him, a resident of Van Wert, making her 
home with her daughter Nora. She is a member of the Baptist church 
and a lady greatly beloved by all who know her. Children : i. Clara, mar- 
ried John Breniser and resides in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania ; 
children : Ruth, Clarence and Martha. 2. Emma, married Horace G. 
Gaston and resides in Webb City, Missouri; children: Paul and Richard. 
3. Nora, married A. J. Sausman and resides at the old home in Van 
AVert, with her widowed mother; no issue. 4. Annie, married George 
Cisney and resides in Brooklyn, New York; children: Samuel Homer, 
Harold and Lenore ; Samuel Homer died in boyhood. 

Mrs. Susanna (Miller) Sieber is a granddaughter of George and 
Barbara (Manbeck) Miller, both born in Snyder county, Pennsylvania. 
After their marriage they moved to Locust Run, Juniata county, where 
George Miller was a merchant and farmer, and where both died. Isaac, 
son of George and Barbara Miller, was born in Snyder county, Penn- 
sylvania. He there resided until two years after his marriage, when he 
moved to Walker township, Juniata county, where he engaged in farm- 
ing until his death at the age of thirty-five years. Both he and his wife 
were members of the Lutheran church. He married Margaret Benfer, 
daughter of Daniel and Susanna Benfer, old residents of Snyder county, 
where Daniel Benfer owned and operated a mill. Mrs. Margaret (Ben- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 68i 

fer) Miller survived her husband, remarried, and died in 1909, aged 
eighty-five years. Children of Isaac and Margaret Miller: Susanna, the 
widow of Samuel Funk Sieber; Delilah, married Harrison Crist and 
died in Ohio; Henry, now living near Mexico, Pennsylvania, a carpenter; 
Mary, widow of James Weaver; Ellen, married Frank Myers and re- 
sides in Ohio; Isaac, now a farmer of Walker township. 



The father of Edwin Cross of Lewistown, Pennsylvania, 
CROSS was born in Lancashire, England, where he died in 1869 at 

the youthful age of thirty-four years. In 1881 his widow, 
Mary (Allan) Cross, also born in Lancashire, came to the United States 
with her son Edwin, but in 1886 she returned to England, where she died 
in 1906, aged seventy years. James Cross was a leather merchant, lo- 
cated at Manchester, England, where he was well established in a good 
business until his early death. Children: Henry, now of Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania; Hannah, residing in England; Edwin, of whom further; 
Charles, residing in England. 

(II) Edwin, son of James and Mary (Allan) Cross, was born in 
Manchester, England, January 21, 1865. He attended the public and 
technical schools of Ramsbottom, Lancashire, and in 1881 came to the 
United States, accompanied by his widowed mother. He located in New 
York, where he began an apprenticeship in a foundry, working in New 
York and Philadelphia several years, then going to England, where he 
finished his trade, becoming an expert workman, and thoroughly familiar 
with foundry details. He then returned to the United States, locating 
in Philadelphia, where he worked for the Chambers Brothers a numljer 
of years, then for a time worked in a foundry at Chester, Pennsylvania. 
He then moved to High Bridge, New Jersey, where he was engaged in 
steel manufacture. In 1898 he located in Lewistown, and for ten years 
was in charge of the foundries of the Standard Steel Works at Burn- 
ham. In 1908 he formed a connection with the Mount Rock Foundry 
and Machine Company, which was later merged with the Lewistown 
Foundry and Machine Company, and of the reorganized company Mr. 
Cross is general manager. His long and intimate connection with the 
foundry and steel business has given him valuable experience and ren- 
ders him particularly useful in capably managing this important trust. 
In politics he is a Republican, and is a popular member of the fraternal 



682 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

societies of Lewistown. He is a member of Levvistown Lodge, No. 203, 
Free and Accepted Masons; Lewistown Chapter, No. 186, Royal Arch 
Masons ; Lewistown Commandery, No. 26, Knights Templar ; the Royal 
Arcanum; Lewistown Lodge, No. 97, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows ; and the Modern Woodmen of America. 

Edwin Cross married, in 1888, Emma Redfern, in Ramsbottom, 
England, died in Lewistown, February 20, 1912. Children: Jane and 
Annie. 



The first LTtts of record in this branch was Wilson S. Utts, 
UTTS who came when a young man to Belleville, Mifflin county. 

The name is no doubt a form of the German Utz, but in its 
present spelling LUts has existed for at least three generations. Wilson 
S. Utts, born in 1822, died in 1871. He worked at the tinning business 
in Belleville, later erected a building and established a hardware store, 
which he successfully conducted. He married Margaret Hampson, born 
in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, in 1826, died in Belleville in 1871. 
Hampson S., son of Wilson S. and Margaret (Hampson) Utts, was 
born in Belleville, January 27, 1848, died March 28, 1912. He was 
educated in the public schools and on arriving at a suitable age learned 
the tinner's trade, working with his father until the death of the latter 
in 1 87 1. He then succeeded to the hardware and tinning business, 
founded by his father, at first with his mother, but later alone, and most 
successfully conducted it until 1905, when he sold out to his brother, 
Wilson S. Utts, Jr., who now owns and operates the business, which has 
been in the family for over sixty years at the same stand. Hampson S. 
Utts was careful and conservative as a business man, upright in all his 
dealings, and although handicapped from his fourteenth year by entire 
deafness, was one of the successful men of his town, living- during his 
last seven years retired from all business in the home on Main street, 
now the residence of his widow. In politics he was a Democrat, and 
both he and his wife were communicants of the Lutheran church. 

Hampson S. Utts married in December, 1874, Ellie E. Smith, born 
in Mechanicsville, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, January 4, 1852, who 
survives him, a resident of Belleville. She is the daughter of George 
and Maria (Haffley) Smith; he was born in Center county, January 25, 
1826, coming to Mifflin county when a boy with his widowed mother, 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 68:5 

Elizabeth (Hubler) Smith. He learned the carpenter's trade and chair- 
maker's trade with his stepfather, John Klepper. George Smith died 
July 5, 1886. His wife, Maria Haffley, was born in Mifflin county, 
April 7, 1831, died September 6, 1872; children: Ellie E., of previous 
mention, widow of Hampson S. Utts ; Joseph Haffley, Laura A., Lavanda 
Irene, Mary Jane, John C, Sarah Margaret, Samuel George and Jessie 
Adams. Children of Hampson S. and Ellie E. Utts: i. Mabel Clare, 
born November 19, 1875, died in 1880. 2. Cora Maud, born October 24, 
1881, educated in the public school, Irving College and Susquehanna 
University; she taught two years prior to her marriage, February 24, 
1903, to Jesse Cloyd Horton, son of Isaac Horton; children: Jesse Ell- 
wood, born September 10, 1904, and Harold Hampson, born March 9, 
1908. 3. Son, born November 9, 1887, died unnamed. 4. George Wil- 
son, born March 6, 1894, graduate of Belleville High School, class of 
1912. 



The Shatsers came to Lewistown from Franklin 
SHATSER county, Pennsylvania, where David Shatser was born 

in July, 1812, and lived until about 1892. He lived for 
a time in Center county, then settled in Lewistown, where he worked at 
his two trades, carpenter and shoemaker. He was first a carpenter, but 
while working on the Presbyterian church fell and so injured himself 
that he was obliged to select a trade requiring less activity. He then 
turned his attention to shoemaking, following that occupation for many 
years; he died in 1892. He resided in the si.xth ward of Lewistown from 
1870 to 1892. In earlier life a Whig, he entered the Republican party 
at its formation and always remained an ardent supporter of that politi- 
cal organization. In religious faith he was a Lutheran. He married 
Mary, daughter of Nicholas Gross, an early settler of Franklin count\-, 
who died in Center county, Pennsylvania, in 1863. Children: E.xann, 
Amos Alexander, Richard, of whom further: David, a veteran of the 
civil war, died in a soldiers' home ; Frederick Galvin, John Henry and 
Thomas W. 

(11) Richard, son of David and Mary (Gross) Shatser, was born 
in Center county, Pennsylvania, October 12, 1844. He attended the 
public schools and when his parents came to Lewistown remained three 
years with his grandfather, Nicholas Gross, later joining the family in 



684 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Lewistown. In I^'ebriiary, 1862, being then in his eighteenth year, he 
enhsted in Company F, One Hundred and Seventh Regiment Pennsyl- 
vania Vohmteer Infantry, commanded by Colonel McCoy, serving with 
the Army of the Potomac until August 19, 1864, when he was captured 
by the Confederates and sent to Libby Prison in Richmond, Virginia. 
Later he was sent to Belle Isle, thence to Salisbury, North Carolina, 
where he was confined until the latter part of February, 1865, when he 
was released and came home on furlough in March, 1865; at Annapolis, 
Maryland, he joined his regiment in May, remaining until July 13, 1865. 
He then entered the employ of the Glay-Morgan Iron Company, with 
whom he remained twenty years; and in 1890 he was employed in the 
treasury department at Washington, D. C, where he remained three 
years. He is now private watchman for George L. Russell, a position he 
held with Mr. Russell's father, before the war, in the same bank, and 
has been so engaged since 1894. He is a Republican in politics, has 
served as borough councilman, and for the past fifteen years has served 
on the local board of health. He has always been interested in the work 
of the borough fire department and rendered efficient service in raising 
funds to erect the building now occupied by Brooklyn Hose Company, 
No. 3. He is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic and in all 
things a consistent, useful citizen. 

He married, in 1867, Mary Ellen Coffman, born in Derry township, 
Mifflin county, died in 1882, daughter of Eunie Coffman. .\fter his 
marriage Mr. Shatser moved to the si.xth ward, where he yet resides. 
Children: i. Harry, married Rosa dinger and has a daughter Cath- 
erine. 2. Bertha, married John Riden, whom she survive-; children: 
Mary, Richard, May, Anneta, Marion, Edna and Lillian. 3. Amos A., 
married Mamie Carl and has : leannette, Marion and Amos Richard. 



The Reeds of Reedsville, Pennsylvania, are of Scotch an- 
REED cestry, James Reed, the first of the family, settling near 
Carlisle, Pennsylvania, before coming to Mifflin county. 
About the year 1751 he came with his half-brother, William Brown, a 
justice of the peace under the King. They thoroughly investigated each 
part of the Kishacoquillas Valley before choosing a location in what is 
now Brown township, Mifflin county. While in the Valley, Mr. Brown 
was drinking at the later well-known "Logan Spring" when the famous 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 685 

Indian Chief Logan suddenly appeared. Brown at once prepared to 
fight, but Logan extended his hand in friendship and an acquaintance 
was there begun that was lasting and of great value to the two young 
pioneers, probably the first settlers in that valley. On this visit James 
Reed selected land that was later patented to him and on which Reeds- 
ville now stands. In the fall the young men returned to Carlisle, where 
James Reed married during the following winter Jane Ogleby. In the 
spring he came with his bride to the Kishacoquillas Valley, and built a 
log cabin, in which his son James, the first white child born in the valley, 
first saw the light. He cleared and improved his land, his home being 
at what is now about the center of the village of Reedsville. He was a 
Presbyterian and signed a call for the first church built in the valley and 
helped to build the first log church in which was formed the East Kish- 
acoquillas Presbyterian Church, now located in a handsome church in 
Reedsville, but the first church standing on a hill three-quarters of a 
mile away. 

The Indians were still troublesome, and at the early services held in 
the log house James Reed and the other men always carried their rifles. 
Mr. Reed became a prosperous land owner and farmer and bore a 
prominent part in all the undertakings for the settlement and develop- 
ment of Reedsville, named in his honor. Pie died in 1803, after a long, 
useful life of eighty years, and is buried in the Presbyterian cemetery 
at "Church Hill," the site of the first log church he helped to build. His 
original farm of five hundred acres, patented to him in 1755, is yet 
partly owned in the family. 

Children of James and Jane (Ogleby) Reed: i. James, the first 
white child born in Kishacoquillas Valley, lived and died near Reedsville, 
a farmer: he married Nancy Milroy. 2. Mary, married John Thomjj- 
son; died in New York. 3. William, married Abigail Kerr; died in 
Ohio. 4. Sarah, married Henry Steely and both spent their lives on 
their farm at the east end of the valley. 5. Thomas, moved to New 
York state, where he died : he married Margaret Van Houten. 6. .An- 
drew, married Hannah Conklin; also died in New York. 7. Alexander, 
lived and died near Reedsville, as did his wife Jane. 8. John, died in 
infancy. 9. John, died in Reedsville after 1840. 10. Joseph, killed in 
a race at age of twenty-seven years, unmarried. 11. Jane, died young. 
12. Abner, of whom further. 



686 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

(II) Abner, twelfth child of James and Jane (Ogleby) Reed, was 
born in Reedsville, Pennsylvania, October i, 1787, died October 13, 
1855. He was educated in the public schools that then existed in his 
neighborhood, and passed his entire active years engaged in agricuhure. 
He became possessed of a large amount of unimproved land and to the 
development of his estate he devoted his life. He lived in Reedsville 
many years, but spent the last ten years of his life on his Back Mountain 
farm. Both he and his wife were devoted Presbyterians and liberal 
supporters of the East Kishacoquillas church. 

He married (first) Rebecca Nancy Henry, daughter of William and 
Nancy (Beatty) Henry, he an early settler and farmer. She died in 
1826, leaving three children: i. Joseph, died in 1861. 2. Nancy Mar- 
garet, married Abner Thompson; children: Mary. John, Ella, Walter. 
3. Alexander, of whom further. Abner Reed married (second) Rhoda, 
daughter of John and Mary (Taylor) McKinney, and widow of John 
Brown. By her first husband she had a son who died in infancy and a 
daughter, Mary ("Polly") Ann Brown, who married Samuel W. Tay- 
lor and had one daughter, Rhoda McKinney Taylor. After being 
widowed a second time, Mrs. Rhoda Reed lived with her children until 
her death in 1877 at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Polly Ann Taylor. 
Children of Abner Reed and his second wife: i. John, now president 
of the Reedsville National Bank and of the Farmers National Bank of 
Belleville ; married Elizabeth D. Taylor ; children : Henry Taylor and 
Rhoda M. 2. Andrew, graduate of Dartmouth College ; a lawyer of 
Lewistown until his death at the home of his sister Rebecca Jane, un- 
married. 3. Ogleby James, a farmer of part of the homestead until his 
death in Reedsville ; married Agnes Jane Cummins : children : John Mil- 
ton, Mary Brown and Ann Cummins. 4. Rebecca Jane, died on ship- 
Ijoard en route from Japan to America and is buried in Reedsville ; mar- 
ried John (2) Hayes, of Brown township; children: Jane A., died 
young; Rhoda M., John Francis, A. Reed and Anna M. 5. Sarah, edu- 
cated in the public schools ; Ercildoun Seminary at Coatesville, Pennsyl- 
vania, and Kishacoquillas Seminary; married Alexander Brown McNitt, 
whom she survives, a resident of Reedsville. 

(TIT) Alexander, son of Abner and Rebecca Nancy (Henry) Reed, 
was born at the Reed homestead farm, where the village of Reedsville 
now stands, October 11, 1823. His mother died when he was very 




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HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 687 

young, but he was reared under the wise guidance of his father, whose 
second wife gave him a mother's care. He attended the Reedsville 
schools and remained with his father until reaching legal age. In 1844, 
in partnership with iiis brother, Joseph, he began farming and cattle 
dealing. After carrying on his business successfully on a large farm 
which they owned, part of the original Reed tract, they began the manu- 
facture of grain drills in Reedsville, also a successful venture. In 1852, 
enticed by the "lure of gold," Alexander Reed made the journey to Cali- 
fornia, via Nicaragua, arriving safely at Sacramento City after a long 
and dangerous trip. At Sacramento he contracted typhoid fever, but 
after a serious illness recovered sufficiently to enter government employ, 
being too weak for work in the mines. He was in the party under Gen- 
erals Denver, Raines and Estelle, who commanded an overland relief 
train for the succor of emigrants, making their way to California across 
the Rock}- and Sierra mountains. A few months spent with this party 
in the healthful outdoors of that section completely restored his health, 
and on his return to Sacramento he continued under the employ of Gen- 
eral Estelle and the State of California on guard at San Ouentin. In 
1856, after four years absence, he returned to Pennsylvania via Panama. 
He resumed farming at Reedsville and so continued until a few years 
prior to his death. Pie was a friend of all improvement and aided mate- 
rially in the upbuilding of his home town. He was a Republican in 
politics, always interested in local political affairs, but never an office- 
seeker. 

He finally retired and removed to Reedsville. where he Iniilt a 
residence in 1898, and there died June 5, 1899. Both he and his wife 
were active members of the East Kishacoquillas Presbyterian Church, 
and in 1892 and 1893 he was president of the building committee in 
charge of the new church erected in Reedsville by that congregation, 
after worshipping on "Church Hill" one hundred and ten years. Pie 
was a warm friend of the cause of education and gave his children the 
benefit of the best advantages the section afforded. 

Alexander Reed married, September 29, 1858, Mary Lyon Taylor, 
born in the Kishacoquillas Valley, December 23, 1837, who survives him, 
a resident of Reedsville. She is a daughter of Henry P. and Elizabeth 
(Forsythe) Taylor, granddaughter of Samuel Williamson and Elizal)ctli 
(Davis) Taylor, and a great-granddaughter of Captain lienry Taylor, 



688 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

an officer of the revolution, and his wife, Rhoda (Wilhamson) Taylor. 
Captain Taylor was a son of Nathaniel Taylor, who lived near Phila- 
delphia, a Scotch-Irish settler, who probably died soon after his arrival 
as no further trace of him is found. Henry P. Taylor lived and died in 
the Kishacoquillas Valley, a farmer and a member of the Pennsylvania 
legislature in 1852 and 1853. He died in 1902, aged ninety-three years; 
his wife died in 1840 at Bedford Springs, Pennsylvania, leaving two 
daughters: Mary Lyon, now widow of Alexander Reed, residing in 
Reedsville; Elizabeth, deceased. Children of Alexander and Mary 
Lyon (Taylor) Reed: i. Elizabeth, married John McDowell, of Reeds- 
ville; children: Alexander Reed and Mary Lyon McDowell. 2. Mary, 
married William S. Ellis, of Pottstown, Pennsylvania, whom she sur- 
vives. 3. Henry Taylor, a farmer of the old homestead; married Sarah 
Means; children: Mary Kyle, Alexander, Elizabeth. 4. Abner Joseph, 
a farmer, residing with his mother. 5. Lillie Henry, married Rev. 
Samuel T. Linton, of Ridley Park, Pennsylvania ; child : Mary. 



William Foy was born in Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, in 
FOY 183 1, died in Lewistown, Pennsylvania. He was left an 

orphan at an early age and was reared by an uncle, Henry 
Arent, of Ferguson Valley, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania. He attended 
the public school, and worked at farming until 1888. when he came to 
Lewistown. He prospered, and at his death owned considerable land 
and several houses. He was a Republican in politics, and a member of 
the Lutheran church. 

He married, February 14, 1875, Ellen Lynch, born in Ferguson 
Valley, ]\Iiiflin county, Pennsylvania, March 28, 1836, now deceased, 
daughter of Lawrence and Bertha (Nelson) Lynch, both born in Ire- 
land, coming when young and settling in Ferguson Valley, where Law- 
rence Lynch died in 1884. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Lynch: i. Dr. 
Horatio L.. a physician, shot and killed by a negro while sitting in a 
chair in his own office. 2. Catherine, married Samuel Logan, and died 
in 1878. 3. Margaret, married James Mackey, and lives in Ferguson 
Valley. 4. Ellen, of previous mention. 5. Henry, died in Colorado. 
6. Alary, married .\lbert Kerns, of Frankfort, Indiana. 7. Lawrence, 
decea.sed. Children of William and Ellen (Lynch) Foy: i. Florence, 
died in .\pril, 1879, aged twenty-one years. 2. Effie, married George K. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 689 

McCurtis, and died in 1883, aged twenty-two years. 3. Maud, died 
February 19, 1877, aged fifteen years. 



The Zinns are of ancient German ancestry, the founders of 
ZINN this branch coming from Berlin in 1868. The grandchildren 

of Andrew Zinn comprise the third generation in the L'nited 
States, and the second of American birth. The founders, Andrew and 
Margaret (Deal) Zinn, were both born in Berlin, Germany. He was 
educated in his native land, learned the shoemaker's trade, married, and 
in 1868, at the age of thirty-nine years, came to the United States, set- 
tling at Huntingdon. Pennsylvania. He was weighmaster at the coal 
wharf for twenty-five years. He was a Democrat in politics, and a mem- 
ber of the Reformed church. He died January, 1907, aged sixty-eight 
years. His widow still survives, aged seventy years. Children: J. 
Phil., John H., of whom further; Harry John, Edward A., Katherine, 
Charles, George, Frank, all living. , 

(II) John H., son of Andrew and Margaret (Deal) Zinn, was 
born in Huntingdon. Pennsylvania, May 5, 1868. He was educated in 
the public school, and until he was nineteen years of age remained in 
Huntingdon. In 1887 he came to Lewistown, and there learned the 
carriage builder's trade. He established in business for himself, and in 
1907 built his present plant at No. 90 Montgomery street. His residence 
is at No. 25 Depot street. Mr. Zinn prospered and is held in high esteem 
as a business man and citizen. He is a Democrat in politics, and a mem- 
ber of the Lutheran church. His fraternal order is the Knights of 
the Maccabees. 

He married, in 1898. Millie Montgomery, daughter of Robert H. 
Monts-omerv, formerly of Lewistown, now deceased. Child, Mar- 

o - 

garetta, born December 25, 1900. 



This record of the Hughes family begins with Theoph- 
HUGHES ilus Hughes, a drummer boy of the war of 1812. He 
was a resident of Pennsylvania, there married and reared 
a family which included a son. Ellis. 

(II) Ellis, son of Theophilus Hughes, was born in Pennsylvania in 
1800, there grew to manhood, married Catherine McDarah and moved 
to Champaign county, Ohio, where his wife died in 1843. Ellis Hughes 



690 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

then returned to Pennsylvania, settling in Columbia, and later was a 
resident of York county. He was for some time a pdot on the Susque- 
hanna river. Later he again went west and died in Galena, Ilhno.s. m 
1885 He was a Democrat in early life, but after the civil war became a 
Republican. In religious faith he was a Methodist. Children: Whil- 
den, Grant, Mary, Joseph W., of whom further. 

(Ill) Joseph W., son of Ellis and Catherine (McDarah) Hughes, 
was born in Urbana, Ohio, September 16, 1840. His mother died when 
he was a child of two years, and he was reared by an aunt, Mrs. Joseph 
Weaver, of Pottsville, Pennsylvania. He was educated in the public 
school, and in 1854, being then fourteen years of age, he began work- 
ing in' a drug store at Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania, remaining there 
until 1861 and becoming thoroughly familiar with the drug i)usiness. In 
April, 1 86 1, he enlisted in the York (Pennsylvania) Rifles, and later 
served in the Fifty-fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Infantry. He was a 
prisoner of war nine months, seven of which he spent at Andersonville. 
He served four years and two months, receiving honoralile discharge 
at the close of the war. He then returned to Mechanicslxirg, where he 
was for a time clerk in a hardware store, later operated a bakery. In 
187 1 he came to Lewistown and there entered the employ of The Fran- 
cisus Hardware Company. He was appointed manager of their store at 
:\Iil"flintown, Juniata county, there remaining seventeen years. He was 
then appointed manager of their Lewistown store, holding that respon- 
sible position thirteen years. He then resigned, and until his retirement 
was engaged in the retail coal business. In 1909 he retired from active 
business, but has been interested in improving his property on Valley 
street by the erection of residences at Nos. 149-151-153. He is a Repub- 
lican in jiolitics, has served on the borough council, and at the session 
of the slate legislature in 191 1 was appointed doorkeeper. He is a mem- 
lier of the Grand Army of the Republic, Department of Pennsylvania, 
and of Lewistown Lodge, No. 203, Free and Accepted Masons, having 
been made a Mason in Mechanicsburg Lodge, No. 302. He is president 
of Lewistown Board of Trade and w-as president of the Mifflin County 
Mutual Insurance Company from its organization until January i, 191 2. 
He is a man held in high esteem by all. 

Mr. Hughes married, in 1869, Carolyn Hopper, who died in 1871, 
daughter of ]\Iartin Hopper, of Lewistown, a pioneer settler. Children 



HISTORY OF THE TUMATA VALLEY 691 

of Joseph W. and Carolyn Hughes: i. Robert T., married Catherine 
Owens, of Lewistown. 2 Carolyn, married Charles M. Rice, of Lewis- 
town. 



This family came to Pennsylvania from Germany, and in 
RICE early records the name is written in the German style, Rees. 
It was soon anglicized and became Rice. The founder of the 
family, Zachariah (also written Zachary) Rice, was one of the thirty 
thousand German emigrants who landed in Philadelphia between the 
years 1727 and 1776. He was born in Germany in 1731. and in his 
native land learned the trade of millwright. He came to Phuadelphia 
in the ship "Edinborough" and at once took the oath of allegiance to the 
King of England. His first work of importance was to build a mill for 
the separating of clover seed. The machinery has disappeared, but the 
mill, built on Pickering creek, near Pikeland station, Chester county, is 
still standing. 

In 1757 he married Maria .Appolonia (afterward called Abigail to 
shorten the name) Hartman, daughter of Johannes and Margaret Hart- 
man, German emigrants, who came in 1750. She was born September 4, 
1742, in Germany, died November 6, 1789, the mother of twenty-one 
children, seventeen of whom walked in procession to her grave. Her 
grave at Pikeland church is lost, the stone having been destroyed. The 
young couple began housekeeping on a farm in Pikeland township, 
where in addition to farming he worked at his millwright trade and at 
carpentering. During the revolution he worked on the government hos- 
])ital, built at Yellow Springs, in Pikeland. for the sick and wounded 
soldiers, and also did other work for the government. He prospered 
and purchased the farm of two hundred and five acres on which he lived. 
In May, 1786, he purchased one hundred and ten acres additional. He 
built in 1767 a stone house and there his children w-ere born. They 
attended St. Augustine's Lutheran Church at the Trappe. thirteen miles 
away, until I77i,when St. Peter's Church, a log church edifice, was built 
at Pikeland. 

During the revolution the hospital at Yellow Springs was filled with 
wounded soldiers, to whom Mrs. Rice was a frequent visitor, carrying 
food and delicacies. During these visits she contracted typhus fever, 
from which she never fully recovered. After the battle of Brandywine, 



692 HISTORY OF THE JUXIATA VALLEY 

it is said \\-ashington, retreating across Chester Valley, stopped at the 
Rice home, receiving from the hands of Mrs. Rice a coolmg, refreshing 
drink Here they lived in peace and prosperity until the spring of I7«9. 
when his farm was seized by the foreclosure of an old English mort- 
gage Zacharv Rice and one hundred and thirteen other farmers lost 
their entire property, through the rascality of Andrew Allen, a Phila- 
delphia merchant and a member of the Continental congress, who mort- 
gaged the tract and divided it into two and three hundred acre farms, 
which he sold to the German emigrants, as they arrived, and who trusted 
him so entirely that they did not question his title. Zachary not being 
able to redeem his property, it was sold and immediate possession taken. 
A few months later his wife died and the old emigrant's cup of sorrow 
was full. But he was made of stern material, and in 1790, with his 
seventeen children, five of whom were married, he started westward in 
search of cheaper land. They crossed the Susquehanna at Harrisburg 
and settled in [Nlilford township, now Juniata county. They had brought 
their household goods with them in wagons and soon obtained land, 
buill log houses and began clearing. The Indians, had all disappeared, 
their foes being the wild beasts. Zachary bought the tract upon which 
he settled in 1700 and paid for it in 1801, five thousand dollars, the result 
of his farming, lumbering and mill building operations, in which he was 
assisted by his unmarried children. He cut and drew to the site the first 
log used in the erection of Lebanon church, built at Loysville, Perry 
county, in 1794, and continued at hard labor until a few years before his 
death, then spending his time traveling around among his children, 
settled in Juniata, Perry and Mifilin counties. He died August 11, 1819, 
aged eighty years, and was buried at Church Hill, Juniata county, Penn- 
sylvania. He was the grandfather of one hundred and forty-seven chil- 
dren, and the great-great-grandfather of eight thousand and thirty-six 
Rice descendants. His son, John Rice, was appointed administrator, 
and on January i, 1803, Jacob Rice bought the farm, paying five thou- 
sand and seventy-six dollars therefor. The administrator's accounts, 
dated Xnvcmbcr 3, 1812, show heirs: John, Peter, Jacob, George Con- 
rad, Zaciiariaii, Henry, Benjamin, Elizabeth, Margaret, Susannah, Ma- 
riah, Mary, Sally. Kitty, Betsey and Polly, the seventeen living children. 
The family were noted for their longevity, eighty and ninety years being 
the usual age. .\11 were men of athletic build, hard workers and good 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 693 

citizens. From this old German "patriarch" sprang Jacob Rice, grand- 
father of Charles Miller Rice, of Lewistown. 

(III) Jacob {2), a grandson of Zachariah and Abigail (Hartman) 
Rice, was born in Perry county, probably a son of Jacob (i) Rice, who 
settled first in Juniata county, later in Spring township. Perry county, 
and left sons, Jacob (2) and Henry. Jacob (2) Rice was a farmer. 
He married a Miss Haynaker and had eleven children. 

(IV) Frank, son of Jacob (2) Rice, was born in Perry county, 
Pennsylvania, in 1846. He grew to manhood in Perry county, learned 
the carriage building trade, married, and moved to the state of Indiana, 
where he remained three years. He then returned to Pennsylvania, 
locating in Lewistown, where he followed his trade until 1912. He then 
joined his son in the management of the Juniata Poultry Farm, in which 
business he is now successfully engaged. He specializes in the raising of 
White Leghorn,- White Orpington and White Rock chickens, and White 
Holland turkeys, and has a plant rapidly increasing in value. 

He is a veteran of the civil war, having served with the Two Hun- 
dred and Fifth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. He was 
engaged in many of the hard battles fought by the Army of the Po- 
tomac, including the Seven Days' fighting before Richmond, Antietam, 
Petersburg. He is a Republican in politics, a member of the Grand 
Army of the Republic, and both he and his wife are members of the 
Lutheran church. He married Isabel Miller, born in Mififlin county in 
1847, daughter of Christian Miller, who was born in Saxony, Germany, 
came to the United States about 1840 with his wife and settled in Lewis- 
town, Pennsylvania. He drove a stage coach over the mountains in the 
early days, later was manager of the Pennsylvania railroad station in 
Lewistown, continuing until 1876, when he purchased a farm three miles 
from the town on which he lived until death. His children were : Wil- 
liam and Charles, both deceased, and Mabel, wife of Frank Rice. Chil- 
dren of Frank Rice: i. Annie E., married G. A. Shiveley and resides 
at Altoona, Pennsylvania ; children : Frank, Isabel and Dorothy. 2. 
^^'illiam M., married Emma Cherry and resides in Altoona; children: 
Charles and Austin. 3. Charles Miller, of whom further. 

(V) Charles Miller, youngest son of Frank and Isabel (Miller) 
Rice, was born in Lewistown, Pennsylvania, September 23, 1873. He 
was educated in the public school and later took a special course at East- 



694 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

man's Business College, Poughkeepsie, New York. In 1889 he entered 
the employ of David Grove, a grocer of Lewistown, as clerk, and con- 
tinued in his employ until 1902, when he was admitted to a partnership, 
the firm becoming Grove & Rice. They are located at No. 16 East Mar- 
ket street, and have a well-stocked store and a prosperous business. He 
is also interested in Lewistown real estate and with his father in the 
poultry business. He is a member of the Patriotic Order Sons of Amer- 
ica and the Royal Arcanum; is a Republican in politics and, with his 
wife, belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church. 

He married, in 1903, Carolyn Hughes, born in Mechanicsburg, Cum- 
berland county, Pennsylvania, daughter of Joseph W. Hughes. She 
came to Lewistown with her parents when she was a babe. Children: 
Carolyn, born February 25, 1905: Marjorie. August 24, 191 1. 

The paternal ancestor of Daniel Rowe Stratford, of 
STR.\TFORD Lewistown, Pennsylvania, was Thomas Stratford. 

who lived and died in England. Both he and his 
wife were members of the Presl)yterian church. Children: i. Sabina. 
2. Julia. 3. Frederick, an eminent educator, who for his services in 
the English schools was pensioned l)y the government in his latter years ; 
he was also a well-known and accomplished vocal musician, for years a 
member of the choir of one of London's famous churches. 4. Wil- 
liam. 5. Charles John, of whom further. 6. Angeline, who married a 
Mr. Higgins and moved to Benton county, Iowa. 

(II) Charles John, son of Thomas Stratford, was born in England 
in 1818, died in Lewistown, Pennsylvania, May 6, 1893. He was edu- 
cated in the public school, and at the age of eighteen years left his home 
and native land. In 1836 he came to the United States, landing in Phil- 
adelphia, and there working for a time on the wharves as stevedore. 
He soon left the city and in a short time was located at Easton, Penns}'!- 
vania, where he learned the trade of marblecutter, serving an apprentice- 
'-hip nf nearly seven years. Mis employer was a hard drinker and treated 
liis a])prcniice with such severity that he would not remain his full term, 
l)Ut i)aid iiis employer to release him six months sooner. He then lo- 
cated in Lewistown. Pennsylvania, where he worked at his trade, form- 
ing a partnership with a Mr. Kcmmerling. They were a successful firm 
and thrcint;h their united efforts established a prosperous marble yard. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 695 

Mr. Stratford was an expert worker in marble, and to his artistic de- 
signing and fine workmanship many fine monuments and gravestones in 
the Juniata Valley bear silent testimony. Mr. Kemmerling later sold out 
to his partner, and for forty years thereafter Mr. Stratford conducted a 
large and prosperous business. Although devoted to business and a man 
of great energy, he was public-spirited, a student, and kept pace with 
the thought of his day. He was a student of Greek and Latin, and a 
great lover of books, owning a good library consisting of the best classic 
literature of the English and other languages. He embraced the cause 
of temperance with all the ardor of his nature and would often walk 
fifteen or twenty miles to deliver a temperance lecture. He gained more 
than local fame as a lecturer and worker for temperance, and in 1870 
visited England in the interest of the cause. So highly was he re- 
garded that he carried abroad, among his credentials, a letter from Gov- 
ernor John \V. Geary, over his own signature, and the great seal of the 
state of Pennsylvania, recommending him to the confidence of the Eng- 
lish people as a "good citizen and of high character, especially distin- 
guished for his active labors on behalf of temperance reform." While 
in England, Mr. Stratford established a lodge of the then popular tem- 
perance fraternity known as the Order of Good Templars. This was the 
first lodge of that order to be organized in England. After his return 
from England he continued his active temperance work, only death 
causing him to cease from his labors. 

He married, January 16, 1837, Catherine, who died aged sixty-five 
years, daughter of Daniel Rowe, of German descent, and an old settler 
in Lewistown. where he died leaving a large family. Children of 
Charles John and Catherine (Rowe) Stratford: i. Temperance, died 
aged three years. 2. Charles, married Elizabeth Gray. 3. Loveday 
Susan, deceased ; married Timoth)- Swany. 4. Frederick, married Eliz- 
abeth M. Kramer. 5. Prudence, married Alfred Smithers. 6. Annie 
E., died aged about twenty-three years. 7. Daniel Rowe, of whom fur- 
ther. 8. Laura Helen, married Grafton Anderson and moved to Dakota. 

(Ill) Daniel Rowe, seventh child of Charles John and Catherine 
(Rowe) Stratford, was born in Lewistown, Pennsylvania, May 21, 
1852. He attended the public schools and Lewistown Academy until he 
was fifteen years of age, then spent two and a half years in Iowa, work- 
ing on a farm. He then returned home and began learning the stone 



696 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

cutter's trade under the instruction of his father. In 1870 Charles John 
Stratford retired, his son Charles succeeding him. Daniel R. continued 
his years of apprenticeship under his brother, becoming an expert work- 
man and a capable artistic designer of monuments and ornamental 
marble work. In 1878 he started in business for himself, competing 
with his brother for ten years. In 1888 the two yards were consoli- 
dated inidcr the firm name, The Lewistown Marble and Granite Works. 
The Ijrothers conducted a prosperous business, both were splendid work- 
men and capable business men with enviable reputations as honorable 
and trustworthy business men. In 1906 they were awarded the contract 
for erecting the Soldiers and Sailors' Monument, now standing in the 
public square at Lewistown. Before this contract was completed, the 
partnership existing between the brothers was dissolved, Charles Strat- 
ford retiring, Daniel C. continuing the business and completing the con- 
tract. The monument, sixty feet in height, was designed by D. C. 
Stratford from an idea suggested by Dr. Parcels, a member of the 
committee, and was erected with but slight change from the plans as sub- 
mitted by Mr. Stratford and is a fitting memorial to the brave dead. 
Since becoming sole owner, he changed the name of the firm and it is 
now The Stratford Marble and Granite Works. His business has won- 
derfully increased in the past six years, the volume having doubled, and 
extends over the counties of Mifflin, Center, Juniata, Huntingdon and 
Perry. He is a Republican in politics, a member of the Royal Arcanum, 
and both he and his wife members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
He is public-spirited and helpful in all that tends to the public good, and 
is held in highest respect by his community. 

He married, October 28, 1875, Mary E., daughter of Jacob and Julia 
Ann (Brown) Ettinger, of German descent, both deceased. Children: 
I. Harry, born November 29, 1877. died aged eleven months. 2. Laura 
Edith, born 1891, died 1894. 3. Charles E., born 1876. 4. Sarah 
Grace, born October 8, 1881 ; married A. L. Bickle. 5. William F., born 
October 8. 1883 ; married Mabel Davis. 6. Julia Ann, born October 2, 
1885. 7. Roy, born July 2^. 1887. 



The Taylor family, of which General John P. Taylor, of 
TAYLOR Reedsville. is a representative, was founded in the Juni- 
ata Valley by Robert Taylor, who came to Mifflin county 



THE NEW YORK 

PUBLIC UBRARY 






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HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 697 

from Pine Ford, on Swartara Creek, Dauphin county, Pennsylvania. 
He took out warrants for several acres of land in the Kishacoquillas 
Valley, much of which is yet owned in the family. Robert Taylor mar- 
ried and had issue: Henry, William, Robert (2), John, and Matthew. 

(II) Matthew, son of Robert Taylor, the pioneer settler, came to 
Mifflin county with his father; he became a prosperous farmer of "the 
valley." He married Sarah ( Sample) Mayes, widow of John Mayes, 
and had issue : Robert (3) ; John, of whom further; Henry and Sample. 

(III) John, son of Matthew, and grandson of Robert (i) Taylor, 
"the settler," was born in Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, ]\Iarch 6, 1775, 
died in 1843. He attended such schools as the locality then aflorded, 
later going to Center county, where he served a regular apprenticeship 
in a tannery, thoroughly learning that business. Returning home, he 
erected a tannery on the homestead farm, and for the remainder of his 
life followed tanning and farming. He was a man of intelligence, very 
energetic and prosperous. Pie married, February 12, 1813, Elizabeth, 
daughter of Neal and Margaret (Thompson) McManigal. She sur- 
vived him twenty-six years, dying in 1869, aged eighty-three years. The 
young couple made their first home in a corner of the tannery building, 
but as prosperity came erected a comfortable home. Children: Sarah 
Sample, married James Watts; Rebecca McManigal, married David 
Brisbin; Matthew, married Jane E. Taylor; Margaret Thompson, died 
aged two years; Margaret Isabella, married Oliver Perry Smith; John 
P., of whom further; Elizabeth, married Samuel McWilliams. 

(IV) General John P. Taylor was born on the Taylor homestead 
in Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, June 16, 1827. He was named John, 
but to distinguish him from other John Taylors, he added "P." to his 
name. Another writer, competent from personal knowledge to speak of 
the boyhood of General Taylor, has said: "Having been born and 
brought up in a community of Scotch-Irish lineage (also his own), it 
was impossible for him not to inherit the stern and patriotic virtues 
which characterized his ancestry. His boyhood was spent chiefly on 
his father's farm, but even there the future man was discernible in the 
prompt and energetic manner in which he executed his father's com- 
mands." After attending school at the old log house he was at an early 
age placed under the care of Professor David Wilson, whose instruction 
he enjoyed for several years, \^'hile at Tuscarora Academy he acquired 



698 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

a good English education, also a knowledge of Latin, then returned to 
the farm where, until the outbreak of the war between the states, he 
was engaged with his cousin, James I. Taylor, in stock dealing, and with 
his brother ^Matthew in working the homestead farm, succeeding in 
both. There was, however, a strain of military ardor in his blood, prob- 
ably from a warlike ancestor of long ago, for at the age of sixteen 
years he was jjlanning to enlist in the American army, then in Mexico 
under the famous generals, Taylor and Scott. His patriotic impulse 
was however checked by the refusal of his parents to give their consent, 
and he continued in peaceful pursuit until 1861. He had been active in 
organizing the company of cavalry, in 1859, called the Mifflin County 
Dragoons, of which G. V. Mitchell was captain; John P. Taylor, first 
lieutenant, and William Mann, second lieutenant. After the company 
had l)ecome well drilled and had appeared in public several times. Lieu- 
tenant Taylor, always the leading spirit of the company, deemed that 
the time had come to prove to the people that they were not "tin sol- 
diers." Accordingly, at a meeting of the company held in Reedsville 
January 26, 1861, he moved that the services of the company be offered 
the governor of Pennsylvania. Their offer was at once accepted but 
was quickly followed by another telegram stating that a cavalrv company 
could not be used, but to hold themselves in readiness. So, while their 
offer was the first on record at Harrisburg, another Mifflin county com- 
pany, the famous "Logan Guards," hold the honor of being the first 
company to have their services accepted by the state. The Dragoons 
confidently expected to be called for under Lincoln's first demand on 
the loyal states for seventy-five thousand men ; each memljer was noti- 
fied and was holding himself in readiness, but the Pennsylvania c^uota 
was filled without calling on the cavalry. No amount of persuasion pre- 
vailed, although Lieutenants Taylor and Mann visited Harrisburg per- 
sonally. When Governor Curtin organized the First Regiment of Penn- 
sylvania cavalrx', August 7, 1861, the Dragoons became part of Com]3an.\-. 
C. and before leaving Harrisburg. Lieutenant Taylor was elected captain 
of that company. The regiment was under the command of Colonel 
George I). P.ayard, who gallantly led his brave troops until killed at 
Fredericksburg in 1862. 

General Taylor's military career was a distinguished one, marked 
by daring courage, devotion to dut>- and rapid promotion. He was en- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 699 

gaged with his company- and regiment in thirty-one pitched battles and 
nearly forty skirmishes, as commander of company, regiment and 
brigade. He received many commendatory notices in the reports of his 
superior officers; was promoted to the rank of lieutenant-colonel in Sep- 
tember, 1862; colonel, January 30, 1863, and was brevetted brigadier- 
general August 5, 1864. He fought at Grangeville, December, 1861 ; 
Cedar Mountain, 1862, where his horse was shot and fell, injuring him 
severely and leaving him dismounted within the enemy's lines but es- 
caping capture: Second Bull Run; Fredericksburg; Brandy Station — the 
greatest cavalry battle of the war, where he led the sabre charge and in 
the midst of battle succeeded to the command of his regiment; Gettys- 
burg, where his regiment was held in reserve at Meade's headcpiarters ; 
Sheppardstown ; Culpeper, where, dismounted, he led his regiment to vic- 
tory; Mine Run, where he captured the entire skirmish line of the en- 
emy; with Sheridan in his hard campaigns — in short, wherever there 
was work for the cavalry during the three years he campaigned in the 
Army of the Potomac, there Colonel Taylor was found in the thick 
of the fight. At the battles of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Malvern 
Hill, and in all his battles, he proved over and over again his soldierly 
qualities and his capacity for leadership, whether as captain, colonel or 
general of brigade. When mustered out, August 31, 1864, he was the 
only officer left that assembled with the regiment at Harrisburg at the 
christening of the First Pennsylvania Cavalry. The following extract 
from his farewell order, August 31, 1864, sums up in beautiful, patriotic 
language the service of his regiment: 

"Officers and soldiers of the First Pennsylvania Reserve Cavalry : 
You have now experienced three \'ears nf terrible devastating war; you 
are familiar with its toils, its hardships and scenes of bloodshed. Dur- 
ing this time, there has been no toil that your manly efiforts have not 
overcome, no hardships that you have not courted for your country's 
sake, no field of strife too terrible to prevent your planting your banner 
in the face of your traitorous foes, and in every instance you have borne 
it ofi^ in triumph. Many have been the fields on which you have dis- 
tinguished yourselves by your personal valor. From your first victorious 
blood spill at Danesville down to that, more green in your memories, 
such as Hawes Shop, Todd's Tavern. Childsburg. Barker's Mills, White 
House, St. Mary's Church, and last, but not least, the bloody summit 
of Malvern Hill, are still sounding in your ears and eternally engraven 



700 



HISTORY OF THE JUXIATA VALLEY 



on your hearts. But now you have reached a goal worthy ot your 
ambition; vou have won for yourselves, your regiment, your state an 
enviable reputation; your military career has been a brave and a clear 
record, in which vou have acquitted yourselves like men But the war 
is not ended vet ; there are more battles to be fought and more lives to 
be offered on 'the altar of liberty. For this end, some of you will remain 
here and manv more of you will be back to battle for a just and holy 
cause But whenever you may answer the bugle's call, and upon what- 
ever field you mav strike the black shield of reljelhcm. let the memory 
of your fallen comrades strengthen your arms and encourage your 
hearts, ever mindful that vou were once members of the First Pennsyl- 
vania ' Reserve Cavalry. 'May the God of battles and of mercy be 
your shield and protection." 

After the above order had been read, Colonel Taylor addressed the 
regiment in most eloquent, patriotic and feeling terms, paying this just 
tribute to their fallen leader of the earlier years : 

"What you were then and what you have since proved yourselves, 
you owe to the might^• impulses of ywir first great and mible com- 
mander, George D. Bayard. Imbued with the influence of his mighty 
genius, you saw the star of his glory rising and shining brighter in 
the military sphere and alas! too soon to set before it had reached its 
zenith — following in his wake, ever ready to stand by you in the hour 
of danger, to share with you your toils and hardships, to cheer you on 
in your conflicts, following strictly in the footsteps of his illustrious pre- 
decessor, the champion of your rights and reputation, came your second 
commander, Colonel Owen Jones." 

To all of these encomiums Colonel Taylor was as justly entitled, but 
of himself he said with becoming modesty: 

"Officers and Soldiers: Through your esteem I had the honor to be 
your next commander, and as such I deem it a high honor today to 
stand before the remnant of what was once a large regiment, to thank 
you for your esteem and the willingness with which you have acceded 
to my every rec[uest and complied with every command, and for the 
manner in which you have so nobly and faithfully discharged your duty 
as soldiers. I believe I am the only officer now left, of those who assem- 
bled at the call of the Governor and witnessed the organization of the 
regiment, in the presence of his staff, and heard it christened the First 
Pennsylvania Reserve Cavalry. And it gives me pleasure today to think 
tliat we can return to our native state those colors entrusted to our care, 
tattered and torn though they be, without a tarnish or stain upon the 
reputation of the regiment. Officers and soldiers of the First Pennsyl- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 701 

vania Reserve Cavalry, you are the veterans of more than thirty engage- 
ments, your banner has proudly floated over almost every field on which 
this historic army has been engaged; the graves of your comrades are 
strewn from Gettysburg to James river, your war paths may be traced 
by the blood of your fallen heroes, and by the strength of justice and 
the might of mercy, you have plumed your arms with honor and 
victory." 

To his brave men, who had elected to remain with the army until the 
end, he said : 

"Enlisted veterans : When you re-enlisted my lips were sealed from 
encouraging you, because circumstances unavoidably rendered my re- 
maining with you impossible. Let not our leaving discourage you, but 
go on to greater deeds of valor, — be faithful and obedient, prompt and 
cheerful in duty, as you always have been; a hopeful country waits to 
crown you and we shall not forget you. We shall continue to breathe the 
desired hope and Christian prayer that you may soon be permitted to 
return to your homes when the red-handed monster war, whose pes- 
tiferous breath blasts with withering death everything lovely on earth, 
may be banished from our distracted land and peace, sweet peace, again 
returning, shall ever pour her Heaven-born blessings on our fair Colum- 
bian soil." 

On the departure of the regiment for home. Colonel Taylor received 
from the division commander. General Gregg, a very complimentary 
letter, in part as follows : 

"For nearly two 3'ears the First Pennsylvania Cavalry has been under 
my command. I can proudly say its record is without a blemish. Many 
officers and enlisted men have fallen. They met death facing the foe ; 
let them be properly remembered by those who survive. To you. 
Colonel, my thanks are due for the efficient manner in which you have 
always performed your duty, whether as a regimental or brigade com- 
mander. You return to your home well satisfied you have failed not 
in your duty, bearing with you the sincere friendship of myself and 
all your companions in arms." 

After closing his brilliant military career. General Taylor returned 
to his estate of four hundred and fifty acres, a part of the tract patented 
by his great-grandfather, Robert Taylor, in 1755. His residence is the 
old stone mansion of solid, dignified appearance, "beautiful for situa- 
tion," erected by his grandfather, Matthew Taylor, who in 1823 also 
remodeled and enlarged it. Here General Taylor has ever resided, and 



/ 



02 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 



amid the beautiful surroundings of the Kishacoquillas Valley he is pass- 
ing an honored old age. In personal appearance General Taylor is about 
six feet tall, well proportioned, of florid complexion and sandy hair, now 
whitened by age. He has always enjoyed good health and today car- 
ries his years, eighty-five, with a surprising vigor. His sterling charac- 
ter has won hini the love and respect of a large circle of friends, and 
nowhere is a man held in higher general esteem than General John P. 

Taylor. 

In political faith he is strongly Republican, but has persistently re- 
fused the many tenders of public office made by his party leaders. He 
accepted, in 1892. the office of department commander of Pennsylvania 
Grand Army of the Republic, to which he was elected by acclamation, 
and the appointment by the governor of Pennsylvania to membership on 
the Pennsylvania Monumental Commission, and was president of the 
board. The object of the commission was to have in charge the marking 
of the battlefield of Gettysburg with suitable monuments, showing the 
position of the different regiments engaged in that battle. This has re- 
sulted in intelligently beautifying this sacred, holy ground, the scene of a 
great conflict and the spot on which President Lincoln's immortal ad- 
dress was delivered. A monument has been erected to every Pennsyl- 
vania regiment engaged during General Taylor's presidency ; also eques- 
trian statues to Generals Meade. Hancock and Reynolds, three great 
generals in action at Gettysburg. 

General Taylor married (first) in May, 1863, Sarah Harriet Nourse, 
who died December 25, 1870, daughter of Rev. James and Sarah (Har- 
vey) Nourse. and granddaughter of Colonel Michael Nourse. He mar- 
ried (second), June i, 1876, Elizabeth, daughter of Hon. John and 
Rhoda (Taylor) Henry. Three months after their marriage, while 
visiting the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia, she received injuries 
in a street car accident that caused her almost instant death. She was 
aged forty-two years and si.x months. 

In 1906, and again in 1910, General Taylor toured the Holy Land, 
and in his beautiful home has many relics, both of the war and of the 
Holy Land, together with many specimens of the rare and antique in 
furniture. One of tiicse relics was found on his own farm, a German 
silver spoon, bearing the name of William Penn on its handle and on the 
reverse, the British crown and the word "Yates," 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 703 

The Burlews are of French descent, the ancestor coming 
BURLEW to Pennsylvania at an early date and serving at Fort Pitt 
in the French and Indian war against England and the 
colonies. His son. Cornelius, grandfather of W. F. Burlew, of Lewis- 
town, was a soldier of the war of 1812, serving in the American armv 
against the British. He married Mary Miller, and they were early set- 
tlers of Mifflin county. 

(III) Alexander, son of Cornelius and Mary (Miller) Burlew, 
was born near Lewistown, Pennsylvania, in 1830, died October, 1910. 
He was a cooper by trade, but later became a superintendent of mines. 
He was a Republican in politics, and a member of the ^Methodist Epis- 
copal church. He was twice married and the father of seventeen chil- 
dren, thirteen of whom are living. He married (first) Catherine East, 
born in Lewistown in 1831, died in 1873, the mother of eight children, 
six living (1913). She was the daughter of Abraham East, who worked 
on the state canal in the early days and married a Miss Lotz. 

(IV) William F., son of Alexander and Catherine (East) Burlew, 
was born in Lewistown, Pennsylvania, February 5, 1857. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools, finishing his studies in Lewistown high 
school. He began business life as a clerk, and in 1885 engaged in busi- 
ness for himself, continuing for twenty years. He manufactured build- 
ing blocks, cement pavement, and was a contractor and builder, erecting 
among others the building he now owns and occupies. On December 
24, 191 1, he opened a grocery store at No. 35 Valley street, where he 
has built up a prosperous business. He is a Republican in politics ; has 
always been active in party afifairs, and in 1900 was elected treasurer of 
Mifflin county, serving three years. He is a member of the Knights of 
the Golden Eagle, and he and his wife are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

He married, August 19, 1878, Alice Brown, born in Blair County, 
Pennsylvania, daughter of Michael Brown. Children: i. William A., 
born May 28, 1880; he was educated in the high school, began life as 
clerk in a store, later was for several years employed in the post office, 
and is now (1913) a partner with his father in the grocery business, 
established December 24, 191 1, under the firm name W. F. Burlew and 
Son; he married, in 1900, Edna Pearl Reddy; two children: Florence 
and William F. 2. Florence Elizabeth, born January, 1882; married 



704 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Walter H. Schell, a seed merchant of Harrisburg, their present home; 
cliild, WilHam Matthew. 



The Doj-le family, which has been known in the state of 
DOYLE Pennsylvania for a number of generations, and of which 
John C. Doyle, of Fermanagh township, Juniata county, 
Pennsylvania, is a descendant, has been identified mainly with the mill- 
ing and agricultural interests of the state. In these fields of industry 
they have borne their share as good citizens, and when the country had 
need of their services as soldiers, they have nobly arisen in defence of 
its rights and liberties. 

(I) John Doyle, grandfather of John C. Doyle, was of Hunting- 
don county, Pennsylvania, and followed the occupation of milling dur- 
ing the active years of his life. 

(II) Richard, son of John Doyle, was born in 1814. He was a 
resident of Beil township, and a miller by occupation. L'pon the out- 
break of the civil war he was one of the first in the district to volunteer 
his services, and fought bravely during that struggle. In the ranks of 
the Republican party he wielded considerable influence, and for a long 
period of time he served as internal revenue assessor. Thrifty and in- 
dustrious, he amassed a considerable fortune, and was the owner of a 
large amount of real property. He married Nancy Criswell, a member 
of the well-known Criswell family of Mifflin county, Pennsylvania. 
'J'heir children were: Adeline and Nannie, who died in infancy; John 
C, see forward ; James, Ella, Margaret, Jennie, Charles and Evelina, 
who died in infancy. 

(III) John C. son of Richard and Nancy (Criswell) Doyle, was 
born in Beil township, Juniata county, Pennsylvania, January 12, 1847. 
He acquired his early education in the public schools of his native town- 
ship, then became a student for several years at the Tuscarora Acad- 
emy, from which he was graduated. In his early manhood he was ap- 
prenticed to learn the trade of printing, with which he was occupied for 
a period of five years. He then took up the study of dentistry, but never 
engaged in active practice in this profession. For some years he was 
busily engaged in agricultural pursuits, then having become associated 
witii railroad work, was thus occupied in various positions for twenty- 
eight years. Always a great lover of nature, he now returned to farm 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 705 

occupations, and has continued in this direction up to the present time. 
He has a beautiful farm of sixty-three acres, and keeps this in a fine state 
of cuhivation. In pohtical matters Mr. Doyle entertains progressive 
ideas, and prefers to form his own opinions independently rather than 
have them formed for him. He and his family are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. His fraternal affiliations are with the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows of Mifflin. 

Mr. Doyle married, in 1868, Margaret C, a daughter of George and 
Hannah (Souders) Goshen, the former a farmer of Perry county, 
Pennsylvania. They have had children as follows: Harry R., unmar- 
ried, is in the employ of the Carnegie Steel Works, at Homestead, Penn- 
sylvania ; George, who is in the west ; Belle, now deceased, married John 
Cibulka, a tailor; Nellie, married Dr. Hammond, of Westmore- 
land county, Pennsylvania; Mamie, is a trained nurse in Philadelphia; 
Anna, married Robert Spanogle, a dentist of Cambria county, Pennsyl- 
vania; Grace, died in childhood; Mildred, died in 1910, at the age of 
nineteen years. 



The Beyer family of Pennsylvania are of German descent, 
BEYER and have been settled in the state for a number of senera- 

tions, greatly to its benefit. They have proved themselves 
to be of industrious habits, have been actively interested in whatever 
concerned the welfare of the community in which they resided, and 
have always occupied places high in the esteem of their fellow citizens. 
(I) Philip Beyer, grandfather of the particular subject of this 
sketch, was one of the early settlers of IMonteur county, Pennsylvania, 
coming thence from Burkes county. Like the majority of the people of 
those days, his time was principally occupied with farming. He was the 
owner of a considerable amount of land and was considered as being one 

of the wealthy men of the town. He married , and had 

children: Solomon, a farmer in the state of Kansas; Peter M., see for- 
ward ; Edmond, a farmer near Danville, Pennsylvania ; Philip, a farmer 
in Danville, Pennsylvania; Mary, married John Snyder, of Kansas; 
Lizzie, married Henry Snyder, a farmer in Michigan ; Jennie, who be- 
came the second wife of Rastus Fleck; Tillie, the first wife of Rastus 
Fleck ; John, a farmer in Kansas. As far as is known, all of these chil- 
dren were living in 191 3. 



7o6 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

(II) Peter M., son of Philip Beyer, was born in Burkes county, 
March 28, 1843, and was but two weeks of age when his parents re- 
moved to Monteur county. His main occupation throughout his Hfe was 
mining, but in addition to this he engaged to a certain extent in farmmg. 
He was the owner of a large tract of land, and an influential member of 
the Lutheran church. In political matters he gave his adherence to the 
Republican party. His death occurred May, 1910, in Union county. 
He married Mary E. Hilkert, born February 19, 1844, who is now living 
in Union county with her daughter, Mrs. Rayback. Mrs. Beyer was the 
daughter of Joseph and Rebecca Hilkert, both of German descent, and 
people of wealth in Monteur county, where they were the owners of a 
large farm which they cultivated themselves. They had children : Mary 
E., mentioned above ; Emma Jane, married Daniel Mull and died shortly 
after her marriage ; Samuel, was in active service during the civil war, 
and died at home of the smallpox: Joseph and James, farmers in Mon- 
teur county ; Thomas, who was a farmer of Monteur county ; Solomon, 
who lived in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. 

Mr. and Mrs. Beyer had children: William, a resident of Lewisburg, 
married Dora Carr; Edward, a miller in Union county, married Eliza- 
beth Hauselman; James Wesley, lives in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, 
and married EHza Fernwalt: Andrew J., see forward: Alice, married 
Charles Harshbarger, a railroad man of Northumberland county; Nora, 
married Joseph Fisher, in public office in Milton ; Calvin, an insurance 
agent at Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania; Ada, married Blaine Raybeck, a 
farmer of Union county. 

(Ill) Andrew J., fourth son and child of Peter M. and Mary E. 
(Hilkert) Beyer, was born in Monteur county, Pennsylvania. August 19, 
1872. He was the recipient of a good, practical education in the public 
schools of the county, and he made the best use of his opportunities 
there. In his early manhood he was associated with his father in the 
milling business and in the cultivation of the farm, being thus employed 
for a period of twenty years. He came to Juniata Valley in 1900, and 
purchased the mill located at Jones Mills, and this is still in his posses- 
sion. In 1912 he removed to Mifflintown, where he established himself 
in the rcstaur.-int business, in which he is successfully engaged at the 
jirescnt time. He keeps well abreast of the times in every particular, 
and the attention he has given to public afifairs has made him a man of 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 707 

note in the Republican party. His religious affiliations are with the 
Methodist Episcopal church, at which he is a devout attendant. He is a 
member of McCalastenville Lodge, No. 716, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows; of Camp No. 717, Patriotic Order of Free Sons of America; 
and the K. O. F. M. of Lewistown. 

Mr. Beyer married, February 26, 1896, Virginia, daughter of Joseph 
Keyser, a trucker and farmer of Northumberland county, and they have 
had children: Leonard K., born November 16, 1897, is a student in the 
high school at Clifton; Clifton, born March 14, 1905, died in 1907; 
Dartha, born August 21, 1907. 



William Thompson McCoy, of Lewistown, Alifflin county, 
McCOY Pennsylvania, is of Irish extraction, his emigrant progeni- 
tor landing in America previous to 1790. The McCoy 
family has lived largely in Pennsylvania, and has helped make history 
for the state, as well as assist in its upbuilding. 

(I) Robert McCoy was born in Ireland and came to this country 
before 1790. He probably landed in New York with his family, and 
driven by the zeal that characterized his life as a minister of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church, he went to Pennsylvania in 1790, and settled for 
a while in Bucks county. Here he farmed as best he could, for he was 
blind for forty years before his death, on February 11, 1829, and 
preached in the little log house set aside for that purpose. He moved 
from Bucks county in 1825 to Allensville, Mifflin county, and there re- 
mained until his death. He was greatly beloved by those who knew him, 
and his charges in the various churches under his care lamented his 
death. He married Mary Iliff. in Ireland, who accompanied him across 
the Atlantic to the wild new country, in which he was destined to accom- 
plish much good. Children: i. John, a saddler in Lewistown, married 
Sarah Willis. 2. Joseph, a farmer in Huntingdon county. 3. Mercy, 
married William Brown, a farmer of Brady township. 4. Wesley, died 
in infancy. 5. Wesley, a farmer in Granville township; married Sarah 
McCord. 6. Mary, died young. 7. Elizabeth, married Thomas Mc- 
Cord, a farmer in Granville township. 8. Edward, died in youth. 9. 
Samuel, of whom further. 10. Benjamin, a farmer in Granville town- 
ship: married Sarah Anderson. All the children of Mr. McCoy are 
dead. For years after his death the good influence of his life was felt. 



7o8 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

his patience and submission to his great affliction binding him to his 
friends and parishioners. 

(II) Samuel Harvey McCoy, son of Robert and Mary (IHff) 
McCoy, was born December i, 1818, in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, 
and died June 8, 1890, in Mifflin county, Pennsylvania. He was edu-, 
cated in the township schools and under the direction of his father, who 
was well educated for a Dissenter minister. He began farming while 
young, anil through thrift and energy was finally able to purchase a large 
body of land, which he converted into an up-to-date farm for those da}-s. 
He was one of the progressive citizens of the county, advocating at all 
times the principles of progress, not only for himself but his neighbors 
as well. He became a Republican on the organization of that party and 
supported it staunchly and actively. He held many township offices, 
giving satisfaction in each. He married Rachael J. Anderson, born 
January 2}^, 1S24, in Granville township, and died Jime 16, 1903, in 
Lewistown, ^lifflin county. She was the daughter of Joseph and Jane 
(McCord) Anderson, who were natives of Ireland, but settled in Mif- 
flin county in the early part of the nineteenth century. He was a farmer 
and distiller near Longfellow, Mifflin county, and was wonderfully pros- 
perous until his accidental death by drowning while he was in his prime. 
Both he and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Cliilclren : 

I. Rachael, married Samuel Harvey McCoy. 2. Sarah, mar- 
ried Benjamin McCoy. 3. Mary, married Thompson Bell, a farmer in 
Derry township, Mifflin county. Children of Samuel Harvey and Ra- 
chael J. (Anderson) McCoy: i. Francis I., born January 16. 1847, a 
fanner: died in 1907: married Rebeca Pennapaker. 2. Charles How- 
ard, born February 10. 1851, a grain dealer in the west; married Lillian 
'I'aylor. 3. Anna M., born March 16, 1853, unmarried. 4. William 
Thompson, of whom further. 5. Samuel Edward, born March i, i860, 
unmarried : makes home with his sister Anna in Lewistown. 

( 11 h William Thompson McCoy, son of Samuel Harvey and Ra- 
chael j. ( Anilerson) McCoy, was born December 25. 1857. in Granville 
townshii). Milllin county. He received his education in the common 
schools of the township and as a young man followed farming as an 
occupation, and has done so until the present time (1913). His home 
farm comprises one hundred and forty-seven well-tilled acres, on which 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 709 

he does general farming and stock raising, making a specialty of dairy- 
ing. He has another farm of one hundred and twenty-five acres in 
Granville township which he rents. He is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and is a Republican in politics, and has held, accept- 
ably, township offices. 

William T. McCoy married. May 16, 1883, Juniata A. Collins, 
born April 14, i860, in Mt. L'nion, Huntingdon county, a daughter of 
Thomas and ]\Iargaret (Hooper) Collins. Children: i. Eva Margaret, 
born March 13, 1884; married Morris Amon, a farmer of Oliver town- 
ship, Mifflin county. 2. George W., born October 26, 1885, unmarried. 
3. James Hugh, born August 18, 1887, at home. 4. Robert Thompson, 
born April 3, 1890, at home. 5. Samuel Honnan, born September 26, 
1893, graduated from Lewistown high school, and is now an employee 
in Standard Steel Works. 6. Mary Rachael, twin of Samuel H. 7. 
Grace, born September 17, 1898. 8. Elizabeth Collins, born July 5, 
1902. 

(The Collins Line). 

James Collins, the paternal grandfather of Mrs. William Thompson 
McCoy, lived in Fulton county, Pennsylvania. Later he moved to 
Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. He was an iron worker by trade. 
He married Mariah Reeder, and among their children was Thomas, of 
whom further. 

(II) Thomas Collins, son of James and ]\Iariah (Reeder) Collins, 
was born March 12, 1834, in Fulton county, Pennsylvania. He was an 
iron worker in his younger days, but in later years was employed by the 
Pennsylvania Railway. He married Margaret Hooper, born February 
24, 1835, in Huntingdon county, a daughter of Phillip and Margaret 
(Robinson) Hooper, who were early settlers in Huntingdon county, 
where he was a farmer and an extensive land owner. Thomas Collins 
enlisted in the civil war in Company K, Two Hundred and Second Regi- 
ment Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served nearly a year, or the full 
time of his enlistment. He died December 5, 1883, and his wife fol- 
lowed him July 15, 1885. Both were highly esteemed in the various 
places in which they lived in their long life. Children: i. Juniata, 
married William Thompson McCoy (see McCoy III). 2. Alice, mar- 
ried C. C. Morrison. 3. Selina, died at the age of seventeen. 4. James 
Howard, married Mary Hammelbaugh. 6. Elsie, died in youth. 



7IO HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

From far-off Germany came Peter Dreyer, born in that 
DREYER country July ii, 1854, son of Fulton and Katerine 
(Cashdollar) Dreyer, who were born, lived, and died in 
Germany. Peter was one of the four sons of Fulton Dreyer, his 
brcjlhcrs Jacob, Frank and Deobalt all being deceased. Peter and his 
brother Frank left their native land, came to the United States, and 
settled first at Pine Grove, Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, but soon 
afterward Peter came to Lewistown, his brother returning to Germany. 
Peter, before coming to the United States, had served in the German 
arm\- and partly learned the barber's trade. After coming to Lewis- 
town he finished his trade, became an expert worker, and in 1870 estab- 
lished in business for himself. He has been very successful and has a 
well-equipped and well-patronized shop at Valley street. For about 
three years he engaged in the poultry business, and otherwise has been 
in business continuously. He is a Democrat in politics and is a member 
of the Episcopal Church. He belongs to Lewistown Lodge, No. 203, 
Free and Accepted Masons ; The Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and the Knights of the Golden Eagle. He married, June 11, 1875, Re- 
becca Davis, daughter of William Davis, an early settler in Lewistown, 
coming from England, with his wife, Susan (Bice) Davis, both de- 
ceased. Children of Peter and Rebecca Dreyer: Frederick, Sadie, Jean- 
ncttc. Catherine, Paul Edgar. 



John Henry Saxton, of Lewistown, Pennsylvania, is of 
SAXTON good old Englisli stock that has been planted in America 

nearly two hundred and fifty years. The first mention 
of John Saxton was in the records of Massachusetts in 1668, and it is 
thought that from him have sprung the Saxtons of the United States. 

John Henry Saxton, son of Leonard and Anna (McCullough) Sax- 
ton (see Leonard Saxton, this work), was born December 16, 1875, in 
Lewistown. Pennsylvania. He was educated in the public schools, and 
during vacations drove his father's boat. Leaving school while yet 
young, he clerked for Wills and Jackson in their grocery store. In 1893 
he was apprenticed to the Lewistown Gazette and took such a vivid in- 
terest in ;ill ilial pertains to a i)rinting office of a newspaper that six 
years later he was made foreman, the mechanical skill displayed 
in the paper speaking for his ability in that capacity. He is a Repub- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 711 

lican in politics, working for that party at all times. He was borough 
auditor for three years and secretary of the town council since 19 10. In 
191 1 he was elected county auditor, which position he fills at the present 
time (1913), and is also secretary of the council. He is a member in 
high standing in the Lewistown Lodge of A. F. A. M., No. 203, and of 
the P. O. S. of A. and P. O. of A., the Royal Arcanum, the Loyal 
Association, and has been secretary of the P. O. S of A. since 1901. He 
is a member of the Lutheran church, attending with his family. He 
married, November 4, 1897, Emma Baum Shatzer, born at New Castle, 
Pennsylvania, a daughter of John Henry Shatzer, a brother of Richard 
Shatzer, who was a son of David Shatzer (see Shatzer, this work). 
Children: i. John Leonard. 2. George Robert. 3. Henry McCul- 
lough. 4. Donald Kimball. 5. James Richard, all of whom make their 
homes with their parents, No. 207 South Brown street, Lewistown. 



The Peters family of Lewistown, Pennsylvania, herein 
PETERS recorded, are of Scotch-German ancestry. The paternal 

progenitor, George Peters, being of Scotch, his wife, 
Elizabeth Wagner, of German ancestry. George Peters grew to man- 
hood near Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania, at the home of his foster parents, 
the Beichtels, where he learned the tailor's trade. He worked, as was 
the ancient custom, among the families of the neighborhood, going to 
their homes and living until outfits for the whole family were completed. 
He continued this mode of work until after his marriage, then settled 
in Reedsville, Mifflin county, where he opened a shop and had trade 
come to him. He was a good workman and continued business until old 
aae called a halt. He was for fourteen vears sexton of the East Kisha- 
coquillas Presbyterian Church, although both he and his wife were 
Lutherans. In later life Mr. Peters joined the Methodist Episcopal 
church. He died in 1875, ^g^^ eighty-four years, his wife following 
him to the grave in 1880, aged seventy-eight years. He married (first) 
a Miss Deemer, who bore him two children ; Isaac, settled in Zanesville, 
Ohio, and Betsey, married Isaac Whitman, of Belleville, Pennsylvania. 
He married (second) Elizabeth, daughter of Adam and Mary (Knepp) 
\\'agner: she was one of a family of eleven. Children of George and 
Elizabeth (Wagner) Peters: i. Levi, a soldier of the Mexican war, 
under Captain Irwin, in which he contracted a disease from which he 



712 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

died sliortly after his return, aged twenty-five years. 2. Elizabeth, died 
in infancy. 3. Mary, died in infancy. 4. Aaron, died in 19 10, aged 
seventy-eight years; married (first) Sophia Beaver, one child; married 
(second) Lavina Hassinger, thirteen children. 5. Harriet, died in 1863, 
married (first) William Hockenberry, (second) Edward Treaster. 6. 
Jacob, died aged seventeen. 7. Henry Tillman, of whom further. 8. 
William, a farmer of Reedsville; died soon after his marriage to Mary 
Fultz. 9. George, died in 1910 at Cold Water, Michigan; married 
Sarah Camp. 10. Polly Ann, died in 1908 at Reedsville, Pennsylvania; 
married William Hulbrook. 11. Catherine, married (first) Joseph 
Purcell, a corporal in the civil war; (second) John Wagner; they now 
reside at Altoona, Pennsylvania. 12. Louisa, died in childhood. 13. 
Died in infancy. 

(II) Henry Tillman, son of George and Elizabeth (W^agner) 
Peters, was born in Decatur township, Snyder county, Pennsylvania, 
July 4. 1837, and is now (1913) living retired in Lewistown, Pensyl- 
vania. He attended the old "Church Hill" school in Brown township, 
his parents settling there in 1838. Later they moved to Reedsville, 
where Henry T. grew to manhood. He worked for the neighboring 
farmers until he was nineteen years of age, then entered the employ of 
the William Mann Axe Company, where he worked for twenty-seven 
years as polisher and wheel dresser. He then retired, but continued to 
live at Reedsville until 1898. when he purchased a farm of one hundred 
and twenty-three acres in Granville township on which he resided seven 
years ; then moved to Lewistown, where he purchased a good stone house 
on Electric avenue in which he lived until 1901. In the latter year he 
l)uilt a residence on the opposite side of the avenue, in which he now 
resides, retired from business life and enjoying the fruits of his years of 
industry in a quiet way. He affiliated with the Democratic party all his 
life until 1904, then and since supporting Republican national nominees, 
but locally voting independently. He served as supervisor of Brown 
township three years, but has never sought public office. In religious 
faith he is a Methodist. 

He married (first), October i, 1859, Sarah M., daughter of Henry 
and Barbara (Houser) Wagner. Henry Wagner died February, 1878, 
aged sixty-nine years; his wife Barbara died in 1889, aged seventv-eight 
years ; their children were : Matilda, married Joel Price ; Mary, married 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 



/M 



William Nieman; Catherine, married Frank Price; Amos, married Lucy 
Ann Price; Adam, married and moved to Michigan; Sarah M., married 
Henry T. Peters, and died on Christmas Day, 1896; \\'illiam. married 
Mary Lyter; Jacob, died in infancy; Elias, married and moved to ^lich- 
igan; Absalom, married Nettie Bell; John, married Annie Shoop, died in 
1897; Joseph, married Mattie McGary. Henry T. Peters married (sec- 
ond), January 23, 1898, Mrs. Caroline (Gilbert) Miller, widow of 
Charles Miller and daughter of Jacob and Catherine (Teats) Gilbert, 
old settlers of Middleburg, Snyder county, Pennsylvania. Children of 
Henry T. and Sarah M. Peters: i. Barbara, married Joseph Kelley and 
resides in Reedsville. 2. William John, a plumber and justice of the 
peace at Mill Hall, Pennsylvania, an axemaker. 3. Charles Walter, of 
whom further. 4. Emma, married Harry Boyer and resides in Denver, 
Colorado. 5. Harry, resides in Lewistown. 6. Clark, a tinner and 
plumber of Reedsville, Pennsylvania ; married Mary Conley. 7. Theo- 
dore W., died aged five years. 8. Calvin Oscar, died aged three vears; 
he and his brother Theodore died within a week, in February, 1878. 9. 
Robert, a minister of the Methodist Episcopal church, stationed at 
Beaver Meadow, Pennsylvania. 10. Ira Clay, a merchant of Burnham, 
Pennsylvania. 

(Ill) Charles \\'alter, son of Henry T. Peters and his first wife, 
Sarah M. (\\"agner) Peters, was born in Reedsville, Pennsylvania, Jan- 
uary II, 1865. He was educated in the public schools and on arriving 
at a suitable age learned the tinning and plumbing business. He became 
an expert workman and for several years traveled the states of Penn- 
sylvania, Ohio, Kentucky and West Virginia, working as a journeyman. 
He finally located in Huntington, West Virginia, and there engaged in 
the plumbing business for about fifteen years. In 1905 he came to Lew- 
istown, built a good home on Electric avenue, just outside the city lim- 
its, and opened a business place on the Pike at Burnham, where he 
successfully conducts a plumbing and tinning business. He is a Demo- 
crat in politics and has served on the school board, also was mayor of 
the town of Kenova, West Virginia. He is a member of the Master 
Plumbers Association, also of the American Guild; the LTniform Rank, 
Knights of Pythias, and both he and his wife belong to the Methodist 
Episcopal church. He is an active, energetic business man and excels 
in all that pertains to his craft. 



714 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

He married, in Cincinnati, Ohio, Carrie J. Burger, born in Kentucky, 
daughter of John and Pauline (Newman) Burger. Children: i. Ray. 
2. Fay, twin of Ray, both died in infancy. 3. Hazel Marie, died in 
1912; married Earl Challenger, and had Pauline and Earl Linn. 4. 
Charles Walter (2), a plumber. 5. Erma Lucille. 6. Pauline, died in 
infancy. 7. John Henry, a plumber. 8. Ruth May. 



The first record found of the Wentz family in Montgom- 

WENTZ ery county, Pennsylvania (then Philadelphia), is in 1755, 

when Jacob Wentz, a German, bought land in Worcester 

township for four hundred and sixty-two pounds. He had been in the 

county some time and owned other lands. 

(II) Abraham, son of Jacob Wentz, was assessed in 1762 in Whit- 
pain township, ]\Iontgomery county, Pennsylvania, as an innkeeper and 
the owner of one hundred and fifty acres of farm land, which remained 
in the family nearly a century and a half. 

(III) Samuel, son of Abraham Wentz, was living in Center 
Square, Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, in 18 19, but during the war 
of 1812 was living in Philadelphia, which was also the city in which he 
died. He married Sarah Tatum and had issue. 

(IV) William T., son of Samuel and Sarah (Tatum) Wentz, was 
born in Philadelphia, and died in 1876. He was a Douglas Democrat, 
but after the war a Republican, and was a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. He married Elizabeth Waithman, born at Cape 
May, New Jersey, died in 1892, aged eighty-two, at Tottensville, 
New York ; her father, a sea-faring man, was a resident of Dennisville, 
Cape May county. New Jersey. Of the seven children of William T. 
Wentz, three are living: William, Sarah and Frank H. 

(V) Frank H., son of William T. and Elizabeth (Waithman) 
Wentz, was born in Philadelphia, February 28, 1844. He was educated 
in the public schools and at the age of fourteen years, in 1858, came to 
Lewistown, where he began serving an apprenticeship at cabinetmaking 
with R. H. McClintic. In 186 1 he enlisted in the Logan Guards, and 
with them went to the front as three-months men. The "Guards" were 
the first company to report for duty at Harrisburg and the first Penn- 
sylvania troops sworn into the United States service from that state. 
They passed through Baltimore, one day before the Sixth Massachusetts 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 715 

Regiment, and. although hooted and jeered by the mob, were not at- 
tacked. After his three months term expired, Mr. Wentz reentered for 
three years in Company F, One Hundred and Seventh Regiment Penn- 
sylvania Volunteer Infantry, commanded by Colonel T. F. McCoy. He 
was in continuous service, fighting with the army of the Potomac at 
Cedar Mountain, Thoroughfare Gap, Second Bull Run, Antietam, South 
Mountain and Fredericksburg. When he entered his second enlistment 
he was sworn in as orderly sergeant, and on March 25, 1863, was com- 
missioned lieutenant of Company F, One Hundred and Se\enth Regi- 
ment Pennsylvania Volunteers. He was wounded at Gettysburg, July i, 
1863, and for a few days held a prisoner by the Confederates. After 
his recovery he was assigned to duty, first, at Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania, and later at Fort Mifflin, as post adjutant. 1864-1865, acting as 
assistant quartermaster and assistant commissary of substance. In 1865 
he was brevetted captain for "gallant and meritorious conduct on the 
field of battle." He returned to Lewistown after the war and was in the 
shoe business for a time. About 1872 he established a bottling business, 
which he has conducted most successfully ever since. He is a Republican 
in politics, and for the past eighteen years has been through successive 
elections auditor of Mifflin county. He was chief engineer of the fire 
department for several years and is a member of Lewistown Lodge, No. 
203, Free and Accepted Masons, which he joined in 1868. He was for- 
merly a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and was 
vice-president of The First Defenders Association, 1910-1911 and 1912. 
Captain Wentz married, January 30, 1868, Emmeline JMiller, born 
March 28, 1844, in Lewistown, died April 29, 1905, daughter of George 
Miller. Children: i. Charles, died at the age of four years. 2. George 
Miller, born October 23, 1871. now living in Lewistown. 3. Mary, 
married Edward Mavberrv and resides in Lewistown. 



James D. Studer, of Belleville, Mifflin county, Pennsyl- 
STL^DER vania. descends from German ancestry in a direct line on 

the paternal side. His great-grandfather crossed the At- 
lantic from the Fatherland during the first part of the last century and 
established himself with his family in Pennsylvania. From him and his 
sturdy sons have descended all of the name in and around Belleville. 
Among his children was one, Jacob, of whom further. 



7i6 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

(I) Jacob Studer, son of the original immigrant of the name, was 
a native of Germany, coming to Pennsylvania with his father. He 
married Racey ]\Iiller, and located in Union township. He was a watch 
and clock repairer by vocation and traveled over a large part of Penn- 
sylvania plying his trade, his itinerary often taking him far from home. 
Through this he came to be well and favorably known to a large num- 
ber of patrons. Among his children was one, Joseph W., of whom 
further. 

(II) Joseph W. Studer, son of Jacob and Racey (Miller) Studer, 
was born and reared in Union township. He attended the common 
schools. He was a stone mason and farmer combined. In politics he 
was a Democrat and was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
He married Rebecca Bethlehem, the daughter of a neighbor. He was 
born in 1839 and she in 1847 ^t Greenwood Furnace, in Stone Valley. 
Children: i. William, a stone mason in Belleville. 2. James D., of 
whom further. 3. Jennie, married Rufus Peachey of Belleville. 4. 
Archie, a stone mason. 5. Joseph Alvin, a stone mason. 

(III) James D. Studer, son of Joseph W. and Rebecca (Bethle- 
hem) Studer, was born April 27, 1871, in Union township, MifHin 
county, Pennsylvania. He was educated in the common schools of the 
township. Leaving school, he learned the stone mason's trade under 
the tutelage of his father and brother William when fourteen 3'ears of 
age. He followed this occupation until August, 1912, when he accepted 
a position with Hertzler and Zook in their machine shop at Belleville, 
where he now resides. During: the vears that he worked at the stone 
mason's trade he accumulated quite a nice property. He invested his 
savings in real estate, erected houses on it, and resold at a profit. He is 
now owner of a block of houses on Main street in Belleville, besides the 
home in which he lives. Like his forbears, he is a Republican in poli- 
tics, always voting the straight ticket. He is a member of the P. O. S. 
of America, and with his wife is a member of the Lutheran church. 
He married (first) Rosana Hunter, in 1896, who died in 1899. leaving 
no children. He married (second) Elizabeth Bennett, of Belleville, born 
May 15, 1880, daughter of Nelson and Clara (Wise) Bennett. Chil- 
dren: I. Earl, born July 27, 1901. 2. Joseph, born January 4, 1903. 
3. James, born .\pril 18, 1905. 

Edmund Bennett, the grandfather of Mrs. James D. Studer (Eliza- 



/ V 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

beth Bennett), was of English extraction. He married Margaret ■, 

who died in 1908. He died when only thirty-eight years old. Among 
his children was one, Nelson, of whom further. 

Nelson Bennett, son of Edmund and Margaret Bennett, was born in 
1853, died 1908. He married Clara Wise, born 1850, in Belleville. 
Pennsylvania. Children: i. Elmer. 2. Edmund, died in 1909. 3. 
Henry. 4. Mary. 5. Elizabeth, married James D. Studer (see Studer 
III). 6. Margaret. 7. Bruce. 



A long-established and important family in Pennsylvania is 
KEIM that of Keim, to which George Bon Keim, of Lewistown. 

belongs. The first of the name to cross the ocean for the 
New World was one Daniel, who came from Frankfort-on-the-Rhine. 
where many of the name reside to-day. It is not known where or when 
he landed in America, but it is conjectured that it was New York, as 
so many of his fellow countrymen were emigrating about the same time, 
with New York as their objective point. He migrated to Pennsylvania, 
probably Berks county, and there located. 

(I) Daniel Keim, German immigrant from Frankfort-on-the- 
Rhine, was the first of the name in America. He located in Pennsyl- 
vania, possibly Berks county, there married and reared a family. He 
followed in America the same trade that he had in Germany, that of a 
miller. Among his children was George, of whom further. 

(II) George Keim, son of Daniel Keim, was an early settler at 
McVeytown, Pennsylvania. He was of direct German descent and was 
probably born in Berks county, where he grew up. He was a miller, fol- 
lowing the vocation of his father, and was the first of the trade in that 
part of the state. His millstones were cut from the rock of the moun- 
tains near the mill. He lived some time at Ryde, Mifflin county, later 
moving to McVeytown, and there died at an advanced age. He married 
Peggy Voght, like himself the daughter of German extraction. His death 
occurred in 1838. They were both members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. Children: i. George; married (first) Ellen Logan, married 
(second) Mary Bradley; he was a contractor and boatman and later ran 
an omnibus line; died in Elk county, Pennsylvania. 2. Daniel, of whom 
further. 3. William, moved to state of New York and died there. 4. 
Samuel, a miller near McVeytown. 5. Isaac, married Miss Gilliland, 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 



\\iio In 



ived in vicinity of Newton, Hamilton county, Pennsylvania. 6. 
Sallie, married Peter Rhodes, who lives in Lewistown. 7. Peggy, mar- 
ried John DeVore, who lived at McVeytown. 

(Ill) Daniel Keim, son of George and Peggy (Voght) Keim, was 
born in 1805, near Reading, Berks county, Pennsylvania, and was mar- 
ried when he moved to Lewistown, Mifflin county. He learned the mill- 
er's trade and ran the first mill at McVeytown, known as the Couch mill. 
From there he went to Newton, and then to Milroy, going later to Allen- 
ville, where he died, March 10, 1909. He married Rebecca Stewart, 
born 1824, died September 15, 1902, daughter of William A. and Rachel 
Stewart, classed among the pioneer settlers of McVeytown. He was a 
Republican, voting for Lincoln, and they were both members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. Children: i. Charles, born September 27, 
1848, a power loom weaver, now retired, lives at Milroy; married Wil- 
helmina Dangler. 2. Ella, married James Wooding; she is dead. 3. 
Cordelia, died in infancy. 4. A son, died in infancy. 5. Jackson, a 
traveling salesman; lived and died in Van Wert, Ohio. 6. William R., 
lives at Van Wert, Ohio, deals in farm implements and hardware. 7. 
Jennie, widow of Clarence E. Gifford ; lives at Jamestown, New York. 
8. George Bon, of whom further. 

(IV) George Bon Keim, son of Daniel and Rebecca (Stewart) 
Keim, was born June 9, 1868, in Mifflin county, Pennsylvania. He re- 
ceived his education in the town schools of Allenville, and on leaving 
was employed for two years in a mill. In 1882 he went to Lewistown and 
for ten years was engaged as salesman, in two different stores — one a 
grocery concern, the other a dry goods firm, of which he became man- 
ager. In 1892 he opened up a line of chinaware, pottery, etc., and has 
been on the road since that time as traveling salesman, with territory in 
central Pennsylvania. For the past seventeen years he has been sales- 
man for Fisher, P.ruce and Company, of Philadelphia. He has advanced 
the interests of his firm in every way, and ranks high with his fellow 
salesmen because of his high sense of honor, energy and efficiency. In 
politics he is a Republican, and has been president of his borough council 
for four years, lie held other offices in the council before he was elected 
])resident. Both he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church, and he has been trustee many years of the church and was 
superintendent of the Sunday school for twelve vears. He resigned this 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 719 

position when elected president of the Mifflin county Sunday school 
work, which he holds at the present time and for which he works most 
zealously. By his able methods, enthusiasm and belief in his work he 
has brought Mifflin county prominently forward in the line of Sunday 
school work. He is a JMason, a member of the Lewistown Lodge, Xo. 
203 ; belongs to the Royal Arcanum and takes an interest in all other 
societies and orders that make for public good and improvement. He 
married, June 16, 1887, Lou A. Rhodes, daughter of Colonel John K. 
Rhodes, one of the notable old residents of that section. Children: i. 
Elizabeth, born February 28, 1S90; educated at Williamsport Dickinson 
Seminary; married George Glenn and lives at Lewistown. 2. Margaret, 
born February 2, 1895; graduated from Lewistown high school, and is 
now a student of music under Professor Lane. 

(The Stewart Line). 

Among the old families of Pennsylvania is that of Stewart. The 
first to come over from Scotland was Angus, a member of the Stewart 
clan in the Highlands. William A. Stewart, the maternal grandfather of 
George Bon Heim, was an artisan, though his real occupation for the. 
greater part of his life was farming, and he was one of the land owners 
in Wayne township. He was a soldier in the war of 18 12. His wife 
was named Rachel, surname unknown. Children: i. William. 2. 
John. 3. James. 4. Rebecca; married Daniel Iveim (see Keim HI). 
5. Susan. After the death of William Stewart, Rachel Stewart mar- 
ried (second) David Sunderland, by whom she had one child, Julia. 



The Culbertsons came originally from Scotland to 
CULBERTSON the north of Ireland, from whence in 1736 came 

Samuel Culbertson, settling in Londongrove town- 
ship, Chester county, Pennsylvania. He appears on the tax records of 
that year as follows : "George Hodgson conveyed to Samuel Culbert- 
son, April 6, 1736, land in this township." He made his will i\Iay 15, 
1741. His wife Frances did not long survive him. Children: r. Wil- 
liam (of further mention). 2. John, settled in Armagh township, Cum- 
berland county, Pennsylvania, where he made his will in 1785. His 
wife, Agnes, born 1726, died 1808; eight children. 3. Kittrena, mar- 
ried a Mr. Dongrey. 



720 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

(II) William, eldest son of Samuel Culbertson, was born in Lon- 
donderry county, Ireland, and undoubtedly came to Pennsylvania with 
his father in 1736. He was executive of his father's will and lived in 
Londongrove township, Chester county, until 1771, when he was granted 
a large tract of land (six hundred acres) in East Pennsborough town- 
ship (now Silver Spring township), Cumberland county, where he set- 
tled and lived until his death in May, 1785. He married Margaret , 

and lived seven miles east of Carlisle, Pennsylvania. Children: i. 
Samuel (of whom further). 2. William (2), born 1760, died May 18, 
1798, married Xancy Bell and left issue. 3. Frances, married Mr. 
Johnston, of Virginia, and had four sons. 

(III) Samuel, son of William and Margaret Culbertson, was born 
in Londongrove township, Chester county, Pennsylvania, in 1742, died 
April I, 1807. He moved to Silver Spring township, Cumberland 
countv, in 177 1, with his father, and lived on the old farm there. He 
married Elizabeth Urie, born 1765, died July 24, 1803. He was a pros- 
perous farmer; justice of the peace; wrote wills and was an elder of the 
Silver Spring Presbyterian Church and a man of exemplary life, influ- 
ence and usefulness. He was a member of the supreme executive council 
of Pennsylvania and an ardent patriot. His farm in Cumberland county 
is yet owned in the family. Children: i. William, born 1801, died 
1878, a dry goods merchant at Lewistown, Pennsylvania, from 1825 to 
1837. then returned to his farm in Cumberland county, married and left 
issue 2. Doctor James (of whom further). 

(IV) Doctor James, son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Urie) Culbert- 
son, was born in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, near Carlisle, on the 
old Culbertson homestead, March 12, 1803, died at Lewistown, Pennsyl- 
vania, March 30. 1854. He was but an infant when his mother died and 
but four years old when deprived also of a father's care. He was taken 
into the family of his legal guardian, Thomas Urie, with whom he lived 
until he was twelve years of age. He then was sent to Hopewell Acad- 
emy, Shippensl)urg, Pennsylvania, later entering in the sophomore year 
Dickinson College, at Carlisle, whence he was graduated, class of 1824. 
He determined to become a ]jhysician, and began medical studv vmder 
Dr. Adam Plays, of Carlisle, then with Dr. Horner of Philadelphia, later 
entered the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania, 
whence he was graduated (M. D.) April 6, 1827. After an extended 



HISTORY OF THE JUNL^TA VALLEY 721 

European tour. Dr. Culbertson located, in 1828, in Lewistown, Mifflin 
county, Pennsylvania, where he was in continuous active practice until 
his death. For the first three years he was associated with Dr. Edmund 
Patterson, after which he practised alone. He was a skillful physician, 
well versed in surgery, but especially expert in diagnosis, possessing a 
mind peculiarly fitted to analyze the nature and tendency of disease. 
He kept himself thoroughly informed in medical advancement, being a 
constant reader of the best professional literature of his day. He loved 
his profession, and was never happier than with professional friends. 
He had a large practice, but gave much time and thought to the study of 
geology and mineralogy, contributing many articles to the scientific, as 
well as the medical, journals. He was interested in the work of the gov- 
ernment weather bureau, and for a year was the official observer for his 
district. His work so pleased the bureau officials that they presented him 
with an expensive barometer which is preserved by his son. He be- 
longed to the Geological Society of Pennsylvania and was a lecturer on 
geology; was president of the Mifilin County Medical Society at the 
time of his death. This society attended his funeral in a body, and as a 
mark of respect wore a badge of mourning for thirty days, besides 
passing appreciative resolutions. Dr. Culbertson was a Whig in politics, 
but never accepted public ofiice, save those of trustee of Lewistown z\cad- 
emy and of the Lewistown Bank, these not, however, being of a political 
nature. He w-as a member of the Presbyterian church and a man thor- 
oughly respected and greatly beloved. He married, July 3, 1839, Mary, 
only daughter of Robert Steel, of Lewistown, and his wife (also his 
cousin), Marv Steel, born in New Castle. Delaware. Robert Steel main- 
tained a private school and prepared young men for college. He was an 
accomplished linguist, and besides his pedagogical duties was justice of 
the peace. He died in 1825, his wife in 1828, both Presbyterians. Chil- 
dren of Dr. James and Mary Culbertson: i. William A., born May 29, 
1840, died October 4, 1843. 2. Horace J. (of whom further). 

(V) Horace J., son of Dr. James and Mary (Steel) Culbertson, 
was born in Lewistown, Pennsylvania, May 25, 1842. He prepared at 
Lewistown Academy, and in 1859 entered the sophomore class of Lafay- 
ette College. After completing his college course, he began the study of 
law in 1864. with D. W. Woods, of Lewistown, and was admitted to the 
Mifflin county bar April 6, 1866, and has since been in continuous prac- 



722 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

tice in Lewistown, having a large private practice, and from November, 
1871, to January, 1875, was district attorney of Mifflin county. He has 
also served as council for the board of county commissioners and the 
borough of Lewistown. His term of office as district attorney was ex- 
tended several months by the changes made in the tenure of office by 
the constitutional convention of 1875. Mr. Culbertson practises in all 
the state and federal courts of his district and occupies a leading position 
at the Mifflin county bar. He has important business interests outside 
his profession. In 1900 he was one of the organizers of the Citizens 
National Bank, of Lewistown, and since 1910 has been its honored pres- 
ident; director and counsel of the Mann Edge Tool Company; director 
and counsel of the Lewistown Ice and Storage Company, and a director 
of the Union Trust Company of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. He is a 
member of the State and Mifflin county bar associations, a vestryman of 
the Episcopal church, and in political faith a Republican. He served as 
chairman of the Republican county committee two terms, has been an 
active campaign speaker; delegate to many state conventions of his party, 
and in 1896 was a delegate to the national convention at St. Louis. He 
has always acted with his townsmen for the advancement of Lewistown's 
interest, and has been an important factor in the growth and improve- 
ment of that borough. His military service covers a period of three 
months — June, 1863, to September, 1863 — in Company A, Thirty-sixth 
Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. He married. February 6, 
1867, Julia M. Watts, born in Carlisle. Pennsylvania, daughter of Judge 
Frederick Watts. Children: i. Frederick N., born March 21, 1868, 
graduate of Lafayette College, read law with his father, was admitted 
to the bar of Mifflin county, and served as district attorney, 1902-1905, 
now engaged in legal practice with his father in Lewistown. He mar- 
ried Emily L. Porter and has: Horace James and Elizabeth Lanning. 
2. Mary Steel, educated in Lewistown Academy, resides at home. 3. 
Julia N., educated at St. Margaret's School, Waterbury, Connecticut, 
resides at home. 4. Anna M. R., educated at Miss Carey's School at 
Baltimore, Maryland, resides at home. 



The progenitors of Joseph McGregor Young, of Belle- 

YOUNG villc, Pennsylvania, came to Mifflin county from England, 

and were among the early settlers. The earliest record 

found in tlie county is of David Young, a weaver, who with his wife 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY j2i 

Catherine lived in Union township, where they died. He was not u land 
owner, but followed his trade. Of their eleven children but one sur- 
vives, Jacob, who resides in Lewistown. Children: Robert, John, 
Richard, David, of whom further; Jacob, the last survivor; Wesley; 
Maria, died in the west; Jane, married Isaac Pierce; Rachel, married 
Cyrus Sample; Mary, married Israel Bigelow ; Elizabeth, married and 
died in the west. 

(II) David, son of David and Catherine Young, was born in Mif- 
fiin county, March ii, 1836. He learned the carpenter's trade, and for 
several years was a journeyman, then began contracting, a business he 
followed until his death. He was well known in Belleville and vicinity, 
there being in that section of the county between three and four hundred 
buildings erected by him during his years as builder and contractor. He 
was a Democrat in politics, and was first a member of the Presbyterian 
church, later a Lutheran. He married, October 15, 1863. Margaret 
Bulick, born in Mifflin county, October 2-^, 1842, who survives him. Slie 
is a daughter of Thomas Nelson and Martha (McGregor) Bulick, and 
granddaughter of Aaron and Mary Bulick, who were born in the state 
of Maryland of English parentage. Martha was a daughter of Joseph 
and Sarah McGregor, he born in Ireland, came to America, where he 
married and settled in Mifflin county, where he followed his trade of 
carpenter. He is buried in the old Presbyterian cemetery in Menno 
township. His widow, Sarah, married (second) James MacFarlane. 
and lived many years thereafter. She is buried in the Lutheran cemetery 
at Belleville. Thomas Nelson Bulick was born in Maryland, but when a 
young man came to Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, where he married 
Martha McGregor, born in that county. They settled in Menno town- 
ship, where he worked at the carpenter's trade until his death, in Oc- 
tober, 1873. His wife died March, 1875. ^^oth were members of the 
Lutheran church. Children : James and John, deceased ; Thomas, lives 
in Harrisburg; Margaret, now the widow of David Young; Emor, de- 
ceased ; Mary, married Solomon Henning and lives in Union townshij) ; 
Sarah, deceased, married Graphus Greenwalt; Franklin, deceased; 
Martha, married Daniel Michael and lives in Union township. Children 
of David and Margaret Young: i. John Nelson, resides in Yeager- 
town, a carpenter; married Annie Smith. 2. Thomas \\'e.sley. a car- 
penter, unmarried, resides at home. 3. James Butler, a carpenter, re- 



724 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

sides in Belleville, also is engaged in the butcher business. He married 
Augusta Rustler. 4. Joseph M., of whom further. 5. David Oscar, 
a carpenter, resides in Belleville ; married Clara Burkett. 6. Emor 
Bulick, a heater at the Standard Steel Works; married Vina Smith 
and resides at Yeagertown. 7. Jesse Wilson, died aged four years. 

(Ill) Joseph M., son of David and Margaret (Bulick) Young, 
was born in Union township, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, September 
24, 1874. He was educated in the public schools of Belleville and in 
early life began working with his father at the carpenter's trade. He 
became an expert workman and also became familiar with the details 
of a contracting business, having been associated with his father until 
his retirement, then continuing the business alone. In 1908 Mr. Young 
added a lumber yard, for the retail sale of lumber and building material 
to his general contracting business. He has erected many of the large 
bams seen in Alifflin county, also the Greybill Mill and Storehouse and 
many residences, both in the county and borough. He is a Democrat in 
politics; was elected constable in 1907 and in 191 1 reelected for four 
years. He is a member of the Lutheran church, the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, and Knights of the (3olden Eagle. He married, July 2, 
1903. Quillas C. Baker, Ijorn in Mifflin county, daughter of George 
Baker, of an old county family. Children: Baker M., born De- 
cember 16, 1907; David Darlington, October 19, 1909. 



This family came to Juniata from Northumberland 
HOWER county, Pennsylvania, Jacob Hower coming from Ger- 
many prior to the year 1800. He settled near Milton, 
Pennsylvania, where he reared a family, including a son Jacob. 

(II) Jacob (2), son of Jacob (i) Hower, was born about the 
year 1800, near Milton, Pennsylvania. He there grew to manhood and 
lived until 1840, when with his family he moved to Fermanagh town- 
shq), Juniata county, where he became a prosperous farmer and large 
land owner, possessing several farms. He was an industrious, retiring 
man, both he and his wife members of the Baptist church. He married 
Mary Morton, of New Jersey, and had issue: i. Nicholas. 2. George, 
born June 25, 1825 ; settled in Juniata county in 1853 ; a lumberman and 
farmer: married (first) Sarah Hagenbach, (second) Eliza Wright. 3. 
Jacob Morton, of whom further. 4. . married Jacob Faust. 5. 




/C' V) yQ&^^xM^Aj 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 725 

, married Elizabeth Nicholas. 6. Eliza, married a Mr. Billmeyer. 

7. Amanda, married a Mr. Pannebaker. 

(III) Jacob Morton, son of Jacob (2) and Mary (]\Iorton) 
Hower, was born in Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, came to 
Fermanagh township, Juniata county, with his parents in 1S40, and 
there died in 191 1. He married and lived on one of his father's farms in 
Fermanagh township, which he later inherited. He was a member of the 
Baptist church, a Republican in politics, holding several township offices. 
He married (first) Harriet Arbogast, who died in 1876, the mother of 
nine children. He married (second) Emma Sanders, the mother of four 
children. Children by first marriage: Henry Clay, of whom further; 
Elijah, Charles, Grant, deceased; Mary, Prudence, deceased; l^ily, and 
two who died in infancy. Children by second wife: Stella, Ellen, 
Blanche and Drew. 

(IV) Henry Clay, eldest son of Jacob Morton and Harriet (Arbo- 
gast) Hower, was born in Fermanagh township, Juniata county, Penn- 
sylvania, Noveiuber 2, i860. He grew to manhood on the liome farm, 
and was educated in the public schools and Airy View Academy. He 
began business life in partnership with his brother, Elijah Hower, under 
the firm name H. C. Hower and Brother, lumbermen, operating largely 
in Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia. This business they have suc- 
cessfully conducted until the present, operating portable saw mills and 
one permanent saw mill in jMaryland that employs fifty men and pro- 
duces six million feet of lumber annually. The three portable mills 
employ about sixty men and operate in di liferent localities. The firm 
are also large wholesalers of lumber, handling besides their own product 
the output of about thirty-five mills in Pennsylvania, Virginia and Mary- 
land. They have been a very successful firm, growing from an humble 
plant consisting of one small portable saw mill, to their present prosper- 
ous proportions. The business has been wisely conducted, each brother 
seconding the efforts of the other and both working energetically for 
their common good. Henry C. Hower is a director of the Juniata Val- 
ley National Bank, at Mififlintown, and interested in all that helps that 
borough to advance materially or morally. He is a Progressive in poli- 
tics, but never has sought or accepted office from any party. He is an 
attendant of the Lutheran church, his wife a member of the Port Royal 
congregation. 



726 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

He married, in 1898, Jeannette Cleck, born in Juniata county, Penn- 
sylvania, daughter of William and Sarah M. Cleck. Children : Dwight, 
Wade, Joyce, Dorn. The family home and home business office is lo- 
cated at Port Royal, where the firm located in 1900. 



The Book family came to Pennsylvania from Germany, 
BOOK settling first in Lancaster county, where John Book, a shoe- 
maker, married Barbara Witmer. Later he abandoned his 
trade and engaged in farming. He was a Whig, served the township in 
various offices, and bore a good reputation ; children : Catherine, mar- 
ried Lewis Evans; Elizabeth, married Isaac Price; Abraham, married 
Mary Keefer; John, of whom further; Samuel, married Annie Coder; 
David, died young; Daniel, married Miss Price of Huntingdon county; 
Esther, married Joseph Keefer; Martha, died unmarried; Henry, mar- 
ried Matilda Burkholder; Jacob. All these children lived and died in the 
Juniata Valley. 

(II) John (2), son of John (i) and Barbara (Witmer) Book, 
was Ixjrn in Lancaster county in 1804, died in Walker township, Juniata 
county, Pennsylvania, in May, 188 1. He was a wealthy farmer and 
extensive land owner, but in later life converted his property into cash, 
which he invested in loans. He was a Republican in politics, and both 
he and his wife members of the religious sect known as River Brethren. 
He married Sarah, daughter of Adam Holtzapfel, a teamster of McAl- 
isterville ; she died in 1890; children: Jeremiah, died in infancy; 
Charles W.. of further mention; Martha, married Michael Bashore, a 
farmer of Walker township; Margarette, married James Milliken, a 
farmer of BeaUiownship ; Sarah, married William Clark, a farmer of 
I'ermanagh township; Mary, married Samuel A. Thomas, deceased, a 
farmer of Fermanagh township; William, died aged thirty-four; Thad- 
deus, twice married, a railroad man, now living in Harrisbursr; Emma, 
married Thomas Crimniel, a farmer of Walker township; Henry and 
wife Priscilla, now living in Walker township, he is a farmer. 

(III) Charles W., son of John (2) and Sarah (Holtzapfel) Book, 
was born in Fayette township. Juniata county, Pennsylvania, December 
'3- '^.33- He was reared a farmer and has followed tiiat business al- 
mo.st his entire life. He married. May 6. 1866, Martha A. Milliken, 
born October, 1842, daughter of John and Isabella (Barkley) Milliken 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 727 

of Beal township; children: J. Hohnes, born February 5, 1868, married 
Hulda R. Kiser, and is now a farmer of Turbett township; Charles C, 
of whom further ; Blanche, died aged nine years ; Walter, born July 26, 
1877, married Matilda Pitzman; children: Myra L., born October 13, 
1901 ; Marian Jane, July 17, 1904; Charles W., June 27, 1907; Leona 
Blanche, April 19, 1909, died March i, 1912; Catherine Pitzman, born 
February 27, 1912; Blanche, born 1881, married Jesse Boyer, a steel 
worker, residing in Steelton, Pennsylvania; George \V., born February 
22, 1885, now a farmer, residing in Walker township, married Agnes 
Rowe. 

(IV) Charles Cleon, son of Charles W. and Martha A. (Milliken) 
Book, was born near Mexico, in Walker township, Juniata county, Penn- 
sylvania, October 24, 1869. He was educated in the public schools of 
Mexico, Mifflintown Academy and Eastman's Business College, a grad- 
uate of the latter institution, class of 1891. For about one year he was 
a clerk in the office of the county clerk at Lynchburg, Virginia, then re- 
turned to Juniata county and began teaching, a profession with which 
he has been connected until the present date (1913). His first school 
was in Turbett township, then engaged in Walker township schools, 
thence again to Turbett. Since 1900 he has also engaged in farming 
and stock raising, having a farm of fifty acres. He is interested as a 
stockholder in the People's National Bank of Mifflin and in the Lewis- 
town Market Company. In politics, Mr. Book is a Republican ; progress- 
ive in his beliefs, interested in public affairs, but never seeking office. He 
is highly regarded as an educator, but not less so as an upright, honor- 
able citizen. Both he and his wife are members of the Lutheran 
Church; affiliated with the Port Royal congregation. 

He married, in 1901, Anne Jane, daughter of John (2) Wisehaupt, 
a prominent citizen of Turbett township, an elder and deacon of the 
Lutheran church for thirty years. She is a granddaughter of John ( i ) 
M^'isehaupt, born in Germany, came to Pennsylvania when young and 
became a prosperous farmer. He was an influential public official of 
Turbett township, and one of the first members of the Lutheran church 
in that township, assisted in building the first log house of worship, and 
took a leading part in all church affairs. Children of Charles C. and 
Anne Jane Book: Dorothy, born February 23, 1904; Sarah, November 
20, 1905; Charles Wisehaupt, November 15, 19 12. 



728 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Rev. John Henry Melchior, pastor of the Cliurch of 
MELCHIOR the Sacred Heart, Lewistown, Pennsylvania, is the 
son of John and Catherine Clara ( Stegmeier) Mel- 
chior, both natives of the Kingdom of Bavaria, Germany, but met and 
married in the United States. 

John Melchior was born in Bavaria in 1848. He came to the 
United States during the last year of the Civil War, hoping to join a 
brother who had preceded him to this country. He found that his 
brother had joined the Union some time before, and this decided the boy 
to himself enlist. Though young, he was large and muscular, which 
fact allowed him to pass the recruiting officer's inspection. Shortly after 
his enlistment, he learned that his brother had been killed in battle. 
After serving his term of enlistment, John Melchior settled in Columbia, 
Pennsylvania, where he was married. The young couple shortly after- 
ward located in Middletown, Pennsylvania, where Mr. Melchior became 
a wholesale shoe merchant, continuing successfully until 1905, when he 
moved to Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and became proprietor of the Me- 
chanic's Hotel. He has been a director of the Farmer's Bank of Middle- 
town, and is yet a director of the Middletown Building and Loan Asso- 
ciation. He is a member of the German Lutheran church. He married, 
in Columl)ia. Catherine Clara Stegmeier, liorn in Ba\aria in 1853, died 
in Lancaster, January 7, 1909, a member of the Roman Catholic church. 
She came to the United States when young, located first in Pottstown, 
thence to Columbia, Pennsylvania ; children : Philip Jacob, who suc- 
ceeds his father in business at Lancaster, married Miss Herzog and has 
Helen and Magdalene ; William, proprietor of the \\'all House in Lan- 
caster, married Anna Smith and has: Frances, Marie and William (2) ; 
Rev. John Henry, of whom further ; Marie, Katherine, married Walter 
Piskell and resides in Lancaster. 

Rev. John Henry, son of John and Catherine Clara f Stegmeier) 
IMelchior, was born in Middletown, Pennsylvania, August 11, 1873. He 
obtained his early education in the public and parochial school and at 
Pennsylvania Business College, Philadelphia. He became order clerk at 
the American Iron and Tube Mills in Middletown, continuing one year, 
then began his years of preparatory study for the priesthood. He en- 
tered La Petite Seminary. Montreal, Canada, but the severity of the 
climate drove him southward. He entered St. Marv's College at Em- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 729 

mitsburg, Maryland, whence he was graduated in 1898. He continued 
his studies in divinity at the Seminary of St. Charles at Overbrook, 
Pennsylvania, and in June w^as ordained a priest of the Roman Catholic 
Church by Archbishop Ryan. On June 6, 1901, he celebrated his first 
Mass at the church in Middletown, then for five years was assistant 
pastor of St. Anthony's at Lancaster, Pennsylvania. For the succeeding 
two years he was pastor of St. Mary's Church, York, Pennsylvania, 
thence to St. Mary's at Lebanon, Pennsylvania, for two years, then re- 
turned to St. Anthony's at Lancaster as acting pastor for ten days, 
thence to St. Edward's at Shamokin for five months. He was then lo- 
cated again at St. Anthony's for two months, and during that period 
was spiritual adviser to four Italians sentenced to be hung for murder, 
attending them until the drop fell. Rev. Melchior was then appointed 
pastor of St. Mary's at Berwick, Pennsylvania, remaining eighteen 
months, thence as pastor at Elizabethtown and a mission at I\It. Joy for 
three years. On May i, 1912. he was appointed pastor of the Church of 
the Sacred Heart at Lewistown and of St. Mary's at Burnham, his par- 
ish numbering one hundred and fifty families, worshipping in the two 
churches. Father Melchior is a faithful pastor and has been very suc- 
cessful in his several charges in creating a strong spiritual sentiment as 
well as in wisely ordering the temporal afifairs of his parishes. He is a 
member of the Knights of Columbus and of the Catholic Benevolent 
Legion. He is a Democrat in politics and always takes an active interest 
in local affairs. He is public-spirited and has many warm friends outside 
his own congregation. 



The Potters of Lewistown descend from John Potter of 
POTTER Princeton, New Jersey, a native of Ireland. The earliest 

record of this family is of James Potter, who married 
Catherine, daughter of Sir John Stewart, of Ballymoran, county Down, 
Ireland. 

(II) John, son of James and Catherine (Stewart) Potter, was 
born at the residence of his grandfather, Sir John Stewart, at Bally- 
moran, county Down, Ireland, April 12, 1765. He emigrated to Amer- 
ica in 1784, locating at Charleston, South Carolina, December 15, 1784. 
He married, August 22, 1791 (probably at Charleston, South Carolina), 
Catherine Fuller of Beaufort, South Carolina. He moved to Princeton, 



730 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Xew Tersey. in 1824, and there purchased an estate called "Prospect," 
on a part of which many of the buildings of Princeton University now 
stand. Children of John and Catherine (Fuller) Potter: i. James, 
born August 2, 1793, died February 25, 1862, married, January 4, 1827, 
Sarah Jones Grimes, daughter of Dr. John and Catherine (Jones) 
Grimes, of Savannah, South Carolina. 2. Elizabeth Charlotte, died 
aged twenty months. 3. William Henry, an officer of the American 
Xavv, died at the island of Syra in the Mediterranean, January 30, 1827, 
aged twenty-nine years. An inscription to this effect is on a stone in 
St. MichaeFs churchyard in Savannah, South Carolina. There is no 
record found of his marriage, but it is believed he was married and had 
a son, John (see forward). 4. Harriet Maria, born 1801, died April i, 
1862, married, March 4, 1823, Commodore Robert Field Stockton 
(grandson of Richard Stockton, signer of the Declaration of Independ- 
ence). 5. John Hamilton, died September 12, 1808, aged four years 
and eight months. 6. Thomas Fuller, born December 2, 1806, died Sep- 
tember 27, 1853. He married (first) September 19, 1843, Sarah Jane 
Hall, born January 18, 1818, died May i, 1877, daughter of Charles 
and Elizabeth Hall of Sunbury, Pennsylvania. The children who died 
in infancy are buried with their brother, William Henry, at Savannah, 
while the other three are buried with their families in Trinity church- 
yard, Princeton, New Jersey. 

(IV) John (2), grandson of John (i) Potter and believed to be 
the son of William Henry Potter, died in Princeton, New Jersey. He 
was a well-to-do farmer, owning two hundred acres of well-improved 
farm land. He married and had children : Charles, of whom further ; 
William II., a farmer, of Daysville, Virginia, and Nelson, also a farmer, 
of Daysville. 

(V) Charles, son of John (2) Potter, was born in Trenton, New 
Jersey, in 1844. He inherited one-third of his father's estate and lived 
in Princeton until after the death of bis wife, March 21, 1822, then in 
1883 moved with his brothers to Virginia, settling in Loudoun county, 
inirchased a good oil farm and there resides, passing his winters in 
Florida. In the civil war he enlisted in the Ninth Regiment New Jersey 
Volunteers, served three years, and was honorably discharged with the 
rank of corporal. Pie is a Republican in politics and a member of the 
Bapti-St church. He married (first) Caroline M. Bodine, born in Cran- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 731 

berry, New Jersey, in 1849, there married and died in Princeton, March 
21, 1882. She was a daughter of Peter Bodine, of Monmouth county, 
New Jersey, descendant of Jean Bodine ("Jean Boudin, fugitive 
Medit"), born in France at the village of Medis, along the Gironde, and 
was naturalized in London, England, October 14, 1681, along with his 
second wife, Esther Bridon. He died on Staten Island, New York, as 
early as 1695, leaving a son, Jean (2), and a daughter, Marianne. 
Jean (2) Bodine left a will dated January 7, 1707, in which he mentions 
brothers Eleazor and Franqois, also sisters Esther and Mary (see Bard's 
Huguenot Emigration, Vol. II, pp. 38 and 39). The New Jersey family 
descend from Franqois, son of Jean Bodine, the emigrant. Frangois 
Bodine had a son, Jean (John), born 1727, who married and had a son 
Abraham, who married Mary Low. Their seventh child, Cornelius, 
baptized November. 1755, died June 12, 1820, served in the Revolution 
and fought at the battle of Monmouth. His second son, Peter, baptized 
March 25, 1781. at Readington, New Jersey, died in 1843 ^t Ovid, New 
Jersey. His son, Peter (2) Bodine, settled at Cranberry, New Jersey, 
where he was a contractor and builder until his death. He left issue: 
John, died at Asbury Park, New Jersey: Charles, died on the homestead 
in Cranberry. New Jersey: Emerson, died in Hightstown, New Jersey; 
Caroline M., first wife of Charles Potter, died in Princeton, New Jersey; 
Eliza, married Joseph Thompson and lived in Trenton, New Jersey. 
After moving to Virginia Charles Potter married (second) Sarah Sny- 
der, who bore him six children. Children of Charles Potter by his first 
wife, Caroline M. Bodine: i. Mary J., married Edward Dawson, both 
deceased. 2. Emerson, of whom further. 3. Sarepta, married Thomas 
Sillex and lives at Fairfax, Virginia. 4. Margaret B., married William 
Spain and lives at Fredericksburg, Virginia. 5. Arthur J., resides at 
Falls Church. Virginia, chief wire inspector for the Bell Telephone 
Company in northern Virginia ; is married. Children of Charles Potter 
and his second wife, Sarah Snyder: 6. Caroline, married Mr. Robey 
and resides at Fairfax, Virginia. 7. Adelaide, deceased. 8. William. 
9. Pearl. 10. Paul, twin of Pearl. 11. Lillian. 12. Sylvia. 

(VI) Emerson, son of Charles Potter and his first wife, Caroline 
M. Bodine, was born in Trenton, New Jersey, December 8, 1870. He 
attended the public school and also from his eighth to thirteenth year 
worked in the Trenton potteries. He was thirteen years of age when 



732 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

the family moved to Loudoun county, Virginia, where he spent two years 
on his father's farm. Later he went to Belleville, Maryland, where he 
learned the undertaking business, remaining there three years, then 
working at the same business in Washington, D. C. In 1891 
he came to Lewistown, where he entered the employ of W. A. Felix, 
continuing with him five years. In 1896 he started in business for his 
own account, locating his undertaking establishment at the corner of 
Valley and Chestnut streets, continuing in successful business at that 
location until 1903. He then moved to the building he had erected at 
Nos. 121 and 123 Valley street, a three-story building, combining his 
mortuary establishment and residence. He is well established in business 
and has a perfectly appointed establishment. In 1906 he was elected 
coroner of Mifflin county, and is now serving his third consecutive term. 
Recently a vacancy occurred in the sheriff's office, caused by the death 
of the elected incumbent, and Mr. Potter, as the law provides, assumed 
the duties of the sheriff's office until a successor was appointed, a period 
of eight days. He is a Republican in politics and candidate for high 
sheriff of Mifflin county, member of the Knights of Malta, American 
.Mechanics, Knights of the Maccabees, Loyal Order of Moose, Fraternal 
Order of Eagles ; and both he and his wife are members of the Baptist 
church. 

He married, in 1896, Elizabeth McCauley, born in Mifflin county, 
daughter of Mathew G. McCauley, a minister of the German Baptist 
church (Dunkard). Children: Mahlon E., born May 30. 1897; Gladys 
E., May 4, 1901. 



For many generations the Henry family has lived in 
HENRY Pennsylvania. The immigrant, Henry, came from 

England in 166S, and located first in Massachusetts, after- 
ward going to Connecticut. His sons wandered into Pennsylvania, saw 
the land was fertile, the climate healthful, and decided to make here 
their homes. They brought with them their families, and from them has 
si)rung the present Flenry family. 

(T) Adam Henry, the first of whom there is definite knowledge, 
was born February 4, 183S, in Decatur township, and moved at an early 
age with his parents to Armaugh township, there receiving his education. 
He began farming immediately on leaving school, and continued in that 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 733 

occupation during his life. He passed his last days in ]\Iilroy, where he 
lived about fifteen years. He died November 10, 1908, and his wife died 
May 5, 1882. He married Susannah Hassinger, daughter of Frederick 
Hassinger, an old resident of Armaugh township, of German extrac- 
tion. The children of Adam and Susannah (Hassinger) Henry were: 
I. Fannie, deceased. 2. Reed. 3. Charles E., of whom further. 4. Fran- 
cina. 5. Anna. 6. Alice. 7. Frinnie. 8. Calvin. 9. Died in infancy. 
(II) Charles E., son of Adam and Susannah (Hassinger) Henry, 
was born September 29, 1868, in Armaugh township, Mifflin county, 
Pennsylvania. He was born and reared on the parental farm, was edu- 
cated in the public schools of the township, and at the Milroy High 
School, where he was a close student. On leaving school, he applied 
himself to learning the carpenter's trade, working early and late at it, 
and studying the latest and most approved methods of carpentry. June 
22,, 1909, he began a thorough course in architecture in the Scranton 
(Pennsylvania) I. C. S., and has since then been a contractor and 
builder, branching out with each month, and ever in the market for 
building contracts. For quite a while he lived in Clearfield, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he contracted for and erected some of the handsomest 
buildings in the town. He moved to Reedsville in 1906, and has built 
many of the homes in the little city, and some of the public buildings, 
notably the annex of the Reedsville school. He also l^uilt the Thompson 
Brothers' dye house at Milroy. He is a manufacturer of concrete build- 
ing blocks and bricks, a business that is extending rapidly. He is a 
Democrat, a member of the Knights of the Golden Eagle and of the 
Congregational church. He married. March 17, 1896, Frances Edith 
McClenahen, born in Armaugh township, July 23, 1871, daughter of 
Francis McClenahen (see McClenahen, this work) who represents a 
family that has long been an integral part of Pennsylvania. In 1909 
Mr. Henry built for himself a beautiful home on Walnut street, Reeds- 
ville. and the greater part of the latest style furniture he made himself, 
taking much pride in so doing. He has no children. 



The Robison name has been linked for over a century 

ROBISON and a half with the fair name and high fortunes of the 

state of Pennsylvania. Early English settlers in the 

province in the days when, where are now opulent cities, live towns, busy 



734 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

villages, there was but a wilderness infested with wild beasts and wilder 
men, when the forests were almost impenetrable, they have maintained 
their share, generation by generation, in making the state one of the 
richest and most desirable in the sisterhood of the LTnion. 

(II) James Robison, son of James Robison, a pioneer of Cumber- 
land county, Pennsylvania, dating back to 1724, came to Milford town- 
ship, Juniata county, from Cumberland, located there, and eventually 
died. Among his children was John, of whom further. 

(III) John, son of James Robison, was born near Mififlintown, 
then Mifflin county, about 1792; later he settled in Milford township, 
where he engaged in farming. He was a prominent man of his com- 
munity, an elder in the Presbyterian church, and aided in erecting the 
first church edifice of that denornination in Mifflintown. He was a Whie 
in politics, advocating the policies of that party; but when the Repub- 
lican party was organized he became one of its strongest supporters, and 
was prominent in its councils until the time of his death, which occurred 
in 1888, at the age of ninety-six. He married (first) Jane Kincaid, born 
in Mifflintown, and died in the fifties, at the age of fifty. Children : i. 
James, died in Atlantic City, aged fifty-two years. 2. Joseph Shelburn, 
deceased. 3. John K., of whom further. Mr. Robison married (sec- 
ond) Mary McCrum, and to them one child was born: Harvey, who 
died aged twelve. 

(IV) Colonel John K. Robison, son of John and Jane (Kincaid) 
Robison, was born in Milford township, Juniata county, Pennsylvania, 
July 17, 1829. He received his education in the common schools of the 
township and on leaving them, while yet a youth, he farmed with his 
father. Later he purchased a farm, brought it up to a high state of 
productiveness, farmed on it for years, and sold it in 1912 to Henry 
Lauver, his son-in-law. In 1896 he came to Mifflintown, Tuniata county, 
and built a home at East End, where he now lives. W'hen the civil war 
began he enlisted, in July, 1861, in Company A, First Pennsylvania Cav- 
alry, and was elected captain. He went to the front and' served nine 
months in that regiment. He resigned from it and assisted in organizing 
the Sixteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry and again went to the front as its 
captain. He was ])rom(.te(l, for signal bravery, to the office of lieuten- 
ant-colonel in the same regiment, commanded and served in it until the 
close of the war. He was with Sheridan during much of that'creneral's 




cy K (/LA'xA-'^-^^ 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 735 

campaign. Colonel Robison was twice wounded: first, in October, 1863, 
on a retreat near Auburn Mills, Virginia, and again at Farmersville, 
Virginia, on the way to Appomattox. He is a Republican in politics, 
and takes an active interest in local, state and national issues. Colonel 
Robison served in the Pennsylvania state senate from 1867 to 1870, 
serving on important committees. He was a member of Governor James 
A. Beaver's staff, with the rank of lieutenant-colonel. He is a member 
of the David H. \\'ilson Grand Army Post, No. 134, and also the Union 
Veteran Legion, comprised of the three-year men. He is a member of 
the Presbyterian church. Colonel Robison married (first), in 1850, Isa- 
bella McKinnan, who was born in Juniata county, a daughter of Patrick 
William McKinnan, an early settler in Juniata county. He married 
(second) Rebecca M. Crawford, in May, 1892, a native of Mifflintown, 
and a daughter of Dr. David Crawford. Children by first marriage: i. 
Albert, graduated from Law Department of Princeton College; was 
solicitor for Union Pacific railroad; died in Idaho. 2. William, died 
aged six. 3. Emma, died aged four. 4. James K., of whom further. 
5. Mary, married Henry Lauver, a farmer of Alilford township. 6. 
Laura, married Elmer Stoner, of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. 7. Cora, 
died aged eighteen. 8. Ella, married James Sartian, of Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania. Children by second marriage : 9. Ellen Crawford, born 
March 28, 1893, ^ graduate of Glen Eden Seminary of Poughkeepsie, 
New York. 10. John K., born 1894, now a student in State College. 

(V) James K., son of Colonel John K. and Isabella (McKinnan) 
Robison, was born in the Robison homestead December 9, 1857. He 
was reared on the farm and educated at the public school in ]Milford 
township, and at Port Royal Academy under Professor David Wilson. 
He engaged in work on the farm, and when he was twenty years old he 
learned the coachmaking trade and established himself in that business in 
Alifflintown in 1881. He entered into partnership with B. C. Wagner, 
under the firm name of Wagner and Robison. In 1908 the senior part- 
ner died and Mr. Robison is now sole proprietor, and has a large, ever- 
increasing and lucrative patronage. He owns a fine residence on Third 
street in Mifflintown, and has a place of business on same street. He is a 
Republican and has been a member of the council. He is a member of 
the Presbyterian church and has been since he was twenty-two. 

Mr. Robison married, March i, 1883, Catherine Goshen, born in 



736 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Alifflintown, a daughter of Henry and Eliza (Howe) Goshen, who were 
among tlie early settlers of Mifflin county. Mr. Goshen was a pioneer 
blacksmith and his smithy was known far and wide. Children of J. K. 
Robison: i. Arabella, born in 1885; married J. C. Wilson, of Altoona, 
Pennsylvania, an employee of the Pennsylvania railroad. 2. Alma V., 
born in 1S87; married James Sterrett, of Mifflintown. 3. Eliza Howe, 
born in 1889; married Ralph Lucas, assistant cashier in Trenton (New 
Jersey) Bank. 4. Catherine, deceased. 5. James Kenney, Jr., born in 
1897, a student in high school. 



The Gutshall family of Pennsylvania, of which G. 
GUTSHALL W. Gutshall, of Blain, Pennsylvania, is a member, 
was established in Pennsylvania before the revolu- 
tionary war. The emigrant ancestor came to the New World from 
l'>ankfort-on-the-Main, Germany, about 1762, landing at Philadelphia. 
His son was a soldier in the war of the revolution. 

(I) George Gutshall, a descendant of the emigrant of the same 
name, was a native of Berks county, Pennsylvania, and was born 
about 1780, perhaps earlier. He was a valiant soldier in the war of 
1812, at which time he had been married to Barbara Spohn, a native 
of Berks county, several years, as their first child was born in 1808. 
After peace was declared between the United States and Great Britain 
he returned to his farm and continued in that peaceful vocation until 
his death. He was a very successful agriculturist and accumulated a 
handsome estate before his death, at which time he owned one hundred 
and sixt}-five highly productive acres of land. Both he and his wife 
were members of the German Lutheran church, and were greatly 
respected by their fellow citizens and co-religionists. Children: i. 
Daniel, of whom further. 2. Samuel, a farmer, died in Kansas; mar- 
ried Elizabeth Hollabaugh. 3. Solomon, a farmer in Perry county, 
Pennsylvania: married Elizabeth Rhinesmith. 4. William, a farmer 
in Franklin county, Pennsylvania. 5. Frederick, married Susan Rhine- 
smith. 6. Abraham, unmarried. 7. John, died soon after reaching ma- 
jority. 8. Lydia, married Jacob Ensminger. 9. Hannah, married Solo- 
mon Roth, a farmer. 

(II) Daniel Gutshall, son of George and Barbara (Spohn) Gutshall, 
was born in Perry county, Pennsylvania. December, 1808, and died 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 737 

in Blain, Pennsylvania, May, 1885. He received his education in the 
common schools of the township, and followed the occupation of farm- 
ing all of his life in Jackson township. He retired from active work 
in 1874, eleven years previous to his death. He was one of the lead- 
ing and successful men of his township and one of its most esteemed 
citizens. He was a Democrat in politics and a member of the Lutheran 
church, as was his wife. He married Sarah Bower, born in Madison 
township, Perry county, Pennsylvania, April, 1809, who died in Blain 
June, 1886, a daughter of Abraham and Barbara Bower. Children: 
I. Jane, married John Tressler, a farmer of Perry county. 2. Mary 
B., married George Kern, a retired farmer. 3. William B., a farmer, 
and who served as county commissioner from 1887 to 1892; married 
Emma Rice. 4. Solomon, born January 13, 1839, a farmer and hotel 
proprietor; married Margaret Wagner; one child, Charles B. 5. Caro- 
line, married Amos Watts. 6. Sarah B., married David Bower, a 
farmer and hotel proprietor. 7. Diana, married Wilson Morrison. 
8. Wilson, a blacksmith ; married Susan Draybenstock. 9. Abraham, 
a blacksmith and railway employee in California. 10. Harry W., died 
in 1874; married Mary Johnson. 11. George Washington, of whom 
further. 12. Malinda, died aged twelve. The parents of Mrs. Gut- 
shall, Abraham and Barbara Bower, were old-time residents of Madi- 
son township, near Andersonburg, Perrj' county, and were among the 
prominent people of that section. He was a Democrat and was Demo- 
cratic commissioner of Perry county for years. He was a land owner 
and did general farming on an extensive scale. Both he and his wife 
were members of the Lutheran church, and lie side by side in the 
cemetery near Andersonburg. Children: i. A son, died soon after 
reaching majority. 2. Josephine, married Jonathan Arnold. 3. Re- 
becca, married Jacob Wentz. 4. Sarah, married Daniel Gutshall. 5. 
Elizabeth, married John Beaver. 6. Lydia N., married George M. Loy. 
7. Diana, unmarried. 8. Mary, married Daniel Garber. There were 
other children, but of their births and deaths and subsequent wander- 
ings and marriages no records have been kept. 

(Ill) George Washington Gutshall, son of Daniel and Sarah 
(Bower) Gutshall, was born April 14. 1852, in Jackson township. 
Perry county. Pennsylvania. He received his education at the Red 
Hill public school in Jackson township, and on completing his studies 



738 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

he assisted his father on the farm. In 1889 he purchased a farm in 
Juniata county, Pennsylvania, improved it, erected houses thereon and 
brought it to a high state of fertiHty. This he sold in 1892 and moved 
to a place near Andersonburg. In 1902 he moved to Blain and in 
1905 he entered the grain and feed business, also incorporating coal 
with the two former. He has continued in this to the present time 
(1913). He was appointed assistant station agent at Blain. He is a 
Democrat in politics, a member of the Junior Mechanics and of the 
Lutheran church, as is his wife. 

He married, September 15, 1874, Celestia Bennett, daughter of 
John and Elizabeth (Boiling) Bennett, who were former residents of 
Adams county, but later of Juniata county. Children of Mr. and 
Mrs. Gutshall: i. William, born July, 1876: married May Richard. 
2. Sarah E., born 1878; married Mitchell Morrow, of Pittsburgh. 3. 
Ira W., a farmer in Jackson township; married Grace Drumgole. 4. 
Mary B., unmarried. 5. Margaret Jane, married Clark Drumgole. 
6. George L., in Pittsburgh, preparing himself to teach. 

Creigh Patterson, of Blain, Pennsylvania, descends 
PATTERSON from Scotch-English and German ancestors who 

were old settlers in Pennsylvania. His English 
forbear was Creigh Patterson, who came to America by way of Scot- 
land, where he was connected with the Patterson clan. He reached 
the New World before the revolution, and was a member of the 
Royal Americans under Lord Jeffrey Amherst in his campaign against 
the French and Indians. It is not known if his wife accompanied him, 
or whether he married a colonial lassie, probably the latter. After 
the Declaration of Independence, when he was advanced in years and 
too old for active service in the field, he sent his sons to fight for the 
cause he espoused, and he became known far and near as an ardent 
patriot. 

(I) Creigh Patterson, a descendant of Creigh Patterson the emi- 
grant, was born in the early part of the nineteenth century, in the 
state of Pennsylvania, He married Sarah Stambaugh, daughter of a 
German-American farmer, also of Pennsylvania, and prominent in 
his community. After his marriage to Miss Stambaugh, Mr. Patter- 
son purchased a large tract of wild land in Tyrone township. Perry 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 739 

county, cleared, improved and lived on it until his death. He was one 
of the public-spirited citizens of the township and gave his influence 
to every proposition that was for the public good. Both he and his 
wife were members of the Church of God, and were active in their 
support of it. He was one of the wealthy men of his day and com- 
munity, and left a handsome estate to his heirs. Children: i. Francis, 
a farmer; unmarried. 2. John, a farmer in Tyrone township: mar- 
ried Anna Lightner. 3. George, of whom further. 4. William, died 
in infancy. 5. Harry, died in infancy. 

(II) George Patterson, son of Creigh and Sarah (Stambaugh) 
Patterson, was born March 13, 1846, in Perry county, Pennsylvania. 
He was educated in the common schools of the township, and on com- 
pleting his course he entered the pedagogic profession and taught for 
more than twelve terms, and established for himself an enviable repu- 
tation as a teacher and disciplinarian. Giving up this profession, he 
entered the mercantile field and located at Landisburg. where he soon 
built up a large and lucrative business, which he continued until 1905, 
when he retired. In 1907 he was elected associate judge and served 
until 1912, with honor to himself and the satisfaction of his fellow 
citizens. He is a staunch Republican, working for and voting the 
ticket. He married Elizabeth Rhinesmith, born March 12, 1847, in 
Perry county, Pennsylvania, daughter of Henry and Fannie (Souder) 
Rhinesmith. Mr. Patterson is a member of the Church of God, and 
his wife of the German Reformed church. Children: i. Creigh, of 
whom further. 2. Harry, a railway employee in Idaho. 3. Fred, a 
jeweler in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. 4. Marie, lives at home. The 
parents of Mrs. Patterson, Henry and Fannie (Souder) Rhinesmith, 
were born in Perry county, and were directly descended from hardy 
German families who emigrated to Pennsylvania about the latter part 
of the eighteenth century. Mr. Rhinesmith was a land owner and a 
successful farmer, living near Landisburg, Pennsylvania, nearly thirty 
years, and dying there. He was a Democrat in politics and was asso- 
ciate judge of Perry county for many years. Children: i. William, 
a farmer; married Margaret Kennedy. 2. Elizabeth, married Georsre 
Patterson. 3. James, a stock dealer in Alinda, Spring township. 4. 
Alice, married Thomas Graham. 5. Ida, married Charles Eaton. 

(III) Creigh Patterson, son of George and Elizabeth (Rhinesmith) 



740 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Patterson, was born April 28, 1883, in Landisburg, Perry county, 
Pennsylvania. He received his preparatory education in the schools 
at Landisburg, later attending that of Mercersburg, Pennsylvania. He 
matriculated at the Pennsylvania State College, graduating in 1903. 
Leaving college, he was appointed assistant cashier of the bank of 
Landisburg, which position he retained until 1906, when he moved 
to Blain and was appointed cashier of the bank. He has since formed 
a partnership in a lumber company under the firm name of Bistline, 
Patterson Company. He is a Republican in politics but has never 
held an office. Is a bright member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, Lodge No. 706, of Blain. His wife belongs to the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

He was married, January 10, 191 1, to Mary Kline, daughter of 
William and Catherine (Mumper) Kline, the former a farmer of 
Jackson township. Perry county. Child : George William, born No- 
vember 24, 191 1. 



Frederick Sheafi^er, the earliest ancestor of this fam- 
SHEAFFER ily to come to America, was born in Germany, where 

he was a tiller of the soil, coming to this country 
and settling in Perry county, Pennsylvania, where he passed the re- 
mainder of his days in the occupation of farming. By his wife, Eliza- 
beth, he had a number of children, among whom were : William, Peter, 
Jane. Sarah, and Daniel; the last named being further mentioned 
below. 

(II) Daniel Sheaffer, son of Frederick and Elizabeth Sheaffer, 
was born in Perry county, where he grew to maturity and where he 
became a blacksmith, a calling which he followed all his life. He 
served for a short time in the Union army during the war between 
the states; after which he returned home and died eventually in Perry 
township. He was a Republican in politics, and was a member of the 
German Reformed church, to which his wife also belonged. She was 
a Miss Rebecca Sheibley, born in Perry county, and dying as did also 
her husband, in Perry township. Children: Olivia, married S. P. 
Kern, now deceased, who was a justice of the peace of Blain, Perry 
county; Fred F., of further mention; William, a blacksmith on the 
homestead in Blain, who married first, a Miss Snvder, and second, 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 741 

Ida Nesbit; Samuel, a shipping clerk in Pittsburgh, unmarried: Aloniia, 
married Joseph Wilt, a farmer of Perr}- county ; Ella, married Thomas 
Kinslow, a Chicago salesman; Gertrude, married William Kennedy, a 
Chicago plumber. 

(III) Fred F. Sheaffer, son of Daniel and Rebecca (Sheibley) 
Sheaffer, was born November 22, 1856, in Perry county. He became 
a merchant, conducting business first in Perry county and afterward 
in Mifflin county, having removed to McVeytown in the year 1888; 
here he has been a jeweler ever since coming to the place, and has been 
very successful in his career, having first been associated with the 
firm of Sheibley and Sheaffer. He is one of the best known citizens 
and merchants of this city, and is widely respected, not only in his 
business dealings but in his social relations as well. In politics Mr. 
Sheaffer is a member of the Republican party. He is now a member 
of the Presbyterian church, as is also his wife; though he was formerly 
a member of the German Reformed denomination. He has been twice 
married; his first wife was a Miss Clara Peck, born August 26, 1854, in 
Perry county, the marriage taking place in that county in October, 
1875. She was a daughter of John and Phoebe (Hench) Peck, both 
of whom were born in Perry county. Mr. Peck was a farmer and 
land owner in the county and a very prominent man in the place. He 
was a Republican and a member of the Reformed church, as was also 
his wife, the mother of Mrs. Sheaffer; for he was twice married. 
By his first wife, who was a Miss Hall, he had four children : Floyd, 
Jerome, Scott, and Coler. By his marriage to Phoebe Hench he had 
seven children : John and George, who remained unmarried ; Belle, 
married James Frantz; Clara, who became Mrs. Sheaffer: Anna, mar- 
ried Ferd Miller: Jennie, became Mrs. Aughe, and is now deceased; 
Alice, died unmarried at the age of twenty-two years. 

After the death of the first Mrs. Sheaffer, on February 9, 1905, Mr. 
Sheaffer married again, his second wife having been a Miss May 
Corkle before her marriage. By his first wife Mr. Sheaffer had chil- 
dren : Charles E., of further mention; May, born 1879, died 1910; 
Walter, born 1891. clerk in a Pittsburgh freight office, unmarried; 
Ralph, born 1894, a graduate of McVeytown High School, 1913. No 
issue by second marriage. 

(IV) Charles E. Sheaffer, son of Fred F. and Clara (Peck) Sheaf- 



742 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

fer, was born December 22, 1876, at Ickesburg, Perry county, Penn- 
sylvania. His education was acquired in the public schools of the 
vicinity until his graduation at high school in 1895, when he at once 
took a preparatory course at private school and was admitted to Easton 
Optical College, from which he was graduated in 1896. He became 
interested in insurance, and for seven years has been the general insur- 
ance agent for McVeytown, covering both life and fire departments. 
To this branch of his activities has been united his mercantile pursuits 
in which he has been extremely prosperous; in 191 1 he bought out the 
general store and has conducted this ever since with continuing success. 
His influence in the community is very keenly felt and he has been 
active in local politics, being a member of the Republican party, in 
whose interests he has been borough auditor for many years. Mr. 
Sheafifer is also prominent in social and fraternal affairs in the bor- 
ough, being a member of the Masonic order of McVeytown; he is 
secretary of Blue Lodge, No. 376, Free and Accepted Masons, and 
belongs also to the Redmen, No. 349, of which he is secretary, to the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, No. 705, and to the Elks of 
Lewistown, No. 663. He stands high in the community as a church- 
man, being a member of the Presbyterian church, of whose Sunday 
school he is secretary and treasurer. 

On November 26, 1905, Mr. Sheaffer was married to Miss Rilla 
Sides, of McVeytown, daughter of Gottlieb and Eliza Sides, promi- 
nent residents of the county and of German descent. Mrs. Sheaffer is 
also a member of the Presbyterian church, in which her husband has 
been an active and efficient worker. Mr. and Mrs. Sheaffer have one 
daughter, Eveline, born January 9, 1908. 

Mordecai Gahagan, deceased, an honored soldier of 
GAHAGAN the civil war, and for nearly a half-century engaged 
i" the smithing business in Huntingdon, was a son of 
Thomas and Salome (Heckathorne) Gahagan. 

Thomas Gahagan was a native of Huntingdon, there was educated 
in the common schools, cultivated his farm, and, after a long life of 
usefulness, died. He was an ardent Democrat and both he and his 
wife, Salome Heckathorne, were members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church: children: William, a railroad employee; John, a farmer of 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 743 

Shavers Creek, Pennsylvania; Mordecai (see forward); Jonathan, a 
farmer of Newton Hamilton, Pennsylvania; Ann, married James Camp- 
field; Lewis, a blacksmith, now living in Lewistown, Pennsylvania, re- 
tired; Adolph, a farmer; James, a fanner; Henry, a farmer, now 
deceased. 

Mordecai Gahagan was born in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, 
June 26, 1836, died in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania. December 9, 1910. 
He was educated in the public schools of Shavers Creek, Pennsylvania, 
and on arriving at suitable age, began learning the blacksmith's trade. 
He became an expert worker in iron and steel, working as a journey- 
man smith until 1863, when he established his own shop in Hunting- 
don, continuing there in successful business until his retirement in 
1909, just one year prior to his retiring to an eternal rest. He was a 
soldier of the civil war, serving a term of nine months in the 125th 
Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers. He was engaged at the battle of 
Antietam and saw much actual service before receiving honorable dis- 
charge at the end of his term of service. It was on his return from the 
war in 1863 that he located in Huntingdon. He was a member of 
the ^Methodist Episcopal church and a faithful, earnest follower of the 
teachings of that church. He was a good smith, a good soldier and a 
good citizen. He married, in 1863, Melissa, born June 19, 1842, in 
Huntingdon county, daughter of Asel and Hannah (Brumbaugh) 
Hight. She was educated in the public schools and survives her 
husband, a resident of Huntingdon. She is a member of the United 
Brethren church and is highly respected in her community ; child : 
Thomas, born October 7, 1864, in Huntingdon county; was educated 
in the public schools of Huntingdon. He is a mechanical engineer and 
for the past twenty-five years has been employed by several of the 
large contracting firms. He was for eight years in the employ of 
the Warren Webster Vacuum Company, who sent him on important 
work to Appleton, Wisconsin, where he remained three years before 
completing the operations under his charge. Since 1910 he has been 
in the employ of the Day & Zimmerman Company at Williamsburg, 
Pennsylvania. He is a Republican in politics: his family are members 
of the Presbyterian church. 

He married, in 1886, Anna, daughter of Logan and Maria Mar- 
tin — he a farmer. Children: i. Irma, born in 1887, married Harry 



744 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Strickler, a traveling salesman, and has a son, Richard Gahagan Strick- 
ler. ii. Logan, born in 1S92, died aged thirteen. 



Ralph Barbin Cassady, of Mt. Union, Pennsylvania, 
CASSADY has behind him an honorable line of Irish ancestry. 

Like so many of that hardy and independent race of 
people who have joined forces with the citizens of the United States, 
they have assisted materially in the financial, social and moral upbuild- 
ing of this country. 

(I) Thomas Cassady, the grandfather of Ralph Barbin Cassady, 
was born in Ireland, and came to America while yet a young man. 
He first engaged in lumbering in Pennsylvania and later purchased 
land on which he farmed. He was an ardent Republican in politics, 
supporting the ticket on all occasions. While a loyal citizen of the 
United States, he still held property in Ireland, which passed to his 
heirs at his death. He was the parent of eleven children, among them 
being Charles, a dairyman in Pennsylvania, and Owen, of whom 
further. 

(II) Owen Cassady, son of Thomas Cassady, the Irish emigrant, 
was born in 1859, in Pennsylvania. He was sent to Vermont to school, 
and on finishing his education engaged in the pedagogic profession in 
Canada for several years. He then turned his energies toward the 
mercantile business and for years was a merchant in Canada. Later 
he came to Pennsylvania, where he established himself in Mifflin county. 
He purchased a farm of two hundred acres, which he cultivated. He 
extended his commercial holdings by the purchase of one-half interest 
in the Lucy Furnace, an estate which had a holding of three hundred 
acres. He retired from active business, moving to Mt. Union, Mif- 
flin county, where he is a man of prominence and influence. He is a 
steward of the Methodist Episcopal church and one of its most valued 
members. He is a Republican, and was elected tax collector on that 
ticket; was a delegate to the Republican state convention from Mif- 
flin county, and has served on the school board as director. He mar- 
ried, in 1883, Martha J- Barbin, daughter of .A.lexander and Susan 
Barbin, prominent people of that section, where he was the owner and 
successful farmer of over four hundred acres of fertile land. He re- 
tired and lived at Newton Hamilton until his death. Children of Mr. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 745 

and Mrs. Cassady: i. Died in infancy. 2. Twin of above, died in in- 
fancy. 3. Ralph Barbin, of whom further. 4. Russel J., died in 
boyhood. 

(Ill) Ralph Barbin Cassady, son of Owen and Martha J. (Barbin) 
Cassady, was born April 29, 1885, at Long Hollow, iMifflin county, 
Pennsylvania. He was educated in the public school at Lucy Furnace 
and at the Mt. Union Academy, later matriculating at tlie Juniata 
College in 1904. In the fall of 1905 he accepted a position with the 
Harbis and Walker Brick Company as chainman. He was offered, 
and accepted, the position of assistant clerk in the same company, and 
then was promoted to the place of chief clerk, which he holds to the 
present time (1913). He is one-third owner of the Bell, Harrison and 
Cassady Company, a local concern. He is a progressive Republican, 
clerk of the council, is largely interested in all matters pertaining to 
education and in the promotion and development of music. 

He married, in 1906, Josephine Galbraith Miller, daughter of An- 
drew and Delia J. Miller, of Huntingdon county, influential people of 
that county. To Mr. and Mrs. Cassady have been born two children, 
both of whom are dead. 



In 1756 there were living in Manheim township, Lan- 
MYERS caster county, Pennsylvania, Jacob. Stephen. Samuel and 
Martin Myre or Myer, now spelled Myers. Samuel and 
Jacob were smiths and owned one hundred acres of improved land 
each. Martin and Jacob were farmers, owning respectively two hun- 
dred and two hundred and fifty acres. Martin had at this time a saw 
and a grist mill, and in 1786 owned two mills. The history of the 
family is closely connected with that of the village of Oregon, in I\Ian- 
heim township, where Martin sold his mill in 1810, but retained his 
farming interest. 

(I) Levi Myers, either a son or grandson of Martin Myers, was 
born in Manhejm township, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, there 
grew to manhood, married and lived until 1868, when he moved to 
Franklin county, Pennsylvania, where he followed his trade of stone 
mason until his death, excepting one period of five years, when he en- 
gaged in farming. He died in Chambersburg, Franklin county, in the 
spring of 1894. Both he and his wife, Susan, were members of the 



746 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Reformed church. She died in 1880. Children: i. John, died in 
childhood. 2. Mary, married Joseph Gabler, died in November, 19 12. 
3. Eliza, married Joseph Strawbridge, whom she survives, a resident 
of Chambersburg; child, Elizabeth. 4. David K., of whom further. 

(II) David K., youngest son of Levi and Susan Myers, was born 
in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, about 1850. He accompanied his 
parents to Franklin county in 1868 and there learned the cabinet- 
maker's trade, married and lived for many years. He worked 
at Orrstown seven years, then cultivated a farm in Franklin county, 
six years, then moved to Chambersburg, where he entered the employ 
of M. C. Stoner, and was also for eleven years assistant postmaster of 
Chambersburg. He next was employed by the Wolf Company, with 
whom he remained until his death. He was a member of the Hepta- 
sophs, Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias, and both he and his wife 
were members of the Lutheran church. He married Alice V. Seiders, 
born in Shippensburg, Pennsylvania, about 185 1, who survives him, 
still residing in Chambersburg. She is the daughter of Samuel 
and Margaret Seiders, who were married in Shippensburg, where 
they resided until their removal to Chambersburg about 1890. 
Later they returned to Shippensburg where Margaret died in 
1897. Later Samuel Seiders moved to Harrisburg where he is 
spending his last years with a daughter. He was a prosperous 
merchant of the two towns, Shippensburg and Chambersburg, for 
many years. Ten children: i. A son, died in infancy. 2. Mamie, 
married Amos Hampshire and lived in Middle Spring. 3. Stewart, 
resides in Chambersburg. 4. Alice V., of previous mention, widow of 
David K. Myers. 5. Macfarland, now living in Philadelphia. 6. Belle, 
died aged about thirty-two years, unmarried. 7. Charles, a traveling 
printer, last heard from in Tucson, Arizona. 8. John, now a carpenter of 
Chambersburg. 9. Lou, married Dole Rebuck, and resides in Harris- 
burg. 10. William, of Chambersburg. Children of David K. and 
Alice V. Myers: i. Harry Benton, of whom further. 2. Mary, re- 
sides with her mother in Chambersburg. 3. Samuel, a draughtsman 
for the Wolf Company; married Mina John, and resides in Chambers- 
burg. 

(III) Harry Benton, eldest son of David K. and Alice V. (Seiders) 
Myers, was born at Orrstown, Franklin county, Pennsylvania, Sep- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 747 

tember i, 1872. He was educated in the public schools, finishing his 
studies in Chambersburg high school. He began business life as clerk 
in a gentleman's furnishing store, but, deciding upon a trade, became a 
molder at the Taylor Works, continuing until 1899, when he moved 
to Lewistown. He then entered the employ of the Standard Steel 
Works as molder, remaining until 1909. He then again entered mer- 
cantile life, opening a stationery store at No. 21 East Market street, 
Lewistown. He has established a profitable business and now has a 
well-stocked modern stationery and book store with a prosperous pic- 
ture framing department. He is a Progressive in politics, and both 
he and his wife are members of the Lutheran church. Fraternally he- 
is connected with the Knights of Pythias. He married, May 14, 1895, 
Cora Bessor, born in Chambersburg, daughter of George and Emma 
Bessor. No issue. 



In 1682 James Dougherty, of County Cork, Ire- 
DOUGHERTY land, landed at Boston, Massachusetts, and settled 

at Salem. He was a tailor by trade and did a 
thriving business mending the torn garments of the bachelors of that 
town. Tiring of the sober dress of the inhabitants, for rigid Puritanism 
was at that time at its height, and also of the social laws and customs 
of the Province of Massachusetts, he sought new pastures in which to 
ply his vocation. He went to New York by sailing vessel, landing at 
the spot that is now known as Battery Park. Here he married the 
daughter of an English emigrant and he established himself as a tailor. 
For many years he prospered greatly and Master Dougherty was in 
great demand by the beaux of the day who wished the latest London 
cut to their clothes. He reared a large family, the greater portion of 
whom left New York and wandered far afield into other colonies. A 
son, James, like his father a tailor, located in Philadelphia. Among 
his descendants was John, of whom further. 

(II) John Dougherty, son of James Dougherty, was born about 
1740, in Philadelphia. He was a soldier during the war of the revo- 
lution, enlisting from Philadelphia. Among his children was Edward, 
of whom further. 

(III) Edward Dougherty, son of John Dougherty, was probably 
born in 1770. He followed the family occupation and was a tailor 



748 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

by trade. He married Margaret Stackpole, whose father most prob- 
ably came direct from Ireland to Philadelphia as there is a record that 
Isaac Stackpole landed in that town in 1780. Children of Mr. and 
Mrs. Dougherty: i. Rosanna. 2. Margaret. 3. Nancy. 4. Barbara. 
5. John, of whom further. 6. James, a merchant tailor. 

(IV) John Dougherty, son of Edward and Margaret (Stackpole) 
Dougherty, was born July 25, 1803, at McVeytown, Mifflin county, 
Pennsylvania. He was educated in a school of Lewistown presided 
over by his mother, also assisted by his father, and on reaching his 
majority he entered the mercantile business, continuing in that line of 
endeavor for some time. Later he engaged in construction work on 
the Allegheny Portage railroad. He was of an inventive turn of mind 
and among his notable inventions was the section boat, one of the 
most useful that transportation men had had up to that time. He 
became interested in transportation between Philadelphia and Pitts- 
burgh, during which time he moved to the former place and took up his 
abode, remaining in that city for three years. At the expiration of 
that time he moved back to Hollidaysburg, where he became interested 
in the Democratic Standard, a newspaper of the town, which he edited 
with notable success. Later he purchased a farm at Blair Station, and 
yet later bought and operated Blair's Furnace. Seeing the possibilities 
of that section, in conjunction with George W. Spear, he laid out 
the town of Mt. Union, after which he engaged in the Adams Ex- 
press Company as one of its organizers, and also dealt in lumber and 
coal. He married, February 15, 1829, Catherine McElhenney, born 
August 5, 1810, daughter of James and Jane McElhenney. Children: 
I. Margaret, born in 1830. 2. Edward James, born November 21, 
1831. 3. Mary Felicitus, born October 13, 1833. 4. Theodore, born in 
1836. 5. Eugene, bom about 1838. 6. Victor V., born March 4, 1841. 
7. Victoria E. Marie, of whom further. 8. Gerald J., born April 5, 
1847. Mr. Dougherty died November 12, 1886. 

(V) Victoria E. Marie Dougherty, daughter of John and Cath- 
erine (McElhenney) Dougherty, was born May 6, 1843, at Hollidays- 
burg, Blair county, Pennsylvania. She was educated in the public 
school of Mt. Union, where the family lived after it had been plotted 
by John Dougherty. Quitting school in Mt. Union Miss Dougherty 
was a student at the famous St. Joseph's Academy, in Maryland. 




J^^v^ b 



vV-i v>.^ 



jTHENl. . ■^' 

IpUBUC UBRaRY 






HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 749 

Leaving school she returned home and was her mother's comfort and 
assistant until the death of both parents. She remained unmarried, 
and now makes her home in Mt. Union, where she is highly esteemed 
for her many sterling qualities, gentle manner and kindness of heart. 
She is one of the best known figures in Mt. Union, where she has 
virtually passed her life. 

James McElhenney, the maternal grandparent of Miss Victoria E. 
Marie Dougherty, was born in Ireland and came to this country while 
yet a lad in search of the golden opportunity that eluded him in his 
native land. He was successful almost immediately on reacliing Penn- 
sylvania, where he located in the Juniata valley. He married Jane 
Bevins, who was born in Maryland. He was appointed esquire by the 
government, which position he filled for many years acceptably to his 
neighbors. They were both Catholics and reared their children in that 
faith. Children: i. James. 2. Jane. 3. Anne. 4. Ellen. 5. Mar- 
garet. 6. William. 7. John. 8. Mary. 9. Catherine, married John 
Dougherty (see Dougherty IV). 10. Matilda. 11. Melinda. 12. 
Died in infancy. 13. Died in infancy. 14. Died in infancy. 



The grandfather of John D. Shull, was Simon Shull, a 
SHL'LL farmer, residing near New Bloomfield, Pennsylvania, 

where he died leaving issue, including a son, David. 
(II) David, son of Simon Shull was born at the paternal farm, 
located four miles west of New Bloomfield, Pennsylvania, February i, 
1835, died in Marysville, Pennsylvania, December 12, 191 1. He at- 
tended the public schools of that district and worked on the farm, later 
learning the carpenter's trade. After his marriage he settled on a farm 
in Fishing Creek Valley, later moving to Marysville, where he followed 
his trade. Some years later he again engaged in farming at Allen's 
Cove, returning to Marysville in August, 1900. Pie there established 
a bakery, which he successfully conducted until his death. He was a 
man of industry, ambition and thrift; his fre<|uent removals always 
being in the line of better opportunities for himself and family. Pie 
was an ardent Democrat and a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. He married, May 15, i860, Leah Yohey, born October 
13, 1839, at Rosstown, York county, Pennsylvania, daughter of George" 
L. and Nancy (Brown) Yohey, who settled in Perry county when Leah 



750 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

was yet a child. She resided there until her marriage, May 15, i860, 
at Marklesville, Pennsylvania, by Rev. Samuel Kuhn of the Reformed 
church, of which she also was a member. Children of David and Leah 
Shull: I. Clara Parmelia, married Harry E. Keel and resides in 
Marysville. 2. Emma Lydoma, married Charles W. Glass and resides 
in Duncannon, Pennsylvania. 3. Omia Elizabeth, died in infancy. 4. 
Annie Laurie, died in infancy. 5. Carrie Eleanora, married Joseph 
Fenicle and resides near Duncannon. 6. Grace Minerva, married Roy 
Mutzabaugh and resides at Waynesboro, Pennsylvania. 7. Elsie Eva- 
lina, married Charles Fenstermacher and resides at Duncannon. 8. 
Brinton McClellan, married Carrie Fenstermacher and resides in Le- 
highton, Pennsylvania. 9. Matilda Mary, married Weston J. Ellenber- 
ger and resides in Hollidaysburg. 10. Sarah Catherine, married Charles 
F. Yingst and resides in Pembroke, Pennsylvania. 11. Nancy Alberta, 
married George F. Albright and resides in Marysville. 12. John D., of 
whom further. 

(Ill) John Dolan, youngest child of David and Leah (Yohey) 
Shull, was born at Marysville, Pennsylvania, August 19, 1885. He was 
educated in the public school at Allen's Cove and after the return to 
Marysville worked in the bakery established by his father and, under 
the direction of a skilled baker, was taught that trade. He gained 
both knowledge and experience in the art of baking, also in the method 
of conducting business, being able at his father's death to succeed him 
and continue to carry on the business already established and profit- 
able. 

He purchased the interests of the other heirs and after becoming sole 
owner, made improvements and extended his operations until 
now he covers with his wagons the town and country as far as 
Allen's Cove. Mr. Shull is an enterprising, progressive business 
man and citizen, held in high esteem in his town. He is treasurer 
of the board of trade and in 191 1 was elected member of the town 
council on the Democratic ticket. He is a member of the Masonic 
order, tlir Tn(le|)cndent Order of Odd Fellows and the Patriotic Order 
Sons of America. He married. October 18, 1910, Mabel May White, 
born in Marysville, daughter of Samuel T. and Sarah Ellen (Brighton) 
White. 

The Whites came from Berks to Perry county, Pennsylvania, later 



HISTORY OF THE JL'NIATA VALLEY 751 

to Marysville, Pennsylvania, where the parents of Samuel T. White died. 
His father was an iron worker and left Berks county at the time Cove 
Forge was established in Perry county. 

Samuel T. White was born in Berks county, came to Perry county, 
when a boy and there grew to manhood, an iron worker. Later he 
moved to Marysville where he entered the employ of Seidel Brothers 
and so continues. He married Sarah Ellen Brighton in Duncannon, 
settled at Cove Forge, which was their home until the removal to 
Marysville. Children: i. James Edward, of whom further. 2. Naomi, 
married Howard Seitz and moved to Baltimore, Maryland. 3. Mary, 
married Milton Arnold and resides in Lemoyne, Pennsylvania. 4. Ma- 
bel M., married John D. Shull, of previous mention. 5. Austin A. 
6. Anna R. 7. Esther. 8. Percy. 

James Edward White was born at Cove Forge, Perry county, 
Pennsylvania, December 8, 1879. He was educated in Marysville pub- 
lic school, but at the age of twelve became clerk in the grocery of 
J. S. Bitner, continuing with him twelve years, gaining a practical edu- 
cation and valuable business experience. In 1903, being then twenty- 
four years of age, he purchased the Adams general store in the Morley 
Building, Marysville, and for five years conducted a successful business 
at that location. He then purchased the E. W. Wise property opposite 
the Pennsylvania railroad station, including a store room, lodge room 
and dwelling. To this location he moved his business and there he con- 
tinues, one of the substantial, successful business men of his town. 
Both he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church 
and in politics Mr. White is a Republican. He married, April 6, 1907, 
Sarah Hippie, born in Dry township, daughter of John and Mary 
(Freed) Hippie, he born in Perry, his wife in York county, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

After their marriage John and Mary Hippie settled on a farm 
in Dry township, where he died in 1903, his wife in 1912. He was a 
veteran of the civil war and both belonged to the Evangelical church. 
Mary Freed Hippie was a daughter of Joseph and Jane Freed of York 
county, Pennsylvania. Children : Cora May; Arbie E., deceased ; Sarah, 
wife of James Edward White : Nettie Jane ; Walter J. ; and Richard B. 
Children of James E. and Sarah White : Paul Edward, born June 9, 
1908; Josephine Lillian, December i, 191 1. 



752 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

The paternal grandparents of Milton W. Derrick, pro- 
DERRICK prietor of the Laird Hotel at Duncannon, Pennsylvania, 

were Gustav and Katherine (Johnson) Derrick, resi- 
dents of Columbia, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. Gustav Derrick, 
of German parentage, was a farmer of Lancaster county all his active 
life, but after his retirement, moved to Columbia, where both he and 
his wife died. He was a Whig, later a Republican, , and both were 
members of the German Lutheran church. Their only son was Rich- 
ard J., of further mention. 

(II) Richard J., only son of Gustav and Katherine (Johnson) Der- 
rick, was born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and there grew to 
manhood. He was a farmer during his early life, but later became a 
hotel proprietor, having managed hotels in Herrville and Lancaster 
for the past eighteen years. Since 191 1 he has kept the hotel at 
Herrville, Lancaster county. He is a Republican in politics and is a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows ; Knights of Pythias : 
Knights of Malta; Knights of the Golden Eagle and the Improved 
Order of Red Men. He married Anna Gochenaur, daughter of a Ger- 
man farmer of Province township, Lancaster county. She had brothers, 
Alonzo and Abner. the latter deceased; also two sisters, Ada and 
Lottie. 

(III) Milton W., only son of Richard J. and Anna (Gochenaur) 
Derrick, was born in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, January 21, 1881. He 
was educated in the public schools of Columbia, Pennsylvania, and has 
spent his entire adult life in the hotel business. In 1903 he rented the 
Laird Hotel at Duncannon and in 1905 purchased the same property and 
continues in its management. He is a Republican in politics and be- 
longs to the Knights of Pythias; Knights of Malta; Improved Order 
of Red Men and the Patriotic Order Sons of America. 

He married, in 1902, Luta, daughter of John Mylin, of Lancaster, 
Pennsylvania. Children : Catherine, John, Anna, Richard. 



The first record of the Loy family in the Juniata Valley is 

LOY found in Tyrone township, Perry county, where, in 1788, 

Michael Loy, a German emigrant, purchased one hundred and 

twenty acres taken up by John Sharp two years previous. On this 

tract the village of Loysville is built, named in 1842 in honor of 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 753 

Michael Loy. In the same year, 1788, Michael Loy built the dwelling 
house and lived on his property until his death in 1815. He left eleven 
children: George; Nicholas, of whom further; John, moved to Ohio; 
Michael, purchased the homestead and resided thereon until his death; 
Mary, married Abram Ritter and settled near Elliotts Run; Catherine, 
married John Bernheisel and settled near Green Park ; Eve, married 
Adam Bernheisel and moved west; Margaret, married a Lippert and 
settled in Cumberland county; Susan, married Nicholas Ickes and lived 
in Ickesburg; Elizabeth, married John Kepner of Juniata county; Bar- 
bara, married a Lupfer of Bloomfield. 

(II) Nicholas, son of Michael Loy, settled first in Saville town- 
ship on two hundred acres of land which he sold, with a saw mill, to 
George Loy, April 25, 1826. Nicholas Loy in 1820 was assessed on 
three hundred acres in Toboyne township, but does not appear to have 
lived there. After 1826 he moved to Centre township, where he resided 
until his death. He had by a first wife seven children — four sons, 
three daughters : John, one of the owners of Hench's tannery ; Samuel, 
moved to Kansas ; Jacob, settled in the west ; William, settled in Clear- 
field county; his three daughters married William West, Jacob Stroop 
and John Titzel. By a second wife Nicholas Loy has two sons: 
Captain Andrew, and George M., a landowner of Madison town- 
ship. 

(III) Captain Andrew Loy, son of Nicholas Loy and his second 
wife, was born in Loysville, Tyrone township. Perry county, Pennsyl- 
vania. Later he became a landowner of Madison township. He mar- 
ried (first) a daughter of John Wormley, (second) Ann Eliza Linn, 
who died in iqii, a granddaughter of Rev. John Linn, identified with 
the early church history of Centre township, Perry county. After his 
marriage he bought out the heirs and became owner of the homestead, a 
farm of two hundred acres. He remodeled the brick house that stood 
thereon, which is still in use as a residence. He erected a new barn 
and generally put the old farm in good condition. Both he and his 
wife were members of the Centre Presbyterian Church, which Cap- 
tain Andrew served as trustee for thirty years. He was an Independent 
in politics, voting for the man rather than the party. He served as 
school director and road supervisor, but devoted himself largely to his 
private affairs. Children of Andrew Loy. by his second wife: i. An- 
drew Linn, now residing at St. Paul, Minnesota, a representative of 



754 HISTORY OF THE JUNL\TA VALLEY 

the Armour Company. 2. William Gettys, of whom further. 3. 
James, now living in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, one of the proprietors of 
the Indian Rug Company. 4. May, married James R. Wilson, cashier 
of the bank of Landisburg. 5. Edwin R., now residing on the old 
homestead. 

(IV) William Gettys, son of Captain Andrew and Ann Eliza 
(Linn) Loy, was born near Centre Church in Madison township, 
Perry county, Pennsylvania, March 13, 1863. He was educated in the 
public schools and grew to youthful manhood on the home farm, his 
father's assistant. 

In 1880 Mr. Loy entered the office of the Bloomfield Ad- 
vocate, as printer's "devil," remaining two years, gaining a good knowl- 
edge of the printer's craft. He then went west and finished his ap- 
prenticeship in the office of the Transcript Publication Company, Spring- 
field, Ohio. In accordance with printer's traditions he then went "on 
the road" and during the next eighteen years worked on about every 
metropolitan newspaper in the United States published between Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts, and Portland, Oregon, north or south. About 
the year 1900 he returned to the Juniata valley and in partnership with 
his brother, Edwin R. Loy, engaged in the lumber business, with 
headquarters at Loysville until 1905 when they transferred to New- 
port, their present office headquarters. The firm manufacture ties and 
lumber used in railroad construction, the Pennsylvania Railroad Com- 
pany being one of the largest customers ; they also handle building 
lumber and supplies. They keep about twenty men constantly em- 
ployed, operating two saw mills in Perry county, also handling the 
product of several other mills. The firm is a prosperous one, both 
brothers being men of fine business ability and experience. William G. 
Loy is a Democrat in politics; since 191 1 has been a member of New- 
port school board and in 19 13 was chosen president of the board. He 
is a member of the Knights of the Golden Eagle; the Knights of 
Pythias and the Patriotic Order ^ons of America. Both he and his 
wife are members of the Presbyterian church. 

He married Olive Zimmerman, born in Ickesburg, Perry county. 
daughter of Thaddeus and Lucinda (Baker) Zimmerman, of an old 
valley family. Children: Anna Lucinda, Andrew Zimmerman. Thomas 
Linn. The family residence is also at Newport. 



HISTORY OF THE JL'XIATA VALLEY 



755 



The Wentzells came to Perry from Xorthuinberland 
WENTZELL county, Pennsylvania, where both the father and 
grandfather of Chnton Hill Wentzell were born. 
The rise of Mr. Wentzell from the bound boy of six years, to the suc- 
cessful lumberman of to-day is a striking example of what an ambi- 
tious boy and a resolute man can accomplish. 

(I) Daniel, son of Wentzell, was born in Xorthumberland 

county, Pennsylvania, and there grew to manhood. About 1855 he 
settled in Perry county at Elliottsburg, where for a time he followed 
his trade of stonemason. He then engaged in farming at Duncannon 
and Blain, in the same county, continuing until the death of his wife, 
whom he survived two years, making his home with his daughter, 
Mrs. Lucinda Garber. Both Daniel Wentzell and his wife were mem- 
bers of the Lutheran church. He married Catherine Campbell. Chil- 
dren : Harriet, died aged twenty-six years ; David, of whom further ; 
Lucinda, married George Garber and resides in Blain; Caroline, died 
aged twenty-one years ; Sinary, a veteran of the 8th Pennsylvania 
Volunteer Infantry, now a farmer of the state of Iowa; Mary, married 
Abraham Bristline, both deceased ; Ira, died in Bellewood, Pennsylvania, 
a merchant; Dennis, now a farmer; Sarah, married Jacob Loy and re- 
sides in Andersonburg ; Luther, now living retired in Harri.sl)urg, 
Pennsylvania ; Martha Matilda, married George Barclay and resides 
in Center, Perry county, Pennsylvania; Anna, married Elmer Lighter 
and resides at Oakdale, Pennsylvania. 

(II) David, son of Daniel Wentzell, was born in Xorthumber- 
land county, Pennsylvania, September 10, 1839. He was a lad of about 
sixteen years when his parents moved to Perry county, where his 
after life was spent engaged in farming and merchandising. He set- 
tled at Blain, where for two years he cultivated a farm nearliy, then 
establishing in general merchandise business in Blain. He was a suc- 
cessful merchant, remaining in active business until his death in 1876. 
He was a Republican; a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and both he and his wife belonged to the Lutheran church. 
He married (first) Susan Loy, who bore him: Luther Melancthon, 
now living in Blain; Ida, married John Bristline, residing in Blain and 
Orlando, a farmer near Duncannon. He married (second) Catherine, 
daughter of Benjamin and Alice (Stewart) Rice, and granddaughter of 
George and Catherine Rice. The maternal grandparents of Catherine 



756 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Rice were William (3) and Margaret (Copeland) Stewart. The 
Stewarts came from Scotland in early Colonial days — three brothers, 
William, James and John, being the emigrants. This first William 
had a son William (2) Stewart, who settled on a tract of land in the 
Tuscarora valley, where he met his death at the hands of the Indians. 
His son, Hiram P. Stewart, married in the Tuscarora valley, in 1778, 
Alice Graham, who bore him ten children, the eldest being William 
(3) Stewart who married Margaret Copeland. 

Benjamin Rice was born in Juniata county, Pennsylvania, as was his 
wife, Alice Stewart. After his marriage he moved to Perry county, 
settling in Madison township, where he owned and cultivated a farm 
of one hundred and fifty acres. In his old age he returned to Juniata- 
county, where he died. He was an elder of the Lutheran church; his 
wife also being a member of that church. Children: Margaret, mar- 
ried John Briner; George, a farmer; William, a farmer and a soldier 
of the civil war, running away from home to enlist when but sixteen 
years of age; Benjamin; Emeretta, married William B. Gutshall, a 
former commissioner of Perry, now residing in Blain; Catherine, mar- 
ried David Wentzell, of previous mention; David, a hotel proprietor at 
Ickesburg; Ellen, never married. 

Children of David and Catherine Wentzell : Clinton Hill, of whom 
further; Nellie, married Howard Kline and resides in Lewistown, 
Pennsylvania; Capitola, residing in Blain. 

(Ill) Clinton Hill, only son of David Wentzell and his second wife 
Catherine Rice, was born in Blain, Perry county, Pennsylvania, Febru- 
ary 12, 1872. At the age of six years he was indentured, serving 
until fifteen years of age, when he started life for himself. From 
fifteen to eighteen years of age he worked on a farm, receiving as 
wages his board and seven dollars cash monthly. At the age of eigh- 
teen years he associated in the lumber business with his half-brother, 
Luther M. Wentzell. The brothers operated a single mill, two miles 
southeast of Blain, continuing one year when they sold their plant to 
an uncle, Abraham Bristline. The partners continued in the same busi- 
ness at another point, but at the end of two years Clinton H. sold his 
interest to Luther M. Wentzell and for the next eight years engaged 
in farming in Perry county. He then formed a partnership with E. K. 
Weaver and for two years again engaged in lumbering, operating mills 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 757 

in Jackson and Madison townships. He then purchased Mr. Weaver's 

interests and operated alone for one year. He then admitted his pres- 
ent partner, W. Frank Stambaugh, forming the lirm of W'entzell & 
Stambaugh. They are successful lumber manufacturers and dealers, 
owning two saw mills in Madison township and a planing mill at 
Blain. They manufacture from the log and handle all kinds and sizes 
of pine and oak lumber, using the product of four other mills in addi- 
tion to their own. At the planing mill a line of carpenters' supplies 
is manufactured and a general planing mill business transacted. Tiieir 
products go by Pennsylvania railroad to many distant points, a large 
share being consumed by the Pennsylvania Steel Company (1913). 
Mr. Wentzell is an energetic, modern business man and reviews with 
satisfaction his rise from the humble boy to a successful man of busi- 
ness. He is a director of the local cemetery company and has other 
business interests. He is a Republican in politics and has served as 
school director and borough councilman. He belongs to the Junior 
Order of American Mechanics ; The Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows; the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and both he and his 
wife are members of the Lutheran church. 

Mr. Wentzell married, December 23, 1893, Mary Ellen McKee, 
daughter of David and Eve (Smith) McKee, of Blain. 



The Taylors of this record are of Scotch descent, their 
TAYLOR earliest known ancestor, Matthew Taylor, being burned at 

the stake in Scotland for his religious beliefs, which he 
would not surrender nor deny. He left a son Matthew (2) Taylor, 
who fled from Scotland to Ireland, where he fought under the flag of 
W^illiam of Orange at the battle of the Boyne. He died in England. 
He left a son Matthew (3) Taylor, born in England, who is the founder 
of this branch of the Taylor family of Pennsylvania. He settled near 
Coatesville, Chester county, Pennsylvania, where he died, leaving a son, 
Matthew (4). 

(IV) Matthew (4) Taylor was born in Chester county. Pennsyl- 
vania, learned the trade of blacksmith and after the year 18 12 settled 
in Dublin township, Huntingdon county. Pennsylvania. He there 
erected a home and shop in which he followed his trade. He also owned 
a farm which he cultivated. He married Elizabeth Rebecca Ander- 



758 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

son and reared a large family. Both were members of the Presby- 
terian church. 

(V) George, son of Matthew (4) and Elizabeth (Anderson) Tay- 
lor, was born in Oxford, Chester county, Pennsylvania, November 24, 
1812. He attended the district schools until he was thirteen years of 
age, but only during the winter months. He never studied grammar 
while in school — in fact, after he was thirteen never was a student in 
any school. Nevertheless, by self study he became a well educated 
man. He was expecting to follow his father's trade of blacksmith, but 
while at work in the shop one day a tlying piece of iron struck him 
in the eye, resulting in a complete loss of sight of that eye. He then 
began his course of self study in order to have a means of livelihood 
other than so dangerous a trade. During his earlier life he taught 
school for many years in Dublin township and in Trough Creek valley 
in Huntingdon county. During these years he availed himself of 
every means of study or improvement possible and added greatly to 
his stock of knowledge. He was thirteen j-ears of age when his parents 
moved to Dublin township in 1825, and nine years later he had so 
improved the time between his hours of toil on the farm and in the 
school room that a profession seemed within his reach. He decided 
upon law as that profession, an ambition developed during his em- 
ployment in the office of David R. Porter, then prothonotary of Hunt- 
ingdon county, later governor of Pennsylvania. In 1834, being then 
twenty-two years of age, he began the study of law in the office of Gen. 
A. P. Wilson, then one of the leading lawyers of the Huntingdon bar. 
After two years of hard study Mr. Taylor passed the required exam- 
ination and was admitted to practice at the Huntingdon county bar, 
April 12, 1836. He at once began practice in Huntingdon, forming a 
partnership with John G. Miles and practicing as junior member of the 
law firm. Miles & Taylor. In 1840 he was chosen by the state to 
assist in the prosecution of Robert jMcConahay, on trial for the murder 
of six of his relatives. Mr. Taylor threw his whole vigor into this 
case; traced it through all its windings; gathered and presented his facts 
in so clear, logical and forcible a manner that, although the evidence 
was purely circumstantial, it was so convincing that the jury rendered 
a verdict of "guilty." The argument of this case before the jury 
brought Mr. Taylor deserved reputation, and later, in a three-hours' 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 759 

speech in the prosecution of the Flanagan murder case in Cambria 
county, in behalf of the state, that was considered as powerful as his 
argument in the McConahay case. He had indeed won an enviable 
reputation as a lawyer and, in 1849, when the act of that year was 
passed increasing the number of judicial districts of the state, he was 
recommended almost unanimously by the bar of Huntingdon, Cambria 
and Blair counties for the president judgeship of the newly created 
twenty-fourth district. In April, 1849, Governor Johnson conferred 
upon him the appointment, which was unanimously confirmed by the 
senate. He served under this appointment until 185 1, when he was 
nominated for the same position by the Whig party. He was elected 
the following October and served the full term of ten years. In 1861 
he had so firmly intrenched himself in the good will and respect of the 
bar of the district that, irrespective of party, they asked him to be a 
candidate for reelection. He was again elected and on October 24, 
1871, while charging a jury in Blair county, he was stricken with paraly- 
sis, and died two weeks later, November 14, 1871. He was aged fifty- 
eight years; had been a member of the bar thirty-five years and for 
twenty-two years president judge of the twenty-fourth judicial dis- 
trict. No more able exponent of the law, nor a more just judge ever 
graced the bench of the district. When his early disadvantages are con- 
sidered, the fact becomes plain that his success in life was entirely due 
to his own courage, ambition and determination to make a name for 
himself. Few men accomplish more, even with the advantages of a 
college education and influential friends. 

It is related of him that during a term as treasurer of Huntingdon 
county, 1843 to 1845, he gave up his idea of the law, retired from the 
firm of Miles & Taylor and began preparing himself for the ministry 
of the Presbyterian church. During these two years as county treasurer 
he made such progress in the study of Greek as to read the New Testa- 
ment in the original. But he returned to the law and therein made a 
lasting name. In the preparation of his papers he was most scrupu- 
lously exact, orthography, punctuation and penmanship faultless, and 
every word carefully selected. All his writings were executed with the 
same care as if they were for the public eye. While a law student he 
edited a newspaper for a time and there acquired a careful style of 
writing, but the mainspring of all he did was the good old maxim, 



76o HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

which in youth he adopted as his own, "What is worth doing at all is 
worth doing well." During his thirteen years at the bar as a practi- 
tioner he was but a new comer in a bar of great ability — men of char- 
acter and experience; some in the prime of life; some in the zenith of 
their fame, so the young man had a hard struggle and barely was able 
to support his family. But when a judge was to be selected from among 
their number, they unanimously selected the young man whose talents 
they had learned to respect. Judge Taylor was an ideal judge. He 
could not be influenced by fear, love or the hope of gain. He had 
an intense love of justice and the nerve to fearlessly administer it in 
the face of all opposition — yet with conscience as his prompter, truth 
and the law as guides, he tempered justice with mercy, and, while a 
just, was never a hard judge. In his course of twenty-two years on 
the bench it is of record that never from sickness or other cause did he 
ever fail to hold the regular term of court in the district. 

Judge Taylor married (first) Adaline, daughter of John Miller, 
who bore a daughter Martha Adaline, who died aged twenty-five years. 
He married (second) Priscilla Moore and had issue: Robert Moore, 
now living in Warren, retired ; Matthew Henry, now president of the 
Pittsburgh Coal Company, residing in Erie, Pennsylvania ; George, 
died in infancy. Judge Taylor married (third) Margaret Stilt, who 
yet survives him, a resident of Huntingdon, a member of the Presby- 
terian church, as was her husband. Children : William Stilt (of 
whom further) ; Annie Miller, residing in Huntingdon with her 
mother; Elizabeth Anderson, twin of Annie M., died June 2, 1910, 
unmarried. Margaret Stilt Taylor is a daughter of Robert and Susan 
(Miller) Stilt and a maternal granddaughter of John Miller, one of 
the early settlers of Huntingdon county, a wealthy miller and tannery 
owner, prominent in the Masonic order in Huntingdon. Robert Stilt, 
of Huguenot descent, was born in Alexandria. Huntingdon county ; 
his wife, Susan Miller, born in the town of Huntingdon. After their 
marriage they settled there and Robert operated a tannery. During 
the war between the states he was in charge of supply trains for the 
government, with an office in Washington, D. C. He died during the 
war, his wife surviving him a few years. Their only child is Margaret, 
widow of Judge George Taylor. 

(VI) William Stilt, only son of Judge George Taylor and his third 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 761 

wife, Margaret Stilt, was born in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, August 
25. 1853- He was educated in Huntingdon Academy and Mantua 
Academy, West Philadelphia, and spent several years in the employ of 
the Pennsylvania road as clerk. He then studied law under Judge 
James R. Ludlow, of Philadelphia; attended lectures at the University 
of Pennsylvania; later went west and in 1880 was admitted to the bar 
at Marion, Lynn county, Iowa. He practiced there two years, then 
returned to Huntingdon, where he was admitted in 1883 and has since 
been in continuous practice, specializing in the law of real estate, in 
which he has acquired a high reputation. Mr. Taylor is well known 
beyond the confines of his profession and is the author of a volume of 
allegorical poems, published in 1891, under the title of "INIan Immor- 
tal." This volume was well received and widely read, as have been 
other of Mr. Taylor's literary productions. He is a Republican in 
politics and an attendant of the Presbyterian church. 

He married, in December, 1895, Margaret Elizabeth Maclay, of 
Spruce Creek township, Huntingdon county, daughter of John Palmer 
and Mary (Highlands) Maclay. Children: iMary Highlands, born 
February 16, 1897, now a student at Juniata College; George, born 
September 6, 1904. 



During the years when the colonies of America were 
ORLADY striving to throw off England's enslaving claims and to 

raise themselves free and unfettered in the pure light 
of liberty, the American cause had no truer friend, supporter and ally 
than the French government. Then it was, under the leadership of 
Marquis de Lafayette, that many of the bravest sons of France left 
their homeland for a life of war in the western world, and then it was 
that Pennsylvania received from France the seed of the Orlady family, 
whose members have made themselves prominent in the medical, educa- 
tional and legal life of the state by the exercise of the same sterling 
qualities of character which brought the American progenitor of the 
line three thousand miles to fight for the right in the defense of the 
weaker. This was Henri Orlady, born in France, November 2. 1758. 
After the War of Independence, he did not return to France, but 
settled in Chester county, Pennsylvania, later moving to Lancaster 
county and then to Roxbury, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, where lie 



762 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

was the proprietor of a tannery until his death, January 8, 1840. His 
brother, Paul, who had come to America at the same time, also died in 
Roxbury, Alifflin county, Pennsylvania. This generation of the family 
were adherents to the Lutheran faith. Henri Orlady married and 
had issue. 

(II) Martin, son of Henri Orlady, was born in Lancaster county, 
Pennsylvania, October 25, 1787, died September 22, 1868, in Hunting- 
don county, Pennsylvania. As a young man he had learned both the 
tanner's and shoemaker's trades, and leaving home in 18 10, he went 
to Warrior's Mark, where he engaged in the pursuit of both trades. 
In church affiliation he followed the convictions of his father, belonp-ins: 
to the Lutheran church. Politically he was a Whig, later a Repub- 
lican. He married Ellen Gable and had issue. 

(III) Henry, son of Martin and Ellen (Gable) Orlady, was born 
in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, July 20, 1818, died in Durand, 
Wisconsin, December 8, 1893. He obtained his preliminary educa- 
tion in Boalsburg Academy, Juniata Valley, and then entered Jeffer- 
son Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, later entering Belle- 
vue College, New York, from which he was graduated Doctor of Medi- 
cine in 1845. He just began to practice in McConnellstown, Penn- 
sylvania, remaining there about three years, when he moved to Peters- 
burg. Here he practiced until 1883, gaining a reputation as one of 
the county's most reliable physicians, his name becoming a by-word 
throughout the locality for gentleness, kindness and embracing sym- 
pathy more than professional. Although absorbed in his practice, he 
still maintained the interest owed by every good citizen to his town 
and was active in church work and civic affairs. In politics he sup- 
ported the Republican platform and in religion was a Presbyterian. 
His fraternal relations were confined to the Masonic order. He mar- 
ried, May I, 1848, Martha Boal, born in Center county, Pennsylvania, 
April 6, 1824, died October 26, 1904, daughter of George and Mary 
(Caldwell) Boal, natives of the North of Ireland, who immigrated to 
the United States at an early date. They were both members of the 
Presbyterian church. 

Children of Henry and Martha (Boal) Orlady: i. George Boal 
(of whom further mention). 2. Mary, born August 15, 1853, married 
Homer Crawford and lives in Franklin, Pennsylvania. 3. Sara, born 



THE NEW YORK 

PUBUC UBRARY 



••TOM, L(>M> 
TTLDtK r 





.o+€.=^ 



'■ aisrjricai tut Co 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 763 

December 5, 1855, died 1885. 4. Henry, born June 28, 1858, moved 
to Durand, Wisconsin, where he is a prosperous and influential business 
man. 5. Martha C, born November 25, 1864, married Rev. Josiah C. 
Wood and hves in Brooklyn, New York. 

(IV) George Boal, eldest son of Henry and Martha (Boal) Orlady, 
was born in Petersburg, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, February 
22, 1850. He was educated in the Bellwood Academy, from which 
he was graduated, and later attended Pennsylvania State College, 
graduating, then going to Washington and Jefferson, graduating in 
1870 with the degree of S. B., the same institution honoring him 
with the LL.D. in 1898. He then took a course at JetTerson Medi- 
cal College, of Philadelphia, graduating as Doctor of Medicine in 1871. 
Being prepared to follow the medical profession, he began to practice 
with his father in Pittsburgh, but his health being too poor to with- 
stand the rigors and cares of the physician's life, he abandoned his 
original intention and began to read law in the office of Samuel Steele 
Blair, Esq., and in February of 1875 was admitted to the Blair county 
bar. He did not, however, confine his practice to Blair county, but 
settled in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, where he was three times 
elected district attorney in 1878, 1881 and 1884, his majority increas- 
ing with each election. When the Superior Court of Pennsylvania 
was created, Mr. Orlady was appointed to its bench by Governor 
Hastings, afterward receiving the unanimous nomination of the Re- 
publican state convention, and was elected November 5, 1895. He is 
a member of the State Bar Association, holding the office of president 
during 1913, and also holds membership in the American Bar Asso- 
ciation. He has taken an active part in the affairs of the Republican 
party both in state and county, and by the exercise of his public speak- 
ing abilities has rendered his party valuable service in many campaigns. 
He has several times been a delegate to county conventions and three 
times to state conventions. In the convention of 1890 he presented 
General Hastings as candidate for governor, and in 1894 nominated 
Hon. Galusha A. Grow for congressman at large. As district attorney 
he prosecuted the pleas of the county ably and well. In him llie ora- 
torical ability is strongly developed : he is keen in debate, withering in 
sarcasm, and possesses to a degree the mannerism which lends weight 
and influence to an argument simply because he uses it. He is a mem- 



764 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

ber of the Masonic order, belonging to Mount ]\Ioriah Lodge, No. 300, 
Free and Accepted Masons, Standing Stone Chapter, No. 201, Royal 
Arch Masons, Huntingdon Commandery, No. 65, and Syria Temple 
of Pittsburgh, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. In 1908 and 1909 he 
served as Grand Master of the Masonic fraternity of Pennsylvania, 
and both he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church. 

Judge Orlady married, February 21. 1877, Mary Irwin Thompson, 
daughter of Dr. Hardman Phillips Thompson; children: i. Edith 
Thompson, born December 29, 1877, was graduated in 1903 from 
Bryn Mawr College and is now secretary of that institution. 2. Fred- 
erick L., born February 27, 1880, was graduated from Yale Univer- 
sity, read law with his father and with the firm of Dalzell, Scott & 
Gordon, Esqrs., of Pittsburgh; was admitted to the bar and has been 
practicing in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. 3. George Phillips, 
born February 2, 1892, attending University of Virginia. 



The paternal ancestors of Judge AA'^illiam N. Seibert, 
SEIBERT president judge of the Forty-first Judicial District of 

Pennsylvania, came to this country from England, 
settling first in Virginia. Their coming antedated the revolutionary 
war, in which members of the family served on the colonial side. The 
family, originally from Wurtemberg, Germany, settled in England, 
from whence they came to America. 

(I) Jacob Seibert, a soldier of the revolution, serving eight years, 
married Jeretah White Lawrence, of Scotch-Irish descent ; children : 
John; William; Lawrence W. (of further mention): Margaret and 
Sarah. 

(II) Lawrence W., son of Jacob Seibert, was born near Strasburg, 
Virginia, April 15, 1797, died in the autumn of 1866. He studied 
law, but became a large owner of landed property ; he never practiced 
his profession. His estate was at Woodstock, Virginia, where he 
lived the life of a wealthy Southern planter until the war came. He 
was a noted public speaker and was much in demand during political 
campaigns as a "stump" speaker. 

He married (first) Mary Ann Miller, born in Virginia. March, 
1801, died February, 1834. She was very young when married, her 
first child being born when she was but sixteen years of age; children: 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 765 

Eli, born 1817, died in Woburn, Illinois, in 1905; Jacob A., born 1819, 
died in Muscatine, Iowa, in 1907; Samuel W. (of whom further); 
James L. W., born 1826, died at Somerset, Pennsylvania; Lorenzo AL, 
born 1828, now living in Selma, Iowa; Sarah Ann, born 1830, died at 
Mount Jackson, Virginia; John H., born 1832, served in the Seven- 
teenth Regiment. Indiana Volunteer Infantry, during the war between 
the states and died in a soldiers' hospital in Marion, Indiana ; Mary 
Ann, married Thomas Skinner, and died at Maplewood, Ohio, De- 
cember 3, 1907. Lawrence W. Seibert married (second) Amelia 
Marshall; they had issue: Six children, the eldest of whom, George, 
was a soldier in the Confederate army at the time his half-l)rother, 
John H., was serving in the Union army; was shot through the breast 
at the battle of Bull Run and died in the hospital. 

(Ill) Samuel W.. third child of Lawrence W. Seibert and his 
first wife, Mary Ann Miller, was born at Woodstock, Virginia, April 
I, 1824, and died at his residence in Newport, Perry county, Pennsyl- 
vania, on May 2"], 1913, in his ninetieth year. He was educated in 
the subscription schools, Fairview Academy and Cambridge College, 
Indiana. He prepared for and became an ordained minister of the 
Evangelical Association, living a long life of Christian usefulness. 
He served many churches in different localities with great acceptability. 
He built over a score of churches, many parsonages, and received into 
communion of his church over two thousand new members. For six- 
teen years he was a presiding elder and was held in high esteem by 
church officials, the clergy and laity. For a year or two he managed 
the Neilson fann for his father-in-law, who was in poor health, then 
returned to the ministry, where he has always been a prominent figure. 
After the failure of his health he retired to a comfortable home in 
Newport, from which he superintended his farm of one hundred and 
ninety-six acres. He was a director of the First National Bank of New- 
port and its president for many years, and in politics a Democrat. 
He married, April i, 1846, Eleanor K. Neilson, born in Perry county, 
Pennsylvania, December 26, 1826, died June 16, 1905. Rev. Seiliert 
came to Perry county shortly after his entering the ministry, tlicre 
met and married Miss Neilson, Rev. Emanuel Kohr performing the 
ceremony; children: Judge William N. (of whom further) ; Dr. James 
L., a practicing physician of Bellefonte, Pennsylvania, married Eliza 



766 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Bolig, no issue; Virginia, died 1897, aged forty-two years; Charles, 
died 1875, aged nine years. , 

Mrs. Eleanor K. (Neilson) Seibert was a daughter of William (2) 
and Rebecca Darlington (Bull) Neilson, granddaughter of John Neil- 
son and great-granddaughter of William (i) Neilson, who is first 
found in Chester county, Pennsylvania, from whence he came to Perry 
county, where he became the owner of a thousand-acre tract. There 
he built a log house, cleared a farm and in 1767 built the stone house 
that is yet used as a residence. After a life of prosperity and useful- 
ness, he died, leaving a widow and two children: John (of whom 
further) and Polly, who married William Power — a runaway match^ 
he a saddler, engaging later and for many years in business at the 
Neilson homestead. 

John, only son of William Neilson, was born at the Perry county 
homestead. He lived there all his life, owning the home farm, also 
lands in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania. He was killed by a run- 
away team while yet in his prime. He married and left five children: 
William (of further mention); Mary (Polly), married Judge Samuel 
Black, lived and died in Perry county ; Sarah, died unmarried, in 
extreme old age; John, died in infancy; John (2) lived and died in 
Perry county; Robert, lived and died in Perry county. At his death, 
John Neilson divided his landed estate among his three sons, providing 
for his daughters otherwise. It was the wish of the daughters, Polly 
and Sarah, to have lands instead of cash, but law and custom awarded 
that part of the estate in equal parts to the three sons, priority of 
choice being in accordance with seniority. 

William (2) Neilson retained the old homestead, to which he 
brought his bride, and there lived a quiet, contented, prosperous life. 
He was of quiet, retiring nature, but nevertheless firm and decided in 
his likes, dislikes, beliefs and opinions. It is related of him that he 
was the first in his community to attempt to abolish rum from the 
harvest field. This he accomplished in the sensible manner of adding 
to the wages of his men the cost of the liquor that would have been 
consumed during the harvest. In this quiet, forceful way he exerted 
a strong influence for good, preaching by deeds, rather than by words. 
His wife, Rebecca D. Bull, was the descendant of the earlv Bull 
family, who in the persons of John, Richard and William Bull came to 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 767 

Pennsylvania in the days of William Penn and located in Chester 
county, founding a prominent, influential family. The only child of 
William (2) Neilson, Eleanor K., married Rev. Samuel W. Seibert. 

(IV) Judge William N., eldest son of Rev. Samuel W. and Eleanor 
K. (Neilson) Seibert, was bom in Center township, Perry county, 
Pennsylvania, May 28, 1848. He was educated in the private schools, 
academies and under private tutors, and during his early years lived 
at the farm with his grandfather. He first intended to become a i)rintcr, 
but after two years at that trade abandoned it and began the study of 
law under the preceptorship of the late William A. Sponsler. Com- 
pleting his studies and passing the required examination, he was ad- 
mitted to the Perry county bar in August, 1869. He at once liegan the 
practice of law in New Bloomfield, and continued in honor and success 
until January i, 1912. when he took his seat upon the Ijench as president 
judge of the Forty-first Judicial District of Pennsylvania, comprised of 
the counties of Juniata and Perry. Judge Seibert practiced alone until 
the admission to the bar of his son, William S. Seibert, then admitted 
him to a partnership, which continued until the father was elevated 
to the bench. Judge Seibert is eminently qualified to fill the high 
judicial position to which he has been chosen. He has devoted his 
entire mature life — forty-two years — to the practice of law: is learned 
in all its phases ; has a fair, impartial, steadfast mind that will not be 
swerved from an upright, honorable course, and, above all, has lived a 
life of such integrity and uprightness that he commands the unbounded 
respect of every member of the bar. His learning, wisdom and fair- 
ness bespeak for him a career of great usefulness and honor as a jurist, 
rivaling that of the lawyer. Judge Seibert is a member of the Presby- 
terian church and since August 5, 1883, has served as elder of the New 
Bloomfield Church. He belongs to the Masonic craft, being affiliated 
with Blue Lodge, Chapter, Council and Commandery of Knights Tem- 
plar. For thirty-two years, by right of official position, he has repre- 
sented his lodge in the annual meetings of the Grand Lodge of Penn- 
sylvania, holding, with four others, supervision of Grand Lodge cor- 
respondence. He is highly esteemed in the craft and has been one of 
those eminent Masons who have made the Pennsylvania Grand Lodge 
one of the leading Grand Lodges of the United States. 

Judge Seibert married, June, 1870, Elizabeth A. Heiges, bom in 



768 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

York county, Pennsylvania, daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth (Mum- 
per) Heiges; children: i. William S., born December 21, 1872, edu- 
cated in New Bloomfield Academy; read law under the direction of 
his honored father; was admitted to the Perry county bar in 1894, 
then was admitted to a partnership that continued until Judge Seibert 
was raised to a president judgeship, now practicing alone. He mar- 
ried Allie E. Fastnacht ; children : William Warren and Helen Eliza- 
beth, the latter dying in infancy. 2. John H., born October 2, 1875, 
now proprietor of a livery stable in New Bloomfield ; unmarried. 



This name, prominent in Pennsylvania annals for several 
MAGEE generations, is an especially honored one in the Juniata 

Valley. Here three generations founded and edited news- 
papers that ranked among the best in the state; were prominent in 
public life and bulwarks of strength to the Democratic party. The 
family became identified with the city of Philadelphia, in the decade 
following the American revolution, and are of ScotcWIrish lineage, 
belonging to that vast army of Scotch Covenanters, the founders of 
the Presbyterian Kirk of Scotland, who, in the latter part of the sev- 
enteenth century, sought refuge from persecution in the northern 
counties of Ireland, from whence came many emigrants to America, 
principally to Pennsylvania and the Carolinas, during the period 1720- 
1800. The Magees were among those who remained in Ireland for 
several generations. In the middle of the eighteenth century they are 
found, settled at Rathmullen, in the extreme northern part of county 
Donegal, just southwest of Scotland, from whence came their fore- 
bears a century earlier. 

(I) Alexander Magee was born in Philadelphia, September 20, 
1 79 1, died in New Bloomfield, Pennsylvania, July 8, 1845. He was 
educated in the city schools and learned the trade of printer and book- 
binder in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. During the war of 18 12- 18 14, he 
enlisted in the American army, serving in Captain Alexander's company 
of volunteers. In 1820 he moved to Landisburg, Perry county, and 
there established the pioneer newspaper of the county, "The Perry For- 
ester," continuing its publication in Landisburg until April i, 1829, 
when the paper was moved to New Bloomfield, then the county seat. 
In 1832 Mr. Magee sold the paper to David A. Reed, and engaged in 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 769 

mercantile life until 1841. In that year he was elected sheriff of Perry 
county, serving his term most acceptably. He then lived a retired life 
in New Bloomfield until his death, at the age of fifty-four years. He 
was a man of high character, with a conscientious regard for his duties 
as a citizen, commanding the respect and esteem of his contemporaries 
m public life, going in and out among the people of Perry county 
for a quarter of a century, leading their thought for half of these 
years through the columns of his paper, and demonstrating in his daily 
life the purity of his purpose. He was the friend of education 
and of every enterprise tending to promote the public good. He was 
a delegate to the constitutional convention of 1837-1838, which framed 
the constitution for the state of Pennsylvania, which existed until 1874. 

Mr. Magee married, about 1815, Sarah, born August 4. 1795, died 
January 24, 1855, daughter of John and Eve Crever, of Carlisle, Penn- 
sylvania, of German descent; children: Anna Catherine, married Ed- 
ward S. Swartz, of Berks county; Eleanor, married James G. Sample, 
of Crawford county; Mary A., married Matthew McBride, of Perry 
county; Eliza, married Samuel G. Morrison, of Lycoming county; 
Margaret, married Joseph M. Shatto, of Perry county; John A. (of 
whom further); Sarah J., unmarried, of New Bloomfield; Emma J., 
married Addis McVeagh, of Williamsport, Pennsylvania; James Black, 
died in infancy. 

(II) John Alexander, son of Alexander and Sarah (Crever) Magee, 
was bom at Landisburg, then the county seat of Perry county, October 
14, 1827, died at his home in New Bloomfield, November 18, 1903, one 
of the oldest newspaper men of the state of Pennsylvania, both in actual 
years and in years of service. He was educated in the public schools 
and at New Bloomfield Academy ; his parents moving to New Bloom- 
field v/hen he was two years of age. In August, 1845, ^^ began an 
apprenticeship at the printer's trade, entering the oftice of the "Perry 
County Democrat," then edited and pulilished by George Stroop. In 
1850 he left the "Democrat" and located in Harrisburg, working on 
the "Keystone" and the "Daily American." In 185 1 he taught school. 
In 1853 ^6 'S found as a typesetter in the printing offices of the "Na- 
tional Era," Washington, D. C. In January. 1854, he became editor 
of the "Perry County Democrat," a vacancy having been created by 
the death of George Stroop, under whom Mr. Magee served his years 



770 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

of apprenticeship. Henceforward until death he continued at the head 
of the "Democrat" and fully estahlished its value and uifluence as a 
leading Democratic journal.' His conduct of the editorial department 
proved him a man of brain and of unusual ability as a writer of force 
and logic. Pie upheld the principles of Jefferson and Jackson, in which 
he firmly believed, and gained deserved recognition for his valuable 
service. He took an active and prominent personal part in county, 
state and national affairs and became an acknowledged leader of his 
party. In 1862 he was elected to the lower house of the State Legis- 
lature, serving his term with credit. In 1868 he was a delegate to 
the National Democratic Convention, held in New York City, that 
nominated Horatio Seymour for the presidency. In 1872 he was the 
candidate of his party for Congress, from the district comprising Cum- 
berland, Perry and York counties. Notwithstanding the heavy Repub- 
lican victories of that year all over Pennsylvania, Mr. Magee was 
elected by a majority of eighteen hundred and twenty-six out of a 
total vote of twenty-eight thousand eight hundred and ninety. This 
splendid endorsement shows plainer than volumes could tell his popu- 
larity and great strength before the people. He was the unanimous 
choice of the delegates from Perry county to the Congressional Con- 
ventions of 1874 and 1878 and a delegate to the National Democratic 
Convention of 1876, held in St. Louis, that nominated Samuel J. Til- 
den for the presidency. He was also many times a delegate to state 
conventions of his party. In 1894 he was elected chairman of the 
first division Democratic State Executive Committee, embracing the 
counties of York, Adams, Cumberland, Franklin, Dauphin, Lebanon, 
Perry, Juniata and Mifflin: was reelected in 1895 and 1896, declining 
another election in 1897. In 1896 he was delegate to the Democratic 
State Convention at Allentown; was there chosen a delegate to the 
national convention that later met at Chicago and nominated William 
Jennings Bryan for the presidency. Mr. Magee continued his work and 
activity in newspaper and public life until his death, literally dying, as 
lie always declared he would, "with the harness on." In his discussion 
of public questions, through his editorial columns, Mr. Magee was dig- 
nified, able and vmbiased, while local news received especial care and 
attention. Tie was loyal and true to the people of his county who so 
faithfully rallied to his support whenever called upon and who always 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 771 

gave him their unreserved confidence. His long life was one of great 
activity and usefulness, while age did not dim his powers nor curb his 
activity. Uprightness, honesty and integrity marked all his dealings, 
while loyalty, devotion and fairness were strong characteristics. He 
never failed a friend, nor took an unfair advantage of an opponent. 
His public life was unspotted by self-seeking ambition, while liis private 
life was above reproach. Mr. Magee married, June 10, 1857, Mar- 
garet Hettie Ramsey, who died March 2, 1898, daughter of William 
D. Ramsey, a lawyer of Cumberland county, Pennsylvania; children: 

1. Alexander Ramsey, born April, 1858, died November 6, 1862. 

2. Charlotte Annie, born November 28, 1859, now residing with her 
brother, James S. Magee, in New Bloomfield, unmarried. 3. William 
Ramsey, born September 19, 1862, died July 29, 1901, unmarried; 
a well-known educator and magazine writer. 4. James Sample (of 
whom further). 5. John Alexander (2), born February 20, 1867, died 
September 20, 1871. 6. Benjamin Crever, born August 12, 1869, died 
September 25, 1886. 7. Louis Alexander, born September 18, 1872, 
died July 25, 1884. 

Mrs. Margaret H. Ramsey Magee was a daughter of William Dean 
Ramsey and granddaughter of Archibald Ramsey, whose parents, Sam- 
uel and Esther Ramsey, came from Ireland to America about 1750, 
settling in Cumberland county, about four miles from Carlisle, where 
Archibald Ramsey was born. The Ramseys were of Scotch ancestry, 
theirs being one of the noted families of Scotland that trace descent 
far into the "long ago." Samuel Ramsey was a farmer, owned land 
in Cumberland county, and there reared a family. 

Archibald, son of Samuel and Esther Ramsey, was born in Cum- 
berland county, was a farmer and there died. He married Margaret 
Dean, who bore him : Samuel ; William Dean ; Robert, served in the 
Mexican war and never returned ; John Alexander, died unmarried ; 
and Hettie, died in childhood. 

William Dean, son of Archibald and Margaret (Dean) Ramsey, 
was a lawyer of the Cumberland county bar, married Charlotte, daugh- 
ter of Dr. John and Rachel (Weakley) Arnold, of Adams county, and 
in 1838 moved in a covered wagon to the state of Ohio with his wife, 
and there died in 1842. After becoming settled, he applied for ad- 
mission to the bar, but the law required a year's prior residence. Be- 



772 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

fore the year expired he died. He left two children: i. Jane Rebecca, 
married George S. Barnett, lived in Perry county, Pennsylvania, where 
she died April 22, 1900; children: William F., Charlotte J., George 
R., Margaret H., Alice R., Edwin C., Lillian and Robert T. 2. Mar- 
garet Hettie, married John A. Magee. 

(Ill) James Sample, only living son of John Alexander and Mar- 
garet H. (Ramsey) Magee, was born in New Bloomfield, Pennsyl- 
vania, November 6, 1864. He was educated in the public schools and 
at an early age began work in the printing department of the "Perry 
County Democrat." He mastered thoroughly the printer's art and at 
age sixteen years was practically in charge of the mechanical depart- 
ment of the "Democrat." He continued thus, taking all possible bur- 
dens from the shoulders of his honored father, who was editor-in-chief 
for nearly fifty years, only surrendering his beloved post to the "grim 
reaper," death. In 1903 the old chief was laid at rest, and James S. 
Magee succeeded to full editorial control and ownership of the "Demo- 
crat," and so continues. His father learned his trade in that printing 
office, beginning in 1845, '^"'^ '''"''s years later, in 1854, became its 
editor, continuing until 1903. The son, James S., also began working 
in the same office as a boy, was manager from 1880 until 1903. then 
became editor. This covers a period of sixty-eight years, fifty-nine of 
which the editorial columns have been controlled by the Magees, father 
and son. The "Democrat" has steadily increased in size, reputation 
and influence, and is now at its highest point of circulation. While 
uncompromising in its advocacy of Democratic principles, it numbers 
many of the opposing party among its supporters. The editorial page 
has ever lieen one of its strong features, while local, county and state 
happenings are attractively presented. The mechanical department has 
been constantly improved and a complete job department, with ample" 
equipment of modern machinery, draws a large patronage. 

James S. Magee was appointed by President Cleveland cashier of 
the Ninth Internal Revenue District of Pennsylvania, and for four 
and a half years was stationed at Lancaster. For ten years he was 
chairman of the Perry County Democratic Committee, and is the pres- 
ent chairman of the Seventeenth Congressional District. In 1912 he 
so successfully managed the campaign that a Democratic congressman 
was elected. He has at various times represented Perry county in 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 773 

state conventions and is one of the influential, active Democrats of 
Perry county. He is a member of Adams Lodge, No. 319, Free and 
Accepted Masons, also belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows. 

Mr. Magee married, February 13, 1889, Mary Mortimer, born in 
New Bloomfield, daughter of Captain Frank Mortimer, a gallant officer 
of the civil war, editor and owner of the "Perry County Times." Cap- 
tain Mortimer was born in Massachusetts, son of Samuel and Eleanor 
(Richardson) Mortimer. He prepared for the practice of law, but 
poor eyesight prevented his ever entering actual practice, although ad- 
mitted to the bar of New York in 1853. ^t the outbreak of the war be- 
tween the states, he entered the service as captain of Company I, Ninth 
Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry. He was captured in De- 
cember, 1862, and held a prisoner at Culpeper and Lynchburg, Vir- 
ginia, until April, 1863, when he escaped, reaching the Union lines in 
safety. He then resigned his commission and in January, 1864, came 
to Perry county, where he engaged in mercantile business at Green 
Park until March, 1865; then moved to New Bloomfield, engaging as a 
merchant until 1889. In 1867 he had established the "Perry County 
Times," and in 1889 he sold his mercantile business to John Arnold 
and gave his entire time to the editorial and business management of 
his paper. The "Times," until 1892, was independent in politics, then 
was made to reflect the political faith of its owner, and has since been 
an advocate of Republican principles. 

Captain Mortimer married and had issue: Eleanor, of Philadelphia; 
Mary, married James S. Magee; Harry, died March, 1896; Alice, wife 
of W. E. Maxfield, of Philadelphia; and Adelaide, who married Harry 
Briggs and resides in New York. Children of James S. and Mary 
Magee: i. John Alexander (2), born January 29, 1890, graduate of 
Yale University, A. B., class of 1912, taking first honors and awarded 
the philosophical oration. He was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and 
Beta Theta Pi fraternities, now professor of Latin and Greek at Dr. 
Holbrook's Preparatory School at Ossining, New York, unmarried. 
2. James Ramsey, born March 26, 1891, a student of the law depart- 
ment of the University of Pennsylvania, LL.B., class of 1914. 3. 
Frank Mortimer, born March 22, 1895, now a student at Bloomfield 
Academy. 



774 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

James Loudon, of East Waterford, Juniata county, 
LOL^DOX Pennsylvania, represents in his person the admirable 
qualities of the transplanted Celt in the second genera- 
tion, which make them such desirable citizens of this Republic. 

(I) Robert Loudon, the grandfather of James Loudon, was born in 
Ireland, and was there married. His stalwart sons, growing tired of 
the scant prospect of advancement at home, determined to put their 
fortunes to the touch, and emigrated to America. After some years 
tiiey induced him to join them in the United States, and it is probable 
that his wife crossed with him. He was then an old man, and never 
returned to Ireland, spending his last days with his children near 
East Waterford. His children, all of whom are dead, were: John, 
Robert. David. A\'illiam, Solomon, Lydia, Eliza, Nancy, Paul and 
James. 

(II) Solomon Loudon, son of Robert Loudon, was born in the 
County of Derry, Ireland, as was his wife. He came to the United 
States at the age of eighteen and located near East Waterford. Here 
he married Eliza Barton, who came with her parents from Ireland 
when she was but twelve years old. He purchased one hundred and 
sixty acres of land in Tuscarora township, and later added to it another 
one hundred and sixty acres, making in all three hundred and twenty 
as fertile acres as could be found in that part of Pennsylvania. In his 
early manhood he followed the shoemaker's trade, eventually gave that 
up and devoted himself to agriculture, and became one of the successful 
fanners of his section. He lived a quiet, retired, though useful, life. 
He erected sulfstantial buildings on his farm, and it was known far 
and near for its up-to-dateness. In politics he was a Democrat, and 
both he and his wife were members of the Presbyterian church. He 
died about 1869 and she in 1879. Children: i. Sarah Jane, married 
Daniel Thatcher; she is dead. 2. John M., married May McKee; 
lived and died in Nebraska. 3. Mary Ann, married Robert McWil- 
liams; he served as register and recorder of Juniata county; they 
moved to Illinois, and he was killed there; she died, aged eighty-four 

4. Samuel B., tailor by trade at East Waterford; he was elected sheriff 
of Juniata county, and died at MifHintown; married Marv Sweringen. 

5. Paul, at the age of twenty-five moved to Ireland and lives tlfere 

6. James, of whom further. 7. Elizabeth, married John Silverborn; 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 



//D 



both died in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. 8. Rachel, married 
James McConnell ; lived in Perry county some years, now makes her 
home in Germantown, Pennsylvania. 9. David S., enlisted in civil war 
and served four years ; married Mary Elder, and moved to Page county, 
Iowa, and there lives. 10. Margaret, married L. E. Dougherty; lives 
in Page county, Iowa. 11. Martha, widow of John Anderson; he died 
in Cambria county, Pennsylvania. 12. Tabitha, died at the age of eight 
years. 

(Ill) James Loudon, son of Solomon and Eliza (Barton) Loudon, 
was born in Tuscarora township, Juniata county, Pennsylvania, Febru- 
ary 26, 1833. He was educated in the common schools of the town- 
ship and reared on the farm. He remained with his father until after 
the civil war, then, following the trend of the times, went to the oil 
region. He returned home, and with his brother, David, took over 
the management of the home farm. A year later David went west, and 
James purchased the homestead from the other heirs, and there made 
his home until 1895. In that year he moved to East Waterford, to 
occupy a house that he had erected the year previous, and has lived 
there until now (1913). In 1909 he disposed of the farm and retired 
from business life. In politics he is a Democrat and has served in 
township offices, and has been tax collector. He and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Presb34erian church, of which he has been an elder for 
more than forty years. He is a member of the local Grange. He 
married, February 14, 1867, Susan E. Dougherty, born January 22, 
1849, i" Juniata county, daughter of Mathew and Susan (Minary) 
Dougherty, old residents of Juniata county. Children: i. Ida M., 
widow of James Hockenberry; lived near Waterford; children: Eva 
and Pearl, twins. 2. Florence, died in infancy. 3 Charles W., en- 
gaged in a silver ore smelter in Montana ; married Olive Allen ; chil- 
dren : Dale, died aged four; and Ray. 4. Millie G., married J. Harry 
Murphey, an employee on railroad at Altoona, Pennsylvania ; children : 
Annis, John and James, the two latter twins. 5. Lottie J., married 
Bruce Hockenberry ; lives in Berea, Kentucky ; children : Susan Ray. 
James Loudon and Dorman. 6. Margaret M., married Harry Lawton; 
has one child, Faye. 7. Frank F., married Blanche Allen; he is a 
ranchman at Plumber, Idaho. 8. Mabel S., married James B. McMeen 
(see McMeen sketch, this work). 



77^ HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

(The Dougherty Line). 
]\[athew Dougherty was the only son of his father, who died when 
he was quite a lad, in Chester county, Pennsylvania. He married 
Susan Minar)', daughter of Joseph Minary, an old resident of Philadel- 
phia, where he was a carpenter before he moved to Juniata county, at 
an advanced age, and died in the home of his daughter. 

Mathew Dougherty was born in the state of Delaware, December 22, 
18 10, and, owing to the death of his father when he was quite young, 
he was reared by an aunt. He married Susan Minary, February 8, 
1837, in Philadelphia, and soon moved to Juniata county. They lo- 
cated near Mifflin, and in 1857 moved to Tuscarora township and 
bought a farm, and later added two more to the land holdings, aggre- 
gating two hundred and seventy-five acres. He died February 15, 1889, 
and his wife died February i, i88g. They were both devout members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, and he was a Democrat. Chil- 
dren: I. William, a farmer, and died in Juniata county. 2. Joseph, 
died on homestead. 3. John, lives in Harrisburg. 4. Thomas, one 
of the wealthy men of Iowa. 5. Sarah, married John Andrews; died 
in Ohio. 6. Mathias Day, lives in Iowa. 7. Lemuel Emory, lives in 
Iowa. 8. Susan Evans, born January 22, 1849, married James Lou- 
don (see Loudon III). 9. Ellen, married Moses Felmlee and lives 
at Shade Gap. 10. Charles, died aged eight. 11. Juniata, died in 
infancy. 12. Wilson McCullough, died on homestead. 13. Martha 
Jane Irvin, married David Milliken, and lives in Reedsville, Penn- 
sylvania. 



Mrs. Mary P. (Frankum) Deni- 
FRANKUM-DENITHORNE thorne, widow of James Denithorne, 

is a granddaughter of John Frank- 
um, of German parentage, who lived in Chester county, Pennsylvania. 
He was an expert stone cutter and engraver of intricate designs in 
stone, renowned in his art, traveling to many places where his especial 
skill was required. He married Susan Posey, also Ijorn in Chester 
county, where both died, members of the Lutheran church : children : 
Lindley: Violet, who married Thomas Hippie; Matilda, married \\'illiam 
Ayres; Susan, never married; Reuben H. (of whom further) ; Nancy, 
married Joseph Clark. 




,j(une.i u fnif/h 



'/fJf/IC 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY | -777 

(II) Reuben H., son of John and Susan (Posey) Frankum, was 
born in Chester county, Pennsylvania, in 1830, died in 1S81. He 
learned the machinist's trade and followed that occupation all his life, 
mostly in Chester county and Philadelphia. He was an expert work- 
man, a man of high character and a member of the Episcopal church. 
He married (first) Mary A. Welker, who died aged forty-five years, 
daughter of John and Elizabeth (Myers) Welker: he at one time a 
physician, who died in Manheim, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. Mary 
A. Welker had an only sister, Henrietta H., who married John Taylor, 
and an only brother, Charles, a bridge builder, who lived in Harris- 
burg, Pennsylvania. Children of Reuben H. Denithorne by his first 
wife: Mary P. (of whom further) : John, born July 22, 1853, now a 
merchant in Ohio ; Lizzie, married Samuel Granim, but only survived 
her marriage a few months, he resides in Lancaster county ; Regina, 
died in Newark, New Jersey, in 1902, married John J. Gifford, a civil 
engineer, of New York City; Charles Lincoln, a bricklayer, of West- 
chester, Pennsylvania, married Alice Glenn. 

(III) Mary P., daughter of Reuben H. Frankum and his first wife, 
Mary A. Welker, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, June 21, 
1851. She was married in Marietta, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, 
February 24, 1879, by Rev. Diller, to James Denithorne, born in Corn- 
wall, England, May 18, 1847, died in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania. No- 
vember 22, 1906, son of John and Anna (Bartle) Denithorne. John 
Denithorne was born in Penzance, England, and in 1848. with his wife, 
elder children and ten-months-old son, James, came to the L'nited 
States, settling in Phoenixville, Chester county, Pennsylvania, where 
he died in June, 1877, aged seventy-four years and ten months. He 
Vi^as an expert stone mason and until his retirement from active labor 
always followed that occupation. His widow, Anna, survived him 
until May 29, 1880, d)'ing at age seventy-one years, three months: 
children: William, bom January 25, 1827, died in 1835: Ann. born in 
January, 1830; William (2), born July i, 1832, died young: John (2), 
born November 22, 1834, married Caroline Francis: Elizabeth, born 
September 5, 1837, never married; William (3), born January i, 1S40, 
died in the Union army in 1864: Richard, born June i, 1842, married 
Emma Tustin: Amelia, born December 24, 1844, married Jacob Mil- 
dren: James (see forward); Catherine, born October 20, 1851, died 



778 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

1909, married (first) I. \V. Marsh, (second) Oliver Nichols; Mary, 
born July 21, 1854, died young. 

James, son of John Denithorne, was ten months of age when he was 
brought to Chester county, Pennsylvania, where he was educated in 
the public schools of Phoenixville. He learned the machinist's trade, 
at which he worked in his younger years. He then took a course of 
instruction in drafting and civil engineering in Philadelphia and until 
1890 followed that business. In 1890 he moved to Huntingdon, later 
becoming general manager of the Langdon Coal Company, continuing 
for several years. In 1902, in association with Elwood Miller, he 
began operating coal mines at Six Mile Run, continuing a successful 
coal operator until his death in 1906. He was a member of the Ma- 
sonic order, holding the thirty-second degree, Ancient Accepted Scot- 
tish Rite, and very popular with his brethren and associates, his genial 
manner and open-hearted generosity winning him friends everywhere. 
He was a member of St. John's Protestant Episcopal Church, liberal 
in its support and interested in all that pertained to the public good. 
He was a good citizen and left behind him the record of an honorable 
life. He was a Republican, and served the city of Huntingdon as 
mayor two terms, and was also a member of the Pennsylvania National 
Guard (Griffin Battery, Chester county, Pennsylvania), in which he 
served as first lieutenant. Children of James and Mary P. (Frankum) 
Denithorne: i. Grace B., born in Chester county, Pennsylvania, August 
15, 1881, died in Huntingdon, November 26, 191 1, unmarried. 2. 
George, born July 21, 1891, is now a student at State College, depart- 
ment of civil and mining engineering. 

Mrs. Mary P. Denithorne survives her husband, and continues her 
residence in Huntingdon. She is a member of St. John's Protestant 
Episcopal Church, and lives a life full of gracious, womanly usefulness. 



For thirty years the well-beloved and 
PARKER-McDOWELL useful pastor of the East Kishacoquillas 

Church of Reedsville, it may be said of 
the Rev. Andrew H. Parker that he gave his life to that church, com- 
ing there shortly after his ordination and continuing until death ended 
his labors. 

Rev. Andrew 11. Parker was a son of Caleb Parker, who earlv in 




'^. %,"' \ 



Erajd by CamphcllBmtl 




PUBLIC UBRARY 







HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY ■' 779 

life settled in Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, and about 1834 located in 
Mifflintown, where for many years he was justice of the peace until 
his death in 1885. His wife, Sarah McCully, was born in IMitflin 
county, daughter of an early pioneer family. They were married in 
Mifflintown and there their children were born. Both were members 
of the Presbyterian church — he a Democrat in politics. Five of their 
children grew to adult years : Robert, James, Thaddeus, Cloyd and 
Andrew H., all deceased except Cloyd, who resides in Harrisburg. 

Rev. Andrew H. Parker was born in Mifflintown, Pennsylvania, 
in 1845, died in Reedsville, Pennsylvania, February i, 1899. His 
early education was obtained in the public schools ; his preparatory 
education at Tuscarora Academy; his classical education at Princeton 
College, when he was graduated, class of 1866. He cliose the 
ministry as his profession and pursued a three years' course in divinity 
at Princeton Theological Seminary, whence he was graduated in April, 
1869. He had received a license to preach from the Huntingdon Pres- 
bytery, October 7. 1868, and soon after his graduation was invited to 
become "stated supply" of the East Kishacoquillas Presbyterian Church 
during the summer. He accepted the call in May, 1869, and so well 
had he pleased the congregation that during the following summer 
they made him a formal call to become their permanent pastor. He 
accepted, and at an adjourned meeting of Huntingdon Presbytery, held 
in the East Kishacoquillas Church, December 7. 1869. he was ordained 
a minister of the Gospel and installed as pastor of that church. The 
first twenty-four years of his pastorate he preached in the "Brick 
Church," in which he was ordained, situated about three-quarters of a 
mile from Reedsville, on a hill consecrated by many precious memo- 
ries, where the congregation had worshipped for one hundred and 
ten years. In 1893 it was deemed wise to change the place of wor- 
ship to Reedsville, and a handsome brownstone church was erected 
there, and has since been the home of the congregation, which still 
retains its old time name. East Kishacoquillas Presbyterian Church. 
On June 14, 1894, the twenty-fifth anniversary of the pastorate of Rev. 
Parker was celebrated with appropriate services held in the church, 
a number of ministers, elders, and a great many members and friends 
of the church and pastor participating. The services at the church 
were followed by a banquet at the town hall, where the pastor was pre- 



ySo HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

sented with an expensive silver water service of beautiful design and 
suitably inscribed. Five years later, after a pastorate of thirty years, 
he ceased from his labors, and in the presence of a large gathering his 
funeral services were held in the church he had served so well. He was 
a faithful servant of God, studious and earnest, a pleasing, forceful 
preacher of the highest type of character and a man beloved by all. 
His church prospered spiritually and materially under his guidance and 
many were added to the church roll of membership. He was interested 
in all that concerned the welfare of his community, aided in their civic 
affairs, and was a strong force for good. He was considered one of the 
strong men of the Huntingdon Presbytery and held many honors re- 
ceived at the hands of his brethren. 

Rev. -Andrew H. Parker married. May 30, 1878, Margaret J. Mc- 
Dowell, born in Milflin county. May 4, 1847, daughter of John and 
Mary (Brisbin) McDowell, who survives him, a resident of Reeds- 
ville, a lady of culture, piety and benevolence; children: i. John Mc- 
Dowell Parker, born July 12, 1879, died May 22, 1880. 2. Frank Mc- 
Dowell Parker, born September 9, 1880, educated in the pul)lic schools 
of Reedsville, Chambersburg Academy, Washington and Jefferson Col- 
lege ; now assistant cashier of the Reedsville National Bank ; he married 
:\Iabel Taylor Smith, and has: Andrew James, born November 6. 191 1, 
and Frank McDowell Jr., born May 7, 1913. 3. Mary Brisbin Parker, 
born .\pril 7, 1884, married Rev. H. M. Campbell, now located in 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: child: Margaret McDowell, born December 
3. 1912. 

(McDowell Line). 

The McDowells are of Scotch ancestry, the emigrant, John (i) 
McDowell, born in that country, coming to America prior to the revo- 
lutionary period. He first settled within the present limits of Franklin 
count}-, then a part of Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, but in 1754 
moved to Mifflin county, settling in the Kishacoquillas Valley. He 
married and left issue, including a son John. 

John (2) McDowell was born in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, 
in 1767, died September 29, 1849. He was a farmer and merchant,' 
having a store at Perrysvilie, now IMilroy. He was a man of great 
energy and ambition, filled many local offices; was sheriff of Mifflin 
county prior to the erection of Juniata, and served well the interests 



HISTORY OF THE JUXIATA VALLEY 781 

of the community in which he Hved. He married, and by first wife 
had children: William, and Elizabeth, who married, February 8, 1817, 
Alexander McCoy, of Potters Mills, Center county, Pennsylvania. 
He married (second) Jane Mitchell, of Irish lineage, who survived 
him until January i, 1864, aged nearly eightj^-eight years. Both 
were devoted members of the Presbyterian church and were widely 
and highly esteemed. He was known as "Colonel John," a rank he 
held by appointment in the Mifflin county militia. He was a genial, 
companionable man, held in high regard for his private virtue, as well 
as his valuable public service. Children by second marriage : i. John (3), 
(of w'hom further). 2. Samuel, born April 20, 1802, died unmarried, 
April 13, 1832. 3. Margaret, born February 9, 1804, died at Law- 
rence, Kansas, September 21, 1869. She married January 11, 1825, 
William McKinney, of Lycoming county, Pennsylvania. 4. Rosanna, 
born August 21, 1806, died November 13, 1882: she married (first), 
April 26. 1827, Alexander Sharp, of Cumberland county; (second) 
William Barr, of Newville, Pennsylvania. 5. Alexander S., born Sep- 
tember 17, 1808, died unmarried, January 7, 1837. 6. George, born 
September 29, 181 1, died April 18, 1885; married, January 6, 1847, 
Elizabeth Kyle. 7. James, born July 20, 18 14, died unmarried at War- 
rington, Florida, September 13, 1852. 8. Mary Jane, born September 
22, 1817, died April 5, 1844; married, March 19, 1839, Abraham 
Adams, of Cumberland county. 

John (3), son of John (2) McDowell and his second wife, Jane 
Mitchell, was born June 26, 1800, died after a short illness, March 29, 
1863. He obtained a limited education in the subscription schools, 
but by self study, reading and experience became a well-informed man. 
He was a farmer, but of so strong a character and of such intelligence 
that he was called to important trusts, managing large estates, also 
filling township and county offices. He was shrewd, thrifty and reso- 
lute, possessing prudence and sound judgment, yet of so genial, gentle 
and unassuming manner that he drew men to him for sympathy and 
advice. Like his father, he held the military rank of colonel, serving 
by appointment of Governor Pollock on the latter's staff with the rank 
of colonel. He was a member of the Presbyterian church, as was his 
wife — he a Republican. He married, December 21, 184 1, Mary Bris- 
bin, born near Reedsville, Pennsylvania, January 27, 18 14, died ;\pril 



782 HISTORY OF THE JUMATA VALLEY 

8, 1892, daughter of James and Margaret (McManigle) Brisbin; he a 
native of Center, she of Mifflin county, Pennsylvania. James Brisbin 
had children: Elizabeth, ;\Iary (of previous mention), James, Sallie, 
William John, William, John and Mary; the latter three dying young. 
Children of John (3) and Mary (Brisbin) McDowell, all born at the 
home farm in .Armagh township, Mifflin county: i. An infant son, died 
unnamed. 2. John (4), now deceased, inherited and farmed the old 
homestead, was a trustee of the Presbyterian church and a man of sub- 
stance. He married, October 11, 188S, Elizabeth R., daughter of Alex- 
ander and Mary L. (Taylor) Reed; children: Alexander Reed and 
Mary Lyon. 3. Margaret J. (of previous mention), widow of Rev. 
Andrew ii. Parker. 4. A child, died unnamed. 



"Born in Germany" signifies that he who can claim that 
WENZEL distinguishing mark is of steady, industrious, thrifty 
habits, is usually well educated, possesses a trade or 
definite occupation, and, if he remained in his native country long 
enough, has had the valuable training in discipline, self-restraint, obe- 
dience and respect for those in authority, gained by service in the Ger- 
man army. Such a man is Charles Wenzel, now engaged in the livery 
business in Mount Union, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. 

Charles Wenzel is the son of Heinrich Christian and Coralina 
(Rausch) Wenzel. both of whom lived and died in Germany — he a 
teamster and farmer and both members of the Lutheran church. Chil- 
dren : Hendrick, a soldier of the German army, married and resides in 
Germany; Charles (of further mention). 

Charles Wenzel was born in Hanover, Germany, February 2, 1854, 
and continued his residence in his native land until reaching: the aere of 
twenty-four years. He was educated in the public schools, learned the 
trade of brick and stone mason, at which he worked until called to the 
colors by German law. He served three years and eight months in 
the army, and in 1878 bade adieu to family and native land, arriving 
Ml the I'nited States on October 21. He gradually worked westward, 
finally deciding to remain in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, engaging there 
as a bricklayer for three years. He then worked for a year in the 
steel works at Braddock, settling in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, in 1884. 
There lie remained until 1898. During this period he began brick and 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 783 

stone contracting, building up a good business in those lines and 
accumulating capital. He then moved to Mount Union, Huntingdon 
county, where he began and for several years engaged in the manu- 
facture of brick. He discovered there a deposit, rich in silica, and 
established a plant for the manufacture of silica brick. This plant is 
now known as the Harbison-Walker Brick Company and, greatly en- 
larged, employs seven hundred men in its operation. I\Ir. W'enzel 
continued in the brick business until 1912, when he retired, and in 
November of that year engaged in the livery business in Mount Union, 
purchasing the property where he is now located in successful operation. 
He is a capable man of affairs, energetic and always to be relied upon. 
He is an Independent in politics and for six years served on the bor- 
ough council at Mount Laiion. Both he and his wife are members of 
the Lutheran church. 

He married, January 23, 1874, in Germany, Mary, daughter of 
Heinrich and Sophia (Waushousen) Bormann, both of whom lived 
and died in Germany. Children of Charles and Mary W'enzel: William, 
Henry, Fred, Anna, Frank, Charles, Rosa, August and Otto. 



The Minick emigrant ancestor, on coming from Ger- 
MINICK many to Pennsylvania, settled in Lancaster county, whei^e 
he lived until death, leaving issue. 

(II) Peter Minick, son of the emigrant, was born in Lancaster 
county, Pennsylvania, where he grew to manhood and learned the 
tailor's trade. He also followed farming, continuing both occupations 
alternately all his life. After leaving Lancaster county, he moved to 
Cumberland county, thence going to the borough of Carlisle. His last 
years were spent in Orrstown, Franklin county, Pennsylvania, where he 
died, aged eight)'-six years. He married Mary Curran, of Irish par- 
entage, who died at the age of thirty-six years. 

(III) John, son of Peter and Mary (Curran) IMinick, was born 
in Carlisle in 1817, died at Shade Gap, Huntingdon county, in 1893. 
He attended school for three months, the instruction there received 
being entirely in the German language. With but this slender founda- 
tion for an education, he went out into the world, working first on a 
farm, but at age fourteen began learning the shoemaker's trade. Two 
years later he moved his residence to Franklin county, Pennsylvania, 



784 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

tliere learning the tanner"s trade, at which he worked until 1849 ^^t 
others. At age twenty-four years he had married, and through all 
the years from boyhood had steadily pursued a course of self study 
that placed him in the ranks of fairly well educated men. He excelled 
as an accountant and as a bookkeeper had few superiors. Having 
accumulated some capital by close economy, and feeling sure of his 
ability to manage both the bookkeeping and manufacturing depart- 
ments of a business, in 1849 he purchased the tanning plant of John 
U. Blair, in Dublin township, Huntingdon county, paying therefor the 
sum of three thousand dollars. His purchase included the tannery, 
twenty acres of good farm land and six hundred acres of mountain 
land. An old stone house stood on the property, which later he greatly 
improved and made his residence. He prospered in business and at 
his death in 1893 was one of the substantial, highly respected men of 
iiis town. He was an active member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
faithful and devoted to its every interest. For many years he was a 
class leader and superintendent of the Sunday-school. He was very 
benevolent and turned away no worthy applicant for assistance. He 
married, in 1841, JMaria Kuhn, also of German parentage, who died 
in 1880, aged sixty-two years; children: i. Elizabeth ("Lizzie"), mar- 
ried D. R. P. Neely and lived in Washington, D. C. 2. Peter, a sol- 
dier in the L'nion army. Company I, Pennsylvania Eucktails, killed in 
front of Petersburg, aged nineteen years, unmarried. 3. John M., 
wounded while in the Union army and died in the hospital shortly 
afterward. He was but eighteen years of age, very large for his age, 
weighing one hundred and eighty pounds. 4. Ellen H., married Rev. 
William H. Zimmerman, a minister of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
later stationed at Lawrence, Kansas. 5. Susan, married Scott Lysinger, 
register and recorder of Bedford county, Pennsylvania. 6. Alfred A. 
(of whom further). 7. Cambridge D., superintendent of the bark 
department of the Elk Tannery Company of Ridgway, Elk county, 
Pennsylvania; married Minnie Lupfer. 8. S. Newton, deceased, a 
farmer, who cultivated the old home farm; married Anna Swan. 

iW) Alfred A., son of John and Maria (Kuhn) Minick, was 
born at tiie old stone house on the tannery property, in Dublin town- 
ship, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, February 28, 1853. He was 
educated in the i)uhlic school and at Milnwood Academy in Shade Gap. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 



7»5 



During his early life he worked in his father's tannery, but during a 
period of depression its doors were closed for two years, and the 
young man sought other employment. He engaged for eight months 
as clerk in a store at Shade Gap, then pursued a full course at business 
college in Lock Haven, Pennsylvania, graduating therefrom in 1886-. 
In 1887 he became assistant superintendent of the Schlosser tannery 
at Westminster, Maryland, remaining there thirteen months. He then 
returned home and reopened the tannery, which he operated for many 
years ; greatly increased the output of the plant, made extensive im- 
provements, and gained a steady market for his tanned hides in New 
York City. He added considerable real estate to his holdings and was 
rated both successful and reliable. He married in 1876 and continued 
in business, residing at Shade Gap until 1903, when he moved to Ashe- 
ville, North Carolina, where he now resides, superintendent of the 
tannery and extract work of Hans Rees Sons & Company. He is a 
thirty-second degree Alason, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, is a de- 
voted member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and in politics a 
Republican. He took a deep and lively interest in public affairs while 
residing in Huntingdon county and served Dublin township in several 
official capacities. He married, in 1876, Sarah M., born April 15, 
11858, at Burnt Cabins, Fulton county, Pennsylvania, daughter of 
William and Susan (Giles) McGowan, born in Franklin county. Wil- 
liam McGowan was a hotel proprietor in Huntingdon and Bedford 
counties and was at the time of his daughter's marriage proprietor of 
the hotel at Shade Gap, where he yet resides. He has children: 
Thomas, married Jennie Weller; Sarah M., wife of Alfred A. Minick; 
Emory, now residing at Tyrone. Pennsylvania ; Jane, married a Mr. 
Roach; John, a hotel proprietor; William, clerk for the Pittsburgh 
Steel Company, married Ritta Caldwell; and three others died young. 
Children of Alfred A. and Sarah M. Minick: i. John M. (of whom 
further). 2. Ira C, born April i, 1881, now an electrician, residing at 
Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania; he married Elaine Ingersoll. 3. Lillian 
L., born February 3, 1892. 4. S. LaRue. born May 20, 1894. 5. Nor- 
man R., born April 2, 1899. 

(V) John M., eldest son of Alfred A. and Sarah M. (McGowan) 
Minick, was born at Shade Gap, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, 
September 27, 1877. He was educated in the public schools, then in 



786 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

1897 entering the National College of Pharmacy at Washington, D. C. 
He pursued the full course there and was graduated, class of 1900. 
In 1901 and 1902 he was associated with his cousin, Guy Minick Neely, 
a druggist of W'ashington, and in the latter year established a drug 
business in Mount Union, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, under 
the firm name, Neely & ]\Iinick. In 1904 the firm dissolved, Mr. 
Minick continuing the business under his own name, and is well estab- 
lished and prosperous. He is a Republican in politics and both he and 
his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

He married, October 7, 1903, Alice H., daughter of Rudolph and 
Susan (Mclntyre) Sechler; her father is freight agent at Mount Union 
for the East Broad Top Railroad. 



The Rhoads family of Perry county, Pennsylvania, is 
RHOADS of Hungarian origin, the immigrant ancestor, John, 
coming to the United States in the first quarter of the 
nineteenth century and settling in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. He 
served in the war of 1812-1814 under the American flag. He died 
near Rockville, Pennsylvania. He married and had two children: A 
daughter, who married Mr. Collins, and George (of further mention). 
(II) George, son of John Rhoads, was born in Lancaster county, 
Pennsylvania, December 6, 1812, died in Perry county, Pennsylvania, 
1892. He spent most of his life in Rye township, Perry county, being 
employed on the various farms of the locality. In politics he was a 
Democrat and held several township offices. He married Margaret 
McLaughlin, born in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, 1807, died 
January i, 1865, daughter of George McLaughlin, a native of what 
was then Cumberland county, and son of the immigrant ancestor. 
Children of George McLaughlin: i. Alargaret, married George 
Rhoads. 2. Jane, died unmarried. 3. Mary, died unmarried. 4. 
George, resident of Rye township, Huntingdon count)-. 5. W'illiam, 
died in Perry county. 6. Susan, died in Cumberland comity, Penn- 
sylvania; married John Reed. 7. Ann, died in Cumberland' county ; 
married (first) Philip Danner, (second) David Houdeshell. 8. Craw- 
ford, died in the west. Children of George and Margaret (McLaugh- 
lin) Rhoads: i. John H. (of further mention). 2. Cyrus, a railroad 
employee and veteran of the civil war, died in Perry county. 3. Joseph 



HISTORY OF THE JUXL\TA VALLEY 787 

W., served in Company M, Seventh Regiment Pennsylvania Cavalry, 
lives in Rye township. 4. George W., railroad employee, died at ^Nlarys- 
ville. Perry county, Pennsylvania. 5. James (of further mention). 
6. Margaret (deceased), married (first) Samuel Harrow, (second) 
Leo Lentz, (third) Elijah Davis. 

(HI) John H., son of George and Margaret (McLaughlin) Rhoads, 
was born in Rye township, Huntingdon county, April 24, 1843. His 
education was obtained in the public school of the township and his 
early life was spent on the farm. He enlisted in the Union army, 
Company AL Seventh Regiment Pennsylvania Cavalry, February 26, 
1864, and served until the end of the war, seeing active service at the 
battles of Atlanta, Resaca, Rome, Lovejoy Station and Chattahoocha 
River. From March 19, 1865, until the date of his discharge, June 
30, 1865, he was on a hospital boat. At the conclusion of the war he 
returned to Pennsylvania and entered the employ of the Northern 
Central Railroad, as hostler in one of the roundhouses, a position he 
held for about two and a half years. He then accepted a position at 
the Seidel Brothers forge, where he remained for eighteen years. At 
this time he was compelled to retire from active labor by approaching 
blindness. In 1889 he purchased fifty acres of ground in Rye township, 
near his old house in Rye township, and in 191 1 erected thereon a 
handsome residence, where he lives at the present time, retired, but 
still retaining great interest in the afifairs of county, state and country. 
He married, April 29, 1861, Louisa Dale, born in Perry county, Penn- 
sylvania, daughter of John Frederick and Margaret (Baer) Dale; 
child: Anna Mary, born September 11, 1862, married John H. Shone, 
who cultivates her father's farm. Children of John H. and Anna 
Mary (Rhoads) Shone: John; Lucy, married Harvey Baker and has 
two children; Margaret, married William Forney, they have children; 
Charles, William, Sarah, Annie. 

(Ill) James, son of George Rhoads, was born in Perry county, 
Pennsylvania, died in 1865 in Perry county. He was for many years 
an employee of the Pennsylvania railroad and was a veteran of the 
civil war, although his term of service was a short one. He married 
in Marysville, Pennsylvania, leaving a widow and children. His wife, 
Susan Hoover, was born of German parents, survived her husband and 
married (second) Israel Houdeshell; both she and her second hus- 



788 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 



/ 



band dying in Baltimore. Children of James Rhoads: i. Levi, an en- 
gineer, residing in Steelton, Pennsylvania, married Sarah Wagner. 
2. John, a track foreman for the Pennsylvania railroad. He married 
Stella Champion. 3. George Washington (see forward). 4. Sarah, 
married Frank Slade and resides in Baltimore. 5. Fannie, married 
F'rank Cooper, a locomotive engineer, and resides in Baltimore. 

(IV) George Washington, son of James and Susan (Hoover) 
Rhoads, was born in Perry county, Pennsylvania, February 14, 1862. 
He was educated in the public schools of Marysville, Pennsylvania, 
and learned the tinner's trade, beginning at the age of fourteen years. 
He worked at his trade for several years, then entered the railroad 
employ, continuing about nine years. He then returned to the tinning 
business, which he followed until 1912. He then purchased the hotel 
at Marysville, of which he is now proprietor. He is a Democrat in 
politics and a keen, foresighted business man. 

He married, in 1883, Margaret, daughter of Isaac and Margaret 
(Strine) Piatt, of Marysville. Children: Pearl, married John Strickey, 
a boiler inspector for the Pennsylvania railroad; Myrtle, married Al- 
fred Flickinger, a fireman on the Pennsylvania railroad; Violet, mar- 
ried Wesley Kerstetter, a brakeman on the Pennsylvania railroad; 
Earl, a tinner, unmarried ; George, a fireman on the Pennsylvania rail- 
road, married Violet Wilson and resides at West Fairview; Edna, 
resides at home. 



One of the contributing causes to the greatness 
SHOEMAKER of the United States has been the large influx of 
German emigrants who came from the Fatherland 
to better their worldly condition and to assist in the upbuilding of this 
country. They have succeeded in doing both, and there is no element in 
the heterogeneous mass of nationalities that go toward making this re- 
public the greatest on earth that has done more than the Germans. 
Of this thrifty race is Harry W. Shoemaker, of Newport, Pennsyl- 
vania, descended. The name was originally written Shumacher, but 
as generation has succeeded generation in America it has become 
Anglicized. 

(I) Jacob Shoemaker, a direct descendant of the first Shumacher 
to emigrate to the United States, was born in Pennsylvania, near 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 789 

Harrisburg. He was at first a day laborer, then he acquired a farm 
on which he grew tobacco. He married (first) Barbara Boosier, Hke 
himself of German descent. Children by this marriage: i. Amanda, 
who died young. 2. Ann, died unmarried. He married (second) Re- 
becca Goss, and to them were born: i. Daniel G., of whom further. 

2. Jacob, a laborer at Steelton, Pennsylvania; married iMary Crone. 

3. Mary, died in childhood. 4. A son, twin of Mary, died in infancy. 
5. Fannie, married Daniel Redman, a laborer. 6. Harry, married Het- 
tie Hawk. 

(II) Daniel G. Shoemaker, son of Jacob and Rebecca (Goss) 
Shoemaker, was born November 10, 1849, i" Dauphin county, Penn- 
sylvania. He married, December, 1869, Mary Ann \Volf, born De- 
cember 30, 1848, at Goldsborough, York county, Pennsylvania, daugh- 
ter of John and Elizabeth (Souders) Wolf, of Goldsborough, Penn- 
sylvania. Mr. Shoemaker was first a farm laborer, then was a farmer 
in Dauphin county for over eighteen years, on a leased farm. In 
1904 he moved to Newport, Pennsylvania, and has since resided there. 
He and his wife are members of the Church of God. Children: i. 
Fannie, born April i, 1871, now deceased; married Daniel Marion. 
2. Elizabeth, born July 7, 1874, married Hugh Crumbling, a miller at 
Steelton, Pennsylvania. 3. Harry W., of whom further. 4. George, 
born February 10, 1879, died June 6, 1880. 5. Katie, born August 28, 
1881; married Fred Dupler, a teamster. 6. Adaline, born October 16, 
1884, unmarried. 8. Anna, born April 17, 1891. unmarried. The 
parents of Mrs. Shoemaker, John and Elizabeth (Souders) Wolf, were 
old time residents of Goldsborough, Pennsylvania. They were both 
born in York county, Pennsylvania, and died in Goldsborough. He was 
a fish net manufacturer, and was for years an invalid. Children: i. 
Catherine, married (first) John Dugan; married (second) Jesse Funk. 
2. Lydia, married Luke Rhinehart, a farmer of York county. 3. Jacob, 
married Catherine Bone; he is a railway employee. 4. Benjamin, a 
farmer; married Hannah Gingrich. 5. William, of Cly, York county, 
Pennsylvania. 6. Mary Ann, married Daniel G. Shoemaker. 7. Eliza- 
beth, married Augustus Wise. 8. Eliza Jane, died in infancy. 9. 
George, married Lydia Grooms. There were others, but no record 
has been kept of their birth, marriage or death. 

(III) Harry W. Shoemaker, son of Daniel G. and Mary Ann 



790 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

(Wolf) Shoemaker, was boni in Highspire borough, Dauphin county, 
Pennsylvania, June 19, 1877. He was educated in the Highspire public 
school, and later in the Harrisburg Business College, graduating in 
1894. He was employed by the Highspire Distillery Company soon 
after graduation and remained with them four years, and for the last 
three years of that time was foreman of the extensive warehouse of 
the distillery company. At the end of four years he entered the em- 
ploy of the Pennsylvania Steel Company at Steelton, where he did 
clerical work for two years; in August, 1904, he moved to Newport, 
Pennsylvania, and established a shirt factory in a building which he 
leased. He employed at that time twenty-five people to help him in 
the business. In 1906 he took possession of a more commodious plant, 
which he purchased May, 19 10, and now has in his employ sixty men 
and women, with an average output of six hundred and fifty dozen 
shirts per week. The business is constantly growing and it will not 
be many years before additions will be needed to meet the demands for 
greater space, or a larger building erected or bought. Mr. Shoemaker 
is member of the Senior Order of American Mechanics, of Highspire; 
the Masonic order of Newport, No. 381, F. & A. M. He is a Republi- 
can, but has never held nor aspired to office. His wife is a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. 

He married, August 13, 1904, Sadie F. Ferree, daughter of Andrew 
and Barbara (Wilson) Ferree; he is a truck farmer near York Haven, 
York county, Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. Shoemaker have one child, 
La Rue Ferree, born July 27, 19 12. , 



The Baileys of Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, descend from 
I'AII.FV Daniel Bailey, a native of county Monaghan, province of 

Ulster, Ireland, who arrived in Philadelphia in February, 
1758. Later he settled in Monaghan township, now Carroll, York 
county, Pennsylvania, his farm being near the site of the present bor- 
ough of Dillslnirg. Flis name occurs in a "list of the taxables" of 
1783 as the owner of fifty acres. He married and left issue. 

(II) John, son of Daniel Bailey, was born in Monaghan, now 
Carroll township, York county, Pennsylvania, and there resided until 
his death, a prosperous farmer and surveyor. He married Mary Nel- 
son, of English descent. Among his children was a son, Samuel N. 




Jo/,„ ai. .!7^ai/e. 



'/ 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 791 

(III) Samuel N., son of John and Mary (Nelson) Bailey, was 
born in Monaghan, now Carroll township, York county, in 1809, died 
in Dillsburg, Pennsylvania, in 1872, after a useful and valuable career. 
He was educated in the common schools and grew to manhood on the 
home farm. He was a close student and great reader with natural 
ability of a high order that enabled him to acquire a liberal education. 
He learned surveying in his younger years with his father and made 
that profession the main business of his life. In 1835 he located in 
Dillsburg, which was built partly on land owned by his grandfather, 
Daniel Bailey. He there resided the remainder of his life — engaged 
for a time in farming, later taught, served for several years as county 
surveyor, and for a number of years was justice of the peace. In 1843 
he was elected to represent his district in the state legislature, serving 
three years with ability and honor. He spent eight years in Harris- 
burg under Adjutant General Banks and his successor, but retained 
his residence in Dillsburg. He was connected with one of the early 
militia regiments, from which he derived the title of "Colonel," by 
which he was ever known. He entered the service of his country in 
1862, was elected lieutenant-colonel of the 12th Regiment, Pennsylvania 
Reserves, was in the service one year, then resigned. He married in 
1836, Margaret, daughter of John and Jane (Beelman) Mumper, of 
Carroll township, of the old pioneer family of that name. Children : 
I. William D., born in Dillsburg, January 3, 1837, graduate of the 
University of Pennsylvania, M. D., 1862, practiced in York, Pennsyl- 
vania, until 1863, when he entered the Union army as assistant sur- 
geon, 78th Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. In 1864 was 
appointed surgeon with rank of major. After the war practiced one 
year in Oil City, Pennsylvania, returning to Dillsburg in 1866, where 
he was in lucrative, honorable practice until his death, February 17, 
1892. He married Josephine F., daughter of Colonel Henry Logan, of 
Carroll township. 2. John M., of whom further. 3. D. Bigler, a law- 
yer of ability, died in York, Pennsylvania, in 188 1. 

(IV) John Mumper, second son of Colonel Samuel N. and Mar- 
garet (Mumper) Bailey, was born in Dillsburg, York county, Penn- 
sylvania, July II. 1839. He attended the public schools of Dillsburg, 
finishing his studies at Tuscarora Academy, Academia, Juniata county, 
Pennsylvania. The expense of the years was in part defrayed by 



792 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

teaching during four winter terms in schools of Walker, Porter and 
Franklin townships, Huntingdon county. During the summer vaca- 
tions he read law, having determined on the legal profession as his 
life work. In 1859 he became a law student in the offices of Scott 
and Brown, Huntingdon, then a leading law firm of that borough. On 
August II, 1862, he was admitted to the Huntingdon county bar and 
three years later to practice before the supreme court of Pennsyl- 
vania. In 1865 he was admitted to a partnership with his former 
preceptors, the firm name becoming Scott, Brown and Bailey. In 1869 
the senior partner, John Scott, was elected United States senator and 
withdrew from the firm, which continued as Brown and Bailey until 
the admission, in 1872, of Mr. Brown's son, Charles G. Brown, when 
the firm name became Brown, Bailey and Brown. In 1891 a peaceful 
dissolution was effected, the Browns continuing, Mr. Bailey retiring and 
practicing alone until 1896. On November 5, 1895, he was elected 
president judge of the twentieth judicial district, composed of the 
counties of Huntingdon, Bedford and Mifflin, and on January i, 1896, 
assumed the duties of that high office. He wisely and impartially 
presided over the courts of his district and as a judge fully realized 
the high opinion of his friends who had elevated him to the bench. He 
did not live to complete his term, but after seven years of honorable 
service as judge and forty-one years after his admission to the bar, 
he died, September 27, 1903. Judge Bailey gave his life to his pro- 
fession and never sought political preferment, although, as one of the 
leading Democrats of his county, he could have had any office in his 
county within his grasp had he so desired. He. however, served his 
state in the constitutional convention of 1872-1873, serving in that body 
on important committees. He also accepted one term in the borough 
council of Huntingdon and served his brethren of the profession as 
president of the county bar association. He was learned in the law 
and his years of practice, 1862 to 1896, were characterized no less by 
marked ability than by his scrupulous regard for the interests of his 
clients. He won the confidence of his community in which his life had 
been spent, not only as an able lawyer, but as an earnest upright citizen. 
Believing not only in his ability, but in his high character also, the 
electors of his district said : "Come up higher," and to his other known 
traits was added that of a "just and upright judge." He was an active 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 793 

member of the Masonic order ; was past master of jMount Moriah 
Lodge, No. 300, Free and Accepted Masons, and past high priest of 
Standing Stone Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, both of Huntingdon. He 
was a member of the Presbyterian church, which he joined in 1864, and 
was a faithful supporter of that church and its various departments of 
Christian effort. 

Judge Bailey married. May 25, 1869, Letitia, daughter of Thomas 
and Rachel (Jackson) Fisher, both life-long residents of Huntingdon 
county. Thomas Fisher was for more than fifty years a merchant ; 
was one of the organizers of the First National Bank of Huntingdon; 
a member of its first board of directors, later became president, an 
office he held until his death. He also served as treasurer of Hunting- 
don county and chief burgess of the borough of Huntingdon. He had 
seven children: i. Fanny, died in Huntingdon, unmarried. 2. Belle, 
died in Huntingdon, unmarried. 3. Horatio G., died May 8, 1890, 
a prominent coal operator of the Clearfield and Jefferson county dis- 
tricts, was prominent also in political life, serving as state senator and 
member of the national house of representatives. He was suc- 
ceeded in business by his son as president of the Berwind-White Coal 
Mining Company, the largest producers of bituminous coal in this 
country. 4. Thomas, died in 1884; his father's partner in business. 
5. Letitia, married Judge John M. Bailey. 6. Kate, married J. C. Blair, 
of Huntingdon, an extensive paper manufacturer, whom she survives. 
7. Mary, married R. Allison ]\Iiller; both deceased. Children of Judge 
John M. and Letitia Bailey: Thomas F., of whom further: Margaret 
and William, died in childhood. Mrs. Letitia (Fisher) Bailey survives 
her husband, she and her sister Kate being the last of the family. She 
is a resident of Huntingdon, a member of the Presbyterian church and 
a lady greatly beloved. 

(V) Thomas F., only son of Judge John M. and Letitia (Fisher) 
Bailey to survive childhood, was born in Huntingdon, November 15, 
1871. His early education was obtained in the public schools and 
Blairstown Academy, Blairstown, New Jersey. He prepared at Law- 
renceville Preparatory School, Lawrenceville, New Jersey, entered 
Princeton University, whence he was graduated, degree of A. B., class 
of 1894. At the university he took special interest in the debating and 
literary societies, belonging to the Coffee House Clulj, which studies 



794 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

exclusively the plays of Sheridan; the Clio Hall Club, a debating society, 
and to the Tiger Inn Club. His fraternity is Tiger Inn. After leaving 
the university he began the study of lavi^ under the preceptorship of his 
honored father and in 1896 was admitted to the Huntingdon county 
bar. He at once began practice in Huntingdon, alone, the elevation 
of his father to the bench frustrating their long cherished plan of a 
partnership. Mr. Bailey has been very successful in his profession, has 
an extensive practice in all state and federal courts of his district and, 
while conducting a general practice, gives especial attention to corpora- 
tion law and the trial of cases before judge and jury. He is a Demo- 
crat in politics, a member of the borough school board, and is inter- 
ested in all that pertains to the welfare of his town. He belongs to the 
Masonic order, the state and county bar associations and is a com- 
municant of the Presbyterian church. 

Mr. Bailey married, November 19, 1902, Wilhelmina, daughter of 
Carl Lentz, born in Germany, a prominent leader of the Republican 
party in Newark, New Jersey, a veteran of the civil war, who carries 
an empty sleeve, his wife's name being Huldah Wildrick Lentz. The 
only child of Tiiomas F. and Wilhelmina Bailey, Elizabeth, was born 
January 7, 1904. 



The earliest record found of this branch is in New 
DE VAULT Jersey, where Joel De Vault was born, December 25, 
1789, died in Lewistown, Pennsylvania, December 2, 
1862. He lived in New Jersey until 1825, then prior to the year 1828 
came to Pennsylvania. He became a wealthy farmer and large land 
owner of the Juniata Valley, his lands lying along the Black Log 
mountains. His wife, Mary, born in New Jersey, July 4, 1793, died in 
Juniata county, Pennsylvania, July 26, 1845. Children: i. Eliza, born 
November 17, 1813, died in Granville township, June 12, 1886. 2. 
Joel, born March 14, 1817. 3. Michael, born February 25, 1819, died 
in Charleston, Illinois, December 26, 1881. 4. George W., of whom 
further. 5. Christian, born April i, 1825, died August 17, 1825. C>. 
John L. S., born April 12, 1828, the first of the children born in Penn- 
sylvania. 7. Mary J., born January 15, 1833, was killed by the cars 
at Mifllintown, Pennsylvania, September 17, 1837. 8. Caroline, born 
March 31, 1835. met her death by accidental burning in Deadwood, 




"^ J 



^aniP4 -Jhe/io/.i 



HISTORY OF THE JUXIATA VALLEY 795 

South Dakota ; she married Patrick Gaston. Joel De Vault married a 
second wife, Elizabeth, who bore him several children. 

{II) George Washington, third son and fourth child of Joel and 
Mary De Vault, was born in New Jersey, May 9, 1822, died in Peoria, 
Illinois, April 29, 1877. He was a very young child when his parents 
moved to Juniata county, Pennsylvania, where he grew to manhood, 
obtaining an education in the public schools. When a young man he 
left the home farm and located in Marshall county, Illinois, with 
his brothers, ^Michael and John L. S. In 1846 he settled in Peoria, 
where he was general agent for the Truesdale Sewing Machine Com- 
pany. He was a Republican in politics, and member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. He married (first) December 3, 1845, Elizabeth 
McLaughlin, who died April 27, 1S53, leaving two children: i. Eliza 
Jane, born 1846; married William Cortell. 2. William B., born Feb- 
ruary 25, 1848. He married (second) October 24, 1853, Hannah E. 
Allen, born August 8, 1833, who died leaving three children. 3. 
George Edwin, born September 30, 1854. 4. Marten Hollis, born 
April 6, 1857; now a shoe dealer of Kansas City, Missouri. 5. Noble 
Cullen, born December 25, 1859. He married (third) August 6, 1872, 
Catherine, daughter of James and Mary Ann (Blymyer) Nichols: their 
child: 6. Mary Nichols, born August 9, 1876, married James Franklin 
Collins, an iron worker, residing in Lewistown ; child, Mary Catherine. 
Mrs. Catherine (Nichols) De Vault survives her husband and resides 

in Lewistow-n. 

(The Nichols Line). 

(I) William Nichols came to Juniata Valley, settling at Lewisburg, 
where he was a merchant for several years, and died May 25, 1852. 
His first wife, Elizabeth (Crull) Nichols, whom he married in York 
county, Pennsylvania, August 13, 1807, died September 3, 181 1, and 
in 1813 he married her sister, Jane Crull, who died June 7, 1826. 

(II) Tames, son of William Nichols, was born in York county, Penn- 
sylvania, January 6, 1809, died July 3, 1885. He married, in 1829, 
Mary Ann Blymyer, born July 14, 1809, died August 2, 1889. They 
came to Lewistown in 1849 by boat on the Juniata canal and for sev- 
eral years James Nichols was a toll gate keeper. Later he started a 
grocery on East Market street, then was elected justice of the peace, 
an office he held for many years until his death. He was an ardent 



796 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Whig, later a Republican, supporting that party witli all the earnestness 
of his nature. He served for a time as tax collector and was always 
active and interested in public affairs. He lived at No. no West 
Market street, which he purchased, and where he and his wife both 
died. They were active members of the Lutheran church and highly 
respected. His wife was a daughter of John and Margaret (Shutter) 
Blymyer, both born in York county. John was a saddler by trade and 
met his death by drowning while attempting to cross the Susquehanna 
river on a raft to Halifax, Pennsylvania. James and Mary Ann Nich- 
ols celebrated their golden wedding in 1879 at Lewistown, thirteen 
grandchildren being present. Children: i. Elizabeth, born January 15, 
1830, died August 8, 1897; married Andrew McCoy. 2. Margaret, 
born December 9, 1832; married Peter Ort, whom she survives, a resi- 
dent of Tyrone, Pennsylvania. 3. Catherine, born December, 1836; 
widow of George Washington De Vault. 4. Leah Jane, born April 
14, 1838; married William N. Hoffman; resides in Lewistown. 5. 
William B., born July 8. 1840, died October 22, 1859. 6. Anna Eliza, 
born May 9, 1842, died May 3, 1890; married G. Rose Reese. 7. Mary 
Susan, born April 15, 1844, died September 5, 1845. 8. Martha Ellen, 
born May 8, 1846; married John H. Reiley, whom she survives, a resi- 
dent of Tyrone, Pennsylvania. 



Charles C. Brewster, of Huntingdon, now serving 
BREWSTER his second term as district attorney of Huntingdon 

county, is a descendant of Elder William Brewster 
of the Mayflower, through the Franklin county, Pennsylvania, branch. 
He is a great-grandson of William Brewster, an early settler and gen- 
eral merchant of Fannettsburg, Franklin county, who married Margaret 
Robinson. 

Their son Henry, born in Fannettsburg in 1798, died in Shirleys- 
l)urg, Pennsylvania, in 1880. He was a general merchant and man of 
prommence in public life (for full account of his career, see another 
Brewster family sketch in this work). He married (first) Nancy Camp- 
bell, who was the mother of his eldest son, William H. 

William H., son of Henry and Nancy (Campbell) Brewster, was 
bnrn ni Concord, Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1829, died at Shir- 
leysburg, Pennsylvania, January 9, 1906. He was educated in the 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 797 

public schools and from early boyhood was a worker in his father's 
store. He there obtained a thorough preparation for the active mer- 
cantile life of fifty years that was spent in Shirleysburg, Pennsylvania. 
He succeeded to his father's business in Shirleysburg on the retirement 
of the latter in 1853 ^^'^ was its active, energetic head until his latter 
years, when the heavier burdens of management were shifted to the 
shoulders of his sons. He never, however, retired, but was potent in 
the conduct of the business until the last. In his younger years he had 
studied surveying and all through his life did his own surveying of 
property as well as acting in the same capacity for others. He was 
one of the best known business men of the county, his long years as 
merchant and his work as surveyor having brought him into contact 
with a great number of people. He was a most capable man of af- 
fairs and in all his transactions was the soul of uprightness and in- 
tegrity. He was a Republican in politics, but never sought public of- 
fice, his private business furnishing an outlet for all his energy. Both 
he and his wife were members of the Presbyterian church, which they 
earnestly supported with personal work and liberal contributions. He 
married in Shirleysburg, Mary Stewart, who died February 20, 1895, 
daughter of Robert Stewart, a farmer and live stock dealer of Hunt- 
ingdon county, where he died a young man. Mary, the daughter, left 
an orphan at an early age, was taken into the family of Rev. G. W. 
Shaiffer, the Presbyterian minister at Shirleysburg, who cared for and 
educated her. Children : Robert Henry, now living retired at Shirleys- 
burg; Frank Stewart, now a member of the Huntingdon county board 
of surveyors, residing at Shirleysburg; William Roy, died in infancy; 
Charles C, of whom further; Laura, died in infancy; John, died in 
infancy. 

Charles C, fourth son of William H. and Mary (Stewart) Brew- 
ster, was born in Shirleysburg, Pennsylvania, November 18, 1867. He 
was educated in the public schools, Shirleysburg Academy (then con- 
ducted by Professor J. B. Kidder, a prominent educator of his day) 
and Juniata College, where he spent the required years to graduate, but 
departing from the regular courses, taking surveying and other special 
studies, therefore did not receive a degree. From 189 1 to 1897 he 
was deputy register and recorder of Huntingdon county, then studied 
law under the direction of Thomas F. Bailey and in 1899 was admitted 



798 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

to the Huntingdon county bar. He at once began the practice of law 
in Huntingdon, where he is well established in general practice. In 
1909 he was elected district attorney of Huntingdon county, served 
his term most acceptably and in 1912 was reelected. He is a Republican 
in politics and from 1906 to 1909 served as chief burgess of Hunt- 
ingdon. 

He is a member of Mount Moriah Lodge, No. 300, Free and Accepted 
Masons; Standing Stone Chapter, No. 201, Royal Arch Masons; Hunt- 
ingdon Commandery, No. 65, Knights Templar; Jaffa Temple, Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine (of Altoona) ; the Patriotic Order Sons of 
America; the Heptasophs, and the Royal Arcanum. His professional 
societies are: The American, Pennsylvania State and Huntingdon 
County Bar Associations. 

Mr. Brewster married, October 30, 1900, Mary, daughter of John 
Brewster, president of Standing Stone National Bank of Huntingdon 
(see his history in this work). Children: Janet, born January 13, 
1907; Mary Stewart, July 11, 1908; John, December 15, 191 1. 



a Ik 



In distant England, in the town of Penzance, Corn- 
LANGDON wall, Richard Langdon was born of English parents. 
There he worked in the mines, married and lived until 
'lit 1835. when he came to the United States, settling at Pottsville, 
Pennsylvania. There he also engaged in mining, holding an official 
capacity. For several years he was also connected with lead mining in 
Missouri, but later returned to Pottsville; died in Minersville about 
1873. He was an expert in his business and known to his intimate 
friends as a bountiful entertainer and a most excellent teller of good 
stories. His wealth of experience gained in the mines of two countries 
gained him important positions and made him an authority on deep and 
difficult undertakings. Children : Jane, deceased ; Samuel, a soldier of 
the civil war, died from the effect of his service ; Mary, married (first) 
George Wigmore, (second) a Mr. Jones, and now lives in Chicago, 
Illinois; Richard (2), of whom further; Jesse W., died at Spring Grove,' 
IVnnsylvania, a hardware merchant. 

(II) Richard (2), son of Richard (i) Langdon, was born in 
Penzance, Cornwall, England, March 19, 1830, died in Philadelphia 
Pennsylvania, in 1890. He was brought to the United States when a 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 799 

boy and became a miner under his father's direction. After his mar- 
riage he settled at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, but later settled in 
Schuylkill county; later he went to Bedford county, Pennsylvania, 
where from about 1855 he was superintendent of coal mines for R. B. 
Davis & Company. Later he became a mine owner, operating in Bed- 
ford county and in Clearfield county until his death. He operated 
many mines during his career, both for others and for himself, being 
a pioneer in some of the now well known producing districts. His 
home, however, from about 1855 was at Huntingdon. He was a 
Democrat in politics; was active in local affairs and was one time chief 
burgess of Huntingdon. He believed in the enforcement of law and is 
remembered by the old residents as the "fighting burgess." Both he 
and his wife were members of the Episcopal church. He married 
(first) Ann Denithorne, born in Penzance, England, January 22, 1830, 
died in Huntingdon in 1878, daughter of John and Ann (Bartol) Deni- 
thorne, both born in Cornwall, England. In 1848, the family came to 
the United States, settling at Phoenixville, Chester county, Pennsyl- 
vania. John Denithorne was a stone mason and followed that trade 
with profit. Later he purchased a farm on which Phoenixville is partly 
built. He died there in June, 1877, aged seventy-four years and ten 
months. His wife died May 29, 1880, aged seventy-one years and 
three months; both members of the Episcopal church. Children of 
John and Ann (Bartol) Denithorne: i. William, born 1827, died 
young. 2. Ann, married Richard (2) Langdon, of previous mention. 
3. William (2), born July 31, 1832, a boiler maker and formerly cap- 
tain of Battery C, Pennsylvania State Militia. 4. Elizabeth, born Sep- 
tember 5, 1837, never married. 5. William (3), born January i, 1840, 
died in the L'nion army in 1864. 6. Richard, born June i, 1842, died 
in Philadelphia, a contractor. 7. Amelia, born December 24, 1844, 
married Jacob Mildren and died in Johnstown, Pennsylvania. 8. James, 
born May 18, 1847, died in Huntingdon, a machinist and boiler maker, 
later a coal operator. 9. Catherine, born October 20, 1850, in Phoenix- 
ville, died in 1909, married (first) I. W. March, (second) Oliver Nich- 
ols. 10. Mary, born July 21, 1854, died in infancy. Children of 
Richard (2) and Ann (Denithorne) Langdon: i. Samuel, died in 
Philadelphia, a coal operator. 2. Elizabeth, married James C. Long 
and resides in Philadelphia. 3. Richard (3), died in 1878. 4. John, 



8oo HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

of whom further. 5. Mary, married Harry A. Jacobs and resides in 
Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania. 6. WilHam Denithorne, resides in Bed- 
ford county. 7. Annie, married Charles A. Coyle, whom she survives, 
a resident of Philadelphia. 

(Ill) John, son of Richard (2) and Ann (Denithorne) Langdon, 
was born in Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, May 18, 1856. He was 
educated in the public schools and in boyhood worked around the 
coal mines. In 1872 he went to the Broad Top coal regions and was 
associated with his father as clerk in the company stores and later 
under him learned the details of mine management. He was placed 
in charge of some of the mines owned by his father and in i88-|. 
branched out independently as mine superintendent in the Clearfield 
district. He incorporated the Clearfield Consolidated Coal Compan}' ; 
was its superintendent until 1889, when he returned to the Broad Top 
district. There he became connected with several producing coal com- 
panies as stockholder and official, but in 1900 sold out all his holdings 
in these and began his successful career as an individual operator. He 
has now centered all his interests in Bedford county, where, in his 
own mines, he employs about three hundred men, shipping his coal to 
Pennsylvania points, the New England and southern states, also to New 
Jersey and New York. He is not only a practical mine superintendent, 
thoroughly familiar with every detail of the mine, but is a capable, 
efficient man of business, able to combat in the selling as well as the 
producing field. He is a director of the Union National Bank of 
Huntingdon, also is interested ni the First National Bank of Hunting- 
don. He is independent in politics and served three years in the city 
council. In religious faith both he and his wife are members of the 
Episcopal church, which ]\Ir. Langdon served as senior warden. He 
is a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and treasurer 
of his lodge. 

Mr. Langdon married, in 1879, Annie H. Zeth, born in Bedford 
county, Pennsylvania, daughter of Martin V. Zeth. Children : Jaines, 
born in 1880. died in infancy; Chester J., born 1883, married Justina 
MarstcIIcr and resides in Bedford county; Sarah, born 1885, died in 
February, 1909, married Thomas J. Strickler and left a son, John; 
.Anna Catherine, born in November, 1896; and Helen, born in Novem- 
ber, 1898. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 8oi 

The Simpsons came to Huntingdon from Bucks county, 
SIMPSON Pennsylvania, a strong Scotch-Irish family. John 
Simpson of Huntingdon was a revolutionary officer, 
born in Bucks county. He was a lieutenant in the revolution and 
shortly after that war was over married, in Dauphin county, a daugh- 
ter of a comrade in arms and settled within the limits of the present 
borough of Huntingdon, at what is now the corner of Second and 
Penn streets. He was a blacksmith by trade and had his shop next 
door to his dwelling, the site now being occupied by Dr. Moore. He 
also carried on farming operations in connection with his smithy. Both 
he and his wife were members of the Presbyterian church. He married 
in Dauphin, Margaret, daughter of Captain James Murray, also an 
officer of the revolution. Lieutenant Simpson died in 1807, leaving a 
large family. 

(II) John (2), youngest child of Lieutenant John and Margaret 
(Murray) Simpson, was born in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, June 21, 
1798, died in 1873. He grew to manhood there and became a farmer, 
inheriting a portion of his father's land. He was a Democrat in poli- 
tics and both he and his wife were members of the Episcopal church. 
He married (first) Elizabeth Ridenour, born in Huntingdon in 1798, 
died there in 1851, daughter of Nathaniel and Mary (Piper) Ridenour, 
both born in Maryland, but coming to Huntingdon about the year 
1800, settling at Third and Penn streets. John (2) Simpson, married 
(second) Mrs. Mary (Holiday) McAllister. Children of first marriage: 
I. John Murray, born in Huntingdon, June 5, 1828, died on his farm in 
Oneida township, Huntingdon county. He was a merchant, then a 
boatman, later a farmer. He was a Democrat in politics, serving as 
burgess of Huntingdon, tax collector and supervisor. He married, 
December 15. 1853, Sarah M. Glasgow, of Mifflin county, daughter of 
Major James Glasgow, an officer of the revolution; children: Elizabeth, 
died in infancy : John G., married Annie Logan ; James ; Ermina, mar- 
ried David Smith, of Carlisle ; Ella, married Charles Frey, of Hunting- 
don; William M., married Dolly Shofif; Frank, married Minnie War- 
fel; and Joseph. 2. George W., a printer, who gallantly died at the 
head of his regiment, the 125th Pennsylvania, whose colors he was 
proudly bearing in one of the desperate charges of that great battle. 
The blood-stained colors are preserved by his sisters in fond remem- 



8o2 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

brance of the gallant youth who gave his life in their defense. 3. 
James Randolph, of whom further. 4. Anna M., resides in Hunting- 
don. 5. Lydia M., resides in Huntingdon. 6. Elizabeth, died in in- 
fancy. 7. Matthias, died in infancy. 

(Ill) James Randolph, third son of John and Elizabeth (Ridenour) 
Simpson, was born in Huntingdon, December 13, 1841. He was edu- 
cated in the public school and spent his early life on the farm. He 
was for a time clerk in a store, but the war between the states coming 
on, he entered the Union army, enlisting August 7, 1862, in Company 
C, 125th Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. At the same 
battle, Antietam, that claimed the toll of his elder brother's life, Mr., 
Simpson was wounded (being shot through the body), and in April, 
1863, was honorably discharged for disability. Returning from the 
war he taught school two years, beginning the study of law in March, 
1S64, under the preceptorship of A. W. Benedict. The following 
August he was placed in charge of the prothonotary's office, for W. C. 
Wagoner, and in 1866 was elected prothonotary of Huntingdon county 
for a term of four years. The same year he was admitted to the bar, 
being now the oldest practicing attorney of that bar. He is a success- 
ful lawyer and holds a high position in the regard of his legal breth- 
ren. While his large practice is general in its character, he has given 
special attention to orphan's and probate court practice. He is a mem- 
ber, and for ten years has been president, of the Huntingdon county 
bar association. In 1892, on the admission of his son to the bar, he 
admitted him to a partnership, the firm becoming and still continuing 
J. R. & W. B. Simpson. He is a Progressive in politics and both he 
and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church. Now nearing 
a half century of legal practice in Huntingdon, Mr. Simpson has a 
right to review his career with pride and pleasure. Admitted to and 
honored in all state and federal courts of his district, with a reputation 
for ability and integrity second to none, he has added to this the high- 
est regard and esteem of many personal friends and the respect of 
the entire community. He has aided in the upbuilding of his native 
borough and added to its archives the record of an honorable, well- 
spent life. Mr. Simpson married, February 12, 1867, Jennie M. Brown, 
born in Huntingdon, daughter of John and Jane Brown, of old Hunt- 
ingdon county, agricultural families. Children: i. George Ernest, 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 803 

now engaged in the insurance business in Huntingdon. 2. Warren B., 
of whom further. 3. Barton L., secretary of the Berwind-W'hite Coal 
Mining Company and resides in Philadelphia. 4. Helen, married George 
A. Boomer and resides in Oakland, California. 5. Charles R., a civil 
engineer, now residing in Elizabeth, New Jersey. Two daughters and 
a son died in infancy. 

(IV) Warren Brown, second son of James Randolph and Jennie 
M. (Brown) Simpson, was born in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, No- 
vember I, 1869. He obtained his education in the public schools 
and was instructed in the principles of law under the able super- 
vision of his honored father, who on his admission to the Hunt- 
ingdon county bar in 1892 admitted him as junior member of the law 
firm of J. R. & W. B. Simpson, one of the leading firms of the Hunt- 
ingdon bar. 

On April 2y, 1898, Warren B. Simpson enlisted in Company A, 
5th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, serving until No- 
vember of the same year, when he was honorably discharged, having 
spent most of his time in camp at Chickamauga. For many years he 
has been secretary of the FrankHn Building and Loan Association and 
since 1906 secretary of the Raystown Water Power Company. This 
latter company he promoted with his brother, George E. Simpson, in 
1906 to convert the water power of the Raystown branch of the 
Juniata to useful purposes. After the incorporation of the company, a 
dam was completed on December 11, 191 1, eight hundred and fifty 
feet long, fifty feet high, fifty feet thick at its base, all of solid rein- 
forced concrete, with a water head of thirty-four feet fall. This dam 
backs the water eight miles up stream and, aside from its practical side, 
has created a most beautiful artificial lake, with the mountain in places 
sloping down to the shores and in other places sheer red sand stone 
rocks near their summit, three hundred feet above the surface of the 
lake. But the object of the dam was utilitarian and in a modern plant 
developing thirty-nine hundred horse power electricity is gathered and 
sent over wires to light the towns of Huntingdon, Mt. Union, Maple- 
ton, Smithfield, Williamsburg and smaller towns, also furnishing motive 
power to several large manufacturing plants. The company is capi- 
talized at seven hundred and fifty thousand dollars, the officers being : 
J. E. Smucker, president ; J. R. Simpson, vice-president ; G. E. Simpson, 



8o4 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

second vice-president; W. B. Simpson, secretary and treasurer; J. H. 
Sweet, H. C. Kinsloe, John B. Kunz, directors. 

Mr. Simpson is a Progressive in politics, belongs to the Knights of 
Pythias, the Patriotic Order Sons of America; the state and county bar 
associations and both he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian 
church. Mr. Simpson was elected a member of the state legislature, 
serving the sessions of 1907 and 1909. He was one of the working 
members of the assembly, serving on committees : Electrical Railways, 
Judiciary, General and Special; Fish and Game. A Republican, he 
supported the Progressive candidates of 1912 for the presidency and is 
firm in his belief in the future of that party. 

He married, March 22, 1899, Sue E., daughter of Benjamin and 
Lydia Miller of Huntingdon. Children: Richard Murray, Frederick 
Miller, Mildred, Robert Brown, Helen Wilkins. 



The progenitor of the Dunns herein recorded was John 
DUNN Dunn, born in Ireland, where his youth was spent. He 

came to the United States when a young man and here 
married Catherine Harnish, Ijorn in Huntingdon county, where their 
after lives were spent. John Dunn enlisted in a Pennsylvania regiment 
during the second war with Great Britain and saw hard service on the 
Niagara frontier. He was out during the winter months and suffered 
hardships and privations of great severity, the snow on one occasion 
being stained by the blood from his poorly protected feet while he was 
compelled to march. John Dunn was a member of the Presbyterian 
church, his wife belonging to the Reformed church. Children : David, 
of whom further; Mary A., died unmarried, September 25, 1878; John, 
a tanner, died at Bellwood, Pennsylvania. 

(II) David, son of John and Catherine (Harnish) Dunn, was born 
in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, July 4, 1820, died January 13, 
18S5. He was one of the earlier "iron men" of the Juniata Valley 
and at different times was superintendent of the Colerain furnaces in 
Franklin township; the Rockhill furnace in Cromwell township, Hunt- 
ingdon county, and at the .T'tna furnaces in Blair county. About 1853 
he abandoned iron manufacture and settled in Huntingdon, where he 
established a general mercantile business and operated a line of boats 
on the old Juniata canal. He transported by these boats, not only his 



HISTORY OF THE JUXL\TA VALLEY 805 

own goods, but handled the freight shipments of nearly every merchant 
in the town until 1862, when he retired from that business. He then 
formed a partnership with Colonel J. J. Lawrence, then superintendent 
of the Huntingdon and Broad Top railroad. They operated as Dunn 
& Lawrence and had two bituminous coal mines in the Broad Top 
district. This partnership was dissolved in 1866. He then located 
near Houtzdale, Clearfield county, Pennsylvania, and until about 1870 
was there engaged in the manufacture of staves for the Cuban mar- 
ket. He then purchased the "Hamer farm" of two hundred acres, 
located in Walker township, three and a half miles south of Hunting- 
don, where he engaged in agriculture until his death in 1885. He was 
an elder of the Reformed church, prominent locally and gained a 
national reputation by appearing before the general synod of United 
States with what is known as the "Dunn Appeal," winning there a 
notable victory for his church. This was an appeal from the ruling 
of the church as to the distribution of moneys contributed for benevo- 
lent purposes. Mr. Dunn's contention was that each church should 
determine to what purpose the money should be applied rather than to 
leave this to be decided by the classes or synod. Mr. Dunn carried his 
case to the Potomac Synod, where the appeal was defeated, but believ- 
ing in the justice of his contention he appealed in person to the Gen- 
eral Synod, gaining from that august body a favorable decision. He 
was a Whig in politics until 1856; assisted in the formation of the 
Republican party in Pennsylvania and ever afterward supported that 
organization, serving in the borough council and on the school board. 
He married Annie Ferguson, born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, 
September 14, 1826, who survived him twenty-two years, dying at the 
home of her son Horace B., November 29, 1907, having made her home 
with him during the entire period of her widowhood. She was a 
daughter of David and Margaret (McKibbin) Ferguson, both born in 
the north of Ireland. After coming to the United States David Fergu- 
son settled in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, where he became the 
owner of a large farm in Path Valley near Concord, where he died in 
1840. His widow survived him until 1872. He was a Democrat in 
politics and both were members of the United Presbyterian church. 
Children of David and Margaret Ferguson: i. William, died in 
Michigan; a farmer. 2. James, born in Franklin county, a farmer of 



8o6 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Path Valley and at one time associate county judge. 3. John, a farmer 
of Pike county, Illinois, where he died. 4. Jane, married David Etnier 
and died at Mill Creek, Pennsylvania. 5. David (2), died in youthful 
manhood. 6. Hannah, married George Colgate and removed to Adams 
county, Illinois, where she died. 7. Joseph, died in Pike county, Illinois, 
a farmer. 8. Andrew Jackson, died at East Waterford, Juniata county, 
Pennsylvania, a merchant and farmer. 9. Annie, of previous mention, 
married David Dunn. Their children were: Horace B., of further 
mention, and Cora, who died March 31, 1864. 

(Ill) Horace B., only son of David and Annie (Ferguson) Dunn, 
was born in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, January 7, 1858. He 
was educated in the public schools and at Huntingdon Academy. He 
pursued a course of legal study under the preceptorship of K. Allen 
Lovell and was admitted to the Huntingdon county bar December iS, 
1882. He at once began practice in Huntingdon; has been admitted 
to the superior court of Pennsylvania and is one of the leading lawyers 
of the Huntingdon bar. He is a Republican and since 1887 has been 
actively engaged in public life. In 1887-1890 and in 1891 he was 
chairman of the Republican county committee. From 1889 until 1895 
he was a member of the borough council of Huntingdon. From Janu- 
ary, 1897, until January, 1903, he was district attorney of Huntingdon 
county. In 1910 he was elected to the Pennsylvania house of repre- 
sentatives and in 1912 was reelected and is a member of the house 
now in session (1913). Besides his large private practice, Mr. Dunn 
is local attorney for R. G. Dun & Company and is a director of Stand- 
ing Stone National Bank of Huntingdon. He is a member of the 
County Bar Association ; Blue Cross Lodge, No. 295 ; Knights of 
Pythias; Standing Stone Conclave, No. 134, Improved Order of Hepta- 
sophs, and both he and his wife are members of the Reformed church 
at Huntingdon, Pennsylvania. 

i\Ir. Dunn married, May 30, 1888, Clara Adelaide Williams, born 
in Ohio, daughter of Nelson C. and Lucinda D. Williams, both born 
in Portage county, Ohio; her father deceased. Children: i. David, 
born July 15, 1891, graduate of Huntingdon high school, was a student 
at Juniata College, later entered Franklin and Marshall College, whence 
he was graduated, class of 191 1 ; now a student of the Divinity School 
of Yale University. 2. Robert Williams, born June i, 1895, member 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 807 

of the senior class of 1913 at Huntingdon high school and is president 
of his class. 



The Bell family has been well and favorably known in the 
BELL annals of Pennsylvania for many years, and various mem- 
bers of this family have bravely offered their lives in de- 
fense of the rights of their beloved country. They have been connected 
with many important business enterprises, and are represented in the 
present generation in Huntingdon county by Charles Frederick Bell, 
secretary and treasurer of the Grange Trust Company. 

(I) Charles Bell, grandfather of the man whose name is mentioned 
above, was a distiller by occupation, a resident of Milroy for many 
years, where his death occurred. He and his wife were consistent at- 
tendants at the Lutheran church. He married Rebecca Kelly, born in 
Lewistown, Pennsylvania, died at Milroy, in the same state, and they 
had children ; George W., see forward ; John, lives in Decatur town- 
ship, ]\Iifflin county, Pennsylvania ; James, died in Cresson, Pennsyl- 
vania; Charlotta, married Henry Steininger, and lives in Lewistown; 
Laura, married Hiram Herbster, and lives in Yeagertown, Pennsyl- 
vania; Eleanore, married the Rev. O. M. Stewart, and lives in Kansas 
City, Missouri. 

(II) George W., son of Charles and Rebecca (Kelly) Bell, was 
born near McAlevys Fort, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, March 
9, 1 84 1, and died in Mooresville, Pennsylvania, February 6, 191 1. He 
settled in West township, where he was engaged in farming for some 
years, then purchased the home in Mooresville, where he spent the 
remainder of his life. During the latter part of the civil war he en- 
listed in Company K, 205th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and 
served for about the last nine months of that struggle. During this 
time he was in active service around Fort Stedman, Richmond and 
Petersburg. Early in the war he was a member of the militia but 
saw no active service during this time. He was a Republican in politi- 
cal opinion, and he and his wife were members of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church, active in its interests, and he served it for a long period 
as steward and trustee. He was also a member of the local Grange. 
He married Ann Gettis, born in West township, December 11, 1846, 
died in Mooresville, May 2, 1908. She was the daughter of Patrick 



8o8 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

and Victoria (Montgomery) Gettis, the death of the latter occurring 
in 1879. Patrick Gettis was born in 1800 and died July 2, 1892. He 
lived in West township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, where he 
was occupied as a carpenter and farmer, being the owner of a farm of 
two hundred acres. His father, Robert Gettis, was a native of Ireland, 
and came to this country with his wife, also born in Ireland, in a sail- 
ing vessel; he was a soldier during the war of 1812, from which he 
never returned, being probably lost near Lake Erie. Patrick Gettis 
was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. He had children : 
Alexander, living in Petersburg, Pennsylvania ; Martha, married Daniel 
Baker, and died at Scottdale, Pennsylvania, 1899; Eliza, married 
Augustus Sisler, and died in Iowa ; William, died unmarried on the old 
homestead about 1903: Robert, died in the United States service, in 
1862, at Falmouth, Virginia; James, killed at Altoona, in the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad yards ; Agnes, married Leonard Armstrong and lives in 
Petersburg, Pennsylvania; Ann; one child which died in infancy. Mr. 
and Mrs. Bell had children: Rhoda, died in 1892 at the age of twenty; 
Charles Frederick, see forward; Ruth, married James G. Miller, and 
lives in Miller township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania; William, 
died at the age of three years ; Robert Harry, was graduated from the 
state college, and is now an assistant in the experimental station of the 
Department of Pomology. 

(Ill) Charles Frederick, son of George W. and Ann (Gettis) 
Bell, was born in West township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, 
August 18, 1875. His education was an excellent one and was acquired 
in the public schools of his section of the country and at Juniata Col- 
lege. For one year he was in the employ of the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road Company at Wilmerding, Pennsylvania, then, in 1899, became a 
clerk in the East Pittsburgh National Bank, at Wilmerding. a posi- 
tion he held for five years. His next field of activity was Pittsburgh, 
where he held a position in the Mechanics' National Bank until they 
combined with the First National Bank, when he went to the Mellon 
National Bank, this, altogether, covering a period of two years He 
then returned to Wilmerding. where he obtained the j^osition of assist- 
ant cashier in the same bank in which he had previously been em- 
ployed. In 1908 he removed to Huntingdon countv. having become 
secretary and treasurer of the Grange Trust Company, which had just 






ZAi^ 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 809 

been organized, and which his executive abiHty has greatly assisted. 
This bank has a capital of one hundred and twenty-five thousand dol- 
lars, surplus and undivided, the profits amount to twelve thousand dol- 
lars, the deposits total two hundred and twenty-five thousand dol- 
lars, the depositors numbering between one thousand and twelve hun- 
dred. The stock is held by the largest number of people of any insti- 
tution here, about two hundred and eighty, almost all of whom are 
residents of Huntingdon county. The officers are : President, Dr. W. 
T. Sheaffer; first vice-president, T. O. Milliken; second vice-president, 
Harry W. Read ; secretary and treasurer, Charles Frederick Bell ; assist- 
ant secretary and treasurer, George E. Corcelius. Mr. Bell is a Repub- 
lican in political matters, and he is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

Mr. Bell married, June 3, 1903, Carrie, born in Huntingdon county, 
a daughter of John M. and Ann Johnson, and they have had children : 
Elizabeth, Jane, Robert and Ann. 



This family has been prominent in the Juniata \'alley 
MILLER since early days and the name is perpetuated by Millers 

Ferry. Millersville, and other similar monuments to the 
pioneers. The first of this branch who can be definitely located is 
George Miller, born in 1807. He was a blacksmith by trade and in 
1840 was elected justice of the peace, an office he held for many years. 
For four years he owned and operated a boat on the Pennsylvania state 
canal. He was a Democrat, and a devoted member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church until his death in 1889. He married Annie Morrison, 
born in Lewistown in 1807, daughter of James IMorrison, who came 
to Lewistown from Rising Sun, Pennsylvania, and here followed his 
trade of shoemaker; he married Elizabeth Brown, and died at the home 
of his daughter in Lewistown. Children of George and Annie (Mor- 
rison) Miller: Mary, married John Fink, both deceased: Joseph A., 
of whom further: Ezilda, unmarried; Emmeline, deceased, married 
Frank H. ^^'entz. 

(II) Joseph A., only son of George and Annie (Morrison) Miller, 
was born in Lewistown, Pennsylvania, November 29, 1833. He was 
educated in the public schools, learned the blacksmith's trade, later 
engaged in the plumbing business, and is now living retired in his na- 



8io HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

tive town, having there spent his long, busy and successful life. His 
home, at the corner of North Main and East Third streets, he purchased 
in 1881. He is a Democrat in politics, and in 1887 was chief burgess 
of Lewistown. He is a veteran of the civil war, being one of the iirst 
to come to the defense of "Old Glory." He enlisted for the three 
months' service, April 16, 1861, and was one of the first body of 
troops, nuinbering five hundred and thirty, who entered the city of 
Washington. He served about one year, reenlisting after his third 
month expired in the 78th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers. He is 
a member of the First Defenders Association, and is the owner of a 
badge presented by the state of Pennsylvania to the members of that 
association. In religious faith he is a Methodist. 

He married, in 1879, Josephine Frey, born in Franklin county, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1858. Children: i. Joseph G., born in 1880: educated in 
the public school; graduate of Lewistown high school, and while a 
student in a trade school in New York City was accidentally shot and 
killed by a classmate, in January, 1899. 2. Anna M., born December 
30, 1884; married in September, 1906, Franklin Conrad, of Sunbury, 
Pennsylvania, and has one child, Joseph M. 

Mr. Miller is rounding out a well spent life in the enjoyment and 
quiet of his Lewistown home, where he has not only gained a compe- 
tence, but the good-will and highest esteem of the community in which 
his entire life has been spent. 



The Zooks of Mifflin county (and in 1880 there were thirty- 
ZOOK eight families of the name in that county) descend from 

^loritz Zug. a grandson of Hans Zug, born in Switzer- 
land, a Alennonite minister exiled to Germany. Moritz Zug came to 
this country in 1742 from Pfaltz, Germany, settling in Lancaster county, 
now Center township, Berks county, later moved to Whiteland town- 
ship, Chester county, Pennsylvania, where he died. He left five sons, 
—John, Christian, Henry, Abraham and Jacob; and also a daughter, 
Fanny. 

(II) John, son of Moritz Zug or Zook, came to Mifflin county in 
179.S with his brother Christian and both lived there after lives 'there 
John Zook liad sons, John, Abraham, Christian, Joseph, Jacob David 
and Shcm, the latter born in 1798, ten years after the next youngest 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 8ii 

son. These sons all married and left issue, except Jacob, who had no 
children. There were also five daughters. 

(III) Abraham, son of John Zook, was born in Chester county, 
Pennsylvania, about 1780 and came to Mifflin county with his father 
in 1793. He owned a small farm of eighty acres, which he cleared and 
improved, and on which he lived for many years. This land was in 
Menno township, where in 182 1 he built a saw mill, which later passed 
to his son Abraham (2), who sold it in 1858 to Jacob Kurtz. In 
183 1 Abraham Zook built a grist mill, which he operated until 1842, 
then sold to David Zook. He married and reared a small family. In 
religious faith he was a member of the Amish Mennonite church and 
lived strictly in accordance with the tenets of that austere faith. He 
died at an extreme old age, in fact, the Zook family are noted for their 
longevity. 

(IV) David ^I., son of Abraham Zook, was born in Alenno town- 
ship, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, in 1810, died near Allenville, Penn- 
sylvania, March 25, 1892. He worked with his father on the farm 
and in the mill until after his marriage. He then purchased a farm 
and saw mill in the same township adjoining his father's land where 
he remained for many years lumbering and farming. He finally sold 
this property and moved to a farm three miles farther north. After this 
he made several moves, his last being to Allenville, which was his home 
until death. He was a member of the Amish Mennonite church, as 
the Zooks have ever been, and in a political faith a Republican. He mar- 
ried, January 31, 1832, Rebecca Bieler (or Byler), born in Lancaster 
county, January 22, 1813, died June 15, 1884, daughter of Jonathan 
Bieler, who came to Mifflin county, a few years later than the Zooks ; 
purchased a hundred-acre farm in Menno township, where he and his 
wife both died. He and his wife were both member of the Amish 
church. Children of David M. and Rebecca Zook: i. Barbara, de- 
ceased, married (first) Solomon King, married (second) Dr. J. K. 
Metz. 2. Nancy, deceased; married (first) John King, married (sec- 
ond) Samuel Lantz. 3. Jonathan. 4. Elizabeth, married Jonathan 
Miller. 5. Abraham, deceased. 6. Eli, deceased. 7. Lydia, married 
Isaac King. 8. David, born near Allenville, Pennsylvania, April 23, 
1844, educated in the public schools and all his life has been a farmer. 
9. Solomon. 10. Samuel B., of whom further. 11. Jacob. 12. Moses. 



8i2 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

13. Levi. These children all lived to middle and old age, the youngest 
being nearly fifty at the time of his death. 

(V) Samuel B., son of David M. and Rebecca (Bieler) Zook, was 
born in Mifflin county, where he grew to manhood, becoming a farmer 
of Menno township, where he yet resides. He is a Republican in 
politics and a member of the Mennonite church. He married Sarah, 
born in Mifflin county, daughter of Peter Allgyre. Children: David 
M.; Emma Eldora; Samuel Herman, of whom further; and Carrie. 
Three of these children died in infancy. 

(VI) Samuel Herman, son of Samuel B. and Sarah (Allgyre) 
Zook, was born in Menno township, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, Oc- 
tober 31, 1 88 1. He was educated at Allenville high school and Elkhart 
(Indiana) Institute, whence he was graduated from the business de- 
partment in the class of 1903. He at once turned his attention to 
journalism and in partnership with his father purchased the Belleville 
Times, a weekly newspaper devoted to the interests of Mifflin county. 
The Times is independent in politics ; has a circulation of about four- 
teen hundred weekly and is one of the leaders of public thought in the 
county in which it circulates. Under its present management the paper 
is prosperous and its weekly issues are looked forward to with interest. 
Mr. Zook married, February 10, 1904, Cora A. Bentz, born in Rose- 
land, Nebraska. Children : Chester Warren and Fay Pearl. 



The Gregory family is an ancient one in England, 
GREGORY where they may be traced for many generations. The 

family herein mentioned descends from the New York 
branch, which sprang from Henry Gregory, born in Nottingham, Eng- 
land, about 1570, came to New England and settled in Boston before 
1639, moved to Springfield, thence to Stratford, Connecticut, of which 
he was one of the founders. His son, John Gregory, moved to New 
Haven, thence to Norwalk. of which he was one of the original settlers, 
deputy to the general court 1662, selectman 1668. There were three 
generations of John Gregorys sprang from him and then a Daniel, 
whose son Daniel (2), who was one of the first settlers of Plattekill, 
Ulster county. New York. From Ulster county the family spread to 
northern and central and southwestern New York, and are found in 
Albany, Chenango, Cattaraugus and other counties of New York. The 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 813 

■grandfather of Benjamin F. Gregory was a Chenango county farmer, 
later of Cattaraugus county, where he died, leaving male issue, in- 
cluding a son Jason. 

(I) Jason Gregory was born in southern New York, where he grew 
to manhood, then moving to Ohio. He was living in that state when 
the gold excitement of 1849 swept over the country and was one of 
those who was carried over plain and mountain in the quest for gold, 
and while crossing the great American desert, as then known, but now 
the beautiful state of Nebraska, at a place called Rawhide he was the 
unwilling witness of the skinning alive of one of the young men of his 
train by the Indians for killing a young squaw (note description in a 
book called "Beyond the Mississippi"). He formed a partnership with 
a stranger and with him "struck" gold in paying quantities. After 
their mine had yielded them ten thousand dollars in dust and nuggets 
his partner decamped with the entire proceeds. Fortunately he could 
not take the mine, and Jason began all over again, but ever afterward 
held partnerships in disfavor. He worked until he panned another 
ten thousand, then sold his claim for twenty-five thousand dollars and 
returned home by way of Cape Horn from San Francisco to New 
York. But the "lure of gold" was upon him and in 1852 he again went 
to California, and after another successful experience again returned 
to Marysville, Ohio, purchasing a farm in Union county, near Rich- 
wood, and in the }ear 1861 enlisted the twenty-sixth day of Octo- 
ber, at Marysville, Ohio, in Company F, 66th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry. He served during the entire period of the civil war, was 
admitted to the Soldiers' Home at Dayton. Ohio, April 2, 1887, and 
died December 23, 1893. and was buried with military honors; age at 
death, 88 years; body interred in Dayton Home Cemetery; location of 
grave. Sec. I, row 21, grave 2>-j. 

He married, in Cattaraugus county, New York, in 1832, Cynthia 
Newton, born in southern New York, died in Nebraska, aged eighty- 
four years, and for seventy-six years a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, and a mother of nine children, all girls but one, the 
youngest being Benjamin F. Gregory, the subject of this biography. 
She married (second) a Mr. Street and moved to Indiana, on the 
Macintucky lake, where he was killed by the caving in of a we!!, the land 
being very sandy in this locality. She married (third) John W. Turner 



8i4 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

and moved to Iowa, where he followed his trade of blacksmith; he 
worked for the Northwestern railroad when being built through the 
state, later died in Iowa. She then moved to Nebraska with her young- 
est son, Benjamin F. Gregory, only son of nine children by first husband, 
and there died at the home of a daughter, Laura E. W'hiteman, Lincoln, 
Nebraska, while on a visit. 

(II) Benjamin Franklin, youngest of the nine children of Jason and 
Cynthia (Newton) Gregory, was born on the farm near Richwood, 
Union county, Ohio, later moved to Indiana. He was with his mother 
in Indiana and from the age of twelve years had supported himself 
and mother. He worked during the summer months when a boy and 
during the winters was able to attend school, in this way obtaining his 
education. At the age of twenty-two years he moved to Whiteside 
county, Illinois, and there married Sarah A. Newman, of Lyndon. 
He learned the plasterer's trade, and after his mother was left a widow 
for the third time moved to Fullerton, Nance county, Nebraska, with his 
wife and mother and one child, Etta May. He there raised a family of 
six children, all girls but one, who was named B. F. Gregory Jr., after 
the father. He there followed his trade, becoming a contractor and 
remaining fifteen years. During this period six children were born, 
five girls and one boy, his wife, mother and two children died. He 
later returned to Whiteside county, Illinois, with his four children and 
there again married. His second wife, nee Jenny King, and himself 
not living happily were soon parted and divorced, and about 1890 he 
moved to Snyder county, Pennsylvania, where he engaged in the con- 
tracting of concrete construction of various kinds. He was again 
married in 1898 to Sarah Breon, nee Spangler, of New Berlin, Penn- 
sylvania, and moved to Sunbury, Pennsylvania, thence in 1900 to 
Lewistown, Pennsylvania, where he engaged in concrete contracting, 
with yard on Chestnut street and residence on Electric avenue in High- 
land Park, a suburb. He has also added the sale of coal and wood to 
his business, thereby making employment for his men during the winter 
months. He has a good, well-established business in Lewistown and 
surrounding territory, the first concrete contractor to establish in Lewis- 
town. His own residence was the first block concrete house built in 
the county, but so rapidly has concrete grown in favor that they are no 
longer a rarity. He is familiar with all forms of concrete construction. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 815 

such as the building of bridges, culverts, houses, sidewalks, steps, posts, 
curbs, gutters, etc. He has later taken up street paving and road con- 
struction. He employs from ten to thirty men and is an energetic 
worker himself. He was one of the organizers of the Highland Park 
Sewer Company and its first president, a position he yet holds. He 
is a Progressive Republican and is now serving as supervisor of Derry 
township, a four-year term. Always a liberal giver in the support of 
the churches and benevolent societies, although not a member of any 
church always recognized a Supreme Being. 

He married (first) in Whiteside county, in 1876, Illinois. Anna 
Newman; married (second), in Whiteside county, Julia King; he mar- 
ried (third) Mrs. Sarah Breon, daughter of Ellis Spangler of Union 
county, Pennsylvania, but at that time a resident of Snyder county, 
Pennsylvania. Children of first marriage: i. Etta May, married John 
Allison and moved to South Dakota and later moved to Lewistown, 
Mifflin county, Pennsylvania. 2. Martle, married Howard Schock and 
resides in Harrisburg. 3. Iva, died in girlhood in Nebraska. 4. Estella 
Rosina, married Elmer Spangler and resides in Lewistown. 5. Benja- 
min, associated with his father in the cement contracting, coal and wood 
business. 6. An infant, died in Nebraska. 

Benjamin F. Gregory Sr., with his wife, Sarah, are now living at 
their beautiful home, No. 426, on Electric avenue, Lewistown, Pennsyl- 
vania, where, surrounded by their children, all not far away, they may 
enjoy their declining years and reap the reward of nearly sixty years' 
toil and care, and have the respect and love of all with whom they 
come in contact in this beautiful Juniata Valley. 



The W^agner family is one of those which have been 
WAGNER well known in the state of Pennsylvania for a num- 
ber of generations and, as the name indicates, they came 
originally from Germany. They brought with them many of the ad- 
mirable traits which distinguish the natives of that country, and these 
have been transmitted in ample measure to their descendants. For 
the most part they were engaged in agricultural pursuits, although we 
also find the name in the annals of professional and commercial life. 

(I) Eli Wagner, who is apparently the first of this branch of the 
Wagner family to have settled in Pennsylvania, was born in 1826, and 



8i6 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

died October i8, 1861. He was the owner of considerable landed 
property, the greater part of which was located hi Armagh township. 
In addition to cultivating this land, he was engaged in trade as a cooper. 
He married Catherine Snook, who was also a native of Pennsylvania, 
and they had children as follows: Solomon, born July 10, 1837, mar- 
ried Julia A. Spigelmeyer, died 1898; Henry, born November 6, 1838, 
married Polly Ann Snook; Cornelius, born April 13, 1840. married 
Sarah Snook; Alary Ann, born July 13, 1841, married David Emmell; 
Edward, born September 30, 1842, married Amelia Steninger; Cath- 
erine, born June 13, 1845, married Leonard Bargo; Daniel, born Janu- 
ary I, 1847, married Sophia Steninger; Delilah, born June 14, 1848, 
married Mr. Derrough; Emmanuel, born April 16, 1850, married Alice 
Sunday; Levi, born October 5, 1851. married (first) Alice Snook, 
(second) Belle Shuck; John D., born August 17, 1853, married Re- 
becca Aumen; James B. A., see forward; Amos, born February 17, 
1859; Eli Lincoln, born February 11, 1861, died October 18, 1861. 

(II) James B. A., ninth son and twelfth child of Eli and Catherine 
(Snook) Wagner, was born April 17, 1857, in Mifflin, Armagh town- 
ship, Pennsylvania. The common school of that section furnished him 
with what was considered a good education for that time, and he prof- 
ited by it to the utmost of his capacity. He was engaged in the manifold 
labors of farm life until 1906, in which year he removed to Milroy. 
There he was in business for a period of four years in the store of 
his brotlier-in-law, then engaged in business for himself, and sells all 
kinds of machinery. In addition to this occupation a goodly portion of 
his time is occupied in the cultivation of his fine farm consisting of two 
hundred and fourteen acres, on which he is engaged in general farm- 
ing. A part of this property is devoted to the purpose of stock raising, 
in which branch Mr. Wagner has met with undoubted success. In 
political matters he is a staunch supporter of Republican principles, and 
he and his family are devout attendants of the Lutheran church. 

Mr. AVagner married, September 12, 1878, Sarah, daughter of 
Lewis and Fannie (Henry) Houser, and this union has been blessed 
with six children: i. A son, died unnamed, July 26, 1880. 2. John 
Lewis, born August 3, 1881, married Bertha Ellen Longwell at Milroy, 
Pennsylvania. November 18, 1901, is now a letter carrier at Braddock, 
Pennsylvania ; they have one child, Sarah Gertrude. 3. A daughter, 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 817 

died unnamed, June 26, 1S84. 4. Norman Heister, born September 10, 
1886, died March 22, 1891. 5. Ottie Jane, born November i, 1889; 
married Arthur Brown at Milroy, Pennsylvania, September 16, 1908; 
they have one child, Catharine Rebecca. 6. Esther Coretta, born No- 
vember 3, 1897, now attending Milroy high school. 



G. Frank Bousum, of Mifflintown, Pennsylvania, a 
BOUSUM highly esteemed and substantial citizen of his com- 
munity, has for his forbears good German stock. The 
Bousums were originally from Frankfort-on-the-Rhine, Germany, where 
many of the name still reside. The first of the name to cross the At- 
lantic in search of new and more advantageous surroundings landed in 
New York the latter part of the eighteenth century, or soon after the 
war of the revolution. The original immigrant of the name of Bousum 
remained in New York several years, finally drifting into Pennsyl- 
vania, where he established himself. 

(I) William Bousum, the first of the name of whom any definite 
knowledge is had, was an early resident of Perry county, Pennsylvania. 
He moved from there to historic Juniata county, and lived for some 
years in Milford township. He was a carpenter by vocation, and there 
are in Perry and Juniata counties today many useful household articles 
of his handiwork. He later moved to Middletown and died there in 
the early nineties. He was the parent of six children: i. Linnie, mar- 
ried Robert Fleming, of an old Scotch-Irish family of that section ; 
lives in Mifflin county. 2. Catherine, married James L. Steward, and 
lives in Milford township, Juniata county; he served in the civil war 
with distinction. 3. Mary, married Mr. Minnick : both dead. 4. George 
W., lives in Marshalltown, Iowa. 5. David, died in the state of Wash- 
ington. 6. John W., of whom further. 

(II) John W. Bousum, son of \\'illiam Bousum, was born in 
Perry county, Pennsylvania, and moved when young with his parents 
to Juniata county, and afterward to Milford township. He married 
(first) Catherine Guss, daughter of George and Mary Guss, who were 
born of German parents in Chester county, Pennsylvania, and in com- 
pany with three brothers moved to Juniata county and settled in Mil- 
ford township. He was a shoemaker and farmer on a small scale. He 
owned his own home and there died in 1889. He was the father of 



8i8 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

five daughters and five sons. John W. and Catherine Guss were mar- 
ried in Juniata county. They Hved for a short time in MilTlin county, 
and then Patterson, finally locating in Milford township. He was a 
track foreman, and for twenty-seven years was foreman of Selin's 
Grove yards. He has retired from active business and lives in Colum- 
bia county. His wife died in 1873. He is a member of the Lutheran 
church and in politics is a Democrat. He enlisted in the Pennsylvania 
volunteer infantry during the civil war, and saw active service for 
eighty-seven days, the term of his enlistment. He is a member of 
the Grand Army of the Republic. After the death of his wife Cath- 
erine, he married (second) Anna Lehman, who is still living. Children 
by first marriage: i. G. Frank, of whom further. 2. R. Louis, who 
lives in Mifflintown, where he has established a tailoring business. The 
other two children died in infancy. There are no children by second 
marriage. 

(Ill) G. Frank Bousum, son of John W. and Catherine (Guss) 
Bousum, was born in Milford township, Juniata county, Pennsylvania, 
November 8, 1869. He received his early education in the common 
schools of Red Bank, then matriculated at the Tuscarora Academy 
and later at the Susquehanna University. On leaving the university 
he attended the Iron City Business College at Pittsburg, and gradu- 
ated from it in 1894. Immediately after graduation he was offered 
the position of bookkeeper with Guss & Seiber, which he accepted 
and remained with them eleven years. Leaving them he was with 
the Pennsylvania railway for two years, or until 1907. In 1906 he 
was elected register and recorder and clerk of the orphan's court. He 
was reelected in 1909, and will hold the ofiices until January i, 1914. 
In politics he is a Democrat and has served for that ticket on the town 
council and school board, and is now on borough council. He and 
his wife are members of the Lutheran church. He is a Mason in high 
standing, a member of the Union Lodge, No. 324, Free and Accepted 
Masons, and of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Mifflin Lodge, 
No. 911. Through his own unaided efforts, except for splendid mental 
equipment and a good education, Mr. Bousum has rapidly forged to 
the front as a representative man of his section. He married, June 
17. 1897, Maude Vernon Lumbard, born Februarv 22, 1871, daughter 
of Joseph and Sarah Lumbard, a native of Selin's Grove, Pennsyl- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 819 

vania. Children: i. John Guss, born June 12, 1898. 2. Joyce Evelyn, 
born July 25, 1906. 

(The Guss Line). 
George Guss was born in Chester county, Pennsylvania, as was his 
wife, Mary. With three brothers he went to Juniata county and there 
settled in Milford township. He bought a small farm, and in conjunc- 
tion with his real vocation, that of shoemaking, he farmed. He ac- 
cumulated cjuite a nice property by his dual occupations. Being of a 
thrifty German mind he saved a great portion of his earnings. He 
died in Milford township in 1889, or thereabouts. Children, all of 
whom are dead but four, are: i. Rebecca, lives in Milford township, 
unmarried. 2. Elizabeth, married Samuel W. Heaps, and now lives in 
Walker township. 3. Mary, now dead, was the wife of Jonathan Kauff- 
man and lived in Walker township. 4. Martha, widow of M. L. Guss, 
and lives in Milford township. Those dead are: i. John, a valiant 
soldier in the civil war, and died from effects of exposure and hard- 
ships. 2. Alonzo H., died at Akron. Ohio. 3. Reuben L., was a hard- 
ware merchant. 4. Cloyd, killed on a railroad while going to work. 
K. G. Frank, died in 1897. 6. Catherine, married John \\'. Bousum, and 
died 1873 (see Bousum II). 



The Watts family of Belleville, Pennsylvania, descend 
WATTS from the English family of that name that has produced 

so many men famous in art, science and religion, including 
Rev. Isaac Watts, an English Independent minister and hymn writer, 
born July 17, 1674; Alaric Alexander Watts, a journalist and poet; 
George Frederick Watts, a painter and sculptor; Henry \\'atts, a noted 
chemist ; and others. In the United States a well known public char- 
acter was Thomas Hill Watts, born 1819, died 1892, a lawyer and 
statesman of Alabama. He exerted himself continually to keep his 
state from seceding, but later joined with the Confederacy and served as 
colonel of the 17th Regiment, Alabama Infantry, but in 1862 was 
chosen as attorney-general in the cabinet of Jefferson Davis. In 1863 he 
was elected governor of Alabama, and served as such until the close of 
the war. 

The history of this branch begins with Samuel Watts, born in 
England prior to the year 1700, settling in Lancaster county, Pennsyl- 



820 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

vania, where he followed the occupation of a fanner. He married and 
reared a family, including a son, Thomas. 

(II) Thomas, son of Samuel Watts, was born in England, came to 
Pennsylvania with his father and became a farmer of Caernarvon 
township, Lancaster county. He married Maria Snyder, of Swiss 
parentage, and both Bied in Lancaster county. Children: i. George, 
married and moved to Holmes county, Ohio, where he has de- 
scendants. 2. Philip, twice married, moved to the Kishacoquillas 
valley, and left two children: Franklin, who became a priest 
of the Roman Catholic church, and Sarah, who became a Sis- 
ter of Charity, going to an institute in Paris. 3. Samuel, of 
whom further. 4. Catherine, married (first) a Mr. Lapp, (second) a 
Mr. Silknitter. 

(III) Samuel (2), son of Thomas and Maria (Snyder) Watts, was 
born in Fairville, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. June 22, 1822, died 
March 16, 1910. He was educated in the public school and remained 
at home, his father's assistant, until 1840, when he came to Belleville 
to become a clerk in the store of his uncle Daniel Overholtzer. He con- 
tinued his studies under private tuition at the same time, but later re- 
turned to his father's home, where he found means to acquire a thor- 
ough education, attending the academy at New London Cross Roads, 
Chester county. There he had as classmates two men later famous in 
Lancaster county — J. Smith Frithy and Robert Emmet Monaghan. 
Again he returned home and studied under private tutors at New 
Holland. He next established a private school near his home where 
he taught for several years. In 1844 he began his long and successful 
career as merchant and financier. He first opened a store at Galtsville, 
Lancaster county, later established in the flour and feed business at 
Pottsville, Schuylkill county. In 1850 he exchanged his Pottsville 
store for that of his uncle Daniel Overholzer in Belleville, Mifflintown, 
taking possession in 1851. Although starting with little capital, he so 
used his powers of youth, perseverance, economy and business acumen 
that he became one of the most substantial and useful men of his bor- 
ough. As his business grew he enlarged and expanded in many ways. 
He was one of the principal organizers of the Kishacoquillas Valley 
Railroad Company and aided largely in the construction of that road in 
1892 and was its first president. He was also one of the organizers and 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 821 

a charter member of the Kishacoquillas Mutual Fire Insurance Com- 
pany; charter member of the East Kishacoquillas Turnpike Company, a 
director and for several years its president. He was one of the leading 
incorporators of the Reedsville National Bank; its first president, serv- 
ing until his death. He was also an organizer and president of the 
Farmer's National Bank of Belleville and of the Citizens National 
Bank of Lewistown, filling these responsible positions with honor and 
credit until his death. He aided in the improvement of Belleville by the 
erection of several modern residences and also made large investments 
in farm lands in Iowa, South Dakota and Illinois, placing these in 
charge of his son, Samuel Henry Watts. He abandoned mercantile life 
in 1895, then devoted himself to the interests of the banking institu- 
tions over which he presided. Both he and his wife were devoted 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church and generous contributors 
to all churches, regardless of creed. He was very liberal in his own 
church and a willing worker. He built the present ]\Iethodist church 
at Belleville and presented it to the congregation, and there with them 
worshipped and labored for the cause of religion until his death. In 
politics he was an ardent Republican, deeply interested in public af- 
fairs, but never sought or accepted office for himself. While Mr. 
Watts's life was an eminently successful one, he did not gain prom- 
inence by favor. He faced many discouragements and difficulties that 
would have defeated a less resolute, determined man, and fairly won 
the high standing he attained. When wealth was gained he used it 
justly, and there was never a man to say it was not fairly won. He 
aided in every public enterprise presented to him and much of the 
prosperity of his section of Mifflin county can be traced to his initiative 
or cooperation. 

Samuel Watts married, February, 1852, Maria, daughter of John 
and Margaret (Kurtz) Overholtzer and granddaughter of Jacob Over- 
holtzer, of Lancaster county. Children: i. Elizabeth, died October 4, 
1854, aged four months. 2. Martin O., deceased. 3. Samuel Henry, 
now living in Iowa. 4. James Kurtz, a farmer of Belleville, Pennsyl- 
vania. 5. Mary Elizabeth, married William H. Oldt, whom she sur- 
vives. 6. Levi Metzler, a traveling salesman of Belleville; married 
October 28, 1896, Sue Stroup, daughter of Samuel and Sue fStroup) 
Killian. 7. John, of whom further. 8. Isaac Sturk, educated in the 



822 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

public schools, now member of the firm of Watts Brothers and inter- 
ested in other Belleville business concerns. 

(IV) John, son of Samuel and Maria (Overholtzer) Watts, was 
born in Belleville, Mifllin county, Pennsylvania, November 12, 1866, 
now member of the firm of Watts Brothers of Belleville. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools and began business life as a clerk in his 
father's store. In 1895, in company with his brother Isaac, under the 
firm name Watts Brothers, succeeded to the mercantile business founded 
by Daniel Overholtzer and conducted by Samuel Watts since 185 1 in 
Belleville. The business, general merchandise, under their manage- 
ment has prospered and increased, both partners being able, energetic 
men of afl:'airs. John Watts is also a director of the Farmer's National 
Bank of Belleville and interested in other lines of business activity, 
including the senior membership of the firm, Watts & Yoder, exten- 
sive grain dealers and millers of Belleville. He is a Republican in poli- 
tics, but has never accepted public office, belongs to Belleville Lodge, No. 
302, Independent Order of Odd Fellows and is a communicant of 
Belleville Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Watts is unmarried. 



The Ellis family herein recorded came to Lewistown from 
ELLIS Center county, Pennsylvania, and are probably descendants 
of the Welsh fanfily of Ellis, founded in Pennsylvania by 
Rowland Ellis, of Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. 

(I) Alexander Ellis, father of John B. Ellis, of Lewistown, was 
born at Boalsburg, Center councy, Pennsylvania, in 1816. He moved to 
Juniata county at an early day, came to Lewistown in 1881, and died 
1885. He married Martha Basem, born in Juniata county in 1822, 
died in Lewistown in 1904. Children: Lemuel, Mary, Kate, William! 
Edward, Carrie, Rebecca, Stewart, and John B., and four who died 
young. 

(II) John B., youngest son of Alexander and Martha Ellis, was 
born in Juniata county, Pennsylvania, January 22, 1863. He attended 
public, common and normal schools, obtaining a good English education. 
At the age of eighteen years he moved to Lewistown with his parents 
and began learning the blacksmith's trade in a Lewistown shop. After 
working five years he entered the employ of the Penns^•lvania railroad 
as blacksmith, in December, 1886. He continued at the foro-e three 




cyP^ ./9. S£c: 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 823 

years, then was promoted to be night foreman, which position he now 
holds. He is a Democrat in poHtics, and has held the offices of school 
director and assessor of the first ward, the latter an office he yet holds. 
He is a member of the Lewistown Lodge, No. 203, Free and Accepted 
Masons; Lost Creek Lodge, No. 131, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows; and of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

He married, October 16, 1884, Ida M. Stoner, born in Lewistown, 
January 31, 1864, only child of Andrew K. and Angeline (Maban) 
Stoner, he an early settler of Lewistown, where he died November 18, 
1864, she surviving him until November 9, 1909. Children: i. Mary 
Grace, born October 22, 1885; married Harry H. Shaw; children: 
Mary Grace, deceased, Harrison H. and Madeline. 2. Anna Gertrude, 
born April 6, 1889; married William D. Feather; children: William 
E., Helen Luella, Thomas Charles, deceased, and Robert David. 3. 
Robert Alexander, born September 15, 1897, residing at home. 



The Pannebakers were old residents of Port 
PANNEBAKER Royal, Pennsylvania, where Jonas Pannebaker 
died, leaving a large family. 

(II) Philo, son of Jonas Pannebaker, was born in Juniata county, 
Pennsylvania, 1830, died at Mifflin, Pennsylvania, about 1893. He 
learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed in different localities, 
finally settling in Mifflin, where most of his life was passed. He was a 
Republican in politics and both he and his wife were members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. He married, in Juniata county, Susanna 
Hurl, born in that county in 1836, who survives him, residing with her 
daughters in Milroy, Pennsylvania. Children: i. A daughter, died in 
infancy. 2. Robert, now living in Mifflin, a carpenter. 3. Philo, now 
living in Mifflin, a carpenter. 4. James Sellers, of whom further. 5. 
Edward, now living in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, a truck farmer. 6. 
Jennie, married James LTlsh and resides in Altoona, Pennsylvania. 7. 
John, now living in Mifflin, a printer. 8. Frances, now living in Mil- 
roy, Pennsylvania, unmarried. 9. Martin, died at Butler, Pennsylvania. 
10. Holmes, now living in Lewistown. 11. Anna, married N. Baer and 
resides in Yeagertown, Pennsylvania. 

(III) James Sellers, fourth child and third son of Philo and Sus- 
anna (Hurl) Pannebaker, was born in Juniata county, Pennsyl- 



824 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

vania, January 26, 1862. He attended Mifflin county public schools and 
literally grew up to the carpenter's trade, having begun work with his 
father at an early age. On arriving at legal age in 1883 he located at 
Renovo, Pennsylvania, where he worked in the Pennsylvania railroad 
shops for three years, then with a lumber company until 1887, when he 
moved to Astor, Orange county, Florida, remaining three months. Re- 
turning to Pennsylvania he entered the employ of the Iroona Lumber 
Company in Clearfield county, becoming assistant foreman in 
charge of their millwright work and remaining with them twelve and 
a half years. In 1899 he located in Lewistown, where he built his own 
home and worked as a journeyman, then entered the employ of the 
Standard Steel Company, where he yet remains. He is a Republican 
in politics and both he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian 
church. He married, March 26, 1891, Louisa Lesher, born in Juniata 
county, daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth (Geise) Lesher, both born 
in Northumberland county, after their marriage moving to Delaware 
township, Juniata county, where Mr. Lesher bought a farm on which 
he lived until his death. He was drafted during the civil war, but 
furnished a substitute. He was a Democrat in politics and both he and 
his wife were members of the Lutheran church. His wife survives 
him, still a resident of Juniata county. 

The only child of James S. and Louisa (Lesher) Pannebaker is 
Gilson, born May 4, 1892, now an apprentice at the molder's trade. 
The family residence is at No. 333 Valley street, Lewistown, which 
Mr. Pannebaker erected in 1900. 



This family is of French ancestry, the founder, George 
LEOPOLD Leopold, coming to the United States from his native 

city, Paris, with his wife, a Miss Swigert. of Gennan 
descent. No record is found of their residence in this country or of 
their family, except of their son, George. 

(II) George (2) Leopold was born in 1800 and made settlement 
m Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, when a young unmarried man. He 
was a blacksmith by trade, but after his marriage bought a farm of 
about one hundred and fifty acres in Ferguson valle^•, which he im- 
proved and later sold. He then purchased a large farm in Oliver 
township. He later bought and moved to a farm in Granville town- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 825 

ship, but after a short residence there returned to his Oliver township 
farm, where he Hved until his death in April, 1861. He was a pros- 
perous farmer, a Democrat in politics and held several local offices. 
He married Anna E. Hannawalt, born in Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, 
in 1804, died in Lewistown, Pennsylvania, in 1880, at the home of her 
daughter, Susan. She was a sister of Rev. Joseph R. Hannawalt and 
a member of the Presbyterian church. Children: i. Louis H., lived 
and died in Granville township, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, a farmer. 
2. Catherine, married Stuart McKee and died in Granville township. 3. 
Susan, married (first) Albert Ickes, (second) Amos Pennsypacker, and 
died in Philadelphia. 4. George Albert, of whom further. 5. Died in 
infancy. 

(Ill) George Albert, son of George and Anna E. (Hannawalt) 
Leopold, was born in Oliver township, ]\Iifflin county, Pennsylvania, 
June 27, 1848. He was educated in the public schools and Bucknell 
College, being a graduate of the latter institution, class of 1865. He 
chose the occupation of farming and purchased one hundred acres of 
the Granville township farm from the heirs of George Leopold, which 
he still owns. There was a rich vein of iron ore on the farm which he 
opened and worked out, employing for several years from twenty to 
thirty men. In 1898 he moved to Lewistown w-here he has lived prac- 
tically retired ever since at the corner of Oak and Logan streets. He 
has real estate interests in the city and county, but is not actively 
interested in any business. He is a Democrat in politics, and has al- 
ways taken an active interest in public affairs. In Granville township 
he was school director and collector of taxes, and in Lewistown was 
elected in 1909 a member of the borough council and in 1911 was 
chosen president of council, an office he now holds. He was one of the 
organizers and first vice-president of the fifth ward fire department, 
and for several years has been its financial secretary. He is a deacon 
and trustee of the Baptist church in Lewistown, of which his wife is 
also a member. 

He married, in 1870, Camilla Catherine Kauffman. born in Oliver 
township, daughter of Hamilton Kauffman, formerly of Juniata county. 
Children : i. Ada Irene, educated at Westchester Normal School, taught 
for seven years, then took a regular course as nurse at Trenton (New 
Jersey) Hospital, now a graduate nurse located at Lewistown and re- 



826 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

siding witli her parents. 2. Mary Luella, married William M. Snook, 
a pattern maker and resides in Lewistown. 3. William Lewis, graduate 
of Juniata College, Westchester Normal School, now principal of the 
Ralston street high school, Pittsburgh. 4- George Albert (2), now 
assistant principal of Wayne street high school, Lewistown; he mar- 
ried Gertrude Reid. 5. Harry, married Sarah Miller and resides in 
Lewistown, a machinist. 

The Harpers of Burnham, Pennsylvania, came from 
HARPER New Jersey, where John Harper settled in 1868. He 

was born in county Tyrone, Ireland, where he grew to 
manhood and married Jane Orr. In 1868 they came to the United 
States, settling first in Hoboken, New Jersey, going from thence to 
Hyburne in northern New Jersey, where he was connected with the 
iron industry. Later in life he moved to Philadelphia, settling in 
Wissahickon, where he engaged in mercantile life until his death, July 
2, 1901, aged seventy-eight years. His widow, Jane, survived him 
until February 7, 1913, aged eighty years. Her mother, Mary (Wat- 
son) Orr, died in Ireland, aged over ninety years. Both John Harper 
and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and 
he was a Republican in politics. Children : Sarah Ann, David, John, 
Robert E., of whom further; Joseph, deceased; Andrew, Augustus, 
Samuel, William, Jane and Mary. At the time of her death, in Febru- 
ary, 191 3, Mrs. Jane (Orr) Harper had thirty-six grandchildren. 

(II) Robert E., son of John and Jane (Orr) Harper, was born in 
county Tyrone, Ireland, August 26, 1861. When seven years of age 
he was brought to the United States by his parents, and in Hoboken and 
Hyburne he attended the public schools. When a young man he worked 
in the iron mines of northern New Jersey, continuing several years. 
He then moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where for thirty years he 
was a trusted employee of the Baldwin Locomotive Works. In 1902 
he came to Burnham, Pennsylvania, entering the employ of the Stand- 
ard Steel W^orks Company as foreman of the axle department. In 
1905 he opened a store in Burnham, continuing in successful business 
until his death, July 4, 191 1. He was thorough master of his trade 
and never failed in giving full satisfaction to his employers. Both he 
and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal church of 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 827 

Wissahickon, and on moving to Burnham brought their letters to the 
Methodist church there. In poHtics he was a Republican, but in his 
later years was a supporter of the Prohibition party. He never ac- 
cepted public office, but found his greatest enjoyment in his home. He 
was highly respected by all who knew him and no man better de- 
served the good opinion of his neighbors. 

He married, May 26, 1881, Mary A. Rittenhouse, born in Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, October 12, 1864, who survives him, a resident 
of Burnham. She is a daughter of John M. Rittenhouse, born in 
Germantown, Pennsylvania, January 22, 1840, now spending his de- 
clining years with his daughter, Mary A., in Burnham. He was for 
many years engaged in the tobacco business in Philadelphia, and for 
six years was a member of the Philadelphia police force under Stoke- 
ley. 

He is a veteran of the civil war, serving from August 14, 1862, 
until June 20, 1865, '^^ Company G, 119th Regiment Pennsylvania 
Volunteers. He married Catherine Street, born June 26, 1840, died 
in Wissahickon, June 6, 1897. Children: Mary A., of previous men- 
tion, widow of Robert E. Harper; Thomas; George W., deceased; 
Abraham ; William, married Mary L. Renshaw, no children. 

Children of Robert E. and Mary A. Harper: i. John ]\Iason, born 
February 17, 1882. 2. Robert E. (2), born November 25, 1883; mar- 
ried Lulu M. Hambright; two children: Roger E. and Robert P. 
3. Catherine Street, born December 18, 1885: married Walter Farley: 
no children. 4. Rachel ^lary, born September 18, 1889: married Clar- 
ence C. Gastrock; one child, Mary M. 5. Jane Orr, born September 29, 
1891 ; married Uri A. Crissman; no children. 6. William Henry, born 
November 25, 1893. 7. Abraham, born December 23, 1895. 8. Sarah 
Ann, born September 8, 1897. 9. Mary Watson, born December 5, 
1899. 10. Ruth Amelia, born February 20, 1902. 11. Matthew Simp- 
son, born September i, 1904. 



The McKees are of Scotch-Irish ancestry and date in 
McKEE Pennsylvania to the year 1738. The first settlement of 

the family was in Lancaster county, thence a branch settled 
in Cumberland county. Andrew McKee was the first of this branch to 
settle in Mifflin county, although Thomas McKee, who may have been 



828 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

his father or uncle, warranted a large tract of land in the Juniata Valley 
in 1755, the land lying at the mouth of Mahantango creek and McKee's 
Half Falls. Andrew McKee warranted his land, containing one hun- 
dred and fifteen acres in what is now Granville township, December 
9, 1784. 

John Andrew McKee, late of Lewistown, Pennsylvania, was a son 
of Thomas R. and Martha (Robinson) McKee, pioneer settlers of 
Lewistown. Thomas R. and his brother, John McKee, were extensive 
land owners and operated several tanneries, doing a large business 
until his death, December 3, 1854, at the age of fifty-nine years. His 
wife Martha died in 1845, 3.ged forty years. Children: John Andrew, 
William R. and Margaret, all deceased. 

John Andrew McKee was born in Lewistown, Pennsylvania, July 
2, 1836. He obtained a good education in the public schools, Lewis- 
town Academy and a school at Shade Gap, Huntingdon county, Penn- 
sylvania. He chose the profession of law, studying under the able 
direction of Joseph Alexander. In April, 1859, Mr. McKee was ad- 
mitted to practice at the Mifflin county bar, and until his death con- 
tinued in active, successful practice. He was a strong Union man, was 
captain of militia and a member of the Logan Guards, and went with 
them to the front on President Lincoln's first call for troops, serving 
three months. The Logan Guards were the first troops to arrive at 
Harrisburg under the president's call, and all those reporting have the 
right of membership in the "First Defenders" organization. Mr. Mc- 
Kee was United States assessor of internal revenue, 1871 to 1873, 
otherwise the law was his chief concern. He was a learned lawyer 
and enjoyed a large practice in the county, state and federal courts. 
He was accurate, conscientious in all his business dealings, and was 
held in highest esteem by his brethren of the bar. He was a Republican 
in politics, and both he and his wife were inembers of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, although his early training had been Presbyterian. 
He was a prominent member of the Masonic order, belonging to 
Lewistown Lodge, No. 203, Free and Accepted Masons, and Lewistown 
Chapter, No. 26, Knights Templar. He also belonged to the "First 
Defenders" Association, and was interested in all that concerned the 
temporal or moral life of Lewistown. His long and useful life termi- 
nated June 10, 1904. 




Q,rZ. A-M"^:/:' 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 829 

John Andrew McKee married, March 4, 1862, Anna Maria Mc- 
Cord, born in Lewistown, November 28, 1838, who survives him in 
her seventy-fifth year, a resident of Lewistown, her lifelong home. 
She is an active, interested, devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church; a charter member of the Women's Christian Temperance 
Union, of which she was for several years president, and always an 
active worker. While Mrs. McKee was president of the local union, 
Lewistown voted "no license," and of all that band of devoted women 
who formed the first union as charter members, she is the only survivor. 
She is also one of the oldest living persons, born in Lewistown and 
now living in the borough. She is active and energetic and as deeply 
interested in all that pertains to the moral welfare of her community 
as of yore, when she was a leader. Her judgment and advice are valu- 
able, and are sought for by the younger women, who are now leaders 
in the cause Mrs. McKee loves so well. She is the daughter of James 

and Mary (Willis) McCord, and granddaughter of Thomas and 

(Hutchison) McCord, pioneer settlers of Mitiflin county. James Mc- 
Cord was born in ]\Iiiiflin county, May 25, 1793, and died 1873. He 
was engaged in the harness business in Lewistown for many years; 
was a Whig in politics and for many years a justice of the peace, and 
was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. His wife, Mary 
Willis, was born in Mifflin county in the year 1800, died in Lewistown 
in 1872, daughter of Isaiah and Susan (Elton) Willis, who came to 
Mifilin from Chester county, Pennsylvania ; he was a successful farmer, 
large landowner and grain dealer at Strode's Mills. Children of James 
and Mary (Willis) 2\IcCord : Isaiah (2), Mary, Anna Maria, of 
previous mention, and James, all deceased, except Mrs. Anna Maria 
McKee, widow of John Andrew McKee. 

Children of Mr. and ;\Irs. McKee : i. Martha Willis, married Edwin 
Spanogle, son of Andrew (2) Spanogle (now living at the age of ninety- 
one years, 1913), a descendant of George Spanogle, who came from 
Germany prior to the revolution, settling in Baltimore, Maryland. Chil- 
dren of Edwin and Martha W. Spanogle: i. Mary Anna, a student at 
Goucher College, Baltimore, ii. John Andrew, a senior at Williamsport 
Seminary, class of 1913, Williamsport, Pennsylvania, iii. Martha An- 
nie, residing at home. 2. William Lincoln, now residing in Beaver, 
Pennsylvania, connected with the Pennsylvania railroad at Pittsburgh, 



830 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Pennsylvania. He married Eliza Bruce and has children : Jane Stokes 
and Martha Willis. 



The name Brumbaugh is of German origin and is 
BRUMBAUGH found in both German and Swiss records with the 

"o" and "u"' used interchangeably. There is a 
German history of the family which indicates with its Von and coats- 
of-arms that they were of the noble class and persons of consequence. 
Whenever the German ancestor executed deeds or important papers, the 
scribe usually wrote the name Broombaugh or Brombaugh, resulting 
in many names originally ending in "bach," becoming "baugh" or 
"back." Tlius the name Brumbach has been so changed that descend- 
ants of the first settlers are found under the names Brounback, Brum- 
back, Brombach, Brombaugh and Brumbaugh. 

The first record of the American ancestor of the branch herein re- 
corded is found in the "immigrant list" of those landing in Philadel- 
phia as follows : "Johannes Heinrich Brumbach, arrived at Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania, on the ship Neptune, Captain Waire, September 
30, 1754, from Rotterdam and last from Cowes." There is no record 
that shows that he tarried long in Philadelphia, but proceeded with his 
family to a point in the Conecocheague district, north of Hagerstown, in 
Frederick county, Maryland, or to Franklin count)', Pennsylvania, im- 
mediately adjoining on the north. There were four children — three 
born in Germany: Jacob, of whom further; Conrad, born 1735, died 
1791 ; Johannes and George. 

(II) Jacob ("Jockel") Brumbaugh, son of Johannes Heinrich Brum- 
bach, was lH)rn in Germany, November 2y, 1734, died in Hopewell town- 
ship, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, August 13, 1816. Jacob and 
his brother George (called Yorrick) moved with the earliest settlers to 
Morrisons Cove, then in Bedford, now in Blair county, Pennsvlvania, 
and located near the Rebecca Furnace property, occupying a large tract 
of land. The Indian outbreaks of 1778 and 1779 caused all the early 
settlers to leave that locality, the brothers returning to their homes in 
the Conecocheague district. After the Indian troubles ended they re- 
turned and occupied their lands in now Blair county. The first census 
of the United States, taken in 1790, locates Jacob Brumbough in Bed- 
ford county and enumerates his family. In 1791, a return shows he 



HISTORY OF THE JUXL\TA VALLEY 831 

was collector of taxes for Woodberry township, Huntingdon county. 
In 1794 he moved across the mountains into the Woodcock Valley, 
Huntingdon county. On August 4, 1800, he received a deed for two 
hundred and nineteen acres on the south side of Warrior Ridge, called 
"Timothy Meadows," and lived there continuously until his death, Au- 
gust 13, 1816. The old homestead farm is yet held in the family 
name. The name of his first wife is not known. His second wife, 
Elizabeth, died December 15, 1827, and is buried at Marklesburg, Penn- 
sylvania. There are several opinions concerning the burial place of 
Jacob. Children of first wife: i. John, born February 28, 1764, died 
February 28, 1848; married Mary Ulrich. 2. Margaret, born May 5, 
1766, died August i, 1820; married Nicholas Fouse. 3. Conrad, born 
1768, died December 6, 1859: married (first) Mary :\Iiller, (second) 
Catherine Markley. 4. Jacob, born July 15, 1769, died July 30, 1855; 
married Mary Miller. 5. Hannah, born October 27, 1775; married 
John Wineland, senior. Children of second wife: 6. Henry, born 
May 24, 1778, died August 29, 1859: married Elizabeth Folk. 7. 
George, of whom further. 8. Daniel, born August, 1783, died March 
2T^, 1859; married Anna Bowers. 9. Catherine, born 1785; married 
Andrew Warner. 10. Samuel, born March 3, 1788, died May 29, 
1875; married Catherine Oaks. 11. Ester, twin of Samuel, died Sep- 
tember 13, 1872; married David Warner. 12. Mary, born August 
26, 1791, died December 5, 1852; married John Matthew Garner. 13. 
David, born September 29, 1793, died November 19, 1880; married 
Barbara Bowers. 14. Susan, born March or August 25, 1795, died 
August 7, 1880; married John Markley. 

(Ill) George, son of Jacob Brumbaugh and his second wife, Eliza- 
beth, was born March 12. 1780, died August 6, 1849, and is buried 
with his wife in the family cemetery on the elevation beyond the 
orchard on the old homestead. Upon the death of each owner, the 
homestead farm passed from Jacob to George, from him to his son 
Jacob, who deeded it to his son Abraham W. and next to Irvin Brum- 
baugh, its present owner, who also cultivates it. George Brumbaugh 
married Maria Bowers, died December 15, 1857, two of whose sisters 
married brothers of George. The following record of children is made 
from a record written in the father's hand, the original being in the 
possession of the compiler of the Brumbaugh genealogy, recently pub- 



832 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

lished: i. Isaac, born April 26, 1802, died November 4- 1871- 2. 
Jacob, born July 4, 1806, died December 15, 1890. 3. John, of whom 
further. 4. David, born August 2, 1832, died young. 5. Samuel, twm 
of David, died young. 

(IV) lohn, third son of George and Maria (Bowers) Brumbaugh, 
was born January 11, 1809, died May 25, 1896. He owned a farm in 
Penn township, Huntingdon county, on the Raystown branch of the 
Juniata river. He continued in active farming operations until aged 
sixty-five years, when he retired and thereafter lived with his son 
David B. He died at the "Frank farm," then owned by David B., 
and is buried in the Brumbaugh cemetery on the nearby original home- 
stead. He was a deacon and later a minister of the Church of the 
Brethren, of which his wife and all his children were active members. 
He was an inveterate smoker, until he reached the age of seventy years, 
when he decided to stop the use of tobacco. It was a hard 
struggle, but he said, "I will die rather than be overcome by it." 
During the remaining seventeen years of his life he totally abstained 
from the weed. This incident gives some idea of the firm, 
determined character of the man. He married, April 6, 1830, Catherine 
Boyer, born ]\Iay 7, 1809, daughter of Henry and Catherine (Roberts) 
Boyer, granddaughter of Abraham Boyer and sister of Rachel Boyer, 
wife of Jacob, a brother of John Brumbaugh. Children: Benjamin, 
born February 9, 1831, died June 14, 1906, married Elizabeth Snowber- 
ger Bechtel; David Boyer, born October 29, 1832, died October 15, 
1908, married Susan Snowberger Bechtel; George (c]. v.); Henry 
Boyer, of whom further; Isaac, born January 7, 1838, married Priscilla 
Elsie Stcver; John Boyer, March 14, 1848, married Eleanor Jane 
Van Dyke. Of all the friends of Juniata College in the early years he 
was one of the most faithful and untiring. He was treasurer of the 
college until 1880, when he resigned and has served continuously as 
trustee. Also for years taught the class in the "Life of Christ" in the 
Bible dt'[)artment of the college. His wife has been a co-worker in 
church, Sunday school and temperance work, both rendering most effi- 
cient service. 

(V) Henry Boyer, son of John and Catherine (Boyer) Brumbaugh, 
was born in Penn township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, April 
I, 1836. He spent his early days on the farm along the Raystown 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 833 

branch of the Juniata river and obtained his early education in the 
public school. He then attended Williamsburg Academy, also took 
courses at Cassville Seminary; finally entering Juniata College where 
he studied Greek and other advanced branches of college work. He 
was baptized into the Church of the Brethren, June 15, 1856, was 
called to the ministry of that church, June 24, 1864, and preached his 
first sermon from John, II chapter, 25th verse, on August 14, 1864. 
Prior to actively entering the ministry he taught in the public schools 
of Huntingdon county and has also been engaged in farming. In 
1889 he was ordained an elder and since that date has been in charge 
of the Huntingdon Church of the Brethren. In 1869 he and his 
brother, John Boyer Brumbaugh, were led to leave the farm and go to 
"town" to begin the publication of a religious paper, along certain dis- 
tinct lines, for which they and their advisers felt there was a distinct 
need. January i, 1870, the first number of the Pilgrim appeared. 
This was an eight-page weekly, edited and published by Henry B. and 
John B. Bnmibaugh, with Elder George Brumbaugh (brother) as asso- 
ciate editor. The office was located at James Creek, Pennsylvania ; the 
subscription price, one dollar yearly. At the beginning of the second 
year the paper was enlarged to sixteen pages and the price raised to 
one dollar and twenty-five cents. In the fall of 1874, the office was 
moved to Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, and located in a large brick build- 
ing, erected by Henry Boyer Brumbaugh at Fourteenth and Washing- 
ton streets. This building was also his family home and became the 
"Chapel" for little LIuntingdon church, chapel and home for the 
Brethren's Normal and Collegiate Institute and home for the Pilgrim. 
As the Pilgrim prospered, other church and Sunday school papers 
were started by the Brumbaugh brothers by and with the advice of the 
"Brethren" and on October 31, 1876, the Pilgrim was consolidated with 
The Primitive Christian, published at Meyersdale, Pennsylvania, 
which resulted in the removal of the office of publication to Hunting- 
don and the change of the paper's name to that of The Primitive 
Christian and Pilgrim, and the firm name of the publishers to Quinter 
& Brumbaugh Brothers. Under this head and title the paper prospered 
until June 19, 1883, when it was consolidated with The Brethren at 
Work, under the title of The Gospel Messenger, and the offices of 
publication at Mount Morris, Illinois, and Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, 



834 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

with Henry Boyer Brumbaugh as eastern editor. This consoHdation 
of pubhshing interests led to the formation of the present large 
Brethren Publishing House at Elgin, Illinois, which, among its ex- 
tensive church publishing interests, continues the weekly issue of the 
Messenger with Henry Boyer Brumbaugh as one of its three corre- 
sponding editors. Thus his editorial career, begun in 1S70, has been 
continuous until the present time. 

The history of the Brumbaughs is also the history of Juniata 
College. During the early years the Brethren church was opposed 
to education, believing it tended to '"worldly mindedness," but later a 
strong sentiment grew up in favor of a liberal education and several 
schools were started in different places under church auspices. In March, 
1876, John Boyer, Elder Henry Boyer and Dr. Andrew Boelus Brum- 
baugh (the latter a cousin of the brothers) held a conference that 
resulted in the establishment of a "Normal College," which was opened 
in the "Pilgrim" building owned by Henry Boyer Brumbaugh, of 
which mention has been previously made. Jacob M. Zuck was the first 
teacher, and on April 17, 1876, school was opened with three students 
in attendance; by the close of the term seventeen were enrolled and at 
the opening of the succeeding fall term the original room was too small 
to accommodate the applicants for admission. From this small begin- 
ning sprang the now prosperous Juniata College, an institution that now 
enrolls over four hundred students yearly ; has a faculty of twenty-two 
teachers and six regular departments : the College ; the Academy ; the 
School of Education; the Bible School; the Music School; and the 
Business School. After the death of Elder James Ouinter, who was 
the first president of the school, Elder Henry Boyer Brumbaugh suc- 
ceeded him and in turn was succeeded by Dr. Martin Grove Brumbaugh, 
now city superintendent of public instruction in Philadelphia. Brum- 
baughs have always served on the board of trustees, have been liberal 
supporters and the present president is a son of Henry Boyer Brum- 
baugh, one of the original founders. 

Henry Boyer Brumbaugh's connection with the Huntingdon Church 
of the Brethren has been even longer continued and valuable. The 
beginning of this congregation was in a room sixteen bv sixty feet 
in the same brick building that sheltered the Pilgrim in its earlier 
days and in which the little normal school was started that grew into 



HISTORY OF THE JUXIATA VALLEY 835 

Juniata College. When the church was started in 1874 there were but 
four members of that faith in the town : Dr. Andrew B. Brumbaugh, 
his wife, Andrew Denizer and wife. The church room was dedicated 
June 20, 1875. When the beautiful stone church erected upon the col- 
lege campus was dedicated, December 11, 1910 (Dr. ]\Iartin Grove 
Brumbaugh preaching the dedicatory sermon), seven hundred and 
twenty-four members had been baptized, thirty men had been called 
to the ministry and eleven missionaries had been sent out to labor in 
foreign fields, and Juniata College established as the direct result of the 
work of this congregation. Since 1888 the church has been under the 
care of Henry Boyer Brumbaugh, who has also been connected with 
it from its organization. He has also been dean of the Bible School of 
Juniata College since its foundation and in 1895 spent six months 
abroad, traveling principally in Bible lands. He has been president of 
the college board of trustees since organization and its financial sup- 
porter at critical times in the life of the school and at other times has 
more than once relieved embarrassment and given the school fresh 
impetus that has carried it past the danger point. He has also given a 
great deal of his time to work in the class room, all of which lias been 
done without even the hope of fee or reward. He is vice-president of 
Standing Stone National Bank of Huntingdon and as a wise financier 
has proved of great value to that institution. Starting life a farmer 
boy he has been farmer, teacher, preacher, printer, editor and college 
president. All the things he has done have been well done and now 
as a man of mature judgment, wise counsel and philanthropic heart he 
is held in the highest esteem by those who have learned to know and 
to love him. His labor has been abundant and his reward is sure. 
In political faith he is a Republican. 

He married, September 20, i860, Susan Fink Peightal, born Octo- 
ber I, 1842, died January 22. 1904, also a faithful member of 
the Church of the Brethren and is Iniried in Riverview cemetery 
at Huntingdon. She was the daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth 
(Fink) Peightal (original name Beightel). Children: Hazel, born 
October 31, 1863, died November 11 following: Isaac Harvey, of fur- 
ther mention. 

(VI) Isaac Harvey, only son of Henry Boyer and Susan Fink 
(Peightal) Brumbaugh, was born in Penn township, March 10, 1870. 



836 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

His early education was obtained in the public schools, after which he 
entered the Normal English course at Juniata College, whence he was 
graduated in 1886, continuing advanced work at the college until 1889, 
when he entered Haver ford College, whence he was graduated A. B., 
class of 1892. In September, 1892. he began teaching in Juniata Col- 
lege as professor of ancient languages, continuing to the present time, 
as professor of Latin in addition to his administrative work. This 
period of teaching has been interrupted by courses of study at Harvard 
University (1894-1895), being graduated A. B. 1895. I" 1898 and 
1899 he was a student in the Graduate School of Harvard, there earn- 
ing his degree of A. M. by special study in the classics. The summer 
of 1896 was spent in the study of pedagogy at the University of Jena, 
Germany. In 1896 he was called to Juniata College as acting president. 
In Mav, 191 1, he was chosen by the trustees as president, which 
honorable position he now holds. LTnder his administration the 
college has increased its endowment funds, making possible the 
strengthening of the faculty, and so has gained a name for good, 
thorough work, coupled with a reputation for careful general train- 
ing and discipline. The alumni are, in ever widening circles, loyally 
exemplifying its good name through their successful lives and earnest 
achievement. 

Professor Brumbaugh was elected to the ministry of the Church of 
the Brethren in 1904 and is frequently engaged in pulpit work. He 
is a trustee of the J. C. Blair Memorial Hospital and a member of the 
National Educational Association, as well as of other societies of learn- 
ing. In political faith he is a Republican. 

He married, April 26, 1900, Amelia Henrietta Johnson, born Janu- 
ary 28, 1874, daughter of Samuel Martin and Ellen (Bulfinch) John- 
son, of Cambridge, Massachusetts. Children : Barbara, born October 
24, 1901 ; Catherine Bulfinch, November 22, 1902; Marion Johnson, 
March 2, 1907; Henry Martin, November 11, 1912. 



(V) George Brumbaugh, third son of John Brum- 

BRUMBAUGH baugh (q. v.), and Catherine (Boyer) Brumbaugh, 

was born in Penn township, Huntingdon county, 

Pennsylvania, February 11, 1834, died August 18, 1899. He was 

educated in the public school and spent one year as a student at 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 837 

Williamsburg, Blair county, Pennsylvania. He taught lor seven or 
eight years in the public schools of Pennsylvania, but after his mar- 
riage engaged for a time in farming. Later he moved to Grafton, 
Huntingdon county, where he engaged in the manufacture of wagons 
and carriages, noted for their excellence throughout the Woodcock 
Valley. He was baptized into the Church of the Brethren in 1852, 
elected to its ministry and ordained elder in April, 1872. He was one 
of the promoters and assistant editors of the Pilgrim, being associated 
with his brothers, Henry Boyer and John Boyer Brumbaugh, who at 
first had the office of the paper at James Creek, but later moved to 
Huntingdon, Pennsylvania. He was for many years an able and regu- 
lar contributor to the Pilgrim and to its successors. He served the 
James Creek congregation of the Brethren church as minister and 
elder, succeeding his uncle, Isaac Brumbaugh, in that office. His use- 
ful life closed at the age of sixty-five years. 

He married, June 6, 1859, Fannie Elizabeth Myers, born near Mc- 
Veytown, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, daughter of Samuel and Eliza- 
beth (Shellenberger) Myers; she survives her husband and resides at 
Kalamazoo, Michigan. Children: i. Otis Myers, of whom further. 
2. Samuel Oscar, M. D., born July 30, 1862; graduate of L'niversity 
of Pennsylvania and an eminent physician of Huntingdon, Pennsyl- 
vania; he married Agnes (Mullen) Harley and has a daughter. Hazel 
T., born October 3, 1898. 3. Ella, born December 17, 1865, died De- 
cember 18, following. 4. Elma Alice, born April 16, 1867; married 
John McLaughlin Kirkwood and resides in Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania ; 
children : Baird, George, Catherine and John. 5. Anna Pearl, born 
February 18, 1872; married Philip Zinn, a merchant, and resides at 
Kalamazoo, Michigan; child: Robert. 

(VI) Otis Myers, eldest son of George and Fannie Elizabeth 
(Myers) Brumbaugh, was born at Grafton, Huntingdon county, Penn- 
sylvania, May 27, i860. He was educated in the public schools and 
at Juniata College, attending the latter institution two }'ears. He then 
taught school one term and after his marriage engaged in farming at 
Grafton for two years, then moved to Huntingdon, where he engaged 
in mercantile life successfully until 1908, as a member of the firm" 
of Brumbaugh & Rupert. He then accepted an appointment as steward 
and superintendent of grounds at Juniata College, a position he now 



838 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

holds. He is a member of the Church of the Brethren and in political 
faith is a Republican. He married, December 15, 1881, Flora Sarah 
Garver, born January 30, i860, in Germany valley, Huntingdon county, 
daughter of George and Annie (Bare) Garver and granddaughter of 
John and Sarah (Eby) Garver. 

Annie (Bare) Garver was born in Sinking Valley, Huntingdon 
county; her husband in Huntingdon county. After their marriage he 
bought a large farm in Hill valley on which they resided until late in 
life, when they moved to Huntingdon; Mr. Garver dying January 14, 
1913. They were members of the Church of the Brethren, which as 
deacon he served forty years, also as trustee and treasurer. Children 
of George and Annie (Bare) Garver: Benjamin Franklin, now a 
farmer near Shirleysburg; Flora Sarah, of previous mention, married 
Otis Myers Brumbaugh ; Laura twin of Flora S., married James L. 
Rupert and resides in Huntingdon ; Senie, married Samuel Shue and 
resides in York, Pennsylvania ; Lloyd, now a farmer on the old Garver 
homestead. 

(VII) Cloy Garver, only child of Otis Myers and Flora Sarah 
(Garver) Brumbaugh, was born in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, Febru- 
ary 4, 1884. He prepared in the public schools and then entered 
Juniata College, whence he was graduated, class of 1901. He entered 
the University of Pennsylvania, spending two years in the department 
of biology and chemistry, then became a student in the medical depart- 
ment, whence he was graduated M. D., class of 1907. After gradua- 
tion he spent one year as resident physician in Lancaster General Hos- 
pital and in 1908 located in Huntingdon, where he is well established 
in general practice. Dr. Brumbaugh is physician to the Juniata Valley 
Home for Orphan Children; is a member of the Pennsylvania state and 
county medical societies and the author of several professional papers 
published in the medical journals. He is well fitted by nature, educa- 
tion and training for his profession and has already gained a satisfac- 
tory practice in his native city. He is a member of the Church of the 
Brethren; his wife belonging to the Methodist Episcopal church. In 
politics the doctor is a Republican. 

He married. May 23, 1912, Mabel Beaver, born in Huntingdon, 
daughter of John G. and Ada (Reiter) Beaver. 





^yd^VCc^WrC^^^ ^.XT" 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 839 

This family is of German descent, the first 
ESTERLINE ancestor in this country having probably been 
George Esterline, who at an early day emigrated 
from the fatherland and settled on a farm in York county, Pennsyl- 
vania. The remainder of his life was passed in this part of the 
country, where his descendants have represented the best portion of the 
community and have been prosperous and honored for generations. 

(I) Jacob Esterline, who seems to have been one of the direct 
descendants of the immigrant, George Esterline, though the imme- 
diate connection has not been recorded, was a native of Pennsylvania, 
living and dying in Juniata county. He owned a considerable amount 
of land in the county, which he cultivated, following the vocation of 
farming all his life. He seems to have been a man of quiet and peace- 
ful disposition, taking part in no war or military enterprise, who 
passed his days industriously and honorably in the care of his family 
and domestic affairs. Among his children were : Jacob, of further 
mention ; Benjamin, William, Catherine, who married a Mr. Landis, 
and others whose names have not been recorded. 

(II) Jacob Esterline, son of Jacob Esterline above mentioned, was 
born in Juniata county, Pennsylvania, in the 3'ear 1821; he passed his 
early life in this county where he resided until the time of his mar- 
riage, working at the trade of shoemaking. After his marriage he 
removed to Granville township, Mifflin county, where he continued 
his calling, which he followed until his death in the year 1856. In 
politics he was a Democrat ; and he won the respect of the community 
by his upright and industrious life, rearing and providing for a large 
famil}- of children. His wife, who survived him many years and died 
in 1904, was a Miss Mariah Hockenbrought, born in 1823, at Little 
York, Pennsylvania. She was the daughter of George Hocken- 
brought, a native of Germany, where he married before coming to 
America. L'pon arriving in this country Mr. and Mrs. Hockenbrought 
settled at Little York, Pennsylvania, where Mr. Hockenbrought be- 
came a farmer and followed this calling for a considerable length of 
time before he finally removed to Juniata county. Here he bought a 
farm of one hundred acres in extent, which he cultivated and where 
the family continued to live until his death. There were eight children 
in the family, seven sons and a daughter: William, a i)risoner at 



840 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Andersonville during the civil war, still survives; John; Henry, a 
soldier, died in the civil war; Daniel, living, was a prisoner in Ander- 
sonville prison; George, a farmer; Jacob, died in service; Mariah, 
became the wife of Jacob Esterline. The family were all members of 
the German Reformed church. Mr. and Mrs. Esterline had ten chil- 
dren: William, unmarried, served in Company B, Forty-ninth Penn- 
sylvania Volunteers, during the civil war, in which he died; David, 
deceased, served in the same company as his brother during the war, 
and married Anna Crawford, having lived in Mifflin county ; Jacob C, 
of further mention; Anna, married A. J. Reed, of the state of Indiana, 
where he still resides, she being now deceased ; Benjamin, died unmar- 
ried; George, married Martha Crawford, and lives in Altoona, his 
wife being deceased; Louisa, died young; Charles, married and re- 
moved to Indiana; Mariah, married to Jesse Kelley, a railroad man 
at Altoona ; Samuel, a farmer, married Miss Trout, and lives in 
Juniata county. 

(Ill) Jacob C. Esterline, son of Jacob and Mariah (Hocken- 
brought) Esterline, was born in Granville township, Mifflin county, 
Pennsylvania, on September 4, 1846. He received his education in 
the district schools of Granville township, and became a soldier during 
the war between the states. He enlisted in July, 1863, in Company E, 
Twentieth Pennsylvania Cavalry, being discharged in January, 1864. 
He again enlisted in March, 1865, in Company E, Eighty-eighth Penn- 
sylvania Volunteer Infantry, and received his honorable discharge 
August 6, 1865. It was not his fortune to take part in any active 
engagement during the time of his service. After the close of the 
war Mr. Esterline engaged in railroading and, besides other properties 
of which he is possessed, owns a farm of one hundred and seventy 
acres in extent in Granville township. He is a Democrat in politics; 
and he and his wife are both members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

On January 2, 1868, after his enlistment as a soldier, Mr. Ester- 
line was married to Miss Ella Reed, daughter of John S. and Elizabeth 
(Hopper) Reed. She died February 16, 1886, having been the mother 
of six children: Edward, born April 29, 1869, married Miss Emma 
Seager; George, born March 4, 1871, married Maggie Rittenhouse; 
Maud May, born August 6, 1873, married William Boyle: Minerva, 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 841 

born August 7, 1875, married Harry Rice, a motorman of Altoona, 
Pennsylvania; Bessie Pearl, born January 3, 1878, married a Mr. 
Merrel, and lives in Altoona; Effie Dean, unmarried, a twin sister of 
Bessie Pearl. After the death of his first wife, Mr. Esterline married, 
second, on August 25, 1887, Miss Millie McCord, daughter of Thomas 
and Mary Ann (Decker) McCord; and by this marriage has one 
child, a son, John Newton, born May 13, 1893. 



William A. Harlan, of McCoysville, Pennsylvania, 
HARLAN is of distinctly English extraction. The first Harlan 
to dare the dangers of crossing the Atlantic from 
England to America, and the subsequent dangers of the wilderness 
of Pennsylvania with its savage inhabitants, both men and beasts, 
came over about 1792, or possibly a few years earlier. He was accom- 
panied by four brothers, all of whom made their way to Pennsylvania 
and adjoining states, two of whom settled in Chester county, Penn- 
sylvania. They took unto themselves wives, reared families, and as- 
sisted in building up that section of the Union. They were farmers 
by preference, taking out warrants, clearing and improving the land, 
building thereon good log houses, and making homes for themselves 
and families. One or more of the Harlan brothers combined other 
vocations with that of farming, thus giving to the new country a few 
of the advantages of a more densely populated section. 

(I) John Harlan was descended from the immigrant Harlan, who 
located in Chester county, Pennsylvania. With the ever ready pioneer 
spirit, that seemed to enter so largely into the make-up of the .\meri- 
cans of those days, his father moved into Maryland, and there John 
Harlan was born. He married Margaret Porter, a descendant of the 
Porter family that has made history for the United States. Through 
the dual occupation of farmer and miller, combined with that of mill- 
wright, he accumulated a nice property. At the age of seventy he 
moved from Maryland to Juniata county, Pennsylvania, and died there 
at the age of eighty. His wife died at the age of eighty-four. They 
had one child, Stephen Porter, of whom further. 

(II) Stephen Porter Harlan, son of John and Margaret (Porter) 
Harlan, was born July 4, 1823, in Maryland. He married Sarah 
Hanna, born February 24, 1826, in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, 



842 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

a daughter of James and Sarah (Ales) Hanna, old residents of that 
section. After his marriage he lived sixteen years in Maryland, and 
then moved to Juniata county, Pennsylvania, on land where his grand- 
father Harlan had taken out warrant many years previous. At one 
time the place comprised many hundred acres, but has been divided 
and subdivided many times since. Stephen Porter Harlan moved to 
the Harlan place in 1862 and lived there until his death, February 7, 
1890; his wife dying June 14, 1892. He was a Democrat, voting the 
straight ticket, but never worked actively for it. He and his wife 
were members of the Baptist church. Children: i. Mary Alice, born 
March 3, 1847; married Alec Anderson, and lives in Tuscarora town- 
ship, Juniata county. 2. James Albert, born December 17, 1848, a 
contractor in New Mexico. 3. John Franklin, born July 8, 1852, a 
carpenter and mason ; died in Tuscarora township. 4. Stephen Robert, 
born May 12, 1854, a farmer in New Mexico. 5. William Andrew, 
of whom further. 6. George Marion, born March 2, 1859, a car- 
penter in New Mexico. 7. Ida Matilda, born October 10, i860; widow 
of Boyd Hart, of Tuscarora township. 8. Edie E., born January 18, 
1863, died in infancy. 9. Maggie R., twin of above, born January 
18, 1863, died in infancy. 10. Lilly Bertie, born September 27, 1867, 
died in infancy. 11. David E., born October 17, 1871, and who died 
in infancy. 

(Ill) William Andrew Harlan, son of Stephen Porter and Sarah 
(Hanna) Harlan, was born in Maryland, April i, 1856; married 
August II, 1883, Lizzie Hart, born in Juniata county, a daughter of 
William and Matilda Hart. She died July 31, 1900. William A. 
Harlan was reared on his father's farm and educated in the common 
schools. He engaged in farming, and with his brother, Stephen 
Robert, bought the interest of the other heirs in his father's estate. 
Three years later he purchased the interest of his brother, the farm at 
that time containing two hundred and eight acres. He does a suc- 
cessful general farming, and is regarded as one of the progressive 
agriculturists of his township. He is a Democrat, but has never held 
nor aspired to office. Children: i. Iva, born October 12, 1885; at 
home with her father. 2. William Albert, died in infancy. 3. Lee, 
born February 19, 1889, a farmer in Idaho. 4. James Harry, born 
January 29, 1896. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 843 

(The Hanna Line). 
James Hanna, grandfather of W'illiam Andrew Harlan on the 
distaff side, was an old and long time resident of Lancaster county, 
Pennsylvania. He married Sarah Ales, like himself a member of an 
old Pennsylvania family. He was a farmer by vocation, but was also 
a good mechanic as well and did much in that line. He served as 
justice of peace for years, and was known for the justness of his 
rulings. He was a staunch Democrat until the outbreak of the Civil 
War, when he espoused the principles of the Republican party and 
advocated them as strongly as he formerly had those of Democracy, 
and was always active in politics. Both he and his wife were mem- 
bers of the Baptist church. Children: i. Rebecca, married Elisha 
Kirk, and died in Delaware. 2. Martha, married Daniel Carter; died 
in the state of Washington. 3. Sarah, born in Lancaster county, 
Pennsylvania; married Stephen Porter Harlan; died June 14, 1892; 
children (see Harlan II). 4. Matilda, married Edward Tollenger; 
she died in Philadelphia in 191 1. 5. Edith, married INIr. Stetler, and 
died in Oregon. 6. John, died in Cissel county, Maryland. 7. Andrew, 
died in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. 



The Hoffmans of Lewistown. herein recorded, 
HOFFMAN descend from Valentine Hoffman, who was born in 
German}', came to Pennsylvania with his wife, set- 
tling in the town of Lancaster, where he is recorded in the early records 
as a "smith," which in his case meant "a maker of edge tools." He 
became a large landowner in Lancaster borough, where Hoffman's Run 
(now W'ater street), a small brook, running through his property, was 
named for him. He had three sons and a daughter. 

(II) Benjamin, one of the three sons of Valentine Hoffman, the 
emigrant, was a resident of Lancaster all his life and associated with 
his father in farming and smithing. He married Margaret, daughter 
of Jacob and Mary Nauman, who were old residents of Lancaster. 
He was a tinner by trade and must have been a revolutionary soldier. 
as after his death his widov.' received a patent for a tract of land 
granted for his military service. 

(III) William Nauman. son of Benjamin and Margaret (Nau- 
man) Hoffman, was born in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. February 9, 



844 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

1836, and is now a resident of Lewistown, Pennsylvania. He grew 
to manhood in Lancaster and was educated in the pubhc schools. When 
a young man he settled in Lewistown, having started for the West but 
getting no farther than Lewistown, where he married and has always 
since resided. He learned the trade of cabinetmaker, following that 
trade for many years. Later in life he became a grocer, having a 
store on Market street. He has now for several years lived a retired 
life, making his home with his son, Charles R. Hoffman. He was an 
active Republican in his younger years and served on the police force; 
was coroner and also collector of taxes at different periods. He en- 
listed in Company A, Thirty-sixth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Infantry, serving a few months as emergency man under two enlist- 
ments. He was at Antietam among the troops held in reserve, and 
at Gettysburg, where he was in the detail to bury the dead and clear 
up the battlefield. He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and is the oldest Odd Fellow in Lewistown, both in actual age 
and in point of years of membership. 

He married Leah Jane Nichols, born in York county. Pennsyl- 
vania, April 14, 1S36, married in Lewistown, where her parents set- 
tled about 1840. She is a daughter of James and Mary (Blymeyer) 
Nichols, of Lewisberry, York county, Pennsylvania, but later of Lewis- 
town, coming by boat on the old Pennsylvania canal. He was a potter 
by trade and in Lewistown served for many years as justice of the 
peace. Children of James Nichols : Elizabeth, married Andrew 
AlcCoy, both deceased; Margaret, married Peter Ort, a farmer, and 
is now living in Tyrone, Pennsylvania, aged over eighty years ; Cath- 
erine, married Mr. DeVault and resides in Lewistown ; Leah Jane, 
married William N. Hoffman and resides in Lewistown, a member of 
the Lutheran cinirch : AA'illiam, deceased ; Ann, married Roseberry 
Reese; Susan, died in infancy; Ellen, married John Riley and resides 
in Tyrone, Pennsylvania. Children of William N. and Leah Jane 
Hoffman: Clayton, died in infancy; Andrew McCoy, died in infancy; 
James N. (q. v.); William H., resides in the south, a traveling sales- 
man, married Emma Cooper; Margaret, died in infancy; Peter, twin 
of Margaret, died aged thirteen years ; Charles Roseberry, of whom 
further. 

(IV) Charles Roseberry, youngest child of William N. and Leah 



HISTORY OF THE JUXIATA VALLEY 845 

Jane (Nichols) Hoffman, was born in Lewistown. Pennsylvania, 
August 16, 1874. He was educated in the public schools, and East- 
man's Business College, Poughkeepsie, New York ; was a graduate of 
the latter institution in 1892. He began business hfe as a clerk. In 
1900 he entered the L'nited States mail service as carrier in the Lewis- 
town office, a position he has filled continuously with the exception of 
four months in 1907. During this period of four months he was 
engaged in the erection of a bakery and establishing the business, which 
has proved very successful. In 19 12 the business outgrew its original 
quarters and was enlarged, with store in front, and ovens with a 
capacity of ten thousand loaves daily, in the rear. 

Mr. Hoffman is a Republican in politics and both he and his wife 
are members of the Lutheran church. He is also a member of the 
Modern Woodmen of America. He married, October 11, 1898. Ida 
E., born in Lewistown, daughter of Robert and Elizabeth (Killian) 
Montgomery; she was born in Newville, Cumberland county, Peim- 
sylvania; he is now deceased. Children of ]\Ir. and Mrs. Hoffman: 
Leah Jane and Robert Nauman. 

(IV) James Nichols Hoffman, third son of William Nauman 
Hoffman (q. v.) and Leah Jane (Nichols) Hoffman, was born in Lewis- 
town, Pennsylvania, November 19. 1861. He was educated in the pub- 
lic schools and began business life as an employee of the Lewistown 
Foundry, continuing six months. The foundry then closing down he 
returned to school. On February 18, 1879, he began his long career 
with the Pennsylvania railroad, first as messenger boy, working the 
first year without salary. On December i, 1880, he was promoted to 
scale clerk, his work as messenger having impressed his employer so 
favorably that he was thus promoted and kept in line for future ad- 
vancement. On November 28, 1885, he was appointed scale agent at 
the Lewistown Junction, continuing there until January i, 1886, when 
he was promoted night train dispatcher. On November i, 1900, he 
was appointed day man, but holding the same position and rank. On 
October i, 1902, he was promoted assistant day yard master and on 
March 17, 1908, was advanced to the position of yard master on 
night duty, a position he now holds. All these positions have been' 
held in connection with the Lewistown Junction and yards and he has 
his residence at Lewistown. His services have been continuous since 



846 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

February, 1879, and his advancement from each post of duty to a 
more responsible one proves the faithfuhiess and attests the high esteem 
in which he is held by the railroad officials. In September, 1886, Mr. 
Hoffman became a partner with his father and brother in the retail 
grocery business, opening a store on Market street, Lewistown, later 
moving to the corner of Brown and Market streets on the site of 
the present building of the Lewistown Trust Company. They con- 
tinued in business there until about 1901, when their store was de- 
stroyed by fire and was not resumed. 

He is a Republican in politics, has served as election board official 
and always has been interested in public aft'airs. He is a member of 
the Knights of Malta and belongs to the Veteran Association of the 
Middle Division of Pennsylvania Railroad Employees, also to the Re- 
lief Department of that association. Both he and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Lutheran church. He married, November 19, 1889, Edith 
Mayes, daughter of William and Sarah Ann (Switzer) Mayes, of 
Mayes Bridge, near Lewistown ; her father is a farmer. Child : James 
Mayes Hoft'man. The family home is at No. 119 West Third street, 
which Mr. Hofifman had built to his order. 



One of the best known and most respected families in 
WHITE Juniata Valley, Pennsylvania, is that of the Whites. For 

many generations they have been located in Pennsylvania, 
where they have added their c|uota to the material wealth and the 
moral upbuilding of the state. The family is of English origin, the 
immigrant White coming over to America a hundred years before the 
revolutionary war. Many of the name have defended the country in 
every war that it has had, from the one with the French to the Span- 
ish-American, and they are widely scattered over the United States, 
there not being a state that has not one or more families of Whites 
within their borders. Many have occupied and do occupy high places 
in the councils of the nation, while others in a quiet way aid it by 
being good, law-abiding citizens on whom it can depend in time of 
need. Robert White, the immigrant, landed in Massachusetts in 1650- 
52. He was a young man of prepossessing appearance and a fine edu- 
cation for those times. He settled near Salem, later wandered into 
Connecticut, where he married, had a numerous family, lived and died. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 847 

While he was a subject of England he soon saw the necessity of better 
laws for the government of the English crown possessions, and often 
spoke of it publicly. He imbued his sons and his sons' sons with the 
idea of liberty of thought and the freedom of speech. In dying he 
left a legacy of a well-spent life to his children, which was of greater 
importance than wealth, though he had accumulated a fine property 
before he had reached the age of fifty. 

(I) Samuel Crawford White, a descendant of Robert White, was 
born in Adams county, Pennsylvania, where his family had come from 
Connecticut in the early days. He was reared on a farm in this county, 
and became one of its best known citizens. During the war of 1812 
he was a commissioned officer from Adams count}'. He was captured 
by the British and held as prisoner for some time. Eventually escap- 
ing or being released, he again entered the American army, but peace 
was made between the two belligerent nations and he returned home 
to again resume the tranquil vocations of life. Later he moved from 
Adams county to Perry county, Pennsylvania, and engaged in the 
lumber business at Baileys. He was successful in his undertaking and 
amassed wealth. In 1854 he moved to Juniata township and settled 
in Tuscarora, where he lived, much honored by his neighbors, until 
his death at the age of eighty-three. He was a prominent Democrat, 
active at all times in the interest of his party, and was once a candi- 
date for legislative honors from Perry county. Both he and his wife 
were members of the Reformed church, and were generous and zealous 
in their support of it. He married Margaret Armstrong, a beautiful 
young woman, daughter of Robert Armstrong, an influential and 
wealthy landed'proprietor of Armstrong county, named for the family. 
Margaret was born in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, and there grew 
up with all the advantages that were given to a young lady of wealth 
and high social standing of that day. She was a dominating figure in 
the life of her brilliant husband, aiding and supplementing his efforts 
in every way. She died at the age of seventy-seven, having lived a 
useful Hfe. Among their children was William A., of whom further. 

(II) WiUiam A. White, son of Samuel Crawford and Margaret 
(Armstrong) White, was born April 2, 1830, in Adams county, Penn- 
sylvania. Later when his parents moved to Perry county he attended 
school, and when at a still later date they moved to Juniata county, he 



848 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

finished his education in Tuscarora. He remained at the homestead, 
and after the death of his father he purchased the interests ot the other 
heirs in the two hundred and sixteen acres of land that comprised it, 
and hved there until to-day (1913)- having reached the venerable age 
of eighty-three. During these years he has commanded the respect, 
admiration and love of all those who know him. He has always been 
a staunch Democrat, voting with and working for the party, and has 
held many township offices. Both he and his wife are members of the 
Presbyterian church. He married Mary Mairs, born in Tuscarora 
township, and died September 15, 1882, a daughter of Thomas and 
xMatilda (Smith) Mairs, both of whom were born in Ireland. Thomas 
Mairs and Matilda Smith came with their respective families to the 
United States while yet young. They met and married in Pennsyl- 
vania, and after marriage located about two miles from East Water- 
ford, Pennsylvania, where he became a farmer and landowner, one of 
the most prosperous men in that section of the state, and one of its 
progressive citizens. They were of the Presbyterian faith, having been 
so in Ireland. He died rather young, but she lived unmarried, faithful 
to his memory, dying after she was eighty. They were the parents of 
eight children : 

I. Silas, a valiant soldier in the civil war, and met a gallant death at 
the battle of Seven Pines. 2. Hugh, a farmer and stock breeder in 
Wayne county, Ohio. 3. Mary, born in Tuscarora township, died Sep- 
tember 15, 1882; married William A. White. 4. James, makes his 
home in Michigan. 5. Margaret, married Neal McCoy Stewart, of 
McCoysville, Pennsylvania. The children of William A. and Mary 
(Mairs) White are: i. Samuel, drowned, aged twenty. 2. Died un- 
named, in infancy. 3. Adella, married J. S. Magill, of Huntingdon 
county. 4. Jennie, married Frank Felger, a grain dealer in Big Graff, 
Ohio. 5. Silas M., a farmer and grain dealer in Burbank, Ohio. 6. 
John Magill, of whom further. 7. Bruce, an employee of the Penn- 
sylvania railroad, at Pitcairn, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 8. 
Died in infancy. 

(HI) John Magill White, son of William A. and Mary (Mairs) 
White, was born June 28, 1871, in Tuscarora township, Juniata county, 
Pennsylvania. He was reared in the free, open life of the farm, and 
educated in the public schools of the township. For some time before 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 849 

his marriage he was engaged in general farm work; after marriage 
he farmed on the White homestead for a year. At the end of twelve 
months he moved to Clearfield county, Pennsylvania, and became an 
employee of the Tuscarora Valley railroad. During the time of his 
employment with the railroad he gradually became interested in the 
lumber business, and in 1906 he resigned from the railway and gave 
up other enterprises to devote his time entirely to lumbering. He 
began operating on a large scale in Lock and Tuscarora townships 
and in Huntingdon county. At the present time (1913) he is the 
owner of one mill and uses the output of two others, which products 
go largely to the Pennsylvania road and many points in Pennsylvania 
and New Jersey. He has rapidly established a reputation for bold 
business transactions, in which he has been eminently successful. He 
votes the Democratic ticket, works for the party and has held town- 
ship offices with credit to himself and the satisfaction of his constitu- 
ency. Both he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

He married, April 3, 1895, Anna L. Marshall, born in Juniata 
county, daughter of Henry and Catherine Marshall, who were old 
settlers in Perry county, moving from thence to Juniata county. Chil- 
dren : I. Clarence. 2. Wellington, died in infancy. 3. Gilbert. 4. 
Alvie. 



The Page family of Millerstown, herein recorded, descends 
PAGE from Christian Page, born in Snyder county, Pennsylvania, 
a wagon maker of West Perry township, where he died. 
He married Mary Diffenderfer, born in Juniata county, Ijoth of Ger- 
man descent and both members of the Mennonite church. Christian 
Page was a Democrat in politics. Children : Emanuel, of whom fur- 
ther; Debias, Christian (2), Delilah, and Mary. 

(II) Emanuel, son of Christian and Mary (Diffenderfer) Page, was 
born in Snyder county, Pennsylvania, in 1835, died in Snyder county, 
March 7, 1903. He was a lifelong farmer of Snyder county, a member 
of the Brethren church, and in politics a Democrat, holding to his church 
and party with all the tenacity and faithfulness of an intense nature. 
He married (first) Elizabeth Cameron, born in Juniata county, in 
1835, died in West Perry township, Snyder county, December 2, 1866, 



850 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

daughter of Robert Cameron, who came from Ireland when a young 
man, took up land near New Bloomfield, Perry county, and there en- 
gaged in farming until his death. He was twice married— Elizabeth 
(of previous mention), William, who died in the Union army, and 
Robert (2), being children of the first wife. Children of Emanuel 
Page by first wife: 

I. Banks W., of whom further below; Lizzie, died at the age of 
one year; Lewis, died aged nine years. He married (second) the 
widow of Michael Shelley, and (third) Malinda Merhood, who bore 
a daughter Edna, married Charles E. Shirk, and now resides in Phila- 
delphia. 

(Ill) Banks W., only living son of Emanuel Page and his first 
wife, Elizabeth Cameron, was born in Fayette township, Juniata 
county, Pennsylvania, September i, 1855. He attended the school 
kept in the old log school house in West Perry township, Snyder 
county, Pennsylvania, and until seventeen years of age worked at the 
home farm. At that age he began working at a tannery at Evendale, 
Pennsylvania, continuing seven years. About 1879 he returned to 
farming, working in Juniata county three years. Later about 1892 
he engaged in the lumber business in the same county, continuing ^suc- 
cessfully for twelve years. He later bought from Mr. Gross and the 
borough of Millerstown the shirt factory plant in Millerstown, which 
he has since successfully operated. He began with a factory force of 
thirty-five and now employs one hundred and four persons. The old 
building and plant proving inadequate to the needs of his growing busi- 
ness, Mr. Page in the spring of 1912 began the erection of a new 
factory building which was completed in September of that year at a 
cost of $8,000, an equal sum also being invested in new and modern 
shirt making equipment. This is now one of the prosperous industries 
of Millerstown, and a striking illustration of the business ability of its 
owner. Mr. Page is a member of the Knights of the Golden Eagle; 
a Democrat in politics ; and for four years was councilman of the 
borough and school director for a like period. 

He married Estella W., daughter of Bayard Nields, a farmer of 
Juniata county; children: Huldah; May, married Llo}d Knight (whom 
she survives) ; Charles C, married Jennie Walker: j\Iercy P., married 
John Slaughterback ; Morton; Frances, married Harry J. Beecham; 
Merl ■, Darlington, died aged five years. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 851 

The Cummins family is of Scotch-Irish descent, the 
CUMMINS American ancestor, Wilham Cummins, arriving in 

Pennsylvania during the latter part of the eighteenth 
century. He first settled on the banks of Little Chickies creek, Lan- 
caster county, and later moved to Kishacoquillas valley, where he pur- 
chased 364 acres of land. He was a cooper by trade, and had a shop 
on his farm. He owned considerable land in the Juniata \"alley, includ- 
ing a farm in Jackson township, Huntingdon county, which he placed 
in charge of his son Robert. William Cummins married Sara Semple ; 
children: i. James, of whom little is known. 2. Robert, married 
Mary Sterrett ; children : Cyrus, a United Presbyterian minister, mar- 
ried Nancy Collins; Sara, married George Porter, a farmer; Samuel, 
a farmer, married Cathern Smith ; Nancy, married John \\'ilson, a 
farmer; Sterrett, a farmer, married Agnes McNitt; Jane, married 
Ebenezer Magill, a farmer; and Elizabeth and Samuel, who died be- 
fore they reached twenty years. 3. Charles, of whom further below. 
4. Margaret, married an Obern. 5. Colonel William, married (first) 

Sara Sterrett; children: Dr. James, married Mina ; David, 

married Cathern Barr; Elizabeth, married John Beatty, a farmer. 
Colonel William married (second) Martha Montgomery AIcElheny : 
children: Rebecca, married Charles Davis; William, died unmarried; 
Sara, married Rev. J. M. Adair; Martha, married John McNitt, a 
farmer; John, died unmarried; Margaret, married James Davies, a 
farmer; Colonel William married (third) Jane Young: no children. 

(II) Charles, son of William and Sara Cummins, was born in 
Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, where he lived until his removal to Jack- 
son township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, where he bought a 
farm and lived until his death. He married Catherine McAlevy, daugh- 
ter of William McAlevy (see below). Children of Charles and Cather- 
ine Cummins: i. William, lived and died in Huntingdon county, Penn- 
sylvania; a miller and farmer, married Alargaret Magill. 2. Colonel 
John, a farmer; lived and died in Huntingdon county; married (first) 
Mary Ann Smith: (second) Jane Nancy Magill Hunter; (third) Mary 
Duff. 3. David, was a soldier during the civil war and died in a boat 
on James river near Fortress Monroe, Virginia: unmarried. 4. Sara, 
who died in her teens. 5. Robert, of whom further. 6. Ruth, the 
second wife of Rev. J. M. Adair, of McAlevy's Fort, for many years; 



852 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

he died in Indiana, Pennsylvania, and she in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania. 
(Ill) Robert, fourth son of Charles and Catherine (McAlevy) 
Cummins, was born in Jackson township, Huntingdon county, Penn- 
sylvania, June i6, 1827, near McAlevy's Fort, and died in Armagh 
township, near Milroy, Mifflin county. May 27, 1882. He attended the 
township school during the winter, while he spent the remainder of the 
year working in the grist mill or on the home farm. After his marriage 
he purchased and inherited his share of two hundred and forty acres 
of good farm land in Jackson township, where he resided until 1866, 
then moved to Armagh township, Mifflin county, where in about 1868 
or 1869 he purchased a valuable farm of about two hundred and ten 
acres near Milroy, on which he resided until his death. This estate he 
improved with suitable modern buildings, and brought the soil to a high 
state of cultivation. He was a successful farmer, and a straightfor- 
ward business man, ever holding the warm regard of his neighbors, to 
whom he was familiarly known as "Long Robert Cummins," to dis- 
tinguish him from others of the same name. He was a tall man, and 
when wearing a high beaver hat was indeed "Long Robert." He was 
a Republican in politics, and held many local offices. In religious faith' 
both he and wife were United Presbyterians. He married, March 9, 
1854, Cathern Ann McNitt, born in Armagh township, Mifflin county, 
in the stone house on the McNitt homestead, near Siglerville, November 
30, 1832, died April i, 191 1, in Reedsville. Pennsylvania. She was the 
ninth child and sixth daughter of Alexander Brown and Nancy (Ster- 
rett) McNitt, and granddaughter of John McNitt. Children of Robert 
and Cathern Ann Cummins: i. Agnes Jane, born June 3, 1855; mar- 
ried. May, 1886, Ogleby James Reed, born August 10, 1834, died in 
Reedsville, Pennsylvania, January 9, 1905, whom she survives, a resi- 
dent of Reedsville; children: John Milton, born November 17, 1888, 
now a civil engineer in Canada; Mary Brown, born April 28, 1890, 
student at Swarthmore College; Anna Cummins, born December 21, 
1891, attending Wheaton College, Norton, Massachusetts; James An- 
drew, student at Lewistown Academy, born March 18, 1897. 2. Cath- 
erine Sterrett. born June 20, 1857; married, December 27, 1887, Wil- 
liam Cummins Beatty, born April 30, 1850, now residing on the old 
Cummins homestead in Huntingdon county, near McAlevy's Fort ; chil- 
dren: Ruth Cummins, born December 12, 1888, a student at Westmin- 



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HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 853 

ster College, New Wilmington, Pennsylvania; Catherine Anna, Au- 
gust 29, 1892, attending Indiana State Normal, Indiana, Pennsyl- 
vania. 3. Alexander Brown, born June 2, 1859; married (first) March 
20, 1894, Martha Gertrude Aitken, who died September, 1910; mar- 
ried (second) Mrs. Mary Mitchell Koons; he is a retired farmer, 
now living in Lewistown, Pennsylvania, and is an elder in the Presby- 
terian church of Milroy, Pennsylvania. 4. Mary Brown, born March 
29, 1861, resides in Reedsville with her sister. 5. Martha, born April 
6, 1870; resides in Reedsville with her sister, Mary B. 

William McAlevy, father of Catherine (McAlevy) Cummins (of 
whom above), wife of Charles Cummins, was born in Ireland, about 
1728, and was but about three months old when his parents came to 
Pennsylvania, but a stroke of lightning killed them both shortly after 
their arrival, and he was left an orphan. He was reared by a maternal 
uncle who taught him his own trade — weaving. Not being enamored 
of his uncle's trade nor of his treatment, William ran away and en- 
listed in the Forbes expedition to Fort Duquesne, and was one of a 
detachment sent to collect and bury the remains of those who fell on 
Braddock's Field, being then nineteen years of age. It is related that 
at one time he concealed himself from the Indians in a log for nine 
days, where a goose had laid nine eggs, apparently for his use, as he 
ate one egg each day: the Indians held a war dance around the log, 
but he was unmolested. He also served in the revolutionary war, and 
was known as General McAlevy. He finally settled in Stone Valley, 
fourteen miles from Petersburg, where he owned a grist mill, a farm 
and distillery. The place was known as Mc.Aleyy's Fort, and later as 
the Old Fort. He was a large portly man, of rugged constitution, and 
one of the well-to-do men of his time. His judgment in matters gen- 
erally was reverenced as the deliverance of an oracle, as the following 
goes to show, which has been handed down and vouched for by those 
whose memories would extend back to or near his day: When an 
important election was being held, and men would meet at the polls 
and one would inquire of another for whom he was going to vote, the 
reply often made would be, "Indeed, I can't say; I haven't seen the 
General yet." He died in August, 1822, aged ninety-four years. He 
was three times married. His first wife was Margaret Harris, sister 
of John Harris, the founder of Harrisburg. His second wife was 



8S4 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Mary Hays: he conveyed her over Stone Mountain on a slide-car, for 
fear of the Indians. His third wife was the widow Allen. 

The following is a copy of his commission as brigadier-general. 
It will be noticed that the spelling of his name in this commission is 
different from the spelling now used, but it is known from the general's 
autograph in a letter to one of his descendants that the present spell- 
ing is correct : 

Commission to William McAlevy, Esq., 
Brigadier General (L. S.) : 

In the name and by the authority of the Commonwealth of Penn- 
sylvania, Thomas McKean, Governor of the said Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania. 

To William Mclllevy. of the county of Huntingdon, Esquire, greet- 
ing: 

Know you, That reposing confidence in your zeal, valor, patriotism 
and fidelity, I have appointed, and, by these presents I do appoint you, 
the said William Mclllevy, Brigadier General of the 2nd Brigade, 
composed of the militia of the counties of Mifflin (including Center and 
Huntingdon), to have and to hold the said office, and to exercise, per- 
form and enjoy all the powers, duties and emoluments there-with law- 
fully belonging, for the term of seven years, from the day of the date 
hereof, if you shall so long behave yourself well. 

In testimony whereof, I have set my hand and caused the great seal 
of the State to be affixed t(j these presents, at Lancaster, the eighteenth' 
day of May, in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred, and 
of the Commonwealth the twenty-fourth. 

By the Governor, 

James Trimble, 

Deputy Sec'y. 

This has been copied from a history of General William McAlevy 
by the late Rev. J. M. Adair, who married Ruth Cummins, the General's 
great-granddaughter, and was written during 1898 or 1899. 



John and Rachel Sellers, emigrant founders of this 
SELLERS branch of the Sellers family, were born in Germany, 

coming to the United States after their marriage and 
settling in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. Later they moved to 
Dauphin county, where John Sellers plied his trade of blacksmith and 
prospered. He owned a good farm, and later in life, when the heavy 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 855 

work of a smith was beyond his strength, retired and managed that 
property until his death. He was a soldier of the war of 1812, a hard 
worker and good citizen. He reared a family of eight. 

(II) David, son of John and Rachel Sellers, was born near Round 
Top, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. He moved with his parents to 
Dauphin county, married there, and settled about one mile from the 
village of Dauphin. For thirty-one years he was engaged as a tanner 
with Mr. Robinson, then retired to a small farm he had bought, on 
which he lived until his death. He was a Republican in politics, and 
both he and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. He married Eliza McNeely, born in Dauphin county, daughter 
of John and Elizabeth McNeely, both born in Ireland, came to the 
United States, settling in Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, where they 
purchased a farm, on which they lived until death, leaving issue. Chil- 
dren of David and Eliza Sellers : William, deceased ; Lucretia, de- 
ceased ; Charles W., now living in Dauphin; Benjamin F., deceased; 
Jennie, deceased ; David Greenbanks, of whom further : Baal, now 
living in Harrisburg; Caroline, deceased; a child, died in infancy. 

(Ill) David Greenbanks, son of David and Eliza (McNeely) 
Sellers, was born near Dauphin, Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, July 
22, 1844. He was educated in the public school and remained at the 
home farm until sixteen years of age. In i860 he entered the employ 
of the Philadelphia & Reading railroad as brakeman, remaining one 
year. He was then employed on bridge construction until his enlist- 
ment in 1865, in Company A, loist Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Infantry. He was in service nearly a year, then received an hon- 
orable discharge. In the latter part of 1865 he entered the services of 
the Pennsylvania railroad as fireman, continuing as such for five years, 
finally in 1870 receiving his promotion to the coveted position on the 
right hand side of the cab. He was assigned to the freight service, 
continuing until 1909. when he was retired, being one of the oldest 
eno-ineers in the service of the company at the time of his retirement. 
He then retired to his fruit farm of thirty-five acres, purchased in 
1909 by Mr. Sellers and his son-in-law, George Edward Hess. The 
farm, located one mile west of Duncannon at Juniata Bridge, is a ver- 
itable bower of beauty, with its many rows of apple, peach, pear and 
cherrv trees in bloom and is a source of pleasure to its owners, as re- 



856 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

turns are received from the bountiful yield resulting. The best known 
methods of fruit culture have been employed, and so model an orchard 
is it that it is used by the State Board of Agriculture as one of its few 
demonstrating stations. The raising of garden produce is carried along 
with fruit culture, a ready market being found with the Pennsylvania 
railroad, furnishing their dining cars and commissary department with 
the delicacies of garden and orchard. Here after his many years of 
life spent on the gleaming rails, rushing his engine through sunshine 
and storm, through daylight and gloom, drawing the products of mine, 
factory, mill and farm to supply the needs of every clime, the veteran 
of forty-four years of faithful service spends his days in the peace, 
quiet and beauty of his own acres. He is a member of the Brother- 
hood of Locomotive Engineers, the Grand Army of the Republic; and 
both he and his wife are communicants of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

Mr. Sellers married, in 1873, Annie Taylor. Children: Ada, mar- 
ried George Edward Hess, now a partner with Mr. Sellers in the fruit 
farm at Juniata Bridge (see Hess family forward) ; Howard, deceased; 
Mary, resides in Harrisburg; Ruth, Mabel. 

(The Hess Line). 

George Edward Hess descends from German ancestors, early set- 
tlers in Marysville, Pennsylvania. His grandfather Hess was a lum- 
berman of Perry and Dauphin counties, also a veteran of the civil war. 
His wife Martha was also of German descent. 

Philip Hess, father of George E. Hess, born at Marysville, became 
a truck farmer, owning a farm of eighty-six acres just north of Harris- 
burg. He continued there for many years in successful business, sup- 
plying the Harrisburg and western markets on the Pennsylvania rail- 
road with the pnxlucts of his carefully cultivated fields. He finally 
retired to the village of Minnick, where he died August 24, 1899, aged 
about sixty-five years. He was a Democrat in politics, and both he and 
his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal church. He mar- 
ried Nannie Hight, born in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, who 
survives him, residing in Minnick. Her father was one of the early 
Pennsylvania railroad men, and rode with the first train that ever 
crossed the middle division of that road. Children : Anna, died ae-ed 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 857 

eighteen years; George Edward (of whom further) ; Frank, killed while 
in the employ of the Pennsylvania railroad, unmarried; William, a 
wholesale produce dealer on East Pratt street, Baltimore, Maryland, 
married Bess Wagner, and their children are Margaret Frances and 
Florence. 

George Edward, eldest son of Philip and Nannie (Hight) Hess, 
was born in Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, July 24, 1870. He was 
educated in the public schools and in a private school in Harrisburg, 
after which he entered the employ of the Pennsylvania railroad as 
freight brakeman. He was later advanced to the passenger service, 
and on May 13, 1906, was promoted to conductor. His run was No. 
1019 fast mail west, and No. 8 day express, East Altoona to Harris- 
burg. This continued until July 4, 1909, when he seized an opportunity 
to return to the business of his boyhood days, truck and fruit farming. 
He joined his father-in-law, David G. Sellers, then recently retired 
from the post of engineer with the Pennsylvania, in the purchase of the 
thirty-five acre tract at Juniata Bridge, which they have developed into 
one of the most productive and beautiful fruit farms in the state. An ex- 
perienced gardener, Mr. Hess has also developed a truck business as 
well, and supplied the restaurants and dining cars of the Pennsylvania 
system with the delicacies for which they are famous. His shipment of 
parsley alone is eighteen half-barrels weekly. A recently added feature 
of this wonderful little farm is a poultry department, with incubators 
brooders, and all the equipments of modern chicken raising. The fruit 
raised includes every variety that can be profitably grown in that climate, 
and so scientifically has the farm been arranged and the fruit cared 
for, that in its second year the State Board made it one of their demon- 
strating stations, and used it as an object lesson for fruit and truck 
farmers. 

Mr. Hess is a Republican in politics; was collector of taxes of the 
Fifth ward in Harrisburg, two years deputy sheriff under H. C. \\'^ells, 
and for one year in charge of the collection of city taxes. He ran for 
councilman for his ward and, although polling the largest vote of any 
candidate on the ticket, was defeated by one vote. He is a member of 
the Brotherhood of Railroad Conductors and of the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road Relief Association. Mr. Hess married, March i, 1894, Ada, 
daughter of David G. and Annie (Taylor) Sellers, and has a daughter, 
Esther. 



858 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

The paternal grandparents of the late Alhert Millar of 
MILLAR Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, were Henry and Mat- 

talina (Brenn) Millar, both born in Germany. His ma- 
ternal grandparents, John and Ann (Burns) McMullen, were of Scotch- 
Irish descent. 

(II) William D., son of Albert and Mattalina Millar, married 
Elizabeth McMullen, who bore him seven children. 

(III) Albert, sixth child of William D. and Elizabeth (McMullen) 
Millar, was born near the village of Gap, Lancaster county, Pennsyl- 
vania, March 16, i860, died in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, May 22, 
1906. When he was seven years of age his parents moved to Harris- 
burg, where he attended the public schools, his brilliant mental (luali- 
ties winning him the commendation and respect of his teachers and 
class mates. He was graduated from high school at the age of sixteen 
years, winning the honor of being Salutatorian of his class. Being 
compelled to earn his own living, he entered mercantile business as a 
clerk, but soon afterward became an employee of the Jackson Manu- 
facturing Company in their engine room. He soon won the 
attention of his employers, who, seeing the mettle of the lad, 
took him from the engine room and placed him in the office, 
where he again quickly demonstrated his ability, winning rapid 
promotion. He was later assigned to the office of the firm in 
Pittsburgh as bookkeeper, remaining two years. These years had lint 
strengthened his purpose, formed long before, to become a lawyer, and 
at the end of his two years in Pittsburgh he returned to Harrisburg 
and registered as a law student in the office of Joshua M. Wiestling, 
then one of the leading members of the Dauphin county bar. On Feb- 
ruary 13, 1884, after passing a creditable examination he was admitted 
to the l)ar and for one year practiced alone. He quickly gained a client- 
age and secured recognition from the older members of the bar by his 
conscientious and skilful handling of the cases entrusted to him. 
During his second year he was admitted to a partnership with Judge 
George Kunkel, later president-judge of Dauphin county, this associa- 
tion continuing until 1898, when Mr. Millar was elected district attorney 
for Dauphin county. He was thrice elected solicitor of the county and 
in 1894 was elected district attorney, continuing by re-election for two 
terms. On retiring from that office he was appointed by the town com- 




W^4^.^ ^-^'-^^c 



HISTORY OF THE JUXIATA VALLEY 859 

missioners, in 1904, continuing in that office until his death two years 
later. His private practice was largely in the appellate courts of the 
state and in the United States courts, he having been admitted to all 
state and federal courts of the district. His fame was not confined to 
Dauphin county, but he was frequently engaged in important litiga- 
tion in other counties. As an attorney he was learned in the law and 
skilful in its application, conscientious and faithful, keen of perception 
and a hard worker, giving his cases thorough preparation. Before a 
jury he was clear and forceful, presenting his facts in a clear, logical, 
convincing manner, trusting to the strength of his presentation, rather 
than to rhetoric — never seeking an opportunity to display his eloquence 
to dazzle a jury, but in well chosen language stating facts and prece- 
dents to jury and court. He was always courteous in all his dealings 
with the court and fair to his brethren of the bar, winning from 
judges and lawyers a confidence and esteem terminated only by death. 
As a prosecutor he was relentless with the guilty, but while giving them 
privileges accorded them by the law, always, if possible, brought them 
to conviction and punishment, ^\'hile stricken in the prime of life, he 
gained prominence at the bar and in public esteem that only falls to the 
lot of a natural leader. He was one of the most brilliant and prominent 
lawyers of that section and won his prominence fairly. 

Full as was his life and busily employed as he was in his legal 
business, he did not neglect his duties as a citizen, but took the deepest 
interest in the politics of his county and state. In fact, he made poli- 
tics his recreation, never being happier than when in the thick of a 
political fight on behalf of his friends. In his early life he engaged in 
these conflicts for pure love of the battle and never outgrew his genuine 
pleasure in campaigning, although not for personal gain. He wielded 
a large political influence. His resourcefulness, keen sense of humor 
and unswerving devotion brought to him a host of loyal and admiring 
friends from all walks of life. He was public spirited, interested in 
the cause of education and in the welfare of the community, and gave 
to the city a liberal donation of land for park purposes, in order that 
his fellow citizens might have adequate opportunity for recreation and 
enjoyment. His was an open-handed generosity, yet his charity was 
never ostentatious. Of him it may truly be said : "He was a friend 
of the people." A fair estimate of the life and character of the man 



86o HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

as a citizen is given in the loving tribute paid to him by his hfelong 
friend and former law partner, President Judge Kunkel, at the meeting 
of the Bar Association convened at the time of his death : 

'T have listened with extreme satisfaction to the kind tributes which 
love and friendship have paid to the memory of our departed friend 
and brother, and it is needless to say that in them I sincerely join. The 
life that has gone out I knew and loved. The attributes of his mind 
you have had an equal opportunity with me to know and admire, but, 
touching the qualities of the heart and soul, my long and intimate ac- 
quaintance with him have given me a truer knowledge and a fuller 
admiration. 

"The character of our friend can best be portrayed by reference to 
those qualities, which, though common to liuman nature, were singularly 
absent in him. He disdained show and ostentation. He was frank 
and open. He was unpretentious. He was without guile. He was 
incapable of pretence or simulation, and he sought to be taken for what 
he really was and for no other. But, remarkable above all else, he was 
a man in whom there was no envy. In this world of strife and conten- 
tion, where, in the struggle for preference and power, for wealth and 
station, this characteristic of human nature is displayed, he rejoiced in 
the success and advancement of others, friend or foe, and felt in no 
degree the sensation of envy's influence. 

"With these qualities there were combined in him unswerving loy- 
alty to friends and an unselfish and untiring activity for their interests. 
His course was one labor of friendship; his public and his private life 
one sacrifice for others. His stay here has been brief, but, in that brief 
period, he has spent the energy and achieved the success of many years. 

"To say his presence among us will be missed is to say what may 
be said of anyone, but to say his forceful influence in public life, his 
delightful companionship at the bar, and his unostentatious beneficences 
in private life will be missed, is to express in feeble and inadequate terms 
the deep and lasting impression his life and character have made upon 
his fellows. The body may decay, the physical presence of our friend 
and associate may pass from our view, but the delightful memories, 
which have entwined themselves about his strong personality, can never 
die. In this world of evanescent things these will remain." 

On September lo, 1902, Mr. Millar married Josephine B. ^^lichener, 
of Duncannon, Pennsylvania; children: Albert Elkin, born June 12, 
1903, and Josephine M., born August 23, 1906. After the death of 
her husband, Mrs. Millar returned to Duncannon with her children, 
and there resides, occupying her old home. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 86 1 

(The Michener Line). 

The first emigrant of this name to arrive in Pennsylvania from 
France settled at Plymouth, jMontgomery county, where he reared a 
family and lived until death. 

Eleazer Michener, his son, was born in Plymouth, which was his 
home until after his marriage and the birth of some of his children. 
About 1838 he moved to Penn township, Perry county, Pennsylvania, 
where he purchased and cultivated a farm until his death many years 
later. He married Mary Fye; children: Jonathan, a farmer, lived and 
died on the Perry county homestead farm ; Katherine, died young, un- 
married; Philip, a noted worker in the Lutheran church, died in Dun- 
cannon; Joseph, of whom further; Martha, died in December, 1912, 
unmarried; Eleazer (2), a veteran of the civil war; Doan, killed in a 
railroad accident; Lewis, died aged twenty-seven years; Washington, 
the only survivor (1913), lives in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Joseph, son of Eleazer Michener, was born in Montgomery county, 
Pennsylvania, in 1830, died in Duncannon, Pennsylvania, February 26, 
1907, aged seventy-seven years. He was in his ninth year when his 
parents moved to Perry county, and there he was educated and ever 
afterward lived. He was for many years a contractor and builder of 
Duncannon, later engaging there in the grocery business, and continu- 
ing until his death. He was an honorable, capable builder and a good 
business man. While raised in and always partial to the Lutheran 
church, he never formally connected with any religious body. He was 
a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the 
Knights of Pythias, holding the perfect esteem of his breth- 
ren. In political faith a Republican, he held several of the town 
offices. He married Margaret M. Mell, born in Petersburg (now 
Duncannon). Perry county, in 1836, died in Perry county, March 
10, 1912, aged seventy-six years, a member of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church. She was the daughter of .Adam and 
Agnes (Reed) Mell, both old settlers of Perry county. Adam Mell, 
of German parentage, lived in Duncannon and there died. His wife 
survived him many years until 1865. I)ut never remarried; children of 
Adam Mell: Matilda, married John Topley, and died in Duncannon; 
Sarah, married Joseph Waite, and died in New Buffalo ; John, a veteran 
of the civil war, died in Duncannon; Christina, married Theodore De 



862 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Normandie; Catherine, the only survivor, married Samuel Saul, and 
resides in California; Harvey, died in Harrisburg; Margaret M., mar- 
ried Joseph Michener, of previous mention; children: Edward, married 
Hannah Gross, and resides in Duncannon; Mary Agnes, married An- 
drew Shull, and resides in Harrisburg; Matilda, married Andrew 
George, and resides in Duncannon; Martha Ann, married William 
Owen, and resides in Duncannon; Josephine B. (of previous mention), 
widow of Albert Millar, resides in Duncannon in the home of her girl- 
hood; Anna D., married Frank Harper, and resides in Duncannon. 

Isaac Lawrence Goss. during his life, was one of the im- 
GOSS portant, progressive and successful business men of Mifflin 

county, Pennsylvania. He was descended from English 
ancestry, the name being a famous one to this day in England, where 
it is written Gosse, and to which belonged the eminent poet, Gosse. 
The first of the name to cross the Atlantic to America probably reached 
New York about 1740, possibly earlier. He drifted into Pennsylvania, 
settled there, and reared his family, all of whom became substantial 
citizens. 

(I) Jacob Goss, father of Isaac Lawrence Goss, was born in Snyder 
county, Pennsylvania, as was his wife, Sarah Stumpff. There they 
grew to maturity and married, making their first home in West Beaver 
township, Snyder county. He was one of the first wagonmakers in 
the county, and one of his specialties was the old fashioned "tar" 
wagon, which was universally used in that day. They lived in West 
Beaver until after the birth of their last child, when they moved to 
Mifflin county, bought land in Decatur township, cleared it, erected 
buildings, and put it under cultivation. From the first Mr. Goss was 
successful as a farmer, and he and his wife lived to an advanced 
age in the quiet surroundings of their home. They were both mem- 
bers of the German Reformed church, and in this faith reared their 
children. They ranked among the most respected members of the town- 
shi]x He was a Republican, and worked actively for its principles. 
Children: i. Margaret, widow of John Weader; makes home in Sny- 
der county. 2. George, lived and died in Adamsburg, Pennsylvania. 
3. John O., lived and died in Snyder county. 4. A boy, died in in- 
fancy. 5. Jacob Irvin, a retired farmer in Paintersville, Mifflin county, 



HISTORY OF THE JUXIATA VALLEY 863 

Pennsylvania. 6. William Howard, makes home in Paintersville. 7. 
Isaac Lawrence, of whom further. 8. Robert, died in infancy. 9. 
Jeremiah, died in Miliflin county. 10. Andrew, lives in Mifflin county. 

(H) Isaac Lawrence Goss, son of Jacob and Sarah (Stumpff) 
Goss, was born September 5, 1857, in West Beaver township, Snyder 
county, Pennsylvania. He received his education in the West Beaver 
township schools. On reaching his majority, with an axe as his sole 
personal possession, he went to a lumljer mill in Mifflin county, where 
he was engaged as a chopper. Later he bought a team and finally, by 
dint of economy, assisted by shrewd judgment, he engaged in the lumber 
business for himself, thus demonstrating his ability to overcome that 
great handicap, the want of capital with which to begin Inisiness. In 
1884 he formed a partnership with William Howard Goss, his brother, 
under the firm name of Goss Brothers, and they continued in the lum- 
ber business at Paintersville until the death of Isaac L., which occurred 
November 2, 1902. It had grown to large proportions and was extend- 
ing with each month. They owned several mills in Mifflin county and 
had extensive farming interests. In 1900 Mr. Goss erected a handsome 
home in Derry township, where he lived until his death. He was a 
Republican, working for the ticket in local, state and national affairs. 
He served one term as school director and one as supervisor, being 
the latter at his death. Like his parents, he was a member of the 
German Reformed church, as is his wife. 

He married Rebecca C. Kemberling, born in Mifflin county, Decatur 
township, a daughter of Robert and Sarah (Gibboney) Keml^erling, 
who were old time residents of Mifflin county. He was a veteran of 
the civil war, and a prosperous farmer. His children were: i. Pris- 
cilla, married Charles McElhoe, of Wagner, Pennsylvania. 2. Emma, 
deceased; married Adam Goss. 3. Rebecca C., married Isaac Lawrence 
Goss. 4. Child, (lied in liabyhood. 5. John, a railroad employee; 
died in German Hospital, Philadelphia. 6. Albert, lives in Lewistown ; 
is ex-sheriff of the county. 7. Lizzie, married William Steininger of 
Maitland, Pennsylvania. Both Mr. and Mrs. Kemberling were mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church. The death of Isaac Lawrence 
Goss was universally regretted by those who knew him, especially those 
with whom he had done business. He was one of the honest, con- 
scientious and upright citizens of his community, and was held in the 



864 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

highest esteem. Children: i. WilHam R., born 1879; died in infancy. 
2. James A., born November 27, 1881 ; lives in Maitland, Pennsylvania; 
married Sadie M. Hummel. He was educated in the common schools 
of Mififlin county and the Kutztown State Normal, from which he 
graduated with honors. Leaving school he taught seven years in Mifflin 
county, making for himself a reputation as an educator. Since 191 1 
he has engaged successfully in milling at Maitland. He has no chil- 
dren. 3. Sadie M., born May 6, 1883; married James L. Smith, a 
baker of Lewistown; one son, Russell. 4. Earl Woodford, born July 
5, 1886; married Ellen Yeatter; lives in Maitland; no children. 5. 
Jacob Howard, born November 20, 1890; unmarried; a miller by 
trade, and a partner of James A. Goss, the firm being known as J. A. 
Goss & Company. 6. Died unnamed. 7. Hettie Sophia; married 
Samuel Richard, of Maitland. 8. Sherman Harrison, a student at Mer- 
cersburg Academy. 9. Ruth Rebecca, at home with her mother. 



This branch of the Smith family descends from Andrew 
SMITH Smith, born in Switzerland, who early in life came to .this 

country, settling in Baltimore county, Maryland. He was 
a tailor by trade, but varied this with farming operations. His wife 
came from Germany when a young woman, working for two years after 
her arrival to pay her passage money, under a custom then much in 
vogue. 

(II) George, son of Andrew Smith, was born in Baltimore county, 
Maryland, where he grew to manhood and followed his father's trade 
of tailor. He married, in Queen Anne's county, Maryland, Mary Mani- 
nee, and later moved to Hopewell township, Huntingdon county, Penn- 
sylvania, where he still followed his trade. In the fall of 18 12 he 
bought a farm of one hundred and forty acres, where Cassville now 
stands, there built a log house, and resided until 1829, his sons cultivat- 
ing the farm and the father working at his trade. In 1829 he sold his 
farm and moved to Tod township, where he bought ninety-eight acres 
which he improved and thereon passed the remainder of his life, and 
died in December, 1839. He was a Whig in politics, and a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. His wife, Mary Maninee, was born in 
Maryland, of French parentage, died in Cass township, Huntingdon 
county, in 1855; children: Eliel; William, died in Huntingdon county, 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 865 

Pennsylvania; Daniel, died in West Virginia; Sarah; Levi, of whom 
further; George, died in Trough Creek VaUey; Jesse P., born March 9, 
18 12, married Susan Gherrett; Andrevi^; Isaac, died in Kansas; Ehza- 
beth S., married Samuel Miller, and died at Mount Union, Pennsyl- 
vania; Barton; Mary M., and one died in infancy. 

(Ill) Levi, son of George and Mary (Maninee) Smith, was born in 
Hopewell township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, about the year 
1808, died from the effects of an accident, at his farm in Union town- 
ship, Huntingdon county, in 1873. He always followed the occupation 
of a farmer, settling after his marriage in Union township. His school- 
ing was in the old Stever school, in Cass township, where for a month 
or two each year he sat on rough pine slab seats, studying his book by 
light admitted through the paper covering the window openings. After 
his settlement in Union township he became duly prosperous, and was 
highly respected in his community. He held various township offices, 
and was a devout Methodist, being class leader, a teacher, and superin- 
tendent of the Sunday school. In political belief a Whig, he joined with 
the Republican party when the old party passed out of existence. He 
married Mary, daughter of Samuel (2) Pheasant, who when a young 
man came from Maryland, settling on a farm of sixty acres in Trough 
Creek Valley, which he purchased and improved. He added to his 
original farm by purchase, and there successfully engaged in farming 
and stock raising until his death, October 30, 1 871, at the age of seventy- 
eight years. 

He was held in high esteem, and was chosen by his neighbors 
for the offices of tax collector, supervisor and school director. He 
was an active, devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
which he served as class leader and trustee. Samuel Pheasant married 
(first) Annie Snyder, who died at the homestead in Trough Creek Val- 
ley, September 22, 1853, aged fifty-eight years. He married (second) 
Mary Baumgardner. Mary, the eldest daughter of Samuel Pheasant by 
his first wife, married Levi Smith (of previous mention). Samuel 
was the son of Samuel Pheasant, of Sheffield, England, who to escape 
military service was smuggled in a barrel on board a ship bound for 
America. He landed in Baltimore, settling in Queen .•\nne's county, 
Maryland, where he married, and there his son Samuel (2) was born. 
Two of the eleven children of Samuel Pheasant by his first wife are yet 



866 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

living — Samuel, a farmer of LJnion township; and Christian, living in 
Trough Creek Valley. Mary Pheasant Smith died in 1910, aged ninety- 
three years two months and three days, having been a widow for thirty- 
eight years. Both she and her husband are buried in Mapleton ceme- 
tery. 

Children of Levi and Mary (Pheasant) Smith: i. Samuel Pheas- 
ant, of whom further. 2. George, a physician, died in HoUidaysburg, 
Pennsylvania. 3. John, a farmer, died in Huntingdon county. 4. Annie, 
married Abram Swope. 5. Rosa Belle, married Joseph Pheasant, whom 
she survives, a resident of Lincoln, Nebraska. 6. Elizabeth, married 
John Bookheimer, and resides in Tyrone, Pennsylvania. 7. David, 
killed in a railroad accident. 8. James, a physician, died in Tyrone, 
Pennsylvania. 9. Miles, now living in Huntingdon county. 10. Abra- 
ham, killed in the battle of the Wilderness. 11. Isaac, now living in 
Manhattan, Kansas. 12. Mary, died in Kansas; married William Chil- 
coot. 13. Leonard, now a farmer on the old homestead. 

(IV) Samuel Pheasant, eldest son of Levi and Mary (Pheasant) 
Smith, was born in Union township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, 
September 3, 1832. He attended the public schools, finishing his studies 
at Cassville Seminary. He grew to manhood on the home farm, and 
there became proficient in the occupation he ever followed — farming. 
After his marriage he purchased a farm of one hundred and twenty 
acres in Union township, where he built a fine home and otherwise im- 
proved. In 1859 he sold his farm and moved to Huntingdon, to fill 
the office of county commissioner, to which he had been elected. After 
his term expired he returned to the farm in Smith Valley, where he 
resided until 1895, when he sold and purchased another of three hun- 
dred and twenty acres in Brady township, where he conducted farming 
and stock raising operations until 1907, when he disposed of his farm 
property and moved to Huntingdon, where he now lives a retired life. 
He is a member of Mount Moriah Lodge, No. 300, Free and Accepted 
Masons, and of the Patriotic Order of Sons of America. He is a man 
of high standing in the community; was justice of the peace in both 
Union and Brady townships, in the latter serving in all township offices, 
and in 1881 was chosen county commissioner on the Republican ticket. 
He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and in his younger 
days took an active part in church affairs. 



HISTORY OF THE JUXIATA VALLEY 867 

He married, November 15, 1853, Catherine W., daughter of David 
and Isabella (Wright) Swope, of German descent. Children: i. Ralph 
P., born in Union township, Huntingdon county, September 7, 1854; 
a teacher in his youth; now a farmer of Cass township, where he has 
resided since 1872; married, September 10, 1872, Amanda Fisher, and 
has issue: Elmer, Lottie, Clem, Beulah, Denver and Carrie. 2. Isa- 
bella, married Madison Swope ; children : A. Dennis and ^lay. 3. 
Jane, married James Kidder, and resides in North Dakota; no issue. 
4. Josephine, married Milton JMierly, a farmer, and resides in Porter 
township, Huntingdon county; children: Mamie, Maud, Lillian, Oscar 
and John. 5. Harrison S. (Harry), of whom further. 6. Catherine, 
married Andrew Neff, and lives at Alexandria, Pennsylvania; by a 
previous marriage she has a son, Fred M. Laird. 7. Samuel, a farmer 
of the Kishacoquillas Valley; married Currie Bumgardner; 
children: Lloyd, Clair, Sam, Anna. Edith. Margaret, Alma. 8. 
Julia, married Charles Streightifif, and resides in Huntingdon ; no 
issue. 9. Edgar, a farmer of Alexandria, Pennsylvania ; married 
Rebecca Huly; children: Mary A., Cora, Edna and Samuel. At 
this writing (1913) Samuel P. Smith and his wife have fourteen grand- 
children. 

(V) Harrison S. (familiarly known as Harry), son of Samuel P. 
and Catherine W. (Swope) Smith, was born in Union township, Hunt- 
ingdon county, Pennsylvania, October 3, 1862. He was educated in the 
public schools, and remained at home as his father's assistant until he 
was twenty-one years of age. He was then for several years in the 
employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, continuing until 1897, 
when he was appointed guard at the Huntingdon State Industrial Re- 
formatory. In 1909 he was elected sheriff of Huntingdon county, an 
office he filled with credit and yet holds. He is a member of the Patri- 
otic Order of Sons of America and the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows of Huntingdon; is a Republican; and both he and his wife are 
members of the Reformed Church. 

He married. May i, 1884, May L., daughter of William and Mary 
(Helsell) Snowden, both born in Bedford county, Pennsylvania: chil- 
dren: Grace, born January 5. 1886, married Ray Goddard, a mechani- 
cal draughtsman, and resides in Alton, lUino.is; Ethel, Isabel and 
Robert, at home. 



868 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

The Garretts, of Lewistown, Pennsylvania, descend 
GARRETT from German ancestry, the emigrant, Jacob Garrett, 

coming at an early day, and settling in what is now 
York county, Pennsylvania. He was a farmer, married and left issue, 
including a son Jacob. 

(II) Jacob (2), son of the emigrant, Jacob (i) Garrett, was born 
in York county, Pennsylvania, there lived and died. He was a farmer 
of York county, but lived in the Juniata Valley for some time. He 
married and had issue, including a son John W. 

(III) John W., son of Jacob (2) Garrett, was born about 1812, 
learned the millwright's trade, and when a young man located in the 
state of Ohio. While dressing a mill-stone in a mill at Cincinnati, his 
home, he was crushed to death. John W. Garrett married Mary 
Shuhz, born in Juniata county, Pennsylvania, in 181 5, died 1892, 
daughter of John Shultz, a pioneer of the Juniata Valley, who had the 
following children: Christina, died in Huntingdon county, Pennsyl- 
vania, in her ninety-seventh year; Elizabeth, died in Lewistown, Penn- 
sylvania, aged eighty-five years; Mina, died aged eighty-eight; Mary, 
married John W. Garrett and died aged seventy-seven years; Hannah, 
died aged seventy-eight years; George, died in his ninety-ninth year. 
The average age of the six children was eighty-six years. John W. 
Garrett, at the time of his death, left an infant son, John S., of whom 
further. 

(IV) John S., only child of John W. and Mary (Shultz) Garrett, 
was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, April 26, 1843, 0"'y ^ ^^^ months prior 
to the accidental death of his father. His mother returned with her 
babe to Lewistown, Pennsylvania, where she lived with her father, John 
Shultz, until her marriage to Henry Kemerling, who died in 1865, leav- 
ing a daughter Margaret, now the widow of Henry S. Jacobs, of Perry. 
John S. Garrett attended the public schools in his early boyhood, but 
at the age of seven years drove a team on the tow path of the canal 
and continued a canal boatman until the war, working summers and 
attending school in the winter months. In 1861 he joined the second 
company of Logan Guards, later enlisting in Company A, 46th Regi- 
ment Pennsylvania Infantry. He served with credit until September, 
1864, then was honorably discharged at Atlanta, Georgia, returning to 
his home in Lewistown at once. He was in railroad employ a short 




d;(U^^.r>-^:fr 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 869 

time, then reenlisted at Philadelphia, March 6, 1865, in Company E, 
Third United States Volunteers, for one year, discharged March 6, 
1866, at Springfield, Illinois. He served during his military service 
with the Army of the Potomac, was with Sherman in the west, and 
engaged in the battles of Nashville, Chattanooga, Marietta, Reseca, 
Kenesaw Mountain, siege of Atlanta, and was within seven miles of 
Washington the night of President Lincoln's assassination, his regiment 
acting as guard over prisoners. After his final discharge Mr. Garrett 
returned to Lewistown and for two years again worked on the canal. 
He was then elected head constable of the township and appointed chief 
of police of Lewistown, serving six years. He was then in the employ 
of the Pennsylvania railroad for two years. In 1881 he was elected 
sheriff of Mifilin county, serving three years, returning to the railroad 
in 1885. Since that year he was continuously in the employ of the 
Pennsylvania railroad, up to 1913, when he was retired, his last capac- 
ity being joint yardmaster at Lewistown Junction. He resides in Lew- 
istown, where he erected, in 1884, a good home at the corner of Wayne 
and Fifth streets. He is a Democrat in politics; a member of Lewis- 
town Lodge, No. 97, Independent Order of Odd Fellows; Improved 
Order of Red Men, Lodge No. 67; the Brotherhood of Railroad Train- 
men; Huling Post, No. 176, Grand Army of the Republic, and is an 
attendant of the Episcopal church. Mr. Garrett was for eleven years 
a member of the Pennsylvania National Guard, connected with the 
Fifth Regiment, as private, sergeant, lieutenant, captain and lieutenant- 
colonel. Mr. Garrett has the record of never having tasted any kind 
of intoxicating liquor in his life. 

He married, December 25, 1867, Mary E. Peters, born in Mifflin 
county in 1850, daughter of Daniel and Rachel (Jones) Peters. Daniel 
Peters died in 1896, aged about eighty years; his wife died September 7, 
1872, aged forty-seven years. The family, after their father's death, 
moved to Clyde, Sandusky county, Ohio. Daniel and Rachel Peters 
had thirteen children, four now living: Frank, Leonard. Solomon and 
Mary E. Children of John S. and Mary E. (Peters) Garrett: i. 
William H., born November 12, 1868, died May 16, 1869. 2. Oliver 
Perry, born March 13, 1870, married Lila Owens, and has children: 
Joseph Shultz, John Howard, Robert Hughes, Harry Owens, Oliver 
Perry (2), Richard Paul and Enslow Beale. 3. Samuel Henry, born 



870 , HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

August 31, 1872, died January 16, 1873. 4. John Lewis, born Decem- 
ber 4, 1873, married Harriet E. Briner, and has children: Charles 
Briner, John Shultz and Thomas Hooker. 5. Daisy Grace, born Feb- 
ruary 12, 1876, at home. 6. Elsie Piatt, born July 18, 1879, married 
Oliver P. Smith. 7. James Albert, born May i, 1881, married Elva 
Crissman, and has children: Esther C. and Catherine Elizabeth. 8. 
Edward Smith, born January 8, 1883, died February 13, 1884. 9. 
Anna Webb, born August 15, 1884, died January 20, 1889. 10. Rufus 
Elder, born November 16, 1886, married Bessie Thornburg, and has: 
Mildred, Elizabeth and Margaret Robinson. 11. Mary Elizabeth, born 
February 11, 1888, married Harry C. Stuck, and had child, John Gar- 
rett. 12. Catherine Strang, born July 16, 1890, married Harold Law- 
rence Wampole. and has Elizabeth Garrett. 13. Robert Jacobs, born 
January 16. 1895, died May 7, 1898. 



One of the first of Ireland's sons to come to America 
MILLER was Matthew Miller, the founder of the Miller family 

in Pennsylvania. Coming from Donegal county, Ire- 
land, soon after the revolution, he settled in Juniata county, then mov- 
ing to Huntingdon county and there purchasing a large farm in Miller 
township. This was all virgin forest, and before a building could be 
raised, the mighty work of reclaiming the land from Nature's sway 
had to be performed. No buzzing-toothed wheel could be used here, 
no power could be utilized but that in the strong right arm, and for 
weeks the only sound rising above the low rustling murmur of the 
forest was the steady ring of axe upon wood. Here in the home he 
had made for himself in the country he had adopted as his own Mat- 
thew Miller died at the marvelous age of one hundred and ten years. 
His wife, Mary (Dunn) Miller, died there, also, at the advanced age 
of ninety-five years. Both had been lifelong members of the Presby- 
terian church. Children: i. Margaret, born in Ireland, died in Hunt- 
ingdon county, Pennsylvania ; married Robert Stewart. 2. James, born 
in Pennsylvania, died in Ohio. 3. David, died in Huntingdon county. 
4. Samuel, of whom further. 5. Thomas, died in Huntingdon county. 
6, Jfihn. a Methodist minister, died in Baltimore, Maryland. 

(II) Samuel, third son and fourth child of Matthew and Mary 
(Dunn) Miller, was born in Huntingdon coimty, Pennsylvania, in 1791, 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 871 

died there 1855. He inherited a large portion of the old homestead 
and spent his entire life thereon. When his sons attained man's estate 
he turned the entire care of the farm over to them and a few years 
later retired. He was a Democrat in politics. He married, October 
3, 1816, Charlotte GraiTfius, born in Huntingdon county, January 31, 
1794, died April 11, 1877, daughter of Nicholas, born 1746, died 1822, 
and Elizabeth Graffius, born 1753, died 1845, natives of Germany, who 
emigrated about 1800 and settled in Huntingdon county. Children of 
Samuel and Charlotte (Graffius) IMiller: i. Graffius, a merchant, sher- 
iff, and assistant judge of courts of Huntingdon county; born July 14, 
1817, died in Huntingdon, 1885. 2. Matthew, a physician of McAl- 
veys Fort: born March 4, 1819, died December 6, 1884. 3. James, 
born May 4, 1821, died November 19, 1894. 4. Jacob C, a farmer; 
born June 10, 1823, died June 9, 1898. 5. John S., a hotel proprietor 
of Huntingdon ; born October 6, 1825. 6. Abraham, a farmer of Hunt- 
ingdon county; born February, 1828, died September 2, 1895. 7- Ben- 
jamin F., a physican; born April 16, 1830, died in Fairmont, West Vir- 
ginia, January 29, 1855. 8. Samuel, born July 3, 1833, died March 15, 
1861. 9. David P., of whom further. 

(Ill) David P., son of Samuel and Charlotte (Graffius) Miller, 
was born in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, October 6, 1836. Hav- 
ing received a thorough preliminary education, at the age of twenty- 
six he began the study of medicine in the office of his brother Mat- 
thew, later entering Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, whence 
he was graduated in 1864. Recognizing the great need of surgeons in 
the military service of that time, he at once enlisted and was stationed 
as assistant surgeon in a hospital at Washington, D. C. During the 
winter of 1864-65 he was on duty on a hospital steamer, and was re- 
tained until the last patient had been removed from Dupotfield Hospital 
at City Point, when he entered Columbia College Hospital at Washing- 
ton, remaining there until July, 1865. Returning to Huntingdon he 
began practice there, continuing until 19 10, when he retired, having 
completed nearly half a century of continuous and active practice. He 
was a member of the County, State and American Medical associations, 
and fraternally is connected with the Mount Moriah Lodge, No. 300, 
Free and Accepted Masons, and Standing Stone Chapter, Royal Arch 
Masons. In politics he is a Democrat. 



872 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

He married, September 20, 1880, Alice C. Anderson, died July, 
1897, daughter of John P. and Margaret Anderson, natives of Hunt- 
ingdon county, Pennsylvania. Child of David P. and Alice C. (An- 
derson) Miller: Charlotta, educated at Oilman school for girls, Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts. 



The Watts family, of Belleville, Pennsylvania, descend 
WATTS from the English family of that name that has produced 

so many men famous in art. science and religion, includ- 
ing Rev. Isaac Watts, an English independent minister and hymn 
writer, born July 17, 1674; Alaric Alexander Watts, a journalist and 
poet; George Frederick Watts, a painter and sculptor; Henry Watts, a 
noted chemist, and others. In the United States a well-known public 
character was Thomas Hill Watts, born 18 19, died 1892, a lawyer and 
statesman of Alabama. He exerted himself continually to keep his 
state from seceding, but later joined with the Confederacy and served 
as colonel of the Seventeenth Regiment, Alabama Infantry, but in 1862 
was chosen as attorney-general in the cabinet of Jefferson Davis. In 
1863 he was elected governor of Alabama, serving until the close of 
the war. 

The history of this branch begins with Samuel Watts, born in Eng- 
land prior to the year 1700, settling in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, 
where he followed the occupation of a farmer. He married and reared 
a family, including a son Thomas. 

(II) Thomas, son of Samuel Watts, was born in England, came to 
Pennsylvania with his father, and became a farmer of Caernarvon 
township, Lancaster county. He married Maria Snyder, of Swiss 
parentage, and both died in Lancaster county. Children; i. George, 
married and moved to Holmes county. Ohio, where he has descendants. 
2. Philip, twice married, moved to the Kishacoquillas Valley, and left 
two children : Franklin, who became a priest of the Roman Catholic 
church, and Sarah, who became a Sister of Charity, going to an institute 
in Paris. 3. Samuel, of whom further. 4. Catherine, married (first) 
a Mr. Lapp, (second) a Mr. Silknitter. 

(III) Samuel (2), son of Thomas and Maria (Snyder) Watts, was 
born in Fairville, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, June 22, 1822. He 
was educated in the public school and remained at home as his father's 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 873 

assistant until 1840, when he came to Belleville to become a clerk in the 
store of his uncle, Daniel Overholtzer. He continued his studies under 
private tuition, at the same time, but later returned to his father's home, 
where he found means to acquire a thorough education, attending the 
academy at New London Cross Roads, Chester county. There he had 
as classmates two men later famous in Lancaster county. J. Smith 
Frithy and Robert Emmet Monaghan. Again he returned home and 
studied under private tutors at New Holland. He next established a 
private school near his home, where he taught for several years. In 
1844 he began his long and successful career as merchant and financier. 
He first opened a store at Galtsville, Lancaster county ; later established 
in the flour and feed business at Pottsville, Schuylkill county. In 1850 
he exchanged his Pottsville store for that of his uncle, Daniel Over- 
holtzer, in Belleville, Alifilintown, taking possession in 1851. Although 
starting with little capital, he so used his powers of youth, perseverance, 
economy and business acumen, that he became one of the most substan- 
tial and useful men of his borough. As his business grew he enlarged 
and expanded in many ways. He was one of the principal organizers 
of the Kishacoquillas Valley Railroad Company, and aided largely in 
the construction of that road in 1892, and was its first president. He 
was also one of the organizers and a charter member of the Kishacoquil- 
las Mutual Fire Insurance Company: charter member of the East Kisha- 
coquillas Turnpike Company ; a director and for several years its presi- 
dent. He was one of the leading incorporators of the Reedsville Na- 
tional Bank; its first president, serving until his death. He was also an 
organizer and president of the Farmer's National Bank of Belleville and 
of the Citizens' National Bank of Lewistown, filling these responsible 
positions with honor and credit until his death. He aided in the im- 
provement of Belleville, by the erection of several modern residences, 
and also made large investments in farm lands in Iowa, South Dakota 
and Illinois, placing these in charge of his son, Samuel Henry Watts. 
He abandoned mercantile life in 1895, then devoted himself to the in- 
terests of the banking institutions over which he presided. Both he 
and his wife were devoted members of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and generous contributors to all churches, regardless of creed. He was 
very liberal in his own church and a willing worker. He built the 
present Methodist Church at Belleville, and presented it to the congre- 



8/4 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

gation, and there with them worshiped and labored for the cause of 
rehgion until his death. In politics he was an ardent Republican, deeply 
interested in public affairs, but never sought or accepted ofBce for him- 
self. While Mr. Watts' life was an eminently successful one, he did 
not gain prominence by favor. He faced many discouragements and 
dii^culties that would have defeated a less resolute, determined man, 
and fairly won the high standing he attained. When wealth was gained 
he used it justly, and there was never a man to say it was not fairly 
won. He aided in every public enterprise presented to him and much 
of the prosperity of his section of Mifflin county can be traced to his 
initiative or cooperation. Samuel Watts married, February, 1852, Ma- 
ria, daughter of John and Margaret (Kurtz) Overholtzer, and grand- 
daughter of Jacob Overholtzer, of Lancaster county. Children: i. 
Elizabeth, died October 4, 1854, aged four months. 2. Martin O., de- 
ceased. 3. Samuel Henry, now living in Iowa. 4. James Kurtz, a 
farmer of Belleville, Pennsylvania. 5. Mary Elizabeth, married Wil- 
liam H. Oldt, whom she survives. 6. Levi Metzler, a traveling sales- 
man of Belleville, married, October 28, 1896, Sue Stroup, daughter of 
Samuel and Sue (Stroup) Killian. 7. John, of whom further. 8. Isaac 
Sturk, educated in the public schools, now member of the firm of Watts 
Brothers and interested in other Belleville business concerns. 

(IV) John, son of Samuel and Maria (Overholtzer) Watts, was 
born in Belleville, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, November 12, 1866, 
now member of the firm of Watts Brothers, of Belleville. He was edu- 
cated in the public school and began business life as clerk in his father's 
store. In 1895, in company with his brother Isaac, under the firm 
name Watts Brothers, he succeeded to the mercantile business founded by 
Daniel Overholtzer and conducted by Samuel Watts since 185 1 in Belle- 
ville. The business, general merchandise, under their management has 
prospered and increased, both partners being able, energetic men of 
affairs. John W'atts is also a director of the Farmers' National Bank 
of Belleville, and interested in other lines of business activity, including 
the senior membership of the firm Watts & Yoder. extensive grain 
dealers and millers of Belleville. He is a Republican in politics, but has 
never accepted public office; belongs to Belleville Lodge, No. 302, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, and is a communicant of Belleville 
Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Watts is unmarried. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 



^/o 



The Vuille family, of Huntingdon, descends from a 
VUILLE French Huguenot ancestor who fled to Switzerland when 

religious liberty was denied him in France by the revoca- 
tion of the Edict of Nantes. This record dates to Onesime Vuille, a 
descendant of the French Huguenot emigrant. Onesime Vuille was a 
watchmaker, and had a shop at Locle, in that part known as French 
Switzerland. He was active in military affairs and was a leader in the 
demonstration against Napoleon when he attempted to invade Switzer- 
land. For his courage and determined stand he was presented with a 
medal by his grateful countrymen. He married Louise Emma Rosalie 
Perrnoud: children: Paul Emile, of further mention; Marie, married 
James Geneell, and resides at Lausanne, Switzerland; Elise, married 
Herman Vuille. came to the United States and settled in New York City 
and had children now living on Staten Island, New York. 

(II) Paul Emile, son of Onesime Vuille, was born in Locle, Switzer- 
land, was there educated, grew to manhood, and married. In 1881 he 
came to the United States, settling first in New York City. He later 
resided in Watertown and Fond Du Lac, Wisconsin, finally settling in 
Greentown, Pennsylvania, where he died. He was an expert watch- 
maker and the inventor of several attachments to watches that gave him 
a high standing in his trade. For many years he was connected with 
the Waltham Watch Company, and ranked as one of the masters in the 
delicate art he practiced. He became a naturalized citizen of the United 
States, and acted with the Republican party. Both he and his wife were 
members of the French Evangelical church (Presbyterian). He mar- 
ried (first) in Switzerland, Elise Girard, born in that country, died in 
the United States, in 1883. He married (second) Lisa Perrett, who 
for several years was instructor to the present Czar of Russia and his 
brothers and sisters. Children by first wife: i. Emile, now residing 
in Greentown, Pike county, Pennsylvania, on the old Vuille homestead 
farm; he is a prosperous farmer, prominent in political life and in edu- 
cational work. 2. Amelia, married Paul Heine, cashier of the banking 
firm of :\Iul]er. Schall & Company, No. 44 Wall street. New York City, 
a large and prominent German banking house ; they reside at Stapleton, 
Staten Island, New York, and have five children. 3. Emma, married 
Albert M. Price, and resides at Bushkill Falls, Pike county, Pennsyl- 
vania. 4. Charles A., of whom further. 



8-6 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

(III) Charles A., youngest son of Paul Emile and Elise (Girard) 
Vuille, was born in Locle, Switzerland, July 12, 1876. He was brought 
to the United States by his parents in 188 1, and obtained a good Eng- 
lish education in the schools of Hoboken, New Jersey, and New York 
City. He then took a course at the College of Arts, in Berlin, Germany, 
and on his return to the United States entered the Illinois College of 
Photography, at Effingham, Illinois. He practiced the latter art at 
Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, from 1890 until 1898 with success, but with 
the coming of the automobile became interested in that business. He 
first was a dealer in steam-driven cars, but with the development of the 
gas engine obtained the first county license to operate a gasoline-driven 
car ever issued in Pennsylvania. He obtained an agency for gasoline 
cars and entered that field, in which he was a pioneer, as he had been 
in the earlier steam car, both as driver and dealer. His first garage was 
a small building in the rear of No. 819 Washington street, where he 
remained ten years, selling in the first years two or three cars annually. 
Sales then rapidly increased until by 1908 he was selling one hundred 
cars annually. In 1908 he erected a modern garage and salesrooms, 
fifty by one hundred and twenty-five feet, at Nos. 609 and 611 Mifflin 
street, where he is now located. Since 1902 he has been the direct 
representative of the Cadillac car, which he now handles exclusively, 
being the third oldest dealer in the Cadillac organization. His territory 
covers the counties of Huntingdon, Blair. Mifflin, Center, Snyder, Juni- 
ata and Fulton, to cover which requires the services of ten men. His 
garage in Huntingdon is one of the largest and best equipped of any 
located between Harrisburg and Pittsburgh, and is the official "blue 
book" garage. Mr. Vuille is a capable business man, thoroughly un- 
derstands the automobile, and is held in high esteem b_y all who know 
him. Fie is a member of Brevard Lodge, No. 113, Free and Accepted 
Masons ; India River Chapter, No. 27, Royal Arch Masons ; the Knights 
of Pythias; the Independent Order of Odd Fellows; the Patriotic Order 
of Sons of America, and Royal Arcanum. He is a Republican in poli- 
tics, and a Presbyterian in religious faith; his wife is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. He has never accepted public office, but 
is interested in puljlic affairs and a warm friend of the cause of educa- 
tion. Himself a highly educated man, and speaking five languages, he 
realizes the benefits of education to a business man, as well as to the 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 877 

professional man. A pioneer in the automobile business in the Juniata 
Valley, he led where others are now eager to follow, but, with a firmly 
established reputation for honorable dealing, he now reaps the reward 
of his enterprise, far-sighted vision, and belief in a business held in low 
esteem when he first ventured into it. 

During the Spanish-American war, in 1898, Mr. Vuille enlisted as 
a member of Company A, Fifth Illinois Regiment, and served to the 
close of the war. He reenlisted in Company A, Fifth Regiment, Penn- 
sylvania National Guards, and was commissary sergeant. 

Mr. Vuille married, June 5, 1901, Juniata E. Eby, born in Hunting- 
don county, daughter of Samuel Eby, a prominent member of the Ger- 
man Baptist church, and for many years a trustee of Juniata College. 
Children: Alice, born August 16, 1903; Ruth, April 16, 1905; Samuel, 
August 12, 1907; James, March 16, 1909. 



The founder of this branch of the Beers family in Penn- 
BEERS sylvania was Andrew Beers, a native of Ireland, where his 

early life was spent. After his marriage he came to the 
United States, settling near Concord, in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, 
there engaged in farming. After the death of his wife he returned to 
Ireland, where he married (second) a Miss Anderson, whom he brought 
back to Franklin county with him. He had issue by both wives, and 
founded a numerous influential family. 

(II) Joseph B., youngest son of Andrew Beers and his second wife, 
was born near Concord, Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 18 16, died 
in Marysville, Perry county, December 2, 1889. He attended the com- 
mon schools of that neighborhood, and grew to manhood on the home 
farm, and learned the art of tanning leather. After his marriage he 
moved to Horse Valley, Toboyne township. Perry county, where he 
purchased a tract of three hundred acres, seventy-five of which was 
cleared. He remained on his farm until 1863, cleared the balance of 
his acres, erected new buildings, and prospered. In 1863 he moved to 
New Bloomfield, Perry county, where for one year he was engaged as 
a tanner with S. A. Peale. In 1864 he moved to McVeytown, Mifflin 
county, Pennsylvania, where for about three years he engaged in tlie 
tanning business with Samuel Myers. Fie then became owner of some 
excellent medical formulas, and for eighteen years was successfully en- 



878 , HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

gaged in the manufacture of "patent medicines." His best-known prep- 
aration was "Beers' Famous American Liniment," widely known in the 
Juniata and Susquehanna valleys as a sovereign remedy for colds, head- 
aches, etc. Later in life he retired and spent his declining years with 
his son, John W. Beers, in Marysville, Pennsylvania. Both he and his 
wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal church. In politics he 
was an ardent Republican, but never accepted public office. 

j\Ir. Beers married, in Perry county, Anna Kelley, born in Franklin 
county', July 23, 1817, died at the residence of her son in Marysville, 
March i, 1895, daughter of John and Margaret Kelley. John Kelley 
was born on the Isle of Jersey, one of the group of islands lying in the 
English channel off the northwest coast of France. He came to the 
United States, settling in Horse Valley, Perry county, Pennsylvania, 
where he became a landowning farmer. He was a strict member of 
the Presbyterian church, and every Sunday walked the five miles from 
his home to the nearest church of his faith. His wife, a Miss Scyoc, 
bore him eight children, all now deceased. Children of Joseph W. and 
Anna Beers: i. Andrew Jackson, born October 19, 1846, now residing 
near McVeytown, Mifflin county, a farmer. 2. John Wesley, of whom 
further. 3. Margaret E., born March 26, 185 1, died August 29 fol- 
lowing. 4. Joseph Alexander, born March i, 1853; a tool sharpener 
with the Pressed Steel Car Company, now residing at McKees Rocks, 
Pennsylvania. 5. Sarah E., born September 13, 1855, died September 
18, 1856. 6. Cambridge Graham, born November 2, 1857, now residing 
in Sunbury, Pennsylvania ; a railroad engineer. 

(Ill) John Wesley, second son of Joseph B. and Anna (Kelley) 
Beers, was born in Horse Valley, Toboyne township. Perry county, 
Pennsylvania, December 27, 1848. He was educated in the public 
schools of the township, and Bloomfield Academy. About 1864 he be- 
gan business life as a newsboy on the trains, then became interested in 
telegraphy, but, after learning that art and working for the Pennsyl- 
vania railroad for a time, abandoned it for a clerkship in a general store 
at Mattawana, Mifflin county. In 1869 he entered the employ of the 
Pennsylvania railroad at Altoona, first as a laborer, but soon becoming 
foreman in the maintenance of way department. On July 5, 1870, he 
was transferred to Marysville as foreman of the quarry owned by the 
company. In 1872 he was sent to Bedford, Pennsylvania, as foreman, 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 879 

but soon afterward was made conductor of a construction train. On 
March i, 1873, he was returned to [Marysville as foreman of subdivision 
No. 4, a position he fiUed until his resignation, January i, 18S1. In 
November, 1880, he was elected sheriff of Perry county for a term of 
three years. At the expiration of his term of office he entered the 
employ of the Bell Telephone Company, at jMarysville, being connected 
with their suit for patent rights for three years. In 1887 he engaged 
in the flour, feed and grain business in Marysville, as senior membep 
of the firm of Beers & Heisley. In 1891 he sold his interest in that 
business, and until 1903 was successfully engaged in lumbering opera- 
tions in Perry and Dauphin counties. He did a large business, the 
timber from his mills being largely disposed of to railroad companies. 
In 1897 he was appointed postmaster at jMarysville, and has served un- 
der successive appointments until the present time, his present term 
expiring March 4, 19 16. During this period the office has advanced 
from fourth to third class, and is headquarters for several rural de- 
livery routes. 

In July, 1895, ^I'"- Beers was, with H. M. Horner, one of the in- 
corporators of the Marysville Water Company; was elected its first 
treasurer and still holds that position. In 1897 he again joined with 
Mr. Horner in the organization of the Marysville Electric Light, Heat & 
Power Company, was elected its treasurer and still serves in that ca- 
pacity. Later Mr. Beers purchased Mr. Horner's interest in both 
companies. In 1906 he assisted in the organization of the First Na- 
tional Bank of Marysville; was chosen first vice-president, and now 
holds that office. In 1908 he was one of the organizers of the Eastern 
Perry County Telephone Company, and since 1909 has been president 
of that prosperous, growing company. 

During his useful, busy life, Mr. Beers has not only been the suc- 
cessful business man. but in public life, in fraternal life, and in the 
church has borne well his part. In 1877 he made his entrance into 
public life as the Republican candidate for sheriff of Perry county, los- 
ing the verdict at the polls by only nine votes. In 1880 he was again 
the nominee of his party and was elected. He filled the office well and 
faithfully, retiring with the good wishes of the judges and court officials 
with whom much of his business was necessarily transacted. As post- 
master for sixteen years he has given abundant satisfaction, both to 



88o HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

the patrons of the office and to the department at Washington. His 
public service also includes several terms as school director, where his 
interest in the cause of education has been of value. His fraternal or- 
ders are : Perry Lodge, No. 458, Free and Accepted Masons ; Newport 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; Beulah Lodge, No. 269, Knights of 
Pythias; and both he and his wife are active members of the Lutheran 
church. 

Mr. Beers married, in Lewistown, Pennsylvania, September 16, 
1873, Rebecca E., daughter of Samuel and Martha Kauffman. Chil- 
dren: I. Joseph C, born November 27, 1874; now a plumber and elec- 
trician of Marysville; he married (first) Mattie Rupley, who bore him 
Leah and John Wesley (2) ; he married (second) Jennie Sellers, and 
has a son Ernest. 2. Pearl, born December 4, 1876, who resides with 
her father, the widow of H. C. Hippie ; children : Victoria and Theo- 
dore, the latter deceased. 3. Walter B., born October 14, 1879, now 
living in Conneaut, Ohio, in the employ of the Lake Shore & Michigan 
Southern Railroad Company; he married Virginia Ellenberger, and has 
a son. 4. Albert W., twin of Walter B., also resides in Conneaut, in 
the employ of the Nickel Plate railroad ; he married Edna Groninger. 



Stephen J. Boyd, of Marysville, Pennsylvania, a member 
BOYD of an influential and prominent family of the state of Penn- 
sylvania, is of clean Scotch-Irish descent. The emigrant 
member who founded the family in America was born in county Antrim, 
Ireland, about 1690, and about 1730 sailed with his family to the New 
World, landing most probably in New York. He later made his way 
into Pennsylvania, and there lived and died. He was of staunch Pres- 
byterian stock, and it was perhaps on account of his religious predilec- 
tions that he left his native land to try his fortunes in a new and wild 
one. Among his children was John, of whom further is to be found 
below. 

(I) John Boyd, son of the Irish emigrant, was born in county An- 
trim, Ireland, in 1721. When quite a lad he accompanied his parents 
and the rest of the family to this country, and with them located in 
Drumore township, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. lie was reared 
on the Boyd farm, which had been reclaimed from the wilderness, and 
received such education as the times afforded. Like his father, John 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 88i 

Boyd was a farmer, taking up wild land, clearing and improving it. 
He married a daughter of a neighbor, after which he moved to L'each 
Bottom township, York county, and there lived and died. Among his 
children was John Jr., of whom further. 

(II) John Boyd Jr., son of John Boyd, was born in Peach Bottom 
township, York county, Pennsylvania. He was reared on the farm, 
and remained a farmer throughout his life. He was a soldier of the 
revolution, being a member of a Pennsylvania regiment of volunteers 
to join the Continental army, as is duly listed in the roster of the Penn- 
sylvania companies. He was a man of importance in his township and 
county, was a justice of peace for many years, and, like his forbears, 
was a staunch member of the Presbyterian church and actively supported 
it throughout his life. He married Nancy Sample, of an old and dis- 
tinguished family of York county, Pennsylvania. Among his children 
was John, of whom further. 

(III) John Boyd, son of John and Nancy (Sample) Boyd, 
was born in York county, Pennsylvania. He was an extensive land 
owner and a progressive farmer of York county, where he had located 
on reaching his majority. He was much interested in all matters per- 
taining to education and religion, and assisted by all means in his power 
in the establishment of public schools in his township; and he actively' 
supported the Presbyterian church, of which he was a devout and con- 
sistent member. During the earlier years of his life he voted with and 
worked for the ^^'hig party, but on the organization of the Repul)lican 
party he became one of its most ardent advocates and voted with it until 
his death. He married Martha J. Farmer, the daughter of a neighbor. 
Children: i. Stephen, born in York county, Pennsylvania; a Repulili- 
can in politics, was nominated and elected to the state legislature on 
that ticket, where he served his county faithfully and well; was also 
superintendent of York county, and one of llie chief contractors and 
builders of the Southern Pennsylvania railroad. 2. William, an attor- 
nev and civil war veteran; died in 1873. 3. Nathaniel W., of whom fur- 
ther. 4. John C, a veteran of the civil war, a retired farmer in York 
county. 5. George \V., deceased, a physician. 6. Jane, widow of James 
Luney ; lives on homestead. 

(IV) Nathaniel W., son of John and Martha J. (Farmer) Boyd, 
was born June 23, 1843, in Peach Bottom township, York county, 



882 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Pennsylvania. He was educated in the public schools of the township, 
after which he settled on a farm in Peach Bottom township, where he 
farmed until he was twenty-six years old. Seeking other outlets for his 
ambition, he founded the Delta Herald, in Delta, which he ably con- 
ducted for six months as editor and proprietor, at the expiration of 
which time he disposed of the paper and all his interest in it and ac- 
cepted the position of assistant civil engineer on the force which sur- 
veyed what is now known as the Southern Pennsylvania railroad. He 
next entered the shops of the Pennsylvania Steel Company, of Steelton, 
Pennsylvania, to learn the manufacture of railway track appliances, and 
was soon promoted to the position of foreman of that department. In 
1886 he resigned from the Pennsylvania Steel Company and accepted 
the position of editor of the Steelton Advocate, which he held for six 
months. He organized the Boyd Switch Stand and Signal Company, 
for the manufacture of automatic switch stands of which he was the 
inventor and patentee, and became general manager of the company. 
He disposed of this advantageously in 1889 and moved to Carlisle, 
Pennsylvania, and became superintendent of the frog and switch works 
of the Carlisle Manufacturing Company, which was the principal com- 
petitor of the Pennsylvania Steel Company. On January i, 1897, he 
resigned to devote his entire time and attention to his personal business 
enterprises, which included the making and putting on the market of 
twenty patents for railway frogs and switches. Later in the year he 
accepted the superintendency of the New York Switch and Crossing 
Works at Hoboken, New Jersey, a position he held until his death, 
February 2, 1902. He was a Republican, voting with and working for 
the party. Both he and his wife were members of the Presbyterian 
church, and he was a Heptasoph and a member of the Grand Army of 
the Republic. On August 17, 1862, he enlisted in Company I, 130th 
Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and was sent to the front. 
He served until May 22, 1863, and was in the battles of Antietam, Fred- 
ericksburg and Chancellorsville. He married, December 6, 1866, Carrie 
M. Boyd, a second cousin, born August 4, 1843, in Drumore township, 
Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, daughter of S. W. P. and Mary (Mc- 
Conkey) Boyd. Mrs. Boyd died January 29, 1891. Children: i. 
Stephen J., of whom further. 2. Blanche I., died aged eleven. 3. Wil- 
liam B., an attorney at Steelton, and member of Dauphin bar. 4. Har- 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 883 

vey H., employed by United States government; resides in Washington, 
D. C. 5. Frank, died in infancy. 

S. W. P. Boyd, father of Carrie AI. Boyd, wife of Nathaniel W. 
Boyd, is also a descendant of the Scotch-Irish emigrant who landed on 
these shores in 1730. He was a man of influence and great prominence 
in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. He was a Republican, and was 
elected on that ticket, by an overwhelming majority, sheriff of Lan- 
caster. He was a large land owner and had a number of farms on 
which he raised stock for the market. Both he and his wife were mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian church. He married Mary iNIcConkey, of an 
old Pennsylvania family. Children: i. Jerry, a merchant in Lancaster, 
Pennsylvania. 2. Anna, deceased; married George Steineford. 3. Ida, 
married Kirk White, of Lancaster county. 4. Slater, clerk of court of 
Philadelphia county. 5. John O., deceased, a physician. 6. Harry, clerk 
in Pennsylvania Steel Company, Steelton, Pennsylvania. 7. Carrie M., 
married Nathaniel W. Boyd (see above). 8. jNIary Paulina, married 
Charles Powers, of Lancaster, Pennsylvania. 

(V) Stephen J., son of Nathaniel W. and Carrie 'SI. (Buyd) Boyd, 
was born June 27, 1869, in Delta, York county, Pennsylvania. He re- 
ceived his education in the public schools and the high school at Steel- 
ton, Pennsylvania. Having finished, he was employed in his father's 
frog and switch enterprises until the death of the latter. He was em- 
ployed by the switch department of the Pennsylvania Steel Company 
from 1899 until June 22, 1912, when he severed his connection with that 
company and moved to Marysville, Pennsylvania, where he purchased 
the Railroad Hotel, of which he has since been proprietor. He is con- 
sidered one of the best hotel men in that part of the state, and through 
his unfailing courtesy and geniality always has the nineteen rooms filled 
with guests, both transient and permanent. It was established about 
forty years ago, though the present building is new and up-to-date in 
every respect. He is a Republican, and served on the Steelton borough 
council for a time. He was reared a Presbyterian, but is not a member 
of the church. He is a Heptasoph. a charter member of the Steelton 
Club, and of the Knights of Pythias. 

He married, May 28, 1891, Pauline K. Dress, born in Dauphin 
county. Children: Nathaniel \V., a graduate of the Steeitf)n High 
School; Julia D. 



884 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

The earliest ancestor of this family in Pennsylvania was 
KNOX Exeter Knox, a blacksmith, who with his family resided at 

Blairs Mills, in Huntingdon county; by his wife Elizabeth 
he had live children, three sons, all of whom grew to maturity and 
married; and two daughters who remained unmarried. They were: 
John, of further mention; James, married Elizabeth Smith; Robert, 
married Mary Ann Sherer; Sallie and Ranie. The family was of Scotch 
descent. 

(II ) John, son of Exeter and Elizabeth Knox, was the eldest child 
of the family, and was born at Blairs Mills, Huntingdon county, where 
his parents resided for many years. He grew to maturity and became a 
blacksmith, like his father, passing all of his life on the place, and 
eventually dying there. He married Jean Briggs, also a resident of the 
county, and like himself a descendant of Scottish forefathers. They 
had a family of fifteen children, two of whom died young; the remain- 
ing thirteen were : James, married Cassius Zimmerman ; Ellen, married 
Sol Pertney; Elizabeth, married George Hutchen; Sarah, unmarried; 
John, of further mention; Nannie, married Jacob Keller; Mariah, mar- 
ried John Phillips; Margaret, married George Amy; Robert, married 
Nannie Ray; Julia, married John Stall; Henry, married Maggie Hut- 
chen; Alexander, married Sukie Wake; Pamelia. 

(III) John, son of John and Jean (Briggs) Knox, was born at 
Blairs Mills, and died October 4, 1907, at Lewistown, Mifflin county. 
He commenced life as a blacksmith, learning the trade with his father 
and working with him. Later on, however, he gave up this calling and 
became a laborer, removing to Lewistown about 1890 or 1891. He 
served about three years in the civil war, and was in politics a Democrat. 
He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, as was also his 
wife, who was a Miss Mary J. Kennedy; she was born also in Juniata 
county, near Blairs Mills, and was the daughter of James and Ruth 
(Kerald) Kennedy, of that county, of which they were natives and 
where they lived and died. Mr. Kennedy was a millwright, he and his 
wife having eight children: David, married Malie Griffin; John, mar- 
ried Lizzie Snipe; William, married Lizzie Smith; Smith, married Mary 
Yocum: Mary J., married John Knox; Margaret, married Samuel Elem; 
Sarah, married Sullivan Rambler; James, killed during the civil war. 
Mr. and Mrs. Knox had the following children : Jennie, married John 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 885 

Commer, a railroad conductor of Altoona, Pennsylvania ; Lucy, married 
William Rush, a carpenter and farmer of Granville, formerly of Al- 
toona; George, of further mention; John, married iSlaggie Roades, of 
Altoona; Robert, became minister of the Methodist church in Hunting- 
don county, and married Nannie Barrick; Maud, married Charley 
Roundtray, a landlord and butcher at State College; Nanny, married 
Harry Price, a mechanic at Lewistown; Adolphus, a heater at Altoona, 
married Mollie Steinbarger ; Homer, married Pearl Berlew, and became 
a Methodist minister at Lewistown ; William, an iron worker at Al- 
toona, married Sadie dinger. 

(IV) George, son of John and ]\Iary J. (Kennedy) Knox, was born 
December 5, 1869, at ^IcVeytown, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania. He 
worked on the farm as a boy and young man. receiving his education 
meanwhile in the district schools. At the conclusion of his studies he 
became a contractor and merchant, engaging also in lumbering and mill- 
ing; of late years he has devoted his time and energies chiefly to con- 
tracting and building. He has met with great success in his various 
business ventures, and owns a great deal of real estate and other prop- 
erty, having a number of farms which aggregate in all al)out five or six 
hundred acres. He has become one of the leading citizens of this place, 
and is influential in the Republican party, whose principles he warmly 
advocates. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church of Gran- 
ville, as is also his wife. 

He was married. May 27, 1891, to Miss Eliza Rittenhouse. who was 
born March 22, 1871, the daughter of George and Susan (Owens) 
Rittenhouse; her father is a farmer of Granville township. Mr. and 
Mrs. Knox have had the following children: Florence, born July 11, 
1892, died January 4, 1896; Charles, born November 29, 1893, died 
in infancy; Bertha, born June 7, 1894; Cartie, March 4, 1897; Anna, 
August 5, 1899; John, August 29, 1902; Lorna, June 2, 1904, died in 
August; Mary, October 5, 1906: Ruth, August 2. 1909. died in infancy. 



This branch of the Snyder family traces to a German 
SNYDER ancestor, who on coming to this country settled in Perry 
countv, Pennsylvania. He there engaged in farming 
until his death. He married and had issue, including a son George. 

(II) George Snyder was born in Liverpool, Perry county. Penn- 



886 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

sylvania, and died there, after a long life of usefulness. He learned 
the saddler's trade, also the art of tanning leather. He built a tannery, 
operated in part by steam, in the operation of which he was assisted by 
his son, Henry. He prospered in business and held high rank in his 
community. He married Matilda Spicer, and had issue: Henry Clay, 
of further mention; Simeon, a lawyer, who practiced in the west; 
John, a captain in the civil war, wounded at Fredericksburg, now de- 
ceased. 

(HI) Henry Clay, son of George and Matilda (Spicer) Snyder, was 
born in Perry county, Pennsylvania. He was educated in the public 
school, and for several years was associated with his father in the 
tannery, and later conducted the same business for himself. He de- 
veloped considerable talent as a musician and was locally famed as a 
teacher as well as a performer. He enlisted in the United States signal 
corps during the civil war, rose to the rank of captain, and served until 
the war closed. He was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, 
and his funeral services were conducted by U. S. Grant Post, of 
Chicago. He married (first) Emma Huggins, (second) Laura Jane, 
sister of his first wife; they were daughters of John Huggins, of Liver- 
pool, Pennsylvania, who also had sons : Charles, now living in Chicago, 
and Thomas, who settled further west. His third daughter, Kate, mar- 
ried John Dietrick, a blacksmith, of Liverpool, and a civil war veteran. 
Laura Jane (Huggins) Snyder survived her husband and was for many 
years postmistress at Liverpool. Children of second wife: Charles H., 
of whom further ; George, now a railroad employee, living in Philadel- 
phia. By his first wife he had a daughter Annie, who died young. 

(IV) Charles H., son of Henry Clay and Laura Jane (Huggins) 
Snyder, was born in Liverpool, Perry county, Pennsylvania, September 
i8, 1877. He was educated in the public schools, and for several years 
was in the employ of the Pennsylvania railroad. In the year 1900 he 
built and equipped a shirt factory at Liverpool, beginning with a few 
machines and employees. He prospered from the first and has contin- 
ually added to his equipment and force of workers until he now employs 
about sixty-five persons. His goods are well established in the market, 
the demand therefor at times exceeding the supply. His plant is modern 
and well conducted, Mr. Snyder giving his entire time and energy to its 
operation and to the two farms he owns nearby. He is a member of 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 887 

Lock Haven Lodge, No. 199, Free and Accepted Masons; Corinthian 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons ; the Commandery, Knights Templar ; Lulu 
Temple, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine (Philadelphia), and Lock Haven 
Lodge, No. 182, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. In political 
faith he is a Republican, and in religion is a Methodist. 

He married, June 12, 1902, Mary E., daughter of O. D. and Frances 
Wingert — he a merchant of Millerstown, Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. 
Snyder have one child, Frances Louise, born April 16, 1905. 

Robert Bruce Zimmerman, of Mifflintown, Mif- 
ZIMMERMAN flin county, Pennsylvania, typifies a successful 
American of the best type. Of good old stock, 
that has been planted in Pennsylvania for many generations, he is a part 
of the state, as well as county life. The original immigrant ancestor 
was from Germany, but the family records do not give his name. Like 
so many of his countrymen, he located in Pennsylvania, lived and died 
there, a tiller of the soil. 

(I) Jacob Zimmerman, a descendant of the above mentioned immi- 
grant, was born in Northumberland county, Pennsylvania. He married 
Jane Pratt Irwin, the daughter of a neighboring farmer. He came 
with his family to Juniata county in the early fifties, and was a post 
fence maker for a railroad company, and later moved to Perry county, 
now Newport, about 1881, where he died. His wife died in Juniata 
county in 1850. Among his children was Nathan H., of whom further. 

(II) Nathan H., son of Jacob and Jane Pratt (Irwin) Zimmerman, 
was born in Perry county in 182 1. He was educated in Perry county 
and came to Juniata county with his parents. Leaving school, he was 
apprenticed to a tanner and learned the trade thoroughly with Robert 
Moore, following that occupation until within a few years of his death, 
which occurred in March, 1886. He married Caroline Sample, born 
in Mifilin county. Pennsylvania, in 1821, near Greenwood, died July 4, 
1892. They were both members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Children: i. Robert Bruce, of whom further. 2. Thomas Irwin, of 
Altoona, Pennsylvania. 3. Rebecca Jane, married William E. Brown, 
of Milroy. 4. Rachel EHzabeth, died at the age of eighteen. 5. Lydia 
Ann, married Isaac Frymoyer, of Ephrata. Lancaster county, Pennsyl- 
vania. 6. Sarah Catherine, married John Parker, of Montana. 



888 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

(III) Robert Bruce, son of Nathan H. and Caroline (Sample) 
Zimmerman, was born May 19, 1850, at Oakland, Fayette township, 
Juniata county, Pennsylvania. He was reared on the farm and was 
educated in the public schools of the township and in a private seminary. 
He farmed many years, and purchased one hundred and twelve acres 
which he brought up to a high state of fertility and productiveness. He 
is an ardent Republican, and was elected on that ticket in 1909 as 
sheriff of Juniata county. During his incumbency of the office he has 
given universal satisfaction to his constituency. He moved, January i, 
1910, to Mifflintown, Juniata county, where he now resides. He and 
his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. He married, 
January 23, 1878, Ada J. Ranck, born in Walker township, Juniata 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1859, a daughter of Phillip and Nancy (Hawk) 
Ranck, of Juniata county. They have one son, Banks A., who was 
educated in the public schools, and on leaving took up the occupation 
of farming. He married Katherine Calhoun, daughter of ex-Sherifif 
James P. Calhoun, of Juniata county, of one of the prominent families 
of that section of the state; children: Mildred, James D., Gladys, Ira 
Brown, Robert Banks, Paul, and Samuel Franklin. 



The Moses family is very widely distributed throughout 
MOSES the United States, there scarcely being a state in the Union 

that has not one or more of the name within its borders. 
It has also furnished a number of bright men to the country, among 
whom may be mentioned Governor Moses, of South Carolina, who made 
history for that state during the reconstruction period soon after the 
civil war. Also, Bernard Mosps, an educator, writer and ripe scholar, 
who is the author, among other works, of "The Federal Government of 
Switzerland," which is generally accepted as a guide book by political 
students. 

It is a matter of actual record that as far back as 1647 there were 
three New England colonists bearing the name of John Moses: one 
lived at Plymouth, one at Portsmouth, and the third at Windsor. From 
these three came the numerous families of the same name in this coun- 
try. In 1660 John Moses was a juryman in Portsmouth, and Benoni 
Moses, his son. was a soldier, his name appearing in the Lexington 
Alarm list. The name is to be found frequently in the rosters of the 





, '^,c..'>4-t'-v-7tA7/7'7-tA-ix2.- — 



HISTORY OF THE JUxXIATA 'v^ ALLEY 889 

companies furnished to the Continental army by the various colonies, 
both north and south. It is more than probable that the Moses family 
in Pennsylvania descended from John Moses, of Windsor, as he is 
thought to have come to America from Switzerland by way of England. 
A descendant of his settled in Philadelphia in 1750, and later located 
near Landisburg, Perry county, Pennsylvania. Here he warranted a 
tract of land, which he cleared and improved, and erected a house for his 
family. He was also an iron worker, and helped cast some of the 
cannon that were used so effectively against the British during the revo- 
lutionary war. He lived to an advanced age, highly respected for his 
many sterling qualities by his neighbors and friends. Among his chil- 
dren was Simeon, of whom further. 

(II) Simeon, son of John Moses, and great-great-great-grandson of 
John Moses, was born near Landisburg, Perry county, Pennsylvania. 
It is supposed that he was afforded the best facilities for obtaining an 
education to be had in that day, as it is proverbial that the Swiss seek, 
even under the most adverse circumstances, to give their children educa- 
tions. He is known to have been a farmer, and most probably pur- 
chased a part of the land warranted by his father. He married Miss 
Heckendorn, like himself of Swiss extraction, and they were both mem- 
bers of the Lutheran church. Children: i. Joseph. 2. Andrew. 3. 
Samuel H.. of whom further. 4. Daniel. 5. A son who moved to 
Louisiana, and there founded the Moses family, among the best known 
in the state. 6. Fannie, married Mr. Roush. 7. Julia, married William 
Isenberg. 8. Mrs. Miller. 

(III) Samuel H., son of Simeon and (Heckendorn) Moses, 

was born near Landisburg, Perry county, Pennsylvania, in 1830, and 
died February 17, 1906. He married Mary A. Wade, born in 1832, 
died Mav 13, 1908, daughter of and Annie (Foulk) Wade; the for- 
mer died when Marv A. was one year f)I(l and his widow married a ^Ir. 
Goss. Mr. Wade was a shoemaker in Whcatfield township. Perry county, 
Pennsylvania, where he died. Children by first marriage: i. Catherine 
Wade, married John Depew, a shoemaker, of Duncannon. 2. Mary A., 
married Samuel H. Moses. Children by second marriage: i. ^^'illiam 
Goss. 2. Lawrence Goss. 3. Mrs. Jo.seph Fleming, of Altoona. Penn- 
sylvania. 4. Mrs. John Parson, of Duncannon. 5. Mrs. David Rice, 
of Duncannon. 6. Mrs. John Phillips, of Wooster, Ohio. 



890 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Mr. Moses was educated in the coimnun country schools. As a youth 
he learned the cabinetmaker's trade, and on reaching man's estate he 
engaged in that vocation, making many of the handsomest pieces of 
furniture found in the homes of that day and section. With cabinet- 
making he combined undertaking, and by the dual occupation succeed- 
ed in accumulating a nice estate. He lived and died at Duncannon. 
He was a Republican in politics, working for the party at every election. 
Both he and his wife were members of the Lutheran church, and he 
belonged to the Lutheran company, was a generous supporter of the 
church, and one of its trustees. Children: i. Name unknown. 2. El- 
mira, married A. P. Nickel, of New Bloomfield. 3. Carrie E., married 
R. M. Coy, ticket agent at Lewistown Junction. 4. Charles Grant, of 
whom further. 5. Minnie, married Professor J. L. Bucke, living in 
Duncannon. Several children died in infancy. 

(IV) Charles Grant Moses, son of Samuel H. and Mary A. (Wade) 
Moses, was born August 22, 1868, in Duncannon, Pennsylvania. He 
attended the public school in Duncannon, and later entered the Eastman 
Business College, graduating therefrom in 1887. He at once became 
associated with his father in his business. Since the death of his father 
he has introduced a line of furniture, and has one of the handsomest 
estaljlishments in Duncannon. In j^olitics he follows the family ten- 
dency, and is a Repuljlican : and attends the Lutheran church. Mr. 
Moses ranks as one of the most progressive and up-to-date business men 
of his native town. 



The KautTmans of the Juniata Valley are a very 
KAUFFMAN prominent and widely distributed family, who have 
intermarried among themselves and the best fami- 
lies of the surrounding country until the connection is one of the widest 
in this portion of the state. They are probably all descended from the 
immigrant, Michael Kauffman, who with his family came from the 
vicinity of Greenstad, Hesse, on the Upper Rhine, some time between 
the years 1710 and 1719, and settled in this region. Michael died a few 
years after his arrival, leaving a widow who survived but a compara- 
tively short time. Two children, a son John and a daughter Elizabeth, 
remained, whose guardian bought of William Penn's commissioner a 
considerable tract of land in the locality now known as Landisville, 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 891 

Lancaster county, where John Kauffman took up his abode. All that 
is known of Elizabeth is that she was married to Christian Stoneman, 
December 12, 1734. John Kauffman had three sons: Christian, Michael 
and John. This last John Kauft'man lived on the farm now owned by 
Samuel Nissley, about a mile from Landisville, where he died March 
24, 1776. His widow died December 22, i(So6. They had nine children 
who reached maturity and married: Mary, Anna, Christian, Barbara, 
John, Michael, Elizabeth, David, Isaac; two, Anna and Susanna, died 
in youth. Michael, the third son, who was born in 1767, near Landis- 
ville, became a physician after removing to Manheim, where he was 
first engaged with his brother John in the hardware business. He was 
a man of considerable prominence, and in 183 1 was elected to the house 
of representatives, being re-elected the following year; he died in 1839, 
at Manheim. 

(I) Christian Kauffman. from whom the branch of the family now 
under consideration was descended, was a farmer and land owner, l)cing 
an early settler in Walker township. 

(II) John, son of Christian Kauft'man, was born in Juniata county. 
where he grew to maturity, becoming a farmer like his father. He 
owned over a hundred acres of land to which he devoted his attention, 
and passed a quiet and industrious life, respected by all who knew him. 
He was a Republican in politics, and a member, as was also his wife, 
of the Lutheran church; he died at the age of seventy-six years. His 
wife, who was a Miss Sarah Cargill before her marriage, was also a 
native of Juniata county, dying at the age of fifty-five years; her 
husband survived her but never married again. Children : Harry, died 
on the homestead; Margaret, widow of Watson Crimmel, a soldier of 
the civil war, lives in Mifflin; James, of further mention; Christian, a 
farmer, died in Walker township; Alton, resides at Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia, unmarried; Frank, lives in Illinois; Clara, married Albert Otto, 
and lives in Indianapolis, Indiana; Joseph, lives in Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia; Marv, married John Dobbs, and died; three remaining children 
died in infancy. 

(III) James, son of John and Sarah (Cargill) Kauffman, was born 
in Walker township, December 14. 184S. He passed his earlier years in 
Walker, and upon attaining manhood resided for a while at Fermaugh ; 
he however returned to Walker township, where he purchased a farm 



892 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

of thirty acres in extent, and here passed the remainder of his Hfe, dying 
October 28, 1908. As a yonth of nineteen he made an attempt to enlist 
as a soldier in the civil war, bnt his father objected on account of his 
immaturity, and prevailed upon him to relinquish the idea. ]\Ir. Kauff- 
man was a Democrat in his political convictions, but was never a promi- 
nent politician or an officeholder. He was at one time a member of 
the I. O. O. F. On January 5, 1875, he was married in Walker town- 
ship to Miss Mary Clack, who was born February 4, 1857. in the town- 
ship. She survived her husband, and is still living on the old home- 
stead. She was a daughter of William and Annie (Kauffman) Clack, 
both natives of Juniata county. William Clack, who was a shoemaker 
all his life, was born in Fermaugh township, settling after his marriage, 
in 1 85 1, in Walker township. He was a Republican in politics, and 
belonged, as did also his wife, to the River Brethren church. He died 
about the year 1901. Mrs. Clack, who was born in Walker township, 
died in April. 1900, but a short time prior to the death of her husband. 
She was the daughter of Jonathan and Nancy (Runk) Kaufifman, who 
were early settlers of Fermaugh township, where they grew to maturity 
and were married, living many years subsequently in the place. Mr. 
Jonathan Kauffman owned land in Walker township and was a pros- 
perous farmer. Mr. and Mrs. Clack had in all eight children: Mary, 
who became Mrs. James Kauffman; Susanna, widow of Winfield Suloff, 
living at Denholm, Pennsylvania; Sarah, married (first) James Depew, 
(second) David Zimmerman, antl now lives in Milford township; Anna, 
married Albert Miller, and lives in L'nion county; John, lives in Walker 
township; Clara, married Fred Lauffer and died; William, a railroad 
man in Mifflintown; Minnie, married Earl Leyder and lives in Walker 
township. William Clack was a son of David and Susanna (Walter) 
Clack, who were natives of Lancaster and Chester counties respectively. 
They married and removed to Juniata county, settling in Fermaugh 
township, where he followed the trade of shoemaker until he removed 
finally to McAllisterville, where he died; his wife died in Walker town- 
ship. Mr. and Mrs. James Kauffman had nine children: Sarah, mar- 
ried William Ellis, a blacksmith, and resides in Fermaugh township; 
Thcorous, of further mention; Milton, went west; Annie, died in in- 
fancy; Eleanor, lives with her mother; Rena, died in infancy; Ella, 
unmarried; Mabel, resides at home; Clara, resides at home. 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 893 

(IV) Theorous Kauffman, son of James and JNIary (Clack) Kauff- 
man, was born in Walker township, Juniata county, Pennsylvania, on 
February 18, 1877. He received his education in the county schools 
and grew to maturity on his father's farm. On September 14, 1900, 
when he was twenty-three years of age, he entered the employ of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad Company and has remained with them ever 
since, having been promoted to the position of engineer, the position 
which he now holds, on August, 1907. His work for the company has 
been eminently satisfactory in every respect, and by his industry and 
economy he has succeeded in accumulating considerable means, so thai 
in May, 1906, he invested his savings in a farm of one hundred and 
five acres in extent in \\'alker. He erected new buildings on his prop- 
perty and conducts a stock and chicken farm, breeding full-blooded 
Holstein cattle, Poland China hogs, and Buff Orphington chickens. .Ml 
of the stock raised by Mr. Kauffman is of the best breeds and full- 
blooded, and he has won for himself a name in the surrounding country 
for the excellence of his farm products. 

In politics Mr. Kauffman is a Republican. He has never desired 
public office, contenting himself to lend his voice to the selection of those 
ofificials whom he deems will best serve the country's needs. He belongs 
to the Knights of Pythias, the Patriotic Order of the Sons of America, 
and the Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen. On Alay 15, 191 1, Mr. 
Kauffman was married to Miss Annie Gertrude Sieber, a native of 
Juniata county, and a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. She 
is the daughter of Gideon and Rebecca (Trego) Sieber, both parents 
also having been born in Juniata county, where they made their home, 
and where her mother died October 19, 1S91. Her father, who has 
been a farmer, now lives in Fermaugh township: he is a Republican and 
a member of the Dunkard church, his wife having been a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. They had four children : Grace Mary, 
residing at home: Annie Gertrude, now Mrs. Kauffman: Thaddcus 
Banks, and Oscar Lee, both at home. Mrs. Kauffman's paternal grand- 
parents were Jonas and Barbara Sielier, her grandfather having removed 
to Fermaugh township from Berkshire county, settling later in Walker, 
where he owned two farms and where he ultimately died. Mrs. Kauff- 
man's mother was a daughter of Benjamin and Elizabeth Trego, Mr. 
Trego having removed from Chester county to Juniata county, making 



894 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

his residence in Fayette township. He was a farmer, and lived a quiet 
and useful life, dying in Fayette township. 

Mr. and Mrs. Theorous Kauffman have one son, Maxwell Sieber, 
born December i8, 1912. 



The Marshalls of Newport, Pennsylvania, descend 
MARSHALL from an illustrious English family that were long 
seated in Derbyshire, England. A member of this 
family was Abraham Marshall, the distinguished botanist and horticul- 
turist, who came from Gratton parish, Derbyshire, in 1700, and settled 
in West Bradford, Chester county, Pennsylvania. John Marshall, the 
celebrated chief justice of the L'nited States Supreme Court, was also 
related to this family. 

John Marshall, the American emigrant, was born in Derbyshire, 
England, Elton parish, from whence he came to Pennsylvania in 1686. 
He first located and lived for a year in Blockley township, Philadelphia 
county, then moved to a farm in Darby township, Delaware county, 
Pennsylvania (then Chester county). He was a member of Darby 
meeting. Society of Friends, and his marriage, 10 mo. 19, 1688, to 
Sarah, daughter of Thomas Smith, was the first solemnized in that 
meeting. John Marshall died 9 mo. 13, 1729; his widow 5 mo. 16, 
1749. Children: i. John, born 6 mo. 16, 1690, died 8 mo. 4, 1749, 
married (first) Joanna Paschall, (second) a widow, Eleanor Shenton. 
2. William, born 2 mo. 11, 1692, died 1727, married Mary Sellers. 3. 
Thomas (of whom further). 

(II) Thomas, youngest son of John and Sarah (Smith) Marshall, 
was born in Darby township, Delaware county, Pennsylvania, 12 mo. 10, 
1694. He was a farmer, and settled in Concord township, Delaware 
county, but then Chester county. He married Hannah, daughter of 
Benjamin and Ann (Pennell) Mendenhall. He died in 1741, and his 
widow married (second) Peter Grubb. Thomas and Hannah Marshall 
had nine children, of whom John (2) was the eighth. 

(HI) John (2), son of Thomas and Hannah (Mendenhall) Mar- 
shall, was born in Concord township, then Chester county, Pennsyl- 
vania, II mo. 22, 1734. In 1765 he moved to Kennett township, Ches- 
ter county, where he became an extensive land owner and proprietor of 
a grist and saw mill. He and his family were members of Hockesin 



HISTORY OF THE JUXIATA VALLEY 895 

meeting, and of Kennett monthly meeting; he died 11 mo. 30, 1815. 
He married (first) Hannah, daughter of Joseph and Hannah (Hick- 
man) James, of Westtown. Until the death of his wife in 1764, John 
Marshall lived in Birmingham township, lie married (second), 4 mo. 
2-/, 1768, Susanna Lamborn, born 4 mo. 7, 1749, died 3 mo. 3, 1839, 
daughter of Robert and Ann (Bourne) Lamborn. Children of first 
wife: Mary, married William Phillips; ALnrtha, died unmarried. Chil- 
dren of second wife: Thomas, born 4 mo. 22, 1769, died 2 mo. 2, 185 1, 
married Sarah Gregg; Robert, of whom further; William, born 5 mo. 
26, 1773, died young; Hannah, born i mo. 7, 1775, died i mo. 21, 1857, 
married John Yeaman ; Ann, born 8 mo. 22, 1778, died 5 mo. 26, 1862, 
married John Scarlett; Martha, born 8 mo. 20, 1780, died i mo. 3, 
181 1, unmarried; William, born 7 mo. 30. 1784, died 1859. married 
Margaret McCammon. 

(IV) Robert, son of John (2) Marshall and his second wife, Su- 
sanna Lamborn, was born in Kennett township, Chester county, 9 mo. 
15, 1771, died there in 1869. He inherited the paternal homestead 
farm in Kennett, and also operated the first grist mill there. He mar- 
ried, II mo. 22, 1804, Mary Hoopes, born 3 mo. 16, 1781, died 7 mo. 
30, 1S47, daughter of Thomas and Sarah (Bane) Hoopes, of Goshen, 
Chester county; children: Caleb H., of whom further; John, born 10 
mo. 7, 1808, died 5 mo. 23, 1885, married (first) Sarah Phillips, (sec- 
ond) Mary Harlan; Martha, born 8 mo. i, 1810, married Thomas Han- 
num; Abner, born 8 mo. 27, 1814, married Ann Eliza Pyle; Thomas, 
born 3 mo. 18, 1818, died 3 mo. 6, 1887, married Mary \\'ay. Thomas 
was a miller and successfully operated the mill at Kennett for many 
years. In 1856 he began the manufacture of paper, establishing the large 
plant later operated by his sons, T. Elwood and Israel W. Marshall. 

(V) Caleb H.. eldest son of Robert and Mary (Hoopes) Marshall, 
was born on the old homestead in Kennett, Chester county, Pennsyl- 
vania, 9 mo. II, 1806, died 12 mo. 16, 1888. He operated the grist 
mill in Kennett until his removal to Mill Creek hundred, New Castle 
county, Delaware. There in partnership with his brother John he en- 
gaged in the iron business at the present site of Marshalltown, Dela- 
ware, named in their honor. The brothers conducted a large business 
until 1863, when Caleb H. moved to Philadelphia, where they had pre- 
viously established a plant, known as the Penn Treaty Iron Works, 



896 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

erected on the land where Wihiam Penn held his deliberations with the 
Indians and where the famous treaty was signed. In 1878 he sold his 
interest in the business to his sons, Wilmer W., Alfred and J. Howard 
Marshall, whom he had previously admitted as partners. Caleb H. was 
a member of the Society of Friends, and a wise, capable man of affairs. 
He married Jane Thompson, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Reed) 
Thompson, of i\Iill Creek hundred, Delaware; children: i. Wilmer W., 
of whom further. 2. Alfred, born October 29, 1848; member of the 
firm of Marshall Brothers & Company, and a prominent man of affairs, 
now living in Langhorne Manor, Bucks county, Pennsylvania ; he mar- 
ried Florence Virginia Mather. 3. Sarah, died young. 4. J. Howard, 
junior member of the firm of Marshall Brothers & Company; died in 
Philadelphia, 5 mo. 23, 1885. 

Jane (Thompson) Marshall, the mother of these children, was a 
descendant of Thomas and Elizabeth Thompson, of Yorkshire, Eng- 
land, where Thomas was born, in Kirkfenton parish. In 1658 he 
moved to Ireland with his wife and two sons, John and Andrew, locat- 
ing in the parish of Donard, county Wicklow, where both died; chil- 
dren: John, of whom further; Andrew, married in county Wicklow, in 
1664, Isabel Marshall, and had Elizabeth, William and Andrew, all born 
in Ireland. 

John, son of Thomas and Elizabeth Thompson, was born in York- 
shire, England, in 1635, moved to county Wicklow, Ireland, with his 
parents in 1658, and there married, in 1665, Jane, daughter of Thomas 
Humble, who had then lately moved to Ireland from county Durham. 
Four children were born to John and Jane Thompson in Ireland, and 
on 9 mo. 16, 1677, John, his brother Andrew and their families, sailed 
on the ship "Mary,"' arriving at Salem, New Jersey, 12 mo. 22, 1677. 
There they joined the Fenwick Colony, and there John died in 1715. 

James, son of John and Jane Thompson, was born in county Wick- 
low, Ireland, 8 mo., 1668, came to America with his parents in 1677, 
settled in Salem county. New Jersey, where he died in 1712, leaving 
five children. He married, in October, 1700, Ann, daughter of Valen- 
tine and Ann (Calvert) Hollingsworth, of New Castle, Delaware. 

James (2), youngest son of James and Ann Marshall, was born in 
Salem county. New Jersey, 8 mo. 26, 17 12. His father died the same 
year and he was reared under his mother's care. On arriving at man- 



HISTORY OF THE JUXIATA VALLEY 897 

hood he settled in Leacock township, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, 
but after his marriage he moved to New Castle county, Delaware, locat- 
ing in Mill Creek hundred. He married (lirst), 3 mo. 22, 1735, Sarah, 
daughter of Daniel and Sarah Worsley, of New Castle county, Dela- 
ware; she was born 4 mo. 3, 1717. He married (second), 4 mo. 10, 
1742, Elizabeth, daughter of Joseph and Amy (Gregg) Hadley, of Mill 
Creek. Three children by first marriage, several by second marriage. 

Daniel, son of James (2) Thompson and his first wife, Sarah Wors- 
ley, was born in Mill Creek hundred, Delaware, 11 mo. 16, 1737. He 
married, 10 mo. 25, 1764, Elizabeth, daughter of William and Elizabeth 
(Miller) Chambers, of White Clay Creek, by whom he had nine chil- 
dren. 

John, sixth child of Daniel and Elizabeth (Chambers) Thompson, 
was born 5 mo. 17, 1777, in Mill Creek hundred, Delaware, and there 
married Elizabeth Reed. 

Jane, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Reed) Thompson, married 
Caleb H. Marshall. 

(VI) Wilmer W., eldest son of Caleb H. and Jane (Thompson) 
Marshall, was born in Marshalltown, Delaware, in 1846. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Marshalltown, Westtown and Philadelphia, 
his parents moving to the latter city in 1863. On leaving school he 
engaged in business with his father at the Penn Treaty Iron Works, of 
which the latter was proprietor, and after mastering every detail was 
admitted a partner. In 1878 \\'ilmer W., in company with his brothers, 
Alfred and J. Howard, purchased the interests of their father and uncle, 
John Marshall, continuing business as Marshall Brothers & Company. 
This firm was the first to manufacture galvanized sheet iron, and in 
1892 theirs was the first plant in the United States to manufacture tin 
plate commercially. They made an instant success of tin plate and con- 
tinued in great prosperity until 1898, when they sold out their plant to 
the American Tin Plate Company, but continued the iron and steel 
business as jobbers, handling an immense business. Shortly after 1870 
the Marshalls had bought a pig iron plant at Newport, Perry county, 
Pennsylvania, and after disposing of his interests in Philadeliihia, Wil- 
mer \V. Marshall lived retired until his death in 1895 '< his son, Edward 
E. Marshall, came to the plant in 1899. He was a fine type of the 
Quaker business gentleman, just and upright in his dealings, a man of 



898 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

clear vision and quick decision, thoroughly understanding every detail 
of his business. He was a Republican in politics, and never accepted 
public office. He married Julia, daughter of George \V. Jacoby, of 
Conshohocken, Pennsylvania, a manufacturer of marble ornamental 
work for buildings. He died in Philadelphia, leaving children: Julia 
(of previous mention) ; Susan, deceased, married Colonel Thomas 
Freedley, a marble manufacturer of Philadelphia. Children of Wilmer 
W. and Julia Marshall: i. Lillian, married John Blakeley, and resides 
in Germantown, Pennsylvania. 2. Edward E., of whom further. 3. 
Edith W., married a Mr. Flavell, and resides in Ambler, Pennsylvania. 

(VII) Edward E., only son of Wilmer W. and Julia (Jacoby) Mar- 
shall, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, July 3, 1877. He was 
educated in William Penn Charter School, Philadelphia, and Sheffield 
Scientific School, Yale University, whence he was graduated, class of 
1899. He at once became a chemist at the Marshall Iron Works in 
Newport, was promoted vice-president and manager, serving as such 
until 1913, when he was elected president of the company. In 1908 the 
plant was enlarged from a capacity of fifty tons to one hundred and 
twenty-five tons. The company employ about one hundred and twenty 
men, sixty of whom are engaged at the iron mines in Cumberland and 
Adams counties, which supply the furnaces with ore. 

Mr. Marshall has other important business interests ; he is president 
of the Perry County Electric Light, Heat and Power Company, which 
supplies light and power to the three boroughs of Millerstown, Newport 
and New Bloomfield ; is senior partner of the Marshall & McNitt Lum- 
ber Company; and vice-president of the American Tea Growing Com- 
pany of Charleston, South Carolina. In political faith a Republican, he 
was a nominee for representative, but was defeated. In religious faith 
he and his wife are members of the Protestant Episcopal church. Dur- 
ing the Spanish- American war. Mr. Marshall enlisted, May 4, 1898, in. 
Battery A, United States army, as sergeant, serving a term of seven 
months until honorably discharged. 

He married, in 1904, Sarah L. Tyler, born in New London, Connec- 
ticut, daughter of Colonel A. C. Tyler, a retired officer of the United 
States army. The Marshall residence is a beautiful home in the out- 
skirts of Newport, surrounded by trees, shrubber}- and plants that be- 
speak the tasteful arrangement of the landscape gardener. In the stables 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 899 

several fine horses are kept; these are a source of great pleasure to their 
owner. 



This family, found in various parts of the United States 
CARMON as Carman, Carmen and Carmon, descends from John 
Carman, who came from England to Roxljiury, Massa- 
chusetts, with his wife, Florence, arriving November 4, 163 1. Later 
he was in Lynn, Massachusetts, going thence to Wallingford, Connec- 
ticut, there joining with John Seamen in the purchase of a large tract 
of land on Long Island, extending from the Sound to the ocean. About 
1633 he settled with his family at Hempstead, Long Island, where he 
died in 1653, leaving sons: John, Caleb and Joshua. From these sprang 
a numerous family, now distributed all over the United States. The 
Carmons of Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, descend from Livingston Car- 
mon, first of New York state, later of Huntingdon county, Pennsyl- 
vania, where his son Alexander followed him, as head of a family. 

(II) Alexander, son of Livingston Carmon, was born in Hunting- 
don county, Pennsylvania. He grew to manhood on the iiome farm, 
later becoming proprietor of a hotel in Stone Valle}-, then engaged in 
the same business at Warm Springs. Later he moved to the borough 
of Huntingdon, where he engaged in mercantile business until his death. 
He was a member of the German Reformed church. His wife, Mary 
Ann, was a daughter of Thomas Kyler; children: Thomas, lived and 
died in Huntingdon: John, also a lifelong re.^^ident of Huntingdon: 
William: Robert: Joseph R.. of whom further: Harrison: Howard: 
Henrv; Sarah: Louanna: one who died in infancy. 

(ill) Joseph R., son of Alexander and Mary Ann (Kyler) Car- 
mon, was born in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, July 24, 1S35. He was 
educated in the public school and when a very young man was en- 
gaged in the work of conducting the Huntingdon and Broad Top rail- 
road. At the age of twenty years he entered mercantile life, opening 
the first store in 1855 at the corner of Fourth and Penn streets, Hunt- 
ingdon. He prospered and outgrew his quarters there, removing soon 
to a building at No. 420 Washington street. There he continued to 
enlarge his business, and again moved to more commodious quarters, 
locating at the corner of Sixth and Washington streets, where he con- 
tinued in successful business until 1903, when he sold out Iiis mercan- 



900 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

tile interests and retired to a well-earned rest. For nearly a half century 
he was engaged as a general store merchant in Huntingdon, and at 
the time of his retirement had been in continuous business for a longer 
period than any other merchant in Huntingdon. Fie was a wise man- 
ager, and in all his transactions preserved a strict business integrity, 
rendering to every man his just due. He is a Republican in politics, 
and both he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. He has served as a member of the borough council, but whether 
in or out of office has always borne his share in all movements to ad- 
vance the interests of Huntingdon. 

He married, in 1S57, Anna Mary McCahan, daughter of John K. 
and granddaughter of John McCahan, born in county Tyrone, Ireland, 
but an early settler in the Juniata Valley (see forward). Of the eight 
children of Joseph R. and Anna Mary Carmon, three are living, four 
died 3'oung. A daughter, Florence H., deceased, married Carl M. Gage, 
manager of the Huntingdon & Broad Top railroad; she left children, 
Carlotta and Edith. The living children are : Martha Cornelia, married 
Colonel Samuel W. Miller, of the United States army, who after service 
in the Philippines is now stationed at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, children: 
Lillian, married Lieutenant Harrison, Ruth, residing with her parents ; 
Adelaide R., married Frank W. L. Snyder, a supervisor of the Penn- 
sylvania railroad, and resides at Tyrone; children: Mary Adelaide, 
Joseph, Eleanor and Florence ; Warren W., now a farmer near Newton 
Hamilton, Pennsylvania ; he married Anna Mary Herncane. 

Since his retirement, Mr. Carmon and his wife have spent a great 
deal of time in travel and in visiting the many points of scenic and 
historical interest in the United States. Their home bears many evi- 
dences of their journeyings in the shape of relics of historical and 
local interest. 

The grandfather of Mrs. Carmon, John McCahan, was born in the 
village of Drumnahaigh, in the North of Ireland, in November, 1780, 
and came to the I'nited States a lad of twelve years, landing in August, 
1792. He learned the printer's trade with Steel & McClain, of Carlisle, 
Pennsylvania, beginning in 1795. After the failure of that firm he 
came to Huntingdon, where in 1797 he worked as a journeyman printer 
on the Courier. After the death of that paper he went to Baltimore, 
Maryland, and in 1799 worked for William Pechin on a "Digest of the 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 901 

Laws of the United States." In 1801 he founded the Gazette, in Hunt- 
ingdon, and continued its editor and pubhsher until June 9, 1828, when 
he transferred its control and management to his son, John Kinney 
McCahan. John McCahan was identified with many of the improve- 
ments and institutions of his time, acquired a large landed estate, and 
remained a resident of the borough of Huntingdon until 1843, when 
he moved to the "Log Cabin Farm" in Walker township, opposite Hunt- 
ingdon, on which he had erected a fine brick residence. He was a man 
of great energy, fairness and tact, traits that characterized his entire 
business life. He was a Democrat, participating in all the political con- 
tests of his day, but outside of borough offices refusing political prefer- 
ment. He died Sunday morning, March 22, 1857, aged seventy-seven 
years, and is buried in Huntingdon cemetery. 

John Kinney, son of John McCahan. grew up in the newspaper 
business under his father, and July 9, 1828, became editor and pro- 
prietor of the Gazette, founded in Huntingdon by John McCahan. He 
had been practically its editor for the preceding ten years, but on the 
date named assumed full control. He conducted the Gazette as a Demo- 
cratic organ until April 23, 1834, when he sold it to Alexander Gwin 
and moved to Laurel Springs Mills, a short distance from Birmingham. 
Here he resided until after the death of his father in 1857, when he 
returned to Huntingdon, residing at the northeast corner of Washing- 
ton and Fifth streets until his death. January 16, 1883, aged seventy- 
nine years. His wife, ^Mary Taylor, died several years before her 
husband. 



The Flertzlers of Port Royal, Pennsylvania, descend 
HERTZLER from Jacob Hertzler, a Swiss emigrant, and date their 
Pennsylvania history from the year 1749- During 
the fifth generation in the Juniata Valley the family have been substan- 
tial and highly regarded citizens, and. while usually agriculturalists, 
have also been prominent in business life, in the Mennonite church and 
in public affairs, sitting in state councils as legislators, and presiding 
over churches as ministers and bishops. 

Jacob Hertzler was born of Swiss parents, in Switzerland, in 1703. 
He grew to manhood in his mountain home, became a farmer, and 
a minister of the Amish Mennonite church. He married, but his 



902 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

wife died early, leaving him a son John. He then married a 
second wife. Catherine, and moved to the German Palatinate, now 
Bavaria, part of the German Empire. He resided there several 
years, but finally was driven by religious persecution to seek a home in 
America. He sailed on the ship "St. Andrew" from Rotterdam, touch- 
ing at Plymouth, England, and arriving at Philadelphia September 9, 
1749. He settled on a farm in Berne township, Lancaster, now Upper 
Berne township, Berks county, two miles west of Hamburg. This he 
purchased from the proprietaries, Richard and Thomas Penn, warrant 
dated January 9, 1750, price stated one dollar and twenty-five cents per 
acre, name of the tract, "Contentment," its area one hundred and 
eighty-two acres and thirty perches. In 1752 he purchased one hun- 
dred and ten acres: in 1765, thirty-six acres; in 1766, forty-four acres; 
and in 1773, thirty acres with odd perches in each tract, the whole 
totaling four hundred four acres, four perches, which he improved. 
On August 30, 1773, he divided his lands among his children — John, 
Jacob, Christian and Fanny, the latter wife of John Kaufifman. Cath- 
erine, his second wife, died between August 30, 1773, when she is known 
to have been alive, and March 4, 1774, when it is known she was dead. 
Jacob, the Swiss emigrant, died in the year 1786, later than March 20. 
Both are buried in the Amish Mennonite burial ground, two miles west 
of Hamburg. Pennsylvania; their graves were unmarked, as was the 
custom of that faith, until 191 1, when suitable granite monuments were 
erected by their descendants. The sons of Jacob, having taken the oath 
of allegiance to the King of England, consequently took no active part 
in the revolution, refusing, as did all the Amish Mennonites, to break 
their oath. 

(II) Jacob (2), first son of Jacob (i) Hertzler by his second wife, 
was born in 1733, came to Pennsylvania with his parents in 1749, and 
became a prosperous farmer of Berks county, as then considered. He 
was a member of the Amish Mennonite church and a good man. He 
married, in 1773. Barbara Yoder, who died in Mifflin county, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1821. He died in y\pril, 1795; children: Daniel (of whom 
further); John, married Catherine Yoder: David, married Catherine 
Reichenbach ; Barbara, married John Stutzman ; Samuel, died unmar- 
ried, and seven children who died young. 

(III) Daniel, eldest son of Jacob and Barbara (Yoder) Hertzler, 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 



903 



was born in Upper Berne township, Berks county, Pennsylvania, June 
26, 1774, and there grew to manhood. He was married in 1803, and in 
1804 moved to a farm in Caernarvon township, Lancaster county, Penn- 
sylvania. He hved on his farm of one hundred and thirty acres in 
Lancaster county until after the birth of his twelve children, then sold 
and moved to Juniata county, Pennsylvania, where he settled in Turbett 
township, April 5, 1834. He then purchased from Jacob Rice a tract 
of two hundred thirteen acres, on which he erected suital)le buildings 
for the comfort of his family and the proper conduct of his business, 
including a wool factory and a saw mill for the production of finished 
lumber. He was a man of superior attainments, was educated in both' 
English and German, and was of the strictest integrity and universally 
respected. He was a man of industry and economy, and trained his 
sons in these same sterling virtues. In early life he acted with the 
Democratic party, but in 1828 became a Whig, voting and working with 
that party until his death. Like his sires, he was a memljer of the Amish 
Mennonite church, strictly observing the austere faith of that denomi- 
nation. He died in Turbett township, March 23, 1848. He married, 
in November, 1803, Barbara Zug (Zook), born January 25, 1778, 
daughter of Rev. Christian and Magdalene (Blank) Zug. of Whiteland 
township, Chester county, Penns}'lvania. lioth descendants of Swiss 
Mennonite families. She survived her husband and died at the Turbett 
township farm, December 29, 1852; children: Christian, married Chris- 
tianna Shirk; Jacob, married Christianna Kepner; Henry, married 
Sarah Hertzler; Solomon, married Mary Trago; Daniel, married Mary 
\\'eaver; David, married Phoebe A. Kauffman; Noah (of further men- 
tion) ; Magdalene, married Casper Schwartzantruber ; Nancy, married 
Jacob Kurtz: Samuel; a child, died in infancy, and John. The last 
survivors of this family were John and Magdalene. 

(IV) Noah, son of Daniel and Barbara (Zug) Hertzler, was born 
in Caernarvon township. Lancaster county. Pennsylvania, July 29. 1815, 
died in Old Port Royal, Juniata county, June 6, 1887. He obtained a 
good education in both German and English, and grew to manhood as 
his father's farm assistant. He came with the family to Turbett town- 
ship, Juniata county, in 1834, and remained at the home farm until he 
was aged twenty-three years. He then, in company with two of his 
brothers, opened a general country store which they successfully con- 



904 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

ducted for several years. He then bought out his partners and con- 
ducted the business alone until his death. He dealt heavily in grain, 
and, in addition to his mercantile business, owned and conducted several 
fertile farms. He possessed unusual business qualifications, and his 
enterprise carried him into channels of business hitherto unknown in 
the family. He invested in banks and held directorships in the Juniata 
Valley Bank of Mifflintown and the Port Royal Branch Bank. He 
took a deep interest in public affairs, held many township offices, and 
was a candidate for the legislature. He was a zealous supporter of the 
Republican party, and while departing from the religious faith of his 
forbears, was a consistent member of the Lutheran church. His name 
was a synonym for integrity, and dying he left to his children an un- 
sullied character, in addition to a generous store of earthly possessions. 
He married, in 1845, Susan Garman, born in Dauphin county, Penn- 
sylvania, June 18, 1817, died December 10, 1901, daughter of John 
Garman, an early settler of Dauphin county, later moved to Perry 
county, where he owned two good farms aggregating four hundred 
acres, there lived and died. He married Catherine Wallower, and both 
are buried in the churchyard of the Hill Church cemetery in Turbett 
township, Juniata county, both having been members of that church. 
Children of John Garman : Catherine, married John Steece, and died at 
"The Aqueduct," Perry county : Mary, married Dr. David Alter, and 
died in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania: Susan, married Noah Hertzler (of 
previous mention) ; John, a farmer, died in Harrisburg. Children of 
Noah Hertzler: i. John G., born November 23, 1848; now a merchant 
at Old Port, a village near Port Royal ; married Euphenia Groninger. 
2. David, born December 4, 1850: now a manufacturer of Philadelphia; 
married Eliza A. Wolford. 3. Mary Alice, born January ir, 1854; 
married James N. Groninger, a millwright, and resides at Old Port. 
4. William, of whom further. 

(V) William, youngest son of Noah and Susan (Garman) Hertzler, 
was born in Turbett township, Juniata county, Pennsylvania, July 7, 
1858. He was educated in the public schools of the township, Air View 
Academy, and Washington and Jefferson College, from which latter 
institution he graduated with the class of 1881. He chose the profes- 
sion of law, and began his study under the Honorable Lewis E. Atkin- 
son, but his father's health failing, he was obliged to abandon all 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 905 

thought of a professional career. With his brother, John G. Hertzler, 
he then assumed charge of his father's affairs, since which time he has 
been entire!}- engaged in business and pohtical affairs. At the death 
of his father he was appointed one of the executors of his estate and 
ably administered that important trust. He is a hfelong RepubHcan, 
and dates his active pohtical life from the year 1881, when he was 
elected chairman of the Republican county committee, being then but 
twenty-two years of age, and the youngest county chairman in the state. 
He held the same position in 1882, and in 1888 had become so well and 
favorably known that he was chosen to represent his district in the 
general assembly, being the only Republican elected on the ticket that 
year, and triumphing by a majority of two hundred and ninety-seven 
votes. He was renominated in 1890, but in that year was defeated with 
the entire Republican ticket, though he was defeated by only one hun- 
dred and forty-nine votes. 

In 1889 Mr. Hertzler was nominated by the Republicans of Juniata 
county for member of the constitutional convention, but declined the 
honor. In 1892 he secured the endorsement of the Juniata county con- 
vention, though not that of the Republican district convention, for state 
senator; but in 1896 he was again a candidate for the office, and, receiv- 
ing both the necessary endorsements, was elected to represent the coun- 
ties of Juniata, Mifflin, and Perry, constituting the thirty-first senatorial 
district, by a majority of nine hundred and twenty-seven votes. His 
record in both the lower and upper houses of the state legislature was 
one of fearless advocacy of the rights of the people and of devotion to 
the interests of his constituents. He served on important committees, 
and by his course in the case of needed legislation gained state-wide 
fame. On January i, 1902, during the second session of the Fifty- 
seventh Congress, he was appointed clerk of the committee on war 
claims of the National House of Representatives by the Hon. Thad- 
deus M. Mahon, M.C., and served under that appointment five years. 
He was then reappointed by Hon. Kittridge Ilaskins, M.C., of Vermont, 
and served under that appointment in the first and second sessions of the 
Sixtieth Congress and the first session of the Sixty-first Congress, a 
total service of seven years and five months, his term expiring .August 
6, 1909. During his congressional committee service he was also private 
secretary to the Hon. Thaddeus M. Mahon, M.C., until 1907, and to 



9o6 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

Congressman Benjamin K. Folk until July, 191 1, when he was ap- 
pointed deputy secretary of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, which 
important office he now holds. 

Since 1901 Senator Hertzler has served as director of the First 
National Bank of Mifflintown, and in 1909 was chosen president of 
that well-known and stable institution. He is a prominent member of 
the Masonic order, being a past master of Union Lodge, No. 324, Free 
and Accepted Masons, at Mifllintown, and past high priest Newport 
Chapter, No. 238, Royal Arch Masons, at Newport; and is a member 
of Lewiston Commandery, No. 26, Knights Templar, at Lewistown; 
and Zemblo Shrine, Ancient Accepted Order Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine. He is also a thirty-second degree Mason of the Ancient Ac- 
cepted Scottish Rite, belonging to Harrisburg Consistory. His other 
orders are the Independent Order of Odd Fellows of Mifflintown, and 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks of Lewistown. He is 
interested in all that pertains to the good of the community, especially 
the cause of education, to which he devoted five years' service on the 
school board. His life has been a busy and useful one, and few men 
can point with more just pride to a lifework now just in its prime. 

Senator Hertzler is married to Miss MoUie M. Kaufman, a daugh- 
ter of the late Kurtz Kaufman, and a member of an old Mifflintown 
family, their union being blessed with one son, Penrose, born August 
15, 1898, and now a student in the Lewistown Preparatory School. 

The family home is at Port Royal, Pennsylvania, near where Jacob 
Hertzler first settled in 1834. 



This is an old Mifflin county family, the ancestor, John 
STEELE Steele, who was of German extraction, having been born 
here, where he resided for a while until his removal to 
Huntingdon county, where he became a large land owner and farmer. 
He was a member of the Lutheran church, as was also his wife, who, 
like himself, was of German descent. She was a Miss Elizabeth Hart- 
sock before her marriage, and was born in the state of Indiana. Their 
children, eleven in number, were: Sarah, married (first) J. C. Stever, 
(second) G. W. Sipe; Susan Jane, married Robert Oakman; Mary 
Ellen, married William Focht; Rebecca, married Robert Geist; Salina, 
married S. H. Phesant ; Isaiah; Charles W., of further mention; John, 





1ynA^ 




HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 907 

married Miss Davis; Thomas, married Margaret Zimincrnian; i'.eile, 
married Samuel G. Steel, no relation; Mariah, died a maiden. 

(II) Charles W. Steele, son of John and Elizabeth (Hartsock) 
Steele, was born May 6, 1834, at Belleville, Mifflin county. He learned 
the trade of cabinetmaking, which he followed until later on he became 
a farmer of Union township, Huntingdon county, where he removed 
and passed the remainder of his life. In politics he was a life-long 
Democrat, and in his religious affiliations was a member of the Metho- 
dist Protestant church, to which his wife also belonged. He died 
August 3, 1895. ''"cl was survived by his wife fourteen years. She 
was Miss Sarah Smith, born September 8, 1837, and died April 23, 
1909. Her parents were Dr. Andrew Smith and his wife, who was a 
Miss Elizabeth Pheasant; he being a native of Maryland and his wife 
of Pennsylvania: both were members of the Methodist church. Dr. 
Smith was also a lifelong farmer of Union township, Huntingdon 
county. There were eight children in the family: Sarah, who became 
Mrs. Steele: Rachel, married Jacob Estep : Mary, married James Bow- 
ser; Susan Jane, married Jacob David; Thompson, married Almira 
Murry: William Bland, married Mina Saner; Charles Wesley, married 
Belle Klippinger; Salina, married W. P. Magsam. 

Children of Mr. and ]\Irs. Steele, who were married December 16, 
1855: Jeannette Belle, born January i. 1857, married T. J. Wright; 
Mary Elizabeth, born November 16, 1858, married D. C. Wilson; John 
A., of whom further: James S., an officer in the Pennsylvania Indus- 
trial Reformatory, born October 12, 1865, married Mary Prough: Bruce 
P., of further mention: William T.. a farmer of Huntingdon county, 
born August 3, 1869, married Luella Deavor; Minnie R., Ixmi .\ugust 
15, 1871. married Harry J. Silknetter, a blacksmith of Altoona, Penn- 
sylvania; Sarah D., born March 19, 1877, married James P. Bohner, a 
bricklaver of Altoona; Prudence M., born December 6. 1879. married 
C. H. Haines, a butcher of Cleveland, Ohio; Zellah, born November 16, 
1881, married Robert Smith, a carpenter of Altoona: and a child who 

died in infancy. 

(Ill) John A., son of Charles W. and Sarah (Smith) Steele, was 
born in L'nion town.ship, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. June 9, i860. 
His education, which was acquired in the pul)lic schools of his native 
township, was a good and practical one, and upon its completion he was 



9o8 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

apprenticed to learn the blacksmith's trade with R. W. Cook, of Bedford 
county, during the years 1878-80. He followed this calling for the 
period of one year at Huntingdon, then entered the employ of the Gon- 
dola Tanning Company, with \\hom he remained eleven years. He was 
then appointed to an official position in the Pennsylvania Reformatory, 
filling the duties of his office ten years, and in 1901 became a candidate 
for the position of sheriff of the county, on the Republican ticket, but 
was defeated in this ambition by seventy-eight votes. Removing to 
Philadelphia, he acted in the capacity of superintendent of the Wolfe 
Process Leather Company for about seven years, and then returned to 
Huntingdon. There he erected a plant for the manufacture of ice, and 
organized a company, of which he became the president and manager, 
and four other members of his family are holding official positions in it. 
Mr. Steele has always been a strong supporter of the Republican party 
in his borough, and has wielded considerable influence in it. He was 
solicited by his many friends to become a candidate for sheriff in the 
fall election of 1913, and it is predicted that he will be the next sheriff of 
Huntingdon county. Mr. Steele and his wife are both members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, and he is a member of the Order of 
Moose. 

Mr. Steele married, July 17, 1881, Agnes L., daughter of Simeon and 
Ellen (Eistep) Wright, and they have had children: i. R. Ernest, a 
trainmaster on the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad. 2. Albert 
W., engaged as a machinist with the Pennsylvania Railroad Company; 
married Margaret Hohman ; one child, Frederick Hohman. 3. C. Le- 
Roy, a fireman on the middle division of the Pennsylvania railroad; 
married Nannie Carmon. 

(Ill) Dr. Bruce P. Steele, son of Charles W. and Sarah (Smith) 
Steele, was born September i, 1867, in Union township, Huntingdon 
county, Pennsylvania. He received his education in the local schools of 
Huntingdon county and at Juniata College in the city of Huntingdon, be- 
ing well fitted for the profession of teaching which he then adopted. For 
six years he taught in the schools, being principal at Huntingdon for a 
period of three years. In 1895 he turned his attention to the study of 
medicine, entering the Medico-Chirurgical College at Philadelphia and 
being graduated therefrom in 1898 after a very successful three years' 
course. He located at once in Newton Hamilton, Mifflin county, where 



HISTORY OF THE JUXL\TA VALLEY 909 

he entered upon the practice of his profession and remained for three 
years, coming to ilcVeytown April i, 1901, and continuing here ever 
since. His practice has grown very rapidly and he is now one of the 
leading physicians in this locality, occupying a prominent position in 
social and business circles as well as in the professional world. He 
is a bank director here, and is influential in the Democratic party, of 
which he is a member. Dr. Steele is also interested in fraternal mat- 
ters, and is a member in good standing of McVeytown Lodge, No. 376, 
Free and Accepted Masons. He is an elder in the Presbyterian church, 
to which both himself and his wife belong. 

On December 4, 1901, after he had established himself in the prac- 
tice of his profession in IMcVeytown, he was married to Miss Lorma 
Postlethwaite, who was born August 28, 1881, daughter of Lambert 
Postlethwaite and his wife, who was a Miss Sarah Catherine Rhodes. 
Dr. and Mrs. Steele have two children : Sarah, born December 18, 1902, 
and Rachel, born January 23, ic 



Mary Barbara, daughter of John and Barbara (Mack) 
STUBER Troutman, was born in Germany in September, 1837. 

She came to the United States with her parents, the fam- 
ily settling in Spruce Creek township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. 
Her brother Michael, born in Germany in 1834, came to this 
country at the same time as his sister and spent most of his 
active life in the employ of the Huntingdon and Broad Top Railroad 
Company. Hilary Barbara Troutman was educated in the public schools, 
and in 1858 married Valentine Brown. He was proprietor of a board- 
ing house' until his enlistment, August 16, 1862, in Company F, 125th 
Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, serving a term of nine 
months, after which he was mustered out with an honorable discharge. 
He fought with his regiment in the battle of Antietam, there receiving 
a severe wound. After the war he worked at house and bridge car- 
pentering, continuing until his death in 1882. He was a man of in- 
dustry and good character, a member of the Lutheran church and faith- 
ful to his obHgations; children: William, born January 26. 1861, died 
aged three vears: Harriet, born May 7. 1859, died aged seven years. 
B^y a first marriage Valentine Brown had a son, John. After remaining 
a widow nine years, Mary Barbara (Troutman) Brown married (sec- 



9IO HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

ond) in 1891, Gottfried Stuber, of German parentage. He was an 
employee of the Pennsylvania railroad for several years, then entered 
the employ of the J. C. Blair Company of Huntingdon, continuing with 
them until his death. He was an upright, industrious man, trusted by 
his employers and respected by all who knew him. Both he and his 
wife were members of the Lutheran church; no issue by second mar- 
riage. 

Mrs. Stuber continues her residence in Huntingdon and though 
bereft of children and husband to cheer her declining years, looks upon 
the bright side of life and is unafraid. She is a member of the Lutheran 
church and is most highly regarded by her many friends. 



This name, originally Reiden, was brought to Pennsyl- 
RIDEN vania from Germany by three brothers, who came before 

the revolutionary war, in which they served. They first 
settled in New York state, later moving to York, Pennsylvania, where 
descendants yet reside. The spelling of the name has changed to Riden, 
but earlier generations retained the German spelling, Reiden. 

The early records of the borough of Newport, Mifflin county, Penn- 
sylvania, show that on the second of April, 1789, David (2) English sold 
to Paul Reiden one hundred and ninety-nine acres of land, which Eng- 
lish had bought from his father, David (i) English, the original grant 
dated February 8, 1775, having been made to the latter. By will, 
dated August 6, 1804, Paul Reiden gave the same tract to his sons: 
Paul (2), John, Daniel, Abraham and Ephraim. Paul, John and Daniel, 
after coming into possession of the paternal estate, first laid out and 
surveyed the town, now Newport, into fifty- four lots, with streets and 
alleys. The part laid out was south along the Juniata River and Little 
Buffalo Creek ; the north part the heirs retained. The settlement was 
called Reidenville until the formation of Perry county in 1820. A 
ferry across the river was established, which was known as Reiden's 
Ferry, and in the war of 1812 was used by the American troops to 
cross the river. This ferry was in use until supplanted by the bridge 
built by the Reiden's Ferry Bridge Company, incorporated April 4, 
1838. The Reiden brothers owned a mill and engaged in boating on the 
Juniata, transporting farm produce and freight for the merchants. 
After several years they dissolved their partnership and divided their 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 911 

property. Paul (i) Reiden married a Miss Closser, and, besides the 
five sons mentioned, had four daughters. 

(II) John Riden, son of Paul (i) Reiden, was born about 1808. 
He engaged with his brothers in founding the town of Newport, Penn- 
sylvania, and in their agricultural and boating enterprises until the disso- 
lution of partnership. He then continued in business alone, principally 
agricultural. He married Hester Mitchell, and both died in Mifflin 
county, leaving issue. 

(III) John (2), son of John (i) and Hester (Mitchell) Riden, was 
born in Dry Valley, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, about 1830. He was 
a miller by trade, and operated at different points in Mifflin county, 
including Milroy. He was an active Democrat, and a devoted member 
of the Presbyterian church. He married Frances Camp, a descendant 
of John (i) Camp, born in France, came to America in 1828, landing 
in New York, finally settling in the west end of the l<ishaco(|uillas Val- 
ley, remaining six years, then moved to jNIilroy, where he died Septem- 
ber 18, 1854. Frances Camp was born at Erie, Pennsylvania. Chil- 
dren : Annie, deceased ; Alvaretta, deceased ; Margaret, deceased ; Sid- 
ney, deceased; Robert J., of whom further; George B. McClellan; 
Harry; Fannie; William J., deceased. 

(IV) Robert J., son of John (2) and Frances (Camp) Riden, was 
born in Milroy, Pennsylvania, May 24, i860. He was educated in the 
public schools and on arriving at manhood engaged in the butcher busi- 
ness. In 1893 he came to Reedsville, where he established a meat market. 
This he conducted very successfully until 191 1, when it was merged with 
his department store business. In 1909 Mr. Riden built what is said 
to be the largest frame store building in the state. It is one hundred 
by fifty feet on the ground, three stories in height. The third floor is 
occupied by lodges and societies, the second floor as an opera house, 
and the first floor by Mr. Riden's department store. He is well estab- 
lished in business, and is one of the prosperous men of his town. He 
is a Democrat in politics and has served as school director. He 
is a member of the Lutheran church, Milroy Lodge, No. 213, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, and Reedsville Eyrie, Fraternal Order 

of Eagles. 

He married, in 1883, Ella, born in Reedsville, daughter of Joseph 
Kellv. Children: Beatrice, Joseph, Frances, Mildred. 



912 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

The first settlers of Bucke's Valley, Buffalo township, 
ALBRIGHT Perry county, Pennsylvania, were Reuben Earl, John 

Law, George Albright, Samuel Rankin and Martin 
Wain, who took up lands along the Susquehanna river about 1773. 
George Albright came to that locality from Lancaster county, Penn- 
sylvania. At the outbreak of the revolution he entered the patriot army, 
served throughout the war, leaving at home a wife and several young 
sons who did the farming. Mrs. Albright and her servant girl took 
her grain to the banks of the Susquehanna on horseback, loaded it into 
a canoe and poled down the stream to the nearest mill, which was at 
Dauphin. After the grain was converted into flour, they poled up 
the stream to the spot where the horses had been left hitched, when it 
was again loaded on their backs and all returned to the farm. After the 
war George Albright returned to the farm in Perry county, and there 
resided until death. He and his wife are buried in the soil of the valley 
he helped to defend from foreign and savage foe. 

(II) George (2), son of George (i) Albright, was born in Lan- 
caster county, Pennsylvania, and there married. Later he moved to 
Ferguson's Valley, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, where he purchased 
a farm of two hundred acres, on which he built a stone house that is yet 
standing. He prospered in his new home and became one of the sub- 
stantial farmers of the valley. In addition to the homestead, he owned 
a tract of about one hundred acres on which the village of Yeagertown 
was built. He donated the land on which the Lutheran church stands 
and also gave the land for the Lutheran cemetery at Yeagertown, in 
which he is buried. His wife, Elizabeth, was also born in Lancaster 
county. Children: i. Sarah ("Sally"), died unmarried. 2. Eliza, mar- 
ried Miller Mcllvaine, moved west and there died. 3. Peter, died in 
Nebraska. 4. John, died in Lewistown, Pennsylvania. 5. Daniel, died 
in Yeagertown. 6. William, died in Kansas. 7. George, died aged 
twenty years, and was the first person buried in the Lutheran cemetery 
at Yeagertown. 8. Henry (of whom further). 

(III) Henry, son of George and Elizabeth Albright, was born in 
Lancaster county in 1818, but when a boy was brought by his parents 
to Ferguson Valley, Mifflin county, where his after life was spent. ITe 
inherited the homestead farm, on which he lived as owner for forty 
years, a substantial, contented and respected farmer. In 1897 he moved 



HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 913 

to Yeagertown, where two years later, in 1899, he died. He was a 
Democrat in politics and served his township as collector of taxes and 
supervisor. Both he and his wife were members of the Lutheran 
church. He married (first) 1834, Mary Miller, born in Juniata county, 
who left an only child, Joseph, now living in Reedsville. He married 
(second) ;Mary Ann AlcCartney, born in Huntingdon county in 1834, 
died 1909, daughter of James and Catherine (Collobine) McCartney. 
James McCartney was born in Centre county, Pennsylvania, 1806, where 
he married and farmed all his active life. Later he moved to Mifflin 
county, where his wife died on their Ferguson Valley farm. His last 
years he spent with his sons in Burnham, where he died in 1893. Both 
he and his wife were Lutherans. Fifteen children: Alfred; John; 
James, a veteran of the civil war; Jerry; Irvin, died young; Sarah, 
married John Irvin; Mary Ann, married Henry Albright; Ellen, died 
young; Asbury, died young; Anthony, and five who died in infancy. 
All these children are deceased, except Jerry, who resides in Yeager- 
town, and Anthony, of Burnham. Children of Henry and Mary Ann 
Albright: i. Millard Burns (of whom further). 2. Laura, married 
Porter Mann and lives in Pottstown. 3. James, resides in Yeagertown. 
4. Lizzie, married James Darwin, of Lewistown. 5. Harry, of Yeager- 
town. 

(IV) :Millard Burns, son of Henry and Mary Ann (McCartney) 
Albright, was born in Ferguson Valley, Mififlin county, Pennsylvania, 
March 11, 1859. He was educated in the public school, grew to man- 
hood at the homestead farm settled by his grandfather, and continued 
there, engaged in its cultivation, until the year 1900. He then joined 
in partnership with his brother Harry and established a meat market 
and butchering business in Yeagertown, which he operated until Jan- 
uary, 191 1, when Millard B. purchased his brother's interest. He con- 
ducted the business alone until 1912, then sold to Harry Albright, his 
former partner. Millard B. then moved to Burnham, where he erected 
a suitable building and again established in the butcher business, which 
he still continues. He is a Democrat in politics and is a member of 
the Lutheran church, his wife belonging to the Methodist denomination. 
He is also a Knight of Malta. He married. May 13, 1906, Mrs. Delia 
(Confer). Wallizer, born in Centre county, Pennsylvania, daughter of 
Elias C. and Alice (Musser) Confer, both natives of Centre county. 



914 HISTORY OF THE JUNIATA VALLEY 

he now living retired on a small farm in Penn township, but she died 
July 27, 1905. Children: i. Delia, married (first) in 1890, Elmer 
Wallizer, by whom she had ; Bruce, married Alice Way and resides in 
Yeagertown; Elias, living at home; she married (second) Millard B. 
Albright. 2. Carrie, married Asher Confer and lives in Centre county. 
3. Franklin, resides at home. 4. John, living in Renovo. 

Mrs. Delia (Confer-Wallizer) Albright is a granddaughter of George 
and Catherine Confer, who were all residents of Centre county. Four 
of their sons served in the Union army, one of them, Felta, receiving a 
wound from which he died. Alice Musser was a daughter of John and 
Catherine (Stumm) Musser, natives of Centre and Clinton counties, 
respectively. 

The only child of Millard B. and Delia Albright is Mary Alice, born 
April 20, 1909. The family residence is at No. 46 North Main avenue, 
Yeagertown, which Mr. Albright built in 1906. 

The Roughs came to Perry county from York county, 

KOUGH Pennsylvania, where Peter Rough lived and died near 

Hanover. He married a Miss Bosserman, and had three 

children : Peter, settled in Adams county ; John, of whom further ; and 

Catharine, who married John Marshall, of Waterloo, New York. 

(II) John, son of Peter Rough, was born in York county in 1789, 
where he resided until his majority. He then came to Perry county, 
settling on a tract of land inherited from his father. He became one 
of the early iron